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Full text of "City-county record"

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SAH FRANCISCO HISTORY CENTER 



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SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

REFERENCE 
BOOK 



Ni)l Id he Idlicn from I he Ijibntiy 



^^RV PERiOOiCAia 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

San Francisco Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/citycountyrecord2527sanf 



City Fathers Name Major Problems of 1958 

PllhllL LIBRARY 




SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




JANUARY. 1958 



REYNOLD C. JOHNSON CO. 
VOLKSWAGEN 



Distributors Northern California 
Western Nevada & Utah 



1600 Van Ness Avenue 
San Francisco, Calif. 



CALIFORNIA MAYORS' 
TOUR TO EUROPE 

July 9th - August 15th 
1958 

♦ 

Visit 

IMPORTANT PEOPLE AND PLACES 

IN TEN EUROPEAN COUNTRIES 

♦ 

For Information Write or Call 

CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

MILO JOHNSON, Tour Committee Chairman 

389 CHURCH STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 14, CALIF. 

Telephone: HEmlock 1-1212 



SEAFOOD 




Ut'i 

and STEAKS 'B:'l 

''Lunch and Dinner" ^* Q 

Panoramic Waterfront View (v)X 



Ted Ince, , JACK LONDON SQUARE 

Mgr. ' Oakland • HI. 4-345* 



When you're cruising the Bay you can tie 
up at the Sea Wolf dock and enjoy a fine 
dinner or some of our famous cocktails. 



ANDREASSEN & CO., INC. 

YUkon 6-0518 

205 Drunun Street 

San Francisco 

Mountain Springs 
WATER CO. 

NATURAL SPRING WATER 
DISTILLED WATER 



930 Oakdale Avenue 



VAIencia 4-1131 



S.in Francisco 24, Cal'fornia 



CAREW & ENGLISH 

LEO r. CAREW. jK. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS . . . MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

MASONIC AT GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 

San FnuK-isc.i IS. Cnlitonii,i 



I \JW*mt^ 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H, ALLEN PUBLISHER 
ALAN P. TORY EDITOR 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock I- 1 2 12 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 

VOLUME 25 NUMBER I 

DECEMBER-JANUARY, 1958 



(PER'^Olf^Ai 



iSay window 



LETTERS 



The new lighting installation on Gear)' 
Street is only one of the good moves that have 
been made in San Francisco lately. It looks 
like it should be easy to spot a parking place 
with all this Ught, but not so. It does help 
m avoiding the Jay Walkers stepping gingerly 
over the water filled chuck holes. 

BEN D. CLARK. 
945 Golden Gate 
San Francisco 



The tribute to Italian-Americans by the 
Record is heart-warming, especially to us who 
belong in that categor)'. For a good many 
years the Italian-Americans in San Francisco 
have been taken too much for granted. It's 
time they got the recognition they so richly 
deser\'e. 

VIRGINIA CASSETTA 
1416 Powell Street 
San Francisco 



The new Record is an outstanding achieve- 
ment. 

WILLIAM FLYNN 
News Week. 
155 Montgomery Street 
San Francisco 



1 feel that the story about Ciry College is 
very well done and I want to take this oppor- 
tunity to express my appreciation for your 
interest in our work. 

LOUIS G. CONLAN, President 
City College of San Francisco 
Ocean and Phelan Avenues. 
San Francisco 



SUNNY SUPERVISORS: Our cover pic- 
ture of the Mayor and Supervisors was 
taken on a stormy day in a brief respite when 
sun broke through the clouds. Beforehand, 
in the Mayors office, the city fathers found 
diversion in switching on an electric train 
which circled round the base of a spectacular 
Christmas tree— which may be why photog- 
rapher Joe Rosenthal caught them in a relaxed 
and jo\ial mcxxl on the eve of their Monday 
afternoon meeting. 

A symposium on what will be San Fran- 
cisco's biggest problem in 1958 reveals the 
thinking of our Mayor and Superi-isors on 
such important issues as freeways, transit, edu- 
cation, and taxation. A profile of newly 
elected Supervisor A. J. Zirpoli by Bill Simons 
will be found on page 7. 

MECORD PUBLISHER: Whit Henry, 
known to readers as a genial master of 
anecdote and local history, has had a long 
asociation with George Allen, founder and 
publisher of this magazine. Now that more 
than a year is passed since the death of a 
loved and memorable figure, the time is ripe 
for some appreciation and assessment of a 
gifted man whose vision and ideas we aim 
to preserve and develop in our publication 
which for over twenty-five years has become 
pan of the life of San Francisco and the Bay 
Area. 

We are glad to print under Whit Henry's 
familiar by-line some memories of the unique 
role which George Allen played, of his genius 
for friendship, and his sturdy independence. 

George Allen's concept of the whole Bay 
Area as his field of operation is confirmed 
ttxJay by the fact that such urgent needs as 
rapid transit and improved policing depend 
upon the out-growing of sectional interests. 
It is rarely that a new- idea is hit upon of 



which the seed may not be discovered in some 
remembered comment of this exceptional San 
Franciscan who made a long and intimate 
study of his adopted city and its sister com- 
munities. 

SMOG: Benjamin Linsky threw up twenty 
years of pension rights in Detroit, where 
he was within fifteen years of qualifying for 
a pension of S8,500. to come to the Bay Area 
as Air Pollution Control Officer. When his 
thirteen-year-old daughter Betty, after driving 
through Marin County, saw the Golden Gate 
Bridge and the vistas of San Francisco for the 
first time, she exclaimed: "Daddy, I think I'm 
going to like it here! Every place you look, 
it's nice to see." 

Her father's article on smog control (see 
page 20) reports, after a year and a quarter, 
on method and progress in the big task of 
preserving our vistas. 

MAKERS OF HISTORY: We were hon- 
ored with an invitation to the last big 
event of the year of the Society of California 
Pioneers at which attorney and civic leader 
Ed Kyle — one of the few scintillating speak- 
ers in the Bay Area — gave a luncheon talk on 
a past which he and his contemporaries have 
helped to create. This brisk and convivial 
society, now housed in elegant premises at 
456 McAllister Street, is unique in that it was 
founded and is sustained today by the makers 
of history. From the word "Go" when they 
met in Delmonico's saloon ( they transferred 
shortly after to rooms above the Bella Union 
then described as "a restaurant with dancing 
waitresses " ) , the Pioneers wrote the pages of 
history with their own doughty deeds, taking 
time off for mutual relaxation composed of 
what they called "collations " and "explosives. " 
The latest comers in this succession are among 
today's prominent builders and citizens. 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 



LETTERS 

BAY WINDOW 



PAY-TV— WHO WINS? 



RARE SAN FRANCISCAN: GEORGE ALLEN 

by Whit "hc-T, 

SUPERVISOR ALFONSO J. ZIRPOLI 
PROBLEMS OF 1958 

b. Moyof Christopher ond Supervisors 

SOMANS AND THE GAY LIFE 

WOMAN OF THE MONTH: JEAN FASSLER 

TOP PERFORMERS OF 1957 
DEATH TO SMOG 

by Ben LlPsly 

DIRECTORY 

BOOKS by Jane Rawson 

PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 



. ■J^..'5'S.C- ~' - 

816174 

rEBIODIC«L 

OEPARTMEurr 



JANUARY, 1958 



PAY-TV 

WHO WINS? 



by Alan Tory 



ITS PAY-TV a wicked spider asking the fly to 
-"- walk into its parlor, or a good angel which 
at the clink of enough dimes will open a 
heaven of quality entertainment? This ques- 
tion the Finance Committee of the Board of 
Supervisors is in process of deciding. They 
have before them requests for granting a 
franchise by Skiatron — a wire transmission 
system for closed circuit television which has 
paid half a million dollars to the Giants for 
the right of bringing baseball to private 
homes and by international Telemeter, which 
is owned for the most part by Paramount Pic- 
tures. 

The delay of the Supervisors in producing 
a report is understandable in view of big 
stakes involved. Taking time will permit the 
seeing of arguments in perspective, and some 
education of the public, most of whom are 
in a fog about the whole thing. It has been 
firmly denied by Supervisor McCarty that any 
commitment has been made to the Giants to 
link their coming to San Francisco with Pay- 
TV, so the discussion starts with a clean slate 
upon which fact, deduction, and speculation 
need to be clearly differentiated. 

Without commiting ourselves to the ex- 
travagances of some current protagonists, it 
is fair to state that television is not all that it 
could be. It is not, as Representative Emanuel 
Celler of New York has said: "The rape of 
the airwaves" (the Bell Telephone "Mister 
Sun" program. Hall of Fame plays, Wide 
Wide World, Omnibus, Studio 90 and news 
programs give the lie to this! ) Nevertheless, 
there are stretches of time when a stranger 
from another planet watching our screens 
might be excused for thinking we are a race 
of suggestible morons. 

From this point of dissatisfaction it is fair 
to start. Would Pay-TV, with its possible 
nation-wide revenue of five billion dollars 
(as opposed to advertising revenue of a billion 
and a quarter dollars for free TV) give us a 
much higher standard of programing? The 
Pay-TV advocates insist that it would, with 



a new dignity of choice for the viewer. The 
anti-Pay-TV partisans say that so far from 
achieving a new dignity, the viewer would en- 
dure a new monthly hole in his pocket, with 
no guarantee that advertising would be kept 
out, and no prospect of a higher proportion 
of good programs than we have at present. 

It is here that we leave the fact of the im- 
perfections of television as it is, for deduc- 
tions which need to be scrutinized, and spec- 
ulations where guesswork may rise from either 
wishful thinking or genuine prescience. 

Opposition to Pay-TV is led by private 
theatre-owners who fear that they will be de- 
serted by patrons, and that fellow-sufferers 
with them will be restaurant-owners and shop- 
keepers. It is argued that the new Giants 
Stadium may become a white elephant if it 
is possible to watch baseball games at home, 
and the huge parking space which is being 
prepared will never be paid for. 

The networks are joined with private the- 
atre owners in warning the public of stresses 
and discomforts and dislocation which will 
follow from the introduction of Pay-TV. Rob- 
ert Sarpoff, president of NBC, claims that 
"Pay-TV will devour free television" since it 
will allure the best show talent with high 
salaries, and force the public ultimately to pay 
for many things which they now get for free. 

The dream of better programs, it is argued, 
may very well not be realized, for the enor- 
mous investment which the toll-men propose 
to make will push them into seeking returns 
from the widest popular suffrage. Further, it 
is said, what guarantees have we that Pay-TV 
will be immune from commercials, and who 
among toll operators will be so high-minded 
as to say No to the offer of a million dollars 
from several sponsors such as is spent tixlay 
for a single evening? 

The toll operators, not yet in business, tend 
to a mixture of coyness with a martyr com- 
plex. Skiatron announces that it is interested 
only in making shows available which are box 
office, such as Sol Hurok's ballets, sports 



events, and Broadway plays. While the price 
is not yet fixed, Skiatron representatives state 
that it will be below the actual price of admis- 
sion for a show. This it is maintained will re- 
sult in actual saving of money for a family, 
who will have a surplus to spend on cit)' shops 
and restaurants ( though the assumption is 
here made that the Pay-TV family will have 
the strength of mind to ration its home enter- 
tainment). 

When taxed with the complaint that major 
prize fights, for example, will on this system 
be withdrawn from free viewing, Skiatron 
replies that this process has already begun 
through closed circuit transmission of fights to 
the very theatres who now object to Pay-T\' 
in the home. 

Payment to colleges and universities for 
football games will, it is claimed, ease many 
a harassed president's budget. Educational 
television stations could be put on their feet 
financially by the opportunirj' to charge for 
certain academic courses. Further, say the I 
apologists of the new Lady Bountiful of the 
air, money will be put back into the commun- 
ity to the tune of 2'/c of the gross revenue 
of Pay-TV (if, as some opponents claim, 
5100,000,000 per year would be spent by 
viewers, then the City and Count}' of San 
Francisco will benefit by S2 million! ) 

Pay-TV, it is concluded, will provide the 
means to enable television to realize its po- 
tentialities and grow up, and in doing so ii 
will spread largesse. 

One other group of interested persons re- 
mains to be quoted, and that is those film 
makers who see in Pay-TV a most attractive 
new channel offering much bigger profits, 
and the chance of capturing a new audience 
at a time when their hold on the public is 
slipping. These people salute on opportunity' 
of exploring new techniques in an art to which 
a home-viewing audience will transfuse life. 

Here then, is a summar)' of conflicting 
arguments which fill the air with loud and 
vituperative voices. What are the issues which 
need to be disentangled? 

It may be asked, first, whether there is the 
possibility of peaceful co-existence between 
free and toll TV. "Just give us a chance to see 
whether people like us" say the Pay-TV advo- 
cates. "We will force nobody's hand. This is 
a free countr)'. Ever)' home will be at libert)' 
to exclude us if they wish." To this suave 
talk the traditionalists — if so nostalgic a word 
may be applied to workers in so young a 
medium — reply: "Beware. This is the talk 
of a hold-up man with a bedside manner." 

All the evidence does point to big conse- 
quences of change if and when Pay-TV is 
introduced. The area of sport events which 
may be seen free will undoubtedly be nar- 
rowed. Acting talent wc now see for nothing ' 
could conceivably be bought up by higher 
bidders, and become available only for pay- 
ment. The networks themselves, though now 
opposed to Pay-TV, would undoubtedly, if 
it became established, get into the act, and 
drain off some of their best talent into the 
world of the toll operators. 

Thus the admission of Pay-TV would be 
a serious and far-reaching decision. 
( Continued on Page 5 1 



Rare San Franciscan 



GEORGE ALLEN 



building character, and helping those who 
made this enterprise their hfe work. He 
cherished his own family, and no prouder 
man ever walked the streets than he did when 
he first became a grandfather. 

It is good to see the Record continuing 
robustly, and building on the foundation 
which George Allen laid. Such an enterprise 
as the Goodwill Tour of California Mayors 
to Europe, slated to depart by Qantas Air- 
ways on July 9, would be welcomed by him. 
The gesture of sp<5nsoring this project is in 
harmony with the aims which inspired his 
years of publishing. 



by Whit Henry 



GEORGE ALLEN was a man with thous- 
ands of friends in all walks of life. It 
is now more than a year since his hand 
ceased to guide the Record, which he pub- 
lished and edited over a quarter of a century. 
As one who had the privilege of working 
with him as a contributor, 1 would like to 
set down some memories of a great lover of 
life and people. 

I first knew George when we were mem- 
bers of the old Press Club before the War. 
At that time the Record was a far different 
appearing sheet than it is at present. 

George was known to all of us as an au- 
thority on happenings in City Hall. He paid 
special attention to the affairs of the scattered 
civic improvement clubs which are such an 
important parr of the life of San Francisco. 
I don't doubt that he installed more officers 
in these clubs than anybody else, before or 
since. And he relished every moment of it. 




He lo.ed life ond people 



for he enjoyed people above all else in the 
world. He had a passion for San Francisco, 
and honored those who were trying to make 
it a better place to live in. 

He was a fiercely independent man. He 
could be brusque and tough-sounding, al- 
though he was at heart engaging and affec- 
tionate, with a great sense of humour. Many 
w-ere the opportunities of taking jobs at the 
invitation of one or other of the Mayors who 
came into office but he refused them all, pre- 
ferring to be on his own. 

One incident is worth quoting of a reporter 
of an oil company who gauchely nettled the 
local Portuguese by an ill-chosen phrase in 
a newscast. George, who was pan Portuguese 
and part Irish, was telephoned by many of his 
irate blood brothers, since they looked to him 
as their leader. He took up the cudgels with 
the hearry zest for battle which was charac- 
teristic of him. Not only did he extract a 
handsome retraction on the air, but the oil 
company, wanting to make its peace with 
this formidable controversialist, provided him 
with a private plane in which he flew across 
the United States on a junket aimed to ap- 
pease his anger. 

Good dining, warm fellowship, and trips 
salted with conviviality and good talk were 
among George's delights. He went on one 
of the first Hetch-Hetchy trips in the twen- 
ties, traveling in a narrow gauge railroad to 
see the one dam that then existed. In the year 
that he died he made another trip, when he 
was fascinated to see the completion of the 
OShaughnessy Dam, and the rwo power 
houses. The growth of the project from one 
to three dams was the sort of thing that 
stirred his pride. 

His zeal for projects that were construc- 
tive and socially useful was matched by his 
hatred of specious and tainted things which 
from time to time he repudiated in vigorous 
language in the pages of this magazine. He 
was a clear and forceful writer, as well as a 
publisher with far-sighted dreams and visions. 
I never considered George a deeply reli- 
gious man, but he was a great believer in 



P/^Y-TV ' Continued from Page 4 i 

On the question of advertising, while Ski- 
atron now gives an assurance that commer- 
cials will be excluded, other Pay-TV systems 
may be more pliable. They may prefer to re- 
duce the cost to the viewer, as does the news- 
paper to the reader, by calling in advertisers 
to carry the main part of the financial burden. 
It would be a mistake to assume that the 
commercial will not follow us up at least some 
of the slopes of the cultural Everest to which 
we are invited to pay our way. 

The real question to resolve is how are 
we to get better programs, to extend the 
promise of television, and encourage its ma- 
turing? Would the initiative of the public 
alone be enough to demand improvements of 
our present free television, and are we thrust 
back on the basic need to raise standards by 
providing better education? Or has television 
with its present equipment gone as far as it 
can go, and does it need more money to ex- 
periment? If power is given to the toll oper- 
ators, will they abuse their privilege, or will 
they be responsible? Should legislation be 
passed to control their operations, so that the 
interest of the public becomes paramount, and 
that of private profit secondary? 

These questions will come up for decision 
by the Finance Committee of the Supervisors 
who have to determine whether or not Pay- 
TV is in the line of progress. If it is, a draught 
may well be created which will affect theatre- 
owners, though not necessarily to the extent 
that they fear if they have the wit to re- 
introduce vaudeville; nor is it likely that 
human gregariousness will succumb complete- 
ly and the Giants will play only to a handful 
of wives and relatives in their stadium. 

If, however, Pay-TV is not in the line of 
progress, and it is no more than a dazzling 
gold mine speciously varnished with high- 
faluting talk about progress and service to the 
community, it will be best to turn a deaf ear 
to its pitchmen. Better to avoid the upset of 
wiring San Francisco at a cost now impossible 
to determine until exact requirements are 
known, and some measure of dislocation of 
community life. The private TV owner, who 
would be required to pay a monthly charge 
of from S2 to $4 to cover installation of 
equipment for Pay-TV, could then keep that 
hard cash, in addition to whatever he might 
spend on programs, in his pocket, and con- 
tinue as before, the normal routine of time 
payments on the set. 



JANUARY. 1958 



Nuclear power now 
helps serve Northern California 



P. G. and E. 



first with 
privately- 
financed 

atomic 
electricity 




p. G. AND E. Customers 
are the world's firet users 
of atomic electricity pro- 
duced commercially in a 
privately-financed plant — the new 
Vallecitos Atomic Power Plant near 
Pleasanton. 

This histoiy-making achievement 
in the peaceful use of atomic energ>' 
is a joint developmental project of 
the General Electric Company and 
P. G. and E. The plant's output of 
A-electricity flows into P. G. and E.'s 
transmission network which sei-ves 
Northern and Central California. 
It is helping to light your home and 
run yom- appliances right now. 
Atomic electricity 
no different 
A-electricity is just the same as 
other electricity. The only difference 
is that nuclear fuel is used instead of 
the usual fossil fuels (oil, gas and 
coal) to make the steam which tmiis 
the generators. 

A-electricity now costs more in 
the United States than power made 
in conventional plants. It will not 
become a basic power supply here 
until it costs no more than elec- 
tricity made with fossil fuels or fal- 
ling water. 

The future of 
commercial nuclear power 
G-E and P. G. and E. joined forces 
at Vallecitos to gain experience and 
know-how from building an atomic 
plant and operating it for everyday 
commercial service. The lessons be- 
ing learned and the experiments 
being conducted at Vallecitos are 
hastening the day when A-plants 
win become economical. We wiU be 
ready with low-cost A-electricity 
long before the inevitable depletion 
of the fossil fuel supply. 

Thus, P. G. and E. customers may 
continue to be assured of power 
ahead of their needs as well as the 
best possible sendee at the lowest 
possible cost. 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company 




ISeticomer to Political Arena 



ALFONSO J. ZIRPOLI 



by Bill Simons 

MARIAN SALMEN went to work in the 
handsomely modern law office on the 
eighth rioor of the Bank of America Building 
on the morning of last December 6. 

The day before San Francisco had been an 
unenthusiastic witness to an excessively drab 
election, the only lilt of which had been pro- 
vided by the decisive election to the Board of 
Supervisors of Marian's new boss. Alfonso J. 
Zirpoli. A newcomer to the arena of elective 
politics, he had shown surprising strength by 
landing in the middle position of five elected 
to the Board, flanked fore and aft by incum- 
bents. 

For almost two solid weeks Marian typed 
hundreds of "thank you's" to congratulatory 
messages, each acknowledgment personally 
dictated by her boss. ( The longest-winging 
message came from Beatrice and Helen Chris- 
topher, the Mayor's sisters, who were vaca- 
tioning in Rome. ) 

She learned a little Italian, for many of the 
telephonic congratulations were from the 
peacock-proud citizens of North Beach, the 
city's Italian heartland where Al Zirpoli's 
roots sink deepest, and whence flows mucli 
of his extremely successful bilingual law prac- 
tice. 

She learned a little of politics, too, for the 
inevitable pressures facing the newest mem- 
ber of San Francisco's legislative body began 
to appear even before he actually assumed 
office. 

But she found her boss a relaxed yet vibrant 
person, one who was familiar with pressure 
and who dealt with it without apparent strain, 
who worked with system and enthusiasm and 



with consideration for others, who never lost 
his temper. . . . 

Looking about 10 years younger than his 
52, about 15 pounds heavier than his 141, 
and another inch taller than his tive-foot- 
nine, Al Zirpoli is on the spot as a man who 
is politically "it" for the first time in a career 
that has been milestoned by the holding of 
such public offices as Assistant District Attor- 
ney (I9.i2-i.S) and Assistant United States 
Attorney for Northern California ( 193.v44). 
A lifelong Democrat, he has been proudly 
partisan in politics on all levels from national 
to local for more than half his life, made his 
first political impression when for two years 
( 1935-.i6) he ser\'ed as state president of the 
Young Democratic Clubs of California. 

His personal chronology starts on April 12. 
1905, with his binh in Denver, Colorado. 
Twelve years later his parents moved to San 
Francisco where he attended Washington 
Grammar School, Lowell High School, gradu- 
ated from the University of California in 
1926, received his law degree two years later 
at the University's Boalt Hall. In 19.36 he 
married Giselda Campagnoli, a former Galileo 
High Schol teacher. With their two daughters, 
Sandra, 14, and Jane, II, the Zirpoli family 
lives at 1140 Greenwich Street. 

Professionally, he is a member of the San 
Francisco Bar Association, having served as a 
director during 1953-54, State Bar of Cali- 
fornia, American Bar Association, San Fran- 
cisco Lawyers Club, Federal Bar Asstxriation 
and American Judicature Society. In 1953 
he was honored by election as a Fellow of the 
American College of Trial Lawyers ( the ex- 



clusiveness of this honor is pointed up by the 
fact there are only 19 other Fellows ui San 
Francisco). In 1945 he served as a lecturer 
in Criminal Law at Hastings Law College, and 
from 1951 to 1956 — ^at the request of the 
judges of the U. S. District Court — he was 
chairman of the San Francisco Lawyers Panel 
to Represent Indigent Defendants in Federal 
C'ourti. 

Thus, his background, personal, profession- 
al and political, is considerable. 

The campaign for office as a Supervisor 
which he waged with vigor and success was 
not entered through any whim or fancy. He 
is in this new area of politics — to use his well 
thought out words — "to the degree that the 
people who elected me are confident in my 
ability to serve them in any further capacity." 

Who knows, Marian's boss could go most 
anywhere from here! 

Off the Record 




"Do you give Green Stamps 



SAN FRANCISCO LABORATORIES. INC. 

•EstaMishcd 191.V 

Hours: 1 a.m. to 6 p.m. — Saturday: 9 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. 

Suite 816, De Young Bldg. — 690 Mlrkel Stro!t 

San Francisco 4, California 



WILSON SANITARIUM 

23-HOUR GENER.AL NURSING CARE 
Aged - Bed Patients & Post Operative Cases 
Special Diets When Ordered 
43rd AVENUE MOntrose 4-8378 S.-VN FR.ANCISCO 



ROSSI'S MARKET 
and Delicatessen 

Groceries - Fruil - I'egelables 

Frozen Foods 

Wines & Liquors 

2100 Union St. WAInut 1-4515 

San Franci'co 23 


MOELLERICH & CO. 

CARAVAN 

Distributors and Wholesalers 

550 MISSION STREET 

Phone G.Arfield 1-4131 - 1-4152 

San Francisco 


MISSION 

PRESCRIPTION 

PHARMACY 

Philip Heidt, Pharmacist 

UNderhill 1-1518 

598 GUERRERO at 18th STREET 

San Francisco 10 


WRESCO 

Wholesale Radio A: Electric- 
Supply Co. 
Main Office 
140 ■ 9th Street HEmlock 1-3680 
San Francisco 
Branch Office 
1 348 El Camino L>-tell l-0-<J4 
San Carlos 


Members Builders tvchange 
SUtter 1-6-00 

Regal Roofing Co. 

nr.ivcl. .\5bcstos. Terra Clta. 

T,l.-, SI.,..-, and Shioclc RoofiuB. 

.M.„Ii, Flf-rs. Waterprocdns 

930 INNES AVENUE 

San Francisco 24. Calif. 
V.Menci.! 4.1261 V.Mencia 4-J262 


ROYAL BARING CO. 

AtJierican, Italiati and 
French Bread 

Grissini, Panertone. Buccellato 

and Focaccia 

4773-77 Mission St. JU. 5-9655 



30th & Mission 
Market 

3398 MISSION STREET 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Mission 7-9751 



Pacific School & 
Oflfice Supply, Inc. 

Bryant al Twentieth Street 

San Francisco 10, California 

AT water 2-9600 



JANUARY, 1958 




FIRST CITIZEN 



Problems We Face in 1958 



The Mayor and Supervisors have each 
answered the question : "JTTia/ uill 
be S. F.^s biggest problem in 1 958?" 



Hord. 



oive the 



MAYOR CHRISTOPHER 

It is not possible arbitrarily to 
choose one of the problems facing 
San Francisco and say its solution 
is more important to the welfare 
of San Francisco than any other. 

We have several projects of long 
standing which should be high on 
the priority list of projects that 
should be completed at the earliest 
opportunity. 

Redevelopment of the slum and 
blighted areas is imperative, as is 
relieving the parking and transit 
situations. Juvenile problems, re- 
habilitation of plant and equipment 
on a pay-as-you-go basis, proper 
policing I which, incidentally, pays, 
as indicated by the State report 
showing San Francisco as the only 
city in California with a cnme de- 
crease ) and many others — all are 
but a link in the chain of problems 
belonging to any city. Hard work 
will solve them. 

FRANCIS Mccarty 

It is eNtremely difficult undei 
the complexities of modem life to 
single out any one governmental 
problem as being the biggest. How- 
ever, one problem comes to mind 
as being most difficult not only 
for 19.58, but for many years there- 
after. 



iSyM^ 




-iW 



^ 



4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 

PoloAlfo. San Ff.inoico ,i.o l.j. . ; f 



This problem is transportation. 
It includes vehicular traffic, with 
decisions to be made on freeways, 
one-way streets, and other traffic 
controls. It also includes the im- 
provement and modernization of 
San Fi-ancisco's surface mass 
transportation, the Municipal Rail- 
way. It includes the consideration 
in San Francisco of the possibility 
of subway or elevated mass transit. 

It also includes the most serious 
problem of Bay Area rapid transit. 
The creation of a Bay Area rapid 
transit system is a "must" for the 
future development of the Bay 
Area. It will be extremely costly 
and will take the cooperation of 
the suiToimding counties, together 
with incorporated towns and cities 
therein. 

With the tremendous influx of 
population into our area it becomes 
increasingly mandatory that San 
Francisco maintain its position as 
the center of this geographical and 
economic luiit. 

To do this we must solve our 
transportation problem. 

JOHX JAY FERDON 

The major local problem, today 
and in the immediate future, is the 
movement of persons, efficiently, 
rationally, safely. We must pro- 
vide for mass transportation, pri- 
vate vehicles and public carriers 
within our boundaries, then rapid 
transit between and among the 
adjoining communities, which are 
ever contracting into a true Bay 
Area unit. In all this concern for 
and with inexorable traffic, we 
must remain not only alert to but 
also active in, such allied subjects 
as parking, street manageinent and 
proper design. 

Progress, not mere change, must 
:ilso be made in the development 
' ' substandard properties and the 
I ' iiirbishing of many other sec- 

I tti)er advances, commercial, fi- 

II iniial, cultural and intellectual, 

III list, and will be, achieved. We 
must think, not skim. We must 
weigh the future, nor surmise. 
Wc- must finally act, not simply 



refer. Thus, we meet the current 
problems and stand prepared for 
the inevitable, subsequent deci- 
sions. 

HENRY R. ROLPH 

The most important problem 
facing San Francisco in 1958 is 
the further development of its Cap- 
ital Improvement Progi'am. I con- 
sider that a veiy careful study 
must be given the plans for the 
proposed Ferry Park at the foot 
of Mai'ket Street with a view to- 
ward submitting a bond issue cov- 
ering this project to the voters. It 
is now apparent that state finan- 
cial aid will not be received for the 
purpose of constructing this park, 
and accordingly San Fiancisco 
must detei-mine exactly the t.N-pe 
of park it wants for this area and 
in tui-n attempt to obtain the ap- 
proval of the voters through the 
passage of a bond issue. 

Further, I consider a carefully 
studied plan mvist be worked out 
for the rehabilitation of the Palace 
of Fine Arts under the legislation 
passed at the 19.57 session of our 
State Legislature. We should 
match the authorized state funds 
and rehabilitate this stioicture and 
make it into a comniunity asset 
and tourist attracion of which wo 
can be justly proud rather than th.- 
dilapidated shambles it is so rap- 
idly becoming. 

In addition, a definite plan must 
be decided upon for the expansion 
and further development of oui 
small boat harbor facilities. The 
cost of this small boat harbor pro- 
gram must be studied and a deter- 
mination reached as to how this 
important work be financed. A.s 
a result of legislation passed by 
our 1957 legislature, some fund.s 
will be available for planning sui li 
small boat progi-am, but the actii.il 
cost of facilities will be throupli 
city funds. 

Another very important Capital 
Improvement project for San 
Francisco is the Maritime His- 
torical Monument to be erected 
adjacent to our Aquatic Park, by 
the State of California. thix)ugh 



tideland royalty funds. This de- 
velopment will considerably en- 
hance the importance of our 
Aquatic Park. 

The State Division of Beaches 
and Parks has indicated it will 
spend up to two million dollars in 
developing this area. 

Our Unified School District, un- 
der the school bond issue of 1956. 




it IS hoped will vindertake in 1958 
the erection of the new Lowell 
High School in the southwestern 
section of the city and the new 
Southeastern High School at the 
corner of Mansell and Holyoke 
Streets in the Portola District, at 
a cost of four and one-half million 
dollars each. 




ROLPH 
Capital improvement 




Other inipoi-tant problems fac- 
ing San Francisco which must be 
solved in 1958 are the repair, mod- 
ernization and expansion of the 
San Francisco County Hospital 
and our very fine Laguna Honda 
Home for the Aged. It is appar- 
ent the work of our entire Public 
Health Department must be care- 
fully studied so that the operations 
of this department can be fully and 
effectively conducted with the as- 
surance that we are constantly 
getting the maximimi return of our 
investment of tax dollars. 

HAROLD S. DOBBS 

I look foi-ward to a prosperous 
year in San Francisco's tourist and 
convention business, highlighted 
by the opening of the new E.xhibit 
Hall in Civic Center which will 
help each and every business inter- 
est in our city. The new 5th and 
Mission Garage will aid the down- 
town section in the parking prob- 
lem and by next year we hope tn 
see the Stockton-Sutter garage 
well on its way. 

The biggest problem San Fran- 
cisco will face in 1958 is the in- 
creasing cost of materials and 
services which has been on the 
rise each year, and has now 
reached the point where our tax 
rate is the highest in San Fran- 
cisco's histoi-y. It will be difficult 
to hold the tax rate down during 
1958 if the cost of government con- 
tinues to rise. 

All in all, however, San Fran- 
cisco still is the greatest city of 
them all and I am sure that with 
the wholehearted cooperation of 
all its citizens our city will con- 
tinue to go forward. 

WILLIAM C. BLAKE 

Freeways are, in my opinion, 
the major problem which San 
Francisco faces in 1958. The ques- 
tion freeways pose is: Shall our 
cit.v, renowned all over the world 
for its beauty and pleasant mode 
of living, retain its character, or 
shall it become merely a staging 
area for the movement of armies 
of motor vehicles from one part of 
California to another? Surely, the 
authorities can combine vision with 
planning. They can and must build 
highways without destroying oui 
residential districts. We must pro- 
tect oiu- corTUnimit.v and the people 
living in it. 

The new Bay Area Rapid Transit 
District has just been created. It 
is empowered to finalize plans to 
build and operate a rapid transit 
s.vstem serving the whole Bay 
Area. Why not see what the Dis- 
trict comes up with, and estimate 
what effect it may have on our 
traffic problems before devastating 
whole areas of our city with ugl,\'. 
multi - story concrete monsters 'i' 
The year 1958 will be a year (t 
decision for San Francisco in thi.^ 
field. 



JAxMES J. SULLIVAN 

The most pressing problem con- 
fronting San Fiancisco today, for 
the short term at least, is the 
street and traffic management 
program. Kvery pei'son in the com- 
mimity is affected to a gi'eat ex- 
tent by the proper or improper use 
of the streets and is vitally con- 




SULLIVAN 

Parking and tran 




McMAHON 
Need for more rev. 




ERTOLA 
Implement *tie Reber plan 



eerned with the symptoms of the 
problem which include congestion, 
lack of parking and commercial 
loading facilities, and a needlessly 
high accident rate. There is a 
grave potential danger that in the 
absence of speedy and effective 
solutions of the parking and trans- 
it problems, economic strangula- 
tion of the city may occur. The 
tremendous losses of time, money, 
life and limb must be reduced if 
San Francisco is to grow and pros- 
per as we all want it to. 

The effoits to solve the problem 
are continual and vigorous, and in 
my opinion local government is 
progi'essing satisfactorily to a 
point where a reallocation of re- 
sponsibilities and functions for pi-o- 
vision of traffic facilities an'l their 
management in San Francisco will 
produce desirable I'esults. Specif- 
icall.v. the Street Traffic Advisory 
Board has recommended a course 
of action which is currently under 
study by the administrative de- 
partments and the Board of Super- 
visors. Upon culmination of the 
studies, I am hopeful that the solu- 
tion of the probleini will be close. 

CLARISSA S. McIVlAHON 

There are many plans and ob- 
jectives for the benefit of the peo- 
ple of San Francisco which the 
public officials hope to accomplish 
during the year 1958. Some of 
these are necessities. Others we 
should have and still others are 
things which we hope to have in 
the future. All would result in the 
improvement of the City such as 
an enlarged Police Department, 
better service for the medically 
indigent, better schools and others 
too numerous to mention. 

However, to my mind the most 
important objective for 1958 is a 
plan which would give these im- 
provements to the people v.'ithout 
materiall.y inci-easing our present 
property ta.x rate. I feel that the 
tax rate can go no higher under 
oiu- present economic conditions, 
and therefore it is incumbent upon 
the Board of Supervisors and the 
other City officials to devise some 
means other than an increase in 
the ad valorem ta.x to increase the 
City's revenue to a point sufficient 
to pay for the needed ser\'ice and 
improvements. 

CHARLES A. ERTOLA 

In 1950, by act of Congress, the 
federal government allocated three 
million {$3,000.0001 dollai-s for 
the stud.v and construction of a 
concrete model of the floor of San 
Francisco Bay. This study and the 
facts about oiu' ba.v will uncover 
anil pinpoint the most important 
fir-iblems facing our city. As a sea- 
i>i>rt we are dependent upon ship- 
ping and commerce. This model of 
our bay will expose the secrets of 
shifting tides and sands that tests 
now show are tending to block our 
Golden Gate. This could mean the 
eventual end of the bay as a truly 
(Continued on Page 10 1 



JANUARY. 1958 



PROBLEMS WE FACE 

(Continued from Page 9i 
great port. Just as London is de- 
pendent on the Thames River, 
Rome on the Tiber and New York 
on the Hudson, our City is depend- 
ent on our Bay and its rivers. Fur- 
thermore, the blocking of the Gold- 
en Gate by sands and silt has been 
causing salt water to back up 
silong the great rivers that flow 
into our bay. The great green val- 
leys of these rivei-s that surround 
our City are thus threatened with 
brackish water and untillable soil. 
San Francisco as the center of 
commerce for this area will suffer 
in the event this comes to pass. 
These arresting fields deser\'e 
the attention of ever>' citizen: 
Shipping and Commerce, Fiscal 
and Financial. Rapid Transporta- 
tion and Eoconomic use of our 
available land or Redevelopment. 
One phase of the first of these has 
been discussed above. What of the 
other focal points ? By the use and 
study of this model we may find 
the Reber Plan a prospective re- 
ality. With the Reber Plan would 
come land filled causeways which 
would ease the transportation 
problem, provide industrial sites, 



Hoiv well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




k ven most lifelong residents of 
I lie Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must: if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars: trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares arc surprisingly 




Oi|X)i: 44 FOURTH STREET 
Yukon 6-4000 



(and concomitantly, property for 
our ta.\ roles I and add great fresh 
water lakes for recreational and 
agricultural use. 

A. J. ZIKPOLI 

San Francisco's most immediate 
need in 1958 is a well-organized 
and aroused Citizens' Council for 
Community Development. It was 
just such a council which gave the 
necessary- leadership to the City of 
Pittsburg and made possible the 
Golden Triangle. San Francisco is 
capable of presenting the samo 
tj^pe of leadership which would 
make possible the redevelopment 
of the Golden Gate Way. better 
known as the Produce Area (Area 
E) and the renewal of Western 
Addition. South of Market and 
Diamond Heights, thereby giving 
our city one of the greatest eras 
of prosperity it has ever known. 

The key to the solution of this 
redevelopment program, around 
which a great city of the future 
can and should be built, centers in 
tm-n on the providing of an ade- 
quate, fast, modern interurban 
mass rapid transit system coordi- 
nated with our freeways and other 
transit facilities in San Francisco 
and the areas served. 

JOSEPH M. CASEY 

The biggest problem for San 
Francisco in 1958, and probably 
for many years to come, is the 
multi-faceted traCfic-transit-park- 
ing problem. 

It should be readily apparent 
that the handicaps encountered 
due to the absence of adequate and 
speedy solutions have an impact 
on every person who lives or does 
business in San Francisco: motor- 
ists, patrons of public transit ve- 
hicles, commercial operators and 
pedestrians alike. The congestion 
and the accidents and fatalities re- 
flect enoi-mous losses in time, 
money, life and limb. 

If San Francisco is to glow and 
prosper, economically, culturally, 
socially and in every way, the com- 
ple.xities of traffic, transit and 
parking must be met adequately; 
and necessary changes, whether 
they be in the nature of freeways, 
one-way streets, tunnels, an inte- 
grated mass transit system or 
other acceptable expedients, must 
be embraced and made effective 
forthwith. 

It is encouraging to know that 
energetic steps are being taken 
to deal effectively with the traffic- 
transit -parking problem. The 
Board of Supervisors has contract- 
ed for and received a Traffic Man- 
agement Study which contains a 
number of constructive sugges- 
tions now under study by City and 
County administrative depart- 
ments. The one-way street pattern 
has been extended and is continu- 
ing to operate satisfactorily. Our 
freeway program is progressing, 
off-street parking facilities are be- 
ing constructed, the San Francisco 



Bay Area Rapid Transit Commis- 
sion is preparing to exercise its 
fionctions, and local transit im- 
provements are being effected 
daily. 

JA.AIES LEO HALLEY 

The most important problem 
facing the people of San Francisco 
and all American communities in 
1958 will be a re-examination of 




Citizens' Council for Community 
Development 




CASEY 
Traffic, transit .and porkinq 




educational practices as related to 
the ciUTiculum of the schools. It 
is now ertdent that the education 
of children from Grade 1 onward, 
must be geared toward a program 
of recognizing and developing the 
early-in-childhood-potentialities — 
the e.xamination and analysis of 
the potential of each American 
child toward the end that the 
greatest possible values associated 
with national security and indiv- 
idual attainment are achieved. It 
1.S my considered opinion that the 
' impulsorj- education law (eight- 
'L-n years of age I should be 
changed to mean compulsory- edu- 
cation and training law. 

Startling demonstrations have 
recently e.xposed the successful 
practices within the educational 
system of a nation which at one 
time was actually a backward na- 
tion, and should cause us to re- 
examme oui- entire educational 
structure. More schools, more 
teachers, more playgrounds, more 
gj-mnasiums. mean little unless the 
intellectual attainment of the stu- 
dents match the great cost of edu- 
cation and produce a substantial 
group scientifically trained to cope 
with the alarming results achieved 
b\' a foreign countrj-. 

The only segregation that should 
be permitted in the schools should 
be that of segregating the pupils 
so that each may be directed to 
follow a coui'se which would cre- 
ate the greatest results within his 
individual capabilities, toward the 
end that as an individual he can 
become a more valuable part of the 
American community. 



Alan K. Browne. \ice president 
of the Bank of Ameiica, who is 
1958 president of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce, was last 
year chairman of the Chamber's 
Civic Development Committee and 
Mass Transit Section. He was also 
chairman of the Bay Area Rapid 
Transit Commission, now supei^ 
seded by the Bay Area Rapid 
Transit District, and played a ma- 
jor role in the engineering and fi- 
nancial studies and the passage of 
the legislation which created the 
district. 

He is a member of the San Fran- 
cisco Parking & Transit Council 
and holds many other titles and 
memberships, including the steer- 
ing committee of the National Con- 
ference on Co-ordinating Metropol- 
itan Area Ti-ansportation. 

Boi-n in Alameda, he is a grad- 
uate of the Univei-sity of Califor- 
nia, class of 1929, 



JAMES tEO HALLEY 
Quollty In education 



Mayor George Christopher rec- 
ognizes the importance of the con- 
tribution to international under- 
standing that the Mayors of Cali- 
fornia will make on their Goodwill 
Tom- to Europe, sponsored by The 
Record Magazine. 



RECORD 



Tlw City After Dark 



Gomans and the Gay Life 



rlE ROBUST laughter of the 
good old carefree days in San 
Fi-ancisco is hard to find in the 
serious fifties of the Sputnik age. 
The thin cackle of satire and man- 
ipulated audience twitters are now- 
adays more in evidence than di- 
i*ect echoes of earthy gaiety. The 
old Barbar>' Coast, transformed 
into the International Settlement. 
faded with one happy e.xception. 
into a street of hiunourless clip 
joints. It has now rejected enter- 
tainment for commerce. 

The one e.xception in Pacific 
Street was of course Goman's Gay 
Nineties, now removed to what 
used to be John's Rendezvous at 
345 Broadway. Vaudevillians Bee 
and Ray Goman have been part of 
the life of San Fi-ancisco since 
1935. They are our living embodi- 
ments of the salty cheerfulness of 
a gaudy, gilded, facetious past. 

Before they opened the Gay 
Nineties in 1941. they were well 
known as performers at the old 
Oi-pheimi and at the Music Box. 
In their rollicking years as enter- 
tainers they have seen changing 
public moods in war and peace, 
and crossed paths with some of 
our city's leading figures. Former 
Mayor Elmer Robinson, once in 
show business himself, has been a 
warm patron of the Goman's. The 
banjo which Ray uses was be- 
queathed to him by Jack McCloud, 



with whom Elmer Robin.son playe.i 
the tnimpet in a dance hall on Pa- 
cific Street when he was working 
his way through law school be- 
tween 1907 and 1913. 

In 1942 the Gomans took part 
with Mayor Angelo Rossi in the 
first bond drive launched in San 
Francisco. They di-ove with the 
Mayor in a two-horse hack dating 
back to 1890, leading a parade 
down Market Street The srimmick 




MAYOR ROSSI AND GOMANS LAUNCH A BOND DRIVE 





Contributor Whit Henry once 
entertolned at the Gay NInellf 



played the trumpet 



was: "Save your gasoline and save 
your tires." The cab ended its 
spectacular journey, in hai-mony 
with old custom, in the Garden 
Court of the Palace Hotel — but not 
without embarassments. since the 
entrance was not wide enough for 
two hoi'ses, and in the presence of 
a big crowd one horse had to be 
edged out of position. 

In their new location on Broad- 
way, although a historic facade 
and period plaques by Putnam 
which once adorned Red Kelly's 
bar are left behind on Pacific 
Street, the Gomans boast a new 
acquisition which goes back half 
a century. This is the portrait of 
Stella, a recumbent nude who was 
a gi'eat attraction at the Pacific 
International Exposition of 1915. 

The gift of Judge Thomas M 
Foley, it comes through his wife 
from her foniier husband, Stanford 
White, who got possession of it 
after the lady's triumphant career 



which grossed $3 million in one 
year by simple addition of dimes. 
Old-timers will remember when: 
"Have you seen Stella?" was a 
slogan all over the coimtry. Art 
connoisseur and perfectionist El- 
liston Ames, the veteran pianist 
who accompanies commimity sing- 
ing of old favorite ditties, points 
out that this painting by Napoleon 
Nani — now at the back of the bar 
— is anatomically at fault in one 
important point — she has two left 
toes. 

Stella is supplemented by one 
other relic of the 1915 Exposition, 
which comes from a retired Vice- 
President of Crown-Zellerbach. It 
is the sign which in those distant 
days inveigled customers to cross 
the daring threshold. This trophy 
was stolen bj' Mr. Louis A. Colton 
at the end of the season in much 
the same spirit as enthusiasts ap- 
propriate goal posts after the Cal- 
Stanford game. He eased a hyper- 
sensitive conscience by surrender- 
ing the board to the Gomans who 



now display it at the entrance to 
their theatre-restaurant. 

Ray Goman dreams of a new In- 
ternational Settlement on Pacific 
Street where national food could 
be served and national songs and 
entertainment given. One day this 
hope may be realized, but mean- 
while one of the few remaining 
outposts where the spirit of old 
San Francisco lingei-s valiantly is 
the Gay Nineties on Broadway, 
now furnished with the relatively 
modern accessor^' of a Dixieland 
band, and blended with the stream- 
lined present by the contribution 
of Ray Goman Jr. so that the show 
is now described as: "The Most 
Up-to-Date Old Time Show in the 
Counti-y." Chorines strike a mod- 
em note, while Wally Rose's baton 
recalls a lively past. 



The California Mayors Tour, 
sponsored by the Record Magazine, 
will be the first such group to visit 
Europe on a Goodwill Tour. 



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JANUARY. 1958 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 

Dii'ectory of City aud County Officers 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

:ijO Cry Hall. Z ;. MA Mjl6} 
GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, Mayor Jan. 8. I960 

JO.SEPH J. .M.I.EN. E.ccuNvc Secretary 
PATRICIA CONNICH. Conftdenual Secretary 
MARGARET SMITH. Personal Secreury 
GtORUE J. GRUBB. Adminutrative Asastant 
JOHN D. SULLIVAN. Public Service Director 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

:i5 City Hall, Z,;. HE 1-2121 

JOHN J. FERDON. Prciidcnt. 155 Montgomery St., 
CAl-5117. Res. 2906 Broderick St.. JO 7-9193..1-8-60 

WILLIAM C. BLAKE. 264 Mallorca Way. Z. 23 
JO 7-3788 , _..____ 1-8-58 

CASEY. JOSEPH M., 235 City Hall, HE 1-2121, E«. 
387. Res. 30-17 Baker St., WA l-15-t8 __l-8-60 

HAROLD S. DOBBS, 311 California St., Z. -1. GA 1- 
4600. Res. 1601 Monterey Blvd.. LO 4-1341_..l-8-60 

Dr. CHARLES A. ERTOLA. 253 Columbus Avenue. 
DO 2-8035. Res. 775 Frandsco St. GR 4-3272__l-8-60 

JAMES LEO HALLEY. Rm. 703, Flood Bide,. 870 Mar- 
ket St. GA 1-4636, PL 5-1727. Res. 20 - 25th Ave.. 
Z. 21. BA 1-2285 _l-S-58 

FRANCIS J. McCARTY. 220 Montgomery St.. EX. 2- 
3475. Z. 4. Res. 3234 Divisadero Street. Z. 23. FI 6- 
IS«02 .._ ,.8.58 

MRS. CLARISSA SHORTALL McMAHON. 703 Mar- 
ket St.. Z. 3. YU 6-4648 1-8-60 

JAMES SULLIVAN. 31 West Portal Ave.. OV. 1-3910. 
Res. 2558 - 17th 'Ave.. OV.1-0861 1-8-58 

HENRY R. ROLPH. 310 Sansome St. YU 6-0700 Res 
2626 Lion St. WA 1-8168 1-8-58 

ALFONSO J. ZIRPOLI. 300 Montgomery St.. GA 1- 
1515. Res. 1140 Greenwich St.. OR 3-5560. 

ROBERT J. DOLAN. Acting Clerk of the Board. 

HE 1-2121. E«t. 284. 
LILLIAN M. SENTER. Chief Assistant Qerk. 
STANDING COMMITTEES 

(First named Supervisor is Chairman of the Committee) 
COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT — 
Sullivan. Blair. Casey. 

COUNTY. STATE AND NATIONAL AFFAIRS— Halley. 
Ertola. Rolph. 

EDUCATION. PARKS AND RECREATION — McMahon. 

Casey. Dobbs. 
FINANCE. REVENUE AND TAXATION — Dobbs Mc- 

Carty. McMahon. 
JUDICIARY. LEGISLATIVE AND CIVIL SERVICE — 

McAteer. Halley. Rolph. 
POLICE— Casey. Blake. Sullivan. 
PUBLIC BUILDINGS. LANDS AND CITY PLANNING- 

Rolph. Dobbs. McAteer. 
PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE— Ertola. Sullivan. Mc- 

PUBLIC UTILITIES— McCatty. Ertola. McMahon. 
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS— Blake. Halley McAteer 
RULES-Ferdon. Dobbs. Halley. McAteer. 

ASSESSOR 

RUSSELL L. WOLDEN. 101 City Hall. Z 2 

KL 2-1910 _ 1.8.59 

CITY ATTORNEY 

DION R. HOLM. 206 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-1322 1-8-58 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

THOMAS C. LYNCH. 550 Montgomery St. Z. 11. 

"° 2-28JH _ — l.g.jQ 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 

EDWARD T. MANCUSO. 700 Monigooiery St Z 11 
^■^ -•"" - 1-8-59 

SHERIFF 

MATTHEW C. CARBERHY -,:: r.,., n,i| t , 

HE 1-2121 ■..::.•..:■. _,.8.5o 

TREASURER 

'OHN I. GOODWIN. Ilu ..„> i,.,n, z.u. HE 1-2121..1.8.58 



12 



SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES-UN. 1-8552 

HENRY J. NEUBARTH. Presiding 
WALTER CARPENETI EDWARD MOLKENBUHR 

C. HAROLD CAULFIELD CLARENCE W. MORRIS 
MELVYN I. CRONIN ORLA ST. CLAIR 

EUSTACE CULLINAN. JR. MILTON D. SAPIRO 
PRESTON DEVINE GEORGE W. SCHONFELD 

TIMOTHY I. FITZPATRICK DANIEL R. SHOEMAKER 
THOMAS M. FOLEY WILLIAM T. SWEICERT 

RAYMOND J. ARATA WILLIAM F. TRAVERSO 

THERESA MEIKLE H. A. VAN DER ZEE 

TWAIN MICHELSEN ALBERT C. WOLLENBERG 

JOHN B. MOLINARI 

JOSEPH M. CUMMINS. Secretary 
480 City Hall. Z. 2. UN 1-8552 

MUNICIPAL COURT JUDGES-KL. 2-3008 

BYRON ARNOLD. Presiding Judge 
CARL H. ALLEN EDWARD ODAY 

LENORE D. UNDERWOOD ALVIN E. WEINBERGER 
CHARLES S. PEERY GERALD S. LEVIN 

JOSEPH M. GOLDEN WILLIAM A. O'BRIEN 

CLAYTON W. HORN JAMES J. WELSH 

IVAN L. SLAVICH. Clerk and Secretary 

301 City Hall. Z. 2. KL 2-3008 

A. C. McCHESNEY. Jury Commissioner 

305 City Hall. Z. 2 



GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall. Z. 2. UN 1-8552 

Meets Monday at 8:00 P.M. 
HENRY E. NORTH. Foreman 
PAUL A. RYAN. Secretary 
DAVID F. SUPPLE. Consultant-Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

604 Montgomery St.. Z. 11. YU 6-2950 
JOHN D. KAVANAUGH. Chief Adult Probation Officer 
Adtilt Probation Committee 

Meets at call of Chairman and 2nd Thursday each month. 
KENDRICK VAUGHAN. Chairman. 60 Sansome St.. Z. 4 
MAURICE MOSKOWITZ. Secretary. 2900 Lake St.. Z. 11 
REV. MATTHEW F. CONNOLLY. 349 Fremont St.. Z. 5 
RAYMOND BLOSSER. 670 Monadnock Bldg.. Z. 5 
FRED C. JONES. 628 Hayes St.. Z. 2 
ROBERT A. PEABODY. 456 Post St.. Z. 2 
FRANK RATTO. 526 Cahfornia St.. Z. 4 
JUVENILE COURT DEPARTMENT 

375 Woodsidc Ave.. Z. 27. SE 1-5740 
MELVYN I. CRONIN. Judge of the luvenile Court 
THOMAS F. STRYCULA. Chief Juvenile Probation Officer 
Juvenile Probation Committee 
Meets at call of Chairman 
MRS, FRED W. BLOCH. Secretary. 3712 Jackson. Z. 18 
ROY N. BUELL. 445 Bush St.. Z. 8— Chairman 
REV. JOHN A. COLLINS. 420 - 29th Ave.. Z. 21 
JACK GOLDBERGER. 109 Golden Gate Ave . Z 2 
MRS. EDGAR H. LION. 2790 Green St.. Z. 23. WA 1-0363 
JAMES S. KEARNEY. 1871 - 35th Ave.. Z. 22 
MRS. MARSHALL MADISON. 2930 Valleio St.. Z 23. 

FI. 6.1222. 
REV. lAMES M. MURRAY. 1825 Mission St . Z 3 
THOMAS J. LENEHAN. 501 Haight St.. UNderliill 1-!:61 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

THOMAS A. BROOKS. Chief Adm. Officer 
289 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
JOSEPH MIGNOLA— Executive Asistant 
MARIAN T. FETT. Confidential Secietary 

CONTROLLER 

HARRY D, ROSS 

lii'< Ciiv Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
WREN MIDDLEBROOK. Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

COL. THOMAS J, WEED 

Suite 536-7-8. Washington Bldg.. Washington. DC. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

DONALD W. CLEARY 

223 City Hall. Z. 2. MA 1-0163 and HE 1-2121 
Hotel Senatot. Sacramento 17 (during sessions) 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkin St. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

Meets first Monday of each month at 3:45 P.M. 
HAROLD L. ZELLERBACH. Ptesident. 343 Sansome Z. 
JOHN K. HAGOPIAN. Vice President. MiUs Touer. Z. 
BETTY (Mrs. Bill L.) JACKSON. 2835 Vallejo St. 
DR. BERNARD C. BEGLEY. 450 Sutter St. 
WILLI.\M £. KNUTH. S. F. State College. 1600 Holla- 
OSCAR LEWIS. 545 Sutter St. 

CLARENCE O. PETERSON. 116 Neo.- Montgomery 
MRS. ALBERT CAMPODONICO. 2770 Vallejo St. 



Ex-Officio Members 
Mavor 

President. Calif. Palace Legion of Honor 
President. City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President. Public Library Commission 
President. Recreation and Park Commission 
JOSEPH H. DYER. JR.. Secretary 

CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 Larkin St.. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

Meets first and third Thursdays each month at 2:30 P.M. 
ROGER D. LAPHAM. JR.. President. 233 Sansome St., Z. 4 
ROBERT T. LILLIENTHAL, Vice-Pres., 813 Market St., Z.J 
DONALD B. KIRBY. 109 Stevenson St.. Z 5 
MRS. CHARLES B. PORTER. 142 - 27th Ave., Z. 21 
THOM.-\S P. WHITE. 400 Brannan St.. Z. 7 

Ex-0(ficio Members 
THOMAS A. BROOKS. Chief Administrauve Officer 
JAMES H. TURNER. Manager of Utilities 

PAUL OPPERMANN. Director of Planning 

THOMAS G. MILLER. Secretary 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSON 

151 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

Meets every Wednesday at 4:00 P.M. 
FRANCIS P. WALSH. President. 68 Post St.. Z. 4 
•";M. a. LAHANIER. 2 Pine St.. Z. 11. YU 6-0968. 



DISASTER CORPS 

4S Hyde St.. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER. Commander 
CHF. ADM. OFFICER THOMAS A. BROOKS. Vive-0)m. 
RE.^R ADM. A. C. COOK. USN (Ret.) Director 
,\LEC X. McCAUSLAND. Public Information Office 

EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Ave.. UN 3-4680 

Meets first and third Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M. 

BERT LEVIT. Pres.. 465 CaUfornia St.. Z. 4 

CH.\S. C. TROWBRIDGE. JR.. Vice-Pres.. 155 Sansome St. 

MRS. LAWRENCE DRAPER. Jr.. 10 Walnut St.. Z. IS 

CHARLES J. FOEHN. 231 Valcnda St. 

JOHN C. LEVISON. 511 Ho>vaid St.. Z. 3 

JOSEPH A. MOORE. Jr.. 2590 Green St.. Z. 23 

ADOLFO dc URIOSTE. 512 Van Ness Ave.. Z. 2 

DR. HAROLD SPEARS. Supl. of Schools and Secretary 

FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall. Z. :. HE 1-2121 

Meets every Tuesday at 4:00 P.M. 
W.^LTER H. DUANE. President. 220 Bush St.. Z. 4 
JAMES E. MURPHY. 240 Golden Gate Ave.. Z. 2 
ARTHUR J. DOLAN. JR.. BIyth &■ Co.. Inc. 

Russ Bldg.. Z. 4 
WILLIAM F. MURRAY. Chief of the Department 
ALBERT E. HAYES. Acting Fite Marshal 
CARL F. KRUCER. Deputy Chief 

THOMAS W. McCarthy. Secretary 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St.. Z. ;. OR 3-5800 

Meet! first and third Thursdays at 10:00 A.M. 
CHARLES J. JUNG. Chairman. 622 Washington St.. Z. II 
AL E. MAILLOUX. ViccChaiiman. 200 Guerrero St., Z. J 
JEFFERSON A. BE.WER. 1335 • 45th Ave. 
B. L. HAVISIDE. 40 Spear St.. Z. 5 
CH.^RLES L. CONLAN. 1655 Folsom St.. Z. 3 

lOHN W. BEARD. Executive Director 

GERALD J. OGARA. (ijunsel 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

500 Golden Gate Ave., Z. 2. PR 6-1565 
Meets every In and 3rd Thursday at 4 P.M. 
Authority Conference Room 
ALBERT E. SCHLESINGER. Chairman. 2001 Market. Z 14 
H.AROLD A BERLINER. 135 Mississippi, Z. 7 
JOHN E. SULLIVAN. 840 Ulloa St.. Wot Portal. S. F. 
D.^VID THOMSON. 65 Berry St., Z 7 



THOMAS J, O'TOOLE. Sectetary 



PERMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 

2:7 City HjII. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

Mc«. every Wednesday at 3:)0 P.M. 
JOSEPH C. TARANTINO. President. tW Jefferson St. 
CLARENCE J. WALSH. Vice-President. 2<S0 - 17th St.. Z. 3 
HAROLD C. BROWN. 605 Market St. 
PETER TAMARAS. 76 Jackson St. 
ERNEST L. WEST. 265 Montgomery St . Z. -I 

I EDWl.N MATTOX. Secretary 

POLICE COMMISSION 

Hall of Justice. Z. 8. SU 1-2020 
Meets every Monday at 4:30 P.M. 

PAUL A. BISSINUER, Pacific and Davis. Z. 11 
THOMAS J. MELHIN. ItO First St.. Z. 5 
HAROLD A, McKlNNON. Mills Tower. Z. 2 
SERCEANT WILLIAM J. O'BRIEN. Secretary 

FRANCIS I AHERN. Chief of Pohce 

THOMAS J. CAHILL. Deputy Chief of Police 

DANIEL P. McKLEM, Chief of Inspectors 

PHILIP G. KIELY. Supervising Capuin 

DANIEL W. KIELY. Director of Traffic 

CAPTAIN JOHN T. BUTLER. Department Secretary 

PUBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 



Met 

MRS. J. HENRY MOHR. President. 2 Castenada Ave.. Z. 16 

ROSE M. FANUCCHI. 511 Columbus Ave.. Z. 11 

REV. F. D, HAYNES. 1399 McAllister St.. Z. 15 

RENE A, VAYSSIE. 240 Jones St.. Z. 2 

CAMPBELL McGregor. 16S Post St.. Z. 8 

J MA.\ MOORE. 598 Pottero Ave.. Z. 10 

MRS. HAZEL OBRIEN. 440 Ellis St.. Z. 2 

ALBERT E SCHWABACHER. JR.. 100 Montgomery St 2 4 

BERT SIMON. 1350 Folsom St.. Z. 3 

S LEE VAVURIS. 990 Geary St.. Z. 9 

DR THOMAS W. S. WU. 916 Kearny St.. 2. 11 

LAURENCE J. CLARKE. Librarian 

FRANK A. CLARVOE. JR.. Secretary to Commission 

PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

287 City Hall. Z. 2. HE I-212I 

Meets every Tuesday at 2:00 P.M. 
JOSEPH MARTIN. IR.. President. 400 Montgomery St.. Z. 4 
DANIEL F, DEL CARLO. Vice-Pres.. 200 Guerrero St.. Z. 3 
EDWARD B BARON. 44 Casa Way. Z. 23. WE 1-8501 
DON FAZACKERLEY. 170 El Verano Way 
STUART N. GREENBERG. 765 Folsom St.. 

R, J. M,uDONALD. Secretary 

T. N. BLAND. Manager of Utilities 

JAMES J. FINN. Esec. Secty. to Manager 

Bureaus and Departments 
BUREAU OF ACCOUNTS— George P. NEGRI. Director. 



PUBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 

585 Bush St . Z. 8. GA 1-5000 

Meets first and third Tuesdays of each mor 



EDWARD J. WREN. President. 1825 Mision St.. 2. 3 

ERNEST D. HOWARD. 315 Montgomery. Z. 4 

FRANK F AGNOST. S. F. Chronicle 

MRS JOHN 1, MURRAY. 1306 Portola Drive. Z, 27 

HENRY M. SANTE. 703 Market St. 

RONALD H BORN. Director. Public Welfare 
MRS. EULALA SMITH. Secretary to Commission 



RECREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

McLaren Lodge. G.G. Park. 2. 17. SK 1-4866 

Meets second and fourth Thursdays of each month 
3:00 P.M. 

LOUIS SUTTER. President. 58 Sutter St.. Z. 4 

WM. M. COFFMAN. 531 Market St.. 2. 5 

REV. EUGENE A. GALLAGHER. 988 Market St.. 2. 2 

DR FRANCIS J. HER2. 450 Sutter St . Z. 8 

MRS. JOSEPH A. MOORE. JR.. 2590 Green St.. Z. 23 

FRED D PARR. I Drumm St . 2 11 

JANE 2IMMERMAN. 2424 Funston Ave.. 2. 16 

MAX G. FUNKE. General Manager 

WILLIAM I. SIMONS. Exec. Secretary to Gen. Mgr. 

FliWARD McDEVITT, Seeretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

512 Golden Gate Ave.. 2. 2. OR J-6134 
Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 

JOSEPH L ALIOTO. Chairman. HI Sutter St.. 2 4 

LAWRENCE R. PALACIOS. Vice-Chr.. 2940 • 16lh St.. 2. 3 

DR J JOSEPH HAYES. 210 Post St. 

ROY N. BUELL. 445 Bush St.. 2. 8 

JAMES E. STRATTEN. 2031 Bush St.. Z. 15 

EUGENE I RIORDAN. Director 

M. C. HERMANN. Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

460 McAUister St.. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
Meets every Wednesday at 3:00 P.M. 

HARRY J STEWART. President. 60S Market St.. 2. 5 
BELFORD BROWN. First Western Bank 
WILLIAM T REED. 1385 ■ 20th Ave 
WM. I. MURPHY. 1771 - 4Sth Ave.. 2. 22 
MARTIN WORMUTH. 4109 Pacheco St. 

Es-Officio Members 
President. Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

RALPH R. NELSON. Consulting Actuary 

JAMES DUFFY. Acting Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Vererans Building. Z. 2. MA 1-6600 
Meets second Thursday of each month at 3:00 P.M. 
J. RUFUS KLAWANS. President. 235 Montgomery 
PRENTIS COBB HALE. JR. Vice-Pres.. 867 Market St 

GEORGE T. DAVIS. 98 Post St. 
SAM K, HARRISON. 431 Bryant 
EUGENE D. BENNETT. 225 Bush 
SIDNEY M, EHRMAN. 14 Montgomery 
COL FRANK A. FLYNN. 68 Post St. 
W A HENDERSON. 19 May».ood Drive 
MILTON KLETTER. 2179 -27th Avenue 
liUlDO J. MUSTO. 535 North Point 
RALPH J. A. STERN. 305 Clay 

EDWARD SHARKEY. Managing Director 

E. LAWRENCE GEORGE. Secretary 
SAN FRANaSCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building 

DR. GRACE MORLEY. Director. HE 1 2040 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

45 Hyde St.. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 



FINANCE a: RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

Vacancy. Director. 220 City Hall 2. 2. HE 1-2121 

COUNTY CLERK — MARTIN MONGAN. 317 City 
Hall. Z. 2. HE 1.2121 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR — WILFRED A ROBIN- 
SON. 463 City Hall. 2. 2. HE 1-2121 

RECORDER AND REGISTRAR OF VOTERS— 
THOS. A. TOOMEY. 167 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

TA.\ COLLECTOR — JAMES REINFELD. 107 City 
Hall. Z. 2. HE 1.2121 

HORTICULTURAL COMMISSIONER 



PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building. 2. 2. UN 1.4701 
DR, ELLIS D. SO.X, Director Public Health 
DR. E. C. S.AGE. Asistant Director of Public Health 

FIASSLER HEALTH HOME— DR. LINCOLN F PUT- 
NAM. Supt.. Redwood City 

LACUNA HONDA HOME — LOUIS A MORAN 
Supt . Tlh Ave and Dewey Blvd.. Z. 16. MO 4-1580 

SAN FRANaSCO HOSPFTAI^DR. T. E. ALBERS. 
Supt . :;nd inJ P.ilrero. Z. 10. MI 7-0820 

CENTRAL EMERGENCY HOSPrTAL— EARL BLAKE. 
Chief Steward. Grove and Polk. HE 1-2900 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
SHERMAN P. DUCKEL. Director 

R BROOKS LARTER. Assistant Director. Administrative 
L J ARCHER. Ast Director. Maintenance and Operation 
Biu-eaus 
ACCOUNTS— J J McCLOSKEY. Supervisor. 260 City 

Hall. Z. 2, HE 1-2121 
ARCHTTECTURE — CHARLES W. GRIFFITH. City 

Architect. 265 Citv Hall. Z, 2. HE 1-2121 
BUILDING INSPECTION— LESTER C. BUSH. Super- 
intendent. 27S Citv Hall. 2 HE 1-2121 
BUILDING REPAIR— WALTER C ZECHER. Superin- 
tendent. 2323 Army. Z. 10. HE 1-2121 



CENTRAL PERMIT BUREAU— SIDNEY FRANKLIN. 

Supervisor. 286 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

ENGINEERING— REUBEN H. OWENS. City Engineer. 
359 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

SEWER REPAIR AND SEWAGE TREATMENT- 
BEN BENAS. Supetiniendent 
2523 Army. 2. 10 HE 1-2121 

STREET CLEANING— S. J. SULLIVAN. Sept.. 232J 
Army. Z. 10. MI 7-9620 

STREET REPAIR— FRED BROWN. Supt.. 2323 Army. 
Z. M HE 12121 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 Cilv Hall. 2. 2 HE 1.2121 
PURCHASER OF SUPPLIES— B. G. KLINE 
CENTRAL SHOPS— AYLMER W. PETAN. Superin- 

tcnJent 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

375 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
PHILIP L. REZOS. Director of Properly 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

O. C. SKINNER. JR. 

6 City Hall. 2. 2. HE 1-2121 
FARMER'S MARKET 

Thomas Christian. Market Master. Ml 7-9423 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 



CALIFORNIA PALACE OF THE LEGION 
OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park. 2. 21. B.-\ 1-5610 

Board of Tnsstecs 

Meets the second Monday in January. April. June and 
October at 3:30 P.M. 
MRS. ADOLPH B SPRECKELS. Honorary President 
PAUL VERDIER. President. 199 Geary. 2. 8 
lAMES B BLACK. 245 Market St.. 2. 5 
ALEXANDER deBRETTEVILLE. 2000 Washington St.. 2 9. 
CHARLES MAYER. S. F. Esaminer. 3rd and Market. Z. J 
WILLIAM WALLACE MEIN. 315 Montgomery St.. 2. 4 
JOHN N. ROSEKRANS. 210 California St.. 2. 1 
WILLIAM R, WALLACE. JR.. Shell Bldg. 
LOUIS A BENOIST. 37 Drumm St.. 2. II 
WALTER E. BUCK. Russ Bldg.. 2. 4 
E, RAYMOND ARMSBY. Ill Sutter St.. 2. 4 
MRS. BRUCE KELHAM. 15 Arguelo Blvd. 
DAVID PLEYDELL-BOUVERIE. Glen Ellen 
WHITNEY WARREN. 285 Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
HAROLD L. 2ELLERB.^CH. 534 Battery St.. Z. II 

Ex-Officio Members 
MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 
LOUIS SUTTER. Pres.. Recreation ff Park Commission 

THOMAS CARR HOWE. Director 

CAPT. MYRON E, THOMAS. Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gale Park. Z.18. BA 1-2067 
Boatd of Trustee* 

Meets the second Monday in January, April. June and 
October at 3:00 P.M. 
MRS. HELEN CAMERON. Hillsborough. Hon President 
MICHEL D. WEILL. President— The White House 
CHARLES R BLYTH. Russ Bldg.. Z. 4 
MISS LOUISE A. BOYD. 255 California 
SHELDON G. COOPER. Crocker Building 
R GWIN FOLLIS. 3690 Washington 
RANDOLPH A. HEARST. 860 Howaid St.. Z. 19 
MRS. WALKER KAMM. San Mateo 
lAMES K, LOGHEAD. 464 California St.. Z. 4 
GROVER MAGNIN, St. Francis Hotel 
GARRETT McENERNEY. II. 3725 Washington 
ROSCOE F O.^KES. 2006 Washington 
RICHARD RHEEM. 235 Montgomery St.. Z. 4 
lOSEPH O TOBIN. Hibernia Bank. Z. 2 
MRS. NION TUCKER. Burlington Country Club 

Ex-Officio Members 
MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 
LOUIS SUTTER. Pres,. Recreation if Park Commision 

DR WALTER HEIL. Director 

HOWARD VAN ORDEN. JR.. Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

61 Grove Si . HE 1-7100 
GEORGE W. CUNIFFE. President. I6I7 - 2Sth Ave. 22 
GEORGE J. GALLAGHER. 3817 - 22nd Et. 
PHILIP G ENGLER 
THOMAS BYRNE. 468 - 30th St. 
DANIFL I GALVIN 
THEODORE T. DOLAN. 124 Juatuu Way 
JOHN M DEAN. 1095 Maiket St. 
HENRY L, McKENZIE 
EDWARD T MURPHY 
THOMAS F, O'NEILL 

WALTER E HOOK. M D.. Medical Diieetor 

Vacancy. Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 

ROBERT J. EVERSON. Librarian 
456 City Hall. 2. 2. HE 1-2121 

PUBLIC POUND 

CHARLES W FRIEDRICHS. Secretary and Manager 
2500 - 16th St.. 2. 3. MA 1-1700 



JANUARY, 1958 



J. R. PENNEY FOODS INC 

PALM ISLAND BRANDS 

Spc<wli;i„g ■„, 

Wholesome Food Pics 

1349 STEVENSON ST. 

VAlencia 6-5616 



Na 



New Location 
ional MOTOROLA Se 
Communication Servic* 



MOBILE RADIO 
ENGINEERS 

1150 LARKIN STREET 
PRospect 6-6166 San Francis 



"MI RANCHO' 
SUPER MARKET 

Latin-American Food Line 
ToTliila Manulacturers 

3365 - 20th STREET 

Mission 7-0581 



San Fr, 



10 



De Espana Restaurant 

Basque Food — Family Style 

Lunch 12-1 - Dinners 5-8 

Fermin Haurie, Prop. 

781 BROADWAY 

SUtter 1-7287 



WILLIAM TELL HOUSE 

630 Qay Street GArfield 1-9405 

San Francisco 11, California 

THE BIRD-ARCHER COMPANY 

OF CALIFORNIA 

DIVISION OF THE BIRD-ARCHER COMPANY 

Marine and Industrial Water Treatment Consultants 

415 Brannan Street San Francisco 7, California SUtter 1-6310 



Wiilard Batteries - Motor Tune-up - Fuel Pumps - Carbu 
Starters • Generators - Distributors - New - Exchanged - Repaired 



ROY W. JOHNSON 

AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRICIAN 
398 So. Van Ness at 15th San Francisco 3 Phone MArket 1-6176 

Toys - Toys ■ Toys 

Don't forget a bringme from . . . 

AMBER'S 

272 POST STREET 



Phone: DOuglas 2-8376 



San Francisco 



LESHER-MUIRHEAD MOTORS 

SAN FRANCISCO'S OLDEST OLDSMOBILE DEALER 
Service: Open 7:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Monday through Friday 
1515 SOUTH VAN NESS AT ARMY 
VAlencia 4-1400 

L&H PAINT PRODUCTS 

150 Mississippi Street, San Francisco 10, Calif. 
THERE'S AN L andH PAINT FOR EVERY PAINTING NEED 

THOMA'S SHEET METAL SHOP 

lOiO GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
Fillmore 6-0553 SAN FRANCISCO 



TELEVISION Sales & Service 

Serving - WESTLAKE . . . PARKMERCED . . . STONESTOWN 

INGLESIDE . . LAKESIDE . . . LAKESIDE VILLAGE 

MERCED M.ANOR ... ST. FR.\NCIS WOODS 

LAKESHORE PARK . . . WEST PORTAL 

Authorized Dealer RCA flc ZENITH - Guaranteed Repairs 

on All Makes . . . Prompt Service 

Miller's RADIO & TV SERVICE 

Phone JUniper 6-6106 
1930 OCEAN .AVE. S.AN FR-\NCISCO 

DUDLEY PERKINS COMPAM 

Harley-Davidson Motorcycles 

Sales & Service-Since 1914 

655 ELLIS STREET 

lonc PRospect 5-5323 San Francisco. Calif. 

Visit the 

PALACE BATHS 



85 - 3rd Street 



San Francisco 



LAST MILE AUTO WRECKERS 

mssion 8-5925 

1208 Evans Ave. San Francisco 

PALLAS BROS. 

R.ADIO ac TELEVISION REPAIRING - AND S.ALES 

5000 MISSION STREET San Francisco 12 

Phone JUniper 5-5000 

SPRAY CRAFT - Auto Painting 

3150 - I6th STREET betneen Valencia and Guerrero 
SAN FR.ANCISCO - UNderhiU 3-5477 
1444 GREEN STREET - PRospect 6-2525 

DARRO\^ ELECTRIC 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

J. Darrow, Owner 

YUkon 6-0159 135 CL.AHA STRET S.in Fr.incisco " 



DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

Any Make or Model Seven Da)s a Week 

9 A.M. - 10 P.M. 

FREE ESTIMATES on Antenna Installations 
1322 HAIGHT ST. UN. 3-0795 — ALso UN. 3-1856 



Woman of the Month 



The Mayor is a lady 



by Mollie Dee Morris 



A REFRESHING variation from today's 
stereotj'ped expectations of the female 
executive, the winsome lady mayor of San 
Mateo coimty's newly-born city, Pacifica, stood 
in her "office" (a colorful, family constructed 
beach dwelling) and expressed her views on 
milady's place in politics. 

Mrs. Jean Fassler, 38 year old housewife 
and mother of three, brushed back a loose 
strand of deep brown hair, smoothed a wrinkle 
from her cotton print skirt and thoughtfully, 
yet with a firm manner, advocated women in 
government as a "stabilizing factor." 

"Here, " she explained, "the mature aspects 
of women's nature — patience combined with 
a sense of order — can really be utilized. " 

She added, though, that "women with a 
home and family are better equipped to un- 
derstand community problems." 

The lively, blue-eyed housewife took on the 
additional role of Pacifica's first chief execu- 
tive when she received top vote from a field 
of 26 candidates in the November election 
which incorporated nine coastal towns into 
the new city. 

Had she imagined a year ago that not only 
would this same Pedro Point dwelling be 
located in a city named Pacifica, but that she 
would head the government of this as yet un- 
born ciry? 

"A year ago!" echoed the mayor, mildly 
astonished. '"Why a month ago I would hard- 
ly have believed it . . . when I first heard the 
returns I just kept wondering if the votes 
weren't counted wrong. " 

Mr. Fassler is now taking this "all in his 
stride," but when he first learned his wife was 
the mayor things were a litde different. 

"Joe, my husband, approved of my nomi- 
nation before I accepted it, of course, but he 
never dreamed this would happen." 

"He used to kid the fellows at work," she 
continued, smiling, "that they had better 
watch how they treated him Jjecause his wife 
was going to be a mayor." 

The Fassler's three children — 'Wally, 12, 
Gregory, 10, and Lynn, 6 — all took the news 



Mayor of Pacifica 
Jean Fassler 




with unimpressive calm with only the slight 
observation from Gregory that "he wasn't sure 
he liked the phone busy so much." 

The mayor denies an interest in politics, 
per se — "titles never impressed me" and "I've 
never been in and around politics before." 
Still digesting all the implications of her new- 
responsibility, she admitted that "I'm a little 
afraid of what all those men will think, " in 
reference to the four males who form her city 
council. 

But beneath the modest and unassuming 
manner one detects a sharp sense of responsi- 
bility as she discusses her new office. 

The chief executive cast a wistful glance 
from her kitchen window at the housing de- 
velopment, Linda Mar, and recalled the time 
when the thriving project was nothing more 
than a squat, green artichoke field. 

This was fourteen years ago when Joseph 
and Jean Fassler and their young son, Wally. 
moved from the war time pace of San Fran- 
cisco to a two-room "shack" on the county 
coastline. Mr. Fassler commuted daily to his 
city job with Standard Oil Company and they 
both worked on turning the modest dwelling 
into the five-room home it is today. 

During the early years at Pedro Point, Mrs. 
Fassler, son in tow, would make daily ex- 
cursions to the neighboring hamlet of Rocka- 
way Beach. Here she would shop and chat; 
eventually she formed a mothers' club where 
common local needs were discussed. 

The need for centralization and unity in 
the small coastal towns was even at that time 
beginning to make itself felt — if in embry- 
onic form. 

Last year, thirteen years and two children 
later, Mrs. Fassler became aware of the acute 
need for centralization when she served as 
president for the county's second largest PTA 
unit, which incorporates three schools. 

"Persons from all over the area would come 
to the PTA with local problems which weren't 
under the association's jurisdiction — however 
this seemed the only place to bring them." 

This involved many trips to Redwixjd Cit)'. 



the mayor continued, and a lot of wasted time 
and "red tape " to get anything accomplished. 
Major problems were transportation and recre- 
ational facilities for the area's children. 

These concerns and the advantage of lower 
tax rates ultimately manifested themselves in 
the incorporation of Pacifica which absorbs 
and unifies the communities formerly known 
as Sharp Park. Linda Mar, Edgemar, West- 
view, Pacific Manor, Rockaway Beach, Fair- 
way Park, Vallemar and Pedro Point. 

Geographically Pacifica extends over a 12 
mile, spasmodically populated coastal span. 
The area is composed of two sharply distinct 
elements — the fast-growing modern housing 
projects which, essentially, lend themselves to 
a certain conformity, and the cluster of older, 
individual homes that punctuate the hillsides 
as naturally as the vegetation which surrounds 
them. 

To blend these factors in a relatively com- 
fortable manner while retaining the area's 
sylvan, rugged charm would seem a uniquely 
formidable task. However, the mayor views 
this with the fundamental understanding and 
calm irmate to her. 

"Basically," she explained, ""I want to pre- 
serve our rural and picturesque atmosphere. 
The family is the heart of our community and 
I think all of us feel strongly the rustic en- 
vironment which first drew us here."" 

"And I think with the common interest and 
unity which we have won we will be able to 
keep Pacificas individual personality along 
with any progressive steps we must take." 

"When asked how she felt about the name 
Pacifica ( some talk has arisen about chang- 
ing this), she turned her gaze toward the 
rooms quiet view of jutting coastline. 

Waves were crawling up the shore and 
slapping lazily against bunches of greenish 
kelp and driftwood scattered along the beach. 
A few seagulls were scavenging through the 
early morning fog. 

""Pacifica," said the mayor, ""seems sort of 
natural." 



WATSON BROS. TRANSPORTATION CO., INC. 

DAN W. MAHONEY, Sales Superyisor 
1025 Tennessee Street - VAIencia 4-9521 - San Francisco, Calif. 


FOOD AT ITS FINEST . . . 

IISTERISATIONAL ROOM 

San Francisco International Airport 
For Reservations Phone PL 6-1662 or JU 5-4363 



JANUARY, 1958 



H. WENIGER 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 

Active Hand a: Finger Splints 

Orthopedic Appliances 

70 TWELFTH STREET 
MArket 1-6876 Sa 



COAST LINE HOTEL 

Tramienl ■ Weekly ■ Monthly 

L. R. Patel. Manager 

206 TOWNSEND STREET 

EXbrook 2-7281 



EL REY T.V. SALES 
& SERVICE 

20% Discount to all City Empoyes 
153 West Portal OVerland 1-8064 



YUkon 2-3245 SUtter 1-9985 

Far East Cafe 

Famous Chinese Food 

Open from 12 Noon to 11:30 p.m. 

631 GRANT AVENUE 

Chinatown. San Francisco 



Reliable Auto Glass 

UNderhill 3-0667 HEmlock 1-0684 

2015 - 16th STREET 

San Francisco, California 



Geo. Norton Machine Co. 

PRECISION ENGINEERING 
ALL TYPES MACHINE WORK 

WELDING - FABRICATING 

366 - 10th Street UN. 1-4294 

San Francisco 3. Calif. 



FRIENDLY MOBIL 
CORNERS 

POLK a: HAYES STS. 

San Francisco 

Mobilias ■ Mobiloil 



Moler Barber School 

System of Barber Colleges 

G.I. Approved 

D. E. BROWN, Maiiager 

161 FOURTH STREET 

GArficld 1-9979 San Francisco 



L. H. BUTCHER CO. 

— Chemicals — 

FOR ALL PURPOSES 

15th a: Vermont MA. 1-4210 

S.m Francisco 



FUCILE'S 

Cocktail Lounge 

2470 SAN BRUNO AVE. 
JUniper 5-9967 Sa 



A. B. Boyde Co. 

1235 Howard St. UN 1-2850 

San Ft 



Grand Pacific Hotel 

Single Rooms - Housekeeping Apt; 

1331 STOCKTON STREET 

YUkon 2-0589 



Excelsior Bakery 

Birthday ■ Wedding Specialties 

4492 MISSION STREET 

lUniper 5-2521 San Franciscc 



Scavengers Protective 
Association 

2550 MASON STREET 
EXbrook 2-3859 San Fr 



Golden West 
Sheet Metal Works 

345 JUDAH STREET 
Lombard 6-8031 San Francis. 



The Owl Rexall Drug Store 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

Drugs ■ Cosmetics 

Liquors - Sundries 

16th a: MISSION STREETS 

3rd a: MARKET STREETS 

UN. 1-1004 San Francisco 



Ask tor S&H Green Stamps 

TheSPERRYand 
HUTCHINSON COMPANY 

HEmlock 1-2742 

1446 MARKET STREET 

San Francisco 



WHY EAT OUT? 

CHINESE FOO 

livered or Rcid> 

Open d.illy 5 p.m. nil I a.m. CI..k-dMo 

entering Service Available for Banquets, 

Partiea, Clubs, Etc. 

Telephone O.Jcrs Efri.ienlly Riled 

.ind I'tomptly Delivered 

Phone SUncr I-llll or GAr.'icId 1-5500 

Chop Suey Express 

801 Brondw.ny, Corner Powell 



M. GREENBERG S SONS 

Brass Foundry & Machine Works 



765 FOLSOM STREET 



EXbrook 2-3143 



EL LIDO BOCCE CLUB 

Cocktail Lounge 
4877 Mission Street 

JUniper 5-9883 



CROWN DRUG STORES 

Daly City - Westlake 

355 So. Mayfair Ave. PL. 5-8200 
Lakeshore Plaza 

2 Lakeshore Plaza OV. 1-4136 

Stonestown 
95 Stonestown LO. 4-6055 



Kansas City Hickory Pit 

Supreme Barbecued Hot Links, 

Spareribs - Choice Beef & Chicken 

Prompt Delivery Hot to Your Door 

1325 FILLMORE STREET 

JOrdan 7-7347 



Montebello Wine Co. 
of California 

Producers of and Dealers in 

Choice California Wines 

Winery: St. Helena, Napa Counf>' 

Office: 

2505 Bryant St., San Francisco 



Storage - Lubrication - Washin^ 
Repairing - Batteries 
Accessories - Tires 

STANDARD GARAGE 

233 DRUMM STREET 
SUtter 1-2744 San Francisco 



GEORGE L. BURGER 

- Wholesale - 

Potatoes and Onions 

EXbrook 2-1313 
52 VALLEIO STREFT 



PASETTI TRUCKING CO. 

Building Demolition . . . Cot,crele 

Breaking . . . Dump Trucks 

General Hauling 



264 Clementina St. GA. 1-5297 
San Francisco. Calif. 



AERO 

HEATING SHEETMETAL 

Furnaces ■ Water Healers 

Installations - Service ■ Repairs 

General Sheet Metal Work 

PLaza 5-3852 
If no answer call S.F. JUno 8-4701 
6 Hillside Blvd. Dalv Cilv 



LIGURIA BAKERY 
Soracco & Co. 

Fogaccia, Panenon. Grissini. 

Bisconi 

Italian and French Bread 

PIZZA our specialty 

1700 STOCKTON STREET 

Phone G.Arfield 1-3-86 



RAHO HOUSEWARES 

// you cant find it try Ratio's 

2132 CHESTNUT STREET 
Phone WE 1-2726 San Francisc 



THE CRITERION 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
Entertainment Nitely 

576 GE.ARY STREET 

Near Jones, San Francisco 

PRospect 6-4468 
C. G. Boots Bonlin 



JOHN OSTRAT CO. 

Industrial Engraving 

Manufacturing ■ Metal Spinnit 

156 SECOND STREET 

G.Arfield 1-6670 

San Francisco 5. Calif. 



OLD WALDORF BAR 

Two T.V.-s for All Sports 

Fine Drinks & Good Foods 

84 - 3rd STREET 

SUtter 1-9632 



FOR FREE DELA'ERY 

Phone JUniper --81!" 

PROSPERITY MARKET 



Meats • Groceries • Fruits 
Vegetables - Beer - Wine 

199 Gennessee San Francisco I J 



UNITED TOWING CO. 

ROBERT Vi . D1ER 

PIER 14 

SUtter 1-6606 San Franci 



Smith Industrial Supply 
Co. 

lack E. Smith /. B. (Dud) Smith 

Sand Blast Sand - Grit 

Garnet — Mineral Shot 

Nozzles - Pots 

SCAFFOLD RENTALS 

1485 UAVSHORE BLVD. 

Jl'nipor 5.-1-4 



Top Performers of 1957 




BEN SWIG 



S. CLARK BEISE 




MARIE HOGAN 



SAMUEL UNTERMEYER II 



Foreman of the Grand Jury which, find- President of the Bonl of America, he re- Secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, Manager of reoctor operations for G.E.'s 

ing that almost half the criminal cases ceived from Consul General Pierlulgi who received the Woman of Achieve- Vollecitos Atomic Laboratory, he guided 

could be traced to narcotics, vigorous- Alvero the Order of Merit of the Italian ^ent Award given by the Business and to completion the first privately owned 

ly re-organized the forces at war with Republic, Italy's highest oword for civil Professional Women's Clubs of S. F. as atomic power plant in the world, 

the narcotics traffic. achievement. <, leader in the field of public service. 




MATHEW C. CARBERRY 



CLAYTON HORN 



ANSEL J. SLOSS 



MARIO CIAMPI 

Sheriff: az chairman of the Mayor's Municipol judge whose precedent-making Pioneer Von Ness auto deoler who took Architect, whose Ferry Park Development 
-immittee for the study of alcohol prob- decision in the "Howl" trial laid down over a foreign cor. and promoted It to Plan, presented to the city on July 16, 

long OS literature has o point where he became the largest 1957, will bring distinction and new 
importance it may not single dealer in his field in the nation, appeol to the Son Francisco port and 
itorted a jail program. be censored as obscene. down-town orea. 



istituted a ground-breaking the 
in Son Francisco, and has red 



JANUARY, 1958 



17 




'Td have 
foiled them all, if Fd 
had a SIMCA" 




Fighting makes me sick. But with a 
sleek, powerful New Simca, I'd have 
zoomed away from all my duels. With 
the tremendous economy, sports car 
handling, and cargo space of the New 
French Simca, I'd have made it across 
the border with enough champagne to 
last a lifetime of cowardly seclusion. 

$|^Ae From Port of Entry — Up to 40 
I w * 3 miles per gallon on regular gas — 

for name of nearest Simea dealer, call or wrile 

SIMCA DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 

1583 Honard Street, San Francisco 

HEmlock 1-4144 



SAN FRANCISCO - OAKLAND 

Piers 29-31-35, San Fmncisco 

YUkon 6-4435 

Cable Addr. 



LOS ANGELES - LONG BEACH 
Pier A, Berths 5-6, Long Beach 
HEmlock 7-6427 
WESTCOTERM 



FOLGER'S COFFEE 

Mountain Groivn 

101 Howard Street San Francisco 

527 CLUB Bar and Restaurant 

DoniMlit .iiid I.uporli-J l.iq.ior. — P.ibsl on Tap 

Joe Fuchslin - Carl Rcichmulh, Proprietors 

527 BRYANT STREET 

lekphone SUtter 1-9625 San Francisco, California 



John Sexton & Co. 

Manufac„„ing 
Hhotesate Grocers 
2150 ARMY STREET 
VAIcncia 6-2010 San Franc 




E. D. MALONEY 

resident of S. F. Chomber of Com- 
lerce 1957, who vigorously promoted 
highly diversified program to develop 
ur city's ogriculturol and trode rela- 
tions over the Pocific coast. 



WEST COAST TEIMIIKALS €0. 
OF CALIFOKKIA 

* STEVEDORES 

* MODERN EQUIPMENT 

* TERMNAL OPERATORS 

* OPERATORS OF: 

FOREIGN TRADE ZONE No. 3 

FOR THE PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Phone UNdcrhill 1-8H4 

Jim Bruce Chinese Laundry 

H'l- Call and Dclircr 
14! - 8lh Street San Francisco 




Restaurant ond hotel proprietor, 
empire nearly doubled in 1957. 
still groviing. 



BOOKS 



Blue Water & Red Tape 



by Jane Rawson 



SAX FKANCISCO BAY: 

By Harold (iilltam 

Doubleday — $4.50 

Sail Francisco is rapidly becom- 
ing the city with the '"most-esf— 
it has glanior. tourist appeal: it is 
an international conference center, 
commercial and industiial capital, 
gateway between east and west. 
and named for a historic little 
friar who delighted to preach his 
heart out to all living creatures. 
To everyone who is part of this 
intense life, and particularly to 
those who are concerned to build 
and enhance the Bay Area. Mr. 
GiUiam's book, which describes the 
setting of this metropolis, is 
packed with exciting facts and de- 
scriptions. Mr. Gilliam points out 
that in the tradition of all great 
cities from Byzantium to New 
York. San Francisco stands on a 
waterway, which in the case of this 
city ranges in mood from the mists 
of the Thames to the golden 
sparkle of the Tiber in no time 
whatever, and is an Impoitant de- 
parture point for ships and people 
to the Orient. The city on such a 
bay is certainly one about which 
we can make "no little plans" — 
highways, bridges, airports, parks 
— all must measure up to its gi'eat 
natural advantages. 

While it is difficult, say. to as- 
sociate St. Francis with Market at 
Tenth Street. Mr. Gilliam restores 
our awareness of wildlife by gi\ing 
detailed accounts of the birds, fish 
and animals who inhabit the bay, 
with charming paragraphs for such 
creatures as the fi.m-lo\-ing por- 
poises. For leisured mulling over 
of the phenomena around us. the 
contents range with reportorial 
nonchalance from poetic atmos- 
pheric pieces about the weather 
and seasons to a straight-hitting 
commentarj' on Alcatraz. 

Ever>*one will have his own par- 
ticular enjoyment in this book. 
For me the tales of old shipwrecks 
had just the right balance of the 
romantic and macabre, with their 



drowned sailors and buried gold, 
moidores. The non-scientfic, if 
there be any such left in this 
atomic age. will also delight in Mr. 
Gilliam's tides as explained to the 
kindergarten. Clearly if our fifth 
graders are to be taught the higher 
mathematics, Mr. GiUiam, who can 
explain in a few brilliantly clear 
sentences the difference between 
"high high-tide" and "low high- 
tide" is the education network's 
man. 

The dust jacket has just the 
right cloudscape over the Golden 
Gate bridge, with an urgent line 
of foam in the foreground, both of 
which contrive to suggest the mys- 
teries and importance of the Bay 

PAKKIXSONS LAW: 

By Prof. C. Northcote Parkinson 
Houghton Mifflin Co. — $3.00 

Professor C. Northcote Pai^kin- 
son is concerned about paralysis, 
inefficiency and waste in the swivel 
chair set. He holds the Raffles 
Chair of History at the University 
of Malaya in Singapore. This van- 
tage point, with empires rising and 
falling aroimd it. is a singularly 
good one from which to cast a 
cvTiical eye over the whole struc- 
ture of administration, bureau- 
cracy and business procedure^a 
project which no-one would have 
delighted in. probably, more than 
the dashing, able promoter and 
observer. Sir Stamford Raffles 
himself. 

Fascinated by the incredible in- 
crease in staffing in complex con- 
temporary organizations, where 
employees are busy about promo- 
tions, pensions and papenvork, 
rather than true productivity. Pro- 
fessor Parkinson has enunciated a 
law which affirms that in the kind 
of organization under his survey, 
staff accumulates at the rate of 
over b^'f each year. He quotes col- 
orful statistics from the British 
Navy, where, since 1914, capital 
ships have decreased by two-thirds, 
officers and men by one-third, but 




of the Oakland Bridge and Bay Is one of the many 
unsual film of San Francisco produced by the Santa 



Fe RalUoy. 



Admiralty officials have increased 
by a remarkable seventy-eight per 
cent. 

Professor Parkinson is also con- 
cerned about the way all people, 
except millionaires and applied 
mathematicians are benumbed by 
large figures, and will happily vote 
in trance-like apathy for appro- 
priations in the $25,000,000 bracket 
with no discussion whatsoever, but 
will spend hours of committee time 
arguing over some item on the 
agenda such as $4.75 for the 
monthly bill for coffee for a Wel- 
fare Committee, purely because it 
is an item they can grasp. One of 
the wr\'est chapters is the tenth— 
on pension point or the age of re- 
tirement — which suggests that of- 
ficials whose usefulness is ended 
should be worn out by being sent 
on continual air-trips to widely 
diversified places. This strenuous 
travel, particularly if indulged in 
without breaks between trips, and 
accompanied by in o r d i n a t e 
amounts of forms to be filled out, 
will finally compel retirement. 

Another good whimsical note is 



struck in the chapter on the selec- 
tion of employees, which includes 
the bright idea of taking a leaf 
out of the old fairy-tales and 
threatening unsuccessful candi- 
dates with liquidation, thereby 
shortening the list of applicants at 
the veiy beginning. 

The book is pointed up by in- 
genious mathematical formulae 
embod>'ing the laws enunciated. 
Mathematics, however, have a 
highly pei-sonalized droller>' all 
their own. Our historian is not so 
entertaining in this department. 
But what is missed in mathemat- 
ics is gained in pictures, which are 
a soui'ce of delight from the mo- 
ment we see the elderly leisured 
aunt, who can happily spend a 
whole day sending a post-card to 
her niece. 



Wives and friends who accom- 
pany the California Mayors on 
their European Tour, sponsored by 
The Record Magazine, will be ac- 
corded the same wonderful treat- 
ment received by the Mayors. 



VERDIE S BAR-B-Q 



2420 Shattuck 



Berkeley, California 



THE STANDARD 

Electric Time Company of California 

Electric Clack Systems — Fire Alarm 6/ Telephones 

Experimental Laboratory Panels — Hospital Signal Systems 

Electric Precision Timers 

16 BEALE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 5, CALIF. 



JANUARY, 1958 



"The HERTZ Corporation" 

HERTZ RENT A C4R 

433 MASON STREET ORdway 3-4666 

Emery C. LUchka 

HERTZ RENT A TRUCK 

1480 FOLSOM STREET UNderhill 1-6870 

D. I. Sulliyan 

HERTZ CAR LEASING DFVISIUN 



1480 FOLSOM STREET 



MArket 1-9755 



St. Vincent de Paul Salvage Bureau 

FURNITURE, CLOTHING, HOUSEHOLD GOODS, NEWSPAPERS 
Ours is a yciir round program to care for the poor. 



SAN FR.\NCISCO — 1815 Mission Street — HE. 


4588 


OAKLAND — 515 Webster Street — 1 Winoaks i-272i 


SAN MATEO — 113 So. 8 Street — Diamond 2 


I860 


DALY cm' — 6726 Mission Street — PLiza 5 


4346 


SAN JOSE — +43 W. Son Carlos St. — CYpress 4 


4974 


VALLEJO — 2J0-A VirEinia St. — VAllejo 2 


5525 


STOCKTON — 626 E. Market St. — Stockton 4 


0067 


SAN RAF.-^EL — 910 "B" Street — GLenwood 4.3302 


E. J. WREN, K.S.G. 


Executive Secretary 


Please Don't Thow It Anay . . .Bui Do Call 


ST. VINCENT DE PAUL SALVAGE BUREAU 



ARROYO'S CHEVRON SERVICE 



Tune-up, 



JU. 7-7128 



PUMP REPAIR SERVICE CO. 

Pumping Equipment — New - Rented - Repaired - Installed 
690 TENNESSEE STREET SAN FRANCISCO 7. CALIF. 

UNION MACHINE COMPANY 

Engineers and Machinists 

934.944 Brannan St. MArket 1-2772 San Francisco 

California Builders Hardware Co. 

17 BLUXOME STREET - YUkon 2-5690 - SAN FRANCISCO 
Telegraphic Address "Edjohn" Telephone SU. 1-6701 

E. A. JOHNSON & CO. 

GREEN COFFEE 
166 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 11, CALIF. 

PACIFIC FELT COMPANY 

710 York Street Mission 7-0111 

TIP-TOE IN DELICATESSEN 

5423 Geary Blvd. San Francisco 

BILL BREWER ASSOCIATES 

802 Montgomery St. San Francisco 11 



Death to Smog 



Why Not Clear 
the Air.? 



by Ben Linsky 

SMOG, in the broad way it is commonly used, means many diiTerent 
things to many people. To some it means the various air pollutant 
gases, droplets, and solid particles that are found in the atmosphere. 
To others it means the effects of these pollutants as noticed by people. 
To still others it means a particular characteristic of polluted air meas- 
ured by some particular instrument. 

To further confuse the users of the word smog, some people think 
only of the sooty, gritty, sulfurous, fogg>' type of polluted atmosphere 
found in London and many other parts of the coal burning world. 
Other people think only of the oily, hazy, sun-bumed gassy type of 
air polluted atmosphere found often on the West Coast of the United 
States and industrialised South Africa. 

Because of this confusion, we have designed our own definition of 
smog. We refined and improved it by consulting with hundreds of 
community leaders and technical specialists in science and language 
arts in October, 1956, when I came on the job as the first technical- 
professional employee of the Bay Area Air Pollution Control District. 
(This date was a little more than a year after the District was estab- 
lished by a special State Law, Chapter 2.5 of the Health and Safety 
Code.) 

The agreed-upon language is: 

Smog is excessive air pollution, recognizable by its effects on 
people, on the things that people own, and on the things that people 
like to do. 

All air pollutants were classified into 5 physical types to clear up 
the confusion between what causes localized effects and what causes 
area-wiie effects. 

Localized Area-wide 

1 . Large dust Yes — Fall out No 

2. Microscopic dust Yes — Downwash Yes 

3. Droplets Yes— Fall out No 

4. Microscopic droplets Yes — Downwash Yes 
T. Gases Yes— Downwash Yes 

The excessive effects of air pollution were classified into 8 types 
to help people organize their thinking about smog and to help people 
understand why we must control open burning and other preventable 
sources of air pollution. By seeing how large scale open burning con- 
tributes to these 8 types, we can easily grasp the idea: 



The Excessive Effect by Type 


Localized 


.\rea-Wide 


1. Sky Darkening 


Smoke 


Smoke 


2. Visibility Interference 


Smoke 


Ha:e 


3. Soiling of Surfaces 


Soot and Fly Ash 




4. Discomfort or Annoyance to 
Senses 


Odor 

Eye irritation 

Throat irritation 


Eye irritation 


?. Vegetation Damage 


Soot 
Ethylene 


Ethylene 
Hydrocarbon-smog 


6. Other Property Damage 


Burning embers 




7. Interference with Production 
of Services 


Traffic interference 
from ha:c 


Traffic interference 
from ha:c 


S. Impalrmcn of Health 


Smoke affects 
asthmatics 


? 



So much for air pollution effects. 
How about sources that can be cleared up? 

Almost everything we do ;it home, at work, and on our way to 
lid from work, adds pollutants to the atmosphere. Most of these 



sources (especially the large ones) know practical ways to control them, 
at some expense. Some of the smaller sources have practical answers 
availahle. 

Some of the sources are, for all practical purposes, not prevent- 
able because they are part of our way of life- fireplaces, home barbe- 
cues and similar cooking and recreational operations. 

Others, like "clean" automobile exhausts, are not quite ready, 
even though they are important. About 1% of the gasoline that goes 
into the gas tank comes out the exhaust to become sunburned and form 
new gases and microscopic droplets that cause trouble. The auto in- 
dustry reports that practical answers are three years away. 

There are several answers, none of them very consoling. First, 
our hills, with the coast-side range, cut off air drainage when the wind 
speed drops —as it does about 23^<- of the time in the Bay Area. Down- 
town San Francisco is better off more of the time, hut when the wind 
dies, and the sun is bnght. even downtown San Francisco air becomes 
heavily polluted. Most other sections of the Bay Area are even worse 
more often. Many sections have even less ventilation than they have 
in Los Angeles. 

Fortunately, there are fewer people, less industries, and fewer 
automobiles in the Bay Area as yet. But we are grow-ing fast. And 
already we have serious man-made haze that cuts off the beautiful 
vistas and interferes with safe flying. Damage to commercial vegeta- 
tion IS reported to run $1,000,000 a year here — and this is always a 
clear warning of other air pollution effects to come, unless it is dras- 
tically curtailed. Other measurements show we are l/.i to 1/2 as bad 
as Los Angeles already. 

Now, who are "we" and what are we doing about it? 

We are a Special District that is the first truly regional govern- 
ment agency in the Bay Area. We are advised by students of law and 
public administration that when our Board of Directors (7 County 
Supervisors and .i City Councilmen) adopted Regulation No. 1 on 
open burning, it was the first area-wide regulation on anything. 

In our philosophy of operation, we do not try to enforce against 
3,000,000 people or 1,500,000 adults and their employers. We try, 
instead, to produce good information, well distributed, so that they will 
make the right decisions, when the time comes, because they know it is 
proper, rather than because the "law" and its "enforcers" will make 
them do it right. 

Also, in our philosophy of operation, we do not wish to build 
a centralized empire that does everything that relates to air pollution 
control. Rather, it is our plan to encourage city and county govern- 
ments to accomplish as much as possible using existing local depart- 
ments that have parallel interests and objectives, especially depart- 
ments for Fire Prevention, Public Health, Planning and Zoning En- 
forcement, Building Code Inspection, and Police. 

Our law provides for the slow, powerful enforcement by injunc- 
tion in Superior Court after review by a quasi-judicial Hearing Board. 
It was anticipated by the State Legislature that much local enforce- 
ment would be done by local agencies using local laws — especially on 
the less complex, less technical violations. 

The State Law says, in effect, "Excessive air pollution is illegal. 
Rules and regulations are to be adopted after surveys and studies and 
public hearings." 

Regulation No. 1 on open burning was adopted after simple sur- 
veys and studies, because the problem and its solutions were so obvious. 

The next group of regulations (on industrial processes and com- 
mercial incineration) will be introduced after we have more precise 
knowledge of our atmosphere, its area ventilation, its present pollutants, 
its future potential, and the sources. These findings await completion 
of our laboratory and its work, together with the work on meteorology 
and source surveying. 

After adoption of these regulations, and while they are being 
complied with (some will take several years to accomplish), we will 
move to clean up oil burning jalopies and smoky diesels. Later, when 
available, "clean" auto exhaust controls will come, and backyard trash- 
burning control. 

Each "tooth in the bu;:-saw" needs to be broken off or filed down 
if wc arc to keep the smog out of our eyes. 



The RATHSKELLER Restaurant 

GERMAN and AMERICAN FOOD 

Luncheon ■ Dinners ■ Beer ■ Wine ■ Liquors 

John Pauls - Fritz Schmidt - Fred Kuchn 

POLK AND TURK STREETS 

PRospecI 5-3188 :-: San Francisco 

Compliments of 

REMINGTON RAND 

Division of Sperry-Rand Corporation 

41 -1st Street 



DOusiIas 2-8600 



San Francisco 



BIG HORN BAR-B-QUE 

808 Geary Street 
Famous for Take Hom.e Food 

Chicken. 2^ lbs $1.50 

Spare Ribs $1.00 



PRospect 6-5619 



GANTNER-FELDER-KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

A mple Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 

Greetings from 

JITNEY DRIVERS 
ASSOCIATION 

10 Mission Street SUtter 1-9271 

San Francisco 



JANUARY. 1958 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 



PERIMETER 
PARKWAYS 



We asked retiring' Supervisor 
Gene McAteer the same question 
addressed by the City-Coimty Rec- 
ord to the present Board of Super- 
visors. He replied: 

The biggest problem that my 
native city will face in 1958 is the 
decision as to how much further 
it will allow the freeway systems 




EUGENE McATEER 

to penetrate the boundaries of our 
city. 

In my opinion, we are on the 
threshold of seeing our city's entire 
topogi-aphy destroyed by the free- 
way planners and builders. Their 
efforts to aid the movement of 
automobiles thi-ough our city have 
placed on the drawing board some 
plans which would rip out long 
established residential areas. 

We recognize that this is a ma- 
chine age. We recognize the need 
to provide adequate highways for 
the automobile. However, we must 
deleiTOine whether or not the pres- 
ei-vation of residential districts 
within our city limits is more im- 
portant than accommodating the 
300 h.p. automobile. 

The dislocation of families is a 
very serious matter. It directly 



American Appliance 
& Supply Co. 

1150 SUTTER STREKT 
I'Rospcci 5-37II San Fr.incisco 



affects schools, stores, businesses, 
churches and friendships of long 
standing. These are the verj' found- 
ation on which America iias been 
founded. 

Perimeter parkways, which 
would avoid residential districts 
are the only answer, in my opinion, 
if we are to preserv'e the charm 
and dignitj' of our city. To carve 
our city into sections divided by 
the concrete walls and pillars of 
the freeways, is to destroy the 
beautiful City of St. Francis. To 
dislocate native families, destroy 
i-esidential districts and to witness 
the rise of ribbons of concrete on 
our skyline is to destroj- the God- 
given beauty with which we have 
been blessed. 

It will be interesting to witness 
the courage and the efforts which 
must be made by our public offi- 
cials to prevent San Francisco 
from becoming another "proving 
ground" for highway engineers 
who. strangely enough, are some- 
times wTong in their estimates and 
with their plans. 



Governor Goodwin Knight warm- 
ly commends The Record for spon- 
soring the Calitoraia Mayors' Tour. 




ot the Generol Electric 
Atomic Plant Equipment Department in 
San Jose. Colifornio. fobricotes fuel ele- 
ments for the Vollecltos Atomic Power 
Plont. 



PRIVATE INDUSTRY 
AND ATOMIC POWER 



The Vallecitos Atomic Power 
Plant which began operations on 
October 24, produced its millionth 
kilowatt hour on Christmas Day. 
The first privately financed plant 
of its kind in the world, it opens a 
chapter of achievement of which 
Califomians may be proud. 

Early in 1951. Pacific Gas and 
Electric Company and Bechtel 
Corporation joined together as one 
of several industrial study teams 
under contract with the Atomic 
EnergT,' Commission to study the 
economic and technical feasibility 
of applying nuclear energy to the 
generation of electricity. 

At the same time, the General 
Electric Company was also carrj-- 
ing out research toward the eco- 
nomic generation of electricity 
from nuclear energy. 

As a result. General Electric and 
Pacific Gas and Electric joined 
with Bechtel. and the first Califor- 
nia privately owned atomic power 
plant came into existence. 

Norman R. Sutherland, president 
of P. G. & E., hailed this achieve- 
ment of engineers and scientists 
from General Electric and his own 
company by saying: "Vallecitos is 
an example of what engineers and 
scientists in this nation's private 
industry can do with the peace- 
time atom." 

The Vallecitos plant and the 
electricity flowing from it to the 
homes and industries of forty- 
seven California counties provide a 
striking symbol of the not too dis- 
tant future when larger and more 
advanced nuclear plants will be in 
operation up and down our nation, 
patterned upon this and other 
promising reactor concepts. 




SHE DOES FIRST THINGS 

Grace Ball, well known among 
the professional women of San 
Francisco, has established the first 
resident club for out-of-town girls 
here to become secretaries. Cer- 
tainly it is an answer to a crjing 
need. 

For our commercial expansion 
has brought girls from even dis- 
tant continents. Supported by their 
families they have a limited in- 
come. So their boarding houses 
must be modest. Often they do not 
know what neighborhoods are de- 
sirable and those not fit to live in. 
Sonretimes their temporaiy home 
is in a distant area from down- 
town. That necessitates them 
hanging on to straps in the crowd- 
ed hours of the buses. So valuable 
time has to be eaten up just in 
transportation. 

But now the students of Grace 
Ball's Secretaiial College have a 
home in the Women's City Club 
at 465 Post St. Sevei-al suites be- 
long e.xclusively to them. These 
fortunate girls can play and splash 
in a swimming pool; eat home- 
cooked food and read from the well 
filled stacks in the library. When 
they wish to become hostesses and 
entertain, they can have access to 
a spacious living room. 

A walk of a few minutes takes 
them to their school and also to 
other downtowTi interests. 

Grace Ball is fond of doing first 
things. This one should breed 
others like it and so make for 
civnc betterment. 



I>li..i,r JUnipcr.(.4J21 

BAYSIDE MOTEL 

AAA Approved Sp.iclaui Quid Groimdi 
IN .SAN FRANCISCO 
OVERLOOKINC BAY 

2011 Bny.horc Blvd.. nl HcMcr, nr. ltd Si. 
Snn Fr-ini-iK-o 2(, Qilil. 



Complete Lettering Service 
Sigrts . . . Show Cards 

PISCHOFF 

SIGNS . . . POSTERS 

177 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

S.in Fr.incisco 2 UN. 1-3822 



The Record wishes to express its 
gratitude to the Foreign Consul- 
ates in San Francisco for their help 
and co-operation in making the 
California Mayoi-s' Tour a signifi- 
cant adventure. 



"Qantas," Australian Global Air 
Carrier, will carrj' the California 
Mayors on their tour sponsored by 
the Record Magazine, to Europe in 
I he most modern planes in the air. 



RECORD 



KTK 

Wrecking Co, 



235 Alabama Street KLoiidike 2-0994 

San Francisco 

875 Monument Blvd. MUlberry 5-7525 

Concord, California 



FOR: 



SAlMPLING - INSPECTION 
LABORATORY SERVICES 

Chemical Analysis 
Bacteriological Examination 
Gratling - Certification 
of 

IMPORTS -:■ EXPORTS 

Specify: 

mm & TOMPKINS, LTD. 

Eslahlished ;«"« 

236 FRONT STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone: EXbrook 2-1130 Cable: ANALYST 

Sampling representatives at Coast and Inland points 

SPECIALISTS IN BULK VEGETABLE AND 

ANIMAL OILS AND FATS 

Ores — Insecticides — Chemicals — Foods 

Members of and Official Chemists and/or Samplers for 

many Scientific and Trades Organisations 
NCPA - NIOP - AOCS ■ ASTM ■ ACIL 



THE JACKSON 
HOSPITALS, INC. 

Executive Offices: 
1410 Bonita Avenue., Berkeley, California 

Berkeley Division 

1410 BONITA AVENUE 

LAndscape 6-41 12 

Mount Eden Division 
6435 DEPOT ROAD 

Mount Eden Section : 

Hayward. California 

ELgin 1-5300 - LUcenie 2-0212 



LARKSPUR 

CONVALESCENT 

HOSPITAL 

For Elderly Chronics and Con\alescents 
R.N. and Physical Therapist on Staff 

GRACE SLOCUM, Director 

Special Diet 

Homelike Atmosphere 
Moderate Prices 

Conscientious Care 

234 HAWTHORNE, LARKSPUR 
Phone LArkspur 819 

I.4RKSPITR, CALIFORNIA 



ANUARY. 1958 



PUB. LIBRARY PERIODICAL ROOM < 

Civic Center CITY 2 

52 X-7/57(27 Sbs)(3077) 3306 



BULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 4507 



HAL'S 

in PALO ALTO . . . 

4085 EI Camino Real 

NOW in LOS ALTOS ■ ■ ■ 

at Loyola Comers 

Two of the Peninsula's fine eating spots 

onned by Hal Graham, a restaurateur 

nith 25 years oti the Peninsula 

York 7-0969 - 1287 Miramonte Ave. 
(at Loyola Comers), Los Altos 




THE BAXTER CO. 

Manufacturers Representatives 

101 Kansas Street 

MArket 1-8636 San Francisco 3, Calif. 

Hong Kon§ Art Goods Co., Inc. 

Importers — Exporters — Wholesale — Retail 

Exclusive Chinese Art Goods, Chinawarcs, Mandarin Apparels 

Brocade and Silk Material, Teakwood Furniture 

815 Grant Avenue San Francisco 8, Calif. 
Phone SVtter 1-4090 

PEERLESS LAUNDRY 
& CLEANERS 

4701 GROVE STREET 
Oakland, California 




NEW PROCESS CHEMICAL CO., INC. 

Tricon Clieniical Products 

121 CLAY STREET 

1 Francisco 11, Calif. Telephone EXbrook l-O^^r 

JOHN F. .ALLEN 
Executive Vice President - General Manager 

Golden West Iron W orhs 



Structural Steel . . . Miscellaneous Iron 

CON FINNIGAN 



505 RAILROAD AVE. 

South S.in Fr.inci- 



PL. 6-0 r 



KING KOLD ICE CREAIM 

901 CLEMENT ST. 

San Francisco, California 



I UULi ■_. L! ;^ ',l\ 



I^EW PROGRAM FOR ALCOHOLICS 



FFB 2 3 1950 



RECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




Courtasy Northern Catifornia Service League 

THE DOOR DOES NOT REVOLVE 



(See story on Page FN 




FEBRUARY, 1958 




Compliments of 

REMINGTON RAND 

Division of Sperry-Rand Corporation 

41 FIRST STREET 

DOiiglas 2-8600 San Francisco 

ELIZABETH ARDEN 

Cordially Welcomes You 
to her San Francisco Salon 



550 Sutter 



YU. 2-3755 



A. A. A. BRASS FOUNDRY 

2275 Jerrold Avenue 
San Francisco, Calif. 

Stevens Associated Service 

Woodside Avenue 8C O'Shaughnessy Blvd. 
SAN FRANCISCO 

CALIFORNIA FOOD SHOP AND DELICATESSEN 

FINE FOOD AND DELICACIES 
Courteous Service 

634 Clement St. BAyview 1-4686 

Business UNdcrhiir 1-9756 GUS KRAUS Residence BAyview 1-2978 

CONDOR MACHINE WORKS 

TOOL AND DIE DORK - GENERAL MACHINE WORK 

DROP FORGE DIES AND DIE SINKING 

JO LUCERNE STREln- SAN FRANCISCO 3 

CALIFORNIA NOTION & TOY CO. 



573 Market Street 



San Francisco 5 



SILVER CREST DOUGHNUT SHOP 

RESIAURANI &. COCKIAIL LOUNGE 
MO 15.iyshore Blvd. AT. 8-0725 Sail Francisco 



PEERLESS LAUNDRY 
CO. 

Launderers - Cleaning and Dyeing 

4701 Grove Street 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

THE 

RATHSI^LLER 

Restaurant 

German and American Food 

Luncheon - Dinners - Beer - Wine - Liquors 
John Pauls - Fritz Schmidt - Fritz Kuehn 

Polk and Turk Streets 

PRospect 5-3188 SAN FRANCISCO 

Master Built Homes 

Since 1919 

MEYER AND YOUNG 
BUILDING CORPORATION 



769 Portola Drive 



San Francisco 2". Calif. 



The National Cash Register Company 

777 MISSION STREET 
San Francisco 3, California 

GEARY SERVICE MARKET 

Meats — Vegetables — Groceries 

1398 GEARY STREET JOrdan 7-1347 SAN FRANCISCO 

CENTRAL MILL & CABINET ((>. 

1595 FAIRFAX AVENUE S-AN FR.\NCISCO 

VAIcncia •»-~316 

California Stucco Products Company 

OF NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

M.innl.u'liirers of 

DECORATIVE PLASTIC M.\TERIALS 

5 59 Bcrrv Street ,-: S.in IV.iiui.seo -. CiIK. 

Lynch CARRIER SYSTEMS, INC. 

TELEPHONE .nnd TELEGRAPH CARRIER EQUIPMENT 

695 BRYANT STREET SAN FR.\NCISCO 7. CAUF. 

EXbrook 7-1471 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 



!r 



KENNETH H. ALLEN 
ALAN P. TORY 



PUBLISHER 
EDITOR 



Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock I-I2I2 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 

VOLUME 25 NUMBER 2 

FEBRUARY, 1958 



B w 



BAY WINDOW 



LETTERS 



May I compliment you on the attractive 
ormat and the interesting substantive con- 
ent of the latest issue of The Record. 

HAROLD S. DOBBS 

Acting Mayor 

City Hall, San Francisco 



Thank you for your coverage of the Board 
jf Supervisors, and the complete constant sur- 
iiey of important issues which confront the 
rommunity. 

JOHN JAY FERDON 

Supervisor 

City Hall, San Francisco 



The itinerary of the California Mayors' 
Tour to Europe was "devoured" by me. I 
have had the pleasure of visiting each of the 
places on the forthcoming tour. It is well 
planned and, in my humble opinion, is de- 
signed to give legislators a comprehensive 
tour of Western Europe. Best wishes for 
:ontinued success. 

J. EUGENE McATEER 
Attorney at Law 
206 Jefferson St. 
San Francisco 1 1 



I was gratified to read the fine tribute paid 
by Whit Henry to the late publisher of the 
City-County Record — George Allen — in your 
January 1958 issue. 

I was proud to be numbered among 
George's legion of friends. Inevitably he is 
missed. 

VINING T. FISHER 
General Manager 
S. F. Parking Authority 
500 Golden Gate Avenue 
San Francisco 



OUR COVER PICTURE, which appears 
by courtesy of the Northern California 
Service League, is a grim comment on the 
clanging of an iron gate on a one-way jour- 
ney into jail. President of the League is Jus- 
tice Raymond E. Peters. Executive Secretary 
Quaker Joseph E. Silver works with a dedi- 
cated staff on problems of prisoners both in 
confinement and after release, when they face 
again a bleak and difficult world. 

MAURIE HAMILTON, KCBS writer-pro- 
ducer who writes on a big community 
assault on alcoholism and Sheriff Carberry's 
rehabilitation program, is one of the most 
active newsgatherers in the Bay Area. One 
of his outstanding current assignments is the 
stimulating and imaginative session: "This 
is San Francisco." He is at ease in a variety 
of worlds from San Francisco Opera debut 
auditions to Stanford football and "Christmas 
Eve in Union Square." 

He has been longshoreman, merchant sea- 
man, and produce market porter before mov- 
ing into his chosen field of radio to which he 
brings nimble wit and acute discernment, to- 
gether with a magically warm human touch. 

WE HAVE been encouraged by a tide 
of renewal subscriptions, most of them 
for a three-year period, and undertake to our 
readers that we will on their behalf cover 
the myriad aspects of civic progress in the 
Bay Area as vividly and picturesquely as we 
know how. The response of interest we en- 
joy indicates quite clearly that there is a 
place for our publication in co-ordinating 
news, exploring important areas of civic life, 
and delineating personality. 

On page 9 is a subscription form for the 
convenience of new readers who, seeing The 
Record for the first time, may wish to ensure 



getting the magazine every month. Numbers 
have been disappointed to find that the supply 
of a particular issue is exhausted because of 
a run of requests. The best way to avoid 
missing a specially wanted issue is to be- 
come a regular subscriber. 

LOYAL SAN FRANCISCANS must take 
issue with Dr. Lawrence Clark Powell, 
librarian of the University of Califotnia at 
Los Angeles, who in his recently published 
"Books West Southwest" (Ward Ritchie 
Press) btxjsts the "cmde and brutal" vitality 
of the southern city as a breeding ground 
for novelists superior to San Francisco. 

Our town, says Dr. Powell, is loved by 
everyone, and "loving happiness makes no 
story."" With the exception of Frank Norris 
and Jack London, nobody, he claims, writes 
powerful novels about Bagdad by the Bay, 
whereas the dry and wrinkled southland pro- 
duces masterpieces compounded from oranges 
and oil, movies and morticians. Just wait. 
Dr. Powell, a few more bank holdups, and 
we"ll qualify to put iron into our genial soul! 

ONE NATIVE San Franciscan always goes 
over big in Hollywood, and that is gentle 
Raymond Duncan, brother of now legendary 
Isadore. '"The stars are crazy about me,"' he 
told us. "Theyre closed in cages, with pro- 
ducers and directors cramping their lives. 
They like me because Em not in chains." 
A record of his present impressions of our 
city in which he grew up as a child in a live- 
ly and talented family will be found on page 
7. We think it good that officials, who con- 
stitute a big proportion of our readers, should 
see themselves in the mirror which he holds 
up to them, and decide whether it is one of 
those distorting reflectors such as you find 
in the side-shows of country fairs. 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 




LETTERS 


3 
3 
5 


BAY Vv'INDOW 


SOCIETY AND CARBERRY'S WARDS 


by Maurice Hamilton 




OCTOGENARIAN IN A TOGA 


7 


by Alon Tory 




WOMAN OF THE MONTH: MARJORY KING 


8 


by Mollle De.;. Morn; 




BOOKS: ATOMS AND DESTINY 


12 


by Jore Ra..on 




SPORT: "BRICK" MULLER 


15 


by Whit Henry 




PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 


10 


MEMO FOR LEISURE 


14 



FEBRUARY, 1958 



Hoiv well 

do you knoiv 

San Francisco? 




Cvcn most lifelong residents ot 
tne Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Frandsco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousand^ 
do — every year and say, "There'^ 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit: fares are surprisingly 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 

I Franciico and Igndcio, Calif. 



COKESBURY 
BOOK STORE 

KLondikc 2-3562 

85 McAllister street 

San Francisco 



ISattk of Ktntvxtn 

NATIONAL sav^iVgs ASSOCIATION 
Condensed Statement of Condition December 31. 1957 

(Figures of Oierseas Branches are as of December 24, 19i7) 

RESOURCES 

Cash and Due from Banks S 1,850,658,364.57 

United States Government Securities and Securities 

Guaranteed by the Government 1,873,880,684.95 

Federal Agency Securities 114,084,739.81 

State, County, and Municipal Securities . . . . 615,224,494.07 

Other Securities 139,340,429.60 

Loans Guaranteed or Insured by the United 

States Government or its Agencies 1,345,072,437.40 

Other Loans and Discounts 4,209,711,583.91 

Bank Premises, Fixtures, etc 115,159,16902 

Customers' Liability on Letters of Credit, etc. . . 318,278,678.02 

Accrued Interest and Other Resources .... 57,739,009.77 

TOTAL RESOURCES $10,639,149,591.12 

LIABILITIES 

Capital $ 160,000,000.00 

Surplus 290,000,000 00 

Undivided Profits and Reserves 133,021,220.77 

TOTAL CAPITAL FUNDS r~. '. '. '. '. '. $ 583,021,220 77 
Reserve for Possible Loan Losses 90,926,400.83 

DEPOSITS ^^^"'^"'^ • • • $4,790,055,035.50} „„,' .' .. .^ 
''^'^°^'TS)Savings and Time. 4,734,061,687.15$ 9,524,116,722.65 

Liability for Letters of Credit, etc 320,828,328.30 

Reserve for Interest, Taxes, etc 120,256,918 57 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $10,639,149,591.12 

Main Offices in the two Reserve Cities of California 
SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES 

Branches throughout California 

Overseas branches: London, Manila, Tokyo, Yokohama, Kobe, Osaka. Bangkok. Guam 

.Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation • Member Federal Reserte System 



Cash and Duo from Banks . . . 

United States Government 

Obligations 

Other Securities 

Loans and Discounts 

ability on Letters of 



Bank of America 

(International) 

A uhotly-^u-net/ subsidiary 

Condensed Statement of Condition December 31, 1957 
New York, N.Y. Branches: Ducsseldorf, Singapore, Paris, Beirut, Gtialcmala City 
of December 24, IVV ) 

LIABILITIES 

Capital .... $34,000,00003 
Surplus .... 6,600 000 00 
Undivided Prof its . 1,205.241.61 



(Branch figure. 

RESOURCES 

$107,755,854.74 



9,734,347.21 
18,353,830.67 
139,124.212.06 

173,730,622.03 
2,520,123.75 
TOTAL RESOURCES S4S1,218,990.46 



Credit, etc. 
Accrued Into 



and Other 



TOTAL CAPITAL FUNDS . . 
Reserve for Possible Loon Losses 

Deposits 

Liability for Letters of Credit, etc. 
Reserve for Interest, Taxes, etc. 

TOTAL LIABILITIES . . . 



$ 41.805.241.61 

2.128.329.59 

227.897.803.93 

176.199.088.02 

3,188.527.31 

S451.2I8.990.46 



SOCIETY AND 
CARBERRY'S WARDS 



by Maurice Hamilton 




Th« Sheriff hot o housing probl. 



WHEN YOU'RE TALKING about the 
rehabilitation of jail prisoners you 
nust define your terms, because often as not 
ehabiiitation can start with a cake of soap." 

The speaker is Matthew Carberry. since 
tlay 1956 the Sheriff for the City and County 
)f San Francisco. When he speaks of rehab- 
itation, he is referring primarily to alco- 
lolics, because unfortunately alcoholics con- 
titute the bulk of the jail population over 
vhich he has charge. 

He's been quoted across the country as say- 
ng that San Francisco has one of the most 
icute alcoholic problems of any city its size 
n the country. This, he says, is a mis-quote. 
^e corrects it to say that San Francisco has 
he most acute alcoholic problem of any city 
hat's trying to find a solution. And as Sheriff, 
itatt Carberry has been making efforts to- 
vards rehabilitation which seem to be bearing 
omc important fruit. 

His efforts date back to July 1956, just two 
nonths after he'd been appointed to his 
^resent job, when San Francisco Police Chief 
rank Ahern slammed shut the "revolving 
oor " Prior to this time, persons booked as 




drunk in a public place had been thrown 
into the drunk tank, allowed to sober up and 
then released. That this procedure was truly 
a "revolving door" is stressed by Carberry. 

He says that in the four months before this 
door was "closed " there were some 44,509 
arrests, and a careful check showed that 1 1() 
men had been picked up, b<x)ked and held 
until sober an average of 17 times each. One 
offender had the distinction of having been 
arrested twenty times in a single month, while 
anotlier holds the record of having made the 
drunk tank forty-seven times in the four 
months. 

When the crackdown came, dnmks were 
made to stand trial or at least appear before 
a Municipal Judge who handed down sen- 
tences ranging up to six months in the 
County Jail. It was a "get tough" policy 
which stemmed from Chief Ahern's recogni- 
tion that the habitual drunk literally needed 
to get help, and that his scxial and medical 
problems could only be helped by commit- 
ment to an institution where medical or 
psychiatric assistance would be available. The 
institution Chief Ahern had in mind was the 
County Jail, which is not generally associated 
in the public mind with medical or psychiatric 
treatment. 

One result of the crackdown was to lower 
the number of arrests by nearly one-half. The 
winos who had made up the big bulk of the 
arrest figures in the past disapipeared from 
sight. At least many of them did. Not only 
was the drunk tank "closed" to them, but the 
new freeway was usurping the Father Crow- 
ley Playground and Columbia Square, and the 
Skid Row property between Third and 
Fourth Streets on Howard was being threat- 
ened by redevelopment, so owners were pad- 
locking many of the fleabag hotels and one- 
arm joints. A large number of habitual 
drunks left the area. 

Another and more important result, how- 
ever, from Carberry's standpoint, was the 
c.'fect of the new sentences on the popula- 
tion of the County Jail. 

The jail at San Bruno, built in 19.^5 to 
house 600 men had 425 inmates at the time 
of the crackdown. Within three weeks this 
figure had swelled to 675, with additional 



prisoners being housed in the San Francisco 
installation. 

So while the Police Department had cleaned 
up the streets, it had also created a housing 
problem for the Sheriff and his department, 
a problem that soon came to the attention 
of Mayor Christopher, who expressed alarm 
at the situation and determined to do some- 
thing about it. 

His determination resulted, on September 
1, 1956, in the appointment of the "Mayor's 
Committee for the Study of Alcoholic Prob- 
lems,' a committee that numbered among its 
members representatives of the many local 
agencies which felt responsibility in this area. 

These agencies included all lix:al law en- 
forcement bodies such as the Police Depart- 
ment, the District Attorney's office, the Muni- 
cipal Courts, and of course, the Sheriff's of- 
fice. Other San Francisco organizations repre- 
sented were the Department of Public Health, 
the Department of Public Welfare, the Com- 
munity Chest, and a distinguished panel of 
fifteen lay perstms who also were concerned 
by the gravity of the community problem. 
The Mayor appointed Carberry as the com- 
mittee's chairman and charged the group with 
the responsibility not only of studying alco- 
holic problems but of studying and recom- 
mending action. 

The committee has met regularly since its 
formation and has made important strides on 
the long, sometimes discouraging, road to- 
ward a solution. But Carberry feels that the 
first step was by far the most important. 

"We've managed to bring ourselves to the 
recognition," the Sheriff will tell you, ""that in 
San Francisco alcoholism is a serious detri- 
ment to a healthy community and that it is a 
disease to be treated as are other diseases 
which threaten public health. Once we had 
agreement on this, we were free to really take 
our gloves off and go to work."" 

Carberry is sincerely emphatic when he 
says that this attack on alcoholism in our city 
is not The Carberry Plan, " or the plan of any 
single individual. He heads the committee, 
yes, but it is a joint effort to which a great 
many people give many hours of time, thought 
(Continued on Page 6) 




V:ew through bors 

CARBERRY'S WARDS 

( Continued from Page 5 ) 
and effort in working toward the common 
goal. 

The committee has already reached a note- 
worthy milestone, a three day conference on 
alcoholism. Held September 26th through 
the 28th of last year, the conference, attended 
by some six hundred participants, was the 
first of its kind on the West Coast and was 
so successful that another is planned for this 
year. 

While this conference included many cities 
and many states, Carberry and his committee 
are quite naturally concerned primarily with 
our local scene and with our own County Jail. 
To understand just what is happening in San 
Bruno, it is necessary to realize that the Sher- 
iff, who graduated from USF in 1936 as a 
Business Administration major, feels that run- 
ning a jail should be a business proposition. 

While he stresses humane treatment for his 
"wards," as he refers to the prisoners, he 
makes sure that every prisoner who can work 
is put to work in one aspect or other of the 
jail's operation. 

