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Full text of "[City documents, 1847-1867]"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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City Document — JYo. 7. 

THE 
THIRD 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS 

ON THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OE EOXBURT : 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING JANUARY31st, 1849. 




ROXBURY : 

JOSEPH G. TORREY, CITY PRINTER. 



1 849. 



City Document — No. 7. 

THE 

THIRD 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS 

ON THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF ROXBURY : 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING JANUARY31st, 1849. 




ROXBURY : 

JOSEPH G. TORREY, CITY PRINTER. 



1 849. 



CITY OF ROXBURY. 



In Common Council, February 5th, 1849. 

Ordered, That twenty-two hundred copies of the Annual 
Report of the Receipts and Expenditures of the City, made 
out by the Committee on Accounts, with such other Documents 
as may be appended thereto, be printed under the direction of 
said Committee, and distributed among the inhabitants of the 
City. 

Passed and sent up for concurrence. 

JOSHUA SEAVER, Clerk. 

In Board op Aldermen, February 5, 1849. 
Concurred. 

JOSEPH W. TUCKER, City Clerh. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON ACCOUNTS, 



The Joint Standing Committee on Accounts, in compliance with 
the provisions of the 3d section of the Ordinance establish- 
ing a system of Accountability in the expenditures of the 
City, requiring that " they shall, on or before the first Mon- 
day in March, annually, and whenever requested by the City 
Council, or either branch thereof, report to the City the 
whole amount of accounts, claims, and demands allowed " by 
them, respectfully 

REPORT: 

That they have prepared a statement of the Receipts and 
Expenditures of the City, for the year ending January 31st., 
1849, with the details under their separate heads. 

The amount of accounts, claims, and demands allowed by 
them during the year, is ... $113,799 40 

The balance remaining in the Treasury, Feb. 

1,1848, was 6,093 41 

And the amount received for the year, from all 

sources, as per account of the Treasurer, is 113,255 42 

Making a total of $119,348 83 

Of this sum there was received — 
For Taxes assessed, 1848, $81,093 T2 

From loans at sundry times, 22,200 00 

From Cities and towns for 

support of Paupers, . . 149 66 
From Income from City Property, 752 65 



Amount earned forward, . $104,196 03 



Amount brought forward, . $104,196 03 

From Commonwealth, for City's 

proportion of School Fund, . 469 48 

From Commonwealth, for Military 

services, .... 477 50 

From licenses for Dogs, . . 470 00 

From Judson Chapin, Treas., tow- 
ards Schoolhouse and ward room. 
Ward 8, - . , . . 150 00 

And from all other sources, which 
will be found in detail in the ac- 
count of the Treasurer, annexed, 18,585 82 

$119,348 83 

The amount of Expenditures, for which bills, accounts, and 

demands have been allowed and ordered to be paid, including 

the payments of the City Debt, is $113,799 40 

And these Expenditures were chargeable to the 

following appropriations or accounts, viz : — - 

To Schools, for Teachers' sala- 
ries, fuel, contingencies, rent 
of Eliot, and appropriation to 
Grammar School, . . $24,422 69 

" new School House, Vernon 

Street, . . ' . . 1,404 24 

" new School House, Ward 8, 3,133 60 

" new School House, Smith st. 3,061 70 

" new Grammar School House 
on Jamaica Plain, for Central 
School, (exclusive of land,) 9,780 00 

" addition to School House on 

Mill Dam, ... 540 00 

" Watch, .... 3,552 73 

" Police, .... 495 61 

" Alteration of Watch House 

and Committee Rooms, . 1,406 49 

" Support of Poor in addition 

to their earnings, . . 13,618 73 

" Contingent Expenses of Alms 
House, including building of 
Shed, . 508 30 

" Fence around Alms House 

land, ..... 694 01 



Amount carried forward, . $62,618 10 



Amount brought forward, . 

To building Pest House, . 

" Pay of Firemen, 

" Contingent Expenses of the 
Fire Department, 

" Oil and Lighting Lamps, 

" Repairs of Lamps, 

" Guide-Boards, 

" Reservoirs, 

" Repairs of Highways and Side- 
walks, .... 

" City Debt and Interest, 

" Interest on Overdrafts, 

" Salaries of City Officers, 

" Militia, .... 

" County Tax, 

" Abatements of Taxes, 

" Discount on Taxes paid prior 

to Oct. 1, ... 2,499 13 

" Contingent Expenses and 

Miscellaneous Claims, - 3,915 61 



$62,618 


10 


361 


85 


3,328 


00 


2,165 


06 


839 


48 


59 53 


8 


00 


1,993 


81 


10,029 


93 


16,374 1 


406 


59 


3,655 


00 


47T 


50 


3,570 


04 


1,497 


66 



Total expenditure, .... $113,799 40 

Showing a balance, and remain- 
ing in the Treasury, of 5,549 43 



$119,348 83 



The City Debt, on the first of February, 1848, as per account 
of last year, amounted to the sum of . . $29,443 31 

Of this sum there has been paid during the year, 

when falling due, 14,666 66 



Reducing the debt to $14,776 65 

Which has been increased by loans, . . 25,197 00 

Making the total City Debt at this time, . . $39,973 65 

Of the increase of the City Debt, $11,197 00 is for pur- 
chasing land and building the new Grammar School House for 
the Central School, at Jamaica Plain, and $14,000 to provide 
for notes becoming due during the year. 

The times when this sum becomes payable may be seen by 
referring to the schedule of the City Debt, accompanying this 
report. 

The expenditures for support of Poor have increased over 



6 

those of last year, in consequence of the number of foreign 
paupers in the Alms House. The amount claimed of the Com- 
monwealth for their support, is upwards of $5,000. The ac- 
count is now before the Committee on Accounts of the Legisla- 
ture, and some action thereon will doubtless be had, during the 
present month. For a detailed statement of the Poor and Alms 
House, reference may be made to the report of the board of 
Overseers of the Poor, which is appended. 

The expenditures for Schools have also been increased, in 
consequence of purchasing land and building the School House 
for Primary Schools, Nos. 4 and 26, in Smith street ; for pur- 
chasing land and building the Grammar School House on Ja- 
maica Plain ; for finishing the School House for Intermediate 
and Primary School, No. 25 Vernon street ; for School House 
in Ward 8 ; and addition to School House on Mill Dam. These 
expenditures, added to the ordinary expenses of Teachers' sala- 
ries, fuel, and contingencies, exhibit an aggregate of $45,339 23, 
for the year. 

Upon an examination of the Watch House, it was found that 
the building was entirely unsuitable and insufficient for the ac- 
commodation of the Watchmen, and an addition to the building 
has been made. Two committee rooms have been added, over 
the Watch House, for the use of Committees of the City Coun- 
cil, Engineers, Overseers of the Poor, School Committee, and 
Assessors. The expense of the same was $1,406 49. 

The appropriation for Highways and Bridges, and for Side- 
walks, was made general ; but the expenditures have been made 
in three sections, as has been the practice for many years. 
These sections were assigned a certain sum by the Surveyors of 
Highways, and the expenditures will be found, in detail, under 
their appropriate heads. A specific appropriation of $2,000 
was made for Sidewalks ; and upon reference to the expenditures, 
it will be observed that the sum of $242 50, only, appears to 
have been expended, and $1,757 50 transferred to Highways 
and Bridges. This transfer became necessary in consequence 
of the amounts expended for Sidewalks being drawn from the 
Highway appropriation. It was the intention of the City Coun- 
cil to have the two accounts separately kept. 

It appears by the report of the Commissioners, that in Wards 
1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, there was expended for Sidewalks, about 
$800 00 ; in Wards 6 and 7, $391 25 ; in Ward 8 5> about 
$60 00. With the exception of the amount stated in the 
account of Sidewalks, this amount was taken from the High- 
way appropriation. 

It will be observed, upon a comparison with the report of last 



year, that the expenditures for the Fire Department fall below 
those of that year upwards of $1,100 00. The report of the 
Chief Engineer, on the state and condition of the department, 
with other details, is appended. It may be proper to state, in 
this connection, that four Hydrants have been placed along the 
line of the Water Pipes of the Boston Water Works, on Tre- 
mont and Washington streets, by order cf the Water Commis- 
sioners ; and permission to use the same in case of fire, has 
been granted by the City of Boston. Five Reservoirs have 
been located and built. 

By an examination of the details of the expenditures under 
the different heads accompanying this report, it will be seen, 
that, besides the ordinary expenditures, there has been a large 
outlay for permanent improvements, amounting to upwards of 
$22,000 00, all of which being deemed indispensable ; such as 

For land and School House at Jamaica Plain, 

amounting to $12,777 00 

Bal. on School House, Vernon st., amounting to 1,404 24 

School House and Ward Room, Ward 8, " 3,133 60 

School House in Smith street, " 3,061 70 

Five Reservoirs, " 1,993 81 



Amounting to $22,370 35 

By the act of the Legislature it is required that the proceeds 
of sales of lots or rights of burial in Forest Hills Cemetery, 
shall be paid into the City Treasury, to be kept separate from 
any other funds of the city, and subject to the order of the 
Commissioners. The proceeds are to be devoted to the liquida- 
tion of the debt incurred in the purchase of the land, and for 
improving and embellishing the grounds. 

The amount received into the Treasury (from 
June 19, 1848, to Feb. 1, 1849) from sun- 
dry persons, from sales and grading lots, was $10,908 09 

And the amount paid upon the drafts or orders 

of the Commissioners, for the same period, was 10,791 40 

Leaving a balance in the Treasury, Feb. 1, of $116 69 

The Cemetery Debt, incurred in the purchase of the land, 
amounts to $27,551 55. The times when this sum becomes 
payable may be seen by referring to the schedule, accompany- 
ing this report. The report of the doings of the Commission* 
era, will be found appended. 



8 

Annexed are statements of the unexpended balances of the 
appropriations of the previous year, and the appropriations and 
transfers for 1848 ; the details of the expenditures under their 
proper heads, and the present balance of each appropriation, 
and a Schedule of the Real and Personal Property of the city. 

All which is respectfully submitted. 

For the Committee, 

JOSEPH N. BREWER. 
Roxhury, February 19, 1849. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 



The Appropriations made by the City Council for different purposes 
in 1848, with the unexpended balances of the previous year, the trans- 
fers from one appropriation to another ; together with the Expenditures 
in detail, under each appropriation, and the unexpended balances. 

The Treasurer's Account, the amount of City Debt, and Forest Hills 
Cemetery Debt, and Schedules of Real Estate and Personal Property 
belonging to the City. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $ 4,657 78 

Appropriation 20,362 00 

" for fuel 800 00 

" additional 1,500 00 

" additional, April, 1848 1,000 00 

Transfer from " New School House, Eustis st." 38 00 

" " " New School House, Vernon st." 52 26 

" " "Repairs of Alms House" 7 13 

$28,417 17 

EXPENDITURES. 

DUDLEY SCHOOL. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION — 

To Jeremiah Plympton, Principal- • -$1,200 00 

" Adeline Seaver, Assistant 375 00 

" Sarah W. Taber, " 160 42 

" Ellen French, " 275 00 

" Lucy A. Lerned " 202 50 

" Maria A. Newell " 25 00 

" Georgiana Howard " 268 75 

" Almira French " 268 75 

" Ellen A. Marean " 268 75 

" Delia Mansfield " 268 75 

" Marv M. Brett " 268 75 

" Harriet Taber " 116 88 

" Eliza Moore " 20 14 

" R. H. Tucker " 91 66 

3,810 35 

Paid for FUEL — 

To Asa Wyman & Son 132 25 

" D. Tiffany 24 00 

156 25 



Amount carried forward, .... $3,966 60 
2 



10 



Amount brought forward, .... 

Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To Jonas Pierce, making fires, sweep- 
ing, and cleaning $195 50 

" True Russell, carpenter's work • • 112 17 

" Weeks & Brock, blacksmith work 3 75 

" Benj.Blaney, repairing furnace- • 19 10 

" Calvin Bird, stoves, funnel, rep. &c. 115 46 

" J. T. Bicknell, books 20 57 

" Reuben Hunting, sundries 7 21 

"John Baker, " • 12 13 

" John Bowdlear, repairing pump • • 3 19 

" Thomas W. Leonard, sinks • • • • 6 00 

" Sylvester Edgerly, rep'ng clock 1 00 

" Nath'l Adams, blackboards, &c- • 23 00 

" J. Plympton, blank registers- • • • 6 00 

" Whitteuaore & Littlefield, painting 24 98 

" Nelson Curtis, mason work 12 74 

" J. P. Brown, hardware 5 00 

" E. P. Scott, repairing pump 2 75 



3,966 60 



570 55 



,537 15 



WASHINGTON SCHOOL. 



Paid for INSTRUCTION — 

To Levi Reed, Principal 

" Levi Dodge, Assistant 

" William H. Long " 

" Ruth H. Clapp 
" Ruth B. Swan " 

" Mary S. Messenger " 
" Mary A. Russell " 

" Mary A. Adams " 

" Abby French " 

" Emily E. Harrington " 
" Charles F. Patch " 

" Robert N. Woodworth " 
" Alfred Hewins " 



Paid for FUEL — 
To Asa Wyman & Son, coal- 
Tiffany, charcoal • 



D. 



,200 


00 


900 


00 


450 


00 


91 


66 


275 


00 


275 


00 


268 


75 


62 


50 


268 


75 


268 


75 


45 


83 


137 


50 


34 


37 


126 


50 


30 


72 



Paid for SUNDRIES— 

To Jonas Pierce, cleaning, sweeping, 

and making fires, 186 50 

" True Russell, carpenter's work • • 120 40 

" True Russell, for seats 300 00 

" George N. Kent, stoves and funnel 16 49 

" Nelson Curtis, mason work 55 55 

" Samuel Felton " " 22 67 

" B. F. Ayers, glazing 162 



4,278 11 



157 22 



Amounts carried forward, 



$703 23 $4,435 33 $4,537 15 



11 



Amounts brought forward, . $703 23 

To Calvin Bird, stoves, funnel, re- 
pairs, &c, 71 65 

" Geo. B. Davis, painting & glazing 9 25 

" J. T. Bicknell & Co., books 23 34 

" Reuben Hunting, sundries 7 55 

" J. P. Brown, hardware 1337 

"Levi Reed, books and stationery 11 62 

" " " inkstands 4 87 

" John Bowdlear, rep. pump 3 19 

" T. R. Whittemore, glazing 75 



1,435 33 



1,537 15 



848 82 5,284 15 



CENTRAL SCHOOL. 

[Including Primary School, No. 6.] 

Paid for INSTRUCTION— 

To Alanson Valentine, Principal- • • 787 50 

" Horatio Stebbins, Assistant 101 42 

" Charlotte Williams, " 2G8 75 

" Ann M. James, " 262 50 

" Sophia G. Prentiss, " 17811 

" Caroline F. Atherton, " 159 36 

1,757 64 

Paid for FUEL— 

To Bullard & Carter, coal 14 00 

" Reuben Clapp, charcoal 3 66 

" Silas Smith, " 10 33 

" Josiah Whiting, " 5 00 

32 99 

Paid for SUNDRIES— 

To Ebenezer W. Stone, for rent 126 00 

" Ann M. James, books and maps 9 12 
" Alanson Valentine, fires and sta- 
tionery 43 95 

" Edward Carter, labor 2 00 

" Martin Concannon, fires and sweep- 
ing 18 25 

" Charles Salmon, sweeping, &c. • • • 6 00 

" Sophia G. Prentiss, cleaning • • • • 4 50 

" Charles Perkins, mason work ■ • • • 3 00 

" Robert Seaver, books, &c. 56 88 

" Wm. B. Fowle, outline maps- • • • 15 00 
" Tappan, Whittemore & Mason, 

maps 6 50 

" Lorenzo Smith, carting 2 00 

" Drew & Talbot, glazing 83 

" Caroline F. Atherton, sweeping- • 5 00 

" John Tolman, Jr., stove repairs- • 5 70 

304 73 

Amount carried forward, ..... 



2,095 36 
$11,916 66 



12 

Amount brought forward, . . . . . $11,916 66 

WESTERLY SCHOOL. 

Paid for INSTRUCTION — 

To Freeman A. Smith, Principal • • • $554 1 7 

" Charles S. Flint 233 33 

" Phcebe F. Marsh 268 75 

$1,056 25 

Paid for FUEL — 

To Asa Wyman & Son, coal 46 00 

46 00 

Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To Hiram Thayer, fence 219 00 

" " repairs 7 87 

" George A. Sawyer, fires, sweep- 
ing, &c. 17 50 

" Benjamin Blaney, funnel, and 

rep'g furnace 30 55 

" John Tolman, funnel and work- • 4 95 

" Dexter Clapp, books and sundries 34 45 

" Charles H. Mayo, fires 12 00 

" F. A. Smith, books &c. 13 00 

" Jonas Pierce, cleaning 9 50 

" James W. Wason, carpenter's 

work 8 36 

" E. W. P. Esty, mason work 7 25 

" Phoebe F. Marsh, books 3 35 

" Kittredge & Blakes, dtsk, &c 18 25 

" C. S. Flint, sundries 10 67 

" Theodore Dunn, for expenses- • • 10 50 

" George Hall, labor, 13 75 

420 95 1,523 20 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS, Nos. 1 & 2. 

Paid to Harriet W. Taber, for instruc- 
tion, 133 43 

" " Mary Brooks, for instruction • 234 36 
" " AbbyJ. Tren, " 100 93 

468 72 

Paid to Asa Wyman & Son, coal- • • • 17 25 

" D. Tiffany, charcoal 8 00 

25 25 

Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To Calvin Bird, stove repairs, &c- • ■ • 15 87 

" Geo. B. Davis, glazing 6 10 

" Mrs. Burke, fires and sweeping- • 15 00 

" Mrs. Hudson, cleaning 7 00 

" Mrs. Lang, " 50 



Amounts carried forward, . . $44 47 $493 97 $13,439 86 



Amounts brought forward, . . $44 47 $493 97 $13,439 86 

To Warren Marsh, mason work 7 00 

" E. Taber, cleaning clock 2 50 

" Mary Brooks, paid for cleaning- • 2 50 

" Abby J. Tren, " 2 50 

58 97 552 94 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS, Nos. 3 & 16. 

Paid to Louisa Curtis, for instruction 234 36 
" " Elizabeth Wyman " 234 36 



To Asa Wvraan & Son. coal 28 75 

" D. Tiffany, charcoal 3 84 

" A. Phelps, " 1 87 



Paid for SUNDRIES— 

To True Russell, carpenter's work,- • • 24 08 

" Faunce & Richards, brush, mats, &c. 3 20 

" Mrs. Whall, cleaning, sweeping, &c. 25 00 

" Jonas Pierce, cleaning 12 00 

" Sylvester Edgerly, cleaning clocks 6 00 

" Charles Marsh, hod, &c. 1 20 

" Kittredge & Blakes, desk, &c. 17 00 

" Levi Philbrook, blinds 3 24 

" S. & G. B. Faunce, mats 1 75 

" R. Hunting, sundries 1 85 

" Calvin Bird, stove repairs 8 75 

" John Egan, glazing 1 00 

" J. P. Brown, hardware 5 00 

" Geo. Harlow, rep'ng clocks 1 50 

" J. C. Hood, mats 6 00 



468 72 



34 46 



117 57 620 75 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS, Nos. 4 & 26. 

Paid to Louisa E. Harris, for instruc- 
tion 234 36 

" Caroline E. Russell, instruction •• • 48 68 

— 283 04 

To Asa "Wyman & Son, coal 23 00 23 00 

Paid for SUNDRIES— 

To True Russel, carp, work 25 33 

" John Champrey, brooms, mats • • • • 8 95 

" Hanckey, Stiles & Co., iron work- • 6 54 

" Louisa E. Harris, cleaning 4 00 

" Julius M. Swain, fires, &c. 6 25 

" Dodd & Wilson, stoves, funnel- • • • 75 44 
" Peda Dudley & L. Faxon, rent of 

land 10 00 



136 51 442 55 



Amount carried forward, ..... . $15,056 10 



14 

Amount brought forward, . ..... $15,056 10 

PRIMARY SCHOOL, KG, 5. 

