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CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 




DOCUMENTS 



PRINTED BY THE ORDER 



OF THE 



CITY COUNCIL 



OR OF Om OF THE BBANCHES THEREOF 



DURING THE MUNICIPAL YEAR 



1^47-8, 



CHARLESTOWN: 

HENRY S. WARREN PRINTER. 

18 4 8. 



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EXTRACT FROM CITY ORDINANCES. 

Sect. 3. x\ll reports and other documents which may 
[)c ordered by either branch to be printed, shall under the 
direction of the joint standing committee, be printed on 
good paper and in uniform manner ; and in addition to the 
number which may be ordered by either branch, there 
shall always be printed fifty extra copies of each report 
and document so ordered to be printed^ forty of which 
may be sent by the Mayor, with a printed copy of this sec- 
tion, to the Mayors of such other cities, and to such other 
public institutions as he may designate, all documents 
which may be sent to the Mayor in exchange therefor, 
shall be by him preserved for the use of the city, and they 
shall from time to time be arranged, bound and lettered 
under his direction, in a suitable manner, and shall always 
remain in the room of the Mayor and Aldermen \ and the 
remaining ten copies shall be retained in the possession of 
the City Clerk, who shall at the end of each year cause 
the same to be bound and lettered in a uniform style, and 
when bound one series shall be deposited in each of the 
following rooms, namely : Of the Mayor and Aldermen, 
of the Common Council, of the School Committee, of the 
Overseers of the Poor, of the Engineers of the Fire De- 
partment, of the Assessors, of the Treasurer, and the re- 
mainder shall be safely kept by the City Clerk. 



LIST OF DOCUMENTS. 

Mayor's Inaugural Address. 

City Register. 

Report on Licenses. 

Communication of the Mayor in relation to the Train-^ 
ingfield. 

Opinion of C. P. & B. R. Curtis, as to the Laying out 
of Streets. 

Address of the Mayor at the laying of the corner stone 
of the High School building. 

Report of the Select Committee on the Petition of A. 
R. Decoster and others. 

Report of a Special Conunittee of the Common Coun- 
cil on the subject of accepting Lynde and Second 
streets. 

Annual Report of the School Conmiittee. 

Statement of Receipts and Expenditures of the City. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



THE 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



OF THE 



MAYOR, 

DELIVERED APRIL 26tH, 1847, 

UPON THE FIRST ORGANIZATION OF THE 

CITY GOVERNMENT 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



Published by Order of the two Branches of the City Council. 



CHARLESTOWN : 

PRINTED AT THE FREEMAN OFFICE 

1847. 



ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen and of the 
Common Council : — 

This is the day which has been selected by the 
proper authority, for putting into operation the new 
form of government adopted by our fellow-citizens. 
The oath we have just taken, and the organization of 
our respective Boards, which must immediately be 
made, will complete all the pre-requisite arrange- 
ments necessary to the establishment of the city of 
Charlestown. The city charter, which the Legisla- 
ture enacted over two months since, has been ratified, 
after full deliberation, by the largest vote that has 
ever been polled by the inhabitants of Charlestown,' 
and by so decisive a majority, that every one feels 
bound to be content with the result. Let it be our 
constant care. Gentlemen, so to discharge our respec- 
tive duties, and to make such discreet and adequate 
provisions for the welfare of our constituents, that no 
one will have cause from us to regret this important 
change in our form of government. 

One of the first subjects that will come before you, 
after the necessary officers shall have been elected, 
will be to prepare suitable accommodations for the 
City Government. The sessions of the Common 



Council must always be open to the public, and so 
must be those of the Board of Aldermen, except 
when engaged upon executive business. Both boards 
will therefore require for their own use commodious 
apartments. A large Hall must also be maintained ; 
for there is reserved to the citizens at large, by the 
express terms of the charter, (which, without any 
such provision, would be deemed inalienable,) the 
right to hold general meetings to consult together 
upon the public good. Convenient rooms will also 
be necessary for the various officers that may be ap- 
pointed, as well as for the several standing commit- 
tees of the City Council. It seems to me, that the 
edifice in which we are now assembled may be easily 
altered, so as to answer all these desired ends. It 
was erected not quite thirty years ago for a Town 
Hall and a Market, at a time when the territory of 
the town extended to eight or nine miles in length. 
It was a highly creditable undertaking for that 
period ; it is a substantial and well proportioned 
structure. It is, however, so constructed that it 
could not conveniently subserve any private use, and 
therefore could not be sold without loss. Should it 
be disposed of, I apprehend there would be no little 
difficulty in selecting a new site, and in deciding upon 
the style and cOst of a new edifice. And, inasmuch 
as all the voters of Charlestown have heretofore been 
so generally satisfied with this location, it would seem 
unwarrantable, for many years to come, to incur the 
heavy expenditure of a new building, for the supposed 



greater convenience of the different boards of public 
officers, when there are wanted so many other things 
more essential to the convenience of our fellow-citi- 
zens at large. I therefore recommend, that under 
the direction of a skilful architect, the jjroper altera- 
tions be made in this building, in a plain but tasteful 
manner, and that it hereafter be denominated the 
City Hall. 

Ward rooms will be necessary for Wards Two and 
Three. These can probably be hired for the present. 
Whenever it shall be determined to erect a new 
school-house in either Ward, or to enlarge an old 
one, a Ward room can be added with but little addi- 
tional expense. There is a peculiar fitness in uniting 
the school and the Ward room under one roof, for 
thus our children may be perpetually reminded that 
they are to qualify themselves at school, so that on 
arriving at the age of manhood, they may exercise 
with discretion the right of suffrage, the inestimable 
boon to a free and intelligent citizen. 

It will be the first duty of the City Council to ex- 
amine the state of the finances, and to ascertain the 
exact amount of the town debt which the city must 
assume. The amount of the funded debt and known 
liabilities is nearly ^80,000 00, which sum is exclu- 
siye of the Surplus Revenue. This last is but a 
nominal debt, as there is no probability that it will ever 
be recalled by the National and State governments. 
There are probably several arrearages in the various 
departments of the town service, and several unliqui- 



dated and contested claims. The whole amount of 
these should be ascertained in the outset, in order 
that measures may be taken for their immediate set- 
tlement, and that no part thereof be attributed to tht^ 
city government. When our present municipal debts 
and liabilities shall be accurately determined, 1 re- 
commend that a system be devised and steadily pur- 
sued for their gradual extinction. By raising for. this 
purpose a specified sum annually, (which should not 
be less than ^3000 00 and need not be more than 
;^5000 00,) and by paying off so much of the float- 
ing debt, or by scrupulously investing the sum raised 
in a productive and safe sinking-fund, this compara- 
tively small debt may be swept off in a few years. 
The utility of well managed sinking-funds has been 
conclusively demonstrated by Massachusetts and hy 
Boston, both of which will soon by their aid, be freed 
from, all pecuniary liabilities. 

Whenever it shall be found to be advisable to incur 
a heavy and extraordinary expenditure for an impor- 
tant object, the necessary means should, at the same 
time, be devised. The same vote or ordinance that 
authorizes the undertaking, should provide for the 
raising of a sufficient sum therefor, either during the 
current year, or by equal instalments during each suc- 
ceeding year, until the whole sum shall be obtained. 
Blindly to incur a public debt, year after year, with- 
out providing for its repayment, is impolitic and illib- 
eral. The more important and valuable the object, 
the more reasonable and equitable it is, that the gen- 



eration which adopted it, should pay something each 
succeeding year for its accomplishment. Posterity 
will never thank an improvident ancestry for having 
bequeathed a public debt, contracted for purposes, 
from which the greatest benefit is generally derived 
by the age which originated them. Each genera- 
tion will find public objects and improvements enough 
of its own to provide for, without having to pay the 
debts of its remote predecessor. 

The municipal authorities, as well as the inhabit- 
ants, have heretofore suffered much from the want of 
a correct and extended plan of Charlestown. 1 re- 
commend that a thorough and accurate survey of the 
whole city be taken at once, and that a plan and a 
profile thereof be prepared upon a large scale, deline- 
ating the streets and courts as they now are, and also 
showing by dotted lines such alterations and improve- 
ments as ought at some time to be made, the grade 
to which the streets should be reduced or elevated, 
and the course and depth of the common sewers, 
which are or ought to be constructed. Lithographic 
copies of such a plan, upon a diminished scale, would 
find a ready sale amongst the owners of real estate 
and other citizens. Persons intending to build may 
then be able to know how they should set their foun- 
dations, to conform to the permanent grade of their 
respective streets ; but heretofore they have been 
subjected to great trouble and perplexity, as well as 
to needless expense. 

A considerable annual outlay will be required, for 



8 



several years to come, for the improvement of our 
streets and side-walks. Whatever is found requisite 
should be done in a thorough and scientific manner, 
and by the employment of the best materials, so that 
the same work may not require renewal. The city 
government should receive, with prompt attention, ap- 
plications for the laying out of new streets, and for 
the widening and improvement of old ones, and 
should evince a disposition to meet the advances of 
proprietors with liberality — ever remembering that it 
is the part of true policy to encourage the improve- 
ment of vacant lots by the building thereon of perma- 
nent and sightly structures, and the part of wisdom, 
to regard in advance the interests and wants of com- 
ing years. The City Government ought to do 
every thing within the scope of its authority, toward 
providing, or causing to be provided, passable side- 
walks in all the inhabited streets of the city. Many 
of our streets need to be furnished with edge stones, 
with crossings, and also with paved gutters and com- 
mon sewers ; and it is desirable that the work be im- 
mediately prosecuted in a systematic, economical and 
workmanlike manner. A small sum may be profita- 
bly expended in the setting out of a few shade trees, 
and in the care of those trees which a few years 
since were set out in our streets from the judicious 
legacy of a late distinguished inhabitant. A moder- 
ate annual outlay towards rendering our public streets 
and squares cleanly, agreeable and tasteful, will be 



rejiaid an hundred fold, in promoting the health and 
comfort of the citizens. 

It is highly desirable that our streets should be suf- 
liciently lighted in the night time. This subject de- 
serves more attention than it has hitherto received. 
It will be the duty of the city government to let the 
city lights so shine in the streets, that the peo- 
ple, who have occasion to be out during the night, 
may see ; — in order that they may pass therein with 
greater security, and that robbers and all mischievous 
persons may be more easily detected. 

Charlestown is not now so fortunate as some other 
places of its size and importance, which own one or 
more commons or squares, enclosed by durable fences 
and ornamented with walks and trees, where the citi- 
zens may enjoy an agreeable promenade and the 
children may indulge in salutary exercise. There is 
a small common without the neck, which was, during 
the last year, improved, partly at the expense of 
the town, and partly by the contributions of indi- 
viduals. And there is also the common, known 
immemorially as the training-field, which, unfortu- 
nately, if not illegally, has for a long period been en- 
cumbered by a heterogeneous assortment of public 
buildings. 

In the year 1 825 the town might have made a fa- 
vorable arrangement with the Bunker Hill Monument 
Association, by which, upon the payment of fifteen 
hundred dollars to be raised by taxation, and by the 
subscription, on the part of the inhabitants, of a cer- 



10 



tain specified amount, a permanent right might have 
been secured to the inhabitants, for the purposes of a 
common, in all the lands originally purchased by the 
Association. The arrangement was not carried into 
effect, and subsequently the Association was obliged 
to dispose of the largest portion of its lands, to re- 
lieve itself from debt. But what the town has lost 
by not securing a right in the original purchase, the 
city will gain in the end, by the increase of taxable 
property occasioned by the sale, on the part of the 
Association, of eligible building lots, which, with the 
buildings that will probably be erected thereon, will, 
in a few years, be equal to half a million of dollars. 
This consideration will somewhat reconcile us to the 
loss of a spacious, open field or common, extending 
from High to Bunker Hill streets, and will enable us 
to keep in better order the two which remain to us. 
I trust that the City Council will see to it, that no 
further obstructions are permitted on the training- 
field, and will, from time to time, as opportunity offers, 
remove those that are now upon it, and will also pro- 
vide that the grounds be kept in decent order. If a 
different course be pursued, the time will soon come, 
(when the population of the place shall be more 
dense and compacted,) that it will be a matter ol 
astonishment, that such parsimony and want of fore- 
cast could ever have been exhibited. 

The support of the poor is one of the duties in- 
cumbent upon municipal bodies. It is alike the dic- 
tate of humanity, and of sound policy, to make ample 



11 



provisions for the indigent and disabled, who by mis- 
fortune are bereft of the means of earning a liveli- 
hood ; — and, at the same time, so to devise various 
kinds of employment, for these recipients of the pub- 
lic bounty, that the ruinous effects of idleness may be 
spared to them, and that some equivalent be returned 
for the amount expended in their behalf. Charles- 
town has never been backward in fulfilling its duty in 
its appropriations, but has uniformly granted such 
sums of money, however large, which the Overseers 
of the Poor have asked for. The expenses of our 
Alms House have been increasing from year to year, 
partly on account of its situation in the heart of our 
population, and partly from the increase of the prices 
of provision and other necessary articles, while, for 
the same reason, the income derived therefrom, has 
not been equal to what the public has a right to de- 
mand. About a year ago, a special Committee was 
raised by the town, to inquire if any alterations 
should be made in the administration of its affairs. I 
had the honor to be the chairman of the Committee, 
and visited with them the establishment. All the 
gentlemen who acted upon the Committee concurred 
in the report which was made to the town, at a sub- 
sequent meeting, recommending that the location of 
the Alms House should be changed to a more se- 
cluded and rural situation, that a new house be erect- 
ed with reference to a better classification of the in- 
mates, and that the present establishment be dis- 
posed of, which, it was thought, could be sold for a 



12 



sum, more than sufficient to pay all the expenses of 
the removal. The report was accepted, and the 
same Committee were charged with the further 
duty to inquire and report what new site, either 
within or without our territorial limits, could best 
be obtained, and also to submit plans, and esti- 
mates for new buildings. The committee have 
wisely delayed making further progress, upon the 
prospect of a change of our form of government. 
The organization of the City Council on this day 
discharges that committee ; but I recommend that 
the measures proposed in their report, be immediate- 
ly carried into effect. By so doing, an annual saving 
may be made in the expenditure for the support of 
the poor ; the poor themselves will be better provided 
for ; while by the sale of the present Alms House 
and lands, and the obtaining of a new establishment, 
a handsome surplus will be realized, which will be 
available for many useful purposes. 

A prompt and efficient Fire Department is a safe- 
guard and protection, indispensable to every populous 
community. The members of the Charlestown De- 
partment have often distinguished themselves by their 
zeal and energy in this important service. Early 
upon the first alarm at the scene of conflagration, and 
contending with the fiery element with an ardor and 
fortitude truly admirable, they have done much for 
the protection of property and even of life. While 
all have been ready to expose their limbs and their 
health in the hour of danger, some have devoted their 



13 



lives to the public welfare. Nor have the exer- 
tions of the officers and members of our Fire Com- 
panies been confined to our own limits, but they have 
been beneficially extended to the neighboring cities 
and towns. Not being myself acquainted in any re- 
spect with the minute details of the affairs of this 
Department, I can only, at this time, express my hope 
and belief, that in the new relation to a city govern- 
ment in which the members now find themselves, they 
will receive that attention and liberality which their 
services fairly demand, and at the same time, will 
cheerfully comply with such general regulations, as 
the city authorities may, upon careful examination, 
decide to be essential to the public interest. 

Our Charter imposes upon the Mayor and Alder- 
men the duty of taking the necessary precautionary 
measures for the preservation of the public health 
and for the conservation of the public peace. They 
will probably act upon the well established principle, 
that it is far easier to arrest an obnoxious evil on its 
first appearance, than to suppress it after it shall, by 
a tacit indulgence, be permitted to attain to its full 
strength. To abate nuisances of every description, 
to enforce such wholesome regulations as may be 
necessary for cleanliness and neatness in the streets, 
in and about the premises of the city buildings, as 
well as upon the lands of the proprietors, and more- 
over to satisfy the numerous calls which good order 
in a populous community absolutely requires, will be 
the constant charge imposed by law upon the Mayor 



14 



and Aldermen, as executive officers. To aid in ac- 
complishing these objects, I recommend that the 
office of a City Marshal, and also that of a Superin- 
tendent of the Streets and Pubhc Buildings, be estab- 
lished, with salaries sufficient to secure the services of 
competent and energetic persons ; and that the means 
be furnished for a suitable addition to the Police and 
to the Night- Watch. 

The highest public interest of a municipal body — 
whether we regard the amount of money appropri- 
ated, or the influence, for good, or for evil, which a 
liberal appropriation, discreetly apphed, or the want 
of it, may have upon the general prosperity, is that of 
the Free Schools. These have, heretofore, been the 
pride and boast of our town, and it is to be hoped 
that, improving with the progress of the age, they will 
continue to be the ornament and defence of our city. 
While the School Committee are clothed, by the 
terms of the Charter, with the same powers that were 
formerly vested in the Board of Trustees, it will still 
devolve upon the City Council to make adequate ap- 
propriations for the support of schools and for the 
alteration or building of school-houses, and to make 
such other provisions as the town, in its corporate 
capacity, has heretofore done. 

There is one deficiency in our school system, in 
consequence of which our community has suffered 
much and will suffer more and more, until it be sup- 
phed. That deficiency is a High School, commonly 
so called, where our children may be instructed in the 



15 



ancient and modem languages, and may have the 
means of obtaining a more thorough knowledge of 
the higher branches of English study than it is possi- 
ble for them to acquire in any grammar school. I 
will not stop to consider, whether Charlestown has of 
late years come up to the letter of the law in this re- 
spect, or whether she has not subjected herself to 
heavy penalties for the breach thereof; this might be 
a doubtful question for judicial decision. But certain 
I am, that she has not brought herself within the true 
spirit of the law, nor within the true spirit of an en- 
lightened age, which both imperiously require the 
best and the fittest education for the young, which 
human sagacity can provide. 

What was called a good and sufficient education 
twenty years ago, is not thought to be so now ; and 
each coming generation will advance the standard. 
There are some who denounce a High School, and 
call it aristocratic, but there is not the least reason for 
applying to it that truly odious epithet. Others hon- 
estly to beheve that a High School has an inju- 
rious effect upon the Grammar Schools, by removing 
therefrom some of the best scholars ; this idea is 
also fallacious. 

It may possibly happen, that where there is no 
High School, a few scholars may remain in a Gram- 
mar School longer than it would be necessary for 
them to receive the instruction there imparted ; and 
they may avail much to the teacher, for the purposes 
of a showy exhibition. But the time for holiday 



16 



exhibitions has gone by, and there has succeeded a 
demand, for a rigid personal examination of all the 
scholars, conducted by the school committee. The 
true test of a faithful teacher nowadays, is not, wheth- 
er he has trained up a few in his school, who stand 
up like some tall trees, overshadowing the rest ; but 
whether he has exhibited the patience, that is not the 
word, but the fond desire, to cultivate the individual 
mind of each of his pupils, and to instil into every 
immortal being entrusted to his care, the germ and ac- 
tive principle of progress. Besides, it is not always 
the case, that the brightest and most showy scholars 
turn out to be the most useful members of society ; — 
certainly the chance is against them, if they have been 
too much accustomed to be exhibited and flattered on 
public school-days. Often it happens that minds of 
the tardiest developement and of the hardest impres- 
sion in youth, become at last the most mature, and 
yield the richest fruit. 

The removal of the most adv^anced scholars from 
the Grammar to the Bigh school, is, in my opinion, 
actually beneficial to the former, by giving its teach- 
ers an opportunity to devote more time and attention 
to the younger classes, which follow on in regular ro- 
tation ; and by making the principle of promotion ac- 
cording to industrious merit a general and powerful 
inducement to study. On the contrary the want of a 
public High school occasions this sad and twofold 
evil, that while some of the most promising children, 
whose parents cannot conveniently afford any addition- 



17 



al expense, do not. receive that education which their 
natural talents deserve, the children of others, are re- 
moved from the salutary influence of public instruc- 
tion, and are placed in the less liberal atmosphere of 
private schools. The office of private instructors will 
probably never be wholly superseded, because there 
will always be peculiar circumstances operating as ex- 
ceptions in individual cases, which will sustain them 
to a certain extent. But it cannot be denied as a 
general principle, that it is the true policy of our re- 
publican institutions to place all the children of the 
Commonwealth in the same schools, which should be 
the very best that the public can afford, and there to 
let them grow up and learn together, imbibing a 
knowledge of each others, traits, taught to treat each 
other with mutual respect and kindness, and thus made 
early to know and to share the common lot of human- 

The Latin and High Schools of Boston, have done 
more for the character and renown of that celebrated 
metropolis, than all its stately structures, its wealth, 
and its predominent influence, — of all which indeed 
that is really desirable, its liberal provision for an ele- 
vated education is the true origin. I know of no bet- 
ter method by which we can celebrate the adoption 
of our new form of government, by which we can 
erect, as it were, an appropriate monument to denote 
the foundation of our City, than by the establishment 
of a High School for both sexes, upon a permanent 
and liberal footing. A far worthier monument this 
2* 



la 



would be, than the erection of a new, an ostentatious 
and coniparativelj useless City Hall. Let the City 
Council and the School Committee unite now in for- 
warding this great object, and the City of Charles- 
town, and the improved education of her children, 
will be henceforth forever identified. 

The Legislature has conferred upon the City Coun- 
cil, the power to make all needful by-laws, and to an- 
nex penalties for the breach thereof, " without the 
sanction of any Court or authority whatever." This 
is a high power, and should be exercised with the 
greatest cautiousness and discretion. Such by-laws 
should be few, clearly expressed, and adapted to the 
acknowledged wants of the place ; due notice thereof 
should be seasonably given to all the citizens, and then 
they should all be alike required to yield their compli- 
ance, for the sake of the general comfort of all. 

It is made the duty of the Mayor and Aldermen, 
amongst other things, to prepare correct lists of all the 
voters of the city, and to issue warrants for calling 
the meetings for the stated elections. The lime for 
opening and closing the polls, at these elections, should 
be determined with the view to the convenience of all 
classes of voters ; and when the most convenient hours 
have once been ascertained, they ought not to be va- 
ried from one election to another. 

I deem it important, that the state of the poll should 
never be made known, until the time for closing the 
polls has arrived. If its condition be communicated to 
one portion of the citizens, and not to another, a gross 



19^ 



injustice is suffered. But it is better, on principles 
of sound policy, that it should not be published at 
all during the canvass ; for the citizen, who deposits 
his ballot during the last hour, should do so, without 
being swayed by the knowledge of the condition of 
the ballots previously deposited. I believe this to be 
the true intention of the election laws of our Com- 
monwealth ; and it was evidently for this reason that 
Congress has lately passed a law, requiring that the 
Presidential election shall be held on the same day 
throughout the Union, in order that, on this most im- 
portant question, one State may not be unduly influ- 
enced by the vote of another. 

There is a high moral dignity and grandeur in the 
spectacle of independent citizens going to the polls to 
exercise that most valuable of all rights, the right of 
suffrage according to the dictates of their best informed 
judgments. It is the sublimest, the god-hke act of 
the sovereign authority of the popular voice. But 
when reason is blinded, and ill-temper governs, when, 
on the eve of an election, specious, exaggerated, and 
agitating rumors are designedly sent forth, like so 
many fire-brands among thickly-strewed combustible 
materials, when false issues are raised before the 
people, when vociferous and opprobious*^ language 
is freely used at the polls, and voters publicly de- 
ride each other for the particular votes which they 
cast, then it is apparent that a disease is raging in the 
body politic, which the good and reflecting men, 
of all parties, would be glad to see thoroughly extex- 



20 



minated. To prevent the spreading of so noxious a 
disease, upon the first appearance of the famihar 
symptoms, is the duty, as well as the true permanent 
interest of every citizen, whether he may hold a pub- 
lic or a private station. 

Deeply impressed with the force of these senti- 
ments, as applicable to every populous community, 
and as especially applicable to this most excitable age, 
T deem it to be my duty, during the year in which I 
am to hold the chief executive office of this city, to 
keep away from all political meetings and celebrations, 
and to refrain from doing any thing which may serve 
to identify myself with any party. 1 beheve, that the 
principal officers of large communities can in no more 
effectual manner be the conservators of the peace and 
of the public tranquility, than by abstaining, for the 
time being, from all political action and partizan effort. 
Having the general superintendence of the elections, 
they should content themselves with depositing their 
ballots in the most quiet manner, and should divest 
themselves of all interested and excited feeling, in 
order that they may perform their official duties with 
the strictest impartiality. 

Our own community is divided into several parties, 
not one of which may be said to have the majority of 
all the voters. How necessary shall we find it to be, 
and how truly desirable to us it is, that in the conduct 
of our civic affairs, all partizan feelings should be laid 
aside. The era must of necessity come, when all the 
citizens, though differing in opinion upon matters of 



21 



National and of State policy, will, for the sake of 
their children, for the protection of all the common 
local interests cordially unite, each successive year, in 
forming a civic administration with reference only to 
the common good. These sentiments, I doubt not, 
are cherished by you. Gentlemen, who are to be asso- 
ciated with me in the city government, for the first 
year of its operation. Let us indulge the hope, that 
in our official intercourse, we shall exhibit that mutu- 
al respect, confidence and forbearance, which fellow- 
citizens and neighbors owe to each other. By pur- 
suing such a course, we shall do much to check the 
growth of party spirit, which, when carried beyond 
its proper limits, is the bane and disgrace of an inde- 
pendent and enlightened people. 

As I shall become more acquainted with the minute 
details of our city affairs, it will be my duty to make 
such suggestions to the City Council, or to either 
branch thereof, as shall seem to me to be advan- 
tageous to the public interest. Such suggestions will 
not be made without due deliberation on my own 
part, and they will receive, I doubt not, all the con- 
siderations which they may deserve. Whatever may 
be decided upon, in the City Council or by the Board 
of Aldermen, acting by its exclusive authority, shall 
be executed by me with fidelity and promptness. Let 
us keep this single object in view, to provide in a sys- 
tematic, economical, and eflfectual manner, for the 
permanent interest of the city which we have chosen 
for our habitation. Having myself no ulterior views. 



22 



indulging no personal prejudices or preferences, but 
intending to confine my official conduct within its 
proper sphere, I shall devote the principal portion of 
my time, for the year on which I now enter, to the 
discharge of my official duty according to the best of 
my humble abihty. 

The Mayor has no vote in the Board of Aldermen, 
nor in the City Council, except when those bodies may 
be equally divided. The casting vote of a presiding 
officer, on such a contingency, should not be given 
without due consideration and judgment. It should 
never be calculated upon in advance, by one side or 
the other, any farther than the reasons it may urge 
should justify such an expectation. Before exer- 
cising this prerogative, I shall feel it incumbent upon 
me to reconsider the question in controversy with 
the greatest caution, and to weigh the arguments 
submitted, with becoming deference to the opinions 
of those who may advance them. 

Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen : — 

You are also Executive Officers with me, besides 
constituting one of the legislative branches of the 
city government. All of you older than myself, and 
having had, most of you, more experience in our 
municipal affairs, I shall rely much upon your pru- 
dence and sound judgment. In the intimate rela- 
tions we must necessarily sustain toward each other, 
I shall depend upon your frank and cordial co-opera- 
tion. 



23 



Gentlemen of the Common Council : — 

You are the representatives of your fellow-citizens 
residing in your respective Wards ; and you are so 
chosen from and by your respective Wards, in order 
that every section of the city may secure its proper 
share of attention from your hands. To you and to 
the other branch are entrusted all the power which 
the inhabitants themselves, acting as a municipal 
body, could heretofore have lawfully exercised. 
There is a true dignity in delegated power, when 
deliberately bestowed and honestly used. This hon- 
orable trust imposes a high obligation. By this, and 
still more by the oath you have taken, you are' bound 
to give to your constituents the benefit of your sound- 
est judgment and of your purest efforts. 

Fellow-citizens of the City Council : 

We owe it as a duty to our constituents to prove to 
them that a City Government is not heedlessly ex- 
travagant ; but on the contrary, that its essential 
element and peculiar province is to demonstrate a wise 
forecast and a sound economy, by protecting the 
pubhc treasury from the waste of useless expenditure, 
and the public property from the ruin of neglect, by 
adopting a well-devised plan of needful improve- 
ments, and the most practicable method of carrying 
them into effect. 

Remember, also, gentlemen, that the character of 
the city of Charlestown is placed in our hands, to 
stamp upon it the first impression ; let it correspond 



M 



with the ancient character of the town. And, gen- 
tlemen, how noble and imposing does that character 
appear, as we trace it along through the wonderful 
events of nearly two hundred and twenty years. The 
soil on which we tread is indelibly marked with the 
eloquent tales of the past. Each ward has its pecu- 
liar glories. Ward One contains the spot where our 
forefathers first landed, the site where the first church 
was erected to the worship of God, and that Town 
Hill, where were interred the remains of the earliest 
settlers, who were swept ofi* by a sudden and dire 
disease. Its whole territory was once covered with 
the flames of that Revolutionary fire which burnt 
down the homes of our fathers, but which could not 
quench that patriotic fire of liberty, which warmed 
their hearts during that memorable but disheartening 
scene. Ward Two contains the celebrated battle- 
field, nourished by the blood of heroes ; a portion 
of which is setj apart forever, as consecrated ground ; 
whereon stands up an imperishable monument, 
which, in the sublimity of its holy silence, declares 
the majesty of liberty protected by equal laws. From 
the top of this monument, one may now behold, as 
far as the aided eye can extend^its vision, the accumu- 
lated evidences of a powerful, prosperous, and 
church-going people. Ward Three contains the old 
burial-ground, where have so long reposed, in peace- 
ful solitude, the ashes of Harvard and of other worthy 
men of that first generation, who left the luxuries 
and blandishments of the old world — hedged around 



25 



a.s they were by unpalatable restraints — for the un- 
tried liberty of the new ; and where each succeeding 
generation, even to our own, has deposited the re- 
mains of those who, in their day, served well their 
town and their country. This ward bears pn its 
front that sightly eminence, the highest of all our 
beautiful hills, the real Bunker Hill, which gave its 
significant name to the most eventful battle which an- 
cient or modern history has recorded. 

Our whole territory is indeed classic ground. No 
city on the face of the earth, in proportion to its ex- 
tent and population, has so many features of such 
attractive interest to the intelligent stranger. Thou- 
sands, and tens of thousands, each year come to visit 
our famous localities. May the character of our 
citizens never be a reproach to the soil on which they 
daily tread. But when the curious traveller, who 
shall linger with admiration about these scenes — 
which time will serve only to deepen with interest — 
shall stop, also, to make pertinent inquiries like 
these : " What sort of people are they who now dwell 
on this goodly heritage ? Is their character in keep- 
ing with the wide-spread fame which the place so 
justly acquired in olden time ? Are they lovers of 
justice, of order, and of equal laws ? Are they truly 
grateful to a beneficent Providence for the peculiar 
privileges vouchsafed to them ? " May there ever 
come forth, from this vicinity, from this ancient Com- 
monwealth, from our beloved Union, one harmonious 
jesponse, in language like the following : " The men 



26 



who inhabit this world-renowned city are, in all re- 
spects, worthy of their sires ; they do still reverence 
the God of their fathers ; they are a goodly people, 
whose God is the Lord." 

G. Washington Warren. 



City of Charlestown, 



April 26th, 1847 



.1 



RULES AND ORDERS 



OP 



THE CITY COUNCIL 



AND A 



LIST OF THE OFFICERS 



OF THE 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN, 



1847. 



CHARLESTOWN : 
HENRY S. WARREN CITY PRINTER. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



JOINT RULES AND ORDERS 



CITY COUNCIL. 



Art. 1 . At the commencement of the mu- 
nicipal year, the following Joint Standing 
Committees shall be appointed by the presi- 
ding officer of each branch; provided, that 
either branch may determine to choose them 
by ballot, namely : 

1 . A committee on Finance — to consist of 
the Mayor, and the President, and two mem- 
bers of the Common Council. 

2. A committee on Accounts — to consist of 
two Aldermen and three members of the Com- 
mon Council. 

3. A committee on Public Property — to 
consist of two members of the Board of Mayor 
and Aldermen, and three members of the 
Common Council. 



4 Joint Rules and Orders of the City Council. 

4. A committee on Public Instruction — to 
consist of the Mayor and one Alderman, and 
the President and two members of the Com- 
mon Council. 

5. A committee on the Poor and Aims- 
House — to consist of the Mayor, one Alder- 
man, and the President and two members of 
the Common Council. 

6. A committee on Fuel, and Lighting the 
Streets — to consist of the Mayor and two 
members of the Common Council. 

7. A committee on the Fire Department — 
to consist of two members of the Board of 
Mayor and Aldermen and three members of 
the Common Council. 

8. A committee on Highways, Bridges and 
Side Walks — to consist of the Mayor, one Al- 
derman and three members of the Common 
Council. 

9. A committee on Main Drains and Com- 
mon Sewers — to consist of the Mayor, one 
Alderman and three members of the Common 
Council. 

10. A committee on the Square and Pub- 
lic Commons — to consist of the Mayor and 



Joint Rules and Orders of tlie City Council. 5 

the President, and one member of the Com- 
mon Council. 

11. A committee on Printing — to consist 
of one member of the Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen, and two members of the Common 
Council. 

On all Joint Committees, wherein it is pro- 
vided that the Mayor shall be a member, in 
case of non-election, decease, inability, or 
absence of that officer, the Chairman of the 
Board of Aldermen shall act ex officio. 

The members of the Board of Aldermen 
and of the Common Council, who shall con- 
stitute the Joint Standing Committees, shall 
be chosen or appointed by their respective 
Boards. 

The member of the Board of Aldermen 
first named on every Joint Committee, of 
which the Mayor is not a member, shall be its 
Chairman ; and in case of his resignation or 
inability, the other members of the same 
Board,- in the order in which they are named, 
and after them, the member of the Common 
Council, first in order, shall call meetings of 
the Committee and act as Chairman. 

Art. 2. In every case of an amendment of 



6 Joint Rules and Orders of the City Council. 

an Ordinance, or Joint Order, or Joint Reso- 
lution, agreed to in one Board and dissented 
from by the other, a conference may be had 
at the request of either ; and the committees 
appointed by the respective Boards, for the 
purpose, shall meet as soon as convenient, 
and state to each other the reasons of their 
respective Boards for and against the amend- 
ment, confer freely thereon, and report to 
their respective Boards. 

Art. 3. When either Board shall not con- 
cur in any Ordinance sent from the other, 
notice thereof shall be given by written mes- 
sage. 

Art. 4. Either board may propose to the 
other for its concurrence, a time to v\^hich 
both Boards shall adjourn. 

Art. 5. All By-Laws, passed by the City 
Council, shall be termed "Ordinances," and 
the enacting style shall be : — Be it Ordained 
by the City Council of the City of Charles- 
town. 

Art. 6. In all votes, when either or both 
branches of the City Council express any 
thing by way of command, the form of ex- 
pression shall be " Ordered ;" and when either 



Joint Rules and Orders of the City Council. 7 

or both branches express opinions, principles, 
facts, or purposes, the form shall be " Re- 
solved." 

Art. 7. After the annual order of appro- 
priations shall have been passed, no subse- 
quent expenditures shall be authorized for 
any object, unless provision for the same shall 
be made by special transfer from some of the 
appropriations contained in such annual order, 
or by expressly creating therefor a City debt ; 
in the latter of which cases, the order shall 
not be passed, unless two-thirds of the whole 
number of each branch of the City Council 
shall vote in the affirmative, by vote taken by 
yea and nay. 

Art. 8. Joint Standing Committees shall 
cause records to be kept of their proceedings, 
in books provided by the City for that pur- 
pose. No Committee shall act by separate 
consultations, and no report shall be received, 
unless agreed to in Committee actually as- 
sembled. 

Art. 9. It shall be the duty of every Joint 
Committee, to whom any subject may be 
specially referred, to report thereon within 
one month, or to ask for further time. 



8 Joint Rules and Orders of the City Council. 

Art. 10. The Reports of all Committees, 
whether by Ordinance, Order, Resolve, or 
otherwise, shall be made to the Board in which 
the business referred, originated. 

Art. 11. Ordinary messages between the 
two boards may be transmitted by their respec- 
tiveClerks, or Messengers ; but all messages, 
proposing or assenting to a convention of the 
two branches shall be borne by some member 
of the Board to be designated by the chair. All 
messages of the two Boards shall be reduced 
to writing by their respective Clerks. 

Art. 12. All Reports and other papers sub- 
mitted to the City Council, shall be written in 
a fair hand, and no report or endorsement of 
any kind shall be made on the Reports, Me- 
morials, or other papers referred to the Com- 
mittees of either branch. And the Clerks 
shall make copies of any papers to be report- 
ed by Committees, at the request of the re- 
spective Chairmen thereof. 

Art. 13. No Committee shall enter into 
any contract with, or purchase, or authorise 
the purchase of any articles of any of its 
members. 

Art. 14. No chairman of any Committee 



Joint Rules and Orders of the City Council. 9 

shall audit or approve any bill or account 
against the City, for any supphes or services 
which shall not have been ordered or author- 
ised by the Committee. 

Art. 15. Every Ordinance shall have as 
many readings in each Board as its own Rules 
shall require ; after which the question shall 
be on passing the same to be enrolled ; and 
when the same shall have passed to be en- 
rolled, it shall be sent to the other Board for 
concurrence ; and after its passage to be en- 
rolled in concurrence, the same shall be en- 
rolled by the Clerk of the Common Council, 
and examined by a Committee of that Board ; 
and on being found by said Committee to be 
truly and correctly enrolled, the same shall be 
reported to the Common Council, when the 
question shall be on passing the same to be 
ordained ; after its passage to be ordained, it 
shall be signed by the President and sent to 
the other Board, where a like examination 
shall be made by the Committee on Enrol- 
ment of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen, 
and the same proceeding thereon shall be had 
as in the Common Council; and when it shall 



10 Joint Rules and Orders of the City Council. 

have passed to be ordained in both branches, 
it shall be signed by the Mayor. 

Art. 16. No Enrolled Ordinance shall be 
amended. 

Art. 17. No vote by vt^hich a Joint Order 
or Resolve, or an Ordinance has been passed 
in its final stage, shall be reconsidered in 
either Board, after the same has been finally 
acted upon in the other Board, unless a mo- 
tion for reconsideration be made, or notice 
thereof be given at the same meeting at which 
the vote to be reconsidered passed. 



RULES AND ORDERS 

OF THE BOARD OF THE 

MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 



Art. 1. The order of business shall be as 
follows : 

1. The journal of the previous meeting 
shall be read. 

2. Petitions shall next be called for, and be 
disposed of by reference or otherwise ; and 
also new business may be introduced by any 
member of the Board. 

3. Such nominations, appointments, and 
elections as may be in order, shall be consid- 
ered and disposed of. 

4. The orders of the day shall be taken up, 
meaning by the orders of the day, the busi- 
ness remaining unfinished at the previous 
meeting ; and such communications as may 
have been subsequently sent up from the 
Common Council. 

Art. 2. Every Ordinance shall pass through 
the following stages before it shall be consid- 



12 Rules and Orders Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

ered as having received the final action of this 
Board, viz : First Reading, Second Reading, 
Passage to be Enrolled, Passage to be Or- 
dained ; and every joint resolution shall have 
two several readings before the question shall 
be taken on its final passage. 

Art. 3. An Ordinance may be rejected at 
either stage in its progress, but shall not pass 
through all its stages in one day. 

Art. 4. Standing Committees shall be ap- 
pointed on the Police of the City, on Licen- 
ses, on Laying Out and Widening Streets, 
and on Enrolment ; each of said Committees 
to consist of three members. 

Art. 5. No member shall be interrupted 
while speaking, but by a call to order, or for 
the correction of a mistake ; nor shall there 
be any conversation among the members while 
a paper is being read, or a question stated 

from the Chair. 

Art. 6. All Committees shall be appointed 
and announced by the Mayor, unless the 
Board shall determine otherwise. 

Art. 7. The above rules and orders of bus- 
iness shall be observed in all cases, unless sus- 
pended by a vote of two- thirds of the members 
present, for a specific purpose. 



RULES AND ORDERS 



COMMON COUNCIL. 



Rights and Duties of the President. 

Art. 1 . The President shall take the chair 
at the hour to which the Council shall have 
adjourned ; shall call the members to order ; 
and on the appearance of a quorum, shall 
cause the minutes of the preceding meeting 
to be read, and proceed to business. In the 
absence of the President, any member pres- 
ent can call the Council to order, and preside 
until a President, pro tempore, shall be chosen 
by ballot. If upon a ballot for President, pro 
tempore, no member shall receive a majority 
of the votes, the Council shall proceed to a 
second ballot, in which a plurality of votes 
shall prevail. 

Art. 2. He shall preserve decorum and 
order ; he may speak to points of order in 
preference to other members; and shall de- 



14 Mules and Orders of the Common Council. 

cide all questions of order, subject to an ap- 
peal to the Council, on motion of any mem- 
ber regularly seconded. 

Art. 3. He shall declare all votes ; but. if 
any member doubt the vote, the President, 
without further debate upon the question, shall 
require the members voting in the affirmative 
and negative, to rise and stand until they are 
counted, and he shall declare the result ; but 
no decision shall be declared, unless a quorum 
of the Council shall have voted. 

Art. 4. He shall rise to address the Coun- 
cil, or to put a question, but may read sitting. 

Art. 5. The President may call any mem- 
ber to the chair ; provided such substitution 
shall not continue longer than one meeting. 
When the Council shall determine to go into 
Committee of the Whole, the President shall 
appoint the member vfho shall take the chair. 
The President may express his opinion on any 
subject under debate ; but in such case, he 
shall leave the chair, and appoint some other 
member to take it ; and he shall not resume 
the chair while the same question is pending. 
But the President may state facts, ^nd give 



Kuks and Order.'! of the Vommuu Cuuncil. 

J lis opinion on questions of order, without 
leaving his place. 

Art. 6. On all questions and motions, the 
President shall take the sense of the Council 
by yeas and nays, provided one third of the 
members present shall so require. 

Art. 7. In all cases the President may 
vote. 

Art. 8. He shall propound all questions 
in the order in which they are moved, unless 
the subsequent motion shall be previous in its 
nature ; except that in naming sums and fixing 
times, the largest sum and longest time, shall 
be put first. 

Art. 9. After a motion is seconded and 
stated by the President, it shall be disposed of 
by vote of the Council, unless the mover with- 
draw it before a decision or amendment. 

Art. 10. When a question is under de- 
bate, the President shall receive no motion, 
but to adjourn, to lay on the table, for the 
previous question, to postpone to a day cer- 
tain, to commit, to amend, or to postpone in- 
definitely ; which several motions shall have 
precedence in the order in which they stand 
arranged. 



# 



16 Mules and Orders of the Common Council. 

Art. 11. He shall consider a motion to 
adjourn as always first in order ; and that mo- 
tion, and the motion to lay on the table, or to 
take from the table shall be decided without 
debate. 

Art. 12. He shall put the previous ques- 
tion in the following form: ^^ Shall the main 
question be now put?^^ — and all debate upon 
the main question shall be suspended, until 
the previous question shall be decided. After 
the adoption of the previous question, the 
sense of the Council shall forthwith be taken 
upon amendments reported by a committee, 
upon pending amendments, and then upon the 
main question. 

Art. 13. On the previous question no 
member shall speak more than once without 
leave ; and all incidental questions of order, 
arising after a motion is made for the pre- 
vious question, shall be decided without de- 
bate, except an appeal, and on such appeal, 
no member shall be allowed to speak more 
than once without leave of the Council. 

Art. 14. When two or more members 
happen to rise at once, the President shall 
name the member who is first to speak. 



Rules and Orders of the Common Council. 17 

Art. 15. All committees shall be appoint- 
ed and announced by the President, except 
such as the Council determine to elect by bal- 
lot. 

Rights and Duties of Members. 

Art. 16. When any member is about to 
speak in debate, or deliver any matter to the 
Council, he shall rise in his place, and re- 
spectfully address the presiding officer; shall 
confine himself to the question under debate, 
and avoid personality. He shall sit down as 
soon as he has done speaking. No member 
shall speak out of his place without leave of 

the President. 

Art. 17. No member, in debate shall 

mention another member by his name ; but 
may describe him by the ward he represents, 
or such other designation as may be intelligi- 
ble and respectful. 

Art. 18. No member speaking shall be 
interrupted by another, but by rising to call 
to order, or to correct a mistake. When a 
member is called to order, he shall immediate- 
ly sit down, unless permitted to explain ; and 
the Council, if appealed to, shall decide on 
the case without debate ; and if the decision 



18 liidrs mid Orders of tJir Common Council. 

is against the member he shall not be permit- 
ted to speak again on the question then in de- 
bate, unless by way of excuse for the same, 
until he has made satisfaction. 

Art. 19. No member shall speak more 
than twice to the same question, without leave 
of the Council ;• nor more than once, until all 
other members choosing to speak, shall have 
spoken; and if on the "previous question," no 
more than once without leave. 

Art. 20. When a motion is made and 
seconded, it shall be considered by the Coun- 
cil, and not otherwise ; and no member shall 
be permitted to submit a motion in writing, 
until he has read the same in his place, audit 
has been seconded. 

Art. 21. Every motion shall be reduced 
to writing, if the President direct, or any mem- 
ber of the Council request it. 

Art. 22. When a vote has passed, it shall 
be in order for any member of the majority^ 
to move for a reconsideration thereof, on the 
same or succeeding meeting, and if the mo- 
tion is seconded it shall be open to debate ; 
but if the motion to reconsider is not made 
till the next meeting the subject shall not be 



Rules and Orders of the Common Council. 19 

reconsidered unless a majority of the whole 
Council shall vote therefor. And no more 
than one motion for the reconsideration of any 
vote shall be permitted. 

Art. 23. No member shall be permitted 
to stand up, to the interruption of another, 
w^hilst any member is speaking, or to pass un- 
necessarily between the President and the 
person speaking. 

Art. 24. Every member who shall be in 
the Council when a question is put, shall vote, 
unless for special reasons excused. 

Art. 25. The division of a question may 
be called for, when the sense will admit of it. 

Art. 26. When the reading of a paper is 
called for, and the same is objected to by any 
member, it shall be determined by a vote of 
the Council. 

Art 27. No standing rule or order of the 
Council, shall be suspended, unless three- 
fourths of the members present shall consent 
thereto ; nor shall any rule or order be repeal- 
ed or amended, without one day's notice be- 
ing given of the motion therefor, nor unless 
a majority of the whole Council shall concur 
therein. 



20 Utiles and Orders of the Common Council. 

Art. 28. Every member shall take notice 
of the day and hour to which the Council may 
stand adjourned, and shall give his punctual 
attendance accordingly. 

Art. 29. No member shall be obliged to 
be on more than two Committees at the same 
time, nor to be Chairman of more than one. 

Of Communications, Committees, Reports, and 
Resolutions. 

Art. 30. All memorials and other papers 
addressed to the Council, shall be presented 
by the President, or by a member in his place, 
who shall explain the subject thereof, and 
they shall lie on the table, to be taken up in 
the order in which they are presented, unless 
the Council shall otherwise direct. 

Art. 31. Standing Committees of this 
Council shall be appointed on the following 
subjects, viz : On Elections and Returns, and 
on Enrolled Ordinances and Resolutions, each 
to consist of three members. 

Art. 32. No Committee shall sit during 
the sitting of the Council, without special 
leave. 



Rules and Orders of the Common Council. 21 

Art. 33. The rules of proceeding in Coun- 
cil shall be observed in Committee of the 
Whole, so far as they may be applicable, ex- 
cepting the rules limiting the times of speak- 
ing ; but no member shall speak twice to any 
question, until every member choosing to 
speak shall have spoken. 

Art. 34. When Committees of the Coun- 
cil, chosen by ballot, or Committees consist- 
ing of one member from each ward, have been 
appointed or elected, whether joint or other- 
wise, the first meeting thereof shall be notified 
by the Clerk, by direction of the President, 
and they shall organize by the choice of 
Chairman, and report to the Council ; and 
when Committees, other than as above speci- 
fied, are nominated by the President, the per- 
son first named shall be Chairman, and in 
case of the absence of the Chairman, the Com- 
mittee shall have power to appoint a Chair- 
man, pro tempore. 

Art,. 35. All messages to the Mayor and 
Aldermen, shall be drawn up by the Clerk 
and sent by the Messenger. 

Art. 36. All ordinances, resolutions, and 
orders shall have two several readings before 



2ii Rules and Orders of the Common Council. 

they shall be finally passed by this Council ; 
and all ordinances after being so passed, shall 
be enrolled. 

Art. 37. No ordinance, order or resolu- 
tion imposing penalties or authorising the ex- 
penditure of money, shall have more than one 
reading on the same day. 

Art. 38. The seats of the members of the 
Council shall be numbered and determined by 
lot : and no member shall change his seat but 
by permission of the President. 

Art. 39. All special committees, unless 
otherwise ordered, shall consist of three mem- 
bers. And no report shall be received from 
any Committee, unless agreed to in commit- 
tee assembled. 

Art. 40. The Clerk shall keep brief min- 
utes of the votes and proceedings of the Coun- 
cil, — entering thereon all accepted Orders and 
Resolutions ; — shall notice Reports, Memo- 
rials, and other papers submitted to the Coun- 
cil, only by their titles, or a brief description 
of their purport ; but all accepted Reports from 
special committees of this board, shall be en- 
tered at length in a separate journal, to be 



%* 



Rules and Ordirs of I he Common Counri/. 2)? 



kept for that purpose, and provided with an 
index. 

Aelt. 41. All salary officers shall be voted 
for by written ballot. 

Art. 42. It shall be the duty of all stand- 
ing committees of the Council, to keep rec- 
ords of all their doings in books provided for 
that purpose by the Clerk ; and it shall be the 
duty of the Clerk to attend the meetings of 
said committees, and make said records when 
requested so to do. 

Art. 43. No meeting of any committee 
shall be called upon less notice than twenty- 
four hours. 

Art. 44. In all elections by ballot, on the 
part of the Council, blank ballots, and all bal- 
lots for persons not eligible, shall be reported 
to the Council, but shall not be counted in 
making up the returns, except in cases where 
this Council have only a negative upon nom- 
inations made by the Mayor and Aldermen. 

Art.- 45. It shall be the duty of every 
Committee of the Council, to whom any sub- 
ject may be specially referred, to report there- 
on within four weeks from the time said subject 
is referred to them, or ask for further time. 



24 Rules and Orders of the Common Council. 

Art. 46. In any case, not provided for by 
the rules and orders of the City Council, the 
proceedings shall be conducted according to 
"Cushing's Manual of Parliamentary Prac- 
tice." 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

IN THE YEAR 

One Thousand Eight Hundred and Forty Seven. 

AN ACT TO ESTABLISH THE 

' CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives in General Court assembled, and by the 
authority of the same, as follows : 
Section 1. The inhabitants of the town of Charles- 
town, shall continue to be a body politic and corpo- 
rate, under the name of the City of Charlestown, and 
as such shall have, exercise and enjoy all the rights, 
immunities, powers and privileges, and shall be sub- 
ject to all the duties and obligations, now incumbent 
upon and appertaining to said town as a municipal 
corporation. 

Sect. 2. The administration of all the fiscal, pru- 
dential and municipal affairs of said city, with the 
government thereof, shall be vested in one principal 
officer, to be styled the Mayor ; one council of six to 
be called the Board of Aldermen ; and one council 
of eighteen, to be called the Common Council ; which 
boards,, in their joint capacity, shall be denominated 
the City Council, and the members thereof shall be 
sworn to the faithful performance of the duties of their 
respective offices. A majority of each board shall 
constitute a quorum for doing business, and no mem- 
ber of either shall receive any compensation for his 
services. 



26 City Charter. 

Sect. 3. It shall be the duty of the selectmen 
of the town of Charlestown, as soon as may be, after 
the passage of this act, and its acceptance by the in- 
habitants, as herein after provided, to divide said town 
into three wards, as nearly equal in number of inhab- 
itants as may be consistent with convenience in oth- 
er respects. And it shall be the duty of the city 
council, once in five years, to revise, and if it be 
needful, to alter said wards in such manner^ as to 
preserve as nearly as may be, an equal number of vo- 
ters in each ward. 

Sect. 4, On the second Monday in March, an- 
nually, there shall be chosen by ballot in each of said 
wards, a Warden, Clerk and three Inspectors of Elec- 
tions, who shall hold their offices for one year from 
the first Monday in April following said second Mon- 
day in March, and until others shall have been chosen 
in their places. And it shall be the duty of such 
warden, to preside at all ward meetings, with the 
powers ofmoderator of town meetings. And if at any 
meeting the warden shall not be present, the clerk of 
such ward shall call the meeting to order and preside, 
until a warden pro tempore shall be chosen by ballot. 
And if at any meeting the clerk shall not be present, 
a clerk pro tempore shall be chosen by ballot. The 
clerk shall record all the proceedings and certify the 
votes given, and deliver over to his successors in of- 
fice all such records and journals, together wath all 
other documents and papers held by him in said ca- 
pacity. And it shall be the duty of inspectors of 
elections, to assist the warden in receiving, assorting 
and counting the votes. And the warden, clerk and 
inspectors so chosen, shall respectively make oath or 
affirmation, faithfully and impartially to discharge 



City Charter. 2 7 

their several duties, relative to elections, which oath 
maybe administered by the clerk of such ward, to 
the warden, and by the warden to the clerk and in- 
spectors, or by any justice of the peace for the coun- 
ty of Middlesex. And all warrants for meetings of 
the citizens for municipal purposes, to be held either 
in wards or in general meetings, shall be issued by 
the mayor and aldermen, and shall be in such form, 
and shall be served, executed and returned in such 
manner, and at such times, as the city council may 
by any by-law direct. 

Sect. 5. The mayor and six aldermen, two al- 
dermen to be selected from each ward, shall be elect- 
ed by the inhabitants of the city, at large, voting in 
their respective wards, and six common councilmen 
shall be elected from and by each ward, being resi- 
dents of the wards in which they are elected ; all 
said officers shall be chosen by ballot, and shall hold 
their offices for one year from the first Monday in 
April, and the mayor until another shall be elected 
and qualified in his place. 

Sect. 6. On the second Monday in March, an- 
nually, the qualified voters in each ward shall give in 
their votes for mayor, aldermen and common coun- 
cilmen, warden, clerk and inspectors, as provided in 
the preceding sections ; and all the votes so given, 
shall be assorted, counted, declared and registered in 
open ward meeting, by causing the names of persons 
voted for, and the number of votes given for each, to 
be written in the ward records in words at length. — 
The clerk of the ward within twenty four hours after 
such election, shall deliver to the persons elected 
warden, clerk, inspectors and members of the com- 
mon council, certificates of their election^ signed by 



28 City Charter. 

the warden and clerk, and by a majority of the in-» 
spectors of elections, and shall deliver to the city 
clerk a copy of the records of such election certified 
in like manner ; provided however, that if the choice 
of warden, clerk, inspectors or common councilmen 
cannot be conveniently effected on that day, the 
meeting may be adjourned from time to time to com- 
plete such election. The board of aldermen shall, 
as soon as conveniently may be, examine the copies 
of the records of the several wards, certified as afore- 
said, and shall cause the person who may have been 
elected mayor, to be notified in writing of his elec- 
tion ; but if it shall appear that no person has receiv- 
ed a majority of all the votes, or if the person elected 
shall refuse to accept the office, the board shall is- 
sue their warrants for a new election, and the same 
proceedings shall be had as are herein before des- 
cribed, for the choice of mayor, and repeated from 
time to time until a mayor is chosen. In case of the 
decease, resignation or absence of the mayor, or of 
his inability to perform the duties of his office, it shall 
be the duty of the board of aldermen and the com- 
mon council in convention to order by vote, an en- 
try of that fact to be made in their records, and then 
to elect a mayor for the time being, to serve until an- 
other is chosen, or until the occasion causing the va- 
cancy is removed. And, if it shall appear that the 
whole number of aldermen have not been elected, 
the same proceedings shall be had, as are herein be- 
fore directed for choice of mayor. And each alder- 
man shall be notified in writing of his election, by the 
mayor and aldermen for the time being. The oath 
prescribed by this act shall be administered to the 
mayor by the city clerk, or any. justice of the peace 



City Char to-. 29 

for the county of Middlesex. The aldermen and 
common councilmen elect, shall, on the first Monday 
of April, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, meet in con- 
vention, when the oath required by this act, shall be 
administered to the members of the two boards pres- 
ent, by the mayor, or by any justice of the peace for 
the county of Middlesex, and a certificate of such 
oath having been taken, shall be entered on the jour- 
nal of the mayor and aldermen and of the com- 
mon council, by their respective clerks. And when- 
ever it shall appear that no mayor has been elected 
previously to the said first Monday in April, the 
mayor and aldermen for the time being, shall make 
a record of that fact ; an attested copy of which, the 
city clerk shall read at the opening of the convention 
to be held as aforesaid. After the oath has been ad- 
ministered as aforesaid, the two boards shall separate, 
and the common council shall be organized by the 
choice of a President and Clerk, to hold their office 
during the pleasure of the common council and to be 
sworn to the faithful performance of their duties. In 
case of the absence of the mayor elect, on the first 
Monday in April, the city government shall organize 
itself in the manner hereinbefore provided, and may 
proceed to business in the same manner as if the 
mayor were present, and the oath of office may be 
administered to the mayor at any time thereafter, in 
a conveiition of the two branches. In the absence 
of the mayor the board of aldermen may choose a 
chairman pro tempore, who shall preside at joint 
meetings of the two boards. Each board shall keep 
a record of its own proceedings, and judge of the elec- 
tions of its own members; and in failure of election, 



80 City Charter. 

, ♦ 

or in cases of vacancy, declared by either board, the 
mayor and aldermen shall order a new election. 

