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G-l VE N B Y 




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City i0fum(«t, ^0. 26. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



OF 



HON. WILLIAM H. KENT, 



MAYOR OF THE CITY OF CHARLESTOWN, 



REPORTS ^^"" 



OF THE MYSTIC WATER BOARD— TRUSTEES OF PUBLIC LIBRARY- 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE — CITY TREASURER — OVERSEERS OF 
POOR — A^D ENGINEERS OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 




CHARLESTOWN : 

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 
1 8 7L 



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MAYOR KENT'S ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council : 

We to-day inaugurate the twenty-fifth municipal govern- 
ment of the City of Charlestown. Yearly, for a quarter of 
a century, men have stood here, as we stand to-day, asking 
God's blessing for our city, and his guidance for themselves, 
and have taken a solemn obligation to be faithful to the 
trusts reposed in them. 

These trusts are highly honorable in their nature and 
character ; and if, as I sometimes think, there is less respect 
for the positions we hold than formerly, it must be owing 
partly to the people themselves, and partly to those who 
administer the matters of government. It is in our power 
to merit the confidence reposed in us, and to maTce our places 
honorable to ourselves and valuable to our community. I 
can assure you, gentlemen, that the interests of our city at 
the present day are such as to demand the sacrifice of some 
portion of your time, and much of your careful thought, and 
wisest and most conscientious judgment. 

In conformity to established custom, it is my duty now to 
call your attention to some of the material interests of our 
city, and to give you such general information in regard to 
them as may seem proper or necessar3^ 

Education. 

From nearly every point of approach to our city, the most 
conspicuous edifices are those devoted to educational pur- 
poses, typifying, I am sure, the preeminence which this 
interest has always held in our community, and endurino- 



4 mayor's address. 

monuments of the liberality of our city. I am glad to be 
able to-day to assure you that our public schools, in all 
respects, compare favorably with those of our sister cities, 
and are just sources of pride to us. I need not rehearse 
any reasons, as trite as they are true, for your care of this 
interest. I should as soon try to tell you of the benefit of 
the sunlight or the showers. You know that the proper 
demands of it, and for it, must be met. It is our duty to 
provide buildings and equipments, and the necessary funds 
for carrying on the schools, though the responsibility for the 
expenditure of these funds rests upon the School Board, and 
not upon us. During the past year, the high-school building 
has been enlarged and improved at an expense of about 
$84,000. The structure was dedicated on the 14th of De- 
cember last, and the regular sessions of the school com- 
menced on the next day. The last city government author- 
ized the purchase of a lot of land on Bow and Prescott 
streets, for the erection of a grammar school, to take the 
place of the present Harvard school. It will be your duty, 
probably, to authorize and supervise the construction of a 
building upon it. You will also be called upon to consider 
the necessity of soon providing a first-class primary school 
in nearly the same locality, — and I am inclined to think 
that even a slight investigation will convince you that the 
necessity exists. The city owns a lot of land on Richmond 
street ample for the purpose. The last census gives six 
thousand children in our city between the ages of five and 
fifteen years, — a fact which needs no comment from me. 
There is a growing demand for increased primary school 
accommodations in the Winthrop school district, and the 
condition of the Winthrop grammar school is quite unsatis- 
factory ; but I think the erection of any new buildings may 
be deferred, and the demands, for the time being, supplied 
in other ways. The school buildings, I think, are generally 



mayor's address. 5 

in fair condition, as constant improvements have been made 
in them. I submit for your good judgment the expediency 
of selling the entire school lot on Harvard street, with the 
building, on the completion of the new school referred to on 
Bow street. Accommodations for the Hose Co. now occu- 
pying the building may be found elsewhere, and I certainly 
think the best interests of the city require the sale of this 
property. It would probably command a fair price, and I 
have no faith in repairing or remodelling the building for 
any other purpose. 

Sec. 2 of chapter 248 of the acts of 1870, reads as fol- 
lows : **Any city or town may, and every city and town 
having more than ten thousand inhabitants, shall, annually 
make provision for giving free instruction in industrial or 
mechanical drawing to persons over fifteen years of age, 
either in day or evening schools, under the direction of the 
school committee." In conformity to this requirement, an 
evening school for drawing has been established in the com- 
modious rooms of the high-school building. Commencing 
the 21st of December, some one hundred and fifty pupils, of 
all ages, presented themselves for instruction — a most grat- 
ifying testimony to the interest prevailing in the minds of 
the people regarding the subject. Our evening schools this 
season are better attended than last, about two hundred 
pupils being regular and devoted in their studies. Every- 
thing considered, Charlestown never has done so much for 
education as is now being accomplished, and the results, 
moral and intellectual, can hardly be estimated. 

As a part of the subject of education, I invite your atten- 
tion to our Public Library. This is in the charge of able and 
faithful men, who believe in it as an educator of the people, 
and who are doing all in their power for its success. Since 
its transfer to the present rooms in City Hall, its patronage 
has increased, and the cheerful and commodious readinof- 



6 mayok's address. 

room has been found to possess special attractions. There 
are indications that it is outgrowing its present apartments, 
however, and that with much further increase of popular 
interest in it, more room will be required for its use. I 
commend the report of the trustees to your consideration, 
and ask such action from you for its support, as may seem 
necessary for its continued usefulness. 

During the past year, the city has received from the execu- 
tors of Mr. Otis Clapp, a bequest of about 800 volumes of 
books, and quite a large selection of coins, shells and insects. 
The books have been placed in the Public Library, and the 
collection of coins, &c., in a room fitted for the purpose in 
the new high-school building. The bequest is a valuable 
one, and deserves mention in terms of gratitude for the gift, 
and respect for the good intentions which prompted it. 

Health. 

The obligations upon you for the care of the sanitary con- 
dition of our community, are certainly not less strong than 
those appertaining to educational interests. We rejoice in 
a city whose site is naturally healthy, with an abundant sup- 
ply of water and of draining facilities, with territory mostly 
composed of the original soil, and with flowing rivers on two 
sides of it. Still there exists in our city grave causes of 
complaint, so far as the health and comfort of a large por- 
tion of our citizens are concerned. As the conditions of 
property change, as buildings increase in number, as the 
population becomes more dense, and light and air are more 
obstructed, so certain things become grievances and even 
nuisances, which were never before thus considered. Many 
of these causes of complaint might be removed or modi- 
fied by the individuals responsible for them, and in some 
cases, I am glad to say, they have cheerfully conformed to all 



mayor's address. 7 

proper requirements. I hope others will follow so good an 
example. 

During the past year there has been constructed 4,723 feet 
of sewer, at an average expense of $2.93 per foot, or total 
cost of $13,825.44. The sewers have been generally con- 
structed from 18 to 20 inches diameter. 

Much complaint still exists in regard to the inequality and 
unfairness of the system of levying assessments for the con- 
struction of drains and sewers. I called the attention of the 
government of last year to this fact, and I again recommend 
a candid consideration of the matter to the proper commit- 
tee. 

Our public bath houses, sources of pleasure and health to 
so many, continue to be largely patronized. The buildings 
are in good condition. The facilities for bathing at Medford 
street are by no means what they should be, but the situa- 
tion perhaps is the best, all things considered, that can be 
obtained. The houses were open from June 13 to September 
13, and during this time, the premises on Medford street 
were used by 3,590 men, 10,748 boys, 2,559 women and 
10,315 girls — a total of 27,212. The house at Warren 
bridge during the same period of time was used by 1,877 
men, and 27, 517 boys; — total, 29,394. Total, in both 
places, 56,506. 

I think the system of collecting the offal of the city com- 
menced in 1869, has not thus far proved one of any saving, 
and we must look for its recommendation, therefore, to a 
faithful and satisfactory preformance of the work. It is one 
in which our citizens are immediately interested, and one 
which requires the constant care and vigilance of the com- 
mittee who supervise it. 



8 mayor's address. 



Streets and Improvements. 

The city government which expired to-day, found, on com- 
ing to their places one year ago, a large legacy of author- 
ized, but unfinished, work. Their attention w^as at once 
called to this, and they promptly commenced their task. 
They originated scarcely anything, and the embellishing and 
grading of Sullivan square is their only monument in this 
respect. It is only exact truth and justice to say, that the 
government of 1870 was one of work and retrenchment. 
They faithfully performed the duties o^ finishing and paying 
for such projects as other administrations had left them ; 
and I am glad to be able to say to you, that all matters 
have been adjusted and closed that can be closed, and that 
you will have but few unfinished subjects to consider. 

As I remarked a year ago, in my judgment, the improve- 
ments in our city are generally worthy of the name. I 
think, however, that the cost of them has not been suflScient- 
ly considered oftentimes, and that we have been hasty in 
pushing them. The subject of betterments, under the statute, 
is one which has caused a good deal of discussion and oppo- 
sition in the application of it. In a city like ours, better- 
ments are not so tangible or so widely extended in their 
effects as in cities of larger business. Many of the natural 
localities for improvements are inhabited by persons of limi- 
ted means, or owned by elderly persons of very conservative 
views, and who have but little of the progressive spirit of 
the times. They naturally enough, perhaps, ask to be let 
alone, and spend the balance of their days without molesta- 
tion. On the first of December, 1870, there stood upon the 
books of the treasurer, $25,060.20 of uncollected assessments 
for betterments. A certain amount of improvements yearly, 



mayor's address. 9 

I have no doubt is desirable, and the people seem to demand 
it; but I should counsel care and thorough investigation 
into such matters, before initiating them. There is now 
authorized, but not commenced, the laying out and extension 
of South Eden street. Ham's court, and Arlington avenue. 
This is work enough to do well, within the limits of a year, 
and I recommend no further expenditure in this direction. 

The committee on repair of streets of the last year were 
actively engaged, and accomplished a great deal of work. 
Canal street was filled, and has become a large thoroughfare, 
relieving Main street from a portion of heavy teaming, and 
materially enchancing the value of the property on its lim- 
its. Many other streets have been greatly improved dur- 
ing the year. Among these are Alford, Lincoln, Prospect, 
Chelsea, Mcdford, Foss, and Cambridge streets. On all 
these streets, large amounts have been expended, and impor- 
tant surface improvements made. There are many others, 
also, on which minor sums have been spent for their benefit. 
There still remains much to be done in the way of paving 
and repairing many of our thoroughfares, audi think money 
could be expended more to the satisfaction of tax-payers in 
this mode than perhaps many others. 

A commission was appointed the past year, consisting of 
Messrs. Wm. B. Long and George II. Jacobs of our city, 
who were authorized to take into consideration, and report 
upon the expediency, expense, etc., of reducing the grade 
of Bunker Hill, and of filling the Mill Pond and flats on 
the southerly side of the city. Since entering on their du- 
ties, they have been actively engaged, and are preparing the 
necessary plans, surveys, and estimates, which will ere long, 
I hope, be laid before you, and to which your careful atten- 
tion and candid judgment will be called. So far as the 
Mill Pond is concerned, I think the proprietors of it are 
satisfied that their interests in relation to it are identical 

2^ 



10 mayor's address. 

with those of the city, and that a satisfactory arrangement 
can be made mutually beneficial, both to them and to the 
city. The necessary authority to fill flats we have already 
had granted to us by the legislature. 

The reduction of Bunker Hill is a larger undertaking ; 
but, considering the sums that have been spent, and will 
continue to be spent, for damages in that vicinity, in an indef- 
inite and piecemeal endeavor to improve property ; consid- 
ering the amount of territory there that can never be made 
available except through some comprehensive plan that shall 
better the whole of it ; considering, too, the necessit}^ every 
day becoming more apparent, for streets easy of use from one 
side of the city to the other, it is a matter well worthy of 
your most intelligent thought. 

Under this head of improvements, I must call your atten- 
tion to a subject which I brought to the notice of the last 
government ; and this is, the necessity of a public hall in our 
city. Private enterprise appears to see no inducement to 
erect one. I think it is the great want of our people at this 
time, and it seems to me the strongest arguments can be ad- 
duced in its favor. It will benefit men, women and children, 
by providing a place of healthful amusement or instructive 
entertainment. It will give character to our city, and it will 
certainly tend to dignify our political gatherings. It might 
be a source of some income, but this I consider a secondary 
consideration, compared with the returns we should get 
from it in other ways. I have intimated that the library is 
outgrowing its present accommodations. A substantial edi- 
fice might be erected near the centre of population, with a 
commodious lower story for its uses, and the upper portion 
devoted to an audience hall. I hope this matter may com- 
mend its importance to you. 



mayor's address. 11 



Bridges. 

On this important subject, I quote largely from my re- 
marks of one year ago, as I think the information then given 
may be interesting to both you and our citizens. By authority 
of the legislature of 1869, commissioners were appointed 
and authorized to construct draws in Charles Eiver and War- 
ren bridges of forty-four feet in width. With infinite delay, 
inconvenience and damage to our people and to business, 
this work has been accomplished so far as relates to Charles 
River bridge. The authority referred to further authorizes 
the same commissioners to apply to the construction of said 
draws any unexpended balance of the Charles River and 
Warren bridge fund ; to divide any balance of the fund 
remaining after the completion of the work, between the 
cities of Boston and Charlestown ; to assess upon the two 
cities any deficiency of said fund ; and lastly, to apportion 
to them the expense of maintaining and keeping in repair 
the said draws and bridges after they shall have been com- 
pleted. By the acts of 1870, chapters 303 and 401, the 
duties of the commissioners were somewhat modified, and the 
width of all draws in bridges in Charles and Miller's Rivers, 
was prescribed at thirty-six feet. By chapter 303, the said 
commissioners were directed to make their award above 
referred to, at the October term of the Supreme Court in 
1870 ; and by the provision of the same act, when such award 
has been accepted by the Supreme Court, the bridges become 
highways, and are thereafter to be managed by the cities 
of Boston and Charlestown by a commission consisting of 
one person from each city, and chosen under such ordinances 
as the cities shall establish. Until such commissioners are 
chosen, the mayor of the several cities, ex officios, constitute 
the board of commissioners. 



12 MAYOll'S ADDKESS. 

This board are required " forthwith " to cause a draw to 
be constructed in Warren bridge thirty-six feet wide. The 
award of the commissioners under the acts of 1869, has been 
made to the Supreme Court, but has not yet been accepted 
by it; and I sincerely trust it never will be. I do not for 
a moment impugn the motives of the gentlemen composing 
the commission ; but I am at a loss to see upon what basis of 
facts as to the use of the bridges, or upon what general 
considerations of equity, they ever arrived at the terms of 
their decree. Their report shows items as follows : — 

For ordinary expenses of maintenance of 

bridges while under their care . . $13,301 29 

For widening Charles River bridge draw . 39,333 12 

For new fender Charles River bridge . . 3,450 00 

For paving, surveys, &c. . ... 5,225 09 



$61,309 50 



Leaving, after payment of this total sum, an unexpended 
balance of the bridge fund, of about $14,575.09. The com- 
missioners award the amount expended and the balance re- 
maining, to be divided equally between the two cities. I 
have been looking for some mode, if there is one, by which 
this award may be re-opened on equitable grounds, or be 
recommitted to the commissioners for further consideration. 
I used my best efforts during the last session of the legisla- 
ture, to influence the proper committee to report a bill for 
the construction of a new bridge between Boston and Charles- 
town, and I also endeavored to enlist the interest of the city 
of Boston in the subject, believing that their interest was 
identical with ours in the matter. For many reasons not 
necessary to enumerate, I failed in my purpose, but my faith 
in the necessity of such a bridge is stronger every day. It 
can be justified on grounds of economy alone, I believe. 



MAYOll's ADDRESS. 13 

Under chapter 309, acts of 1868, commissioners were 
appointed, and by them were imposed upon Charlestown 
the following conditions in reference to Chelsea bridge : Of 
the sum of $70,732, awarded as the value of the franchise 
and damages to the turnpike corporation and Maiden bridge 
proprietors (owners of the Chelsea bridge), Charlestown 
was decreed to pay one-tenth, or $7,073.20, and further to 
maintain and repair 1,921 feet of the said bridge, with the 
draw therein. From this sum is to be deducted the amount 
paid by the Lynn horse railroad company, viz : one-half of 
the surface repairs of the said 1,921 feet length. The draw 
is small, and the expense of it inconsiderable compared with 
that maintained by the city of Chelsea. 

I have had occasion to make a report to the city council 
recently upon the condition of this dilapidated structure, 
forced upon us in its dry old age for support. The repairs 
upon it during the past year are between three and four 
thousand dollars. There can be no question but the ])est 
economy is, immediately to fill and make solid such portion 
of the bridge as we may. All considerations of safety and 
propriety require your prompt attention to this subject. I 
suppose the work can be done in the winter season as well 
as in summer. There is a probability that many of the 
laboring people of the city will be out of work this winter, 
and the calls on me lately have been large in this respect. 
The filling of the bridge appears to me to be an imperativ 
necessity, and would furnish labor for many men. I think 
it is cheaper and better every way to furnish worh for the 
needy, rather thansot(_p, though we maybe required to do 
both. I suggest also the importance of widening the bridge- 
way at the time of filling. 

By an act of the legislature of 1869, the county commis- 
sioners were authorized to award the expense of maintenance 
and repairs of Maiden bridge to such cities and towns as are 



14 mayor's address. 

benefited by it, and also to determine the amount to be 
expended yearly for its support. By their decree, Charles- 
town is to pay twenty-five per cent of the amount fixed for 
the year 1870. This amount is $8,000, and our proportion 
is consequently''$2,000. It is quite important that the amount 
of travel from Charlestown over this bridge should be deter- 
mined, as our yearly proportion of the expenses is based upon 
this fact. 

Our city is further ol)]iged to repair and maintain that 
portion of the draw and bridge at the Prison Point, which 
lies on its side of the channel. This is but small, however ; 
but in the event of the widening of the draw, in conformity 
with the acts of 1869, the city would be obliged to bear 
one half the expense. 

Financial. 

The accounts of the city are made up to March 1 , in each 
year, and that is the proper time to make any comparison of 
expenditures, or statements of debt. I cannot satisfactorily 
to myself, or even with tedious explanations, understandingly 
to you, attempt to do so at this time. The last government 
found a large floating debt incurred or authorized by their 
predecessors, arising partly from the under-estimate of the 
cost of the various improvements of the past few years, and 
which had been gradually accumulating in one way or another 
for a long time. Their policy was to fund, or put into the 
shape of city bonds, this debt. It was thought better to 
do this, than to raise by taxation the required amount of defi- 
ciency. The issue of city bonds during the year ending to- 
day, is $267,000. However much the city debt may have 
been increased in 1870 (and it is only the form that has been 
changed in a great degree), I deny, in the most absolute 
terms, that the council of that year is responsible to any 



mayor's address. 15 

extent for it. They only performed the somewhat ungra- 
cious task of completing and paying for improvements and 
work authorized by others, and their various committees ad- 
hered closely to the limit of their appropriations. They did 
in a few cases exceed them, and the circumstances were such 
as to render this almost unavoidable ; but as a whole, on the 
first of De(;ember, the appropriations had not been exceeded 
but to a small extent. I certainly recommend to you the 
propriety of continuing the funding policy so far as occasion 
remains to do so, though I hope the first of March will show 
it not to be necessary to any great extent. I have labored 
diligently to close up unfinished work, and get the liabilities 
into tangible form, so that this government might start fairly, 
and have only its own matters to attend to. There are many 
considerable expenditures for which it has not been usual to 
make appropriations. I recommend that provision be made 
for all purposes, both large and small ; and that as a general 
rule, nothing be done that is not provided for, and taxed for, 
under the appropriation bill. When the appropriations have 
been made, then I trust that the rule of not exceeding them 
on any pretext whatever, will be made absolute by the 
various committees. In this you shall find your best safe- 
o^iiard a<?ainst debt. 

During the past year, all the outstanding and overdue notes 
held by the city have been collected. 

By authority of the last council, an ordinance establishing 
a sinking fund was passed. Under the terms of it, not less 
than $15,000 yearly must be appropriated, and placed in the 
hands of the committee on the fund, and by them invested, 
or applied to the purchase of the debt of the city. To this 
fund must also be added the sale of any land owned by the 
city, and any unexpended balances of appropriations. This 
fund amounts at the present time to $21,468.50. I think the 
establishment of the fund a prudent movement. It will soon 



16 mayok's address. 

accumulate fast, and be a help and convenience to us in many 
ways. 

In leaving this subject, I can only counsel you to do as 
your predecessors have done, endeavor to get all liabilities 
into proper form, and watch diligently that the expenditures 
arc not unwarrantably increased. 



Police. 

I said, a jear ago, that this department was a difficult one 
to manage satisfactorily. Experience has fully confirmed 
this statement. The duties of the policemen naturally bring 
them in direct opposition to the prejudices and vices of a 
large part of the community, but I have endeavored to im- 
press U2)on them the importance of independence and character 
in the discharge of their functions. I have never hesitated to 
support them when in the right, or to condemn them in 
what appeared wrong, and I hope that the general character 
of the department has improved during the past year. I 
wish, sometimes, that public sentiment was stronger in favor 
of sustaining ordinances manifestly for the good of all, and 
that severer penalties might be enforced in many cases for 
the defiance of them. The mode now adopted of appointing 
the regular police force, or during good behavior, is proving 
itself to be wise and salutary. Though not here to flatter any 
one, I feel it but just to say, that I have ever found the 
marshal prompt and ready to enforce the laws and the re- 
quirements of the city council. The State constables now 
located in the city, have done good service for us, and aided 
often by our police, much has been accomplished in enforcing 
the statue in regard to the sale of intoxicating liquors. This 
is shown by the decrease recently of arrests and committals 
to the station house for drunkenness, especially on Saturday 



mayok's address. 17 

nights. It may not be known to you that there are in the city 
two hundred and thirty places where liquor is sold. They 
are of all grades, and prolific sources, to a greater or less 
extent, of idleness, crime, and misery. 

From the report of the marshal as made to me, I note the 
following facts : The whole number of committals to the sta- 
tion house during the past year was 1860. Of these, 640 
were for drunkenness, 530 were night lodgers, and 690 were 
for different offences; 370 of the number were brought 
before court and punished by fine or imprisonment ; 18 boys 
and girls were put to reformatory institutions, and 9 insane 
persons were sent to the Asylum at Worcester. Compared 
with the year 1860, the number of arrests are 150 less, 
lodgers 76 'less, cases of drunkenness 60 less, and 48 less 
complaints in the court. 

The number of deaths for the year is 599, or 83 less than 
in 1869. Of the whole number, 7 died at the State Prison, 
2 at the Almshouse, 2 were found drowned, and 7 killed by 
accident. 

The marshal represents the necessity for an additional 
day patrolman, and urges the importance of providing "lock 
ups " in Wards two and three. He expresses great confidence 
in his subordinate officers, and says that the detective officers 
have been very successful in recovering stolen property. 

Water. 

The water-works continue in successful and satisfactory 
operation. Notwithstanding the great scarcity of rain the 
past season, the lake has yielded an ample supply for the 
wants of our inhabitants, and the neighboring places fur- 
nished from its source. 

The financial resources have fully realized the estimate for 
the year, the amount of revenue in excess of the cost of 
3 



18 MAYOIi's ADDRESS. 

maintenance and interest being about $60,000, which will 
go to the credit of the construction account. Under the 
authority of the city council , a contract has been made with 
Mr. George H. Norman, for laying a second main supply 
pipe, thirty inches in diameter, and the work on the same 
has been completed, with the exception of about twenty -five 
hundred feet at this end of the line. A twenty-inch main 
has been laid from the terminus of this line through Main 
and Medford streets to Chelsea bridge, and a sixteen-inch 
main throuo'h Canal and Mill to Main street. The cost of 
these two mains will not exceed $200,000. Connections will 
shortlj^ be made with the portion of thirty-inch pijDC laid, 
that will greatly facilitate the delivery for Chelsea, East 
Boston and Somerville. Including the cost of the new 
mains, the net water debt will be about $1,225,000. It is 
iudged that this amount will not necessarily be increased, as 
the cost of anticipated additions to the construction account, 
for increase of pumping power and storage facilities, will 
doubtless be met by the surplus revenue of the two succeed- 
ing years, and after that period, we may reasonably antici- 
pate a material annual reduction thereof. 

The amount of water bonds issued at the present time is 
$1,122,000. 

I have only to add a just appreciation in behalf of the city 
and the people, for the ability and faithfulness which con- 
tinues now as heretofore, to direct the operations of this 
valuable interest. 

Support of Poor. 

The number of inmates at the almshouse January 1, 1870, 
was forty-one, and the number at the present time is the 
same. During the year, twenty-eight have been admitted. 
One birth has occurred in the house. Twenty- four have 



mayor's address. 19 

beeu discharged, and five have died. Of the forty-one 
present inmates, five are boarders on account of other 
places, five on private account, four work for their board, 
and twenty-seven are supported by the city. Good health 
has generally prevailed, and under the present judicious man- 
agement, this department of our city will compare favorably, 
perhaps, with that of any of the kind in our sister cities or 
towns. I call your attention to the subject of heating the 
building, as one worthy of your consideration. The use of 
steam for the purpose commends itself on the ground of 
safety as well as economy. 

The sum of $11,400 was appropriated for this department 
the past year, and will be sufiicient for its ordinary demands. 
There has been a large increase in the calls for assistance, and 
the appropriation of $1,200 made specially for medical relief 
is already exhausted. The subject of appointing a city 
physician has been much discussed for some years past, but 
thus far has found no favor with the government. It is one 
entitled to judicious inquiry. 

At the last session of the legislature, an act was passed, 
giving to any soldier serving one year in the late war on the 
quota of any town, a legal claim on that town for support. 
It would seem, therefore, of the highest moment, that we 
should at once proceed to do, what should have been done 
years ago — procure an accurate record of all who served on 
the quota of our city during the war of the rebellion. We 
need it as an honorable historical document, and we also 
need it for a practical and important purpose. 

Since the removal to a neighboring city of that faithful 
friend of the poor, Eev. O. C. Everett, his place has been 
supplied by Kev. Charles F. Barnard. This gentleman, in 
pursuing his own peculiar vocation, is at the same time act- 
ing with our overseers of the poor, and materially aiding 
them in their duties. I think it not inappropriate to allude 



20 mayok's address. 

to him, and to express the obligations we must all feel for 
so faithful an ally in good works. 



Fire Department. 

The department is worthy of honorable mention for the 
efficiency, promptness, discipline and general good character 
of its members. I think there are evidences of a laudable 
desire among them to make it a credit to our city, and to 
themselves. No material change has been made in its con- 
stitution during the year. It consists of one hundred and 
thirty-eight men, divided as follows : chief engineer and 
four assistants ; four hose companies of twenty men each ; 
two steamers and a hose company of twenty-three men ; one 
ladder company of thirty men. The houses are in good 
order, as well as the apparatus ; though I am informed by 
the report of the chief engineer, that the hose is in a very 
ordinary condition, 

The fire telegraph has been changed so far as the distribu- 
tion of the alarm bells is concerned, during the past year, 
and is now satisfactory in its practical workings. The whole 
number of alarms during the year was eighty-two. Of these 
thirty were slight fires, requiring no service from the depart- 
ment, and twelve were false, or needless. The amount of 
loss is large, owing to the destruction of the Tudor Company 
building, though the average number of fires is no greater 
than that of the past few years. 

The total amount of loss is . . . $169,395.00 
Amount of insurance . . . . 146,815.00 



Net loss $22,580.00 



mayor's address. 21 



Miscellaneous . 

During the past year a contract has been concluded with 
Martin Milmore, of Boston, for the erection of a soldiers' 
monument. The design is of an original and interesting 
character. The contract price is $20,000 for the work com- 
plete in every particular. The location selected by the com- 
mittee is on Winthrop square. The monument, by the terms 
of contract, is to be in place on or before the 17th of June, 
1872, and the proper foundation will be set during this year. 
The basin has been removed to Sullivan square the past sea- 
son, and it is now proposed to erect the monument in its 
place. Nothing has been done this season for the renovat- 
ing or appearance of this square ; therefore, it was deemed 
best to leave it until the foundation, at least, for the monu- 
ment was in position. 

It has been the practice to make abatements on tax bills, 
and on drain and betterment assessments, in cases where 
parties owning and occupying the property so taxed or 
assessed, were infirm or aged, and had but limited means 
of support. There have been many such cases in our city, 
and the consideration shown is but just and proper. But 
considering that these estates may, and in most cases un- 
doubtedly will, naturally fall into possession of those amply 
able to pay these claims, I have thought whether it may not 
be worth while to attempt to get some legislation by which 
these abatements may become a perpetual lien on the prop- 
erty. I believe the subject is one quite worthy of consider- 
ation. 

The question of annexation to Boston is still agitating to 
some extent our community, with I suppose about the same 
difference of opinion as existed one year ago. So far as the 
city government is concerned, I take the same position that 



22 mayor's address. 

I did then. It is a matter with which we have no concern 
under the present aspect of it, and except by the expressed 
wishes of those from whom we derive authority. 

Our city has many rear lots of land reached by narrow 
passages or streets. To supply the demand for dwellings at 
a reasonable rent, and at the same time to make them remu- 
nerative to the owners, the tendency seems to be to erect 
buildings cheap in character and material, and at the same 
time to crowd them so closely, as in case of fire, to seriously 
endanger whole neighborhoods . I am told that many blocks 
of wooden buildings of fair outside appearance, and contain- 
ing six or eight tenements, have nothing but partitions of 
wood to separate them. The city is very compact in build- 
ings, and notwithstanding our abundance and power of 
water, the destruction by fire in some localities, and under 
some not unlikely conditions, would probably be very seri- 
ous. It is a consideration worthy of your thought, as well 
as that of our citizens. 

The copying of the old records of the town, and the class- 
ifying and arranging of the documents and papers belonging 
to it and to the city, has been progressing favorably during 
the past year. Mr. Harry H. Edes has charge of the latter, 
and Mr. A. B. Shedd, of the former portion of the work. 
Mr. Edes promises me that he will complete the undertaking 
during the year 1871, unless some unforeseen contingency 
should arise. 

Conclusion. 

I have thus, gentlemen, as fully perhaps as may be within 
the limits of an address of this kind, brought to your notice 
such prominent interest of our city as will be likely to en- 
gage your attention, and have further given you such gen- 
eral information as I deem of im23ortance to you. I have 



mayor's address. 23 

done it imperfectly, I am aware ; but familiarity with your 
duties as they arise, will supply any deficiency of mine in 
the detail of them. 

We are now ready to complete our organization, as relat- 
ing to the distinct branches of the government, and to begin 
our year of service. We have taken solemn obligations to 
support the laws, and to do our duty faithfully and impar- 
tially to the community, and to every member thereof. If 
we are faithful, independent and conscientious in our action, 
we shall not only satisfy our best and highest convictions, 
but will also secure the approval of those who have placed 
us here. 

I ofier you the customary congratulations and good wishes 
of the bright and pleasant new year. It shall be through 
no act of mine, if its declining sun does not shine upon a 
pleasant, harmonizing, and useful relation and intimacy be- 
tween us. 



REPORT OF THE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 



Office of the Mystic Water Board, 

Charlestown, March 15, 1871. 
To the City Council : 

The Mystic Water Board has the honor to present herewith the 
Sixth Annual Report of the operations connected with, and the 
present condition of, the Charlestown Water Works. 

The supply of water at the lake continues abundant and ample, 
although during a portion of the year it reached a point lower than 
at any time since the construction of the works. The remarkable 
drought experienced during the past year admonishes us, that in 
view of the largely-increasing demands for a supply from our 
lake, it would be wise and prudent to provide additional storage 
capacity at a very early period ; hence, it is recommended that the 
necessary action to accomplish this object should be had imm.e- 
diately. 

The height of the lake in the spring caused some damage to 
the dam, requiring some 800 hundred loads of stone to make the 
necessary repairs, and the water was washed into the land of Mr. 
Wyman, beyond the boundary line. It is deemed advisable to 
purchase a small strip of land, which may be done at a moderate 
expense, and establish a permanent boundary. The reduced 
height of the lake, during the drought, furnished an opportunity 
long desired to cleanse the basins and bays in the vicinity of 
Bacon's Dam, which has been done to the advantage of the purity 
of the water, as well as that of furnishing additional storage 
capacity. 

P'rom the lake to the pumping works we find everything in satis- 
factory condition. The engines are in good order, and give undi- 
minished satisfaction. The coal-shed erected is found to be a 



4 REPORT OF THE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 

great improvement, and a great saving thereby in the expense of 
handling coal has been effected. 

For the purpose of enlarging the engine-house for the accommo- 
dation of additional pumps, a strip of land adjoining, containing 
about two and a half acres, has been purchased for the sum of 
$400. Another adjoining parcel, containing about 80,000 square 
feet, and necessary for the same purpose, the Board not being able 
to acquire by purchase, has taken and holds under the provision 
of the act of the legislature, and awarded therefor the sum of 
$1,000, which is deemed to be the full value. In the matter of 
procuring an additional engine, as authorized by the City Council 
(the necessity for which becomes more apparent in view of the 
enormous consumption of water during the severe cold weather), 
the Board is proceeding with all proper despatch, and hope to 
have it in operation before the close of the year. 

The force main is in good condition, no repairs having been 
required. The grounds at the reservoir have been properly graded 
and put in order to conform to the new grade of the road. 

Under the authority granted by tlie City Council, a contract has 
been made with George H. Norman, of Newport, R. I., for the 
construction of a 30" iron and cement main pipe from the reservoir 
to Sullivan square, a 20" from Sullivan square through Medford 
street to Chelsea bridge, and a 16" iron from the same point 
through Canal and Mill streets to Hancock square, there connect- 
ing with the 16"; the contract embraces all the gates, hydrants 
and other appurtenances. It was intended that these pipes should 
have been completed by the first of November ulto., but a variety of 
circumstances prevented it. Jt will require but a short time after 
the weather permits, to complete the remaining 2,300 feet of 30", 
and we shall then realize the great benefit sure to be derived from 
this much-needed addition to our facilities for supply. 

In making the connections with the new mains, it became neces- 
sary to shut the water off from the citj^ on two occasions. Once in 
November, about eighteen hours, and once in December, twenty- 
four hours. By the favor of the Cochituate Water Board, we re- 
ceived a supply from the Boston pipes while the Mystic was shut 
off. For this and other courtesies received at their hands, as also 



REPORT OF THE MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 5 

from the Water Boards of Chelsea and Somerville, we desire to 
express our acknowledgments. 

The necessity for a convenient storage shed and yard for pipes, 
lumber, &c., and for a stable, being urgent, the Board purchased 
and has fitted up a fine brick stable with 13,000 feet land 
connected, situated on Tuft's street, the entire cost of which is 
S8, 723.50. 

The town of Everett has taken preliminary measures for a supply 
of water ; should it be desirable on its part to obtain it from Mystic 
Lake, the Board is of opinion that it ^vould be advisable to furnish 
it, if satisfactory terms can be agreed upon ; particularl}'^ so, for the 
reason that the laying of a main pipe through that town connecting 
with the distribution pipes in the high lands of Chelsea, would be 
of ver}^ material benefit to the distribution and circulation in that 
portion of Chelsea ; and also prevent the liability of freezins: up 
the pipes on Maiden Bridge, the limited supply now furnished 
through these pipes renderii:ig it necessary to waste large quantities 
of water during the severe cold weather. 

In a financial point of view, the works continue to prove a grati- 
fying success. With the increased and increasing demand for 
water, the income from water rates is steadily increasing, and gives 
promise of a liquidation of the debt incurred in the construction, 
in much less time than was anticipated, when the enterprise was 
initiated. 

The income for water rates for 1870 was ^156,216 08. Cost of 
maintenance, $36,820.83. Interest on water bonds, $58,340.00, 
leaving an excess of $61,055.25 to be credited to the construction 
account. 

Amount of Water Rates since the Introduction of the Water. 

Cliarlestown. 1865, .... $27,079 10 

47,323 16 

60,188 83 
68,815 32 
74,369 81 
82,227 95 $360,004 17 





1866, 




1867, 




1868, 




1869, 




1870, 



Amount carried forward . . < , $360,004 17 



REPORT OF THE CLERK 



OF THE 



MYSTIC WATER BOARD, 



FOR. THE YEAR 1870. 



KEPORT OF THE CLERK. 



Office of the Mystic Water Board, 

Charlestown, March 5. 1871. 
Edward Lawrence, Esq., President Mystic Water Board, 

Sir, — In conformity with the City Ordinance, I have the honor 
to submit herewith, the annual report of the Clerk for the year 
1870:-— 

The number of water-takers registered January 1, 1871, was 
10,706, distributed as follows : Charlestown, 4,100 ; Chelsea, 
2,700; Somerville, 1,014; East Boston, 2,892. 

During the year 1870, the water was supplied as follows, viz : 



Charlestown 
Chelsea . . . . . 
Somerville . . 
East Boston . 
Total.... 



Dwelling 
Houses. 


Families. 


Stores 
and shops. 


Manu- 
factories. 


4,008 


6,59« 


273 


45 


2,043 


2,834 


130 


11 


994 


1,183 


18 


5 


2,079 


4,959 


221 




9,124 


15,572 


642 





Stables. 

264 
92 
98 

163 



617 



The water has also been supplied for 8 tug-boats, 18 fire engine 
and hose houses, 74 public schools, 49 saloons, 80 offices, 24 
churches, 5 armories, 6 hotels, 4 railroads, 1 brewery, 3 tanneries, 
3 gas houses, 2 sugar refineries, 1 distillery, 2 potteries, 1 drain 
pipe factory, 3 coal oil companies, 1 bleachery, 1 tube works, 1 
chemical works, the Nav}'^ Yard, Naval Magazine, Naval andU. S. 
Marine Hospitals, State Prison, McLean Asylum, 2 City Halls 
and the Chelsea Ferry Company. 

The amount of receipts for water rates for 1870 has been as 
follows: Charlestown, $73,338.75; Boston, $36,822.74 ; Chelsea, 
$21,386.12; Somerville, $10,387.67 ; making $141,935.20 ; and 
there was due to January, 1871, $14,280.80, making a total of 



REPORT OF THE CLERK. 



11 



$156,216.08 for that year. The aggregate amount of water rates 
to January 1, 1871, is S481,462.24. 

The expenses of the office for 1870, including all the charges 
for collection and care in Chelsea and Soinerville, were $1,333.65, 
viz. : for clerk hire, $996.00 ; printing, advertising and stationery, 
$387.65. For the expenses of collection, etc., in East Boston, the 
sum of $2,500 per annum is allowed by the terms of the contract, 
which amount is reserved by the city of Boston, so that the 
amount of receipts credited to that city is clear of all charges and 
expense. 

The number of places shut off for non-payment of water rates 
was 50, 41 of which have been let on again. The amount collected 
for off and on water and fines was $165.00. 

Statement showing the number and kind of water-fixtures contained 
within the premises of water-takers^ to January Is?, 1871. 





Bath 
Tubs. 


Water Closets. 


Self 

Acting 

Hoppers. 


Foun- 
tains. 


Sinks. 


Wash 
Hand 
Basins. 


Taps . 


Pri'te 
Hyd'is 




1 Pan. 


Hopper 


Charlest'n . . 


619 


823 


253 


389 


4 


6,040 


1,173 


1,383 


121 


Chelsea 


299 


275 


62 


68 


5 


2,870 


254 


189 


35 


Somerville . 


198 


254 


109 


24 


3 


1,185 


232 


180 


28 


East Boston. 


227 
1,343 


295 


666 


18 


1 
13 


2,428 
12,523 


518 
2,177 


538 

2,282 


46 
230 


Total 


1,647 


1,090 


499 



Uri- 
nals. 

26 

11 

17 

26 

80 



Statement showing the number and sizes of Meters in use. 



VHERE APPLIED. 

Charlestown, &c 

Chelsea 

Somerville 

East oston 

Total 





SIZE 


OF METERS. 




t inch. 


1 inch. 


2 inch. 


3 inch. 


4 inch. 


30 


14 


16 


1 


2 


3 


2 


4 


1 




7 


7 


4 




1 


36 


15 


2 


2 




76 


38 


26 


4 


3 



Respectfully submitted, 

WM. W. PEIRCE. 

Clerk. 



j^NNU^L REPORT 



OF THE 



SUFERIXTENDENT 



OF THE 



CHAELESTOWN WATER WORKS 



1870. 



EEPOKT OF THE SUPERINTE^S^DEjS^T. 



Charlestown, Jan. 10, 1871. 
Edward Lawrence, Esq., President Mystic Water Board. 

Sir, — In conformity to the city ordinance, I herewith present 
the annual report of the Superintendent for the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1870. 

The works are in complete working order throughout. There 
has been an abundant supply of water during the year, although 
the level of the lake at one time reached a lower point than ever 
before since the works were completed, but it is now up to high 
water mark. The consumption has been the largest of any year 
since the water was let on to the city. The number of gallons 
drawn from the reservoir was 1,405,095,151, an excess over last 
year of 600,085,285. The supply to East Boston, which began 
Jan. 1st, including the leak in their pipe in the river, was about 
400,000,000, as near as canbe estimated ; the balance is on account 
of the graduall}^ increasing consumption in Charlestown, Chelsea, 
and Somerville, This increasing consumption demonstrates more 
than ever the necessity of the new main which is now being laid 
and which is partially completed. Ground was broken for the 
*' thirty" inch main on the 23d of August. It is divided into 
tlu-ee sections, two of which are completed, extending from the 
reservoir to Mt. Vernon street. Somerville, a distance of 14,800, 
leaving about 2.300 feet to be completed next season. The 20-inch 
main is completed and the water was let on Tuesday, Jan. 24, 
and it is now supplying Chelsea and East Boston. The new 
16-inch iron main from Cambridge street, throuofh Canal and Mill 
street, connecting with the 16-inch cement pipe on Main street, is 
completed, and the water was let on December 7th. It is now 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 15 

supplied by the 8-inch pipe on Cambridge street, but is to be con- 
nected with the 30-inch when completed. 

The water has been shut off wholly from the city once during the 
year, — on the 12th of November, — for the purpose of putting in 
the iron partitions and sluice-gates at the reservoir gate-house, and 
again partially on the 9th of December, to make the connection 
of the new 30 and 20-inch main with the 24-inch, and on each 
occasion the city was supplied with Cochituate water, through the 
courtesy of the Boston Water Board, 

LAKE. 

The greatest depth of water at the lake during the year was in 
January, which was 12 inches above high water level ; and the least 
depth was in October, which was 30 inches below high water level, 
or 23 inches above the top of the conduit. From January 1st to 
August 1st, the average depth was Gy^y- inches above, and from 
August 1st to January 1st the average depth was 18 inches below 
high water level, making the average for the year llxV inches 
below high water level. 

Advantage was taken of the low level of the water to raise and 
repair the riprap around the lower end of the lake, and also to 
improve a shallow section which was left exposed at the upper 
end, by grubbing it out about an average depth of one foot, thus 
removing a large amount of grass, water-weeds, and other accumu- 
lations, which has greatly improved its appearance. The fish- 
ways have proved a success, the fish passing through easily and in 
considerable numbers. 

CONDUIT. 

The Conduit is in good condition throughout, no change appa- 
rently having taken place since it was thoroughly examined a year 
ago. At the head gate-house a perforated cast-iron floor has been 
substituted for the old plank floor, which is a decided improvement. 

The iron gratings that protect the inlets from the lake to the 
well-room in the gate-house, give us considerable trouble, in 
becoming clogged up, and are so situated, that it is impossible to 
remove them. New gratings, to be placed inside the house, and 



16 REPORT OP THE SUPERINTENDENT. 

arranged to slide similar to the screens, are being prepared, which, 
I think, will entirely remedy this diflficulty. The pipe chamber is 
in good condition. 

ENGINE-HOUSE. 

The Engine House is in excellent condition. The engines have 
performed their duty satisfactorily, although a much greater de- 
mand has been made on them than on any previous year. They 
have been run alternately every day in the year, and on an average 
18.5 hours per day, and on 44 days they were run 24 hours per 
day, making 18,298,468 strokes, and pumping 1,408,484,028 gal- 
lons, using 3,258,200 lbs. of coal, being an increase of 69J per 
cent in the number of hours, 74§ per cent in the number of gallons 
pumped, and 67 per cent in the amount of coal used in pumping, 
and showing a duty of 530,783 lbs. of water raised 1 foot high per 
lb. of coal. 

The amount of coal used in firing and banking was 209,249 lbs., 
or 6J per cent of the whole amount used, and showing a saving in 
this item of 64J per cent over that of last year. The number of 
gallons pumped per lb. of coal used is 406.2, last year 338. The 
coal shed has proved a very valuable and convenient auxiliary to 
the engine-house, and it would be next to an impossibility now to 
dispense with it. 

FORCE MAIN. 

The force main has remained in good condition during the year, 
requiring no repairs. On Sept. 2d, for the first time, both pumps 
were put to work at the same time, and the result was very satis- 
factory. The pressure being even and more uniform, and increased 
only 2 lbs., while the pumps worked smoother and steadier, 

RESERVOIR. 

The Reservoir and the grounds about it are in excellent condi- 
tion. On the southeast side, the picket fence has been removed, 
the grade of the road has been lowered to conform to that of the 
new road around the college grounds at the point of entrance. On 
each side of this the banks have been sodded and surmounted by a 
hedge, thus making a great improvement in appearance of the 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT, 17 

grounds and also being in keeping with the improvements that are 
being made about the college grounds. 

In the gate house, a perforated cast iron floor has been substi- 
tuted for the old wooden one. The well-room has been divided 
into three equal compartments, by inserting cast iron partitions in 
which are located sluice gates, by which it can be thrown into one 
as before when desired. This is one of the most important im- 
provements that has been made on the works, as by it the supply 
to the city is under perfect control, and repairs in the well-room 
can be made at any time without shutting off the water from the 
city, which it was impossible to do before. The new thirty-inch 
main has also been carried through into the well-room, and a thirty- 
inch gate established in the gate-chamber. The average depth of 
water in the reservoir has been 21. S feet, equal to 25,955,084 gal- 
lons. 

SUPPLY MAIN. 

The supply main is in very good order, but one slight leak 
having occurred on it during the year ; and when the large amount 
of water that has passed through it is considered, and the number 
that are entirely dependent on it for their daily supply of water, it 
must be a matter of congratulation to the Water Board and to all 
concerned that no accident has occurred to it during the year. 

DISTRIBUTION PIPE. 

The distribution pipes in this city, of which there are now about 
24 miles, are all apparently in good condition. During the year 
there have been fourteen leaks on the wrousjht iron and cement 
pipe, of which one was a defective joint, and thirteen were defec- 
tive pipes. On the cast iron pipe there have been sixteen leaks, 
of which fifteen were defective joints, and one was caused by the 
pipe being broken by driving piles. In this city the number of 
feet of cement pipe laid during the year was 11,518 feet; of cast 
iron pipe the number of feet laid was 2,800 including the new 
mains. Forty-six new gates have been set in different parts of the 
city. 

In Chelsea, there has been laid during the year 3,037 feet of 
wrought iron and cement pipe, and 1,615 feet of cast iron pipe, 
including two gates. 



18 REPORT OP THE SUPERINTENDENT. 

In Somerville, there has been laid 58,933 feet of wrought iron 
and cement pipe, including fifty-seven gates. 

SERVICE PIPES. 

There have been entered, during the year, in Charlestown, 291 
new service pipes; in Somerville, 388; in Medford, 1, and in 
Everett, 1. Of the tin-lined pipes, 12 have been taken out and 
replaced by lead ; also 1 rubber pipe. 

