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Full text of "[City documents, 1847-1867]"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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City Document. — No. 12. 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OP THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



€xh ui Ikdurg, 



YEAR 1858. 




ROXBURY : 
L. B. & O. E. WESTON, PRINTERS, GUILD ROW. 

1 80S . 



Cits of $0&bttrj. 



In School Committee, May, 1858. 

The Chairman appointed the following members as the Annual Exam- 
ining Committees, viz. : 

High and Grammar Schools. — Messrs. Bay, Shailer, Cummings, Nute, 
Brewer and Williams. 

Primary and Intermediate Schools. — Messrs. Olmstead, Putnam, 
Seaver, Allen and Anderson. 

These Committees, through their Chairmen, submitted their Reports 
at the Quarterly Meeting in June, which were accepted. 

November, 1858. 

The Chairman appointed the same Committees to make the Quarterly 
Examination. 

At a subsequent meeting, Reports of said Examination were submitted 
and accepted. 

The Chairman, and Messrs. Ray and Olmstead were appointed a 
Committee to prepare the Annual Report for publication. 

December 15, 1858. 
The Reports of the Chairman, and Messrs. Ray and Olmstead were 
submitted and accepted. It was then 

Ordered, That 2500 copies of the same be printed, under the direction 
of said Committee, and distributed to the citizens of this City, as the 
Annual Report of the School Committee. 

JOSHUA SEAVER, Secretary. 



REPORT. 



The School Committee, to whom the citizens of Roxbury 
intrusted the "care and superintendence of the public 
schools/' for the year 1858, respectfully submit the follow- 
ing Report : 

The condition of our Public Schools is a subject which 
commends itself to, and awakens a lively interest in, the 
mind of every citizen interested in the improvement of 
the rising generation. The Committee, in the perform- 
ance of their duties, have repeatedly visited every School 
under their charge ; and examined the same each quarter. 
The results of these several examinations are embodied 
in the accompanying reports. They have endeavored to 
improve the existing system of instruction, without intro- 
ducing any radical changes ; and, so far as they were able, 
to render our Schools more efficient and profitable. They 
have the satisfaction of assuring the citizens, that the 
Schools generally are in a healthful and prosperous condi- 
tion — and will compare favorably, both as to progress 
and attainments, with those of the same grade in other 
places. 



4 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 

Much must necessarily remain for our successors to 
accomplish; and a constant supervision will be' requi- 
site, to maintain the Schools in their present efficiency, and 
adapt them to the wants of the community. 

The whole number of Public Schools, under the care of 
this Board, is Forty ; which are graded as Primary and 
Intermediate, Grammar, and High. 

The whole number of Teachers employed is Seventy ; 
including a teacher of music for the Grammar Schools, and 
one, in drawing, for the High School. 

The whole number of Pupils belonging to all the Schools, 
is Three thousand two hundred and forty-seven. 

The cost of maintaining our Public Schools the current 
year, is, exclusive of the erection and repair of buildings, 
$29,559.13, or $9.10 per Scholar. 

Primary Schools. — The number of Primary Schools is 
Thirty-three, which are under the charge of Thirty-three 
Teachers. 

The number of Pupils belonging to these Schools, is 
One thousand seven hundred and fifty-three, making an 
average to each School of Fifty-three Pupils. 

The cost of keeping the Primary Schools, the present 
year, is $11,282.61, or $6.43 per Scholar. 

The Primary Schools are located in different parts of 
the City — so as best to accommodate the younger chil- 
dren belonging to them. In some sections of the City, 
four schools occupy the same building, and are classified 
into three grades; in other sections, only one or two 
schools are kept in each house. Where there are two, 
they are arranged in two grades. Each School is com- 
posed of both boys and girls. Pupils are received into 
these Schools when five years of age, and remain members 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 5 

until prepared for admission to the Grammar Schools, the 
length of time being about three years. They are here 
taught the first rudiments of education : only a limited 
knowledge of Reading, Spelling, and Arithmetic is acquired. 
Yet here the child forms habits of study, attention, and 
order, which he will carry with him through his whole pu- 
pilage, and which will tend either to facilitate or retard 
his future progress in study. Here, too, the development 
and improvement of his moral and physical nature demands 
attention. That teacher is most successful, who, possess- 
ing a real sympathy for children, makes the school exer- 
cises attractive, as well as profitable ; who adapts her 
instruction to the capacities of her pupils, and, by familiar 
illustrations and explanations, makes every subject easily 
understood. It is by the use of such means that young 
children become interested, and are taught to think for 
themselves, and bring into use the various faculties of their 
minds. 

During the year, the City Authorities have erected a 
fine building in Ward 3, to aiford additional accommoda- 
tion for Primary School children residing in that part of the 
City. The structure is two stories in height, and contains 
four large rooms, and connected with each is a convenient 
dressing room. The school yard affords ample play ground 
for the pupils ; and altogether, the building is as neat and 
convenient a Primary School House as any in the City. 
The building, soon after it was placed in the hands of the 
School Committee, was occupied by the two schools for- 
merly kept in Orange Street, by the one lately in a 
hired room on Washington Street, and by the school newly 
organized. 