The one hundred acre farm connected with 
the jail property is a good example of Car- 
berry's philosophy in action. Last year this 
acreage produced over a quarter million 
pounds (some 310,000, to be exact) of pro- 
duce, under the supervision and assistance 
of only two paid workers. The rest of the 
labor came from inmate volunteers, and this 
is but one example of what happens in every 
department of the jail. 

Inmates work in the assignment office, run 
the elevators, help prepare and serve the meals, 
run the laundry, do the landscaping and a 
whole host of other duties, always imder the 
supervision of paid professional employees, 
but with the bulk of the work being done 
as part of the rehabilitation of the prisoner. 

"This set-up works to everyone's advan- 
tage," Carberry says. "The prisoners get five 
days off their sentences for participating in 



the program, but more important, it cuts 
down idleness, and provides work therapy 
that helps to restore the man's sense of use- 
fulness. Furthermore it costs the city less to 
run the jail." 

In this statement you have the key to two 
important aspects of Matt Carberry 's view of 
his job as Sheriff, his desire to run a good 
jail at a minimum cost to the taxpayers and 
his basic respect for the dignity of the indiv- 
iduals who have come under his superi'ision. 

He sees alcoholism as a health problem, for 
the individual as well as the communit)' at 
large. 

To give real emphasis to the rehabilitation 
program recommended by the committee he 
heads, he needs to employ additional paid 
professional personnel; thus the lowering of 
cost to run the jail physically is important and 
it is a matter of justifiable pride to Carberr)' 
that he does manage to keep costs down. 

By growing much of the food that is con- 
sumed at the jail, and by using inmate labor 
in the other phases of the operation, the 
overall per capita cost is now considerably 
less than $2 per prisoner per day, and the 
money saved is being used to obtain the serv- 
ices of a psychiatrist and a psychologist, each 
on a half time basis, as well as to employ 
three trained psychiatric social workers on a 
full time basis. 

These professional staff members work with 
the prisoners directly both in group and in- 
dividual therapy sessions in an effort to get 
at the emotional causes for excessive drinking. 
They also make referrals for continue! help 
once the prisoner is released, to such agencies 
as the Northern California Service League, 
Alcoholics Anonymous, and the Adult Guid- 
ance Center, a city-operated clinic under the 
direction of Dr. Fred Boyce, which devotes 
itself exclusively to the problem of the alco- 
holic. 

This treatment program has been in oper- 
ation only for the past eight months and ev- 
eryone agrees that it's still far too early to 
evaluate its results. There have been many 
cases, though, where a former inmate has 
shown up at the local AA meetings or for 
more therapy with a worker at the Adult 
Guidance Center, a hopeful sign that some 
of the effort is having its effect. 

Another aspect of the professional help 
given to County Jail prisoners comes from 
a staff of three Adult Probation Officers at- 
tached to the institution. These men take case 
histories of the prisoner upon arrest, and in 
the case of a repeater, bring these histories 
up to date, so that the information is ready 
when the man goes to Court. 

This enables the Judge to determine a fair 
sentence without endless questioning. The 
Probation Officers also assist released or par- 
oled prisoners in finding jobs and in general 
in adjusting to socier)' once they leave jail. 

In fact the matter of finding jobs for re- 
leased prisoners is crucial to the whole pro- 
gram of rehabilitation. More than one re- 
formed alcoholic back-slides when he is out 
of work. Carberry, with the help of Dalton 
Howitt of the Adult Division of the Depart- 
ment of Education, is presently exploring the 



possibility of working out some sort of a 
training program within the kitchen facilities 
of the jail. 

Using these facilities, and working with the 
various culinar)' unions in the area, the Sher- 
iff hopes to be able to train men for useful 
jobs once they are released. A similar pro- 
gram to teach women inmates tj'ping is pres- 
endy being started under the auspices of the 
Queens Bench and the Soroptomist Club of 
San Francisco. 

But Carberry's philosophy of rehabilita- 
tion still goes back to his statement that it 
can begin with a cake of soap. "Everyone 
has one thing, if nothing else," he says. "That 
is human dignit)'. If you can restore that in 
an alcoholic, even a Skid Row bum, you've 
done a great deal toward making any rehab- 
ilitation program work." And often, if a man i 
is given a chance to clean up and do some 
productive work, his self-esteem is sufficiently • 
restored so that other therapy can have some 
chance of success. 

If this sounds like the philosophy of a "Jo- 
gcxxfer," be assured that this is not the «ay 
to describe Matt Carberr)'. To the Sheriff and 
his committee, without whose help he readily 
admits he'd be lost, the whole program is the ■ 
result of a hard-headed businessman's ap- 
proach to a pressing problem. 

If the City of San Francisco can cope with i 
its foremost problem, that of alcoholics and I 
alcoholism, the whole city will benefit by ■ 
having a reduced jail population with an at- • 
tendant reduction in operating costs and sav- • 
ing to the taxpayer. And the communit)' will I 
also benefit by becoming a better place in i 
which to live as well as having some of its . 
citizens restored to health. 



Mr. Slocum, co-ordinator of Public A^airs, 
has advised thex Calijornia is the on\y state 
sending such a distinguislied group as l/ie 
Maxors' Tour to the Brussels Fair. 



Off the Record 




"Whafs ;t soy. Doddy.O?" 



THE RECORD 



le H-ill host California Mayors in I'aris 



OCTOGENARIAN 
IN A TOGA 



by Alan Tory 



CAN FRANCISCO is going to go up, or 
■3 it's going to go down. It will go up not 
/ making one-way streets and freeways and 
ridges and houses. It will go up if people 
) up. All of this fantastic system of trying 
I get there quick is helping to make people 
J down. It is not important to human life." 

This pronouncement was made by a white- 
lired son of San Francisco in a quiet, gentle 
lice which contrasts with the novel dissi- 
;nce of his views. For Raymond Duncan, 
ho wears a Greek toga woven with his own 
inds, the art of living is something which 
rows out of the practice of arts and crafts, 
• enjoying beauty and trying to create it. 
e resembles Frank Lloyd Wright in that 
herever he goes controversy springs up. 
however, whereas the famous architect is a 
;ry gladiator, this classic-featured, non- 
rinking. non-smoking octogenarian is more 
le kindly persuader than the icontxrlast. 

It was enlightening to have breakfast with 
im and the white-robed Aia Bertrand at the 
neraton-Palace whither he returns for peri- 
dical visits from the Akademia over which 
s presides in Paris. His eye is un-dimmed 
■ter decades of prophesying and good-natured 
efiance of convention, and his musical ar- 
culation of words is a rare delight in an 
je of slurred and lazy speech. 

An individualist, he is suspicious of official- 
Dm and all its works. "The moment a thing 
ecomes official it gets spoilt," comments 
aymond Duncan, who is a believer in spon- 
ineous effort and the merits of impassioned 
nthusiasm. He is more interested in re- 
anditioned human beings than feats of en- 
ineering, though his religion of beaut)' in 

harsh and frenetic world is a trembling 
lame that can easily be overkxiked among 
res stoked by high-powered fanatics. 

One of four children ( the others were 
iadora, Elizabeth and Augustine) born to 
oseph C. Duncan, auctioneer, gold miner, 
tockbroker, publisher, printer, and patron 
f the arts, Raymond has pioneering blood 
n his veins. His maternal grandfather, Thom- 
s Gray, dreamed in St. Louis of making a 
lew world in San Francisco, and came over 



the Panama Isthmus with Fremont. His fath- 
er, Joseph Duncan, built the Pioneer Bank — 
at that time the highest building in San 
Francisco. As a child Raymond lived on the 
northwest corner of Geary and Taylor Street 
The horses owned by the family were pas- 
tured where the Bellevue Hotel now stands 

At an early age he became interested in 
type and printing, gave his first lecture in 
1891 on "The Reform of Education," assim 
ilated his versatile father's joy in organizing 
art exhibitions. He soon broke l(X)se to ex- 
plore the world, collaborating with his sister 
Isadora in the presentation of her Greek 
dances, and homing ultimately to Paris where 
he founded the Akademia, a meeting place 
of musicians, actors, and poets where arts and 
crafts are taught. 

One of Raymond Duncan's most cherished 
aims is to promote a reformed printing type 
devised by him in 1908. This alphabet of 
pure geometric forms is inspired by the 
Greek Archinos. He prints with his own 
hands a periodical ventilating his views on 
art and life, which circulates in France and 
the United States. 

Another crusade to which he has more 
recently given himself is a fight in Paris 
against the Prix de Rome. Arguing that 
Rome belongs to the past, he has advocated 
the instituting of a Prix de New York, and 
brought 250 paintings from Paris for exhibi- 
tion in Manhattan. His latest enterprise has 
been to start a Prix de San Francisco at the 
Maxwell Galleries, and to collect paintings 
by American artists for showing in Paris. 
"See what San Francisco energy can do!" he 
exclaimed, kxjking towards Aia. "We did 
this by our rwo selves." 

An encourager of the young who takes 
the results of human folly in his stride, as 
when he lived through the Nazi occupation 
of Paris, preserving the graces of hospitality 
and helpfulness, he is a tireless liver and seek- 
er with a saving sense of humor. His appear- 
ance, with sandalled feet and flowing white 
l(K'ks is surprising as the views which he 
holds, to us who swarm in the crowds of 
Market Street and rub our eyes to see a 




poll thingi" 



Greek figure from antiquity. 

Perhaps we are missing the point, with 
our rush and blixxl pressure? Or may it be 
that freeways and bridges could have their 
own functional beauty, and spc-edcd com- 
munication its special contemporary boons 
and achievements, and Hathaway shirts grace 
and dignity.' These questions may be dis- 
cussed, if not resolved, when the California 
Mayors on their nine-country European tour 
enjoy the honor of a reception by Raymond 
Duncan in Paris in August at his Academia 
at 31 Rue de Seine — an encounter which 
will be in striking contrast to their various 
meetings with ambassadors and municipal 
dignitaries! 

Here are some of the obiter dicta of Ray- 
mond Duncan: "Wisdom is more precious 
than success, a far greater wealth than money 
and more desirable than war or peace, and 
though quite simple, more difficult to attain. 
. . . The newspapers should have a detective 
agency to discover people of talent. They 
shouldn't wait until they're famous. . . . The 
planting of potatoes brings man nearer to 
life than the c-ating of them. The essential is 
not the prtxluct, but the living while produc- 
ing." 



Ambassador Zelterbach has arranged a 
meeting with the Mayor oj Rome for mem- 
bers of Calijomia Mayors' Tour, endorsed by 
The Record. 



The Regents of San Marino, the smallest 
and oldest Republic in the world, will wel- 
come members of the California Mayors' 
Tour. 



EBRUARY, 1958 



Woman of the Month 



Dynamic Marjory King 



by Mollie Dee Morris 



IF ONE DAY while taking a leisurely stroll 
in the staid environs of upper Nob Hill, 
you should happen to run into a lively, small- 
framed woman hurrying along with a black 
knit stole flying out behind her and toting 
an oversize bag filled with assorted papers, 
chances are it might be Marjorj' King. 

Now if it were Miss King, she would be 
heading toward the radio studios of KSFO 
in the Fairmont Hotel to tape an interview 
for her nighdy program, "No Holds Barred. " 
And if there might be any question on your 
mind — from where to obtain a job in San 
Francisco, if you are over fort)' and facing 
age discrimination, to how great an influence 
snoring imposes on the divorce rate — Mar- 
jory is the person to consult. 

An active personality in Bay Area civic 
affairs since her arrival here in 1942, and 
radio in particular since 1949, Marjory traces 
her many-faceted career to the basic concept 
that "I'm just crazy about people!" 

This can be easily testified to by the provo- 
cative gamut of human interests explored in 
her KSFO program, San Francisco's first con- 
troversial nighr-time show. "No Holds 
Barred" may one night ask '"What Can 
Frenchmen Teach American Men About 
Courtship?" and follow this the next evening 
with a penetrating discussion on methods of 
curbing juvenile delinquency in the Bay 
Area. 

Marjor)' has interviewed more than 39,000 
national and international celebrities and less- 
er known persons from almost every imagin- 
able walk of life in the span of her active 
twenty-four year radio and TV career — a 
somewhat sobering fact to digest for an inter- 
viewer of this seasoned performer. 

However the engaging woman with the 
startling slate-blue eyes and sharply contrast- 
ing brunette hair .soon puts an interviewer at 
ease by her frank and easy manner. 

A native of Oregon, Marjory's career of- 
ficially began on a spring day in 19.34 when, 
as a student from Reed College in Portland, 
she entered the local radio studios of KGW 
and convinced the station managers they 
should employ her for a daily program. They 
did, and it wasn't long before the enterpris- 
ing young woman had inaugurated a Saturday 



children's program, "Merry Microphoners," 
which she performed in addition to her daily 
program. Shortly afterwards she also took on 
the job of fashion co-ordinator for the depaa- 
ment store which sponsored her shows in an 
effort to recoup expenses from a Japanese- 
American Student Conference in Japan which 
she had attended as Reed's representative. 

Marjory stayed in Ponland until 1937 
when she embarked upon a round-the-world 
trip through Siberia where she taught self- 
improvement classes, American st}'le, to girls 
in the countries of Japan, Germany, Hungary 
and Italy. "These," she expresses, "were a real 
experience." 

She had an interpreter, but thinks things 
may have been better off without him. The 
classes inevitably dissolved in everj'one "talk- 
ing all the time." So Marjory resorted to 
pantomime. '"Women," she says, "are the 
same ( in some respects ) the world over." 
With the use of demonstration, the p's and 
q's of becoming more attractive to the oppo- 
site sex were easily put across. 

The trip ultimately ended in Washington, 
D.C., where Marjory worked for a local sta- 
tion and the NBC nerwork, gaining experi- 
ence in writing, producing and acting. 

Next stop was New York where she ex- 
plored a variet)- of outlets for her ambitious 
talents, ranging from writing copy for Arthur 
Godfrey to teaching radio acting. She also 
performed some dramatic roles herself, on 
NBC daytime serials. 

She moved to the Bay Area in 1942 where 
she raised a family, did war work and, utiliz- 
ing a latent interest in painting, organized 
art classes. These, she explained, helped ease 
the tension of the war years and also allowed 
her recreation in one of her favorite hobbies. 

In private life the dynamic Miss King is 
Mrs. Frits Winbald, wife of a prominent 
local dentist and mother of a healthy brood 
of five children ranging from seven to seven- 
teen years. 

How does one woman manage all these 
activities? For one thing Marjory completely 
disavows any compliance with the twenty- 
four hour day. 

"I seldom go to bed before the wee hours 
of the morning. Since I'm one of those peo- 




,w;th New York, 
executive Wilnam McDa 



pie that suffer from insomnia, I use the tima 
for getting various projecrs completed." 

Currently she is writing a research paper 
on sleep because no conclusive material seems 
available on the subject. Marjor)' may not be 
the world's earliest riser, but this is indicative 
of her method of getting things accomplished.. 

A staunch advocate of self-sufficienc)'. Mar-: 
jor)' believes not enough emphasis is put on 
this admirable qualir)', at least where children; 
are concerned. All the Winbald clan learn at 
an early age to assemble their own clothes, 
cook and quite early provide entertainment 
for themselves. She describes rhe household, 
too, as "constantly full of kids " doing every- 
thing from planning plays together to writ- 
ing poetr)'. 

Recently this home served as nucleus for 
rhe creation of San Francisco's newly-organ- 
ized Teen-Age Academy. " This is a projea 
which Marjor)' stimulated and the kids carried 
out. The children realized the need for more 
recreational outlets, as one form of curbing 
juvenile delinquency, so with the sponsorship 
of civic leaders they banded together and 
formed the academy. Plans now include teen- 
age art shows, plays and a variet)' of recre- 
ational projects. 

Always active in community affairs, the 
seemingly inexhaustible Miss King received 
recognition in 1956 when she won the Mc- 
Call's magazine Golden Mike award for her 
creation of San Francisco's unique employ- 
ment agenq', "Careers Unlimited."" which cat- 
ers exclusively to women over 40. 

The idea for the agenq' was conceived after 
Marjor)- received lerters from listeners com- 
plaining that they were virtually barred from 
many good jobs because of their age. She then 
solicited the help of William McDaniel, 
KNBC general manager, and Fairmont Hotel 
owner Ben Swig, and formed the no-fee 
agency. The organization is staffed by vol- 
unteer workers and sponsored by civic leaders. 
It now places the "over 40" set in good posi-) 
tions at the rate of 50 to 70 per month. { 

Criminology, though, occupies primar)' in- ' 



THE RECORD 



tercst in Marjory's acute social consciousness. 
"If all the country's jails could be turned 
into hospitals tomorrow it wouldn't be a day 
too soon," she candidly expresses herself. 
Appalled by the current lack of funds to bet- 
ter provide psycho-therapeutic institutional 
staffs, she feels that more public emphasis on 
emotional stability can to some degree curb 
the present crime rate. By interviews similar 
to the one recently presented on "No Holds 
Barred " which sought out the feelings of a 
young ex-convict from the San Bruno County 
Jail, Marjory feels the public may gain a bet- 
ter understanding of why people end up in 
such institutions. The defense attorney for 
Elaine Soule was also a recent guest of the 
program, as was Sheriff Mathew Carberry, 
who is highly admired by Marjory for the 
administrative work he performs at the jail. 



Obsers'ation and insights gained through 
such an intensified career in dealing with 
people have been gathered together in a book 
dealing with emotional relationships which 
Marjory recently completed, and which is 
slated soon for publication by Prentice-Hall. 
She also is the coordinator of a series of text- 
books on the subject of emotional develop- 
ment. The books, for all grade levels, come 
under the auspices of a new school for "emo- 
tionally defective incorrigibles, " which was 
recently incorporated under State laws, and 
which Marjory founded. 

Listed by "Who's Who,"" the dynamic Mar- 
jory was recently selected for a special edition 
of the volume devoted to outstanding women 
in America. 

What imderlies her remarkable capacity for 
transforming ideas into projects.' Marjory 



cites a small item she once read in the Read- 
ers Digest: 

A young boy asked his father what was 
the most important thing in the world The 
father didnt immediately reply, but took a 
stick of wood and a knife and whittled one 
small piece away. The next day he invited 
the son into his study, took from a drawer the 
same pic-ce of wood and whittled one more 
slice away. The following day he again re- 
peated the procedure and the father continued 
the daily prtxess until one day he picked up 
the stick to play a tune for his son on a finely 
carved whistle. 

"This seemed a sound philosophy,"" con- 
cluded the personable radio star, mother of 
five, author and civic leader. 



JOE'S OF WESTLAKE 

Famous for Charcoal Broiled Steaks and Chops 

Dinner from 1 1 a.m. to 12 a.m. 

Alemany & Lake Merced Blvtl. 

PLaza 5-7400 

IN SAN FRANCISCO. VISIT 
ORIGINAL JOE'S 

Chestnut & Fillmore -:- FI. 6-5253 



SCAVENGERS' PROTECTIVE 
ASSOCIATION 

2550 Mason Street EXhrook 2-3859 

SAN FRANCISCO 

FOSTER & KLEISER 

Outdoor Advertising 
1675 Eddv Street Sail Fraiiciseo 

VERDIE S BAR-B-Q 



2120 Shattuck 



Berkeley., California 



WILSON SANITARIUM 

23-HOUR GENERAL NURSING CARE 

Aged - Bed Patients & Po.st Oper.itivc Cases 

Special Dkls Uhoi Ordered 

1 >26 - 43rd .AVENUE MOntrose 4-8578 SAN FRANCISCO 

Visit the 

PALACE BATHS 

85 - 3rd Street San Francisco 



■iUkon 2-3245 SUltcr 1-9985 

Far EfLst Cafe 

F.imous Chinese Food 

Open from 12 Noon lo 1I:}0 p.m. 

631 GR.ANT AVENUE 

Chin.itown. San Fr.mcisco 



NATIONAL GLOVE &. 
SPORTSWEAR CO. 

Glo\cs and Leather Sportswear 
209 Clay Street S. 



CLYDE E. BENTLEY 

(.onsitltinss Eiifiineer 

405 .S.ANSOME STREET 



Art Davis Truck Repairs 

11— HOW.\RD STREET 
UNderhill 1-6855 San Fr: 



HAVISIDE COMPANY 

E-lahlished I.S-'} 

Marine and Industrial Supplies 

Ship Chandlers. Canvas Goods. Salvage and Derrick Barges 
40 SPEAR STREET EXhrook 2-0064 SAN FR.\NCISCO 5 



Subscribe to The Record 

Keep abreast of civic progress in 
San Francisco and the Bay Area 

CITY-COUNTV RECORD 

389 Church Street 

San Francisco 14, Calilornia 

Please enter my suhscription for the City-County Record fo 
One Year ($5.00) ; for Three Years ($10.00) 

Remittance inclosed 

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Name 

Address - 



FEBRUARY. 1958 



The Owl Rexall Drug store 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 
Drugs - Cosmetics 

16th &. MISSION STREETS 

3rd a: MARKET STREETS 

UN. 1-1004 San Francisco 



H. WENIGER 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 

Acti\-e Hand SC Finger Splints 
Orthopedic Appliances 

70 TWELFTH STREET 

MArkct 1-6876 San Fr^ 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Cerciat French Laundry 
& Dry Cleaners 

1025 McAllister street 



Telephone GAr.'icId 1-8273 

HAAS WOOD AND 
IVORY WORKS 

Cabinet Makers ■ Wood & Ivorv Turnmc 
Manufacturers of All Kinds of Woodwork 

Domestic and Foreign Hardwoods 
64-66 Clementina Street San Francisco 5 



Filbert 
Auto Reconstruction 

Complete Auto Rebuilding 

Auto Painting 

711 Chestnut San Francisco 

TUxcdo 5-2303 



Res. KJ. 7-2145 Free Delivery 

GARNERO'S 
GROCERTERIA 

FINEST OF GROCERIES 

"AT THh RIGHT PRICE" 

544 EXCELSIOR AVE. JU. 4-9993 

At Cot. Naples San Francisco 12 



Albert Engineering, inc. 

Automatic Fire Protection 

371 FOURTH STREET 

YUkon 2-4594 

San Francisco 7, Calif. 



Golden State Mutual 
Life Insurance Co. 

2012 FILLMORE STREET 
JOrdan 7-5787 San Francisco 1' 



FREED'S 
MOCHA COFFEE 



The Ferry Garage 

24 DRUMM STREET 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 



WORLD TRADE CENTER 

Frank K. Runyan was elected 
president of Woi-ld Trade Center, 
Inc., which pioneered creation of 
the World Trade Center, at its fif- 
teenth annual meeting in January. 
Runyan succeeds Olaf C. Hansen, 
manag-ing pai-tner of the interna- 
tional trading firm of Frazar and 
Hansen. Ltd.. one of the prime 
movers of the project in 1943. 

Runyan is one of the founders 
of Western Merchandise Mart, its 
vice president for twelve years, its 
president for ten years, and is now 
its associate manager and consult- 
ant. The Mart has become a focal 
trade market center and attracts 
ovei- 100,000 trade buyers to San 
Francisco annually, the volume of 
Western business cleared through 
the Mart and its associated re- 
sources exceeding a billion dollars 
per year. 

It was felt by the trustees of 
World Trade Center, Inc., that his 
backgi'ound and experience with 
the Mart would be helpful in fur- 
ther developing world trade, of 
which San Francisco is one of the 
major gateways. 

Runyan announced that his first 
objective will be to bring about a 
closer co-ordination of the market- 
ing activities of the Merchandise 
Mart and the World Trade Center. 
He pointed out that the objects of 
both organizations are closely re- 
lated, and close teamwork would 
be mutually beneficial. The Mer- 
chandise Mart, he emphasized, at- 
tracts domestic trade and the 
World Trade Center attracts for- 
eign buyers and sellers to San 
Francisco and the Bay Area. 

The World Trade Center is dedi- 




'That ain't hay, Mr. Mayoi 
poid their important annuo 
a checit for $166,773.69, th 
Left to right: A! Mailloux, 
topher, and Commissioners 



!■■ Four members of the Hoi 
visit to the City Hall and | 
Housing Authority's annual 
vice-ohoirman; Chorles Jung 
Charles Conlan and Jacob 



iing Conr 



She 



Mayor Chri 




Marketing expert Runyo 



Gated to the principle of greater 
international understanding 
through trade, and to this end the 
Center program is geared to pro- 
mote two-way trade through the 
ports of San Francisco Bay. 

Located in the completely mod- 
eiTiized north wing of San Fran- 
cisco's Fen-j' Building at the foot 
of Market Street, the Center pro- 
vides a market place for importers 
and exporters and the sei"vices re- 
quired by those engaged in ship- 
ping and inteiTiational trade. 

BIG TAXPAYER 

The San Francisco Housing Au- 
thority paid its j'early visit to 
Mayor Christopher's office in the 
City Hall recently not in the roll 
of an agency seeking funds, but as 
a ta.xpayer — and one of the city's 
biggest taxpayers at that. 

Accompanied by three other 
commissioners. Chairman Charles 
Jung presented the Housing Au- 
thority's check for $166,773.69, the 
largest payment in lieu of taxes 
made by the Housing Authoiity 
since the conclusion of World War 
II. Being a government agency the 
payments are not technically taxes, 
but payments in lieu of taxes. Ac- 
tually only .t76,965.24 was a con- 
tractural payment made by the 
agency. The remainder, $89,808.45, 
was a voluntary payment over and 
above the conti-actural requiie- 
ment, made by good management 



and general efficiency of the busi- 
ness practices of the Authority. 

As an indication of the propor- 
tions of the Housing Authority 
operation, this yeai-'s check 
brought the total paid into the 
city's treasury' since the first year 
of the public housing operation to 
$4,227,359.64 of which $1,247,711.83 
has been voluntaiy, over and above 
the contractural obligations to the 
city. 

In presenting the check. Chair- 
man Jung told the Mayor that all 
of the Commissionei-s and staff of 
the Housing Authority were grate- 
ful for the full cooperation re- 
ceived at all times from Christo- 
pher. 

"This payment actually does not 
fully represent what the Housing 
Authority retiu-ns to the city," 
Jung said. "Our projects bring a 
higher return in these payments 
in lieu of ta-xes than the same sites 
returned to the city in the form of 
ta.xes before our projects were 
built. In addition we know that 
our projects have brought about a 
decrease in cost of city services 
such as health, fire, police and 
other things that make the exist- 
ence of a slum area a liability and 
not an asset to the city." 

The commissioners accompany- 
ing Jung to the Mayor's office were 
Al Mailloux, Charles L. Conlan and 
Jacob Shemano. 



THE RECORD 



DOWN TOWN PLANS 

Albert E. Schlesinger, new pres- 
lent of the Downtown Association, 
oes not share the fears and dis- 
airitedness of some national Cas- 
uidras. He says: 

"In spite of the highly publi- 
ized nation's current economic re- 
ession. the outlook in 1958 for 
an Francisco and the Bay Area 
i brightened by the fact that we 
liall continue to experience out- 
Landing growth, insuring a high 
?vel of prosperity for business and 
nd the citizenry at large. 

"The Down Town Association, 
.ist having finished its 50th year 
s a major contributor to San 
'rancisco's progress, looks forward 
D 1958 with unprecedented antici- 
ation since the year will see the 
ruition of many impoi'tant undei'- 
ikings in which the Association 
as been in the forefront, includ- 
ig: 

"Completion of the 1000-car gar- 
ge at Fifth and Mission Streets 
nd stai-t of construction of the 
000-car Sutter-Stockton garage. 





Optimist Schlesinger 

"The opening of the season of 
he San Francisco Giants and the 
itart of construction in the new 
itadium at which National League 
james will be played in 1959. 

"Completion of the downtown 
^.irline Bus Terminal at Taylor 

"Completion of the Exhibit Hall 
it Civic Center and start of con- 
itruction of the new Hall of Jus- 
ice. 

"Further development of San 
?^aiicisco International Airport 
ind the Port of San Francisco. 

"Further freeway construction 
md progi-ess in developing rapid 
;ransit plans. 

"There are many serious prob- 
ems facing San Fi-ancisco, but we 
ire certain that these will be solved 
jy facing them squarely. The joint 



Rancher Mailliard 

effort of our public officials, civic 
groups, private industi-y and the 
people generally will assure that 
our beloved City will maintain its 
role as one of the most famous 
and prosperous cities in the world." 

COW PALACE GROWTH 

J. W. Mailliard, III, prominent 
business executive and civic leader, 
has been unanimously elected 1958 
president of the No. 1-A District 
Agricultural Association which op- 
erates the Cow Palace and spon- 
sors the annual Grand National 
Livestock Exposition, Horse Show 
and Rodeo and the Grand National 
Junior Livestock Exposition and 
arena show. 

Mailliard succeeds Wilson Meyer, 
who has served the Association for 
eight and a half years as director 
and for the past two years as pres- 
ident. Meyer had requested to be 
relieved of his duties as President 
of the Board. 

During Meyer's presidency, the 
Cow Palace has grown in national 
stature as headquarters for shows 
and conventions of nearly every 
kind; the annual Grand Nationals 
have been developed to command 
wide acclaim, and the recent Grand 
National livestock auction sales 
brought greater community sup- 
port than ever before. 

Mailliard had been First Vice 
President of the Cow Palace board, 
on which he has served since 1951. 
He is vice president, director and 
sales manager of Mailliard & 
Schmieden, long established San 
Francisco food brokers and im- 
porters. He has served as presi- 
dent of the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce, is a director of 
the American Trust Company and 
California Pacific Title Insurance 
Co. He is also well known as a 
horseman and cattle and sheep 
rancher. 



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(101 Hwy.) Near Golden Gale Bridge 

7 MIN. TO UNION SQUARE Tel. WAInut 1-4980 

Elcv.itor ■ Garages - Phones 

Free TV and Radios - Tile Bathrooms 

Cofnplelely Soundprooj Rooms 

Capt. and Mrs. C Jokstad. On.ifrs and Operators 

2322 LOMBARD STREET San Francisco, Calif. 



CHIP S SERENADE 

SAN BRUNO, CALIFORNIA 

HOME |»,^ 

OF THE "Pi 

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STEAK 

ROAST CHICKEN 

POT ROAST 



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WIRE . . . WIRE PRODUCTS . . . WIRE FENCE 

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Phone VAlenda 6-0167 San Fram-isco 2-1, C.ilifornia 

SHEEDY DRAYAGE CO. 

Crane and Lift Ser\'ice up to 20 Tons 
MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT HAULING 

630 Tennessee Street, near 3rd and Mariposa Sts. 

San Francisco 

W. (BIL L) STATTON Telephone MArket 1-8080 

WESTERN LOOSE LEAF COMPANY 

Printins, Rulinc Jt LithoBraphy 
AccoiinlinB Forms ■ Binders Si IndeNes - Machine Forms &. Equipment — ALSO 

WESTERN MICROFILM COMPANY 

COMPLETE MICROFILM S.\LES 8: SERVICE 
Photocopy Service and Machi: 



1045 SANSOME STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



The Letter Shop 

PAUL i-= DICK SMITH 

67 BEALE STREET 

San Francisco 5, Calif. 

sutler 16564 



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Caesar's ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

The Finest in Food — The Best Wines and Liquors 

LUNCHES DAILY 

— Closed Monday — 

Ba y and Powell Streets — DOuglas 2-1153 — San Francisco. Calif. 

BANCO CORPORATION, LTD. 

BANK CHECK PRINTERS 
Stationers - Specialty Jobbers 
824-836 MONTGOMERY ST. EXbrook 2-1450 
SAN FR.ANaSCO 

THE GEO. H. EBERHARD COMPANY 



182 SECOND STREET 



S.AN FRANCISCO 



Exhrook 2-44-I4 



ALHAMBRA CURTAIN CLEANERS 



480 FIFTH AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



FEBRUARY, 1958 



DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

Any Make or Model Seven Days a Week 
9 A.M. - 10 P.M. FREE ESTIMATES on Antenna Installaric 

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UN. 3-0-93 — Also UN. 3-1836 

Speedometer-Electric Company 

COMPLETE MOTOR TUNE UP - AUTO PARTS 
AUTO RADIO REPAIR 



690 VAN NESS AVENUE 
650 TURK STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 
ORdway 4-4633 



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Notary Public - Public Accountant 
3410 - 25th Street AT. 2-4151 

San Francisco 



IvLINGER & SHAFFER CO. 

CONFECTIONERY EQUIPMENT 

We Buy No.' and Used Equipment 

342 - 5th STREET Phone YUkon 2-5697 SAN FRANCISCO 7 



MOBILE IL4DIO ENGINEERS 

1416 Brush Street 

OAKLAND 12, CALIF. 

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SAN FRANCISCO 9. CALIF. 

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CONTRACTOR . . . BUILDER 

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Wm. Duggan - Edwin J. Duggan - Leonard F. Dugga 

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BOOKS 



ATOMS AND DESTINY 



by Jane Rawson 



.\TOMS AXD PEOPLE 
By Ralph Lapp 

Harper — ,$4.00 

"This discovery begins a new 
era in the histoiy of ci\'11ization. 
It may some day be more revolu- 
tionarj' in the development of hu- 
man societj' than the invention of 
the wheel, the use of metals or the 
steam engrine. Never in history has 
society been confronted with a 
power so full of potential danger 
and at the same time so full of 
promise for the future of man or 
for the peace of the world." 

This quotation used by Dr. Lapp 
is from a statement by a Joint 
Committee of Congress in 1875 
and refers to the Horseless Car- 
riage. It sounds, of course, exactly 
like a quote from a report of the 
Joint Committee on Atomic En- 
ergy, and we can hope that as the 
automobile has been, on the whole, 
an added blessing to contemporar}- 
living so may the atomic discov- 
eries be. 

For the atom age is here. The 
first few shocks and excitements, 
nuclear fission, the Hiroshima 
bomb, Sputnik and Vanguard, al- 
ready belong to historj': moreover, 
the histoiy of a mere two decades. 
For those who want to catch up 
with scientific history since the 
moment even the word atom was 
found to be a misnomer — it comes 
from a Greek root meaning "indi- 
visible" — this is the book. There 
is a clear account of the research 
leading up to the stiiking experi- 
ments of 1938 and 1939. followed 
by chapters on defense uses of 
nuclear energy', the whole sad story 
of the Japanese fishermen and 
radioactive fall-out (Dr. Lapp him- 
self was the scientist who discov- 
ered this ) , and previews and heart- 
ening suggestions as to how atom- 
ic eneig>- can enrich peaceful liv- 



so that in future you can be as he] 
as junior when discussing thes< 
matters with him. 

At a time when society is beinf 
reminded that "eggheads" are not 
only essential, but are also human 
and lovable, this book points up 
these facts, as much as possible, in 
the brief space available ( the booh 
covers less than 300 eas.v-to-read 
pages), by giving engaging hints 
as to the characters of the scient- 
ists. 

People, such as Einstein. Fermi, 
Bohr, whose names are well known, 
and distinguished workers like Lisa 
Meitner whom readers will prob-, 
ably not have met before, take ris- 
ible shape before us. hobbies like 
figure-skating duly noted. Two at- 
tractive ones are Dr. Otto Frisch, 
also a gifted pianist, and Leo Szil- 
ard, one of whose personality traits 
is to enjoy startling people — : 
dom can it have been given to a; 
man to find such satisfaction in his. 
career. Szilard having been con- 
cerned in much of the early work. 
Finall.v, Dr. Lapp is convinced 
that a universal comprehension of 
the full potency of the atom is the 
precondition which will prevent 
nuclear wars. Con\-inced that 
atomic war is global war. an expert 
on fall-out. his words chime with 
a note of wistful hopefulness: 
such knowledge does not deter 
war, then we can only conclude 
that man is a witless creature.' 



Radioactivity is being used as a 
first-class private detective to in- 
vestigate a range of things from 
the working of the human Uiyroid 
gland to the wearing-out of the 
Ford Motor Company's piston 
rings. Those of .vou who visit the 
World's Fair in Brussels this year 
will find the necessary power and 
light for this exhibition provided 
by a Westinghouse Electric nuclear 
machine near the Belgian capital. 
At the back of the book is an in- 
ilu-sive glossary of technical terms. 



THE COinXG C.A£SAKS 
By Aniaury de Riencoiirt 

Coward JloCann — S6.00 

Mr. de Riencourt has made an 
extensive, rather than intensive, 
study of histoiy and his imagina- 
tion and interest have been cap- 
tured b.v many apparent historic 
parallels, for example, that between 
the Persian Empire of Darius, 
"Great King-of- Kings" in the fifth 
centuiy B.C., and the empires of 
the Tsars of all the Russias in six- 
teenth century Eiuope and later. 
He has finally reached the conclu- 
sion that the pattern which gave 
rise to the Caesars of Rome is be- 
ing repeated before our eyes now, 
with America in the role of a con- 
temporary Rome, and its President 
in the role of Caesar. 

The author points out that the 
Roman empire was civilized, rather 
than cultured, giving the mass of 
the people "a sound administration 



THE RECORD 




Id their elites full possibilities of 
ivelopment through the channels 
id within the framework of the 
;w world order." The culture of 
reece was buried to allow the 
ossoniing of the civilization of 
yme. Mr. de Riencourt sees the 
kttern working again — European 
iltine arising from the dawn of 
e Gothic age will give birth to 
merican civilization. In his mind, 
ilture is seen as a dynamic cre- 
ive spirit of the age. civiliza- 
5n as efficient mass organiza- 
3n. practical and ethical, but cul- 
rally sterile. 

Spell-binding is a fascinating 
cupation. Mr. de Riencourt de- 
!lops his theory, which grows and 
oots and flowers like some trop- 
al forest in which the reader is 
apped and held. Historically, 
iwever, the prophet has ever been 
I dangerous ground, with a tend- 
icy to be mesmerized by his own 
ophesying and to overlook some 
lling piece of data. 
Could it not be that the atom 
ce in wliich we are involved par- 
loxically throws civilization back 

the path of culture, by stressing 
e importance of the scientist in 
ir living pattern, for the scientist 
presents culture rather than civ- 
zation ? Also modern mass enter- 
imnent, beyond the range of 
iread and circuses" out into, such 
ograms as "Omnibus" and "Play- 
)use 90," is a factor in promoting 
vareness of art, music, drama 
id literature in the full rich life. 
It is possible that Mr. de Rien- 
lurt cannot see the wood for the 
ees? The emphasis on person- 
ity in politics in the U.S. may be 

simpler phenomenon than the 
ithor of "The Coming Caesars" 
inks. England, for example, has 

long tradition of government 
ith different political principles 
ishrined in opposing political par- 
;s. Therefore, the English citi- 
■n is aware of principle more 



than persons in govertiment when 
Mr. Churchill has handled the cris- 
is of war, principle dethrones him. 

America is younger in political 
tradition: the personality of the 
man chosen to head the party is of 
paramoimt importance, but it does 
not indicate his power when in of- 
fice. I, personally, find it impos- 
sible to see the loose toga of Cae- 
.-Jar in the golf-jacket of Eisen- 
hower, nor do I catch in the recent 
intei-view on TV, a note of authen- 
tic imperial absolutism in Harry 
Truman's answers. 

Whethei- or not the reader is in 
agreement with the author's thesis, 
this book is a colorful review of 
aspects of ancient, medieval and 
modem histoiy. full of interest to 
the layman. Also, when a book 
may come with a vague and sloppy 
table of content, it should be 
noted that this one has a useful 
appendi.x and a startlingly inclus- 
ive and scholarly index. 

KEFLECTION.S ON AMERICA 
By Jacques Maritain 

.Scribners — $3.50 

This book is a report on Amer- 
icans at home by a gi'acious and 
philosophical Frenchman, who has 
lived among us and loved us. M. 
Maritain takes a pretty wide look- 
see. He obsei-ves us at work and 
play, on the campus and in the fac- 
tory, falling in love, marrying, di- 
vorcing. He listens to what we 
have to say about everything from 
sex to the intellectual life. All the 
time he delineates the soft body 
hidden beneath the hard, showy 
outer carapace. 

He finds the underlying reality 
charmingly and flatteringly to our 
credit, and accounts reasonably 
and tolerantly to those who see 
only the outer shell foi- its belying 
appearance. In a particuarly stim- 
ulating chapter, M. Maritain notes 
seven illusions from which he con- 
siders contemporary society, and 
America in particular, suffers. 

Illusion number five is particu- 
larly relevant: "Americans seem 
sometimes to believe that if you 
are a thinker you must be a frown- 
ing bore, because thinking is so 
damn .serious." If you have recent- 
ly been avoiding thought as anti- 
social in this way, M. Maritain's 
book will give you the benefit of 
his reflections and stimulate your 
own, and help you catch the re- 
soimding beat of the contemporary 
American heart. 



Noel Coleman, Public Utilities 
Commission, has announced his in- 
tention to join the Mayors' tour. 
He will be accompanied by his 
wife. 



NASON PAINTS 

Paints for Every 

Household and 

Automobile Purpose 

151 Polrero Avriiiu' 

UN. 1-0480 San Francisco 



LOU FREMY. 
INC. 

Manufacturers" Distributor^ 

DRUGS • COSMETICS 

and 
ALLIED PRODUCTS 

330 Ritch Street 

San Francisco 7, California 
YUkon 6-4526 



Tclephc^nc SL'ttcr 1-4625 

527 CLUB 

Bar and Restaurant 



DOMESTIC AND 

IMPORTED LIQUORS 

PABST ON TAP 

]uc Fuchsl.n - Carl Reichmuth 

Proprietors 

527 Bryant Street 

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Sheet Metal Work 

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• MET.\L GLITTERS 

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I( No Answer Oil BAy^iew 1.8282 



ITALIAN FRENCH 
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Specializing in French Bread dt Rolls 

1501 GRANT AVE. G.^. l-i-lli 

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Phone UNderhill 1-8144 

Jim Bruce Chinese Laundry 

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4624 GEARY BOULEVARD 

Branch at 1112 Taraval LO 4-4410 

Office: B.^vview 1-2353 



The Famous 

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ROASTING INSTRUMENTS 

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Manufacturing Co. 

Ever^thinc (or the Coflee Induserj- 
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i W First Street San Francisco. Calif. 

TiUphom: sutler I-IO-fi - 1-14S0 



CROWN DRUG STORES 

Daly City - Westlake 
355 So. Mayfair Ave. PL. 5-8200 

Lakeshore Plaza 
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Typesetting 

M.ikeup - Reproduction Proofs 
Lockup 

532 S.-\NSOME STREET 
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ASK FOR S &: H GRI I N STA.MPS 

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lltiiilock I-2-4J 

1446 M.\RKET STREET 

San Francisco 



BRUARY, 1958 



FLOOR STYI.es 
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1899 Mission Street 
UN. 1-4646 

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S.in Francisco. C.llif. 



DuvaVs 

STUDIO CLUB 

John :■: Paul 

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Mission 7-9981 



N. MECHETTI Sc SON 

THE GOLD SPIKE 
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All Kinds of Mixed Drink, 
Italian Dinners served Family Style 

527 COLUMBUS AVENUE 
San Francisco GA. 1-9363 



The DOUBLE PLAY 
Cocktail Lounge 

Where Sportsmen Meet 

Pete - Stan - Lee 
STANFEL 

16th and BRYANT STREETS 



HOTEL DE ESPANA 
RESTAURANT 



31-785 Broadway San Francisco 



A. C. Calderonj & Co. 

731 FILBERT STREET 
San Francisco 11. Calif. 

Lemon Juice and 
Bar Supplies 



Moler Barber School 

System of Barber Colleges 

G.I. Approved 

D. E. BROWN, Manager 

161 FOURTH STREET 

GArficId 1-9979 San Francisco 



AUNGER 
COMPANY 

1633 MARKET STREET 

San Francisco 3 

California 



MEMO FOR LEISURE 



Saturday Night Pops proved so 
successful last year that the San 
Francisco Symphony Association 
has increased this year's series to 
four, of which the second is sched- 
uled for March 1. The program 
includes Aaron Copland's Rodeo, 
Britten's Scof(i,s)^ Ballad with two 
pianists, WiUiam Corbett Jones 
and Francis Whang, and the trans- 
cription for orchestra of Bizet's 
Carmen. 

Andre Kostelanetz made music 
news when five years ago, as guest 
conductor of the New York Phil- 
harmonic Symphony, he conducted 
a new series of special Saturday 
night non-subscription concerts in 
Carnegie Hall, since when similar 
concerts have been brought by him 
to San Francisco, Chicago, New 
Orleans and other cities. 

It has been computed that dur- 
ing the last twenty years more mu- 
sic has been discovered by more 
people than since the beginning of 
time. To this development Kostel- 
anetz has contributed perhaps 
more than any other man through 
his recordings and the success of 
his concerts all over the world. 

Our present High Fidelity era 
owes much to his pioneering in the 
field of recording. He is credited 
with being the first to recognize 
the flexibility of the microphone 
set-up, the significance of the mul- 
tiplicity of microphones, and the 
influence of special accoustical 
and atmospheric conditions in the 
recording studio. 

Kostelanetz has been a force for 
the appreciation of the American 
composer. In addition to introduc- 
ing many American compositions 
in other cotmtries. he has commis- 
sioned works by outstanding 
American composers. Among these 
are Aaron Copland's The Lincoln 
Portrait and Jerome Kern's only 
orchestral work, Mark Twain. 

Fortunately for the Kostelanetz 
schedule, he is a flying enthusiast. 
He has received many citations not 
only for a record mmiber of air- 
miles on different commercial air- 
lines, but also for having inaugu- 
rated several new, by now^ well 
established, flights. He was the 
first passenger ever to fly a heli- 
copter — this at the invitation and 
in the company of Eddie Ricken- 
backer. 

Even the fact that a little over 
a year ago he had to make an air- 



plane crash landing in the jungle 
of Cambodia (when he was on his 
way to visit the King of Cambodia, 
who also happens to be a compos- 
er) did not diminish Kostelanetz's 
faith in aeronautics. He also has 
won his pilot license, but admits 
to having been grounded by his 
wife, Lily Pons. 




Music f. 



On her annual cost-to-coast tour 
of the United States, Marian An- 
derson, the great American con- 
tralto, will appear in concert at the 
Opera House on Monday, March 10. 

A perennial maker of headlines. 
Miss Anderson has made news in 
recent months for her extraordin- 
ary tour of India and the Far East 
for the U. S. State Department 
from which she returned in No- 
vember, for the five honorary de- 
grees which she received last 
spring, and for the honors and at- 
tention given her best-selling auto- 
biography, "My Lord, What a 
Morning!" 

In the last four years the artist 
has sung in Japan, Korea, Israel, 
Europe, North Africa and South 
America as well as in the U. S. 
and Canada. In Paris last year her 
concerts were so crowded that the 
critics had to sit on the stairs. So 
great was the reception for her in 
Israel that in gratitude she estab- 
lished a scholarship fund for young 
Israeli vocalists. 

It was in Europe tliat the con- 
tralto first began a career unique 
in musical history. Toscanini. hear- 
ing her in Salzburg, said: "A voice 
like yours is heard once in a hun- 
dred years," In Finland, Sibelius, 



the world-famous composer, ex 
claimed: "The roof of my house i 
too low for your voice!" 

Noel Coward, brilliant actor ant 
author, well known for musicals aj 
well as sophisticated comedies, ii 
cui-rently appearing for the firs- 
time on a West Coast stage in hii 
comedies "Nude With Violin" anc 
"Present Laughter" at the Currat 
Theatre. The plays come here di- 
rect from New York and will givi 
alteniate performances. Noel Cowr 
ard is solo star of "Nude With Vio- 
lin" and in "Present Laughter.' 
glamorous Eva Gabor is co-starred 

"Nude With Violin" is a hilaris 
ous spoof at certain phases of mod 
em art, in which with rapier-likd 
wit Coward frolics through thre< 
acts as a wily "gentleman's gentle-' 
man." Morris Carnovsky. Joyc(J 
Carey and Mona Washbourne aw 
featured. In "Present Laughter," 
Noel Coward portrays a jaded mat- 
inee idol who finds himself amor- 
ously involved with several attrac- 
tive and predatory feminine wor- 
shippers. The Misses Carey andi 
Washbourne are featured in thisj 
one. Coward himself directs botlii 
comedies. 

Author of plays like "The Vor- 
tex" in which he made his Ameri-, 
can debut back in 1925: "Caval- 
cade," "Blithe Spirit," and "Privatel 
Lives," he appeared with Gertrude 
Lawrence in his last American 
stage performance twenty years 
ago in "Tonight at 8:30." 




Sophisticated stog. 



lolden Youth 



Fly-Weight Pilot 
Harold "Brick" Muller 



by Whit Henry 




A short while ago I was reminiscing with an old pal of mine, 
Vinsor Joslyn, and he told me an interesting story of Dr. Harold 
'Brick" Muller — All- America end at the University of California 
b the early iy20's. 

The anecdote relates how Brick's athletic ability kept him from 
leing among " "^ ' -■_»■- 



the first aviation 
asualties at San Diego 

Winsor recalls; 

"Brick was still at the University toS<^ther a 
ieights grammar school and y'"- This 
ihowing his high and broad jump 



Heights was represented by a 

couple of daring young men putting 

hang" glider in their 

A'as a biplane glider 

th a central opening in the lower 



ng ability by breaking the records ^^''"S where the pilot grasped 



hat we other kids set in the inter- 
ichool track meets. A red-headed. 




V 



:% 



^: 



handrails, lifted the glider waist- 
high and ran into the wind until 
he was airborne ... or else. 

"Every afteinoon in the wanu 
months a salt-tangy breeze comes 
up from bay at San Diego and in 
those days it gave promise of sup- 
port to gliders launched on strong 
starting legs. ( You may also recall 
that Prof. John J. Montgomery 
pioneered gliding history at Otey 
Mesa, a handful of miles southeast 
of the Muller flying slope, by being 
borne over 600 feet down a hill in 
controlled motorless flight in 
18831. 



?>« 



This particular vacation aft- 
I'lnoon the builders of the Univer- 
--;ity Heights glider, surrounded by 
ill the kids in the area, lugged the 
slider over to the canyon brow 
near the Muller home. Of course 
Brick was there. He was prac- 
tically a plank-owner, as sailors 
say, in having watched the glider 
grow from its first collection of 
spruce spars, cotton sheeting and 
piano wire. 

"The wind was capricious and 
light, to the fuming" remarks of the 

;rly edge of University Heights builders, neither of whom was a 

vhere the canyons start down to 

.he bay. 



Doctor of the fifties 

mub-nosed, stock y-shouldered, 
ong-legged kid with a wide smile, 
le and his family lived on Yupas 
Street, I think it was, at the west- 



lightweight. Try their aeronautical 
marvel they must, and finally they 

"His father was superintendent decided to' take a flyweight pilot 

)f schools, and his mother a teach- from their admirers. Brick was in 

'.r, as I remember. And it was his the front rank. In fact, he was in 

nother's action one Saturday aft- the glider, squatting between the 

?rnoon that kept him from a spec- handrails as it rested on the long 

Lacular repeat performance as an slope of the brown hillside, the 

!arly glider pilot on the brush-and- warm air aromatic with sage and 

cactus covered sidehill near home. sea. 

"Box-kite gliders were being "'I can fly it! I'm light and can 

juilt in various parts of San Diego run fasti Please let me try, huh. 

-led by Waldo Waterman and his please?' clamored Brick, 

contraptions that were towed "The upshot was that they gave 

iroimd Coronado racetrack in dust him the nod. Eager hands squared 

md splinters — and University the plane into the puffy breeze and 



Athlete of the twenties 

gave it a shove down bay-ward. 
Brick brought the handrails up 
under his arms and pushetl might- 
ily with strong legs. He was away 
down the hill, now on his toes, now 
in the air, now running again. He 
began taking giant jumps and go- 
ing faster and faster over brush, 
cactus and gopher mounds. 

"Nobod.v cared how far he went, 
nor how high. Besides showing 
that the glider had promise, he 
also showed that the legs of man 
made a wonderful landing gear for 
primitive, powerless wings. Brick 
had broad jumped and high jumped 
the machine clear down the canyon 
and across to a thumping landing 
on another canyon slope when the 
wind gave out. He was soon sur- 
rounded by breathless builders, 
juvenile admirers and bug-eyed 
elders. 

"And what was his reward on 
again reaching his homeside hill- 
top, and glowing with desire to use 
his new experience for a flight that 
would really show the countryside 
how to fly? 

"His titian-haired mother, sum- 
moned by a young messenger who 
had told of Brick's takeoff, broke 
through the spectators and 
grabbed the future Dr. Harold 
"Brick" Muller by an arm and led 
him home, giving chapter and 
verse on w^hat she thought of 
crazy flying machines that threat- 
ened children with instant death. 
And what she thought of sonny for 
getting himself into it in the first 
place. 

"Brick, by the way, later did 
some personal high-flying himself 
on those same legs as a member 
of the U. S. Olympic team in 1924 
in Europe and he placed well up 
in the high jump." 



The intense interest shown by 
California officials, both state and 
local, in the California Mayors' 
Goodwill Tour is tantamount to a 
vote of confidence for The Record. 



Mayor Robert Boyd of Willows 
will be a member of the California 
Mayors' Tour. 



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SERVICE 

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Main Office 340 - 7th Street 

1144 HARRISON STREET 

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Cre.itors and Producers of Effective 
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Priming, Lithography, Publications, 
Catalogs, Brochures, Inserts, 



96 JESSIE STREET 

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R. J. "Bob" Dunnigan 

Everything for the Home 

947 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

OR. 3-7990 San Francisco 1 1 



Coast Casket Company 

74 L.ANGTON STREET 
San Francisco. Califorrua 



YAWMAN and ERBE 

OF SAN FRANCISCO, INC. 

50-60 Fremont St. DO. 2-2356 

San Francisco 5. Calif. 



Moler Barber School 

System of Barber Colleges 
G.I. Approved D. E. Brown. Mgr. 

161 FOURTH STREET 
GArfield 1-9979 San Francisco 



NAPOLI MARKET 

Groceries - Vegetables 

Wines - Beer - Liquors 

1756 Stockton Str<?et YV 2-6730 



P. I. Central Cleaners 

DOuglas 2-4210 
683 BROADWAY 



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901 Fillmore St. FBImorc 6-9760 



Gregory Lendaris 

Wholesale Citrus Fruit 

406 FRONT STREET 

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FEBRUARY, 1958 



PUB. LIBRARY PERIODICAL ROOM 

Civic Center CITY 2 

52 X -7/57 (27 Sbs)(3077) 3306 



LARKSPUR 

CONVALESCENT 

HOSPITAL 

For Elderly Chronics and Convalescents 
R.N. and Physical Therapist on Staff 

GRACE SLOCUM, Director 

Special Diet 

Homelike Atmosphere 
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Phone LArkspur 819 

LARKSPUR, CALIFORNIA 



K T K 
WRECKING CO. 



2.S5 Alabama Street KLondike 2-0994 

San Francisco 



875 Monument Blvd . MUlberry 5-7525 

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Road Service 

PARKING SPACE FOR 150 CARS 
Located Across From Civic Auditorium 



TIRES — BATTERIES — ACCESSORIES 

No Down PoymenI - Up to 6 Mot, to Pay 

POLK & HAYES SERVICE 



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"Built Like a Mack'' 

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SAN FRANaSCO 3 

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INSPECTION AND REPAIR INC. 

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Tcniiitc - Fungi - Beetles 

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Established 19 M 
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Kinkade Brake Service 

Offici.ll Brake Station No. 2561 

241 Tenth St., San Francisco IIF. 1-123 1 



fv oria 1 raae ana ine w est i^oasi 

PUBLIC LIBRA RV 
MAR 28 1958 





SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




iOME SECOND THOUGHTS 
DN CITY PLANNING 

'AUL OPPERMANN 

(ORET OF CALIFORNIA 

MURICE HAMILTON 

:herry blossom time 
n golden gate park 

iILL SIMONS 

nJEW TIES WITH OSAKA 



r 



\ 



\ 




Portrait by Hartjook Studios 

PAUL OPPERMAN: SAN FRANCISCO'S GIFT TO CHICAGO 

(S^ Pag. 4| 




MARCH, 1958 







COAST-DAKOTA FLOUR GOi ^ 

151 Bayshorc Bouleva'd San Francisco, California 

QUALITY FLOURS FOR QUALITY BAKERS 
Distributors of 

V-10 BREAD MIX 

The only complete protein in bread. 


JOE'S OF WESTLAKE 

Famous for Charcoal Broiled Steaks and Chops 

Dinner from 11 .i.m. to 12 ,T.m. 

Alemany & Lake Pierced Blvd. 

PLaza 5-7400 

IN SAN FRANCISCO, VISIT 

ORIGINAL JOE'S 

Chestnut 8C Fillmore -:- FI. 6-3233 


The FIM & SCHINDIER CO. 

MANUFACTURING CONTRACTORS 

Slore ■ Office - Church - Bank - Bar a<id Restaurant fixtures 

Cabinet Work - General Alterations - Store Fronts 

LABORATORY EQUIPMENT 
552 BRANNAN STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 7, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone EXbrook 2-1513 


DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

Any Make or Model Seven Days a Week 

9 A.M. - 10 P.M. FREE ESTIMATES on Antenna Installati. n- 

1322 HAIGHT STREET 

UN. 3-0793 — Also UN. 3-1836 


HOTEL HERALD 

Transient - Permanent Rates 

Downtown San Francisco 
EDDY AT JONES 

TUxedo 5-3151 
JAMES ti BARBARA MURRAY, Managers 


ANDREASSEN & CO., INC. 

YUkon 6-0518 

205 Driinmi Street 

San Francisco 


VALENTE MARINI PERATA & CO. 

— Funeral Directors — 

With Over 60 Years of Distinctive Service 
Tryo Modern Funeral Homes Centrally Located 

4840 MISSION 

Near Onondaga Ave. - Phone DEIaware 3-0161 

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Near Columbus Ave. — Phone DOuglas 2-0627 


Venturi-Rey Golf Shop 

FRED VENTURl :-: JOEY REY 

Harding Park Golf Course 


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Dislinclire Sports & Golf Dear 
Lessons by P.G.A. Professionals 


Everybody, Just Everybody 
Has Fun in Our Gag Department 

Comic Greeting Cards, Jokes, Hilarious Gifts for Christmas P.nrtics, 
Office Parties, Home Entertainment and Rumpus Rooms 

SEA CAPTAIN'S CHEST 

Fisherman's Wharf 

Corner Taylor and Jefferson 


THE BAXTER CO. 

Manufacturers Representatives 

101 Kansa^s Street 
MArket 1-8636 San Francisco 3, Calif. 


2 THE RECOIl 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 



KENNETH H, ALLEN 
ALAN P. TORY 



PUBLISHER 
EDITOR 



Published af 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-12 12 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 

VOLUME 25 NUMBER 3 

MARCH, 1958 



B^^nWINDOW 



LETTERS 



The San Francisco Police Department 
lust have been very busy making 44,509 
rrests in four months preceding the end of 
ne revolving door policy. I would vote for 
iving our cops a raise in pay if they were 
s energetic as that. 

Richard Berg 

945 Golden Gate Ave. 

San Francisco 

Ell. — 0/ir mistake. This was the number 
f arrests for driinkentiess over twelve months. 

You are to be complimented on the in- 
roduction of a monthly "Off the Record" 
artoon which I find always up-to-the-minute 
nd amusing. 

Anita Samsel 
516 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 



Your book reviews, always timely, reached 
high spot in February with a most inter- 
sting combination of books on atoms, poli- 
cs, and American mores of special contem- 
orary interest, treated with perspicacity and 
reshness. Keep up the good work. 
Dora Miller 
\^22 Shatter Street 
San Francisco 

Why can't you find something cheerful for 
our cover picture instead of that depressing 
loseup of a jailor turning the key? 
Otis Wike 
1840 - 15th Street 
San Francisco 



Your last cover was the most striking and 
ramatic yet — an apt pictorial comment on 
le excellent Carberry story. 

William Sparke 
47 De Wolf Street 
South San Francisco 



FOR THE RECORD: Our feature article 
this month by Paul Oppcrmann, who for 
the last nine years has been Director of 
Planning for the City and County of San 
Francisco, is a swan song which will com- 
mand the ears of all believers in Bay Area 
progress. He points out ( sec page 4 ) what 
has been done, what yet needs to be done, 
and specifies in what ways the tools of gov- 
ernment could be improved. 

Our warm good wishes go with this orig- 
inal and creative public servant on his de- 
parture for Chicago on March 24, where he 
will become Executive Director N.E. Illinois 
Metropolitan Area Planning Commission. He 
goes to one of the biggest planning jobs in 
the country, which covers an area stretching 
from the Wisconsin border on the north to 
the Indiana border on the south, and extend- 
ing a long way from Lake Michigan to the 
west. Sixty per cent of the people of the 
State of Illinois live in this area. 



PACKING FOR CHICAGO: The press, 
which has often twitted Paul Opper- 
mann for his proneness to travel, will be 
curious to note whether this globe-trotter 
who does his own packing will for the final 
leave-taking journey repeat in some form an 
omission he committed on a Yosemite ex- 
pedition last December. His wife and daugh- 
ters Kyra and Paula, elegantly turned out for 
the famous Christmas Bracebridge Dinner, 
were horror-struck to find that the much 
traveled head of the family had carefully 
brought all the appurtenances of black tie 
respectability except the all-important tuxedo. 
Thus the women of the Oppermann clan 
advanced in glamorous distinction towards 
the banquet hall, while Paul followed at a dis- 



tance in a tweed coat. What, we wonder, will 
he leave behind on March 24 as a sub- 
conscious token of his nostalgic aflfection for 
San Franciscor' 



JAPANESE TEA GARDEN: The new con- 
cessionaire of Golden Gate Park's famed 
Japanese Tea Garden, Shotara Yasuda, was 
an Oakland florist when, together with other 
West Coast Japanese, he was ordered into a 
relocation camp during the war. And like 
many another, he returned to find his business 
gone. 

But his wife was a fine cook — so they 
opened a small sukiyaki house. This venture 
proved so successful that it expanded into 
the flourishing Jefferson Street restaurant, 
Tokyo Sukiyaki on Fisherman's Wharf. For 
the story of Yasuda's latest enterprise, see Bill 
Simons' article on page 9. 



■Wjr^'ORLD TRADE: Our story on the es- 
»▼ tablishing of reciprocal relations be- 
tween Osaka and San Francisco ( page 7 ) 
fits into the picture envisaged by the World 
Trade Club which will be located in the 
World Trade Center for Northern Califor- 
nia. New Orleans has demonstrated over the 
last ten years the value of an International 
House and International Trade Mart in build- 
ing that port's record in dollar value and 
cargo tonnage. There are happy signs as Mr. 
George Killion points out of progress stimu- 
lated by our two-year-old World Trade Cen- 
ter which now includes 17 foreign nations 
in its directory, and is within 10% of full 
occupancy. It offers tenants valuable services 
from counselling to translation and inter- 
pretation of interviews. 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 




LETTERS 


3 


BAY WINDOW 


3 


CIVIC PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS 


4 


by Paul Oppermann 




WOMAN OF THE MONTH: STEPHANIE KORET 


5 


by Maurice Homilton 




JAPANESE TEA GARDEN 


9 


by Bill Simons 




BOOKS: TWO RESEARCH REPORTS 


13 


by Jane Rawson 




WORLD TRADE NEWS 


6 


DIRECTORY 


6 


SAN FRANCISCO-OSAKA AMITY 


7 


PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 


14 



lARCH, 1958 



A Salute, a Summary, and 
Some Second Thoughts 



Civic Problems 
And Prospects 



by Paul Oppermann 



IN TAKING my leave, after nine years, of 
the San Francisco community and the Bay 
Area, both of which I hold in great affection, 
many friends including Editor Alan Tory have 
suggested some departing comments. I am 
not unwilling, though time in clearing my 
desk and getting ready for the new assign- 
ment obviously is in short supply! 

This is a good time and place to say again 
that San Francisco is fortunate in its Planning 
Commission — to a man and to a woman! 
Roger Lapham, Jr. is an outstanding Planning 
Commission President — a real civic leader 
v.-ith imagination and courage. If there were 
space in this place I would salute as well each 
of his colleagues on the Commission, individ- 
ually. Each deseri'es it. 

The city planning office has a remarkably 
fine staff. I could not be more pleased to 
know that the Commission has selected Jim 
McCarthy, Chief of the Land Planning Divi- 
sion, as helmsman on the next leg of the 
course. 

I am leaving the work program in good 
order. However, the budget is wholly in- 
adequate to do the job that needs to be done. 
Within its restrictions of personnel, and funds 
to operate, however, I am confident a good 
job within the limits set will be done. 

What has been accomplished to date? A 
brief account must suffice. 

San Francisco has a Master Plan equal to 
the best. The city's growth and development 
is being shaped and guided by the San Fran- 
cisco Master Plan towars greater order, better 
coordination of public improvements and pri- 
vate developments, and toward an increase 
of urban attractiveness. A city naturally so 
beautiful must enhance its gifts with the 
handiwork of man. 

It is a hard and wearing struggle to achieve 
this, but enough, or almost enough citizens 
are at long last aware of the many serious 
threats to its aesthetic character, present and 
future, to get on the march. A sequence of 
steps they must support might be indicated: 
more stress on good design of homes, office 
buildings, shops, yes even factories. 

There are good examples already to be fol- 
lowed. Selection of architects to achieve the 
best standards is possible here. No other part 
of the country can surpass or even equal us in 
architects, or masters of site and land devel- 
opment skill. But even good design of land 
and buildings is not enough. Poles and wires. 




outsize signs, billboard and street clutter must 
be done away with, or properly regulated, 
before they "do to death" the charm and in- 
tetest of our city. 

We have not always "put our best foot 
forward." We must live a long time with 
the unworthy results. One example: Market 
Street. 

The Golden Gate Park and the Golden 
Gate Bridge are masterpieces. They need 
only to remain inviolate and protected in 
perpetuity. The Sunset Community Center 
should be completed, its high qualify design 
objectives not lost in the shuffle. McLaren 
Park can be a tremendous asset, in a part of 
the city that deser\'e it, or it can be frittered 
away. A good design has been made by the 
planning and parks departments, and it should 
be well executed. 

Bayview Park, in an area which has not 
reached its full development, should be given 
the benefit of an overall design and a long 
range development program. In fact the en- 
tire area from south of Hunter's Point to the 
county line should have a well conceived plan 
prepared for its future, and its near-future, 
development, a coordinated land use area 
plan. 

This is urgently necessary so the Giants' 
Stadium will be the asset that it could be to 
that section of the city. Industrial develop- 
ment on the adjacent tidelands should be well 
planned, and the Bayview district residential 
development given a buffer, so that both types 
of development will live harmoniously and 
peacefully adjacent to each other. 

The San Francisco Master Plan provides 
an excellent basis and guiding framework for 
the important developments mentioned above, 
and for a great many others. 

The controversial freeway program will re- 
quire wise and sensible handling. The Master 
Plan has a Trafficways Section, including free- 
ways, adopted after public hearings in 1951. 
The City-Wide Land Use Plan adopted two 
years later, in conjunction with the traffic- 
ways scheme, provides a long range guide to 
innumerable public improvements and facili- 
ties. 

The city's schools, its parks and recreation 
areas, the branch libraries, the firehouses, high- 
way and street changes and many others too 
numerous to specify, have been built to the 
standards and for the community purposes 
indicated in the San Francisco Master Plan. 



Future developments over many years like- 
wise will have this guidance and its benefits. . 

The numerous plans and the technical as- 
sistance of the Department of City Planning , 
have proved fruitful in the development of : 
every district and neighborhood, for example, 
the Lake Merced area and the large number 
of neighborhoods of the West of Twin Pe.iks 
section of town. 

Park Merced and Stonestown are only two 
examples of high qualin'. well-designed pri- 
vate development which the cit)' planning, 
office has guided and aided. Even more signi- 
ficant are the thousands upon thousands of 
single family homes protected and proNiJcd 
with public structures and services of r 
kinds. 

"Modernizing Downtown San Francis- . 
issued early in 1955, set the stage and pro-, 
vided some of the stimulus needed, to raise 
the sights in .'enewing the central business , 
district, so vital to the economy, and to pros- 
perity of all citizens. Excellent new buildings , 
have been completed in recent years. More' 
starrling and even more important changes 
are in prospect, as the old, run-down whole- 
sale produce market is redeveloped on thei, 
lines laid down for the Golden Gateway — I 
a unified design for new office buildings and ; 
downtown walk-to-work apartments, in a spa- 
cious setting. And, happily, the most exciting 
civic design in the country is the proposed 
Ferr)' Park. 

Mario Ciampi's striking architectural con- 
ception, harmonized with the Master Plan 
scheme for downtown and the waterfront, 
will be, I freely predict, an enormous source 
of pride to all San Francisco and to the Bay 
Area. It will be a thrilling sight for the mil 
lions who visit the city in the years ahead 
and a tourist attraction of world-wide inter- 
est. It will greatly aid in pouring tourist 
money into San Francisco in a golden stream. 
It must not be permitted to fail! 

The urban renewal program is too impor- 
tant to permit it to fail. It is vital to the pri- 
vate business economy of the community and 
because of the magnitude of the tax income 
it will return to the city. It should no' 'v 
permitted, as those of limited vision 
pinch-penny logic intend, to grind to .i ^ 
Our broad gauge business leaders and in 
forward-looking communitj'-wide and ncmh- 
boring groups of San Francisco have seen iht 
(Continued on Page 10 i 



THE RECORD 



Ionian of the Month 



KORET OF CALIFORNIA 



oy Maurice Hamilton 

-THESE DAYS the ■California Look" in 
-"■ fashions is generally known all over the 
vorld. But it hasn't always been that way, 
ind the person responsible for bringing a 
listinctively Caiifornian style to the attention 
)f the rest of the world is a bright, vivacious, 
inergetic and thoroughly charming woman, 
vfrs. Stephanie Korct. 

Mrs. Koret and her husband Joe are the 
ounders and owners of the now internation- 
illy known Koret of California, and it has 
)een through their efforts and talents that 
ian Francisco has become the home of fashion 
eadership in the field of women's sportswear. 

The story goes back to 1924 when Steph- 
anie Koret married a young traveling sales- 
nan. At that time Joe was on the road with 
everal different lines of women's sweaters, 
ihortly after their marriage she joined him as 
lis assistant, helper, model and general handy- 
voman. It soon became apparent to Joe's 
lustomers that his attractive young wife had 
ome oxellent ideas when it came to colors, 
tyling and design of women's clothes. ' Peo- 
)le began to ask my opinion," Mrs. Koret 
remembers, "and before long I discovered 
that they were taking my advice and putting 
rny ideas into practice. " 

With the discovery of this latent talent, 
iteplianie Koret decided to develop it, so she 
eft the road to take a course at the Fashion 
Vrt School in San Francisco. The school has 

Off the Record 




Say you decide to stoy home and mow the lo 
vlARCH, 1958 



long since disappeared but Mrs. Koret credits 
it with being partially responsible for her 
leadership in the design field today. Her talent 
for design was soon discovered by the director 
of the school, who offered Mrs. Koret a 
tuition-free scholarship to continue her studies 
there; however her personal circumstances 
dictated that she return to selling on the 
road witth her husband. The crash and de- 
pression had made a shambles of their fi- 
nances and it was all the two of them could 
do to keep their heads above water. 

All the time, however, Stephanie Koret 
was counting on the day when she and Joe 
would go into business for themselves. It 
was in 19.t8 that they decided to take the 
chance. A chance it was too, because the de- 
pression was still being felt all over the land 
and the clothing business, like every other, 
was feeling the pinch. Actually Mrs. Koret 
made the break by herself, after she and Joe 
decided that he should stay on the road sell- 
ing while she attempted to set up the busi- 
ness. It wasn't easy. "We'd lost everything 
but an insurance policy," Mrs. Koret .says, 
"so we had to borrow on that to make the 
step." 

She was the entire company: designer, cut- 
ter, seamstress, model, saleswoman, book- 
keeper, and janitor. The hours were long; 
the returns — at first — were meagre. Then 
came a thrill she still remembers, the day 
she hired her first model. Soon afterwards she 
was able to hire a salesman and Koret of 
California was on its way. 

At just about that time. Joe came in off 
the road and went to work ar the plant. At 
that point they were doing everything con- 
nected with the clothing but the actual 
manufacturing, which was contracted out to 
other firms (a practice nor uncommon in 
the clothing industry ) . Stephanie Foret re- 
calls spending seven days a week, eighteen 
hours a day making sure that the shipments 
got out on time. The firm grew to include a 
bookkeeper, two salesmen, and a model, and 
everyone pitched in at night after a hard 
day of showing and selling garments, to work 
several hours at packing and wrapping the 
merchandise. 

Koret of California could have gone along 
for years being just another clothing firm but 
for the talent of Mrs. Koret. As a designer 
she was always attempting to put something 
just a little different on the market. She suc- 
ceeded with a bang, the echoes of which are 
still being heard today. It was a pleated skirt 
with a drawstring arrangement, called the 
"Trick Skirt," that first brought fame to the 
company. The skirt could be stored without 
danger of creasing or losing the pleats, and 
today, some eighteen years after it was first 
introduced, Koret of California still gets mail 
addressed simply to Trick Skirt, California. 




Stephanie and Joe took a ch 



The trick skirt was followed shortly by 
the first permanently pleated skirt that was 
completely washable, and by the first of the 
miracle fabrics, known as Tubynel. These 
fabrics and processes were arrived at through 
research sponsored by Koret of California 
and carried out in cooperation with chem- 
ists at the University of California in Berke- 
ley. 

When you ask Mrs. Koret why her cloth- 
ing is so successful, she tells you without 
hesitation that it is the simplicity of its 
design combined with the fit and finish of 
the garments that keeps her customers com- 
ing back again and again. She won't take 
credit for setting fashion trends: she leaves 
that to the Paris and New York designers. 
She looks upon her job as that of an inter- 
preter. She tries to modify current high 
fashion so that it adapts itself to the demands 
of her particular clothing, so that there's 
something of Stephanie Koret in each gar- 
ment that goes out with the Koret of Cali- 
fornia label. Thar this approach has been 
eminently successful is attested to by the fact 
that at the present time the company employs 
over a thousand people, has five sales offices 
in the United States, seven manufacturing 
plants, and sales representatives on five con- 
tinents. 

In spite of such expansion, Stephanie Koret 
has managed to maintain the kind of per- 
sonal and professional graciousness that must 
be the envy of all her competitors. Although 
her firm is a large one, each employee is per- 
sonally important to its operation and is 
encouraged to develop ideas and suggestions. 

Although both Mrs. Koret and her hus- 
band arc still very active in running the 
business, the eighteen hour days are a thing 
of the past. They maintain a beautiful two- 
story home in the Seacliff district of San 
Francisco and it's there that they spend much 
of their leisure time, Joe working in the gar- 
den, Stephanie reading, watching television, 
and enjoying herself working out new design 
ideas. 

And although Stephanie and Joe Koret 
are owners of a multi-million dollar com- 
pany, a company that's known all over the 
world, they make sure that their organization 
retains its heart. The heart it had when 
-■Stephanie Koret was doing e\crything her- 
self. 



DIRECTORY 



HONDURAS CONSUL GENERAL 
Francesco Lopez 



461 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



CONSULATE GENERAL OF ITALY 
Dr. Pierluigi Alvera, C.G. 



2590 WEBSTER STREET 

San Francisco, Califomt; 



WEst 1-4924 



CONSULATE-GENERAL OF JAPAN 
Akira Nishiyama 

Consul General 
346 California Street YU 2-0780 San Fr; 



CONSLXATE GENERAL of SWITZERLAND 
August Ochsenbein, C.G. 



55 NEW MONTGOMERY 

San Francisco, Califon 



EXbrook 2-7118 



JAPAN TRADE CENTER 

GENZO MAEZAWA 

Executive Director 
531 SUTTER STREET DOuglas 2-0915 

Room 103, World Trade Center, San Francisco, Calif. 

WORLD TRADE CENTER 



FERRY BUILDING 



F. E. MARSH, Director 
F. E. FELIZ, Manager 

San Francisco, California 



DOuglas 2-0701 



GEORGES TREMEL 
French Government Tourist Office 

323 GEARY STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

ITALIAN STATE TOURIST OFFICE 

GIOVANNI BENTIVOGLIO, Direcior 

ST. FRANCIS HOTEL EXbrook 2-6206 

San Francisco, California 

JAPAN TOURIST ASSOCIATION 

TAKEO KURIHARA, Manager 

651 MARKET STREET EXbrook 2-6640 

San Francisco, California 

TURKISH INFORMATION OFFICE 

347 Stockton Street 

SUtcr 1-7375 San Francisco, California 




WORLD TRADE NEWS 



Plans for the new World Trade 
Club to be located in the World 
Trade Center for Northern Cali- 
fornia in San Francisco were pre- 
sented on March 3rd by George 
Killion, club president, and presi- 
dent of American President Lines, 
at a luncheon meeting of promi- 
nent Bay Area business and world 
trade leaders held in the club's' 
future site in the Center. 

The World Trade Club will he 
located in the new two and one 
half million dollar Center building 
and will be the first organization 
of its type dedicated to world 
trade, travel and international af- 
fairs to be established in the west- 
em United States. 

The club will occupy fifteen 
thousand square feet with hand- 
some facilities on the Center's 
third floor commanding a pano- 
ramic view of the San Francisco 
Bay. Architects Robert Anshen, 
Stephen Allen and William G. 
Merchant have completed prelim- 
inary sketches of the clubrooms. 
including a spacious dining room, 
lounge, conference rooms and 
other facilities and services re- 
quired for an hospitable meeting 
place between businessmen of Bay 
Area ports' commerce and over- 
seas nations. 

Mr. Killion previewed the club's 
purpose and plans for the gather- 
ing with the following comments: 

"It is significant that this new 
club be organized as a meeting 
place for men of good will in in- 
ternational commerce, finance and 
transportation at the same time 
that our harbor region attained 
the one billion dollar world trade 
level for the first time in its his- 
tory. The successful progress of 
the World Trade Center since its 
opening less than two years ago 
augurs well for the future of the 
new World Trade Club which will 
enhance tlie Center's program with 
its facilities and services contrib- 
uting to a hospitable climate tor 



conferences, parleys and business 
negotiations. | 

"The benefits to be derived fromi 
membership in the new World ( 
Trade Club will undoubtedly in- 
crease through the passage of the 
years. The prestige and profit- 
able returns from club member- 
ship will serve to bring its Bay; 
Area sponsors into the \ital orbit ' 
of worldwide commerce, travel andi 
international affairs." 

It was pointed out that a sim- 
ilar International House and Inter- 
national Trade Mart at New Or- 
leans has been highly successful i 
in building the port's record in dol- 
lar value and cargo tormage in' 
world trade over the past 10 years. 

MAY CELEBRATION 
San Francisco's annual Golden 
Gate Trade Week. May 18-21. uill 
salute the "one billion dollars' 
worth of world trade through thet 
Golden Gate in 1957." the first ' 
time in history, according to Ed- 
ward P. McCall. general chairman 
of the event. 

A new feature of this year's ob- 
servance will be an international | 
aviation breakfast, highlighting / 
the growing importance of air i 
freight in world trade: a special I 
salute to the merchant marine and I 
to land transportation and inter- 
national communications, as well ' 
as a reception by foreign flag 
carriers. 

The traditional international 
trade and travel e.xhibition: civic 
ceremonies in the historic Ferry 
Building and in Golden Gate P.irk; 
the annual world trade limcheon 
honoring Consular Coi-ps and of- 
ficial economic representation- 
other nations, and an intei'ti.i: 
al banquet and ball will roun! 
the week-long celebration. 



Do you have relatives in Kvi- 
rope? No? Friends then? Let's 
visit them on the California May- 
ore' Tour sponsored by the Record. 



THE RECORD 



IK) major Pacific ports join hands 
I sisit-r city protiram symholizinsi 
I'll relations in trade and culture 
■III con Calif ornians and Japanese 



SAN FRANCISCO- 
OSAKA AMITY 




jN FRIDAY moiTiing, March 7, 
' the "City of San Francisco" 
ik to the skies en route for 
kyo. to return on March 16. 
npleting the inaugural flight of 
jan Air Lines' new fleet of DC- 
's. Mayor and Mrs. George 
ristopher attended the "bon 
."age" reception for more than 
U. S. news writers making the 
;:it. 

»I~s. Christopher had christened 
; gleaming new Super Courier 
■lier. At that time Yoshito Ko- 
la, JAL vice president in charge 
its American Region, said, "It 
fitting that the first of JAL's 
V fleet be named after this won- 
•ful city, which has extended us 
:h hospitality, encouragement, 
listance." 

ulayor Christopher responded 
saying that the City of San 
mcisco is proud to have its 
Tie carried throughout the great 
ies of the Pacific by the splendid 
L plane. 

This exchange of compliments 
)ifies the close and cordial rela- 



tionships growing stronger each 
year between San Francisco and 
Japan. 

Another evidence is that under 
leadership of their two friendly 
and trade-minded mayors, San 
Francisco and Osaka. Japan — 
5.000 miles apart on opposite 
shores of the vast Pacific — have 
adopted each other as "sister 
cities." 

Next month Osaka will entertain 
thousands of visitors from all over 
the world at the Japan Interna- 
tional Trade Fair April 12-27 and 
the Osaka International Festival 
of Arts April 10 - May 10. 

Mayor Christopher recently ap- 
pointed Phillips S. Davies general 
chairman of the San Francisco- 
Osaka Town Affiliation Commit- 
tee, and Mr. Davies plans to visit 
Osaka and attend its Trade Fair 
as a member of the second annual 
Business Development Tour of 
Eastern Asia sponsored by the 
San Francisco Chambei' of Com- 
merce and the San Francisco Area 
World Trade Association. The vis- 




istening the "City of San Fmncisco"- 
ma. Consul General of Japan Akir 
istopher. (Cuts courtesy of Pacific Co 



-left to right: JAL Vic 
3 Nishiyoma. Mayor 



I President Yoshito 
and Mrs. George 



Ml 



it to Osaka will be the first and 
most important event of the tour, 
and the San Franciscans will be 
received officially and entertained 
as sister-city representatives. 

Mr. Davies. formerly a San 
Francisco banker, is vice presi- 
dent of E. W. Axe & Co.. a large 
New York firm of investment 
counselors v\'ith offices in the Russ 
Building. He is a director of the 
Golden Gate Bridge and Highway 
District and active in many civic 
matters. 

Mr Davies is keenly enthusiastic 
over the sister-city program. 

"The number of things San 
Francisco and Osaka have in com- 
mon is amazing." he says. "Both 
are major Pacific ports— both are 
commercial cities — both are fa- 
mous theatrical centers." Mr. 
Davies was interested especially 
to know that Osaka h?.s five ma- 
jor baseball teams — a fact that 
San Francisco has recognized by 
a gift of Willie Mays bats and 
autogiaphed baseballs from the 
San Francisco Giants to each of 
the five, the Osaka Tigers, the 
Xankai Folks, the Ilanshin Braves. 
the Kintetsu Pearls, and the Nish- 
itetsu Lions. The baseballs v.e' c 
lutographe:' by Walter "Tl'c 
Great" Mailc and Frank "Lefty" 
ODoul. 

Osaka, a city of about three 
million, iz on; of the oldest clt eo 
in Japan — it was the home of eany 
eriperors in the third and faurth 
ce.nturies — anc* a ■ji-eat incIusLr'r.l 
and commercial ce.itcr. It is cred- 
ited with be nj the :;o!-ie and I'.o.-.rt 
of the Japanese drama. 

In o-:'e:- to cstablc!) rccr'ioc^! 
relat'ons on ?11 levels and in .-s 
nnny field 3 as possible — cor.mie:- 
c-al. pr; f i::3;onal. cur.U'.vl. ed,> 
cv'.ional — t:ie Tov.-n /JT laton 
Committees ;n San FrancEco ."."d 
Osaka wU have a parallel mem- 
bei-ship. and the opposite members 
will communicate directly with 
each other. 



s. George Christopher chats with Jopon 
Air Lines' stewardess Solado Olruro 



The membership roster ranges 
from Chsimber of Commerce pres- 
idents to Rotary Clubs and Boy 
Scouts, and includes UNESCO 
groups. YM and YWCA's. wom- 
en's organizations, youth groups. 
PTA's. industrial and commercial 
associations from banks to depart- 
ment stores, factories and shipping 
fimis. newspapers and airlines and 
television executives. 

"As leaders of these diverse 
groups write or visit each other 
and discuss their mutual interests 
person-to-peraon. we foresee op- 
portunities to exchange informa- 
tion, organize mutual activities, 
and help solve mutual pi-oblems," 
Mr. Davies says. "I hope we can 
establish such a liaison that it 
will become a symbol for an equal- 
ly -close relationship between the 
entire American and Japanese 
peoples." 

The San Francisco-Osaka affili- 
ation began just a year ago, when 
on April 29. 1957. the San Fran- 
cisco Board of Supei-visors - in- 
spired by President Eisenhower's 
great people-to-people movement 
— adopted a resolution favoring it. 
This foi'mally was presented to 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 



Pdio Alto, S.in Fri 



and Iqnacio. Calif, 




San Francisco and Japanese leoders shared in the lighting of 
tune at the opening of the Japan Trade Center's new quarters 
Genzo Maezawo. executive director of the Japan Trade Center; 

Michisub Sugi, president of the Osaka Chamber of Cr "" 

Mayor Christopher's absence; E. D. Moloney, Chombt 

of Japan; James P. Wilson, secretary of the San Francisco , 

tours to Japans Intcrnotional Trade Fairs in Osoka and Toky( 



of Co 



3 ceremonial lantern t, 
at 531 Sutter Street 
G. L. Fox, Chamber 
and Industry; James 



J. Su 



I World Trade Association 



Nishiy 
»hlch ! 



ir. Left to right ore 
•ce general manager; 
acting mayor during 
■mo. Consul General 
Donsors business men's 



How well 

do you knoiv 

San Francisco? 




Even most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends; 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous drivefguides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares arc surprisingly 



UDriy 




Charter Buses 
available 



Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
YUkon 6-4000 



Osaka officials by a personal rep- 
resentative of Mayor Christopher 
during the first annual Business 
Development Tour of Eastern Asia 
last year. The Mayor's represent- 
ative was received and entertained 
with great cordiality and official 
ceremonies. 

During the 90th anniversary of 
the modern port of Osaka in Octo- 
ber, the City of Osaka officially 
confirmed the affiliation in a color- 
ful public ceremony, and last fall 
Mayor Mitsuji Nakai and three 
other members of the Osaka muni- 
cipal government visited San Fran- 
cisco. A reception was given for 
them in Mayor Christopher's of- 
fice. 

Later, Michisuke Sugi, presi- 
dent of the Osaka Chamber of 
Commerce and Industry, spoke at 
a luncheon given in his honor by 
the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce and World Trade Asso- 
ciation to celebrate the sister-city 
tie. 

Genial Mr. Sugi is well known 
in San Francisco, having visited 
here several times as the head of 
the Japan External Trade Recov- 
ery Organization (JETROl which 
operates the Japan Trade Center 
at 531 Sutter Street, with a Mer- 
chandise Division and showroom 
in the 'World Trade Center in the 
Ferry Building. 

The Japan Trade Center is one 
of the leading agencies in San 
Francisco dedicated to promoting 
trade and friendship between Jap- 



an and the United States. Its 
executive director, Genzo Mae- 
zawa, is an Osaka man whose en- 
tire career has been in intei-na- 
tional trade. 

It is a picturesque, inviting 
place — typically Japanese in arch- 
itecture and decoration — where 
thousands of visitors come each 
year to see the colorful quality 
products which Japan exports to- 
day. These are shown in a con- 
tinuous, ever-changing series of 
exhibits which in a year range 
from arts and crafts to machinery, 
fish and tea. 

Exhibits are dramatized by liv- 
ing demonstrations. This month's 
food show, for example, featured 
demonstrations of Japanese cook- 
ing by the chef of the famed Yam- 
ato Sukiyaki House, Joe Ishizaki, 
which were attended by home eco- 
nomists of the entire Bay Area. 
For the last annual Japan Silk 
Show, designers of the distin- 
guished San Francisco Fashion 
Group created exciting and lovely 
original costumes made of Jap- 
anese silks, which were modeled 
in daily fashion promenades dur- 
ing the entire exhibition. The 
glamour and interest of such at- 
tractions stimulates trade by dem- 
onstrating practical western vises 
for Japanese imports and featin-- 
ing their decorative charm. 

Since the Japan Trade Center 
was opened in 1954, imports from 
Japan through the Port of San 
Francisco (and Bay Area portsi 
have more than doubled, and ex- 



ports to Japan have incre;i-' 
nually. 

Because Japan lives on ;; 
ing economy, her ability to inipo 
is limited by her ability to expor 
and her intensive export prom 
tion is an almost desperate effo ' 
to establish a better balance in h- 
two-way trade, especially with tl 
United States. 

Both ways, a major part of tl 
trade flows through the Port 
San Francisco, which thereto 
shares Japan's interest in increa 
ing it. Japan is her best custome 
Bay ports handle far more trai 
— both export and import — wii 
Japan than with any other coin 
try. 

In 1954. imports from Japs 
were under $20-million. The Ja 
an Trade Center was opened ( 
November 30. The next year the 
increased more than $6-million; 
and in 1956, nearly $15-millM 
more. 

These are the figures: 

IMPORTS EXPOR''i 
( from Japan ( to Japat 

1954 S19.421.974 S 94.772,1, 

1955 25.864.155 104.723,1 

1956 40,516,712 105.644,4' 
»1957 29.477,341 99.384,8; 

« (8 months — Jan.-Aug. only- 
latest figures available.) 

San Francisco always has hi 
unusually close associations vn- 
Japam. As the historic "Gatewi' 
to the Orient," it has been a ma 
port of entrj- for Japanese gooc 
Japanese immigrants, students ai 
visitors; and the main take-< 
point for United States expor- 
and travelers — traders, tourist 
officials, missionaries, joui-nalist 
and all the varied Americans hea- 
ed Far East. 

It now has a Japanese popiil 
tion of about 7,000 — and with 
its trade area are several thovisai 
more. 

On July 1, 1950, the Japane 
government re-established reli 
tions in San Francisco by openii 
a Japanese Overseas Agency whi 
became the Consulate General 
Japan in April 1952, immediate 
after the San Francisco-sign: 
Peace Treat.v went into effect • 
March 28. By December 1953 t 
Consulate General was reportil 
that eight Japanese firms had < 
fices in San Francisco, and thr 
Japanese banks were operatii 
here. At that lime the Consula 
General also opened a "Trade a 
Industry Exhibition Room" t 
first in the United States «hi 
was a predecessor of the .l;ip 
Trade Center. 

The Japan Tourist Associatii 
operates an office on Mark 
Street which was opened in 19.'! 



THE RECO 



1 



Golden Calf Park 



Japanese Tea Garden 
Greets Another Spring 



?y 



Bill Si 



rtesy of S. F. Ctiamber of C 




OPERATION of Tourist At- 
traction finally comes back 
o Japanese!" So happily head- 
ined Hokubei Hainichi. the Jap- 
jiese newspaper, last month. 

Cause foi' elation in the Jap- 
nese colony was approval by the 
an Francisco Recreation and 
'ark Commission of the assigji- 
lent to a Japanese gentleman of 
he lease agreement under which 
he world-famed Japanese Tea 
(arden in Golden Gate Park is 
perated. 

The new concessionaire, Sho- 
aro Yasuda. is now in charge of 
he tea house and gift shop just in 
ime to greet the year's most spec- 
acular display in the garden — 
^pril blossom time when the en- 
tire area breaks out in the color- 
magic of peach, plum and 
herry blossoms. 

For beautiful although it is the 
ear around, the fabled garden 
ecomes a place of enchantment 
\ the Spring. It is then that the 
undreds of thousands of visitors 
.'ho have wandered through its 
ently twisting pathways during 
lie almost 64 years of its exist- 
ence repeat with rapt disregard 
or originality such delighted com- 
ments as "Why it's like being in 
[nother world!" 

' The originator of the garden 
vas an Australian. George Turner 
klarsh. who foimded America's 
Irst Oriental art goods store in 
ihe arcade of the old Palace Hotel 
h 1876. 

He was one of the backers of 
Ihe Califomia Mid-Winter Exposi- 
tion held in Golden Gate Park in 
894. and his particular interest 
n the Exposition was the creation 
if a garden that would be an exact 
eplica of the restfuUy simple yet 
maginative landscaping he knew 
rom the years he had lived in 
apan 



In ordei' to accomplish his gar- 
den. Marsh — who spoke Japanese 
fluently — imported materials and 
workmen directly fi-om Japan. 
Known as "The Japanese Village, " 
it was so unique and attractive a 
feature of the Exposition that the 
Park Commission continued to 
maintain and operate the tea gar- 
den after 1894. 

One of the men who had been 
brought to San Francisco by 
Marsh was Makoto Hagiwara, a 
Japanese who displayed such an 
unusual affinity for his work that 
in 1910 the Commission turned 
the tea garden over to him as a 
concession. 

Later Hagiwara and his family 
built their home there and his chil- 
dren continued its operation after 
his death. This dynastic succes- 
sion was terminated in 1942 when 
the War Department "relocated" 
the Hagiwaras and the Park Com- 
mission — responsive to the wave 
of Pearl Harbor-engendered re- 
crimination—changed the name to 
"Oriental" Tea Garden. It was 
restored to "Japanese" in 1952. 
Mrs. Takano Hagiwara, daughter 
of Makoto and last of the family 
to run the garden, died last No- 
vember, aged 81. 

From 1910 to 1942 the rental 
for the tea garden concession was 
$50 per month. The Commission 
operated it until April of 1949 
when it leased the tea house and 
gift shop concession to Mr. and 
Mrs. S. Alan Agnew for 10 per 
cent of the gross revenue with a 
minimum guarantee of $5,000. 

Agnew's advent to the garden 
was a logical rounding out of its 
inteinationally - flavored histon,-. 
For he. like Marsh, was an Aus- 
tralian and, like Marsh, had lived 
much of his life in the Orient. 
The Agnews operated successfully 
and happily until last year when 



tragedy invaded llieir Golden Gate 
Park wonderland. Mrs. Agnew, a 
charming and gracious lady, died 
of cancer. And Agnew decided to 
leave the thriving business he and 
his wife had built. 

The new concessionaire, who had 
come to this.coimtiy before World 
War II, is no stranger to dealing 
with the public. He is the owner 
of Tokyo Sukiyaki at 255 Jefferson 
Street on Fishennan's Wharf. 

Shotaro Yasuda is quite at home 
in the teagarden. with its numer- 
ous remembrances of his home- 
land. 

It is entered through a tall 
arched gateway — a typical "torii" 
gate — which is a marvel of work- 
manship made of himdreds of 
hand-cai-ved pieces of wood and 
which has become a treasured San 
Francisco landmark as well as one 
of the few existing reminders of 
the 1894 Exposition. 

Among its many other features 



aic a tautly arched .Moon Bridge - 
over which countless delighted vis- 
itors have crawled-climbed — a 
mode! Japanese dwelling which 
contains the gift shop, a gigantic 
bronze Buddha which is the gift 
of the Gump family and which is 
said to be the largest ever to leave 
the Orient, and a many-tiered 
Temple which dominates the high- 
est elevation in the gaiden. 

In the area formerly occupied 
by the home of the Hagiwara fam- 
ily, a broad terrace overlooks a 
sunken garden with a series of 
pools and a lush planting of dwarf 
maples, azaleas and conifers 
against a backgroimd of bamboo. 

Recent additions to the garden 
include a 9000-pound Lantern of 
Peace — purchased from the small 
contributions of the school chil- 
dren of Japan as a symbol of 
friendship to the new generations 
of the L'nited States — and a class- 
ical garden presented to San Fran- 
cisco by Japan in 1953 



LEN E. MEINECKE'S 
SHELL SERVICE 

^"Anything that's a Service to You tf e '^ilo^' 
Experts to «lo the Job 

High and Foothill Blvd. 

KElIog 4-6647 Oakland, Calif. 

Blue Chip Stamps 



^ARCH. 1958 



THIRD -POP" CONCERT 

San Francisco Symphony 

Andre Kostelanetz, Conducting 
OPERA HOUSE 



Saturday Evening, March 29, at 8:30 

Damnation of Faust BeWioi 

Grand Canyon Su.te Grofe 

INTERMISSION 

Enchanted Lake Uadoff 

Blues Opera — Suite for Orchestra Harold Arlen 

Arranged and Orchestrated by Samuel Matlowsky 

(First Performance in San Francisco) 

ENCORES - ENCORES - ENCORES 

TICKETS NOW: Opera-Symphony Box Office, Sherman, Clay & Co 
EX 7-0717, and all Bay Area agencies 



SAFES 



Now in the Hub of San Francisco 

NEW & USED 

Undernriters' Approred and Labeled 

Fire Resistive Safes - Vault Doors - Burglar Resistive Money Chests 

FLOOR - WALL - HOME SAFES 

Bank Vault Equipment 

COMPLETE SERVICE & REPAIR DEPARTMENTS 

Combinations Changed ■ Safes Opened and Repaired 

Western Representative 

HERRING-HALL-MARVIN SAFE CO. 

Phone UNderhill ',-6644 

// No Ansner Call JUniper 5-4075-R. HERMANN 

or JUniper 5-8819-J. HERMANN 

THE HERMANN SAFE CO. 

Since 1889 
FREE CUSTOMER PARKING ADJACENT TO BUILDING 

1699 Market Street 



Marsh & McLennan - Cosgrove & Company 

Insurance Brokers 

CONSULTING ACTUARIES - AVERAGE ADJUSTERS 

SAN FRANCISCO - LOS ANGELES 
PORTLAND - SEATTLE - PHOENIX 



Vancouver - Chicago - New York ■ Dclroil ■ Boston 

Minneapolis - Toronto - Pittsburgh ■ St. Louis - Indianapolis 

Montreal - St. Paul ■ Didulh ■ Bulfaln - Atlanta - Calgary 

Tulsa - Nen Orleais - Milnaukee - Cleveland 

Havana ■ London ■ Caracas 



OPPERMANN 



I Continued from Page 4 ) 



challenge, and the threat to its success. They may be counted upon. 
J believe, to pursue downtown modernization and urban renewal to a 
successful conclusion. 

The press has given powerful assistance to this program with 
strong endorsements. Our newspapers have supported alike dov.-ntown 
renewal and modernization and the residential developments, for two 
of which. Diamond Heights and Western Addition, land is being cleared 
to prepare the wav for the construction stage. When they are com- 
pleted, in my judgment, there will be an end to doubts and fears a£ 
to the wisdom of backing them. 

The citizens of San Francisco. leaders and rank and file, \iill 
insist upon stepping up the "rate of production" substantially. In 
saying this I have only one reservation. This qualification is: pro- 
vided that the quality of the architectural designs and of the site 
plarming are of the highest quality, and these are scrupulously and 
responsibly applied during the execution of the project plans in thee 
construction period. 

SOTIE SECOND THOUGHTS— S.-VX FR.4XCISCO .\XD BAY .\R^X. 

San Francisco rapid transit and Bay Area rapid transit should 
be moved along togethter without letup or hindrance, and coordinated 
in planning and in program. The Bay Area Rapid Transit District 
fortimately is now a fact, San Francisco rapid transit has been await-i 
ing a policy decision, a final plan and a program. It will soon be pos- 
sible for decisions to be made on a firm metropolitan area foundation: 
Bay Area Rapid Transit, There is no question in my mind whatevei 
that a coordinated Bay Area rapid transit system has top priority to. 
all of us. 

The traffic problem in San Francisco and in its neighboring com-' 
munities cannot be solved with freeways, but it cannot be solved' 
without them. It can be well solved if rapid transit and freeways are' 
planned together. The Master Plan approach to this is that they be 
planned in coordination with each other, utilizing where feasible free^ 
way rights of way for "designed-in" rapid transit. Oiu- freeways are 
used now, can be used more fully for bus transit as well. 

Metropolitan area planning on an official basis for the Bay Area 
counties is long overdue, San Francisco, Oakland and Contra Costa 
County were the holdouts at the last rerrular session of the Californial 
Legislature. The rest of the Bay Area appeared to be ready for metro-l 
politan area planning! This was not the fault of the City and County 
Planning Commission, including San Francisco's Planning Commis- 
sion, Nor was it the fault of Mayor Christopher, who has supported 
regional planning all along" the wa,v. 

With regional planning much of the controversy, the endless dis- 
putes among the cities and counties and within our Bay Area cities, 
not excluding San Francisco, could have been eliminated in the past 
and would be avoided in the future if a metropolitan area plan were 
now in the picture, or if one had been prepared, preferably, years ago 

With regional planning the long and muddled fight over the South- 
ern Crossing with all its bitterness could have been handled better; 
the new Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, the proposed San Francisco- 
Tiburon Bridge (which will be very controversial! could be analyzed 
in relation to the Bay Area as a whole, and with long range vision 
instead of jurisdictional "warfare" with its loss of time and mone> 
and peaceful relations. 

With regional planning the public would have had a basis foi 
judgments and decisions in the fight over rails on the bridge, the ques- 
tion of a rail passenger terminal in San Francisco and would receivf 
better guidance in such questions a3 the locations of future airport" 
(including those for jetsl, water control, distribution and flood pre- 
vention, shoreline development, locations for futiu-e regional and stati 
parks and numerous other issues. These important and costly public 
facilities would have had and in the future will have, through metro- 
politan area planning, sound location studies and recommendation! 
to guide them, within a Bay Area-wide frame of reference! 

These kinds of questions will always be present. The efficient am 
sensible way to handle then>, where they extend beyond one jiu-isdic 
tion and involve two or many more political units, requires metro 
politan "wide screen" diagnosis and treatment, if they are to be solvei 
in the public interest — all the separate interests merged in a conimo) 
interest! 



THE RECORI 



Planning for defense and security, planning a pattei-n for a per- 
nent agiioultural supply neai- the cities sei-ved, and for pi-eservation 
the important agriicultiiial economic base of Northein California 
^ needed. Both urban anil riiral planning, to control or minimize 
ccts of urban sprawl, for a sound economy, and to promote an order- 
environment for the present population and for futui'c generations— 
s could be done with reasonable expense, as "cheap insui'ance," 
t)Ugh competent regional planning by an official Bay Area Planning 
itrict. 

A powerfiil regional authority for public works construction of 
kin;Is, as has been urged in recent years, v.'ould be premature and 
.vise while the lack of a metropolitan plan to set the stage for co- 
linatcd consti-uction of public inipi-ovements continues. 

HKiH PKIOHITY CHFX'K-LIST OF "SECOXD THOl"<iHTS": 
I. 1: IMPROVED t'0.>LMl'N'ICATIOXS: 

One of the almost chronic, and ver\' serious problems is that of 
)d communications between aJl parties of interest in civic affaii-s. 
ere is a ciitical lack and there is need for better conimimication 
the part of the electorate with its elected and appointive officials: 

0, communication between politicians and career officials heading 
iartments or as membei-s of staffs; also, communication between 
siness leaders and civic leaders of the community all the way out 
:he neighboi'hoods. 

Thei'e is miich need at all times as well to keep a two way street 
;n at all times back and foi-th between the Press and all of these 
tups. Communications inside City Hall with the Pi'ess, and through- 
, the comniimity at large among the business, labor, civic and 
ghborhood associations can be inipi'oved and it is greatly to every 
zen's advantage that this occur. 

Stating in my own w^ords some of the things that need doing 
ould include also the following: 

1. 2: CrriZEX'S COIXCILS FOB COMIMI'XITY IMPROVEMENT: 

There is a long-present urgent need of local community councils, 
h city-wide types and for those councils which serve neighborhoods, 
blic issues, policies, programs need continuing study. These issues, 
icies and pi'ogranis are complex, therefore a citizen's council on 
amunity development, or w'hatever you call it. cannot operate with- 
, a decent budget and some full-time staff. San Francisco, to start 
re, needs one. 

I. 3: A X'EW Crrv CH.\RTEK: 

A chai'ter commission should be foi'med. Organization changes 
;ded in San Francisco's municipal govei-nment include fii-st and 
emost a new and modern city charter. No one drives a 1932 car. 
ept as a collector's item. Our charter dates from that year. Great 
inges and impiovements. both in the politics of government and in 
nagement and organization have taken place since that date. San 
uicisco should, without fiii^ther delay, get as many of these for itself 
it can. 

>. 4: GIVE THE MAYOR THE TOOL.S TO DO HIS BKi JOB: 

The Mayor's job is like top management of a vast and intiicate 
poration. The business of govei'nnient in a big city is veiy com- 
X. The cmTent budget of San Fi'ancisco. to illustrate how big, ex- 
ds one-fifth of a billion dollars. In addition to established duties. 
•an renewal is at long last getting undei-w^ay. here and neai'ly evei'y- 
ere. A city development cooi'dinator. a top level management dep- 
■ of the Mayor, is going to be needed here. Other big cities are get- 
? them or have them. Just to coordinate several scoi'e city depart- 
iits and bui'eaus is a job that shoiild be given several full time 
[hly qualified administrative assistants with proven skill, that is. if 
1 economv is the target. 
I 

I. 5: TAKE THE HOBBLES OFF THE DEP.\RTMEXT 
I CITY PLAXXIXii: 

i The San Fi-ancisco Depaj'tment of City Planning has been in- 
Iquately staffed for a decade, not in tei'ms of an.vthing but num- 
|s of skilled personnel and dollars in the budget, however. The small 
p we have is first rate, but thei-e is too much work for too few 
kds. The work of this Depai-tiiient has ti'emendoiis importance, both 
ihe pi'ivate economy of the city and to its tax base. 



St. Vincent de Paul Salvage Bureau 

FURNITURE, CLOTHING, HOUSEHOLD GOOOS, NEWSPAPERS 

Ourt ia .1 yenr round program to cjrc for ihr poor. 

SAN FRANCISCO — 1815 Mii.ion Slr«l — HE. 1.45ll« 

OAKLAND — !15 Wrhitrr Sirrct — 'm'inoalu ^■272^ 

SAN MATEO — in Soulh B Slrct — Dbmond 2- 1860 

DALY CITY — 6726 Miuion SlrMl — PLua 5-4546 

SAN JOSE — 443 W. San Cnrloi Slrwl — CYpr.u 4.4974 

VALI.EJO — 2)0.A Viruinia Strrtt — VAIIrjo 2-5525 

STOCKTON — 626 E. ■ ■ ■ " - 

SAN RAFAEL — "llO 



Please Don I Thron It Away ...But Da Call 
ST. VINCENT DE PAUL SALVAGE BUREAU 

BANCO CORPORATION, LTD. 

BANK CHECK PRINTERS 

Stationers - Specialt>' Jobbers 

836 MONTGOMERY ST. EXbroo 

San Francisco 

GEARY SERVICE MARKET 

Meats — Vestetables — Groceries 



1398 GEARY STREET 



JOrdan 7-1347 



SAN FRANQSCO 



The Letter Sho|) 

PAUL tf DICK SMITH 

67 BEALE STREET 

San Francisco S. Calif. 

sutler 1-6564 



ART. PASTE-UP. LAYOUT 
|i ^ 1 COMPOSITION 

OFFSET DUPLICATINC 
MIMEOCRAPHING 

MULTIGRAPHING 
DIRECT MAIL 

ADDRESSOGRAPHING 
SPFEDAMAT ADDRESSING 

MAILING LISTS 



Visit the 

PALACE BATHS 

8,^ - 3rcl Street San Francisco 

W. O. (BILL) DUFFY 

ISotary Public - Public Accountant 
3410 - 25th Street AT. 2-4151 

San Francisco 

Caesar's ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

The Finest m Food — The Best Wines and Liquor. 
LUNCHES DAILY 
— Closed Monday — 



Bay and Powell Streets — DO iglas 2-1153 



Francisco. Calif. 



HAVISIDE COMPANY 

Eilahlhhed 1X79 

Marine and Industrial Supplies 

Ship Chandlers, C 



40 SPEAR STREET 



vas Goods. Salvage and Derrick Barges 
EXbrook 2-0064 SAN FRANCISCO 5 



SHEEDY DRAYAGE CO. 

Crane and Li.'t Ser\'ice up to 20 Tons 
MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT HAULING 

630 Tennessee Srreel, near 3rd and Mariposa Sts. 

San Francisco 

W, (BILL) STATTON Telephone MArkct 1-8080 



«CH. 1958 



Snyder Bros. Knitting Mills 

120 - 8:h STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 3, CALIF. 
Eyelyn Robinson. Pres. Telephone VNderhill 1-8058 

CALIFORNIA BUILDERS HARDWARE COMPANY 

1^ BLUXOME STREET - YUkon 2-5690 - SAN FRANCISCO 

527 CLUB Bar and Restaurant 

Domestic and Imported Liquors — Pabst on Tap 

Joe Fuchslin - Carl Rcichmuth, Proprietors 

527 BRYANT STREET 

Telephone SUtter 1-9625 San Francisco. California 

WALTER KREUTZMANN 

2000 Van Ness Avenue 
F. J. BURNS DRAYING 

- GENERAL DRAYING - 

Pool Car Distribution - Contract Trucking 

San Francisco - Oakland - East Bay Area - San Mateo - San Jose 

UNderhill 3-4995 



nd All Intermediate Poi, 
516 TOWNSEND STREET 



KUSTOM LIGHTING & MANUFACTURING CO. 

359 - I2th STREET San Francisco 3. California 

Lighting Fixtures-Custom. Commercial. Residential 

Metal Spinning-Specialty. Production, Experimental 

Robert Ross Phone: UNderhill 1-5863 

MONTEBELIO WINE CO. OF CALIFORNIA 

Producers of and Dealers in 

Choice California Wines 

WINERY-ST. HELENA. NAPA COUNTY 
Office: 2505 Bryant Street. San Francisco 

BAY CABINETS & FIXTURES 

377 Bay Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



PALLAS BROS. 

RADIO & TELEVISION REPAIRING - AND SALES 
5000 MISSION STREET JU 5-5030 SAN FRANCISCO 12 



WATSON BROS TRANSPORTATION CO., INC. 

DAN W. MAHONEY, Sales Supervisor 
1025 Tennessee Street - VAlencia 4-9521 - San Francisco. Cilil 

THE NATIONAL CASH REGISTER CO. 

777 Mission Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 3. CALIFORNI.'Si 



SO. 6: INCKE.\SE CREATIVE "IXVESTJIEXT," PI BLIC 
.A.ND PKIV.\TE, IX S.\X FRANCISCO: 

The city is largely built up. Much of the land here, however, 
covered with poor and obsolete buildings of all kinds. Piivate weaj 
of large magnitude can be created on these underdeveloped or pool 
used sites. The city's tax revenues can be increased ven.' substantial 
to pay for public improvements and maintenance, through we 
balanced building and a more vigorous action program. There is n 
"gold" in this approach. The program needs more than a shot in t 
arm: it needs major emphasis at the top. on the part of the May 
and Supen'isors, on the part of the business and civic leaders of t 
community. 

XO. 7: ESTABLISH A TOP CO.'UMAXD BUSINESS 
LEADERSHIP COJIMITTEE: 

A business advisory committee on city development like those 
New Haven. Philadelphia, Chicago. Pittsburgh, and other communit) 
is needed. This should be strongly organized, with leadership of I 
top men of San Francisco. It cannot be effective without a full-tii 
staff, as these leaders among the cities of the United States ha 
learned. 

XO. 8: ESTABLISH A STR.\TEGIC FIXAXCIXG 
BrsiX'ESS GKOIP: 

A "strategic financing" business group, either separately set 
or combined with the business advisory group is also needed, 
should be organized as a kind of "minute man" organization, to { 
high priority jobs done, to raise private funds where public funds : 
coming along too little or too late. This has been a success in Phi 
delphia and is so in an increasing number of American cities. To , 
the pertinent facts without endless delays, to advance small su 
to free quickly larger ainounts of private and public investment, w. 
real benefit to the whole local economy, a strategic financing "fl>T 
wedge" like the Old Philadelphia Development Corporation, will prci 
its worth and repay its cost many times over. 

XO. 9: CHECK UP, IX FACE TO F.\CE CONTACTS, WHAT 
THE LEADERS ARE DOIXG, IX OTHER CITIES: 

Finally, I would like to repeat a suggestion made on my retu 
last October, from a week of intensive study, a day in each of a nu 
ber of cities which I am convinced are doing the best job in 
United States, on city development and renewal based upon loi 
range, city-wide Master Plans. I ursre that a delegation, consist:- 
of the municipal top command, the Mayor and some of the Sup 
visors and several department heads, accompanied by a number of 
outstanding civic leaders from business and the community at lar. 
devote about a day apiece to meeting with their opposite numbers 
a half dozen outstanding cities. 

Cities should be chosen which are centers of coordinated, effect 
action programs of city planning, urban renewal and city devel 
ment. First hand study in these places, man to man discussions. « 
briefing sessions and field visits prepared in advance, in the cc 
munities chosen working witth the local leaders, would in my judgm 
help us to progress much more rapidly in San Francisco. 

I have thoroughly enjoyed my work here, and the good life affor 
in this wonderful place. I have felt an obligation, even after resign 
my position as of March 21, to contribute as fully as I can to 
solution of civic problems which must and which will be found. Th 
are a great many pressing and ciritical problems of growt 
development of this great city and the region of which it is the he;i 
Our beloved San Francisco is the pride of the west, it is the deli 
of Americans from all parts of our laind. Others, too, around 
world. 

I have no personal regrets over the years lived here and there 
no personal recriminations in this article. In a word, these have b 
grand years for me and my family. While I regi-et to leave. I 
e.xcited and very enthusiastic about my new assignment — keen to n 
its challenge. 

Finally, nothing could give greater satisfaction to San Francis 
millions of admirers: her citizens, her happy and delighted \ 
from near and far, to those who deeply love her for her fasc 
and matchless charm (of which society I will always be a nicmb 
than to see this unique commimity move with surer and faster i 
to the goal of unchallenged and imchallengeable greatness, and 
urban quality and beauty second to none. What San Francisco ni 
most is a real challenge to her pride. When that is really felt 
citizens will do the rest! 



THE REC' 



)OKS 



TWO RESEARCH REPORTS 



STERS OF DECKIT 

» Storj' ()f <'i)n»n»inUni in 
(eric'i and How to Fijiht It. 
\f. Edear Hoover 

Holt— $5.00 

he impact that this book mal<es 
the reader is urgent and per- 
al. Mr. Hoover presents brief 
jraphies of the founders of 
imunism. Marx. Lenin and 
Un, a history of the Commiin- 
Party. and details of its oper- 
in here in the United States 
The reader is given keyhole 
ks of Party meetings, an in- 
it into how likely membe!-s are 
[iboozled into joining the Party, 
^ave picture of what Party 
fnbership entails, and a still 
ver one of what Party expul- 
1 and its accompanying vili- 
[tion means. 

ersonal life of any kind, includ- 
the closest family ties, are all 
10 accoimt if they do not sei-ve 
Party interest. It is made tm- 
takeably and horrifyingly clear 
; under communism the hu- 
1 compassion that man has 
ven to attain through centuries 
altering civilization, the ideals 
ireedom that our ancestoi-s have 
Jht and suffered for, here and 
over the world through count- 
I ages, are ideals beyond the 
^prehension and concern of the 
ktical communist, whose heart 
pet on a world state serving 
rely materialistic ends. 
ir. Hoover exposes the lying, 
[tent words of the communist 
lers about progress, society's 
bifold and pressing problems, 
war and peace. He also indi- 
ts the types of movement and 
pie of genuine goodwill, who 
unfortunately liable to be used 
fronts by designing Party pro- 
lers. In a final optimistic chap- 
he demands that each respons- 
member of our democracy 



by Jane Rawson 

shall wake up to the danger in our 
midst and rally to preserve "our 
heritage of freedom, justice and 
the religious spirit" before it is 
too late. 

«H.\T .M.\KES WOSIEN BI V 

B> .lanet Wolff 

McGraw-Hill — $6.00 

After reading Mrs. Wolff's re- 
poils, the reader has the impres- 
sion that woman in today's world 
is an insecure, bewildered ci'eat- 
uve. beset by g>'necological com- 
plexities, and so unfortimately 
constructed that even the prin- 
cipal bones in her limbs are set 
at inconvenient angles. Therefore, 
any salesman with a product which 
promises to bolster her confidence, 
make her feel and look better, or 
simplify her daily tasks can im- 
mediately loosen her purse strings. 

At the end of each of twelve 
chapters, in thick type, is set out 
a so-called "Feminine Guidepost" 
for the handy reference of those 
who would breach the economic 
and political defenses of women. 
Despite the cynical approach and 
humiliating exposures, the basic 
psychology' of the book is soimd, 
and the volume will undoubtedly 
be a great asset to those who need 
to influence women in the fields 
both of purchasing and voting. 

Wpmen also ought to read what 
Mrs. Wolff has to say, so that, be- 
ing forewarned, they can e.xercise 
intelligent choice, or in moods of 
delicious whimsy take the line of 
least resistance and decide that in 
a free world with a free economy, 
there is plenty of fun at the fair 
and if their money is good, why 
shouldn't they have all the color 
and excitement and helps by the 
way that advertisers so resource- 
fully commend? The fact that 
most feminine readers will tend 
to do the latter is in itself a tri- 
bute to Mrs. Wolff's ingenuity in 
salesmanship. 



New Method Cleaners & Laundry 

Finished W ork • Rough Dry 

Expert Dry Cleaning - Pickup and Delivery 
— MArket 1-0545 - 

Corner 17th & Sanchez Streets 



Jack Gomperts & Co., Inc. 

110 Market St. San Francisco 11, Calif. 

Phone: G.Arf.eld 1-6^02 
Ciblc .Address: GOMPER T.S 

World's Largest Dried Fruit Exporters 

European OtTicc: 

GOMPERTS OF CALIFORNIA. LTD. 

Chandos House, Buckingham G.ile 

London S. W., England 

Phone Abcy ii?} - Cables REGOM 

Telex: London 8614 



CAREW& ENGLISH 

- Leo V. Careu - 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS . . . MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

MASONIC AT GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
San Francisco 18, California 

THE F.W.D. PACIFIC 
COMPANY 

Indiis^trial. HigliMay and Contractors 

E(|iii])nient 

850 HARRISON STREET 

Phone GArfield 1-4971 San Francisco 7. California 

formely: 

THE FOUR ViHEnL DRI\E PACIFIC COMPANY 

GLOBE of CALIFORNIA 

Canned Food Products 

Valley W.ooin Brand Food Products 
13S0 Folsom Street San Francisco 

GANTNER-FELDER-KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parkiiifi 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



OCEAN AVENUE 
LAUNDERETTE 

1338 OCEAN AVENUE 

Near Plymouth 

DE 3-01~l San Francis 



Domestic Cheese Co. 

Wholesale Only 

2701 - 22nd STREET 

VA. 4-5470 San Francis 



Joe Cervetto Company 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE 

15 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

YTJkon 2-1556 San Francisco l: 



HOTEL DANTE 

Transient ■ Weekly Rates 

310 Columbus Ave. 



AJAX FOUNDRY 
COMPANY 

525 Phelps St. San Francis 



GINA & JOE'S 

ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

The Choieest Foods 

Ted Kilton SC Son, Proprietors 

1617 POLK STREET 

TUxedo 5-9678 San Francisco 



FENTON HOTEL 

259 - 7th STREET 
UNderhill 1-7386 



RICHLAND HOTEL 

1906 MISSION STREET 
San Francisco 



REO HOTEL 

422 VALENCIA STREET 



BELL HOTEL 

37 COLUMBUS AVE. 
San Francisco 



HOTEL DU MIDI 

1362 POWELL STREET 
GA. 1-9571 San Francisc 



PEOPLE AND PROGRES!: 



CARL F. WENTE 

Carl F. Wente. one of Califor- 
nia's and the Nation's outstanding 
business and civic leaders, has 
been appointed Chairman of the 
1958 Northern California Invest- 
In-America Weelt Committee. 

In accepting the chairmanship 
of the 1958 Northern California 
Invest-In-America program, Mr. 
Wente, who is Chairman of the 
Executive Committee, Bank of 
America, and immediate past pres- 
ident, California State Chamber 
of Commerce, stated: 

"Investments in America — 
through savings, life insurance, 
property and business ownership 
— is every American's opportun- 
ity to participate in our virile 
economy which makes America 
strong. Such investments create 
jobs and contribute substantially 
toward insuring our economic, re- 
ligious and pohtical freedoms. 
Through investments of all kinds, 
we all own our country and 
strengthen our American way of 
life." 

Invest-In-America Week is a 
community educational program. 
Originated in California, this year 
it will be observed across the na- 
tion from April 27 through May 
3, 1958. 



P.G.&E. PLANS 
Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
pany appears to have broken the 
cost barrier to commercial atomic- 
electric power. 





ident Sutherland 



One of the industry leaders in 
atomic power research and devel- 
opment, PGcStE's achievement has 
knocked several years off the ac- 
cepted time when nuclear elec- 
tricity would become economic for 
normal public use. 

The significant development in 
peacetime application of atomic 
energy was annoimced in Wash- 
ington before the Joint Congress- 
ional Committee on Atomic Ener- 
gy by Admiral Lewis L. Strauss, 
chairman of the Atomic Energy 
Commission. 

Quoting a telegram from Nor- 
man R. Sutherland, PGcfeE presi- 
dent. Admiral Strauss informed 
the committee that the company 
is preparing to support its findings 
by building a 60,000 - kilowatt 
atomic power plant for service by 
the middle of 1962. 

Sutherland's wire attributed the 
company's belief that it had brok- 
en the economic barrier to (1) 



advances in the design ai; 
nology of the boiling v. i 
actor, based on knuv. ;„ 
in the successful op- 
General Electric-PG,vi: \ ; 
Atomic Power Plant, and ■ _ 
orable factors at the i i 
plant location. 

These two elements con. 
achieve competitive power 
8 mills per kilowatt hour, i : 
stated. 

Sutherland explained tli 
8-mill goal should be reached w 
the second core of uranium t 
placed in the proposed new pit 
and that "we expect to appro 
this goal with the first core.* 

Subject to receiving the us: 
permits, licenses and certifica: 
PG&E proposes to install and 
erate a boiling water atomic p<] 
er unit rated at 50,000 kilowa 
which it expects will produce ( 
000 kilowatts of electric powei 

It would be located at the cc 
pany's existing new Humbc 
Bay Power Plant south of Eure 
The Humboldt plant is in a mod 
ately high fuel cost area and th. 
are other favorable factors wh 
make A-electiicity economics 
feasible there ahead of other ar 
in the PG&E service territc 
Output of the plant would be 
into the intercoimected PG&E s 
tem serving Northern and Cent 
California. 



California's 48 northern count 
have 62 per cent of the Stai 
farm product sales, 70 per cent 
the farms, 74 per cent of orch. 
land, and 57 per cent of the li 
stock and livestock products sa 
according to the San Franci 
Chamber of Commerce. 



Would you like to expre 
goodwill message to Euro] 
Write or phone the Record. 



Golden Gate Hotel 

549 KE.^RNY STREET 
San Francisco 



DROHER COAL CO. 

- Mexican Charcoal - 

1331 FOLSOM STREET 

San Francisco 



'MI RANCHO' 
SUPER MARKET 

Latin-American Food Line 

Tortilla Manufacturers 

3365 - 20th STREET 

llssion 7-0581 S.m Fr.incisc 



BKTLER BROS. 

28.'5 Winslon Drive 



LOANS 

On lii.inK.nds, Watclics. J.v.ilr- 

Coleman Attell'sJewelei 

1S15 Fiihnori- St. WE^l l-.M" 



Dudley Perkins Compao 

H.irl.n-iXiMds.ni MoIorcM los 

Said e/ SerriceSincc !'>l I 

655 ELLIS STREl : 

PRospcct 5-552i San Iruui- 



CHOICE BEFORE US 
A dual warning that California 
?£i<ients face a choice of higher 
ixes or of reduced government 
?rvice3 was issued in Cloverdale 
ebruary 23 by Governor Good- 
■in J. Knight and Assemblyman 
aspar W. Weinberger of San 
rancisco. 

The Governor and Assemblyman 
ere guest speakers at the armual 
incheon of the Redwood Empire 
ublishers Unit the closing day 
the Cloverdale Citrus Fair, 
'einberger was voted by working 
pwsraen in Sacramento last year 
ae "most valuable member of the 
late Legislature." 




Approximately 125 newspaper 
iblishers and editors, state and 
lUnty officials and representa- 
.•es of civic organizations attend- 
, the luncheon. The Record was 
presented by Editor Alan Tory. 
m Bowerman, Publishers Unit 
esident, presided. Ben A. Cober, 
esident of Redwood Empire As- 
ciation, served as co-chairman- 




Voters must decide 

Knight chose the occasion to 

nounce also that concurrently 
t h the regularly scheduled 

igei session of the legislature 
will call for a special session 
consider proposed changes in 

' State Education Code. 

.RCH, 1958 



Phone UNdcrhill I -8 1 44 

Jim Bruce Chinese LaundtT' 

\\V- r,ill and Deliver 
14i -8th Street San Francisco 



Grand Pacific Hotel 

1331 STOCKTON STREET 
San Francisco 



T. MIKAMI 



Japanese Art Center 
School of Fine Arts 

960 Bush St. GRaystone 4-0779 
San Francisco, Calif. 



DALY CITY CLEANERS 
and Shirt Laundry 

6287 Mission Street 

PLdza 5-5261 



Westlake Flying "A" 
Service 



Motor 



Leslie J. Richie 
lite Luh - Brake Ser 
Tune-up - S&H Green Stamps 
ny & Lake Merced Blvd. 



AI. 



PLa 



5-8005 



Storage - Lubrication - Washing 
Repairing - Batteries 
Accessories ■ Tires 

STANDARD GARAGE 

2ii DRUMM STREET 
SUtter 1-2744 San Francisco II 



UNITED TOWING CO. 

ROBERT W. DYER 

PIER 14 

SUtter 1-6606 San Francisco 



De Espana Restaurant 

Basque Food — Family Style 
Lunch 12-1 — Dinners 5-8 

Fermin Haurie, Prop. 

781 BROADWAY SUtter 1-7287 



THE CRITERION 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Entertainment Nitely 

576 GEARY STREET 

Near Jones, San Francisco 

PR 6-4468 C. G. Boots Bonlin 



JAPANESE TEA GARDEN 

In the Heart ,1/ Gulden Gate I'ark 

Unusual and Distinctive 
Gifts i Souvenirs from the Orient 
Delicious Tea and Cookies Served 



POTRERO AUTO SERVICE 

Gas ■ Oil - Lubrication 

Tune-up - Brake Service 

Auto Electric Work 

Potrero 3l 22nd, opp. S. F. Hosp. 

Phone VA 4-I55I 



Mobile Radio Engineers 

1416 Brush Street 

OAKLAND 12. CALIF. 

TEmplebar 6-3600 

1150 Larkin Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 9. CALIF. 

PRospect 6-6166 



"Fine ltalian-A„ 



Marconi's Restaurant 

122 Battery Street 
EXbrook 2-7268 



Easterday Supply Co. 

Everything for Sanitation 
and Maintenance 

FELL AND GOUGH STS. 
San Francisco 2, California 



Reliable Auto Glass 

UNderhill 3-0667 HEmlock 1-0684 

2015 - 16th Street 

San Francisco. California 



RAHO HOUSEWARES 

// you can't find it try Rultos 

2132 CHESTNUT STREET 
Phone WE 1-2726 San Francisc 



ONE 4 THE ROAD 

2092 - 3r<l Street 

San Francisco 



JOHN T. BEVANS 

Typesettinfi 

Makeup - Reproduction Proofs 

532 SANSOME STREET 
G.Arfield 1-4152 San Francisco 11 



N MECHETTI Si. SON 

THE GOLD SPIKE 
RESTAURANT 

All Kinds ot Mixed Drinks 
Italian Dinners served Family Style 

527 COLUMBUS AVENUE 
San Francisco GA. 1-9363 



.\SK FOR S SC H GRI I N STAMPS 

The SPERRY and 
HUTCHINSON COMPANY 

HEmlock 1-2742 
1446 MARKET STREET 

San Francisco 



CROWN DRUG STORES 

Daly City - Westlake 
355 So. Mayfair Ave. PL. 5-8200 

Lakeshore Plaza 
2 Lakeshore Plaza OV. 1-4136 

Stonestown 
95 Stonestown LO. 4-6055 



DiivaVs 

STUDIO CLUB 

]ohn :■: Paul 

309 COURTAND AVENUE 
Mission 7-9981 



WRESCO 

Wholesale Radio 4 Electric 
Supply Co. 

Main Office 

140 ■ 9ih Street HEmlock 1-3680 

San Francisco 

Branch Office 

1348 El Camino LYiell 1-0794 

San Carlos 



BEAUTILITIES INC. 

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ruL'L:.. -THAT* NEW BALL PARK FOR THE GIANTS 

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CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 



KENNETH H. ALLEN 
ALAN P. TORY 



PUBLISHER 
EDITOR 



Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlocIc 1-12 12 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 

VOLUME 25 NUMBER 4 

APRIL, 1958 



BAY WINDOW 



LETTERS 

I am sure the European Goodwill Tour of 
ilifornia Mayors will be a memorable expe- 
•nce for all those fortunate enough to make 
c trip ... It is a pleasure to extend my best 
shes for a most successful and enjoyable 
p which I know will bring honour and 
;ognition to the State of California. 
Richard Nixon 
Vice-President 
Washington, D. C. 

jl was pleased to learn of the Goodwill 
iropean Tour by California mayors which 
being endorsed by the Record Magazine. 
I am certain that this proposed tour will 
■ate international good will, and will serve 
I bring to the leaders of local governments 
California a greater understanding of some 
our foreign relations problems. 
Goodwin J. Knight, 
Governor of California 

The Record" is to be commended for en- 
xsing the Goodwill Tour of California May- 
i to visit Europe. This project will, in my 
fw, contribute greatly to the international 
derstanding so important at this time, 
iln addition, I can vouch from my own ex- 
rience that Mayors who seize this oppor- 
lity will return to their work with broad- 
sd horizons. 

George Christopher 
Mayor of San Francisco 

iCongratulations on publishing the views 
Paul Oppermann in the March issue of 
:'he Record"! 

I think it is very good for San Francisco to 
ve a magazine such as this, which publishes 
(.•el-headed criticism of our local government 
i well as such excellent news of the city's 
airs. 

I This city has a great future, and I am sure 
I serious-minded citizens want to see it de- 
'iop along lines such as those Mr. Opper- 
inn suggests. We shall certainly miss him 
,ien he leaves for Chicago. 

K. H. Watson 
929 Broderick St. 
San Francisco 



GIANT WELCOME: San Francisco will 
long remember the fabulous welcome to the 
Giants on Monday, April 14 — the parade in 
which the players took part, and the biggest 
luncheon ever at the Sheraton-Palace with 
nine hundred guests including Mrs. John Mc- 
Graw, widow of the great manager of the 
Giants whose name belongs to the immortals. 
It was a magnanimous gesture of Milwaukee 
to approve the breaking of tradition, and to 
consent to the presence at our first game of 
Ford Frick, Commissioner of Baseball, and 
Warren C. Giles, President of the National 
League, who by custom open the season with 
the team which wins the championship. 

These two notables were among a galaxy 
of sports figures and civic leaders who ap- 
plauded Supervisor McCarty when he rose as 
M.C., Mayor Christopher when he welcomed 
the Giants, and Horace Stoneham when it 
came his turn to reply. 

In common with all the press of our citv, 
we salute the Giants in this issue, and con- 
gratulate the Mayor and President of the 
Board of Supervisors on their achievement in 
bringing this team — of which so much is 
hoped — to the West. 

GREEN SPACES: One of our most acute 
local problems ( by no means peculiar to 
the Bay Area) is the fast disappearance of 
green spaces which can be used for open air 
recreation in urban areas. With more leisure 
time, our citizenry needs more playgrounds 
and picnic places. Excitable modern teenagers 
need more places for healthy outdoor ac- 
tivities. 

At the core of the problem is the necessity 
to act regionally to acquire and develop park- 
like areas for the use of the people, yet we 



have found no satisfactory solution. 

Political scientists can have no more press- 
ing problem than evolving some quick -acting 
regional political machinery that can get re- 
gional decisions quickly. In a state becoming 
urbanized as rapidly as California, delay can 
be fatal to sound land use and to such pro- 
jects as Bay Area Rapid Transit. 

OPEN CITY: Tall, gaunt Sir Donald An- 
derson with Mayor George Christopher sit- 
ting at the table beside him brought humor 
and some healthy independent thinking into a 
luncheon sponsored by a combination of San 
Francisco societies including the British- 
American Chamber of Commerce and Trade 
Center. As Deputy Chairman and Managing 
Director of the Peninsular and Oriental Steam 
Navigation Company of London he spoke in 
acknowledgment of a welcome to the S.S. 
Himalaya, luxury liner of the newly created 
Orient and Pacific Lines. 

"The slaves of time must fly. The masters 
of time have choice — and usually choose a 
ship," said this shrewd and canny exponent 
of the merits of travel by sea, who recalled 
to his audience that American friends, com- 
menting on the enterprise of his country's 
shipping had obsenx-d to him that the British 
were "always willing to take us for a ride." 

