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Full text of "[City documents, 1847-1867]"

City Document — No. 1. 

ADDRESS 



HON. THEODORE OTIS, 

MAYOB, 



%\z dig Cmmcil of Ikekrj, 



DELIVERED BEFORE THE 



TWO BRANCHES IN CONVENTION, 

January 3, 1859. 




ROXBURY: 

PRINTED FOR THE CITY COUNCIL. 

1859. 



U 



(jlitg of Ho*bnrt). 

_+_ '•• 7 

In Board op Aldermen, Jan. 3, 1859. 

Ordered, That one thousand copies of the Address of His Honor the Mayor 
be printed for the use of the City Council, and for distribution among the cit- 
izens. 

Sent down for concurrence. 

JOSEPH W. TUCKEE, City Clerk. 



Concurred. 



In Common Council, Jan. 3, 1859. 
FRANKLIN WILLIAMS, Clerk. 



JOHN M. HEWE3, FRINTEB. 



ADDRESS. 



Gentlemen op the City Council : 

We are assembled to organize the fourteenth Mu- 
nicipal Government of the City of Koxbury. Let us 
gratefully return thanks to God, that, at this commence- 
ment of a new year, we are enabled, in health and pros- 
perity, to enjoy the high and responsible privilege of 
self-government ; that the beautiful City of our choice or 
our birth has been visited by no overwhelming calamity 
of sickness or fire ; that general prosperity, industry and 
contentment prevail. Having been honored by the gen- 
erosity of my fellow-citizens with the responsible and 
important office now assumed, allow me to express to 
you, and through you to them, the sincerity of my grat- 
itude for this unexpected expression of their confidence 
and trust. If by the entire devotion of my time and 
abilities to the best interests of our 'City, I can satisfy the 
just expectations of her citizens, my highest ambition 
will be gratified. Unacquainted with some parts of her 
territory and many of her citizens — not familiar with the 
details of municipal affairs, it better becomes me to ap- 
pear before you as a learner than teacher. It will not 



4 MAYOR'S ADDRESS. [Jan. 

be expected that I should take up and discuss the affairs 
of the City minutely and in detail. That duty was so 
fully and ably done last year by the mature experience 
and ripe wisdom of my worthy predecessor, that I deem 
it unnecessary. In a few days, too, you will have laid 
before you full reports by the respective officers of the 
government. 

SCHOOLS. 

The Annual Report of the School Committee, now 
printed, will give you full particulars of that department. 
The schools are represented to be " generally in a health- 
ful and prosperous condition, and as comparing favorably, 
both as to progress and attainments, with those of the 
same grade in other places." 

The citizens of Roxbury have always evinced a lively 
interest in having good teachers, and making liberal ap- 
propriations for our schools. It would encourage and 
gratify those teachers, and essentially benefit the schools 
if our citizens would frequently visit them. We owe it 
to teachers, scholars and ourselves to do so. Parents 
should make the acquaintance of their child's teacher as 
far as is practicable. This to some extent is the case ; 
but it should be more general. An acquaintance with a 
large number of our teachers, enables me, with great 
pleasure, to bear testimony to their fidelity and ability. 
They are skilful, competent, trustworthy, and should be 
liberally paid. With this they will be satisfied ; and 
short of this we should not be. And while, on the one 
hand, we should not be governed by the general average 
wages of the State, $46.63 per month for male teachers 
and $19.17 for female ; neither, on the other, should we 



1859.] 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 1. 



be held to follow the example of Boston, certainly not 
till we are annexed, where the wages for male teachers 
are $139.75 per month, and for female $39.74. A more 
just comparison would be with places similar to Roxbury 
in position, population or wealth. 







Male Teachers. 




Female Teachers 


Salem 


pays 


$82.00 


per month 


$19.00 


New Bedford 




73.82 




26.30 


Worcester 




92.00 




27.74 


Lowell 




96.00 




23.00 


Cambridge 




97.50 




24.93 


Charlestown 




100.62 




24.05 


Roxbury 




107.56 




27.29 



It thus appears that not a single place in the State, 
having as large a number of children to educate, except 
Boston, pays so liberally. 

If we look once more at the subject, we shall find that 
Roxbury raises a larger amount for each child ($9) than 
any of the places named, except Lowell, — higher even 
than Boston, and ranks as the tenth town in the whole 
Commonwealth. It is a matter of just pride to see our 
City standing so honorably before the community. 

It is to be regretted that, with our Committee and the 
citizens generally, there is no settled, well matured, 
thoroughly digested policy for conducting our High 
Schools. Perhaps it arises in part from a yearly liability 
to change in the Committee. Some fixed plan should be 
determined upon. The Report says, " The interest to 
be looked after has become so extended that the expedi- 
ency of enlarging the Committee, or employing a Super- 
intendent of the Schools, demands attention." I would 



6 MAYOR'S ADDRESS. [Jan. 

recommend to your attention the propriety of adopting 
both. An able, well qualified, faithful Superintendent 
is as much more important for our schools than a Super- 
intendent is for our streets or almshouse, as the first ex- 
cels the latter in magnitude. It is his business to know 
minutely every thing pertaining to schools, — the best 
books, the best mode of teaching, the best teachers. He 
should be a man worth a liberal salary. It is not un- 
likely that Dorchester, or West Roxbury, or both, would 
join with us, and employ one to do the labor of each 
place. His time and pay would be apportioned to each 
place, according to the number of schools. The number 
of schools in all three places would be less than one-third 
the number in Boston, which are under one Superin- 
tendent. The Committee should be increased to twenty 
or twenty-five ; and as their labor would be greatly les- 
sened, doubtless they would most cheerfully relinquish 
the pittance they are now allowed under the name of 
pay. Increased accommodations are called for in the 
Washington and Dudley Schools, and have been, for the 
past two years. 

The whole amount expended for Schools, except the 
Boys' High School, is $30,875. 

STREETS. 

The future prosperity of this City very much depends 
upon a wise forethought in the management of Street 
Expenditures. As the law now stands, you are aware 
that if a new street is laid out, or an old one widened, 
each individual claims damages by proving the value of 
his front land, and he is thus enabled sometimes to get 



1859.] CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 1. 7 

large damages, and still have an estate left of twice the 
value that the whole was before, in consequence of the 
improvement. This is neither equitable nor just ; and 
desirable improvements are frequently prevented, or ac- 
complished at the expense of the community by unrea- 
sonable and exorbitant claims for damages, when none 
have been suffered. The City of Boston, within the last 
thirty-five years, has paid two and a half millions of dol- 
lars for laying out and widening streets. Wide streets 
for health, convenient transaction of business, prevention 
of fires, and the good appearance of the place, are most 
essential. 

A law that will favor and encourage such in all large 
places, is of vital importance. The citizens generally, 
and the representatives in particular, should use all 
their influence to have what is commonly known as the 
"Betterment Law," enacted in this State, — allowing 
each man the damage he actually sustains, and requiring 
those who are greatly benefitted, and in a much larger 
proportion than the rest of their fellow-citizens, to con- 
tribute their just share. 

