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Full text of "City documents. Municipal register, mayor's address, annual reports, etc"

LIBRARY 



^nssach^ 




1895 



CITY DOCUMENTS 



Municipal Register 1916 

Mayor's Address to ttie Council 

Annual Reports, Etc. 

FOR THE YEAR 1915. 




CITY OF NEW BEDFORD 
MASSACHUSETTS. 



INDEX IN DETAIL. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. Page 

Mayor 1 

City Council 1 

Standing Committees of Citv Council 2-3 

City Clerk ' 3 

Assistant City Clerk 3 

City Treasurer and Collector 3 

City Auditor 3 

Assistant City Auditor 3 

Clerk of Committees 3 

City Solicitor 3 

City Engineer 3 

Superintendent of Streets 3 

Superintendent of Public Buildings and Inspector 3 

Assistant Superintendent of Public Buildings 3 

Inspector of Wires 3 

City Physician 3 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 3 

City Forester 3 

Harbor Master 3 

City Wharfinger 3 

Inspector of Crude Petroleum 3 

Fence Viewers 3 

Caretaker of Graves of Soldiers and Sailors 3 

Registrar of Labor 3 

Consulting Engineer, Intercepting Sewer 3 

Superintendent of Sewers 3 

Inspector of Milk, Provisions and Animals 3 

Board of Health 4 

Assessors 5 

Trustees Free Public Library 6 

Commissioners of Sinking Fund 6 

New Bedford Water Works 6 

Board of Park Commissioners 6 

Cemetery Board 7 

Registrars of Voters 7 

Licensing Board 7 

Fire Department 7 

Protecting Society 8 

Police Department 9—12 

Minor Officers: Special Police Officers 12-15 

Constables 15 

Public Weighers 16-19 

Weighers of Coal 19-20 

Weighers of Boilers and Heavy Machinery 20-21 

Surveyors of Lumber 21 

Measurers of Grain 21 

Measurers of Wood and Bark 21 

Election Officerj 22-28 

Ward Lines 29-31 

Voting Precincts 32-35 



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INDEX IN DETAIL. 



MAYOR'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

Page 

Introduction 3 

City Finances 4-5 

Public Buildings 5-7 

Intercepting Sewer 7 

Extension of Fare Limit to City Line 7 

Street Department 7-8 

Fire Department 8-9 

Bath Houses 9 

Conclusion 9-10 

ANNUAL REPORTS. 

Bath Houses, 4 pages 

Statement of receipts 3 

Financial Statement 4 

Building Department, 22 pages 

Portable Schools 3 

Municipal Building 3 

Water Department 4 

Fire Station No. 6 4 

City Wharves 4 

Willis Street Police Station .' 4 

Veteran Firemen's Headquarters 5 

Purchase Street Wardroom 5 

Bath Houses 5 

Old Bath Houses 5 

New Central Fire Station 6 

Schoolhouses 7-9 

Fire Stations 9 

Police Stations 9 

Miscellaneous • 9-10 

Estimate of repairs needed 11-13 

Table of Building Statistics 14-18 

Building Statistics for 1915 18-20 

Elevator Inspection 21 

Street Signs 21-22 

Cemetery Department, 16 pages 

Personnel 2 

Financial Statement 4-6 

Recommendations 7—8 

Acting Superintendent's Report 9-11 

Summary ■ 12 

Schedule of Burial Charges 13-14 

Conveyance of Lots in Trust 15 

Perpetual Care 16 

City Clerk, 16 pages 

License receipts : 3 

Fees 4 

Other Financial Business 4 

Vital Statistics 5-8 

Minor Licenses 8-9 

Elections 9-16 






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4 INDEX IN DETAIL. 

City Auditor, 50 pages Page 

Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures, 1914 Insert 

Receipts, Sources of 3-8 

Taxes 3 

Licenses and Permits 3 

Fines and Forfeits 3 

Grants and Gifts 4 

Special Assessments 4 

Privileges 4 

Departmental 4-5 

Public Service Enterprises 6 

Cemeteries 6 

Interest 6 

Municipal Indebtedness 7 

Sinking Funds 8 

Agency and Trust Accounts 8 

Refunds 8 

Cash 8 

Payments, Objects of 9-36 

General Government 9-13 

Protection of Life and Property 14-16 

Health and Sanitation 17-20 

Highways and Bridges 21-24 

Charities 25 

Soldiers Benefits 26 

Education 27-29 

Libraries 30 

Recreation, 31-32 

Unclassified 33 

Public Service Enterprises 34 

Cemeteries 35 

Administration of Invested Funds 36 

Interest and Indebtedness 36 

SinkingFunds 37 

Agency, Trust and Investment 37 

Cash 37 

Summary 38 

Balance Sheet, Assets and Liabilities 39 

Statement of Bonded Debt and Sinking Funds Insert 

Schedule and Valuation of City Property 41-46 

Recapitulation 47 

Certificates 49-50 

City Treasurer, 12 pages 

Statement of Cash Receipts and Payments 4 

Cash Receipts in Detail 5-6 

Cash Payments in Detail 6—9 

Valuation of Real and Personal Property 10 

Division of Tax Rate 10 

Bonded Debt 11 

City Trust Funds 12 

Collector of Taxes, 5 pages 

Sewer Assessments 14—15 

Tax Collections 16 

Percentages of Collections, 1915 17 

National Bank Taxes 17 

Street Railway Excise Taxes 17 



INDEX IN DETAIL. 



Treasurer of Sinking Funds, 9 pages Page 

Statement of Treasurer's Account 18 

Investment of Sinking Funds 19-22 

Report of Commissioners 23- 26 

Engineering Department, 33 pages 

Financial Statement 3-4 

Sewers 4-8 

City Planning and Street Work 8-11 

Platting system 11-12 

Meteorological Records 12-13 

Poles and Wires 13-14 

Personnel 14 

Classification of Work Insert 

Streets Laid Out and Accepted 16 

Streets Widened 17 

Streets Altered 17 

Streets, Grades Established 17 

Sewers Constructed in 1915 Insert 

Record of Tides 19 

Meteorological record 20 

Rainfall Insert 

Intercepting Sewer 22 -23 

Summary of Work by Day Labor 24-25 

Summary of Contract Work 26 

Contracts let during 1915 27-29 

Maintenance Costs 30 

Expenditures for 1915 31 

Expenditures Complete through 1915 32 

Fire Department, 41 pages 

Personnel 2-4 

Apparatus 5-6 

Pension List 6 

Deaths and Injuries 7 

Financial Statement 8 

Recommendations 8 

Protecting Society 9 

Report of Alarms, Losses and Insurance 10 

Fire Alarm Telegraph 11-12 

Roster 13-24 

Record of Signal Fires 1915 25-41 

Health Department, 39 pages 

For Index, see page 39. 

Inspector of Animals, 1 page 

Inspector of Wires, 6 pages 

Inspection of inside wiring 3 

Removal of overhead wires and construction 3-5 

Outside work 6 

Police Signal System 6 



INDEX IN DETAIL. 



Public Library, 43 pages Page 

Personnel 2 

Trustees' report 3 

Librarian's report 4-11 

Juvenile Room 12-13 

Appendices 14-43 

Park Department, 56 pages 

Personnel 4 

Commissioners Report . 7-9 

Plans by VV. F. Williams 11-14 

Superintendent's report 15-18 

George D. Barnard 20-24 

Area of Parks 25 

Superintendent's Account of Activities 27-46 

Financial Report 49-56 

Police Department, 16 pages 

Arrests 3 

Nativity of Prisoners 4 

Offences 4-7 

Disposition of cases 7 

Miscellaneous Business 8 

Inspector's Department 9 

Matron's Report 9 

Personnel of Force 10-15 

In Memoriam 16 

Poor Department, 15 pages 

Personnel 3—i 

Mothers' Aid Law 5 

Almshouse 5-6 

Financial statement 7 

Outside Relief 8 

Expenditures at Almshouse 9 

General Statistics 10 

Almshouse register 11 

Products of City Farm 12 

Physicians' Reports 13-15 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, 4 pages 

In general 2 

Weights aud Measures 3 

Trial Weighings and Measurements 4 

School Department, 80 pages 

For Index see pages 79-80. 

Industrial School, 21 Pages 

Personnel 3 

Boys' Day School 4—6 

Girls' Day School 6-7 

Evening Classes 8 

Enrollment 9 

Machine Department 10-11 

Carpentry Department 12-13 



INDEX IN DETAIL. 



Page 

Power Department 14-15 

Electrical Department 16-17 

Girls' Department 18-19 

Administration Department 20-21 

Financial Statement 21 

Street Department, 61 pages 

Administrative 3 

Streets 3-4 

Street Cleaning 4 

Collection of Ashes and Refuse 4 

Bridges 5 

Forestry 5 

Sewers 5 

Equipment 6 

Recommendations 6 

General Statistics of City 7 

Financial statement 8 

Highways and streets account 9-1 1 

Streets laid out and accepted 12 

Streets widened, altered 13 

Dust prevention 14 

Stable and teaming account 15 

Highways and Streets 16 

Gutters 17 

Highway Improvement 18 

Macadam Loan 19-23 

Highway Improvement Account 25-26 

Bituminous Concrete Pavement 27 

Granite Block Paving 28 

Wood Block Pavement 29 

Curbing 30-36 

Gutters 37 

Filling and Grading 38-39 

Granolithic 40-44 

Bridges 45-48 

Forestry 49-50 

Sewers and drains 51-54 

Sewer Construction Account 55-58 

Sewer Loan Account 59-61 

Catch Basins 60-61 

Water Board, 66 pages 

Personnel .-, 2 

Financial Statement 3 

In general 4-11 

In Memoriam 12 

Report of Water Registrar. 13-21 

Receipts 13-14 

Expenditures 14-15 

Extensions 15-16 

Changes in Management and Repair Account . . . .16—17 

Expenditures from Beginning of Works 17-19 

Receipts from Beginning of Works 19-20 

Water Debt 20-21 



INDEX IN DETAIL. 



Page 

Report of Superintendent 22-38 

Rainfall Tables 24-25 

Water analysis 26-29 

Table of Leaks 31 

Meters 32-34 

Consumption of Water 35-38 

Table of Work 39-62 

Summary of Statistics 63-66 

City Ordinances, 16 pages 

An Ordinance Repealing an Ordinance entitled "An 

Ordinance Regulating Traffic on Certain Streets" 3 

An Ordinance Amending an Ordinance entitled "An 
Ordinance Regulating the Passage of Vehicles in 
the Streets" 3 

An Ordinance Regulating the Transportation of 

Passengers for Hire by means of Motor Vehicles 4-8 

An Ordinance Amending an Ordinance Regulating 

The Passage of Vehicles in the Streets 9 

An Ordinance Authorizing the Appointment of an 

Assistant Superintendc't of Public Buildings. ... 10 

An Ordinance Relating to Moving Buildings and 
Obstruction of Sidewalks and Streets for Building 
Purposes 11-15 

An Ordinance Relative to the Licensing of Fish 

Peddlers 15-16 



Municipal Register 

JUNE 1, 1916 



MAYOR. 

HON. EDWARD R. HATHAWAY, 106 Brigham Street, 

Salary S5,000. 

ALDERMEN— Salary $100 each. 

Ward One:— SAMUEL A. GOODFELLOW .. . . 198 Whitman Street 

Ward Two:— ELZEAR H. CHOQUETTE . . .192 -Mt Pleasant Street 

Ward Three:-EDWARD O. KNOWLES 556 County Street 

Ward Four:— JOHN H. AINDOW 271 Palmer Street 

Ward Five:— SAMUEL E. BENTLEY 106 South Street 

Ward Six: —GILBERT G- SOUTHWORTH, ... .694 Brock Avenue 

President:- ALDERMAN BENTLEY. 

Clerk:— W. H. B. REMINGTON. 

COMMON COUNCILMEN. 
Ward One. 

ARTHUR A. AUDETTE 1205 Acushnet Avenue 

GEORGE D. LACROIX 119 Tall man Street 

JOHN T. SLOANE 433 North Front Street 

BURGOYNE WOOLLEY 185 Whitman Street 

Ward Two. 

JAMES F. COLLINS 27 Trinity Street 

EDWARD T. GLENNON 545 Cottage Street 

JOHN H. HOLLIHAN 79 Richmond Street 

FIELDING H. WALSH 21 Ashland Place 

Ward Three. 

CHESTER W. CHASE 68 Hillman Street 

GEORGE T. DUCKWORTH 137 Smith Street 

HUBERT S. KELLEHER 1174 Purchase Street 

EDWARD L. AIORIARTY 397 Park Street 

Ward Four. 

FREDERICK J. J. ABRAMS 237 Middle Street 

CHARLES L. FISHER 361 Arnold Street 

W. SEYMOUR LANGSHAW 152 Cottage Street 

WALTER H. PEIRCE 304 Kempton Street 

Ward Five. 

MURRAY F. BARROWS 215 Hawthorn Street 

HARRISON T. BORDEN ' 154 Fair Street 

WILLIAM J. FRANCIS 21 Crapo Street 

JOHN McCULLOUGH, 3d 38 South Sixth Street 

Ward Six. 

FRANK T- CAMERA 163 Bonney Street 

WILLIAM J. HARNISH 15 Ruth Street 

GRORGE A. J. LAGASSE 119 Ruth Street 

JAMES O'ROURKE 185 Division Street 

President:— JOHN H. HOLLIHAN. 

Clerk:— CHARLES P. SAWYER. Salary, $500. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Standing Committees of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. 

Burial Grounds — Aldermen Aindow (ch.), Bentley, Southworth. 
Enrollment — Alderman Southworth (ch.), Goodfellow, Choquette. 
Licenses — Alderman Knowles (ch.), Aindow, Bentley. 
Streets — The Mayor (ch.), Aldermen Knowles, Bentley. 
Police — The Mayor (ch.), Aldermen Aindow, Southworth. 
Soldiers' Aid — The Mayor (ch.). Aldermen Goodfellow, Southworth. 

JOINT STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE CITY COUNCIL. 

Armories and Military Property — -Aldermen Southworth (ch.), 

Bentley; Councilmen Audette, Walsh and Duckworth. 
Audit — Aldermen Aindow (ch.) Goodfellow; Councilmen Sloane, 

Glennon and O'Rourke. 
Bath Houses — Aldermen Southworth (ch.), Aindow; Councilmen 

Audette, Chase and Cambra. 
Buildings in the Fire Districts — Aldermen Aindow (ch.), Choquette; 

Councilmen Collins, Abrams and McCullough. 
Charities, Almshouse and the Poor — Aldermen Choquette (ch.), 

Knowles; Councilmen Wooley, Collins and Harnish. 
City Property — -Aldermen Choquette (ch.), Southworth; Councilmen 

Lacroix, O'Rourke and Fisher. 
Claims — Aldermen Bentley (ch.), Goodfellow; Councilmen Walsh, 

Langshaw and Peirce. 
Education — -Aldermen Choquette (ch.), Knowles; Councilmen Peirce, 

Borden and Francis. 
Finance — The Mayor (ch.). Alderman Knowles; Councilmen Sloane, 

Hollihan, Duckworth, Fisher, Francis and Lagasse. 
Fire Department — -Aldermen Goodfellow, (ch.), Bentley, Council- 
men Lacroix, Glennon and Audette. 
Fuel — The Mayor (ch.). Alderman Aindow; Councilmen Walsh, 

Langshaw and McCullough. 
Ordinances — Alderman Bentley (ch.), Goodfellow; Councilmen 

Chase, Abrams and Barrows. 
Printing — Alderman Aindow (ch.), Councilmen Duckworth and 

Kelleher. 
Roads, Bridges and Sewers — Aldermen Knowles (ch.), Aindow; 

Councilmen Borden, Lagasse and Harnish. 
Street Lights — Aldermen Bentley (ch.), Goodfellow; Councilmen 

WooUey, Kelleher and Lagasse. 
Water Works and Water Supply — - Aldermen Knowles (ch.), 

Choquette; Councilmen Barrows, McCullough and Cambra. 

Wharves — Aldermen Goodfellow (ch.), Aindow; Councilmen Moriarty, 
Barrows and Cambra. 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE COMMON COUNCIL. 

Bills in the Second Reading — Councilmen Kelleher (ch.), 

Moriarty and Francis. 
Elections and Returns — • Councilmen Collins (ch.), Langshaw 

and Peirce. 
Enrolled Ordinances — Councilmen Chase (ch.), Moriarty and 

Abrams. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



DEPARTMENTS. 



City Clerk — WALTER H. B. REMINGTON, Salary $3,000. 

219 Ash Street.. Assistant City Clerk — JAMES DIGNAM, 

Salary $1,500, 289 Maple Street. 
City Treasurer and Collector of Taxes - CHARLES S. ROWLAND, 

Salary $3,500. 89 Chestnut Street. 
City Auditor— EDWARD L. CRONIN, Salarv $2,500, 119 Maxfield 

Street. Assistant City Auditor— EDWIN L. TILLINGHAST, 

Salary $1,700, 180 Clinton Street. 
Clerkof Committees— CHARLES P. SAWYER, Salarv $1,500. 

42 Park Street. 
City Solicitor— HENRY E. WOODWARD, Salary $3,000. 

40 Florence Street. 
City Engineer— GEORGE H. NYE, Salarv $3,000. 

23 Arnold Place. 
Superintendent of Streets — WILLIAM P. HAMMERSLEY, 

Salary $3,000, 16 Maple View Terrace. 
Superintendent of Public Buildings and Inspector of Buildings — 

JOSEPH L. GIBBS, Salary $2,500. 569 Purchase Street. 

Assistant Superintendent of Public Buildings — 

JOHN WATLING. Salary $1,500. 35 Larch Street. 

Inspector of Wires, THOMAS A. LOFTUS. Salary $1,500. 
314 Court Street. 

OTHER OFFICIALS. 

City Physician— Salary $550. SAMUEL K. SEGALL, M. D. 

1208 Acushnet Avenue. Term expires February, 1917. 
Sealer of Weights ano Measures — JOHN HOBIN, 1285 Pleasant 

Street. Salary $1,200. 
City Forester— WILLIAM P. HAMMERSLEY, Superintendent of 

Streets, ex-officio. Salary $100. 
Harbor Master— EDWARD T. CASWELL. Salary $300. 

21 Jenny Lind Street. 
City Wharfinger— HENRY F. WEST. 209 So. Second Street. Fees. 

Inspector of Crude Petroleum— ORVILLE E. YOUNG. 246 Palmer 

Street. Fees. 
Fence Viewers— STEPHEN H. BOND, 75 Carroll Street; SAMUEL 

W. JENNINGS, 401 Pleasant Street; THOMAS THORLEY, 

467 Allen Street. 
Caretaker of Graves of Soldiers and Sailors — HURLBURT E. 

THOMAS, 177 Shawmut Avenue, (Assistant Superintendent of 

Cemeteries.) No salary. 
Registrar of Labor (Under Massachusetts Civil Service Commission) 

—WILLIAM J. CARTER, 409 Bolton Street. Salary $300. 
Consulting Engineer, Intercepting Sewer — WILLIAM F. 

WILLIAMS, 34 Court Street. Salary $2,000. 
Superintendent of Sewers — Superintendent of Streets, ex-officio. 

Inspector of Milk, Provision and Animals Intended for Slaughter 

—Dr. Herbert B. Hamilton, 79 Hillman Street. Salary $1,700. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Salary $500 each. 

J. UBALDE PAQUIN, M. D. Term expires February, 1917 

COOPER GAW, Term expires February, 1918 

JOSEPH R. GLENNON, Term expires February, 1919 

J. UBALDE PAQULN, M. D., Chairman 

Agent and Executive Officer — Salary $2,200. 
WILLIAM G. KIRSCHBAUAI 

Clerk — Salary $1,000 
SUSAN J. SMALL, 

Assistant to Clerk — $15 per week. 
EDNA E. WRIGHT, 

Sanitary Inspectors, Salary $1,100 

THOMAS DAHONEY, JOHN E. GLENNON. 

EDWARD RAYMOND. 

Emergency Inspector 
ROBERT N. R. DOANE, 

Inspectors of Plumbing — Salary, $1,500 each. 
LOUIS H. RICHARDSON, WILLIAM DEACON. 

Aledical Inspector — Salary, $1,500 
A. N. SENESAC, M. D. 

Oculists — Salary $1000 each. 
FREDERICK L. CLARK, M.D. CHAS. M. ATCHISON, M.D. 

Bacteriologist — Salary $1,000 
A. H. MANDELL,' M. D. 

Quarantine Physician 
JOSEPH A. FRASIER, M. D. 

Public Vaccinators 
L. K. DORAN, M. D. R. D. HEAP, M. D. 

Nurse — • $19 per week. 
SARAH W. CHASE 

Nurse to Parochial Schools — $20 per week for -10 weeks. 
CATHERINE W. LOWNEY 

Medical School Inspectors — Salary, $400 each 
DR. A. V. PIERCE DR. J. F. WEEKS 

DR. CHARLES SHANKS DR. J. P. ST. GERMAIN 

DR. W. A. NIELD DR. J. C. ROSS 

DR. E. P. SEAVER, TR. DR. D. J. LOWNEY 

DR. E. ST. J. JOHNSON DR. WILLIAM ROSEN 

Inspector of Milk, Provisions, Slaughtering, etc. — Salary, $1,700 
H. B. HAMILTON, D. V. S. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary $2,000 each 
JOHN HANNIGAN, Chairman Term expires 1918 

JOSEPH H. HANDFORD, Secretary Term expires 1916 

JOHN H. FINNELL, Term expires 1917 

Assistant Assessors 
Salary $4.00 per day when employed. 
Ward 1— JOSEPH A. DIONNE 
Ward 2— JAMES H. HOLDEN 
Ward 3— FREDERICK A. WASHBURN 
Ward 4— ROLAND A. LEONARD 
Ward 5— FREDERICK D. SOULE 
Ward 6— JOHN B. ROBERTS 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 

Salary, $300 each 

ULRIC E. COLLETTE, Chairman 

CHARLES E. VAUGHAN, Term expires May 1, 1916 

ULRIC E. COLLETTE, Term expires May 1, 1917 

ANTONIO A. FERNANDES, Term expires May 1, 1918 

Secretary and Almoner — ^Salarv, $2,000 

DOUGLAS L. McGEE 

Stenographer — -Salary $15 per week 

LUCY E. BROADBENT 

Visitor and Portuguese Interpreter — Salary, $1,200 

ANTONE H. SENNA 

Visitor — Salary $18 per week 

RAYMOND HALLO WELL 

Clerk — Salarv^ $12 per week 

M. CATHERINE ROGERS 

Clerk and French Interpreter — Salarv, $1,200. 

JOSEPH A. DESJARDINS 



Physicians to Board — Salary, $75 per month each. 

Physician to the North District 

ARTHUR L. BRUNELLE, M. D. 

Physician to the Centre District 
HARRY L. STEVENS, M. D. 

Physician to the South District 
FRANK W. MATHEWSON, M. D. 

Physician to Clarks Point and Almshouse 
LOUIS D. PERRAS, M. D. 

Superintendent of Almshouse, Salary $1,050 
THOMAS F. BROWN 

Matron of Almshouse — Salary $400 
CATHERINE E. BROWN 

Chaplain of Almshouse 
REV. CHARLES S. THURBER 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



TRUSTEES FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Ex-Officio Terms expire January 1916. 

EDWARD R. HATHAWAY Mayor of the City. 

JOHN li. HOLLIHAN President of the Common Council. 

ELZEAR H. CHOQUETTE, Chairman of the Committee of the City 
Council on Education. 

Elected by the City Council 
ABBOT P. SMITH, Term expires April, 1917 

JIREH SWIFT, JR., Term expires April, 1917 

FRANK A. MILLIKEN, Term expires April, 1918 

SAMUEL F. WINSPER, Term expires April, 1918 

CHARLES M. HOLMES, Term expires April, 1919 

FRANCIS M. KENNEDY, Term expires April, 1919 

President of the Board 

THE MAYOR 

Clerk 

GEORGE H. TRIPP 

COMMISSIONERS OF SINKING FUND 

WIL'LIAM A. MACKIE, Chairman 

WILLIAM A. MACKIE, Term expires March, 1917 

CHARLES S. KELLEY, JR. Term expires March, 1918 

HERBERT C. WTLBOR, Term expires March, 1919 

WILLIAM S. COOK, Secretary and Treasurer— Salary $300 



NEW BEDFORD WATER W ORKS 
New Bedford Water Board 
EDWARD R. HATHAWAY, Mayor, ex-ofHcio, President 
JOHN H. HOLLIHAN, President of Common Council, ex-officio 

WILLIAM H. PITMAN, Term expires June, 1918 

FREDERIC H. TABER, Term expires [une, 1919 

LETTICE R. WASHBURN, Term expires June, 1917 

Clerk 

ROBERT C. P. COGGESHALL 

Superintendent — Salary, $3,000 

ROBERT C. P. COGGESHALL 

Water Registrar— Salary, $1,800 

CLIFFORD BAYLIES 

BOARD OF PARK COMMISSIONERS 

WILLIAM P. COVELL, Chairman 
WILLIAM F. CASWELL, Term expires 1st Monday in May, 1917 
WILLIAM FERGUSON, Term expires 1st Monday in May, 1918 

WILLIAM P. COVELL, Term expires 1st Monday in May, 1919 

GEORGE H. HEDGE, Term expires 1st Monday in May, 1920 

JOSEPH BARNES, Term expires 1st Monday in May, 1921 

WILLIAM F. CASWELL, Secretary 

General Superintendent — Salary, $2,000 
THOMAS W. COOK 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



CEMETERY BOARD 

WILLIAM M. HIGHAAI, Chairman 
WILLIAM M. HIGHAM, Term expires May 1, 1918 

JOHN G. NICHOLSON, Term expires May 1, 1919 

CHARLES H. VINAL, Term expires May 1, 1917 

CHARLES H. VINAL, Secretary 
Assistant Superintendent of Cemeteries — -Salary, vSl,200 
HURLBERT E. THOMAS 



REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Salary $400 each 
CHANNING WILDE, (Dem.) Chairman, Term expires May, 1917 
WILLIAM J. GLASGOW, JR., (Dem.) Term expires May, 1918 

JOSEPH A. DESAULNIERS, (Rep.) Term expires Mav, 1919 

W. H.. B. REMINGTON, (Rep.) Clerk, Salary, $300. 



LICENSING BOARD 

Salary, $500 each 
JOHN V. THUOT, Chairman and Secretary 
GEORGE H. POWER, (Dem.) Term expires 1918 

MINER W. WILCOX (Rep.) Term expires 1920 

JOHN V. THUOT, (Rep.) Term expires 1922 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Board of Fire Engineers 

EDWARD F. DAHILL, Chief Engineer, Term expires April, 1918 
Salary, $2,500. , 

JAMES J. DONAGHY, First Assistant Engineer, Elected yearly 
in April, 1916. Salary, $1,700. 

WILLIAM E. WATSON, Jr., Second Assistant Engineer. Elected 
yearly in April. Salary, $1,500. 

FRANK R. PEASE, Third Assistant Engineer. Elected yearlr in 
April. Salary, $1,500. 

jOSEPHP. KENNEDY— Clerk of Board. Salary, $500. 



8 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



THE NEW BEDFORD PROTECTING SOCIETY. 

1916—1917 



PRESIDENT : 

CHAS. S. KELLEY, JR. 



Directors. 

HENRY S. HUTCHINSON F. OSCAR COVILL 

THOMAS B. AKIN F. P. R. PATTERSON 

CHAS. S. BAYLIES JOSEPH F. CORNWELL 

EDWARD B. ROBBINS ERNEST H. BOUCHER 



SECRETARY AND TREASURER : 

CHESTER P. REXFORD 



Allen, Geo. H. H. 
Webber, James A. 
Swift. Horace W. 
Blair, John K. 
Dawe, William C. 
Bonneau, F. A. 
Bourne, Williams S. 
Brightman, Harry C. 
Brooks, Arthur T. 
Coe, I. H., Jr. 
Coggeshall, R. C. P. 
Brooks, Andrew J. 
Williams, Thos. W. 
Delano, Arthur D. 
Read, W. Kempton 
Francis, James P. 
Covin, Clarence W. 
Gifford, Frank H. 
Gifford, Thos. J. 
Chase, Chester W. 
McDonald, Henry J. 
Howard, Henry, Jr. 
Budlong, James E. 
Humphrey, Jas. L., Jr. 
Taber, George C. 
Knowles, Henry S. 
Macy, Frederick B. 
Macy, George I. 
Macy, J. Roland 
Shaw, John C. 
Manchester, P. F. 
Mendelson, Hyman 
Tuell, Clifton P. 



Watson, Edwin M. 
Makin, Henry J. 
Parker, David L. 
Perry, Samuel H. 
Pitman, William H. 
Porier, Aime J. 
Potter, William F. 
Oesting, Edward A. 
Olivier, Geo. L. 
Oman, Charles E. 
Smith, Nat. C. 
Richardson, Louis H. 
Francis, Arthur S. 
Phillips, William C. 
Robinson, Wm. A., Jr. 
Butler, Morgan 
Sharpies, Charles S. 
Sharpies, Arthur 
Smith, Alex. T. 
Dunham, Otis M. 
Sullivan, D. J. 
Sears, Louis A. 
Taber, Frederic H. 
Taylor, Wm. T. 
Whittemore, Harry E. 
Wagner, Isaiah C. 
Wood, Horace 
Burke, Harry 
Russell, Charles A. 
Allen, Lesley B. 
Bliven, George F. 
Carpenter, Orrin B. 
Parker, Ward M. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Chief 

Salary, $2,500 
TIMOTHY C. ALLEN 

Deputy Chief 

Salary, $1,800 
JOHN C. PARKER 

Captains 

Salary, $1,500 each 
DANIEL DENEEN ' FRANK W. SYLVIA 

HARRY D. STOW THOMAS J. TAFT 

Chief Inspector 

Salary $1,500 
WALTER ALMOND 

Inspectors 

Salary $23.86 per week each. 
GEORGE R. LAWRENCE ALBERT E. MOSHER 
BENJAMIN LAMOTHE CHARLES F. SMITH 

Lieutenants 

Salary $23.86 per week each 
NARCISSE A. BREAULT JEREMIAH McCARTHY 

EDWARD P. DOHERTY SAMUEL D. McLEOD 

THOMAS FAY WILLIAM E. ROSCOE 

WILLIAM FOWLER WILLIS C. UNDERWOOD 

CHARLES L. McBAY JOSEPH B. WING 

Sergeants 

Salary $22.42 per week each. 

HARRY C. ELLIS JAMES W. SAVAGE 

EDMUND FOLEY GEORGE A. SHERMAN 

AROD B. HOLLOWAY DANIEL P. SWEENEY 

TAMES J. MOORE CHESTER L. TRIPP 

FRANK L. REMINGTON WILLIAM WELSH 

Inspector of Minor Licenses 

JOSEPH S. MANNING 

Police Matron 

Salary $2.00 per day 
SARAH M. BROWNELL 

Keeper of the Lockup 

Salary, $100 per year 
TIMOTHY C. ALLEN 



10 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



PATROLMEN 

Salary: 1st year $2.50 per day. 
2d year $2.75 per day. 
3rd year $3.00 per day. 



Aillery, Constant 
Allen, Charles E. 
Almond, William, Jr. 
Ashley Henry T. 
Astley, Thomas 
Astley, Maurice 
Barbour, Robert L. 
Boehler, Max F. 
Bolton, James E. 
Bourgeois, Albibi 
Breault, Joseph A. 
Brennan, Michael J. 
Briggs, Myron S. A. 
Brightman, Ellery E. 
Brophy, Edward O. 
Butts, Henry 
Cash, James 
Caswell, Charles A. 
Chase, Raymond 
Chausse, Onat A. 
Clcary, William E. 
Cole, William T. 
Craft, James F. 
Crapo, Albert A. 
Cushing, William S. 
Daley, Charles F. 
Davies, John W. 
Deane, James 
Degrasse, Charles H. 
Doherty, Thomas 
Downey, Daniel 
Downey, John B. 
Downey, William M. 
Dupuis, Patrick H. 
Dupuis, Wilfred H. 
Durant, Lawrence J. 
Earley, Edward C. 
Evans, John 
Fanning, John F. 
Faunce, Albert M. 
Fay, John H. 
Fell, Charles 
Fernandes, Joseph A. 
Francis, Antone 
Freitas, Manuel 
Gatenby, James S. 
Gibbs, Nathaniel F. 
Glennon, William F. 
Gobiel, Joseph 



Corner, Arthur 
Grant, George P. 
Gregory, William 
Hafford, Stephen, Jr. 
Haggerty, Timothy F. 
Haran, Luke T. 
Haran, John F. 
Harding, James P. 
Harrington, Daniel 
Hawes, Harry C. 
Hayden, Abram L. 
Head, Edgar E. 
Hickey, William B. 
Horton, Eliphalet H. 
Howes, Charles M. 
Howland, William A. E. 
Hynes, Edward A. 
Irwin, Henry, Jr. 
Ivey, James A. 
Jacobs, Ellsworth C. 
Jenkins, Thomas J. 
Johnson, Harry 
Kane, John 

Karcher, Frederick, Jr. 
Kelley, Michael J. 
Kinney, William E. 
Kinney, Joseph R. 
Leahy, William T. 
Lemaire, Anthony C. 
Lentz, Joseph A. 
Lowther, George H. 
Marden, James 
McKinstry, Albert B. 
McCarthy, William H. 
McCrohan, John H. 
McFarlane, Joseph A. 
McGofT, James E. 
McDonald, Daniel J. 
McEnnis, Robert B. 
McKay, John T. 
Miller, John J. 
Mitchell, William 
Mott, Cassius B. 
Muldoon, Thomas 
Mullins, Enoch 
Murphy, Edward 
Murphy, Francis A. 
Murphy, Lawrence 
Nault, Joseph 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



11 



Nelson, Ivar V. 
Oliver, John F. 
Perry, Anthony E. 
Phinney, Charles E. 
Pieraccini, Raphael 
Place, Joseph A. 
Pollock, John H. 
Prifogle, Edward 
Reddy, Michael 
Rooks, Albert H. 
Rooks, John C. 
Sanders, Joseph A. 
Searell, William E. 
Seddon, Thomas 
Souza, William H. 
Spooner, John C. 
Stanley, Charles A. 
Staples, Walter C. 



Sullivan, James H. 
Sullivan, Mathew 
Sundin, Carl A. 
Sylvia, Antone F. 
Taber, Jeremiah H. 
Touchette, Hermes 
Velho, Augustine F. 
Vogel, Robert F. 
Walsh, John P. 
Walsh, William 
White, Albert B. 
Winterson, Henry B. 
Wilcox, Seth A. 
Williams, Benjamin F., Jr. 
Williams, Charles H. 
Wixon, James A. 
Woolfenden, Albert 



EMERGENCY OFFICER: 

Salary $3.00 per day. 
Patrick Kennedy 



WAGONMEN 



Murdy, Robert H. 



Paige, George W. 



Nickerson, Charles F. 



CHAUFFEURS 



Dalbec, Edmond 
Meade, James 
Nickerson, Charles 



Patterson, Charles G. 
Ryan, William M. 
Turgeon, Joseph V. 



HOUSEKEEPERS : 

Salary $2.50 per day. 



Cannavan, Patrick 
Dodds, James 
Kenney, Patrick 
Meehan, Daniel 



Smith, Andrew J. 
Sullivan, Timothy 
Wilson, Thomas H. 



pensioned: 

Clough, George V. Comstock, Thomas W. 

Mason, Henry W. 

JANITORS : 

Allen, Charles G. Drew, Moses C. 

Laborer : 
Atwood, William W. 



StA^\ 



u 



©^^ 






n 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Bedford, Ellverado 
Benoit, \Villiam R. 
Berry, James W. 
Burgess, Edward 
Burke, John E. 
Carroll, Eudore 
Carroll, James M. 
Downey, Stephen P. 
Dupuis, Bernard 
Fay, Miles L. 
Fowler, Harry 
Gero, Henry R. 
Hamersley, Raymond 
Hickey, James M. 
Hutchinson, George R 
Lague, Ernest 
Machado, Manuel 
Maynard, John 
Manning, James L. 



RESERVE POLICE : 

McDonnell, James 
McDonald, William I 
Nunes, George J. 
O'Rourke, John J. 
O'Rourke, Thomas 
Parkinson, John 
Poirier, David J. 
Reed, George H. 
Reedy, Joseph C. 
Schultz, Gabriel 
Spooner, Charles A. 
Sullivan, John T. 
Sundin, Henning E. 
Turgeon, Francois X. 
Valentine, Thomas A. 
Vincent, Charles H. 
Wilson, George A. 
Wooley, Thomas 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS : 



Adams, John 
Algar, Reuben T. 
Allaire, Alphonse J. 
Allen Charles G. 
Allen, David W. 
Allen, George H. 
Amaral, Nedhart F. 
Anderton, Arthur 
Andrews, William 
Arendt, Walter 
Arnett, Robert 
Arruda, Manuel 
Audette, John 
Avilla, Joseph P. 
Baker, Daniel A. 
Baker, Daniel W. 
Baldwin, Walter Jr. 
Bariteau, Victor J. 
Bear, John G. 
Benoit, Alfred F. 
Bentley, Frank T. 
Berry, James H. 
Bliss, Frederick P. 
Bliss, William H. 
Bonnin, Narcisse 
Booth, Benjamin T. 
Booth, Charles L. 
Booth, John 
Bosworth, Joseph 
Bourbeau, Augustine 
Bourgeault, Agon 
Brennan, Charles W. 



Brown, William L. G. 
Brownell, Herbert A. 
Buckley, Alfred R. 
Buckley, John P. 
Buckley, Maurice L. 
Burgess, Stephen 
Burke, Charles 
Burke, Harry 
Burke, Michael I. 
Burke, Raymond 
Burt, Hadiey A. 
Butts, Henry R., Jr. 
Butts, James D. 
Callahan, John 
Cantwell, John T. 
Cardin, Adelard Eddie 
Carney, John F. 
Carter, John 
Cathcart, Charles E. 
Cash, James 
Charpentier, Hormidas 
Chase, Aruna S. 
Chenoweth, H. A. 
Clark, Edward 
Clark, William 
Clarkson, Nicholas J. 
Claudino, Manuel L. 
Clitheroe, Thomas 
Clynes, Thomas 
Collins, John 
Concannon, Myles F. 
Conklin, Abraham 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



13 



Connelly, Daniel J. 
Connolly, John 
Corley, JNIaurice C. 
Cornell, Abraham 
Cornell, Sydney I. 
Corson, J. A. 
Costa, Joseph L. Jr. 
Cote, Joseph 
Cowen, James L. 
Cronin, Cornelius 
Crow, James 
Cummings, Archibald 
Cunningham, George W. 
Davenport, Charles H. 
Davis, Alfred A. 
Dawe, William C. 
Dean, Thomas F. 
Demars, Arthur 
Dessert, Antoine 
DevoU, George H. 
Doiron, Wilfred 
Driscoll, Patrick J. 
Dubois, Eugene 
Duckworth, William A. 
Duffy, Thomas 
Dunlevy, Thomas 
Dutra, Manuel 
Duval, Napoleon 
Dwycr, Thomas 
Dwyer, Walter 
Edwards, Robert E. 
Eldridge, Samuel T. 
Ellis, Robert C. 
England, George 
Fairclough, Thomas 
Fanning, John F. 
Farnham, Charles W. 
Fay, Miles H. 
Ferguson, Joseph 
Ferguson, William 
Fernandes, Joseph H. 
Field, Edward H. 
Fournier, Aldei 
Francis, William H. 
Gauthier, Levi 
Fingal, Stening 
Finn, Michael 
Flathers, Walter J. 
Folger, Frank 
Foster William E. 
Fournier, Napoleon J. 
Francis, Frank W. 
Francis, Frederick J. 
Francis, Joseph K. 
Furtado, Manuel J. 



Garvin, Patrick F. 
Geary, Albert V. 
Geddis, Henry S. 
Gendron, George D. 
Gibbs, George IL 
Gibbs, Preston H. 
Gibbs, William H. 
Gifford, George H. 
Gifford, John 
Gifford, John F. 
Glennon, Thomas F. 
Gomes, Michael 
Goodwin, Albert 
Gray, Shirley H, 
Greene, Joseph S. 
Greene, Marshall S. 
Greer, John 
Gregoire, Philias 
Grew, John W. 
Gtiyer, Henry 
Hannigan, John 
Harrington, Cornelius 
Harrington, Daniel H. 
Harrington, John S. 
Hathaway, Henry L. 
Hathaway, John T. 
Hatton, Charles 
Henner, Noe 
Heron, James T. 
Higginbottom, Eli 
Hildreth. Samuel 
Hill, Frank Leslie 
Hoarle, George E. 
Holland, William H. 
Holloway, James T. 
Holmes, Ezra 
Holmes, John J. 
Holnies, Thomas C. 
Houle, Dolor A. 
Howland, George W. 
Howland, \\'illiam G. 
Hurll, Daniel 
Jrwin, Henry 
Jameson, Frederick 
Jason, Alonzo M. Jr. 
Jason, Antone 
Jameson, Harry A. 
Jennings, Charles E. 
Johnson, Oscar 
Johnson, William Harold 
Jones, John J. 
Jordan, F. C. 
Kelley, Hiram C. 
Kennedy, Augustus M. 
Kennedy, Thomas 



14 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Kenyon, Benjamin W. 
Kiernan, Thomas 
King, Joseph T. 
Kniffen, Lewis 
Ladino, Manuel M. Jr. 
Lagasse, Telesphore 
Lajole, Eugene 
Lamery, Arcade 
Leary, Dennis, Jr. 
Leary, Michael M. 
LeClair, WilHam 
Latere, Louis 
Leite, Louis 
Levasseiir, Ludger 
Lima, Anthony M. Jr. 
Lima, Joseph 
Little, Frank 
Little, John E. 
Littler, Henry 
Lumbert, Hiram T. 
Lupo, E. D. 
Luther, Joseph P. 
Lyons, John 
Lynch, Simeon F, 
Lyng, William H. 
Macia, William H. 
Macomber, H. M. 
Magnant, Isaie 
Maenant, John B. 
Mallon, John 
Marshall, Thomas R. 
Martel, Henry 
Matthews, Howard L. 
McCann, Edward J. 
]\IcCoy, Patrick 
McDonald, Patrick J. 
McHugh, John 
McKenna, Frank 
McSally, James 
Mello, Arthur 
Mello, Jose Jacinto 
Melzer. Alois 
Menez, Manuel 
Miller, George 
Montague, Henry 
Moran, Charles 
Morosse, Alfred 
Morrison, Thomas 
Morrissey, Alex 
Mosher, Willard B. 
Mott, Cassius B. 
Mullins, James J. 
Mullins, John 
Nault, Joseph 
Nelson, Samuel J. 