When Mayor Christopher presented him 
with a key to the city. Sir Donald asked what 
it might be used for as it was somewhat big 
and cumbersome to carr)' about. The Mayor, 
quick at repartee, replied that since he had be- 
come Mayor he was careful to see that as few 
things as possible were opened. Then, with a 
twist of irony, he said: "This is a wide open 
city — wide open to every legitimate enter- 
prise." 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 




LETTERS 


3 


BAY WINDOW 


3 


THAT NEW BALL PARK 


5 


by Wllliom Stelf 




WOMAN OF THE MONTH: JUDGE UNDERWOOD 


8 


by Donlel Pinner 




PUBLIC DEFENDER EDWARD T. MANCUSO 


10 


bv Alon Tory 




WOMEN'S BOWLING CONGRESS IN S. F. 


14 


ERIC LIVINGSTON— STURDY CITIZEN 


17 


GIANTS' DEBUT 


23 


PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 


12 


MEMO FOR LEISURE 


20 



RIL. 1958 



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William Steif 




BILL RIGNEY 
Giants' Pilot 



HORACE STONEHAM 



''HE WOOING and winning of a major 
league ball club can be a pretty complex 
siness, but every franchise shift in base- 
I's mcxlern-day maturity has involved one 
iic necessity. 

The necessity, of course, is a big-league 
Ipark, or the imminent delivery of such 
tadium. 

In the early 1950's, when talk of moving 
; of the less profitable Eastern baseball 
nchises to San Francisco still seemed a re- 
ite dream, a little coterie of men determined 
put first things first and at least put San 
incisco in position to build a 40,000-to-50,- 




AMAZIN' WILLIE MAYS 



000-seat stadium if, when and whereas. Chief 
among this coterie were: 

1 ) Fran McCarty, the lively lawyer-poli- 
tician who had lately become a city super- 
visor; 

2) Tom Gray, the soft-spoken brains be- 
hind the Downtown Association; 

i) Curly Grieve, the tenacious, prolific 
sports editor of the San Francisco newspaper 
with the biggest political muscle. Hearst's 
well-heeled morning Examiner. 

McCarty, to mix a metaphor, carried the 
ball on a 1954 bond issue for S5 million — 
the idea was that if the city ever got a seri- 
ous nibble from a big-league team, the S5 
million would be available bait, earnest 
money, for construction of a big park. Gray 
conned the fat-walleted downtown business- 
men into supporting the bond issue. Grieve 
yammered endlessly at the public through his 
columns. And the end result was that the 
city's voters approved. 

The reason a ballpark had to be promised 
to whatever team cast envious eyes west was 
that the city had no adequate field. 

The only possibilities were Kezar Stadium, 
a 59,000-seat oval at the southeast corner of 
Golden Gate Park, and Seals Stadium, a 21- 
000-seat ballpark housing the then artless 
and moribund Seals of the Pacific Coast 
League. 

Kezar was — and is — a football field, long 
and relatively narrow. Seals Stadium, while 
spacious enough from an esthetic viewpoint, 
lacked sufficient seats to make it a paying 
proposition for big-leaguers and, beside, own- 
er Paul Pagan had already marked the site 
for industrial construction. 

But possibly the worst drawback of both 
stadia was this fact: parking was (and still 
is) simply an atrocious problem in both 
neiehborhoods. 

For two and one-half years San Francisco's 
big-league aspirations lay fallow. 

The old St. Louis Browns in Baltimore, the 
old Philadelphia Atttletics in Kansas Cirv 
and. especially, the old Boston Braves in Mil- 
waukee, became vast box office successes, all 
with large, relatively new ballparks. 

Then, early in 1957, the rumble from the 
East started. The word was that the fabled 
New York Giants, despite two pennant-win- 
ning scnisons in the 1950's, had had it. Their 
attendance at the inconvenient Polo Grounds 



had slid downward steadily. Owner Horace 
Stoneham, though not precisely a young man, 
was ready to go west. 

As the rumble spread, it reached the ears 
of a smart, rugged, highly opinionated San 
Francisco contractor named Charles Harney. 
This bluff fellow had been playing around 
with the idea of building a ballpark on his 
own and the city's land at undeveloped Bay- 
view Park, just south of Hunters Point. 

It was Harney's thought that the S5 million 
would make a convenient base for the high 
finance necessary to put across a deal. 

By the time McCarty and Mayor George 
Christopher, with an assist from Matty Fox, 
the Grand Poobah of Pay-TV. had finished 
selling Stoneham on the deal for moving the 
Giants west last May, Harney was dc-cp in 
plans to build the new home of the Giants, 
now officially known as San Francisco Mu- 
nicipal Stadium. 

Working closely with Harney was Archi- 
tect John Bolles, who made a study of U.S. 




SOUTHPAW PITCHER JOHNNY ANTONELLI 



baseball stadia before committing his ideas 
to paper. 

The result, as finally revealed last month, 
was: 

1) The park and its 77 acres of land will 
cost S 101/2 million; 

2) The stadium will seat 45,000 persons 
with room for expansion to a capacity of 75,- 
000; 

3 ) Parking for 20,000 autos will be pro- 
vided; 

4) Another $4.6 million will be spent to 
improve access roads leading to the park and 
for utilities. 

For Stoneham's Giants, it is a sweet deal. 
They will pay the city 5 per cent on their 
gross admissions and get to operate the con- 
cessions inside the park — the city keeps the 
parking concession. 

The S4.6 million will have to come from 
city funds, and very likely, from gas tax rev- 
enues accruing to the city. 




Where does the S5V2 million — difference 
between the bond issue money and the stadi- 
um's actual cost — come from? 




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That is another innovation of millionaL 
Harney. He and his construction compai. 
are putting S3V'2 million into a non-pro- 
corporation and the last 52 million is comir 
from a pair of Eastern insurance companies 

The non-profit corporation will build d 
stadium and enjoy the protection of a fir' 
lien on it. It will derive its payoff from n, 
cit)', a payoff amounting to $352,960 a y«. 
for 30 years. In addition, the city will ha, 
to pay Harney directly $218,715 annual, 
for five years. Finally, the city will have •; 
sers'ice the debt on the $5-million bond issi-| 

At first blush, it would appear that the ciJ 
is getting the short end of this deal, for tl 
most optimistic estimates are that the nc 
stadium will net San Francisco no more tbl 
$500,000 a year. 

The gimmick, however, is that at the ei'\ 
of 30 years, or less if the bonds and no 
profit corporation can be paid off sooner, t 
citj' gets the stadium and all its acreage, 
much the same way that it gets such parkii 
facilities as Union Square Garage. 

It is this which, ovei the long haul, 
the plan attractive. 

There are, of course, some San Francisti 
who don't like the project, no matter whi 
way it's sliced. Generally speaking, they f 
into two groups: 

1 ) The taxpayers represented by lawy 
^fichael Lewton who are threatening a n 
payers' suit because it's "a bad financial 
rangement for the cit^'" — Lewton refuses 
identifj' his clients, but some rumors lav tl 
inspiration at the feet of Supervisor Janr 
Leo Halley. who was notoriouslv balky ab( 
approving the ballpark deal and is known 
have an aversion to the current City Hall i 
ministration; 

2 ) The downtowners who have revived t 
so-called Swig Plan for dcvelopine the Sou 
of-Market area — thev want to build a ballps 
in the remnants of Skid Row. Halley's 
volved in this caper, too. 

It seems questionable whether either 
these crouDS will get to first base, for the f 
midable Christopher - McCarty - Gray-Grie 
Harney combination appears to have an 
surmountable lead as this game goes into 
top of the ninth. 

Indeed, Harney, at a recent dinner pa 
remarked : 

(Continued on Page ~ 1 



THE RECC 









CURLY GRIEVE 



^4 



JACK McDonald 



Son Fronciico sports writers who put the publi< 



I'm not waiting for anything. We're go- 
right ahead out there, filling land, level- 
the hill, getting ready to let the contracts. ' 
rhe attentive listener could almost hear 
crack of the bat, the explosive roar of the 



crowd, the churning of Willie Mays' spikes 
along the first-base line, as Harney, a long- 
time baseball-lover, added: 

"That park's going to be ready opening 
day in April, 1959. " 




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Womxin of the Month 



LENORE UNDERWOOD 

FACING JUDGE UNDERWOOD, hap- 
pily not in court, but accorded a little of 
her closely-budgeted time in her tastefully- 
appointed home, I learned a little of the in- 
dustry and personal magnetism of a woman 
whose life is devoted to the community. 

Fair of skin and hair, with eyes that look 
steadily at the person to whom she is speak- 
ing, she gave immediate evidence in conver- 
sation of an alert and logical mind. 

Underlying her vitality and directness is 
a compassion for people and their individual 
problems. This humane aspect of her nature 
was not learned in the courtroom, but in her 
childhood. The early death of her mother ma- 
tured her quickly into being the guide, phil- 
osopher and friend to five younger brothers, 
besides being manager of those daily chores 
necessary to keep a large household running 
smoothly. In those days there was a dearth of 
funds and she learned well the lessons that 
little-money-to-spare teaches. 

She was born in Cleveland and spent some 
time in the east of the United States. She paid 
tribute to both her mother and father, and re- 
called her mother's ability to sew, crochet, 
cook and bake, particularly the baking of 
pumpernickel in a special way, the secret of 
which is now lost. 

Her father was an architect and he found 
a more than willing listener in his daughter, 
Lenore, in discussions on the minute details 
of the design, planning, material and work 
for a building. These talks later proved to be 
a turning point in Judge Underwood's life. 

Her commercial business life gave evidence 
of remarkable ability, for she became claims 
department chief in a San Francisco insur- 
ance agency. She married H. T. Underwood, 
an insurance broker, and two small stepsons 
were taken charge of, as part of her new life. 
There was no standing still, and more and 
more, her conviction grew that her life yet 
needed a more purposeful pattern. That pat- 
tern she found in the study of law. 

She began studying at Hastings Law Col- 
lege. She graduated after three years of in- 
tensive work, and passed the State Bar ex- 
amination in 1932 at the first attempt. 



The Wide Horizons 
of Judge Underwood 



by Daniel Pinner 



With full confidence in herself, she set up 
an office of her own. She simply wanted to 
carry out the exacting work of research for 
her own cases. Although her practice grew 
steadily, she found time to give her services 
gratuitously to the Legal Aid Society and the 
Children's Protective Society. 

Her private practice flourished for eight 
years. Then came the legally historic case of 
the Pacific States Savings and Loan Company, 
with its far too numerous small investors 
threatened with the loss of much, if not all, 
of their savings. The Attorney-General looked 
for an attorney with a sound basic knowledge 
of real estate and the intricacies of building. 
Attorney Lenore D. Underwood was that per- 
son and she became deput)' to the Attorney- 
General. 

The litigation for this case ranged from 
the local courts to the U. S. Supreme Court. 
With a gleam in her eyes which told her 
pride in justice and right for the small man, 
she referred to the success of her efforts and 
those of the Attorney-General's staff, in get- 
ting all creditors paid one hundred cents on 
the dollar with appropriate interest. Again, 
she put her energy and legal erudition m 
pleading in Washington, D. C, when she 
participated in the cause of the California 
people in the Tidelands case. 

It was, therefore, not surprising when Gov- 
ernor Earl Warren recommended this gifted 
attorney to the Municipal Court in 1951. The 
appointment was approved by the Board of 
Governors of the State Bar. When she was 
sworn in, in February, 1951, the Queen's 
Bench, the association of Bay Area Women 
lawyers, felt justifiably proud of their illustri- 
ous member. 

The administering of the oath, by Justice 
Phil S. Gibson of the State Supreme Court, 
was not the end of endeavor, already mag- 
nificent, but the beginning in a more demand- 
ing field for this woman who had already 
achieved so much. 

She has presided both in civil and crimi- 
nal cases, including the scourge of the addict 
to narcotics. A glance over the past few years, 
s1k)ws her time ever in demand as she serves 
and gives advice to committees and organiza- 
tions. 

Her interest and active participation is 



shared by the National Association for & 
Blind, the United Nations, Traffic Schoc 
which was established on her recommem 
ation, UNESCO, for which she is Norther 
California's Chairman, Citizens' Advisoi 
Board, Governor Goodwin Knight's Confe' 
ence on Children and Youth, and mat; 
women's organizations, too numerous for o- 
space. 

No matter how humble the person appea: 
ing in court, nor how many similar storii 
she has heard before, she knows, with th: 
compassion developed early in life, that h 
own experience is terribly important to tt 
person arraigned. Yet, there is absolutely r 
room for partiality. She is. and knows shet 
the personification of the law. This, couplt 
with her deep understanding of human frai 
ty, gives her a unique place in the eyes 
litigants, attorneys, fellow judges and a wic 
circle of admirers in this complex commi 
nity. 

She cannot be approached by any influent 
until she has heard the case completely 
court. Then and then only will she he 
pleadings in all those particular circumstanc 
that can tell why or why not a senten- 
should be tempered with the limit of le 
iency within her power. 

It is useless to try weak arguments. Whi 
one man gave as his excuse for the offen 
that he was down and out, the judge repli^ 
"You may be down, but you are not out — s 
months." It has been said of the Honorab 
Lenore D. Under\vix->d that she possesses t! 
four requisites which Socrates declared b 
longed to a judge: to hear courteously; 
answer wisely; to consider soberly; to deci' 
impartially. 

Although it is her duty to sentence the la- 
breaker, she feels deeply the need for mc 
and more to be done to show him the ro 
back to an honorable and respected place 
the community. Everj' cause or effort 
achieve this end finds the judge an inspirit 
advocate. 

Her appointed work is the law, her life 
dedicated to the raising of comnumity star 
ards. This after all, has been the dream a 
purpose of great thinkers throughout t 
course of recorded history. 

THE RECO 



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His tough job requires 
heart as well as head 



THE SHORT, sturdily built attorney stood 
by the side of a frightened youth in front 
of the Judge of the Superior Court. He lis- 
tened to the verdict on a case which had been 
one of his pre-occupations for three months. 
With a sigh of relief and satisfaction, he 
heard the verdict — six months in the county 
jail. Tough enough, but far better than the 
grim alternative against which he had fought. 

Then the judge did an unusual thing. He 
broke off from routine business to compli- 
ment the attorney on the time and care he 
had given to the defense of the accused, on 
whose behalf he had painstakingly rallied up 
a roster of witnesses. 

Edward Mancuso was pleased with the 
compliment, but pleased most of all by the 
human achievement which the verdict con- 
firmed. He smiled encouragingly at the youth 
whom he had saved from being sent to San 
Quentin on a felony charge which would have 
wrecked him for life. Instead, this boy with a 
bad juvenile record behind him, would go to 
the count)' jail, guilty of a misdemeanor, 
with a real chance of making good when he 
came out. 

Back in his office after this appearance in 
court, the Public Defender reflected that the 
effort of checking on the value of a stolen 
painting, getting a number of experts into 
the witness stand, learning through sympa- 
thetic conferences about the boy's background, 
had been well worth while. 

One more offender against society, while 
paying a just penalty, had been saved from a 
crippling and destructive sentence, and given 
a real prospect for re-habilitation and turning 
into a good citizen in accordance with the 
rights promised to citizens by our Constitu- 
tion — a counsel to defend him, even though 
he had no means to hire a private attorney. 

Mancuso turned to his files, glancing over 
some of the cases which had yielded human 
dividends — a woman, accused of fraudulent 
application for aid on behalf of her child, 
who on investigation turned out to be desert- 
ed by her common-law husband; a young sol- 
dier who had stolen a camera, whose military 



Edward T. Mancuso 

Public Defender 



career was saved . . . Then the telephone bell 
rang. 

The busy hours of consultation, administra- 
tion, planning were resumed — for Mancuso at 
this morning's hearing had taken the place of 
one of his assistants who was ill, whereas in 
general he directs a team of seven deputy pub- 
lic defenders who divide their time between 
court and interviewing. This team is supple- 
mented by investigator Fitzgerald Ames, Jr. 

The man who fills the important role of 
Public Defender knows the rough and tumble 
of life and the hazards which can ensnare the 
weak or unwary. Born in San Francisco on 
June 1, 1901 of Domenico and Margaret 
Mancuso, Edward was nine years old when 
his father died in 1910, leaving a family of 
eleven children — seven boys and four girls. 
The three youngest boys, including Edward, 
were placed in a home for boys; the other 
children endeavored to help with the family 
budget. His mother, fortunately, lived to see 
all of her children well established in busi- 
ness, in the professions or in their own homes. 

Selling chewing gum and newspapers, 
working Saturdays in a drug store, running 
errands on his "bike," attending night schools, 
both elementary and high, young Edward 
grew from childhood to boyhood. While at- 
tending the University of California, he 
worked continuously eight hours and more 
daily as a salesman. By the time he was gradu- 
ated from the University, he already held an 
unbroken employment record of seventeen 
years with one firm. 

During his school years Edward was both 
athletically and forensically inclined. Together 
with his brother Joseph and several other 
youths, he found time in 1921 to organize and 
help finance the Humboldt Athletic Club, en- 
couraging competitive sports for underprivi- 
leged children in an effort to help combat 
juvenile delinquency. 

Eventually, handicaps and difficulties over- 
come, Edward, in 1929 successfully completed 
his 3-year course at the University of Cali- 
fornia, Hastings College of the Law, San 
Francisco, and received his coveted degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. A few months later he was 



by Alan Tory 



married to Dorothy E. J. Fegan, of Sacn 
mento, California. 

Since that time, Edward T. Mancuso h 
risen rapidly as a lawyer, a public official, I 
civic and a religious leader, as well as a bm 
nessman. He became the senior member < 
the law firm of Mancuso, Herron and Win 
345 Grove Street, San Francisco, until tern- 
nation of the partnership in Januar)', 1955 

As a public official. Supervisor Manca' 
ser\'ed more than 10 years (1943-5-1) wi. 
the Cit)' and County of San Francsco Boa 
of Supervisors, an elective office, until Apr 
1954, when he was appointed Public Defen 
er. Subsequently, with the completion of th 
term, he was elected to ser\'e four years toti 
end of 1958. 

This background of struggle and achiev; 
ment means that Mancuso can bring to h 
work a real understanding of persons wh 
have been subjected to exceptional strait 
and temptations, while being quick to dete' 
the professional fast talker. 

The office which he holds derives its a 
thorit)' from the Sixth Amendment of tl 
Federal Constitution which, among oth 
things, requires that in all criminal prosec 
tions the accused, no matter what his financi 
standing, shall have the assistance of couns 
for his defense. 

The Public Defender system in counties 
California was introduced through enablii 
legislation in 1921. A Public Defender's c 
fice was established in San Francisco on Oa 
ber 15, 1921. It was not until Fcbruar}', 19' 
that the scope of the office ( thanks to Ma. 
cuso's overture to Mayor Robinson ) was e 
larged to include certain of the more coi 
plex misdemeanour cases. I 

In representing defendants, the Public Dij 
fender's prime duty is to see that each d 
fendant is granted a fair and impartial tri 
and that all his rights are preserv'ed. The c 
pediting of trials and opposing of unnect 
savj delays is another aspect of the offii 
which both reduces strain on the defenda: 
and indirectly saves the count)' money. The 
is no intent to secure acquittals or dismlssa 
of the guilty — but ever)' possible defense 



THE RECOI 



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One of them (brilliant and dedicated Jo- 
seph Kennedy) expresses his grave concern, 
on behalf of defendants, about the use in 
court of evidence obtained as a result of un- 
reasonable searches and seizures. 

Mancuso himself, with the concurrjnce of 
the whole team, is convinced that pushers of 
narcotics and addicts ( as distinct from the 
wholesaler) should not be looked upon as 
criminals, but rather as persons in need of 
medical therapy. A punitive approach, except 
for dope sellers, will not he believes, solve the 
narcotics problem. Meanwhile, however, the 
Public Defender is hamstrung by an obsolete 
system of law enforcement, and the dope 
problem is getting out of hand. 

Despite such disappointments and frustra- 
tions, the most marked progress has been 
made in these last four years in the admin- 



1955. Left to right: Fitigerald Amci in ..-..tlgo-or 
le Minudri. Joseph G. Kennedy 

istration of a great office which is important 
to dem(x:racy. 

"Equal justice under law," Chief Justice 
Warren has said, remains our goal, but is not 
fully secured to all citizens. The rights prom- 
ised them bv our Constitution are not yet per- 
fected. Some of the defects in our system are 
inherited; others keep creeping in. Justice, 
like freedom, needs constant vigilance." 

The work, arduous and little publicised, of 
bands of men and women in Public Defend- 
ers' offices throughout our land, contributes 
towards a closer approximation to the ideal of 
protection of the innocent and just treatment 
of the guilty. 

Mancuso has enlarged the scope and dig- 
nity of his department, and brought a new 
drive and energy to one of the toughest jobs 
in our community which requires heart as 
well as head. 



SEAFOOD 




Lee 
Lee's 

and STEAKS xr 

''Lunch and Dinner" J' 9 

Panoramic Waterfront View w) 5 



Ted Ince, JACK LONDON SQUARE 
AIf!r. Oakland • Hr. 4-3456 



When you're cruising the Bay you can tie 
up at the Sea Wolf dock and enjoy a fine 
dinner or some of our famous cocktails. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
BUSINESSMAN 
TELLS ALL! 




Prominent local executive (pictured above) tells all tie meets about 
the exhilarating executive luncheons served every forenoon at the 
Veneto Restaurant. Veneto caters to the educated palate with 
liberal libations and leisurely one hour lunches that send the 
businessman back to face the afternoon refreshed and revitalized. 

VENETO RESTAURANT . a., a, .Vta.on.Rcser.aUons: GA 1-97,1 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 



BOYS CLUB BAND 

Once a year the San Francisco 
Boys' Club Music Department of- 
fers many boys of San Francisco 
musical opportunities. The San 
Francisco Boys' Club Concert and 
Marching Bands have been per- 
forming throughout the state for 
th2 past three and a half years. 

This is the only youth band in 
San Francisco, and the only boys' 
club band in Northern California. 

It takes part in many events, in- 
cluding California State Fair. 
East-'West Football Game Pa;:- 
eant. Guardsmen Christmas Pa- 
rade, Santa Clara County Fair, 
California Days Festival and many 
others. 

The Band performs at the State 
Fair yearly, and was the first Band 
from San Francisco to perform at 
this Fair in over 10 years. 

At their summer camp all of 
the boys have the opportunity of 
spending two weeks where they 
receive music training as well as 
a vacation. 

A Concert is given once a year 
here in San Francisco. 

As proclaimed by Mayor George 
Christopher, the San Francisco 
Boys' Club Band has been named 
Ambassador of Goodwill for the 
City and County of San Francisco. 

The San Francisco Public 
Schools, as well as the Musicians 
Union, are very much in favor of 
this musical organization, which is 
to give a concert at the 'War Me- 
morial Opera House on April 25 
with Enrique Jorda as guest con- 
ductor. 






ni 



'iJMl-rxTTJ/ 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 

Polo Alto, Son Franciico and Iqnocio, Colli, 



Model of new Bonl of An 



BANK OF AMERICA EXPANDS 

Construction is due to begin 
shortly after June 1 on the new 
Bank of America Service Center 
which will be on Market and South 
■Van Ness streets. 

Fronting 324 feet on South Van 
Ness, the building will extend 150 
feet on Market, 275 feet on Elev- 
enth street and 320 feet adjoining 
the existing Coca Cola building. 

It will consist of eight stories, 
mezzanine and basement, framed 
for future expansion to 13 stories. 

It will house under one roof 
those departments which serve 
metropolitan branches of the Bay 
Area and in some cases the entire 
Bank of America organization. 
These services will include ERMA 
installations, data processing cen- 
ter, tabulating, the addressograph, 
mail, mechanical, stock transfer, 
inspection, travellers cheque ac- 
counting and payroll departments; 
plus an auxiliary office of the 
Ninth and Market branch. 

The building will be provided 
with a heliport with accommoda- 
tions for two helicopters at one 
time, and also with a facility for 
drive-in banking to provide aux- 
liary sei-vice to the Ninth and 
Market branch. There will be three 
drive-up windows, with car en- 
trance on South 'Van Ness and 
exit on Eleventh Street. Cost of 
land and improvements will be ap- 
proximately $13 million. 



building 



HOPEFUL ATTORNEY 




widely and intimately known 
both Democrats and Republican 
Press i-cpresentative Charl 
Siegfei th reports that, she has i 
solid backing of the 3.50 clubs 
the California Federation of Bi 
ness and Professional Wome 
Clubs. For three legislative s 
sions she was its legislative rep 
sentative at Sacramento. Her wi 
proved so successful that the F 
eration has backed her to the J 
to win the election. 

ESSENTIAL MATTER 

The San Francisco Giants i 
count Governor Goodwin C. Kni) 
among their most enthusiastic si 
porters. 

The governor, in addition to > 
ing a baseball fan personally, 
turned his official attention to 
sport to help assure the success 
big league ball in San Francisf- 

In reply to a request from Sut. 
visor Francis McCarty, Gover 
Knight announced he had inclu 
baseball among the essential iri 
ters to be presented to the spH 
session of the legislature. i 

He has pushed vigorously | 
with success for passage of led 
lation to make possible constxl 
tion of the Giants' new basea 
park at Candlestick Point, ci 
struction of the park hingesj 
the state's convejing to the '] 
and county certain state tidelai 
dedicated as streets. 

"It is my wish," the gover 
said, "to assist in every way J 
sible to make big league base, 
a success in California and in 
specific instance to help make: 
new^ Giants' bail pai'k ready fori 
start of the 1959 season." 



CANDIDATE RUTH GUPTA 
Attorney Ruth Church Gupta's 
campaign machinery is set for a 
stiff battle in what augurs a "free- 
for-all" for the legislative post of 
Assemblyman in the 21st A.D. 
She's battling one opponent in the 
Democratic primary, but she is 
coniident of winning in the June 3 
primary as she has been endorsed 
by the Democratic parties in the 
21st A.D. 

On the GOP side of the battle, 
Mrs. Gupta is stacking her experi- 
ience and qualifications against 
four candidates — all men. 

She is the only one of the five 
candidates with legislative experi- 
ence. This makes her no newcomer 
to the State Legislature where it is 



During the Gold Rush, pricei 
San Francisco were so high 
laundry was sent to and from CI 
by chpper ship, according to i 
San Francisco Chamber of CI 
merce. 




BASEBALL FAN GOODWIN 



POPULATION JUMP 

An expected 82 per cent in- 
■reaae of California population by 
1975 and other striking economic 
^owth projections in areas of in- 
comes, school enrollment, house- 
lolds. labor force, manufactnrin*: 
employment, electric power i<).iil 
ind thermal energy requirenu iits 
vnthin the State have been dis- 
•losed by the California State 
"hamber of Commerce, based on 
naterials assembled for the Cham- 
)er by the Stanford Research In- 
titute. 

California's population is ex- 
>ected to jump from 12,961.000 in 
955 to 23.565.000 in 1975. By 
960 it is expected to reach 15.- 
129,000; in 1965 it will rise to 18,- 
159.000. and by 1970 to 20.696.- 
100. During this period the ratio 
letween male and female popula- 
ion will remain relatively un- 
hanged. 

In 1955, personal incomes were 
29,748.000.000 and spendable in- 
omes were $26,583,000,000. In 
|975 personal incomes are fore- 
ast at $70,411,000,000 and spend- 
ble incomes. $62,865,000,000. 

Other significant trends will ap- 
[ear in California public elemen- 
ary and high school enrollment 
i-hich is expected to almost double 
uring the 1955-1970 period. En- 
oUment reached 2.448.030 in 1955. 
•hereas in 1970 4.345.200 will en- 
pll. In 1960 there will be 3.264.- 
,00 students, and in 1965. 3.883.- 

po. 

I 

\ PFE ENTERPRISE 

I Fresh produce, freight and froz- 
\\ foods will be hauled in the 
kme car, a new "all-purpose" 
■lechanical "reefer" now being 
uilt on its assembly line at Los 
ingeles by Pacific Fruit Express, 
' The new car, it was announced, 
■Tibodies new concepts in refrig- 
^ation and design and departs 
idically from standard models 
iilt only to haul frozen foods. 
A total of 1.000, costing more 
an $20 million, has been ordered, 
alf of the order will consist of 
l-foot "super-giant" models and 
le other half will be of the stand- 
"d 40-foot size. 

The cars are unique in that 6x8 
ovements from the East and 
ot shding doors and metal floor- 
g will permit pallet loading and 
indling of dead freight on return 
idwest. 

Historically, according to K. V. 
ummer, vice president and gen- 
al manager of PFE. westward 
ovement of mechanical reefers 
s been largely empty. Officials 
pe that ability to handle dead 
Jight will increase revenues— 

RIL, l9Se 




PUBLISHER MARRIOTT 

eliminate financial burdens of cost- 
ly empty westward movements. 

The company- jointly owned by 
Southern Pacific and Union Pa- 
cific will place cars in service at 
the rate of four per day starting 
in mid-March. 



BUSINESS NEWS 

William H. Marriott, founder and 
publisher ot Family Weekly Mag- 
azine has taken over the Daily 
Commercial News, 82-year-old San 
Francisco shipping and industrial 
paper. 

"San Francisco and the Bay 
Area," says 48-year-old Marriott, 
"form the business Mecca of the 
West — the centers of finance, bank- 
ing, insui-ance. shipping, food pack- 
aging, wholesale disti'ibution. ag- 
riculture. retaiUng. advertising, 
and manufacturing of diverse 
types. Leaders in these vital fields 
have a right to expect a firm and 
solid voice through a dail,v business 
newspaper that concentrates on 
matters of interest to them, with 
its sights focused on the better- 
ment of the community at lar^e: 
a paper that is comprehensive in 
its coverage, dynamic in its ap- 
proach and firm in its convictions." 

NEW ELITE 

The streams of thought of the 
20th century reflect a new ideol- 
ogy- Bureaucracy — according to a 
sociologist at the University of 
California. Los Angeles. 

Dr. Svend Riemer. who fled an 
earlier ideology of the 20th cen- 
tury — Fascism — when he left his 
native Germany to come to the 
United States, has made a socio- 
logical study of ideological struc- 
tures. 

He points out that the patterns 
of Bureaucracy, which he describes 
as the rule by an anonymous, tech- 
nical elite, fall precisely into 
neither the traditional pattern of 
conservative or liberal ideologies 



nor in that of Communism or 
Fascism. 

In addition to its leaders. Bu- 
leaucracy embraces two types of 
passive participants, "those who 
idolize and those who deprecate 
the Bureauciacy which works for 
them, and -in so doing — manipu- 
lates them." 

Like other ideologies Bui-eau- 
I rac.v has its cultural manifesta- 
tions, its reflections in streams of 
thought derived from contempor- 
ary social reality. Dr. Riemer says 

The Existentialism of Sartre is 
easily assigned to the disapprov- 
ing bureauciatic followers, he says. 
The architecture of Frank Lloyd 
Wright places him among the 
"technical creative elite, building 
a new world from intuition and see- 
ing everything in its technical re- 
lationship to a particular field of 
competence." 

Bureaucracy's art is found in 
the Fi-ench Impressionist school, a 
reflection of escape "into immense- 
ly complex reality." Its music — 
jazz--"sings of the monotony of 
machine-made civilization, which 
grants individual freedom at the 
cost of slavish submission to bu- 
reaucratic routines just as the 
jazz musician must improvise 
against a background of conven- 
tionalized rhythm or chords." 

The literature of Bureaucracy is 
science fiction —an intellectual play 
with the possibility of a bureau- 
cratic social order. Dr. Rieiner 



CUSTOMS REPORT 
In January of 1957, the local 
Customs office reported a four 
year all-time high in business pro- 
cessed and revenues collected. Ac- 
tually business through this Cus- 
toms Port tripled in 1957 over 
1952. Likewise, Customs revenues 
increased to $42,00,000 from 
$19,600,000 dm-ing the compai- 
able period. At the time these fig- 
ures were released, the Collector 
of Customs. Chester MacPhee, 
stated this tremendous increase 
had been absorbed by a consci- 
entious staff of employees without 
an increase in personnel. 

FLOATING FAIR 
The World Trade Center in co- 
operation with the California 
World Trade Center Authority and 
San Francisco Bay ports has ex- 
tended a special cabled in\ntation 
to the Japan Industiy Floating 
Fair, a shipload of Japanese prod- 
iicts available foi- sale in world 
markets, to visit the ports of San 
Francisco Bay enroute to or from 
its tour of Latin-American ports 




COLLECTOR OF CUSTOMS MacPHEE 
scheUuled fur laic lHb&. 

Japan Industry Floating Fair 
features a shipload showcase ex- 
hibit of Japanese machinery and 
other products which has already 
received favorable reception in a 
voyage to Southeast Asian ports. 
The 1958 Japan Floating Fair plans 
to embark for piincipal Central 
and South American ports in Oc- 
tober of this year. 



How well 

do you hnow 

San Francisco? 




bvcn mo5t lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still lind a tour ex- 
ciung, informative, entertaininR. 
Be sure to tell visiting frieai^: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothinc like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars: trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares arc surprisingly 
low. 

l/.Dr 



Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 

YUkon 64000 



BLACK HAWK 

Jazz Corner of the West 

200 HYDE STREET 
GRaystone 4-9567 



JOHN NOGA 



GUITO CACIANTI 



International Womer 
Bowlers Meet in S. F 



The same month which sees the 
debut of the Giants goes down to 
history for another sporting event 
which underlines the building up of 
San Francisco into a sports Mecca 
for Americans. The Downtown 
Bowl at Jones and Eddy w'ill be 
the scene from April 17 to May 20 
of the W o m e n's International 
Bowling C o n g r e ss Tournament. 




Alaska will be likely to spend an 
prize money they win while the 
are here. 

Hosts of this flood of compel 
tors will be a dynamic father an 
son duo — Henry and Rex Golobii 
The commodious and i n v i t i n 
building with 40 alleys in whic 
the contests will take place — bip 
gest bowling center in Northet' 
California — was taken over by tl 
elder Golobic in April, 1942. It ha 
been used for walkathons. wrest: 
ing. and dancing before that, ar 
no-one succeeded in luring contimi 
ing crowds to the location. But t' 
Golobic regime brought prospe) 
ity to what had been a white el< 
phant. In 1946 record-breakir 
business was attained, and sini 
then the Downtown Bowl has b 
come a cheerful and convivial fef 
ture of our city's life. 

Any night you may see excitt 
watchers and rapt performei 
stooping forward as they hurl tl 
ball against a distant constellatif 
of skittles. You may hear tl 
pleasant noise of knocking astl 
pins fall, and shouts, whoops, ■ 
wails expressing individual rea.' 

BowUng fans transcend rac 
class, and occupation, as shown 1 
Rex Golobics hst of divei-sifl'l 
clubs who play at the Downtov 
Bowl. Like love, this art has a la 
guage of its own that does not dl 



and all you 



San Francisco Giants 



We are so proud to have you with 
us. May your happiness in our be- 
loved City of San Francisco always 
be as enthusitistic as ours is in hav- 
ing you with us. 

MAX SOBEL 



HOST REX GOLOBIC IN COSTUME 

This will biing 2,587 teams (each 
of five girls I from thirty-six states 
plus Alaska, Hawaii, and Canada. 
In addition there are 4,043 doubles 
and 8,086 singles entrants, with 
prize booty amounting to $87,321. 

Mr. Swanson of the Con\'ention 
and Tourist Bureau estimates that 
at least three-quarters of a million 
dollars' worth of business will be 
brought into the city by these 
women over the 34-day period. He 
stresses that the spreading of visi- 
tors over this time is the most 
valuable of all forms of patronage, 
much better than having a big 
number of people confined to a 
very few days. He also says that 
guests from remote places such as 




.vling Cha 




?nd upon formal speech. It can 
eep teenagers out of mischief, 
ji-e the doldrums of middle age. 
nd anyone who is looking for a 
u-e for juvenile or adult delin- 
iency might well make a hopeful 
iquiry into this absorbing and 
[illed relaxation. 
From the days when the Dutch 
New Amstei'dam became capti- 
Ited by the game of ninepins, 
jwling has figured as an Ameii- 
in sport. When the austere Dutch 
jthorilies. frowning upon people 
n j o y i n g themselves overmuch, 
issed a law forbidding ninepins, 
tenth pin was added, and the 
aying of the game was gaily re- 



sumed! Now It is estimated there 
are between 18 and 20 million 
bowlers in the United States— who 
include among Bay Area notabili- 
ties the Public Defender Edward 
Mancuso and Mayor Clifford Rish- 
ell of Oakland. 

Rex Golubic. an enthusiastic 
bowler himself, is rightly pleased 
that after efforts e.xtending over 
ten years, he and his fi-iends have 
succeeded in bringing this impor- 
tant tournament to San Francisco. 

The women bowlers will cer- 
tainly bi-ing their own colour and 
vivacity to blend with the roman- 
tic elements which are indigenous 
to our city. 




SAN FRANCISCO'S MOTOR HOTEL 
at Civic Center 

r- 



HOTEL WHITCOMB 

8th to 9th on Market Street 
At the Hub of the Freeways 

Moderate rates - Children Free 

500 Rooms - Free Guest Parking 
Use New Motor Entrance 



All Services - Excellent Food 

TRY THE WHITCOMB NEXT 

Karl C. Weber, Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 
UN 1-9600 



FOR JOB I.AR(,E OR SMALL 

CALIFORNIA BASEMENT CLEANERS 

B.isemcnts - Buildings - Yards - Lots Cleaned 
Furniture • Junk &? Iron Wanted - Fully Insured 



FREE ESTIMATE 
2648 lirvaiit St. 



24 HR. SERVICE 

HE. 1-6740 



ART COLVIN REALTY 

ART COLVIN. President 

REAL ESTATE - BUSINESS INVESTMENTS 
INSURANCE 

A Sales Staff of 25 Persons to Serve '^ou 

1999 Jimipero Serra Blvd. PL 5-1000 

WESTVIEW 

Color Reproductions 

JULIAN J. DYKE 

1536 - 48th Avenue San Francisco 12 

LOnibard 4-6180 

CHOICE OF COURSES AT 

RILEY S SCHOOL 

1 -HOTEL-MOTEL FRONT OFFICE COURSE 

for men and women. Age no b.irrier. 
2-PBX SW ITCHBO.\RD-RECEPTIONIST 

Ideal for girls and women who enjoy contact 

with the public. 
i-HOTEL TR.\NSCR1PT COURSE 
For experienced Hotel Clerks. 

Day and I\ight Classes 

Room 400. Wilson BIdg. Free Placement Service San Francisco 3 
973 Market Street G.ArficId 1-8112 

REMINGTON RAND 

Division of Sperry-Rand Corporation 

41 FIRST STREET 
DOu^las 2-8600 San Francisco 



LARKSPUR 

CONVALESCENT 

HOSPITAL 

For Elderly Chronics and Convalescents 
R.N. and Physical Therapist on Staff 

GRACE SLOCUM, Director 

Special Diet 

Homelike Atmosphere 
Moderate Prices 

Conscientious Care 

234 HAWTHORNE, LARKSPUR 
Phone LArkspur 819 

LARKSPUR, CALIFORNIA 



WALGREEN DRUG STORES 

9 REGISTERED PHARMAQSTS 

• LOW PRICES 

• SPEEDY SERVICE 

135 POWELL STREET 

981 MARKET STREET 

STONESTOWN 

FALLON 

AND 

HARGREAVES 

550 Montgomery Street 
San Francisco 



CONTINENTAL SERVICE 
COMPANY 

260 -5th STREET 
San Francisco 



Japan Tourist Association 

651 Market St. San Erancisco 5, Calif. 

Cable Address "TOURIST S. F." 

Telephones 
EXbrook 2-66-«) EXbrook 2-6641 



PEERLESS WELDING CO. 



265 - 10th Street 



''Happy Slidin^s Giants" 

MOLLERICH & CO. 



550 MISSION ST. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



ORIGINAL JOES No. 1 Restaurant 



144 TAYLOR STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BABE & SAM S VILLAGE INN 

• 



1410 SUNNYVALE AVE. 



SAN FR.\NCISCO 



^ 



JERRY & JOHNTNY'S 

• 

81 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SILVER CREST DOUGHNUT SHOP 

RESTAURANT Sc COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
340 Bayshore Blvd. AT 8-0-53 S.in Fr.incisco 



Hillside Market Grocery 

(Mexican and American) 

100 BLANKEN AVENUE 



SAN FR.ANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO'S GUYS & DOLLS CLUB 

WELCOMES THE S. E. GIANTS 

ROOM 202 GR. 4-6100 

ELAINA TENNYSON. i\u/<i/ Director 



527 CLIB Bar and Restaurant 

Dotiicslic afij Imported Liquor, - Pahsl on Tap 

Joe Fuchslin - C.irl Rcichmulh. Proprietors 

52- BRYANT STREET 

Iclephone SUtter 1-9625 S.in Fr.incisco. Cilifornil 



THE RECO 



The niosl beautiful city 
that I could remember" 



Why a Sturdy Citizen 
Chose San Francisco 




Eric Livingston is a grrey-haired, 
pcky man with a fine forehead, 
id a penetrating gaze, whose 
Nible and expressive speech I'e- 
jns a recognizable Gemian ac- 
nt. He resolved to come to San 
ancisco. at a time when his life 
d fallen apart, "because it was 
! most beautiful city that I 
ild remember from all my trav- 
t." One way in which he has re- 
id the Golden Gate for opening 
a new life was to rid City Hall 
a pest of pigeons, and thereby 
'e our exchequer thousands of 
liars. 

iPhis Pied Piper of Hamelin ges- 
e, however, is actually only one 
his minor achievements, though 
is of intrinsic interest. Pigeons 
.vhich cany the same bacteria 
rats— plagued the balcony of 
? Mayors office and the flight of 
ps leading dov\'n to Polk Street, 
■■ingston. a pest control expert. 
is called in to do a test job. He 
■ated the areas of invasion with 
i-hemical which, in the parlance 
his profession, gives pigeons "a 
t foot." No bird that came once, 
umed to the scene. 
iVhen he and his wife first came 
live here, having been used to a 
u s e h o 1 d with domestics and 



chauffeurs, life was tough. They 
had changed their name from 
Loewenstein. because in Germany 
the curtain had just fallen on a 
tragic climax which shattered 
family life. 

.A. Jew whose family tree in- 
ludes a scion who was knighted. 
the fugitive from Nazi persecu- 
tion — engineer, owner of a ribbon 
factory, importer. Army officer — 
wished to put from his mind the 
nightmare of Hitler's increasing 
pressure on his race. It had begun 
with minor impositions, and ended 
n the blacklisting of his factoi-j'. 
nterference in the education of 
Ins children, and three weeks in 
Dachau, from which he was re- 
leased on signing a paper to say 
that on leaving the countrj' he 
would renounce all his possessions. 

In their first months in San 
Francisco, the wine of freedom, 
concerts in Stem Grove with no 
admission charge, and few and dif- 
ficultly earned dollars sustained 
this brave man and wife, who at 
the end of each day brought back 
their separate earnings and looked 
gratefuU.v at three dollars laid on 
the table. Eric filled cigarette and 
cand.v machines, and his wife did 
bab.v-sitting and worked as a wait- 
ress. 

At last a break came which en- 
abled the Livingstons to use their 
talents in a constructive way. The 
Crane Pest Control business, fallen 
on evil days since the death of its 
founder, was looking for someone 
to take over, and Eric Livingston 
was asked by Mrs. Crane to step 
in. He brought to this new field the 
same qualities of mind and deter- 
mination which he had demon- 
strated as a successful manufac- 
turer in Germany. 

He got in touch with the head 
of the entomology- department in 
the Universit.v of California at 
Berkeley, who helped him to de- 
velop potent insecticides. He con- 
ceived a new approach to pest con- 
trol governed by professional 
standards, got together other com- 
panies and founded the California 
Pest Control Association, and as a 
final step in collaboration with 



WELCOME S. F. GIANTS 

CENTRAL ELECTRIC 
COMPANY, INC. 

SAN FRANCISCO REDWOOD CITY 
SAUSALITO SUNNYVALE 

INDUSTRIAL and COMMERCIAL WIRING 

STREET LIGHTING and 

UNDERGROUND INSTALLATIONS 

TOWER and POLE LINE CONSTRUCTION 

A HALF CENTURY OF SERVICE 

PLaza 53448 

VaVs Redwood Room 

COCKTAILS - DINNER - LUNCHEON 
SUNDAY MORNING BREAKFAST 



89th Street & Junipero Serra Blvd. 
Daly aty 

UNderhill 1-2200 - HEmlock 1-6961 

YOUR ELECTRICIAN 

EMIL J. WEBER 
ELECTRIC CO. 

Electrical Contracting 

258 DORLAND STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 14, CALIF. 



RIL. 1958 




.^fflSv -SE*- 



Coming to S. F. with nothing except br< 



Eastern groups founded the Na- 
tional Pest Control Association. 

Currently he is working in close 
connection both with University 
departments and with many lead- 
ing chemical manufacturers in the 
making of field tests. The firm of 
which he assumed control is now 
one of the leading companies in 
California. 

But business success alone is not 
enough to satisfy a man who in 
Dachau found himself in a strange 
company including Schumaker, the 
Social Democrat leader, and Sev- 
enth Day Adventists — a collection 
of humanity diverse in origin, yet 
united in hope. From this experi- 
ence he conceived a vision of one 
human race imperilled by false 
prophets or dictators, and the im- 
portance of improving the educa- 
tion and living conditions of the 
people as the one means of pro- 
gress. 

Thus, not only did he look for a 
means of personal livelihood which 




should be related to human wel- 
fare, but he encouraged his two 
children in the same positive direc- 
tion, and having established him- 
self financially, looked round tor 
outlets of social service to which 
he now gives a proportion of his 
time. 

Eric Livingston is active in the 
United Ci-usade, and Jewish Wel- 
fare; he is committee chairman of 
the Lions Club for the Lucinda 
Weeks Home for Crippled Chil- 
dren, and Vice Pi-esident of the 
Newcomer Group from Germany. 

This bracing story of a man to 
whom San Francisco has given the 
opportunity of shaping a second 
life, culminates in a journey back 
to the scene of his birth upon 
which he is about to embark. He 
leaves for a vacation in Europe 
which will take him to Wuppertal 
near Cologne, a spot famous for I. 
G. Farben. its stainless steel, and 
Rayon industries, and as the birth- 
place of Rontgen who discovered 
X-rays. 

When he comes back, he will 
have at his fingertips exhaustive 
information about the Monorail, 
built in 1898, which runs from one 
end of the valley to the other. This 
means of transport, which is 
cheap, safe, and takes traffic off 
the street, offers in Livingston's 
view the best solution for the traf- 
fic congestion which is one of the 
acutest problems of his adopted 
city. San Francisco. He will be an 
articulate and well-versed expon- 
ent of the merits of the Monorail 
when the time comes (as it must, 
soon) for a community review of 
alternative ways of moving oiu- 
citizens from place to place. 



San Francisco's Fleishhacker 
Fool is the longest in the world 
and contains 6,000,000 gallons of 
warm salt water, according to the 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. 



SCHIRMER STEVEDORING COMPANY, 
LTD. 

Contracting 
Stevedores 

55 Sacramento Street San Francisco, 11 

Telephone: YUkon 2-4500 

INTERNATIONAL 

BUSINESS MACHINES 

CORPORATION 

340 MARKET STREET 
YUkon 2-0100 San Francisco 11, Calif. 

WORLD HEADQUARTERS 
590 Madison Ave., Ne« York 22. N. Y., Phone PLaza 3-1900 



Golden West Iron Works 

Structural Steel . . . Miscellaneous Iron 
CON FINNIC AN 



I 



505 Railroad Ave. PL. 6-0375 

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

CHUCK'S AUTO GLASS 

REPLACEMENT GLASS FOR ALL MAKES OF CARS 

Wings - Felt Channels - Rubber Weather Strips W 

64th Ave. and East 14th LOckhaven 2-3926 

OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 

THE RECOf 



Welcome San Francisco GIANTS 




The lOOO's of Californians 
who are our FANS every day 
will be your FANS 
on opening day! 



Tln' Spt'iTv «S: Hutchinson Company 

Welcome S. F. (giants! 

LET'S LEAD THEM ALL 

MACK NEWMAN AND JACK NADEL 

For New Ideals tn Help Your Business 

2415 CHESTNUT STREET 
WE. 1-0643 

Bisliop Edivard T. Scott 
1017 Golden Gate Ave. JOrdan 7-1198 

San Francisco, California 

SAN FRANCISCO HEALTH FOOD STORE 

A complete assortment of Foods for alt dietary and allergy requirements. 

Also a complete line of dried foods and natural vitamins. 
415 Suiter Street EX. 2-8477 Sa 



M.D. AMBULANCE SERVICE 
Emergency Specialists 

98 EAST MARKET STREET -:- DALY CITY, CALIF. 
- PLa;a 6-4800 - 

"Welcome to the Giants" 
JOHN W. BUSSEY 

1802 FILLMORE STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF. 

- fOrdan 7-8054 — 

24-HOUR SERVICE 

RYANS -10'' SERVICE - Signal Oil Products 

■We Give Ryans Extra Dividend Coupons" 

16th .ind So. Van Ness UN. 1-2748 San Francisco. Calif. 

Park here while attending Giant Games 

M. GREENBERG'S SONS 
Brass Foundry & Machine Works 

765 FOLSOM STREET 



MISSION 

Prescription 
Pliarniacv 

Phllip Heidl 

598 GUERRERO 

AT 18th STREET 

Phone UNderhlll I-I5I8 

SAN FRANCISCO 



EXbrook 2-} 143 



San F 



TRAP AN I Really 

• REAL ESTATE • RENTALS 

• NOTARY PUBLIC • LOANS 

Alice Traptmi 



4749 THIRD STREET 

Comer Oakdale Aveno 
In the Bay View Dislrii 



WELCOME GIANTS! 

John Mullane 

Painters Union Local J9 

200 Guerrero St. M.A. 1-0446 

San Francisco. Calif. 



Roy's Chevron Service 

Atlas Tires & Batteries 

Use your National Chevron 

Credit Card here 

1799 Ocean Ave. JU. 4-3019 

San Francisco. Calif. 



Washington Studio 
Apartments 

Henderson, Manager 



2277 Washington St 
WEst 1-9677 San Franci 



HENRY'S FASHION 
RESTAURANT 

270 MARKET STREET 
San Francisco 



WING DUCK CO. 

IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 

Liqtior. Wine and Grocery 

Hawaiian Products and Fresh Poi 

Chinese Porcelains 

928 Grant Ave. YUkon 2-1907 



Maiden lane Jewelers 

Expert Watch & Jenelry Repairin, 

47 MAIDEN LANE 
sutler 1-1351 San Francisco 1 



F 



ishermens^ 
GFotto ^^^ 




Phone UNderhlll 1-8144 

Jim Bruce Chinese Laundry 

W'c r^ll and Deliver 
14 i - 8th Street San Francisto 



THE JAZZ WORK 
SHOP 



HOTEL EL DRISCO 

Pacific Avenue al Broderick 
San Francisco, 15 



Blue & White Moving 

1755 O'FARRELL STREET 

WA. 1-9809 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Reasonable Rates Louis Vianoli 

VIANOLI AUTO WORKS 

- Automoti^e Specalisi - 

880 POST STREET 

ORdway 3-4128 San Francisco 



H. WENIGER 

SURGICAL INSTRUMENTS 

Active Hand 5l Finger Splints 

Orthopedic .Appliances 

70 TWELFTH STREET 

MArket 1-68-6 San Francisco : 



DROHER COAL CO. 

- Mexican Charcoal - 

1331 FOLSOM STREET 
San Francisco 



CHRISTY VAl LT CO. 

1000 Collins Avenue Colma, Califoruia 



PAUL G. BRUNNER 

CABINET MAKING 

Hi-Fi Cabinels to Order 

1446 PINE ST. PR. 5-5325 

San Francisco, Calif. 



SMITH INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

]ack E. Smiih /. B. (Dud) Smith 

Sand Blast Sand - Grit 

Garnet — Mineral Shot 

Nozzles - Pots 

SCAFFOLD RENTALS 

1485 Bayshore Blvd. JU. 5-7174 



VISTA GRANDE 
MARKET 

6350 MISSION STREET 
Daly City. Calif. 



Res. JU. 7-2145 Free Deliyery 

Garnero's Groceteria 

Finest of Groceries 
"Al the Right Price" 
544 Excelsior Ave. JU. 4-9993 

At Cor. Naples San Fi 



PRospect 6-0146 

THE WOODEN HORSE 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

MATT 
622 POLK ST. Smi Francis 



SAM a: DORIS USHER 
LOUISE BRISCOE 

SAMBAS 

Restaurant - Cocktail Lounge 
638 BROADWAY 
GA. 1-9628 San Franci: 



JUniper 5-9989 JUniper 5-1179 

23 CLUB 

Wesleni Enlertainmenl 

Cocktails - Barb-B-Que 

Fine Food 

23 VISITACION AVE. 

BRISBANE 



BEST WISHES 

SWISSAIR 

PIERRE S. RHEIN 

District Manager Snissai: 

171 POST STREET 

San Francisco 8, Calif. 

YUkon 2-6830 



ENJOY YOUR COCKTAILS 
at 

MY HOUSE 

1737 BALBOA STREET 
At 19th Ave. 



The Owl Rexall Drug Store 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

Drugs - Cosmetics 
Liquors ■ Sundries 

16th Sc MISSION STREETS 

3rd a: MARKET STREETS 

UN. 1-1004 San Francisco 



DOuglas 2-4654 

NORTH BEACH 
French Italian Bakery 



516 Green St. 
San F. 



Near Grant Ave 
11. Calif. 



CELSO BOSCACCI 



PRospect 6-6208 

POLYCLINIC HOSPITAL 

A General Hospital With All Facilities. 

Out Patient Department, EmergcnQ' 

Medical and Stu-gical Treatment 

DAY AND MIGHT 

1055 PINE STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



Lemasney 


Bros. Co. 


Fi,rnjture • Pianos 


. Cabinet Maker, 


L'rholstcrjng • Cust 


om Refinishing and 


Recond 


tioning 


COMPLETE LINE OF 


HOME FURNISHINGS 


50 Years i 


n Business 


J 745 Mission Street 


San Francisco 7 


ATwale 


2-8477 



P. A. BERGEROT 

Coun.scl for 

BANK OF AMERICA 

Couns,:l for 

CONSUL.\TE GENERAL OF FRANCE 

Phone SUtter 1-7868. 1-7869 

FRENCH BANK BtnLDING 

110 Sutter St. San Francisco, Calif. 



THE DRUM BAR 

220 TURK STREET 

San Francisco 



ANGELO'S 
PIZZA HOUSE 

I'Kza - Cocktails - DANCING 
3231 FILLMORE ST. 



PASTINE'S 

15 KEARNY STREET 
San Francisco 



EXPANSION 
BAR 

Lou, Bud and Leo 
TELEVISION 

2124 MARKET STREET 

San Francisco 
Phone MArket 1-9273 



STATE SUPPLY 



INDUSTRIALS AND METALS 



222 SEVENTH STREET 

San Francisco 3, CaW. 

MArket 1-2212 

JOE GENTILE 



AERO 

HEATING SHEETMETAL 

Furnaces - Water Heaters 

Installations - Seryice - Repairs 

General Sheet Metal Work 

PLaza 5-3852 

If no answer call S.F. JUno 8-4701 
6 Hillside Blvd. Daly Cit>- 



Phone OLympic 8-2187 

CandC 
PET SHOP 

6303 COLLEGE AVE. 

Oakland, Calif. 

JIMMIE CLAUSEN 

licensed Professional Handler 



LOU FREMY 

Incorporated 

Manufacturers' Distributors 
DRUGS - COSMETICS 

ond 
ALLIED PRODUCTS 

330 RITCH STREET 
YU. 6-4526 San Francisco 7 



Memo for Leisure 

The Gean,' Theatre i remembe 
to be there for eight o'clock i of 
fers a rare dramatic opportunit. 
in Eugene ONeill's sombre ani 
powerful play: "Long Days Jour 
ney into Night" with Fay Bainte 
and Anew McMaster in roles mad 
famous on Broadway by Fredericl 
March and Florence Eldridge. 

This Pulitzer prize play — whicl. 
is drawn from life — is directed b; 
Jose Quintero. It is of profound in 
terest as exhibiting the youii;| 
O'Neill and the family in which b 
grew up. 

The widow of Eugene O'Neil 
Carlotta Monterey O'Neill, re 
leased this coveted play to a younj 
trio of producers including Quin 
tero, because of their inspired pre 
duction of O'NeiU's other plajj 
"The Iceman Cometh," and he 
confidence in them was vindicate' 
by the plaj* receivong all the hoTi 
ours the American stage can bf 
stow on a production. 

The new Cinerama productions 
the Orpheum takes us on a fasc^ 
nating journey to the peaks i 
Central Asia. Entitled: "Search fc 
Paradise," it is in our judgmer 
the best of all the Lowell Thoma 
creations. 

Its strength is the off-beat a( 
ventures which it records — a S( 
joum among the Hunzukuts in ' 
Himalayan lost world where thei 
are no income taxes, no diseas 
and no jails: a trip on the rivt 
Jhelum which flows through tl 
city of Srinagar in Kashmir, Vei 
ice of the East; and as clima.\ tl 
coronation of the king of Nep 
which Lowell Thomas attended i 
a representative of President Ei' 
enhower. 

An added appeal of the ente 
tainment is the fine baritone voi 
of Robert Meixill who sings haun 
ing ballads descriptive of seen 
from the Roof of the World. 

April 21 marks "'" launching 
the 21st annual festival of the S. 
Francisco Civic Light Opera at t 
Cunan, with the Broadway prii 
winning musical, "The Most Hap 
Fella," set in the lush Napa V 
ley wine country. 

The series will include, in a* 
tion to "The Most Happy Felln," 
lavish Civic Light Opera prodi' 
tion of "The King and I," May ; 
the world premiere of a new It 
sical, "Grand Hotel," August 
and Broadway's newest No. 1 1 
"The Music Man," October 23. 
musicals will play the Curran 
fi\e weeks each on subscription. 

THE RECO 



A 



FLOORCRAFT 

l/7'fr - LINOLEUM TILE 

s-i MISSION STREET 
II. r 1-8254 San Francisco 



./■n If. Bell Loun,- M. lucoh, 

ansas City Hickory Pit 

Supreme Barbecued Links, Ribs 

Choice Beef & Chicken 
t-aluring Sneel Potato. Fruit Pief 
X - -347 1355 Fillmore St. 

,n„p, Drlirery Sar, Franchco 



unnigan Furniture Co. 

R J. "Bob" Dunnigan 

t>crylhmgfor the Home 

^4- COLUMBUS AVENUE 

R. !--990 San Francisco 11 



I U.n J- 5245 SUtter 1-9985 

FAR EAST CAFE 

Famous Chinese Food 

'fpen from 12 Noon to ll-.iO p.m. 

631 GR.\NT AVENUE 

Chinatown. San Francisco 



R. PENNY FOODS INC. 



PALM ISLAND BRANDS 



Specializing in 
Wholesome Food Pi, 



1349 STE\'ENSON ST. 
VAlencia 6-5616 



AL- JACK'S CLVE 

W'/icre Good Sports Meet 

5~0- BALBOA STREET 

.. 2-240 Jack Storm. Prop. 



'RANK'S LOUNGE 

4100 GEARY BLVD. 
San Francisco 



JACK 


S 


INN 


6456 MISSION 


STREET 


San Fr 


anc. 


,c„ 



JACK'S TAVERN 

1951 SUTTER STREET 
San Francisco 



WELCOME S.F. GIANTS 

■GOOD LICK" 

Canadian Pacific Airlines Ltd. 

Iiitercoiitiiieutal Routes 

Serving Canada, Hawaii, Fiji, New Zpalan«l. Australia 
The Orient. South .America and Europe 

212 STOCKTON STREET 

(ROOM 210) 

DOuglas 2 8595 




DIISE OL'T WITH YOIR FAMILY AT THE 

New Pisa Restaurant 

1268 GRANT AVENl E SAN FRANQSCO 

Dante Benedetti. Proprietor 

Everyone Enjoys Our 
SPECIAL STEAK DINNERS 

at the 

Paper Doll Restaurant 

524 UNION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

DOuglas 2-9835 



UNION OIL COMPANY 
OF CALIFORNIA 



W elcome 




SUtter 1-0400 



S. F. Giants 



425 HRST STREET 



JOE S OF WESTLAKE 

Famous for Charcoal Broiled Steaks and Chops 

Dinner from 11 a.m. to 12 a.m. 

Alemany & Lake Merced Blvd. 

PLaza 5-7400 

IN SAN FRANCISCO, VISIT 

ORIGINAL JOE'S 

Chestnut 8C Fillmore -:- FI. 6-3233 



DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

Any Make or Model Seven Days a Week 

9 A.M. - 10 P.M. FREE ESTIMATES on Antenna Installation; 

1322 HAIGHT STREET 
UN. 3-0793 — Also UN. 3-1836 

VALENTE MARINI PERATA & CO. 

— Funeral Directors — 

With Over 60 Years of Distinctive Service 
Ttfo Modern Funeral Homes Centrally Located 

4840 MISSION 
Near Onondaga Ave. - Phone DEIaware 3-0161 

649 GREEN STREET 
Near Columbus Ave - Phone DOuglas 2-0627 

Everybody, Just Everybody 
Has Fun in Our Gag Department 

Comic Greeting Cards, Jokes, Hilarious Gifts for Office Parties, 
Home Entertainment and Rumpus Rooms 

SEA CAPTAIN'S CHEST 

Fisherman's Wharf 

Corner Taylor .ind Jefferson 



COAST-DAKOTA FLOUR CO. 

151 Bayshore Boulevard San Francisco, California 

QUALITY FLOURS FOR QUALITY BAKERS 

Distributors of 

V-10 BREAD MIX 

The only complete protein in bread. 

The FINK & SCHINDLER CO. 

MANUFACTURING CONTR.ACTORS 

Store ■ Office ■ Church - Bank ■ Bar and Restaurant Fixtures 

Cabinet Work - General Alterations • Store Fronts 

LABORATORY EQUIPMENT 
552 BR.ANNAN STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 7, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone EXbrook 2-1513 



SELECT FOODS INC. 



1265 Battery St, Telephone YU. 2-05401 

San Francisco 11, California 

NEW METHOD LAUNDRY & CLEANERS 

FINISHED KORK - ROUGH DRY 
Expert Dry Cleaning - Pick-up and Delirery 

407 Sanchez Street MArket 1-0545 

■Make Our Phone Line Your Clothes Line" 

METROPOLITAN LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

PACIFIC COAST HEAD OFFICE 

600 Stockton St. EXbrook 7-lOOfl 

SAN FRANCISCO 



WALTER KREUTZMANN 

2000 Van Ness Avenue 

San Fr.nncisco 



A 



CRANE Pest Control Co. 



Servicing over 1800 Bay Area 

Industrial Plants . . . Oihcc Buildings 

Homes . . . Since 1930. 

Free Inspection 

Klondike 2-3727 

28 - 8th Street 
San Francisco 




Be Sure ... Be Safe ... Be Sane ... Use CRANE 



FRIENDLY MOBIL CORNERS 



a.^ 



FEATURING 

Expert Polishing 

"Suii"-Motor Tune-Up 

Road Service 

PABKING SPACE FOR 150 CADS 
Louled Across From Civic Auditorium 

ACCESSORIES 



POLK & HAYES SERVICE 

"(Dpen 7 AJ«!. to 12 P.M. ' 
101 Polk - Oppotila Civic Audilorium - MArkat 1-4905 





^.■^ I 



..tflllMltllllllSlllilll 



Giants'' Debut 

\nonling to California Poll in- 
vieweis. when major league 
;eball makes its debut in San 
incisco this coming spring, it 
I count on the support of most 
t the baseball fans in northern 
Jlifornia and many fans in central 
Jlifomia. 

Jp to two or three times as 
(ny baseball fans are expected to 
hn out for one or more games 
ring the season as went to any 
fcifle Coast League game this 

fr. Figures compiled by opinion 
orters who interviewed a sampl- 
(■ of adults show that where 10 
I' cent of the San Francisco Bay 
Ba residents attended a PCL 
)ne. 27 per cent say they would 
end one or more major league 
nes. 

Ls a result of the interest gen- 
ted by the news of major league 
.eball here by next season, the 
■portion of the California public 
-.0 have an interest in baseball is 
'ater today than it was ten year's 
!>. In 1947, California Poll intei- 
Wers asked the question, "Do 

!pay any attention to base- 
?" and they found 45 per cent 
to said "yes." This year the 
pre is 51 per cent who sa.\- they 
;ow baseball. 

^hirty-nine per cent of nor-thern 
' ifornia baseball fans apparent- 
. are more keenly interested in 
por league baseball than they 
fe in PCL baseball. 
)ne of the biggest "ifs," of 
".rse, is the quality of baseball 
I Giants will pi-ovide. A colorful 
ining team could throw all esti- 
ites out the window and exceed 
I fondest hopes of proponents. 
■; Giants promise to bring to 
a Francisco a strong club cap- 
le of staying in the first division, 
•iding the team is "Amazin' 
' lie" Mays, described as "per- 
ils the most exciting and cer- 
-ily one of the most gifted play- 
r, in major league baseball," 

IL. 1958 



There's a ''one and only" 
in refreshment, too 




;4uta^^^^ 



BOTTIEO UNDED AUTHOUrr OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY 

THE COCA-COL.A BOTTLING COMPANY OF C.-\LIFORNIA 
SAN FRANCISCO, CVLIFORNA 



WEST COAST TElMIIKilLS CO. 
OF CilLiniltNIA 

* STEVEDORES 

* MODERN EQUIPMENT 

* TERMINAL OPERATORS 

* OPERATORS OF: 

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HORACE C. STOMEHAM. P. 
CHARLES S FEENET. F.,, 
CHARLES H STONEHAM 
EDGAR P. FEELEY, Tr<a,^r, 
EDWARD T. BRANNICK. J"* 



OFFICES • SEALS STADIUM • SAN FRANCISCO 
163 & BRYANT STREETS • PHONE MARKET 1-2.471 



To the Baseball Fans of San Francisco: 

It has been a privilege for the Giants to bring major league baseball 
to San Francisco, and all of us are looking forward eagerly to the 
1958 season at Seals Stadium. I feel this move to the Pacific Coast 
strengthens the entire structure of our game, and that it is entering 
upon a great new era of expanding success. 

All of us deeply appreciate the cordial welcome the people of San 
Francisco have extended to the Giants, and I know their support 
will be heartening to the players on the field. For our part, we are 
pointing and planning toward a winning future, a team that will 
restore the Giants to the championship ranks in the years ahead. 
The Giants and San Francisco — I think all of us are going to find 
it a very happy partnership. 

Sincerely, 



c 




Horace C. Stoneham 



A PQKieiH)!;^? POLICE CRIME LABORATORY 




SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




lOBILE UNIT FOR 
lOMICIDE SQUAD 

AURICE HAMILTON 

IRS. LORRAINE MARCHI 

Irsil L. ELLIOn 

iuSTOMS COLLECTOR 
IHESTER MacPHEE 

HE PUBLIC— 

low WILL IT JUMP? 

|NE RAWSON 



PRINCE OF THE NETHERLANDS GREETS MAYOR BOYD OF WILLOWS 

(See Page 



FOR CALIFORi^lA 

EDMUND G. (PAT) 

BROWN FOR GOVERNOR 

THE ONLY CANDIDATE 
FOR GOVERNOR WHO IS- 

1. A Democrat. 

2. Concerned with People and Their 
Needs. 

3. Thoroughly Familiar with Califor- 
nia. 

4. Experienced as a State Executive. 

5. Trained in State Government. 

6. A Stronff, Look-ahead Leader. 




YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSN. OF S.F. 

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San Francisco 2, California 


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SAFES 

Now in the Hub of San Francisco 

NEW & USED 

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Fire Resistive Safes - Vault Doors - Burglar Resistive Money Chests 

FLOOR - WALL - HOME SAFES 

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COMPLETE SERVICE SC REPAIR DEPARTMENTS 

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Western Representative 
HERRING-HALL-MARVIN SAFE CO. 

Phone UNderhill 1-6644 

// No Answer Call JUnipcr 5-4075 - R. HERMANN 

or JUniper 5-8819 - J. HERMANN 

THE HERMANN SAFE CO. 

Since 1889 
FREE CUSTOMER PARKING ADJACENT TO BUILDING 

1699 Market Street 




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THE REC 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

PUBLISHER 
EDITOR 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock I - 1 2 1 2 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 



KENNETH H. ALLEN 
ALAN P. TORY 



VOLUME 25 



MAY, 1958 



NUMBER 5 



LETTERS 

..iulations on your April issue — the 

Ir has real distinction, and underlines 

u^i that there is a place in our commun- 

lite for a periodical such as yours, which 

ats civic a: airs with accuracy and authorit)', 

i is at the same time interesting to read. 

n these days of high mortality of magazines, 

IS good to s.-e The Record so alive and full 

I promise for an influential future. 

MAY BETTENCOURT, 
221 DelIbnH)k Ave., 
San Francisco 

^hat is San Francisco doing about this 
lifornia Mayors Tour to Europe? We 
juld be proud that the idea for this valu- 
;e contribution to international good will 
. germinated here. 

Our city fathers ought to get behind this, so 
It when the mayors go to Europe in July 
I people of Europe will hear about the city 
paint Francis as well as places in the south 
luding Los Angeles, whose Mayor Poul- 
has appointed a personal representative 
!o on the trip. 

F ERNEST GEORGE, 

29 Hillpoint, 

San Francisco 
! Editor — Mayor Christopher, in addition to 
Jial commending of the tour, has appointed 
pis representative Mr. Noel Coleman of 
[ Public Utilities Commission. We appre- 
^ this gesture. ) 

wish to say that recently I needed to refer 
ome b(X)ks on the Elizabethan theatre, and 
ed the information department of our 
liic Library. I was treated with great cour- 

and was informed that rwo of the three 
ilarly books of which 1 was in search were 
liable, and they would be kept at the 
nter for me to pick up. 
<'ithin half an hour I arrived at the library 

the books were there for my convenience. 

this senice I would like to record my 
nude. Enough brickbats have been thrown 
he Public Library, but here is a bouquet. 
C'hy can't we all get together to see to it 

enough public money is allotted to books, 
n the circulation of which the life of 
iKracy depends? 

JACK NEGHERBON, 
.^069 Sacramento St., 
San Francisco 



B^'S^INDOW 



WHITE CARNATION: His Royal High- 
ness the Prince of the Netherlands is shown 
on our cover wearing a white carnation, his 
favorite flower, which played an important 
role during the Nazi Occupation as an em- 
blem of resistance. On Prince Bernhards first 
birthday after the German invasion, when all 
national emblems were forbidden, thousands 
of people appeared on the streets wearing a 
white carnation which the Germans had ne- 
glected to prohibit. This silent national dem- 
onstration was a tribute to the affection the 
Prince h.ad won since his coming to live 
among the Dutch in 1936. The flower de- 
livered its cryptic message of patriotism in 
that dark moment, and has since become the 
symbol of the Prince's activities. 

AMBASSADORS: At the Press Club, May- 
or Robert Boyd of Willows received a warm 
welcome from the Prince as a representative 
of the California mayors who will visit Hol- 
land in July. The ambassadors from this 
State will find themselves often crossing paths 
with German visitors, who from tulip time 
onwards now cross the border in great num- 
bers— "more than we had in the Occupation ' 
said the Prince with a wry smile. To this 
great world citizen wrongs of the past are less 
important than opportunities of the present. 
He sees the California Mayors Tour as an 
important contributing factor to the welding 
together of Western Europe and North Amer- 
ica in firm understanding, with strengthen- 
ing economic ties which give reality to 
pledges of goodwill. Mayor Boyd and his com- 
panions will bring back to their communities 
refreshing reports of how others live, and 
what similarities underlie superficial differ- 
ences between ourselves and Europeans. 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT: We wish that 
in our Giants issue of last month we had 
called attention to a little recognized con- 
tribution rendered by the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce to the creating of pub- 
lic enthusiasm for the first season of big league 
baseball. Our indefatigable C. of C. promoted 
the Giants through circularizing eighty Cham- 
bers of Commerce and many corporations in 
Northern California, and also . distriituted 
reservations forms. 



The pictures illustrating William Steif's 
fine article in April were lent to us by the 
S. F. Chamber of Commerce, and we hope 
that this acknowledgment will make up for 
our omission to give due credits. We extend 
to the oldest Chamber in the West, now en- 
tering its 109th year, our salutations for the 
vision it is displaying and the efforts it is 
making on behalf of San Francisco. Ameng 
issues which it is taking up are the creation 
of an adequate water development fund from 
revenues from the State's oil resources, the re- 
modelling of City Hall, and the development 
of International Airport to meet the needs-of 
the coming jet age. 

WASHINGTON SQUARE: We had a 
look at Washington Square the other day — 
a deserted sand lot, where no old men were 
sunning themselves, and no chattering wives 
of North Beach exchanging news and views 
with one another. The sight of turned up 
earth prompted us to consult Mrs. Grace 
Duhagon who has been active in drives for 
giving Washington S(|uare a new face. We 
gently chided her, in fear that some sweep- 
ing reform might be brought about abolish- 
ing the old men, the wives, and playing chil- 
dren, and substituting for them some in- 
human domain. 

But Mrs. Duhagon assures us that the 
exiles will come back. The Square is being 
graded, new grass will be planted, and— 
bless her heart — new benches will appear set 
in round circles to encourage intimate talk. 

She calls them "conversation-type" benches 

a new expression which we gladly add to our 
vocabulary. She tells us that there will be 
more walks, and the park will be finished by 
mid-August or early September. 

One piece of information we could not 
pry from her — and that is what objects are 
buried underneath the statue of Benjamin 
Franklin. All she would tell us was that one 
day — perhaps in I960 — the statue will be 
lifted, and Ben will find another home. We 
would vote for keeping him where he is, 
being ourselves no dislikers of anomaly, with 
a sneaking instinct to preseRe things'as we've 
found them. 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 

LETTERS 
BAY WINDOW 
NEW MOBILE UNIT FOR HOMICIDE SQUAD 

bv Ma ,nce Hami:t:r 

WOMAN OF THE MONTH: LORRAINE MARCHI 

by V;rgll L. EIHof 

BOOKS: THE PUBLIC— HOW WILL IT JUMP? 
ADMINISTRATOR CHESTER MocPHEE 



SAM YOUNG 

AulhorUed Shell Dealer 

Stockton a: Sacramento Sts. 

GArfield 1-9644 



Torino Ravioli Factory 



Downtown Shell Service 

Raytnond Choyc 

Firestone Tires • Tubes - Batteries 

PARKING SERVICE 

Ellis Si Taylor Sts. GRaystone 4-2041 

San Frandsco 

Public Rental Center 

Homes - Flats - Apartments 
2191 Market St. HE. 1-7621 



BlinoSf & BlinoSS 

Manufacturers of 
KNITTED GOODS 

2236 Irving Street MO. 4-4184 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Complete Lettering Serrice 
Signs - S/iow Cards - Posters 

PISCKOFF 

177 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 
San Francisco 2 UN. 1-3822 



McCahon & Dahlen 
Nursery Co. 

South San Francisco &: Colma 
250 Taylor Dr., So. San Francisco 



BAYSIDE MOTEL 

The Finest in Accommodations 

2011 BAYSHORE BOULEVARD 

(Near Third Street) 

San Franisco, California 



BIAGIO'S PIZZA 

HOT DELICIOUS PIZZA 

Eat It Here or Take It Out 

1963 OCEAN AVENUE 

JUniper 6-4747 

San Francisco 12, California 



MAURICE 

57 POWELL 

STREET CLUB 

57 POWELL STREET 
San Francisco, California 



CENTRAL MILL & 
CABINET CO. 

1595 FAIRFAX 
SAN FRANCISCO 



FOR FREE DELIVERY 
Phone JUniper 7-8137 

PROSPERITY MARKET 



Meats - Groceries - Fruits 

Vegetables ■ Beer - Wine 

199 Gennessee San Francisco 12 



OLYMPIC HOTEL 

GEO. C. CURTIS, Manager 

GRaystone 4-8100 

230 EDDY STREET 



San Fr 



o, Califon 



ccc 

Background Music BC Paging Systems 

CaliSornia 

Coanmunications 

Company 

48 SECOND ST. GA. 1-0238 

San Francisco, California 



WILLIAM R. STAATS 
&C0. 

Members New York Stock 
Exchange 



SUtter 1-7500 
111 SUTTER STREET 
San Francisco, California 



A-1 Auto Wreckers 

WRECKED CARS BOUGHT 
Parts tor All Makes 
CAL a: GENE 
1200 Evans Ave. Sa 

Phone ATwater 2-8471 



HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR 

Your Furniture ■ Stoves 

Refrigerators and Antiques 

J. BISON 



WOLFE & DOLAN 

SKyline 1-6630 

198 - 18th AVENUE 

San Francisco. California 



ST. LUKE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

The Rev. Carl N. Tnmblyn. Rector 

VAN NESS AVENUE AT CLA'i' STREET 

San Fr.incisco. California 



BANK OF CANTON 



555 Montgomery Street 



San Francisco 



CRANE Pest Control Co. 

Sen-icing over 1 800 Bay Area 

Industrial Plants . . . Office Buildings 

Homes . . . Since 1930. 

Free Inspection 



KLondike 2-3727 

24 - 8th Street 
San Francisco 

Be Sure ... Be Safe ... Be Sane ... Use CRANEI 




HERMAN DOBROVOLSKY 

Union Oil Dealer 



21st & Clement Street 



RIVIERA Dinner House 



mr dining delight: 

RIVIERA Restaurant 

2325 Taraval Street Banquet Rooms and Orders to Take Ou 
near 34th Avenue 455 Clement St. • EV. 6-9489 

Fine Wines • Italian Dinners - Reasonable Prices 



HI-FI ROOM 

■•TALK OF THE TOWN" 
With our new Driftwood Room with the famous HI-FI Paintings 



STERO DISHWASHING MACHINE MFG. CO. 



333 - 11th STREET 



HEmlock 1-2414 



SAN FRANCISCC 



MANN'S DINNER HOUSE 

BUB AND I'.-\UL1NE MEERU\H:H 

Good Food . . . Reasonable Prices 

3^nd Avenue and Judah Street, San Francsco LOmbard 6-740J 

S„nJav> i.nd Hol.Jays. J .■■ S p „, ~ Wol O:--, 5 .- < P n, - CI.^-oJ M,.nJ.y 



HarleyDaridson MOTORCYCLES 

DUDLEY PERKINS COMPANY 

Sales and Service 

655 ELLIS STREET 

San Francisco 9. California Phone PRospect 5-532 

sirvirig the San Francisco Police Dcpl. Motorcycle needs for it yeia, 



F. W. WOOLWORTH COMPANY 

405 Montfioinery Street 
Sail Francisco 



I 



I he Record 



New Mobile Lab Assists 
Work of Homicide Squad 



y Maurice Hamilton 



I 

P A PUBLIC raised on fiction's concept 
l)f homicide detection — the television 

in which a crime is committed, investi- 
1, and neatly wrapped up in a half hour, 
vhodunit novel in which the private eye 
,'S gets the case solved before the police 
■ it has happened, or the movie that de- 

only the chase elements of investigation 
; possibility that homicide work is a long, 
ult, dragged-out process, completely with- 
jlamour is probably a very remote one. 
Jte, that is, to everyone who is not con- 
d in one way or another with the Homi- 
Division of a metropolitan police depart- 

le homicide man, because of the peculiar 
nds of his job, must possess a combina- 
of qualities that are either inherent in 
lakeup when he comes into the Division, 
at can be developed over a period of time 

he is appointed. A question to Frank 
n on how men are chosen for this im- 
nt post brings an answer that illustrates 

this ex-homicide detective chooses any 
e people he intends to promote to other 

/'hen I make an appointment to any 
ion," Ahern says in all sincerity. I inake 




it solely on the basis of merit. Politics have 
nothing to do with my choice whatsoever. The 
man may be in uniform or not, but no matter 
what his present job is, if I feel he's qualified 
on a merit basis he gets the appointment." 

As a former member of the Homicide Di- 
vision, Ahern realizes the importance of 
merit very keenly and seems determined to 
bring this quality into his Dpartment as a 
whole. And as an ex-homicide detective he 
has definite ideas on the qualifications a homi- 
cide man should have to do a good job for 
the Division. These include patience, tact, 
an eye for detail, an inquisitive mind, a re- 
tentive memory, and a penchant for objectiv- 
ity regardless of the situation with which he 
is faced. The day to day duties of the homi- 
cide detective, as well as his specific duties 
when called on a case, are the best illustra- 
tion of the necessity for these qualifications. 

Taken overall, the cases that come to the 
attention of Homicide are surprisingly ( to the 
laymen) diverse and include any situation in 
which death either has occurred or might 
occur. Criminal abortion serves as a case in 
point, to illustrate the kind of special know- 
ledge a homicide detective must have, as well 
as to point up some less familiar parts of his 
overall duties. 

Abortion mills are big business, so big that 
a $10,000 daily take is not uncommon, and 
so of necessity the persons running this illegal 
activity take extreme precautions against be- 
ing detected. The investigation of such a case 
brings into play all the skills of good police 
work as well as specialized knowledge that a 
well trained Homicide man eventually ac- 
quires. 

Months of surveillance of suspects is often 
necessary in order to nail down a case. Tailing 
of persons suspected of being involved is not 
uncommon. Then once on the scene of the 
illegal activity the Homicide man must be 
completely familiar with the instruments used 
to perform abortions so that he can seize 
the correct ones to help build his case. 

There are other things he must know too. 
He must know human anatomy, particularly 
the female body structure. He must be aware, 
on a step by step basis, just how the baby 
grows within the body of the mother. He 
must be able to converse intelligently with 
medical doctors, either legitimate or not, so 
that he is on an equal footing with the per- 
son suspected of performing abortions. He 




da Datactive Ahern 



must know the various drugs that are some- 
times used by abortionists and he must know 
the effects these drugs have on the body of 
the expectant mother or the embryo she is 
carrying. Along with all this specific know- 
ledge he must also know how to pursue an 
investigation in case the aborted woman dies. 

The Homicide detective must undertake 
investigation of all cases assigned by the Cor- 
oner or his deputies. These are usually cases 
where the Division was not called in initially 
because of the nature of the complaint. It 
might be suicide, death as a result of any kind 
of accident ( other than by a moving vehicle ) 
or any case where the Coroner or his Depart- 
ment has reason to suspect foul play. 

These cases often take as much time and 
skill as the seemingly more complicated mur- 
der cases. The Coroner merely raises the sus- 
picion that murder might have been com- 
mitted and it is up to the Homicide man to 
prove or disprove it. In such instances he 
must gather his proof after the fact and 
without the benefit of having been on the 
scene shortly after death occurred. 

While the investigation of actual murder 
cases comprises only a small portion of the 
Division's work, it is the type of case that 
gives the Division its name, and is what the 
public thinks about when it thinks about the 
Division. It is here that the meaning of dedi- 
cation to duty becomes apparent. 

The typical member of the Division works 
from nine in the morning to six at night. 
There are many times too, when he is called 
on, after his regular shift, to give his fellow 
workers a hand on their cases, for example 
when an intensive door to door manhunt is 
under way, or when routine can be speeded 
with extra help. Once every three weeks your 
Homicide man must remain on call even after 
finishing a day's work. He must be ready to 
respond to a case on a moment's notice and 
must forego any social engagement that might 
take him away from the telephone. 

When he does roll on a homicide "kick " he 
usually arrives at the scene after the beat 
officer or the patrol car crew has answered 
the first call. As soon as these patrolmen deter- 
mine that death has come as the result of 
extraordinary causes. Homicide is called in 
to take over. After pictures of the scene are 
taken, the detective in charge of the case 



tl.UH:BlHUM:h 



FRANCISCO 




Left to RIgh 



must see to it that fingerprints are lifted, 
evidence is gathered and preserved, that the 
witnesses are interrogated, that derailed state- 
ments are taken, and all the other necessary 
steps made to assure his having a good case 
in the event it goes to court. 

While all this sounds as though he might 
have his hands too full to do a good job in 
any one area of investigation, it must be re- 
membered that he does get a large helping 
hand from the Department's Crime Lab, its 
Mobile Unit, and the resident criminologist, 
Duayne Dillon. Dillon, at this writing, is 
actually acting criminologist pending an ex- 
amination to determine who will permanently 
fin the job, but he brings to the Police Depart- 



Foster & Klelser V.P., Corr 
Deputy Chief Cahlll 

ment generally, and to its Homicide Division 
particularly, a wealth of technical know-how 
that reduces much of the Homicide Detec- 
tive's investigative work to a scientific routine. 
The Crime Lab and Dillon are not called 
into every case because many can be handled 
without this scientific help, but where the 
gathering of physical evidence is complicated 
by the nature of the crime, the facilities of 
the Lab, the ser\'ices of Dillon, and the use 
of the Mobile Unit are brought into play. 
The Mobile Unit, ordered and stocked by the 
members of the Division who know from 
past experience the kinds of equipment they 
need, is of particular interest because it is 
so new. According to Dillon, who has had 



several years of crime experience before I 
coming associated with the San Franci; 
Police Department, the Mobile rig has eve 
thing needed to further the investigation ' 
tne most complicated case. 

It contains, among other things, a complf 
chest of tools for removing bullets that miji 
be buried in walls or doors, or the cutting | 
wires or nails when the occasion arises. Th. 
are portable lights of high voltage to illui 
nate any area, ^^any times such light is neci 
s.i:y even in broad daylight in older bui| 
ings that aren't adequately lighted. The pq 
Me lights are also of great us; for inveji 
gation of outdoor scenes at night. The Mot| 
Lab also has a tRO-way walkie-talkie rig .^ 
a ground search or dragnet, enabling the mi 
in command to be in touch with all o 
earned as he directs the operation. 

The mobile unit also provides a place 
privacy where a detective may question a s 
pect or witness without the whole neighbi 
hood getting in on the interrogation. It ' 
typewriters for taking of statements at 
scene of the crime and a tape recorder ■ 
c;ses where the detective in charge feels ■ 
person making a statement might change : 
mind later on. There are containers for clj 
fying and preserving items that are later taJ 
back to headquarters for further study, 
fingerprint kit, a blood testing kit. eqir, 
ment for taking casts of footprints, anc 
great number of other items any one of wh 
might be necessary during the course of' 
on-the-spot investigation. 

While this mobile unit is nearly compli 
in itself, Dillon is careful to point out tha 
is just an arm of the Crime Lab itself, ; 
that the bulk of his work is conducted in 
headquarters on the sixth floor of the ¥ 
of Justice. Here he has equipment that 
necessar)' to test-fire a gun to determine 
bullets found in the body or at the scene 
the murder match the weapon of the ; 
pect. He might bring a powerful microsc* 
into play to match blood samples or finf 
prints. In this room the visitor is apt to 
photographs of handwriting samples bic 
up to many times the original size, or clotl* 





^ 



Elect 

ACHILLE H. 

MUSCHI 

ASSEMBLYMAN 
20th District 

Fducaldr - Voleraii 
Hxeciitivp 



♦ Attorney ♦ Native Son ♦ Veteram 

For 

INTELLIGENT 

REPRESENTATION 




JAMES RYAN 

CUNHA I 

ASSEMBLYMAN - l9th District 

THE RECil 




must be gone over for minute bits of 
or other panicles that could provide a 
ible clue. 

o one in the Division will deny the value 
piportance of Dillon and his lab to crime 
pion, but they also point out that the 
i of their work is attention to detail and 
jngness to do countless hours of leg work, 
fiomas Cahill, a long-time member of 
licide before becoming Deputy Chief, can 
instance after instance where a case was 
en by dint of hard, bone-weary work. 



For example, a woman had been killed in 
the Mission District. Cahill and his men had 
reason to believe that the suspect was still in 
the district, and had further reason to believe 
that he might be found in one of the many 
small hotels or rooming houses in the area. 

They mapped out a plan that included the 
visiting of every such establishment from a 
point on Mission beginning at 29th Street, 
and moving toward the downtown district to 
a point in front of the old Juvenile Hall on 
Otis Street. They were armed only with a de- 
scription of the person and his name. It took 
three days of walking, up one side of the 
street and down the other, up at least one or 
two flights of stairs, to talk to landlords, hotel 
managers, apartinent house owners. It took 
endless questions, tact, salesmanship to get 
unwilling people to tell what they knew. 

Finally after hours of walking and ques- 
tions by every member of the Division, Ca- 
hill recalls finding a room where a man an- 
swering the description of the suspect had 
been living. Permission was obtained to 
search the room and in a bureau drawer, be- 
tween two sheets of newspaper used to line 
the bottom they found a key. It fitted the 
front door of the house where the woman 
had been killed. They were on the right 
track, for the man had moved out just the 
day before, and shortly after that they picked 
up the young man who finally confessed, was 
convicted and sent to the gas chamber. Not 
the way it is done in the movies, or with the 
swiftness of a television show. It took four 



days with the detectives working on their 
own time and far into the night after a day's 
work downtown or in court testifying on 
other cases they had handled in the past. 

According to Lieutenant Al Nelder, the 
man who presently heads the Homicide Di- 
vision, he and his men handle an average of 
.^00 cases annually with some -10 of these be- 
ing murder cases. And when he and his men 
are not working on a San Francisco case, 
Nelder is helping out-of-town law enforce- 
ment officials with theirs. A witness or sus- 
pect shows up in San Francisco and right on 
the trail are detectives from the town where 
the crime was committed. 

Nelder recalls a case where a witness in an 
abortion had fled to the Bay Area from a 
city in the south. Detectives from that city 
had little more knowledge about the witness 
than that it was a woman they were seeking. 
With the help of our Homicide Division the 
girl was found, but only through a lot of hard 
work. 

The homicide man is a unique person. He 
must have a good basic knowledge of police 
work to begin with, and to this he must add 
knowledge of the rules of evidence; he must 
be able to take the stand and testify for days 
at a time without referring to a note and do 
it on a case that he worked on as long as 
three to five months ago. The homicide man 
must have the physical stamina to go as long 
as 48 hours or more without sleep, and an 
understanding family that realizes that the 
job comes first. 



The 

BILLY GRAHAM 

^AN FRANCISCO 
BAY CITIES 

CRUSADE 

Nightly Except Monday 7:30 
Sundays: 3:00 p.m. Only 

COW PALACE 
From April 27, 1958 









FOR 

STATE 
SENATOR 

FORDEN "Skip" 

ATHEARN 




ELECT EXPERIENCE 

Five \'ears on ihe Board of 
Supervisors, he voted for salary 
increases for city-county em- 
ployees; initiated improvements 
in Laguna Honda Home. 

Elect 

GENE McATEER 

State Senator 

from 
SAN FRANCISCO 
ATTORNEY 

BUSINESSMAN 

WAR VETERAN 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

(,EORGE CHRISrOPHER. MAYOR 

Diiectory of City and County Officers 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



COURTS 



MAYOR 

:uu C.ty HoM. 2.1. MA 1-0163 
GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, Nliyor 

JOSEPH J. ALLEN. E^ecui.vc ScacMr. 
PATRICIA CONNICH. Confidential Sc> 
MARGARET SMITH, Personal Sciietary 
GEORGE J. GRUBB. Adminislralnc A 
JOHN D, SULLIVAN. Public Service 1 



SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

255 City Hall. Z.2. HE 1-2121 



JO''N J. FERDON. 
Res. 2906 Brodcrick 

JAMES LEO HALLEY. Rm 



St.. GA. 1-5117. 



JAMES SULLIVAN. 



ALFONSO J. ZIRPOLI. 300 Monteomery St.. GA 1- 
1515. Res. IHO Greenwich St.. OR. 3-5560 1-8-62 

ROBERT J. DOLAN. Actinc Clerk of the Board. 

HE 1-2121. Ext. 28-1. 
LILLIAN M. SENTER. Chief Assistant Clerk. 

STANDING COMMriTEES 

(First named Supervisor is Chairman of the Committee) 
COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT — 

Sulluan. Bl..ke. Casey. 
COUNTY. STATE AND NATIONAL AFFAIRS— Halley. 

Ertola. Ferdon. 
EDUCATION. PARKS AND RECREATION — Rolph. 

Blake. Dobbs. 
FINANCE. REVENUE AND TAXATION — Dohbs. Halicy. 

McMahon. 
JUDICIARY. LEGISLATIVE AND CIVIL SERVICE — 

Zirpoli. Casey. Rolph. 
POLICE— Casey. Rolph, Sullivan. 
PUBLIC BUILDINGS. LANDS AND CITY PLANNING— 

McMahon. Dobbs. Zirpoli. 
PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE— Ertola. Sullivan. Z,r- 

p.ili. 
PUBLIC UTILITIES— Ferdon. Ertola. McMahon. 
STREETS AND HIGHWAYS— Blake. Ferdon. Halley- 
RULES— McCarty. Dobbs, Halley. 

ASSESSOR 

RUSSELL L. WOLDEN. 101 City Hall. Z. 2. 



CITY ATTORNEY 

DION R. HOLM. :u', Cit 



Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-1522.. 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY 



PUBLIC DEFENDER 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MA^e 



SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES-UN. 1-8552 

HENRY J. NEUBARTH. Presiding 
WALTER CARPENETI EDWARD MOLKENBUHR 

C HAROLD CAULFIELD CLARENCE W. MORRIS 
MELVYN I. CRONIN ORLA ST. CLAIR 

EUSTACE CULLINAN. JR. MILTON D. S.WRO 
PRiiSTON DEVINE GEORGE W. SCHONFELD 

TIMOTHY I. FITZPATRICK DANIEL R. SHOEMAKER 
THOMAS M FOLEY WILLIAM T. SWEIGERT 

RAYMOND J. AR.ATA WILLIAM F. TRAVERSO 

THFRFSA MEIKLE H A. V.AN DER ZEE 

Twain MicHELSEN albert c. wollenberg 

JOHN B. MOLIN.\RI 

JOSEPH M. CUMMINS. Secretary 
480 City Hall. Z. 2. UN 1-8552 

MUNICIPAL COURT JUDGES-KL. 2-3008 

BYRON ARNOLD. Presiding Judge 
CARL H ALLEN ALVIN E. WEINBERGER 

LENORE D. UNDERWOOD GERALD S. LEVIN 
CHARLES S. PEERY WILLIAM A. O'BRIEN 

JOSEPH M. GOLDEN JAMES J. WELSH 

CLAYTON W. HORN ALBERT A. AXELROD 

EDWARD ODAY 

IVAN L. SLAVICH. Clerk and Secretary 

501 City Hall, Z. 2. KL 2-3008 

A. C. McCHESNEY, Jury Commissioner 

305 City Hall. Z. 2 

TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU, 16-1 City Hall. Z. 2. KL 2-300 
JAMES M. CANNON. Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

•157 City Hall. Z. 2. UN 1-8552 

Meets Monday at 8:00 P.M. 
HENRY E. NORTH. Foreman 
PAUL A. RYAN. Secretary 
DAVID F. SUPPLE. Consultant-Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

604 Montgomery St.. Z. 11. YU 6-2950 
JOHN D. KAVANAUGH. Chief Adult Probation Officer 

Adult Probation Committee 1 

Meets at call of Chairman and 2nd Thursday each month. 
KENDRICK VAUGHAN. Chairman. 60 Sansome St.. Z. 4 
MAURICE MOSKOWITZ. Secretary. 2900 Lake St.. Z. 11 
REV. MATTHEW F. CONNOLLY, 349 Fremont St., Z. 5 
RAYMOND BLOSSER. 670 Monadnock Bldg.. Z. 5 
FRED C, JONES. 628 Hayes St., Z. 2 
ROBERT A. PEABODY, 456 Post St.. Z. 2 
FRANK RATTO. 526 California St.. Z. 4 
JUVENILE COURT DEPARTMENT 

375 Woodside Ave.. Z. 27. SE 1-5740 
MELVYN I. CRONIN. Judge of the fuvcnile Court 
THOMAS F. STRYCULA. Chief Juvenile Probation Officer 
Juvenile Probation Committee 
Meets at call of Chairman 
MRS FRED W. BLOCH. Secretary, 3712 Jackson, Z. IS 
ROY N. BUELL. 445 Bush St.. 2. 8— Chairman 
REV, lOHN A. COLLINS. 420 - 29th Ave.. Z. 21 
lACK GOLDBERGER. 109 Golden Gate Ave., Z. 2 
MRS EDGAR H. LION. 2790 Green St.. Z. 23. WA 1-0363 
lAMES S- KEARNEY. 1871 - 35th Ave.. Z. 22 
MRS. MARSHALL MADISON, 2930 Vallcjo St.. Z. 23, 

FI. 6-1222. 
Rl'V lAMES M. MURRAY. 1825 Mission St.. Z. 3 
THOMAS J. LENEHAN. 501 Haight St.. UNderhill 1-5:61 



SHERIFF 

MATTHEW C. CARBERRY, 331 City Hall, Z. 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkin St. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

Meets first Monday of each month at 3:45 P.M. 
HAROLD L. ZELLERBACH. President. Hi Sansome 2. 
lO ,N K. HAGOPIAN. Vice President. Mills To»et. - 
BETTY (Mr.. BiU L.) JACKSON. 2835 Vallejo St. 
OR. BERNARD C. BEGLEY. 450 Sutler St. 
WILLIAM E. KNUTH. S. F. State College. 1600 Holla 
OSCAR LEWIS. 545 Sutter St. 

CLARENCE O. PETERSON, 116 Neiv Motitgomety 
MRS ALBERT CAMPODONICO. 2770 Vallejo St. 
ALBERT F. ROLLER, 1 Montgomery St. 
JOHN GARTH. 1141 Market St. 

Ei-Officio Members 

President. Calif. Palace Legion of Honor 
President. City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President. Public Library Commission 
President. Recreation and Park Commission 
JOSEPH H. DYER. JR.. Secretary 



30 I 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 Larkin St.. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

Meets first and third Thursdays each month 
ROGER D. LAPHAM. JR.. President. 233 Sansome St.. 
ROBERT T. LILLIENTHAL. Vice-Ptes.. 813 Market St. 
MRS. CHARLES B. PORTER. 142 - 27th Ave.,-Z. 21 
THOMAS P. WHITE. 400 Brannan St.. Z. 7 
JOSEPH E. TINNEY. 2517 Mission St. 

Ex-Offido Members 
THOMAS A. BROOKS. Chief AdministraUve Officer 
JAMES H. TURNER, Manager of Utilities 

PAUL OPPERMANN. Director of Plannine 

THOMAS G. MILLER. Secretary 

CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSON 

151 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

Meets every Wednesday at 4:00 P.M. 
FRANCIS P. WALSH. President. 68 Post St.. Z. 4 
WM A. LAHANIER. 2 Pine St.. Z. 11. YU 6-0968. 
WM. KILPATRICK. 820 Hyde St.. Z. 29 

WM. L. HENDERSON. Secty. and Personnel Dired 

DISASTER CORPS 

45 Hyde St.. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER. Coimnandet 
CHF ADM OFFICER THOMAS A. BROOKS. Vive<S 
REAR ADM. A. G. COOK. USN (Ret.) Director 
ALEC .X. McCAUSLAND. Public Informanon Office 

EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

ns Van Ness Ave., UN 3-4680 
Meets first and third TuMdaya at 7:30 P.M. 
BERT LEVIT, Pres.. 465 California St.. Z. 4 
CHAS C. TROWBRIDGE. JR.. Vice-Pres . 155 San__ 
MRS LAWRENCE DRAPER. Jr.. 10 Walnut St.. Z. 
CHARLES J. FOEHN. 231 Valencia St. 
JOHN G. LEVISON. 55 Fillmore St. „ , ,. 

JOSEPH A. MOORE. Jr.. 2590 Green St.. Z. 2) 
ADOLFO de URIOSTE. 512 Van Ness Avx.. Z. 2 

DR HAROLD SPEARS. Supt. of Schools and SCO 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY MAYOR 



TREASURER 

IDHN J. GOODWIN, 110 Cit 



Hall, Z,2. HE I-212I..1-8-58 



CHII^F ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

THOMAS A. BROOKS. Chief Adm. Officer 
289 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
JOSEPH MIGNOLA— Executive Asistant 
MARIAN T. FETT. Confidential Secictary 

CONTROLLER 

HARRY D. ROSS 

1119 City Hall, Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
WREN MIDDLEBROOK, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 

COL. THOMAS J. WEED 

Suite 536-7-8. Washington Bldg.. Washington, D.C. 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

DONALD W. CLEARY 

223 City Hall, Z. 2. MA 1-0163 and HE 1-2121 
Hotel Senator. Sacramento 17 (during sessions) 



FIRE COMMISSION 



. City Hall. Z. 2, HE 1-2121 

Meets every Tuesday at 4:00 P.M. 
WALTER H. DUANE. President. 220 Bush St.. Z. 4 
J.AMES E. MURPHY. 240 Golden Gate Ave.. Z. 2 
ARTHUR J. DOLAN. JR.. Blyth if Co.. Inc. 

Russ Bldg.. Z. 4 
WILLI.^M F. MURRAY, Chief of the Department 
ALBERT E. HAYES, Acting Fire Maishal 
CARL F. KRUGER. Deputy Chief 

THOMAS \V. McCarthy. Secretary 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St.. Z. 2, OR !-5S00 

Meets lir.st and third Thursdays at 10:00 A.M. 
CHARLES I. JUNG. Chairman. 622 Washington St . 2. 
AL E. MAl'LLOUX. Vice-Chaitman. 200 Guerrero S" 
JEFFERSON A. BEAVER. 1)35 • 45ih Ave. 
li 1.- H.WISIDE. 40 Spear St.. Z. 5 
CHARLES L. CONLAN. 1655 Folsom St.. Z. 5 
lOHN W. BEARD. Executive Director 

GERALD J. O'GARA. Counsel 

PARKING AUTHORITY 

500 Golden Gale Ave.. Z. 2. PR 6-1565 

Meets every 1st and 5rd Thuriday at 4 P.M. 

Authority inference Room 

^LHFRT F SCHLESINGER. Chairman. 2001 Mi 

HAKom .\ m RLINER. 135 Mississippi. 2. ■ 



\lMNii 1. FISHER, General Manager 
THOMAS J. OTOOLE. Secretary 



•ERMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 



Mc. 



; Hall. Z. 2. HE I'2I2I 
«ty Wednesday at J;!0 P.M. 



XARfNCl-: r W.^LSH. [•r,...d>nl. 2A 

FTER ^.^M.^R.^s, Vi.. I'r.sij.m, 7 

RNH.ST I. \\|-:ST, .-',> M..ntu..ni..i 

I.^Rcn.ll ( HKIUI. N, M' Miik.i Si 

ISEl'H ( r.\K.^N I INO, J'.ii J.ll, , 

J EUttlN M.MTO.\. SL.rtL.ri 

>OLICE COMMISSION 



AUL .^. BISSINGER. Pacific and Davi«. Z. 11 
HOMAS J. MELLON. JWl First St.. Z. 5 
lAROLI) A. McKINNON. Mills Tower. Z. 2 
ERCEANT WILLIAM J. OBRICN. Secretary 

RANCIS J. AHERN. Chief of Police 
HOMAS J. CAHILL. Deputy Chief of Police 
lANIEL I' McKLEM. Chief of Inspectors 
KIILY. Supervising Capta 



'UBLIC LIBRARY COMMISSION 



K^ I HENRY MOHR. President. 2 Castenada Ave.. Z. 16 
'^1 M KANUCCHI. 511 Columbus Ave.. Z. 11 
l\ I 11 HAYNES. UW McAllister St.. Z. 15 
IM \ X'AViSIR. 240 Jones St.. Z. 2 
AMrillll M.iiREGOR. 165 Post St.. Z. 8 

MAX Mm 11)1 , 51S Potrero Ave.. Z. 10 
IRS H.\Z1L o IIRIEN. 440 Ellis St.. Z. 2 
.LBERT E, SCH\V.\BACHER. JR.. 100 Montgomery St. Z.4 
ERT SIMON. 1550 Folsom St.. Z. 3 

LEE VAVURIS. OTO Geary St.. Z. 9 
iR. THOMAS W. S. WU. 916 Kearny St.. Z. II 
LAURENCE J. CLARKE. Librarian 
FRANK A. CLARVOE. JR.. Secretary to Commission 

>UBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

287 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

Meets every Tuesday at 2:00 P.M. 

lON FAZACKERLEY. President. 851 Howard St.. Z. >. 
DANIEL F DEL CARLO. Vicc-Pres.. 200 Guerrero St.. Z '. 
;DW B baron. 44 Casa Way. Z. 2J. WE 1-8501. 
OSEPH MARTIN. JR.. 400 Montgomery St.. Z. 4. 
TUART N. GREENBERG. 7(i5 Folsom St.. Z. 7, 

R. J, MacDONALD. Secretary 

T. N, BLAND. Manager of Utilities 
I JAMES J. FINN. Exec. Sccty. to Manager 

Bureaus and Departments 

P. NEGRI. Director. 



PUBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 

585 Bush St.. Z- 8. GA 1-5000 

Meets firsr and third Tuesdays of each mon 



•RANK F, AGNOST. S. F. Chrt 

VIRS JOHN I MURRAY. 1J06 Portola Drive. Z. 27 

iENRY M. SANTE. 705 Market St. 

RONALD H, BORN. Director. Public Welfare 
MRS EULALA SMITH. Secretary to Commission 

RECREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

McLaren Lodge. C.G. Park. Z. 17. SK 1-4866 

Meets second and fourth Thursdays of each month 
5:00 P.M. 

■RED D, PARR. President. 120 Montgomerv St. 
VM. M COFFMAN. 551 Market St.. Z. 5 
lEV. EUGENE A. GALLAGHER. 988 Market St.. Z 2 
IR. FRANCIS J. HERZ. 450 Sutter St.. Z. 8 
vIRS JOSEPH A MOORE. JR.. 2590 Green St.. Z. 2J 
ANE ZIMMERMAN. 2424 Funston Ave.. Z 16 
'ETER BERCUT. inlo Lombard St. 
RAY KIMBELL. General Manager 

WILLIAM J SIMONS, E«c. Secretary to Gen Mgr 
EDWARD McDFVITT. Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

512 Golden Gale Ave.. Z. 2. OR J.6IJ4 
Meets every Tuesday at 3:J0 P.M. 

JOSEPH L. ALIOTO. Chairman. Ill Sutter St., Z. 4 

l.AWRl-NCI- R I'AI.ACIOS. ViceChr.. 2940 - 16th St.. Z. J 

IIR I liisl I'll HAYES. 210 Post St. 

ROV \ 111 I I I J4i Hush St.. Z. 8 

JAMI SI SI K M 1 i:n. 20)1 Bush St.. Z. 15 

l.LM.L.Nl; I KIORDAN. Director 

M. C. HERMANN. Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 



HARRY J. STEWART. President. 605 Market St.. Z, 5 
llELFORD BROWN. First Western Bank 
WILLIAM T. REED. 1S85 - 20th Ave 
WM J. MURPHY. 1771 - 45th Ave., Z. 22 
MARTIN WORMUTH. 4109 Pachceo St. 

E.Officio Members 
President. Board of Supervisors 



WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 



,1 RUFUS KLAWANS. President. 235 Montgomery 
I'RENTIS COBB HALE. JR. Vice-Prea., 867 Market St. 

Trustees 
GEORGE T. DAVIS, 98 Post St. 
SAM K. HARRISON. 4)1 Bryant 
EUGENE D. BENNETT. 225 Bush 
SIDNEY M. EHRMAN. 14 Montgomery 
COL, FRANK A. FLYNN. 68 Post St. 
W, A HENDERSON. 19 Maywood Drive 
MILTON KLETTER, 2179 - 27th Avenue 
liUlDO J. MUSTO. 555 North Point 
RALPH J. A. STERN. )05 Clay 

EDWARD SHARKEY. Managing Director 

E. LAWRENCE GEORGE. Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Vercrans Building 

DR. GRACE MORLEY. Director. HE 1-2040 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



CORONER 

DR HENRY W. TURKEL 

650 Merchant St.. Z. 11. DO 2-0461 

ELECTRICITY, DEPARTMENT OF 

45 Hyde St., Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
D O. TOWNSEND. Chief 
DOYLE L, SMITH. Supt. of Electrical Plant 
E, J MILLER. Supervisor of Mechanical Plant 

FINANCE & RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

Vacancy. Director. 220 City Hall Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

COUNTY CLERK — MARTIN MONGAN. 517 City 
Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR — WILFRED A. ROBIN- 
SON. 46) Citv Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

RECORDER AND REGISTR.\R OF VOTERS— 

THOS, A. TOOMEY. 167 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 

TAX COLLECTOR — JAMES REINFELD. 107 City 
Hall. Z. 2, HE 1-2121 

HORTICULTURAL COMMISSIONER 



PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building. Z. 2. UN 1-4701 

llR ELLIS D. SOX. Direcror Public Healrh 

DR E C SAGE. Asurant Director of Public Healrh 

HASSLER HEALTH HOME— DR. LINCOLN F. PUT- 
NAM. Supt.. Rcdivood City 

LACUNA HONDA HOME — LOUIS A MORAN, 
Supt . 7th Ave. and Dewey Blvd.. Z. 16. MO 4-lSSO 

SAN FRANCISCO HOSPrrAL— DR T E ALBERS. 
Supt . 22nd and Potrero. Z. 10. MI 7-0820 

CENTRAL EMERGENCY HOSPn"AI,-EARL BLAKE. 
Adminislr.nicc Superintendent. Crovc and Polk, HE 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 Ciry Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
SHERMAN P. DUCKEL. Director 

R, BROOKS LARTER. Assistant Director. Administrative 
L, J, ARCHER. Ast. Director. Maintenance and Operation 
Bureaus 
ACCOUNTS J 1. McCLOSKEY. Supervisor. 260 City 

Hall. Z 2. HE 1-2121 
ARCHrrECTURE — CHARLES W. GRIFFITH. City 

Archit,-ct. 265 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
BUILDING INSPECTION— LESTER C, BUSH. Super- 

■ niendenl. ;-.( Citv Hall. Z HE 1-2121 
BUILDING REPAIR — A H EKENBERC. Superin- 
tendent. 2)23 Army. Z. 10. HE 1-2121 



CENTRAL PERMIT BUREAU— SIDNBY FRANKLIN. 

Supervisor. 286 City Hall. Z. 2. HE 1-2121 
ENGINEERING REUBEN H. OWENS. City Engineer. 

1^1 I iTv 11,11. Z 2. HE 1-2121 
SIWIR REPAIR AND SEWAGE TREATMENT- 

111 N HI \AS. Siip,-rmlendenl 

2-.;) Army. Z. 10 HE I-2I2I 
STRfcHT CLEANING--S. J. SULLIVAN. Sept.. 2J2J 

Army. Z, 10, Ml 7-9620 
STREET REPAIR— FRED BROWN. Supt.. 2J23 Atiny. 

Z. 10, HE 1-2121 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall. Z, 2. HE 1-2121 
PURCHASER OF SUPPLIES -B. 0. KLINE 
CENTRAL SHOPS AYLMER W. PETAN, Supetin- 

l.ii.lcrit 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

575 City Hall. Z, 2. HE 1-2121 
PHILIP L. REZOS. Director of Properly 
JAMES A, GRAHAM. Superintendent of Auditorium 

Civic Auditorium. Z, 2, HE 1-6)52 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

O. C, SKINNER. JR. 

6 City Hall. Z, 2. HE 1-2121 
FARMER'S MARKET 

Thomas Christian. Market M.isicr Ml 7 Jl. . 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 



CALIFORNIA PALACE OF THE LEGION 
OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park. Z, 21, BA 1-5610 

Board of Trustees 

Meets the second Monday in January, April. June and 
October at ):)0 P.M. 
MRS. ADOLPH B SPRECKELS. Honorary President 
PAUL VERDIER. President. 199 Geary. Z. 8 
JAMES B. BLACK. 245 Market St.. Z. 5 
ALEXANDER deBRETTEVILLE. 2000 Washington St.. Z <>. 
CHARLES MAYER. S. F. Examiner. 3rd and Market. Z. 3 
WIILIAM WALLACE MEIN. 315 Montgomery St., Z. 4 
JOHN N. ROSEKRANS. 210 California St., Z. 1 
WILLIAM R, WALLACE. JR.. Shell Bldg, 
LOUIS A, 8ENOIST, 37 Drumm St., Z. II 
WALTER E, BUCK. Russ Bldg,. Z, 4 
E, RAYMOND ARMSBY. Ill Sutter St.. Z, 4 
MRS, BRUCE KELHAM. IS Atguelo Blvd. 
DAVID PLEYDELL-BOUVERIE. Glen Ellen 
WHITNEY WARREN. 28S Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
HAROLD L. ZELLERBACH. 5)4 Battery St.. Z. II 

ExOflicio Members 
MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 
LOUIS SUTTER. Pres . Recreation if Paik Commission 

THOMAS CARR HOWE. Director 

CAPT, MYRON E, THOMAS. Secretary 

M. H. dc YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gale Park. Z.13. BA 1-2067 
Board of Trustees 

Meets the second Monday in January. April. June and 
October at ):00 P.M. 
MRS. HELEN CAMERON. Hillsborough. Hon President 
MICHEL D. WEILL. President— The White House 
CHARLES R BLYTH. Russ Bldg.. Z. 4 
MISS LOUISE A, BOYD. 255 (jlifotnia 
SHELDON C, COOPER. Crocker Building 
R GWIN FOLLIS. 5690 Washington 
RANDOLPH A. HEARST. 860 Howard St.. Z. 19 
MRS WALKER KAMM. San Mateo 
I AMES K, LOGHEAD. 464 California St.. Z. 4 
CROVER MACNIN. St. Francis Hotel 
GARRETT McENERNEY. II. 3725 Washington 
ROSCtlE F, OAKES. 2006 Washington 
RICHARD RHEEM. 2)5 Montgomery St.. Z. 4 
JtlSEPH O. TOBIN. Hibernia Bank. Z. 2 
MRS. NION TUCKER. Burlington Countty Club 

Ex-Olficio Members 
MAYOR GEORGE CHRISTOPHER 
LOUIS SUTTER. Pres . Recreation S" Park Commision 

DR WALTER HEIL. Director 

HOWARD VAN ORDEN. JR.. Secretary 

HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

61 Gro>c St . HE 1-7100 
GEORGE W. CUNIFFE. President, 1627 • 25tli Ave. 22 
i:EORGE I, GALLAGHER. 3817 - 22nd Et. 
PHILIP G ENGLER 
THOMAS BYRNE. 468 - 30th St. 
hANIEL I, CALVIN 
THEODORE T. DOLAN. 124 Jusnila War 
IDHN M DEAN. 1095 Maiket St. 
HENRY L McKENZIE 
EDWARD T MURPHY 
THOMAS F ONEILL 

WALTER E. HOOK. M.D . Medical Director 

Vacancy. Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 



PUBLIC POUND 



De Espana Restaurant 

Buique food — Family Slylc 

Lunch 12-1 — Dinners 5-8 

Fermin Hauric. Prop. 

■'81 BROADWAY SUtter 1-7287 


RALPH EICHENBAUM 

HERE'S HOW 

UNderhill 1-9818 
1050 Market St., San Francisco 


REO HOTEL 

422 VALENCIA STREET 
San Francisco 


FREEWAY SERVICE 

1698 Mission at 13th and Duboce Sts. 
MArket 1-9443 — San Francisco 

Sat, Francisco-, only tct.ul outlet for tc 

r.lincJ m<.to, oil — Save one-half or m.r, 

R-RERNED on, GIVES YOU 

Longer Oil Lite - Longer Motor Life 

Longer Battery Life - Less Gum 

Less Carbon - Higher Viscosity 


FENTON HOTEL 

259 -7th STREET 
UNderhill 1-7386 


HOTSL DU MIDI 

1362 POWELL STREET 
GA. 1-9571 San Francisco 


CROWN DRUG STORES 

Daly City - Wcstlake 
355 So. Mayfair Ave. PL. 5-8200 

Lakeshore Plaza 
2 Lakeshore Plaza OV. 1-4136 

Stonestown 
95 Stonestown LO. 4-6055 


BELL HOTEL 

37 COLUMBUS AVE. 
San Francisco 


A M. Onorato 

RAHO HOUSEWARES 

// you can't find it try Ratios 

2132 CHESTNUT STREET 

Phone WA 1-2726 San Francisco 


BETHLEHEM CAFE 

Beer - Wines - Liquors 
Phone HEmlock 1-9455 
2290 THIRD STREET 


The Fulton Supply Co. 

MAYONNAISE and SALADS 

SILVER IN BLUE BRAND 

901 Fillmore St. Fillmore 6-9760 


Storage ■ Lubrication - Washing 
Repairing - Batteries 
Accessories - Tires 

STANDARD GARAGE 

233 DRUMM STREET 
SUtter 1-2744 San Francisco 11 


Grand Pacific Hotel 

1331 STOCKTON STREET 
San Francisco 


Golden Gate Hotel 

549 KEARNY STREET 
San Francisco 


UNITED TOWING CO. 

ROBERT W. DYER 

PIER 14 

SUtter 1-6606 San Francisco 


NAPOLI MARKET 

Groceries - Vegetables 

Wines - Beer - Liquors 

1756 Stockton Street YU 2-6730 


"Ml RANCHO" 
SUPER MARKET 

Latin-American Food Line 
Tortilla Manufacturers 

3365 - 20th STREET 
Mission 7-0581 San Francisco 


Telephone GArfield 1-1660 

The T. H. Wilton Co. 

Photographic and Identification 

Supplies 

1155 FRONT STREET 


WING SUN 
Funeral Director 

17 Brcnham Place YU. 2-0719 


MONTEBELLO WINE CO. 
OF CALIFORNIA 

Producers of and Dealers in 
CHOICE CALIFORNIA WINES 
K'incry— St. Helena, Napa County 

Office: 2505 Bry.nnt Street 
San Francisco 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

Cerciat French Laundry 
& Dry Cleaners 

1025 McAllister street 



J. p. MATHEU 
PATTERN WORKS 

Wood, Metal and Ornamental 
Patterns for Castings 

WILLIAM BOYLE, Prop. 

293 Bayshore Blvd. MI 7-888C 



PEREZ BROS. 

GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

New Homes and Remodeling 

JOSEPH A. PEREZ 

Phone VAIencia -1-6363 

2904 -23rd STREET 



Star-Delta Electrical 
Works 

Since 1918 



Ele 



Mo 



Switchboards 

G.'^rfield 1-0215 

50 SHIPLEY STREET 



Ames Mercantile Co., Inc. 

MArket 1-8444 

1665 MISSION STREET 
San Francisco 



TERRY A. FRANCOIS 



2085 Sutter Street 1 

WEst 1-0127 
San Francisco 



JAYNE GARAGE 

GRaystone 4-9729 

1945 HYDE STREET 

At Union 

SAN FRANCISCO 



DUVAL'S STUDIO CLUB 

John • Paul 

309 COURTLAND AVENUE 

Mission 7-9981 



Westlake Flying "A" 
Service 

Leslie J. Richie, Prop. 

Nite Lub - Brake Service - Motor 
Tuncup ■ S&H Green Stamps 

Alcmany & Lake Merced Blvd. 
PL.iza 5-8005 



DON ROSSI 

THE BLUE BOOK 

COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
"5crvi;ig Authentic Mexicai 



Phone TUxedo 5-5955 
1624 California St. San Francixo. 



ANTONI TRUCK LINES 

COMMON CARRIES 
Daily Service to and from 

Mendocino -Lake Counties 



San Francisco 

I 8-1991 



BERONIO LUMBER CO. 

Office and Yards 

KANSAS AND MARIN STS. 
San Francisco 24 

Phone VAIencia 4-3283 

M J TOLLINI 



VIA VIA 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

1203 POLK STREET 



OLD MISSION INN 

Beer - Wines and Liquors 

Mixed Drinks Our Specialty 

50- VALENCI.A. ST. At 16tb, 

Phone MArket 1-9294 

JOE HARTMAN 



Moler Barber Schook 

System <>/ Barber Colleges 

G.I. Approved 

D. E. Brown, Manager 

161 FOURTH STREET 

GArfield 1-9979 San Francl^c( 



HOTEL DANTE 

Transient - H\ekly Ralv 

UO COLUMBL'S AVE. 



Phone UNderhill 1-8144 

Jim Bruce Chinese Launilr 

Wc Gill and Deliver 
1 H - 8th Street San Francis* . 

AUNGER 
COMPANY 

10 ii M.ARKET STREEI 

San Francisco 3, California 

MOntrose 1-6055 



Oman of the Month 



Resourceful Mother 
Lorraine Marchi 



by Virgil L. Elliott 



iHANKS TO THE ingenious and tireless 
efforts of a San Francisco mother, par- 
ly sighted children in San Francisco now 
getting the same educational advantages 
I other youngsters. Through Mrs. Gene 
^chi they are being provided with "new 
Is" to read, study and learn. 
Lorraine Marchi is the guiding light he- 
ld a new organization that is receiving so 
ch acclaim and growing so rapidly into a 
ionwide effort that she has to pinch herself 
[realize what has happened — to her own 
jiily and to thousands of visually handi- 
iped children — in a brief span of four years. 
Ker story goes back to when she first en- 



rolled her son, Gene Jr., in school. She knew 
he had faulty vision, but she didn't know how 
bad it really was. ( He has a sight deficiency 
which afflicts one in every 500 youngsters; 
he is not blind, but he cannot read normal 
size type and his condition cannot be cor- 
rected by glasses. ) The result was Gene Jr. 
S(X5n began to lag behind his classmates. He 
couldn't see well enough to keep up. 

Many parents would have resigned them- 
selves to a less than normal life for a poorly- 
sighted child. But Mrs. Marchi wasn't willing 
to let her son live his life in a shade; she de- 
termined that Gene Jr. "deserves the best . . . 
like the others " 





Mother and son— 6ene Jr. de 



StocUodorge-lype boob 

She learned that Gene Jr., and others like 
him, could read books printed in large ( 18 
point) type. The problem was, there were 
only a few such books available, and the cost 
was very high. In some schools there were 
teachers who devoted of their spare time to 
printing lessons in large type for the visually 
handicapped pupils. 

Lorraine Marchi, with the aid of volun- 
teers from the San Francisco branch of the 
National Council of Jewish Women and the 
Robert Louis Stevenson PTA, began tran- 
scribing standard school texts into large print 
editions with a borrowed offset press. They 
worked nights and week-ends. The volun- 
teers helped with proofreading and assembling 
of pages. Only the binding work was paid for. 

As the work expanded, and with the help 
of more and more volunteers, an organiza- 
tion now known as Aid to Visually Handi- 
capped was formed with Mrs. Marchi as presi- 
dent. The organization is now incorporated 
and just this spring Lorraine became its execu- 
tive director. The new AVH president is Dr. 
Maurice D. Hart, a San Francisco oculist. 

Not content with the limited number of 
books which her volunteers could produce, 
free of charge, Lorraine led a move in the 
State Legislature to get funds appropriated 
for state-financing of large-type texts. Her 
efforts were successful to the extent that the 
State is now beginning to provide one basic 
text for each subject taught in grades one 
through eight. However, even when the 
State aid reaches its maximum, it will account 
for barely iO per cent of the necessary read- 
ing matter in elementary schools, and will not 
provide at all for texts in secondary ( high ) 
schools. 

Thus, Aid to Visually Handicapped is left 
to supplement and augment the State pro- 
gram — left to provide the major share of en- 
larged type books for public, private and paro- 
chial schools, as well as for public libraries 
and many other special schools and groups 
serving handicapped children. 



Woman of the Month 

AVH is the only organization of its kind 
in tlic United States. Labor is performed by 
volunteers — even the art work — with neces- 
sarj' funds derived through donations, be- 
quests, memorials and memberships. A spe- 
cial fund drive is being conducted during 
May 12-17, the period having been pro- 
claimed as "Aid to Visually Handicapped 
Week" by Acting Mayor Harold S. Dobbs. 

Lorraine points with understandable pride 
to the more than 8,500 enlarged texts which 
her organization has produced free for par- 
tially sighted youngsters not only in San 
Francisco but throughout California and in 
many other parts of the nation. Word of 
AVH has spread far and wide. Within the 
past month, Lorraine has received more than 
200 letters from 31 different states, as edu- 
cators and parents inquire how AVH does its 
important work of aiding the visually handi- 
capped child. 

"The demand for large type books is grow- 
ing much faster than the supply can be met," 
she said. "Our volunteers are sending out 
letters to mote than 105,000 San Francisco 



For the Record 



Bay Area residents, seeking financial help 
and more volunteer workers. The story of our 
work undoubtedly is leading to establishment 
of similar volunteer efforts throughout the 
United States, and it is just tremendous how 
much good such efforts can produce for chil- 
dren who need help." 

The Marchi family resides at 173 Jordan 
Street, San Francisco, where the pages for the 
large-type books are reproduced on a basement 
offset press. The pages are then assembled 
at the recently opened AVH headquarters at 
1963 McAllister Street and shipped from 
there, again with the aid of volunteer workers. 

While Lorraine and her husband, a general 
contractor, are chiefly interested in providing 
"new eyes ' for partially sighted children in 
this area, they know there are some 75,000 
youngsters throughout the nation whose vision 
is impaired to the extent they can only read 
and learn if provided with large-type texts. 

"A child's sight is priceless," Lorraine firm- 
ly believes. "If we can give these children a 
chance to learn to read — to see to their future 
— then see how gocxl it makes us feel too!" 





MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT 

Elect 

Ruth Church 
GUPTA 

Your 

ASSEMBLYMAN 

The Only Candidate nilh 

Lcgistatire Experience 

Legislative Representative for 

more than 330 Business and 

Professional Women's Clubs. 

RUTH CHURCH GUPTA 
is Best Qualified! 



NONA REALTY 

Nona Harwick - Realtor 



533 BALBOA STREET 
Bus. BA. 1-5576 Res. BA. 1-3504 



REMINGTON RAND 

Division of Sperry-Rand Corporation 

41 FIRST STREET 
DOiis;Ias 2-8600 San Francisco 

DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

Any Make or Model Seven Days a Week 

V A.M. - 10 P.M. FREE ESTIMATES on Antenna Install.ui..ns 

1322 HAIGHT STREET 
UN. 3-0793 — Also UN. 3-1836 

ELIZABETH ARDEN 

Cordially JT elcomes You 
to her San Francisco Salon , 



550 SUTTER 



YU. 2-3755 



THE RECCt 



CHARLIE'S 

cow PALACE TAVERN 

V. 1. STEAKS -CHICKED DIISISERS $1.04 
COCKTAILS 

Bert Bennett • Tad and L.ms O'Reilly 

Phone DElaware 3-7080 

"Next Door tt> The Cow Palace" 

2660 GENEVA AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 

SEA CAPTAIN MOTEL 

2322 Lombard St. Phone WAliiul 1-4980 

• 

Phones - Elevator - Covered Parking 
Free TV and Radio - Completely Soundproof 



MOUNTAIN SPRINGS 
WATER COMPANY 

205 DRUMM STREET 

San Francisco 

MEYER & YOIING 

BUILDING CORPORATION 

679 Portola Drive MO. 1-0300 

GENERAL BUILDING CONTRACTORS 

CHOICE OF COURSES AT 

RILEY'S SCHOOL 

l-HOTEL-MOTEL FRONT OFFICE COURSH 

for men and women. Age no barrier. 
2-PBX SWITCHBOARD-RECEPTIONIST 

Ideal for girls and women who enjoy contact 

with the public. 
3-HOTEL TRANSCRIPT COURSE 
For experienced Hotel Clerks. 

Day and ISight Classes 

loom 400. Wilson Bldg. Free Placement Service San Fra-cisco 3 
p3 Market Street GAr.leld I-8I12 

2A-HOVR SERVICE 

RYANS '10" SERVICE - Signal Oil Products 

"We Give Rya,i! Extra Dividend Coupons" 

6lh and So. Van Ness UN. 1-2748 San Francisco. Calif. 

Park here while attending Giant Games 



Bring Your Family 

Ihe new IJEACM MOTEL 
ha,s ideal accomtnodations for 
singles, couples or families. 
Relax in lovely rooms, fire- 
places, G.E. Kitchens and an 
ocean view. 

ONLY 2 BLOCKS TO 

OCEAN AND TO 
GOLDEN GATE PARK 

An easy 20-minute drive to 
the Giants Staditmi! 

BEACH 
MOTEL 

4211 Judah Street 
OVerlaiid 1-8464 



The Owl Rexall Drug Store 

PROSCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

Drug. - C,..me/,cs 
Liquor, ■ Sundries 

1 6th &: MISSION STREETS 

3rd a: M.'XRKET STREETS 

UN. 1-1004 San Francisco 



PRospect 6-6208 

POIVCllNK HOSPITAL 

A Gener.il Hospital Wilh All F.ioHtiti.. 

Out P.itiem Department, Emeriteno' 

McJical and Surgical Treatment 

DAY AND NIGHT 

1055 PIN3 STREET 
S.\N FRANCISCO, CALIF. 




SPICES - EXTRACTS 

COFFEE - TEA 

INSTANT POTATOES 

GELATINE 

"Products for the fla\'or 
conscious family" 

Mccormick & 
company, inc. 

SCHILLING DIVISION 
301 Setoiul Street 



NASON PAINTS 

Paints for Every 

Household and 

Automobile Purpose 

151 Potrero .Avenue 

UN. 1-0480 San Francisco 



9th & Harrison Sts. 

A 4-Block Walk frt.m 
THh BALL PARK 

6AYW000 MOTEL 
FRANCISCO MOTEL 
Old Stand Cocktails 

One Block From Freeway 
t hollo, Ci..V Center Oris el 



THE FEZ 

RESTAURANT 
COCKTAIL LOUNGE 

Your Host 
GEORGE MOUNTANOS 

"Visit Cur Grecian Room" 

Phone ORdway 5-8219 

162 TURK ST. San Francisco 



LAUREL LOOGE 



5491 CALIFORNIA ST. 

In Laurel Heights 

San Francisco 



SKvline 2-1098 



WING OUCK CO. 

IMPORTERS and E.XPORTEI'.S 

Liquor, lyine and Grocery 

Ha aiian Products and Fresh Poi 

Chinese Porcelains 

928 Gra.-.t Ave. YUkon 2-1907 



DANTE'S 
BILLIARD PARLOR 

-.21 HROADWA'i San Francisco 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




C ven most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must: if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends; 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 
low. 

U-Drives, 



Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
YTJkon 6-4000 



Books 



N. MECHETTI a: SON 

THE GOLD SPIKE 
RESTAURANT 

All Kinds oj Mixed Drinks 

Italian Dinners sencd Family Style 

527 COLUMBUS AVENUE 
San Francisco GA. 1-9363 



MAX FORKS 

FRESH PRODUCE 
"At Wholesale Prices" 

1369 Folsom Street 



The Public 

How Will It Jump? 



by Jane Rawson 

YOl" AND YOUR LEADERS 

By Elmo Roper 

.Morrow — S3.9.5 

Mr. Floper states that in a de- 
mocracy the course of events is 
shaped by a djiiamic mixture of 
public opinion and the leading per- 
sonalities of the times which give 
it expression — and often give it in- 
spiration. This is in itself a chal- 
lenging statement in an era when 
the public, whose opinion is so 
vital to affairs, has really very 
little opportunity and time to sift 
the noise and excitement created 
by those who wish to control that 
opinion- 

Therefore, any book such as this, 
which tends to bring home to the 
public the magnitude of their re- 
sponsibility in a contemporary de- 
mocracy, and at the same time 
analyses for them the forces 
moulding public opinion, is to be 
welcomed. 

The author is a pioneer in the 
field of public opinion research. 
The book begins with a study of 
Roosevelt and the year 1936, con- 
tinues through Eisenhower and the 
year 1956, and in addition studies 
presidential candidates Willkie. 
Stevenson, Taft and Dewey, and 
also the generals, Marshall and 
MacArthur. 

During the twenty years cov- 
ered, Mr. Roper's organization and 
others have conducted polls of pub- 
lic opinion on these personalities 
and the decisions and actions they 
have taken. The book gives an in- 
teresting picture of the variations 
in public opinion, charting the ris- 
ing and falling in an individual's 
popularity and vote-getting 
strength. The reader gains a fas- 
cinating picture of each character 
studied as seen through the pub- 
lic's eyes at differing periods, and 
it is highly informative to com- 
pare the public image at any 
earlier time with that which, with 
more knowledge and judgment, 
you have later found to be the real 
person. In the cases of Eisenhower 
and Stevenson, the author himself 
gives a valuable assessment of the 
real influence of the person con- 
cerned, and compares it with the 



assessment by the public recorded 
through opinion polls. 

The public reactions to Truman 
throughout his career in ofiEice, 
when viewed in the light of later 
evidence are a particularly re- 
warding study. The historic fiasco 
of the prognostications for the 
Dewey and Truman fight is care- 
fully analyzed. The failure is 
judged largely due to the fact that 
the pollsters were unable to real- 
ize that the particular personali- 
ties in the contest made it a unique 
election, the principal factor over- 
looked being Truman's phenomenal 
capacity to collect votes vigorously 
in the closing stages of a cam- 
paign. 