You are well aware that, in portions of the City where 
drainage is difficult, there is danger of streets being ac- 
cepted, and abutters being allowed to build on them at 
so low a grade that, as population increases, they will 
have to be raised, and large damages paid by the City. 
To avoid this, and to avoid misleading abutters, the 
grade of all such localities should be established by a 
competent survey (if it has not been made), and every 
individual, about to build, notified not to set any 
building below that line, except at his own risk. If this 



8 MAYOR'S ADDRESS. [Jan. 

is not faithfully attended to, our tax bills will in future 
demonstrate its importance. 

Our predecessors are entitled to great credit for the 
improvements made, of the most substantial character, 
upon our streets. 

The ordinary outlay for repairs has been about $20,000 
— the cost of new streets about $30,000. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

j3o important is an energetic, harmonious and efficient 
Fire Department in a city where so many of the build- 
ings are constructed of wood, I recommend to your 
watchful and liberal care this branch of the City service. 
Our firemen, who so willingly and intrepidly submit to 
toil and danger at the risk of health and life in protect- 
ing our property, merit our sympathy and regard. No 
reasonable expense should be spared to keep the Depart- 
ment thoroughly furnished and equipped. Having done 
this, the citizens have a right to hold it responsible for the 
faithful and judicious care of the property, for prompt, 
manly, heroic endeavors to prevent and extinguish fires 
and save property. Never failing censure of the wrong, 
and generous encouragement of the right, will be our 
true policy with the Fire Department. The practice 
which has prevailed of permitting boys, too young if not 
too reckless, to belong to the Department, to run with 
the machine and to partake of refreshments after the fire, 
is no doubt a source of evil, destructive to the character 
of the boys, creating distrust of, and reflecting dishonor 
upon the Department ; and is by many believed to be 
the cause of most of the false alarms and many of the 



1859.] CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 1. 9 

fires that occur. If these opinions are well grounded, 
the officers and men owe it to themselves and their fellow 
citizens, by decided and fearless conduct, to put a stop 
to this practice. No person, not a member of the De- 
partment, should be allowed to work at the engine, par- 
take of refreshments, or be about the houses, unless 
invited. Such a course would put our firemen above 
censure. 

The purchase of a thousand feet of Hose will be need- 
ed this year, and the construction of two or more Reser- 
voirs. 

During the past year there have been fifty-nine fires ; 
sixty-one false alarms and alarms from out of town — too 
large a number. The Department has been called out 
one hundred and twenty times ; more than double the 
number of last year. The amount of property destroyed 
was $45,900. Insurance $30,060. Cost of the De- 
partment $14,204. 

POLICE COURT. 

The return of the Justice of the Police Court places it 
on a paying footing. 

The receipts being about . . . $2,037 
The expenses " " . . . 1,565 

This leaves a balance in favor of the Court of $472 

There have been 648 criminal cases tried, and 260 
civil cases. In all 908 — being 145 cases more than last 
year. Of these there have been 228 cases for drunken- 
ness, and 50 liquor cases. The residue for all grades of 
offences usual in such a Court. 



10 MAYOR'S ADDRESS. [Jan. 

The Justice says that, in his opinion, at least eighty 
per cent, of the criminal business of the Court is clearly 
traceable to the pernicious effects of intoxicating liquors. 

POLICE AND WATCH. 

By the City Marshal's returns, it appears that 886 
arrests have been made. Of this number 345 were for 
drunkenness. Last year the number of arrests were 893, 
of which number 404 were for drunkenness. 

The number of complaints made by the Marshal for 
violation of the Liquor law have been 52. 

The number of Truant children looked up and taken 
to school, is about 400. 

Persons lodged in the Watch-house, 495. 

The expense of Watch and Police . $13,660 

Received for officers' fees . . . 2,152 



Net cost to the City $11,508 



ALMSHOUSI 



Prior to 1854 the number of poor persons to be pro- 
vided for at our Almshouse averaged from 225 to 300; 
consequently, extensive preparations were needed for 
their accommodation. In the Spring of that year, all but 
eleven were transferred to the State. But no correspond- 
ing transfer of expenditure took place. The large estab- 
lishment remained, and it was necessary to use it. It 
remains still, a large part of it, unoccupied. No feasible 
plan has, as yet, been suggested to remedy the difficulty. 
The School Committee in their Report for this year say, 
that l ' the City Ordinance, in relation to truant children 



1859.] CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 1. 11 

and absentees from school, is of little aTail in diminish- 
ing the number of idle, vicious boys, about our streets. 
The want of some suitable place to which they could be 
committed after being arrested by the truant officers, is 
sensibly felt." It is worthy of your consideration, 
whether such boys may not be provided for at the Alms- 
house, and thus, at slight expense, diminish the increas- 
ing number of criminal recruits. The number of poor 
now in the house is nineteen, and four, paid for by West 
Roxbury. There has been paid for assisting those out of 
the Almshouse $1617.11. The whole expenditure for 
the poor has been $6073.46. All the inmates are well 
provided for and kindly treated, and the management of 
the premises by the Overseers and Superintendent affords 
a most hospitable and comfortable home for the unfortu- 
nate. May our Almshouse always present as favorable a 
type of our humanity and civilization. 

The amount of the City debt at this time is $280,000 
The whole expenditures for the year . 268,000 
Of this sum about $35,000 were for extraordinary ex- 
penses. 

Ordinary expenses, about . . $233,000 

FOREST HILLS. 

It gives me great pleasure to call your attention to the 
increasing beauty and prosperity of a spot which has be- 
come consecrated ground to us all — Forest Hills. Great 
credit is due the Commissioners for the faithful and judi- 
cious manner in which they have administered this hon- 
orable, but laborious and gratuitous trust. Their Report 



12 MAYOR'S ADDRESS. [Jan. 

will be laid before, you in February, giving full details of 
its affairs. The number of lots sold the past year is 
about 80, making in all 1250. After building an orna- 
mental cottage, at the entrance of the grounds, for the 
Superintendent at a cost of $4000, the Commissioners 
have reduced the debt from $16,000 to $13,000 during 
this year. About the same number of interments have 
been made as last year. Many monuments have been 
erected, and the same interest seems to be manifested in 
the care of the grounds and the planting of ornamental 
shrubs and flowers as formerly. It is gratifying to ob- 
serve how completely the sacredness of the place inspires 
in the most thoughtless passer, such respect that a simple 
border of flowers is sufficient protection to the most costly 
monument, thus encouraging taste and refinement to 
beautify and ornament the resting place of the loved and 
revered. 

ANNEXATION. 

There is one subject of great magnitude and import- 
ance to the citizens of Roxbury, Gentlemen, to which I 
wish to call your serious attention ; for I do not propose 
to argue that question. I allude to annexation. This 
subject was ably and vigorously discussed on both sides 
in 1851. A vote of the inhabitants was taken upon it in 
1853, resulting in 262 votes in favor and 399 against it. 
In 1857 a vote was again taken and resulted in 808 votes 
in favor and 762 against it. And the action of those in 
favor at the recent municipal election, shows an earnest- 
ness and determination indicative of the final result, al- 
though, by no means claimed as a test vote. A portion 



1859.] CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 1. 13 

of those who favor annexation are engaged in business 
in Boston, are taxed there, without the right of voting 
there, and they look upon the measure as of great im- 
portance and benefit to both places. It is certainly very 
desirable for a wise and judicious management of our 
municipal affairs, that this question should be, if possible, 
settled. It bears directly upon all improvements we may 
contemplate, in drainage, streets, schools, water, &c, &c. 