All the Primary School Houses in the City are, with one 
or two exceptions, in good condition, commodious and well 
adapted to school purposes. 



6 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 

Intermediate School. — This School is situated on 
Vernon Street, Ward 2, numbering Eighty-eight Pupils, 
who are arranged in two divisions, and are under the charge 
of two Teachers. 

The cost of maintaining this School, for the year, is 
$856.64, or $9.73 per Scholar. 

The rank of the Intermediate is the same as that of the 
Primary Schools. It is composed of boys over eight years 
of age, who are not qualified for admission to the Grammar 
Schools, many of whom never enjoyed the benefits of any 
previous instruction. The Pupils are promoted to the 
Grammar Schools, as soon as they are sufficiently advanced 
in their studies. 

Grammar Schools. — There are five Grammar Schools 
in the City. The Pupils belonging to each of these, are 
arranged in the following number of Divisions : nine in the 
Washington, six in the Dearborn (both for boys); — seven 
in the Dudley, five in the Comins (both for girls); — and 
one in the Francis Street (mixed). Each Division, averag- 
ing Forty-eight Pupils, is under the charge of a single 
Teacher ; with the addition of an Assistant to the Princi- 
pal in the First Division of the Washington, Dearborn and 
Dudley Schools — making the number of permanent Teach- 
ers Thirty-one. 

The whole number of Pupils belonging to the Grammar 
Schools, is One thousand three hundred and thirty-seven. 

The cost of maintaining these Schools, the current year, 
is $15,160.92, or $10.60 per Scholar. 

Pupils are admitted to the Grammar Schools, from the 
Primary and Intermediate, semi-annually. Those who 
complete the regular course of study, remain members four 
or five years ; during which time, every facility and en- 
couragement are afforded them to obtain an education, in 
all the branches of study necessary to qualify them for the 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 7 

High School, or to enable them intelligently to act their 
part in the ordinary pursuits of life. 

It is to be regretted, that so many pupils leave school be- 
fore completing the regular course of study ; and that some 
fail to derive so much advantage, as they otherwise might, 
by want of thoroughness in the more elementary studies, or 
by frequent absence. Pupils are sometimes promoted to 
a higher division, with the other members of the class, be- 
fore they, from want of capacity or other causes, thorough- 
ly understand the ground gone over ; but as these promo- 
tions are generally made to make room for the next lower 
class or division already full, they cannot always be avoid- 
ed. A pupil may, from various reasons, fail to secure an 
education equal to others of the same class ; but none can 
pass through the different classes of our Grammar Schools, 
without acquiring much useful knowledge, and receiving 
that training of the intellectual and moral faculties, which 
will be of inestimable advantage in after life. 

The several Grammar School Houses are conveniently 
located. The want of accommodation, for boys in the 
Western Section of the City, and for girls in the Eastern, 
has caused the overflow of the two Central Schools. It 
has been found necessary to form a Division of the Wash- 
ington School in the Primary School House in Orange 
Street; but this can only afford temporary relief, besides 
being remote from the main building. Three Divisions of 
the Dudley School are kept in two different buildings, 
separate from the main house, one of which does not be- 
long to the City, and is not adapted to school purposes. 
There will be a demand for the accommodation of 
another Division within a few months. And that all the 
pupils may be provided with suitable privileges and con- 
veniences in attending school, further accommodation must 
soon be made for both boys and girls. 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 

High School (for Girls). — This School numbers 
Sixty-nine Pupils, who are under the charge of two 
Teachers. 

The cost of maintaining the High School, the present 
year, is $2258.96, or $32.74 per Scholar. 

The High School for Girls is designed to give, to those 
who have completed the Grammar School studies, and are 
able to pass a satisfactory examination in the same, such 
an education in all the requisite branches of study, as will 
enable them to act efficiently as teachers in our schools, 
or to be, by its refining and elevating influence, the better 
prepared for the active duties of life. 

The Latin and the English High School for Boys, 
are free and open to all who possess the qualifications re- 
quired by the Trustees. The former school is designed 
to prepare boys for College ; the latter, to give them a 
thorough English education. The School Committee have 
no care or control over these Schools, and cannot report 
upon their condition. 

Teachers. — The teachers employed in our schools 
are nearly the same as those of last year; some few 
changes have been made, caused by the resignation of 
those who were appointed to more lucrative situations in 
other places, and those who were about to assume other 
duties. Their places have been filled by new appoint- 
ments. Two teachers have been added to the number, 
one for the new division of the Washington School, the 
other for the new Primary School in Ward 3. 

In every instance of an appointment, the Committee, 
after a thorough examination of the literary qualifications, 
credentials, &c, of each applicant, have selected the one 
who afforded the best evidences of being qualified and 
adapted for the particular vacancy, and after placing her 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 9 

on trial for several months, if she then gave satisfaction, 
the appointment was confirmed, but not otherwise. 