There have also been 452 new service pipes entered in Chelsea, 
making a total for the year of 1,133. 

The number of new meters set in this city, during the year, was 
5 ; in Somerville, 7 ; in Chelsea, 1 ; total, 13. The number set 
previous was 79, making in all, 92. 

DRINKING FOUNTAINS. 

The drinking founts were all thoroughly repaired last winter ; 
the old iron supply pipes were replaced with lead. This was a 
decided change for the better, as they have worked very well the 
past season, requiring but very little care. Three new drinking 
founts, of an entirely different pattern, were set in Somerville, the 
latter part of the season, by order of the selectmen. They possess 
one advantage over these in this city, by being self-acting, by 
which no more water is taken than is actually used for drinking 
purposes. 

PIPE YARD. 

The new yard and stable which were purchased by the Board 

last season were occupied for the first time, June 18. Since that, 

the yard, which was much below the grade of the street, has been 

filled up, and a strong and substantial fence has been built around 

the entire lot. It will probably be necessary next season to put 

up a building for the storage of such material as requires to be 

protected from the weather. 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHAS. H. BIGELOW, 

Superintendent. 

The following tabular statements show the amount of pipe laid 
and the amount of service pipe entered during the year ; also the 
materials on hand at the end of ihe year. 



REPORT OP THE SUPERLVTEN'DENT. 



19 






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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



21 



DISTRIBUTION PIPES LAID IX CHARLESTOWN IN 1870. 





20 in. 


16 in. 


8 in. 


6 in. 


4 in. 


3 in. 


2 in. 


1 in. 




Kind of 


Street. 


















TOTAI-. 




Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Feet. 


Pipe. 


Williams Court . . 












168 




168 


Cement. 


Warren Avenue . 








24 










24 


t( 


Decatur 










250 








250 


(( 


School 
















117 


117 


(< 


Arrow 














100 




100 


c; 


Jefferj^on Avenue . 














175 




175 


(( 


North Mead .... 
















129 


129 


(( 


Cambridge .... 






400 












400 


(( 


Lincoln 










125 








125 


(( 


Cook Street Court . 














80 




80 


(t 


Dor ranee 












275 






275 


(1 


Fremont 












50 


150 




200 


t( 


Quincy 
















120 


120 


<( 


Jackson 










250 








250 


(. 


Polk Street Court . 














65 


• 


65 


t( 


Sherman Square . 














160 




160 


it 


Main and Medford . 


5,980 
200 
















5,9S0 
2iX> 


(< 

Iron. 


Canal and Mill . . 




2,700 














2.7<JO 




Total 


6,1S0 


2,700 


400 


24 


625 


325 


898 


366 


11, .51 3 


feet. 



Laid previoue, 



120.219 = 131,737 ft. 





12 in. 


10 in. 


8 in. 


6 in. 


4 in. 


3 in. 


2 in. 




Somerville . . 
Laid previoua . 


60 
5,887 




5,155 

16, M2 


25,.^34 
2U.965 


24.570 
16,554 


3.131 
177 


483 
11.18 


= 58.933 

= 61,243 = 120.176 ft. 


Chelsea .... 

l.aid previous . 


16 in. 


291 
5,722 


9,078 


533 

17.548 


3.565 

58.631 


273 

18.621 




= 4.662 

= 111.060 = 115,722 ft. 


1.460 



Total. 



Charlestow.-*. 

131.737 feet. 
24 miles. 5,ol7 ft. 



Chelsea. ' Somerville. 

115,722 feet. I 120.176 feet. = 367.635 feet 
21 miles, 4.842 ft. i22 miles. 4.016 ft. = 69miles. 3.315 ft. 



22 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



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REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



23 



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24 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 

TOOLS AND MATERIALS ON HAND AT ENGINE HOUSE. 

1 Portable Forge ; 2 pair Bellows ; 2 Platform Scales ; 1 Truck : 
1 Ratcbett ; 2 pairs Tongs ; 30 Wrencbes ; 1 Deferential Block ; 1 
set pipe Taps and Dies ; 1 Anvil ; 2 Vises ; 1 Die-stock and Taps : 13 
Cold cbisels ; 8 Iron Bars ; 1 Sledge ; 3 Saws ; 3 Brass Lanterns ; 6 
Brackett Lamps ; 2 Desks ; 1 Table ; 2 Clocks ; Brass Tray, and 
set of oil Fillers ; 150 feet Hose, 2J incb ; 8 feet, IJ incb ; 90 feet, J 
incb ; 2 sets Fire Irons ; 3 Sliovels ; 1 Coal Car ; 5 Brooms ; 2 
Pails ; 2 Wbeelbarrows ; J barrel Soft Soap ; 10 ba s Soap ; 3 Oil 
Cans ; J barrel Sperm Oil ; 5 barrels Kaolin ; 130 Fire Brick ; 13 
feet Iron Pipe, 2J incb ; 21 do., 1 incb ; 65 do., J incb ; 18 do., 

1 incb ; about 600 tons Coal ; 4J cords Wood. 

MATERIALS ON HAND AT PIPE YARD. 

36 feet of 3-incb Cast Iron Pipe ; 80 feet do. 30-incb ; 260 feet 
do. 34 incb ; 2 Sleeves, 36 incb (wbole) ; 5 do. 30 incb ; 4 do. 24 
incb ; 3 do. 30 incb (clamps) ; 2 do. 24 incb ; I pair Callipers ; 1,000 
common Brick. 

TOOLS AT GATE HOUSES. 

2 Iron Bars ; 3 Cbains ; 3 Bog Hooks ; 3 Nets ; 3 Grapples ; 2 
Ice Cbisels ; 1 Ice Hook ; 3 Boat Hooks ; 1 Boat ; 4 Oars ; 3 Hoes ; 
12 Sbovels ; 5 Wbeelbarrows ; 1 Hammer ; 1 Sledge ; 1 Trowel ; 5 
Pails ; 1 Oil Can ; 3 Drills ; 6 Chisels ; 3 Picks ; 1 Spade ; 2 Iron 
Rakes ; 1 Wooden Rake ; 1 Scytbe ; 1 Derrick ; 2 sets Falls and 
Blocks ; 50 pounds Rope ; 1 Iron Roller ; 3 Pumps ; 1 Table ; 1 
Stove ; 1 Grass Cutter. 

DISTRIBUTION DEPARTMENT. 

3 pieces 24-incb Iron Pipe ; 7 do , 16 inch ; 1 do,, 12 incb ; 1 do., 
10 incb; 10 do., 8 incb; 8 do., 4 incb; 2 do., 3 incb; 3 cast iron 
Pipe Sleeves, 16 incb ; 1 Clamp do., 16 incb ; 2 cast iron Branches 
8X8 incb ; 2 Tees 4 incb ; 7 Quarter Beads 4 incb ; 1 Reducer 8 to 4 ; 

2 do., 6 to 4 ; 1 do., 4 to 3 ; 2 Bands 8 incb ; 6 Plugs 4 incb ; 1 Fur- 
nace ; 1 set Caulking Tools ; 4 Flammers ; 23 lengths Wrougbt Iron 
and Cement Pipe 16 incb ; 4 do., 12 incb ; 13 do., 8 incb ; 34 do., 6 
incb; 127 do,, 4 incb ; 128 do,, 3 incb; 92 do., 2 incb; 20 do.. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 25 

3 inch; 2 Branches 10X10; 2 do., 8X4; 1 do., 6X(^] 1 do., 
6X4; 3 Sleeves 4 inch; 66 do., 3 inch; 48 do., 2 inch; 14 
Cement Plugs ; 2 Mortar Boxes ; 2 Mortar Hods ; 2 hot water Ket- 
tles ; 11 packages Rivets ; 1 Riveting Iron ; 2 pairs Rubber Mittens ; 

4 bbls. Cement ; 2 Derricks and Falls ; 1 Tool Chest ; 6 Rammers ; 

I piece of Enamelled Cloth ; 4 Sledge Hammers ; 6 Pumps ; 8 Cold 
Chisels ; 2 Paving Hammers ; 2 Pairs Shears ; 4 Steel Wedges ; 6 
Street Horses ; 2J coils Hemp Rope ; 1 Gate 6 inch ; 2 do., 10 inch ; 

II Gate Frames ; 10 Gate Wrenches ; 8 Gate Stems ; 45 lbs. Red 
Lead ; J Lowry Hydrant 16 inch ; 2 Lowry Hydrants Pots ; 4 Valves 
for do. ; 2 Stems ; 3 Chucks ; 4 Barrels ; 9 Frames and Covers ; 1 
Valve Wrench ; 1 Flesh Hydrant ; 7 Covers for do. ; 6 Casings ; 1 
Pot ; 1 Valve ; 6 Stems ; 26 Composition Nuts ; 2 pair Hydrant 
Tongs. 

SERVICE DEPARTMENT. 

520 lbs. Lead Pipe 2 inch ; 397 do., 1 J inch ; 388 do., } inch ; 
1612 do., finch; 927 do., J inch; 118 lbs. Block Tin; 45 lbs. 
Solder ; 2 Solder Pots ; 7 Solder Moulds ; 2 Fire Pots ; 6 Soldering 
Irons ; 3 Stop Cocks 2 inch ; 5 do., 1 J inch ; 45 do., 1 inch ; 141 
do., f inch ; 18 do., f inch ; 19 do., J inch ; 6 lever handle Stop 
Cocks 1 inch ; 4 do., f inch ; 11 do., f inch ; 11 do J inch ; 3 Cor- 
poration Stops IJ inch; 30 do., 1 inch; 33 do., f inch; 23 do., 
f inch ; 87 do., J inch ; 1 do., 2 inch ; 1 Valve 2 inch ; 1 Union 
1 inch ; 10 Soldering Nipples 2 inch ; 1 do., 1 J inch ; 6 Couplings 

1 inch ; 2 iron Pipe Drills 2 inch ; 1 do., 1 J inch ; 1 do., 1 J inch ; 

2 do., 1 inch; 1 do., J inch; 1 Tap for the same 2 inch; 1 do., 
1 J inch ; 2 do., 1 inch ; 1 do., J inch ; 7 Rimmers for the same ; 
1 Drill for cement pipe 2 inch ; 1 do., 1 J inch ; 1 do., 1 inch ; 
1 do., f inch ; 1 do., f inch ; 1 do., J inch ; 183 Stop Cock Covers ; 

3 pair Pipe Tongs 2 inch; 2 do., 1^ inch; 2 do,, j inch; 2 do., 
J inch ; 1 set of Dies for iron pipe ; 1 bbl. Resin ; 1 stationary 
Drill ; 1 Crab ; 1 Ratchett ; 1 Metre 1 inch ; 1 do., | inch, 
Worcester pattern ; 3 do., Blake ; 1 do., Hartford ; 2 Metre 
Unions 2 inch ; 18 do., f inch ; 3 Wrenches. 

STABLE. 

1 Light Business Wagon ; 1 Heavy do. ; 1 old do. ; 2 Hand- 
4 



26 REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. - 

carts ; 2 Harnesses ; 2 old Harnesses ; 2 Horses ; 1 Grain Chest ; 
1 Hay Cutter ; 1 Jack ; 5 Blankets, and the necessary stable fur- 
niture ; 1 Bundle English Hay ; ^ ton Salt Hay. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

20 Shovels ; 20 Picks ; 6 Wheelbarrows ; 3 Ladders ; 14 Lan- 
terns ; 8 Nut Wrenches ; 1 Spirit Level ; 1 Pair Scales ; 1 Mark- 
ing Pot and Brush ; 1 Mallet ; 3 Saws ; 2 Steel Squares ; 3 Pair 
Plyers ; 3 Stone Drills ; 3 Cutting Chisels ; 2 Wood Chisels ; 
1 Grindstone ; 1 Stove ; 4 Oil Cans ; 3 Tape Lines ; 2 French Lines. 



o 



MYSTIC WATER BOARD. 

18 7 1. 



EDWARD LAWRENCE, 

FRANCIS CHILDS, > From the Citizens at Large. 

LYMAN R. BINGHAM, 

PETER S. ROBERTS, 

From the Board of Aldermen. 

JAMES W. JACOBS, 

From the City Council, 



WM. W. PEIRCE, 

Clerk and Begistrar. 

CHARLES H. BIGELOW, 

Superintendent of the Works 



REPORT. 

To the City Council of the City of Charlestown : 

The Board of Trustees of the Public Library pre- 
sent their Annual Keport to the City Council, made 
up to the 15th of ]N'ov ember, 1870. 

The whole number of volumes belonging to the 
library, at this date, is 11,617. The number of vol- 
umes added since our last report, is 654; of which 59 
were donations, and 595 were purchased. In addi- 
tion to these, the late Mr. Otis Clapp gave by his will 
his library of about 800 volumes, which have not yet 
been entered in the accession catalogue, and there are 
a few new books now nearly ready to be entered 
therein : these, with the additions which will be made 
before the end of the financial year, Feb. 28, 1871, 
will carry the library up to nearly 13,000 volumes. 
During the year, 1,047 volumes have been rebound. 
The record of persons using the library shows an 
addition this year of 971, which makes 10,792 in all 
since its first opening. The total circulation since the 
opening of the library is 543,331 . The circulation for 
the year, 57,783, a gain of 23,678 over the last year, 



and 6,850 over the year ending Jfov. 15, 1868. This 
gain ha^ been gratifying to the board, as it fulfils the 
prediction of their last report, and indicates continued 
interest in the library, which needs but the stimula- 
tion of frequent additions of new books, to keep the 
circulation up to the highest point. The demand for 
new books, if only partially suj)plied, helps very much 
the circulation of the old, as a great many persons who 
would not come to the library at all, if it were not for 
the new books, take out old ones to fill up the time 
they may be waiting for the new. Libraries, like 
everything else, to be useful must be kept alive and 
active, and we therefore hope that for the coming 
year we may be supplied with funds sufficient for the 
purchase of a large number of the new and valuable 
book publications. This will insure an increase in 
the circulation over the present year, and a continued 
demand for what is interesting and instructive in the 
whole collection of books which we have in charge. 
The new table and .furniture in the reading-room 
have greatly improved its appearance, and added 
much to the comfort and convenience of visitors there. 
The reading-room is a pleasant place, and well pro- 
vided with the best publications of the day; and it 
affords us satisfaction to be able to report, that it is 
used, and seems to be appreciated, by a large number 
from all classes in the community. The old, the 
middle-aged, and the young, are daily represented 
there; and the tax-payer who would like to know 
what becomes of his money, would be satisfied by a 



visit or two at this room, that so much of it at least 
as is used for this purpose, is wisely and well 
expended. The library room is convenient, and the 
work in it can be done with ease and expedition; but 
it is too small for the library; and we are already 
puzzled to contrive for more shelf room, which is now 
actually needed. We can get a little temporary 
relief by putting shelves on the wall above the 
alcoves, and by storing some of the books, but little 
used, in a room which has been furnished by the com- 
mittee on city property, in the fourth story of the 
building; but for any further growth of the library 
we seem to be wholly unprovided. We hope to see, 
at no distant day, an appropriate building, near the 
centre of the present city limits, which shall be known 
as the Public Library of Charlestown, which shall be 
the evidence of public and private generosity, and the 
assurance of actual and advancing good sense and 
good taste in the community. 

At the regular meeting of the board, in July, Mr. 
John H. Holmes, the librarian, sent in his resignation, 
to take effect after the end of August, and in Sep- 
tember, Dr. C. S. Cartee was elected to fill the 
vacancy. He is so well known that any remarks con- 
cerning him will be unnecessary; and we simply 
state our belief, that he possesses such qualifications 
as will insure his success, and make him a most 
acceptable officer to all interested in the library. 

We present the financial condition of the libraiy 
in the following statement: — 



6 

Balance N^ovember 15, 1869, $1,417 85 

Amount received for Dog licen- 
ses under chap. 250 of the 
act of the Legislature of 1869, 
Collections for Fines, 

" Catalogues, 

" Old Paper, 

Sales of Settees, &c.. 
Appropriation for the year end- 
ing Feb. 28, 1871, 



Pay Rolls have been sent to the 
City Clerk amounting to 
Leaving unexpended at this 

date a balance of $2,629 51 

The items of expenditure have been as follows: — 



1676 


26 


104 


16 


41 


29 





56 


44 00 


3,500 00 


po,793 


12 


3,l(j'3 


61 



Hoi 


' Salaries, 


$1,275 30 


a 


Books and Periodicals, 


967 07 


a 


Binding, 


289 15 


a 


Stationery, 


46 83 


a 


Printing and Advertising, 


56 50 


a 


New tables and chairs for 






Heading Room, 


120 00 


li 


New shelving, gas fixtures, 






painting, &c., 


225 29 


u 


Insurance, 


45 00 


a 


Teaming, 


29 20 


ii, 


Incidentals, 


44 30 


a 


Expenses of removal, 


45 10 


u 


Cleaning rooms, 


19 87 



In closing this report, we have no new suggestions 
to make in regard to the value of public libraries. 
We look upon them as a part of the system of gen- 
eral education, and as deserving the same interest 
and care as the schools. The superintendent of our 
schools, in his last semi-annual report, remarks, that 
''in questioning pupils, and making suggestions to 
teachers, he approves and encourages every effort to 
go beyond the text-books to interest the pupils in 
the subjects taught, and thus lead them to gather 
information and illustration from other sources; and 
he thinks it desirable, that all the branches in ordi- 
nary business should be taught in a practical man- 
ner, and, if possible, a general interest should be 
awakened in some department of literature, history, 
or science, which will induce the children after leav- 
ing school to make a good use of the Public Library." 
We think he takes a corect view of the matter, and if 
his advice is followed, not only will the schools 
increase the importance of the library, but the library 
will add to the usefulness of the schools, and we 
shall have begun to act upon the right idea, that the 
school-days of the citizen and trae man must never 
cease. 

For the Board of Trustees of the Public Library, 

TIMOTHY T. SAWYEE, 

President. 



OFFICERS 



OF THE 



CHAELESTOWN PUBLIC LIBEARY. 

1870. 



Trustees: 

Timothy T. Sawyeh, President. 



George Hyde, 

ElCHARD FrOTHINGHAM, 

George P. Kettell, 
George D. Edmands, 



Richard ]S"a80n, 
James Adams, Jr., 
Aaro:n^ O. Buxton, 
Enos Merrill. 



Librarian : 

C. S. Cartee. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



In School Committee, September 15, 1870. 

Messrs. Gardner, Finney and Cutter were appointed a Com- 
mittee to prepare the Annual Report. 

Attest : F. A. DOWNING, 

Secretary. 



In School Committee, December 29, 1870. 

Mr. Finney submitted the Annual Report of the School Com- 
mittee, which was accepted ; and it was ordered that eight hundred 
copies be printed for distribution. 

Attest : F. A. DOWNING, 

Secretary. 



REPORT. 



By regulation and custom, the Annual Eeport of 
the School Committee is required at the close of the 
municipal year. As the school year commences in 
September, and the financial year in March, it is im- 
possible to present the complete results of the year's 
work in school, or a complete record of the year's 
expenses. 

The Committee will endeavor, however, with the 
aid of the Superintendent's report, to present an 
outline of what has been done during the year, what 
is now doing, and what it is hoped will be accom- 
plished. 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

By virtue of his office, the Mayor of the city is 
Chairman of the Board of School Committee. The 
Committee are much indebted to his Honor, William 
H. Kent, for the interest he has manifested in the 
subject of education, for his constant attendance at 
the meetings of the Board, and for his courtesy, effi- 
ciency, and impartiality as a presiding officer during 
the past year. 

At the first meeting of the Board in January, the 
organization was completed by the choice of F. A. 
Downing for Secretary, William H. Finney for 
Treasurer, and Abijah Blanchard for Messenger. 



6 

At a subsequent meeting, the various Standing 
Committees were appointed as designated elsewhere. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

At the close of his second year of service, Rev. J. 
H. Twombly sent a communication to the Board, 
declining to be a candidate for reelection, and the 
office was filled by the choice of Prof. B. F. Tweed, 
of "Washington University, St. Louis. Mr. Twombly 
had attended to the examination of the several schools 
in January and February. He was the first Super- 
intendent, and brought to the office ability, earnest- 
ness, and a heart thoroughly alive to the importance 
of the great work in which he had engaged. The 
labors he performed in stimulating and systematiz- 
ing the schools are worthy of high commendation. 

The present incumbent of the office, Mr. Tweed, 
is not a novice in education nor a stranger to Charles- 
town, having been formerly master of the Bunker 
Hill School. His high reputation as an educator 
commands the confidence of all. He has entered 
upon his work with a quiet and practical efficiency 
that insures success in this, as it has already achieved 
it in other departments of the same general work. 

FINANCES. 

The amount asked of the City Council for the 
financial year, commencing March 1, 1870, was: — 

For Salaries of Teachers, Officers and Superintenrlent, $88,750 CO 

Support ot Evening Schools 1,000 00 

Incidental Expenses 1 5,050 00 



$104,800 00 



This sum, in addition to the amount to be received 

from the State for the city's proportion of income of 

the school fund, was appropriated to be expended 

under the direction of the School Committee. 

The expenses, including the pay-roll of January 1, 

1871, have been 

For Salaries of Teachers, &c $69,752 81 

Support of Evening Schools 67 75 

Incidental Expenses 9,406 59 

$79,227 15 

Leaving a balance for expenses in Jan- 
uary and February, of $25,572 85 

It is estimated that at the close of the financial 
year, there will remain an unexpended balance of 
about $8,000. 

The principal of the fund of which the School 
Committee are Trustees, amounts to $5,600, invested 
in two notes of the city, at six per cent interest. 
The balance of income now in the hands of the 
Treasurer, which can be applied towards school 
expenses, is $814.77. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 
On Finance. — William Peirce, Charles E. Daniels, Nahum Chapin. 
On Books. — Wm. H Finney, James F. Hunnewell, Georo-e A. 

Hamilton. 
On Music. — S. S. Blanchard, Washington Lithgow, John Turner. 
On Printing. — William R. Bradford, Nahum Chapin, Willard 

Rice. 
On Examination of Teachers. — Geo. W. Gardner, Chas. F. Smith, 

Nahum Chapin, Charles E. Daniels, William Peirce, Wm. 

H; Finney. 
On Fuel. — John Sanborn, William Raymond. 
On Evening Schools. — Wm. H. Finney, William Raymond, A. E. 

Cutter, Nahum Chapin, L. P. Crown. 



8 



ORGANIZATIOTSr OF THE SCHOOLS. 



No. 
Sch>l. Teacher. 

1 Helen G. Turner . . 

2 Sffie G. Hazen . . . 

3 Elizabeth B. Norton 

4 Lilla Barnard . . . « 
6 Mary H. Humphrey 

6 Ella "Worth 

7 Martha B. Stevens . 

8 Sarah A. At wood . , 
B. Josephine Chase . 



10 
11 
12 
13 



14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
38 



19 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 

32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
87 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 
District ISo. 1. 

Location^ 

. Haverhill street 

. Cor. Charles & Bunker Hill Sts. 



M, Josephine Smith 
Elizabeth W. Teaton 
Abbie P. Richardson 
Melissa J. A. Conley 



Jennie D. Smith . . 
Frances M. Lane . . 
Ellen Hadley . . . , 
Mary A. Blanchard . 
Carrie E. Osgood . . 
Mary F. Richards . . 



District 
Mead Street . 



No. 2. 



District No. 3. 



, Sullivan Street 
(i (I 

, Medford " 

, Cross " 

{( (< 

Medford " , 



Martha Teaton . . . 
Mary P. Swain . . . 
Persis M. Whittemore 
Frances B. Butts . . 
Louisa W. Huntress 
Carrie C. Smith . . . 



District No. 

Bunker Hill Street . 



4. 



Moulton Street . 



5. 



District No. 

Louisa A. Pratt Common Street .... 

Elizabeth A. Prichard . " •'.... 

Elizabeth R. Brower . , " " . . . . 

Catherine C. Brower . . " ** • • • • 

Mary F. Kittredge ... " " . , • , 

Effie A. Kettell •' " . . . . 

Matilda Gilman Soley " . . . . 

District No. 6. 

Ellen M. Armstead . . . Bow Street 

Elizabeth F. Doane ..." " 

Sarah E. Smith ♦' " 

Charlotte M. W. Tilden . " " 

Caroline A. Rea Richmond Street . . . 

Frances A. Foster . ... " " . . . 



Committee. 



John Turner, 
y Charles E. Daniels, 
Geo. W. Gardner. 



A. J. Bailey, 
Wm. H. Finney. 



"Washington Lithgow, 
>• Charles F. Smith, 
"William Raymond. 



John Sanborn, 
Nahum Chapin, 

S. S. Blanchard. 



James F. Hunnewell, 
"Willard Rice, 
L. P. Crown. 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 



Lucy M. Small "Winthrop Street 

Anna R. Stearns .... Main " 



A. E. Cutter, 
>• Geo. A. Hamilton, 
"Wm. R. Bradford. 



Nahum Chapin, 
A. J, Bailey. 



9 
GEAMMAE SCHOOLS 



BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 

Committee. — Charles E. Daniels, John Turner, A. J. Bailey. 

Teachers, — Charles G. Pope, Principal ; Henr^- F. Sears, Sub- 
master ; Abby F. Crocker, Head Assistant ; Mary A. Eaton, 
Martha Blood, Emily M. Warren, Sarah A.. Benton, L. Edith 
Howe, Georgia A. Smith, Abbie P. Josselyn, Angelia M. Knowles, 
Lydia S. Jones, Mary S. Thomas, Ida O. Hurd, Emma S. Rand- 
lett, AUice M. Burt. 

WARREN SCHOOL. 

Committee, — Wm. H. Finney, A. E. Cutter, Wra. Raymond, 
Wm. R. Bradford. 

Teachers. — George Swan, Principal ; E. B. Gay, Sub-master ; 
Sarah M. Chandler, Head Assistant ; Annie D. Dalton, Marga- 
ret W. Veazie, Elizabeth Swords, Frances L. Dodge, V. A. M. L. 
Dadley, Georgeanna Haralen, Abbie E. Holt, Ellen A. Pratt, Julia 
A. Worcester, Abby C. Lewis, Maria L. Bolan, Alice Hall. 

PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 

Committee. — Charles F*. Smith, Washington Lithgow, Willard 
Rice. 

Teachers. — Geo. T. Littlefield, Principal; Frank W. Lewis, 
Sub-master ; Mary G. Prichard, Head Assistant ; Martha M. 
Kenrick, Mary C. Sawyer, Julia C. Powers, Elizabeth J. Farns- 
worth, Ellen C. Dickinson, Lydia A. Sears, Georgie T. Sawyer, 
Frances A. Craigen. 

WINTHROP SCHOOL. 

Committee. — Nahum Chapin, John Sanborn, L. P. Crown, S. 
S. Blanchard. 

Teachers. — Caleb Murdock, Principal; Wm. B. Atwood, Sub- 
master ; Mary A. E. Sanborn, Head Assistant. ; Bial W. Willard, 



10 

Harriet E. Frye, Mary F. Goldthwaite, Arabella P. Moulton, 
Josephine A. Lees, Abbie M. Clark, Ellen R. Stone, Elsie A. 
Woodward, Jennie E. Tobey. 

HARVARD SCHOOL. 

Committee, — William Peirce, James F. Hunnewell, Geo. A. 
Hamilton. 

Teachers. — Warren E. Eaton, Principal ; Darius Hadley, Sub- 
master ; Abbie B. Tufts, Head Assistant ; Ann E. Weston, Lois A. 
Rankin, Fanny B. Hall, Fidelia L. Howland, Susan H. Williams, 
Emma F. Thomas. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Committee. — Geo. W. Gardner, A. E. Cutter, Geo. A. Hamilton, 
James F. Hunnewell, A. J. Bailey, S. S. Blanchard. 

Teachers, — Caleb Emery, Principal ; Alfred P. Gage, Master 
of English Dept. ; George W. Drew, Sub-master ; Katherine 
Whitney, 1st Assistant ; Dora C. Chamberlain, 2d Assistant ; 
Frances M. Read, Mary L. Coombs. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

The reports of the sub-committees on these schools 
represent them generally to be in a satisfactory con- • 
dition. Still there is undoubtedly a great difference 
between the best and the poorest. The Superinten- 
dent has given a good deal of attention to these 
schools, with results already noticeable, and it is 
hoped that under his judicious management the best 
will become still better, and the poorest at least 
approximate the best. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 

Perhaps these schools might be more appropriately 
termed " Ungraded schools." They were established 
for children who were too old to attend the primary 



11 



schools, and not sufficiently advanced to enter the 
grammar schools. But it should not be understood 
that as soon as a pupil reaches the age of nine years, 
he is to be immediately transferred from a primary 
to an intermediate school. In many cases such chil- 
dren can as well pursue their studies in the primary 
school as in the intermediate ; and in most instances 
the scholar should retain his connection with the 
primary until he enters the grammar school. 

The teachers of these schools are worthy of high 
commendation for faithfulness and efficiency in the 
performance of their arduous duties. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

These schools, to use the almost stereotyped ex- 
pression of sub-committees, " are in good condition 
as a whole." ^^ As a wJiole " indicates, however, that 
in some particulars they may be improved. And 
when may it be expected that school committees will 
have no use for such a convenient phrase in giving 
commendations to schools? It is gratifying that it 
can be used conscientiously. But there are some 
faults, and there have been some disturbing agencies, 
as will be seen by reference to the superintendent's 
report. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The new building for this school was dedicated on 
the lith December, 1870, with appropriate and in- 
teresting exercises, an account of which will be found 
in the Appendix to this report. With its efficient 
corps of teachers, and all its added privileges, it is 



12 

confidently hoped and expected that the school will 
more than ever meet the wants of the community. 
In a school made up, as the High School is, of schol- 
ars from all the ranks of life, and of great variety of 
tastes and inclinations, it is necessary to provide a 
course of study to meet all their varied wants. The 
committee have therefore modified the course of study, 
and have established a course of three years, or an 
English Department. They believe that both valuable 
mental discipline and increased knowledge can be at- 
tained by pursuing this course when the scholar does 
not intend to take the time for the four years' course. 
This course of study is so arranged and interwoven 
with the full course, that in the studies pursued in 
common, there are the same advantages for each, — the 
same teachers and the same thoroughness of instruc- 
tion. The high prestige of the school is shared alike 
by all. In looking for a teacher for this department, 
the committee selected Mr. A. P. Gage, who for 
several years had been the efficient and successful 
principal of the Bunker Hill School, and he was 
transferred to the position of master of the English 
Department in the High School. This arrangement, 
while leaving the head mastership of the school solely 
with the principal, secures a better superintendence, 
by assigning specific duties to the master of the 
English Department, and giving him a special super- 
vision of that department. With this arrangement, 
and the additional facilities offered in the new buildr 
ing, the school starts upon its new career under the 
most favorable auspices. 



13 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The evening schools for the winter of 1869-70 were 
not so fully attended as during the previous winter. 
The whole number belonging was, of males 150, 
females 74. The average attendance was, males 52, 
females 39. Notwithstanding the small proportion 
of attendance compared with the whole number, 
there is no doubt that much good was accomplished 
by these schools. The pupils generally appeared to 
appreciate the efforts made for their benefit, and 
many of them made astonishing progress in their 
studies. The schools for the present season of 
1870-71 were established in the latter part of No- 
vember — two for females and two for males; and 
the attendance has thus far greatly exceeded that of 
the year before. 

These evening schools have already become a 
part of our educational system, and as experience 
is gained in their management, will, without doubt, 
be more and more efficient. 

DRAWING SCHOOLS. 

In compliance with a law of the State, passed at 
the session of the legislature of 1870, a school for 
instruction in mechanical, or industrial drawing, has 
been established under the direction of the Com- 
mittee on Evening Schools. A meeting for organi- 
zation was held on Friday evening, December 16th, 
at the High School-house, at which 117 pupils above 
the age of fifteen years presented themselves for ad- 
mission; and it was found necessary to divide them 



u 



into two classes, each of which meets two evenings 
a week in the High-School house. The present num- 
ber of pupils is 188, there having been accessions 
each evening that the school has been in session. 
The committee have engaged the services of Mr. 
Lucas Baker, who comes highly recommended for 
his accomplishments as a teacher of drawing. It 
may perhaps be necessary to establish a third class, 
and it will undoubtedly become needful to engage 
an assistant in this branch, as it is found that con- 
siderable individual instruction is necessary for 
progress. 

The experience of other cities, as well as the lim- 
ited experience in this city, leads the Board to believe 
that this class of schools meets a decided want which 
has existed in our Commonwealth, and will be pro- 
ductive of the best results in all respects, though the 
law requiring the establishment of such schools, no 
doubt, contemplates its utilitarian, rather than its 
aesthetic, value. 

PROSPECTIVE WANTS. 

Notwithstanding the many calls by the School 
Committee upon the City Government, and the lib- 
eral and generous responses thereto, there still 
remains much to be done for better school accom- 
modations. The present Harvard School building is 
entirely inadequate to the wants of the district. It 
is not large enough, by nearly one half, for the num- 
ber of scholars, and was built originally without 
proper regard to ventilation or yard conveniences. 



15 

The City Government have recently passed a vote 
to buy a large lot of land a short distance only from 
the present location. It is to be hoped that the work 
thus begun will be continued, and that by the time 
another annual report is published, a new and com- 
modious building, commensurate with the needs and 
standing of this school, will be ready for occupancy. 
Aside from sanitary considerations, we need the re- 
fining and elevating influences of good buildings and 
accommodations. All the scholars in our schools 
have hearts to be moved, and fancies to be wakened; 
and it is during the period of youth, while the mind 
is most susceptible, that every good influence possi- 
ble should be brought to bear upon it. 

Besides, the residents of this district have the 
undoubted right to all the benefits possessed by 
others in diff'erent parts of the city, where so much 
has been done. 

The Warren School, the Bunker Hill, the Prescott, 
and the High School, have now all the accommoda- 
tions and privileges we can reasonably ask for. 
There only remain the Harvard and Winthrop schools 
to be provided for with like generosity. The terri- 
tory of the city is so small, and so almost entirely 
built upon, that after these two schools are provided 
for, it is not likely there will be any further call for 
Grammar or High School buildings for a generation 
or two to come, or until the "mill pond" is filled in 
and completely built upon with dwelling houses. 

The taking of the proposed lot on Bow street for 
the Harvard Grammar School will necessitate the 



16 

removal of the Primary School building now standing 
upon it. It will therefore become necessary to pro- 
vide accommodations for these four schools. Indeed, 
there is now need for one or more school-rooms for 
this district, and the Board would suggest that a new 
primary school-house, to contain eight rooms, be built 
on the lot of land in Richmond street, owned by the 
city and now occupied by two wooden, primary school- 
houses. 

Increased primary school accommodations are also 
needed in the vicinity of Polk and Medford streets; 
and it has been found necessary to engage Harvard 
Chapel for the accommodation of a large number of 
surplus scholars in that vicinity. It has been sug- 
gested that in the event of the erection of a new 
building for the Winthrop School, it would be desir- 
able to have it built upon the lot of land on Prospect 
street, known as "Rydal Mount"; and the present 
building could be easily remodelled .o accommodate 
five or six primary schools. 

It is also desired that better accommodations 
should be furnished for the scholars attending the 
primary schools in the two one-story wooden build- 
ings on Medford street, both of which are small and 
inconvenient, and one of which is wholly unfit,* by its 
location and surroundings, for the purpose for which 
it has been used. 

CORPORAL PUNISHMENT. 

The subject of corporal punishment in school has 
become a question of great importance in considering 



17 

the proper methods of disciphne and instruction, and 
it should receive the careful and candid consideration 
of all interested in the maintenance and progress of 
public schools. "We read of a master in the olden 
time " who would in winter whip his boys over for 
no other purpose than to get himself a heat." Hap- 
pily those times have long since passed away; but 
unhappily they have left their trace behind. 

The opinion of the School Committee of Charles- 
town on this subject is expressed in the following 
regulation : — 

" The discipline in the schools shall be such as a 
kind, judicious, and faithful parent would exercise in 
his family, avoiding corporal punishment, especially 
in the case of girls (and by corporal punishment is 
understood all inflictions of bodily pain), in all cases 
where good and wholesome restraint and discipline 
can be secured by milder measures." 

The committee require that a record shall be kept 
of each case of corporal punishment, with the attend- 
ant circumstances, and a monthly report be made to 
the superintendent. 

It will be observed that although the Committee do 
not prohibit the use of corporal punishment, they re- 
quire that it should be avoided as far as possible. In 
other words, they authorize its use in certain cases, 
but prohibit its abuse. 

The Committee believe that the occasions for its 
use are far more rare than the instances of its inflic- 
tion. It is undoubtedly easier for the timey for an 



18 

incompetent teacher to dispose of. a case of infraction, 
or supposed infraction of the rules, bj administering 
two or three blows with a rattan, than by using that 
form of discipline which "a kind, judicious, and faith- 
ful parent would exercise in his family " ; but in many 
cases the punishment works almost irreparable injury 
to the child, and is subversive of good order and real 
.discipline in the school. It has generally been re- 
marked by those who have carefully examined the 
records of corporal punishment in our schools, that, 
as a rule, the most incompetent teachers do the most 
whipping; and it would seem that a teacher who is 
unable to maintain good order without the excessive 
use of the rod, should be replaced by one who can 
secure "wholesome restraint and discipline" "by 
milder measures. " 

The Committee understand corporal punishment to 
mean " all inflictions of bodily pain." But if the 
monthly reports can be relied on, either the term is 
understood differently by some of the teachers, or 
else there has been no other form of punishment ad- 
ministered in our schools but the use of the rod, — as 
there appears no record of pinching, shaking, slap- 
ping, &c. Perhaps, however, some of these modes, 
such as slapping on the head, might be more appro- 
priately termed capital punishment. But in what- 
ever sense the term may be understood, it remains as 
the settled opinion of the Committee that all inflic- 
tions of bodily pain should be avoided when consist- 
ent with good order and discipline. By good order and 
discipline the Committee would not be understood as 



19 

at all approving of that precise and tedious strictness 
which is so detrimental to the proper relation be- 
tween master and pupil, as also to the healthy and 
hearty progress of the school in its studies. It is 
absurd to require perfect uniformity in a class, thus 
destroying all of the native imagination and force of 
the individual scholar. All restraint not absolutely 
needful, either to the mind or the body, should be 
avoided. 

While the Committee would hesitate long before 
expressing the opinion that corporal punishment 
should be entirely abolished, they believe its ahuse to 
be far more detrimental than would be its abolition; 
and unless its administration be restricted to ex- 
treme cases of insubordination, public opinion will 
demand its prohibition by law. 

But there are other forms of punishment as objec- 
tionable as that of bodily pain. The Scriptures tell 
us that a tongue can scourge. A taunting or sneer- 
ing word may sting more than the tingling rattan, 
and a teacher that is continually finding fault will 
soon cause discouragement and derangement of a 
class of scholars, who, under judicious treatment, 
might be zealous and studious. 

The Committee are aware that much might be said 
in excuse for a teacher in contracting the habit of 
fretting y for it is frequently an unconscious habit; 
they fully realize the strain to which a teacher's 
patience is often subjected; but they nevertheless 
desire to call the attention of teachers to the subject, 
with the hope that the habit may be broken up, if 
formed, or guarded against if not already contracted. 



20 

* 

While speaking thus plainly and earnestly to 
teachers, it is but just to say that, in some cases, at 
least, parents are equally responsible for the exces- 
sive use of the rod in our schools. 

It will be seen that the Committee wish to restrict 
its use to extreme cases of insubordination, and every 
one conversant with our schools knows that those 
cases rarely occur when the home influence is what 
it should be. 

A petulant or thoughtless word, reflecting upon 
the teacher, in the presence of a child, is often the 
cause of such insubordination, and renders the pun- 
ishment necessary. If the pupil feels that the teacher 
has the confidence of his parents, he is not apt to 
place himself in an attitude of insubordination. 

The Committee would not, by this, intimate that 
parents should take no interest in the discipline of 
the school, or submit to what they consider wrong 
without complaint. On the contrary, they consider 
it the duty of parents to manifest such an interest, 
and aflbrd such aid as will contribute essentially to 
good order, and prevent the necessity of resorting to 
harsh modes of discipline. In case of doubt of the 
reasonableness of a school requirement, if the parent 
will go to the teacher, and in the spirit of kindness, 
make known his supposed grievance, such an inter- 
view, in a vast majority of instances, will put the 
teacher and the parent in harmony, and thus exert a 
twofold influence on the pupil, — an influence that 
will render punishment unnecessary. 



21 

In conclusion, the Committee commend the report 
of the Superintendent herewith submitted, for a more 
detailed statement of the condition of the schools, and 
for more comprehensive suggestions in relation to 
their management. 

Hespectfully submitted, on behalf of the Board. 

WM. H. FINNEY, 
GEO. W. GARDNER, 
ABRAM E. CUTTER. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OE SCHOOLS. 



Gentlemen^: In conformity to the requirements 
of your Eules and Orders, I present to you my first 
Semi- Annual Report, — it being the eighth of the 
Semi- Annual series of the Superintendent of Public 
Schools in this city. 

The following statistics will give a concise view of 
our schools for the Term ending July 23, 1870. A 
careful perusal will show their condition in point of 
numbers, regularity of attendance, &c., and, perhaps, 
while indicating existing evils, may suggest a remedy. 

Number of children in Charlestown between five and fifteen years 

of age, May 1,1870 6,081 

Number of pupils in all the schools during the term ending 

July 23, 1870, about 6,137 

Number in High School 250 

" Warren School 831 

" Winthrop School 560 

" Harvard 'School 447 

" Prescott School . 548 

" Bunker Hill School 827 

" Primary Schools 2,488 

" Intermediate Schools 186 

Average attendance in all the schools 4,582 

" " High School 224 

" ." Warren School 681 

" " Winthrop School 450 

" " Harvard School 318 

" " Prescott School... 448 

" " Bunker Hill School 638 

" " Intermediate Schools 106 

'* *' Primary " 1,717 



23 



Per centage of attendance in High School ^^jij 

*» " Warren School 92+ 

" " Winthrop School 92+ 

" " Harvard School .95+ 

*» " Prescott School 94 

" «« Bunker Hill School 94+ 

" *' Intermediate Schools 79+ 

" " Primary Schools 85+ 

Number of pupils admitted to the Grammar Schools in 

March, 1870 249 

Number admitted to the Warren School 63 

" • " " Winthrop " 51 

", " " Harvard " 41 

" " '* Prescott " 34 

" " " BunkerHill'' 60 

Number of graduates from the Grammar Schools, July 

23d, 1870 146 

Number of graduates from Warren 40 

" *' Winthrop 38 

" " Harvard 9 

" " Prescott 35 

" *' Bunker Hill 24 

Knowing that great efforts had been made by the 
Board, and by my predecessor, to grade the schools 
and to arrange a "course of study," I determined, in 
entering upon the duties of my office, to make my- 
self acquainted with the schools as at present organ- 
ized, to compare them with those of other cities, and 
to improve the methods of instruction and discipline 
in them, rather than make hasty innovations in a 
system which is the result of many years' experience. 
I did not, indeed, feel that I wg-s an entire stranger 
to the schools of Charlestown. A pleasant remem- 
brance of them, as they were twenty years ago, led 



24 

me to hope that I might find them in such a condi- 
tion as to make my duties pleasant and profitable. 

in this, I have not been disappointed; for, though 
the system is essentially the same, great improve- 
ments have been made in grading, and a much great- 
er degree of uniformity of attainments is secured to 
pupils entering the Grammar and High Schools. 

This is an important step. The pupils admitted 
from difierent schools are able, at once, to advance 
in the course prescribed, having had essentially the 
same preparation in the schools from which they 
were promoted. 

There is, however, a limit to this uniformity, that 
cannot be passed without interfering with the free- 
dom of the teacher, and the individuality of the pu- 
pils, — which must ever be respected in whatever 
deserves the name of education. 

There are two extremes to be equally avoided; on 
the one hand, such a disregard of system as tends to 
both mental and physical confusion, — and on the 
other, a too rigid system of dogmatic instruction, 
which checks and stifles all ingenuity in teachers and 
pupils, reducing the school to a mere piece of mech- 
anism, where everything goes like clock-work, and 
with as little thought. 

The true principle, I take to be that of nature, — 
variety in uniformity. That which makes science 
possible is uniformity. The naturalist finds certain 
essential characteristics which determine the class; 
yet within these limits, what endless variety is found. 
No two human faces are exactly alike, nor, indeed. 



25 

so nearly alike as not to be easily distinguishable. 
What a variety in trees, standing in the tables of the 
naturalist in the same class. 

Thus nature, while ever mindful of that uniformity 
on which order is based, seems to delight in ^the 
variety which makes all things beautiful; and the 
naturalist and the artist are alike lovers of nature, — 
the one for its uniformity, the other for its infinite 
variety. 

The same is true of character, — that which, as 
teachers, we seek to develop. 

There is a science of metaphysics based on essen- 
tial elements, — on uniformity; but within this well- 
defined sameness, and in perfect harmony with it, we 
have all those various shades of character drawn by 
a Shakspeare pr a Dickens, or which we meet in act- 
ual life. 

The characters of our friends are as distinctly 
marked, and as plainly recognized by us as their faces 
or forms. 

Let us, then, have in the school-room the greatest 
freedom in methods of discipline and instruction con- 
sistent with a general uniformity of attainment. 

No school committee can frame definite rules that 
will secure a good school. A general course of study, 
not too literally insisted on, may aid the best teachers 
and stimulate the poorest; but it should be under- 
stood that teachers are to secure the results indicated 
in the " course," by their own ingenuity. Perhaps 
it would be better in all cases to have a course, 
or programme of sttbjects to be taught, independent 



26 

of text-books ; but whatever the programme, I would 
have it interpreted with a freedom which would 
render it so, in fact. 

The text-book prescribed by the Committee, is the 
only one the teacher can require the pupils to obtain. 
But if he is able, from his own knowledge, or that 
obtained from other authors, to improve on the text- 
book prescribed, so much the better. It is not Kerl's 
grammar or Greenleaf 's arithmetic that we care for, 
but English grammar and arithmetic; and these 
books are prescribed as aids. If the teacher can fur- 
nish or find better methods, as he doubtless can in 
some respects, he shows himself to be a live teacher 
by adopting them. The text-book should be used 
by the teacher, not the teacher by the text-book. 

However perfect our school system, it is but a life- 
less mechanism without " the spirit of the living crea- 
ture in the wheels." 

In fact, the more perfect the system, the greater 
the necessity of ingenuity in the teacher to prevent 
settling into a formal routine, wearisome alike to 
teacher and taught, and making our schools, not sem- 
inaries, but cemeteries, of learning. 

The object of our schools is not merely to impart 
knowledge, but to quicken thought, to teach pupils 
how to investigate. The process by which the pupil 
arrives at a result is often more important than the 
result itself. 

The pupil, if educated, in the proper sense of that 
term, must be educated by his own activity, under 
proper guidance and restraint. Hence, any system 



27 

which makes, or seeks to make, all the pupils alike, 
regardless of personal idiosyncracies, is not an educa 
tional institution, but a manufacturing establishment, 
where "nature's journeymen make men," and, as in 
Shakspeare's time, the men thus made " imitate hu- 
manity most abominably. " 

Here, then, is the point where the true teacher 
shows himself. While the knowledge he imparts to 
each is essentially the same, the methods he adopts 
are as various as the capacities and dispositions of 
his pupils. 