As this subject, together with one for dividing the 
City, will be brought before the Legislature this win- 
ter, it will be your duty to decide what action you will 
take. 

I have thus, in a very imperfect manner, called your 
attention to a few subjects that have seemed to me of 
importance. There are many others which I am not un- 
mindful of, but with which I am not yet sufficiently famil- 
iar. What I have alluded to, together with those things 
that will naturally arise and be presented during the 
year, in addition to those bequeathed to us by my worthy 
predecessor in his valedictory, will give us occupation 
for part of our time at least. 

From the statistics of building in Roxbury during the 
last year, there is every reason to believe that her pro- 
gress for years to come will be more rapid and substan- 
tial than ever before. Important changes are taking 
place in Boston, which will make themselves felt in this 
city. The locations of the Post Office, United States 
Courts, the Mechanics' Institute, the free Public Library, 
are all much nearer to us than last year. The building 
of four churches the coming season, at the South part of 
Boston, indicate that the growth of that city is near our 
borders. 



14 MAYOR'S ADDRESS. [Jan. 

When the wharves on the lands East of Harrison 
Avenue are opened for business, dwellings will he great- 
ly in demand here. 

If the movement by the Board of Trade in favor of 
making Boston the market of all the cotton and woollen 
goods manufactured in New England should be carried 
out, instead of allowing them to be sold in New York 
and other places as now by branch houses, the onward 
march of Boston, and consequently of Koxbury, will be 
unequalled. 

We have been entrusted, Gentlemen, by our fellow 
citizens with the care and interests of this favored City 
for the coming year. Let us see to it, that nothing shall 
be wanting on our part to prepare and fit it for its ad- 
vancing prosperity. Let us, by harmony, strict fidelity to 
every duty, impartiality and a conscientiousness that knows 
nothing but the right and the just, labor for the common 
good. Let us disregard no right of the most humble, 
nor overlook a wrong if done by the highest. 

And above all, let us have faith in the honesty and good 
intentions of our fellow citizens and of each other, and 
ask of them that we may not be condemned by prejudice, 
or on suspicion, or in ignorance of facts. We have no 
light task before us to accomplish as many good deeds as 
our predecessors have done. 

I see before me many of you, Gentlemen, who have 
large experience and knowledge in the management of 
our affairs, and I shall rely upon your indulgence and 
generous assistance in this untried and difficult position 
in which I am placed. 

Having given no pledge to any man, and I am happy 



1859.] CITY DOCUMENT— No. 1. 15 

to say, not having been asked; having promised patron- 
age to no man, and not having been asked, I enter upon 
the discharge of my office with but one wish, one thought, 
one determination, to do my duty to all the inhabitants 
and interests of Roxbury. With the assistance of the Un- 
seen Power above only, can I hope this. May He keep, 
sustain and strengthen us all, for our labors and duties. 



.—No. 2. 



REGULATIONS 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 







ADOFTBI3 ijrj£!i.-mXJJ^JES.lir, ISS©, 



EOXBUEY: 

L. B. & O. E. WESTON, PRINTERS, GUILD ROW. 

1859. 



Citg of lUsbttrg. 



In School Committee, January 5, 1859. 
Messrs. Crafts, Williams, and Seaver were appointed a Committee to 
prepare and report to this Board, Rules and Regulations for their govern- 
ment the present year. 

January 19. 
The Committee on Rules and Regulations submitted the Report of said 
Committee, which was read, amended, and adopted ; whereupon it was 

Ordered, That 1000 copies of the Rules and Regulations, accompanied 
by the Course of Studies, and Text-Books allowed in the several Schools 
of the City, be printed, for the use of the Schools and Committee. 

JOSHUA SEAVER, Secretary. 



HEGULA-TIOlSrS 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE OE BOXBUBY. 

CHAPTER I. 
Organization. 

Section. 1. The first meeting of the Board shall be held 
on the Wednesday next succeeding the organization of the 
City Government. A Chairman and a Secretary shall then 
be chosen by ballot. 

Sect. 2. There shall also be appointed at the same 
meeting, Local Committees for the several schools in the 
City, to consist of three members for the High and each of 
the Grammar Schools, and one member for each Primary 
and Intermediate School; a Committee on Intermediate 
and Primary School Teachers, and on Books, each consist- 
ing of five members, one of whom shall be the Chairman of 
the Board; a Committee on Rules and Regulations, and on 
Finance, each consisting of three members. 

Sect. 3. It shall be the duty of the Committee on In- 
termediate and Primary School Teachers to receive the 
names and credentials of all applicants over eighteen years 
of age ; to examine the qualifications of those present at 
any regular meeting called by the Chairman ; to grant a 
certificate to those who pass a satisfactory examination ; 
and to keep a list of approved applicants, from whom 
teachers to fill vacancies in Primary or Intermediate 
Schools shall be appointed, and substitutes provided in 
the temporary absence of teachers. 



4 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. [Jan. 

Sect. 4. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Books 
to propose the text-books to be used in the schools, which 
shall, in all cases, be submitted to the Board for approv- 
al, but shall not be finally acted upon until said books 
have been before the Board at least one week, and not un- 
til every member of the Board has been supplied with a 
copy of the book or books proposed to be introduced into 
the schools. Nor shall any change of books be allowed, 
except on condition that the publisher of the book pro- 
posed to be introduced into the schools, shall give a copy 
of said book to each pupil for the one in use by such pupil, 
which said new book shall displace. 

Sect. 5. It shall be the duty of the Committee on Fi- 
nance, to confer with any committee of the Board of Al- 
dermen and Common Council on the subject of appropria- 
tions for the Public Schools. 

Sect. 6. Stated quarterly meetings of the Board shall 
be held on the Wednesday after the third Monday in Feb- 
ruary — on the second Wednesday in June — on the 
Wednesday after the last Monday in July — and on the 
second Wednesday after Thanksgiving Day. 

Sect. 7. At the last quarterly meeting in the year, the 
teachers of the public schools shall be elected, and their 
salaries voted. 

Sect. 8. Seven members shall constitute a quorum for 
the transaction of business. 

Sect. 9. All meetings of the Board shall be held in 
public, except when otherwise ordered by special vote, and 
notice thereof shall be given to all the members at least 
four days previous. 



1859.] SCHOOL REGULATIONS. 5 

CHAPTER II. 

Rights and Duties of the Chairman. 

Sect. 1. The Chairman shall take the chair precisely 
at the hour appointed for the meeting of the Board ; he 
shall call the members to order, and on the appearance of 
a quorum shall cause the minutes of the preceding meeting 
to be read, and proceed to business. In the absence of 
the Chairman, the Board shall choose a Chairman pro tem- 
pore. 

Sect. 2. The Chairman shall call a special meeting of 
the Board whenever he may deem it necessary, or at the 
request in writing of any two members. 

Sect. 3. He shall appoint all committees, unless the 
Board shall otherwise direct. 

Sect. 4. He shall preserve order in the meetings ; he 
may speak to points of order in preference to other mem- 
bers, and shall decide all questions of order, subject to an 
appeal to the Board, on motion of any member. 

Sect. 5. He shall declare all votes, but if any member 
doubt the vote, he shall, without further debate upon the 
question, require the members voting to rise and stand un- 
til they are counted, and he shall declare the result. 