Netcher, George F. 
Xoonan, Thomas 
Xormandin, Frank 
Norton, Charles H. 
Oliveira, Antone 
Oliver, Garrison L. 
Oliver, John 
O'Malley, WilHam 
O'Dctte, J. 
Outlaw, Walter E. 
Palmer, Robert 
Parker, Charles W. 
Peltier, Joseph P. 
Pettey, Benjamin H. 
Phillips, Henry T. 
Pierce, Clarence E. 
Pierce, Jason F. 
Pierce, Thomas H. 
Place, William J. 
Poirier, Thomas M. 
Pollock, Frederick O. 
Pollock, John H. 
Potter, Walter S. 
Quntanihla, .Antonio V. 
Rainville, Joseph G. 
Rau, Gustavus L. 
Rawstron, John 
Read, Richard A. 
Reed, W. Kempton 
I(eed, Frank F. 
Resendes, Frank F. 
Resendes, Seraphin 
Reynolds, Charles H. 
Reynolds, James R. 
Richie, David 
Ridings, Thomas H. 
Riley, Thomas S. 
Robbins, Edmund M. 
Robinson, Charles 
Rooney, John L. 
Rosseau, Arthur 
Rouiller, Domina 
Roy, John V. 
Roy, Romuald J. 
Russell, Edward 
Sadler, William G. 
Salmon, John 
Sargent, William A. 
Sawyer, William 
Senesac, Harvey 
Shaw, John C, Jr. 
Shea, Michael J. 
Sheenan, Daniel D. 
Sheffield, John P. 
Sherman, John 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



15 



Sicard, Phillippe 
Silva, Amador 
Silva, Joaquin da 
Simpson, Andrew A. 
Slater, Rothvvell 
Smethurst, Harry 
Smith, Henry H. 
Soucy, Joseph 
Souza, Arthur E. 
:^ouza, IManuel 
Sowle, Herbert T. 
Spicer, Robert H. 
St. Aubin, Philip 
St. Onge, Antoine 
St. Peter, Albeit 
Staples, Ellis 
Stephens, H. A. 
Stephens, Michael 
Stephenson, John 
Sutcliffe, Arthur 
Sweeney, James 
Swift, Horace W. 
Sylvia, Charles G. 
Sylvia, John J. 
Sylvia, Manuel 
Sylvia, Manuel (No. 2.) 
Taber, George C. 
Tallman, Edward S. 
Taylor, Henry 
Taylor, William A. 
Taylor, William J. 
Tebarge, John 
Thomas, Edward, Jr. 
Thonias, Joseph S. 
Thomas, Foldo 



Thompson, George L. 
Thompson, James A. 
Thompson, Thomas 
Thornton, John H. 
Tripp, Benjamin E. 
Tripp, Leroy G. 
Tucker, Theodore L. 
- Ty.son, James 
Viera, Joseph S. 
Viera, Joseph 
Vining, Charles W. Jr. 
Vera, Louis 
Wagner, I. C. 
Waish, Joe 
Ward, David G. F. 
Wartield, James H. 
Waters, Charles O. 
Watts, William H. C. 
Webb, Elijah 
Weedall, Samuel 
Wells, L. A. 
Westwood, Benjamin 
Whitehead, Albert 
Whitman, William 
Wilbur, Allen R. 
Wilbur, William 
Wilcox, Otis A. 
Wildman, David 
Wilcox, William H. 
Wiley, James 
Wilkinson, Henry 
Williston, Hii^am L. 
Wood. James A. 
York, Irving LeRoy 



CONS 



ISTABLES : 

The Members of the Police Force and 



Barnum, James E. 
Benoit, Alfred F. 
Black, Jacob 
Bryant, John H. 
Damon, Clarence L. 
Dean, John H. 
Doane, Robert N. B. 
Edgerton, William J. 
Foster, William E. 
Francis, Frederick J. 
Galligan, Patrick J. 
Gaucher, Elphege 
Greene, Anthonv F. 
Hall, William Patrick 
Jackson, Herbert M. 
Luce, John E. 
Lynch, John W. 



Mellody, Anthony J. 
Noyer, John C. 
Patnaude, Joseph C. 
Picanco, Joao 
Poirier, Thomas M. 
Reynolds, Charles H. 
Scioleno, Gaetano 
Shuster, Hyman 
Simmons, Charles H, 
Sweeney, William J. 
Sweet, Isaac H. 
Sylvia, Antone A. 
Sylvia, Thomas A. 
Sylvia, Wm. K. 
Sylvieira, Manuel J., 
Vieira, John C. 
Wilcox, Otis N. 



Jr. 



16 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Public Weighers 



Allen, Lesley B. 

Andrews, Manuel A. 

Andrews, William 

Ashcroft, John 

Ashley, Andrew H. 

Ashley, Roland R. 

Axelson, Emanuel 

Baldwin, John 

Bardsley, Edwin, Jr. 

Bariteau, Alfred J. 

Bariteau, Joseph L. 

Barrows, Allan 

Baron, William 

Bassett, Elton K. 

Bassett, Thomas E. 

Bates, Lonnie D. 

Belanger, Lucien 

Bennett, Francis F. 

Bennett, James T. 

Bertrand, Joseph 

Bessette, William 

Blais, Laucque 

Blakeley, Albert 

Blossom, Alonzo C. 

Bonille, Alfred F. 

Bottomley, William 
Borden, Horace 

Borden, Louis F. 
Bradford, Edgar A. 

Brennan, Peter J. 

Briggs, Arthur S. 
Briggs, Lester W. 
Brosseau, Oscar 
Brown, Walter 
Brownson, George L. 
Bruce, George C. 
Bulcock, Fred 
Burke, Raymond 
Brunette, Joe 
Butler, Clarence FL 
Butts, James D. 
Byrne, James 
Byron, John 
Cabiel, Manuel 
Carpenter, Clayton W. 
Carter, John J. 
Carter, William 
Chase, Kenneth 
Chase, Nathan P. 
Christie, Joseph E. 
Clarke, Thomas J. 
Clark, George 
Cobb, George A. 
Cobb, George S. 



Coe, Walter L. 
Coe, William A. 
Coholan, John L. 
Comeau, John 
Comey, Charles M. 
Connors, James 
Conway, John 
Cooper, Joseph 
Corey, William S. 
Cornelius, Orrin S. 
Correira, Manuel 
Coupe, Horace R. 
Cowen, Edson S. 
Coxen, Harold M. 
Crowley, James T. 
Coyle, Joseph S. 
Craig, Harry 
Cumisky, John A. 
Cummings, Archibald 
Cunningham, James 
Curtis, Daniel J. 
Gushing, Joseph B. 
Crossley, Frank 
Daly, James 
Day, Thomas E. 
Deane, Albert E. 
DeCosta, William A. 
DeMello, Edward 
Devoll, Roland G. 
Dextradeur, Victor 
Dickson, Fred 
Dion, John 
Dion, Alphonse J. 
Dodge, Louis 
Donahue, Joseph F. 
Donley, William 
Dow, William A. 
Downey, Maurice 
Duckworth, Alexander 
Duerden, Arthur 
Duff, John, Jr. 
Duff, MarkM. 
Duffy, Alice 
Duffy, John 
Dupre, Joseph 
Dyer, Howard C. 
Dwyer, Thomas E. 
Dwyer, Walter 
Earnshaw, John 
Ellis, Harold C. 
Emerson, David R. 
Fanning, James A. 
Faisneau, Harold P. 
Fay, John 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



17 



Feldgen, Frank H. 
Feenan, Henry Allen 
Findley, Thomas S. 
Foley, Edward F. 
Forbes, Joseph C. 
Francis, William H- 
Franklin, William A. 
Frates, Joseph 
Frechette, Edward 
Furtado, Manuel J. 
Furtado, Manuel J. 
Furtado, Manuel, Jr. 
Gallagher, William 
Gannon, John 
Gannon, Patrick J. 
Gargan, John 
Gatie, Joseph B. 
Gatonski, Peter 
Gaughan, Patrick 
Geddis, William J. 
Gee, John 

Gifford, Bradford F. 
Gifford, John I. 
Gifford, Wm. F. 
Gile, John F. 
Girard, Fred 
Girouard, Clement 
Girvan, Douglass J. 
Gobeil, John J. 
Goddard, James 
Goldthwait, B. D. 
Gomes, Michael R. 
Gooding, Homer B. 
Gooding, Clinton S. 
Goulding, James 
Goulet, Fred 
Gray, Charles A., Jr. 
Gray, Robert 
Gray, William 
Greenough, Harry 
Hales, Arthur J. 
Hanrahan, Charles E. 
Harney, John J. 
Harrison Joseph 
Hart, Robert J. 
Harwood, William S. 
Hatton, John 
Hawes, George W. 
Hayden, Edward D. 
Haynes, Mark L. 
Higgins, Daniel F. 
Hilligee, Robert 
Hilton, Samuel J . 
Hitch, Frank B. 
Holland, Charles 
Holmes, William A. 



Honneyman, Bertram C. 
Hunter, Joseph 
Hutchings, Walter C. 
Inne, Albert 
Inne, Louis 
Irwin, James 
Jarry, Archie 
Jemphrey, Robert 
Jenny, Julia 
Jennings, George L. 
Jennings, John W. 
Jennings, Ralph A. 
Johnson, Henry L. 
Johnson, Robert I. 
.Judd, Henry 
Keane, Paul F. 
Kennedy, Charles F. 
Kennedy, George H. 
Kinney, E. D. 
Kilbride, Philip H. 
Kiernan, James F. 
King, Joseph F. 
Lacy, Philip 
Lahey, Edward V. 
Lareau, Theodore 
Larocque, Wilfred 
Lawrence, Charles L. 
LeBlanc, Adelard 
LeClair, Alphonse N. 
Lees, Fred 
Lees, William K. 
Leferre, Louis 
Letourneau, Hector 
Letourneau, Hormidas 
Lewis, Percy 
Lilly, Howard F. 
Lincoln, Frank N. 
Lindsey, Robert 
Linnehan, Peter 
Littler, Harry 
Lord, Thomas 
Lowe, Moses 
Lyon, John 
Macia, William H. 
Macomber, George A. 
Macomber, James S. 
Macy, Frank H. 
Manna, Joseph 
Marks, John S. 
Marshall, Joseph 
Marshall, Manuel C. 
Masse, Joseph 
Mather, Arthur H. 
Matley, William 
McAuliffe, D.J. 
McCarty, Mortimer 



18 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



McDonald. Edward 
McKenzie, George 
McKiernan, Arthur 
Medeiros, Joseph 
Medeiros,' Manue! 
Mellor, Leonard H. 
Menard, A. J. 
Midgley, William H. 
Mitchell, John 
Mitchell, Thomas F. 
Moores, Joseph 
Morgan, David A. 
Morrison, Richard F. 
Morse, E. C. 
Mosher, Fred 
Murphy, John 
Murphy, Joseph E. 
Murray, Thomas 
Neagus, John P. 
Nelson, William 
Newett, Arthur B. 
Niles, Abram J. 
Norton, Joseph 
Norton, Thomas 
Gates, John F. 
O'Brien, F. Thomas 
O'Brien, William 
Oesting, F. W., Jr. 
Parker, Thomas 
Paul, George H. 
Pease, Bryden 
Peckham, William E. 
Pedro, Frank O. 
Pedro, William 
Perkins, Andrew 
Perry, John 
Pierce, David H. 
Pierce, Nathaniel E. 
Pontbriand, Oscar 
Porter, James F. 
Potter, Edwin L. 
Prescott, Albert N. 
Putnam, Arthur C. 
Quigley, Thomas 
Quinn, Thomas 
Radcliffe, Ralph 
Rawstron, JohnT. 
Raymond, Thomas A. 
Readio, James H. 
Reid, Frank A. 
Reynolds, Albert 
Reynolds, William 
Rezendes, Frank F. 
Richard, Calixte 
Richard, Clement 
Richardson, Clifford 



Riley, Thomas 
Roberts, Leonard 
Robinson, Frank J. 
Rodman, Frank P. 
Rogers, Edward 
Rogers, Henry V. 
Rose, Manuel 
Ross, Samuel 
Roy, Albert J. 
Roy, John V. 
Roy, Joseph R. 
Roy, Romuald J. 
Russell, Frederick J. 
Russell, John 
Russell, Pardon 
Russell, Richard 
Ryan, Ambrose J. 
Ryan, Harold D. P. 
Ryan, John W. 
Ryder, Frank 
Ryder, Leon G. 
Ryder, Thomas 
Sami, Alfred 
Santos, Frank 
Sayles, Hariy D. 
Sayles, Joseph A. 
Schilansky, Moiris 
Shaw, Chauncey. L. 
Sheehan, Michael J. 
Sheppard, Alex 
Sheratt, Henry 
Sherman, Edward R. 
Simpkins, John T. 
Sisson, Minerva M. 
Slater Edward 
Smith, George H. 
Smythe, Fred R. 
Soares, Manuel 
Souland, Arthur 
Spooner, Ralph 
Spencer, Walter G. 
St. Germain, Burt 
Staples, Willard F. 
Stephenson, Daniel C. 
Stevenson, Thomas 
Steward, Robert H. 
Stuart, Milburn C. 
Sullivan, Daniel 
Sullivan, Michael 
Sullivan, Thomas A. 
Sullivan, William H. 
Sumner, Samuel 
Sutcliffe, Benjamin 
Swallow, Samuel 
Swasey, John 
Sykes, George T. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



19 



Sylvia, Antone L. 
Sylvia, William M. 
Taft, Daniel H. 
Taylor, George, 
Taylor, Samuel 
Thibault, Ludger J. 
Thompson, Arthur 
Tibbutts, Samuel 
Tighe, James 
Toolis, Edward 
Tremblay, Leo N. 
Tripp, Desmond W. 
Tripp, Jabez D. 
Tripp, Warren A. 
Vedring, Joseph 
Vieira, John R. 
Wadsworth, William H. 
Weeks, John L. 
Whalley, John W. 



Whelan, Andrew J. 
Whitehead, Albert 
Whiteside, Thomas 
Whittle, John C. 
Wilbor, Alfred P. 
Wilbor, Walter C 
Wild, Wright 
Wilding, George 
Wilkin, August C. 
Wilkinson, Leonard 
Wilson, Melville S. 
Wilson, Wallace B. 
Winn, Thomas P. 
Winterbottom, Edward 
Wooler, Elsie G. 
Wright, William C. 
Young, Orville E. 
Young, Charles 



Anderson, Thomas 
Ashcroft, John 
Baldwin, John 
Bariteau, Joseph L. 
Baron, William 
Bassett, Thomas E. 
Bates, Lonnie D. 
Bennett, James T. 
Borden, Louis F. 
Brennan, Peter J. 
Briggs, Arthur S. 
Briggs, Lester W. 
Brownson, George L. 
Butts, James D. 
Carpenter, Clayton 
Carter, John J. 
Carter, William 
Champlin Rebecca W. 
Chase, Kenneth W. 
Clark, Thomas J. 
Coe, Walter L. 
Coe, William A. 
Comey, Charles M. 
Conway, John 
Cowen, Edson S. 
Craig, Harry 
Crawford, Samuel 
Crossley, Frank 
Cummings, Archibald 
Gushing, Joseph B. 
Day, Thomas E. 
DeCosta, William A. 
DeMello Edward 
Deane, Albert E. 
Dion, Alphonse J. 



WEIGHERS OF COAL. 
Dion, John 
Donahue, Joseph F. 
Duff, John Jr. 
Duff, Mark M. 
Dyer, Howard C. 
Faisneau, Harold P. 
Fanning, James 
Fay, John 
Forbes, Joseph C. 
Francis, William H. 
Gobeil, John j. 
Gooding, Clinton S. 
Gooding. Homer B. 
Gray, Charles A., Jr. 
Hillygee, Robert 
Hilton, Samuel J. 
Hutchings, Walter C. 
Jemphrey, Robert 
Jennings, John 
Jennings, Ralph A. 
Johnson, Robert I. 
Keane, Paul F. 
Lacey, Phillip 
Lawrence, Charles L. 
LeClair, Alphonse N. 
Letourneau, Hector J. 
Lindsey, Robert 
Lilley, Howard F. 
Lord, Thomas 
Macomber, George A. 
Macia, William H. 
Madeira, Joseph 
Marland, William 
Masse, Joseph 
McGinnes, John T. 



20 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



Moores, Joseph 
Nelson William 
Niles, Abram J. 
Norton, Joseph 
Norton, Thomas 
Pierce, Nathaniel E. 
Pontbriand, Oscar 
Porter, James F. 
Radcliffc, Ralph 
Raymond, Thomas A. 
Readio, James H. 
Read, Frank A. 
Reynolds, Albert 
Reynolds, William 
Roberts, Leonard 
Rodman, Frank P. 
Rogers, Henry V. 
Roy, John V. 
Russell, Frederick J. 
Russell, Pardon 
Ryan, Ambrose J. 
Ryan, John W. 
Ryder, Leon G. 
Shaw, Chauncey L. 
Sisson, Minerva M. 
Smith, Carlton W. 



Smith, George H. 
Spencer, Walter G. 
Staples, Willard F. 
Stevenson, Thomas 
Stewart, Robert H. 
Stuart, Milburn C. 
Sullivan, Peter F. 
Sullivan, Thomas A. 
Swasey, John 
Sykes, George T. 
Taylor, George 
Tibbutts, Samuel 
Tripp, Jabez D. 
Travers, Chas. L 
Tripp, Warren A. 
Vedring, Joseph 
Wadsworth, William H. 
Weeks, John L. 
Whiteside, Thomas 
Wilbor, Walter C. 
Wilding, George 
Wilson, Melville S. 
Wilson, Wallace B. 
Winn, Thomas P. 
Young, Orville E. 



WEIGHERS OF BOILERS AND HEAVY MACHINERY. 



Ashley, Andrew H. 
Baldwin, John 
Balthazar, William H. 
Bariteau, Joseph L. 
Baron, William 
Bassett, Thomas E. 
Bennett, James T. 
Borden, Louis F. 
Brennan, Peter J. 
Briggs, Lester W. 
Briggs, Arthur S. 
Brownson, George L. 
Butts, James D. 
Carpenter, Clayton 
Carter, John J. 
Carter, William 
Chase, Kenneth W. 
Clarke, Thomas J. 
Coe, Walter L. 
Coe, William A. 
Comey, Charles M. 
Conway, John 
Crossley, Frank 
Cummings, Archibald 
Cushing, Joseph B. 
Craig, Harry 
Crawford, Samuel 



Day, Thomas E. 
Deane, Albert E. 
DeMello, Edward 
DeCosta, William A. 
Dion, Alphonse J. 
Dion, John 
Donahue, Joseph F. 
Duff, John, Jr. 
Duff, Mark M. 
Dyer, Harold C. 
Earnshaw, John 
Faisneau, Harold P. 
Fanning, James 
Foley, Edward F. 
Forbes, Joseph C. 
Francis, William H. 
Gile, John F. 
Gobeil, John J. 
Goldthwait, B. D. 
Gooding, Clinton S. 
Gooding, Homer B. 
Gray, Charles A., Jr. 
Hillygee, Robert 
Hilton, Samuel J. 
Hitch, Frank P. 
Hutchings, Walter C. 
Jemphrey, Robert 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 21 



Jennings, John ~ Ryan, John VV. 

Jennings, Ralph A. Shaw, ChaunceyL. 

Johnson, Robert I. Simmons, Lester F. 

Keane, Paul F. Sisson, Minerva M. 

Lagace, T. Smith, Carlton W. 

Lawrence, Charles L. Smith, George H. 

Lilley, Howard F. Spencer, Walter G. 

Lindsej^ Robert Staples, Willard F. 

Lord, Thomas Stephenson, Thomas 

Macia, William H. Stewart, Robert H. 

Macomber, George A. Stokoe, George 

Macy, Frank H. Stuart, Milburn C. 

Marland, William Sullivan, Michael F. 

Masse, Joseph Sullivan, Peter F. 

Madeiros, Joseph V. Sullivan, Thomas A. 

McGinnes, John J. Swasey, John 

Nelson, William Sykes, George T. 

Niles, Abram J. Taylor, George 

Norton, John Tibbutts, Samuel 

Norton, Thomas Travers, Charles L 

Pierce, Nathaniel E. Tripp, Jabez D. 

Pontbriand, Oscar Vedring, Joseph 

Porter, James F. Wadsworth, William H. 

Reid, Frank A. Weeks, John L. 

Reynolds, Albert Whiteside, Thomas 

Reynolds, William Wilbor, Walter C. 

Roberts, Leonard Wilde, Webster 

Rodman, Frank P. Wilding, George 

Rogers, Henry V. Wilson, Wallace B. 

Roy, John V. Wilson, Melville S. 

Russell, Pardon Winn, Thomas P. 

Ryan, Ambrose J. Young, Orville E. 



SURVEYORS OP LUMBER. 

Beetle, John H. Howe, Benjamin F. 

Croacher, Thomas Longpree, Joseph Z. 

Desmond, William F. Rowland, James E. 

Doane, Joshua G. Spooner, Daniel A. 
Gray, Charles A., Jr. 



MEASURER OP GRAIN. 
Rodman, Frank P. 

MEASURERS OP WOOD AND BARK. 

Ashley, Roland R. Howe, Benjamin F. 

Borden, Harrison T. Rodman, Frank P. 

Cobb, George A. Stephenson, Thomas J. 

Cobb, George S. Tripp, Warren A. 

Hathaway, Edward E. Walsh, Thomas 

Westgate, Clarence E. 



22 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



ELECTION OFFICERS. 

Term of Office Expires Sept. 15, 1916. 



WARD 1, PRECINCT A. 

Warden, OTIS A. SISSON, R 

Clerk, JOHN W. SPENCER, D 

Inspector, GEORGE S. COBB, R 

JAMES H. GRIFFIN, D 

DANIEL A. SPOONER, R 



3913 Acushnet Ave. 
400Tarkiln Hill rd. 
30 Hersom St. 
55 Mill Rd. 
3243 Acushnet Ave. 



Warden, 

Clerk, 

Inspector, 



ADEMAR A.NORMANDIN,D 247 Bowditch St. 



Deputies 

WILLIAM F. ANDREWS, R 
WILLIAM H. MACIA D 

GEORGE W. ALLEN, JR. R 
ANDREW MORAN, D 

WESTON J. BORDEN, R 
ARTHUR DAVIGNON, D 



126 Tarkiln Hill Rd. 
427 Tarkiln Hill Rd. 
286 Bowditch St. 
8 Felton St. 
2082 Acushnet Ave. 
59 Sylvia St. 



WARD 1, PRECINCT B. 

1 Warden, HENRY CHARPENTIER, D 

2 Clerk, LEROY S. STURGIS, R 

3 Inspector, JOHN PILKINGTON, D 

4 " FRANK E. SISSON, R 

5 " JARVIS COUNSELL, JR., D 

6 " FRANK O. COVILL, R 

Deputies 

1 Warden, JOHN WALSH, D 

2 Clerk, JOHN WOOLLEY, R 

3 Inspector, WILLIAM E. MURRAY, D 

4 " ALBERT BOURGET, R 

5 " HENRY DOYLE, D 

6 " JOHNT. DRINKWATER, R 



12 Bentley St. 
2115 Acushnet Ave. 
116 Hathaway St. 
2143 Acushnet Ave. 
251 Bowditch St. 
1848 Acushnet Ave. 



61 Covin St. 
335 Bowditch St. 
203 Tinkham St. 
102 Beetle St. 
105 Nash Rd. 
56 Beetle St. 



WARD 1, PRECINCT 1. 

1 Warden, NATHANIEL H. JENNEY R 

2 Clerk, JOSEPH N. FINNI, D 

3 Inspector, FREDERICK H. ROSCOW R 

4 " WILLIAM S. GIFFORD D 

5 " WILLIAM J. SWEENEY, R 

6 " PIERRE MANDEVILLE.D 

Deputies 

1 Warden, THOMAS RIDINGS, R 

2 Clerk, DANIEL F. MURPHY , D 

3 Inspector, CHARLES E. FOURNIER, R 

4 " ARTHUR DUBUQUE, D 

5 " FRANCOIS LAPOINTE, R 



1811 Acushnet Ave. 
1105 Acushnet Ave. 
259 Bowditch St. 
1450 Pleasant St. 
253 Collette St. 
43 Dean St. 



204 Earle St. 
208 Nash Rd. 
301 Earle St. 
201 Tinkham St. 
142 Collette St. 



TIMOTHY O'BRIEN, 



D 250 Davis St. 



Municipal register. 



23 



WARD 1, PRECINCT 2. 



1 Warden, HENRY J. FOURNIER, R 

2 Clerk, ERNEST A. DUNHAM, D 

3 Inspector, JOHN E. HANDFORD, R 

4 " JOSEPH A. MAHONEY, D 

5 " A. DENNIS PERRAULT, R 

6 " HENRY BEAULIEU, D 29 Nye St. 



148Tallman St. 
1430 Acushnet Ave. 
274 Sawver St. 
218 Tinkham st. 
335 Bowditch St. 



Deputies. 



1 


Warden, 


FRED CASAVANT, 


R 


2 


Clerk, 


FREDERICK HODSON, 


D 


3 


Inspector, 


ARl'HUR POIRIER, 


R 


4 


" 


STEPHEN H. SULLIVAN, 


D 


5 


" 


PAUL PARADIS, 


R 


6 


" 


LUKE BROZEK, 


D 



341 CoRgeshall St. 

139 Bullard St. 

1176 Acushnet Ave. 
257 Cedar Grove St. 
80 Battle St. 
132 Holly St. 



WARD 1, PRECINCT 3. 

1 Warden, JOSEPH Z. BOUCHER, R 253 CoHctte St. 

2 Clerk, WILLIAM McCANN, D 200 No. Front St. 

3 Inspector, THOMAS f . LEWIN, R 1082 Countv St. 

4 " DANIEL J. CONNELLY, D 370 State St. 

5 " DOLOR A. HOULE, R 150 Tallman St. 

6 " SAMUEL THOA/IPSON, D 133 Bullard St. 

Deputies. 

1 Warden, FRANCIS P. LAUGHLIN, R 191 Davis St. 

2 Clerk, JERONIM J. JANAK, D 39 Hicks St. 

3 Inspector, J. ARTHUR BALTHAZAR, R 396 No. Front St. 

4 " ROCK DUPRE, D 7 Bentley St. 

5 " MOSES DENAULT, JR. R 366 State St. 

6 " Vacancy D 



1 

2 


Warden, 
Clerk, 


3 
4 
5 
6 


Inspector, 


1 
2 


Warden, 
Clerk, 


3 


Inspector, 


5 
6 


iC 



WARD 2, PRECINCT 4. 

GEORGE P. MACOMBER 
PETER F. SULLIVAN, 
CHARLES A. HALL, 
CHARLES K. LEWIN^ 
CHARLES L. FAUNCE, 
WM. BEARDSWORTH, 



Deputies. 

EDWARD CARTER, 
JOSEPH B. MURRAY, 
FRANK S. SULLIVAN, 
PATRICK H. SULLIVAN, 
THOMAS T. GIFFORD, 
VICTOR LEMIEUX, 



R 


774 County St. 


D 


328 Cedar St. 


R 


1207 Pleasant St, 


D 


153 Adams St. 


R 


13 Pope St. 


D 


907 Summer St. 


R 


275 Pope St. 


D 


46 Robeson St. 


R 


14 Studley St. 


D 


56 Linden St. 


R 


389 Cedar St. 


D 


1375 Pleasant St. 



24 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



WARD 2, PRECINCT 5 

Warden, CHARLES T. BROWNELL R 749 Summer St. 

Clerk, THOMAS J. MURPHY D 721 County St. 

Inspector, Vacancy R 

J.ARTHUR DESAULNIERS,D 180 Reynolds St. 

EDWARD T. MAHONEY, R 328 Cedar St. 

MICHAEL J. HURLEY, D 49 Vine St. 

Deputies 

Warden, JOHN J. GOLDTHORPE, R 18 Trinity St. 

Clerk, LEON J. DUFOUR, D 51 Vine St. 

Inspector, ERNEST H. BOUCHER, R 87 Reynolds St. 

GEORGE H. GOULET, JR. D 35 Linden St. 

EDWARD F. HARPS, R 30 Collins St. 

JAMES S. McGRATH, D 11 Reynolds St. 



WARD 2, PRECINCT 6 



1 Warden, JAMES H. BAMFORD, R 

2 Clerk, GEORGE H. BONNER, D 

3 Inspector, ALBERT BARBER, R 

4 " TIMOTHY J. DORGAN, D 

5 " EMILE C. BELLENOIT, R 

6 " JOHN HOLLIHAN, D 

Deputies 

1 Warden, STEPHEN B. ARNOLD, R 

2 Clerk, JOSEPH P. REILLY, D 

3 Inspector, JOHN P. O'HARA, R 

4 " EDWARD J. BELLENOIT D 

5 " THOMAS W. RAMSDEN, R 

6 " JAMES M. HICKEY D 



90MerrimacSt. 

9 Willow St. 

7 Gloyer St. 

5 Tilton Si. 

Ill Mt. Vernon St. 

107 Robeson St. 



525 Cottage St. 
9 Richmond St. 
25 Richmond St. 
87 Highland St. 
682 Cottage St. 
390 Cedar St. 



WARD 3, PRECINCT 7 



1 Warden, ANDREW P. KIRBY, D 

2 Clerk, HORACE WOOD, R 

3 Inspector, WILLIAM T. DAVIS, D 

4 " ARTHUR B. CASE R 

5 " ALVIN H. PAINE, D 

6 " JOSEPH L. FORRESTER, R 

Deputies 

1 Warden, JOSEPH C. DESAdOND, D 

2 Clerk, FREDERICK W. BESSE, R 

3 Inspector, ROBERT E. EDWARDS, D 

4 " PHILIP S. COLYAR, R 

5 " WILLIAM T. DAVIS D 

6 " Vacancy R 



48 Sycamoree St. 
85 Mill St. 
614 County St. 
873 Pleasant St. 
55 Hill St. 
953 Pleasant St. 



117 Hillman St. 
1101 Pleasant St. 
171 Kempton St. 
830 Pleasant St. 
4 Smith St. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



25 



WARD 3, PRECINCT 8 

1 Warden, MARTIN H. SULLIVAN, D 

2 Clerk, JOSEPH C. FORBES, R 

3 Inspector, ALBERT J. BARNEY, D 

4 " B. FRANKLIN WORDELL, R 

5 " ALBERT C. WELCH, D 



78 North St. 
299 Chancery St. 
241 Summer St. 
59 Sycamore St. 
69 Sycamore St. 



FREDERICK J.FRANCIS, R 42 Hill St. 



Deputies 

1 Warden, JAMES A. REED, D 61 Chestnut St. 

2 Clerk, HARRY BURKE, R 178 Cedar St. 

3 Inspector, CHARLES A. GALLIGAN, D 36 Peari St. 

4 " ABNER P. POPE, R 63 Thomas St. 

5 " EDWARD L. BRAWLEY, D 215 Maxfield St. 

6 " CORNELIUS B, PIPER, R 1299 Purchase St. 



WARD 3, PRECINCT 9 

1 Warden, SAMUEL E. GABRIEL, R 436 Cottage St. 

2 Clerk, DANIEL J. SULLIVAN, D 100 Hillman St. 

3 Inspector, GEORGE E. NYE, R 43 Hill St. 

4 " EDWARD F.RILEY, D 21 Shawmut Ave. 

5 " WILLIAM YORK, R 123 Cedar St. 

6 " JAMES J. FINN, D 161 North St. 



Deputies 

1 Warden, ANDERSON H. SWIFT, R 

2 Clerk, JOHN H. RYAN, JR., D 

3 Inspector, ARTHUR C. KIRBY, R 

4 " ISAAC BARRON, D 

5 " ANTHONY LOFTUS, R 



98 Campbell St. 
162 Campbell St. 
123 Sycamore St. 
431 Mill St. 
859 Rockdale Ave. 



WM. H. RICHARDSON, D 281 Park St. 



WARD 4, PRECINCT 10 

1 Warden, EDWARD B. GRAY, D 450 Union St. 

2 Clerk, JOSEPH H. SCHOFIELD, R 200 Tremont St. 

3 Inspector, PATRICK J. NORTON, D 277 Park St. 

4 " CHESTER E. DAVIS, . R 165 Middle St. 

5 " CLARENCE E. ROCKEFELLER, 

D 51 Emerson St. 

6 " CHARLES H. SIMMONS, R 446 Union St. 



Deputies 

1 Warden, JOHN T. CANTWELL, D 91 Pierce St. 

2 Clerk, SETH W. GODFREY, R 429 Union St. 

3 Inspector, PAUL RIOUX, D 126 Mill St. 

4 " JOSHUA B. JOHNSON R 585 Elm St. 

5 " WILLIAM L. SLOCUM,JR. D 190 Ash St. 

6 " WILLIAM A. COE R 71 Mechanics St. 



26 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



WARD 4, PRECINCT 11 

1 Warden, HENRY A. GRAY, D 288 Palmer St. 

2 Clerk, LYNTON M.BUFFINTON, R 418 Union St. 

3 Inspector, JAMES F. HARRISON, D 326 Middle St. 

4 " FRED'K D. BARROWS, R 60 Mechanics St. 

5 " CHARLES H. TALMAGE, D 162 Park St. 

6 " WILLIAM E. CARROLL, R 565 Kempton St. 

Deputies 

1 Warden, JOHN G. PURRINGTON, D 147 Arnold St. 

2 Clerk, CHARLES E. CARROLL, R 247 Middle St. 

3 Inspector, PETER J. RILEY, D 53 Morgan St. 

4 " HENRY HARLOW, R 417 Union St. 

5 " WM. L. FITZGERALD, D 240 Middle St. 

6 " CHARLES B. DAVIS, R 95 High St. 



WARD 4, PRECINCT 12 

1 Warden, JAMES E. MIDDLETON, 

2 Clerk, WALTER RAWCLIFFE, 

3 Inspector, MICHAEL C- AUSTIN, 

4 " FREDERICK B. COOK, 

5 " ANDREW TATE, 

6 " ALBERT E. WELSH, 



D 


483 Union St. 


R 


32 Lindsey St. 


D 


431 Court St. 


R 


253 Arnold St. 


D 


399 Elm St. 


R 


114 Newton St, 



Deputies 

1 Warden, FRANK E. GILLETTE, 

2 Clerk, IRVING S. ALLEN, 

3 Inspector, HERBERT E. MACY, 

4 " FRANK W. DAVIS, 

5 " GEORGE W. PECKHAM, 

6 " DAVID M. PIPER, 



456 Mill St. 
153 Morgan St. 
151 Morgan St. 
567 Kempton St. 
64 Ocean St. 



R 49 Florence St. 



WARD 5, PRECINCT 13 



1 Warden, GEO. P. RICHARDSON, D 

2 Clerk, FRANK WHITTAKER, R 

3 Inspector, MANUEL G. CRUZ, D 

4 " JAMES F. MacCAULEY, R 

5 " ROBERT J. CURRY, D 

6 " GEORGE F. CURRY, R 



52 Russell St. 
93 So. Sixth St. 
161 Acushnet Ave. 
167 Allen St. 
69 South St. 
67 Taber St. 



Deputies 

1 Warden, JOHN M. FAGAN, D 242 Purchase St. 

2 Clerk, PHILIP J. SHERMAN, R 28 Borden St. 

3 Inspector, THOMAS A. MORRISON, D 173 Grinnell St. 

4 " CLIFTON F. ASHLEY, R 42 So. Sixth St. 

5 " WILLIAM C. DeMELLO, D 211 Acushnet Ave. 

6 " Vacancy R 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



27 



WARD 5, PRECINCT 14 

1 Warden, PHILIP S. BRIGGS, D 

2 Clerk, HARRY S. BRIGHTMAN, R 

3 Inspector, HENRY C. GRAY, D 

4 " E. PHILIP BERTHIAUME R 

5 " EDWARD W. GALLIGAN, D 

6 " WANTON H.S.BEAUVAIS, R 



173 Acushnet Ave. 
251 Orchard St. 
75 Dartmouth St. 
23 Fair St. 
277 Hawthorn St. 
263 Pleasant St. 



Deputies 

1 Warden, ROBERT SIBOR, D 

2 Clerk, JOHN H. BURKE, R 

3 Inspector, Vacancy D 

4 " WILFRED S. KIRBY, R 

5 " ARTHUR R. HOWLAND, D 

6 " ANTONE PI. SENNA, R 



304 Hawthorn St. 
153 Acushnet Ave. 

33 So. Sixth St. 
116 So. Sixth St. 
173 Allen St. 



WARD 5, PRECINCT 15 

1 Warden, JOHN C. EMERY, R 

2 Clerk, CLIFTON P. TUELL, D 

3 Inspector, JOSEPH A. CRONIN, R 

4 " JOHN H. DEAN, D 

5 " CHARLES A. BENNETT, R 

6 " HERBERT W. BLISS, D 



99 Bedford St. 
341 So. Orchard St. 
240 Maple St. 
15 Borden St. 
183 Washington St. 
72 Rotch St. 



Deputies 

1 Warden, SAMUEL MORRIS, R 

2 Clerk, NORMAN BARSTOW, D 

3 Inspector, JOHN A. MacKAY, R 

4 " ARTHUR J. CUNNINGHAM, 

D 

5 " CHAS. J. MATTHEWS, R 

6 " LUTHER M. DAYTON, 2d D 



60 Bay St. 
326 Clinton St. 
167 Grinnell St. 

33 Plymouth St. 
191 Washington St. 
22 Bay St. 



WARD 6, PRECINCT 16 



1 


Warden, 


PATRICK J. COYNE, 


D 


17 Stapleton St. 


2 


Clerk 


Vacancy, 


R 




3 


Inspector, 


JAMES KINCAID, 


D 


4 Welcome St. 


4 


" 


PHILIP E. FOGARTY,' 


R 


22 Hall St. 


5 


" 


EDWARD MAYNARD, 


D 


604 So. Second St, 



RAYMOND HALLIWELL, R 26 George St. 



Deputies 

1 Warden, JOHN McGLADDERY, 

2 Clerk, ELI HIGGINBOTTOM, 

3 Inspector, JOHN L. MULCAIRNS, 

4 " FRED ]. BENTLEY, 

5 " JOHN HARRISON, 

6 " PIERREH.DANDURAND,R 9 West French Ave. 



D 


19 Nelson St. 


R 


104 Clara St. 


D 


150 Blackmer St. 


R 


69 County St. 


D 


878 Brock Ave. 



28 MUNICIPAL REGISTER,. 



WARD 6, PRECINCT 17 

1 Warden, OWEN J. DOWD, D 790 So. First St. 

2 Clerk, JAMES V. RONAN, R 29 Mosher St. 

3 Inspector, DANIEL McAVOY, D 48 Rockland St. 

4 " HUBERT HALL, R 24 Winsor St. 

5 " PIERRE H.DANDURAND,D 9 W. French Ave. 

6 " GEORGE W. NOYER, R 77 County St. 

Deputies 

1 Warden, JOHN R. WALDRON, D 193 Crapo St. 

2 Clerk, GREENWOOD PENDLEBURY, 

R 109 Division St. 

3 Inspector, WILLIAM CLARKE, D 41 Mosher St. 

4 " ARTHUR W. GILMORE, R 835 So. Water St. 

5 " JAMES P. MARTIN, D 110 Division St. 

6 " ZEPHIR J. ROBERT, R 56 Jouvette St. 



WARD 6, PRECINCT 18 

1 Warden, MARSHALL S. GREENE, R 233 Rivet St. 

2 Clerk, JOHN J. McAVOY, D 25 Welcome St. 

3 Inspector, HORACE R. COUPE, R 1 Warwick St. 

4 " MANUEL JOSEPH, D 206 Rockland St. 

5 " CHRISTOPHER SOUTHWORTH, 

R 79 Rockland St. 

6 " WILLIAM N. NELSON D 46 Oak St. 

Deputies 

1 Warden, ERNEST A. ROTHERA, R 866 Brock Ave. 

2 Clerk, WALTER WALDRON, D 16 Briggs St. 

3 Inspector, MICHAEL QUINN, R 103 Rockland St. 

4 " HENRY W. RAYMOND, D 163 Bonnev St. 

5 " WILLIAM WALLACE, R 28 Cove St. 

6 " DANIEL McAULIFFE, D 699 So. Front St. 



WARD 6, PRECINCT 19. 

1 Warden, DENNIS F. SHUGRUE, 

2 Clerk, NAPOLEON GREGOIRE, 

3 Inspector, JOSEPH A. McAVOY, 

4 " JOHN A. HYDE, 

5 " Vacancy 

6 " FRED LEES, 



Deputies. 

1 Warden, PATRICK F. GARRITY, 

2 Clerk, HENRY MAKIN, 

3 Inspector, WH.LIAM A. ADAMS 

4 " THOMAS SINGLETON, 

5 " LUDGER LAVOIE, 

6 " Vacancy 



D 


33 Delano St. 


R 


74 Nelson St. 


D 


25 Welcome St. 


R 


738 Brock Ave. 


D 




R 


44 Winsor St. 


D 


877 So. Water St. 


R 


28 Rockland St. 


D 


166 Clara St. 


R 


46 Ashley St. 


D 


28 Ashley St. 


R 





MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 29 

WARD LINES. 

City of New Bedford, 

In Board of Aldermen, 

December 23, 1914. 

ORDERED, That in conformity with the Revised Laws of 
Massachusetts, and under authority of Chapter 67 6 of the Acts 
of the Legislature in the year 1914, the several wards of the 
city be and they hereby are divided and established according 
to the following described lines, said division and designation 
to take effect as prescribed by Section 4 of said Chapter 676 
of 1914: 

Ward One — All that portion of the city lying north and 
east of a line beginning at a point in the Acushnet River in 
the line between the City of New Bedford and the Town of 
Fairhaven, and drawn through the middle of Sawyer Street 
to the westerly line of the location of the Old Colony Railroad; 
thence northerly and westerly in that line and in the southerly 
line of the Watuppa Branch of the Old Colony Railroad to the 
line between the City of New Bedford and the Town of 
Dartmouth. 

Ward Two — All that portion of the city lying between a 
line l)eginning at a point in the Acushnet River in the line 
l)etween the City of New Bedford and the Town of Fairhaven 
and drawn through the middle of the following streets, namely: 
Wamsutta, Purchase, Austin, County, Hazard, Summer, Rol)e- 
son, and the last named line extended to the line between the 
City of New Bedford and the Town of Dartmouth, and the line 
beginning at a point in the Acushnet River in the line between 
the City of New Bedford and the Town of Fairhaven and drawn 
through the middle of Sawyer Street to the westerly line of 
the location of the Old Colony Railroad; thence northerly and 
westerly in that line and in the southerly line of the Watuppa 
Branch of the Old Colony Railroad to the line between the 
City of New Bedford and the Town pf Dartmouth. 

Ward Three — All that portion of the city lying between 
a line l)eginning at a point in the Acushnet River at the line 
between the City of New Bedford and the Town of Fairhaven, 
and passing north of Popes and Fish Islands, and thence 
through the middle line of the following streets, namely: 
North, Newton, Mill and Kempton to the line between the City 
of New Bedford and the Town of Dartmouth, and the line 
beginning at a point in the Acushnet River in the line lietween 
the City of New Bedford and the Town of Fairhaven and 



30 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

drawn through the middle of the following streets, namely 
Wamsutta, Purchase, Austin, County, Hazard, Summer, Robe- 
son, and the last named line extended to the line between the 
City of New Bedford and the Town of Dartmouth. 

Ward Four — All that portion of the city lying between 
a line beginning at a point in the Acushnet River in the line 
between the City of New Bedford and the Town of Fairhaven, 
and passing south of Popes and Fish Islands, and thence 
through the middle of the following streets, namely: Walnut, 
County and Arnold, to the line between the City of New Bed- 
ford and the Town of Dartmouth, and the line beginning at a 
point in the Acushnet River in the line between the City of 
New Bedford and the Town of Fairhaven passing north of 
Popes and Fish Islands, and thence through the middle line of 
the following streets, namely North, Newton, Mill and Kempton 
to the line between the City of New Bedford and the Town of 
Dartmouth. 

Ward Five — All that portion of the city lying between a 
line beginning at a point in the Acushnet River in tlie line 
between the City of New Bedford and the Town of Fairhaven 
and passing north of Palmers Island; thence through the 
middle of the following streets, namely: Potomska, Purchase, 
Thompson, Bonney and Rockland; thence westerly across the 
Rural Cemetery and through the middle of Winterville Road 
to the line between the City of New Bedford and the Town of 
Dartmouth, and the line beginning at a point in the Acushnet 
River in the line between the City of New Bedford and the 
Town of Fairhaven, and passing south of Popes and Fish 
Islands, and thence through the middle of the following streets, 
namely: Walnut, County and Arnold, to the line between the 
City of New Bedford and the Town of Dartmouth. 

Ward Six — All that portion of the city lying south of a 
line beginning at a point in the Acushnet River in the line 
between the City of New Bedford and the Town of Fairhaven 
and passing north of Palmers Island; thence through the 
middle of the following streets, namely: Potomska, Purchase, 
Thompson, Bonney and Rockland; thence westerly across the 
Rural Cemetery and through the middle of Winterville Road 
to the line between the City of New Bedford and the Town 
of Dartmouth. 

In Board of Aldermen, Dec. 23, 1914. Adopted and sent 
down for concurrence. 

In Common Council, Dec. 23, 1914. Concurred. 

Presented to and approved by the Mayor, Dec. 2 4, 1914. 

A true copy, attest: w. H. B. Remington, City Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 3I 



EXTRACT FROM LAW. 

Section 4 of Chapter 67 6 of the Acts of 1914, entitled 
"An Act relative to the re-division of cities into wards and 
voting precincts," is as follows: 



Chapter 676, Acts 1914. 

"Section 4. Said Chapter eight hundred and thirty-five 
is hereby further amended Ijy striking out section two hundred 
and nineteen and inserting in place thereof the following new 
section: Section 219. For all elections held prior to the annual 
state primary in the second year following a re-division of a 
city into wards, and for the assessment of taxes prior to such 
time, the wards as existing prior to such re-division shall 
continue, and for such purposes the election officers shall be 
appointed and hold office, and voting lists shall be prepared, 
and all other things required l)y law shall be done as if no 
such re-division had been made. For all other purposes, the 
new division shall take effect on the thirty-first day of Decem- 
ber of the year when it is made." 