Paid to Caroline X. Heath, for instruc- 
tion $209 36 $209 36 

Paid for SUNDRIES— 

To Lebbeus H. Varney, carp, work- • 160 75 

" Caro. N. Heath, fires & sweeping • 1 7 08 

" John Bowdlear, repairing pump • • ■ 2 75 

" George James, mat 1 00 

" John Tolman, Jr., tin on roof- • • • 4 50 

" A. R. Rell, mason work 19 75 

" Drew & Talbot, painting 16 77 

" Ann P. Johnson, cleaning- ••••• • 3 00 

" Benj. Armstrong, carpenter's work 157 

" Charles Perkins, mason work- ■ • • 75 

" Bryant & Herman ,' stove & funnel • 51 78 

279 70 489 06 

PRIMARY SCHOOL, No. 7. 

Paid to Louisa Newton, for instruction 159 36 159 36 
" Ebenezer Dudley, wood 9 14 9 14 

Paid for SUNDRIES— 

To James W. Wason, carpenter's work 3 27 

" Louisa Newton, books and sweeping 5 00 

" E. Taber, cleaning clock 100 

■ 9 27 177 77 

PRIMARY SCHOOL, No. 8. 

Paid to Sarah J. Morse, for instruction 215 61 
" Elvira Morse 22 46 

238 07 

To Asa Wyman & Son 11 50 

" Joseph Harper 3 87 

15 37 

Paid for SUNDRIES— 

To E. P. W. Esty, mason work 6 63 

" John Tolman, Jr., stove, &c. 46 93 

" D. Prouty & Co., funnel, &c. 4 23 

" Bryant & Herman, stove, &c. •••• 47 17 

" William G. Shattuck, seats 61 39 

" Sarah J. Morse, fires, &c. 10 77 

" C. M. Hall, carting 4 37 

181 49 434 93 

PRIMARY SCHOOL, No. 9. 

Paid to Mary O. Larken, for instruc- 
tion 209 36 209 36 

Amounts carried forward, .... $209 36 $16,157 86 



15 

Amounts brought forward, .... $209 36 $16,157 86 

Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To Joel Seaverns, coal hod, &c- • • • $1 62 

" Mary O. Larkin, sweeping, &c- • 10 50 

" Asa F. Onion, Jr., fires 8 08 

" William G. Shattuek, seats 21 87 

" E. Taber, cleaning clock 1 00 

" Luther Hodgdon, carpenter's work 18 12 

" Drew & Talbot, glazing 2 75 

" R. Stiles & Co., carting 1 75 

" Robert Seaver, sundries 11 06 

76 75 286 11 

PRIMARY SCHOOL, No. 10. 

Paid to Elizabeth Daniels, for in- 
struction 209 36 

209 36 

Paid to Charles D. Fisher, charcoal 6 21 

6 21 

Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To Calvin Bird, stove funnel 6 00 

" G. C. Anderson, fires 5 00 

"Elizabeth Daniels, cleaning 7 75 

" Charlotte Donnell, sweeping- • • • 1 50 

20 25 235 82 

PRIMARY SCHOOL, No. 11. 

Paid to Louisa Mitchell, for instruc- 
tion 234 36 

■- 234 36 

Paid to J. B. Page, bark 10 00 

10 00 

Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To Alfred Williams, for sundries- • • 12 52 

" Michael Moore, labor 2 50 

" Level Maxwell, mason work • • • • 3 00 

" Louisa Mitchell, fires, &c. 5 60 

23 62 267 98 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS, Nos. 12 & 21. 

Paid to Catherine S. Adams, for in- 
struction 14 06 

Paid to Sarah I. Morse, for instruction 1 54 21 
" " Lucretia W. Hews, for " 234 36 

■ 402 63 

To Asa Wyman & Son, coal 23 00 

" D. Tiffany, charcoal 1 28 

24 28 

Amounts carried forward, .... $426 91 $16,947 77 



16 

Amounts brought forward, .... $426 91 $16,947 77 

Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To Horatio Davis, for rent $75 00 

" Calvin Bird 18 47 

" Lucretia W. Hews, fires, clean- 
ing, sweeping 13 75 

" Sarah I. Morse, fires, cleaning, 

sweeping 6 49 

" S.Hudson, cleaning 3 50 

" Richardson & Robbins, well curb 6 00 

" " " " carp, work 24 02 

" Caleb Parker, mats, &c 6 02 

" John Mulhearn, digging well ■ • • 9 94 

" John Bowdlear, pump 11 38 

" Charles Marsh, sundries 2 43 

" WilUam G. Shattuck, seats 33 25 

■ 210 25 637 16 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS, Nos. 13 & 15. 

Paid to Jane M. Swain, for instruc- 
tion 234 36 

" " Martha P. Parmelee, for in- 
struction 234 36 



To Asa Wyman & Son, coal 23 00 

" D. Tiffany, charcoal 4 16 

Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To Uriah T. Brownell, glazing 5 09 

" Overseers of Poor, gravel 9 75 

" Bowdlear, for fires and cleaning- 27 16 

" William Seaver, books, &c. 15 89 

" Level Maxwell, mason work • • • • 6 00 

" Lord & Lewis, carpenter's work • 22 27 

" Catherine Sherady, sweeping • • • 5 00 

" Calvin Bird, stove repairs 16 65 

" Alfred Williams, sundries 75 



468 72 



27 16 



108 56 604 44 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS, Nos. 14 & 17. 

Paid to Louisa Newell, for instruc- 
tion 234 36 

Paid to Sarah T. Jennison, for instruc- 
tion 234 36 

468 72 

Paid to Asa Wyman & Son, coal- • • 20 12 

" " Bullard & Carter 5 00 

" « D. Tiffany, charcoal 2 24 

27 36 



Amounts carried forward, ... . . $496 08 $18,189 37 



17 

Amounts brought forward, .... $496 08 $18,189 37 

Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To Hunneman & Co., stoves, &c- • • $57 09 

" Calvin Bird, stove repairs 21 88 

" Sarah T. Jennison, fires, sweep- 
ing, &c 10 00 

" Louisa Newell, fires, sweeping, &c. 11 17 

" C. S. Adams, cleaning 3 75 

" Mrs Ryan, " 6 25 

" Mrs. Anderson, " 5 50 

" S. Edgerly, cleaning clock 2 00 

" E. Taber, " " 1 00 

" Patrick Doland, labor 1 25 

" William White, mason work 6 00 

" B. F. Avres, painting 17 68 

143 57 639 65 

PRIMARY SCHOOL, No. 18. 

Paid to Sophia G. Prentiss, for in- 
struction 50 00 

Paid to Sophia L. Larkin, for instruc- 
tion 159 36 

209 36 

Paid to Bullard & Carter, coal 10 50 

" « D. Tiffany, charcoal 2 88 

13 38 

Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To S. G. Prentiss, sweeping 8 00 

" S. L. Larkin, fires 10 62 

" Enoch P. Davis, fires 5 00 

" R. Stiles & Co., carting 1 00 

" William G. Shattuck, seats 18 90 

" Enoch Nute, sundries 4 08 

4 7 60 270 34 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS, Nos. 19 & 20. 

Paid to Sarah C. Bartman, for in- 
struction 56 25 

Paid to Abby P. Prentiss, for instruc- 
tion- •• • 234 36 

Paid to Sarah E. Gardner, for in- 
struction 1 78 11 

468 72 

Paid to Asa Wyman & Son 23 00 

" " D. Tiffany 5 44 

28 44 

Paid for SUNDRIES— 

Mrs. Roak, fires, sweeping, and clean- 
ing 29 00 

Sarah C. Bartman, books 1 00 

Amounts carried forward, . . $30 00 $497 16 $19,099 36 

3 



18 

Amounts brought forward, . . . $30 00 $497 16 $19,099 36 

Abby P. Prentiss, books 3 79 

Sarah E. Gardner, l \ 72 

William Seaver, sundries 16 42 

Level Maxwell, mason work 6 00 

Lord & Lewis, carpenter's work 59 66 

Josiah Richardson, fence - • 3 50 

120 09 617 25 

PRIMARY SCHOOL, No. 22. 
Paid to Mary A. Hamilton, for in- 
struction 115 62 

" " Mary A. Matthews, for in- 
struction 105 55 

" " Ann M. Wentworth, for in- 
struction • 76 87 

- 298 04 

To Asa Wyman & Son, coal 28 75 28 75 

Paid for SUNDRIES— 

To Calvin Bird, stove repairs, &c. • • • • - 11 89 

" Richardson & Robbins, carpenter's 

work 17 47 

" William G. Shattuck, seats 10 85 

" Samuel Mclntire, fires 10 00 

" Mrs. Kelley, sweeping and clean'g 8 50 

" William J. Reynolds & Co., books 1 50 

" Lewis Grandy, digging well 42 37 

" John Bowdlear, repairing pump • • 4 75 

" True Russell, carp, work on well- • 2 50 

" Geo. B. Davis, glazing 50 

" Rand, Cate & Co., sundries 4 33 

114 66 441 45 

PRIMARY SCHOOL, No. 23. 

Paid to Elizabeth F. Thomas, for in- 
struction 221 86 221 86 

" " Asa Wyman & Son, coal- • ■ 23 00 
" " A. & A. W. Putnam, bark- • 5 50 

28 50 

Paid for SUNDRIES— 

Elizabeth F. Thomas, sweeping, fires, 

and books 20 99 

True Russell, carpenter's work 19 37 

J. H. Josselyn, Jr. & Co., " • • • • 5 68 

William Seaver, sundries 413 

50 17 300 53 

PRIMARY SCHOOL, No. 24. 
Paid to Elizabeth S. Emmons, for in- 
struction 56 25 

" Hannah Hall, for instruction • • • • 163 11 

219 36 



Amount carried forward, $20,677 95 



19 

Amount brought forward, $20,677 95 

PRIMARY SCHOOL, No. 25. 

[Intermediate School included.'] 

Paid to Eliza W. Newbury, for in- 
struction $300 00 

To Mary M. Tappan, for instruction 234 36 

" Susan M. Underwood, " 234 36 

" Georgiana S. Whitney, " 153 23 

$921 95 

" Asa Wyman & Son, coal 34 50 

" Bullard & Carter, " 8 38 

" D. Tiffany 96 

43 84 

Paid for SUNDRIES— 

To True Russell, fence- • 129 25 

" " " seats 350 73 

" " " carpentei-'s work- • 27 38 

" Kittredge & Blakes, clock 8 00 

" R. B. Callender, " 5 00 

" Jonas Pierce, cleaning and fires 50 50 

" S. M. Underwood, books 37 

" Lord & Lewis, seats ; • • 22 97 

" Fitzmaurice & Smith, digging 

well • 50 12 

" John Bowdlear, pump 28 71 

" David Huntington, carp, work- • 4 82 

" Reuben Hunting, sundries 3 80 

" Dodd & Wilson, stove and funnel 41 25 

" John McElroy, carting 1 25 

" Nelson Curtis, mason work 3 00 

" J. P. Brown, hardware 5 00 

" George B. Davis, glazing 1 88 

" Overseers of Poor, gravel 35 24 

769 27 

Paid for MUSIC— 

To Theodore B. Moses, for instruc- 
tion 257 81 

" J. Edgar Gould, for instruction- - 125 80 

383 61 2,118 67 

CONTINGENCIES. 

Paid for PRINTING, STATIONERY, and BOOKS — 

To Joseph G. Torrey, printing report, regula- 
tions, &o. 214 45 

" J. T. Bicknell, books, stationery, &c. 227 59 

" Wm. J. Reynolds & Co., outline maps • • ■ • 38 00 

" C. H. Fay, for stationery 112 

481 16 



Amount earned forward, $23,277 78 



20 

Amount brought forward, $23,277 78 

Paid for SUNDRIES not enumerated — 

To Joshua Seaver, clerk to school committee- • $50 00 

" Horace Bacon, messenger 15 00 

" N. H. Ghnes and other constables, distribut- 
ing reports 16 00 

" William Maccarty, taking births 12 00 

" Horace King, omnibuses 15 00 

" A. R. Mathes, carriage hire 35 00 

" W. J. Mathes, carriage hire 30 22 

" J. E. & G. H. Williams, carriage hire 13 50 

" Alonzo Freeman, carriage hire 11 00 

" Geo. W. Bond, carriage hire 7 94 

" Henry Pratt, repairing locks 9 73 

" Joshua Seaver, postage 4 52 

— 219 91 

For Teachers' salaries, fuel, and contingent for 

schools ■ $23,497. 69 

Transfer to support of poor 161 39 

$23,659 08 
Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $4,758 09. 



NEW SCHOOL HOUSE AND LAND,* 

Vernon street. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $1,456 50 $1,456 50 

EXPENDITURES, 

Paid to William D. Adams, for out-buildings • • 1 45 34 

" " John L. Hanson, for carpenter work • • 68 75 

" " U. T. Brownell, painting 18 75 

" " Kittredge & Blakes, desk, &c. 9 00 

" " Dodd & Wilson, stove, funnel, &c. • • • 55 40 

" " Joseph F. Perry, stove 12 00 

" " James Hendley, balance of contract • • 1,095 00 

Transfer to contingent expenses of schools- • • - 52 26 

$1,456 50 



NEW SCHOOL HOUSE AND WARD ROOM.f 

Ward 8. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848- • • $2,735 00 

Received from Judson Chapin, Treasurer, 150 00 
Transfer from contingent appropriation • • • 248 60 

Amounts carried forward, . . . - — — - $3,133 60 

* The cost of School House, with expenditures of last year, $5,217 74. 
t The cost of this building, including the expenditure of $115 on last year, is 
$3,248 60. 



21 

Amount brought forward, $3,133,60 

EXPENDITURE. 

Paid to William Keith, grading land $137 00 

" " Michael Whyland, wall 64 00 

" " James Hendley, for contract and work 2,932 60 

$3,133 60 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 18-19- -nothing. 



NEW SCHOOL HOUSE AND LAND. 

Smith Street. (Nos. 4 & 26.) 

APPROPRIATION $3,000 00 

Transfer from contingent appropriation- • • 61 70 

$3,061 70 

EXPENDITURE. 

Paid to Joseph Dorr, for land 1,044 00 

" " William A. Crafts, examining title •■• • 13 00 

" " Lord & Lewis, contract and work • • • • 1,780 86 

" " Fitzmaurice & Smith, well and grading 87 62 

" " John Bowdlear, pump, 27 12 

" " William G. Shattuck, seats 7710 

" " Kittredge & Blakes, furniture 32 00 

$3,061 70 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849- -nothing. 



ADDITION TO SCHOOL HOUSE ON MILL DAM. 

(No. 11.) 

APPROPRIATION $600 00 $600 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid to Thacher Sweat, for contract 540 00 

Transfer to Interest on Overdrafts 60 00 

$600 00 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 18-19- -nothing. 



NEW GRAMMAR SCHOOL HOUSE AND LAND. 

(For Central School.) Corner Brewer and Burroughs streets. 

APPROPRIATION $2,000 00 

" additional 8,200 00 

" " (for land) 2,997 00 

Amount carried for ward, .... $13,197 00 



22 

Amount brought forward, ...... $13,197 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid to A. W. & H. A. Folsom, contract $8,880 00 

" " Trustees of Eliot School, for land 2,997 00 

" " C. L. Palmer, graining 95 00 

" " S. Wales, Jr., seats 702 00 

" " Kittredge and Blakes, furniture 103 00 

$12,777 00 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849- -$420 00. 



ROXBURY GRAMMAR SCHOOL. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848, $250 00 

Appropriation 500 00 

EXPENDITURE. 

Paid to Enoch Bartlett, Treasurer 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849- -$125 00. 



$750 00 
$625 00 



ELIOT SCHOOL. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $75 00 

Appropriation 150 00 

Transfer from contingent appropriation 75 00 

EXPENDITURE. 

Paid to Francis C. Head, Treasurer 

Balance undrawn, Feb. 1, 1849- -nothing. 



$300 00 
$300 00 



SUPPORT OF POOR. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $476 17 

Received from Commonwealth 7,316 47 

From which deduct appropriation of 
Dec. 1847, which was to be re- 
funded from this account 5,000 00 2,316 47 

Received earnings of poor on highways 2,900 60 

Received from other towns and cities 149 66 

Appropriation 5,000 00 

Appropriation additional, on account of alien 

paupers, to be reimbursed by Commonwealth 5,000 00 
Appropriation additional 500 00 

Amount carried forward . . . $16,342 9 



23 

Amount brought forward, . . . $16,342 90 

Transfer from fuel account for schools 161 39 

" " pay of firemen 295 75 

" " contingent appropriation of fire 
department 14 97 

$16,815 01 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for GROCERIES USED AT THE ALMS 
HOUSE — 

To Caleb Parker 518 87 

" William Seaver 120 03 

" S. & G. B. Faunce 209 04 

" Reuben Hunting 10 65 

858 59 

Paid for MEAT, FLOUR, BREAD, MEAL, POTA- 
TOES, FISH, BEANS, &c— 

To Joseph L. White, meat- 704 51 

" H. & G. W. Pierce, meat 899 50 

" James McKeon, fish 38 01 

" S. Whitney & Co., fish 42 50 

" James Weld & Co., flour 1,307 75 

" Joseph Houghton, grain and meal 96 7 25 

" H. White, meal 91 59 

" E. G. Scott, bread 103 95 

" Jesse Brown, bread 5 93 

" C. M. Hall, potatoes 45 00 

" Isaac H. Meserve, paid for potatoes 75 75 

" " " " " beans 42 50 

" Thomas G. Morse, beans 15 94 

" Isaac H. Meserve, butter 12 00 

" " " poultry 32 34 

" Eben Stone, milk ' 88 40 

4,472 92 

Paid for CLOTHING, DRY GOODS, SHOES, &c — 

To John S. Williams, dry goods 910 53 

"W. &A. Bacon, " 16 17 

" Field & Gould, " 120 44 

" Lemist & Kellogg, " 86 91 

" Bacon & Atwood, " 39 59 

" Thomas H. Cooper, shoes 35 90 

• 1,209 54 

To Oliver L. Gridley, shoes 21 7 76 

" Charles G. Bird, " 20 62 

" Wm. Mitchell & Co., leather 27 19 

" Nichols & Jacobs, buffalo robes 36 00 

301 57 

Paid for NURSING CHILDREN OUT OF THE HOUSE. 