Sect. 7. The mayor, thus chosen and qualified, 
shall be the chief executive officer of said city. It 
shall be his duty to be vigilant in causing the laws 
and regulations of the city to be enforced, and to keep 
a general supervision over the conduct of all subordi- 
nate officers, with power to remove them for neglect 
of duty. He may call special meetings of the boards 
of aldermen and common council, or either of them 
when necessary in his opinion, by causing notices to 
be left at the places of residence of the several mem- 
bers ; he shall communicate, from time to time, to 
both of them, such information and recommend such 
measures, as in his opinion the interests of the city 
may require ; he shall preside in the board of alder- 
men, and in convention of the two branches, but shall 
have only a casting vote. The salary of mayor for 
the first year in which this charter shall take effect, 
shall be five hundred dollars, and no more ; his sala- 
ry shall afterwards be fixed by the city council, but 
neither increased nor diminished during the year for 
which he is chosen, and he shall have no other com- 
jjensation ; provided however, that the city council 
shall have power to appoint the mayor, commissioner 
of highways, when in their opinion such an officer is 
necessary, and allow him a suitable compensation 
therefor. 

Sect. 8. The executive power of said city gen- 
erally, and the administration of police, with all the 
powers heretofore vested in the selectmen of Charles- 
town, shall be vested in the mayor and aldermen, as 
fully as if the same were herein specially enumerated. 
And all other powers now vested in the inhabitants 



City Charter. 31 

♦ ^ 

of said town, as a municipal corporation, and all pow- 
ers granted by this act, not herein otherwise provided 
for, shall be vested in the mayor and aldermen and 
common council of said city, to be exercised by con^ 
current vote, each board to have a negative upon the 
other. And the mayor and aldermen shall have full 
and exclusive power to appoint a constable and as- 
sistants, or a city marshal and assistants, with the 
powers and duties of constables, and all other police 
officers ; and the same to remove at pleasure. And 
the mayor and aldermen may require any person ap- 
pointed a constable of the city, to give bonds with 
such security as they may deem reasonable, before he 
enters upon the duties of his office, upon which bonds 
the like proceedings and remedies may be had as are 
by law provided in case of constables bonds taken by 
the selectmen of towns. And the mayor and alder- 
men shall have the same power to grant licenses to 
inn-holders, victuallers and retailers, within the city, 
which is possessed by the mayor and aldermen of the 
city of Boston. The city council, shall, annually, 
as soon after their organization as may be convenient, 
elect, by joint ballot in convention, a Treasurer and 
Collector of taxes, and fix their compensations. They 
shall also, in such manner as they shall determine, 
appoint or elect all other subordinate officers, not 
herein otherwise directed, define their duties and fix 
their compensations. All sittings of the common 
council, shall be public, and all sittings of the mayor 
and aldennen, when they are not engaged in execu- 
tive business. The city council shall take care that 
no moneys be paid from the treasury unless granted 
or appropriated ; shall secure a just and proper ac- 
countability by requiring bonds with sufficient penal- 



33 City Charter. 

ties and sureties, from all persons trusted with the 
receipt, custody or disbursement of money ; shall have 
the care and superintendence of the city buildings, 
with the power to let, or to sell what may be legally 
sold ; and to purchase property, real or personal, in 
the name and for the use of the city, whenever its in- 
terest or convenience may in their judgment require 
it. And the city council shall, as often as once in 
a year, cause to be published, for the use of the in- 
habitants, a particular account of the receipts and ex- 
penditures, and a schedule of city property. 

Sect. 9. In all cases in which appointments are 
directed to be made by the mayor and aldermen, the 
mayor shall have the exclusive power of nomination, 
such nomination, however, being subject to be con- 
firmed or rejected by the board of aldermen ; provid- 
ed however, that no person shall be eligible to any 
office of emolument, the salary of which is payable 
out of the city treasury, who, at the time of such ap- 
pointment, shall be a member of the board of alder- 
men or of the common council. 

Sect. 10. The City Clerk shall be clerk of the 
board of aldermen, and shall be sworn to the faithful 
performance of his duties. He shall perform such 
duties as shall be prescribed by the board of alder- 
men, and he shall perform all the duties and exercise 
all the powers, by law incumbent upon or vested in 
tbe town clerk of the town of Charlestown. He shall 
be chosen for one year, and until another shall be 
chosen and qualified in his place, but may be at any 
time removed by the city council. 

Sect. 11. The citizens, at their respective annu- 
al ward meetings for the choice of officers, shall elect 
by ballot two persons in each ward to be overseers of 



city Charter. ,33 

the poor, and the persons thus chosen, together with 
the mayor, shall constitute the board of Overseers of 
the Poor, and shall have all the powers and be sub- 
ject to all the duties now by law appertaining to the 
overseers of the poor for the town of Charlestown. — 
And the citizens shall at the same time, and in the 
same manner, elect five persons from the city at large, 
and two persons from each ward to be members of 
the school committee, and the persons thus chosen 
shall constitute the School Committee, and have the 
care and superintendence of the public schools ; and 
said school committee shall have all the powers and 
privileges and be subject to all the liabilities set forth 
in an act passed by the Legislature of Massachusetts 
in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred 
and ninety-three, entitled an act to incorporate cer- 
tain persons by the name of the Trustees of Charles- 
town Free Schools, and all acts in addition thereto. 
And the persons chosen by the city council as asses- 
sors, shall constitute the Board of Assessors, and shall 
exercise the powers and be subject to the duties and 
liabilities of assessors in towns. All taxes shall be 
assessed, apportioned and collected in the manner 
prescribed by law relative to town taxes ; provided 
however, that it shall be lawful for the city council 
to establish further additional provisions for the col- 
lection thereof. Should there fail to be a choice of 
overseers of the poor, or members of the school com- 
mittee, the vacancy or vacancies shall be filled by 
the city council in convention, in the same manner 
that is provided for filling vacancies in the Senate of 
this Commonwealth. 

Sect. 12, The city council shall have exclusive 
authority and power to lay out any new street or 



34 C'lfy Cliarter, 

town way, and to estimate the damages any individ- 
ual may sustain thereby, but all questions relating to 
the subject of laying out, accepting, altering or dis- 
continuing any street or way, shall first be acted up- 
on by the mayor and aldermen. And any person 
dissatisfied with the decision of the city council in the 
estimate of damages, may make complaint to the 
County Commissioners of the county of Middlesex, 
at any meeting held within one year after such deci- 
sion, whereupon the same proceedings shall be had 
as are now provided by the laws of this common- 
wealth in cases where persons are aggrieved by the 
assessment of damages by selectmen, in the twenty- 
fourth chapter of the Revised Statutes. 

Sect. 13. All power and authority now by law 
vested in the board of health for the town of Charles- 
town, or in the selectmen of said town, shall be trans- 
ferred to, and vested in the city council, to be car- 
ried into execution in such manner as the city coun- 
cil shall deem expedient. 

Sect. 14. The city council shall have authority 
to cause drains and common sewers to be laid down 
through any street or private lands paying the own- 
ers such damages as they may sustain thereby ; and 
to require all persons to pay a reasonable sum for 
the privilege of opening any drain into said public 
drain or common sewer. And the city council may 
make by-laws with suitable penalties for the inspec- 
tion, survey, measurement and sale of lumber, wood, 
coal and bark, brought into the city for sale. 

Sect. 15. It shall be the duty of the city coun- 
cil annually, in the month of October, to meet in con- 
vention and determine the number of representatives 
to be elected by the city to the General Court in 



City Charier. 35 

such year, which shall be conclusive, and the num- 
ber thus determined shall be specified in the warrant 
calling meetings for the election of representatives. 

Sect. 16. All elections for County, State and 
United States officers, who are voted for by the peo- 
ple, shall be held at meetings of the citizens, quali- 
fied to vote in such elections, in their respective 
wards, at the time fixed by law for these elections re- 
spectively ; and at such meetings all the votes, given 
for said several officers respectfully, shall be assorted, 
counted, declared and registered in open ward meet- 
ing, by causing the names of all persons voted for, 
and the number of votes given for each, to be written 
in the ward record in words at length. The ward 
clerk shall forthwith deliver to the city clerk, a cer- 
tified copy of the record of such elections. The city 
clerk shall forthwith record such returns, and the 
mayor and aldermeh shall, within two days after eve- 
ry such election, examine and compare all said re- 
turns, and make out a certificate of the result of such 
elections, to be signed by the mayor and a majority 
of the aldermen, and also by the city clerk, which 
shall be transmitted or delivered in the same manner 
as similar returns are by law directed to be made by 
selectmen of towns. And in all elections for repre- 
sentatives to the General Court, in case the whole 
number proposed to be elected shall not be chosen 
by a majority of the votes legally returned, the may- 
or and aldermen shall forthwith issue their warrant 
for a new election, conformable to the provisions of 
the constitution and the laws of the commonwealth. 

Sect. 17. Prior to every election, the mayor and 
aldermen shall make out lists of all the citizens of 
each ward qualified to vote in such elections, in the 



36 City Charter. 

manner in which selectmen of towns are required to 
make out hsts of voters ; and for that purpose they 
shall have full access to the assessors' books and list, 
and be entitled to the assistance of all assessors, as- 
sistant assessors and city officers, and they shall de- 
liver said lists, so prepared and corrected, to the 
clerks of said wards to be used at such elections ; and 
no person shall be entitled to vote whose name is not 
borne on such list. 

Sect. 18. General meetings of the citizens qual- 
ified to vote, may, from time to time be held, to con- 
sult upon the public good ; to instruct their represent- 
atives, and to take all lawful measures to obtain re- 
dress for any grievances, according to the right secur- 
ed to the people by the constitution of this common- 
wealth. And such meetings may and shall be duly 
warned by the mayor and Aldermen, upon the requi- 
sition of fifty qualified voters. 

Sect. 19. For the purpose of organizing the sys- 
tem of government hereby established and putting 
the same into operation in the first instance, the se- 
lectmen of the town of Charlestown, for the time be- 
ing, shall, on some day during the months of March 
or April of the present year, issue their warrants 
seven days at least previous to the day appointed, 
calling meetings of the said citizens at such place and 
hour as they may deem expedient, for the purpose of 
choosing a warden, clerk and inspectors for each 
ward, and all other officers whose election is provid- 
ed for in the preceding sections of this act ; and said 
selectmen shall appoint for this first meeting a war- 
den, clerk and three inspectors of elections for each 
ward, which officers shall be sworn to the faithful 
discharge of their duties, and the transcript of the 



City Charter. 37 

records of each ward, specifying the votes given for 
the several officers aforesaid, certified by the warden, 
and clerk of such ward, at said first meeting, shall be 
returned to the said selectmen, whose duty it shall 
be to examine and compare the same, and in case 
said elections should not be completed at the first 
meeting, then to issue new warrants until such elec- 
tions shall be completed ; and to give notice thereof 
in the manner hereinbefore directed, to the several 
persons elected. And at said first meeting a list of 
voters in each ward, prepared and corrected by the 
selectmen for the time being, shall be delivered to 
the clerk of each ward, when appointed, to be used 
as hereinbefore directed. And the selectmen shall 
appoint such time for the first meeting of the city 
council, as they may judge proper, after the choice 
of city officers as aforesaid, or a majority of the mem- 
bers of both branches, not later than the first Monday 
in May, in the year one thousand eight hundred and 
forty-seven, and shall also fix upon the place and the 
hour of said first meeting, and a written notice thereof 
shall be sent by said selectmen, to the place of abode 
of each of the city officers chosen, as provided in this 
section. And after this first election of city officers, 
and this first meeting for the organization of the city 
council, as in this section is provided, the day of hold- 
ing the annual elections, and the day and hour for 
the meeting of the city council, for the purpose of or- 
ganization, shall remain as provided in the sixth sec- 
tion of this act. And it shall be the duty of the city 
council, immediately after the first organization, to 
elect all necessary city officers, who shall hold their 
offices respectively until others are chosen and quali- 
fied. And at the meetings to be called as prescribed 



38 City Charter. 

in this section for the choice of ward and city officers, 
the said inhabitants may, and shall also give in their 
votes for county officers, which votes shall be record- 
ed, certified and returned in the manner provided in 
the sixteenth section of this act. 

Sect. 20, The city council shall have power to 
make all such salutary and needful by-laws, as towns, 
by the laws of this commonwealth, have power to 
make and establish, and to annex penalties not ex-* 
ceeding twenty dollars, for the breach thereof, which 
by-laws shall take effect, and be in force, from and 
after the time therein respectively limited, without 
the sanction of any court, or other authority whatev- 
er ; provided however, that all laws and regulations 
now in force in the town of Charlestown, shall, until 
they shall expire by their own limitation, or be re- 
vised or repealed by the city council, remain in force ; 
and all fines and forfeitures for the breach of any by- 
laws, or ordinance, shall be paid into the city treas- 
ury. 

Sect. 21. The annual town meeting for the town 
of Charlestown, which by law is to be held in the 
month of March, is hereby suspended, and all town 
officers now in office, shall hold their places until this 
act shall go into operation, and in case this charter 
shall not be accepted in the manner and form as here- 
inafter provided, then the selectmen shall issue their 
warrant according to law, for holding the annual town 
meeting of the inhabitants, in which all the proceed- 
ings shall be the same, as if this act had not been 
passed. 

Sect. 22. All officers of the town of Charles- 
town, having the care and custody of the records, pa- 
pers or property belonging to said town, shall deliver 



City Charter. 139 

the same to the city clerk, within one week after his 
entering upon the duties of his office. 

Sect. 23. All such acts, and parts of acts, as 
are inconsistent with the provisions of this act, shall 
be and the same are, hereby repealed. 

Sect. 24. Nothing in this act contained shall be 
so construed as to prevent the Legislature from alter- 
ing or amending the same, whenever they shall deem 
it expedient. 

Sect. 25. This act shall be void, unless the in- 
habitants of the town ofCharlestown, at a legal town 
meeting, called for that purpose, shall, by a vote ofa 
majority of the voters present and voting thereon, by 
a written ballot, determine to adopt the same within 
twenty days from and after its passage, at which 
meeting the polls shall be kept open not less than 
six hours, and the presiding officer in receiving said 
ballots shall use the check list, in the same manner 
as they are used in elections. 

Sect. 26. This act shall go into operation from 
and after its passage. 

House of Representatives, February 20th, 1847. 
Passed to be enacted : 

Eben. Bradbuky, Speaker. 

In Senate, February 22d, 1847. 
Passed to be enacted ; 

W. B. Calhoun, President. 
February 22d, 1847. 

Approved : GEO. N. BRIGGS. 

Secretary's Office, February 25th, 1847. 

I certify the within to be a true copy of the 
original Act. John G. Palfrey, 

Secretary of the Commonwealth. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSAeHDSETTS* 

In the year 
One Thousand Eight Hundred and Forty-Seven, 

AN ACT TO AMEND AN ACT TO ESTABLISH 
THE 

CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 

Be it ENACTED by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives in General Court assembled, and by the 
authority of the same, as follows : 
Section 1. The qualified voters of each ward at 
their respective annual ward meetings for the choice 
of officers, shall elect by ballot two persons, who 
shall be residents of the ward for which they are 
elected, to be overseers of the poor ; and the mayor, 
together with the persons thus chosen, shall consti- 
tute the Board of Overseers of the Poor. And at 
the same time and in the same manner, the qualified 
voters of the City shall elect five persons from the 
city at large, and the qualified voters of each w^rd 
shall elect two persons, who shall be residents of the 
ward for which they are elected, to be members of 
the school committee, and the eleven persons thus 
chosen shall constitute the School Committee. 

Sect. 2. The elections of overseers of the poor 
and school committee made on the fifth and nine- 
teenth days of April in the year one thousand eight 
hundred and forty-seven, under the provisions of the 
act to estaWish the City of Charlestown, passed on 



An Amendment to the City Charter 41 

the twenty-second day of February in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and forty-seven, are hereby 
confirmed. 

Sect. 3. Such parts of the eleventh section of 
said act as are inconsistent Ijerewith are hereby re- 
pealed. 

Sect. 4. This act shall take effect from and af- 
ter its passage. 

House of Representatives, April 24th, 1847. 
Passed to be enacted : 

Eben. Bradbury, Speaker. 

In Senate, April 24th, 1847. 
Passed to be enacted : 

W. B. Calhoun, President. 

April 24th, 1847. 

Approved : GEO. N. BRIGGS. 

Secretary's Office, April 24th, 1847. 

I certify the foregoing to be a true copy of the 
original act. John G. Palfrey, 

Secretary. 



GOVERNMENT 



OF THE 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 

1847. 



MAYOR. 

GEO. WASHINGTON WARREN. 

Monument Square. 



ALDEKMEN, 

Ward No. 1. 
DEXTER BOWMAN, 29 Washington street. 

EBENEZER BARKER, 4 Harvard Row. 

Ward No. 2. 
THOMAS HOOPER, 168 Main street. 

PHINEHAS J. STONE, 25 Concord street. 

Ward No 3. 
PAUL WILLARD, 38 High street. 

JOHN CHEEVER, 129 Main street. 



COMMON COUNCIL. 

CHARLES W. MOORE, President, 

No. 3 Alston street. 



City Officers 



43 



Ward No. 1. 



Melvin Simmons, 
Kendall Bailey 2d, 
Jacob Caswell, 
Henry A. Pierce, 
Moses G. Cobb, 
Edward Riddle, 



11 Riclimond street. 

12 Warren street. 

3 Chestnut street. 
9 Harvard row. 

4 Bow street. 
99 Main street 



Ward No. 2. 



P. S. Briggs, 
John Sanborn, 
Ichabod Lindsey, 
Marshall Blanchard, 
Philip B. Holmes, 
Jesse Mann, 



15 Adams street. 

10 Tufts street. 

4 Concord street. 

7 Bunker Hill street. 

Hancock street. 

30 Bunker Hill street. 



Ward No. 3. 



David C. Willis, 
James Damon, 
Joseph Young, 
Seth W. Lewis, 
William S. Fretch, 



21 Lawrence street. 
Bunker Hill street. 
237 Main street. 

Cor. N. Pleasant and Bartlett st. 

Salem street. 



CITY CLERK. 

DAVID DODGE, Cor. Austm and Richmond st. 

CITY CLERK PRO TEMPORE. 

ABRAHAM B. SHEDD, 15 Oak street. 

CLERK OF COMMON COUNCIL. 

PAUL WILLARD, Jr., 38 High Street. 

Messenger to the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Nathaniel Pratt, No. 4 Call street. 

Messenger to the Common Council. 

George L Lindsey, No. 4 Concord street. 



44 City Officers. 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES. 



ON FINANCE. 

The Mayor and the President of the Common Coun- 
cil, and Messrs. Pierce and Briggs. 

ON ACCOUNTS. 

Aldermen Hooper and Stone, and Messrs. Willis, - 
Caswell and Fretch. 

ON PUBLIC PROPERTY. 

Aldermen Bowman and Cheever, and Messrs. 
Simmons, Holmes and Damon. 

ON PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. 

The Mayor and Alderman Willard, the Presi- 
dent of the Common Council, and Messrs. Lindsey 
and Pierce. 

ON POOR AND ALMS HOUSE. 

i The Mayor and Alderman Bowman, the Presi- 
dent of the Common Council, and Messrs Sanborn 
and Bailey 2d. 

ON FUEL AND LIGHTING STREETS. 

The Mayor, and Messrs. Briggs and Mann, 

ON FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Aldermen Barker and Cheever, and Messrs. Lewis, 
Blanchard and Lindsey. 

ON HIGHWAYS, BRIDGES AND SIDEWALKS, 

The Mayor and Alderman Stone, Messrs. Pierce, 
Youns: and Damon. 



City Officers. 45 

ON MAIN DRAINS AND COMMON SEWERS. 

The Mayor and Alderman Barker, Messrs. Briggs, 
Lewis and Riddle. 

ON THE SQ,UARE AND PUBLIC COMMONS. 

The Mayor, President of Com. Council and Mr. Cobb. 

ON PRINTING. 

Alderman Willard, and Messrs. Holmes and 
Caswell. 

Joint Special Committee on alterations of City Hall. 

The Mayor and Alderman Barker, and Messrs, 
Lindsey, Pierce and Willis. 



STANDING COxMMITTEES 

OF MAYOR AND ALDEUMEX. 



ON THE POLICE OF THE CITY. 

The Mayor, and Aldermen Willard and Barker. 

ON LICENSES. 

Aldermen Willard, Cheever and Hooper. 

ON LAYING OUT AND WIDENING STREETS. 

Aldermen Barker, Hooper, and Stone. 

ON ENROLLMENT. 

Aldermen Bowman, Stone and Cheever. 

ON BURIAL GROUNDS. 

Alderman Hooper. 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

01' THE COMMON COUKCII.. 

ON ELECTIONS AND RETURNS. 

Messrs. CasN^ell. Sanborn and Fretch. 



46 City Officers. 

ON ENROLLED ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Messrs. Briggs, Simmons and Lewis. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Amos Stone, 6 Salem street. 

ASSESSORS. 

Timothy Fletcher, 24 High street, 

Thomas Greenleaf, 2 Adams street. 

John Wesson, 14 Washington street. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Ward No. 1. The Mayor, Chairman Ex. OfF. 
John Gregory, Washington street. 

Alfred Carlton, Main street. 

Ward No. 2. 
Ichabod Lindsey, Concord street. 

Richard C. Bazin, Cross street. 

Ward No. 3. 
Francis Turner, Neck Village. 

Thomas Greenleaf, Sec'y-j 2 Adams street. 



KEEPER OF THE ALMS HOUSE. 

Albert Eaton. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

William. M. Edmands, Main street. 

PUBLIC WEIGHER AND GUAGER. 

Edward T. Thompson. Henley j)lace. 

FIELD DUIVERS. 

Asa B. Barker, Theodore T. Dearing and Joseph 
Underwood. 

WEIGHER or VESSELS. 

John Wesson, 14 Washington .street. 



OiUj Officers. 47 



FUNERAL UNDERTAKERS. 



Caleb SyjnmeSj 4 Joiner street. 

Nathaniel Pratt, 4 Call street. 

Patrick Denvir, Austin street. 



SURVEYORS OF LUMBER. 



Loammi Kendall, Stephen Fuller, 

Thomas J. Elliott, J. B. Wilson 2d, 

Edward A. Ward, Aaron Clarke 2d, 

Joseph Burrell, George W. White, 

Calvin Simonds, Jr., William Phipps, 

Isaac Kendall, James M. Phipps, 

Oliver Kimball, Joshua Magoun. 



MEASURERS OF WOOD AND BARK. 



William Phipps, Nathan Josselyn, 

Samuel Cutter, James M. Phipps, 

Thomas J. Elliott, Godfrey B. Albee, 

Abram Chamberlin. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



ENGINEERS. 



Isaac Cook, Chief Engineer, Chestnut street. 
Henry Conn, 1st Ass't. Henley street. 

James M. Gardner, 2d Ass't. Edgarton street. 
Stephen P. Kelley, 3d Ass't. Walker street. 

ENGINES. 

Hancock No. 1. 
David S. Tucker, Foreman, Walker street. 

BimJcer Hill No 2. 
John Howard, Foreman, Mead street. 

Hoivard No. 3. 
Thomas Barker Jr, Foreman, Main street. 



48 CiUj Officers, 

Warren No 4. 
James Poor, Foreman, Lawrence street. 

Washington No. 5. 
Samuel F. Tilden, Foreman, Chelsea street. 

FranTclin No. 7. 
Henry P. Gardner, Foreman, Edgarton street. 

Warren HooTc and Ladder Co. 
Robert Todd, Foreman, Washington street. 

Hose Co. 
E. W. Brackett Foreman, Austin street. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

CITY MAllSHAL. 

Richard Nichols, Johnson Avenue. 

DEPUTY CITY MARSHAL. 

Adolphus J. Carter, Lawrence street. 

CONSTABLES. 

Richard Nichols, Abram Chamberlain, Charks 

R. Knights, Charles Sanderson, Adolphus J. Carter, 

and Theodore T. Dearing. 

SUNDAY POLICE. 

Adolphus J. Carter, Isaac Sargeant and Asa B. 
Barker. 



WATCHMEN OF THE NIGHT. 

Watch No. 1. 

Charles Sanderson, Captain; George Richardson, 

Francis Powers, Charles Parkenson, John Sawtell, 

and Moran Knights. 



City Officers. 49 

Watch No. 2. 
Adolphus J. Carter, Captain, Jonathan Bartlett, 
Stephen Fosdick, A. L. Melvin, Joshua W. Lincoln, 
and Judah Wetherbee, 
TVatch No. 3. 
Ebenezer Parker, Captain, Joseph Davis, Mo- 
ses G. Flanders, Asa B. Barker, Ephraim Chandler, 
and John W. Smith. 

Watch No. 4. 

Stephen Fuller, Captain, William Norton, John 

C. Hutchinson, Harry Sanderson, Augustus Taylor, 

and Nelson Cutter. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE AT LARGE. 



Edward Thorndike, J. W. Bemis, Geo. Farrar, 

John Sanborn, and James Adams. 

Ward No. 1. 

Seth J. Thomas and George A. Parker. 

Ward No. 2. 

N. Y. Culbertson and James Miskelly. 

Ward No. 3. 

Henry K. Frothingham and Joseph F. Tufts. 

SCHOOLS. 

Warren School, 

CORNER OF SALEM HILL AND SUaiMER STREET. 

Calvin S. Pennell, Grammar Master — salary ^900. 

Residence — No. 11, Oak street 

Joseph T. Swan, Writing Master— salary $900. 

Residence— Bunker Hill street. 



-50 City Officers. 

Francis H. Clark, Emeline Brown, Sarah G. Hay, 
and Sarah T. Chandler, Assistants. 

Winihrop School. 
Winslow Battles, Grammar Master — salary ^900, 
"Stacy Baxter, Writing Master — salary $900. 

Residence — Green street. 

Mary L. Rowland, Elizabeth D. Moulton, Julia E, 
Hinckley, aiid Evelina A. Flint, Assistants. 

Harvard School. 

ON HARVARD STREET. 

Paul H. Sweetser, Grammar Master — salary $900. 

Residence — South Reading. 

Robert Swan, Writing Master — salary $900. 

Residence — Dorchester. 

Mary J. Whiting, Rebecca Drake, Frances T. Hol- 
land, and Maria L. Thompson, Assistants. 

Bunker Hill School. 

AT THE NECK, ON BUNKER FILL STREET. 

■Benjamin F. Tweed, Grammar Master — salary $900^ 

Residence — Cor. of Green and Bunlier Hill st. 

Mary S. Lewis and Lucretia Foster, Assistants. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

LOCATION. TEACHERS' NAMES. 

3\o. 1. Near B. H. school, Caroline Phipps. 

2. Mead street, Malvina B. Skelton, 

3. Rear 187 Main St., E. M, Sweetser, 

4. Warren school house, M. A. Chandler. 

5. Elm street, E. D. Pratt. 

6. " " F. A. Sawyer. 

7. Rear 162 Main st., S, L. Sawyer. 







€ity Oficers. ■ 51 


u 


8. 


Cross street, 


Mary J. Chandler. 


ii 


9. 


i( a 


S. F. Brown. 


li 


10. 


Common street. 


Elizabeth Ernes, 


li 


11. 


a (( 


Jane S. Putnam. 


a 


12. 


Bow street. 


J. M. Burckes. 


u 


13. 


a li 


M. E. Lincoln. 


u 


14. 


a a 


S. E. Smith. 


(C 


15. 


li li 


S. E. Clark. 


(C 


16. 


Harvard street, 


A. E. Hinckley. 


(C 


17. 


At the Point. 


S. J. Bradbury. 


cc 


18. 


a 11 


C. Brackett. 


C( 


19. 


Moulton street. 


M. M. Sanborn 


ii 


20. 


Common street. 


M. A. C. Bodge, 


ii 


21. 


Sullivan street, 


C. A. Goodridge. 






WARD OrFICEES. 



Ward No. 1. 

John Wesson, Warden ; Lenthel W. Phillips, Clerk; 

Caleb Rand, John B. Wilson and William W. 

Pierce, Inspectors. 

Ward No. 2. 

Jonathan Locke, Warden ; E. D. Pierce, Clerk ; 

P. S. Briggs, Jotham Barry Jr., and A. P. 

Baxter, Inspectors. 



52 City Officers. 

Ward No. 3 

Timothy Fletcher, Warden ; E. P. Brigham, Clerk ; 

Hu-am P. Remick, G. B. Albee and George E. 

Edmands, Inspectors. 



SURVEYOR OF MASON WORK AND MATERIALS, 

Samuel L. Tuttle. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



The Mayor and Aldermen. 

HEALH OFFICER. 

Richard Nichols. 



SUPPLEMENT. 

Page 42 — Alderman Willard's name should be in Ward 2, 
and Alderman Hooper's in Ward 3. 

Page 47 — Surveyors of Lumber — in Addition. 

Nathan Josselyn and Samuel T. Johnson. 

Same page. 

Nathan Josselyn, oot a Measurer of Wood and Bark. 



CITY ORDINANCES. 



(No. 1.) 
CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 

In the Year One Thousand Eight Hundred and 
Forty-Seven. 

AN ORDINANCE 

Directing the form of Warrants, and the manner of 
serving, executing and returning the same : 
Be it ordained, by the City Council of the city 
of Charlestown, as follows : 

Section 1. The form of Warrants, for calling 
meetings of the citizens of the several Wards, shall 
be as follows, to wit : 

"City of Charlestown. 
[seal] 

To either Constable of the City of Charles- 
town, Greeting : In the name of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, you are hereby required, forthwith, 
to warn the citizens of Ward No. — , qualified to vote 

as the law directs, to assemble at , on 

, the ■ day of , at 9 o'clock in the 

forenoon, then and there to give in their ballots for 



S4 City Ordinances. 



Hereof fail not, and have you there this warrant 
with your doings thereon. 

Witness, — — , Mayor of our said city 

of Charlestown, on this day of , in the- 

year of our Lord orte thousand eight hundred and 



By order of th^e Mayor and Aldermen, 

— , City Clerk." 

Sect. 2. The form of Warrants, for calling gene- 
ral meetings of the citizens qualified to vote, shall be- 
as follows, to wit :■ 

"City of Charlestown. 
|seal] 

To the Constables of the City of Charlestown y 
Greeting : In the name of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, you are hereby required forthwith tO' 
warn the citizens of Charlestown, qualified to vote as 
the law directs, to assemble in general meeting at the 

City Hall, on the day of at 

o'clock, — . M., then and there to 

Hereof fail not, and have you there this warrant 
with your doings thereon. 

Witness, , Mayor of our said City 

of Charlestown, on this day of , in the 

year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 



By order of the Mayor and Aldermen, 

, City Clerk." 

Sect. 3. All warrants, whether for calling gene- 
ral meetings or for calling meetings of the citizens of 
the several wards, shall be issued by the Mayor and 
Aldermen seven days at least before the time for 
holding the same; they shall be signed by the City 
Clerk, and shall be served by either constable of the 



City Oi'dinanccs. 5S 



'City, by leaving a copy thereof at the residence of 
each citizen quahfied to vote at the meetings called 
thereby, and by posting a copy thereof near the place 
■of said meeting. And the constable to whom any 
warrant shall be delivered for service, shall seasona- 
bly return the same with his doings thereon, to the 
Mayor and Aldermen, if it be for calling a general 
meeting, otherwise to the Warden of the ward named 
therein. 

Sect. 4. For the election of all officers, except 
Warden, Clerk and Inspectors, the polls shall be 
^opened at nine of the clock in the morning, and clos- 
•ed at four o'clock in the afternoon. 

Passed, May 10, 1847. 



(No. 2,) 
An Ordinance authorising the appointment and pre- 
scribing the duties of City Marshal. 

Se it Ordmned, hy the City Council of the City of 

Charlestown, as follows : 

Sect. 1. The Mayor and Aldermen shall forth- 
with, and hereafter, in the month of May, annually, 
appoint a City Marshal — who shall remain in office 
one year, unless removed as hereinafter provided. 

Sect. 2. Said city marshal shall be also 
'Constable ; and during his continuance in the office 
of city Marshal, shall have precedence and command 
•over the other Constables, whenever engaged 
;in the same service, or when directed tiiereto by the 
-Mayor and Aldermen. 

Sect. 3. The said city marshal before entering 



.56 City Ordinnnce^. 



upon the duties of his office, shall take the oath of of-^ 
fice as by law provided for Constables ; and 
he shall give bond in the sum of Five Hundred 
Dollars, with surety, to be approved by the Mayor 
and Aldermen, for the faithful performance of his 
said office. 

Sect. 4. The City Marshal shall whenever au^ 
thorised by the Mayor and Aldermen, employ one or 
more deputies, who shall be approved by the Mayor 
and Aldermen, who shall in like manner, take the 
oaths of office ; whereupon such deputy shall have 
power and authority to assist the City Marshal, in the 
execution of his office, or in his absence, to officiate 
in his stead; the City Marshal being always responsi- 
ble for his deputies. 

Sect. 5. It shall be the duty of the City Marshal, 
from time to time, as often as once a week, to pass 
through all the streets, alleys and courts of the city, 
to observe nuisances, obstructions and impediments 
therein, to the end that the same may be removed or 
prosecuted according to law ; to notice all offences 
against the laws and orders in being, taking the names 
of offenders, for the purpose of prosecuting them ; to 
receive all complaints of the citizens against any 
breach of the laws ; to obey and execute all com- 
mands of the Mayor and Aldermen in relation to any 
matter or thing concerning the city ; to superintend 
the night watch and report their doings, once a week 
or oftener to the Mayor, to institute all prosecutions 
against offenders of the laws or City Ordinances, and 
to attend regularly and punctually on all trials of of- 
fenders prosecuted on behalf of the city, in any court 
whate"'er;and for the convenience of the citizens having 
business with the City Marshal, he shall attend daily at 



City Ordinances. 57 

some stated hour, in some central and public office, 
of which due notice shall be given ; and further to 
perform all such other and additional duties, and to 
comply with all such regulations as may at any time 
be prescribed to him by the Mayor and Aldermen. 

Sect. 6. The Mayor and Aldermen may at any 
time, by vote, remove from office the said City Mar- 
shal ; and thereupon appoint a successor, and in like 
manner appoint, in case of death or resignation. 

Sect. 7, The city marshal shall be compensa- 
ted according to such ordinance as the City Council 
may hereafter establish and ordain. 

Passed, May 10, 1847. 



(No. 3.) 

An Ordinance concerning the Ordinances of the City; 

the Orders of the Mayor and Aldermen, and the 

printed documents of either Branch, 

Be it Ordained, by the City Council of the City of 

Charlesiown, as follows : 

Sect. 1. All Ordinances which shall be passed 
by the Mayor and Aldermen, and by the Common 
Council of said city, shall be engrossed or recorded, 
by the City Clerk, in a fair and legible hand, with- 
out interlineation, or erasure, and in the order in which 
they shall be passed, in a book to be kept for that 
purpose, made of strong linen paper, with proper mar- 
gins and index, and strongly bound, to be lettered 
"Record of Ordinances of the City of Charlestown," 
which book shall be preserved in the office of the Ci- 
ty Clerk, subject to the inspection of the citizens. 



58 City Ordinances: 

Sect. 2. All said ordinances, and also all the 
orders of the Mayor and Aldermen shall be published 
and promulgated by causing the same to be inserted 
three weeks successively in such newspapers as shall 
be printed and published in the city ; and the Mayor 
may, in his discretion, cause any ordinance or order 
to be printed and distributed by the Marshal or Con- 
stables among the citizens. 

Sect. 3. All reports and other documents which 
may be ordered by either branch to be printed, shall 
under the direction of the joint standing committee, 
be printed on good paper and in a uniform manner ; 
and in addition to the number which may be ordered 
by either branch, there shall always be printed fifty 
extra copies of each report and document so ordered 
to be printed, forty of which may be sent by the May- 
or, with a printed copy of this section, to the Mayors 
of such other cities, and to such other public institu- 
tions as he may designate ; all documents which may 
be sent to the Mayor in exchange therefor, shall be by 
him preserved for the use of the city, and they shall 
from time to time be arranged, bound and lettered 
under his direction, in a suitable manner, and shall 
always remain in the room of the Mayor and Alder- 
men ; and the remaining ten copies shall be retained 
in the possession of the City Clerk, who shall at the 
end of each year cause the same to be bound and let- 
tered in a uniform style, and when bound one series 
shall be deposited in each of the following rooms, 
namely := — of the Mayor and Aldermen, of the Com- 
mon Council, of the School Committee, of the Over- 
seers of the Poor, of the Engineers of the Fire De- 
partment, of the Assessors, of the Treasurer, and the 



City Ordinances. 59 

remainder shall be safely kept by the City Clerk. 
Passed, May 24, 1847. 



(No. 4.) 

An Ordinance prescribing the mode of appointing 

certain City Officers. 

Be it Ordained, by the City Council of the City of 

Charlestown, as follows : 

The Mayor and Aldermen of the said city are 
hereby authorized to appoint for the current and every 
succeeding municipal year, the following city officers, 
to wit : — Field Drivers, Fence Viewers, Health Offi- 
cers, Fish Officers, Sealer of Weights and Measures, 
Surveyors of Lumber, Measurers of Wood and Bark, 
Hay Weighers, Sealers of Leather and Coal Baskets, 
Pound Keepers, and such other officers as may be 
necessary or convenient to the public, unless some 
other provision for the time being shall be made by 
the City Council. 

Passed, May 31, 1847. 



(No. 5.) 
An Ordinance establishing the office of Superintendent 
of Streets and Public Buildings, and pre- 
scribing his duties. 
Be it Ordained, by the City Council of the City of 
Charlestown, as follows. 

Sect. 1. There shall be chosen at the commence- 
ment of each municipal year by the City Council in 
convention, and by ballot, an able and discreet per- 



60 City Ordinances. 



son, to be styled the Superintendant of Streets and 
Public Buildings, who shall hold his office at the 
pleasure of the City Council, and shall receive such 
compensation as said Council shall determine; when- 
ever said office shall become vacant by death, resig- 
nation, or otherwise, a successor shall be appointed 
in the manner herein described. 

Sect. 2. The said Superintendent shall, under 
the direction and control of the Mayor and Alder- 
men, have the general care and charge of the high- 
ways, streets, lanes, side walks and bridges of the ci- 
ty ; and shall attend to the making, improving, and 
alteration thereof, and shall cause the same to be 
kept in good repair, so as to be safe and convenient 
for travellers, with their horses, teams and carriages, 
and for foot passengers, at all seasons of the year. — 
He shall superintend the building and repairing of the 
drains and common sewers of the city, and the enter- 
ing of the same by private drains. He shall see that 
the highways, streets and squares are kept in good 
order ; that they are swept as often as may be requis- 
ite for their cleanliness, and that all nuisances and 
obstructions therein are forthwith removed, or give 
notice thereof to the Mayor or Marshal. He shall 
also see that the exterior of the buildings belonging 
to the city, also the fences and grounds appertaining 
to the same, and the square and public commons un- 
der the direction of the standing committee on the 
same, are kept in good order and not defaced in any 
way ; and also, that the trees which now or may 
be hereafter set out in the streets, or on the public 
grounds are properly protected by posts and strips of 
wood securely and neatly placed, and that said trees 
be pruned or trimmed when necessary, and otherwise 



City Ordinances, 61 



taken care of, and that they be replaced by other 
trees when necessary. He may under the direction 
of the Mayor make all necessary contracts for the 
supply of any labor, or materials, which he may re- 
quire in the discharge of his official duty ; and he 
shall also perform such further duties as may be re- 
quired by any future ordinance of the City Council. 

Sect. 3. The said Superintendent shall, on the 
morning of the first Monday in every month, present 
to the Mayor a report in writing, stating minutely all 
his doings during the preceding month ; the sums of 
money by him expended ; the contracts made, and 
the laborers by him employed, and describing the ac- 
tual condition of the streets and public buildings at 
the date of said report. He shall also give informa- 
ton thereon, at any other time, when required by the 
Mayor or by the Board of Aldermen. 

Sect. 4. Whenever any highway, bridge or 
street of the city, shall, from want of necessary re- 
pair, or by reason of any alteration or repair thereof 
being made, or for any other cause, be unsafe or in- 
convenient for travellers or passengers, the said Super- 
intendent shall forthwith put up a suitable fence 
across such highway, street or bridge, and exclude 
all travellers from passing the same ; or cause such 
parts thereof as are unsafe or inconvenient to be en- 
closed by a sufficient fence ; and he shall also fix one 
or more lighted lanterns about the place, to be there 
kept every night during twilight and dark, so long as 
said fence shall be kept standing. 

Sect. 5. The said Superintendent shall have: the 
general care and control of the teams and carts which 
may be furnished by the Overseers of the Poor; and 



62 City Ordihattccs. 



may make any arrangement with said Overseers, for 
a supply of labor and materials for the city, which 
the mterest thereof may require. 

Passed, May 31, 1847. 



(No. 6.) 
An Ordinance for the regulation of Hackney Car- 
riages, Cabs, and other Carriages within the 
City of Charlestown. 
Be it Ordained, l)y the City Council of the City of 
Charlestown, as follows : 

Sect. 1 . No owner, or driver, of any Hackney 
Carriage, Cab, or other Carriage, shall place such 
Hackney Carriage, Cab, or other Carriage, in any pub- 
lic street, lane, avenue, court, place or square, within 
the City, to stand there to be employed, unless such 
owner shall first obtain the consent of the Mayor and 
Aldermen of the City, so to place them. 

Sect. 2. Whoever shall offend against the pro- 
visions of this Ordinance, shall forfeit and pay, for 
each offence, a sum not less than one dollar or more 
than ten dollars, to be recovered by complaint before 
any Justice of Peace for the County of Middlesex. 
Passed, June 21, 1847. 



(No. 7.) 

An Ordinance to establish a Board of Health. 
Be it Ordained, by the City Council of the City of 

Charlestown, as follows : 

Sect. 1 . All power and authority heretofore vested 
in the Board of Health of the Town of Charlestown 



Ciiy Ordinances. ©3 



shall remain in and be exercised by the Board of 
Mayor and Aldermen, who shall make such regula- 
tions and may affix such penalties for the breach 
thereof as they may from time to time deem expe- 
dient, provided that the rules and regulations of the 
late Board of Health shall be in force, until others 
shall be duly made and published by the Mayor and 
Aldermen. 

Sect. 2. Whenever any emergency shall happen 
likely to endanger the public health, or any conta- 
gious disease break out requiring immediate action, 
there being no order in force to meet the case, the 
Ma3'or, by the advice of any three of the Aldermen, 
may give such written directions in the premises as 
may be deemed necessary, which directions shall have 
the force of law for the time being, but the same 
shall be reported at the next regular meeting of the 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen, and may be by them 
repealed or amended. --. — 

Passed, June 23, 1847. 



(No. 8.) 

An Ordinance to establish a City Seal. 

Be it Ordained, by the City Council of the City of 

Charlestown, as follows : . 

The following shall be the device of the Seal of 

said City, to wit : In the centre thereof, a view of 

the Bunker Hill Monument and Monument Square ; 

on the outer circle around the same, the inscription 

shall be, "Charlestown— Founded A. D. 1628. Es- 



64 



City Ordinances 



tablished a City, A. D. 1847;" within a smaller cir- 
cle as the city motto, shall be the words "Liberty — 
a trust to be transmitted to posterity ;" — the whole 
to be arranged according to the impression of the 
seal hereunto annexed. 

Passed, July 13, 1847. 




(No. 9.) 
An Ordinance concerning the Assessment and Col- 
lection of Taxes. 
Be it Ordained, hy the City Council of the City of 

Charlestown, as follows : 

Section 1. The City Treasurer shall be the Col- 
lector of Taxes and of all rents and other sums pay- 
able to the City, not otherwise specially provided for. 

Sect. 2. The Assessors shall make their valua- 
tion of estates, and complete the assessment of taxes 
and place a list thereof in the hands of the Collector 
on or before the first day of September in each year. 



City Ordinances. fiS 



Sect. 3. The Assessors if they shall abate any 
tax wholly or in part, shall keep a record thereof in a 
book to be provided for that purpose ; which record 
shall contain the name of the person whose tax shall 
be so abated, the amount of his tax as originally as- 
sessed, the amount abated, and the reasons for such 
abatement ; and they shall lay such record before the 
City Council in the first week of February annually. 
The Assessors shall decide fully upon all applications 
for abatement on or before the thirtieth day of Oc- 
tober in each year. 

Sect. 4. The Assessors shall deliver to the Col- 
lector a list of the taxes for all poll taxes assessed by 
them on persons who shall be assessed for a poll tax 
only, with a warrant for collecting the same as soon 
as the amount of such tax in each year can be ascer- 
tained, and such poll tax shall be paid on demand af- 
ter legal notice; and, if not so paid to the Collector, 
he shall forthwith proceed to collect the same in the 
manner provided by law for the collection of taxes 
from delinquents. 

Sect. 5. The Collector shall, within thirty days 
after the Assessors shall have placed any list of taxes 
in his hands for collection, deliver to every person 
on whom any tax other than a poll tax shall have 
been assessed, or leave at his place of residence or 
business a bill of such taxes, which shall be equiva- 
lent to a special demand of payment thereof by the 
Collector ; and in case any such tax shall be due and 
unpaid on the first day of November in each year, the 
Treasurer shall issue a summons to the person or cor- 
poration from whom such tax shall be due, and if said 
tax and the sum of twenty cents for said summons be 
not paid within ten days after the delivery or service 



66 City Ordinances. 



of such summons, a warrant shall be issued for the 
collection of the same according to law. 

Sect. 6. The Collector shall in every case exact 
the payment of the sum of twenty cents for the sum- 
mons when issued, and also the same fees for collec- 
tion which are allowed by law on executions, togeth- 
er with the interest from said first day of November^ 
when the tax is not paid within ten days after the ser- 
vice of such summons. He shall keep a record of all 
sums and fees so paid and of the persons by whom 
they are paid, which record he shall lay before the 
City Council during the second week in February in 
each year, and all said sums and fees when received 
by him shall be paid into the City treasury. 

Sect. 7. The Collector shall, within the muni- 
cipal year for which he was chosen, collect all taxes 
committed to him from all persons against whom he 
shall have any such tax, and who shall be resident 
in or have sufficient goods or estate within the city ; 
and he may for this purpose pursue any of the rem- 
edies by law in such cases provided. 

Passed, August 16, 1847. 



SPECIAL LAWS. 



An Act to Incorporate certain persons by the name of 
The Trustees of Charlestown Free Schools. 

Whereas the education of youth has ever been 
considered by the wise and good as of the highest 
consequence to the safety and happiness of a free 
people ; and whereas sundry persons have bequeathed 
real and personal property to the town of Charles- 
town, the rents and profits thereof to be solely and 
forever apphed to and for the use of the Free Schools 
in said town ; and whereas many inconveniences have 
arisen in the present method of executing their gene- 
rous designs : 

Sect. 1. Be it therefore enacted by the Senate 
and House of Representatives, in General Court as- 
sembled, and by the authority of the same, That Rich- 
ard DevenSj Nathaniel Gorham, Josiah Bartlett, Aar- 
on Putnam, Esquires, Joseph Hurd, merchant, Na- 
thaniel Hawkins, and Seth Wyman, gentlemen, all of 
Charlestown, in the county of Middlesex, be, and 
they are hereby nominated and appointed Trustees of 
the Free Schools in said town of Charlestown, and 
they hereby are incorporated into a Body Politic by 
the name of The Trustees of Charlestown Free 
Schools. 



68 Special Laws. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted by the authority 
aforesaid, That all the donations which have been 
given to said town for the use and support of their 
schools, whether real, personal or mixed, shall be, 
pursuant to the consent and at the request of said 
town, had in public town meeting on the fourth day 
of March, one thousand seven hundred and ninety* 
three, and they are hereby confirmed unto the said 
Richard Devens and others, and to their successors 
in said office of Trustees of Charlestown Free Schools, 
forever, for the sole use and benefit of said schools, 
agreeable to the true intent and meaning of the do- 
nors. 

Sect, 3. Be it further enacted by the authority 
aforesaid, That the said Trustees and their succes- 
sors shall have one common seal, which they may 
make use of in any cause or business that relates to 
the said office of Trustees of said schools ; and they 
shall have power and authority to break, change and 
renew the same from time to time as they shall see 
fit ; and they may sue and be sued in all actions, real, 
personal and mixed, and prosecute and defend the 
same to final judgment and execution, by the name of 
the Trustees of Charlestown Free Schools. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted by the authority 
aforesaid, That the aforesaid Richard Devens and 
others, and their successors in said office of Trustees, 
be the Visitors, Trustees and Governors of the afore- 
said Charlestown Free Schools, to be continued in 
the way and manner following, viz : That the said 
town of Charlestown, at their annual town meeting 
in the month of May, shall have authority to elect by 
ballot such persons, to the number of seven, as they 
shall think proper, to the said office of Trustees of 



Special LaiDs. 69 

Charlestovvn Free Schools ; and that five of said Trus- 
tees shall constitute a quorum for doing business ; and 
the major part of the members present shall decide 
all questions that shall come before them ; and that 
the said Trustees shall have power and autliority to 
elect a President, Treasurer and Secretary, and such 
other officers as they shall judge necessary and con- 
venient ; but no pecuniary compensation shall be al- 
lowed the said Trustees without the consent of said 
town of Charlestown ; and to make and ordain such 
laws, rules and orders for the good government of said 
schools, as to them the Trustees, Governors and Vis- 
itors aforesaid, and their successors, shall from time 
to time seem most fit and requisite ; all which shall 
be observed by the officers and scholars of said school, 
upon the penalties therein contained: provided not- 
withstanding, that the said rules, laws and orders be 
no ways repugnant to the laws of this Common- 
Wealth. 

Sect. 5. Be if further enacted by the authority 
aforesaid, That the Trustees aforesaid be, and they 
hereby are rendered capable in law to take and re- 
ceive by gift, grant, devise or bequest, or otherwise, 
any lands, tenements or other estate, real and person- 
al, which may in future be granted for the benefit 
of said Charlestown Free Schools : provided, the an- 
nual income thereof shall not exceed the sum of Six 
Hundred Pounds, to have and to hold the same un- 
der such provisions and limitations as may be ex- 
pressed in any deed or conveyance to them made by 
the donor or donors ; and that all deeds and instru- 
ments which the said Trustees shall lawfully make, 
shall, when made in the name of said Trustees, and 
signed and delivered by the President, and sealed 



70 Special Lmffs. 



with their common seal, bind the said Trustees and 
their successors, and be vahd in law. 

Sect. 6. Be it further enacted by the authority 
aforesaid, That the aforesaid Trustees shall have full 
power and authority to determine at what times and 
places their meetings shall be holden, and upon the 
manner of notifying the Trustees to convene at such 
meetings ; and the said Trustees shall have full pow- 
er and authority to determine and prescribe from time 
to time the powers and duties of their several offi- 
cers, and to fix and determine the tenures of their re- 
spective offices. 

Sect. 7. Be it further enacted by the authority 
aforesaid, That the said Trustees shall, at the annu- 
al meeting of said town of Charlestown in the month 
of May, previous to the election of Trustees, lay be- 
fore said town the particulars of their proceedings 
and the state of their funds. 

Sect. 8. Be it further enacted by the authority 
aforesaid, That Richard Devens be, and he is au- 
thorized and empowered to fix the time and place 
for holding the first meeting of said Trustees, and to 
certify them thereof. Passed, March 27, 1793, 



An Act authorizing the Town of Charlestown to es- 
tablish a Board of Health. 