It is a mistake to suppose that a teacher will succeed, 
because she possesses the requisite literary attainments ; 
for beside these qualifications, she must understand how 
to impart instruction, and, when a subject is being studied 
or recited, be able to explain every difficulty, to the com- 
prehension of her pupils ; she must have sufficient knowl- 
edge of Physiology and Hygiene, to understand the inju- 
rious effects of inadequate ventilation, bad position, and 
want of exercise j she must know the best methods to 
subdue the obstinate, arouse the indolent, and encourage 
the dull, and to win the confidence and affection of all ; 
she must be able to correct the bad habits and evil ten- 
dencies of her pupils, and set forth the attractions of mo- 
rality and piety. If she does not possess these requisites, 
she is not qualified for the position to which she aspires. 

It is a greater mistake, to suppose that teachers of in- 
ferior attainments will answer for Primary Schools, or 
that almost any one can teach small children. It is most 
important to commence aright in the process of education. 
Habits of study and order are soon formed, and when 
once formed, it is almost impossible to change them. The 
education a child receives in the Primary School, is the 
basis, largely, of all his after attainments, and shapes and 
directs his course in maturer years. Hence, only compe- 
tent and thoroughly qualified teachers should have charge 
of the Primary Schools. 

Most of our teachers are successful and efficient, devo- 
ted to their work, and especially valuable to their par- 
ticular schools. 

Parents. — It is a gratifying fact, that so few com- 
plaints have been made during the year, in reference to 
our schools. Whenever any distinct charge has been 
made, it has received the prompt attention of the Com- 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 

mittee ; if it was well founded, and sustained by facts, such 
action was taken as to prevent a repetition of the offence, 
and to remove all proper grounds of complaint. All teachers 
are required by this Board to maintain order, and secure 
obedience to the rules of the school, without the use of 
harsh or improper means. If a child is treated with un- 
due severity, it should be made known to the Committee, 
whose duty it is to see that justice is done to the child, 
as well as to the teacher. The welfare of the schools 
would be promoted, if parents generally were more dis- 
posed to aid the teachers and Committee in the work of 
education; by conferring, in a spirit of confidence, with 
them, in any case of difficulty; by inculcating upon their 
children the duty of obedience to the rules of the school, 
and respect for the teachers, and by exhibiting more in- 
terest in the studies and exercises of the school room. 

Truancy. — The City Ordinance in relation to truant 
children, and absentees from school, is of little avail in di- 
minishing the number of idle, vicious boys, about our 
streets. The want of some suitable place, to which they 
could be committed after being arrested by the truant offi- 
cers, is sensibly felt. Should the City Government pro- 
vide a house of reformation for juvenile offenders, means 
would then be furnished to carry out the design of the 
Law. The existence of such a place, with a certainty of 
the execution of the Ordinance, would have a salutary in- 
fluence, in deterring many from becoming truants, while 
those who should be subjected to the discipline of such a 
place, would be reclaimed, and instead of pursuing a course 
of vice and crime, would there form habits of industry and 
honesty. 

Committee. — The care of the Public Schools has be- 
come more important, and more laborious, than it was for- 
merly. The Committee have promptly met the increasing 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 11 

demand upon their time, although the proper discharge of 
the duties imposed upon them, in this relation, has at 
times seriously interfered with their other engagements. 
The interest to be looked after has become so extended, 
that the expediency of enlarging the Committee, or 
employing a Superintendent of the Schools, demands at- 
tention. 

During the greater part of the year, the Committee have 
been deprived of the experience and valuable services of 
one of their number; one who has so faithfully devoted 
his time and talents to the interests of the Public Schools 
of this City, for the last seven years. It is a satisfaction 
to know, that he has regained his health, the loss of which 
caused him to withdraw from the duties of Chairman. 

HORATIO G. MORSE. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Examined May 2\st. 

Several of the Committee were present, and devoted 
the whole of the day to this school. Very marked success 
attended every exercise. Reading, Spelling and Defining 
were every way creditable. 

In Algebra, Geometry and Natural Philosophy, the pu- 
pils showed a quickness of comprehension, and power of 
thought highly gratifying. 

French and Latin Sentences selected by the Committee 
were read and translated with remarkable correctness and 
fluency. The presence of several ladies and gentlemen, 
who came in to witness the exercises, together with the 
enthusiastic and ready manner of the scholars, contributed 
to make the occasion one of unusual interest. When we 
remember that this school was organized less than four 
years ago, we feel justified in saying that it has met our 
highest expectations ; and that it is preeminently entitled 
to occupy the honorable position we feel it has already at- 
tained in the estimation of the public, as well as among 
the High Schools of this Commonwealth. And we con- 
gratulate our citizens upon the possession of such efficient 
aid in the moral and intellectual training of their children 
as it presents. No amount of interest which they do, or 
may in future manifest in its behalf, no amount of judicious 
expenditure of money for its accommodation and support, 
will, we think, fail to give a full and satisfactory reward. 
The school is not large, and so long as only girls are ad- 
mitted, and the supply comes chiefly from our present 
Grammar Schools for Girls, its number will not be, per- 
haps, very greatly increased. 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 13 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

The labor of examining these schools was sub-divided as 
follows: The exercises in Reading, Spelling, Defining and 
Declamation were conducted by Messrs. Ray and Brewer, 
— in Grammar, History, Writing, Compositions and Book 
Keeping by Messrs. Nute and Williams, — in Arithmetic 
and Geography by Messrs. Cummings and Shailer. 