Sect. 6. The Chairman may call any member to the 
chair, provided such substitution shall not continue longer 
than one meeting. When the Board shall determine to go 
into Committee of the Whole, he shall appoint the mem- 
ber who shall take the chair. He may express his opin- 
ion on any subject under debate, but in such case he shall 
leave the chair, and appoint some other member to take it, 
and he shall not resume the chair while the same question 
is pending. But he may state facts, and give his opinion 
on questions of order, without leaving his place. 



6 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. [Jan. 

Sect. 7. When any member shall require a question to 
be taken by Yeas and Nays, the Chairman shall take the 
sense of the Board in that manner, provided any one of the 
members present is in favor of it. 

Sect. 8. After a motion has been stated by the Chair- 
man, it shall be disposed of by a vote of the Board, unless 
the mover withdraw it before a decision or an amendment. 

Sect. 9. The Chairman shall consider a motion to ad- 
journ as always in order, unless a member has possession 
of the floor, or a question has been put and not decided ; 
and said motion to adjourn shall be decided without de- 
bate. 

Sect. 10. He shall put the previous question in the 
following form : " Shall the main question be now put ?" 
and all amendments or further debate of the main question 
shall be suspended, until the previous question shall have 
been decided ; and the previous question shall not be put 
unless a majority of the members present are in favor of 
it. 

Sect. 11. When two or more members happen to rise 
at the same time, the Chairman shall name the member 
who is first to speak. 



CHAPTEE III. 

Duties of the Secretary. 

Sect. 1. The Secretary shall have charge of the records 
of the Board, and of all papers directed by them to be 
kept on his files; he shall keep a fair and full record of 
all the proceedings of the Board ; shall notify all stated 
and special meetings ; he shall notify the Chairman of any 
committee appointed, stating the commission, and the 
names of the members; shall notify the meetings of all 
committees when requested by their Chairman; he also 



1859.] SCHOOL REGULATIONS. 7 

shall notify the instructors of their appointments, and shall 
give other notices as the Board may require. 

Sect. 2. He shall prepare the annual report required 
by the statute of the Commonwealth. 



CHAPTER IV. 

Rights and Duties of Members. 

Sect. 1. When any member is about to speak in de- 
bate, or to deliver any matter to the Board, he shall rise 
in his place, and respectfully address the Chairman ; shall 
confine himself to the question in debate, and avoid per- 
sonality. 

Sect. 2. No member, in debate, shall notice another 
member by his name ; but may describe him by the Ward 
he represents, the place he sits in, or such other designa- 
tion as may be intelligible and respectful. 

Sect. 3. No member speaking shall be interrupted by 
another, but by rising to call to order, or to correct a 
mistake. But if any member, in speaking or otherwise, 
transgress the rules of the Board, the Chairman shall, or 
any member may, call him to order; in which case the 
member so called to order shall immediately sit down, 
unless permitted to explain ; and the Board, if appealed 
to, shall decide on the case, but without debate. 

Sect. 4. When a motion is made, it shall be considered 
by the Board; and when a question is under debate, no 
motion shall be received but to adjourn — to lay on the 
table — for the previous question — to postpone to a day 
certain — to commit — to amend — or to postpone indefi- 
nitely ; which several motions shall have precedence in the 
order in which they stand. 

Sect. 5. Every motion shall be reduced to writing, if 



8 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. [Jan. 

the Chairman desire, or any member of the Board request 
it. 

Sect. 6. When a motion has once been made and car- 
ried in the affirmative or negative, it shall be in order for 
any member to move a reconsideration. And in case the 
motion be made at the same meeting, it shall be compe- 
tent for a majority of the members present to pass a vote 
of reconsideration; but if it be made at a subsequent 
meeting, the subject shall not be reconsidered unless a 
majority of all the members of the Board shall vote there- 
for. But no more than one motion for the reconsideration 
of any vote shall be permitted. 

Sect. 7. Every member who shall be present when a 
question is put, shall give his vote, unless the Board, for 
special reasons, excuse him. 

Sect. 8. On the " previous question," no member shall 
speak more than once, without leave of the Board. 

Sect. 9. When the reading of a paper is called for, 
and the same is objected to by any member, it shall be 
determined by a vote of the Board. 

Sect. 10. All proposed amendments to the Regulations 
shall lie over until the next meeting. Any rule may be 
suspended for the time being by a vote of two-thirds of 
the members present. 



CHAPTER V. 

Duties of Local Committees. 

Sect. 1. The Local Committees shall visit their re- 
spective schools at least once a month, and oftener if con- 
venient. 

Sect. 2. The Local Committees shall give their advice 
to the instructors on any emergency ; and take cognizance 
of any difficulty which may have occurred between the in- 



1859.] SCHOOL KEGULATIONS. 9 

structors and parents or guardians of pupils, or between 
the instructors themselves, relative to the government or 
instruction of the School. An appeal, however, to the 
whole Board, is not hereby denied to any citizen or in- 
structor. 

Sect. 3. The several chairmen of the Local Commit- 
tees of the High and Grammar Schools shall be the or- 
gan of communication between said committees and the 
schools ; but shall not act on any matter of interest to the 
school, without the sanction of a majority of the Local 
Committee. 

Sect. 4. In case of a vacancy in the office of principal 
in the High or Grammar Schools, nominations and elec- 
tions for the place shall be made by the Board. 

Sect. 5. In case of a vacancy in the High or Grammar 
Schools, in the place of any teacher, other than the princi- 
pal, the Chairman with the Local Committee shall exam- 
ine his or her qualifications, and the Local Committee 
shall appoint a teacher pro tempore, and give notice of 
such vacancy, at the next quarterly meeting of the Board, 
that it may be filled by election. And no such teacher 
shall be appointed by the Board, until he or she shall 
have been examined as aforesaid, and shall have received 
a satisfactory certificate thereof. The masters or heads 
of departments shall be consulted in the appointment of 
their assistants. 

Sect. 6. In case of a vacancy in the place of a teacher 
of any Primary or Intermediate School, it shall be the 
duty of the Local Committee, in concurrence with the 
Chairman, to fill such vacancy from the list of approved 
applicants, as provided in Chapter 1, Sect. 3 ; such ap- 
pointment to be submitted to the Board, for confirmation, 
within three months. 

Sect. 7. In addition to these specific duties of the Lo- 
cal Committees, it shall be their duty, generally, to make 



10 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. [Jan. 

any temporary arrangement which they may find neces- 
sary, relative to their schools, or the convenience of the 
instructors, in cases not provided for by the general regu- 
lations. 

Sect. 8. Although the interest of the schools demands 
Local Committees, yet each member of the Board shall 
consider it his duty to watch over all the public schools in 
the city, to attend their examinations, and to visit them at 
other times so far as practicable. 

Sect. 9. No teacher or other person in the employ of 
the School Committee, shall purchase anything at the ex- 
pense of the city without a written order from the Local 
Committee of the School for which such purchase is to be 
made, or from the Chairman or Secretary of the Board, 
and all bills for salaries, repairs, books and furniture, shall 
be approved by the Local Committees, or in case of 
absence or any other inability, by the Secretary of the 
Board. 



REaULA.TIOISrS 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

CHAPTER I. 

Teachers. 

Sect. 1. All the teachers shall be responsible to the 
Board for the faithful discharge of their duties. They 
shall punctually observe the hours for opening and dismis- 
sing the school, and during school hours shall devote them- 
selves to the public service. 