Sect. 1 . Be it enacted by the Senate and House 
of Representatives, in General Court assembled, and 
by the authority of the same, That the inhabitants of 
the town of Charlestown, qualified to vote for town 



special Law?. 71 

officers, may, in the month of March, annually, in 
town meeting assemble, elect, by ballot, seven able 
and discreet persons, being freeholders and residents 
in said town, to be a Board of Health, whose duty it 
shall be, when notified by the Town Clerk, of their 
election as aforesaid, to meet within six days after 
such notice, and organize themselves by electing a 
President and Secretary. The Secretary thus cho- 
sen, to be sworn to the faithful discharge of the du- 
ties of said office ; which oath shall be entered and 
subscribed by such Secretary, on the records of said 
board, and attested by the person administering the 
same ; and a certificate from the records of said board, 
shall be received and admitted as evidence in all 
cases relating to the proceedings of said board. — 
On the death or resignation of any member 
of the said Board of Health, such vacancy shall 
be filled by election, by ballot, at the next town, 
meeting which may be holden after such vacancy ex- 
ists ; and a majority of the board shall be competent 
to transact any business which the whole board could 
transact. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted, That the said 
Board of Health shall have power, and it is hereby 
made their duty, to examine into all causes of sick- 
ness, nuisances, and sources of filth, that may be in- 
jurious to the inhabitants of the town of Charlestown, 
which do or may exist within the limits of said town, 
or in any vessel at any wharf within the limits there- 
of ; and the same to destroy, remove, or prevent, as 
the case may require ; and all the expenses attending 
the same, to be paid by the person or persons, who caus- 
ed such nuisance to exist, if known, and if not known, 
such expense to be paid by the town : and in all cases, 



I ft 



72 (Special Laws. 

where such nuisance, source of filth, or cause of sick- 
ness, shall be found on private property, the owner or 
occupier thereof on being notified by the authority of 
this board, and ordered to destroy or remove the same, 
shall forthwith destroy or remove such filth or nui- 
sance ; and in case said owner or occupier shall re- 
fuse or neglect to remove such filth, nuisance, or 
cause of sickness, from his, her, or their property, 
within the time specified by said board, he, she, or 
they, so offending, shall forfeit and pay a fine of not 
less than one dollar, or more than one hundred dol- 
lars, to be sued for and recovered by said Board of 
Health, in manner hereafter directed. And any two 
members of this board may cause the same nuisance 
to be removed or destroyed, as the case may require; 
and all costs or expenses, incurred in removing or des- 
troying the same, shall be paid by such owner or oc- 
cupier, on whose premises, or in whose possession 
such cause of sickness, nuisance, or source of filth 
may be found. And the said board may have pow- 
er to appoint scavengers when necessary, to carry 
into effect the requirements of this act, and the same 
to remove, and substitute others at the pleasure of 
the board. 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted, That tha said 
Board of Health shall have power to seize, take, and 
destroy, or to remove to any safe place within the 
limits of the town, or cause the same to be done, any 
unwholsome and putrid, or tainted meat, fish, bread, 
vegetables, or other articles of the provision kind, or 
liquor, which in their opinion (first consulting some 
respectable physician of the town of Charlestown,) 
shall be injurious to the health of those who might 
use them ; and the cost of seizing, taking, destroying, 



special Laws. 7^ 

or removing, shall be paid by the person or persons, 
in whose possession the same unwholesome, putrid 
or tainted article shall or may be found ; and when- 
ever said board shall think it necessary for the pres- 
ervation of the lives or health of the inhabitants of 
said town, to enter forcibly any building or vessel, 
having been refused such entry by the owner or oc- 
cupier thereof, within the limits of the town of 
Charlestown, for the purpose of examining into, des- 
troying, removing or preventing any nuisance, source 
of filth, or cause of sickness aforesaid, which said 
board have reason to believe is contained in such 
building or vessel ; any member of said board, by or- 
der of said board, may apply to any Justice of the 
Peace, within and for the county of Middlesex, and on 
oath complain and state, on behalf of said board, the 
facts, as far as said board have reason to believe the 
same, relative to such nuisance, source of filth, or 
cause of sickness aforesaid ; and such Justice shall 
thereupon issue his warrant directed to the Sheriff of 
the county of Middlesex, or either of his Deputies, or 
any Constable of the town of Charlestown, therein 
requiring them, or either of them, taking with them 
sufficient aid and assistance, and also in company 
with said Board of Health, or any two members of 
the same, between the hours of sun rise and sun set, 
to repair to the place where such nuisance, source of 
filth, or cause of sickness, complained of as existing 
■ as aforesaid, and there if found, the same to destroy, 
remove or prevent, under the directions and agreeably 
to the order of said Board of Health, or such mem- 
bers of the same as may be present for such purpose : 
provided however, that no Sheriff, Deputy Sheriff, or 
Constable, shall execute any civil process, either by 



74 Special Lmcs. 

arresting the body, or attaching the goods or chat- 
tels of any person under color of any entry made for 
the purpose aforesaid, unless such service could by 
law be made without such entry ; and all services, so 
made under cover of such entry, shall be utterly void ; 
and the officer making such service shall be consider- 
ed a trespasser to all intents ah initio ; and in all 
cases where such nuisance, source of filth, or cause 
of sickness, shall be removed as aforesaid, the costs 
arising in such proceedings shall be paid by the per- 
son or persons who caused or permitted the same 
nuisance, source of filth, or cause of sickness to exist, 
or in whose possession the same may be found. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted, That the said 
Board of Health shall have power to make such rules, 
orders and regulations from time to time, for the pre- 
venting, removing or destroying of all nuisances, 
sources of filth and causes of sickness within the lim- 
its of the town of Charlestown, which they may think 
necessary ; which rules, orders and regulations, after 
having been posted up in three or more public places 
within the town, shall continue in force and be obey- 
ed by all persons until altered or repealed by said 
board, or by the town ; and any person or persons 
who shall disobey or violate any such rules, orders or 
regulations so as aforesaid made, shall severally for- 
feit and pay for such offence a sum not less than one 
dollar, nor more than fifty dollars, according to the na- 
ture and aggravation of such offence. 
■ Sect. 5. Be it further enacted, That the pow- 
ers and duties which are given to, or required of tlie 
Selectmen of the town of Charlestown, by law of this 
Commonwealth, passed on the twenty-second day of 
June, in the year of cur Lord one thousand seven 



Special Lazes. 75 

hundred and ninety-seven, entitled "An act to pre- 
vent the spreading of contagious sickness," and by 
the several acts in Addition thereto, shall be, and 
they hereby are transferred to, and made the duty of 
the Board of Health of the town of Charlestown, from 
and after the election of said board, any thing in the 
said laws to the contrary notwithstanding. And for 
all expenses, which may arise in the execution of 
their duty, the said Board of Health shall be author- 
ized to draw upon the Town Treasurer of the town 
of Charlestown ; and the accounts of said board, in- 
cluding all receipts and expenditures of money, shall 
be examined annually, and reported to the town by 
a committee chosen for that purpose ; and the same 
shall be paid by the Town Treasurer of the said town 
of Charlestown. 

Sect. 6. Be it further enacted, That all fines, 
forfeitures, and sums to be paid, arising under any 
of the provisions of this act, shall be prosecuted for, 
by and in the name of the Board of Health of the 
town of Charlestown, in the same manner within the 
county of Middlesex, as is pointed out by the twelfth 
section of an act passed on the twentieth day of June, 
one thousand eight hundred and sixteen, entitled 
"An act to empower the town of Boston to choose a 
Board of Health, and to prescribe their power and 
duty for the recovery of all fines and forfeitures aris- 
ing under said act in the county of Sufiblk :" and all 
. moneys, arising by fines, forfeitures or sums to be 
paid trider any of the provisions of this act, shall 
enure to the use of the inhabitants of the town of 
Charlestown, and shall be accounted for by said 
board to the Treasurer of said town. 

Approved by the Governor, June 12, 1818. 



76 Special Laics. 



An Act in addition to "An Act authorizing the town 
of Charlestown to establish a Board of Health." 

Sect. 1. Se it enacted by the Senate and House 
of Representatives, in General Court assembled, and 
by the authority of the same. That the selectmen of 
the town of Charlestown be, and they hereby are au- 
thorised and empowered, from time to time, to make 
and establish rules, orders and regulations for the in- 
terment of the dead in said town, to establish the po- 
lice of the burying grounds, appoint and locate the 
places where the dead may be buried in said town, 
to make regulations for funerals, and appoint all nec- 
essary officers and persons to carry the same into ef- 
fect, and to prescribe their duties and fees. And the 
said selectmen may establish such penalties for the 
violation of any such rules, orders and regulations, as 
they may think proper : provided, that the penalty 
for any one such violation shall not exceed the sum 
of fifty dollars : and provided, further, that before any 
such rule, order or regulation shall go into effect, the 
same shall be approved by the inhabitants of said 
town, at a legal meeting thereof for that purpose call- 
ed, and shall be published in one or more newspapers 
printed in Charlestown or Boston. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted, That all fines, 
forfeitures, and sums, to be paid, arising under any of 
the provisions of this act, shall be prosecuted for, by 
and in the name of the selectmen of the town of 
Charlestown, in the same manner, and under the same 
provisions within the county of IMiddlesex, as are 



Special Laws. 77 

provided for the recovery of similar fines, forfeitures, 
and sums, vv^ithin the county of Suffolk, by the tv/elfth 
section of an act, entitled "an act to empower the 
town of Boston to choose a Board of Health, and to 
prescribe their power and duty," passed the twentieth 
day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand 
eight hundred and sixteen. And all fines, forfeitures, 
or sums, to be paid under any of the provisions of this 
act, shall enure to the use of said town of Charles- 
town, and shall be accounted for by the said select- 
men to the Treasurer thereof. 

Passed, March 20, 1832. 



An Act establishing a Fire Department in the town 
of Charlestown. 

JBe it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives, in General Court assembled, and by the 
authority of the same, as follows : 

A Fire Department is hereby established in the 
town of Charlestown, subject to the duties and liabil- 
ities, and with the powers and privileges, and govern- 
ed by the provisions of the act entitled "an act to 
regulate fire departments," passed on the ninth day 
of April, in the year one thousand eight hundred and 
thirty nine. [Passed, Feb. 15, 1840.] 



78 Special Laws. 



An act to regulate the Side-walks in the town of 
Charlestown. 

Sect. 1 . Be it enacted by the Senate and House 
of Representatives, in General Court assembled, and 
by the authority of the sawie, That in all streets which 
shall hereafter be paved in the town of Charlestown, 
the side-walks shall be made according to the follow- 
ing regulations, viz : the foot-path or side-walk en 
each side of the street, shall be of a breadth not ex- 
ceeding one sixth part of the whole width of the 
street, and shall be paved with brick or flat stone, 
and shall be secured with good and sufficient hammer- 
ed edge stone on the outside of the same. 

Sect. 2. He it further enacted, That whenever 
the town shall direct the paving of any public street 
as aforesaid, each and every owner or owners of a lot 
or lots of land adjoining the same, shall without de- 
lay, at his or her own expense, cause the side-walk 
in front of his or her land, to be paved with brick or 
fiat stone, and supported by hammered edge stone, 
and kept in repair, the same to be done under the 
direction, and to the acceptance of the surveyors of 
the highways. And il the owner or owners of such 
lot or lots, shall neglect or refuse to pave and sup- 
port the side-walk as aforesaid, for the space of twen- 
ty days after he or she, or the tenant of such lot or 
lots, or the attorney of such owner or owners, shall 
have been thereto required, by any of the surveyors 
of highways, then it shall be lawful for said survey- 
ors; and they are hereby enjoined and required to 



Special Laws. 79 

pave and support the same in the manner aforesaid, 
or to repair the same, and shall recover the whole 
amount of the expense thereof, by action of the case., 
to be brought by the surveyors of highways before 
any court proper to try the same : provided, never- 
theless, that vvhenever in the opinion of the select- 
men, any owner or owners of any lot on such street, 
shall be unable to comply with the foregoing requisi- 
tions, the said selectmen may direct the surveyors of 
highways to cause such side-walk to be made at the 
expense of the town : provided, also, that when there- 
are any vacant lots of land on any such street, the 
surveyors of highways may, at their discretion, allow 
the owner or owners thereof, to cover the side-walk 
with plank, and support the same with timber, which 
shall be removed, and the edge stone, and brick or 
fiat stone pavement be completed, whenever in the 
judgment of said surveyors, it shall become necessary. 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted, That no canopy, 
balcony, portico, or door-steps, hereafter erected in any 
street, lane, or alley, in the town of Charlestown, shall 
project into such street, lane, or alley, more than one 
twelfth part of the width thereof, and in no case more 
than three feet, and all cellar doors hereafter made or re- 
paired, shall be built with upright cheeks, which shall 
not project from the line of the house, into the street, 
lane, or alley, more than nine inches, nor shall the 
platform of the same rise above the level of the side- 
walk. And if any proprietor, owner, or owners, shall 
erect any canopy, balcony, portico, cellar-door, door- 
step, or other obstruction, contrary to the provisions 
of this act, and shall refuse or neglect to remove or 
take down the same, v^dthin five days after having been 
directed and required thereto, by any of the survey- 



80 Special Latvs. 

ors of highways, such proprietors, owner or owners 
shall forfeit and pay the sum of two dollars for each 
and every day the same shall remain after the expi> 
ration of the said five days. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted, That all forfei- 
tures and fines which may be recovered in pursuance 
of this act, shall go and be destributed, one moiety 
thereof to the poor of the town of Charlestown, and 
the other moiety to the surveyors of highways. 
Passed, June 12, 1824. 



An Act to incorporate the Trustees of the Poors' fund 
in the town of Charlestown. 

Sect. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House 
of Representatives, in General Court assembled, and 
by the authority of the same. That James K. Froth- 
mgham and others, selectmen of the town of Charles- 
town, and Thomas Miller, Amos Tufts, and Matthew 
Skilton, deacons of the First Congregational Church, 
William Arnold and James Fosdick, deacons of the 
Baptist Church, Moses Hall, Daniel Tufts and Jo- 
seph Gould, deacons of the Universalist Church, Jo- 
seph Phipps and Elias Phinney, deacons of the New 
Church, all of said Charlestown, for the time being, 
and their successors in the said offices of selectmen 
and deacons, for the time being, be, and they hereby 
are, made a body politic and corporate forever, by 
the name of the Trustees of the Charlestown Poors' 
Fund, for the purpose of managing certain donations, 
given and bequeathed at different periods of time, by 



special Laws. 8"!. 

Richard Russell, Esq., Captain Richard Sprague, 
Mr. Thomas Call, and Richard Devens, Esq., all 
formerly inhabitants of the said Charlestown, and 
such other funds as may come into their hands for 
like purposes ; and the said trustees, by the name 
aforesaid, may sue and be sued, prosecute and defend 
suits, with power of substitution, and may have a 
common seal, and the same may alter and renew at 
pleasure ; and the two senior deacons of all regularly 
organized religious churches, which may hereafter be 
constituted in said town of Charlestown, shall be con- 
sidered as members of said board of trust : Provided, 
that, whenever any new society shall be constitut- 
ed in said town, the board of trust shall be composed 
of the selectmen and two senior deacons from each 
church, for the time being, and their successors in 
said offices. 

Sect. 2. Be it further enacted, That the said 
trustees may choose a treasurer and other necessary 
officers, and may adopt all needful by-laws and reg- 
ulations for the government of the corporation, not 
repugnant to the constitution and laws of this Com- 
monwealth, and the same may alter as they may find 
expedient and necessary. 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted, That the said 
trustees shall have full power to receive and hold all 
money, secureties, and other estate, real or personal, 
. now constituting the said Poors' Fund, and also to 
receive and hold all gifts, grants and donations, real 
and personal, that may hereafter be made to increase 
the said fund, and the same to manage and put on 
interest, and to apply the income thereof, annually, 
for the relief of the poor of said town forever, con- 
formable to the true intent and meaning' of the sever- 



82 Special Laws. 

al donors : provided, however, that the annual in- 
come of said fund, shall not exceed the sum of two 
thousand dollars. 

Sect. 4. Be it further enacted, That the said 
trustees shall have power to make sale of any of their 
property, real or personal, purchased or given, as they 
shall judge most for the interest of their said trust, un- 
less that which shall be given, be expressly other- 
wise appropriated by the donor ; and all moneys aris- 
ing from such sale and the subsequent income, shall 
be applied to the same use to which the property sold 
and the income thereof were respectively applicable, 
and all deeds, conveyances, contracts and other in- 
struments, duly authorized by the board at a regular 
meeting, and signed by the president and attested by 
the secretary, shall be good and valid. 

Sect. 5. Be it further enacted, That James K. 
Frothingham be, and he hereby is authorized to call 
the first meeting of the trustees, at such time and 
place as he shall think proper. 

Passed, June 18, 1825. 



An Act authorizing the Selectmen of Charlestown to 

appoint a Company of Hook and Ladder Men, 

and additional Engine Men. 

Sect. 1. Be it enacted by the Senate and House 
of Representatives, in General Court assembled, and 
by the authority of the same, That the selectmen of 
the town of Charlestown, in the county of Middle- 
sex, be, and they hereby are, authorized and era- 



Special Laws. 83 

powered to appoint a company of hook and ladder 
men, consisting of not more than forty, whose duty 
it shall be, under the direction of the firewards in 
said town, to attend fires therein with fire-hooks, fire- 
sails and ladders, and to be subject to such further 
duties, and organized and provided in such manner, 
as the said selectmen shall, from time to time, direct. 

Sect. 2. Be it farther enacted, That the said 
selectmen be authorized and empowered to appoint 
any number of engine men, not exceeding thirty-five, 
in addition to the number they are authorized to ap- 
point by existing laws ; and the engine men so ap- 
pointed may be attached to any new engine compa- 
ny, which may be hereafter formed, or apportioned 
among any of the engine companies of said town, at 
the discretion of the selectmen ; and all persons ap- 
pointed to any company, pursuant to the provisions 
of this act, shall continue in office during the pleas- 
ure of said selectmen, and be entitled to all the priv- 
ileges and exemptions to which engine men now are, 
or may hereafter be by law entitled. 

Sect. 3. Be it further enacted, That the resolve 
authorising the selectmen of Charlestown to appoint 
additional engine men, passed December seventh, one 
thousand eight hundred and sixteen, be, and the same 
is hereby repealed. [Passed, June 20, 1826.] 

ERRATUM IN CITY CHARTER. 

On the 31st page, at the 11th line from the bot- 
tom and after the word "taxes," the following words 
should be inserted — "Engineers of the Fire De- 
partment, A City Clerk, three Assessors of 

Taxes," 



€:oMTEr«'T,^, 



Joint Rules and Orders of the City Council, page 3 

Rules and Orders of the Board of Mayor and Aid., 11 

" " " Common Council, ... 13 

City Charter, 25 

" " Amendment of 40 

Members of City Government and other Officers, 42 

Ordinance, concerning the form of Warrants, . . 53 

The City Marshal, 55 

" Printing and publication of 
" Ordinances and Orders, . . 57 
" Appointment of certain Ci- 
ty Officers, 59 

" Superintendent ofSts,,&c., " 

" Carriages, Cabs, &c., ... 62 

Board of Health, 

City Seal, 63 

^* Assessment and Collection 

ofTaxes, . 64 

An Act to incorporate the Trustees of the Pree 

Schools, 67 

" " Authorising the Town of Charlestown to 

establish a Board of Health, 70 

•' " In addition thereto, 76 

" " Establishing a Fire Department in Town, 77 

" " To regulate Sidewalks, &c., 78 

•• "'•To incorporate the Trustees of Poors' Fund, 80 
" " Authorizing Selectmen to appoint a Cora- 

... pany of Hook and Ladder men, 82 

•^ ■ uKrraturn in City Charter^ .,.,.,... 82 



(JTitg 0f €l)axltBtown. 



REPORT 



SPECIAL COMMITTEE 



BOARD OF THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN ON THE 
SUBJECT OF 

GKANTING LICENSES 

TO SELL WINE AND SPIRITUOUS LIQUORS. 
MAY, 184 7. 



CHARLESTOWN: 

PRINTED AT THE FREEMAN OFFICE. 

1847. 

c 



CITY OF CHAHLESTOWN: 

In Board of the Mayor and Aldermen, 

Mat 17, 1847. 

Ordered, That the several Petitions of 0. C. Cutter, &c., be referred 
to the Standing Committee on Licenses, to consider and report thereon 
as soon as practicable, and that the Mayor be added to the Committee for 
this purpose. 

David Dodge, 

City Gkrh 



REPORT. 



The Committee to whom were referred the several 
petitions of O. C. Cutter and others, praying to be 
licensed as Innholders, and the petitions of Andrew 
Sawtell and others, praying to be licensed as Retailers, 
and of Seth Sawyer and others, praying to be licensed 
as Victuallers, and all of them with authority to sell 
wine and other spirituous liquors, under the restrictions 
of law, have attended to the duty, and ask leave to 

REPORT. 

To the Board of the Mayor and Aldermen is entrusted 
the same authority, on the subject of Licenses, which the 
County Commissioners exercise in the towns within 
their jurisdiction. It is a subject which has excited 
great attention, and upon which public opinion is di- 
vided. It belongs to that class of subjects, upon which 
honest and well-meaning citizens may be expected to 
differ widely ; while at the same time it is desirable, for 



the sake of the public peace, for the promotion of that 
scrupulous observance of just laws, and of that respect 
for legal authority, which ought to characterize a free 
and happy people, that a greater harmony of public sen- 
timent should be brought about. It is due from this 
Board to our fellow-citizens, that we should look at this 
much-vexed question, of License or no License, hon- 
estly in the face ; that we should not undertake to evade 
it, or to act upon it in a spirit of a time-serving policy ; 
but that we should decide it as rational men, who are able 
to give a reason for what we do ; as Christians, aware of 
our accountability in every station in life ; and as ma- 
gistrates, bound by a solemn oath to discharge our du- 
ties impartially, and to see that the laws are faithfully 
executed. 

The first inquiry that arises is, What are the laws of 
the Commonwealth upon this subject ? and the second 
inquiry will naturally suggest itself, What is the state of 
facts in the case to which these laws are to apply ? 

I. The Law. The 47th chapter of the Revised Stat- 
utes is devoted wholly to the subject of licensing the 
sale of wine and spirituous liquors. Assuming that 
these are articles which every one has a right to buy, 
under such conditions as public policy may pre- 
scribe, the statute permits every one to buy or to sell 
twenty-eight gallons of wine, or any spirituous liquor, at 
any one time, which the purchaser must carry away 
at once. Before any one can sell either of these articles 
in less quantities, the government requires that he 
should obtain a license from the constituted authority, 
under certain restrictions, which license, by limitation of 
law, expires on the first day of April in each year ; and if 



any one "presumes" to sell any less quantity without such 
license, he is subjected to the severest penalties, while 
the purchaser, who often buys to betray the seller, is 
allowed to escape without legal censure. It is provided 
by the 47th chapter that these licenses may be given to 
retailers, innholders, and common victuallers. Retail- 
ers may be either grocers or apothecaries ; these are 
prohibited from selling any quantity to be used in or 
about their respective premises ; the law intending that 
they should sell only what might be wanted by the 
citizens in their business to be used in the arts, or in 
their families for various domestic purposes. Licensed 
innholders are to furnish these articles, if wanted, to 
strangers and travellers, and to the permanent inmates 
of their houses; so that these persons, who for the time 
being have no other home, may receive the same ac- 
commodations which housekeepers may enjoy within 
the sanctuary of their domestic circles, — the latter hav- 
ing these articles sent to their houses by their grocers 
and apothecaries. Victuallers may also be licensed to 
furnish these articles, with their meals, to their custom- 
ers. Innholders and victuallers are strictly prohibited 
from having, or from allowing to be used, about their 
premises any unlawful game or sport, from selling any 
intoxicating drink on any part of Sunday, or on any 
evening of the six working days after ten o'clock. They 
are also liable to a penalty, if they suffer any person on 
or about their premises to drink to excess. In addition 
to these restrictions upon those who may be hcensed to 
sell such articles, persons who purchase them are liable 
to the law for the abuse of them. Intoxication is made 
a crime, punishable in every case; and the proof of 
three instances of intoxication in a single individual is 



sufficient to convict him as a common drunkard, and 
to commit him to the House of Correction or Refor- 
mation. 

These are all the leading provisions of law, which the 
soundest wisdom of legislators and the experience of 
centuries have been able to devise upon this subject, for 
the security of good order, and for the promotion of the 
common good. 

A law, upon a different principle, was enacted by the 
legislature of Massachusetts in 1838, commonly known 
as the fifteen-gallon law. It permitted every one to buy 
or sell fifteen gallons of wine, or spirituous hquors, 
to be purchased and carried away at one time ; and it 
prohibited every one from selling any less quantity, ex- 
cept hcensed apothecaries (and no more of them were 
to be licensed than one to every two thousand inhabit- 
ants), who were to sell only for medicinal purposes, or 
for purposes connected with the arts. This law was 
passed on the 19th of April, 1838 ; but, in order to pre- 
pare the people for the great change proposed, its opera- 
tion was postponed to the 1st of July, 1839 ; and on the 
11th day of February, 1840, it was absolutely repealed, 
without a saving clause. Although it was undoubtedly 
passed with the best intentions, and with the sincere 
desire, on the part of the legislature, to promote the 
public good, large numbers of citizens from every part 
of the Commonwealth having signed petitions in favor 
of it, yet its provisions proved obnoxious and unpalat- 
able to the people ; and the experiment, after an ac- 
tual trial of it for seven months and ten days, signally 
failed. 

II. The Facts in the Case. Wines and spirits are 



articles of merchandise and sale. They are imported 
into this country in large quantities every year, and are 
also extensively manufactured or distilled here. It is con- 
tended that, so far as they are articles of import, the 
sale of them is authorized by the national government, 
and that the local government has no authority to pro- 
hibit such sale, but merely to regulate it, in accordance 
with the well-known principles of internal police regu- 
lations. It is also insisted upon, that individuals have 
the natural and inalienable right to purchase these arti- 
cles in some mode or other, under such general forms 
and restrictions as the proper local authorities may 
deem it necessary to establish, and to use the same 
upon their own private premises as they may see fit ; 
taking care that they do not incommode or injure their 
neighbors, and being liable to the municipal power 
solely for the abuse of this, in precisely the same way 
in which they are liable for the abuse of all other un- 
questioned rights. 

These articles are used in various ways : they are 
used in the arts, in the preparation or preservation of 
medicines or specifics, in external applications, or bath- 
ing, and for many other purposes of a domestic charac- 
ter. They are freely used in culinary preparations, and 
as an ingredient, to a greater or less extent, in various 
kinds of drinks. Probably there is not an individual in 
this Commonwealth, who has ever passed the period of 
a single year without partaking of some food or medi- 
cine, of which wines or spirits are not ingredients, and 
without using them in some form or other — even though 
he may ordinarily abstain from using them as a drink — 
so multiform and various are the uses to which they 
are put. Wine, especially, is used by a considerable 



portion, if not by a large majority of the people, as a 
drink at some season of the year. It is also provided 
by most of the churches, for the Communion service. 
The attempt, indeed, was at one time made to abolish 
it from Christian altars; but the proposition did not 
comport with the good sense of the age, for it seemed 
too much like " straining at a gnat " to meet the gen- 
eral sanction of the churches. 

It must also be admitted that these articles are grossly 
and shockingly abused ; and it is because of this abuse 
that so much difficulty and perplexity are involved in 
the settlement of this question. A few years ago, in- 
temperance was rife in the land. Drunkenness came 
to be a common crime, and the source and attendant of 
many other crimes ; the cause of wretchedness, of pov- 
erty, and of disorder. Public attention was attracted to 
this alarming state of things. People saw that intem- 
perance was a social vice, and that many young men, 
and men in middle hfe, were brought to the brink of 
ruin by habits which were contracted, in frequent in- 
stances, at pubHc places of resort. It was found that 
there were many bar-rooms and drinking-shops, far out- 
numbering in several communities the churches and 
school-houses ; and by the popular judgment these tip- 
pUng places were justly condemned as nuisances. To 
suppress these nuisances, and to compel all persons 
holding licenses to keep themselves within the legal 
restraints of the statute, was and now is the proper duty 
of all magistrates and executive officers. 

Societies were formed for the suppression of intem- 
perance. Much good has been effected by these volun- 
tary associations, by the force of example, by persua- 
sion, and by individual effort. Not satisfied with the 



9 



progress of their favorite cause induced by these means, 
a portion of the community established a new class or 
order of societies, called Total Abstinence Societies; 
which made it the duty of their members to abstain in 
every way from the use of all kinds of drink, which, if 
taken to excess, may intoxicate. Others, equally as 
good friends of temperance, have declined to join this 
new order ; insisting that there is as wide a difference 
between the principle of Temperance and that of Total 
Abstinence, as there is between a Christian citizen who 
lives in the world pure and unspotted, and a rigid her- 
mit who lives secluded and remote from the tempta- 
tions and trials of mortality. But this is a matter of 
individual opinion, which each citizen must for himself 
make clear to his own conscience. The Committee 
allude to these efforts and movements, only as a part of 
the statement of the facts in the case. 

No one will probably dispute the assertion that a 
great majority of our own fellow-citizens, probably nine- 
tenths of them, do in some form or other, and upon some 
occasion or another, make use of wine or spirituous 
liquors, and must therefore purchase them. The books 
of our grocers and apothecaries, and the testimony of 
their porters, could probably substantiate this statement. 
If, then, licenses be indiscriminately refused, all these 
sales will be made in the known violation of the law. For 
it is hardly to be supposed that any individual, whether 
he be clergyman, magistrate, or officer of a church, or 
however worthy may be his motive, would be so scru- 
pulous and thoughtful as to be at the expense and trou- 
ble of buying and carrying away at one time twenty- 
eight gallons of an article, when half a gallon, or less, 
would suit his purpose. But if the purchaser buys and 



10 



takes away less than the twenty-eight gallons, he causes 
his seller to violate the law ; and though the former may 
escape the ignominy of a conviction, in point of morals 
he is equally culpable with the latter. And yet it is not 
probable that the most visionary reformist, to whom 
may be left any modicum of soundness, would seriously 
ask the legislature to impose the same severe penalties 
cipon the purchaser, which by law now impend over 
the seller. Nor could any one seriously believe that, if 
such an act should be passed by the legislature, it would 
receive the popular approbation. 

From this review of the law and the facts in the case, 
the question comes up, What shall this Board do, to 
whom the legislature has committed for the first time 
the power of granting and withholding licenses? At 
first sight, one would suppose, that, it being admitted 
that there was an extensive and legitimate demand for 
wine and spirituous liquors for private use, some pro- 
vision should be made for the lawful sale of them, under 
such restrictions and by such persons as a regard for 
the public good may require ; and that no one could be 
found to be so " guiltless " as to " cast the first stone " 
against such a provision, who has ever had occasion to 
make use of any of these articles in any form or for any 
purpose. 

There are, however, many persons in our community, 
who are opposed to the granting of any licenses. Some 
are so opposed, because they distrust the ability of the 
licensing power to discriminate with proper judgment 
in favor of the public good. Others are opposed, be- 
cause they believe that the whole system of licenses is 
an unjust and odious monopoly. These persons insist 
(and their number is greater than the most forward 



11 



friends of temperance imagine), that the sale of every 
article of merchandise ought to be unrestricted, and 
they believe that the refusing to grant any licenses 
will have the ultimate effect to bring about the unqual- 
ified repeal of all license laws. 

With this latter class of objectors, we, as a Board, 
have nothing to do : we must administer the law as 
we find it. It may be said, however, on this head, 
that if, in the discharge of our duty, a very limited 
but adequate number of licenses should be granted with 
proper conditions, and if the persons licensed should 
obtain thereby an advantage over other citizens who 
may wish to follow the same calling, still that advan- 
tage is but incidental to the great end proposed. It is 
like the establishment of an important office, which it 
is necessary that some one should fill, although he may, 
in fining it, obtain a comfortable livelihood, which others 
may envy. 

But to those who, from their strenuous zeal for the 
cause of temperance, desire that licenses may be in- 
discriminately refused, these serious questions should 
be solemnly ptit : Do you expect that, by the withhold- 
ing of licenses altogether, the use of wine and of spirit- 
uous liquors — for any and every purpose whatever, and 
in every form whatsoever — will be abolished from the 
land? Or will the compulsory purchase of twenty- 
eight gallons, when only half a gallon is wanted, by 
those citizens who may be disposed to respect the law, 
have the tendency to promote the cause of temperance, 
or to diminish the traffic ? To such questions it may 
be replied — and we do not see what other answer a 
consistent objector could make — " Let all licenses be 
refused; but if respectable men buy of respectable traders 



12 



a reasonable quantity, and for proper purposes, these 
traders need not be prosecuted ; the officers of the law- 
need not see them violate the law ; but when others 
follow their example in such violations, then prosecute." 
In other words, " Refuse to administer the license laws ; 
but let the penalties of such laws be enforced upon one 
class of the community, and not upon another." 

Such a policy, upon careful examination, must appear 
to every intelhgent and candid mind, both hazardous 
and iniquitous. It is hazardous, because it strikes at the 
foundation of all law and order ; it undermines in the 
popular mind, that respect for legal authority, that will- 
ingness to yield implicit obedience to a law, while it 
remains on the statute-book, because it is a law, which 
is so essential to the salvation of a republic. It is also 
iniquitous, because it tends to nullify the sacredness of 
that official oath which is imposed upon executive offi- 
cers, who, from the moment they are inducted into office 
to the time that they yield it to their successors, are 
bound to see that the laws are faithfully executed. It 
is not for them to decide whether a particular law is 
judicious or expedient, or whether the motives of the 
violator of it are more or less worthy. It is their sole 
province to enforce it. 

Your Committee believe, that, so far as public officers 
are legally entrusted by the legislature with discretion- 
ary powers on this subject, they can best subserve the 
cause of temperance by making such provisions for the 
public accommodation under the law, as will prove 
generally acceptable. In this way, the cause itself will 
be placed upon a firmer footing ; it will be rescued from 
its present somewhat equivocal position ; and the license 
laws, by being judiciously administered and then im- 



13 



partially enforced, will receive from the community the 
same respect which is yielded to the other laws. 

In conclusion, your Committee, after mature reflec- 
tion, are of the opinion, that, in a case like the present, 
where the legislature has conferred upon us, as the prin- 
cipal executive officers of a City, the authority to discrim- 
inate, to declare what licenses may be granted as an 
enlarged view of the common good may require, it is 
our bounden duty, — instead of refusing to do any thing, 
and thereby to suffer the good and the evil to fall under 
the same legal condemnation, — to draw the line with a 
firm and impartial hand ; so that the use of these articles, 
which, to a certain extent and for certain purposes, are 
conceded to be necessary, salutary, or at least a matter 
of right, may be made under the sanction of legal au- 
thority ; and that the abuse of them may, on account of 
this just discrimination, with greater consistency and far 
greater efficiency, be restrained. They therefore recom- 
mend the adoption of the following Order. 

Per order of the Committee, 

G. Washington Warren, 

Chairman, 



14 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN, 

IN BOARD OF THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

Ordered, 

That licenses to sell spirituous liquors be granted to Apoth- 
ecaries who will stipulate that they will sell them only for medicinal 
purposes. 

That licenses to sell wine and spirituous liquors be granted to 
Retailers, of good moral character, who will stipulate that they will 
not sell in any case less than one half of a gallon thereof, to be carried 
away at one time. 

That not exceeding three licenses be granted to Victuallers of good 
moral character, who will stipulate to sell only to those persons for whom 
they may provide meals. 

That not exceeding three licenses be granted to Innholders, of 
good moral character, who will stipulate that they will furnish wine 
and spirituous liquors only to their inmates and boai'ders with their 
meals, or at their private rooms ; and who will further stipulate, that 
they will keep a correct register of their inmates and boarders, which 
shall at all times be open to the inspection of any member of the Board 
of the Mayor and Alderman. 

That all applications for licenses be referred to the Standing Commit- 
tee on Licenses, who shall make careful inquiry as to the character of 
the applicants, and report thereon to the Board, sitting in Executive 
Session. 



In Board of the Mayor and Aldermen, Mat Vlth., 1847. 

Read and accepted ; adopted unanimously, and ordered to be printed, 
with the Report. 

Attest, Ebenr. Barker, 

GlerTi pro tern, to the Board. 



Citg JDommmt, No. 3. 



COMMUNICATION FEOM THE MATOE. 



To the Board of Aldermen and the Common Council. 

Gentlemen, — My attention has been frequently- 
called, since I have entered upon the duties of my 
office, to the encroachments which have been made, 
within the last twenty years, upon the plot of ground 
anciently appropriated for a public square, and known 
as the Training Field. From a careful examination 
of the subject, I am convinced that these unsightly 
encroachments have been hitherto suffered to exist, 
contrary to law, and against the rights of the citizens ; 
and that they ought to be removed at once. 

In our earliest records, mention is made of the 
Training Field. More than two centuries ago, this 
land was set apart for a public common ; for this pur- 
pose it was probably given by some public-spirited 
inhabitant. But whether the title of Charlestown 
was originally derived by gift or by purchase, it is 



wholly immaterial : in either case, immemorial usage 
had given to each and every inhabitant a right in the 
whole of the Training Field, as a public and unob- 
structed Common, long before a single building was 
erected thereon. This is a right which no majority, 
however large, can take away from a dissenting mi- 
nority. 

In 1825, a highly respectable Committee was ap- 
pointed by the town, to consider the expediency of 
selling the Training Field, and applying the proceeds 
of the sale in aid of the Bunker Hill Monument 
Association. That Committee, on mature delibera- 
tion, reported that the town had no right to sell or 
alienate the ground. If it could not then have been 
legally sold, the placing of the diflferent buildings 
thereon afterwards was clearly unlawful. 

At the time that the largest building, the Winthrop 
School House, was erected on the Training Field, 
sites of land, equally eligible, could have been pur- 
chased for less than one quarter of the price per foot 
which is now asked. This fact should be a signifi- 
cant warning to us who now compose the city gov- 
ernment, and should teach us that it is our duty to 
provide seasonably, and in an adequate and suitable 
manner, for the well-known wants of a flourishing 
city, so that our successors hereafter may not discover 
in our conduct of public affairs the traces of improv- 
idence, and of neglect of the public interest. 

By the sixty-first and sixty-third sections of the 



twenty-fourth chapter of the Revised Statutes, it is 
provided that any fences, buildings, or other incum- 
brances, on "any training field, highway, or other 
land appropriated for the general use or convenience 
of the inhabitants of the Commonwealth, or of any 
town or parish," " they may, upon the presentment 
of a grand jury, be removed as a nuisance ; " and when 
so adjudged, "the materials may be sold at auction, 
to pay the expenses of the prosecution and removal." 
It has come to my knowledge, that some of the citi- 
zens intend to avail themselves of this legal remedy, 
and to assert, before the courts of law, their right to 
enjoy, with their fellow-citizens, the whole of the 
Training Field, as a public Common. The only 
wonder is, that the grievance has been so long en- 
dured. 

In order to prevent, if possible, the misfortune and 
waste incident to such suits at law, and also to ac- 
complish an object which would be highly desirable, 
even if the law did not imperiously require it of us, 
I have taken pains to ascertain the probable amount 
of the cost of abating all the nuisances upon the 
Training Field. I find that a commodious lot can be 
purchased upon Common or Fayette Street, for the 
reception of the main building of the Winthrop 
School House, and of the Engine House, which can 
both be removed thereon without injury ; that the 
buildings can all be removed or disposed of; and that 
the Training Field can be enclosed by a permanent 



fence, and put in order, for ten thousand dollars. 
The increase of taxes, from the enhancement of the 
real estate in the vicinity, which would inevitably 
follow so great an improvement, would in a short 
time pay the annual interest on this expenditure. 
But it will not be necessary to increase any taxes for 
this purpose. 

In my opinion, the present is also a favorable op- 
portunity to accomplish this end, in view of the new 
arrangements generally conceded to be requisite for 
the public schools. It is understood that the School 
Committee are about to adopt the policy of placing 
the boys and girls in the same schools ; and it is also 
known that a large section of Ward Two is not at 
present very well accommodated by the Harvard and 
Winthrop schools. A petition, signed by many citi- 
zens of that Ward, has been already sent to the City 
Council, praying for the establishment of a new 
Grammar school therein. If, therefore, the Winthrop 
School House were not illegally located where it is, 
it is most likely that it would in a short time be aban- 
doned for the purpose for which it is now used. The 
main portion of this building, when removed to a 
neighboring lot, can be easily divided into four large 
and convenient rooms, for as many Primary schools. 
It could then accommodate the three Primary schools 
now wrongfully upon the Training Field, and also 
the one upon Harvard Street. The erection of the 
new porch to the City Hall will render the removal 



5 



of the building for the last-named school very desira- 
ble, if not absolutely necessary. 

By following out this plan, there would remain to 
be disposed of four Primary school-houses, which are 
built of wood, and are only one story high; the 
Gun-house, which is the property of the Common- 
wealth ; and the side building, which now presents 
an unpleasant excrescence to the Winthrop School 
House. I understand that two or three Primary 
school-houses are much needed in other parts of the 
city. Two of those upon the Training Field, and the 
one on Harvard Street, are nearly new, or in good 
repair, and can be removed at trifling expense ; the 
third one upon the Training Field is an old building, 
and, with the materials of the side building to the 
Winthrop School House, can be disposed of by sale, 
on condition that they are removed. It is thought 
that the Commonwealth would unite with the city 
in building a new Gun-house, on a lot to be furnished 
by the city ; and that a drilling-room for the Artillery 
Company, and also a Ward-room, might be added, 
with but Uttle additional expense. 

In connection with this project, and as suggesting 
the means of carrying it into effect without increas- 
ing the taxes, or even the permanent debt of the city, 
I recommend that authority be given to the Joint 
Standing Committee on the Poor and the Alms 
House to purchase a farm, of not exceeding one 
hundred acres, in some town on the line of the Fitch- 



burg Railroad, or one of its branches, for our pauper 
establishment, and with the view of selling the pres- 
ent one. The convenience and cheapness of trans- 
portation by this railroad, having a passenger depot 
in our city, renders the distance of a few miles 
more or less of trifling importance ; and the farther 
we should go to make such a purchase, the less 
costly and the more healthy will be the situation se- 
lected. By this removal, the Poor, whom our city 
may become liable to support, will be provided with 
profitable labor, they will be more comfortably accom- 
modated, and our own community will be free from 
that constant liability to contagious disease, which the 
collection of a great number of the sick and disabled 
induces amid a dense population. 

The appropriation made for the support of the Poor 
for the past year was $7,000, and it was supposed to 
be ample ; but it was over-run by the late Board of 
Overseers by about $3,500, or fifty per cent. The 
benefit which has been realized from the labor of the 
Poor is quite small ; that upon our highways is 
merely nominal. While at work in the public 
streets, they are exposed to many temptations, and, 
at the same time, they must feel more sensibly their 
dependence and comparative degradation, than they 
would if employed on an extensive farm, secluded 
from observation. They would then become produ- 
cers of more than would be sufficient for their own 
support, and would in time make some return 



towards paying the interest on the outlay. The ap- 
preciation of the farm would, in a few years, be 
another source of profit to the city, and would fur- 
nish an additional inducement in favor of this pro- 
ceeding. 

There are at present appropriated for our Alms 
House, about two and a half acres of land, between 
Bunker Hill and Medford Streets, in the most thickly 
settled part of the city ; and there is also appur- 
tenant to this estate, a solid wharf, on Mystic river, 
with a considerable area of flats. The land may be 
sold for a large sum, if judiciously laid out in build- 
ing lots, upon wide streets ; a handsome square being 
also reserved. Experience has proved that it is a 
matter of pecuniary profit, as well as of permanent 
utility, even for individuals having extensive lands to 
dispose of, to lay out wide streets and squares ; the 
lots bounding thereon always bringing more money 
than the whole area would if divided off upon nar- 
row lanes and courts. It is certainly the true policy 
of a city, in disposing of its own lands, to set the ex- 
ample of providing liberally, in this way, for the pub- 
lic accommodation. 

From the most careful estimates which I have 
been able to make, I believe that the Alms House 
estate can be so laid out as to make eligible building 
lots, which would be sold for enough to accomplish 
all the objects suggested in this communication (the 
new Grammar School included). All these impor- 



8 



tant improvements may be effected at the same time, 
and not a single citizen would feel the least addi- 
tional burden on account thereof 

Fully persuaded that these objects ought to be un- 
dertaken at once, I earnestly commend them to the 
immediate attention of the two branches of the City 
Council ; and I trust that, on mature consideration, 
it will be decided to carry them into effect, with all 
the promptness consistent with sound economy, and 
with a due regard to law and to the comfort of the 
citizens ; — and that a temporary loan of a sum suffi- 
cient to supply the necessary means, be negotiated 
for three or five years, to be repaid from the proceeds 
of the Alms House and lands, when sold as above 
recommended. 

All which is respectfully submitted, 

G. WASHINGTON WAKREN, Mayor, 

1 • 



City of Charlestown, 
June 7, 1847. 



In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, > 

June 7th, 1847. ]" 

Read and referred to the several Joint Standing Committees on the sub- 
jects herein mentioned, and 500 copies ordered to be printed, for the use of 
the City Council. A. B. Shedd, City Clerk pro tempore. 

In Common Council, \ 
June 7th, 1847. ^ 

Concurred. Paul Willard, Jr., Clerk C. C. 



\J 



City Document.—No. 4. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 




REPORT or JOINT SPECIAL COMMITTEE 
ON STREETS, &c. 

In Board of the Mayor and Aldermen. — October 18, 1847. 

Read, laid on the table, and 200 copies ordered to be 
printed for the use of this Board. 

G. Washington Warren, Mayor. 

CHARLESTOWN: 

HENRY S. WARREN CITY PRINTER. 

1 S47. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



IN BOARD OF THE MAYOR AND ALDERMEN. 

September 6th, 1847. 

Ordered, — That the Mayor and Alderman Willard, 
with such as the Common Council may join, be a Com- 
mittee to consider and report what course should be pur- 
sued, conformably to the provisions of the Charter, in the 
laying out, widening, or discontinuing of streets, with 
authority to consult eminent counsel in relation to the 
whole subject. 

Passed, and sent down for concurrence : 

G. Washington Warren, Mayor, 



IN COMMON COUNCIL. 

October itJi, 1847. 

Concurred, — and Messrs. Cobb, Bailey and Wilhs were 
joined. 

Charles W. Moore, Pres, C. C. 



THE JOINT SPECIAL COMMITTEE 

Appointed by an order passed on the 4th instant, to con- 
sider and report what course should be pursued, conform- 
ably to the provisions of the Charter, in the laying out, 
&c., of streets, with authority to consult eminent counsel, 
have attended to the duty, and ask leave to report : 

That they have applied to Charles P. and B. R. Cur- 
tis, Esquires, eminent Counsellors at Law, to consider the 
whole subject, who have, after due consideration, given 
the annexed opinion, which the Committee believe to be 
of sufficient authority to govern the City Council. 
Respectfully submitted. 

Per order of the Committee : 

G. Washington Warren, Chairman. 
Ochber, 18, 1847. 



OPINION 



At the request of the Mayor and Aldermen of Charles- 
town, we have examined the questions below, growing 
out of the provisions of the Charter of that city in rela- 
tion to the laying out of streets and ways. 



If the Mayor and Aldermen in the first instance lay out 
a new street, has the Common Council authority to alter 
or amend the location ? Have they power to confirm and 
adopt the location in part, and to reject or dissent from it 



in part, and what is the proper course to be pursued by the 
City Council in the premises ? Is there a right of appeal 
from the decision of the city government to any other tri- 
bunal, except on the question of damages ? 

By Sect. 12 of An Act to establish the City of Charles- 
town, it is provided, that the City Council shall have ex- 
clusive autliority and power to lay out any new street or 
town way, and to estimate the damages any individual 
may sustain thereby ; but all questions relating to the sub- 
ject of laying out, accepting, altering, or discontinuing 
any street or way, shall first be acted upon by the Mayor 
and Aldermen. And any person dissatisfied with the de- 
cision of the City Council, in the estimate of damages, 
may make a complaint to the County Commissioners of 
the County of Middlesex, at any meeting held within one 
year after such decision, whereupon the same proceedings 
shall be had as arc provided, when persons are aggrieved 
by the assessment of damages by the Selectmen, in the 
24th Chapter of the Revised Statutes. 

All the authority and power heretofore possessed and 
exercised by the Selectmen and Inhabitants of Charles- 
town, touching the laying out, accepting, altering or dis- 
continuing of streets and ways, are vested in the City 
Council ; and like all the other powers conferred on that 
body, are to be exercised by concurrent vote, each board 
having a negative upon the other, — In most cases 
either branch of the City Council may act on propositions 
in the first instance, but in relation to streets and ways, the 
initiative is expressly given to the Mayor and Aldermen, 
who are first to act on all questions concerning those sub- 
jects, — ihc Common Council however mubt concur m the 



o 



order of the Mayor and Aldermen before it will be efiect- 
iial ; when they do so, the street or way is laid out, alter- 
ed or discontinued definitely, supposing that proper no- 
tice is given to parties interested, and the proceedings to 
be otherwise regular. 

If the Common Council refuse their assent to the act 
of the Mayor and Aldermen, it becomes inoperative ; but 
suppose the Common Council to be wilhng to assent to 
the location of a street or way for a portion of the extent 
of it, but not for the whole ; or to concur in the whole 
with an alteration in some part of it ; can they lawfully 
propose amendments to the order of the Mayor and Al- 
dermen, or must it be simply rejected or adopted by the 
City Council ? 

Our opinion is that the Common Council may propose 
amendments to an order of the Mayor and Aldermen, 
for laying out, altering or discontinuing streets and ways, 
which if concurred in by the latter become incorporated 
in, and parcel of the original order. Without this power 
we do not see how the two boards, in case of a difference 
of opinion as to a street, not going to the rejection of it 
altogether but only affecting it partially, could be legally 
brought to a concurrence. If the common council are 
dissatisfied with some of the details of the location and may 
not offer amendments to it, they must either adopt that 
which their consciences do not approve, or reject it in 
whole. The Mayor and Aldermen may learn out of doors 
the cause of the rejection, and the wishes of the other 
Board, and may then pass a new order approximating to, 
or adopting the views of the majority of the Common 
Council ; but in the mean time those views may have 
changed, or the absence of some and the presence of oth- 



6 



er members may have altered the relative numbers for oi* 
against the measure, and the new order may be rejected 
for the want of the very provisions which were fatal to its 
predecessor. We think the Legislature could not have in- 
tended to embarrass the action of the government of the 
city, on a subject of so much consequence to the daily 
comfort of the inhabitants, as the having of convenient 
streets and ways, by the mere requirement in the 12th 
Section of the Charter, above cited. The object of that 
requirement we think was, to prohibit the Common Coun- 
cil from instituting proceedings concerning streets, but 
not from dealing with such subjects after they are intro- 
duced by the Mayor and Aldermen, in the same manner 
as they are authorized to act on other matters to which 
their concurrence is necessary. The "question" which by 
the Charter is first to be acted on by the Mayor and Al- 
dermen, is, the location or discontinuance of a street, be- 
tween certain termini and running in a certain direction, 
and though in strict logical accuracy the identity of the 
question may be destroyed by an amendment to the order 
for location, yet by parliamentary laws and usage this ef- 
fect is avoided — A Bill which orginates in one branch of 
the Legislature or of Congress, is not the less the bill of 
that branch, though it may be entirely changed in its de- 
tails — (and even in its character) — by amendments made 
in the other branch. If the Legislature had intended to 
confine the authority of the Common Council to the sim- 
ple adoption or rejection of the act proposed by the May- 
or and Aldermen, we think they would have used lan- 
guage analogous to the provision in Section 9th, respect- 
ing appointments to office made by the Mayor and Alder- 
men, in which it is declared that "the Mayor shall have 



tJic exclusive power of nominations, such nominations 
however being subject to be confirmed or rejected by the 
Board of Aldermen," This clearly excludes all right of 
amendment by the latter ; they cannot strike out the name 
of the person nominated by the Mayor and insert another ; 
if not satisfied with the nomination they must reject it. 

On the whole therefore, we are of opinion that the Com- 
mon Council are not restricted by the Charter to the mere 
acceptance or rejection of the orders of tlie Mayor and 
Aldermen for the location &ac., of streets and ways, but 
may adopt them with amendments ; which, if assented to 
by that Board, become incorporated with the order, — An 
order so amended should be then passed witli the usual 
forms, by the Mayor and Aldermen. 

One of the questions proposed to us relates to the right 
of appeal from the adjudications of the City Council to 
another tribunal: — We are of opinion that the right of ap- 
peal, technically speaking, is confined to the estimate of 
the damages caused by the location, &c., of streets and 
ways ; from the judgment of the City Council when it has 
been exercised according to the law, on the expediency or 
-necessity of laying out, accepting, altering or discontinu- 
ing a way, there is no appeal to any other court or tri- 
iaunal. 

C, P. & B. R. CURTIS. 

October, 1847. 



4 



CITY DOCUMENT— No. 5. 



€ttB of €l)arle0toron. 



ADDRESS 

DELIVERED BY THE MAYOR, 

OCTOBER 7, 1847, 

AT THE 

LAYING OF THE CORNER STONE 

OF A 

BUILDING FOE A HIGH SCHOOL 

ON MONUMENT SQUARE. 




CHARLESTOWN: 
PRINTED AT THE FREEMAN OFFICE. 

1847. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN: 

In Board of the Mayor and Aldermen^ 

October 18, 1847, 

Resolved, That, His Honor, the Mayor, be respectfully requested to furnish 
to this Board a copy of his appropriate address, delivered on the occasion of 
the laying of the corner stone of the new building designed for the High 
School, in order that the same may be published. Read, and adopted. 

The Mayor then replied, that, in pursuance of the Resolve of the Board, he 
would furnish for its disposal a copy of the address. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Printing on the part of this Board, be 
instructed to cause Two Thousand and Five Hundred copies of the address of 
His Honor, the Mayor, delivered at the laying of the corner stone of the 
edifice for the High School, to be printed in neat pamphlet form, for general 
distribution among the citizens. Read, and passed. 

Attest, A. B. Shedd, City Clerk, pro tempore. 



ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council, and 

Fellow Citizens: 

We are assembled this morning to lay, with appro- 
priate ceremony, the corner stone of an edifice, designed 
for a public High School. The City Government has 
fully admitted the obligation imposed upon it by law, 
and by the dictates of a wise policy, to provide liberal 
means for the education of the young. Having decided 
to make new arrangements for the better accommodation 
of the present schools, by the erection of two new 
Grammar School Houses with the conveniences adapted 
to the increased numbers, it has also resolved to wipe 
out the stain which has hitherto rested upon Charles- 
town in her neglect to establish a High School for 
furnishing to the advanced scholars the means of a 
finished and complete education. 

Hitherto it has been considered by us sufficient to 
provide instruction for children in reading, penmanship 
and the bare rudiments of practical knowledge. We 
have only Primary and Grammar Schools. The first 
are for children firom four to eight years of age, who 



are there taught the Alphabet, a few tabular forms, and 
reading and spelling. On leaving the Primary, the 
children are sent to the Grammar Schools, there to 
remain until they are sixteen years of age — if they can 
stay there so long to any advantage — and are further 
instructed in reading and spelling, and also in pen- 
manship, arithmetic, grammar, geography, and a few 
other branches of English study. 

For eight years — more than one tenth part of the 
ordinary standard of the longest lives, and these years 
the most valuable and the most precarious of all — the 
children are made to spend their days in the same 
school-house, and to go through a constant routine of 
exercises and lessons, which in a very short time become 
familiar. This long continued familiarity — this monot- 
ony of scene must have the effect to repress the ardor 
and enthusiasm of youth, to stifle that curious spirit of 
inquiry, that thirst after knowledge, which nature has 
implanted within them for the development of their 
intellectual powers, and to induce a spirit of dulness 
and apathy calculated to encourage the formation of 
indolent and vicious habits. 

Four years constitute a term long enough for one 
class of schools. It is the term generally allotted to 
primary instruction ; it is also the full term of a colle- 
giate course. The important intervening period of 
eight years — from the age of eight to sixteen — ought to 
be divided into the Grammar and the Academic or 
High School. 

The human faculties require constant exercise and 
renewed motives for action. Unless they are in early 
life suitably tasked, they lose their vigor. If they are 
not made to advance, they will of themselves recede. 



If they do not gain strength from being constantly 
nerved to vigorous exercise, they will lapse into deteri- 
oration and decay. Discipline and severe tasks are as 
necessary to the vigor of mind, as exercise and labor 
are to bodily health and strength. For a complete and 
thorough education there should be planned a regular 
series of appropriate studies, properly classified and 
various, each in turn being more difficult than the pre- 
ceding, and all of them interesting and useful. The 
Languages, ancient and modern, the Sciences, History, 
Philosophy and Rhetoric, the means for thorough in- 
struction in all these should be furnished in the High 
School. Whatever is inculcated, should be earnestly 
and clearly presented to the youthful mind with all the 
attractions that naturally belong to the subject, and 
with the apt and copious illustrations of skilful and 
devoted teachers. The mind thus addressed will seize 
hold of, and thoroughly master the subject. As in 
erecting an imposing edifice — like the one now in con- 
templation — the foundation must first be carefully 
prepared, and each course of masonry must be laid in 
a workmanlike manner, the beams and frame-work 
securely placed, and the ornament and finish well ad- 
justed ; — ^so in the rearing of the mind, each successive 
course of study must be appropriate to the understand- 
ing, a substantial foundation must be laid with the 
solid rudiments, and by the training of one faculty after 
another, a superstructure must be formed in which the 
useful, the practical and the ornamental are gracefully 
blended, until at last an intellectual character is built 
up which will exhibit the mental poAvers developed in 
full strength and beautiful proportion. 



In our Commonwealth the public has taken upon 
itself the whole charge of the education of the young, 
and has designated for this purpose a period of twelve 
years. Our State laws have so devolved upon the 
public this educational care of the young, not by any 
means that it should do less than parental affection 
would dictate, but that in the forming of a compre- 
hensive system of public instruction, and by embracing 
all the children of the Commonwealth within its range, 
the great work of preparation for life might be done 
better than it could be accomplished by individual 
effort. Recognizing the doctrine of American Inde- 
pendence, that " all are born free and equal," the laws 
of our Commonwealth intend that all her children shall 
receive the same facilities of public instruction, so that 
in the mind and character, which are the essential ele- 
ments of the true dignity of life, they may aU have, in 
proportion as they improve the advantages offered, a 
fair opportunity to live equal. This is the theory of 
our laws upon the support of public schools. True 
indeed it is, that the principle has never been carried 
out into perfect operation. Here, as everywhere else, a 
vast amount of natural talent has remained dormant. 
Minds of strong natural capacity there have been in 
every age, which from neglect and from the want of 
proper culture in youth have failed of accomplishing 
the beneficial results, which they might and ought to 
have done. The talents and native energies of thou- 
sands have been wasted or misguided ; and their mental 
force and moral power, which should have been devel- 
oped for the benefit of the race, have been unfortunately 
lost to the world. 