The figures bring home the fact 
that polls analyse why people do 
things, such as vote or buy, the 
way they do, rather than predict 
what people will do. This would 
seem to indicate that public opin- 
ion polls are more useful as tools 
of marketing research than in po- 
litical fields, mainly because mer- 
chandise can be trimmed consider- 
ably to meet the buyer's ideas, 
whereas the better the political 
candidate the less he can be mould- 
ed to please the people. All that 
can be trimmed is the presentation 
of his candidature, and the study 
of the Stevenson fights shows this 
to be a very dangerous field of ac- 
tivity indeed. 

The book is authoritative and 
clear, and leads the unbiased read- 
er to the conclusion that the poll- 
sters gleanings are much more 
useful in the offices of McCarm- 
Erickson than on the desk of Give- 
'em-hell Harry. 
»L\DISOX AAENirE. ISA, 
By Martin flayer 

Harper— S4.9;) 
The Madison Avenue boys are 
here wiitten up again. This time 
we have inside reports of the big 
agencies and fully delineated char- 
acter sketches of their principal 
personnel and a welter of directly 
quoted remarks from the moguls. 
There is a revealing client-agency 
discussion, from the final, despair- 
ing "Then we'll do it your way be- 
cause you might as well waste 
your money w^ith us," of one agen- 
c.v to the more general agency at- 




He (ooled the pollsters 

titude that not an idea should 
altered. 

This guided tour of the avei 
gives you a piquant sense of be: 
shown quite a bit that is off 1 
record, but where Vance Pack 
in 'Hidden Persuaders " views : 
motivational research men ai, 
possible fifth column in sod 
and likes to be hair-raising abi 
present-day advertising, Mr. JE 
er in his look-see takes ver>* si 
ously the problems involved in p 
senting to the public commodit 
which are basic in our econoij 
and which also appear in bew) 
ering abundance. He is theref I 
concerned that advertising sho^ 
have high standards of prol 
sional efficiency and ethics. 
Mayer also has a fluid writ 
style. A real affection git 
through the description of tin 
Walter Thomson activities, ■ 
Air. Doyle Dave Bembach aim 
achieves an aura of winsome l< 
ableness. which would sugf 
that Mr. Mayer brings a crit' 
mind to his task, and is very c 
tent to let his opinions s 
through. 

■While most readers, no <lo 
alongside the ghost of the gi 
Dan Chaucer, will fail to m 
sense out of the statement on 
back of the dust-jacket that 
book "does for Madison Avenui 
the Eisenhower Age much w 
the Canterbury Tales did 
Southern England of the late > 
die Ages. " everyone concert 
\nth promotion and marketing 
find this nm-down not only hij 
informative but racy and en 
taining, and arrive with agrccn 
at the author's fine last senten 
"With the conception of hinisel 
a professional offering a trs. 
creative intelligence, the advei 
ing man can face his critics ci 
ly. He can face his clients ooun 
ously. And he can face hinisel I 
the morning." 

THE REC 



. S. Customs officials co-oi»>r(itv 
osely tvith San Francisco police 



Able Administrator 
Chester R. MacPhee 



^ significant role in the local 
' enforcement scene is played by 

men of the United States Ciis- 
is Sei-\'ice. who cooperate fully 
h the San Francisco police in 
continual war against the 
iiggler. 

Our men work closely with the 
ice Department, even to the ex- 
it of exchanging personnel." said 
fster R. MacPhee. Collector of 
koms for the 28th Collection 
Itrict which comprises northern 
lifomia. Nevada and Utah. This 
[rch for contraband involves ex- 
ining of cargo, mail, baggage 
I persons arriving by ships, 
pes and vehicles, 
piligent efforts to prevent smug- 
kg. together with the painstak- 

work of collecting revenues 
n Customs by means of tariffs 
)ughout the widespread Dis- 
t, call for an unusual combina- 



tion of administrative talent and 
governmental efficiency, qualities 
fully possessed by MacPhee. 

Not only has he stepped up 
seizures by 30 per cent, but he has 
boosted Customs' revenues in the 
district by more than double since 
assuming his present post as an 
appointee of President Eisenhower 
in 1953. Customs collections this 
past year approximated $44,000,- 
000, as compared to only $19,000,- 
000 just five years ago. 

MacPhee's job. chiefly adminis- 
trative in natuie. involves directing 
the work of 340 persons in nine 
divisions and four related service 
departments from his headquarters 
in the five-stor>- U. S. Customs 
Building at 5.^.5 Battery Street, San 
Francisco. Customs men are sta- 
tioned at strategic locations such 
as along the waterfront, at air- 
ports and at bonded warehouses 



in San Francisco, Oakland, Eureka, 
Monterey, Stockton, Salt Lake City 
and Fresno. 

His vigor and enthusiasm as a 
San Francisco realtor and Board 
of Supervisors member was carried 
over into Fedei-al service, resulting 
in noteworthy efficiencies and pro- 
cedural innovations, many of which 
have been adopted by the Bureau 
of Customs in Washington for use 
in other Collection Districts and 
winning for MacPhee high com- 
mendation from the U. S. Commis- 
sioner of Customs. 

These have included a revamped 
program for bettering employee 
relations, improved management 
liaison and streamlined operation- 
al techniques in many Customs 
functions. For e.xample, he cor- 
rected a situation whereby delin- 
quent duties on vessel repairs, some 
going back 10 years, were brought 




Collector of Customs 
to current status. A simple tech- 
nical change resulted in an $18.- 
000 annual savings. These and 
other improvements have been ac- 
complished with almost no increase 
in personnel and without any ap- 
preciable increase in cost. 

His friends and associates agree 
that MacPhee has demonstrated his 
capabilities as a businessman, civ- 
ic leader, administrator and law 
enforcement official. In this latter 
capacity he has. with the coopera- 
tion of San Francisco police, helped 
to curb the smuggling of dope and 
other contraband, thus protecting 
the health and welfare of our citi- 
zens. 



San Francisco 
Stevedoring Company 



»5 Brannan Street San Francisco 7, Calif. 
YLkon 6-4545 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 

^Ito, San Francisco and Ignacio, Calif, 



MINCHSN'S 
PHARMACY 

BALBOA a; 37th AVENUE 
5<in Francisco 



D. & P. Ciean-A-Rama 

janitorial Service 

Building Maintenance 

H;„J„. Cleaning 

115 NEW MONTGOMERY ST. 
San Francisco 5, California 
Office Phone: YUkon 2-8156 



CAREW & ENGLISH 

Leo V. Carew 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS . . . MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

MASONIC AT GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
S.in Fmncisco IS. Calif. .rni,, 



VENTURI ■ REY GOLF SHOP 

FRED X'ENTURI . JOEY RE^ 

HARDING PARK GOLF COURSE 

SEabright I -99 14 San Francisco 
Dislinclire Sport, and Coll Wear - Lesion, by P.G.A. Professional, 

WESTERN AMERICAN ENGINEERING CO., INC. 

HAROLI> P. NORTON, PresiJem 

109 Stevenson Street San Francisco 

EXbrook 2-6677 



Public Libry. Periodical Km. 
Civic Center. City 2. 



GEARY SERVICE MARKET 

Meats — Vegetables — Groceries 

1398 GEARY STREET JOrdan 7-1347 SAN FRANCISCO 



PALLAS BROS. 

RADIO U. TELEVISION REPAIRING - AND SALES >^ 
5000 MISSION STREET JU 5-5000 SAN FRANCISCO 12 



PRospect 6-3655 

EMBEE GROCERY STORES 

1244 LARKIN STRET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CALIFORNIA 



DELUXE BOCCE BALL COURT 



622 BROADWAY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MARIO SIL 



OKEY • DOKEY CLUB 



619 Broadway 



San Francisco 



ATLAS AUTO WRECKING 

1320 Indiana San Francisco 



BIG HUNK - - - LOOK 
Chewy, Good, Big 5c Candy Bars 

REED ROBINSON 
Golden Nuggcl S«ccts. Ll. Sa; Francisco. Califorr.is 



AMERICAN JANITOR'S SUPPLY 

HE. 1-0612 
1780 MISSION GTrEFT 
S.in Frnnckco. C.iIifrr:M.n 



VISIT THE 



PALACE BATHS 

D5 THIRD STREET ^-.\^: Fr;.* NCISCO 



SILVER CREST DOUGHNUT SHOP 

RESTAURANT f: COCKTAfL LOUNGE 
340 Bayshore Blvd. AT. 80753 S^ 



BULK R.A.TE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 4507 



Caesar's ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

■ . The Finest in Food - The Best Wines and Liquors 
LUNCHES D.AILY 
- Closed Monday - 
BAY AND POWELL STS. DOuglas 2-1153 S.in Francico. Calif 



HOF BRAU 



FINEST FOOD 
Money Can Buy 

DOUBL": SHOT BAR - OPEN 7 A.M. TO 3 .^.M. 

at OTarref Street San Francisco. Californi' 

OCEAN PARK MOTEL 

S.\N FRANCISCO DE LUXE MOTEL 
- All Modern Facililies - 

2690 - 46th AVENUE at SLOAT BLVD.. near ZOO 
overland 1--268 



THOS. THOMASSER 



EXbrook 2-1083 

AMERICAN EXPRESS CO. 



253 POST CT. 



S.A.N FRANCISO 



L»H PAINT PRODUCTS 

FIEmlock 1-4766 
150 Mississippi Street. San Francisco 10. Calif. 

the.":e's an l a: h paint for e\ery p.ainting neec 



Night Phones: Dunnajc-BEacon 4-2—0. BEaco.i -1-7185 
Night P;-.ci:cs: Shipv-riglit-LAndscape 6-0653. BEacon 2-8199 

GATEWAY SHIPWRIGHT, INC. 

LEO .A. CR.M.N. Dunr.ir.c ;>: Shipwright 
Hvde Street Pier. San Frnncl.co Pho- c GRa>.t,.o::e 4-4 



M.D. AMBULANCE SIR VICE 

Emergency Specialists 

98 EAST MARKET STREET -:- DALY CITY. CALIF. 
- PLa;a 6-fSOO - 



JERRY cK JOHXMS 



31 THIRD STREET 



.AN I RANCI.S< 



n 



EXfy^^l|(grjlg^|^ FOR JET AGE OF TOMORROW 

nil '^ - iQt;Q 



RECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 



DERATING AN AIRPORT 

LFORO BROWN 

IJTH CHURCH GUPTA 

DUIE 0. MORRIS 




.DHN RICKEY CAME WEST 
» NEW ERA 

J ME RAWSON 




FIRST COMMERCIAL JET ARRIVES IN SAN FRANCISCO 

leUord Brown (lef«| ond Kenneth Freidkin, President. Pacific Southwest Airlines, 
qreet French pMol. '" ' 



JUNE, 1958 





1 



GRAHAM W. S. MILLER 

A.I.D. 



Residential and Industrial Designer 
Color Consultant 



1353 POST STREET 
San Francisco, California 



ORdway 3-8076 




Don't be a dishwasher 
BUY ONE! 

An automatic dishwasher wUl save you many a weary 
moment at the sink. Just shake off scraps, set a dial 
and you're through. Automatically, the dishwasher 
rinses-scrubs-dries in water so hot it actually sanitizes. 
Glassware and silver come out spotless. Built-in or 
portable . . . designs are bright, prices right. And with 
P. G. and E.'s low rates, the average family can enjoy 
automatic dishwashing for just a few pennies a day! 
LIVE BBTT BR —electricity is cheap in California 

n2-E.45a Paci/icCasiutJiBietricComptn) 



^<n <z new^ dctiitu^ cx^iencetice . 




Located at 
SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 



PROTECTING 
AMERICA'S 
GREATEST 
ASSET 



Workmen's 
Compensation 

Group Accident 
& Sickness 

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THE RECORI 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 



KENNETH H. ALLEN 
ALAN P. TORY 



PUBLISHER 
EDITOR 



Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-12 12 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 



JUNE. 1958 
VOLUME 25 NUMBER 6 



JUL 3 - 1958 

BA¥-WINDOW 



LETTERS 

Congratulations on the increasing attractive- 
ss of your lay-out. Since you came out with 
lur new cover design in the October 1957 
iue, I have watched with interest the intro- 
iction of fresh features such as your excel- 
it monthly cartoon, and a gradual modern- 
ing of your make-up which contributes to 
sier reading. 

Good success to you in giving the Record 
new look. 

CESAR VELASCO. 

1314 Shafter Street. 

San Francisco 



So far as I am concerned, the statue of Ben- 
min Franklin can be taken away from Wash- 
gton Square and no one will be any the 
orse. 

I am surprised at your sentimentality in the 
ly Window paragraph of May, in which you 
in the advocates of keeping him where he is. 
Send him back to Philadelphia, 1 say. Why 
lould we bother about notables from other 
ates, when we have so many great men of 
ir own? 

WILLIAM SPARKE, 
47 De Wolf Street, 
San Francisco 

(Editor — George Washington came from 
irginia. ) 

You tell an inspiring story about Eric Liv- 
igston. Those of us who were born in San 
rancisco tend to take for granted the advan- 
*ges we enjoy. 

' It gives us a healthy jolt to read about a 
'rave man who was the victim of persecu- 
lon, and came to our city where he built up 
fe anew. It helps us to value our freedoms 
lore, and to l(X)k around our city and see its 
cauties with fresh eyes. 

To have men like Eric Livingston in our 
lidst is good for San Francisco. They bring 
lew red blood into our life, and save us from 
.ening complacent. 

LAURA BECHTEL, 
1 1 1 1 Jackson Street, 
San Francisco 



JET AGE: Belford Brown, manager of the 
San Francisco Airport, who contributes our 
For the Record" article this month, com- 
mands the goodwill of the Bay Area business 
commimity, and has played an important role 
in civic life. A former Vice-President of the 
First Western Bank, he was President of the 
Junior Chamber of Commerce in 1945, and 
has held important chairmanships of C. of C. 
committees; he has also been President of the 
L^nited Cnisade. 

This background fits him happily for the 
responsible job of heading our airport in a 
time of expansion when g<X)d relations and 
co-operation berween this vital operation and 
the community are of paramount importance. 
He has recently returned from a meeting of 
tlie Airport Operators' Council at San Juan, 
Puerto Rico, at which engineers contributed to 
an enlightening symposium on the future of 
jet aircraft. Dynamic and forceful Belford 
Brown is confident that a solution will be 
found to the noise problem when jet aircraft 
begin to land regularly — corrective measures 
he says, will be worked out through practical 
observations which will supplement the the- 
oretical knowledge derived from drawing 
board analyses. 

HETCH-HETCHY: Last week-end we had 
a kx)k at the largest single project the 
City has ever undertaken. It is well under 
way, though no fireworks of dramatization 
accompany the steady day-to-day labor. Wear 
ing a steel helmet somewhat self-consciously, 
we picked our way in the company of other 
press representatives along a tunnel ( in itself 
an S]^'z million dollar job) which is being cut 
through solid granite from both ends by teams 
working 24 hours a day. This tunnel will con- 
nect Cherry Dam with the new Cherry Power 
House. It is pan of an expansion of the Hetch- 
Hetchy Power Project which is costing S54 
million. 

It is expected that the Cherry Power House 
will go into operation in July 1960, and a 
second — the Canyon Power liouse — will be 



completed a few years later, with a cumu- 
lative result of tripling the present hydro- 
electric power capacity of Hetch-Hetchy. This 
is a healthy prospect of which the citizens of 
San Francisco should sit up and take notice. 
Too few people are aware of the far-flung 
operations of our city's water and power 
system. It would be a gtxxi thing to have 
a color film made to portray the object lesson 
to the entire State of California which is pro- 
vided by inter-county co-operation in exploit- 
ing the water and power resources of the 
Tuolumne River. 

VTISION AND ACTION: Salty-tongued, 
' gravel-voiced Harry Lloyd, after whom 
Lake Lloyd is named, has inherited the mantle 
of the late great Michael Maurice O'Shaugh- 
nessy who carried through the first stage of 
the Hetch-Hetchy project. One of the most 
lively and active-minded executives in City 
Hall, Harry Lloyd recalls that the initials of 
San Francisco's famed engineer were seized 
upon in his day by short-sighted economizers 
to dub him as "More Money O'Shaughnessy. ' 

It was in the mid-twenties that O'Shaugh- 
nessy, called in as consultant to an engineering 
project in Grass Valley on which young Lloyd 
was working, induced this promising junior 
engineer to come and see him when the work 
was completed. So began Lloyd's distinguished 
career for the City which in early days in- 
cluded summers of surveying in Cherry River 
Valley on horseback, and from 1950 onwards 
has shaped the expansion of the Hetch-Hetchy 
project. 

Harry Lloyd speaks with admiration of 
O'Shaughnessy's great care for detail and mar- 
velous memor)', which could be disconcerting 
when after a lapse of three months he chal- 
lenged a junior on some small departure from 
a statement. "It was he," says the present 
chief engineer, "who tied the loose ends to- 
gether and fought to do the thing people 
had been talking about — which involved 
building 65 miles of railroad." 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 




LETTERS 


3 


BAY WINDOW 


3 


OUR EXPANDING AIRPORT 


4 


by Belford Brov.n 




WOMAN OF THE MONTH: RUTH CHURCH GUPTA 


8 


by MolI.e D, Morr; 




BOOKS: A NEW ERA IN WORLD AFFAIRS 


10 


b, Jan» Rawicr 




JOHN RICKEY CAME WEST 


12 


PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 


13 


MEMO FOR LEISURE 


IS 



,UNE, 1958 



For the Record 



Expansion Plans For 
Jet Age of Tomorrow 



by Belford Brown 

Manager. Airport Department 
S. F. Public Utilities Commission 



l\y[rUCH has already been written about the 
-L'-ll- history and background of San Fran- 
cisco International Airport. However, no arti- 
cle touching on the subject would be com- 
plete without at least a broad brushstroke cov- 
ering early aviation in this area. 

It could Stan in 1883 when a University of 
Santa Clara professor, John Joseph Mont- 
gomer)', made the first successful glider flight 
in the United States. It could start with the 
aerial actobatics of Lincoln Beachy at the Pan- 
ama Pacific Exposition at San Francisco in 
1915. 

It could start with the City Charter amend- 
ment passed November 2, 1926 which, in ef- 
fect, created what was to become San Fran- 
cisco International Airport, by authorizing the 
purchase of land for the development of a 
municipally owned aviation facility outside 
the city limits. On March 17, 1927, the Board 
of Supervisors approved a lease of 150 acres 
of Mills Estate property. The first runway was 
dedicated May 7, 1927, exactly two weeks be- 
fore Charles Lindbergh was to make the first 
nonstop flight from New York to Paris. 

The history of the Airport's early years re- 
cords a struggle for survival since there was 
little money to devote to such a new indus- 
try. One bond issue after another was rejected 
by the voters until June 8, 1932 when the 
San Franciscno Public Utilities Commission 
became responsible for airport afl^airs, and 
new business was attracted to the newly born 
facility. The first bond issue to be approved 
was in 1933. 

World War 11 placed renewed emphasis on 
this mode of transportation and brought its 
many technical advances into sharp focus. In 
1945 a 520,000,000 airport bond issue was 
approved by the citizens of San Francisco. 
CJver §7,000,000 of these funds were ear- 
marked for the reclaiming of tidelands, and 




the relocating of the old Bayshore Highway. 

Before the program could be completed, in- 
flation, coupled with higher airport design 
standards, consumed the available money. In 
1949 the voters approved an additional SIO,- 
000,000 to bring the airport up to the stand- 
ards of the fast growing air industry. The 
present terminal facilities and flying field im- 
provements were developed with these bond 
funds, and the existing main terminal build- 
ing was dedicated September 1, 1954. 

As the airport was improved, and as it kept 
pace with industry expansion, new air car- 
riers, many carrying foreign flags, were certi- 
fied into San Francisco; and in November, 
1956, with an awareness of the impending Jet 
Age and confident of retaining a leading 
position among major airports, San Francisco 
voted another 525,000,000 to improve and 
expand San Francisco International Airport. 
With the passage of the 1956 bond issue, the 
Cit)''s total capital investment at San Fran- 
cisco International Airport will soon amount 
to 555,000,000. 

Today San Francisco International Airport 
ranks fifth in the nation in number of pas- 
sengers ser\'ed annually. With a daily average 
of 11,000, some four million passengers used 
the terminal facilities in 1957. This represents 
an increase of more than thirteen per cent 
over the preceding year — and approximately 
half a million more passengers than in 1956! 

As a further example of the tremendous 
scope of the aviation industry, it is interesting 
to note that over seventy-eight million gal- 
lons of aviation fuel ate currently being 
pumped annually through the airport's under- 
ground pipelines and delivered by truck. 

These are but a few of the many facts 
pointing to the growth of this young industry. 

The city must continue to take positive 
action to provide airport facilities to insure 



that predominance of airline schedules and ! 
serv'ice is maintained at San Francisco Inter- • 
national Airport. 

Thanks to several recent sutA'eys, we have : 
many vital facts to take into consideration ■ 
when planning futute expansions. Foremost 
in our thinking is the tremendous growth of 
passenger traffic. The dramatic traffic figures 
referred to above point up many factors, one 
of the most important being that although 
our beautiful terminal building was dedicated 
less than four years ago. it is already too small 
to handle the piesent traffic load. 

Forrunately, this amazing growth has not " 
caught San Francisco off guard. The 525,000,- 
000 authorized by the 1956 bond issue, plus 
additional funds allocated by the Civil Aero- 
nautics Administration, is earmarked exclu- 
sively for airport expansion. 

The proper use of this money presents 
many problems. Commercial aviation is grow- 
ing at such a rapid rate that the vet)' nature 
of planning becomes subject to what amounts 
to continual changes. However, San Francisco 
is keeping pace with the industt}' and staying 
a jump ahead. This is mentioned only because 
an often asked question is, "When will the 
expansion program commence?" It has 
started! 

While much planning preceded the actual 
placing of the bond issue on the ballot of 
1956, extensive consideration had to be given 
the entire program following its passage. 
There is no question but that such additional 
sur\'ey activity' is time-consuming and very 
involved. As a result of the planning and pre- 
liminat)' investigation made, a complete study 
containing suggested expanded terminal fa- 
cilities, traffic projections, and estimates of 
future flying field requirements is now avail- 
able. It is interesting to look at some of tlu-sc 
predictions. 



THE RECORD 




Throng of departing passengers checking in before boarding oirplon 



As of this wricing, there are approximately 
thirt)- parking Dositions for large commercial 
'lircraft immediately around the central termi- 
nal area. By this time next year another con- 
course will have been added, providing nine 
iidditional parking spaces capable of handling 
):he large jet liners expected later this year. By 
(1970 a minimum of fifty-six parking spaces 
will be necessary. 

Breaking this down in terms of passengers, 
these fifty-six aircraft (assuming all spaces 
were filled at one time) represent approxi- 
Tiately 1,920 passengers! Bearing in mind the 
fact that the airport is now processing about 
rwelve thousand passengers per day, by 1970 
— just twelve years from now — the terminal 
urill be required to take care of some .M,000 
passengers every day! It is expected that a 
rotal of over ten million people will be using 
rhe terminal each year, or almost triple the 
present volume! 

San Francisco's share of the U. S. domestic 
passenger volume has steadily increased from 
2.9 per cent in 1953 to about 3.5 per cent in 
1957. Usually, major hubs will enplane a con 
stant percentage of the domestic volume over 
the years; however, the rapid growth of San 
Francisco International Airport traffic volume 
indicates that its share of the total domestic 
volume will increase to about 4 per cent. 

VC'hat about the airplanes themselves? Be- 
ginnmg late this year or early in 1959, San 
Francisco will have pure jet aircraft service. 
It is expected that this initial service will con- 
isist of nonstop flights to and from New York, 
jfollowed by trans-Pacific service. Jet aircraK 
will carry from 100 to 162 passengers, de- 
pending on the type of service and seating 
configuration. 

These airplanes will fly at altitudes above 
30,000 feet, and cover the distance from San 
Francisco to New York or Honolulu in about 
four hours — half the present flying time. 
These are not dream craft of the future. They 
are being flown today and will be here at San 



Francisco International Airport before another 
year passed. 

Jet planes present new problems to the air- 
lines and to the airpons. They are heavier 
than present flying transports, they burn en- 
tirely different types of fuel, and require 
greater areas in which to maneuver both in 
the air and on the ground. All these factors 
had to be taken into consideration in plan- 
ning the expansion of existing facilities. A 
good portion of this exploration has been ac- 
complished, but as new models are develop- 
ing, new problems will arise. Each in turn 
must be carefully studied and analyzed, re- 
quiring many conferences between airport 
management and representatives of the air- 
lines involved. 

If you have visited the airport recently you 
may have noticed new buildings being con- 
structed. These are new hangars and offices 
being built on airport property by the air- 
lines serving San Francisco, and represent 
but one of many sources of revenue derived 
from leases which help to support this city- 
owned airp<5n. 

Runways are being lengthened in order to 
accommodate the new sky liners expected to 
start sers'ing this area within the next few 
months. At San Francisco International Air- 
porr almost all runway extension involves 
filling in bay waters, the cost of which must 
be borne by the city, and is an expensive pro- 
cess. Funds from the 1956 bond issue are be- 
ing used, along with Federal Airport Aid. 

These are only two of the growth symp- 
toms which currently can be observed. Many 
other changes will soon be in evidence. New- 
concourses and piers are to be built, and con- 
tracts for some of the work have already been 
signed. A luxury hotel will soon be construct- 
ed on airport property, and considerable modi- 
fication of the terminal building will shortly 
get under way. 

In due time two "satellite" terminals will 
be construaed on either side of the present 



building — one for domestic traffic, the other 
for international passenger service and pro- 
cessing. Cargo facilities will be enlarged, and 
eventually expanded further, perhaps at a new 
liKation adjacent to the Hying field. 

It is not necessary to mention that all such 
progress represents large expenditures of 
money, some by private industry, some by the 
Airport Department. However, every new 
addition to the "master plan" of San Francisco 
International Airport represents more dollars 
to the over-all economy of San Francisco. Our 
airport at this date is the place of full-time 
employment for over 12,000 people, repre- 
senting over 565,000,000 in payroll checks 
per year — the largest single concentration of 
industry in the Bay Area! 

Included in the expansion plans are many 
items that might appear of a minor nature 
when viewed from the vantage point of com- 
plete development, but will be of great indi- 
vidual importance. For example, it has become 
quite obvious that the terminal building 
would function more efficiently if a rwu-way 
escalator were installed connecting the ground 
floor baggage-claiming area and the main 
ticket lobby level. This addition will be made 
in the very near future. 

There is need too for a fast self-claiming 
baggage system, and plans are currently being 
developed. Doors that open automatically 
when approached from either side would cer- 
tainly aid passengers carrying hand baggage. 
This is being accomplished. New ticket coun- 
ter space is a most obvious and urgent need, 
and new areas for this purpose will soon be 
available. Parking areas for automobiles must 
be greatly enlarged, perhaps requiring multi- 
level garage facilities. 

Before long, the downtown airline bus ter- 
minal will be in operation. With that new 
terminal comes the problem of handling pre- 
checked baggage. It will arrive at the airport 
aboard the same buses bringing passengers 
from the city, and methods are being explored 
to have baggage removed from the buses and 
delivered to aircraft without interfering with 

0# the Recorrl 




"This is Pierre. He will do oil the tri 



JUNE, 1958 



the flow of passenger traffic through the ter- 
minal. 

All of these items appear to be relatively 
minor in themselves but would immediately 
assume major proportions if overlooked. These 
projects are now in the hands of engineers 
and will be a part of the terminal in the very 
near future. 

Innovations that will soon be evident in- 
clude such items as telescoping boarding 
ramps, which will permit passengers to board 
aircraft from the second level of concourses 
and walk, under cover, directly into waiting 
planes; such novel concepts as moving side- 
walks connecting one terminal area with an- 
other; and additions to our master plan such 
as "in flight" commissary kitchens where food 
will be prepared for service enroute from 
San Francisco. 

In the operation of any airport the most 
vital link in the chain is its air service. At 
San Francisco, air service is one of our 
strongest "links." We are now served by 
eleven scheduled airlines offering direct serv- 
ice to almost every city in the nation, plus 
international sen'ice direct to Europe, Central 
America, the Pacific, and Canada. We have 
many flights terminating or originating at 
this airport that were undreamed of a few 
years ago. 

Two carriers now offer regular, often non- 
stop. Polar route service from here to Lon- 
don, Paris and Rome. One carrier frequently 
has two aircraft on the ground at San Fran- 
cisco, each having left Australia at the same 




Existing t, 
Ing positl 
in backgr 



ies ot San Francisco International Airport showing twenty 
^courses will soon be added to area in foreground. Partially 

extended to full size. Building upper left is dedicated to ci 
tinted circle, center foreground, denotes helicopter landing. 



. time but each traveling in a different direc- 
tion completely around the world! Another 
airline offering regular service to London via 
New York recently started using turbo-prop 
aircraft on its route. 

It is felt that San Francisco deserves addi- 
tional nonstop air service between here and 



New York, and warrants direct sers'ice cu 
several other American cities presently reached 
only by change of planes. There are many) 
such issues continually under discussion. 

The Airport Department, with the cooper-i 
ation of other departments of city govern-: 
ment and civic organizations, is constantl]^ 



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THE RECORD 



ikir Id these siruations as they develop, and 
-iriMs continually to move toward an ex- 
>,in Inl diversification of air services, not only 
'nriii .iirlines now operating from here, but 
Inmi carriers that have indicated an interest 
(II -'ix rating out of San Francisco. Each issue 
iiDsi be weighed on the basis of demand tor 
.cr\ Kc, Its effect on competition, and the over- 
ill ccimomy of the Bay Area. 

W hilc San Francisco is a major interna- 
HHi.il airpon, route applicaticms pending or 
Diucmplated could bring additional intcrna- 
Min.il carriers to San Francisco International 
\irport. Scandinavian Airlines System may 
n. indurate service in the future; Air India, 
I'liitippine Air Lines, Lufthansa, and Air 
Ir.iiiLC' may be certified for West Coast serv- 
Lc riiere is a possibility that San Francisco 
in.' I OS Angeles will be designated as co- 
iiiiiiii.ils for these carriers; however, lixal ef- 
rnrs .ire being concentrated on choosing San 
rr.iiKisco as the West Coast terminal. 

TliDsc of us associated with airport oper- 
uion are always aware of responsibilities as 
iiciyliburs. An airport can, if its operation is 
nm controlled, become a nuisance to adja- 
-ciir communities. Aircraft are noisy — there 
..in he- no argument in this regard. But this 
noiM, can and is being kept to a minimum. 
M.im techniques are employed to accomplish 
tins To date a great deal of progress has been 
m.i.lc. 

However, we are now on the threshold of 
I ni u sound, the sound of the "jet age." We 
111 onvinced that if this new sound causes 
III' oncern it will be because of its "new- 
K^' Aircraft manufacturers have been suc- 
.cssliil in quieting the noise of the new jets 



to the point that they now compare with ex- 
isting airplanes. This effort on the part of the 
airplane makers cost many millions of dollars 
and was accomplished only after prolonged 
periods of research. 

In spite of many advances made through 
use of muffling and silencing devices, San 
Francisco International Airport has instituted 
a policy of keeping as much flying over water 
as possible, thereby avoiding populated areas. 

It must be remembered that these new air- 
planes will climb faster and fly faster than 
any presently in operation. What litde nuis- 
ance develops as the result of this new power 
will be of such short duration that very little 
inconvenience will result. It is sincerely be- 
lieved that the sound of the commercial 'jei 
age" will be less annoying to airport neigh- 
bors than the noise of present day conven- 
tional aircraft. 

It must be realized that the transition pe- 
riod during which propeller type planes are 
being replaced by jet planes will be long. We 
should not expect to come to the airport next 
year and see only jets parked around the field 
side of the terminal building. The propeller 
aircraft will be with us for several years, will, 
in fact, outnumber jets for at least the next 
five years. 

In looking over the past and present his- 
tory of San Francisco International Airport 
many things become immediately apparent, 
the first being that aviation is still in its in- 
fancy. There are few men willing to predict 
what the future will produce beyond the next 
decade, or in fact, within the next decade, in 
the way of high speed transportation. 

San Francisco has been fortunate in the 



past in that her civic leaders had the fore 
sight to envision the great growth of thi: 
young indu.stry. As a result of this willing 
ness to pioneer in a new enterprise, San Fran 
Cisco has remained at the forefront of com 
mcrcial aviation, and if present indication; 
prove true, San Francisco will not only main 
tain its present rank as a major hub of inter 
national air transportatiorr, but continue tc 
progress until all objectives are achieved. 

Meet the Press 




GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEnilock 1-0131 

San Francisco 

FALLON & HARGRAVES 

550 Montgomery Street 
MR. FALLON 

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TYPE 

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510 BATTERY STREET 

Telephone EXbrook 2-0764 San Francisco, Calif. 

JAPAN TRADE CENTER 

GENZO MAEZAWA 

Execlire Director 

531 SUTTER STREET DOuglas 2-0915 

Room 103. World Trade Center, San Franciico, Cahf. 




TT WOULD be difficult, if not impossible, 
^ to wander down Chestnut Street through 
Marina without coming across at least one 
bright orange and blue poster proclaiming 
Ruth Church Gupta for Twenty-first Dis- 
trict Assemblyman. After meeting a sufficient 
amount of the pungent proclamations, the 
question arises; just who is Ruth Church 
Gupta? 

The offices of Gupta and Gupta, Attor- 
neys at Law, are located on the upper story 
of a remodeled flat in the heart of the Ma- 
rina. On either side of the old window that 
separates the offices of Ruth and Kamini 
Gupta hangs a multi-colored India print. In 
the first office Kamini, resplendent in a hand- 
some checked vest which contrasts with his 
conservative business suit, smiles and motions 
you on into the back office where the Twen- 
ty-first district's only woman candidate for 
the Assembly is casually going through a for- 
midable stack of papers. 

Looking unusually rela.xed for a woman 
who has just not only won her own party's 
nomination for the office, but come in a 



Past President of Queen's Bench 
is sponsored by 330 B.P.W. Clubs 



The World and Aims 
of Ruth Church Gupta 



by Mollie Dee Morris 



strong third on the Republican ticket also, 
Ruth admits she and Kamini have just re- 
turned from a brief vacation in the Sierras 
where they blissfully enjoyed doing "noth- 
ing at all." 

The retreat to the mountain country for a 
few days' relaxation is natural and perhaps 
almost second nature for this third-gener- 
ation Californian whose pioneer stock dates 
back to the Gold Rush days. 

She was raised in Yuba City. Her father 
served with the Forest Service which afforded 
her many vacation days spent roaming the 
Northern California countryside with her 
energetic parent. However, curiosity about 
the world of business, and a basic interest in 
furthering human understanding as a profes- 
sional woman drew the young Ruth away 
from her rural upbringing to spend four 
years at Mills College where she majored in 
both business and economics. Working her 
way through Mills, Ruth waited tables in the 
college dining hall, an experience which, 
though trying at first, soon became the bal- 
ancing human factor to offset her heavy study 



schedule. 

Ruth never considered law as the ultimate; 
outcome of her early ambitions. After gradu-j 
ation, she began working for W. P. Fuller W 
Co., and became active in Democratic party 
volunteer work. It was during this time than 
she met Kamini, a young student with an ac-: 
tive interest in the legal world. They were' 
married in 1939. During the WoHd War III 
years, when Kamini was overseas, Ruth's in-i 
terest became her ambition, and she enrolled 
in Hastings Law School. After her husband 
returned home they completed Hastings to- 
gether. They opened the Marina office in 
1949. 

"Going to school and studying together 
was a wonderful experience," Ruth related, 
"and one, I think, that has formed the basis: 
for our working together easily." 

Unlike many husbands who prefer if not 
to keep the wife at home, at least to have her 
working in a different field or location, Ka- 
mini encourages Ruth's interests. The two 
work harmoniously, wandering in and out 
of each other's offices upon occasion, which 



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S.,n Fr.incis<-o, C.ilif. 



THE RECORD 



1 iMZOs a close bond ol unjcrstandiiiy. 

iih u'lit up and iipcncd the hack door ot 

iIko to reveal a delicate Japanese garden 
1. J like an o.usis anioni; the blank wo(xJen 
I'liL-s that torm the hack buildings of the 
P' pulated neighborhood. 
I things ever get too crowded," she ex- 
I.J, "we always have this." Thanks to 
li .\\ nstairs flonst, the garden is kept im- 
il.aely. 
miini and Ruth are beginning to feel the 

tit expand their busy quarters more and 
strongly, but cannot face leaving their 
nil liome. 

luminous bookshelves cover almost all 

iv.nlable wall space, with stacks here and 

I '11 filing cabinets, among which is a 

I |ii "ckct book collection ranging from 

to Perry Mason. This latter Ruth likes 
ipi\ as a release from her own busy pro- 

11, tor the hero wins case after case with 
jiL.itest of fictional ease. 

lt interest in politics has become more 
. during the past four years, while she 
.J .IS legislative advocate for the Busi- 
inJ Professional Women's Clubs. Dur- 
'i ^cssIOns she has observed in Sacra 
t the legislative process, Ruth soon 
Mth California's only two assembly- 
Pauline Davis of Portola, and Dor- 
I 'i inohoe of Bakersfield, that women 
ninre representation in the legislature. 
lit fast with the state's large population 
.M)rking and professional women, two 



representatives seem remarkably inadequate 
when some States have as many as forty-five 
or fifty female lawmakers. 

However, the dynamic yet gentle attorney 
IS not leading any bandwagon for female 
rights. This doesn't even enter into her per- 
sonal philosophy, which admits simply that 
the "battle of the sexes ended years ago when 
women got the right to vote." She feels that 
her responsibility is to human beings, men or 
women. 

This might perhaps form the basic attitude 
of each of the Guptas. Both are active in 
civic affairs, especially in the Marina area 
where Kamini has done an outstanding job 
as head of che Marina Merchants' Associ- 
ation. Ruth, herself, has held a variety of 
positions of civic responsibility including past 
president of the woman attorneys' association. 
Queen's Bench, a post which she describes as .i 
healthy challenge: "If there was ever an or- 
ganization of all chiefs and no Indians, that s 
it!" 

However, it is evident in observing their 
modest quarters which they loyally maintain, 
and in noticing the Benny Goodman album 
piled among sheaves of papers, and the Ming 
tree situated among a stack of law books, 
that success in the art of living is more im- 
portant to the gracious and interesting couple 
than is the acquiring of material prizes. It 
sometimes happens in politics, however, that 
victories come to those whose eye is on serv- 
ice and whose first preoccupation is integ- 
rity. 



The .V^O clubs constituting the B.P.W. who 
are sponsoring Ruth Gupta, and the more 
than 10,000 citizens who voted for her in the 
priniar}', now have their eye hopefully on 
November. 

After three years spent observing the leg- 
islature, Ruth says that she now feels ready 
to become a representative taking part in de- 
bates and committees, if the will of the people 
in the 21st district sends her to Sacramento. 




Dan London. Commodore of the Great Goldei 
Fleet, shows him the sights o( the Boy during a re 
cent cruise aboard the "Adventuress."— Ccu-tes- 
:, F Chamber of Commerce. 




SAN FRANCISCO'S MOTOR HOTEL 
at Civic Center 



HOTEL WHITCOMB 

8fh to 9th on Market Street 
At the Hub of the Freeways 

Motderate rates - Children Free 

500 Rooms - Free Guest Parking 
Use New Motor Entrance 

All Services - Excellent Food 

TRY THE WHITCOMB NEXT 

Karl C. Weber, Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 
UN 1-9600 



FOR 

SAMPLING - INSPECTION 
LABORATORY SERVICES 

Chemical Analysis • Bacteriological E.xamination 
Grading • Certification 



OF 



IMPORTS 



EXPORTS 



Specify 

CURTIS & TOMPKINS, LTD. 

Eitablhln-d ISTIi 

236 Front Street • San Francisco 1 1 
Phone: EXbrook 2-11 50 Cable: ANALYST 

Nevada Operations Headquarters — Lovelock 

Sampling Representatives at Coast and Inland Points 

SPECIALISTS IN 



Members of and Official Chemiils and or Samplers fo 
Many Scientific and Trade Organizations 

NCPA — Ninp — AOCS — ASTM — ACIL 



BOOKS 



New Era in World Affairs 



by Jane Rawson 




^hich 



chrisf 
nphas 



Foreign Policy: The Next Phase. 
Thorns K. Finletter 
Harper — S3.50 

Thomas K. Finletter, a former 
Secretary of the Air Force, ampli- 
fies in book form the Elihu Root 
lectures given by him at the Coun- 
cil in Foreign Relations in New 
York City at the end of 1957. 

Mr. Finletter sees the launching 
of the Russian satellites in the fall 
of 1957 as the beginning of a new 
era of post-World War II history 
in which the struggle with com- 
munism enters a more difficult and 
dangerous phase. In this book, the 
writer looks back over the foreign 
policy of the United States in the 
period from the end of World War 
II, and delineates the modifications 
he considers necessary as we face 
the next few years. 

The author looks out from the 
present day situation and tries to 
plan for a more distant future than 
most present-day policy makers. 
He makes a plea for a long-range 



W^' 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 

Jto, Sdn Frdnclico and Igndcio, Cdtlf. 



foreign poUcy based on sound prin- 
ciple, and aimed at outlawing war, 
in contrast to the day-to-day ex- 
pediencies which have proved in- 
capable of grappling constructive- 
ly with such problems as the Suez 
crisis and recent flare-ups in the 
Middle East. 

Mr. Finletter sees US air-atomic 
strength and correlated modem 
military and naval measures ab- 
solutely essential for security, to- 
gether with similar strength de- 
veloped by our Western allies. He 
is also firmly convinced of the ne- 
cessity for developing fimi al- 
liances, both with Western nations 
and, after fostering greater under- 
standing, with Asian countries. 

In the field of international re- 
lations there are aspects which 
need to be explored alongside these 
views. There are fortunatelj' things 
being worked out in the audiences 
of Van CUbui-n and the Moiseyev 
dancers on a "people to people" 
level, which promise to reinforce 
efforts of diplomats. 

YONDER ONE WORLD 

A Study of Asia and the West. 
By Frank Moraes 

Macmillan — $3.75 

Mr. Moreas is an alert, intelli- 
p^ent Indian journalist, educated in 
part in Europe, who has travelled 
widely over all five continents of 
the world. 

He examines national traits 
with tolerance, perspicuity and hu- 
mor, and reports to us in a way 
that is stimulating, frank and in- 
formative. As Mr. Moraes is con- 
cerned to build bridges of under- 
standing between the people of the 
East and the West, he introduces 
his views on present-day problems 
with relevant historical facts of 



great help to those readers whose 
knowledge, for example, of Asian 
historj' is sketchy. 

Mr. Moraes skilfully preser\'es a 
remarkable objectivity, extending 
this not only to his own countr>^ of 
India, but, what is more striking 
still, to recently severed Pakistan. 

Chapter 12 on "The Free 
World" is introduced by the sen- 
tence: "On the United States de- 
pend largely the answers to two 
vital questions; Will peace be pre- 
served? Will liberty survive?" Mr. 
Moraes' compassionate look at 
mankind leads us to believe that 
basically the concept of one world 
is eminently workable, and that 
battling with intelligence and Wgor 
to solve problems of segregation 
within our own family, of differing 
views on colonialism within our 
own race, and different philoso- 
phies within world society, this 
nation can look forward to sur- 
vival, and embark with optimism 
on journeys to outer space, meet- 
ing 'one-horned, one-eyed, flying 
purple-people-eaters" or answering 
questions about the Bank of Amer- 



WORLD POLITICS 
By A. F. K. Organski 

Knopf — S7.50 

This book is a detailed and schol- 
arly account of international rela- 
tions, written in readable English. 
It is an excellent reference book 
for any member of the general 
public who wishes to become bet- 
ter informed about world affaii-s. 
Dr. Organski investigates nation- 
alism and power. 

He presents a careful criticism 
of the balance of power theory, 
emphasizing that a balance of 
power does not ensure peace. Col- 
lective security is examined criti- 



jd Japan Air Lines' "City of San Fror, 
[zed new ties between East and WeiL 

cally, and shown in his view ti 
be unworkable in practice as f 
final preventive of war. 

Dr. Organski boldly faces th 
question: "Will there be a thin 
world war?" As he sees world af^ 
fairs, developing industrializatior 
and economic security bring sta-. 
bility and satisfaction to a coun* 
tr>' . He cautiously hopes thai 
through international organiza- 
tions, we can build, if not a usefu'l 
__ collective security against an ag- 
gressor, at least a body of sounc 
international understanding, whicJ 
will make aggression less likely. 

He foresees vaiied rates of indus- ' 
trial progi-ess in the great natiom 
of Russia. India and China, whicfc 
could ensure nations growing it 
strength through a period of peact 
into an era where the spoils of wai 
would have no value, and w^ 
would therefore be eschewed. 

These three books can be recom- 
mended collectively, as stimulat- 
ing intelligent thought and encoui^ 
aging alert attitudes in the field ol 
world affairs. Mr. Finletter, wilt 
his plea for facing the problems 
squarely, Mr. Moraes with his fists 
ever raised against communism 
and Dr. Organski. with his schol- 
arly appraisal, give an extensive 
view both of the problems in th« 
present world situation and th« 
principles by which they could b< 
solved. 



MONTERE'i' 
MOHAVCK SERVICl 

198 Monlcrcv Blvd., S.in Ir.m.iv 



Molunvlv St'r\i<'«' 

Chde W. HcnJriclcot, 

I 
35th Ave. Sl B.ilboa, San Francisco 



THE RECORD 



MELWILLIAMS CO. 

*'Ciil() Dofi Food i'.o." 

112 MARKET STREET 

EXbrook 2-7366 

San Francisco, Calif. 


KANG'S MARKET 

Ciroceries - Fruits - Vegetables 
Beer - Wines - Liquor 

19"1 FILLMORE STREET 


ROBERTS CAKE SHOP 

HOH HOFFMAN 

1401 Irving Street 

SEabright 1-0311 
San Francisco. Calif. 


OMEGA FOOD 
PRODUCTS, INC. 

84 CLAY STREET 
YUkon 2-20- -1 San Francisco 


Golden Gate Home for 
Aged People 

Froso Photos, Mgr. 
ig 34- 1943 - 19th AVENUE 

San Francisco 


Broadmore Service 
Station 

24 Hours T orpins Service 

173 SCHOOL STREET 

San Francisco 


P. A. BERGEROT 

Counsel lor Batik of America 

Counsel for Consulate General 

of France 

Phone SUtter 1-7868, 1-7869 
FRENCH BANK BUILDING 
110 Sutter St. San Francisco 


Insurance 

GEORGE KWOK 

752 SACRAMENTO ST. 
San Francisco 


VISTA GRANDE 
MARKET 

FRANK BISORDI 

PLaza 5-9874 

6 3 50 MISSION STREET 


Valley Motor Lines, Inc. 
(Express Company) 

ARTHUR A: QUINT STS. 


Smith Industrial Supply 
Company 

Jack E. Smith J. B. (Dud) Smith 

SauJ Blast Sand - Gril - Garnet 

Mineral Shot - Noales - Pots 

Scafjold Rentals 


PAUL G. BRUNNER 

Cabinet Making • Fine Interior 

Woodwork - Furniture - Fixtures 

Radio 6/ T.V. Cabinets 

1446 PINE STREET 

PR 5-5325 




Harry S. Wainwright 
J. Edward Fleishen 

841 FLOOD BLDG. 
San Francisco 


JOHN'S BODY SHOP 

Painting - Welding 
John Boteilho, Prop. 

■Xl- GRAND AVENUE 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 




FLORA CRANE 
SERVICE 

General Engineering 

Contractors 

250 MENDELL STREET 

AT 2-1455 


PAT O'SHEA'S 
Cocktails 

5-54 GEARY BLVD 
SKyline 2-3148 

San Francisco 


STAR TERMINAL, INC. 

Pier 22 

YUkon 2-4993 
San Francisco, Calif. 


New Process 
Chemical Co., Inc. 

7 ricon Chemical Products 

121 CLAY STREET 
San Francisco 



Facts About Our Airport 



OWNKKSHIP: San Francisco 
International Airport is municipal- 
ly owned by the City and County 
of San Francisco and operated 
under the jutisdiction of the Pviblic 
Utilities Commission. 

HISTORY: The City and County 
of San Francisco dedicated the 
Airport in March of 1927. The 
present Terminal Building and re- 
lated area were opened in August 
of 1954. This Airport currently 
I'anks fifth in the nation in number 
of passengers served annually (4.- 
000.000 passengers in 1958 -nearly 
12,000 per day in 19571. 

LOCATION: The Airport is situ- 
ated on the San Francisco Penin- 
sula, in San Mateo County, on the 
Bay shore Freeway, 14 miles (20 
minutes) from downtown San 
Francisco. This Aiiport is nearer 
Honolulu than any other major 
airport in continental United 
States. 



WEATHER: With present navi- 
gational aids, the record shows 
that at least 98.5 per cent of all 
scheduled arrivals and departures 
are completed. 

.\KEA: 3,685 acres. Present land 
area is 2,203 acres, or more than 
double the area of Golden Gate 
Park. This acreage is to be in- 
creased by the purchase of addi- 
tional area earmarked for expan- 
sion purposes in the immediate fu- 
ture. 

AIR SERVICE: Scheduled air- 
lines operating from this airport 
offer service to all major cities in 
the United States. Hawaii, Au- 
stralia and Japan. Non-stop serv- 
ice to Europe via the polar route 
was recently started by two Amer- 
ican carriers, while two foreign 
carriers provide through plane 
sei-vice to Europe via New York. 
Regular sei'vices operate to Mexico 
('it\', <".'ntiai and South .A.merica, 




SHASTA BARBER SHOPS 

384 Bush Street 

48 Kearney Street 

FEDERAL BARBER SHOP 

8 - ~th Street 



Floyd L Osborn Tire Sales 

USED TIRES 

1670 INNES AVENUE 

AT. 8-1493 

San Francisco 



W&M Union Service 

Pine St Franklin Streets 



United Nations Realty 
& Insurance Company 

JAMES C. KLUNIS & SON 
137 - -th Street HE. 1-1938 



JIM'S 
Union Service 

3350 ALEM.ANY BLVD. 
Sna Francisco 



JOHN'S SPOT 

Clyde and .\nne Van Meter 

Best of Mixed Drinks 

2604 - 3rd STREET 

San Francisco 



John Rickey's Studio Inn 
has firoivn into an empire 



How a Young Man Came West 
and Bought a Plot of Earth 






F |_ 


n 


17 Y 


- D 1 


1 t '^ 1 


i 


1 i, III 




i1- x.~.5ali 



JOHN RICKEY is a nimble- 
witted, engaging man with a 
restless pride in creating. Small of 
stature and eagle-eyed, he presides 
over a northern California empire 
which includes Rickey's Studio Inn 
on El Camino Real three miles 
south of Stanford University in 
Palo Alto, the Red Chimney Res- 
taurant in Stonestovvn, another 
restaurant in San Francisco called 
the Rendezvous Room in the 
Southern Pacific terminal at Third 
and Townsend Streets, and the 
Raneho Rafael at Ignaclo in Marin 
County. 

Newest addition to the Studio 
Inn with its extensive ranch style 
accommodations is a de luxe hotel 
called the Lake Tower Suites which 
rises above a lagoon. It is a con- 
crete fireproof building with a red- 
wood front, six stories high. As 
vou ascend in the all-glass outside 



Otis elevator, which has the long- 
est shaft ever made on the West 
Coast, you get a wide view over fif- 
teen acres of land to the cedar 
shake roofing of rows of bunga- 
lows, all within easy access of a 
swimming pool, a croquet lawn and 
putting green, a lake with black 
and white swans gliding on its 
surface, and a Spanish garden. 

This domain which also includes 
one conference hall seating 250. 
and two others seating 125. has 
gi-own from the original Studio 
Inn which John Rickey acquired 
in 1944. As the years have gone 
by. this indefatigable planner and 
traveller has added wood carvings 
and oil paintings to adorn his res- 
taui'ant. Italian marble and bronze 
statuary to the gi'ounds. which now 
boast an incense burner from the 
Emperor of China, and a penguin 
with two baby penguins sculpted 



iP 



^'^-^,^' 



^^W 



"■*•'. 





John Rtckoy ploys host to 



Lake Tower Suites, with swi 

in granite by Benjamin Bulano, 
and for illumination at night, old 
gas lamps from New Orleans with 
mantles perpetually burning. 

The Tower Suites contain an ex- 
quisite Chinese room, and a bridal 
suite with Spanish tiles and an 
Austrian stove and a bathroom 
with gold taps and fittings. In this 
building may be found lamps from 
Munich, wrought iron from Vienna, 
and Indian hope chests, while the 
lagoon below is lit by lanterns 
from Tokyo. German-bom John 
Rickey, now a naturalized Ameri- 
can and a citizen of the world, in- 
jects an international outlook into 
the subconscious of guests who are 
fortunate enough to live under his 
roof! 

The human story behind this 
achievement is an inspiring recital 
of obstacles overcome and single- 
minded purpose. Forty-three years 
ago at the age of 15, John Rickey 
boarded the "George Washington" 
in Bremen, Germany, for Ameri- 
ca. His father gave him ten dollars 
and once more repeated an admon- 
ishment upon which the whole 
family had been brought up: "Stick 
to the earth, and it will always 
take care of you." 

Young John first got a job in 
New Jersey delivering milk, and 
later worked in a delicatessen. 
After six years he had enough 
money saved to open a delicatessen 
for himself in Jeisey City. This 
he sold for a bigger store for which 
he found a buyer six years later 
who paid him $60,000. He invested 
this money in the stock market 
and lost it all in the crash of 1929. 

Then came nine lean years of 
taking any job he could find, from 
bus bo.v to hardware salesman. 



ling pool in ton 



Qund 



With $3,000 saved, he drove 
and got a job running the 
missarj- of a logging camp, iron 
which he journeyed to San Fran 
Cisco once a month for a ni^-hf 
sleep in a comfortable bed in Ih 
Palace Hotel — then back to th 
rigors of a climate often 20 degree 
below zero. Similar work in othe 
camps followed, until the crucia 
moment when with 535,000 in th 
bank he bought the vacant Miller' 
Restaurant on El Camino Rea 
with 3V2 acres of land in 1944. 

John Rickey's office at t h 1 
Studio Inn is a wai-m and intimat* 
place where he sometimes relaxe 
and confides to his friends how h'' 
has savoured the adventure of lifi 
in America. Sophisticated a n r 
worldly wise, yet verj' humEin, h'' 
looks back upon tough moment 
in the past with humor, and stil 
dreams dreams. 

Framed on the wall is the Get 
tysburg address in Lincoln's ovn 
script, and near it a picture 
Camp Bunyan in 1939 showin) 
Rickey in workman's garb with . 
tin box. Other pictures are a por 
trait of Lincoln by President Eis 
enhower, and a snap of Rickey 01 
horseback — one of his present fa 
vorite forms of exercise. 

That bit of advice which hi 
father gave him about sticking t 
the earth has paid off since 1944 
The land he owns now is wort 
about a million dollars. The ex 
perience through which he ha 
gone to get it has made the Ricke. 
of today a mellowed human being. 
who remains an advent\irer an 
still finds his deepest satisfactio 
in translating a dream and ide 
into concrete fact. 



THE RECOR 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 



GOLDEN FLEET 

rin S;in Francisco Chamber of 

I •? has been awarded a spe- 

iiendation for its seven- 

nsorship of the Chamber's 

'Men Fleet, San Francisco's 

I ;unbassador of goodwill." 

I! ! uns of the fleet and their 

111 lie Harry Barusch, "Mary 

\ 1, eland S. Cormick. "Boun- 

, \ . inon Dallman, "Sea Angel"; 

1.^ \V, Elliott, "Eagre"; Wil- 

I Gray, "Grayling": Jerry 

Lang Syne": John Klop- 

iiiita"; Paul Koss, "Pee 

liarles A. Langlais, "Adios 

L mis L. Levy, "Dorsal": Ger- 

I Minrher. "Gateway"; Leavitt 

1^ .Lilly Roger"; Les Vogel, 

IMizabeth Sueann"; Dr. Stu- 

1 • Way, "Pattie Stuart"; W. E. 

?i.'^i:..rher. "Julie Ann"; Edward 

se. Jr . "Financee" Jind Douglas 

rn, Contessa." 

J'n the first annual press day of 
' eii'lilen Fleet, the Record was 
iie>ep.ted by Editor Alan Ton,- 
d hi.< wife as guests on Com- 
Hiiut Dan London's "Adventur- 
^ The San Fi-ancisco Chamber 
C'liiinerce extends through the 
11. n Fleet a multiplicity of 
■\ii e.-i in welcoming visitors to 
r I Kilt, and being on hand for 
poiumt occasions. 
rile eaptains — in addition to 
niMiMiore Dan London — who 
I - hosts for a three-hour 
lie Captain Douglas Dom 

~sa"i. Captain Bill Gray 

yling"), and Captain Jerry 
loper ("Lang Syne"i. 
It was an afternoon of idyllic 
ishine, conviviality, and deep- 
ed delight by everybody in the 



charms of our harbor. Such an in- 
troduction to San Francisco can 
build goodwill and generate an 
enduring happy memoi-y, as we can 
testify, having been on hand when 
a body of Australian business men 
were given the hospitality of the 
S. F. Chamber's Golden Fleet. 

The captains who give their 
time, and share with others the 
joys of ship-board are doing a 
public relations job of rai'e value 
to our city. 

BOOKMEN MEET 

The 77th Annual Conference of 
the American Library Association 
will be held in San Francisco July 
13 to 19 with more than 3,500 li- 
brarians and libraiy tiiistees par- 
ticipating. The conference theme 
is "Intemational Responsibilities 
of the ALA." 

Luther Evans. Director General 
of UNESCO, will address the First 
General Session on Monday (July 
141 evening; Dr. O. Meredith Wil- 
son, President, University of Ore- 
gon, will discuss "Libraries in 
Education" at the Second General 
Session, Wednesday (July 16) eve- 
ning; and Quincy Howe, news an- 
alyst and historian will be the 
speaker at the Third General Ses- 
sion on Thursday (July 17 1 eve- 
ning when the $15,000 ALA Lib- 
erty and Justice Book Awards will 
be announced and presented. 

The General Sessions, Council 
Meetings and many imit gather- 
ings will be held in the San Fran- 
cisco Auditorium where the ALA 
offices and the Conference Contact 
Placement Clearing House will 
also be located. More than 200 ex- 
hibits of publishers, and suppliers 



of services and equipment will fill 
the Plaza Exhibit Hall of the Audi- 
torium. 

From a membership of 103 in 
1876, the Association has grown to 
approximately 20,000 members in 
the United States and possessions, 
Canada, and more than 50 foreign 
countries. Members also include li- 
brary^ trustees, friends of libraries, 
publishers, business men and edi- 
tors, as well as librarians. The 
ALA has become the chief spokes- 
man of the modern library move- 
ment in North America and exerts 
considerable influence on libraries 



GREAT MUSEUM DIRECTOR 
Dr. Grace L. McCann Morley and 
the Trustees of the San Francisco 
Museum of Art have jointly an- 
nounced Dr. Morley's resignation 
as Director of the Museum, effect- 
ive December 31, 1960. This date 
coincides with the 25th anniversai-y 
of her service to the Museum as 
its Director. Dr. Morley helped 
organize the Museum in 1935 and 
has served as its Director during 
its entire existence. Under her 
guidance, the Museum has achieved 
intemational recognition as one of 
the outstanding institutions in its 
field, and has played a prominent 
part in the ailistic life of San 
Francisco. 

During her career as Director of 
the Museum, Dr. Morley has car- 
ried on a great many outside activ- 
ities. She has lectured, organized 
exhibitions, and traveled abroad on 
cultural missions, including her re- 
cent trip for the United States 
State Department to Asia and 
Africa. 



Hoiv ivell 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




Even most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Frandsco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver'guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit: fares are surprisingly 
low. 

UDrives, 

Limousines, 

Charter Buses 

ayallabU 

Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
Yukon 6-4000 



Herman Dobrovolsky 

Union Oil Dealer 

2000 CLEMENT STREET 

San Francisco. California 

SKyline 2-4272 




PHILIP H. FRAHER & CO. 

Complete Insurance Service 

4721 MISSION STREET 
San Francisco 12 

JUniper 6-2300 - JUniper 6-2301 Res. PLaza 5-4719 

Molloy's Catering Co. 

Benefit Dances Our Specialty 

MOLLOY'S SPRINGS 

1655 Old Mission Road 

COLMA 

PL 5-9545 

DO-NUT BOWL 

4604 Geary Blvd. 
Phone SKyline 1-6454 San Francisco 18 

BANKY'S COFFEE SHOP 

354 Sansome Street EX. 2-9385 

In the Hearl of the Financial District 



SUPERIOR PLUMBING & HARDWARE 

Registered Plumbing - Electrical Repairing 

3326 SACRAMENT STREET, Near Presidio Ave. 

WEst 1-1266 - WEst 1-9133 San Francisco 18, Calif. 

Pete Pelletier - Manuel Menendez 

PLAYER'S CLUB 

2245 Geneva Avenue 

Opposite Cow Palace 

DANCING FRIDAY S; SATURDAY NITES 

JU. 7-3566 JOE JACKSOrJ 

Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butchers 
Workmen of North America, Local 115 

Wc are Opposed to the Un-American 
•RIGHT TO SCAB LAW 

MARTEN'S MARKET 

Groceries ■ Fruits - Vegetables - Meals - Poultry 

Wines ' Liquors - Cigars • Cigarettes 

Phone MArket 1-4745 1890 MarVet Street 

Aunger Artificial Limb Co. 

1633 MARKET STREET MArket 1-60^^ 

S.in Fr.nnci-fo. C.nlifornl.i 



BLACK HAWK 

Jazz Corner of the West 

200 HYDE STREET 

GRaystone 4-9567 

JOHN NOGA :-: GUITO CACIANTI 



HASTIE 

Real Estate Inspection and Repair, Inc. 

Complete Termite Inspection Reports 

Termites - Fungi • Beetles 

225 CAPITOL AVENUE 

DElaware 3-3700 San Francisco 

Batteries - Tires - Storage - Washing - Polishing - High Pressure 
Lubrication 

Up to 6 Hours Parking 50 c - All Day 75 c 

TEMPLE GARAGE 

WALTER T. BARKETT. Managing Owner 

644 GEARY STREET 
PRospect 5-8141 San Francisco 2 

SILVER CREST DO-NUT SHOP 

Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge 

p. LYNCH a: J. FITZGERALD. Proprietors 
Restaurant Phone AT. 8-0753 Bar Phone MI. 8-995-I 

340 Bayshore Blvd. 

SAN FRANCISCO 24 

W. O. (BILL) DUFFY 

NOTARY PUBLIC - PUBLIC .ACCOUNTANT 



3410 - 25th Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SHEEDY DIL4YAGE CO. 

Crane and Lift Service up to 20 Tons 
MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT HAULING 

630 Tennessee Street, near 3rd and Mariposa Sts. 

San Francisco 

W. (BILL) STATTON Telephone MArket 1-8080 



DON'S UNION OIL STATION 



500 Ikv-iiit Str 



S;ln Frnnc'sco 



Memo for Leisure 

'•visit to a Small Planet" by 

ire Vidal at the Geary Theatre 

one of the best plays v^-hioh has 

me to San Francisco in months. 

tells the story of a delinquent 

im another planet who comes to 

earth, and is on the point of 

his powers to stir up a war 

;en he is summaiily recalled to 

superior civilization by a stern 

sergeant t>-pe. 

,e visiting supei-man who finds 
ways juvenile is played with 
kle and finesse by Cyril Ritch- 
, and a stupid American general 
John Alexander who extracts 
{arious fun from bureaucratic 
Iban'assments. 

the cast, directed by Ritchard. 
excellent. The play never lags, 
t best passage is a scathing as- 
Jlt by Kreton the visitor from 
Iter space on corny sentimental- 
BS to which the younger gener- 
jon proves immune, 
irhe action is interspersed by un- 
nny cacophonies which accom- 
jny the landings of sputniks, and 
k processes of mind-reading by 
liich the visitor is able to know 

tat everj- human is thinking, 
is intelligent, satiric play is a 
jist which should not be missed. 

"Les Ballets de Paris" opens for 
|aeries of eight pei-formances at 
Curran on July 7. Starring 
aire and Roland Petit, the 
■ge troupe will present two new 
"Counter Point" and "La 
dans la Lune," as well as 
recreation of "Carmen." an 
iting version in dance of the 
:et opera which drew applause 
m London and New York critics. 

A treat to come in September is 
ivisit from the London Old Vic 
jmpany who will play "Hamlet." 
'.enry V," and "Twelfth Night." 

jA'e caught the first show of 
jrvard mathematician Tom Leh- 
V the other night at the Hungrj- 
(our towns egghead night spot. 
tery possible bit of space in En- 
co Banducci's ample cellar was 
:?upied with keyed-up people who 
Hponded with almost ritualistic 
fciour to the dynamic singing of 
l5 Kingston Trio, and to Lehrer's 
ling, sardonic exposes of com- 
'ircialized Christmas carols, hyp- 
itic folk songs, and spring-time 
'-nanticism. We liked best his 
*tty description of the time he 
tent in the Army. 

L 

i3an Francisco's Golden Gate 
'idge has the longest single span, 
■d highest bridge towers in the 
•rid, according to the San Fran- 
co Chamber of Commerce. 

NE. I9S8 



ROSEO-FAYE 
CLEANERS 

Wc Take Pride in Our Work 

All Work and Finished 

7-1 CAPP STREET 

San Francisco 



BAY VIEW 
Cleaners & Dyers 

Cleaning * Dyeing Service 

4923 THIRD STREET 

San Francisco 



King's Cabinet Shop 

luduflrtal - Residential. Cahinis 
Sinks ■ Counters - Paneling 



15 STONE STREET 
San Francisco 



DAN COLEMAN 

Civil Engineer 

2048 M.\RKET STREET 
UNdcrhill 5-7800 



CHRIS' RESTAURANT 

Good Food 

Reasonable Prices 

220 CHURCH STREET 

San Francisco 



For the First Time 
100 Octane Gasoline is Here 

Earl Pasley Flying "A" 

Third Street at Egbert 



RAYMOND'S 
French Beauty Salon 

376 Sutter St. YU. 2-5365 

San Francisco 



Quality Brake Supply 

"Grialy Brake Lining" 

Joseph McGee 

368 - 11th STREET 

San Francisco 



Golden Gate Hotel 

549 KE.ARNY STREET 
San Francisco 



FENTON HOTEL 

259 - 7ih STREET 

UNderhill 1-7386 



DINO'S 
PHARMACY 

Service for the Sick 
4601 Mission Street 

San Francisco 12, Calif. 

JUniper 7-2032 
D. A. ROSSELLI 



Van Eckhart Studio 



Paul's Wilshire Service 



2101 - 19th Av 



Simone's Woolcraft 

Betty Gayle. Prop. 
3232 Scott Street WA. 1-8921 



Shop at 

PETE'S MARKET 

On Your Way lo Work 

241 - 3rd Street DO 2-3488 



Orpheus Sandwich Shop 

1194 Market St. San Francisco 

KL. 2-5318 



NOE MARKET 

Quality Groceries - Vegetable 

Beer - Wine - Liquors 

276 Noe Street 



WOODEN HORSE 

622 Polk Street 
Your Gemal Host-Matt 



Grand Pacific Hotel 

1331 STOCKTON STREET 
San Francisco 



George Orchard 
Locksmith 

DOOR CLOSERS 
SAFES 

3257 . 24lli Street 

Near Capp 
San Francisco, Calif. 

VAIencia 4-5084 



STAR OF THE SEA 
Father Cloiitier 

4420 GE.\RY STREET 



Crest Delicatesen 
& Liquors 

COFFEE SHOP 
900 Sutter Street San Franc 



The SHAWWALKER CO. 

Ererything for the Office 
Except Machines 

36 GE.'VRY STREET 
YUkon 2-2884 San Francisco 



NEW MISSION TAVERN 

Harry and Ida Renard 

2286 MISSION STREET 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Phone MArkcl 1-9425 



MIN'S MOBILE 
SERVICE STATION 

901 Golden Gate .Avenue 



JAY'S COMPLETE 
SERVICE STATION 

1362 Fell Street San Francis. 



JUniper 5-9993 

The Huddle 

Cocktails 
Lunch & Dinner 

4541 Mission St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



MARIOS 

$1.00 
STEAKS 



Public Library ?eriodlcal"Rm.' 
i Civic Center City a. 



CAREW & ENGLISH 

Leo V. Carew 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS . . . MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

MASONIC AT GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
San Francisco IS, California 

F. W. WOOLWORTH 
COMPANY 

405 Montgomery Street 
San Francisco 

The RATHSKELLER Restaurant 

GERMAN and AMERICAN FOOD 

Luncheon - Dinners - Beer - Wine - Liquors 

JOHN PAULS - FRITZ SCHMIDT - FRED KUCHN 

Polk and Turk Streets 

PRospect 5-3188 - San Francisco 

BRICKER & SON SERVICE 

We Can Fix 'Em 

TOWING SERVICE AND REPAIRS 
Used Auto Parts - 24 Hr. Ton Seryice 

370 Bayshore Blvd. 

VAIcncia 4-1210 - VAIcncia 4-1289 San Francisco, Calif. 

VISIT THE 

PALACE BATHS 



83 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HarUy-Davi,lso,i MOTORCYCLES 

DUDLEY PERKINS COMPANY 

Sales and Servic 
655 ELLIS STREET 
ancisco 9, California Phone PRospect 5-5323 

Ibc San Francisco Police Dcpt. Motorcycle needs for 39 years 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 4507 



SUTTON & FROST 
ELECTRIC 

Contractors - Engineers 

UNderhill 1-4685 

532 NATOMA STREET 

San Francisco, Calif. 

Auto Trans. Specialists - Tune-Ups - Brake Scr\-ice - Sun Equipment 

JOHN J. MADLER 

AUTO REPAIRS - SKILLED MECHANICS 

Chevron 
Automotive Service 

KEllog 6-1728 

2151 - 35th AVE. Oakland 1, Calif. 

CHERRYBURRELL CORP. 

DAIRY - FOOD - FARM - BEVERAGE 
CHEMICAL - EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 



1 



i 



2132 Palou 



San Francisco 



REGENT HOTEL 

562 SUTTER STREET (between Mason Sl Powell) 

Transient - Residential ■ American Plan 

GA. 1-5818 

ADLON HOTEL 

Transient - Residential 
428 OT.ARRELL - S.A.N FR.^NCISCO 



NATIONAL ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 

•WHOLHSALi; tLtcrrRIC SLPPLIES" 

SANTA ROSA S.n a Rc^. 

SAN CARLOS LYlcll !■( 

SAN IR.\NCISCO HEml.vk It 

M,iin OITiic S,m Francijco, Oliornii 



PALLAS BROS. 

RADIO 4: TELEVISION REPAIRING - AND SALES 
5000 MISSION STREET JL' ■s.sooo S \N FRANCISCO 1- 



^1 I T-^^UrM I T 



:iM^^^c tAitKi rAii ainu rKtitrNi 



RECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




MARY McLEAN OGDEN 

NORA HAIvlPTON 

new faces at 
McLaren lodge 

BILL SIMONS 

BOOKS 

JANE RAV/SON 



^oyor Christopher bids farewell lo some of the 
jn Colifornlo mayors and civic leaders, who set 
:out from San Francisco on a 34-day journey 
through ten countries of Western Europe. From 
left: Noel Coleman. Courtney Short. Mayor E. D. 
Kremer and Captain Hugh Birch. (See Page 3 




flOSTRUI* 



A RECORD FLIGHT OF GOODWILL 



JULY -AUGUST, 1958 




}6u dream better with a savings 
account at QaNKOF 

Americai 

Pot a smile in your dreams with a Savings Account at Bank of America! Rest 
easy with the knowledge that your savings are earning regular bank interest — 
secure in the bank where more than 2 miUion Californians do their saving. Like 
so many others, you'll appreciate xhe ph/s values of Bank of America's neighbor- 
hood convenience, its statewide strength, its 52 banking services — all yours when 
you open a Savings Account at Bank of America... BEST WAY TO SAVE! 

BANK OF AMERICA • NATIONAL TRUST AND SAVINGS ASSOCIATION • MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



How well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




k ven most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Frandsco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must: if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained. 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit: fares are surprisingly 
low, 

U-Drives, 

LimousineSf 

Charier Buses 

arailable 

Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
YUkon 6-4000 



L\DL\ HOUSE 

629 WASHINGTON ST. 
EX. 2-0744 



L A IM B R O S 

(Closed Sundays) 

315 Bush Street 



VUkon 2-3245 



SUlIcr 1-9985 



FAR EAST CAFE 

FAMOUS CHINESE FOOD 

Open from 12 Noan la ll:iO p.n 

New ■iork Ch.irco.il-Broilcd 

631 GRANT AVENUE 

CHINATOHN. San francisco 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 



KENNETH H. ALLEN 
ALAN P. TORY 



PUBLISHER 
EDITOR 



Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-12 12 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 



VOLUME 25 NUMBER 7 

JULY -AUGUST, 1958 



BAY WINDa'^: 



50 



LETTERS 



1 h.ipc someone with the power will act 
lull vour suggestion in a June Bay Window 
ir.iL:i.ipli that a color film should be made 

(Ik Hetch-Hetchy project. Few people are 
.ilU .iware of the far-sighted planning 
iiitli has created our city's water and power 
scciri 

A iiliii could do for a large number of 
;i>plL what at present is done by the well- 
^.tiu/L-J trips which open the eyes of mem- 
.r> lit the Grand Jury and others to a far- 
ing operation whose latest expansion in- 
)l\c-. S'i4 million. This sum is a real in- 
;stnuiu. Our school children and groups in 
ir .idiilt schools would benefit in knowledge 

uli.it is being done for the welfare of our 
t\ b\ seeing this story in vivid pictorial 
trm 

PAUL KELLY 
823 - 14th Street 
San Francisco, 14 



(.)ii .1 recent visit to the S. F. Airport to 
L I •;! ,1 friend, I foolishly locked myself out 

ni\ own car, leaving the key inside. I 
.i.Il inquiries of a mechanic who courteously 
ttin.l me to a uniformed official. This man's 
b, ;f seems, includes looking after forgetful 
-opk like myself. He procured a wire, ac- 
'nip.iiiied me to my automobile, and opened 

up with a cheerful willingness which I 
)preciated. 

I would like you to know that visitors to 
in Francisco appreciate the ready service 
hich is offered at your airport, and the 
illingness to help them out in predicaments. 
his reflects credit on the administration, 
hich directs its employees to take a personal 
iterest in individuals. 

ELIZABETH OSBORNE 
San Diego 



Your "Meet the Press" drawing of last 
onth gives me an appetite for more such 
nusing cartoons of public figures. 

BEN D. CLARK 
945 Golden Gate, 
San Francisco 27 



nPHH RLCX)RU has re.ison for pride and 
A satisfaction in the successful launching of 
tlie California Mayors' tour to Europe. Mayor 
Christopher gave his blessing to the prece- 
i.lent-making pilgrimage of mayors at the air- 
port, where a brief farewell ceremony was pre- 
sided over in the Ambassador Room by Editor 
Alan Tory. 

The mayors were met by a member of 
Parliament at Croydon Airport in England, 
after a smooth and pleasant flight by Qantas, 
and were given a cixktail party in the House 
of Commons. They were shown historic West- 
minster Hall, and the famed debating cham- 
ber in which Sir Winston Churchill made his 
great wartime speeches. All along the road of 
their fascinating journey they have received 
special courtesies — a garden parry hosted by 
the mayor of Amsterdam, and a reception in 
his own home by the mayor of Brussels. 

Captain Hugh Birch, Qantas executive 
who accompanied the party to New York, 
reports back that our mayors set forth with 
the most serious purpose of doing a job as 
American representatives in Europe at a cru- 
cial time. 'We believe that this enterprise, 
conceived and endorsed by the Record, and 
ably planned by Elton Asher, will make a 
valued contribution to international under- 
standing. 

i~iNE OF THE best entertainments offered 
^-^ in San Francisco is a twenty minutes' ride 
on the elephant train at the Fleishhacker Zoo. 
It costs thirty cents (.15 for children), and 
is a drama-packed adventure. Lou Bono, a 
bronzed young man wearing a pith helmet 
who might have come from an African safari 
was our guide ( he is a student of S. F. State ) . 
He maneuvered the snake-like procession of 
trucks expertly, and at the same time talked 



into a microphone, advising us of intiinate 
family details, such as that the veteran lioness 
Henrietta has given birth to upwards of 35 
cubs, and four of her sons — Eeny, Meany, 
Miney, and Mo — are in the next grotto to 
mother. 

In contrast to the lithe lioness and other 
"cats " who miss out meals one day in seven, 
we learned that Puddles the hippopotamus 
who through life has rejected asceticism and 
eats every day, weighed only sixty pounds at 
birth, and now tips the scales at 2J/2 tons — 
a somber thought which warns humans of the 
wisdom of controlling appetite. The coyotes 
set up a full-throated howl for our benefit, 
and Bimbo the 23-year-old chimpanzee per- 
formed his celebrated spit. The elephant train 
was proposed by a private citizen — realtor 
James Kenny. Zoo E)irector Carey Baldwin 
liked the idea, and the project came into 
being on June 18, 1957. 

IT IS A FAR CRY from the early days of 
rival volunteer fire companies to our pres- 
ent stream-lined Fire Department with its 
familiar ear-splitting alarm and its swift co- 
ordinated service. Our "For the Record" ar- 
ticle this month by Maurice Hamilton recalls 
the names of Gear)', Green, Brannan. Turk 
and others who took part in the special meet- 
ing in 1849 which resulted in a citizens' 
rally in Portsmouth Square when it was 
rcsohed to organize fire companies after a 
terrible Christmas Eve fire. 

The growth of our Fire Department from 
this beginning to 52 fire stations is an in- 
spiring story, which includes a vital contribu- 
tion by city engineers in building a separate 
system of water mains independent of our 
regular water supply. 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 




LETTERS 


3 


BAY WINDOW 


3 


FIRE FIGHTERS PAST AND PRESENT 


4 


by Maurice Homiitci 




WOMAN OF THE MONTH: MARY McLEAN OGDEN 


10 


by Noro Hampton 




DISTINGUISHED APPOINTMENTS 


15 


NEW FACES AT McLAREN LODGE 


16 


by Bill Simons 




BOOKS: THE AMERICAN SCENE 


22 


by Jane Rawsor 




DIRECTORY 


12 


PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 


15 


MEMO FOR LEISURE 


20 



JLY- AUGUST, 1958 




One of the ivorld's most striking Tnonuments— 
unveiled in IT ashin^lon Square in 1933. it 
commemorates S. F.\s Volunteer Firemen. 



Hardy Fire Fighters 
of Past and Present 



by Maurice Hamilton 



SAN FRANCISCANS enrolled as firemen 
rhrough rhe same sense of patriorism 
that leads men to join the colors when danger 
threatens the safety or honor of the nation." 

When Pauline Jacobson penned this as 
part of a series for the old San Francisco 
Biillelin in 1916 she was referring to the vol- 
unteer firemen of the middle 1800's. And 
while the fer\'or might be somewhat reduced, 
the fire laddies of today could well fit that 
glowing description. For they demonstrate 
day after day that they are a devoted group. 

History shows that the early firemen were 
unpaid but much sung (witness another quote 
from Miss Jacobson who mentions that no 
social affair was deemed complete without the 
presence of one of these brave smoke-eaters) 
while today's breed of firemen is paid but 
unsung except in instances where their role in 
city life is dramatized by a spectacular fire. 

It was in fact a seties of spectacular fires 
that brought the San Francisco Fire Depart- 
ment into being. Picture this city during the 
middle 1800's. A sprawling, lusry town that 
had just seen the light of day, thanks to the 
Gold Rush. Founded by men whose main 
ambition was to wrest the riches from the 
earth around her, the infant communiry came 
close to being still-born as her cirizens de- 
serted their midwifely duties for the business 
at hand: that of accumulating wealth. 

So blinded were early San Franciscans by 
the bright gleam of gold that civic pride was 
almost unheard of. San Francisco's present 
claim to being one of the cleanest and neatest 
cities in the world came long after these days 
of ramshackle wooden houses (shacks really), 
nondescript tents, and decaying hulks of ships, 
that sheltered the hordes gathered from the 



four corners of the earth to seek the fortune 
that was theirs for the taking. 

It was in such a community that fire took 
its toll, not once but many times. In the 
short span between December 1849 to the 
middle of 1851 the city was almost com- 
pletely demolished six times. 

Historians relate that the first fire of major 
importance took place in January 1849, when 
the Shades Hotel was destroyed. Then in 
June of that year a ship, the "Philadelphia," 
burned in the harbor with such intensity 
that the thinking people of the town began 
to see the danger involved. They began to 
realize that our famous afternoon winds might 
well spread a similar fire through the in- 
flammable material of which the town was 
built, with nothing at all to stop the blaze. 

It wasn't until December of that year, 
however, that fear was really known. It was 
the day before Christmas, 1849, that ". . . the 
awful cry of fire was raised in the city, and 
in a few hours property valued at more than 
a million dollars was totally destroyed." 

This report by a now unknown writer con- 
tinues: "The fire began in Dennison's Ex- 
change, about the middle of the eastern side 
of rhe Plaza and spreading both ways, con- 
sumed nearly all that side of the Square, and 
the whole line of buildings on the south side 
of Washington Street between Montgomery 
and Kearny Streets." 

It was this Christmas Eve fire of 1849 that 
galvanized the citizens of San Francisco into 
concerted action, A special meeting was held, 
attended by some of the men who gave their 
names to our present day streets. Steuart, El- 
lis, Green, Brannan, Turk, Davis, and Har- 



rison, all were on hand, with John W. Gear) 
presiding. 

The result of this session was a resolurior 
calling on the citizens to meet in Portsmouth 
Square and to " . . . take such measures a; 
may be deemed advisable to protect the towr 
against another such calamity, by organizing 
fire companies, and that the Town CouncL 
will supply the hooks, ladders, axes, ropes 
etc., to be kept by said companies." 

Two days later the Town Council appro« 
priated the sum of 5800 for the necessarj 
purchases and ordered the gear into the keep-j 
ing of Edward Otis who was then forminf 
the "Independent Unpaid Axe Company. " the 
first of many such volunteer companies. 

Further steps were taken the following 
February when the Town Council authorizec 
the formation of the office of Chief Engineer 
the first paid official of tlie Fire Department 
The Council outlined his duties to includt^ 
the supervision of all volunteer companies x 
all fires and gave him the right to " . . . blo« 
up any building . . . with gunpowder, wliicf 
he may deem necessary for the suppression ol 
. . . fire or conflagration ..." 

History neglects to state if the first Chie> 
Engineer, F. D. Kohler, ever had to blow uj 
any buildings in an attempt to keep his fire- 
under control, but it does state that the salan 
fof his duties would be S6.000 per year. A 
footnote to this was added in a 1925 issue ol 
the Municipal Record devoted to the Fin 
Department, which rcnids: "It may be of in 
terest to note that this $6,000 a year salar) 
was increased on July 1 of this year tc 
S7,200." 

While these precautions were a step in tli( 
right direction. San Francisco's wck-s wcr( 

RECORC 




ar troin over. It was the following May of 
•851), just three months after the new Chief 
i;nj;iiieer was appointed and the new volun- 
,etr companies began to come into being 
ihat the fledgling community once again 
tnew the ravages of fire. 

The conflagration began at 4 a.m. and by 
, 1 oclock three blocks of the most valuable 
buildings in the city had been razed at a 
[oss of over four million dollars. This par- 
licular fire was said to have been set and 
everal persons were arrested, though no one 
l^'as ever brought to trial. 

This fire too brought action from the Town 
louncil. An ordinance was passed immedi- 
itely that any person who refused to assist 
n extinguishing the flames or to assist in 
he removing of goods should be fined not 
ess than $5 nor more than $100. Another 
irdinance directed that every householder 
hould keep six water buckets always in readi- 
less for future emergencies. 

Again this was not enough to prevent 
everal more disastrous fires. Just a month 
Iter another blaze swept through blocks of 
aluable property between Clay, California, 
Cearny Streets and the waterfront, levelling 
■verj' building in its path. It was about this 
ime that the citizens of San Francisco began 
eriously to regard some possibility of fire 
irevention. 

From a strictly economic point of view, 
onie reasoned, it was cheaper in the long 
un to build houses of brick rather than of 
rood. Initial construction might cost more, 
lut brick could withstand the ravages of fire 
ar better than the frame dwellings that 
bounded on the scene. While a handful did 
onsider brick, most construction continued 



to be of wood, and fire continued to 
havoc on the town. 

Space does not permit the detailing of suc- 
ceeding fires but beginning with September 
17th, 1850 to just a year later no fewer than 
five major fires occurred with the total dam- 
age estimated at over $16,000,000! Several 
of these were also believed to have been the 
work of incendiaries but whatever their source 
the damage was devastating. In that period 
more than 2000 houses, the City Hospital, the 
City Hall and the Jenny Lind Theatre all fell 
before the devouring flames. 

This destruction of the theatre in June 
of 1851, marked the sixth time it had burned 
with a total loss for its owner, Thomas Mc- 
Guire. By now San Franciscans really began 
to build houses of brick. Many were con- 
structed with walls two to three feet thick of 
solid brick in an attempt to make them fire- 
proof. 

It was also about this time that the volun- 
teer firemen so glowingly referred to by Miss 
Jacobson, began to make their presence felt 
on the San Francisco scene. They were a 
colorful lot and they brought to their unpaid 
duties the rollicking spirit which characterized 
our early citizens as hard working, hard 
drinking, and hard playing individuals. Hard 
playing certainly — accounts of their antics 
while responding to alarms has history stu- 
dents wondering just how a fire was ever 
extinguished. 

To begin with there was great rivalry be- 
tween the men of each company and berween 
the companies themselves. Individual com- 
panies, and there were 15 in existence by 
January 1854, were under the command of 
a foreman. When an alarm sounded the men 



responded to the fire house of their own 
company and their duties were determined on 
the basis of who got there first. 

Many times great arguments occurred as 
to who did get there firsr, and everything was 
held up till these disagreements were resolved, 
either by the participants or by the foreman. 
The apparatus was all hand-drawn, even up 
our steep hills, and position on the rope that 
pulled the wagons was felt to be important, 
as was the job of steering the rig, or who 
would open the doors and the like. But this 
kind of dispute was minor compared with 
the whole company's feeling about a rival 
company. 

Each volunteer group vied with the others 
to see who would get to the fire first. To be 
passed by another company on the way to a 
fire was deemed unpardonable, just as pass- 
ing another group was the height of achieve- 
ment. There were dodges used to prevent 
the former and achieve the latter. 

A company that heard another approaching 
down the street on the way to an alarm would 
strain every man on the rope ro keep from 
being passed. If it became apparenr to the 
foreman that he couldn't prevent his group 
from being passed he would turn down an- 
other street, often in exactly the opposite 
direction of the fire, to prevent this ignominy 
from happening. Or he might feign some- 
tliing wrong with his rig and pull over to 
the curb to examine a supposedly defective 
wheel in an attempt to save face. 

Because passing another group was so 
important, companies on the way to a fire 
would secrete themselves, fire wagon and all, 
behind a pile of bricks, or in a side street, 
wait for the approaching company to pass 



The RATHSKELLER Restaurant 

GERMAN and AMERICAN FOOD 

Luncheon - Dinners - Beer - Wine - Liquors 

JOHN PAULS ~ - FRITZ SCHMIDT FRED KUEHN 

POLK and TURK STREETS 

PRospoct 5-5188 :-: San Francisco 



PEERLESS LAUNDRY CO. 

Laiitulerers — Cleunints and Dyeing 

4701 GROVE STREET 

Oakland, ( California 



ULY- AUGUST, 1958 




food dollars 

go farther 

v^ith 

a freezer 



Freezer-owners will have a field day this 
weekend buying food bargains in quan- 
tity. There's plenty of room to store good 
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The dear dead days beyond recall— 
a typical engine compony smartly 
turned out. with well-kept, light-weight, 
'.and-drown rig. 



, thtn come out of hiding full tilt and pull 
t .ihc.id. It was usually a good-natured riv- 
T .ilthoiigh on ocxasion harsh words as 
•II .IS tists would fly; all the while the fire 
IS hiirning brightly at some distant point. 
Niir did this rivalry abate once the fire 
IS rcKhcd. Many times the early arrivals on 
; Stenc would proudly put "first water" on 
;e blaze only to find themselves a few min- 
tes later with no water at all. Another com- 
jny had arrived, sized up the situation and 
th a fierce sense of competitiveness that 
:en ignored the problem at hand, would 
iconnect the rival company's hose and con- 
ct their own to the hydrant, leaving the 
sr outfit if not high, certainly dry. 
It was this rivalry that brought one of San 
mcisco's most colorful characters the dis- 
iciion of being one of the few if not the 
ly female mascot a fire company ever had. 
■ course today the idea of a "Miss Hook and 
dder" ( usually a beautiful and helpless 
:1 ) being associated with a fire depart- 
;nt or function thereof is not too startling, 
,t this was a century ago when such refine- 
snrs were still to enrich our culture. 
Moreover this feminine complement to our 
rly fire department actually earned her right 

this honor, and at the tender age of 10 
ars. She was, of course, Lillie Hitchcock, 
e daughter of a prominent San Francisco 
ictor. Coming home from school one day, 
e saw the men of the Knickerbocker En- 
ne Company 5 straining at the rope tryini; 

get their rig up Telegraph Hill to respond 
a blaze. 

To her dismay she discovered that they 
ere falling behind in their task and faced 
e possibility of being passed. Nothing 
lunted she threw down her school books and 
Tang to their aid, all the while urging by- 
mders to join in the effort. The results 
ere what you might expect and the men 
the Knickerbocker Engine Company 
lopted the youngster as their own. She was 



presented with the full firefighting regalia 
that the volunteers affected at the time and 
became an honorary member of the group. 

For her part Lillie Hitchcock accepted this 
honor with the graciousness that befitted a 
young lady in her station, and she did eveiy- 
thing possible to identify herself with the 
Knickerbockers. She wove the number 5 
into most of her clothing and it appeared 
on many of her belongings. She was hon- 
ored guest at the social functions of the com- 
pany, she rode their rig in all the parades and 
it was generally accepted by everyone that 
she belonged. 

In later years when reimions were held 
she attended in person and when prevented 
by her travels, she would send a wire or a 
cable acknowledging the affair. Nor was her 
devotion and interest in our early fire fighters 
forgotten when she died. For as Lillie Hitch- 
cock Coit she left the sum of 850,000 in her 
will to be used as a monument to these often 
slap-happy but none the less courageous men. 

This bequest made upon her death in 1929 
brought into being one of our most famous 
landmarks, Coit Tower. The City of San 
Francisco has also memorialized her by a 
monument erected in Washington Square. 

The end of the volunteer era came in 1866 
with the introduction of heavier equipment 
and horses to pull it. Once again the Muni- 
cipal Record supplies information about this 
phase of our Fire Department's history. 

"The age of horse-drawn vehicles brought 
an entirely new element into the life of the 
Fire Departmnt as it was originally organized. 
The apparatus became heavier and more 
massive. The steamer supplanted the power 
supplied by the citizens of the earlier peri- 
od ... " And the anide continues: "Man's 
wonderful companion, the horse, was trained 
to race to fires with almost human sagacity, 
in its efforts to assist in curbing the terrible 
fire fiend. These noble animals tore to fires 
in a frenzy almost as great as in their wild 



Our first firemen were o colorful lot, 
who brought a rollicking and competi- 
tive spirit to their unpaid duties. Rival- 
ry between componies, usually good- 
natured, sometimes ended in fist fights. 



State they would have fled from them." 

This article, also unsigned, goes on to state 
that at one time the San Francisco Fire De- 
partment had something like 450 horses and 
that the care of these beasts necessitated a 
new order of things. The chronicler of 1925 
concludes by observing that: "Hardly a horse 
is left to the Department of all the hundreds 
that once served the municipality. Most of 
them have gone the way of all living things, 
while a few are still eking out a comforr- 
able old age in some of the City's less strenu- 
ous departments . . . The motor has driven 
the horse from the field of activity in man's 
behalf." 

Far too much has already been written 
about the 1906 Quake and Fire as well as 
the Department's role in it to necessitate 
repetition here, except ro nore that it prob- 
ably prompted the development of a high 
pressure water system, a need foreseen as 
early as the late 1800's by the then Chief 
of the Department, Dennis Sullivan, who 
himself lost his life fighting this major con- 
flagration. 

It is this high pressure system, built at a 
cost of nearly $6,000,000 during the early 
1900's, that serves as the backbone of the 
Fire Department today. For the greatest fear 
of fire fighting officials is the repetition of 
the '06 disaster. 

Afrer the great fire of 1906 a study was 
made to determine what could be done to 
prevent a similar occurrence. The fire got such 
a strong foothold in the city because the 
quake had broken a large number of our 
water mains, lying as they did in many cases, 
across rhe path of the San Andreas Fault. 

The study determined that this might well 
happen again since our water must be fed 
us from the Peninsula. To cope with this 
problem, ciry engineers determined that a 
sufficient amount of water should always be 
in readiness in the city itself to take care of 
any emergency. 



ILY- AUGUST, 1958 




With this in mind the city undertook to 
build a separate system of water mains in- 
dependent of the regular water supply. The 
water was and is stored in a reser\'oir high 
on Twin Peaks in order to provide enough 
pressure so that no engines would be needed 
for pumping. As an extra precaution, this 
high pressure system is also connected with 
the Bay so that if water from the reservoir 
is cut off, salt water can be forced into the 
system for the purpose of fighting fire. 

Another adjunct to this system that is also 
still in evidence and use around our city is 
a series of cisterns, filled with water and 
marked by a circle of cobblestones at many 
of our street intersections held in constant 
use if the need arises. A part of the S6,000,- 
000 appropriation that was raised for the 
high pressure system and the cisterns was 
used to purchase two fireboats, a situation that 
is unfortunately not duplicated today as our 
many acres of docks must rely on shore-based 
equipment and just a single fire-boat for pro- 
tection. 

The present status of our Fire Department 
is summed up in a single word by the pres- 
ent chief, William F. Murray: "Strength is 
the keyword today in every area of fire pre- 
vention and fire fighting." 

Accounting for this "strength" are 1764 
men who serve in the two main branches of 
the Department, the Fire Fighting Service, 
and the Special Auxiliary Service. The former 
explains itself, while the Special Auxiliary 
is devoted to such phases of the work as pre- 
vention, training, and the like. 

Murray's Secretary, Battalion Chief Wil- 
liam Lindeckcr, lines out the strength theme 
even further, by saying that our Department 
ranks among the top four in the country for 
area strength, and that it provides protection 
that is well within the requirements of the 
National Board of Fire Underwriters, the 
body that determines fire insurance rates in 
proportion to the amount of service a local 
community gets. 

Lindecker too, says that our high pressure 
system is one of the finest in the world and 
that on its 1 1 5 miles of pipe, the Depart- 
ment can count nearly 1400 hydrants, mostly 
in the high value districts to insure against 



the staggering losses that the city was once 
faced with. To soothe feelings of those who 
have homes out of the high value areas in 
San Francisco, Lindecker points to another 
7300 hydrants on the domestic lines. 

Visitors to San Francisco are impressed with 
the amount of equipment that is turned out 
for every alarm and rightly so. Suppose the 
place is Third and Market, a high value dis- 
trict for sure, and someone pulls a single 
alarm box. Answering this call routinely 
would be an Assistant Chief, a Battalion 
Chief, three engine companies, a tank wagon 
company, two ladder truck companies, a 
rescue squad and a salvage company. 

With each company having an officer and 
five or six men it is an impressive show of 
strength, and a sight that must be reassuring 
to everyone who knows our phoenix-like his- 
tory and dreads a recurrence of major dis- 
aster. The response in the residential areas 
of the city is smaller only in proportion to 
the problem at hand. 

Guarding the city against demon fire on 
a 24 hour a day,, seven days a week basis are 
52 fire stations housing 48 engine companies, 
19 ladder truck companies, 15 rank wagon 
units, 9 hose tenders, two rescue squads, four 
salvage companies, that lone fireboat, and 
units that include a water tower, air com- 
pressors, and other very specialized gear that 
is needed from time to time. 

While guarding the city against its proven 
mortal enemy is a full-time job, the ser\'ice 
rendered by the Fire Department ranges far 
beyond this, as witness any number of news 
photos during a given year showing firemen 
rescuing cats from trees or undoing little 
boys' hands from candy machines. The Fire 
Department is called out with its inhalation 
equipment to revive drowning swimmers or 
gas victims. It is also summoned for the 
happier instances of helping someone who is 
locked out of his home. 

As Chief Murray puts it: "We don't ask 
questions, we respond first." And respond 
they do at the rate of some 500 calls per 
year per company. While many of these calls 
may be routine, the Department expects to 
respond to 60 or 70 greater alarms annually. 
Although the holocausts of the past have 



never been repeated, there have been ; 
fires that have caused a great deal of li. 
and even loss of life. 

Chief Lindecker recalls one of the wors: 
It was the Herbert Hotel which burned i 
1946. The fire started in a night club in th' 
basement and due to the construction of the 
building and the location of the blaze, veoo 
ilation was impossible. The resulting back 
draft built the flames to a five alarm call ani 
before the fire was brought under contrd' 
four members of the Department were deaf 
— they died sa\'ing the city from a fate tha' 
might possibly have equalled the 1906 did 
aster, though only a handful of men car 
call their names. 

The men of the present day Fire Depart 
ment are not the glorified heroes that th- 
volunteers were. And while they do ge 
paid whereas the early firefighters did noi 
these men have a great deal in common wid 
their predecessors: the common ground 
devotion. 

Off the Record 




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To 
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WILLIAM MURRAY 

And To 

The San Francisco Fire Department 

In Having Such A 

Fine. Capable Fire Chief 

My Best Wishes 

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SAN FRANCISCO 
BUSINESSMAN 
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LY- AUGUST, 1958 




Woman of the Month 



Mary McLean O^den Heads 
3200 Red Cross W orkers 



by Nora Hampton 



Ogdcn (center) 



: Red Cr. 



newly capped Mrs. Murr 
-, baslcef. 



"JYI ARY McLEAN OGDEN, who has been 
■'-'-'- named Volunteer of the Month by the 
San Francisco Volunteer Bureau, is command- 
ing officer of a corps of 3200 Red Cross 
volunteers. 

She has many of the same problems as a 
military commander who must keep his troops 
combat ready with or without benefit of the 
excitement of an immediate emergency. 

Red Cross, which is organized along lines 
somewhat similar to the military, must stand 
always trained and ready to meet disasters 
with immediate relief. And between the head- 
line-making events it must work steadily and 
efficiently to prevent and relieve the human 
suffering unavoidable in normal life. 

Mrs. R. Clarence Ogden is a veteran of 
both types of service. She came into the 
surgical dressing service of Red Cross in 1941 
when fervor was high. World War II loaded 
Red Cross with a tremendous job, and vol- 
unteers poured in by the hundreds eager to 
be of ser^'ice. She worked on steadily as head 
of the Gray Ladies through the postwar years 
when enthusiasm ebbed, and became chair- 
man of all volunteers in 1953 when the Ko- 
rean conflict had again accelerated activities. 

She had left her initial assignment as a 
Gray Lady at Shriners' Hospital for Crippled 
Children regretfully to head that service; she 
had demurred at leaving her beloved Gray 
Ladies to become the volunteers' top execu- 
tive; and any but the staunchest of volun- 
teers would have turned away from the first 
big project that crossed her new desk. 

This was the reception operation for wel- 
come of American prisoners-of-war being re- 
turned from Korea. For eight long weeks 
ship after ship arrived at Fort Mason bring- 
ing POWS. Working side by side with the 
army. Red Cross met every man. Motor 
Service took patients directly to their hos- 
pitals; Canteen served families waiting on 
the docks through the interminable delay of 
arrivals and debarkation; Gray Ladies ar- 
ranged the first call home for GIs not met 
by relatives. Red Cross was welcoming its 
heroes home for the American public. 

Plotting the operation, assigning responsi- 



bilities, making time and duty schedules, 
maintaining liaison with the armed forces, 
Mary Ogden proved herself "the most able 
and competent woman administrator I have 
ever seen" — in the words of one of the top 
men involved. 

"She's hard to convince," the same officer 
said of Mrs. Ogden. "With an insatiable in- 
tellectual curiosity she insists on knowing all 
about a problem before expressing an opinion. 
Once she knows the situation thoroughly she 
lays out an operation that reflects a brilliant 
sense of organization, then follows through 
with perfect timing and proportion. First 
things come first with Mary, and last things 
can wait." 

The people whose work she directs give 
Mrs. Ogden almost fanatic loyalty. 

"She works right along with us," said a 
brown-eyed beauty who does her bit for 
Motor Sen'ice. "And she's more than merely 
democratic — she's innately gracious. She treats 
everybody just alike, as if we were all her 
equals." 

Her tone clearly implied that few are Mary 
Ogden's equals. This opinion is obviously 
shared by a great many people. 

Native daughter of a distinguished Bay 
Area family, Mrs. Ogden lives with two of 
her sisteis and a brother — and Mac, the black 
French poodle they all adore — in Seacliff in 
a house their father built in 1913. 

She was married in that house to a young 
attorney — the late R. Clarence Ogden, son of 
Superior Court Judge Frank M. Ogden of 
Oakland — with a wedding that was a major 
social event of 1920. They lived in Eastbay 
for a while, but the MacLeans are a close- 
knit clan and the young couple soon moved 
back into her family home. 

Mr. Ogden's law practice gave him far 
flung interest, coinciding with the couple's 
love of travel. Beginning with a wedding 
trip to Canada, their trips fanned out across 
the globe until today she is a seasoned world 
traveller. 

"I love the Scandinavian countries. They 
are so beautiful," she says. "And South Amer- 
ica. Especially crossing the Andes. Buenos 



Aires has wonderful shops. And I like Pen-' 
— the people are so hospitable. " I 

Why does a woman with leisure, loolci 
means and background to lead a life of easa 
and brilliant pleasure choose instead to won 
full time as a Red Cross volunteer.' 

Ask Mrs. Ogden that and she looks at yoa' 
as nearly as her calm poise will permit, as i 1 
you were being foolishly facetious. As i 
giving service is taken for granted! 

The children at Shriners' Hospital couJo 
answer, too. There is one thing, among others 
she has done for them each winter for I'. 
years. When the teams arrive in San Frani 
Cisco for the annual East- West football gami' 
they call at the hospital. Waiting there fo" 
each player is one special child who will bi 
his sponsor, and for whom he wiU play hi 
heart out in the famed classic. Even- mai 
knows his girl when he sees her — because 
Mary Ogden has been there earlier and tiec; 
into her hair a big ribbon bow in the player' 
college colors. 

She is going back to those children fo' 
good when she retires as Volunteer Chair 
man. "When this assigrmient is finished 
can be a Gray Lady again at Shriners, say 
Mary Ogden. 




Friendly persui 



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Cable Address "GEOMEYER" 

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JULY -AUGUST, 1956 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

GEORGE CHRISTOPHER. MaWOR 

Dii'ectory of City and County Officers 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

200 C.ty Hall MA 1-0165 

Gcurgc Christopher, Mayor 

Joseph J. Allen, Executive Secretary 
Patricia H. Connich. Confitlcntial Secretary 
George J. Grubb. Adminietrativc Aesistant 
John D. Sullivan, PubUc Service Director 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

235 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Francis McCarty, 220 Montgomery St.. President 
William C. Blake. 90 Folsom St. 
Joseph M. Casey, H4 Townsend St. 
Harold S. Dobbs, 351 Cabtornia St. 
Dr. Charles A. Ertola, 253 Columbus Ave. 
John J. Ferdon. 155 Montgomery St. 
James L. Hallcy, 870 Martet St. 
Qarissa Shorlall McMahon, 703 Market St. 
Henry R. Rolph. 310 Sansome St. 
James J. Sullivan, 31 West Portal 
Alfonso J. Zirpoli, 300 Montgomery St. 

Robert J. Dolan, Clerk 

Lillian M. Scntcr. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Committees (Chairman named first) 
Commercial and Industrial Development— Sullivan, Blake. 

County, State and National Affairs— Halley. Ertola. Ferdon 
Education. Porks and Recreation- Rolph, Dobbs. Blake 
Finance. Revenue and Taxation— Dobbs. McMahon, Halley 
Judiciary, Legislative and Civil Service — Zirpoli. Rolph, Casey 
Police— Cascv. Sullivan, Rolph 
Public Buildings, Lands and City Planning— McMahon. Dobbs. 

Public Health and Welfare- Ertola, Sullivan, Zirpoli 



Rules— McCarty, Dobbs, Halle' 



Russell L. Wolden 

CITY ATTORNEY 

206 City Hall 
Dion R. Holm 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

617 MontKomcry St. 
Thomas C. Lynch 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 

700 Montgomcrv St. 
Edivard T. Mancuso 

SHERIFF 

JJl City Hall 
Matthew C. Carberry 

TREASURER 

110 City Hall 
John J. Goodvv.n 



COURTS 



SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 

Fourth Floor. City Hall UN 1- 

Harry J. Neubarth, Presiding Twain Michclscn 

Raymond J. Arata J, B. Molinari 

Walter Carpeneti Edward Molkenbuhr 

<:. Hsr„lJ Caulfield Clarence W. Morris 

Milvyn I. Cronin Oria St. Clair 

l;ust,icc Ci.llinan, Jr. Milton D. Sapiro 

l'.c,t„n Dcvine George W. Schonfcld 

Timothy 1. Fitipatrick Daniel R. Shoemaker 

Tl,.,mas M. Foley William T. Swciocrt 

ll.rald S. Levin William F. Traverso 

Tl,«c!j Meikle H. A. Van Dcr Zee 

Joseph M. Cummins. Secretary 

■ISO City Hall UN 1- 

MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Fl.ior. City Hall KL 2- 

llyron Arn..Id, Presiding William O'Brien 

':arl H. Allen Edward O'Day 

Albert A. Axclrod Charles Peery 

John W. BuMey Lcnorc D. Underwood 

Joseph M. Golden Alvin E. Weinberger 

Clayton W. Horn James J, Welsh 

Ivan L. Slavich, Secretary 

101 City Hall KL 2. 

A. ('.. McChcsney, Jury Commissioner 



TRAFHC HNES BUREAU 

16-) City Hall KL 2 

James M. Cannon. Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

•157 City Hall UN 1 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
Henry E. North, Foreman 
Paul A. Ryan. Secretary 
David F. Supple. Consultant-Statislidan 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

60-1 Montgomery St. YU 6-2950 

John D. Kavanaugh, Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan. Chairman, 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosser, 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew F. Connolly. 349 Fremont St. 
Fred C. Jones. 628 Hayes St. 
Maurice Moskovits. 2900 Lake St. 
Robert A. Peabody. 456 Post St. 
Frank Ratto. 526 CaUfornia St. 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. SE 1-5 

Thomas F. Strycula. Chief Juvenile Probation Officer 

JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Roy N. Buell, Chairman, 2512 Pad6c Ave. 
Mrs. Fred W. Bloch. 3712 Jackson St. 
Rev. John A. Collins. 420 - 29th Ave. 
Jack Goldberger. 240 Golden Gate Ave. 
James S. Kearney, 1871 - 35th Ave. 
Thomas J. Lenehan, 501 Haight St. 
Mrs. Marshall Madison, 2930 Vallejo St. 
Rev. James M. Murray. 1825 Mission St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFHCER 

2S9 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Chester R. MacPhee 

Joseph Mignola. Executive Assistant 

Virgil Elliott. Director. Finance 6= Records 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren Middlctrook. Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 



LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. CIcary 
Hotel Senator. Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkin 

Meets Isl Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 
Harold L. Zcllerbach. President. 343 Sansomt 
Bernard C. Beglcy. M.D.. 450 Sutter St. 
Mrs. Alhcri Camniidon.co. 2770 Vallejo St. 



h State College 



Clarence O. 
Albert 

Ex-OfTicio Members 

President. California Palace Legion of Honor 
President. City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President. Public Library Commission 
President, Rccrcltion and Park Commission 
Joseph H. Dyer. Jr.. Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 Larkin St. H 

Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 
Roger D. Lapham. Jr.. President. 233 Sansome St. 
Robert Lilienthal. 813 Market St. 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter. 142 ■ 27th Ave. 
Joseph £. Tinney. 2517 Mission St. 
Thomas P. White. 400 Brannan St. 

Ex-Offido Members 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 
Francis P. Walsh. President. 68 Post St. 
Wm. Kilpatrick. 827 Hyde St. 



DISASTER CORPS 

45 Hyde St. 
Rear Admiral A. G. Cook. USN (Ret.), Dir 
Alex X. McCausland. Public Information OJi, 



EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN 3-46»(l 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M.. 170 Fell St 1 

Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. President. 351 California St. 



Charles J. Foehn. 55 FiUn 

John G. Levison. 511 Howard St. 

Mrs. Claire Matsger. 3550 Jackson St. 



Superintendent of Schools and Secretary 



COMMISSION ON EQUAL 
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 

Meets at call of Chairman 
C. J. Coodcll. Chairman. Room 400. 35 Post St. 
Mrs. Raymond E. Alderman. 16 West Clay Park 
John F. Brady, 1296- 36th Ave. 
Terry A. Francois. 2085 Sutter St. 
Peter E. Haas. 98 Battery St. 
John F. Henning. 995 Market St. 
Roger D. Lapham. St.. 215 Market St. 

John D. Sullivan. Executive Secretary (lemporar^ 



FIRE COMMISSION 

: City Hall 1 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 
Arthur J. Dolan. Jr.. 235 Montgomery, President 
Walter H. Duane. 220 Bush Stteet 
Edward Kcmmitt. 601 Polk St. 

William F. Murray. Chief of Department 

Albert E. Hayes, (Jhicf. Division of Fire Preve 
Investigation 

Thomas \V. McCarthy. Secretary 



HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

61 Grove St, 
Daniel Mattrocce. President. 264 Dellbrook Ave 
Donald M. Campbell. 977 Valencia St. 
Donald J. McCook. 230 Montgomery St. 
Henry L. McKeniic. 2619 - .59th Ave. 
Thomas P. O'SuIlivln. 1J40 Powell St. 

Walter E. Hook. M.D.. Medical Diiector 

Frank Collins. Secretary 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. 

Meets lit and 5td Thursdays at 10 A.M. 
Charles J. Jung. Chairman. 622 Washington St. 



Jefferson A. Beaver. 1758 Post St 
Charles L. Conlan. 1655 Folso 
Al F. Mailloux. 200 Guerrero i 
Jacob Shcmano. 988 Market St 
John W. Beard, Executive 



vRKING AUTHORITY 

sou (Ji.lJcn Catc Ave. 

:cn every Thui.day. 4 P.M. 
XR E. Sclilciinser. Chairman. 20UI Mai 
rold A. Berliner. US MissiMippi St. 
E. jcllick. 56-1 Marker St. 
n E. Sullivan. 940 UMoa St. 
;jii Thuinion. 65 Berry St. 

Vininc T. Fuher. General Manager 



iRMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 

227 City Hall 

Meets every Wednesday at 3:)0 P.M. 

ICC J. W'alsK, President. 24SO - 17tb St. 
-old C Bruwn. 605 Market St. 
r Tamiras. 76 Jackson St. 
tpb C. Tarantino. 490 Jefferson St. 
ictt L. West. 265 Montgomery St. 

J. Edwin Mattox. Secretary 



)UCE COMNUSSION 

Hall ul Jo.li.c SU 1-2020 

Meets every Monday at 4rJ0 P.M. 
A Bissineer. President. Davii and Pacific Sts. 
old R. McKinnon. Mills Tower 
Has J. Mellon. 390 First St. 
Francs J. Ahem. Chief of Police 
Thomas Cahill. Deputy Chief of Police 
Capt, Daniel Kiely. Director of Tragic 
Capt. Daniel McKlem. Chief of Inspectors 
Sgt. William J. O'Brien. Commission Sccrcury 
Sgt. John T. Butler. Department Secretary 



IBUC LIBRARY COMMISSION 

Civic Center 

Meets 1st Tuesday each month at 4 P.M. 
Simon. Presidenr. 1550 Folsom St. 
I Rose M. Fanuechi. 511 Columbus Ave. 
. F. D. Haynes. 1)99 McAllister St. 
ipbcll McGregor. 165 Post St. 
. J. Henry Muhr, 2 Caslcnada Ave. 
i(a> M.L.re. Potrero and 18th Sts. 
. Ha:el O'Brien. 440 Ellis St. 

:hivabacher. Jr., 100 Montgomery St. 

iris. 990 Geary St. 

yssie. 240 Jones St. 

S. Wu. D.D.S.. 916 Kearny St. 



Lee Va 






)BLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

' ..V Hall 

wry Tuesday at 2 P.M. 
ricy. President. 851 Hou-ard St. 
,„„ ,. li.Mun. 44 Casa Way 
ucl f . Del Carlo. 200 Guerrero St. 
irt N, Crccnberg. 765 Folsom St. 
:ph Martin. Jr., 400 Montgomery St. 
T. N. Bland. Manager of Utilities 



Bureaus and Departments 

;S7 City Hall 
:c Negri, Director 
port, San Francisco International 

Belford Broun. Manager 
dl Hereby, 425 Mason St. 

Harry E. Lloyd. Chief Engineer and Gene 
It, Heat 8C Power, 425 Mason St. 

B. A. Devinc. Manager 
nicipal Railway, 949 Presidio Ave. 

Charles D. Miller. Manager 
lomicl a: Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. 

Paul J. Fanning, Director 
lie Service, 287 City Hall 

Willijm J. Simons. Director 
ler Department, 42 5 Mason St. 

James H. Turner. Ccn.-ral Manager 

IBUC WELFARE COMMISSION 

58) Bush St. 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays each month 
Bard J. Wren. President. 1825 Mission St. 
rd. 315 Montgomery St. 
"~D Montgomery St. 



: 1-2121 

, 6-0500 

5-7000 
inager 

5-7000 

6-5656 
6-5656 
: 1-2121 
, 5-7000 



Muri 



1306 Portola Driv 



703 Market 
H. Born. Director of Public 
ilala Smith. Secretary 



CREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

M.L.ien Lodge, Golden Gate Park SK 1-4 

M.ets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month at 3 P.M. 
Bercut. 1 Lombard St. 
ry Margaret Casey. 5 32 Mission St. 
M. Coffman. 525 Market St. 
gene A. Gallagher. 1548 Market St. 
Iter A Haas. Sr.. 98 Battery St. 
Francis J. Her:. 450 Suiter St. 
■ leph A. Moore. 2590 Green St. 

ymond S. Kimbell. General Manager 
ward McDeiitt. Secreiary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

512 Golden Gate Ave. 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 
Joseph L. Alioto. Chairman. Ml Sutler St. 
Roy N. Buell. 445 Bush St. 
John L. Merrill. 582 Market St. 
Lawrence R. Palacios. 355 Hayes St. 
Sydney G. Walton. Crocker Building 

Eugene J. Riordan. Director 

M. C. Herman, Secretary 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

93 Grove Street 

Meets every Wednesday at 3 P.M. 
William T. Reed. President, 1385 - 20th Ave. 
Phihp S. Dalton. 1 Sansomc St. 
James M. Hamill. 120 Montgomery St. 
William J. Murphy. 1771 - 45tb Ave. 
Martin F. Wormutb. 4109 Pacheco St. 

Ex'Officio Members 



J. L. Mooti, Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building . MA 1-6600 

Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
Prcnlis Cobb Hale. President. 867 Market St. 
Eugene D. Bennett. 225 Bush St. 
George T. Davis. 98 Post St. 
Sidney M. Ehrman. 14 Montgomery St. 
Frank A. Flynn. 1690 - 27th Ave. 
Sam K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 
W. A. Handcrson. 19 Maywood Dr. 
Milton Klettcr. 2179 - 27th Ave. 
Guido J. Musto. 535 North Point St. 
Samuel D. Sayad, 256 Santa Ana 
Ralph J. A. Stern, 305 Clay St. 

Edward Sharkey, Managing Director 

E. L. George, Secretary 

SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HE 1-2040 

Dr. Grace Morley. Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONER 

.Agiieultural Eldg.. Embarcadcio SU l-300i 

Raymond L. Boijini 



CORONER 

650 Merchant St 
Dr. Henry W. Turkcl 



ELECTRiaTY, DEPARTMENT OF 

45 Hyde St. HE I 2121 

D. O. Townsend. Chief 
Doyle L. Smith. Superintendent of Plant 

FINANCE ac RECORDS, DEPARTMENT OF 

2121 



City Hall 
tt. Director 

ity Clerk 
Martin Mongan. 317 City Hall 



;il Ell 

County Clerk 



HE 1 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 
HE 1-2121 



PUBLIC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN I- 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox. Director of Pubbc He.ilth 
Dr. E. C. Sage. Assistant Director of Public Health 



Central Emergency, Grove ff Polk 



MI 7-( 
HE 1-: 



PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall HE 1-: 

Sherman P. Duckel, Director 

R. Brooks Larrer. Assistant Director. Admim'strativ-e 
L. J. Archer. Asst. Director. Maintenance and Operations 



Accountl, 260 City Hall HI 

J. J. McCloskey. Supervisor 
Archilecturi, 265 City Hall HI 

Charles W. Crillith. City Architect 
BuiMing liupecdon, 27S City Hall Hi 

Leiter (^ Bush, Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army HI 

A. H. Ekenberg, Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau, 286 City Hall HI 

Sidney Franklin, Supervisor 
Engioe«rin|!, 359 City Hall HI 

Reuben H. Owens. City Engineer 
Sewer Repair Sc Scwaee Treatment 2323 Army St.. HI 

Ben Benas. Superintendent 
Street Cleaning, 2323 Army St. HI 

Bernard M. Crony. Superintendent 
Street ReDair, 2S23 Army St. HI 

F. D Brown. Superintendent 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall HI 

Ben G. Kline. Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, 313 Francisco St. HI 

Aylmcr W. Petan. Superintendent 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

93 Grove St. HI 

Philip L. Rejos. Director of Property 
James A. Graham, Superintendent Auditorium HI 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

6 Citv Hall H 



Thus. P. ihrist 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



1-2121 
1-2121 



1-2121 
1-2121 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-5100 

Dr. Robert C. Miller, Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF THE LEGION 
OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-5610 

Meets 2nd Monday, Jan., April, June, Oct., 3:30 P.M. 



Board of Trustees 



Mrs. A. B. Sprcckels, Hoi 



37 Druit 
James B. Black, 245 Market St. 
Walter E. Buck, 23 5 Monrgomery St. 
Alexander de Brettcville. 2 Pine St. 
Mrs. Bruce Kelham. 2006 Washington St. 
Charles Mayer. San Francisco Examiner 



John N. Rosekr; 
William R. Wallace. Jr.. 310 Sansomc St. 
Whitney Warren. 285 Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L. Zellerbacb. 343 Sansomc St. 

Ex'Officio Members 

President. Recreation S' Park Commission 
Thomas Carr Howe. Jr., Director 
Capt. Myron E. Thomas, Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Monday Jan., April. June. Oct.. J P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Helen Cameron. Honorary President. Hillsborough 

Michel -D. Weill. Pre.idem. The White House 

Charles R. Btyth. 235 Montgomery St. 

Miss Louise A. Boyd. 255 California St. 

Sheldon G. Cooper. 620 Market St. 

R. Gwin Follis. 3690 Washington St. 

Randolph A. Hearst. S. F. Call-Bulletin 

James K. Lochcad. 464 California St. 

Grovcr A. Magnin. St. Francis Hotel 

Garret McEnerney. II. 3725 Washington St. 

Roscoe F. Oakes. 2006 Washington St. 

Richard Rheem. 2828 Vallejo 

Joseph O. Tobin. Hibernia Bank 

Mrs. Nion Tucker. Burlingame Country Club 



Ex-Officio Members 



President. Recreation If Park Comn 
Dr Walter Heil. Director 
Col. Ian F. M. Macalpine. ! 

LAW UBRARY 

436 City Hall 
Robert J. Everson. Librarian 

PUBUC POUND 

2500 - 16th St. 
Charles W. Fricdrichs. Secretary a 



LY- AUGUST, 1958 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 

Thoma's Sheet Metal Shop 

1030 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco 

Fillmore 6-0553 

Lynch Carrier Systems, Inc. 

TELEPHONE and TELEGRAPH CARRIER EQUIPMENT 
695 Bryant St. EXbrook 7-1471 San Francisco 7, Calif. 

TOM'S UNION SERVICE 

29th Avenue & Taraval Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

WESTERN STEEL & WIRE CO. 

Wire — Wire Products — Wire fence 

Straightening and Cutting All Types of Wire 

1428 Egbert Ave., East of Third Street at 6000 Block 

Phone VAlencia 6-0167 :-: San Francisco 24, Cahf. 

Herman Dobrovolsky — Union Oil Dealer 

2000 CLEMENT STREET 
SKyhne 2-4272 :-: San Francisco. California 



THOS. THOMASSER 



C & C PET SHOP 

6303 COLLEGE AVENUE 
OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

BLACK HAWK 

JAZZ CORNER OF THE WEST 

200 HYDE STREET GRaystone 4-9567 

lohn Noga ■ Guilo Cacianti 

W ally & Rick Jentzsch Shell Station 

20th a: VALENCIA STREETS 
Phone: VAlencia 6-6436 



OCEAN PARK MOTEL 

SAN FR.ANCISCO DE LUXE MOTEL 

-All Modern Facilities - 

2690 -46lh AVENUE at SLOAT BLVD.. near ZOO 

OVerland l-"268 

BRICKER & SO\ SERVICE 

WE CAN FIX EM 

Towing Service and Repairs Used Auto Parts 24 Hr. Tow Service 

370 BAYSHORE BLVD. VAlencia 4-1210 - N'AIencia 4-1289 

San Francisco. Calif. 

UNITED TOWING COiVIPANY 

ROBERT W. DYER 
PIER 14 SUner 1-6606 San Fmncisco 

JAKE'S BODY SHOP 

JAKE IMMEL 

Spot Painting - Wrecks Rebuilt 

1631 Hayes Street Fillmore 6-1300 San Francisco. Caif. 



CECO STEEL PRODUCTS C0RP0R.4TI0N 

Formerly Concrete Engineering Co. 

401 Tunnel Avenue DEla^are 3-3600 

Night Phones: Dunnage-BEacon 4-2770. BEacon 4-7185 
Night Phones: Shipwright — LAndscape 6-0653. BEacon 2-8499 

GATEWAY SHIPWRIGHT, INC. 

LEO A. GRAIN, Dunnage & Shipwright 
Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco Phone GRaystone 4-4110 

Pancho's Mexican Restaurant 

Lu,ich 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. - Dinner 5 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. 

Closed Mondays 

505 ELLIS STREET :-: SAN FRANOSCO 

George's Richfield Service 

TuneVp — Brakes — Lubrication 
19th AVENUE Sc TARAVAL STREET S.AN FRANCISCO 

PAUL'S SERVICE STATION 

Brake Service - Tune-Up - Ton Serrice - Electrical Service 

Joseph P. Cauchi 

2101 - 19th Avenue - Phone SEabright l-99~8 - San Francisco 16 

MSIT THE 

PALACE BATHS 

85 THIRD STREET SAN FR.\NCISCO 

EARL PASLEY'S FLYING • A" 



Pick-Up and Deli' 



3rd a: EGBERT 



S.^N FR.ANCISCO 



RAY'S UNION STATION 

1850 ARMY STREET 
San Francisco 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 



Distinguished Civic 
Appointments 



CITY BOARD DIRECTOR 

■ nfficers and delegates of 
"ederation of Municipal Eni- 
i-s have unanimously elected 
i'.vin Mattox to membership 
'■ board of directoi's. 

Mattox is Secretary to the 

■f Appeals, which position 

held for the past eight 

That he is a highly capable 

nu-ient executive, and will 

-reat asset to the Federa- 

'fficial family is borne out 

■ following: Executive Coni- 



League of Improvement Clubs and 
Associations of S. F. ; member. 
Board of Deacons of Calvary Pres- 
byterian Church; member. Execu- 
tive Committee of the University 
of San Francisco Dons Club; mem- 
ber. Navy League of the United 
States. San Francisco Chapter: 
Commonwealth Club. He is li- 
censed as public accountant in 
California though he is not cur- 
I'ently practicing. Formerly he has 
been Deputy Collector of Inteinal 
Revenue. Special Agent in the 



^m«;D.^" 




pnittee member, and Chairman of 
[the S. F. Municipal Executive Em- 
ployees Association; member. San 
[Francisco Federation of Municipal 
temployees; member. Board of Di- 
Irectors. and Admissions Committee 
[Chaii'man of the Press and Union 
[League Club of S. F. ; member, 
"Board of Governors of the Civic 



California State Attorney Gener- 
al's office. Lieutenant. California 
State Guard, and a member of the 
Selective Service Draft Board. 

CHASE. WARD & GARDNER 
Personnel development expert 
Wallace R. Richman of New York 





J. EDWIN MATTOX 



WALLACE RICHMAN 



and airlines executive Henry S. 
Bailey have joined Chase Ward 
and Gardner as piincipals, it is 
announced by Michael Rollie Jones, 
senior principal of the San Fran- 
cisco firm of executive procure- 
ment and development consultants. 
Mr. Richman has for the past 
four years been special assistant 
to management of the Iranian 
Operating Companies (Consor- 
tium I at Tehran. Mr. Bailey has 
been assistant treasurer and comp- 
troller of Transocean Airlines of 
Oakland. Both of the principals 
have had e.xtensive experience in 
personnel and organization prob- 
lems in their respective fields. 

On ratification of the Oil Agree- 
ment in Iran in October. 1954. Mr. 
Richman became a niember of the 
survey party acting for the In- 
ternational Consortiimi in Iran. 
He assisted in the establishment 
of the refining and producing com- 
pany's initial oi'ganization. Later 
at Tehran he was placed in charge 
of procurement for supei-\'isor\" 
and management levels of over- 
seas personnel for all of Iran, do- 
ing extensive liaison with the 17 
parent companies in France. Hol- 
land. England and the United 
States. 

TEA AND SPICES EXCHANGE 

In an effort to augment San 
Francisco's position as a center for 
tea imports from India, establish- 
ment of a tea and spices exchange 
here is being considered, accord- 
ing to Robert Taylor, president of 
the San Francisco Area World 
Trade Association of the San Fian- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce. 

"Ever since India. Ceylon and 
other Asiatic countries have 
gained independence, they have 
sought to discover another im- 
portant tea - marketing center 
which would enable them to com- 
pete seriously with the London Tea 
Board," Taylor said. 

"With the grouing trade in the 
tea and spices through the Golden 
Gate, intense efforts are being 
made to establish a tea and spices 
e.xchange in San Francisco which 
would ser\'e the United States antl 
other countries in the Western 
hemisphere." 

The late Carlos B. Lastreto. one 
of the founders of the Pacific Coast 
Coffee Association, initiated the 
move to set up such a tea and 
spices exchange in San Francisco. 




JOHN WESLEY BUSSEY 

Appointed to the Municipal Court bencH 

by Governor Knight, he becomes Son 

Francisco's first Negro judge. 








JOHN 


M. PIERCE 


New 


gen 


erol 


mane 


ger of the five-county 


San 


Fro 


CISC 


o Ba 


Areo Rapid Tronsi 


Dist 


ict, 


he 


was 


formerly California's 






Di 


rector 


of Finance. 



JULY- AUGUST, 1958 



THE FEZ 

Restaurant - Cocktail Lounge 

Your Host 

GEORGE MOUNTANOS 

■Vml Out Grecian Room" 

Phone ORdway 3-8219 

162 TURK ST. San Francis. 



LAW BOOKS 
Phone 

T. R. (Ted) Henry 

Repreienting 

Bender-Moss Co. 

91 McAllister St. HE 1-7343 

San Francisco 2. CaliL 



Bud's Richfield Service 

Expert Lubrication ■ Washing 

Complete Accessories 

Minor Repairs 

12th Avenue and Judah Street 

Phone SEabright 1-9548 



MIKE'S 
RICHFIELD SERVICE 

199 Pine Street 

WA 1-2825 



San Francisco's Only Independent 

Richfield Combination Car and 

Truck Service 

Ramorino Bros. Richfield 

Motor Tune-up - Brake Service 

Heavy Truck &; Auto Lubrication 

1998 EVANS AVE. at Napoleon 

Phone VAlencia 6-9857 



Rudy's Texaco Service 

Mar£ax Lubrication 
Motor Tune-up - Brake - Battery 

Tire Service - Car Washing 
1701 OCEAN AVE. at Faxon 



JUniper 5-3535 San Franci; 



12 



J P. Ma 



P. J. Ma 



Shell Service Station 

Tires - Batteries - Accessories 

Lubrication 
LAGUNA and LOMBARD 

San Francisco 23, Calif. 

Phone WAlnut 1-9869 



HOTEL DU MIDI 

1562 POWELL STREET 
GA. 1-9571 San Francisc 



Grand PaciSic Hotel 

1331 STOCKTON STREET 

Snn Francisco 



Someth.ng D.fjerent 

LEONE'S 

ESPRESSO - CAPPUCCINO 

COCKTAILS 

450 Broadway San Francisco 

Telephone DOuglas 2-9620 



ISeiv Method 
Laundry & Cleaners 

Finished Work - Rough Dry 

407 SANCHEZ STREET 

MA. 1-0545 



Best Wishes to 
FIRE CHIEF MURRAY 

AMAZON CLEANERS 

1107 NAPLES STREET 
DElaware 3-3259 



Blinofif & Blinoff 

Manufacturers of 

KNITTED GOODS 

2236 Irving Street MO. 4-4184 

San Francisco. Calif. 



Oriental Agency & 
Trading Co. 

55 COLUMBUS AVENUE 
San Francisco, California 



Stratford's Richfield 
Service 

4300 MISSION STREET 
JU. 5-9874 



THE JACKET SHOP 

Repairing — Leather, Suede 

1795 MARKET STREET 

MArkct 1-6672 



Orpheum Sandwich 
Shop 



1194 Market St. 



MARCELLA'S 

5126 GEARY BOULEVARD 
San Fn 



FILBERT AUTO 
RECONSTRUCTION 

Complete Automotive 

Reconstruction 

711 FILBERT STREET 



McLeod & Clarke 
Corp. 

633 Bayshorc Blvd. JU 4-4825 



WEVG SUN 
Funeral Director 



17 Brenham Pla 



Three Home-Town 
Boys Bring New Look 
To McLaren Lodge 



by Bill Simons 



There's a "new look" in the 
high command of the Recreation 
and Park Department for the first 
time since the two former depart- 
ments merged in 1950. 

This important branch of city 
government which functions from 
its venerable, ivj'-covered com- 
mand post, McLaren Lodge in 
Golden Gate Park, has entered 
fiscal year 1958-59 with a new 
General Manager, Rajmiond S. 
Kimbell; a new Superintendent of 
Parks, Bartle S. Rolph; and a new 
Superintendent of Recreation, Jas. 
P. Lang. 

Actually the only "newness" 
about the three executives is their 
occupancy of new positions; all 
are veterans of many years' serv- 
ice in both the consolidated de- 
partment and its two predecessors. 

And that is significant, for ap- 
pointment of Kimbell and subse- 
quent approval of his appointment 
of Rolph and Lang by the Recre- 
ation and Park Commission was 
recognition of the worth and qual- 
ity of the home-town boys. 



This was particularly so in the 
case of Kimbell. He was the first 
recreation careerist named to the 
top job. The other General Man- 
agers in the 8-year-old depart- 
ment's historj' had come from pri- 
vate business t the late Harvey E, 
Teller I or from other areas of city 
government (Da\'id E. Lewis and 
Max G. Funke i . 

Kimbell started as a recreation 
professional 30 years ago. The 
only dilution of this long span was 
five years of wartime Naval serv- 
ice from which he emei-ged a Com- 
mander. He had risen steadily in 
the Recreation Department, had 
served since 1931 as Assistant 
Recreation Superintendent until 
his appointment as Superintendent 
in 1951 when Josephine D. Randall, 
San Francisco's "first lady" of 
recreation, retired from that posi- 
tion. 

■When he was selected last April 

as the S15,600 General Manager 

of the sprawling properties and 

virtually continuous programs of 

(Continued on Page 19 i 




SAM'S GRILL 

From the Hisloric CilifornUi M.irktl 

Many OuIslardmB 

Seafood Specialties >uch .11 

BAKtD CLAMS ELIZABETH 

Entree* Start jt SI. 25 

Open II .t.ni. to 8:10 p.m. 

CI.-»Ld S.itu.d.iV ..nd Sund.iv 

!-4 Kush Street G.\. 1 -9( 



Italian Food 

Open from 7 1.30 a.m. 'o " p.m. 

LUNCH iJ.-'5 . DINNER Sl.iO 
SVND.4Y $1.60 
Closed Wednesday 

BUON GUSTO 

555 Broadway G.A 1-9938 



Bl TLKR BROS. 

258 WINSTON DRIVE 
San Francisco 



DAVES 
Flying "A" Service 

5crvi,ig Ihc Suniel DiilrkI 

Motor Tune-Up 
Brake SC Muffler Service 

2050 Irvins Street SE. 1-4' 



De Espana Restaurant 

Basque Food — Family Stylf 

Lunch 12 - 1 - Dinners 5 - 8 

Fermin Haurie, Prop. 