Sect. 2. When any teacher is reported as very deficient 
by the quarterly examining committee, and placed on pro- 
bation by order of the Board, the Secretary shall notify 
such teacher of the same, and state the deficiency report- 
ed. 

Sect. 3. The morning exercises of all the schools shall 
be commenced by reading from the Holy Scriptures, fol- 
lowed by the Lord's Prayer. 

Sect. 4. The teachers shall open the school rooms of 
their respective schools, for the reception of scholars, at 
least ten minutes before the time prescribed for commen- 
cing the school. 

Sect. 5. The teachers shall give the children constant 
employment, and endeavor by judicious and diversified 
modes, to render the exercises of the school pleasant as 



12 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. [Jan. 

well as profitable ; — they shall maintain firm, prudent and 
vigilant discipline ; they shall punish as sparingly as possi- 
ble, consistent with securing obedience, and shall govern 
by persuasive and gentle measures as far as practicable. — 
They shall never resort to corporal punishment, until oth- 
er means of influencing the pupils shall have failed; and 
when it shall be necessary, it shall be administered in such 
a manner as to operate on the moral sense of the pupil in 
the strongest manner. As far as practicable, they shall al- 
so exercise a general inspection over their scholars, as 
well out of, as within the school, and on all suitable occa- 
sions inculcate upon them the principles of truth and vir- 
tue. 

Sect. 6. The teachers shall keep a list of the scholars 
under their instruction, and shall record the page of the 
text-book at which every class commences in each term, 
and also the page to which it shall have advanced during 
said term, and this record shall be open to the inspection 
of the School Committee. 

Sect. 7. The principals of the Grammar Schools are 
authorized under the direction of the Local Committees, to 
make such classification of their respective schools, and 
such regulations for the discipline and government thereof, 
(not in violation of the regulations of this Board,) as they 
may deem expedient. And it shall be the duty of the 
principals to examine the pupils under the care of the as- 
sistant teachers, in said schools, as often as they can, con- 
sistent with proper attention to those who are under their 
immediate charge. 

Sect. 8. The teachers of the several Grammar Schools 
shall impart oral instruction to their pupils, at stated times, 
by assigning topics for their consideration, referring them 
to approved works for information, questioning them upon 
the themes assigned, and communicating such information 
thereon as they may think necessary. These exercises 
shall take place as frequently as may be thought practica- 



1859.] SCHOOL REGULATIONS. 13 

ble by the Local Committee and teachers. A list of the 
topics shall be open to the inspection of the examining 
committee. 

Sect. 9. In all the classes of the High and Grammar 
Schools, (provided the pupils are able to write a fair, legi- 
ble hand,) the teachers shall require, at least once in two 
weeks, regular exercises in Composition, to consist of Es- 
says, Letters, Descriptions, or Abstracts of Lessons, accord- 
ing to the age and capacity of the pupils. These exerci- 
ses shall be corrected by the teachers, and preserved with 
their dates respectively, in writing books, to be inspected 
by the committee, as evidence of the proficiency of the pu- 
pils in penmanship, punctuation, use of capitals, spelling 
and the grammatical construction of sentences. In the 
first division of the Washington and Dearborn schools 
there shall also be regular exercises in declamation. 

Sect. 10. In the Grammar Schools for Girls, no lessons 
shall be assigned expressly for study out of the regular 
school hours; and in all the schools, except the High 
School, the programme of daily study shall be arranged, 
and the time apportioned, as far as possible, so that the 
lessons assigned may be prepared in school, and not re- 
main for study out of school. Of the pupils in the High 
School, a moderate amount of study out of school may be 
required. 

Sect. 11. When the example of any pupil is very inju- 
rious, and in all cases where reformation appears hopeless, 
it shall be the duty of the teacher, with the approval of 
the Local Committee, to suspend or expel such pupil from 
the school. But any child under this public censure, who 
shall have expressed to the teacher regret for such misde- 
meanor, as openly and implicitly as the nature of the case 
may require, and shall have given evidences of reform, shall, 
with the previous consent of said committee, be reinstated 
in the privileges of the school. 

Sect. 12. It shall be the duty of the teachers to take 



14 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. [Jan. 

good care of the apartments of the public buildings which 
they occupy, and of the appurtenances thereof, that there 
may be no unnecessary injury sustained by them ; also to 
attend to the ventilation and temperature of the school 
rooms, and to the cleanliness and comfort of the pupils. 

Sect. 13. No subscription or contribution, for any pur- 
pose whatever, shall be allowed by the teachers, in any 
public school. 

Sect. 14. Any teacher may, by permission of the Local 
Committee, take half a day each term, for visiting such oth- 
er school in this city, or in the vicinity, as may be designa- 
ted, and the name of the school thus visited shall be en- 
tered in the teacher's register, with the date of the visit. 

Sect. 15. YHien the teachers in the Grammar and Pri- 
mary Schools leave their divisions, temporarily, and require 
their places to be supplied by others, they shall notify their 
Local Committees, who shall provide the substitutes ; and 
as far as practicable, these substitutes shall be taken from 
the list of approved applicants in the hands of the Commit- 
tee on Intermediate and Primary School Teachers, and the 
salary shall be at least two-thirds that which is paid to the 
teacher of the division. 

Sect. 16. No teacher shall be allowed to relinquish the 
charge of his or her school without giving at least three 
weeks' notice to the Local Committee; and in ordinary 
cases no teacher shall be required to give up the charge of 
his or her school without having received at least three 
weeks' notice to that effect. 

Sect. IT. Any teacher who shall persist in violating 
the Eules of this Board, shall be put on probation by the 
Local Committee or the Chairman, who shall report the 
delinquency at the next meeting of the Board. 

Sect. 18. The teachers are required to make vocal 
music one of the exercises of the school. 



1859.] SCHOOL REGULATIONS. 15 

CHAPTER II. 

Pupils. 

Sect. 1. All children residing within the limits of this 
City, shall, on application to the Local Committee, have 
free admission to such public schools as, in the opinion of 
said Committee, they may be qualified to enter, provided 
they be five years of age ; and no obstacle shall be inter- 
posed by any teacher or any member of this Board. 

Sect. 2. But no child shall be admitted into any of the 
public schools without a certificate from his parent, or a 
physician, that he has been vaccinated, or otherwise secured 
against the contagion of the small -pox. 

Sect. 3. Children of the age of eight years and upwards, 
who may pass a satisfactory examination in the reading 
books used in the Primary Schools, in spelling words se- 
lected from the reading lessons and from the spelling book 
used in the Primary Schools, in explaining the use of the 
marks of punctuation, in enunciating clearly and accurately 
the elementary sounds of our language, in writing words 
in script hand upon the slate, in reading and writing Arabic 
numbers containing four figures, and in the Arithmetic 
used in Primary Schools, shall be entitled to admission 
into the Grammar Schools. Children above eight years 
of age, though not possessing the requisite qualifications, 
may be admitted into the Grammar Schools by special per- 
mission from the Local Committees. 