To Ann Murray 26 00 

" N. White 85 35 

Amounts carried forward, . . . . $111 35 $6,842 62 



24 

Amounts brought forward , Sill 35 $6,842 62 

To Mary McGloan 14 00 

" Isaac H. Meserve, 20 00 



Paid for LIVE STOCK— 

To Isaac H. Meserve, paid for 3 horses 280 00 

" " " " " 1 yoke oxen- • 100 00 

" Manly & Butler, " " 1 horse 35 00 

" John Fussell, " " 1 yoke oxen- • 125 00 

" Daniel Torrey, pigs 70 00 

" Calvin C. Dunbar, pigs 21 32 

" Benj. Meriam, Jr., " 123 59 



Paid for FUEL USED AT ALMS HOUSE— 

To Asa Wyman & Son, wood & coal 734 55 

" A. & A. W. Putnam, wood ■ 79 04 

" George L. Binney, " 31 96 

" J. T. Ellis & Co. " 146 71 

" Bullard & Carter, coal- • ■ 109 60 

" D. Tiffany, charcoal 6 00 



Paid for BLACKSMITH'S AND WHEELWRIGHT'S 

work- 
To Weeks & Brock, blacksmiths 4 58 

" Phineas B. Smith " 149 56 

" Richard Weekes " 13185 

" Leonard Hall, wheelwright 117 

" F. Simpson 80 88 

" Isaac H. Meserve, for plank for dray 30 00 



Paid for FURNITURE, HARDWARE, STOVES, 
REPAIRING, &c— 

To Hunneman & Co., stoves, &c. 34 62 

" S. A. Coburn, furniture, &c. 14 00 

" Calvin Bird, stove rep. 13 11 

" Geo. N. Kent, " " 38 33 

" Charles Marsh, hard ware 6 87 

" J. P. Rrown " S7 76 



145 35 



754 91 



1,107 80 



398 01 



194 69 



Paid for STRAW, HAY, AND GRASS, &c— 

To Henry B. Dana, hay 175 67 

" William B. Kingsbury, hay 101 45 

" Benjamin Meriam " 20 00 

« Thomas J. Cook, " 43 32 

" Com. Forest Hills Cemetery, grass 165 00 

" Thomas J. Orange, straw 52 77 

Amounts carried forward, . . . $558 21 $9,443 47 



25 



Amounts brought forward, . . . . $558 21 

To Lowell Adams, straw 7 08 

" Joel Seaverns, straw 22 22 

" Aaron Cass, straw 29 12 

" Thomas N. Woodward, straw 34 13 

" Jonathan Aver}-, straw 13 28 

Paid for FUEL TO DESTITUTE PERSONS OUT 
OF ALMS HOUSE — 

To Asa Wyman & Son, wood 321 25 

" James B. Page, wood 269 03 

" Preston, Curtis & Co., wood 11 50 

" A. & A. W. Putnam 101 92 

" Tillson Williams 4 75 

" Benj. Farrington 6 00 



$9,443 47 



664 04 



714 45 



Paid for SUPPLIES TO POOR OUT OF ALMS 

house- 
To Moses Gragg, for supplies 48 50 

" George James, for supplies 1 04 

" John Champrey, for supplies 100 

" A. Trowbridge, for supplies 4 68 

" C. Cowing, for supplies 74 10 

" Cyrus S. Cushman, for supplies 30 90 

" Warren Marsh, for supplies 77 43 

" Judson Chapin, for supplies 4 04 

" Henry Basford, for supplies 12 50 

" Geo. Gregerson, for supplies 212 

" Ira Allen, for supplies 60 00 

" B. B. Howe, for supplies 33 20 

" R. Gardner, for supplies 2 00 

" Saml. S. Whitney, for supplies 12 00 

" H. H. Williams, for supplies 3 00 

" Thomas Simmons, for supplies 6 25 

" Isaac H. Meserve, for supplies 40 46 



413 22 



Paid other Towns for SUPPORT OF POOR AND 
LUNATIC HOSPITAL — 

To City of Boston 70 06 

" City of Charlestown 25 50 

" State Lunatic Hospital 709 25 



804 81 



Paid for SUPERINTENDENCE, LABOR, AND 
MEDICAL ATTENDANCE — 

To Isaac H. Meserve, superintendent 600 00 

" " _ " " for extra 

services allowed in ship fever cases 500 00 



Amounts carried forward, 



$1,100 00 $12,039 99 



26 

Amounts brought forward, .... $1,100 00 $12,039 99 

To Richard S. Meserve, services 319 00 

" B. E. Cotting, M.D., physician 100 00 

" " " " " allowance for 

ship fever patients 300 00 

" Mary A. Gay, services 86 59 

" Susan Hooper, services 26 00 

" Miles Sweeney, collecting offal 309 00 

" Ezra Young, labor 230 50 

" Horace B. Swan, labor 346 00 

" B. E. Swain, labor 75 00 

41 James Sherburne, labor 58 42 

" Joshua Chesley, labor 55 50 

" Cyrus Hays, labor 180 06 

" John Merrifield, labor 33 00 

" John H. Kendall, labor 221 71 

" Joseph Virrell, labor 189 20 

" Michael Sweeney, labor 52 25 

" Robert Welch, labor 46 75 

" Stephen Edwards, labor 36 87 

" Sweeney & Welch, labor 29 00 

" Obed Rand, labor 40 00 

" Isaac Curtis, labor 12 00 

" Richardson & Robbins, labor 915 

" Jacob Sherburne, labor ■ 62 00 



Paid for SUNDRIES NOT INCLUDED UNDER 
ANY OF THE FOREGOING HEADS — 

To J. T. Ellis & Co., powder, &c. 237 63 

" John Bowdlear, repairing pump 3 50 

" John Seaver, undertaker • 42 50 

" Joshua Seaver, as Secretary of Board of 

Overseers 40 00 

" J. T. Bicknell & Co., stationery and school 

books 21 30 

'• Frederic S. Whalley, harness • 9 50 

" Samuel Wilson, work 3 33 

" Parker Fowle & Son, painted carpet 49 20 

" Albert Putnam, sand 11 75 

" William J. Mathes 12 00 

" L. R. Herrick, sand 7 00 

" Nathan Watson, harness work 60 01 

" H. J. V. Myers, painting carryall 11 50 

" A. Carruth, repairs on same • 10 09 

" Edward Brown, « 7 25 

A F. A. Heath, lumber 8 15 

" Francis Dana, oil 5 26 

" Geo. B. Davis, glazing • 8 37 

" John McElroy, carting 4 00 

" Geo. Belford, trees • 9 00 



3,918 00 



561 34 



Balance undrawn, $295 68. $16,519 33 



2T 
REPAIRS OF ALMS HOUSE. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $94 18 

Appropriation 300 00 

Transfer from contingent appropriation 325 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To Heath & Allyn, lumber 76 27 

" Hiram Hall, sawing lumber 13 58 

" Geo. B. Davis, glazing 38 24 

" James D. Bullock, mason work 187 

" John Merrifield, carpenter's work 17 25 

" William Jones, materials and labor for 

shed 361 09 

Amount paid for Repairs and Shed 

Transfer to fence round the Alms House, • • • 55 86 

Transfer to Con. Expenses, '48-'49 4 33 



S719 18 



508 30 



60 19 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $150 69. 



$568 49 



FENCE ROUND THE ALMS HOUSE. 

Appropriation $500 00 

Transfer from " Building Pest House " 138 15 

Transfer from " Repairs of Alms House" • • • 55 86 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Moody & Norris, posts and lumber 56587 

" John Merrifield, labor 69 37 

" Phineas B. Smith, iron work 58 77 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1 1849, nothing. 



$694 01 



$694 01 



BUILDING PEST HOUSE. 

(At Alms House.) 
APPROPRIATION 



$500 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

To Ira Allen, materials and labor- • $327 82 
M Warren Marsh, mason-work ••• • 18 28 

" Cornelius Dougherty, stone work 15 75 

" Transfer to " Fence round the Alms House" 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, nothing. 



$361 85 
138 15 



$500 00 



28 



HIGHWAYS AND BRIDGES. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $684 69 

APPROPRIATION 7,000 00 

Transfer from " Side-walks" 1,757 50 

Transfer from " Watch," '48 • 449 42 

Transfer from contingent appropriation, fire 

department • ■ 165 21 

EXPENDITURES. 

Wards 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. 

Paid for LABOR — 

To Overseers of Poor, labor- • • 2,900 60 

" Robert Welch " 252 10 

" Michael Sweeney, " 263 00 

" Fitzmaurice& Smith," 74 67 

" John Dolan, " 14 32 

" Daniel Mahan, " 32 67 

" Stephen Edwards, " 229 98 

" Michael Follen, " 190 75 

" Thomas Craig, " 197 75 

" Roger Kennedy, " 102 67 

" Patrick Gilmore, " 188 50 

" James McGowen, " 96 25 

" James Kennedy, " 59 50 

" Thomas Dorsey, " 190 25 

" Andrew McGettrick, " 199 50 

" James O'Brien, " 174 25 

« Calvin Gilson, " 127 11 

" Dennis Doyle, " 36 59 

" Roger Drury, " 33 00 

" Curtis Gilson, " 6186 

" Hugh McNulty, " 3 00 

" John Hardy, ;t 34 25 

" Patrick Maliens, " 3 00 

" Jon. W. Waldron, " 22 50 

M Edward Roak, " 108 50 

« Edward Kilday, " 74 75 

" William Kelley, " 8 75 

" John McCue, " 58 00 

" William Gibney, « 1 00 

" George McLane, paving 26 90 

" Warren Marsh, " 80 50 

" Moses Gragg, superintendent 250 00 

" Isaac H. Meserve, " 50 00 



$10,056 82 



6,146 47 



For GRAVEL, STONE CHIPS, and CROSSING 
STONES— 

To William S. Heath, gravel 120 80 

" John R. Howard, " •• 82 67 

Amounts carried forward, .... $203 47 $6,146 47 



29 



Amounts brought forward, .... $203 47 

To Nelson Curtis, gravel 39 26 

" Abiel S. Lewis, " 30 40 

" Isaac Wyman, " 52 85 

•' Leonard Hyde, " 15 60 

" Ebenezer Wales, " 59 92 

" Isaac Curtis, " 2187 

" Obed Rand, stone chips 4 25 

" Eben. Dodge, Jr., " 37 20 

11 Benj. Meriam, " 3150 

" George W. Sewall, crossing stones 159 65 

" Patrick Sharkey, bricks 48 00 

For BLACKSMITH'S WORK— 

To Daniel Hays, blacksmith 8 75 

« Richard Weeks, " 100 78 

" Richard Virgin, « 28 77 

" Phineas B. Smith, " 11 84 

" J. W. Cheney, " 19 42 

" James Card, " 48 32 

" Hancky, Stiles & Co., " 18 65 

" Weeks & Brock, " 4 70 

Paid for SUNDRIES NOT OTHERWISE ENUMER- 
ATED— 

To J. T. Ellis & Co., powder, &c. 192 82 

" J. P. Brown, « 38 53 

" Lord and Lewis, work 8 13 

" Richardson & Robbins " 162 

" John Merrifield, " 9 00 

" F. A. Heath, " 5 39 



$6,146 47 



703 97 



241 



255 49 



[Note. — The amount expended in Wards 1, 
2, 3, 4, and 5, is $7,347 16.] 



FOR WARDS 6 AND 7. 



Paid for LABOR — 

To William Cheever, 
" Owen Donnelly, 
" Patrick Leonard, 
" Thomas Feeley, 
" J. D. Hooper, 
u James Abeam, 
" Paul Lincoln, 
" Samuel Champion, 
" John Blackburn, 
° Moses Johnson, 
" Eben. Murray, 



labor $63 48 

" ]7 62 

" 42 18 

" 8 37 

" 17 52 

" 74 90 

" 3 92 

" 3 12 

" 34 93 

« 29 68 

" 16 62 



Amounts carried forward, 



$312 34 $7,347 16 



so 



Amounts brought forward, . . . . $312 34 

To Albert Jenness, labor 20 93 

" George Thurston, " 2 50 

" George Brooman, " 128 24 

" Joseph M. Weld, " 43 12 

" Joseph W. Page, " 62 

" Nathaniel Weld, " • 26 62 

" Samuel Smith, " 18 75 

" Cornelius Kelley, " 39 69 

" Edward Curley, " 1 50 

" George Henry, " 43 62 

" Alexander Garrick, " 15 00 

" George Otis, " 2 00 

" Joseph Lambert, " 6 50 

" Hosea B. Stiles, commissioner and labor- • • 497 87 



For GRAVEL, STONE CHIPS, &c, 

To John J. Low, gravel, 

" Alexander Dickson, gravel 

" John Blackburn, " 

" Robert Seaver, " 

" James Greenough, " 

" Samuel Hills, " 

" Calvin Young, " 

" Elisha James, " 

" Mary May, " 

" George Brown, " 



$7,347 16 



32 


50 


6 


96 


6 


30 


9 


12 


25 


20 


10 


68 


1 


80 


8 


00 


1 


30 


3 


90 



1,159 30 



105 76 



Paid for BLACKSMITH'S and WHEELWRIGHT'S 
WORK — 



To Abner Childs, blacksmith- 
" Alexander Dickson, " 



9 88 
12 35 



22 23 



Paid for BUILDING BRIDGE — 

To Samuel Smith, for building bridge on line 
between Wards 6 and 8 

[Note. — The amount expended in Wards 6 and 
7, is $1,507 39, which includes the expenditure 
of $220 10 for bridge between Wards 6 and 
8 ; one half of which is chargeable to Ward 8. 
There has been expended for sidewalks, $391 25. 
The money expended in repairing the highways 
in Wards 6 and 7, has been laid out as follows : 
Scraping roads, $46 96 ; Walk Hill street, 
220 61; Bourne street, 119 98; Forest Hill 
street, 17 87 ; Green street, 92 46 ; Pond street, 
near Parsons's estate, 93 12; Perkins street, 
26 50 ; Burroughs street, 67 10; Centre street, 



220 10 



Amount carried forward, 



.$8,854 55 



Amount brought forward, .... 

on Plain, 56 20 ; Centre street, near Winches- 
ter's estate, 113 89 ; Eliot street, 17 00 ; South 
street, 42 50 ; Canterbury street, 128 60 ; drain, 
corner of Eliot and Centre streets, 95 75 ; side- 
walks, Green street, 242 50 ; Burroughs street, 
12 00 ; Eliot street, 32 00 ; Pond street, 41 50 ; 
Cottage street, 15 25 ; Centre street, 48 00. — 
Total, $1,529 79.] 

WAKD No. 8. 

Paid for LABOR, GRAVEL, &c — 

To William Keith, labor and paid for labor- • • 

" Michael O'Brien, labor 

" Patrick Walsh, " 

" Samuel Smith, " 

" Daniel Chamberlin, " 

" George Lyndall, " 

" Thomas Gaffey, " 

" Eph'm M. Dudley, " 

" George Hall, " 

" Jacob Wentworth, " 

" JohnT.Whittemore " 

" John Chamberlin, " 

" James Wiggin, " 

" Mason Basto, " 

" Joseph Williams, " 

" Henry L. Goldsmith " 

" Martin Tully, " 

" Borchart Meyer, " 

" Aaron Cass, " 

" George U. Mann, " 

" Hezekiah Hildreth " 

" Otis Gay, _ " 

" Philip Denning, " 

" George Morse, " 

" William McGuire, " 

« Hen. H. Williams, " 

" James Mullen, " 

" Henry Hodges, " 

" Tho's Cunningham, " 

" Ayres & Enslin, " 

" Mich'l Whittemore, " 

" Mich'l Whyland, " 

" Abner Guild, " 

" Thomas J. Orange, " 

" Perry & Marston, gravel 

" Ch's P. Hartshorn, blacksmith 

" Ruggles, Nourse & Mason, 



[Note. The amount expended in Ward 8, is $932 
Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $ 289 39. 



$8,854 55 



315 


23 


10 


00 


74 


06 


30 


00 


57 


87 


10 


00 


6 


25 


2 


50 


25 


81 


65 


07 


15 


00 


12 


50 


5 


62 


13 


00 


14 


25 


4 


50 


23 


75 


11 


50 


1 


00 


83 


04 


5 


31 


1 


25 


9 


37 


13 


12 




62 


2 


75 


2 


50 


1 


00 




88 


9 


26 


1 


50 




42 


3 


00 


3 


12 


80 


06 


15 


CO 


2 


17 




OQO QQ 








$9,787 43 


, is ! 


5932 88.] 



32 



SIDEWALKS. 

Appropriation $2,000 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

To George H. Williams, for labor on drain and 

sidewalk, Green Street 100 00 

" Stephen M. Weld, for labor on drain and 

sidewalk, Green Street 115 83 

" Lewis Grandy, for labor on drain and side- 
walk, Green Street 26 67 

242 50 
Transfer to Highway and Bridges 1,757 50 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, nothing. 



$2,000 00 



2,000 00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $1,164 35 

Appropriation 5,362 00 

" additional, April, '48 300 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid to ENGINEERS — 

To Abraham S. Parker, Chief Engineer $100 00 

" Jerahmeel C. Pratt, assistant engineer 20 00 

" Samuel Felton, " " 5 00 

" Joseph H. Billings, " " 20 00 

" James Kelley, 1st, " " 5 00 

" Alexander Dickson, " " 20 00 

" Samuel S. Chase, assistant engineer and sec- 
retary, 35 00 

" Hiram Hall, " " 15 00 

" Daniel E. Page, " " 15 00 



Paid to FIREMEN — 

To Officers and men of Engine No. 1 

" Officers and men of " No. 2 

" Officers and men of " No. 3 

" Officers and men of " No. 4 

" Officers and men of " No. 5 

" Officers and men of " No. 6 

" Officers and men of " No. 7 



" Officers and men of Hook and Ladder 



414 


50 


475 


00 


263 


00 


339 


00 


144 


00 


582 


50 


575 


00 


300 


00 



5,826 35 



235 00 



3,093 00 



Amount carried forward, 



$3,328 00 



Amount brought forward, $3,328 00 

Paid for SUNDRIES TO SEVERAL COMPANIES, VIZ: — 

ENGINE No. 1. 

To Shelton & Cheever, repairs, &c. $18 38 

E. A. Hovey, repairs, &c. 16 93 

Kendall Brooks, repairs 75 

Wm. Curtis, repairs on house 15 09 

D. S. Eaton, badges and carting 1909 

T. R. W. Humphris, repairing boiler 3 00 

James L. Harrington, painting bouse 15 00 

Geo. B. Davis, glazing 1 00 

Albert Brewer, sundries 14 95 

A. E. Whittemore, blacksmith work 18 25 

H. Basford, sundries 4 24 

Sewall, Day & Co., dray rope 4 83 

John Bowdlear, repairing pump 1400 

Charles Marsh, lamps • 7 65 

Asa Wyman & Son, fuel- • • • 15 00 

Chubbuck & Campbell, repairs 21 84 

Howard & Davis, repairs 21 00 

Jas. D. Brown, mason work 13 50 

E. Robbins, lock 2 25 

Oliver P. Paine, carting hose 287 

F. Dana, oil • 6 00 

E. B. Scott, pump 12 25 

Refreshments for out-of-town companies- •• 20 19 

268 06 



ENGINE No. 2. 

To E. A. Hovey, repairs 3 00 

" W. P. Mercy, carting hose 3. 00 

" C. Coverly & Co., drawing engine 9 49 

" Weeks & Brock, blacksmith's work 1 00 

" L. Freeman, sawing wood 1 25 

" Shelton & Cheever, hose 134 00 

" " " repairs 18 50 

" Hunneman & Co., repairs 56 64 

" D. Dudley, carting hose 1 00 

" Reuben Hunting, oil, &c. 22 36 

" Wm. Seaver, oil 5 8a. 

" Wm. Rumrill & Co., repairs on house 5 20 

" D. M. Brown, carting hose 50 

" Sewall, Day & Co., dray rope 5 83 

" James E. Clark, labor 117 

" Whittemore & Littlefield, glazing 2 00 

" Refreshments for out-of-town companies • • • 6 00 



ENGINE No. 3. 

To Shelton & Cheever, hose 67 00 

" " " repairs 25 00 

" Bullard & Carter, coal- 7 00 



276 77 



Amounts carried forward, $99 00 $3,872 83 

5 



34 

Amounts brougJit forward, . $99 00 $3,872 83 

To Stiles & Co., carting _ 3 25 

" Alexander Dickson, blacksmith work 3 95 

" George James, sundries 9 17 

« Leonard Hyde, Jr., use of horse 9 00 

" Hunneman & Co., repairs 34 00 

" Charles Leroy, repairs on house 19 52 

" J. Tolman, Jr., work 12 24 

" H. Y. & J. Wiggin, painting 9 54 

" Geo. W. Ricker, labor 7 1 7 

" John Fowle, oil 1 60 

" James Davenport, painting engine 35 00 

« J. C. Pratt, repairs 4 00 

« Asa Wyman & Son, fuel 9 25 

" Isaac Carter, mason work- 23 00 

" Robert Seaver, sundries 5 88 

" J. E. & Geo. H. Williams, repairs 8 00 

« William Curtis, " 30 24 

" Filling Reservoir 12 00 



ENGINE No. 4. 

To Alexander Dickson 

" Joseph Seaver, use of horse 

" Stephen Child & Son, fuel 

" Asa Wyman & Son, " 

" John Tolman, Jr., repairs 

" Sewall, Day & Co., dray rope 

" Saunders & Fillebrown, rep. lantern 

" J. E. & G. H. Williams, repairs 

" Robert Seaver & Co., sundries and refresh- 
ments to out-of-town companies 

" Filling Reservoir 

" R. Stiles & Co., carting 



ENGINE No. 5. 

To Hunneman & Co., repairs 

" S. D. Butler, use of horse 

" W. S. Keith, oil- • • • 

" Edward Richards, oil, &c. 

" Hiram Thayer, rep. on house 



ENGINE No. 6. 

To E. R. Wood, repairs 

" Anthony Waldmire, sawing wood 

" James Nason, sundries and refreshments for 

out-of-town companies 

" Charles Marsh, lamps 

" Bullard & Carter, fuel 

" Asa Wyman & Son, " 



3 


00 


1 


00 


1 


75 


9 


25 


14 


79 


4 


87 


4 


00 


8 


05 


40 


39 


12 


00 


2 


75 


1 


75 


1 


00 


1 


35 


4 


60 


8 


42 


46 


63 


1 


25 


62 


52 


3 


64 


7 


00 


15 


00 



335 81 



101 85 



17 12 



Amounts carried forward, . . . . $136 04 $4,327 61 



35 



Amounts brought forward, . . . , $136 04 

To Shelton & Cheever, hose 134 00 

" " " repairs 23 00 

" Hunneman & Co., suction hose 113 42 

" " " repairs 46 32 

" David Dudley, carting hose 5 50 

" W. Trowbridge, " " 3 00 

" John Dove, painting house 17 80 

" Samuel Felton, mason work 4 50 

" F. S. Whalley, repairs 6 00 

" John McElroy, use of horse 11 75 

" Sewall, Day & Co., dray rope 6 00 

ENGINE No. 7. 