It is not, I repeat, the amount of knowledge, 
imparted in a given time, which determines the 
character of the teaching. The cramming system is 
no more conducive to mental vigor and health than 
to physical. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

It cannot be denied, I think, that some of our 
methods of examination tend to drive teachers to this 
process of cramming. When the teacher's reputa- 
tion depends wholly or chiefly on the ability of his 
pupils to give a categorical answer to the questions ot 
the text-book, or on the number of scholars he sends 
to the High School, and the percentage of questions 
answered, he is, in a manner, forced to adapt his 
teaching to the examination they are to undergo. 
Now, if the test questions involve the memorizing oi 
unimportant dates, exact definitions in the words of 
the author, or arbitrary rules, it is vain to urge the 
teacher to be independent of the text-book. 

Teaching follows the law of demand and supply as 



28 



truly as any article of merchandize. Teachers are 
quick to notice the questions proposed by those in 
authority over them, and their teaching is, to a great 
extent, moulded by the character of those questions. 

In visiting the schools, questioning the pupils, and 
making suggestions to teachers, I have approved and 
encouraged every effort to go beyond the text-book, 
to interest the pupils in the subjects taught, and thus 
lead them to gain further information and illustration 
from other sources. 

Our teachers, I am happy to say, have, with great 
unanimity, expressed a decided preference for this 
mode of teaching, and are" disposed heartily to co- 
operate in all endeavors to improve the methods of 
instruction in our schools. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

The whole number of pupils belonging to these 
schools, on the 30th of June, was 2,082, — an average 
of about 55 pupils to a school. This, if the pupils 
were equally distributed, would be a reasonable num- 
ber; but, for evident reasons, they are not so distrib- 
uted, and while some fall short of this number, others 
are crowded. It will be remembered that the com- 
mittee appointed by the Board to equalize them by 
redistricting, after investigation reported, that it is 
not redistricting, but more room, that is required; 
and an order was passed requesting the City Gov- 
ernment to furnish it. 

This excess of pupils exists only in Districts No. 
4 and No. 6. The six schools in No. 4, had, in 



29 

June, an aggregate of 430 pupils, — an average of 
about 72 to a school. Taking the same data, the 
establishment of two new schools in this district 
would give 54 pupils to each school, and would 
supply only the immediate wants of the district. 

In District I^o. 6, the excess of pupils is chiefly in 
the lowest grade; No. 34 and No. 36, having an ag- 
gregate of 142 pupils, — enough for three schools, — 
while the erection of buildings in the district, con- 
taing nearly thirty tenements not yet occupied, indi- 
cates a large accession to the Primary Schools. 

The condition of our Primary Schools, in respect 
of discipline and instruction, is, as a whole, satisfac- 
tory, and compares favorably with schools of a sim- 
ilar grade in most cities and towns in this vicinity. 

What is here stated, however, of the whole, col- 
lectively, cannot be said of each school, individually. 

We have some excellent schools, and others that 
are not all that could be desired, nor that we have a 
right to expect. If this difierence could in all cases 
be accounted for by the difference in numbers or ac- 
commodations, it might be easily remedied, and would 
furnish an additional argument for good accommoda- 
tions and limited numbers. Unfortunately, however, 
our smallest and best accommodated schools are not 
uniformly the best, nor are our largest the poorest. 
This statement is not made as an argument in favor 
of large schools or poor school-houses, but to show 
that it is the teacher more than anything else that 
determines the character of a school. 

Hence the necessity of great care in the selection 
of teachers. Our salaries are such, that we can com- 

5 



30 



mand the services of teachers who have had some 
experience; and as that is the only sure test, I be- 
lieve justice to our schools requires that we should 
ignore all individual claims unless backed by a suc- 
cessful experience.. 

The idea that almost any one can keep a Primary 
School has gone by. 

The requirements are, in all respects, fully equal 
to those in the lower grades of the Grammar Schools, 
and in some respects, greater. The Grammar School 
assistant may, at any time, appeal to the principal, 
in matters of instruction or discipline, while the 
teacher of a Primary School has no such appeal. 

It may also be laid down as a general principle, 
that the younger the pupils, the greater will be the 
call on the teacher for ingenuity in imparting in- 
struction. 

DISTRIBUTION OF TIME IN THE PRLMARY SCHOOLS. 

It has been my object so to distribute the time de- 
voted to the various exercises, as to secure to each a 
recognition of its relative importance, as compared 
with others. 

Primary teachers have f^quently told me that it 
was not possible to give so much time to reading as 
is desirable, on account of the number of studies re- 
quired, each of which was marked on a scale of ten^ 
in the examination for promotion to the Grammar 
School. 

I think there are some grounds for this complaint. 
We certainly require more in Arithmetic than is 



31 

required in any other city with whose schools I am 
acquainted. In Boston, Cambridge, &3., no ivritten 
Arithmetic is required for promotion to the Grammar 
Schools, while we require a knowledge of the pro- 
cesses of Addition, Subtraction, and Multiplication. 
Without, however, excluding these from the course 
of study, I have advised teachers to practise only the 
simplest examples, and urged that special attention 
should be given to Reading, Spelling, and the Tables, 
and have made them tell more on promotion. 

Printing, writing, drawing, &c., in these schools, 
I regard chiefly as aids in discipline, and in reading 
and spelling. 

Physical exercises, and singing, take but little 
time, and are excellent safety-valves for the exuber- 
ant nervous energy of childhood. But none of these 
are to be regarded as, in any sense, the rivals of 
Reading, Spelling, and the Tables in Arithmetic. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 

Of this grade we have two schools ; the number 
of pupils in them in June was 147. 2^0. 1 has re- 
spectable accommodations ; but the room occupied by 
No. 2 is quite too small for the school. Nor would 
a more commodious room remedy the evils arising 
from an excess of pupils in the Intermediate Schools. 
The grading in these schools is necessarily much 
less perfect than in our Primary Schools, the material 
poorer and less tractable, and the requirements such 
as to call for more personal attention and instruction. 
Such being the case, it seems to me that the number 



32 

of pupils should be considerably less than in a Pri- 
mary School. 

When our Grammar School accommodations will 
allow it, I think there should be a room in each 
building assigned to this intermediate grade, giving 
the pupils the benefit of a master's discipline. 

The condition of our Intermediate Schools with re- 
gard to discipline and instruction is much better than 
we are entitled to expect; and, notwithstanding the 
difficulties under which they have labored, our inter- 
mediate teachers have proved that a good teacher can 
make a good school in the face of great obstacles. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

The buildings occupied by these schools remain the 
same as they were last year, except that they are one 
year older. 

What was then said of the Harvard and Winthrop 
school-houses, is true now, and may be said with 
greater emphasis. 

It was found necessary, on account of the crowded 
condition of some of these schools, to change the 
boundaries of the districts. This, of course, gave 
great dissatisfaction to many of the pupils, who were 
obliged to leave teachers and classmates to whom 
they had become strongly attached. 

The Committee will recollect that they were flooded 
with petitions to remain, and the startling fact was 
revealed, that a large percentage of our Grammar 
School pupils — if we take the number transferred 
as reliable data — were invalids. 



33 

This change, occurring in the middle of a term, 
interfered sensibly with the regular progress of the 
schools; for, grade as we may, and prepare as defi- 
nitely as we can the " course of study," there will be 
a difference in the administration of the several 
schools. Though they may reach certain objective 
points, at the same time there is, and must be, if the 
teachers are what they should be, a marked difference 
in the ways and means by which they have accom- 
plished the same end. 

But however great the evils resulting from these 
changes, they are liable to occur frequently so long 
as our Grammar school-houses remain in their pres- 
ent condition. The last change was made to relieve 
the Harvard and Winthrop schools, by utilizing some 
seats temporarily vacant in the Bunker Hill school- 
house. Inhere are already indications that the Bun- 
ker Hill school will need relief in March, that can 
only be obtained by restoring essentially the old limits 
to the district. But whatever inconveniences and 
hardships have resulted or may result from these 
changes, it should be understood by our community, 
in justice to the School Committee, that they are in 
no way responsible for them. They have not failed to 
make known the wants of the schools, and have pro- 
vided the best accommodations their means would 
allow, with the least possible change in the district 
lines. 

With the exception of the interruption caused by 
re-districting, our Grammar Schools have suffered 



34 

during the term only the occasional inconvenience of 
a change in assistant teachers. 

The principals of these schools are all gentlemen 
of experience, who, I believe, merit and possess the 
confidence of the Committee and the community. 

The presence of a head-assistant in the room with 
the principal, affords him an opportunity to bring 
himself into more imrnediate relation with all the pu- 
pils, and to advise with subordinate teachers of less 
experience. 

The beneficial results of this arrangement are seen 
in comparing our own schools, in regard to discipline 
and instruction, with schools of similar size where it 
does not exist, and where the supervision by the 
principal is necessarily much less perfect. 

The methods of instruction in our Grammar Schools, 
though not in all cases up to our ideal, are, I believe, 
fully equal to those of the best schools in the Com- 
monwealth. They are not, of course, equally good 
in all the schools. There is a tendency, in all pro- 
fessions, to fall into routine, and the teacher is not 
exempt from this liability. 

I might, however, give many instances of improved 
methods in our schools, which promise, and are 
already giving better results. An exercise in com- 
position, in one of our schools, written in my pres- 
ence, and upon a subject named by me, gave better 
evidence of the pupils' proficiency in English gram- 
mar, — ^Hhe art of speaking and writing the English 
language correctly," — than could possibly be ob- 
tained by hearing them analyze and parse what 
somebody else wrote. 



35 

Our Grammar Schools constitute what may be 
called the " popular branch " of our public schools. 
A large majority of the pupils who enter them from 
the primary schools, finish their school education in 
them, — in many cases not even completing the pre- 
scribed course. 

It seems desirable, then, that in these schools, all 
the branches required in ordinary business should be 
taught in a practical manner, and if possible, a gen- 
eral interest awakened in some department of litera- 
ture, history, or science, which will induce our 
children, after leaving school, to make good use of 
our pubhc library. 

For this latter object, our "course of study" makes 
but imperfect provision. Yet some of our teachers, 
perhaps all in greater or less degree, by familiar lec- 
tures, or conversations on interesting and important 
subjects not in the regular course, are sowing this 
seed broadcast, some of which cannot fail to fall into 
good ground; and whoever suceeds in awakening 
this interest in his pupils is more than a teacher^ he is 
an educator. He not only gives us good specimens 
of fruit, but plants and cultivates the tree that bears 
the fruit. 

COURSE OF STUDIES. 

The course of studies which has been, with some 
few exceptions, a growth in our New England 
schools, embracing what is now required by law to 
be taught in every town, has been adopted, essen- 
tially, as the course of our Primary and Grammar 
Schools. It includes "orthography, reading, writ- 



36 

ing, English grammar, geography, arithmetic, the 
history of the United Sates, and good behavior." 

This course is the result of a long and comprehen- 
sive experience. 

This fact alone is sufficient reason for caution in 
disturbing it. A wise conservatism, while not allow- 
ing itself to be made a slave to the past, will be 
careful not to mistake mere innovation for improve- 
ment; but will adhere to what commends itself to 
the reason, all the more tenaciously if it has stood 
the test of experience. But, while believing in a wise 
conservatism, let us not fall into the error of sup- 
posing that we have arrived at perfection, nor enter- 
tain so poor an opinion of ourselves as to think that 
we can make no improvement on the past. 

Have we developed all the latent power in our 
time-honored curriculum? and does not the progress 
of society in the sciences and the arts, in their appli- 
cation to business, require that something be added to 
the list? I propose to consider these two questions 
at some length. 

ORTHOGRAPHY. 

Orthography is first named, perhaps because re- 
garded as of the first importance, and the most 
difficult attainment. 

It runs through our whole course in the Primary 
and Grammar Schools; and even then, such is the 
irregularity of our composite language, that the eye 
is not unfrequently pained by bad spelling. There 
are certain principles of orthography which, if 
taught, would prevent mistakes that often occur in 



37 

several classes of words in very common use. But 
I suppose we must depend mainly on practice, in this 
branch, as we have heretofore done. There is a ques- 
tion among teachers of the extent to which the 
spelling-book should be used, and the class of words 
which should occupy the chief attention of the pupil. 

My own opinion is, that while a spelling book 
with words well classified may assist pupils in recog- 
nizing the general principles already alluded to, a 
large part of the practice in spelling should be upon 
words which the pupils are in the habit of using in 
conversation, or meeting with in their reading. 

The orthography of words of whose meaning and 
use they have no conception, will hardly be retained 
for a long time, but may be easily acquired when 
such words become a part of their vocabulary. 

READING. 

Reading stands next in the course, — an art in 
itself sufficiently wonderful, if its commonness had 
not made us insensible to its value. 

But reading gives us a more or less perfect tran- 
script of the writer's mind, according to the degree 
of perfection to which the art is carried. 

A merely tolerable reader will obtain the main 
ideas of a writer, especially where the understand- 
ing alone is addressed. But in all that constitutes 
our best literature, in poetry, and in the choicest 
specimens of prose, it is only a cultivated ear and a 
well-trained voice, that can bring out the aesthetic el- 
ement, the sentiment, and feeling, — and, at the same 

6 



38 

time, intimate the mental mood of the writer or 
speaker. In proof of tliis, I might confidently ap- 
peal to any one who has heard familiar pieces read 
by experts in such a manner as to invest them with 
beauties, which, with their own reading, they had 
never discovered. We pay the price of an ordinary 
volume to hear a good elocutionist read a few selec- 
tions from Hood, Dickens, and Shakspeare, when we 
have the books containing those selections unread, 
upon the shelves of our own library ; or, if not un- 
read, yet read with greater interest after paying a 
good reader for breathing into them a living soul. 

It has seemed to me that we fail in our schools, to 
make this exercise what it might be made. 

Of all the branches taught in our Grammar Schools, 
this appeals to the greatest number of faculties. 

Apart, then, from its o^vn value as an art, it is, per- 
haps, of greater educational value than any other 
school exercise. It calls, if rightly taught, more fac- 
ulties into play than any other. Nothing but a per- 
fect understanding of the author's meaning can secure 
correct emphasis, force, rate, and inflection. The 
sentiment, if appreciated, will manifest itself in the 
quality and modulations of the voice. 

As a means of general culture, it has no rival. It 
opens to the pupils the richest treasures of thought 
and sentiment on all conceivable subjects. A teacher 
who has command of a good elocution, can give, by • 
reading, a more subtile analysis of a choice specimen 
of prose, or a beautiful poem, than can be imparted in 
any other way. 



39 



But, to make the reading exercise what is here 
claimed for it, every teacher should not only be a good 
reader, but should understand the principles of elocu- 
tion. It may not be necessary to teach those princi- 
ples abstractly, or to say anything of the technical 
terms employed in the art; but the teacher should be 
so possessed with those principles that they will be 
unconsciously recognized by him in all his teaching; 
» and he should be able at all times to give a reason 
for the emphasis, quality of tone, the rate, pitch, &c., 
with which he reads a passage. I^o one would be 
considered qualified to teach music because he sang 
or played well by rote, if he knew nothing of the sci- 
ence of music; nor should one undertake to teach 
reading without making himself acquainted with the 
principles of elocution. 

Much of the early instruction in this branch is neces- 
sarily mechanical and imitative. The ear must be 
cultivated to an appreciation of all the elements of 
expression, and the voice to their utterance. 

When this is done, by systematic practice in artic- 
ulation, inflection, stress, &c., in the lower classes, it 
is not too much to expect that, in the higher classes, 
the reading exercise may be made to convey much 
information on important subjects, to create and 
strengthen a literary taste, — in short, to become an 
efficient means of general culture. 

WRITING. 

Writing has received much attention in our 
schools recently, and though, perhaps, of less educa- 



40 

tional value than some others, is still of great prac- 
tical importance. 

This, as a mechanical exercise, is carried to a great 
degree of perfection in our Grammar Schools. Of 
the special merits of particular systems, I am not pre- 
pared to speak. They all, doubtless, have their excel- 
lences, and are all valuable in educating the powers 
of exact observation, and training the hand to the 
execution of exact forms. 

GRAMMAR. 

Grammar, too, is found among the recognized stud- 
ies in all our New England schools, and has even 
given the name to what is perhaps considered the 
most important grade of schools. 

And yet, it may be doubted, whether, as generally 
taught, it is of much practical value. If it is merely 
a critical art, designed to enable one to detect errors 
in what somebody else has written, perhaps the com- 
mon mode of teaching it is as good as any. But if, 
as the books say, it is " the art of speaking and writ- 
ing correctly," then, committing the text-book to 
memory, and learning to analyze and parse, and cor- 
rect false syntax, do not teach the art. 

In teaching any art, three things are required, — a 
knowledge of principles, an examination of models, 
and systematic and abundant practice. A text-book, 
in the hands of a judicious teacher, may assist in 
teaching a knowledge of principles. 

Analysis and parsing — or the examination of 
models — will show the application of these prinei- 



41 

pies; but systematic and abundant practice alone 
will secure the power of ^^ speaking and writing cor- 
rectly. " The groat error that we have committed in 
teaching grammar is, undervaluing, or wholly omit- 
ting, practice in writing. 

"What proportion of the time now allotted to gram- 
mar in our schools, is spent in composition? I think, 
at least, half the time might be devoted to it without 
detriment to the exercise in analysis and parsing. 
How does the carpenter learn his trade? Not simply 
by studying the working plan of the architect, and 
committing to memory the names of the several parts, 
and the manner in which they are put together. He 
must do what he wishes to learn. " Ye shall Icnoio of 
the doctrine," says the great Teacher, ^^ if ye 6?o," &c. 
This is true in all things. We learn to read by read- 
ing; to sing by singing; to paint by using the brush. 
We learn a trade by working at it, of course under 
proper guidance^ and subject to criticism, — that 
what is done poorly at first, may be improved upon. 
We laugh at the folly of tlie man who resolved never 
to go into the water till he had learned to swim. 
Let us beware lest 

" Like that strange missile that the Australian throws, 
Our verbal boomerang slaps us on the nose." 

GEOGRAPHY. 

Geography seems to me to have usurped more time 
in our schools than properly belongs to it. 

We attempt to teach more facts than can be re- 
tained in the memory, and more than would be of any 
value if they were remembered. 



42 



The most accurate knowledge of the form of a 
country, and one which will be the most deeply im- 
pressed on the memory, is best obtained by drawing 
it; and the location of the mountains and great 
rivers will best indicate the character of the surface. 

If any one wishes to test the value of drawing the 
form, as compared with seeing it, in order to get an 
accurate idea of it, let him ask a dozen adults, who 
have been able to read for years, to make the printed 
letters of the alphabet, and, ten to one, less than half 
the number will be able to do it. Such, at least, has 
been the experience of those who have taught at 
the Teachers' Institutes. 

With regard to topical geography, it seems proper 
that we should have a fuller knowledge of our own 
State and country than of others. 

The descriptive part of our school geographies, if 
read with a constant reference to the outline -map, 
and accompanied by such interesting remarks as the 
teacher may be able to offer, will make a deeper im- 
pression, and be longer remembered than if commit- 
ted to memory, verbatim, as a task. But it may be 
said, that many teachers are not competent to teach 
in this way ; that their knowledge of geography is 
almost wholly derived from the text-book. If this 
is the case, the remedy is at hand. It is that the 
teacher should study the lesson; not exclusively from 
the text-book, but from a gazetteer, or some other 
work, and learn some interesting fact in regard to 
every important place mentioned, — something with 
reference to the occupation of its inhabitants, some 
curiosity it contains, or interesting historical event 



43 



connected with it. It becomes then more than a 
little circle on the map; it is a place around which 
some human interest clusters, and concerning which 
there is an interest to know more. 

The location of places will neither be learned with 
interest nor retained in the memory, unless held by 
association with some interesting event or historical 
fact. And this suggests the value of some historical 
reading in connection with geography; the pupil, of 
course, having his atlas before, him and looking out 
every place of importance mentioned in the history. 

In this way, I believe, more valuable geographical 
knowledge would be obtained in the time now de- 
voted to that study, with the additional advantage of 
having acquired such a knowledge of the history of 
some of the most interesting countries as would 
stimulate many to more extensive reading. The 
mathematical geography taught in our Grammar 
Schools will, of course, be reserved for the higher 
classes, who can best understand it. 

ARITHMETIC. 

Arithmetic is justly regarded as one of the most 
practical of school studies, and I think it one of the 
best taught. Undoubtedly there are faults, in some 
instances, in teaching this branch. But the errors 
which exist in our modes of teaching grammar are 
avoided to a great extent, by the fact that most of the 
pupils' time is occupied in the solution of problems. 
That is what they wished to learn, and, as already 
said, the way to learn it is to do it. 



44 



It is perhaps due to the labors of Warren Colburn 
that arithmetic has been taught better than anything 
.else. I am not sure that there is not a tendency^ at 
the present time, to work more by rule and less by 
analysis, than Colburn would approve. If such ten- 
dency exists, I doubt very much whether it is in the 
right direction. 

HISTORY. 

The history of the United States is also a study 
required by statute; and I should be glad to give the 
subject of general history a place in our Grammar 
schools, while we make it more prominent in our 
High School. That it has not held a more important 
place in all our New England schools is probably 
owing to the fact, that it has been poorly taught. 
The text-books have bristled with unimportant dates, 
and facts uninteresting to children, who have been 
required to commit to memory whole pages of them 
which could be retained only just long enough to 
answer the requirements of the recitation. The great 
object of the study of history — creating a desire 
to know more — is thus defeated. 

It is but recently that such^^ works as Dickens' 
Child's History of England have revealed to the 
young the romance of history, and shown them that 
truth may be not only " stranger than fiction," but 
more interesting. 

DRAWING. 

Drawing has pushed its way into the course of 
required studies. 



# 45 

The instinctf of childhood, which could not be 
whipped out, impelling the pupil to make pictures on 
his slate, came gradually to be " endured,'' perhaps 
not without a touch of pity, and is finally "em- 
braced." Is this the insidious approach of vice, or, 
is it not rather a proof that the instincts of childhood 
may be wiser than the mature judgment of manhood? 

Is it not possible that some other restless activity 
of youth, which now subjects the ofi'ender to punish- 
ment, may hereafter be found to be in the same cate- 
gory? " Take heed that ye offend not one of these 
little ones." 

Such being the history of the introduction of this 
branch into the regular course, it would not be 
strange if it were found that many of our teachers are 
but poorly qualified to give instruction in it. I will, 
therefore, suggest that it might be well in this respect 
to follow in the footsteps of Boston and some other 
cities, and employ, at least temporarily, a competent 
teacher in this department, to exercise a general 
supervision in all our schools. 

GOOD BEHAVIOR. 

The last, but not least, of the requirements of the 
statutes is, that "instruction be given in good be- 
havior." We have no text-book in our schools 
intended exclusively to teach " good behavior " ; nor 
is there an hour specially set apart for recitation in 
it. I^or is it necessary. It would be as absurd to 
think of teaching good behavior in that way as to 



4G 

teach to ^^ speak and write correctly," simply by 
teaching to parse. 

There are, however, opportunities constantly occur- 
ring for teaching good behavior. Perhaps, in some 
instances, teachers are liable to limit the phrase too 
much, and think of it chiefly or wholly as referring 
to behavior in the school-room. This, of course, is 
part of it, but by no means the whole, nor the most 
important, except as it is made to extend its influence 
over the whole. 

It is at this point that we touch what is called the 
" order " or " discipline " of a school, and the question 
is, how we can secure this, and at the same time make 
it contribute to "good behavior " everywhere, and at 
all times. 

Mere quiet or stillness in a school is not neces- 
sarily good order. If secured by harsh and objec- 
tionable means, — if the pupil is subjected to constant 
constraint, the very stillness becomes subversive of 
good order. There are so many hidden springs coiled 
in children, that nature will vindicate her claims, 
even in the face of severity. 

How, then, shall the teacher proceed to secure 
good order, and to teach ^^good behavior"? In the 
first place, let him iwesume all scholars to be well- 
disposed. To be suspected of wrong-doing is dan- 
gerously near to being guilty of doing wrong. 

Let the teacher frequently, and good-naturedly, 
speak of the necessity of good order to the comfort 
and well-being of the pupils, showing that disorder 
is an ofience not only against him, but each other. 



47 

Nothing but the spirit that hopeth all things can 
secure order, in its- best sense. The teacher must 
not only be just and firm, but magnanimous and 
kind. 

Then, again, there will be no good order without 
industry. 

"Satan finds some mischief still, 
For idle hands to do." 

Keep the scholars at work, and relieve the tedium 
by frequent changes. Change is rest. 

Try every means of interesting the pupils before 
resorting to punishment. But punishment will some- 
times be necessary? Undoubtedly. But let it be 
after all the means of persuasion which a fertile brain 
and a kind heart can suggest, have failed, — and 
then let it be inflicted more in sorrow than in anger. 

In the minor modes of punishment, as stopping 
after school, etc., it is not always the greater length 
of time that is most efiective. Five minutes is often 
as good as half or three quarters of an hour. If the 
penalty for tardiness is to pay double the time after 
school, the pupil soon finds it a bad bargain to pay 
ten minutes for five, and there is an inducement for 
him to get into school as soon as possible even if he 
is tardy. 

For graver offences, but those which do not affect 
the quiet of the school-room, as falsehood, etc., it is 
doubtful whether severity is the best remedy. The 
natural penalty for falsehood is loss of confidence. 
Let the teacher impress this on the mind of the 
pupil, and show him, in all kindness, the only method 



48 

by which he may regain his lost confidence. I do 
not say that this will cure all tendencies to falsehood. 
Neither will the rod. But I do say it is not by what 
the pupil deserves, but by what will probably be for 
his good and that of the school, that we should 
regulate our punishments. Isabella's words to An- 
gelo, when pleading for the life of her brother, whom 
she admits to have been justly condemned, may well 
be addressed to every one entrusted with a " brief 
authority " in the school-room. 

" How would you be, 
If He which is the top of judgment, 
Should but judge you as you are f 
Oh, think on that, and mercy then 
Will breathe within your lips 
Like man new made." 



EXAMINATIONS FOR PROMOTION TO THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

The graduates of our Grammar Schools — if the 
Committee have done their duty — have passed all 
the examinations in that grade, and the report of the 
condition of the several schools and of the faithful- 
ness and success of the teachers is made from data 
obtained by those examinations. 

The object of our examination for promotion to 
the High School, is to ascertain whether the pupil 
can join the class with profit to himself, and without 
detriment to the school. There are certain studies 
in which each lesson depends on principles devel- 
oped in a preceding lesson, like arithmetic, where 
it is necessary that the pupils shall have done essen- 
tially the same work. But in geography and history, 



49 

grammar and spelling, uniformity of attainment is 
much less important. 

There are many pupils in our Grammar Schools, 
whose primary training (in the country perhaps) 
was imperfect, and who may fail to get the required 
percentage for admission to the High School; but 
whose habits of thought and study, — in a word, 
whose mental disciphne is such that they would have 
no difficulty in taking a prominent position in the 
class, if admitted. 

I am informed by the principal of our High School 
that candidates who have failed to obtain the required 
percentage, but have been admitted by the Com- 
mittee on the High School, upon obtaining " satisfac- 
tory evidence of their good conduct and ability to 
sustain themselves," have almost uniformly taken a 
respectable rank, and not unfrequently a high rank. 
At Westfield, also, where a " School of Observation," 
as it is termed, under the supervision of the principal 
of the Normal School, occupies the position of a 
Grammar School, the pupils uniformly enter the High 
School on a lower percentage than from the other 
Grammar Schools, but they as uniformly are found 
among the first scholars in the upper classes of the 
High School. This is due, undoubtedly, to the fact 
that the instruction in the " School of Observation," 
as its name indicates, is broader than in the 
Grammar Schools, tending to develop and educate 
rather than to cram for the High School; and it 
suggests that the rank of pupils in the advanced 
classes of the High School is a better test of the 



50 

quality of the instruction in the Grammar Schools 
than the number and percentage of those who enter. 
In view of these facts, and the difficulty of deter- 
mining by a single written examination, the exact 
scholarship and capacity of pupils, it seems to me 
that this examination should be regarded as but 
one element, and that the same consideration of the 
Committee on the High School which is now 
given to those who fail, should be given to all the 
candidates. 



61 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

During the term ending July 23d, this school was 
separated into three parts, — its sessions being held 
in .three places, viz.: about one hundred of the junior 
class in Harvard Hall, with Mr. Littlefield and Miss 
Downes; the second middle class with Mr. Adams 
and Miss Coombs, in City Hall; and the first middle 
and senior classes, and about twenty of the juniors, 
with Mr. Emery, Miss Whitney and Miss Chamber- 
lain, in Seminary Hall. 

This separation of the school was, of course, at- 
tended with some disadvantages, especially in regard 
to supervision and general exercises ; but most of the 
classes accomplished the requirements of the pre- 
scribed course, and made good proficiency in all their 
studies. 

The monthly written examinations of all the classes, 
conducted by their respective teachers, and the oral 
examinations by the Superintendent, and by the prin- 
cipal as often as other duties would allow, indicated 
a satisfactory degree of ability, faithfulness, and 
thoroughness on the part of the teachers, — with a 
single exception, — and a corresponding interest and 
progress on the part of the pupils generally. 

In consequence of the disintegrated condition of 
the school, and the want of a suitable place for a 



52 



public exhibition, the usual graduating exercises 
were omitted. 

The class, however, met in the Seminary Hall, with 
a few of their friends, where they received their di- 
plomas from the acting chairman of the High School 
Committee, and were addressed by the Superinten- 
dent. 

The graduating class consisted of twenty-nine 
members, — eight boys and twenty-one girls, — being 
46 per cent of its original number. 

Of the four boys of the college class, three entered 
Harvard, and one, Middletown, Conn., all honorably 
admitted; two, with unimportant conditions, and 
two, free. 

The changes in the course of study, and the organ- 
ization of the High School, which, it is confidently 
believed, will render it more efficient as a preparation, 
and a means of culture for those who are to enter 
upon active business pursuits, although begun during 
the term of which this is a report, were not com- 
pleted, and will more properly receive attention in 
the next report, when we shall be able to speak of 
the practical working of the system inaugurated. 

With many thanks to you, gentlemen, for the kind 
consideration I have received at your hands, and the 
aid afforded me in the discharge of duties new to me, 
and therefore, perhaps, imperfectly understood, this 
Keport is respectfully submitted. 



B. F. TWEED, 

Superintendent of Public Schools^ 



APPENDIX. 



DEDICATION OF THE HIGH SCHOOL-HOUSE. 



This elegant and commodious building was dedi- 
cated by appropriate exercises on the 14tli of De- 
cember, 1870. 

The services were introduced by a hymn, sung by 
the pupils of the High School, under the direction 
of J. M. Mason, Esq., teacher of music in the Pub- 
lic Schools. Selections from the Scriptures were 
read by the Eev. Addison Parker. Prayer was 
offered by the Eev, H. W. Warren. 

Geo. B. ]S^eal, Esq., Chairman of Committee on 
City property, on passing the keys to the Mayor, 
made the following statement: — 

Mr. Mayor ^ and Ladies and Gentlemen : 

It is my agreeable duty, in behalf of the Commit- 
tee on Public Property, under whose supervision this 
building for the use of the Charlestown High School 
has been erected and furnished, to announce to you 
the completion of this noble work, and that we are 
ready to surrender to the School Committee this 
commodious and beautiful edifice, completely fit- 
ted up and furnished, to be by them devoted to the 
purposes for which it has been designed. 



54 

But before doing so, I will make the following 
statement, which I trust will be of interest to you 
all. The area of the lot of land on which the orig- 
inal building stood and upon which a portion of the 
present structure now stands, is 8,332 square feet, 
and was purchased by the city Aug. 2, 1847, for the 
sum of $6,338, or at a cost of about 75 cents per 
square foot. The corner-stone was laid with appro- 
priate ceremonies, Oct. 7, 1847, and the building 
dedicated on the 17th day of the month of June 
following, both under the direction of our first Mayor, 
the Hon. G. Washington "Warren, who had been one 
of the most earnest and active friends and promoters 
of the then new enterprise of establishing a High 
School in our city. The cost of the building was 
somewhat less than $20,000, so that the whole outlay, 
including the cost of land, was only about $26,000. 

The accommodations thus afibrded were for a long 
time considered amply sufficient for the school; but 
as the city increased in population, and in conse- 
quence, the number of pupils attending the school 
became larger and larger from year to year, the de- 
mand for a more commodious building became more 
and more pressing. Great changes and improve- 
ments in school architecture had been made in the 
meanwhile, so that, at the end of twenty years from 
the time of its erection, the building was generally 
admitted to be decidedly behind the age. 

In fact, it became at length so crowded with schol- 
ars, owing to the large numbers promoted from the 
Grammar Schools, that it was found absolutely nee- 



55 

essary to transfer a portion of the pupils to the upper 
rooms in the City Hall. 

The City Council at last decided to take measures 
to remedy the difficulty, and accordingly they au- 
thorized the purchase of a lot of land adjoining the 
original one, on the southerly side. The area of this 
lot is 3,882 square feet, and cost at about $2.12^ per 
foot, $8,250. Several plans for a new building, or for 
an enlargement of the original structure, were pro- 
posed; but finally it was decided to remodel the old 
building and to add to it on the southerly side, a 
very large and entirely new wing. The plans and 
specifications for the same were prepared and fur- 
nished by Mr. S. J. F. Thayer, of Boston, a skilful 
and successful architect, under whose personal super- 
intendence the work of enlargement and alteration 
has been done. 

The principal contractor for this work was Mr. 
Amos Brown, a well-known carpenter and builder of 
our city. The principal sub-contractors were as fol- 
lows: — 

For Masonry Robert R. Wiley. 

Plaster Work Chas. P. Brooks. 

Painting and Glazing Horatio G. Waldron. 

Stone Work J. F. & F. L. Gilman. 

Iron Work Cook, Rymes & Co. 

Gas Fitting and Plumbing F. A. Titus. 

Steam Heating Apparatus Geo. W. Walker & Co. 

The elegant and tasteful cases for books, minerals, 
philosophical and chemical apparatus, and several of 



56 

the teachers' desks, were manufactured and furnished 
by "Wassenius & Whittle, the settees by "W. O. Has- 
kell & Son, and the new desks and chairs for the 
pupils, by Joseph L. Eoss. The furniture which was 
taken from the old building, haying been fitted up 
for use in the new, as far as practicable, the entire 
outlay for new furniture did not exceed $5,500. To 
sum up the whole, the present structure, with its con- 
tents and the land upon which it stands, has cost the 
city about $87,000, not including the furniture from 
the old school-house just referred to ; but if we in- 
clude that, the estimated value of the whole estab- 
lishment may safely be fixed at $90,000. Desks and 
chairs have been arranged in the three principal 
school-rooms for 300 pupils; but whenever it may 
become necessary, further accommodations for 175 
more pupils, can be provided in the spacious recita- 
tion rooms. 

Fears for the safety of the former building, through 
supposed defects in its construction, having often been 
entertained, (and I must confess that those fears 
were not wholly groundless), great pains have 
been taken to make the present structure per- 
fectly safe; and to that end, intermediate and cross 
walls and solid masonry have been built up from the 
ground to the upper flooring; the walls- have been 
firmly bound together by cross-ties of iron, and 
massive iron girders resting on brickwork have been 
placed in the floors. I can therefore with confidence 
assure you that no fears need be entertained for a 
moment, that the floors or the walls will settle or 



57 

yield in the least, however crowded with people the 
building may be at any time. 

I think it entirely unnecessary for me at this time 
to enter into any description of this building or its 
appointments, or to speak in justly-merited terms of 
commendation of the very excellent workmanship 
therein displayed, or of the skill and taste of the 
architect, as shown in its design and general ar- 
rangement, for immediately after the close of these 
dedication services, the whole building will be thrown 
open to your inspection, and you will be able to see 
and judge for yourselves. I think, however, that you 
will agree with me in the opinion that this struc- 
ture, with its furniture, in workmanship, design, and 
finish, is not excelled by any of the kind in this 
vicinity. 

And now, Mr. Mayor, in placing in your hands 
these keys, and thus transferring the charge of this 
temple of learning, with all its appointments, to the 
Board of School Committee which you represent, let 
me congratulate you and all here present upon the 
successful completion of this good work, which re- 
flects great credit upon those who have been directly 
employed in its construction, and stands a real orna- 
ment and honor to the city in which it is located. 
May thousands of our youth of both sexes hereafter 
go forth from its spacious halls to take their respective 
parts in the business and active duties of life, well 
fitted by the discipline and instruction here received, 
to occupy with honor and credit stations of distinc- 
tion and high trust in the community, to fill accept- 



5a 

ably the more humble positions in life, or to improve 
and adorn the domestic circle. May no fire or any 
other casualty occur to mar or destroy this noble 
structure, but may it stand, for many long years to 

' come, an enduring evidence of the wise forethought 
and liberaUty of our City Government in the cause of 

.popular education; and if in the distant future it 
must no longer exist, let it pass away only when it 
has fully accomplished all the high and holy purposes 
for which it was erected. 

His Honor Mayor Kent, on receiving the keys 
and passing them to the Chairman of the High 
School Committee, spoke as follows : — 

Mr. Chairman of Committee on City Property : 

It is my duty perhaps, at least my privilege, 
to receive, from you the keys of this completed 
building. I feel it no more than just, representing- 
the government at this time, to add a proper appre- 
ciation and commendation of, and for, the zeal, 
faithfulness, and ability displayed by you and your 
committee, and the contractors under you, in the 
prosecution of the work. I believe the building is 
conceded to be nearly perfect in its details and ap- 
pointments — at least to-day. What may be demand- 
ed to-morrow, in this rapid age of improvement, I 
cannot say. But at the present speaking, I believe it 
satisfies all. It needs no comments from me; it 
speaks for itself. And now, Mr. Chairman of tne 
High School Committee, to you, in my turn, I trans- 
fer it. I have the honor to-day to represent, as I may 



59 

be able, those whose duty it is to build and equip 
school-houses. You, if you please, represent those 
whose duty it is to apply them to their proper use. 
The city of Charlestown has been liberal in its appro- 
priations for education. It is becoming in a commu- 
nity to be thus liberal, that believes in morality and 
education as the corner and foundation stones of all 
civil law and order, — of all progress, social and intel- 
lectual. As a consequence of this liberality, our 
schools rank high with those of our sister cities in 
the Commonwealth. I trust that with the increase of 
the means and appliances of knowledge, there may 
come an increased degree of responsibility on the 
part of those more immediately entrusted with the 
education of the children. 

A little child (so runs an allegory I have some- 
where read) seated at his father's door, and gazing 
at a neighboring hill bounded by the blue horizon, 
became suddenly inspired with the idea of reaching 
that shining belt of azure. With infinite toil and 
trouble he gained the summit, when lo! another 
eminence and a new horizon, and the object of his 
desire as far off as ever. Nothing daunted or dis- 
heartened he pressed on, pressed on, until his child- 
ish desire became a manly faith; until, having met 
with all the disappointments and trials of mortal 
life, his head became white and he died. But travel- 
ling on the surface of the round globe, the object of 
his desire he never achieved. 

In matters of education, as in all the highest and 
noblest aims and purposes of our lives, whether we 



60 

consider the means to be employed or the ends to be 
attained, it is not likely we shall ever reach our ideal 
standard. It is none the less our duty to press on- 
ward towards it, without fainting or distrust — with 
a child's faith and a man's purpose. 

I have the honor now, sir, to symbolically place in 
your hands this beautifully-completed temple of 
knowledge. Long may it stand, and long may there 
continue to go from it the wisest.and purest and best 
influences for the good of humanity. 

Eev. Dr. Gardner, Chairman of the High School 
Committee, on receiving the keys, and passing them 
to the Principal of the High School, made the fol- 
ing remarks : — 

Mr. Mayoe, — I receive these keys, sir, as signifi- 
cant of a trust to which the members of the sub-com- 
mittee on this school hope not to prove recreant. It 
will be our constant aim to make the High School, in 
its inner life — the school-soul — not unworthy of 
such a material habitation. 

Ancient Athens, in the plain of Attica, has its his- 
toric Acropolis, around whose rocky base the waves 
of war have surged, and on whose summit the master- 
pieces of architecture have stood for twenty-five cen- 
turies. The Parthenon most fitly crowns the citadel. 
Genius outlives brute force, — Minerva is mightier 
than Mars. 

Ladies and gentlemen : Bunker Hill is the historic 
Acropolis of modern Athens ; and this majestic 
structure, now dedicated to art, science, and all good 



61 

learning, is our Parthenon, — crowning and shedding 
additional glory on our citadel. We dedicate this 
temple to a divinity mightier than Minerva. Our 
goddess is not an ideal wrought in marble, ivory, and 
gold ; but an idea, taking on beautiful forms in the 
living, intelligent young images of God before us. 

The old Greek mythology had no god or goddess of 

^ 

popular education. The old Greeks had no such 
idea. It is essentially modern — Christian. . 

I seem to be standing in presence of two audiences 
to-day. These living faces before me represent one; 
these mute busts in their places on the wall, another. 
This silent audience of the great departed suggests 
to me the proper functions of our American High 
School. There are Homer and Cicero, with charm- 
ing verse and eloquent tongue, to plead the cause of 
classical learning. Whatever else may be introduced, 
the study of the old classic tongues of Greece and 
Rome must not be ignored. The study of language, 
in its wider relations, is the study of the world's life. 
Philology is the key to history, to philosophy, to 
science. Far distant be the day when the Latin and 
Greek languages shall be left out of the curriculum 
of what shall even look toward a liberal education. 

Then there is Benjamin Franklin — his very simula- 
crum seems to talk of science in its relations to prac- 
tical life. And Shakespeare and Milton — have they 
come here to bid us study our own strong and noble 
mother tongue, in its rich literature? The High 
School is not only a preparatory school for the Uni- 
versity; with a far greater number it is preparatory 



62 



to the immediate work of life. One of the proper 
functions of this school is to supplement and com- 
plete the English studies of the Grammar School. 
The father who wishes his son or daughter to pursue 
an English and commercial course of study simply, 
without the classic languages, has the same claim to 
such advantages here as he who would have his son 
*^fit for college." Hence, the School Committee have 
taken great pains to adapt the courses of study to 
the actual wants of the people, in the direction of 
higher instruction of all kinds, and have established 
an English and commercial course, under the imme- 
diate charge of a master, whose success in other de- 
partments of instruction insures the same in this. 
The study of the natural sciences will henceforth be 
made more- prominent, and special attention by the 
master be paid to such pupils as are fitting for busi- 
ness life. 

It is to be remembered, too, that this is a mixed 
school, for the education of girls as well as boys. 
The day is past when woman is content with sucking 
learning through a straw, while her brother quaffs 
the open bowl. The High School must be made high 
enough to teach and train young ladies for the few 
positions which it is allowed them to fill in the higher 
and more remunerative work of life. This is a 
' right ' which we purpose to concede. 

Thus the function of the High School in our coun- 
try is three-fold, — to furnish preparatory instruction 
to those who wish to enter higher institutions of 
learning; to give a good, practical business educa- 



63 

tion to those who wish to enter immediately upon 
mercantile or mechanical pursuits; and to afford 
such facilities for a complete course of study in sci- 
ence and letters, as shall insure a fair measure of 
discipline and culture to young ladies, who are 
denied admission to the colleges. 

With such a work before it, the great outlay for 
such buildings and appliances as are to-day devoted 
to the uses of this school, is eminently wise, and will 
prove a paying investment in the best sense of the 
word. 

It remains for me only to pass these keys on to 
him who will hold the trust as its immediate custo- 
dian, — the honored principal of the school, — who for 
so many years has ably filled this position, and who 
carries a key in his own bosom that has never failed 
to unlock the minds and hearts of his pupils. 

On receiving the keys, Mr. Emery, Principal of 
the High School, replied as follows: — 

It is with no ordinary pleasure that I receive this 
pledge of your confidence, with the land words you 
have spoken. I accept it as a fit symbol of the 
teacher's prerogative and duty ; as it opens to us 
the halls of this beautiful temple, so is it the teach- 
er's privilege to unlock the mysteries of science and 
the treasuries of learning. 

It is for this purpose that you have erected this 
noble edifice, consecrated to the service of public 
instruction and culture. 

The first High School has accomplished its work 
and passed away, — or rather has been developed into 



64 

the new, and incorporated with it — 1848 with 1870 — 
the old with tlfe new; the old, one of the most per- 
fect in its time, but constructed upon the single idea 
of artistic effect, with little reference to the comfort 
or convenience of teachers or scholars; the new 
embodying all that was worthy in the old, together 
with the essential improvements of more than twenty 
years of experience and progress. 

The history of the old is already written; that of 
the new commences to-day; and if its record shall 
not be even brighter than that of its predecessor 
it will not surely be the fault of our liberal city 
fathers, or of the gentlemen of the committee which 
you represent. You have given us all the facilities 
we have asked or desired, and I am not insensible 
to the corresponding responsibilities; but, under the 
wise supervision and cooperation which you have so 
generously granted us hitherto, and with the able and 
efficient teachers with whom I have the honor to be 
associated, it shall be my endeavor that the just 
expectations of the committee and the community 
shall not be disappointed. 

The following ode, written for the occasion, by 
A. B. Cutter, was then sung: — 

DEDICATION ODE. 

There, valor's monumental pile, 

Here, Academic Hall ; 
Fit structures for historic hill, 

And worthy coronal. 

Where swarthy Mars roll'd his black cloud, 

And lighted it with flame, 
Sweet peace is found, and temple raised 

To mild Minerva's name. 



There, as at Freedom's holy shrine, 

Be pilgrim homage paid ; 
Here, scholars scan the classic line. 

The lofty Iliad. 

For meet it is, in scholar's mind, — 

Call it not base alloy, — 
To mingle thoughts of Bunker Hill 

With Homer's siege of Troy. 

Then side by side thus proudly stand ; 

Due honor give each one ; 
This, dedicate to life's great aim. 

And that, to great deeds done. 

The Superintendent of Schools, Mr. B. F. Tweed, 
being called upon by the Chairman, spoke as fol- 
lows : — 

Mr. Chairma]^', — I feel some embarrassment in 
rising to speak at this stage of the proceedings. The 
gentlemen who have preceded me have all had a 
definite duty to perform. The Chairman of the 
Committee on Public Property gave the key to their 
remarks, and they certainly have rung almost all 
imaginable changes upon it. 

My misfortune is, — and it is one that will be 
appreciated by every musician, at least, — that I have 
lost the key. I may say, however, that it seems fit- 
ting that Bunker Hill should be chosen as the site of 
an institution, whose mission it is to perpetuate the 
blessings which follow in the train of freedom. 

The school-house, open alike to the sons and daugh- 
ters of the rich and poor, is the logical sequence of 
the monument, erected to the memory of the cit- 
izen soldiery who here laid down their lives that we 
might enjoy the blessings of civil liberty. 



66 

This splendid edifice, beckoning all our children 
to its embrace, and pointing our sons to the classic 
halls of Harvard and Tufts, or to lucrative and hon- 
orable positions in the great commercial houses of 
yonder metropolis, is itself a monument of the fidel- 
ity of the sons to the principles of their sires. It 
is more than this. It is one of a line of fortresses, 
stronger than any of a merely military character, 
extending from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The 
roll-call of the school-bell, commencing on our east- 
tern borders, and following the rising sun in his 
course through the heavens, is the signal for the 
parade of an army that spans the continent. 