The examination for admission into the Grammar Schools 
shall be made by the principal or assistant teachers there- 
of, and shall take place on the first Monday of the first 
and third terms ; and no pupil shall be admitted into the 
Grammar Schools from the Primary and Intermediate 
Schools except at those times. Provided, however that, 



16 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. [Jan. 

the Local Committees shall have discretionary power to 
admit pupils, possessing the necessary qualifications, at 
other times than those mentioned. Pupils changing resi- 
dence, shall be transferred from one school to another of 
the same rank, provided they bear a certificate from the 
teacher of the school they leave, expressing their standing 
and character, as a condition of their admission by the 
teacher to whom they apply for that purpose. 

No pupil shall be admitted into an Intermediate School, 
from a Primary, except by the express permission of the 
Local Committee of the Intermediate School, and in such 
case, only on the first week of the month. The examina- 
tion for admission into the High School, shall take place 
during the last week of the second term. Pupils who 
shall have reached the age of twelve years, and shall pre- 
sent a certificate of good moral character, and of presumed 
literary qualifications, from the Principal of the school 
which they last attended, and shall pass a satisfactory ex- 
amination in the following studies, viz : Spelling, Reading, 
"Writing, English Grammar, Arithmetic, Modern Geography, 
and the History of the United States, shall be regarded 
by the School Committee as qualified to enter the High 
School. 

Sect. 4. No pupil, whilst under sentence of suspension 
from one school, shall be admitted to the privileges of 
another, unless by a vote of this Board. 

Sect. 5. In the Grammar Schools, each session, there 
shall be a recess for every pupil, of ten or fifteen minutes ; 
and in the Primary Schools of from fifteen to twenty min- 
utes. 

Sect. 6. Pupils shall be prompt and punctual at school, 
and shall not absent themselves from school except on 
account of sickness or other urgent reason; and no re- 
quest for absence shall be deemed valid, unless it be a 
written one from parents or guardians. Every pupil en- 
tering after the time prescribed for the commencement 



1859.] SCHOOL REGULATIONS. 17 

of school, shall be marked tardy ; and whenever any pupil 
shall absent himself or herself for two weeks in succession, 
such pupil shall be considered no longer a member of the 
school. 



CHAPTER III. 
Periods of Instruction. 

Sect. 1. There shall be four Terms in the year. The 
first shall commence the Monday after the third Monday 
in February.* 

The second shall commence the Monday following the 
last Wednesday in May.f 

The third shall commence the first Monday in Septem- 
ber.^: 

The fourth shall commence on the Monday after Thanks- 
giving Day. 

Sect. 2. The schools shall be kept three hours in the 
forenoon, and three in the afternoon of each day, Sundays 
and the holidays and vacations hereinafter specified, ex- 
cepted. Schools shall begin at eight o'clock in the morn- 
ing, from May to August inclusive ; — at other times, at 
nine in the morning ; and shall commence at two in the 
afternoon, except the Girls' High School, which shall com- 
mence at nine in the morning, and close at two in the af- 
ternoon. Scholars may, however, be detained for delin- 
quencies a reasonable time after the regular school hours. 

Sect. 3. There shall be the following Vacations : 

1. One week commencing on the third Monday in Feb- 
ruary.! 

2. One week commencing on the Monday before the 
last Wednesday in May.|| 

3. Six weeks next preceding the first Monday in Sep- 
tember.^ 

* Feb. 28th. f May 30th. J Sept. 5th. 

§ Feb. 21st. || May 23d. *tf Juty 25th. 

3 



18 . CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 2. [Jan. 

4. One week, commencing on the Monday before Thanks- 
giving Day. 

Sect. 4. The following holidays shall be granted alike 
to all the schools : — Every Wednesday and Saturday af- 
ternoon; Fast Day; Independence Day; Christmas Day; 
New Year's Day ; May Day. No holiday not herein speci- 
fied shall be given except by a vote of the Board, or by a 
written certificate, signed by at least seven members of 
the School Committee ; and in such case it shall be given 
alike to all the schools in the city. 

Sect. 5. The Norfolk County Convention of Teachers 
may be attended by all the teachers belonging to the 
schools in this city, for which purpose their respective 
schools may be dismissed ; it being understood, however, 
that this permission is not granted, except to those teach- 
ers who actually attend said Convention. 



CHAPTER IV. 

Examinations. 

Sect. 1. Quarterly. The Chairman, or some member 
or members of the Board designated by him, shall visit 
and examine every public school in the City, at least once 
each quarter, without giving previous notice to the teach- 
ers, according to the provisions of the Statute. It shall 
be the duty of this committee to obtain accurate informa- 
tion of the condition of each school, and at the next quar- 
terly meeting to make a report to the Board, in writing, 
of their examination and its results ; of the condition of 
the school houses, and of any occurrences affecting the 
standing and usefulness of the schools. 

Sect. 2. Annual. During the last two weeks of the 
first term, a committee of seven members of the Board 
shall examine the High and all the Grammar Schools, and 



1859.] SCHOOL REGULATIONS. 19 

a committee, also of five members, shall examine all the 
Primary and Intermediate Schools in the city, and report 
upon the same, at the next quarterly meeting of the 
Board. 



CHAPTEE Y. 

Books and Studies. 

Sect. 1. The studies pursued, and the Text-Books 
authorized, in the High School for Girls, shall be the fol- 
lowing : 

FIRST YEAR. 

First and Second Terms. 

1. Arithmetic — Greenleaf s Higher ; 

2. History — Worcester's; 

3. Physiology — Comings's Class Book of; 

4. Reading — Hillard's First Class Reader, and Cleaveland's 

Compendium ; 

5. [Spelling and Defining — ^Worcester's and Webster's 

Dictionaries ; 

6. English Grammar — Butler's ; 

7. Composition and Rhetoric — Quackenbos's ; 

8. Linear Drawing — Bartholemew's System ; 

9. Penmanship — Dunton's System. 

Third and Fourth Terms. 

1. Arithmetic — Continued ; 

2. History — Continued ; 

3. Botany — Wood's ; 

4. Reading, Spelling and Defining, Composition, Analysis; 

5. Penmanship, and Linear Drawing. 

SECOND YEAR. 

First and Second Terms. 

1. Algebra — Sherwin's ; 

2. Latin — Andrews' Latin Lessons ; 

* Worcester's Dictionary to be the standard in orthography in all 
the Schools. 



20 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. [Jan. 

3. Physical Geography — Cartee's ; 

4. Natural Philosophy — Tate's (larger) ; 

5. English Literature and Biography — Continued ; 

6. Composition and Rhetoric — Quackenbos's ; 

7. Perspective Drawing — Bartholomew's System. 

Third and Fourth Terms. 

1. Algebra — Continued; 

2. Latin — Nepos, or Caesar ; 

3. French — Fasquelle, and Le Grand-Pere ; 

4. Chemistry — Stockhardt's ; 

5. English Literature and Biography — Continued ; 

6. Composition and Rhetoric — Continued ; 

7. Perspective Drawing — Continued. 

THIRD YEAR. 

First and Second Terms. 

1. Geometry — Da vies' Legendre ; 

2. Latin — Virgil (Bowen's Ed.) ; 

3. French — Le Grand-Pere ; Conversations sur lie Grand- 

Pere; 

4. Astronomy — Olmstead's, and Burritt's Geography of the 

Heavens ; 

5. Composition and Rhetoric — Continued ; 

6. English Literature and Biography — Continued ; 

7. Drawing from Nature. 

Third and Fourth Terms. 