W, H. B. Remington, City Clerk. 



32 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 



VOTING PRECINCTS. 

City of New Bedford, 
In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 14, 1915. 

ORDERED, That the wards of the City of New Bedford as 
established l)y the City Council of 1914, be and they hereby 
are divided into voting precincts, as follows: 

WARD ONE. 

Precinct 1 — All that part of ward 1 lying northerly and 
westerly from the following described lines, viz: Beginning 
at a point in the Acushnet river and in an extension easterly 
of the centre line of Belleville road to the centre line of the 
Old Colony railroad; thence southerly in the centre line of 
the Old Colony railroad to its junction with the line between 
ward 1 and ward 2 ; thence westerly in the centre line of the 
Watuppa branch of the Old Colony railroad to the line be- 
tween the city of New Bedford and the town of Dartmouth. 

Precinct 2 — All that part of ward 1 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: Beginning at the Acushnet 
river and extending through the centre lines of Manomet 
street. Riverside avenue, Hathaway street, Belleville avenue, 
Earle street, the Old Colony railroad, and Belleville road to 
the Acushnet river. 

Precinct 3 — All that part of ward 1 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: Beginning at the Acushnet 
river and extending through the centre lines of Deane street, 
the O'ld Colony railroad, Earle street, Belleville avenue, Hatha- 
way street. Riverside avenue, and Manomet street to the 
Acushnet river. 

Precinct 4 — All that part of ward 1 bounded by the 
following lines in sequence, viz: Beginning at the Acushnet 
river and extending through the centre lines of Sawyer street, 
Old Colony railroad, and Deane street to the Acushnet river. 

WARD TWO. 

Precinct 5 — All that part of ward 2 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: Beginning at the Acushnet 
river and extending through the centre lines of Wamsutta 
street, Old Colony railroad, and Sawyer street to the Acushnet 
river. 

Precinct 6 — All that part of ward 2 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The centre lines of Wamsutta 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 33 

street, Purchase street, Austin street, County street, Linden 
street, Reynolds street and Reynolds street produced, and the 
Old Colony railroad. 

Precinct 7— All that part of ward 2 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The centre lines of Hazard 
street, Summer street, Robeson street, Cottage street, Mt. 
Pleasant street, Old Colony railroad, Reynolds street and 
Reynolds street produced. Linden street, and County street. 

Precinct 8 — All that part of ward 2 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The centre lines of Robeson 
street and Robeson street produced, the line between the city 
of New Bedford and the town of Dartmouth, the centre line of 
the Old Colony railroad, and the centre lines of Mt. Pleasant 
and Cottage streets. 

WARD THREE. 

Precinct 9 — All that part of ward 3 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The centre lines of North 
street. Hill street, Hillman street, State street, Willis street, 
State street. Pearl street, County street, Austin street, Pur- 
chase street, and Wamsutta street. 

Precinct 10 — All that part of ward 3 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The centre lines of North 
street, Chestnut street, Robeson street. Summer street. Hazard 
street. County street, Pearl street. State street, Willis street, 
State street, Hillman street, and Hill street. 

Precinct 11 — All that part of ward 3 bounded by the 
following lines in sequence, viz: The centre lines of North 
street, Cedar street, Parker street, Shawmut avenue, Robeson 
street and Chestnut street. 

Precinct 12 — All that part of ward 3 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The centre lines of North 
street, Newton street. Mill street, Kempton street, the line 
between the city of New Bedford and the town of Darmouth, 
the centre lines of Robeson street "and Robeson street pro- 
duced, Shawmut avenue, Parker street and Cedar street. 

WARD FOUR. 

Precinct 13 — All that part of ward 4 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: Beginning at the Acushnet 
river and extending through the centre lines of Walnut street. 
County street and North street to the Acushnet river, includ- 
ing the islands in the Acushnet river known as "Fish island" 
and "Popes island." 



34 MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 

Precinct 14 — All that part of ward 4 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The centre lines of Arnold, 
Ash, North and County streets. 

Precinct 15 — All that part of ward 4 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The centre lines of Arnold, 
Tremont, Mill, Newton, North and Ash streets. 

Precinct 16 — All that part of ward 4 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The centre line of Arnold street 
and Arnold street extended, the line between the city of New 
Bedford and the town of Dartmouth, and the centre lines of 
Kempton, Mill and Tremont streets. 

WARD FIVE. 

Precinct 17 — All that part of ward 5 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: Beginning at the Acushnet 
river and extending through the centre lines of Potomska, 
Purchase, Thompson, County, Sixth and Walnut streets to the 
Acushnet river. 

Precinct 18 — All that part of ward 5 bounded by the 
following lines in sequence, viz: The centre lines of Thomp- 
son, Bonney, Rockland, Orchard, Arnold, County, Walnut, Sixth 
and County streets. 

Precinct 19 — All that part of ward 5 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The centre line of Rockland 
street, the southerly line of ward 5 in Rural cemetery, the 
centre lines of Lewis street and Lewis street extended, Grape, 
Oak, Clay, Ward, Bedford, Ash, Arnold and Orchard streets. 

Precinct 20- — All that part of ward 5 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The southerly line of ward 5 
in Rural cemetery, the centre line of Winterville road, the 
line between the city of New Bedford and the town of Dart- 
mouth, the centre lines of Arnold street and Arnold street 
extended, Ash street, Ward street, Clay street. Oak street, 
Grape street, Lewis street and Lewis street extended. 

'ward six. 

Precinct 21 — All that part of ward 6 l)ounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: Beginning at the Acushnet 
river and extending through the centre lines of Gifford, Water, 
Division, Crapo, Thompson, Purchase and Potomska streets to 
the Acushnet river including the island in Acushnet river known 
as "Palmers island." 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER. 35 

Precinct 22 — All that part of ward 6 bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: Beginning at the Acushnet 
river and extending through the centre lines of Ruth street 
and Brock avenue to Clarks cove; beginning again at Clarks 
cove and extending through the centre lines of Crapo, Division, 
Water and Gifford streets to the Acushnet river. 

Precinct 23 — All that part of ward G bounded by the fol- 
lowing lines in sequence, viz: The boundary line between 
the city of New Bedford and the town of Dartmouth, the 
centre line of Winterville road, the northerly line of ward 6 
across Rural cemetery, the centre lines of Rockland, Bonney, 
Thompson and Crapo streets to Clarks cove. 

Precinct 2 4 — All that part of ward 6 lying southerly of 
the following lines in sequence, viz: Beginning at the Acush- 
net river and extending through the centre lines of Ruth 
street and Brock avenue to Clarks cove. 

In Board of Aldermen, Jan. 14, 1915. Adopted. 
Presented to and approved by the mayor Jan. 15, 1915. 
A true copy, attest: 

W. II, B. Remington, City Clerk. 



SECOND 
INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



OF THE 



Jrion. rydward Iv. iTatnaway 



MAYOR OF NEW BEDFORD 

MASSACHUSETTS 



AT THE 

INAUGURATION OF THE CITY GOVERNMENT 



JANUARY THIRD 
NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTEEN 



New Bedford, Massachusetts 

WILLISTON H. COLLINS CO. 

Printers 

19 16 



SECOND INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



OF THE 



Hon. EDWARD R. HATHAWAY 



Gentlemen of the City Council: — 

We are about to open a new year of city government in 
New Bedford; a new year fraught with great responsibilities 
and with weighty problems to decide. 

The bitterness engendered by political strife is a thing 
of the past. We stand together for the welfare of our great 
and prosperous city and we will work unitedly with the com- 
mon aim to aid in her development and to increase her pros- 
perity and well-being. 

The people have reposed in me the honor and responsi- 
bility of acting as the head of this great business enterprise — 
the municipal corporation — for the ensuing year. But they 
have equally imposed upon you the duty to aid me with your 
advice, and your judgment that this government may not be 
the government of a single person, but the united effort of 
many working for the same common end. 

As mayor. I shall welcome your advice and shall con- 
form to your judgment, insofar as I believe it to be for the 
upbuilding of the city. 



MAYOR'S ADDRESS 



CITY FINANCES 



The most serious problem to be faced is that of city fin- 
ances. The city today is at the turning of the ways. We 
can either stumble along for a few years with an increasing 
weight of debt until our position becomes unendurable or we 
can continue the policy of last year when, in spite of serious 
obstacles, the debt was decreased. There is much which 
should be done. Demands are constantly made by well- 
meaning citizens for improvements, who do not realize the 
financial position of the city. The easy course is to grant 
wherever the need appears; the only businesslike action at 
the present time is to refuse, unless such work and improv- 
ments are imperative. 

You have all of you, probably, heard of the municipal 
finance law of 1913. This is a splendid piece of legislation 
and one which, ultimately, will restore cities to a sound finan- 
cial basis; but, owing to extravagances in the past, the effect 
of this law has been especially felt in New Bedford. Under 
the old law running expenses were constantly bonded for and 
loans for highways, such as macadam, were made for ten 
years. Under the new law, macadam loans can be for only 
five years. The result of this has been that we are paying off 
each year on the principal of old ten year macadam loans, 
and are now adding the extra burden of paying each year 
until 1919, when the first five year macadam loan is retired, 
an additional amount due to the shortening of the time of 
the loan. Thus, although the amount of the debt has been 
actually decreased, the requirements for debt purposes this 
year will be about sixty-thousand dollars more than in 1915. 
This higher debt requirement will use up the probable in- 
crease in revenue from new valuations. 

As there will be increased expenditures in certain depart- 
ments, such as schools, due to larger population, the strictest 
economy must be practiced in order that there may not be a 
higher tax rate. I anticipate small savings in the Poor De- 



MAYOR'S ADDRESS 5 

partment, owing to improved business conditions; and in the 
Health Department, where the recurrence of a smallpox epi- 
demic is not to be expected. If the trend of corporation 
shares remains as at present, a larger corporation tax will be 
available and of material aid in lightening our financial bur- 
den. I believe in parks and playgrounds, boulevards, wide 
streets, commodious schoolhouses and beautiful public build- 
ings and it is with deep regret, but an absolute sense of my 
oath of office, that I say to you "ECONOMY MUST THIS 
YEAR BE OUR WATCHWORD." 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 

The strictest economy does not mean that we cannot 
have our necessities. I am determined that no committee 
shall delay further in the building of the new central fire sta- 
tion. This building, for which the money has been appro- 
priated, must be finished at once. Action must also be taken, 
without delay, for a sixteen-room school building on the site 
of the old high school. The horror of the recent Peabody 
fire has emphasized the need of school buildings constructed 
according to the latest and safest plans. This has also been 
brought out in the report of the Fire Prevention Committee 
of the National Board of Fire Underwriters, following a sur- 
vey of the conditions in New Bedford. 

The matter of fire prevention, you will agree with me, is 
of as great, if not of more importance, than the matter of 
protection from fire. I recommend that immediate steps be 
taken toward the appointment of a special committee to take 
into consideration the report mentioned, especially with rela- 
tion to schoolhouses, to the end, that there may be enacted, 
as early in the year as possible, such changes in the city or- 
dinances as will afford better protection from fires and the 
prevention of fires. 

After very careful consideration, I shall recommend to 
the City Council and the School Committee that the better 



6 MAYOR'S ADDRESS 

policy to be practiced, with relation to the old high school 
building, is to tear down the old building to either the belt, or 
the foundation, and construct, on the same site, a new six- 
teen-room school building containing all modern improve- 
ments and built with the strictest regard to fire prevention. 
This contemplated modern building would not involve a dis- 
proportionate cost over remodelling the old building and it 
has been apparent, in the remodelling of the present munici- 
pal building, that remodelling does not give satisfactory re- 
sults for the amount of money expended. 

The need of a new central police station is also impera- 
tive. The old building has, at various times, been condemned 
as unsanitary and its condition and appearance are a disgrace 
to the city. On account of the size of the building, cells for 
women have to be provided in a separate building and a garage 
for the patrol wagons and ambulances maintained at some 
distance from the station- It is my intention to request au- 
thority from the legislature to bond outside the debt limit for 
a new central police station, and to start construction at the 
earliest possible date. 

The School Committee also recommends that a new 
school building be constructed at the north end. It does not 
seem advisable to me to undertake the erection of this build- 
ing during the current year- It will be possible, however, 
within the borrowing capacity, to secure a site for this build- 
ing so that work may proceed early in 1917. There is avail- 
able, during the current year, a borrowiug capacity of Five 
Hundred Thirty-Five Thousand, Two Hundred Ninety One 
Dollars. This is not exclusive of bonds for the widening of 
Union Street amounting to One Hundred Thirty-Eight Thou- 
sand, Nine Hundred Nineteen Dollars, as these bonds have 
not yet been authorized. The borrowing capacity is no larger 
than is required for street construction, sewers and other 
usual permanent improvements. 

I shall seek further authority from the legislature to bond. 



MAYOR'S ADDRESS 7 

outside the debt limit, for the cost of the Union Street widen- 
ing and a new school building, to be constructed on the site 
of the old high school. 

INTERCEPTING SEWER 

During the past year bonds, to the amount of Two-Hun- 
dred Eighty-Five Thousand Dollars, have been issued for con- 
struction of the Intercepting Sewer. This work, in order to 
become available, must be continued. A larger amount was 
expended on the Intercepting Sewer in 1915 than should be 
spent in 1916 as, on account of the conditions of unemploy- 
ment during the winter of 1915, the work was rushed in order 
to give relief to men out of work. The Intercepting Sewer 
should be completed this year as far as the work is now laid out. 

EXTENSION OF FARE LIMIT TO THE CITY LINE 

The development of the north end of the city has been 
greatly retarded owing to the extra fare charged on the street 
railway lines beyond Lunds Corner. This appears to be an 
injustice to those owning land in this section of the city. I 
shall, at once, introduce a bill in the legislature authorizing 
the Union Street Railway Company to lease the property and 
trackage of the Bay State Street Railway Company from Lunds 
Corner to the citylimitsand shall take up the question of a single 
fare within the city limits with the Public Service Commis- 
sioners. This is a matter of great public interest, and one 
in which the city government and the citizens of this city 
should work unitedly to secure the benefits desired. 

STREET DEPARTMENT 

The greatest question confronting cities today is the 
construction of roads and streets which can withstand the wear 
and tear of automobile traffic. It has been found that water 



8 MAYOR'S ADDRESS 

bound macadam becomes disintegrated and worn out in two 
or three years; for that reason no water bound macadam was 
laid in 1915, but the efforts of the department were directed 
toward the construction of streets of a more permanent char- 
acter. This construction has been as follows: — 

1. For streets having a heavy traffic — a concrete base 
with granite blocks jointed with cement grout. 

2. For central streets — a cement base with a wood block 
surface giving a minimum of noise. 

3. For streets having a heavy automobile traffiic — a 
crushed stone base with a two inch asphalt surface. 

4. For streets having a small or medium traffic — a 
crushed stone base and a penetration asphalt surface. 

All of this construction is more expensive than water 
bound macadam, but the lasting qualities are so much greater, 
that no question exists of the economy of such construction. 
In January, 1915, the City owned no apparatus or plants for 
laying and constructing asphalt street surface. During the 
past year the City has purchased a concrete mixer of the latest 
approved type, a road machine and grader, a tandem roller, a 
street flusher, an oil distributor and a fully equipped asphalt 
plant. These machines are all available for use in 1916. 
Further apparatus will have to be purchased in order to ade- 
quately equip the department with labor saving machinery to 
bring the plant thoroughly up to date. The saving in cost to 
the City in doing its own work has been so large that this 
policy will be continued during the current year. I do not 
anticipate that any outside contracts for street construction 
will be awarded. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

It has been recognized for sometime that the complete 
motorization of the department was essential, both from the 
standpoint of efficiency and of economy. I recommend that 
steps be taken by the Fire Department Committee, or by a 



MAYOR'S ADDRESS 9 

special committee, to investigate, at once, this problem. In 
his report of last year, Edward F. Dahill, Chief Engineer, 
estimated the cost of complete motorization as Forty-Six Thou- 
sand Dollars. This is a considerable sum, but not prohibitive. 
The Committee, in its investigation, should also consider 
savings to be effected in doing away with the horses now used 
by the department and the possible elimination of certain 
groups of call firemen, thus continuing the policy of organiz- 
ing a permanent force. Until the matter has been thoroughly 
gone into and the report of the committee rendered, it is not 
advisable to recommend the extent to which motorization 
should be carried; some provision, however, should certainly 
be made for better fire protection at the north end of the City. 

BATH HOUSES 

Following the suggestion of the last city government, I 
shall introduce a bill in the Legislature to permit the City to 
build bath houses at Hazelwood Park. It has been ruled by 
the City's legal department that, under the statutes, no bath 
houses could be constructed without a special act of the Legis- 
lature. I am not in favor, as a general rule, of encroaching 
upon park property for any other municipal purpose, but, in 
this case, where the City owns a solendid water frontage, the 
use of that frontage to furnish bathing facilities appears to be 
a proper and necessary part of the utilization of park property. 

CONCLUSION 

It is seldom that a new year, from a business standpoint, 
has opened more auspiciously for New Bedford. Unemploy- 
ment is at its lowest mark. Our mills and industries are not 
alone prosperous at present, but have opening in front of them 
an era of prosperity perhaps unequalled in their history. It 
is for us, who have been elected to represent the people of 
New Bedford in the administration of municipal affairs, to see 



10 MAYOR'S ADDRESS 

that the city government gives every aid and assistance in 
this growth and development of the city so that this era of 
good times may not be transitory, but permanent. I feel con 
fident that the coming year will witness the erection of new 
mills and the establishment here of new industries. I feel 
confident that, with your help, I9I6 will be the brightest year 
in the history of New Bedford; not alone in industrial devel- 
opment, in increased population and new homes, but also in 
a city government operated economically, but with a far 
sighted view of the future needs of the City. Above all let 
this year witness an administration conducted for the benefit 
of the people of this City with special favors to none and 
courtesy to all. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Committee on Bath Houses 



To the City Council 




For the Year 1915. 



FREE PUBLIC BATHS 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 

December 31, 1915. 

To the City Council. 

GENTLEMEN : The Committee on Bath Houses 
begs leave to submit herewith its annual report for the 
season of 1915; the figures speak for themselves which 
prove it to be a record year in the history of the Public 
Bathing Houses. 

The bathing houses were opened for business Saturday, 
June 19, 1915, and closed Saturday, October 2, 1915, 
remaining open a period of fifteen weeks. 

The estimated number of bathers and weekly receipts 
are shown in the following reports of the Superintendent, 
viz: — 

No. of Bathers Receipts 

950 $12.99 

1,357 12.77 

2,131 33.89 

4,021 53.14 

6,162 88.65 

4,028 49.23 

9,067 83.37 

2,965 (inclement weather) 28.59 

8,346 74.27 

4,146 (week-end rain) 33.68 

3,406 (inclement weather) 16.95 

2,415 18.04 

3,095 18.44 

2,945 20.83 

194 .69 

55,228 $1,135.32 



Week ending 


June 


20 


" 


27 


July 


4 


" 


11 


" 


18 


" 


25 


Aug. 


1 


" 


8 


" 


15 


" 


22 


" 


29 


Sept, 


. 5 


" 


12 


i( 


19 


" 


26 



4 FREE PUBLIC BATHS 

The houses, during the season, were in charge of the 
lollowing employees : 

Superintendent, - Alfred F. Benoit, 
Assistants, - - - Francis J. Kennedy, 

Arthur Wooley, 
Lady Assistant, - Mrs. Mary E. Doyle. 

A financial statement is herewith presented, viz: — 

Appropriations, $2,500.00 

Expenditures, 

Payrolls, attendants $ 965 . 50 

Land rent 400.00 

Laundry 356.62 

Lighting 10 . 04 

Supplies 114.94 

Stock, labor, ect 316.88 

Telephone 18.18 

Traveling 123 . 25 

2,305.41 S2,305.41 

Balance $194 . 59 

This year, owing to the location of the bath houses on 
East French Avenue being leased to H. W. Stacy of Spring- 
field, Mass., by the present owners, for park and amusement 
purposes, the Committee were compelled at the close of 
the season to sell the bathing houses, which they did at 
public auction for the sum of $388.00. 

It is to be regretted that the Committee cannot in the 
immediate future take care of the thousands of people 
who delight in taking advantage of this popular diversion 
and beneficial recreation. To prove the popularity of 
these bath houses, in the past year over 16,000 people 
were turned away for the lack of houses and deprived 
of the enjoyment of salt-water bathing during the summer 
heat; and it is to be hoped that the efforts of the Mayor 
to get the necessary legislation to locate permanent bath 
houses on the west side of West Frence Avenue, will be 
successful. 

For the Committee, 

GILBERT G. SOUTHWORTH, 

Chairman. 



Annual Report 



OF THE 



Superintendent of Public Buildings 



ALSO 



Inspector of Buildings 



OF THE 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 



For the Year 1915. 




new bedford 

The a. E. Coffin Press, Printers 

1916 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Superintendent of Public Buildings. 



Office of Superintendent of Public Buildings, 

New Bedford, Mass., Dec. 31, 1915. 

To his honor tJie Mayor and the City Council: 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit this report 
on the condition of public buildings under construction 
December 81, 1914, also the work performed under my 
supervision u]) to and including December 31, 1915. 

PORTABLE SCHOOLHOUSES. 

During the year, our City Council authorized the 
Committee on City Property to procure plans and specifi- 
cations, obtain bids, and award contracts for six portable 
schoolhouses, to be located on the various schoolhouse 
grounds as directed by the School Board, and one to be 
located at the Sassaquin Sanitarium grounds. 

The contract for these buildings was awarded to the 
E. F. Hodgson Company, of Boston, ^lass., for furnishing, 
erecting on the lot and furniture complete for the sum 
of $10,834.00. 

MUNICIPAL BUILDING. 

The principal repairs to this building during the year 
was the awarding a contract to ]\Iorss & Whyte Co., ot 
Boston, Mass., for inclosing elevator wellway with grill 
work to comply with the new statute law governing safety 
of elevators. The total cost of this work was $480.00. 

A contract was awarded to William T. Caswell in 
November for painting all window sash to this building 
for the sum of $147.00. 



SUPEEINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

During the summer a contract was awarded by the 
Board to the B. F. Smith Co., lowest bidders, for repairing 
the large brick chimney on the Purchase street pumping 
station for the sum of $890.00, this work being done under 
the supervision of this department. 

FIRE STATION NO. 6. 

In June, a contract was awarded to Jones & Dodge 
for interior alterations to this station. 

Total cost of this work, including plumbing, was 
$609.00. 

CITY WHARVES. 

In November, a contract was awarded to Frank C. 
Taylor of this city, lowest bidder, for general repairs to 
north side of Pier No. 4, from plans and specifications 
prepared by this department, for the sum of $475.00. 

This part of the pier, which is occupied by the N. B. 
Fish Co., had long been neglected and had become 
absolutely dangerous to the occupants. 

This work was completed in December and accepted 
by the Committee on Wharves. 

In the month of August, fire damaged the building 
known as the Potter Building, located on the wharf 
property. The Committee voted to award the contract 
for repairing same to Charles L. Faunce, lowest bidder, 
for the sum of $786.00. 

Other minor repairs were made to the several piers 
during the year. 

WILLIS STREET POLICE STATION. 

General repairs and painting both inside and outside 
to this building was ordered by City Property Committee 
in October. The contract was awarded to Jones & Dodge, 
lowest bidder, for the sum of $490.00. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS 



VETERAN FIREMEN'S HEADQUARTERS. 

During November, a contract was awarded Jones & 
Dodge, lowest bidders, by the Committee on City Property 
for general repairs and exterior painting to this building 
from specifications prepared by this department. The 
total cost of this work was $210.00. 

PURCHASE STREET WARD ROOM. 

This building was painted and repaired during the 
year by the Committee on City Property from specifica- 
tions prepared by this department. 

BATH HOUSES. 

At the rec{nest of the Committee on Bath Houses, this 
department prepared plans for a permanent Bath House 
building to be located on tlie shore of West French Avenue 
opposite Hazelwood Park. 

This plan called for a concrete building throughout, 
to contain 300 compartments, superintendent's room, stoclv 
rooms, and large public promenade facing the water. 

This shore property being a part of our City Park 
System, it was necessary to obtain the right from our 
Park Board to locate this building thereon. 

The Park Board refused to grant this right, thereby 
causing the matter to be tabled by the Committee. 

OLD BATH HOUSES. 

The lease of the shore property having expired and 
the owners wishing to use the same for private purposes, 
the Committee voted to sell at auction the old bath houses 
located on the shore at the southern extremity of East 
French Avenue. These houses being of a temporary 
character, had become so weather beaten and dilapidated 
that they were unfit to be moved to another location. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS 



NEW CENTRAL FIRE STATION. 

At a meeting of the City Council held May 13th, it 
was voted to purchase the lot northeast corner of Pleasant 
and North streets, known as the "Church" estate, for the 
purpose of erecting a new Central Fire Station thereon. 

At the same meeting, an order was passed authorizing 
the Committee on City Property to select an architect to 
prepare plans for this building, obtain bids and report to 
City Council for further action. 

June 22nd, the Committee selected James S. Mclntyre, 
Architect, of this city, to prepare plans and specifications, 
he to consult with the Chief of the Fire Department as to 
the department's needs. 

On November 12th, Architect Mclntyre submitted the 
finished plans to the Committee, who referred same to 
the Superintendent of Public Buildings for a report as to 
their completeness for the })urpose. 

December 12th bids were called for by the Committee 
in two parts : 

First. Bids for heating, plumbing and electrical 
work, to be submitted December 28th. 

Second. Bids for general construction, including the 
above items, to be submitted December 30th. 

December 30th, bids were received by the Committee, 
J. W. Bishop Co. being the lowest bidder in the sum of 
$121,990.00. 

The matter was referred to the City Council of 1916. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS 



In compliance ■with Section 2, Chapter XIII, of the 
City Ordinances, I hereby submit a detailed report of 
all repairs to city buildings coming under my supervision 
during the year of which the cost in each case was in 
excess of ten dollars: 

SCHOOLHOUSES. 
High School : 

Ordinary repairs, $380.84 

Repairs of cornice, 260.04 

$640.88 



Parker Street School : 

Ordinary repairs, $62.60 

Painting outside, 148.00 

210.60 

H. M. Knowlton School: 

Ordinary repairs, 120.20 

Middle Street School: 

Ordinary repairs, 136.22 

Fifth Street School: 
Ordinary repairs, 
Painting fire escajie, 

R. C. Ingraham School : 
Ordinary repairs, 

J. B. Congdon School : 
Ordinary repairs. 
Repairing chimney (struck by lightning), 

J. H. Clifford School: 
Ordinary repairs, 

Thomas Donaghy School : 
Ordinary repairs, 

William H. Taylor School: 
Ordinary repairs, 

T. R. Rodman School: 
Ordinary repairs. 
Painting inside, 

Jireh Swift School : 
Ordinary repairs. 
Metal ceilings, 

Abraham Lincoln School: 
Ordinary repairs, 

Betsey B. Winslow School: 

Ordinary repairs, 112.25 



$139.33 
36.75 


176.08 
93.94 




$235.46 
68.00 


303.46 
239.61 






120.71 




78.14 


$209.83 
175.00 


384.83 
359.93 


$98.93 
26.1.00 






335.48 



SUPEEINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS 



Harrington Memorial School: 

Ordinary repairs, $208.73 

New grates in furnaces, 269.00 

Eepairing after fire, 52.95 

Repairing after fire, painting, 247.00 



777.68 



Katharine Street School: 

Ordinary repairs, 131.76 

Phillips Avenue School: 

Ordinary repairs, ' 32.45 

Cedar Grove Street School: 

Ordinary repairs, $224.08 

Painting fire escape, 36.75 

260.83 

Clark Street School: 

Ordinary repairs, 60.31 

Merrimac Street School: 

Ordinary repairs, 39.90 

Mary B. White School : 

Ordinary repairs, $106.34 

Granolithic walks, 218.84 

325.18 

H. A. Kempton School: 

Ordinary repairs, 36.21 

Cedar Street School: 

Ordinary repairs, 65.46 

S. A. Howland School: 

Ordinary repairs, 220.77 

T. A. Greene School: 

Ordinary repairs, 132.81 

Acushnet Avenue School: 

Ordinary repairs, 121.62 

Thompson Street School: 

Ordinary repairs, 67.54 

I. W. Benjamin School: 

Ordinary repairs, $239.09 

Painting inside, 501.75 

Painting fire escape, 36.75 

Dartmouth Street School: 

Ordinary repairs, $139.44 

Granolithic walks, ^'^^•^9 

Painting fire-escape, 36.75 

George H. Dunbar School: 

Ordinary repairs, $87.92 

Copper gutters, 148.00 



777.59 



350.79 



235.9-. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS 



Plainville School : 

Ordinary repairs, 

Rockdale School : 

Ordinary repairs, 

Sassaquin School, 

Old High School: 

Setting glass, etc.. 
Committee Rooms : 

Miscellaneous work, 



EIRE STATIONS. 

No. 1 Station: 

New fence around lot and general repairs, 
No. 6 Station : 

Interior alterations to second story, 
No. 7 Station: 

Carpentry work. 



52.58 

36.66 
1.15 

14.50 

275.99 

$7,330.03 

$133.53 

6.09.00 

21.85 



VETERAN FIREMEN'S BUILDING. 
General repairs and painting, 



210.00 



POLICE STATIONS. 
Willis Street Station : 

General rei)airs and painting, 
Kempton Street Station : 

Repairing heating plant, 
Weld Street Station: 

Plumbing repairs, 
Police Barn : 

Repairs to heater. 



490.00 

166.60 

11.23 

47.05 



MISCELLANEOUS. 




Municipal Building : 




Repairs to heating plant, 


$116.00 


Mason work, 


41.45 


Plumbing repairs. 


61.66 


Painting, 


147.00 


Carpenter work, 


27.55 


Electrical work, 


22.64 


Repairs to elevator, 


480.00 


Isolation Hospital: 




Repairs to heating plant, 


$173.63 


Carpentry work. 


292.77 


Masonry work. 


32.80 


Wharves : 




Repairs to piers No. 3 and No. 4, 


$522.25 


Repairs to Potter building, 


851.54 


Moving "Mullen" building, 


175.00 



896.30 



499.20 



1,548.79 



■[^0 StJiPEElNTENDENT OF BUILDINGS 



WATEE WOEKS. 

Purchase Street Station : 

Eepairing brick chimney, $1,339.51 

Eepairing roof, 45.98 

Eepairing metal work, 31.61 



PAEKS. 

Carpentry work at Buttonwood Park, $151.80 

Eepairing and setting up apparatus at Grove Park, 65.26 



1,417.10 



217.06 



PIIECHASE STEEET WAED EOOM. 
Painting and repairing conductors, 60.81 

FEEE PUBLIC LIBEAEY. 

PUnn])ing and heating repairs (North End reading room), 42.00 



Eepairing slate roof. 
Plumbing repairs, 


ALMSHOUSE. 

BATHING HOUSES. 

CEMETEEIES. 
ik Grove Cemetery, 


$18.01 
20.77 


30.80 
241.08 
212.89 


General repairs. 

New tool house at Oa 







Total, $5,800.58 



SUPEEINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS H 



In compliance with Section 2, Chapter XIII, of the 
City Ordinances, I herewitli submit a statement showing 
the amount and kind of repairs needed upon the following- 
city buildings, during the fiscal year next succeeding, to- 
gether with an estimate of the probable cost thereof : 

High School: 

Ordinary rejjairs, $300.00 

Parker Street : 

Ordinary repairs, 200.00 

H. M. Knowlton: 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Metal ceilings, 300.00 



500.00 
Middle Street: 

Ordinary repairs, 200.00 

Fifth Street: 

Ordinary repairs, 200.00 

R. C. Ingraham : 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Painting hall, 200.00 



400.00 
J. B. Congdon : 

Ordinary repairs, 200.00 

J. H. Cliffbrd: 

Ordinary repairs, 200.00 

T. Donaghy: 

Ordinary repairs, 200.00 

W. H. Taylor: 

Ordinary repairs, 200.00 

T. R. Rodman: 

Ordinary repairs, " 200.00 

Jireh Swift : 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 



Paint, inside, 4.50.00 

Metal ceilings, 300.00 



A. Lincoln : 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Repair brickwork, 300.00 



B. B. Winslow: . 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Granolithic walks,, grading yard, 1,000.00 



950.00 



500.00 



1,200.00 



\^ SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS 



Harrington Memorial: 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Granolithic walks, 450.00 



Granolithic walks, 150.00 

Metal ceilings, 300.00 



M. B. White: 

Ordinary repairs, $100.00 

Slate blackboards, 250.00 



Fence, repair yard, 250.00 

Slate blackboards, 450.00 



S. A. Rowland: 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Paint, inside and outside, 400.00 



T. A. Greene: 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Repairing chimney, 150.00 

Slag roof on deck, 125.00 



Acushnet Avenue: 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Repair fence: 100.00 



Thompson Street: 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Slate blackboards, 85.00 



600.00 



650.00 
Katharine Street : 

Ordinary repairs, 200.00 

Phillips Avenue : 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Granolithic walks, 400.00 

Cedar Grove Street: 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Grading yard, 100.00 

Slate blackboards, 1,200.00 

1,500.00 

Clark Street: 

Ordinary repairs, 200.00 

Merrimac Street: 

Ordinary repairs, $100.00 



550.00 



350.00 



H .A. Kempton: 

Ordinary repairs, 200.00 

Cedar Street: 

Ordinary repairs, $100.00 



800.00 



600.00 



475.00 



300.00 



285.00 



SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDINGS ]_3 



I. W. Benjamin : 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Slate blackboards, 750.00 

Paint inside, 300.00 

1,250.00 



Dartmouth Street : 

Ordinary repairs, $200.00 

Slate blackboards, 250.00 



450.00 
G. H. Dunbar: 

Ordinary repairs, 200.00 

Plainville : 

Ordinary repairs, $100.00 

Paint inside and outside, 150.00 

250.00 



Eockdale : 

Ordinary repairs, $100.00 

New out-building, 125.00 

Grading yard, 150.00 



375.00 

School Committee rooms, 200.00 



Total, $14,885.00 



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Clark's Point 
Ash Street 
Purchase stre 
William stree 
High and Fos 
Fourth street 
Rivet street 
Kempton,Eai 
Lakeville 
City Farm 
City Wharf 




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18 INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



Inspector of Buildings Report. 



OFFICE SUPERINTENDENT PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 



BUILDING STATISTICS FOR 1915. 

Total number of permits granted during the year 
for new buildings, alterations and repairs was 1012. at 
an estimated cost of $3,126,734. Classified as follows: 

Permits Est. Cost 
New dwellings (including stores and dwellings 

combined) 383 $1,397,800.00 

Newbuildings and additions for manufacturing 

and business purposes 21 702,500.00 

Buildings for religious and hospital purposes. . 5 189,000.00 

Buildings for theatrical purposes, 2 272,000.00 

Buildings for hotel purposes 1 20,000.00 

Blocks of stores, U 54,250.00 

Garages 142 148,305.00 

Alterations and repairs 316 250,085.00 

Miscellaneous — barns, sheds, etc 128 68,830.00 

1012 $3,102,770.00 

CITY BUILDINGS 

Six portable schoolhouses 10,834-00 

Alterations and repairs to schoolhouses and other 

city buildings 13,130.00 

Total $3,126,734.00 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDliSTGS 



19 



Number of new tenements added 



699 



DWELLINGS ERECTED BY WARDS. 



One 
171 



Two 
11 



Three 
27 



Four 
74 



Five 
36 



Six 
64 



CLASSIFICATION OF DWELLINGS ERECTED 



Two ■' 
Three " 


99 

7.S 


Four " 
Five " 
Six " 


8 

5 

3 


Sixteen" 


1 



STATISTICS FOR YEAR 1914 

No. permits Estimated New 

granted. cost. dwellings erected 

1062 $3,0397.36 406 



New 
tenements 



STATISTICS OF PREVIOUS YEARS. 



1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
189S 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
190.S 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 







No. 


No. 


No. 


Estimated 


Dwellings 


Tenements 


Permits 


Cost 


Erected 


Added 


340 


$1,800,000 


151 


322 


69 


795.860 


144 


361 


554 


1,301.871 


201 


527 


794 


1.687,396 


378 


920 


797 


1,357,395 


310 


699 


415 


490,647 


81 


122 


424 


708.245 


79 


124 


402 


755.401 


68 


102 


416 


1,099,102 


161 


235 


470 


1,968,840 


164 


354 


608 


1,984,871 


252 


578 


541 


1,575,552 


210 


447 


648 


1,506,275 


293 


645 


672 


2,450,500 


296 


649 


682 


2.256,000 


278 


721 


774 


2,872,300 


411 


1,083 


986 


6,267,650 


550 


14,73 


117 


7,037,337 


639 


1,812 


950 


2,661,063 


485 


1,117 


940 


2,400,050 


379 


896 


1245 


3,067,700 


425 


820 


1062 


3,039,736 


406 


808 


1012 


3,126,734 


383 


699 



16,310 .$52,210,525 



6,744 15,514 



20 



INSPECTOK OF BUILDINGS 



INSPECTIONS BY THE BUILDING INSPECTORS. 

Table showing number of inspections made each month and for 
what purpose. 



Januaiy. . . 
February. . 
March. . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. . . . 
September. 
October . . . 
November 
December. 

Totals 



O 3 

2:m 



511 

669 

1024 

990 

1137 

1103 

762 

555 

828 

801 

882 

749 

10,011 



c o 



156 

1Q7 
293 
249 
255 
219 
164 
90 
159 
153 
170 
133 



2,238 







rt 






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^ 


33 


1 


16 


1 


15 


4 


36 


2 


21 


1 


23 


1 


15 


1 


71 


2 


27 


1 


35 


2 


25 


3 


35 


2 


352 


21 



701 

883 
1336 
1277 
1414 
1346 

942 

718 
1015 

991 
1080 

919 



12,662 



VIOLATIONS REPORTED AND CORRECTED. 

Building without permit 67 

Dangerous buildings 8 

Dangerous chimneys 7 

Defective construction 20 

Flue lining omitted 12 

Lathing without notification 34 

Omission of fire stops 10 

Miscellaneous 30 

Total 198 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS £1 



ELEVATOR INSPECTION. 

In accordance with Chapter 806, Acts of 1913, it sha'l 
be the duty of the Inspector of Buildings in every city 
of the Commonwealth to inspect all elevators in their 
respective cities annually, and a practical test of the safety 
devices and other requirements coming under this act, 
the Inspector to make a detailed report thereof to the 
Chief of the ]\Iassachusetts District Police upon forins 
furnished by him, and a complete record of each inspection 
to be kept by such Inspector; said Inspector also to issue 
licenses to all elevator operators after a thorough examina- 
tion as to their fitness, etc. 

In compliance with the above laAV, 244 freight and 
20 passenger elevators were inspected by this department 
during the year; a record filed of each elevator inspected, 
and a notification sent to the owners of th6 changes neces- 
sary to be made to comply with the law, which in every 
case has been complied with, or a promise made to have 
the necessary changes made at once. 

Forty applicants were examined for licenses to 
operate passenger elevators and a certificate granted to 
each applicant. 



INSPECTION OF STREET SIGNS. 

As required by Section 16, Chapter 22 of the City 
Ordinances, 308 applications for permission to maintain 
signs extending over the public highway were forwarded 
to this office during the year for inspection as to their 
method of fastening to their supporting surface, height 
of same, and distance extending over sidewalk. 

Many were found to be existing contrary to law, the 
owner being notified of the requirements necessary to 



22 INSPECTOE OF BUILDINGS 



comply with the law, — which in every case was promptly 
complied with. This required in many cases several inspec- 
tions of one application. 



HOTEL AND LODGING HOUSE INSPECTION. 

In compliance with Sections 33, 34 and 35 of Chapter 
104 of the Revised Laws, relative to hotels and lodging 
houses having eight or more rooms above the second floor, 
I have made an annual inspection of every hotel and 
lodging house in the city coming under this law and 
reported their condition relative to safety in case of fire 
to the Chief of ]\Iassachusetts District Police. 

Also, in accordance with Chapter 129, Acts of 1911, 
I have made an inspection of forty houses maintained for 
furnishing lodging to transient persons and not licensed 
as an inn, in which ten or more persons are lodged, not- 
withstanding that no price is charged for lodging, and 
reported their condition as a matter of safety in case of 
fire to the I\Iayor and Board of Aldermen. 

In every case where the necessary precautions against 
the spread of fire and giving alarm to inmates had not 
been provided for, the petitioner for license to maintain 
such house was given leave to withdraw. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation and 
thanks to the Mayor and the various committees of the 
City Council for their cordial co-operation in all matters 
pertaining to the work of this department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH L. GIBBS, 

Supt. Public Buildings. 
Inspector of Buildings. 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 

In Board of Aldermen, 

January 27, 1916. 

Received, ordered printed in the City Documents 
and sent down for concurrence. 

W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 



Concurred. 



In Common Council, 

January 27, 1916. 

LILY F. DARCY, 

Clerk pro tern. 



Twenty -first Annual Report 



OF THE 



Board of 
Cemetery Commissioners 



For the Year Onding December 5fh 
1915 




new bedford 

The a. E. Coffin Press, Printers 

1916 



CEMETERY BOARD. 



WILLIAM M. HIGHAM, Chairman. 

JOHN G. NICHOLSON. 

CHARLES H. VINAL, Secretary. 

Clerk of the Board. 
PARDON A. MACOI\IBER. 

Assistants. 
MISS IVAH M. HUNT. 
MISS ALICE G. SHAW. 



Acting Superintendent. 
HURLBERT E. THOMAS. 



CEMETERIES. 

RURAL Sexton, NELSON L. PIKE. 

OAK GROVE. . . Sexton, EDMUND M. CORNELL. 

PINE GROVE. 

GRIFFIN STREET. 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD, 
OFFICE OF CEMETERY BOARD. 



New Bedford, December 6, 1915. 

To the Honorahle, the City Council of tlie City of Sew 
Bedford. 

Gentlemen : — 

In conformity with Section 8, Chapter XVIII of the 
Ordinance, relative to the Department of Cemeteries, the 
Board of Cemetery Commissioners herewith submits its 
twenty-first annual report, the same being for the year 
ending December 5th, 1915. . 

CHARLES H. VINAL. 

Secretary. 



CEMETERY REPORT. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 5, 1915. 

Dr. 

Balance, old account v*> 46 . 52 

Annual appropriation 15,000.00 

Receipts, labor to December 6, 1915 10,347 . 24 

Receipts on Perpetual care lots 6,510.33 

$31,904.09 
Cr. 

Transferred to unappropriated funds, (see City 

Auditor's balance) $ 46.52 

Expenditures, general 31,835 . 23 

Unexpended balance 22.34 

$31,904.09 

SALE OP LOTS. 

Dr. 

Balance, old account $ 842.53 

Receipts, Sales of Lots, to December 6, 1915 6,625 . 00 



$7,467.53 



Cr. 



Expenditures, improvement and embellishment. . . . $6,181 .87 
Balance, to new account 1,285.66 

$7,467.53 



Cemetery report. 



CLASSIFIED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES. 



RURAL CEMETERY. 

General labor account $5,390, 28 

Distribution account 2,852. 87 

Supplies, tools 220.82 

" (Brick cement, lime and sand) ..... 551 . 72 

" (Seed, sod, fertilizer) 165.70 

(General) 306.62 

Water 100.58 

Avenues 530. 79 

New sections 1,904.86 

" wall 43.64 

Sewer assessment 295 . 43 

Pension 349 . 44 

Police 78.00 

$12,790.75 

OAK GROVE CEMETERY. 

General labor account $4,945 . 04 

Distribution account 1,688.58 

Supplies, tools 164.90 

" (Brick, cement, lime and sand) ... . 191.45 

" (Seed, sod, fertilizer) 138.93 

(General) 167.30 

Water 81.91 

Avenues on new sections 634.42 

Tool house repairs 2 12 . 89 

Nursery 6 . 84 

$8,232.76 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

General labor account .' §1,668.46 

Distribution account 573. 45 

Supplies, tools 40 . 26 

(Cement and lime) 19 . 80 

(Fertilizer) ■ 289.71 

" (General) 156.98 

Water 10.01 

Nu rsery 3.35 

Avenues on new sections 82 . 19 

New approach 702 . 1 7 

New wall 2,389.00 

Extension account 1,556. 28 

$7,491.66 



CEMETERY REPORT. 