781 BROADW.'^Y SUtter 1-7287 



Union Oil Dealers Station 
No. 208 

Bill Chau - Bert Yip 

Polk-Geary Union Service 

Firestone Tires 

Prest-O-Lite Batteries 

999 POLK ST. PRospect 5-89~l 

Buffas Union Service 

Complete Car Service 

21st & Noriega Streets 
Lombard 4-0:'6- 



PASEHI TRUCKING CO. 

Building rjeniolilion . . . Concrete 

Breaking . . . Dump Trucks 

General Flauling 

264 Clementina St. GA. 1-529- 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Ocean Avenue Service 
Station 

Associated Products 

Full Line Accessories 

4650 MISSION STREET 

JU. 4-8095 San Francisco 



ALEX ANGUZZA 

ALEXS SERVICE 

699 COLUMBUS .\ VENUE 



SIMS BROS. 
SIGNAL SERVICE 

Specialise Tune Ups & 
Brake Service 

Res. MI. 7-3769 - TW. 3-6106 

6201 - 3rd STREET 

VA. 4-2517 San Francisco 



Camilleri's Service 

MOBIL PRODUCTS 

Tire, - Motor Ttnie Up - Batter 

Lubrication Service - Brake Serti 

Waxing - Washing 

2400 San Bruno Ave., al Silvci 

JUnipcr -0100 San Francisco 



Mitch's Signal Service 

Wash - Polish ■ Brakes Adjusted 
Complete Auto Service 



401 BRYANT STREET 
UN. 1-9134 San Franc 



COLLIER'S 
Rio Grande Service 

TuneUp - Brakes - Lubrication 
Carburetors - Accessories 

700 - 36th .AVENUE 
BA. 1-406- 



JOHNS TEXACO 
SERVICE 

Wash - Polish - Lubrication 
Pick-Up & Delivery Service 
44th Avenue Sc Sloat Blvd. 



Harry's Mobil Service 

S & H Green Stamps 

Brake Service - Motor Tune-Up 
Pickup a: Delivery 

800 ULLOA STREET 

Claremont & Ulloa SE. 1-2463 



SANFORD'S 
SHELL SERVICE 

Lubrication - TuneUp ■ Brake 
Service 

4501 GEARY BLVD. 

B.A. 1-0424 San Francis 



less VA 4--092 Angela 

Gomez Bros. Service 

Baneries, Accessories. Lubrication 

Tires. Tubes 
1401 So. Van Ness San Francisco 



RATHE 
UNION SERVICE 

25th i California 
San Francisco 



OCEAN SHORE 
IRON WORKS 

Complete Boiler &; Tank Repair 
21-Hour Service 
7 Days a Week 

1660 Jerrold \\e. 
Mission 7-5737 



AL HOOKE'S 
SHELL SERVICE 

He Give S&H Green Stamp, 

California &: .^rguello Streets 

SKyline 2-1703 San Francisco 



ROY' S 
SHELL SERVICE 

Brake Repairs - Engine Tune-Vp 

l-'th STREET, Cor. Clayton St, 

HEmlock 1-5390 



Miraloma Shell 
Service 

p. A. BROOKWELL, Prop. 

Service Is My Business 

Free Pick Up & Delivery 

PORTOLA and FOWLER 

LO. 4-1919 San Franci 



Hillside Market 
Grocery 

- Free Delivery — 

Meals - Groceries - Vegetable 
Beers 6/ Wines 



100 Blanken Av 



JU. 5-1257 



Regal Roofing Co. 

Gravel. .Asbestos, Terra &.tla, 
T,lc. Sl.uc and Shmsle Roofine. 
Mastii- Floors. Watcrproolint 

930 INNES AVENUE 

San Francisco 24, Calif. 



-!26I 



VAIencia 4-!262 



MINS MOBILE 
SERVICE STATION 

901 Golden Gate Avenue 



Lloyd Spangenberg 
SHELL SERVICE 

19th a: T.\RAVAL 
Phone SEabright 1-985- 



FLY TRAP 



•_< Finest Restaur 



DOuglas 2-9781 



Trinity Realty, Inc. 

Rich.ird Enimott H.irl-cri; 

60- MONTEREY BLVD. 

Jl'. 4-4900 



P. A. BERGEROT 

Counsel for Bank of America 
Counsel for Consulate General 

o/ France 

Phone SUtter 1-7868. 1-7869 

FRENCH BANK BUILDING 

110 Sutter St. San Francisci 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Cerciat French Laundry 
& Dry Cleaners 

1025 McAllister st. 



JOHN OSTRAT CO. 
Engraving 

Dials - Panels - Labels 

Name Plates - Embossing Dies 

Brass & Steel Dies 

156 SECOND STREET 
GA. 1-6670 San Francisco 



CENTRAL MILL & 
CABINET CO. 

VAIencia 4-7316 
1595 Fairfa.v San Francisco 



WILLARD'S SERVICE 

Mobil Oil Products 

Cole SL Frederick Sts. 

San Francisco 17, Calif 

ED. WILL.ARD 



EL SOMBRERO 

.4 beautiful cocktail bar for your 

Famous for our Marguerites 
5800 Geary Blvd.. cor. 22nd Ave. 
Close to .Alexandria Closed Mon. 
No Parking Problem EV. 6-9661 
Alicia Arroyo and Billy Bernal 



COAST CASKET CO. 

74 Langton Street 
San Francisco, Calif. 

UN. 3-2324 



JULY -AUGUST, 1958 



CAREW & ENGLISH 

Leo V. Careiv 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS . . . MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

MASONIC AT GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
San Francisco 18, California 


THEODORE V. TRONOFF 
Civil Engineer & Surveyor 

- Berkeley Office - 

1617 University Ave., Berkeley 3, Calif, THornuall 5-4242 

- Wesllake Office - 

345 Park Plaza Dr.. Daly City 25. Calif., PLaza 5-7144 
FOR JOB LARGE OR SMALL 


CALIFORNIA BASEMENT CLE.AiNERS 

Basemcnla ■ Buildings - Yards - Lois Cleaned 

Furniture ■ junk & Iron Wanted ■ FulU Insured 

Free Estimate - 24Hr. Service 

2648 Bryant Street HE. 1-6740 


DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

Any Make or Model Seven Days a Week 

9 A.M. - 10 P.M. FREE ESTIMATES on Antenna Installations 

1322 HAIGHT STREET 
UN. 3-0793 — Also UN. 3-1836 


CHERRY -BURREI I, CORP. 

Dairy - Food ■ Farm - Beverage - Chemical 
Equipment and Supplies 

2132 PALOU SAN FRANCISCO 


TO BUY - SELL OR TRADE 
REAL ESTATE 

it's 

ARTCOLVIN 

Real Estate — Insurance 
1999 Junipero Serra Blvd. PL. 5-1000 


BERONIO LUMBER CO. 

Office and Yards 

K.A.NSAS AND MARIN STS., SAN FRANCISCO. 24 

Phone VAIencia 4-3283 


W. GRAZIANO & CO. 

Contractor - Builder - Alterations fe? Repairs 
1432 PALOU AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 24, CALIF. AT. 2-7620 


THE MILLER HOUSE 

Formerly Colombo Liquors 

FRANK MILLER, Owner-Mgr. 

Phone DElaifare 3-9111 — Delivery Service 

105 BROAD STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 

At the End of the "M" Line 


Compliments of 
A FRIEND 


WALTER B. KRELTTZMANTV 

2000 Van Ness Avenue 

SAN FR.1JVCISCO 


AERO HEATING ■ SHEETMETAL 

Furnaces - Water Heaters - Installations - Service 

Repairs - General Sheet Metal Work' 

PLAza 5-3852 — If no answer call S.F. JUno 8-4701 

6 HILLSIDE BLVD. DALY CfTY 


SOUTHER WAREHOUSE COMPAM 

CAR UNLO.ADING AND WAREHOUSING 
1006 North Point St. GR.iystonc 4- "000 S.in Fr.mcisio, C.ilif. 


KINliADE BRAKE SERVICE 

Wheel Aligning * Balancing 

ED KINKADE, Owner 

241 Tenth Street HEmlock 1-1234 San Francisco3 


POLO'S Famous Italian Food 

Open Every Day from 11 A.M. to } A.M. 

Telephone DOuglas 2-7719 
34 MASON STREET SAN FRANCISCO 2. CAl II 


M.D. AMBULANCE SERVICE 

EMERGENCY SPECIALISTS 

98 E.iM M.irket Street D.ily City, C.ilif. PL.iz.i 6-4800 


DON'S UNION OIL STATION 

500 Bryant Strc.t San Francisco 



LOU FREMY 
Incorporated 

M.inuf.icturcrs- Dislribulors 

DRUGS - COSMETICS 

and 

ALLIED PRODUCTS 

330 Ritch Street 

fU. 6-4526 San Francisco 7 



STATE SUPPLY 

Industrials and Metals 

222 Seventh Street 

San Francisco 3, Calif. 
MArket 1-2212 

JOE GENTILE 



GEORGE L. BURGER 

Wholesale 
POTATOES 

and 

ONIONS 

EXbrook 2-1313 
52 VALLEJO STREET 



GEORGE & NORM'S 

RICHFIELD SERVICE 

STATION 

300 West Portal 
San Francisco 



PARRGATE 
Flying "A" Service 

mth AVE. & LINCOLN 

San Francisco 



HERBERT HAAS 
Flying "A" Service 

12th d: GEAR'^' 
S.in Francisco 



RICHLAND HOTEL 

1906 MISSION STREET 
San Fra 



NEW LOOK 

I Continued from Page 16) 
the Recreation and Park Depart- 
ment, he was faced with two ex- 
tremely important appointments. 

There was no hesitation in his 
first appointment of a friend and 
ro-worker. James P. Lang, as 
Superintendent of Recreation. 
Lang and Kimbell had shared the 
same years and the same from- 
the-bottom-up experience. 

They had worked so closely for 
so long that the appointment was 
most natural from a complement- 
ary point of view. It was also a 
logical reward of service and - 
because of Lang's stature in the 
recreation field — professionally 
popular. 

Filling of the other top staff job 
was not as simple. The position of 
Superintendent of Parks had been 
vacant since the death last No- 
vember of Julius L. Girod, suc- 
cessor of the late, great John L. 
McLaren. 

Considerable pressure had been 
generated aimed at elimination of 
the position as an economy meas- 
ure. ( Both superintendencies — 
parks and recreation — pay $12,000 
annually. \ But Kimbell showed 
how greater efficiency could be 
achieved and economy served at 
the same time by the appointment 
of Bartle S. Rolph as Park Super- 
intendent. 

This action, he pointed out, 
would consolidate in the one posi- 
tion the duties for which Rolph 
was then responsible as Superin- 
tendent of Structural and Mechan- 
ical Repair. 

Commission approval of the ap- 
pointment resulted in the upgrad- 
ing of the Park Superintendency as 
well as the rewarding of another 
veteran, for Rolph had joined the 
former Park Department in 1934, 
had served as Assistant Park Sup- 
erintendent since 1943. 

Result of the three appoint- 
ments — Kimbell, Lang and Rolph. 
the "new faces" at McLaren Lodge 
— is an organizational tightening 
up that has had a noticeably salub- 
rious effect on internal morale at 
the Recreation and Park Depart- 
ment. 



SUN FOOD CO. 

1516 FOLSOM STREET 
MArket 1-8156 



Oowntown Shell Service 

Firestone Tires - Tubes ■ Baltenes 

PARKING SERVICH 

EIH. 4: T..>lot Sis. GR.iysI.in( 4-2(Ml 



Denny Murphy's 

READY ROOM 

"HOLD ON -Youre HcadinR 
for Food and Drinks Superb 

501 VAN NESS AVE 
HE 1-1014 San Francisco 



HARP AUTO SERVICE 

Gas - Tires - Lubrication - Brake 
iervice - Motor Tune-up - Battery 

H'cMug - H'axing 

21st &i VALENCIA 

AT 2-0909 



Snyderknit Knitting Mills 

120 ■ 8th STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 5, CALIF. 

Eyelyn Robinson. Pres. 

Telephone UNderhiil 1-8058 



WRESCO 

Wholesale Radio St Electric 

Supply Co. 

Main Office 

140 - 9th Street HEmlock 1-3680 

San Francisco 

Bra,ic/i Office 

1348 El Camino LYtell 1-0-94 

San Carlos 



Mobile Radio Engineers 

1416 Brush Street 

OAKLAND 12, CALIF. 

HIgate 4-0941 

1150 Larkin Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 9, CALIF. 

PRospect 6-6166 



Bob and Tod's Service 

Saie Will, Mohan k Gasoline 

OCEAN and SAN JOSE AVE. 

San Francisco 12, Calif. 

JU 7-1131 



LUCKY'S 
SIGNAL SERVICE 

2101 Lombard St. 

San Francisco, California 
Phone FI 6-8236 



Tlie Fulton Supply Co. 

Mayonnaise and Salads 

Siher in Blue Brand 

901 Fillmore St. Fillmore 6-9-60 



ITALIAN FRENCH 
BAKING CO. 

Specialising in French Bread. Ralls 
1501 Grant Ave GA. 1-3796 



JIM TRAYC'S 
Union Oil Service 

19th Ave. and Judah 



Moler Barber School 

System of Barber Colleges 

G./. Approved 

D. E. Brown. Manager 

161 FOURTH STREET 

GArfield 1-9979 .San Francisco 



Sonierton Lounge 

Hosts 

Lorn Perchevitch - Ed Chosich 

Piano Bar ■ Cocktails 

Phone PRospect 6-6366 

436 Geary St. San Francisc 



LAWRENCE'S 
Service Stations 

590 - 1 0th Street 

200 Industrial Street 

865 - 3rd Street 



DOUBLE M 

Service Station & Garage 
Maintenance 
Complete Ser\'icing 
Gasoline Pumps, Hoists, Com- 
pressors, Grease Eiquipment, Etc, 
26 Shotwell M.Arkct 1-8275 



FRED'S 
Richfield Service 

Fred A, Brunswig 

28th Avenue 3.: Judah Street 

SEabright 1-9942 



Phone JUniper 5-9868 

CHARLIE'S 
Richfield Service 

Complete Car Care 

Charles P. Tomassini 

GENEV,^ and S.AiNTOS STS. 

San Francisco 



i British Cars 

Jan's Mobil Service 

Complete Tune-up - Batteries 

Brake Service - Tyres 

Lubrication - Accessories 

2300 Taraval St. at 33rd Avenue 

Lombard 6-4282 



J and M's Super Service 

Lubrication — Motor Tune-Up 

Brakes 

!Sth Arc. & Geary Bhd. 



JIM Vi'ILLIAMS 
SERVICE 

1401 Eddy Street. Cor. Webster 
San Francisco 



KEMPS SIGNAL 
SERVICE 

Lee Tires - Hashing - Polishing 
2398 PINE ST. - JO. 7-I28I 



San Fn 



Calif. 



ULY- AUGUST, 1958 



FIRE RETARDANTS 

for woodf textiles 
FIRE KETARDANT PAINTS 
U.L. Listed 

Flamort Chemical 
Company, Mfg. 

746 NATOMA STREET 

MArkct 1-7825 
San Francicco 3, California 



Hotel Espanol 

Dine in genuine Basque atmosphere 

DINNERS . . . ^1.75 to ?3.50 

served from 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. 

719 Broadway GA. 1-9412 



HOTEL DANTE 

Transient - Weekly Rates 

E. Wester, Prop. 

310 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

EXbrook 2-9458 San Francisco 



George Di Quattro 

George's Cigar Store 

Beer and Soft Drinks 
759 COLUMBUS AVENUE 
SUtter 1-9218 Sa 



SHANGHAI LOW 

532 Grant Ave. 

San Francisco 



John's Shell Service 

Tune-Up - Minor Repairs 

Tires — Batteries 

Golden Gate & Buchanan 

JOrdan 7-9986 



Gene Diiden's 
Shell Service 

Independent Dealer 

Shell Petroleum Products 

Fulton a: Divisadero Street; 

WEst 1-4666 



H. WILLIAMS & CO. 

1108 STOCKTON STREET 
San Francisco 



ORIENTAL HOTEL 



856 Stockton Street 



Wes Mcleod's Service 

Tires - Batteries ■ Lubrication 

fVashing - Motor Tune-Up 

Brake Service ■ Open All Nighl 

Phone WAlnut 1-2043 

2498 LOMB.ARD STREET 



Lindy's Richfield 
Service Station 

Tires ■ Batteries - Auto Paris 

TURK & HYDE 

TUxedo 5-9753 

San Francisco 



Bryant Wong's 
UNION SERVICE 

"Complete Car Seryice" 

33 INDUSTRIAL STREET 

San Francisco 24, Calif. 



S & S 
UNION SERVICE 

- Jim Strong - 

19th 8C Valencia Streets 

UNderhill 3-5183 



"Ml RANCHO" 
SUPER MARKET 

Lalin-American Food Line 

Tortilla Manufacturers 

3365 -20th STREET 

ssion 7-0581 San Francis 



Ask for S&H Green Stamps 

The SPERRY and 
HUTCHINSON COMPANY 

HEmlock 1-2742 

1446 MARKET STREET 

San Francisco 



BRIDGE HOTEL 

Reasonable Rates 

Day ■ Week or Month 

2524 LOMBARD STREET 

JO. 7-9828 San Francisco 



H. WENIGER 

MattitfacluTCT of 
Instruments for Hand Surgery 
Active Hand and Finger Splints 

70- 1 2th STREET 

MArkct 1-6876 San Francisco 



LIGURIA BAKERY 
Soracco & Co. 

Fogaccia, Panetton. Grissini. 

Biscotti 

Italian and French Bread 

PIZZA our Specially 

1-00 STOCKTON STREET 

Phone GArfield 1-3785 

Cliick's Signal Service 

Motor Tune-Up - Brakes 

"Clean Courteous Seryice" 

501 - 4lh Street EX. 2-2413 



JIM'S 
UNION SERVICE 

Complete Seryice 
3350 ALEMANY BLVD. 



HUGHE'S 
TEXACO SERVICE 

LOMBARD at FILLMORE 
on motel row 



PHILS 

NorwaJk Super Ser\'ice 

Motor Tune Up - Brakes Relined 

Minor Repairs 
2200 ■ 19th Ave. SE. 1-6312 

FRED HAGUE 
RICHFIELD SERVICE 

1898 ALEM.ANY BLVD. 

WALT'S 
RICHFIELD SERVICE 

400 TARAVAL STREET 
San Francisco 

Richard M. Tong 

General Petroleum Products 

Phone ORdway 3-0723 

1090 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

MOBILGAS 

Mobilgas - Mobiloil - Mobil 

Products 

3rd and H.ARRISON 

Phone G.Arfield 1-3073 



EARL KING 
UNION OIL DEALER 

Pick-up & Deliyery Seryice 
44th at Noriega SE. 1-9670 



Roy's Chevron Service 

Atlas Tires - Batteries & 

Accessories 

1799 Ocean Avenue JU. 4-3019 



"Bill Hunt's" 
Associated Station 

25th Avenue A: Gcarv Blvd. 



Carton's Mobil Service 

Mobilgas - Expert Lubrication 

2-00 SAN (OSE AVENUE 

San IVancisco 



Potrero Auto Service 

Gas - Oil - Tires 

Repairing - Toning - Service 

Brakes & Tune-Up 

Free Pick-up 6 Deliyery 

22nd and POTRERO AVE. 

Phone \Alencia 4-1 5i4 



EXPANSION BAR 

Lou. Bud and Leo 
Telcyision 

2124 MARKET STREET 

San Francisco 

Phone M.Arket 1-92"; 



BUD CHENEYS 
Chevron Service 

Community Green Stamps 

Motor Tune-Up ■ Lubrication 

Brake e Muffler Seryice 

GENEVA a: S.A.NTOS STS. 



Hildreth's Pharmacy 

•W. F. (Bill) Kniffel". Proprietor- 

2998 MISSION STREET 

San Francisco 10. California 

Residence Phone ATwater 2-6484 ■ 

Telephone Mission 7-1289 



Joe's (if Westlakc 

Famous for Charccil Broiled Steaks 

and Chops 

Dinner (rom II a.m. to 12 a.m. 

ALEM.\K1' a: LAKE MERCED BLVD. 

PLaza 5-7400 

Nn San Francisco. Visit Oriciivil Jot's 

Chestnut SC Fillmore — Fl. 6-32!! 



Telephone DOuglas 2-3292 

Welding Service Sales, 

Inc. 

\SELDCO PRODUCTS 

£.cry//.ing for Welding 

026 HOW.ARD STREET 

San Francisco 3, California 



Sepp's Mohaick 
Sunset Service 

Tune-Up - Brakes ■ Transmissi 
Carburetors - Lubrication 

855 LINCOLN WAY 

LO. 4-1836 San Franciscc 



JOE & CHARLIE'S 
AIOBH. SERVICE 

4199 IVIissioii Street 



Memo for Leisure 



Local talent is having a heyday 
San Francisco theatre, with 
C. Jones at the Curran in a 
usical revue: "Mask and Gown." 
he show is presented by Leonard 
llman who discovered Mr. Jones 
r town, and gave him his 
roadway opportunit.v in "New 
ices of 1956." The satire of T. C. 
)nes ranges from TV and HoU.v- 
ood to current fashions. Shake- 
)earean women, and crooners. 

At the Playhouse on Beach and 
yde an intimate theatre where 
ee coffee is sei-ved in the inter- 
il- we dropped in on a Sunday 
'ening of original plays by James 
roughton. His work is timely las 
the short play about two people 
ho face the end of human life on 
lis planet), studded with wit and 
Lcetiousness, and adorned with 
any a well-turned phrase. 

On Friday and Saturday eve- 
ngs this enterprising group, with 
le help of a distinguished musi- 
an, Dr. Ian Alexander, has been 
resenting two operas: "Trouble 

Tahiti" bv Leonard Beinstein — 
1 entertaining and melodic study 

life in suburbia- and "L'Enfant 
rodigue" — a moving interpreta- 
of the Prodigal Son — by 
laude Debussy. The evening is 
iriched by a brief introduction 
the conductor. Dr. Alexander, 
ho knows how to switch from 



light persiflage to serious coiu- 
ment. 

Another showplace for local tal- 
ent is the Actoi's Workshop at the 
Marines' Theatre on Sutter and 
Mason. This group will be repre- 
sented at the Brussels World's 
Fair by its production of "Waiting 
for Godot" — a skilful rendering 
of Beckett's mystifying play about 
Skid Row characters. 

Latest production of the Actor's 
Workshop is: "The Iceman Com- 
eth" by Eugene O'Neill. This is 
a massive undertaking which lasts 
four hours. It is well staged and 
acted, and its bunch of anguished, 
quipping bar-flies show us O'Neill 
in some of his finest moments as 
the chronicler of America's melt- 
ing pot, with a satirical eye on the 
pitchman, and the dream at the 
end of the rainbow. 

This year's Ice Follies at Win- 
terland is light-hearted and gay 
as ever, with comedian Frick at 
his best, Ink.v-Dinky the black 
bear on an excursion to heaven in 
the "Garden in the Sky" number, 
and among the skating stars, an 
enchanting 13-year-old, Janet 
Champion from San Diego. This 
excellent family show, said to be 
worth "more than ten conven- 
tions" to Ssm Francisco, is for the 
first time in recent histoi'.y ending 
in the month of August — on the 
31st. 




OCEAN AVENl E 
LAUNDERETTE 

i;!8 OCE.'\N AVEiNUE 
Near Plymouth 
i-0171 San Francisco 



1201 HARRISON STREET 
Sail Fran 



MEYER \r\I) YOl N(; 

BiiiLi)ir\(; coHroHVTiorN 

General Contractors 

679 I'orlola Drive San Francisco 27 

MOnlrose 1-0300 

The F.W.D. Pacific Co. 

Fire, Industrial, High«a)- and Contractors Equipment 

850 Harrison St. Phone GArfield 1-4971 

San Francisco 7, California 
Formerly: TH E FOUR WHEEL DRIVE PACIFIC CO. 

SHEEDY DRAYAGE CO. 

Cr.ine and Lift Service up to 20 Tons 
MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT HAULING 

630 Tennessee Street, near 3rd and Mariposa Sts. 

San Francisco 

W. (BILL) STATTON Telephone M.Arkct 1-8080 

PALLAS BROS. 

RADIO 4: TELEVISION REPAIRING - AND SALES 
5000 MISSION STREET JU 5-5000 SAN FRANCISCO 12 

SILVER CREST DOUGHNUT SHOP 

RESTAURANT d: COCKTAIL LOUNGE 
340 Bayshore Blvd. AT. 8-0753 San Francisco 

G. Sherjnan & M. Thompson Lnion Service 

3601 L.A.WTON STREET 
Lombard 6-6262 :-: San Francisco 

I NION SERVICE - Fong & Chin 

1301 DIVISADERO STREET 



DELUXE BOCCI BALL COURT 

operatic Entertainment 



(,22 BROADWAY 



SAN FRANCISCO 



MARIO 



DIMTO CHEVRON SERVICE 

Complete Brake anil Electrical Service 

Wheel Balancing 

2998 S.\N JOSE AVE. JUniper 5-9885 

BOB'S UNION SERVICE 

-01 - 3rd STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Aunger Artificial Limb Co. 

1653 MARKET STREET MArkct 1-6055 

San Francisco, California 



JLY- AUGUST, 1958 



Books 



From Sea to Shining Sea 



THE COURAGE TO 
BE H.-iPPT 

bj Dorothy Thompson 

Houghton Mifflin Company: $3.50 

"For years I have been haunted 
by the memory of a week-end I 
once spent with Dorothy Thomp- 
son. Oh, that efficient housekeep- 
ing, that energy of political in- 
telligence. How often the picture 
of those magnificent gifts has come 
back to reduce me to a humility 
just this side of tears," This quo- 
tation, from an article in "Vogue" 
for July 1958, by Victoria Lincoln, 
describes the Miss Thompson who 
has achieved so much in the world 
of journalism. 

Dorothy Thompson in "The 
Courage to be Happy" is in an- 
other mood, reflecting on values 
and drawing inspiration from the 
current American scene, in a col- 
lection of articles originally pub- 
lished in "The Ladies' Home Jour- 
nal." 

As you read this book you can 
understand Miss Lincoln's frustra- 
tion, for, being a woman and a 
vei-y capable one. Miss Thompson 
is eminently practical and her 
writings spur you on to engage 
in good, wholesome neighborhood 
and educational projects. She is 
an ideal dispeller of bureaucratic 
cobwebs and red-taped lethargy, 
and a sharp goad to the fulfillment 
of civic responsibilities. 

The book brings you also into 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 

> Alio, San Francisco and Ignacio, Calif. 



by Jane Rawson 



an engaging human contact with 
an author who is often regarded 
as a bright intelligence, rather 
than a waim heart. In particular, 
one charming essay, "The White 
Sofa." describes her at first as be- 
ing "unbearably bossy" (the auth- 
or's own words), unhelpful when 
she discovers her son and his wife 
have bought a new sofa. "White?" 
I cried. "Have you gone crazy? 
White — in New York! You know 
what it means to keep house in 
New York — the soot and white — 
and with a child in the house." 
Later in the essay comes, "I called 
up and apologized, saying I had 
been tired and cross," and there 
stands Miss Thompson, ready her- 
self to be hugged and comforted, a 
perfectly delightful grandmother. 
It should be noted that among 
Miss Thompson's many talents re- 
vealed in this book, is one that 
clever women have found useful 
dov^Ti the centuries, namely a 
shrewd sense of when to take her 
husband's advice. 

ONT.Y IN AJWERICA 

by Harry Golden 

World Publishing Company: S4-00 

Hcrrj' Golden, the genial, bouncy 
("when I weigh myself I do not 
look at the results. I just listen 
to the gears grind . . . ") author 
of this highly individual anthology, 
explains his lay-out policy as edi- 
tor of the Carolina Israelite: "Each 
month I set the ads first . . then 
I cram my editorials into every 
other inch of available space. I 
sort of sHther them in and around 
. . . with only one beginning and 
one end. Many of" my subscribers 
have tried to pick out individual 
items of special interest to them; 
all in vain. The only chance they 
have is to begin at the top left- 
hand column on page one, and 
keep going to the end." 

This quotation points up the 
business acumen in the author's 
family, further developed in a vig- 
orous portrait of the rich, rare and 
lovable Uncle Koppel, and warns 
you of Mr. Golden's literary mag- 
netism. Once the reader has his 
nose inside the book, he is ensnared 
until the last page is read, and all 
the time Mr. Golden will be wedg- 



ing into his mind a vast number of 
bright ideas. 

From Galli-Curci to Garbo, Cleo- 
patra to "modem America on a 
huge breast binge." New York 
City to Charlotte. Carolina. Caesar 
to Sandburg. Mr. Golden's quiz- 
zical glance sweeps over it all. Pol- 
itics, race segregation, the marry- 
ing of widows, the perplexities of 
Rabbis, problems of Unitarians, 
quirks of Irishmen, the stage, the 
cocktaU bar, all generate in Mr. 
Golden's mind new and provoca- 
tive ideas. Lewis Carroll's famous 
Walrus, with his chatter of shoes 
and ships and sealing wa.x, is here 
splendidly outclassed. 

Each reader will have his own 
special delights. We liked the 
recollection of Mr. Golden's East- 
side childhood, with the smell of 
kosher cooking, the warm feeling 
of family affection and personal 
activities like the suit buying: 
"Usually it turned out to be the 
hottest Sunday in the year . . . 
You left nothing to chance. The 
word went down: 'We are buying 
Hymie a vrinter suit,' and the 
matter was prepared carefully." 

Then the account of his moth- 
er's generalship in the suit-buying 
campaign, particularly her atti- 
tude in the shop: "Never mind the 
talk; all we want here is a little 
suit for a bar-mitzvah boy." Fi- 
nally when the suit is successfully 
bought and all are home again: 
"The mother takes her traditional 
place in the kitchen to make some 
potato latkes for everyone. And 
she resumes her traditional status 
within the family circle — 'Hymie, 
did you give your father a big kiss 
for the suit he bought you to- 
day?' " 

Mr. Golden has his wistful mo- 
ments ("They never met a pay- 
roll: Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, 
Einstein") and his poetic ones ("A 
Day With Carl Sandburg: But we 
mostly laughed just as the poet 
Blake imagined it . , . we laughed 
and the hills echoed.") 

These comments and penetrating 
ideas all spring from a deep com- 
passion for man in the anguished 
world of today, and what makes 
this book bracing to read for the 
man harassed by responsibility is 




the gay, infectious, buoyemt hu 
mor which ripples across all the 
pages. 

PROSPERITY «ITHOt'T 
IXFLATIOX 

by .Arthur F. Bums 
Fordham I'niv. Press. New York 
S2.00 

These are the AOUar Lecturei 
delivered at Fordham Universit; 
by Professor Bums in 1957. 
wiites: "The lectures are focusec 
on the problem of inflation, which 
has seriously marred our nation'.' 
prosperity in the post-war period 
They take stock of recent events 
and suggest economic policies that, 
may help us build a better future.' 

Professor Bums begins by exam- 
ining expansion of consumer de- 
mand and investigates the threat 
of gi'adual. or creeping, inflatior 
in the coming years. He reviewj 
measures which could be taken tc 
stabilize the national economy, anc 
after painstaking assessment 
reaches the following conclusions 

"Reasonably full employmeni 
and reasonably stable price leve 
are not incompatible. We have 
often come close to this ideal ir 
the past, and we have done sc 
again recently during the yean 
from 1952 to 1955. The matten 
I have stressed . . . explicit recog- 
nition of reasonable price stabil 
ity among the objectives of tht 
Employment Act, improvement ii 
the practical workings of m 
tary and fiscal policies, the reduc 
tion of monopolistic practices, 
better organization of economi" 
policy-making — will not be at 
tained without great and continu 
ing effort. But if I am right ii 
thinking that these measures wil 
significantly improve our chance: 
of maintaining a reasonably stabh 
consumer price level as well a; 
reasonably full employment ove 
a long span of years, the effort i, 
surely worth making." 

The book is short and writtei 
with clarity, and desen'es carefu 
study by persons in places of re 
sponsibility. 



RECORI 



ANCHOR REALTY 

INSURANCE 
LOANS ■ RENTALS 

22 Mnrkel St. MA 1-2700 

S.in Fr.i 



KIM'S CABINET SHOP 

hiduslrial ■ Rviidclial 

'abincts. Sinks, Counters, Paneling 

15 STONE STREET 

S.m Fr.inclsco 

lARPER ROBINSON & CO. 

Foreign Freight Forwarders 

510 BATTERY STREET 

S.,n Fr.,ncisco 



^INOLER LAUCCI & DAY 

Surety Bonds 

• 

244 CALIFORNIA ST. 



.EVIN'S AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

E.ery,hi„glorll,cAu,o 

11 VAN NESS AVENUE 

HE. 1-7500 



KERK'S T.V. 

SALES - SERVICE 

Service Calls $}.50 Plus Paris 

9. A.M. to 9 P.M. 

114 Excelsior Ave. JU. 4-2991 



WISEMAN REALTY CO. 

REALTORS 

/in> ■ Sell ■ Exeharige Properties 
J64 1 II I) AH LO. 4-1080 



ISEW MISSION 
T.4VERN 



San Fr, 



M.\rkel 1-9423 
ico. Calif. 



,< fnijis to Mumcipal Employees 

STATE MORTGAGE CORP. 

RE.-^L ESTATE LOANS 
i40 Market St, YU. 2-7H1 



Joe\s Sheet Metal 
Works 

3515 Mission St. AT. 2-3121 

San Francisco 



BEL-CLIFT 
GROCERY 

498 Geary Street San Fran 



ASHBURY 
MARKET 

205 Frederick St. LO. 6-3134 
San Francisco 



ANDY'S 
GROCERY 



Groceries ■ 
i"'40 Irving Str 



San Francisco 



Joe June's Indo-China 
Restaurant 

263 O Farrell St. San Francisco 



JAYNE GARAGE 

GRaystone 4-9729 
1945 HYDE STREET at Unic 



Telephone GArfield 1-1660 

The T. H. Wilton Co. 

Photographic and Identification 

Supplies 

1155 FRONT STREET 



PUGH^S RICHFIELD 
STATION 



801 Golden G 
San Fra. 



SMITH'S 
UNION SERVICE 



RORERTS 
Richfield Service 

Washing - Polishing 

Motor Tune-up 

4th Ave, a: California EV 6-9616 



ROYAL BAKING CO. 

.Im.ricd-i. Italian and French 
Bread 

Grissini, Panettone, Boccellato 
and Fociccia 

4773-7- Mission Si. JL!. 5-9655 



SERGE'S 
Richfield Service 



600 Portola Dri\ 
SE. 1-9965 



Rert's Richfield 
Service 

Tires - Lubrication - /lccessoric.< 
1298 Ocean Ave. San Francisco 
JU 5-9955 SSH Greefi Stamps 



GEORGE ORCHARD 

lAH-ksmith 

Door Closers - Safes 

3257 - 24th Street, near Capp 

San Francisco, Calif. VA. 4-5084 



"Star Out Right on Monday 
NiRht" M-EAT at 

BINO'S 

for Donnloun Quality Dinners 

and Serrice 

Closed Tuesday. Ample Parking 

Noriega at 32nd Ave. LO 4-3363 



KANG'S MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetable: 
Beer - Wines - Liquor 

1971 FILLMORE STREET 



William R. Staats & Co. 

Members Nea York Slock 

Exchange 

SUtter 1-7500 

111 SUTTER STREET 

San Francisco, California 



DuvaVs 

STUDIO CLUB 

John - Paul 

309 COURTLAND AVENUE 

Mission --998 1 



INDUSTRIAL WELDING 
CO., INC. 

701 Indiana VA. 6-3026 

San Francisco 



MARCONI'S 

122 BATTERY STREET 
San Francisco 



CARAVAN LODGE 

EDDY a: LARKIN STS. 
San Francisco 



AERO 
HEATING -SHEETMETAL 

Furnaces - Water Heaters 

Installations ■ Service ■ Repairs 

General Sheet Metal Work 

PLaza 5-3852 

If no answer call S.F. JUno 8-4701 

6 Hillside Blvd. Daly City 



GOLDEN WEST 
SHEET METAL WORKS 

345 JUDAH STREET 
Lombard 6-8031 San Francisc 



SAMBA 

638 BROADWAY 
GA. 1-9628 San Fr. 



Star-Delta Electrical 
Works 

Since I 'I IS 

Electric Motors - Controls 

Switchboards 

50 Shipley St. GArfield 1-0215 



Elkin's Roadside Service 

RICHFIELD SER\ ICE 

Towing 24-Hour Service 

1924 Ocean Ave. JU. 5-9943 



Ted's Flying 'A' Service 

Lubrication - Brakes - Tuneup 

Tires - Batteries - Accessories 

Pickup and Delivery 

1095 JUNIPERO SERRA 

San Francisco JU 7-9900 



L. E. (HAP) HOUGHTON 

"Flying A" Batteries S; Tires 
Lubrication ■ Car Washing 

ARGUELLO &: BALBOA 
San Francisco, Calif. 

EVergrcen 6-9522 



JOHN'S BODY SHOP 

Painting - \f elding 
John Boteilho, Prop. 

3827 GR.AND .WENUE 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

TE 6-3254 Home: LO 9-268" 



JLY - AUGUST.,1958 



PUB, LIBRARY PERIODICAL HOOU 

Civic Center 

San Francisco 2, Calif. 

52 X-1/59 (3077) 3630 






RCA\^CT0R television 




Leo J. Meqber^ Companq 

33 GOUGH STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 1 



ELIZABETH ARDEN 

Cordially Welcomes You 
to her San Francisco Salon 



550 SUTTER 



YU. 2-3755 



SUNRISE PRODUCE COMPANY, INC. 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
General Commission Merchants 

201 WASHINGTON STREET 
San Francisco 11, California 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 4507 




HAL'S 

In Palo Alto 

4085 EL CAMINO REAL . 
Also in Los Altos at Loyola Corners 

Two of the Peninsula's fine eating spots owned by 

Hal Graham, a restaurateur with 25 years on the 

Peninsula. 

JIM'S DONUT SHOP 

6202 Third Street JUnipcr 4-9898 

San Francisco. Calif. 



rNdi-rhiii 1-jjro 



liEmlock 1-6961 



YOUR ELECTRICIAN 



Eniil J. Weber Electric Co. 

Electrical Conlractiiii: 

258 DORLAND SI'REET S,.n Fr.nuisco 11. c:..lif. 



PUdLi'^^'^ (-|</\INL.Ibl^U b bblNbhU^bNI U^^IUh-Ub 



RECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




SHERMAN DUCKEL AND NEW-STYLE PEDESTRIAN OVERPASS 

Tli;s ililfully constructed romp features latest methods of using pre-stressed concrete. (See page 



PTEMBER, 19! 




KTK 


LARKSPUR 
CONVALESCENT 


Wrecking Co. 


HOSPITAL 




For Elderly Chronics and Convalescents 


235 ALABAMA STREET 


R.N. and Physical Therapist on Staff 


KJLondike 2-0994 


GRACE SLOCUM, Director 


SAN FRANCISCO 


Special Diet 




Homelike Atmosphere 


• 


Moderate Prices 


875 MONUMENT BLVD. 


Conscientious Care i 


Mulberry 5-7525 

CONCORD, CALIFORNIA 


234 HAWTHORNE, LARKSPUR 
Phone WAbash 4-1862 

LARK:SPUR, CALIFORNIA 




PACIFIC METALS COMPANY, LTD. 

1900 - 3rd STREET 

San Francisco, California :-: UNderhill 3-5600 

East Bay, San Jose, Peninsula, Sacramento and Stockton Servu 

ENterprisc- 1-0806 



INTERNATIONAL 

ENGINEERING CO. 

INC. 

Design & Consulting Engineers 

Dams, Tunnels, Highway, 

Railroads, Hydro-Electric Power Plants 



Motels near the Com Palace 

... 2 LOCATIONS . . . 

VINMAR MOTEL TOWTN MOTEL 

DElaware 3.3000 JUnlpcr 4-51 10 

3255 GENEV.A. AVE 3211 GENEVA AVE. 

BAYSHORE BLVD. .\T GENEVA AVE. 

15 Minutes to Downtown S. F. or S. F. International Airport 

AAA Approved ■ All FacililUs - Bu> Limi al Door 

Youngstown Kitchens .\\'ailable at Town Motel 



ruoi '^' LM 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

PUBLISHER 
EDITOR 

Published at 389 Church Street 

San Francisco 14, California 

Telephone HEmlock 1-12 12 

SUBSCRIPTIO N $5.00 PER YEAR 

^"^ SEPTEMBERri958 
VOLUME 25 NUMBER 9 



OCT I 

(|PF.7^'^!ji(;ai 



KENNETH H. ALLEN 
ALAN P. TORY 



BAY WINDOW 



ro|eL 

Tlu 



LETTERS 



the official representative of Mayor 

r Christopher on the recent California 

Tour, I wish to say that a great con- 

1 to better international understand- 

:s been accomplished. 

L State of California and especially the 

ot San Francisco can well be proud of 

tlie first to attempt such a worthwhile 

Record is to be congratulated for its 
1 this ver)' successful mission. 

NOEL COLEMAN 

State Building 

San Francisco. Calif. 



I A.int you to know how much I enjoyed 
;x rt-^cnt California Mayors Tour of Eu- 
ope- 1 found the contacts with officials of 
European cities vet)' stimulating and very 
nuch worthwhile. I hope you will be able to 
rrange another one in the future and that 
)xn.ud will be represented. 

HAROLD NASON 
Mayor pro-tempore 
Oxnard, California 



A HERN AND THE RECORD: One 
memor)' of the late Chief Frank Ahern 
belongs to his associations with The Record, 
.md recalls a particular occasion when Chief 
William Delderfield of Hobart, Tasmania 
paid a brief visit to San Francisco. Chief Del- 
derfield expressed to us a keen interest in po- 
lice problems and administration in our city, 
and we resolved to try and arrange a meet- 
ing at short notice with Ahern. Within 
twenty minutes of our telephoning the police 
depanment, we got a message back to come 
at seven o'clock. 

It turned out. when we got there, that 
Ahem was holding a momentous conference 
with his top brass which was to go far into 
the night. He broke this up for the time be- 
ing in deference to a distinguished visitor 
who was a colleague from overseas, answered 
and asked questions, though obviously tired 
and strained, and left upon his guest and our- 
selves an indelible impression of bigness of 
heart. 

ROCKETS IN AIR; A word of commen- 
dation is due to the organizers of the 
Pacific Festival for a magnifiicent display of 
fireworks on Sunday. September 14. Rockets 
like enormous candelabra shed their stars in 
the night sky. there were bangs, flashes and 
bursts of gaudy evanescent beauty delighting 
young and old, with a flamboyant exploding 
climax of color and noise engineered by Rikio 
Ogatsu. of the Ogatsu Fireworks Company of 
Japan, who super\ised the show. 

The spectacle was in striking contrast to the 
damp squibs of July 4 which were unworthy 
of the red glare they commemorate. Was this 
fiasco due to the foggy air of July, or to the 
quality of the fireworks? We wish some in- 
formed person would look into this, and if 
the fault really lies with the climate, perhaps 
as the Queen of England postpones her 
public birthday celebration two months, we 
could delay our Independence Day fireworks 
by those few weeks required to assure a 
balmy and congenial evening. It may be, how- 
ever, that all we need is better fireworks 
which refuse to be dampened. 



W c have read with great interest the stor)' 
ibout Woman of the Month. Marj- Ogden. 
n vour July-August issue and send sincere 
ippreciation from the San Francisco Red 
Cross Chapter for your recognition of this 
outstanding leader. 

I Mrs. Ogden deserves all the praise you 
■printed, and even more. But she is such a 
quiet and modest person thar her fine work 
■might well be overlooked. Therefore, your 
salute to her is doubly gratifying. 

SYDNEY G, WALTON 

The American National Red Cross 

San Francisco Chapter 

1625 Van Ness Avenue 

San Francisco 9. California 



CLEMENTINE: Some years ago a bony, 
young, golden Mexican burro, the gift 
of George B. Potorf, Sr., of Tucson, Arizona, 
was flown here by Pan-American clipper, 
and put into the arms of Coach Frank Albert 
to be the mascot of the 49ers. She was chris- 
tened "Clementine." given a coat inscribed 
"goal-rushers " recalling the donkeys of the 
miners in gold-rush days, and made custod- 
ian of the 49ers' good luck. 

Burro never had it so good: Clementine 
lives with the blooded horses at Woodside. 
She is now so well-fed that she has to be 
hauled up to football games by special trailer. 
Prosperity has dulled her sense of responsi- 
bilit)'. She casually chews the Kezar Stadium 
grass and does not appear to give a damn 
however critical the play. 

If the 49ers need their opponents hexing, 
we would suggest Frankie Albert diets that 
donkey and gets her concentrating on the 
game. On the other hand, the carefree, golden 
Clementine, nonchalantly eating in the aft- 
ernoon sun, while mo teams fiercely bartle 
it out a few yards away, does add her authen- 
tic personal touch to tolerant, live-and-let- 
live, debonair San Francisco. 

MAYORS IN EUROPE: Milo Johnson 
reports on his return from the Califor- 
nia Mayors' Tour that wherever the party 
went, they noted the American flag flying 
from the masts of hotels and city halls — 
almost invariably with fotrj'-nine starsi There 
w,-is, of course, no Texan in the company to 
take umbrage at this precipitate recognition 
of Alaska. Califomians. serenely impartial 
on the vexed issue of the largest state, were 
appreciative of the up-to-the-minute alertness 
of their hosts, a quality upon which we like 
to compliment ourselves in the Golden State. 
An article giving an account of the fasci- 
nating journey of our Mayors appears on 
page 12. The Record takes pride in the part 
we have played in promoting a significant 
California "first," and wishes to salute the 
achievement of Milo Johnson and Elton 
Asher. 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 

LEHERS 
BAY WINDOW 
SHERMAN DUCKEL'S ASSIGNMENT: PUBLIC WORKS 

bv Mc.rlce Ha-r.;itor 

FAMILY HOLIDAYS AT CAMP MATHER 

bv Alan Tory 

WOMAN OF THE MONTH: IRENE DALIS 

b, Pon>' P r-er 

BACK-STAGE VIEW OF CALIFORNIA POLITICS 
MAYORS IN EUROPE 

bv Milo Johnson 

AN OFF-BEAT EXCURSION 

bv Whlf Henry 

MEMO FOR LEISURE 

BOOKS 

PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 



10 
II 
12 
15 

14 
16 



SEPTEMBER, 1958 



Sherman Ducket's responsibilities include 
building tunnels, correcting landslides, 
and facing wild neighborhood meetings. 



Public Works Department 
S. F/s Beneficent Octopus 



IT IS EXTREMELY doubtful that the An- 
nual Report of the Department of Public 
Works, City and County of San Francisco 
will e\'er become a best seller. It's not the 
kind of a book that most people prefer to 
curl up with on a cold night, because it is by 
its nature completely factual and statistical. 
But, buried in those sometimes dry as dust 
statistics, is a story of great accomplishment 
as well as day to day work that few residents 
of this city are aware of except in a most su- 
perficial way. Yet, the Department of Public 
Works influences the lives of all San Fran- 
ciscans in many ways. 

If you own a car and use it at all, many of 
the streets you travel over are built by, cleaned 
by, and repaired by the Department of Pub- 
lic Works. If your children go to a public 
school they attend classes in buildings that 
were designed and erected under the aegis of 
the Department. If you intend to build within 
the County, your permit to do so is issued by 
the Department and your finished product is 
inspected by the men of this same govern- 
mental organization. And this is just the be- 
ginning. 

The Department of Public Works removes 
tracks, builds and cleans sewers and pumping 
stations, builds public libraries, erects air raid 
sirens, conducts surveys, corrects landslides, 
engineers traffic, builds parking lots, puts up 
traffic signs, installs parking meters, builds 
runnels, installs street name signs, paints 
curbs, plants and maintains trees. 

At present 31 of the 40 miles of freeway 
through San Francisco are the responsibility 
of the State Highway Department as far as 
construction is concerned, but Public Works 
is charged with the job of keeping them clean 
and maintaining them. The additional nine 
miles of highway are the full responsibility 
of the Department and one that is taken very 
seriously, just as is the duty of taking care of 
all our city streets. 

Occasionally, this gets to be a matter of 
jurisdiction, and because Duckel is known by 
his associates as a man who never turns down 
a job, Public Works presently plants and 



by Maurice Hamilton 



cares for the various tree plantings along most 
of our major boulevards. 

And so it is that among the 1,600 or so 
men and women employed by the Department 
you find such job classifications as gardener 
along with others that include engineer, 
sewer cleaner, draftsman, laborer, operating 
engineer, asphalt worker, building inspector, 
window cleaner, cement finisher, chauffeur, 
water chemist, janitor, architect, truck driver, 
accountant, all the building trades, most of 
the clerical classifications as well as others who 
are hired to do a job peculiar to the Depart- 
ment alone. 

The current Annual Report is written in 
terse and, to the layman at least, surprisingly 
understandable prose. It manages to convey 
in a small way the big job these myriad em- 
ployees accomplish routinely and in many 
cases without public recognition that Public 
Works is involved at all. 

For example, a section of the Bureau of 
Engineering's ponion deals with landslide 
control. This section labeled Landslide Cor- 
rection begins with a discussion of the an- 
nual rainfall for the period July 1, 1956 to 
June 30, 1957 and points out that because it 
was 33 per cent less than the yearly average 
there were not many slides to contend with. 
Only nine, which is probably eight more than 
the average citizen was at all aware of. 

Thej-eport then tells briefly how each slide 
was dealt with and comments on the success 
or failure of the methods used. In some cases 
new drainage systems had to be built, or ex- 
isting ones improved. In other cases test bor- 
ings were taken to determine the cause of the 
slide so that a solution could be worked out. 
In still other cases observation by means of 
surveys was the only immediate method em- 
ployed to arrive at a satisfactory answer. 

And in all of rhis there is no mention made 
anywhere of the number of men, man hours, 
brain and experience hours that were needed 
to do the job. This is taken for granted be- 
cause it is simply one of the routine duties of 
the Department. But it is a routine duty that 
stops a lot of discomfort and inconvenience 
for Mr. and Mrs. San Francisco. 



h, I 



The Design Division of the Bureau 
Architecrure sen'es also as an example ofthi 
unheralded but very importanr work of the 
Department. "The greatest amount of the Bu- 
reau's work load at present, " to quote direcd) 
from the report, "is processing work for which 
bonds have been voted." This deceptively sim- 
ple sentence covers design and construction 
work that was initiated as long ago as 194f 
by successful bond issue referendums. 

Historically the big jobs have been and 
continue to be farmed out to established 
architectural firms here in the cit)'. But the 
smaller ones are handled through the Bureau 
and the overall super\'ision of all jobs large 
or small is the responsibilit)' of this division 
of the Department of Public Works. Just how 
much work this involves is evident from the 
amount of construction that is presently gp- 
ing on, or just completed. 




I thought I won!' 



THE RECORD 



SALENE 

CONSTRUCTION 

CO. 

3224 JUDAH STREET 
MO. 4-3478 San Francisco 

Specializing in Insurance Repairs 



VANDAMENT & 
DARMSTED 



Industrial Engineers 



Consulting - Mechanical 

Electrical - Chemical 

156 -2nd Street, San Francisco 



BAYSHORE WRECKERS 
INC. 


Congratulations 


Demolition Experts 
New & Used Building Materials 


WESTERN TRACTION 
CO. 


621 BAYSHORE BLVD. 


1615 JERROLD AVENUE 


Jl . 6-0678 San Francisco 


ATwater 2-0287 San Francisco 



Congratulations 


Congratulations to Sherman Duckel and 




Public Works Department 


JOHN J. GOULD 


From 


& 


CHIN & HENSOLT 


H. G. DEGENKOLB 


Consulting Engineers 


Consulting Engineers 


(Structural Engineers for New Giant Baseball Stadium) 



:FTEMBER. 1958 





Phone for Phoenix 
LINderhiU 1-5606 



Congratulations to 

Department of Public Works 
and Sherman Duckel, Director 

HEAIY TIBBITTS CONSTRUCTION CO. 



Congratulations 

GRAHAM & HAYES 

Structural Engineers 

225 FRONT STREET 

San Francisco 

Diesel Engineering Service 

Marine Diesel Engine Repairs 

Governors - Fuel Pumps - Injectors 

24.Hour Service. — TE 2-2118 



1401 Middle Harbor Rd. 



Oakland 



SMITH & MOOREHEAD 

Structural Engineers 
709 Mission Street San Francisco 



DUDLEY DEANE 
& ASSOCIATES 

Consulting Engineers 
182 - 2nd Street, San Francisco 



Congratulations to 
S.F. Public Works Dept. 

CEMENT GUN 
CONSTRUCTION CO 

Porter, Urquhart, McCrary & O'Brien 

Consulting Engineers 
DAMS & HYDRO-DEVELOPMENT 

1140 Howard Street San Francisco 

HE. 1-4888 

ALBERT ENGINEERING, INC. 

Autoni.itic Fire Protection 
371 FOURTH STREET 



EXbrook --1568 



THE RECORI 




lliis intludes for example, a junior high. 
,kI ,111 elementary school as well as additions 
iJ modernizations of existing structures. 
inti. I.muary, 1957, two firehouses have been 
impkted and one reconstructed and four 
klitiniial houses are under construction. 
Ink two are in the design stage. Other pro- 
tts include the Laguna Honda Home, the 
in Fr.mcisco Hospital, the Hall of Justice 
nJ oilier assorted projects that are subject to 
n.il \nter approval on a bond issue election. 

11 use are but rwo bureaus within the De- 
.irmicnt of Public Works that are involved 
1 our city life without our really thinking 
houi It. And similar examples of such in- 
(lUcinent can be found within each and 
\xi\ bureau of Public Works. 

Ht.khng up this sprawling and many facet- 
d Liiipire is Sherman P. Duckel. Duckel.now 
s, .111 engineer and a native son has been 
inplnved by the Deparrment since 1927 
.hen he quit his job as assistant superintend- 
nt of construction for PG&E to take a job 
s iiinior engineer for the Bureau of Engineet- 
ni; 

.\tter a progression of jobs through the 
iiirciu he acted as assistant city engineer from 
y i2 to early 1950. It was on February first 
if rli.it year that Tom Brooks the much re- 
pet re J former Chief Administrative Officer 
or till- City appointed Duckel to his present 
xi.Mtion as Director of Public Works. The 
ippointment was reaffirmed by Chester Mac- 
'huv our present Chief Administrative Of- 
icer 

It IS safe to assume by nature of Duckel's 
:enure that he has been successful as Public 
Works Director. And in talking to his associ- 
ites it becomes apparent that part of this suc- 
cess is due to the fact that he has around him 
many top flight men and on a personal basis 
liis administrative make-up is such that he 
recognizes their ability and allows them as 
much freedom as is possible with their ideas 
and methods. Another contributing factor to 
Duckel's abilir)' to delegate authority and re- 
sponsibility is the physical structure of the 

SEPTEMBER, 1958 



Department itself. 

A glance at the organization chart of the 
Department of Public Works shows that the 
Director has working under him men who in 
another situation might hold positions direct- 
ly comparable to his own. The Bureau of 
Engineering, for example, is headed up by 
City Engineer Reuben H. Owens, while the 
City Architect Charles W. Griffith is in 
charge of the Bureau of Architecture. 

In other Bureaus, Duckel is fortunate in 
also having competent men in charge. Men 
like Lester Bush in Building Inspection, F. D. 
Brown in Street Repair, B. Benas Sewer Re- 
pair and Sewage Treatment, W. C. Zecher in 
the Bureau of Building Repair and S. J. Sul- 
livan as Superintendent of the Bureau of 
Street Cleaning. 

On the administrative side there is J. J. 
McCloskey supervising the Bureau of Ac- 
counts, while the Central Permit Bureau has 
S. Franklin at its head. It is these men, who 
along with Duckel's rwo Assistant Directors 
R. BriX)ks Larter, Administrative and L. J. 
Archer, Maintenance and Operation, that 
keep the Department going. And going it is, 
night and day, to see to it that this city keeps 
functioning as a metropolitan entity. 

Although this article has stressed how little 
knowledge and public attention generally ac- 
companies the diverse activities of the De- 
partment and although we have suggested that 
its annual report is scarcely calculated to raise 
the reader's blood pressure or his emotions, 
there are times when Sherman Duckel musr 
face an angry and hostile public. 

This occurs occasionally when he must let 
the citizens of San Francisco know how some 
of the actions his department must take will 
affect them, their families and in some cases 
their very homes. It is this tradition of free 
speech, held so dear by all of us, that can 
cause a conscientious man like Duckel more 
than a little grief. 

The mosr recent example of this was a 
meeting held just a short time ago in one of 
the neighborhood schools. The issue under 



discussion was the proposed Crosstown Free- 
way that would eventually connect the South- 
ern Freeway with the one going through 
Golden Gate Park. The meeting was held, as 
Duckel describes it. to inform the residents of 
the areas through which this road would pass, 
of the eventuality of some of them losing 
their present homes. That the action would 
be taken, regardless of how the people in- 
volved felt about it, was the very sore point 
that the Director of Public Works had to 
contend with in trying to do his job of giv- 
ing information. The newspapers reported 
that the meeting was a wild one in which 
some angry things were said about Duckel 
and his Department. 

"We were just trying to give people an 
idea of what was going to happen, " Duckel 
said later. "We could have had them come 
downtown bur we went out to see them in 
their own neighborhood because we felt it 
would be easier all around." 

He went on to explain that under the law, 
the residents had to be informed of the action 
that was being taken, by a public meeting, 
.and that this meeting was held in the neigh- 
borhood affected, because most of the resi- 
denrs were working people and a daytime 
session downtown would have been impos- 
sible for many of them to attend. 

The people invohed however, viewed rhis 
invasion" by the Department of Public Works 
and the Director of the Department with a 
feeling of something akin to the Southern- 
ers" emotions regarding the carpetbaggers 
after the Civil War. And as a result the meet- 
ing that was to have answered questions and 
given people an idea of what they could ex- 
pect in the future, degenerated into a hot ses- 
sion of name calling, threats and general ill 
will. 

Forrunately these scrapes with the public 
at large are few and far between, and mostly 
the work of the Department of Public Works 
is done unnoticed by most ever)'one except 
Department employees, whose unspoken 
motto seems to be: ""Never refuse a job and 
once you do take it on, do it right."" 



1 



GLOBETROHER TOURS Announce 
Their Greatest Travel Value 

Round 



THE 



World 

Featuring 

CHERRY BLOSSOM 
TIME IN JAPAN 



$1 




80 DAYS 
WITH TRAVEL, 

HOTEL, 

MEALS, 
SIGHTSEEING 

DEPARTING MARCH 11, '59 

Visiting 
HONOLULU 

JAPAN— Tokyo- Nora- 

Lake ChuzenjI - Kyoto 

Mikowo Odor! Cherry 

Dances - Nora 

HONG KONG - VIETNAM 

CAMBODIA & Angkor 

Wot, 8th Wonder of World 

THAILAND - BURMA 

INDIA— Calcutta, Benares, 
Delhi, Agra end the Taj 
Mahal, Jaipur, Bombay 

NEPAL - EGYPT - EUROPE 

Our January Round the WORLD Tour wos com- 
pletely sold out o week after announcement. So 
we ore pleased to announce a 2nd Personally 
Conducted departure. celebrating CHERRY 
BLOSSOM TIME IN JAPAN. You travel mostly 
by luxury liners, but you so can visit far inland 
places . . partly by air. With 1st class hotels 
(rooms with both) . . . most meals ... all sight- 
seeing, much of it by privote car . . . the services 
compore with many tours almost twice the price. 
Departure is from SeaHle, returning to New York. 

GLOBETROHER TOURS, 

118 Powell, San Francisco 

SU 1-6190 



They come back year after 
year to enjoy its program 



Family Holidays at 
Sunny Camp Mather 



WE WOULD PRESCRIBE at least a 
week at Camp Mather to every new- 
comer to California, of whatever age. What 
better introduction could you have to family 
life in the West, to our magnificent scenery, 
and the vision and expertness of the Recre- 
ation and Park Department of the City and 
County of San Francisco? 

This is one of the best bargains you can 
meet in a life-time — S6.50 a day for adults, 
and S3.50 for children. Three meals a day 
are provided — and they are good. You stand 
in a line and a gimlet-eyed boy sitting at a 
table punches your ticket before every meal. 
Service is cafeteria-style, with the shrewd 
provision that when ice cream is ser%'ed, one 
helping per person is individually given. 
Families from tots to teen-agers offer an en- 
tertaining spectacle of organization, with 
fathers and mothers solicitously watching over 
their broods. 

The camp is directed by Daniel Dempsey, 
who combines equability with unsleeping 
awareness of what is going on. He is an ad- 
mirable administtator who seems born for 
this particulai and exacting job, and oversees 
with the most human touch a family which 
last season reached as many as 403 in one 
week. There is a sense of order without bossi- 
ness, and opportunity for corporate activities 
without any dragooning of the individual. 

Dempsey took over five years ago, when 
the assets of Camp Mather were substantially 
extended with the addition of new electrical- 
ly lighted cabins, bath-house facilities and 
laundries. Lasr season Barbara Totheroh was 
Recreation Director. We accompanied her 
one afternoon on a nature study group, and 
watched with admirarion the way she in- 
stilled into her proteges a love and knowledge 
of flowers and plants. The kitchen team who 
operate the restaurant are young men of many 
parts. They put on a campfire show one nighr 
which exhibited real acting and singing tal- 
ent. 

One character in Camp Mather who brings 
color to life is Joe Barnes who runs the rid- 
ing school. A cowboy from Arizona. Joe rode 
into the camp owning only his hotse and 
saddle bags, and has become an established 
figure. Children whom he taught to ride, now 
appear at his corral wirh a second generation 
of families of their own, who listen with the 



by Alan Tory 



same delight as their parents to Joe's tall 
stories. A breakfast ride with Joe to that 
clearing in the mountains where fried p 
toes, bacon, and coffee are seried is a i _ 
lighr in a holiday ar Camp Mather. 

Nor should we forget three other in 
rant characters — the bears who come [■ 
garbage dump at night, and provide incLi 
for stalkers and camera addicts to tipKv 
wards the area for a glimpse of the cli 
family. 




Soddli 



but happy 



Mention should be made of the swimming 
facilities in Birch Lake, and the pool for sm.ill 
children, of horse-shoe courts, tennis, bad- 
minton, volleyball and Softball, of fishing op- 
portunities in the Tuolomne River, and the 
option of automobile trips to Yosemite Val- 
ley. Then there are hours of freedom for quiet 
rambling round the camp in daytime, and 
that seductive evening hour when you ni.u' 
sit and listen to the shouts and laughter ot 
children and the music of a distant accordiiii. 
Thanks to good organization, rare peopli-, 
and a beautiful setting this is a holiday u 
remembered. 

The camp is open from the middle of 1 
to the end of August. Priority in grant 
reservations is given to residents or taxp.i' 
of San Francisco, though non-residents i 
apply after one month from the opening l 
of booking, which is in April. Rescr^-.ui 
may be made for not less than 6 days and 
more than 21 days. Guests need to pro\ 
their own blankets and linen. 



Ix- 



THE RECORD 



WAR MEMORIAL OPERA HOUSE 

SAN FRANCISCO OPERA 

LA BOHEME-Scptcmber 19. 2?', October 2 

RIGOLETTO-September 25 and October 20 

n. TRONATORE-Septcmbcr 26 and October 11 

THE BARTERED BRIDE-September HI and October 4 

THE WISE MAIDEN followed by CARMINA BURANA- 

Octobcr 5 and October 9 

LA FORZA DEL DESTINO-October 7 

GIANNI SCHICCHI followed by ELEKTRA-October 10 and 16 

TANNHAUSER-Oclobcr 14 and 18 

MANON-October 17 

LE NOZZE DI FIGARO-Octobcr 21 and 23 

Single Performance tickets at Opera-Symphony Box Office. Sherman. 
Clay SC Co.. EX 7-0717. and all Bay Area agencies. 



"The HERTZ Corporation" 



HERTZ RENT A CAR 
45 i MASON STREET 



ORdway 3-4666 



Emery C. Lhchka 

HERTZ RENT A TRUCK 

1480 FOLSOM STREET UNdcrhill 1-68-0 

D. /. Sullhan 

HERTZ CAR LEASING DIVISION 

1480 FOLSOM STREET MArket 1-9755 

HonardKirmae 



Coiiiiratulations to Sherman Duckel 

KENNETH R. TOPPING, JR. 

General Contractor 
1667 - 48th Avenue SE. 1-5980 

P. MARTIRE & SON 

General Contractors 
dldl Mission Street Daly City, California 

Bus. Phone PLaza 6-7664 Res. Phone PLaza 6-7561 

P. MARTIRE 



5th 


ROLANDO LUMBER CO. 
and Berry Street SUtter 1-6901 


133 


MILTON RHINE 

Oculist Prescriptions a 

Geary Street 


OPTICAL CO. 

ccurately filled 

YUkon 6-6589 


TESI DRAYAGE 
1425 - 17th Street 


COMPANY 
UNderhiU 3-3134 



NONA REALTY 

NONA HARWICk, Realtor 

533 BALBOA STREET 

Bus. BA. 1-5576 Res. BA. 1-3504 

Batteries - Tires - Storage - Washing - Polishing - High Pressure 
Lubrication 

Up to 6 Hours Parking 50c - All Day 75c - 24 Hours Sl.OO 

TEMPLE GARAGE 

WALTER T. BARKETT. Managing Owner 

644 GEARY STREET 
PRospect 5-8141 San Francisco 2 

ARVIN ELECTRIC CO. 

Electrical Contractor 

24-HOUR SERVICE 



Industrial - Commercial - New Constsruction 8C Alterations 

220 Volt Wiring-Ranges - Residential - Dryers 

Motors Sold a: Repaired ■ "City-Wide Service" 

CALL 

Mission 7-0752 

If No Answer Call EVergreen 6-7575 

1611 Innes Avenue at 3rd Street 



MeGUIRE and HESTER 

General Contractors 

796 -66th AVENUE 
Oakland 21, California 

PETERSON SUPPLY COMPANY 
480 - 5th Street DO 2-1695 San Francisco 

S. F. WIRE & IRON WORKS 

All Purpose - Industrial SC Ornamental 

53 Colton Street MArket 1-8712 

ARNOLD'S APPLIANCE SERVICE 
632 Persia Street JUniper 6-6100 



SEPTEMBER. 1758 



CECCOTTI & SON 

Cement-Concrete Contractors 

1610 HARRISON STREET 
UNderhill 1-2472 

MARKET RADIO SUPPLY CO. 

SOUND DEPT. 

EVERYTHING IN SOUND 
1276 Market Street San Francisco 

Phone MArket 1-2115 
FRANK KYRIAKIS 

THE LOWRIE PAVING CO., INC. 

Contractors 

Asphalt & Light Grading 
Heavy & Light Grading 

Main Office: 174 San Bruno Road (So. San Francisco) 
S. F. Office: 222 Napoleon - Mission 7-5600 

RODONI-BECKER CO., Inc. 

Mechanical Contractors 
HEATING - PLUMBING - PIPING 

3070 - 17th Street San Francisco 10 

MArket 1-3662 



SUPPLYING THE FINEST 

OFFICE FURNITURE - OFFICE SUPPLIES 

STATIONERY - PRINTING - LITHOGRAPHY 

H. S. CROCKER COMPANY, INC. 

Established 1856 



720 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

— DOuglas 2-5800 — 



Woman of the Month 



Opera Star Irene Dalis 
is Native of San Jose 

by Daniel Pinne 



Irene Dalis. internationally cele- 
brated opera singer, has such 
charm that there is little wonder 
she has captured audiences and 
has been rewarded with acclaim by 
the Metropolitan, Covent Garden, 
andtheStaedtischer 1 Berlin ) 
Operas as one of the leading young 
artists. 

"What I have worked for and 
achieved," she says, "has only been 
possible because of unstinting sup- 
poz't of very many people." Words 
of praise spontaneously escaped 
her when she said that the first 
time she crossed the stage and 
worl^ed through a reheai-sal at the 
San Francisco Opera House, she 
recognized the smooth organiz- 
ation and harmony that prevailed. 
Stage hands, technicians, mu- 
sicians, conductor and directorate 
were all generously included in this 
sincere appreciation. 

Bom in San Jose, California, the 
youngest of five children, she 
found that her parents, brothers 
and sister were all musically gift- 
ed. It followed naturally that mu- 
sic was to be her destined career. 
The piano was her first choice and 
after graduation from San Jose 
State College she went on to Co- 
lumbia University where she re- 
ceived her M.A. degree. 

It was during these years that 
Miss Dalis took up 'voice.' She was 
fortunate in being able to study 
with Edyth Walker and Paul Ath- 
ens, and a smile played round her 
lips when she recalled the odd jobs 
she worked at during that time to 
help to finance her by no means 
small expenses. 

Amied with a Fulbright scholaa'- 
ship in 1951, Miss Dalis was able 
to study under Otto Muellei- in 
Milan. Later, the famous di'amatic 
soprano, Martha Moedl, hearing 
her sing at a student perfonnance, 
arranged for an audition with the 
director of the Opera Company at 
Oldenburg, Gennany. Irene was 
immediately engaged as the lead- 
ing mezzo-soprano for the follow- 
ing season and made her operatic 
debut there in August, 1953 as 
Princess Eboli in Verdi's "Don Car- 
los." 

Berlin heai-d of this new Ameri- 
can star and as soon as the Olden- 
burg contract allowed, she was en- 
gaged by the Berlin Staedtischer 
Opera where today she is the lead- 
ing mezzo-soprano. Mr. Rudolf 



Bing of the Metropolitan, by ai 
rangement with the Berhn com 
pany. was quick to secure her tal 
ent. Her curtain call reception a 
the "Met. " as Princess Eboli wa 
described by the New Yorker 
"a frenzied ovation." 

The wide range of her reper 
toire includes Azucena. Ortnjt 
Dorabella. Erda, Lady Macbeth 
Brangaene and Amneris. It was ii 
this last role that she sang beta 
Queen Elizabeth duiing the cele 
brations of the 100th aimiversar 
of Covent Garden in June of las 
year. 




Son Fran 



Miss Dalis considers herself a 
humble custodian of a gift to be 
shared by all who have the oppor- 
tunity to hear her sing. It is in this 
sense that she devotes her life to 
this most exacting professi( 
There is no resting on laurels al- 
ready won nor is there room for 
over-confidence: but there is the 
joy of giving pleasure in artistic 
expression to the utmost of a s: 
er's ability. San Franciscans are 
justly proud of this native Cali- 
fornia daughter whose simiptuous 
voice and operatic intei-pretation 
make critics exclaim "e.xcitin 
"brilliant." "color and fire." "beau- 
ty of tone and a noble style." 

The near future takes Miss Dalis 
back to Berlin, the Metropolitan 
and Covent Garden with carefully 
spaced guest appearances in other 
parts of the world. Wherever she 
appears though, witli stage staffs 
talking in foreign tongues, 
thought will occur as it did when 
she stepped out of the plane on 
landing in San Francisco, "Here 
am at home." 



THE RECORD 



A Back-Stage View of 
California Politics 

by William Sparke 



Vilh increasing momentum. 
C ifoina's 1958 political rocket 
ps into orbit, can-ying with it 
t fate of numerous candidates 
f office, including those of Gov- 
eior and U. S. State Senator, as 
vll as eighteen statewide ballot 
ppositions. 

Dn November 4, Election Day, 
V the people, uill have to decide 
\ K-h of these will ride success- 
f l\- upon a star and how many 
', I ha\e to be brought back down 
t .11 th again. 
n the meantime, as we gaze 
■ n ihe travellers in this year's 
''ifi'il junket, and wait for the 
l''Cision. We are likely to be 
by a swelling galaxy of 
^n speeches on radio and 
I k billboard slogans and 
< propaganda fireworks in 
spapers and magazines, 
we see a political candl- 
TV or read about him in 
~s. the chances are that his 
nee in facsimile or in print 
the result of a carefully 
1 plan blueprinted by a po- 
liublic relations campaign 
--' nient agency. 
.Su. h organizations make careers 
t of presenting political candi- 
tes :ind ballot propositions to 
e jH-ople in the most favorable 
;ht po.ssible. They think in terms 
aixertising in the popular press 
W'W as in labor and minority 
ihhi ations. They must plan the 
>u- and when of radio and TV 
■ot.'!. They must think in terms of 
'Id riperations at the grass roots 
vel. forming committees and win- 
np endorsements. They need to 
ive at their fingertips all the 
laetaal "know-how" of the de\d- 
is u a>'s of politics. 
In leeent years, political public 
laiion.s firms have multiplied in 
inii"is to meet increasing politi- 
il lieinands intensified by CaU- 
jmia's penchant for direct legis- 
ition through the use of the initi- 
tive. the referendum and the re- 
all. In each of these instances a 
roposed political move is put di- 
,ectl,\- to the electorate for a vote 
astead of being sifted through 
ommittees in the California Leg- 
ilatuie. 
Ont e upon a time, the political 
rena of California was the prov- 
lee of the ward leader or "boss" 
.■ho 1 eieived his patronage and fa- 
01.'; from loyal followers whom 



he knew and who knew him. To- 
day, bossism in Califoma is prac- 
tically dead — killed by gigantic 
migrations into the state of inde- 
pendent non-partisan voters who 
rarely have the name of their next 
door neighbor, never mind the 
friendship of the political ward 
leader. Too, the rapid growth and 
influence of mass commimication 
media have helped bring about a 
radical change in the conduct of 
political tilts. PoUticians and inter- 
est groups have become increas- 
ingly aware of the success of the 
skills and techniques used by com- 
mercial advertising agencies to 
niove millions of dollars worth of 
merchandise. They rightly feel that 
advertising techniques designed to 
help men and women make up 
their minds which brand of soap 
to buy, can be successfully em- 
ployed to pei-suade voters which 
way to vote. 

Advancing technological com- 
plexities of mass media machin- 
eiy have made poUtical communi- 
cation a highly specialized field. 
This factor, along with the rising 
costs of printing, displa.v and TV 
advertising have forced the poli- 
tician to become increasingly de- 
pendent on the services of compe- 
tent public relations coimsel. 

An experienced political public 
relations firm will save money for 
its client by supervising e.xpendi- 
tui'es of campaign funds and see- 
ing that every doUai- spent gets a 
dollar's worth of propaganda im- 
pact. Thus the budget is not wasted 
in dii-ections which don't pay off. 
politically. 

When hired by a candidate for 
office, political PR firms rarely re- 
main mere advertising technicians. 
More often than not, they shoulder 
a policy-making role and manage 
their client's activities veiy much 
like a theatrical agent handles the 
career of an actor. Besides han- 
dling printed publicity, they ar- 
range TV appearances, grant in- 
terviews uith the press and sec 
that the candidate lives up to the 
character given him by a carefully 
prepared build-up. 

The biggest difference, however, 
between the program put into 
force by the poUtical advertising 
expert and the progi'am operated 
by commercial and industrial con- 
cerns lies in the "degi'ee of suc- 
cess" factor. If a commercial cam- 



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Phone UlVderhiU 3-2288 
248 Oak Street San Francisco 

SONOMA WINE CO. 

LIQUORS FOR PEOPLE OF PARTICULAR TASTE 

WE CARRY ALL THE BEST LIQUORS 

Thoroughly Aged! 

Scotch. Rye. Bourbon, Gin — Only the Best 

Phone LA. 5-6775 

1533 Solano Avenue Berkeley, Calif. 

KINKADE BRAKE SERVICE 

Wheel Aligning - Balancing 
ED KINKADE, Owner 

241 Tenth Street 

HEmlock 1-1234 San Francisco 5 

BRICKER & SON SERVICE 

WE CAN FIX 'EM 
Towing Service and Repairs - Used Auto Parts 

24-Hr. Tow Service 

370 Bayshore Blvd. 

VAIencia 4-1210 - 4-1289 San Francisco, Calif. 



West Lake Insurance Agency, Inc. 

"All Forms of Insurance" 
301 South Mavfair Ave. Daly Gtv, Calif. 



EPTEMBER, 1958 



paign succeeds in capturing three 
per cent of the market it might be 
applauded a winner. In the politi- 
cal field, however, a campaign is 
invariably a dead loss unless its 
candidate is a success. 

All political PR fii-ms must face 
this disturbing fact. They are free 
to accept or reject a client. But 
once a campaign is initiated, a 
public relations agency must pit 
its skills and resources against 
similar assets held by the cam- 
paign manager in the opposite 
camp. T h e r e's no "p 1 a c e" or 
"show" they've got to win. 

If the choice of a candidate is a 
poor one. skills are second rate, 
timing not quite light, budget 
skimpy or misused, then defeat at 
the polls is courted. 

But whatever combination of 
causes brings about defeat, retri- 
bution comes sv/iftly in loss of 
prestige. Losing too many cam- 
paigns may put a firm out of busi- 
ness since clients prefer a winner 
and are inclined to hire an organ- 
ization which has a reputation for 
victories at the polls. 

Only the skillful, the lucky per- 
haps, and the aggressive who 
habitually bite off just as niuch aa 
they can chew can survive in this 
dog-eat-dog arena. Continuing suc- 
cess however, brings with it big- 
ger assignments, wealthier, more 
important clients, a swelling bank 
account and immeasurable politi- 
cal influence. 

Such has been the record of the 
eminently successful San Fran- 
cisco PR firm of Whitaker and 
Baxter, Canipaigns, Inc. This or- 
ganization is undoubtedly the most 
experienced and influential cam- 
paign management firm in Cali- 
fornia. By national standards, it 
has been acknowledged by the 
Public Relations Journal to be 
"the first campaign management 
firm; and they are by all odds the 









p^ 


^2« 
..'.1?^ 


H^ 



4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 

> Alio, Son Francisco and Ignacio. Calif. 



acknowledged leaders in their 
field." 

A detailed chronicle of Whitaker 
and Baxter victories would be long, 
but even in capsule form, the rec- 
ord speaks for itself. Since 1933 
when the talented twosome of 
Leone Baxter and Clem Whitaker. 
Sr.. first teamed up to defeat a ref- 
erendum sought by the PG&E, 
they have been ninety-eight per 
cent successful in waging some 
seventy-nine political campaigns. 

They have elected two Governors 
of Califoi*nia, several lieutenant 
governors and a flock of lesser of- 
ficials. They have handed out de- 
feats to most of the freak political 
schemes which have characterized 
California politics in past decades 
and they have waged a successful 
three-and-a-half-year, close to five- 
million-dollar campaign, on behalf 
of the American Medical Associ- 
ation, to defeat a national health 
insurance plan backed by Presi- 
dent Harry Truman. 

Leone Baxter and Clem Whit- 
aker were the first publicists to 
foresee the trenaendous political 
advantages of lobbying the elec- 
torate instead of the legislators in 
Sacramento. And thus they origi- 
nated the logical idea of using the 
tremendous possibilities offered by 
the mass media to present a candi- 
date or an issue to the electorate 
in the most favorable light pos- 
sible. As Miss Baxter once re- 
marked at a public relations con- 
ference in Tulane University, "Our 
conception of practical politics is 
that if you have a sound enough 
case to convince the folks back 
home, you don't have to buttonhole 
the Senator. He will hear from 
home and he is prone to respect 
very highly the opinions he gets 
from that quarter. 

Over the past 25 years, the 
Whitaker and Baxter conceived 
method of political campaigning 
has been the object of study, 
adaptation and use by a mush- 
rooming number of campaign man- 
agement firms throughout the na- 
tion. 

In this campaign year in Cali- 
fornia, many San Francisco adver- 
tising agencies and public rela- 
tions firms udth a flair for poli- 
tics are working to elect candi- 
dates, float bond issues or urge 
passage or defeat of ballot propo- 
-sitions. 

Among these are: Whitaker and 
Baxter, Campaigns Inc.; Harry 
Lerner & Associates; McKinney 
Associates; Gross and Roberts; 
Howard G. Hanvey, Advertising; 
Howard Freeman; Lykke- Wilkin & 
Associates; D. V. Nicholson & As- 
sociates; Duncan Rowan and 
Woods. 



Report on Record Tour 

Bear State Mayors Come 
to the Tower of London 



by Milo Johnsoi 



The California Mayors have re- 
turned from a vei*y successful 
Goodwill Tour of Europe with a 
much better understanding of the 
problems that are faced by their 
contemporaries, problems that 
parallel their own, namely that of 
building for the future. 

The Mayors were received 
throughout Europe with genuine 
enthusiasm by people who have 
done a remarkable job in a fev.'' 
short years of rebuilding cities 
that were ci-ushed under the heels 
of power mad militarists. 



world, the British Crown jewel 
The Mayors' visit to the Towi 
was covered by Europe's Holida 
Magazine. After three days 
sightseeing in London, they boan 
ed a plane for Brussels. 

In Brussels they were welcome 
by Mayor L. Coormans at th 
magnificent old city hall or 
Grande Place, the most beautifi 
square in Europe. After the oCficis 
reception they were escorted t 
the World's Fair in the suburb c 
Wemmel. where they were we 
corned at the Eagle Room of tti 




n lleft] and Mllo Johnson with beefeater 



In London they were gi'eeted 
personally by the Lord Mayor, Sir 
Dennis Truscott, who welcomed 
them to Europe and especially to 
the great City of London. After 
an official reception at the historic 
Mansion House, his official resi- 
dence, our Mayors were escorted 
to the Houses of Parliament where 
they met a number of England's 
law makers. An account of their 
visit was carried in the London 
Times, England's top newspaper. 
They paid a visit to Buckingham 
Palace where they witnessed the 
impressive ceremony of the chang- 
ing of the guard, and to the Tower 
of London, where the "Beefeatere" 
gave special attention to the 
gj'oup. Here they saw the greatest 
collection of precious gems in the 



United States Pavilion by 
U. S. officials of the Fair. 

The U. S. Pa\'ilion at the fai 
presents a well planned e.xhibil o 
American culture cleverly c 
bined with tokens of scientific ad 
vancement. It contains an ulln 
modem theater where plays, boti 
old and new ai"e presented in th. 
breathtaking splendor of scientifl 
lighting achievement. The Mayor 
were treated to their first glimp 
of "Circ6irama' where one is place, 
in the center of the action, com 
pletely sun-ounded by motion pic 
tures which create an illusion o 
"on the spot" participation, 
only thing left to the imaginatio) 
is the smell of the vegetation. 

A trip throYigh the Russian ex 
hibit, which is right next do 



THE RECORI 




: u r e d their advancement in 

niks. The walls are hung with 

ips of Russia's industrial 

' steel mills, and locomotive 

There are stacks of pamph- 

t'very display, most all of 

[I Tinted in English. 

Mile on the overhead trams is 

•spectacular after dark be- 

>i t.ie View of the brilliant 

ition of the World's Fair. 

- the most thrilling thing is 

laurant atop the atomium 

liich the entire city may be 



A I aiiy morning flight took the 
!.i m:,- to Amsterdam, where they 
xpeiienced their first fall of rain, 
[owever. it cleared by mid-mom- 
^^ and they visited the Royal Pal- 
n-i Coronation Hall. They 
the Rijksmuseuni to see 
;•■ (--ollection of Rembrandt's 
iamtings. Lunch was provided at 
[he famous Five Flies Restaurant 
'■■hpit- the Mayor and other digni- 
. ere our guests. The Mayor 
* -d us that the principal 
;<>'.■- •>( transportation in the city 
.a.s bicycles. He stated that there 
\er.- five thousand cows and five 
housand bicycles within the city 
nnu- one bicycle for each cow. 
R' turning to Brussels by a late 
ill.' our Mayors enjoyed a good 
uLjiit s rest. In the morning they 
'. '1 their motor toui- of the 
' nt crossing Belgium to 
II in Germany, the place se- 
• ; ii>' Emperor Charlemagne in 
Ml. I i-hth centm->- as the capital 
<i i;.s Holy Roman Empire. Fol- 
lowing the Rhine, they stopped at 
Koniss^^'inter. beautifully situated 
beneath the seven mountains 
uh.!>- Valkyiies sang. Across the 
tiv. ! lay Bonn, the capitol of the 
^Vtv^• I leniian Republic. Hen* Hein- 
n< n Reingen. Mayor of Konigs- 
■in'. I was guest of honor at din- 
nei A male chorus of fifty voices 



oirport 



sang German songs throughout 
the evening. 

Continuing along the Rhine past 
the many hill top castles of the 
Robber Barons who extracted toll 
from the river traffic by stretch- 
ing chains across the river, our 
Mayors arrived at the little town 
of Eberbach where Herr Herman 
Scheiser. Mayor of the town was 
guest for the evening. 

It may be significant to note 
here that in eveiy city and at every 
hotel where the Mayors stopped, 
the American flag was flying from 
the top of the city halls and the 
masts of the hotels, a silent tribute 
to the people of the United States. 

In the morning Mayor Scheiser 
returned to the hotel to conduct 
personally a shoi't sightseeing trip 
through the beautiful hills that 
surround Eberbach. 

In Munich they were welcomed 
with a reception given by Hen- 
Thomas Wimmer, Oberburgemieis- 
ter. at the town hall on Marien 
Platz. after which they were taken 
to the Hofbrauhaus. the mosts fa- 
mous of Munich's fine beer halls. 
The following moiTiing they took a 
side trip through the lovely coun- 
trv'side of Austria to Salzburg 
where lunch was provided at the 
famous Cafe Winkler, retuniing to 
Munich via the Eagle's Nest, 
where Hitler dreamed of his Third 
Reich. 

Leaving Munich, they continued 
south along Stamberger Lake to- 
wards the Alps and Garmisch-Par- 
tenkirchen beneath the Zugspitze, 
highest mountain in Germany. The 
motor coach then climbed to the 
peaks of the Kai'wendal Range 
with its breathtaking views, to 
Mittenwald, famous for its \iolin 
industry. They then descended m 
dizzying spirals to Innsbruck, 
capital of Emperor Maximilian 
and on to the little town of Bol- 



zano in Italy, where they were wel- 
comed by the Mayor of Bolzano at 
the town hall. 

Continuing through the most 
spectacular mountain scener>' of 
the Dolomites, past the Emerald 
Lake of Carazza to Cortina D'Am- 
pezzo. Winter Olympics Sports 
Center, they descended into the 
Venetian Marches to the causeway 
into Venice, where motor boats 
took them to the Bauer Gnmwald 
Hotel situated on the Grand Canal. 
The Mayors were welcomed to 
Venice with a reception given by 
Mayor Roberto Tognozzi. and in 
the evening were serenaded by 
gondoliers. Leaving the City of 
Canals the Mayors proceeded to 
Padua where they visited the 
Shrine of St. Anthony, then across 
the Po Valley to San Vitale where 
they inspected the finest mosaics 
in the world dating from the 8th 
centurj'. They continued on to the 
incredible mountain top republic 




Hoiv ivell 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




Even most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still 6nd a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 




44 FOURTH STREET 
VUkon 6-4000 



ceived at a reception in the Capitol 
building given by the Vice Mayor. 
Count Paoli La Torre. This was 
followed by a \isit to the Villa Ma 
donna where by special arrange- 
ment a welcoming reception by the 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs was 
(Continued on Page 22) 



of San Marino, the oldest republic 
in the world. 

The Mayors were presented by 
the two Captains Regents v/ith 
scrolls and medals, and welcomed 
to San Marino by Professor Bigi 
after which an elaborate reception 
was provided by this little Repub- 
lic. 

With grateful feeling of good- 
will, the Mayors left San Marino 
and descended to the Valley of the 
Tiber, where the Umbrella pines 
dot the landscape approaching the 
great City of Rome. 

The Mayors paid visits to several 
of the gi-eat Churches in Rome 
highlighted by St. Peter's Cathe- 
dral in the Vatican. A reception 
was given by the Italian National 
Tourist office on Via Marghera. 
showing the latest documentary 
films of Italy. They were then re- 




Guard at Buckinghi 



SEPTEMBER, l%8 



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Groceries - Beer - Wines - Liquors 
3101 - 24th STREET 



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Contracting Plasterers 



2155 TURK STREET 



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DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 

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751 Howard Street San Francisco 

KELLBERG, PAQUETTE & MAURER 

Structural Engineers 

417 Market Street San Francisco 

GENEREAUX & HANSEN 
Robert Dollar Bldg. San Francisco 

SILVER DOLLAR TAVERN 

BOB THOMPSON 



64 Eddy Street 



YUkon 6-4796 



DAN REGAN CHEVRON SERVICE 

Greets the City Employees 

4801 Lincoln Way 

Ryan's 10 Service Signal Oil Products 

Open 24 Hours 

We give Ryan's extra dividend coupons 

SOUTH VAN NESS & 16th STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



Memo for Leisure 



England's fanied Old Vic Com- 
pany is appearing for the first 
time in a season of Shakespeare 
repertory beginning September 16 
at the Curran Theatre. The com- 
pany, which scored a phenomenal 
success on its last visit to the 
United States in the 1956-57 sea- 
son, will arrive here after a series 
of brilliant performances at the 
International Theatre Festival in 
Paris, the Brussels World Fair and 
the Edinburgh Festival. 

The repertorj' consists of three 
productions which have all been 
outstanding successes during their 
i-uns at the Old Vic in London. 
They are "Haralet," "Twelfth 
Night" and "Henr>' V" — possibly 
the most popular, and representa- 
tive of the whole Shakespeare 
foUo, embodying tragedy, comedy 
and historj'. 

"Hamlet" opens the engagement 
and will play the entire week of 
September 16 — plus two perfor- 
mances during the second week on 
the 26th and 27th — with an extra 
matinee on Friday, September 
19th, along with the Wednesday 
and Satm-day matinees. "Hamlet" 
has more than a hundred perfor- 
mances to its credit, having plaj'ed 
to capacity houses throughout the 
whole of the past season in Lon- 
don. John Neville's perfoiTnance in 
the title role won cheers from 
audiences in Paris and Brussels. 

"Twelfth Night," which opens on 
September 22nd and runs for five 
performances, through September 
25th. also foiTned pai"t of the 1957- 
58 season in London. It was hailed 
there as one of the outstanding 
successes of the Company and was 
also performed at the Edinburgh 
Festival just before the troupe's 
departure for the United States. 

"Henry V" opens September 
29th for eight perfoi-mances and 
completes the repertory. It is 
probably the greatest and best- 
loved of all history plays. This 
production was first seen in Lon- 
don during the Company's 1955-56 
season, and its great popularity 
then made it an obvious choice for 
inclusion in the forthcoming tour. 

All three plays are directed by 
Michael Benthall. Barbai-a Jefford 
who has just completed her second 
season with the Old Vic Company, 
will be seen as Ophelia in "Ham- 
let" and as Viola in "Twelfth 
Night." Mr. Neville will turn from 
the tragedy of Hamlet to the slow- 
witted naivete of Sir Andrew 
Aguecheek in the enchanting 



"Twelfth Night." Laurence Har 
vey, well known to morte audi 
ences, will play the starring roli 
of Henry V. No s tr a n g e r ti 
Shakespeare, Mr, Har\'ey playc 
for two seasons with great succes: 
at the Shakespeare Memorial The 
atre at Stratford-on-Avon. 

The 36th annual season of thi 
San Francisco Opera opened will 
the American stage premiere o 
the classical opera "Medea" b; 
Chei-ubini. Heretofore heard in thi 
United States only in a conceri 
version. "Medea" based on Euri' 
pides' powerful drama has beer 
widely acclaimed since its reviva 
in the 1953 May Festival at Flor 
ence. The role of Medea is playec 
by Eileen Farrell. and Jason b; 
Richard Lewis. 




Courtenay 



Another highlight of this season 
is the combined offering in one 
evening of "The Wise Maiden" and 
"Camiina Bui-ana" by Carl Oi-ff. 
whose importance as a contempo- 
raiy composer is well estabhshed. 
Also, in recognition of many re- 
quests, "Don Carlo," one of Verdi's 
masterpieces, will be perfomied 
for the flret time by the company. 

There will be new stage settings 
for "The Bartered Bride." by Snie- 
tana, and for "La Boheme," the 
latter in obsen'ance of the centen- 
nial of Puccini's birth. 

In addition to the regular sub- 
scription series, there will be Sat- 
urday and Thursday evening per- 
formances. The season in San 
Francisco will conclude with "The 
Marriage of Figaro" on October 23 
Such familiar works as "La Bo- 
heme" and "II Trovatore" are 
eluded in the program in addition 
to new offerings mentioned above. 



THE RECORD 



An OH-Beat Excursion 
Into Caliiorniu^s Past 

by Whit Henry 




An :iltogether charming: and de- 
htful stopping place near Santa 
uz IS the Bay View Hotel in Ap- 
s Aptos is south of Santa Cruz 

th.' road towards Watsonville. 
If hiilel is not visible from the 
■tn>.:i\-. so don't be in too much 

H hurry if you start hunting 
f it I discovered it quite by acci- 
nt while on a Sunday drive, and 
ve been recommending it to 
lends ever since. 
Fled and Elma Toney are the 
teipiising couple that operate 
IS establishment that brings 
' I; ineiiiories of bygone days in 
idii. rnia. And both of them have 
m'-- in California; they were bom 

-^ptos. Mr. Toney's father was 
e depot agent there for the 
>iithern Pacific. Mrs. Toney's 
thei was bom in a covered 
agon as it was coming over the 
oniifi Pass to the Santa Clara 

■dlr-,' 

Tlii \ do no advertising and there 

e nil .signs on the highway to 
:iii tile motoring public to their 

ii.'i , Init on Sunday afternoons 
?ople swarm there to partake of 
le well cooked and well sei-ved 
leals Many of their regular pa- 
■ons are from San Francisco, who 
nd It no chore to drive down for 

plesant Sunday dinner in a quiet. 
;stful atmosphere. There is no 
ar in the restaurant and no alco- 
olic beverages are seiA'ed. 

Three charming daughters as- 
ist the Toneys in the operation of 
he establishment and they in turn 
ften enlist their husbands in 
arn-ing on the many details of 
unnin^ a successful hosteliy. 

Tile original Bay View Hotel 
.as hiiilt in 1870 by Joseph Arano. 



stayed he 



a French immigrant who married 
Augusta, .youngest daughter of 
General Rafael Castro, owner of 6,- 
680 acre Rancho Aptos by grant 
from Mexican Governor Figueroa 
in 1833. 

Tradition has it that Mr. Arano 
examined every board in this build- 
ing. The sturdy but exquisite fur- 
niture he chose is still in daily use. 

Popular with wealthy and 
prominent people for over 40 years, 
it numbered among its guests Lil- 
lian Russell, King Kalakaua and 
many distingiiished European visi- 
tors. It also became the village 
center, as it housed for a time Mr. 
Arano's gi-ocerj- and the Aptos 
Post Office. But with the lumber 
country logged out. railroad activ- 
ity curtailed, and the coimtiy in 
the grip of war. it went out of 
business before the end of World 
War I. 

Fred Toney purchased the long 
idle hotel in 1944. The extensive 
service wing had been destroyed 
by fire in 1929. but the main build- 
ing was intact. Ignoring the warn- 
ings of professional house movers 
that the job was impossible, Fred 
and a crew of Aptos men moved 
the hotel from its original site on 
the old highway to its present lo- 
cation, some 500 feet distant. 

The commodes and kerosene 
lamps were replaced with modem 
plumbing and electric lights: but 
the antique charm of the high-ceil- 
inged rooms was preserved. The 
four superb marble fireplaces on 
the first floor were not altered, and 
the old jalousies were left on the 
windows. 

Go see for yourself. You will not 
be disappointed. 



ALPINE REST HOME 

Expert Care - Bed • Semi-Bed SC Ambulatory 
Special Diets if Needed - State Licensed 



1152 Alpine Road 



Walnut Creek 



YEUowstone 5-556 



ROYAL TALLOW & SOAP CO., INC. 

of Tallow, Grease and Soap Products 



1260 DAVIDSON AVENUE 
7-8673 San Francisco 24, Calif. 



THOS. THOMASSER 



COSGRA TULA TIONS 

ROGERS ENGINEERING CO., INC. 

16 BEALE STREET 



■VTJkon 6-6546 



San Francisco 



BAYHA, WEIR & FINATO, INC. 

Mechanical & Electrical Engineers 

San Francisco 

CODDINGTON CO- 

355 Stockton Street San Francisco 

CONGRA TULA TIONS 

HAROLD B. HAMMILL 

Civil Consulting Engineer 

417 Market Street 
ALERT DISPLAY, INC. 

Xmas Decorations Items for Do-It-Yourself. 



2089 - 15th Street 



HEmlock 1-2755 



PACIFIC COAST BUILDERS 
1 South Park YUkon 2-4756 



San Francisco 



VERDIE'S BARB 

2420 Clay Street GArfield 1-9405 

San Francisco 1 1, Calif. 



EPTEMBER. 1958 




SPICES - EXTRACTS 

COFFEE - TEA 

INSTANT POTATOES 

GELATINE 

"Products for the flavor 



' family" 

Mccormick & 
company, inc. 

SCHILLING DIVISION 
301 Second Street 



Hamilton Wayne 
Frames 

Custom Picture Framing 
590 PACIFIC AVE. 



AC TV CO. 

When in need of a TV repair, call 
a thoroughly trained technician to 
spot and repair your trouble cor- 
rectly. 

4080 -24th STREET 

VA. 4-6150 



Alexander Mfg. Co. 

Overalls • Sportswear 

TIM JONES 
684 Commercial St. YU 2-2491 



Holy Names 
High School 

4660 HARBOR DR. 
OL 5-1716 Oakland 

Fall Semester Sept. 3, 195S 



NATALEVrS 
FLOWERS 

1415 STOCKTON ST. 
GA. 1-4025 San Francisco 



JIM'S 

DO-NUT SHOPS 

6202 Third St. 
3306 Mission St. 
632 Geneva Ave. 



THEOOORE Y. TRONOFF 

Civil Engineer 8C Surveyor 
Subdhhious - Tracts - Lots 
Boundaries and Contours 

Two Offices to Serve You 

1617 University Ave., Berkeley 
TH. 3-4242 

345 Park Plaza Dr., Daly City 

PL. 5-7144 



COKESBURY 
BOOK STORE 

85 MsALLISTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



GEORGE E. CHASE 
& ASSOCIATES 

Insurance Adjusters 

114 SANSOME STREET 
GA 1-1277 



STATE FARM INSURANCE 

Auto - Life ■ Fire 

Dillon C. Gracy 
Jacob A. Mummert 

1326 OCEAN AVE. 
JU. 5-6960 



One of San Francisco's Finest 
Restaurants 

U Trianon Reslaiirant 
Francais 

2420 O'FARRELL ST. 



GEORGE RANGAVES 
Booh Binding 

500 SANSOME STREET 
EXhrook 2-6443 



Books 

MEN AND MISSILES 

by Jane Rawson 

WAR AISD PEACE IX THE 
SPACE AGE 

By Lt. Gen. James M. Gavin 
Harper — $5.00 

As a professional soldier. Gen- 
eral Gavin has oriented his whole 
life towards the defense of the free 
men of this countrj' and their 
established institutions. His pur- 
pose in writing this book is to lay 
before the public his views about 
the present state of our national 
defense program. 

Since the launching by the 
USSR of Sputnik I, we are used to 
reading striking statements and 
deeply concerned criticisms. Gen- 
eral Gavin 's book is much more 
than a further addition to this fab- 
ric of worried and excited com- 
ment. It goes much more incisively 
into the reader's consciousness, 
and has a profoundly stimulating 
effect. 

For General Gavin is an Irish- 
man and a poet at heart, and as 
well as furnishing us with an ob- 
jective analysis of our defenses, 
the author has written an auto- 
biography enshrining a stirring 
personal credo. We see the sensi- 
tive boy, orphaned at two years 
old, growing up in the family of a 
hard working, godfearing coal 
miner in Permsylvania. We detect 
a certain basic compatibility be- 
tween the future thoughtful com- 
batant and the motherly disciplin- 
arian whose methods combined 
saintly invocations uith vigorous 
lambas tings. 

James Gavin grew up with a 
fierce desire for a first class edu- 
cation. With much determination 
he finally managed to enter West 
Point, and because of his limited 
background his years there were 
to make a veiy lasting imprint. 

Now General Gavin has left the 
army, because he feels outspoken 
criticism is necessaiy. The criti- 
cism is contained in the later chap- 
ters of this book. 

The reader comes to the final 
page with a great deal of regret, 
for he has had a delightful e.\pe- 
rience in reading. He has added to 
his portrait gallery one of the most 
engaging personalities ever en- 
countered in the armed services. 
He has gained a clear view of the 
range of the problems which face 
those responsible for our defenses 
in what General Gavin calls "The 
Decade of Decision, 1955-56." 



Wiith Bio.^. 
Pastry Shop 

Geary at 23rd Avenue 
San Francisco 21, Calif. 



BAY CITIES 

NEON 

761 VALENCIA ST. 
San Francisco 



Res. JU. 7-2145 Free DeVne 

Garnero's Groceteria 

Finest of Groceries 
"At the Right Price" 
544 Excelsior Ave. JU. 4-999? 

At Cor. Naples San Francisc 



B.K.E. Inc. 

British 4 Continental 

Auto Parts SC .Accessories 

1828 Market St. UN 3-7220 



Special Attention to City Employee.' 

FRANCES A. RUSSELL 

Realtor 



Member M.L.S. GR 4-4232 
2545 VAN NESS AVE. 



Welder's Union No. 1330 

International .-Vssn. of Machir 

Work. Vote & Fight Against the 
Right to Scab Lan 

Pete Taylor 24-0 - I'lh St. 



Reverend Joseph Poii;^h 

1739 HLLMORE ST. 
San Francisco, Cilif. 



NORIEGA MEAT CO. 

Quality Meats - Rcason.-ibic Pric 
Wholesale & Retail 

3815 Noriega St. LO 6-.SS21 



REX'S RESTAURANT 

Brcikt.i.'it - Lunch • Sii.icks 
pDuntain Service 

,'^01 OTarrell St. 



Allevons Inc. 

Restaurant 

H..USC of QUALITY Fo„ds 

154 McAllister st. 

MA. 1-772^ 



Fung Loy 

RESTAURANT 
CHINESE FOOD 

'- n 7 AM I.. ; A M Ilailv 

except Th.jisJ.iv 
lu.e Btun.-h (Dim SunI scrvej 

until : P.M. 
ORDERS TO TAKE OUT 
sutler 1-7899 San Francisco 

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Phone lUiiiper 4-4121 

BAYSIDE MOTEL 



^.■dli■<^ Enclosed SwimniinB Pool 
Approved Spacious Quiet Grounds 

IN SAN FRANCISCO 

OVERLOOKING B.'VY 
i.ivihore Blvd.. at Hester, nr. 3rd St. 

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Company 

Onh Aulliori;cJ National Cash 
Regiiler Office in the Cily 

S.ALES - SERVICE - SUPPLIES 

— Mi>sion Street SU. 1-2782 



DEAN'S 
BEAUTY SALON 

BEAUTY CULTURE 
IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 

See Hummel 

4691 TELEGRAPH 

Oakland OL. 5-0336 

HILL & CO. 
— Realtors — 

2107 UNION STREET 
WAlnut 1-3040 
San Francisco 



RICKMAN-LEE CO. 

A Complete Service 

Alterations ■ Remodeling 

Old Homes Out Specially 

4"84 MISSION STREET 

JU. 6-28"8 



Yukon Hotel 

2 5" - 5rd Street 

Atlantic Hotel 

226 - 6th Street 

Park Hotel 

1040 Folsom Street 



He also has a sense of home- 
coming to solid earth when he 
finds that General Gavin's solu- 
tions lie ultimately, not in wea- 
pons, but in philosophy: "It is 
time we took counsel, not from 
our fear of communism, but from 
our aspirations and the promise 
of democracy. Our country will 
never be truly secure until our peo- 
ple hold clear convictions on some 
fundamental issues, and hold them 
closely and fiercely. Among these 
con\'1ctions should be a respect for 
the ti-uth; a belief in the dignity of 
the individual; a belief in govern- 
ment by law, not by men; a belief 
in honesty and fair play, among 
nations as well as individuals; a 
belief in man's right to worship 
freely, and to climb as high as his 
talents will lift him and his am- 
bitions drive him. held within the 
bounds of consideration for others 
and the knowledge that the com- 
mon good must be sei-ved above all 
else." 

It is the general's convinced be- 
lief that only in so far as our val- 
ues are sound will our defense 
policies and weapons be effective. 

AIR FORCE REPORT ON 
THE BALLISTIC MISSILE 

Edited by Lt. Col. 
Kenneth F. Gantz 

Doubleday : .$4.00 

The reader, interested in our de- 
fenses and looking for accurate, 
detailed, and up-to-the-minute in- 
foi-mation about ballistic missiles, 
would be well-advised to study 
these contributions by high-rank- 
ing officers in charge of the Air 
Force missile progi-am. 

The Thor. Atlas and Titan are 
described and explained. There is 
discussion of the tvpe of men, 
training and equipment required 
for handling these weapons, includ- 
ing an account of the part played 
by the flight surgeon in investigat- 
ing man's reactions in the upper 
atmosphere and outer space. 

The book is technical, but very 
clearly wi'itten, comprehensive, 
and well illustrated. It is especially 
helpful to the intelligent reader 
who wishes to gain reliable insights 
into our complex, present-day 
weapons, and it has the advan- 
tage of an excellent glossai-y of 
the technological terms daily be- 
coming more and more essential to 
our vocabulary. 



Miii« Tree Rfslaiiranl 

Chinese American Food 

Food Delivered 

Open 7 Days a Week 

1508 MARKET ST. 
UN. 3-6955 



Congratulations 

A. ABBOTT HANKS, INC. 

"Oldest Testing Laboratory in the United States" 
Operated for 92 years in Cahfornia 

Inspection and Testing Engineeiing 

624 Sacramento Street G.\. 1-1697 



Congratulations Public Work Edition 

DAMES & MOORE 

Soil Mechanics Engineers 
340 MARKET STREET 

SVERDRIIP & PARCEL, 
INC. 

Engineers AR 
417 Montgomery EXbrook 2-8927 

ROBERT C. KIRKWOOD 

CONTROLLER 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA 

Represented by Hugo P. Correll - Leslie W, Irving 

220 BANK OF AMERICA BLDG. 
John Ober — Oakland 

RED\^ OOD CITY NURSERY 

Cameleas, Roses, Azaleas, Bedding Plants 

Lawn Seeds, Flowering, Shade 8C Fruit Trees 

Garden Needs, Bulbs, Fertilizers and Insecticides 



2710 El Camino Real 



EM. 8-0357 



FREDERICK'S PAINT SHOP 
625 - 18th Street Mission 7-9933 

CHINA INN RESTAURANT 
4117 - 18th Street San Francisco 



EPTEMBER, I9S'8 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 

ED VINSON 

CHEVRON SERVICE STATION 

For Real Service. Courteous - Dependable. 

1695 EL CAMINO REAL SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 

THADDEUS JOHNSON PORTER SERVICE 
San Francisco International Airport 

■Righl to Work is a Fraud-it Means Right to Wreck" 

BUTCHERS UNION LOCAL 115 
OF SAN FRANQSCO 

W. O. (BILL) DUFFY 

Notary Public 

3410 - 25th Street AT. 2-4151 



lOODin (BUTTLE 



Pumps for every service — Goulds - Roper - Submersibles. Wade Rain Irrigation. 
80 Elmira St., San Frandjco 24, Calif. JU. 6-6500 

Congratulations to S. F. Public Works Department 

ARTHUR C. JENKINS 

Utility Engineer— Transportation, Traffic & Transit 
1095 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

MISSION PRESCRIPTION PHARMACY 

PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS 

598 Guerrero Street UNderhill 1-1518 

S. S. AUTO RECONSTRUCTION 

Complete Automotive Reconstruction 

830 Larkin Street PRospect 6-3023 

JOHN L. HUNTER 

Consulting Civil Engineer 

960 Harrison Street San Francisco 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 

WOMEN IN PUBLIC LIFE 

With women playing ever more 
important parts in public life, one 
of the problems they have to re- 
solve is how to retain feminine 
charm and at the same time be 
sufficiently aggressive to keep a 
larg:e meeting in order. 

International Toast mistress 
Clubs are dedicated to meeting 
this challenge to the perfect secre- 
tary or the enchanting lady execu- 
tive. Courses are available for each 
member, which will give her poise, 
attractiveness and self-confidence. 
At the same time she is trained in 
effective public speaking and in 
the handling of meetings and con- 
ventions. 




Toastmis+i 



A Toastmistress is a friendly, 
well-informed dynamic career 
woman or homemaker, ready to 
take a lead in any valuable com- 
munity service, in a world where 
women are more and more needed 
in leadership. 

The Saint Francis Toastmistress 
Club is about to embark on a Fall 
program in furtherance of its 
aims. It meets second and fourth 
Wednesdays, at the Women's City 
Club, where it is delighted to wel- 
come new members. 

NEW PIKES FOR OLD 
A Pacific Gas and Electric Com- 
pany employee agrees with his 
company's philosophy that a work- 
ing man should have "better tools 
to do a better job." He proceeded 
to develop an improved tool which 
won a $1,000 award under the 
company's suggestion plan. 

R. R. McCamish, now assistant 
general foreman at PG&E's elec- 
tric department seri'ice center in 
Fresno, may make even more 
money from the tool which he in- 



Scrivani Shoe Repair 

Half Soles. Heels 
All Work Done by 
Expert Craftsmen 

3017 MISSION STREET 

Mission 8-3 344 



CHAS. J. GRESEZ CO. 

Realtors 

"Driyein" Parking for ClienK 
2430 Chestnut Street 



TELL HOUSE 

— Liquors — 
MctIs Sen.'ed 

291 SICKLES AVE. 

JU 4-9920 San Francis 



WILLIG FREIGHT 

LINES 
123 Loomis Avenue 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Service Concrete Co. 

Concrete Contractors 

744 Southgate Avenue 
overland 1-9242 
Daly City, Calif. 



Castro Street Garage 

Complete Automotive 
Reconstruction 

557 Castro Street 

UN 1-9368 Coy D. Madsen 



PL\K POOOLL BFAl'TY 
SALON 

2143 Taraval Street 
LO. 4-0575 

Claudius - Val Facn:i 



ACE TRANSFER & 
STORAGE CO. 

LOCAL y LONG 

DISTANCE MOVING 

VA. 6-5088 

?l(iS . 22nd Street 



Nalidiial Association of 
Real Estate Boards 

W illl.ird L. Johnson, Direclor 
22^> KEARN\- STREET 



Dally Car Wash & 



Open daily 9 lo 5 

Sundays 9 to 2 P.M. 

24 J ^ JL'NIPERO SERRA BLVD. 

PL ^-0(l,Sl Daly City 

GELARDI FLORIST 

VI rddings - Corsages - Hospital 
Funeral - Special Arrangements 
I 639 GREEN STREET 

I DO 2-0-58 



TONY'S FOUNTAIN 

Brc.ikf.ist - Lunch • Dinnc 

73 Leland Ave. 

Helen e Tonv McJin.i 



LEE'S TEXACO SERVICE 



Lubrication 
Washing - Tires - Baneries 

3201 - 16th STREET 

UN. 3-9760 



HOWARO M. C. WONG 

\S cMern Life General Insurance 
Established 1939 

835 Clay Street - Room 212 

SUtter 1-4822 



Lincoln Boivl 



Bowling— Free In 

Lanes available for Leagues 

Week-end Pot Games 

Open daily 'till 2 A.M. 

319 - 6th .Ave. SK 1-3939 



TOULOUSE 
L\UNDRY 

821 Lincoln Way 

MO 4-1654 San Francisco 



Golden Valley 
French Laundry 



Lace 
2235 Gr 



tains OUT Specialty 
■ich St. W.A 1-7214 



vented — a hydraulic pike. The pike 
has gained wide acceptance among 
utility companies and is being sold 
in many of the 49 states, and Ha- 
waii. Inquries have come from 
firms in Canada, Puerto Rico, 
Brazil, the Philippines, Japan and 
Australia. 

McCamish started working for 
PG&E in 1920 as a member of a 
line construction crew. For many 
years he wielded a pike which is 
used in setting new power poles 
and replacing or straightening old 
ones The pike, an 18-foot wooden 
pole tipped with a metal spike and 
weighing about 20 pounds, was 
often hard to use in cramped 
places. 

Poles are set in holes with hy- 
draulic derricks and line crew 
members jam pikes into the pole 
to hold it at the proper angle while 
tamping soil firmly aroimd its 
base. The new hydraulically oper- 
ated pike greatly reduces the ef- 
fort required to straighten a heavy 
pole. 

"A very' strong man," McCam- 
ish said, "could push about 200 
pounds with the old pike." It 
would often take the combined ef- 
forts of four men to push a pole to 
the desired position. 

McCamish worked his way up to 
line crew foreman. He began look- 
ing for ways to perform his work 
"more easily, safely and econom- 
ically." He watched his men sweat 
on wooden pike ends and remem- 
bered his days on the end of one. 
He thought of his axiom, "a better 
tool to do a better job," and the 
idea for his hydraulic pike was 
born. 

He worked evenings and week 
ends perfecting its design. When it 
left the drau-ing board and a work- 
ing model was made, it looked like 
a collapsible telescope with a 
metal spike on the "eye" end, and 
a 6 by 5i2-inch metal base on the 
"seeing" end. The pike weighed 28 
pounds, stood five feet tall col- 
lapsed, and six feet-six inches ex- 
panded. 

The pike operates on the SEime 
principle as a hydraulic bumper 
jack. One man operating the pike's 
handle can exert 3,000 pounds push 
on a power pole — 15 times the 
amount of force a strong man can 
exert. The pike is so powerful, it 
would drive itself through the 
tough cedar poles were it not for a 
circular hilt at the base of the 
pike. 

With a pair of the new pikes 
three men instead of the usual four 
can set a new pole in place with 
ease. The fourth man is free to do 
other work. McCamish, an old 
hand at the game, said: "The truck 



CONSUL GENERAL OF ITALY 
2590 Webster Street 

ERICKSON PRODUCTS CO. 

Gill-Spark Arrestos 



I960 CARROLL 



JOHN WORKMAN MEAT DEPT. 
Cashway Market 

868 GEARY STREET GR 4-1778 

TOWING AND STORAGE 

24-Hour Emergency Road Service - Complete Automotive Repairs 

Credit Terms Arranged - Small Monthly Payments 

LEE-MONTY GARAGE 

1023 Mission near Sixth Ernii W. - Monty - Larsen MA. 1-1858 

George L. Erkson Chevron Service 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE 
4801 MISSION STREET JU. 4- 5400 

ST. CHARLES HOTEL 

507 Bush Street GArfield 1-9832 

LISA'S 

Kosher Stvle Restaurant & Delicatessen 

186 EDDY STREET PR 5-6155 

B.L.NISHKIAN - L. H. NISHKIAN 

Consulting Engineers 

1045 SANSOME STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

Congratulations lo S. F. Public R'orks Dept. 

NATIONAL EXPANSION JOINT CO. 
1601 Enibarcadero 

DONUT BOWX 

FRANK FREEMAN 

4605 Geary Blvd. SK 1-6454 

Congratulations on Public Works Edition 
DWIGHT A. CODDINGTON 

L. C. NARGAARD & ASSOCIATES 
Pier 20 - San Francisco 

For Understanding and Dignified Service 

H. F. SUHR CO.,INC. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Oyer Seyenty-five Years of Faithful Service 

Parking Facilities Available 

2919 MISSION STREET Mission 7-1811 



fPTEMBER, 1958 



KLINGER & 
SHAFFER CO. 

Confectionery Equipment 
We buy new and used equipmen 

342 HFTH STREET 

San Francisco 7, Calif. 
Phone YU 2-5697 



T & R 
TRIM SHOP 

Tops - Seal Carers 
Cushions ■ Carpets 

490 Linden Street 

Between Octavia and Laguna 
SAN FRANCISCO 
UNderhill 3-1361 

Tess Morrow - Rich Russell 



Camille's Restaurant 

Nationally known for our fine 
French Cuisine 



For Fraternal, Business Groups, 

Socials, Wedding an Anniversary 

Parties 

447 Pine Street 

SUtter 1-9600 



San Francisco 

Turkish 

Information 

Service 

347 Stockton St. 



The Villa 
Sanitarium 

Joseph Sarto, Director 

130 VALE ST. 
PL 5-0411 Daly City 



Raymond I). Wonj 

Insurance Broker 

fire- • Liabilily ■ Life ■ Aulo 
Western Life Chinese Agency 

734 GRANT AVE. 
GA 1-3975 



PARKER PEN CO. 

278 Post Street 
SU. 1-4809 



'S 



MONADNOCK BLDG. 

San Francisco 



Greetings 

Clifford E. Rishell 

Mayor 
City of Oakland 



AT. 2-2616 

Colan Heating & 
Sheet Metal Co. 

25 Patterson St. 
San Francisco 



Telegraphic Address "Edjohn" Telephone SU. 1-6701 

E. A. JOHNSON & CO. 

GREEN COFtEE 
166 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 11. CALIF. 



driver and I can set any pole a 
derrick can lift." 

The PG&E suggestion plan com- 
mittee estimated the hydraulic 
pike, 80 pairs of which are now 
used by PG&E with 20 more on 
order, would save $10,000 a year. 
It also eliminates the possibility 
of pikes falling or slipping and 
employees injuring their backs 
while using the manual pike. One- 
third of the length of a manual 
pike, the new model can be opei'- 
ated with much greater ease in 
"tight quarters." 

HUNTER SAFETY TRAINING 
Each year avoidable fatalities 
occur in the hunting field. Some- 
times they are caused by over- 
alertness with fireamis, as when 
the inexperienced hunter fails to 
remember in time that a hidden 
movement in trees may be caused 
by a man in a red hat and not by 
a deer, or under-alertness in the 
management of loaded gims. 

To combat these accidents, the 
State Department of Fish and 
Game in 1954 set up a hunter safe- 
ty training program. The Depart- 
ment reports striking success in 
the reduction of casualties, fatali- 
ties dropping from 31 in 1955 to 
14 in 1957. 

111,174 persons had been trained 
under the program by August of 
this year, and in addition to a 
large number of certified hvmter 
safety instructors, 250 secondar>' 
schools offer training. 

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHERS 
Many people are now reviving 
their summer vacations by means 
of photographs. If the results of 
their shuttercraft are disappoint- 
ing, they will be interested to 
note that the Photography Center 
of the San Francisco Recreation 
and Park Department will now be 
open on Sunda.vs from 12:00 noon 
to 5:30 p.m., and more frequently 
than before during the week. 

The center is open to amateur 
photographers only, and while it is 
not a school, it does feature 
"quicltie" courses in basic photo- 
graphic skills, and enables photog- 
raphers to improve between vaca- 
tions. 



The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce, founded in 1850, is the 
oldest organization of its kind in 
the West. 



Rudy's Body & 
Paint Shop 

1I2S STEINER STRFET 

S.in l-r.Mulsco. C.ilif. 



KAYS 
GROCERY 

2.5.5 Precita Ave. 



LA PALMA MARKET 

Mexicatessen - Tortillcria 

Corn and Flour Tortilla.s 

2884 - 24th STREET 

MI. 8-5500 San Francisco, Calif. 

N. and O. Haro 



KING'S MARKET 

Groceries - Fruits - Vegetables 
Beer - Wines - Liquors 

1971 FILLMORE ST. 

JO. 7-8815 



MISSION 
PORK STORE 

3016 - 16th Street 

San Francisco UN. 1-5534 ( 



Frank - Babe 



P. G. Molinari and Sons 

FINE SAUSAGES Since 1896 

373 COLUMBUS .AVENUE 

GA. 1-2337 San Francisco 



Nu-Way Fruit 
Market 

11-5 MARKET STREET 
MA. 1-5385 San Franci 



A-1 Delicatessen 

1430 HAIGHT STREET 
MA. 1-7371 



Stevens Petaluma 
Market 

Fruils — VcgeCablcs. Etc. 
2138 Mission St. M.-\. 1-235- 



Huiis's Market 

1600 LARKIN STREET 
PR. 5-9313 San Francisco 



Washington Square 
Meat Market 

650 LINION STREET 



HANDY 

Fhe Fr.tndir DelicaU-ssen 
Fancy Foods - Wines - Liquors 

1815 IR\1NG STREET 

S.iii l-r.ini-1-.i-o 




CANINE WORLD 
Bi' :iuse of its expressive face, 
e [to. PI lie is one of the most popu- 
r hr.'e<.ls of man's best friend. In 
~ smaller editions — toy poodles 
• t mure than 10 inches high at 
e shoulders and miniatures not 
ore than 15— it appears to pay 
■ave attention to matters of par- 
:ular canine interest, and to 
■n' h the world in general with 
hiiiisual compassion. 



This handy, apartment-sized dog 
has been bred to great beauty and 
perfection in the last twelve years 
by Jimmie Clausen of Oakland. Mr. 
Clausen has sold black and brown 
mmiatures and toys as far afield 
as India and Japan. Statewide, he 
has concentrated on developing 
these little animals in what is 
probably the darkest available 
shade of their most exciting up- 
holstery color, namely apricot. 



ROY'S 
Rio Grande Service 

Complete Automotive Service 

ilOO NORIEGA STREET 

LO 4-6246 



JOHN'S BODY SHOP 

Painting - Welding 
John Boteilho. Prop. 

3827 GRAND AVENUE 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

TE 6-3254 Home: LO 9-2687 



Reliable Auto Glass 



UNderhill 3-0667 HEmlock 1-0684 



2015 - 16th Street 

San Francisco, California 

IKE WILLIAMS 

Richfield Service 

Gas — Oil — Lubrication 

1495 ELLIS STREET 

WE. 1-9843 



DAVES 
Flying A Station 

David L. Weill 
2050 Irving Street SE. 1-4730 



Lubr 

Accessories - Electronic Motor 

Tune-up - Brake Service 

APPAREL CITY 

FLYING A SERVICE 

M. A. MacLEAN 

Oakdale &. Industrial 

mission 7-6606 San Francisc( 



DICK AND DOUG'S 
"A" Service 



33rd AVENUE & VICENTE ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Lombard 4-5014 



ROY W. JOHNSON 

Auto Electric Tune Up 
Carburetors 

15th a: South Van Ness 
MArket 1-6176 



SIGNAL SERVICE 
STATION 

FELL Si FRANKLIN STS. 
Frank Miley 
HE. 1-93S1 



MONARCH 
Union Service 

1300 FELL STREET 

JOrdan 7-5036 



BURKE'S DRIVE-IN 

"Best IVe Hamburger in Tonn" 

Market at 14th Street UNderhill 1-1266 



A. R. REID CO. 

CONCRETE SPECIALTIES 
PROTECTIVE COATINtJS 

2600 Oakdale Avenue 

San Francisco 24 

Phone VAlencia 4-4060 

- B. W. Clutc - 



KERK'S 
TV SERVICE CO. 

Sales & Service 

ZENITH TV 6? RADIO 

"Kerk" Kerkvtiet 

314 Excelsior Avenue 

JUniper 4-2991 San Francisco 



N. MECHETTI 8C SON 

THE GOLD SPIKE 
RESTAURANT 

All Kinds of Mixed Drinks 
Italian Dinners served Family Style 

527 Ck)lumbu8 Ave. 

San Francisco GA. 1-9363 



Batteate Livestock 
Transportation Co., Inc. 

UNION STOCKYARDS 
SO. SAN FRANCISCO 



CARAVAN LODGE 

Eddy & larkin Sts. 
San Francisco 



Visitacion Valley Auto 
Reconstruclion 

Body Si. Fender Repair SC Painting 

2520 BAYSHORE BLVD. 

JU. 6-5593 



THE BANK 
OF TOKYO 

OF 
CALIFORNIA 



160 Sutter Street 
San Francisco 



Haviside Company 

Established 1879 
Marine and Industrial Supplies 

SHIP CHANDLERS 

CANVAS GOODS 

SALVAGE AND 

DERRICK BARGES 



40 Spear Street San Frai 
EXbrook 2-0064 



ANGLO HOTEL 

Reasonable Rates 
Mr. SC M.P.B. Mullins, Props. 

1550 Fillmore St. 



Diamond Bakery 

Specializing in 

Wedding, Anniversary and 

Birthday Cakes 

800 Diamond St. at 24th St. 



NESLON'S CATERING 

Specializing in Weddings 
Teas - Banquets 

2542 MacARTHUR BLVD. 
OAKLAND 



EPTEMBER, l?58 



TOMPKINS & COMPANY 

Insurance Specialists 
for Business and Industry 



111 SUTTER STREET 
DO. 2-0844 



W. J. PHILLIPS 

General Insurance Broker 

190 IRVING STREET 

DE. 3-0788 

DALY CITY 



"Bill" Gurbarg, REALTOR 

HOMES • INCOME PROPERTY' 

INSUR-'\NCE 

Greetings from NTTA GERBARG 

Broker - Notar>- 

AND STAFF 

Bus. — DElaware 4-0200 

2537 OCEAN AVE., "In Lakeside Vilbge 



Pacific Industries Inc. 

PIER 36 YU. 6-2526 

Pacific Ship Repair 
San Carlos Mfg. Co. 

Heating Equip. Mfg. Co. 
Tri-Counties Rece. Co. 
Flanders Mining Co. 

Unicorn Engineering Co. 



Tucker Equipment & 
Engineering Co. 

Repairing, Manufacturing, 

Engineering and C( 
Equipment 

2255 Quesada Ave. S; 



McLeod & Clark 
Corp. 

633 BAYSHORE BLVD. 
San Francisco 



FLORA CRANE 
SERVICE 

DEMOLITION &? CRANE 
SERVICE 

250 Mendell Street 
AT. 2-1455 



Xavier Simon, Jr. 

GENERAL BUILDING 
CONTRACTOR 



DALY CITY 



HARRY A. COX 

Structural Engineer 

166 GEARY STREET 
YUkon 2-4739 



Joseph Banovich 

Structural Steel Erector 



MAYORS 

I Continued from Pa;/e 13 i 
given, after they paid their re- 
spects to Ambassador Zellerbach 
at the American Embassy. In the 
evening they were gniests of the 
Municipality of Rome in a perform- 
ance of the opera "Aida" at Terme 
de Caracalla. This open-air theatre 
seats twenty-five thousand people. 
The stage is large enough to use 
chariots with eight horses and live 
camels, with a cast of thousands. 
Touring northward, the Mayors 
headed for Orvieto. famous for its 
golden wine, and proceeded to the 
beautiful City of Florence where 
the Acting Mayor welcomed the 
group in the Palazzo Vecchio. 
After the reception the Mayors 
visited the Medici Chapels, the Ca- 
thedral and the Golden Door of the 
Baptistry and the art exhibition in 
the Pitti Palace. 

They continued along the valley 
of the Amo to Pisa and the Lean- 
ing Tower, then on to Genoa, the 
City of Columbus where they were 
greeted by Mayor Vittorio Peilusi. 
Sightseeing in Genoa included the 
cemetery of Stagliano, where 
graves are rented for a period of 
twelve years, then exhumed and 
the remains placed in small areas 
to make room for new graves. 

Leaving Genoa, they turned 
westward along the beautiful Ital- 
ian and French Rivieras stopping 
at the principality of Monaco 
where our own Grace Kelly now 
presides. They visited Monte Carlo 
Casino, then on to Nice, the fair- 
est city on the French Riviera. 

Mayor Jean Medecin of Nice 
gave an official reception in honor 
of the California Mayors at the 
Villa Massena, inviting one hun- 
dred and fifty local officials and 
members of the local American 
Colony. 

Turning north into the Maritime 
Alps, they drove through the most 
magnificent scenery in Europe to 
Briancon in the French Alps where 
Mayor Garrand accompanied by 
his lovely wife were guests at din- 
ner. 

Next morning they left Briancon 
for the Lakes of Armecy and Aix 
les Bains, and arrived in Geneva 
about noon where the Maj'or of 
Geneva gave a reception and wel- 
come to Switzerland. After lunch, 
a motorcycle escort was provided 
to direct our Mayors through the 
city and place them on the road to 
Neuchatel, where another recep- 
tion was given by the Mayor of 
that city. They were shown the 
three remaining dolls of Marie An- 
toinette. When wound up, one of 
the dolls draws pictures: one 
writes poetry and the third plays 
a piano. 



.527 (XLB 
Bar and Restaurant 

Domestic and Imported Liquors 

Pabst on Tap 

Joe Fuchslin, Carl Reichmuth. 

Proprietors 

527 BRYANT STREET 

SUtter 1-9622 San Fr.incis< 



ANGELO'S 
PIZZA HOUSE 

- In the Marina - 
Pizzas - Cocktails - Dancing 
3231 FILLMORE STREET 



Cream Crest 
Doughnut Shops 



1500 Ocean 
JU. 6-6061 



323 Grant Ave 
EX. 2-9590 



Ever 'Ready 
Coiiee Shop 

Joe Dias, Prop. 

545 Golden Gate Ave. 

MA. 1-9329 



Howard Bldg. 
Coffee Shop 

209 POST STREET 
SUtter 1-9810 



EL DORADO 
RESTAURANT 

- Mexican Food - 
1827 HAIGHT STREET 



Freddie's 
COFFEE SHOP 

Tacos — Tamales — Enchilades 
i8 - 7th Street MA. 1-0901 



William Tell House 

630 CLAY STREET 

GAr field 1-9405 

San Francisco 11. Calif 



MILO COFFEE 

759 Harrison St. 



BULL PUP 
ENCHILADES 

Mexican-Spanish Food 
690 GRE.\T HIGHW.AY 



John C. Drews 

RESTAURANT 
RANGE REPAIRS - SERVICE 
112 South Park EX. 2-7911 



Food Equipment & 
Supply Inc. 

Packaging Machinery 
210 MISSISSIPPI STREET 



SYNTRONE S. 
SALES CO. 



F. 



.59 -30th Street 

AT. 8-1317 San Francisco 



BABE OSBORN 

Expert Shoe Repair 

Ladies Invisible Soles 

30 HILLCREST DRIVE 

PL. 5-6180 Daly Cit> 



E. J. MULLANEY 
Monuments 

1675 MISSION ROAD 

SOUTH S.'\N FR.ANCISCO 

PLaza 5-2282 



Bradley Cameras 

Camera Supplies 

1124 M.-^RKET STREET 

HE. 1-7476 



San Francisco 
Duplicating Co. 

26 O FARRELL STREET 
EX. 2-1775 San F 



GEO. A. KAAS 

Paper Mill Represcntatiye 
420 M.'XRKET STREET 



Roland H. Osterberg 
Diamond Setter 

324 DeMONTFORD .AVE. 
JU. 4-8950 



New O.P.O. Clothes 

Americas Foremost Clothing 

Store 

33 Kearny Street SU. l-39i: 



Diamond Shirt Co. 

Custom Tailored 
Wool Gabardine 

240 COLUMBUS A\ENUE 



George R. Anderson 
Complete Insurance 

lOOI OCE.AN .WENUE 



BELL BAZAR 
Toys - Gifts 

iOHi. IMh STREET 



Th£ Bellaire 

1096 UNION STREET 
ILIxido 5-5894 San Francisc 



MERCURY PHARMACY 

Robert J. Patterson 
1201 CHURCH ST. 



Lemasney Bros. Co. 

Custom Furniture 

Refinishing .ind Upholstering 

5-45 MISSION ST. 

AT. 2-8477 

GREENBLATT'S 

HARDWARE CO. 

Hardware 

\AZb FILLMORE STREET 
WE. 1-5427 



Atlas Painting 
Co., Inc. 

for FREE ESTIMATE Phone 
Fillmore 6-9578 



.et me re-cover and re-upholster 
our livmg room set. 18 to 24 
lonths to pav. Workmanship guar- 
nteed. Callat once MI 7-3771 or 
vc. .\T 2-6981. Also open Satur- 
lays. Free estimates. Pick up and 
)eliverv 

Richard's Upholstery 

?l-4 - 24th STREET 



A. M. COHAN 

45 Years Experienced CuHorr 

Work 

Doilyourself Materials 

829 CLEMENT STREET 

B.'^. 1-5571 



Kelley Box Co. 

Specialising in Used Boxes 
lU. 4-1931 50 Elmira Street 



PAUL SEMION 
Public Accountant 



1655 Polk Street 



PHIL EGAN 

Watch <fr Clock Repair 

511 N'alencii Si. HE. 1-8733 



Sleep Shade Co. 

828 MISSION STREET 
DO. 2-8185 



Coloniiil 
I pholstering Shop 

Mall Spoiler 



Continuing in the late afternoon 
the Mayors enjoyed a distant view 
of Mount Blanc, highest Peak in 
the Alps, on their way to Montreu.x 
and the Hotel Des Alpes. After 
dinner they were taken to a local 
wine cellar where the wine and 
song were free. Our Mayors were 
gMests of the city and its people. 

In the morning the Mayors wei^ 
escorted to the Castle of Chillon 
made famous by B>'ron's immortal 
poem. By gracious permission of 
the Council of State of the Canton 
de Vaud, the reception given by 
the Mayor of Montreux-Veytau.N 
was held in one of the halls of the 
Castle. 