De Quincey, in one of his inimitable essays, sup- 
poses the inhabitants of some distant planet to have 
so far excelled us in the construction of optical in- 
struments as to be able to see all that we are doing; 
and asks, "What is the grandest sight we ever have 
to ofier them? 

Is it St. Peter's, with its lofty dome and long- 
drawn aisles? Is it the ^' Field of the Cloth of Gold," 
Avhere rival kings vie with each other in the splen- 
dor of their royal retinue? • "No," h^ says; "These 
are mere baubles in celestial eyes;" and curiously 
enough, he gives his verdict in favor of a public ex- 
ecution as the grandest and most imposing of all 
human spectacles. Not, of course, a vulgar " hang- 
ing," where the scafibld has but its due ; but a public 
execution, where the victim wears the crown of mar- 
tyrdom, and is perhaps a woman, who, according to 
De Quincey, can die more grandly than man. 



67 

From this verdict, ,Mr. Chairman, I feel bound to 
dissent. There is, doubtless, a tragic interest and a 
moral grandeur in such a scene that may well arrest 
the attention even of superior beings, and cause 
them to burn with indignation at the treatment of 
the world's prophets and Saviours, who " have come 
to their own and their own received them not." 

But, for simple beauty unalloyed by any painful 
associations, for moral grandeur suggestive only of 
the noble and true, it seems to me that the march of 
this great procession of school-children, with its 
"thousands of thousands and ten times thousands, 
which no man can number," must be an object of 
intenser admiration and purer delight ; and the tones 
of the school-bell reverberating over hill, plain, 
mountain, and valley, till they are lost in the mur- 
murs of the Pacific waves, must greet celestial ears 
with a harmony not unlike the music of the spheres. 

To-day, Mr. Chairman, and by these ceremonies, 
we but proclaim an accomplished fact. 

The High School House is already dedicated. 

The ground is hallowed where it stands; its very 
adaptation to the purposes for which it is intended 
is its dedication. 

By these ceremonies, we publicly recognize the 
fact, that the city government has erected and fully 
and beautifully equipped our fortress. 

In behalf of the School Committee, we now man it, 
and wheel our division of the grand army of the 
republic into line. 



68 



To use the words of the beautiful ode we have just 
sung, may our youth, as they here pursue "life's great 
aim," resolve that they too,, like their ancestors, will 
not leave the world without a record of " great deeds 
done. " 

Hon. G. Washington Warren, the first Mayor of 
Charlestown, during whose administration the High 
School was established, was then called upon by the 
Chairman, and responded as follows : — 

REMARKS OF JUDGE WARREN. 

Mk. Chairman, — In introducing me to this as- 
sembly, whose presence shows their interest in the 
cause of popular education, you announce me as the 
one who laid the corner-stone of the Old High School 
building in 1847. I accept the distinction, though it 
carries with it the imputation of age. And I am 
willing to confess ten years more. For in 1837, I 
was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Pub- 
lic Schools under the town government, who were in- 
structed to consider and report upon a plan of a High 
School and of the cost thereof. The Board devolved 
the duty upon me to prepare and present that repoi't ; 
and being then comparatively fresh from college, and 
having previously devoted a few years to instruction 
in the higher branches, I entered upon the work im- 
posed upon me with proper zeal; and in due time I 
presented to the town meeting a complete sketch and 
outline of a High School proposed to be established, 
with full estimates. But no sooner was the report 
read, when, much to my surprise and disgust, a mo- 



69 

tion to indefinitely postpone the whole subject was 
carried, upon the simple assertion of the mover, that 
" of all institutions, the High School was the most 
aristocratic ! " 

But a good object, having firm friends, though- 
postponed for a time, you may be sure, will succeed 
at last. In ten years — a very short period for a 
community, but a momentous one to that generation 
of youth who were meanwhile deprived of the means 
of higher instruction which the law required should 
be given them — the new city celebrated its coming 
by the establishment of a High School, which, in all 
its appointments, should be inferior to none then 
existing. So it was, that the first city government, 
within six months of its inauguration, procured this 
glorious location, and laid with ceremony the corner- 
stone of the former building, — the only municipal 
buildhig in Charlestown, I believe, whose corner-stone 
was laid with public ceremonial. 

On our following anniversary, the 17th of June, 
1848, that building was publicly dedicated as a fit 
commemoration of the day. In delivering it over, 
sir, to the gentleman then occupying your position, I 
remember to have observed, that those who should 
hereafter have the management of its concerns, should 
ever bear in mind, that the principal cause of the par- 
tial defeat of our revolutionary fathers in the first 
great national battle fought on this memorable spot, 
was the want of ammunition ; and they should there- 
fore take care that ample means be always provided 
to maintain this institution, so fortunately placed, in 

10 



70 

order that the successive genei'ations here instructed 
should learn to prize and to perpetuate their inval- 
uable heritage. And so far, we may say, this High 
School has been nobly sustained. If at any time there 
was any apprehension that succeeding administra- 
tions of the city might overlook some of its interests 
through the influence of the old prejudices of the 
town, the result showed those fears to be groundless. 

As we look around us, the foundation of this 
school does not seem to have been so very long ago. 
For here the principal, in the maturity of his man- 
hood, still flourishes in full vigor, who, in his prime, 
first presided over its auspices. For an interval of 
a few years he strayed over to Boston; but, on a 
vacancy occurring, the committee and the friends of 
the High School were determined to bring him back; 
and may he long continue to shed here the lustre of 
his brilliant reputation and his true dignity of char- 
acter, and to impart the rich fruits of his experience 
and of his well-stored mind. We gladly remember 
how fortunate this school has been in all its teachers 
and assistants. To this the graduates of the school 
will bear willing testimony. We can hardly wish 
more for its future than it may have the same signal 
advantages always secured to it. 

We are truly sensible, sir, how short and insuf- 
ficient is the longest school term for acquiring what 
may and should be taught. The most that can be 
hoped to accomplish is to lay a solid foundation of 
the elements and rudiments of knowledge; to expand 



71 

the youthful mind and make it receptive and appre- 
ciative, and thus deliver over the keys of the different 
branches of learning, with which each one for him- 
self may be able in after life to unlock and explore its 
richest treasures. The great art of teaching is to 
show how to study. If the mind can be trained to 
master one subject thoroughly, it will by the same 
process find out of itself how to master other sub- 
jects. " Ex uno discite omnia." 

The honorable secretary of the Board of Educa- 
tion has told the young ladies that if they would 
learn the Greek language so as to be qualified to 
teach it, they would find immediate employment 
But those who do not intend to be teachers would 
find ample inducement and pleasure in this study, in 
being able to read the N^ew Testament in its own 
vernacular; and then by comparing the ancient with 
the modern Greek, as it may be read in a newspaper 
from Greece of the latest date, in curiously tracing 
the resemblance between the words now spoken at 
Athens and those in which Saint Paul preached there. 
There is no reason why ladies, in their self-culture, 
should not pursue the study of the ancient languages. 
I knew a chiss of ladies in Hebrew who became quite 
proficient in that which is the oldest and simplest of 
all. 

But, sir, not to exceed my brief limit, I will come 
to a practical conclusion. Alderman I^eal, Chairman 
of the Building Committee, has stated that the whole 
cost of the land and building provided in 184:7 was 
about $26,000. That was the day of small things, 



72 

when a thousand dollars seemed as large a sum to 
the tax-payer as ten thousand does now. For twenty- 
four years the oldbuildmg answered well its purpose. 
The cost, then, to the city is about a thousand dollars 
a year. The enhancement of the land would pay 
even for the demolition of the building, if that had 
been done. So it will be seen that the city, with its 
increased population, has only done its duty in pro- 
viding these superior but much-needed accommoda- 
tions, whatever they may have cost, it being presumed 
that the committee have been judicious in their ex- 
penditures. We hail this enlargement, and auspicate 
for the future as brilliant a career for the High School 
as it has heretofore enjoyed. May this improvement, 
sir, enliven the interest of your committee and of 
their constituents, and quicken the zeal of teachers 
and pupils; may every facility for study, and every 
advantage of instruction be here given and improved ; 
so that the High School, standing up by the monu- 
ment, shall be always signalized as our favored free 
University of public instruction. 

Hon. J. White, secretary of the Board of Ed- 
ucation; Mr. Jonathan Kimball, superintendent of 
schools in Salem; and Mr. A. P. Marble, superin- 
tendent of schools in Worcester, were called upon, 
and responded with interesting and eloquent remarks. 

The pupils then sung another hymn, after which 
the exercises were closed with the benediction by 
Kev. O. C. Everett. 



73 



COURSE OF STUDY FOR HIGH SCHOOL. 



The High School embraces tliree courses. 
ENGLISH AND COMMERCIAL COURSE. 

Three Years, 
J DNIOR CLASS. 

1. Ph3'siology ; Physical Geography, 

2. Algebra. 

3. History of England ; English Language and Literature, 

and English Composition. 

Wednesday and Saturd-iy. 

Book-Keeping by Double Entry, with practice in Banking, Insur- 
ance, and Business Forms ; Exercises in Elocution, Readings in 
Natural History ; Spelling and Defining. 

MIDDLE CLASS. 

1. Ancient and Modern History. 

2. Arithmetic reviewed ; Natural Philosopliy ; Mechanical 

Drawing. 

3. Geometr3\ 

Wednesday and Saturday. 
French Grammar ; Rhetoric ; Reading, Spelling, and Defining. 

S ENIOR CLASS. 

1. Science of Government ; Chemistry. 

2. Astronomy ; Botany ; Geology. 

3. French Grammar and Reader. 

Wednesday and Saturday. 
Mental Philosophy ; English Literature and Biography. 



74 



ENGLISH AND CLASSICAL COURSE. 

Four Years. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

1 . Physiolog}'^ ; Physical Geography. 

2. Algebra. 

3. Latin Grammar and Reader. 

Wednesday and Saturday. 
Exercises in Elocution, Readings in Natural History, Spelling 
and Defining, Practice in Business Forms, and English Compo- 
sition. 

SECOND MIDDLE CLASS. 

1. Ancient and Modern History. 

2. Arithmetic reviewed ; Natural Philosophy, with practice in 
Mechanical Drawing. 

3. Latin Reader, finished ; First Book of Caesar's Gallic War. 

Wednesday and Saturday. 
French Grammar, Rhetoric, Reading, Spelling and Defining, 

FIRST MIDDLE CLASS. 

1. Science of Government ; Chemistry, 

2. Geometiy. 

3. Second, Third, and Fourth Books of Caesar ; Cicero against 
Catiline, — Latin Division. French Grammar, and Translation, — 
French Division. 

Wednesday and Saturday. 
French Grammar and Reader ; Mental Philosophy. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

1. Astronomy ; Botany ; Geology. 

2. French Grammar and Reader. 

3. The First Six Books of Virgil, — Latin Division. Noel et 
Chapsal's Grammaire Fran^aise, and Translating English into 
French, — French Division. 

Wednesday and Satiirday. 
English Literature and Biography ; Moral Philosophy. 



75 

PREPARATORY COLLEGE COURSE. 

Four Years. 

Junior Class same as the English and Classical Course. 

THIRD CLASS. 

1. Ancient and Modem History. 

2. Latin Reader, finished ; First Book of Caesar^s Gallic War. 

3. Greek Grammar, and Greek Lessons. 

Wednesday and Saturday. 
Ancient Geography, Reading, Rhetoric. 

SEC OND CLASS. 

1 . Geometry, 

2. Second, Third, and Fourth Books of Caesar ; Cicero against 

Catiline. 

3. Greek Grammar, continued ; Xenophon's Anabasis. 

Wednesday and Saturday. 
Latin and Greek Composition ; Sallust ; Cicero, finished. 

SENIOR CLASS. 

1. The uEneid of Virgil. 

2. The Anabasis, finished ; Three Books of Homer's Iliad. 

3. Algebra and Geometry, reviewed. 

Wednesday and Saturday. 
Latin and Greek Composition ; General Review. 

GENERAL EXERCISES BY ALL THE SCHOOL. 

1. Calisthenics, by the girls, daily. 

2. English Composition ; Public Reading by the girls, and 
Declamation by the boys, every Saturday. 

3. Instruction in Music and Drawing, twice a week. 



AXXUAL REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldemnen, March 13, 1871. 
Report received, and referred to the Committee on Finance, 
and sent down for concurrence. 

DANIEL WILLIAMS, CRy Clerk. 



In Common Council, March 20, 1871. 
Referred in concurrence. 

< JOHN T. PRIEST, Clerk. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



April 3, 1871. 

The Joint Standing Committee on Finance, to whom was 
referred the City Treasurer's statement of his Receipts and 
Expenditures for the financial year ending Feb. 28, 1871, 

REPORT, 

That they have made a careful investigation of the books, 
papers, bonds, mortgages, notes, &c., in the hands of the 
Treasurer. They find the books kept in a systematic method, 
deserving of passing commendation. The accounts are prop- 
erly vouched ; and the balance on hand at the date named 
was as he states, one hundred thirty-four thousand, three 
hundred four dollars and thirty cents. ($134,304.30). 

In conformity with the ordinance, the Committee submit 
herewith a detailed statement of the Expenditures of the 
city for the said financial year, with a statement of the City 
Debt, a schedule of City Property, and the estimated value 
thereof. 

The Committee recommend that one thousand copies of 
the same be printed for distribution among the citizens. 

WM. H. KEN1\ 

GEO. B. NEAL. 

H. WELLINGTON. 

J. B. NORTON. 

JOHN FENDERSON. 

JOSEPH W. HILL. 

A. D. HOITT. 

A. 0. BUXTON. 

Committee on Finance. 



In Board of Maijor and Aldermen, April 3, 1871. 
Report accepted, and sent down for concurrence. 

DANIEL WILLIAMS, City Clerk. 



In Common Council, April 3, 1871. 
Concurred. 

JOHN T. PRIEST, Clerk. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen^ April 3, 1871 . 
Ordered : — 

That the Joint Standing Committee on Printing cause to 
be printed for the use of the citizens one thousand copies of 
the City Treasurer's statement of his Receipts and Expendi- 
tures for the financial year ending Feb. 28^ 1871, together 
with a statement of the City Debt, a schedule of City 
Property, and the estimated value thereof, and that the City 
Clerk give public notice when the same are ready for distri- 
bution, the expense of same to be charged to the Appro- 
priation for Contingencies. 

Passed, and sent down for concurrence. 

DANIEL WILLIAMS, City Clerk. 



In Common Council^ April 11, 1871. 
Concurred. 

JOHN T. PRIEST, Clerk. 



Dr. 



LINUS E. PEARSON, Treasurer, in Account to 



March 1, 1871. 

To Cash on hand, as per account, March 1, 1870 $39,408.58 

" from loans on City Notes 300,875.60 

" " sales of City Bonds 234,000,00 

*• •' " " Water Loan Bonds 150,000.00 

" " collector of Taxes of 1864 $167.20 

" " " " " 1867 9,345.15 

" " ♦' " " 1868 320.64 

" " " " " 1869 30,892.43 

" " " " " 1870 414,940.99 455,666.41 

" " Mystic Water Board " Water Rates " .... 164,996.11 

" " Assessments on Drains and Sewers .... 13,022.64 

" " " " Betterments 12,200.95 

'• " " for construction of Sidewalks . . . 7,886.26 

" " Sundry payments on Notes receivable .... 11,996.30 

" " Interest accrued on City Bonds sold, Notes due the 

City, Taxes, &c 13,551.52 

" " Interest accrued on Water Bonds sold .... 2,000.00 

" " State, on account of State Aid, 1869 .... 17,000.00 

" " " Amount paid by City " Militia Bounty " . . 7,235.90 

" " " " " " "Armory Rent" . . 1,400.00 

" '* " City's proportion of School Fund, 1869 . . ' 1,757.42 

" " Sales of house oflFal, from Mar. 1, 1870, to Mar.l, 1871 6,293.44 

" " State, sundry Cities, Towns, &c., reimbursement of 

amount paid by City for aid furnished by "Poor 

Department" 4,865.19 

" " Fines, Officer's fees, &c., due the City from Police 

Court, for the years 1869 and 1870, " Police Dept." . 1,956.01 

" " Hugh Kelly & Son, balance due _on bond for sale of 

Land on Mystic Street 1,281.70 

" " Hugh Kelly, one-half of purchase money for sale of 

land on Bunker-hill Street, " Gun House Lot " . 520.40 

" " John S. Whiting, for sale of strip of land on Bow St. 500.00 

*' " John Fitzgerald, for right of way over sti'ip of land 

on Richmond Street, "School Lot" .... 170.62 

" " Bunker-hill-Monument Association, 3d and 4th pay- 
ments due City on account of extension of Monu- 
ment Avenue to Main Street . . . . . 1,200.00 
" " Dog Licenses refunded, as per act of 1869, sales of 

catalogues, fines, &c., " Public Library " . . . 968.11 

" " P. J. Stone, Treas, cash dividend on forty shares of 

stock in Mystic-river Corp., owned by the City . 662.41 

" " U.S. Navy Department, sale of signal-box, "Fire 

Alarm Telegraph " 300.00 

" " Salesof old materials, manure, &c., " Repairs of Sts." 311.80 

" " Excessof original award over verdict of SherifF's jury, 

in case of John Cronin et al. " Park Street " . . 112.50 

" " Sales of old settees, " High School Furniture " . . 104.00 

" " R.Denvir, error in bill for labor, " Drains and Sewers" ' 21.00 

" " City Clerk, fees, &c., as follows, viz.: Recording 

Mortgages, $232.65; Marriage Licenses, $210 . . 442.65 

" " Billiard Table Licenses, $135.00, Circus Licenses, $1.">0 285.00 

" " Junk Dealers' " $21.75, auctioneers' " $2.00 23.75 751.40 

" " Costs on taxes, &c., "Contingencies" .... 551.32 



$1,453,567.59 



March 1, 1871, with CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



Cr. 



March 1, 1871. 

By Amount paid on City Deferred Roll of 1869 $47,821.23 

" Soldiers' Deferred Roll of 1869 1,525.29 

" City Pay Rolls of 1870 and 1871, Nos. 1 to 12 . . . . 774,031.69 

" Soldiers' Pay Rolls of 1870 and 1871, Nos. 1 to 12 . . . 14,087.16 

" City Notes 265,070.00 

" Interest on City Bonds and Notes 69,843.38 

" Interest on Water Loan Bonds 60,340.00 

Committee on " Sinking Fund," as per terms of ordinance . 21,468.50 
State Treasurer being tax on National Banli Stock owned by 

non-residents erroneously credited to taxes of 1868 . , 68.08 

State Treasurer, State Tax, 1870 46,200.00 

County Treasurer, County Tax, 1870 18,807.96 

Cash on hand to balance 134,304.30 

$1,453,567.59 

L. E. Pearson, City Treasurer. 
Charlestown, March 1, 1871. 



Dr 



BALANCE SHEET. 





City Property 


$323,193 


55 




Notes Receivable .... 


. 




18,452 


55 




Interest on Water Bonds 


. 




284,811 


90 




Warren Institute for Savings 






4,000 


00 




Charlestown Five Cent Scivin^s Bank 






3,000 


00 




Water Construction 






1,236,279 


44 




Cash 






134,304 


30 




Water Maintenance 






150,287^ 


42 




Militia Bounty .... 






100 


00 




Reduction of City Debt 






723,263 


64 




Collector of Taxes, 1869 . 






3,515 


54 




State Aid 






27,239 


56 




Betterment Assessments 






34,295 


29 




Drain Assessments 






8,218 


06 




Sidewalk Assessments . 






5,399 


97 




Collector of Taxes, 1870 . 






34,774 


61 




' 


$2,991,135 


83 



CITY OF CHAELESTOWN, March 1, 1871. 



Cr. 





Soldiers* Deferred Roll .... 


$2,135 


90 




City Deferred Roll 








119,894 


28 




Notes Payable 








396,818 


10 




City Bonds .... 








689,000 


00 




Water Bonds 








1,172,000 


00 




Public Library 








769 


10 




Archibald Babcock's Legacy 








3,000 


00 




Jacob Foss, Bequest . 








4,000 


00 




Bunker-Hill Monument Association 






2,400 


00 




Income of J. Foss, " Flag Fund " 






23 


51 




Water Rates .... 






518,626 


34 




New Harvard School .... 






80,168 


81 




Mystic River Corporation Stock . 






2,299 


79 












$2,991,135 


83 



EXPENDITUEES 



FOB THE 



Financial Year ending Feb. 28, 1871, 



SALARIES OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Wm. H. Kent, Mayor, 82,000 00 

Linus E. Pearson, City Treasurer, 2, 500 00 

Daniel Williams, City Clerk, 2,500 00 

Thomas E. Smith, City Messenger, IJOO 00 

Henry W. Bragg, " Solicitor, 1,250 00 

T. Edward Ames, " Civil Engineer, 1,500 00 

John T. Priest, Clerk of Common Council, 400 00 

Erdix T. Swift, City Marshal, 1,600 00 

" " " Health Officer, 100 00 

" " '' Supt. of Burials, 100 00 

Wm. S. Robbins, Supt. of Streets, 1,500 00 

Israel P. Magoun, Chief Engineer Fire Dept., 500 00 

Wm. E. Delano, Asst. '' " " 100 00 

Edward E. Turner, '^ '' " " 100 00 

John Bartlett, " " " <* 100 00 

JohnLouer, " " '' " 100 00 

Wm. E. Delano, Sec'y of " " " 75 00 

David B. Weston, " " Overseers of Poor, 1,000 00 

George S. Pendergast, Ch'm., ^ 1,500 00 
Nahum Chapin, V Board of Assessors, 700 00 

John Gary, ) 700 00 

C. S. Cartee, Clerk of Assessors, 500 00 

L. H. Bigelow, '' '' " 250 00 

Geo. S. Pendergast, " '^ pro tern., 150 00 



Amount carried forward, $20,925 00 



J.AJ XJ.^fXliXIJ^J.X UXV£iO. 

Amount brought forward, 
S. Augustus Rogers, City Sealer, 


$20,925 00 
490 00 


Charles A. Lerned, Milk Inspector, 


100 00 


Alex. L. Brown, Asst. in 


Treas. Office, 


555 33 


Charles G. Gibson, " " 


a ic 


167 15 


Charles A. Pearson, " '^ 


u ii 


77 52 


L. H. Bigelow, " " 


City Clerk's Office, 


487 00 


E. R. Wilde, " '^ 


$22,815 00 
22,425 00 


13 00 


Amount expended, 
" appropriated. 


$22,815 00 



Deficit, $390 00 



SALARIES OF TEACHERS. 

Caleb Emery, $2,500 00 

Alfred P. Gage, 2,050 00 

George Swan, 1,900 00 

George T. Littlefield, 1,900 00 

Caleb Murdock, 1,900 00 

Warren E. Eaton, 1,900 00 

E. P. Gay, 1,500 00 

Henry F. Sears, 1,500 00 

Wm. B. Atwood, 1,500 00 

Darius Hadley, 1,500 00 

Frank W. Lewis, 1,168 27 

James M. Mason, 1,000 00 

Nathan W. Littlefield, 800 00 

John G. Adams, 780 00 

George W. Drew, 733 34 

Charles G. Pope, 864 75 



Amount carried forward, $23,496 36 



EXPENDITURES. 



13 



Amount brought forward, 
Samuel J. Bullock, n 

Catharine Whitney, 
Abby F. Crocker, 
Sarah M. Chandler, 
Mary G. Prichard, 
Mary A. E. Sanborn, 
Abbie B. Fiske, 
Y. A. M. L. Dudley, 
Bial W. Willard, 
Anna R. Stearns, 
Lucy M. Small, 
Dora C. Chamberlin, 
Mary L. Coombs, 
Mary S. Thomas, 
Edith L. Howe, 
Angel ia M. Knowles, 
Lydia S. Jones, 
Martha B. Stevens, 
Ida 0. Hurd, 
Margaret Veazie, 
Julia A. Worcester, 
Frances L. Dodge, 
Ah'ce Hall, 
Georgianna Hamlin, 
Abby E. Holt, 
Maria L. Bolan, 
Ellen A. Pratt, 
Mary C. Sawyer, 
Ellen C. Dickinson, 
Martha M. Kenrick, 
Lydia A. Sears, 
Georgianna T. Sawyer, 
Frances A. Cragin, 
Elizabeth J. Farnsworth, 

Amount carried forward. 



$23,496 


36 


336 


54 


900 


00 


700 


00 


700 


00 


700 


00 


750 


00 


700 


00 


624 


31 


625 


00 


625 


00 


625 


00 


675 


00 


600 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


575 


00 


844.132 


21 



u 



Abby M. Clark, 
Arabella P. Moulton, 
Mary F. Goldthwait, 
Harriet E. Frye, 
Elsie A. Woodward, 
Josephine A. Lees, 
Adii E. Weston, 
Susan H. Williams^ 
JFannie B. Hall, 
Lois A. Rankin, 
Emma F. Thomas, 
Fidelia L. Howland, 
Helen G. Turner, 
Effie G. Hazen, 
Elizabeth B. Norton, 
Lilla Barnard, 
Mary H. Humphrey, 
Ella Worth, 
Mary J. Smith, 
Elizabeth W. Yeaton, 
Abbie P. Richardson, 
Maria J. Conley, 
Jennie D. Smith, 
Frances M. Lane, 
Ellen Hadley, 
Mary A. Blanchard, 
Martha W. Yeaton, 
Mary P. Swain, 
Persis M. Whittemore, 
Frances A. Butts, 
Louisa W. Huntress, 
Carrie C. Smith, 
Louisa A. Pratt, 
Elizabeth A. Prichard, 



EXPENDITURES. 




>unt brought forward, 


844,132 21 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 


t 


575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




590 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 




575 00 



Amount carried forward, 



3,697 21- 



EXPENDITURES. 


1^ 


Amount brouglit forward, 


$63,697 21 


Elizabeth R. B rower, 


575 00 


Catharine C. Brower, 


575 00 


Matilda Gilman, 


575 00 


Ellen M. Armstead, 


575 00 


Sarah E. Smith, 


575 00 


C. M. W. Tilden, 


575 00 


Carrie A. Bea, 


575 00 


Fannie A. Foster, 


575 00 


Carrie Osgood, 


575 00 


Mary A. Eaton, 


550 00 


Martha Blood, 


567 63 


Georgie A. Smith, 


541 6Q 


Emma S. Randlett, 


537 50 


Abby P. Josselyn, 


528 25 


Elizabeth Swords, . 


585 58 


Julia C. Powers, 


550 00 


Jennie E. Tobey, 


541 66 


Helen R. Stone, 


545 83 


S. A. Atwood, 


558 33 


Josephine S. Chase, 


545 83 


Mary F. Kittredge, 


533 33 


Effie A. Kettell, 


533 33 


Elizabeth Doane, 


562 50 


Paulina Downes, 


300 00 


Frances M. Reed, 


300 00 


Nancy Chandler, 


287 50 


Henrietta J. Merrill, 


287 50 


Rose J. Prescott, 


287 50 


Almira Delano, 


287 50 


Annie D. Dalton, 


262 50 


Abby S. Lewis, 


262 50 


Mary F. Richards, 


262 50 


Maria T. Savage, 


276 45 


S. Addie Benton, 


218 75 


Amount carried forward, 


^79,586 34 



16 



EXPENDITURES. 



Amount brought forward, 




$79,586 34 


Emily M. Warren, 






185 09 


Alice M. Burt, 






155 24 


Marietta F. Allen, 






136 30 


Caroline M. Sisson, 






127 69 


Anna S. Osgood, 






87 50 


Annie M. Prescott, 






107 26 


Elizabeth M. Gardner, 






23 54 


Homer Sweetser, 






20 00 


Lottie Knight, 






10 09 


Mary S. Dana, 






8 02 


Beiij. F. Tweed, Supt. of Schools, 






2,500 00 


F. A. Downing, Secretary of School Committee 


) 


300 00 


Wm. H. Finney, Treasurer of " 






350 00 


Abijah Blanchard, Messenger " 




- 


600 00 




$84,197 07 


Amount appropriated, 


890,507 


42 




Amount expended, 


84,197 


07 




Balance unexpended, 


$6,310 35 





SCHOOL CONTINGENCIES. 

Joseph Smith, care of rooms and labor, 
Daniel Conant, " • " 



J. S. Cunningham, 


11 


John Johnston, 


(I 


Matthew Boyd, 


u 


Daniel L. Small, 


^ u 


Moses Eastman, 


u 


Ann Taylor, 


11 


Martha Conway, 


11 


Catharine Keenan, 


a 


Bridget Kelly, 


(C 



tc 
li 
a 
u 
it 



$993 45 


841 


63 


851 


39 


940 


56 


254 


17 


670 


85 


87 


50 


135 


00 


125 


00 


110 


00 


70 


00 



Amount carried forward. 



$5,079 55 



EXPENDITURES. 17 



Amount brought forward, 
Margaret O'Brien, care of rooms and labor, 
Catharine Rogers, " 

Mrs. Moore, " 

Catharine Peterson, " 

Benjamin Hatchfield, " 
Henry Smith, " 

A. W. Locke, printing, 

C. S. Wason &. Co. '' 
Wm. H. DeCosta, '' 

Caleb Rand, " 

Boston Journal, " 

A. E. Cutter &. Co,, books, stationery, &c., 
J. G. Jones, " '' 

S. K. Abbott &. Co., binding books, 
Ira Bradley &. Co., '' 

Joseph L. Ross, furniture, 
Geo. M. Starbird, carpentry. 
Archer & Lund, " 

E. J. Norris, " 

H. B. &. W. C. Chamberlin,. repair apparatus, 
H. W. Homer, ^' furniture, 

Geo. H. Marden, window shades, 
Brintnall & Osgood, '^ " 

J. C. LeFerre, " elevators, 

E. 0. Webster, locks, keys, &c., 
J. Junio, '' " 

John McLoud, brushes, &c., 
Boston Ice Co., ice, 
Charles West, glazing, 
Charlestown Gas Co., gas, 
S. P. Hill & Co., sundries, 
A. C. Palmer, wall-paper, 
A. J. Carter, carpeting, 
Childs, Crosby, & Lane, carpeting. 



$5,079 55 


45 


00 


85 


00 


25 


00 


41 


50 


8 


00 


25 


25 


404 


50 


350 


00 


63 


95 


45 


00 


2 


50 


2,436 


81 


131 


82 


10 


00 


56 


50 


379 


50 


141 


04 


34 


03 


14 74 


92 


25 


53 


74 


127 


25 


6 


52 


247 


00 


31 


10 


9 


45 


214 


86 


13 


50 


99 


93 


162 


87 


259 


78 


28 


79 


30 


00 


72 


86 



Amount carried forward, $10,829 59 



18 EXPENDITURES. 

Amount brought forward, $10,829 59 

0. Ditson & Co., use of pianos, 68 00 

Harvard Chapel, '' " '' 54 00 

Water Board, water rates, 363 90 

American Tablet Co., blackboards, 20 50 

G. & E. H. Gififord, iron work, 11 34 

B. W. Gage, crockery, 4 62 

H. G. Waldron, painting, . 2 00 

Rufus Mason & Son, " . 94 50 

Enoch J. Clark, " 34 30 

A. Blanchard, disbursements, 167 36 

Charles H. Wing, stoves, and repairs, 53 54 

Griffin Gibson, " " " 194 72 

N. H. Stevens & Son, " " " 188 05 

Hadley & Wright, iron fence, 4 00 

Jasper Stone, clocks, and repairs, 161 20 

Lewis Hunt, hardware, 19 50 

Wm. B. Moore & Son, hardware, 2 84 

F. A. Titus, plumbing, 45 62 

Stowell & Co., chemicals, 2 40 

Thomas Sprague, rubbers, . 8 00 



Amount appropriated, $15,050 00 

" expended, 12,329 48 

82,720 52 
Transferred to evening schools, 1,000 00 

Balance unexpended, $1,720 52 



$12,329 48 



HIGH SCHOOL ENLARGEMENT, FURNISHING, &c. 

Amos Brown, builder, contract, $53,712 88 

S. J. F. Thayer, architect, " 1,262 50 

Geo. W. Walker & Co., furnaces, contract, 6,353 00 

Amount carried forward, $61,328 38 



EXPENDITURES. 

Amount brought forward, 
R. R. Wiley, mason work, 
C. L. Lothrop, " " 

H. G. Waldron, painting. 
Cook, Rymes, & Co., iron work, 
John Louer, " ^' 

F. A. Titus, gas fittings, 
Brintnall & Osgood, paper and hanging, 
John McLoud, stone work,' 
Ch. Gas Co., service pipe, 
J. F. & F. L. Gilman, stone work, 
Morss & Wbyte, window guards, 
Alex. Campbell, plumbing, 
C. S. Parker & Sons, roofing work, 
Burns & Goodwin, fuel for drying, 
Charles P. Brooks, plastering, 
J. W. Wilson, teaming, 
A. J. Carter, storage of furniture, 
John Johnston, labor. 
Harvard Chapel, rent of rooms. 
Free Will Baptist Society, rent of rooms, 
W. W. Wheildon, advertising, 
A. J. Carter, furniture, 
Joseph L. Ross, " 
H. W. Homer, " 
J. 'W. Ross, " 

W. 0. Haskell & Sons, furniture, 
Thomas A. Upham, furniture, 
Wassineus & Whittle, '' 
Benjamin Brintnall, " 
John McLoud, 



19 



cc 



Expended prior to March 1, 1870, 
u since " " '' 

Total cost, 

Rec'd from sale of settees, 

City Debt, $81,777 90 



,^ard. 


$61,328 38 
672 40 




179 65 




515 62 




455 65 




13 75 




1,111 18 


3; 


33 86 




6 75 




8 20 




242 72 




260 42 




56 53 




59 18 




72 30 




24 00 




60 00 




' 390 00 




141 37 




450 00 


ms. 


425 00 




3 50 




86 00 




384 00 




15 17 




100 99 




921 06 




181 00 




3,719 30 




131 10 




84 00 


$9,748 
72,133 


$72,133 08 

82 

08 


$81,881 
104 


90 
00 



20 



EXPENDITURES. 



NEW HARYAED SCHOOL. 

Henry D. Austin, estate, $6,500 00 

Betsey Putnam Heirs, " 5,016 34 

Andrew Sawtell, estate, 15,875 60 

S. J. F. Thayer, plans and specifications, 1,900 00 

Caleb Eand, printing, " 40 00 

C. S. Wason & Co., printing and advertising, 3 00 

George B. Neal, revenue stamps, 16 00 

Water Board, water rates, 7 00 

$29,357 94 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Lucius Baker, teaching, 


$220 00 


Bradford H. Locke, '' 


56 00 


Bial W. Willard, '' 


54 00 


Helen B. Stone, " 


47 25 


Annie S. Osgood, " 


52 00 


Ellen A. Pratt, " 


45 50 


Darius Hadley, " 


65 00 


Lois A. Rankin, " 


45 50 


Mrs. Darius Hadley, *' 


10 50 


Henry F. Sears, " 


65 .00 


Julia C. Powers, " 


45 50 


L. E. Howe, " 


21 00 


Elizabeth J. Farnsworth, teaching, 


5 25 


G. Gilman & Co., gas fittings. 


9 94 


Amos Brown, carpentry, 


205 24 


A. E. Cutter & Co., books, stationery, &c.. 


303 61 


John Johnston, janitor, 


44 00 


Martha Conway, care of rooms. 


20 00 


C. S. Wason & Co., printing. 


27 00 



Amount carried forward, 



$1,342 29 



EXPENDITURES. 



21 



Amount brought forward, 



Appropriated, 

Trans, from school contingencies, 

Balance from last year, 

Total, 
Expended, 

Balance unexpended. 



^1,000 00 

1,000 00 

265 83 

$2,265 83 

1,342 29 

$923 54 



fl,342 29 



INFANT SCHOOLS. 

Infant School Society, appropriated, and expended, $200 00 



CARE OF TRUANTS, &c. 

City of Lowell, care of truants, 

S. P. White, expenses to Lowell, 

C. S. Wooffindale, " '' " 

State Reform School, support of boys, 

State Nautical School, " " " 

State Industrial School, " " g^^ls. 

Amount expended, $1,226 65 
Appropriated, 1,000 00 



Deficit, 



$226 65 



$308 78 


14 


32 


3 


58 


526 


55 


134 


00 


239 


42 



,226 65 



FUEL FOR SCHOOLS. 

Burns & Goodwin, coal and wood, 
Levi Goodnow, shavings, 
Matthew Boyd, labor on fuel, 
J. S. Cunningham, labor on fuel, 
Daniel Conant, labor on fuel, 
Abijah Blanchard, services, 



14,541 


64 


33 


00 


161 


70 


27 


00 


29 


80 


' 18 


00 



Amount carried forward, '$4,811 14 



22 



EXPENDITURES. 



Amount brought forward, |4,812 14 

Appropriated, $4,500 00 

Balance from last year, 802 16 



Expended, 

Balance unexpended, 



5,302 16 
4,811 14 

1491 02 



REPAIRS SCHOOL-HOUSES. 



David S. Tucker, carpentry, 


$84 73 


John Randall, ^^ 


• 320 63 


E. J. Norris, " 


129 89 


Archer & Lund, ^' 


27 52 


John B. Wilson, " 


312 22 


George M. Starbird, " 


108 "87 


Joseph W. Hill, « 


14 36 


R. R. Wiley, mason-work, 


2,487 76 


C. L. Lothrop, " 


583 55 


Dennis Kelly, " 


68 71 


Mark Pope, painting. 


12 50 


Rufus, Mason, & Son, painting, 


299 13 


H. G, Waldron, " 


122 27 


F. A. Titus, plumbing. 


11 50 


Alexander Campbell, plumbing. 


45 35 


James Gaffney, " 


6 32 


Griffin Gibson, '' 


36 75 


John McLoud, plumbing, stove work, &c.. 


218 00 


G. Gilman & Co., gas-fittings. 


44 78 


George Mitchell, plastering, 


105 73 


H. Riley & Sons, slating, 


9 88 


C. S. Parker, roofing work, 


94 26 


G. W. W^alker & Co., repair furnaces. 


20 68 


Cook, Rymes, & Co., iron-work. 


5 00 



Amount carried forward, 



;,170 39 



EXPENDITURES. 



23 



a 



Amount brought forward, 
Jacob Caswell (estate), repair pumps, 
Joseph L. Ross, furniture, 
Daniels & Harrison, 



Expended, 
Appropriated, 



Deficit, 



'ard, 


15,170 39 




6 00 




365 76 




6b 00 




$5,607 15 


$5,607 15 




14,000 00 





1,607 15 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

John H. Holmes, librarian, salary, 

C. S. Cartel, '' '' 

S. Edwards, " assistant, salary, 

Annie Stevens, " " '' 

Crosby & Damrell, books and periodicals, 

T. T. Sawyer, " 

Lewis Dwight, 

Lee & Shepard, 

Noyes, Holmes, & Co., books. 

Little, Brown, & Co., " 



u 



n 



u 



(I 
u 



John H. Holmes, 

D. C. Coles worthy, 

William H. Piper, 

Henry Hoyt, 

L. Angier, 

A. E. Cutter & Co., stationery, 

C. S. Cartee, " and books, 

Thomas Groom & Co., " 

Lawrence, Wilde, & Hull, furniture, 

S. Peirce & Co., " 

Seth Goldsmith, binding, 

Charles Hersey, '' 

Amount carried forward. 



$527 


04 


466 


66 


345 


75 


196 


75 


268 


21 


155 


17 


10 


00 


484 


33 


202 


05 


6 


45 


55- 


00 


78 


74 


302 


20 


23 


30 


20 


00 


73 


26 


145 


73 


2 


00 


90 


00 


30 


00 


155 


08 


50 


25 



13,687 97 



24 



EXPENDITURES. 



C. S. Wason & Co., printing, 

Caleb Rand, '' 

Rand, Avery, & Frye, " 

H. G. Waldron, painting, 

John B. Wilson, carpentry, 

G. Gilman & Co., gas-fittings, 

Brintnall &. Osgood, cord, &c., 

Frederick Small, repair of stamp, 

Amariah Storrs & Co., cards, 

Washington Ins. Co., insurance, 

E. W. Bean, teaming, 

Stowell & Co., gnm, 

Childs, Crosby, & Lane, matting, 

C. J. Peters & Son, stereotypes, 

William H. DeCosta, printing, 

William W. Wheildon, " 

Brewer & Co., expressage, 

William B. Moore & Son, hardware, 

Richard Murphy, labor, 

Thomas E. Smith, '^ 

S. A. Rogers, '^ 

Post-OfiSce, box-rent, 

Boston Advertiser, subscription. 

Commercial Bulletin, " 

G. W. B. Taylor, paper, 

Whipple & Smith, pamphlets, 



Appropriated, 
Balance from last year. 
Sundry receipts, 



Expended, 

Balance unexpended, 



orward, 


$3,687 97 




47 25 




45 50 




122 40 




11 85 




287 64 




50 64 




13 82 




9 75 




11 25 




37 50 




2 50 




5 10 




70 30 




6 00 




14 25 




25 00 




14 10 


^ 


2 45 




2 00 




19 87 




9 75 




3 00 




24 00 




4 00 




46 90 




24 98 




$4,599 77 


$3,500 00 




900 76 




968 11 




$5,368 87 




4,599 77 





$769 10 



EXPENDITURES. 



25 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



n 



ii 



Orison Little, captain, 

Benjamin Williams, lieutenant, 

Charles Stone, police services, 

Albert E. Dodge, 

Samuel Palmer, 

L. H. Hutchings, 

Charles E. Fuller, 

Reuben T. Whittier, 

Joseph H. Knox, 

James F. Green, 

Dennis C. Brennan, 

John Studley, 

Thomas C. Yose, 

Augustus Johnson, 

WilHam Faunce, 

Ephraim Freeman, 

Augustus Johnson, 

Joseph B. Cotton, 

William H. Brown, 

Rufus W. Sprague, 

Jeremiah H. Pearson, 

Ephraim Tarbox, 

Henry Fox, 

Richard H. Lund, 

Reuben S. Randall, 

Thomas C. Kelly, 

Johii S. Robinson, 

Samuel T. Yaughan, 

Charles Clark, 

Silas W. Braley, 

Thomas W. Sargent, 

John H. Brower, 

Robert Sylvester, 



i( 



a 



it 



$1,195 00 
1,200 00 

957 00 
1,021 50 
1,086 00 
1,089 00 
1,065 00 
1,095 00 
1,095 00 
1,071 00 

798 00 

390 00 
1,089 00 
1,086 00 
1,083 00 
1,050 00 

930 00 
1,083 00 
1,086 00 
1,086 00 

984 00 
1,056 00 
1,083 00 
1,065 00 
1,077 00 
1,065 00 

978 00 
1,032 00 
1,089 00 
1,086 00 
1,089 00 
1,080 00 
1,071 00 



Amount carried forward, 



$34,310 50 



26 EXPENDITURES. 




Amount brought forward, 


$34,310 50 


Charles S. VVooffindale, police-services, 


1,104 00 


Sumner P. White, 


a 


' 1,095 00 


John L. Webb, 


u 


838 50 


Emorj F. Wright, 


u 


184 50 


Gustavus A. Norton, 


u 


322 50 


Joseph W. Noble, 


u 


201 00 


Dennis Cass, 


u 


225 00 


Perez R. Jacobs, 


u 


174 00 


Thomas VV. Gardner, 


it 


105 00 


L. P. Young, 


11 


282 00 


Seth Thing, 


t( 


121 50 


Zina Campbell, ' 


i( 


108 00 


John P. Sullivan, 


u 


39 00 


John Carlisle, 


u 


72 00 


William H. Dennis, 


iC 


52 00 


J. F. Hatch, 


u 


58 50 


Clark D. Garey, 


(( 


69 00 


A. S. Lang, 


u 


99 00 


Charles D. W. Lane, 


a 


36 00 


Joseph E. Palmer, 


it 


21 00 


John McDonald, 


it 


21 00 


G. Kidney, 


ti 


15 00 


Edward MisKelly, 


it 


10 50 


Wm. E. Clayton and 26 others. 




167 00 


Water Board, water-rates. 




30 00 


Bridget Shehan, labor. 




100 32 


S. G. Bean, one bay horse. 




250 00 


William H. Chapman, boardin 


g horse, 


246 30 


Garland & Priest, horse-shoeing. 


5 00 


Thomas D. Strand, " 


( 


5 00 


Dr. Saunders, horse doctoring, 


8 00 


Charles T. MuUett, horse blanket, 


2 50 


Joseph Dickson, horse harness. 


104 75 


D. L. McGregor, " " 




2 80 



Amount carried forward, 



,486 17 



EXPENDITURES. 



27 



Amount brought forward, $40,486 17 

E. L. Bruce, buggy, whip, robe, &c., 135 00 

Dearborn <fe Co., one carryall, ^0 00 

John Bryant, carriage repairs, 44 25 

James Emery & Co., carriage repairs, 22 05 

T. V. Heath, carriage repairs, 3 75 

Maynard Bros., carriage-hire, 1 ^^ 

Bariaut & Shaw, '' 2 00 

E. T. Swift, disbursements, 13 00 

S. A. Davis, medical services, 16 00 

J. S. Whiting, " 5 00 

N. D. Parker, '' 6 00 

William Mason, " 2 00 

Gas Company, gas, 336 11 

C. W. C. Association, sundries, 51 52 

Hayward & Co., " 11 50 

A. N. Swallow, " 10 75 

J. T. & N. Glines, " 13 75 

William B. Moore & Son, " . 9 95 

OHver W. Hall, " 8 00 

A. E. Cutter & Co., stationery, &c., 40 16 

Caleb Rand, printing, 37 00 

C. S. Wason & Co., printing, 19 00 
John Louer, repair rattles, 3 00 
Ephraim Tarbox, strapping billies, 4 00 
Watson & Bisbee, " '; 11 50 
William Read & Sons, hand-cuffs, 35 25 

D. Evans & Co., badge-buttons, 23 75 
George R. Kelso, bedding and repairs, 33 00 
H. C. Amory, meals for prisoners, 35 75 
J. Edwin Bray, " " " 78 QQ 
Griffiths & Co., '' " " 64 00 
R. R. Wiley, whitewashing, 6 00 
Heraing Ericcson, posting bills, 8 00 

E. J. Klous, coat and pants, 19 00 

Amount carried forward, $41,655 87 



28 EXPENDITURES. 

Amount brought forward, 
William B. Moore & Son, hardware, - 
A. J. Carter, carpet, 
John McLoud, repairs, 
Boston Ice Company, ice. 
Meadows & Enwright, repair furniture, 
Mary Jaegar, lounge, 
James Miskelly, constable services, 
Brintnall & Maynard, towels, 
Walter S. Tower, sponge, 



Appropriated, $41,000 00 

Sundry receipts, 1,956 01 



$42,956 01 
Expended, 41,733 17 



Balance unexp'ded, $1,222 84 



EEPAIRS OF STEEETS. 