GRIFFIN STREET CEMETERY. 

General labor account $293 . 58 

Supplies • ^^ 

Water 5-00 

$298.93 

GREENHOUSE. 

General labor account $2,014. 34 

Maintenance, stock and supplies 332.13 

$2,346.47 

OFFICE. 

Supplies $388 . 65 

Telephone 82 .93 

$471.58 

SALARIES. 

Office $2,786.00 

Assistant Superintendent 1,200.00 

Sexton, Rural Cemetery 1,020.28 

Oak Grove Cemetery 936.00 

$5,942.28 

TELEPHONES. 

Oak Grove Cemetery $37.00 

Pine Grove Cemetery 43 .00 

Assistant Superintendent's residence 16 . 68 

$96.68 

Automobile account, supplies $269.25 

Road Roller account, insurance 44.00 

" " " painting 26.75 

" supplies 4.19 

Crusher account, supplies 1 .80 

Amount of uncollected bills to December 6, 1915 ... . $2,528 . 40 



Respectfully submitted, 

PARDON A. MACOMBER, Clerk. 



Report of Cemetery Commissioners. 



Following' the ecoiiomical action served out to the sev- 
eral departments of this city, at the apportionment of the 
annual appropriations, this department's allotment was 
cut from a conservative estimate, by $10,000, allowing 
funds, sufficient with the possible income of the depart- 
ment to barely provide for the perpetual and annual care 
of lots under contract, and the proper maintenance of the 
ever growing city of the dead. Thus, no progress could 
be made in deyelopment or improvement, only as the funds 
from "Sales of Lots" would permit, and this to a very 
limited extent. 

The Board has sought to meet the requirements of the 
administration to accomplish the work of its department 
as far as possible without exceeding its appropriation or 
requesting additional funds. The Board, however, desires 
that the incoming administration may become impressed 
with the fact that the rapid growth in this department 
does warrant an appropriation sufficient to allow the de- 
partment to continue along the lines of development, that 
desired sections can be made available for burial pur- 
poses. This is particularly essential in Pine Grove Ceme- 
tery, for so much preparatory work has to be done, and 
permanent improvement and development has to be made 
before sections and lots are available for burials. The 
nature of this work consists of the extension of avenues 
to reach desirable sections, the digging over the entire 
ground as development extends, to the depth of a grave, 
and the removal of all obstructions, the macadamizing of 
avenues, the building of proper drainage, the extension of 
water mains, the building of the enclosures to protect th;' 
grounds, the grading, seeding and embellishment of all 
new development, — all are essential requirements to prop- 
erly prepare these grounds for public use. 



CEMETERY REPORT. 



On September 9th. the following action was taken by 
the City Council at the request of the Veterans of the 

Spanish War: 

CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 
In Board of Aldermen. 

September 9, 1915. 
ORDERED, That the Cemetery Board is hereby authorized 
and directed to set apart a section of Pine Grove Cemetery 
for the burial of all persons who belonged to the army and 
navy of the United States during the war between the United 
States and Spain, and died in service, or were honorably dis- 
charged, and for the burial of their wives, widows and children: 
the section of said cemetery to be set apart and the rules and 
regulations governing the use thereof to be discretionary with 
said Cemetery Board. 

In BOARD OF ALDERMEN, Sept. 9, 1915. 

Adopted and sent down for concurrence. 

In COMMON COUNCIL, Sept. 9, 1915. 

Concurred. 
Presented to and approved by the Mayor Sept. 10, 1915. 
A true copy, attest: 

(Signed) W. H. B. REMINGTON, 
(Copy) City Clerk. 

The Board have already been approached by this body 
as to the possible layout of this section; the proper site, 
however, deemed by the Board as appropriate for this 
purpose is quite remote from the present developed dis- 
trict of Pine Grove Cemetery, and a large outlay will be 
necessary before this section can be reached, and a special 
appropriation must be made for proper development of a 
section for this purpose. Should the wisdom of the City 
Council lead to such a provision, the Cemetery Board Avill 
make every effort to meet the desire of the Veterans. 

Through available funds from "Sales of Lots" account, 
permanent improvements of 701 feet of wall enclosure 
have been constructed, and 801 feet of foundation for the 
same have been laid; 17,512 square feet of land was dug 
over. Thus some small progress has been accomplished. 



CEMETERY REPORT. 



Acting Superintendent's Report. 



To the Cemetery Board of the City of New Bedford. 

Gentlemen : — I herewith submit my annual report, to- 
gether with a statement of the work done during the fiscal 
year just ended, and recommendations in respect to work 
which will be needed during the approaching season. 

Griffin Street Cemetery, situated in one of the most 
thickly settled districts of the city, while continuously 
subject to trespass by many children who live near the 
grounds and who are indifferent to the feeling of respect 
which all should have for places of this character, has re- 
ceived constant attention throughout the year. A care- 
taker has been regularly detailed from the cemetery force 
to care for these grounds, the grass has been regularly cut, 
three large flower beds have been maintained, filled with 
foliage plants. These beds have been thoroughly watered 
and weeded, and the appearance of the cemetery through 
the summer was very satisfactory. 

RURAL CEMETERY. 

For the past two years, no more work has been done in 
this, our largest and most beautiful cemetery, than was 
necessary to maintain the grounds here in good condition, 
and provide sufficient lots for sale to meet the constant 
demand in this rapidly growing city of the dead. On 
account of the pressing demand of developing Pine Grove 
Cemetery, and by reason of the stringency adopted by the 
Council in appropriating funds for this department, all 
permanent improvement, extensions, drains, enclosures 
and new avenues, recommended in previous reports, have 
been held in check, until sufficient funds are available to 
warrant their construction. 



IQ CEMETERY REPORT. 



1 would recommend that the south wall enclosure, and 
2,000 feet of 15-inch surface drain should be constructed, 
if possible, the coming season. 

The sexton's quarters need re-shingling and painting 
as well as the tool house. 

OAK GROVE CEMETERY. 

The general appearance of these grounds has been very 
satisfactory this year. The work has been confined prin- 
cipally to embellishment and maintenance. Practically all 
the land in this cemetery suitable for burial purposes has 
been improved, cut up into lots, and burial rights in the 
same sold. The park section in that portion of the ceme- 
tery north of Parker Street has been most attractive, em- 
bellished with a choice variety of specimen trees, flower- 
ing shrubs, beds of flowers, artificial ponds, fountains, etc., 
and all lend their attractiveness to dispel the gloom so 
often associated with the burial ground. 

In these grounds are the greenhouses. These supply all 
the cemeteries with plants, annual plants for the many 
flower beds and borders, at a nominal expense to this de- 
partment. No less than 60,000 plants are raised and dis- 
tributed for the embellishment of the several grounds. 

The old section, south of Parker Street, has received its 
usual attention and care, the grass regularly cut on the 
sections and lots, the shrubs trimmed, the walks and 
avenues properly cared for and cleaned. I not only 
recommend to the Board, but I wish to impress the great 
necessity of repairs and painting of the picket fence which 
surrounds this cemetery. 

From some unknown cause, fire badly damaged the 
tool house in this cemetery, and destroyed many of the 
tools used by the employees. Repairs were subsequently 
made to the building. It now needs repainting. 



CEMETERY REPORT. H 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY. 

But little progress in the development of this new ceme- 
tery has been accomplished this year ; available funds from 
the "Sales of Lots" account have enabled this department 
to continue construction on the wall enclosure to an ex- 
tension of 701 feet. 

By reason of the sections set aside in the other ceme- 
teries of the city for public grounds becoming filled, all 
burials of this character are required to be made in Pine 
Grove and it will require continuous provision for them 
each year. 

An unlimited outlay might be recommended to the 
Board in this cemetery, for so much must be done before 
these grounds can generally be made available for burial 
purposes. The continued construction of the enclosure 
wall, 1,000 feet of water main laid to connect with tlie 
city's service, tool house constructed, sexton's quarters 
should be built, avenues constructed and many other ac- 
cessories, all are essential to the building of a new ceme- 
tery; this, however, I prefer to leave to the judgment of 
the Board, as to which will be the most advisable to pro- 
vide for the coming year. 



12 



CEMETERY REPORT. 



. SUMMARY. 

Rural 

Sq. ft. land dug over 7,344 

Sq. ft. sod laid 1,690 

Lineal ft. avenues fitted . 

Lineal ft. borders fitted 

Foundations for tablets 121 

Foundations for mounuments 18 

Cement bound posts set 68 

Cement numbers set 

Corner posts on lots set 8 

Shrubs set out 40 

Bodies entombed 1915 10 

Bodies disinterred 1915 7 

Interments in Friends Cemetery 7 

Interments made in lots 246 

Interments made in public ground 32 

Interments m ide in single graves 

Interments made in Soldiers' and Sailors' lot 4 

Total interments, 1915 289 

Bodies remaining in tomb 1 

Lots sold in 1915 45 

Single graves sold in 1915 2 

Prepared lots unsold 216 

Prepared single graves unsold 

Value of lots unsold $15,625 

Value of single graves unsold 

Foundations re-built 5 

Headstones re-fitted 15 

Brick graves built 55 

Lots in annual care 676 

Lots in annual care Friends Ground .... 9 

Lots in perpetual care ** 829 

Lots refitted and seeded 2 

Lots refitted and sodded 2 

Trees set out 24 

Lineal ft. of wall built 

Lineal ft. of wall foundation built 

Trees remo\ ed 2 

**St. Mary's, 58. Friends, 21. 

Congregational Church 15. Peckham West, 12. 



Oak Pine 
Grove Grove 
17,512 

500 

5,000 

121 14 

23 

423 

222 

19 4 

18 7 

208 17 

347 

2 42 

210 406 

1 

47 8 

2 44 
310 90 

187 

$40,420 $5,055 
$2,805 

6 

25 1 

574 36 

601 38 

192 

701 

881 

6 

St. John's, 7 
Griffn Street, 1. 



Respectfully submitted, 

HURLBERT E. THOMAS, 

Acting Superintendent. 



CEMETERY REPORT. 



13 



REVISED SCHEDULE OF PRICES, COVERING 
BURIAL CHARGES. 



For opening grave for coffins $3 .00 

" " case or casket 4.00 

" " " " chestnut or steel case 5 .00 

" brick 6.00 

" bricking graves (Adult) with interment 24.00 

" double graves (Adult) with interment 44.00 

Opening grave for child under 1 year 1 . 25 

1 " with case 1 . 50 

1 year and under 5 1 ■ 

" 1 " " " 5 with case 2.00 

" 5 years and under 12 2.50 

5 " " " 12 with case 2.75 

" for brick 3.50 

Entombing .75 

Lease in tomb for Adult per month 1 .50 

" " " " Child " " 1.00 

Bricking graves for ashes 5.00 

Interment in same 1 .25 

Cement box for ashes 6. 00 

Interment in same 1 . 25 

Removing and replacing earth 5.00 

Boughing grave for interment 3-00 



In effect Nov. 15, 1915. 



14 



CEMETERY REPORT. 



With the comiug of winter, there is to some extent a 
cessation of activities in the cemetery, and yet it is also 
the season when plans are being formulated, and perhaps 
at no other season is there more time devoted to the study 
of the possibilities of the cemetery. In the study of plans 
for the building and opening of a new cemetery, the Board 
realize the necessity of acting slowly to try at least to 
avoid some of the gigantic mistakes which we see perpe- 
trated about us. More thought is being put into the plan- 
ning of cemetries than ever before, that future genera- 
tions may not be confronted with the problem of the old 
cemetery to be uptorn, bodies to be removed, and emer- 
gencies which are daily being placed before those of the 
present day. 

The cemetery has always been a sacred place, particu- 
larly in Christian countries, but the ideas and ideals 
associated with the cemetery have known great changes, 
especially during the last score of years. Gloom and de- 
pression were the only thoughts then connected with the 
cemetery of other days. Sadness there must of necessity 
be at the memory of loss, l)ut the cemetery of today is 
entirely removed in the dominant impressions it makes 
from the cemetery of other days. Then, mounds wer-- 
marked with a slab which seemed to carry with it some 
sense of chill, and there was no attempt made to lessen 
the impression of desolation. With the coming of the 
park cemetery, came the thought too of eliminating as far 
as possible all that was unlovely from the modern ceme- 
tery. 

Pine Grove Cemetery, the site of which lies in the north- 
west section of the city, four miles from the city's centre, 
is on high ground commanding a view of the surrounding 
country. The quiet grandeur of the location makes it 
ideal as a resting place for those who for a time have gone 
before. 

With an area of seventy-three acres, the possibilities of 
development along modern lawn or park ideas are unre- 



CEMETERY REPORT. I5 



stricted. The soil is a saud loam, Avhicli insures a dry 
burial, a feature which will be appreciated by those who 
know how few cemeteries possess it. 

Conveyance of Lots to the City in Trust. 

One provision which the Cemetery Board has mad-j 
since its organization is the conveyance of lots to the city 
in trust. It is a matter of daily occurrence that cemetery 
lots come into the possession of those who have no rela- 
tionship or respect for the family, or the memory of the 
original owner of the lot who may be buried therein. This 
is the result of changes and lapse of years. To absolutely 
prevent such conditions and yet retain all rights of use, 
the Board has provided a re-conveyance to the city of lots 
which will be held in trust. Such conveyance can be made 
so as to secure the full use of the lot to the owner and the 
descent of such use to such persons as may be specified, 
which will effectually prevent the lot ever coming into the 
possession of persons not akin to the original owner, a 
matter which those who have had experience will thor- 
oughly appreciate, and while individual tastes and opin 
ions must of necessity be subordinate to the general wel- 
fare and appearance of the cemeteries, it is believed that 
by co-operation with those in charge, the best results tor 
all will be attained. 

The purchase of a cemetery lot is one of the most sacred 
of obligations. Sooner or later it must be met, and it is 
so much lietter to make the purchase when one is calm 
and undistur))ed by grief than when compelled by heart 
breaking necessity to provide a resting place for some 
loved one. INfany, appreciating this fact, have bought lots 
in one of the several cemeteries, which are still unoccupied 
and are a provision against that time which comes into 
every life. Such lands are exempt from assessments and 
public taxes, and also from the liability of being sold on 
execution or for the debts of the individual proprietor. 



IQ CEMETERY REPORT. 



PERPETUAL CARE. 

Since the organization of the Board, it has persistently- 
advocated, particularly to new purchasers, the perpetual 
care of lots. With many sales, the cost of permanent care 
is included in the purchase price of a lot, and insures care 
of the grass, monumental work, and the general and 
permanent gfood appearance of the lot. without additional 
expense to the owner. This care the cemeteries of the 
city are well equipped to give, since it has its own green- 
houses for bedding-out purposes, and a corp of competent 
men who serve under the management. 

Number of lots placed in perpetual care in 1915.. 59 

Number of additional deposits on lots already in 

perpetual care 9 

Total number of lots in perpetual care 1,582 

Amount deposited for perpetual care in 1915 89,035.00 

Total amount now deposited 8192,256.62 

In closing this report, Ave beg to acknowledge the 
courtesy and helpfulness extended by his Honor, the 
]\Iayor, and the City Council, in connection with depart- 
ment problems on numerous occasions. Your co-operation 
with this unpaid commission has made our executive man- 
agement a pleasure, wliile performing a civic dut3^ 

Respectfull^y submitted, 

W. M. HIGHA:M. Chairman. 
JOHN G. NICHOLSON, 
CHARLES H. VINAL. Secretary. 

Board of Cemetery Commissioners. 



Annual Report 



OP THE 



CITY CLERK 



OF THE 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD 



MASSACHUSETTS 



For the Year 1915 




New Bedford, Mass., 

MERCURY PUBLISHING CO., PRINTERS, 

112 AND 114 Union Street. 

1916. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF CITY CLERK. 



City of New Bedford 

City Clerk's Office, 

Jan. 31, 1916. 
To the City Council : 

Gentlemen: — During the fiscal year 1915 (Dec. 7, 1914 
to Dec. 4, 1915) the City Clerk's Department received and 
turned into the city treasurj^ the following : — 

FOR LICENSES. 

Auctioneers, $80.00 

Billiards, pool, etc., 1,513.00 

Bowling alleys, 162.00 

Firearms, 90.00 

Carousals, 26.00 

Fruit peddlers, 2,320.00 

Fruit peddlers, badges, 31.00 

Fruit peddlers, wagon plates, 59.00 

Hacks and wagons, 82.50 

Wagon plates, 89.00 

Motor trucks, 20.00 

Autos, etc., 311.50 

Intelligence office, 24.00 

Junk dealers, 280.00 

Junk collectors, 204.00 

Junk collectors' badges, 13.00 

Junk collector's wagon plates, 33.50 

Pawnbrokers, 450.00 

Petroleum, 108.00 

Petroleum (registration), 124.00 

Gunpowder (registration), 1.50 

Private detective, 20.00 

Scallops, 57.00 

Lunch vehicle, 50.00 

Dry cleaning, 3.00 

Dry cleaning (registration), 1.00 

Manufacture of sausages, etc., - 14.00 

Garage, 33.00 

Garage (registration), 29.00 

Motor bus, 278.00 

Motor bus seals, 279.00 

Motor bus drivers, 352.00 

Motor bus drivers' badges, 353.00 

Sign permits, 194.00 

$7,685.00 



City Clerk's Report. 



FEES. 



Intention of marriages, $1,207.00 

Mortgages, 332.20 

Assignment of mortgages, 2.75 

Foreclosure of mortgages, 1.25 

Discharge of mortgages, 39.25 

Bills of sale and conditional bills of sale, 64.27 

Assignment of wages, 11.75 

Married women's certificates, 10.75 

Voluntary assignments, 10.00 

Writs, .50 

Copies of record, 719.65 

Business certificates, 14.75 

Transfers, 11.00 

Telephone toll call, .85 

Record of partnership, .50 

Found article recorded, .25 

Church incorporation. 1.65 

Power of attorney, .25 

Dog fees, (City's share. Ch. 102. R. L.), 522.60 

$2,951.22 

Total of licenses and fees returned to city treasury, $10,636.22 

OTHER FINANCIAL BUSINESS. 

Dog fees collected and returned to County Treasurer 

(County's share, Ch. 102, R. L.), $6,020.40 

Hunters' licenses issued and returned to Commission- 
ers on Fisheries and Game, 877.00 

Non-resident hunters" licenses, ditto, (Chap. 614, Acts 

1911), 1.00 

Non-resident hunters' licenses, ditto, (Chap. 614, Acts 

1911), 10.00 



$17,544.62 



The growth of the business of the otHce is shown by a 
comparison of these figures with the figures of 1914' The 
total receipts over the counter (exclusive of receipts for 
shellfish commission) were $17,544.62, which is an increase 
of $1,518.29 over 1914. Inasmuch as the items of receipt are 
individually small, this indicates a considerable increase in 
the amount of work done bv the clerical force in the handling 



City Clerk's Report. 5 

of the various additional items. The work has been accom- 
plished without increase of otfice force, and with the same 
appropriation as in 1914. 

VITAL STATISTICS. 

The campaign for birth returns, which has been carefully 
followed for several years, with the slogan "Births must be 
reported," is beginning to bear good results. Phj^sicians and 
midwives generally are co-operating splendidly and making 
their returns promptly. 

At this writing the result of the canvass made by the 
Children's Bureau of the U. S. Department of Labor, under 
the direction of jMiss J. S. Whitney, has not yet been pub- 
lished. Through the courtesy of ]\Iiss Julia C. Lathrop, chief 
of the Children's Bureau. I have been supplied with an ad- 
vance estimate of the work done in New Bedford by the City 
Clerk's office as the office for the registration of vital statis- 
tics. In a communication. Miss Lathrop says: 

"Miss Whitney speaks in the highest terms of the work of the 
registration office in New Bedford, as does Mr. Drown. Miss 
Whitney says: 

" 'The general work of the registration office in New Bedford 
I consider excellent. The certificates are all excellently filed by a 
card index system, the originals are kept in fireproof cases, the 
employees who handle this part of the work are earnest and 
capable and the general atmosphere of the office is businesslike 
and progressive.' " 

These words of commendation afford particular satis- 
faction inasmuch as they furnish the chance "to see our- 
selves as others see us." iMiss Whitney has had opportunity, 
through long connection with J:he work engaged in by the 
Children's Bureau, to correctly estimate the comparative 
values of registration methods, and her tribute, as the result 
of her experience in New Bedford, is one of which to be 
proud. It shows that New Bedford is on the right track, at 
least. Several suggestions which Miss Whitney made, Avhile 
in New Bedford, are being followed, greatly to the advan- 
tage of the service. 



6 City Clerk's Report. 

During the year 1915 there were recorded in the office of 
the city clerk, as registrar of births, marriages and deaths, 
the following: 

Births, 3,724 

Marriages, 1,227 

Deaths, 1,923 

Of the births reported, 129 were stillborn. 

Using the Massachusetts state census figures (State cen- 
sus, 1915) the birth rate for 1915 was 32.80 per 1,000, a gain 
of six hundredths per cent. 

Based on the same method of reckoning, the death rate 
for 1915 was 16.37 per 1.000, a decrease of sixteen hundredths 
per cent. 

There were 115 less marriages recorded in 1915 than in 
1914. 

There were 101 less marriage intentions filed in 1915 
than in 1914. 

The 1915 birth canvass, which was very thoroughly 
made, reveals the fact that during the year 149 births which 
occurred were not in any way returned to the office of the 
registrar. While this is a slightl,y larger number of unre- 
ported births than appepred in the figures of 1914, the result 
seems quite satisfactory, when it is considered that the bulk 
of the increase in population is from a source where little 
attention is given to vital statistics, and through the ignor- 
ance of the newcomers as to the requirements of law, they 
are careless in the matter of returns for statistical purposes. 

The following table shows the sources of the 1915 birth 
returns : 

Reported by physicians, 2,537 

Reported by midwives, 722 

Reported at office by parents, etc., 69 

Reported by church records, 116 

Reported from death returns, 131 

Reported by canvassers, (not otherwise covered) , 149 

3,724 



City Clerk's Report. 7 

The percentage of total births reported from various 
sources outside the canvass was 95.70 per cent., the canvass 
completing- the remaining 4.30 per cent. 

BIRTHS BY NATIONALITIES. 

It is a matter of interest as to from what source comes 
New Bedford's increase in population by birth. The sources 
of increase by nationality are shown in the following table, 
by which it appears that the children born of Portuguese 
parents far out-number the children born of parents of other 
nationalities. The figures credited to the several nation- 
alities indicate that both father and mother were of the 
nationality named. Where the father was of one nation- 
ity and the mother was of another, the figures appear under 
the caption "mixed." The table is of further interest as 
showing what a cosmopolitan city New Bedford really is. 



TABLE SHOWING PARBNTAGl 


E OF CHILDREN B( 


Portugal: 






Portugal, 


286 




Azores Islands, 


670 




Cape Verde Islands, 


145 




Madeira Islands, 


64 


1165 
711 


United States, 




Mixed, 




700 


Canada, 




332 


Great Britain: 






England, 


207 




Ireland, 


37 


244 
225 


Austria, 




Russia 




197 


Italy, 




54 


Syria, 




34 


Greece, 




32 


Germany, 




8 


Prance, 




7 


Sweden, 




2 


Norway, 




2 


Belgium, 




2 



City Clerk's Report. 

Turkey, 2 

Spain, 2 

Brazil, 1 

Dutcli West Indies, 1 

Arabia, 1 

Egypt, 1 

Asia Minor, 1 



Total, 3724 

In connection with the general subject of birth returns, 
a form of acknowledgement to parents of the receipt of the 
birth report has been adopted, with the idea that it will 
be of assistance in interesting the people in the matter of 
more full and more accurate returns. An engraved card, con- 
taining the essential facts relating to the birth, made out 
in the form of a memorandum, signed by the registrar, is 
sent to the parents of every child whose birth is recorded in 
the office. This card can be, and undoubtedly will be kept 
by the parents in most instances. When a birth certificate 
is desired, the card maj^ be shown at the registrar's office, 
and will assist in the ready finding of the record. 

MINOR LICENSES. 

The issuing of minor licenses, under the law and 
ordinance delegating power to issue to the City Clerk, 
which has been in force for the past year, has worked very 
satisfactorily. The only hitch on the operation of the law 
has been the occasional delays in the receipt of reports from 
the police, when applications have been referred to the 
police department for investigation. I have been assured 
by those in charge of the police department that the recom- 
mendation which I have made yearly since 1911, that a police 
officer be specially detailed for the work, will be carried out. 
With this change in force, conditions should be improved. 

In the matter of licenses and fees it may be worth while 
for the City Council to consider whether one or two sources 
of possible income should not be followed up. For instance. 



City Clerk's Report. 9 

in Boston and other cities, contractors who block the streets 
and passageway's w^hile constructing buildings (under the 
form of permit commonly known as building obstruction 
permits), pay into the city treasury small sums for the 
privilege which is granted to them by the Board of Alder- 
men or bodies having similar powers. In New Bedford, 
the custom has been to make no charge for this form of 
inconvenience to the public. It may be argued that the 
privileges secured by the permits are special privileges, and 
that there should be some recompense to the public for the 
inconvenience caused by the blocking of the streets. A small 
fee, sufficient to cover the expense of the clerical work of 
making out and recording the permits would not seem to be 
out of the way. 

The same is true of permits for disturbing the surface oi 
streets, by the public service corporations. It is theory that 
the streets disturbed are repaired and put into as good condi- 
tion as before the disturbance, the cost of the repairs bein^ 
met by the charge of the street department made by regula- 
tion of the board of aldermen. But this is mainly theory, in- 
asmuch as when a disturbance of the surface is once made the 
surface can never be put back into as good condition as it 
was before the surface was disturbed. Whether or not it 
would be good policy to provide a fixed fee for every permit 
for disturbance is a matter which well might be considered. 
The cost of such fees would, of course, be borne by the 
patrons of the public service corporations, but this may 
seem more fair than to make the expense chargeable to the 
whole public, a part of which receives absolutely no benefit. 



ELECTIONS. 

During the year 1915 there were three regular elections 
(the joint primaries being counted as an election). 

The results of the state and municipal elections are here 
given. 



10 City Clkrk's Report. 

STATE ELECTION. NOV. 2, 1915. 

GOVERNOR. 

Nelson B. Clark, Progressive Party, Beverly, 89 

Walter S. Hutchins, Socialist, Greenfield, 257 

Samuel W. McCall, Republican, Winchester, 5,13:^ 

Peter O'Rourke, Socialist Labor, Medford, 53 

William Shaw, Prohibition, Andover, 519 

David I. Walsh, Democratic, Fitchburg, 4,664 

Blanks and scattering, 13 7 

LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR. 

Edward P. Barry, Democratic, Boston, 4,07 S 

Calvin Coolidge, Republican, Northampton, 5,53 5 

Alfred H. Evans, Prohibition, Hadley, 39 7 

James Hayes, Socialist Labor, Plymouth, 110 
Chester R. Lawrence, Progressive Party, Citizens Nom. 

Paper, Boston, 72 

Samuel P. Levenberg, Socialist, Boston, 271 

Blanks and scattering, 389 

SECRETARY. 

Edwin A. Grosvenor, Democratic, Amherst, 3,660 

Albert P. Langtry, Republican, Springfield, 5,773 

Thomas J. Maher, Socialist Labor, Medford, 13 5 

Marion E. Sproule, Socialist, Lowell, 3 20 

Willard O. Wylie, Prohibition, Beverly, 356 

Blanks and scattering, 60S 

TREASURER. 

Henry L. Bowles, Democratic, Springfield, 3,577 

Charles L. Burrill, Republican, Boston, 5,791 

Charles E. Fenner, Socialist, Worcester, 3 42 

William E. Marks, Prohibition, Worcester, 331 

Jeremiah P. McNally, Socialist Labor, Salem, 146 

Blanks and scattering, 66f> 

AUDITOR. 

Alonzo B. Cook, Republican, Boston, 5,716 

James W. Holden, Socialist Labor, New Bedford, 489 

Henry C. Iram, Socialist, Warwick, 356 

Jacob C. Morse, Democratic, Brookline, 3,241 

William G. Rogers, Prohibition, Wilbraham, 331 

Blanks and scattering, 719 



City Clerk's Report. 11 

ATTORNEY-GENERAL. 

Henry C. Atwill, Republican, Lynn, 5,850 

Frank Auchter, Prohibition, Boston, 3 82 

Joseph Joyce Donahue, Democratic, Medford, 3,436 

John McCarthy, Socialist, Abington, 354 

William Taylor, Socialist Labor, Worcester, 154 

Blanks and scattering, 676 

COUNCILLOR — FIRST DISTRICT. 

Abraham Bloom, Socialist, Brockton, 1,161 

David L. Parker, Republican, New Bedford, 8,07 5 

Blanks and scattering, 1,616 

SENATOR — THIRD BRISTOL DISTRICT. 

Richard Knowles, Republican, New Bedford, 6,784 

John E. McBride, Democratic, New Bedford 3,447 

Blanks and scattering, 621 

REPRESENTATIVES IN GENERAL COURT. 
(Seventh Bristol District) 

D. Herbert Cook, Republican, New Bedford, 2,851 

Thomas Dibb, Republican Independent Nom. Paper, New 

Bedford, 1,431 

George E. Lilley, Republican, New Bedford, 2,687 

John T. Sloane, Democratic, New Bedford, 1,903 

Blanks and scattering, 2,3 90 

REPRESENTATIVES IN GENERAL COURT. 
(Eighth Bristol District) 

Joseph H. Fernandes, Republican Independent Nom. Paper, 

New Bedford, 1,624 

John Halliwell, Republican, New Bedford, 2,793 

Ward M. Parker, Republican, New Bedford, 2,53 2 

Matthew Quinlan, Democratic, New Bedford, 1,346 

Blanks and scattering, 2,147 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER — BRISTOL COUNTY. 

John I. Bryant, Republican, Fairhaven, 7,219 

William H. Gifford, 3rd, Democratic, Westport, 2,918 

Blanks and scattering, 715 

COUNTY TREASURER — BRISTOL COUNTY. 

Edgar L. Grossman, Republican, Taunton, 8,036 

Blanks and scattering, 2,816 



12 City CLtJiK s Repokt. 

SHERIFF — BRISTOL COUNTY. 

Edwin H. Evans, Republican, Taunton, 7,909 

Blanks and scattering, 2,943 

"Shall the proposed amendment to the constitution, em- 
powering the general court to authorize the taking of land to 
relieve congestion of population and to provide homes for 
citizens be approved and ratified ? ' ' 

Yes, 5,884 

No, 2,797 

Blanks, 2,171 

"Shall the following proposed amendment to the consti- 
tution, enabling women to vote, be approved and ratified? 

Article of Amendment. 

Article three of the articles of amendment to the consti- 
tution of the commonwealth is hereby amended by striking 
out in the first line thereof the word "male." 

Yes, 3,537 

No, 6,396 

Blanks, 919 

"Shall the following proposed amendment to the con- 
stitution, relative to the taxation of incomes and the granting 
of reasonable exemptions, be approved and ratified? 

Article of Amendment. 

Full power and authority are hereby given and granted to 
the general court to impose and levy a tax on income in the 
manner hereinafter provided. Such tax may be at different rates 
upon income derived from different classes of property, but shall 
be levied at a uniform rate throughout the commonwealth upon 
incomes derived from the same class of property. The general 
court may tax income not derived from property at a lower rate 
than income derived from property, and may grant reasonable 
exerhptions and abatements. Any class of property the income 
from which is taxed under the provisions of this article may be 
exempted from the imposition and levying of proportional and 
reasonable assessments, rates and taxes as at present authorized 



City Clerk's Report. T8 

by the constitution. This article shall not be construed to limit 
the power of the general court to impose and levy reasonable 
duties and excises." 

Yes, 5,89L' 

.\o, 2,485 

Blanks, 2,475 

Total number of names checked on the voting list, 10,851 

Certificate issued by Registrars of Voters, 1 

Whole number of ballots cast, 10,852 

Whole number of ballots cast in Representative Dis- 
trict, Seventh Bristol, 5,631 
Whole number of Ijallots cast in Representative Dis- 
trict, Eighth Bristol, 5,221 



.MUNICIPAL ELECTION, DECEMBER 7. 1915. 
(As Amended by Recount) 

MAYOR. 

Charles S. Ashley, Citizens Party, 93 State St., 6,253 

Edv.'ard R. Hathaway, Fusion Party, 106 Brigham St., 6,701 

Blanks and scattering, 900 

ALDERMAN, WARD ONE. 

Samuel A. Goodfellow, Fusion Party, 198 Whitman St., 6, 808 

William D. Hamel, Citizens Party, 119 Tallman St., 5,772 

Blanks and scattering, 1,274 

ALDERMAN, WARD TWO. 

Elzear H. Choquette, Fusion Party, 102 Mt. Pleasant St., 6,393 

Mortimer McCarty, Citizens Party, 87 Hazard St., 6,09'i 

Blanks and scattering, 1,3 62 

ALDERMAN, WARD THREE. 

.John F. Hatch, Jr., Citizens Party, 899 Pleasant St., 5,775 

Edward O. Knowles, Fusion Party, 556 County St., 6,740 

Blanks and scattering, 1,3 3 9 

ALDERMAN. WARD FOUR. 

John H. Aindow, Fusion Party, 271 Palmer St., 6,451 

Clifton W. Bartlett, Citizens Party, 12 Orchard St., 5,984 

Blanks and scattering, 1,419 



14 City Clerk's Report. 

ALDERMAN, WARD FIVE. 

Samuel E. Bentley, Fusion Party, 106 South St., 6,856 

Rossa Moriarty, Citizens Party, 302 Purchase St., 5,742 

FJlanks and scattering, 1,255 

ALDERMAN, WARD SIX. 

Gilbert G. Southworth, Fusion Party, 694 Brock Ave., 6,810 

.lames H. Taylor, Citizens Party, 556 Brock Ave., 5,551 

Blanks and scattering, 1,493 

ASSESSOR-AT-LARGE — THREE YEARS. 
.John Hannigan, Citizens Party, Fusion Party, 162 Butler 

St., 10,639 

Blanks and scattering, 3,215 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE — THREE YEARS. 

.Joseph Eccleston, Independent, 9 Jenney Lind St., 4,929 

George Fred Lewis, Independent, 76 Walnut St., 5,407 
Edward W. Sherman, Public School Association, 61 Cottage 

St., 6,301 
Samuel F. Winsi)er, Public School Association, 226 Grinnell 

St., 5,672 

Blanks and scattering, 5,399 

COMMON COUNCILMEN — WARD ONE. 

Arthur A. Audette, Fusion Party, 1205 Acushnet Ave., 1,630 
Eugene E. Barthelemy, Citizens Party, 254 Tinkham Ave., 1,107 

Rodolphe J. Carrier, Citizens Party, 1220 Acushnet Ave., 1,281 

Albert Cassidy, Citizens Party, 78 Tallman St., 1,025 

James M. Hughes, Citizens Party, 162 Nash Rd., 1,117 

George D. Lacroix, Fusion Party, 119 Tallman St., 1,627 

John T. Sloane, Fusion Party, 433 No. Front St., 1,464 

Burgoyne Woolley, Fusion Party, 185 Whitman St., 1,420 

E^lanks and scattering, 1,497 

COMMON COUNCILMEN — WARD TWO. 

Francis A. Bonneau, Citizens Party, 187 Austin St., 820 

James William Calverley, Fusion Party, 111 Clark St., 86 S 

James F. Collins, Citizens Party, 27 Trinity St., 956 

Edward T. Glennon, Fusion Party, 545 Cottage St., 1,102 

William A. Harrington, Citizens Party, 281 Summer St., 814 

John H. Hollihan, Fusion Party, 79 Richmond St., 1,023 

Simon F. Lynch. Independent, 188 Weld St., 178 

John Sykes, Independent, 19 Collins St., 199 

Fielding H. Walsh, Fusion Party, 2 Ashland Place, 902 

Robert S. Weaver, Citizens Party, 168 Merrimac St., 871 

Blanks and scattering, 1,451 



City Clerk's Report. IT) 

COMMON COUNCILMEN — WARD THREE. 

George W. Auger, Fusion Party, 1155 Purchase St., 55 1 

Chester W. Chase, Citizens Party, 68 Hillman St., 906 

George T. Duckworth, Citizens Party, 57 Hill St., 905 

Nelson T. Fuller, Fusion Party, 126 Chestnut St., 587 

William E. Jennings, Fusion Party, 33 Parker St., 76 7 

Hubert S. Kelleber, Citizens Party, 1174 Purchase St., 920 

Frederick C. Luce, Fusion Party, 128 Campbell St., 695 

Edward L. Moriarty, Citizens Party, 3 87 Park St., 889 

Blanks and scattering, 1,177 

COMMON COUNCILMEN — WARD FOUR. 

Frederick J. J. Abrams, Citizens Party, 23 7 Middle St., 84," 

Robert Burke, Citizens Party, 178 James St., 827 

Hugh Donaghy, Fusion Party, 218 Brownell St., 81-! 

Charles L. Fisher, Fusion Party, 371 Arnold St., 88^) 

W. Seymour Langshaw, Citizens Party, 152 Cottage St., 84 8 

Walter H. Peirce, Citizens Party, 3 04 Kempton St., 942 

Louis N. Schuler, Fusion Party, 198 Cottage St., 841 

George G. Sylvia, Fusion Party, 5 43 Union St., 806 

Blanks and scattering, 1,084 

COMMON COUNCILMEN— WARD FIVE. 

Murray F. Barrows, Citizens Party, 215 Hawthorn St., 986 

Harrison T. Borden, Citizens Party, 154 Fair St., 1,019 

Frederic T. Browne, Jr., Fusion Party, 131 Brownell St., 821 

William J. Francis, Citizens Party, 21 Crapo St., 927 

John McCulIough, 3rd, Citizens Party, 38 So. Sixth St., 1,015 

Edwin L. Potter, Jr., Fusion Party, 94 South St., 804 

Abe Stuart, Independent, 236 Acushnet Ave., 77 

Thomas Thorley, Fusion Party, 467 Allen St., 697 

Warren A. Tripp, Fusion Party, 5S Park St., 72 7 

Blanks and scattering, 1,235 

COMMON COUNCILMEN — WARD SIX. 

William R. Benoit, Citizens Party, 73 Independent St., 981 

William Bond, Citizens Party, 104 Butler St., 925 

Frank J. Cambra, Fusion Party, 518 Rivet St., 1,093 

Edward Del^Iello, Citizens Party, 93 Sidney St., 816 

Joseph Gerrard, Citizens Party, 63 7 So. First St., 883 

William Joseph Harnish, Fusion Party, 15 Ruth Ave., 1,292 

George A. J. Lagasse, Fusion Party, 119 Ruth Ave., 1.397 

James O'Rourke, Fusion Party, 185 Division St., 1,314 

FJIanks and scattering, 1,7 5 5 



16 City Clerk's Report. 

ASSISTANT ASSESSOR, WARD ONE. 

Joseph Arsene Dionne, Citizens Party, Fusion Party, 2,405 

Blanks and scattering, 637 

ASSISTANT ASSESSOR, WARD TWO. 

James H. Holden, Citizens Party, Fusion Party, 874 County 

St., 1,799 

Blanks and scattering, 497 

ASSISTANT ASSESSOR, WARD THREE. 

Frederick A. Washburn, Citizens Party, Fusion Party, 75 

Kempton St., 1,3 98 

Blanks and scattering, 452 

ASSISTANT ASSESSOR, WARD FOUR. 

Roland C. Leonard, Citizens Party, Fusion Party, 26 

Seventh St., 1.545 

Blanks and scattering, 430 

ASSISTANT ASSESSOR. WARD FIVE. 

Frederick D. Sowle, Citizens Party, 70 So. Sixth St., 1,463 

Blanks and scattering, 614 

ASSISTANT ASSESSOR, WARD SIX. 

Edward J. Devlin, Independent, 13 2 Purchase St., 3 84 

John B. Roberts, Fusion Party, 72 Delano St., 1,272 

William S. Williams, Citizens Party, 71 Rockland St., 718 

Blanks and scattering", 2 40 

"Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors 
in this city?" , 

Yes, J, 776 

No, '4,537 

Blanks and scattering, 1,541 

Women, 666 
Total number of names checked on voting lists — Men, 13,188 
Total number of ballots cast, 13,85 4 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

CitY Clerk. 



City Clerk's Report. 17 



In Board of Aldt'i-iucii, 
Feb. 25. ]916. 

Received, placed on file, ordered printed in the City 
Documents, and sent down for concurrence. 

W. IT. B. REMINGTON, City Clerk. 



In Common Council, 
Feb. 25. I9T6. 
Concurred. 

CHARLES P. SAWYER. Clerk. 



THE 



Auditor's Annual Report 



OF THE 



Receipts and Expenditures 

OF THE 

CITY OF NEW BEDFORD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

For the Year 

1915 



NEW BEDFORD 

THE A. E COFFIN PRESS 

1916 



THE CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 



Office of the City Auditor. 
January 25, 1917. 

The Honorable City Council : 

I respectfully submit herewith a report of the 
receipts and expenditures of the city of New Bedford 
for the financial year 1915, with a statement of the 
bonded debt and a schedule of the city property. 

EDWARD L. CRONIN, 

City Auditor. 



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AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Taxes. 

1915. Property 

Polls.... 

Corporations 

Street railways 

National bank from State. 

Ships in foreign trade 

Prior Years. Property 

Polls 



Total. 



^ 



Licenses and Permits. 

JjICKNSES. 

Amusements 

Auctioneers 

Billiards and bowling 

Firearms and gun powder 

""Fruit pedlers 

Hacks and wagons 

Health 

Intelligence offices 

Itinerant venders 

Junk 

Liquor 

Milk, provisions and slaughter. 

Pawnbrokers 

Petroleum 

Private detectives 

Sunday 

Victuallers 

Permits. 

Marriage 

Scallop 

Lunch cart 

Sausage 

Signs 

Garage 

Dry cleaning 



Total . 



Fines and Forfeits. 

Court fines 



Total. 



Revenue 

for 
Expenses 



$1,991,052.14 

, ., 34,122.00 

148,454.89 

20,120.90 

3,972.72 

8.33 

199,447.82 

14,564.00 



$2,411,742.80 



$428 . 00 

80.00 

1,675.00 

91.50 

2.410.00 

1,765.00 

40.00 

24.00 

250.00 

530.50 

95,614.50 

229.50 

450.00 

232.00 

20.00 

1,890.00 

1,030.00 

1,207.00 
57.00 
50.00 
14.00 
194.00 
62.00 
4.00 

$108,348.00 



$4,833.30 
$4,833.30 



Revenue 

for 
Outlays 



/ 



Total 



(-^ /7-^^^^' 



$2,411,7^2.80 



$108,348.00 



$4,833.30 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



RECEIPTS. 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


Revenue 

for 
Expenses 


Revenue 

for 
Outlays 


Total 


Grants and Gifts. 

Industrial scl^ool, from State 

Bristol County, dog licenses 


$15,017.62 
5.36S.75 


$23,741.83 
$23,741.83 

$2,389.42 




Total 


$20,386.37 
$102,382.68 


$20,386.. ?7 


Special Assessments. 

Street widenings 




Sewer construction 




Total 


$102,382.68 

$12,787.23 
$12,787.23 

$1,744.22 

2,400 30 

227.75 
1,085.81 


$126,124.51 


Privileges. 

Street railway excise tax 

Total 

Departmental. 

(iKXKRAI, (JOVEKX M K.\T. 

City clerk, fees 

Citv property, sales 


$12,787.23 

m 


Citv collector, fees and costs 




Licensing board, fees 




Engineering department, sales 




Total 


$5,458.08 

$38 . 00 

282 . 00 

38.95 

18.25 
283.00 
970.01 


$2,389.42 

$1,259.68 
95.00 

$1,354.68 
$277.35 


$7,847.50 


l'R(!TK(TION OF LiFE AND PROPEKTV. 

Elevator inspection 


Fire department, sales 




Fire department, service 




Rifle range, sale of land .... 




Police, sales 




Police, jitnev inspection. 




City sealer, fees 








Total 


$1,630.21 

$50.60 
15,769.88 
10,747.52 

550.00 


$2,984.89 


Board of health, inspection 

Board of health, reimbursements 

Sewers and drains, miscellaneous 

Sewer entry fees 






Total 


$27,118.00 

$9,415.89 

404.63 


$277.35 

$12,276.00 
186.12 


$27,395.35 


Utghways AN]) Bridges. 




Highway construction .« 




Street widening sales 




Bridge maintenance 








Total 


$9,820.52 


$12,462.12 


$22,282.64 





AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS. 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS. 



rilAKITlKS. 