After lunch the Mayors con- 
tinued to Interlaken where Peter 
Hofmann, President of the City 
Council gave a reception at the 
Hotel Beau Rivage welcoming our 
group to Interlaken. The following 
moi-ning a group of the hardier 
Mayors made a trip to the top of 
the Jungfrau, twelve thousand feet 
to the pei-petual snow-covered 
summit where breathtaking views 
of lesser peaks spread out as far as 
the eye can see. 

Reluctantly our Mayors left In- 
terlaken to travel along the shores 
of Lake Thun to Bern, the pleasant 
capital of Switzerland : then on 
again to re-enter France, stopping 
at the City of Dijon, the town of 
epicures, for wonderful food and 
wine and a much needed I'est. 

In the morning, our group left 
on the final motor coach trip of 
the Continent passing through 
Burgundy and some of the most 
faniotis vineyard coimtry in the 
world, to Auxerre and Fontaine- 
bleau where a \isit was made to 
the historic castle of Napoleon and 
Josephine; then on to Paris. 

In Paris, an official reception 
was given by Marcel Leveque, 
President of the Coimcil of Mu- 
nicipalities of Paris at the Hotel 
De Ville followed by a personally 
conducted tour of the beautiful 
City Hall. Our Mayors were then 
taken to the Place de la Concorde 
where the Guillotine stood, to the 
Madeleine Church. Champs-Elysses 
and the Arch of Triumph, to the 
Eiffel Tower, Napoleon's Tomb and 
the Cathedral of Notre Dame. 

The Mayors left Paris, grateful 
for the royal hospitality extended 
to them by their European hosts 
on this first California Mayors 
Tour, which succeeded in sowing 
many seeds of good will. 



Eric Nordgren 

Leilering — Poslers — Displa 

617 MARKET STREET 
DO. 2-6021 



PACIFIC MUTUAL 
SALES 

365 BRANNAN STREET 
San Francisco 



CaliSarnia Stucco 
Products Company 

o/ Norllurn California 
Manufacturers of DECORATIVE 

PLASTIC MATERIALS 
359 Berry St. San Francisco :• 



CHARLIE'S UNION 
SERVICE 

COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE 

SERVICE 

1216 Hillside Blvd. 

Colma. California 



Judge's Lustrwash 

3 MINUTES - SAVE 50c 
Bring Ihis Ad — Fast car wash 

2790 VAN NESS AVE. 
corner Lombard 



Bill Allen's 
Union Service Station 

No. 1S56 

Fremont & Harrison Streets 

DO. 2-993- 



Bleaiio Flame 
ProoSing 

729 MINNA STREET 
UNJerhill I-221S 



Ignition Supply 
Exchange Co. 

300 GROVE STREET 
HE 1-3-0- 



F. ALA YON 
SPORT CENTER 

Billiards. Etc. 

835 KEARNY STREET 

SUttcr 1-9800 



houis Cleaning Cf 
Dyeing 

1206 M.ASONIC 
HEmlock 1-1992 



PAUL LEE 
Sewing Contractor 

1613 GR.\NT AVENUE 



GINN'5 
Sewing Shop 

15 34 GRANT A\ENUE 



Jimmy Pugh's 
Richfield Service 



Gough at Golde 
San Fro 



Village Beauty Salon 

5'> Vicente — Room 6 

MOntrose 4-3181 

La Vonne Smith 

1 ormerly with Elizabeth Arden 



FOR PRINTING 
AT ITS VERY BEST 

Fingar Printing Co. 

2806 - 24lh STREET 
\Alencia 6)1)4 



CLYDE E. BENTLEY 

Consulting Engineer 

405 Sansome Street 
San Francisco 1 1 



RKHARD H. STEVENS 

Tennis Professional 

California Tennis Club 

BUSH 3l SCOTT STREETS 



Jeanette's 

KOSHER STYLE 

RESTAURANT 

Take Home Orders 

Catering to Parties 

WA. 1-0720 1476 Turk St. 



Steacy's 

FAMOUS ROUND HOUSE 
RESTAURANT 



Golde 



latc Bridge Toll Pla 
FI. 6-8416 



JIM BRUCE 
CHINESE LAUNDRY 

Price. Reasonable - Quick Service 

143 - 8th STREET 

San Francisco, Calif, 

Phone UNderhill 1-8144 



Searle's Corner 

0.\KIE LUM 

linese & American Food lo Go 

601 HAYES STREET 

UN. 3-9-51 



Chirolas Homemade 
Candies 

3 380 MISSION STREET 
Mission --9-65 



RandoI«3h Salami 
Factory 



- Ilalian 
5125 Mission St. 



age - 



Daly City 
Washette 



SELF SERIICE LAUNDRY 
PL. 5-1445 Dalv Cii 



SPTEMBER, 1958 



PUB. LIBRARY" PERIODICAL ROOM 

Civic Center 

San Francisco 2, Calif. 

52 X-1/59 (3077) 3630 



CAREW & ENGLISH 

Leo V. Carew 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS . . . MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

MASONIC AT GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
San Francisco" 1 8, California 

DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

Any Make or Model Seven Days a Week 

9 A.M. - 10 P.M. FREE ESTIMATES on Antenna Installations 

1322 HAIGHT STREET 
UN. 3-0793 — Also UN. 3-1836 

Pacific Fire Extinguisher Company 

Established 1894 

Fire Protection Engineers and Contractors 

142 -9th STREET 
San Francisco 3, California 

UNderhiU 1-7822 

FOSTER & lO^EISER 

Outdoor Advertising 



1675 Eddy Street 



San Francisco 



PALLAS BROS. 

RADIO a: TELEVISION REPAIRING - AND SALES 
5000 MISSION STREET JU 5-5000 SAN FRANCISCO 12 



NATIONAL ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 

"WHOLES.M-E HLECTRIC SUPPLIES" 

SANTA ROSA Sam. Rosa 255 

SAN CARLOS LYlell 1.0743 

Mlh &: Hurijon Sh. SAN FRANCISCO HEmlock 1-8529 
Miin OfIic« Son Franci^o, Oli ornia 



BULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 4507 



TO BUY - SELL OR TRADE 
REAL ESTATE 

it's 

ART COLVIN 

Real Estate — Insurance 
1999 Junipero Serra Blvd. PL. 5-1000 

RINGSBY SYSTEM 

Ringsby Truck Lines, Inc. 

5915 Hollis Street 
EMERYVILLE 8, C\L1F. 

SELECT FOODS INC. 

SPECIALISTS IN FROZEN FOOD DISTRIBUTION 

1265 Batterv St. Telephone YU. 2-0540 

San Francisco 11, California 

VENTURIREY GOLF SHOP 

FRED VENTURI • JOEY RE"^' 

HARDING PARK GOLF COURSE 

SE.ibrlght 1-9914 San Fr.incisco 
D/sdnclivc Sporii and Golf H'.ar - Lcsfo„< (.% P.G.A. Prolesiionah 

VISIT THE 

PALACE BATHS 



85 THIRD STREET 



SAN FR.ANCISCO 



HOF BRAU 



FINEST FOOD 
3Ionev Can Bnv 



DOUBLE SHOT BAR — OPEN 7 A.M. TO 3 A.M. 
Powell .It O Farrell Street San Francisco, Qilifoniia 



SAN FRANCISCO'S CROWDED COURTS 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




rHE LONG ARM OF THE LAW 

ilAURICE HAMILTON 

//OMAN OF THE MONTH: 
)ORIS BENEDICT 

dARY DUNNE 

vllLLER OF THE MUNI 

VILLIAM SIMONS 

rWO CONTROVERSIAL FIGURES 

"A.WSON 



I 



Charles D. Miller and Lafest Model Muni Bus 







•\ \C- 



T} 



PROPOSITION NO. 17 is an irresponsible tax-tinkering scheme which 
would reduce the State's chief revenues so drastically that the vital services 
those revenues now support would have to be abolished or heavily cur- 
tailed, until other tax sources could be found. 

The millions of beneficiaries of these State services would not be the only 
ones to suffer if such a Monkey Wrench should strike the machinery of 
California's government. 

Proposition No. 17 is a Personal and Dangerous Threat 
to Every State Employee 

Passage of Proposition No. 17 would mean: 

• State Employees' Retirement Plans would suffer badly or be 
eliminated, and miscellaneous functions of State government 
would have to be abolished or cut. 

• The Legislature would have to take a meat axe to public assist- 
ance programs for Aid to the Needy Aged, Aid to Children, 
Aid to the Needy Blind, and Aid to the Disabled. 

• Funds for State institutions — Prisons and Asylums — would have to 
be slashed. 

Proposition No. 17 would also mean NEW taxes, HIGHER cost of liv- 
ing for everyone. 



EFEAT THE MONKEY ^RfRENCH TAX BILL 



Vote NO on 17 



NORTHERN CALIFORNIA COMMITTEE AGAINST PROPOSITION NO. 17 

870 Market St., San Francisco 2 



CITY-COUNTY RECORDCT 



THE MAGAZINE ,'pFOiOf ,,,0^, ,-,fc.T 



^fif 



OF GOOD GOVERNME 



San Francisco and the Bay Area 



KENNETH H. ALLEN 
ALAN P. TORY 



PUBLISHER 
EDITOR 



Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock I- 1 2 12 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 



OCTOBER, 1958 
VOLUME 25 NUMBER 7 



r 1958 



BAY WINDOW 



LETTERS 

1 w as glad to see your comments last month 
n the great service that is rendered to the 
leople of San Francisco by the Parks and 
I.ecreation Department in so efficiently run- 
ling Camp Mather each summer. Specially 
Ire parents of small children grateful for the 
pportunity of taking away the family for a 
ealthy and happy holiday on a restricted 
udget. 

JUNE TILTON, 
3824 Scott Street, 
San Francisco 

It is worthy of particular note that the 
■layors of California made the pages of the 
•ondon Times on their visit to England in 
he summer. This is indeed a compliment, 
t is not too often that an enterprise of our 
(ity is featured in this important European 
iewspaper. I wonder when last San Francisco 
'ad so much space — was it in the Fire of 
906, or something later.-' 
i MARK MA, 

j 1045 Post Street, 

j San Francisco 

I Those Independence Day fireworks on the 
Marina were a disgrace to the city this year, 
"hey were indeed shown up by the brilliant 
■ apanese display to which you referred in 
iSay Window. I hope we are going to do 
fetter in 1959. 

KATHLEEN WATSON 

!929 Broderick Street, 
San Francisco 
In your June issue you make an interesting 
eference to Michael Maurice O'Shaughnessy 
vho. called in his day "More Money 
D'Shaughnessy", carried thtough the first stage 
)f the Hetch-Hetchy project. You omitted 
)ne big name in our history to whom credit 
ihould be given. 

' A plaque at O'Shaughnessy Dam pays a 
ieser\ed tribute to James D. Phelan, and at- 
tests the important role he played, both as 
Mayor and Senator, in developing our water 
system for future generations. It was he who 
put in the original claim for land, and fought 
for it right through to a successful conclusion. 
I WILLIAM A. DAVIS 

j 119 Skyview Way 

I San Francisco, 27 



TS THERE A DENTIST in the car.> On 
* Friday, October 10, there arrived in front 
of City Hall, after a 25-day journey, a Con- 
cord coach, built like the original Buttertield 
Overland Mail carrier of one hundred years 
ago. Along with this coach, from Tipton, 
Missouri, over 2800 miles away, came suit- 
ably dressed and bearded passengers, a watch- 
ful, lean Indian, with deerskin loincloth and 
bead necklaces, and an ox-drawn chuck 
wagon. The tarpaulin on the wagon adver- 
tised the following services: ammunition, 
gunsmith, tyre-setting, horse-shoeing, lock- 
smith, teeth pulled, shoes cobbled. At a 
luncheon, sponsored by the Chamber of Com- 
merce in cooperation with local societies 
interested in California history and tradi- 
tions, the Assistant Postmaster-General, from 
Washington, D.C., emphasized the progress 
in transportation during the last hundred 
years. Progress is, as usual, illusory, we re- 
jected. True, we fly by jet in hours over jour- 
neys which took our ancestors of a century 
ago months: porters on the Southern Pacific 
or Western Pacific deliver us clean and well- 
brushed at our destination as we jump down 
from streamlined trains: aerial nymphs delight 
us with champagne on many holiday flights. 
No airline has yet, however, offered to repair 
our shoes: no club car features a dentist. 
Some tilings may be gained, others are lost. 



CONGRATULATIONS to the Police Com- 
mission: Maury Hamilton, who wrote a 
story on the Police Department for the May 
issue of the Record, worked very closely 
with the then Deputy Chief of Police Thomas 
CahiU. In the office the other day, he gave this 
frank evaluation of the man who is now 
Chief of the Department: "In Thomas Cahill, 
1 feel the City of San Francisco has found a 



man of intelligence, tact, and hard working 
integrity. He has the kind of maturity needed 
to head the police department of a city as met- 
ropolitan as San Francisco. He possesses a 
sense of humor and insight that not only al- 
lows him to evaluate a situation, but to deal 
with it in proper perspective. Most important, 
he is an honest man, and. from what I could 
gather from his colleagues, respected as a 
good cop' { this in the best possible sense 
of the word) and a gocxl administrator. Time 
may prove me wrong, but I doubt it. Politics 
being what they are, attempts may be made 
to change Tom Cahill, but I feel he s too tough 
to be changed." The Record commends the 
Police Commission and Mayor George Chris- 
topher for their choice. We cannot imagine 
anyone who would better fit the bill. 



FORTY-NINE— that's our number: Bagh- 
dad-by-the-Bay has made several efforts 
to think up some colorful festival which would 
spotlight her character in the way that Mardi 
Gras epitomizes New Orleans. As the fort)'- 
ninth star tix)k its place in Betsy Ross's ex- 
panded needlework. Mayor George Christo- 
pher seems to have hit the right idea: why 
not an annual Pacific Festival? Although he 
was given very short notice, Robert B. Mur- 
ray, Jr., the alert vice-president of Pan- 
American World Airways, made an excellent 
job of such a festival this year. With a 
little persuasion we think Mr. Murray would 
make the festival an annual event, and we 
hope the Mayor will ask him to do this. If a 
start were made in planning right away, we 
feel sure that a large number of ambassadors 
and foreign dignitaries would be happy to 
check their schedules and make time to visit 
San Francisco for its Pacific Festival. 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 




LETTERS 


3 


BAY WINDOW 


3 


HOW TO GET TO JAIL 


4 


by Moi'rlce Homilton 




MILLER OF THE MUNI 


7 


by Wllliom Simons 




WOMAN OF THE MONTH: DORIS BENEDICT 


10 


by Mory Dunne 




BOOKS 


15 


PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 


17 


MEMO FOR LEISURE 


20 



PCTOBER, 1958 




Legal procedure is speeded by hard-uorliiusi jur/fcs 

^ in Superior and Municipal Courts, aided by District 

Attorney Lynch and Public Defender Edward Mancuso 



Complex Drama of Oui 
Crowded Law Courts 



by Maurice Hamilton 



Judge Harry Neubarth (Supi 
Arnold (Munrcipal Court) sha 



Court), right, and Judge Byri 
vel on day of their appointn--- 



IF YOU ARE a California resident, it is a 
two to one bet that by this time next year 
you will have appeared in court for one reason 
or another. While the odds may seem starrl- 
ingly short, you can bank on their accuracy 
because they come from a man who should 
know, Judge Byron Arnold, the Presiding 
Judge of the Municipal Court of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Judge Arnold estimates that in this state, 
with a ten million population, somewhere in 
the neighborhood of five and a half million 
people are summoned into court annually. 
While some of these people will appear in 
the Superior Court, by far the greatest num- 
ber will be involved with the Municipal 
Court. 

Countless other individuals and agencies 
are involved in hearings of the District At- 
torney's office, sometimes prior to their court 
appearance, at other times in unofficial pro- 
ceedings which eliminate the necessity for 
court action. 

The Superior Court is concerned with ma- 
jor crimes, all civil suits involving amounts 
of money over S 3,000, all domestic relations 
cases, and all juvenile cases. 

The cases best known to the public, the 
more spectacular and publicized criminal cases 
which come before the Superior Court, such as 
fraud, abortion, grand larceny, kidnapping 
and murder, actually constitute a minor part 
of the court calendar. Last year fewer than 
1500 criminal cases were heard in Superior 
Court, out of approximately 10,500 cases ap- 
pearing before the twenty-two judges of 
Superior Court. 

According to Harry Neubarth, Presiding 
Judge, of Superior Court, he and his colleagues 



spend the bulk of their time hearing law- 
suits involving personal injury, ritle or prop- 
erty claims: as court statistician Ray Mul- 
crevey puts it, "money cases." Last year 54% 
of all Superior Coiu-t cases involved money, 
and the balance of the cases were mainly 
"domestic relations," with divorce actions pre- 
dominating. 

One of the mosr important advances made 
by Superior Court in recent years is the use 
of the Pre-Trial method of disposing of many 
of the technicalities surrounding a compli- 
cated law suit. Since inception of the Pre- 
Trial in January of 1957, the trial calendar 
backlog has been reduced from twenty-two 
months in jury cases to its present eleven to 
twelve month period and Judge Neubarth 
hopes to reduce this even further as time 
goes on. 

The Pre-Trial method of handling a case 
is basically simple. Judge Preston Devine, 
currently piesiding, calls the opposing attor- 
neys into conference and tries to get as many 
concessions as possible before the case is 
assigned to a trial judge. Often opposing at- 
torneys will reach an agreement that could 
have taken hours of trial time to argue out in 
court. 

In divorce cases the Pre-Trial procedure has 
been most effective in determining how com- 
munity property is to be divided and how 
much alimony and child support should be 
allotted to the wife. 

Even with this reduction in time almost 
a year elapses before the average case is 
brouglit to jury trial, though exceptions are 
made when a person has to leave the area or 
when tliere are proven instances of hardship. 
In his hopes of speeding up the calendar, it 



is the "routine" rather than the spectacula 
cases that concern Judge Neubarth the niosi 
and in particular the personal injur)' case 
that make up a large percentage of the Supe 
rior Court Calendar. 

As things now stand, the amount of th 
award depends on the discretion of the jud 
and the influence the case has on the jut) 
Thus it is that a man who sues for a los 
arm may get $70,000 while the next ma; 
with the same injurj' will wind up witl 
S5,000. Judge Neubarth would like to Se- 
this inequit)' solved in much the same manne 
that the penalties for felony cases have beei 
standardized. 

Before the Adult Authority came into be 
ing, the length of a prison term for a par 
ticular crime depended solely on the judge 
The Authority now sets the length of sentcnc 
according to the nature of the crime, rathe 
than basing time in prison on the feelings o 
the judge. 

Harry Neubarth feels that some siniila 
soit of impartial commission should be se 
up to function in personal injur)' cases, k-av 
ing the courts to decide the metits of a givei 
case but not the amount of the award. Witl 
the precedent set by the Adult Authorit)- am 
with the increasing pressure on law bodie 
and juries away from the current practice o 
granting liuge judgments, such a comniissioi 
may not be as far from a reality as it migh 
seem. 

Whether in the near or the distant futur 
there are such changes made, in the meantim 
the Superior Coun of San Francisco continue 
to function in as efficient a manner . 
possible, hearing non-jut)' trials in a matte 
of days and working constantly to reduce th 



THE RECORI 



rrnber of months it takes to bring a case be- 
fie a panel of our peers. 

iThe Municipal Court is a "people's court." 
Ijis tiere that we take most of our minor 
jlevances when settlement outside the court 
i impossible. It is here that we go to argue 
f vaHdity of a traffic tag, to recover a "small 
^1111 I less than SI50), or to bring a civil 
s: tor amounts up to S3,000. Here also all 
r.sdemeanor and some felony cases are tried. 

The Municipal Court in San Francisco was 
f.iblished in 19.S0 with 12 judges, each of 
licir from 150 to 170 cases per month. 
Ii^e is in charge of a department and 
several of these departments may be 
lo the same type of case. Some judges 
trned with traffic, others with civil 
criminal cases. 

1 r.iltiL charges cover the bulk of offenders 
. .1 iii.iy involve anything from simply argu- 
1^ that a traffic tag was unjust, to a more 
s-ious "moving violation." Most of these 
lies start with a citation. Not everyone 
iilizes that the tag he finds under his wind- 
.'ield wiper is actually a citation and that 
rhnically it is usually disposed of by for- 

tini; bail in the amount the violation 
iTies. 

If .1 violation is more serious the person 

emni; a citation is requested to sign it. 

IS sinning of the citation is not, as is 
jpularly supposed, an admission of guilt. 
")ur signature on the tag is merely a promise 
r appear in court. 

In San Francisco, your appearance in com- 



pliance with the citation constitutes a pre- 
liminary hearing. You are given an appoint- 
ment tiine before the judge who will hear 
your case. Following that, if you decide to 
plead guilty, you are usually allowed a chance 
to make a statement before the fine is assessed. 

If you plead not guilty, bail is set and you 
are given a date for a trial. The outcome of 
the trial will determine whether or not you 
must pay a fine, spend some time in jail, or 
both. Of course there is also the possibility 
of your going free. 

Most traffic violations are misdeameanor 
offenses with the penalties relatively light, 
but the volume is so great, thanks to the fan- 
tastic number of automobiles on our streets, 
that in San Francisco the collection of money 
for these fines and violations is very big 
business. 

According to Clerk of the Municipal Court 
Ivan Slavich, who.se office is responsible for 
receiving bail and fine money, San Francis- 
cans annually pay out close to three million 
dollars, for a variety of offenses, the bulk of 
this money being for traffic violations. 

If you are a careful driver or a lucky one, 
you may not have to appear in the Municipal 
Court because of traffic violations. But you 
can still get there in other ways. 

One of the most common "other ways" is to 
be booked on a misdemeanor charge of one 
sort or another. The most common of these 
is 152 of the Municipal Police Code: Drunk 
in a Public Place. During the fiscal year end- 
ing June 30, 1958, there were some 53,378 



misdemeanor cases heard before our Muni- 
cipal Court and of these 24,199 were for vio- 
lation of 152 MPC. 

Moving traffic violations accounted for the 
next largest number, nearly 12,000 cases. 
Vagrancy cases followed with about 4,900 
for the year. While the vagrancy figure is 
dramatically small compared with the others, 
it will undoubtedly become even smaller now 
that San Francisco Police Chief Tom Cahill 
has decided to scrap the "S 1 ,000 Vag ' charge 
that's been under attack for some time by 
groups concerned with civil liberties. 

Other misdemeanor cases range from bat- 
tery, disturbing the peace, and petty theft, on 
through joyriding, health and safety code 
violations and fish and game code violations. 

There are four departments of our Muni- 
cipal Court that hear misdemeanor cases, with 
one department hearing all the jury trial cases. 
Because of the more stringent laws against 
drunk driving (a second offense carries a 
mandatory sentence of at least five days in 
jail), persons now accused of drunk driving 
almost routinely demand a jury trial. Other 
misdemeanor offenses that were tried by a 
jury last year included prostitution, sex of- 
fenses, gambling, manslaughter and narcotic 
addiction. 

The civil suits that are heard in Municipal 
Court must be confined to amounts of up to 
$3,000, when one individual sues another, 
for example, for breach of contract, non- 
payment of promissory notes, automobile dam- 
ages, rent, recovery of real estate, enforcement 



First Choice for GOVERNOR 

"Sfln Francisco''s Oifii" 

^PAT' BROWI\ 




A Great Attorney General . . . Will Make A Great Governor. 



Brown for Governor Committee 



of liens or reco\cn' of personal property. 

Here ncirhtr the Police Deparrmenc nor the 
District Attorney's office is concerned. The 
: crson bringing suit files a complaint and a 
summons is issued to the defendant, who then 
Uis a period of time to file an admission or a 
denial of the allegations in the complaint. 
The defendant is assumed to be guilty if he 
does not answer within the prescribed time. 
If the summons is anscwered, the case goes 
to trial either before a judge or before both 
judge and jury. 

Not so formal but still an important func- 
tion of the Municipal Court is the hearing of 
small claims. The small claims court was set 
up to assist parties in recovering amounts of 
money under SI 50. Here lawyers are seldom 
if ever used. The rwo principals involved 
argue the case before the judge, who decides 
on the merits of the case. The small claims 
court affords all of us protection of certain 
civil rights, at a modest cost, as well as giv- 
ing every man his "day in court." 

As we have indicated, not everyone con- 
cerned witth justice in our dry, sits on the 
bench or in the jur)' box. There are those who 
are equally concerned with this blindfolded, 
scale-holding lady headquanered in a relative- 
ly new office building at 617 Montgomery 



to be heard by the District Attorney's office. 

If the person is rebooked on either a felony 
or a misdemeanor charge, it is up to the DA's 
office to take charge of the prosecution. While 
most major cities have as part of the District 
Attorney's office an investigative staff, in San 
Francisco tradition dictates that this be left 
to our police. This arrangement is a happy 
one as far as Tom Lynch is concerned; he 
feels that the San Francisco Police Depart- 
ment do an excellent job in investigation. 

Another function of the District Attorney's 
office is the issuing of citations. Many times 
a municipal agenq', for example the Depart- 
ment of Public Health, the Fire Department, 
the State Board of Medical Examiners, or the 
Department of Employment, will find some 
individual or company in violation of one or 
more parts of their particular operating code. 

The agency requests from the DA a cita- 
tion for the offender to appear at 617 Mont- 
gomery Street where a deputy of the DA's 
department will hold an informal hearing to 
determine the facts in the case. If the offender 
is determined guilty, very often an admoni- 
tion is sufficient to correct the situation, and 
courts are saved the bother of hearing the case. 

The Fraud Division of the District Attor- 
ney's office is another busy depanment. It 



SUPERIOR COURT JUDGES 



real imagination and inventiveness. One i 
teresting case involved a man who talki 
several wealthy oldsters into advancing hi 
large sums of money that he would invest f 
them in annuities. 

After supposedly buying the annuities. I 
would send each one a check for somethii 
like S200 a month, and continue to do so t 
the three year statute of limitations for crir 
inal prosecution had run out. 

The DA's office handles the Aid to Xeei 
Children program, it is involved in commi 
ments to mental hospitals, in family relatio 
counselling, and many other functions invol 
ing justice in a modern community'. 

Justice is sometimes a bulky and c 
some process, like democracy itself, i 
verj' unwieldiness, however, lies our gi...r.i 
tee of our most precious rights, and it \\ou 
be improper to conclude this outline sunc 
of San Francisco's courts, without a referem 
to the office of the Public Defender, Edwai 
T. Mancuso. 

The San Francisco Public Defender's olScc 
is now recognized as one of the outstandir 
Public Defender's offices in the nation, in th 
all persons accused of crime who are un.ih 
to employ counsel now receive full legal re 
resentation ( misdemeanors as well as ftij 

DISTRICT AnORNEY 




Street, just in back of Police Headquarters. 

It is in this four-story strucnire that Thomas 
C. Lynch, our District Attorney, and his staff 
work constantly to keep the legal machinery 
of the city moving. 

One of the busiest divisions of the DA's 
office is that dealing with complaints, for it 
is up to the men working in the Complaint 
Division to investigate all arrests made by 
the police without a warrant. These are termed 
"on view felony arrests" or "arrest on suspi- 
cion." On the day following such an arrest, 
the arresting officer, the witnesses and the 
police inspector to whom the case is assigned, 
appear before one of the Assistant District 
Attorneys in the Complaint Division. 

If the facts so warrant, the arrested person 
is reb(K)ked on the original felony charge, or 
he may be b(x)ked on a misdemeanor charge 
or he may be released without a charge being 
placed against him. In the last fiscal year 
nearly 4,000 suspicion bookings were made 
by our Police Departinent, each case having 



MiHon Saplr 



functions in investigations of charges of em- 
bezzlement, bunco operators, and similar ac- 
tivities. The Fraud Division also looks into 
the matter of avoiding payment of California 
Personal Income Tax. Since 1951 it has been 
a misdemeanor to fail to file such an income 
tax return and in 1953 the legislature got 
tougher and made it a felony. 

Of course the DA's office works with other 
agencies of the government on these cases 
and last year such teams turned up two major 
cases, one involving a Market Street arcade 
operator and the other a well known real 
estate dealer. Both cases were successfully 
prosecuted by the District Attorney and the 
real estate dealer became the first individual 
in California to be sentenced to a State prison 
for such a violation. 

Embezzlements, however, constitute the 
bulk of the Fraud Division's work load. They 
range from plain stealing from one's boss, by 
having access to funds and misappropriating 
them, to the fancier bunco schemes that show 



: C. Lynch 



onies) by a staff of full time deputies and a 
investigator. 

Last year it represented 5,608 defendants i 
the Municipal, Juvenile and Superior Court 
which was an increase of 25^f over the la; 
fiscal year. 

In the misdemeanor field, more than 449 
of the defendants were either dismissed, di; 
charged or found not guilty. In the preliir 
inary felony hearings, more than 36'r wer 
dismissed, or reduced to misdemeanors, cor 
siderably reducing the percentages hcretofot 
held to answer to the Sup>erior Court, pric 
to the office's having deputies in these Court: 

Of the cases heard in the Superior Cour 
more than 19^f were reduced to misdemeano 
cases, dismissed, or found not guilty. 

Of the defendants who plead guilt)' or wer 
found guilty of misdemeanors, only a littl 
over 35'"f were sentenced to serve a jail tem 
The other 65'"f were either given probatior 
suspended sentences, fined or sentenccxl v 
time served. 



THE RECORI 



The lifeline of S. F. to downtown 
chopping and financial sections 



Miller of the Muni 



by William Simons 




METROPOLITAN PLANNERS for years 
" have viewed with alarm the growing 
ost-war specter of private transportation in 
le city. They point out that — unless public 
ansit is developed into proper balance — 
des will continue to require such economy- 
raining antidotes as more street widenings, 
icreased off-street parking, additional free- 
ays. 

In San Francisco, a city with the second 
ighest per capita riding habit in the United 
ates, the Municipal Railway is holding the 



tide against the private transportation specter 
by carrying more than 16,000,000 passengers 
each month. 

Each weekday the modern transit vehicles 
of the "Muni" — to use the system's colloquial 
abbreviation — travel 90,000 miles on sched- 
uled routes to bring its passengers to their 
destinations. That's a daily distance equal to 
three times around the world. 

Is it a convenient system? The answer lies 
in the fact that nine out of 10 people in this 
highly-congested city of hills, valleys and gen- 



erally dramatic terrain live within two blocks 
of a Muni route. 

And they are transported for a fare that is 
one of the country's biggest transit bargains 
— 15c a ride. 

Reason for the 15c fare is the city's of- 
ficial policy to subsidize transit as a necessary 
and essential public service. The policy is 
based on recognition of the Muni as a virtual 
"lifeline" to the downtown shopping and 
financial sections, an area small in size but 
giant in economic proportions since it com- 



Quoth the Raven 



"NEVERMORE" 




AdSTINENCE — pI'JS Indifference to Alcoholic Beverages, and 
A Return of Self-respect and Self-confidence — 
Is the Result of Conditioned Response Therapy 
as given at 

Wbodside Ams WospUal 



1600 GORDON STREET 



Member Americon Hospital Association 

EMerson 8-4134 REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA 

"Exclusively for the treatment of Alcoholism" 



prises a whopping 70 to 80ff of San Fran- 
cisco's rax base. 

If it were not for the Muni, sure traffic 
strangulation would quickly result in rigor 
mortis downtown. It's a simple matter of 
mathematics: An average of at least 26 autos 
is required to do the transportation job of one 
Muni vehicle. And the inescapable clincher 
is that the Muni moves on schedule, it comes 
and goes, while the autos, somehow, some- 
where, have to stop and park. 

To use the proudly-voiced expression of its 
General Manager Charles D. Miller, today's 
Muni is the "New Municipal Railway." "The 
new look and improved service stem from ex- 
tensive conversions from the more expensive 
rail operation to less costly, more comfortable 
rubber-tired operation of the new motor buses 
and trolley coaches. 

But even though the Muni is operating with 
far more modern equipment than ever before 
and maintaining an entirely adequate modern 
transit ser\-ice at the lowest possible charge, 
it is still confronted with a progressive decline 
in riders. In the fiscal year 1945-46 it carried 
326,007,393 passengers — 66.85? more than 



the 195,471,709 riders it carried in 1957-58, 
the fiscal yc-ar just completed. 

Thus it is the challenge of decreasing use 
that the Muni's Charlie Miller and his staff 
of transit experts face in their day-by-day 
operation as well as in their future planning. 

Miller, a true transit professional, has been 
in the business for more than half a century. 
During this time he has acquired the most 
literal kind of from-the-bottom-up experience. 

It was back in January of 1908 that he first 
went to work for the old Market Street Rail- 
way Company as a repairman; he was 18 
years old at the time. From then on his work- 
ing years were punctuated by regular steps 
up the transit echelon, through the 1944 
Market Street Railway merger with the Muni, 
until he was appointed to the top job of 
General Manager in 1951 on the retirement 
of William H. Scott. 

So Charlie Miller speaks with the pride of 
a San Franciscan and with the authority of 
one of the country's great transit men when 
he looks out of the office window at his head- 
quaners, Presidio and Gear)', and says of the 
fleet-moving Muni vehicles: "It's the best 
transportation system in the world! " 



Off the Record 




thing new: a hula-hoop for squ 



FOR JOB LARGE OR SMALL 

CALIFORNIA BASEMENT CLEANERS 

Basements - Buildings - Yards - Lots Cleaned 

Furniture - Junk fe? Iron Wanted - Fully Insured 

FREE ESTIMATE -:- 24-HR. SERVICE 

2648 Bryant Street HE. 1-6740 


RHODES & JAiVIIESON 

BUILDING MATERIALS :-: READY MIX CONCRETE 

PROMPT DELIVERY IN ALAMEDA COUNTY' 

OAKLAND — 333 - 23rd Avenue — KE. 3-5225 

SAN LEANDRO — 143 Ave. 8C Washington 

EL. 7-4200 LU. 2-4014 

PLEASANTON PLANT — VI. 6-2852 

FREMONT PLANT — SY. 7-1220 

RICHMOND PLANT — 3rd 8C Cutting Blvd. 

BE. 5-8515 LA. 6-1965 


DAVE'S SHETT. SERVICE 

"Serrice is my Business" 
Expert Lubricntion — Brakes Relined — Tune-Up 

High & Foothill Blvd., Oakland KE. 4-6647 


■W^ ARE DEHNITELY AGAINST THE 
"RIGHT TO SCAB" LAW 

Cook's Union — Local No. 228 

H. J. BADGER, Secretarj-Treasurer 

1608 Webster Street, Oakland TE. 2-3965 


Don's HiUtop TV Service 
5344 Mission Street San Francisco 


RIGHT TO WORK IS A FRAUD 
IT MEANS RIGHT TO WRECK 

Brewers & IMalters Union Local No. 893 


SIMONDS SAW & STEEL CO. 

228 ■ 1st Street 

San Francisco 4, California 


Vote NO on PROPOSITION 18 

Radio, T.V. & Appliance Technicians 
local No. 202, I.B.E.\S . 


WALTER KREUTZMANN 

2000 Van Ness Avenue 
.Sail Francisco 


Alameda Municipal Golf Course 

Earl & Don Fry 
Maitland Drive. Alameda I.A. 2-4324 



THE RECO? 




Re-elect CONGRESSMAN 
MAILLIARD 

(4th District) 

He has earned our support! 



DON'T TAX SCHOOLS - 
DONT RAISE TAXES - 

Vote NO on 16 

Proposition No. 16 is DISCRIIVIINATION. It seeks 
to punish nonprofit schools— Protestant, Catholic 
and Jewish— by imposing a discriminatory, crip- 
pling tax on them. It would increase public school 
taxes by shifting part of the nonprofit school 
burden to the public schools. It would impose new 
demands on money available for city and county 
purposes. 

Citizens United Against Taxing Schools 
Protestants United Against Taxing Schools 

CTOBER, 1958 • 




VOTE 
RIGHT 

VOTE 
KNIGHT 



HE MEETS THE TEST 



Tested In the stern proving ground of California's 
governorship. As U. S. Senator he'll uphold the 
prestige of our State and bring stature and states- 
manship to the national scene. 



NOV. 4 



K N I (i H T 

For U. S. SENATOR 



X 



STERLING 

MATTRESS 

COMPANY 

1919 Bryant Street San Francisco 10, California 

Phone UNderhill 1-5541 

THOMAS WINTERS, President 

Manufacturers of 

Quality Mattresses, 

Box Springs, Headboards 

Featuring Thru Quilted Mattresses 




Woman of the Month 



No Wasted Days for Doris Benedict 



Trio of Friends 

EVERY THURSDAY aftemoon 
when school lets out, fifteen 
lively boys, aged eight to ten, hur- 
rj' to a inviting Lakeshore district 
home for their Cub Scout meeting. 
Mrs. Donald E. Benedict, the Den 
Mother who awaits their anival, 
sees to it that her busy schedule 
of managing her household of five 
persons and paiticipating in church 
and veterans' groups, is so ar- 
ranged as to free her for these 
meetings. Even during summer 
vacation, when many Cub Dens lie 
doi-mant, this large Den's activities 
continue. 

The remarkable thing about all 
that Doris Benedict accomplishes 
is the fact that for the past eight 
years she has been totally blind. 

How she conducts these meet- 
ings, directing the boys' boundless 
energj' into productive channels, 
and assisting them in working to 
earn their various badges — how 
she manages to crowd so many 
constructive activities into her 
week — is, therefore, an unusual 
story. 

This small, attractive woman in 
the dark blue Den Mother uniform, 
who laughs often, was bom in San 
Francisco and attended Everett 
Junior High and Lowell High 
School. She went to work for the 
Pacific Telephone and Telegraph 
Company as an operator. Doris left 
work to join the Women's Army 
Corps in 1942, being stationed at 
Fort Oglethoi-pe, Georgia, and 
Camp Blanding, Florida. She at- 
tained the rank of Sergeant, leav- 
ng the W.A.C. in 1945. 

Doris Benedict's disability oc- 
curred gradually, beginning in 1947 
with lessening of vision. For a 
time light perception remained. 
Then that, too was lost. 

Asked if she ailjusted to her new 
world of darkness by prolonged 
training as a blind person she 
said: "No, I do not believe in that. 
This is a woild of sight and the 
handicapped pei'son must make his 

10 



own place in it." 

Proof of her con\iction is the 
fact that she allows herself no con- 
cessions in running her home. 
Neither telephone nor appliances 
are equipped with special attach- 
ments. She cooks, cleans, and laun- 
ders like any other housewife. 
"Will I ever get through with my 
ironing?" she smiled, pointing to 
the half -filled clothes basket. Neat- 
ly finished pieces were hung and 
stacked nearby. She does her mar- 
keting at regular, but infrequent, 
intervals bu>'ing lai-ge quantities 
to go into the huge freezer. Organ- 
ization and planning are an in- 
tegral part of her busy household 
routine. 

Doris has recently completed a 
four weeks' course at the Guide 
Dog School for the Blind in San 
Rafael, and she speaks with great 
enthusiasm of this experience. The 
well-rounded program even includ- 
ed s\vimming. Her Cub Den helped 
her celebrate her graduation. 
Windy, her new Guide Dog, is an 
18 month old black Labrador re- 
triever, a vigilant, intelligent ani- 
mal, luckily with a fondness for 
Boy Scouts. 

Doris reads Braille but admits 
that she has little time for read- 
ing. Her sense of hearing is ex- 
cellent. "I can even hear the chil- 



dren when they whisper," she 
smiles. 

Her husband, Donald, was bom 
in Seattle. Washingfton. He is a 
deputy sheriff at the Hall of Jus- 
tice, and is also assigned to Youth 
Guidance Center, Juvenile Court. 
A former United States Marine, 
Don also served with the Army in 
such far-off lands as Africa, Italy 
and China. 

The Benedicts have three lively, 
good looking children, Adele. 14, 
Gilbert, 12, and Maribeth, 10, all 
active in youth organizations. 
Adele is a Rainbow Girl, Gilbert a 
Boy Scout, and Maribeth a Girl 
Scout. Gilbert also plays the trum- 
pet. 

Mrs. Benedict belongs to the 
Peninsula, Women's Post, American 
Legion, and to the Parkside Aux- 
iliary. She has served as 1st Vice- 
President and 2nd Vice-President 
of the American Legion Auxiliary, 
and was also chairman of the 
Blinded Veterans' Association of 
Northern California for five years. 
At present she is Secretary of 
Spiritual Life and Devotions in 
her church's Circle of Women's 
Work. 

Both she and her husband teach 
a 6th grade Sunday School class 
every Sunday from nine imtil ten- 
thirty at Temple Methodist Church 



by Mary Dunne 



on Junipero Serra Boulevard. Th 
family then attends church sen 
ices from eleven to twelve. In th 
evening there are Youth Fellow 
ship activities at the church i 
which their two older childre 
participate. 

Mrs. Benedict insists on leavlr, 
her Saturdays free. That is the:: 
family day. 

Donald and Doris Benedict bt 
came Interested in Cub Seoutin 
when they were foster parent 
early in their marriage. Sharing 
deep love of children, they hav 
cared for four foster children i 
addition to their o\%'n family. "Xc-. 
I get letters from these boys, i 
Korea and Japan," she says. 

Don is Cub Master of Pack 34;' 
Seven dens form a pack. Doris ha 
been a Den Mother for the past fiv 
years, the only bUnd person cor 
ducting a Cub Den. It is tj-pics 
of her good nature that Den .' 
which she supervTses. has 15 boy; 
The average den has 8 boys, jus 
half that number. 

The den has gone out on sue 
trips as an ice-skating sessior 
father-son baseball game, and th 
annual Scout-o-rama. Doris ha 
attended Cinerama shows with th 
boys, as well as "Around the Worl 
in 80 Days." Mortes. she saj-s, ar 
(Continued on Page 22) 



i4> 




u 



,\ 



GIVE A VOTE OF CONFIDENCE 

EDWARD T. MANCUSO 

PUBLIC DEFENDER 
INCUMBENT - - - UNOPPOSED 



The Villa 
Sanitarium 

Joseph Sarto, Director 

130 VALE ST. 
PL 5-0411 DalyGty 

LOU FREMY 

Incorj)orated 

M.inufacturers" Distributors 

DRUGS ■ COSMETICS 

and 

ALLIED PRODUCTS 

330 Ritch Street 



IYU 6-4526 






JACK'S TV 

Sales - Service 

I TV RENT.'VLS 

\ VM RECORD CHANGERS 

233 El Camino Real 

JU 8-6453 
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO 



Madler's Automotive 
I Service 

lAulomalic Trausmhsion Specialist 
I Sun Equipment - Brake Service 

2151 - 35th AVENUE 
Oakland. Calif. KE 6-1728 



\^ IRTH BROS. 
PASTRY SHOP 

Home of 
"Happy Day" Paslry Cakes 

GEARV AT 23rd AVE. 
San Francisco 



CHINATO\^N 
SERVICE 

900 Kearny St. 

G.>\ 1-4093 



Bataau Sundries 

842 KEARNY 
DO 2-0272 Open till 2 A.M. 




JTOBER, 1958 



}6t/ plan better with a savings 
account at "^p^^Y^Q^ 

AMERICA! 



Great expectations— or small— it's a good idea to start your plans with a Savings 
Account at Bank of America! Plan with confidence, knowing your savings earn 
regular bank interest — jff//rf in the bank where over 2 million Californians save. 
You can count, too, on the statewide strength of Bank of America, the advantages 
of its neighborhood convenience, its 52 banking services — all yours when you 
open a Savings Account at Bank of America... BEST WAY TO SAVE! 

BANK Of AMERICA • NATIONAL TRUST AND SAVINGS ASSOCIATION • MEMBER FEDERAl DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 

II 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

GEORGE CHRISTOPHER, MAYOR 

Directory of City and County Officers 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

200 an- Hall MA 1-OlOJ 

Gcuri;c Chriitophcr. Mayor 

JoKph J. Allen. Excculive Secretary 
Patricia H. Connicb, Confidential Secretary 
George J. Crubb. Administrative AwiBlant 
John D. Sullivan. PubUc Service Director 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OP 

2)5 Cly Hall HE 1-212] 

Francii McCart>-. 220 Montgomery St.. President 
William C. Blake, 90 Folsom St. 
Joseph M. Casey, m Tawnsend St. 
Harold S. Dobbs. 351 California St. 
Dr. Charles A. Erlola. 2S3 Columbus Ave. 
John J. Fctdon. 155 Montsomery St. 
Jame. L. Halley. 870 Market St. 
Clarissa Shortall McMahon. 70} Market St. 
Henry R. Rolph. 310 Sansome St. 
James J. Sullivan. 31 West Portal 
Alfnnw, J. Zirpoli. 300 MontRomcry St. 



Stiinrfing Cotnmittcc* (Chairman named first) 
Commercial and Industrial Development— Sullivan. Blake. 

County, State and National Affairs— Halley, Erlola. Ferdon 
Education, Parks and Recreation— Rolph. Dobbs. Blake 
Finance, Revenge and Taxation- Dobbs, McMahon, Halley 
Judiciary, Legislative and Civil Service— Zirpoli, Rolph, Casey 
Police— Casey, Sullivan, Rolph 
Public Buildings, Lands and City Planning— McMahon, Dobbs. 

Public Health and Welfare— Ertola, Sullivan, Zirpoli 
Public Utilities— Ferdon, Ertola. McMahon 
Slrecls and Highways— Blake. Halley, Ferdon 
Rules- McCarty, Dobbs. Halley 

ASSESSOR 

101 City Hall KL 2-1910 

Ru.kM L. Woldcn 

aXY ATTORNEY 

206 Cly Hall HE 1-U22 

D,..n R. H.ilm 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 



Edward T. Mancuso 

SHERIFF 

331 City Hall 
Matthew C. Carbcrty 

TREASURER 

no City Hall 

J„l,n J, Cu.Hlwin 



SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 

r.,.irll, f]u.,r. City Hal] UN 1 

Harry J. Ncubarth, Presiding Twain Michel.cn 

Raymond J. Anu J. B. Molinari 

Walter Catpcneti Edward Molkcnbuhr 

C. Harold CaulCcld Clarence W. Morris 

Melvyn I. Cronin Orla St. Clair 

Einiace Cullinan, Jr. Milton D. Sapiro 

Pre. ton Devine George W. Schonfeld 

Tirn.itl.v 1. Fitipatrick Daniel R. Shoemaker 

Thonia. M. Foley William T. Swcigcrt 

Gerald S. Levin William F. Traverso 

Tlieteti Meikle H. A. Van Der Zee 

Joseph M. Cummins, Secretary 

■180 City Hall UN 1 



MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 



Third Fl 
llyton Arnold. P 
Carl H, Allen 



William O'Bri 



Albert A. Asclrod 

John W. Bussey 

Joseph M. Golden 



Lenore D. Underwood 

/ — Alvln 0. Weinberger 

Clayton W. Horn James J. Welsh 

Ivan L. Slavich, Secretary 

301 City Hall KL 2- 

A. C. McChcsney, Jury Commissioner 



TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

164 City Hall KL 2-3008 

Janes M. Cannon, Chief Division Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall UN 1-8552 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
Henry E. North. Foreman 
Paul A. Ryan. Secretary 
David F. Supple. Consultant-Statistician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

604 Montgomery St. YU 6-2950 

John D. Kavanaugh. Chief Adult Probation Officer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan. Chairman. 60 Sansome St. 
Raymond Blosscr, 681 Market St. 
Rt. Rev. Matthew F. Connolly, 349 Fremont St. 
Fred C. Jones. 628 Hayes St. 
Maurice Moskoviu, 2900 Lake St. 
Robert A. Pcabody. 456 Post St. 
Frank Ratto, 526 California St. 



YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodsidc Ave. SE 1-5 

Thomas F. Strycula, Chief Juvenile Probation Officer 

JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Roy N. Buell. Chairman, 2512 Pacific Ave. 
Mrs. Fred W. Bloch. 3712 Jackson St, 
Rev. John A. Collins. 420 - 29th Ave. 
Jack Goldberger. 240 Golden Gal ' 



35th Avi 



Hai 



St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

2S9 City Hall HE 1-21 

Chester R. MacPhee 

Joseph Mignola. Executive Assistant 

Virgil Elliott. Director. Finance e Records 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 



LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1-0163 

Donald W. CIcary 
Hotel Senator, Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

100 Larkin 

Meet.. l5t Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 
Harold I Z.ll. ,! I, Pr.-sidcnt, 343 Sansom, 
Bernard ( r M I. . 450 Sutter St. 

Mr.. .M ■ I ; : ,.. 2770 Vallejo St. 
JohnC.K- . M, , St. 

.lohn K M ,• ; M.ll, Tower 

Betty Jack.cn. :a:.S Vallejo St. 

William E. Knuth, S. F. State College 



Albert F. Roller, 1 Montgomery St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President, California Palace Legion of Honor 
President. City Planning Commission 
President, de Young Museum 
President, Public Library Commission 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 Larkm St. 

Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 
Roger D. Lapham. Jr., President 
Thomas P. White, Vice-President 
Robert Lilientbal 
Mrs. Charles B. Poner 
Joseph E. Tinney 

Ex-Offido Members 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Manager of Utihties 

James H. Turner. Designated Deputy o( 

Manager of Utilities 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 
Francis P. Walsh, President, 68 Post St. 
Kilpatrick, 827 Hyde St. 



DISASTER CORPS 

45 Hyde St. HE 1-21. 

Rear Admiral A. G. Cook, USN (Ret.). Dircaor 
Alex X. McC^usland, Public Information Officer 



EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue UN 3-4« 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M., 170 Fell S 

Joseph A. Moore. Jr.. President, 351 Califort 



Charles J. Foehn, 55 FiUn 
John G. Levison, 511 Howard St. 
Mrs. Claire Manger, 3550 Jackson St. 
Elmer F. Skinner. 220 Fell St. 

Dr. Harold Spears 

Superintendent of Schools and Secretary 



COMMISSION ON EQUAL 
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 

Meets at call of Chairman 
C. J. Goodell. Chairman, Room 400, 33 Post St. 
Mrs. Raymond E. Alderman. 16 West Clay Park 
John F. Brady. 1296 - 36th Ave. 
Terry A. Francois. 2085 Sutter St. 
Peter E. Haas. 98 Batter)- St. 
John F. Hcnning, 995 Market St. 
Roger D. Lapham. Sr.. 215 Market St. 

John D. Sullivan. Executive Secretary (tempi 



FIRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall 

Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 
Arthur J. Dolan. Jr.. 235 Montgomery. President 



■'V. 



Ciirthy, Secretary 



HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 



lid J. McCook. 230 Montgomery St. 
Henry L. McKeneie. 2619 - 39lh Ave. 
Thomas P. O'SuUivan, 1340 Powell St. 

Waller E. Hook, M.D., Medical Dir 

Frank Collins, Secretary 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. OR 3-580 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 

Charles J. Jung, Chairman, 622 Washington St. 

Jefferson A. Beaver, 1738 Post St. 

Charles L. Conlan, 1655 Folsom St. 

Al F. Mailloux, 200 Guerrero St. 

Jacob Shcmano. 988 Market St. 

John W. Beard. Executive Director 



PARKING AUTHORITY 

5UU Golden Gate Ave. 

Meeu every Thunday. 4 P.M. 
Albert E. Schlej.nger. Chairman. 21)01 Mai 
Harold A. BerUner. 135 Miiaiuippi Si. 

Ja»E. Ml - 

Jofcii E Si 

David Thom.nn, 6! 

Vming T. Fi3hcr. (Ji-neral Manager 

Thomai J, OTuole. Secrclary 



. 135 Miu 
M.,rler S( 
SW UMoa St. 



PERMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 

::7 City H.fii 1 

Meets every Wednesday at j:30 P.M. 
Clarence J. Walsh. President. 2450 - 17ih St. 
Morgan J. Doyle. Ill Sutter St. 
Peter Tamaras. 76 Jaekson St. 
loaeph C. Tarantino. 490 JcHerson St. 
Ernest L. West. 265 Montgomery St. 

J. Edwin Mattox. Secretary 

POLICE COMMISSION 

Hall of Justice S 

Meets every Monday at 4;i0 P.M. 

'aul A. Bissinger. President. Davis and Pacific Sts. 

larold R. McKinnon. Mills Tower 

rhomas J. Mellon. 390 First St. 

Francis J. Ahern. Chief of Police 
Thomas Cahill. Deputy Chief of Police 
Capt. Daniel Kiely. Director of TraOic 
Capl. Daniel McKlem. Chief of Inspectors 
Sgt. William J. OBrien. Commission Secretary 
Sgt. John T. Butler. Department Secretary 

?UBUC UBRARY COMMISSION 

Civic Center f 

Meets 1st Tuesday each month at 4 P.M. 
lett Simon. President. 1350 Folsom St. 
■Iiss Rose M. Fanucchi. 511 Columbus Ave 
lev. F. D. Haynes. 1399 McAllister St. 
^mpbell McGregor, 165 Post St. 
i4rj. J. Henry Mohr, 2 Castenada Ave. 
. Max Moore, Potrero and 18th Sts. 
An. Hajel O'Brien. 440 Ellis St. 
llbert E. Schwabachcr. Jr.. 100 Montgomery St. 
'. Lee Vavuris. 990 Geary St. 
lene A. Vayssie. 240 Jones St. 
"homas W. S. Wu. D.D.S.. 916 Kei 

L. J. Clarke. Librarian 

Frank A. Clarvoc. Jr.. Secretary 



:ny St. 



OJBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

287 City Hall 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 
)on Fa:ackerley. President. 851 Howard St. 
Idward B. Baron. 44 Casa Way 
)anicl F. Del Carlo. 200 Guerrero St 
tuart N. Greenhcrg, 765 Folsom St. 
oseph Martin. Jr., 400 Montgomery St. 

" N. Bland. Manager of Util 



R- J. 



i Com 



Bureaus and Departments 

287 City Hall 

George Negri. Director 
iuport, San Francisco International 

Belford Brown, Manager 
letch Hetchy, 425 Mason St 

Harry E. Lloyd. Chief Engineer and Gent 
ighr. Hear &. Power, 425 Mason St. 

B A. Devme. Manager 
funicipal Railway, 949 Presidio Ave 

Charles D Miller. Manager 
«raonnel & Safety, 901 Presidio Ave 

Paul J Fanning, Director 
ublie Service, 287 City Hall 

William J. Simons, Director 
^atet Department, 425 Mason St, 



PR 5-7000 
:al Manager 
PR 5-7000 



Ja. 



1 H Tu 



cr, Ge 



ral Manager 



'UBUC WELFARE COMMISSION 

585 Bush St. GA 1-5000 

Meets Ist and 3td Tuesdays each month at 9 A.M. 
dward J. Wren. Presidenr. 1825 Mission Sr 
mest D. Howard. 315 Montgomery St 
licholas A. Loumos. 220 Montgomery St 
(n. John J. Murray. 1306 Portola Drive 
lenry M. Sanre, 703 Market St. 

Ronald H. Born, Director of Public Welfare 

Mrs. Eulala Smith, Secretary 

RECREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

McLaren Lodge, Golden Gate Park SK 1-4866 

Meets 2nd and 4rh Thursdays each month at J P M 

eler Bercut, 1 Lombard St- 

lary Margaret Casey, 5 32 Mission St. 

/illiam M. Coffman. 525 Market St. 

ev. Eugene A. Gallagher. 1543 Market St. 

'alter A. Haas. Sr.. 98 BatKry St. 

;. Francis J. Her:. 450 Sutter St. 

Irs. Joseph A. Moore. 2590 Green St. 

Raymond S. Kimbell. General Manager 
Edward McDeviit. Secretary to Commission 

)CTOBER, IV5« 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

512 Golden Gate Ave. 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:!0 P.M. 
Joseph L. Aholo, Chairman, 111 Sutter St. 
Roy N. Buell. 445 Bush St. 
John L. Merrill, 582 Market St. 
Lawrence R. Palacios, 355 Hayea St. 
Sydney G. Walton, Crocker Building 

Eugene J. Riordan, Director 

M. C. Herman, Secrerary 



RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

93 Grove Srreet HE 1- 

Meets every Wednesday at 3 P.M. 
William T. Reed, President. 1J85 ■ 20th Ave. 
Philip S. Dalton. 1 Sansome St. 
James M. Hamill, 120 Montgomery St. 
William J. Murphy. 1771 - 45th Ave. 
Martin F. Wormuth. 4109 Paeheco St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

President, Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

J. L. Mootz, Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veteran. Building MA I- 

Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 3 P.M. 
Eugene D. Bennett. 225 Bush St.. President 
George T. Davis. 98 Post St. 
Sidney M. Ehrman. 14 Montgomery St. 
Frank A. Flynn. 1690 ■ 27th Ave. 
Sam K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 
W. A. Handerson. 19 Maywood Dr 
Milton Klettet. 2179 - 27th Ave. 
Guido J. Musto. 535 North Point St. 
Samuel D. Sayad. 256 Sanu Ana 
Ralph J. A. Stern. 305 Clay St. 

Edward Sharkey. Managing Director 

E. L. George, Secretary 

SAN FRANaSCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HE 1-: 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONER 

Agricultural Bldg., Embarcadero SU 1-3003 

Raymond L. Boztini 



CORONER 

650 Merchant St 
Dr. Henry W. Turkel 



ELECTRiaTY, DEPARTMENT OF 

45 Hyde St. HE 1-: 

D. O. Townsend. Chief 
Doyle L. Smith. Superintendent of Plant 



HNANCE a; RECORDS, DEPARTMENT 

HE 1 



1 Mongan. 317 City Hall 

375 City Hall 



HE 1 
HE 1 
HE 1 
HE 1 



PUBUC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-- 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox. Director of Public Health 
Dr. E. C. Sage. Assistant Director of Public Health 
Haaaler Health Home, Redwood City 

Dr. S:u T. Tsou. Superintendent 
Laguiu Honda Home, 7th Ave. &* Dewey Blvd. 

Louis A. Moran, Superintendent MO 4-1 

San Francisco Hospital. 22nd i^ Potrero 

Dr. T. E. Albers, Superintendent MI 7-( 

Central Emergency, Grove 6? Polk HE 1-7 

PUBLIC WORKS, DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall HE 1-2 

Sherman P. Duckel. Director 

R. Brooks Larter. Assistant Director. Administrative 
L. J. Archer. Asst. Director, Maintenance and Operations 



Bureaus 

ty Hall 

J. J. McCloalccy, Supctvitor 
Architecture, 265 Oty Hall 

Charles W. GriSith. City Archit. 
Building Inspectioa, 275 City Hall 

L'itcr C Bush, Supetintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army 

A H Ekenberg, Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau, 286 City Hall 

iidncy Franklin. Supervisor 



Sewer Repair Si Sewage Tmtmem 2323 Army St.. H 

Ben Benas. Superintendent 
Street Cleaning, 2323 Army St. H 

Bernard M. Crotty. Superintendent 
Street Repair, 232! Atmy St. H 

F. D. Brown, Superintendent 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall H 

Ben G. Kline. Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shopa, 31! Francisco St. H 

Aylmcr W. Petan. Superintendent 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

9! Grove St. H 

Philip L. Resoa, Director of Property 
James A. Graham, Superintendent Auditorium H 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS 8C MEASURES 

6 City Hall H 

O. C. Skinner, Jr. 
Fa^mcra* Market. Bayshore &* Alcmany 

Thos. P. Christian. Market Master W 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



: 1-2121 
: 1-2121 

I-212I 
: 1-2121 

: 1-2121 

: 1-2121 

: 1-2121 

: 1-2121 

: 1-2121 

1-2121 
1-2121 

1-2121 
1-2121 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Golden Gate Paik BA 1-5100 

Dr. Robert C. Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF THE LEGION 
OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-5610 

Meeta 2nd Monday. Jan., April, June, Oct., 3:30 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. A. B. Spreckels. Honorary President. 2 Pine St. 

Paul Vcrdier. President, 199 Geary St. 

E. Raymond Armsby. Ill Sutter St. 

Louis A. Benoist. 37 Drumm St. 

James B. Black. 245 Market St. 

Walter E. Buck. 235 Montgomery St. 

Alexander de " " " 

Mrs. Bri 

tiesh 

liam 
David Pleydell-Boi 

John N. Roscfcrans. 2 Pine St. 

William R. Wallace. Jr.. 310 Sansome St. 
Whitney Warren. 285 Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L. Zellerbach. 343 Sansome St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President. Recreation &■ Park Commission 

Thomas Carr Howe. Jr.. Director 

Capt. Myron E. Thomas. Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORL\L MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Monday Jan.. April. June, Oct., 3 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Helen Cameron, Honorary Presidenr, Hillsborough 

Michel D. Weill, President, The White House 

Charles R. Blyth, 235 Montgomery St. 

Miss Louise A. Boyd. 255 California St. 

Sheldon G. Cooper. 620 Market St. 

R. Gwin Follis. 3690 Washington St. 

Randolph A. Hearst. S. F. Call-Bulletin 

James K. Lochead. 464 California St. 

Crovcr A. Magnin. St. Francis Hotel 

Garret McEnerney. II. 3725 Washingron St. 

Roscoc F. Cakes. 2006 Washington St. 

Richard Rheem. 2828 Vallejo 

Joseph O. Tobin. Hibernia Bank 

Mrs. Nion Tucker. Burlingame Country Club 



Ex-OSido Members 



President. Recreation H Park Comn 
Dr. Walter Heil. Directot 
Col. Ian F. M. Macalpine. ; 

LAW LIBRARY 

436 City Hall 
Robert J. Everson. Librarian 

PUBUC POUND 

2500 - 16th St. 
Charles W. Friedrichs. Secretary a 




dryer-dried things 
are softer, nicer 

Towels are an example. A sun-dried towel 
feels like burlap compared to one that's been 
dryer-dried. Everything (from stuffed animals 
to throw-rugs) comes out of an automatic 
dryer soft and fluffy . . . fresh and sweet. 

And with a dryer, there's no fuss with clothes- 
pins ... no lugging, weather worries or sun- 
baked wrinkles to iron out. You just push a 
button and the job's done — softer, fresher, 
fluffier! 

BETTER BUY NOW! 

:. 1 5 8 Pacific Gas andEUciric Company 



Sure it's better... 



High dividends with insured 
safety (through an agency of 
the U.S. Government) up to 
.$10,000 is a savings opportun- 
ity hard to surpass. Open an 
account with Franklin SaWngs 
...California's oldest, founded 
in 1875. 

Current per annum 

dividend rate 4% 

Saue-by-mail accounts invitcdf 

FRANKLIN SAVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION 

1201 Market Street at 8th • Telephone; KLondike 2-1356 





ABLE 

ALERT 

AGGRESSIVE 

KEEP 



Robert C. 

Kl RK WOOD 

STATE CONTROLLER 

Democrats — Republicans — Independents agree 
— Let's keep KIRK^SOOD, the PROGRESSIVE 
LEADER, on the job. He has given you expert, 
non-political administration. KIRKWOOD has the 
background and e.xperience — plus proved ability 
and distinguished record of PLANNING AHEAD 
FOR YOU. 

Committee to Re-elect ROBERT C. KIRKWOOD 



ELIZABETH ARDEN 

Cordially Welcomes You 
to her San Francisco Salon 



550 SITTER 



YU. 2-3755 



Books 



Tivo Controversial 
Public Figures 



by Jane Rawson 

rHE .AJTHENT SOCIETY 

t>y John Kenneth Galbruith 
Houghton Miflin Company — $5.00 

This book causes a considerable 
sarthquake in the economic ground 
Linder the feet of the averag'e man. 
He finds himself looking out over 
1 denuded landscape, feeling lost. 
[f you are a professional economist, 
sympathetic to the views widely 
shared in the Harvard economic 
'acuity, you breathe a deep sigh 
)f relief that at last someone has 
jegun to clear the gi'ound. If, on 
:he other hand, you share the views 
)f the distinguished Oxford econ- 
>mist, Professor Colin Clark, then 
'the wigs are on the green." and 
,'0U go forth to the duel. 

Professor Galbraith analyses the 
heories of Smith, Ricardo, MUl and 
Marshall, and rejects them as not 
elevant to present-day American 
lociety. From the opening para- 
fraph. which includes the sentence, 
'But. beyond doubt, wealth is the 
■elentless enemy of understand- 
ng," the battle is joined. If, like 
'rofessor Clark, you had a leLs- 
ired youth reading Adam Smith 
it an English university. Professor 
Jalbraith's readability will perhaps 
itrike you as flashy. If, however, 
'ou feel that to gain a little fresh 
nsight into economics will be an 
ntelligent way of spending the 
weekend, even if it means putting 
iside Nabokov's "Lolita," then you 
i-ill find Professor Galbraith's style 
m occasion excellent, as in this 
>assage about the human tendency 
laziness: "We have feather- 
ledding unions and goldbricking 
^'orkmen and slothful supemumer- 
iries everywhere. Indeed it is pos- 
lible that the ancient art of evad- 
ng work has been carried in our 
ime to its highest level of sophis- 
ication, not to say elegance. One 
ihould not suppose that it is an 
iccomplishment of any particular 
lass, occupation, or profession. 
Ipart from imiversities where its 
>ractice has the standing of a 
cholarly rite, the art of genteel 
nd elaborately concealed idleness 
nay well reach its highest devel- 
opment in the upper executive 
eaches of the modem corpora- 
ion." We ourselves much like 
'rofessor Galbraith's saucy attack. 



(Our quarrel with the author, on 
occasion, is that when he talks 
about other people's theories with 
which he is very familiar, he is a 
little obscure to the less well- 
informed like ourselves.) 

Professor Galbraith calls the con- 
temporary ideas acceptable to the 
majority "the conventional wis- 
dom." He goes on to develop the 
view that this conventional wis- 
dom is inadequate for the prob- 
lems of the present day, and, in 
truth, it does seem abimdantly 
clear that a dispassionate glance 
over present day economic con- 
fusion must detect more of the 
conventional than the wise in om- 
thinking. The author's major the- 
sis is that societies prior to ours 
have taken tor granted that pover- 
ty was the predestined, unaltei-able 
lot of many members of a society. 
Modern Amei'ica is, in fact, the 
first society which could be called 
affluent. 

Professor Galbraith reviews the 
govermuental docti-ine that the 
country's budget must be balanced. 
He also looks out over society and 
detects a new class. This new 
class is in his mind primarily more 
concerned to work at satisfying 
jobs, than to labor for the highest 
wage. It is much concerned to 
gain knowledge and education, that 
values may be of greater impor- 
tance in life than dollars. For a 
government budgeting for a coun- 
ti-y energized by and satisfying to 
these newly-awakening citizens, 
obviously thinking along the lines 
of Professor Galbraith is eminent- 
ly in order. Whatever the inhab- 
itants of Professor Clark's Cxford 
may be doing, here in America 
hard-working, resilient citizens are 
taking two-week or longer paid 
vacations looking at fai'away 
places. They are coming back 
home hoping that their children 
recently graduated from high 
school can continue their education 
in alert institutions, either public- 
ly or primarily financed, at the col- 
lege level. The twentieth century 
is wonderfully inventive and. as 
Professor Galbraith is concerned to 
point out, full of worthwhile re- 
wards for its denizens. Their ac- 
cess to these riches must not be 




EXPERIENCE COUNTS! 

23 years working in all phases of California law 

— as practicing attorney 

— as executive assistant to the Governor 

— and for the past 1 5 years as Superior Court Judge 

makes 

JUDGE STANLEY MOSK - Democrat 

by far the most qualified candidate 

for ATTORNEY GENERAL 



THE JACKSON 
HOSPITALS, INC. 

Executive Offices: 
1410 Bonita Avenue, Berkeley, California 

Berkeley Division 

1410 BONITA AVENUE 

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Hayward, California 

ELgiii 1-5300 - LI (erne 2-0212 



>CTOBER, 1954 



THE BAM 
OF TOKYO 

OF 
CALIFORNIA 



160 Slider street 
San Francisco 



Hotv well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




t ven most lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour cx- 
citing, informative, cntcrtaininR. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Trancisco. Hundreds of thousands 
dt) — every year and say, "There's 
nothinc like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous drivcr-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares are surprisingly 




haiiipcrcd by outmoded economic ing woman advising a refreshingly vigor of the author, and whateve 

practices. humble and sincere politician, his political \'iews may be. he can 

The intelligent reader, who is (Governor Stevenson comes out not fail to be enchanted by Mrs 

also in a position of leadership in like a somewhat absurdly wa.\'\vard Roosevelt herself as she looks bacl 

his commimity, will find this book pony, who just refuses to take the over the years since her husband': 

"The Affluent Society" more than bit between his teeth. ) death, and recounts the adjust 

stimulating. In passing, we would The writing throughout is terse, ments she has so excellently madi 

Uke to compliment the professor alive and informed. The reader and gives a picture of the gay an 

on coming up with a title for his cannot fail to be infected by the valiant heart, 
book as fine and evocative as that 
of the great classic of the science 
of economics, Adam Smith's "The 
Wealth of Nations." 



Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
YUkon 6-4000 



ON snr OWN 

Eleanor Roosevelt 

Harper — S4.00 

This is a book full of ideas and 
insights to quicken and awaken 
similar streaks in more slumbrous 
minds. The book gives a wonderful 
picture of the right way to handle 
the later years of life: "I had few 
definite plans but I knew there 
were certain things I did not want 
to do. I did not want to rtm an 
elaborate household again. I did 
not want to cease trying to be use- 
ful in some way. I did not want to 
feel old — and I seldom have. In 
the years since 1945 I have known 
various phases of loneliness that 
are boimd to occur when people no 
longer have a busy family life. But, 
without particularly planning it, 
I have made the necessary adjust- 
ments to a different way of living, 
and I have enjoyed almost every 
minute of it and almost everything 
about it." 

As the word "almost" indicates 
in the last sentence, this book has 
a ring of authenticity and truth. 
Mrs. Roosevelt's combination of 
flexibility and discipline in everj'- 
day living has led her to wisdom, 
and this wisdom the reader may 
share. 

Riches sparkle all through the 
pages. Here, on the fli-st page, is 
the gist for a complete treatise on 
marriage: "My husband and I had 
come through the years with an 
acceptance of each other's faults 
and foibles, a deep understanding, 
warm affection and agreement on 
essential values." 

■What the reader \V'iU enjoy most, 
however, are probably the glimpses 
of scenes played by Mrs. Roosevelt 
and well-known contemporary fig- 
ures. Her accoimt of her visit with 
Khrushchev and her impressions 
of the Soviet Union add real facts 
to our armorj'. Her conversation 
and gentle admonishments about 
campaigning for the Presidency to 
Adlai Stevenson, her forthright ad- 
vice that he "would not be making 
an error if he got a little automo- 
bile and traveled leisurely in vari- 
ous sections of the country," raise 
in the reader's mind an imforget- 
uble image of a clever and charm- 



LARKSPUR 

CONVALESCENT 

HOSPITAL 

For Elderly Chronics and Convalescents 
R.N. and Physical Therapist on Staff 

GRACE SLOCUM, Director 

Special Diet 

Homelike Atmosphere 
Moderate Prices 

Conscientious Care 

234 HAWTHORNE, LARKSPUR 

Phone WAbash 4-1862 

LARK:SPUR, CALIFORNIA 



RIGHT TO WORK IS A FRAUD 

VOTE NO on PROP. 18 

Elevator Constructors Union Local No. 8 



FRANK I. MURPHY'. Bi: 



M:in,igcr 



SAVE THE PALACE OE EINE ARTS 

Vote YES on PROPOSITION B 

Compliments of Maurice Uglow 
West Coast Linoleum and Carpet Company 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 



CITY AND SUBURBS 

General Manager John M. Peirce 
r the five-county Bay Area Rapid 
ransit District \.vanied that the 
ay Area may become an "asphalt 
ingle of freeways, highways, 
loverleafs and parking lots" if it 
jntinues to rely solely on the 
utomobile for the movement of 
eople. 

"We are convinced that the trend 
jward the vise of more and more 
utomobiles can be checked and 
ongestion can be cured only with 
ipid transit — rapid transit work- 
ig with the freeways and high- 
ways to provide a truly balanced 
ransportation system." 

The former State Director of 
'inance said rapid transit can 
love vast numbers of people more 
fficiently than freeways because 

two-track rapid transit line has 
he carrying capacity of 30 to 40 
ines of freeways. 

Noting that usable space is rap- 
31y disappearing in the Bay 
ounties. Peirce said he questions 
,ow much of this space can be 
elinquished to accommodate the 
iiovement and parking of the auto- 
lobile and how much of this avail- 



able space "we can afford to deny 
to the uses and purposes which 
constitute the very life blood of 
our area." 

Peirce spoke on the subject, "The 
Business Community and Rapid 
Transit." 

He described the "core area of 
the Bay Area as the three cities of 
San Francisco, Oakland and Berke- 
ley." and said there is a mutual 
inter-dependence between this core 
and the surroimding suburbs. 

"The central core of a metro 
politan area." he said, "is the heart 
that pumps the life blood out into 
the suburbs. It. in turn, is depend- 
ent upon the subiu-bs for nourish- 
ment. But if the heart becomes 
imhealthy. the suburbs very rap- 
idly become unhealthy. 

"I would hazard a guess that 
subuiban comjuuters earn in this 
central core area more than $1,- 
500.000,000 annually, the bulk of 
which is spent on goods and serv- 
ices and to pay taxes in the com- 
munities in which they reside. 

"What would the outlying com- 
munities do without this inflow of 
dollars ? 

"But the other side of the coin 



is that the central core area would 
be in just as bad a fix if it did not 
have the skills and abilities of these 
commuting employees. 

"The primary purpose of the 
rapid transit system proposed for 
the Bay Area." Peirce said, "is to 
pemiit the free flow of people and 
goods on which our very economic 
base depends." 

He said his main goal in the 
months ahead will be to attempt 
to guide the planning of a rapid 
transit system "that will be so 
economical to build and so eco- 
nomical to operate that its entire 
cost can be met by its users." 

"But even if a subsidy is re- 
quired." he added, "it will be a 
small price to pay for the benefits 
which will accrue to all classes of 
citizens if rapid transit can pro- 
tect our economic values and pre- 
vent urban disintegration." 

NEW PALACE 
The Palace of Fine Arts, de- 
signed and built in 1915 by Bernard 
Maybeck. and considered by many 
as one of the highest achievements 
of one of America's greatest archi- 
tects, is again under discussion. 



The Palace of Fine Arts League, 
Inc., with the able statesmanship 
of Assemblyman Caspar W. Wein- 
berger, have persuaded the State 
to appropriate from available State 
Park funds, the amount of $2,000,- 
000 so that the Palace "shall be 
repaired and rehabilitated as close 
to its oi-iginal form as possible." 

To utilize fully this State gift of 
$2,000,000, San Francisco voters 
must pass the Bond Issue of $3,- 
600,000, Proposition "B," at the 
polls on November 4th, by a two- 
( Continued on Page 18) 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 

. San Francisco and Ignacio. Calif. 



FOR 

SAMPLING - INSPECTION 
LABORATORY SERVICES 

Chemical Analysis • Bacteriological E.xaniination 
Grading • Certification 

OF 
IMPORTS -:- EXPORTS 

Specify 

CURTIS & TOMPKINS, LTD. 

EitablhUed 187S 

236 Front Street • San Francisco 1 1 
Phone: EXbrook 2-1130 Cable: ANALYST 

Members ../ and Official Chemists andlor Samplers lor 

Sampling Representatives at Coast and Inland Points 

SPECIALISTS IN 



Nevada Operations Headquarters — Lovelock 
Many Scientific and Trade Organisations 

KCl'A - NlOP - .A,o( S — .^STM — .^CIL 



SALEME 

CONSTRUCTION 

CO. 

3224 JUDAH STREET 
MO. 4-3478 San Francisco 

Specializing in Insurance Repairs 

GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



OCTOBER. 1956 




Students study graceful li 

thirds majority. 

The supporters of this proposi- 
tion argue that the rehabilitated 
PaJace of Fine Arts would not only 
preser^'e a famous, internationally 
known landmark, but would add 
more than 100.000 square feet of 
convention and meeting space. 

If the Palace of Fine Arts were 
rehabilitated, it would offer 54.320 
square feet of open exhibit space, 
smaller meeting rooms, two the- 
aters of 1500 and 500 seats each, 
radio and television facilities, cat- 
ering and restaurant facilities, of- 



is of Palace of Fir 

lourfesy of Redw( 



Dd Err 



otlon 



fices and administrative 
which would not only be attractive 
to industry and commerce for con- 
ventions, but would be of great 
value to education, art, music, the- 
ater, ballet and other cultural and 
artistic activities. 

The new Palace could become a 
universal educational-cultural cen- 
ter worthy of the great traditions 
of San Francisco and a logical and 
handsome backgi'ound for great 
festivals in America, comparable to 
those of Salzburg, Edinburgh, and 
Bayreuth in Europe. 



BUSINESS PROGRESS 
Thirty large corporations — eight 
of them billion-dollar businesses — 
with national headquarters in San 
Francisco reported combined assets 
of $34. 2 billion last year, according 
to the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce Reasearch Department. 
Representing a broad cross- 
section of the national economy — 
including finance, insurance, util- 
ities, railroads, shipping, manu- 
facturing and trade — the corpora- 
tions have shown an increase of 
S12 billion since 1950. 

A few of the corporations are 
among the largest in the nation. 
One of the banks and the gas and 
electric company are foremost in 
the countrj'. The companies in- 
clude: Bank of America, Pacific 
Telephone and Telegi-aph Co., 
Standard Oil of Califomia, South- 
em Pacific Company. Pacific Gas 
and Electric Company, Crocker- 
Anglo National Bank, Fireman's 
Fund Insurance Company, Amer- 
ican President Lines, Ltd., Matson 
Navigation Company. 



The first Pony Express rider 
arrived in San Francisco from St. 
Joseph. Missouri, on April 14, 1850, 
according to the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce. 



GRAHAM W. S. MILLER 

A.I.D. 

Residential and Industrial Designer 
Color Consultant 

1353 POST STREET 
San Francisco, California 

ORdwav 3-8076 



SHEEDY DRAY AGE CO. 

Crane ami Lifl Sirricc up lo 20 Tom 
.MACHINERY .ind EQUIPMENT HAULING 

Street, ncir 3rd SC M.iripos.i Sts, S,in Fr.incisco 

Tclcphom: MA rkcl 1-8080 



OVERN'S CABINET 
SHOP 

Custom Built Furniture 

Chinese Modem, also Desks, Tables 

Radio, TV a: Rec. Cabinets 

Low Prices 

2512 - 25th Mission 8-1070 



SILVER CREST 
DO-NUT SHOP 

Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge 

P. Lynch ac J. Fitzgerald, Props. 

340 BAYSHORE BLVD. 

Restaurant Phone AT 8-0753 

Bar Phone MI 8-9954 



Moler Barber School 

System of Barber Colleges 

G. I. Approved 

D. E. Brown, Manager 

161 FOURTH STREET 

GArfield 1-9979 San Francis 



L.4NDINI 
SMOKE SHOP 

688 BROADW.\-i- 
SAN FR.ANCISCO 



VALLEY JOE'S 

Your Genial Host-Joe Banni< 

1087 SUTTER STREET 

PR 5-9766 



Miraloma 
Shell Service 

Fowler Ave. 8C Portola Dr. 
LO 4-1919 Nick Brookweli 



MR. HOT DOG RANCHO 

5121 Geary Blvd. 

Featuring the Famous Rancho' 
Burgers - Delicious Food Specialties 



CROWN DRUG STORES 

Daly City - 'Westlake 
355 So. Mayfair Ave. PL. 5-8200 I 

Stonestown 
95 Stonestown LO. 4-6055 



Crest Delicatessen 
& Liquors 

COFFEE SHOP 

900 Sutter Street San Francisco 



Villa Marina 
Cleaners 

1531 CHESTNUT STREET 
ORdway 3-2424 



P. A. BERGEROT 



Counsel for Bank of Ar 
Counsel lor Consulate General 
of France 

Phone SUtter 1-7868, 1-7869 
FRENCH BANK BUILDING 
1 10 Sutter St. San Francisco 



San Gottardo Hotel 

Reasonable Rates 

217 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

EXbrook 2-9500 

San Francisco 



VICTORIA 
PASTRY CO. 

Pastory. Birthday S Wedding 

Cakes 

1226 STOCKTON ST. 

SL'. 1-2015 



EXCELSIOR BAKERY 

BIRTHO.W WEDDING 
SPECIALTIES 

4492 Mission Street 
fUniper 1-2521 San Francisco 



THE RECORD 



Cheri's Beauty Salon 

rsh SUTTER STRtET 
OR 3-2925 



Bruno's Hollywood 
Barber Shop 

425 STOCKTON ST. 
EX 2-3371 



Chin's Liquor & 
Grocery Store 

20')2 Sutter St. San Fr.inci 



Chinatown 
Smoke Shop 

727 W.Tshington Street 



Duo Leather Shop 

16 California Street 
GA 1-1466 

NORIEGA MEAT CO. 

Quality Meats - Reasonable Pric 

niwhiale & Retail 

3815 NORIEGA STREET 

LO 6-8821 

DALY CITY DRUG CO. 

6B!1 MISSION STREET 

PL 5-1445 

Open Daily 9 A.M. ■ 10 P.M. 

Including Sundays and Holiday 

Batteate Livestock 
Transportation Co., Inc, 

UNION STOCKV.ARDS 
SO. SAN FRANCISCO 

BURKE'S DRIVE-IN 

"Ben 19c Hamburgers in Town" 

MARKET AT 14th STREET 
UNderhill 1-1266 

Storage - Lubrication - Washii 
Repairing • Batteries 
.4rr,-,,„r,V, . Tires 

STANDARD GARAGE 

233 DRUMM STREET 
Utter 1-2744 San Francisco 1 



THREE PRESIDENTS 

OF LEADING S. F. 

CORPORATIONS 




S. CLARKE BEISE 
Banl of America 




DeLEUW, 
GATHER & 
COMPANY 



— Engineers — 
SAN FRANCISCO 



MEYER AND YOUNG 

BUILDING CORPORATION 

-:- General Contractors -:- 

679 Portola Drive MOntrose 1-0300 

San Francisco 27, Calif. 



REMINGTON RAND 

Division of Sperry-Rand Corporalion 

41 FIRST STREET 

DOuglas 2-8600 San Francisco 



CONTINENTAL SERVICE 
COMPANY 

260 -5th Street EXbrook 7-2800 

San Fraiieiseo 



ROBERT COGHI.AN AGENCY 

State Farm .Auto Insurance 

HE. 1-5055 
524 VAN NESS AVENUE 



HOF BRAU 



FINEST FOOD 
Money Can Buy 



DOUBLE SHOT BAR ■ 
Pow ell at OTan-ell Street 



-OPEN 7 A.M. TO 3 A.M. 

San Francisco, California 



TH.4DDELS JOHNSON PORTER SERVICE 

San Francisro International Airport 

■Righl lo Hork is a Frcud-il Means Right to Wreck" 

BUTCHERS UNION LOCAL 115 
OF SAN FRANQSCO 

A^fERICAN MEAT CO. 

780 Folsom Street SU. 1-8700 

RIGHT TO WORK IS A FRAUD 
IT MEANS RIGHT TO WRECK 

Automotive Warehousemen's Union Local No. 241 

VOTE NO on PROP. 18 

(So called Right to Work) 
Automobile Drivers 8C Demonstrators — Local No. 960 

Ryan's "10" Service, Signal Oil Products 

"We give extra Diridcnd Coupons" 

670-15 Re-Caps - ?3.50 a: up 

16th SC So. Van Ness Ave. UN. 1-2748 

VISIT THE 

PALACE BATHS 

85 THIRD STREET SAN FRANOSCO 



PALLAS BROS. 

RADIO a: TELEVISION REPAIRING - AND SALES 
5000 MISSION STREET JU 5-5000 SAN FRANCISCO 12 



BIANCHI BAKING CO. 

523 GREEN STREET 

LAUNDRE BRITE 

Self Service Laundry 

1445 HAIGHT STREET 

UN. 3-9851 



TONY PAPPAS 
Apartments 

1264 HOWARD STREET 



BITLER BROS. 

258 WINSTON DRIVE 
SAN FRANCSCO 



MILO COFFEE 

759 HARRISON STREET 
DO. 2-4322 



Father & Son 
Shoe Repair 

Shoe, ReneoeJ 
32nd a: Noriog.i Si OV. 1.2515 



Plays and Music 
in Coming Weeks 



MEMO FOR LEISURE 



On Sunday afternoon. November 
2, at 2:30, an e.xuberant program 
of song and dance singularly re- 
freshing to the responsible citizen 
in search of rela.xation after a busy 
week, will be offered by the famous 
General Platoff Don Cossack Chor- 
us and Dancers, an attraction as 
familiar a part of the Ameiican 
scene as the National League or 
the Shriners Football Classic. Sea- 
son after season the dashing Cos- 
sacks sing their musical journeys 
across the land, winning new fans, 
and pleasing old friends with their 
stirring music-making. 

Their concert, scheduled for the 
Masonic Memorial Temple, has 
special sentimental significance for 
the company who made their 
American debut here in 1939 as a 
feature of the Golden Gate Inter- 
national Exposition. They have 
had their homes in the United 
States ever since and all are now 
American citizens. 

Long before the expression Anti- 
Communist was known in America, 
these Cossacks chose exile from the 
country of their birth rather than 
live imder a totalitarian ideology. 
The Platoff Don Cossack Chorus 
was organized in Pi-ague, Czecho- 
slovakia in 1922, two years after 
they had fled from their native 
land. 

Edwin Booth, known as the 
Prince of Players and the foremost 
actor of the American theatre in 
the 19th century, made his fare- 
well appearance in 1891 in a per- 
formance of •■Hamlet" at the 
Brooklyn Academy of Music. Now 
after 67 years he "returns" to the 
living theatre in a re-creation of 
his life by Jose Ferrer, staiTing in 
"Edwin Booth," a new play by 
Milton Geiger, coming to the Al- 
cazar Theatre for a three-week en- 
gagement, prior to Broadway be- 
ginning Monday, October 27. It 
is on the Theatre Guild subscrip- 
tion series. 

This interesting new play is a 
co-production by Mr. Ferrer and 
the Plaj-wrights' Company. In ad- 
dition Mr. Ferrer has also directed 
the play in a unit setting, designed 
and lighted by Zvi Geyra, that per- 
mits the free-flowing action to 
occur in "America, Elsinore, Duns- 
inane, Bosworth Field, Mantua, 
Verona, Rome — and the mind of 
Edwin Booth." 






^ 



■ Ferrer plays Edwin Booth 



DOuglas 2-4654 

North Beach 
French Italian Bakery 

16 Green St. Near Grant Ave 

San Francisco U. Calif. 

CELSO BOSCACa 



W. KELLY 
Plumber 

Heaters Rebuilt 

1772 ELLIS STREET 

WE 1-4429 



Min's Mobilgas Service 

Lubrication - tt'ashing - Polishing 

901 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

Fillmore 6-4992 



KIM'S 
CABINET SHOP 

Industrial - Residential 

CABINETS. SINKS. 

COUNTERS i PANELING 

15 Stone Street 



CLYDE E. BENTLEY 

CoTu^ultiriii Engineer 

405 Sansomc Street 
Snn Francisco 1 1 



NORIEGA MEAT CO. 

)u.ilu\' Me.ils - Reasonable Prices 
Hholesalc& Retail 

815 Noriega St. LO 6-8821 



OHN'S BODY SHOP 

P^inlmg- Welding 
John Botellho, Prop. 

3827 GR.AND AVENUE 

OAKL.\ND, C.'VLIFORNI.^ 

E 6-3254 Home: LO 9-2687 



BAY CITIES 

NEON 

761 VALENCIA ST. 

San Francisco 



Hildreth's Pharmacy 

■W .f. (Bill) Kniffel" 
Propr.eloT 

2998 MISSION STREET 

San Francisco 10, Calif. 

Reiidenee Phone ATnaler 2-64S4 

Telephone Mission "-1289 



151^ Johnny Cancilla, Lou Cancilla 
Charley Solomon 

Johnny's Twenty-four 
Hundred Club 



Temescal 

Rug & Upholstery 

Cleaning Co. 

Rue Cleaning PrturTc, Value 

Renovation Worki H'onders 

4701 Shattuck Ave. Oakland 

OL 8-2575-6 



ionded Roofing & Siding 

Tar - Gravel - Shingles - Tile 

1280 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 

WA 1-9459 WA 1-9027 



Lenhardt School of 
Court Reporting 

Secretarial Courses 

1005 MARKET KL 2-301 



Current offering at the Actor's 
Workshop is "The Waltz of the 
'loreaaors oy Jean Anouiln, la- 
mous tor his mougntfvU plays "An- 
tigone and "The L.ark." This lat- 
est sample of his work is a de- 
parture trom the high passion and 
seriousness which most of us assi- 
ciate with Anoulh. It is a light 
farce, spaiKling witn Gall.c wit 
about an aging general with a 
possessive wife and a wandering 
eye. Direction is by Herbert Blau, 
Cieneral St. Fe is played by Mau- 
rice Argent, his wile by Mara Gil- 
bert, and a disconcerting feminine 
admirer wiio turns up trom the 
past by tsealrice Manley. 

This sort of fare is a change in 
pace for the Actors Vvorksnop who 
iiiainiy present literary di'aiiias of 
the classic tradition, 'ine audience 
responded witn gales of laughter 
to an entertainment which is re- 
freshing in iLs gusty vigor. The 
run will be e.xtendea through No- 
vember 22. Ne.\t production will 
be Tennessee Williams' "Garden 
District" which is scheduled to 
open November 28. 

An outstanding international 
event for a three day visit Novem- 
ber 18, 19 and 20 will be the pre- 
sentation by the Theatre Vieu.x- 
Colombier of France in Racine's 
"Brittanicus " starring Marguerite 
Jamois under the auspices of the 
Actors Workship in association 
With the French and American 
governments. 

The San Francisco S>Tnphony 
Orchestra's pre - season Pension 
Fund Concert featuring the famous 
guest piaJiist, Rudolf Serkin, under 
the baton of Maestro Em-ique Jor- 
da, is scheduled for Sunday, No- 
vember 16th, at 3:00 p.m. in the 
Opera House. 

The progrram will include Wag- 
ner's Prelude to "Die Meistersing- 
er '; Schubert's Symphony No. 3 in 
D Major; Suite from "The Love for 
Three Oranges " by Prokofleff, and 
the highlight of the afternoon's 
concert, Ml'. Serkin's classic inter- 
pretation of Beethoven's Piano 
Concerto No. 5 in E Flat Major 
I fc^mperor. 

This pre-season date, November 
16th, has been arranged to accom- 
modate Mr. Serkin who is gracious- 
ly donating his services for this 
Orchestra Pension Fund Concert 
and cannot appear at a later date. 
Ml'. Serkin is the first concert artist 
to voltmteei' his talents in support 
of this worthy cause. The 47th 
Annual San Francisco SjTiiphony 
Season starts December 3, 4, 5. 



Beef accounts for 51 per cent of 
the average American's meat diet. 



CAREW & ENGLISH 

Leo V. Carew 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS . . . MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

MASONIC AT GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
S,in Fnuiciscci IS. C.ilitorni.i 

DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

Any Make or Model Seven Days a Week 
y A.M. . 10 P.M. FREE ESTIM.MES on Antenna Installations 

1322 HAIGHT STREET 

UN. 3-0793 — Also UN. 3-1836 

FOSTER'S OLD FASHION FREEZE 
and OLD FASHION HAMBURGERS 



2660 SO. EL CAMINO REAL 
FI. 509-0 



SAN MATEO 



PARIS LOUVRE RESTAURANT 

Fine Cuisine in a French Atmosphere 

THE HOUSE OF CREPES SUZETTE 

Free Parking One Block Away 

648 BRO.\DW.^Y :-: YU. 2-7936 

Frank C. Borrman — Steel Supply Co. 

Headquarters for Steel Beams — Steel Plates 

NEW and USED 

815 BRYANT STREET MArkei 1-3063 

AERO SERVICE CORP. 

Incorporated 1919 

Foreign 4; Domestic - .Aerial Mapping by Photogrammetric Methods, 

Contour Maps, Airborne Geophysical Surveys, Photo Mosaics and 

Relief Models 

68 POST STREET -:- YUkon 2-4796 

NATIONAL ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 



■WHOLES.XLE HLECTRIC SUPPLIES " 



100 - 4th Street 
U77 Old Count 
14th & Harrison 


Rd. 

Sts. 




s.^rrrA ros.-\ 

S.\N CARLOS 
S,\N FR.\NCISCO 






Ma 


n Oflice San Franciico, Cali 



Santa Ro<ta 255 

LYtell 1-0743 

HEmlotl 1-8529 



HAVISIDE COMPANY 

Established 1S79 

Marine and Industrial Supplies 

Ship Chandlers, Canvas Goods, Salvage and Derrick Barges 
40 SPEAR STREET EXbrook 2-0064 SAN FRANCISCO 5 



rrOBER. 1958 



Gourmet Fair 

Groci-rics Imporlcd 
Wino • Liquors - Beer 
2181 UNION STREET 



BURKE FALLON 

Columbia Building 
Mainlenance Co. 

1-2 School St. PL 5-6021 

D.nlv City 



Kilroy Photo Studio 

Wedding, Baby & Family Photos 



WOO BROS. 



, Fresh Fruits, Vegetables 
Delicatessen, Wines & Liquors 

200 - 6th STREET 



Neda's Flower Shop 

1581 Haight St. KL 2-2920 

F/o».T< /or all Occasions - Delivery 



ALBERT L. NG 

Union Oil Dealer 
B.iy & Taylor-OR 3-7913 
Pacific & Taylor-PR 6-4465 



QUONG FAT CO. 
Grocers 

1009 GRANT AVE, 



Ivy^s Beauty Scdon 

Hair Styling 
1812'2 Eddy Street JO 7-3684 



Chinatown Charlie 

2615 MISSON STREET 
VA 6-9866 



Chinese Modern Kitchen 

Take Out - Delirered 
1 337 IrvinK St. LO 6-4722 



Kerr Paint Co. 

2001 OAKDALE AVE. 
Ml 8-5263 



Chinese World, Ltd. 

736 GRANT AVE. 
EX 2-1263 



WOMAN OF THE MONTH 
(Continued from Page 10) 
easy to follow by the voices and 
background music. The boys still 
request hearing the record "Around 
the World" at meetings. 

Doiis, who attended State Col- 
lege under the Disabled Veterans' 
plan, and accompanied by her first 
Guide Dog, Hale, is still eager to 
learn new skills. She is enrolled in 
a leather-craft class in the Adult 
School system, and she was happy 
about an unexpected donation of 
scrap leather to her Den. 

"We're going to use it to make 
miniature cowboy chaps," she said, 
showing a sample, "which will 
serve as novel rings for the boys 
to pull their uniform ties through.' 

Her fingers moved rapidly over 
the cardboard pattern and the ma- 
terials, as she explained how the 
tiny chaps would be cut out and 
tied together. She then described 
a completed project — the making 
of little racing "mice," from walnut 
shell halves on which the boys 
placed features, putting a marble 
beneath each shell, so that it could 
move. 

Both Mr. and Mrs. Benedict have 
Scouter's awards. This award is 
no longer given to women. Doris 
also has received the Den Mother 
award for outstanding achieve- 
ment. She said that another big 
thrill for her was receiving an 
orchid lei at a recent Pack dinner, 
a token of appreciation from the 
parents of her boys. 

In 19.57 Doris was chosen "Den 
Mother of the Year" for the Lake 
Merced District, San Francisco 
Boy Scout Council. A number of 
Scout executives, including one 
from the Philippines, were present 
as Doris received the certificates 
from Mayor George Chiistopher. 
At a meeting of Scout Commis- 
sioners early this year the award 
was again mentioned, and one of 
the commissioners remarked that 
Doris was Den Mother of Any Year. 

The Benedicts' spacious, attract- 
ively furnished home contains 
many objects made by their son 
imder Doris' direction at Cub meet- 
ings — a tray, picture-frames and 
plaques. Her ideas are numerous 
and original. 

"One Den Mother had her boys 
sign a tablecloth," Doris related. 
"Then she embroidered the names. 
I wanted a similar keep-sake so I 
thought of this." She brought out 
a square of plywood the size of a 
large picture. The boys had signed 
it and then Gilbert had put his 
wood-burning set to good use on 
their names. After being shellacked 
it was hung up by Gilbert's blue 
and gold Den Chief's card, which 
he had earned by working with 



the youunger Cubs. 

Doits manages her Den 5 with 
the same organization used in run- 
ning her home. Programs are care- 
fully planned. "Although." she ad- 
mits cheerfully, "occasionally we 
have to forego an activity because 
something unforeseen arises or the 
boys are not in the mood." 

This flexibility shows her under- 
standing of young children. 

The walls of the basement meet- 
ing room are hung with each boy's 
chart, marked with symbols as he 
advances from Wolf to Bear to 
Lion. Decorated cigar boxes with 
the boys' names on them are ready 
on shelves when the need arises 
for scissors, pencils and crayons. 

Doris's sense of humor bubbles 
up frequently. "Did everyone re- 
member to fill his box this week?" 
she asks. 

"Mine is still empty," pipes up 
one voice. 

"Like your head," she scolds 
amiably, calling him by name. 

She knows every one of this 
rather new group by his voice, 
even by a chuckle or a single word. 
And her memory is an amazing 
storehouse of lists and notes — who 
paid dues, dates of future projects, 
who has been absent. 

If the boys become overly exub- 
erant, up goes her hand in the 
silence signal and they respond 
quickly. She possesses a rare com- 
bination of gentleness and firm- 
ness. She usually conducts meet- 
ings alone, with assistance from 
Gilbert. Each boy's birthday 
throughout the year is celebrated 
with cake and soft drinks, and on 
these occasions another Den 
Mother helps her. 

At one meeting she was teach- 
ing the boys clever Cub Scout 
lyrics she had written to the tune 
of "Home on the Range." She also 
writes skits and simple dramatiza- 
tions which she modestly dismisses 
as "not very good, but the boys 
enjoy them." 

It is easy to see why Doris Bene- 
dict's Cub Den has a very long 
waiting list, and why everyone 
who knows her thinks highly of 
this fair-haired, vivacious woman 
with the optimistic outlook. 

No one can talk to her long with- 
out becoming aware of her genu- 
ine interest in people. She mini- 
mizes self while emphasizing 
the good qualities in others — the 
kindness of Guide Dog School per- 
sonnel, the cooperation she receives 
from her Cubs' parents, the con- 
sideration of Boy Scout officials. 
One reaches the conclusion that 
Doris Benedict not only leads a 
full, rewarding life herself, but that 
she enriches every life with which 
she comes in contact. 



Independent Mexico C\hi 
Cafe 

Our Mqmvji, Cookinii I. Con.ur.tl^ 

Imiuted — But N>%cr Eqtullrd 

Op«n 11:30 .A.M. lo 8 P.M. 

Clovd Moivlav> 

BAyview 1-5517 1792 Haight 



h O M 
Laundromat 

Open Etery Day 

2854 MISSION STREET 



CHIN'S 

Liquors & Groceries 

2092 Sutter Street SU. 7-3665 

San Francisco 



City Hard^^are i 

"Finest Tools for the 

Finest Craftsman" 

5443 MISSION STREET 

DEIaware 3-8989 



Courtesy Body Shop 

Bert Drisclla 

4733 GEARY BLVD. 

SKvIine 2-1279 



EL DRISCO 
HOTEL 

2901 P.'XCIFIC .AVENUE 
FI. 6-098- 



Ed Castagnetto 
Rooting Co. 

1197 HILLSIDE BLND. 
PL. 60900 COLMA 



Florence Cleaners & 
Laundry Service 

168 RICHLAND AVE. 
MI. 8-4818 



Hayes Valley 
Acquariunt 

Tropical Birds - Fish 
327 Haves St. UN. 3-3483 



LARKIN HOTEL 

C. Hobson. Mgr. 

596 EDDY STREET 

TUxedo 5-9638 



Fardin Realty & 
Staff 



Realtors — 

MO. 4-2-80 



JOE CERVETTO CO. 

Window Cleaning 
15 Columbus Ave. YU. 2-1556 

DON'S GROCERY 

CROCEKIES 
BEERS - WhSES 
1301 Church Striit 



NONA REALTY 

Nona Harwick 



Realtor 



533 BALBOA STREET 

Bus. BA. 1-5576 Res. BA. 1-3504 

Woodward-Clyde, 
Sherard & Associates 

Foundation & Testing Engineers 

Highivays - Earth Dams - Airports 

Geologic Investigations 

auto 
i nsu ranee from 



and save u p to 



% - 



excfusivefy for 
Public Employei 



*CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES 



INSURANCE COMPANY 

^:ET street, San FRANCISCO, CAIIFORNM 
: TOUK AGENT r O II DETAILS 



* SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT * 

CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES INSURANCE COM- 
PANY HAS NOT INCREASED RATES ON AUTO 
INSURANCE. ACT NOW ... AND SAVE ... SAVE 
... SAVE! 






. . of the poor downtrodden 

working men and women 

of California! 




The National Association of Manufacturers 

U. S. Chamber of Commerce 

California State Chamber of Commerce 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce 

Los Angeles Merchants & Manufacturers Assoc. 

The General Electric Company 

Are now posing as protectors of the people, 
rushing nobly and without thought of personal 
gain (?) to free us and save us from evil. 

Is the high income of people 

in California an evil? 

Are fair wages an evil? 

Are stable labor-management 
relations an evil? 

You can fool some of the people some of the 
time— but not all of the people all of the time — 
at least not in California! 









-54 



VOTE 



ON PROP. 

(so called Right to Work) 



18 



CITIZENS COMMIHEE AGAINST PROPOSITION 18 

LOUIS ETS HOKIN, HAROLD A. BERLINER, CO-CHAIRMEN 



(iiki«l;kMAiMkJUUtik««iMjkkjiuki 



•54 



PUB. LIBRABY PERIODICAL ROOU 

Civic Center 

San Francisco 2, Calif. 

5? X-"'/'^'^' (7077^ '^'5.'V> 



HASTIE 

Real Estate Inspection and Repair. Inc. 

Complete Termite Inspection Reports 

TERMITES - FUNGI - BEETLES 

225 CAPITOL AVENUE SAN FRANCISCO 12, CALIF. 
DElaware 3-5700 

THE F. W. D. PACIFIC COMPANY 

Industrial, Highway and 
Contractors Equipment 

850 HARRISON STREET 

San Francisco 7, Calif. Phone GArfield 1-4971 

Formerly: The Four Wheel Drive Pacific Company 

Hunter's & Vacation Rentals 

iVew/ & Used Mobile Homes 



Dealers for Field & Stream-Ideal 
Also, the new MARWOOD~10 feet 



■ide 



ORO VILLAGE TRAILER SALES 

7577 MISSION STREET 
DALY CITY PLaza 6-5911 

PEERLESS 
LAUNDRY CO. 

Launderers 
Cleaning and Dyeing 

4701 GROVE STREET 

Oakland, (California 

The RATHSKELLER Restaurant 

GERMAN and AMERICAN FOOD 

Luncheon - Dinners - Beer - Wine - Liquors 

JOHN PAULS :-: FRITZ SCHMIDT :-: FRED KUEHN 

POLK AND TURK STREETS 

PRospect 5-3188 - San Francisco 



BULK RATE 


U. 


S. POSTAGI 




PAID 


San 


Irancisco, Cihl 


Pe 


nnit No. 450" 



FOR YOUR NEXT GET-TOGETHER 

Swanson^s Channel Inn 



900 THIRD STREET 



YU. 2-7850 



BANQUETS, MEETINGS. RECEPTIONS 
25 to 500 

SEE SAN FRANCISCO FROM A NEW POINT OF VIEW 
YOU OPERATE THE CAMERA FROM OUR BAR 



Donohoe & Carroll 
MONUMENTS 

Office opposite Holy Cross Cemetery 
MO. 4-5449 -:- PL. 5-5251 



We invite all Goofl Americans to lieb) fight 
the Un-Amcriean ''Right-to-Wcrk Law" 

Printing Specialties & Paper Products Union 382 

Marshall J. Thorpe. Secretary-Treasurer 
John C. Ferro, President 

1068 WEBSTER STREET, OAKLAND GL. 1-0309 

Be Sure To Vote mmi Proposition 18! 



TWENTY TWO ELEVEN 
POLK CLUB 

2211 POLK STREET 

San Francisco 



Conipluneuts 

of a 

FRIEND 



CITY-COUNTY 



UbLiU LlUKMKf WATER LIFE LINE FOR A CITY 





SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 



CHERRY POWER PROJECT 

by BILL SIMONS 

TWO WOMEN IN WHITE 

by EMILY BLACKMORE 




ALASKA PROFILE 

by DAVID BRODIE 

NORTHWEST SAGA 

by JANE RAWSON 



HARRY E. LLOYD. CHIEF OF HETCH HETCHY PROJECT 

Utilities' cipert engineer, with big penstocl ot Moccasin Power House in bockground 



NOVEMBER, 1958 







DUDLEY DEANE 
& 


Sverdrup & 


ASSOCIATES 


Parcel, Inc. 


6^ — ') 


^s<x=» 


Consulting 
Engineers 


Engineers 
Architects 


G^^ 


isxx^ 




417 MONTGOMERY 


182 - 2nd STREET 


EXbrook 2-8927 


San Francisco 





K T K 

Wrecking Co. 

235 ALABAMA STREET 
KLondike 2-0994 

San Francisco 



875 MONUMENT BLVD. 
Mulberry 5-7525 

Concord, California 



INTERNATIONAL 

ENGINEERING 

CO. 

INC. 

Design & Consulting 
Engineers 

G^ — P 

Dams, Tunnels, Highway, 

Railroads, Hvdro-Electric 

Power Plants. 

llarl)or Development 



UDLik/ Liur\nn I 



CITY-COUNTY 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and fhe Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN PUBLISHER 
ALAN P. TORY EDITOR 

Published at 389 Church Sfreef 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-12 12 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 

NOVEMBER, 1958 
VOLUME 25 NUMBER 10 



^ic^^r^eAy window 



LETTERS 

I am glad to see The Record adding its 
ice to those of people wishing to see San 
ancisco become an interesting and alive 
teway to the Pacific. I hope that our civic 
iders will act in this matter. What we want 
some comparable festival to Mardi Gras in 
ew Orleans, which will make our cit)' invit- 
g to visitors and give it an enhanced repu- 
:ion throughout the world. 
Some festival in which all citizens could 
are would also deepen San Francisco's sense 
community and encourage civic pride. 
Wendy Watson 
929 Broderick Street 
San Francisco 

On behalf of the San Francisco Council of 
e Boy Scouts of America, I would like to 
<j how much we appreciate your story on 
rs. Doris Benedict. 

Mrs. Benedict has for many years been a 
voted and effective volunteer in the Scout- 
g organization in San Francisco. We are 
:ppy to see her being accorded wider recog- 
tion. 

Oscar C. Alverson 
Scout Executive 
San Francisco Council 
Boy Scouts of America 
'm Fell Street 
San Francisco 2 

The Public Library is often discussed in the 
:ws and recently a commission reported on 
e inadequacy of the city's library facilities. 
The librarians do a good job; it is money 
hich is needed to enlarge the scope of the 
jrary. When is action going to be taken? 
^ WiUiam Nelson 

B 116 Mason Street 

r San Francisco 

I very much enjoy the new features of 
he Record. I find the Book Review stimu- 
ting and I welcome the information I get 
om Memo for Leisure about the cultural 
tivities of the City. I particularly enjoy the 
ly spirit of the cartoons. Congratulations to 
)ur cartoonist! The drawing of the rectangu- 
r hula hoop, captioned "Hula hoop for 
|uares " has me laughing still. 

Jack Green 
1260 Noe Street 
San Francisco 



LEFT HAND, RIGHT HAND? Candidate 
Edmund G. "Pat" Brown came into his 
campaign headquarters at 9:20 p.m. on elec- 
tion night and was cheered by jostling sup- 
porters, through whom he fought his way to 
a platform. Starry eyes were focused on him. 

In answer to cries of "Let's hear the new 
Governor, " he felt in a left-hand pocket, and 
pulled out some notes. "OhI that's my conced- 
ing speech, " said Pat — a modest man always 
prepared for emergencies. He then delved 
into a right-hand pocket, came up with an- 
other set of notes, more appropriate to the 
victorious occasion. 

Armed with these he faced the expectant 
audience and gave utterance to sentiments 
which were, to quote a favorite phrase in the 
Brown vocabulary, "Fine and dandy." 

PRESIDENTIAL "VISIT: The Muni bus 
suddenly drew to a stop, as it was about 
to cross Van Ness Avenue. Sirens were scream- 
ing. "It is the President arriving," said the 
operator. Everyone in the bus stood up to get 
a good view. The President, smiling and 
happy-looking, radiated the famous Ike mag- 
netism. 

When he made his peech at the Republi- 
can Party rally in the Civic Auditorium, ruddy 
cheeked and vital, he exhibited a bracing dual 
mood. He changed from engaging fatherli- 
ness to the rugged dourness of a resolute gen- 
eral on a difficult engagement, a switch singu- 
larly suitable on the eve of a hard-contested 
election. 

■pROZEN NORTH: Governor Mike Stepo 
•^ vich. in a speech which was part of the 
Pacific Festival sponsored by the Chamber of 
Commerce, Downtown Association and Com- 
monwealth Club, pointed out that Alaska, 
once a remote noahem fastness, was now a 



close neighbor to the nerve centers of the 
rest of the United States and to the world in 
general. Said he: "We are closer to Wash- 
ington today, in time required for travel, than 
George Washington was from Philadelphia 
at the time of our Constitutional Convention. 
We are closer in time than Washington, 
D. C, was to London during either of the re- 
cent worldwide conflicts." 

A brief article on Page 7 comments on 
the resources of this newest State of the 
LInion and its promise for the future. 

CONSCIENCE MONEY: Mayor George 
Christopher wryly ribbed guest Dr. Har- 
old Spears of the Board of Education at the 
latest monthly dinner of the Municipal Execu- 
tive Employees Association. He accused the 
Superintendent of responsibility for raising 
the tax-rate, year by year, for which the May- 
or's office unfairly takes the blame. While 
most taxpayers write unkind letters to City 
Hall, the Mayor confided to his audience one 
welcome exception. This correspondent en 
closed a check for SlOO, explaining that he 
had cheated the city of its dues, and there- 
after could not sleep at night. He added that, 
if he continued to suffer from sleeplessness, 
he would send the balance of what was owing. 

ELECTIONEERING ETHICS: There is a 
line which ought to be drawn between 
political fighting according to the rules, and 
some of the wild swinging which went on in 
the recent campaign. We welcome the action 
of Board Super\isor Francis McCart)' who has 
asked the city attorney's office to draw up a 
resolution forming a fair campaign practices 
committee, which would report to the Board 
when it thinks a campaign has gone beyond 
the limits of "normal decency. " 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 




LETTERS 


3 


BAY V/INDOW 


3 


WATER LIFE LINE FOR A CITY 


4 


by Bill Simons 




TWO WOMEN IN WHITE 


6 


by Emily Bioclmore 




ALASKA PROFILE 


7 


by Dovid Erode 




PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 


8 


BOOKS 


14 


MEMO FOR LEISURE 


15 



OVEMBER, 1958 




Lake Lloyd, formed by impounding Cherry River water behind Cherry Valley Da 



Members of the 1958 Grand Jury inspect site of new powerhous. 



Water Life Line for a City 



by Bill Simons 



SAN FRANCISCO'S success secret to the 
provision of water at an economical price 
is the development of power resources as a 
by-product of the giant Hetch Hereby System 
which supplies 60 per cent of the water used 
in the city's seri'ice area. 

Today one of the finest water supply and 
power systems in the entire country, Hetch 
Hereby was pioneered by San Franciscans 
with vision more than a half century ago. 

It is being built under a long-established 
plan for the full development of the Tuol- 
umne River watershed high in the Sierra by 
San Francisco in neighborly cooperarion with 
the Modesto Irrigation District, the Turlock 
Irrigation Disrrict and the U. S. Army En- 
gineers. 

The development plan was legalized in 
1913 when the people of San Francisco ob- 
tained a special Congressional grant — the 
famc-d "Raker Act " — giving the city the right 
to fully develop its water resources within the 
boundaries of Yosemite National Park and 
Stanislaus National Forest. 

World War I and work on Hetch Hetchy 
started together. 

By 1934 the water lifeline was completed. 
In a historic ceremony on October 2 of that 
yc-ar, the first waters cascaded from the 155- 
milc-long Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct into the 
classic Pulgas Water Temple which had been 
specially built for the occasion on the east 
shore of Crystal Springs Lake in San Mateo 
County. 

At the time of the ceremony, the following 
tribute was paid the late, great Michael Mau- 
rice O'Shaughnessy, Ciiy Fngincer during the 
project's sometimes frustratingly long history. 

"For 22 years M, M. O'Shaughnessy labored 
to bring Hetch Hetchy water to San Fran- 



cisco. To him, in large measure, goes the 
credit for this miracle of modern engineer- 
ing. To him, the people of San Francisco 
owe an incalculable debt of gratitude. M. M. 
O'Shaughnessy died 16 days before he could 
see the fruition of his dream in these cere- 
monies." 

The great Hetch Hetchy Project at that 
time was comprised of Lake Eleanor and 
Hetch Hetchy reservoirs, the latter impound- 
ed behind massive O'Shaughnessy Dam; the 
small ( 3,750 kilowatt capacity) Early Intake 
and the huge (82,000 kilowatt capacity) Moc- 
casin power plants; and 155 miles of tunnels 
and pipelines. 

Yet another reservoir was to be added to 
the project, and it — like O'Shaughnessy Dam 
— was to bear the name of one of the build- 
ers of the Hetch Hetchy system. This reser- 
voir was Lake Lloyd, formed behind the 
Cherry Valley Dam which was completed in 
1956. 

The story of Lloyd Lake actually goes back 
to the " mid-rwenties when O'Shaughnessy, 
called in as consultant to an engineering pro- 
ject in Grass 'Valley, met a young engineer 
named Harry Edison Lloyd. 

Impressed by the young man's performance, 
O'Shaughnessy induced Lloyd to look him up 
when the work was completed. Thus it was 
that Harry Lloyd came to Hetch Hetchy and 
to a career that brought him to one of the 
highest positions in San Francisco when in 
1951 the Public Utilities Commission ap- 
proved his appointment as Manager and Chief 
Engineer of the Hetch Hetchy Water Supply. 
Power and Utilities Engineering Burc-au. 

New Mexican-born (in White Oaks, Feb- 
ruary 3, 1896), World War I veteran ( in as 
private, out as 2nd Lieut., Field Artiller)'), 



University of California-educated ( B. S. 
Mining, 1921), Lloyd well remembers the 
early days surveying beautiful Cherry River 
'Valley on horseback. The dam was subse- 
quently built with some S 10,000.000 of Fed- 
eral flood control funds and S4.000.000 in 
bonds voted by San Francisco in 1949. And a 
grateful Board of Supervisors paid recogni- 
tion to the proselyting fore-sightedness of Mr. 
O'Shaughnessy by naming the newly-formed 
resen'oir "Lake Lloyd" in honor of Harr^' 
Lloyd. 

With the additional water storage afforded 
by the new lake, San Francisco had a splendid 
network of resers'oirs established in the 
Tuolumne River watershed. Now it turned 
to the further development of hydro-electtic 
power as a by-product of and financial aid 
to the water supply system. 

Because it was a logical step in the care- 
fully-planned, long range development pro- 
gram and also because there was the threat 
of a raid on the city's water and power rights 
in the Sierra, San Francisco voters in 1955 
overwhelmingly approved a S54.000.000 bond 
issue for two large power plants in the moun- 
tains — the Cherry and Canyon power pro- 
jects. 

The first of these projects, the Cherry, will 
utilize water stored in Lake Eleanor and 
Lloyd Lake, conveying it through a pressure 
tunnel six miles long to a point on the Cher- 
ry River nt-ar its confluence with the Tuol- 
umne River. Here a power drop of approxi- 
mately 2,400 feet to the powerhouse will de- 
velop a peak capacity of 131.500 kilowatts. 

The second plant, the Canyon Power Pro- 
ject, will develop a power drop on the Tuol- 
umne River between O'Shaughnessy Dam and 
Early Intake Diversion Dam. Ar present, the 



THE RECORD 



water released from O'Sliaughnessy Dam 
flows down the Tuolumne to Early Intake 
where it is diverted through 19 miles of tun- 
nel to MiKcasin Powerhouse. By construct- 
ing 1 1 miles of new pressure tunnel connect- 
ing to the reservoir at OShaughnessy Dam, a 
power drop of some 1,370 feet can be realized 
at Early Intake. It is estimated that the aver- 
age output of a new powerhouse at this point 
will be about 61,000 kilowatts. 

Actual construction work on the Cherry 
Power Project was started during the 1957- 
58 fiscal year with the award of 10 construc- 
tion and equipment purchase contracts total- 
ing 516.300,000, including S8,l 36,420 for the 
pressure tunnel through which Lake Lloyd 
ind Lake Eleanor water will flow to the Cherry 
Powerhouse. The tunnel will be 29,400 feet 
long, 12 feet wide, \2'/2 feet high. As part 
Df the tunnel project is a smaller diversion 
runnel connecting Lake Eleanor with Lake 
Lloyd; this will be 5,850 feet long, S'/z feet 
ivide, 1 1 feet high. Tunnel work was started 
December 2, 1957, is scheduled for comple- 
ion in June, 1960. 

A 55,230,174 contract for the Cherry Pow- 
erhouse was awarded by the Public Utilities 
Commission two months ago. This — the last 
najor contract for the Cherry Project — pro- 



vides for the installation of the steel pipes 
of the penstock for the power drop ( seven 
feet in diameter, 2,400 feet long, composed of 
4,900 tons of steel). They are being manufac- 
tured at a cost of $1,694,000. In addition, the 
contract provides for the installation of two 
large 93,000-horsepower water wheels which 
are being manufactured at a cost of 52,429,- 
420. Two generators are also being manu- 
factured for 53,170,000, which includes in- 
stallation at the powerhouse. 

The powerhouse contract also includes the 
tirst construction phase of a switchyard at 
Early Intake which will combine power from 
Cherry and Canyon — when the latter is ulti- 
mately completed — for transmission on to 
users. 

Completion of the Cherry Powerhouse is 
expected by mid- 1 960; the start of its oper- 
ation will mark the completion of the Cher- 
ry Project. 

In the meanwhile, preliminary studies and 
engineering work are continuing on the Can- 
yon Power Project. Bids will be received the 
early part of July, 1958, for construction of an 
access road to the Canyon Powerhouse site. 
And that will be the first construction con- 
tract for the Canyon Power Project. 



Off the Record 




Edivard Hill Jr. and Associates 

CONSULTING ELECTRICAL AND 
MECHANICAL ENGINEERS 

166 Geary Street -:- GArfield 1-3955 
San Francisco 8, California 

BEN B. LEZIN 

Consulting Electrical Engineer 
GArfield 1-6086 

Phelan Building 

760 Market Street 

San Francisco 2, California 

CHARLES H. LEE, Life Member A.S.C.E. 

Public VV titer Supply, Drainage, Ground Water Hydrology. 

Foundations, Earth Grading Control, Earth Slide 

St.ibilization, Court Testimony. 

58 SITTER STREET 
Telephone: EXbrook 2-5670 



Woodward-Clyde, Sherard & Associates 

Foundation & Testing Engineers 

Highways - Earth Dams • Airports 
Geologic Investigations 

KENWARD S. OLIPHANT 

Consulting Engineer 
ACOUSTICAL ELECTRICAL MECHANICAL 

41 Sutter Street GA. 11164 

San Francisco 4, Calif. 

Congratulations 

A. ABBOTT HANKS, INC. 

"Oldest Testing Laboratory in the L'nited States" 
Operated for 92 years in California 

Inspection and Testing Engineering 

624 Sacramento Street GA. 1-1697 



*<OVEMBER, 1^58 




Tivo Women in White 



by Emily Blackmore 



IN CRISP WTKTE. two gra.N- 
haired women. Miss Cordelia 
DeLaurier and Miss Anita Magee, 
vital in spirit and wise in compas- 
sion, walk the long corridors of 
San Francisco Hospital. In the 
wards they comfort the dying, re- 
lieve the suffering and reassure 
the troubled. They lend sure hands 
to harassed floor nurses and sug- 
gest simpler work methods to tired 
orderlies. They trundle carts of 
wanned blankets to Mission Emer- 
gency as the combings of a city 
are brought in by screaming am- 
bulances. 

They look in at the silent and 
shining pathologj* laboratory from 
the murky tunnel that begins near 
23rd Street and in its endless 
length dips under 21st Street into 
the newest unit in the hospital 
group. They unlock and relock 
doors leading to disturbed patients 
whose days are always night. They 
end their rounds speaking softly 
to women in labor, and watch deft 
nurses minister to the newborn. 
"There is gi'eat satisfaction in our 
job," they say. 

The measure of an institution is 
not determined by its size or its 
purpose but by the spirit of those 
who direct it. San Francisco Hos- 
pital, a stark mass of brick build- 
ings on Potrero Avenue, set in 



lav.-ns and gardens behind an iron 
fence, ranks high among city and 
county hospitals not only for the 
discernment of its medical force 
from Stanford and the University 
of California but for its devoted 
nui'sing service. Miss DeLaurier 
and Miss Magee in their years of 
duty there have become a living 
legend, a parodoxical legend. 

Because of the exacting duties 
and heavy responsibility of her po- 
sition, a supei-visor of nurses often 
becomes inhuman and tyrannical. 
These two, however, have main- 
tained their chann, and speak in 
low musical voices and twinkle 
with humor: smiles have patterned 
the lines of their faces. 

Miss DeLaurier, evening super- 
visor of all hospital personnel from 
3:30 p.m. to midnight, is from 
British Columbia. Her brown eyes 
sparkle as she tells how her moth- 
er in Acadia shared with Long- 
fellow's heroine the surname of 
Bellefontaine and migrated to 
Nova Scotia as Evangeline did. 
Mr. DeLaurier came from Quebec. 

Miss DeLaurier gi-aduated from 
San Francisco Hospital Training 
School in 1929. "The emphasis was 
on nursing," she says, "not on the- 
ory. Discipline was strict, but it 
is only good manners and obedi- 
ence in one's training. Nowadays 



some of the young nurses confuse 
discipline «nth ser\'ility instead of 
realizing that it reflects the pride 
the nurse should take in skillful 
work. Col. Frick was superintend- 
ent of the hospital then, and Dr. 
Norman and Dr. Wilbur had also 
been army men so that the medical 
staff maintained the same discip- 
line e.xpected of us. 

"I specialized in obstetrics, and 
from the outpatient clinic I an- 
swered night calls to deliver 
babies." She still loves children, 
and now receives her gi-eatest 
pleasure outside of her work in 
taking groups of underprivileged 
youngsters into the country to en- 
joy the freedom of woods and 
fields. 

When asked how the hospital 
had changed through the years, 
she said. "We are more crowded 
now although we have fewer pa- 
tients. When I began working here 
in 1930 we used to have a patient 
census of around 1150, for with no 
Blue Cross or other insurance far 
fewer people could afford private 
hospital care. The present crowd- 
ing came about by the necessity to 
turn wards into laboratories and 
supply rooms. I have been here 
during epidemics and fires but my 
worst experience was V-J Day: 
Wctims of the rioting and carous- 
ing streamed in so that we had to 
use every possible facility." 

Miss Magee is the assistant eve- 
ning supenisor, and in her mod- 
esty wishes to be mentioned only 
as Miss DeLaurier's assistant, but 
she is no one's shadow. Taller and 
more slender, she shares Miss De- 



Laurier's attachment to the ho.s- 
pital. She always knew she would 
be a nurse. "There was nothing 
else for me." She has worked at 
San Francisco Hospital since 1933. 

"I was bom in San Francisco as 
my mother had been, although my 
father came from Massachusetts. 
I graduated from Lane-Stanford 
School of Nursing at Stanford Uni- 
versity and I was fortunate to be 
there during the transition from 
using student nurses as menials t< 
their elevation into a recognized 
professional group: I don't mean 
keeping the patients' rooms tidy- 
always a nurse's duty — but wash- 
ing windows and scrubbing the' 
corridors and kitchen floor." 

Miss Magee, too, specialized in 
obstetrics and also in pediatrics. 
"Dr. Lucas, a great pediatrician, 
honored me by selecting me as t^ - 
first nurse he assigned to Stanf 
Convalescent Home for Childrei. 
Her cornflower-blue eyes soften a."; 
she remembers. "I also did public 
health work and helped to train 
Red Cross Volunteer Nurses' Aides. 
I was always blessed by associ- 
ation with fine people." 

She speaks of her off-duty hours. 
"I've taken up gardening and I 
love it. I find that such plants as 
African violets require the same 
careful nursing as a premature 
baby." 

These two dedicated women have 
brought strength and grace to the 
city and county hospital where 
their own high standards remain 
a protot>-pe for the more recently 
graduated nurses who ser\'e with 
them. 



WESTERN TRACTION 
CO. 

1615 JERROLD AVENUE 
ATwater 2-0287 San Francisco 



Porter, Urquhart McCreary & O'Brien 

Consulting Engineers 

1140 HOWARD STREET 
HE. 1-4888 San Francisco 



PROFILE OF ALASKA 

y David Brodie 



T THEN THE GAVEL bangs 
vV to order the Democratic 
id Republican National Conven- 
ons in 1960. Alaska, latest new 
tate in the Union, will be foi* the 
rst time proudly participating in 
loosing the nominee of its party. 
Tien the roll call of the individual 
ates blares forth. Alaska will be 
inounced second only to Ala- 
ima. 

Alaska is one of the world's 
rgest and least populated areas, 
s 571.000 square miles are almost 
lice the area of Te.xas. On the 
Jier hand, the population is un- 
?r 100.000 in comparison to the 
one Star State's over eight mil- 
Dn. It is a huge land mass at the 
Drthwest extremity of the North 
merican continent, between the 
acifie Ocean on the south and the 
rctic Ocean on the north. Its 
igged and indented coastline 
u'usts itself westward to a pen- 
isula on the Bering Straits. At 
lis point it is only thirty-five 
liles from Siberia in the U.S.S.R. 

When most people think of Alas- 
1. they think of freezing cold and 
low and ice. They think of a bar- 
!n land of tundra and little vege- 
Ltion. Yet much of Alaska has a 
lild climate, not unlike that of 
lany other of the American 
;ates. with just a little more than 
ie average amount of rainfall. 

The largest city is Anchorage, 
ith a population of around twen- 
r thousand, and gi-owing. It is a 
mter for the fishing" and mineral 
idustries and an important mar- 
eting ajid supply point. 

Juneau is the capital and is of 
)nsiderable scenic beauty, lying 



between Moimt Juneau and Mount 
Roberts. It is a port of entry with 
the asset of an ice-free harbor. 

The difficulties of communica- 
tion, previously one of Alaska's 
most troublesome problems, have 
been overcome by air transporta- 
tion. Almost every town has an 
airstrip. 

The scenery of Alaska has a 
wild, awesome, primitive beauty, 
delightful to the ever-increasing 
number of tourists. It has fiords 
and glaciei-s. forests and moun- 
tains. It is a fisherman's paradise. 
Its waters teem with trout, whit- 
ing and salmon. Sportsmen come 
here to fish in small nunibei"s and 
commercial fishing is a major in- 
dustry. 

Alaska has also gi'eat mineral 
wealth, and a large revenue from 
fur-trapping. Lumber is an impor- 
tant factor in the economy. 

Farming is gaining in popular- 
ity. There are thousands of acres 
of good potential farmland be- 
tween the mountains and the sea. 
and under the protective slopes of 
Mount McKinley. where they are 
shielded from the violent grists of 
regional winds. 

The U.S.A. has owned Alaska 
since 1867, when it was bought 
from Russia for the sum of seven 
million dollars, by the much- 
maligned Secretary of State. Wil- 
liam E. Seward. The bitter critics 
at the time said it was a worth- 
less investment, and called it Sew- 
ard's Folly in derision. It has ac- 
tually turned out to be one of the 
biggest bargains in real estate this 
countiy has ever indulged in. 

World War II brought a period 




right) and Jon 
e among the 



Governor Mike Stepo.ich of Aloslra 
right), author of "South Pacific," w, 
Pacific Festival in Son Francisco, h 
Dinner in their honor with (left to right) Tom Borbour of American Airlines, dinner 
host; Marie A. Hogon. secretary of the Son Froncisco Chomber of Commerce, who 
was in charge of arrangements for the Pacific Festival Grond Ball in the City Hall 
rotunda, and Jim Warnocl. Chomber publicity manager, who coordinated festivol 
publicity and wos dinner chairman. 



of prosperity to the region in build- 
ing and development. 

Since the war. more speedy air- 
planes have brought us closer to 
Alaska. The approach of an atom- 
ic submarine service and jet and 



supersonic air transport makes 
Alaska a near neighbor. She will 
be a competitor in trans-Pacific 
trade. Japanese business men have 
already shown interest in her esti- 
mated 100 billion tons of coal 



JOHN A. BLUME & ASSOCIATES 
Engineers 

Civil and Structural Engineers 
612 HOWARD STREET 



EXbrook 7-2525 



San Francisco 5, Calif. 




TV's more 

fun with 
another one 



When parents and children meet in front 
of one TV, there's bound to be a difference 
of opinion. A peaceful solution to this 
nightly problem is another set. Move the 
old TV into the children's room. Then 
treat yourself to one of the neat new 
slenderized sets (and enjoy your favorite 
program ... or quiet hour, as you please). 

BETTER BUY NOW! 

I»G E- 

Pacific Gas andEUctric Company 



lOVEMBER, 1958 



Executive Gifts 

San Froncisco's Chinatown 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 




GHUN PI'S AGREEMENT 
The Bank of America wished to 
use a painting by a Formosan art- 
ist. Huang Chun Pi. for its Chinese 
calendar of 1959. A lengthy legal 
document was drawn up in English 
to cover all aspects of the contract. 
This Chun Pi pored over for some 
time, and finally d«;ided that a 
simpler document would satisfy 



Scnto's Boot Lg. 7.80 Sm. 4.75 
Sonto's Sleigh Lg. 8.50 Sm. 3.90 

Festive Bell 4.85 Christmas Tree 3.95 

NSJIJ/ 436PociflcAve., Dcpt. G2 



How ivell 

do you knoiv 

San Francisco? 




b vcn most lifelong residents of 
t!ic Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour cx' 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit; fares arc surprisingly 



UDrives, 




(i.-IH.t: 44 FOURTH STREET 
YUkon 6^000 






i i 

If 4 

i 
i 

''a 



If. 
-5 



ORIENTAL BREVITY 
him. We were told by an informant 
of the Bank of America that Chun 
Pi's agreement (which we repro- 
duce) reads from right to left and 
top to bottom: "I present one of 
my humble painting creations to 
the Bank of America to be used by 
them for their calendar. Huang 
Chun Pi, August 12. 1958." 

We have unbounded confidence 
in the Bank's monetary activities, 
but having a Chinese associate 
who works on the Record, we de- 
cided to check with him the mate- 
rial in the document. We are 
pleased to report that the Bank of 
America is as sound linguistically 
as it is in matters of finance. 

QUICKER MAIL 

Postmaster John F. FL\a has ad- 
vanced the times of Sunday mail 
collections by from 30 minutes to 
an hour, in order to make better 
train and rail connections. This 
will put fonvard the delivery time 
of the mails. 

Mr. Fixa saw to it, therefore, 
that the old collection times on the 
schedule cards for Sundays were 
crossed out, while new cards were 
being prepared to be installed in 
the city's 1,700 mail boxes as rap- 
idly as possible. 

While wc are pleased that Fixa 
is improving the S>mday mail sei-v- 



ice. we wish his press releases 
came out earlier. The release about 
the Sunday collections was dated 
October 24. Unfortunately on Sun- 
day, October 19, we went to mail 
our letters and found the time of 
collection crossed out. This caused 
us to be puzzled and frustrated, 
since we not unnaturally concluded 
that the Sunday collection had 
been cancelled. 

ACCOLADE 

The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce invaded Southern Cali- 
fornia this year to select its "Live- 
stock Man of the Year." 

Roger Jessup of Glendale, one 
of the State's outstanding milk 
producers and distributors and a 
Los Angeles Covmty supervisor for 
almost 24 years, is the honoree. 
The presentation was made dm-mg 
the Grand National Livestock Ex- 
position here November 1. 

In addition to his dairy inter- 
ests, Jessup is also noted as a beef 
cattle producer, and for his many 
civic activities. He is presently 
ser\'ing as president of the Cali- 
fornia Association for the National 
Cowboy Hall of Fame. 

KANGAROO LEAP 
Australia will enter another ex- 
citing era in its long commercial 
aviation history one day next 
spring when a giant Qantas 707 jet 
airliner lifts oft a San Francisco 
runway for its home base at Mas- 
cot Field, Sydney. It will be the 
first of the Qantas fleet of Boeing 
jet airliners and Lockheed Electras 
to be delivered to the Australian 
airline which has opened its North 
American headquarters and San 
Francisco district ticket office on 
Union Square. 350 Post Street. 