The momentous importance of this consideration can- 
not be fully appreciated by the public. There is but 
one youth to a life. If in a single instance that season 
is neglected, then is one human life crippled of its 
proper means of usefulness and enjoyment. But if a 
whole community is at fault, if in the seed-time, it hesi- 
tates and delays to perform its duty, if it deals out the 
seeds of knowledge in a partial, parsimonious or unskil- 
ful manner, then in the next generation will the harvest 
be blighted, and a desolating famine will fall upon the 
land. 

It has been said to be too much the characteristic 
of our people to look backward into the history of 
their past. We are prone to glorify ourselves for the 
deeds of our fathers ; we love to extol the heroes of the 
revolution ; we praise their deeds, and by our unstinted 
praise would adopt them as our own. This retrospect 
is indeed pleasant, but as we frequently indulge our- 
selves in taking it, we should at the same time contrast 
the plans and labors which we are extending for the 
benefit of those who are to come after us with the toils 
and hardships which our fathers endured for us. We 
should turn our eyes forward and look to the prospect 
of coming years. We should provide for the future 
destinies of our country. As the most effectual means 
to this end we should devote our time and treasures to 
the improvement and support of a sufficient number of 
public schools, of the various grades, with the same 
spirit of duty and patriotism with which our fathers 
pledged " their lives, their fortunes and their sacred 
honor" for the sake of gaining liberty for them and for 
us. Thankful ought we to be, that it is our duty only 
to preserve and secure what our fathers struggled with 



8 

countless sacrifices to obtain. The City Council lias 
adopted for the motto of our new city, " Liberty — a trust 
to be transmitted to posterity," and in no more certain 
way can this trust be transmitted than by devising and 
maintaining a complete system of public education. 
The liberal expenditures which we are this year incur- 
ring for the erection of this and other school houses 
will be repaid to our City an hundred fold in the im- 
proved intellectual condition of her children. Although 
the outlay in the first instance is necessarily large, still, 
by laying aside a moderate sum each successive year, 
the burden of which no one will feel, a fund will in a 
short time be accumulated sufiicient to pay the whole 
cost; and while we are every day reaping the reward, 
we shall also be able to present to the next generation 
as an unincumbered legacy these bulwarks and de- 
fences which we have set up in our City coeval with 
her establishment to preserve inviolate this sacred trust. 
The High School to be established on this spot is 
designed for Girls as well as for Boys. It is a republi- 
can and a Christian doctrine, that although in some 
slight respects difi'erent branches of study may properly 
be pursued by the two sexes as adapted to their respec- 
tive spheres, equal advantages of public instruction 
ought to be afforded to both. Relying upon intelli- 
gence and virtue as the foundation of our free institu- 
tions, our whole social and political fabric depends 
much for its stability and order upon the cultivated 
talent and moral excellence of woman. The sister and 
the mother have an immeasurable influence upon the 
conduct of the boy and the man. Discipline and 
strengthen the mind, cultivate and direct the moral and 
intellectual faculties of the female sex, and you elevate 



the whole race. In our land of liberty this principle 
should be distinctly recognized. By the decree of 
Providence woman is to be the companion of man 
through the journey of life. In the hour of sickness 
she is to solace him, in the time of perplexity and 
temptation to counsel and sustain him, and amid all the 
toils and cares, the joys and sorrows of every day life to 
assist and relieve, to rejoice and sympathize with him. 
How strongly is man bound by every obligation of duty 
and by every consideration of interest to place the 
standard of female education on the highest ground, 
and to determine that, so far as the means are furnish- 
ed at the public charge, the daughters of our free Com- 
monwealth shall be as well qualified for their duties as 
the sons shall be for theirs ! 

A prejudice has heretofore existed in some minds 
against a public High School from the vague and 
unfounded suggestion that none but the children of 
wealthy parents can readily avail themselves of its ad- 
vantages. Nothing can be more at variance from the 
truth than this idea. By our State law the public 
schools are open to all without distinction. There is 
not the least danger that any favoritism will be exhib- 
ited by any persons having authority over the difierent 
schools, either in the mode of applying the general 
rules of admission, or in the mode of governing the dif- 
ferent pupils. That strong respect for personal right, 
that vigilant jealousy with which it is guarded in all 
places, and especially in the latitude of Bunker Hill, 
would put down such a disposition whenever and by 
whomsoever manifested. 

Nor is it true that parents who are not wealthy, 
are regardless of the importance of having their chil- 



10 

dren attend the public schools of the first grade, to re- 
ceive the benefit of all the instruction that may be af- 
forded. Go into any of the High Schools in the neigh- 
boring cities, and in the first rank you will find some of 
the most promising pupils to be those whose only capi- 
tal or dowry which they will have to start with in life, 
will be a good education and a good character. Many 
of the most eminent men and women of our State were 
children of poor parents, and they owe their present 
favorable position to the free schools. In them they 
learned the history of our country and were taught to 
compare it with the history of the republics of ancient 
days, and with that of other nations of the present time. 
In them they first imbibed a reverence for our republi- 
can institutions, and acquired the requisite qualifica- 
tions by which they are now able to sustain and perfect 
what in youth they were taught to admire. 

Raze from the land our free school system, or what is 
about as disastrous, neglect to provide the means of sus- 
taining the schools in an adequate manner, but keep them 
at so low a level, that every parent who can possibly af- 
ford it, will take his child away from them, and you 
strike at the foundation of a free government. It is 
quite unnecessary to enforce this sentiment here where 
its justice is so generally acknowledged. The lightning 
in some furious storm may shiver that shaft into the 
separate masses of which it is constructed, the earth in 
some violent convulsion of nature may shake it from its 
solid foundation ; but it cannot be, that the men who 
shall dwell beneath its lofty summit will ever prove 
recreant to the principles which it proclaims, will ever, 
by slighting the demands of popular education, show 



11 

themselves unworthy of their inheritance and reckless 
of the real welfare of their children. 

It has been wisely determined to erect on this site a 
building of a permanent character, which will be 
adapted to the wants of a flourishing and intelligent 
community, a building tastefully designed according to 
the rules of a classic architecture, one which will stamp 
an impression of dignity upon our City, which will be 
appropriate to its object and to the consecrated ground 
on which it is to stand. Such an edifice will inspire 
the minds of the pupils who from time to time shall be 
assembled within its walls with ideas of taste and beauty, 
with a salutary feeling of just pride that they belong 
to such a school, and with a corresponding spirit of 
emulation to strive to become worthy members of it. 

The character of the man is moulded by the early 
and impressive influences and associations of his youth. 
Whatever is then presented to him that is seemly, 
agreeable and consonant with correct taste will always 
have a purifying influence upon his mind and heart. 
The more such influences can be made to operate upon 
the young, the more likely are they to grow up intelli- 
gent and virtuous. This consideration ought never to 
be disregarded in the construction and arrangement of 
school houses. If the school room be confined and ill- 
ventilated, the seats uncomfortable and crowded close 
together, the form or bench unsuited to the youthful 
frame, if the building itself be awkward, disfigured and 
scarcely kept in decent repair, if the grounds around be 
neglected and resemble the frightful neighborhood of a 
pest house, then will the school and its legitimate pur- 
suits be repulsive, and while the children are detained 
there, they will think of little else on each day than of 



12 

the hour when they shall be dismissed to breathe pure 
air and to unfetter their limbs in open space. Surely 
the place, where in every age, the rising generation are 
to be qualified for the serious duties and responsibili- 
ties of life, ought of all others to be rendered attractive. 

It is one of the great means of success in the 
business of instruction, it is indeed the very first step 
to be taken, to make the children feel desirous of 
learning, to convince them that it is a high privilege 
which they have, to be allowed to attend the public 
schools. Let the teacher instil such a feeling in the 
minds of the young, and above all, let the people by 
their constituted agents make the outward and internal 
arrangements of all the schools so fitting and appropriate 
that the discerning youths will see that we are in earnest 
when we talk of the importance of education, and they 
will greedily take hold of the instruction offered ; they 
will grow up with a profound respect for parental and 
civil authority and for that system of government which 
is every day developing their capacities of pure enjoy- 
ment. 

Fellow Citizens, not one of us can truly estimate the 
beneficial consequences that are likely to flow from this 
important undertaking. Its immediate effects will be 
visible in the improvement of our grammar schools. The 
pupils who attend these will have presented before 
them a more powerful inducement to apply themselves 
assiduously to the preparatory studies and exercises in 
order to be seasonably qualified for admission to the 
High School. The Teachers of the Grammar Schools 
will naturally feel a stronger incentive to exertion, as 
iaiiother public test will obviously offer itself for com- 
paring their different merits. So by the united efforts 



13 

of teachers and pupils an enthusiastic spirit of study, a 
love of correct knowledge will be cultivated, which will 
wake up the minds of our youth and give them a new 
start. I believe that the High School will also have 
the effect to induce among the young a more correct 
and orderly deportment ; for in every place, as you ele- 
vate the standard of education you also will elevate the 
standard of character. 

May the Gentlemen of the School Committee, whose 
honored province it is to control and govern all our 
schools, be fortunate from the first in the introduction 
and proper arrangement of the various branches of 
learning that ought to be pursued in this High School, 
in the framing of judicious regulations for its internal 
government, and in the selection of competent and 
devoted instructers. And, fellow citizens, when all of 
us shall have passed away from the stage of life, when 
there shall not be one of the present generation living 
to inform the men of the twentieth century of the 
doings of these times, may the Institution this day 
planted yield its own good fruit and be ever fondly 
cherished by the people. May there annually proceed 
from it the young of both sexes, who, having been well 
disciplined and thoroughly instructed, will by the aid 
here received sustain the reputation of this memorable 
place. And as from year to year, by the discovery of 
new truths and principles in science and of improved 
methods of illustrating and enforcing them, additional 
knowledge shall be imparted, may the attachment of 
its pupils grow stronger and stronger to our country 
and all her free institutions, to this City which will 
have so nobly performed her duty to the young, and to 
the faithful teachers who shall have labored for their 



14 

advancement. "When under the benign influences of 
this most improved form of municipal government, the 
population of Charlestown shall be multiplied, her pros- 
perity increased, and her good name still more exalted, 
it will not be forgotten, that during the first year of a 
City Organization, this corner stone was laid and a 
permanent foundation secured for the more liberal and 
improved education of the young. As long as this 
Monument shall commemorate the successful contests 
of our fathers for National Independence, may the High 
School, standing up proudly by its side, serve, by its 
generous and ennobling influences, to perpetuate and 
guaranty the blessings of that Independence to our 
children's children unto the remotest generation. 



INSCEIPTION UPON THE PLATE DEPOSITED 
UNDER THE CORNER STONE. 



CHAELESTOWN HIGH SCHOOL FOR BOYS AND GIRLS. 

This Corner Stone laid October 7, A. D. MDCCCXLVII. 

Joint Committee of the City Council on Public Instruction. — G Washington 
Warren, Mayor; Paul Willard, Alderman; and C. W. Moore, President, H. 
A. Pierce and I. Lindsey, Members of the Common Council. 

School Committee. — H. K. Frothingham, President; Geo. Farrar, Secre- 
tary ; Joseph F. Tufts, Treasurer ; James Adams, J. W. Bemis, N. Y. Culbert- 
son, James Miskelly, George A. Parker, John Sanborn, Edward Thorndike 
and Seth J. Thomas. 

Architect. — Ammi B. Young. 

Builders. — James Tuttle and A. S. Tuttle, Masons. 

John B. Wilson and Charles Wilson, Carpenters. 



[O'There were also deposited in a leaden box with the plate, the documents 
printed by the City Government, including the City Register, several Docu- 
ments printed lately by the Town, including the last two annual reports of 
the School Committee, and the Report of the Committee of the Town upon 
obtaining a City Charter, «fcc. Also, a copy of the Bunker Hill Aurora, and of 
the Middlesex Freeman, and a few coins. 



/ 



CITY DOCUMEIVT— No. 5. 



(JEttj) of €l)arlcston)n. 



ADDEESS 

DELIVERED BY THE MAYOR, 

OCTOBER 7, 1847, 

AT THE 

LAYING OF THE COENER STONE 

OF A 

BUILDING FOR A HIGH SCHOOL 

ON MONUMENT SQUARE. 




CHARLESTOWN: 

PRINTED AT THE FREEMAN OFFICE. 

1847. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN : 

In Board of the Mayor and Mdermen, 

October 18, 1847. 

Resolved, That, His Honor, the Mayor, be respectfully requested to furnish 
to this Board a copy of his appropriate address, delivered on the occasion of 
the laying of the corner stone of the new building designed for the High 
School, in order that the same may be published. Read, and adopted. 

The Mayor then replied, that, in pursuance of the Resolve of the Board, he 
would furnish for its disposal a copy of the address. 

Ordered, That the Committee on Printing on the part of this Board, be 
instructed to cause Two Thousand and Five Hundred copies of the address of 
His Honor, the Mayor, delivered at the laying of the corner stone of the 
edifice for the High School, to be printed in neat pamphlet form, for general 
distribution among the citizens. Read, and passed. 

Attest, A. B. Shedd, City Clerk, pro tempore. 



ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen of the City Council, and 

Fellow Citizens: 

We are assembled this morning to lay, with appro- 
priate ceremony, the corner stone of an edifice, designed 
for a public High School. The City Government has 
fully admitted the obligation imposed upon it by law, 
and by the dictates of a wise policy, to provide liberal 
means for the education of the young. Having decided 
to make new arrangements for the better accommodation 
of the present schools, by the erection of two new 
Grammar School Houses with the conveniences adapted 
to the increased numbers, it has also resolved to wdpe 
out the stain which has hitherto rested upon Charles- 
town in her neglect to establish a High School for 
furnishing to the advanced scholars the means of a 
finished and complete education. 

Hitherto it has been considered by us sufficient to 
provide instruction for children in reading, penmanship 
and the bare rudiments of practical knowledge. We 
have only Primary and Grammar Schools. The first 
are for children firom four to eight years of age, who 



are there taught the Alphabet, a few tabular forms, and 
reading and spelling. On leaving the Primary, the 
children are sent to the Grammar Schools, there to 
remain until they are sixteen years of age — if they can 
stay there so long to any advantage — and are further 
instructed in reading and spelling, and also in pen- 
manship, arithmetic, grammar, geography, and a few 
other branches of English study. 

For eight years — more than one tenth part of the 
ordinary standard of the longest lives, and these years 
the most valuable and the most precarious of all — the 
children are made to spend their days in the same 
school-house, and to go through a constant routine of 
exercises and lessons, which in a very short time become 
familiar. This long continued familiarity — this monot- 
ony of scene must have the eiFect to repress the ardor 
and enthusiasm of youth, to stifle that curious spirit of 
inquiry, that thirst after knowledge, which nature has 
implanted within them for the development of their 
intellectual powers, and to induce a spirit of dulness 
and apathy calculated to encourage the formation of 
indolent and vicious habits. 

Four years constitute a term long enough for one 
class of schools. It is the term generally allotted to 
primary instruction ; it is also the full term of a colle- 
giate course. The important intervening period of 
eight years — from the age of eight to sixteen — ought to 
be divided into the Grammar and the Academic or 
High School. 

The human faculties require constant exercise and 
renewed motives for action. Unless they are in early 
life suitably tasked, they lose their vigor. If they are 
not made to advance, they will of themselves recede. 



If they do not gain strength from being constantly 
nerved to vigorous exercise, they will lapse into deteri- 
oration and decay. Discipline and severe tasks are as 
necessary to the vigor of mind, as exercise and labor 
are to bodily health and strength. For a complete and 
thorough education there should be planned a regular 
series of appropriate studies, properly classified and 
various, each in turn being more difficult than the pre- 
ceding, and all of them interesting and useful. The 
Languages, ancient and modern, the Sciences, History, 
Philosophy and Rhetoric, the means for thorough in- 
struction in all these should be furnished in the High 
School. Whatever is inculcated, should be earnestly 
and clearly presented to the youthful mind with all the 
attractions that naturally belong to the subject, and 
with the apt and copious illustrations of skilful and 
devoted teachers. The mind thus addressed will seize 
hold of, and thoroughly master the subject. As in 
erecting an imposing edifice — like the one now in con- 
templation — the foundation must first be carefully 
prepared, and each course of masonry must be laid in 
a workmanlike manner, the beams and frame-work 
securely placed, and the ornament and finish well ad- 
justed ; — so in the rearing of the mind, each successive 
course of study must be appropriate to the understand- 
ing, a substantial foundation must be laid with the 
solid rudiments, and by the training of one faculty after 
another, a superstructure must be formed in which the 
useful, the practical and the ornamental are gracefully 
blended, until at last an intellectual character is built 
up which will exhibit the mental powers developed in 
full strength and beautiful proportion. 



6 

In our Commonwealth the public has taken upon 
itself the whole charge of the education of the young, 
and has designated for this purpose a period of twelve 
years. Our State laws have so devolved upon the 
public this educational care of the young, not by any 
means that it should do less than parental affection 
would dictate, but that in the forming of a compre- 
hensive system of public instruction, and by embracing 
all the children of the Commonwealth within its range, 
the great work of preparation for life might be done 
better than it could be accomplished by individual 
effort. Recognizing the doctrine of American Inde- 
pendtence, that " all are born free and equal," the laws 
of our Commonwealth intend that all her children shall 
receive the same facilities of public instruction, so that 
in the mind and character, which are the essential ele- 
ments of the true dignity of life, they may all have, in 
proportion as they improve the advantages offered, a 
fair opportunity to live equal. This is the theory of 
our laws upon the support of public schools. True 
indeed it is, that the principle has never been carried 
out into perfect operation. Here, as everywhere else, a 
vast amount of natural talent has remained dormant. 
Minds of strong natural capacity there have been in 
every age, which from neglect and from the want of 
proper culture in youth have faded of accomplishing 
the beneficial results, which they might and ought to 
have done. The talents and native energies of thou- 
sands have been wasted or misguided ; and their mental 
force and moral power, which should have been devel- 
oped for the benefit of the race, have been unfortunately 
lost to the world. 



The momentous importance of this consideration can- 
not be fully appreciated by the public. There is but 
one youth to a life. If in a single instance that season 
is neglected, then is one human life crippled of its 
proper means of usefulness and enjoyment. But if a 
whole community is at fault, if in the seed-time, it hesi- 
tates and delays to perform its duty, if it deals out the 
seeds of knowledge in a partial, parsimonious or unskil- 
ful manner, then in the next generation will the harvest 
be bhghted, and a desolating famine will fall upon the 
land. 

It has been said to be too much the characteristic 
of our people to look backward into the history of 
their past. We are prone to glorify ourselves for the 
deeds of our fathers ; we love to extol the heroes of the 
revolution ; we praise their deeds, and by our unstinted 
praise would adopt them as our own. This retrospect 
is indeed pleasant, but as we frequently indulge our- 
selves in taking it, we should at the same time contrast 
the plans and labors which we are extending for the 
benefit of those who are to come after us with the toils 
and hardships which our fathers endured for us. We 
should turn our eyes forward and look to the prospect 
of coming years. We should provide for the future 
destinies of our country. As the most effectual means 
to this end we should devote our time and treasures to 
the improvement and support of a sufiicient nimiber of 
public schools, of the various grades, with the same 
spirit of duty and patriotism with which our fathers 
pledged " their lives, their fortunes and their sacred 
honor" for the sake of gaining liberty for them and for 
us. Thankful ought we to be, that it is our duty only 
to preserve and secure what our fathers struggled with 



countless sacrifices to obtain. The City Council has 
adopted for the motto of our new city, " Liberty — a trust 
to be transmitted to posterity," and in no more certain 
way can this trust be transmitted than by devising and 
maintaining a complete system of public education. 
The liberal expenditures which we are this year incur- 
ring for the erection of this and other school houses 
will be repaid to our City an hundred fold in the im- 
proved intellectual condition of her children. Although 
the outlay in the first instance is necessarily large, still, 
by laying aside a moderate sum each successive year, 
the burden of which no one will feel, a fund will in a 
short time be accumulated sufficient to pay the whole 
cost; and while we are every day reaping the reward, 
we shall also be able to present to the next generation 
as an unincumbered legacy these bulwarks and de- 
fences which we have set up in our City coeval with 
her establishment to preserve inviolate this sacred trust. 
The High School to be established on this spot is 
designed for Girls as well as for Boys. It is a republi- 
can and a Christian doctrine, that although in some 
slight respects different branches of study may properly 
be pursued by the two sexes as adapted to their respec- 
tive spheres, equal advantages of public instruction 
ought to be afforded to both. Eelying upon intelli- 
gence and virtue as the foundation of our free institu- 
tions, our whole social and political fabric depends 
much for its stability and order upon the cultivated 
talent and moral excellence of woman. The sister and 
the mother have an immeasurable influence upon the 
conduct of the boy and the man. Discipline and 
strengthen the mind, cultivate and direct the moral and 
intellectual faculties of the female sex, and you elevate 



9 

the whole race. In our land of liberty this principle 
should be distinctly recognized. By the decree of 
Providence woman is to be the companion of man 
through the journey of life. In the hour of sickness 
she is to solace him, in the time of perplexity and 
temptation to counsel and sustain him, and amid all the 
toils and cares, the joys and sorrows of every day life to 
assist and relieve, to rejoice and sympathize with him. 
How strongly is man bound by every obligation of duty 
and by every consideration of interest to place the 
standard of female education on the highest ground, 
and to determine that, so far as the means are furnish- 
ed at the public charge, the daughters of our free Com- 
monwealth shall be as well qualified for their duties as 
the sons shall be for theirs ! 

A prejudice has heretofore existed in some minds 
against a public High School from the vague and 
unfounded suggestion that none but the children of 
wealthy parents can readily avail themselves of its ad- 
vantages. Nothing can be more at variance from the 
truth than this idea. By our State law the public 
schools are open to all without distinction. There is 
not the least danger that any favoritism will be exhib- 
ited by any persons having authority over the different 
schools, either in the mode of applying the general 
rules of admission, or in the mode of governing the dif- 
ferent pupils. That strong respect for personal right, 
that vigilant jealousy with which it is guarded in all 
places, and especially in the latitude of Bunker Hill, 
would put down such a disposition whenever and by 
whomsoever manifested. 

Nor is it true that parents who are not wealthy, 
are regardless of the importance of having their chil- 



dren attend the public schools of the first grade, to re- 
ceive the benefit of all the instruction that may be af- 
forded. Go into any of the High Schools in the neigh- 
boring cities, and in the first rank you will find some of 
the most promising pupils to be those whose only capi- 
tal or dowry which they will have to start with in life, 
will be a good education and a good character. Maiiy 
of the most eminent men and women of our State were 
children of poor parents, and they owe their present 
favorable position to the free schools. In them they 
learned the history of our country and were taught to 
compare it with the history of the republics of ancient 
days, and with that of other nations of the present time. 
In them they first imbibed a reverence for our republi- 
can institutions, and acquired the requisite qualifica- 
tions by which they are now able to sustain and perfect 
what in youth they were taught to admire. 

Eaze from the land our free school system, or what is 
about as disastrous, neglect to provide the means of sus- 
taining the schools in an adequate manner, but keep them 
at so low a level, that every parent who can possibly af- 
ford it, will take his child away from them, and you 
strike at the foundation of a free government. It is 
quite unnecessary to enforce this sentiment here where 
its justice is so generally acknowledged. The lightning 
in some furious storm may shiver that shaft into the 
separate masses of which it is constructed, the earth in 
some violent convulsion of nature may shake it from its 
solid foundation ; but it cannot be, that the men who 
shall dwell beneath its lofty summit will ever prove 
recreant to the principles which it proclaims, will ever, 
by slighting the demands of popular education, show 



11 

themselves unworthy of their inheritance and reckless 
of the real welfare of their children. 

It has been wisely determined to erect on this site a 
building of a permanent character, which will be 
adapted to the wants of a flourishing and intelligent 
community, a building tastefully designed according to 
the rules of a classic architecture, one which will stamp 
an impression of dignity upon our City, which will be 
appropriate to its object and to the consecrated ground 
on which it is to stand. Such an edifice will inspire 
the minds of the pupils who from time to time shall be 
assembled within its walls with ideas of taste and beauty, 
with a salutary feeling of just pride that they belong 
to such a school, and with a corresponding spirit of 
emulation to strive to become worthy members of it. 

The character of the man is moulded by the early 
and impressive influences and associations of his youth. 
Whatever is then presented to him that is seemly, 
agreeable and consonant with correct taste will always 
have a purifying influence upon his mind and heart. 
The more such influences can be made to operate upon 
the young, the more likely are they to grow up intelli- 
gent and virtuous. This consideration ought never to 
be disregarded in the construction and arrangement of 
school houses. If the school room be confined and ill- 
ventilated, the seats uncomfortable and crowded close 
together, the form or bench unsuited to the youthful 
frame, if the building itself be awkward, disfigured and 
scarcely kept in decent repair, if the grounds around be 
neglected and resemble the frightful neighborhood of a 
pest house, then will the school and its legitimate pur- 
suits be repulsive, and while the children are detained 
there, they will think of little else on each day than of 



12 

the hour when they shall be dismissed to breathe pure 
air and to unfetter their limbs in open space. Surely 
the place, where in every age, the rising generation are 
to be qualified for the serious duties and responsibili- 
ties of life, ought of all others to be rendered attractive. 

It is one of the great means of success in the 
business of instruction, it is indeed the very first step 
to be taken, to make the children feel desirous of 
learning, to convince them that it is a high privilege 
which they have, to be allowed to attend the public 
schools. Let the teacher instil such a feeling in the 
minds of the young, and above all, let the people by 
their constituted agents make the outward and internal 
arrangements of all the schools so fitting and appropriate 
that the discerning youths will see that we are in earnest 
when we talk of the importance of education, and they 
will greedily take hold of the instruction ofiered ; they 
will grow up with a profound respect for parental and 
civil authority and for that system of government which 
is every day developing their capacities of pure enjoy- 
ment. 

Fellow Citizens, not one of us can truly estimate the 
beneficial consequences that are likely to flow from this 
important undertaking. Its immediate effects will be 
visible in the improvement of our grammar schools. The 
pupils who attend these will have presented before 
them a more powerful inducement to apply themselves 
assiduously to the preparatory studies and exercises in 
order to be seasonably qualified for admission to the 
High School. The Teachers of the Grammar Schools 
will naturally feel a stronger incentive to exertion, as 
another public test will obviously offer itself for com- 
paring their different merits. So by the united efforts 



13 

of teachers and pupils an enthusiastic spirit of study, a 
love of correct knowledge will be cultivated, which will 
wake up the minds of our youth and give them a new 
start. I believe that the High School will also have 
the effect to induce among the young a more correct 
and orderly deportment ; for in every place, as you ele- 
vate the standard of education you also will elevate the 
standard of character. 

May the Gentlemen of the School Committee, whose 
honored province it is to control and govern all our 
schools, be fortunate from the first in the introduction 
and proper arrangement of the various branches of 
learning that ought to be pursued in this High School, 
in the framing of judicious regulations for its internal 
government, and in the selection of competent and 
devoted instructers. And, fellow citizens, when all of 
us shall have passed away from the stage of life, when 
there shall not be one of the present generation living 
to inform the men of the twentieth century of the 
doings of these times, may the Institution this day 
planted yield its own good fruit and be ever fondly 
cherished by the people. May there annually proceed 
from it the young of both sexes, who, having been well 
disciplined and thoroughly instructed, will by the aid 
here received sustain the reputation of this memorable 
place. And as from year to year, by the discovery of 
new truths and principles in science and of improved 
methods of illustrating and enforcing them, additional 
knowledge shall be imparted, may the attachment of 
its pupils grow stronger and stronger to our country 
and all her free institutions, to this City which will 
have so nobly performed her duty to the young, and to 
the faithful teachers who shall have labored for their 



14 

advancement. "When under the benign influences of 
this most improved form of municipal government, the 
population of Charlestown shall be multiplied, her pros- 
perity increased, and her good name still more exalted, 
it will not be forgotten, that during the first year of a 
City Organization, this corner stone was laid and a 
permanent foundation secured for the more liberal and 
improved education of the young. As long as this 
Monument shall commemorate the successful contests 
of our fathers for National Independence, may the High 
School, standing up proudly by its side, serve, by its 
generous and ennobling influences, to perpetuate and 
guaranty the blessings of that Independence to our 
children's children unto the remotest generation. 



INSCRIPTION UPON THE PLATE DEPOSITED 
UNDER THE COENER STONE. 



CHAELESTOWN HIGH SCHOOL FOR BOYS AND GIELS. 

This Corner Stone laid October 7, A. D. MDCCCXLVII. 

Joint Committee of the City Council on Public Instruction. — G Washington 
Warren, Mayor; Paul Willard, Alderman; and C. W. Moore, President, H. 
A. Pierce and I. Lindsey, Members of the Common Council. 

School Committee. — H. K. Frothingham, President; Geo. Farrar, Secre- 
tary ; Joseph F. Tufts, Treasurer; James Adams, J. W. Bemis, N. Y. Culbert- 
son, James Miskelly, George A. Parker, John Sanborn, Edward Thorndike 
and Seth J. Thomas. 

.Architect. — Ammi B. Young. 

Builders. — James Tuttle and A. S. Tuttle, Masons. 

John B. Wilson and Charles Wilson, Carpenters. 



[CrThere were also deposited in a leaden box with the plate, the documents 
printed by the City Government, including the City Register, several Docu- 
njents printed lately by the Town, including the last two annual reports of 
the School Committee, and the Report of the Committee of the Town upon 
obtaining a City Charter, «fec. Also, a copy of the Bunker Hill Aurora, and of 
the Middlesex Freeman, and a few coins. 



REPORT 



OP THE 



SELECT COMMITTEE OF THE COMMON COUNCIL, 



TO WHOM WAS REFERRED THE 



PETITION OF i R. DECOSTER 11 OTHERS. 



ON THE SUBJECT OF 



WARD TWO BEING DEPRIVED OP ITS 
LEGAL EEPEESENTATION. 

CHAELESTOWN, FEBRUARY 14, 1848. 



BOSTON: 

PRINTED BY DAMRELL & MOORE. ...52 WASHINGTON ST. 

1848, 



To the Common Council of the City of Charlestown, 

Jan. 24, 1848. 

Whereas, it being not only a fundamental principle 
in our form of Government, but a constitutional and 
lawful right guaranteed in our City Charter, that every 
portion of the people shall have a fair and equal repre- 
sentation in each branch of our City Council; and 
Whereas, one of the constitutional and lawful repre- 
sentatives of Ward two having been unconstitutionally 
and unlawfully deprived of his right to speak and vote 
again for the remainder of the current municipal year, 
which is depriving said Ward of one-sixth part of its 
constitutional and lawful representation, therefore, 

We, the undersigned, legal Voters of Ward two, res- 
pectfully petition that the Order passed by your Board, 
depriving Ichabod Lindsey of his right to speak or vote, 
be repealed. And the Petitioners further ask to be 
heard, by themselves or counsel, upon the consideration 
of this Petition. 

A. K,. Decoster. Royal Underwood. 

Alonzo Corey. Jacob Foss. 

Aura S. Tuttle. Wells Chase. 

Joseph Hayne. Jacob L. Schwartz. 

Cyrus Towle. William Hennessy. 

J. W. Wentworth. Charles Lang. 

James Tuttle. James Wiley, Jr. 

Samuel L. Tuttle. Jerome B. Wallace, 

Charles P. Brooks. Edward Miskelly. 

Gilbert D. Cooper. Nelson Cutler. 

J. B. Norton. James Miskelly. 

E. L. Norton. James S. Mahony. 

Aaron Clark. George J. Barrell. 

Isaac S. French. Henry Grines. 

Zenas C. Howland. C. S. Waldin. 

Samuel F. Tilden. Samuel Williams. 
Henry Howland. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWR 



IN COMMON COUNCIL. 

Jan. 24, 1S48. 

Oedered, That the Petition of A. R. Decoster and 
others, (relative to "Ward two being deprived of its con- 
stitutional and legal representation,) be referred to a 
Special Committee, consisting of Messrs. Holmes, Bai- 
ley, 2d, and Lewis. 

PAUL WILLARD, Jr., 

Clerk of Common Council, 



City of Charlestown. 
In Common Council, Feb. 14, 1848. 
Ordered, That the Special Committee to whom was 
referred the Petition of A. R. Decoster and others, pro- 
cure the printing of one thousand copies of the Report 
upon said Petition, and that a copy be sent to each of 
the petitioners. 

Passed. 

C. W. MooRE, Fres. C. C 

A true copy. 
Attest, 

Paul Willard, Jr.j Cierk C. C 



REPORT. 



The Committee to whom was referred the Petition 
of A. R. Decoster and others, "relative to Ward two 
being deprived of its constitutional and legal represen- 
tation," having heard the petitioners upon the matter of 
their petition, and having fully considered the subject, 
beg leave to submit the following 

MAJORITY REPORT. 

The Committee conceive that the only question in- 
volved in a full consideration of the petition referred to 
them, is the right of this Board, as a constituent branch 
of the city government, to make and enforce rules "for 
its regular and satisfactory proceeding." 

Much was said at the hearing in behalf of the peti- 
tioners that the Committee deemed wholly irrelevant, 
and, under other circumstances, might have refused to 
hear ; they were, however, constrained by the novelty 
of the case, as well as the delicacy of the duty assigned 
them, to hear the petitioners patiently and fully. 

Every deliberative assembly, if it desires to effect the 
purpose of its creation, must necessarily have the power 
to make and enforce rules and forms of proceeding. It 
was upon this principle, that the rules and orders of 



both branches of the City Council were adopted, among 
the first acts in the organization of the city government. 
In the language of Mr. Justice Story, commenting 
upon the fifth Section of Article 1st of the Constitution 
of the United States, which gives to each House of 
Congress the power to determine the rules of its pro- 
ceeding, " The humblest assembly of men is under- 
stood to possess this power." 

Mr. Cushing, also, in Sections 10 and 20, of his Par- 
liamentary Practice, lays down the same fundamental 
principle. " Every deliberative assembly, by the mere 
fact of its being assembled and constituted, does there- 
by necessarily adopt and become subject to those rules 
and forms of proceeding, without which it would be 
impossible for it to accomplish the purposes of its crea- 
tion." There is not a State Legislature in the Union, 
that does not expressly recognize this power, by the 
adoption, at the beginning of every session, of rules and 
orders for its legislative proceedings ; and this, in many 
of the States, without any authority for so doing ex- 
pressly given in their Constitution. 

The power exists in every deliberative assembly, at 
common law, " which furnishes principles equally, for 
civil and criminal justice, for public privileges and pri- 
vate rights." 

It is a singular fact, that the Constitution of the 
United States does not give any power to punish for 
contempts committed against either House of Congress, 
and yet, the Supreme Court of the United States has 
decided, that this remarkable power belongs inciden- 
tally to both Houses of Congress at common law, and, 
by parity of reasoning, to both branches of State Leg- 
islatures ; so that, as expressly decided by the Supreme 
Court of the United States, the Speaker of the House 



of Representatives, by their order, may issue his warrant 
to the proper officer of that body, authorizing him to 
arrest and imprison in any State in the Union, any per- 
son or persons declared guihy of contempt against that 
body. If such a remarkable power as this — the power 
to arrest and punish persons not members of a delibe- 
rative assembly — can be derived incidentally to such 
bodies, for a still stronger reason does the power exist 
to make rules of proceeding to punish the members 
themselves for a breach of their rules. And within the 
last month, the House of Representatives of Louisiana, 
for some breach of its rules, ordered that one of its 
members be imprisoned twelve hours in the parish jail; 
and yet, the Constitution of Louisiana gives no such 
power to that body, in express terms. 

Towns throughout New England are a sort of inde- 
pendant republics, in all matters of local concern, where 
the humblest individual has a hand and A^oice in all 
town affairs, where the rights of speech are free and 
unrestricted as could be desired ; and yet, the Legisla- 
ture of this Commonwealth have enacted, that the 
Moderator of town meetings may order any person 
who shall persist in conducting himself disorderly at 
such meetings, " to withdraw from the meeting ; and on 
his- refusal, may order the constable or any other person 
to take him from the meeting, and confine him in some 
convenient place until the meeting be adjourned," and 
this without any constitutional authority. It may well 
be argued, on the principles urged in behalf of the pe- 
titioners, that no Legislature can thus limit the inalien- 
able rights of the individual, without the power so to 
do expressly granted in the Constitution. But town 
meetings are in fact as much deliberative assemblies as 
the Common Council of this city ; and indeed a large 



8 



part of what is now done by both branches of the City 
Council in concurrence, was formerly done by the in- 
habitants in town meeting. They deliberated — they 
legislated ; and in the opinion of the Committee, the 
Moderator of a town meeting duly assembled, would 
Lindoubtedly, at common law, which is the united com- 
naon sense of all preceding ages, and without any au- 
thority of the Legislature, have the power to expel from 
the meeting or put into custody any refractory member 
of the meeting, in order to preserve the decency, dignity, 
and character thereof Of the same nature is the 
power to pimish for contempt, possessed by every court 
of justice in this and every other country, from the very 
organization of its tribunals. There is not, the Com- 
mittee believe, a Constitution in this country, that ex- 
pressly gives the power to their judicial tribunals, and 
yet, there is not a common-law court in any State in 
this Union, that has not exercised this power, time and 
again, unquestioned and undenied. 

The general principle plainly to be inferred from 
what has been said, is, that whenever and wherever, 
any assembly, tribunal, or body corporate, is created for 
a certain express purpose, such assembly, tribunal, or 
body corporate, must possess all the incidental powers 
necessary to effect that purpose. 

This Board, by the act incorporating the City of 
Charlestown, is made a constituent branch of the city 
government, having certain legislative and judicial 
powers, requiring much careful and judicious delibera- 
tion, and involving largely the property and interest of 
others, in their execution. It is therefore the duty, and 
privilege, of every member of this Board, to do all in 
his power to promote the end for which it was estab- 
lished. If, on the contrary, one or more members of 



the Board do all in their power to frustrate the purposes 
of our incorporation, it is undoubtedly, in the opinion 
of the Committee, the duty and privilege of the rest to 
put down such impertinence as summarily and effect- 
ually as they can, consistently with the dignity and 
character of the Board. 

It only remains for the Committee to consider, in this 
connection, the kind and degree of punishment deliber- 
ative assemblies may inflict upon its members. It was 
argued to the Committee, in behalf of the petitioners, 
that the Common Council was precluded from exer- 
cising any other mode or degree of punishment than 
that prescribed by the 18th Article of the Hules and 
Orders of the Common Council, which provides, that if 
a member is decided to be out of order by the Council, 
he shall not " be permitted to speak again on the ques- 
tion then in debate, unless by way of excuse for the 
same, until he has made satisfaction." The Committee 
do not understand, even if the case of the member of 
Ward two came expressly within the terms of the ISth 
Article, that the punishment prescribed there is the only 
punishment they may inflict. They have only to sup- 
pose a very probable state of things to show the un- 
soundness of this view of the petitioners. Suppose the 
member from Ward two should refuse to comply with 
the Article in question, if decided to be out of order as 
there prescribed ; if^ as contended in behalf of the pe- 
titioners, that is the only mode and the maximum of 
punishment in the power of the Board, the member 
from Ward two might effectually defy their influence. 
But the Committee are of opinion that the Council 
may resort to any kind and degree of punishment 
known to deliberative assemblies, and sufficient to avert 



10 



the mischief complained of. If not, — if a degree of 
punishment be prescribed inadequate to stop the dis- 
order, — then all the rules of this Board are entirely nu- 
gatory. 

But then again; if the construction contended for 
by the petitioners be correct, it can at best only apply 
to the case expressly provided — that is, where a member 
is called to order in debate. It is obvious to every one 
at all familiar with parliamentary proceedings, that 
very many gross misdemeanors, calling for exemplary 
punishments, are committed in deliberative assemblies, 
and not necessarily in debate. If in the course of de- 
bate a member violate some rule of debate, and at the 
same time commits some breach of decency or good 
breeding, or otherwise insults the assembly of which he 
is a member, ever so grossly — according to the construc- 
tion of the petitioners, the offending party can only be 
prohibited, by way of punishment, to speak again on 
the question then in debate. A member of this Board 
has only then to spring a debate upon some subject, 
and commit any indignity he pleases upon the assem- 
bly, or the members of the assembly, — spit in a mem- 
ber's face, — or lay down upon the floor of the assembly- 
room, — and yet the Board can only punish him by 
passing an order, that " he shall not speak again upon 
the question then in debate ;" and even then, according 
to the petitioners, if the refractory member does not 
obey, the Board have no power to compel a submis- 
sion. 

The Committee believe that the mere statement of 
the practical results of this construction by the petitioners, 
is enough to show its unsoundness. 

Much was said to the Committee in behalf of the 



11 



petitioners, relative to the mode of punishment adopted 
by this Board — a punishment virtually depriving Ward 
two of one sixth of its representation. The Committee 
are of opinion, that the order, as already construed by 
this Board, does not deprive Ward two of its represen- 
tation. The suspended member has still a right to 
speak and vote before all Committees of which he is 
or maybe a member; to make reports; to introduce 
orders, and present petitions, memorials, and other 
papers to the Council. 

But the Committee go further, and contend that if 
the order had received a strict construction, and the 
member been entirely cut off from the privilege of vot- 
ing and speaking in Committees and before this Board, 
it would have been clearly parliamentary, and this on 
the ground already discussed in the Report, that every 
deliberative assembly possesses the power incidentally 
to make rules for its proceeding, and compel its mem- 
bers to observe them. 

But on the score of the injustice thereby done 
to the inhabitants of Ward two, the Committee would 
suggest : — which is the greater hardship, for one-sixth of 
the constituents of Ward two to be deprived of their 
representation by the punishment of their representative, 
or for the remaining seventeen eighteenth's of the whole 
city to be deprived of their representation, if the offend- 
ing member go unpunished 1 If the punishment work 
a hardship upon his constituents, then let it rest where 
it belongs — on the refractory member himself He is the 
individual who has infringed upon the rights of repre- 
sentation. The sovereignty of the people, — :the right of - 
representation has been variously qualified by the peo- 
ple themselves, in adopting their constitutions and 



12 



fundamental laws. In Massachusetts, the right to vote 
is qualified by prescribing that voting shall be performed 
on a particular day, in a particular place, and the voter 
shall not, in the exercise of the prerogative, infringe 
upon the rights of others. The people's sovereignty be- 
ing thus qualified, in its primary exercise by themselves 
— it is not, in the opinion of the Committee, enlarged, 
by being delegated to a representative, and that he can- 
not exercise more powers and prerogatives than the 
people who delegated it exercised themselves. 

"The rules of parliamentary proceeding in this coun- 
try," says Mr. Gushing, "are derived from, and are es- 
sentially the same with those of the British Parliament." 
In regard to the modes of punishment this body have 
from time to time inflicted upon its members — the Com- 
mittee find, in the representative portion of that body, 
the most common punishments to be, the committing 
the refractory member to the Tower, for an uncertain or 
a specified time — expelling him from the House — com- 
mitting him to the custody of the sergeant-at-arms, to be 
confined during the pleasure of the House; and the Com- 
mittee beheve that within a year, Mr. Smith O'Brien, an 
Irish member of the House of Commons, was put into 
the custody of the sergeant-at-arms, and kept in confine- 
ment the whole session of Parliament — one or two 
months — for refusing to act upon a committee ; and yet 
the Magna Charter of British Hights provides, that 
"every freeman shall be adjudged of life, liberty, or 
property, only by his peers or by the law of the land." 

In this country the same punishments have been 
frequently inflicted upon their members, by legislative 
and deliberative assemblies. The House of Represen- 
tatives of this Commonwealth (and the Committee 



13 



deem it unnecessary to go further) have frequently sus- 
pended its members for misdemeanors committed in 
and out of that body. 

In 1784 Jeremiah Leanard, a member of the House 
from Oxford, was suspended from exercising the duties 
of a member, because he had been indicted for opposing 
the collection of Taxes, and was under recognizance to 
appear to take his trial at a future day. 

In 1800, Elisha Fuller, a member of the House from 
Ludlow, " was excluded from a seat in the House," be- 
cause he had been indicted and convicted of forging, in 
1791, a certificate of his character, for sober life and 
conversation, in order to get a license to sell spirituous 
liquors. 

In 1808, John Waite, a member of the House from 
Falmouth, was suspended from exercising the duties of 
a member, until the House should take further order 
upon the report of a Committee, appointed to investi- 
gate the truth of a charge against said Waite, of having 
been convicted of forgery. These summary powers are 
those assumed and exercised by the House of Repre- 
sentatives of this Commonwealth, although the Massa- 
chusetts Bill of Rights provides, that no person shall 
" be despoiled or deprived of his property, immunities, or 
privileges, but by the judgment of his peers or the law 
of the land." 

Reprimanding, exclusion from the Assembly, a prohi- 
bition to speak or vote for a specified time — and expulsion — 
are enumerated among others, in Section 42, of Cush- 
ing's Manual, as modes of punishment inflicted by de- 
liberative assemblies, upon their members. 

One other fact in this connection, which operated 
somewhat to satisfy the Committee that the course 



14 



adopted by this Board towards the member from Ward 
two, is perfectly in accordance with parliamentary prac- 
tice, as understood by our House of Representatives, is 
that the Xlllth Article of Chap, ii, of the Rules and Or- 
ders of the present House of Representatives of this Com- 
monwealth, provides, that if any member of that body 
shall " be guilty of a breach of either of the Rules and 
Orders of the House, he shall not be allowed to speak 
or vote, until he has made satisfaction." And this 
article the Committee believe has been among the rules 
and orders of that body, near twenty years. 

From general reasoning and from authority, the Com- 
mittee are of opinion, that the order passed by the 
Council, Jan. 10th, 1848, and referred to by the peti- 
tioners, was clearly demanded at the time, by the ex- 
igences of the case ; and that there is not, in the con- 
siderations urged in behalf of the petitioners, before 
the Committee, any substantial reasons why the order 
should be repealed ; and the Committee, therefore, re- 
commend that the petitioners have leave to withdraw 
their petition. 

The Committee cannot close the foregoing report, 
giving, as it does, their approval of the order complained 
of^ without expressing to the Board the unpleasant na- 
ture of the duty they have had to perform. There is 
not a member of the Council, the Committee are sure, 
that does not regret the occasion that ever subjected 
the member from Ward two to their censure or pun- 
ishment. 

The Committee cannot forget, that all the members 
of this Council are sent here, not to censure or punish 
each other, but to consult for the interest of the city, as 
representatives, under a degreee of accountability to 



15 



their constituents, or their words and actions — and, as 
men and citizens, under a degree of accountabiUty to 
society for decent speech, decorum, and behaviour. 

Any occasion, therefore, caUing for the censure or 
punishment of a member, for a breach of decorum, re- 
flects more or less upon the character of the whole 
Board. At the same time, however gross the misde- 
meanor of the individual, — the members cannot be 
wholly regardless of the circumstances and feelings of 
the guilty member, in the punishments they are com- 
pelled to inflict. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, by 

P. B. HOLMES. 

KENDALL BAILEY, 2nd. 



REPORT 



THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE 



€)f tl)c €omintin Council, 



UPON THE SUBJECT OF 



LYNDB AND SECOND STREETS. 



CHARLESTOWN : 

PRINTED AT THE FREEMAN OFFICE. 

1848. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 

IN COMMON COUNCIL, ? 
March 24, 1848. ^ 

Ordered, That the Report of the Special Committee on the 
subject of Lynde and Second Streets, be taken from the files, 
and four hundred copies printed, for distribution, and that a 
copy be furnished to each of the petitioners. 

The vote relative to printing four hundred copies of the 
Report, as above, v^^as reconsidered, and amended by adding, 
" That the Special Act referred to in the Report of the above 
named Committee be printed vi^ith the Report." 

The Order, as amended, was read and adopted ; any rule in- 
consistent with its passage being first suspended. 
A true Copy of Record. 

Attest PAUL WILLARD, Jr. Clerk, C. C. 



The Special Committee to whom was re- 
ferred the papers on Lynde Street, and 
the Order relative to Second Street, hav- 
ing considered the subject matter of the 
Papers and Order referred to them, and 
having viewed the said Streets, beg leave 
to submit the following 

EEPORT. 

The Committee are of opinion, that Lynde 
Street is not properly graded, and if accepted as 
it now is, the City must incur, to make the same 
safe and passable, an expense greatly dispropor- 
tionate to the importance of the Street, as in ad- 
dition to the actual cost of labor and material of 
filling up or digging down one side or the other 
of this Street, to make the grade as it should be, 
proprietors of lots also abutting the Street, nearly 
all of which on both sides are built upon, could, 
if the Street were properly graded, be undoubt- 
edly entitled to some compensation for damages. 

The Committee entertain the same opinion 
with regard to Second Street, that it is not prop- 
erly graded, and, if accepted, would subject the 
City to an unnecessary and unjust expense. 



They therefore recommend that the petitioners 
for the acceptance of Lynde and Second Streets, 
respectively have leave to withdraw. 

The attention of the Committee, while having 
the subject matter of this Report under conside- 
ration, was called to a special act concerning 
Streets and Ways in the City of Boston, passed 
March 26, A. D. 1845, which ])rovides that, be- 
fore accepting Streets laid and dedicated to the 
public over private lands, the Mayor and Alder- 
men may cause the same to be graded in such 
manner as the safety and convenience of the pub- 
lic, in their opinion, may require, and may assess 
the expense thereof upon the owners of the 
abutting lots. 

The Committee believe that it was too fre- 
quently the case under the late town govern- 
ment, that Streets laid out over private lands, 
were accepted as public Streets, before they were 
properly graded, and the town then compelled 
to put them in a safe and passable condition, at 
an expense greatly disproportionate to their im- 
portance, and often to no other effect or purpose 
than to benefit and enhance the property of in- 
dividuals. 

It often happens also, that a Street is laid out 
over private lands, which, if made safe and passa- 
ble, would convene and benefit the public very 
much, and at the same time greatly enhance the 
value of the adjoining land ; but the authorities 
having no power to compel the proprietors to bear 
a proportionate share of the expense of properly 



grading the same, are forced, for a comparatively 
little public convenience, to grade the same at the 
public cost, and thus give an advantage to indi- 
viduals which they ought not to have. There 
are several Streets in this City now within the 
knowledge of the Committee, in the same situa- 
tion with Lynde and Second Streets, awaiting the 
acceptance of the City as public Streets, but 
which cannot be accepted, in the opinion of the 
Committee, without becoming a burden upon the 
City, as they are not, and never have been prop- 
erly graded. 

In view, therefore, of the foregoing considera- 
tions, and in order to correct and prevent what 
may be termed a public abuse, the Committee 
recommend the adoption of the accompanying 
Order. 

M. G. COBE, ) 

P. B. HOLMES, i Committee. 

MARSHALL BLANCHARD^ ) 



An Act concerning Streets and Ways in 
the City of Boston. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives, in General Court assembledi and by 
the authority of the same, as follows : 

Section 1. When any Street or Way, which 
now is, or hereafter shall be opened in the City 
of Boston, over any private land, by the owners 
thereof, and dedicated to, or permitted to be used 
by the public, before such Street shall have been 
accepted and laid out according to law, it shall 
be the duty of the owners of the lots abutting 
thereon, to grade such Street or Way at their 
own expense, in such manner as the safety and 
convenience of the public shall, in the opinion of 
the Mayor and Aldermen of said City, require ; 
and if the owners of such abutting lots shall, after 
reasonable notice given by the said Mayor and 
Aldermen, neglect or refuse to grade such Street 
or Way in manner aforesaid, it shall be lawful for 
the said Mayor and Aldermen to cause the same 
to be graded as aforesaid, and the expense thereof 
shall, after due notice to the parties interested, be 
equitably assessed upon the owners of such abut- 
ting lots, by the said Mayor and Aldermen, in 



such proportions as they shall judge reasonable ; 
and all assessments so made shall be a lien upon 
such abutting lands, in like manner as taxes are 
now a lien upon real estate ; provided, always, 
that nothing contained in this Act shall be con- 
strued to affect any agreements heretofore made 
respecting any such Streets or Ways as aforesaid, 
between such owners and said City : provided, 
also, that any such grading of any Street or Way 
by the Mayor and Aldermen as aforesaid, shall 
not be construed to be an acceptance of such 
Street or Way by the City of Boston. 

Sect. 2. No Street or Way shall hereafter be 
opened as aforesaid, in said City, of a less width 
than thirty feet, except with the consent of said 
Mayor and Aldermen, in writing, first had and 
obtained for that purpose. 

Sect. 3. This Act shall take effect in thirty 
days from the passing thereof, unless the City 
Council of said City shall, within that time, vote 
not to accept the same. 

[Approved by the Governor, March 26, 1845.] 



SCHOOL REPORT 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING FEBRTTf RY 1, 1848. 



The School Committee of Charlestown, in compli- 
ance with the Statutes of the Commonwealth, 
. herewith present their Annual Report of the Pub- 
lic Schools of Charlestown. 

The Annual Reports of the " Trustees of Charles- 
town Free Schools," have usually been made up to 
the first of April, and printed and distributed imme- 
diately after that date ; but the change which has 
taken place in the Municipal relations of Charles- 
town, during the past year, makes it necessary for 
the School Committee to present their Report earlier 
than has been the practice in former years : — conse- 
quently, the present Report must be understood to 
cover only a period of ten months. 

We presume the present act of the Committee 
will be justified, and that hereafter, the Annual Re- 
ports of the Schools will be made up to the period 
of the year at which this Report is closed ; espec- 
ially, as it does not conflict with the Statute of the 
Commonwealth, and as the old Committee will con- 
tinue in office long enough each year, to enable them 
to make the annual return required by law, to enti- 
tle the City to its portion of the School Fund, from 
the Treasury of the Commonwealth. 

The School Committee, as has been customary for 
a long series of years, made up their estimate of the 



pecuniary wants of the Schools for the current School 
year, and instead of submitting their estimate to the 
citizens, as has been the practice of the " Board of 
Trustees " of the Public Schools, it was presented to 
the City Government, to whom the citizens have 
delegated the power of administering " the fiscal, 
prudential and municipal affairs " of the City. This 
estimate embraced the sums required for the salary of 
the Teachers, for the Fuel, Stoves, sweeping School 
Houses, and other contingent expenses of the Schools, 
— also, for sundry small repairs of buildings, and for 
instruction in Music in the Grammar Schools ; -,— 
amounting, in the whole, to seventeen thousand 
dollars. 

The Committee also asked the sum of seventeen 
hundred and twenty-five dollars, for purchasing land 
and erecting a new Primary School House above the 
Canal Bridge, — for finishing the second story of the 
Primary School House at the corner of Bartlett and 
Sullivan Streets, and for furnishing the above School 
Rooms, 

Of the above sums, ^17,000 was appropriated, 
" subject to the order of the School Committee," to 
be disbursed by them for the current expenses of the 
Schools for the municipal year. 

This sum has been expended as follows, viz : — 

For salaries of the Teachers, ^14,086.73 

" the contingent expenses, &c,, as 
stated above, 2,750.92 



Total, ^16,837.65 

Leaving the sum of ^^1 62.35 of the appropriation 
made for the support of Schools, unexpended. 



The above amount covers the School expenses for 
one year to the 1st of March, 1848, as it includes all 
the disbursements v^hich have been made by the 
Committee, since the last Tov^^n Statement was pub- 
lished, and which was made up to the 1st of March, 
1847. 