Almshouse, sale of produce 

Reimbursements from persons 

Reimbursements from cities and towns 
Reimbursements from State 

Total 

Boi.DiEKS Benefits. 

Burial of soldiers 

Military aid 

State aid 

Total 

Education. 

Tuition, schools 

Miscellaneous sales 

Industrial school, tuition 

Total 

IjIHRAKIES. 

Fines 

Sales 

Total 

K'ECKEATIOX. 

Bathing houses, fees 

Bathing houses, sale of 

Park commission, rent 

Park commission, sales 

Total 

Total Departmental 



Revenue 

for 
Expenses 



Revenue 

for 
Outlays 



Tote 



81,549.20 
2,219.32 
7,206.32 

17,834.49 

$28,809.33 



S450.00 

2,078. 50» 

11,136.00 

$13,664.50 



S3.915.25 

203.23 

4,334.45 

$8,452.93 



$1,109.00 
143.57 

$1,252.57 



$552. 55 
343 . 90 
175.00 
127.14 

$1,198.59 



$28,809.33 



$13,664.50 



$8,452.93 



$1,252.57 



$1,198.59 



$113,888.30 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS. 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 


Revenue 

for 
Expenses 


Revenue 

for 
Outlays 


Total 


Public Service Enterprises. 

NvAV Bkuford Water \V( rks. 

Income from sale of water. . .... 


$295,737.24 
27,018.97 






Receipts from other sources 




Total 


$322,756.21 

$2,487.01 

1,164.51 

1,529.70 

239.80 


$322,756.21 


DEP.'MtTMENT OF WHARVES. 

Wharfage 

Dockage 




Rents 




Water 




Total 


$5,421.02 


$5,421.02 




Total, Public Service Enterprises 


$328,177.23 


Cemeteries. 

Care of lots and graves. 


$15,180.15 


$6,625.00 
$6,625.00 












Total Cemeteries 


$15,180.15 


$21,805.15 


Interest. 

Perpetual care funds 6^^ Account 

On library funds 


$1,604.10 
10,015.00 
2,671.08 
2,087.08 
4,482.89 
8,094.10 
943.57 






On school funds 




On deferred taxes 




On bank deposits 












Total, Interest 


$29,897.82 


$29,897.82 





AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS. 



Municipal Indebtedness. 

Temporary loan, revenue 1914. 
Temporar)'^ loan, revenue 1915. 

Bridge bonds 

Highway extension bonds 

Higliway improvement, bonds . 
Highways, macadam, bonds... . 

Municipal building bonds 

Sewer construction, bonds 

Premium on bonds sold 

Unpaid warrants of current year 

Total Municipal Indebtedness. . . 



Revenue 

for 
Expenses 



Indebtedness 



$175,000.00 

2,150,000.00 

31,425.09 

41,817.43 

230,000.00 

111,000.00 

8,137.32 

315,000.00 

1,581.66 

221,799.41 

$3,285,760.91 



Total 



f2l. 



'l^l 



$3,285,760.91 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



RECEIPTS. 



SOURCES OF RECEIPTS 



Sinking Funds. 

From sinking fund commissioners to 
pay bonds 

Total 

Agency and Trust Accounts. 

Agicx' v. 

State tax 

Grade crossing tax 

County tax - 

Non-resident bank tax 

Liquor licenses for state 

Trust. 

Cemetery b' v fund income 

Cash discrepancies 

Cemeteries, perpetual care deposits ... 

Highway deposits 

Sewer deposits 

Summons fees due collectors 

Department adv'ances returned 

Salary advances returned 

Kempton fund advances returned. . . 

Total 

Refunds. 

Sundry departments 

Street widening 

Accrued interest 

Total 

Total cash receipts 

Cash. 

Cash at beginning of the year 

Total 



Temporary 
Accounts 



Total 



$110,000.00 

$110,000.00 $110,000.00 



$2.16,340.00 
1 ,080 00 

12.S,315..()1 

~T6,06.5.05 

31,871.50 



1,428.12 
70.71 

9,185.00 

8,666.70 

13.011.20 

602.00 

493.38 

14,770.73 

11,859.15 

$503,758.55 

$205 . 97 
2,100.00 
2,059.64 

$4,365.61 



$,S03,758.55 



$4,365.61 
$7,081,875.78 



164,694.87 



$7,246,570.65 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



DEPARTMENTAL. 
General Government. 

ClTV ('(1IIN( II,. 

Salaries of aldermen 

Salary clerk of common council 

Compensation of pages 

Advertising 

Carriage hire 

City council calendar 

City documents 

Committee expenses 

Plant decorations . . 

Printing and stationery 

Recording and filing plans .... 

Special services 

Miscellaneous charges 



Total . 



Mayor. 

Salary of mayor 

Salary of secretary to mayor 

Advertising 

Carriage hire 

Fixtures and furnishings 

Mileage 

Office expenses, miscellaneous . . . 

Printing and stationery 

Telephone and telegraph charges. 
Traveling expenses 



Total. 



Auditor. 

Salary of auditor 

Salary of assistant 

Clerk hire 

Printing and stationery 

Office fixtures and expenses 

Surety bonds 

Telephones 



Total. 



Expenses 



$600 . 00 

500 . 00 

201.00 

1,078.11 

366 . 50 

347.50 

926.58 

47 . 50 

81.17 

314.42 

61.55 

152.50 

9.90 



$4,686 . 73 



$5,000.00 
1,300.00 
138. .50 
18.35 
128.39 
180.00 
120.28 
159.67 
223.63 
383.65 

s$7,652.47 



$2,500.00 

1,800.00 

1,367.98 

718.44 

84.47 

50.00 

50.82 

$6,571.71 



Outlays 



Total 



$4,686.73 



,652.47 



,571.71 



10 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Treasurek and Collector. 
Salary of treasurer and collectorf 

Clerk hire 

Driver for paymaster 

Carriage hire 

Legal financial opinions 

Office expenses 

Postage 

Printing and stationery , 

Surety bonds 

Fixtures and furnishings 

Telephone and telegraph charges. 
Traveling expenses 



Total. 



Assessors. 

Salary of assessors (3) 

Payrolls assisitants and clerks. .. 

Advertising 

Carriage hire 

Furniture and fixtures 

Office and traveling expenses 

Printing and stationery 

Special services 

Telephone and telegraph charges. 



Total. 



City Clerk. 

Salary of city clerk 

Salary of assistant 

Clerk hire 

Adding machine 

Advertising 

Fixtures and furnishings 

License badges and plates 

Office and traveling expenses 

Postage, printing and stationery.. 

Posting notices 

Telephone and telegraph charges. 
Typewriters and repairs 



Total . 



Expenses 



$3,500.00 

10,730.13 

132.00 

1,101.25 

376.95 

121.08 

1.074.50 

865 . 78 

452.20 

124.73 

145.71 

108.56 



$18,732.89 

$6,000.00 

7,076.29 

94.78 

282.00 

28.51 

205.71 

1,233.93 

90.00 

106.75 



$15,117.97 

$2,700.00 

1,500.00 

6,821.05 

250.00 

280.78 

390.76 

193.00 

206.23 

1,514.42 

84.00 

149.26 

274.50 

$14,364.00 



Outlays 



Tote 



$18,732.89 



$15,117.97 



$14,364.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



11 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



( 'lerk of Committees. 

Salary clerk of committees 

Stenographer and clerk 

Municipal manual , 

Office expenses - 

Printing, postage and stationery. 
I'elehone and telepgraph charges. 
Typewriter exchange 



Expenses 



Total . 



City Solicitor. 

Salary of city solicitor 

Expert service and witness fees. . 

I'urniture and furnishings 

Office expenses 

Printing and stationery 

Telephone and telegraph charges. 

Travelling expenses 

Typewriter exchange 



Total. 



City Messenger. 

Salary of city messenger 

Pay rolls, municipal building. . . 

Care of grounds and walks 

Decorating building 

Engine room charges 

Fuel 

Furniture and furnishings 

Hardware and tools 

Ice 

Janitor and toilet supplies 

Laundry 

Light and power, commercial . . . 

Machinery repairs 

Miscellaneous supplies 

Printing and stationery 

Stock and labor, repairs 

Telephone and telegraph service. 
Travelling and office expenses . . . 
Water rates 



Total. 



$1,500.00 
1,017.53 
276.00 
108.58 
232.01 
182.85 
156.50 



$3,473.47 



$2,500.00 
958.75 
118.76 
180.40 

75.14 
106.37 
465.25 

49 . 50 



$4,454.17 



.$500.00 

16,249.99 

73.15 

105.00 

444.95 

2,975.90 

95.82 

60.89 

252.05 

280.99 

209.58 

931.23 

363.77 

23.59 

40.53 

367.30 

138.26 

41.31 

345.21 

$23,499.52 



Outlavs 



Total 



5,473.47 



.454.17 



$23,499.52 



J 



12 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



I'lliECTIOXS. 

Pay of precinct officers 

Clerical services 

Janitors and watchmen \. . 

Advertising 

Ballot boxes and repairs 

Carriage hire 

Polling places, maintenance 

Polling places, rent 

Postage, Printing and stationery 

'I'otal 

Registrar of Voters. 

Salaries of registrars (4) 

Clerk hire 

Advertising 

Carriage hire . 

Office expenses 

Printing and stationery 

Recount assistants 

Telephonccharges 

Total 

LifEKsiNG Board. 

Salaries of board (3) 

Clerk hire 

Advertising, printing and stationery 

Office expenses 

Telephone charges 

Total 

Engineering. (Civil) 

Salary of city engineer 

Compensation of assistants 

Clerk hire 

Drawing instruments and supplies. . 

Furniture and furnishings 

Office supplies and expenses 

Printing and stationery 

Stock and labor, miscellaneous 

Telegraph and telephone charges.. . 
Transportation 

Total 



Expenses 



$2,109.00 

3.S.46 

10.00 

148.75 

161.45 

304.00 

556.60 

825.00 

1,413.30 



Outlavs 



Total 



§5,563.56 



$1,500.00 

1,033.25 

292 83 

15 00 

52 . 24 

614.06 

63.75 

89.01 



$3,660.14 

$1,488.74 

780.00 

143.34 

88.09 

68.92 

$2,569.09 

$2,500.00 

14,683.44 

1,095.70 

681.83 

46.00 

137.37 

352.72 

115.25 

126.94 

744.46 

$20,483.71 



$5,563.56 



,660.14 



,569.09 



$20,483.71 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



13 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENT^ 



Sri'EKINTEXDEXT OF PrBI.IC iil'IhUlXGS 

AND Inspector of Buildings. 
Salary of superintendent and inspector 

Compensation of assistants 

Clerk hire 

Automobile maintenance 

Car tickets 

Furniture and furnishings 

Office and traveling expenses 

Printing and stationery 

Special services 

Telephone and telegraph charges 

Total 

New Municipal Building. 

Electric contractor award 

Total 

City Property Committee. 

Advertising 

Committee expenses 

Municipal building elevator charges... 

Municipal building, repairs 

Municipal lot, upkeep 

Police station, repairs, 

Skating pond, expenses 

Sewer assessments, street widenings... 
Ward room repairs and maintenance. . 
V'eteran fireman building repairs 

Total 

Total, General Government 



Expenses 



S2,500.00 


2,695 


48 


1,404 


00 


413 


05 


120 


00 


126 


40 


87 


66 


190 


30 


394 


18 


102 


03 



,033.10 



$4,435.27 



S4,435 


27 


S85 


89 


213 


87 


480 


00 


147 


00 


200 


74 


490 


00 


578 


68 


15 


13 


200 


63 


210 


00 




Total 



$8,033.10 



$4,435.27 



$2,621.94 



$2,621.94 
s<5145,919.74 



14 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



OBIECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Protection of Life and Property. 

Police Department. 

Pay rolls, weekly department 

Pay rolls, reserve police 

Pay rolls, quarantine police 

Keeper of lockup, salary 

Labor, women's lockup 

Disbursements by chief 

Fuel 

Furniture and furnishings 

Janitor supplies 

Laundry 

Lighting 

Meals for prisoners 

Miscellaneous charges 

Printing and stationery 

Repairs to stations 

Rents 

Signal system, maintenance of horses.. 
Signal system, motors maintenance.. . . 

Signal system, repairs 

Telegraph and telephone charges 

Uniform repairs, equipment and insignia 

Use of boat and motor cycle 

Water rates 

Total 

Less service transfers 

Police Signal System. 

Repairs 

Total 

Fire Department. 

Pay rolls 

Protecting society 

Accident account 

Advertising, printing and stationery. . . 

Commitee expenses and travel 

Equipment supply charges 

Fuel 

Furniture and furnishings 

Harness supplies and repairs 

Horse board and auto keep, engineers.. 

Horses maintenance 

Laundry 

Lighting 

Motor maintenance 



Expenses 



Outlays 



Total 



$182,427.11 

9.164.64 

3,730.89 

100.00 

471.7.S 

306.68 

1,041.61 

7.50 

316.32 

119.43 

1,003.70 

96.48 

61.10 

273.33 

473.90 

_. 225.04 

47.53 

1,319.49 

. 222.07 

761.60^ 

249.17 

605 . 50 

158.16 

$203,183.00 

$3,730.89 



$199,452.11 



$97.44 
$97.44 



$137,239.08 

200.00 

32.85 

499.67 

317.59 

1,105.57 

2,331.69 

1,113.38 

33.88 

595.97 

4,843.41 

145.95 

1,674.97 

2,349.62 



$199,152.11 



$97.44 



AUDITORS REPORT. 



15 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


New equipment 


$448.51 

2.487.11 

565.74 

1,331.03 

646 . 68 

299.13 


$1,621.47 




Repair of apparatus 




Repair of stations 




Signal system, i"harges 




Supplies, miscellaneous 

Telephone and telcgirxph charges 

Water rates 








Total 


$158,261.83 
80.30 




Less service transfers 




Fire Eoiui'ment: 


$158,181.53 

$104.55 

11.77 

1,173.13 


$1,621.47 

$4,150.00 


$159,803.00 






Total 


$4,150.00 

$16,000.00 
$16,000.00 

$87.00 
1,168.88 

495.00 


$4,150 00 


Fire Station; 

Land for new station 


Total 


$16,000.00 


MlI.ITl.\. 

Committee expenses 


Boat station expenses 

Expenses qualifying marksmen 




Total 


$1,289.45 

$1,500.00 

2,000.96 

732.00 

1,988.25 

529.79 

594 . 03 

1,063.05 

430.50 

139.93 

270.50 


$1,289.45 


Salary of inspector 




Compensation of assistants 

Clerk hire 




Payrolls, police signal system 

Advertising, printing and stationery. . 

Office and traveling expenses 

Police signal system 




Stock, supplies and labor 




Telephone and telegraph charges 

Transportation charges 








Total 


$9,249.01 

$1,200.00 

69.87 

31.60 

657.00 

45.13 


$1,750.88 


$10,999.89 


Hraler. of Weights and ^Measures. 
Salary of sealer 




.Advertising, printing and stationery... 








Tools and seals 








Total 


$2,003.60 


$2,003.60 





16 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS 



GBJF.CTS OF PAYMENTS 



CiTV FOKESTUY. 

Pay rolls, salary of forester and labor. 

Chemicals 

Labor and teaming 

Tools and repairs 

Miscellaneous expenses 

Total 

Total, Protection of Life and Property 



Expenses 



S4,140 


S3 


6 


80 


1,074 


16 


311 


64 


5 


25 



$5,538.68 



Outlays 



Total 



$5,538.68 
$399,334.17 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



17 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


Health and Sanitation. 

Board of Health. 


$1,500.00 

1,624.08 

2,200.08 

1,000.08 

1,827.25 

2,200.32 

1,000.08 

4,000.80 

800 . 00 

1,200.00 

1,056.00 

1,166.65 

3,115.40 

800.00 

505.30 

799.92 

22.50 

881.04 

599 . 26 

25,500.00 

151.08 

319.53 

65.00 

343.51 

722.50 

1,300.47 

1,814.49 

74.65 

1,404.44 

2,011.64 

3,730.89 

75.20 

901.44 

49.11 

966.79 

663.19 

2,080.84 

1,383.97 

34,838.19 

81.00 

1,059.62 

259.48 

3,154.30 

182.85 

953.50 

605.00 

469.18 














Bacteriologists 




Department nurses, wages 








Medical inspectors, salaries 

Medica' school inspectors 


1 


Medical school employment inspector. 
Milk and provision inspector, salary . 
Milk collectors and fumigators, wages. 

Oculist Cpart of year) 

Plumbing inspectors, salaries 

School nurses, wages 

Slaughter inspector, salary 

Advertising, printing and stationery. . 
Beach cleaning 








Chemicals and medical supplies 

Garbage removal, contract 

Office supplies and expenses. . . 




Telephone and telegraph charges. . . . 

Traveling expenses 

Contagious diseases, compensation.. . . 

" " hospitals 

" ' nurses 




" " other towns 

" " physicians ..... 
" " quarantine police. 
*' ' rents 




" " supplies 

Isolation hospital, furnishings 

" " nurses 




" " repairs 




" " supplies 




" " wages 




Tuberculosis, hospitals 

" nurses 




" other towns 




" rents 




" supplies 




" transportation 




Pest house, attendants 




" " burials 




" " supplies 




Less service transfers 


111,460.62 
1.00 








Total 


$111,459.62 


$111,459.62 



18 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Inspector of Animals : 

Compensation of Inspector 

Total 

City Physician. 

Salary of city physician 

Total 

Dental Clinic. 

Attendant and care taker 

Dentist services 

Equipment supplies 

Office expenses 

Total 

Vital Statistics. 

Advertising, printing and stationery 

Birth and death returns 

Canvass by city clerk 

Total, 

Sewers and Drains. 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Boiler insurance 

Brick, cement and pipe 

Castings and iron reinforcement 

Machines and repairs 

Miscellaneous supplies 

Motor maintenance 

Sewer rebates 

Stock and labor, highways 

Tools and repairs 

Water service 

Less service transfers 

Total 

Sewer Construction No. 1, 1914. 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Stock and labor, drains account. . . . 
Stock and labor, highways account.. 

Total 



Expenses 



$50.00 



$50.00 

$550.00 
$550.00 



$526.40 

1,113.00 

2.53.48 

30.82 



$1,923.70 



$223.71 

1,553.75 

637.49 



,414.95 



$30,536.30 
216.08 
12,383.21 
974.88 
702.02 
.595.93 
478.98 

50.00 
701.19 
859.68 

25.72 



$47,523.99 
17,951.36 



$29,572.63 



Outlays 



.12.50 



$112.50 



$528.57 
619.88 
162.89 

$1,311.34 



Total 



$50.00 



$550.00 



2,036.20 



$2,414.95 



$29,572.63 



/ $1,311.34 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



19 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Sewer Construction, C. 7(5, 1912. 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Stock and labor, highways 

Stock and labor, water works 

Supplies, miscellaneous 

Total, 

Skwer Construction, C. 183, ISM."'. 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Stock and labor, other city accounts . 
Stock and labor, outside mechanics.. 
Supplies, miscellaneous 

Total 

Skwkk Construction, C. lol, 1i)11. 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Stock and labor, other city accounts. 
Supplies, miscellaneous 

Total 

Sewer Construction, 
General Account : 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Brick 

Cement 

Explosives 

Fuel 

Freight and carting 

Pipe and segment blocks 

Railroad work, train service , 

Sand, 

Stock labor and teaming, highways... , 

Stock labor and teaming, drains 

Stock labor and teaming, water works 
Stock and labor, outside mechanics. . 

Stock sewage disposal. , 

Stock, highway improvement 

Stock, highways, macadam 

Supplies 

Timber 

Miscellaneous, charges 

Less service transfers 

Total 



Expenses 



Outlays 



J510,856.77 



3,461.95 

1,678.70 

473.62 

$5,614.27 



$34,820.10 

32.20 

1,756.63 

42.25 

188.35 

924.81 

1,675.92 

158.45 

325.73 

5,826.86 

13,495.20 

587.29 

58.19 

22.75 

119.50 

835.37 

358.47 

648.56 

9.05 



$61,885.68 
1,714.81 



Total 



$1,594.22 

217.48 

2.23 

539.86 

$2,353 . 79 



/ 



$2,353.79 



S9,350.27 

850.39 

56.64 

599.47 



.S10,856.77 



/ $5,614.27 



),178.87 



/ 



20 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



objects; OF PAYMENTS 



Sewage Disposal. C. 474. lit 10. 

Pay rolls, engineering and inspection. 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Accident account 

Advertising, printing and stationery.. 

Brick . 

Castings 

Cement 

Contractor, J. W. Bishop Co 

Contractor, Wood Boiler Works 

Contractor, F. E. Earle Co 

Damages repaired 

Divers and tenders 

Electrical contractor 

Electric light and power. 

Explosives 

Freight and carting 

Fuel 

Hardware and tools 

Hydraulic press 

Iron reinforcement 

Machinery, new 

Machinery, use of 

Pumps and equipment 

Rent of land 

Sand and gravel 

Sewer forms, use of 

Sewer pipe and segment blocks 

Sluice gates 

Stone, broken 

Stock, labor and teaming 

Other municipal accounts 

Stock and labor, outside mechanics 

Supplies, miscellaneous 

Telephone and telegraph charges 

Timber and lumber 

Transportation 



Ex 



peases 



Less service transfers 

Total 

Total, Health and Sanitation 



Outlays 



$1.S,407.67 
133,565.66 
324.75 
1 18 . 75 
454 . 40 
2,346.57 
1L60L79 
.^711.28 
^295.46 
415. 0^ 
146.44 
^-250.20 
2.246.83 
2,644.02 
1,708.56 
650.28 
1, .505. 41 
1,852.24 
487.00 
2,215.83 
1,008.51 
766 . 00 
2,070.25 
72 . 50 
12,318.00 
665.00 
3,940.45 
215.00 
1,829.19 

24,419.91 
5,377.93 
1,298.83 

179.34 
6,551.35 

299.00 

$250,989.40 
1,740.51 



$249,248.89 



Tot; 



n 



./ 



$249,248.89 



$475,639.33 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



21 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Highways and Bridges. 

HIGHWAYS. 

Pay rolls, salaries and office 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Accident account 

Advertising, printing and stationery. . 
Automobile and motor maintenance. . 

Carpenter shop supplies 

Curbing and paving, repairs 

Crusher stone 

Crusher, supplies and repairs 

Dust prevention, supplies 

Freight and express 

Fuel 

Hardware and tools 

Land rent 

Light and power, commercial 

Machine shop supplies 

Miscellaneous supplies 

New machinery and equipment 

Office expenses 

Paint shop supplies 

Pension account 

Road roller repairs and supplies 

Sand 

Teaming supplies 

Stock and labor, miscellaneous 

Stock and labor macadam account.. . . 
Stock and labor. Purchase street 

widening account 

Stock and labor, drain account 

Stock, highway improvement account. 
Water 



Less service transfers. 
Total 



Highways, Permanent Improvement 
1915 : 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Asphalt 

Cement 

Crushed stone 

Curbing 

Enduriie paving, contractor 

Expert services 

Franklin wood blocks 

Fuel 

Freight and carting 

Granite blocks 

Granolithic walks, contractor 

Hardware and tools 



Expenses 



$8,340.20 

196,825.48 

2,681.07 

997.59 

7,598.06 

1,116.92 

1.976.00 

6,251.39 

1,422.49 

14,929.09 

1,260.84 

1,631.75 

3,494.89 

162.50 

1,210.04 

842.11 

1,794.10 

1,033.76 
504.89 
1,099.28 
1,139.97 
1,461.65 
8,596.89 
1,515.38 
16,533,59 

2,404.85 

165.23 

1,014.96 

1,3C3 61 



$289,308.58 
88,804 83 



$200,503 . 75 



Outlays 



Total 



S485.00 



5,187.0o 



85,672.00 



$89,163.04 

2,090.50 

10,274.12 

545.67 

7,108.61 

638.45 

201.00 

14,674.02 

763.93 

192.15 

22,747.66 

10,605.87 

584.04 



$206,175.75 



22 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



I. umber 

Sand 

Stevens wood blocks 

Stock, labor and teaming, other 

municipal account 

Stock and labor, outside mechanics 

Use of concrete mixer 

Supplies, miscellaneous 



Less service transfeis. 
Total 



Expenses 



JflGHWAYS, I.MPROVKMENT.S, 1914 

Endurite paving, contractor 

Hassam paving, contractor 



Total. 



] riGHvvA Ys, Macadam . 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Asphalt 

Crushed stone 

Crusher stone 

Fuel 

Hardware and tools 

Land rent 

Lumber 

Machines repairs and maintenance. 

Sand 

Stock, labor and teaming, other 

municipal accounts 

Tarvia 

Miscellaneous charges 



Less service transfers. 
Total 



Bridges. 

Pay rolls 

Conduits 

Electric light and power 

Lumber 

Repairs 

Stock and labor 

Stock, labor and teaming, highways 

Supplies, miscellaneous 

Telephones 



Total. 



$8,094.78 

172.45 

415.57 

1,545.20 

664.94 

21.33 

564.20 

332.28 

49.48 

$11,860.23 



Outlays 



$175,98 

6,455.47 

11,650.44 

45,822.70 
164.63 
246.00 
282 . 93 

$224,387.21 
12,843.27 



!1 1,543. 94 



$4,109.53 
3,183.46 



$7,292.99 



$36,798.61 

9,421.18 

12,465.12 

21,239.08 

2,306.09 

267.58 

512.50 

118.03 

5,884.33 

894.32 

26,110.11 

9,560.16 

341.57 



$125,918.68 
29,160.89 



$96,757.79 



/- 



Total 



-^$211,543.94 



§7,292.99 



$96,757.79 



$11,860.23 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



23 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Turner's Pond Bridgb : 

Pay rolls, labor 

Cement, gravel, sand and crushed stone 

Miscellaneous charges, 

Stock, labor and teaming, other city 

accounts 

Timber and lumber 



Expenses 



Total. 



Cove Road Retaining Wall 

Pay rolls, labor 

Crushed stone 

Teaming, highways account.. . 



Total. 



Widening Purchase Street. 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Cement and sand 

Franklin wood paving blocks 

Hardware and tools 

Stock and labor, other city accounts. 
Miscellaneous charges 



Less service transfers. 
Total 



Widening Union Street. 

Pay rolls, labor and teaming 

Cement and sand 

Granite paving blocks 

Hardware and tools 

Stock and labor, other city accounts. 



Less service transfers. 
Total 



Acushnet River Bridge : 

County Assessment, C539- 1912. 

Total 



Outlays 



Total 



$4,418.80 
597.32 
146.05 

794.57 
193.91 



),150.65 



$627.34 

1,041.00 

3.02 



$1,671.36 



3,228.73 
1,123.81 
5,305.29 

243.38 
9,529.54 

125.99 



^ $6,150.65 



/ 



$1,671.36 



$19,556.74 
$2,404.85 



$17,151.89 

$2,376.35 

613.70 

2,618.00 

22.90 

3,736.62 



V $17,151.89 



,367.57 
356.84 



,010.73 



$19,425.09 
$19,425.09 



k' $9,010.73 



[9,425.09 



24 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Land Damages. 

( Highway Extension 1915 ) : 

Arlington street 

Concord street 

Elm street 

Mt. Vernon street 

Spring street 

Wood street 

Total 

Street Lightixo. 

Committee expenses 

Electric lighting 

Gas lighting 

Lighting clock tower 

Moving posts and lamps 

Naphtha lighting 

Total 

Harbok Mastkk. 

Salary of harbor master 

Use of boat 

Total 

Board op Survey. 

Advertising, printing and stationery 

Total 

Total, Highways and Bridges 



Expenses 



$269.71 

63,118.85 

42,055.86 

200.00 

79.95 

3,334.03 



$109,058.40 



$300.00 
52.00 



S3 52. 00 



$68.43 



S.43 



Outlays 



$5,236.50 
5,425.85 
1,148.00 
175.00 
1,945.00 
3,525.40 



7,482,75 



Total 



$17,482.75 



$109,058.40 



$352.00 



$68.43 
$714,002.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



25 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Charities. 

Poor Department. 
Salaries, overseers and secretary. 

Salaries, clerks and visitors 

Office expenses 

Almshouse, salaries and wages. . . 
Almshouse, maintenance charges. 

Outside relief, burials 

cash 



clothing and furnishings 

fuel 

homes 

hospitals 

other towns 

physicians and medicines 

provisions 

state charges 

transportation 



Less service transfers, 

Total 

Total, Charities 



Expenses 



$2,693.66 
3,634.60 
1,030.98 

14,192.28 

26,038.62 
2,721.00 

22,787.00 
1,586.39 
6,342.34 
1,240.40 
9,907.91 
3,082.74 
5,084.49 

47,020.13 
2,036.56 
1,120.97 



$150,520.07 
1,151.05 



$149,369.02 



Outlays 



Total 



$149,369.02 



26 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Soldiers Benefits. 

Burial op Soldikks. 

Burial agents 

Undertakers 



Total . 



Military Aid. 

Cash disbursements 



Total. 



Soldiers Relief. 

Salary of agent 

Salaries of physicians 

Cash disbursements 

Fuel 

Medical attendance and supplies. 

Office expenses 

Provisions 

Telegrams and telephones 



expenses 



S36.00 
864.00 



$900 . 00 



,785.00 



Total. 



State Aid. 

Cash disbursements. 



Total 

Total, Soldiers Benefits. 



$3,785.00 

$936 . 00 

960.00 

10,865.00 

2,126.48 

770.89 

138.05 

7,532.50 

65.66 



Outh 



Total 



$900.00 



$3,785.00 



$23,394.58 



$12,052.00 



$12,052.00 



$23,394.58 

$12,052.00 
$40,131.58 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



27 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


Education. 

Public Schools, Pay of Teachers. 
Pay rolls, day schools 


$357,638.91 
9,641.50 


$1,638.27 




Pay rolls, evening schools 




Total 


$367,280.41 

$ 4,000.00 

53,603.76 

13,245.50 

512.31 

339 . 34 

165.22 

309.62 

19,252.52 

175.32 

1,883.45 

326.55 

1,989.53 

412.96 

1,301.00 

309.37 

770.00 

3,700.17 

1,045.64 


$367,280.41 


I'UBLic Schools, Incidentals. 

Salary of superintendent 


All other salaries and wages .. . 




Book and stationery supplies 

Cooking school supplies 

County training school 

Engine room supplies 




Express, freight and carting.. 




Fuel 




Hardware and tools 




J anitor supplies 




Labratory supplies and equipment .... 
Lighting and electric power 




Manual training school supplies 

New furnishings 




Printing and advertising 




Telegrams and telephones 




Transportation 




Water service 




Miscellaneous supplies and service 




Total 


$103,342.26 

$304.05 
147.40 
384.11 
393.44 
164.50 

1,686.91 
114.49 
551.85 
418.60 

1,865.78 
411.00 
418.15 

195.02 
274.73 


$1,638.27 


$104,980.53 


Public Schools, Repairs o^ Buildings. 
Care of grounds 


Carpentry 




Electric repairs and supplies 




Granolithic sidewalks 




Hardware 




Heating and lighting, repairs and 
supplies 




Lumber 




Mason work 




Metal ceiling 




Painting and glazing 




Plumbing 




Roofing repairs 




Stock, labor and teaming, other city 
departments 




Supplies and service, miscellaneous. . . 




Less service transfers 


$7,330.03 
1.33 








Total 


$7,328.70 


$7,328.70 





28 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Public Schools, Dog Fund 

Automobile maintenance 

Books, maps and models 

Carting books 

Flags, poles and repairs 

Mileage and car tickets 

Music 

New furnishings 

School census charges 

Supplies and service, miscellaneous. 
Traveling expenses 



Total. 



Public Schools. S. A. Howland Fund. 

Art objects 

Books and periodical 

Lectures 

Musical instruments and supplies. . . . 

Reflectoscope and equipment 

Typewriters 



Total. 



Public Schools, Bourne Prize Fund. 
Cash prizes for essays 



Expenses 



$336.43 
124.71 
258.00 
144.45 
115.00 
173.34 
22.50 
132.40 
416.42 
167.08 



$1,890.33 



$389.95 
1,069.12 

50.00 
247.17 

46.00 



Total. 



Katherine Street School, 
Furnishings : 

Fire extinguishers 

Reflectoscope 



Total. 



New High School, Furnishings. 
New furniture and furnishings. . . . 



Total. 



New Portable School Houses. 
Portable school buildings 



Total . 



$1,802.24 
$60 . 00 



$60.00 

$48 . 00 
1.08 

$49 . 08 
$95.89 



$95 89 



Outlays 



$124.00 

207.80 

1,635.00 

$1,966.80 



$203.80 
$203.80 



$10,834.00 
$10,834.00 



Total 



$1,890.33 



$3,769.04 



$60.00 



$252.88 



$95.89 



$10,834.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



29 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


Nkw Bedford Industrial School. 
Pay rolls, salaries and wages 


$25,945.67 

600.04 

957.91 

38.00 

137.16 

1,138.69 

178.83 

1,509.68 

278.73 

1,213.21 

88.00 

80.35 

506 . 03 

1,728.82 

804.94 

74.25 

395 . 84 

96.31 

106.00 

2,750 00 

309.34 

969.67 

27.82 

89.10 

171.77 


$4,802.08 




Compensation of pupil care takers.. . . 
Advertising, printing and stationery. . 
Auto hire 




Carpenter shop, tools and supplies.. . . 

Chemical and electrical supplies 

Equipment, furniture and furnishings . 
Express, freight and carting 




Fuel 




Grocery supplies 

Hardware, tools, iron and steel 

Insurance 




Janitor supplies 




Lighting and electric power 

Lumber 




Machine shop, tools and supplies 

Mileage 




Miscellaneous supplies and service. . . . 
Painting and glazing 




Postage 




Rent 

Steam department supplies and tools. . 
Stock and labor, outside mechanics. . . 
Stock and labor,other city departments 
Telephone and telegraph charges 








Less service transfers 


$40,196.46 
18.50 








Total 


$40,177.96 
$10,000.00 


$4,802.08 


«44,980.04 


New Bedford Textile School. 
Trustees, New Bedford textile school. 




Total 


$10,000.00 


$10,000.00 


Total, Education 


$551,471.82 



30 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Libraries. 

Frei-; Public Library. 

Salaries and wages 

Car tickets 

Carting, freight and expenses 

Furniture, furnishings and repairs. . 

Insurance, personal property 

Laundry 

Lighting and heating 

Printing, advertising and stationery. 

Supplies, miscellaneous 

Telephones and tolls 

Traveling expenses 

Water rates 



Total 

liii!i;AKY, Dog Fund. 
Salaries and wages 



Miscellaneous charges 



Total. 



Library. S. A. IIowland Fund. 

Art exhibitions 

Books 

Lectures 

Newspapers and periodicals... . 
Printing and binding 



'xpenses 



Total. 



Library, Kempton Fund. 

Art objects 

Books, newspapers and periodicals. 

New furniture 

Printing and binding 

Research work 



Total. 



Library, G. O. Crocker Fund. 
Pay rolls, salaries and wages 
Miscellaneous supplies 



Total. 



Library, Oliver Crocker Fund. 

Pay rolls salaries and wages 

Miscellaneous supplies and service. 



Total 

Total, Libraries. 



$23,856.90 

60.00 

122.91 

354.41 

201.60 

35.82 

519.22 

368.17 

379.53 

48.19 

13.23 

126.33 

$26,086.31 



82,534.37 
319.02 

$2,853.39 



$52 . 50 
969.18 
847 . 70 
220.93 
722.52 

$2,812.83 



$244.47 
8,267.68 

2,606.92 
168.47 

$11,287.54 



$387.25 
21.09 

.34 



$58.35 
10.15 

$68.50 



Outlavs 



Total 



$203.29 



$203 . 29 



$26,289.60 



$2,853.39 



$2,812.83 



S760.00 



$760.00 



12,047.54 



$408.34 



68.50 
$44,480.20 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



31 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Recreation. 

Park Commission. 
Pay rolls, labor and superintendence, 

Advertising and printing 

Animal supplies 

Athletic fixtures , 

Bears 

Building and fixtures, repairs 

Care Tiiangle Park 

Carriage and auto hire and car ticket 

Flags poles and repairs 

Fountain repairs 

Freight and cartine 

Fuel ^. 

Hardware and tools 

Land rent for greenhouses 

Lighting 

Loam and filling 

Lumber 

Office supplies and furnishings 

Plants, seeds and shrubs 

Sewer assessments . . <. 

Supplies, miscellaneous 

Teaming 

Telephones and telegrams 

Water service 

Less service transfers.. 

Total 

Parks. Streets and Walks. 

Pay rolls, labor 

Lighting 

Posts and cables 

Stock, other municipal accounts 

Total 

Playgrounds. 

Pay rolls, attendants 

Carting and car hire 

Iron gate 

Miscellaneous supplies, service and 

repairs 

Sand 

Water service 

Total 



Expenses 



$20,692.04 

2S6.86 

1,496.97 

284.91 

1 50 . 00 

361.67 

50 . 00 

177.52 

133.05 

110.89 

49.51 

194.87 

163.84 

240 . 00 

585.95 

50 . 62 

82.06 

205.71 

185.98 

1,864.76 

334.53 

625.76 

186.61 

L^76.73 

$29,890.84 
63.25 

$29,827.59 



$106.10 



$106.10 



$2,. 500.64 
76.76 



148.75 
62.68 
23.29 

$2,812.12 



Outlays 



Total 



$70.00 



$70.00 



$56 . 25 

497.77 
199.14 

$753.16 



$97.00 



$29,897.59 



$859.26 



•7.00 



$2,909.12 



32 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Bathing Houses. 

Pay rolls, attendants 

Advertising, printing and stationery 

Committee expenses 

Hardware and tools 

Labor, cleaning beach 

Land rent, beach 

Laundry 

Lighting 

Stock and labor, fitting 

Supplies, miscellaneous 

Telephones 

Total 

Total, Recreation, 



Expenses 



^965 . 50 
55.22 

119.75 
26.17 
76.00 

400.00 

356.62 
8.99 

248.55 
30.43 
18.18 



$2,305.41 



Outlays 



Total 



$2,305.41 
$35,971.38 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



33 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 



Unclassified. 

Committee ox Claims. 

Payments in settlement of claims for 
damages 



Total. 



Court Judgments. 

Executions for land damages.. . . 
Execution for personal damages. 

Total 



Labor Registr.vr. Civil Service. 

Compensation of registrar 

Express charges 

Furniture and furnishings 

Postage 

Printing and stationery 



Total. 



Memorial Day. 

Advertising and printing. . . 
Flowers and flag decorations. 

Miscellaneous charges 

Music 

Transportation 



Total. 



I'RE.MiUMS OX Bonds. 

Legal opinions 

Mileage 

Printing 



Total. 



George T. Macomber. Claim. 
Award for personal injuries. . . . 



Total 

Total, Unclassified. 



Expenses 



$382.75 



$382 . 75 



$542.01 
S542.01 



$365 . 74 

6.55 

.85 

14.50 

36.29 

$423.93 



$87.20 
319.00 
95.96 
355.00 
239.50 

$1,096.66 



$370.00 

22.50 

191.92 



$584.42 

$178.00 
$178.00 



Outlavs 1 Total 



$486.25 



$486.25 



S104.15 



$104.15 



52.75 



1,028.26 



$528.08 



11,096.66 

$584.42 

$178.00 
3,798.17 



34 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF pavmp:nts 



Public Service Enterprises. 

.\ea\- Hedford Water W(;rks. 
Salaries, superintendent and office 

Other salaries and wages 

Extensions and equipment 

Interest 

Miscellaneous maintenance 

Rebates 

Sinking funds 

Less service transfers 

Total 

Department of Wharves. 

Fees 

Advertising 

Committee expenses 

Lighting 

Moving building 

Pension account 

Repairs 

Supplies 

Water 

Total • 

Wharf TJepatrs. Special. 

Repairs to wharves 

Total 

Total, Public Service Enterprises. . . 



Ex 



penses 



$22,859.26 
70,395.96 



6.392.37 
678.56 



$100,326.15 
21,861 .14 

$78,465.01 



$439.42 

53.64 

3.00 

6.50 

216.48 

242.38 

258.32 

7.39 

20.76 



$1,247.89 



$786.00 



$786.00 



Outh 



$22,989.30 
75.740.84 



$98,730.14 



Total 



$177,195.15 



$1,247.89 



$786.00 



$179,229.04 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



35 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


Cemeteries. 

Cemetery Board. 

Pay rolls labor and teaming 


$25,195.03 
2,244.00 
209 . 97 
320.90 
1,045.60 
226.09 
257.39 

44.00 
120.00 
187.92 

27.75 
295.43 
228.80 
842.35 
179.61 

197.50 


$212.89 




Salaries and wages, supervision 

Advertising, printing and stationery. . 
Fuel 




Ground keeping supplies 




Horse and motor maintenance 

Insurance 




Local car tickets 

Office expenses 




Road machinery repairs 




Sewer assessments 








Supplies, miscellaneous 

Telephones 




Tool house 




Water supply 




Less service transfers 


$31,622.34 
249.30 




Total 


$31,373.04 
$249.30 


$212.89 

$5,282.15 
899.72 


S3 1,585. 93 


Cemeteries, Sale of Lots. 

Pay rolls, labor 




Other improvement expenses 




Total 


$6,181.87 


$6,181.87 


Soldiers and Sailors Graves. 

Care of graves 








Total 


$249 . 30 


$249.30 


Total, Cemeteries 


$38,017.10 



36 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



PAYxMENTS 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Outlays 


Total 


Administration of Invested Funds. 

SiXKlXG KrXD C^OMiMIS.SIONKRS. 

Salarv of treasurer 


$300.00 
148.00 




^ 


Other expenses 








Total 


$448.00 


$448.00 


Total, Administration of Invested 

Funds... 






$448.00 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS 


Expenses 


Indebtedness 


Total 


Interest. 

On Bourne prize fund . 


$20,00 

1,601.10 

328,619.02 

75,300.00 

1.660.00 

35,934.13 


17,\0C0.00 

1,'K)0,000.00 

100,000.00 

20,000.00 

20,000.00 

$2,215,000.00 
$228,157.34 

$2,443,157.34 




On Cemetery perpetual care fund . . . . 
On bonded debt 




On bonded water debt 




On bonded wharf debt 




On temporary loans. 








Total 


$443,137.25 

$21,000 00 
110 000.00 

27,000.00 
451,866.12 

16,450.61 


$443,137.25 


Municipal Indebtedness. 

Bonds paid from water income 

" " " sinking funds 

assessments.. 

taxes 

" " " premiums 

Temporary loans taxes, 1914 

" " 1915 

'1 ;^ " (SewersC.4741910) 

" (High, improvem't) 

" " " (High, macadam). . 


Unpaid warrants of prior years 

Total 


$626,316.73 
$626,316.73 


$3,069,474.07 


Total, Interest and Indebtedness 


$3,512,611.32 



3 -^^^ ^ 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



37 



PAYMENTS. 



OBJECTS OF PAYMENTS. 



Sinking Funds. 

Appropriation from revenue paid to 
sinking fund commissioners 

Total 

Appropriation from water income. . 
" " wharf 

Total, Sinking Funds 



Agency, Trust and Investment. 

Agkncv. 

County taxes 

State taxes 

Non-resident bank taxes 

Liquor licenses for State 

Trtst. 

Cash discrepancies 

Cemeterj' perpetual care deposits .... 

Cemetery 6% fund income 

Department advances 

Highway deposits 

Summons fees due collectors 

Salary advances 

Sewer deposits 

Kempton fund income 

Pay rolls, tailings 

Total, Agency, Trust and Investment 

Gash at the end of the year 

Total 



From 
Revenue 



$61,513.00 



861,513.00 

27,930.00 

1,061.00 



Temporary 
Account 



5128,315.01 

237,420.00 

46,0f)5.05 

31,871.50 



111.91 

9,185.00 

1,428.12 

4^)3.38 

8.429.16 

564 . 00 

14,881.44 

11,526.20 

10,015.00 

2.00 



$500,307.77 



Total 



$90,504.00 



$500,307.77 

365,336.01 

7,246,570.65 



38 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



SUMMARY. 



CLASSIFICATION 



Taxes 

Licenses and permits 

Fines and forfeits 

Grants and gifts 

Special assessments 

Privileges 

General government 

Protection of life and prop- 
erty 

Health and sanitation 

Highways and bridges 

Charities 

Soldiers benefits 

Education 

Libraries 

Recreation, 

Unclassified 

Public service enterprises 

Cemeteries 

Administration of invested 
funds 

Interest 

Municipal indebtedness 

Sinking funds 

Agency, trust and investment 

Refunds 



Revenue 

for 
Expenses 



$2 



Totals. 