While workmen put the finishing 
touches on the modem Unioi 
Square offices, in Sydney the firsi 
steps were being taken to handl< 
the I unning and maintenance of tin 
great jet planes of the new era. 

At the Sydney airport new run- 
ways, hangai-s and workshops havt 
been built, pilots and aircrews are 
being tested on the latest training 
apparatus that simulates actual 
flight down to the last detail, all 
hostesses and flight-planning staffs 
are making world trips, months in 
advance. 

Qantas and its famed Flying 
Kangaroo emblem in mid-1959 will 
add jet power to its worldwide 
leaps that take it 15.000,000 miles 
each year to eighty cities in 27 
countries on five continents. 

PARKING SPACES 

San Francisco will need nearly 
40,000 new off-street parking 
spaces by 1962, the Parking Au- 
thority has reported. 

Since the Authority was created 
in 1949. it has helped build 3.620 
parking spaces; private gai-a 
have opened 6,997 and about 2.520 
more stalls, to be built under i 
emment-business partnership, are 
in the planning or construction 
stage. Private companies are re- 
ported planning 7,197 more garage 
spaces. 

In 1953. the Authority said, 93,- 
396 cais passed through various 
off-street parking garages then in 
existence and by last year the fig- 
ure had grown to 728,221. 

A 1,000-car garage is to be con- 
structed imder the north portion of 
the Civic Center at a cost of S4.5 
million with work on the project 




l^W^ 



1 




It]. Vincent W. Von Gogh 
d Netherlands Consul-General Wlllem ■ 
rrounded by masterpieces of $8,000,000 e 

hediiled to beg:in next month. 
le city is presently purchasing 
nd for the $5.4 miUion gai-age 
ith 1,000 stalls at Sutter and 
ockton Streets. 

IMMORTAL VINCENT 
A bright page in San Francisco's 
story as the cultural center of 
e West has been added by the ex- 
bition of a $8,000,000 collection 
paintings, drawings and water- 




Albert E. SchI 
of S, " ■■ ■ ■ 



:h;b;i 



E. Schlesinger. Cholrman Parking Authority 
:, (leftl with Robert S. Lamborn of William 
Moron Co.. ot opening of new garage. 



Mayor Jensen of Sydney (left) ond Moyor Christo- 
pher cut metal ribbon to open Qontas building. 
Behind Moyors are Robert Smith and Hugh Birch. 



colors of Vincent van Gogh, which 
will be on display through Nov. 30 
at the M. H. de Young Memorial 
Museum in Golden Gate Park. 

The 155 pictures included in the 
show are the largest collection of 
this great Dutch artist's works 
ever to appear here. Many of them 
never have been displayed before 
in America and most of these mas- 
terpieces have never been seen in 
California. 



That San Francisco has been 
chosen as the first city on the Pa- 
cific Coast to view this notable art 
collection is in line with the city's 
tradition of welcoming creative 
arts. The van Gogh collection is a 
fitting sequel to the fabulous Ger- 
man and Vienna art treasures, as 
well as many distinguished smaller 
exhibitions, which have appeared 
here in recent years. 



DUE COMPENSATION 
A brand new concept in training 
a child to earn and save his money, 
developed by a young Oakland 
couple, is presently being mtro- 
duced to the toy and gift market. 
Known as "Chore Board," this 
combination of toy and teacher is 
being welcomed by parents and 
educators alike as a much-needed 
means of divorcing youngsters 



Continental Service Company 



260 Fifth Street 



San Francisco 3, California 



SILVER CREST DO-NUT SHOP 

Reslaurant and Cocktail Lounge 

Restaurant Phone; AT 8-0753 Bar Phone: MI 8-9954 

P. Lynch & /. fitzgerald. Proprietors 
340 BA-^SHORE BLVD. SAN FRANOSCO 24 



HOF BRAU 



FINEST FOOD 
Money Can Buy 



DOUBLE SHOT BAR — OPEN 7 A.M. TO 3 A.M. 
Powell at O'Farrell Street San Francisco, California 

WESTERN STEEL & WIRE CO. 

WIRE :■: WIRE PRODUCTS :■: WIRE FENCE 

BAILING . BROOM - STAPLING STRAPPING 

ROUND .\ND FLAT BRUSH WIRE - FLORISTS WIRE . ROSE STAKES 

STRAIGHTENING AND CUTTING ALL TiPES OF WIRE 

U2t Eebert Avenue S.-n Francisco 24, Olit. Phone VAIencia 6-016- 



Soe^S OF WESTLAKE 

Fine Food 
Banquet Accommodations for any occasion 

Phone PLaza 5-7400 
11 GLEN WOOD AVENUE DALY CITY, CALIF. 

DANGER of a Disastrous FIRE 
lurks in overloaded and o\'eraged electric wiring. 

BE ASSURED YOUR CIRCUIT CAN SAFELY 
SERVE YOU. 

ARVIN ELECTRIC CO. 

24 HOUR SERVICE 
MI. 7-0752 1611 Innes Ave. 

NATIONAL ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 

"WHOLESALE ELECTRIC SUPPUES" 



Mth & Harrison Sts. 



SANTA ROSA 
SAN CARLOS 
S.\N FR.\NCISCO 
Main Office San Francisco, Calion 



HEmlocIc 1-8529 



yiSIT THE 



PALACE BATHS 



85 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



^Vut CkcUce In 



RCA\/iCTOR TELEVISION 




Leo J. Meuberfl Companq 

33 GOUGH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 1 



Reverend Joseph Pou^h 



1739 Fillmore street 
San Francisco. Calif. 



AMES BILLINGSLEY CO. 

JVcB Vramei ■:■ Fully Work ■:■ Piclurc- H'i.iJon 
3850 - 24th STREET VA. 4-:077 



from the ubiquitous television set 
long enough to perform the house- 
hold tasks that have been assigned 
them, and a pleasant method of 
training small fr>' to think in 
terms of earning their allowance, 
rather than merely accepting it. 

Frank and Margaret Doupnik of 
4290 Piedmont Avenue, Oakland, 
conceived the first "Chore Board" 
to teach their own children that 
an allowance is more than a "hand- 
out." and that as an integral part 
of the family unit they had an obli- 
gation to their home in terms of 




TlOth. 



Doupril puts the allowance 

■ned in her Chore Board while 

watches. (Photo courtesy Co 

Hansen, San Francisco News.] 



simple household tasks. Doupnik, 
an industrial builder, made a 
twelve inch square laminated 
board marked with the days of the 
week across the top, with six rec- 
tangular spaces down the side for 
filling in the desii-ed tasks. Oppo- 
site the rectangles were slots to 
receive the coins which provided 
his son and daughter wath an add- 
f Continued on Pafje 12} 



ROGERS-KNEEDLER 

Mamijaclurer'i Repreictitatiy, 

26 HOTALING PLACE 

Al Jackson Square San Fratici 

YUkon 2-49S7 

- Wholesale Only - 

Harold Knccdler 



NELSON'S CATERING 

specialising in Weddings 
Teas ■ Banquets 



2542 M.ncARTHUR BLVD. 
O.A.KLAND 



JOHN'S BODY SHOP 

Paififiiij: - Welding 
John Bolcilho. Prop. 

3827 GRAND AVENUE 

OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 

TE 6-3254 Home: I.O 0.268" 



Phone OLympic 8-2187 

C and C 
PET SHOP 

6303 COLLEGE AVE. 
Oakland, Calif. 

JIMMIE CLAUSEN 
Licensed Professional Handltx 



WILSON SANITARIUM 

Liceiued by Sute of California 

24-Hour General Nursing Care 
Aged ■ Bed Palienis S 
Post Operaliye Cases 

Special Diets When Ordered 

Attended by Their Own Physician i 

AGNES B. WILSON, Owntr S: Opento 

1326 -43rd .\ VENUE 
MOntrose 4-8379 



BEL-CLIFT 
FOOD SHOP 

IMPORTED LIQUORS 

WI.VES nnd CHAMP.AGNE 

FANCY GROCERIES 

CHOICE FRUITS 

Maurides 8C Bartholomew 

J98 GEARY STREET 

TUvedo 5-2330 



BELFAST BEVERAGES 

640 VALENCIA STREET 
UNderhill 1-8820 



BERONIO LUMBER CO. 

Complete Line of 
Building Materials 

M.ARIN ST. ai K.-\NS.-\S 



Vlsilaclon Valley Aulo 
Reconstriiclion 

Body 6/ Fender Repair & Painting 

2520 B.WSHORE BLVD. 

JU. 6-5593 



DEANS 
BEAUTY SALON 

4691 Telegraph Ave. 

OAKLAND. CALIFORNI.\ 



THE RECOR 



Majestic Hotel 

fohn Burke 

Rents Reasonable 

Permanent - Transient 


JOSE COREAH CO. 

Windor, Cleaning 
lanitorial Service 

Floors, Walls - Washed » Waxed 

General House Cleaning 

165 OFARRELL STREET 

YU. 6-2704 


San Francisco Laboratories, Inc. 

"Eitablithed 1915" 
Hour.: 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. Saturday: 9 A.M. to 1 P.M. 

Suite 816 De Young BIdg. 690 Market Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 4, CALIFORNIA 


2438 MISSION STREET 


BERONIO LUMBER COMPANY 

Wholesale and Retail 

Office SC Yards: MARIN & KANSAS STS. 
Telephone VAlencia 3283 San Francisco. California 


NORIEGA MEAT CO. 

Quality Meats - Reasonable Prices 
Wholesale 6f Retail 


Batteate Livestock 
Transportation Co., Inc. 

UNION STOCKYARDS 
SO. SAN FRANCISCO 


3815 NORIEGA STREET 
LO. 6-8821 


ROYAL BAKING CO. 

American, Italian and French Bread 

Grissini, Panettone. Buccellato and Focaccia 
4773-77 MISSION STREET /(;. 5-9655 




Admiralty 
Manufaduring C(i. 

Permanood & Pejilanood Products 
Fire RetardanI Paints 

2530 - 18th STREET 

UN. 1-4441 


PACIFIC FELT CO. 

710 York Street 
San Francisco 


KEN'S FLYING "A" 

Complete Associated Smilinf^ Service 

Complete Automotive Service 

BAYSHORE &. GENEVA DE. 3-2463 


BAYSHORE MARINE 

'"Scow Palace'''' 

Marine Equipment 

2614 GENEVA AVENUE 

JU. 7-4536 


FARMERS 
INSURANCE GROUP 

ALEX GROSS. District Agent 

Auto - Truck - Fire - Life 

1827 IRVING STREET 

Lombard 6-5891 


SILVER DOLLAR TAVERN 

Bob Thompson 

64 Eddy Street YUkon 6-4796 




Compliments of A Friend 


GINO & CARLO 
548 Green Street 


GRAND MARKET 

Daily 8 a.m. It. 7 p.m. 

FREE DELIVERY 

18H POLK STREET 

ORdw.iy 3.1846 Son Francisco 


GOLGH LIQUOR STORE 

"/Vo/ the Biggest - But the Finest" 

112 GOUGH STREET -:- UNdcrhill 1-6546 




N. Viscovi's Grocery 

Salami - Groceries - Fruit 


ROSSI'S 
DELICATESSEN 

627 VALLEJO STREET 
rUkon 2-7074 


753 Columbus Ave. YU. 6-0438 


CAL-MARINE RADIOPHONE CO. 
Marine Contmunications 

1018 COLUMBUS .AVENUE ORdway 3-2552 




HOWE'S MARKET 

Groceries - Vegetables - Meats 


QUON-WO & CO. 
Grocer 

845 GRANT AVENUE 


2084 HAYES STREET 


NELSON'S CATERING SERVICE 

KE. 2-7057 - Oaklan<l, Calif. 
If no answer, call KE. 2-1086 




DON'S GROCERY 

1301 CHURCH STREET 


THE OWL MARKET 
1001 Bush Street 

TUxedo 5-9866 


VA. 4-6083 


TEDDY S PET SHOP 

PETS - SUPPLIES - ACCESSORIES - AQUARIUMS 

3730 Geary Blvd. SK. 2-1833 


Lok's Laundromat 

S DAYS FINISHED LAUNDRY 

DRY CLEANING SERVICE 

MS - 22nd Street San Francisco 


Bay Bridge 
Launderette 

2406 LOMBARD STREET 




FOSTER'S OLD FASHION FREEZE 

WE CATER TO SPECIAL PARTIES 

FI. 5-0970 2660 So. El Camino Real 

SAN MATEO 


HOME GROCERY 

Groceries - Vegetables ■ Meats 

Beer & Wine 

2801 - 22nd STREET 


ST. CHARLES 
HOTEL 

507 BUSH STREET 



NEW! I*i UNUSUALl 

EDUCATIONAL! It's FUN! 

Ifi a 

CHORE BOARD 




$1.98 plus ta« 
Help yoor youungsters learn to earn 
the <un way . . . with Chore Board 
penny, nickel or dime for each c 
chore, inserted in the space provi 
assembles on allowance ot week's 
Adults love Chore Board too. (or o 
coffee money, club or church sov 
programs, and every "nest egg" nee 
At your favorite toy store or stotit 



r for info 



CHORE BOARD 
4290 Piedmont Ave.. Oakland 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 

Polo Alio, San Franclico and Ignacio. Calif. 



SING LUNG 
STEAM LAUNDRY 

771 O'FARRELL STREET 
GRaysiont 4-0900 San Fi 



NEW CAPITOL 
GROCERY 

454 CAPITOL AVENUE 



E. J. Finnerty & Son 
Painters 

850 V.in NcM Ave, So. 
AT. 2-8220 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 
(Continued from Paiic 10) 
ed incentive to pei-fonii their 
"chores." The tremendous amount 
of favorable comment elicited from 
otlier parents, as well as little 
Bob's and Lorre's friends, encour- 
aged Mr. and Mrs. Doupnik to mar- 
ket the "Chore Board" which has 
now become practically a full time 
business for both. 

Chore Boaid combines not only 
the idea of earning but has the 
additional value of showing chil- 
dren that it can be fun to save. A 
removable coin slot tab has been 
added to the board so that at the 
week's end the child receives the 
pennies, nickels and dimes he has 
eaiTied, and can usually be encour- 
aged into starting his first savings 
account with all or part of his 
Chore Board accumulation. 

Chore Board has been adopted 
by adults for many uses, too. It is 
ideal for keeping the coffee money 
straight at the office, for church 
savings programs, for club pro- 
gi-ams. for putting aside for the 
new barbecue, or mother's new 
hat, or for any of the multitude of 
needs for saving. 

FAMILY FORTUNES 
The smell of fresh baking and 
almonds teases the nostrils as you 
approach 436 Pacific Avenue. Here 
is the kitchen which is the heart of 
the Louie family, and here for two 
generations they have made the 
Lotus fortune cookies, a culinary 
product of old China reproduced in 
modem San Francisco. Cookie 
dough is electrically mixed in an 
out-sized basin. Cai-ried in big 
buckets, it is poured into a big 
container which automatically 
.spills it in smaU round cakes, on 
t(i an electric tray. After three 
minutes of heated travel, the 
I ookie is baked to fragrant excel- 
lence, removed while moist, folded 
over a strip of paper printed with 
an appropriate message, bent to 
en.sure safe closing, and placed to 
cool in the notch of a wooden tray. 
The stereotyped, unromantic, 
custom-staled fortunes on the pa- 
pers have been replaced by philo- 
.sophical inspii'ation notes, (Books 
do not exhaust words: words do 
not exhaii.sl thoughts), common- 
sensical bits of advice, (Wine 
should be taken in small doses, 
knowledge in lai-ge), as well as 
many of the more gay and deUght- 
fu! of the old-fashioned, good-luck 
profihecies. The folded cookies are 
also being packed four in an ele- 
gant box, to carry announcements 
of weddings and other important 
family happenings, as well as ad- 
ve'lisement announcements from 
(Continued on Page 15) 



BAY CITIES 

NEON 

UNJerhill 3S8S0 
761 VALENCIA STREET 



State Mortgage Corp. 

540 MARKET STREET 
YUkon 2-7131 



Miniature Restaurant 
Baitery & Delicatessen 

N. D. Birushenko 

431-433 CLEMENT STREET 

(Bet. 5th 8C 6th .^ves.) 



IMOZZETTI MOTEL 

In Traler Village 
101 BY P.\SS HIGHWAY 

BRISBANE, CALIF. 

Service Station - Cocktail Bar 

JV. 7-9898 



HA-RA 
CLUB 

875 Geary Street 



Omega Food 
Products, Inc. 

84 CLAY STREET 
YUkon 2-2074 San Francisco 



Rudy's Rody & 
Paint Shop 

1125 STEINER STREET 
JO. 7-8441 



Ever Ready 
Coffee Shop 

545 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 
MA. 1-9329 



Colonial 
Upholslerint: Shop 

Mall Spoiler 
1846 Union Street FI. 6-"70! 



KIM KONG 
1126 Grant Avemn 



Shanghai Herb Co. 

hnporlers of 

SELECTED CHINESE HERBS 

3307 MISSIO.N STREET 

Opposite 29lh Street 

Phone Mission 7-6877 



GARTLAND HOTEL 

MR. c^ MRS- STANLEY MONROE 
Manaeing Owners 



909 GEARY STREET 
ORdway 3-3131 



KNOTT HOLE 

■Donl Drtnk Walcr-Drink Beer" 

THE BEST - AND PLENTY 
OF IT AND ICE COLD 

GEORGE SUOn', Prop. 

1483 HAIGHT STREET 
M.A. 1-9135 



H. WENIGER 

Manufacturer of 

Instruments for Hand Surgery 

Active Hand and Finger Splints 

70.12th STREET 

M.Arket 1-6876 

San Francisco 3 



Gary's Auto Service 

Toning — .4.4/1 .4ulo .45<ocialion ■ 

MOTOR i BODY REP.AIRS 

GEN'ER.-kL .AUTO REP.MRS 

3475 Champion Street 

KE. 6-2165 Oaklani 



Wong Lew Herb Coj 

Herb Specialists 
2842 Mission St. AT. 8-0462 



KEAN HOTEL 

1018 MISSION STREET 
M.-\. 1-0201 



ALFRED GEE 
Insurance 

FIRE— LI/\BILrn— LIFE— .XLTO 



Circosta Iron & 
Metal Co., Inc. 

1801 EV.\NS .AVENUE 
.AT. 2-8568 



MILO COFFEE 

759 HARRISON STREET 
DO. 2-4322 



SAN FRANCISCO 
BUSINESSMAN 
TELLS ALL! 




Prominent local executive (pictured abovel tells all he meets about 
the exhilarating executive luncheons served every forenoon at the 
Veneto Restaurant. Veneto caters to the educated palate with 
liberal libations and leisurely one hour lunches that send the 
businessman back to face the afternoon refreshed and revitalized. 

VENETO RlSlMfl^Hl.BayatM<,son.Resenauons:aA 19711 



IB-CT-K- auto 


insurance from 


CJISSX3XC30^ 


and save u p to 


^^^^^^ J^^^^^^ ^if^r ^^^^ exclusively for 
^^ta^^V ^^^^^^ M^% ^^^^ Public Employees 


'Civil- SERVICE EMPLOYEES 


INSURANCE COMPANY 


<>&<> MABK.ET STREET. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 


ASK TOUR AGENT FOR DETAIIS 




CLIP AND MAIL TODAY 




CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES 
INSURANCE COMPANY 


HOMEOWNER'S 
"PACKAGE" 




CSEICO, 919 Market St., Son Francisco 






Without obligolioo, pleoie lend derails on how 
1 can >ave on inwronca. 


AUTO 




Noma 


PERSONAL LIABILITY 




Address 


Toon Stole 






Place of Employment 











National Expansion Joint Co. 

Expansio,, jomli, Alt Typo - ConcrcU Curiug Compounds 

foini Sealers — Polyethylene Film 

1601 EMBARCADERO RO.\D OAKL.\ND 6. CALIFORNIA 



N T. BEVAiVS TVPtSETTING CO.. INC. 



552 Sa 



• Street 



John T. Bevans 
GArfield 1-4152 



San Fr. 



11. Calif. 



ANTONI TRUCK LINES 

COMMO.N CARRIERS 

Daily Sirrice to and from Sonoma ■ Mendocino ■ Lake Counties 

1495 ILLINOIS STREET Mission 8-1991 SAN FRANCISCO 

Television ■ Radio Sales - Service ■ Repairs 

DON'S HILLTOP T.V. SERVICE 

Antenna Installations 
5344 MISSION STREET JU. 6-457 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HYSTER COMPANY 

4445 Third Street 
San Franeiseo 24, Calif. 

Pacific Federation 

Brotherhood of W^ny Maintenance Employees 

C, L, ASHLEY, General Chairman A. KREUGER, Vice-chairman 

C A- GRENVIK, Secretary-Treasurer 
GA. 1-2814 Rni 849, 821 Market Street San Francisco 

KLINGER & SHAFFER CO. 
Confectionery Equipment 

342 FIFTH STREET YUkon 2-5697 San Francisco 7, Calif. 

CHRISTY VAULT COMPANY 

1000 Collins Ave. Box 337 Colma, Calif. 
Telephone PLaza 5-4119 

PLAYERS' CLUB 
2245 Geneva Avenue 

Opposite Con Palace :-: /C. 7-i566 
JOE A; ERMIE J.ACKSON 

Zenith TV 6/ Radio 

KERK'S TV SERVICE CO. 

S.ALES Sl service 

514 Excelsior Avenue JUniper 4-2291 San Francisco 

•■Kerk" Kerkvliet 



)VEMBER, 1956 



Book> 



Drive to the Northwest — 
a Region Big ivith Promise 



by Jane Rawson 



L.\>D OF GI.4>.TS 

The Drive to the Pat- Ific- Xorthuest 

liy David I>a\'ender 

Doubleday — So. 95 

The unexplored northwest of the 
American continent was notable 
for a quality which terrorizes the 
timid, but challenges the intrepid 
— bigness. The rivers, the trees. 
the spaces, all were out-sized. The 
personalities, who finally came to 
grips with this territor>', were of 
mythic proportions too. David Lav- 
ender in The Land of Giants has 
caught the authentic flavor of the 
development of this terrain. 

The author's splashy, large-can- 
vas technique will not please the 
stylistic techniciaJi in literature or 
the scholarly historian. It will, nev- 
ertheless, bring home to the less 
well-informed a vigorous, exciting 
picture of the liisty, self-centered 
pioneers, who are responsible for 
the inspiring vitality of the con- 
temporar>' northwest. One of the 
purposes of historical knowledge 
is to give perspective in charting 
the present: this book is of invalu- 
able resource to the individual m- 
terested in the present-day poten- 
tial of this region. 



He will be warned by the placer 
miner's crude exploitation: "Rush 
in, clean up. get out." He will learn 
from the fascinating account of 
the Western River's first stem- 
wheeler. John C. Ainsworth. the 
Vcdue of alertness, sound explor- 
ation of the problems involved, a 
certain cjTiicism in dealings with 
fallible fellowmen, and creative 
ability, when new tasks are being 
undertaken. Above all, from this 
book, he will realize that the suc- 
cessful opening of new territories, 
whether commercial, intellectual, 
or philosophical, depends on vision. 

This book brings to the reader a 
sweeping view of the vastness of 
the effort involved in opening up 
this region which has grown so 
rapidly. It emphasizes the resili- 
ence, ingenuity and the sheer en- 
erg>' of both will and muscle that 
underpin western history. The 
storj' of the "baddie," Henry Plum- 
mer, who bedeviled Idaho and 
Montana and was finally brought 
to book by the local vigilantes, is 
a warning to hesitant and inert 
citizens. 

As the reader assimilates the 
contents of these 450 factual pages. 




^V^ 



he will respond to their scope. The 
book opens with an account of the 
graceful galleon, Drake's Golden 
Hind, raiding the Spanish ports of 
Valparaiso and Callao de Lima, 
and subsequently vanishing north. 
No rattle of cutlasses or drunken 
swashbucklers' oaths are over- 
heard, and one knows from the 
start that imaginative overtones of 
derring-do and high passion will 
have to be supplied by the reader 
himself. The terms having been 
made. David Lavender goes to in 
a big way. The factual material, 
the geographic boundaries are be- 
yond first hopes. We begin in 1579, 
with the English sailing north 
from Panama. We end in 1952, 
when Governor Bowman milks a 
cow in a bam on a newly-settled 
farm, made possible by irrigation 
from the new Coulee dam. It is an 
impoverished i m a g i n a tion that 
cannot bring color to these bald 
facts. After a certain massacre of 
white men by Indians in the Uma- 
tilla valley in Oregon, we are given 



an account of the Catholic pries' 
Father Brouillet. going out alon 
save for a single Indian interprf 
ter, to bury the corpses, solace th. 
bereaved, and plead with the In 
dians for peace. It is not too difr 
cult to visualize the poignan 
scene. 

One clearly delineated tragedy i 
the book is that of the Indians an 
the forlorn way in which the. 
way of life is gradually devitalize 
by the advent of the white ma. 
and his ambitions. 

Like all early history, that o 
the northwest is a violent stop.- c 
human greed, self-interest, and ex 
ploitation of the weak and unde 
termined, salted by the efforts o 
justice-loving, doughty spirits, wh 
saw^ beyond the present to a splen 
did future. As the author says h 
his final sentences: "For alway 
the far comer of our land has beei 
a region big with promise. It sti 
is." San Franciscans will whole 
heartedly agree. 



MACK TRUCKS, INC. 

1745 Folsom Street 
UNderhiU 1-1455 

San Francisco 3, California 

AUTOMOBILE 

UPHOLSTERY CLEANEVG 

CALL FOR 

AL AGRESTI 

DOuglas 2-1400 

Dyeing of Upholstery and Leather Scats 

700 CAYUGA AVENUE 

Residence Phone: DE. 3-0671 



SUPPLYING THE FINEST 

OFFICE FURNITURE - OFFICE SUPPLIES 

STATIONERY - PRINTING - LITHOGRAPHY 

H. S. CROCKER COMPANY, INC. 

Established 18^6 

720 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO 

— DOuglas 2-5800 — 



PHOENIX-SIMPSON COMPANY 

'^General Contractors^^ 

520 SIXTH STREET 

UNderhill 1-5606 




Memo for Leisure 



e «hlrd generation of the Louie family leorns from grondmo Chin Shee Louie 
d grondpo Wing fhe secrefs of fhe fortunes in Lotus Fortune Coolies at the 
tus Bakery. 436 Pocific Ave. (Photo courtesy Bob Klein. Son Francisco News.) 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 
iContinued from Page 12) 



ers and three sisters, is the second 
generation to work there. Ernie 
studied business administration at 
Iventurous firms Uke Joseph college, and delights in developing 
*^^"' new ventures. At present he im- 

The folded cookies travel as far ports baskets from Hong Kong 
ray as Chicago. Minneapolis, Salt which he fills with packaged lichee 
ike City. Most of the restaurants nuts, jasmine tea. ginger, as well 
San Francisco's Chinatown as cookies. The baskets are in the 
rry them. The diligent promoter form of sleighs, parasols, Christ- 
liding this firm at the present is mas specialties, boots, bells and 
•nie Louie, who, with three broth- trees, and other artistic shapes. 



Opening on December 30, the 
Beryozka Russian Folk Ballet will 
give a series of seven performances 
at the War Memorial Opera House. 

Ce 1 e b r a t i n g its tenth arau- 
versarj', it comes from Moscow to 
the United States for the flret 
time. This lovely company of dan- 
cers — all women — cast its spell 
over Paris on three different occa- 
sions. The dazzling beauty of a 
Northern reel, the infectious 
rhythm of a troika are blended in 
a delightful progi'am with touches 
of great beauty and enchantment. 

On January 26 Julie Harris, one 
of today's most exciting young 
actresses, comes to the Cuixan 
Theatre for three weeks in "The 
WaiTii Peninsula," a new comedy- 
drama by Joe Masteroff. A play 
of today with its scene laid in 
Miami Beach. "The Warm Penin- 
sula" tells the engrossing story of 
Ruth Arnold, a girl who goes look- 
ing for the fulfillment of a dream 
and finds, in the end, that she 
wants reality. 

Ruth Arnold unll undoubtedly 
prove to be one of the most appeal- 
ing roles Julie Harris has ever 



played. Seeing her in it, one can 
not fail to think of her former suc- 
cesses and how different it is from 
any of them, — Frankie Adams, a 
fourteen-year-old tomboy in "The 
Member of The Wedding," the 
amoral Sally Bowles in "I Am A 
Camera" and the heroic and spir- 
itual Joan of Arc in "The Lark," 
in both of which she was seen here, 
the easy-of-Wrtue Margery Pinch- 
wife in "The Countrj- Wife," and 
her performances on television for 
the Hallmark of Fame in "The 
Good Fair>'," "The Little Moon of 
Albam" and "Johnny Belinda." 

The Actor's Workshop opens on 
November 28 with "Garden Dis- 
trict" by Tennessee Williams. The 
evening's entertainment consists 
of two plays: "Something Un- 
spoken" and "Suddenly Last Sum- 
mer." 

San Franciscans will thus have 
an opportunity of seeing a distin- 
guished work which has had suc- 
cess in London, New York, and Los 
Angeles. It has been described as 
a superb drama of poetic Grand 
Guignol. Here it will be directed by 
Vincent Porcaro. 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 

DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

Any Make or Model Seven Days a Week 

9 A.M. - 10 P.M. FREE ESTIMATES on Antenna Installations 

1322 HAIGHT STREET 

UN. 3-0793 — Also UN. 3-1836 

PALLAS BROS. 

R.ADIO ac TELEVISION REPAIRING - AND SALES 
5000 MISSION STREET JU 5-5000 SAN FRANCISCO 12 

RAY'S C4L MART LIQUORS 
3385 California Street San Francisco 



ANCHOR REALTY 

Insurance — Loans — Rentals 

A. E. CAMPANA, Owner D DEL CURTO, Owner 

G. V. McKEEVER, JR.. Sales Manager 

2122 MARKET STREET 
MArket 1-2700 San Francisco 14, Calif. 

CAREW & ENGLISH 

Leo V. Careiv 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS . . . MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

MASONIC AT GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
San Francisco 18, California 



CEMENT GUN CONSTRUCTION CO. 
Marin Ship Yards Sausalito, Calif. 

Herman Dobrovohky 

UNION OIL DEALER 



21st St CLEMENT STREET 



S.AN FRANCISCO 



ODICAL ROOM 



i"ViC 0'.::i. 



L.or' Francinco 2, Calif. 
E9. 'y^l/59 (3077) 3630 



BULK RATE 


U. S. POSTAGE 


PAID 


San 1 rancisco, Calif. 


Permil No. 4507 



SAFES 

Now in the Hub of San Francisco 

NEW e USED 

Undernriters' Approved and Labeled 

Fire Resistive Safes - Vault Doors - Burglar Resistive Money Chests 

FLOOR - WALL - HOME SAFES 

Bank Vault Equipment 

COMPLETE SERVICE a; REPAIR DEPARTMENTS 

Combinalioiis Changed ■ Safei Opened and Repaired 

Western Representative 

HERRING-HALL-MARVIN SAFE CO. 

Plione UNderhill 1-6644 

// No AnsJfer Call JUniper 5-4075 - R. HERMANN 

or JUniper 5-8819 - J. HERMANN 

THE HERMANN SAFE CO. 

Since 1889 
FREE CUSTOMER PARKING ADJACENT TO BUILDING 

1699 Market Street 


JOHN SARDIS & Associates 

Engineers 

JOHN M. SARDIS, Structural Engineer 

DOuglas 2-2291 

64 PEVE STREET 

San Francisco 11 


FIBERGLAS 

Engineering & Supply Division 

Owens-Coming Fiberglass Corporation 

1200- 17th Street San Francisco UNderhill 3-2380 

SALES & CONTRACTING 

IN 

ACOUSTICAL 

6? 

HIGH y LOW TEMPERATURE 

THERMAL INSULATIONS 


CHIN & HENSOLT 

Consulting 
En'^ineers 

(Structural Engineers for 
New Giant Baseball Stadium) 


Remington Rand 

Division of Sperry Rand 

41 FIRST STREET 

DO. 2-8600 San Francisco 


G. L GENDLER & ASSOCIATES 

Mechanical and Electrical Engineers 

1044 UNIVERSITY AVENUE 
Berkeley 10, California 

THornwall 1-3456 



^ 



IMPORTANT PERSONALITIES OF 1958 



COR 



f.) 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




ALAN TORY 

LIBRARY FOR A CITY 
TOP PERFORMERS OF 1958 
NOTABLE APPOINTMENTS 
JADE SNOW WONG 

DANIEL PINNER 

NEW TAX BENEFIT 

SUNN 6RAVES 



CALIFORNIA'S NEW GOVERNOR EDMUND G. BROWN 



DECEMBER, 1958 — JANUARY. 1959 









PITTSBURGH TESTING 


GEORGE S. NOLTE 


LABORATORY 


Consulting Civil 
Engineers 


Engineers - Chemists • X-Ray and 
Gamma Ray 

Metallurgists and Soils Foundation 
Engineering 

Inspection and Testing 




Materials of Construction and Industry, X-Ray and 


Santa Clara Walnut Creek 


Gamma Ray of large and small items — welded 


San Rafael Palo Alto Airport 


structures, vessels and pipe lines. Engineering soil 
foundation investigation and tests. Asphalt paving 




materials. 


3850 Middlefield Road 




DAvenport 6-2440 


Offices in all principal cities 


Palo Alto, California 






651 HOWARD STREET EX 2-1747 


LARKSPUR 
CONVAT£SCENT 






HOSPITAL 


WILSEY & HAM 


For Elderly Chronics and Convalescents 
R.N. and Physical Therapist on Staff 


Engineers & Planners 


GRACE SLOCUM, Director 


# 


Special Diet 


^F 


Homelike Atmosphere 
Moderate Prices 


111 ROLLINS ROAD 


Conscientious Care 


Millbrae, California 


234 HAWTHORNE, LARKSPUR 




Phone WAbash 4-1862 

LARKSPUR, CALIFORNIA 






2 


THE RECOM 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN PUBLISHER 
ALAN P. TORY EDITOR 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock 1-12 12 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 



DECEMBER, 1958 
VOLUME 26 



JANUARY, 1959 
NUMBER I 



BAY WINOnS' 



LETTERS 

I hope the success of the California Mayors 
four of last summer will encourage further 
■ood will gestures of this kind. The Record 
las through this tour contributed to the spread 
)f international good will at a time when 
personal relationships at the grass roots level 
.re of utmost importance. 

Maybe a tour to the Scandinavian countries 
nd the Soviet Union would find many eager 
o take part. The Mayors were given excep- 
ional opportunities to extend their knowledge 
if the real life of the people whom they vis- 
ted, and to get behind the facade which is 
hown to the tourist. It will be good to ex- 
;nd the project. 

MICHAEL KLINKNER 
484 Oak Avenue 
San Bruno 

Must those ugly candles appear once again 
3r Christmas celebrations in Union Square.' 
he one redeeming feature at the festive sea- 
Dn is the Salvation Army Christmas Tree. 

is time we citizens raised a protest at the 
rude and unimaginative decoration which 
ireatens to become an annual habit at the 
athering place where crowds enjoy the sing- 
ig of carols. Why not revert to traditional 
ees.' 

BARBARA GARDIEN. 
1466 Noe Street, S. F. 

Your anicle on "Two Women in White" 
y Emily Blackmore painted a vivid picture 
f Cordelia DeLaurier and her assistant, Anita 
lagee, who have rendered devoted service in 
m Francisco Hospital. It is good to see the 
xjtlight on constructive work of this kind 
hich is too often forgotten or ignored. 
J. M. KUCERA, 
1280 Pine Street, S. F. 
There is much talk about the desirability of 
tracting conventions to San Francisco. Why 
e not make a New Year resolution for 
P59 that we will brighten our city.'' San 
rancisco is in danger of losing its glamor 
id charm. There is so much that could be 
5ne to make our city festive — more sidewalk 
fes, street coflee stalls like flower barrows, 
irades with color and F>aEeantrv. All we 
xd is some guidance and inspiration from 
e top. 

CLAUDE KILGORE, 
1626 Yosemite Ave., S. F. 



(PERIODICAL OEPT.) 



BALKANIZED BAY AREA 

We arc all for the bold and far-sighted 
proposal of the Bay Area Council for the 
establishment of an overall authority to co- 
ordinate and operate the Bay Area's sea- 
ports, airports and bridges. In a period of 
rapid change, with explosive population 
growth facing our nine counties, there is a 
need for a will to adapt ourselves to ex- 
tended horizons and a new stnde of life. 

The New York Port Authonty, which 
operates bridges, tunnels, airports and term- 
inals, is an inspiring example of a regional au- 
thority which serves successfully a growing 
metropolitan community. Our Balkanized 
Bay Area shows up in comparison like an 
out-moded balloon in the jet age. 

The project for a Bay Area Authority en- 
joys the endorsement of an impressive array 
of business and labor leaders. It is com- 
mended in the weighty Coverdale and Col- 
pitts report on the grounds that it is desir- 
able for the economic welfare of the Area 
and its people, that it is practicable from an 
operational standpoint, and that it is finan- 
cially feasible. 

We know of no better New Year's reso- 
lution for the people of the nine counties 
than to pledge time and energy to the tena- 
cious pursuit of this goal which can be 
reached only after much necessary debate 
and negotiation. 

AIRLINE TER)vllNAL 

Our new airline bus terminal at Taylor 
and O'Farrell Streets is a welcome addition 
to the facilities of San Francisco. Its 40,000 
square feet of floor space includes not only 



ticket offices for eight major air lines, but 
the local headquarters of the U.S. Passport 
Department, a studio for taking of passport 
photographs, shops and a restaurant. 

This modernizing of our until now old- 
fashioned and cumbersome machinery for 
processing passengers is a hopeful sign for 
those of us who are perturbed by a stiffen- 
ing of the joints which has held back San 
Francisco from fully seizing its opportun- 
ities. 

A WORD FOR A CITY 

Whatever new face an economically uni- 
fied Bay Area may exhibit, of one thing we 
may be sure — the city will remain. It was 
good that in Boston Mayor George Christo- 
pher put in a powerful word for the much- 
abused city in our American economy, and 
went so far as to propose a Federal Depart- 
ment of Urban Affairs headed by an official 
of Cabinet rank. 

President Clark Kerr of the University of 
California is an ally of Mayor Christopher 
in defence of urban civilization, which he 
rightly claims to have an immense future 
because of the intensifying of industrial de- 
velopment. "The city," he asserted in a re- 
cent address, ""is man's most natural, most 
advantageous habitat, an exciting place to 
live, providing more opportunity for self- 
fulfillment than any other." 

We see no reason — particularly if Police 
Chief Cahill can subdue the activities of 
gunmen who invade domestic parties — why 
the Bay Area should not see a metropolitan 
renewal at its heart, together with an expan- 
sion of life in the complex of counties to 
which San Francisco is extricably bound. 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 

LETTERS 


3 


BAY WINDOW 


3 


TOP PERFORMER OF 1958 ENTERS THE BIS LEAGUE 

'a<, A'ar Tcry 

LIBRARY FOR A CITY 
TOP PERFORMERS OF 1958 
NOTABLE APPOINTMENTS OF 1958 
DIRECTORY 


4 

6 

8 

10 

12 


WOMAN OF THE MONTH- JADE SNOW WONG 


IS 


by Don, el P,r,r,er 

BOOKS: A TIME OF CRISIS 

bv Jane Rawson 

GOOD NEWS FOR OUR SMALL BUSINESS MEN 

by Glenn Groves 

GROWING CONGESTION PROBLEMS OF THE BAY AREA 

by John M. Peirce 

PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 


16 

17 

18 

20 
23 


MEMO FOR LEISURE 



iCEMBER. 1958 -JANUARY, 1959 




THE SLENDER YOUTH, who was still 
a year away from his law degree, helped 
the blind man onto a trolley car, found a 
scat for his friend, and on the journey home 
asked explanations of legal points which had 
arisen in court that afternoon. He wanted 
to learn all he could, and prized the oppor- 
tunity of feasting from the mind of Milton 
Schmidt, one of San Francisco's most bril- 
liant and able attorneys. 

Day after day, for a small emolument, 
LJu-ing the whole of the past year, the eager 
;'pirc!iticc had led this blind lawyer in and 
out of courts, accompanied him from his 
home to work, done research for him. The 
money wasn't much, but it helped in getting 
through evening law school, and the hours 
he spent watching the workings of a line 
\''':i\ mind were beyond price. 

Edmund Gerald Brown was destined to 
1 L-nd three more years in this employment 
-two after he had officially joined the pro- 
fession, to enter which he had worked since 
he left Lincoln High. 

In those days he was physically a light- 

luht. The memory was still fresh of his 

.iking the 100 lb. basketball team at school, 

licre he attained his first elective office- 

.11 leader and secretary of the student body. 

Even then, the characteristics of the man 

he were emerging — a willingness to Hsten 

lid learn, a pleasure in leadership, a quality 

I patience ready to wait for opportunities. 

One often told story which came from 

I he home of Uncle Frank Schuckman, whose 

• inch in Colusa County the boys delighted 

visit, vent back to Abraham Lincoln. 

' )Me of the family forebears was among 

lii'iM.- v.li. . -.Mitcd the body of the great 

RcpubhiMii President to hi.s last resting 

pl.,a-. 

I'erh.ips it was this echo from the Civil 
War era which induced the fledgling lawyer 
ol twenty-three to offer himself for election 
for the first time as a Republican. His op- 
ponent for the office of Assemblyman was 
Ray Williamson, former inheritance tax ap- 
praiser in the St.iti- of Cdifornia. 



Governor Edmund C. Broivn\s career has been 
shaped against a San Francisco background 



Top Performer of 1958 
Enters the Big League 

by Alan Tory 



In this campaign Brown had to find some 
way of distracting the attention of the 
voters from his youth and inexperience, so 
he chose as his slogan: "Twenty-three years 
in the district." Williamson won, and young 
Pat went on to more political fights and to a 
change in party allegiance. 

He became, as the vjorld knows, and our 
expert daily newspapers have fully recorded, 
S. F. County District Attorney and Attor- 
ney General, from which office he has now 
taken the big step to the Governor's man- 
sion in Sacramento. Here, on 16th and H 
Streets, the noise and fury of the traffic 
compared with the peace surrounding his 
Bay Area home is a symbol of a change from 
the charted course of Attorney General with 
its comforting precedents, to the inescap- 
able initiatives and garish spotHght of the 
Governersfiip. 

We doubt if the cold hand of protocol 
will succeed in cramping the style of the es- 
sential Pat Brown, who remembers Milton 
Schmidt, and specially welcomed on the 
night of November 4 the congratulations 
of Uncle Frank Schuckman, now ninety, 
and the oldest Mason in Colusa County. 

As we see it, a combination of Irish 
charm and German tenacity have helped to 
bring Pat Brown where he is, and a good 
sense of humor will preserve him from the 
politician's peculiar occupational disease of 
arrogance. 

Quite obviously his new role will demand 
qualities of leadership, decision, and inde- 
pendence, whereas his success in the Attor- 
ney Generalship hinged upon consultation 
of authorities and the choice of a good team. 
As in his last office, he is surrounding him- 
self with competent men. He is likely to 
display, as he has done in the past, a sense 
of timing and strategic acumen which is no 
small part of the art of government. 

Time will show whether he is a man who 
can match himself against the mountains of 
major politics, and his friends in proudly 
wishing him well on the eve of the new 



Sacramento drama will 
grown from lesser to 



hope that, as he h 
bigger jobs, he wi 









eveal the maj;ic power which is nccdcJ to 
;ad men. 
At the inaugural ceremony Brown de- 
larcd: "Not for twenty years and only once 
eforc in this century, has a Democratic 



Governor ( Culbert Olson in 1939) made an tive pnjyram which emphasized the need 

inaugural address to the Legislature. And tor development of State services, and prom- 

not since 1889 has there been a majority of ised to .submit detailed messages later on 

Democrats in both houses of the Legislature. three ma;or problems — the budget, the 

He rccummcnJcd .1 twelve point legisla- v.atcr cr'sis. and labor reforms 



Diesel Engineering Service 

Marine Diesel Engine Repairs 

Governors - Fuel Pumps - Injectors 

24-Hour SerN-ice — TE. 2-2118 

1401 Aliddle Harbor Rd. Oakland 


Whipple, Adamson, Murphy & Pearson 

Consulting Enf^ineers 

650 EL CAMINO REAL 
REDWOOD CITY, CALIFORNIA 


Roy M. Ti'olter & Associates 

1 — Consultants — 

1 Municipal and Sanitary Engineering 

i W.iter SuppK- Water Treatment 
1 Sewage and Waste Treatment 
Storm and Sanitary Sewers 

1784 SHATTUCK AVENUE 
KERKELEY 9. CALIFORNIA 


MEYER and YOUNG 

Building Corporation 

General Contractors 

679 I'ORTOLA DRIVE 
.AlOnlrose 1-0300 San Francisco 27 


**The HERTZ Corporation" 
HERTZ BENT A CAR 

43 3 MASON STREET ORdKav 3-4666 
Emery C. Liuhka 

HERTZ RENT A TRUCK 

1480 rOL-SOM STREET L'Ndcrhlll 1-68-0 
U. j. St.llna,, 

HERTZ CAR LEASING DIVISION 

1480 FOLSOM STREET MArkit l-O-ii 

HonurJ Kirmssv 


St. Vincent de Paid Salvajje Bureau 

rtiR.NrruRE. clothing, housefhold goods, newsp.apers 

Ours i« a y&ir roiinj proRr.im to care Icr (he poof. 

SAN FR\NCISCO — 1015 MU.ion Sir«< — HE. 1-^5I«I 
OAKLAND — SI5 W.bslcr Sireol — rWinoals J-272! 
SAN MATEO — 113 Soulh B Sircet — Diamond 2-1860 
D.ALY CrrV — 6726 Missicn Strn-I — PLaza 5-4J-)6 
S.AN JOSE — • • ! W. S,-n Carlo. Slrrcl — C\pras 4-4<>74 
VALLE.IO — 2J0.A Viremj Slrect — VAIIejo 2-5525 
STOCKTON — 626 E. Market Street — Stoekton 4-0067 
SAN R/V-AHL — 910 "B" Street — GLetlw<K>d 4-J302 
E. J. WREN. K.S.G. 

PUiu- UunI Throw ll Away . . . Hul Do Call 
ST. \TNCENT DE PAUL SALV.AGE BUREAU 



CEMBER, 1958 -JANUARY, 1959 



The Dignity oi a City Demands Well 
Stocked Functional Public Libraries 



THOSE OF US who have been familiar 
with good libraries over many years have 
some sort of picnire of swinging doors open- 
ing into a warm, well-lit room, probably with 
mellow woodwork and copies of old masters, 
and archways leading to stacks of books, un- 
imaginable numbers of books stretching into 
unbelievable distance — reading matter for the 
whole of a lifetime. 

Somewhere hovers a librarian. If we think 
back a good long way, maybe there is a quiet, 
small-boned creature with a velvet neckband 
and speaacles that run up and down efficient- 
ly on a piece of elastic: maybe, it is a lanky, 
thoughtful young man. Perhaps in these days 
we think of crew-cut Phi-Beta-Kappas and 
young women with Soctatic intellects and the 
appearance of airline stewardesses. Always, 
however, the librarian has a charming and 
welcoming smile. 

There is no mystery. What makes a good 
library? Three things; lots of books; good 
librarians; appropriate premises. Unfortim- 
ately, all three are very costly. If a library is 
unsatisfactory the basic reason for its inade- 
quacy is usually lack of money. 

Recently there have been criticisms of the 
library facilities of the City of San Francisco. 
In 1958 a sur\'ey was conducted for the City 
Library Commission by Emerson Greenaway. 
In its introduction, the resulting report 
states: "The Library has been hampered over 
the years by lack of funds, by lack of trained 



librarians in sufficient quantity to do the work 
needed, by lack of books and by a Main Li- 
brary in which it is impossible to function 
efficiently and effectively." 

The last three defects stem from the first, 
and it is to be hoped that the city will see its 
way to appropriate substantial funds for the 
development of library services. 

Highlights of the report are: the creation 
of a committee of fifty to assist the library 
commission in securing a broad base of under- 
standing; recommended major changes in or- 
ganization; long range plans for the rebuild- 
ing of the main librar)'; within the next 5 
years, an increase in the aimual budget to 
$2,200,000. 

The report contends that: "The San Fran- 
cisco Public Library can be developed in qual- 
ity and effectiveness only to the extent that 
the people of San Francisco wish it to be. This 
calls for thinking and action on the part of all 
those involved in the various component parts, 
the citizens, the city government, the city 
librarian and his staff." 

In a survey of the responsibilities of the 
City Librarian the report comments: "The 
City Librarian, for a city the size of San Fran- 
cisco, cannot possibly handle an organization 
the size of the San Francisco Public Library 
without top-level assistance. He must be free 
to plan the overall work and growth of the 
Library. He must have time to work with 
the Library Commissioners, the various offic- 
ers of the city government and the many civic 



leaders and groups interested in the Library 
He must have the necessary time to mee 
every new opportunity as well as every nev, 
problem." 

An important criticism of the Main Library 
building is that it is not functional. The re 
port states: "Central libraries designed prio 
to 1933 have uniformly created terrific build 
ing problems in trj'ing to design functional 
modern library sen'ice programs for libran 
ser\'ice today. No large public library in th 
United States faces a worse problem in thi 
respect than does San Francisco. For botl 
service and psychological reasons it is im 
perative that something be done and doni 
soon — to the Main Library. 

Ideally a new building should be buik 
but land and funds are problems and it wouk 
take years to arrive at a solution. The seconi 
best thing would be to tear out the interio 
of the present building and to rebuild it and 
at the same time, extend it to Hyde Street 
This will have to be done in time. 

The third alternative, and it is only expedi 
ency, would be to departmentalize, reorganiz 
present seriices. to relight and redecorate, ani 
to place more books on open shelves. Thi 
tempotarj' expediency would pay off in effici 
ency, convenience and public relations." 

The Library has a big challenge before i 
Not too long ago, we heard one of its Publil 
Relations staff members stimulate a l 
deal of interest in the work of the Lib 





LAWRENCE J. CLARKE 
City Librarian 



Also recently we hesitantly asked the refer- 
ence depanment to check an article written 
about ten years ago in a small periodical: 
we hesitated to ask for this information be- 
cause we know how understaffed the Library 
is and we felt qualifications as highly special- 
ised as those of the FBI were needed for this 
particular project. Within an hour our re- 
quested information came. On its lean budget, 
our Librar)' does remarkably well. It is up to 
the city and its citizens to get behind it. 

A library is in the last analysis simply a 
place where people can borrow books for 
reading. It is here that they discover the 
magic that "draws children from play and 
old men from the chimney corner" including 
chimney corners on Skid Row and play with 
switch-blades. Not many weeks ago, as we 
were leaving the Main Library, a visitor from 
Boston asked us with raised eyebrows if this 
non-functional, old-fashioned edifice were in- 
deed the principal public library in San Fran- 
cisco. We look forward to the day when even 
Bostonians will gasp in admiration before our 
library facilities. 



Off the Record 




SONOMA WINE CO. 

LIQUORS FOR PEOPLE OF PARTICULAR TASTE 

WE CARRY ALL THE BEST LIQUORS 

Tlioroughly Aged! 
Scotch, Rye. B.mrhon, Gin -- Only the Best 

Phone LA. 5-6775 

15:^3 Solano Avenue Berkeley, Calif. 



SIGNAL SOUND SYSTEMS 

1572 CHURCH STREET 

San Francisco 14, California 

Phone ATwater 2-4138 

.■1. L. (LINK) SARGENT 



GREER REALTY CO. 

Real Estate - Loans - Insurance 

WM. J. GREER 
4624 GEARY BOULEVARD 

Branch at 11 12 Taraval — LO 4-4410 
Office: BAyview 1-2353 



PINKERTON'S NATIONAL DETECTIVE AGENCY 
Monadnock BIdg. -:■ San Francisco 



ROBERT E. THOMAS 



ROBERT E. THOMAS 
& ASSOCIATES 

Engineers 

582 MARKET STREET 

EXbrook 2-1700 San Francisco 



The FINK & SCHINDLER CO. 

MANUFACTURING CONTRACTORS 
Store - Office - Church ■ Bank ■ liar and Restaurant fixtures 

Cabinet Work - General Alterations - Store Fronts 

Metal ac Wood Office Partitions - Laboratory Equipment 

552 BRANNAN STREET - SAN FRANCISCO 7, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone EXbrook 2-1513 



HASTIE 

Real Estate Inspection and Repair, Inc. 

Complete Termite Inspection Reports 
TERMITES - FUNGI • BEETLES 

225 Capitol Ave. San Francisco 12, Calif. 
G.I. Loans State Veterans Loans 



lECEMBER, 1958 - JANUARY. 1959 



Fleetwood Rest Home 

Licensed Home for Ambulatory Seniles, 

Quiet surroundings - Excellent Food - Loving Care 

BA- 1-1325 123 - 14th AVENUE, Near LAKE STREET 



TOP PERFORMERS OF 1958 




TULA CHRISTOPHER 



NORMAN SUTHERLAND 



MELVYN CRONIN 



DICK NOLAN 



As wi(e o( San Francisco's Mayor, she President of P.G.&E.. tie spear-heoded Superior Court Judge, who pricked the He successfully took o.er Art Cofin's 
preserved mognonirrity. poise and chorm the construction of the first privately bubble of Beatnik pretence in telling column in S.F. Examiner in Morch 1958, 
through a year of politicol fireworks, financed atomic power plant in the U. S. Eric Nard to get o job, stop bumming, has punch, candor, nimbleness of mind. 




MMk 




GEORGE KILLION 



JOHN B. RODGERS 



ABIGAIL VAN BUREN 



ALAN K. BROWNE 



Proiidont of Amoricon Proiidont Linos, Partner, S.F. office. Skidmoro. Owings & Her witty "Dear Abby" column in S. F. President, S.F. Chamber of Commer 
he achieved ondorscmont in Washington Morrill, who wore ossociofe orchitecis Chronicle, born in 1956, furnished the 1958. he attocked recession proble 
♦o build o (ronj-Pocific suporlinor. for fine Civic Center Development Plan, material for a best-selling book. with optimism, gave strong leadership. 




Air Pol 
piloted 
roundly 



BEN LINSKY ROBERTA FENLON 

lution Control Officer, he hos President-elect, S. F. Med 



CYRIL MAGNIN 



TOM FRANKLIN 



:al Society, President, Board of Commissioners. S.F. Crisp, forceful newscoster for 
an open dump burning ban which this Californio Professor is first womon Port Authority, he led drive for bond he is on engaging M.C. to S. 
beat opposition in the courts, to be nomed to the office in 90 yeors. issue of $50 million to modernize port, and an irresistible Shell oflc 



KRON-T 
F.s dran 
lonodo. 




EDGAR F. KAISER 



MILTON MARKS 



EDWARD T. MANCUSO 



GENE McATEER 



President o( the Boy Area Council, he Republican Assemblymon for the 21st As Public Defender, his work received Moved from sphere of city governme 
proposed far-sighted economic plon District, he bucked Democratic tide praise from the Grand Jury for aid to into State politics through his clecti. 
for o co-ordinated Boy Area Authority, to become noted newcomer in politics, courts and representing of defendants, as Democratic State Senator for S, 




ENRICO BANDUCCI 



FRANCIS McCARTY 



WALTER HEIL 



ROGER JESSUP 



Opened o new coffee house on Broadway Spearheaded drive to bring the Giants Director of De Young Museum, who Notable mill producer and distribut 
with tobies on sidewall., showing how to S.F. ond to estoblish a functional thought up and carried through record named by the S.F. Chamber of Coi 
S.F. might emulate the chorm of Paris, airline terminal in the downtown area, breaking spectacular Von Gogh exhibit, merce as "Livestock Man of the Yeoi 



DECEMBER. I«)56 -JANUARY, 1959 



NOTABLE APPOINTMENTS 

IN 1958 




CHESTER R. MocPHEE 
Chief Administrative Office 



JOHN M. PEIRCE 

General Manager 

S. F. Bay Area Ropid Transit District 




THE RT, REV. JAMES A. PIKE ALBERT C. WOLLENBERG 

Bishop of Colifornio Judge, U. S. District Court 



GERALD S. LEVIN 
Judge, Superior Court 



JOHN W. BUSSEY 
Judge, Municipol Court 




THOMAS CAHILL 

Chief of Police 



JACK H. HOW 
President, S, F. Chamber of Co 



VIRGIL ELLIOn 
Director, Finance and Records 



JAMES R. McCarthy 

Director of Plonning 



FOR 

SAMPLING - INSPECTION 
LABORATORY SERVICES 

Chemical Analysis • Bacteriological Examination 
Grading • Certification 



OF 



IMPORTS 



EXPORTS 



Specify 

CURTIS & TOMPKINS, LTD. 

tflabliihed I87K 

236 Front Street • San Francisco 1 1 

Phone: EXbrook 2-1130 Cable: ANALYST 

Members of and Official Chemists and/or Samplers for 
Sampling Representatives at Coast and Inland Points 

SPECIALISTS IN 



Nevada Operations Headquarters — Lovelock 
Many Scientific and Trade Organizations 

NCPA — NIOP — AOCS — ASTM -- ACIL 



THE JACKSON 
HOSPITALS, INC. 

Executive Offices: 
1410 Bonita Avenue, Berkeley, California 

Berkeley Division 

1410 BONITA AVENUE 

LAndscape 6-4112 

Mount Eden Division 
2595 DEPOT ROAD 

Mount Eden Section: 

Hayward, California 

ELgin 1-5300 - LUceme 2-0212 




TV's more 

fun with 
another one 

When parents and children meet in front 
of one TV, there's bound to be a difference 
of opinion. A peaceful solution to this 
nightly problem is another set. Move the 
old TV into the children's room. Then 
treat yourself to one of the neat new 
slenderized sets (and enjoy your favorite 
program ... or quiet hour, as you please). 

BETTER BUY NOW! 

Pacific Gas tuulEkctiic Company 



VANDAMENT & 
DARMSTED 

Consulting 

Engineers 

• 

156 SECOND STREET 

San Francisco 5. Calif. 

Telephone EXbrook 2-2723 



DECEMBER, I9S8 - JANUARY, 1959 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

GEORGE CHRISIOPHER. MAYOR 

Directory of City and County Officers 



liLECIlVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

;uij (Jily HjH 
(:.-.,.« CliM«..pher. May<,i 

JoKpli J. Allen, li.cculivc Scctel.ii>- 
l-jltiua H. O.nnich, Confidcniial Sccrclatr 
Ccoise J- Cruhh. AJmini.lralivc Auuun 
John D. SuU.van, I'ublic iktvi.c Diicclor 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OF 

2)5 City Hall 
Frjncii McCarty. 220 Monlgomory Si.. I'lcjijcnl 



Hiruld S. Dubbs, 351 Californji Si. 
Dr. Chailo A. Eriola. 25! Columbus Ave. 
John J. Ferdon. 155 Montgomery St. 
Jime. L. Hallcy. 870 Marlet Si. 
Clarjsv. Shoitall McMahon. 70J M.irkct St. 
Henry R. Rolph. 310 Saniomc St. 
Jamc. J. Sullivan. Jl WcM Portal 
Alfonso J. Zirpoli. 300 Montgomery St. 
Roberl J. Dolan. Clerl 
Lillian M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 

Standing Conunitteea (Chairman named first) 
Commercial and Industrial Development— Sullivan. Blake. 

a»ey 
County. Stale and Nau'onal Affairs— Halley. Eriola. Ferdon 
Education. Parks and Recreation — Rolph, Dobbs, Blake 
Finance. Revenue and Tajauon— Dobbs. McMahon. Halley 
Judiciary, Legislative and Civil Service — Zirpoli. Rolph, Casey 
Police — Casey, Sullivan. Rolph 
Public Buildings, Lands and City Planning— McMahon. Dobbs, 

Zirpoli 
Public Health and Welfare- Ertola. Sullivan, Zirpoli 



Rule, 



-McCarty, Dobbs. Hal 



ASSESSOR 

inl Ciiy Hall 
Rii!.cll L. Woldcn 

CITY ATTORNEY 

20C City Hall 
Di,.n R. Holm 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

617 M,.nle"iiicry St. 
Thomas C. Lyn,!, 



Edward T. Manci 



Maitbew C. Carbei 



SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 

Fourlh Floor, City Hall L 

Edward Molkenbubr, Presiding Twain Miclielsen 

Raymond J. Arala J. B. Molinari 

\V.,Ii,-, f:,iipcneti Harry J. Ncukirili 

' 11. .11 f^i.ulCcld Clarence W. M,„i 

■ ■ ! I f:r.,nin Orla St. Clair 

' .Muian. Jr. George W. Schcnf. 



.....rl..,. L F,.., 

..ma. M. Foley 
■ aid S. Uvin 

rreu Meillc 
Ir.ieph M. Cumra 
180 City Hall 



alrick 



Daniel R. Shoemaker 
William T. Sweiiicri 
William F. Traverse. 
H. A. Van Der Zee 



. Sccretai^ 



UN 1-8552 



MUNICIPAL, JUDGES OF 

Third Floor. City Hall KL 2-3008 

V.lliam <) llri,,,, P,. .„J„„, Claylon W. Horn 

'■■',"!/'.",',■''' Edward O'Day 

■ '1 H. Allen Charlc. Pcery 

.'■'.'"■'hr'^n^"'"--' '-«"""= D- Underwood 

';■''" J^i,"","?', '^'^'■" E. Weinberger 

|...eph M. Coldef, James J. Welsh 

Ivan L. Slavieh. Sr.reljry 

101 City Hall KL 2-J008 

A. C. McChe.ney. I .. .. 



TRAFFIC FINES BUREAU 

164 Cily Hall 
James M. Cannon. Chief Divi.ion Clerk 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall 1 

Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
J. liiidd McMan.gal. Foreman 
Paul M. LcBaron. Secretary 
David F. Supple. Consultant-Statislician 

ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

604 Montgomery St, YU 6-2950 

John D. Kavanaugh. Chief Adult Probation OlTicer 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Mecu at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan. Chairman. 60 Sansome St. 



Raym 

Rl. [ 

Fred C. Jones. 628 Ha. 

Maurice Moskov.ts. 2900 Lake St. 

Robert A. Pcabody. 456 Post St. 



YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodside Ave. 
Thomas F. Strycula. Chief Juvenile Probatie 



Si. 



Ollic 



JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
t N. Buell, Chairman. 2512 Pacific Ave. 
i. Fred W. Bloch. 3712 Jackson St. 
. John A. CoMins. 420 - 29th Ave. 
[ Goldbcrgcr. 240 Golden Gate Ave. 
cs S. Kearney. 1871 - 55th Ave. 
,mas J. Lcnchan. 501 Haighl St. 
!. Marshall Madison, 2930 Vallcjo St. 
. James B. Flynn. 1825 Mission St. 
. Hamilton T. Boswell. 1975 Post St. 
.» Myra Green. 1362 - 30th Ave. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 
MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMNISTRATIVE OFHCER 

289 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Sh,:rm.in Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

Virgil Elliott. Director, Finance 6= Records 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 



LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATTVE, FEDERAL 
LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1.0163 

Donald W. Cleary 
Hotel Senator. Sacramento, during Sessions 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

lUO Larkin 

Meets 1st Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 
Harold L. Zcllcrbach. President. J43 Sansom, 
Bernard C. Bcglcy, M.D., 450 Sutter St. 



John K 
Hetty J.i. 
Willian. 



Ex-Officio Members 



Jill. Library Commission 
'. l.'.--i.-:-ittun and Park Commit 
■iph H. Dyer, Jr., Secretary 



CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 Larkin St. HE lIi: 

Meets every Thursday 2:30 P.M. 
Roger D. Lapham, Jr.. President 
Thomas P. White. Vice-President 
Roberi Lilienthal 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter 
Joseph E. Tinncy 

Ex-Officio Members 

Chief Administrative Officer Sherman Duckel 
Manager of Ucilitiea 

Jamea H. Turner, Designated Deputy of T. N. Bland, 

Manager of Utilities 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 
Wm. A. Lahanier. Prejiden;. 995 Market St. 
Wm. Kilpatrick. V,cc-Pres.. 827 Hyde St. 
Hubert J. Sober. 155 M.:.nIgomcry St. 

(-•corcc 1 Gnibb. i;,n. Mcr, of Personnel 



DISASTER CORPS 

45 Hyde St. 
Rear Admiral A. G. Cook, USN (Ret.), Dircaoi 
Alex X. McCausland, Public Information Officer 



EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van .Mess Avenue UN 3 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M., 170 Fell Sf 
Draper. Jr.. President. Kl Walnut St. 



Adolfo de Uriost 


e. 512 Van Ness Ave. 


Charles J. Foehn. 


55 Fillmore St. 


l..ho G L.:vK..,n. 


i;- M..ni(omerv St. 


Mrs (:!.ur, U:,i 


s;cr. 3 5M) Jackson St. 


I..Mpl, A .Vl,...r, 


Ir , i'l California St. 


|.:inH r F Skini.tr 


\ uc-l'r.., . 220 Fell St 


Dr. H:ir..M 


Speirs 


Superintend 


nt ut Schools and Sec 



COMMISSION ON EQUAL 
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 



A. Fr; 

Peter E. Haas. 9S Battery St. 
John F. Henning. 995 Market St. 



HRE COMMISSION 



er H. Duane. 220 Bush Street 

Simon. 1550 Folsom St. 
William F. Murray, Chief of Department 
Albert E. Hayes, (Dhicf, Division of Fire Prcvi 

Investigation 
Thomas W. McCarthy. Secretary 



HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

11.1. : M.i. I'lesident, 264 Dellbtook Av. 

I'" 11. 977 Valencia St. 

i* ' ! . 230 Montgomery St. 

II. ... . I M k. .,;.... 2619 . !9th Ave. 
II , V. o S,..iivan, 1340 Powell St. 

Walter E. Hook, M.D.. Medical Direclo 

Frank Collins, Secretary 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 
Charles J. Jung, Chairman. 622 Washington St. 
Jefferson A. Beaver, 1738 Post St. 
Charles L. Conlan, 1655 Folsom St. 
Al F. Mailloux. 200 Guerrero St. 
Jacob Shemano. 988 Maikct St. 

John W. Beard. Eiecutive Director 



PARKING AUTHORITY 

^ul/ Golden i;jic Aic, 
M.ft. £w.v Tliurjjy. « )• M 
I Sthk.miter. Uuiinnn. iui.i Mjcln 



Sulln 



.1 St 
84U Ull.u Si 



in. 65 Berry St 
T. Fiahcr. General Manager 
I j. O'TuoIe, Seerclary 



PERMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 

;:7 Cily Hall 

MeetJ e>cry VVcdnrsJav at '. '.(J I'M, 
'. ..: r.marai. 1II!M Hatn...n St, 

>65 Montgomery 



POLICE CX)MMISSION 

Hall o( Ju.l,ce 

Meeli every Monday al 4:50 PM. 
Paul A Biuinger. Prcj.denl. Davi. and Paeifie 
Hiri IJ R McK^nnon. Mill. Toner 

I Mellon. yW F.rji St. 
:T,a. Cahill. Chief of Pol.ee 

:. J Nelder. Deputy Chief of Police 
mas Zaragou. Director of Traffic 
.tl McKlcm. Chief of Inipectors 
I. am J. OBrien. Commisaion Sccreiar 

II T. Butler. Department Secretary 

PUbLIC UBRARY COMMISSION 



c.> 



Cent, 



Meets 1st Tuesday each month at 4 P.M. 
Albert E Schi»..hachcr. Jr.. President. 101) Montgomery St 
Miss Rose M. Fanucchi. 311 Columbus Ave. 
Campbell McGregor. 165 Post St. 
Rev tt illiam Turner. 1642 BrodericL St 
Mi= 1 Henry Mohr. 2 Castenada Ave. 
• ■• M.»re. Potrero and 18th Sts. 
I OBrien. 440 Ellis St. 
vuns. WO Geary St. 
\'ayssic. 240 Jones Si 
\v S. Wu. D D.S.. nil Siocliron St. 
ttill.n, H, Kirkpatricl. 1836 • 4.Ud Ave. 
L J. Clarke. Librarian 
Frank A. Clarvoc, Jr., Secretary 

PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

;s7 City Hall HE i;i;i 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 

Don Farackerley. President. 851 Howard St. 

Ednrd B. Baron. 44 Casa Way 

Daniel F. Del Carlo. 200 Guerrero St. 
N. Greenbcrg. 765 Folsora St. 

JiMcph Martin. Jr.. 400 Montgomery St. 
T. N. Bland. Manager of Utilities 
I. J. Macdonald. Secretary to Commission 
lames J. Finn. Executive Secretary to Manager 

Bureaus and Departments 

Accounts, 287 City Hall HE MI21 

jeorge Negri. Diiector 
Anport, San Franeuco International PL 6-0500 

Belford Bro»n. Manager 
Atttb Hctchy, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

"-iarry E, Lloyd. Chief Engineer and General Manager 
Light, Heal a: Pover, 425 Mason St. PR 5-7000 

B. A. Devme. Manager 
kimiidpal Railway, 949 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Charl.-! D Miller. Manager 
taKnnel Si Safety, 901 Presidio Ave. FI 6-5656 

Paul J Fanning. Director 
VUblic Service, 297 City Hall HE 1-2121 

William J. Simons. Director 

■ Department, 425 Mason St. PR 5.7lin() 

J.-imcs H. Turner, General Manager 

'UBLIC WELFARE COMMISSION 

•85 Bush St. GA 1-5000 

viects Isc and 3rd Tuesdays each month at 9 A.M. 
a»ard J. Wren. President. 1825 Mission St. 
Jnest I). Howard. 515 Montgomery St. 
licholas A Loumos. 220 Montgomery St. 
<«. John J. Murray. 1506 Portola Drive 
y M. Sante. 703 Market St. 
Ronald H. Born. Director of Public Welfare 
Mrs. Eulala Smith. Secretary 

USCREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

McLaren Lodge. Golden Gate Park SK I -4866 

Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month at 3 P.M. 

--- Bercot. I Lombard St. 

lary Margaret Casey. 552 Mission St. 

'illiam M. Coffman. 525 Market St. 

'liter A Haas. Sr.. 98 Battery St. 

I. Francis J. Her:. 450 Sutter St. 

Iri. Joseph A. Moore. 2590 Green St 

An F Conn^y. 511 California St. 

FUyroond S. Kimbell. General Manager 
Edward McDevitt. Secretary to Commission 

KEMBER. 1958 - JANUARY, 1959 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 



R.,y N. Uucll. 445 Bush St 
Julm L. Merrill. 582 Mallet St. 
Lawrence R. Palacn... 355 Hayes St. 
Sydney G. Walton. Crocker Buildini: 



RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

95 Grove Street 

Meets every Wednesday al 5 P.M. 
William T. Reed. Presidenl. 1J85 - 20lh Ave 
I'liilip S. Dalton. I Sansome St. 
James M. Hamill. 120 Montgomery St. 
ttilliam J. Murphy. 1771 . 45th Ave. 
Martin F. Wormulh. 4109 Pacheco St. 

Ex-Otficio Members 
President. Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

J. L. Moot:, Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building 

•Meets 2nd Thursday each month at 5 
George T. Davis. President. 98 Post St. 
Eugene D. Bennett. 225 Bush St. 
Sidney M. Ehrman. 14 Montgomery St. 
Frank A. Flynn. 1690 - 27th Ave. 
Sam K. Harrison. 451 Bryant St. 
W. A. Handersun. 19 Maywood Dr. 
Ouido J. Mosto. 55 5 North Point St. 
Samuel D Sayad. Vice-Pres.. 256 Santa Ana 
Ralph J. A. Stern. 305 Clay St. 
Fred Campagnoli. 300 Montgomery St. 
Prentis C. Hale, 867 Market St, 

Edward Sharkey. Managing Director 

E L, George. Secret.iry 



SAN FRANOSCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HE 1-: 

George Culler. Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL COMIVUSSIONER 

Agricultural Bldg.. Embarcadero 
Raymond L. Bo::ini 



CORONER 

650 Merchai 



ELECTRIOTY, DEPARTMENT OF 

276 Golden Gate Avenue HE 1-: 

D. O. Townsend. Chief 
Doyle L. Smith. Superintendent of Plant 

HNANCE a: RECORDS, DEPARTMENT 

HE 1 : 

HE 1-: 
HE 1-: 
HE 1-: 
HE 1-: 

James W. Reinfeld. 107 City Hall 

PUBUC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1-J 

Dr. Ellis D. Sox. Director of Public Health 
Dr. E. C. Sage. Assistant Director o( Public Health 



Laguna Honda Home, 7lh Ave. U Dew 



Central Emet«ency, Grove &* Polk 

PUBLIC WORKS. DEPARTMENT OF 

260 City Hall 
Reuben H. Owens. Director 

R. Brooks Larter. Assistant Director. Administrativi 
L. J. Archer, Assl. Director, Maintenance anii Opi 



MI 7-( 

HE 1-3 



Account*. 260 City Hall 

J. J. McCloiliey. Supeivi.or 
Architecture, 265 City Hall 

Charles W Griffith. City Architect 
BuIMinc Inapectioli, 275 C:iiy Hall 

Lc.ter C. Bush. Superintendent 
Building Repair, 2323 Army 

A. H. Ekenberg. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau, 286 City Hall 

Sidney Franklin. Supervisor 
Eosineerins, 559 City Hall 

Sewer Repair )C Sewage Treatmeiit 2523 Army St.. 

Ben Benai. Superintendent 
Street Cleaninff, 2525 

Dcinard M, Cro 
Street Repi 



tepair, 2 

D Bto 



grotty, Superi 
Army St, 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall 
Ben G. Kline. Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, 313 Francisco St. 

Aylmer W. Pelan. Superintendent 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 



Philip L. Re; 



I A. Grahii 






SEALER OF WEIGHTS Sc MEASURES 

6 City Hall HI 

O, C. Skinner. Jr. 
Farmers' Market, Baysbore (^ Alemany 

Thos. P. Christian. Market Master M 



1-2121 
1-212 
1-212: 
1-212: 
1-212 
1-212 
1-212 



1-212: 
1-212: 

1-212: 

7-942: 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

l.:..IJen Gate Park BA 1-5 lul 

Dr. Robert C. Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF THE LEGION 
OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-561( 

Meets 2nd Monday. Jan.. April. June. Oct.. 3:30 PM 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. A. B. Spreckels. Honorary President. 2 Pine St. 

Paul Verdier. President. 199 Geary St. 

E. Raymond Armsby. Ill Sutter St. 

Louis A. Benoist. 37 Drumm St. 

James B. Black. 245 Market St. 

Walter E. Buck. 255 Montgomery St. 

.Mciander dc Breltville. 2000 Washington St. 

Mrs Bruce Kelham. 15 Arguello Blvd. 

Charles Mayer. San Francisco Examiner 

William W. Meln. 515 Montgomery St. 

David Pleydell-Bouverie. Glen Ellen. Calif. 

John N. Rosekrans. 555 Montgom 



Harold L. Zeilerbach, 543 Sansc 



St. 



Ex-Officio Members 

Mayor 

President. Recreation if Park Commission 

Thomas Carr Howe. Jr.. Director 

Capt. Myron E. Thomas. Secretary 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-2067 

Meets 1st Monday Jan.. April. June. Oct.. 3 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Helen Cameron. Honorary President. Hillsborough 

Michel D. Weill. Presidenl. The White House 

Charles R. Blyth. 255 Montgomery St. 

Mi« Louise A. Boyd. 210 Post St. 

Sheldon G. Cooper. 620 Market St. 

R. Gwin Follis, 5690 Washington St. 

Randolph A. Hearst. S. F. Call-Bulletin 

Orover A. Magnin. St. Francis Hotel 

Garret McEnerncy. II. 3725 Washington St. 

Roscoe F. Oakes. 2006 Washington St. 

Richard Rheem. 2828 Vallejo 

Joseph O. Tobin. Hibemia Bank 

Mrs. Nion Tucker. Burh'ngame Country Club 

Charles Page. 511 California St. 

Ex-OfTicio Members 



President. Recreation 6^ Park Commission 
Dr Walter Hell. Director 
Cc.l. Ian F. M. Macalpine. Secretary 

LAW LIBRARY 

456 City Hall 
Robert J. Everson. Librarian 

PUBUC POUND 

2500 - 16th St. 
Charles W. Friedrichs. Secretary and Manai 



Continental Service Company 

260 Fifth Street 
San Francisco 3, California 



PEERLESS 
LAUNDRY CO. 

Launderers 
Cleaning and Dyeing 

4701 GROVE STREET 
Oakland, California 

Automotive 
THE 

SAFETY HOUSE 

INC. 

982 POST STREET 

ORdway 3-3505 San Francisco 9, Calif. 

CAREW & ENGLISH 

LEO V. CAREW, JR. 
President 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS . . . MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

MASONIC AT GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
S;in Francisco 18, California 

NONA REALTY 

Nona Hardivick - Realtor 

533 BALBOA STREET 
Bus. BA. 15576 Res. BA. 1-3504 



iC^inilh TV & Radio 

KERKS TV SERVICE CO 

SALES ac SERVICE 
514 Excelsior Avenue JUnipcr 4-2291 San Fn 

'*Kerk" Kerk\'liet 



T. BEVj\NS typesetting CO.. INC. 

John T. Berans 
532 Sansome Street GArfield 1-4152 San Francisco II. Calif. 

SAN FRANCISCO TURKISH INFORMATION SERVICE 

347 Stockton Street 

PALLAS BROS. 

RADIO & TELEVISION REPAIRING - AND S.^LES 
5000 MISSION STREET JU 5-5000 SAN FR.'kNCISCO 12 

UNIT-BILT STORE EQUIPMENT CO. 

175 Quint Street AT. 2-9900 

San Francisco 

LEVLN'S AUTO SUPPLY CO. 
Everything for the Auto 

11 VAN NESS AVE. HE. 1-7500 



527 CLUB 

Bar and Restaurant 

Domestic and Imported Liquors 
Pabst on Tap 

Joe Fucfislin, Carl Reichmuth, 
Proprietors 

527 BRY.'UMT STREET 

SUtter 1-9622 San Fi 



Joe's of W estlake 

Famous for Charco.il Broiled Stc.iks 

a: Chops 

Dinnir Irom II am. lo 12 a.m. 

ALEMANV a; LAKE MERCED BLVD. 

PLoj.1 5.7.)00 

In San Frnndjco Visil ORIGINAL JOES 

Chostnul ac FMlmon ■:- FI. 6^i2n 



Photic JVniper 4-4i2l 

BAYSIDE MOTEL 

Heated Encloaed Swimmini: Pool 
AAA Approved Spaciotii Quiet Ground 



2011 Bayshorc Blvd., 



[ Hester, nr. )cd St. 

2\, C.lil. 



WILSON SANITARIUM 

Licensed by Slate of California 

24-Hour General Nursing Care 

Aged - Bed Patients & 
Post Operative Cases 

Special Diets When Ordered 
Attended by Their Own Physician 

.A.enes B. Wilson. Oxner-Operator 

1326 -43rd AVENUE 

MOntrose 4-8379 



RATTO HOUSEWARES 

;/ •.LHi can't /iiij It Ir-i Ratio's 

2132 CHESTNUT STREET 
Phone W.-^ l-2~26 San Francisco 



Toys - Toys - Toys 

Don't lorscl to hr.ni: r,..- /torn . . . 

AMBER'S 

272 POST STREET 
DOu..;:as 2-8376 San Francino 



THE RECOR 



Snow fell on San Francisco in the year when 
this famous fiftli (Jnnese daughter was horn 

Jade Snow Wong is Ceramic 
Artist, Author, Traveller 



It is a rich experience to meet 
fade Snow Wong', author of the 
)est seller, "Fifth Chinese Daugh- 
er." The visitor is revitalized by 
he overflow of her concentrated 
ndustn,', and encouraged by her 
rentle assurance which, no doubt, 
pring from the subtle and cata- 
ytic combination of a Chinese fam- 
ily upbringing and an American 
'ducation. 

, Her autobiographical book, 

ranslated into over fifteen lan- 

iuages including Chinese, Telugu, 

lurmese and Arabic, is an intrigu- 

ig story of her young life as one 

a family of eight childi-en in a 

ese household in San Fran- 

Now in her own successful 

id renowned studio at 410 Paci- 

Avenue, she devotes all the day- 

ht hours she can spare, and often 

ose of the dusk, to ceramic art. 

Mills College, across the Bay, is 

roud of this outstanding alumna, 

'ho includes in her experience a 

irticularly distinctive honor. She 

chosen by the U. S. State De- 



by Daniel Pinner 



partment to tour the Far East as 
an unofficial ambassador to explain 
and to demonstrate one of the many 
important roles played by peoples 
stemming from many differing 
races in the free way of life imder 
American democracy. 

With products of her own de- 
sign and creation around her, she 
talks happily about her present 
family life. She is now Mrs. Ong, 
and it is interesting to compare the 
ways her children are brought up 
now with the fascinating account 
of her owm childhood. It is no sur- 
prise to learn that while propriety 
and decoi-um are emphasized still, 
the individual desire is heeded as 
well as the family wish. Discipline 
is evidently not lessened by a par- 
ental hug and display of affection 
not found in the older traditional 
Chinese family circle. 

The accoimt of how Jade Snow 
came to make one of her exquisite 
bowls lined with glowing Chinese 
red and inscribed with a poem com- 
posed by her father, brings an in- 




timate contact with Oriental cul- 
ture. The storj' appeared in "Holi- 
day" Magazine in December 1956, 
one of many absorbing articles 
written by this much traveled 
author-artist. She and her husband 
had just returned from guiding a 
party of Americans on a cultural 
tour of Japan. 

A glance at the itinerary of a 
tour of the Far East they con- 
cluded last year, brings them into 
the forefront of experts who know 
what a visitor to foreign lands 
should see and do. It was aston- 
ishing to learn that one member 
of this year's tour was over eighty 
years. The infinite cai'e and pre- 
planning ensured a most success- 
ful Jouraey vinthout one untoward 
incident. Japan, Hong Kong, Bur- 
ma, Malaya, Indonesia, Australia, 
New Zealand, Suva, Honolulu were 
included in the full, aptly-named 
"Adventure Tour." 

The ceramic kilns and experi- 
ments in new colors and desigrn that 
were in progress at the studio, 



demonstrated what unusual and 
yet complementing activities are 
engaged in by Mr. and Mrs. Ong. 
The artistic creation of beautiful 
ceramic and lacquered copper work 
seems to go naturally hand in hand 
uith the professional planning of 
travel, enriching in itself. 

The discriminating owner of a 
signed piece from Jade Snow 
Wong's studio should know that 
her work is in many permanent 
collections including the Metropol- 
itan Museum in New York, the 
Detroit Institute of Arts and the 
International Ceramic Museimi of 
Faenza, Italy. Even in this busy 
life, time has been foimd by Mrs. 
Ong to serve honorarily on many 
civic committees. At present she 
is a member of the Chinese School 
Board. 

With inimitable Chinese poetic 
love of nature, her given middle 
name commemorates the snow that 
fell on San Francisco the year she 
was bom. 



DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

.\ny Make or Model Seven Days a Week 

9 AM. ■ 111 P.M. FREE ESTIMATES on Antenna Installations 

1322 HAIGHT STREET 

UN. 3-0795 — Also UN. 3-1836 


GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 
San Francisco 


DANGER of a Disastrous FIRE 
lurks in overloaded and overaged electric wiring. 

BE ASSURED YOUR CIRCUIT CAN SAFELY 
SERVE YOU. 

ARVIN ELECTRIC CO. 

:4 HOUR SERVICE 
All. 7-0752 1611 Innes Ave. 


THEODORE V. TRONOFF 

Registered Civil Engineer 
Licensed Land Surveyor 

345 PARK PLAZA DRIVE • DALY CITY, CALIFORNIA 

Telephone PLaza 5-7144 


ICEMBER, 1958'- JANUARY. 1959 


15 



UNITED TOWING CO. 

R„h.;l W. Dyer 

PIER 14 

Sail Fraiiciico 

SVttpr 1-6606 

SIFdmncho^ 

5121 Geary Blvd. 

fcaluriiig ihc Famous 

Rancho-Burgers 

r>.licioui Food Speciallics 

For Frinling 
at its very best 

FINGAR PRINTING CO. 

2806 - 24th STREET 
VAIencia 6-3134 

Lf Trianon Restaurant 
Francais 

YU. 2-9353 

2420 O'Farrell Street 



Robert E. Boulware 

Painting Contractor 

Sheel Rock Taping 
Sandhlailmg - Waterproofing 

1143 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 
JO. 7-2211 



KIM'S 
CABINET SHOP 

Industrial — Residential 

CABINETS. SINKS, 

COUNTERS ac PANELING 

75 Stone Street 



Marino's Noriega Bakery 

Bakery Goods for All Occasions 
^r.^nci^ W. Harder, New Owner 

1324 NORIEGA STREET 
OV. 1-5447 



SAM'S 
ANCHOR CAFE 

Tihiiron, California 



INDIA HOUSE 

Cochlails 

Dinners 

629 WASHINGTON STREET 



W. KELLY 

— Plumber — 

Hater Heaters Rebuilt 

1772 ELLIS STREET 

WE. 1-4429 



HOLY NAMES 
HIGH SCHOOL 

4660 Harbor Drive 
OL. 5-1716 O.^KLAND 



Winston's Moving 
& Storage Co. 

DR.AYAGE Sc CARTAGE 
"Kinstons Mores Good — 

Like a Morer Should" 

2164 MARKET STREET 

MI. 7-5306 YU. 6-2448 



Books 



SINAI-JOHNSON 

845 Jessie Street 

UN. 2-5841 

San Francisco 



Deans Beauty Salon 

Beauty Culture in all its Branches 

Lee Hummel 

4691 Teelgraph Ave. OL. 5-0336 

0.\KLAND 



Diamond Bakery- 
specializing in 

Wedding, Anniversary and 
Birthday Cakes 

800 Diamond St., at 24th St. 



A TIME OF CRISIS 



by Jane Rawsor 



LANDMARKS OF TOMORROW 
by Peter F. Dracker 

Harper & Brothers — .S4..50 



Lentiardt School of 
Court Reporting 

Secretarial Courses 

1005 MARKET KL 2-3083 



WRESCO 

Wholesale Radio 8: Electric 
Supply Co. 

Main Office 

140 - 9th Street HEmlock 1-3680 

San Francisco 

Branch Office 

1348 El Camino LYtcll 1-0794 

S.I.. Carlos 



Dming the last twenty yeai-s 
Mr. Drueker has lived in the Unit- 
ed States. After a European edu- 
cation, including graduation in law. 
Mr. Drueker was successively for- 
eign correspondent, economist at- 
tached to an international bank- 
ing house, and prefessor of politics 
at Bennington College. He is at 
present management consultant for 
some of the large companies in this 
countiy. 

Mr. Drueker is essentially for- 
ward-looking. He is the individual- 
ist educator who likes to visualize 
as clearly as possible the society 
of the future for which his stu- 
dents must be prepared. Realizing 
that contemporary society is liable 
to cataclysmic changes, as a sens- 
ible economist and advisor, he 
strives to be aware of the direc- 
tions from which these changes are 
most likely to come. 

In his new book, "Landmarks of 
TomoiTOW," he takes a basically 
realistic attitude to the scope of 
the individual's role in society, and 
a basically optimistic approach to 
possible and probable lines of solu- 
tion for social problems. 

He emphasizes that we now ex- 
perience a world view totally dif- 
ferent from that of previous years, 
while retaining mental attitudes 
suitable to the viewpoint of ^^ 
last three hundred years. He opines 
that our experience is the basis 
for artistic perception, philosoph- 
ical analysis, and technical vocab- 
ulary. 

We, therefore, have a contempo- 
rary practical approach to life, 
accompanied by a completely out- 
dated set of intellectual furniture, 
and as a result planning for the 
future and our approach to the- 
oretical problems must both be 
confused. 

Mr. Drueker stresses some im- 
mediately desirable reorientations 
of intellectual viewpoint. Nine- 
teenth and early twentieth centui-y 
ideas of human progress are out- 
moded: we live in an age not of 
progress but of innovation. The old 
idea that an individual loses iden- 
tity in contemporary coUectivist 
societies is also of no further signi- 



ficance: in the society of the i 
ture, if it is to develop soundl} 
the more fully a man develops hi 
individuality the richer will be hi 
contribution to society. Similarly 
as material benefits accrue, ma 
will become less materialistic, be 
cause he can concentrate his enei. 
gies on other things. 

Mr. Drueker is able to mak 
helpful suggestions about educs 
lional and governmental improvf 
ment. In the field of educatio. 
particularly he has some vet; 
sound ideas. 

Mr. Drueker is at his least co: 
vincing when he analyses conten 
porarj' political changes in Ul 
east. His cri-stal ball mists wit 
frustrating patches when he ash 
questions about the Orient. 

What Mr. Drucker's book doe 
beyond doubt, is to make helpfi 
corrections to our angle of \TSic 
as we look at besetting problerai 
He exposes the antiquarian mytl 
oiogy many of us treasure as moc 
ern ideas, because of the changi 
of view in the last three centuric 
He spotlights the ephemeralism i 
Fabian Society thought patten 
and coUectivist secularism. Fina 
ly he offers as this optimistic a 
tack: "A time like this is not con 
fortable, secure. laz>'. It is a tin 
when tides of histon.' over >vhi( 
we have no control sweep over tl 
Individual. It is a time of agon 
of peril, of suffering— an ugly bni 
ish, hateful, cruel time at be 
. But oui-s is also a time of ne 
vision and greatness, of opporta 
ity and challenge, to ever>-one 
his daily life as a person and as 
citizen. It is a time in which e 
eiyone is an understudy to t 
leading role in the drama of h 
man destiny. Everyone must 
ready to take over alone and wit 
out notice . . - 

It is a time of change and ch; 
lenge. new vision and new dangi 
new frontiers and permanent cr 
is, suffering and achievement, in 
time of overlap such as ours, t 
individual is both all-powerless a 
aU-powerful. He is powerless, ho 
ever exalted his station, if he I 
lieves he can impose his will, tli 
he can command the tides of h 
tory. He is all-powerful, no mall 
how lowly, if he knows himS' 
responsible." , 



THE RECOI 



GOOD NEWS FOR OUR 
SMALL BUSINESS MEN 

by Glenn Graves 



4 rule granting the opportunity 
for small businessmen to gain 
federal tax benefit is now part of 
he Internal Revenue laws. 

If a corporation is formed un- 
er certain prescribed rules enabl- 
ig such organization to file as a 
tax-option coi-poration." general- 
f a substajitial saving may result. 
This is a radical departure from 
iws that governed corporations. 
n main it permits coi"porations 
tiat come under such rules to re- 
port corporation inr-ome as part- 
lership in?ome. No-mally this wili 
p away with the double tax feat- 
re thit all corporations must now 
pllow That is. the corporation 
ays a tax on earning and the 
Lockholders pay a tax on divi- 
pnds. 

Under the new law the corpora- 
Ion eligible to effect this savings 
j"iU report income to the share- 
ilders without tax on the corpora- 
on, and the shareholders will treat 
le amounts they receive as divi- 
^ds. The amounts so received 
the stockholders will not be 
tnsidered self - employment in- 
tme. 

The stockholders will for the 
ost part receive no dividend cred- 
or retirement income credit on 
3 payment of such dividends. 
ley will, however, receive the 
inefit of the long temi capital 
tins advantages for most corpor- 
long term capital gains, and 
,ey will be able to deduct corpor- 
e operating losses. 
Strict rules have been estab- 
ihed to permit a corporation to 
Ice advantage of filing as a "tax- 
tion" corporation: 

The corporation must have 
only one class of stock. That 
is, all par value stock or all 
no par value stock. It cannot 
have common and preferred. 
It cannot have both voting and 
non-voting stock. 
) There must not be more than 

ten stockholdei-s. 
) All stockholders must consent 
to the corporation filing in this 
manner. 
> All stockholders must be in- 
dividuals or estates. Thev can- 



not come under this rule if 
stockholders are trusts. 

(5) Income from interest, dividend 
rents, royalties, annuities and 
gains on sales of securities 
cannot exceed 20 per cent of 
total income. 

(6) There can be no non-resident 
alien as a stockholder. 




GLENN GRAVES 

Well-lcnown San Francisco newsman and 
accountont of 530 O'Farrell Street 

1 7) It cannot be a member of an 
affiliated group eligible to file 
a consolidated return. 
(8) It must be a corporation cre- 
ated under the laws of the 
United States, a state or a 
territory. 
i9i It cannot have more than 80 
per cent of its gross receipts 
from sources outside the U. S. 
This means that many businesses 
now operating as tndi\'idual own- 
ers will find it to their advantage 
tax wise to incoi-porate and take 
advantage of the law. 

Before making this move the 
advice of a qualified tax consultant 
should be obtained. While normal- 
ly it would work to the advantage 
of individual members of the cor- 
poration, there are some un- 
answered questions. 

One of the first that looms is. 
how will state taxing agencies 
treat "tax-option" coi-porations ? 

In California a recent ruling is 
to the effect that the "tax-option" 
corporation will be ignored. This 



FOSTER & KLEISER 

Outdoor Advertising 



1675 Efldv Street 



San Francisco 



Scavengers' Protective Association, Inc. 

Contrnclon far ihc Rcmuyal of Garbage. Rubbtih and Ha<l,- Paper 

2550 Mason Street EXbrook 2-3859 

San Francisco 11, Calif. 

Alameda Municipal Golf Course 

Eorl & Don Fry 

Maitland Drive, Alameda LA. 2-4324 

Sears-Roebuck Employees Cafeteria 

Geary Blvd. SC Masonic Ave. 
San Francisco, Calif. 

The Salvation Army 

'^Your Help — Their Hope'' 

Your Repairable Dhcardi Creates Work That Pays 
336 -6th STREET. OAKLAND GL. 1-4510 

Res.: 10- Helens Line, Mill Valley. Calil. - DL'nljp 81118 

RICHARD S. HARDING 

- C.ril Eugnuer - 

Soil and Foundation Engineering 

Test Borings - Field and Laboratory Testing 

405 SANSOME STREET 

Telephone YUkon 2-8893 San Francisco II. Calif. 



Balte 



■ Storage - Hashing - Polishing • High P: 
Lubrication 



Up to 6 Hours Parking 50c - All Day -5c - 24 Hours ?1.00 

TEMPLE GARAGE 

WALTER T. BARKETT. Managing Ouner 
644 Geary Street PRospect 5-8141 San Fr, 



Building Service Employees" Union 
Local No. 87 of San Francisco 



240 Golden G.nte Ave. 



PRospect 5-2664 



JSotre Dame High School 

347 Dolores Street San Francisco 

DONUT BOWL 

Frank Freeman 

4605 Geary Blvd. SK 1-6454 



CEMBER, I9S8 - JANUARY. 1969 



means it will be treated exactly 
B9 in the past. Earnings in the 
form of dividends will be taxed to 
the individuals only when received, 
as the state tax rate is low, it will 
not generally worlt to the disad- 
vantage of individuals. 

Under the new federal law earn- 
ings will be ta.\ed to the individual 
when actually and "constructively" 
received, but will not be taxed 
when actually received, if received 
in a later year. 

One other factor may work to 
the advantage of "tax-option" cor- 
porations. That is expense ac- 
counts. These have become a source 
of disputes with the Internal Rev- 
enue. Under a recent Internal Rev- 
enue ruling an individual will not 
have to itemize such expenses on 
their tax return as long as he is 
required to account for such ex- 
penses to the corpoi-ation and he 
claims no amount over reimburse- 
ment. 

Only careful scutiny of the busi- 
ness aims of the tax-payer made 
by a tax consultant will determine 
the advantages and disadvantages 
of inrorporation. 



H^c helicrc that our readers nilt nelcome ihh extract from an address by the General Manager 
of the S. F. Bay Area Rapid Transit District before a recent meeting of the Real Estate Board. 
It raises questions that will not slay long for an ansver. 



GROWING CONGESTION PROBLEMS 
OF S. F. AND THE BAY AREA 



Hoiv well 

do you know 

San Francisco? 




H vcn mosl lifelong residents of 
tlic- !5ay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranRer, a 
Crav Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex- 
citing, informative, entcrtaJninK. 
lie sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do -every year and say, "There's 
nothinE like it!" 

PasscnRers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars: trained, 
courteous driver-Ruides tell yovi 
the backcround story of the places 
vou visit: fares arc surprisingly 




Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 

'VUkon 6-inOO 



ASA NEW YEAR BEGINS and 
we look to the future, I think 
it is vital that all of us recognize 
that San Francisco and the sur- 
roimding counties are fast ap- 
proaching a congestion crisis. The 
consequences of this ciisis could 
be economically and sociallj' dis- 
astrous to every resident, but they 
will be immediately and particular- 
ly felt in the field of real estate. 

As you know, property has little 
or no vailue for any purpose if it is 
not accessible to people. Its value 
increases in direct proportion to 
the nimiber of people who have 
access to it and who have induce- 
ment to take advantage of that 
accessibility. 

Thus, good accessibility is the 
key to real estate values, and real 
estate values, in turn, are the key 
to a healthy and expanding prop- 
erty ta.x base. 

Primarily, the property taxes 
levied against real estate produce 
benefits which protect property 
values. I refer to such govern- 
mental functions as police protec- 
tion, public health, sewage disposal 



by John M. Peirce 



and many others. There is little 
question about the desirability of 
property owners paying taxes to 
protect their property rights and 
benefits. 

Yet, property ta.xation, if carried 
to excess, can destroy the verj' 
property values it is designed to 
protect. For this reason it is nec- 
essaiy to keep property tax rates 
and ta-xable valuations within rea- 
sonable limits. 

This involves on the one hand 
the economical and efficient ex- 
penditure of property tax monies, 
and on the other hand the main- 
tenance of an equitable and broad 
tax base. 

I want to place special emphasis 
on the need for protecting the 
property tax base against the en- 
croachment of property tax ex- 
emptions which arise when gov- 
ernmental agencies take property 
off the tax rolls. The more re- 
stricted the ta.x base becomes 
through use of land for tax exempt 
purposes, the more onerous the 
property tax burden becomes for 
those property owners whose prop- 



erty remains on the tax rolls. 

It is clear, then, that any threa 
to good accessibility and any un 
wise reduction of the property ta; 
base are threats to the health.^ 
functioning of our community 
a threat to oiu- business and in 
dustry, our cultural attractions 
our jobs and our people. 

Today, real estate values, th' 
property tax base and the healt, 
of our Bay Area communities 
being threatened by congestioi 
that grows worse with each pass 
ing day. This is not an assiunp 
tion. It is a cold, hard fact, observ 
able to anyone who drives the free 
days or bridges or city streets- 
paii;icularly between seven ant 
nine in the morning and four 
six in the evening. 

Having recognized this problem 
then, we must seek its cause ant 
then work out a solution. The caus^ 
of our growing congestion prob 
lems is. without question, the pri 
vate automobile. I say this witl 
no hint of derogation, for all of u 
recognize the great contributioi 
to our economy of the atitomobile 




of a langlo of slowod-down traffic is fomillor In Iho Bay Area, whoro population loops porpoluoily ohcod of pori 
:ng spoco accommodation and tho construction of freeways. 



its firmly established position in 
the Amencan way of life and the 
esteemed place it has achieved in 
the hearts and minds of our citi- 
zens. 

But I think we must begin to 
realize that the automobile is not 
sacrosanct. It is a means to an 
end not an end in itself. It is 
merely the latest — and admittedl>' 
a very popular — development in the 
evolution of transportation. 

When the Bay Area began in a 
grouping of small settlements on 
the rim of the Bay a little over a 
century ago. the horse and the 
small boat were the major modes 
of transportation. They were en- 
tirely adequate because of the 
small population and the short 
distances involved. 

But then the Bay communities 
began to spread out as each new 
an-ival built his home just past the 
home of the settler who ai'rived 
before him- a process which, in- 
cidentally, is still going on. 

The electric streetcar and the 
ferryboat soon replaced the horse 
and the small boat, facilitating and 
.accelerating the outward expan- 
,sion of towns and cities. Finally. 
|the private automobile came upon 
|the scene with its convenience and 
its ability to go anj-where, any- 
time at the press of the foot on the 
accelerator. Again, population and 
development exploded outward. 

But with the attributes which 
we all recognize, the automobile 
also brought a seemingly insatiable 
demand for space for movement 
and parking —new freeways, ex- 
panded highways and city streets, 
and massive parking areas sprawl- 



ing on the ground, rising in sky- 
scrapers above the ground and ex- 
tending below the ground. 

Thus far, even though we have 
spent hundreds of millions of dol- 
lars, we have not been able to keep 
up with the automobile's demands 
for more and more road and park- 
ing space. The experts, noting the 
imiformly fantastic predictions for 
increases in our population of peo- 
ple and automobiles, say we will 
never be able to catch up — that 
congestion will become worse, in- 
stead of better, no matter how 
much money is spent. 

San Francisco is an excellent 
example of what I am talking 
about. The central traffic district 
comprises about three square miles 
in the center of the city. In the 
decade from 1947 to 1957 the num- 
ber of motor vehicles entering and 
leaving this district increased by 
about 40 per cent. Yet many ex- 
perts fear that the number of 
people entering and leaving may 
not have increased because of the 
decline in use of public transporta- 
tion. In other words, the number 
of cars and congestion increased 
but the number of people — the leal 
indicators of intensified economic 
activity — may have remained 
static. 

Such findings demand that we 
begin to re-examine the system of 
moWng goods and people which 
has spiimg up aroimd the private 
automobile to determine whether 
too much emphasis has been placed 
on this one mode of transportation 
and whether public transpoi-tation 
does not have a vital role which it 
can play. 



This is the context in which we 
must seek a solution to our con- 
gestion problems. 

It seems to me that we have only 
two alternatives. One is to seek 
to find some way to pro\ide for the 
movement of all people for all 
purposes in automobiles. The other 
is to seek to provide the best, most 
efficient and most economical com- 
bination of facilities for both the 
automobile and rapid transit. 

Recently, the National Institute 
of Real Estate Brokers of your Na- 
tional Association of Real Estate 
Boards published a booklet entitled 
"Public Transportation and Your 
Commimity." If you have not yet 
seen this compi-ehensive publica- 
tion. I commend it to your immed- 
iate attention. 

In a foreword to the booklet. 
John J. Herd of Philadelphia, one 
of the Nation's leading realtors, 
had this to say: 

"The informed realtor can awak- 
en the thinking of real estate own- 
er's, the business community, the 
public, and local government to the 
importance of ti-ansportation in 
presei-ving the established business 
areas. It is most important that 
owners of large real estate hold- 
ings and the substantial merchants 
decide for themselves the merits of 
public transportation and then, one 
way or the other, becomes vocal. 
The realtor can explain the need 
for coordinated transit, embodying 
as it must both the centers of pop- 
ulation and the suburban areas 
which generate much traffic. Real 
estate and transportation are in- 
separable." 





4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 

Palo Alto, San Francisco and Ignacio. CalK. 



How hoppy life might be if all Boy Aret 

congested highways. 



DECEMBER. 1958 -JANUARY, 1959 



d by rapid public transit. Insteod of the 
would enjoy journeys to work. 



Rudy's Body & 
Paint Shop 

1125 STEINER STREET 
JO. %844I 



BUTLER BROS. 

285 Winslon Drive 



The Fulton Supply Co. 

Mayarniaiie and Salads 

Silver In Blue Brand 

901 Fillmore St. Fillmore 6-9760 



BELL HOTEL 

37 COLUMBUS AVE. 
San Francisco 



Grand Pacific Hotel 

H31 STOCKTON STREET 
San Francisco 



Lake Merced Boat House 

Fhhmf. ..- Boalma 

Near Fleishacker Zoo 

HardinR Ro.id LO. 6-8442 



E7ipo3itioi!a Crab 
Ctand No. 1 

G.//< - Souyenirs 

Gus Gelardi 

FISHERMAN'S WHARF 

New P Clothes 

Exceptional Vahici 
i Kcar„\ Si. SU. 1-3917 

Willis Barber & 
Beauty Supplies 

1210 McAllister st. 

JO. 7-1497 



PARKER PEN CO. 



278 Post Street 
SU. 1-4809 



EXPANSION BAR 

Lou Larsen 

2124 Market Street 
MArket 1-9273 
San Francisco 



BAY CITIES 

NEON 

UNclerhill 3-8880 
-61 VALENCIA STREET 

S.in Francisco 



NORIEGA MEAT CO. 

Quality Moats - Reasonable Prit 
Wholesale e Retail 

!8I5 NORIEGA STREET 
LO. 6-8821 



JOHN'S BODY SHOP 

Painlmg - Holding 

John Boteilho. Prop. 

3827 GRAND AVENUE 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

TE 6-3254 Home: LO 9-2687 



PLAYERS' CLUB 

2245 (ieneva Avenue 

opposite Con Palace 

JU 7-3566 

JOE Sc ERMIE JACKSON 



Clyde Bentley 

Cottitilting Engineer 
l()j SANSOME STREET 



•Idhii .1. BarrHl. Jr. 

Insurance Broker 
220 Monlgonicr\- St. 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 



BETHLEHEM STEEL 
The steelwork for Bethlehem Pa- 
cific's new general offices at Sacra- 
mento. California and Da\1s Sts. 
in downtown San Francisco has 
lisen to the half-way point, seven 
floors above street level. 

And unfolding before the gaze 
of sidewalk superintendents is the 
skeleton of a unique consti-uction 
which is making its debut in San 
Francisco for the first time. The 
office floors of the building appear 
to be cradled between 16 free 
standing exterior columns. These 
will eventually rise 210 feet from 
the street level. At the seventh 
floor, the silhouette of this design 
is already apparent. 

The exterior columns are built 
up from hea\'y steel wide flange 
sections uith reinforcing plates 
and stiffening channels which have 
been shop riveted to the flanges, 
making a slender steel shaft cap- 
able of bearing a load of approxi- 
mately 1,484,000 pounds per col- 
umn. Earthquake forces are par- 
tially transmitted to the inside 
core by a built-up box girder sec- 
tion. Where these girders connect 
to the exterior columns, they are 
haunched to a depth of four feet. 
In designing the building, the 
architects. Welton Becket, F.A.I.A. 
and Associates, followed the desire 
of Bethlehem Pacific to eliminate 
all column obstructions along the 
outside wall of the building. Com- 
plete flexibility is achieved for in- 
terior offices which can be planned 
on a modular system using movable 
metal partitions to enclose any de- 
sired space. 

When the building is completed, 
the steel shafts will be covered by 
white marble, and will actuallj' be 
located several inches from the 
exterior walls of the building. The 
glistening white shafts and their 
placement impart a strong struc- 
tural feeling of steel to the edifice. 
These will be offset by spandrels 
of charcoal gray granite trimmed 
with stainless steel. The glass 
panels set on 5 foot module will 
be composed of gray plate glass. 
The imposing structure rises from 
an elevated terrazzo platform, 2 '4 
feet above the sidewalk level. 

While Bethlehem Pacific erection 
crews continue to place steel for 
the next seven floors, construction 
crews foi- Swinerton & Walberg, 
the general contractors, expect to 
complete the basement exterior 
walls next week. Demolition work 
will also begin on buildings across 
the Davis Street side of the job 




Riveters on the iob 
site where Bethlehem Pacific plans 
to bu'ld a 300-car capacity garage. 
Six floors of the Bethlehem Pa- 
cific general offices will be avail- 
able for leasing as downtown office 
space in addition to some of the 
garage area. The building is ex- 
pected to be ready for occupancy 
late in 1959. Structural engineers 
for the Bethlehem Pacific building 
are Hayes & Little and John A. 
Blume & Associates. The mechan- 
ical and electrical engineers are 
Dudley Deane & Associates. 

SAFETY EXPERTS 

The safety of the citizens of 
San Francisco is one of the con- 
cerns of Abbot A. Hanks Inc. This 
firm of engineers, chemists and 
metallurgists tested the concrete 
for "Mole Hall" to make sure that 
Larkin Street would not fall on the 
heads of conventioneers. It has re- 
cently tested concrete and steel for 
the bleachers of stadiums at Bal- 
boa and Funston. When St. Mary's 
garage was constructed, it checked 
the amounts of sand and cement In 
the different loads of concrete. 

The company is now engaged in 




testing the soil under the construc- 
tion work at the airport for Amer- 
ican Airlines, to check the com- 
paction. It also checks the fill to 
see that it is solid enough. The 
safety of the new Bank of Amer- 
ica building at 11th and Market, 
and the San Francisco Interna- 
tional Airport is partly insured 
through the tests performed by 
this firm on the concrete used in 
the buildings particularly in col- 
umns. 

Recently the firm has been test- 
ing concrete on its own behalf, for 
a new building to house its varied 
laboratories, at the comer of Fil- 
bert and Sansorae Streets. De- 
signed by John Lyon Reid, this ■ 
elegant structure has rough-sur- 
faced, "exposed aggregate" wall 
panels, separated by columns of 
regular concrete. It will be opened : 
for use in 19.59. 

GRAND JURY REPORT 
The retii-ing Grand Jur>- of 1958 ■ 
complimented the Board of Permit i 
Appeals in its December report. 
It pointed out that the Board in ■ 
its actions encompasses m any 
phases of our City and County 
government, and each year its de- 
cisions involve many millions of ' 
dollars in property and construc- 
tion. Its principal role is to pro- 
Nade a channel whereby appellants 
may seek justifiable relief without ' 
resort to expensive and time-con- 
suming lawsuits. Any citizen, upon 
paN'ment of a nominal filing fee. 
may appeal actions of city depart- 
ments regarding pennits and li- 
censes, and, as a last resort, the 
decision of the Boctrd of Permit 
Appeals likewise may be appealed 
to the courts. 

"It is our belief." the i-epoit 
sums up. "that the citizenry have 
through the Board of Permit Ap- 
peals adequate recourse for a full ■ 






Abbot A. Honb Inc. New Loboroto 



'-^DUH 



THE RECORD ^ 



imd impaitial hearing: of their per- 
mit and license giievances without 
undue expense and dela\'." 



In 1953. the Planetarium's spe- 
ial student shows were inaugii- 
ated: some 2ii.(XHJ students from 




BROADMORE SERVICE STATION 

173 School Street PLaza 6-3394 

Daly City 



CLARENCE J. WALSH PETER TAMARAS 

sident 1958 Board of Permit Appeals President 1959 Board of Permit Appeols 



\STRONOMY EDUCATION 

The country's pronounced need 
for basic science education for 
roung students has been much in 
iie news in recent months, but the 
California Academy of Sciences' 
Morrison Planetarium has been 
jroWding such education in as- 
ironomy since the Planetarium 
'irst opened in November 1952. 



Bay Area schools attended. Din-- 
ing 1957-1958. the picture was 
much different: a record total of 
57.000 students attended the shows 
-nearly tripling the attendance of 
the program's first .year. 

Among San Francisco students 
alone. 8.661 students attended the 
1957-1958 student shows, an in- 
crease of some 3.000 over 1956- 



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San Francisco 



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Self Service Laundry 

26 Ilillcrest Drive PL. 5-1 71 '5 

DALY CITY 

GEORGE ABIiSCH 
Iron Works 

IS-O BANCROFT .A\ENUE 

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Funeral Director 

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CLAREXCE IV. COOPER 

MORTUARIES 



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DECEMBER, 1958 -JANUARY. 1959 



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Business Investments 

Insurance 

A SALES STAFF OF THIRTY 
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MOBILE RADIO 
ENGINEERS 

1415 Brush Street 

TEmplebar 6-3600 

OAKLAND 12. CALIF. 

1150 Larkin Street 

PRospect 6-6166 

SAN FRANCISCO 9. CALIF. 



COHEN BROS. 

Koihcr Meal e Poultry 
1 143 McAllislcr St. WE. 1-1132 



HURON NURSERY 

820 GENEVA AVENUE 

JU. 7.y221 



(;* ^ '< 




GEORGE BUNTON 
Planetorium Monagcr 

1957; reflecting a steadily growing 
interest by San Francisco students 
and teachers in the Planetarium's 
student program. 

Throughout the school year, spe- 
cial student shows are held at 11 
a.m. on Wednesdays. Thursdays, 
Fridays and Saturdays. They are 
open to any organized youth group 
as well as to school classes. Ad- 
mission to these group rate shows 
is only 20 cents per person. 

FEDERAL OFFICE BLDG. 

The proposed $45 million Fed- 
eral Office Building in San Fran- 
cisco will be 21 stories high, George 
F. Phillips, regional commissioner 
for the General Services Adminis- 
tration, has annoimced. 

Preliminary plans call for a 
sheer, plain tower that will occupy 
half a block that is bounded by 
Golden Gate Avenue. Turk, Polk 
and Larkin Streets. The balance of 
the area will be a landscaped plaza, 
facing Golden Gate Avenue. 




GEORGE F. PHILLIPS 
Regional Commiisioner 
nerJ Seroicilt Adminiitrotlc 



Happy Hollow Liquors 
and Delicatessen 

FREE DELIVERY SERVICE 
Drop m and See "FLOYD" for Your Parly Needs 

10524 ACALANES DRIVE 
LO 9-9778 Oakland. Calif. 

FLOYD R.ANDOLPH. Proprietor 

NATIONAL ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 



Hth a: Harrison Sis. 



"WHOLESALE ELECTRIC SL'PPLIES ' 

SANTA ROSA Santj Rosa 255 

SAN CARLOS LYtell 1-0743 

SAN FRANCISCO HEmlock 18529 
Nloin Oflice San Francisco, Cali'omia 



VISIT THE 

PALACE BATHS 



85 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HOF BRAU 



FINEST FOOD 
Money Can Buy 



DOUBLE SHOT BAR — OPEN 7 A.M. TO 3 A.M. 
Powell at O'Farrell Street San Francisco, California 

Caesar's ITALIAN RESTAURANT 

The Finesl in Food - The Best Wines and Liquors 

LUNCHES DAILY 

— Closed Monday — 

Bay and Powell Streets - DOuglas 2-1153 - San Francisco. Calif. 

MORRIS A. LISTON - Engineer 

971 SUTTER STREET 
PRospect 6-6933 San Francisco 9, Calif. 

Thos. Thoniasser & Associates 
Caterers 



1228 - 20th Avenue 



San Francisco 



WATSON BROS. TRANSPORTATION CO., INC. 

DAN W. MAHONEY, DislricI Sales Manager 

1025 Tennessee St. — GA. 1-1227 — San Francisco 



B & T SPRAY EQUIPMENT CO. 

Dick Tra^crsy -.- Olio Barlholomay 

45 Elmira Street DE. 3'0070 

Bradley Camera & Supply Co. 
1126 IMarket Street HE. 1-7476 



MEMO FOR LEISURE 



ICTARK DRAMA matched with 
I powerful acting may be seen at 
jUie Geary Theatre where Chester 
iMorris stai-s as Eddie in Arthur 
^Miller's "A View fro!i\ the Bridge." 
Agamst a background of Brookl.\-n 
tenement life the grim story un- 
folds of a tough-seeming long- 
shoreman, and a niece blossoming 
rnir> womanhood whose gi-ouing up 

■i nted by her gviardian. The 
_ of two young Italian emi- 

- into the home creates first 
and in the end explosive 

Miller is a master of pithy idio- 

Tiatic dialogue, of pulling out the 

-tops of emotion and passion, and 

"t -searching curtain falls. He 

.sei-\'ed by a splendid cast — 

■^ as the tortured insecure 

luu^lei- of the household, avid for 

respect." and — among others — 

Marie Andrews as the niece Cath- 

;rine. Mary James as Eddie's wife. 

ind Rudolph Solari and Alan Mix- 

)n in the roles of Marco and Ro- 

iolpho. 

The audibility of the actors, in 
iddition to their utter believability 
IS people, is a special reason for 
■ompliment in a production which 
\'ill live in the memoiy of those 
\'ho are wise enough to make a 
x>int of seeing it. 




Julie Harris 
Due to open at the Cunan on 
anuari,- 26 is "The Warm Penin- 
ula. ■ a play of today with its 
eene laid in Florida. It will star 
ulie Harris, a brilliant young ac- 
u'ho has been seen here in "I 
m a Camera," and "The Lark." 



Zealand and Australia. The story 
line is less distinctive than in earl- 
ier Cinerama ventures, but as a 
travelogue it is good, and some- 
times hair-raising entertainment. 
It provoked a gentleman from 
Texas sitting next to us to ejac- 
ulate "holy mackerel" at frequent 
intervals, most especially at the 
primitiveness of Australian roads, 
and at the ingenious school of the 
air in the Australian "bush," where 
children in remote homesteads are 
able to share in the activities of the 
class room. 

There were plenty of thrills from 
surf riding to daring jumps from 
Toala's Tower in Pentecost Island. 
Aesthetic delights range from en- 
jojTiient of hula dancing in Hawaii 
to choral singing in Tonga. One of 
the best bits of the film is a most 
oi-iginal rendering of the Lord's 
Prayer in pidgin English, spoken 
with gi'eat reverence by a little 
company of natives instructed by 
a missionary'. 

QUITE DIFFERENT from this 
colorful and romantic travel- 
ogue is "The Seventh Seal," a Swe- 
dish film which is having a phe- 
nomenal run at the Vogue Theatre. 
Set in the fourteenth century in 
Sweden at a time when the Black 
Death swept Europe, it tells the 
story of a knight and his squire 
returned from the Crusades, and 
their adventures in a land ravaged 
by fear. There is some rich por- 
traiture which covers the whole 
human gamut from the innocence 
of a pious juggler and his Madon- 
na-like wife to the cjmical world- 
ling, the sceptic who longs to be- 
lieve, and the deliberate worker of 
evil. 

The climax of the film in which 
Death claims his victims, implies 
that those who escape his tyranny 
are persons who have learned 
the art of acceptance and resigna- 
tion. There ai-e witch-buj-nings, 
processions of flageolants, scenes 
of horror and violence and to bal- 
ance them, exquisite glimpses of 
material tenderness, frolic ajid 
gaiety, pious confession. The pho- 
tography is the work of a rare ar- 
tist who knows both Natiu-e and 
human nature in a variety of 
moods. 



certo No. 3 in G major, and Tzig- 
ane, a rhapsody for violin and or- 
chestra by Ravel. 

Szeryng was bom m Wai-saw, 
near the home of Chopin. Since 
1946 he has made his home in 
Mexico. A friend of such artists 
as Artur Rubinstein. Yehudi Menu- 
hin, and George Szell. he is a 
worldwide traveller, an enthusias- 
tic intei-preter of contemporary 
music, and a versatile linguist. 




Henryk Szeryng 

His talent was discovered by the 
great Huberman, who heard him 
play as a child and insisted that 
his parents send him to Berlin to 
study with Carl Flesch. 

SzerjTig will appear in concerts 
on January 28, 29, and 30. 



I'HE LATEST Cinerama offering A HIGHLIGHT of this season 

at the Oi-pheum Theatre is '^ of the San Francisco S>-m- 

South Seas Adventure." which phony Orchestra will be the visit 

inducts the audience on a tour to of famous violinist, Henryk Szer- 

[awaii, Tahiti, Tonga, Fiji, New yng, who wiU play Mozart's Con- 

ECEMBER. 1958 -JANUARY, 1959 



FLOYD OSBORN 
V$ed Tires 

1670 INNES AVENUE 
ATwater 8-1493 



Gourmet Fair 

Groceries Imported 
M'iries • Liquors - Beer 

2181 Union Street 



ASK FOR S4:H GRFI N ST.^.MPS 

The SPERRY and 
jTOHfNSON COMPANY 

HEmloc-k 1-41 U 

1446 MARKET STREET 
San Francisco 



Roland H. Oslerber|» 

Diamond Setter 

324 DeMontford Ave. 

JU. 4-8950 



Superb Cuisine - Continental Food 

L A M B R O S 

(Closed Sundays) 

315 Bush Street 

YU. 6-6165 San Francisco 

THE MILLER HOUSE 

Wines - Liquors ■ Delivery 

FRANK MILLER 
Owner-Manager 

105 Broad Street 



SIMPSON NURSING HOME 

R.N. Supervised 
24 Hour Nursing Service 
Excellent Food and Care 

744 - 35th Avenue 

SK 2-0184 



Duval's 

STUDIO CLUB 

fohn :■: Paul 

309 COURTLAND AVENUE 
Mission 7-9981 



Intileside Coin Launderette 

Holloway &: Brijihton Avenues 



Phone UNderhill 1-8144 
Jim Bruce Chinese Laundry 

WE (-.\LL .AMI DELIVER 
143 - 8th Street San Francisco 



George Di Quattro 

George's Cigar Store 

Beer and Soft Drinks 

-59 COLUMBUS AVENUE 

SUtter 1-9218 San Francisco II 



Bayview Refrigeration 

d: APPLIANCE SERVICE 

Hashers - Dryers ■ Ranges 

Refrigerators 

24 Hour Ser\'ice 

UN. 3-4664 789 Valencia St. 



Soochow Restaurant 

Fine Chinese- American Food 
16-8 POST STREET 



Huie*s Market 

1600 L.-\RKIN STREET 
PR. 5-9313 San Francisco 



^■. LIBRiXRY PERIODICAL ROOM 
Civic Center 
San Francisco 2, Calif. 
52 X-1/59 (3077^ "'^•^'^ 



BULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 4507 



CINCOTTA BROTHERS 

Distributors 

-:- Marine Hardware -:- 
-:- Fisheries Supplies -:- 

169 JEFFERSON STREET 

San Francisco 11, Calif. 
Telephone PRospect 5-8977 

Branch — MONTEREY, CALIF. 


KELLER 8 GANNON 

Consulting Engineers 
PHILIP E. GANNON 


WAVERLY SHOPS 

PALO ALTO, CALIFORNL4 

DAvenport 6-4990 


Western Traction Company 

Sacramento Office 

16th & American River 

P. O. Box 2649 
Phone WAbash 5-8551 

Main Office 

1615 Jerrold Avenue 

San Francisco 24, Calif. 
Phone ATwater 2-0287 

Construction and Maintenance Machinery 
Liiiht & Heavy Duty All-Wheel Drive Trucks 


126 POST STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

SUtter 1-7015 


ALPINE REST HOME 

Expert Care - Bed - Semi-Bed & Ambulatory 

Special Diets if Needed - State Licensed 

Nursing Care 24 Hours - Delicious Food 

Walnut Creek 1152 ALPINE ROAD VElIoHstonc 5-555 
RUTH BAKER, 0»fur-Opcrator 


DEL MONTE MEAT CO., INC. 
Sweetheart Brand Idaho Quality Fed Beef 

-51 HOWARD STREET EX. 2-4700 SAN FRANCISCO 


WEST LAKE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 

"All Forms of Insurance" 

301 South Mayfair Ave. Daly City, Calif. 


PACIFIC FELT COMPANY 

710 York Street Mission 7-0111 


MFRd'HV PH.ARMAIV - Prrscriplioii Spccialisls 

Rolnri j. l'alUr,„n 

VA. 4-660- IJOI CIIL'RCH STREET 


STERO DISHWASHING MACHINE MFG. CO. 

335- Uth STREET 
HEmlock 1-2U4 --.. San Fraucitco 


WIRTH BROS. PASTRY SHOP 

Home of -Happy /)<»■ /'..(.rv ■ td<:.> 

Geary at 23rd Avenue Saii Francisco 







ITY-COUNTY 



ECONOMIC HOME RULE FOR THE BAY AREA 



ECORD 



SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




BAY AREA COUNCIL PRESIDENT EDGAR F. KAISER 



FEBRUARY. 1959 



Hoiv well 

do you knoiv 

San Francisco? 




t vcn moa lifelong residents of 
the Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
[iiade San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Gray Line tour is a must: if you're 
.1 native, you'll still find a tour ex' 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
l-rancisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say. "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Pa.';sengcrs ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver'guidcs tell you 
the background story of the places 
you visit: fares are surprisingly 




Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
YUkon 6-4000 



The Villa 
Saiiitariuni 

Joseph S.irto. Director 

130 VALE ST. 
ri .'^-0411 Daly City 



PARKER PEN CO. 



278 Post Street 
SU. 1-4809 



iSank oi Ktntvxtn 

NATIONAL JXV'i NGS ASSOCIATION 
Condensed Statement of Condition December 3h 1958 

(Figures of Overseas Branches are as of December 24, 1958; 

RESOURCES 

Cash and Due from Banks $ 1,860,453,87196 

United States Government Securities and Securities 

Guaranteed by the Government 2,398,143,579.13 

Federal Agency Securities 124,372,037.99 

State, County, and Municipal Securities . . . . 740,290,190 72 

Other Securities 154,734,050.16 

Loans Guaranteed or Insured by the United 

States Government or its Agencies .... 1,382,149,36930 

Other Loans and Discounts 4,279,738,98137 

Bank Premises, Fixtures, etc 130,696,396 48 

Customers' Liability for Acceptances 150,067,009.00 

Accrued Interest and Other Resources .... 70,207,265.61 

TOTAL RESOURCES $11,290,852,751.72 

LIABILITIES 

Capital $160,000,000 00 

Surplus 340,000,000 00 

Undivided Profits and Reserves 1 07,536,822,99 

TOTAL CAPITAL FUNDS . \ '. '. '. '. ~. $ 607, 536, £ 
Reserve for Possible Loan Losses 103,771 

deposits' ^^-^"'^ •• ■ lt;''i\\'l;ZVA7\ 10,307,560,992.60 
(.Savings and Time. $5,332,350,593,471 

Liability on Acceptances 152, 985, i 

Reserve for Interest, Taxes, etc 118,997,^ 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $11,290,852,751.72 

Main Offices in ihe two Reserve Cities of California 

SAN FRANCISCO • LOS ANGELES 

Branches throughout California 
Overseas branches: London, Manila, Tokyo, Yokohama, Kobe, Osaka, Bangkok, Guam 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation • Member Federal Reserve System 



1,822.99 
,68506 



,857.84 
,393.23 



Bank of America 

(InternaHonal) 

A uholh-ou-ned subiidiar) 

Condensed Statement of Condition December 31, 1958 
lew York, N. Y. Branches: Ducsseldorf. Singapore, Paris, Beirut, Guatemala City 
(Branch figures are as of December 2-f, 1958) 



RESOURCES 



;ash and Due from Banks 
Jnitod States Government 
Obligations .... 



TOTAL RESOURCES 



$136,330,592.04 

13.646,792.97 
15,487,814.21 
141,269,082.88 

26,056,780.50 

2,128,808.03 

$334,919,870.63 



LIABILITIES 

Capital .... $34,000,000.00 
Surplus .... 6,800,000.00 
Undivided Profits. 1.201812.11 



TOTAL CAPITAL FUNDS . . 
Reserve for Possible Loan Losses 

Liability on Acceptances. . . 
Reserve for Interest. Taxes, etc. 

TOTAL LIABILITIES . . 



$ 42.001.812,11 

2,630,002,42 

260.529,535.01 

27,575,309.75 

2,183,211.34 

5334.919,870 63 



^uBfciw tiorrftKT 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 



KENNETH H. ALLEN 
ALAN P. TORY 



PUBLISHER 
EDITOR 



Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock I-I2I2 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 



FEBRUARY, 1959 
VOLUME 26 NUMBER 2 



LETTERS 

Congramlations on the December, 1958- 
anuar)', 1959 issue of the City -County 
lecord. I was particularly interested in the 
seful information in the article by Glenn 
jraves on the new tax benefit. I also think 
nat your special feanire Top Performers 
if 1958 was ver>' well selected to give read- 
;rs a dramatic survey of local personalities 
'/ho add so much to the vigor, success and 
olor of the Bay Area. 

HARRY JORSS 
I 4.i7 - 17th Avenue 

San Francisco 

• It was good to see The Record featured in 
news session of KRON TV, just after a 
ilimpse of Cyril Magnins comments on his 
reject to beautify the Embarcadero. The two 
ages of your magazine adorned by porrraits 
f top performers showed up well on the 
:reen, and brought your interesting publica- 
on into wide and deserved notice. 

DORA MILLER 
1.^22 Shafter Street 
San Francisco 

My compliments to the Record for report- 
ig the Grand Jur)' compliment to the Board 
f Appeals. All too often, the press reports 
ily unfavorable comments on a government 
;ency. 

I believe most public servants are rrying to 
a good job. They certainly deser\'e a pat 
n the back for a job well done, and the 
ic should be informed of the successes 
i well as the failures. 

MARY FRANCES SMITH 
95 1 Jones Street 
San Francisco 

I have just read the December, 1958 - 
inuary. 1959 issue of the Citv -Count)- Rec- 
rd. 
I very much enjoyed Alan Tory's article 
n Governor Edmund G Brown. It seemed 
) me that this concise profile was much 
lore accurate and more fair to the new 
ovemor than much that has been pub- 
shed. 1 would, however, like to point out 
lat Governor Brown is a loyal Lowell High 
umnus. 

KENNETH C. MERCER 

55 yO- 18th Street 

San Francisco 



MAR A 19S9 

^®9¥y"'WINDOW 



NEW PROJECTS: One of the most inde- 
fatigable public servants in Cirj' Hall 
IS Joseph Allen, secretar)' to the Mayor. We 
dropped in ro see him rhe other day and asked 
what plans are really going through for the 
city. In response this man of unquenchable 
ardor waxed lyrical, and rolled off a generous 
list of projects — Cyril Magnin is going to 
get the Golden Gateway plan off the ground, 
the Civic Center plan is definitely in the 
works to dignify the governmental hub of 
the city, and with the underground garages 
to be added at Portsmouth Square and Sut- 
ter-Stockton so that native son and tourist 
can park their cars while enjoying the city, 
San Francisco is moving ahead fast. 

Incidentally, in a city where someone is 
always complaining that new projects are out- 
of-date before they get in action, it is of in- 
terest to know that the Fifth and Mission 
Garage is ten years ahead of estimates for its 
use. 

Fifteen fine major buildings are scheduled 
to be added to the city during 1959. The ball 
park will be completed. The master plan for 
the International Airport provides for a dash- 
ing place of entry to the Bay Area. The 
budget includes money to give Kezar stadium 
a coat of paint and a lengthy list of minor 
improvements does not neglect better hous- 
ing for the zoo gorillas, and the possible 
addition of some charming Australian koala 
bears. Small fry will be delighted with Story- 
land, soon to open at the beach. Now, Los 
Angeles, let's see your list! 



COMPLAINTS: An irate voice on the 
telephone recently addressed one of our 



staff with the words: That doesn't sound like 
Mayor Christopherl ' Our representative an- 
swered that he was not Mayor Christopher, 
upon which the voice asked why she was not 
speaking to the Mayor. The explanation that 
we are a privately owned magazine with of- 
fices on Church and Sixteenth Streets did not 
appease the enquirer, who wanted to know 
why the Muni Railway does not run a proper 
two-way service for the taxpayers. 

We are accustomed to giving the City Hall 
number cheerfully to flustered would-be brides 
and troubled gentlemen with foreign accents 
het-up about building permits. This courtesy, 
however, the angry lady obtusely prevented 
by insisting that our staff member was lying, 
so he had no option but to end the conver- 
sation before a further storm broke! 



PROMOTION: The Record congratulates 
Sherman Duckel on his appointment as 
Chief Administrative Ofl^icer for the city. 
Since 1950, Duckel has been Director of Pub- 
lic Works making a gixxl engineer's job of 
that many-sided department which is respons- 
ible for everything from installing parking 
lots to cleaning sewers, from mainraining 
trees to building public libraries. Nor is Mr. 
Duckel entirely unused to standing up against 
pressures — a new state freeway can bring 
forth a great deal of fire. 

Duckel is a good mixer, with a pleasant 
tenor voice in which he delighrs to lead com- 
munity singing, and a cheerful, rugged ap- 
proach to the problems of government. A 
profile of the new C.A.O. will appear in our 
next issue. 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 




LEHERS 


3 


BAY WINDOW 


3 


ECONOMIC HOME RULE FOR THE BAY AREA 


4 


C¥ Edgar F. Kol;,:-- 




CITY PURCHASER; BEN KLINE 


6 


by Jone Rowson 




DIRECTORY 


8 


PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 


II 


MEMO FOR LEISURE 


15 



'EBRUARY, 1959 




lit (I recent (uldress to the Doivntotin Association, thi 
President of the Bay Area Council outlined bold plan 
for a Golden Gate Authority. We publish below thi 
subsl(uice of his notable talk. 



Economic Home Rule 
For the Bay Area 

by 



Edgar F. Kaiser 



SAN FRANCISCO — and the entire Bay 
Area — can be verj' proud of its civic and 
business leadership. In every community, 
dc-dicated citizens, men and women of energy 
and vision, are working hard for improve- 
ment and progress, and we can see the results 
of their efforts all around us. 

1 am verj' sure, moreover, that the vision 
that guides these good citizens extends be- 
yond the boundaries of their own cities or 
counties. I am sure they are deeply concerned 
as well with the future of the Bay Area as a 
whole — that they realize their future is in- 
delibly linked with that of the other com- 
munities that help make up this great metro- 
politan area of ours. 

No longer can any community be an is- 
land. The physical and economic future of 
all of the cities of the Bay Area has been in- 
divisibly linked by forces none of us could 
stop even if we wanted to. 