The number of Grammar Schools remains unchanged. 
The Washington and Dudley continue very much crowded, 
to the great inconvenience of teachers and pupils, and the 
Committee regret to report that a large number of boys 
have been denied admission to the Washington School 
who were fully qualified to enter, for want of room, and 
made to suffer great injustice at our hands, by being kept 
in the Primary Schools while they should be enjoying the 
advantages of promotion. 

Foreseeing this difficulty and recognizing the moral and 
legal right of parents to require of the City through the 
Board of School Committee suitable accommodations for 
the education of their children, the Board of last year re- 
quested the City Council to furnish such accommodations as 
the obvious necessities of the case demanded, but were re- 
fused. At a meeting of the Board in the early part of the 
present year, the subject was again presented, and the im- 
mediate and pressing wants of these Schools, properly and 
respectfully' urged. The very unsafe condition of the 
Washington School House, the probable cost of altering 
and enlarging it to meet the demand, the necessity for 
a substitution of more modern seats and desks for the 
present inconvenient and health-destroying ones which the 
scholars are compelled to occupy, together with such eco- 
nomical reasons as the whole subject suggested, were, it is 
believed, faithfully represented. But the Committee on 



14 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 

Public Property reported against making any appropria- 
tion for the purpose, and, therefore, the request of the 
Board of School Committee was again refused. 

The subject is, however, by no means disposed of, and 
it is confidently expected that the desired alterations and 
improvements in the Washington School building, will be 
made during the coming season. 

DEPARTMENT OF READING, SPELLING, DEFINING AND 
DECLAMATION. 

Eight days were devoted to the examination in these 
studies, and so nearly alike did all the Divisions appear, 
age and grade considered, that the Committee think it 
not necessary to single out any of them for either censure 
or praise. Reading in all cases was good, and in some 
instances, excellent. 

The habit which many of the scholars have of holding 
the book too low, and bending the head so far forward as 
to cramp the vocal organs, thereby preventing a clear and 
distinct utterance, greatly marred the otherwise creditable 
performance ; and seriously endangers the health. Nearly 
all the defects which were noticed in this truly valuable 
exercise were chargeable to a bad position of the body. 
Spelling, in some instances, fell a little below the point de- 
sired, yet, on the whole, it might be considered as good. 
Each Division contains about forty-eight pupils; but so 
many were absent on account of sickness as to reduce the 
number present on the day of examination to about forty. 
The words were selected from the reading lesson by the 
examiner, and each scholar allowed to spell once. Four 
words in each Division, on an average, were misspelled. 

The Definitions in most cases were not so clear and 
distinct as could be desired. There seemed to be a want 
of language to express the precise idea. Your committee 
regard this as a very important branch of study, and one 
which should receive greater attention. 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 15 

GRAMMAR, HISTORY, WRITING, COMPOSITION, AXD 
ROOK KEEPING. 

English Grammar. — In the lower Divisions of the 
Grammar Schools, the examiner proposed various extem- 
poraneous questions, involving some of the more simple 
and obvious principles of this study, and required answers 
to the same verbally and from memory. But in the first 
Divisions, and in the Girls' High School, a different and 
more reliable method was adopted. A list of eighteen 
questions embodying many essential and leading principles 
of English Grammar were given to each school, and the 
pupils required to answer them in writing. The impor- 
tance of this branch of study, in the opinion of the Com- 
mittee, cannot well be over-estimated, and the examination 
was conducted in a manner correspondingly thorough. 
The result, as a whole, is creditable to the scholars and 
their respective teachers, and satisfactory to the examiner. 

History, Writing, &c. — Goodrich's History of the 
United States is used as a text book in this branch of 
study, which is not much taught below the 1st Divisions. 

The scholars were questioned concerning the discover- 
ers of our country, the early history of the Colonies, the 
War of the Revolution, the first settlers of the different 
States — their characteristics and the principal events in 
their early history; and they answered correctly and 
promptly. — Some of the scholars delineated upon the 
black board the battle of New Orleans, and the capture 
of the city of Washington in the last war, in a manner 
which showed an intimate knowledge of the history of 
those events. — There are, perhaps, few accomplishments 
of greater practical utility than a plain, easy and uniform 
hand writing. This, under a judicious system of instruc- 
tion, almost all, perhaps, may acquire, though all may not 
become elegant writers in the highest sense of the word. 