The balance, ^1,725.00, it was decided by the 
City Council, would be more appropriately disbursed 
by them ; to whom is delegated " the care and super- 
intendence of the City Buildings." 

They authorized the Joint Committee on Public 
Instruction, from the two branches of the City Coun- 
cil, to carry out these objects ; — consequently, the 
School Committee have been relieved from the care 
and responsibility of what has heretofore been con- 
sidered an appropriate part of their duties. 

The following table exhibits a statistical view of 
our schools on the 31st of January, 1848. 



Primary Schools 23 I 23 1 4,61604 I 1,521 I 1,164 I 357 
Grammar do. 4 | 22 | 9,471.69 j 1,283 | 1,021 \ 262 

, The number of children in this City between the 
ages of 4 and 16 years, is 3,500. 

The members of the School Committee have made 
507 visits to the Primary Schools, and 337 to the 
Grammar Schools, during the past ten months. 

PRIMAEY SCHOOLS. 

The upper room of the Primary school house 
erected in 1846, on the corner of Bartlett and Sulli- 
van streets, has been finished and is now occupied. 
The school was organized and placed under the 



charge of Miss Mary J. Underwood, on the 1st of 
November last. The Primary school house which 
was located in rear of the City Hall, has been re- 
moved to a central location above the Canal bridge, 
and is occupied by a school formed from a part of 
Primary No. 1, on the 1st of November last; and is 
under the charge of Miss Sarah J. Bradbury. In 
May last. Miss M. Peabody resigned the charge of 
Primary No. 16, and Miss Abby E. Hinckley was 
appointed to her place. In August last, Miss S. E. 
Clark resigned the charge of Primary No. 15, and 
Miss C. A. Goodridge,of No. 21. Miss S. Eliza F. 
"Watson has the charge of No. 15, and Miss Eme- 
line Brown, 2d Assistant in the Grammar depart- 
ment of the Warren school, has been appointed to 
No. 21. 

On the 1st of November, Miss E. W. Butts was 
appointed teacher of Primary school No. 17, in 
place of Miss S. J. Bradbury, transferred to Primary 
No. 23 ; and Miss S. E. Sanborn was appointed 
teacher of Primary No. 19, in place of Miss M. E. 
Sanborn, resigned. In the same month. Miss Mar- 
tha A. Chandler was transferred from No. 4 Primary, 
to the position of Assistant in the upper division of 
the Bunker Hill school, and Miss M. H. Eice, has 
the care of Primary No. 4. Miss E. D. Pratt, having 
resigned the charge of Primary No. 5, this school is 
now in the care of Miss M. H. Farnsworth. Miss 
Mary J. Chandler was also, in November, transferred 
from Primary No. 8, to the position of 1st assistant 
in the writing department of the Warren school, and 
Miss E. A. Thorndike was appointed to fill her 
place. 

The following table gives a view of the number, 
attendance, &;c.j in our Primary Schools, at the last 



examination, which closed on the 31st of January, 

1848. 



Caroline Phipps, 
M. B. Skillon. 
E. M. Sweetser, 
M. H. Rice, . . 
M. H. Farnsworth, 
P. A. Sawyer, 
S. L. Sawyer, 
A. E. Thorndike, 
S. F. Brown, 
Elizabeth Ernes, 
S. S. Putnam, 
J. M. Burckes, . 
M. E. Lincoln, . 
S. E. Smith, , . 
S. E. F. Watson, 
A. E. Hinckley, 
E. W. Butts, . . 
C. Brockett, . . 
S. E. Sanborn, . 
M. A. C. Bodge, 
Emeline Brown, 
M. J. Underwood, 
S.J. Bradbury, . 



Near B. Hill School House. 
Mead street. 
Rear 187 Main street. 
Warren School House, 
Elm street. 

Rear 162 Main street. 

Corner Cross and Bar'lett streets, 

Common street, 

Bow street. 



Common street. 

Bunker Hill street, at Point. 

Moulton street. 

Winlhrop street. 

jCorner Sullivan and Bartlett sts. 

Corner Kingston st. and Medford 
I roada 



52 44 
5941 
6o!4l 



39,37 

■24 28 
24 30 



S 

S . 
ooo 

A "^ 



Jos. F. Tufts. 
Jos. F. Tufts. 
H. K. Frothingham. 
J. W. Bemis. 
E. Thorndike. 
N. Y. Culbertson. 
E. Thorndike. 
N. Y. Culbertson. 
John Sanborn. 
G. A. Parker. 
James Adams. 
George Farrar. 
S. J. Thomas. 
S. J. Thomas. 
George Farrar. 
G. A. Parker. 
John Sanborn. 
J. Miskelly. 
J. Miskelly. 
James Adams. 
J. W. Bemis. 
H. K. Frothingham. 
H. K. Frothingham. 



The salary of the Primary School Teachers is 
;5f210, each, per annum. 

The course of study in the Primary Schools, which 
now, as a general rule, is pursued by children from 
four to eight years of age, is one of no little impor- 
tance to their future success and attainments. 

The Teachers of these Schools should well under- 
stand the elements of the English language, and pos- 
sess a thorough knowledge of the vowel and conso- 
nant sounds and their combinations, and a tact in 
imparting such knowledge to their pupils. They 
should be good readers, that they may be able to 
teach those under their charge, to read naturally, in- 
telligibly, and with the proper intonations of voice ; 
that they may enter into the meaning and spirit of 
what they are reading. Much oral information can 
also be communicated to the children upon common, 



though important matters. In some of our Pri- 
mary Schools, this method of instruction is pursued 
with much tact, and awakens in the children a lively 
interest in the subjects presented to their minds. 

The bodily movements and manual exercises, as 
well as the daily practice of singing resorted to by 
most of our Primary Teachers, as a relaxation from 
the too rigorous confinement of the School Room, 
are aids, rather than hindrances to good order in 
School, and their ha|)py influences combine to make 
the School Room a pleasant resort to the young. 

This Primary Schools are generally in a flour- 
ishing condition, and, with very few exceptions, 
under the charge of skilful and devoted Teachers, 
who labor assiduously and faithfully, to promote the 
best interests of those intrusted to their care and in- 
struction. With Teachers who have an " aptness to 
teach," and minds devoted to the responsible calling 
which they have chosen, our Primary Schools cannot 
remain stationary; and as the character and useful- 
ness of these Schools are advanced, in like proportion 
will their influence be felt upon our higher Schools. 

VACATIONS, EXAMINATIONS, AND PROMOTIONS 
TO GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

The Committee have thought it advisable, that the 
vacations of our Grammar and Primary Schools should 
be permanently established ; therefore, they have ar- 
ranged them as follows, viz : — Fast day ; — the first 
day of May ; — from the last Wednesday in May to 
the first Wednesday in June, both inclusive ; — the 
seventeenth day of June ; — fourth day of July ; — the 
three weeks preceding the first Wednesday in Sep- 
tember ; — Thanksgiving day and the two following, 
and Christmas day. When either of the single days 



named above as a vacation shall occur on Sunday, 
the vacation will take place on the next following 
day. 

The semi-annual examinations of all the Schools 
will take place during the fifteen days next preceding 
the August vacation, and during the last twenty days 
of January, in each year, — and the exhibitions in the 
Grammar Schools shall be held during the last fifteen 
days of January, in each year. 

In consequence of the great interruptions to which 
three of our Grammar Schools have been subjected 
during the past term, and from the want of suitable 
rooms and conveniences, the Committee have thought 
it best to omit the public exhibition which has usu- 
ally taken place in these Schools after their examina- 
tions in the Spring ; — the usual examination of them 
by the Committee, however, has been as thoroughly 
made as in former years. 

With a view of securing a more uniform practice 
in promoting the children from the Primary to the 
Grammar Schools, the School Committee have adopt- 
ed the rule, that all such promotions shall be made 
on the first day of February, and the first Wednes- 
day of September, in each year. This arrangement 
will enable the Teachers of both Primary and Gram- 
mar Schools, to make up their classes for the semi- 
annual terms of our Schools, at one and the same 
time, — thereby preventing the interruption and em- 
barrassments which formerly attended the practice of 
admitting scholars to the upper Schools, for the first 
two or three weeks of each term. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

The Board have had under consideration for sev- 
eral months past, the subject of establishing one or 



8 

more Intermediate Schools in some central location 
in the City, to supply the wants of a class of pupils 
who are always to be met with in all populous 
places. This is a class of scholars who are too old to 
be continued in the Primary Schools, without wound- 
ing their ambition or self-esteem, or interfering with 
the arrangements and methods of discipline and in- 
struction pursued in these Schools. 

There will be found in many of our Primary 
Schools, children who have not reached those at- 
tainments and habits of study, either from irregular 
attendance in these Schools, or a want of opportu- 
nity to attend any School, which is requisite to 
qualify them to enter the classes in the Grammar 
Schools composed of children of a corresponding age, 
or even the classes younger than they. It would 
promote the interests of both the Primary and Gram- 
mar Schools, if a School of this kind were estab- 
lished for this class of scholars ; — they appear to be 
out of place in a Primary School, and they are a 
dead weight, when hung upon any class in the 
Grammar Schools. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

WARREN SCHOOL. 

FOR CHILDREN OF BOTH SEXES, BUT OCCUPYING SEPA- 
RATE ROOMS. 

In August last. Miss Emeline Brown, second As- 
sistant Teacher in the Grammar department of this 
School, was appointed Teacher of Primary School 
No. 21, and Miss Augusta M. Hayes was appointed 
to fill her place ; and in November following. Miss S. 
G. Hay, first Assistant in the Writing department, 
having received an appointment in one of the Gram- 



mar Schools in Boston, was succeeded by Miss Mary 
J. Chandler. These are the only changes which 
have occurred in this School during the past year. 

" There has been evident improvement in this 
School during the past year," and it " seems to have 
been the object with the Teachers, to be thorough 
with their pupils." " There are many of them that 
seem to be well grounded in the studies they have 
gone over," and possess an intelligent view of the 
subjects they h^-ve been pursuing. " That there are 
exceptions, however, to this," may be clearly seen, 
but " these are found in almost every instance, among 
those children who are irregular in their attendance " 
at School. 

Both departments of this School appear to be 
making successful progress, and the Teachers, to be 
devoted and faithful in their endeavors to advance 
the interests of the School. 



WINTHROP SCHOOL. 

FOR BOYS ONLY. 

The change of Teachers in the Grammar depart- 
ment of this School, during the past year, has been 
very frequent. In May last, Mr. Aaron Walker, Jr., 
Principal of this department, retired from the School, 
and Mr. Winslow Battles was appointed to fill the 
vacancy. In September last, Mr. Battles was elected 
sub-Master in the Mayhew School in Boston ; — he 
was succeeded by Mr. William C. Bradlee, who is 
now the Principal of this department of the School. 
In October last. Miss E. D. Moulton, having received 
an appointment as Assistant in the Mayhew School 
in Boston, resigned her place as second Assistant in 



10 

this school, and her place was filled by the appoint- 
ment of Miss Anna M. Bradley. In November, Miss 
M. L. Rowland was also appointed as an Assistant 
in one of the Boston Schools, and her position as 
first Assistant is now filled by Miss Rebecca T. Ames. 

In the Writing department, there has been no 
change of Teachers for the past year. 

In the first division of the School, under Messrs. 
Bradlee and Baxter, there has been "decided im- 
provement in the reading and other studies " in the 
Grammar department; and the proficiency of the 
scholars in Arithmetic and Algebra, together with 
the specimens of penmanship which were exhibited, 
were highly creditable to them, and also to the abil- 
ity and fidelity of their Teacher. " The Assistant 
Teachers are faithful," and under the circumstances in 
which the School has been placed for several months, 
as successful as we could have a right to expect. 

Many of the obstacles to the entire success of their 
labors will be removed, when the scholars are trans- 
ferred from their present inconvenient and badly ven- 
tilated rooms, (the only ones which could be obtained 
for temporary use,) to the new School House now in 
progress of erection. 

HARVARD SCHOOL. 
EXCLUSIVELY FOB, GIRLS. 

There has been but one change of Teachers in this 
School the past year. Miss H. L. S. Teel, in May 
last, resigned her office of first Assistant Teacher in 
the Writing department, and Miss Frances Holland 
was appointed to fill the vacancy. 

Taking all the interruptions and " inconveniences 
into the account," under which this School has been 



11 

placed for several months past, the expectations of 
the Committee would be thought unreasonable, if 
they were not " satisfied with the progress made by 
the scholars." The Teachers appear assiduous and 
faithful in their endeavors to promote the interests 
of the School, and with the disadvantages under 
which the pupils have labored, they give evidence of 
unremitted devotion and industry, which is credit- 
able to themselves and those under whose charge 
they are placed. 

BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 

FOR BOTH SEXES, WHO MEET IN THE SAME ROOM IN 
EACH DEPARTMENT. 

This School has experienced several changes dur- 
ing the last year. In October last. Miss Mary A. 
Lewis resigned her situation, having been appointed 
an Assistant in one of the Grammar Schools in Bos- 
ton, — Miss M. A. Stover was appointed second As- 
sistant to fill her place. On the 29th day of Novem- 
ber last, this School was organized by forming it into 
two divisions — a Senior and Junior division; the 
first occupying the upper room (recently finished) in 
the Building, and under the charge of Mr. B. F. 
Tweed, as Principal, with Miss Martha A. Chandler, 
from Primary School No. 4, as Assistant ; — the sec- 
ond division, under the charge of Miss L. Foster, 
assisted by Miss M. A. Stover, occupies the lower 
room. In January last. Miss Foster resigned her 
situation, in consequence of having received an ap- 
pointment as Principal of one of the Public Schools 
in Medford ; — she was succeeded by Miss Lydia A. 
Hanson, who is now in charge of this division of the 
School. 



12 

The " Teachers in this School are all devoted to 
their work, and with general success." The upper 
division of the School, under the charge of Mr. 
Tweed, assisted by Miss Chandler, " exhibits evi- 
dences of a judicious and thorough training, and 
both Teachers and Scholars are deserving great 
credit." The appearance and attainments of the 
Junior division were creditable to the Teachers and 
JPupils, and gave evidence of the fidelity and devo- 
tion of the Teachers in this division, to the trust 
committed to them. 

Instruction in Music has been given twice each 
week, in our Grammar Schools, for about five months, 
by Mr. John E. Gould, a skilful and efficient Teach- 
er; and the sub-Committees have been present on 
some of these occasions, to witness the exercises of 
the pupils in this delightful art. We cannot with- 
hold our united approbation of the practice of this 
science by the children in these Schools. " It exerts 
a wholesome influence upon the spirits of the Schol- 
ars, and the discipline " of the Schools, and we 
" have so much confidence in its beneficial results," 
both mentally and physically, that we strongly urge 
its continuance in our Schools, upon the attention 
of those who may hereafter have the care and re- 
sponsibility of managing them. 

The practice of map drawing, either on the black- 
board, slates or paper, in connection with the study 
of geography, is highly important and useful ; as 
the eye will do much by this means, in fixing upon 
the mind, the location and boundaries of countries. 
States and towns — • the course of rivers, &c. &c. 
These and other means which by the eye carry knowl- 
edge to the mind, should be found among the ar- 
rangements of every well regulated school, as they 



13 



tend to awaken early in life, a careful observation of 
objects which, address the eye and mind, and create 
a spirit of self-culture, which will prove available in 
securing knowledge from reading and experience, 
after school education shall have been finished. 

At the last examination, the number of children 

in the four Grammar Schools, was as follows, viz. : 

In the Warren School, 349 

" " Winthrop, " 359 

" " Harvard, " 340 

" " Bunker Hill," 235 

Total, - 1,283. 

During the past year, the average daily absence in 
the Grammar Schools has been as follows, viz. : 







___^ 


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0£ 


o.o 






*o 










ss 


S S 


"^ ^ 


W) 


tUD 




3 


3 O 


o 




5 m 


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C M 




o c 


-e 5 




O 


-■ES 


01 rt 


fee vs 
cs-a 


S coo 


S £tf 


■ o 


c = S 


O J3 >. 


> S 




^ ««!' 
£^S 


Warren, 


592 


349 


294 


20 


20x1,^ 


Winthrop, 


468 


359 


289 


17 50 
-• 'Too 


1 Q 50 


Harvard, 


448 


340 


264 


17 5 
-'^' TOO^ 


18 


Bunker Hill, 


315 


235 


174 


18 ^° 


19AV 



It is gratifying to find, that in all these schools, 
there has been some improvement in the attendance, 
since the last school report was made up. Yet, we 
do not think that parents ought to feel fully satis- 
fied that all has been done that is practicable, to rem- 
edy this — one of the greatest of inflictions upon 
the prosperity of our schools, and their usefulness 
to those for whose especial benefit they are sustained. 

If a young man were placed under the charge of 
a competent person, to be taught some mechanical 
art or trade, or qualified as a ready and skilful ac- 
countant, and he should be found wasting one fifth 
of the time which ought to be devoted to gaining a 



14 

knowledge of his trade or art, in the pursuit of friv- 
olous objects, or in absenting himself for unimpor- 
tant engagements or amusements, or in any manner 
wasting his time, all would conclude at once, that 
he would never become very proficient in the em- 
ployment for which he had undertaken to qualify 
himself; nor would the parent of such a young man 
be very likely to feel satisfied with such a state of 
things, or with the teacher or master who would al- 
low them to exist. 

If some trifling errand or visit, or some moment- 
ary pleasure or recreation, which could, without in- 
convenience, be attended to at another time, is often 
allowed to interfere with the school obligations of 
children, is it to be wondered, that these will be con- 
sidered by them, as of paramount importance to the 
claims of school upon their attention and interest 1 — 
and is it not often the case, that the ability and de- 
votion of teachers are called in question, for a want 
of interest and progress in their scholars, when the 
principal cause of their sluggish indifierence may be 
traced to their frequent absence from school, and a 
lack of proper influence at home ? 

Such a state of things is also a fruitful source of 
truancy — a pernicious and demoralizing habit ; and 
we cannot but appeal to parents, to make this a sub- 
ject of individual interest, not only for the moral and 
intellectual well-being of their children, but for their 
own happiness and peace. 

In this connection, the committee make the follow- 
ing quotation from the report of the Board of 
Trustees for the year ending April, 1841 ; as the 
subjects to which it refers, are of no less importance 
now to the welfare of our schools, than at the time 
that report was made. 



15 

" The Board again advert to the great cooperation 
Parents can render in promoting the efficiency of 
our schools. Let them be arrayed against the teach- 
er, and but little hope can be entertained of prog- 
ress ; let them act with him, and it is a great step 
toward it. Many are the ways in which this co-op- 
eration can be rendered. Parents can prevent ab- 
sences ; they can enjoin confidence on the part of the 
scholars towards the teacher; they can encourage 
pupils in their lessons ; they can promote a love of 
school duties ; they can insist for their children up- 
on the principle of entire obedience to the rules of 
the school ; they can visit the school rooms. And 
they can, at least, practise the negative duty of re- 
fraining from the injustice of judging the teacher on 
the sole testimony of their children. The Board 
have encountered many cases of the latter descrip- 
tion. Violation of well-known rules of the school 
subjects a scholar to discipline — to corporal punish- 
ment, or to checks, or to the loss of place in the 
class. The corrected and disappointed child becomes 
a swift witness, and finds in the parent a willing ear. 
On this partial testimony the parent forthwith con- 
demns the teacher, and this too in severe, round- 
about language — language which the excited child 
takes care shall lose none of its severity by repeti- 
tion. It is retailed among playmates and goes 
through the school. This, it may be thought, would 
be bad enough. But this is by no means all. The 
parent, in a temporary fit of excitement, sometimes 
rushes to the school room, and in the presence of the 
school, abuses the teacher in words that would do no 
discredit to a Persian Satrap lashing his subordi- 
nates. What possible effect can both these methods 
of reform produce than to weaken the moral author- 



16 

ity of the teachers, to lay a foundation for a renewal 
of the scholar's punishment, to injure permanently 
the school ; in fine, to produce unmitigated evil ? Be- 
sides: there is no necessity for this. The Board 
have made it a rule to investigate promptly, fully, 
every case of complaint. They have no modest re- 
serve in their intercourse with the teachers. In this 
matter frankness is kindness. If complaints are 
abroad, a teacher should know them, in all their 
length and breadth ; if unreasonable, the sooner they 
are contradicted the better — if well-founded, reform 
should be applied at once. The Board, then, earn- 
estly recommend to parents the practice of suspend- 
ing their judgment in relation to cases of discipline, 
to be chary of their words of displeasure, and to 
apply directly to one of its members when they feel 
aggrieved — confident, as they are, that such a course 
would be of great advantage to our schools." 



17 










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18 

The Grammar Schools in Charlestown, do now, 
and have for many years, ranked high in the estima- 
tion of our citizens, as well as in the estimation of 
the Board of Trustees of our Schools. The Report 
of the Trustees for April, 1839, (our Hon. Mayor 
then being President of the Board,) says, in speaking 
of these Schools, " They have generally been termed 
Grammar Schools, but they would be better denoted 
by the name of Upper or High Schools, as in them, 
all the high branches of English study are taught to 
the first classes." These Schools are now no less 
deserving this high commendation, than they were at 
that period, and as an evidence that the pupils who 
have attended them, have not been confined to the 
" elementary and a few other branches of English 
study," as has been stated, we have only to refer to 
the statistical tables of these Schools for the past 
eight years ; where we find, that in addition to 
" Reading, Spelling, Writing, Arithmetic, Grammar 
and Geography," studies which have been attended 
to by all who have been members of these Schools 
during this period, — 1,847 have pursued the prac- 
tice of writing Composition, — 985 have attended to 
Declamation, — 1,362 to History, — 1,189 to Natural 
Philosophy and History, — 217 to Chemistry, — 47 
to Astronomy, — 685 to Algebra, — 69 to Geometry, 
— 170 to Book-Keeping, — 43 to Rhetoric, — 969 
to Drawing, — 85 to Languages, and 106 have pur- 
sued a course of studies in the Political Class Book. 

There is, therefore, truth in the assertion made in 
the Report of 1839, that these Schools "would be 
better denoted by the name of Upper or High 
Schools," for they are equal to most of those which 
are termed High Schools in this Commonwealth; 
and we are gratified in being able to state as an evi- 



19 

dence of their efficiency, that of the number who 
have graduated from them during the past eight 
years, (from 1840,) upwards of 50 have become 
Teachers ; most of them having enjoyed no other in- 
struction than that furnished to them in the Public 
Schools of Charlestown. Many of these persons are 
now engaged in teaching, and some of them have 
been called from the care of our Schools by oifers of 
a higher salary than we are paying our Teachers, to 
fill responsible positions as Teachers in Boston, 
Cambridge, Medford, Somerville, Lexington, and 
other neighboring towns ; — others are engaged in 
teaching beyond the limits of this Commonwealth. 

"With such facts before us, we cannot but feel, that 
our citizens have cause to be proud of what their 
Public Schools have accomplished, and that such re- 
sults will encourage them to continued efforts to sus- 
tain these Schools, and to provide for the more 
thorough education of the young in the higher 
branches of study, than have yet been attained to in 
our Public Schools ; and for furnishing them the 
means of acquiring a knowledge of the ancient and 
modern languages, and the higher branches of math- 
ematics and science, 

"The City Government, by the erection of a Build- 
ing for a High School, have takei> one step towards 
securing to the young these advantages ; and if, after 
the experiment has been fairly tried, it should prove 
successful, (as we have no doubt it will, if judiciously 
managed,) the citizens of Charlestown will congratu- 
late themselves, that they have in their midst an In- 
stitution which furnishes, if rightfully improved, a 
thorough and complete education to the children of 
all classes of our citizens who will avail themselves 
of its privileges. 



20 



The establishing of a High School in Charlestown, 
is a subject that has long occupied the thoughts and 
interests of its citizens. In 1831, the subject was re- 
ferred to the " Trustees of the Schools, who reported 
the cost of its establishment, and after a discussion 
of the matter in Town Meeting, it was indefinitely 
postponed." Again in 1836, the subject having been 
committed to the Trustees of the Schools to report 
upon the same, they say, " the present state of public 
education in this Town has nearly approximated to 
all we could hope or wish ; but if the Town see fit 
to add another School for the instruction of youth in 
the higher branches of knowledge, and thereby ena- 
ble them to take a more exalted part in the duties 
of life, then indeed our system and means of instruc- 
tion would be complete." 

The subject was then referred to the Trustees 
again, with instructions ; and at a meeting of the 
citizens in November 1836, they reported, " that af- 
ter a full consideration of the subject," and the fact, 
that " instruction in the higher branches" is provid- 
ed for in " one of our present excellent free schools, it 
is inexpedient and unadvisable for the present, to pro- 
vide for the establishment of an additional School." 
This report was not accepted, but the matter was 
again referred to 1;he Trustees, with instructions to 
report at the next March meeting ; when, on the 
sixth of March, 1837, a report was made in favor of 
establishing a High School, " furnished with suitable 
apparatus, &c., for the pursuit of the higher branches 
of English study ;" — which report, after being read, 
was referred to the next annual meeting in the month 
of March, at which time, this subject does not ap- 
pear to have been acted upon by the citizens, nor do 



21 

the Trustees make any reference to it in their print- 
ed report of May 7th, 1838. 

In the report of the Trustees of Schools, made in 
April, 1839, to which allusion has already been made, 
it is recommended that another School be established 
in addition to the three " Upper or High Schools," viz. 
the Winthrop, Harvard and Bunker Hill, in which 
the " pupils receive a thorough instruction in all the 
common and higher branches of English study," this 
recommendation was carried out in the erection of a 
building in 1840, now known as the Warren School. 
Our citizens are well aware, that the City Govern- 
ment, have, during the past year, been making per- 
manent arrangements for the establishment of a 
higher School in Charlestown, than any which has 
heretofore existed. 

The design of this High School, is not to make 
our Grammar Schools any less elevated in their char- 
acter, than they have heretofore been ; such a result 
could not but be a source of regret to all who have 
at heart the usefulness and prosperity of our schools. 
The standard of admission to the High School, 
should be placed high, and should be rigidly adhered 
to ; — not only for its own well-being and usefulness, 
but for the good of our Grammar Schools, that they 
may preserve their present high standing and con- 
tinue to be instruments of good to those, whose cir- 
cumstances in life make it necessary for them to 
withdraw from School at nearly the age when they 
become qualified for admission to the High School, 
or for those who may never be able to attain to the 
standard of admission to this School. There need 
not be any conflict of interest or usefulness between 
these two classes of our Schools. If the character 
of our High School is one of superior rank, and ad- 



22 

mission to it is made a motive to exertion with the 
pupils of our Grammar Schools, its effect in stimulat- 
ing them to powerful effort, cannot but have an im- 
portant influence on these Schools, and greatly aid 
the teacher in his labors to qualify his pupils for pro- 
motion to the higher School ; — a result, in which 
his interest as well as that of his pupils, is at stake. 
The examination of candidates for admission to the 
Upper School, will, and always should be, free from 
all partiality, and be made to depend, not upon what 
the pupil may be able to do, but upon what he has 
already done — upon the state of his knowledge. 
This will depend somewhat upon the ability and in- 
dustry of the pupil, and as scholars are more or less 
faithful to the opportunities afforded them, under an 
able and efficient teacher, (and the general result of 
an examination may to some degree become evidence 
of the ability of the teacher) the time will be more 
or less protracted, of their making the preparation 
required for admission to the High School. Having 
reached the point of his present ambition, the pupil 
is now to be carried forward in a more comprehen- 
sive and thorough knowledge of some of the studies 
which he has been pursuing, among which, are the 
English language. Writing, History, Algebra, Draw- 
ing, Music and Geometry, with their applications, 
and with such of the following studies as the School 
Committee may hereafter determine, viz : — 

Mathematics, — Natural Philosophy, Natural His- 
tory, — Chemistry, — Astronomy, — Surveying, — 
Drafting, — Navigation, — Mental and Moral Sci- 
ence, — Natural Theology, ■ — Physiology, — Politi- 
cal Economy, — the Constitution of the United States, 
and the Latin, Greek and French languages. The 
studies to be modified according to the sex and ad- 



23 

vancement, and, in some degree, the future destina- 
tion of the pupils. To every young man, should be 
given a thorough English education, with high moral 
principles, preparing him for the pursuit of Agricul- 
ture, Trade, Manufactures, Commerce, or the Me- 
chanic Arts, and for College, if it may be desirable or 
advisable : — and to every young v^oman, the culti- 
vation of an elevated and well disciplined mind, high 
moral aims, practical views of the duties and obliga- 
tions of life, and a knowledge of those resources of 
purity of thought, manners and conversation, which 
stamp with beauty every station in life, and make 
true virtue, not only valuable to its possessor, but an 
object of loveliness wherever it is found. 

Scholars may be formed by books alone ; but yet, 
it is desirable to give them some practical knowledge 
also, and to this end, a suitable supply of apparatus 
for illustrating the study in Mathematics, Natural 
Philosophy, Chemistry, Astronomy, &c., should be 
furnished to every high school. A small appropria- 
tion annually, for the above object, would, in a few 
years, secure to our school this desirable end, and 
would not be felt in the aggregate expense of sup- 
porting the school. 

RE-ORGANIZATION OF THE GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

The establishing of the High School, together 
with the change made in the location of the Gram- 
mar School House in Ward 2, and the rebuilding of 
that in Ward 1, renders it necessary that an altera- 
tion be made in the limits of the School districts. 

In view of this fact, the Committee have devoted 
much time and thought to the subject of re-organi- 
zing the Grammar Schools, They are aware of the 



24 

importance of this measure, and while they have 
availed themselves of the opinions of many vrhose 
practical knowledge of school organization is worthy 
of much consideration, they have not been unmind- 
ful of the opinions and wishes of the large class of 
our own citizens, who feel deeply interested in all 
matters connected with the educational interests of 
their children, and the prosperity and usefulness of 
our public schools. No subject of equal magnitude 
has been presented to the consideration of this Board, 
and there is none upon which they have bestowed so 
much careful investigation. 

Their conclusions have been deliberately formed, 
and with a full conviction that if parents generally 
will second the measures decided upon by the Com- 
mittee, these schools will be placed in a higher sphere 
of usefulness to the children, of both sexes, than 
they have heretofore sustained. 

We have in Charlestown, nearly all the varieties 
of school organization ; — the Primary Schools, for 
children of both sexes, — a Grammar School, with 
children of both sexes in the same room and under 
the same teacher, — a school for both sexes, (double 
headed) each sex occupying separate rooms, and 
alternating from one room to the other each half 
day ; — - one school for boys only, and one for girls 
only, (both double headed) and alternating from one 
room to the other, in the same building each half 
day. That there has been an opportunity for wit- 
nessing the operation, and contrasting the results of 
these several systems of organization, no one will 
deny ; — their different merits have been fully dis- 
cussed in the Committee, — their claims upon the 
confidence and support of our citizens have been 
considered — the intellectual and moral influence 



25 

exerted by them upon the young has received that 
careful deliberation which the importance of the sub- 
ject appeared to demand ; and in view of all the 
facts, as presented to your Committee, they have been 
irresistibly led to the conclusion, that our schools 
should be organized as distinct and separate schools, 
each embracing the children of both sexes, and un- 
der the charge of one Principal teacher, one sub- 
master, and two female assistants. 

The separate school system for each of the sexes 
appears to be entirely at war with the whole social 
organization of society. Where is the separation of 
the sexes tolerated, except in some of the Public or 
Private schools'? 

We do not find it in the organization of Sunday 
schools or Primary schools. In all social gatherings 
of the young, whether in the domestic circle, in par- 
ties of pleasure, or in rural and other excursions, it 
is desired and expected that both sexes will be 
brought together to participate in, and add to the 
enjoyments of the occasion. The same practice is 
almost invariably pursued by young ladies and gen- 
tlemen, and by adults, in all their social gatherings ; 
under all circumstances, and in all conditions of civ- 
ilized life, female influence is recognized, and its 
power to refine and soften the feelings of man and 
promote his welfare and happiness, is acknowledged. 

Shall, then, our schools be the only places where 
this influence is to be excluded, and school days, the 
happiest in human existence, be marked as the only 
period in life, at which the bringing together of the 
sexes, can have no agency in purifying and elevating 
the character and condition of the social compact? 
Besides, by the proposed arrangement of our schools, 
the children of one family will be brought together 



26 

in the same room, and under the influence and in- 
struction of one set of teachers, thereby avoiding the 
embarrassments, perplexities and adverse influences 
to which both scholars and teachers are often sub- 
jected in double-headed schools. 

Our schools are occasionally subjected to a change 
of teachers, and when this occurs, it requires much 
time for the new teacher to become familiar with his 
pupils, their temperament, habits, dispositions, and 
the best mode of governing them. This labor is at 
best, a very arduous one, and is made doubly so, un- 
der the double-headed system of organization, where 
the teacher is brought in contact with twice the num- 
ber of children ; yet he has but half the time to be- 
stow upon this work that would be allowed him 
under the system of separate or single school organ- 
ization, and as the pupils now alternate each half 
day, the influence exerted upon them one half of the 
day, in one room, may be in part or entirely coun- 
teracted the next half day in the other room ; there- 
fore, the labor is again to be gone over, and success 
in carrying out his purposes and plans for a well 
regulated school, must be much protracted, and with 
his best directed efl"orts, never perhaps fully realized. 

The Bunker Hill School House, and the new 
School Houses on Bunker Hill street and on Har- 
vard street, are constructed with separate entrances, 
clothes rooms and yards, for the accommodation of 
both sexes, and are provided with suitable recitation 
rooms. 

These conveniences are yet to be furnished for the 
Warren School, and when they are provided for this 
School, there will be a uniformity in the construc- 
tion and general arrangement of all our Grammar 
School Houses. 



27 

The importance of furnishing recitation rooms for 
the Warren School, has been urged by former 
Boards, and your Committee have now instructed a 
Sub-Committee from their number, to ascertain the 
cost of supplying this want for the above school, 
and for providing an additional stairway in the pres- 
ent porch of the building, to admit of separate en- 
trances for both sexes to the school room in the sec- 
ond story. 

They have farther instructed this Sub-Committee 
to apply to the City Council for an appropriation to 
defray the expense thereof 

In view of the positions herein taken, and with a 
desire to secure greater perfection and uniformity in 
our school system, the School Committee have deci- 
ded, that when the Winthrop and Harvard School 
Houses shall be completed, they shall be occupied by 
four distinct schools, each school to be composed of 
children of both sexes ; and when recitation rooms 
and an additional stairway are provided at the War- 
ren School House, it shall be occupied by two dis- 
tinct schools, each to be composed of children of 
both sexes ; the Bunker Hill School has long been 
organized and successfully conducted upon this plan. 

The number of scholars in all our schools, is quite 
too large for the force employed in teaching them. 
Teachers cannot do full justice to their pupils, espe- 
cially in the Grammar Schools, where the variety 
of studies is more numerous and difficult. While 
these schools contain so large a number of scholars, 
it is absolutely essential to their welfare and success, 
that additional assistance be furnished to all the 
Grammar Schools, by the appointment of a sub-mas- 
ter to each of them. 

There being two recitation rooms in each story of 
all the Grammar Schools except the Warren, the 



28 

assistant teachers will be able to attend to all the 
recitations of their classes in these, while the princi- 
pal and sub-master can, at the same time, be conduct- 
ing their recitations in the main room ; and by the 
sub-master at such times, having the general care and 
oversight of the room, the principal could be reliev- 
ed from this duty while engaged with the upper 
classes in giving illustrations or explanations, upon 
the studies which these classes have been pursuing. 
The system of monitors, also, which now, at such 
times, is indispensible, (a system attended with many 
evils wherever practiced,) could be entirely avoided ; 
a point which it will be difficult to eifect with the 
present arrangement of our Schools, and the large 
number which, under the present construction of our 
School Houses, must necessarily be enrolled upon 
their lists. 

The salary of a competent, faithful, and efficient 
sub-Master, will not exceed seven hundred dollars 
per annum, a sum of money which, in promoting the 
welfare of our Schools, would be profitably expended. 

This arrangement will also give the Principal 
Teacher an opportunity of knowing the character 
and proficiency of all the Scholars of his School, and 
of suggesting to his Assistants a remedy for any de- 
fects which, upon an examination of their classes, he 
may find to exist ; thus adding to the usefulness and 
prosperity of our Grammar Schools. Our Schools 
will, therefore, in carrying out the plan now fixed 
upon for their organization, contain one Principal 
Teaciier, one sub-Master, and two female Assistant 
Teachers, to each School. 

These Schools, together with the High School, 
when organized, will meet the wants of the City for 
such a class of Schools for several years. 

It will be seen by reference to the abstracts of the 



59 

Massachusetts School Returns, for several years past, 
that Charlestown stands high in the graduated scale, 
which represents the amount of appropriations made 
by the Towns in this Commonwealth for the support 
of Public kSchools. Although the sum to each child 
between the ages of four and sixteen years, for 
the School years ending in April, 1847, and Feb- 
ruary, 1848 — may be found to fall a little below 
the amount for the several years immediately preced- 
ing these ; yet, this is no evidence of a want of inter- 
est among our citizens for the cause of popular edu- 
cation. They are ever anxious that the Schools of 
Charlestown shall aiford to the young equal oppor- 
tunities, to those enjoyed by the children of any other 
Town or City in the Commonwealth, and are always 
ready and willing to be liberally taxed for this object. 
"We doubt not that every resident in this City feels a 
desire, that the prosperity of its Free Schools shall 
keep pace with the accumulating wealth of its citi- 
zens, its rapidly increasing business prospects, and 
the growth of its population. They well know how 
much the peaceable enjoyment of the comforts which 
prosperity affords, depends upon the moral and social 
obligations which bind a community together, and 
the mighty influence which knowledge has in pro- 
moting the general welfare of society, and the bright- 
est hopes of mankind. Therefore, they look with 
pride to their Public Schools, and strive to make 
them .instrumental in disseminating knowledge 
through every rank and condition of life; thereby 
imparting to all classes a better understanding of the 
sources of true interest and happiness ; — leading all 
to a more just appreciation and a more faithful dis- 
charge of every civil, social, and domestic duty. 

3* 



80 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. — TRUSTEES OF CHARLES- 
TOWN FREE SCHOOLS, TRUST FUND, &c. 

In the 11th section of the Charter of the city of 
Charlestown, after prescribing the manner of elect- 
ing, and fixing the number of the School Committee, it 
says : " The persons thus chosen shall constitute the 
School Committee, and have the care and superin- 
tendence of the Public Schools." 

The Statutes of the Commonwealth provide, that 
every town shall hold an annual meeting in the 
month of March or April, and that the inhabitants 
of every Town or City, shall, at their annual meeting, 
choose by written ballot, a School Committee, who 
shall have the general charge and superintendence 
of all the public schools in such town or city. 

The Statutes provide, that the School Committee 
shall determine the number and qualifications of the 
Scholars to be admitted into the Schools kept for the 
use of the whole Town, and said School Committee 
shall direct what books shall be used in the several 
Schools, and may direct what books shall be used 
in the respective classes ; — and the scholars shall be 
supplied by their parents, masters or guardians, with 
the books prescribed for their classes. It says fur- 
ther, that in case any scholar shall not be furnished 
by his parent, master or guardian, with the requisite 
books, he shall be supplied by the School Committee 
at the expense of the Town, and the School Commit- 
tee shall give to the Assessors of the Town the names 
of the scholars so supplied with books, and they shall 
tax the parent, master, or guardian of such scholars 
for the same, and the amount shall be collected in 
the same manner as the town taxes. 

The 11th Section of the City Charter, further pro- 
vides, that the persons chosen as the School Com- 
mittee, shall have " all the powers and privileges and 



be subject to all the liabilities set forth in an act 
passed by the Legislature of Massachusetts, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
ninety-three, entitled ' An act to incorporate certain 
persons by the name of the Trustees of Charlestown 
Free Schools,' and all acts in addition thereto." By 
this act, the Trustees are made the " Visitors, Trus- 
tees and Governors of the Schools," and " have power 
to make and ordain such lavs^s, rules and orders for 
the good government of said Schools, as to them the 
Trustees, Governors and Visitors and their succes- 
sors, shall from time to time seem most fit and requi- 
site ; all which shall be observed by the officers and 
scholars of said Schools, upon the penalties therein 
contained." 

" Said rules, laws and orders not to be inconsist- 
ent with the laws of the Commonwealth." 

It will be seen by the above, that the act incorpor- 
ating the " Trustees, &c.," — does not give to them 
the powers which are generally given to the Trustees 
of Academies and other Schools not supported by pub- 
lic authority and at public expense ; but such as by 
the general laws of the Commonwealth, are given to 
the School Committees of each town, over the Schools 
of their respective towns. 

By the preamble of the act of March 27th, 1793, 
creating the Corporation of the Trustees of the 
Charlestown Free Schools, the object appears to 
have been, a more convenient administration of cer- 
tain real and personal property that had been be- 
queathed to the town for the use of the Public 
Schools, "and prevent it from being indiscriminately 
mixed with other property or funds of the town, and 
so lost to the specific use for which it was given." 
Traditionary account says also, that there was an ex- 
pectation, that other funds would be given, if there 



should be an assurance that they would be kept 
sacred for the above object. 

The object of the Charter, then, appears to have 
been, to provide Trustees for these funds, which were 
trust property ; and it " was thought most appropri- 
ate at that time, to make the persons whom the town 
should yearly elect to the care of its Schools, the 
Trustees of such funds;" they and their successors, 
were, therefore, designated by the corporate name of 
"The Trustees of Charlestown Free Schools," and 
clothed with all the usual powers and liabilities of 
similar corporations, for all purposes connected with 
the care and administration of the aforesaid trust 
funds ; — but in all other respects, their powers were 
only such, as under the general laws of the Com- 
monwealth, are given to School Committees. 

It was doubtless " intended by this Charter, to keep 
the gifts of public spirited citizens, made for uses, 
which, compared Avith the ordinary expenditures of 
the Town for streets, drains, and the like, may well 
be called sacred, from falling into the general Treas- 
ury, to be drawn out and expended for ordinary pur- 
poses," when a momentary or imaginary want, urged 
at a Town Meeting, should prove stronger than a 
strict regard for the intention of the donors. 

In 1 842, the Trustees' funds consisted of 35 shares 
of the Union Bank Stock, a town note for ^1,200, 
for money loaned the town, and a town note for ^600. 
All these funds were productive, though the income 
from them was united with the appropriations of the 
town, and from the whole sum, all the expenses of 
the schools were paid; the practice at that time 
being, for the treasurer of the trustees to draw money 
from the town treasury, and pay all school bills. 
The trustees, in 1842, sold the Union Bank stock, 
collected the town note of ;^1,200, and the interest 



m 

due on the same, also one year's interest on the town 
note of ^600. These sums, together with the 
amount of Dea. Thomas Miller's legacy, with the 
interest on the same, — the whole amounting to 
^4,913.67, — were invested in the Bow Street school 
house and land ; for which, no rent or interest has 
been received since this large portion of the trust 
property was so expended, — the trustees having no 
income from the property, except the interest on the 
town note for $600, which is regularly received. 

Thus, as to the bulk of the trust funds, the very 
thing which was sought by the act of 1793 to be 
guarded against, has come upon us. 

We see no reason why the city should not give to 
the School Committee a note, on interest, for the 
amount invested in the Bow Street school house 
estate, and receive from the committee a conveyance 
of this property ; thus restoring to the trustees the 
amount of the trust funds, w^hich would give to them 
an annual income of about ^300, which sum " could 
be usefully expended by the School Committee," as 
the trustees of these funds, for the legitimate pur- 
poses for which it is supposed the funds were orig- 
inally bestowed. 

The fact that only the income of these funds was 
to be expended for the benefit of the schools, 
shows that they were not intended to relieve the 
citizens from taxation for the support of schools. 
" They were given for the improvement, and not the 
support of schools, not for the purpose of building 
school houses, or purchasing fuel, or paying salaries, 
but as a fund in the hands of the School Committee, 
to be expended in their discretion, in the purchase of 
books for libraries, for maps, apparatus," &c. ; or for 
" some convenience or ornament to make the school 
room more attractive" or useful to the children ; for 



which purposes, many are not willing to appropriate 
money, and yet would delight to see, and to feel that 
their children could enjoy as a gift. What feelings 
of " grateful remembrance towards some venerable 
father of the town, or friend of education, may be 
awakened in the young, by the daily enjoyment of 
some such luxury. No man will be thanked for 
paying the taxes of posterity, but let him leave a 
fund, the income of which shall be expended in fur- 
nishing some convenience, accomplishment, or im- 
provement, above the ordinary means afforded by the 
town, and successive generations will rise up and call 
him blessed." 

SCHOOL BOOKS, &c. 

The 19th Section of the 23d Chapter of the Re- 
vised Statutes, provides, " That the School Commit- 
tees of each town may provide, at the expense of the 
town, or otherwise, a sufficient supply of such class- 
books for all the schools aforesaid, and shall give no- 
tice of the place, where such books may be obtained ; 
and the books shall be supplied to the scholars 
at such prices as merely to reimburse the expense of 
the same." 

The subject of supplying the children of our 
public schools with books and stationery, after the 
plan suggested by the above statute, has been before 
the committee for some time, and they are endeavor- 
ing to make an arrangement, by which school books 
shall be furnished to the pupils, at " such prices 
as merely to reimburse the expense of the same.'' 
If the committee can fix upon some plan, by which 
books of an uniform quality shall be provided at 
some central location in this city, where all can 
readily obtain them, they are of opinion that the 



35 

cost of the same may be made such as to become an 
inducement to all, to supply themselves with school- 
books and stationery in this manner, rather than in the 
way in which they have ordinarily been provided for 
the children of our schools. Due notice will be 
given when these arrangements for the supply of 
books shall have been completed, and whether the 
same are to be furnished at the expense of the city, 
or be paid for by individuals on their receiving them. 

TEACHEES' SALARIES, &c. 

The School Committee have had under considera- 
tion the salaries paid to our Teachers, and after fully 
deliberating upon this subject, they have decided, 
that in justice to them and the interests of our 
Schools, we should be warranted in making an addi- 
tion, to the amount which has heretofore been paid 
to them ; — therefore, they have fixed the salaries of 
the Masters in the Grammar Schools at ^^1,000 per 
year, each, and all the Primary School Teachers and 
Assistants in the Grammar Schools at ^250 each, 
per year ; — this arrangement to take effect on the 
16th day of the present month. 

,Charlestown is nearly encircled by cities, in some 
of which, higher salaries are paid to both male and 
female Teachers than we pay, and while this City is 
no less prosperous than her sister cities, and has as 
deeply at heart the cause of public education, she 
must, if from no higher motive than self-defence, fix 
the rate of compensation for her School Teachers at 
something near the rate paid in other cities and large 
towns in her immediate vicinity. The number of 
Teachers who bave been taken from our Schools dur- 
ing the past year, has fully proved to your Board the 
fact, that soon after Teachers have established a 



36 

reputation in our Schools, and have become efficient 
in the positions they have been called to fill, they 
are taken from them by offers of a higher salary 
than they receive with us, — a powerful inducement 
to every one, whose merits will commend them to 
the notice of those in pursuit of competent, experi- 
enced, and successful Teachers. 

The establishing of several new Primary Schools, 
will be indispensable during the coming year. Ar- 
rangements should be immediately made for the or- 
ganizing of one or more, in the eastern section of the 
city, where some of this class of schools are so full 
that the scholars, at times, cannot be seated. There 
is also a want felt in the western part of the city for 
a new Primary School. The citizens in that section 
have already petitioned the School Committee upon 
this subject, and they have submitted the matter to 
the City Council, asking of them a suitable building 
for the purposes of such a school. It is understood 
that a lot of land has been secured for this object. 

The prosperity of our Free Schools, is of vital im- 
portance to the public good, and these noble institu- 
tions, which have come down to us as a heritage from 
the wisdom and patriotism of worthy and honored 
ancestors, should be cherished, improved and perpet- 
uated, for the general welfare of society, and for the 
advancement of mankind in all that is elevating and 
noble in his nature. 

HENRY K. FROTHINGHAM, Chairman. 

In School Committee^ Feb. 23, 1848. 
Voted, That the foregoing Report be accepted by 
this Board. 

Voted, That twenty-five hundred copies be printed 
and distributed to the citizens. 

GEO. FAPRAR, Secretary, 



LIST OF PERSONS TAXED 



FOR 



CITY AND COUNTY, 

FOR 1 847, 



IN THE 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 

TO WHICH IS ADDED THE 

TREASURER'S STATEMENT 

OF 

RECEIPTS, EXPENDITURES, &c. 

PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE CITT, 



CHARLESTOWN r 

PRINTED AT THE FREEMAN OFFICE, 



1848. 
C 



LIST OF PERSONS TAXED. 



The names of those Persona whose Taxes remain nnsettled, are denoted by a * 



WARD No. 1. 



Abbott, John 


1 50 


Armstrong', Oliver . . . . . 


1 50 


Applin, Wesson 


15 94 


Ayer, Oliver 


3 78 


Artherton, Samuel 


39 50 


Adams, Edwin F 


]04 10 


Adams, George S 


151 22 


Alberty, Raphael B 


1 50 


Arnold, William 


54 76 


Adams, James 


149 70 


Adams, Abraham D 


1 50 


Ayer, Samuel 


15 94 


Adams, Chester 


170 98 


Adams, Edward 


117 02 


Ames, Cyrus 


1 50 


Adams, Daniel S. 


10 62 


Arnold, James 


12 90 


Arnold, George 


6 06 


Arnold, William, heirs of, 


34 20 


Armitage, John 


1 50 


Armitage, Joseph 


1 50 


Andrews, Abraham 


77 50 


Alexander, Henry S 


5 30 


Ambor, Artemus 


1 50 


Abbott, Samuel 


201 38 


Abbott, Samuel & Co. . . 


27 36 


Applin, Benjamin 


13 66 


Austin, Nathaniel 


1 50 


Applin, Sumner 


15 94 


Arnold, Catharine 


7 60 


Arnold, Isaiah F 


28 10 


Alden, James 


7 58 


Boyle, Francis 


1 50 


Bogardus, A. R 


1 50 


Burnham, Harrison 


1 50 


Brown, Franklin 


1 50 


Brown, Ephraim 


1 50 


Beard, William 


1 50 


Blanchard, Benjamin G. . 