We are linked by the forces generated in 
an explosive population growth. We are all 
well aware of the rapidly accelerating urban- 
ization of the Bay Area. If you drive a car 
outside your city limits, you just can't escape 
it. But all of us — including those from 
across the Bay in Oakland — sometimes are 
too close to change to recognize its full sig- 
nificance. 

In 1846, when the flag of the California 
Republic was raised in Sonoma — San Fran- 
cisco was a trading station of some 800 in- 
habitants. In 1850, when California was ad- 
mitted to the Union, the entire state — from 
the Oregon border to Mexico — could count 
a total of less than 93,000 inhabitants. 

By 1900, the Bay Area itself had reached 
one-half million; and a half century later, it 
had mu.shr()omcd to 2,681,322. Today we 
number nearly 3.500,000. 

Tomorrow? Tlic Bay Area is growing at 
the rate of 7,000 persons a month — and that 
rate is expected to double the next twelve 
years. In 1970 — which is ju,st like tomorrow 
as far as most of us are concerned — we will 
be close to the five million mark. 

If you want to ride the "time machine" 
thirty years into the future, you will see a 
Bay Area teeming with double — or even 
triple — its present population. These Bay 



Area citizens of the future will have taken 
over some 600 square miles of land now de- 
voted to agriculture, recreation, and other 
such purposes. There will be a million more 
homes than there are now. What few open 
spaces you can find now, if you drive around 
the Bay, will long since have been filled to 
form a solid urban area. 

To a young man of thirty, three decades 
is a lifetime. But I can assure you that time 
has a bad habit of speeding up. To many of 
us it seems but the day before yesterday that 
Lindberg flew the Atlantic alone — and that 
Al Jolson started the talking picture era with 
'The Jazz Singer" — to name only a few 
events of three decades ago. 

The next thirty years will be gone before 
we know it. And before we know it, this Bay 
Area of ours will be not just the sixth or 
seventh largest metropolitan area in the na- 
tion — as it is now — but close to the largest. 

Early last year the San Francisco Bay Area 
Council decided to make an analysis of what 
were the greatest problems in this 9-County 
Bay Area. And after a thorough study it came 
up with the inescapable fact that this area 
needs an authority as the vehicle to provide a 
farsighted solution to our basic economic 
problems. 

Very simply and frankly, we were forced 
to face the fact that- — because various com- 
munities in this Bay Area are not pulling to- 
gether — are not sitting down together to 
work out our mutual problems — a lot of 
these problems just are not being solved. 

We are losing the race for trade to Eastern 
ports. Trade patterns are blind, to tradition — 
and in some respects, to geography. They are 
formed on the hard rc-alities of markets, 
docks, piers, and landing strips. 

But we do not need to continue our strag- 
gling. 

The Council — at the request of Senator 
John McCarthy, of Marin, Chairman of the 
Senate Interim Committee on Bay Area Prob- 
lems — brought together some of the best 
legislative, and financial, minds in the coun- 
try to help us work out legislation to create 
what we call the "Golden Gate Authority." 

As now proposed, the Golden Gate Au- 
thority eventually would manage and have 



responsibility for all of the area's brid 
seaports, and airports. There should be specir 
stress on that word "eventually." State legis 
lation, initially, would provide machinery fo 
the Authority to assume control of the tol 
bridges, and to begin negotiations for thi 
State and city-owned seaports and airports ii 
the area. 

It should be made very dear that Stati 
legislation cannot take over any facilitie 
owned by cities or coimties without the ex 
press consent of the leaders and the people 
of those cities and counties. I refer specific 
to the San Francisco airport, to the airpor 
and the port of Oakland, and to the ports o: 
Redwood City and Richmond. 

The Authority would be granted permis 
sive power to start negotiations with the re 
spective cities for these facilities. But tht 
owners of the airports — and the owners o; 
the seaports — would have to want to negoti 
ate. Legally, no one could grant the Author- 
ity the power to take over these facilities 
That is the way it should be — and will be. 

Obviously, evolving an effective, single 
management that can transcend politici 
boundaries in order to operate the major com 
mercial facilities of nine counties — to tht 
best interests of each county — is no simpit 
task. But I am confident we have a good an- 
swer. 

Actually, transcending of political bound 
aries is the key barrier to the fullest develop- 
ment of the Bay Area economy. There is nc 
single agency tcxlay that can do the job. Tht 
Air Pollution and the Rapid Transit Districn 
transcend boundaries — but they are limitec 
to single purposes. The State, of course, car 
transcend them, too — but the State is noi 
dedicated to the interests of the Bay Area. Ii 
has to take care of the other three-fourth; 
of California, as well. 

Just as an example (and regardless ol 
which side anyone may be on) — for rwelvt 
years, the Legislation has been studying vari- 
ous possibilities for a Southern Crossing. Nine 
plans- - and some S3 million later — no de- 
cision has been reached. The Golden Gatt 
Authority would be in a far better piosition 
to reconcile the various conflicting interest! 
involved, to the lasting benefit of everyone. 



THE RECORO 




This Authority would have no taxing; 
power. It would finance new facilities, and 
the expansion of old ones, through revenue 
bonds — using the combined and massive 
credit base of all the facilities in this area. 
Through the Golden Gate Authority, and its 
pooling of revenues, we of the Bay Area 
could afford to build badly needed facilities. 
Unless we have this Golden Gate Authority 
through which we can work together, 1 don't 
think the vast population we will have in 
1970, or 1990, will find a well-ordered econ- 
omy capable of providing the transportation, 
the jobs, the materials, the many services the 
people will need. 

The Bay Area cannot afford to continue 
tackling its economic problems in the piece- 
meal way of the past. We must start facing 
the future head-on. We must face the fact 
that we can achieve area-wide economic pro- 
gress only through joint action in dealing with 
area-wide problems. 

If all of the facilities we are talking about 
come under this Authority, it has been esti- 
mated that by 1972 the Golden Gate Author- 
ity would have a borrowing capacity of ap- 
proximately 5400,000,000. This massive credit 
base would be the foundation on which we 
could — without requiring any taxing power — 
build new bridges, modernize seaports, and 
lengthen airpon runways. 

We need economic "home rule" in this 
area. And that is what the Golden Gate Au- 
thority will provide. It will transcend bound- 
aries — business-wise — without in any way 
abrogating them politically. 



Those of us who ha\e had a part in shap- 
mg the Golden Gate Authority program — 
are by no means the first to recognize the 
need for it. In 1951 a State Senate fact-find- 
ing committee recommended a Port Author- 
ity for San Francisco Bay. Congressman John 
F. Shelley long has been an Authority advo- 
cate. Two years ago the Chairman of the Fed- 
eral Maritime Board called for creation of 
such an agency. 

A committee, "Citizens for the Golden 
Gate Authority," has been formed to give as 
wide dissemination as possible of all infor- 
mation concerning the proposal — its impor- 
tance to all the Bay Area, its feasibility, and 
the manner in which it will safeguatd and 
enhance local interests, while serving to give 
the entire area insurance of a sound and pros- 
perous economic future. 

The Bay Area Council has unanimously 
endorsed the principle of an Authority. 

Other groups in the area are studying this 
plan — and, as people understand the princi- 
ple — more and more of them are expressing 
their support. 

In no sense of the word are we saying that 
cur various facilities — our bridges, our air- 
ports and seaports — are being poorly run, or 
that this new Authority could run them bet- 
ter. What we are saying is that no matter 
how well the various facilities are operated, 
they cannot do the job that needs to be done 
for the future development of the Bay Area 
unless they work together — and make the 



best use of their combined resources and nat- 
ural advantages. 

We in the Bay Area are a great commu- 
nit>' of individuals, sharing a common bount)' 
of natural resources — unmatched in any 
other great metropolitan area. The world's 
finest natural harbor is our heritage. We are 
blessed with unsurpassed climate and scenic 
magnificence. Around us grows the multimde 
of the earth's products. The oceans, and the 
airlanes, link us with teeming ports and citiei 
that seek our goods — and send us theirs. We 
are the growing Mecca for people in all parts 
of the world who want to live the better life 

As we share blessings — so do we share 
problems; so do we share a future potentially 
as great as that of almost any area in America 

This future we have in common — if wc 
act in common. 

The real test will be how well we adjusi 
to change — how well we handle the chal- 
lenge of those two mighty facts, population 
growth and the demand for economic de- 
velopment that is inescapably linked with it. 

Let us enunciate a "Declatation of Inter- 
dependence" — a declaration that, in full re- 
spect for our individual rights, we recognize 
the mutualit)' and urgency of our needs; thai 
we will work together for a Golden Gate Au- 
thority, to make sure the great community 
in which we live will have the productive 
and prosperous future its natural endow 
ments make possible, but which only plannec 
and cooperative action can fully achieve. 



PARIS LOUVRE RESTALRAMT 

Fine Cuifine in a French Almoiphere 

THE HOUSE OF CREPES SUZETTE 

Free Parking One Block Anay 

648 BROADW.W :-: VU. 2--956 

VILLA SANITARIl M 

JOSEPH SARTO, Direcior 

I iO Vale Street PL 5-0411 

Daly Citv 



KINKADE BRAKE SERVICE 



HEmlock 1-1234 



241 Tenth Street 

ED KINK.ADE. Owner 



BERONIO LI MBER CO. 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL 

Office and Yards 

KANSAS AND M.ARIN STS., S.\N FR.ANCISCO 24 

Phone VAIencia 4-3283 M. J. Tollini 



FEBRUARY, 1959 



City Purchaser Ben Kline Trades in 
Arroivs^ Zoo Animals, Police Radios 

by Jane Rawson 



THE CITY'S housekeeping Is the responsi- 
bility of the Purchosing Department, 
housed in two lorge rooms and some smaller 
offices focing McAllister Street, in City Hall. 
If you read the Annual Report of this de- 
partment you will find that it purchases 
materials and supplies, eauipment and con- 
tractual services, for all departments of the 
City and County, including city-owned utili- 
ties, and the San Francisco Unified School 
District. It repairs and maintains automo- 
tive and other equipment for the various 
departments except Public Utilities and for 
the School District as requested, operates 
a central tabulating and reproduction bu- 
reau for departments requiring its services 
and transfers to other departments or sells 
equipment and supplies no longer useful to 
any department of the city. It also main- 
tains perpetual inventory of equipment 
in the various departments, and operates 
central stores of the Purchasing and various 
other departments. 

In this department you will find an alert 
staff working with bright-eyed concentra- 
tion, but Ben Kline, the head of the depart- 
ment, probably has the brightest eyes and 
the most determined concentration. Should 
you comment to him that you are struck by 
the Individualistic activity and personal in- 
terest In his domain, he will flash back at 
you: "Unlike a lot of public service, we hove 
no routine here. Everything that we handle 
is a problem." 

Sometimes these problems may even 
cotch the layman's imagination with their 
unexpected romance. For example, only the 
most intractable problems hit the desk of 
Kline himself, ond we were delighted to 
discover that they do not always concern 
big purchoses of heavy equipment for high- 
woys and buildings. They may concern 
something os colorful as target arrows for 
the athletes of Cily College. Very exact 
specifications are sometimes difficult for a 
1 smell item like this, and the resulting pur- 
chase may present problems. Kline may 
need to look into it himself before the stu- 
dents are happy with their arrows. 

Ben Kline mojored in the journolism school 
of Missouri University. He has had a varied 
career In newspaper work, ronging from 



financial news to Far East coble services, 
sometimes living In the Far East, sometimes 
employed Stateside. He first got to know the 
workings of City Hall as City Hall reporter 
for the San Francisco Chronicle. Now he 
attacks the pernickety problems of the Pur- 
chasing Department with the ferret-like at- 
tack of a reporter getting the facts of a 
good news story. 

As he points out, everybody with things 
to sell feels he has a right to sell to the city 
In which he plies his trade. Kline's policy is 
to ovoid restrictive specifications os far as 
possible and cost the net for bids very wide. 
The bids are opened and read publicly with 
room and time as clearly specified as a 
newspaper deadline. With Kline's passion 
for sending his staff out like reporters ofter 
facts, and believing with most right-minded 
people that once the facts ore in the day- 
light, the solijtions ore there too, yester- 
day's purchasing problems are as dead as 
yesterday's news, by the time fresh problems 
hove to be tackled. The most teasing per- 
plexities are taken home by the purchasing 
chief himself to be mulled over quietly on 
Twin Peoks. 

Kline is not, however, a harassed house- 
keeper. He has time for two principal hob- 
bies, family and fishing. With one son, Rob- 
ert, In Varlon Associotes ot Polo Alto, an- 
other, David, with Bethlehem Steel in Los 
Angeles, and a daughter, Marjorie, married 
to a Bechtel engineer who goes abroad 
quite frequently, he has many windows out 
over the next generation. 

Grandfather is, of course, delighted with 
his four grandchildren, who ore hobby num- 
ber one. The other hobby accounts for his 
eyes, which, like those of o sea captain, look 
long distances into space, different from the 
restless file-tray to file-tray office glance. 
Saturday and Sunday usually find Ben Kline 
headed for Sausallto, maybe as early as 7 
o.m., for year round he goes off fishing at 
weekends in his beloved boat. The seven- 
yeor-old grandson hos been a fishing pupil 
since the age of three, with grandfather still 
very happy to help wind in when a big one 
might otherwise get away. 

Thus, Kline comes back to his office each 
Monday prepared to muster the requisite 




hopping list 



impartiality to handle the deportment"' 
problems. His principal assistants are eigh 
buyers, who are guided In their buying b: 
the desires of the using departments, bu 
who tactfully have to circumnavigate who 
the department considers unfair prejudic 
obout firms or merchandise. 

Ceramic kilns, merry-go-round organs 
dried sewage sludge, zoo animals, play 
(dramatic), globes (geographical). $2Vi mil 
lion turbines and related Items for Hetch 
Hetchy, short-wave rodios for the cops, flrii 
hose for the fire department, all figure or 
the bizarre shopping lists and soles agree 
ments of this busy city department. 

When Ben Kline retires at 65 In April, th. 
city will hove a tantalizing job to find c 
like successor. As for the man himself, whe 
that time comes: "I Intend to get the ten 
sions out. Do strictly what I want to do 
After 40 years you con start to do thr 
things you want to do" he repeats with 
relish, adding, "Very exciting, very interest 
Ing." 



Off the Record 




if! 12 o'clock. taU off your mask, miitor' 
THE RECORC 



PROTECTING 
AMERICA'S 
GREATEST 
ASSET 

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Compensation 

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& Sickness 

Automobile 

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Major Medical 

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ARGONAUT 
INSURANCE 

HOME OfflCE MCNIO P/»«< 




PITTSBURGH TESTING 
LABORATORY 

Engineers - Chemists - X-Ray and 
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Metallurgists and Soils Foundation 
Engineering 

Inspection and Testing 

Materials of Construction and Industry, X-Ray and 
Gamma Ray of large and small items — welded 
structures, vessels and pipe lines. Engineering soil 
foundation investigation and tests. Asphalt paving 
materials. 

Offices in all principal cities 
651 HOWARD STREET EX 2-1747 



4Z/W C/uuceiH 



RCA\^CT0R television 




Leo J. MeuberX Companq 

33 GOUGH STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 1 



LARKSPUR 

CONVALESCENT 

HOSPITAL 

For Elderly Chronics and Convalescents 
R.N. and Physical Therapist on Staff 

GRACE SLOCHM, Director 

Special Diet 

Homelike Atmosphere 
Moderate Prices 

Conscientious Care 

234 HAWTHORNE, LARKSPUR 
Phone WAbassh 4-1862 

LARKSPUR, CALIFORNIA 



EBRUARY. 1959 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

GEORGE CHRISTOPHER. MAYOR 

Directory of City and County Officers 



ELECTIVE OFFICERS 



MAYOR 

;"ij C.ly l{;ill 
,ic CliiiMupLct. Mijoi 
JoKph J. Allen. Eaccuiivc Secretary 
Paliifia H. Oinnich. Confidcnliil Sccttuty 
Ccumc J. Cruhb. Admmi.Kaiivc Aui.uiil 
J..l,n n. SuUmii. I'uHu- Scivicc I)ir.-.-I..r 

SUPERVISORS, BOARD OP 

n.s Cllv Hall 
Harold S. Dokb.. I'tc.ldcnl. )51 Caiaornia St. 
William C. Blake. 90 FoUom St. 
JoKpb M. d«y, M4 T<.wn»cnd St. 
Dr. Chatlca A. Ertola. 253 Columbus Ave. 
John J. Ferdon. 155 Montgomery St. 
Jame. L. Halley. 870 Market St. 
Qatiua Shottall McMahon. 70] Market St. 
Henry R. Rolph. 310 Sansome St. 
Jame. J. Sulbvan. 31 West Portal 
}. JoKph Sullivan. Ill Sutter St. 
Alfonso J. Zirpoli, 300 Montgomery St. 
Robert J. Dolan. Clerk 
Lillian M. Senter. Chief Assistant Clerk 
Standiog Committees (Cbairman named fin 
.ircul and Industrial Development— SuUiv 






Sullivan. Rolph 

Public Buildings, Lands and City Planning — McMahoi 

Public HMlth and Welfare— Erida. Sullivan. 
Public Utilities— Ferdon. Ertola, McMahon 
Street, and Highv.^ys— Blake, Halley, Ferdoi 
Rulcj -McCarty, Dobbs, Halley 

ASSESSOR 

101 City Hall 
Russell L. Woldcn 

CITY ATTORNEY 



Tliomas C. Lynch 

PUBUC DEFENDER 

700 Montgomery St. 
Edward T. Mancuso 

SHERIFF 

j)l City Hall 
M;itt!tcvv C Carberry 

TREASURER 



J..l,r, J. 



11" (Ji 



Hall 



SUPERIOR, JUDGES OF 

Fourth Floor. City Hall 



Iward Molkcnbuhr. 
.yni'.nd J. Arala 

. H.rnl'j Caulficld 



:>illina 



1.. 

I'i.:,t.m D..>.... 
T,m.,lliy 1. Pitzp., 
Thomas M. Foley 
Ccrald .S. Levin 
Thereu Mcifcle 
Joseph M. Cum 
W) City Hall 



,. _. Molinari 
Harry J. Neubarlb 
Clarence W. Morris 
Orla St. Clair 
George W. Schonfeld 
Daniel R. Shoemaker 
William T. Swcigcrt 
William F. Traverso 
H. A. Van Dcr Zee 
.Mvin E. Weinberger 
Secretary 



MUNiaPAL, JUDGES OF 



Third Floor, City Hall 
William O'Brien. Pte.ltllni 
Byron Arnold 
i;arl H. Allen 
Albert A. A.elrod 
John W. Bu.icy Li 

Andrew Eyman J 

Ivan L. Slavich. Sf.r,i;,ry 

301 City Hall 

A. C. McCheiney. Jury Comm 



Clayton W. Horn 
Francis McCarty 
ird O'Day 



TRAFHC HNES BUREAU 

I6< City Hall 
James M. Gannon. Chief Division CI 

GRAND JURY 

457 City Hall 
Meets Monday at 8 P.M. 
J. BudJ McManigal. Foreman 



. Scci 



l-Stal 



ADULT PROBATION DEPARTMENT 

601 Montgomery St, YU 6 

John D. Kavanaugh. Chief Adult Probation Olliccr 

ADULT PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
Kendrick Vaughan, Chairman, 60 Sansome 



..-..d Blosscr, 681 Market St. 
Rev. Matthew F. Connolly, 349 Fremont St. 
:d C. Jones, 628 Hayes " 



Rayi 
Rt 

:dC. ., 

Moskovit=. 2900 Lake St. 
Robert A. Peabody. 456 Post St. 
Frank Ratio. 526 Cahlornia St. 

YOUTH GUIDANCE CENTER 

375 Woodsidc Ave. 
Thomas F. Strycula, Chief Juvenile Probatic 



OHic 



JUVENILE PROBATION COMMITTEE 

Meets at call of Chairman 
; N. Buell. Chairman, 2512 Paci6c Ave. 
i. Fred \V. Bloch, 3712 Jackson St. 
. John A. Collins, 420 - 29th Ave. 
t Goldbcrger, 240 Golden Gate Ave. 



Rev. H.imihnn T. 



•ell, 1975 Post St. 



OFFICERS APPOINTED BY THE 

MAYOR 



CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

289 City Hall HE 1.2121 

Sherman Duckel 

Joseph Mignola, Executive Assistant 

Virgil Elliott, Director. Finance tf Records 

CONTROLLER 

109 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Harry D. Ross 

Wren Middlebrook, Chief Assistant Controller 

LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, FEDERAL 
LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE, STATE 

223 City Hall MA 1.016; 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE MAYOR 



ART COMMISSION 

loo Larkin 

Meets Isl Monday of month 3:45 P.M. 
Harold L. Zellerbach, President, 343 Sansome 
Bernard C. Beslcy. M.D., 450 Sutter St. 

Albeit Campodonico. 2770 Vallcjo St. 



, 2835 Vallei 
E. Knuth, S. F. State College 
wis. 2740 Union St. 

O. Peterson, 116 New Montgomery St. 
ihciick. 2707 Larkin St. 

Ex-Oflicio Members 

, California Palace Legion of Honor 

. City Planning Commi.sion 

, dc Young Museum 

. Public Library Comntiasion 



QTY PLANNING COMMISSION 

100 Larkin St. 

Meets every Thursday 2;30 P.M. 
Roger D. Lapham. Jr.. President 
Thomas P. Whitt. Vice-President 
Robert LiUentbal 
Mrs. Charles B. Porter 
Joseph E. Tinney 

Ex-Officio Meinl>ers 

Chief Administrative Officer Sherman Duckel 



:r. Designated Deputy of T. N. Bland. 



CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION 

151 City Hall 

Meets every Thursday at 4 P.M. 
Wm. A. Labanicr. President, 995 Market St. 
Wm. Kilpatrick, Vice-Pres., 827 Hyde St. 
Hubert J. Sober, 155 Montgomery St. 

Ccorge J. Grubb. Gen. Mgr. of Perst 



DISASTER CORPS 

45 Hyde St. 



EDUCATION, BOARD OF 

135 Van Ness Avenue 

Meets 1st and 3rd Tuesdays at 7:30 P.M.. 
Mrs. Lawrence Draper, Jr., President, 10 Walnut 



John G. Levison, 127 Monteomcly St. 
Mrs. Claire Matsger. 3550 Jackson St. 
Joseph A. Moore, Jr., 351 California St. 
Elmer F. Skinner, Vice-Pres., 220 Fell St. 

Dr. Harold Spears 

Superintendent of Schools and Secretary 



COMiVUSSION ON EQUAL 
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY 

Meets at call of Chairman 
C. J. Goodell, Cbairman. Room 400. 33 Post St. 
Mrs. Raymond E. Alderman. 16 West Clay Park 
John F. Brady, 1296 - 36th Ave. 
Terry A. Francois, 2085 Sutter St. 
Peter E. Haas, 98 Battery St. 
John F. Henning, 995 Markei " 

■ St. 

Secretary (tempo 



HRE COMMISSION 

2 City Hall 
Meets every Tuesday at 4 P.M. 
Edward Kcmmitt. President. 601 Polk St. 
Walter H. Duane. 220 Bush Street 
Bert Simon. 1350 Folsom St. 

William F, Murray. Chief of Department 
Albert E. Hayes, Chief. Division of Fire Pt. 

Invesiieaiion 
Thomas W. McCaithy, Secretary 



HEALTH SERVICE SYSTEM 

01 Grove St. 
Daniel Mattrocce. President, 264 Dellbtook Avi 
Donald M. Campbell, 977 Valencia St. 
Donald J. McCook. 230 Montgomery St. 
Henry L. McKcniic. 2619 . 39lh Ave. 
Thomas P. O'Sullivan. 1340 Powell St. 

Waller E. Hook, M.D.. Medical Directo 

Frank Collins. Secretary 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

440 Turk St. 

Meets 1st and 3rd Thursdays at 10 A.M. 
Charles J. Jung, Chairman, 622 Washington St. 
Jefferson A. Beaver. 1738 Post St. 
Charles L. Conlan. 1655 Folsom St. 
Al F. Mailloux, 200 Guerrero St. 
Jacob Shemano, 988 Market St. 

John W. Deard, Executive Director 



PARKING AUTHORITY 

500 Golden Gate Ave. 

Meets every Thuisdiy. 4 P.M. 
Albert E. Schles.nger. Cha.iman. 2001 Markei 
John B, Woostet. 216 Slocllon St 
lay E. JellKk. 564 Market St 
John E. Sullivan. 840 Ulloa St. 
Oavid Thomson. 65 Betty St. 

Vining T. Fisher. Getieral Man 

Thomas J. OToole. Secretaiy 






PERMIT APPEALS, BOARD OF 

227 City Hall I 

Meets evety Wednesday at ;;30 P.M. 

I>etei Tamat.i5. 1020 H..riison St, 

Ernest L, West. Viec-Ptes.. 265 Montgomeiy St, 

Morgan J. Doyle, 111 Sutter St. 

Joseph C. Tatantino. 490 Jegeraon St. 

~ !nee J. Walsh. 2450 • 17th St, 
J. Edwin Malto.. Secretary 

POLICE COMMISSION 

Hall o( Justice 

Meets every Monday at 4:30 P.M. 

Paul A- Bissinger. President. Davis and Pacidc Sts 

Haiold R. McKinnon. Mills Towct 

Thomas J, Mellon, 390 Fust St. 

Thomas Cahill, Chief of Police 
Alfted Nelder, Deputy Chief of Police 
Thomas Zaragoja. Director of Traffic 
Daniel McKlem. Chief of Inspector! 
William J. O'Brien, Commission Secretary 
John T. Butler, Department Secretary 

PUBLIC UBRARY COMMISSION 

Civic Center 

Meets Ist Tuesday each month at 4 P.M. 
Albert E. Schwabacher. Jr., President, 100 Montgoi 
Miss Rose M. Fanucchi, 511 Columbus Ave. 
Campbell McGregor. 16S Post St. 



and 18th Sts. 
lajel O'Btien, 440 Ellis St. 

Vavutis. 990 Geary St. 
\. Vayssie. 240 Jo: 



PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION 

2S7 City Hall 

Meets every Tuesday at 2 P.M. 
Don Fatacketley, President, 851 Howard St. 
Edward B. Baron, 44 Casa Way 
Daniel F. Del Carlo, 200 Guerrero St. 
Stuatt N. Greenberg, 765 Folsom St. 
Joseph Martin. Jr., 400 Montgomery St. 

T. N. Bland, Manager of Utilities 

etaty to Commission 
ive Secretary to Man 

Bureaus and Departments 

Accounu, 287 City Hall 

George Negri, Director 
Airport, San Francisco International 

Belfotd Brown. Manager 
Hetch Hetchy, 425 Mason St 

Harry E. Lloyd. Chief Engineer and Gener; 
Light, Heat 6C Power, 425 Mason St. 



a. A Devi 



Mai 



aget 



Presidio Av. 

Personnel Si Safety, 901 Presidio A' 
Paul J. Fanning. Director 

Public Service, 287 City Hall 

William J. Simons. Director 

Water Department, 



1-2121 

6-0500 

5-7000 
inager 

5-7000 

6-5656 
: 6-5656 
; 1-2121 



H Tun 



Ge) 



al Man 



PUBUC WELFARE COMMISSION 

585 Bush St. GA 1-51 

Meets 1st and 3td Tuesdays each month at 9 AM, 
Edward J. Wren. President. 1825 Mission St. 
Ernest D, Howard. 315 Montgomery St. 
Nicholas A. Loumos. 220 Montgomery St. 
Mrs John J Murray. 1306 Portola Drive 
Henry M. Same. 703 Market St. 

Ronald H, Born. Director of Public Welfare 

Mrs, Eulala Smith. Secretary 

RECREATION AND PARK COMMISSION 

McLaren Lodge. Golden Gate Park SK l-4f 

Meets 2nd and 4th Thursdays each month at 3 P,M, 

Pctet Bcrcut. 1 Lombard St, 

Maty Margaret Casey. SJ2 Mission St, 

William M CoSman. 525 Market St 

Waltet A. Haas. St.. 98 Battery St. 

Dt, Francis J. Hen. 450 Suttet St. 

Mrs. Joseph A. Moore. 2590 Green St. 

John F. Conviay. 311 Califotnia St. 

Raymond S. Kimbelt, General Manager 
Edward McDevitt. Secretary to Commission 



REDEVELOPMENT AGENCY 

512 Golden Gate Ave. 

Meets every Tuesday at 3:30 P.M. 
Koy N. Buell. 445 Bush St. 
John L. Merrill. 582 Market St. 
Lawiencc R. Palacios. 355 Hayes St. 
Sydney G. Walton. Ciocket Building 
Everett Gtiffin. 465 California St. 

Eugene J, Riordan. Director 

M. C. Herman. Secretary 



RETIREMENT SYSTEM BOARD 

93 Grove Street 

Meets every Wednesday at 3 P.M. 
William T. Reed. President. 1385 - 20th Ave 
Philip S. Dalton. I Sansome St. 
James M. Hamill. 120 Montgomery St. 
William J. Murphy. 1771 - 45tb Ave. 
Martin F. Wormulh. 4109 Pacheco St. 

Ex-Officio Members 

Ptesident. Board of Supervisors 
City Attorney 

J. L. Moot!. Secretary 

WAR MEMORIAL TRUSTEES 

Veterans Building 

Meets 2nd Thutsday each month at 3 
George T. Davis. Piesident. 98 Post St. 



k A. Flynn. 1690 - 27th Ave. 
Sam K. Harrison. 431 Bryant St. 
W. A. Handetson. 19 Maywood Dr. 
Guido J. Musto. 535 North Point St. 
Samuel D. Sayad. Vice-Ptes.. 256 Santa 
Ralph J. A. Stern. 305 Clay St. 



Fred Campagnoti. 300 Montgom 



■ St. 



. Hale. 867 Matket St. 
Edward Sharkey, Managing Dir 
E. L. George. Secretary 



SAN FRANCISCO MUSEUM OF ART 

Veterans Building HE 1-2040 

George Culler. Director 



DEPARTMENTS UNDER THE 
CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 



AGRICULTURAL COMMISSIONER 

Agricultural BIdg.. Embarcadero SU 1-3003 

Raymond L. Boisini 



CORONER 

650 Merchant St, 
Dr, Henry W. Turkel 



ELECTRiaTY, DEPARTMENT OF 

275 Golden Gate .\venue 
D. O. Townsend. Chief 
Doyle L. Smith. Supeim 



endenl of Plal 



HNANCE a: RECORDS. DEPARTMENT OF 

220 City Hall HE 1 



Mongan. 317 City Hall 
ity Hall 



I W. Reinfeld. 107 City Ha! 



HE 1-: 
HE 1-: 
HE 1-: 

HE 1-: 



PUBUC HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 

Health Center Building UN 1- 

Dr. Ellis D. Soi. Director of Public Health 
Dr. E. C. Sage. Assistant Diiector of Public Healrh 



Emergency Hospital Sen 

Earl Blake. AJm S 



Bureaus 
Account*. 260 City Hall 

J. J. McCloskey. Supervisor 
i^rchitecttire, 265 City Hall 

Charles W. GriBith. City Archiu 
Building InapcctsoD, 275 City Hall 

Lcstct C. Bush. Supeiinlendent 
Building Repur, 2323 Army 

A. H. Ekenberg. Superintendent 
Central Permit Bureau, 286 City Hall 






Sidney Franklin. Supervisor 
eering. 359 City Hall 

' Repair 8c Sewage Treatment 232 3 An 



Street Cleaning, 2323 Army St HI 

Kernard M. Crotty. Superintendent 
Street Repair, 2323 Army St HI 

F. D- Brown. Superinienjent 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 City Hall HI 

Ben G, Kline. Purchaser of Supplies 
Central Shops, 313 Ftancisco St. HI 

Aylmer W. Petan. Superintendent 

REAL ESTATE DEPARTMENT 

93 Gtove St. HI 

Phihp L. Re:os. Director of Property 
James A. Graham. Superintendent Auditorium HI 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS ac MEASURES 

6 City Hall HI 



1-2121 

1-212: 
1-2121 
1-212 
1-212 
1-212 
1-212 
1-212 
1-212 

1-212 
: 1-212 

: 1-212 

; 1-212 



PUBLIC WORKS, DEP.\RTMENT OF 

260 City Hall HE 1-2121 

Reuben H. Owens. Director 

R. Brooks Lartet. Assistant Ditector, Administrative 
L. J. Archer, Asst. Director, Maintenance and Operationi 



SEPARATE BOARDS AND 
DEPARTMENTS 



CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 

Gulden Gate Park BA 1-510 

Dr, Robert C, Miller. Director 

CALIFORNIA PALACE OF THE LEGION 
OF HONOR 

Lincoln Park BA 1-561 

Meets 2nd Monday. Jan,. April. June. Oct,. 3:30 P.M 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. A. B. Spreckels. Honorary President. 2 Pine St. 
Paul Verdier, President. 199 Geary St. 
E. Raymond Armsby. Ill Sutter St. 



37 Droit 
Black. 24S Market St. 
E. Buck. 235 Montgomery St. 



inder de Brcttville. 2000 Washington St. 
Mrs, Bruce Kelham. 15 Arguello Blvd. 
Charles Mayer. San Francisco Examiner 
William W. Mein. 315 Montgomery St. 
David Pleydell-Bouverie. Glen Ellen. Calif. 
John N. Rosekrans. 333 Montgomery St. 
William R. Wallace. Jr.. 100 Bush St. 
Whitney Warren. 285 Telegraph Hill Blvd. 
Harold L. Zellerbach. 343 Sansome St. 

Ex-O0icio Members 

President. Recreation If Park Commission 
Thomas Carr Howe. Jr.. Director 
Capt. Myron E. Thomas. Secretaty 

M. H. de YOUNG MEMORIAL MUSEUM 

Golden Gate Park BA 1-206 

Meets 1st Monday Jan.. April. June. Oct.. 3 P.M. 

Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Helen Cameron, Honorary Presidenr. Hillsborough 
Michel D. Weill. President. The White House 
Charles R. Blyth. 235 Montgomery St. 

" uise A. Boyd. 210 Post St. 
Sheldon C. Cooper. 620 Market St. 
n Follis. 3690 Washington St. 
Randolph A. Hearst. S. F. Call-Bulletin 

■ A. Magnin. St. Francis Hotel 
Garret McEnerney. IE. 3725 Washington St. 
Roscoe F. Oakes. 2006 Washington St. 
ichard Rheem. 2828 Valleio 
iseph O. Tobin. Hibernia Bank 



?-0820 
1-2800 



President. Recreation H Park Com 
Dr. Walter Hell. Director 
Col, ian F. M. Macalpine. 

LAW UBRARY 

436 City Hall 
Robert J. Everson. Librarian 

PUBUC POUND 

2500 - 16th St. 
Chatles W. Friedrichs. Secretary 



FEBRUARY, 1959 



GATEWAY 
SHIPWRIGHT, INC. 

Hyde Street Pier 
San Francisco 9, Calilornia 



Dunnage 
Cattvalk Material 
Shipwright Work 



Phone: GRaystone 4-4110 
Nile: BEacon 2-1271 



ROYAL BAKING CO. 

American. Italian and Frencli Bread 

GRISSINI. PANETTONE, BUCCELLATO 
AND FOCACCIA 



177."J-77 Mission Street 



JU. 5-9655 



Much Success to the 
Bay Area Council 



MAX SOBEL 



The Salvation Army 
"Your Help — Their Hope" 

Your RcpairabU Discards Crealei Work Thai Pays 
))6-6ih STREET, OAKLAND GL. 1-4510 




CLAREXCE N. COOPER 

I^IORTLARIES 



Fruitvale Chapel 

1580 FRUITVALE AVENUE 

KEIlog 3-4114 



Elmhurst Chapel 
8901 E. I4lh STREET 

NEptune 2-4343 



Sure it's better . . . 




High dividends with insured 
safety (through an agency of 
the U.S. Government) up to 
$10,000 is a saNings opportun- 
ity hard to surpass. Open an 
account with Franklin Savings 
...California's oldest, founded 
in 1875. 

Current per annum 

dividend rale At^f: 

Save-by-mail accounts invited! 

FRANKLIN SAVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION 

1201 Market Street at 8th • Telephone: KLondike 2-1356 



CADILLAC MOTOR CAR DIVISION 

SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH 
1000 Van Ness Ave. - PRospect 5-0100 

STONESTOWN BRANCH 

20+h Ave. & Buckingham Way 

LOmbard 4-7400 



Start loDAV/ 

Shop where you see 

this sign 




WIRTH BROS. PASTRY SHOP 

Home of "Happy Day" PdKrv - Cake, 

Gc.iry at 23 rd Avenue San Francisco 



THE RECORD 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 



FACTORY TOWN 
'"'"Ugh San Francisco is sel- 
' liought of as a "factory 
ihere are almost 2.000 man- 
ita> turers in the city, according to 
Harold S. Dobbs, president of the 
3an Francisco Board of Supervis- 
es, in an article published in 
['California, Magazine of the Pa- 
cific." 

I Dobbs pointed out that by far 
;he largest manufacturing group 
^.n San Francisco are the proces- 
feors and packers of food and kin- 
llred products — more than 200 
establishments — handling every- 
;hing from fruits, vegetables, meat 



California is the nation's largest 
canned food processing State, with 
an average of 217 million cases an- 
nually valued at about $5 billion 
and today mole than half the 
State's vase canning industry is 
centered on the San Francisco 
Bay region. The city is the pack- 
ing center for many of the nation's 
lai'gest finiis. Dobbs said. 

AQUARIUM 
If Steinhardt Aquarium's latest 
batch of inhabitants are any indi- 
cation, someone must have decided 
long ago that evei-j' fish has a 
look-alike outside the piscine 
world. 




ind .sea foods, to special diet pro- 
iucts. herbs and seasonings in end- 
ess variety, paste products of all 
iinds. jams, jellies and many 
)thers. 

Coffee, chocolate, spices, licorice 
?onfections and a wide assortment 
)f Italian. Mexican and Chinese 
00' i (products ai'e produced or pro- 
■es.sed in the citv. Dobbs said. 



Anvway. among the new speci- 
mens now on display in the Aquar- 
ium ai-e a rare form of poison- 
spined tmkey fish, giant goat 
fishes, squirrel fishes, hawk fishes, 
convict fishes, sergeant major 
fishes, cardinal fishes and one va- 
riety which apparently has no 
countei-part on land, black tangs. 

According to Dr. Robert C. Mil- 



ler, Director of the Academy, the 
fish were collected on Canton Is- 
land in the South Pacific by per- 
sonnel of Standard Oil of Califor- 
nia and Pan American World Air- 
ways. The specimens were brought 
to Steinhart Aquarium on board 
Standard Oil's tanker, the M. E. 
Lombardi. which was recently 
equipped with two fish-can-j'mg 
tanks of 250 gallons capacity each. 
The Canton Island catch includes 
many varieties never shown in 
captivity before in the United 
States, according to Dr. Earl S. 
Herald, Curator of Aquatic Bi- 
ology at the Aquarium. 

NEW CHIEF ENGINEER 

Keneth M. Hoover, nationally- 
known transportation expert, has 
been appointed chief engineer of 
the five-county San Francisco Bay 
Area Rapid Transit District. 

General Manager John M. Peirce 
told the disti-ict's board of direc- 
tors he selected Hoover as the 
candidate most qualified for the 
chief engineer's post following a 
Nationwide search in which more 
than 30 candidates were inter- 
viewed. 

"Mr. Hoover." he said, "will 
bring a broad and varied experi- 
ence of more than 30 years in tran- 
sit engineering, operations and 
consulting work to the district. 
His talents and abilities are recog- 
nized throughout the countn'. and 
he was highly recommended on the 
basis of his past accomplishments 
by numerous leaders in the engi- 
neering and ti-ansportation fields. 

"In addition. Mr. Hoover will 

bring to the district a thorough 

knowledge of the Bay Ai-ea and 

the planning that has thus far 

iContmued on Page 13 i 



Clyde Bentley 

Co,„.M„g Eng.ne.r 

405 SANSOME STREET 



Swanson 
Residence Club 

DO 2-9597 . GA 1-2220 
851 California Street 

HOTEL FENTON 

259 - ~th Street 

Miinish Baths 

18i4 DIVISADERO ST. 
WA 1-0306 



BELL HOTEL 

!- COLUMBUS .^VE. 
San Francisco 



NEW BARNEY'S 

Beer ■ Mine - Uquor, ■ Cocktaih 

Brd a: O.'VKD.ALE 

Bernard Olives 



JOE CERVETTO CO. 



lauilor Seryici 
ir.nJoi. Cleam, 



15 Colu 



VU. 2-15 56 



Milo Coffee Co., Inc. 

-59 HARRISON STREET 
DO. 2-4322 
San Francisco 



INDAY'S CAFE 

55- KE.ARNY STREET 
YU. 6-1060 



Bert's Flying A 
Station 

/" Ihe txceliior Dislricl 
550 Rusia St. JU 5-0428 



Daldas Grocery 

Delkaleaen - Fruili - Groccri 

199 EDDY STREET 

PR 5-7732 



Fucile's Cocktail Bar 

2470 SAN BRUNO .A\E. 
JU 5-996- 




4 FAMOUS RESTAURANTS 

, San FranciiCO and Iqnacio. Calif. 



Arnold's Appliance 
Service 

hiuMatiou - Delhery 

Service of all major home 

appliances 

JU. 6-6100 632 Persia St. 



ROSE-0-FAVE (LEANFRS 

H-e Take Pride in Our H'ork 

771 CAPP STREET 
AT. 2-2762 



Pacific School & 
Office Supply, Inc. 

Bryant at Twentieth Street 

San Francisco 10, California 

ATwater 2-9600 



BOP CITY 

1690 Post Street 

FI. 6-2412 



Willard Batteries - Motor Tune-up 

Fuel Pumps - Carburetors ■ Starters 

Generators - Distributors 

Nc» - Exchanged - Repaired 

ROY W. JOHNSON 

Aulornolive Electrician 

398 SO. V.AN NESS at 1 5th 

MArket 1-61-6 San Francisco 3 



"Ml RANCHO" 
SUPER MARKET 

LalinAnierican Food Line 
Tortilla Manufacturers 

3365 ■ 20th STREET 

^ion 7-0581 San Francisco 



•EBRUARY. 1959 



.idisti & McLennan - Cosgrove & Company 

Insurance Brokers 

CONSULTING ACTUARIES - AVERAGE ADJUSTERS 



SAN FRANCISCO - LOS ANGELES 

PORTLAND - SEATTLE - PHOENIX 

OAKLAND 

Vaiicouyer - Chicago - Nen York ■ Dclroil - Boston 
nneapolis ■ Toronto ■ Pittsburgh - St. Louis ■ Indianapolis 
ontreal - St. Paul - Dululh - Buffalo - Atlanta - Calgary 
Tulsa ■ Sew Orleans ■ Milwaukee - Cleveland 
Haratta ■ London • Caracas 



LEN E. MEINECKE'S 

SERVICE STATION and GARAGE 

"Anything that a Service to You We Do" 

FEATURING GILLETTE TIRES 

EXPERTS TO DO THE JOB 

Tires as low as — 15" - ^13.90 — 14" - ^19.90 

LAKE CHABOT RD. AND CASTRO VALLEY BLVD. 

EL. 7-3321 - Castro Valley 

NATIONAL CASH REGISTER COMPANY 

Only Authorised National Cash Register Office in the City 
SALES - SERVICE - SUPPLIES 

777 Mission Street SU 1-2782 

SAN FRANCISCO 

MOUNT OLIVET CEMETERY 

GL. 4-4283 - GL. 4-2404 

San Rafael, California 

SILVER CREST DO-NUT SHOP 

Restaurant and Cocktail Lounge 

p. LYNCH & /. FITZGERALD, Proprietors 

)40 BAYSHORE BLVD. SAN FRANCISCO 24 

Ri-it.iur.inl Phone AT 80765 Bnr Phone MI 8-9954 



Reverend Joseph Pough 



17B9 FiUmore Street 
San Francisco. Calif. 



jj^jty 1 1000 Collins Avenue 

Vault; Box 337, Colma, Calif. PL 5-4119 



SLW HUNG HEUNG RESTAUR.4NT 

GENUINE CHINESE FOOD 
■ COCKTAILS - 

744 Washington St. 

YU. 2-2319 CLOSED TUESDAY 



West Lake Insurance Agency, Inc. 

■■ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE^^ 

301 South Mayfair Ave. 



D.-\LY' CIT'i' 



W.ALTER F. BRODIE 



BUTCHERS UNION LOCAL 115 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

3012 Sixteenth Street 

MR. GEO. MASSURE-Sicr.Mri Tr.j.ur.r 

BANTNER - EELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 

1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 

San Francisco 



527 CLUB 

Bar anil Restaurant 

Domeilic and Imported Liquors 
Pabst on Tap 

Joe Fuchslin. Carl Reichmuth. 
Proprietors 

527 BRYANT STREET 

SUttor 1. 0622 S.in Fr.inciso 



MOBILE RADIO 
ENGINEERS 

1416 Brush Street 

TEmplebar 6-3600 

OAKLAND 12. CALIF. 

1150 Larkin Street 

PRospect 6-6166 

SAN FR.-\NCISCO 9. CALIF. 



BAY CITIES 

NEON 

UNderhill 3-88S0 

-61 VALENCIA STREET 

San Francisco 



HOLY NAMES 
HIGH SCHOOL 

4660 Harbor Drive 
OL. 5-1716 OAKLAND 



Ames Mercantile Co., Inc. 

Sundries - Toiletries ■ Vitamins 

MArkct 1-8444 

1665 MISSION STREET 

San Francisco 



LECIC4 

Repairs 

Fred Lehmann 

ISiO - 24th .Ji VENUE 

MO 4-2208 



/ry'.s Beauty Salon 

Hair Styling 
18121 J Eddy Street JO "-3684 



MRS. CLARK 

Adr.ce ,n all affairs of life 

Apt. No. 1-946 Geary Street 

GR 4-0-58 



I Continued from Pag:e 11 ) 
gone into our project." 

For the past three years. Hoover 
has been director of the National 
Capita! Reg^ional Mass Transpor- 
tation Sui^'cy in Washington. D. C. 
This survey, authorized by Con- 
gress in 1955 and costing more 
than $500,000. was made to ascer- 
tain future highway and public 
transportation requirements for 
the Washington metropolitan area 
and to provide master plans for 
the needed facilities. 

Findings of this study vrill be 
submitted to President Eisen- 
hower. 




Chief Engineer Hoover 

As a transportation consultant. 
Hoover has since 1953 participated 
in the following studies: Atlanta, 
Ga., transportation problems for 
the State Legislature and City of 
Atlanta: Rochester, N. Y.. transit 
operations: tinancial study of Wor- 
cester. Mass.. transit operations: 
study of various transit facilities 
and operations in New York Cit.v. 

CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE 

Ameiican chambers of com- 
merce, originally founded to pro- 
mote and advertise business, have 
evolved into semi-official organiz- 
ations charged with communicat- 
ing the needs of the local commu- 
nity to official governmental au- 
thorities. 

This is the conclusion of Miss 
Beatrice Dinerman. staff member 
of the UCLA Bureau of Go\'ern- 
mental Research, after making a 
study of 50 chambers of commerce 
in the Los Angeles area. 

In a paper entitled "Chambers 
of Commerce in the Modern Me- 
tropolis," Miss Dinerman obsen-es. 

"The creation of many of these 
semi-official community-level or- 
ganizations is the result of a felt 
need for a representative body, 
armed with the advantages of or- 
ganized, unified strength, in the 
presentation of community needs 
to governmental authorities." 



DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

Any Make or Model Seven Days a Week 

9 A.M. - 10 P.M. FREE ESTIMATES on Antenna Installations 

1322 HAIGHT STREET 

UN. 3-0795 — Also UN. 3-1836 

KLINGER & SHAFFER CO. 
Confectionery Equipment 



342 FIFTH STREET 



YUkon 2-569- 



CALIFORNIA WOODCARVING CO. 

Carving - Raised Wood Letters 

1123 HOWARD STREET 

1-5540 Peter Polos, new 



iidiii" Servicp Employees' Union 
Local No. 87 of San Francisco 



240 Golden Gate A\e. 



PRospect 5-2664 



PALLAS BROS. 

R-ADIO &: TELEVISION REPAIRING - AND SALES 
5000 MISSION STREET /U 5-5000 SAN FRANCISCO 12 



PACIFIC FELT COMPANY 

710 York Street Mission 7-0111 



PHIL & JIM 



Auto Wrecking 



200 Meiulell Street 
ML 7-0779 



Frank's Pizzeria 

Italian Dinners 

Frank Falanga, Prop. 

1661 El Caniiiio Real 
Millbrae, Calif. 



LOl FREMY, 
INC. 

Manufacturers' Distributors 

DRUGS - COSMETICS 

and 

ALLIED PRODUCTS 

330 Ritch Street 

San Francisco 7, California 
YUkon 6-4526 



Raymond 0. Won^ 

Insurance Broker 

Fire - Liability ■ Life - Auto 
W estern Life Chinese .Agency 

818 Clay Street 
GA 1-3975 



FEBRUARY. 1959 



Complete Auiomobile Repairs 
Engine Tunc-up - Mobilgas - Mobiloil 

PAUL'S AlTOMOXrVE SERVICE 

MOBILGAS STATION 
347 EAST 18th STREET OAKLAND, CALIF. 

TW. 3-549} Pi"' M. S..II 



AMERICAN MEAT CO 

780 Folsom Street SU. 1-8700 



WESTERN STEEL & WIRE CO. 

WIRE - WIRE PRODUCTS - WIRE FENCE 

Siraighleiiing and Cullhig All Types of Wire 

1428 EGBERT AVENUE-East of Third Street at 6000 Block 

Snn Francisco 24, Cahfomia Phone VAIencia 6-0167 

THE LETTER SHOP 

PAUL a: DICK SMITH 
I ilnct Mail & AdvcrtlsinB - D.S.J. Composition - OfTset Duplicating 



sutler 1.6564 



67 BEALE STREET 



MEL WILLIAMS CO. 

"Calo Dog Food Co." 



112 MARKET STREET 



EXbrook 2-7366 



ALBERT ENGINEERING, INC. 

Automatic Fire Protection 

371 FOURTH STREET 

EXbrook 7-1568 Sa 



SILVA SHELL SERVICE 

Complete Lubrication 
2249 Taraval St. MO. 4-4366 

\ELSON\S CATERING SERVICE 

KE. 2-7075 - Oakland, Calif. 
If no answer, call KE. 2-1086 

National Employee Benefit Service, Inc. 



HI Sutter St. 



San Francisco 



Grace Ornamental Iron Works 

Aiiylhiiig & ErcrytUing in Iron 

EX. 7-18L5 140 Clementina St. 

LLOYD R. SMITHERS 

BODY & l-nNnF.R SPFXIAUSr 

LLOYD R. SMITHERS, Prop. 

12'.) Ilnsh .Sin.-I S.in Fr.inLisco. Calif. PR, 6-8342 



HOF BRAU 



FINEST FOOD 
Money Can Buy 



DOUBLE SHOT BAR — OPEN 7 A.M. TO 3 A.M. 
Powell at O'Farrell Street San Francisco, California 

Zenilh TV & Radio 

KERKS TV SERVICE CO. 

SALES 8C SERVICE 

314 Excelsior Avenue JUnipcr 4-2291 San Francisco 

"Kerk"' Kerkv'lict 

VISIT THE 

PALACE BATHS 



85 THIRD STREET 



S.\N FRANCISCO 



Batteries - Tires - Storage - Hashing ■ Polishing - High Pressun 

Lubrication 

Up to 6 Hours Parking SOf - All Day 75c - 24 Hours $1.00 

TEMPLE GARAGE 

WALTER T. BARKETT, Managing Onner 
644 Geary Street PRospect 5-8141 San Fr^ 



NATIONAL ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 

■ViHOLESALE ELECTRIC SUPPLIES" 

SANTA ROSA Sunu Rosa 255 

SAN CARLOS LYteU 1-074 3 

SAN FRANCISCO HEmlock 1-852') 
Main Office S,iii Francisco, California 



14th & Harrison Sts. 



WATSON BROS. TRANSPORTATION CO., INC. 

DAN W. MAHONEY, District Sales Manager 
1025 Tennessee St. — GA. 1-1227 — San Francisco 

TEDDY'S PET SHOP 



iorcrnment Inspected Horse Meat 
Complete Line of Pet Supplies 



3730 Geary Blvd. 



SK. 2-1833 



DR. H. H. CALDWELL 

415 MacDonald Ave. Richmond, Calif. 

GEORGE E. ( HASE 

INSURANCE ADIUSTERS 

114 Sansonie St. GA. 1-1277 

ATLAS AUTO \^ RECKING 

1320 Indiana Street UN. 1-9368 

CASTRO STREET GARA(;E 

Complete Aulonwtire Reconstruction 

.■5.57 (Castro Street UN. 1-9368 

C.n l>. M.ids.n 



THE RECORD 



p. A. BERGEROT 

< o„mcl lor Bank ot America 

( ,.i<-i.c/ for Coniulalc General 

ol France 

Phone sutler 1-7868 - 1-7869 

I RENCH BANK BUILDING 

110 Sutter St. S.m Francisc< 



Reliable Auto Glass 

UNderhill 3-0667 
HEinlock 1-0684 

2015 -16th Street 

San Fr.incisco, Cilifornla 



GROVER ENGINEERS, 
INC. 

Engineers 
44 IMcI^a Court 



SILVER DOLLAR 
TAVERN 

64 Eddy Street 
San Francisco 

H. WENIGER 

Manufacturer of 
Instruments for Hand Surgery- 
Active Hand and Finger Splints 
70 - 12th STREET 
MArket 1-6875 
San Francisco 3, Calif. 

Moler Barber School 

System i./ Barber College! 

G.I. Approved 

D. E. Brown, Manager 

161 FOURTH STREET 
GArfield 1-9979 San Franciscc 

HENSLEY 
HOME COOKING 

A Working Mans Meal 

at Reasonable Price 

1825B SUTTER STREET 

JO. 7-7081 



HOTEL DANTE 

Transient ■ Weekly Rates 

310 COLUMBUS AVE. 

San Francisco. Calif. 



Vianoli Auto Works 

Automolire Specialist 

Reasonable Rates 

ORdway 3-4128 880 Post Street 



Memo for Leisure 

f-pHAT WISE and witt.v musician 
Victor Borge. who was recent- 
ly seen on television in "Small 
World" involved in a heated arg^i- 
ment with Madame Callas and Sir 
Thomas Beecham. will appear at 
the California Masonic Memorial 
Temple for four nights in March 
( Wednesday through Saturday. 
March 11-14). 

The entertainment is called 
"Comedy in Music" and may be 
relied upon to pack the house, for 
this Borge is a rare artist whose 
virtuosity is matched by a gift for 
establishing rapport with an audi- 
ence, letting them into his jokes 
as if members of a family party. 




Laughfi 



is currently at the Curran The- 
atre with a few days left for those 
who want to seize the opportunity 
of seeing in the flesh a comedian 
whom the film "Me and the Col- 
onel" exhibited in a new light. 
Kaye is among the great clowns 
of our age — one of the most pun- 
gent stage figures we have seen, 
a master of the intimate song and 
the impromptu situation. 

AT THE ACTOR'S Workshop in 
week-ends an excellent cast is 
rendering "The Entertainer" by 
John Osborne, one of the Angrj^ 
Yoimg Men of England. The show 
is admirably staged in a way 
which re-creates the seedy world 
of defeated vaudeville where 
Archie Rice displays his wayward 
ego. The play is a composite of 
scenes from the vaudeville stage 
and a drama which reaches a cli- 
max in theatrical lodgings where 
the Rice clan drink, quai-rel, suf- 
fer, and dispute about the meaning 
of life. 

It is studded with good lines, 
and comprehends a gamut of emo- 
tions. 



FIVE milf: 

HOUSE 

3600 SAN BRUNO AVE. 
SAN FRANCISCO 



MR. HOT OOG RANCHO 

5121 Geary Blvd. 



Featuring the Far 

RanchoBurgei 

Delicious Food Spe 



Duval's 

STUDIO CLUB 

lohn .-.• Paul 

309 COURTLAND AVENUE 
Mission 7-9981 



NORIEGA MEAT CO. 

Quality Meats - Reasonable Pri 
niiolesale & Retail 



3815 NORIEGA STREET 
LO. 6-8821 



JOHN'S BODY SHOP 

Painting - Welding 
John Boteilho, Prop. 

3827 GRAND AVENUE 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA 

TE 6-3254 Home: LO 9-2687 



LISA'S 

Kosher Style Restaurant 

Non Open Daily by Request 
Enjoy Sun. Brunch-Lunch-Dinner 
186 Edy Street PR 5-6155 



Belfast Beverages 

640 VALENCIA STREET 

UNderhill 1-8820 

San Francisco, California 



PLAYERS' CLUB 

2245 Geneva Avenue 

opposite Con Palace 

JU 7-3566 

JOE & ERMIE JACKSON 



Bill's Barber Shop 

5954 CALIFORNI.A ST. 
SK. 1-2772 



SHAWMUT HOTEL 

YOUR DOWNTOWN HOME 

516 OF.'\RRELL STREET 

ORdway 3-4884 



Bank of Canton 

555 Montgomery St. 
San Francisco 



GERNHARDT- 
STROHMAIER CO. 

Stoves - Gas Ranges 

Water Heaters - Gas Appliances 

Refrigerators - Washing Machini 



MISSION STREET corner of 18th 
Mission 7-0236 San Francisco 



Visitaeion Valley Auto 
Reconstruitioii 

Body e Fender Repair 6/ Paintin( 

2520 BAYSHORE BLVD. 

JU. 6-5593 



DEAN'S 
BEAITY SALON 

Beauty Culture 
in All its Branches 

See Hummel 

4691 TELEGRAPH 

0.ikland OL. 5-0336 



United Importers 
& Exporters 

811 Qay Street 

VU. 2-903- San Franc 



Pearinian & Geiger 

Painting - Paper Hanging 

Decoration 

21 years serving Daly City 

16 MISSION CIRCLE 

PL. 52816 Daly City 



Rudy's Body & 
Paint Shop 

1125 STEINER STREET 
JO. 7-8441 



Chinatown 
Smoke Shop 

Washington St., San Francis 



•EBRUARY, 1959 



-RIODICAL 



Sin Francisco 2, Calif. 



Finest Dim-Sim 

Hang Ah Tea Room 

1 HANG AH STREET 

San Francisco 8, California 

Phone YU. 2-5686 
Hours: 1 1 A.M. to 3 P.M. :: Closed Every Monday 

For (I neiv dining experience 

THE INTERNATIONAL ROOM 

PL. 6-1662 

PANCAKE l>AtAC£ 

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT 

The F. W. D. Pacific Company 

INDUSTRIAL, HIGHWAY AND 
CONTRACTORS EQUIPMENT 

850 HARRISON STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 7, CALIF. 

Phone GArfield 1-4971 

Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co. 

Fire Protection Engineers 
and Contractors 

142 NINTH STREET 

' Ndcrhlll 1-7822 :: San Frnncisco 5 



ALPINE REST HOME 

Expert Care - Bed - Semi-Bed a: Ambulatory 

Spcci.nl Diets if Needed - Sl.itc Llrersed 

Nursing C.ire 24 H<iurs - Delicious Food 

W.Wnu. Creek 1152 ALPINE ROAD Yellowstone 5-556 

RUTH BAKER. On„rr-nperalor 



BULK RATE 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permit No. 4507 



St. Vincent de Paul Salvage Bureau 

FURNITURE, CLOTHING. HOUSEHOLD GOODS. NEttSP.^PERS 
Ours is a year round proRram to catt for the poor. 

SAN FRANCISCO — 1815 Mi.jion Sum — HE. 1.4588 

OAKLAND — 515 Webster Street — TWinoalu 3-2723 

SAN MATEO — 113 South B Street — DUmoiJ 2.18«0 

D.ALY CFTi — 6726 MUsion Street — PLaia 5-1346 

SAN JOSE — 443 W. San Carlos Street — CTpresa 4-1974 

VALLEJO — 230A Virj;ini» Street — VAIlejo 2-5525 

STOCKTON — 626 E. Miirket Street — Stockton 4-0067 

SAN RAFAEL — 910 "B" Street — GLenwood 4.3302 

E. J. WREN, K.S.G. 

E.\ecutive Secretary' 

Please DonI Thron It Anay . . . Bui Do Call 

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL SALVAGE BUREAU 



CAREW & ENGLISH 

LEO V. CAREW, JR. 
President 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS . . . MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

MASONIC AT GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
San Francisco 18, California 



NONA REALTY 

Nona Hardtvick - Realtor 

533 BALBOA STREET 
Bus. BA. 1-5576 Res. BA. 1 3504 

SONOMA WINE CO. 

LIQUORS FOR PEOPLE OF PARTICl^L.SR T.-NS i E 

WE CARRY ALL THE BEST LIQUORS 

Thoroughly Aged! 
Scotch, Rye, Bourbon. Gin — Only the Best 

Phone LA. 5-6775 

1533 Sohtno Avenue Berkeley. Calif. 

Scavengers' Protective Association, Ice. 

Conlraclorf for the Remoral of Garbage. Knbbish anj Uasle Paper 

2550 Mason Slr.el EXhrix.k 2-3859 

San Francisco 11. Calif. 



A »^iiT urrii^t uiNiuut iiN inc u.:>. 



[BLIC LIBRARY 
4 1959 





SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER SHERMAN P. DUCKEL 



1ARCH, 1959 







ABBOT A. HANKS 

Incorporated 

Engineers - Chemists - Assayers 

* • * 

Inspection - Tests - Control 

Structural Materials 

Tests and Investigations 

Foundation Soils 

* * * 

1300 SANSOME STREET 
San Francisco 

EXbrook 7-2464 


INTERNATIONAL 

ENGINEERING 

CO. 

INC. 

Design & Consulting 
Engineers 


Dams, Tunnels, Highways, 

Railroads, Hydro-Electric 

Power Plants, 

Harbor Development 


K T K 

Wrecking Co. 

235 ALABAMA STREET 
KLondike 2-0994 

San Francisco 

• 

875 MONUMENT BLVD. 
Mulberry 5-7525 

Concord, California 


THE JACKSON 
HOSPITALS, INC. 

Executive Offices: 
1410 Bonita Avenue, Berkeley, California 

Berkeley Division 

1410 BONITA AVENUE 

LAndscape 6-4112 

Mount Eden Division 
2595 DEPOT ROAD 

Mount Eden Section: 

Haj'^vanK California 

ELgin 1-5300 - Llceme 2-0212 



CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 



KENNETH H. ALLEN 
ALAN P. TORY 



PUBLISHER 
EDITOR 



Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlock I - 1 2 1 2 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 



VOLUME 26 

MARCH, 



NUMBER 3 



1959 



LETTERS 

Ar the meeting of the San Francisco Public 
.ibrar)' Commission held Tuesday, February 
'l'59. members of the Commission re- 
narkcJ in most complimentary terms on the 
irticlc about the Library which appeared in 
he December, l95S-Januar)', 1959 issue, 
iincc the story points up so clearly the Li- 
jrary's greatest problem — the shortage of 
funds — we hope that it will serve to call the 
ittention of many citizens to our need for 
greater support. 
May I add my best wishes to those of the 
ibrar)' Commission for the continumg sue- 
ess of the City-County Record. 

Frank A. Clarvoe, Jr., Secretary 
Public Library Commission 
San Francisco 

Your interesting article on the San Fran- 
isco Public Library makes the point that the 
juaiiiy of a city library is largely conditioned 
>y the wishes of the citizens. I look forward 
herefore, to the implementing of Emerson 
jreenaway's proposal that there should be a 
:ommittee of fifty to assist the Library Com- 
nission. 

On the other hand, I feel it should be the 
onccrn of the Commission and the library 
taff to make known to the public just what 
s wrong with the library and that they, too. 
hould agitate for improvements. After all. 
hey are the experts and if they are doing a 
!0od job, they should see to it that the com- 
nunity knows what the library needs, so that 
nformcd action can be taken. 

Jack Green 
1260 Noe Street 
San Francisco 

I would like to call the attention of the 
■■arks and Recreation Department to one 
)lemish in their otherwise perfect provision 
or the public enjoyment of the Park adja- 
lent to Lake and Twelfth Avenue. The in- 
scription on the men's lavatory is to me an 
^esore, because of the clumsy inversion of 
mers perpetrated by the original signwritcr. 
Uould the word "Men" be revised and cor- 
■ectcd,' At present it is a public display of 
ninor inefficiency. 

Carl Hasselbacher 
948 Lake Street 
San Francisco 



JffiyY WINDOW 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

APR 
(PERIOI 

po 1.1 TICS AT THE BEACH: Mayor 
-*- Christopher likes to get things done and 
his recent visit to Hawaii was an excellent ex- 
ample of the vigorous attack of San Fran- 
cisco's first citizen. 

While storing up vitality for his coming 
campaign months in a round of swimming 
■ind sunbathing, he managed to spend some 
\ery profitable hours on the beach boning up 
on European alTairs by talking to Mayor 'Wil- 
ly Brandt of West Berlin. He also had profit- 
able talks with Bob Haynie, of Haas and Hay- 
nie, the contractors who arc working on the 
underground garage at the Civic Center, with 
reference to future developments in the city, 
and with Ken Newton of the Sheraton-Hotel 
chain, who is also interested in expansion. 

Clair MacLeiKl, who was on the beach too, 
tells us that Christopher particularly empha- 
sized the fact that he considers the time is 
ripe to get behind a good Rapid Transit Sys- 
tem for the nine-counties Bay Area. Our 
Mayor also told Mayor Neal Blaisdell of 
Honolulu it was time Hawaii achieved state- 
hood. The last item was no sooner said than 
done, and we l(X)k forward to some equally 
smart work, therefore, about the transport 
situation! 

CUTRO'S 250.000 VOLUMES: Between the 
^ years 1870 and 1890, Adolph Sutro 
amassed a fascinaring historical library, be- 
ginning with some thirteenth century Hebrew- 
scrolls and representing man's thoughts down 
the centuries to the gaslit years of England's 
Queen "Victoria. 

This collection was presented to the State 
of California in 191.^, Sutro's heirs stipulat- 
ing that it be maintained in San Francisco. 
In a typically happy-go-lucky San Franciscan 
manner, the collection has found its way into 
the basement of the Main Library, where it 
IS. as it were, rather inaccessibly accessible, in 
about five different places. 

It has been suggested that the University 
of California should rehouse it in more suit- 
able accommodation, but it would seem that 
this collection, which was especially willed to 
be stored in this cin'. would be better housed 
in our own State College or the University 



of San Francisco. We particularly like the 
idea of its being given space in the distin- 
guished Gk-cson Library of USE. There its 
cu.stodian would be the present Sutro librar- 
ian. Dr. Dillon, aided by his current staff. It 
would be readily accessible to all researchers 
nc-eding to use its wealth of material, and it 
would have space in one of the most attrac- 
tive library buildings in the West. 

'-PHE WRECKERS: The genuine San Fran- 
■*- ciscan is always sorry that so many lovely 
old building perished in 1906. The Record, 
therefore, is pleased to add its voice to those 
calling for the preservation of the Old Mint. 
Super\'isor Blake led a magnificent group of 
architects, historians and civic leaders in put- 
ting the case for letting this landmark stand. 
We only wish that he, too, had been able to 
take a swimming vacation in Hawaii and 
rally a little extra support. 

Meanwhile a further discussion of old 
buildings will be found on Page 8. 

P MIGRATION PERMIT.^ Carey Baldwin 
-*-' at the San Francisco Zix) is all excited be- 
cause Sir Edward Hallstrom, the Director of 
Australia's Taronga Park in Sydney, has prom- 
ised him three koalas, two pin-up girls and 
their boy friend. A similar present is to be 
made to San Diego, 

These choosy little bears only like about 
four species of eucalyptus leaves. Neverthe- 
less, Sir Edward has bet S6,500 that the koalas 
would find life in California good-oh, and 
even for a betting nation S6,500 is a fair 
sum. Moreover, Sir Edward is prepared to fly 
here with them at his own expense, and su- 
pervise the initial gum-chewing. 

Obviously, the kangaroos and wallabies en- 
joy our Fleishhacker Zoo. The sulphur-crested 
cockles shriek healthily. We sometimes have 
our doubts about the rather ragbag kooka- 
burras, but Baldwin assures us even they 
laugh occasionally. So we think that the Aus- 
sie government should let the koalas have a 
go over there. They do very nicely in sanctu- 
aries in their native land with bunches of 
fresh leaves from trees they like, tied on any 
old tree they happen to be sitting in. Why 
shouldn't they settle down quite quickly here? 



INSIDE THIS ISSUE 



LETTERS 

BAY WINDOW 

SHERMAN DUCKEL BEGINS WORK AS C.A.O. 

WOMAN OF THE MONTH: JOSEPHINE GARDNER 



by Lu: 



Erslu 



NEW DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 

A CHALLENGE TO CITY PLANNING COMMISSION 

BOOKS: APARTMENT LIFE IN MOSCOW 

by Jane Rowson 

PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 
MEMO FOR LEISURE 



■^ARCH, 1959 




For the Record 



Sherman Duckel Take; 
Up City's No. 2 Job 



Dr. Fronds J. Curry, right, chief of S. F. Health DeportmenCs 
of TB control, eiplolns chest X-roy procedure to Chief Admin 
Officer Shermon P. Duckel, center, as Health Director Dr. Ellis 
looks on. 



AFFABLE SHERMAN PHILIP DUCKEL, 
pipe smoking and unpretentious li- 
censed civil engineer, has quickly and quietly 
settled down to his expansive duties as San 
Francisco's Chief Administrative Officer. In 
the five and one-half years ahead of him be- 
fore he reaches the usual retirement age of 
65, he will guide the working lives of a quar- 
ter of the city-county's 20,000 employees and 
administer the operations of nine departments 
which expend at least twenty per cent of the 
over-all municipal budget. 

At 59, Duckel has become the fourth to 
hold the C.A.O. job which was set up in the 
19.i2 Charter. Like his predecessors — Alfred 
J. Cleary, Thomas A. Brooks and Chester R. 
MacPhee, "Duke" brought with him a vast 
knowledge of municipal government affairs. 
Likewise, his effectiveness is immeasurably in- 
creased through hundreds of good friends 
both in government and in the business 
community. 

The C.A.O.'s influence reaches into the 
homes of every San Franciscan. Employees 
under his jurisdiction protect the public 
health; provide hospital care for the indigent; 
build and maintain the public streets, public 
buildings and sewer sj'stem; inspect food- 
stuffs brought into the city; collect the taxes; 
conduct the registration of voters, the elec- 
tions and the counting of the votes; keep the 
records of the Superior Courts; issue marriage 
licenses; record all sorts of dtxruments, includ- 
ing property deeds; transact all real property 
sales and purchases for the city-county; in- 
spect all sorts of weighing devices in use in 
the city; maintain the traffic lights and park- 
ing meters; investigate unusual circum- 
stances surrounding deaths, and under certain 
circumstances probate the c-statc-s of deceased 
citizens. They do many other things, but this 
gives an idea of the scope of the C.A.O.'s re- 
sponsibilities. 

Duckel is a man who thinks and lives by 
organization. He thoughtfully evaluates a 
problem, carefully weighs the alternatives, 
and once a decision has been made hastens 
to put it into action. He "follows up" by 
establishing check points and various control 



factors to make certain actions conform to 
plans and policies. 

Some of the major projects which have 
occupied his time over the past two decades 
have been the North Point Sewage Treatment 
Plant, the Islais Creek Bridge, the Broadway 
Tunnel, the Stanley Drive Overpass, the new 
Hall of Justice, Brooks Hall, the new baseball 
stadium for the Giants, the schools construc- 
tion program, the Geary Boulevard and the 
Market-Portola widening, and various other 
jobs including new firehouses, district police 
stations, sewer outfalls and branch hbraries. 

Now, in his new job, Duckel has not only 
Public Works, but many other segments of 
city-county government, to administer. "While 
he must broaden his scope of activity, never- 
theless he plans to maintain a watch over 
several special Public Works projects, includ- 
ing the establishment of a proper program 
for the continuing maintenance and repair of 
all public works — particularly public build- 
ings and the priority listing of all capital im- 
provements. 

Duckel places strong emphasis upon "the 
early completion of an acceptable freeway 
system for San Francisco and the completion 
of a Bay Area rapid transit system which can 
be integrated with our Municipal Railway." 

Looking to the financial aspects of govern- 
ment, he added: "New sources of revenue 
should- be found and approved. In addition, 
inspection fees should be adjusted so they 
cover the full costs of the services rendered." 

On his list of short term objectives are de- 
termining how city ser\'ices can be consoli- 
dated to eliminate duplications and otherwise 
effecr efficiencies and economises, and to have 
made an overall survey by a qualified firm of 
all the operations in the Department of Pub- 
lic Health, with special attention given to 
the San Francisco General Hospital. A little 
more on tlie long range side is his goal of 
establishing a motor pool for use by all de- 
partments in the City Hall. He believes "this 
could be done when the Civic Center Garage 
is complecd in I960." 

The management task confronting Duckel 
is sufficient to challenge the acumen of the 



most stout-hearted man in the administracio! 
field. Let's take a look at the various goven 
mental functions over which the C.A.O. hj 
jurisdiction. 

The two largest departments under his su j 
pervision are Public Works and Publi I 
Health. Together, these have about 4,500 er 
ployees. Heads of these departments are ir 
pointed by the C.A.O.. as are the Purch.i:, 
of Supplies and Director of Finance and R - 
ords. The heads of the remaining five dep. 
ments are promoted through the Civil Sen 
ranks. 

The Department of Public Works is rt 
sponsible for the design, construction an. , 
maintenance of public buildings, streets am- 
thoroughfares, sewers and sewage treatmen 
plants. The department includes the bure.iu 
of engineering and architecture. Public L'lii: 
ties has its own engineering bureau, and r! 
Recreation and Park Department can let 
own construction contracts, but the Dep 
ment of Public Works ser%'es all other - - 
partments plus the Unified School Distri^: 
Its contracts for school and other public builJ 
ings, streets, tunnels and viaducts, sewers .in. 
sewage plants amount to many millions - 
dollars a year. 

The Director of Public Health is resp'ns 
ibie for not only the protective public he.iltl 
services such as sanitat)' inspection and coir. 
municable disease control, but also ha,s .in 
emergency hospital and ambulance service. . 
big count)' hospital for indigents, a home .m. 
hospital for the aged and chronic ill. an.' 
tuberculosis sanitarium under his jurisdic: 

The Purchaser, in accordance with ptiv. 
ures established by ordinance by the Bo.trdol 
Super\'isors. purchases all materials and sup 
plies, contractu;!! ser\'ices and equipment foi 
all departments and for the school district. 
The only exceptions are petty purchases 
which he allows departments to make undei 
procedures prescribed by him, and the pro- 
curement of such unusual things as objects of 
art which he may authorize museums or de- 
partments to buy. In addition, the Purchaser' 
has under his direction central shops for the 
scr\'icing and repair of motor vehicles, a ccn-| 



THE RECORD I 



il tabulating and reproduction bureau serv- 
j; the various departments, and inventory- 
g and warehousing of supplies and equip- 
ent. 

Duties of the Director of Finance and 
ecords include supervision of the functions 
id personnel of the offices of County Cleric, 
iblic Administrator, Recorder-Registrar. 
IX Collector and Records Center. The latter 
fice was set up in recent years to provide a 
stematic storage system for important ree- 
ds. Records for all city-county departments 
e stored at 150 Otis Street and in a vault 
■neath the Municipal Railway's Forest Hill 
acion. 

The Real Estate Department handles all 
irchases and sales of real property for the 
ty and the School District, rentals and leases 
• or for the city, and the management of the 
unicipal auditorium. 

The Department of Electricity, so named 
ior to municipal use of radio and prior, 
o, to the transfer of the bureau of electrical 
spection to the building inspection bureau 

the Department of Public Works, now in 
ality is a communications department, re- 
onsible for the installation and maintenance 

fire and police communications system; 
dio intallations and maintenance for vari- 
is departments; and traffic signal and park- 
g meter maintenance. 

The Coroner, Sealer, and Agricultural Com- 
[issioner ( the latter being an inspector of 
jirsery stock, fresh fruits and vegetables and 
,me other farm products under state stand - 
(dization and insect control law ) all are 
laller departments but perform essential 
unicipal services. 

I The Chief Administrative Officer serves on 
je City Planning Commission, budgets and 
Wtrols the city's publicity and advertising 
inds; serves on the city's Regional Service 
bmmittee, attends all meetings of the Board 
( Supervisors and the Mayor's Legislative 
bmmittee, and administers funds appropri- 
pd for other than departmental uses — such 
' money for museums and the public pound. 
The 19.^2 Charter placed the "Welfare De- 
irtment under the C.A.O., but by later 
nendment it was put under a commission. 
"le Treasurer would have been made a 



C.A.O. appointed position except for the wish 
of the then incumbent, a retired police officer 
who wanted to run for election. 

The Chief Administrative Officer's re- 
sponsibilities can be compared to those of a 
city manager, except that his tenure is for life 
and his jurisdiction is limited to certain de- 
partments. Those under the C.A.O. are some- 
times called the "housekeeping" or "non-pol- 
icy" departments. Most of the policy matters 
relating to the C.A.O.'s are settled by the 
Mayor, the Board of Supervisors and by direct 
vote of the people. 

His job, as established under the present 
charter, is unique in the United States. And 
it is a job which commands ability, integrity 
and resourcefulness — qualifications such as 
possessed by Sherman Philip Duckel. 

When he finds any spare time, Duckel likes 
to experiment with his construction ideas. 
Several years ago he designed and built a 
summer home in Marin County for himself 
and his attractive wife, Elise. Their San Fran- 
cisco home is at 125 St. Elmo Way. 

Not only is "Duke" a native son but his 
parents also were both born in San Francisco. 
After attending the California School of Me- 
chanical Arts and Stanford University, he 
worked eight years for Pacific Gas & Electric 
Company. He resigned as P.G. & E"s. assistant 
superintendent of construction in 1927 to 
join the city"s Public Works engineering staff. 
He advanced through Civil Service ranks to 
the top civil service position of Assistant City 
Engineer, which position he held for eight 
years. On February 1, 1950, he was picked by 
Brooks as Director of Public Works. It was 
nine years later — to the day — that he became 
Chief Administrative Officer. 

Duckels memberships include the Ameri- 
can Society of Civil Engineers, Structural 
Engineers Association, American Public 
Work Association, California Sewage Works 
Association, Stanford Alumni Association, 
American Legion Municipal Post 429 and 
Richmond Lodge F. & A.M. His civic activi- 
ties include serving as trustee of the Hunters 
Point Reclamation District, chairman of the 
city employees group of the United Crusade, 
chairman of the Streets Utilities Committee, 
.md a member of several other civic and 
municipal committees. 



That is the background of the man Mayor 
Christopher chose for what is often referred 
to as the "No. 2" job in our city-county gov- 
ernment. How does the man himself view the 
C.A.O.s job' Here is how he answers that 
question : 

"The name of the position of Chief Ad- 
ministrative Officer indicates that the job is 
principally that of an administrator whose 
duties are to manage and direct the applica- 
tion, execution or conduct of public affairs 
and city business under his control; to explore 
and investigate methods and ways of improv- 
ing city services and of improving the city's 
physical plant for the advancement and bet- 
terment of our city. 

The Board of Supervisors and the Mayor 
are. and should be, the policy-making bodies 
on matters affecting the ciry and county, tak- 
ing their guidance from the voters." 



Of f the Record 




Woter's down 150 feet. The boys won't get 
thirsty OS they used to!" 



SALEME 
CONSTRUCTION CO. 



R. E. SALEME, JR. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 
SAN FRANCISCO 

3224 JUDAH STREET — MO 4-3478 

MARIN COUNTY 

125 MERIAM DRIVE — GL 4-8827 



CEMENT GUN 
CONSTRUCTION CO 



MARIN SHIP YARDS 

SAUSALITO, CALIFORNIA 



Hoiv ivell 

do you knoiv 

San Francisco? 




t veil mosi lifelong residents of 
; c Bay Area haven't visited all 
the famous landmarks that have 
made San Francisco beloved the 
world over. If you're a stranger, a 
Grav Line tour is a must; if you're 
a native, you'll still find a tour ex' 
citing, informative, entertaining. 
Be sure to tell visiting friends: 
Take a Gray Line tour of San 
Francisco. Hundreds of thousands 
do — every year and say, "There's 
nothing like it!" 

Passengers ride in specially built, 
luxurious parlor cars; trained, 
courteous driver-guides tell you 
ihc background story of the places 
vou visit: fares are surprisingly 



UDr, 




Depot: 44 FOURTH STREET 
•VUkon 6-4000 



Father & Son 
Shoe Repair 

OV 1-2515 2455 Noriega St. 



Divident Market 

I'r-Ju-,- • llairv I'ruJiKt, ■ Man 
Dcliciilcsbcn 

•;998 - 18th St. MA 1-8 



The Fulton Supply Co. 



<)01 Fillmo-e St. FI 6-9760 



Chin Dick Realty 

'X 7-^255 850 Jackton St. 



CHIN AT O WIS 
SERVICE 

101 Kearny St. GA 1-4093 



KKFR PAINT CO. 

2001 OAKDALE AVENUE 
MI 8-5263 



Woman of the Month 



The Magic of Josephine 
Gardner^ s Story Telling 



by Lucile Erskine 




It was the hour for recess — 
eleven in the morning But it 
wasn't for recess that these seven- 
year-olds were hurrjing out of 
their class rooms. There were 
about 100 of them, boys and girls. 

In the school yard, they didn't 
run abut. They formed into a little 
battalion. With a teacher as a 
commanding officer, the crowd 
marched over to the Potrero Street 
Branch Library. There the chil- 
dren, still e.^icited, squatted on the 
floor. 

A car stopped outside the li- 
brary. From it a woman was lifted 
into a wheel-chair. As she was 
rolled before her seated audience, 
their applause and smiles indicat- 
ed that they already knew her. 

Josephine Gardner was coming 
to tell them another fairy tale. 

I watched them as they watched 
her. Soon, because of her soft 
voice, the expressive gesture of 
her hands, and her power as a 
story-teller, her little listeners 
were not conscious of a crippled 
woman in a wheel-chair. For she 
was making them see a monstrous 
creature, a man who could swal- 
low the whole sea. This was from 
that old Chinese folk tale, "The 
Five Chinese Brothers." 

And when she went into "Titty 
Mouse and Tatty Mouse," an old 
English folk tale, their little faces 
became grave. Because they felt 
so sorry for that tree — poor thing! 
She was so sad — she dropped all 
her leaves at once. It was just like 
tears falling. 

There was one small girl, with a 
Latin tan of skin and black-eyed. 
She may have been a Cuban or 
Puerto Rican. With a sharply up- 
turned chin, she sat on the fl(X)r, 
her eyes fastened on Josephine 



Gardner's face. It was not a com- 
fortable position. But for twenty 
minutes, during the whole story- 
telling period, she didn't drop that 
chin. 

The face that is such a magnet 
for children's eyes is round and 
imaging, in spite of the stor>'-tel- 
ler's fifty-three years. It doesn't 
register her battles with pain 
from the arthi-itis that has made 
the wheel-chair necessar>^ Her 
wide blue eyes are not sad and 
show no frustration. True, the 
hair is prematurely white, but it 
still makes a pretty fluff. Her 
seated figure is peaceful, and she 
is always attractively dressed. 

Formerly, when she could nan 
about with the children on the 
playgrounds, she was a story tel- 
ler in the Recreation and Park 
Department of the City of San 
Francisco. In the same capacity, 
she was on the staff of the Adult 
Education Department of the Pub- 
lic Schools. The University of Ten- 
nessee brought her south to let 
loose her lovely folk tales on their 
students. 

In one simimer alone, she talked 
to over 12.000 children from 16 
different playgrounds. 

"Folklore," she says, "is the uni- 
versal language of humanity. All 
countries even the American In- 
dian have a Cinderella stoiy. Be- 
cause it expresses the yearning of 
every human being to better his 
or her environment — stop sweep- 
ing up ashes and ride in a car- 
i-iage." 

You might well ask, "Now that 
she can't walk, isn't the productive 
period of her life over?" Let's see. 

On everj- Monday now at 6; 15 
P.M. she is rolled before the tele- 
vision camera of Channel 9, to en- 



Spell-boond listene 



thrall an uncoimted multitude 
children. She has made five diffe 
ent recoi-dings of the ways sh- 
tells her folk tales. These continu 
to be popular. 

Nor is stor>'-telling her sole ac 
tivity. For the working day 
this unwearied woman begins a 
9 A.M. She is then wheeled to he 
desk at the Sen-a Library', estat 
lished by the Franciscan Father 
of St. Boniface Church. There, sh 
is librarian: handles books, han 
dies people, from her wheel-chaii 

While at the librarj", she is ofte; 
a consultant in the charity case 
that come to these Franciscai 
priests. Many a girl, stranded ii 
San Fi-ancisco without a job, or ; 
roof over her head, or a bite to pu 
in her mouth, is counseled am 
helped by Josephine Gardnei'. 

After her night dinner in a i"es 
taurant. she is taken to her roon 
in a resident hotel for women. 

Sui-ely now, you'd say, she rests 
But she doesn't. She is able ti 
wheel herself to a sewing machine 
With its help she makes remark 
able dolls of nylon. They are wash 
able and imbreakable. These, howl 
ever, she does not sell! Just tht 
opposite — gives them away to difi 
ferent charities to be raffled off. 

Or she might create an exquisiti 
child's dress — an original — for one 
of her 12 grandchildren. 

For, after a broken maniage 
she was left with three childrer 
to rear and educate. She began this 
big job when she was well imt 
could use her feet. By the time it 
was finished, she was afflicted 
Now, all three children are hap' 
pily married and have their own 
households. 

Truly — her spirit is like hei 
dolls- unbreakable. 



THE RECORD 



Vpir Director of Public Works 

REUBEN OWENS HAS CLIMBED 
CITY HALL CAREER LADDER 



OEUBEN H. OWENS, who suc- 
ceeds Sherman Duckel as Di- 
■ector of Pubhc Works, has. with 
iie exception of a short period in 
.932. been in that department 
!ince 1926. 

I He was bom in Dublin, Ireland, 
it the turn of the century, receiv- 
ng his degree from Dublin's Trin- 
ty College, famous among other 
Jiings for its copy of the beautiful 
Book of Kells, of which USF has 
ii facsimile, and its associations 
mth Oliver Goldsmith and Dean 
Swift. 

Owens graduated to Sanitary 
Engineering Designer from a var- 
.ed number of assignments in the 
;Bureau of Engineering. In Septem- 
per, 1955. he was appointed to the 
(important position of City Engi- 
|Qeer. 

I While usually serious and con- 
fcemed with the business of the 
day. the new director takes time 
■out to relax. He owns a cabin 
fcruiser, and relishes fishing. From 
the athletic interests of his youn- 
ger days, which included Rugby 



football and water polo, he retains 
an interest in golf. 

Also he has a sense of humor not 
too far below surface. After the 







'M 



to She 



an Duckel 



swearing-in ceremony recently, 
with Utilities' Kirkwood and the 
new City Engineer Gertz, he, their 
senior by several years, teased 
them merrily about the fact that 
he was the one who had retained 
a good head of dark hair through 
the passing years! 



CHIN & HENSOLT 

Consulting 
Engineers 



(Structural Engineers for 
New Giant Baseball Stadium) 



THE LOWRIE PAVING CO., INC. 

Contractors 



Asphalt 8C Concrete Paving - Heavy and Light Grading 
Underground Construction 



Main Office: 174 San Bruno Road (So. San Francisco) 
S.F. Office: 222 Napoleon - Mission 7-5600 



M^GUIRE and HESTER 



General Contractors 



796 -66111 AVENUE 
Oakland 21, California 



HARRY LEE PLUMBING 
& HEATING 



1327 NO. CAROLAN AVE. 



Biirlingame, Calif. Diamond o-IJi91 



INARCH, 1959 




JF/iy not restore Victorian houses in condemned areas ivhere 
larfie numbers of old houses are already aimed by the city? 

A Challenge to City 
Planning Commission 



Scene at the Weoverville palnt-up festival 

CONSTANCE FIELD, color -wishes to live in a housing project, 
consultant who has success- •'They are necessai-y because they 
fully boosted the business of nine fit the financial needs of people 
Western towns through the re- v\'ith low incomes. But is it neces- 
habilitation of their main streets, sary for the lower middle and mid- 
feels that some of the Victorian die income groups to live with 
houses should be saved in San such a lack of individuality?" 
Francisco. This, she points out, is "it seems to me that we can well 
both financially sound and estheti- afford to take another look at the 
cally desirable. possibility of preserving the old 
Appearing before the Urban Re- Victorian houses that are at pres- 
newal Committee and the City ^^^ gifted to be demolished. A cer- 
Fathers, she maintained that the tain percentage of these will be be- 
character of San Francisco should y„^^ ^ope of saving, but some can 
be presei-ved. not only for those be saved. I hope the City Planning 
who live in the city but also for commission will make an effort to 
the tourist who brings and spends ^^^ ^t least one block on all four 
large sums of money in the city, si^es that we could use for a dem- 



"In New Orleans," says Mrs. 



onstration project. With it 



Field, "tourists do not visit the ^^^^^ p^.^^g how to save San Fran- 



modem section of the city but the 

beautiful old and historic French ^ts priceless chai-m and character 

section. The combination of low 

cost housing plus preservation of 

some of the Victorian houses for 

the lower middle and middle in 



Cisco money and how to preserve 
! priceless chai-m and character." 
This is the deep conviction of 
Mrs. Palmer Field, whose paint 
executive husband, shai-es her en- 
come bracketT in San~FrancTsco 'is thusiasm for these projects. They 
live in the little Bay area suburban 
town of Tiburon, and it was Tib- 



most desirable from eveiy view- 
point. 

"The restoration of Victorian 
houses in condemned areas where 
large numbers of old houses are al- 
ready owned by the city and due 



uron that started Mrs. Field on the 
road to becoming a "civic color 
consultant." 

There, two years, ago, a new 



for demolition, can actually save shopping center opened and sub- 



the city money." 



stantial business began moving 



Mrs. Field cited the New York away from the main street, and 
City Planning Commission. A study ''ars and cheap entertainment 
by this group, she says, revealed Places began moving in. Mrs. Field 
that it was possible to save .$5,000 proposed a town paint-up on a co- 
for evei-y 3-room unit restored in operative community basis and 
this way, over the cost of tearing provided the first community co- 
the buildings dowTi and replacing ordinated color plan from which to 
them with ugly, low-cost housing woi-k. 
developments. W. P. Fuller & Co., 110-year-old 

Such low-cost housing develop- Western paint and glass firm, 
ments could in time envelop entire liked the spirit of the little town 
sections of a city, destroying its and agi-eed to supply the paint at 
character and charm, and setting cost and to give the amateur paint- 
the stage for large potential slum ers technical assistance and ad- 
areas. No one, she insists, really vice, as a public service gesture. 



The paint-up was accomplished in 
a single weekend. 

Results were almost immediate. 
Property which had been dropping 
in value began to climb. Merchants 
stayed on the main street, others 
moved in, and today after two 
years it is a pleasant and prosper- 
ous commimity with a number of 
high quaUty specialty shops and 
restaurants in place of the cheaper 
establishments that had disturbed 
the local residents. 

The California communities of 
Portola, McCloud and Weaverville 
liked what happened at Tiburon 
and followed its lead. 

One of the most spectacular and 
successful of these ventm-es was 
the Weaverville paint-up. This fa- 
mous old mining town in Trinity 
County, has a liistoric background 
and some fine old buildings. The 
main street was normally lined 
with tall elms. When the state 
highway was widened, these were 
cut down exposing previously hid- 
den buildings as old, shabby and 
unpainted. Also Weaverville was 
about to be by-passed in favor of 
new trading areas springing up in 
connection with the Trinity Dam 
project. Here, again, was the eco- 
nomic problem of declining busi- 
ness facing the merchants. 

The coordinated color plan pre- 
pared by Mrs. Field took into ac- 
count all the historic significance 
of the town and exploited many 
unique architectural aspects of 
buildings on the main street. 

Weaverville results were highly 
satisfactoiy fi-om a business stand- 
point. Sewer bonds which previous- 
ly could not be financed, were fi- 
nanced without difficulty. Mer- 
chants foimd conditions improved 
and the tourist ti-ade became 
brisker. 

Buckley, Washington, was the 



next community to take advantage 
of the unique teaming of Mrs.- 
Field's expert color knowledge and 
the public-spirited coperation of 
W. P. Fuller & Co. This Uttle town 
found itself, like Tiburon, in dan- 
ger of heading into a severe local 
depression because of a lai'ge shop- 
ping center being built nearby. 

W. P. Fuller & Co., had by now- 
formed a Community Sei-^ices Di- 
vision headed by Palmer Field. A 
motion picture of the Weavenille 
paint-up, made by Fuller, was 
shown to the citizens committee at 
Buckley. The committee accepted 
Constance Field's coordinated 
color plan and the active cooper- 
ation of Fuller, and conducted 
their paint-up as a weekend festi- 
val of the townspeople. 

This paint-up, like the othere 
conducted in the same way. ap- 
pears to be ha\ing excellent re- 
sults. 

Shortly after this, Governor 
Steve McNichols of Colorado, s,i\v 
the Weaver\ille film and asked the 
Fuller company for the loan of the 
Fields to help tliem in planning a 
state-wide paint-up along the same 
lines to help celebrate their "Rush 
to the Rockies" Centennial in 19.59. 
The Fields went to Denver, con- 
sulted with the Governor and \isi- 
ted foul' of the communities. They 
met with town committees and 
found essentially the same prob- 
lems — rim dowii condition of tlie 
main streets and business falling 
off. Mi-s. Field prepared coordinat- 
ed color plsyns for all foiu' towns — 
Georgetown, Black Hawk, Central ■ 
City and Fairplay. All were used 
in tlie paint-ups now completed 
with the enthusiastic backing of 
their citizens. 

Eight towns in California, Wash- 
ington and Colorado have utilized ' 
coi'dinated color plans prepared by 



THE RECORD 




Books 

APARTMENT LIFE IN MOSCOW 

by Jane Rawson 



A (oce-lift In Central City, Colorado 
drs. Field. This is the key factor similar piojects. making in time, a 
a the success of these community more beautiful city and better liv- 
laint-ups which are confined, of ing conditions for the lower mid- 
ourse, to both sides of the main die and middle income brackets, 
treet. But the general principal. With the center of the block land- 
Irs. Field points out, can be ap- scaped as a playground for the 
ilied to individual houses, to block's children, living at a reason- 
Toups of houses or to whole able economic level in the city 
locks in the I'esidential sections in could become as gracious as that 
city. of many suburban homes where 
In her own home town of Tibur- costs are many times higher, 
in. Mrs. Field has proved this by "At least," says Mrs. Field, "this 
olor planning the successful con- will be a step foi-ward. Nothing 
ersion of a group of homes in- that has been done so fai- here in 
lading her own. She has also ap- the West, or that has been sug- 
ilied her special techniques to resi- gested. answers the problem of 
ential homes in other communi- how to provide pleasant, gracious 
ies. living inside the cities at reason- 
In her recommendation to the able cost. The towns we have ad- 
Irban Renewal Committee, Mrs. vised on community paint-ups, 
ield stresses that if the City have proved what painting the 
'lanning Commission will select a commercial buildings according to 
lock of Victorian houses in San a coordinated color plan on a sin- 
"i-ancisco for a pilot study, the gle street will do for business. It 
emonstration «iU speak for itself, can and will do the same thing in 
uch a block, v\-ith its buildings re- the cities for people's morale, con- 
abilitated through the use of a tinue its architectural heritage, 
oordinated color plan and paint- preserve the charm and character 
ig on the outside and inside, and of the city and save the city a 
rith the plumbing and lighting fa- great deal of money. What could 
ihties brought up to the present be more desirable from all points 
ode, would stimulate residents of of view — property owners, tenants 
eighboring blocks to embark upon and city government? " 



STEEL FOR ALL PURPOSES 

FRANK C. BORRMAN SUPPLY CO. 



813 BRYANT STREET at 6th 



SAN FRANCISCO 3 



General Sheet Metal Wo 
Stainless 

THOMA\S SHEET METAL SHOP 

1050 GOLDEN GATE AVENUE — SAN FRANCISCO 
A.THOMA — Fillmore 6-053 3 

LEVIN'S AUTO SUPPLY CO. 

EVERYTHING FOR THE AUTO 
U VAN NESS AVENUE HEmlock 1-7500 



MAIN STREET, l^SSR 
by Ir\'ing R. Levine 

Doubleday — $4.50 

This book is written by NBC's 
commentator. Irving R. L#evine. 
who has been accredited to the 
Soviet Union since 1948. He and 
his wife live in a Moscow apart- 
ment overlooking the Kremlin. Mr. 
Levine has also traveled extensive- 
ly in the USSR. By charm and per- 
tinacity he has managed to collect 
material which adds up to a well- 
rounded view of life in that coun- 
try. 

Winston Churchill, speaking of 
the Soviet Union some years ago, 
commented that it was a riddle 
wrapped in a mystery inside an 
enigma. For most people in other 
countries this still holds true. 

In this book, Mr. Levine has 
sought to answer the questions 
that the ordinary eveiyday citizen 
in the USA asks about Russia: do 
Russian women make their own 
clothes or buy them ready-made? 
What's on Russian television ? Do 
Russians keep pets? 

He has striven to give the read- 
er some picture of what it is like 
to wake up in Moscow, set about 
the business of living for the day, 
go to bed and get through the night 
without trouble from the secret 
police ( easier now. than in the 
daj's of Stalin) and start all over 
again ne.xt day. 

The reader gets a vivid impres- 
sion of life in Russia. Principally 
the American citizen is left with a 
feeling that Mr. and Mrs. Sovietski 
suffer a lot of minor frustrations 
and calamities. For example, if you 
go on a highly recommended va- 
cation to take mineral water baths, 
you may find the little carbon di- 
oxide bubbles are just not there. 
Small consolation that the Min- 
istiy of Health in due com^se recti- 
fies these things! Similarly, if 
there should be something worth 
bu>'ing in the store, the customer 
must stand inordinate time in line. 

Lines are so much a part of 
Soviet life that a Russian scien- 
tist, retu ming from Copenhagen, 
reported to a Western conference 
that conditions in Denmark were 
veiy bad. ""But didn't you notice 



that the store windows were full 
of goods?" queried a puzzled lis- 
tener who knew this to be untrue. 
'Oh yes," acknowledged the Rus- 
sion. "but the Danish people have 
no money to buy. There are no 
lines in front of the stores." 

You learn little items about 
shopping around — it is cheap to 
get a haircut, expensive to buy a 
hat. On the whole, too, you dis- 
cover it is advantageous to be a 
foreigner. The Russian is courte- 
ous and helpful to the visitor, 
rather grimly combative to his fel- 
low-citizen. 

All in all, the trivia that give 
color and flavor to living are here 
detailed with unusual excellence. 
Until we can go and see for our- 
selves, we can get a good general 
impression from Mr. Levine. 

In addition to local color, the 
book does examine the Russian 
character. We find a ver>'- good 
run-down of the geographic size 
and regional variety of the USSR, 
a look into the Russian sense of 
humor, and an assessment of or- 
tistic and cultural standards. We 
find an analysis of education which 
not only enables us to imagine 
what little Vladimir feels about 
his school, but to assess the pro- 
mulgations of the Ministry of En- 
lightenment. 

In a final evaluation concerning 
the ever-present problem of inter- 
national amity, the author on the 
whole takes an optimistic view of 
the chances for future peace. He 
feels that time is on the side of 
the West, for Russia shows signs 
of becoming more moderate and 
more reasonable. Mr. Levine's book 
is in itself a further step towards 
mutual understanding. He brings 
to life for us the ordinary human 
beings, who have temporarily been 
ver>' much obscured as history 
works out over this great land 
mass a desperate revolution and 
far reaching social reorganization. 

The author has an easy rapport 
with the reader, bringing home his 
facts ajid obser\'ations with the al- 
most casual expertness that a 
first-rate television commentary 
achieves. All the reporting in these 
400 pages is piquant and full of in- 
terest. 



/lARCH. 1959 



Woodward - Clyde - Sherard & 
Associates 

CONSULTING CIVIL ENGINEERS 

1 1 50 28th STREET — OAKLAND 8. CALIF. 
HIGATE 4-1256 

SOIL AND FOUNDATION ENGINEERS 
MATERIALS TESTING AND INSPECTION 

OAKLAND — DEN\^ER — OMAHA 
KANSAS CITY 



CECCOTTI & SON 

Cement-Concrete Contractors 



1610 HARRISON STREET 
UNderhill 1-2472 



Subscribe to The Record 

Keep abreast of civic progress in 
San Francisco and the Bay Area 

CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

S89 Church Street 

San Francisco 14, California 

Please enter my subscription for the City-County Record for 
One Year ($5.00) ; for Three Years ($10.00) 



Remittance inclosed 
Bill MIC 



('. R EFTINC^.S 



Berkeley Hills Chapel 

BEAUTY AND DIGNITY HAVE NO PRICE 



CLARENCE W. PAGE — A. LEE ODER 
JOHN M. FREEMAN. General Manager 



SHADDUCK AVENUE and CEDAR AVENUE 
BERKELEY 9 

St, Vincent de Paul Salvage Bureau 

FURNITURE, CLOTHING. HOUSEHOLD GOODS, NEWSPAPERS 
Ours is 3 year round prosram to care for the poor. 

SAN FRANCISCO — 1815 Mission Street — HE. 1-1588 

OAKLAND — 315 Webster Street — TWinoaks 3-2723 

SAN MATEO — 113 South B Street — DLunoivl 2-1860 

D.-\LY cm' — 6726 Mission Street — PLaja 5-^346 

SAN JOSE — 443 W. San Carlos Street — O'presi 4-4974 

V.ALLEJO — 230-A Vireinia Street — V.MIeio 2-5525 

STOCKTON — 626 E. Market Street — Stockton 4-0067 

SAN RAF.AEL — 910 "B" Street — GLenwood 4-3302 

E. J. WREN, K.S.G. 

Executive Secretary' 

Please Dont Thron It Away . . . Bui Do Call 

ST. VINCENT DE PAUL SALVAGE BUREAU 

CAREW & ENGLISH 

LEO V. CAREW. JR. 
President 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS . . . MEMORIAL CHAPELS 

MASONIC AT GOLDEN GATE AVENUE 
San Francisco IS, California 

ALPINE REST HOME 

Expert Care - Bed - Semi-Bed A: Ambulator\- 

Special Diets if Needed - Stale Licensed 

Nursing Care 24 Hours - Delicious Food 

Walnut Creek U52 ALPINE ROAD YEllowsIone 5-55 

RUTH B.-^KER, Ouncr-Opcralor 

T. & W. ENAMELING CO. 

1 562 BANCROFT AVENUE Mission 8-1595 

SAN FRANCISCO :4, CALIFORNIA 

Zcnilh TV & Radio 

KERKS TV SERVICE CO. 

SALES i SERVICE 

i 14 E.vcelsior Avenue JUnipcr 4-2291 San Francisco 

"Kerk" Kerkvliet 



PEOPLE AND PROGRESS 



HONOR FROM NORWAY 
Wilson Meyer, San Francisco 
businessman who was the subject 
of a City-County Record "cover 
story" in March. 1956. recently re- 
ceived from King Olav V of Nor- 
way the Knight's Cross, First 
Class, of the Royal Order of St. 
Olav. 

The decoration, presented to 
M e y e r by George K. Thestup. 
acting Consul General of Noi-way 
at San Francisco, was in recogni- 
tion of Meyer's promotion of 
friendly cultural and trade rela- 
tions- between Noi-way and the Pa- 
cific Coast of the United States 
over a long period of years. 




[Georg K. Thesfrup. left, acting Co 
'.Generol of Norwoy, pins Knight's Cross, 
i First Class, of the Royal Order of St. 
1 Olav on Wilson Meyer. 

i Mo 



volved 862 pi-ojects or 630 expan- 
sions and 232 new plants. 

Out of this total, the 13-countic.s 
of the Bay Region — Alameda. Con- 
tra Costa, Marin, San Franciscn 
San Mateo, Solano, Napa. Sant;i 
Clara, Sonoma, Sacramento, San 
Joaquin. Santa Cruz and Yolo 
committed $266,560,490 for 69:; 
projects or 413 e.xpansions and 18() 
new plants. 

San Francisco committed $4,- 
1)8,300 for 107 projects involving 
591 new jobs and 87 expansions 
and 20 new plants. 

GOOD NEIGHBOR POLICY 
Chester R. MacPhee. Chief Ad- 
ministrative Officer and chainnan 
of the nuinicipal Regional Service 
Committee. i-ecentl.v announced 
the appointment of Jack T. Pick- 
ett, editor of the 104-year-old 
"California Farmer," to the Com- 
mittee. 

The Committee was created by 
the San Francisco Board of Super- 
visors and is composed of high 
ranking city officials. It strives 
constantly to earn for San Fran- 
cisco the understanding and re- 
gai'd of its neighbors and to make 
San Fi'anciscans conscious of the 
city's dependence on the welfare of 
its neighbors. 

It is a unique agency in the field 
of city-counti-y relationships. 

FOUR DECADES 

The Peninsula Division of the 
San Francisca Water Department 
is about to lose its "voice." 

Miss Cecilia Carleton. pleasant- 



imoti: 




Editor Jack T. Pickett 

voiced and efficient telephone oper- 
ator at the Division's Millbrae of- 
fice, uill retire Mai-ch 31 when she 
reaches the mandatoiy retirement 
age of 65. 

When she retires. Miss Carleton 
will have served 40 years and 20 
days, having started to work with 
the Spring Valley Water Company 
on March 11, 1919. 

During her four decades-plus 
Miss Carleton has been an ob- 
server of and participant in great 
changes in the Peninsula's water 
suppl.v. high and historic dates in 
her sei-vice having included March 
3. 1930 when the new San Fran- 
I Continued on Page 12 ) 



has been active in pro- 

'eciprocal trade relations 

Noi-way and the Pacific 

Coast and has worked closely with 

;i irultural interests in both coun- 

ies. He has visited Norway many 

Me.\er is president of the 109- 
year-old firm of Wilson & Geo. 
Meyer & Co.. 333 Montgomery 
Street. Pacific Coast distributors 
of agricultural and industrial 
chemicals and plastics. With head- 
quarters in San Francisco, the firm 
has district offices in Los Angeles. 
Portland, Seattle and Salt Lake 
City. 

BURSTING SEAMS 
A total of $298,923,990 was com- 
mitted in industrial expansion for 
Northern California during the 
first eight months of this year, ac- E 
coi'ding to the Industrial Depart- ** 
ment of the San Francisco Cham- 
The sum in- 




first goal. 



r. (0. 

Robert W. Dyer 

PIER 14 

San Francisco 

SUtter 1-6606 



JIM BRUCE 
CfflNESE LAUNDRY 

Pricci Reasonable - Quick Serrice 

143 - 8th STREET 

San Francisco. Calif. 

Phone UNderhill 1-8144 



Herman Dobrovolsky 

UNION OIL DEALER 

21st fit Clement Street 

San Francisco 



WORLD 
THEATRE 

640 Broadway YU 2-6085 



ALBERT L. NG 



ACME FOOD 
Products Mfg. Co. 

■ 7 Sl.ir Food Seaamine" 
- From St. EX 2-8104 

Photo-Lith 
Laboratories 



Clyde Bentley 

Co„<ul„„g Engineer 
405 SANSOME STREET 

MRS. CLARK 

Adrice in all affairs of life 

.\pl. No. 1—946 Geary Street 

GR 4-0758 



NATIONAL TROPHY COMPANY 

2225 MARKET STREET 
San Francisco 14, California 

Trophies • Medals - Plaques - Engraving 
Medalions 



Frank Jimenez 



UNderhiJI 1-6616 



Jim^s Donut & Coffee Shops 

Retail and Wholesale 

JIM HAWTHORNE. Owner 
4500 MISSION STREET 



3306 MISSION STREET 
Mission 8-9764 



6202 THIRD STREET 
JUniper 4-9898 



GANTNER - FELDER - KENNY 

— Funeral Directors — 

Ample Parking 
1965 Market Street HEmlock 1-0131 



San Francisco 



VISIT THE 

PALACE BATHS 



85 THIRD STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



HOF BRAU 



FINEST FOOD 
Money Can Buy 

DOUBLE SHOT BAR — OPEN 7 A.M. TO 3 A.M. 
Powell at O'Farrell Street San Francisco, Califon 

MEL-WILLIAMS CO. 

"Calo Dog Food Co." 

112 MARKET STREET 
EXbrook 2-7366 San Francisco, Ca 



PALLAS BROS. 

RADIO 3c TELEVISION REPAIRING - AND SALES 
5000 MISSION STREET JU 5-5000 SAN FRANCISCO 12 

TEDDY'S PET SHOP 



Goreriimcnl Inspected Horse Me 
Complete Line of Pet Supplies 



3730 Geary Blvd. 



SK. 2-1833 



People and ProereSS f""",."^^' An"0""cement of the s.- 
• " lection was made by Mortimer 

( Continued from Page 11 1 Smith, of Oakland. President of 

Cisco Water Department took over the Association, 
from Spring Valley, and October Black has directed the destiny of 
28, 1934 when the first deliver.' of one of the world's largest private 
Hetch Hetchy water was made to 
Crystal Springs Lake at Pulgas 
Temple. 

REDWOOD EMPIRE 

The president of the Redwood 
Empire Association. Ben A. Cober 
of Ukiah. commends the selection 
of outstanding community leaders 
to further the association's mani- 
fold operations for the City and 
County of San Francisco during 
the 1958-59 fiscal year. 

The statement by Cober followed 
certification of the election of 113 
persons to the association's Inter- 
coimty Board of Directors and the 
re-election as County Vice Presi- 
dent of John W. Pettit. 




FOREMOST INDUSTRIALIST 
The Council of the CaUfomia 
Alumni Association has named 
James B. Black, chairman of the 
Board of Pacific Gas and Electric 
Company, as the University of 
California's Alumnus of the Year 



dent 



power companies for more than 23 . 
years. He began his career as a i 
sei-vice inspector for the Great I 
Western Power Company, immedi- 
ately after graduation from the ■• 
University in 1912. He subsequent- 



HARRY'S 

Liquor Store 

WINES-LIQUORS-BEER 
1108 Lincoln Ave 

LA 3-0944 
ALAMEDA, Calif. 



HOLY NAMES 
HIGH SCHOOL 

4660 Harbor Drive 
OL. 5-1716 O.^KLAND 



PI^4YERS' CLUB 

2245 Geneva Avenue 

opposite Cow Palace 

JU 7-3566 

JOE a; ERMIE JACKSON 



Dc Espana Restaurant 

Basque Food — Family Style 
Lunch 12-1 — Dinners 5-8 

Fcrmin Hauric. Prop. 

7,^1 BROADW.-\Y Sl_' l'7;s- 



TOULOUSE 
LAUNDRY 

82 1 Lincoln Way 

MO 4-1634 San Francisco 



JOHN'S BODY SHOP 

Painling ■ ndding 
John Boteilho, Prop. 

3827 GR.AND .-WENUE 

OAKLAND. CALIFORNIA 

TE 6-3254 Home: LO 9-2687 



JOHN ^XOL.^H.AN 

EL P.\TIO 

Greets His maity City Employee 
Friends 

VAN NESS a: MARKET STS. 

Be sure to visit our new 



"Ml RANCHO" 
SUPER MARKET 

Latin- Amcrkan too J Line 
Tortilla Manufacturers 
3365 - 20th STREET 

aiion --0581 San Franc 



Aniericaii Fi.sli Market 



Ifciis - Poultry- - Fi»h ■ Frnii* - \'n^t^blu 

■W'Alnut 1-5154 
1836 BUCHANAN STREET 



GEORGE'S CIGAR STORE 

-59 COLL MBLS AVENUE 
S.AN FRANCISCO 



THE RECORD 




The striking Pulgas Temple ot Crystal Springs Lolce 
woter first flowed in 1934. 



Hetch-Hetchy 



,y assumed executive responsibili- 
ties in Ihe electrical power indus- 
:r>' that were climaxed in 1935 
vhen he became president of the 
Pacific Gas and Electric Company 
n San Francisco. He became 
;;hairman of the Board on June 1. 
1955. 

The 1958 "Alumnus of the Year" 
viW be honored. Smith said, for his 
iistin^ished contributions to the 
levelopment of Western power re- 
sources, for his stature as one of 
he nation's foremost industrial- 
sts. for his pioneering interest and 
efforts in the development of pri- 
rately-financed nuclear power 
ilants, for his many outstanding 
lervlces to the government as a 
cey advisor in important national 
igencies and for his continuing 
lupport of cultural and educational 
:nterprises. Smith noted that the 
Host recent evidence of Black's 
support of higher education is 
'ound in his service to the Univer- 
lity of California as General Chair- 
nan of the Student Center Fimd 




Campaign which raised almost two 
and a half million dollars for con- 
struction of a new Student Center 
at Berkeley. The project is now 
under construction. 

In addition to his Board Chair- 
manship for P. G. & E., Black is a 
director of the United States Steel 
Coi-poration, Southern Pacific 
Company. Equitable Life Assur- 
ance Society of the United States, 
Shell Oil Company, Chemical Com 
Exchange Bank, Fireman's Fund 
Insurance Company, Del Monte 
Properties Company, California 
Pacific Title Insurance Company 
and Gila River Ranch, Inc. 

He is also a trustee of Stanford 
University and the Ford Found- 
ation: a consultant to the National 
Security Coimcil, a tnistee of the 
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships, 
Inc., a member of the executive 
committee for the Business Advis- 
ory Council for the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Commerce, a member of 
the Industrial Advisory Council 
for the secretary of the Treasury, 
a director of the national Indus- 
trial Conference Board and a mem- 
ber or officer of numerous other 
professional and service organiza- 
tions. 

In 1958, he received an Honorary 
Degree from the University of 
California on the Berkeley campus. 
He also holds an Honorary Degi'ee 
from the University of San Fran- 
cisco. 

The "Alumnus of the Year" Ci- 
tation will be presented to Black 
at the ninety-fii"st annual Charter 
Day Banquet at the Garden Court 
of the Sheraton-Palace Hotel at 7 
p.m., March 20. 

Mr. Black is the sixteenth alum- 
nus of the University of Califor- 
nia's Berkeley campus to receive 



CONSUl GENERAL OF ITALY 

2590 WEBSTER STREET. SAN FRANCISCO 

CALIFORNIA BUILDERS HARDWARE COMPANY 

17 BLUXOME STREET — YUkon 2-5690 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

L&H PAINT PRODUCTS 

HEMLOCK 1-4766 
150 Mississippi Street, San Francisco 10, California 

Thcrc'.s An L e<^ H PAINT F..r Every P.untms Need 

HUGHES AUTO BODY SUPPLY CO. 

EVERYTHING FOR THE AL'TO BODY 
AND PAINT SHOP 

BERT HUGHES 
Fillmore 6-4400 — 1344 Divisadero Street 

Thos. Thoinasser & Associates 
Caterers 

1228 - 20th Avenue San Francisco 

DEL MONTE MEAT CO. 

Sweetheart Brand Idaho Quality Fed Beef 

751 Howard Street EX 2-4700 San Francisco 

Sears-Roebuck Employees Cafeteria 

Geary Blvd. Masonic Ave. San Francisco 

Building Service Employees' Inion 
Local No. 87 of San Francisco 



240 Golden Gate Ave. 



PRospect 5-2664 



WIRTH BROS. PASTRY SHOP 

Home of ■Happy Day" PaMy ■ Cakes 

Geary at 23rd Avenue San Francisco 

PACIFIC FELT COMPANY 
710 York Street Mission 7-OIII 

DR. H. H. CALDWELL 

415 MacDonald Ave. Richmond, Calif. 



itARCH, 1959 



THEODORE V. TRONOFF 

Civil Engineer & 
Surveyor 

Subdi\i5ion-Tracts-Lots 
Boundaries & Contours 
Two Dtficcs to SCP.-C you 
1617 University Avenue 

BERKELEY — TH 3-4242 
345 Park Plaza Drive 

DALY CITY — PL 5-7144 



N.MECHETTI&SON 

THE GOLD SPIKE 
RESTAURANT 

All Kinds of Mixed Drinks 
Italian Diners served F.imily Style 

527 COLUMBUS AVE. 



SIMPSON NURSING HOME 

R.N. Supervised 

;4.HOUR NURSING SERVICE 
E.XCELLENT FOOD and CARE 



744 - 35th AVENUE 
SKyline 2-0184 



Smith Industrial 
Supply Company 

I', ilaHc Aluminum Slagine — Abra.ivcs 
Spartan Aluminum Pl.ink, 

Air Compressors 

Sand Blastins Equipment 

Industrial Hose 

SAIES and RENTAL 

l,,cl E. Smith J. D. (Dud) Smith 

1485 Bayshore Blvd. JUniper 5-7174 



DOuglas 2-4654 

NORTH BEACH 

French Italian Bakery 

516 Green St. Near Grant Ave. 

Siin Francisco 11. California 
CELSO BOSCACCI 



the •Alumnus of the Year" award. 
Coincidentally, he is the fourth 
member of the Class of 1912 to re- 
ceive the honor. Others are Chief 
Justice Earl Wanen, Horace M- 
Albright, outstanding consen'a- 
tionist. and Herman Phleger, for- 
mer Counsel to the U. S. Depart- 
ment of State and now a member 
of the World Court. 



Washington 
Studio Apartments 

Studio Apartment! Available 



WE 1-9677 



Ray's Cal-Mart Liquors 

Complete Dereragc Service 

3585 C.lliforni.i Slrcet 

HA 1.W69 




Chancellor Glenn Seoborg 

NEV/ ATOM-SMASHER 
A fabulous eighty - eight - 
inch cyclotron will be constructed 
at the Ernest O. Lawrence Radi- 
ation Laboratoi-j' of the University 
of California with $4,600,000 of 
Atomic Energy Commission funds. 
Chancellor Glenn T. Seaborg has 
announced. 

The atom-smashei' will be of 
novel spiral ridge design, and will 
have a versalitity unmatched by 
other cyclotrons. Its imusual feat- 
ures will permit nuclear explora- 
tions which have not been possible 
before. 

Ground-breaking for the building 
is expected next May, and the tar- 
get date for completion is three 
years hence. The machine will have 
260 tons of steel and 10 tons of 
copper conductor in the magnet. 

While the new atom-smasher will 
not accelerate particles to the very 
high energies of the "184-inch cyclo- 
tron and the giant Bevatron, its 
beam current ( number of particles 
accelerated in a given time) will 
be large compared to either of 
these existing higher energy ma- 
chines. Some million billion par- 
ticles per second - about double 
that of the world-famous 60-inch 
Berkeley cyclotron and about one 
thousand times that of the 184- 
inch machine — will stream out of 
the 88-inch instrument. 

Chancelloi- Seaborg, who won 
the Nobel Prize for his work in 
discovering new elements heavier 
than uranium, said the new c.vclo- 
Iron will pennit experiments on 



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1416 Brush Street 

TEmpIcbar 6-3600 

OAKLAND 12, CALIF. 

1 1 50 Larkin Street 

PRospetrt 6-6166 

SAN FRANCISCO 9. CALIF. 



NORIEGA MEAT CO. 

Qu.nlity Mcat.s - Reasonable Pric 
Wholesale & Retail 

3815 NORIEGA STREET 
LO. 6-8821 



LLOYD R. SMITHERS 

BODY and FENDER 
SPECIALISTS 



New Address 



1234 Pine St. 



CROWN DRUG STORES 

Daly City - Westlake 

.^5 5 S. Mayfair Ave PL 5-8200 

Stonest'own 

95 Stonesto^xn LO 4.60';i 



Cook^s Union 
Local No. 228 

H. ]. BADGER 

Secretary -Treasurer 

1068 Webster Street, Oakland 
TE 2-3965 



BAY CITIES 

NEON 

UNderhill 3-88S0 

761 VALENCIA STREET 

San Francisco 



P. A. BERGEROT 

Couusel lor Bank of America 
Counsel lor Consulate General 

ol France 

Phone SUtter 1-7868 - 1-7869 

FRENCH BANK BUILDING 

1 10 Sutter St. San Francisci 



MAYER LEON 

Painting; Contractor 

6P 2 Valley Street 

.•\r 8-4582 



problems that cannot be tackl. 
with present machines, includin 
his o\\-n continuing research on th 
trans-uranium elements. The ir 
tense beam will permit producti" 
of larger (although still minut' 
quantities of important isotopes • 
the very heavy elements. This v ;: 
result in more detailed studies ' 
the properties of the trans-uraniun 
elements. 

Dr. Elmer Kelly, physicist at thi 
Radiation Laboratory, has beer 
designated physicist-in-charge o 
construction of the new instru 
ment. Richard Burleigh, mechan- 
ical engineer at the Radiation Lab. 
oratory, is the project engineer. 

IMPULSE AND WISDOM 
Mans reaction to a crisis— or- 
iginally intended by Nature J 
protective mechanism — is offer 
civilized man's worst enemy, 
cording to Dr. Lanrence E. More 
house, director of UCLA's Humar 
Performance Laboratory. 

"As an example," he said, "wher 
the business vice-president needs a 
cool head to defend his planE 
against the unfair attacks of his 
intra-office arch-rival or when the 
basketball player needs a light 
fluid touch to sink his crucial shot 
or when the jet pilot needs to think 
clearly and act calmly, what hap- 
pens? 

"Their bodies start preparing foi 
violent physical activity; a reaction 
which in primitive times was nec- 
essaiy for survival but today ma\ 
work against the individual's best 
interest." 

Blood i-ushes to the vice-presi- 
dent's face, the hair on the back 
of his neck stands up. adrenaUr 
pours into his blood stream. He is 
physically prepared to leap over 
the conference table and let his 
rival have it. 

The basketball player. Dr. More- 
house said, feels like giving thel 
ball a mighty heave which might 
send it through the roof but cer- 
tainly not into the basket. Andi 
the jet pilot, with only delicate in- 
struments and his clear thinking, 
between him and death, wants tc 
start slamming things around. 

"But civilization forces us to act 
opposite to what experience has 
taught our bodies, " Dr. Morehouse, 
a professor of physical education 
and an expert on fatigue studies, 
said. 

Thus the business executive, in 
order to stall for time while his 
body returns to normal, cooly asks 
his rival to repeat his proposiU 
And the basketball player and jel 
pilot, through discipline and count- 
less hoius of training, suppres! 
their impulses to violent activity 



THE RECORC 



Memo for Leisure 



San Francisco's new subscrip- 
tion play season will begin on 
April 6 when 'Not In The Book," 
an English comedy thriller star- 
ring Edward Everett Horton and 
Reginald Owen, will open an en- 
jagement at the Alcazar Theatre. 

Three other attractions — one a 
musical - have already been se- 
:ured for the six-play series or- 
janized by The Theatre Guild- 




Regirdd 0». 



Unerican Theatre Society under 
he auspices of The Council of the 
jiving Theatre. They are "Look 
Jack In Anger," coming to the 
Ueary on April 20: the musical 
1.1*1 Abner" at the Curran on 
tpril 27, and "Two For The See- 
»w," arriving at the Geary on 
«ay 25. 

Not In The Book," a London 



hit, recently underwent a success- 
ful tryout season in Palm Beach, 
Fla.. and will arrive at the Alcazar 
as a stop on a nation-wide tour, 
with Renee Gadd and Ralph Pur- 
dom as featured players. "Not In 
The Book" is the work of Arthur 
Watkyn, produced by Gilbert Mil- 
ler and Henry Sherek of London. 

"Look Back In Anger." the sec- 
ond item of the series, is another 
English play, called, indeed, the 
play which brought a new vigor 
into the London theatre. Written 
by Osboi-ne, the first of England's 
"angry young men," "Look Back 
In Anger" was judged the best im- 
ported play on Broadway last sea- 
son. 

"Li'l Abner" finds Al Capp's 
comic strip characters breaking 
into song and dance all over Dog- 
patch. During its two years on 
Broadway, "Li'l Abner" was the 
favorite musical of the danceo- 
philes, who contended that Michael 
Kidd's choreography had patterns 
of violent grace which were the 
highest expressions of the dancing 
art. 

"Two For The Seesaw," co-star- 
ring Ruth Roman and Jeffrey 
LjTin, has been the most success- 
ful show on tour during the pres- 
ent season. A Cinderella play, the 
work of the then unknown William 
Gibson, "Two For The Seesaw" 
still flourishes at the Booth The- 
atre in New York a year after its 
unexpected success. 

Two plays by Eugene lonesco, 
"The Lesson," and "Victims of 
Duty," directed by Norma Miller, 
open at the Playhouse, Beach and 
Hyde Streets, on April 17. 



KENWARD S. OLIPHANT 

Consulting Engineer 

ACOUSTICAL - ELECTRICAL - MECHANICAL 

41 Sutter Street GA. 1.1164 

San Francisco 4, Calif. 

BUTCHERS UNION LOCAL 115 
OF SAN FRANCISCO 

3012 Sixteenth Street 

MR. GEO. MASSL'RE-Stcrclary-Treaiurer 




CLARENCE X. COOPER 

3IOKTLARIKS 



Fruitvale Chapel 
1580 FRUITVALE AVENUE 

KEIlog 3-41 14 



Elmhurst Chapel 
8901 E. 14lh STHEET 

NEptune 2-4343 




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sa/ety (through an agency of 
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$10,000 is a savings opportun- 
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account with Franklin Savings 
...California's oldest, founded 
in 1875. 

Current per annum 

dividend rate AC/L 

Save-by-mail accounts invited! 

FRANKLIN SAVINGS and LOAN ASSOCIATION 

1201 Market Street at 8th • Telephone: KLondike 2-1356 

DAY & NIGHT 

Television Service Company 

Any Make or Model Seven Days a Week 

9 AM. ■ 10 P.M. FREE ESTIMATES on Antenna Installations 

1322 HAIGHT STREET 

UN. 3-0793 — Also UN, 5-1836 

LEE and PRASZKER 

(Charles H. Lee, M. A8CE) 
(Michael Praszker, A. ASCE) 

Public Water Supply, Drainage, Ground Water Hydrology 
Foundations, Earth Grading Control. Earth Slide Stabilization 



58 Sutter Street 



EXbrook 2-5670 



(iFO. I. .WERV- Traffic Safely Devices 

4516 MOLLIS STREET EMER'^ A'lLLE. CALIF. 

BROADMORE SERVICE STATION 

173 SCHOOL STREET PLaza 6-3394 

Daly City 



ilARCH, 1959 ■ 



USH'Ua PERIODICAL ROOU 
Givic Center 
San Francisco 2, Calif. 
52 X-l/5-9(:^a77) 3630 



KELLER 8 GANNON 

Consulting Engineers 
PHILIP E. GANNON 

126 POST STREET 
San Francisco, California 

SUtter 1-7015 



WAVERLY SHOPS 
Palo Alto, California DAvenport 6-4990 



Cadillaf Motor Car Division 

1100 VAN NESS AVENUE PR 5-0100 



Stonestown 
20th ac BUCKINGHAM WAY 



LO 4-4700 



NONA REALTY 

Nona Harwich - Realtor 

533 BALBOA STREET 
Bus. BA. 1-5576 Res. BA. 1-3504 



BULK RATE 

U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

San Francisco, Calif. 
Permil No, 4507 



LARKSPUR 

CONVALESCENT 

HOSPITAL 

For Elderly Chronics and Con%aIescents 
R.N. and Physical Therapist on Staff 

GRACE SLOCUM, Director 

Special Diet 

Homelike Atmosphere 
Moderate Prices 

Conscientious Care 

234 HAWTHORNE, LARKSPUR 

Phone W Abash 4-1862 

LARKSPUR, CALIFORNIA 

DAMES & MOORE 

SOIL MECHANICS ENGINEERS 

Los Angeles — San Francisco — Portland 
Seattle — Salt Lake City — Chicago 

New York — Atlanta 

340 MARKET STREET — SAN FRANCISCO 1 1 

The Lowrie Paving Co., Inc. 

GENERAL CONTRACTOR 

Grading — Paving — Underground Construction 

MAIN OFHCE AND YARD 

1 7-) San Bruno Road — South San Francisco .California 

PLAZA 5-848-t JUNO 3-3574 

J. F. Lowrie, President — James W. Lowrie, Vice President 

R. J. Kilroy, Superintendent 

SAN l-RANCISCO YARD — 222 N.ipoleon St. — Mission 7-60011 



ITY-COUNTY 



A NEW STADIUM FOR A MAJOR LEAGUE CITY 





SAN FRANCISCO AND THE BAY AREA 




WILLIE MAYS WITH PENNANT HOPEFULS 

Moyor George Christopher, Thomas Gray, Willie Mays and a youthful adr 




JUMP TO IT GIANTS! 



Hoppy anniversary from Qantas, 
Australia's round-the-world airline. 
350 Post Street • YUkon 2-3670 



P.S. We start jumping ourselves on July 29th! 

Jumping by Jet... Sydney to London, straight across the U.S. A.I 




CITY-COUNTY RECORD 

THE MAGAZINE 
OF GOOD GOVERNMENT 

San Francisco and the Bay Area 

KENNETH H. ALLEN PUBLISHER 
ALAN P. TORY EDITOR 

Published at 389 Church Street 
San Francisco 14, California 
Telephone HEmlocIc 1-12 12 

SUBSCRIPTION $5.00 PER YEAR 



VOLUME 26 



NUMBER 4 



APRIL, 1959 



LETTERS 



Ir is .1 pleasure to drive on rhe new Em- 
ircadero Freeway from which a wonderful 
cw of rhe Bay. of ships in port, and our 
agnihcent city may be seen. What an asset 
lis new freeway is! It ofTers in five minutes 
le most breath-taking introduction to our 
lis. 

The latest freeway developments have con- 
ibuted valuably to the convenience of mo- 
irists getting in and out of San Francisco. 

Marjorie Day 
1322 Shafter Street 
San Francisco 



Your outstanding article on Sherman 
'uckcl published in March embodied infor- 
lation about the policies of the new Chief 
dministrative Officer which could not be 
lund elsewhere. It was a competent, smooth- 
written job, the sort of writing which be- 
ngs to a periodical publication as opposed 
the quite different newspaper style. 
Thete is a real place in the Bay Area for 
ur magazine which follows civic progress, 
id gi\es to readers a more contemplati\e 
id reflective point of view on current issues 
lan can possibly be offered under the pres- 
ires of daily journalism. 

William Sparke 
47 De Wolf Street 
South San Francisco 



1 hope our City Planning Commission will 
ke to heart your article advocating the 
"eservation of some Victorian houses in San 
ancisio. These fellows should be ashamed 
themselves for allowing our beautiful city 
be disfigured on the pretext of making it 
ibservient to freeways. If we don't watch it, 
I the color and picturesqueness will disap- 
i3T from our city, and we shall soon hear 
le clang of the last cable car bell! 

Harold E. Lunny 
395.3 - 24th Street 
San Francisco 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

BAY-WINDO.W 



TT'EEP TALKING; Gb 
-l^ Brown, speaking recently in Eureka, re- 
minded his audience that democracy has been 
defined as government by talk. 

The Governor then went on to talk about 
what the Legislature since his election has 
been concerned with: measures for flood 
control, water development, new power pro- 
jects, industrial growth; pioneering new ap- 
proaches to narcotics problems; setting the 
65 mile per hour speed limit; working on 
laws to ban racketeering and abuses in install- 
ment buying agreements; to safeguard the 
holding of union elections and meetings, to 
establish a minimum Californian wage, along 
with other progressive measures. 

Governor Brown talks of the current legis- 
lative program as one of "responsible liberal- 
ism." Most Californians are both surprised 
and impressed by the Governor's farsighted 
vision and apparently boundless energy in 
tackling programs and problems ( press an- 
nouncements of jobs accomplished come off 
the duplicating machines so fast that in one 
department of duplicating we notice the ink 
getting thin! ). 

If he continues to make such good sense, 
the electorate will be pleased to hear many 
more speeches from the Governor. 

pERIL BY NIGHT: Arthur D. Hairing- 
•*- ton. General Electric's engineer in charge 
of safety development for street and highway 
lighting, sees American cities after dark as 
places where man is reduced to scurrying like 
a rabbit before headlights, and woman to 
hurrying home, heart in mouth. 

San Francisco, with its hit-run auto acci- 
dents and its bag-snatching forays, offers 
something like 7-1 odds on traffic streets and 
50-1 on residential streets, that you cannot 
walk at night in comfort and safety. 

Mr. Harrington, whose job it is to provide 
information on the increasingly complex fea- 
tures of good city illumination to Public 
Utilities and City Departments who want it, 
is incorrigibly optimistic. He is sure that sensi- 
ble citizens from well-lit homes are tired of 
groping about the streets after dark, and that 
a new era of public street and highway light- 
ing is about to explode in the West. 

While he acknowledges that say, the golden 
sodium flares in the little lake of Funston 
Avenue reflect both the aesthetic and utili- 
tarian success in the lighting of the Golden 
Gate Bridge approach, he shakes his head 



over the inadequacies of Market 
Street. A main thoroughfare like that re- 
quires