To Shelton & Cheever, repairs 18 01 

" Cate & Whittle, repairing pump 2 00 

" James Whittle, rep. pump and clean'g hose 7 35 

"J.B.Page, fuel 3 00 

" Asa Wyman & Son, " 15 00 

" H. Y. & J. Wiggin, painting house 65 94 

" J. C. Pratt, repairs 28 38 

" Pratt & Chubbuck, " 2 50 

" Sam'l D. Rumrill, « 4 00 

" J. J. Caldwell, " 2 00 

" Sanders & Fillebrown, repairing lantern •• • 2 00 

" William Curtis, repairs on house 26 30 

" WiUiam Weymouth, building ladder house 6 85 

" B. C. Evans, ladder 7 50 

" Charles Marsh, lamps 11 25 

" James D. Bullock, mason work 4 50 

" David Dudley, carting hose 100 

" William Seaver, sundries and refreshments 

for out-of-town companies 76 39 

" William Dove, glazing 1 25 

" John Jones, badges 9 50 

" E. R. Wood, repairs 5 55 

" James W. Cobb, cleaning hose 1 00 

" Sewall, Day & Co., dray rope 5 50 

" James Holmes, repairs 1 80 

" Thomas Bowdlear, sawing wood 1 25 

" F. Dana, oil 2 26 

HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY. 

To Hunneman & Co., repairs 6 00 

" William D. Clark, " 57 

" Isaac S. Burrell, " 5 50 

" Nathaniel Adams, " 1 75 

" Charles Marsh, sundries 2 30 

" Henry Basford, " 5 48 

" A. E. Whittemore, blacksmith work 2 25 

" R. H. Wiswall, painting carriage 35 00 

Amount carried forward, 



1,327 61 



507 33 



312 08 



58 85 



$5,206 87 



86 

Amount brought forward, $5,205 87 

Paid for POLICE AT FIRES— 

To Manly O. Butler, attending fires $45 50 

" Luke Jewett, " " 25 50 

" Leonard Haynes " " 20 00 

" Aaron Joy, " " 1 00 

92 00 

Paid for SUNDRIES NOT OTHERWISE ENUMERATED. 

To Jonathan Moulton, filling reservoirs 54 87 

" William D. Clark, lumber ■ 2 00 

" James L. Callender, cleaning snow from 
reservoirs and Hydrants for the sea- 
son 30 00 

'• Lewis Grandy, hay for boxing hydrants- • • 8 30 

" H. W. Farlev, cover to reservoir 1 50 

" D. Safford & Co., water pipe 3 78 

" Geo. S. Goss, watching fire 2 00 

" John A. Foley, cleaning hose and watching 

fire 4 00 

" Eben'r Munsey, carting 6 00 

" H. B. Stiles, rep. well 15 00 

" James L. Callender, cleaning city hose • • • • 5 00 

" J. W. Sweat, " . " • • • • 5 00 

" T. A. Kenniston, hay for boxing hydrants- • 7 97 

" G. W. Bradlee, ringing 6 67 

" G. F. Barnacoat, hydrant pipe 7 00 

" Richard Cochran, watching fire 150 

" J. T. Bicknell & Co., stationery ••• 297 

" Shelton & Cheever, cap 7 00 

" Rand, Cate & Co., refreshment for out-of- 
town companies 5 30 

" Ford & Hobbs, refreshment for out-of-town 

companies 11 33 

" Horace Bacon, messenger 8 00 



TRANSFERS. 

Transfer to " Support of Poor," April, 1848 • • • 310 72 

" " » Highways & Bridges" 165 21 

" " " Contingent App.," '48 and '49- • 14 37 



195 19 



5,493 06 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $842 99. 



490 30 



$5,983 36 



37 



RESERVOIRS. 

Appropriation $2,000 00 

EXPENDITURE. 
Paid to Nelson Curtis, per contract Si, 993 81 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $6 19. 



WATCH. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $1,347 36 

Appropriation 3,700 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for NIGHT WATCH — 

To William Maccarty, Captain of Watch 513 21 

Luke Jewett, watchman 260 85 

John J. Hastings, " 263 23 

Oliver P. Payne, " 203 98 

Geo. R. Matthews, " 262 48 

Timothy Cook, " 92 87 

William D. Cook, " 66 74 

Solomon Sanborn, " 47 25 

Joseph Cracklin, " 21 00 

Manly O. Butler, " 200 11 

Henry J. V. Myers, " 204 62 

Thaddeus Wheeler, " 270 98 

Joseph Hubbard, " 250 73 

Andrew V. Dodge, " -293 72 

Russell Rogers, " 231 98 

Edward Lang, « 32 49 

Loring W. Reed, " 155 86 

Philip L. Bartlett " 167 99 



Paid for SUNDRIES — 

To Calvin Bird, stone work 7 73 

" S. & G. B. Faunce, oil 2 66 

" F. Robinson, buckets 2 25 



,047 36 



3,540 09 



12 64 



Amount expended for Watch 3 552 73 

Transfer to Highways and Bridges 449 92 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849,- • -$1,044 71. 



$4,002 65 



38 



POLICE. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848, $107 57 

Appropriation 300 00 

Transfer from " Discount on Taxes" 200 87 



EXPENDITUKES. 

Paid for POLICE OFFICERS — 

To Leonard Haynes 222 50 

" Manly O. Butler 136 24 

" William Maccarty 21 25 

" Aaron Joy 21 87 

" Nathan H. Glines 21 25 

" Samuel S. Littlefield • 20 00 

" Luke Jewett 20 00 

" Wm. D. Cook 32 50 

Amount expended for Police 495 61 

Transfer to " Contingent App. '48 and '49" 10 07 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $102 76. 



OIL AND LIGHTING LAMPS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $229 32 

Appropriation 1,100 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for OIL — 

To George A. Simmons 46 29 

" John H. Griggs 304 88 

" Kinsley Bullock 103 50 

" To Sturtevant, Edwards & Co., oil 42 68 



Paid for LIGHTING LAMPS — 

To George R. Matthews, lighting lamps, 26 62 

" Russell Rogers, " ' " 224 57 

" Jonathan Moulton, " " 90 19 

" Oliver P. Paine, carting 75 



44 



)5 68 



,329 32 



497 35 



342 13 



Amount expended $839 48 

Transfer to " Contingent Expenses, '4 7 and '48 " 13091 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $358 93 



$970 39 



39 



REPAIRS OF LAMPS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $151 72 

Appropriation 100 00 

8251 72 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for REPAIRS— 

To Calvin Bird 25 38 

" Geo. B, Davis 21 40 

" J. J. Caldwell 9 00 

" Caldwell and Hardacre 3 00 

" Weeks & Brock 75 

Transfer to " Contingent appropriation, '48 and 

'49" 141 02 

$200 55 

Balance undrawn, $51 17. 



GUIDE BOARDS AND POSTS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $51 98 

Appropriation 100 00 

$151 98 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for SUNDRIES— 

To James Davenport, painting guide-boards • • • 8 00 

Transfer to Contingent Appropriation 51 98 

$59 98 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $92 00. 



COUNTY TAX. 

Appropriation, $3,570 04 

EXPENDITURE. 

Paid to John Bullard, Treasurer Norfolk County $3,570 04 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, nothing. 



MILITARY SERVICES. 

Amount received from Treasurer of the Commonwealth- • $477 50 

Amount carried forward. 



40 

Amount brought forward, $477 50 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid to Norfolk Guards $247 00 

" Roxbury Artillery 230 50 

$477 50 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, nothing. 



DISCOUNT ON TAXES. 

Appropriation $2,700 00 

DISCOUNT. 

To Discount on Taxes prior to October 1 $2,499 13 

" Transfer to Police 200 87 

— $2,700 00 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, nothing. 



ABATEMENTS OF TAXES. 

Appropriation $1,500 00 

EXPENDITURE. 

Abatements allowed by Assessors $1,497 66 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $2 34. 



SALARIES OF CITY OFFICERS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $987 50 

Appropriation 3,530 00 

$4,517 50 

EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for SALARIES— 

To Henry A. S. Dearborn, Mayor 600 00 

" Joseph W. Tucker, City Clerk 500 00 

" Joseph W. Dudley, Treasurer & Collector- 1,100 00 

" Joshua Seaver, Clerk Com. Council 150 00 

" Horace Bacon, City Messenger 275 00 

" Thomas Adams, City Marshal* 350 00 

Amount carried forward, .... $2,975 00 

* The City Marshal's pay is for 1 year and 9 months ; the amount in last 
year's report was his pay for the year previous. 



41 

Amount brought forward, . . . $2,'975 00 

To Abraham F. Howe, Assessor 175 00 

" Joshua Seaver " 1 75 00 

" John Fowle " 125 00 

" Michael Whittemore, Jr. " - - 50 00 

" J. Seaver, Clerk to Assessors • • 75 00" 

" Josiah Richardson, Assistant Assessor- • • • • 10 00 

" Gera Farnham, " " 10 00 

" John L. Hanson, " " 10 00 

" Jona. P. Robinson " " 10 00 

" Aaron D. Williams, " " 10 00 

" John E. Williams, " " 10 00 

" Charles S. Hersey, " " 10 00 

"Judson Chapin, " « 10 00 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $862 50. 



$3,655 00 



WATCH HOUSE AND COMMITTEE ROOMS. 

APPROPRIATION by Transfers from " Contingent Ap- 
propriation " $1,406 49 

EXPENDITURES. 

To Nelson Carter, contract $749 00 

" " " additional contract 533 00 

" " " extra work 9S 49 

" Charles G. Hall, plans and specifications- • • 26 00 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, nothing. 



CITY DEBT AND INTEREST. 

Appropriation $7,874 11 

Transfer from " Contingent Appropriation,"- • 500 00 
Loan 8,000 00 



1,406 49 



$16,374 11 



EXPENDITURES. 

To People's Bank, for principal and interest • • 8,620 00 
" Suffolk Savings' Institution, principal and 

interest 2,826 66 

" The Estate of John Parker 120 00 

" Tillson Williams, principal and interest- •• • 2,120 00 '■ 

" Howard S. Williams, interest 120 00 

" Boston Provident Institution for Savings,- 

principal and interest 1,575 00 

Amount carried forward, . . . .$15,381 66 

6 



42 



Amount brought forward, ... . $15,381 66 

To Boston Provident Institution for Savings, 

interest on note $2,276 05 a 4 1-2 102 45 

" Isaac Davis, interest 120 00 

« John C. Warren, interest 180 00 

" James Parker, interest 440 00 

" Nineteenth Annual Payment on Alms-house 

Land 150 00 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, nothing. 



INTEREST ON OVERDRAFTS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848 $128 59 

Appropriation • • 350 00 

Transfer from " School House on Mill Dam,"- 60 00 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid interest to People's Bank 391 09 

" " James Hendley 15 50 

Transfer to " Contingent Appropriation," 1847 

and 1848 • 124 85 

Transfer to " Contingent Appropriation," 1848 

and 1849 3 74 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $3 41. 



$16,374 11 



$538 59 



$535 18 



GENERAL CONTINGENT EXPENSES, AND MISCEL- 
LANEOUS CLAIMS. 

Balance undrawn Feb. 1 , 1848 $651 07 

Sundry Transfers, 1st May, 1848 84 49 

Appropriation 3,000 00 

Received from E. A. Hovey, land in 

Dudley Street $15 06 

" " David Hall, land in 

Dudley Street 4 68 

M " John F. Davis, land in 

Dudley Street 20 75 

14 " George Dove, land in 

Warren Street 50 00 

90 49 

" " Obed Rand, for lamp 90 

M " Lincoln Fearing, rent of land ad- 
joining Chemical Works 20 00 

" " Commonwealth, for city propor- 
tion of School Fund 469 48 

Amount carried forward, . . . . . $4,316 43 



43 

Amount brought forward, .... $4,316 43 

Received from A. & A. W. Putnam, 

rent of City Wharf- $200 00 
" " Geo. B. Davis, rent of 

house 200 00 

" " H. & G. W. Pierce, rent 

of market 150 00 

" " Andr'w W. Newman, in- 
come from Hay Scales 113 89 
" " Robert Seaver, income 

from Hay Scales • ■ • • 88 76 

752 65 

" " Licenses for Dogs 470 00 

" " License to Thomas Dillon, (Ped- 
lar's license) 16 00 

u " Town of Brookline, for its propor- 
tion of County Tax on part of 
territory annexed to it from 

Roxbury 30 75 

" " J. T. Bicknell, books 2 80 

" " Joseph W. Tucker, rent City Hall 15 00 

" " Overplus in casting taxes 1,495 57 

" " Transfer from " Oil and Lighting 

Lamps" 130 91 

" " Trans, from " Repairs of Lamps " 14102 
" " Transfer from "Interests on Over- 
drafts" 124 85 



EXPENDITURES. 

Paid for PRINTING, ADVERTISING, 
STATIONERY, AND BOOKS — 

To Joseph G. Torrey, printing $712 26 

" Eayrs & Fairbanks, stationery- • • • 
" Aaron R. Gay, " • • • • 

" Jas. T. Bicknell & Co., " 
" Dutton & Wentworth, advertising 

« E. L. Keyes, " 

" John Jones, " • • • • 

" Morey & Ewer, " 



Paid for NOTIFYING AND ATTENDING 
MEETINGS, &c — 

To James Kelley, 1st, notifying and at- 
tending meetings 13 00 

" Manly O. Butler, notifying and at- 
tending meetings 36 75 

" Luke Jewett, notifying and attend- 
ing meetings 35 12 

" Leonard Haynes, notifying and at- 
tending: meetings 20 50 



18 


25 


99 


82 


38 


12 


6 


75 


61 


50 


15 


00 


6 


50 



958 20 



$7,495 98 



Amounts carried forward, . . $105 37 $958 20 



44 



Amounts brought forward, . . $105 37 $958 20 

To Ira Allen, notifying and attending 

meetings ■ 17 00 

" N. H. Glines, notifying and attend- 
ing meetings 14 00 

" Benj. Guild, notifying and attend- 
ing meetings • • • 21 75 

" John H. Davis, notifying and at- 
tending meetings 14 00 

" William Maccarty, notifying and 

attending meetings 10 00 

" William D. Cook, notifying and 

attending meetings 7 00 

" William Maccarty, census of births 31 05 

" Jamaica Plain Baptist Soc, use of 
vestry, ward meetings for two 
years, Ward 6 25 00 

" Freewill Bap. Soc, use of vestry 

for Ward 2 9 00 

" Read & Bronson, ag'ts, use of Oc- 
tagon Hall for Ward 4 20 00 

" George W. Humphrey, sundries* • 4 50 

" H. O. Whittemore, " • • 6 00 



Paid for PROFESSIONAL SERVICES— 

To John J. Clarke, examining titles, &c. 47 50 
" Francis Hilliard, counsel in case of 
Commonwealth vs Hayes, and 
Town of Somerset vs City of Rox- 

bury 203 97 

" Battelle & Williams, (Somerset vs 

Roxbury) 120 81 

" Isaac H. Meserve, paid for expenses 

of witnesses attending the same- • 37 20 
" Wm. A. Crafts, examining titles- • 4 00 
" Thomas Adams, serving orders of 

notice from General Court 47 48 



Paid for INSURANCE— 

To Norfolk Mutual Fire Ins. Co.- • • • 70 00 

" Roxbury Mutual Fire Ins. Co.- • • 108 00 

" National Ins. Co. • • • • • 3 75 



Paid for LAND FOR WIDENING 
STREETS, &c— 

To Otis Shepherd, land to widen Short 

Street 87 50 

" AndreAv Cole, land to widen Short 

Street 262 50 



284 67 



460 96 



181 75 



Amounts carried forward, . . $350 00 $1,885 58 



45 

Amounts brought forward, . . $350 00 $1,885 58 

To Sarah and Mary Cummins, land to 

widen Short Street 10 75 

" Gera Farnham, removing wall- • • • 3 75 

" Obed Rand, removing buildings 
corner of Warren and Dudley 

Sts., to widen same 55 00 

419 50 



Paid for SUNDRIES, FOR CLAIMS NOT 
OTHERWISE ENUMERATED— 

To Thomas Adams, for settlement with 
Bradford Smith, for injuries to his 

horse in Poplar street 130 00 

" Thomas Adams, paid for burying 

dogs 19 50 

" Patrick Glynn, for damages 50 00 

" Horace King, for omnibuses for use 
of city council, to attend funeral 

of John Q. Adams, at Quincy- • • 40 00 

" Wm. G. Eaton, for crape 10 00 

" Geo. H. French, bill 36 75 

" H. A. S. Dearborn, authorized by 
board of aldermen for private 

police, to detect incendiaries- • • • 247 00 

" Henry H. Williams, oil, City Hall 65 09 

" Stephen Smith, furniture • ■ 10 50 

" Calvin Bird, stone work 38 29 

" John Kelley, for repairs 15 66 

" Horatio Boyden, charcoal 4 00 

" Charles Marsh, hardware 15 12 

" Joseph W. Tucker, registering 

births 82 02 

" Weeks & Brock, repairs on town 

pump 4 85 

" Charles G. Hall, examination of 

county buildings 12 00 

" Chas. Whitney, surveying streets 192 81 

" Enos Foord, recording deeds • • • • 2 29 

" Hunneman & Co., stone work- • • • 2 00 

" Kittredge & Blakes, furniture- • • • 4 25 

" John Seaver, returns of burials •• 19 90 
" Henry Robinson, cleaning rooms, 

fires, City Hall 33 60 

" First Religious Society, rent of 

hearse house 10 00 

" Horace Bacon, sundries furnished 20 60 
" John Doggett & Co., carpet, alder- 
men's room 53 31 

" Benj. H. Burrell, for powder, and 

firing national salute, 4th July • • 75 00 

" Wm. J. Mathes, stabling 12 73 



Amounts carried forward, . $1,213 27 $2,305 08 



46 

Amounts brought forward, . $1,213 27 $2,305 08 

To Cobb & Rich, for injuries of horse 

near Washington street 40 00 

" Ebenezer Pratt, painted carpet- • • 1 50 

" Asa Wyinan & Son, coal, City Hall 35 94 

" Nathan Haynes, for burying dogs 2 00 

" Joshua Seaver, postage 12 25 

" Silas Smith, charcoal 567 

" John Collaniore & Co., glass ware 187 

" Nathaniel Adams, repairs 75 

" H. B. Stiles, repairs on Hay Scales, 

Jamiaca Plain 9 25 

" Stephens & Perkins, repairs on 

Hay Scales, Jamaica Plain 91 29 

" George Curtis, blinds, Aldermen's 

room 31 49 

" Apollos Morris, survey of street • • 11 25 
" P. P. F. Degrand, commissions in 

negotiating loan 123 50 

" Isaac Curtis, stove 14 00 

" John McElroy, carting 25 

" Warren Marsh, mason work 1 00 

" A. R. Mathes, carriage hire 3 50 

" J. W. Blanchard, furniture 7 00 

" George B. Davis, painting 4 75 

1,610 53 

Total Am't for Con'gt Exp's and Mis. Claims $3,915 61 

TRANSFERS. 

To Watch House and Committee 

rooms 1,406 49 

" Building Shed at Alms House- • • 325 00 
" School "House and Ward room, 

Ward 8 : 248 60 

" School House, Smith street 61 70 

" Eliot School, rent of 75 00 

" City Debt and Interest 500 00 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1849, $963 58. 



2,616 79 
$6,532 40 



47 



TABLE 

OF APPROPRIATIONS,* EXPENDITURES, TRANSFERS, 
AND BALANCES. 

1848. 



Appropriations. 



For public Schools, including 

Salaries of Teachers, Fuel, 

and Contingent Expenses, 
School House and Land, Ver 

non street, 

School House & Ward Room, 

Ward 8, 

School House, Smith street, 

and Land, 

Repairs, School House, Mill 

Dam, 

Grammar School House and 

Land for Central School, 

Jamaica Plain, 

Roxbury Grammar School, . . 