James Reardon, labor, 
Andrew J. Boynton, '* 
Robert B. Cochran, " 
George H. Brown, ^* 
Frank Norton, " 

George W. Woods, " 
Cornelius Broderick, " 
Daniel Flynn, " 

John Murray, " 

John Waters, " 

Patrick Lally, " 



$41,655 87 


19 


00 


15 


15 


3 


00 


12 


00 


5 


50 


5 


00 


14 


00 


1 


50 


2 


15 



,733 17 



$843 00 


699 


75 


666 


00 


699 


75 


699 


75 


680 


50 


704 


25 


448 


00 


394 00 


172 00 


172 


00 



Amount carried forward, $6,129 00 





EXPENDITURES. 


2\) 


Amount brought forward, 


$6,129 00 


William H. Dennis, labor, 


284 00 


Lawrence Hewitt, 


i( 


424 00 


James Carroll, 


u 


456 00 


William Gilmore, 


u 


367 00 


Patrick Fitzgibbons, 


i( 


486 00 


Patrick Murpbj, 


11 


235 00 


Michael Fitzgerald, 


t( 


899 00 


Thomas Stack, 


u 


475 00 


Thomas Flaherty, 


n 


467 00 


Terence McManus, 


(i 


494 00 


J. CuUinane, 


11 


509 00 


William Casey, 


it 


482 00 


William Wells, 


tc 


534 00 


George Farmer, 


(C 


244 00 


Patrick Reardon, 


n 


165 00 


Patrick Toomey, 


n 


470 00 


J. G. Woods, 


li 


493 00 


Dennis Cronin, * 


It 


191 00 


James Sullivan, 


it 


124 00 


John Reynolds, 


it 


123 00 


James Kimball, 


it 


305 00 


John Terrey, 


It 


275 00 


Lawrence Bamerick^ 


tt 

1 


121 00 


Michael Higgins, 


tt 


162 00 


Patrick Cochran, 


tt 


137 00 


C. P. Briggs, 


it 


175 00 


Timothy Guiney, 


tt 


146 00 


Michael Sullivan, 


it . 


127 00 


William B. Robbins, 


li 


96 00 


Charles Gabriel, 


tt 


92 00 


Samuel W. Robbins, 


it 


72 00 


Patrick Murphy, 2d, 


It 


75 00 


Patrick Welch, 2d, 


it 


85 00 


S. A. Rogers, 


tt 


49 00 



Amount carried forward. 



15,468 00 



30 EXPENDITURES. 

Amount brought forward, 
Henry G. Dwight, labor, 
George W. Sparr, " 
David Bunting, " 

Michael Campbell, " 
James Larvin, " 

John H. May, " 

Timothy Desmond, " 
James Hoi brook, " 
Charles Cullinane, *' 
Edward Miskellj, " 
Patrick Brennan, and 72 others, labor. 
Turner, Kidney, & Co., paving, setting edgestone, 

(fee, 
John Donovan, teaming, 
P. O'Riordon, " 

R,. R. Wiley, teaming ashes, snow, &c., 
John Bamerick, " 

Timothy Calnan, " 

Patrick Brown, " 

Wm. Freeman, *' 

Richard Coleman, ^^ 

Timothy Wholly, " 

Edmund Keyes, " 

John Doyle, " 

James McNulty, " 

Patrick Ryan, " 

J. B. Burroughs, Drawman P. P. bridge, 
H. H. Burroughs, " " 

Daniel S. Lawrence, " Chelsea bridge, 
Adam Bowlby, " '' 

Daniel Crimmins, road stone, 
Dennis Kelly, * " 

Hugh Kelly, " 

J. F. & F. L. Gilman, stone work. 

Amount carried forward. 



$15,468 


00 


79 


00 


64 


00 


73 


00 


34 


00 


25 


00 


23 


00 


23 


00 


24 


00 


26 


00 


24 


00 


626 


00 


le, 
35,003 


77 


2,345 


75 


2,310 


00 


3,578 


6Q 


837 


25 


34 


00 


7 


00 


3 


00 


. 21 


00 


129 


00 


1,652 


40 


6 


00 


560 


00 


6 


00 


89 


88 


28 


75 


850 


00 


840 


00 


878 


40 


41 


00 


981 


20 


264 


70 


$66,951 


76 



EXPENDITURES. 


31 


Amount brought forward, 


$66,951 76 


Benjamin Fiske, bricks, 


40 00 


Franklin Hdpkins, lumber, 


3,133 59 


Hall Brothers, " 


168 18 


Trickey & Jewett, " 


19 76 


Thomas McGrath, painting. 


93 25 


E. J. Clark, 


54 00 


John McMath, " 


18 33 


Dennis Cummings, grading. 


136 75 


R. R. Wiley, mason work, 


4 25 


Kelly & Joy, " 


6 25 


Jesse U. Jones, carpentry, 


222 03 


S. G. Kelso, 


31 55 


John Cass, *' 


98 20 


Wm. Quigley, teaming, 


10 00 


John Townsend, '' 


10 50 


Patrick Kenney, '' 


252 00 


Joseph Dickson, harness, 


346 73 


D. L. McGregor, " repairs, 


1 70 


J. G. Ripley, iron work. 


39 48 


James Emery, " 


291 01 


Cook,Rymes,& Co., ^' 


■ 38 62 


J. & E. H. GifFord, " 


86 45 


C. Fowler & Son, *^ ' 


3 00 


Garland & Priest, " 


48 09 


Thos. D. Strand, '' 


67 48 


E. R. Robinson, " 


122 79 


John Louer, " 


27 38 


Asa Storey, hay. 


536 72 


S. H. Fall, hay and straw, 


91 48 


Richard Nason, grain. 


614 11 


S. D. Sawin, '' 


27 90 


Water Board, water rates. 


3 00 


Wm. Allen, hardware, 


14 00 


Lewis Hunt, " 


92 05 



Amount carried forward. 



$73,702 39 



32 



EXPENDITURES. 



Amount brought forward, 
Edmund Keyes, fuel, 
P. R. Jacobs, serving notices, 
Caleb Rand, printing, 
C. S. Wason & Co.," 
Wm.H.DeCosta, " 
James D. Jenkins, sprinkling pots, 

B. S. Hussey, sundries, 
Timothy Calnan, watering streets, 
R. W. Gordon, " 
Maiden Bridge, city's assessment, 

C. L. Lothrop, cesspools, 
John Bryant, " 

J. E. Bray, " 

Hartwell Mayers, " 
John Kelly, " 

C. Dinevan, " 

J. H. Lombard, gravel, 
Chas. J. Barry, weighing, 

A. E. Cutter & Co., stationery, 
T. J. Hunnewell, repair carts, 
Anthony S. Morss, tools, 

F. A. Titus, " and repairs, 

G. G. Brown, broom stuff, 
Joseph Robinson, " 
Nathaniel Butters, " 

B. S. Hussey, sundries, 
M. P. Griffin, 

E. A. Foster, damage on Chelsea Bridge, 
Dana & Goodrich, drilling for fence, 
Wm. Saunders, veterinary services, 
James Marshall, " 

Amount carried forward. 



$73,702 39 


10 


75 


45 


15 


10 


00 


10 


25 


1 


20 


13 


00 


5 


50 


6 


00 


3 


00 


2,000 


00 


509 


06 


261 


00 


369 


75 


126 


73 


156 


22 


68 


00 


207 


00 


123 


41 


12 


68 


6 


96 


26 


52 


4 


00 


4 


00 


15 


68 


1 


20 


17 52 




75 


119 


00 


127 


50 


4 


00 


8 


00 



$77,976 22 



EXPENDITURES. 33 

Amount brought forward, $77,976 22 

Expended, 877,976 22 

Assessments abated, 354 51 



$78,330 73 
Appropriated, $54,500 00 

Sidewalk assessments, &c., 8,249 15 62,749 15 



Deficit, $15,581 58 



PURCHASE AND CARE OF TREES. 



Kendall Bailey, labor, 
Edward Miskelly, " 
William Casey, " 
Thomas Barrett, trees, 
Caleb Green, " 

Franklin Hopkins, lumber, 
B. E. Gline, hardware, 
John McMath, paint. 



Expended, 
Appropriated, 





$16 50 




217 50 




50 00 




48 00 




4 00 




. 45 85 




2 87 




35 69 




$420 41 


1420 41 




200 00 




8220 41 





Deficit, 



CANAL STREET GRADING. 

Patrick O'Riordon, teaming dirt, $3,531 20 

John Donovan, '' 1,424 35 

Hugh Kelly, " 4,039 40 



Amount carried forward, $8,994 95 



34 



EXPENDITURES. 



Amount brought forward, 
John Bamerick, teaming dirt, 
Patrick Kenney, '^ 

Timothy Wholley, '' 

R. R. Wiley, 
Timothy Calna'n, " 

James McNulty, " 

Richard Coleman, " 

J. H. Lombard & Co., '< 
Charles Sullivan, '^ 

Wm. Freeman, " 

Patrick Ryan, 
John Doyle, 
Edmund Keyes, 
Dennis Crimmins, 
William Quigley, 
Patrick Cain, 
Richard Tierney, 
John Lombard, 
Daniel Scannell, 
Michael McMahan, 
Charles Turcotte, 
John Flanagan, 
Patrick Brown, 
Timothy Donovan, 
Jeremiah McCarty, 
John Donovan, 2d, 
Maurice Freeman, 
Turner, Kidney, & Co., 
Michael Lombard, 
Johnson & Richmond, 
Joseph E. Bray, 
S. D. Sawin & Co., 
Dennis Kelly, 
E. B. Stetson, 



it 



n 



(C 



6t 



IC 



u 



(C 



a 



a 



K 



u 



ti 



$8,994 95 


1,911 


40 


631 


50 


806 


50 


484 50 


153 


50 


192 


20 


224 


00 


109 


50 


86 


25 


318 


50 


53 


00 


469 


25 


333 


50 


170 


25 


281 


05 


580 


20 


651 


75 


324 


75 


77 


15 


5 


50 


4 


25 


3 


50 


116 


25 


156 


95 


62 


50 


280 75 


62 


50 


74 50 


8 


25 


75 


25 


12 


50 


283 


60 


10 


80 


2 


00 



Amount carried forward. 



$18,012 80 



EXPENDITURES. 



35 



Amount brought forward, 


$18,012 80 


E. L. Bruce, teaming dirt, 


6 60 


Wm. H. Parks, 


344 25 


Prentice Sargent, " 


1,313 25 


S. A. Rogers, services, 


75 00 


C. P. Briggs, '' 


270 00 


John Murray, " 


142 00 


Wra. Gilmore, " 


151 00 


John P. Perkins, repair of culvert, 


315 97 


E. J. Clark, signs. 


13 75 


J. W. Hill, " 


• 6 38 


Caleb Rand, printing, 


6 00 


Hartwell Mayers, cesspools. 


249 57 


John Cass, drain repairs, 


19 53 



$20,926 10 



Appropriation (balance), $19,340 65 

Credited from "Laying out sts."acct., 1,585 45 



Expended to March 1, 1871, 



$20,926 10 



WALNUT STREET GRADING. 



Patrick Cain, grading, 
Rosanna Clark, damage to estate, 
Patrick W. Maloney, '' 
John Carney, " 

Stephen Joyce, " 

John Milliken, " 

Thomas Casey, 
William Welch, 
Alice Green, 
John O'Brien, 



(t 



K 



H 



$2,093 98 
390 00 
400 ^' 



^00 00 
1,500 00 
700 00 



Amount carrie 



$7,383 ?,B 



60 


EXPENDITURES. 






Amount brought 


forward, 


$7,383 98 


John McCormick, 


damage to estate. 




300 00 


James Mahoney, 


li 




500 00 


Eichard Porter, 


it 




300 00 


John Mullen, 


K 




350 00 


James McNulty, 


Ci 




300 00 


John Hayes, 


i( 




600 00 


Edward Dulleny, 


(( 




800 00 


Henry Harding, 


(I 




600 00 


Gilbert Williams, 


(I 




300 00 


Patrick Grady, 


u 




400 00 


James H. Dow, 


u 




400 00 


Ellen Cohalan, 


tt 




400 00 


John Mead, 


u 




, 300 00 


Morris Freeman, 


a 




300 00 


William Casey, 


u 




300 00 


Patrick Hayes, 


u 




500 00 


John Murray, 


u 




125 00 


John Killilee, 


(( 




400 00 


John B. Wilson, appraisals, 




10 00 


R. R. Wiley, masc 


m work. 




204 25 




$14,773 23 


Credited from account " Lay- 






ing out streets,'' 


$14,773 23 




Expended, 




14,773 23 




PROSPECT STREET EXTENSION AND GRADING. 


Nathan Tufts, damages to estate, 




$4,743 00 


Charles Tufts, 


n 




7,595 50 


Gilman Heirs, 


u 




5,372 40 


Henry W. Bragg, 


i( 




96 00 


Isaac E. Brown, 


i( 




44 49 



Amount carried forward, $17,851 39 



EXPENDITURES. 37 

Amount brought forward, 117,851 39 

P. O'Riordon, grading, 2,539T05 

John B. Wilson, carpentry, repair of estates, 867 35 

R. R. Wiley, mason work, " " '' 1,807 80 

Dennis Kelly, " " " " " 502 75 

J. F. & F. L. Gilman, edgestone, 24 57 



Credit by Betterments, $9,708 00 

'* from account " Lay- 
ing out streets," 14,000 91 

$23,708 91 
Expended, $23,592 91 

Betterments abated, 116 00 123,708 91 



123,592 91 



MAIN STREET WIDENING. 

(Between Franklin and Eden Streets.) 

F. A. Hall, damages to estate, 17,145 00 

Benjamin Phipps, '' 4,620 56 

Walker Heirs, " 1,487 00 

J. Perkins, '' 619 00 

Joseph Caldwell, " 931 00 

R. M. Wilson, " 1,917 50 

William Stickney, " 1,507 60 

Poor & Robbins, " 150 00 

C. L. Lothrop, " 75 00 

Thomas M. Paine, " 100 00 

R. B. Stickney, " 1,250 00 

R. R. Wiley, teaming, 41 75 

John Donovan, " 40 50 

John B. Wilson, carpentry, repair of estates, 775 00 

Credited from account " Lay- $20,660 81 

ing out streets," 820,660 81 

Expended, 20,660 81 



38 EXPENDITURES. 

CEDAR STREET EXTENSION. 



Joseph S. Hart, damages to estates, 
John P. Barnard, " 


$1,002 00 
763 50 


Thomas Coop, " 
VV. Oilman, " 




186 00 
334 00 


Ephraim Linscott, " 




126 00 


John McGill, 




34 00 


R. R. Wiley, mason work, repair 
John B. Wilson, carpentry, '' 


estates, 

$2,835 00 
2,669 46 


150 00 
73 96 


Betterments assessed. 
Expended, 


$2,669 46 



Balance to account " Laying 

out streets," $165 54 



ALFORD STREET. 

John Kent, damages to estate, 

Chester Guild & Sons, damages to estate, 

Charles K. Guild, " '^ " 

P. O'Riordon, grading and sea-wall, 

P. R. Jacobs, serving notices, 

John Murray, labor, 

Daniel Flynn, " 

Cook, Rymes, & Co., iron fence, 

N. Tufts, Jr., & Son, drawing Mill Pond, 



Credit with Betterments, $12,799 00 

" from account " Laying 

out streets," 43,954 48 



$1,932 


56 


10,604 75 


186 


00 


42,465 


98 


3 


00 


52 


00 


62 


00 


1,037 


19 


420 


00 



$56,753 48 



Expended, .-...*._. $56,753 48 



EXPENDITURES. 39 

BALDWIN STREET WIDENING. 

Amos Stone, land taken, $500 00 

Nathl. E. Hill, '^ '^ 1,765 00 



$2,265 00 
Expended, . $2,265 00 

Betterment abated, 22 00 



^2,287 00 
Betterments assessed, 1,180 00 

Credited from account " Lay- 
ing out streets," 1,107 00 82,287 00 



WARREN STREET WIDENING, (At Crafts' Corner.) 

Benjamin F. Dean, et al., interest on award, $156 89 

Anna B. Brown, '• " " 156 89 

Bailey Brothers, damages to estate — verdict, 1,371 17 

R. R. Wiley, repair of stable, corner Henley Street, 250 00 



$1,934 95 
Expended, $1,934 95 

Betterments abated, 500 25 

Deficit, March 1, 1870, 10,929 38 



Total amount expended, $13,364 58 

Cr. from acct. " Laying out sts.," 13,364 58 



FOSS STREET. 

A. Gage & Co., damage to estate, $5,672 75 

Turner, Kidney, & Co., edgestone and paving, 1,683 88 



$7,356 58 
Betterments assessed, $268 00 

Cr. from acct. "Laying out sts.,'' 7,088 58 



Total amount expended, $7,356 58 



40 EXPENDITURES. 

LINCOLN STREET GRADING. '^*' 

Patrick Kenney, grading, ^4,066 40 

P. R. Jacobs, serving notices, 6 50 



14,072 90 



Appropriated, $3,600 00 

Cr. from acct. " Laying out st3.," 472 90 



Total amount expended, $4,072 90 



LAYING OUT STREETS. 

A. R. Tiiomp3on (heirs). Main St., damages, $1,324 00 

Alson Studley, Canal St., '' 200 00 

Asa Lewis, Warren St., '' 224 00 

John Cronin, Call St., '' 75 00 

Mrs. Wetherbee, . Kingston St., '^ 224 50 

Nathan Tufts, Edge worth St., " 410 00 

William Currey, " '' " 16 50 

James Armstrong (heirs), Adams St., '^ 100 00 

Prentice Sargent & Bro., Lincoln St., " 3,000 00 

J. S. Whiting, Bow St., " 19 50 

Josiah Brackett, Wesley St., '' 230 00 

Edward Thorndike, Moulton St., " 300 00 

F. R. Roberts, " " " 200 00 

S. G. Burbank, Arlington Ave., " 300 00 

Geo. M. Starbird, fence repairs, Bow St., 5 25 

S. P. Kelley, serving notices, 3 00 

P. R. Jacobs, " '' 16 25 

P. O'Riordon, grading Edgeworth St., 597 53 

C. S. Wason & Co., printing and advertising, 21 38 

W. W. Wheildon, " " 7 50 

W. H. DeCosta, " " 10 65 

Amount carried forward, $7,285 06 



EXPENDITURES. 41 

Amount brought forward, $7,285 06 

John B. Wilson, appraising estates, 195 00 

John Donovan, teams and labor, 57 75 

R. R. Wiley, " '^ 211 00 

Gas Company, re-setting lamp-posts, 8 88 

Enoch J. Clark, painting signs, 4 25 



$7,761 94 



Expended, . $7,761 94 

Betterments abated, 1,890 40 

Debited to sundry streets, 127,269 51 



$136,921 85 



Appropriated, $15,000 00 

Betterments assessed, 701 04 15,701 04 



Deficit, $121,220 81 



SULLIVAN SQUARE FOUNTAIN. 

James & Kirtland, fountain. 

Cook, Rymes, & Co., iron fence. 

Metropolitan Steam Co., freight, 

Mr. Saville, setting up fountain, 

H. Wellington, committee's expense to New York, 

R. R. Wiley, mason work. 

Earl Wyman, carpentry, 

H. G. Waldron, painting, 

George E. Rogers, teaming, 

Appropriated and expended, $4,077 77 



$1,861 


76 


640 


00 


44 


37 


7 


50 


36 


00 


1,288 


05 


125 


00 


63 


59 


11 


50 



42 EXPENDITURES. 

SULLIYAN SQUARE GRADING. 

Hartwell Mayers, labor, &c., 
R. R. Wiley, teaming earth, 
Simonds & Lord, loaiB, 
Timothy Donovan, " 
John T. Banierick, " 
Patrick Kenney, " 

John Donovan, " 

Hugh Kelly, " 

Patrick Kenney, sods and labor, 
McNulty, " " 

Appropriated and expended, $2,579 50 



DRAINS AND SEWERS. 



S. W. Robbins, mason work, 
John Waters, labor, 
Patrick Lally, " 

Michael Campbell, " 
J. Larvin, '• 

John H. May, " 

Patrick Grady, " 

Charles McCarty, " 
Jeremiah Hickey, " 
Stephen Joyce, " 
James Carroll, " 



$954 


00 


410 


75 


38 


00 


30 


50 


150 


00 


117 


00 


159 


00 


68 


50 


310 


75 


361 


00 



SULLIYAN SQUARE FENCE. 

Cook, Rymes, & Co., iron fence, contract, $5,313 00 

Appropriated and expended, $5,313 00 



$1,365 


00 


526 


50 


508 


49 


415 


00 


386 


00 


327 


00 


414 


00 


340 


00 


460 


50 


413 


00 


408 


00 



Amount carried forward, $5,563 49 





EXPENDITURES. 


4'^ 


Amount brought forward, 


$5,563 49 


Thomas Collins, labor, 


323 00 


John Ahearn, 


a 


349 00 


John Keenan, 


li 


337 00 


John Graham, 


a 


301 00 


Dennis Cronin, 


a 


290 00 


John Reagan, 


u 


286 00 


George Farmer, 


u 


.255 00 


John McKern, 


u 


201 00 


Dennis O'Brien, 


C( 


261 00 


P. P. Sullivan, 


n 


179 00 


Patrick Culnane, 


ii 


133 00 


John Stammers, 


n 


110 00 


James Barrett, 


i( 


177 00 


Michael Ash, 


i( 


178 00 


James Sullivan, 


cc 


141 00 


Michael Higgins, 


u 


145 00 


Patrick Fitzgibbon 


} 


51 00 


Michael Fitzgerald 


11 


70 00 


Lawrence Hewitt, 


labor. 


61 00 


Patrick Rice, 


u 


68 00 


Daniel Moriarty, 


(I 


54 00 


Michael Gilmore, 


cc 


24 00 


Timothy Lane, 


cc 


■ 32 00 


John Kelly, 


cc 


69 00 


John McDonald, 


cc 


45 00 


Michael Mahar, 


cc 


30 00 


Patrick Hayes, 


cc 


86 00 


Manuel Rogers, 


cc 


29 00 


Robert Dennen, 


cc 


42 00 


Henry A. Rice, 


cc 


83 00 


Patrick Cochran, 


a 


39 00 


John Madden, 


cc 


27 00 


Patrick O'Loan, 


a 


85 00 


Thomas Reagan, 


cc 


22 00 



Amount carried forward, $10,086 49 



44 


EXPENDITURES. 




Amount brought forward, 


$10,086 49 


James McCratt, 


labor. 


38 00 


Jeremiah Holland, 


IC 


74 00 


James Grimes, 


n 


28 00 


John Coughlin, 


ii 


39 00 


Thomas Lahey, 


ii 


60 00 


Martin Curran, 


11 


20 00 


William Cashman, 


i( 


33 00 


Timothy Guiney, 


(C 


14 00 


Edward Hughes, 


u 


14 00 


Patrick Toomey, 


tl 


18 00 


Terence McManus, 


il 


14 00 


Joseph Hamill, 


a 


16 00 


J. G. Woods, and ten others, labor, 


93 00 


Bay State Brick Co. 


J bricks, 


1,485 00 


James Dana, 


u 


28 00 


Wellington Bros., 


cement and sand, 


833 70 


Winslow, Stewart, & Co., " " 


27 86 


S. H. Fall, 


a t( 


37 70 


K-. R. Wiley, sand. 


teaming, &c., 


1,277 86 


John B am e rick. 


(I 


39 00 


John Donovan, 


a 


58 00 


D. S. Tucker, carpentry. 


180 51 


E. J. Norris, '' 


3 50 


John P. Perkins, cu 


Ivert, 


915 00 


Cook, Bymes, & Co. 


, iron work, 


' 48 65 


G. & E. H. Gifford, 


u 


50 20 


Philip Ham, 


(C 


23 19 


A. E. Cutter, stationery. 


11 53 


F. Hopkins, lumber. 




114 26 


Day & Collins, drain 


I pipe. 


633 25 


C. S. Wason, printir 


ig and advertising, 


24 00 


W. H. DeCosta, " 


K 


10 85 


VV/W. Wheildon, " 


u 


4 50 


Lewis Hunt, hard we 


ire, 

.mount carried forward, 


24 61 


A 


$16,378 QQ 



EXPENDITURES. 45 

Amount brought forward, $16,378 QQ 

C. L. Lotlirop, mason work, 408 54 

Kelly & Joy, '' 15 00 

J. E. Bray, " 27 50 

Hartwell Mayers, " 20 50 

P. R. Jacobs, serving notices, 19 50 

John Bryant, cesspool covers, 76 50 

Turner, Kidney, & Co., paving, 69 28 

Joseph W. Hill, repair sewer, 14 81 

Fred. Lund, buckets, ' 13 50 

Sloop " Starlight," repairs Gas-House, sea-wall, 50 00 

Geo. E. Edmands, oil, <fec., 35 10 

J. F. & F. L. Gilman, stone curbs and labor, 123 49 

Baldwin & Emerson, " " 192 00 

Chas. Robinson, Jr., legal advice, 25 00 

Gas Company, repair drain pipe, 27 30 



$17,496 68 



Expended, $17,496 68 

Assessments abated, 1,061 24 



$18,557 92 



Appropriated, 85,000 00 

Balance of old acct. 2,660 31 

Drain assessments, 10,208 50 17,86? 81 



Deficit, $689 11 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Hose Company No. 1, services, &c. $400 00 

" '' 2, '' 400 00 

" '' 3, '' 400 00 

" " 4, ^' 400 00 

Amount carried forward, $1,600 00 



46 EXPENDITURES. 

Amount brought forward, $1,600 00 

Hose Company, " (steamer), services, &c. 300 00 

Hook and Ladder Company, " 600 00 

Albert C. Smith, engineer of steamer, 1,165 80 

Charles Miller, fireman " 755 00 

Isaac W. Brackett, '' " 375 00 

Daniel K. Wheelock, driver '' 840 00 

John S. Linscott, extra services, 7 50 

N. E. Abbott and others, extra services, • 51 50 

L. B. Kimball " '' , 12 00 

Hook and Ladder Company, '^ 20 00 

Thomas W. Wright, " 10 00 

J. W. Sweetser, '' 2 00 

Wm. H. Ferris, refreshments, 20 00 

Boston Fire Company, '' 13 30 

Somerville " " 33 00 

Cambridge " '' 10 00 

Hose Company No. 2, " 25 00 

Hook and Ladder Co., " 50 00 

Israel P. Magoun, " 30 00 

John P. Conklin, " . 25 00 

S. R. Wiley, " 39 50 

Stumcke & Goodwin, " 12 00 

Mullett & Bradbury, " • . 7 00 

Wellington Bros., fuel for ste^imer house, 36 00 

DeCosta & Sawyer, « 262 00 

S. 0. Little & Co., " 48 25 

George Prescott, " 19 80 

S. & E. Knight, " 10 00 

Israel P. Magoun and others, poll tax refunded, 146 00 

John Louer, repair of apparatus, 489 95 

James Emery, " 44 25 

1 00 

61 05 

10 00 

334 21 



Caleb Larkin, 
Lockwood & Lumb, 
Union Machine Co., 
Cook, Rymes, & Co., 



Amount carried forward, $7,466 11 



EXPENDITURES. 47 



Amount brought forward, 
John B. Wilson, carpentry, repairs, 
David S. Tucker, " 

Joseph W. Hill, " 

Samuel 0. Weston, painting, 
H. G. Waldron, " 

C. H. Tufts, " 

McMath & Reed, " 

John McLoud, oil, lanterns, rep. stoves, &c., 
Hunneman & Co., axe, 
Edwd. 0. Webster, locksmithing, 
John J. Hillman, lanterns, repairs, <fec., 

F. D. Chase, " " '' 

Wight, Benner, & Co., lanterns, 
William B. Moore & Son, " " « 

Thos. S. Johnson, badges, 
Joseph Dickson, harness, repairs, &c., 
George Jacobs, hand stamp. 
Water Board, water rates, 
Kent & Gore, cotton waste, 
Edwd. E. Turner, repair furniture, 
David E. Torrey, " hose house, 
T. J. Whittemore, " ^' 
Brintnall & Osgood, paper and hanging, 
Chas. Holm & Son, " ' 

E. L. Bruce & Co., hay, grain, and straw, 
Chas. D. Wild, '' " 

Brooks & Stover, " " 

N. Tufts, jr., & Son, " " 

Mrs. Isaac W. Brackett, washing bedding. 
Murphy & Leavens, brushes, 
W. S. & G. 0. Wiley, carriage hire, 
Morris Mead, horse hire, 
Geo. W. Hobbs, stationery, 
Mrs. J. W. Stocking, horse medicine, 



^7,466 


11 


1 


50 


- 77 


63 


. 97 


45 


198 


38 




50 


247 


75 


155 


02 


402 


14 


5 


00 


16 


40 


48 


00 


31 


88 


4 


00 


1 


75 


77 


50 


109 


14 


3 


50 


75 


00 


46 


69 


20 


50 


11 37 


13 


00 


89 


92 


95 


88 


34 


83 


21 


32 


244 


93 


28 


86 


37 


62 


19 


00 


102 


00 


20 


00 


15 


76 


3 


50 



Amount carried forward, $9,823 83 



48 EXPENDITURES. 

Amount brought forward, $9,823 83 

Garland & Priest, horse shoeing, 39 47 

Samuel Gould, " 47 06 

B. W. ^imonds, hose ropes, 9 qq 
James Boyd & Son, " 251 12 
J. Baker & Co., " 10 22 
John Healey, services to injured fireman, 10 00 
S. A. Davis, medical services, 20 00 
James B. Bailey, *^ 10 00 
Gas Company, gas, steamer house, 131 36 

F. A. Titus, chandelier, 40 82 
Alex. Campbell, plumbing, 10 75 

G. Gilman & Co., gas fittings, 4 75 
Geo. S. Bailey, '' 75 
George R. Kelso, chairs, 45 00 
Wm. H. Wilson, fire hats, 62 50 
Game well & Co., services on fire alarm, 52 50 
Charles E. Gibbs, " " 37 00 
George E. Rogers, fire alarm gong, 75 00 
Dexter & Bros., vitriol for fire alarm, 48 73 
Charles Williams, battery for fire alarm, 12 00 
Torslofi" & Hinckle}^, cloth, 12 00 
T. S. Clogston, repairs, 4 75 

C. S. Wason & Co., printing, ^ 71 65 
Caleb Rand, " " ' 24 00 
Boston Herald, advertising, 2 25 
Brintnall & Maynard, bedding, 9 00 
Geo. D. Edmands, repair water-closets, 36 75 
Russell & Fitch, removing night soil, 4 00 
H. D. & R. Lock wood, belfrey on factory, 76 55 
John Bryant, reservoir covers, 75 50 
A. J. Wilkinson, emery cloth, 1 25 
Israel P. Magoun, disbursements, 25 00 
H. R. Bishop, ladders, 65 39 
Bunker Hill Hose Co., vane, 25 00 

Amount carried forward, $11,174 95 



EXPENDITURES. 



49 



Amount brought forward, 
Corey & Goodwin, sundries, 
John Flynn, horse hire, 
John Gallagher, whitewashing. 



niyl14: 95 

10 90 

28 00 

168 00 

$11,381 85 



Expended, 
Appropriated, 

Deficit, 



ill,381 85 
10,000 00 

fl,381 85 



NEW HOSE. 

James Boyd & Sons, 3,000 feet hose. 
Appropriated and expended, 



HYDRANTS. 

Water Board, for use of hydrants. 
Appropriated and expended. 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Gamewell & Co., fire-alarm boxes, &c., 
Wm. Blake & Co., alarm bells, 
Hayden & Crafts, hanging bells, 
Amos Brown, building belfrys, 
John B. Wilson, " 

S. J. F. Thayer, plans of belfrys, 
Wm. R. Bradford, iron castings, 
C. C. Diamond, gilt eagle for belfry, 



Expended, 

Appropriated (balance). 
From sale signal box. 



$G,402 U 
:,973 87 
300 00 

5,273 87 



$3,998 75 
3,998 75 



$2,400 00 
2,400 00 



$975 00 
2,526 84 

198 50 

962 76 
1,400 00 

139 65 
31 69 

168 00 



$6,402 44 



Deficit, 



$1,128 57 



50 



EXPENDITURES. 



REPAIR STEAMER "HOWARD." 

Cook, Rymes, & Co., rebuilding steamer, contract, $1,400 00 
Appropriated and expended, 1,400 00 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 



State of Massachusetts, support of paupers, 


1224 49 


City of New Bedford, " 


50 10 


City of Boston, " 


344 02 


City of Lynn, " 


58 25 


City of Chelsea, " 


5 00 


Worcester Hospital, " 


1,G57 9G 


Town of Wakefield, " 


256 3G 


Taunton Hospital, '^ 


230 57 


Town of Natick, 


24 00 


Massachusetts General Hospital, " 


9 00 


John L. Perry, burials, 


189 00 


E. N. Coburn, " 


45 00 


John Bryant, " 


15 00 


John Reade, " 


23 00 


Woodlawn Cemetery, burials. 


154 00 


Benjamin F. Stacey, medicines, 


243 34 


William L. Bond, " 


47 05 


George P. Kettell, " 


220 60 


Geo. C. Goodwin & Co., '' 


41 52 


Stowell & Co., " 


1 55 


Thomas J. Stevens, medical services, 


305 50 


G. H. W. Herrick, 


52 00 


Thomas Crozier, " 


12 50 


S. H. Hurd, 


39 00 


N. D. Parker, 


860 50 


H. H. Fuller, 


12 00 


Overseers of Poor, cash-orders drawn on Treasurer, 


1,580 15 



Amount carried forward. 



$6,701 46 



EXPENDITURES. 


51 


Amount brought forward, 


$6,701 46 


Robert Todd, fuel, 


314 04 


Burns & Goodwin, fuel, 


1,226 84 


Gas Company, " 


51 00 


Winslow, Stewart, & Co., fuel. 


3 50 


George Prescott, " 


5 88 


S. P. Hill & Co., groceries, 


■ 288 42 


Brooks & Stover, " 


190 38 


L. R. Bingham, " 


38 00 


G. F. & B. Hurd, 


646 05 


C. W. C. Association, " 


578 18 


F. E. Downer, " 


1,072 50 


Charles B. Goodrich, " 


116 25 


S. D. Sawin, " 


125 00 


Mullett & Bradbury, " 


322 80 


J. W. & A. Roberts, " 


230 05 


L. B. Hathon, " 


34 00 


M. B. Hall, 


125 00 


Learnerd Downing, " 


23 00 


Lyman Stickney, " 


47 00 


Corey tt Goodwin, " 


302 00 


J. W. Roberts & Co., " 


507 00 


James Rea & Son, '^ 


26 00 


E. B. Burgess, " 


135 25 


Charles A. Barker, '' 


73 00 


Sawyer & Smith, " 


154 39 


George W. Stevens, " 


17 00 


A. N. Swallow, « 


28 00 


Bradford & Gary, provisions, 


273 33 


E. A. Gary, " 


489 46 


Dupee, Farnum, & Co., provisions, 


90 50 


Hobbs & Wilson, " 


117 94 


V. M. Dunn, fish, 


156 78 


J. G. Holbrook, fish. 


38 72 


Sawyer & Smith, butter, 


42 22 



Amount carried forward, 114,590 44 



52 EXPENDITURES. 

Amount brought forward, 
Hall & Fiske, butter, 
Mystic Water-Board, water-rates, 
Boston Ice Company, ice, 
Hayward & Co., coffee, 
J. T. & N. Glines, coffee, 
Lewis Klous, clothing, 
N. Martin <fe Co., shoes, 
J. W. Rand, caps, 
Brintnall & Maynard, dry goods, 
William Murray & Son, " 
Edward Carnes, Supt., salary, 

" " disbursements, 

Charles J. Barry, hay, lime, &c., 
Edward Carnes, " 
N. Tufts, Jr., & Son, grain and meal, 
Ladd & Brown, '' '' 

William S. Phipps, dentistry, 
W. S. & G. 0. Wiley, carriage hire, 
Offal Department, swill, 
Edward Carnes, " 
Caleb Rand, printing, 
William W. Wheildon, printing, 
S. A. Rogers, sealing-scales, 
Lewis Hunt, hardware, 
Dennis Kelly, white-washing. 
Earl Wyman, carpentry, 
S. W. Fuller & Co., lumber, 
Philip Ham, iron work, 
John Bamerick, horse hire, 
A. E. Cutter & Co., stationery. 
Cooper &, Burgess, plumbing, 
Charles H. Wing, tin ware, 
Jasper Stone, spoons, 
Timothy Brinnen, gravel teaming. 

Amount carried forward. 



$14,590 44 


64 


02 


75 


00 


89 


75 


9 


84 


16 


65 


115 


74 


105 


92 


4 


50 


223 


36 


91 


77 


600 


00 


299 


57 


60 


48 


215 


42 


155 


41 


55 


90 


2 


00 


12 


50 


285 


50 


100 


00 


5 


50 


19 


50 


7 


70 


11 


30 


64 


67 


223 


73 


39 


32 


19 


01 


6 


00 


18 


54 


4 


35 


9 


63 


5 


60 


16 


11 


$17,624 73 



EXPENDITURES. 



53 



Amount brought forward, 
P. O'Riordon, gravel teaming, 
E. W. Bean, " 

Turner, Kidney, & Co., paving, 
H. G. Waldron, painting, 
Rufus Mason & Son, painting, 
Rand & Bjam, soap. 
Water Board, hydrants, labor, <fec., 
Damon, Sherburne, & Co., glass, 
B. W. Gage, crockerj^, 
George W. Robinson & Co., bell, &g., 
Cooper & Burgess, repair stoves, 
Cyrus Carpenter & Co., cooking stove, 
Thomas Gaffney, " 

Carpenter & Woodward, oil, 
Griffin Gibson, copper boiler. 



Balance of old account, 
Appropriated, 
Sundry receipts, 



Expended, 

Balance unexpended, 



$655 87 

12,600 00 

4,865 19 

$18,121 06 
18,039 23 

$81 83 



117,624 73 
40 36 
60 62 
23 13 
62 85 

10 50 
38 74 

12 45 
5 00 

45 72 

11 47 
3 75 

55 50 
8 50 

13 11 
22 80 

$18,039 23 



FUEL AND LIGHTING. 

Orison Little, supt. of lamps, services, 
Daniel Conant, lighting and care of lamps. 

J. S. Cunningham, ^' " 

J. S. Cunningham, Jr., " " 

Daniel L. Small, " " 



$200 00 

80 00 

480 00 

480 00 

480 00 



Amount carr'.ed forward. 



$1,720 00 



54 



EXPENDITURES. 



Amount brought 


forward, 


$1,720 00 


Eussell S. Lufkin, lighting and 


care 


of lamps 


400 00 


Elmer Lufkin, ^' 






80 00 


J. H. McDonald, " 






50 67 


Chas. E. Cutter, " 






480 00 


H. C. Gardner, " 






429 33 


George W. Williamson, " 






400 00 


John McLoud, lanterns, repairs, oil, 


fluid 


, &o., 


808 49 


F. A. Titus, gas fittings, (fee, 






6 70 


G. Gilman & Co., '' 






7 50 


Hemino; Ericcson, labor, 






1 50 


Burns & Goodwin, fuel, 






1,316 84 


Oriental Oil Co., oil. 






13 02 


A. N. Swallow, oil, wicking, &g., 






97 


Caleb Rand, printing. 






16 50 


Gas Company, gas, street lamps, 






14,504 16 


" '' City Hall, 






791 78 


" " repairs, alcohol, &c., 






637 56 


John Louer, iron work. 






276 36 


E. R. Robinson, " 






85 00 


H. G. Waldron, painting, 




* 


1 50 


W. F. Hodgkinson, " 






111 00 


W. S. & G. 0. Wiley, carriage hire, 






6 00 


Robert Stimpson, lamp post, 






25 00 


Amos Brown, carpentry, 






2 00 


Nathaniel Shattuck, ladders, 


204 13 


32 25 


Expended, $22, 


$22,204 13 


Appropriated, 20,240 


00 




Deficit, $1,964 13 





NEW LAMPS AND FIXTURES. 

Gas Company, lamp-posts, lamps, &c.. 
Appropriated, $1,000 00 

Expended, 835 20 



$835 20 



Balance unexpended. 



$164 80 



iEXPENDITURES. 55 

REPAIRS PUBLIC PROPERTY. 



R. R. Wiley, mason work, 


$201 36 


C. L. Lothrop, " " 


343 12 


Louis Little, " " 


22 25 


C. S. Parker & Son, roofing, 


72 58 


H. Riley & Sons, slating. 


12 32 


0. D. Mooney, plastering, 


118 50 


John Mitchell, " 


10 00 


Charles P. Brooks, " 


29 88 


John B. Wilson, carpentry. 


670 54 


George M. Starbird, " 


542 46 


David S. Tucker, '' 


279 82 


Nathaniel Shattuck, ^' 


42 08 


Joseph W. Hill, " 


515 01 


John McLoud, stove work. 


82 00 


Cook, Rymes, & Co., iron work. 


75 


John Louer, " " 


1 00 


Cushing & White, lightning rods. 


60 66 


T. J. Blake, boiler repairs, 


4 92 


Prescott, Ring, & Co., steam-pipe valves. 


17 62 


Morss & Whyte, wire railing, 


151 75 


F. A. Titus, gas-fittings. 


1,184 86 


G. Gilman & Co., " 


222 01 


S. 0. Weston, painting. 


110 86 


H. G. Waldron, " 


391 67 


McMath & Reed, " 


42 00 


Enoch J. Clark, '• 


131 17 


Benjamin F. Fish, painting. 


52 00 


J. T. Hoyt, whitewashing. 


84 00 


Joseph Caldwell, flagstaff and labor. 


37 28 


Alexander Campbell, plumbing, 


47 47 


Hadley & Wright, " 


5 75 


Turner, Kidney, & Co., paving. 


140 63 


Enoch R. Morse, safe knob, 


9 00 



Amount carried forward, ^5,637 32 



5(5 EXPENDITURES. 

Amouut brought forward, $5,637 32 

G. M. 0. Fernald, speaking tube, 34 00 

Gas Company, repair lanterns, 3 00 

T. J. Wbittemore, labor and stock, 6 00 

C. C. Holm & Son, paper and papering, 16 44 

Brintnall & Osgood, '' " " 68 44 

E. 0. Webster, hardware, 4 55 

Lewis Hunt, " 3 23 

Parker & Gannett, grass mower, 36 00 

Hook and Ladder Company, repairs of house, 75 00 

S. A. Rogers, repairs of city weights, 2 25 

Russell & Fitch, removing night soil, 4 00 

C. J. Barry, coal, 9 75 

Meadows & Enwright, repairs furniture, 5 50 

Joseph Ward & Sons, repairs of old paintings, 13 50 

S. J. F. Thayer, plans for hose -house, 50 00 



Expended, $5,968 98 

Appropriated, 2,000 00 



Deficit, $3,968 98 



$5,968 98 



PUBLIC BATHS. 

Lorenzo Gary, officer at bath house, 

Joseph B. Hutchins, " " " •' 

Patrick Reddy, '' " '' 

Mrs, Dunn, labor, '' " ^' 

H. G. Hubbard, carpentry, 

Boston Ice Co., ice, 

Richard Nason, sundries, 

Waverley House, dinner to committee from Salem, 

Amount carried forward, $977 50 



$298 


00 


294 


00 


276 


00 


65 


00 


26 


00 


9 


00 


1 


50 


8 


00 



EXPENDITURES. " 57 



Amount brought forward, 
Lorenzo Gary, repairs, 
John McLoud, brooms, 
C. S. Wason & Co., printing, &c., 
J. R. Bolan, mooring bath house, 



Appropriated, $1,800 00 

Expended, 1,021 08 



Balance unexpended, ' $778 92 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

P. O'Riordan, teaming earth, burial grounds, 

C. S. Wason, printing, 

Caleb Rand, " 

John Cass, lumber for fence, 

John Bamerick, grading burial grounds, 

Dennis Kelly, mason work, ^' " 

Thomas J. Stevens, medical services, 

C. W. Stevens, " " 

N. D. Parker, <* 

John L. Perry, burials, 

J. E. Downing, services, 

A. E. Cutter & Co., stationery. 



Appropriated, $400 00 

Balance of old account, 623 09 



li 



11,023 09 
Expended, 671 23 



Balance unexpended, $351 86 

8 



$977 


50 


28 


20 


2 


00 


7 


38 


6 


00 



$1,021 08 



$6 


00 


15 


50 


23 


00 


169 


48 


383 


00 


18 


75 


3 


00 


3 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


1 


00 


8 


50 



$671 23 



58 



EXPENDITURES. 



BURIAL GROUNDS, 

Cook, Rymes, &. Co., iron work, 

E. G. Clark, labor, 

John Fitzgerald, mowing grass, 

W. F. Hodgkinson, painting, 

Thomas Connorton, mowing grass, &c.. 



Appropriated, 
Expended, 

Balance unexpended, 





m 00 




15 00 




20 00 




18 00 


, &c.. 


126 75 




$186 75 


$500 00 




186 75 





$313 25 



COLLECTION OF OFFAL. 

George Todd, superintendent, services, " $1,056 00 

Andrew P. Wilson, labor, 141 75 

Morris Cochran, " 706 50 

Robert Dower, '' 706 50 

Edward Corbett, " 693 25 

Edward Finerty, " 628 00 

John Bowdoin, " 628 00 

Patrick Rice,- " 498 00 

Matthew Muller, " 4 75 

A. S. Morss, tools, 13 15 

Hoyt & Lewis, repair of pungs, 18 50 

T. Y. Heath, " '^ wagons, 2 50 

John Louer, wagon, sled, &c., 411 38 

G. & E. H. Gifford, tools, 2 33 

Richard Nason, grain, 347 20 

Frank E. Downer, " 26 80 

A. D. Hoitt, hay, 47 87 

S. H. Fall, ^' 20 70 



Amount carried forward. 



$5,953 18 



• 

Amount brought forward, 


f5,953 18 


E. L. Bruce & Co., h^y and straw, 


17 48 


Alson Story, " 


220 17 


Ladd & Brown, " 


9 20 


B. S. Hussey, oil, &c.. 


9 91 


Enoch J. Clark, painting. 


88 50 


William Curry, '' 


1 50 


Maynard Bros., boarding horses. 


15 00 


F. A. Titus, repair of hoes, 


4 75 


Parker & Gannet, hay-cutter, &c., 


30 45 


Frederick Lund, pails. 


G 40 


George Todd, sundries, 


10 22 


Earl Wyman, carpentry. 


60 07 


Charles T. MuUett, sundries, 


3 07 


Joseph Dickson, harness repairs, 


2 33 


S. P. Hill & Co., sundries, 


2 65 


Lewis Hunt, hardware, 


1 13 


A. E. Cutter & Co., stationery. 


1 58 


E. R. Robinson, iron work. 


3 18 


Caleb Rand, printing, 


9 00 


C. S. VVason & Co., '' 


3 75 


Wm. H. DeCosta, " 


5 00 


Wm. W. Wheildon, " 


2 50 


Thos. D. Strand, blacksmithing, 


49 01 


J. G. Ripley, " 


35 98 

« 


• 


86,546 01 


Appropriated, ' $1,800 00 




Received from sale offal, 6,293 44 




$8,093 44 




Expended, 6,546 01 




Balance unexpended, $1^547 43 





60 



EXPENDITURES. 



MILITIA BOUNTY. 