1. Latin — Virgil — Continued ; 

2. French— he Grand-Pere, Collot's Dialogues, Collot's An- 

ecdotes : 

3. Intellectual Philosophy— W ayland' s ; 

4. Moral Philosophy — Wayland's ; 

5. English Literature and Biography — Continued ; 

6. Composition and Rhetoric — Continued : 

7. Drawing from Nature. 

[Note. — Any parent or guardian desiring a change made in the 
course of studies, in reference to the pupils under his or her charge, is 
requested to confer with the Local Committee and Teacher.] 



1 



1859.] SCHOOL REGULATIONS. 21 

Sect. 2. The studies pursued, and the Text-Books 
authorized, in the Grammar Schools, shall be the follow- 
ing: 

FIRST YEAR. 

1. Reading — Hillard's Fourth Reader; 

2. Spelling — The Reader, and Worcester's Speller ; 

3. Mental Arithmetic — Colburn's First Lessons ; 

4. Geography — Cornell's Primary ; 

5. Penmanship. 

SECOND YEAR. 

1. Reading — Sargent's Third Reader; 

2. Spelling — Continued ; 

3. Mental Arithmetic — Continued ; 

4. Written Arithmetic — Leach and Swan's ; 

5. Geography — Cornell's Primary, and Grammar School ; 

6. Penmanship, {Drawing by the Girls — Bartholomew's 

system.) 

THIRD YEAR. 

1. Reading — Sargent's Third and Fourth Readers ; 

2. Spelling — Continued; 

3. Defining — Worcester's and Webster's Dictionaries ; 

4. Geography — Cornell's Grammar School ; 

5. Mental and Written Arithmetic — Continued ; 

6. Grammar — Tower's Elements of; 

7. Penmanship, Map-Drawing, {Drawing — Continued.) 

FOURTH YEAR. 

1. Reading — Sargent's Fourth Reader ; 

2. Spelling and Defining — Continued ; 

3. Geography — Continued ; 

4. Mental and Written Arithmetic — Continued ; 

5. Grammar — Continued ; 

6. Composition — Tower's Grammar of; 

7. History — Quackenbos's United States ; 

8. Penmanship, Map-Drawing, {Drawing — Continued;) 



22 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. [Jan. 

FIFTH YEAR. 

1. Reading — Sargent's Fifth Reader; 

2. Spelling and Defining — Continued; 

3. Geography — Continued ; 

4. Mental and Written Arithmetic — Continued; 

5. Grammar — Butler's ; 

6. Composition — Continued; 

7. History — Continued ; 

8. Penmanship ) Map-Drawing, ( Drawing — Continued ;) 

9. Book-Keeping — Hannafordand Payson's (by the Boys) ; 
10. Declamation — (by the Boys). 

Sect. 3. The Exercises, Studies and Text-Books au- 
thorized in the Primary Schools, shall be the following : 

FIRST YEAR. 

1. Charts, and Sargent's Primer ; 

2. Spelling, from the Charts and Primer ; 

3. Enunciating the elementary sounds of letters and 

words ; 

4. Oral Instruction ; 

5. Exercises on the Slate ; 

6. Singing. 

SECOND YEAR. 

1. Sargent's First and Second Readers ; 

2. Spelling, from the Readers and Swan's Primary Spelling 

Book; 

3. Enunciating the elementary sounds of letters and 

words ; 

4. Marks of Punctuation; 

5. Arithmetical cards ; 

6. Reading and Writing Arabic numbers ; 

7. Exercises on the slate ; 

8. Oral Instruction ; 

9. Singjng. 



1859.] SCHOOL KEGULATIONS. 23 

THIRD YEAR. 

1. Sargent's Second, and Hillard's Fourth Reader; 

2. Spelling, from the Readers and Swan's Primary Spelling 

Book ; 

3. Enunciating the elementary sounds of letters and 

words ; 

4. Leach and Swan's Primary School Arithmetic ; 

5. Geography, taught orally, (Cornell's Primary;) 

6. Oral Instruction ; 

7. Writing words in script-hand, and other exercises on 

the slate; 

8. Singing. 

Sect. 4. Scholars requiring books shall be directed by 
their teacher to provide them. If not so provided within 
three days, the teacher shall notify the parent or guardian 
iu writing, of the kind of book required, and in case of his 
neglect to provide in two days thereafter, shall then make 
a requisition upon the Local Committee, in which shall be 
expressed the name of such scholar, the name of the parent 
or guardian, and the name of the book ; and it shall be the 
duty of the Local Committee thereupon to furnish the book, 
and make return thereof, according to law, to the Asses- 
sors of the city. 



24 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. [Jan. 

CHAPTER VI. 

Morals. 

The attention of teachers is particularly directed to the 
following section of the Revised Statutes : 

" Sect. 7. It shall be the duty of the president, profes- 
sors and tutors of the University of Cambridge, and of the 
several Colleges, and of all preceptors and teachers of 
Academies, and all other instructors of youth, to exert their 
best endeavors to impress on the minds of children and 
youth, committed to their care and instruction, the princi- 
ples of piety, justice, and a sacred regard to truth, love to 
their country, humanity and universal benevolence, sobriety, 
industry, and frugality, chastity, moderation and temperance? 
and those other virtues which are the ornament of human 
society, and the basis upon which a republican consti- 
tution is founded : and it shall be the duty of such instruc- 
tors to endeavor to lead their pupils, as their ages and ca- 
pacities will admit, into a clear understanding of the ten- 
dency of the above-mentioned virtues to preserve and per- 
fect a republican constitution, and secure the blessings of 
liberty as well as to promote their future happiness, and 
also to point out to them the evil tendency of the opposite 
vices." 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 1859. 



ELECTED AT LARGE. 

George Putnam, Highland, near Cedar Street. 

Arial I. Cummings, 121 Dudley Street. 

William A. Crafts, Washington, near Francis Street. 

elected by wards. 

Ward 1. — Horatio G-. Morse, 65 Zeigler Street. 

Franklin Williams, 73 Zeigler Street. 
" 2. — Joshua Seayer, Cabot Street, cor. Sumner PI. 

Ira Allen, Cabot, cor. Sudbury Street. 
u 3.— Timothy R. Mute, 163 Dudley Street. 

Richard Garyey, Cabot St., op. Sumner PI. 
" 4. — Joseph N. Brewer, 37 Centre Street. 

John W. Olmstead, Centre, cor. Cedar Street. 
" 5. — Edwin Ray, Warren, near Walnut Street. 

Robert P. Anderson, 37 Winthrop Street. 

Horatio G. Morse, Chairman. Joshua Seayer, Secretary. 



SUB-COMMITTEES. 

Regulations. — Messrs. Crafts, Williams, Seaver. 

Finance. — Messrs. Seaver, Anderson, Garvey. 

Music and Drawing. — Messrs. Nute, Allen, Williams. 

Books. — Messrs. Morse (ex. off.), Putnam, Brewer, 
Nute, Crafts. 

Intermediate and Primary School Teachers. — Messrs. 
Morse (ex. off.), Ray, Olmstead, Cummings, Allen. 
4 



26 



CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. 



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28 



CITY DOCUMENT.— No. 2. 



[Jan. 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS AND LOCAL COMMITTEES. - 

[Each School for both Sexes. — Salary of each Teacher $300.] 



Teachers. 


Location. 


Committees. 


1. 