Rent, Eliot School, 

Support of Poor, including 

earnings on Highways,.... 
Repairs of Alms House, and 

building Shed 

Fence round the Alms House 

Land, 

Pest House, 

Highways and Bridges, 

Sidewalks, 

Fire Department, 

Reservoirs, 

Watch, 

Police, 

Oil and Lighting Lamps, .... 

Repairs of Lamps, 

Guide-boards and Posts, 

County Tax, 

Military Services, 

Discount on Taxes, 

Overdrafts and Interest, 

Pay of City Officers, 

Watch House and Committee 

Rooms, 

Abatements of Taxes, 

City Debt and Interest, 

Gen'l Contingent Expenses, . 



Appropri'd. 


#28,417 17 


1,456 50 


3,133 60 


3,061 70 


600 00 


13,197 00 


750 00 


300 00 


16,815 01 


719 18 


694 01 


500 00 


10,056 82 


2,000 00 


6,826 35 


2,000 00 


5,047 36 


608 44 


1,329 32 


251 72 


151 98 


3,570 04 


477 50 


2,700 00 


538 59 


4,517 50 


1,406 49 


1,500 00 


16,374 11 


7,495 98 


#136,496 37 



Expended. 



#23,497 69 

1,404 24 

3,133 60 

3,061 70 

540 00 



12,777 00 
625 00 
300 00 

-j-16,519 33 

508 30 

694 01 

361 85 
9,787 43 

242 50 
5,493 06 
1.993 81 
3,552 73 

495 61 

839 48 

59 53 

8 00 

3,570 04 

477 50 
2,499 13 

406 59 
3,655 00 

1,406 49 

1,497 66 

16,374 11 

3,915 61 



Transfers. 



#161 39 
52 26 



60 00 



60 19 



138 15 

1,757 50 
490 30 

449 92 

10 07 

130 91 

141 02 

51 98 



200 87 
128 59 



2,616 79 



3,449 94 



Balances. 



#4,758 09 



420 00 
125 00 



295 68 
150 69 

269 39 

842 99 

6 19 

1,044 71 

102 76 

358 93 

51 17 

92 00 



3 41 

862 50 



2 34 

963 58 



#10,349 43 



* Including the undrawn balances, Feb. 1, 1848. 

t The actual expense is #2,900 60 less than the amount here given. This 
amount (#2,900 6'J) is the earnings of the poor on the highways. 

Note.— It will be observed that the balance here is represented as #10,349 43, 
which is more than there is in the Treasury by #5,000 00 ; and is accounted for 
by the Treasurer's not borrowing the sums authorized,— the same not having 
been wanted. 



48 



AMOUNT OF CITY DEBT. 



Date of Note. 



Oct. 1, 
Jan. 1, 
Dec. 3, 
Nov. 1, 
Oct. 27, 
Nov. 8, 
Nov. 27, 
Nov. 28, 
Dec. 15, 
Jan 26, 
Jan. 29, 
Jan. 30, 
Jan. 31, 



1840 
1846 
1817 
1847 
1848 
1848 
1848 
1848 
1848 
1849 
1849 
1849 
1849 



Feb. 1, 1849 
Feb. 2, 1849 
Feb. 2, 1849 
Feb. 6, 1849 
Feb. 17, 1849 



To Whom Payable. 



Isaac Davis, 

Provident Institution for 

Savings, Boston, 
Estate of John Parker, 
James Parker, 
John C. Warren, 
Howard S. Williams, 
John H. Foster, 
P. P. F. Degrand, 
P. P. F. Degrand, 
Charles Davis, 
Stephen Hersey, 
Richard Pickett, 
Mary Brown, 
Ebenezer Upton, 
Inst, for Savings, New- 

buryport and vicinity, 
Abigail Brown, 
P. P. F. Degrand, 
P. P. F. Degrand, 
People's Bank, 
Francis C. Head, Treas'r, 



Interest. 


When Payable. 


Amount. 


per cent. 








6 


On demand. 


#2,000 00 


*1 


Jan. 1, 


1851, 


2,276 65 


6 


Oct 1, 


1849, 


2,000 00 


5h 


Jan. 1, 


1850, 


8,000 00 


6 


Oct. 1, 


1849, 


3,000 00 


6 


Nov. 1, 


1849, 


2,000 00 


6 


Oct. 27, 


1831, 


2,500 00 


6 


Nov. 8, 


1853, 


2,000 00 


6 


Nov. 27 


1853, 


700 00 


6 


Nov. 28 


1853. 


500 00 


6 


Dec. 15 


1853, 


500 00 


6 


Jan. 26, 


1854, 


2,000 00 


6 


Jan. 29, 


1854, 


700 00 


6 


Jan. 33, 


1853, 


1,000 00 


6 


Jan. 31, 


1854, 


5,000 00 


6 


Feb. 1, 


1852, 


500 00 


6 


Feb. 2, 


1852, 


300 00 


6 


Feb. 2, 


1854, 


500 00 


6 


May 6, 


1849, 


1,500 00 


6 


Oct. 1, 


1819, 


2,997 00 




#39,973-65 



49 



AMOUNT OF DEBT,* 

FOR FOREST HILLS CEMETERY. 



Date of Note. 


To Whom Payable. 


Interest. 


When Payable. 


Amount. 


Mar. 28, 1848, 
Aug. 12, 1848, 


Joel Seaverns, 
John Parkinson, 


per cent. 
6 
6 


Aug. 1, 1857, 
July 1, 1854, 


519,944 98 
7,606 57 




527,551 55 



* The Debt of the Cemetery is kept separately from the ordinary City Debt, 
and provision is made for the payment of the same by the proceedsof the sales 
of lots in the grounds, as will be seen by the following section from the Act 
obtained from the Legislature : — 

Sect. 4. " The proceeds of sales of lots, or rights of burial in said Cemetery, 
shall be paid into the City Treasury, to be kept separate from any other funds of 
the city, and subject to the order of said Commissioners, and such proceeds shall 
be devoted to the liquidation of the debt incurred in the purchase of the land 
for said Cemetery, and to the improvement and embellishment thereof, as afore- 
said, under the direction of said Board of Commissioners. And no other monies 
shall be appropriated from the City Treasury by the City Council, for such im- 
provement and embellishment." 



ACCOUNT 



JOSEPH f . DOLEY, CITY TREASURER 



FEBRUARY 1, 1848, TO FEBRUARY 1, 1849. 



52 



Dr. 



Joseph W. Dudley, City Treasurer, in Account Current, from 



1849. 
Feb. 1, 



To Balance in Treasury at last audit, 

Cash received of E. A. Hovey for land, Dudley st. $15 06 
" " of David Hall, " " " " 4 68 

" « of J. F. Davis, " " " " 20 75 

" " of Geo. Dove, " " Warren " 50 00 



" " of Commonwealth for support of pau 

pers, i 

" "of Obed Rand for repair of Lamp, 

" " of Judson Chapin to build School House 

and Ward Room, Ward 8, 

" " of Lincoln Fearing for rent of Land,.... 

" borrowed of People's Bank, 

Amount of appropriations raised by tax, .... 76,028 11 

" of County tax, 3,570 04 

" of overplus in casting taxes, 1,495 57 



Cash received from the Commonwealth from School 
Fund, 

" "of the town of Scituate for sup- 
port of poor, 6 29 

" " of Thos. McDonough for board 

of child, 6 0C 

" " of the town of Brookline for 

support of poor, 137 37 



Loan 



of John H.Foster, 2,500 00 

of P. P. F. Degrand, 3,500 00 

of Charles Davis 500 00 

of Stephen Hersey, 500 00 

of Richard Pickett, 2,000 00 

of Mary E. Brown 700 00 

ofEben Upton, 1,000 00 

of Institution for Savings, Newburyport 

and vicinity, 5,000 00 

of Abigail Brown, 500 00 

of People's Bank, 1,500 00 



" Cash received of A. & A. W. Putnam for rent 

of wharf 200 0C 

" " " of George B. Davis for rent of 

house, 200 00 

" " " of H. & G. W. Pierce for rent 

of market house, 150 00 

" " " of Andrew W. Newman for in- 
come from hay scales, 113 89 

" " " of Robert Seaver for income 

from hay scales, 88 76 

" " " for dog licenses, 470 00 



of Commonwealth for pay of militia, 

of Thomas Dillon for license, 

of town of Brookline for county tax, . • 

of J. T. Bicknell for books, 

of Joseph W. Tucker for rent of hall, . . 



3,093 41 



90 49 



7,316 47 
90 

150 00 

20 00 

4,500 00 



81,093 72 
469 48 

149 66 



17,700 00 



1,222 65 

477 50 

16 00 

30 75 

2 80 

15 00 



#119,348 83 



Roxbury, Feb. 17, 1849. 



53 



February 1, 1848, to February 1, 1849, with the City or Roxbury, © r . 



1849. 
Feb. 1 



By Cash paid School Teachers' Salaries, #17 ',445 67 

" " " Contingent Expenses of Schools,.. 5,314 42 

" " " Fuel for Schools, 737 60 

" " " New School House, Vernon street, 1,404 24 

" " " " " " Ward 8, 3,133 60 

" " " " " " Smith street,.. 3,061 70 
" " " " Brick School House, Jamaica 
Plain, not including note for 

land,.... 9,780 00 

" " " Addition to School House, Mill 

Dam, 540 00 

" " " Rent of Eliot School, 300 00 

" " " Roxbury Grammar School, 625 00 



Watch, 3,552 73 

Police, 495 61 

Watch House, 1,406 49 



" Support of poor, in addition to earn- 
ings on the highways, 13,618 73 

" Conting't expense of Alms House, 

including building a shed, ....... 508 30 

" Fence round the land of the Alms 

House lot, 694 01 

" Building Pest House, 36185 



Pay of Firemen, 3,328 00 

Contingent expenses of Fire De- 
partment, . 2,165 06 



Oil and lighting Lamps, 839 48 

Repairs of Lamps, 59 53 



Guide Boards, 

Reservoirs, 

Repairs of highways in Wards 1, 2, 

3, 4, and 5, 7,347 16 

Repairs of highways in Wards 

6 and 7, 1,287 29 

Repairs of highways in Ward 8, . . . 932 88 
Building Bridge betw. W'ds 6 and 8, 220 10 
Repairs of Sidewalks, W'ds 6 and 7, 242 50 



City Debt and Interest, 

Interest on overdrafts, 

Salaries of City Officers, 

Militia, 

County Tax, 

Abatement of Taxes, 

Discounts on Taxes paid prior to Oct. 1, 
Contingent expenses 



Balance in the Treasury, 



#42,342 23 



5,454 83 



15,182 89 



5,493 06 



899 01 

8 00 
1,993 81 



10,029 93 

16,374 11 
406 59 
3,655 00 
477 50 
3,570 04 
1,497 66 
2,499 13 
3,915 61 



113,799 40 
5,549 43 



#119,348 83 



JOSEPH W. DUDLEY, City Treasurer. 



CITY OF ROXBURY, Feb. 19, 1849. 

The undersigned, Joint Standing Committee on Accounts, in pursuance of 
the provisions of the eighth section of the Ordinance entitled "An Ordinance 
establishing a System of Accountability in the expenditures of the City," 
requiring them "to audit the account of the City Treasurer at the close of each 
Municipal year, and as much oftener as they may deem expedient," — hereby 
certify that we have examined and audited the within account of Joseph W. 
Dudley, City Treasurer, and find the same correctly cast, and all payments 
and expenditures therein charged against the City, are sustained by necessary 
vouchers. 

"We find that there has been received into the Treasury at sundry times 
within the year ending January 31, 1849, including the balance on hand Feb- 
uary 1, 1848, the sum of One hundred and nineteen thousand three hundred 
ana forty-eight dollars and eighty-three cents : and that there has been paid out 
from the Treasury during the same period, the sum of One hundred and thirteen 
thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine dollars and forty cents, leaving in the 
Treasury, January 31, 1849, a balance of Five thousand Jive hundred and forty- 
nine dollars and forty-three cents. 



Committee 



WM. B. KINGSBURY, "} 

RICHARD WARD, 

JOSEPH N. BREWER, I on 

STEPHEN M. ALLEN, , 

Accounts. 

DANIEL JACKSON, J 



In Common Council, Feb. 19, 1849. 
Read, accepted, and sent up for concurrence. 

JOSHUA SEAVER, Clerk. 

In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 19, 1849. 
Concurred. 

JOSEPH W. TUCKER, City Clerk. 



y 



55 



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5 03 



CITY OF ROXBURY, Feb. 19, 1849. 

The undersigned, Joint Standing Committee on Accounts, in pursuance of 
the eighth section of the Ordinance entitled " An Ordinance establishing a Sys- 
tem of Accountability in the expenditures of the City," requiring them " to audit 
the account of the City Treasurer at the close of each Municipal year, and as 
much oftener as they may deem expedient," hereby certify that we have exam- 
ined and audited the within account of Joseph W. Dudley, City Treasurer, 
in account with Forest Hills Cemetery, and find the same correctly cast, and all 
payments and expenditures therein charged against the Cemetery, are sustained 
by the necessary vouchers. 

We find that there has been received into the Treasury on account of the 
Cemetery, at sundry times within the year ending January 31, 1849, the sum of 
Ten thousand nine hundred and eight dollars and nine cents : and there has been 
paid out from the Treasury, during the same period, on the orders of the Com- 
missioners, the sum of Ten thousand seven hundred and ninety-one dollars and 
forty cents, leaving a balance in the Treasury, January 31, 1849, of One hundred 
and sixteen dollars and sixty-nine cents. 



WM. B. KINGSBURY, "] 
RICHARD WARD, 
JOSEPH N. BREWER, 
STEPHEN M. ALLEN, 
DANIEL JACKSON, 



Committee 

on 
Accounts. 



In Common Council, Feb. 19, 1849. 
Read and accepted. Sent up for concurrence. 

JOSHUA SEAVER, Clerk. 

In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 19, 1849. 
Concurred. 

JOSEPH W. TUCKER, City Clerk. 



REAL ESTATE OWNED BY THE CITY. 



The City Hall (of brick) and land $12,000 00 

The Alms House (of brick) and land— about 11 acres 30,000 00 

The Munroe Farm, about 22 acres, between Warren and Walnut 

streets 35,000 CO 

The City Wharf at Point 8,000 00 

The Flats, 72 acres 1 quarter, in the dry basin, not valued 

Dwelling house and land on Washington street 2,500 00 

Land on Green street, 5,000 feet 300 00 

Land on Warren place, 28,341 feet 5,300 00 

Land on Washington street, near " Wait's Mill " 300 00 

Dudley School House (of stone) and land, Kenilworth street ■.* q™ qq 

Dudley School House (of brick) and land, Bartlett street 

Washington School House (of brick) and land, Washington street. 14,000 00 
Westerly School House (of wood) and land, West Roxbury, Centre 

street 4,000 00 

Central School House (of brick) and land, corner Brewer and Bur- 
roughs streets 14,000 00 

School House and land on Summer street, occupied by Primary 

Schools land 2 1,000 00 

School House, Centre street, Nos. 3 & 16 1,400 00 

School House and land, Smith street, Nos. 4 & 26 3,000 00 

School House and land, Centre street, No. 5 800 00 

School House and land, Upper Canterbury, No. 7 200 00 

School House and land, West Roxbury, No. 8 4,000 00 

School House, Lower Canterbury, No. 9 — no land 200 00 

School House, near Grove Hall, No. 10 — no land 500 00 

School House, Mill Dam, No. 11— no land 600 00 

School House and land, Oxford street, Nos. 13 & 15 2,600 00 

School House and land, Yeoman street, Nos. 14 & 17 2,600 00 

School House and land, near toll-gate, No. 18 1,000 00 

School House and land, Orange street, Nos. 19 & 20 2,600 00 

School House and land, Eustis street, No. 21 4,000 00 

School House and land, Elm street, No. 22 3,000 00 

School House and land, Edinboro' street. No. 23 3,000 00 

School House and land, Vernon street, No 25 5,000 00 

Engine House and land, No. 1 Dudley street 1,000 00 

Engine House and land, No. 2 Centre street 800 00 

Engine House and land, No. 3 Centre, near Perkins street, con- 
nected with No. 5 Primary School — valued in School No. 5 ... . 

Engine House (brick) and land, No. 4 Centre street, Jamaica Plain 1,500 00 

Engine House (no land), No. 5 Centre street, West Roxbury 500 00 

Engine House, No. 6 Eustis street 800 00 

Engine House (no land), No. 7 Ruggles street 500 00 

Forest Hills Cemetery — not valued 

Burial Ground on Eustis street — not valued 

Burial Ground on Warren street — not valued 

Burial Ground on Walter street, Ward 8 — not valued 

Burial Ground on Centre street, Ward 8 — not valued 



[Note. — The City Lands in the dry basin of the Boston and Rox- 
bury Mill Corporation were not valued by the Committee on 
Public Property. There are 72 acres and 1 quarter. The 
valuation of the Real Estate belonging to the City is a nominal 
one. In nearly every case it is believed the property is valued 
far below its real worth.] 

8 



$180,000 00 



58 



PERSONAL PROPERTY BELONGING TO THE CITY.* 

The Furniture in the City Hall — Mayor and Aldermen's Room, Common Coun- 
cil Room, City Clerk's, and City Treasurer's offices. In the several School 
Houses and Watch Houses. 

In charge of the Chief Engineer — 

8 Fire Engines, 

9 Hose Carriages, 

208 Feet of Leading Hose, 
4,200 Feet of Suction Hose, 
1 Ladder Carriage, 
18 Ladders, 
10 Fire Hooks, 
52 Buckets, 

Axes and other apparatus and furniture, 
22 Reservoirs, 
6 Hydrants, on Mount Warren. 

In charge of the Superintendent of the Alms House — 

Stock and Utensils. 

6 Horses, 

1 Yoke of Oxen, 

39 Hogs, 
3 Cows, 

3 Horse and Ox Wagons and Harnesses, 
5 Horse and Ox Carts and Harnesses, 
5 Horse and Ox Carts, 

2 Horse and Ox Sleds, 
Stone Drays, 

Plows, Iron Bars, Drills, Drilling Tools, Hammers, Picks, Chains s 
and other tools. 

Produce raised on City Lands. 

800 Bushels Potatoes, 
30 Tons Hay, 
4,000 Heads Cabbages, 

7 Tons Carrots, 
300 Bushels Turnips, 

40 Bushels Onions, 

10,000 Lbs. Pork raised and killed. 

Furniture, Beds and Bedding. 

140 Beds and Bunks, 
160 Under Beds, 

35 Feather Beds, 
439 Sheets, 
160 Pillows, 
214 Bed Spreads, 

50 Counterpanes, 

20 Buffalo Robes, with Blankets and other articles of bedding. 

In charge of the Undertakers — 

3 Hearses. 

In charge of the Weighers of Hay — 
2 Hay Scales. 

In charge of the Lamplighters — 
The Lamps. 

* The value of the Personal Property of the City was not ascertained by the 
Committee. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



The Overseers of the Poor, City of Roxbury, respectfully sub- 
mit the following 

REPORT. 

During the past year, a neat and commodious Pest House, 
one story high, and containing three rooms, has been erected in 
an isolated position at the western end of the garden, where 
patients infected with the Small Pox can be provided with those 
comforts, and receive that medical attention, which their afflict- 
ive condition may require, without the danger of that loath- 
some disease being communicated to the inmates of the Alms 
House. 

A substantial, close board fence, two thousand feet in length, 
and ten feet high, supported by white cedar posts, has been 
constructed on three of the most exposed sides of the grounds, 
in such a manner as to preclude the intrusion of any persons 
within the establishment, except such as the superintendent 
may deem it proper to admit, under the regulations of the in- 
stitution. 

The salutary effect of this structure has been fully realized 
by the more perfect order which has since been preserved. 

A shed, sixty-two feet long and twenty-five feet wide, for the 
reception and preservation of the wagons, carts, plows, and 
other agricultural implements belonging to the City, with a ca- 
pacious store-room over it, has been completed. The walls of 
the lower portion of the edifice are of stone, which were ob- 
tained from the quarry in the vicinity. 

More appropriate places for keeping the swine have been pro- 
vided, and such measures adopted for securing a more perfect 



60 

drainage of the waste-water, and greater cleanliness in the 
yards, as were considered necessary for accomplishing those 
important objects on which the neatness and salubrity of the 
establishment are so dependent. 