Co. A, 5th Regiment, 
" D, " " 

" C, 1st Battalion Cavalry, 



Amount disbursed. 
Received from State, 



Due from State, 







$1,160 


90 






804 


50 






598 


50 






781 


50 






3,990 


50 




$7,335 


90 


$7,335 


90 






7,235 


90 







$100 00 



ARMORY RENT. 



Co. H, 5th Regiment, armory rent, 
'' G, 9th " " 
" C, 1st Batt. Cavalry, " 


$1,462 
1,400 


50 
00 


$250 00 
412 50 

800 00 


Expended, 
Received from State, 


$1,4G2 50 


Deficit, 

» 


$62 50 





CONTINGENCIES. 

C. S. Wason &, Co., printing and advertising, 

Wm. H. DeCosta, 

Wm. W. Wheildon, 

Caleb Rand, 

W. & E. Howe, 

Am. Bank Note Co.^ 



a 

ci 
u 
It 






city bonds. 
Amount carried forward. 



$1,031 72 

208 80 

240 50 

423 25 

1,008 00 

650 00 

$3,562 27 



EXPENDITURES. 61 

Amount brought forward, $3,562 27 

Daily Advertiser, subscription, 20 13 

Bank Note Reporter, " • 3 00 

A. E. Cutter &. Co., books, stationery. &c., 303 61 

George W. Hobbs, " " 84 07 

S. Y. Collins, " 163 50 

Aaron R. Gay, " 5 00 

A. C. Libby, " 2 00 

Post-office, postage and revenue stamps, 70 39 

George B. Neal, " 5 00 

A. B. Shedd, " 6 00 

L. E. Pearson, disbursements, 6 15 

Thos. E. Smith, '^ * 51 75 

Walsh & Co., ink-eraser, 1 00 

Maynard & Noyes, ink, 2 25 

Henry Prentiss, ringing bells, 100 00 

Edward Parker, '' 8 00 

Joseph Smith, " 8 00 

Edmund Conway, '^ 6 00 

•Timothy Callahan, '' 8 00 

J. H. Bryant, ''- 9 00 

J. C. Burbank, " - 9 00 

Samuel F. Harding, " 8 00 

Joseph Caldwell, two flagstaffs, 217 00 

R S. Randall, care of " 76 00 

Charles B. Stevens, recording deeds, 1 60 

Town of Everett, tax of 1870, 22 61 

H. R. Bishop, ladders, 10 75 

Timothy Calnan, watering streets, 230 00 

Mystic Water Board, water rates, 68 00 

Clemens Herschell, estimates for new bridge, 25 00 

Stephen Smith & Co., furniture, 200 00 

George R. Kelso, '^ 53 Q^ 

George W. Berry & Co., " 36 00 

Childs, Crosby, & Lane, " 16 50 

Amount carried forward, $5,399 23 



62 EXPENDITURES. 

Amount brought forward, 
Russell & Fitch, moving night soil, 
Hicks & Badger, copper work, 
H. W. Bragg, City Solicitor, expenses and disburse 

ments, 
Jasper Stone, clocks and repairs, 
S. A. Rogers, labor, 
E. R. Wild, " 

A. Davis, " 

Homing Ericson,^^ 
Richard Power, marble work, 

Isaac W. Brackett, injured fireman, per order C. C, 
Post 11, G. A. R. decoration day, " ^' 

Lucy H. Stetson, injuries, " ^' 

Susan G. Harrington, '^ '•' " 

John McGill, injuries to son, " " 

Thomas H. Hall, Mess. Com. Council, '* " 

L. W. Chamberlin, ex-Treasurer, " 

Co. A, 5th Regiment, gas for armory, " 

a J) u u a (I 

a JJ i( ic II u 

u Q 9 th " " • " 

" C, 1st Battalion Cavalry, '^ " 

J. A. D. Worcester, city dinner at Mattapoisett, 

Cape Cod R. R., fare to and from "■ 

Shawmut Band, music for " 

Maynard Bros., carriages. 

Dearborn & Co., " 

W. S. & G. 0. Wiley, "• 

Chapman & Shaw, " 

John P. Barnard, *' 

Waverley House, collation, steamer " Inquiry," 

Hovey & Co., bouquets, decoration day, 

John McLoud, plumbing, 

Enoch R. Morss, lock, &c., for safe, 

Amount carried forward. 



it 



$5,399 


23 


20 


00 


15 


50 


585 


22 


203 


67 


63 


25 


41 


25 


12 


25 


2 


50 


15 


47 


., 525 


00 


400 


00 


400 


00 


200 


00 


500 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


600 


00 


200 


00 


50 


00 


70 00 


20 


00 


178 


00 


10 


00 


20 


00 


19 


00 


30 


00 


13 


00 


62 


00 


$10,105 


36 



EXPENDITURES. 63 

Amount brought forward, 
Brintnall & Osgood, curtains, 
Brintn^yi & ]\Iaynard, cloth, &c., 
Rand & Byam, soap. 
Gushing & White, vane and setting, 
Alex. Campbell, rent of i-ooms. 
Trinity M. E. Church, rent, Mission Hall, elections, 
Barney Hull, " Union Hall, '' 

L. H. Bigelow, street service for Assessors, , 
George F. Morgan, " " 

Nathaniel Shattuck, carpentry, repairs, 
George M. Starbird, '' " 

Wm. T. Gardner, constable service, coPg poll taxes, &c., 66 00 
Abijah Blanchard, " 

Stephen P. Kelley, " 

Perez B. Jacobs, " 

James Miskelly, " 

Charles Burcham, " 

Richard F. Murphy, collecting poll taxes, 
L. W. Charaberlin, tax sales, 
Pruden Simpson, auctioneer services, 
James M. Simpson, " 

Lewis Hunt, hardware, 

Wm. B. Moore & Son, " 
John T. Rand, sundries, 
Cornelius Cheek, cleaning windows, 
M. Sanson, stationery, 
J. T. Priest, " 
Amos Brown, appraising estates, 
Boston Ice Co., ice, 
Matthew Rice, report on bridges, 
Mass. General Hospital, care of injured man. 
Cook, Rymes, & Co., iron work, 
A. N. Swallow, alcohol, &c., 
George G. Powers, filterers, 

Amount carried forward, $11,693 79 



110,105 


34 


9 


05 


• 16 


39 


15 


93 


95 


00 


61 


25 


80 


00 


75 


00 


162 


00 


195 


99 


61 


13 


51 


00 


, &c., 66 


00 


30 


50 


14 


00 


130 


10 


33 


50 


2 


00 


39 


00 


18 


00 


10 


00 


58 


91 


41 


42 


29 


29 


6 


00 


23 


00 


2 


50 


1 


00 


32 


00 


99 


00 


87 


00 


13 


00 


13 


60 


12 


39 


3 


50 



64 EXPENDITURES. 

Amount bro.ught forward, $11,693 79 

Edmund Butler, teaming, 2 00 

J. W. Wilson, '' 3 00 
Johnson & Richmond, removing walls, Tudor bld'g, 178 50 

Prescott, Ring, & Co., steam piping, 6 45 

F. E. Downer, brooms, soap, &c., 15 79 

E. 0. Webster, keys, &c., 15 63 

Boston Directory, one copy, 4 00 

Thomas Connorton, mowing grass, 50 00 

R. R. Wiley, mason work, 129 62 

B. F. Brown, insurance city scales, &c., 3 75 
Ward officers, services at elections, 150 00 
James Walker, refreshments for ward officers, 35 00 
H. T. Amory, *» " 25 00 
Jolin Bryant, returns of deaths in 1870, 15 50 
John Reade, " 14 60 
John L. Perry, '* 13 30 
Erdix T. Swift, ,,. " • 7 60 
E. N. Coburn, " 7 00 
Patrick Denvir, " 6 20 
L. R. Home, surveys and plans (B. Hill grade com.), 2,000 00 
A. W. Locke & Co., printing, ^' 41 00 

C. S. Wason & Co., '' " 13 00 
Michael Fitzgerald, labor, " 22 50 
Michael Higgins, '' " 26 00 
Daniel Flinn, " " 29 25 
Wm. Blake & Co., castings, ■" 17 31 
Robert McLaughlin, granite posts (B. Hill Grade Com.), 80 00 
Henry A. Rice, setting " " 41 40 
E. W. Bean, teaming, " 2 50 
A. E. Cutter & Co., stationery, " 57 40 
George H. Jacobs, disbursements, *^ 23 52 

$14,730 61 



EXPENDITURES. 



65 



Expended, 

Charged with Soup House, 
17th June, 
Armory Eents, 



ii 



IC 



Appropriated, 
Sundry receipts, 

Deficit, 



816,000 00 
1,292 72 



$14,730 61 

2,226 08 

3,000 00 

' 62 50 



,019 19 
17,292 72 

82,726 47 



SOUP HOUSE. 

Edward Miskelly, cooking, 
G. A. Winslow, " 

Orin Gilmore, bread, 
G. A. Sanderson, bread, 
Charles B. Goodrich, bread, 
Thomas Parker, " 

Emri B. Stetson, " 

John Armstrong, " 

William Davis, " 

David O'Flanagan, " 

L. 0. Bemis, " 

Michael O'Keefe, '' 

D. L. & J. C. Bean, " 
Henry Cutler, fish, 
Caleb Drew, milk, 
F. E. Downer, groceries, 
Richard Nason, fael, 
George Prescott, " 
Jasper Stone, clock, 
Charles P. Brooks, rent, 
J. W. Noble, jr., teaming, 
H. P. Dunnels, meat, 
T. A. Meadows, crockery. 

Expended and charged to " Contingencies," 

9 



$256 75 

138 00 

73 64 

65 12 

98 80 
79 00 
76 96 
73 00 
65 40 
59 40 
59 00 
48 60 
79 00 
142 42 
12 40 
237 06 
57 00 
26 85 

4 50 
75 00 

4 50 
487 56 

6 12 

$2,226 08 



66 



EXPENDITURES. 



17th JUNE CELEBRATION. 



High School Cadets, parade, 
Post 11, G. A. R., " 

Co. A, 5th Regt, " 



a 



it 



a 



iC 



u 



li 
u 
(I 
a 



a 



ic 
u 
u 
u 

IC 



H, " 

" G, 9th Regt., 
" 0, 1st Batt. Cav. 
Engineers, Fire Dept., 
Hook and Ladder Co., 
Hose Co., No. 1, 

" 2, 

" 3, 

" 4, 
(Steamer), 
O'Connor^s Band, music, 
Shawmut " " 

Chelsea " '' 

Edmand's " " 

Boston Cornet Band, music, 

" Brigade " " 
First Light Battery, salute, 
W. S. & G. 0. Wiley, carriages, 
Peter Chevalier, " 

Hicks & Whittle, '' 

Wm. H. Chapman, " 

Maynard Bros., '' 

Charles F. Barnard, floral procession, 
Wm. Beals, decorations, 
Samuel A. King, balloon ascension. 
Gas Company, " gas, 

Johnson & Richmond, labor, 
"George E. Rogers, teaming, 
Caleb Rand, printing, 

Amount carried forward. 



$50 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


400 


00 


75 


00 


75 


00 


75 


00 


75 


00 


75 00 


75 


00 


75 


00 


202 


00 


100 


00 


222 


00 


162 


00 


162 


00 


170 


00 


60 


00 


90 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


20 


00 


40 


00 


65 


00 


250 


00 


200 


00 


123 


00 


76 


25 


5 


50 


13 


00 



$3,455 75 



EXPENDITURES. 67 

Amount brought forward, 
C. S. Wason & Co., advertising, 
William H. DeCosta, '' 
William W. Wheildon, " 
Bunker-hill Yacht Club, regatta, prizes, &c., 
J. Edwin Bray, collation, 
Robert Baker, services, 
James Poollej, " 
Nathaniel Shattuck, music stands, 
F. A. Roberts, chiming bells, 
R. R. Wiley, teaming, 
F. A. Titus, lanterns, 

$4,014 54 
Expended, $4,014 54 

Appropriated for ^' Contingencies," $3,000 00 
Income J. Foss's 1 7th June Fund, 143 5 1 

" Babcock Music '' 182 70 3,326 21 



$3,465 


75 


38 


50 


35 


50 


55 


50 


300 


00 


38 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 


50 


29 


10 


00 


4 


00 


23 


00 



Deficit, $688 33 



WATER WORKS. 

Paid on " Construction " account, $189,455 17 

" '^ Maintenance " " 35,813 40 

" "Interest" " (Water Bonds) net, 58,340 00 

$283,608 57 



NOTES PAYABLE. 

H. M. & F. M. Wingate, $1,500 00 

G. Washington Warren, 4,125 00 

Merchants National Bank, 10,000 00 

FaneuilHall " " 50,000 00 



Amount carried forward, $65,625 00 



68 



EXPENDITURES. 



Amount brought forward, 
Warren Inst, for Savings, 
J. W. Roberts & Co., 
Bunker-Hill National Bank, 
Monument Bank, 
New-England Mut. Life Ins. Co., 
Eagle Nat. Bank, 
Betsey and Joanna Putnam, 



$65,625 00 

70,000 00 

10,000 00 

60,000 00 

15,000 00 

20,000 00 

20,000 00 

4,445 00 

$265,070 00 



INTEREST ACCOUNT. 

Warren Institute for Savings, 

Provident " " " 

City Bonds (coupons). 

Discounts on City Bonds sold. 

Brokerage " " " " 

Government Tax on City Bonds sold, 

New-England Mut. Life Ins. Co., 

Bunker-Hill National Bank, 

Monument 

Faneuil Hall 

Eagle 

Merchants 

H. M. & F. M. Wingate, 

Peirce Fuel Fund, 

Trustees Poor Fund, 

Trustees School Fund, 

J). B. Weston, Guardian, ^ 

G. Washington Warren, 

Fitchburg Railroad Co., 

J. W. Roberts & Co., 

Amount carried forward, 



i( 



i( 



II 



u 



$11,050 00 


1,000 


00 


37,625 


00 


4,458 


75 


751 


25 


9 


20 


7,000 


00 


2,554 


16 


540 


00 


982 


08 


361 


67 


QQ 


11 


90 


00 


90 


00 


1,203 


12 


336 


00 


54 


00 


291 


16 


110 


25 


169 


18 



$68,741 93 



EXPENDITURES. 69 



Amount brought forward, $68,741 93 


D. G. Haskins, 






449 38 


VViDchester Home Corp., 






432 00 


J. & B. Putnam, 






32 00 


County Tax, interest on. 






188 07 




$69,843 38 


Expended, 






$69,843 38 


Deficit, Old Account, 






34,010 22 


Cr. to Sundry Accounts, 






469 72 




$104,323 32 


Appropriated, 


845,000 00 




• Sundry receipts. 


13,551 


52 


58,551 52 


Deficit, 






$45,771 80 



STATE AID. 

Paid to Soldiers and Families, $14,087 16 



REFUNDING OF TAXES. 



Jonatlian Stone, per order C. C. 
Emily G. Moody, " " 



Appropriated, 
Expended, 

Balance unexpended, $419 72 





$20 87 
59 41 


$500 00 
80 28 


$80 28 



70 ' EXPENDITURES. 

ABATEMENT OF TAXES. 

Tax of 1869 (abated by Assessors), $917 44 

'' " 1870 " " " 13,780 00 



$14,697 44 



Amount abated, $14,697 44 

Credited with Unapp. Taxes, 6,122 64 

Deficit, $8,574 80 



STATE AND COUNTY TAX. 

State Treasurer, tax of 1870, $46,200 00 

County Treasurer, " " '' 18,807 96 

$65,007 96 



FUNDED MUNICIPAL AND WATER DEBT. 



71 



FUNDED MUNICIPAL AND WATER DEBT AND TEMPORARY 

LOANS. 



To whom due. 


Date. Time. 


Rate of 
Interest. 


Amount. 


Trustees of Schools, 


1 
May 1, 1837 Permanent, 


6 per cent. 


$600 00 


t( t( 


" 22, 1848 " 


6 


5,000 00 


Provident Inst. Savings, 


Jan. 29, 18.53 20 years, 


5 


20,000 00 


Warren Inst, for Savings, 


Sept. 1, 18.57 " 


6 " 


25,000 00 


Pierce Fuel Fund, 


Sept. 20, 1860 Permanent, 


6 «' 


1,500 00 


"Warren Inst, for Savings, 


Oct. 1, 1864 8 years, 


6 " 


25,000 00 


N. E. Mut. Life Ins. Co. 


Jan. 1, 1868 3 


7 " 


50,000 00 


D. B. Weston, Guardian, 


Feb. 26, 1868 Demand, 


6 " 


900 00 


Trustees of Poor Fund, 


April 1, 1868 Permanent, 


6 " 


17,187 50 


Winchester Home Corp. 


Xov. 1, 1868 Demand, 


6 " 


7,200 00 


N.E. Mut. Life Ins. Co. 


Jan. 2, 1869 3 years, 


7 " 


30,000 00 


Winchester Home Corp. 


July 13, 1869 Demand, 


7 " 


3,000 00 


Warren Inst, for Savings, 


Aug. 2, 1869 1 year. 


7 " 


80.000 00 


Sinking Fund, 


Dec. 6, 1870 Demand, 


6 " 


20,000 00 


Bunker Hill Xat. Bank, 


Dec. 17, 1870 4 months, 


6 


50,000 00 


Warren Inst, for Savings, 


Jan. 9, 1871 3 months. 


7 " 


30,000 00 


George S, Putnam, 


Jan. 2, 1871 Demand, 


7 


555 00 


Andrew Sawtell, 


.Jan. 2, 1871 1 year, 


7 " 


15,875 60 


Monument Xat. Bank, 


Jan. 9, 1871 3 months, 


6 " 


15,000 00 

Aon<> PIP -jrt 






City Loan Bonds, 


Jan. 1,1853 20 years, 


5 per cent. 


20,000 00 


«i t( 


Oct. 1, 1862 20 " 


6 " 


20,000 00 


(i It 


Oct. 1, 1862 15 " 


5 " 


110,000 00 


i( (I 


Oct. 1, 1863 20 " 


5 " 


38,000 00 


<( (( 


Oct. 1, 1866 10 " 


5 " 


1.000 00 


t( (( 


April 1, 1868 20 " 


6 . «' 


100,000 00 


(i u 


Jan. 1,1869 20 " 


6 " 


' 95.500 00 


« <t 


July 1, 1869 20 " 


6 . " 


78,500 00 


t( (( 


Jan. 1,1870 20 " 


6 '« 


13f),000 00 


l< « 


July 1,1870 20 " 


6 " 


90,000 00 

d>f>pr) f>/>n nn 






Water Loan Bonds, 


Oct. 1,1862 20 years. 


5 per cent. 


100,000 00 


(( (. 


Oct. 1, 1863 20 " 


5 '' 


202 000 00 


<i « 


Oct. 1, 1863 30 " 


6 *♦ 


6,000 00 


(i (( 


April 1,1864 30 '« 


5 ♦« 


102,000 00 


<( t( 


Oct. 1, 1864 10 " 


6 " 


81,000 00 


it (( 


Oct. 1, 1864 8 " 


6 *« 


92,000 00 


it u 


April 1, 1865 20 " 


6 " 


1.000 00 


(( (< 


April 1. 1865 10 " 


6 " 


7,000 00 


(( (( 


Oct. 1, 1865 10 •' 


6 " 


59,000 00 


It << 


April 1,1866 20 " 


6 « 


35,000 00 


4k << 


April 1, 1866 10 " 


6 «' 


130,000 00 


l( (< 


Oct. 1, 1866 20 " 


6 «' 


60,000 00 


(t (( 


Oct. 1, 1866 15 " 


6 " 


2i,000 00 


<( l( 


Oct. 1,1866 10 " 


6 " 


57,000 00 


(( (< 


April 1, 1867 10 " 


6 " 


11,000 00 


(. t( 


Oct. 1, 1867 20 " 


6 " 


50,000 00 


(t (( 


April 1, 1868 30 " 


6 «' 


3.000 00 


(i « 


July 1, 1870 20 " 


6 '• 


100,000 00 


l( i( 


Jan. 1, 1871 20 " 


6 " 


50,000 00 














$2,257,818 10 



72 



EXPENDITURES. 



NET INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY, MARCH 1, 1871. 

"Water Debt Funded $1,172,000 00 

Municipal Debt Funded 758.287 50 

Municipal Debt " Temporary Loans " 327,530 60 

Accounts audited and unpaid 122.030 18 



To meet this there was Cash on hand March 1, 1871 
Amount due from State on State Aid and other accounts 
Amount due fron sundry persons " Notes Receivable " 
Uncollected taxes for the years of 1869 and 1870 . 
Betterment Assessments uncollected .... 
Drain and Sewer Assessments uncollected . . . 
Sidewalk Assessments uncollected .... 



$2,379,848 28 



$134,304 30 
27,239 56 
18,452 55 
38,290 15 
34.295 29 
8,218 03 
5,39'.) 97 



266,199 88 

/ $2,113,648 40 

The Sinking Fund for the Reduction of the City Debt amounts, with the amount appro- 
priated this year, to over $40,000.00, which amount is so much offset to the net debt stated. 



SCHEDULE, SHOWING THE AMOUNT OP FUNDED CITY AND "WATER 
DEBT AND DATES "WHEN THE SAME BECOMES PAYABLE. 



Year. 


City. 


Water. 


Total. 


1872 




$92,000 00 


$92,000 00 


1873 


40,000 00 




40,000 00 


1874 




81,000 00 


81,000 00 


1875 




66,000 00 


66,000 00 


1876 


1,000 00 


187,000 00 


188,000 00 


1877 


135,000 00 


11,000 00 


146,000 00 


1881 




26,000 0) 


26,000 00 


1882 


20,000 00 


100,000 00 


120,000 00 


1883 


38,000 00 


202,000 00 


240,000 00 


1885 




1,000 00 


1.000 00 


1886 




95,000 00 


95,000 00 


1887 




50,000 00 


50,000 00 


1888 


100,000 00 


3,000 00 


103,000 00 


1889 


174,000 00 




174,000 00 


1890 


226,000 00 


100,000 00 


320,000 GO 


1891 




50,000 00 


50,000 00 


1893 




6,000 00 


6,000 00 


1894 




102,000 00 


102,000 00 


* Permanent 


24,287 50 
$758,287 50 




24.287 50 




$1,172,000 00 


$1,930,287 50 



* Pierce Fuel Fund, and amounts held by the City belonging to Trustees of Schools, and 
Trustees of Poor Fund. 



VALUATION, TAXATION, ETC. 



73 



VALUATION, TAXATION, &c., FROM 1847 TO 1870 INCLUSIVE. 



Year. 

1847 

1848 

1849 

1850 

1851 

1852 

1853 

1854 

1855 

1856 

1857 

1858 

1859 

1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 

1865 

1866 

1867 

1868 

' 1869 

1870 



Real Estate. 



Personal 
Estate. 



$6,018,690 

6,363,745 

6,583,000 

6,783,050 

7,259,400 

7,546,500 

• 7,723,900 

10,010,800 

10,464,800 

11,135,700 

11,678,400 

12,070,000 

12,315,200 

12,518,200 

12,405,400 

12,692,800 

12,057,200 

13,233,800 

13,280,600 

13,619,750 

16,883,200 

17,441,500 

17,908,500 

18,904,200 



$2,396,455 
2,376,440 
2,238,100 
2,064,650 
1,943,300 
2,070,900 
2,381,900 
3,198,800 
2,895,500 
3,026,700 
3,057,600 
3,024,600 
3,008,100 
3,181,600 

3,ooa,ioo 

3,506,350 
5,712,000 
3,892,100 
4,022,400 
4,577,150 
6,503,200 
7,282,100 
7,760,000 
9,064,900 



Total. 



$8,415,145 

8,740,185 

8,821,100 

8,847,700 

9,202,700 

9,617,400 

10,105,800 

13,209,600 

13,360,300 

14,162,400 

14,736,000 

15,094,600 

15,323,300 

15,699,800 

15,408,500 

16,199,150 

18,669,200 

17,125,900 

17,303,000 

18,196,900 

23,386,400 

24,723,600 

25,668,500 

27,969,100 



Amount 
Taxed. 


' Rate. 


Polls. 


$68,899 15 


$7 60 


3296 


105,173 10 


11 40 


3690 


84,671 40 


9 00 


3521 


90,729 42 


9 60 


3861 


94,000 92 


9 60 


3707 


95,377 32 


9 30 


3957 


107,521 50 


10 00 


4309 


102,886 20 


7 30 


4302 


116,152 96 


8 20 


4399 


125,846 16 


8 40 


4588 


144,279 30 


9 30 


4823 


136,169 90 


8 30 


5016 


147,561 63 


9 00 


5001 


149,612 70 


9 00 


5543 


155,904 60 


9 60 


5322 


166,443 84 


9 60 


5466 


195,380 16 


9 80 


6211 


252,164 24 


13 60 


5753 


332,856 67 


19 60 


5767 


332,491 44 


17 60 


6113 


394,631 00 


16 50 


6558 


380,965 38 


14 80 


7528 


446,578 80 


16 80 


7674 


463,495 60 


16 00 


7995 



10 



74 



VALUATION OF CITT PROPERTY. 



SCHEDULE AND VALUATION 



OF THE 



PROPERTY OWNED BY THE CITY. 



City Hall, land and 


High Schoolhouse, 


VVinthrop 


a 


Warren 


a 


Bunker-hiJ] 


(i 


Prescott 


ii 


Harvard 


u 


Harvard 


(I 


Primary 


a 




11 




(I 




u 




11 




u 




u 




ii 




a 




a 




a 




a 



furniture, City Square, 



it 



$150,000 00 
90,000 00 
21,000 00 
92,000 00 
80,000 00 
60,000 00 
20,000 00 



Monument Square, 

Bunker-hill Street, 

Summer Street, 

Baldwin Street, 

Elm Street, 

'' Harvard Street, 

(unfinished) and land. Bow St., 40,000 00 

land and furniture, Cross Street, 2,400 00 

" Bunker-hill St., 1,500 00 

Mead Street, 15,000 00 

Kingston St., 3,000 00 

Moulton St., 15,000 00 

Sullivan St., 1,500 00 

Soley St., 1,000 00 

Common St., 20,000 00 

Richmond, 5,000 00 

Bunker-hill St., 20,000 00 

and furniture, Medford St., 500 00 

" 500 00 



(( 



ii 



it 



ti 



It 



it 



Amount carried forward. 



)38,400 00 



VALUATION OF CITY PROPERTY. 75 

Amount brought forward, 8638,400 00 
Winthrop-street Building, land, <fec., occupied by 

Hook & Ladder Co., Armory, &c., 20,000 00 

Hose House No. 1, and Land, Main Street, 8,000 00 

" No. 2, " " 4,000 00 

Steamer House and Land, Elm Street, 20,000 00 

Land and Flats, Medford Street, 8,500 00 

Lot of land. Bunker-hill Street, 2,500 00 

City Stables and Land, Medford Street, 10,000 00 

Five Hose Carriages and Hose, 5,000 00 

Furniture in Fire Department Buildings, 1,000 00 

Two Steam Fire-Engines, 7,000 00 

Two Horses for Fire-Engines, 700 00 

Fire-Alarm Telegraph, 15,000 00 

Hooks, Ladders, and Carriage, 2,000 00 

Horses, Carts, Harnesses, &c., 5,000 00 

Gravel Land in Maiden, 1,500 00 

" Chelsea, 1,700 00 

Water Works, 1,500,000 00 



$2,250,300 00 



EEPORT 



OF THE 



SECRETARY OF OVERSEERS OF POOR. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, April 10, 1871. 

Report accepted, and ordered that the same be printed 
with the City Treasurer's Annual Statement of Receipts and 
Expenditures. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

JOHN T. PRIEST, City Clerk, pro tern. 



In Common Council^ April 11, 1871. 

Concurred; 

JOHN T. PRIEST, Clerk. 



REPORT, 



TO THE CITY COUNCIL CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 

Gentlemen, — Notwithstanding no ordinance exists requir- 
ing an exhibit from this department, we belief a brief statement 
is due both to ourselves and those we represent, and most 
respectfully submit the following " 

REPORT. 

At the commencement of our financial year, March 1, 1870, 
we had 42 inmates in our Almshouse ; and during the year 
ending Feb. 28, 1871, 82 had been admitted, making the total 
number in the house for the year 124. 

During the same time, 77 have been discharged, and 6 
removed by death, leaving our present number 41 ; of which 
26 are represented as a legal charge, and on expense to the 
city, 6 are on expense of other cities or towns, 5 are on 
private account, and 4 are at work for their board. 

The gross expense at the house, including repairs and in- 
provements, have been, — 



For Salary paid Superintendent and Matron, 
" " " Assistant Matron, 

For Provisions bought of E. A. Gary, 
" Salt Beef " " Farnura, Hayward, & Co., 
"♦Fresh Fish, " " V.M.Dunn, 
*' W. I. Goods, Flour, Butter, &c., sundry persons, 

For Dry Goods, sundry persons, 
" Clothing, •' " 

" Boots, Shoes, and repairing. 



$716 


67 


188 


13 


$880 73 


90 


50 


116 


24 


1,070 


32 


$315 


13 


130 


24 


105 


92 



$904 80 



2,157 79 



551 29 



Amount carried forward, $3,613 88 



80 REPORT. 

Amount brought forward, $3,613 88 

For Carpenter and Mason Work — Painting, Glazing, and Teaming, 576 27 

Mystic Water Board, $87 45 

For Grain and Meal, 211 31 

" Potatoes, Hay, Lime, and Lumber, 582 67 

" Coal, Wood, and Coke, 508 86 
" New Stoves and Boiler, 90 55 

" Health Department for Swill, 385 50 

" Miscellaneous, 483 37 







*»"'" •* 




$6,539 86 


On which account, we have, — 






Cr. by Cash received for Sale of Pork, 


$343 42 




" Cow and Calf, 


70 00 




" Boarders, private account, 


666 69 




" " towns and cities, 


455 19 




" Miscellaneous, 


78 50 




" Health Department,* 


100 00 


1 713 80 










$4,826 06 


Expense in the City out of Almshouse, — 






For Medical Attendance and Medicine, 


$1,766 04 




" Burials and Graves at Woodlawn, 


377 00 




" Groceries ordered for sundry families, 


3,912 98 




" Fuel 


1,222 80 




•' Cash Orders, 


1,523 72 




" Miscellaneous, 


102 75 


$8,905 29 






Support out of the City, — 






For Worcester and Taunton Hospitals, Insane, 


$1,929 03 




" Towns and Cities, Relief to our Poor, 


485 46 




" State Workhouse, Support of Convicts, 


179 69 


2 594 08 






MttfOT \JW 




$11,499 37 


On which account, we have, — 






Cr. by Cash received from Towns and Cities, 


$2,150 88 




" State of Massachusetts, 


952 51 




** Miscellaneous, 


148 00 


a 2ft 1 39 






Ok^OX 0*r 



Recapitulation. 

Dr. 

1870, March 1, for Cash on hand, $655 87 

" City Council Appropriation, 11,400 00 

" " Medical Relief, 1,200 00 

'* Miscellaneous Receipts, 4,965 19 



^,247 98 



$18,221 06 



* A difference will appear in the Auditor's Account of $100 received on account of care 
and sale of swill. 



REPORT. 



81 



Amount brought forward, $18,221 06 

Cb. 

By Cash paid on account Support of House, S6,539 86 

" " " out of House, 8,905 29 

" " " " City, 2,594 08 

" on hand, 81 83 

" Sale of Swill, 100 00 

518,221 06 

By which it will be observed that the expense of relief 
and partial support out of the Almshouse is largely in excess 
of the full support of the inmates of the house. 

Our board, after careful deliberation, believe this to be the 
most judicious course to pursue, in dispensing the charities 
committed to our trust, especially where there are families of 
young children, who should be watched over and cared for by 
their natural guardians, and those only who know the love of 
a parent for their own children. 

They will there spend their youthful and happy days with 
no alienated affections ; and, if poor, in their mature years the 
stigma which invests those who have passed through the por 
tals of an Almshouse will not rest on them. 

And here we may express our views briefly in regard to 
the duty of Overseers of the Poor towards those for whom 
our State has made us liable when they fall into distress, and 
have no other means of relief. 

In our early history, and before the establishment of the 
Almshouse system, provision was made generally at the an- 
nual town meeting for the care of the poor, which was in 
most cases by offering them at auction ; when, of course, the 
meanest man, with but a very slight apology for a soul, was 
declared to be the lucky person : and the widows and orphan 
children were assigned to his tender mercies, which not un- 
frequently were very cruel. 

But, in process of time, what seemed a better way suggested 

itself in the Almshouse system ; where from the infirmities of 

age or disease a home might be found. But, like all other 

charities, this mode has been subject to imposition and abuse ; 
11 



82 REPORT. 

and a class of idle and dissolute persons have claimed a right 
to support, when they were abundantly able to earn their own 
living, and, if not wholly devoid of shame, would shun such an 
institution as not designed for them : and too often we believe 
Overseers of the Poor have encouraged such, when, if a 
prompt refusal had been met, the applicant would have gone, 
and in an honest way obtained his own living. We think 
the managers of our Almshouses should in all kindness con- 
sider the condition of the applicant; and, if temporary relief 
only is desired, let it be granted : at the same time, endeavor to 
assist the person to some employment, and in such ways as 
will show to him, that, with health and strength, he can be* 
one of nature's noblemen, and care for himself. 

In the various and trying discharge of our duties, we have 
as far as possible endeavored to pursue such a course as we 
believe will commend itself to every thoughtful and candid 
mind, both in regard to its domestic economy and indulgence, 
in allowing a retentive pride of manliness, which in eight out 
of ten cases ought to be encouraged, toward the applicant. 

Our work has somewhat exceeded that of the last year, as 
a natural result of an increase in population. With such in- 
crease, there will be some who have not brought their pocket- 
books with them. Were it not so, we might in hopeful anticipa- 
tion look forward to that joyful day, when no pinching hand of 
want should seek relief from the Overseers of Poor, and 
charity in kindness and long-suffering should cease to exist, 
for want of occasion for its healthy exercise. 

The whole number of families relieved during the year has 
been three hundred and eighty-five, an increase of sixty-two 
over the previous year, representing more than thirteen hun- 
dred persons. Fourteen hundred and thirteen orders have been 
given for groceries, fuel, or cash. Eighty-one persons have 
been medically treated; and we have buried twenty-three 
adults and eleven children, and sent twenty-seven persons to 
the State Almshouse. 

Of the total number of families relieved, one hundred and 
nineteen are those of soldiers who served on the quota of this 



REPORT. 83 

city in the late war, being an increase of thirty-four over the 
previous year, and more than .fifty per cent, of the increase 
during the year. 

We must express our disapproval to this mode of relief, 
furnished in the manner it now is. Not denying its legality, Ave 
fail to see why a man who abundantly provided for his family 
before engaging in the service should, by such act, place him- 
self and family before the community as dependent on the 
public for support and paupers. 

Trusting to the wisdom of our General and State Govern- 
ments, and believing that eveHtually a system of relief of a 
more substantial nature will be adopted by them, for the 
present we must meet and relieve as the law provides ; but 
with deep regret that a diflferent way, and such as would better 
comport with the inducement held out when the country was 
in peril, and men must be had to maintain our national ex^ 
istence, has not already been devised. 

Having briefly reviewed the work of the board in its general 
features for the past year, we would not be unmindful of those 
who have contributed of their time and means in furtherance 
of our benevolent work, prominent amongst whom has been 
the Rev. Mr. Barnard. 

A man of long experience, and having a heart in the right 
place, a hand to act in unison with its pulsation, has always 
cheerfully acted with us in every desired benevolent work. 
The ladies, too, with their natural sympathy for the poor and 
less favored, have been diligent in their missions of relief to 
the sick and suffering. Whether as almoners of public charities, 
or from private means, their kind and generous contributions 
have alleviated much suffering, and in silence caused many to 
rejoice for the liberal hand that withholdeth not, extended for 
their relief. 

Selected as we have been to this duty, by the suffrage of 
our fellow-citizens, it has been our earnest desire, first, to meet 
all applicants in a proper spirit of kindness, and, after due in- 
vestigation, send no one empty away who apparently was in 



84 REPORT. 

need of the sought-for relief; and second, to carefully guard 
against any waste or misuse of the means committed to our 
trust for the relief of our worthy poor. 

With an approving conscience, we must submit to the public 
to decide whether we, as good stewards, have been faithful to 
that trust. 

Very respectfully submitted by 

Overseers of the Poor. 

DAVID B. WESTON, Secretary. 

Charlestown, Feb. 28, 1871. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY TREASURER. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen^ March 27, 1871. 

Referred to Committee on Fire Department, and sent down 
for concurrence. 

DANIEL WILLIAMS, City Clerk. 



In Common Council, March 21, 1871. 
Referred in concurrence. 

JOHN T. PRIEST, Clerk. 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



Engineer's Office, March, 1871. 

To His Honor the Mayor and City Council: — 

Gentlemen, — Section 6th of the Rules and Regulations of 
the Fire Department requires the Chief Engineer annually, in 
the month of March, to make a report of the condition of the 
Department, the age, residence, occupation, of the members 
belonging to the same, the houses and apparatus, cost of main- 
taining the same, all losses that may occur, all accidents, the 
number of fires, description of the buildings, names of the 
owners, and the insurance thereon, and the number of reser- 
voirs and hydrants where water can be obtained. And, in 
compliance with this section, I most respectfully submit the 
following report : — 

FORCE OF THE DEPARTMENT. 

The Department consists of a Chief Engineer and four as- 
sistants ; four hose companies, of twenty men each ; one steam- 
engine and hose company, of twenty-three men, including the 
engineer, foreman, and driver, who are permanently employed ; 
one hook and ladder company, of thirty men : making in all a 
total of one hundred and thirty-eight men. They have in 
charge five four-wheeled carriages, two steam fire-engines, and 
one hook and ladder carriage. 

Our duty during the past year has been very arduous. 
We have on several occasions been called upon to respond 
to the alarm bells of this city when there were six or 
eight buildings on fire at once ; but, thanks to the Mystic and 
the alacrity of the members of the Department, we soon had 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 87 

the fire under control : and I know of no year while I have 
been connected with the Department that it has been more 
prompt and efiicient than during the past year. 

HOUSES. 

The Houses of the different companies are in fair condition. 
Hose Company No. 4's house has during the past year been 
put in good condition : the bell-tower has been removed, and 
the inside of the building greatly improved. 

Hose Company No. 2's house has had the bell-tower re- 
moved, and the inside of the house renovated twice. The first 
time, necessity called for it ; and the last time was occasioned 
by a fire occurring on the premises : and at the present time 
the house is in good condition. And I know of no very ex- 
tensive repairs needed on any houses connected with the 
Department for the ensuing year. 

APPARATUS. 

During the past year the Howard Steamer has been rebuilt 
by Cook, Rymes, & Co. ; and I pronounce her at the present 
time as good, if not better, than when she was new. The 
Steamer Mystic has been at the shop of the same firm, and had 
a good overhauling, and thoroughly repaired at considerable 
expense. Both engines are at the present time in good condition 
to go into service at any and all times when called upon. 

The carriages for the past year have had no very extensive 
repairs. The running part of the same are in good condition ; 
but, for the ensuing year, most if not all the hose-carriages 
will need repainting, and some other repairs, more especially 
the carriage under the charge of the Howard Company, which 
needs new wheels and other repairs to make her compete with 
other carriages connected with the Depai*tment. 

HOSE. 

There is connected with the Department about six thousand 
feet of leather hose, of which three thousand feet is good, and 



88 CHIEF engineer's report. 

in fair condition to attach to a hydrant, but not safe and reli- 
able for the use of steamer-e. The remaining three thousand 
feet I would recommend to be sold at any price that can be 
obtained. We also have about four thousand feet of Boyd's 
patent hose, with the universal coupling attached to the same ; 
which gives great satisfaction to all parties who use it. And I 
would recommend that during the present year one thousand 
feet more be added to the Department, so that we can be able 
to put one more company in service with the same, to take the 
place of leather. Of the amount of hose now in service in 
the Department, not more than one-third is capable of stand- 
ing the pressure of the steamers ; and, as we have on many 
occasions nearly lost valuable buildings on account of hose 
bursting, and owing to the service it has seen, I would re- 
commend that this important branch of the Department be 
replenished as soon as possible. 

FIRE ALARM. 

During the past year the fire alarm has worked well. The 
apparatus has been detached from the bell of the St. Francis 
De Sales Church, and attached to a three thousand pound bell 
on the Warren Sclioolhouse. It also has been detached from 
the bell of the St. John's Church, and attached to a three 
thousand five hundred pound bell on the City Hall. In the 
lower and upper part of the city, the fire alarm gives perfect 
satisfaction. There has been some complaint from the citizens 
and firemen near the centre of Ward 3, that they are not 
properly alarmed in case of fire. And, as the distance between 
the Warren School bell and the bell on the Rubber Works is 
greater than between any two alarm bells in the city, I 
would most respectfully recommend that a two thousand five 
hundred pound bell be placed on the Bunker-hill Schoolhouse. 
I would also recommend that a fire alarm box be placed at the 
head of High and Winthrop Streets, and one near the foot of 
Baldwin Street on Main, and another at Prudenville. With 
these suggestions carried out, I think the alarm would be a 
great deal more perfect than at the present time. 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 89 

ACCIDENTS. 

There have been no fatal accidents the past year, but some 
narrow escapes. On the evening of May 20, at the fire at F. 
0. Reed & Co's. glove fectory, Mr. Albert C. Abbott, a mem- 
ber of Hose Company No. 1, was badly burnt in the face and 
hands by an explosion of naphtha. At the same fire, Mr. 
Albert Smitli, Engineer of steamers, lost the end of two fin- 
gers by being caught in the machinery of his engine. At a 
fire in Rideout's stable, on the evening of August 1, Mr. John 
Uatt of Hose Company No. 4 was somewhat injured by falling 
from the hay-loft. At the fire in Tudor Buildings, July 21, 
several members of the Department received slight injuries, 
but none serious. At the fire at Mr. Charles Curtis's stable on 
Lawrence Street, on the morning of December 26, Mr. W. 
E. Bridgett, Secretary of Hose Company No. 3, and Mr. Wm. 
H. Dennis of the Steamer Company, received severe injuries 
by the falling of a floor. 

At an alarm of fire on the morning of February 17, Mr. 
Geo. H. Huff, First Assistant of Hose Company No. 1, fell 
while running with the carriage, and received severe injuries 
to his arm and head. 

Most of the above were provided for by the Charitable As- 
sociation. 

The Charitable Association is still in a prosperous condi- 
tion, although they have been called upon to pay more bene- 
fits than any previous year. It has been the means since its 
organization of helping a good many needy men connected 
with the Department, who have been injured while in the 
performance of their duty. I hope it will continue to receive 
the merited support it deserves from our citizens. 

FINANCES. 

The amount appropriated for the Fire Department for the 
past year was $10,000; expended 111,381.85; being a deficiency 
of $1,381.85. The amount received for services of steamers and 
sale of old material was f 136. 00. 

12 



90 CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 

FIRES AND ALARMS. 

During the year ending March 1 , 1871, the Fire Department 
has been called into service by thirty-five fires, to which all or 
part of the Department was in service, — thirty-two slight 
fires and repeating alarms, and twelve needless and false. 
Whole number of alarms, 79. 

Loss from March 1, 1870, to March 1, 1871, $176,275 ; in- 
surance, $151,495. Total loss, $28,780. 

HYDRANTS. 

During the past year there has been put in some eight or ten 
new Lowry's hydrants. The whole number now in service is 
120 Lowry's and 36 single hydrants ; and, as the same is now 
under the charge of the Superintendent of Streets, I would 
recommend that they, or any thing appertaining to the Fire 
Department, be transferred to the Board of Engineers. I 
know if this recommendation is carried out, it would be more 
perfect, and give more satisfaction to all parties concerned. 

NEW LADDER CARRIAGE AND SPARE LADDERS. 

For the last two years it has been fully demonstrated, that 
the city needed more ladders, and a new hook-and-ladder 
truck. I would at this time recommend that there be pur- 
chased for the use of the department a first-class hook-and- 
ladder truck, to be located as near the centre of the city as 
possible ; and as this apparatus is one of the first we need, 
and in case of hard going the last we get, I would recommend 
that the said carriage be run by horses at every alarm. There 
are spare ladders located at the several schoolhouses, and at 
the houses of Hose Companies 1, 2, and 4, and at the City Hall. 
There is also in reserve one two-wheeled carriage at the Poor 
Farm, with two hundred and fifty feet of hose, and at the store- 
room of the Department on Winthrop Street, one two-wheeled 
hose carriage, and five hose sleds for winter use. 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 91 



CONCLUSION. 



In closing this report, I would thank the City Government 
for the respect and courtesy that they have shown me at all 
times, also for favors that have been asked for, and speedily 
granted. To the City Marshal and men under his charge 
thanks are due, for assistance rendered at many times during 
the year. For services rendered by many of our exempt 
members, I would return thanks. Will many of our citizens, 
who have at many times while we have been on duty given us 
much encouragement, please accept thanks. To my assistants, 
for the able and faithful manner they have supported me dur- 
ing the past year, I desire to return thanks more sincerely 
and gratefully felt than any words at my command can express. 
To the officers and members of the Department, I would say, 
that words are wholly inadequate to convey to you the feel- 
ings of my heart ; and I hope that the noble and invaluable 
services that you have rendered me and the inhabitants of our 
beloved city will not go unrewarded. 

All of which I most respectfully submit to your honorable 
body. 

ISRAEL P. MAGOUN, 

Gliief Engineer Charlestown Fire Department. 



COMMITTEE ON FIRE DEPARTMENT FOR 1870. 

Alderman John Linscott, Chairman, 

** Sam'l N. Nesmith, 

Councilman Geo. E. Rogers, 

" Nathan E. Gltnes, 

" John Gardner. 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



Chief Engineer. Age. Residence. 

Israel P. Magoun, 44 9 Haverhill St., 

Assistant Engineers. 

1st, Wm. E. Delano, 38 46 School St., 

2d, John Bartlett, 42 1 Moulton St., 

3d, Edward E. Turner, 31 25 Prescott St., 

ith, John Louer, 34 34 Pleasant St., 



Occupation. 




Rep. to Gen'l Court, 




Badge. 


Clerk, 


A. 


Engineer, 


B. 


Carver, 


C. 


Blacksmith, 


D. 



Wm. E. Delano, Secretary. 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 



93 



RED JACKET HOSE COMPANY No. 1. 
House on Main Street. 



Foreman. 

Thos. M. Paine, 


Age. 

26 


Residence. 

30 Walker St., 


Occupation. 

Saloon Keeper, 


Badge 

14 


Assistant. 

Geo. H. HufF, 


25 


• 

17 Wall St., 


Blacksmith, 


7 


Secretary. 

John S. Tuck, 


26 


57 Sullivan St., 


Piano-maker, 


12 


Treasurer. 