,411,742.80 

108,348.00 

4,833 . 30 

20,386.37 

102,382.68 

12,787.23 

,S,458.08 

1,630.21 

27,118.00 

9,820.52 

28,809.33 

13,664.50 

8,452.93 

1,252.57 

1,198.59 

328,177.23 
15,180.15 



29,897.82 



$3,131,140.31 



Revenue 
for Other 
Purposes 



$23,741.83 

2,389.42 

1,354.68 

277.35 

12.462.12 



6,625.00 



3,285,760.91 
110,000.00 

503,758.55 
4,365.61 



5,950,735.47 



Expenses 



$145,919.74 

375,811.82 

145,970.90 

321,842.81 

149,369.02 

40,131.58 

532,026.87 

43,516.91 

35,051.22 

3,207.77 

80,498 . 90 

31,622.34 

448.00 

443,137.25 

626,316.73 

90,504.00 



,065,375.86 



Revenue for expenses $3,131,140.31 

Revenue for other purposes.... 3,950,735 .47 



Total receipts 

Cash at beginning of the year 



$7,081,875.78 
164,694.87 

$7,246,570.65 



Current expenses 

Outlays and othei objects. 

Total expenditures. 
Cash at end of year 



^?JU -S' . .?" 



-Zr=Ef^ " 



zzzzzzz^^sizsiz^zzzzzzzzzzxzzzzzzzzzzzzzz 



ppppo p ££- 73a,pp": : oPp" 



rV'= 


ncni Imrro»ement. Loan No. 1, 191 
" No. 2. 191 
" No. 3, 191 

lion Lo.in,No. 1, 1914 

" No. 1, 1914 

■• No. 1. 1915 

■' No. 1, 1915 

■' N'o. I, 1915 

dam. No. 1 

No.2 

No.3 

No. 1, 191S 

'other PubiicBuildingj'.' .'.'.'.'.'.' .'!'.'.! 

C. 298, 1904 

C, 298, 1904 

C18S, 1907 

C. 144, 1909 

C. 144, 1909 

C. 144, 1909 

C. 233, 1910 

C. 123, 1911 

C. 123, 1911 

ion, 1910 

School, Equipment 

C. 184, 1907 

C.1S4, 1907 

C. 131. 1911 






1 


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38 



CL 



Taxes. 
Licensi 
Fines a 
Grants 
Special 
Privile 
Genera 
Proteci 

en 
Health 
Highwi 
Chariti 
Soldier 
Educat 
Librari' 
Recreai 
Unclass 
Publics 
Cemete 
Admini 

fur 
Interest 
Munici] 
Sinking 
Agency. 
Refunds 



Revenut 
Revenui 



1 

jh at 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 39 

BALANCE SHEET OF THE CITY OF NEW BEDFORD 
DECEMBER, 1915. 

ASSETS. 



Cash in treasury $365,336.01 

Uncollected taxes 250,769 . 05 

Advances for Commonwealth lb, 242 . 93 

Other accounts receivable 2,062 . 37 

Deficit, other estimated revenue 19,648.25 

Current assets $654,058.61 

Kempton fund, cash and investments 260,960.41 

Sinking funds, cash and investments 1,838,894.26 

Cemetery fund, cash and investment 187,431 . 87 

Library and school funds 117,100.00 

City property, ledger account 13,541,911 . 74 

Construction authorized, not expended 101,801 . 71 

Total assets $16,702,158.60 



LIABILITIES. 



Accounts payable $471,799.41 

Balances, sinking fund 1,838,894.26 

Balances, municipal utilities accounts 28,794 . 12 

Balances, trust fund income accounts 5,235 . 29 

Balances, deposit accounts 41,958.81 

Balances, construction accounts 46,563.46 

Balances, special accounts 108,324 . 29 

Reserves for tax abatements ^ 41,189. 11 

$2,582,758.75 

Kempton fund 259,493 . 77 

Cemetery funds 187,431 . 87 

Library and school trust funds .'. . 117,100. 00 

Bonds outstanding 10,063,045. 16 

Loans authorized, not issued 185,000.00 

$13,394,829.55 

Balance, public property account 3,307,329.05 

Total liabilities $16,702,158 . 60 



40 AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



City of New Bedford, 
April 22, 1916. 

To the City Council Committee on Finance: 

Gentlemen: — The sub-committee on the valuation 
of city property reports herewith a list of city property 
and its value. The valuation of real estate has been 
secured from the Board of Assessors, and the valuation 
of other property has been secured from the officers in 
charge of the several departments. The entire valuation 
is believed by your sub-committee to be a fair valuation 
of the city. 

JOHN T. SLOANE, 
GEORGE A. J. LAGASSE, 
GEORGE T. DUCKWORTH, 

Committee. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



41 



SCHEDULE AND VALUATION OF THE CITY PROPERTY, 
JANUARY 1, 1916. 

Board of Assessors: 

Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 
ishings ^S7,976.00 $7,976.00 

Board of Health: 

Furniture and equipment in office 

and bacteriological laboratory.... 6,753.38 

Disinfecting apparatus 100.00 

Furniture bedding, etc., in small 

pox buildings 275.00 

Ambulance and wagon at small 

pox hospital 200.00 

Partial equipment of isolation hos- 
pital .^ 1,000.00 

Buildings used as small pox hospi- 
tals 1,800.00 

Isolation hospital buildings 41,200.00 

Land at isolation hospital 92,625.00 

• 143,953.38 

Cemetery Board: 

Oak Grove Cemetery 70,075 . 00 

Old Burying Ground, Second st 10,325.00 

Pine Grove Cemetery 41,575.00 

Rural Cemetery .' 207,625.00 

Tools, machinery, wagons and 

equipment 3,480.00 

Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 
ishings 3,432.00 

— — • 336,462 . 00 

City Auditor: 

Office furniture, fixtures and furn- 
ishings 2,640.00 2,640.00 

City Clerk: 

Office furniture, fixtures and furn- 
ishings 7,000.00 7,000.00 

City Messenger: 

Miscellaneous supplies on hand.. . . 200.00 200.00 

City Solicitor : 

Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 
ishings , . . . 843.00 

Law library 250 . 00 

1,093.00 

City Treasurer: 

Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 
ishings 7,245.00 7,245.00 

City Engineer: 

Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 
ishings 13,837.84 13,837.84 

Clerk of Committees : 

Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 
ishings, 2,600.00 2,600.00 



42 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



Elections: 
Ballot boxes, and voting parapher- 
nalia 

Fire Department: 

No. 1 engine house and lot 

No. 2 engine house and lot 

No. 3 engine house and lot 

No. 4 engine house and lot 

No. 5 engine house and lot 

No. 6 engine house and lot 

No. 7 engine house and lot 

No. 8 engine house and lot 

No. 9 engine house and lot 

No. 10 engine house and lot 

No. 11 engine house and lot 

Land cor. Pleasant and North Sts. 

Steam fire engine No. 1 

Steam fire engine No. 2 

Steam fire engine No. 4 

Steam fire engine No. 5 

Steam fire engine No. 6 

Steam fire engine No. 7 

Steam fire engine No. 8 

Steam fire engine No. 9, reserve. . . 

One Ahrens Fox auto engine 

One Robinson auto engine 

One Webb auto engine 

One White auto engine 

Three Locomobile combination 

chemicals 

One Locomobile repair car 

One Locomobile instruction car.. . 

Three hook and ladder trucks 

One combination hook and ladder 

truck 

One hook and ladder truck (reserve) 
One combination chemical and 

hose wagon 

Five hose wagons 

Eight exercise and coal wagons .... 

One fire alarm wagon 

Oneexpress wagon (Plainville). . . . 

One chief's buggy 

Twenty-six horses and harnesses. . 

Hose and connections 

Fire alarm telegraph 

Sundries, as per inventory 

Free Public IjIbrary: 

Land and building 

Books, pictures, etc 



$ 3,000.00 



$14,450.00 

46,400.00 

23,400.00 

16,225.00 

33,250.00 

12,975.00 

17,225.00 

30,650. OC 

2,150.00 

21,075.00 

23,050.00 

7,300.00 

3,500.00 

3,000.00 

3,000.00 

3,500.00 

3,000.00 

3,500.00 

3,000.00 

2,000.00 

9,0C0.00 

9,000 . 00 

7.500.00 

6,0C0 . 00 

18,000.00 

4,500.00 

250.00 

13,500.00 

2,685.00 
100.00 

2,000. CO 

2,000.00 

1,200.00 

200.00 

75.00 

150.00 

8,500.00 

13,000.00 

35,000.00 

5,000.00 



441,675.00 
125,000.00 



$3,000.00 



410,310.00 



566,675.00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



43 



Inspector op Wires: 

Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 
ishings $ 715.00 

Police signal system 8,000.00 

Cable, wire and material 1,750.00 



$10,470.00 



Licensing Board: 

Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 
ishings 1,755.00 

Mayor 's Office : 

Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 
ishings 4,500.00 

New Bedford Industrial School: 
Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 

inshings and machinery 39,760.00 

New Bedford Water Works: 

Acushnet supply 401,503.00 

Further supply 1,118,400.00 

Distribution and other items 1,875,000.00 

Park Commissioners: 

Bridge Park 25,375.00 

Brooklawn Park 312,625 . 00 

Buttonwood Park 176,550.00 

Common 96,950.00 

Grove Park 24,425 . 00 

Hazelwood Park 158,875 . 00 

Ashlev Park 26,350.00 

Triangle Park 1,275.00 

Office furniture and fixtures 1,200.00 

Animals 2,500.00 

Tools and working implements. . . . 3,500.00 
Swings, seats, band stands, and 

amusement fixtures 7,500.00 



Police Department: 

Police Station, Blackmer street. . . . 

Police Station, So. Second street. . . 

Police stable, So. Second street. . . . 

Police Station, Kempton and Ce- 
dar streets 

Police Station, Willis street 

Police Station, Bowditch and Weld 
streets 

Ambulances, wagons, furniture, 
furnishings and miscellaneous 
equipment 



13,850.00 

15,025.00 

4,250.00 

$22,575.00 
3,175.00 

13,350.00 



1,978.00 



1.755.00 



4,500.00 



39,760.00 



3,394,903.00 



837,125.00 



$74,203 . 00 



44 AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



Poor Department: 

Almshouse, outbuildings, etc $ 186,650.00 

Furniture, furnishings, live stock 

and equipment 15,850.00 

— 202,500.00 

PuKLic Baths: 

Miscellaneous equipment 600.00 

600 . 00 

J'l'RLic Buildings, Land and Other 
1'roperty: 

Screen House, West French ave. . . 78,875.00 

Land, West French avc 1,075.00 

Land, West French Ave 7,050.00 

Land, West French Ave 325.00 

Land, south side of Cove street. . . 250.00 

Land, Cove and Shore streets. . . . 400.00 

Pump house, Brock Ave 19,075.00 

Wardroom, Rivet and Briggs Sts.. 1,525.00 
Land, n. e. cor.. Arnold street and 

Rockdale ave 725.00 

Land, s. e. cor. Arnold street and 

Rockdale ave 1,075.00 

Wardroom, 610 Purchase street.. . 1,025.00 

Land, west side Liberty street.. . . 25.00 
Veteran Firemen's Building, High 

and Foster streets 2,700.00 

Land, Mechanics, Elm, Sixth and 

Pleasant streets 157,350.00 

Municipal Building, William and 

Pleasant streets 504,150.00 

Land, North to Hillman sts 3,800.00 

Land, Hillman street 8,200.00 

Building, 195 Mill st. on leased land 150.00 
Wardroom, Kcmpton st. on leased 

land 800.00 

Land, east side of Belleville ave... . 2,125.00 
Land at head of Lambeth street, 

Edgwood, Sunderland, Dana sts. 175.00 

Land, Conway, Edgewood Streets 100.00 
Land and buildings n. s. Tarkiln 

Hill Road 8,075.00 

$799,050.00 

Registrars of Voters: 

Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 
ishings 4,000.00 4,000.00 

School Department : 

Wm. H. Taylor, Brock ave 91,000.00 

George H. Dunbar, Dartmouth st. 46,050.00 

Katherine street school 171,225.00 

R. C. Ingraham, Blackmer and 

Second streets 86,925 . 00 

Isaac W. Benjamin, Division street 38,325 . 00 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



45 



James B. Congdon, Thompson st... 102,975.00 

Thomas Donaghy, South st 79,875.00 

Thompson Street school 44,475.00 

Dartmouth Street school 17,375.00 

Acushnet avenue school 48,975.00 

Betsey B. Winslow, Allen streets... 151,750.00 

Fifth street school, Pleasant street 36,075.00 
Thomas A. Greene, Purchase and 

Madison streets 69,925 . 00 

Harrington School, Court st 57,350.00 

Hathaway playgrounds 11,575.00 

Sylvia A. Howland, Kempton and 

Pleasant streets 72,125.00 

Middle street school 36,800.00 

New High School, County and 

Court streets '. 565,600.00 

School Committee Rooms, William 

street 9,950.00 

Thomas R. Rodman, Rockdale 

avenue and Summit street 78,725.00 

Cedar street school 8,425.00 

Mary B. White, Maxfield street.. 24,925.00 

Old High School, Summer street. 111,675.00 

H. A. Kempton, Shawmut avenue 51,975.00 

Parker street school 80,750.00 

Merrimac street school 17,800.00 

Clark Street school 38,250.00 

John H. Clifford, Bowditch and 

Coggeshali streets 80,600.00 

Cedar Grove Street School 36,175 . 00 

H. M. Knowlton school, Countv 

and Coggeshali streets '. 110,000.00 

Phillips Avenue school 46,550.00 

A. Lincoln, Bowditch and Glennon 146,250.00 

School, Hathaway road 1,150.00 

School, Plainvillc 1.125 . 00 

Jireh Swift school, Lunds Corner.. 84,425.00 
Acushnet avenue, north of Lunds 

Corner 1,600.00 

Portable buildings 18,000.00 

Furniture and furnishings 231.858.00 

Seai,er of Weights and Measures: 
Standard weights and measures and 

equipment 2,280.00 

Streets axd Sewers: 

City stables and land 63,150.00 

Air drills 2, 144.. SO 

Asphalt plant 7,299.44 

Blacksmith shop.. 3,734.47 

Carpenter shop 1,496.06 

Concrete tools 1 13 . 99 

North crusher 2,177 . 25 

Portable crusher 2,749.00 



$2,908,608.00 



2,280.00 



46 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



South crusher 3,969 . 69 

Centre crusher 4,797 . 25 

Forestry 1,556.90 

Garage, autos and trucks 9,299 . 70 

Higways and streets 15,789 . 28 

Hoisting engine 880. 20 

Machlneshop 993.35 

Office 1,020.94 

PaintShop 166.57 

Portable boiler 962 . 50 

Roadroller 10,466.45 

Sewers and drains 572.33 

Stable 28,779.90 

Stationery boiler and engine 3,312 . 62 

Steam drills 2,885.36 

Steam pumps 493 . 50 

168,811.31 

Strekt Lighting Department: 

Lampposts 9,000.00 9,000.00 

Superintendent of Public Buildings : 
Office fixtures, furniture and furn- 
ishings 5,722 . 13 

^ — 5,722.13 

Wharves : 

Land, foot of Hovvland St 7,825.00 

Land, foot of Centre st 500.00 

Rotch Wharf 42,450.00 

S. E. cor. Front and Centre sts... . 2,950.00 
Landandbuilding, FrontandUnion 

Streets 10,300.00 

64,025.00 

Total Valuation $10,030,304.66 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



47 



RECAPITULATION. 



Board of Assessors $ 7,076 . 00 

Board of Health 143,953 . 38 

Cemetery Board 336.462 . 00 

City Auditor ' 2,640 . 00 

City Clerk 7,000.00 

City Messenger 200 . 00 

City Solicitor 1,093.00 

City Treasurer 7,245.00 

City Engineer 13,837 . 84 

Clerk of Committees 2,600.00 

Elections 3,000.00 

Fire Department ' 410,310.00 

Free Public Library 566,675 . 00 

Inspector of Wires 10,470.00 

Licensing Board 1,755.00 

Mayor's Office 4,500 . 00 

New Bedford Industrial Scliool 39,760 . 00 

New Bedford Water Works 3,394,903 . 00 

Park Commissioners 837,125 00 

Police Department 74,203 . 00 

Poor Department 202,500 . 00 

Public Baths 600 . 00 

Public Buildings, Land and Other Property 799,050.00 

Registrars of Voters 4,000 . 00 

School Department 2,908,608.00 

Sealer of Weights' and Measures 2,280 . 00 

Streets and Sewers 168,81 1 .31 

Street Lighting Department 9,000 . 00 

Superintendent of Public Buildings 5,722 . 13 

Wharves 64,025 . 00 

Total valuation $10,030,304.66 



48 AUDITORS REPORT. 



City of New Bedford, 
Office of the City Auditor. 
March 4, 1916. 

The Honorable City Council: 

I respectfully report that I have examined the 
report and investments of the trustees of the Kempton 
fund and find the same correct. Said investments are 
represented by securities having a face value of two 
hundred and fifty-seven thousand dollars, and a savings 
bank deposit amounting to one thousand dollars and 
sixty-three cents. 

I have also examined the report and investments 
of said trustees of the Sylvia Ann Rowland Educational 
and Library Fund, of the George 0. Crocker Library 
Fund, the Charles L, Wood Library Fund, the Oliver 
Crocker Library Fund, the George Rowland, Jr. Library 
Fund, the Charles W. Morgan Library Fund, the James 
B. Congdon Library Fund and the Jonathan Bourne 
Prize Fund, and find the same correct. Said invest- 
ments are represented by securities and deposits of a 
par value of one hundred eighteen thousand four 
hundred fifty-four dollars and forty-five cents. 

EDWARD L. CRONIN, 

City Auditor. 



AUDITOR'S REPORT. 49 



CERTIFICATES. 

We have examined the foregoing report and 
statements of the City Auditor and believe the same 

to be correct. 

EDWARD 0. KNOWLES, 
WILLIAM J. FRANCIS, 
CHARLES L. FISHER, 

Sub-committee of the joint standing committee on 
finance, appointed tp examine the books and accounts 
of the City Treasurer and the City Auditor. 



The foregoing report and statements of the City 
Auditor are approved. 

JOHN H. AINDOW, 
SAMUEL A. GOODFELLOW, 
JOHN T. SLOANE, 
EDWARD T. GLENNON, 
JAMES O'ROURKE, 

Committee on Audit. 



50 AUDITOR'S REPORT. 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 

In Board of Aldermen, 

January 25, 1917. 

Received, ordered printed in the City Documents 

and sent down for concurrence. 

W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 



Concurred. 



In Common Council, 

January 25, 1917. 



CHARLES P. SAWYER, 

Clerk. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



CITY TREASURER 



FOR THE 



Fiscal Year Ending December 4 
1915 




MERCURY PUBLISHING CO., PRINTERS 
New Bedford, Mass. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 

In Board of Aldermen, 

February 10, 1916. 

Received. Ordered printed in the City Documents and 
sent down for concurrence. 

W. H. B. REMINGTON, City Clerk. 



Concurred. 



In Common Council, 
February 10, 1916. 



LILY F. DARCY, Clerk. 

Fro. tcin. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Office of the City Treasurer, 

New Bedford, January 1, 1916. 

To the City Council of the City of New Bedford. 

Gentlemen, — Submitted herewith find the annual re- 
port of this department for tlie year ending December 4, 
1915, as required by the ordinances. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM S. COOK, 

City Treasurer. 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND CASH PAYMENTS 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 1915. 

SUMMARY. 

Cash receipts from revenue 

sources, $3,110,293.13 

Cash receipts from Sinking 

Funds, 110,000.00 

Cash receipts from special 

funds and acounts, 567,174.05 

Cash receipts from revenue 

loans, 2,325,000.00 

Cash receipts from bonds, 737,379.84 



Total cash receipts, $6,849,847.02 

Cash balance December 5, 1914, 161,821.00 



$7,011,668.02 



Cash payments for revenue 

purposes, $2,726,674.55 

Cash payments for special funds 

and accounts, 1,079,340.73 

Cash payments for revenue 

loans, 2,075,000.00 

Cash payments for other loans, 140,000.00 

Cash payments for bonds, 625,316.73 



Total cash payments, $6,646,332.01 

Cash balance December 4, 1915, 365,336.01 



$7,011,668.02 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



CASH RECEIPTS IN DETAIL. 



From Revenue Sources: 



Taxes, 


$2,666,644.83 


Premiums on bonds, 


1,581.66 


Miscellaneous, 


442,066.64 




«o 110 ^1'' 1*^ 




(P0,XXl',^«7O.J-J 


From Special Funds and Accounts: 


Water Works, 


$322,600.21 


Wharves, 


5,447.95 


Cemeteries, sale of lots. 


6,575.00 


Cemeteries, Perpetual Care de- 




posits, 


9,235.00 


Sewer deposits, 


13,106.00 


Highway deposits, 


8,689.16 


Sewer construction, assess- 




ments. 


23,741.83 


Sewer construction, miscellane- 




ous receipts. 


95.85 


Sewage disposal. Chap. 474 of 




1910, 


181.50 


Highways, permanent improve- 




ments, 


11,384.69 


Highways, macadam. 


894.05 


Sales of City property. 


3,993.00 


Katherine Street School, equip- 




ment. 


4.07 


Police signal system. 


95.00 


Purchase street widening. 


2,215.47 


Union street widening, 


70.65 


Purchase street betterments. 


74,188.18 


Union street betterments. 


27,626.92 


Spring street betterments. 


567.58 


State aid. 


11,268.00 


Military aid. 


2,078.50 


Burial of soldiers, 


450.00 


Library Trust funds. Income 




account. 


2,671.08 


School Trust funds. Income 




account. 


2,067.08 


Library, Dog fund. 


2,684.37 


Schools, Dog fund. 


2,698.70 


Trust account, licenses due 




State, 


31,871.50 


Trust account, summonses due 




collectors, 


602.00 


Short and over. 


70.71 




"P'lfi? 17/1 f\'^ 




*p »_) 1,1 t ^ . u o 


From Loans: 




In anticipation of revenue 1914, 


$175,000.00 


In anticipation of revenue 1915, 


2,150,000.00 




$2,325,000.00 



g TREASURER'S REPORT 

From Sinking Funds: 

To pay maturing bonds, $110,000.00 



$110,000.00 



From Bonds: 

Sewers, Chap. 474 of 1910, $285,000.00 

Highway Permanent Improve- 
ment Loan No. 3 of 1914, 20,000.00 

Macadam Loan No. 3 of 1914, 11,000.00 

Highway Extension Loan No. 1 

of 1914, 24,334.68 

Bridge Loan of 1915, 19,425.09 

Highway Permanent Improve- 
ment Loan No. 1 of 1915, 120,000.00 

Macadam Loan No. 1 of 1915. 100,000.00 

Sewer Loan No. 1 of 1915, 30,000.00 

Highway Permanent Improve- 
ment Loan No. 2 of 1915, 60,000.00 

Bridge Loan No. 2 of 1915, 12,000.00 

Highway Extension Loan No. 1 

of 1915, 17,482.75 

Highway Permanent Improve- 
ment Loan No. 3 of 1915, 30,000.00 

Municipal Building Loan No. 1 

of 1915, 8,137.32 



$737,379.84 



Total cash receipts, $6,849,847.02 



CASH PAYMENTS IN DETAIL. 

For Revenue Pui-poses: 

Sundry departments, audits, 

payrolls and advances, $2, 726, 090. 13 

Premiums on bonds, 584.42 



$2,726,674.55 



For Special Funds and Accounts: 

Water Works (not including 

bonds), $301,969.88 

Wharves (not including bonds), 4,713.32 

Cemeteries, sale of lots, 5,524.75 

Cemeteries, Perpetual Care 

deposits, 9,185.00 

Sewer deposits rebated, 11,526.20 

Highway deposits rebated, 8,429.16 

Sewer construction, 59,573.66 

Sewage disposal, Chap. 474 

of 1910, 227,633.82 

Highways, Special Account, 

1913, 1.68 

Highways, permanent improve- 
ments, 200,096.56 

Highways, macadam, 83,715.26 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Purchase street widening, 

Union street widening, 

Spring street widening. 

Land damages, Arlington street, 

Land damages, Cedar Grove 
street. 

Land damages, Cleveland street. 

Land damages. Concord street. 

Land damages, DeWolf street, 

Land damages, Phillips road. 

Land damages. Wood street, 

Parks, Special Account, 1914, 

Bridge, Chap. 53 9 of 1912, 

Turner's Pond bridge. 

New Central Fire Station, 

Fire Department, motor appara- 
tus and equipment, 

Police Signal system, 

Municipal 1)uilding, 

Portable schools, 

Katherine Street School, equip- 
ment. 

High School, furnishings, 

Almshouse alterations, 

Cove road, retaining wall, 

State aid, 

Military aid. 

Burial of soldiers, 

Trust Account, summonses due 
collectors. 

Trust Account, licenses due 
State, 

Pay roll tailings, 

Court judgments. 

Library, Dog fund. 

Schools, Dog fund, 

Library, Kempton fund, 

Library, Trust funds. 

Schools, Trust funds. 

Short and over, 

For Loans: 

Account of Revenue, 1914, 
Account of Revenue, 1915, 
Account of Sewers, Chap. 471 

of 1910, bonds,' 
Account of Highways, Perma- 
nent Improvements bonds. 
Account of Highways, Macadam 
bonds, 

For Bonds: 

Improvement, 

Water, Chap-. 202 of 1909, 



14,332.89 
5,623.16 
1,945.00 
4,934.50 

978.00 

400.00 

4,765.25 

150.00 

1,575.00 

3,525.40 

660.12 

19,425.09 

5,129.53 

16,000.00 

4,150.00 

97.44 

4,435.27 

3,840.00 

243.28 
128.41 
145.00 
606.05 
12,122.00 
1,869.50 
852.00 

564.00 

31,871.50 

2.00 

1,028.26 

2,553.76 

2,965.79 

11,859.15 

4,377.49 

3,704.69 

111.91 



$175,000.00 
1,900,000.00 

100,000.00 

20,000.00 

20,000.00 



$110,000.00 
10,000.00 



$1,079,340.73 



$2,215,000.00 



8 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Water, Chap. G5 of 1911, 
Wharves, Chap. 110 of 1911, 
Library, Chap. 353 of 1907, 
Municipal Building, Chap. 352 

of 1907, 
Coggeshall Street Bridge, 
Taunton bridge. 
High School, Chap. 385 of 1903, 
Katherine Street School, equip- 
ment. 
Schools, Chap. 298 of 1904, 
Schools, Chap. 185 of 1907, 
Schools, Chap. 144 of 1909, 
Schools, Chap. 233 of 1910, 
Schools, Chap. 123 of 1911, 
Sewers, Chap. 184 of 1907, 
Sewers, Chap. 474 of 1910, 
Sewers, Chap. 131 of 1911, 
Sewers, Chap. 76 of 1912, 
Sewers, Chap. 183 of 1913 
Purchase Street Widening, 
Union Street Widening, 
Trust Fund Loan of 1914, 
Municipal Loan No. 1 of 1907, 
Highway Loan of 1908, 
Municipal Loan No. 1 of 1908, 
Municipal Loan No. 2 of 1908, 
Municipal Loan No. 1 of 1909, 
Municipal Loan No. 2 of 1909, 
Municipal Loan No. 1 of 1910, 
Municipal Loan No. 
Municipal Loan No. 
Municipal Loan No. 
Municipal Loan No. 
Municipal Loan No. 
Municipal Loan No. 
Municipal Loan No. 
Municipal Loan No. 
Municipal Loan No. 
Highway Permanent Improve- 
ment Loan No. 2 of 1911, 
Municipal Loan No. 1 of 1912, 
Municipal Loan No. 2 of 1912, 
Municipal Loan No. 3 of 1912, 
Municipal Loan No. 4 of 1912, 
Municipal Loan No. 5 of 1912, 
Municipal Loan No. 6 of 1912, 
Municipal Loan No. 7 of 1912 
Municipal Loan No. 
Municipal Loan No. 
Municipal Loan No. 
Municipal Loan No. 4 of 1913, 
Municipal Loan No. 5 of 1913, 
Municipal Loan No. 6 of 1913, 
Highway Permanent Improve- 
ment Loan of 1914, No. 1, 



of 1910, 

of 1911, 

of 1911. 

of 1911, 

of 1911, 

of 1911, 

of 1911, 

of 1911, 



8 of 1911. 



1 of 1913, 

2 of 1913, 

3 of 1913, 



11,000.00 

3,000.00 

14,000.00 

20,000.00 
5,000.00 
2,000.00 

23,000.00 

1,000.00 

10,000.00 

15,000.00 

10,000.00 
7,000.00 
9,000.00 
9,000.00 

36,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
4,000.00 

20,000.00 
6,000.00 
8,100.00 

23,000.00 
1,000.00 

18,000.00 
1,000.00 

26,000.00 
1,000.00 

21,000.00 
4,000.00 

15,000.00 
4,000.00 
2,000.00 
9,000.00 
2,000.00 
2,000.00 
3,000.00 
5,000.00 

1,000.00 

10,000.00 

14,000.00 

1,000.00 

2,000.00 

3,000.00 

5,000.00 

4,000.00 

25,000.00 

8,000.00 

2,000.00 

12,000.00 

3,000.00 

8,000.00 

13,000.00 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Macadam Loan No. 1 of 1914, 10,000.00 

Sewer Loan No. 1 of 1914, 2,000.00 
Highway Extension Loan No. 1 

of 1914, 3,334.68 
Macadam Loan No. 2 of 1914, 10,000.00 
Macadam Loan No. 3 of 1914, 3,000.00 
Highway Permanent Improve- 
ment Loan No. 3 of 1914, 2,000.00 
Cemetery Loan of 1914, 1,711.05 
Park Loan of 1914, 2,171.00 



$625,316.73 
Total Cash Payments, $6,646,332.01 



We have examined the foregoing and believe the same to 
be correct. 

EDWARD O. KNOWLES, 
CHARLES L. FISHER, 
WILLIAM J. FRANCIS, 

Sub-committee of the Joint Standing Committee on Finance, 
appointed to examine the books and accounts of the City 
Treasurer and City Auditor. 



-.n. TREASURER'S REPORT 



The following table, compiled from previous reports, compares the Assessors' 
valuation of real and personal property, the tax rate, inventory of city property, 
funded water debt, funded debt other than water, and sinking funds, from the 
year 1901 to the year 1915, inclusive: 





Assessors' Net 
Valuation 


Tax 


Inventory 
Of 


Funded 


Other 


Sinking 


Year 


Real & Personal 


Rate 


City Property 


Water Debt 


Funded Debt 


Funds 


1901 


$62,401,390 


$17.40 


$4,887,803 


$1,628,000 


$2,078,000 


$923,838 


1902 


61,964,450 


17.40 


4,954,634 


1,598,000 


2,311,000 


1,044,399 


1903 


62,246,300 


18.00 


5,065,011 


1,568,000 


2,369,000 


1,073,379 


1904 


62,865,476 


19.20 


5,228,788 


1,538,000 


2,570,000 


1,184,665 


1905 


63,951,461 


19.40 


5,440,536 


1,508,000 


2,884,000 


1,352,077 


1906 


65,550,381 


18.40 


5,576,817 


1,478,000 


2,844,000 


1,495,459 


1907 


70,719,086 


17.60 


5,586,995 


1,448,000 


4,129,000 


1,547,871 


1908 


75,505,198 


19.00 


5,777,292 


1,418,000 


4,498,000 


1,661,725 


1909 


77,464,331 


19.00 


6,289,217 


1,388,000 


4,721,581 


1,711,226 


1910 


83,426,001 


19.00 


8,453,894 


1,638,000 


5,494,938 


1,873,676 


1911 


95,511,184 


18.40 


9,512,735 


1,778,000 


6,313,752 


2,035,119 


1912 


101,354,409 


19.30 


10,707,053 


1,923,000 


7,042,077 


1,964,632 


1913 


104,491,928 


20.20 


11,930,480 


1,902,000 


7,420,000 


1,809,453 


1914 


107,829,482 


23.20 


12,722,208 


1,881,000 


8,180,316 


1,948,894 


1915 


111,136,138 


23.00 


13,535,547 


1,860,000 


8,197,045 


2,014,797 



COMPARATIVE TABLE OF DIVISION OF TAX RATE. 

Rate per $1,000 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 

valuation $19-00 $19.00 $19.00 $18.40 $19.30 $20.20 $23.20 $23.00 

Divided as follows: 

State Tax, $1.43 $1.10 $1.41 $1.24 $1.33 $1.81 $1.92 $2.07 

Grade Crossings, .14 .26 .23 .20 .18 .09 .01 .01 

County Tax, 1.26 1.21 1.30 1.15 1.10 1.15 1.13 1.12 

City Purposes, 10.86 11.28 10.50 10.15 10.97 10.44 11.94 11.83 

City Debt, 4.95 4.95 5.27 5.35 5.52 6.49 8.09 7.74 
Armory, .02 

Overlay, .34 .20 .29 .31 .20 .22 J^ ^3 

$19.00 $19.00 $19.00 $18.40 $19.30 $20.20 $23.20 $23.00 



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COLLECTOR'S REPORT 



13 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 



January 1, 1916. 

To the City Council of the City of Neiv Bedford. 

Gentlemen : — In compliance with the ordinance requir- 
ing that the annual report of the Collector of Taxes shall 
be made to the City Council annually in January, I submit 
herewith detailed statements of all collections made during 
the fiscal year ending December 4, 1915, together with a 
statement of taxes remaining unpaid. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM S. COOK, 

Collector of Taxes. 



14 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT 



STATEMENT OF SEAA^R ASSESSMENT. 











Uncollected 










Dec. 4, 


Name 


of Sewer. 


Debits 


Credits. 


1915. 


Rockdale Ave., 




$177.38 


$177.38 




Armour St., 




176.56 


176.56 




Beech St., 




70.07 


70.07 




Brownell St., 




274.65 


274.65 




Oaklawn St., 




1,127.33 


1,127.33 




Rockdale Ave. and Hillman St., 


728.64 


728.64 




Yates St., 




162.32 


162.32 




Brook and Glennon Sts., 


322.02 


322.02 




Bank St., 




230.39 


230.39 




Brock Ave. and Aquidneck St., 


299.30 


299.30 




Calumet St., 




888.48 


888.48 




Chancery St., 




124.24 


124.24 




Kempton St., 




134.12 


134.12 




North St., 




182.04 


182.04 




Sowle St., 




89.66 


89.66 




Aquidneck St., 




293.07 


293.07 




Cedar Grove St., 




159.68 


159.68 




DeWolf St., 




24.86 


24.86 




Potter St., 




359.09 


359.09 




Allen St., 




1,407.45 


605.15 


*$802.30 


Parker, Caroline 


and Durfee Sts., 


3,215.91 


3,215.91 




Richmond, Roswell and Bullock Sts., 


47.66 


47.66 




Rockdale Ave., 




1,052.24 


1,052.24 




Winterville Rd., 




360.91 


360.91 




Armour St., 




275.29 


275.29 




Carroll St., 




130.69 


130.69 




Whitman St., 




132.35 


132.35 




Acorn St., 




115.03 


115.03 




Carroll St., 




148.23 


148.23 




Church St., 




270.95 


92.46 


178.49 


Luke St., 




44.80 


44.80 




Milford St., 




105.83 


105.83 




Mill St., 




57.56 


57.56 




Princeton St., 




43.28 


43.28 




Query St., 




362.44 


108.50 


**253.94 


Sycamore St., 




166.32 


166.32 




Wood St., 




898.41 


898.41 




Harvard St., 




3,068.00 


367.49 


2,700.51 


Middle St., 




190.26 


97.35 


92.91 


Topham St., 




805.92 




805.92 


Topham St., 




536.13 




536.13 


Brook and Query 


Sts., 


1,138.00 


674.71 


***463.29 


Hudson St., 




2,467.37 


1,207.02 


1,260.35 


Vernon St., 




217.65 


217.65 




Garfield St., 




184.61 


170.33 


14.28 


Rotch St., 




204.89 


204.89 




Clinton St., 




780.21 


780.21 




Summer St., 




258.42 


131.72 


126.70 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT 



15 



Central Ave., 
Charles St., 
Ernest St., 
Hemlock St., 
Irvington St., 
Mt. Vernon St., 
Rochambeau St., 
Buchanan St., 
Coggeshall St., 
Lombard St., 
Brook St., 

Totals, $32,961.83 $23,741.83 $9,220.00 

* Assessment against property of City of New Bedford, unpaid. 
** Assessment against property of City of New Bedford, $203.43 unpaid. 
***Assessment against property of City of New Bedford, $409.59 unpaid. 



126.69 


60.45 


66.24 


283.75 


52.78 


230.97 


208.53 


192.76 


15.77 


649.27 


420.68 


228.59 


3,482.20 


3,137.47 


344.73 


285.51 


285.51 




799.37 


599.34 


200.03 


385.17 


209.09 


176.08 


802.54 


802.54 




431.97 


431.97 




996.12 


273.35 


722.77 



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COLLECTOR'S REPORT 



17 



PERCENTAGES OF COLLECTIONS OF WARRANTS FOR 1915 TAXES. 



Real estate. 
Personal estate. 
Polls, 

Totals, 



Assessments. 
$1,598,533.35 
928,087.38 
62,048.00 



Collected 
and Abated. 

$1,418,392.23 

913,291.69 

34,272.00 



Uncollected. 

$180,141.12 
14,795.69 
27,776.00 



Per Cent 
Collected. 

88.73% 
98.40% 
55.23% 



$2,588,668.73 $2,365,955.92 $222,712.81 91.69% 



NATIONAL BANK TAXES IN DETAIL. 



Name of Bank. 
First National, 
Mechanics National, 
Merchants National, 



Due City. Due State. Totals. 

$13,153.20 $16,861.80 $30,015.00 

7,808.51 9,165.49 16,974.00 

13,387.93 18,352.07 31,740.00 



Totals as figured by Assessors, $34,349.64 $44,379.36 $78,729.00 
Added by Tax Commissioner, 1,685.69 

Deduction from City, 1,685.69 



Revised totals. 



$32,663.95 $46,065.05 $78,729.00 



STREET RAILWAY EX<:iSE TAXES IN DETAIL. 



Bay State Street Railway Co., 
Union Street Railway Co., 

Total, 



$2,788.84 
9,998.39 

$12,787.23 



We have examined the foregoing and believe the same to be correct. 

EDWARD O. KNOWLES, 
CHARLES L. FISHER, 
WILLIAM J. FRANCIS, 

Sub-committee of the Joint Standing Committee on P'inance, appointed 
to examine the books and accounts of the City Treasurer, Collector oi 
Taxes, and City Auditor. 



18 



SINKING FUNDS 



REPORT OF THE 
Treasurer of the Sinking Funds. 



City of New Bedford, Mass. 
January 1, 1916. 

To the Commissioners of the Sinking Funds of the City 
of New Bedford. 

Gentlemen : — Herewith find a statement of my accounts 
as Treasurer of the Sinking Funds for the year 1915, to- 
gether with a list of the securities in the fund. 

DR. 

Par value of Sinking Funds investments, close of 

1914, $1,948,894.20 

City of New Bedford, from taxation, 61,513.00 

from water revenue, 27,930.00 

from wharf revenue, 1,061.00 

Premium Account, 13,826.40 

Interest Account, 74,951.8.'5 



$2,128,176.51 



CR. 

Accrued interest on securities purchased, $2,712.39 

Premium on securities purchased, 666.60 

Sinking Fund No. 52, matured July 1, 1915, 110,000.00 
Par value of Sinking" Funds investments, close of 

1915, 2,014,797.52 

$2,128,176.51 



SINKING FUNDS 



19 



INVESTMENT OF NEW BEDFORD SINKING FUNDS, 

1915. 



1916 Jan. 




Maiden, 


4 


$10,000.00 


Mar. 




Fall River, 


4 


5,000.00 


May 




Quincy, 


4 


1,000.00 


July 




New Bedford, 


4 


5,000.00 


Aug. 




Fall River, 


4 


19,000.00 


Oct. 




Framingham, 


4 


5,000.00 


Oct. 




New Bedford, 


4 


9,000.00 

"tp;/! oofl no 


1917 Jan. 




Chicago, 


4 


$25,000.00 


Feb. 




New Bedford, 


4 


21,000.00 


Feb. 




West End St. Ry., 


4 


16,000.00 


Mar. 




New Bedford, 


4 


38,000.00 


Apr. 




Minneapolis, 


4 


36,000.00 


Apr. 




Waltham, 


4 


6,000.00 


May 




Quincy, 


4 


3,000.00 


June 




Albany, 


414 


6,500.00 


June 




Northwestern Union, 


7 


6,000.00 


July 




Milwaukee, 


4 


5,000.00 


July 




New Bedford, 


4 


5,000.00 


July 




Somerville, 


4 


2,000.00 


Aug. 




West End St. Ry., 


5 


50,000.00 


Oct. 




Boston, 


4 


3,000.00 


Oct. 




Gloucester, 


3 1/2 


5,000.00 


Dec. 


If) 


Newport (Note), 


41/2 


8,000.00 

'R''''fi fiAA on 




«p^i>tJ,(IUU.UU 


1918 Feb. 




New Bedford, 


31/2 


$4,000.00 


Apr. 




Pittsburg, 


31/4 


50,000.00 


May 




Quincy, 


3 1/2 


1,000.00 


May 




Quincy, 


4 


3,000.00 


July 




Burlington & Mo. River, 


6 


1,000.00 


July 




New Bedford, 


4 


5,000.00 


Aug. 




Medford, 


4 


30,000.00 


Aug. 




New Britain, 


4 


25,000.00 


Sept. 




Orange, 


4 


3,000.00 


Oct. 




Clinton, 


31/3 


1,000.00 


Oct. 




Wakefield, 


4 


9,000.00 


Nov. 




New York, 


31/2 


14,000.00 

ci/jc 000 on 




fp i ^ , u u u . u u 


1919 Feb. 




New Bedford, 


31/2 


$7,000.00 


May 




Quincy, 


31/2 


1,000.00 


May 




Quincy, 


4 


3,000.00 


July 




Boston, 


31/2 


10,000.00 


Sept. 




Orange, 


4 


3,000.00 


Oct. 




Clinton, 


31/2 


2,000.00 


Oct. 




C, B. & Q., 


4 


6,000.00 


Dec. 




Saginaw, 


4 


10,000.00 




ip^^,UUU.U'' 


1920 May 




Quincy, 


31/2 


$1,000.00 


May 




Quincy, 


4 


3,000.00 


May 




Watertown, 


4 


3,000.00 


June 




New Bedford, 


31/2 


66,000.00 



20 



SINKING FUNDS 



July 




Syracuse, 


3V2 


5,000.00 




Dec. 




Citizens Electric Ry., 


5 


1,000.00 


$79,000.00 






1921 May 




Quincy, 


31/2 


$1,000.00 




May 




Quincy, 


4 


3,000.00 




July 




New Bedford, 


4 


3,000.00 




Oct. 




Clinton, 


^V2 


1,000.00 




Oct. 




Fitchburg, R. R , 


31/2 


15,000.00 




Oct. 




Haverhill, 


4 


20,000.00 




Nov. 




Boston & Maine, 


3y2 


2,000.00 




Dec. 




Middletown, 


3-1/2 


5,000.00 


$50,000.00 






1922 Jan. 




Lynn, 


4 


$5,000.00 




Mar. 




New Bedford, 


3^ 


3,000.00 




Mar. 




Providence, 


4 


8,000.00 




May 




Quincy, 


4 


3,000.00 




June 




Boston, 


3% 


2,000 00 




July 




Barre, 


31^ 


3,000.00 




July 




Prov. & Springfield Ry., 


5 


20,000.00 




Dec. 




Haverhill, 


4 


5,000.00 


$49,000.00 






1923 Jan. 




Chicago, 


4 


$2,000.00 




Feb. 




New Bedford, 


31/2 


3,000.00 




Apr. 




Lynn, 


4 


4,000.00 




Apr. 




Saginaw, 


4 


10,000.00 




May 




Quincy, 


4 


1,000.00 




May 


15 


Newport, 


4 


15,000.00 




Sept. 




Commonwealth of Mass. 


, 3 


5,000.00 




Oct. 




Saginaw, 


4 


10,000.00 




Nov. 




Commonwealth of Mass. 


, 3 1/2 


3,000.00 




Dec. 