30 38 


Brooks, Charles H 


3 78 


Bailey, Barker 


12 90 


Bradford, Duncan 


9 10 



Buel, Loveman 1 50 

Blaisdell, William 5 30 

Baker, Abiah 1 50 

Bridges, Francis 1 50 

Breed, John 1 50 

Brewer, John 2 26 

Brown, Amos 22 02 

Brewster, Ezra S 3 78 

Baldwin, Edson 1 50 

Bunker, Thomas 1 50 

Bowman, Zadock 41 02 

Bowman, Dexter 96 50 

Barker, George 77 50 

Bragdon, Roderick 1 50 

Bakewell, Henry 5 30 

Bradford, Russell 1 50 

Bagley, T 1 50 

Braun, Eugene E 5 30 

Barker, Loring 15 20 

Burdett, William 1 50 

Barker, Ebenezer 49 38 

Bemis, Horace 3 02 

Bellman, Francis C 1 50 

Bell, John C 6 06 

Bailey, Loami 3 78 

Brown, Benjamin, Jr. ... 64 58 

Brown, Caleb S. ....... 3 02 

Brown, Jonathan, Jr 34 94 

Blaisdell, Francis 1 50 

Bemis, Jonathan W 38 74 

Bailey, Joshua S 39 12 

Brown, George A 1 50 

Bradley, Edwin 6 82 

Bryant, John 1 50 

Bryant, John, Jr 4 54 

Bryant, Thomas 150 

Brown, Isaac E 14 42 

Balfour, Walter 66 10 

Bulkley, Samuel 1 50 

*Boyd, William 5 30 

Brown, John H 50 14 

Brown, George W 1 50 

JBeckford, William M 1 50 



Brackett, Joseph 3 78 

Brown, James 3 02 

Bowman, D. & Z 171 00 

Bradley & Richardson, . . 31 16 

Bailey, Cyrus B 1 50 

*Batchelder, John G. ... 1 50 

Brownell Benjamin 1 50 

Bowen, John R 3 02 

*Burns, Edmund A 1 50 

*Bartlett, Stephen 1 50 

Ballard, Alpheus 1 50 

Brown, Jonathan L 1 50 

Byrnes, William M 49 38 

Bellows, Albert J 42 54 

Boyle, Patrick 1 50 

Burkholder, Daniel 1 50 

Batchelder, Peter 3 02 

*Beckler, Charles 3 02 

Brown, Sumner 3 02 

*Brannan, Timothy 1 50 

*Bond, Asa 1 50 

Bridgeman, Stephen V. R. 1 50 

*Bisbee, 1 50 

Bragdon, Feter 1 50 

Bean, Joseph P 1 50 

Bradbury, Thomas 1 50 

Baker, Thomas 3 02 

Burrill, Joseph, 14 42 

Bradbury, Oakes J 3 78 

Brintnell, Samuel 2 20 

Brintnell, Samuel R. . . . . 3 02 

*Banks, John 1 50 

Brown, Abraham 1 50 

Butterfield, William 1 50 

*Brannan, Patrick 1 50 

Brandenburg, Oliver W. . 3 02 

Butts, Noah 9 10 

Brintnall, Thomas 3 02 

Burbank, Elisha 1 50 

Barker, William 1 50 

Bartlett, Jonathan 1 50 

Bowers, Henry 1 50 

Barnes, Jonas L 1 50 

Barril, Frederick 1 50 

Barrett, Samuel W, 1 50 

Brower, Henry 3 02 

Bailey, Ephraim 1 50 

Buel, Jeremiah 1 50 

*Bowman, Richard 1 50 

Bailey, Kendall 284 22 

Bambrich, James 1 50 

Beal, Elijah 3 78 

Bailey, Kendall, 2d 12 14 

Blanchard, Isaac 31 14 

Bradbury, Josiah C. .... 3 02 



Brown, David 17 46 

*Beard, Augustus 1 50 

Blanchard, Cyrus 12 14 

Bacon, William H 32 42 

Bailey, George S 1 50 

Bryant, Timothy 69 14 

Babcock, Moses 9 10 

*Bowers, b^dward C 1 50 

Bogart, Cornelius 1 50 

Brown, James, 2d 3 02 

Brown, Henry 1 50 

Burcham, Charles 1 50 

Barrett, Jonas 30 38 

Bradt, Isaac M 1 50 

*Blood, Nathan 1 50 

Brown, George, 2d ..... 1 50 

Bradshaw, Eleazer E. ... 136 78 

Balfour, David M 3 02 

Bailey, John B 1 50 

Babcock, Albert H 1 50 

Bridge, Jonathan, heirs of, 24 32 
Barnes, Reuben K. heirs of, 7 60 
Bartlett, Elizabeth, heirs of; 19 76 

Brown, David & Son ... 3 80 

Brown, Benj. Jr. guardian 3 80 

Crowley, Jeremiah 1 50 

Conroy, John 1 50 

Carr, Uriah W 12 90 

Cole, Augustus H 9 86 

Carnes, Nathan W 1 50 

*Cummings, Amos M. . . 1 50 

Crafts, Elias 42 54 

Cummings, David 1 50 

Clark, Enoch J 1 50 

Cameron, Alexander J. . . 8 00 

Carte, William 1 50 

Cobb, Moses G 9 10 

Carleton, William 308 54 

Chalk, William 3 02 

Cox, Charles 1 50 

Currier, Charles 1 50 

Call, Jonathan 50 90 

Crane, Silas 1 50 

Conner, John 1 50 

*Chase, Ede K 1 50 

Collins, Hiram 3 02 

Cummings, William — . 1 50 

Cotting, William W. . . . 3 02 

Chamberlin, George C. . . 11 38 

Curtiss, Jared 9 10 

Corigell, James 10 64 

Cody, John 1 50 

Collins, Richard 1 50 

Carleton, Catharine .... 55 48 



Carlcton, Alfred 77 50 

Crosby, Franklin 1 50 

■Chapman, Lothrop 3 02 

Cory, Isaac ..' 3 78 

Cutter, Samuel 18 98 

Childs, William C 9 10 

Collins, Herrod 3 02 

Cook, Lydia T 7 60 

Croswell, Joseph B 3 78 

Currier, John P 6 82 

Cristy, William C 47 10 

Cristy, William C. & M. . 8 36 

Cristy, Moses 4 54 

Cristy, Henry F. . . . 1 50 

Cristy, William C. Jr. , . 13 66 

Caldwell, Timothy B. . . . 17 46 

Chickering, Joseph ..... 1 50 

Cassell, William C 7 58 

Clark, Joshua S 3 78 

*Cummings, 1 50 

Cutter, J.Carter 6 82 

Carter, Charles S 4 54 

Campbell, Eliza 13 68 

Caverly, Moses 1 50 

*Crandal], Hezekiah I 50 

Crafts & Taylor 6 08 

Child, George H 16 70 

Chase, Artemas E. ..... 1 50 

Curtiss, Orin 3 t)2 

Coffran, Susannah 47 12 

Coffran, John, heirs of, . . 32 68 

Cook, Trueworthy . . 1 50 

*Carroll, John 1 50 

*Coburn, S. A. 1 50 

*Connely, Patrick 1 50 

Caverly, Everett F 3 78 

Creighton, John 1 50 

Cutting, William H 6 06 

*Chellis, Seth 1 50 

Cutter, George W 1 50 

Cutter, Marshall N. .... 25 82 

*Calhoun, Thomas 1 50 

Carter, Augustus H 1 50 

Clark, James, 2d 1 50 

Campbell, James 1 50 

Cutter, Oliver C 9 10 

Crowningshield, Benjamin 20 50 

Clark, John C 1 50 

Cheeny, Albion 1 50 

Childs, Francis 28 10 

Clark, Asahel G 1 50 

Caswell, William 157 30 

Caswell, Jacob 109 42 

Caswell, Octavius B 1 50 

Caswell, Francis J 6 82 



Caswell, James M 1 50 

Clapp, George H 3 02 

Crowningshield, Jacob . . 6 00 

Caldwell, Joseph 3 02 

Caldwell, Asa 1 50 

Colburn, Gilbert 1 50 

Crooker, Nath'l, heirs of, . 11 40 

Choate, Benjamin E. . . 9 10 

Cilley, Jonathan 1 50 

Caverly, John H 3 50 

*Cutter, William 1 50 

Carr, Charles F 1 50 

Caldwell, George A 3 78 

Curtiss, Robert 1 50 

*Cunningham, John T. . . 1 50 

Chandler, Samuel 13 66 

Conroy, John, 2d, 1 50 

Gov, Horace C 1 50 

Calder, Robert, Jr 92 70 

Chandler, William T. . . 1 50 

Cloutman, John 4 54 

Cades, William H. 3 78 

Collins, Joshua C. 3 78 

Carter, Joseph 77 50 

Clark, Aaron 1 50 

Caldwell, John, Jr 31 90 

Caldwell, John B. 137 54 

Church, Forster 1 50 

*Corson, Frederick F. . . 1 50 

*Conroy, Lawrence .... 1 50 

Chaffee, E. Bound 1 50 

Clapp, William G 1 50 

*Crooker, Thomas M. . . . 1 50 

*Chase, Elias 1 50 

«Chand]er, A 1 50 

Cleary, William W 1 50 

Child, Caleb 1 50 

Clark, James 5 30 

Dix, LeviW 1 50 

Denvir, William 3 78 

Denegan, Jeremiah 1 50 

*Dimon, John 1 50 

Donevan, John 1 50 

Dickenson, Lucius, Jr. . . 1 50 

Dalrymple, Willard, 36 46 

Dwinnell, Ira C 1 50 

Devens, Sam_uel 98 02 

Deleno, Jeptha 1 50 

Dunkan, John 1 50 

Drake, Ames 1 50 

Doane, Heman S 72 18 

Dean, Christopher C. ... 13 66 

Delin, Nicholas 1 50 

Downer, Barney T. .... 22 02 



Devens, David , 392 14 

Delano, Nathaniel 1 G2 

Dodge, David 24 30 

Deblois, James 47 38 

Drew, Harriet 26 60 

Draper, Samuel 20 50 

Draper, Edward L 3 78 

*Davenport, Charles D. . 3 78 

Deveraux, John N 3 02 

Dockum, Ephraim N. . . . 1 50 

Durkin, Mark 1 50 

Dodge, Seward 1 50 

Dunkan, Stephen D 3 02 

Dodge, Benjamin 3 78 

*Danforth, Henry W. . . . 3 78 

Davis, James 3 78 

*Day, 1 50 

Devlin, Peter 1 50 

Dockham, Josiah B ] 50 

Deviney, William 1 50 

Downer, Elisha 3 78 

Durfee, William 1 50 

*Driscoll, Nicholas 1 50 

Doyle, Perley H 1 50 

*Davis, Edward 1 50 

Davis, John 1 50 

Dow, James 1 50 

Dennis, Jacob 1 50 

Dennis, William 1 50 

Davenport, Edwin 5 30 

Daggett, Samuel 4 01 

Daggett, Cooledge C. , . 1 50 

Davis, Henry 6 06 

Dickenson, Joseph 3 02 

Driscoll, John 1 50 

Dow, Moses A 5 30 

Davis, Gillman, 3 78 

Dill, Washington 1 50 

Downing, Abraham E. . . 1 50 

Downing, Orin E 3 78 

Davidson, Hamilton .... 472 70 

Davidson, Charles H 11 38 

Dearborn, David 1 50 

*Durgan, James W 1 50 

Dana, James 395 18 

Devens, David, Pres 136 80 

Davis, Webster D 1 50 

Davidson, Hamilton, and 

others, 136 80 

Ennis, Simon 1 50 

Enwright, Daniel 1 50 

Emmons, Charles P 35 70 

Ellisg & McKean, 12 92 

Evelcth, Charles .3 02 



Eddy, George R. ...... 40 26 

Edmands, Benjamin 86 62 

Edmands, William S. . . 4 54 

Edmands, Waldo B 1 50 

Edmands, Martha 28 88 

Edmands, George W. . . 1 50 

Everett, Lucian C 1 50 

Edmands, Barnabas . — 350 32 

*Edmands, Joseph W. . . 4 54 

Edmands, Benjamin B. W. 1 50 
Edmands, Barnabas & Sons 25 84 

Eldridge, Benjamin W. . . 3 02 

Edmands, Augustus B. . . 1 50 

Eaton, Albert 7 58 

*Edmands, Thomas J. .. 150 

Edmands, John D 22 02 

Edmands, George D 1 50 

Emerson, Nathan 3 02 

Elliott, George C 1 50 

Edes, Robert B. Jr. & Co. 19 00 

Evans, Benjamin 3 78 

Edmands, William M. . . 37 22 

Emerson, William . . 1 50 

Ellis, John 1 50 

Emerson, Charles 60 02 

Emerson, Elias 7 58 

Ellis, Joseph 3 78 

Ellis, George E 20 50 

Eger, William 7 58 

English, Patrick 1 50 

Edmands, Barnabas, Trust. 38 00 

Flanagan, John 1 50 

*ri etcher, Samuel 1 50 

French, Moses S 3 78 

Feathers, Francis 1 50 

Finney, William 17 46 

Fayes, Martin P 10 62 

*Francis, Samuel ...... 1 50 

Frost, Albert A 5 30 

P'uller, Stephen 4 54 

Fosdick, James 62 30 

Fletcher, Jonathan V. . . 47 10 

Farrar, George 25 06 

*Flint, Mason 3 02 

Flint, Simon 66 86 

Felton, Samuel M 117 78 

Frothingham, Amos T. . . 44 82 

Frothingham, EdAvard M. 5 30 

Fosdick, John 55 46 

Ford, Ebenezer 48 62 

Felton, Thomas 1 50 

Forster, Henry 434 70 

Flagg, John P 123 86 

Fatnsworth, John C 6 82 



Fauncc, Elisha 13 

Fessenden, Isaac 

Ford, Hannah 

Forbes, William 

Fox, David B 

Fox, Edward S 

*Foster, 

Fuller, Charles W 

Fellows, Milo 

Fernald, Joseph 

Fitchum, Edward A 

Field, Jacob 

Fosdick, Daniel 

Frost, Charles T 

Fickett, Samuel 

Fall, Tristram 

Fowler, Thomas 

Forster, Jacob 

Fairbanks, Henry P 

Frothingham, John W. . . 

Fenno, Stephen 

Forster, Lawrence & Co. 
Fosdick, Carter & Co. . . 
Fletcher & Tay ........ 

Fisk, Letetia 

Fisk, Emeline 



G 82 
1 50 


7 60 


9 10 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


1 50 


37 22 


1 50 


1 50 


9 10 


9 86 


1 50 


18 98 


463 58 


73 70 


9 10 


1 50 


114 76 


45 60 


44 08 


9 12 


38 00 



*Green, William 

Gillman, Benjamin . . . . 

*Gleason, 

Goodrich, Ira 

Grover, Alexander H. 

*Gilbert, 

Gale, Charles W 

Ginn, James 

Goodridge, David 

Glines, Nahum M. . . . . 

Griffin, Warren 

Gould, John B 

Gregory, John 

Gibson, Griffin .- . 

Gary, John 

Gerry, William 

Gutterson, William H. 
Grant, Abraham W. . . 
Grover, Calvin ...... 

Goodwin George J. . . 

Gould, James 

Green, George .....-, 

*GofF, James 

GofF, Reuben ....... 

Gardner, Franklin . . . 

Ginn, John C 

Gardner, Aaron H. . . . 
Goodnow, Joseph . . . 



1 50 
1 50 
1 50 

45 58 
8 34 



22 78 
74 46 

1 50 
43 30 

7 58 

1 50 
15 18 

1 50 

22 02 

455 98 



50 

78 
50 
50 
50 



Grubb, John, heirs of, . . . 7 00 

Gregg, Chauncy 1 50 

Gage, George W 1 50 

Gaffncy, Peter 1 50 

Gates, Noah 3 02 

Goodridge, Lorenzo 1 50 

Gage, Hittenger & Co. . 378 48 

*Galagher, Laurence 1 50 

Golding, Dennis 1 50 

Green, Thomas H 1 50 

Gorham, Stephen 9 10 

Goodridge, George W. . . 1 50 

*Green, Rufus 1 50 

Gage, Jane 7 60 

Goodnow, Alexander 1 50 

Gates, James L 7 58 

Goodnow, Levi 51 66 

Goodridge, George ..... 30 38 

Gage, Elizabeth 14 44 

Gove, Warren 1 50 

Gardner, Daniel B 1 50 

Gage, Addison 9 10 

*Gage, Asa 

Goodwin, Thomas R. 2d 
Gove, Ebenezer T. ...... 

*Gilbert, Samuel W 

*Gray, Augustine 

Greenleaf, Patrick H. . . 9 10 

Glidden, John W 21 26 

Gline, Bradford E 1 50 

Gould, Joseph, heirs of, . 9 12 

Higgins, Thomas 3 02 

Hardy, Benjamin 1 50 

Hatsfield, Joseph 1 50 

Hays, John • 1 50 

Huff, Benjamin 1 50 

*Hobart, George 1 50 

Harris, John 83 58 

Holden, Thomas F 56 22 

Hinkley, Ezra 1 50 

Hinkley, John 1 50 

Horn, Van Voorhis 1 50 

Haywood, George 1 50 

Houghton, Ezra 1 50 

Houghton, Charles 3 02 

Houghton, George . 1 50 

Holden, Nathaniel 3 02 

Houghton, Jonas .... 

Hill, Mark P 

Hoyt, Sylvester S. . . 

Hooper, Edward 

Horton, Reuben 

Horton, Reuben, Jr 1 50 

*Hart, Joseph 3 78 



50 
02 
50 
50 
50 



Hoburt, Elbiidge G 1 50 

Hall, Isaac 5 30 

Hunt, Reuben 355 66 

Hunt, Reuben, J r 3 02 

Houghton & Hill . . 7 60 

Hall, Gorham 1 50 

Hale, Pollus 1 50 

Hubbel, Peter 139 06 

Hastings, Walter 39 50 

Harris, John, 2d 6 06 

Hall, Jacob 1 50 

Hovey, Solomon 34 94 

Hutchins, Ezra C 64 58 

Hutchins, Henry C 9 10 

Hill, William 1 50 

Hurd, J. Stearns 90 42 

Hurd, Marv F 157 32 

Hurd, William .... ... 677 14 

Haynes, Benjamin 1 6 70 

Hoyt, Otis 39 50 

Hyde, George 43 30 

Hadley, Isaac V 3 78 

Hovey, Henry 150 

Higgins, John, Jr 1 50 

Hadley, Aaron 16 70 

Hadley, Aaron, Jr 11 38 

Hadley, Albert G. ..... . 3 78 

Hutchins, Horace G 44 82 

Hobart, Leavett 3 78 

Hazletine, Charles 14 42 

Harrington, Daniel 1 50 

Ham, Frederick A 3 02 

Hale, Joseph L 7 58 

Hays, Jacob 3 78 

Harris, Josiah, heirs of, . 12 16 

Harris, Josiah A 1 50 

Harris, Thomas B. s 1 50 

Hunt, Enoch 82 82 

Hunt, William 12 90 

Hurd, John 365 54 

Hunt, James .....,,... 1 50 

*Hancock, Thomas . 1 50 

*Heigenton, Thomas 1 50 

Howe, David B 41 02 

Hawkes, Benjamin 1 50 

Hunnewell, Joseph 149 70 

Hagar, Solomon 1 50 

Heald, Benjamin 1 50 

Hittinger & Cook 54 72 

Haynes, Amos 5 30 

Haggerty, Andrew 12 90 

Howland, H. & Z. C. . . . 53 20 

*Hayes, Timotliy 1 50 

Hatch, Abijah 1 50 

.Holt, William 1 50 



Huddleston, William .... 1 50 

Heath, William 1 50 

Hittinger, Jacob 170 Oa 

Hancock, Josiah B 1 50 

Hurley, David 1 50 

Hadley, Isaac 3 02 

*Hayes, James 1 50 

Hurley, Timothy 1 50 

Howe, Jonathan . 18 22 

Howe, Walter 9 10 

Heath, Nathaniel .. 25 82 

Hood, Harvey B 1 50 

Hobbs, Isaac 9 10 

Hill, Samuel P 24 30 

Plill, Henry 7 58 

Hill, H. & S. P. ....... . 48 64 

Herriman, Joseph 1 50 

*Hughes, Owen 1 50 

Hall, Charles 1 50 

Haskell, George W 1 50 

Haste, Henry 3 78 

Horton, Thomas Bw . . . . . 1 50 

Hobbs, James , . . 14 42 

*Holman, John 1 50 

Hunnewell, Thomas 12 90 

*Higgins, Alfred 1 50 

Hurd, Frederick L 1 50 

Hawes, William ....... 17 92 

Holbrook, Joseph . . 1 50 

Hodgkins, William 4 54 

Harding-, John, Jr 3 02 

Harding, Samuel L. .... 1 50 

Harding, Thomas M 1 50 

Harding, John 27 42 

Harding, Wilber F. .... I 50 

Harding, Noah 11 38 

Harding, Henry S, ^ 1 50 

*Hatch, Cyrus P. 1 50 

Hart, Joseph S 5 30 

Holbrook, William A. .. 150 

Hall, Frederick W. . . . . 1 50 

Haws, Elnathan 1 50 

Hunnewell, John 4 54 

Hatch, James B 11 40 

Horsington, Henry 1 50 

Hastings, James — .... 1 50 

Hill, Thomas 1 50 

Hooper, Samuel T 6 06 

Hall, Alfred -B 26 58 

Hall, Osborn B 5 30 

Hunnewell, James 444 58 

Hunnewell, T. & T. F. . 1 52 

Hunnewell, Thomas F. . 3 02 

*Hill, Amos 1 50 

Howell, William 4 54 







hadley, Betsey, and Mra. 

Richardson 11 40 

Hurd, Harriet. 5 32 

Jewett & Gates, 53 20 

Jordan, Nelson 1 SO 

Jaques, Henry L 71 42 

Jaques, Henry L. adm'r, . 3 80 

Jaques, Henry, heirs of, . 357 96 

Jordan, Ambrose ....... 1 50 

Jose, John 1 50 

Jones, Daniel 3 02 

Jaquith, Oliver 47 86 

Jewett, Cummings 1 50 

Jewett, James C 1 50 

Jewett, John H 7 58 

Jacobs, Perez R. 4 ..... , 4 54 

Jones, John P 1 50 

*John3on, 1 50 

Johnson, Isaac 1 50 

Joy, Francis H 6 06 

Jenkins, Henry . . . « . . . . 1 50 

Johnson, Jothara, Jr. ... .^ 67 62 

Jackson, George 3 02 

Jackson, Andrew 3 02 

Jackson, Samuel, heirs of, 17 48 

Jones, Leonard W 1 50 

Jones, William 3 02 

Jones, Catharine 13 68 

*Jayne, Thomas ....... 1 50 

*Johnson, Willard S 1 50 

*Kelly, James 3 02 

Kinman, John 1 50 

*Eelly, Samuel 1 50 

Kelley, Morris 60 78 

Kimball, Daniel A 5 30 

Kean, Tilden H 1 50 

Kimball, William 1 50 

**Kimball, Joshua ...... 1 50 

Kimball, Thomas J 1 50 

*Knight, Thomas 1 50 , 

Kendall, Isaac - 5 30 

Kendall, Loami 60 02 

Kendal], Isaac, 2d ..... . 43 30 

Knowles, Willard 7 58 

Kennah, James 1 50 

Eilbraith, Dennis 1 50 

*Kelly, George 1 50 

*Knight, 1 50 

Kelsoe, Lewis 1 50 

Kinney, Marshal N .• 3 78 

Kidder, Andrew B. v 3 78 

*Knight, Benjamin 1 50 

Kelly, John 1 50 

3 



Kelly, Thomas 7 58 

Kendall, Isaac, heirs of, . 12 16 

Kidder, Samuel & Co. . . 174 80 

Knight &, Poor, . . * 3 80 

Langridge, John ...... ^ 1 50 

Lyons, Dan 1 50 

Lamson, Horatio N 9 10 

Leonard, Martin 25 06 

Luf kin, Russell S 1 50 

Little, George W 164 14 

*Lennan, John 1 50 

Lincoln, Joshua 1 50 

Leonard, Watson 1 50 

Leonard, Albion I 50 

Lathrop, Cummings .... 1 50 

Loring, Abraham M. ... 1 50 

*Lyons, David , 1 50 

Lawrence, Arthur L 1 50 

Leavitt, Daniel 40 26 

Leighton, George A. . . . 1 50 

Lawrence, Edward ..... 288 78 

Lamson, Samuel « 12 90 

Lampreli, Simon 3 02 

Lapham, Luther 41 02 

Leach, Edward B I 50 

Lyons, William 3 78 

Lincoln, Uriah 1 50 

Lincoln, Oshea 1 50 

Lord, Asa ... * 1 50 

Lamson, Walter 1 50 

Lord, William, 2d 1 50 

Larkin, Thomas 1 50 

Leavitt, David 1 50 

*Loring, Joseph P « 1 50 

*Lowrey, John 1 50 

Littlefield, Abiel 6 06 

Loring, Joseph 1 50 

Lovering, Robert, heirs of, 9 88 

Larkin, Israel J 30 38 

Larkin, Ruth 17 48 

Leman, Henry B 1 50 

Loring, Mary H 79 80 

Lapham, Charles 3 02 

*Lanwell, Peter 1 50 

*Leavitt, Samuel 1 50 

McElroy & Denvir, .... 11 40 

*McKusker, Francis 1 50 

*McNall, James 1 50 

*McCarty, Charles ..... 1 50 

*Murphy, Peter 1 50 

McCarty, Timothy . 1 50 

Manning, Benjamin F. ^ . 1 50 



10 



*McCarty, Jeremiah .... 1 50 

Manners, John 1 50 

Marium, Otis W 6 82 

Munroe, Henry 6 06 

Munroe, Royal K 3 02 

Mulliken, Henry B. G. C. 1 50 

Mulliken, Nathan C 3 02 

Martin, Ebenezer 1 50 

Morrill, Jesse 3 02 

Mason, Samuel L 22 78 

Mason, Hale 1 50 

Mauriura, William H. . • . 1 50 

McNulty, James 1 50 

McPoland, John 1 50 

*Mills, Caleb 1 50 

Merrill, Enos .^ 150 

Mulliken, Clement 1 50 

Morse, George H , f) 10 

McNamara, Bartholomew 1 50 

Marshall, Thomas 64 58 

Mclntire, Theodore B. . , 4 54 

Marsh, Jacob T 50 

Murray, John 42 54 

Mason, Francis M 3 02 

Murray, Thomas B 3 78 

*Murray, Michael 1 50 

McDonough, James F. . . 1 50 

^Montgomery, John B. . . 12 90 

Mead, Isaac H 1 50 

Melvin, Adono L 1 50 

Munroe, Abijah 31 90 

Munroe, Lewis B. ..... . 3 02 

McKean, John 3 78 

Mann, Alexander 18 98 

Mann, Desire 17 48 

Moore, William R 1 50 

McGrath, Michael 3 02 

*Middleton, Thomas 5 30 

*Marsl)all, James 1 50 

*Matliez, DeLouis 3 78 

Merrill, Nathan 15 ] 8 

Murray, William 6 06 

Merrill, .7. Warren 4 54 

Mason, J. Otis I 50 

McNeills, John 2 26 

^Morrison, Jesse L. . .-. . ^ 1 50 

*McLaughlin, William . 1 50 

*McCarty, Jeremiah, 2d . 1 50 

McHughes, James 1 50 

Mead, Frederick . . .- 3 02 

McLoud, John 3 02 

McDonald, Patrick 18 22 

Munroe, Moses 150 

McLaughlin, James ..... 1 50 

Mo Williams, Barney .... 9 10 



McCollar, John ........ 


7 5& 


Morrell, George 


1 50 


*Murray, Edward 


1 50 


Maloon, David 


1 50 


*Mayo, 


1 50 


*McNeal, 


1 50 


Metcalf, David 


3 02 


Mullett, James 


13 66 


McGuire, Barney 


1 50 


McLaughlin, Barnard . . . 


1 50 


McKinney, John 


1 50 


*Murphy, Daniel 


1 50 


*Murray, Thomas 


1 50 


Melvin, Jerome 


1-50 


Mills Elisha 


2 72 


McFarlane, Dennison . . , 


1 50 


Melvin, Thomas M 


7 58 


*Marston, John 


1 50 


Myrick, Henry 


3 78 


Mellen, Thomas 


6 06 


*Maling, Patrick 


1 50 


Mitchell, John 


6 82 


Mitchell, George 


4 16 


McFarlane, William .... 


6 82 


McKay, George 


1 50 


Mclntire, James 


1 50 


Munroe, James F 


3 02 


Moulton, Joseph 


1 50 


McDonald, John 


3 78 


Marpole, John M. ^ ..... . 


2 26 


Murphy, Patrick 


1 50 


Mann, Joseph, heirs of, . . 


7 60 


Manning, Mary, heirs of, . 


2 28 


*Maloon, D 


1 50 


*Mahan, Martin . . . 


1 50 


Moody, Edward F 


3 40 


Murray, James 


14 42 


Nichols, Edward O 


3 78 


Neal, George B, 


3 02 


Newell, Constantino F. . 


6 06 


Nickerson, Jonas C 


3 78 


*Norton, Elisha 


1 50 


Nichols, Thomas 


40 72 


Nutting, Hosea 


1 50 


*Noonan, David 


1 50 


Nichols, John R 


4 54 


*Nason, John ... 


1 50 


Norcross, Joseph W. 


1 50 


Norton, Doniel J 


3 02 


Noyes, Michael 


1 50 


Noyes, Abraham 


1 50 


Newcomb, Samuel 


24 30 


Norton, Charles 


5 30 


Norton, Thaxter 


3 02 



11 



*Newton, Francis 1 50 

Newell, Jos. W., heirs -of, 15 20 

Osgood, William H 28 10 

Osborn, Ezra 1 50 

Oakman, Samuel 6 06 

Oakman, Samuel, heirs of, J 9 00 

Orman, James 1 50 

Oakes, NehemiaJi 1-50 

Proctor, John R 28 86 

Parker, William B 9 «6 

Peirce, Polly 11 40 

Philbrook, Samuel , . . . . 1 50 

Pickett, Henry J 1 50 

Page, George 1 50 

Plunket, James 13 66 

Powers, Lucius 13 66 

Powers, Lucius, Jr 1 50 

Powers, Charles 3 78 

Priest, Ira H 1 50 

^Pitcher, Luther 2 50 

Pitcher, William i 50 

Patterson, Lucius 3 75 

Parker, Daniel H 1 50 

*Pollard, George N 3 02 

Putnam, George A -. i 50 

Pattee, Cyrus C 25 82 

Peirce, Henry A 440 02 

*Powers, John 1 50 

Priest, Samuel 7 58 

Page, George A 1 50 

Perry. Charles H 1 50 

Peters, Andrew B. 1 8 22 

*Pearson, Henry 1 50 

*Peirce, George W. L. . 1 50 

Paine, John 17 46 

Paine, Elbridge G 1 50 

Paine, John, Jr 1 50 

Pratt, Oliver .- 3 78 

Pond, Nathaniel 3 02 

Peirce, William W 5 30 

Parker, Warren B 5 78 

Paterson, Wm. C. & Co. 12 16 

Pennell, Joseph W 1 50 

Perry, Charles 3 78 

Parkinson, Charles 3 02 

*Porter, Amasa 1 50 

Porter, Samuel A IK) 

Payson, Samuel 73 70 

Parkinson, John 1 50 

Preston, Thomas B 3 02 

*Parker, Henry 1 50 

Pasco, John 1 50 

Parker, Isaac „. . 10 63 



PettingiH, Benjamin H. . 3 02 

Palmer, John D 3 02 

•^Pike, John K 1 50 

*Pike, Lyba 1 50 

Phelps, Charles 1 50 

Parker, George A 18 98 

Pearson, Jacob 1 50 

*Pond, William 3 02 

Phillips, Lenthel, heirs of, 7 60 

Phillips, Lenthel W, . . . 3 02 

Powers, Francis 1 50 

Potter, Samuel W ] 50 

Palmer & Harding, 3 80 

Pearson, John 4 54 

Philrotho, Archer 1 50 

Phelps, Mary 26 60 

Perkins, John 56 98 

Pratt, Nathaniel 2 26 

Peirce, Caleb 334 38 

Preble, George B 3 02 

Palmer, A sahel 18 98 

Payson, Mary P 11 14 

♦Quinland, Edward, ... - 1 50 

*Quigley, Philip 1 50 

Quaint, George 2 26 

Quincy, Henry A 3 02 

Robinson & Fifield, 15 20 

Ross, John A. 3 02 

Robinson, Thomas 1 50 

Richardson, John W. . . . 3 02 

Robertson, John C 22 78 

Rand, Lilies 15 96 

Reynolds & Waitt, 98 04 

Ryan, Patrick, 1 50 

Rice, John R 20 50 

Rice, Charles A 1 50 

Rice, Levi 2 26 

Rice, Aaron 1 50 

Richards, Thomas B. . . . 1 50 

Richardson, Josiah B. . . 1 50 

Richardson, Charles 1 50 

Raymond, Samuel, 2d, . . 58 50 

Raymond, William J. . . . 1 50 

Rich, John 1 50 

Raymond, Samuel S I 50 

Rowe, Philip C 3 78 

*Rodgers, Seth 1 50 

Rodgers, William 1 50 

Rodgers, Zaccheus 3 78 

Rand, Caleb 7 58 

Riddle, Edward .... 52 42 

Roberts, Jacob W 3 78 

Randall, James 1 50 

Russell, Thomas 22 02 



12 



Jlobinson, John S 1 50 

Robinson, T. S. G 18 98 

Richardson, William S. . 3 02 

Richardson, Job 68 3§ 

Richardson, Moses ..... 1 50 

*Rider, Samuel C 1 50 

*Rose, Joseph 1 50 

*Ricker, Charles , J 50 

Ripley, Dennis 1 50 

Robbins, William S 1 50 

Rice, Phinehas 20 50 

Rice, Merrick 5 30 

Rice, Henry 1 50 

Russell, Spencer 16 32 

Roberts, Amos , 3 02 

Roberts, James W. , . . . . 1 50 

Richards, Sylvester .... 1 50 

Riee & Pettingill, 3 04 

Rice, Samuel 119 30 

*Rice, William 3 02 

*Rice, James, 1 50 

Roach, Luke 1 50 

Runey, James 71 42 

Reigan, Jeremiah 1 50 

*Rodgers, James S 1 50 

Robinson, John 3 02 

*Ridley, Alonzo 1 50 

Richardson, Thomas ... 1 50 

Raymond, Francis 1 50 

Redding, Howard 1 50 

Rice, Charles . . . , 3 02 

Rice, Matthew, heirs of, . 11 40 

Rice, Matthew 41 78 

Rodgers, Samuel 3 02 

Reed, Franklin 1 50 

Roach, Edward 1 50 

Raymond, Bartholomew , 59 26 
Raymond, Bartholomew, Jr. I 50 

Rice, John 4 54 

Reigan, James 1 50 

Robinson, Jonathan H. • 1 50 

Rice, Samuel R 35 70 

Richards, Asa T, 6 06 

Raymond, Samuel 136 78 

Rodgers, Charles B 26 58 

*Rowell, M , 1 50 

Reed, JosiahT 1 50 

Sullivan, Timothy, 2d, . . 1 50 

*Shanhan, Philip 1 50 

Smith, John 1 50 

*Sullivan, Michael O. . . 1 50 

Smith, Emery 1 50 

Stevens, William H 1 50 

Solis, Frederick .,,,.... 1 50 



Sullivan, Patrick 1 50 

Shute, J ames 1 50 

Shultz, Christopher H. . . 1 50 

Shaw, John E 3 78 

•Stearns, Oliver 1 50 

*Smith, Alexander 1 50 

Smith, Nathaniel 1 30 

*Storer, William 1 50 

Stinehart, William & Co. 7 60 

Stinehart, John 1 50 

Sisson, William B 1 50 

Sargent, David 4 54 

Snaith, Richard T 3 02 

Sweetser, Isaac 43 30 

Souther, Joseph 101 82 

Souther, Joseph, Jr 5 30 

•Sawtell, 1 50 

Sanger, George P. ..... . 15 18 

Stoddard, Mary 13 68 

Skinner, Francis E 3 78 

Sheridan, Barnard 6 06 

*Sewall, Samuel T 5 30 

Stuart, Darwin E 1 50 

Stiggers, Joseph H 1 50 

*Small, Samuel 1 50 

Sargent, David, 2d, 1 50 

Sawtell, Andrew 102 58 

Swallow, William K. . . . 1 50 

Spring, Isaac H 48 62 

Stetson, Lemuel , 129 18 

Stratton, Nathan W 3 02 

Sullivan, Eugene 1 50 

Stevens, George C 1 50 

Stinehart, William , . . . , 1 50 

Skilton, George 5 30 

Sampson, Ebenezer .... 19 74 

Simmonds, Melvin 18 22 

Sumner, Thomas , 57 74 

Smith, John A 1 50 

*Smith, John 1 50 

Sisson, Robert 7 08 

Simonds, Joel 3 02 

Smith, Charles H , 1 50 

*Shapley, Henry 1 50 

Sylvesver, John 1 50 

Smith, Joseph N 15 94 

Stone, Charles , , 1 50 

Shedd, Daniel 1 50 

Stone, William 1 50 

Shultz, Mary , 10 64 

Sweetser, John 49 38 

Sweetser, Isaac, heirs of, 16 72 

Shaw, Daniel W 3 02 

Saville, Richard L 3 03 

Skilton, Samuel P. .... . 34 94 



13 



Skidmore, John 1 50 

Sawyer, William B 39 50 

Sawyer, Otis V 3 02 

Sargent, Thomas 1 50 

Stone, Jasper & Co 17 76 

Snow, Hannah 2 28 

Savage, John 1 50 

*Smith, James 3 78 

Sawyer, Isaac 3 02 

Sweetser, Daniel 1 50 

Smith, William 25 44 

Sylvester, Artemas 1 50 

Sawyer, Leonard 2 26 

*Sawyer, Abiel . • 1 50 

♦Spalding, Henry O. . . . 1 50 

*Sanborn, Josiah ...... 1 50 

•Sampson, Andrew 1 50 

Sullivan, John 1 50 

Smith, Charles 2 26 

Stinson, Erastus R. . . . . . 3 02 

Stark, John 3 02 

Soley, John 334 38 

Skilton, John 45 58 

Skilton, James 7 58 

Sparrell, George P 27 34 

Stratton, John 11 38 

Stowell, Abel 28 86 

Stowell, John 1 50 

Stowell, Francis 1 50 

Smith, Perley 3 02 

Stone, Stephen H 5 30 

Sweeney, James 1 50 

Savage, Joseph 1 50 

*Sullivan, John 2d, 1 50 

Sawyer, Joseph 1 50 

*Stearns, Henry 1 50 

Shaw, Benjamin F 1 50 

Symmes, Caleb 72 22 

Scollan, James 1 50 

*Sividy, Henry 1 50 

Seavy, Simeon 3 02 

Sholes, John J 1 50 

Stark, Hezekiah 3 02 

Stark, Robinson &, Co. . 7 60 

Simonds, Francis 31 90 

Spring, Samuel 177 06 

Sutton, J ames A 1 50 

Souther, E. Jr 1 50 

*Shay, William H 1 50 

Sanderson, Harry 1 50 

*Shelburn, Nathaniel ... 1 50 

*Shedd, Samuel 1 50 

Stetson, George W 1 50 

*Smith, 1 50 

Smith, Joseph 84 34 



Sampson, Thomas 84 

Southwick, John 34 94 

Sampson, Thomas, Jr. . . 3 02 

*Smitli, Haskell 1 50 

Sawyer, Seth 30 36 

Southwick, Arnold 9 10 

Southwick, Oliver B, . . . 3 02 

Sylvester, Ingenious .... 1 50 

Smith, Albert 13 66 

Scaramon, James 1 50 

Smith, Amos 3 78 

*Stearns, William 1 50 

Symmes, Calvin 1 50 

Seavey, Joshua R 22 02 

Stevens, Thomas J 32 66 

Southworth, Thomas 42 54 

South worth, James ..... 1 50 

Sutton, Robert 1 50 

Sawyer, Clark 1 50 

Sawyer, Harrison 1 50 

Snow, Martin B. ....... 1 50 

*Sargent, James 1 50 

*Sargent, R 1 50 

Sullivan, Timothy 9 10 

Skilton, Augustus H. . . . 1 50 

Stanley, Mrs 15 20 

Sampson, Amos, heirs ?of, 9 88 

Stetson, David, heirs of, . 104 12 

Stetson, Catharine 12 16 

Stetson, Mary 6 08 

Skilton, S. P. and James 

Adams, Trustees, . . 41 80 

Thompson, Clark 3 78 

Twycross, Martha 247 00 

Turner, William B 1 50 

*Teague, Samuel 1 50 

Tilden, Edward 9 86 

Thomas, Seth J 63 06 

Tufts, Gilbert 408 54 

Tufts, Gilbert, Jr 7 58 

Tufts, William 56 22 

Tufts, Amos 113 98 

Tufts, Edwin 5 30 

Thomss, Warren B 25 06 

Tayler, William 3 02 

Thayer, A bner 1 50 

Turner, Henry 1 50 

Turner, Greenleaf 6 82 

Turner, Rebecca 7 60 

Thomas, George 1 50 

Turner, Robert R 11 38 

Thomas, Charles 18 22 

Turner, James R 6 82 

Thomas, John C. 11 38 



14 



Tolman, Samuel 1 50 

Taylor, Cyrus 1 50 

Todd, Robert 43 30 

Tyler, Edward 7 58 

Todd, George 7 58 

Tufts, Samuel P 79 02 

Tarbell, Daniel 1 50 

Tibbetts, Israel 6 06 

Turner, Barnabas 1 50 

Taylor, George W 43 30 

Thompson, Joseph 77 50 

Thompson, Abraham R. . 153 50 

Tyler, Jonas 77 50 

Tyler, Benjamin F 3 02 

Taylor, Daniel h 1 50 

Travers, Calvin 25 82 

*Taylor, Carleton 1 50 

Tilson, Edward C 15 18 

Turner, William L 18 98 

Turner, William 1 50 

*Tenney, Daniel I 50 

Toomey, Dennis 1 50 

Toomey, Patrick 1 50 

Taylor, John J 4 54 

Tibbetts, Phinehas 1 50 

Taylor, Thomas 1 50 

Tinslar, Benjamin R. . . . 39 50 

*Tibbetts, Richard 1 50 

Trefethen, Nathaniel ... 4 54 

Tufte, Leonard 49 38 

Tapley, Warren 3 02 

Todd, Thomas 3 78 

Tewksbury, Cyrus 1 50 

Thompson, Charles 87 38 

Thompson, Francis 3 02 

Thompson, Charles, Jr. . 3 78 

Thompson, Benjamin - . . 134 50 

Tufts, Nathan A 229 50 

Taggard, John L 79 02 

Thurston, Andrew 1 50 

Thompson, Benj. & Co. . 372 64 

Todd, Aaron 1 50 

Thompson, Timothy .... 136 78 
Tufts, Nathan A. guardian, 19 00 

Thompson & Lapham, . . 20 52 

Thompson. Timo. heirs of, 55 46 

Upham, Timothy 9 10 

Upham, George ....... 9 10 

Ventriss, Moses 1 50 

Viles, William A 7 58 

Vinal, Otis 100 30 

Van Voorhis, Robert D. . 4 54 

Vial, John 3 78 



*Verry, John 1 50 

Vannevar, Alexander, Jr. 10 62 

Vaughan, Eliphalet L. . . 1 50 

Veasey, Dennis 16 70 

Vinal, Otis, guardian, ... 9 88 

Wesson & Gary, 330 60 

Walcott, Edward K 3 78 

Wright & Ross, 2 28 

Wright, Joel 3 78 

Warren, G. Washington, 402 02 

Warren, Abigail 144 40 

Walker, Charles, 1 50 

Watson, Nathaniel 1 50 

White, Benjamin T 1 50 

Wason, Samuel A 1 50 

Wason, David 6 06 

Ward, Edward A. ..... . 26 58 

Whitney, Charles 1 50 

Whitney, John S 1 50 

Woodman, Ezekiel 7 58 

Whittier, Leonard N. . . . 1 50 

White, Moody 3 78 

Wilson, Nathaniel B. . . . 14 42 

Wilson, John B 3 78 

Whiting, Eldad 22 80 

*White 1 50 

White, Ebenezer , 25 82 

Whiting, George 5 30 

Waitt, Warren 3 02 

Wetherbee, Judah 1 50 

Worthen, True F 1 50 

Wyman, Mary 9 12 

Wyman, Thomas B 1 50 

Wyman, James K 4 54 

Wyman, Thomas B. Jr. . 6 82 

*Woodbury, Benjamin F. 3 02 

White, Nicholas 1 50 

Wilson, John 5 30 

Wheeler, Alexander 5 30 

Wiley, Peter B 16 70 

Whittier & Viles, ...... 15 20 

Worthen, Charles J. & Co. 5 32 

Wesson, John 43 30 

Walker, Joseph C 3 02 

* White, Willard C 3 02 

* Wheeler, Joshua S 1 50 

White, James 1 50 

White, Ephraim 1 50 

Welch, John P 42 54 

Wyman, Joshua 1 50 

Whiting, Samuel 15 94 

White, Amos W 1 50 

*Williams, Jonas 1 50 

Waldo, Sarah V 21 23 



15 



Wade, Reuben S 

Wyman, William 

Walker, Lucy J 

Wason, Robert 

Wason, Robert & Co. . . 

Wason, I. Putnam 

Woodward, Benjamin — 
*Whitcomb, Leicester C. 
*VVhitcomb, Frederick G. 
Wellington, Leander . .. . 

Wetlierbee, Isaac J 

Woodbury, Samuel T. . . 

*Weston, 

Whitney, Thomas P 

* Wilson, Francis 

Whitney, Hiram 

* Whiting, Ebenezer .... 

* Webber, Georo-e 

Wilson, J. B.& C 

Webster, Jasper 

White, George W 

* Wilson, George 

Wiley, William 

Walker, James, heirs of", 
Woodbury, George W. . 

Winslow, Varnum S. 

Wilson, Isaac 

Worthen, Charles J 

Watson, Lewis W 

West, Charles 

Wing, Charles H 

Weeman, Eli P 



59 26 


1 50 


180 12 


47 86 


8 36 


3 78 


1 50 


2 26 


3 02 


1 50 


3 78 


3 78 


1 50 


] 50 


I 50 


3 78 


1 50 


1 50 



42 56 
1 50 
y 10 
1 50 
1 50 

48 04 
1 50 
1 50 
3 02 

12 90 
1 50 
9 86 
1 50 
3 02 



50 
50 



Winch, James 1 

Wyman, Nathaniel F. . . 1 

Witherell & Field 2 28 

Wiley, Aaron 3 02 

Woodman, Edwin 1 50 

Wiley, Uethuel 1 50 

Wilson, Charles 3 78 

Whiton, Lincoln B 3 02 

Whiton, James 33 42 

Whiton, Walter M 1 50 

Whiton, Albert G. 1 50 

Whiton, Henry L ] 50 

Whiton, Blossom, heirs of, 25 84 

* Williams, John 1 50 

Woodland, Charles 1 50 

Webb, Nathan 128 42 

W^hite, Daniel 307 78 

*Whcelock, B. 1 50 

Wyman, Francis^ and Su- 
san, heirs of, . 77 50 

Wiley, Hannah, heirs of, 26 60 

Warren, G. W. trustee, . 38 00 

Welch, Sarah 27 36 

Walker, Helen L 9 88 

Walker, Helen L. guard. 7 60 

Whiting, Martha 19 00 

*Welch, Rachel 22 80 

Whitney, Luther F. 10 62 

Yeaton, Charles 2 66 

York, Joseph W I 50 

Young &L White, 84 32 



WARD JVo. 2. 



Armstrong, James . . 94 98 

Adams, Benjamin, heirs of, 101 12 

Alstine, J. Van 1 50 

Anderson, Dugal 1 50 

Armstrong, William .... 1 50 

Almeider, Francis J. Jr. . 6 82 

Archer, William 9 10 

A veriil, Ebenezer 1 50 

Alden, Ichabod 15 94 

Allen, Squire J 1 50 

Averill, Hiram 42 54 

Allen, James 3 02 

Abbott, William 31 90 

Austin, Arthur W 92 70 

Austin, Arthur W. exec'r, 22 80 

Austin, Arthur W. guard. 9 12 

Anthon, Benedict . . .^. . , 5 30 

Aiken, John 1 50 

*Andrews, Edward 1 50 

Adams, George W. .... 7 58 

*Anderson, William 150 



Barker, Josiali ^ . , , 

Barker, Seth 

Brown, George, heirs of 

Bass, John 

Bartlett, Stephen 

Briggs, Philander ^. . . . 
Burckes, Lewis ....... 

Breed, Ebenezer 

Bateman, John 

Bailey, Otis 

Boudett, Louis 

Blanchard, Marshall — 

Barker, William 

Byron, Thomas C. . 

Byron, Thomas A. . . . 
*Beal, George W. ... . 

Butler, John . ^ 

*Burns, John 

Baxter, Alexander P. . . 

Burckes, Martin, Jr. 

Bailey, James 



54 70 

175 54 

36 48 

1 50 

47 10 
57 74 

1 59 

5 30 
1 50 
1 50 

16 70 

27 34 

I 50 

25 82 

6 82 
6 06 
3 02 
1 50 
9 10 

48 62 
10 62 



16 



Baldwin, Joshua 1 50 

*Blood, Putnam B 1 50 

Bibram, Joseph 1 50 

Buckman, John 9 86 

Barrill, George 1 50 

Barry, Edwin C. ....... 1 50 

Bradford, Edmund 1 50 

Barrill, Colburn 8 34 

Barrill, Colburn, Jr. ... 1 50 

Barry, Jotham 20 50 

Brown, Edward 12 14 

Bodge, Samuel G 25 82 

*Bryant, George 1 50 

Brown, Ezra 18 98 

Beckford, Albert C 10 62 

Beddoe, Thomas 21 26 

Budington, William J. . . 52 42 

Bentley, Thomas 1 50 

Blaisdell, Charles 13 66 

Bettinson, Richard B. . . . 15 18 

* Brewster, Daniel 1 50 

Blaisdell, Nicholas ..... 22 02 

Brintnall, Stephen 3 02 

Blaisdell, J oseph 1 50 

Barnicoat, John A 1 50 

Brintnell, Samuel, 2d . . . 1 50 

Burns, Andrew 14 42 

Bradford, John R 5 36 

Bradford, Charles L. F. . 1 50 

Bradford, Samuel S 1 50 

*Burrows, Edward 1 50 

Brooks, Charles P 12 90 

Bruce, Joseph A 18 98 

Baxter, Stacy 18 98 

Bazin, Richard C 22 02 

Bryant, Charles M 1 50 

Butts, William D 17 46 

Bassett, Abigail & Rachel, 10 64 

Bates, Theodore E 1 50 

Brown, Lyman 3 78 

Brown, Nathan R 1 50 

Brown, John 15 94 

Badger, John, heirs of, . . 15 20 

Badger, Benjamin ...... 34 94 

Barker, Benjamin W. — 1 50 

Barnard, Currier, 11 38 

Barnard, John 9 10 

*Bennett, James 1 50 

Battles, James 1 50 

Burley, William 1 50 

Butterfield, Levi 1 50 

Burnett; Philetus W 1 50 

Burnett, Thomas 2 26 

Burnett, James F 2 26 

Blanchard, Henry V. V. . 16 70 



Bryant, Ebenezer ...... ISI l4 

Barstow, Charles N. . . . . 1 50 

Bass, Robert P 20 50 

Butterfield, Stephen .... 13 66 

Bodwell, Mary R 7 60 

Burnett, James 38 74 

Brackett, Benjamin F. . . 9 10 

*Bonner, Cornelius 1 60 

Colby, John 1 50 

Crowell, Aaron ........ 1 50 

Champney, Samuel 4 54 

Caswell, William H 1 50 

Conn, Henry 3 02' 

Carnes, Edward, Jr 9 10 

Chase, Wells 4 54 

Chapin, Nahum .... 31 90 

Caban, William 24 30 

Cook, Isaac 32 66 

Curtis, John, Jr 12 14 

Cooledge, Nathan T 5 30 

*Coffin, Augustus A. . . . 3 02 

Commerford, Michael .^ . 1 50 

Cutter, Thomas M 114 74 

Crosby, 'I'homas 1 50 

Clough, Thomas B 1 50 

*Conley, Lawrence 1 50 

♦Cassidy, Patrick 1 50 

Chamberlin, Lowell W. . 4 50 

Costigan, Edwin 1 50 

Cole, John 6 06 

Cory, John W 12 14 

*Cross, Anthony 1 50 

♦Connelly, Patrick 1 50 

Conway, Edmund 11 38 

CoUins, Michael 1 50 

Campbell, Patrick 11 00 

Calwell, John 1 50 

Chamberlin, Abraham . . 6 06 

Cutter, Joseph 10 62 

Clausen, Martin 3 02 

Clark, Perley 1 50 

*Collins, Richard 1 50 

Cutler, Nelson 1 50 

Crocker, John , 3 02 

Chase, Oliver 1 50^ 

Clay, Otis 1 50 

Cottle, Abisha 9 10 

Crocker, Benjamin 3 02 

Clark, Joseph 1 50 

Colburn, Charles 1 50 

Cottrell & Brooks, 57 00 

Cushing, Isaac 18 22 

Crosby, George 1 50 

Cutter, Ezra 11 38 



It 



Coffin, Samuel 1 50 

*Cummings, Nathaniel . . 3 02 

Crooks, Joseph 1 50 

Currell, Joseph S. ...... ] 50 

Clapp, James 11 38 

Child, Nicholas G 18 22 

Cooper, Gilbert D 31 90 

Carroll, Barney 1 50 

Cassidy, Andrew 1 50 

Cooper, Abner, Jr ] 50 

Crai^-g. M. Clark 3 02 

Clifford, John 1 50 

Crapo, John 1 50 

Cummings, Charles H. .. 3 78 

Cram, Timothy B. 1 50 

Coburn, Ethan N 1 50 

Chandler, Thomas M. ... 3 02 

Clancy, Haskell D 26 58 

Clark, Ramsey 3 02 

Cooper, Samuel 50 90 

Call, Henry J 3 02 

Cross, Albert F 1 50 

*Cooms, John 1 50 

Covington, Caroline L. . . 9 12 

Curtis, Nathan P. B 9 10 

Culbertson, Nathaniel Y. 18 22 

Culbertson, John H 1 50 

Chapman, Faulkner .... 20 50 

Cutter, George 3 78 

Currier, Ephraim 11 38 

Cook, Henry A 1 50 

Cobb, William 13 66 

Call & Seavey, 7 60 

Cobb, Cyrus 18 98 

Conant, Peter 19 74 

Childs, John 1 50 

Conant, James H 1 50 

Conant, William F 4 54 

*Clark, Edward 1 50 

Cory, Anna 20 52 

Doriety, Thomas 1 50 

*Dinsmore, Timothy 1 50 

Dickson, Joshua G 27 34 

*Durkin, Aaron 1 50 

Dana, Edward 11 38 

Dana, Henry 23 54 

Dearborn, James 45 58 

*Dearborn, John H 3 02 

*Devens, Richard 9 10 

Devens, Thomas M 55 46 

Dechan, Thomas 14 42 

*Driscoil, Jeremiah ..... 1 50 

Drinen, Morris 1 50 

Dustan, Benjamin F 11 38 

3 



Decoster, Amos R 18 68i 

*Doyle, Michael, 2d 1 50 

Dearing, Thomas 88 90 

Davis, James S J 50 

*Downs, John 1 50 

Devine};', James? , , ^ 8 78 

Doriethy, Philip 1 50 

*Dormett, Joseph 1 50 

Davis, Theodore 3 02 

DriscoU, James, 1 50 

*Davis, James C 2 26 

Davis, Joseph 21 26 

Davis, Edward K 1 50 

Decosta, Lucius 1 50 

Downing, Earned 18 22 

Dinsmore, Samuel 14 42 

Davis, Lois 9 12 

Downs, Ezekiel 1 50 

Doyle, Michael 20 50 

Deming, Francis ....... 6 82 

Edmands, William B. . . . 1 58 

Eastman, Samuel 1 50 

Estee, Elijah R 1 50 

*Emerson, John 1 50 

Eldridge, Shubael 1 50 

Edmands, David 15 18 

b^merson, Hiram, Jr 10 62 

*Elworth, James 1 50 

Edick, James J. 1 50 

Elms, John 6 82 

Edwards, Thomas 16 70 

Eberlee, Frederick 3 02 

-Everett, Horace 14 42 

Emery, Alexander, Jr. . . 1 50 

Eaton, Osgood 7 58 

Emerson, Joseph ....... 33 42 

Eaton, John L. ........ 378 

Enwright, John ........ 6 06 

Esckert, George 1 50 

Field, Simon C. 3 78 

Foss, Jacob 761 50 

Fuller, James G. ...... . 74 46 

Folsom, Nathaniel S. . . . 4 54 

Farwell, James D 5 SO 

Foley, Patrick ......... 7 58 

*Flynn, William ... 1 50 

*Fo]an, Patrick 1 50 

Farrell, John 1 50 

Fassan, Charles H 3 02 

Fales, Newell 1 50 

Ferren, Samuel 104 10 

Friend, Samuel 2 26 

Forster, Joseph S. ...... 150 



ts 



^Fisfeer, Lewis ........ 1 50 

Follens, Richard ........ 5 30 

Fisber, Sanford ...... 6-06 

Fowler, William 6 06 

Fowler, Samuel, Jr 9 86 

Forster, James G 37 22 

Fall, Parker ........... 41 02 

Forster, George .. . . .• . 33 42 

Freeman, Charles ...... 18 98 

Fly Hn, Morris 150 

Fosdick, William .■• 24 30 

Fiske, Paschal . .- 13 66 

Fifield, Daniel W •■ 5 30 

Fosdick, Stephen 1 50 

Ferren, Albert 3 02 

Fitzpatrick, Peter 1 50 

*Fitzpatrick, Patrick 1 50 

Farnsworth, Thomas H. . 12 14 

Finnegan, Daniel 1 50 

Frost, Oliver 31 90 

Farr, William W 3 78 

French, Isaac S 1 50 

Fiske, Frederick A 12 14 

Fessenden, Charles . . 1 50 

Fisher, George N 15 94 

Falan, Hugh 1 50 

*Farnsworth, Jacob . 5 30 

*Ford, 1 50 

Forster, George H 1 50 

Fifield, John B. M 5 30 

Fessenden, Charles P. . . 3 02 

Fessenden, George F. . . 1 50 

*Fuzzard, William 9 86 

Faulkland, George ..... 3 78 

Farnsworth, Eliza C. . . . 11 40 

Fall & Pearsons, 16 72 

*Green, Daniel ........ 1 50 

Goodwin, George ....... 1 50 

Greenleaf, Thomas . .... 212 78 

Gilday, James 1 50 

Green, Patrick ......... 6 06 

Ginter, John H 1 50 

*Griffin, Martin ......... 1 50 

Graham, Henry G 5 30 

Gardner, James M. . ..^ . 6 82 

Gardner, Henry P 1 50 

Goodwin, Henry P 1 50 

Gamraell, John 3 02 

Glinds, Nathan 1 50 

Gerry, Lorenzo 1 50 

Gray, John 4 54 

Grant, Nathan W 7 58 

Goldthwaith, Silas B. . . . 23 54 

*Graves^ Benjamin ..... 1 50 



Gillman, Christopher G. . 6 06 

Gear, Charles 1 50 

Gray, Aseph 1 50 

Goldsmith, George W. .. 12 14 

Gay, J esse 11 38 

Garretty, Owen — .... . 1 50 

Gage, Alvah. 12 90 

*Gall, Warren 1 50 

Gardner, Garland 12 90 

Gabriel, Benjamin E. ,. . . 1 50 

Gerry, Samuel L. 25 06 

Gwinn, James L. ....... 1 50 

Griffin, James 1 50 

Gillson, Edmand L 14 42 

Gillson & Towne 3 80 

Gould, James 12 14 

Glines, Hiram ....... — 9 10 

Garland, Norvill . 3 02 

Goodwin, Thomas R. . . . 23 54 

Gay & Leavitt, 17 48 

Harding, Edward ...... 85 10 

Harding, Edward, Jr. ... 1 50 

Hunt, Samuel C 7 58 

*Hunt, Samuel C. Jr. ... 1 50 

Howland, Zenas C 34 18 

Howland, H enry . , . 47 10 

*Harrington, John 1 50 

Hay, Thomas H 1 50 

Hicks, Joseph G 23 54 

Hallett, James H. .. . 28 86 

Hittenger, Michael . 32 66 

Hanford,- James W. . . . . . 5 30 

Hadley, Moses ........ 150 

*Hamstead, James 1 50 

Heigan, Henry . - 1 50 

Hopkins, Patrick, heirs of, 4 56 

*Hayes, William 1 50 

Huntress, Dyer P 1 50 

Higgins, John 6 06 

Higgins, William 1 50 

Haskell, Joel 17 46 

Holbrook, Henry E 1 50 

*Holderness, George ... 1 50 

*Hamilton, Lawrence A. 1 50 

Hamlin, Thomas 150 

HeAvett, Thomas 1 50 

*Hennessy, William 1 50 

Hopkins, Daniel 1 50 

Haskell, Andrew 1 50 

Hudson, James 1 50 

Hardy, Sylvander ...... 3 02 

Hatch, Seth H 1 50 

Hancock, Samuel ...... 1 50 

Hartman, Anthony, 1 50 



19 



Hatch, Leonard L. , . , . . 1 50 

Holmes, FrHjicis 1 50 

*Hoyt, Jason T 1 50 

Hurd, James 10 62 

Howard, Henry 14 42 

Hamlin, Benjamin B. . . . 1 50 

Howilton, Robert 150 

Hunnewell, William ... 12 90 

Hinds, Lowell L 5 30 

Hinds, Elisha W 1 50 

Hobart, Shubael, heirs of, 16 72 

*Hayward, Jabez 1 50 

Hall, John M 1 50 

Hammett, Thomas 9 10 

Hall, Charles S 6 82 

Hovey, James 1 50 

Hayden, Lincoln ....... 1 50 

Hayden, Joseph 1 50 

Hutchings, Sincere 1 1 30 

Hayward, Justin .... 1 50 

*Hayes, John G 1 50 

Harrington, William 1 50 

Hadley, Elijah 73 70 

Hadley, Elijah L 1 50 

Hopkins, Franklin 12 16 

Hall, Gustavus V. ....... 124 62 

JHitchings, Joshua ...... 3 02 

Healey, Samuel W. . . , . 1 50 

Holmes, Enoch 6 62 

Hitchens, Nathaniel, Jr. . 18 22 

Holmes, Philip B 8 34 

flaggett, William H. ... 9 10 

Harvey, William A 1 50 

Holden, William H 1 50 

Hay, Francis, heirs of, . . 12 92 

Hay, Oliver H 1 50 

Hinckley, Benjamin .... 4 54 
Henry, William, heirs of . 28 88 
Henry, Pamelia, adminis- 
tratrix, 76 00 