Chas. 0. Richardson, 


37 


Mason Ct., 


Paver, 


11 


Geo. J. Moore, 


29 


55 Park St., 


Brakeman, 


1 


W. S. Oakman, 


37 


34 Elm St., 


Peddler, 


ro 


A. A. Sanderson, 


24 


5 Hall's Row, 


Teamster, 


13 


Wm. D. Lander, 
John Silva, 


28 
24 


Lyndeboro' St., 
4 Exeter Place, 


Sailmaker, 
Varnisher, 


8 
15 


Henry C. D wight, 
Frank E. Delano, 


25 

28 


Princeton St.^ 
46 School St., 


Cooper, 
Bolter, 


2 
5 


Augustus Wilson, 
Fred Sanderson, 


45 
24 


18 Phipps St., 
5 Hull's Row, 


Carpenter, 
Teamster, 


9 
3 


Albert C. Abbott, 


30 


17 Wall St., 


Fireman, 


4 


Fred. J. Stickney, 
Chas. Bennett, 


30 
29 


8 Phipps St., 
8 Williams St., 


Carver, 
Teamster, 


19 

20 


Barrent V. Dennis, 


49 


16 Mead St., 


Hose Maker, 


18 


T. H. Harrington, Jr., 


38 


36 Summer St., 


Merchant, 


17 


Wm. H. Wellington, 


21 


16 Mead St., 


Milkman, 


16 


John Walden, 


24 


126 Chelsea St., 


Watchman, 


6 


Twenty members. 











List of Property belonging to city in charge of Co, 

One four-wheeled carriage, built by Wm. Williams, N. Y., 
in good order; 1 hydrant chuck, 3 fire hats, 3 hose pipes, 4 
lanterns, 8 settees, 16 chairs, 2 stoves, 2 water pails, broom, 
spanners, wrenches, hose ropes, gas fixtures in hall and engine 
room, 1 hose sleigh, 25 feet hand hose, 1,000 feet leading hose 
20 keys and badges. 



94 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 



BUNKER HILL HOSE COMPANY No. 2. 

House on Main Street. 



Badge. 



Foreman. 










L. B. Kimball, 


25 


98 Cambridge St., 


Teamster, 


24 


Assistant. 




• 






Wm. E. Story, 


40 


11 Mead St., 


Painter, 


23 


Secretary. 










E. A. Roulstone, 


33 


54 Haverhill St., 


Clerk, 




Treasurer. 










John Grardner, 


51 


593 Main St., 


Carpenter, 


26 


Wm. Femald, 


46 


1 Canal St., 


(( 


25 


Isaac F. Phillips, 


48 


7 Bunker-hill St., 


Painter, 


28 


John Howard, 


63 


59 Russell St., 


Carpenter, 


27 


Jos. W. Welsh, 


52 


16 Charles St., 


Blacksmith, 


29 


Oliver Dickson, Jr., 


38 


60 Pearl St., 


Teamster, 




Kilby J. Paine, 


44 


28 Sullivan St., 


Painter, 


39 


Wm. F. Caldwell, 


21 


32 Cambridge St., 


Baker, 


40 


Wm. H. Phipps, 


22 


47 Mill St., 


Laborer, 




John White, 


24 


569 Medford St., 


(( 


21 


Daniel GriflBn, 


23 


Medford St., 


Morocco Dresser, 




W. H. White, 


47 


47 Mill St., 


Silver Plater, 




Lewis Little, 


23 


2 Thorndike St., 


Mason, 


41 


T. P. Dickson, 


33 


33 Cambridge St., 


Wheelwright, 


34 


Geo. E. Tyler,. 


39 


15 Seaver St., 


Teamster, 




E. H. Richardson, 


38 


Charles-st. Ct., 


Brewer, 




Geo. B. Stan wood. 


21 


Russell St., 


Printer, 




Twenty members. 











List of Property belonging to city in charge of Co. 

One four-wheeled carriage, built by C. E. Hartshorn, N. Y., 
in good condition ; 2 hydrant chucks and wrench, 3 hose 
pipes, 3 lanterns, 6 hose caps, 6 belts and spanners, 6 hose 
ropes, 1 gooseneck, 1 stove and pipe, hod and shovel, broom, 
water pot, copper boiler, 2 buckets, 1 steel shovel, 50 feet 
hand hose, 1000 feet leading hose, 20 keys and badges, 1 pat- 
ent coupling. 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 



95 



WASHINGTOxV HOSE COMPANY No. 3. 
House on Harvard Street. 





Age. 


Residence. 


Occupation. Badge. 


Foreman." 










John McNulty, 


22 


41 Main St., 


Morocco Dresser, 


42 


Assistant. 










P. J. Donnovan, 


22 


6 School St., 


Teamster, 


47 


Secretary. 










Wm. E. Bridgett, 


21 


10 Wood St., 


Salesman, 


50 


Treasurer. 






^ 




Elias Crafts, Jr., 


62 


20 Albion Ct., 


Merchant, 


57 


David McNulty, 


27 


35 Moulton St., 


Carver, 


41 


Chas. H. Bridges, 


24 


31 Walker St., 


Machinist, 


51 


Ashel Q. Clark, 


31 


3 Blaber Place, 


Printer, 


52 


James Turnbull, 


25 


11 Monument St., 


Cooper, 


43 


Charles L. Kendall, 


23 


54 Baldwin St., 


Polisher, 


59 


Michael McCafferty, 


28 


Everett St., 


BolttT, 


48 


Gr. H. R. Burroughs, 


21 


49 Pearl St., 


Blacksmith, 


45 


P. T. Fleming, 


25 


80 Chapman St.,^ 


Currier, 


60 


J. J. McCarty, 


22 


Beach St., 


Morocco Dresser, 


44 


Daniel F. Flynn, 


21 


109 Elm St., 


H tl 


49 


Ashbel Waitt, 


62 


34 Winthrop St., ' 


Merchant, 


55 


A. W. Berry, 


21 


9 Park St., 


Clerk, 


53 


Frank Bowker, 


21 


Austin St., 


Carver, 


48 


Seventeen Members. 









List of Property belonging to city in charge of Co. 

One four-wheeled carriage, built by C. E. Hartslioru, N.Y., 
in g-uod order; 1 sleigh, 1 boiler, 3 water pails, sponge and 
chamois, stove and pipe, 1 wheel jack, 15 cane bottom chairs, 
1 iron shovel, 1 crowbar, 6 fire caps, 15 feet rubber hand hose, 
1 hydrant chuck, pipes, wrenches, hose ropes, <fec., 1000 feet 
leading hose, 20 badges and keys, 1 patent coupling. 



96 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 



FRANKLIN HOSE COMPANY No. 4. 



House on Bunker-liill Street. 



Foreman. 










Wm. J. Jordan, 


34 


3 Jackson St., 


Caterer, 


61 


Assistant. 










M. A. Carroll, 


27 


29 Joiner St., 


Painter, 


62 


Secretary. 










Geo. Getchell, 


23 


51 Pearl St., 


Carpenter, 


67 


Treasurer. 










Benj. F. Stacy, 


36 


Vine St., 


Druggist, 


64 


John Sleeper, 


29 


8 Albion Ct., 


Calker, 


65 


James Murphy, 


23 


16 Cottage St., 


Carpenter, . 


63 


Frank TurnbuU, 


30 


42 Everett St., 


Cooper, 


66 


L. E. Colbert, 


28 


5 Decatur St., 


Rope-maker, 


68 


John Slavin, 


22 


5 


(( a 


69 


Geo. Almeder, 


23 


37 " 


Coachman, 


70 


James Lewis, 


22 


76 Lexington St., 


Rigger, 


71 


Wra. Butler, 


23 


44 *' '* 


Plasterer, 


72 


Edward Grover, " 


28 


71 Decatur St., 


Stone-cutter, 


73 


M. J. Singleton, 


24 


37 


Upholsterer, 


74 


George Chell, 


45 


27 Mystic St., 


Teamster, 


75 


Harry Wyman, 


33 


193 Medford St., 


Machinist, 


76 


John McCurdy, 


24 


15 Marion St., 


Can-maker, 


77 


John Cassidy, 


24 


124 Bunker-hill St. 


, Blacksmith, 


78 


Fred. Smith, 


23 


193 Medford St., 


Teamster, 


79 


Rob't Welsh, 


24 


348 • " 


Cabinet Maker, 


80 


Twenty members. 











List of property belonging to city in charge of Co. 

One four-wheeled carriage, built by C. E. Hartshorn, N. Y., 
in good condition; 1 sleigh, 2 hose pipes, 6 pair spanners, 6 
hose caps, 1 patent coupling, 1 reducing coupling, 1 wrench, 
1 carriage jack, 1 hydrant wrench, 5 settees, 12 chairs, 3 cane 
seat chairs, 1 table, 7 curtains, 20 feet rubber hose and pipe, 
1 stove and funnel, 1 coal hod and shovel, 1 chandelier, 1 
chuck. 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



97 



MASSACHUSETTS HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY. 




House 


! on Winthrop Street 


■. 




Foreman. 


Age. 


Residence. 


Occupation. 


Badge. 


Thos. H. Pike, 


31 


63 Austin St., 


Spar-maker, 


127, 


Assistant. 










Geo. "Williamson^ 


36 


41 Soley St., 


Ship-joiner, 


110 


Secretary. 










Thos. W. Strand, 


27 


2 Salem-st. Ct., 


Clerk, 


116 


Treasurer. 






. 




Wm. S. Wiley, 


40 


26 Park St. 


Stable-keeper, 


122 


Geo. B. Edmands, 


30 


28 Chapman St., 


Tinsmith, 


101 


Daniel R. Beckford, 


40 


13 Eden St., 


Merchant, 


104 


"William Selby, 


37 


2 Joiner St., 


Painter, 


108 


J. K. Stevens, 


30 


38 Pleasant St., 


Teamster, 


123 


W. J. Coojo-swell, 


25 


79 Warren St., 


Blacksmith, 


130 


James Reed, 


23 


Chelsea St., 


Teamster, 


115 


Wm. H. Conn, 


23 


10 Chestnut St., 


Hack-driver, 


129 


C. H. Risley, 


25 


69 Decatur St., 


Teamster, 


114 


W. F. Butler, 


31 


it ii (( 


<;« 


105 


F. D. Woodbury, 


22 


15 Irvin Place, 


Clerk, 


124 


John Mears, 


22 


14 Russell St., 


Carpenter, 


103 


S. W. Fletcher, 


26 


18 Cottage St., 


Ship-joiner, 


126 


A. C. Lynn, 


22 


19 Marion St., 


Cabinet-maker, 


109 


C. H. Marshall, 


22 


70 Bunker-hill St., 


(( i( 


117 


S. E. Virgin, 


22 


210 Main St., 


Machinist, 


113 


J. K. P. Williams. 


25 


1 Common St., 


Spar-maker, 


106 


Frank Fall, 


21 


19 Marion St., 


Brass-finisher, 


119 


J. Johnson, 


26 


57 Main St., 


Carpenter, 


111 


G. T. Clark, 


22 


64 Decatur St. 


Painter, 


102 


C. H. Broughton, 


24 


52 Austin St., 


Printer, 


128 


C. H. Beckford* 


21 


13 Eden St., 


Clerk, 


120 


Wm. F. Pike, 


23 


84 Elm St., 


Painter, 


121 


E. E. Whiton, 


21 


10 Tremont St., 


Clerk, 


107 


Thirty Members. 











List of Property belonging to city in charge of Co, 

One hook and ladder carriage complete, built by Hittenger 
& Cook ; 2^ stoves and pipe, 2 tables, 26 chairs, 1 boiler, 1 
washbowl, 5 fire caps, 50 feet rubber hand hose, 30 badges 
and keys. 

13 



98 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



HOWARD STEAMER AND HOSE COMPANY. 

House on Elm Street. 



Foreman. 










James W. Poor, 


28 


14 Trenton St., 


Internal Rev. Ass 


• 


Assistant. 










Wm. Whittemore, 


29 


Middlesex St., 


Hackman, 


91 


Secretary. 










E. B. Kenah, • 


26 


154 Chelsea St., 


Letter-carrier, 


87 


Treasurer. 










Marcellus Carpenter, 


45 


28 Green St., 


Merchant, 


84 


John L. Rogers, 


24 


34 Allston St., 


Chair-varnisher, 


100 


Thos. H. Wright, 


25 


61 Russell St., 


Blacksmith, 


82 


T. J. Whittemore, 


31 


8 Cross St., 


Joiner, 


88 


Israel F. Crafts, 


24 


4 Mead-st. Ct., 


Teamster, 


96 


Samuel Bridgett, 


21 


10 Wood St., 


Jig-sawyer, 




Jas. W. Clark, 


24 


43 School St., 


Clerk, 


92 


Thos. H. Burbeck, 


23 


Bunker-hill St., 


Bolter, 


89 


Charles Miller, 


35 


39 Bow St., 


Engineer, 




Chas. E. Hayden, 


23 


14 Cross St., 


Calker, 




Benj. Williams, 


21 


84 Elm St., 


Machinist, 




Wm. H. Dennis, 


23 


16 Main St., 


Laborer, 


85 


Geo. F. Titus, 


23 


13 Polk St., 


Plasterer, 




John W. Gale, 


24 


4 Thompson St., 


Clerk, 




Edgar F. Gross, 


22 


18 Chelsea St., 


Butcher, 





Eighteen Members. 



PERMANENT MEN. 

John B. Cilley, Engineer. 
Isaac W. Brackett, Fireman. 
Daniel K. Wueelock, Driver. * 

List of Property belonging to city in charge of Co. 

One first-class steam fire engine, built by the Amoskeag 
Manufacturing Company, in good order ; 1 third-class steam 
fire engine, built by Wm. Jeffers, in good order ; 1 four- 
wheeled carriage, built by A. J. Jones, Cambridge ; needs ex- 
tensive repairs ; 1 wagon, 1 hose sleigh, 1 pair horses, 2 set 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 99 

A. 

of harnesses complete, 2 horse blankets, 1 grain chest, 1 
currycomb and card, 2 horse and dust brushes, 2 pitchforks, 
2 halters, 2 buckets,- 1 broom, 1 stall scraper, &c., in stable ; 

2 hose pipes, 5 wrenches, 6 spanners, 2 hose ropes, 5 con- 
necting couplings, 5 oil cans, 1 work-bench, 1 vise, 1 car- 
riage jack, 3 bedsteads, 3 hair mattresses, 3 husk mattresses, 

3 pillows and cases, 6 blankets, 9 sheets, 2 towels, wash- 
bowls and stands, 3 coverlets, carpet in sleeping room, 2 
tables, 3 settees, 20 chairs, 1 clock, 1 looking-glass, 20 
fronts for fire hats, 1 double falLand tackle, 2 lanterns, 2 
coal boxes for wagon, 1 closet, 1 feather duster, 1 broom, 
20' badges and keys. 



lOO CHIEF ENGINEEE's EEPOET. 



FIRES AND ALARMS, 

Ik 

From March 1, 1870, to March 1, 1871. 

March 6. 5, p.m. Alarm from box 5. Slight fire in house 
of Mr. Flannagan, Medford Street. Caused from drying plas- 
tering. 

March 29. 8.30, p.m. Alarm from box 12. Fire in Lane's 
Morocco Factory, rear of Main Street, opposite foot of Sulli- 
van Street. Loss, $50. Insured. Cause, incendiary. 

March 31. 10.15, a.m. Alarm from box 16. Slight fire in 
house 42 Main Street, owned by Mr. Samuel Frost, and occu- 
pied by Mrs. Savage. Loss, |20. Insured. Cause, defective 
flue. 

April 5. 12.10, M. Alarm from box 25. From an unoccu- 
pied dwelling-house on Monument Street, owned by Hugh 
Kelley. Loss, $50. Insured. Caused by boys. 

April 5. 3, P.M. Alarm from box 5. Fire in building 
rear of 531 Main Street, owned and occupied by A. H. Allen 
for storage. Loss, $500. Insured. Cause unknown. 

April 14. 8.15, p.m. Alarm from box 5. From a burning 
chimney on Weymes Brothers' mill, Medford Street. 

April 18. 11.30, p.m. Alarm from box 31. Fire discov- 
ered in an unoccupied house on North Mead Street, owned by 
A. H. Allen. Loss, $200. No insurance. Incendiary. 

May 7. 11.55, a.m. Alarm from box 13. Fire in block 
of tenement houses on Donnovan's Court, rear of Richmond 
Street, occupied by several families, and owned by Dennis 
Donnovan. Loss, $600. Insured. Caused by children. 

May 8. 2.30, a.m. Alarm from box 31. SHght fire in 
barn of Hugh Kelley. No loss. 

May 9. 8.05, p.m. Alarm from box 12. Fire in shed con- * 
nected with Lane's Morocco Factory, rear of Main Street. 
Loss, $50. Insured. Incendiary. 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. lOl 

May 10. 1.30, a.m. Alarm from box 6. Fire discovered 
in stable rear of Alford Street, owned by John Gardner, and 
occupied by Mr. Stimpson. Loss, $550. Insurance, $300. 
Cause, supposed incendiary. 

May 18. 9.50, a.m. Alarm from box 2. Fire on Chelsea- 
bridge dumps. No damage. 

May 18. 11.10, p.m. Alarm from box 5. Fire broke out 
in a large shed used for storage of lumber, and pwned and oc- 
cupied by S. W. Fuller. Loss, $6,850. Fully insured. In- 
cendiary. 

May 20. 9.15, p.m. Alarm from box 7. Fire broke put in the 
large kid glove factory owned and occupied by F. 0. Reed & 
Co. The fire spread rapidly, and communicated to the house 
and barn occupied by Mr. Tibbetts. The house was saved ; but* 
the barn was destroyed in the rear. The fire communicated to 
a house owned by Messrs. Reed, and occupied by Mr. Starks, 
the roof of which was destroyed. Nothing but the heroic efforts 
of the Department prevented a large fire. Messrs. Reed's loss, 
$16,000. Insured for $6,500. Mr. Tibbetts's loss, $1,800. 
Fully insured. A new stable, in course of erection by 
Hicks & Whittle, was damaged to the amount of $1,500. 
Cause of fire, by explosion of naphtha caused by a lamp in hands 
of Mr. Reed. 

9.30, P.M. Box 7, repeating alarm for above. 

May 24. 12.30, p.m. Alarm from box 7. Fire in stable of 
Mr. Sargent on Frothingham Avenue, occupied by Brooks & 
Stover. Partly consumed. Sargent's loss, $600. Insured. 
Brooks & Stover's loss, $700. Insured for $500. Mr. Smith's 
loss, $300. Insured. Supposed incendiary. 

May 31. 4.40, a.m. Alarm from box 16. Fire in coal-yard 
of Mr. Carleton, Monument Avenue. ' Loss $400. Insured. 
Cause unknown. 

June 4. 11.15, p.m. Alarm from box 5. Slight fire in 

cooper shop of P. Dunnivan, Medford Street. No loss. In- 

'cendiary. At same time, fire was set in the saw-mill of Page 

& Littlefield, on Main Street, but was extinguished without 

damage. Incendiary. 



102 CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 

June 20. 5, p.m. Alarm from box 24. Caused by light- 
ning striking the provision store of I. Brooks, on Bunker-hill 
Street. No damage. 

June 20. 5.10; p.m. Alarm from box 41. Caused by light- 
ning striking the flagstaff on the armory of the Prescott 
Guards, on High Street. 

June 22. 11.30, a.m. Alarm from box 6. Slight fire in a 
shop at foot of Dorrence Street. No loss. Cause accidental. 

July 1. 9.30, P.M. Alarm from box 5. Fire in paint shop 
of Mr. Henderson, owned by A. W. Tufts. Henderson's loss, 
f 400. Insured. Loss on building, $50.00. Insured. Cause 
unknown. 

July 6. 9.30, P.M. Alarm from box 41. Caused by cur- 
tains taking fire from gas in the house of Hon. T. T. Sawyer, on 
High Street. Damage, |600. Insured. Caused by a gaslight. 

July 18. 4.50, P.M. Alarm from box 21. Fire broke out in the 
large five-story brick building of the Tudor Company, on 
Charles-river Avenue, used as a linseed oil factory. The De- 
partment was quickly on hand ; but, owing to the inflammable 
nature of its contents, it was totally destroyed. Another large 
building near by was saved with slight damage, assistance 
being sent for. Engines from Boston, Cambridge, and Somer- 
ville, and the Navy Yard were present, and rendered valuable 
assistance. Loss, $100,000. Fully insured. Cause accidental. 

4.55, P.M. Repeating alarm for above fire. 

4.57 " " '' '^ 

July 26. 3, P.M. Alarm from box 5. Slight fire in shed 
owned by S. W. Fuller, Main Street. Loss, $815. Unknown. 

July 29. 1.25, p.m. Alarm from box 21. Slight fire on 
roof of house rear of Cook, Rymes, & Co. Caused by sparks. 

July 30. 3, P.M. Xlarm from box 21. From slight fire 
from same house rear of Cook, Rymes, & Co. Sparks from 

chimnev. 

%/ 

July 30. 8.45, p.m. Needless alarm from box 16. From 
smoke issuing from a house on Main Street. 

August 1. 3.30, A.M. Alarm from box 23. Fire broke out 
in small stable on Grey Street, owned and occupied by P. 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 108 

O'Reardon, which was mostly consumed, with four horses. 
Loss, $2,200. No insurance. Incendiary. 

August 12. 8.30, P.M. Alarm from box 23. Slight 'fire 
on roof of the carpenter shop of John B. Wilson, Chelsea 
Street. Cause, sparks from chimney. 

August 12. 4.20, P.M. Needless alarm from box 21. From 
smoke issuing from house, Warren Avenue. 

August 18. 8, A.M. Alarm from box 25. Slight fire from 
boys setting fire to a bale of excelsior in an unoccupied house 
rear of Monument Street. 

August 18. 11, P.M. Alarm from box 21. Fire broke out 
in the large stable on the corner of Henley and Warren 
Streets, owned by John Hurd, and occupied by Jesse Rideout. 
The Department rallied promptly, and saved the building 
from total destruction, the roof only being burnt. Loss, $1,- 
400. Insurance, $1,000. Cause unknown. 

August 19. 10.15, P.M. Alarm from box 25. Slight fire 
in house of A. P. Holmes, Monument Square. 

August 22. 12.10, M. Alarm from box 3. Slight fire in 
house on Princeton Court. Loss, $5.00. Accidental. 

August 24. 2.10, P.M. Alarm from box 16. Caused by 
boys setting fire to a spout on a house on Cordis Street. 

August 26. 9, A.M. Alarm from box 3. From slight fire 
in house on Princeton Street. Accidental. 

August 27. 12.15, P.M. Alarm from box 5. Fire in house 
on Allen Street, owned by A. H. Allen, and occupied by 
Messrs. Runey and Mahan. Loss, $200. Insured. Caused 
by a lamp. 

August 30. 10.30, A.M. Alarm from box 3. Slight fire in 
house on Medford Street. Caused by a lamp. 

August 30. 11.30, P.M. Alarm from box 25. Fire discovered 
in an old unoccupied house on Monument Street, owned by 
Hugh Kelley. Loss, 50.00. Insured. Incendiary. 

August 30. 10.30, A.M. Alarm from box 3. Slight fire in 
house rear of Medford Street. Caused by a small girl attempt- 
ing to light a* fire by the use of kerosene. The girl was 
fatally burned. No damage to the house. 



104 CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 

August 30. 11.30, A.M. Alarm from box 25. From fire in 
an unoccupied house on Monument Street, o^yned by Hugh 
Kelley. Damage, $50.00. Insured. Incendiary. 

September 1. 1.30, p.m. Alarm from box 3. Slight, fire 
in an old shed on Medford Street. No loss. Supposed to be 
set by boys. 

September 1. 4.30, 'p.m. Alarm from box 3. From the 
same shed. Loss $25.00. Caused by boys. 

September 1. 9.00, p.m. Alarm from box 7. Caused by 
an explosion of a lamp, on Arthur Place. 

September 4. 8.15, p.m. Alarm from box 31. From slight 
fire in the old Morocco Factory, foot of Cook Street. No loss. 
Caused by stove. 

September 6. 9.45, a.m. Alarm from box 25. Slight 
fire in house of C. Yenetche, on Concord Street. Defect in 
flue. 

September 10. 12.20, a.m. Alarm from box 6. Fire dis- 
covered in an unoccupied house on Canal Bank, owned by 
Hugh Callahan. Mostly consumed. Loss, $1,500. Fully in- 
sured. Incendiary. • 

September 17. 11.20, p.m. Partial alarm from breakage 
of wires. 

September 26. 4.45, p.m. Alarm from box 25. Fire 
broke out in a large block of new dwelling-houses on Everett 
Street. The fire was confined to one tenement, owned by P. 
O'Reardon. Nothing but the promptness of the Department 
prevented a serious fire. "Loss, $1,000. Fully insured. Cause 
unknown. * 

September 27. 4.00, p.m. Alarm from box 31. Fire broke 
out in a house on Belmont Street, owned and occupied by 
Mr. Thompson. Loss, $300. Insured. Cause, accidental. 

September 28. 1.40, p.m. Alarm from box 21. Fire dis- ' 
covered in paint-shop of E. J. Clark, on Park Street. Loss, 
$25.00. Cause, spontaneous. 

October 9. 10.25, p.m. From box 5. Fire broke out in a 
large stable situated between Canal and Main Street, near the 
foot of Baldwin Street. Owing to some delay in giving the 



CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 105 

alarm, the fire had gained great headway before the Depart- 
ment got to work. The stable was entirely consumed, with its 
contents, including seven horses, harnesses, grain, &c. Th6 fire 
then extended to a block of nine houses, belonging to A. H. 
Allen and others, and to four small houses occupied by 
colored families. All the above buildings were on fire before 
the Department arrived, but were all saved, with the excep- 
tion of the stable, in a damaged condition. The dwellings 
were occupied by Messrs. Devens, Riley, Burr, Kelley, Runey, 
and Crosby, on Allen Street; and tlie houses on the east side 
of the stable were owned by the Hovey heirs, and occupied 
by William Morris, Mrs. Thompson, Mrs. Fenno, and Mrs. Bry- 
ant. The stable was owned by Mr. Ilutchins, and occupied 
by himself and others. The whole loss was $15,000. Insured 
for $11,000. Great credit is due to the Department for their 
heroic efforts at this fire, every building above-- mentioned 
being on fire when the Department arrived ; and nothing but 
hard work on their part; and a good supply of Mystic, pre- 
vented a large fire. Cause, incendiary. 

October 19. 11.50, A.m. Alarm from box 23. From the 
burning out of a chimney on Ice Court. 

October 20. 4.40, a.m. Alarm from box 31. Pulled by 
some unknown person. This is the first actual false alarm since 
the fire-alarm went into operation. 

October 25. 11.30, p.m. Alarm from box 25. From fire 
in a storehouse on Clark & Smith's Wharf, Medford Street. 
Loss, $400. Insured. Cause unknown. 

October 26. 3.30, a.m. From box 25. Re-kindling of above. 

November 2. 11.45, p.m. Alarm from box 6. Fire dis- 
covered in the milk stable of Mr. Hennesey, rear of Dor- 
rence Street. Roof destroyed. Loss, $340. No insurance. 
Cause, incendiary. 

November 12. 10.45, p.m. Alarm from boxes 41 and 25. 
Caused by a fire breaking out in the house of George W. 
Warren, on Monument Square. The Department rallied 
promptly, and confined the fire to the room it originated 
in. Loss, $1,500. Fully insured. Caused by defective flue. 

14 



106 CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 

November 14. 11.45, p.m. Alarm from box 12. From 
fire being discovered in the stable of" Mr. Parks, on Frothing- 
ham Avenue, occupied by Mr. Hill and Mr. Frost. Loss, $350- 
Insured. Supposed incendiary. 

November 21. Alarm from box 6. Fire in the coal-shed of 
Stickney & Poor, on Cambridge Street. Loss, $1,000. In- 
sured. Cause, spontaneous. 

November 24. 12.45, a.m. Alarm from box 25. Fire dis- 
covered in a stable owned by Jesse Stevens, on Elm- Street, 
and occupied by Oliver Dickson, and Stone Brothers, each of 
whom lost a horse. Whole loss, $1,800. No insurance. Sup- 
posed incendiary. 

December 1. 12.00, M. Alarm from box 5. Fire broke 
out in the building occupied by the Bunker-hill Hose Company, 
on Main Street. The roof and meeting-room w^ere badly dam- 
aged, and the uniforms of the company destroyed. Loss to the 
city $500. No insurance. To company $300. Insured. In- 
cendiary. 

December 7. 9.10, a.m. Alarm from box 6. Caused by 
the upsetting of a dwelling-house near the Gas Works, on 
Dorrence Street. Assistance being required to rescue a man 
beneath the ruins, the firemen set to work, and in a few min- 
utes rescued the man, badly hurt. 

December 13. 9.05, p.m. Alarm from box 24. From the 
burning of an outhouse on Ferrin Street, owned by G. W. 
Turner. Loss $25.00. Insured. Accidental. 

December 22. 1.30, a.m. Alarm from box 5. Caused by 
fire breaking out in the grocery store of Henry Sharkey, 
junction of Main and Medford Streets. Building owned by 
Mrs. Chaplin, whose loss was $200. Insured. Mr. Sharkey's 
loss, $600. No insurance. Cause, incendiary. 

December 22. 4, a.m. Needless alarm from box 21. 
Caused by a gaslight burning in store of Mr. GafFney on Chel- 
sea Street. 

December 24. 2, a.m. Alarm struck from box 5. From a 
fire in Cambridge, the officer supposing the fire to be in the 
city. 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 107 

December 25. 10, p.m. Alarm from box 5. Fire in the 
billiard room of Mrs. Flynn, 519 Main Street. Loss, 125.00. 
Insured. Cause, incendiary. 

December 26. Alarm from boxes 12 and 41. Fire broke 
out in the milk stable of Mr. Charles Curtis, on Lawrence 
Street, which was nearly consumed. The fire extended to a 
dwelling-house owned by the same, damaging it somewhat. 
Whole loss, $4,000. Insured for $2,900. Cause, supposed in- 
cendiary. 

January 5. 8, a.m. Partial alarm from box 42. From slight 
fire in Navy Yard. 

January 21. 1.30, p.m. Alarm from box 14. Slight fire 
in dwelling-house on Front Street, owned by Michael Reagan. 
Caused by carelessness. 

January 24. 1, a.m. Alarm from box 5. Fire broke out 
in the large planing mill of Weymes Brothers, on Medford 
Street. The mill was mostly destroyed ; but the adjoining build- 
ings were saved. Loss, -$15,000. Insured for $8,000. Cause, 
accidental. 

January 24. 1.05, a.m. Repeating alarm for above. 

February 1. 8.15, a.m. Alarm from box 5. From the up- 
setting of a stove in house 480 Main Street. No damage. 

February 1. 10, p.m. Alarm from box 7. Slight fire in 
house of J. T. Reed, Essex Street. Cause unknown. 

February 17. 5.30, a.m. Alarm from box 6. Fropa slight 
fire on roof of Bradford's Iron Foundry, Sherman Square. 

February 26. 7.30, p.m. Alarm from box 21. Fire dis- 
covered in the store of Mr. Conner's, under the Waverley 
House. Loss, f 1,500. Insured. Cause unknown. 

February 28. 12.30, p.m. Alarm from box 5. From the 
burning of a shed on Medford Street. Caused by hot ashes. 
Loss, $10.00. 



108 CHIEF ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Whole number of Engineers - - 5 

" " officers and members • - 128 

133 

Steam-engines - - - - - 2 

Four-wheeled carriages - - - . 5 

Two " " .... 2 

Hose sleighs - - - - - 5 

Whole number working fires - - - 35 

« " slight '' - - - - 32 

*^ " needless and false alarms - - 12 

Whole number alarms - - - - - 79 

Whole amount of loss . - - - $175,635 00 

" '' insurance - - - 149,120 00 

Total lo^s - - - - - $26,515 00 

Whole amount of money appropriated - 10,000 00 

" " " expended - 11,381 85 

Deficiency - - - - - $1,381 85 

Received for use of steamers and old material 136 00 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 109 



LOCATION OF HYDRANTS. 

lowry's. 



No. 

1. Corner of Chelsea Street and Charleston Square, 

2. " Harvard " '' 

3. " Main " " 

4. On Main, opposite head of Winthrop Street. 

5. " " Pleasant Street. 

6. Corner of Main and Union Streets. 

7. " " Austin " 

8. " " Chapman." 

9. " " Phipps " 

10. Main Street, opposite Franklin Street. 

11. " at Reed's Corner. 

12. " opposite Mead Street. 

13. Corner of Main and Middlesex Streets. 

14. Main Street, opposite Baldwin Street. 

15. Corner of Thorndike and Main Streets. 

16. "• Bunker-hill '' " 

17. Bunker-hill, opposite Short Street. 

18. Corner of Linden and Bunker-hill Streets. 

19. " Bunker-hill and Quincy " 

20. " North Mead and Bunker-hill " 

21. " Belmont and Bunker-hill " 

22. " Sullivan and Bunker-hill " 

23. '' Pearl and Bunker-hill " 

24. '^ Elm and Bunker-hill " 

25. " Polk and Bunker-hill " 

26. " Everett and Bunker-hill " 

27. *' Lexington and Bunker-hill " 

28. " Tufts and Bunker-hill " 

29. " Decatur and Bunker-hill " 

30. " Main and Water " 

31. " Joiner and Water " 



110 CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 

32. Corner of Water Street, opposite Trull's Distillery. 

33. " Water and Wapping Streets. 

34. " Henry and Chelsea '' (Mallett's). 

35. " Gray and Chelsea " 

36. Chelsea Street, opposite 26 Adams Street. 

37. " " Tremont " 

38. '' " Vine " 

39. Corner of Chelsea and Medford Streets. 

40. " Tufts and Medford " 

41. " Lexington and Medford " 

42. " Everett and Medford '' 

43. " Elm and Medford " 

44. " Pearl and Medford " 

45. " Cook and Medford '' 

46. '' Belmont and Medford " 

47. Medford Street, opposite Union Planing Mill. 

48. Corner of Quincy and Medford Streets. 

49. " Linden and Medford . " 

50. " Short and Medford " 

51. " Russell and Auburn " 

52. " Mead and Russell " 

53. " Walker and Russell " 

54. " Sullivan and Bartlett " 

55. " Pearl and Bartlett '' 

56. " Bartlett and Elm '' 

57. " Green and Bartlett " 

58. " Concord and Bartlett " 

59. ", Lexington and Tremont " 

60. " Edgworth and Tremont " 

61. " Ferrin and Jackson ^' 

62. ," BainbridgeandMoulton '^ 

63. " Perry and Decatur " - 

64. Mount Yernon, opposite house 31. 

65. Corner of Chestnut Street and Mount Vernon Avenue. 

66. " Winthrop Street and Monument Square. 

67. " Pleasant and High Streets. 

68. " Cross and High " 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. Ill 

69. Corner of Elm and High Streets. 

70. '-' Pearl and High " 

71. " Walker and High " 

72. " Summer and School " - 

73. " Winthrop and Adams " 

74. " Chestnut and Adanas " 

75. " Putnam and Common '^ 

76. " Warren and Winthrop ^' 

77. " Austin and Front " 

78. " Second and Front " 

79. " Union and Front " 

80. '^ Arrow and Front ^' 

81. " Walford and Front " 

82. " Mason and Front '' 

83. Front Street, opposite ice stables. 

84. Corner Walford and Bow Streets. 

85. Corners Washington, Bow, and Arrow Streets. 

86. Corner Richmond and Bow Streets. 

87. '^ Washington and Harvard Streets. 

88. Washington Street, opposite Washington Place. 

89. Corner Union and Washington Streets. 

90. " Union and Richmond '^ 

91. " Washington and Union ^' 

92. '^ Richmond and Austin '' 

93. " Lawrence and Austin " 

94. " Lawrence and Chapman '^ 

95. " Richmond and Chapman '' 

96. " Essex and Middlesex " 

97. " Seaver and Cambridge *' 

98. " Perkins and Cambridge " 

99. " Perkins and Brighton " 

100. " Mount Pleasant and Perkins Streets. 

101. " - Seaver and Haverhill " 

102. '' Canal and Dorrence " 

103. Dorrence Street, near gas-house. 

104. Alford Street, opposite Mystic Brewery. 

105. Cambridge Street, opposite Fisher's keg factory. 



112 CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 

106. Corner Parker and Cambridge Streets. 

107. '' Henley and Warren " 

108. " Thompson and Warren " 

109. " Princeton and Marion '^ 

110. Eastern Railroad, between Maine Railroad and Eastern. 

111. Corner Moulton and Medford Streets. 

112. " Polk and Medford " 

113. Fitchburg Railroad Yard. 

114. Corner of Water Street and Warren Avenue. 

115. " Corey and Moulton Streets. 

116. " Cambridge and Canal " 

117. Canal Street, near Perkins's Morocco Factory. 

118. Canal Street, foot of Allen Street. 

119. Corner of Mill and Canal Streets. 

120. Main Street, opposite Hose 2 House. 

121. Medford Street, between Main and Short Streets. 



CHI5F engineer's REPORT. ' 113 



SINGLE HYDRANTS. 

Corner of Broadway and" Columbia Court. 

" Medford Turnpike and Sherman Square- 

Main Street, opposite car-stables. 
Corner Allen and Canal Streets. 
Mill Street, corner of Canal. 
Frothinghara, opposite No. 10. 
Williams Street, '^ ^' 32. 

Soley " " " 32. 

Cordis '' " " 21. 

Albion Court, at the head. 
Main Street, opposite Cambridge Street. 
Corner Webster and Hill Streets. 
Allston Street, opposite No. 26. 
Mystic '^ " " 23. 

Hittenger's Wharf. 
Tudor's " 

Rubber Works at the Neck. 
Chelsea-bridge Dumps. 
Chelsea Street, near Bridge. 
North Street. 

Charles Street, corner Charles-street Court. 
Fitchburg Railroad Yard. 

Corner Charlestown Square and Warren Avenue. 

" " Chelsea Street. 

" Joiner and Chelsea Streets. 

" Henley " '' " 

" Chestnut" " " 

" Adams " " " 

" Bunker-hill " " 

" Vine and " " 

" Bainbridge and" " 

Chelsea Street, near Chelsea Bridge. 



15 



114 CHIEF engineer's REPORT, 

CHARITABLE ASSOCIATION* 

OF THE 

CHARLESTOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



OFFICERS FOR 1869. 

President, 
WILLIAM E. DELANO. 

Vice-President, 
GEORGE B. EDMANDS. 

Secretary, 
AUGUSTUS WILSON. 

Treasurer, 
ELIAS CRAFTS, Jr. 

TRUSTEES. 

Committee on Fire Department, 
Alderman JOHN LINSCOTT. 

Board of Engineers, 
L P. MAGOUN. 

Red Jacket Hose Company, 

wiNSLOw s. oakman; 

Bunker-Hill Hose Company, 
JOHN HOWARD. 

Washington Hose Company, 
P. J. DONNOVAN. 

Franklin Hose Company, 
GEORGE GETCHELL. 

Massachusetts Hook and Ladder Company, 
WM. L. COGGSWELL. 

Exempt Fireman, 
S. R. BRINTNALL. 

The Association was organized March, 1867. The Annual 
Meeting takes place on the second Monday in March, for the 
choice of officers. The Board of Trustees meet quarterly. 



CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 115 



THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 



LOCATION OF SIGNAL BOXES AND KEYS. 

No. 3 — Holmes's Manufactory, Medford Street. Key at same. 
No. 4 — 30.5 Medford Street. Key at Brooks's counting-room. 
No. 5 — Junction Medford and Bunker-hill Streets. Key at Dodge's apothe- 
cary. 
No. 6 — Corner of Seaver and Main Sts. Key at Peaslee & King's store. 
No. 7 — Corner of Main and Eden Sts. Key at Lovering's and W. L. Bond's. 
No. 8 — Main St., foot of Baldwin. Key at Mr. Warner's store. 
No. 12 — Corner Miller and Main Streets. Key at Stickney's store. 
No. 13 — Corner of Washington and Union streets. Keys at 68 Washington St., 

and H. Thomas's store, Austin Street. 
No. 14 — Front, foot of Arrow Street. Key at Waitt's factory. 
No. 15 — F. R. R. Yard. Key at round house. 
No. 16 — Junction Main and Harvard Streets. Keys at T. S. G. Robinson's store, 

and W. B. Morse's apothecary. 
No. 21 — City Square, corner Chamber Street. Keys at car-office and police 

station. 
No. 23 — Corner Henley Street and Henley Place. Key at MuUett & Bradbury's. 
No. 24 — Junction of Tufts, Vine, and Bunker-hill Streets. Key at Stacey's 

apothecary. 
No. 25 — Corner of Concord and Bunker-hill Streets. Keys at Ginn's store, 156 

Bunker-hill Street, and A. P. Melzar's apothecary, 171 Bunker-hill 

Street. 
No. 26 — Wallace Court. Key at Geo. B. Neal's house. 
No. 31 — Corner Bunker-hill and Webster Streets. Key at car-office. 
No. 32 — Corner of Walker and Russell Streets. Keys at J. W. Tuckerman's 

store, and house 59 Russell Street. 
No. 34 — 21 Medford Street. Key at Edmand's pottery. 
No. 41 — Steamer house, Elm Street. 
No. 42— Navy Yard. 

Positively no second alarm to be given unless by order of an engineer. 



116 CHIEF engineer's REPORT. 



INSTRUCTIONS TO KEY-HOLDERS. 

1 . On the breaking out of a fire, notice should be immediately communicated to 
the nearest alarm box, keys of which are always ip the hands of tlie police, and re- 
sponsible persons in the vicinity of the boxes. 

2. Keyholders, upon the discovery or positive information of a fire, will unlock 
the box, pull down the slide or hook once, and let go. This gives the desired alarm 
all over the city, repeating itself four times. 

3. All persons giving fire-alarms are requested to remain by the box a moment, 
and, if no clicking is heard in the box, pull again ; if you still hear no clicking, go 
to the next nearest box, and give the alarm from that. 

4. Never signal for a fire seen at a distance. Never touch the hook except to 
give an alarm of fire. Be sure the box is locked before leaving it. Give an alarm 
for no cause other than an actual fire. Do not give an alarm for a chimney. 

5. Owners and occupants of buildings are requested to inform themselves of the 
locations of the signal boxes near their properly ; also the places where the keys 
are kept. *Be sure the alarm is properly given. One single stroke of the bells and 
gongs is not given for an alarm of fire. 

6. Alarms will be sounded upon the fire bells thus : for box 5, five strokes 1-1-1- 
1-1, with short intervals, and repeating. For box 32, three strokes 1-1-1, a pause, 
then two strokes 1-1, a pause, and repeating. Alarms for other numbers are given 
in a like manner. 

I. P. MAGOUN, Chief Engineer. 



EXTRACT FROM AN ORDINANCE FOR THE PROTECTION OF 
THE FIRE-ALARM TELEGRAPH. 

Sect. 1. Any person or persons who shall wilfully deface, injure, or destroy, or 
in any way interfere with the fire-alarm telegraph in this city, or any part thereof, 
or any of its appurtenances, shall, for every such off'ence, forfeit and pay a penalty 
of twenty dollars for the use of the city. 

Sect. 2. Any person who shall open any alarm box connected with the fire- 
alarm telegraph,, except by the authority of, or with the keys furnished by, the 
Board of Engineers, shall forfeit and pay therefor a penalty of twenty dollars for 
the offence, for the use of the city. « 



REPORT 



OF THE 



COMMISSIONERS 



APPOINTED BY THE CITY GOVERNMENT OF 1870, 



Reduction of Bunker Hill, 



AND THE 



IT- I L L I IV CS^ 



OF THE 



Mill Pond and Mystic River Flats. 




BOSTON : 
PRESS OF NOYES & POOLE, No. 79 KILBY STREET. 

1871, 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 

Hoom No, 15, City Hall, August 18, 1871. 

Hon. Wm. H. Kent, Mayor, 

Sir : 

We transmit the Report and 
Plans, authorized by the several orders of the City Council. 
The plans for convenience of reference have been left in the 
room occupied by the Commissioners. 

We also present herewith an abstract of the ' ' Commissioners 
Memoranda," and hereto annex a detail statement of the cost of 
the commission. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. B. LONG, ) Commissioners on B, H. 



:■] 



GEO. H. JACOBS. < Mill Pond and Flats. 



EEPORT. 



TO THE CITY COUNCIL, OF THE CITY OF 
CHARLESTOWN. 

The Commissioners, appointed under the Order, passed April 
5th, 1870, '* to examine, ascertain, and embody in a report to 
the City Council all the facts relative to the several projects of 
reddcins: the Grade of Bunker Hill, and fillino: the Mill Pond 
and adjacent Flats on the west side of the city, which may in 
their discreet judgment, be requisite for a proper understanding 
of the difficulties to be overcome in the event of the work being 
undertaken, said Commisioners, to consult with the owners of 
the property directly affected, and with parties competent as 
experts in such works as those herein referred to, to obtain an 
approximate estimate of the damages involved, and the cost of 
accomplishing the improvement." — And who were further au- 
thorized and directed under an Order, passed June 14th, 1870, 
' * to cause suitable surveys and plans to be made of the terri- 
tory," embraced in the original order, respectfully, — 

EEPORT. 

That after a careful consideration of the subject entrusted to 
them, it was believed that no reliable result could be obtained, 
unless a survey of the territory was made, and plans based 
thereon, prepared. 

It was. with reluctance, that this conclusion was reached, as 
it was well known that a considerable amount of time would be 
required, as well as a large expense be incurred. But believing 
that in the end results would justify the expenditure by giving 
your Commissioners, means and data upon which to base the 
approximate cost of doing the work, (which they would not 
otherwise have), and thereby show as nearly as possible, short 
of actual and reliable contracts, what the total disbursement 
would be. 

If the investigation should show that the work could be done 
at a reasonable outlay, it was fair to presume that steps would 
be taken at the proper time for its accomplishment ; on the 
contrary, if the cost was found to be in excess of present or 



REPORT. 



TO THE CITY COUNCIL, OF THE CITY OF 
CHARLESTOWN. 

The Commissioners, appointed under the Order, passed April 
5th, 1870, '* to examine, ascertain, and embody in a report to 
the City Council all the facts relative to the several projects of 
reducing the Grade of Bunker Hill, and filling the Mill Pond 
and adjacent Flats on the west side of the city, which may in 
their discreet judgment, be requisite for a proper understanding 
of the difficulties to be overcome in the event of the work beinof 
undertaken, said Commisioners, to consult with the owners of 
the property directly affected, and with parties competent as 
experts in such works as those herein referred to, to obtain an 
approximate estimate of the damages involved, and the cost of 
accomplishing the improvement." — And who were further au- 
thorized and directed under an Order, passed June 14th, 1870, 
* * to cause suitable surveys and plans to be made of the terri- 
tory," embraced in the original order, respectfully, — 

REPORT. 

That after a careful consideration of the subject entrusted to 
them, it was believed that no reliable result could be obtciined, 
unless a survey of the territory was made, and plans based 
thereon, prepared. 

It was> with reluctance, that this conclusion was reached', as 
it was well known that a considerable amount of time would be 
required, as well as a large expense be incurred. But believing 
that in the end results would justify the expenditure by giving 
your Commissioners, means and data upon which to base the 
approximate cost of doing the work, (which they would not 
otherwise have), and thereby show as nearly as possible, short 
of actual and reliable contracts, what the total disbursement 
would be. 

If the investigation should show that the work could be done 
at a reasonable outlay, it was fair to presume that steps would 
be taken at the proper time for its accomplishment ; on the 
contrary, if the cost was found to be in excess of present or 



6 COMIMSSIONERS' REPORT. 

prospective benefit, it would probly settle the question at once, 
and for all time. 