In consequence of the increased number of Children — which 
now amounts to nearly a hundred, under twelve years of age, a 
more extensive, better arranged, and more perfectly ventilated 
School Room is required ; and as a suitable apartment is indis- 
pensable for enabling the inmates to attend religious services 
on the Sabbath, it is recommended that an edifice be erected 
for those purposes, in which a Hall can be formed sufficiently 
spacious to be used as a School-Room, and a Chapel, with a 
basement, in which convenient Dormitories can be provided for 
the children, as it is very desirable that they should be sepa- 
rated, as much as possible, from the other persons in the Alms 
House, both for the health and improvement of the morals of 
those unfortunate objects of charity. 

The expense of rearing such a building has been estimated at 
two thousand dollars. 

The propriety and necessity of regular religious services at 
the institution are so self-evident, and the duty of furnishing 
the means therefor is so clearly and impressively inculcated 
by the dictates of Christianity, and the most exalted moral 
principles, that it is not believed to be necessary to dwell upon 
the subject ; and there not being any apartment that will ac- 
commodate a third of the inmates, there is no alternative but 
that which has been suggested, or an utter abandonment of the 
hundreds of men, women and children, placed under municipal 
guardianship, to a hopeless exclusion from reformatory teach- 
ings, and the precious consolations of that holy religion, on 
which their happiness here and hereafter is so entirely de- 
pendent. 

By the Report of the Physician, it appears that the whole 
number of patients during the year, have amounted to five 
hundred and twelve, being an increase of over four hundred 
within less than four years ;* and as it is to be expected that 
the number of persons admitted will annually increase, in a ra- 
tio equal to that of the augmentation of the population, it is 
probable that the sick and maimed will be multiplied in a like 
proportion — more especially if that augmentation should be 
caused to a great extent, as for the past three years, by an un- 
precedented immigration from foreign nations. It therefore 

* The sick in the years 1844 & 184-5 amounted to 65 
" " " " 1845 & 1843 " " 103 
" " " " 1846 & 1847 " " 150 



61 

becomes necessary to make such arrangements, as will enable 
the physician to discharge his duties in a manner that will not 
only fully meet the requirements of his patients, but at the 
same time fulfil the conditions which justice, mercy, and human- 
ity impose upon us. For this purpose, the additional attend- 
ants which he has recommended, should, unquestionably, be 
employed, as the present number have quite as much work to 
perform as should be devolved upon them, which renders it im- 
practicable to detail from among them, a man or woman, who 
should have the special care of the sick, in conformity to the 
views which the physician has presented. 

When the character and condition of the patients, and the 
virulent nature of several of the prevailing diseases are con- 
sidered, it is apparent that the mode of treatment which has 
been adopted, must have been judicious and skilful, from the 
small number of deaths which have occurred, compared with 
the great number of patients. The Board of Overseers, there- 
fore, deem it a duty to express their decided approbation of the 
course the physician has pursued, and the high opinion they 
entertain for the attentive, faithful, and able manner in which 
that officer has acquitted himself, during the period they have 
generally been members ; for while it is eminently honorable to 
him, it is a source of congratulation to them, that the numerous 
unfortunate objects of commiseration have thus been favored 
in the periods of their greatest calamity, by the medical and 
surgical services of a gentleman who has been equally as distin- 
guished for his humanity and kindness, as for his attainments 
and practical proficiency in all the branches of his arduous 
and highly responsible profession. 

When permission was given to Dr. Cotting, last spring, to 
visit Europe for the special object of acquiring professional in- 
formation, the Board of Overseers requested him to examine 
the asylums for the support of the poor, the public hospitals, 
and other eleemosynary institutions of the countries through 
which he might travel, for the purpose of collecting and re- 
porting, on his return, such intelligence in relation to their or- 
ganization and management as he might consider interesting 
and useful. This he has done in a manner so satisfactory, that 
the Board believe it to be very important that his Report, — ■ 
which is hereto annexed, should be published, as it contains in- 
formation which cannot fail of being most acceptably received 
by all persons, whose duty it may be to provide for the desti- 
tute and diseased in the cities and towns of this commonwealth, 
as well as by every philanthropic individual who may be dis- 
posed to cooperate in such measures as are best calculated to 



62 



ameliorate the condition of all classes of persons who require 
public or private assistance, to relieve them from the miseries of 
poverty, and the calamities of physical and moral infirmities. 

The inmates of the Alms House at the commencement of the 
year, were 



Admitted 

Present number 

Births 

Deaths in the House 

Deaths out of the House, and buried by the 

Superintendent 
Adults, Americans 
Children, " 



20 
58 



224 

710 

260 

12 

51 

13 



78 



Adults, Aliens from England 
« " Scotland 

" " Germany 

" " Ireland 

Children, " Ireland 



Work done on the farm, and in drilling, 
blasting, and hammering stone, and on 
the fence — 
By men hired 
" Inmates 
" Oxen 
" Horses 
Work done on the high ways by inmates 



10 
1 

4 
126 

41 



182 



332 

1,749 

83 

48 

12 



There was much work done in forming the foundation of the 
shed, making 300 feet of stone drain, leveling the ground 
around the house, and on the farm and garden, of which no 
account was kept. 

As the Commissioner of Streets did not employ the inmates 
so much, the past season, as usual, they have been engaged in 
the manner above stated, for the purpose of rendering their 
services available in the best manner which could be devised for 
the interests of the city ; and they have been occupied during 
the winter in removing stone from the ledge between the Alms 
House and Highland street, and in breaking it up for repairing 
the highways. 



63 



STOCK AND UTENSILS. 



Horses .... 








6 


Oxen .... 








1 yoke 


Cows .... 








3 


Hogs .... 








39 


Horse and Ox "Wagons 








3 


Horse and Ox Carts . 








5 


Horse and Ox Sleds 








2 


Stone Drays 








5 


Stone Hammers 








32 


Plows, Harrows, Iron Bars, Drills, Chains, and 




various other tools. 




FURNITURE IN THE HOUSE. 




Bedsteads and Bunks .... 


140 


Under Beds 








160 


Feather Beds 








35 


Sheets .... 








439 


Pillows .... 








160 


Pillow Cases 








264 


Bed Spreads 








214 


Counterpanes 








50 


Buffalo Robes 








20 


With Blankets and other articles of bedding in suf 




ficient quantities. 




PRODUCE RAISED ON THE CITY LANDS. 


Potatoes ....... 


800 bushels 


Hay 








30 tons 


Cabbages .... 








4,000 heads 


Carrots ..... 








7 tons 


Turnips ..... 








300 bushels 


Onions ..... 








40 " 


Pork raised and killed 






10,000 pounds 



RECEIPTS FOR THE SUPPORT OF THE POOR FROM 
FEB. 1, 1848, TO FEB. 1, 1849. 



Balance undrawn Feb. 1, 1848, 
Amount carried forward 



$476 17 



17 



64 

Amount brought forward .... $476 17 

Received from the Commonwealth, $7,316 47 
From which deduct appropriation of 
Dec. 1847, which was to be re- 
funded, .... 5,000 00 



Additional appropriation ... 
Transferred from fuel account for schools 
Transferred from pay of Firemen 

" " conting. expenses of Fire Depart't 

Appropriation for the years 1848 and 1849 
Received earnings of poor on Highways 
Received from other cities and towns 
Additional appropriation, to be re-imbursed from 

State account for support of paupers . 5,000 00 



2,316 47 


500 


00 


161 


39 


295 


75 


14 


97 


5,000 


00 


2,900 


60 


149 


66 



Balance undrawn for repair of Alms 




House .... 


$89 85 


Appropriation for repairs . 


300 00 


" for building a Pest 




House .... 


500 00 


Appropriation for building a fence 




around the grounds of the Alms 




House .... 


500 00 


Transferred from contingent fund to 




build shed .... 


325 00 



1,714 85 

$18,529 86 



EXPENDITURES. 

For support of Poor . . $16,519 33 

Repairs of Alms House, and build- 
ing shed .... 508 30 

Fence round the land of the Alms 

House ... . 694 41 

Building Pest House . . 361 45 

18,083 49 

Unexpended balance Feb. 1, 1849, 446 37 

$18,529 86 



65 

The Superintendent not having been, as heretofore, one of 
the Commissioners of Streets, the past season, his whole time 
has been devoted to the discharge of his various duties in the 
management of the Alms House and the cultivation of the 
farming and garden land ; and he justly merits commendation 
for the very efficient and satisfactory manner in which the 
whole of them have been performed, and the improved condi- 
tion of the institution as well as of the surrounding grounds. 

H. A. S. DEARBORN, 

Mayor, and ex officio Chairman B. 0. P. 

Roxbury, Feb. 12, 1849. 

In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 19, 1849. 

Read and accepted, and referred to the Committee on Ac- 
counts, with instructions to print the same. Sent down for 
concurrence 

JOSEPH W. TUCKER, City Clerk. 

In Common Council, Feb. 19, 1849. 
Concurred. 

JOSHUA SEAVER, Cleric. 



REPORT 



PHYSICIAN TO THE ALMS HOUSE. 



To the Overseers of the Poor of the City of Roxbury : 

Gentlemen : The following Table, constructed from records 
kept for the purpose, "will give you some idea of the number, 
nature, and result of the medical cases treated at the Alms 
House during the past year : 



Diseases. 



Recover'd, 



Under 
Treatm't. 



Dead. 



Total. 



Ship Fever, 

Typhoid Fever, 

Scarlet Fever, 

Lung Fever and Pleurisy, 

Consumption, 

Diseases of Bowels, 

Diseases of Brain, 

Palsy (P. Agitans), 

Palsy (Hemiplegia), 

Delirium Tremens, 

Diseases of Skin, 

Small Pox, 

Venereal Disease, 

Cancer of Breast, 

Amputation of Arm, 

Severe Fractures, 

Debility, &c, from Ship,.. 

Rheumatism, 

Ulcers 

Other Diseases, 



64 



58 
22 



143 
6 



9 
34 
15 

7 



1 
14 

7 
9 

.!2 



1 

3 

1 

11 
6 



7 


83 


2 


10 


O 


61 


1 


23 


5 


6 


7 


150 


7 


13 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


10 




40 


3 


18 


1 


9 


1 


1 




1 




4 


1 


15 




8 




20 




38 



429 



32 



51 



512 



Besides these there have been 12 insane, of whom 6 have 
been sent to Worcester, 1 discharged, 2 recovered, and 3 
remain. 

There have been, also, 12 cases of childbirth ; one a still- 
birth, and another premature, in the midst of scarlet fever. 
All the women did well and recovered. 

Adding these cases to those of the table, it appears that the 
whole number of patients for the year amounts to 535. 

It may be worthy of remark, that there has been quite an 
increase of the common diseases of the vicinity, and a rcduc- 



tion of the number of cases of ship fever, so frequent the year 
previous. At one period, the small pox caused considerable 
annoyance. The scarlet fever also has prevailed, chiefly 
among the children, and generally in a manageable form. 
With such a changing population, occasional incursions of con- 
tagious diseases must be expected. 

The new remedy, chloroform, brought into notice since the 
last report, has been tried in suitable cases, with all anticipated 
Success, and, as yet, without unpleasant effects. In delirium 
tremens, of which we have had an unusual amount, it has proved 
very beneficial. In some surgical cases, the patients have been 
rendered completely insensible to the pain of the severest oper- 
ations. 

The condition of the medical department is as satisfactory as 
can be expected, where proper assistance is so limited. In an 
establishment where, during the year, there are over five hun- 
dred sick — many of incurable diseases — and where a dozen 
births and fifty deaths occur, should there not be at least one 
male and one female nurse, capable and trustworthy persons, 
whose sole duty should be to attend to the wants of the sick 
and the dying ? To expect such attendance as is desirable, 
from those already overburdened with other duties, or to trust 
to the caprices of the inmates, seems unreasonable. Yet such 
is the condition of things at the house. It is hoped, that the 
simple statement of the fact will be a sufficient appeal to the 
wisdom of the Board. 

Another matter, introduced here with some reluctance and 
after much hesitation, ought in some way to be brought to your 
official notice. I allude to the want of religious services at the 
house on the Sabbath. It has often been spoken of; but, as 
yet, no plan has been adopted. There are now over 250 in- 
mates, nearly one-half of whom are children. Under the pres- 
ent arrangements, only now and then one can attend church in 
the city. The daily school is in successful operation. Classes 
are also instructed in moral and religious subjects, by a number 
of disinterested and charitable ladies, who feel much encouraged 
by their success. Why, then, should the Sabbath pass neg- 
lected, or be known to the inmates only by a change of raiment 
and the subtraction of a ration of food ? If no other plan be 
practicable, it is respectfully suggested, that a proper place be 
prepared and an appropriation made for suitable religious ser- 
vices at the house on the Sabbath. 

I remain, gentlemen, your obedient servant, 

B. E. COTTING, 
Physician to the Almshouse. 

Roxbury, January 81, 1849. 



ANSWER 

TO 

A LETTER FROM THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 
(See page 61.) 

To the Hon. H. A. S. Dearborn, Chairman of the Board of 
Overseers of the Poor of the City of Roxbury : 

My Dear Sir, — 

Circumstances, well known to yon, have, up to the pre- 
sent hour, prevented my answering your letter sent me at the 
request of the Board of Overseers ; and even now I shall be 
obliged to confine myself in the present paper to a few general 
remarks on, the Charitable Institutions of France, or rather on 
those of the city of Paris. 

The territory of France has an area of about 202,125 square 
miles ; with a population of 33 to 35 millions. 

The number of Charitable Institutions in the country is near- 
ly or quite 10,000 — sustained at a yearly cost of more than 
23 millions cf dollars. This large sum is derived chiefly from 
duties (octroi) levied on articles of food, &c. brought into the 
various cities ; from licenses for places of amusement ; from 
governmental and private munificence ; donations, legacies, 
yearly contributions of churches, &c.,&c. 

These institutions are designed for the sick, the infirm, the 
aged, and infants — healthy adults, afflicted with poverty alone, 
being left for the most part to their own resources, or receiving 
a stinted allowance at their homes from charitable societies of a 
more private character, or from individual charity. 

The population of Paris and its immediate precincts, is not 
far from a million and a half — of which about 70,000 are at pub- 
lic charge. There are about 20,000 aged and infirm, incapa- 
ble of work, and about the same number of foundlings support- 
ed by the public. Besides, there are about 15,000 always in 
the Hospitals and Infirmaries— from 150,000 to 160,000 pass- 
ing through these institutions during the year. 

The whole expense of their maintenance, so far as it comes to 
the knowledge of the public, amounts to about three millions of 
dollars a year. The expense of each individual, so supported, 



70 

per day, varies greatly in the several establishments, being 
from 15 cents, or even less in some, to 80 cents or more in oth- 
ers — that of the general and special Hospitals averaging about 
35 to 40 cents. 

These institutions are usually classed as follows : Hospitals, 
(general and special) — Hospices — Houses of Refuge — Creches 
or Nurseries — Foundling Asylums, &c. 

Hospitals for the reception of the sick only, number at least 
twenty ; besides two of great size not yet finished. The build- 
ings are of stone, generally not remarkable for architectural 
beauty ; usually built around one or more large court yards, 
and in one instance on the opposite sides of the river and a 
street, the buildings being connected by a bridge and a tunnel 
under the street. 

Most of the Hospitals receive both sexes, but not all. Their 
wards are large, containing often from thirty to sixty beds each. 
Ventilation is chiefly effected at the windows, a portion of which 
is made to open on hinges, so as to give the least exposure to 
occupants. Heat is generally derived from large porcelain 
stoves (a kind of furnace) placed in the middle of the room — 
the flue or tunnel passing along or under the floor. The floors 
are usually of stone, tiles, or oak. Such is the degree of pol- 
ished smoothness of the floors in general, which are waxed and 
rubbed every morning, that walking on them is very difficult 
to one unaccustomed to it. The bedsteads are of iron, single, 
high-posted, surrounded with long white curtains, open however 
at the top. There is a little table at the side of each, and a 
small shelf just over the patient's head, for his cup and other 
articles. The beds are usually double paillasses, or wool mat- 
tresses, very comfortable ; and the clothing suitable and neat. 

The diet of the patients, within certain limits made by gov- 
ernment, is, of course, under the direction of the attending 
physicians. The average number of days passed in these hos- 
pitals, by each patient, is 22. The average mortality, in the 
general hospitals, is 1 in 8 in medical cases, and 1 in 14 in 
surgical. In special hospitals, the mortality is less. 

Special Hospitals are those devoted to one or more particular 
diseases — ■ including those for lying-in females — for syphilitic 
diseases — for diseases of the skin — for sick children — for 
the insane, &c. In other respects, they resemble the General 
Hospitals. 

Besides these, there are in the city also several Military 
Hospitals, under the direction of the medical staff of the arrnjr, 
having several hundreds of beds for the reception of sick 
soldiers. 



71 

Hospices. — These resemble, in many respects, our alms- 
houses ; though generally occupied by persons rendered help- 
less by reason of old age or bodily infirmity. There are sepa- 
rate establishments for men, women, and young children. 

The largest for men is at Bicetre, a short distance outside of 
the city. It has a community of nearly four thousand old men, 
lunatics, and idiots. It is situated on high ground, surrounded 
by a wall, and has three extensive court yards, flanked by 
ranges of buildings of several stories in height. There are 
other smaller yards, surrounded by smaller buildings, for the 
insane. There is also a church, of appropriate dimensions, 
within the enclosure — of stone, as are the rest of the build- 
ings. There are no single rooms, except for some classes of 
the insane. Various means are adopted for the exercise and 
recreation of the inmates, workshops, gardens, a model farm, 
&c, &c. Sometimes money is paid for labor ; to be spent 
wholly, or in part, in procuring better food or other little 
luxuries. 

The daily allowance for an inmate, consists of a pint of soup, 
a pound and a quarter of bread, six ounces of meat, about a 
half pint of vegetables, two ounces of cheese or grapes, and 
three-quarters of a pint of wine.* At seventy years of age, 
the allowance of wine may be doubled. After thirty years' 
residence, an inmate is entitled to a double quantity of every 
thing. The sick are treated in Infirmaries attached to the 
establishment. Lunatics, idiots, and epileptics, (usually about 
800,) have separate communities. When able to work employ- 
ment is given to them. They have also school-rooms and teach- 
ers ; and much progress has been made in their education. In one 
section, there is a school for idiots, under the direction of Dr. 
Voisin. By the efforts of this gentleman, and of Dr. Guggen- 
biihl, at a school for Cretins, subsequently visited, on Mount 
Abendberg, near Interlachen, in Switzerland, it has been clearly 
demonstrated that many, if not all of those unfortunate beings, 
heretofore abandoned to the wretched and beastly degradation 
of supposed hopeless idiocy, are capable of being so far edu- 
cated and improved as to cease to be disgusting burdens, and, 
in some instances, to become useful members of the community. 
Six physicians — one resident — and several assistants, select- 

* This is the allowance decreed by government for the Hospices. At the 
almshouse of one of the parishes of London, the daily allowance consists of 
half a pint of broth, twelve ounces of bread, six ounces of meat, eight ounces of 
potatoes, a pint of table beer, and a pint of tea. There were at this almshouse, 
in August last, 564 inmates, of all classes. The total amount assessed, for the 
relief of the poor of the parish, for the quarter ending Sept. 29th, was£4,000, or 
#19,400, including £1,175, or $5,700, for out-door relief. 



72 

ed from the most meritorious medical students, are attached to 
the establishment. 

The average daily cost of each inmate is about sixteen cents, 
and the whole yearly expense not far from $200,000. 

The Hospice for old women (la Salpetriere) is even larger 
than that for old men, having a population of nearly six thous- 
and, including about four hundred attendants. It is situated 
within the city, and surrounded by a wall of nearly two miles 
in extent. The buildings are around large court yards, on a 
grand scale. The church is an immense building, 180 feet in 
length, surmounted by a dome. There is quite a large market, 
or depot of provisions, within the walls ; and nothing can sur- 
pass the completeness of the kitchen and laundry. (We saw, 
one day, in the kitchen, 30 huge boilers in operation, and 2,800 
lbs. of meat, with the usual accompaniments, cooking for din- 
ner.) The lunatics are treated on a plan similar to that at 
Bicetre ; the other sick, in infirmaries. The well were in rooms, 
from 20 to 60 together ; each having a small space to herself 
near her bed. They seemed generally to be employed on their 
own little matters, though it is said that sewing and spinning 
are sometimes required of them to a considerable amount. The 
arrangements throughout the establishment are truly perfect, 
and the neatness and order wonderful. Nine physicians are 
attached to this Hospice ; a chief, and several assistant apothe- 
caries, and an indefinite number of assisting students, selected 
as at Bicetre. 