Boyer Valley, R. R., 


31/2 


55,000.00 




Dec. 


15 


Brockton, 


4 


1,000.00 


$109,000.00 






1924 Jan. 




Bridgeport, 


4 


$6,000.00 




Jan. 




Chicago, 


4 


3,000.00 




Jan. 




Kansas City, 


4 


34,000.00 




Feb. 




Cambridge, 


4 


4,000.00 




Feb. 




Old Colony R. R., 


4 


6,000.00 




Mar. 




Indianapolis, 


4 


5,000.00 




Apr. 




Brockton, 


4 


7,000.00 




Apr- 




New Bedford, 


4 


4,000.00 




Apr. 




Newton, 


4 


19,000.00 




Apr. 




Woonsocket, 


4 


3,000.00 




May 




Maiden, 


4 


5,000.00 




June 




Minn. & Iowa, R. R., 


31/2 


5,000.00 




June 


30 


Indianapolis, 


4 


5,000.00 




July 




Mil., L. S. & Western, 


6 


3,000,000 




July 




New Britain, 


4 


9,000.00 




Aug. 




Cambridge, 


4 


32,000.00 




Dec. 


15 


New Bedford, 


4 


20,000.00 


$170,000.00 






1925 May 




Kennebec, 


31/2 


$10,000.00 




May 




Maiden, 


4 


20,000.00 




July 




New Bedford, 


4 


5,000.00 





SINKING FUNDS 



21 





July 




New Bedford, 


SVa 


24,000.00 






Aug. 




Troy, 


4 


10,000.00 


$69,000.00 






1926 


Mar. 




Peoria & N. W., 


31/2 


$5,000.00 






Apr. 




New Bedford, 


4 


1,000.00 






July 




Attleboro, 


4 


18,000.00 






Aug. 


ir. 


Chicago & N. W., 


4 


10,000.00 






Sept. 




Boston & Maine, 


4 


• 25,000.00 


$59,000.00 






1927 


Jan. 




New Bedford, 


4 


$9,000.00 






Jan. 




Waltham, 


4 


2,000.00 






Mar. 




Fitchburg R. R., 


4 


5,000.00 






May 




C, B. & Q., 


4 


5,000.00 






May 




New Bedford, 


4 


52,000.00 






May 




Newton, 


4 


16,000.00 


$89,000.00 






1928 


Feb. 




New Bedford, 


31/2 


$3,000.00 






May 




Portland & Ogdensburg, 


41/2 


5,000.00 






July 




Worcester, 


4 


17,000.00 


$25,000.00 






1929 


Feb. 




Mil., L. S. & W., 


5 


$30,000.00 






July 




Amer. Tel. & Tel. Co., 


4 


25,000.00 






Oct. 




Chicago & N. W., 


5 


18,000.00 






Oct. 




Chicago & N. W., 


6 


5,000.00 






Oct. 




St. Louis, 


4 


10,000.00 


$88,000.00 






1930 


Jan. 




Commonwealth of Mass., 


, 3 


$50,000.00 






Mar. 




Brockton, 


3-1/2 


10,000.00 


$60,000.00 






1931 


Nov. 




Commonwealth of Mass., 


, 3 


$25,000.00 


$25,000.00 






1932 


Mar. 




New Bedford, 


31/2 


$3,000.00 






Aug. 




West End St. Ry., 


4 


49,000.00 


$52,000.00 






1933 


May 




Boston & Albany, 


4 


$5,000.00 


$5,000.00 






1934 


Aug. 




Augusta, 


4 


$40,000.00 


$40,000.00 






1935 


Mar. 




Westerley, 


31/2 


$8,000.00 






Apr. 




Northern Maine Seaport, 


, 5 


35,000.00 






May 




Boston Elevated, 


4 


25,000.00 






July 




South Norwalk, 


4 


3,000.00 






Sept. 




South Norwalk, 


4 


5,000.00 


$76,000.00 






1938 


July 




Kalamazoo, Al. & G. R., 


.5 


$4,000.00 






Dec. 




Stamford, 


4 


5,000.00 


$9,000.00 






1940 


July 




Erie & Pittsburg, 


31/2 


$50,000.00 


$50,000.00 






1942 


May 




Quincy, 


31/2 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 






1943 


Jan. 




Bangor & Aroostook, 


5 


$29,000.00 


$29,000.00 






1944 


Jan. 




Boston & Maine, 


41/2 


$5,000.00 





22 



SINKING FUNDS 



1945 July 1 New England R. R., 4 $13,000.00 



1946 July 1 Boston Terminal, 4 $20,000.00 



1949 July 1 C, B. & Q., 3 1,^ $36,000.00 

July 1 C, B. & Q., 4 39,000.00 



1951 Aug. 1 Illinois Central, 3 $25,000.00 

Sept. 1 Michigan Central, Zy^ 12,000.00 



1952 May 1 Michigan Central, 3 V2 $30,000.00 



1953 July 1 Illinois Central, 31/2 $22,000.00 



Mar. 1 St. Johnsbury & L. 

Champlain, 5 11,000.00 

$16,000.00 

$13,000.00 

$20,000.00 

$75,000.00 

$37,000.00 
$30,000.00 
$22,000.00 

$66,000.00 

$53,000.00 

$25,000.00 

$5,000.00 

$10,000.00 

Total $1,983,500.00 

Savings Bank Deposits 9,370.52 

Cash on Deposit 21,927.00 



1954 Jan. 1 Washington Co. R. R., 31/2 $16,000.00 

Apr. 1 N. Y., N. H. & H., 3 Vz 11,000.00 

May 1 N. Y., N. H. & H., 4 35,000.00 

May 1 Naugatuck R. R., 4 4,000.00 



1955 July 1 N. Y., N. H. & H., 4 $53,000.00 



1956 May 1 N. Y., N. H. & H., 4 $25,000.00 



1957 Jan. 1 New Bedford, 4 $5,000.00 



1958 Mar. 1 C, B. & Q., 4 $10,000.00 



Securities at Par, close of 1915 $2,014,797.52 

Respectfully sulimitted, 

WM. S COOK, 

Treasurer. 



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SINKING FUNDS 



23 



REPORT OF THE 
Commissioners of the Sinking Funds. 



City of New Bedford, 
March 9, 1916. 

To the City Council of the City of New Bedford, Mass. 

Gentleineii : — At a meeting of the Commissioners of the 
Sinking Funds of the City of New Bedford, hekl at this 
date, it was 

Voted : — To adopt the foregoing statement of the Treas- 
urer of the Sinking Funds as the report of the Connnis- 
sioners of the Sinking Funds of the City of New Bedford, 
required by the Statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts to be made annually to the City Council. 

WM. A. MACKIE, 
CHAS. S. KELLEY, JR., 

Commissioners of the Sinking Funds. 



24 SINKING FUNDS 



JxVMES P. Francis, 
Certified Public Accountant. 

Masonic Building. New Bedford, j\Iass. 

March 88, 1916. 

William A. Mackic, Esq. ) Commissioners of the 

John T. Billiard, M. D. \ New Bedford 

Charles 8. Kcllcy, Esq. \ Sinking Funds. 

Dear Sirs: — I have finished my examination of the 
books and accounts of the Treasurer of the Sinking Funds 
for the year ending December 31, 1915, and hereby certify 
tliat they are correct. I have also examined the securities 
representing the investments, and have found them as 
stated in his report. 

Yours very truly, 

JAMES P. FRANCIS, 

Certified Public Accountant. 



KEMPTON FUND 



25 



New Bedford, Mass., 

January 1, 1916. 

To ike City Council of the City of Xew Bedford: 

The Trustees of the Kempton Fund herewith submit 
the following as their Eighth Annual 

REPORT. 

During the past year there has been no change of the 
securities in which the fund of the Kempton Trust, the 
Gift of Sarah E. Potter, of $250,000.00 is invested. 

Under the provisions of City Ordinances approved by 
the Mayor February 26, 1914, and March 12, 1914, the 
Trustees of the Kempton Fund are also charged with 
the management, direction and control of the investment 
of the following trusts, viz : 

Sylvia Ann Rowland Educational and Library 

" Fund, $100,000.00 

George 0. Crocker Library Fund, 10,000.00 

Charles L. Wood Library Fund, 2,000.00 

Oliver Crocker Library Fund, 1,000.00 

George Howland, Jr. Library Fund, 1,600.00 

Charles W. IMorgan Library Fund, 1,000.00 

James B. Congdon Library Fund, 500.00 

Jonathan Bourne School Fund, 1,000.00 

The gross amount of income which has been received 
by the Trustees is $15,508.16, and this amount less $15.00 
expended by the Trustees for rental of safe deposit box at 
the Mechanics National Bank, has been paid to the City 
Treasurer, as provided in the several Trusts and the City 
Ordinances. 

FREDERIC TABER, 
ABBOTT P. SMITH. 
THOMAS S. HATHAWAY, 

Trustees. 



26 



TRUST FUNDS 



SYLVIA ANN HOWIJI^ND EDUCATIONAL AND LIBRARY 

FUND. 

Annual 
Income 
$2,000.00 



Par Value Cost 
$50,000.00 State of California, $48,646.80 
25,000.00 City of New Bed- 
ford, 25,000.00 
1,000.00 City of Brockton, 998.75 
25,000.00 City of Marlboro, 25,000.00 
354.45 N. B. Inst, for Sav- 
ings Deposit, 3 54.45 



Rate 

4% 

4% 
4% 
4% 

4% 



GEORGE O. CROCIiER LIBRARY FUND. 

Par Value Cost Rate 

$10,000.00 City of Providence, $10,000.00 4% 



1,000.00 

40.00 

1,000.00 

14.16 



Annual 
Income 
$400.00 



CHARLES L. WOOD LIBRARY FUND. 

Cost Rate 

$2,000 4% 

OLIVER CROCKER LIBRARY FUND. 

Cost Rate 

4% 

GEORGE ROWLAND, JR., LIBRARY FUND. 

Cost Rate 

$1,600.00 4% 
CHARLES W. MORGAN LIBRARY FUND. 
Cost Rate 

$1,000.00 4% 
JAMES B. CONGDON LIBRARY FUND. 
Cost Rate 

$500.00 4% 
JONATHAN BOURNE SCHOOL FUND. 
Cost Rate 

4% 



Par Value 
$2,000.00 N. B. Inst, for Sav 
ings Deposit, 



Par Value 
$1,000.00 N. B. Inst, for Sav- 
ings Deposit, $1,000.00 



Par Value 
$1,600.00 N. B. Inst, for Sav 
ings Deposit, 



Par Value 
$1,000.00 N. B. Inst, for Sav 
ings Deposit, 



$500.00 N. B. Inst, for Sav 
ings Deposit, 



"Pit* "VjiIu^ 
$1,000.00 N. B. Inst, for Sav- 
ings Deposit, $1,000.00 



Annual 
Income 

$80.00 



Annual 
Income 

$40.00 



Annual 
Income 

$64.00 



Annual 
Income 

$40.00 



Annual 
Income 

$20.00 



Annual 
Income 

$40.00 



Twenty-Third Annual Report 



OF THE 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD 



BY THE 



CITY ENGINEER 



FOR THE YEAR 1915 



new bedford 

The a. E. Coffin Press, Printers 

1916 



NEW BEDFORD 

December 4, 1915- 

Set off from Dartmouth 1787 

Incorporated as a city 1 847 

Area — Land .... 12,206 acres 
Ponds.... 200 " 

Land and ponds 12,406 acres - 1Q.39 sq. miles 

Tidal waters 8,467 " 

20,873 '• -32.614" " 

Length 10.78 miles 

Breadth (maximum) 3.10 

Population (estimated) 111,000 

Valuation $1 1 1,346 538 

Valuation per capita $1,003.12 

Accepted streets 186.60 

Bridges (3) 0.796 miles in New Bedford 

Sewers, exclusive of intercepting 119,909 miles 

Length of Intercepting Sewer constructed : 

Outfall 0.626 miles 

Interceptor 5-688 " 



ENGINEER'S REPORT 



City of New Bedford, 

Engineering Department, 

January 1, 1916. 

To the City Council of the City of New Bedford : 

Gentlemen: — In compliance with section 5 of the 
ordinance defining the duties of the City Engineer, I 
respectfully submit the following report of the expenses 
and operations of the Engineering Department for the 
year ending December 4, 1915. 

EXPENDITURES. 

Salaries and pay rolls $18,282.44 

Telephone 76.94 

Local transportation 701.18 

Drawing supplies. 157.55 

Blueprint materials 177.93 

Printing, stationery, advertising, etc .... 229.77 

Sundry supplies 116.55 

Office furniture and repairs 43.45 

Platting system expenses 102.10 

General instruments for office and field 313.11 

Traveling expenses, express, postage, etc. 109 56 

Printing annual report 48 00 

Public statutes and reference books. . . 13.75 

Meteorological instruments 59 56 

Boundstones 3.15 

Sundry labor not in pay roll. ^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^ 

Balance 16-29 

$20,500.00 
RECEIPTS. 

Appropriation, regular $19,000.00 

special : 1,500.00 

^ $20,500.00 

EXPENDITURES. 
Gross $20,483.71 

RECEIPTS. 
By credit to Miscellaneous Revenue of 1915 : 

Cash from sale of blueprints, print- 
ing materials and maps $531.64 

Plans of poles and conduits under Section 

12, Chapter 335 of Acts of 1914 . 513. 30 

$1,044.94 

Net expenditures 19,438.77 

$20,483.71 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



The usual Avork of the department has been carried 
out during the year, the nature and cost of which is 
clearly set forth in the table of general classification of 
work. 

The Board of Aldermen this year renewed the prac- 
tice of referring all street matters to the Committee on 
Streets, and estimates of the cost on all work considered 
have been furnished that committee by this department. 

The Street Department has purchased equipment 
this year for doing all permanent street surfacing 
formerly done by contract. This has required more time 
from this department than heretofore in giving lines and 
grades in detail. 

In the following pages I have attempted to give a 
general review of the work done during the year, to- 
gether with some suggestions for the future. 

SEWERS. 

There has been a great falling off in the amount of 
sewer construction during the last two years, altliough 
the number of new dwellings for the corresponding period 
has shown only a slight decrease. This is plainly shown 
in the following table : 

Expended for Sewers. New Dwellings. New Tenements. 

639 1812 

485 1117 

379 896 

425 820 

406 808 

383 699 

As practically all the sewers petitioned for have been 
granted, this would seem to indicate that nearly all the 
sewers needed had been built in the district where the 
bulk of construction is now in progress. 

It now becomes a cpiestion of judgment as to the best 
policy to pursue in the construction of trunk sewers into 
new and undeveloped country. It would seem better to 



1910 


$99,137.05 


1911 


80,696.47 


1912 


165,658.60 


1913 


223,452.18 


1914 


66.694.96 


1915 


72,129.75 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



do some of the work on the trunk sewers in advance of 
the demand rather than be forced to construct them at 
the same time that we do the laterals and thus bring an 
excessive expense in one year, as in 1913, when nearly a 
quarter of a million dollars was expended on sewer con- 
struction. 

The section of the city north of Brooklawn Park and 
east of Bowditch street is provided with the sanitary 
sewers of a separate system, and many houses of a good 
class have already been built in this location. There is 
at present absolutely no provision for the drainage of tlie 
surface water from this entire district, and in the case of 
Hersom street not even the sanitary servers have yet been 
built. Numerous petitions have been received for relief 
from these conditions, and it would seem that the most 
urgent need for sewer extensions for the next year is in 
this district. 

The relief for this condition lies in the acceptance of. 
several streets, as approved by the Board of Survey this 
year, and the construction of a large surface water sewer 
and sanitary sewer to extend as far as Belleville avenue 
at least, where the sewage can be cared for in the Belle- 
ville avenue sewer, which is soon to be connected with the 
intercepting sewer system. All of this sewage will require 
pumping and ought on that account to be kept as free as 
possible from storm water. The surface water drain, 
which will follow closely the present water course, can 
drain, for some time to come, through the brook which 
lies in this valley from Belleville avenue to the river. 

Perhaps the next section in importance is that lying 
west of Bowditch street, from Query street northerly. 
There is a summit about 450 feet west of Bowditch street 
which prevents the drainage of property west of that 
point through the sewers to the river. The natural 
drainage is to the swamp and brook near Church street. 
Considerable building west of this summit has already 
been done, and numerous petitions have been received for 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



sewers that could not be provided. This situation will be 
relieved by the construction of the sewer and surface 
water drain which now ends at the brook in Query street, 
followed by the construction of the lateral sewers as peti- 
tioned for. 

The former owners of the Oneko ]\Iill property set 
great value on a small pond fed by the above mentioned 
brook, which lies between Bowditch street and the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, and were insistent 
upon its preservation for their use. The result has been 
that where the brook formerly Howed through a marshy 
district with a dense growth of wood and underbrush, 
there are today houses, streets and catch basins ; and a 
surface drain 36 inches in diameter replacing the brook. 
Below the mill property the valley of the brook has been 
entirely built up, and the brook cut otf except for such 
outlet as it has into small sewers in the vicinity of the 
mill. The resultant quick rush of storm water, together 
with the restriction of its means of outlet, has caused flood 
conditions on the mill property. 

The new owner of the mill is as anxious to be rid of 
the water as the former owners to conserve it. If the city 
is to furnish such relief, a preliminary study of the case 
indicates that the best method will be by the construction 
of a new sewer connecting with the Sawyer street sewer 
and extending from Sawyer street through Purchase and 
Deane streets to Brook street and diverting the flow of the 
surface water drain at this point. 

Another section which will require a trunk sewer 
before it can be built on lies north of Maxfield street and 
west of Liberty. A large part of this land is now on the 
market, but as yet much filling is to be done. This section 
can be drained by an extension of the Tripp 's brook relief 
sewer which now terminates at Kempton street. 

The main system for the relief of the Shawmut avenue 
valley has not been completed and the portion already 
built, while doing good service in the removal of ground 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



water and providing dry cellars for the Topham street 
neighborhood, cannot be utilized for the removal of 
sewage until after the completion of the entire system. 

Acushnet avenue, north of Balls Corner, lies on a 
ridge, and it will be necessary, in the near future, to care 
for this district by the construction of servers both east 
and west of the avenue. This district is nearly all divided 
l)y streets and cut into house lots, and many buildings 
have been erected. This section will be a very expensive 
one to drain and will require foresight to secure streets 
located in the proper place to prevent excessive cost for 
damages. 

All schedules for sewer assessments this year have 
been prepared in accordance with the order passed by the 
Board of Aldermen, December 10, 1914, the object of 
which was to equalize • the assessments paid for sewer 
benefits. 

The method seems to be entirely successful as there 
have been no excessive charges. The sewers built this year 
have been in the class calling for the maximum assessment 
of 75% of the cost of the sewer, yet the average cost for 
the drainage of a 50-foot lot has been only $37.13 this 
year, and of a 40-foot lot only $29,704. 

In accordance with Chapter 227 of the Acts of 1915. 
assessment plans and schedules have been made for the 
purpose of recording in the Registry of Deeds. The Act 
requires that the plans shall be made to show the lots as 
they existed on April first previous to the completion of 
work, while the description is required of metes and 
bounds as they exist at the time the assessment is made. 
As an interval of two years is possible between these 
events, some of the plans do not bear any resemblance to 
the lots described. This is sure to be very confusing and 
I feel that this section should be amended in such manner 
as to cause the plans and descriptions to be of one date, 
and that date preferably that on which the sewer was 
ordered and an incumbrance really placed on the land. 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



Work on the intercepting sewer has progressed con- 
tinuously through the year and at the present time the 
flow of all sewage has been intercepted from the upper 
part of Clarks Cove and from that part of the city lying 
west of Second street, Water street, and Acushnet avenue 
as far north as Logan street. The details of this work, 
together with the costs, are given fully in the report of 
William F. Williams, Consulting Engineer, which is made 
a part of this report. 

CITY PLANNING AND STREET WORK. 

Under this heading much is being written today, and 
a city planning board seems to be considered the modern 
cure-all for the various problems confronting cities. It 
is true that the only way to secure the best results from 
large expenditures for streets is by following out a care- 
fully studied and prepared system, which will approach 
the ideal as near as possible within the limit of funds 
available and taking into account also existing conditions. 
The mere creation of a planning board does not secure 
this, but too often. I think, results in the appointment of 
new commissions having jurisdiction over the same sub- 
jects already under the management of other authorities 
and with almost unlimited powers to recommend but not 
to execute. This is sure to lead to conflict of authority and 
unsatisfactory results. 

The Board of Survey of this city was established by 
law with the idea in view of avoiding some of these diffi- 
culties by constituting the Board of Mayor and Aldermen 
to act as a board of survey or planning board ; thus those 
authorities having the consideration of the acceptance of 
streets and the providing for the cost of construction of 
the same have also to consider the planning for the future. 
Under this act the City Clerk has the custody of all 
records and plans belonging to this board as well as the 
acceptance plans ; also the same engineer who has charge 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



of the layout work makes the studies and plans for ex- 
tensions and projected sewer systems for the same, de 
signed to harmonize with present conditions. 

This Board of Survey has now been in operation more 
than a year. During this time it has passed on eight plans 
submitted by real estate owners and has projected three 
plans on its own initiative. These plans cover 17.77 miles 
of streets and their final adoption was without opposition 
of any owner or abutter. 

It is proposed this winter to make surveys, take 
levels, etc., as far as possible, in the undeveloped districts 
of the citj^ with the ultimate object of making a compre- 
hensive plan whereby the future locations of streets 
throughout the city can be determined. 

In May of this year, a committee made a study for 
the development of heavy traffic streets. At the south 
end it was decided to extend the block paving laid last 
year in Front street from Gifford to Potomska streets 
northerly to Rowland street, and at the north end to pave 
Cedar Grove street from Front street to Belleville avenue, 
and Belleville avenue from Cedar Grove street to Belle- 
ville road. This will eventually give a wide, level street 
through the heart of the manufacturing section of the 
north end from the center of the city to Tarkiln Hill road. 

During the year, 2.037 miles of streets have been 
accepted, making the total length of accepted streets at 
the present time 186.6 miles. Four streets have been 
widened and the lines of one altered. On two streets the 
grade has been changed and on West French avenue a 
plan establishing the grade and method of developing the 
street as a boulevard was accepted. 

This latter plan provides for a 24-foot roadway, so 
arranged as to be readily widened when necessary, two 
sidewalks and three grass and tree spaces. The outer 
grass plot, 14 feet in width, is in full view of the cove. 
on the shore of which the city owns practically the entire 
frontage. A large portion of the shore is now under the 



xo 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



.jurisdietiou of the Park Board. With its exceptionally 
tine location and arrangement, this street should provide 
a magnificent parkway for the future. It ought, however, 
to be constructed as soon as possible as it is now nearly 
impassable. Also trees of a suitable species to withstand 
the exposed situation near the salt water should be set out. 

Five streets, which have presented a difficult problem 
for solution for several years have been accepted, viz. . 
Arlington and Concord streets, across land which was sold 
in house lots and lying between Acushnet avenue and 
Bowditch streets where the leng-th of the blocks was over 
2,000 feet, these streets ' dividing the distance approxi- 
mately into thirds- Elm street, from Reed street to Rock- 
dale avenue, where the original owner had reserved to 
himself a strip of land 40 feet wide in line of Elm street 
to the east, and parties buying adjacent lots had built 
houses fronting on this land, thinking it a street ; Maple- 
view terrace, from Tremont street west as far as thrown 
out; and Wood street, from Acushnet avenue to Belleville 
avenue. 

On the latter street there still remains an entire block 
to be accepted before there is a direct connection from 
Acushnet avenue to the new bridge across the Acushnet 
river. 

Of the above, Arlington, Concord and Elm streets 
were accepted under the provision of law authorizing the 
assessment of betterments. 

On October 29, 1915, Union street, from Front street 
to Acushnet avenue, was widened fourteen feet on the 
south side, making a continuation of the work already 
completed from Acushnet avenue to Sixth street. 

A conference was held with President Elliot, of the 
N. Y., N. H. & H. Railroad, at which the probability of 
the location of the passenger station at the foot of Union 
street was discussed. Mr. Elliot admitted the general 
desirability of this location. The question is complicated, 
however, with the problem of handling the boat freight 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. H 

and the storage of necessary cars in a cramped place. In 
an undertaking of this magnitude careful study must be 
given to be sure that the changes proposed will give ample 
accommodation for fifty years or more, otherwise the ex- 
penditure would be unwarranted. This department has 
submitted plaiLS, sketches and data of various kinds, and 
the engineers of the railroad are now giving the matter 
a thorough study. 

The construction work of the Union and Purchase 
street widenings, made in 1913, was fully completed in 
June and a portion df the cost of the same assessed upon 
the. abutters and on the Union Street Railwa^^ The latter 
has contested the payment and taken its claim to the 
Supreme Ck)urt where it will be necessary for the City 
to contest the case. The amount of money involved is 
$139,000. 

The old stone causeway across Turner's Pond was torn 
down and rebuilt this year at a cost of about $6,500. The 
old structure was rapidly falling to pieces and had become 
dang-erous. The roadway was widened to 30 feet on the 
top with side slopes of 2 to 1, paved with large stones from 
the old wall up to a point about two feet above the spill- 
way at the dam at Turner's Mill. The culvert was con- 
structed of reinforced concrete with side walls supporting 
reinforced concrete slabs. The opening is about 5 by 10 
feet and is smooth and free from obstructions. This gives 
a considerable increase of capacity over the other culvert. 

PLATTING SYSTEM. 

The following is a record of conveyance of real estate 
copied at the Registry of Deeds, at New Bedford, and re- 
ported to the Board of Assessors each month by this de- 
partment. 



12 ENGINEER'S REPORf. 



TRANSFERS. 

December, 1914 114 

January, 1915 122 

February, " 106 

March, " 198 

April, " 165 

May, " 169 

June, " 194 

July, " 215 

August, " 218 

September, " 189 

October, " 190 

November, " 114 



Total 1,991 

Two full sets of blue prints of the plats, 159 in num- 
ber, are furnished the Board of Assessors in April of each 
year. These plats and indexes in this and the Assessors' 
office are corrected to date each day. 

During the year the records of 188 estates have been 
looked up in the Probate Court at Taunton and the changes 
in ownership reported to the Assessors. 

Thirteen new tracings of plats have been made to 
replace old tracings, and one entirely new plat has been 
made to take care of a cut-up in the farming district. 

December 1, 1915, there were 39,681 lots shown on 
the plats. 

Sewers have been shoAvn on all the plats. 



METEOROLOGICAL RECORDS. 

Our meteorological records this year show maximums 
in several cases. 

On January 12 and 13 a heavy storm with snow 
occurred in which the wind velocity was 90 miles — the 
highest that we have ever recorded. 

On June 18 a rainfall occurred which lasted for 36 
minutes with a total precipitation of .68 of an inch. The 
maximum rate was 4.32 inches per hour for 6 minutes, 
and a rate of 2.12 per hour prevailed for 17 minutes. 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 13 

On June 26 there was a thunder storm lasting one 
hour with a total precipitation of .85 of an inch and a 
maximum of 6 inches per hour for 6 minutes. This is 
the maximum rate we have ever recorded. The highest 
rate fortunately occurred at the beginning of the storm. 
The dry streets, by retarding the rush of water to the 
sewers, prevented serious flooding. As we use a rainfall 
of 1^ inches per hour in estimating sewers, this record 
gives cause for thought. 

On December 26, with a gale of 60 miles per hour, 
which shifted from southwest to northwest, the high tide 
was 2.7 above and the low tide 7.85 below mean high 
w^ater. This is a range of tide 10.55 feet in one day and 
is the lowest low tide we have ever recorded. The New 
Bedford Gas & Edison Light Company and tlie Union 
Street Railway Company were obliged to sliut down their 
power plants. If this tide had occurred on a week day, 
all the mills depending on the river for their condense 
water would probably have been unable to run during 
the time of the extreme low tide. 



POLES AND WIRES. 

Under Chapter 335 of the Acts of 191-i, all poles, con- 
duits, manlioles. etc., of the wire using companies were 
located, and sectional maps, similar to those used for the 
assessment plans, have been-, made covering that part 
of the city designated in the act. These give, in addition 
to the above information, lot frontages and a designating 
number corresponding to the assessment plan in order 
that the OAvners of abutting property on any street may 
be readily determined by reference to the assessment 
index. 

These plans are corrected constantly for all changes 
and additions and a set of blueprints from them furnished 
to the Inspector of Wires each year. 



14 ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



The work was done by this department during the 
winter months without the employment of additional 
help, one half of the cost being borne by the public ser- 
vice corporations in accordance with the Act. 

In January the committee specified in the Act met 
and recommended the removal of wires from one mile of 
streets, the section selected being directly west of the 
business center of the city. The Board of Aldermen 
ordered this work done and the various companies com- 
pleted the removal before the end of the year. 

The assistants who have been employed in this de- 
partment during the yar are : 

Assistant Engineer — Leonard J. Hathaway. Jr. 

Field — Arthur C. Kirby. Elmer L. Deane, Edward F. 
Mulally, Walter E. Wilson. *Ellsworth B. Tolman, Manuel 
M. Enos, James M. Hayes, Randall S. Coe, *Walter Mar- 
tin, Merton J. Batchelder. 

Office— Clifford L. Wade. Paul G. Covill. Benjamin F. 
Howe, Wilfred T. Fahey. 

Plotting system — Edward ]\I. Slocum and Norman 
Barstow. 

Clerks — Jessie Loughlin and JMarion L. Clarke. 

*Part of the year. 



Respectfully submitted-, 



GEORGE H. NYE, 

City Engineer. 



GENERAL CLASSIFICATION OF WORK. 

City Government and Committees : 

Court and hearing plans, etc 

Sewer investigation 

Sewer assessments 

Street layouts 

Wharf and harbor work 

Miscellaneous 

Assessors : 

Records, plans, surveys 

Cemeteries : 

Surveys, lines, grades, records, plans, etc 

I ngineering Department : 

Levels, profiles, etc. for establishing grades of streets 

Boundstones and benchmarks 

Blue printing 

Clerical work 

Drain records 

Meteorological instruments 

Miscellaneous 

Office records, plans, indexing 

Street numbering 

Vacations and legal holidays 

I ire department : 

Miscellaneous 

Health Department : 

Miscellaneous 

Inspector of Buildings : 

Lines and grades for private buildings 

Lines and grades for public buildings 

Inspector of Wires : 

Investigation, abutters, etc. on pole and conduit petitions 

Pole plansin accordance with Sec. 12, Chap. 335 of the Acts of 1914 
Park Department : 

Parks, playgrounds, — -surveys, lines, grades, plans 

School Department: 

Miscellaneous 

Street Department : 

Catch Basins, culverts, eyeholes, etc 

Drains, — locations, grades, etc 

Sewer construction, — ^lines and grades: manholes 

Street construction, lines, grades, etc 

Street construction, — measurement of new work 

Miscellaneous 

Water Works : 

Lines, grades, plans, etc 

Public Service Corporations : 

Lines, grades, plans, etc 

Private Parties : 

Information for grade of buildings 

Private Work: 

Lines, grades, plans, etc 

Board of Survey : 

Surveys, levels and plans 

Totals 

Administration 



ASSISTANTS' TIME AND COST. 



Time 


Office. 

Cost 


Time 


Field 

Cost 


Total Cost 


362 
371 
112 
888 
19 
95 


$ 193.78 

214.45 

61.59 

479.00 

10.26 

53.24 


1,229 
274 

542 
168 
179 


$386.82 
86.63 

166.38 
47.68 
66.84 


$ 580.60 

301.08 

61.59 

645.38 

57.94 

120.08 


$1,766.67 


4,386 


2,392.10 


209 


55.84 


2,447.94 


2,447.94 


97 


64.75 


177 


58.06 


122.81 


122.81 


16 

26 

1,722 

3,106 

889 

735 

2,373 

1,438 

154 

2,676 


8.08 

11.44 

451.04 

1,095.70 

287.35 

251.93 

970.24 

627.83 

35.97 

1,006.49 


12 
1,004 

9 

67 

28 

529 


3.02 
320.57 

3.24 

24.70 

6.91 

114.27 


11.10 
332.01 
451.04 

1,095.70 
290.59 
251.93 
994.94 
634.74 
150.24 

1,006.49 


5,218.78 


11 


4.28 






4.28 


4.28 


3 


1.73 


4 


2.55 


4.28 


4.28 


140 
1 


60.79 

.77 


1,899 
9 


612.54 
3.21 


673.33 
3.98 


677.31 


90 
604 


42.89 
220.78 


402 


108.20 


42.89 
328.98 


371.87 


3 


1.27 


20 


5.08 


6.35 


6.35 


4 


3.07 






3.07 


3.07 


6 

4 

139 

292 

1.004 

124 


4.27 

1.69 

88.24 

183.34 

325.80 

48.56 


390 

402 

761 

4,886 

2,217 

20 


157.14 
107.47 
331.10 
1,765.54 
495.86 
6.66 


161.41 
109.16 
419.34 
1,948.88 
821.66 
55.22 


3,515.67 


356 


158.03 


699 


200.47 


358.50 


358.50 


143 


107.85 


70? 


293.07 


400.92 


400.92 


29 


18.95 


46 


21.02 


39.97 


39.97 


22 


13.83 


94 


33.32 


47.15 


47.15 


676 


389.94 


1,394 


406.93 


796.87 


796.87 


23,116 


$9,891.32 
2,500.00 

$12,391.32 


18,379 


$5,891.12 
$5,891.12 




$15,782.44 
2,500.00 


23,116 


18,379 


$18,282.44 



(15) 



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17 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 







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CITY OFNEW BEDFORD DETAILS OF SE.WERS CONSTRUCTED IN 1915 — COMPILED BY EINGINEERING DEIRARTMENT 













VITRIFIEID 




PIPE! 








«l 

5| 


S 

t J 


1 


1 
1 


Ledge 


l^lu 
of 


Character 

of 
Excavcrtion 


1 
S 

2 




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el 


° 1 
2 


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!2 




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1 


X 


X 

1 


1 


i 


11 


COMBINELD SYSTEIM 


BUCHANAN 

CAROLINE 

COGGESHALI 

DAVID 

FLORENCE 






389 
462 
755 
























38S 
462 
755 
218 
462 
53 1 
117 
553 
242 
230 
630 
553 
205 
2240 


1107 725 
1058 782 
357 790 
800520 
8.17 7.75 
874686 
II 48 1049 
&68 71 a 
347 8,74 
956 872 
991866 
1038 840 
698 642 
1685 640 


34 
79 


418 
468 
773 
147 
464 
674 
165 
515 
274 
327 

nil 

602 

195 

7892 


Gravel 

Gravel 

Gravel 
Sand 

Grovel 
Filled land-ledge 

Gravel 
Dry gravel 

Gravel 

Gravel 
Riled land 
Dry gravel 

Gravel 
Wet gravel 


1 
1 
2 

1 
4 

1 
1 
1 

2 
1 

2 
12 


57883 1.49 
557.21 1.21 
123 13d 1.63 

l6Sia077 

65860 1,43 

3l3i34 590 








Dec 21914 
Iui.i30i.qi.s 




1 PIQIS 




























17344 73065! 158 




Myrtle toMtPleasant 


— 
























373711 l60507'2l3bec2.l8l4Decll.!9l4t)ec3U9l4 
393851 562.l3 258f>jnelOI9ISJuneiaiS15^2SI9l5 
2477 1 i 3065 1 ; 1,96 JulyJCISIS Aus23)8l5Sept4t3IS 

27 1482! 5348 161 1,0 lUuiydQIQISAujZllSIsi 

7856 372! 031 8Apr22JSI5^pr?9l9l5M») 6I9IS 
17737 67462; l,22kJols3QI9l5Ajg 6.l9ISAug27l9l5 
1 2270 57595i23aDecE3l9l^bec30l9MJanl6l9l5 
1 234 1 433flfi' 1 50Sepra.lSI5lSeptni3«)ct.l9l8IS 

276585 578 1 42 9 1 eJulij3(!ISI5SeptS4l9iaJov.Zai9!5 

1 8368 80207| l.45UuneiaiSI5y<jlal2l9l5U'la24l9IS 

53732i Novll,l9l5Novl2I9SNov27l9l5t 

978a4lb438977J63^Au924l9M!Septl4ISMAj9ll,l9l5 


216 
268 




























184 






































531 












117 
4ZS 

290 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


~ 


— 


— 


2935^251 


OUNIOR 

LOMBARD 

MAPLE 

ORCHARD 

PALMER 




125 
E4Z 


49665 080 
45325 1.87 
31043 1.07 

301357^479 
SIS3ai.l2 
5373 2[ 

J4600.36lll.28 




— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


::] 


— 


— 
















30 
185 








600 


ZIIO 




252 


301 


— 


— 


90 


— 


— 


20 

40 


— 


::: 




Spring to School 

In Chancery, Union. Newton. Elm andLibertij„ 


TRIPp's BROOK. RELIEF. 




Combined System TbtaU 


619 


HAZ 


486 


194 


SO 




2IS 




60 




531 


600bl0J7647 






1 73I4025 




30 


S67I335 




7336625404997 








SEIPARATE SYSTE.M 


























































AQUIDNECK 

AQUIDNECK ^SJi 

BROOK__ 

BROOK 




400 


408 
181 
SIS 
SIS 
122 
52S 
440 


48 
80 






















8S6 
26 1 
519 
519 

2305 
529 
440 
260 

1353 
266 
290 
251 
176 


1030 973 
823620 

964 853 

1133 703 
766 704 
902690 
705 586 
884802 
374 710 

926 898 

963 916 





230 
146 

574 

2401 
483 
450 


Gravel 
Gravel 

Gravel 

Gravel 
Gravel 
Gravel 


4 

2 
7 

1 
1 


39623 

97016 
3743.32 
35584 
50967 
32938 
2 17047 
28880 

43958 
24522 


1.67 
163 

116 
"l59 
161 

*l.65 


3ZQI-i 

35670 

493727 
1Z792 
14635 

siai 1 

1 46683 
4789 

6273 1 

7939 


71637 

132886256 

668659177 

48378 


Nov.101815 
FeblOI9]5 


NoviaiSIS 


i 


Clarks Cove toSSO'east of W French Ave.. 
Query to Shaw 












































— 


173 


___ 


261 


221 




350 520 


658 


— 


— 


— 


Marl7ISI5^l£ll9l5 


BUTLER ST RELIEF- 
LAKE 

LANDRY 










NovlO.I9I^Nov.22ISI5pec2l9l5+ 






-- 


— 


— 


— 


260 
S50 




— 


\- 


— 


— 


— 


LIBERTY 






e420^24«No'v 11.1914 






ORCHARD 












403 


— 
















A„aXI.1S 


Sept27l9l5 
Dec.4l9l5t 

Decl2l9l4 

JulylQI9l5 


QUERY. 

ROCHAMBEAU 

ROCHAMBEAU 

SHAW 


Brook 5t, east. 


Z66 




















245 

?09 


Gravel 
Gravel 


33669 Nov.iai8l5jNov27l9l5 
1 06689 271 MovH.ISmInovZS.ISM 
32521 i)une2JI9Bijune2ai9IS 


260'northof Irvington to Carlisle 


290 
























260 north of Irvington to Carlisle S.D 








251 


















140'east of Brook to Brook St 


176 


























Seporote System Totals 


642 


3008 


I2& 


173 


654 


zei 


431 


350 


520 


658 








S0Z5 




- 




6960 




15 


945527 




862451 


807378 






Total - ISSTEft - 2366 miles — Length added to system - IZ989ft ■ ZASmilcs ^ ^'^ incomplete 

t Unfinished 
Entire sewer systemClncludinginterceptingsewer) l2S223miles- Entlrocost - 4^3,039.45473 i- Basedontotol cost 
. . S.D Surface Dram 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



19 



RECORD OF TIDES — 1915. 





HIGH TIDE 


LOW TIDE 


RANGE 


MONTH 




S 


B 




B 


S 






(U 




3 


<u 


3 




1) 




C3 


B 


B 


C3 


B 


B 


W) 




> 

< 






> 

< 


X 
ns 


c 


> 

< 


January 


—0.682 


+ 1.4 


—2.6 


—3.748 


—2.1 


—5.7 


3.066 


February 


—0.533 


+ 0.5 


—1.6 


—3.742 


—1.4 


—5.4 


3.209 


March 


—0.358 


+ 1.0 


—2.1 


—3.796 


—2.4 


—4.9 


3.438 


April 


—0.498 


+ 1.4 


—1.8 


— 3.897 


— 1.7 


—5.0 


3.399 


Mav 


—0.281 


+ 1.0 


—1.4 


—3.803 


—2.9 


—5.3 


3.522 


June 


—0.296 


+ 1.0 


—1.1 


—3.586 


—2.7 


—5.0 


3.290 


July 


—0.165 


+ 0.8 


—1.6 


—3.608 


—1.5 


—5.1 


3.443 


August 


—0.098 


+ 1.2 


—1.8 


—3.458 


—2.6 


—4.7 


3.360 


September 


—0.339 


+ 1.3 


—1.5 


—3.565 


—2.2 


—5.4 


3.226 


October 


—0.233 


+ 1.3 


—1.5 


1 —3.438 


—2.0 


—4.9 


3.205 


November 


—0.126 


+ 1.9 


—1.6 


1 —3.525 


-) 9 


—5.2 


3.399 


December 


—0.294 


+ 2.6 


—2.0 


—3.883 


—2.5 


—7.9 


3.589 


Average for ye 


ar— 0.325 






—3.670 






3.345 


Extreme for y 


ear 


+ 2.6 


—2.6 




—1.4 


—7.9 





All figures above refer to so called "Mean high water" which has been used at 
0.65 below City Datum. 

Observations for the last 20 years indicate that : 
Average high water is 0.852 below City Datum. 
Average low water is 4.393 below City Datum. 
Average Range of tides is 3.541. 

In the future observations will be based on the assumption that Mean high 
water is 0.85 below City Datum, and Mean low water is 4.39 below City- 
Datum- 





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February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 




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Means for year 
Totals for year 
Extremes 



RAINFALL. IN NBW BELDFORD — 1915 

Engineering Department at centre of City__E: "Total for year 4l.99inches 

UJ.Hatlnawciy Jr. Qt Clifford Post Of fice H 43.83 

AcushnetS-^oringStationofN.B. Waterworks A 4-8^8 

Quittacus Pumping Station at Quit I'qcus Pond Q •46.44- 




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ENGINEER'S REPORT. £2 



Intercepting Sewer System 

WILLIAM F. WILLIAMS 

Consulting Engineer 



New Bedford, Mass., February 26, 1916. 

The Mayor, and Board of Aldermen and Committee on 
Roads, Bridg-es and Sewers. 

Gentlemeii :— *I beg to submit the following rei)ort on 
the progress of the construction of the Intercepting Sewer 
Syst("m (luring the year ending December 4, 1915. 

The main interceptor is completed to a point in Logan 
street about 200 feet east of Acushnet avenue and work is 
in progress on the extension of the sewer, as now author- 
ized by the Committee, easterly in Logan street to Front 
street and northerly in the same to Holly street. All work 
on the intercepting sewer, during the year, has been done 
by the city with day labor. 

Plans are now in preparation for the last section of the 
intercepting sewer and the North End pumping station to 
take care of the separate sewer system north of Belleville 
road. As now planned the gravity section of the inter- 
cepting sewer will end in Belleville avenue about 200 feet 
north of Davis street. 

The screen station was placed in operation in January 
although the boilers did not go into use until a later date. 
The screenings removed during the last six months of the 
year amounted to 1149 cubic yards of unpressed material. 
The pressing reduces the bulk to about one-third of its 
volume as it comes off the screens. The pressed screenings 
are burned under the boiler. 

The Screen Station and the two pumping stations 
have performed their work smoothly and without accident 
during the year. The sand washing apparatus has not 



23 ENGINEER'S REPORT. 

yet been placed in commission but it is hoped to have it 
in operation in a very short time. In the mean time the 
heavy matter that passes the screens is not causing any 
trouble in the outfall as it is small in quantity and the 
velocity secured in the main sewer is all that was antici- 
pated. The maintenance cost of each plant is given in 
detail in the tables. 

The net cost of the intercepting sewer system to De- 
cember 4, 1915, including engineering and inspection, was 
$1,073,895.91. Total net expenditures for the fiscal year 
1915, including engineering and inspection, was $249,- 
067.39. For details of work done, money spent, and con- 
tracts made see tables. 

The following assistants and inspectors have been 
employed on the intercepting sewer work during the 
year: Stanley G. Proverbs, Walter N. Charles, Robert S. 
Graham, William H. Chase, Robert A. Mclntyre, Jasper 
Sisson, John N. O'Brien, Jr. 

