(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "[City documents, 1847-1867]"

Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/citydocuments597roxb 



City Document. — No. 7. 



REPORT 



HARBOR MASTER 



Citg 0f |l0^krg, 



YEAR 1859. 




ROXB URY : 

L. B. & O. E. WESTON, PRINTERS, GUILD ROW 

1859. 



In Common Council, Dec. 19, 1859. 
Report accepted, and it was Ordered, That three hundred copies be 
printed for the use of the City Council. 
Sent up for concurrence. 

FRANKLIN WILLIAMS, Clerk. 

In Board of Aldermen, Dec. 19, 1859. 
Concurred. 

JOSEPH W. TUCKER, City Glerh. 



REPORT 



The number of vessels that have discharged cargoes in 
our harbor in 1859, with the different varieties, quanti- 
ties and cost of the merchandise, have been as follows: 





Number of vessels, 536 






Lumber, 


16,140,767 feet, 


cost $138,268 


Coal, 


16,846 tons. 


11 


84,230 


Wood, 


1,512 cords, 


a 


7,834 


Bricks, 


. 3,126,000 


a 


18,756 


Paving Stones, 


4,099 tons. 


ti 


5,738 


Block " 


2,577 " 


u 


5,798 


Edge " 


8,173 feet. 


u 


3,267 


Iron, 


1,015 tons. 


a 


23,345 


Staves, 


20,000 


11 


2,540 


Lime, 


19,693 bbls. 


u 


13,785 


Cement, 


3,450 " 


u 


3,967 


Sand, 


3,426 " 


u 


4,923 


Hay, 


200 tons. 


ii 


3,400 


Potatoes, . 


600 bushels, 


u 


390 



Making the total cost. 



$316,241 



Exported — 750 tons prepared bones, $22,500. 

Since my election to office last May, I have been dis- 
tinctly called upon to render instructions or assistance to 
vessels in the harbor thirty-seven times, and I have given 



directions and assistance nearly two hundred times. Much 
of this care and service has been called for by the peculiar 
condition of the bed of the channel, which on the Boston 
side has been dug down to the depth of fourteen feet, while 
on the Roxbury side it is only nine feet deep. Thus there 
is a steep bank of five feet in the centre, which makes it 
always dangerous, often ruinous to a vessel, to ground in 
the centre of the channel. Three vessels have filled with 
water in consequence of doing so ; two of them were so 
much damaged as to require caulking, and one lost eight 
or ten cords of wood from her deck. 

All such accidents render the port unpopular — enhance 
freights, and thus put our citizens at disadvantage com- 
pared with those in the same business in Boston; in fact, 
tend to lessen business and the value of wharf property 
here. The only practical remedy of the dangers in the 
channel seems a deepening of it on the Roxbury side by 
the City. This can be well done for from two to three 
thousand dollars. Such an improvement would not merely 
remove the dangers spoken of, but by deepening the waters 
and opening our navigation to larger vessels, would secure 
to Roxbury a large increase of business. Our wharfingers 
now are turning their thoughts to the other side, seek- 
ing, as soon as their leases expire and Albany Street is 
opened, to secure yards contiguous to deeper waters. 

Drainage, partly from Roxbury, has in years past been 
gradually shoaling the water, and now that a much larger 
amount of drainage is to enter the canal, its filling up will 
probably go on faster than before. Here seems to be a 
further reason why the City should deepen the channel. 

Each vessel that discharges here leaves from five to fifty 
dollars with our citizens, in pay for labor, provisions, &c., 
so that other citizens besides our wharfingers will become 
losers from the existing state of our channel. 

F. WINCHESTER. 

Roxbury, Dec. I2th, 1859.