1G CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 

Very gratifying proficiency in this important branch has 
been made during the year past. In Composition consid- 
erable progress has been made in the higher Divisions. 
It is the practice of the teachers to furnish the pupils sub- 
jects On which to write, and to combine good writing with 
good composition in estimating its merits. Some very 
scholarly productions, and beautifully written, were shown 
the Committee, in the 1st and 2d Divisions. — Book Keep- 
ing is taught to a limited extent, showing the pupil how to 
keep in convenient and simple form ordinary accounts, to 
make out bills, drafts, &c, so as to qualify him, should he 
pursue the study no further, to keep accurate accounts of 
the ordinary business transactions of life. 

ARITHMETIC AND GEOGRAPHY. 

Arithmetic. — The examiner intended to devote suffi- 
cient time to this department to enable him to judge of 
the condition and comparative advancement of the classes. 
He remarks that, after having gone through with the exam- 
ination, the conviction was left that the Schools had an- 
swered a reasonable expectation. The methods of dif- 
ferent teachers are so various that the same method of 
examination with about the same list of questions will 
show seeming inequalities which do not in reality exist, 
and commendation or blame is very likely to be misplaced. 

The advancement in the text-book of the classes of the 
same grade in the different schools is about equal. " The 
exceeding value of intellectual and analytical Arithmetic 
is apparent; and continued and large attention to these is 
to be commended." 

" The practical shorter methods of analysis, which may 
be carried into all the different rules, should be instilled 
for the purpose of practical life as well as for the intellec- 
tual training and the ultimate principles and philosophy of 
fin-ures." 



SCIIOOL REPORTS. 17 

Geography. — Several days "were spent in the examina- 
tion in this study. The large amount of absences for sev- 
eral months past, occasioned by sickness among the pupils, 
had an important effect in the results of this, as well as of 
the other examinations. " It is not our design," says the 
examiner, " to speak fully, at this time, of the results of 
our examination in each class seperately, and in detail, as 
such a course would extend this Report to an unreasonable 
length. As a whole the classes sustained the examination 
as well as, under the circumstances, could have been ex- 
pected. The average of correct answers in all the divis- 
ions examined, was about seventy-five per cent., which is 
a very fair average indeed, and shows conclusively that the 
teachers have labored hard, and successfully, and are worthy 
of our confidence. 

Various methods of teaching Geography are employed 
by the Teachers, — and although much knowledge in this 
important study had been acquired by the pupils, we fear 
that sufficient prominence has not been given to the Ge- 
ography of our own Country, — its Soil, Productions, — 
Climate, — Commerce, — Government, — Religion,. &c. 
Several excellent specimens of Map Drawing, executed by 
the pupils in the Washington and Dearborn Schools, were 
examined, and the Committee recommend a continuance of 
the practice, and also that it be introduced into the Dudley 
and Comins Schools. 

MUSIC AND DRAWING. 

"In these ornamental branches of education, the ex- 
amination was strictly elementary and conducted upon 
the inductive principle. It was somewhat protracted 
and thorough. In the former branch, it embraced the 
whole of the first and second departments of music, called 
Rythm and Melody. In the latter, it was confined to the 
principles of Linear and Perspective Drawing. And suffice 

3 



18 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 

it to say, that the pupils examined gave convincing evidence 
of having put forth untiring efforts to acquire a practical 
knowledge of these accomplishments. It is due to the pu- 
pils to say that, with few exceptions; they bore the exami- 
nation in a manner highly creditable to themselves and 
their accomplished and worthy teachers, and which fully 
satisfied the Committee that the small outlay required to 
continue instruction in these ornamental branches, is a ju- 
dicious and commendable expenditure." 

EDWIN RAY. 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 19 



STATEMENT OF THE EXAMINATION IN ENGLISH 
GRAMMAR. 

[Prepared by Dr. T. R. Nute, Examiner.] 
QUESTIONS. 

1. Define English Grammar, and state the several parts to which its 
principles relate. 

2. State the several departments of English Grammar, and define 
each. 

3. State the several classes of words or parts of speech, and define 
each. 

4. Mention the several classes or kinds of the noun, define each class, 
state its several properties, and define each. 

5. Mention the several classes of the adjective, define each class, state 
its several degrees of comparison, define each, and state in how many 
and hy what ways it is compared. 

6. Mention the several classes of the adverb, define each class, state 
its several degrees of comparison, define each, and state in how many 
and by what ways it is compared. 

7. Mention the several classes of the pronoun, define each, state its 
properties, define each, mention the several leading personal pronouns 
and decline the second person in both numbers. 

8. Mention the several kinds or varieties of the verb, define each 
state its several properties, define each, and mention its several voices 
and define each. 

9. Define the term mood, mention the several used in English Gram- 
mar, define each, and state the auxiliaries used in each mood. 

10. Define the term tense, mention the several used in English Gram- 
mar, define each, state which are used in each mood, and give the sign 
of each in each of the different moods. 

11. Write a synopsis, with the pronoun I, of the verb touch, through 
each of the several moods, through each of the several voices, in each 
of the several tenses, and mention the several participles derived from 
the same verb. 