The whole expense is not far from $250,000 a year. 

Besides these two immense establishments, containing within 
their walls inhabitants enough to form moderate sized cities — 
besides these there are other Hospices for incurables, some of 
the larger of which contain six or seven hundred beds. There 
are again others for the reception of families whose members 
are over sixty years of age, and who are able to contribute some 
part of the expense of their own support. At one of the more 
expensive of these institutions, that at Chaillot, besides the main 
buildings, there are several smaller, capable of lodging from 
two to six persons, situated in the groves and gardens of the es- 
tablishment, and inhabited by those who choose to live in com- 
parative retirement. The whole aspect of this establishment is 
that of a respectable hotel, such is the thorough system, order, 
and neatness throughout. The dining hall is arranged with a 
series of tables for ten persons each ; and the white napkins, 
bright silver forks, spoons, and tumblers, not to mention the de- 
canters of wine, would not disgrace the table of any private 
gentleman of the country. There was an air of comfort through- 



73 

out the whole Institution, and cheerfulness and content on the 
face of every inmate seen. There is a hospital attached to the 
establishment, and a physician in daily attendance. None are 
admitted under sixty years of age. The rules require the 
payment of 120 dollars a year, or a capital in advance of about 
1,000 dollars if of 60 years, and less in proportion to the great- 
er age. 

While the wants of the aged and incurable are thus amply 
provided for, helpless and forsaken children are not forgotten. 
There are Hospitals exclusively appropriated to such as are 
sick, and Hospices for the well, until they can be apprenticed 
or otherwise provided for. 

There is also an establishment in each ward of the City, 
called a Creche, or Nursery, where mothers may leave their 
children during the day, and thus be enabled to pursue their 
occupations. The child must be accompanied with its little 
basket of provisions, or, if not weaned, the mother must return 
at intervals to nurse it. The children are tended by experi- 
enced persons, and, if sick, placed under the care of a physi- 
cian, one or more of which are attached to each Creche. 

There are also places where children under fifteen years of age, 
whose parents have been obliged by sickness to resort to a hos- 
pital, are received, provided for, and educated. 

Moreover, there is the noted Hospice for Foundlings.— 
Of the moral effects of this and similar institutions much may 
be said on both sides, though the opinion prevails, founded on 
such statistics as are available and other probable estimates, 
that illegitimates and abandoned have not increased, while in- 
fanticides have greatly diminished in consequence of their 
erection. 

At this Hospice mothers may appear and give up their 
children on declaring inability to support them ; or the child 
may be deposited and " no questions asked." In the evening 
a box (called a Tour, placed in the wall and turning on a pivot) 
is turned open side towards the street, for the reception of such 
as may be placed therein. On the crying of a child so placed, 
an attendant turns the box, and, removing the child, attaches a 
number to its wrist, and places it in the establishment. When 
there, in June last, the number for this year had risen above 
two thousand. Between four and five thousand are annually 
received. As soon as practicable the well are put out to nurses 
in the country. The sick arc retained, and placed under medi- 
cal treatment. A large proportion of these children are diseased ; 
and one cannot but be struck with the kindness and attention 
10 



74 

bestowed upon them all. The total expense of the Institution 
is about $300,000 a year. 

Throughout all these institutions there was noticed a degree 
of discipline, order, and decorum, unsurpassed if ever equalled 
in similar establishments in this country. This was particularly 
observable in the Hospices. Without a resort to violent meas- 
ures, there was a respectful submission to regulations, and an 
apparently cheerful acquiescence in official requirements. This 
may perhaps be attributable in part to the greater number of 
responsible assistants — in which respect many of our institutions 
are lamentably deficient — and to that civility of demeanor uni- 
versally inculcated outside of as well as within such establish- 
ments. There was also in those in authority a kindness of 
manner toward those committed to their charge, plainly showing 
that they were regarded, not as items of expense, but as human 
beings in misfortune. 

To complete the circle of charities in the City of Paris, is 
the Morgue — a building for the reception of the bodies of those 
found dead ; in order to give friends and others an opportunity 
to recognize them. The bodies are exposed on inclined tables, 
especially constructed for proper ventilation and preventing de- 
composition. The clothes and other articles found on the dead 
are hung up near by. It is rare for a visitor not to find one or 
more bodies thus exposed. 

A word or two respecting the Cemeteries may not be inap- 
propriate. Burials under churches, or in the cities and towns 
of France have long been forbidden by law, and permitted only 
on extraordinary occasions. The Cemeteries of Paris are three 
in number, and all outside the walls of the City. In these Cem- 
eteries there are three kinds of graves, the common, the tem- 
porary, and the perpetual. In the common graves the poor are 
buried at the smallest cost, or at the expense of the public. 
A large trench is dug several hundred feet in length, fifteen to 
twenty in width, and from five to seven deep. In this the cof- 
fins are placed, side by side, but not upon each other. Usually 
a black wooden cross, placed over the coffin by friends, tells the 
name and age of the departed. On this cross are placed 
wreaths and funeral emblems. As the trench is filled it pre- 
sents a perfect thicket of these crosses — a sad but singular spec- 
tacle. Twenty, thirty, sometimes even fifty burials take place 
at one of these trenches in the course of a day. At the end 
of five years the trench may be again opened for new occupants 
—such being the nature of the soil that within this time a 
thorough decomposition has taken place. The temporary graves 
are usually single graves, hired for six years, to be then re- 



75 

opened unless the term be renewed. This is not often done if 
appearances may be trusted. Perpetual graves may be pur- 
chased ; but they must be of certain dimensions, and two bodies 
are not allowed to be placed in the same lot, unless it contain at 
least 21 square feet, and then only on the construction of a 
vault. The price of such a lot is rather more than $100. The 
larger the lot, the higher the proportionate price. 

I have thus glanced at some of the more important points in- 
dicated in your letter, in the hope that even such slight sketches 
may not prove wholly uninteresting. It was my privilege to see 
these institutions more than usually crowded from causes inci- 
dent to the recent Revolution ; and particularly after the Insur- 
rection of June, when many hundreds of the wounded were 
brought into the Hospitals — affording opportunities for observa- 
tion rarely obtained even in Paris. My feeble testimony is not 
needed to their acknowledged reputation and superiority ; and 
further details, if desired, must be deferred to a future occasion. 

With acknowledgements to the Board for repeated acts of 
confidence and kindness, 

I remain, my dear Sir, 

with great respect, your obliged friend and serv't. 

B. E. COTTING. 
Roxbury, December, 1848. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

COMMISSIONERS 

OF 

FOREST HILLS CEMETERY. 



In conformity to the fifth Section of " An Act relative to a 
Public Cemetery in the City of Roxbury," the Commissioners 
respectfully submit the following 

REPORT: 

In the month of February, 1847, a petition was presented to 
the City Council, signed by a number of citizens, in which they 
represented the " great importance, in view of the health and 
comfort of the inhabitants, as well as the pleasing aspect of the 
city generally, that some regulation should be made, in order 
to prevent the INTERMENT of the DEAD in the established 
BURIAL GROUNDS, in thick-settled districts, in the heart 
of the City, or in places for other reasons unsuited to the 
purpose ;" and requested that an Ordinance might be passed 
for accomplishing that object. The petition was referred to a 
joint special committee, who " recommended that the subject 
be referred to the next City Council." 

By an Order of the nineteenth of April, the petition was 
referred to the Joint Standing Committee on Burial Grounds, 
who made a Report thereon, on the sixth of September, in 
which it was alleged, " that from the limited extent of the sev- 
eral Burial Grounds in Roxbury, and the rapid increase of 
inhabitants, it had become necessary that a tract of land should 
be procured, in as nearly a central position as was possible, for a 
PUBLIC CEMETERY, and of a sufficient size to meet the 



77 

prospective requirements of a population which must be vastly 
augmented within less than thirty years ; " and that after having 
" made extensive reconnoisances, for the purpose of discovering 
a site that would the most perfectly combine all the requisite 
qualities, in natural features, capabilities of improvement, and 
appropriateness of location," they stated that they had been 
" so fortunate as to select two tracts of land, which not only 
included most of the important elements for the fulfilment of 
those conditions, but that the largest could be obtained on favor- 
able terms." 

Those tracts included the Seaverns Farm, which fronted on 
Canterbury street, and a lot of about six acres owned by Doc- 
tor John C. Warren, on Walk Hill street, which they recom- 
mended should be purchased ; and, in conformity thereto, an 
Order was passed on the ninth of November, authorizing them 
to procure fifty-five acres of the former ; but as an act of the 
Legislature was considered requisite to enable the City Council 
to provide for the establishment of a RURAL CEMETERY, 
in the most perfect manner, the negotiation for the land was 
not completed and a deed obtained, until the twenty-eighth day 
of March, 1848. 

In conformity to the provisions of that Act, five Commission- 
ers were chosen by the City Council in Convention, on the thir- 
tieth day of March, who are invested with " the sole care, 
superintendence, and management of the Cemetery." 

After the Commissioners had examined the grounds, the 
manner of laying them out was determined upon and the work 
commenced on the twenty-fifth of April. 

While the Carriage Avenues and Foot Paths were being 
constructed, a range of fence, over six thousand feet in length, 
was extended around a large portion of the land, and gate-ways 
on Canterbury and Walk Hill streets were erected ; also a 
small edifice on Fountain Hill, for an office. 

As insuperable difficulties were encountered in the attempt 
to effect a purchase of the lot owned by Doctor Warren, he 
generously ceded a passage-way, thirty-three feet wide, through 
it, from Walk Hill street to the Cemetery ; as that, however, 
was not deemed sufficiently spacious for the chief entrance, an 
effort was made to procure an acre of land, west of that pas- 
sage-way, for the purpose of enlarging it ; but the owner de- 
clined selling it, which induced the Commissioners to examine 
the estates north of the Cemetery, to ascertain whether it was 
practicable to form a road through either of them, to Curtis or 
Walnut streets ; and after several explorations, it having been 
determined that it could be done, they were authorized by the 



78 

City Council to purchase about fourteen acres for that purpose, 
as well as to extend the grounds in that direction, to render the 
whole area more available for the objects of its destination. 

By this acquisition, the Commissioners were enabled to open 
an avenue from near the north-western angle of the Cemetery 
to Scarborough street, fifty feet wide, by the liberal aid of the 
proprietors of the land through which it passed ; and as that 
street united with Curtis street, an entrance was secured far 
preferable to any that could be formed from Walk Hill street, 
even if the requisite land therefor could have been purchased ; 
for the two dangerous rail-way crossings near the westerly end 
of that street, as well as the long and steep hill, between the 
turnpike road and the entrance to the Cemetery, were thus 
avoided, while the distance is three-quarters of a mile less, 
from the intersection of Dudley street with the northern termi- 
nus of the turnpike road. 

It having been ascertained, that most of the avenues and 
paths could be formed, and three or four hundred lots be laid 
out by the latter part of June, arrangements were made for 
opening the grounds for interments, on the twenty-eighth day 
of that month, when they were consecrated as a RURAL 
NECROPOLIS, by appropriate religious services. Since that 
period, until late in the autumn, a number of additional car- 
riage avenues and foot paths have been laid out, and most of 
them are so far finished, that nearly all parts of the Cemetery 
are available for sepulchral lots. During the winter, a few men 
have been employed in removing vegetable loam from the mo- 
rass land, to be used as a manure in preparing the lots for sod- 
ding. This deposit is not only of great value for that purpose, 
but when the excavations are completed, the areas will form 
two beautiful lakes, which, being surrounded by trees and 
shrubs, will diversify the scenery in a picturesque and interest- 
ing manner. 

Guide-boards have been placed at both ends of the avenues 
and paths. 

A RECEIVING TOMB will be constructed near the main 
gateway, next summer, for the temporary deposit of the re- 
mains of persons who die in the winter, when it may be difficult 
to dig a grave, or at other seasons of the year, until the rela- 
tives have purchased and prepared burial lots for their re- 
ception. 

Since the consecration, one hundred and seventy-five lots have 
been sold, seventy-four graded and sodded, and between twenty 
and thirty others nearly completed. Nine have been inclosed 
with iron fences, three with granite posts, and chains, and two 



79 

with Arbor Vitse hedges. There have been seventy-one inter- 
ments. Six tombs have been built in such a manner as to 
have no openings on any avenue or path, in the external wall, 
and when closed, the door being on the top, and horizontal, is 
covered with earth at least two feet deep below the surface. 
This mode of construction was prescribed by the Commissioners, 
to obviate the unpleasant consequences arising from the defective 
plan which has been too commonly adopted in public burial 
places, as well as from sanitary considerations. 

It was also recommended that all tombs should be located in 
level situations, as those objects would thus be more effectually 
accomplished than is possible where there is an exposed front, 
on a hill-side ; and all which have been made are thus established 
except one. This method of construction is much less expen- 
sive, and leaves the lot in a condition to be embellished with 
turf, shrubs, and flowers, as perfectly as in those where a tomb 
has not been formed. And as they are covered with large, 
thick, flat stones, a superb monument can be reared on them, 
in the centre of the lot, for a less sum than is generally expended 
in an ornamentally sculptured marble, granite, or free-stone 
front, of the usual kinds, which so much disfigure the cemeteries 
where they have been constructed. 

As one of the Commissioners furnished a description of the 
Cemetery for an annual publication, that contained information 
which it is deemed incumbent upon them to present to the City 
Council, in a faithful discharge of the very responsible duties 
imposed upon them, it has been inserted as a part of their re- 
port, with such corrections and additions as were requisite to 
render it more perfect. 

FOREST HILLS CEMETERY 

Is situated between the Norfolk and Bristol Turnpike, Walk 
Hill, Canterbury and Scarborough streets, and includes an area 
of about seventy acres, a large portion of which is covered with 
most of the varieties of trees, shrubs, and herbacious plants 
which are indigenous to New England. The topographical 
features are diversified in a remarkably picturesque and impres- 
sive manner, by numerous hills, valleys, glades, precipitous 
cliffs, isolated masses of moss-covered rocks, dales, and lakes. 

The carriage avenues and foot-paths have been laid out on 
the principles of landscape gardening, in such a manner as to 
render the approach to all parts of the grounds facile and beau- 
tiful ; and so numerous and extensive are they, that the aggre- 
gate length of the former exceeds three miles, and of the latter 



80 

two ; but when the whole of them have been completed, there 
will be nearly five miles of avenues, and three of foot-paths. 

The burial lots are fifteen feet wide, and twenty feet deep, 
with spaces between them six feet wide. There are borders 
six feet in width on each side of all the avenues and paths, 
which, with the spaces between the lots, may be ornamented by 
the cultivation of trees, shrubs, and flowering plants, by the 
proprietors of the lots ; and in the event that it is not done by 
them, it will be by the Commissioners. The avenues are 
sixteen feet wide, and the paths six, which are to be defined by 
lines of sods one foot wide. The surfaces of the avenues and 
paths will be gravelled and made slightly convex, with a gutter 
on each side for conducting off the water. The foundations of 
both will be formed of stone, from two to three feet deep, as the 
earth is required for grading lots, and the materials for filling up 
the excavations can be obtained from various parts of the grounds 
in sufficient quantity for that purpose. This mode of construct- 
ing the avenues and paths will not only insure a perfect drain- 
age, but render them so substantial that the labor and expense 
of annual repairs will be greatly diminished. Not only the 
stones for the road-beds, but excellent gravel, for the completion 
and replenishment of all the thoroughfares, can be obtained 
within the Cemetery. 

The range of four heights in the south-western portion of the 
grounds has been designated as the Eliot Hills, to commemorate 
the name and pious labors of the venerated John Eliot, who 
was appointed " Teacher" in the first Church in Koxbury, in 
16-32 ; over which he presided for nearly sixty years. He 
founded the first Indian Protestant church in North Amer- 
ica, in Natick ; and such was his holy zeal to civilize the sav- 
ages, that he translated the whole of the Scriptures into the 
language of the Natick tribe, and a number of other religious 
works, from which he justly obtained the title of the APOSTLE 
ELIOT. 

Two hills on the northern side of the Cemetery have received 
the names of Consecration and Chapel, as the services of the 
consecration were performed on the eastern slope of the former, 
and the other has been appropriated as the site for a sacred 
temple, where funeral rites may be performed, in conformity to 
the mode which has been adopted by the various religious 
sects. 

The largest hill, south of the former, bears the name of the 
most honored native-born citizen of Roxbury — •WARREN — 
the illustrious patriot and hero, who gloriously fell in the ever 
memorable battle of BUNKER HILL, while gallantly con- 



81 

tending for the FREEDOM and INDEPENDENCE of his 

country. 

A lofty rocky eminence, west of Lake Dell, is called Snow- 
Flake Cliff, from a rare and beautiful American plant, which is 
found in a meadow near its base. 

There are five other hills, which have been named Fountain, 
Dearborn, Clover, Strawberry, and Juniper. On the first the 
office of the Commissioners has been erected, and in front of it 
a sun-dial has been placed upon a rough bowlder, which is cov- 
ered with lichens, to which a brass plate with the following 
epigraph has been secured : 

HORAS NON NUMERO NISI SERENAS. 

A rustic OBSERVATORY has been formed round a large 
oak tree on the summit of Consecration Hill, twenty-five feet 
high, and vistas have been opened through the grove of trees 
which surround it, in such a manner as to reveal to persons 
standing in the gallery which surmounts it, the entire ranee of 
the Blue Hills, and portions of the villages of Randolph, Milton, 
Dorchester, Quincy, Jamaica Plain, Brookline, Brighton, and 
Cambridge, Dorchester Bay, and several of the islands in that 
broad expanse of water. Each of the other hills commands views 
of greatly diversified interest and beauty. 

Near the north-eastern base of Fountain Hill is a natural 
SPRING, which has been enlarged and surrounded by an em- 
bankment covered with rough stones and wild plants ; and over a 
portion of it a flat stone has been placed to preclude the sun's 
rays from the water. On the front side of a large stone which 
surmounts that over the eastern portion of the spring, a bronze 
tablet has been affixed, with the following inscription : 

WHOSOEVER DRINKETH OF THIS WATER WILL 

THIRST AGAIN; BUT THE WATER THAT I 

SHALL GIVE, WILL BE IN HIM A WELL 

OF WATER SPRINGING UP INTO 

EVERLASTING LIFE. 

The small lake east of Consecration Hill, has been designated 
Woodbine Mere, and two other lakes will be formed by excav- 
ating the meadow east of Mount Warren and Fountain Hill, in 
the manner which has been named, by removing the loam as a 
valuable material for covering the lots after they have been 
graded, previous to the sods being laid. 



82 

The grounds have been enclosed in most of their extent by 
a substantial pale fence, seven feet high, supported by excellent 
red cedar posts, which were all obtained from the cemetery 
grounds, and over a thousand were required for that purpose. 

The chief gate-way has a front of one hundred and sixty feet. 
The carriage entrance is through an Egyptian portico, twenty 
four feet high and forty in width at the foundation. It was 
copied from the ancient portico at Garsery, above the first 
cataract of the Nile, and is embellished by two massive columns, 
richly sculptured, and a winged globe on the entablature of the 
exterior side. On each side of the main gate are Lodges for 
the superintendent's office and for the gate-keeper. These three 
structures, and the piers for the small gates and terminii of the 
gate-way, have been painted and sanded in such a manner as 
to resemble Jersey free-stone. 

The fences between the large gate-way and the Lodges, as 
well as all the gates, are formed of round pales over two inches in 
diameter, which are alternately surmounted with Lotus blossoms, 
and lance-heads, and have been painted to resemble bronze. 