Morse. 


2. 






Morse. 


3. 






Morse. 


4. 






Morse. 


5. 






Williams. 


6 


Maria L. Youno - 




Williams. 


7. 




Williams. 


8. 






Williams. 


9. 


Harriet H. Fay 




Cummings. 


10. 






Cummings. 


11. 






Allen. 


12. 






Allen. 


13. 






Allen. 


14 


Sarah E. Field 


Avon Place 


Allen. 


15 




Garvey. 
Garvey. 
Allen. 


16, 




17 




Mill Dam 


18. 




Seaver. 


19. 




Heath Place 


Seaver. 


<>0 


Anna M. Eaton 




Nute. 


^1 


Smith Street 


Nute. 


22. 






Crafts. 


33 


Mary A. Morse 


Centre Street 


Brewer. 


*>A 






25. 


Caroline N. Heath 




Putnam. 


Bfi. 






Olmstead. 


27. 






Olm stead. 


28. 


Margaret G. Chenery. . . . 




Ray. 


29. 




Elm Street 


Anderson. 


30 




Elm Street 


Anderson. 


31. 


Heath Place 


Seaver. 


32. 






Anderson. 


33. 






Seaver. 



NAMES OF MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

SINCE THE ADOPTION OF THE CITY CHARTER IN 1846. 



At Large. 

George Putnam, 1346, '48, '56, '57, '58, '59. 

Cyrus H. Fay, 1846, '48. 

*Samuel H. Walley, Jr., 1846, '48. 

George R. Russell, 1847. 

Thomas F. Caldicott, 1847. 

George W. Bond, 1847. 

John Wayland, 1849, '50, '51. 

William R. Alger, 1849, '50, '56. 

William Hague, 1849, '50. 

Theodore Dunn, 1851. 

Thomas D. Anderson, 1851. 

Horatio G. Morse, 1852, '53, '54. 

William H. Ryder, 1852, '53, *54, '57, '58. 

William A. Crafts, 1852, '53, '54, '59. 

Bradford K. Peirce, 1855. 

Joseph H. Streeter, 1855, 

John S. Flint, 1855. 

Julius S. Shailer, 1856, '57, '58. 

Arial I. Cummings, 1859. 

Ward 1. 

Allen Putnam, 1846. 

Henry B. Wheelright, 1846, '47. 

Horatio G. Morse, 1847, '48, '49, '50, '51, '55, '56, '57, '58, '59. 

William R. Alger, 1848, '52. 

Bradford K. Peirce, 1849, '50, '51, '52. 

John Jones, 1853, '54. 

Joseph Bugbee, 1853, '54. 

Henry W. Farley, 1855, '56, '57. 

Franklin Williams, 1858, '59. 

Ward 2. 

Thomas F. Caldicott, 1846. 

Joshua Seayer,1846, '47, '48, '49, '50, '51, '52, '53, '54, '55, '56, '57, '58, '59 

Alfred Williams, 1847, '48. 

Ira Allen, 1849, '50, '51, '52, '56, '57, '58, '59. 

Arial I. Cummings, 1853. 

Charles Marsh, 1854, '55. 



* The junior dropped in 1850. 



30 CITY DOCUMENT. — No. 2. [Jan. 

Ward 3. 

Charles K. Dillaway, 1846, '47. 

Francis Iiilliard, 1846, '48, '49. 

Theodore Otis, 1847. 

Julius S. Shailer, 1848, '50, '51, '52, '53, '64. 

William Gaston, 1849, '50, '51. 

Timothy R. Nute, 1852, '57, '58, '59. 

Joseph H. Streeter, 1853, '54. 

William H. Ryder, 1855. 

Benjamin Mann, 1855. 

Arial I. Cummings, 1856, '57, '58. 

William A. Crafts, 1856. 

Richard Garvey, 1859. 

Ward 4. 

Benjamin E. Cotting, 1846, '47, '49. 

David Green, 1846, '47, '48. 

Henry Bartlett, 1848. 

Henry W. Fuller, 1849, '50, '51. 

John S. Flint, 1850, '51, '52. 

John Wayland, 1852, '53, '54, '55. 

Theodore Otis, 1853. 

*John W. Olmstead, 1854, '56, '58, '59. 

James Waldock, 1855, '56. 

Joseph N. Brewer, 1857, '58, '59. 

Jonathan P. Robinson, 1857. 

Ward 5. 

Augustus C. Thompson, 1846. 

Daniel Leach, 1846, '47, '48, '49, '50, '51, '52, '53, '54, '55. 

Samuel Walker, 1847, '56. 

John H. Purkett, 1848. 

Charles F. Foster, 1849, '50, '51, '52. 

Bradford K. Peirce, 1853, '54. 

Edwin Ray, 1855, '57, '58, '59. 

Theodore Otis, 1856. 

Alfred P. Putnam, 1857. 

Robert P. Anderson, 1858, '59. 

t Ward 6. 
George W. Bond, 1846. 
Edward Turner, 1846. 

Edmund F. Slafter, 1847, '48, '49, '50, '51. 
Dan. S. Smalley, 1847. 
George Faulkner, 1848. 
Edward D. Boit, 1849, '50, '51. 

Ward 7. 
John O. Choules, 1846, '47. 
Joseph H. Allen, 1846. 
Theodore Dunn, 1847, '48, '49, '50. 
Grindall Reynolds, 1848, '49, '50, '61. 
Stephen M. Allen, 1851. 



* Resigned in 1856, and Joseph N. Brewer elected. 

f Wards 6, 7 and 8, with parts of Wards 4 and 5, were set off and incorporated, by Act 
of the Legislature, May 34, 1851, under the name of the Town of West Roxbury. 



1859.] SCHOOL REGULATIONS. 31 

Ward 8. 

Theodore Parker, 1846. 
George R. Russell, 1846. 
Dexter Clapp, 1847, '48, '50, '51. 
Matthews W. Green, 1S47. 
Abijah W. Draper, 1848, '49. 
Joseph H. Billings, 1849. 
Cornelius Cowing, 1850, '51. 

Chairmen. 

Charles K. Dillaway, 1846, '47. 
George Putnam, 1848. 
Daniel Leach, 1849, '50, '51. 
Julius S. Shailer, 1852, '53. 
John Wayland, 1854. 
Bradford K. Peirce, 1855. 
*William H. Ryder, 1856, '57, '58. 
Horatio G. Morse, 1859. 

Secretaries. 

Joshua Seaver, 1846, '47 ,48, '49, '50, '51, '52, '53, '54, '55, '58, '59. 
Ariall. Cummings, 1856, '57. 



* Resigned in 1858, and Horatio G. Morse elected Chairman ad interim. 



Curator op School Buildings, 
j o kt .a. s i> i e ir, o e , jr 
Residence on Bartlett Street. 



NOTE TO TEACHERS. 

As articles which may be needed for the Schools cannot 
be purchased without written orders from Local Commit- 
tees, the Chairman, or Secretary of the Board, Teachers 
will perceive the necessity of procuring such orders, when 
they desire to have anything purchased for the use of their 
Schools at the expense of the Committee. All such or- 
ders, if the Teachers prefer, may be given to the Curator, 
or deposited in his box in the Post Office,* as it is his 
duty, in such cases, to see that the articles needed are pur- 
chased and promptly delivered. 

* Box 336.