12. Inflect the verb touch in the indicative mood, past tense, passive 
voice ; in the potential mood, active voice, past perfect tense ; in the 
subjunctive mood, passive voice, future perfect tense ; in the infinitive 
mood, active voice, perfect tense ; and in the imperative mood, passive 
voice, present tense. 

13. "Write the plural number of each of the following words, viz : 
loaf, grief, journey, fancy, this, that, and state the rule for its forma- 
tion, in each instance. 



20 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 

14. Write two sentences, one containing a noun in the possessive 
case, singular number, and the other, containing a noun in the posses- 
sive case, plural number, and state the rule for its formation, in each 
number. 

15. Compare the following words, viz. : few, many, near, far, wisely, 
ignorant, well, soon, beautiful, and state the rule applicable to the 
comparison of each word. 

16. Decline the principal relative pronouns in both numbers. 

17. Correct the errors in the following sentences, viz : Both cold and 
heat have its extremes. Books not pleasure occupies his mind. Pa- 
tience and diligence, like faith, removes mountains. He not they 
are mistaken. Several persons were entered into the conspiracy. 

18. Parse, in accordance with the several models laid down in tho 
Grammar used, each word in the following sentence, viz : The lips of 
Isaiah, the prophet, were touched with fire. 

The above questions, in the aggregate, resolve themselves into 140 
particulars, which were answered as follows, viz : — 

Girls' High School. 
First Division — Senior Class. 
The average No. of correct answers was 135, or 97 per cent. 

Middle Class. 
The average No. of correct answers was 133, or 95 per cent. 

Junior Class. 
The average No. of correct answers was 131, or 93 per cent. 

"Washington School. 
First Division — First Class. 
The average No. of correct answers was 127, or 90 per cent. 

Second Class. 
The average No. of correct answers was 115, or 82 per cent. 

Comins School. 
First Division — First Class. 
The average No. of correct answers was 125, or 89 per cent. 

Second Class. 
The average No. of correct answers was 108, or 77 per cent. 

Dearborn School. 
First Division — First Class. 
The average No. of correct answers was 121, or 87 per cent. 

Second Class. 
The average No. of correct answers was 112, or 80 per cent. 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 



21 



Francis Street School. 
Tlio average number of correct answers was 113, or 81 per cent. 

Dudley School. 
First Division — First Class. 
Tho average No. of correct answers was 98, or 70 per cent. 

Second Class. 
The averago No. of correct answers was 95, or 68 per cent. 



TABULAR ABSTRACT.— Br Classes. 



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16 
25 
25 
23 

9 
16 
20 
19 

9 
20 
25 



Girls' High School — Senior Class 
Middle " 
Junior " 
Washington School — First Class. 
Second " . 

Coniins School — First Class 

Second " 

Dearborn School — First Class .... 
Second " 

Francis St. School 

Dudley School — First Class 

Second " 



135 


5 


97 


3 


133 


7 


95 


5 


131 


9 


93 


7 


127 


13 


90 


10 


115 


25 


82 


18 


125 


15 


89 


11 


108 


32 


77 


23 


121 


19 


87 


13 


112 


28 


80 


20 


113 


27 


81 


19 


98 


42 


70 


30 


95 


45 


68 


32 



m 

16* 

151 

131 

13* 

14£ 

13* 

141 

14£ 

131 

15 

14* 



TABULAR ABSTRACT. — Br Schools. 



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49 


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133 


7 


95 


5 


16* 


51 


Washington " . . 


121 


19 


86 


14 


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25 


Comins " . 


117 


23 


83 


17 


14 


39 


Dearborn " 


116 


24 


82 


18 


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9 


Francis Street " . . 


113 


27 


81 


19 


131 


49 


Dudley •• . . 


97 


43 


69 


31 


14f 



TABULAR ABSTRACT. — In the Aggregate. 



O HI'S 
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ALL THE SCHOOLS COMBINED. 


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U* 



REPORT ON PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

Examined May, 1858. 

Besides the writer hereof, the Committee to whom was 
assigned the annual examination, so called, of the Thirty- 
three* Primary and Intermediate Schools of the City of 
Roxbury, were Rev. Dr. Putnam, Ira Allen, M. D., Joshua 
Seaver, and R. P. Anderson, Esqs. The absence of Dr. 
Putnam, for a number of weeks, at the period of the Ex- 
amination, gave him valid claim to be excused from 
service, which was promptly discharged by the acting 
Chairman of the School Committee, Dr. H. G. Morse. 
The Committee on the Primary Schools performed their 
labor mostly during the month of May, preceding immedi- 
ately the close of the Spring Term. They found many of 
the schools greatly thinned in number, and put back in at- 
tainments, by the prevalence of an epidemic, (Measles,) 
which had raged for weeks previously. From this cause, 
some of the schools had been more than decimated, reach- 
ing in a few cases to a reduction to half their usual at- 
tendance. It must be plain, that the operation of such an 
agency, just at the time of its existence, must have been a 
serious hindrance to the favorable appearance of not a 
few of the schools. 