Henry, William W S 78 

Hall, Milton, Jr 3 78 

Hall&Burrill, ......... 31 16 

Hayes, Joseph i 50 

Harwood, Jesse 22 02 

Hammond, Richard C. . . 12 14 

Hammond, George W. . . 1 50 

Hutchinson, James W. . . 3 02 

Howard, William 150 

Hobart, David H. 12 ] 4 

Hobart, James P. .. . . 1 50 

Hobart, Isaac 1 50 

Haynes, Joseph Jr. 3 02 

Jlobart, Prudence, admin- 
istratrix, 15 20 



Ingalls, Joseph, 2 26 

Johnson, Thomas C 1 50 

Johnson, Daniel 50 90 

Jaqnes, Henry B 1 50 

Jordan, Charles 1 50 

Johnson, John H 2 26 

Johnson, Peter 15 18 

Jacobs, George H 91 18 

*Jones, Peter 3 02 

Jones, Silas 14 42 

Janes, Charles J 15 94 

Knox, Robert '. 35 70 

Knox, Robert, Jr 12 -90 

Knox, Joseph ,. 5 30 

Knight, Moran . . . , 1 50 

Kimball, John D. ....... 1 50 

Kettell, George A 338 94 

Kettell, Thomas 62 30 

Kelly, Patrick 1 50 

Kelly, Michael 1 50 

*Kelly, James, 2d, 1 50 

Kibble, Arthur W 6 82 

Kimball, George, W. . . . 1 50 

*Kearney, John 1 50 

Kenrick, John 1 50 

Kershaw, John 1 50 

Kershaw, Edward 1 50 

Kent, John 1 50 

Kelly, James 5 30 

Kibble, William 1 50 

.*Kearvin, Timothy 1 50 

Kyley, Richard 7 58 

*Kennedy, William 1 50 

Knox, John 14 42 

Kimball, Oliver 14 80 

King, Daniel 1 50 

Kidder, James 30 88 

Kidder, Elias U 3 02 

Kendall, Isaac 1 50 

Keith, William H 22 78 

Kettell, George A. guard. 38 00 

*King, Herman 6 06 

Keliy, James, 4th, 1 50 

Kelly, Patrick, 2d, 1 50 

Kevill, Patrick 13 68 

Leach, Samuel, heirs of, . 21 28 

*Leach, Phebe, guardian, 25 84 

Locke, Isaac ....... — . '8 78 

Lothrop, Loring H) 62 

Lothrop, Joshua 5 30 

*Lyon, Lawrence 1 50 

Lang, Charles -.. 150 



20 



Low, Jolin 2 64 

*Laffity, Barnard 1 50 

Long, John 1 50 

Lincoln, Joshua W 10 62 

Lake, Alphens A.W. ... 11 38 

Loring, Seth L 13 66 

*Lyds'ton, William 1 50 

Linnell, Elkanah 6 82 

Loring", Joseph 7 58 

Lincoln, John A 1 50 

Leavitt, David 10 62 

Lindsey, Ichabod 8 34 

Lincoln, Charles D. . . . 1 50 

Lincoln, Joseph S 1 50 

Liverjnore, Josiah 1 50 

Lewis, George 1 50 

Leach, Roland 11 38 

Libby, Josiah 1 50 

Linscott, Ephraim 9 10 

Lockwood, Rhoades G. . 14 42 

Ladd, Stephen F 10 62 

Lincoln, Hawkes 6 06 

Lears, John C 1 50 

Lears, William C 10 62 

Locke, Andrew J 18 22 

Locke, Jonathan 3 02 

Linnell, Ralph 1 50 

Lothrop Harrison 3 02 

Lund, William 150 

Laskey, John 1 50 

Lynde, Stephen H. 18 22 

Lyndo, Larkin T 3 02 

*Low, William 1 50 

Littlefield, Frederick 1 50 

McGuire, Arthur 1 50 

*McGuire, Patrick 1 50 

McCafSty, John 150 

Mullett, John 5 30 

Mullett, Bradbury 15 96 

Murphy, Francis 1 50 

Manix, Timothy 1 50 

McBrady, Edward 1 50 

McCarty, William 1 50 

*Mnrphy, James 1 50 

*31cKinne3r, Thomas 150 

McLaughlin, Patrick ... 1 .50 

Miskelly, James 12 90 

Miskelly, Edward 3 02 

Moore, Andrew 1 50 

*Moran, Robert 150 

McLeod, William 1 50 

McAuslan, Joseph 7 58 

Moran, Gabriel 1 50 

McTeagu.e, Patrick 1 50 



McNamara, James 1 50 

Murphy, Timothy 1 50 

Madden, John 6 06 

Madden, Thomas 6 06 

Madden, John, 2d 7 58 

Madden, James 9 86 

Moore, John 1 50 

Marshall, Samuel 9 10 

Murphy, Michael (i 06 

McConville, Felix 1 50 

Morris, William 1 50 

McDonald, John R 1 50 

Mahan, Daniel 1-50 

Madden, Patrick 6 06 

Moore, Thomas 1 50 

*McCrea, James 1 50 

Mullett, James, Jr 10 62 

Mears, Joseph 6 06 

Marriam, Cheeney F. . . . 3 02 

Murphy, Thomas 5 30 

McCurdy, John 1 50 

Mann, Jesse 28 86 

McConologue, Daniel ... 1 50 

Miller, John 1 50 

McFarlane, Alexander . . 20 50 

McFarlane, Horatio N. . 14 42 

McDevett, George 1 50 

*Morris, Robert 3 02 

Morrow, Nathaniel 1 50 

McLaughlin, Patrick ... 13 66 

Morse, Edwin 1 50 

Melcher, Lee 1 50 

McComber, George 14 42 

Moore, James 1 50 

*McClusker, James 1 50 

Mahoney, James S 15 18 

Mousely, William 16 70 

Morgan, James 1 50 

Munroe, George .... 12 90 

Mills, Maiisoii L 2 26 

Morse, Charles 1 50 

*Murray, James 1 50 

^Murray, James, 2d ... . I 50 

Mann, Josiah 14 42 

Moolton, Andrew 1 50 

Mills, Lemuel 24 30 

Meserve, Hopley 4 54 

Martin, Newhall, 2d 1 50 

Meserve, Charles Y 1 50 

Merrill, Stephen 3 78 

Martin, John C 1 50 

Meserve, Hopley T 25 06 

*Moore, Orin 1 50 

Maynard, Jason G. . . . . , 12 14 

Morris, Clarissa L 32 68 



^1 



Marshall, James 17 44 

Mansur, Nathaniel R. . . 8 34 

*Mayhew, Albion ...... 150 

Moody, Benjamin 1 50 

*Melcher, John 1 50 

Morse, Jonathan 1 50 

Martin, Newhal] 34 18 

Muzzey, Charles 3 02 

Newhall, Joseph 1 50 

Nolan, Richard 1 50 

Niles, James 6 82 

Nason, Moses 1 50 

Norton, William 1 50 

Norton, John B 1 50 

Norton, Eugene L 1 50 

Norcross, William T. . . 14 42 

Norton, Daniel Jr 3 02 

Noyes, Uriah W 6 06 

Nutting, Henry 10 62 

North, John W 1 50 

Nash, William H 1 50 

Noyes, James M 1 50 

Nichols, Susan 15 20 

O'Brien, James 1 50 

*0'Flarety, Anthony 1 50 

O'Donnell, William .... 6 06 

Osgood, Isaac 166 42 

Osgood, Thomas, heirs of, 21 98 

O'Niel, Lawrence 7 58 

Overen, James 8 34 

^O'Brien, James, 2d 1 50 

Pedrick, William 26 58 

Poor, Charles 51 66 

Pitts, Lemuel 55 46 

Pook, Samuel M 49 38 

Peirce, Elias D 4 54 

Powers, Edward 1 50 

Page, Jacob 1 50 

Potts, James 12 ] 4 

Peppard, William 1 50 

Perkins, True 11 38 

Porter, George M 1 50 

*Patten, John ,... 1 50 

*Powell, Michael 1 50 

Perry, Henry 1 50 

*Page, Jacob, Jr 1 50 

Powers, John F 1 50 

Pray, Lyman 15 18 

Pook, George 3 78 

Putney, GiJlman 1 50 

Pearson, Jefferson 3 78 

*Pratt, Isaac B 1 50 



Paine, Thomas N 3 02 

Paine, Orlando J 1 50 

Page, Benjamin 25 67 

Plaisted, John 10 62 

Pearson, Samuel ....... 3 78 

Patch, Charles R 14 42 

Poor, Henry R 1 50 

Prentiss, Henry 1 50 

Pratt, Charles 1 50 

Palmer, Samuel 3 78 

Pratt, Edward H 12 90 

Perkins, Edwin L 3 78 

Plummer, William B. 1 50 

Parkhurst, Horace 3 02 

Pulsifer, Edgar 1 50 

Porter, James A. 7 58 

Pulsifer, Peckford ...... 910 

Powers, Patrick 8 34 

Peirce, Salem 1 50 

Prescott, Samuel T, 12 90 

Putnam, Allen 1 50 

Pratt, Edward 115 88 

Peirce, Foster 42 54 

Peirce, Joseph 24 30 

Preston, David 3 78 

Prescott, Jeremiah S. . . . 1 50 

Preble, Jeremiah 2 26 

*Pratt, Henry 1 50 

Pedrick, Joseph. W 3 02 

Pearsons, Francis W. . . 3 78 

Patterson, George W, . . 1 50 

Peirce, Haskell 1 50 

Pettingill, David 1 50 

Plumb, Samuel 1 50 

Peirce, Charles 1 50 

Pope, Mark 6 84 

Peirce, Hiram 1 50 

Peirce, F. & J, & Co. . . 7 60 

Q,uinn, James 1 50 

Gluiraby & Hanford 22 80 

*Quimby, Dyer 1 50 

Richards, Moses 18 22 

Rice, George 1 50 

Ryan, Jeremiah 1 50 

Roach, Garret 1 50 

Reed, Charles 3 78 

Riley, Barnard 1 50 

Richardson, Baxter 5 30 

Reigan, John 1 .50 

Richardson, George .... 1 50 

Rider, James 1 50 

Richardson, C. heirs of, . 15 96 

Richardson, Oliver ..... 1 50 



23 



Rosevelt, Oscar 1 50 

Ricker, Lewis 1 50 

Ryan, William 1 50 

Rimback, Christian 1 50 

Raffity, Bartholomew ... 6 82 

Robinson, William L. . . 1 50 

Redfern, William C 10 62 

Riley, Michael 6 08 

Roper, John B 1 50 

Roach, John 3 02 

Richardson, Job, Jr 1 50 

*Roach, Timothy, 1 50 

Rasmuson, Augustus 1 50 

Richards, Enoch 12 14 

Rice, Henry A 20 50 

Rodgers, James 6 82 

Roach, Morris 1 50 

Robinson, John 4 54 

Rose, James 9 80 

Randall, Henry A 7 58 

Robinson, Asa L 3 02 

Rice, Samuel 1 50 

Riley, Nancy 6 08 

Rodenburg, Simon 1 50 

Richardson, Thaddeus . . 28 10 

Riblett, Cornelius 1 50 

Ranlett, Charles A. .... 9 10 

Richardson, Palmer .... 1 50 

Raymond, Joel 1 50 

Remick, Jeremiah J. . , . . 1 50 

*Rodgers, William . 1 50 

Randall, Ivory H. ..... . 1 50 

Rich, Robert, Jr. 9 10 

Rich, Robert 7 60 

Raymond, William 22 02 

Rand, Warren 11 38 

Richardson, William B. . 1 50 

Rand, Alonzo 1 50 

Rand, Albert S 1 50 

*Steed, Patrick 1 50 

Silva, John M 3 02 

Southwick, Lawson .... 3 78 

Sampson, Daniel 22 78 

Sewall, Moses B 48 62 

Stockbridge, William G. 1 50 

*Sampson. William .... 1 50 

Sanborn, Russell F 44 06 

Bidley, Daniel 1 50 

*Sullivan, John 1 50 

*Sullivan, John, 2d 1 50 

Sullivan, Daniel 1 50 

Sibley, Timothy 1 50 

Slivan, Owen 1 50 

Bprague, Rufua 1 50 



Swift, ErdixT. 12 14 

Southwick, Alonzo 1 50 

Sherland, Joseph 9 10 

Stearns, Jerome B 1 50 

Smith, Frederick 1 50 

Styles, Francis 1 50 

Streeter, Levi W 6 25 

Sullivan, Daniel 7 58 

Sanborn, John 63 06 

Sanborn, Peter 11 38 

Sanborn, John A 1 50 

Stone, Nathan G. ...... 3 02 

Stone, George W 9 10 

Smith, Harvey 1 50 

Stevens, Levi 1 50 

Simonds, Nathaniel G. . . 4 54 

Stevens, Simeon I 50 

Smith, Lemuel 3 02 

Stone, John 1 50 

Stevens, John D 1 50 

Stone, Joseph G 1 50 

Scott, George 1 50 

Sawyer, William 124 62 

Smith, Samuel L 1 50 

Stone, Jasper 6 06 

Storer, Asa 17 46 

Simonds, Charles H 10 62 

Stockbridge, Lewis N. .. 15 18 

Stevens, Benjamin 1 50 

Southwick, John, Jr 24 30 

Smith, David 13 66 

Sanborn, Matthew P. . . . 3 02 

Sisson, Francis 3 02 

Sanborn, Matthew P. Jr. . 1 50 

Stone, Phineas J 324 SO 

Sanford, William W. . . . 12 14 

Sto well, George A. ..... 1 50 

Spinney, Leonard 3 02 

Stearns, Philip P 4 16 

Sherburn, Reuben B. ... 1138 

Shapley, William 3 02 

*Snell, Albion K 1 50 

Snow, David 90 42 

Shipley, Simon G 63 82 

Searle, Robert 10 62 

Searle, Frederick A. ... 1 50 

Sargent, Nathan 1 50 

Seabury, Benjamin 28 86 

Seabury, Jeremiah 3 78 

Sweetser, Henry P 3 78 

Savage, William S 1 50 

Wmith, Oliver 23 54 

Savage, Thomas W. ... 1 50 

Smith, John W. 1 50 

*Seavy, Harrison N. . , . . 1 50 



2S 



SpaaMing, Samuel W. . . 1 50 

Seawood, Oliver 1 50 

Stocker, Joseph W 11 38 

Stocker, Nancy 3 04 

Savill, David 3 78 

*Stone, James M 1 50 

Sampson, Alden 6 06 

Swan, Joseph T 20 50 

Sanborn, Joseph S. . . . . . 1 50 

Swan, Francis 3 02 

Stevens, Abraham L. . . . 1 50 

Sisson, Rebecca H 7 60 

Sisson, Walter J 1 50 

Sawyer, Timothy T. , . . . 31 90 

Sewall, Freeman C 1 50 

Stowell, Alexander 28 10 

Scales, John 150 

Seavy, Moses 14 42 

Strout, Elbridge G* 1 50 

Seavey, Stephen S 3 02 

Schwartz, Jacob L 5 30 

Turner, George W. . . . . 3 78 

Turner, Lewis ......■.., 1 50 

^Thompson, Edward T. . 1 50 

Teel, Gershom 1 50 

*Thomp3on, George — . 1 50 

Taylor, Warren P. .... . 5 30 

Till, Thomas 1 50 

Till, Joseph H 1 50 

Taylor, Augustus ...... 3 02 

^Taylor, Charles 1 50 

Tuttle, Samuel L 9 10 

Turner, Joshua 9 86 

Tilley, James A 1 50 

*Trafton, Joel 1 50 

Tate, Moses F 16 70 

Tirrell, Artemas 116 28 

Tay, Rufus L. 7 58 

Thorndike, Edward 7l 42 

Toomcy, Dennis 22 78 

Turner, James D 1 50 

*Taylor, James J 1 50 

Trask, Asa T 7 58 

Towle, Cyrus 1 50 

*Taylor, Daniel ,.. 3 02 

Tice, Luther K. 19 76 

Temple, Thomas G 16 70 

Tapley, William 8 34 

*Tufls, George 1 50 

*Tilley, Henry W 1 50 

Tapley, Samuel T 3 78 

Taylor, Dolphin 12 14 

*Turner, Abel 1 50 

Teel,, Benjamin ........ 3 30 



Thomas, Warren S. .... 28 86 

*Taggard, John A 1 50 

Tweed, Benjamin F. 18 22 

Taylor, Joseph G. 1 50 

Tinkham, Jeremiah ..... 3 02 

Tylor, Simon H 3 02 

Tamplin, James B 54 70 

Tuttle, Ezra 1 50 

Towne, John 3 02 

Thurston, John 1 50 

Tuttle, James 16 70 

Tilden, Samuel F. 16 70 

Tuttle, AuraS. 1 50 

Taylor & Hobart, 24 32 

Thomas, John 13 66 

Tee], Benjamin F 6 82 

Underwood, Royal 12 14 

Upham, Russel 6 82 

Underbill, Samuel G. ... 20 20 

Unthank, William B. ,.. 3 02 

Varney, Shadracfc 162 62 

Valentine, George 1 50 

Vose, Zilpha 9 12 

*Vining, John 150 

Veasey, James 1 50 

Varrell, Joseph 2 26 

Vaughan, Richard K. . . . 1 50 

Whitney, Isaac 1 50 

Wiley, Stephen, heirs of, 45 60 

Winslow, William .^.... 4 54 

Wyman, Thomas W. . . . 48 62 

Warren, Mark F 150 

Wentworth, Sally 40 28 

Wasgatt, Rhoda . . 7 60 

Webster, Benaiah 7 58 

White, Daniel 1 50 

Ward, William 1 50 

Wallace, Jerome B 2 72 

Willson, Charles 1 50 

Ward, Robert 1 50 

Waters, John S. .., 10 62 

Wri^-ht, John 1 50 

* Wallace, Patrick ... 150 

Waldron, Horatio G 9 86 

Worcester, Alfred, 28 86 

Woodbridge, Samuel .... 1 50 

Wilkinson, Benjamin 1 50 

Wayland, Patrick 150 

Wiley, James, Jr. ....... 4 54 

Woodward, Roland S. . . 48 62 

Wheeler. Lewis G. ..... 1 50 



u 



Williston, Frederick P. . 14 

Woodworth, Alfred ..... 1 

Witham, Samuel, 1 

Wormwood, James 1 

Welch, Michael 6 

Wadleigh, Rufus 1 

*Wren, Walter 1 

*Wenlworth, Isaac 3 

Williams, Sheldon 13 

Whitehead, George 16 

Williams, Samuel 1 

Warren, Sampson 64 

Watts, Joseph 18 

Waldron, Elias L 1 

White, Sumner P 1 

Watson, William G 1 

Whiton, Joseph D 4 

W aitt, Francis T 5 

Withey, Simeon 1 

Witherell, Benjamin 4 

Whittemore, Augustus .. 10 

Wingate, Harrison 22 

Walker, John W 39 



Wilde, Washington 
Weltch, Thomas G. 
Witherell, Elisha B. 

West, William 

Williams, Oliver 



1 
1 

18 

1 

1 

Wells, Joseph 3 



Wehster, Nathan ...... 18 45 

Willson, Augustus 1 50 

*Whitney, George 1 50 

Williams, Isaac F 21 26 

*VValker, Horace 1 50 

Willard, Paul 89 64 

Willard, Sidney A 3 02 

Willard, Paul, Jr 2 26 

Warren, Henry S. ' 5 30 

West, John 1 50 

Whipple, Benjamin 34 94 

Waitt, Sarah 7 60 

Witherell, William 5 30 

Waitt, James M 3 78 

Wheeler, George W. . . . 1 50 

*Whittomore, 1 50 

Woodward, Charles 2 26 

Woods & Gerauld, 13 68 

Winship, Abel - 6 82 

Walker, John W. trustee, 9 88 

Waldron, Thomas 3 02 

Williams, John 1 50 

Willis, Stillman D 14 42 

Willis, Sidney D 8 36 



Yenitche, Constantine ... 1 50 

Yale, Eli A 6 82 

Young, E. G. 1 50 



WARD J?fo. 3, 



Adams, Joseph H 3 02 

Arnold, Caleb H. S 30 38 



Armstead, Samuel L. 



1 50 



Armstead, John 1 50 



Andrews, James 



1 50 



Andrews, George 1 50 

Andrews, James B 1 50 

Austin, Henry D , 56 22 

Ayer, Nathaniel 55 46 

Anderson, Sween 18 98 

Andrews, Samuel R 1 50 

Anthony, Joseph W 1 50 

Ayer, Alvah G 1 50 

Aldrich, James 1 50 

*Armstead, Samuel 1 50 

Austin, Lucy 125 40 

Austin, Lucy, guardian, . 66 12 

Austin, Edward 5 30 

Ames. Dean 1 50 

Alien; John 1 50 

Almy, George W 3 78 

Allen, Samuel H 6 06 

Alden, Charles 1 50 



Abbott, John G 

Allen, David 

Albee, Godfrey B 

Ansonberry, Christopher 

Aldrich, L-a 

Abbott, David 

Allen, Macon B 

Abbott, Hiram 



3 02 

7 58 

55 46 



Batchelder, George . . . 
Brown, Benjamin, 2d ... 

Bolton, William , 

Brackett, Ebenezer W. . , 
Bromade, Abraham . . . 

Barber, Edward , 

Boynton, Samuel H. . . . , 

Burr, Freeman F. 

Burr, Temperance , 

Burr, Joshua 

Bradford, Jeremiah B. . . . 

Burrell, John H , 

Bailey, Thomas P 

Brown, Oliver , 



50 
50 
50 
02 
50 

50 
54 
50 
50 
26 
50 
50 



10 62 

41 80 

29 62 

3 02 

3 78 

1 50 

68 38 



125 



Brintnall, E^ra W. ..... 3 02 

Breed, Ephraim, heirs of, 15 20 

Breed, Anderson P. .... . 35 18 

Blancbard, Reuben K. . ^ 1 50 

Bigelow, GorJiam 7 58 

Brown, Elbridg-e ....<.. 47 10 

Boyd, Joseph F 45 56 

Blain, John 12 ]4 

Bruce, Benjamin 9 10 

Barry, Richard 1 50 

Barker, Cliarles A 6 82 

Bronwick, William 1 50 

Baldwin, George R 126 90 

Beckford, Thos. heirs of, 190 00 

Brown, John D 5 30 

Baxter, Hiram 1 50 

Barry, William 4 54 

Bolton, William, 2d 3 78 

Bispham, William ..... , 1 50 

Brazier, James 1 50 

Brackett, Josiah 35 70 

Bun-ill, John 22 78 

Barker, Levi 1 50 

Bennett, Theophilus S. . . 1 50 

Battiste, Antonio 7 88 

Blanchard, Asa 1 50 

Barrus, Benjamin K. . . . . 1 50 

*Bel], Samuel 1 50 

Bell Mrs. & Mrs. Parkman, 8 36 

Barry, John 1 50 

Brannin, John, heirs of, . 4 56 

Brigham, Elijah P 8 34 

Brown, Jacob 15 18 

Baker, Richard 39 50 

Baker, Richard, Jr 54 70 

Bennett, David E 1 50 

*Bailey, James E I 50 

Brazier, John H. . 1 50 

Blanchard, Isaac W. . . . . 11 38 

Brooks, William P. B. . . 7 58 

Blanchard, Abijah . . 12 90 

Bird, James 1 50 

Bro-wn, Atkins 3 78 

Belknap, Austin 3 78 

*Kruee, Charles 1 50 

Baker, Samuel H 1 50 

Bazin, Joshua W J 50 

liarstow, George E 16 70 

Burr, Henry T 46 34 

Butts. John W 1 50 

Bryant, William T 1 50 

Blaban, Nathaniel , 31 14 

Brown, Nathaniel 25 82 

Burley, Nathaniel A 1 1 38 

Bragdon, William 15 18 

4 



*Bryant, James A 1 ^0' 

Bean, James A 11 38 

Bent, Ebenezer .... 3 02 

Brooks, John W 4 54 

Burley, Thomas H 3 02 

Bennett, Stephen 1 5Q 

Bennett, Charles 1 fiO 

Bean, George W 1 50 

Bigelow, Elijah 40 39 

Batchelder, James W. .. 1 50 

Barker, Asa B 1 50 

Blanchard, Louisiana 33 44 

*Boynton, Samuel, 2d . . 1 50 

Bigelow, Sullivan 1 50 

Bigelow, Charles ...... 6 06 

Burroughs, William .... 2 26 

Bridgeman, William H. . 4 54 

Blanchard, Sampson S. . 10 62 

*Babbidge, Levi 1 50 

Brown, Benjamin 38 00 

Brown, Peter 3 02 

Blaisdell, Charles H.C. . 150 

*Blye, Sanford 1 50 

Brown, Ward B 1 .50 

Babcock, Archibald 297 90 

Babcock, Thomas 3 02 

Brown, Josiah 6 06 

Brigden, Michael ...... 3 80 

Baldwin, George R. guard. 22 80 

Batchelder, Putnam .... 1 50 

*Barton, Peter 1 50 

Bishop, Joseph ^ 1 50 

Blood, John 28 10 

Brown, Asa N 4 .54 

Breed, Charles S 3 78 

Broraade, Benjamin C. . . 1 50 

Bartlett, Timothy 5 33 

Bettis, Joseph L 4 5© 

Corker, Peter J. . . . . 1 .50 

Cole, John 84 34 

Crafts, Elias, Jr 28 10 

Cheever, John 162 62 

Caldwell, Daniel 1 50 

Cbesley, Charles 1 50 

Collins, [jovi 16 70 

Cass, Rufus 10 62 

Cass, John 1 50 

Carpenter, Thomas V. .. 19 74 

*Chipinan, David 1 50 

Chapman, Samuel 1 50 

Clapp, Otis 32 66 

Clapp, John H 41 C2 

Clapp, Eliza A, 28 88 

Collins, John 1 50 



26 



Collins, John S. .... 1 50 

Crisp, Antonio 4 54 

Cutter, Edward 1^14 

Call, Edwin 1 50 

Clark, John M 1 50 

Cartel, Cornelius S, .,.^ 4 54 

Conn, George S 78 

Chandler, Elijah 6 82 

Carr, Michael 1 50 

Clark, Reuben 1 50 

Collins, Joseph 1 50 

Cole, Lysander 1 50 

Children, Henry 18 98 

Calder, Robert 19 00 

Clark, Sarah T 6 84 

Chandler, Bradford . 1 50 

Cutter, John 1 50 

Cunningham, Hartley ... 1 50 

Clifford, Charles W 9 10 

*Char]fdler, Roswell .... 1 50 

Charter, John 4 54 

Cutter, Amos 15 18 

Cutter, Isaac S 1 50 

Cutter, Amos, Jr. ...... 1 50 

*Cothrin, Thaddeus 1 50 

Curley, John 1 50 

Chase, Samuel C 7 58 

Gushing, Luther 13 66 

Cronach, William H. .... 1 50 

Collins, Seneca V 1 50 

Collar, Charles W 3 78- 

Cutter, Samuel, 9A 99 54 

*Cutter, Samuel P 1 50 

Conant, George H 6 06 

Carr, Samuel 45 58 

Gushing, Holmes 1 50 

Corlis, Edwin W 1 50 

Carroll, Henry 11 38 

Card, John P 9 10 

Grossman, Benjamin .... 1 50 

Chase, Amos 4 54 

Gross, Porter 14 42 

Gumroings, James M. 9 86 

Carrol], Barney 1 50 

Carpenter, Marcellus ... 3 02 

*ClufF, Samuel 1 50 

Cook, Ebenezer R 1 50 

Clra.mberliri', John H. 3 78 

Craigg, .Tames 5 30 

Craigg, John D 4 54 

Craigg, Joel 4 54 

Churchill, Amos 2 26 

Clark, Aaron, 2d 25 06 

Clark, Bradley M 42 54 

Conner, James R 3 78 



Caldwell, Moses H. 12 14 

*Cook, David .- 1 50 

Cochran, Robert B. ....- 150 

Goon, John .... . .. 7 58 

Gall, Robert 30 38 

Coleman, Augustus . — . 1 50 

Chase, Lyman O 1 50 

Cox, James 12 14 

Cooper, John 1 50 

*Dunn, Michael I 50 

Devlin, John 24 30 

Denvir, Patrick ., 29 62 

Donevan, Timothy 4 54 

Driegan, William . . 1 50 

Dadley, James G 1 50 

Day en, Richard 1 50 

Deland, James C 3 02 

Dean, Charles . ,. .- 1 50 

Davis, Phineas ,. . . » 3 78 

Davis, Reed & Churchill 4 56 

Dix, Joel 12 14 

Dennis, Barney 1 50 

Dyer, John 7 58 

Dadman, Francis W. ... 1 50 

Dennett, George 1 50 

Dailey, James B. 1 50 

Dearborn, Daniel 1 50 

Devlin, Joseph 1 5) 

Dillingham, Samuel ] 50 

Davis, David E 7 58 

Davis, Charles W 1 50 

Drowne, Samuel 1 50 

Davis, Luther, 3 78 

Dodge, Francis S 1 50 

Davis, Henry 3 02 

* Daniels, Charles 1 50 

Daniels, Sylvanus B^ . . . . 3 02 

Drury, William P. ..... 1 50 

Dearborn, Thomas W. . . 18 22 

Dyer, David B 1 50 

Davis, Jacob 12 90 

Daniels, John E 26 58 

Drink water, Jacob 6 (8 

Dewson, Alexander .... 6 82 

Damon, James 110 08 

Davis, John 19 74 

Davis, Consider 1 50 

Dyar, Smitli 82 82 

Duffee, Thomas 1 50 

Durant, David 2 26 

*Denvir, Robert 1 50 

Darton, William 12 14 

Downing, Richard 3 02 

Dailey, Thomas 3 80 



m 



Dorris, J ohn 1 50 

Dickson, Oliver 26 58 

Daby, Bdward 1 50 

^Dislinj, Peter 1 50 

Davidson* Nancy, admr'x, 19 00 

Donevan, John 4 54 

Edmands, Edward T. , . . 4 54 

*Ecclc3, Nathaniel 1 50 

Eberle & Trask, 1 52 

Edmands, Horace M. ... 4 54 

*Edg-erley, Peter « 1 50 

Edes, Robert B 41 02 

Edes, Robert B. Jr. 4 54 

Edes, Henry A .8 34 

*Edes, George A 1 50 

Edmands, Thomas R. B. , 6 82 

Edmands, George E 14 42 

Emery, James ...... 15 \% 

Estabrook, James A. . .« . 5 30 

Edwards, John 4 54 

Emerton, John 1 50 

Edminster, Aaron 1 50 

Elliot, Thomas J 22 78 

Esler, John 3 80 

Emery, Moses 14 42 

Eddy, John E 4 54 

Emerton, Leonard 8 34 

• Foster, Isaac S 1 50 

Fuller, Henry 1 50 

Fletcher, Elisha R 3 02 

Fowler, Augustus 3 i 

Paunee, William 2 26 

Fuller, Stephen B 1 50 

*Foley, Michael 1 50 

Foster, Jonas 3 78 

Fuller, John K 11 38 

Fletcher, Charles 3 02 

Furhush, Andrew 3 78 

Frothingham, Joshua P., 

- heirs of 68 40 

Frothingham, Thomas H. 9 10 

Furbush & Davis 22 80 

Fuller, George 4 54 

Farnsworth, James L. . . 1 50 

Frost, William W i 50 

Frost, Samuel 1 50 

Fretch, William S 17 46 

Fletcher, Timothy 123 86 

Farrie, William 1 50 

Fowler, Samuel 26 58 

Flanders, Asa 19 74 

Frink, George S 1 50 



*Faulkner, Edward 15® 

*Fowler, James 1 50 

Flint, Benjamin 1 50 

Field, Freeman 9 86 

Floyd, Joel 1 50 

Fowler, George T 14 42 

Fowler, Stephen G 14 42 

*Frye, Levi 1 50 

Freeman, Abigail ... 6 08 

*Frost, Benjamin 1 50 

*Fish, Ansel H 3 02 

Fislre, William i 50 

Freeman, Charl«s H. . . . 1 50 

Foster, David . , 3 78 

Frothingham, Nathaniel F. 71 42 

Freeman, Joshua 5 30 

Flanders, Moses G 1 50 

Frothingham, Isaac C. . . 18 22 

Fernald, William ...... 150 

Frothingham, James K. . 94 98 

Frothingham, Richard .. 31 14 

Frothingham, Richard, Jr. 58 50 

Frothingham, Henry K. . 34 18 

*Flint, Charles 1 50 

Fulton, Bailey 1 50 

Fall, Otis 1 50 

Frothingham, James K. Jr. J 50 

Frazier, James 4 56 

Flanders, John H 1 50 

Field, James H. , 150 

Farr, Frank 1 50 

Flanagan, John ........ 1 50 

Fleming, Martin ....... 1 50 

Finerty, Edward ....... 1 50 

Flanders, Isaac 1 50 

Finegan, James 1 50 

Folsom, Samuel M 21 26 

*Fullerton, Ezekiel . J 50 

Felt, Jacob, heirs of, 3 80 

Fialsom, Orral 1 50 

French, Levi 1 50 

Francis, James M 10 62 

Goldsmith, Seth 4 54 

*Gafney, Barney 1 50 

Gillman, Alfred 3 78 

Goodrich, Abijah, heirs of, 272 08 

Gerauld, Edwin R 1 50 

Goodnow, John B. 1 50 

Godbold, Henry St. John 5 30 

Go wan, Edwin 1 50 

Giimon, William B. ..... 1 50 

Gill, John 1 50 

Gibbs, John , 3 02 

Goodridge, Lowell ..... I 50 



28 



Gleason, Nathaniel 2 26 

Gillmore, Orin 3 02 

Gillinore & Wurdock, ... 3 80 

Gillmore, James 3 02 

Goodrich, Charles B. . . . - ] 50 

George, Stephen M. 3 02 

Gulliver, Lemuel 35 70 

Greeley, Guy 1 50 

Goodwin, George C 37 98 

Gould, William 1 50 

Guild, James 1 50 

Getchell, Uriah 1 50 

Getchell, Benjamin ] 50 

Gould, William H 3 02 

Gibbs, John, heirs of, ... 15 20 

Gill, George I 50 

Gardner, Henry 79 78 

Gardner, John 1 50 

Gibbs, George L 2 26 

Gillson, Joseph? 1 50 

Gage, Benjamin W 43 30 

Goodridge, Mrs. adrnr'x, , 3 04 

Gibbs, Geo, L. & Leman, 3 04 

Hughes, George 1 50 

Howe, Reuben 1 50 

Hogan, Edward C 3 78 

Hill, Roland 3 02 

Howe, Nathaniel E 3 78 

Heath, Augustus II 24 30 

Hall, George S. 26 58 

*Hall, David 3 78 

Ho] I is, John H 1 50 

Hall, Edward 1 50 

Howe, David 3 02 

Hovey, Joseph F 12 90 

*Ham, Silas W 1 50 

Hutchinson, John C 1 50 

Hearsev, William 7 60 

Hooper, Thomas 97 26 

Hoooer, Richard H 1 50 

Ifooper, Thomas W 96 50 

Hunt, Andrew K 66 10 

Hamlin, Josiah 1 50 

Huntington, Lynde A. ,. 47 10 

Hager, James 9 86 

Hammatt, Caleb 7 58 

*Haynes, Elbridge G. . , . 1 50 

HagaTj James, Jr. 14 42 

Hitchborn, Pliilip .. 1 50 

Hunting, Ebenezer N. . , 1 50 

Harrington, Thaddeus ,. 3 02 

Hearsey, Edward ...... 64 58 

Hearsey, Edward, Jr. . . . 11 38 

Hamlin, William 18 24 



Hamlin, George, 1 50 

Haywood, John W 1 50 

Hartshorn, Francis S. . . 3 87 

Holbrook, Rafus 1 50 

*Hale, Robert 1 50 

Hutchinson, James R. . . 1 50 

Howard, John 1 50 

Hall, Franklin A 7 58 

Hammond, Ezra 6 82 

Henry, Francis 1 50 

Hall, William P 12 14 

Haynes, William 17 46 

*Hayes, Sidney C 3 02 

Hurd, LoamiS 12 14 

Huntley, Russel 18 22 

Howard, William 8 34 

Hayward, Gorham J. ... 6 82 

Herman, Benjamin 6 82 

Hatch, Joshua F 1 50 

Harrington, Adam 3 78 

Hartwell, Thomas 12 90 

Hatch, John, Jr 1 50 

Higgins, Payne S 31 14 

Hair, JoelT 11 38 

Hall, Jonas G 1 50 

Hancock, John C 3 02 

*Hobill, Thomas 1 50 

*H arris, Jeplhar 1 50 

Harding, William 1 50 

Hobel, John 1 50 

Plandley, John 6 82 

Harley, Joseph 6 82 

Harley, Thomas B 1 50 

Hertell, Charles A 1 50 

Hustin, John 16 70 

Hurd, Charles 1 50 

Hall and Brother, 4 56 

Hall, Moses B. 42 54 

Hall, James 101 06 

Hall, Theodore A 1 50 

Higgins, Jeremiah 31 92 

Howe, Edwin 6 06 

Hovey, Abijah, heirs of, , 24 32 

Hovey, Abijah W 5 30 

*Hovey, Albert 1 50 

Hovey, William 5 30 

Hovey, Sarah ., 3116 

Henry, Alden 3 02 

Henry & Brown, ? 2 28 

Hood", Asa , . . 3 02 

Hutchins, Joseph 13 1 50 

Hollis, Charles , 6 06 

Hutchinson, Herman .... 38 74 

Hussey, Joseph, ... , 1 50 

Hadley, William 2 26 



m 



Ham, Philip 1 50 

Hitchlar, Henry 1 50 

*HaGkett, Charles W. . . 1 50 

Hutchinson, J eri-y !• 8fi 

Herlfley, Belen. 1 50 

Holden, Oliver, heirs of, . 207 48 

*Hunter, Michael 7 58 

Haywood, James 9 86 

*Hobart, Samuel, 1 50 

Higg-ins, Josiah G 1 50 

*Huut, Merrill C 1 50 

*Johnson, Philip J. ..... I 50 

Johnson, Samuel R 85 10 

Johnson, Mary 11 40 

Jones, Nathan 9 10 

*Jones, William 1 50 

*Jordan, James 1 50 

Johnson, John J\J 1 50 

Johnson, John, heirs of, ,. 26 60 

Jennerson, Jonas L 3 02 

Jennings, Alexander H. . 1 50 

Janes, Elihu 1 50 

Janes, William H. . 1 50 

Jordan, George W 5 30 

Janes, Francis P 1 50 

Johnson, William 12 90 

Johnson, John M. ...... 1 50 

Janes, Elihu, Jr. 1 50 

Johnson, Thomas S 14 42 

Johnson, Jotham 139 06 

Johnson, William, 2d . . . 10 62 

Johnson, John B 5 30 

Johnson, Bradford 1 50 

*JefFerson, Willis R ' 1 50 

Jordan, Daniel 1 50 

Johnson, Samuel T. , • . . 1 50 

Johnson,. Lewis 14 42 

Jenkins, Samuel R 1 50 

Jefferson, Nathaniel W. . 1 50 

*Johnson, John 1 50 

Johnson, George - 97 26 

Jeffrey, Peter 1 50 

Killen, Patrick 1 50 

Kelley, James C 1 50 

*Keiley, Michael 150 

Kimball, Richard 1 50 

Kettell, George P 7 60 

*Knapp, George M 1 50 

Kerr, William 1 50 

Kellv, Joseph 1 50 

*Knight, Daniel 1 50 

*Knights, Calvin S 1 50 

Kingsbury, Nathaniel . . 1 50 



Kalner, John 150 

Kimball, Samuel 7 58 

Kenrick, Warren F 1 50 

Kelly, Stephen P 2 26 

Kimball, Benjamin 17 46 

Kimball, Benjamin A. . . 1 50 

Kimball, Samuel J 1 50 

Kimball, Harvey T. .... 1 50 

Knight, Oliver 1 50 

King, Thomas S 5 30 

Kimball, Joshua W 31 90 

Kilfoil, Thomas 1 50 

Kimball, Lewis 1 50 

Kimball, Shubael C 1 50 

Kimball, Jonathan 1 50 

Kimball, James J 1 50 

*Kelley, Keiren 1 50 

Kent, John 126 14 

Kenrick, William W. . . . 3 78 

Kinsley, Silas 43 30 

Kinsley & Kenrick, .... 1140 

Knio-ht, Charles R 12 14 

Knight Horace 3 02 

Knio-ht, Horace & Co. . . 34 20 

Kimball, Charles 22 78 

Lyon, Flenry 15 18 

Lynde, Nathan 16 68 

Littlefield, Albert 1 50 

*Lamb, George H 1 50 

Lane, Simon, 1 50 

Lane, George 32 66 

Leman, Henry W 1 50 

*Lothrop, Joseph 1 50 

Long, William 3 78 

Leman, Nathaniel R. . . . 7 58 

Leman, Frederick W. . . 2 26 

Lewis, Seth W 6 44 

Leavens, George L. .... 1 50 

Laing, Daniel 5 30 

Lincoln, Charles N. M. . 9 10 

Lewis, Justin H 1 50 

Logan, John 1 50 

Lewis, Andrew 1 50 

Larkin, Franklin 1 50 

Lewis, Humphrey 6 82 

Littlefield, Richard 15 18 

Letter, Flush 1 50 

Littlefield, Ivory 57 74 

Linnell, Joshua 5 30 

Lord, Edwin 7 .58 

Laing, Daniel, Jr. 1 50 

Lakeman, Ebenezer .... 5 30 

Lane, Augustus, 150 

Locke, Jonathan F 1 50 



30 



Larkin, Abraham - 1 50 

Locke, Daniel 1 50 

Lamson, Nathaniel 33 42 

Lund, James 8 34 

•Lawrence, Benjamin . . 1 50 

Low, Nicholas 25 82 

Larkin, Caleb 1 50 

Lincoln, Susan C. guard. 13 68 

Leavens, George M 1 50 

McMahar, Owen 8 34 

Miller, Albert 1 50 

Marshall, Joshua P 10 62 

Mahoney, Thomas, 1 50 

*Morey, David W 3 78 

Marshall, Daniel 32 66 

Mayo, Asa 3 78 

Martin, Newhall. heirs of, 32 68 

Mitchell, Lewis S 3 02 

Murdock & Tilson, .... 3 04 

Morris, Thomas 1 50 

Munroe, George S 6 06 

McKillips, JohnP 1 50 

*Miller, James, 2d 1 50 

*Marston, Ward 5 30 

Moulton, Joseph 1 50 

^Marshall, Christopher . . 1 50 

Mayhew, Freeman F. 1 50 

Mayhew, Freeman T. . . . 1 50 

Mayhew, Daniel M 1 50 

Mayo, Uriah K 9 10 

Martin, James B 15 94 

Marden, George H 10 62 

Mason, Rufus 8 34 

Murdock, John 17 46 

Mayhew, George H 1 50 

McElroy, Charles ..... 7 58 

McNear, Christopher ... 3 02 

McCortif, Andrew 1 50 

Miller, George 1 50 

Mason, Thomas 1 50 

Matlock, John 1 50 

Mullett, Charles T 6 82 

*McDaniels, William ... 150 

Marpole, Samuel 1 50 

Mann, Patrick 1 50 

Mead, Isaac, heirs of, 136 04 

Melvin, John, heirs of, . . 30 40 
Marpole, Catharine, heirs of, 19 00 

McDade, Robert 1 50 

*Murdock, Stephen 3 02 

Mayers, Hartwell 2 26 

Moore, Charles W 21 26 

Mason, Marshall 12 14 

*Mahan, Abraham 3 78 



Miller, James ......... 6 06 

*Morey, Alexander S. .. 1 50 

Murphy, Timothy 1 50 

Melville, John 6 82 

Myrick, George 3 02 

Morse, Caleb 1 50 

Mellen, Cad H 1 50 

McCloud, Peter 1 50 

Maling, Nathaniel G. . . . 1 50 

Mills, William F 3 02 

McElroy, John 1 50 

*McBay, John 3 78 

Mclntire, Silas 18 22 

Melvin, Nathan 4 54 

Magoun, Joshua 20 50 

Magoun & Turner 47 12 

McKinney, James 1 50 

Moore, Benjamin P 7 58 

Marshall, Albert 6 06 

Melvin, Wier T 1 50 

McGlaulin, William H. . 1 50 

McGlaulin, Eben W. . . . 1 50 

Nichols, Richard 5 28 

Neval, James 1 50 

Norris, Moses 6 82 

Nelson, Neil 14 42 

Nowell, Oliver 1 50 

Neagle, William 21 26 

Neagle, Godfrey B 4 54 

Norton, John 1 50 

Oakman, Forbes 1 50 

Oliver, Marshall 6 06 

Otheman, Edward 3 78 

Oakes, Levi 1 50 

Osgood, Sylvester 3 78 

Oakes, William H 1 50 

Osborn, Richard 18 98 

Osgood, Moses 1 50 

Peters, William 9 86 

Peters, Edmund F 1 50 

*Parker, Charles E 2 26 

Porter, Alfred H 3 78 

Phinps, Solomon G 146 66 

*Phe]ps, Jonathan E. ... 150 

Payne, Thomas 1 50 

Poor, James C 12 14 

Percival, Francis 1 50 

Phipps, John S 1 50 

Parker, Ebenezer S 1 50 

Poole, Charles 1 50 

*Parker, 1 50 



81 



Phipps, William 4 54 

Phipps, Solomon ] 50 

*P age, Thomas R. ...'.. 1 50 

Pratt, Ralph 9 86 

*Page, Nathan 1 50 

Payne, Nathaniel G 1 50 

Phipps, James M 2 20 

Paterson, William C 8 34 

Pratt, Henry C 4 54 

*Putnam, William H. . . . 1 50 

Penny, Samuel 1 50 

Perkins, Joseph P 1 50 

Perkins, Benjamin F 1 50 

Payne, Kilby J 1 SO 

Pratt, Augustus VV 1 50 

Pratt, Isaac, heirs of, 7 60 

Pratt, Caleb 25 74 

Pearson, Charles 1 50 

Phipps, Thomas 1 50 

Pratt, Ruel 1 50 

*Pritchard, Abraham P. . 1 50 

Pritchard, Abraham P. Jr. 1 50 

Pendergast, George S. .. ]8 98 

Philbrook, Heman S 1 50 

Pearson, Enoch .... ■. i 50 

Phipps, Benjamin 83 58 

Phipps, IJenjamin, Jr. . . . 3 78 

Phipps, Solo'n, Jr. heirs of, 38 00 

Phipps, Solomon, heirs of, 9 ]2 

Percival, Harper E. .... ] 50 

Praddox, Robert C. 1 50 

Pattee, Asa D. 2d, 47 10 

*Pattee, Amos 2 26 

Pennell, Calvin S. . 9 86 

Patch, Sidney S 14 42 

Peirce, Charles } 50 

Purington, Samuel 1 50 

Perry, Edmund S 1 50 

*Parkhur3t, Benjamin E. . 1 50 

Pollard, Asa D 37 98 

Phipps, Joseph, heirs of, . 34 20 

Phipps, Emeline 19 00 

Poll&rd, Samuel 1 50 

Pollard, Preston 150 

Phipps, Wm. S. heirs of, . 27 36 

Phipps, Williams 3 02 

Phipps, Albert 18 98 

Pattee, Asa D ... 3 78 

*Phelp3, E. Bartlett 150 

*Parker, William 1 50 

Packard, Jesse 1 50 

Phelps, Henry .... . , 1 50 

Peirce, Dane 9 86 

Parker, Benjamin ... 111 70 

Purrington, Stephen .... I 50 



Peacock, Freeman H. . . 10 62 

Page, John 3 78 

Penny, Jonathan, heirs of, 7 60 

Payne, Ebenezer 10 62 

Phillips, Isaac F 1 50 

Quinlan, Timothy 4 54 

Quinn, Alichael 1 50 

Robinson, Frederick .... 59 26 

Rooney, Edward . . . 1 50 

Robertson, John M. . . . . 3 78 

Robertson, George 1 50 

Roberts, J. W. & A. ... . 8 36 

Rorin, Cornelius 1 50 

Raymond, Oliver F. .... 4 54 

Reed, Leonard ........ 1 50 

*Reed, Charles 1 50 

Remick, Hiram P 52 42 

Richardson, Nathan . — 1 50 

Reed, Dana 1 50 

Reynolds, Samuel S 9 10 

Reynolds, Edward E. . . . 3 78 

Raymond, Joel, Jr. ,.... 1 50 

Rich, Michael 1 50 

Roulstone, Samuel 17 46 

Rhoades, SamiJel .. . 19 74 

Rhoades, Samuel, guard'n, 7 60 

Rogers, Henry 13 66 

Rogers, Edward H 1 50 

Kand, Warren, Jr 1 50 

Restrick, John 1 50 

Randall, Henry A • 1 50 

Richards,. Samuel C 25 82 

Richards, Leonard 22 78 

Rodman, Ezra 3 78 

Rugg, Luther 1 50 

Rogan, James 8 34 

Randal], John 5 30 

Robinson, Nathaniel VV. . 5 30 

Robbins, Walter 21 26 

Rice, Henry 3 78 

Reed, Martin L. . 150 

Rand, A bsalom. 38 74 

Rand, Edward T 1 50 

Rogers, Albert B 1 50 

Rollins, Williams S. ... 150 

Riley, Peter 1 50 

Richardson, Edward H. . 1 50 

Rooney, William ...... 1 50 

Rice, Thomas, heirs of, , 79 SO 

Robertson, John P. . 1 50 

Reace, John 6 84 

Richardson, John 14 80 



Sloane, Thomas 1 

Stowe, Amos 20 

Sn^an, William H 17 

Smith, Charles A. 2d, . . . 1 

Shaw, Joseph W 1 

Stevens, William H 5 

Smith, Amos J 1 

Simonds, Benjamin H, . . 1 

*Simonds, William C . . 1 

Stevens, Edward 1 

Savage, Seth H 1 

Savage, Theodore L 1 

Savage, Francis 1 

Stowell, Abel, Jr 88 

Shed, Imla 3 

Stickney, Luther 1 

*Shattuck, Charles 1 

Stone, Paschal 1 

Sears, Clark 7 

Seward, Alfred 3 

Shaw, Charles A. ...... 1 

Stevens, Isaac li 1 

♦Sylvester, John M 1 

Spear, Joseph S 9 

Stickney, Silas 76 

Stanwood, Solomon 4 

Stinson, Charles 7 

Sunderland, Le Roy 36 

Stimpson, George, Jr. . . 23 

Schwap, Francis 1 

^Spear, James 1 

Stone, Phineas 53 

Stone, Amos 38 

Stone, Jonathan 22 

Smith, Charles A 1 

Sanderson, Charles . — 3 

Shattuck, Nathaniel 9 

S ward, Henry H 1 

*Simpson, Joseph 1 

Sears, Charles 1 

Smiley, Hezekiah S 1 

Stone, Sardine, Jr. 10 

Smith, Henry 1 

Smith, James 1 

*Smith, 1 

Stimpson, Robert 13 

Stover, Frnucis 1 

Sheriff, Charles H 1 

*Smith, Christopher S. . . 1 

Sargent, Isaac 1 

Sawtell, John 1 

*Smith, Daniel J 1 

Shedd, Thomas I 

Shedd, William B 1 

Stimpson, James M 1 



Stevens, Jesse , 6 W2 

Stimpson, George ...... 18 22 

Spear, Samuel G 150 

Stetson, John 3 02 

Stanwood, George E. . . . . 1 50 

Snow, Benjamin B. .... 1 50 

Sawyer, Edward T 2 2G 

Stickney, William . 35 70 

Snow, Ezekiel, heirs of, . 7 60 

Smith, William 3 79 

Sawyer, George H. .... 1 50 

*Stowell, Otis W 1 50 

Simonds, Calvin, Jr 27 34 

Smith, Charles C 21 64 

Smith, David 1 50 

Simmons, Henry B. . 8 34 

Shedd, Abraham B 3 78 

Sanborn, Azel 4 54 

Swan, Reuben 34 94 

Spear, Salathiel 14 42 

*Shay,John.. 150 

Stevens-, Collins, 4 54 

Small, Sylvester 1 50 

Smith, Addison 12 SO 

Sibley, Nahum 37 98 

Smith, Samuel 4 54 

Stumche, Charles 15 18 

*Stimpson, Reuben .... 3 02 

Swift, Joseph , 12 14 

Stover, Jonathan 1 50 

Shaw, Joseph 1 50 

Sampson, Miles 1 50 

Stockwell, George 1 5& 

Simonds, Henry 1 50 

Sweetser, Amos 6 82 

Storer, Robert B 1 50 

*S wan, Joseph, Jr 1 5& 

Simmonds, Stephen .... 3 78 

*Sherman, Hiram 1 50 

*Shedd, Edward 1 50 

Skilton, Samuel D 5 30 

Skilton, Samuel, heirs of, 22 80 

Skilton, William W 1 50 

Sweetser, Seth 9 86 

Stearns, Ezra 5 30 

Simonds, John 1 50 

Stewart, James 6 06 

*Scollay, Michael 1 50 

Stone, Calvin 11 3S 

Simonds, David 9 10 

Stevens, Seth 25 82 

Stearns, Joshua B. 20 50 

Stewart, Wentworth 1 50 

Salisbury, William 1 50^ 

Studley, Alson 69 90 



ss 



Simpson, Mark . . . ^ 1 50 

Sargent, Sam'l S. heirs of, 20 52 

Sargent, Mary, heirs of, . ]2 IG 

Smith, O. H. P 3 78 

Slowe, Haven P 1 50 

Sargent, Samuel S 1 50 

Shedd, John 4 54 

Skilton, Martha 15 20 

Tibbetts & Hill, 24 32 

Taggard, Samuel 5 30 

Tenney, Leonard 3 78 

Tabor, William ; . 1 50 

Tee], Henry T 3 78 

Tibbetts, John 12 90 

Tufts, Daniel 208 22 

*Titus, George 1 50 

Titus, John 1 50 

Thomas, John 1 50 

Tillson, Benjamin F. .... 3 02 

Thorp, Charles M 1 50 

Thrasher, James 1 50 

Trask, Isaac B 3 02 

Taylor, Joseph 1 50 

Tash, Charles G ] 50 

Tilden, Freeman F 12 14 

*Turner, Henry 1 50 

Thompson, Isaac 3 02 

Torrey, David, heirs of, . 10 64 

Tufts, Uriah 9 10 

Tucker, David S 1 50 

Trowbridge, Almarin ... 33 42 

Turner, Jarnes R 7 58 

Thompson, Lafayette ... 1 50 

Tiitty, John 1 50 

Tubbs, Edward 1 50 

Tufts, Joseph F. , , 64 58 

Tufts, Joseph F. Jr. . . . . 1 50 

Tufts, George '1' 1 50 

Tufts, Gilbert «fc Co 129 96 

Thayer, Henry 1 50 

Teel, Joseph E. 2 26 

Tolman, William 9 10 

Thompson, Luke 1 50 

Tirrell, Parker P 2 26 

Tyler, Philip 18 98 

Tandy, Moses S 1 50 

Tufts, N. & G 47 12 

Turner, Francis 19 74 

Tibbetts, Timothy W. .. 1138 

Tenant, John . , 1 50 

Tufts, Joseph P. guardian, 45 60 

Tasmau, Zebediah ..... 1 50 

Tnfts, William 12 90 

Tufls, Joseph F. guardian, 22 80 



Underwood, Joseph . . . . ; 1 50 

Vestiman, Simon a 1 50 

Vancleve, Peter J i 1 ."SO 

Varney, Jacob 1 50 

Vose, "I'homas C 3 02 

Varney, Enos . * 18 98 

Wharton, John 150 

Whitney, Alfred .. . 3 78 

Winslow, Samuel, 2d .i . i 3 02 

Willson, Jesse J6 70 

West, Thomas Y 31 90 

Wyer, Cath. & Margaret, II 40 

Wellman, Asa 43 30 

Willis & Kendall, 26 (iO 

Willis, David C 17 46 

Whittle, John 150 

W bitten, Jonathan 1 50 

Winchester, Mark ...... 77 50 

Willson, John B 7 5^ 

Williams, Richard 4178 

Worcester, James A. D. 6 J3 66 

Walker, George 50 14 

Witham, Lorenzo D 1 50 

Wright, Winsor 3 02 

Wyman, Earl 1 50 

Waitt, Ashbel 28 10 

Whiting, Augustus 236 34 

Whiting, George A. . . . . 5 -30 

Whiting, James H 3 78 

Willson, Jeremy 26 58 

Willson, George B 1 50 

Woodb ridge, Samuel ... 1 50 

^Williams'; John H 1 50 

Warren, George H. .... 9 10 

Woodbury, David 3 02 

Waterman, James ...... 15^ 

Winslow, Edward 20 50 

*Winslow, John B 3 02 

Watson, Horace H 3 78 

Warren, Bezaleel, heirs of, 9 12 

Warren, Henry 2a ^ 

Webster, Humphrey H. . 1 50 

Worthen, Moses P. .... 3190 

Wells, George E. 1 50 

Welch, George F. 3 78 

Wright, John .......... 1 50 

Willson, Robert 10 62 

Wyman, William 1 50 

Winn, George — , . 1 50 

Walker, Henry B. J3 66 

Walker, Persis 6 08 

Walker, Cliaries, beira of, 139 84 



34 



Wright, Charles S. 
Welch, Gardner R, 
Weston, David B. . 
Wyman, Moses , . . 
*W' right, Marcus L, 
Williams, William 
Waitt, Charles . .. 
WiJmott, Nathaniel N 
Williams, Thomas . 
Wilmot, Sullivan N. 
Wig-gin, Thomas L. 
Willson, James W. . 
Welch, Richard . . . 
Woodman, Joseph B. 
Walker, Edwin R. . 
Woodson, Joseph . . 
Wriglit, Sylvester . . 
*Wicks, Elias S. . . . 
* Watts, Simeon N. 
Wiley, Ephraim W. 
Williams, Caleb . . . 