Entertaining the opinion that the Commissioners, were ap- 
pointed to present such information as would enable the citizens 
to reach one or the other of the above conclusions, a request 
was made for authority to make the survey and plans. 

SURVEY AND PLANS. 

Proposals to do the work, in accordance with the specifica- 
tions, which had been prepared were received from three par- 
ties, differing materially in price, and the time within which 
they proposed to accomplish the work. 

The maximum price covered by the proposals, was fifty five 
hundred dollars, ($5500), the minimum twenty five hundred 
dollars, ($2500), the shortest time six months, the longest nine 
months — after due consideration, a contract was made with Mr. 
Loring R. Home, of this city, for the sum of twenty ^ve hun- 
dred dollars, ($2500), to make the survey and plans ; which 
contract has been faithfully performed to the entire satisfaction 
of your Commissioners, and in a manner indicating great pro- 
fessional skill and ability on the part of the genthman doing 
the work ; we believe that in accuracy of detail and in com- 
pleteness, the survey and plans, will favorably compare with 
any similar work. In addition to the sum mentioned, two 
hundred dollars, ($200), has been paid Mr. Home, for the sur- 
vey and plans of a certain portion of territory, deemed to be 
desirable, not included in the original specifications ; making the 
entire sum paid to Mr. Horne, twenty seven hundred dollars, 
($700.) 

The plans have been so arranged as to give the precise loca- 
tion of each estate, size and area of each lot, class and descrip- 
tion of buildings, which with other practical information desir- 
able to possess, has been recorded in suitable books, for refer- 
ence at any and all times hereafter. And in the opinion of 
your Commissioners, whatever may be the result of the present 
inquiry, must be of value to the city and citizens, for present 

and future use. 

MONUMENTS. 

In order to define the bounds of the district surveyed, in such 
a manner as to enable a partial or entire reproduction of the 



commissioners' report. 7 

lines to be made without unnecessary loss of time, monuments, 
consisting of granite posts, each about five feet in length, and 
six inches square, with a composition plate suitably inscribed 
placed thereon, have been put at certain points ; the tops of the 
monuments are from ten to twelve inches under the surface of 
the street, and their location shown on the general plan. It is 
believed they will be found to be of value as points from which 
to run lines in local surveys hereafter required to be made. 

PAST ACTION RELATING TO THE GRADE OF 

THE HILL. 

Your Commissioners find, as is generally known to the older 
citizens, that the reduction of the Hill, was not only a subject 
of consideration, but of action also, in the years that are passed. 
The peculiar conformation of the original Hill and its relation to 
the adjacent territory was such that to facilitate the travel 
throughout Bunker Hill street, it was found necessary to reduce 
the grade. 

A profile of Bunker Hill, dated June 25, 1846, was made 
by Eben Barker and G. Learned, indicating a cut of about ten 
feet from the summit of the Hill. By an Order of the Board 
of Mayor and Aldermen, passed July 19, 1847, the plan was 
accepted, and the reduction of grade ordered to be made. Sub- 
sequently, during the year 1848, Orders, were successively 
passed *' to consider the expediency of a further reduction" to 
complete the grading of Bunker Hill, *' under the direction of 
a Special Committee," — and a final Order, for the Committee 
on Streets to complete the grade of the Hill. 

The above is believed to be substantially the action under 
which the Hill was reduced, the amount of reduction being, 
as near as we can ascertain, about fourteen feet at the summit. 
It may not be out of place to express a regret that a more rad- 
ical change was not then made ; the obstacles then existing 
being nothing, as comp^,red with those which now interpose. 

DETERMINATION OF GRADE. 

Assuming that there is no difference of opinion in any quar- 
ter, but that the subject referred to your Commissioners, is one 
of great local importance, and one that has received not only 



8 commissioners' report. 

consideration at the hands of the city authorities, but has be- 
come one to which the citizens generally have directed their at- 
tention, from the fact, that in the present condition of the Hill 
and its surroundings, it is admitted there is not derived there- 
from those advantages and benefits which they might be made 
to yield, we approach the important question, how much shall 
Bunker Hill be reduced in grade, to meet the present and pros- 
pective requirements of the citizens, for business purposes, and 
for residences ? 

Your Commissioners are fully impressed with the importance 
of reaching if possible such conclusions as will commend them- 
selves to the judgment of their fellow citizens. At the same 
time we are not unaware that upon a question of magnitude, 
like that under consideration, it is difficult, if not impossible to 
reconcile conflicting views. We propose to present such views 
of the reduction of the Hill, as in our opinion, would be for 
the permanent benefit of the city, leaving the future to decide 
whether the plans presented are the best adapted to secure that 
end. 

During the time devoted to the consideration of the subject, 
suggestions have been made that time and expense might be 
saved, by the adoption of some one of the following plans, — 
by terracing the Hill ; by raising the grade of Main and Med- 
ford Streets ; by tunneling the Hill, at Mead and North Mead 
Streets and at Sullivan and Cook Streets ; and by taking oflf 
about fifteen feet on Bunker Hill at North Mead Street. 

After some consideration of each of the above suggestions it 
is believed that only limited and temporary advantages would be 
gained, and that the cost of either plan would be greatly dispro- 
portionate to the benefits obtained. 

For the purposes of our investigations, we include the area 
lying within the following lines, — commencing at the corner of 
Bunker Hill and Elm Streets, thence by the northerly line of 
Bunker Hill Street, to a point which extended shall make a line 
passing in the rear of lots on Mystic and Pearl Streets, to Med- 
ford Street, thence by Medford to the northerly corner of Bald- 
win Street, thence by the rear of lots on the Northwesterly side 
of Baldwin Street, to Bunker Hill Street, thence by the rear of 
lots on the northeasterly side of Bunker Hill Street, to Medford 



commissioners' report. 9 

and Main Streets, thence by the rear of lots on the southwesterly 
side of Bunker Hill Street to Baldwin Street, South, thence on 
said Baldwin Street South about forty feet, thence across said 
Baldwin Street, Irving Place, and Albion Court, to Russell 
Street, thence by Russell to Pearl, thence from Pearl, by the rear 
of lots on Bunker Hill to School Street, thence by Bunker Hill 
to Elm Street, which area for convenience of reference we term 
the Bunker Hill District. 

The above district contains 1,970.152.38 square feet, or 
about 45J acres. The vacant land (exclusive of streets) suita- 
ble for building purposes, if the reduction should be made is es- 
timated to be about 487,000 square feet. 

In attempting to solve the question, as to the amount of re- 
duction, w^e have not limited ourselves to a consideration of ex- 
isting difficulties alone, but have endeavored to keep in view the 
surroundings, and the prospective improvements which sooner 
. or later must make the territory bordering on Mystic River the 
most valuable part of our city. 

With the limited business now transacted on that portion of 
the river, adjacent to the territory under consideration, there is 
much inconvenience and loss of time experienced, in reaching 
(by teams with ordinary loads) the central portions of our city. 
It would seem that for the full development of the territory on 
Mystic River, there should be streets leading to and from the 
river at such grades as would enable teams with ordinary loads 
to pass over without difficulty. 

Entertaining the view that any reduction made should be a 
finality, and forever prevent the necessity of further effijrt in 
that direction, making available at once the entire area for bus- 
iness purposes or residences, and giving easy transit across the 
Hill, the Engineer, in preparing the plans was directed to put 
upon the profiles, lines requiring the following cuts to be 
made. — 

Commencing to excavate at grade on Bunker Hill Street, at 
a point thirty-five feet westerly from the centre of Elm Street, 
in such a manner as to require the following excavations to be 
made on the centre line of Bunker Hill Street, at the points 
hereinafter mentioned, — opposite Mystic Street, IJ feet; Pearl 
Street, North, 6.80 feet. Pearl Street, South, 7.20 feet; All- 



10 COMMISSIONEKS' REPORT. 

ston Street, 15 feet; Cook Street, 21.80 feet, Sullivan Street, 
22 feet; Webster Street, 34 feet; Belmont Street, 40.10 feet, 
Clark's Court, 45.55 feet, Bunker Hill Court, 46.10 feet. North 
Mead Street, 46.10 feet. Mead Street, 45.80 feet. Auburn 
Street, 27.16 feet, Quincy Street, 2^.73 feet. Walnut Street, 
18.21 feet, Baldwin Street, South, 10.23 feet, Baldwin Street, 
North, 9.70 feet, Charles Street, 2.87 feet, running out to the 
present grade at Short Street. 

The above grades for Bunker Hill Street, will give to the 
several streets leading to Medford Street, the following grades 
in each one hundred feet of their several lengths, viz : — Pearl 
Street, North, 3.98 feet, Allston Street, 3.72 feet. Cook Street, 
3.62 feet, Webster Street, 4.37 feet, Belmont Street, 5.03 feet. 
North Mead Street, 6.29 feet, Quincy Street, 5.10 feet. Wal- 
nut Street, 4.30 feet, Baldwin Street, North, 3.62 feet, on that 
portion of Sullivan Street, from Bunker Hill, to Russell Street, 
3.38 feet, on that portion of Mead, from Bunker Hill, to Rus- 
sell Street, 3.90 feet, and on Auburn, from Bunker Hill, to 
Russell Street, 4.38 feet. 

From the preceeding statement, it will be seen that your 
Commissioners, have adopted such lines as will leave no doubt 
that the Hill can be crossed with comparative ease by any class 
of teams. It is desired to call particular attention to the grades 
of Cook and Sullivan Streets, as indicated by the profiles ; it 
will be seen that from Medford to Bunker Hll Street, a dis- 
tance of 617 feet, the grade is 22.335 feet, or 3.62 feet in a 
hundred, from Sullivan to Russell Street, a distance of 220 
feet, the grade is 7.436 feet, or 3.38 feet in a hundred, — in 
order still further to improve the grade, we show on the profile 
a small filling from Russell to Bartlett Street. 

As the result we have a through street, designed to accom- 
modate the heavy travel from Medford to JMain Street, and ul- 
timately to Canal, or such other street or streets as may be 
made over the flats. 

The highest part of Bunker Hill, under the present grade, is 
at a point forty feet, southeasterly from the centre of North 
Mead Street, being 98.75 feet above mean high water, the 
profile indicating the new grade brings the summit at the same 
point, on the street, and indicates a height of 52.40 feet, above 



commissioners' report. 11 

mean high water. The deepest cut is on North Mead Street, 
100 feet in rear of Church, being 58.63 feet. 

Objections may naturally be male to the line as indicated on 
the profile, of that portion of Bunker Hill, from Pearl to Cook 
Street, as being a down grade, but a brief explanation will in- 
dicate the reason for adoj)ting it. 

The Commissioners, presumed that whilst they were to take 
into consideration the several projects for the reduction of the 
hill, and to report a feasible plan for its accomplishment, it was 
expected of them to proceed no further in a given direction than 
would be necessary to accomplish that end, therefore after con- 
sideration of the peculiar conformation of the hill, and the im- 
perative necessity of getting as easy grades as possible for the 
least possible expenditure ; it was concluded to make what we 
term a compromise line between Mystic and Cook Streets, on 
Bunker Hill Street ; if this had not been done, we could not 
have secured at Cook and the several streets above, the grades 
before mentioned, unless a deeper cut had been made, commenc- 
ing below Elm Street, and continuing over the hill on a grade, 
which would have involved the lowering of the houses, and the 
removal of earth from Elm and Mystic Streets ; thereby adding 
materially to the cost. 

It is believed that should the work be carried out, and the 
streets properly graded, that the slight depression, will not prove 
to be objectionable, either as a matter of taste, or \\hat is of far 
greater importance will not be an obstacle to travel. 

Obstacles increasing cost of Keduction. 

It is not believed that there exists any insurmountable obsta- 
cle to the progress of the work, although there are certain im- 
pediments, which enhance the cost of doing the work. We 
allude to the Saint Francis De Sales Church, and the Burying 
Ground adjacent thereto. The Church is a building 147 feet 
in length, by 66 feet in width, with an L 48 feet in length, by 
25 feet in width; occupying an area of 21,049.78 square feet. 

The Church is built of blue stone, a material durable, and 
enduring; when undisturbed, and yet not to be fully relied 
upon, when making changes of grade to the extent required in 
this instance, (46.35 feet.) And yet we have the assurance of 



12 commissioners' report. 

persons competent to judge, that It can be safely placed on the 
lower grade, without injury. It will be readily perceived that 
the lowering, must be a work requiring considerable time, and 
attended with great cost. 

We deem the Burying Ground, to be the greatest impedi- 
ment, in the way of the proposed reduction, for the reasons 
hereinafter mentioned. 

On January 19th, 1830, about three acres of land, with the 
flats adjacent, was purchased of Hepzibah G. Blanchard, by 
the Right Reverend Benedict Fenwick, of Boston. 

A portion of the upland was soon after appropriated for 
burial purposes, and from time to time the area has been en- 
larged, until the present amount was enclosed. 

The ground has a frontage of 131.30 feet on Medford Street, 
and measures 504.70 feet on the southeasterly side, 492.13 
feet on the northwester Iv side and 142.50 feet in the rear of 
vacant land on Bunker Hill Street; and contains 68,377.60 
square feet. 

The fee of the land being in the Bishop, a stipulated sum 
was received for every person permitted to be buried within the 
inclosure, which sum gave to the party purchasing the right of 
possession solely for burial purposes, and virtually gauranteed 
freedom from molestation by any power other than that of the 
state ; exercised for the public good. The ground has been 
closed for some years, its entire area being filled, there are 
however occasionally, interments made where graves have not 
been occupied by numbers reaching the prescribed limit ; It is 
understood that these are family graves or lots, — disinterments 
are frequently made, the bodies being removed by friends to 
other places. From the best information, obtainable, it is sup- 
posed that at the present time there are about 7800 bodies, in- 
terred within the enclosure. 

Your Commissioners, have found a difficulty, in conferring 
wdth (a party or parties, who would or could, speak with) any 
degree of authority, as regards the proper arrangements possi- 
ble to be made with the view of removing the bodies to another 
place. In a large majority of cases the immediate friends of 
the persons buried, are widely scattered, their residences un- 
known, in a word can not be reached by any means known to 



commissioners' report. 13 

your Commissioners, We also find, as is natural, great objec- 
tions made by surviving friends, still residents amongst us, to 
the disturbing of the remains of those who it was believed had 
been lain in their final resting plaee, and who view any change 
of the grounds as being a desecration and a wrong. 

In our conferences with the official representatives of the 
Church, it w^as clearly understood as an expression of opinion, that 
they had no power or control of the matter as regards the exer- 
cise of authority in consenting to, or arranging for a removal of 
the bodies. 

Their position as understood by your Commissioners, is this, 
that any change in the grade of the Hill, which involves any al- 
teration in the Church and its surroundings, is deemed detri- 
mental to Church interests, and will not receive favor or encour- 
agement at their hands. 

Under these, or in fact under any circumstances, it is the 
opinion of your Commissioners, that the only proper way to 
accomplish the removal of the remains, is to secure proper 
legislative action, and have the remains disinterred under such 
regulations as will give rise to the least possible objection ; the 
expense of disinterment, reburying and other proper observan- 
ces, to be borne by the city, — due notice to be given in such a 
manner as will enable those who desire, sufficient time within 
which to remove the bodies of relatives and friends to other 
places. 

The city by purchase of suitable ground, or by arrangements 
to occupy a portion of the grounds out of the city, now used by 
the Church for burial purposes, to provide for the remains of 
those not removed by friends. 

Your Commissioners, appreciate the feeling that exists with 
regard to the disturbance of the dead, and yet it may be re- 
marked that there is a growing belief that sooner or later the 
grounds occupied for burial purposes, in cities, as compact as 
our own, will be required for other purposes. It is no part of 
our duty to present reasons, sanitary or otherwise in support of 
this belief. 

The cost of lowering the Church, and the work con- 
nected therewith is estimated to be $83.000 ; for removal 



14 COMIMSSIONERS' REPORT. 

of bodies including reinterment elsewhere, $25,000; these 
amounts are included in the general estimate. 

VIEWS OF OWNERS. 

As directed under the order, efforts were made to obtain the 
views of^ the owners upon the reduction of grade. Circulars were 
sent apprising them of the completion of the survey and plans, 
and inviting them to call at certain designated times during 
office hours. 

The whole number of circulars sent was 543, answers by 
letter or in person 217, leaving 326, from which nothing was 
heard. 

Of the parties responding, ninety were strongly opposed to 
any reduction being made, being well satisfied with their sev- 
eral estates, and claiming that it would be a great damage, with- 
out increasing the value of their property ; eighty four were in 
favor of the improvement, viewing the damages as offset by the 
benefits that ould accrue. A few of this number expressed 
themselves as being willing to pay something towards the re- 
duction ; forty three expressed themselves as indifferent, whether 
the work was done or not. It should be remarked, that a con- 
siderable number stated that whilst they could not see that their 
estates were to be benefited yet they thought the City, as a 
whole would receive a great benefit. 

It was remarked by many, representatives of all the classes 
referred to above, that the time would come, when the work 
must be done ; it may be here remarked, that if the work must 
be done, a pertinent question would be, can there be a more fa- 
vorable time to do it than the present ? 

There are 494 owners of estates on the Bunker Hill district, 
and 25 on the Main Street district, (which embraces the terri- 
tory between Cambridge and the junction of Bunker Hill, Med- 
ford and Main Street, which it is proposed to raise, and which 
is hereinafter referred to,) making a total of 519, the discrep- 
ancy between this number and the notices sent, is accounted for 
by sending in some instances more than one notice to ensure a 
reply. Notwithstanding the efforts made, it will be seen that 
the views of a majority of the owners, were not obtained. 



commissioners' report. 15 

Whether this holdin*]: back was from anv fear of committal as re- 
gards the views entertained we are not able to determine, we 
simply state the facts. 

MILL POND AND FLATS. 

The laying out and grading of Canal Street has done much 
towards bringing the subject of filling the Mill Pond and Flats 
prominently before the public. 

The nearness of the area to Main and other important streets, 
the want of more land for residences, and the opinion so often 
expressed that it may be made to be a most valuable part of 
the city, at a comparatively small expenditure, alike serve to 
attract both public and private attention to the area. 

The area of the Mill Pond, including Dam, is 1,549,600 
square feet ; the amount of filling required to bring the area up 
to the grade, hereinafter referred to, will be 70,6 8.56 squares ; 
average depth of filling 9.85 feet, over the entire area ; average 
depth of filling for streets 15.10 feet, for lots 8.10 feet, streets 
above mean high water 12.25 feet, lots 5.25 feet. 

This area, from its location, can be divided in such a manner 
as to make very desirable lots, with less trouble and inconven- 
ience than any other section of the district under consideration. 
The owners are few in number, their interest equal, or nearly so, 
and as a consequence there is less liability for differences to arise 
in the discussion of measures for its improvement. This area 
is not required to make any compensation for the displacement 
of tide-water. 

The Flats, adjacent to the Mill Pond, contain 1,992,251 
square feet, and will require 127,189.91 squares of earth, to 
fill to the established grade ; the depth of filling over the eutirfe 
area will average 13.79 feet, the depth of filling for streets, 
will average 19.04 feet, for lots 12.04 feet. The several inter- 
ests are unequal, some possessing a large and others a small 
area. 

PLAN FOR IMPROVING THE AREA OF THE MILL 

POND AND FLATS. 

Having presented a brief statement of the separate areas in 
the above district, we desire to suggest a plan for their improve- 
ment. The district comprises the Flats and Pond lying easterly 



16 COMMISSIONEES' REPORT. 

of the Boston & Maine Eailroad, and westerly of Canal Street. 
The Flats mentioned, are a portion of those which the City was 
authorized to enclose and fill up, in accordance with Chapter 
253, of the Acts of the year 1868, and in. said act are defined 
as follows, — *' all of those Flats included within the northeast- 
*'erly side of the Boston and Maine Rail Road location, and 
*' the present high-water line of the Charlestown shore, and the 
*' upland of the Commonwenlth ; said Flats being known as the 
" ' Flats in Prison Point Bay.' " The district contains 3,541,- 
851 square feet, and will require 197,848.47 squares of earth to 
fill. By the plans submitted about 500,000 square feet will be 
required for streets. 

After consideration of the way and manner that the riparian 
lines extend over the Flats, the small frontage possessed by 
some, the divergence of lines being such that no uniformity 
could be attained by the individual improvement of any separate 
interest, your Commissioners were led to the conclusion that 
the improvement should be made in such a manner as to be of 
the greatest value to public, as well as private interest, viewing 
them as identical when properly carried out. We therefore 
recommend that the entire area be filled in such a manner as 
will raise the portion required for streets 12.2 » feet above mean 
high water, the parts reserved for lots to 5.25 feet above mean 
high-water and that streets be laid out over the territory thus fill- 
ed, in conformity to the plans herewith presented, — which would 
require a marginal street from Cambridge, (opposite Parker) to 
Austin, thus connecting w^ith Front Street, of about 3,300 feet in 
length, and 60 feet in width, with fifteen lateral streets running 
to Canal, of about 540 feet each in length, and 40 feet each in 
width, making a section of 140 feet, or two lots in depth be- 
tween each street, the frontage of lots to be hereafter deter- 
mined. It is believed that this, or a similar plan, varied per- 
haps only by the width of lots or streets, would give a perma- 
nent value to this area, to be obtained in no other w^ay. As 
before remarked, if this area is filled and left to individual im- 
provement, no uniformity can be expected to be obtained. 

There is a prevalent opinion that this area is to become val- 
uable beyond the average of surrounding lands, when the cost 
of reclaiming is taken into account, which opinion would un- 



■i* 



commissioners' report. 17 

doubtedly prevent its being sold for some time, but might in- 
duce the owners to erect cheap and temporary buildings, or 
lease it for stables and mechanics' shops, until such time as its 
appreciation in value met their views. If this can be avoided, 
and the area when filled be put into uniform lots, at once at- 
tractive to purchasers, with the assurance that the surround- 
ings are to be unobjectionable, there will be an immediate value 
given, which time and improvement will enhance. It is be- 
lieved that the City, has an interest in the developement of this 
area, which should induce the exercise of a liberal policy, the 
assuming: of the direction of the work, and the bearin": of a 
fair portion of the necessary expenditure. 

It will be seen that to carry out the plan suggested, the pres- 
ent owners would be reqaired to transfer to the City, or its 
properly constituted agent, all their interest in and to the Mill 
Pond and Flats, under such an agreement as would fully ac- 
complish the end in view. Your Commissioners, requested the 
owners of the territory to meet them ; the invitation was ac- 
cepted and every interest but one, represented ; an interchange 
of views was had, opinions freely expressed, and we believe we 
express the unanimous opinion of those present when we state 
that the plan met their approbation, and was considered the best 
that could be devised for the interests of all parties. The details 
being under consideration, the parties present indicated a 
willingness to arrange with the City, substantially upon the fol- 
lowing terms : — To make such release of their property as would 
enable the City, to lay out the area, in the manner propos- 
ed, — to give to the City the area required for streets, (the City 
to be at the expense of filling and grading) : — to pay to the 
City a fiiir price for filling the lots ; the lots when filled to be 
restricted, for the erection of brick and w^ooden buildings, of 
certain descriptions. 

Your Commissioners, are of the opinion that if the arrange- 
ment can be brought about without unnecessary delay, it would 
be a public benefit, and add greatly to the taxable property of 
the City. 

In considering the methods to be recommended for the re- 
payment to the City, of the amount expended for filling of lot 



18 commissioners' report. 

areas, and displacement of tide-water, we confine ourselves to 
the presentation of two : — 

1st. — Under the release of the Mill Pond and Flats, the en- 
tire area is taken as one lot; the proportion of streets, being 
ascertained, the rest and residue must contribute to pay the ex- 
pense of filling the lot areas. If it is found that J or J of the 
whole is taken for streets, the amount of land originally belong- 
ing to the individual owner will be lessened in that proportion, 
and if a money compensation is exacted payable at stated pe- 
riods, the payment may be secured by a mortgage of each or 
alternate lots, on the sale of which, the City receiving the 
amount due, will cancel the mortgage. 

2d. — Ascertain the amount due to the City, then fix a price 
upon the filled land, and assign under such regulations as may 
be deemed equitable, as regards location, a sufficient amount of 
land as will compensate the City for its expenditure. Under 
this method the original owners will have the residue, in pro- 
portion to their several interests, less what has been taken for 
streets, and to pay the City for filling, leaving each owner's 
land unincumbered. 

ESTIMATED COST OF FILLING MILL POND AND 

FLATS. 

It was supposed that this area could be filled for the least 
money per square foot, and in the shortest time, with gravel 
brought by cars from the country ; but it is found that so far as 
offers have been made, this opinion is not sustained as regards 
the price for filling ; not that gravel can not be transported 
from the country, at a cheaper rate than the earth can be taken 
from Bunker Hill ; but that the railroads, which centre at this 
area, cannot permit the use of their tracks or do the hauling, 
without greatly interfering with their local business. It should 
be mentioned also, as an element enhancing the cost, that about 
all the gravel banks within a reasonable distance of the City, 
have been secured in view of present or prospective demand. 
If the interference with local business did not exist, it is 
believed that gravel could be furnished at 40 cents per cubic 
yard. The prices given to fill with gravel brought by cars, are 
respectively $5 and $6 per square, those given to fill with earth 



commissioners' report. 19 

taken from Bunker Hill, are $6 and $6.56 per square. The 
prices given to put the earth from the Hill, on to the Mystic 
Kiver Flats, are $5 and $5X0. 

It will be seen that if it was certain that Bunker Hill was to 
be reduced in grade, but one conclusion could be reached as to 
where the earth should be put, as the immediate demand for, 
and the value of the land on the West side would far outweigh 
the slight difference in price that exists in favor of the Mystic 
side. Assuming for a moment that both projects are to be 
carried out at the same time, and that no offers had been re- 
ceived to fill with gravel at a less price than that offered to put 
the earth from Bunker Hill on the area under consideration, it is 
a matter of some moment to determine what would be a prop- 
er sum to charo-e as the cost of fillino^ from the Hill. 

If the area could not be filled at a less cost than that given, 
namely, $6 per square, then it would be equitable to charge 
that price and give the Bunker Hill district credit for the amount ; 
but a considerable portion of the Flats have been already filled 
with earth, obtained from various sources, at an expense 
not exceeding $3.20 per square, and in time no doubt the 
whole basin can be filled at a price less than that offered to do 
it at once ; but this is preeminently a case where time saved is 
money in hand, as undoubtedly the difference Is in favor of the 
higher price and shortest time. 

Considering the difference in the amount of filling required 
for the Mill Pond and Flats, we believe 25 cents per square 
foot, exclusive of what may be paid as compensation for the dis- 
placement of the tide-water, would be an equitable price for the 
City to charge the owners of the Flats, and 19 cents per square 
foot, for filling the Mill Pond. Should it be determined to pro- 
ceed to fill the Mill Pond and Flats, leaving the reduction of 
Bunker Hill for future consideration, the prices given to fill with 
gravel brought by cars, would make the cost of filling the Flats 
about 32 cents per square foot exclusive of compensation for 
displacement of tide-water, and about 23 cents per square foot 
for the Mill Pond. 

Under the authority already granted to fill a portion of the 
area in question, (see Chap. 253, Acts of l'^68) it is provided 
in accordance with the general law upon the subject that com- 



20 commissioners' report. 

pensation for the displacement of tide-water shall be made ; the 
amount thereof to be ascertained by the Board of Harbor Com- 
missioners. Your Commissioners, desiring to know the precise 
amount applicable to this territory, addressed at an early day, a 
communication to the Harbor Commissioners, desiring to be in- 
formed in this particular ; and at the same time expressing a 
desire that the whole subject might receive renewed considera- 
tion at their hands. 

It will be remembered that in a communication made to a 
Committee of the City Government on July 9th, 1868, the com- 
pensation for the displacement of tide-water was fixed at 37 
cents per cubic yard ; in a communication subsequently made to 
the City Government by the City Engineer, the sum mentioned 
is stated to be '' $172 000 or about 14 cents per foot". 

Your Commissioners are of the opinion, that the theory en- 
grafted in the Act, and which is the fundamental law, applica- 
ble to the improvement of tidal basins in this vicinity, that com- 
pensation shall be made for tide-water displaced, on the ground 
that a restriction of flowage into and from tidal basins, necessa- 
rily injures the Harbor of Boston, should not be applied to this 
basin without further examination. 

The Harbor Commissioners very promptly acknowledged the 
receipt of our communication, and directed their Engineer to 
make the necessary examinations, preliminary to a thorough ex- 
amination of the tidal currents ; this last being a work requiring 
a great amount of time, the result we regret to say can not be 
made available for this report, and we are obliged to take the 
amount as given to the Committee of the City, as the basis for 
cost of tide water displaced. It is hoped that the result of the 
examina^ion will greatly reduce, if not entirely remove the 
amount previously given. 

We desire in this connection to express our thanks to the 
Board of Harbor Commissioners, for their promptness in insti- 
tuting the necessary measures to accomplish the object of our 
communication. 

MYSTIC RIVER FLATS. 

It may be remarked that it is quite unusual in considering 
works of this kind to have such a favorable combination of 



commissioners' report. 21 

circumstances ; — an area which it is desired to reduce in grade, 
and a choice of places in which to deposit the earth to be re- 
moved. 

From the location of the Hill, and its relation to the Flats 
on Mystic River, it must be admitted that the natural place for 
the deposit of the earth, would be upon that side of the City ; 
its close proximity, the average distance to carry the earth being 
but about 800 feet ; less public inconvenience, as only one street 
is crossed ; and last but not least, the length of line of the Hill 
on Medford Street, giving opportunity to apply the means of 
excavation at one and the same time along the entire line, would 
seem to be conclusive reasons for putting the earth upon that 
locality, unless the special reason given in the chapter on the 
Mill Pond and Flats outweighs, at the present, the natural ad- 
vantages of the East side of the City. 

The area of Flats on Mystic River, tnost convenient to fill 
from the Hill, is enclosed hyaline drawn from Tufts' Mill Pond 
at the Neck, to a point on the South-east side of Elm Street, 
extended. This area contains 2,851,187 square feet, and to 
fill it to five feet above mean high water, the grade deemed best 
adapted to business purposes, would require 189,419.13 squares 
of earth. 

The average depth of filling would be 14.35 feet. The entire 
area if filled in accordance with the lines laid down on the 
Coast Survey Plan, would be 3200 in length on the channel, 
1580 feet in length from shore to channel on the South-east side 
of Elm Street extended, 3350 in length following curve of 
shore to Mill Pond wall, and 990 feet from shore to channel on 
wall of Mill Pond. 

The Flats of the Mystic River Corporation lying southerly 
and easterly require but a small portion of filling in addition to 
that which will be obtained by excavating for deepening the 
basin. It is supposed that three feet in addition to that thus ob- 
tained will be ample to raise to required grade. 

The recent sale of land and Flats, to the Lowell Railroad 
Corporation amounting, it is said, to 1,300,000 feet, to be used 
for terminal purposes, bringing, as it will, the northern and 
western lines to tide- water, marks an era in the development of 



22 COMIMSSIONERS' REPORT. 

this section, and indicates that the entire area is likely to be 
used for Railroad purposes. 

Efforts were made to learn the views of the owners of land 
and Flats on Medford from Elm Street to Tufts' Mill Pond, and 
in nearly every case they were obtained ; it was found that there 
exists no well defined idea as to the manner of filling the Flats ; 
some desiring that the inner channel, which it was proposed to 
stop at the southeasterly side of Elm Street, be continued up 
the River two or three hundred feet further, crossing it by a 
draw or draws at convenient points, to reach the filled area be- 
yond, thus preserving the line of wharves as at present exist- 
ing ; others would fill out to the line of the channel, leaving 
areas for ships and docks. The opinion was generally expressed, 
that if the Hill was reduced in grade, and the earth put on 
the Mystic Flats, there would be no diflPiculty in making arrange- 
ments to bear a fair share of the cost of so doing. 

RAISING OF MAIN STREET. 

Your Commissioners, in connection with the reduction of the 
Hill, had their attention drawn to the area bounded by Cam- 
bridjre Street at the Neck, on the North, and extendinjx souther- 
ly on Main Street, as far as Charles Street, as being very low, 
and in many respects objectionable. We are of the opinion 
that the entire area should be raised ; and it will be found that 
on the profile of Main Street, from Bunker Hill to Cambridge, 
a line of filling is delineated coming to the present grade of 
Cambridge Street. The present grade of Main, near the junc- 
tion of Medford Street, is 4.45 feet above mean high water, at 
the centre of Cambridge Street, the present grade is 10.77 
feet above mean high water. 

The amount of earth required to fill the area is estimated to 
be 4,807.26 squares. 

The work, in our opinion, without any connection with the 
reduction of the Hill, is one which should be done. It could 
probably be done at a less expense in connection with it, as the 
earth to fill covdd be taken by cars or carts from the Hill in a 
short time. 

The buildings, for the most part, are of small value, and con- 
sidering the permanent advantages to be derived, is an improve- 



commissioners' report. 23 

ment that would add largely to the value of the property in that 
section. It might possibly be done, under the betterment Act, 
in such a manner as not to be very expensive. 

Since the lines indicating the proposed fill, were put on the 
profile, the Boston & Lowell Railroad Corporation have filled 
the location of their road as crossing Main Street, at grade ; al- 
though not a matter within the special province of your Com- 
missioners, yet as the crossing is over the street that we suggest 
should be raised, we desire to make a brief allusion to it. It 
is at all times inconvenient, as well as dangerous to have Rail- 
roads cross the street at grade, and any effort that can be made 
to prevent it seems to be a duty. We therefore suggest, that 
should it be thought best to take any action on the raising of 
Main Street, that it be so raised as to require the cars to pass 
under the street. From levels taken, we believe this can be done 
without disturbing a very large area. The expenses would be 
quite large, but we believe in the end the City would be the 



gainer. 



REMOVAL OF EARTH. 

The grade selected, requires the removal of 217,644.19 
squares of earth from the Hill, from lots 180,215.37, from 
streets 37,428.82 squares ; the cost per square has already been 
stated. The method of doing the work is worthy of some con- 
sideration, — should the whole be commenced at one time, oi 
a portion only be put under contract ? If it was practicable to 
put the earth into the Mystic River, the application of sufficient 
means at once, might decide the putting of the whole under 
contract at one time ; but if the Mill Pond and Flats should be 
selected, the increased distance, and the natural impediments, 
might justify the adoption of the suggestion involved in the 
second question. 

The distance from the centre of Bunker Hill Street, by 
direct lines extending through Eden and Auburn Streets, to the 
Mill Pond and Flats is about 1300 feet ; the average distance to 
carry the earth is about 2000 feet. There are but two conven- 
ient ways of reaching the areas above referred to, if cars should 
be used, namely; — by use of trestle work through Eden and 



24 COI^IMISSIONERS' REPORT. 

Auburn Streets, crossing Main Street above grade, and other 
streets at grade. 

But there are other elements which require consideration. If 
the whole work is under contract at the same time, it will re- 
quire to a great extent the depopulation of the whole district ; if 
done by sections, the people would have a longer time within 
which to make arrangements for obtaining dwellings, and many 
residents of the second section might obtain tenements in the 
first after its completion, and so on from section to section. 
Another element of cost will be the loss to the city, of a certain 
amount of taxes, for such time as the area is in a transition 
state : this amount might possibly be much reduced if a given 
area was selected and the work in all its parts prosecuted with 
energy. Your commissioners, are inclined to the view that to 
do the work in sections would prove to be the most advantage- 
ous to all interested. 

LOWERING OF BUILDINGS. ^ 

The cuts coming to grade in nearly every instance at the rear 
of lots fronting on Medford and Russell Streets, require no 
lowering, and but little alteration of the buildings on those 
streets, — the buildings on the rest of the district with the ex- 
ception of a few on Bunker Hill Street, at the neck, require 
lowering to the grade indicated. 

Whole number of Buildings on the district, 1202 

Brick Buildings, with Ls, 46 

'< " without Ls, 25 

Wooden '« " " 317 

" '' with «' 240 

Stables, 22 

Sheds, 166 

Privies, 363 

Other structures, 23 



1202 

Brick Buildings, with Ls to be lowered, 17 

'* " without Ls to be lowered, • 39 

Wooden *' " '' " '' " 229 

(( ic ^ith ** *« *' *' 188 

473 



COI^miSSIONERS* REPORT. 25 

In presenting the cost of lowering buildings, in the proper 
division of the report, it should be understood as including the 
cost of all the buildings to be lowered. But we desire in this 
connection to state the views held by your Commissioners, with 
regard to this part of the subject committed to us. The lower- 
ing of the buildings, together with the repairs necessary to 
make them suitable for occupancy, is an important item of the 
cost of doing the work, and one which has received much 
thought. We feel compelled to say that in our opinion, at least 
125 buildings of the whole number are not worth the expendi- 
ture of a third part of the estimated cost to put them in condi- 
tion for occupancy, — while there are many not worth the 
spending of a dollar to lower. In our estimates covering the 
expenditures for lowering, mason, carpenter, and other neces- 
sary work, the rule has been to put the building in a condition 
as near as possible to its present status as it can be, leaving all 
changes which the owners might desire to have made a subject 
for consideration at the time the work is in progress. It has 
not been found possible to apply this rule in all cases, as the 
new grade in some instances will not permit it to be done. 
Where the exceptions exist a sufficient amount has been added 

to meet the change. 

STREETS. 
The radical change of grade suggested, renders it necessary 
to relay the water and gas pipes, rebuild the sewers, reset edge- 
stones, repave sidewalks and gutters, reset the flaggings at street 
crossings, and finish the streets by macadamizing, or otherwise, 
as may be deemed best ; this involves a large expenditure as 
stated in the estimates. An opportunity will be offered to 
widen or continue any street or streets, as may be thought^ de- 
sirable ; nothing has been added to meet this contingency, as it 
was thought best to leave these and kindred changes to the 
operation of the present laws for street improvements. The total 
length of the streets is estimated to be 10.440 feet. 

ESTIMATED COST OF DOING THE WORK. 

Your Commissioners, have consulted with parties who have 
done, and with some who are now doing similar work, and 
with experts familiar with all the details, persons whose compe- 
tency to execute is unquestioned, and believe that in submitting 



26 COIVOIISSIONERS* REPORT. 

the folio wins: estimates, it would be found should the work be 

performed, that the expenditure can be brought within the sum 

mentioned. 

BUNKEK HILL DISTRICT. 

Excavation and removal of earth to Mill Pond 

and Flats, $1,332,987 

Lowering of Buildings, 403.950 

Mason, Carpenter, and other work on buildings, 269.687 

Relaying Water Pipes and services, 13.000 

*' Gas '' '' " 7.500 

Sewers, 31.320 

Sidewalks, Gutters and other street requierments, 46.278 

Damages, Loss of Rent, Taxes, &c. 131.431 

Contingent Expenses, Surveys, Supervision, &c. 45.000 

Estimated total cost, $2,281,153 

Less. — Value of Filling charged to 

Mill Pond and Flats, $791,393.88 

Value of Filling, estimated, 
at 19.795.72 squares in ex- 
cess of amount required for 
Mill Pond and Flats, which 
can be put into Mystic River, 79.182.88 870.576.76 

Estimated net cost, $1,410,576.24 

MILL POND AND FLATS. 

197.848.47 squares of earth, for filling, a $4, $791,393.88 
Compensation for displacement of tide water, on 

Flats, estimated at 10 cents per square foot, 199.225.10 

Estimated total cost, $990,618.98 

Less. — Estimated return to the City 
from owners, for filling lots 
on Flats a 25 cents per 
square foot, $441,662.75 

For displacement of tide wa- 
ter, 176.665.10 
For filling lots on Mill Pond 
a 19 cents per square foot, 236.740.00 855.067.85 

Estimated net cost, $135,551.13 



COMIinSSIONERS' REPORT. 27 

MEASURES EEQUIEED TO ACCOMPLISH THE 

WORK. 

In considering the measures to be adopted to accomplish the 
work, we have no precedents which apply in all respects to the 
matter under consideration. Under existing laws, the City 
may reduce the grade of streets, and take land for street wid- 
enings, paying all damages incurred, and charging the estates 
for benefits received ; this gives no power to reduce the grade 
other than for streets, and applied in this case would not accom- 
plish the end in view. This method ordinarily gives rise to much 
vexation and litigation. The only case at all parallel, to the 
work under consideration, is the reduction of ** Fort Hill" by 
the City of Boston. By Chapter 159, of the Acts of the year 
1865, the City of Boston, was authorized to widen and lay out 
the line of streets extending from Milk to Broad Street, known 
as Oliver Street, Washington Square and Belmont Street. The 
work was commenced and prosecuted to a certain extent. In the 
mean time the owners of other property on the Hill, not suc- 
ceeding in obtaining measures to relieve them from the incon- 
venience attending the work, and probably foreseeing that a 
corresponding reduction of the whole territory would be neces- 
sary, from what had already been done, obtained an Act, 
Chapter 278 of the year 18.65, under the name of the ''Fort 
Hill Corporation," authorizing the grading and laying out of 
new streets, and the grading of the entire Hill, under such re- 
strictions as to grade and laying out of streets, as the Board of 
Aldermen, might prescribe. The right of the Corporation, to 
take land, with other necessary powers, was fully recited 
therein, as also the right of the Board of Aldermen to have 
the general direction of the matter. 

By Chapter 94, of the Acts of the year 1869, the Board of 
Aldermen may reduce the grade of estates that require exca- 
vation upon Fort Hill, and may cause the removal of buildino's 
whether abutting on streets or otherwise ; thus giving in con- 
nection with the first Act, full power to the City to reduce 
the grade. Under these several Acts, the work is now beino- 
done, and is approaching completion. If the City of Charles- 
town should determine that the grade of Bunker Hill Street, 



28 • commissioners' report. 

required lowering, and under the existing law should proceed 
to execute the work, paying all damages incurred and charging 
such betterments as might result, they would seem to be in the 
precise situation of the City of Boston at the time that Oliver 
Street was commenced. 

It would seem to your Commissioners, that the territory 
known as Fort Hill was required for business purposes, that its 
grade rendered it unsuitable for those purposes, that the City 
was not disposed to initiate direct measures for its reduction, 
but in the manner mentioned rendered the occupancy of the 
Hill inconvenient, and that the owners to improve their prop- 
erty and secure to themselves the advantages of a reduction, 
were compelled to take measures, giving to the City the direc- 
tion of the matter. 

It cannot be said that the land on Bunker Hill is in demand 
for business purposes, although needed for building purposes, 
and cannot well be improved for such purposes, without a reduc- 
tion of grade ; it is therefore, in degree if not to the same ex- 
tent, brought within the Act obtained by the City of Boston. 

In the opinion of your Commissioners, the proper way would 
be, to present the subject to the Legishiture, on this ba«is, — 
That the Hill was of such a height that the streets leading to 
and from the surroundings, were of a grade rendering it impos- 
sible to improve the area in a profitable manner, and that the 
public and private interests of the City required that the Hill be 
reduced in a systematic manner. The City to have the entire 
direction under such re^rulations as to the takins: of land and 
buildings as might be deemed equitable. But the plan, in the 
opinion of your Commissioners, best adapted to secure the 
greatest benefit to the City, would be an Act authorizing the 
City to take the land and buildings by purchase or otherwise, 
make the reduction and such chanoes in streets as miofht be re- 
quired, selling the buildings not worth lowering, and on the 
completion of the work, sell the vacant land, under such re- 
strictions as to class of buildino:s to be erected as would best 
promote the public interest. The cost at the commencment 
would undoubtedly be very large, but in the end if properly 
carried out, would be profitable. 



COMMISSIONEKS' REPORT. 29 

The benefits to result, we deem to be these, — the improve- 
ment of the entire area for building purposes, an increase in 
the value of the land, enhanced from year to year by the im- 
provements made ; the making of land by the filling of the 
Mill Pond and Flats, suflficient for the erection thereon of at 
least 600 houses, besides the general advantage certain to ac- 
crue to all sections from the improvement of any particular 
locality. 

The Assessors valuation for the year 1870, of the Bunker 
Hill District was $1,323,533, of which $430,599 was estima- 
ted as the value of the land. The value put by them on the land 
is presumed to be an approximate one, and in connection with 
the buildings, indicates their opinion of the total value of any 
given estate ; the value of the land as given by them will not 
average more than 35 cents per square foot ; the value of the 
land and buildings as given by them will not average more than 
$1.05 per square foot. Comparing the location (under an im- 
proved condition,) with other parts of the City, it is be- 
lieved that no part of the Hill would be worth less than $1 per 
square foot exclusive of buildings. The moment the work is ac" 
compllshed, some parts would undoubtedly command consider- 
ably more than that. The benefits expected are not however 
alone from the increased value of the land ; the buildings erec- 
ted would probably be of a better class, and increase in this 
way the property of the City. 

CONCLUSION. 

During the consideration of this subject it has been made 
manifest to your Commissioners, that some decisive action was 
but just to all parties in interest. 

We have found parties who desired to make Improvements, 
but have been deterred therefrom by the agitation of the sub- 
ject. In the opinion of many it serves to reduce the value of 
their property, the uncertainty of the works being done, giving 
the advantage to those who are bold enough to purchase land 
and make improvements, at the expense of those who are too 
timid to make improvements, in view of the contingency that 
exists. 



30 commissioners' report. 

Being a matter that effects the entire city, It seems desirable 
to have the citizens indicate In a public manner their views of 
the matter, either for or against the reduction. 

Your Commissioners have endeavored to present such infor- 
mation as will enable the City Government and the citizens to 
draw a conclusion whether the work should or should not be 
done. It was made their duty simply to state the facts. If as full 
information as is desired on particular points is not found here- 
in, the omission can probably be supplied from the Abstract of 
the Commissioners' Memoranda, which accompanies the report, 
or your Commissioners will furnish if desired, at any time the 
information sought. 

WM. B. LONG, > ^ . . 
GEO. H. JACOBS, r""™"^^^""" 

Charlestown, August 18, 1871. 



COMMISSIONERS REPORT. 



31 



EXPENDITURES UNDER THE ORDERS OF THE CITY COUNCIL, AUTHORIZ- 

ING THE APPOINTMENT OF COMMISSIONERS ON BUNKER HILL, 

MILL POND, AND FLATS IN PRISON POINT BAY. 



Wm. B. Long, services as Commissioner, 12 Months, 
Geo. H. Jacobs, " « « 14 " 

L. R. Home, Survey and Plans, 



Robt. McLaughlin, Stone Monuments, 
Wm. Blake & Co., Castings for " 
Henry A. Rice, Setting " 

" " " Blacksmith work on Monuments, 
3 Laborers, setting ** 

A. E. Cutter & Co., Stationery, 

A. W. Locke & Co., Printing and Ruling, 

C. S. Wason <fc Co., " « 

J. W. Hill, Labor and Material, 
Wm. B. Long, Disbursements, 
Geo. H. Jacobs, " 

John B. Wilson, Services, 
Amos Brown, " 

Sam'l L. Tuttle, " 





1500.00 




1750.00 


2500.C0 




200.00 


2700.00 


80.00 




17.31 




39.00 




2.40 




77.75 


216.46 


64.09 




41.00 




23.00 


128.09 


2.88 




2.25 




23.90 


29.03 


25.00 




25.00 




10.00 


60.00 



$6383.58