The schools examined by Dr. Allen were numbers 9, 10, 
15, 16, 18, 19 and 22, being those in Vernon Street, Avon 
Place, and Francis Street. Teachers : Misses Fay, Durant, 
Backup, Adams, Russell, Rice, and Waldock. " Satisfac- 
tory," and "very satisfactory," are the terms used by the 

* By the completion of the new Primary School House on Heath 
Place, the number of the Primary and Intermediate Schools is now 
Thirty-four. 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 23 

examiner, in describing the state of these schools. The 
largest number of pupils present (in No. 19, in Orange 
Street,) was 75, the average belonging to the School being 
87; the smallest attendance is in connection with the 
School in Francis Street, 21. The largest per centage of 
attendance is in the most numerous school, — Orange 
Street, — 91.|, though Number 9, in Vernon Street, 
nearly equals it, being plus 91; the lowest per cent. 
of attendance is 79. These schools are generally large, 
exceeding forty, and, in some cases, fifty scholars. Dr. 
Allen thinks the number connected with Number 19, of 
the Orange Street School, " altogether too many for one 
teacher," and hopes " the new School House will soon be 
completed, and better accommodations provided.''" Still 
he found " the order good, and the school in a healthy con- 
dition," which, in such circumstances of disadvantage, re- 
flects, he well concludes, much credit on the teacher. 
The school room of Number 10, in Vernon Street, 
wants facilities for better ventilation. The First Class 
in Number 9, of the same school, are using the text 
books used in the Grammar School, by permission of the 
Local Committee. This class consists of twenty-five, out 
of nearly sixty, in the school. They might enter the 
Grammar Schools, were room offered for that purpose. 
The over crowded condition of several of the schools, is 
due to the same cause. 

Dr. Morse examined the four Schools in Yeoman Street, 
under the instruction of Misses Jennison, Brown, Bab- 
cock and Hosmer, which schools have an aggregate of 238 
pupils, or an average of 59 J. " The examination was 
every way satisfactory," "the teachers are faithful and effi- 
cient." The classification of the schools, by which the 
scholars pass from one to the other, through a graded 
scale, is thought to promote progress, and was " so appa- 
rent " to the examiner, that he recommends it for " adop- 
tion in all cases where it is practicable." Seventy-five pu- 



24 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 

pils were admitted to the two lower schools, during the 
quarter, and sixteen in the first were prepared for the 
Grammar Schools at the time of the last promotion. The 
per centage of attendance in two of these schools reaches 
92, in the others 89 and 90. 

Mr. Seaver examined the two schools on Smith Street 
— teachers, Misses Waldock and Eaton, — the four schools 
in Sudbury Street, taught by Misses Dickerman, Stone, 
Bills and Williams, also the school at the Mill Dam, Miss 
Holbrook's. Some of these schools, as that last named 
depending on a floating population, and having pupils rang- 
ing from 5 to 13 years of age, and the over crowded one in 
Smith Street, labor under disadvantages which, however, 
have been coped with in a successful manner. Mr. Seaver 
speaks in one case of a little lack of energy in one of the 
teachers, but applies the terms "well," and " excellent," to 
the schools generally, which he examined. The per cent- 
age of attendance in the Smith Street Schools, is 92 and 
87; in the Sudbury Street, somewhat less. Speaking of 
the matter of order, he says : " Of all the schools exam- 
ined, a large majority of the scholars are children of for- 
eigners, but the best order was manifested by those who 
had the best teacher to govern, so that I do not wish to 
hear that if a school is not well governed, or well taught, 
it is because the pupils are foreign, for I believe the fault 
is in the teacher." 

The largest number of Schools examined by any one 
member of the Committee, was by Mr. Anderson, ten in 
all, being the two Schools in Centre Street, taught by 
Misses "Wood and Morse, the two in Edinboro' Street, 
Misses Savage and Hewes, the two in Eustis Street, taught 
by Misses Wales and Davis, the two in Sumner Street, 
Misses Young and Neal, also the Monroe and Washington 
Street Schools, under the instruction of Misses Chenery 
and Duncklee. He speaks of these schools, for the most 
part, in terms of commendation, as exhibiting "cleanli- 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 25 

ness," " goo<5 order," " contentment," and a * disciplfne," 
including affection, as a prominent element In all lie 
found, in addition to the branches usually taught, phonet- 
ics attended to. The manner of ingress and egress of the 
school rooms on Centre Street, were found objectionable, 
and the situation of the School on Washington Street is 
noisy and bad, accounting, in a measure, for the lack 
of order in the school, — if not for the want of proper 
ventilation. The per centage of attendance in No. 23, 
Centre Street, is 93. The largest is that of School 
No. 5, Eustis Street, 95; No. 6, in the same building, 
reaches 92. 