3 02 
6 82 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
23 64 
15 94 
5 30 
1 50 
1 50 
5 32 
30 38 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
9 10 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
8 34 
1 50 



*White, Otis 1 5Q 

Worcester, Prudence ... 16 72 

Worcester, William E. . 3 02 

Wardwell, Bailey R. .... 1 50 

Walker, Alexander .... 1 50 

Ward, Edward 3 78 

Wetherbee, Isaac . . . 1 50 

Whitehead, George .... 1 50 

White, Ambrose H 47 10 

Wallace, James M 3 78 

Winslow, Samuel 16 70 

Waterman, Charlotte ... 3 80 

Welch, Jane 6-08 

Walker, Joseph F. heirs of, 12 16 

Weeks, George M 1 50 

*Walsh, George 1 50 

Young, Joseph, 2d 1 50 

Young, Thomas P 1 50 

Young, Joseph 5 30 



NON-RESIDENTS. 



Aspinwall, Samuel . , . . . 19 00 

Adams, George W 6 84 

Andrews, Samuel 13 68 

Armstrong, Samuel T. . . 39 52 

Andrews, Joseph E 7 60 

Ames, Philander 179 36 

Adams, Samuel 5 32 

Aldrich, Aaron 14 44 

Allen, Francis 7 60 

Barnicoat & Tuckerman, 5 70 

Brintnall, Benjamin .... 25 84 

Bradstreet, Samuel 45 60 

Barnard, Samuel 238 45 

Bennett, Joshua 52 44 

Boylston, Ward N. heirs of, 53 20 
Binney, Amos, Sen., heirs 

of, 114 00 

Binney, Amos, Jun., heirs 

of, 15 20 

Breed, John, heirs of, 155 80 

Bramhall, Cornelius 2128 

Barton, Martha 3 80 

Bates, Martin 33 44 

Bradstreet, Elizabeth ... 14 44 

Bass, Moses 1 52 

Brown, Charles 361 00 

Bartlett, George 56 24 

Bowles, John 8 36 

Bowman, Francis 38 00 

Betterley, 7 .30 

Baldwin, Catharine 53 20 

Blake, Philip 34 20 

Burckes, Martin 34 96 

Bartlett, Thomas M 6 08 

Bigelow, Samuel 77 ,52 

Bradshaw, Samuel C. Jr. 98 80 

Bryant & Herman 83 6U 

BaVbour, J. R 15 20 

Bray, Charles C. 21 28 

Buliard, Lewis 21 28 

Boylston, Marcy 22 80 

Bell, Benjamin 23 56 



Brown & Swift, 121 60 

Barry, Richard 22 80 

Barker, Abel 13 68 

Baker, Alice 110 20 

Barker, George 22 80 

Bradeen, Benjamin ..... 12 92 

Bowen, Charles 80 56 

Barker, Cyrus 15 20 

Blanchard, Seth 6 84 

Bowers & Ham, 26 60 

Barry, William 6 08 

Babbitt. Alvin 7 60 

Bowthorp, Thomas 6 08 

Buzzejl, Samuel 5 32 

Bigelow, Josiah 10 64 

Baxter «fe Brothers, ..... 5 32 

Barstow, George 38 00 

Bent, Stephen C. ...... . 12 16 

Chapman, Jona. heirs of, 243 96 

Colby, Sarah 32 68 

Cary, Jonathan 15 20 

Gary, Isaac H. 6 08 

Cary, Charles S 27 36 

Chelsea Bridge Corpora'n, 16 72 

Cummings, Samuel 1 52 

Coburn, Daniel J 88 92 

Corbett, Leavett 9 12 

Clapp, Salmon, heirs of, . 13 68 

Calhoun. Mrs 24 32 

Calahan, John 20 52 

Cook, Martha 19 00 

*CampbeIl, Patrick 9 12 

Collier, Martin 9 12 

Carruth, F. S. treasurer, . 101 08 

Cook, George 47 12 

Clapp, Eliza 47 88 

Chandler, Newton A. & Co. 12 16 

Chamberl in 5i' Foster, .. 3 04 

Carruth, Nathan 9 12 

Chambers, David 15 96 

Crowningshield, Abr. W. 18 24 

Cole, William 3 80 



36 



Collamore, Gillman 66 88 

Campbell, James 15 20 

*Currier, A. H 1 52 

Deterbee, Peter 1 52 

Damon, Rebecca 11 40 

Dix, James H 22 80 

Daltori, Thomas 11 40 

Dee, Patrick 7 60 

Douglass, Robert 8 36 

Dunbar, Peter & Thomas, 38 00 

Dutton, Francis L. trustee, 174 80 

Edmands, Thomas 72 20 

Eustis, James 15 20 

Elwell, David 30 40 

Edmands, Thomas B. . . . 8 36 
Emerson, E. Mrs. and S. 

Sweetser, 13 68 

English, Jerome 3 04 

Eaton, William 39;i 20 

French, Ann 19 CO 

Fuller, Stephen 13 64 60 

Fenwick, Benedict 15 20 

Fosdick, David 37 24 

Fairbanks, l^oring & Co. 92 .2 

P'oster, William, heirs of, 20 .52 

Foster, Gidi-on 42 56 

Frotbinofham, Richard, Jr. 

age'nt, S83 48 

Fiske, Francis 10 64 

Fernald, Wm. heirs of, .. 31 92 

Farnsworth, William J. . 11 40 

Fullerton, Samuel 12 16 

Fitz, Abel 90 06 

Foster, Charles 120 84 

Fnsg, Ezra D 80 40 

Fiske, R. F. &. J. C. & Co. 1 9 00 

Forbes, Daniel H 10 64 

Farley, William 6 08 

Fitchburg Rail Road, . . 2945 CO 

Gerrish, George W 4180 

Guiney, Elizabeth 9 12 

Guild, Reuben 34 20 

Gasner, Peter 49 40 

Goodnow, John 16 72 

Gillman, John T. heirs of, 26 60 

Grant, Moses 76 00 

Guild, Chester & Son, . . 61 56 

Granger, George T. . . * . 7 60 

Gove & Locke, .... 12 16 



Gass & Bowcn, 30 40 

Gage, Stephen M. & Co. . 9 12 

Guild, Chester 64 60 

Gaul, Emeline 3 80 

Haywood & Carnes, .... 205 20 

Harris, Jonathan, heirs of, 638 40 

Hull, Isaac, heirs of, .... 150 48 
Hull, I. heirs of, and heirs 

of Amos Binney, Jr. 253 84 

Hall, Milton 4 56 

Hay, Marmaduke 17 48 

Harris, Richard 43 32 

Hurd, Charles 102 60 

Hollis, John R. heirs of, . 3 04 

Harris, J ames 6 08 

Harrington, Andrew .... 7 60 

Harwood, Patty 5 32 

Holden, George 23 56 

Horn & Sinclair, 14 44 

Haskell, Thomas 4 56 

Holbrook, Daniel 4 56 

I! ay ward, John 9 12 

Harrison, Lydia A 7 60 

Hammond, Edward 25 C8 

Haynes, Charles 39 52 

flarris, Jerome 10 64 

Howe, Joseph J 15 CO 

Hastings, Edmund T. ... 49 40 

Howard, William C 7 60 

Hancock, John, Jr. ..... 57 00 

Holton, Leonard 4 56 

Hatch, John B 26 60 

Hanson, James ........ A ^Q 

Harwood, James 6 08 

Hazleboom, 9 12 

Hamlin, Cornelius 12 16 

Hazlett, William 11 40 

Haskins, William 7 60 

Holden, Nehemiah 9 13 

Hubbard, W. J. and others, 114 00 

Harrod & Fernald 60 80 

Hammatt, Barnabas .... 9 12 

Ingolls, John R 7 60 

Ireland, George W. .... 18 24 

Jones, Ebcnezer, 36 48 

Jackson, Ebenezer ..... 12 16 

Johnson, Seth, heirs of, . . 22 80 

Johnson, William M. ... 4 56 

Johnson, Polly 5 32 

Jones, Jonathan 34 20 

Jackson, George , 152 



37 



*Kellan, Robert . 
Kendall, Henry A. 
Kidder, Jerome G. 



Loomis, Hubbel 

Lane & Reed, 

Lakeman, James 

Locke, Charles A 

Littlefield, Walter 

Lincoln, Beza, admin'r, . . 
Lawrence, Sylvester .... 

Lawrence, Joshua 

Lennox, Asa 

Leavett, H. H 

Lord, Peletiah 

Lane, George F 

Lawrence, Brown & Stick- 

ney, 

Langmaid, Samuel P. — 
Lawrence, Richard C. . . 



Mackentire, James . . 
Mahan, Benjamin F. . 
MuUiken, John W. ... 

Manning, Mary 

Means, James . . 

Munroe, Sally P 

Mountford, Nathaniel 
Mellows, William . . . 

Miller, Charles 

McGrath, Edward . . . 
McElroy, William . . . 
Mulliken & Gould, . . 

Millen, James 

Morse, Foster 

McKinsley, Rosannah 

McKay, John 

McElroy, Patrick . . . 

Morrison, E. J 

McKenney &l Story, . 
McFarlane, David . . . 



Nudd, Thomas . . 
Newcomb, Norton 
Noyes, Clement . 



Payson, Ruth 

Pratt, John, heirs of, . 

Parks, Elisha 

Parsons, Nehemiah . . 

Parkman, George 

Prentiss, Nathaniel A. 
Perry, Benjamin 



6 08 


1] 40 


86 20 


4 56 


21 28 


34 20 


83 60 


24 32 


15 20 


7 60 


34 20 


10 64 


15 20 


7 60 


10 64 


12 16 


8 36 


22 80 


n 40 


12 92 


31 16 


6 08 


9 12 


3 80 


6 08 


7 60 


7 60 


15 20 


53 20 


76 00 


11 40 


3 80 


5 32 


11 40 


6 08 


7 60 


21 28 


10 64 


15 20 


15 20 


12 92 


66 88 


28 88 


395 20 


]5 20 


9 12 


24 32 


4 56 



Parker, Jonathan 22 04 

Parkman, Susan 40 28 

Peirce, Jonathan 19 00 

Patterson, David 19 00 

Peirce, Abijah H 18 24 

Plympton, Ralph 20 52 

Pook, Charles L. Jr. ... 16 72 

Peirce, Thomas 34 20 

Pettengill, Benjamin .... 95 CO 

Phinney, William 3 80 

Penniman, Edward M. .. 5 32 

Parsons & Bacon, 9 88 

Quimby, A. W 28 88 

Roberts, Francis R 7 60 

Roberts, John L 10 64 

Robins, Richard 166 44 

Raymond, William 40 28 

Rand, Benjamin 30 40 

Rice & Thaxter, 64 60 

Ritchie, James 167 20 

Rice, John P 41 80 

Reed, Samuel G 14 44 

Raymond, Charles F. . . . 6 C8 

Raymond, Francis L. ... 15 P6 

Richardson, S. B 2 28 

Swett, Taskpr H, heirs of, 38 00 

Sullivan, Richard 699 20 

Stevens, John 19 00 

Stearns. Sarah, heirs of, . 38 00 

Sawyer, Stephen (! 08 

Shaw, Mary 91 20 

Sipne, William W 167 20 

Smith, Thomas C 1 1 40 

Swett, J ohn H. 27 36 

Stearns, Eckley 21 28 

Sheafe, Mary A 45 60 

Swasey, JohnH 18 24 

Sylvester, Oakes 11 40 

Sanderson, J osiah 12 16 

Saunders, Oliver 30 40 

Sanborn, Jacob 25 84 

Swan, Joseph 13 68 

Smyth, R. M. N 79 80 

Solis, Christopher 125 40 

*Swift, H. & Co 7 60 

Simpson, Daniel P 7 60 

Sawyer, Samuel ]5 20 

Swett, Benjamin 6 08 

Somes, John G 1 52 

Severance, David 2 28 

Skinner, John 39 52 

Sargent, Joseph R 7 60 



38 



Taylor, George A 92 80 

Thorndike, Ebenezer ... 10 64 

Turner, Larkin 44 08 

Tudor, Frederick 22 80 

Torry, Deborah, heirs of, . 30 40 

Tufts, Charles 11 7 80 

Trott & Bumstead, 3 80 

Tufts, Nathan . 266 00. 

Turner, Henry 7 60 

Tenney, Robert G 12 16 

Twombly, James 22 80 

Tuttle, John 25 84 

Thrasher, Benjamin 15 20 

Terhant, Gerard 13 68 

Thayer, Jason 4 56 

Taft, Alonzo 6 84 

Todd, Moses 18 24 

Turner & Cudworth, ... 86 64 

Teel, Benjamin R 13 68 

Trowbridg-e, John H. ... 34 20 

Tripp & Colman, 3 04 

Tenny, Gilbert 15 20 

Tucker, John C 26 26 

Tivnin, Owen 1 52 

Towne, Orr N 113 24 

Tileston, Edmund P. . . . 9 12 

Underwood, Joseph, Jr. . 9 12 

Underwood, William ... 64 60 

Upton, Ebenezer P 3 04 

YanVoorhis, Henry, heirs 

of, 49 40 



Wiley, Ephraim 11 40 

Winchester, E. A. & W. 45 60 

Whitney, Simon 30 40 

Wheeler, Increase S. . . . 31 92 

Williams, Mary 3 04 

Walley, Samuel H. Pres't, 9 12 

Welch, Abraham _ 3 80 

Walker, Thomas ' 15 20 

Winter, Waterman G. .. 12 92 

Wig^in, Robert P 4 56 

Warren, Charles W 4 56 

Walker, William J. 15 20 

Willson, Shipley W 13 68 

Whiting, George ....... 21 28 

Watts, S. B. 3 04 

Wells, T. G 36 86 

Wills, John 53 20 

Waitt, Joseph & Co 11 40 

Whieldon, William W. . . 91 20 

Williams, Thomas 8 36 

Willis, Royal B 12 16 

White, Seneca 13 68 

West, Thomas, President, 30 40 

Whitten, Jeseph W 6 08 

Wiley, Elizabeth 10 64 

Williams, Gilbert 3 80 

Wheeler, Plummer 7 60 

Weeman, Ebenezer 13 68 

Whittredg-e, Alfred W. 

heirs of,- 6 84 

Yeaton, Benjamin 13 68 

Yeaton, George H 11 40 



TREASURER'S STATEMENT 

OF 

EECEIPTS AND EXPBNDITUEES, 

FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING FEBRUARY 29, 1848. 

RECEIPTS. 

From Notes payable to the Bunker Hill Bank, 

for temporary Loans, $46^000 00 

From Notes payable to J. W. Whitten, for 

temporary Loan, 2,000 OO 

From Notes payable to William Stevens, for 

temporary Loan, 2,500 00 

50,500 OO 

From Notes payable to Lowell Institution, for 

Saving, for pennanent Loan, ^. 26,000 OO 

From Notes payable toN. E. M. Life Insurance 

Company, for permq,nent Loan, 12,000 00 

From Notes payable to Scituate Savings Insti- 
tution, for permanent Loan^ . . •' ' • • 1,000 00 

From Notes payable to Warren Savings Insti- 
tution,, for permanent Loan, 7,000 OQ 

From Notes payable to Suffolk Savings Bank, 

for permanent Loan, 7,000 00 

From Notes payable to John Callahan, for per- 
manent Loan, .^ ^ 4,000 00- 

From Notes payable to heirs of Esther Sar- 
gent, for permanent Loan, - . 15,000 0& 

From Notes payable to Charles Johnson, for 

permanent Loan, 500 00 

72,500 00 

From State Treasurer, on account of Public 

■ Schools, , 585 92 

From State Treasurer, on account of State 

Paupers, - ^ 39 01 

From Treasurer of Somerville, for County Tax, 599 95 

From Chief Engineer, on account of Fire De- 
partment, 23 55 

From Secretary of Board of Overseers of the 

Poor, 202 50 

Amount carried forward, $124,450 9a 



40 

Amount brought 
From James Dana, in favor of the Estate of 
Solomon Hovey, 

From William Sawyer, balance of Account 
rendered by him, 

From John Donevan, for School House bought 
of City, 

From Jacob Hittenger, for Interest on Note, . 
From Benjamin Edmands, for old Book Case, . 
From City Clerk, on account of Dog Licenses, 
From Nathaniel Pratt, for Rent of City Hall, . 
From Richard Nichols, for Rent of City JBall, 



forward, $124,450 93 

42 65 

3 07 

120 00 

24 00 

2 CO 

64 00 



From G. Washington Warren, \ t^ 

" John Callahan, 

« William H. Keith, 

" Ezra Brown, ^ u5 

" Thomas Beddoe, ( O 

" J. C. Cashing, \ S. 

" Charles Freeman, ..../ S 



Joseph F. Boyd, \ 

William M. Edmands, . i 

Seth Sawyer, / 

David Edmands, ( ^ 

E. N. Hunting, > = 

J. C. Cutter, I "^ 

John Hatsfield, \ 

Palmer & Harding, / 



27 00 
310 37 



28 52 


18 00 


14 10 


3 00 


9 00 


3 00 


10 80 


5 00 


125 00 


25 00 


30 00 


39 00 


120 00 


26 00 


175 00 



Taxes Assessed in T847, 65,036 51 

" " " 1846 1,810 80 

" « " 1845, 378 25 

« " " 1844, 57 CO 



Interest on Taxes, 
Costs on Taxes, . . 



337 37 



86 4S^ 



545 00 



67,282 56 
215 53 
134 97 

$193,308 50 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid Stoneham Tax, 92 

" County Treasurer, in part for County Tax, 2,C00 00 

" on account of temporary Loans, 31,000 00 

" Interest on temporary Loans, 1,132 37 

" Interest on permanent Loans, 4,368 14 

" Heirs of Esther Sargent, for Almshouse Farm, 15,000 OO 

« Town Notes, 9,000 00 

« on Town Accounts, 3,910 33 

** Members of the Military Companies, . , 204 00 

$66,615 76 



41 
PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS. 

CITY HALL. 

REPAIRS AND FURNieHINQ. 

George S. Adams, $1,709 95 

Morris Kelly, 1,383 26 

J. B. & C. Wilson 2,882 00 

Joseph Kingsley, ^ 608 15 

H. G. Waldron, 988 59 

Richardson & Chalk, 1,683 07 

John P. Dimond, 81 87 

William M. Edmands, 300 00 

Stephen Smith, 386 00 

William A. Viles, 1,541 32 

Cross, Brown & Mellen, 15 00 

Benjamin Thompson & Co. .- c 181 25 

A. Stowell, Jr 769 IS' 

Charles P. Brooks, 3 00 

Richard Nichols, 11 27 

Edward Pratt, 66 23 

James A. D. Worcester, 175 12 

Roger Herring, 134 88 

Bryant & Herman, 314 80 

13,134 88 

SCHOOL HOUSE AND WARD ROOM 
IN WARD 2. 

Taylor, Hobart & Co 7,000 00 

Ellis & McKean, 3,500 00 

John Callahan, Land, 3,963 50 

14,463 m 

HIGH SCHOOL HOUSE. 

J. & A. S. Tuttle, 8,000 00 

J. B. & C. Willon, 3,000 00 

Edward Pratt, 15 00 

P, J. Stone, Land, ,. 6,338 00 

-— ^ 17,353 00 

HARVARD SCHOOL HOUSE. 

George S. Adams, 4,350 00 

M. & J. O. Mason, 2,606 25 

6,956 25 

OLD WINTHROP SCHOOL HOUSE. 

George S. Adams, 607 81 

Amos Brown, 1,000 00 

Jacob Forster, Land, • 7,000 00 

Timothy Dailey, » . • . » 25 00 

8,632 81 

Amount carried forward, $60,540 44 
6 



. 42 

Amount brought forward, $60,540 44 
TRAINING FIELD. 

Cross, Brown & Mellen, Trainingfield, 2,115 50 

A. C. Sanborn & Co 916 73 

J, B. & C. Wilson, 300 00 

3,332 23 

Barker, Felton & Parker, City Survey, 1,300 00 

Wm. M. Edmands, Stoves and Ventilators, for 

School Houses, 727 64 

William G. Shattuck, Seats for School Houses,. 99 75 

$66,000 06 
SCHOOLS. 

Hannah S, Austin, $ 4 33 

James Madden, 6 75 

James Kelley, 12 50 

Samuel Fowler, 10 20 

Emeline Courtney, , 35 25 

George H. Johnson, 7 50 

Johnson, 'J'olman & Pollard, .... ... - 51 36 

William W. Frost, 27 21 

B. F. Brackett, 95 25 

Mi-s. Hall, 112 00 

Nancy Fuller, 52 53 

Mrs. Jones, 10 00 

Mary McGregor, 6 00 

Whitten & Viles, 2 75 

Margaret Frye, 48 58 

Ames Drake, 16 00 

Jonas Tyler, I 33 

James S. Edick, 5 18 

C. Soule Cartee, 8 00 

Fuller & Davidson, 82 97 - 

Robert Swan, 3 50 

N. W. Stratton, 27 00 

William G. Shattuck, 39 00 

William B. Fowle, 5 00 

Mrs. Daniels, 15 50 

Abijah Blanchard, 125 97 

Institution for the Blind, 7 20 

Benjamin Edmands, 8 35 

Mrs. Nichols, 22 66 

John L. Taggard, 1 18 

A.V.Courtney, 118 63 

L. F. Whitney, 32 12 

J. P. Courier, 5 02 

Joseph L, Ross, 7 50 

Jacob Caswell, 28 61 

R. Herring, 16 14 

Mrs. Rebecca Small, 16 25 

Eberle & Trask, 49 39 

James Arnold, ^ 68 75 

Amount carried forward, $1,193 46 



4S 

Amount brought forward, $1,193 46 

X L. Johnson, 9 35 

Thomas Groom, , 7 98 

C P, Emmons, 325 24 

Samuel Abbott & Co 5 64 

Benjamin Thompson & Co 15 25 

Harvard Church, 65 00 

Moses Babcock, 4 31 

D. & Z. Bowman, 9 44 

H. & S. P. Hill, 20 62 

Taylor & Hobart, 14 25 

Perez R, Jacobs, 48 00 

William C. Bradlee, 4 12 

D. Prouty & Co 131 85 

Elijah Wilson, 6 38 

Little & Brown, 6 50 

George W. Little, 4 35 

H. K. Frothingham, 1 90 

J. E. Gould, 100 00 

Gardner Chilson, 3 00 

Samuel Kidder & Co 11 50 

A. Stowell, Jr. 8 25 

James Adams, 23 18 

James Hanson 3 00 

Nathaniel Pratt, 57 00 

J. & P. Sanborn, 601 33 

John Bryant, 67 97 

Teachers' Salaries, 14,061 73 

— $16,611 50 

Note. — The Roll paid under the Town Government, 
amounting to ^226 15, malces this agree witJi the School 
Committee's Report, ^16,837 65. 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

A. C. Palmer, finishing 2d story of B. H. School 

House, 1,072 00 

Cross, Brown & Mellen, moving Primary School 

House to the Neck, 100 00 

Newton A. Chandler and others. Land for Pri- 
mary School House, 1,512 00 

Thomas J. Elliott, Repairs of Primary School 

-House, 28 60 



J,712 60 



POOR AND ALMSHOUSE. 

H. & S. P. Hill, 196 05 

Samuel Abbott & Co 56 08 

Andrew Sawtell, , 274 43 

Bradley & Richardson, 438 42 

John L. Taggard, , 103 04 

William Tapley 73 89 

Palmer & Harding, 387 40 

Amount carried forward, $1,529 31 



44 

Amount brought forward, $1,529 31 

Nahum Chapin, 275 24 

Wesson & Gary, 412 55 

N. & G. Tufts, 282 86 

Absalom Rand, 63 26 

David Edmands, 80 80 

W. C. & M. Christy, 157 63 

H. T. Meserve, 278 30 

M. Richardson, 23 17 

Luther F. Whitney, 35 05 

Alexander Stowell, 123 21 

JohnSkilton, 125 23 

I. F. Arnold, 188 05 

James Adams, 34 98 

Elias Crafts, Jr. 32 98 

James R. Turner, 33 33 

Ann Harris, 21 72 

Margaret Bangs, 7 50 

Perkins & Cummings, 1 00 

Jonas Tyler, 17 44 

Francis Richardson, 19 57 

Joseph Grover, 33 50 

Nathaniel Pratt, .- 118 00 

Joanna Hilton, - 13 00 

Sarah Mahoney, 12 00 

Miss Ross, 5 00 

William Gray, 150 75 

P. Denvir, 8 00 

Cottrell & Brooks, 80 

Fosdick, Carter & Co 22 60 

John C. Thomas, 7 26 

S. G. Phipps, 90 40 

J. P. Currier, 56 99 

Mullett & Bradbury, 51 96 

D. & Z. Bowman, 564 14 

Jasper, Stone & Co 350 29 

John W. Hollis, 456 91 

E. N. Hunting, 119 22 

Charles Poor 62 22 

J. C. Cutter, 14 08 

C. C. Pattee, 41 25 

David Brown, » 1 45 

G, W. Little, 45 94 

H. J. Call, 31 50 

Richard Nichols, 10 75 

A. J. Carter, 75 

Theodore T. Dearing, 2 50 

William Gilbert, 2 25 

R. Wason & Co 136 75 

Albert Eaton, 200 00 

John P. Flagg, 97 81 

William Fosdick, 156 19 

Parker Fall, 12 11 

Amount carried forward, $6,619 55 



45 

Amount brought forward, $6,G19 55 

Thomas Greenleaf & Co 99 64 

Foster Lawrence & Co 5 00 

Jotham Johnson, Jr. 388 99 

William M. Edmands, 40 14 

Clement Noyes, 27 15 

Benjamin Edmands, 39 00 

Frederick Carter, 19 50 

Dr. G. Cutler, 6 67 

William Arnold, 219 13 

Jacob Davis, 45 62 

C. P. Emmons, 21 12 

Leonard Tufts, • 6 97 

Lamson & Edmands, 5 39 

George W. Adams, 5 00 

Charles A. Barker, 25 20 

R. B. Edes, Jr. & Co 34 82 

William Saunders, 8 00 

James Arnold, 30 47 

Charles T. Mullett, 5 32 

Thomas Ascroft, 7 96 

T. & T. F. Hunnewell, 22 00 

Francis Tuttle, 52 50 

Oliver Brown, 1 25 

Alvah Gage 47 72 

Jesse Wilson, 5 00 

Augustine H. Pray, 91 30 

R. Bettinson, 60 35 

Caleb Symmes, 13 00 

Charles Sanderson, 75 

Paul Willard, 4 50 

Harry Sanderson, 15 50 

William Hodgkins, 12 27 

Joshua Seavy, 7 00 

William Patterson, 11 25 

John C. Thomas, 26 75 

S. M. Gage & Co 42 58 

Heman S. Doane 9 50 

Tapley & Lincoln, 45 50 

Samuel Tallman, 16 75 

Thomas Greenleaf, 204 00 

Noble & Sturtevant, 396 60 

Jam'es Edmands, 15 31 

Benaiah Webster, 9 20 

A. H. Heath, 10 19 

J. C. Carpenter, 36 44 

Benjamin Thompson & Co 1 85 

C. Guild & Sons, 5 04 

John Hustin, 3 00 

House of Correction, Boston, 38 96 

« « « Cambridge 25 86 

Estate of Joseph Burrell, deceased, 46 18 

G. H. Warren, 2 00 

Amount carried forward, $8,940 74 



46 

Amount brought forward, $8,940 74 

J. & P. Sanborn, 8 00 

Eliza Richardson, 34 50 

Adeline Shaw, 102 01 

A. R. Thompson, 3 00 

Israel Cliase, , 470 68 

Jotham Johnson, 42 09 

WiUiam Garj, 12 54 

$9,613 56 



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43 

HIGH WAYS. 

Hittenger & Cook, , $ 34 67 

Gage, Hittenger & Co. 15 79 

G. Rich, 146 25 

James O'Brine, 224 35 

John Tutty, 74 05 

James Deblois, 300 83 

Ivory H. Randall, 179 63 

Bernard Murphy, .., 14 38 

William Roach, 255 95 

Faucett, Davis & Co 3,520 84 

Charles R. Sturgis, 78 30 

William Adams, 25 50 

Gilman, Davis & Co 46 61 

John D. Stevens, 139 04 

Francis Richardson, 138 75 

P. Hubbell, 18 40 

B. F. Bracket!, 312 88 

John Donevan, 231 19 

John Long, 160 30 

Nathaniel Pratt, 160 55 

John Henley, 192 48 

Ellis & McKean, 9 54 

Willis & Randall, 15 25 

Luther Rugg, 19 25 

C.C.Smith, 2 25 

S. L. Armistead, 12 50 

T. R. Goodwin, 2 50 

J. R & C. Wilson, 11 53 

E. B. Faunce, 406 58 

Warren B. Thomas, 48 16 

John Riley, 89 06 

William Ryan, 5 31 

John Moore, 6 25 

Nelson Cutler, 123 18 

Levi Goodnovv, 62 62 

W. S. Richardson, 29 89 

Crafts & Taylor, 3 00 

Willard & Dalrymple, 59 00 

D. C. Willis, 15 86 

T. Griffin, 12 75 

Jacob Caswell, 30 10 

George Neagle, 77 87 

Ed. McCrady, 30 62 

Michael Donevan, . 39 99 

Hugh McLaughlin, 13114 

Caleb Morse, 75 

James G. Fuller, 21 69 

B. W. Parker, 126 60 

Betsey Lynde, 15 63 

G.W.Warren, 20 Oa 

Abram Chamberlain, 37 22 



Amount carried forward,^ $7,736 81 



Amount brought forward, $7,736 81 

Warren S. Thomns, 125 00 

Morris Kelley, 05 16 

J. C. Cushing, .... 19 30 

Weeman & Harding-, ...... 19 42 

Bradley & Richardson, ... . 4 50 

Charles Poole, 3 56 

Benjamin Edmands, 4 48 

Daniel Leman, 3 00 

James Adams, . 18 21 

George H. Conant, 116 

J. Worthen, 6 00 

J. L. J ennerson, 88 74 

George S. Adams, , 221 36 

Haskell Gore, 148 41 

William Tinker, 201 00 

George Dix, 326 25 

•Philip Shanahan, . . . 77 50 

Joseph Miller, 9 12 

Worthen & Co., 15 60 

Leonard Tufts, 6 92 

John Coon, 79 

Benjamin Phipps, 14 14 

T. & T. F. Hunnewell, 50 20 

Heirs of David Stetsoa, 4 50 

Thomas Dearing, 35 50 

John Paine, 15 15 

D. & Z. Bowman, ■ 6 5a 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Hancock Company, No. 1, $523 43 

Bunker Hill " " 2, , 505 50 

Howard " " 3, 485 64 

Warren " " 4, 500 00 

Washington « « 5 525 33 

Franklin " " 7, 482 31 

Hook and Ladder Company, No. 1, 280 00 

Hose '' « 1, 63 13 

Philip, C. Rowe, '.... 60 00 

Amos R. Decosta 5 00 

Thomas Greenleaf & Co. 1 73 

Hall & Burrell, 96 43 

John Williams, 150 

Clark & Jefferson, 5 00 

George Porter, 14 00 

Crafts & Carter, .....'. 42 

S.& E.Thayer, 14 75 

PL G. Waldron, 36 01 

Charles P. Brooks, 1 10 08 



'058 28 



Amount carried forward, $3,710 26 
7 



50 

Amount brought forward^ f 3,710 26 

Jesse Wilson, 1 25 

George Fuller, 20 50 

Eberle & Trasit, 9 30 

Thomas Beddoe,- 3 50 

William Pedrick, 22 00 

R. Watts, ., 9 46 

B. G. Blanchard, ,. 20 25 

Shelton & Cheever, 149 47 

R A. Fiske, 12 00 

Richardson & Chalk, 10 00 

Hittenger & Cook, 43 15- 

James Boyd & Sons, 323 00 

John C. Bell, 1 50 

George W. Turner, 19 50 

Willis R. JeiFerson, 6 71 

Nathaniel G. Paine, 1 50- 

James Emery, 1 50 

David L. Tucker, 9 00 

James J. Erdick, 2 00- 

Jacob Carswell, 2 00- 

Charles Poole 3 75 

Messrs. Hunneman & Co 223 1 2 

Oliver Brown, 24 62 

William M. Edmands, 72 36 

Moses Babcock, ]2 06 

Jotham Barry, Jr , . 7 50 

Asa Wellman, -. . , 3 00- 

T. M. Cutter, ]3 51 

T. &. T. F. Hunnewell, 7 63 

Lysander Cole, 5 62 

John Coon 8 63 

S. Kidder «& Co 2 50 

Worthen & Co. 2 05 

Cross, Brown & Mellen, 338 83 

Mark Fiske, 143 37 

Charles T. Mullett, 1 50 

Rodger Herring 4 23 

Kendall Bailey, 2d, 33 

Martin Burckes, Jr 2 96 

G. W. Little, 1 22 

Weeraan & Harding, .*. . . 75 



$5,257 39 



SALARIES OF CITY OFFICERS. 

G.W.Warren, $375 00 

Amos Stone, 600 00 

A. B. Shedd, 510 93 

Paul Willard, Jr. 300 00 

James Deblois, 525 00 

Richard Nichols, 450 00 

Amount carried forward, $2,760 93 



51 

AmvDunt brought forward, $2,760 93 

Nathaniel Pratt, 262 50 

Adolphus J. Carter, J 87 50 

George J. Lindsey, 37 50 

Assessors, , , 800 00 

Isaac Cook, 112 50 

Henry Conn, , 50 00 

James M. Gardner, 50 00 

Stephen Kelley, 37 50 

Joseph F. Boyd, 37 50 

Ames Drake, 12 50 

T.J.Elliot, 12 50 

Isaac Blanchard, '. 40 00 



$4,400 



WATCH. 

Perez R. Jacobs, $16 67 

Charles Sanderson, .....,,., 100 67 

Jonathan Bartlett, 75 60 

Isaac Wetherbee, 6 GQ 

Charles Hackett, , — ,....«.. 5 50 

Nathahiel D, Howe, , 5 50 

A ugustus Taylor, ...........<. ...'... 91 70 

A. X Carter, 88 00 

Moran Knight, 78 25 

Russell Uphara, 5 50 

Francis Powers, 88 15 

Asa B. Barker, , 87 05 

Joshua W. Lincoln, 82 50 

William Norton, 85 95 

Joseph Davis, ^ 87 05 

Harry Sanderson, 85 95 

William B. Unthank, 60 GO 

John C. Hutchinson, 84 85 

Stephen Fosdick, '. 58 85 

A. L. Melvin, 5185 

Judah Wetherbee, 59 40 

Joseph Currill, 60 50 

Joseph Bibram, • • 67 25 

Stephen Fuller, 51 70 

Nelson Cutler, 72 60 

Charles Parkinson, 55 95 

JohnSawtell, •••• 26 40 

George Richardson, 60 40 

John^W. Smith • 40 70 

Ebenezer Parker, 86 20 

Moses G. Flanders, 82 80 

E.R.Davis, 80 30 

William McCloud, 38 40 

Benjamin Hearsay, 1 10 

Amount carried forward, $2,029 89 



52 

Amount brought forward, $2,029 89 

Harper Percival, 45 10 

Benjamin Huff, ■ 48 55 

E. R. Fletcher, 3 45 

William H. Jones, 47 30 

Daniel Fosdick, ...-.-. 1100 

Benjamin F. Brackett, 47 30 

William Phipps, 48 55 

Russell Lufkin, 1 10 

William Laird, 1 10 

Isaac Sargent, 18 70 

Perkins Norton, • 48 55 

John W. Ginter, 2(1 90 

James G. Dadley, 33 00 

John West, 110 

Royal Underwood, 31 10 

Joseph Cutter, 4 55 

John C. Martin, 2 50 

Joseph Mears, 27 50 



POLICE. 

Sundry persons, for Police on 17th June, and re- 
ception of President of the U. S $153 00 

A. J. Carter, 80 00 

Asa B. Barker, 84 00 

Isaac Sargent, 246 75 

Charles R. Knight, 20 00 



LAMPS AND LIGHTING- 

LutherRugg, $531 65 

G. W. Little, 943 39 

William Butterfield, 29 14 



2,477 24 



$583 75 



$1,504 17 



RESERVOIRS. 

Marshall Blanchard, $ 3 30 

Atkinson Brown, 8 75 

Gilman Davis & Co 61 62 

J. L. Jennerson, ... 808 82 

Joseph Burrill, • 41 00 

Jesse Wilson, 76 75 

E. B. Faunce .' 3 25 

Sanford & Co. 12 69 

D. C. Willis & Co, ..■.•..■..•.• 35 78 

C. Stinson, ,..■.•,•.■.,.•.■.....■.,■ 320 00 

Amount carried forward, $1,371 96 



53 

Amount brought forward, $1,371 96 

Massachusetts State Prison, 35 30 

Willard Dalrymple, 229 42 

T. & T. F. Hunnewell, '..'..'.. 10 50 

Hittenger & Co 23 14 

High Way Department, 90 00 

Benjamin Page, 5 00 

Nelson Cutler, 15 75 

Morris Kelley, 50 00 



$1,831 07 
MAIN DRAINS 6c COMMON SEWERS. 

George S. Adams, $158 50 

Timothy Donevan , ] 41 25 

Hubbell & Abbott, , 45 00 

Nathaniel Pratt, 315 00 



CONTINGENCIES. 

Caleb Rand, $ 31 50 

H. S. Warren, 578 49 

Josiah Brackett, 14 50 

Perez R. Jacobs, 5 25 

Thomas K. Knights, , . 10 00 

Little & Brown, 46 50 

Nathaniel Pratt, 122 05 

Ames Drake, 18 87 

Charles Poole, 8 00 

Richard Nichols. ......... 74 01 

Benjamin Edmands, 6 40 

A. J. Carter, 20 68 

Charles Sanderson, , 20 68 

Luther Rugg, 53 20 

Charlestown Post Office, 5 54 

Bethesda Society, 3 CO 

J. A. D. Worcester, '. 16 75 

B. F. Brackett, 150 

Asa Wellman, 32 50 

Worthen & Co 14 00 

Thomas Beddoe, . .■ 1 00 

Stephen Brintnall, ....-.- 6 00 

Benjamin Connor, — . ......... 6 00 

G. Washington Warren, Disbursements, ...... 63 50 

Gustavus V. Hall, : . .....•.•. ....... 10 00 

Silas Crane, 1 50 

William Butterfield, "8 09 

A. B. Shedd, 51 75 

H.H.Seaward, ......•.....•.• 300 

Samuel Fowler, ' ....'... 1 25 

Amount carried forward, $1,235 51 



$659 75 



54 

Amount brought forward, $1,235 51 

C. R. Knights, 23 68 

Nathaniel Johnson, , 20 50 

Lexington & West Cambridge Rail Road, .... 10 00 

Howe, ... - 28 60 

Benjamin Brown, Jr 127 50 

Nelson Cutler, 3 00 

Thomas H. Farnsworth, 1 50 

Nathan Emerson, 8 25 

Philander Ames, 247 96 

Benjamin Thompson & Co 83 09 

J. B. & C. Wilson, 42 20 

Sleeper & Rogers, 2 50 

Charlestown Artillery, 16 25 

C. P. Emmons, 258 88 

Harrison Wingate, 52 50 

J. Stone &. Co 4 10 

Jonathan Tileon, 5 00 

Ellis &McKean, 29 70 

Taylor &. Hobart, 5 87 

T. W. Willard 9 00 

Jonathan Howe, 44 40 

Joseph Mears, 67 63 

John Bryant, 5 50 

Ames Brown, 130 00 

George Clapp, 19 50 

T. J. "Stover, Jr 12 00 

Theodore Dearing, . 4 00 

John P. Flagg, 6 CO 

Asa B. Barker, 22 25 

Isaac Sarirent, 5 .50 

Joshua Bennett, 15 00 

W.Jones, 3 00 

James G. Dudley, . . .'. 3 CO 

J ohn Ginter, 2 50 

William McCloud, 150 

Warren S. Thomas, ] CO 

George S. Smith, 35 CO 

Oliver C. Cutter, 44 75 

Thomas J. Elliott, 125 01 

Crafts & Taylor, 5 20 

William M. Edmands, 316 25 

J. L. Cady 60 00 

J. M. Seav.ey, 1 50 

A. Chamberlain, 8 67 

T. R. Goodwin, 21 00 

S. Bigelow, , , 3 00 

N. Stratton, . ^ 1 85 

D. & Z. Bowman, 5 54 

J. Delano, 2 CO 

Society of the M. E. Church, 150 CO 

A. Blanchard, 40 25 

AbeJ Stowell, Jr. 152 88 

Amount carried forward, $2,304 76 



55 

Amount brought forward, $2,304 76 

Esther Sargent, IGO 00 

William S. Rollins, . ." 27 50 

David Dodge, ]4 00 

Aaron Clark, 2d, 3 00 

Hittenger & Cook, 16 00 

A. CarTeton, 15 25 

Paul Willaid, 25 00 

Bunker Hill Encampment, 65 00 

D. B. Weston, 335 19 

George W. Turner, 1 00 

Moses P. Worthen, 7 50 

Moses Babcock, 5 95 

Stephen Smith, 139 50 

James Adams, 4 47 

Beals & Greene, 1 50 

Daily Advertiser, 5 50 

Overseers of the Poor, 202 50 

William A. Viles, 36 GO 

John R. Barnicoat, 1 .''iO 

George Fuller,. 23 44 

Washino'ton Engine Company, 7 50 

C. Symmes, 27 85 

W. W. Wheildon, 100 00 

William G. Shattuck, 78 50 

Roger Herrina', 66 01 

Charles P. Brooks, 86 07 

David Granger, 1 21 

Lessees of Fountain Hall, ,.,.... 4 00 

Wesson & Gary, 5 00 

Barker, Felton & Parker, 304 50 

First Parish 50 00 

Thomas P. Whitney, 50 00 

Henry L. Jaques, '. 74 84 

A. R. Thompson, 180 CO 



$5,605 55 



Celebration of 17th of June. 

Boston Daily Advertiser, $11 83 

Boston Brass Band, 90 00 

Crafts & Taylor, 2 00 

Charlestown Artillery, 75 00 

Jacob Caswell, 37 73 

White's Cornet Band, 42 00 

Thomas Knights, .... 10 00 

Boston Courier, 17 18 

Harrison Wingate, „ 8 00 

James G. Hovey, 108 00' 

O. C. Cutter, 62 50 

Thomas Beddoe, 5 00 

Boston Daily Atlas,. 16 00 

Amount carried forAvard, $485 24 



56 

Amount brought forward, $485 24 

Patrick Campbell, 25 00 

B. F. Brackett, 1 50 

P. R. Jacobs, 1 50 

Boston Post, 19 88 

Samuel Thompson, ■ 8 00 

Sleeper & Rogers, 2 00 

James F. Fullam, 5 00 

Schouler & Brewer, 7 00 



Reception of the President of the 
United States. 

William H. Barker, $18 00 

Samuel Brintnall, 15 00 

John Tapley, 15 00 

O.P.Caswell, ]8 00 

A. Jordan, 15 00 

J. Kennar, 6 00 

W. H. Caswell, 4 50 

C. Poor, 35 00 

T. Peterson, 24 00 

R. Jones, 6 00 

W. Johnson, 6 00 

G. W. Turner, 7 00 

T. R. Goodwin, 52 02 

H. C. Hill, ;....... 6 00 

A. Harding, .... 1 00 

J). VV. & S. H. Barnes, 54 25 

A. Fearing & Co 42 21 

C. Barnard, 7 00 

Luther Rugg, 3 00 

Crafts & Taylor, 4 50 

James G. Swan, 14 50 

Oliver C. Cutter, 155 00 

Boston Morning Post, 7 08 

Boston Brigade Band, 80 CO 

John S. Reed, 30 00 

James Giiday, * 6 00 

Alexander Stowell, 32 12 

Bunker Hill Encampment, 6 00 

Nathaniel Pratt, ....;;.. 6 00 

John A. Ross, 24 00 

Bunker Hill Engine Company, No. 2,- • . •. . ; 12 00 

Franklin " «' « • •7,- ........ 12 00 

Harrison Wingate, 16 75 

Hancock Engine Company No. 1, 12 00 

Howard " '« "3, 12 00 



$555 12 



Amount carried forward, $744 93 



57 

Amount brought forward, $744 93 

Boston Brass Band, 68 00 

White's Cornet Band, 75 00 

B. T. Downer, 8 00 

Schouler & Brewer, , 7 00 

Forbes Oakman, 1 00 

Proprietors of Boston Courier, 4 25 

James F. Fullam, 132 00 

Dexter, Hixson & Dexter, 45 00 



$1,085 18 



68 

Dr, CITY of CHARLESTOWN, iu Aceonnt 

To Cash disbursed at sundry times, as detailed in the foregoinor 
Schedules of Expenditures, viz : 

Paid Stoneham Tax, $ Q2 

" County Treasurer, in part for County Tax, 2,000 00 

" on account of temporary Loans, 31,000 00 

" Interest on " " 1,132 37 

** " " permanent " 4,368 14 

" Heirs of Esther Sargent, for Almshouse Farm, . . . 15,000 00 

" members of the Military Companies, 204 00 

" Town Notes, 9,000 00 

" on Town Accounts, 3,910 33 

" " account of Permanent Improvements, 66,000 06 

" " " « Schools, 16,611 50 

" « « " School Houses, 2,712 60 

" " « " Poor and Almshouse, 9,613 5G 

« " " " Highwaj's, 9,058 28 

« " « " Fire Department, 5,257 39 

« « " « Salaries, 4,400 93 

« « « " Watch, 2,477 24 

" " " " Police, 583 75 

" " " " Lamps and Lighting, 1,504 17 

« " " " Reservoirs, 1,83107 

" " " « Drains, 659 75 

" " " " Contingencies, 7,245 85 

Lost by Robbery, November 12, 1847, 759 34 

Balance in the hands of the Treasurer, March 1, 1848, . 1,524 24 

$196,855 49 

The Joint Standing Committee on Finance, have examined this Ac- 
count Current, together with the foregoing Schedules of Receipts and 
Expenditures, all of which they find to be accurate, and sustained by 
proper vouchers. 

The balance in the hands of the Treasurer, March 1, 1848, was, 
one thousand five hundred and twenty-four dollars, and twenty-four 
sents, 

G. WASHINGTON WARREN, J „. 
CHARLES W. MOORE, J J^mance 

PHILANDER S. BRIGGS, S committee, 

Charlesloimt, March 30, lSi8. 



59 

Current with AMOS STONE, City Treasurer, Cr. 

By Balance in hands of Treasurer, May 13, 1847, $ 2,815 40 

" Cash received at sundry times, as detailed in the 
foregoing Schedules of Receipts, viz : 

" Notes payable for temporary Loans, 50,500 00 

" " " " permanent " 72,500 00 

" State Treasurer, on account of Public Schools, . . . 585 92 

" " " " " " State Paupers, ... 39 01 

" Treasurer of Somerville, for County Tax, 599 95 

" Chief Engineer, on account of Fire Department, . 23 55 

" Secretary of Board of Overseers of the Poor, 202 50 

" James Dana, in favor of Estate of Solomon Hovey, 42 65 

" Wm. Sawyer, balance of account rendered by him, 3 07 

'* John Donevan, for School House bought of City, . 120 00 

" Jacob Hittenger, for Interest on Note, 24 00 

" By Benjamin Edmands, for old Book Case, 2 00 

" City Clerk, on account of Dog Licenses, 64 00 

« Rent of City Hall, 337 37 

" sundry persons for entering Drains, 86 42 

« « " " Rents, 545 00 

« Taxes collected to March 1, 1848, 67,282 56 

« Interest « on Taxes to March 1, 1848, 215 53 

« Costs « " « to March 1, 1848, 134 97 

« unpaidRolis, 73159 

#196,855 49 

«' Balance of Account, ..... $1,524 24 

E. & O. E. 

AMOS STONE, Treasurer and Collector. 
Charle$town, Mas$., March 30, 1848. 



SCHEDULE AND VALrATION 



CITY PROPERTY. 



City Hall, Land and Building, $35,000 00 

Lot of Land on Medford Street, 30,625 feet, 10,200 00 

« " " " " 5,000 " and Flats, . 5,000 00 

*' " " B.Hill « 4,700 « at 25 cents, 1,175 00 

" " in Stoneham, 200 00 

Ledge of Land on Cambridge Road, 500 00 

Hearse House and Hearse, 100 00 

Tomb Lots in Old Burying Ground, 500 00 

City Bell and Clock, ^ . . 500 00 

Furniture in City Hall Building, 2,500 00 

Military Articles, $100 ; Weights and Measures, $50 00, 150 00 

Almshouse Land and Wharf, ..... 70,000 00 

Furniture of do.. Live Stock, Provisions, &c., ........ 1,700 00 

City Farm, containing 45 acres, 15,000 00 

High School House, Monument Square, when completed, 26,000 00 

Winthrop School House, Bunker Hill Street, 21,000 00 

Harvard " " Harvard - " 18,000 00 

Warren " " Summer " 12,000 00 

Bunker Hill " " Bunker Hill " 9,700 00 

Primary " " Winthrop Square, four Schools 

and two Engine Rooms, . . . 13,000 00 

" " " Bow Street, four Schools, 5,000 00 

« " " Cross " two " 2,400 00 

" " " B. Hill « one School, .... 1,350 00 

" " " Mead « one " .... ],000 00 

" " " Main " one " .... 800 00 

"" " " B.Hill " 600 00 

« " " Elm « 600 00 

" " " " " 500 00 

" " " Kingston Street, 2,000 00 

" " " Moulton " 500 00 

" " " Sullivan " 2,500 00 

" " " Chelsea •' (on leased land,) 250 00 

" " " Winthrop " « " " 500 00 

Maps, Books, Desks, Globes, Stoves, &c 500 00 

Amount carried forward, $260,725 00 



62 

Amount brought forward, $260,725 00 

No. 1 Engine House and Land, $ 700 00 

Engine, 1^200 00 

Furniture, 30 00 

1,930 00 

No. 2 Engine House and Land, $1,400 00 

Engine, , 1,200 00 

Furniture, 30 00 

• 2,630 00 

No. 3 Engine House and Land, $1,300 00 

Engine, 1,200 00 

Furniture, 30 00 

2,530 00 

No. 4 Engine, $1,200 00 

Furniture, 75 00 

1,275 00 

No. 5 Engine, . _ $1,200 00 

Furniture, 65 00 

1,265 00 

No. 7 Engine House and Land, $1,200 00 

Engine, 1,200 00 

Furniture, 45 00 

■ 2,445 00 

Hook and Ladder House and Land, $1,200 00 

Carriage, &c 200 00 

Furniture, 25 00 

1,425 00 

Hose Carriage and Hose, $ 800 00 

Extra Hose for the several Companies, ...... 1,200 00 

" Ladders and Fire Hooks, 25 00 

2,025 00 

Jacob Hittenger's Note, 400 00 

Flats appurtenant to the Old Burying Ground, 
Claim against Boston and Maine Rail Road, 
Deposit in Phcenix Bank, $1,194 45, worth . . 125 00 



$276,775 OD 



Amount due from different Estates for Drains 
paid for by the City, but not yet assessed. 



63 

DEBTS OF THE CITY, FEBRUARY 29, 1848. 

PERMANENT LOANS. 

Lowell Institution for Savings, at 5 per cent., $61,000 00 
" " « « at 5h " " 26,000 00 

Warren " " " at 6 " " 7,000 00 

Suffolk « " " at 6 " " 7,000 00 

John Callahan, at 5 " " 4,000 00 

Scituate Institution for " at 6 " " on 

account of loan of $3,000, 1,000 00 

New England Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, at 6 per cent., on account of loan 

of $20,000, 12,000 00 

Trustees of Poor's Fund, 8,500 00 

School Committee, including their claim, . . 5,600 00 
Esther Sargent and others, for Maiden Farm, 15,000 00 



147,100 00 



TEMPORARY LOANS. 

Bunker Hill Bank, $15,000 00 

William Stevens, Treasurer, 2,500 00 

Sundry Individuals, 2,500 00 

20,000 00 

$167,100 00 

N. B. To meet the above Temporary Loans, and also the balance 
due on the Public Improvements, permanent loans have been author- 
ized and engaged. 



«, 



I