To secure such a lofty and broad structure as the Egyptian 
Portico from being blown down in violent gales of wind, a 
foundation was thus prepared. Red cedar posts were set in the 
ground, which were from twelve to fourteen inches in diameter 
at the but, and from thirteen to fifteen feet long. These posts 
were secured by iron bolts to sills of red cedar, which were 
fourteen feet long, and placed in trenches five feet deep. There 
were four such posts for each pier of the gate-way, and the 
space between them being six feet by seven, a flooring of cedar 
posts was laid to connect the sills, and from the ends of the lat- 
ter, cedar braces extended to the posts at the surface of the 
ground, where cedar cross-ties were fastened to the posts on all 
sides for combining the whole together. The areas over the 
floorings and sills were filled with stones, and for this purpose 
about eighty tons were used. From the cedar posts there were 
braces of joist, crossing each other, extending to the top of the 
frame of the gate-way, which were secured at each end, and at 
their intersections by iron bolts. The Lodges were placed on 
cedar posts sunk three feet in the ground, and the piers of the 
small gates were formed of four posts each. One hundred and 
twenty-four red cedar trees were required for these purposes, 
and it is believed that they may be relied upon for at least half 
a century ; but long before the expiration of that period, there 
cannot be a doubt, that those wooden structures will be replaced 
by stone and iron, or bronze. 



83 

On the external architrave is the following inscription in ni e- 
tallic gilded letters : 

THOUGH I WALK THROUGH THE VALLEY OF THE 
SHADOW OF DEATH, I WILL FEAR NO EVIL. 

On the interior architrave are these words of our Saviour, 
and the date of consecration : 

I AM THE RESURRECTION AND THE LIFE. 

CONSECRATED JUNE 28, 1848. 

There are entrances on the southern side of the Cemetery, 
from Walk Hill street, and on the eastern, from Canterbury- 
street, through gates supported by Egyptian piers, which have 
been painted and sanded like the large gate-way. 

The price of a lot containing three hundred square feet, has 
been established at fifty dollars ; but a smaller quantity of 
land, from a half to a sixth of a lot, can be purchased, at six- 
teen cents and two-thirds per foot, in many parts of the grounds ; 
and there is a large compartment, on the southern side of the 
Cemetery, enclosed with a rustic fence, which will be screened 
by a buck-thorn hedge, and the area divided by foot-paths and 
embellished with trees and shrubs next spring, in which a grave 
can be secured for five dollars ; while on the eastern side a tract 
has been appropriated for the interment of deceased persons, 
free of expense, if their friends are unable to pay for a place 
of sepulchre in neither of the other positions which have been 
named. 

A nursery has been commenced for raising forest and other 
trees and shrubs, to be set out in such portions of the grounds 
as may be required ; and within two years, there will be at 
least a hundred thousand plants growing therein, from seeds 
which have been planted, and will be next autumn, of the elm, 
rock and white maple, beech, ash, chestnut, yellow, white, red, 
and English oaks, horse chestnut, mountain ash, hickory, black 
walnut, and other trees. Orders have also been sent to Eng- 
land for several thousands of the various kinds of forest and 
ornamental seedling trees of Europe and other countries, from 
one to three feet high, that will flourish in this climate, to plant 
out in the nursery next spring, as they can be procured for 
from three to ten dollars per thousand, as has been ascertained 
by a correspondence with one of the most eminent nurserymen. 

Thus, within fifteen years, all the land requiring trees can 



84 

be covered with a young forest, at a very small expense, and 
the proprietors of lots supplied with such as they may wish to 
set out, for a few cents apiece. 

The distance from Guild Hall, over the turnpike, and through 
Forest Hill and Scarborough streets to the Cemetery, has been 
measured, and ascertained to be only two miles and three-quar- 
ters, and that route is one of the most rural and interesting in 
the environs of the capital. On returning, the ride or walk 
may be varied, by passing out of the Cemetery at the southern 
gate, and proceeding through Jamaica Pond village to Tremont 
street ; or through the eastern gate into Canterbury street, and 
from thence by East or Warren streets, to Washington or Har- 
rison streets ; or, on leaving the northern Egyptian gate-way, 
and passing from Forest Hill into Walnut street, another line of 
communication is afforded with Washington street, which with 
Tremont and Harrison streets constitute the great avenues con- 
necting Boston with Roxbury. But each of those lines of 
travel presents numerous deviations, which will admit of a ride 
being extended through the north-western part of Dorchester 
to South Boston ; or the north-eastern portions of Brookline and 
Brighton to Cambridge, and from thence by crossing the bridge, 
or from the two preceding towns, over the Western avenue to 
Boston. There are also numerous picturesque drives south of the 
Cemetery, which may be united with most of the roads that 
have been named, should it be desirable to extend an excursion 
into the country, when the forest crowned hills, umbrageous 
valleys, verdant fields, and numerous orchards and gardens are 
arrayed in all their diversified magnificence, and the air is red- 
olent with the aroma of vernal or summer flowers, or 

the ripe harvest of the new mown hay 



Gives it a sweet and wholesome odor.' 

The propriety of removing the remains cf the APOSTLE 
ELIOT to one of the hills which bear his name, and the erec- 
tion of a monument over them has often been a subject of con- 
sideration by the Commissioners, and has likewise been suggest- 
ed by many of the persons who visited the Cemetery last sea- 
son ; and they earnestly hope that measures will be speedily 
adopted, for accomplishing that very desirable object. It is 
also confidently believed, from the universal respect which is 
entertained for the character and distinguished services which 
GENERAL WARREN rendered his country, that the citizens 
of Roxbury will not suffer many years to pass by, before they 
will have reared a bronze statue of him, on the summit of the 
hill which has been expressly designated for that purpose. 

With the rapid increase of the population of Boston and the 



surrounding cities and towns, but a brief period will have 
elapsed before the funds derived from the sale of lots in Forest 
Hills Cemetery will enable the Commissioners to render it as 
magnificent a rural burial-place as any in this country ; for a 
more pious reverence for the DEAD, a deeper sympathy, a 
holier sentiment of affection, a more enlarged and generous 
disposition to discharge all the duties inculcated upon man, in 
an exalted state of civilization, by extending appropriate honors 
to the manes of those persons who were tenderly beloved or 
highly venerated, when living, has been developed throughout 
the Union since the establishment of the rural Cemetery at Mount 
Auburn. That profound, pure, and sanctified spirit of the 
patriarchs of Judea, and that unexampled respect and attach- 
ment which was evinced by the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans, 
for their illustrious men and relatives, when at the culminating 
point of their national grandeur and refinement, and which was 
so emphatically illustrated by the excavation of sepulchres in 
the " living rock," and the construction of steles, cenotaphs, 
columns, pyramids, temples, and superb mausoleums, and other 
funereal monuments, to commemorate the names, and testify their 
affection or veneration for those who had gone down to the 
" narrow house," has again revisited the earth, and the dead 
will no longer be abandoned and forgotten, in revolting grave- 
yards, and the dark, humid, and dreary caverns formed un- 
der churches : but they will be ever present in the midst of the 
living, by having assigned to them consecrated GARDENS, 
where their names and characters will certainly be perpetuated ; 
for all succeeding generations will seek unutterable consolation 
by often repeated visits to such beautiful, quiet, and soothing 
receptacles for the earthly remains of those great and good 
men, those honored parents, and those dearly beloved children 
and friends, whose immortal spirits have ascended to the realms 
of eternal life. 



The receipts and expenditures have been as follows : 

Cost of 56 3-4 acres and 37 rods of land, bought of 

Joel Seaverns, .... $19,944 98 

Cost of 14 1-2 acres and 13 rods, of John Parkinson, 7,949 69 



$27,894 67 
Cash paid John Parkinson, .... 343 12 

$27,551 55 



86 



Receipts. 

Received for 175 lots, in cash and labor, 
" " grading lots, &c, . 
" " wood sold at auction, 
" " hay and apples, 



$8,192 


35 


3,083 


61 


219 


73 


165 


00 


$11,660 


69 



Expenditures. 

Paid for labor in making avenues, paths, grading 

lots, &c, .... 

Paid for making 6,015 feet of fence, 
" main gate-way, 
" gate-ways, office, seats, &c, 
" stone posts, 
Joel Seaverns, interest, 
for sundries, .... 
John Parkinson, for land, 
for making Forest Hills Avenue, . 
Henry Onion, surveying, 
for powder and lumber, 
" signs for avenues and paths, . 
Cash on hand, .... 



,288 81 



990 


00 


925 50 


280 


00 


450 


00 


1,196 


70 


466 


16 


343 


12 


147 05 


95 


00 


261 


m 


100 


00 


116 


69 


$11,660 


69 



The names which have been given to the Hills, Lakes, and 
such of the Avenues and Foot Paths as have been laid out, are 
as follows : 

HILLS. 



ELIOT HILLS. There are four, which are situated be- 
tween the western bounds of the Cemetery and White Oak 
avenue, and extend northerly from Walk Hill street gate, to 
the junction of the north-eastern terminus of Eliot Hills path 
with White Oak avenue. 

FOUNTAIN HILL is bounded on the south-west by Cherry, 
on the south-east by Fountain, west by Aspen, and north by 
Willow and Fountain avenues. 

MOUNT DEARBORN is bounded north by White Oak, 
east by Fountain, south by Willow, and west by Red Oak 
avenues. 



87 

MOUNT WARREN is bounded north by Walnut and Tu- 
pelo, east by Rock Maple, south by White Oak Avenues, and 
west by the Cemetery fence. 

CONSECRATION HILL is bounded north and east by the 
Cemetery fence, south by Lily path, and west by Magnolia and 
Yew avenues. 

CHAPEL HILL is bounded north by the Cemetery fence, 
east by Magnolia and Yew, and south and west by Chestnut 
avenues and the fence. 

SNOW-ELAKE CLIFF is bounded west by Mulberry, 
north by Chestnut and Tupelo, east by Larch, and south by 
Walnut avenues. 

CLOVER HILL is in front of the gate on Canterbury 
street, between Elm and Beech avenues. 

STRAWBERRY HILL is bounded north by the fence, west 
by Beech, and south by Elm and Beech avenues. 

JUNIPER HILL is bounded south by the fence, and is 
between the eastern fence and Fountain avenue. 



LAKES. 

LAKE DELL is bounded on the north by Consecration and 
Chapel Hills, south by Mount Warren, and west by Snow-Flake 
Cliff. 

WOODBINE MERE is south-east of Consecration Hill, and 
north of Lake Iris. 

LAKE IRIS — east of Rock Maple, and north of Elm and 
Fountain avenues. 

LAKE HIBISCUS— south of Elm and east of Fountain 
avenues. 

The two latter are to be excavated, and the others enlarged 
and deepened ; and it is believed, that at some future period an 
additional supply of water can and will be obtained, by forming 
a large reservoir, near the stream west of the Cemetery, or that 
south-east of Canterbury street, from which it can be filled 
and the water raised in pumps worked by a small steam engine, 
through metallic pipes, to Lake Dell, from whence it may be 
conducted to the three other lakes, and thus insure a suffi- 
cient quantity to keep them filled during the summer and au- 
tumnal months, besides affording a cascade between Lake Dell 
and Woodbine Mere, as well as fountains in all the lakes. 
A column of water a few inches in diameter, would furnish a 
quantity equal to that which escapes from those lakes by evapo- 
ration ; and the expense would be inconsiderable, compared with 



88 

the great objects attained. If neither of these sources can be 
relied upon, Jamaica Pond will certainly afford a sufficient and 
perpetual reservoir, and be thus employed ; for "when science, 
art, and ample means are combined, with an indomitable deter- 
mination to succeed, impossibilities are annihilated ; and this is 
an age in which the genius of enlightened man seems to have 
bid defiance to impediments, by his bold conceptions and won- 
derful developments in physical and intellectual progression. 

AVENUES. 

ASPEN leads from White Oak to Willow. 

BEECH leads from Canterbury street gate to Rock Maple 
avenue. 

CEDAR leads from Chestnut to Tupelo. 

CHERRY leads from Fountain to Willow. 

CHESTNUT leads from Egyptian gate, north side of Lake 
Dell, to Rock Maple. 

CYPRESS leads from Chestnut to summit of Chapel Hill. 

ELM leads from Fountain to Canterbury street gate. 

FOUNTAIN leads from Walk Hill street gate to Rock 
Maple. 

HEMLOCK leads from White Oak to Fountain. 

LARCH leads from Chestnut to Walnut. 

LINDEN leads from Eastern front of Mount Warren av- 
enue to near its western junction with White Oak. 

LOCUST leads from Egyptian Gate to Mount Warren av- 
enue. 

MAGNOLIA leads from Chestnut to the summit of Conse- 
cpSytion Hill 

MOUNT WARREN leads from White Oak to White Oak 
near its junction with Rock Maple. 

MULBERRY leads from Egyptian Gate to the junction of 
Mount Warren and Walnut avenues. 

RED OAK leads from Willow to White Oak. 

ROCK MAPLE leads from the junction of Fountain and 
White Oak to the junction of Tupelo and Chestnut. 

TUPELO leads from Chestnut, south side of Lake Dell, to 
Rock Maple. 

WALNUT leads from Tupelo to junction of Mount Warren 
and Mulberry. 

WHITE PINE leads from White Oak to Cherry. 

WILLOW leads from White Oak to Fountain. 

WHITE OAK leads from Walk Hill street gate to Rock 
Maple. 

YEW leads from Magnolia to summit of Chapel Hill. 



89 

PATHS. 

AZALIA leads from Mount Warren to Pitch Pine avenue. 

CLEMATIS leads from White Oak to Mount Warren. 

CLOVER leads from Linden avenue to Ivy path. 

COLUMBINE leads from Egyptian gate to Mulberry. 

COWSLIP leads from White Oak to junction of Sweet Brier 
and Violet paths on Mount Dearborn. 

ELDER leads from Chestnut to Magnolia, on the southern 
side of Consecration Hill. 

ELIOT HILLS leads from White Oak, near Walk Hill 
street gate, over the summits of the Eliot Hills to the junction 
of Green Brier path and White Oak avenue. 

FERN leads from White Oak avenue to Eliot Hills path. 

GRAPE leads from Mount Warren avenue to Tupelo. 

GREEN BRIER leads from White Oak avenue at its junc- 
tion with Eliot Hills path. 

HAWTHORN leads from White Oak to Eliot Hills path. 

HAZEL leads from Egyptian gate, near Mulberry, to Tu- 
pelo. 

HOLLY leads from Red Oak to Wnite Oak avenue. 

HAREBELL leads from Grape path to Walnut avenue. 

IRIS leads from White Oak to Eliot Hills path. 

IVY leads from Mount Warren to Pitch Pine avenue. 

KALMIA leads from Mount Warren, near its eastern junc- 
tion with White Oak, to Linden avenue. 

LILY leads from Chestnut to Beech. 

MAY-FLOWER leads from near the southern end of White 
Oak to Eliot Hills path. 

MISTLETOE leads from Walnut to Hazel path. 

MOSS leads from White Oak to Eliot Hills path. 

PRIMROSE leads from White Oak to junction of Sweet 
Brier, on summit of Mount Dearborn. 

ROSE leads from White Oak to Linden. 

RASPBERRY leads from Mount Warren to Linden. 

SUMACH leads from Mt. Warren avenue to Harebell path. 

SNOW-FLAKE leads from Walnut to Harebell. 

STRAWBERRY leads from Rose path to Linden avenue. 

SWEET BRIER leads from Willow to summit of Mount 
Dearborn. 

VIBURNUM leads from White Oak to Eliot Hills. 

VIOLET leads from Red Oak to the junction of Sweet Brier 
and Cowslip, on Mount Dearborn. 

The Commissioners have been very fortunate in having ob- 
tained the services of Daniel Brims as Superintendent of the 
12 



90 

Cemetery. He was educated as a horticulturist in one of the 
most celebrated nurseries in the vicinity of Edinburgh, and 
has been extensively employed, for many years, in the manage- 
ment of the grounds annexed to the country residences of sev- 
• eral gentlemen, in the environs of Boston ; but more recently 
in cultivating his own estate near the Cemetery. He has had 
the charge of the laborers which have been employed in con- 
structing the carriage avenues and foot-paths, grading and sod- 
ding lots, and various other kinds of work, in the execution of 
which he has evinced a thorough knowledge of his duties, a 
zealous interest in the prosecution of the diversified labors re- 
quired, and acquitted himself, in all respects, in such an able 
and faithful manner, as to merit unqualified approbation. 

H. A. S. DEARBORN, 
Chairman of the Board of Commissioners of 
Forest Hills Cemetery. 
Roxbury, February 18, 1849. 

In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 19, 1849. 

Read and accepted, and referred to the Committee on Ac- 
counts, with instructions to print the same. 
Sent down for concurrence, 

JOSEPH W. TUCKER, City Clerk. 

In Common Council, Feb. 19, 1849. 
Concurred. JOSHUA SEAVER, Clerk. 



REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Roxbury, Feb. 1, 1849. 
To the Honorable Mayor and Aldermen and Common Council. 
Gentlemen : 

In compliance with Section 5th of the Fire Ordinance, 
I herewith submit a report of the state and condition of the 
Engine Houses, Engines, and apparatus, with the number of 
men composing the several Companies : Also, the number of 
Reservoirs, their condition, location, &c, together with the 
number of Fires and alarms within the City, from Feb. 1st, 1848, 
to Feb. 1st, 1849, with the amount of Loss and Insurance. 

The Engine Houses, Engines, and apparatus generally are in 
good condition. The department consists of seven Engineers 
and 301 Firemen. There are 8 Engines, 7 of which are in 
use ; 9 Hose Carriages, 7 in use ; 208 feet of Suction Hose ; 
4,200 feet Leading Hose, 950 feet of which is bad ; one Hook 
and Ladder Carriage, carrying 4 Fire Hooks and 9 Ladders of 
various lengths ; 22 Reservoirs, which, with the exception of 
the ones on Walnut and Elm streets, are in good condition. 

The Department has been called out the past year, from 
Fires, 53 times ; false alarms, 13 times ; burning of chim- 
neys, 5 times ; bursting of a camphene lamp, 1 ; alarms 
originating out of the City, 34 ; total number of times called 
out, 105. The loss by Fire amounts to $34,420, with an In- 
surance of $21,000. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ABRAHAM S. PARKER, 

Chief Engineer. 



92 



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RESERVOIRS. 



No 



Situation. 



In the square, opposite Norfolk House, 

"Warren, near "Washington street, 

Corner of Washington and Eustis streets, 

Dudley street, fills from the Brook, 

Short street, 

Chestnut street, Mount Pleasant, 

Near "Webber's Ropewalk, 

Cedar street, .* 

Sidewalk, opposite No. 2, Engine House, 

Centre street, Jamaica Plain, near L. Hyde's, . 
Centre street, near Green street, Jamaica Plain 

"Washington, near Ruggles street, 

Vernon, corner of Auburn street, 

Dudley, foot of Kenilworth street, . . . ^ 

Dudley, near Warren street, 

Dudley, near Greenville street 

Eaton, corner of Yeoman street 

Centre street, opposite Dr. Stewart's, 

Porter street, 

Elm street, Mount Pleasant (not filled) , 

Walnut, corner of Warren street, 

Well, opposite No. 4, Engine House, 



Gallons of 

Water 
contained. 


Condition. 


25,000 


Good. 


30,000 


Good. 


16,000 


Good. 




Good. 


24,000 


Good. 


15,000 


Good. 


15,000 


Good. 


15,000 


Good. 


1,300 


Good. 


15,000 


Good. 


15,000 


Good. 


18,000 


Good. 


18,000 


Good. 


18.000 


Good. 


18,000 


Good. 


18,000 


Good. 


18,000 


Good. 


18,000 


Good. 


18,000 


Good. 


18,000 




18,000 




18,000 


Not good. 






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98 



EECAPITULATION. 



Number of Engineers 7 

Number ofFiremen 301 

Number of Engines 8 

Number of Hose Carriages 9 

Number of feet of Suction Hose 208 

Number of feet of Leading Hose 4200 

Number of Ladder Carriages 1 

Number of Ladders 18 

Number of Fire Hooks 10 

Number of Buckets 52 

Number of Reservoirs 22 

Number of Fires 52 

Number of false alarms 13 

Number of burning chimneys 5 

Number of alarms by bursting of campbene lamp 1 

Number of alarms originating out of the city 34 

Total number of alarms 105 

Amount of Loss by Fire #3-1,420 00 

Amount of Insurance 21,000 00 



In Board of Aldermen, Feb. 19, 1849. 
Read, accepted, and referred to the Committee on Accounts, with instructions 
to print the same. 

JOSEPH W. TUCKER, City Clerk. 



In Common Council, Feb. 19, 1849. 
Concurred. 

JOSHUA SEAVER, Clerk.