The examination of the Intermediate School on Vernon 
Street, taught by Miss Delia Mansfield and Miss N. L. 
Tucker, was conducted in the Spring and Fall Terms, by 
Messrs. Seaver and Anderson, both of whom speak of the 
the School in warm commendation. The 'programme of 
studies, as submitted by the teachers, shows a defined aim, 
which includes, very manifestly, the idea of efficiency and 
progress. 

The Schools not already enumerated, were examined, so 
far as he was able to attend to that service, by Mr. Olm- 
stead. These were the Schools in Heath Street, taught 
by Miss Heath, Winthrop Street, by Miss Brooks, and the 
two Schools in Elm Street, under the tuition of Misses 
Dudley and Scammell. The per centage of attendance, 
owing to the cause named at the beginning of the Report, 
has not been up to the usual average, ranging from some 
seventy to eighty, and more. The schools, especially 
those in the Fifth Ward, were found in a good condition, 
in respect both of discipline and teaching. The Heath 
Street School labors under the disadvantage of being the 
only one, in a large territory, where there is a demand 
for Grammar School instruction, besides being, as com- 
pared with nearly all the others, newly organized. The 
keeping of such a school requires qualifications, not alone 
4 



26 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 

of experience, and knowledge, and character, but of adap- 
tation. Your Committee are impressed with the need of 
the presence of this element in the guidance, especially, of 
our Primary Schools. The pupil is taken here at. an age 
of great susceptibility to the moulding influence of sympa- 
thy, and of the hand that almost instinctively touches the 
delicate springs of opening being and character. One 
cannot pass through these schools without marking how 
important is the possession of this power. He will be 
led to question, we think, whether beyond a certain age in 
the teachers, especially of such schools, that power, with 
rare exceptions, does not begin to decay. 

Since the foregoing was written, the Fall examination 
of the Primary and Intermediate Schools of the City, has 
been assigned to the same Committee, who have, without 
exception, performed the duty faithfully. The attendance, 
generally, was found better than at the annual examina- 
tion, but complaint in most cases was made of the loss of 
the most advanced pupils, by promotion to the Grammar 
Schools. The Committee bear uniform testimony on points 
of order, and of general features, in the schools. They are 
reported, with almost no exception, in a healthy and good 
condition. In the matter of phonetic, and other vocal 
drill — in some cases singing included — the Committee 
found a difference. In a few schools singing seems at 
such a discount, as to have nearly or quite ceased, as an 
exercise ; in others there was no method of physical exci- 
tation, and discipline, by means of varied positions; in yet 
others, the drill by analysation, if ever adopted, had gone 
into disuse. Decline in all these respects is lamented, on 
grounds as well of wholesome diversion to very young 
minds, as of other utility. It must be clear that the chil- 
dren in our Primary Schools need, quite as much as good 
instruction, a certain tact in the use of proper expedients 
for the right play and employment of the juvenile restless- 
ness, and the enthusiastic sport which, at so early an age, 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 27 

assert themselves. The mind is then commonly less active 
than the body, and the mental far less than the flow of an- 
imal spirits. Formation is what is now wanted, and in its 
development the teacher should know well how to touch 
the right " strings," and make thus good music on those 
immortal instruments, with which, for a brief season, she is 
largely entrusted. 

To do this well, is quite as needful and important, as 
the most successful rudimentary teaching. Your Commit- 
tee believe this qualification — including, always, the right 
moral influence — can never be kept too distinctly before 
the minds of our Primary School Teachers — teachers 
whose vocation, as one of normal influence and power, 
yields to no other. 

J. W. OLMSTEAD. 



2S 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 1%. 



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30 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 12. 



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Yeoman Street. 

Eustis Street. . . 
Sumner Street. 

Eustis Street. . . 
Vernon Street. 

Sudbury Street. 
Avon Place. . .. 

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Mill Dam. . . . 
Heath Place. . • 


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No. 1. Sarah T. Jennison. 

2. Eliza Brown. . . . 

3. Sarah 0. Babcock. 

4. Sarah H. Hosmer. 

5. Margaret E. Davis. . 

6. Maria L. Young. . . 

7. Mary F. Neal. . . . 

8. Emma C. Wales. . . 

9. Harriet H. Fay. . . 

10. Susannah L. Durant. 

11. Sophia L. Stone. . . 

12. Charlotte Williams. . 

13. Cornelia J. Bills. . . 

14. Sarah E. Field. . . 

15. Ann M. Backup. . . 

16. Clara M. Adams. . . 

17. Sarah W. Holbrook. . 

18. Almira B. Russell. 



SCHOOL REPORTS. 



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SCHOOL COMMITTEE, FOE 1859. 



ELECTED AT LARGE. 

George Putnam, Arial I. Cummings, William A. Crafts. 

ELECTED BY "WARDS. 

Ward 1. — Horatio G.Morse, Franklin Williams. 
" 2. — Joshua Seaver, Ira Allen. 
" 3. — Timothy R. Nute, Richard Garvey. 
" 4. — Joseph N. Brewer, John W. Olmstead. 
" 5. — Edwin Ray, Robert P. Anderson.