Eespeetfully submitted, 

WILLIAM F. WILLIAMS, 

Consulting Engineer. 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 24 

SUMMARY OF WORK PERFORMED BY DAY LABOR 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 4, 1915. 



SECTION 5. 

In Water street, south of Union, thence in Water, Bridge 

Park, High Second, Water, Acushnet avenue, and in 

Logan street to about 200 feet east of Acushnet 

avenue. 

Length 6,825 feet. 

Total excavation 27,512 cu. yds. 

Rock excavation 5,065 " 

Reinforced concrete masonry 5,053 " " 

10" pipe separate sewer (no present outlet) 4,236 ft. 

18" storm water sewer 302 " 

10" " " " 290 " 

6" underdrain 2,575 " 

6" house connections 1,300 " 

This work included 14 regulating chambers at street 
crossings with siphons for storm Avater overflow. 



SECTION 6. 

In Logan street from 200 feet east of Acushnet avenue 
easterly 525 feet. Worlj; in progress. 

Total excavation 2,136 cu. yds. 

Rock excavation 19 6 " " 

Reinforced concrete masonry 263 " " 

10" pipe underdrain 475 ft. 



BONNEY STREET SEWER. 

In Bonney street north of Brock avenue (Cove road). 

Length 350 feet. 

Total excavation 555 cu. yds. 

10" pipe separate sewer 310 ft. 

1 brick manhole. 



25 ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



FIRST STREET PUMPING STATION. 

One concrete manhole with hydraulic gate adjacent to 
pumping station in First street. 

Total excavation 51 cu. yds. 

Reinforced concrete masonry 19 " 

Overflow in Second street to connect separate under 
sewer leading to the ('ove Pumping Station with the 
separate sewer leading to the First Street Pumping 
Station. 

Location : Second street across Grinnell street. 

Length 68 feet. 

Total excavation 72 cu. yds. 

10" pipe separate sewer 68 ft. 



There were 8 sewer outlets into Clarks Cove repaired, 
— at Hudson, Calumet, Capitol, Lucas, Woodlawn, Shore 
and Crapo streets, and Acushnet avenue. 

The outlet at David street was extended 221 feet. 

The outlet at County street was dicontinued from be- 
yond the high water line and a new outlet built leaving 
the old sewer as a possible boat landing. 



.ENGINEER'S REPQRT. 



26 



CONTRACT WORK. 



Item 


1 


743.3 


Item 


2 


391.2 


Item 


3 


250.7 


Item 


4: 


11,370 


Item 


5 


86.6 


Item 


6 


1.2 



FIRST STREET PUMPING STATION. 

J. W. Bishop Co., Contractor. 
Pinal Estimates — Dec. 16, 1914. 
cu. yds. earth excavation ( 



2.54 


$1,887.98 


6.47 


2,531.06 


9.93 


2,489.45 


.028 


318.36 


2.53 


219.10 


26.00 


31.20 




$7,477.15 



rock excavation @ 

concrete masonry (a) 

lbs. reinforcing @ 

sq. ft. vault light sidewalk @ 

M. ft. B. M. lumber left in place. . . @ 



SCREEN HOUSE SUPERSTRUCTURE. 

J. W. Bishop Co., Contractor. 

Final Estimate — Dec. 31, 1914. 

Contract for construction $31,864.00 

Rebate (to City of New Bedford) for changes in specifications. . . 64.68 



Excess of contract allowance for Fmish Hardware. 



$31,799.32 

53.87 



Total cost $31,853.19 



27 ENGINEER'S REPORT. 

CONTRACTS LET DURING THE YEAR 1915 FOR 
WORK AND MATERIALS. 



CEMENT. 

March 10, 1915. IMoses & T. A. Denault, New Bedford. 

$1.49 per bbl. in carload lots. 
$1.51 per bbl. In storehouse. 

Credit allowed for empty bags of 10 cents apiece. 

CRUSHED STONE. 

February 24, 1915. John B. Sullivan & Son, New Bedford. 

Charles Desrosiers, New Bedford. 

Stone run of crusher $1.40 per ton 

Smaller stone 1.50 

DYNAMITE. 

March 10, 1915. Nitro-Powder Company, Kingston, N. Y. 

60% dynamite $ .169 5 per pound 

6-foot wire exploders 4.08 per hundred 

LUMBER. 
February 15, 1915. Central Lumber & Supply Company, 
New Bedford. 

Dimension lumber — 4x4, 4x6, 4x8, 6x8, 6x6 $27.00 per M. 

Plank — Under 9" wide 27.00 " " 

— Under 10'' wide 28.00 " '' 

— All 10" wide 29.00 " " 

— 2"x7"xll' spruce 25.50 " " 

SAND. 
February 24, 1915. John Chicoine, New Bedford. 
Sand $ .89 per ton 

GRAVEL. 
February 15, 1915. Frank G. Rose, Dolla Goodreau, and 

John Connors, New Bedford. 
Gravel $1.15 per ton 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 28 

SEWER PIPE. 

February 15, 1915. Paisler & Willis. New Bedford. 

3" to 24'-' 76% % from manufacturer's list 

27" to 30" 671/8% 

33" to 3 6" 621/8% 

SEWER CASTINGS. 

February 15, 1915. Fairhaven Iron Foundry, Fairhaven. 

Manhole frames — about 2 65 lbs., each 

Manhole covers — about 195 lbs., each $8.00 complete 

MANHOLE STEPS. 
June 24, 1915. Chester F. Hathaway, New Bedford. 
300 cast Iron box manhole steps, 60 lbs. each. .214c per pound 

REINFORCING STEEL. 
February 10, 1915. New Bedford Boiler & Machine Co.. 

New Bedford. 
80,000 lbs. 1/2" dia. round steel lO'-lO" long. .$ .0135 per lb. 

August 25, 1915. New Bedford Boiler & Machine Co., 

New Bedford. 

40,000 lbs. Vz round rods 8 ft. long 
40,000 lbs. 1/2 round rods 10 ft. long 
30,000 lbs. 1/2 round rods 26 ft. long $1,588.00 

April 7, 1915. Cambria Steel Co., Boston, Mass. 

60,000 lbs. %" Slick reinforcing rods 26 ft. long, 

$ .01439 per pound 

PAVING BRICK. 
June 9, 1915. Metropolitan Paving Brick Co., Canton, 

Ohio. 
6,000 paving brick $190.50 

REGULATORS. 
July 22, 1915. Gibby Foundry Company, East Boston, 

Mass. 
12-inch regulators $150.00 each 



^ ENGINEER'S REPORT. 

SCREEN STATION. 
PIPING. 

December 28, 1914. P. F. Wood Boiler Works. New Bed- 
ford. 
Steam piping, valves, etc., for boilers Screen House. . . .$4 90.00 

December 28, 1914. New Bedford Boiler & Machine Co.. 

New Bedford. 
Installing piping, valves, etc., for boilers Screen House, $185.00 

January 22, 1915. F. E. Earle Company, New Bedford, 

]\Iass. 
Furnishing and installing high pressure piping at Screen 

House $141.00 

HEATING SYSTEM. 
February 3, 1915. Furnishing and installing system of 
heating: 

New Bedford Boiler & Machine Co., Valves $ 80.00 

F. E. Earle Company, Piping 415.00 

HYDRAULIC PRESS. 
February 15, 1915. P. F. Wood Boiler Co.. New Bedford, 

Mass. 

Furnishing and installing hydraulic press at Screen House, 

$487.00 

COAL CHARGING CAR. 
February 15, 1915. Harold L. Bond Company, Boston, 

Mass. 
1 1,000 lbs. capacity charging wagon $67.00 

PUMP AND MOTOR. 
July 25. 1915. Allis-Chalmers ]\Ifg. Co., Boston, Mass. 
1 3-inch, 3-stage centrifugal pump and motor $706.00 

FIRST STREET PUMPING STATION. 

SLUICE GATE. 

March 10, 1915. F. E. Earle Company, New Bedford, 

Mass. 
1 18'' hydraulically operated sluice gate $215.00 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 3() 



Maintenance of Screen House for the year 1915: 

Labor $3,166.75 

Electricity 91.84 

Coal 570.85 

Water 25.09 

Oil 6.60 

Telephone 3 3.18 

Supplies and renewals 145.05 

$4,039.36 

Maintenance of Cove Pumping Station for the year 1915: 

Labor $ 750.00 

Electricity 875.33 

Coal 44.20 

Water 5.00 

Oil 66.50 

Telephone 35.70 

Supplies and renewals 281.25 

$2,057.98 

Maintenance of First Street Pumping Station for the year 
1915: 

Labor $ 632.60 

Electricity ^. 101.44 

Coal 57.33 

Water .68 

Oil 25.00 

Supplies and renewals 79.00 

$ 896.05 



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33 ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 

In Board of Aldermen, 

March 9, 1916. 

Received, ordered printed in the City Documents 
and sent down for concurrence. 

W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 



Concurred. 



In Common Council, 

March 9, 1916. 

CHAS. P. SAWYER, 

Clerk. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



CHIEF ENGINEER 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1915. 



EDWARD F. DAHILL, Chief Engineer. 




new bedford 

The a. E. Coffin Press, Printers 

1916 



COMMITTEE OF THE CITY COUNCIL 

ON 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



ALDERMEN, 

SAMUEL A. GOODFELLOW, 

Residence, 116 Hathaway Street. 

MORTIMER McCARTY, 

Residence, 332 Summer Street. 
COUNCILMEN, 

JAMES M. HUGHES, 

Residence, l62 Nash Road. 

ROBERT S. WEAVER, 

Residence, 168 Merrimac Street. 

JOSEPH H. FERN ANDES, 

Residence, 383 South Second Street. 



BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 

CHIEF ENGINEER, 

EDWARD F. DAHILL, 
Residence, 11 Robeson Street. 

FIRST ASSISTANT ENGINEER, 

JAMES J. DONAGHY, 
Residence, 159 Washington Street. 

SECOND ASSISTANT ENGINEER, 

WM. E. WATSON, Jr., 

Residence, 373 Pleasant Street, 
THIRD ASSISTANT ENGINEER, 

FRANK R. PEASE, 

Residence, 493 County Street. 
CLERK, 

JOSEPH P. KENNEDY, 
Residence, 15 Sherman Street. 



CAPTAINS IN CHARGE OF STATIONS. 



REPAIR SHOP, BEDFORD STREET, 

HARRY H. KIMBALL, Master Mechanic, 
Appointed October 15, 1912. 

HEADQUARTERS, PURCHASE STREET, 

CHARLES S. WING, Telephone Operator, 
Appointed August 15, 1910. 

STATION NUMBER ONE, 

JAMES L. RASKINS, 

Appointed April 1, 1897. 
STATION NUMBER TWO, 

FRANK A. C. GREENE, 

Appointed May 22, 1907. 
STATION NUMBER THREE, 

JAMES H. MAHONEY, 

December 31, 1914 
STATION NUMBER FOUR, 

FREDERICK E. RICKETSON, 

Appointed August 15, 1910. 

STATION NUMBER FIVE, 

THOMAS H. FORBES, 

Appointed April 1, 1897. 
STATION NUMBER SIX, 

JOHN W. DONAGHY, 

Appointed April 1, 1897. 
STATION NUMBER SEVEN, 

EDWARD H. COGGESHALL, 
Appointed April 26, 1910. 

STATION NUMBER EIGHT, 

GEORGE H. COOK, 

Appointed April 1, 1897. 
STATION NUMBER NINE, 

AMBROSE F. MERCHANT, 

Appointed December 31, 1914. 
STATION NUMBER TEN, 

REUBEN TABER, 
Appointed April 1, 1897. 

STATION NUMBER ELEVEN, 

JERE T. HAGGERTY, 
Appointed October 19, 1908. 



ASSISTANT MASTER MECHANIC, 

LIEUT. JAMES H. DOWNEY, 

Appointed October 15, 1912. Residence, 103 So. Sixth Street. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM. 

ROBERT E. ALLEN, 

Appointed March 26, 1913. Residence 57 Bedford Street. 

ASSISTANT TELEPHONE OPERATOR, 

LIEUT. JAMES T. WING, 

Appointed December 31, 1914, Residence, 3 Green Street. 

DEPARTMENT LINEMEN, 

HENRY LAMEY, 

Appointed March 12, 1912. Residence 230 Kempton Street. 

MICHAEL HALLARAN, 

Appointed March 24, 1914. Residence, 209 Bowditch Street. 

DEPARTMENT ENGINEERS, 

JOHN H. BACKUS, 

Appointed March 13, 1910. Residence, 71 Bonney Street. 

MILES L. FAY, 

Appointed September 21, 1913. Residence 401 Orchard Street. 

DEPARTMENT MECHANICIAN, 

GEORGE H. BAYLIES, 

Appointed March 13, 1910. Residence, 111 Grinnell Street. 

DEPARTMENT DRIVER, 

THOMAS F. BREAKELL, 

Appointed May 12, 1909. Residence, 866 Rockdale Ave. 



Fire department 



REPORX. 



Headquarters Fire Department, 
Office of Chief Engineer. 

December 31, 1915. 

To tJie Honorable the City Council: 

Gentlemen: — I have the honor of submitting the 
annual report of the fire department for the year ending 
December 31, 1015, together with such recommendations 
as I deem necessary for increasing the efficiency of the de- 
partment. 

APPARATUS. 
We have in service the following ; — 

Horse Drawn: 
3 Second size Steam Fire Engines and Hose Wagons. 
1 Combination Chemical and Hose Wagon. 
1 Hose Wagon. 

3 Aerial Hook and Ladder Trucks. 
1 Fire Alarm Wagon. 
G Exercise and Coal Wagons. 

Automobile: 
1 Ahrens Fox Combination Engine and Hose Wagon. 
1 Robinson 
1 Webb 
1 White 
3 Locomobile Combination Chemicals and Hose 

Wagons. 
1 Locomobile Supply Car for Repair Department. 
1 Locomobile Instruction Car. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



IN RESERVE 
1 Combination Truck. 
1 Ryan Truck- 
5 Steam fire engines. 
4 Wagons 

HORSES. 
There are twenty - six horses in this department, 
mostly in good condition. 

HARNESSES. 
There are nine sets for three horse hitches, twelve 
for two horse hitches and four single harnesses in good 
condition. 

HOSE. 

There are 17,950 feet 'iV^ in. cotton rubber lined hose 
in good condition, 1000 feet should be added during the 
year. 



PENSION LIST. 
Mrs. Mary M. Nelson, widow of Martin S. Nelson. 

Capt. Loring T. Parlow, Engine Co. No. 2 who joined the 
Department May 21, 1863. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



DEATHS. 

Fourth Assistant Engineer Stephen L. 
FiNNELL died May 26, 1915. 

Engineer f'innell joined this department 
December 3, 1888 as hoseman, Hose Co. No. 2, was 
elected second lieutenant in May, 1890, and first 
lieutenant in May 1898, which rank he held until his 
election by the city council, April 8, 1908, to the 
position of Fourth Assistant Engineer; re-elected 
in April, 1912, he served until his death. 

His associates keenly regret the loss of a wise 
counsellor, a just and capable official, a delightful 
companion and co-worker, a true friend. 

Capt. Francis P. Washburn, Pension List; 
died September 4. 1915; 
joined the department November 28, 1864. 

Frank B. Chadwick, Engine Co. No. 5; 
died October 24, 1915; 
joined the department February 1, 1893. 



INJURIES. . 

Lieut. Harry A. Francis and Clerk David A. Cobb 
of Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 were seriously 
injured at the fire at the Hill & Cutler Mill, 
May 27th, and their cases have been reported 
to the city council with the recommendation 
that they be compensated in full for their 
injuries and loss of time. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

DR. 

Appropriation $160,000.00 

Transfer, equipment 4,150.00 

Receipts 420. 14 

$164,570.14 

CR. 

Salan'es, permanent force $120,149.69 

Salaries, caM force 17,782.41 

Horse feed and bedding 3,^2 1.50 

Supplies and furnishings 2,836.32 

Light 1,560.95 

Telephones 630. 10 

Fire Alarm, 1,007.76 

Blacksmithing and shoeing, 658.21 

Apparatus repairs, 3,464.49 

Harness repairs 116.00 

Station repairs, 2,246.49 

Fuel, 2,883.43 

Horses and horse hire, 171.97 

New apparatus, 4,534.89 

Hose and couplings 706.13 

Committee Expenses 356.39 

Miscellaneous, 1,006.57 

$164,033.30 

Transfer, to balance, 536.84 §164,570.14 



RECOMMENDATIONS. 

I respectfully renew my recommendations of last year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD F. DAHILL, 

Chief Engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



THE NEW BEDFORD PROTECTING SOCIETY. 

1915—1916 

PRESIDENT : 

CHAS. S. KELLEY, JR. 

Directors. 
HENRY S. HUTCHINSON F. OSCAR COVILL 
THOMAS B. AKIN F. P. R. PATTERSON , 

CHAS. S. BAYLIES JOSEPH F. CORNWELL 

EDWARD B. ROBBINS ERNEST H. BOUCHER 

SECRETARY AND TREASURER : 

CHESTER P. REXFORD 



Allen, Geo. H. H. 
Webber, James A. 
Swift, Horace W. 
Blair, John K. 
Dawe, William C. 
Bonneau, F. A. 
Bourne, Williams S. 
Brightman, Harry C. 
Brooks, Arthur T. 
Coe, I. H., Jr. 
Coggeshall, R. C. P. 
Bropks, Andrew J. 
Williams, Thos. W. 
Knowles, Jos. F. 
Delano, Arthur D. 
Francis, James P. 
Covin, Clarence W. 
Gifford, Frank H. 
Gifford, Thos. J. 
McDonald, Henry J. 
Howard, Henry, Jr. 
Humphrey, Jas. L., Jr. 
Taber, George C. 
Knowles, Henry S. 
Macy, Frederick B. 
Macy, George I. 
Macy, J. Roland 
Manchester. P. F. 
Parker Ward M. 
Allen Lesley B. 
Bliven, George F. 
Mendelson, Hyman 
Tuell, Clifton P. 



Watson, Edwin M. 
Makin, Henry J. 
Parker, David L. 
Perry, Samuel H. 
Pitman, William H. 
Porier, Aime J. 
Potter, William F. 
Oesting, Edward A. 
Olivier, Geo. L. 
Oman, Charles E. 
Smith, Nat. C. 
Francis, Arthur S. 
Phillips, William C. 
Robinson, Wm. A., Jr. 
Sharpies, Charles S. 
Sharpies, Arthur 
Smith, Alex. T. 
Dunham, Otis M. 
Sullivan, D. J. 
Sears, Louis A. 
Taber, Frederic H. 
Taylor, Wm. T. 
Wagner, Isaiah C. 
Wood, Horace 
Burke, Harry 
Shaw, John C. 
Butler, Morgan 
Whittemore, Harry E. 
Chase, Chester W. 
Read, W. Kempton 
Budlong, James E. 
Carpenter, Orrin B. 



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FIRE DEPARTMENT 



11 



FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH, 1915. 

SUPERINTENDENT 
EDWARD F. DAHILL, Chief Engineer. 

Assistant Superintendent 
ROBERT E. ALLEN. 



LOCATION OF SIGNAL BOXES. 



PRIVATE BOXES. 

112 Pairpoint Corp. » 

113 Quissett Mill 

114 City Mills 

115 Potomska Mills ' 

116 Acushnet Mills 

117 Hathaway Mills 

118 Dartmouth Mills 

12 Butler Mill 
122 Holmes Mill 

124 Booth Mill 

125 Kilburn Mill 

13 Page Mill 

131 Gosnold Mills 

132 Rotch Mills 

133 Sharp Mill 

14 Morse T. D. & M. Co. 

141 Frank L. Young Co. 

142 N.B. Gas & Ed.Lt.Co., Water St. 

143 N. E. Steamship Co., 

144 N. E. Telephone & Telegraph Co. 

145 U. S. R. R. Co., Power House 

146 U. S. R. R. Co., Popes Island 

15 N. B. Cordage Co. 

16 St. Lukes Hospital 

21 E. E. Taylor Shoe Co. 

211 N. B. Spinning Co. 

212 Wamsutta Mills 

213 GrinnellMill 

214 Bristol Mill 

215 Columbia Mills 

216 Pierce Mills 

217 Bennett Mills 

218 Soule Mill 
221 Whitman Mills 

223 Manomet Mills 

224 Nashawena Mills 

225 Nonquit Mill 



23 Neild Mill 

231 Pierce Bros. Ltd. Mill 

232 Taber Mill 

233 N. B. Cotton Mills 

234 Beacon Mills 

24 U. S. R. R. Co., Weld St. 

241 Snell & Simpson 

242 Smith Bros. Brewery 

243 N. B. Warehouse 

244 Dawson's Brewery 

245 W. C. Jones Co. 

25 A. L. Blackmer Co. 

251 N. B. Copper Co. 

252 Z. B. Davis Corp. 

253 Freight House, Pearl St. 

254 Freight House, Willis St. 

255 Railroad Engine House 

PUBLIC BOXES. 

3 Lunds Corner 

31 Acushnet Av. and Wood St. 

311 Acushnet Av. and Perry St. 

313 Acushnet Av. and Belleville Rd. 

315 Howard Av. and River Rd. 

316 Belleville Av. and Covell St. 

317 Belleville Av. and Hope St. 

323 Bowditch and Shaw Sts. 

324 Nash Rd. and Bowditch St. 
334 Nash Rd. and Church St. 

363 Shawmut Av. and Plainville Rd. 

375 Tarkiln Hill Rd. and Lowell St. 

38 Acushnet and Squin Avs. 

386 Acushnet Av. and Phillips Rd. 

4 Tinkham Av. and North Front St. 
41 Hathaway Av. and Diman St. 

411 Be.lleville Av. and Davis St. 

412 Acushnet Av. and Davis St. 

413 Bowditch St. and Coffin Avs. 



12 



Fire department 



414 Coffin Av. and No. Front St. 

415 Belleville and Coffin Avs. 

416 Acushnet Av. and Bullard St. 

42 BellevillejAv. and Nye St. 

421 Tallman and Bowditch Sts. 

422 Acushnet Av. and Sawyer St. 

423 Holly and North Front Sts. 

43 Acushnet Av. S. of Coggeshall St. 

431 Belleville Av. and Coggeshall St. 

432 Cedar Grove and North Front Sts. 

433 Bowditch and Weld Sts. 

434 Plicks St., east of Howe St. 
441 Brook and Earl Sts. 

452 Mt. Pleasant St., near Reservoir 

46 Sawyer and County Sts. 

461 Coggeshall and Reynolds Sts. 

462 Purchase and Cedar Gro\'e Sts. 

463 County and Clark Sts. 

464 Myrtle and Clark Sts. 

47 Purchase and Linden Sts. 

471 County and Linden Sts. 

472 Cottage and Durfee Sts. 

48 Shawmut Av. and Durfee St. 
482 Shawmut Av. and Grand St. 
484 Shawmut Av. and Hathaway Rd. 

49 Rockdale Av. and Rogers St. 

5 Hazzard and State Sts. 

51 Purchase and Franklin Sts. 

511 County and Pearl Sts. 

512 Purchase and Willis Sts. 

513 Acushnet Av. and Maxfield St. 

514 Sycamore and State Sts. 

515 Acushnet Ave. and Seneca St. 

52 Merrimac and Summer Sts. 
521 Cedar and Locust Sts. 

523 Shawmut Av. and Parker St. 

524 Smith and Cedar Sts. 

53 Kempton and Liberty Sts. 

531 Kempton and Florence Sts. 

532 Kempton and Reed Sts. 

533 Kempton and Jenny Lind Sts. 

54 Purchase and North Sts. 

541 Water and North Sts. 

542 Water and Middle Sts. 

543 Fish Island 

544 Rodman and Front Sts. 

551 County and Hillman Sts. 

552 County and Kempton Sts. 

553 Purchase St. and Mechanics Lane 

56 Union and Eighth Sts. 

561 Union St. and Purchase Sts. 

562 Union and Water Sts. 

57 Hillman and Ash Sts. 

58 Kempton and Cedar Sts. 



581 Court and Cedar Sts. 

582 Union and Park Sts. 
59 Court and James St. 

6 Purchase and School Sts. 

61 Pleasant and Madison Sts. 

611 Walnut and Seventh Sts. 

612 Walnut and Water Sts. 

613 Water and Coffiin Sts. 

614 Water and Leonard Sts. 

615 Cannon and Second Sts. 

616 Bedford and Sixth Sts. 

62 Allen and Dartmouth Sts. 

621 Allen and Page Sts. 

622 Allen aud Brigham Sts. 

623 Bedford and Borden Sts. 

63 Hawthorn and Page Sts. 

64 Orchard and Clinton Sts- 

641 Arnold and Ash Sts. 

642 Arnold and Rotch Stb. 

7 Howland and Second Sts. 

71 Water and South Sts. 

711 Purchase and Potomska Sts. 

712 Water and Rivet Sts. 

713 Water and Division Sts. 

714 Water and Cove Sts. 

72 County and Grinnell Sts. 

721 Rockland and Hall Sts. 

722 Orchard and Fair Sts. 

723 County and MosherSts. 

73 Crapo and Rivet Sts. 

731 Rivet St. and Bolton Rd. 

732 Crapo and Division Sts. 

74 Dartmouth and Rockland Sts. 
741 Dartmouth and Dunbar Sts. 

8 Almshouse 

81 Brock Av. and Capitol St. 

811 Brock Av. and Butler St. 

812 Br ck Av. and Mott St. 

813 Ruth Av. and Sa'isburv St. 

821 West French Av. and Willard St. 

83 East French Av. and Cove St. 



Special Signals. 

121 struck twice, General Alarm. 

22 struck once, summons Truck No. 1. 

33 struck once, summons Truck No. 2. 

44 struck once, summons Truck No. 3. 

2-2-2 struck four times, Police Call. 

10 blows, struck twice, Military Call. 

15 blows, struck twice, Naval Reserve Call. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



13 



HOSE COMPANY No. 1. 



Date of 












Joining 


J3 


Name 


Rank 


Residence 


Occupation 


Dept. 


O 

6 










Oct. 31, 1882 


85 


Frank A. C. Greene 


Captain 


Station No. 2 


Fireman 


Nov. 14, 1894 


83 


Frank A. Lewis 


Lieutenant 


3 Lincoln St. 




May 5, 1901 


81 


Horace S. Bennett 


Hoseman 


Station No. 2 




IVlay 1, 1910 


82 


William S. Gatenby 


Hoseman 


27 Pierce St. 




May 25, 1903 


80 


Frederick R. Syfnons 


Hoseman 


16 North St. 




Jan. 3. 1915 


79 


Frank J Nicklas 


Hoseman 


420 Purchase St. 




March 7, 1911 


84 


Arthur E. Souza 


Chauffeur 


152 North St. 





HOSE COMPANY No. 2. 



Date of 


u 
bo 
T3 


Joining 


XI 


Dept. 


O 

d 


May 5, 1884 


185 


May 1, 1910 


186 


Nov. 17, 1913 


187 


Dec. 1, 1894 


189 


Oct. 26, 1903 


191 


Nov. 1. 1910 


192 


Dec. 15, 1912 


193 



Name 



George H. Cook 
John J. Mahon 
Frederick G. Gifford 
Antonio M. Lemos 
Frank N. Cleveland 
Thomas VVooley, Jr. 
Michael J. Melia 



Rank 



Captain 

Lieutenant 

Chauffeur 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 

Hoseman 



Residence 


Occu 


pation 


280 Earle St. 


Fireman 


81 Myrtle St. 






198 Tinkhani A v. 




'• 


176 Davis St. 




" 


217 Phillips Av. 




" 


154 Purchase St. 




" 


211 Hathaway St. 




" 



14 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



HOSE COMPANY No. 3. 



Date of 


V 

•o 










Joining 


J2 


Name 


Rank 


Residence 


Occupation 


Dept. 




d 
2 










April 22. 1896 


268 


Chas. P. Johnson 


Captain 


489 Acushnet Ave. 


Carpenter 


Jan. 13. 1896 


265 


Arthur C. Smith 


Lieut. 


39 Bedford St. 


Electrician 


Sept. 14. 1903 


263 


Wilfred L. Bacon 


Clerk 


42 Summer St. 


Plumber 


Jan. 12. 1892 


266 


Henry A. Sherman 


Hoscman 


51 Russell St. 


Blacksmith 


May 19, 1896 


262 


Chas. E. Thomas 


" 


42 Liberty St. 


Carpenter 


Feb. 16, 1888 


264 


Frank C. Jennings 


" 


81 Allen St. 


Clerk 


Mar. 7, 1911 


267 


Peter Lambert 




19 Seventh St. 


Fireman 


April 25. 1892 


260 


Charles W. Allen 


Driver 


86 High St. 


" 



HOSE COMPANY No. 4. 



Date of 


CIO 

-a 










Joining 


J3 


Name 


Rank 


Residence 


Occupation 


Dept. 




6 
Z 




















Sept. 1. 1888 


270 


Jeremiah T. Haggerty 


Captain 


90 David St. 


Fireman 


Aug. 10. 1909 


272 


James Doran 


Lieut. 


236 Purchase St. 




Dec. 9, 1894 


271 


Frederick E. Mosher 


Hoseman 


37 Woodlawn Ave. 




March 10, 1908 


273 


John Wooley 


" 


754 Brock Av. 




Jan. 4, 1900 


275 


Richard F. Burke 


" 


27 Viall St. 




Aug. 11, 1908 


276 


James Sanderson, Jr. 


" 


57 Ellen St 




Sept. 8, 1908 


274 


Allan L. Phillips 


Chauffeur 


113 Mott St. 





FIRE DEPARTMENT 



15 



HOSE COMPANY No. 6. 



Date of 


60 










Joinin? 


J3 


Name 


Rank 


Residence 


Occupation 


Dept. 


O 

6 
138 










April 5, 1889 


John W. Donaghy 


Captain 


39 Crapo St. 


Fireman 


Oct. 31, 1882 


136 


N. Herbert Greene 


Driver 


58 Bedford St. 




Jan. 1. 189.> 


124 


George H. Whelan 


Hoseman 


224 County St. 




Oct. 19, 1908 


132 


John McQuilkin, Jr. 




451 Orchard St. 




Oct. 1, 1902 


123 


Frank T. Cooke 


'. 


144 Purchase St. 




Sept. 11, 1906 


134 


Henry L. Burding 


" 


151 Rockland St. 




Feb. 11, 1908 


125 


John Sylvia 


<■ 


145 Armour St. 




Oct. 14, 1915 


131 


Percy Shepherd 


« 


Ill Tallman St. 





16 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 1. 



Date of 


V 

tie 










Joining 


J2 


Name 


Rank 


Residence 


Occupation 


Dept. 


q 

6 

2: 










Acril 24, 1893 


10 


James L. Haskins 


Captain 


1530 Purchase St. 


Fireman 


July 28, 1890 


16 


Charles H. Thomas 


1st. Lieut. 


663 Cottage St. 


Rollcoverer 


July 30, 1894 


13 


Herbert C. Gifford 


2nd. Lieut. 


75 Maxfield St. 


Foreman 


May 25, 1895 


6 


Law'ce T. Woolfenden 


Clerk 


6 Studley St. 


Shoe dea'er 


Feb. 26, 1900 


15 


George Palmer 


Hoseman 


61 Myrtle St. 


Machinist 


July 28, 1902 


14 


William F. Thomas 


•' 


6 Mt. Pleasant lane 


Roll coverer 


July 25, 1904 


11 


Sidney S. Fisher 


" 


6 Franklin St. 


Shipping 
Clerk 


Dec 3, 1888 


12 


Bartholomew P. Fury 


" 


130 Willis St. 


Clerk 


Jan. 14, 1908 


9 


William D. Flagg 


" 


5 Warwick St. 


Fireman 


Sept 1, 1901 


8 


Hyman Mechabcr 


" 


87 Kenyon St. 


Merchant. 


Aug. 3, 1903 


19 


George II. Denliam 


" 


1519 Purchase St. 


Carpenter 


Mar. 1, 1901 


20 


Joseph L. Crowley 


Engineer 


252 Chestnut St. 


Fireman 


Feb. 2, 1902 


22 


Oscar S. Hammond 


Stoker 


70 North St. 


Carpenter 


June 9, 1894 


21 


Edward F. A. Cowen 


Driver 


1196 Pleasant St. 


Fireman 


Dec. 31, 1888 


23 


William II. Young 


" 


253 Chestnut St. 


" 


Dec. 13, 1912 


18 


George T. Davis 


" 


54 Maitland St. 


" 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



17 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 3. 



Date of 


00 

•a 












Joining 


J3 


Name 


Rank 


Residence 


Occu 


pation 


Dept. 


o 
d 
























May 1, 1896 


31 


James H. Mahoney 


Captain 


803 Kempton St. 


Fireman 


May 1, 1910 


32 


Frederick A. Stouell 


Lieutenant 


240 Palmer St. 






April 28, 1892 


33 


William R. Moore 


Hose man 


69 Round St. 






Jan. 8, 1907 


34 


Ernest G. S. Teachman 


" 


360 Reed St. 






May 1, 1910 


35 


John R. Walsh 


" 


136 F'lorence St. 






Oct. 23, 1906 


36 


James S. Cooke 


" 


30 Buttonwood St. 






July 11, 1904 


37 


Frank R. Riley 


" 


162 Chancery St. 






Nov. 21, 1913 


38 


Cliarlcs J. Calnan 


Chauffeur 


200 Weld St. 







ENGINE COMPANY No. 4. 



Date c 


f 


-a 


Joining 


J3 


Dept. 




o 
6 


Oct. 4, 


1897 


44 


Aug. 29, 


1904 


59 


Dec. 30, 


1895 


51 


May 28, 


1894 


45 


Oct. 26, 


1903 


54 


Aug. 10, 


1909 


56 


May 1, 


1910 


48 


July 13. 


1908 


55 


Oct. 7, 


1913 


42 


Oct. 19, 


1908 


57 



Name 



Fred E. Ricketson 
William N. Whelan 
John E. Joseph 
Louis A. Viereck 
Frank H. Vincent 
Walter H. Merchant,Jr 
Norman S. Dyer 
Edward A. Pollock 
Joseph E. Freitas 
Edward F. Wood 



Rank 



Captain 

Lieut. 

Hoscman 



Chauffeur 
Hoseman 



Residence 



267 Purchase St. 
143 Pleasant St. 
97 S. Sixth St. 
Ill Grinnell St. 
117 Grinnell St. 
61 Bay St. 
396 Purchase St. 
156 Grinnell St. 
71 Acushnet Ave. 
35 Crapo St. 



Occupation 



Fireman 



18 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 5. 



Date of 


V 

-a 










Joiaing 


"o 
6 

70 


Name 


Rank 


Residence 


Occupation 


Dept. 










Dec. 31, 1888 


Thomas H. Forbes 


Captain 


120 Chestnut St. 


Fireman 


Dec. 28, 1891 


73 


Ernest L Soule 


1st. Lieut. 


90 Hillman St. 


Wood- 
worker 


Mar. 27, 1899 


65 


William C. Coon 


2nd. Lieut 


09 Foster St. 


Painter 


Oct. 1, 1885 


63 


Joseph C. Forbes 


Clerk 


299 Chancery St. 


Clerk 


Sept. 1, 1892 


77 


Charles A. Haskins 


Hoseman 


629 County St. 


Fireman 


Sept. 30, 1890 


68 


Thomas N. Meyer 


" 


219 Kempton St. 


Carpentei 


Dec. 31, 1894 


66 


Charles H. Bowman 


" 


94 Midd.e St. 


Teamster 


April 29, 1895 


72 


Louis H. Almy 


" 


183 Chancery St 


Printer 


July 31, 1899 


64 


Samuel E. Gabriel 


" 


463 Cottage St. 


Janitor 


July 9, 1907 


69 


Ernest Allen 


" 


21 Chestnut St. 


Harness 

Maker 


April 29, 1901 


60 


Edward L. Moriarty 


Hoseman 


387 Park St. 


Merchant 


Jan. 14, 1908 


71 


Frederick A. Blossom 


Substitute 


37 Button wood St. 


Wood 

Worker 


Nov. 10, 1884 


74 


Bcnj. C. Groves 


Engineer 


6 Foster St. 


Fireman 


Mar. 1, 1882 


76 


Charles W. Jones 


Stoker 


66 Mill St. 


Contractor 


May 9, 1905 


75 


Edward J.. BIy 


Driver 


104 Smith St. 


Fireman 


Feb. 3, 1902 


62 


Charles H. Lawrence 


Driver 


171 Kempton 


Driver 


July 1, 1896 


61 


William L. Durlee 


" 


144 Mill St. 


'• 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



19 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 7. 



Date of 

joining 

dept, 


-a 

o 

o 
Z 


Name 


Rank 


Residence 


Occupation 


Sept. 1,1890 


205 


Edward H. Coggeshall 


Captain 


13 Collins St. 


Fireman 


Sept. 1, 1890 


204 


Edward H. Booth 


1st. Lieut. 


1 Vine St 


Retired 


Sept 1, 1890 


206 


John H. Ryan 


2nd. Lieut. 


563 Cottage St. 


Sealer of 
weights & 
measures 


Jan. 3, 1893 


195 


John N. O'Brien 


Clerk 


101 Robeson St. 


Merchant 


Sept. 1, 1890 


209 


Charles A. Galligan 


Hoseman 


36 Pearl St. 




Sept. 1, 1890 


207 


John D. Manseau 


" 


30 Duriee St. 


Laborer 


Sept. 1, 1890 


203 


Geo A. Bosworth 


" 


674 Cottage St. 


Con- 
tractor 


Dec. 11, 1894 


196 


William Simister 


" 


38 Trinity St. 


Merchant 


Aug. 2, 1904 


197 


James F. Collins 


" 


18 Trinity St. 


Plumber 


April 5, 1897 


210 


Edward L. Wilson 


" 


61 Durfee St. 


Painter 


Mar. 12, 1907 


211 


Joseph H. Gurl 


Substitute 


89 Highland St. 


Teamster 


June 10, 1908 


198 


Paul Gagne 


" 


61 Merrimac St. 


" 


Mar. 1, 1901 


199 


Henry Leeming 


Engineer 


652 Cottage St. 


Fireman 


Sept 1, 1890 


202 


Andrew W. Tripp 


Stoker 


45 Durfee St. 


Shoem'ker 


Sept. 1. 1890 


200 


William H. H. S. King 


Driver 


15 East Durtec St. 


Fireman 


June 11, 1907 


212 


George Pierce, Jr 


" 


135 Robeson St. 


" 


June 1, 1907 


215 


Manuel Brown 


•■ 


41 Pierce St. 


" 


Jan. 12, 1892 


201 


George W. Haskins 


•• 


18 Studley St. 


•• 



20 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 9. 



Date of 


CIO 

-o 










Joining 


Xi 


Name 


Rank 


Residence 


Occupation 


Dept. 




o 
Z 

146 










Mar. 1, 1901 


Ambrose F. Merchant 


Captain 


2266 Acushnet Ave. 


Fireman 


April 2, 1895 


148 


William J. Moore 


Lieut. 


910 Belleville Ave. 


Fireman 


Sept. 24, 1900 


159 


Frank E. Washburn 


Clerk 


2443 Acushnet Ave 


Carpenter 


Nov. 10, 1908 


149 


Albert Crossley 


Chauffeur 


1034 Phillips Road 


Fireman • 


Dec. 14, 1878 


160 


Herbert M. Spooner 


Hoseman 


920 BellviUe Ave. 


Laborer 


Sept. 3, 1883 


151 


John G. Whalon 


" 


906 BelleviUe Ave. 


Grocer 


May 31, 1892 


157 


Walter H. Darling 


" 


2444 Acushnet Ave. 


Foreman 


June 1. 1907 


150 


Horace A. Bird 




920 Belleville Ave. 


Fireman 


Dec. 6, 1886 


145 


John F. Parker 




924 Belleville Ave. 


Fireman 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



21 



ENGINE COMPANY No. 10. 





Date of 


no 




Joining 
Dept 


6 
Z 


Dec. 


13, 1888 


241 


Nov 


1, 1910 


242 


Dec. 


12, 1893 


244 


Oct. 


19, 1908 


246 


May 


9, 1905 


248 


Dec. 


18, 1894 


245 


Oct. 


1. 189S 


243 


Nov 


23, 1913 


219 


Dec. 


8. 1908 


240 


Nov 


1, 1910 


247 



Name 



Reuben Taber 
John H. McDonald 
Arthur R. McDonald 
William F. McDonald 
Joseph A. Mahoney 
John T. Conway 
John E. Murphy 
Thomas J. Summers 
Peter Hebert 
Philip J. Prevost 



Rank 



Captain 

Lieut. 

Hoseman 



Chauffeur 



Residence 


Occupation 


1005 County St. 


Fireman 


43 State St. 




427 Cedar Grove St. 




147 Adams St. 




508 Cottage St. 




476 Cedar Grove St. 




209 Cedar Grove St. 




332 Tinkham Ave. 




1527 Purchase St. 




Station No. 10 





22 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY No 1. 



Date of 


V 










Joining 


Xi 


Nanne 


Rank 


Residence 


Occupation 


Dept, 


"o 
d 
Z 

105 




















June 24, 1883 


Edward D. Francis 


Captain 


86 Kempton St. 


Shoemaker 


July 10, 1906 


86 


Harry A. Francis 


1st. Lieut. 


86 Kempton St. 


Shoemaker 


Nov. 29, 1886 


103 


Alfred M. Giflord 


2nd Lieut. 


94 Maxfield St. 


Teamster 


Feb. 1, 1897 


89 


David A. Cobb 


Clerk 


379 Elm St. 


Painter 


Jan. 1, 1900 


107 


Edward F. Magrath 


Ladderman 


228 Mill St. 


Janitor 


May 19, 1896 


100 


John P. Thompson 


" 


120 High St. 


Painter 


April 26, 1897 


106 


William F. Wilcox 


«' 


7 North St. 


Hostler 


July 2, 1894 


104 


Harrie B. Jennings 


" 


349 Reed St. 


Salesman 


Mar. 10, 1908 


102 


Walter H. Peirce 


" 


304 Kempton St. 


Stable 

Keeper 


Sept. 3, 1907 


95 


Charles E. Carroll 


'. 


247 Middle St. 


Gas 

Foreman 


Jan. 1, 1907 


101 


David A. Dexter 


" 


217 Hillman St. 


Glass 

Cutter 


Jan. 14, 1908 


87 


Wm. E. Russell 


Driver 


130 Mill St. 


Fireman 


Feb. 13, 1895 


97 


Isaac R. Allen 


Tillerman 


120 High St. 


" 


Dec. 5, 1887 


92 


Geo. S. Allen 


Driver 


297 Acushnet Ave 


" 


Jan. 1, 1895 


98 


Edward C. Neagus, Jr. 


" 


93 Park St. 


" 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



23 



HOOK AND LADDER COMPANY No. 2. 



Date of 


1) 










Joining 


XI 


Name 


Rank 


Residence 


Occupation 


Dept. 




"o 
d 
2 

176 






















Sept. 8 


1893 


Edward M. Murphy 


Captain 


168 Austin St. 


Clerk 


Sept. 1, 


1892 


174 


C. Henry McCarthy 


1st Lieut. 


87 Hazard St 


Foreman 


April 14, 


1908 


172 


Edward T. Mahoney 


2nd Lieut 


508 Cottage St. 


Druggist 


Sept. 1, 


1888 


180 


Peter F. Sullivan 


Clerk 


328 Cedar St. 


Book 
keeper 


Dec. 1, 


1894 


178 


Daniel S. Considine 


Ladderman 


171 Davis St. 


Merchant 


Nov. 3 


1897 


175 


Michael E. Daley 


" 


238 Collette St. 


Contractor 


Jan. 27, 


1902 


177 


Timothy J. O'Brien 


" 


250 Davis St. 


Watchman 


June 12, 


1906 


179 


George Entwhistle 


•' 


1051 Acushnet Av. 


Laborer 


July 31, 


1893 


181 


John Woolfenden 


" 


69 Deane St. 


Retired 


Nov 10, 


1908 


183 


Joseph Z. Boucher 


.. 


253 Collette St. 


Agent 


Mar. 30, 


1896 


184 


Thomas Walmsley 


" 


158 Davis St. 


Clerk 


Jan. 15, 


1911 


108 


Onat A. Chausse 


Substitute 


230 Coffin Ave. 


Clerk 


April 22, 


1896 


167 


Charles E. Robertson 


Tillerman 


1012 Pleasant St. 


Fireman 


Mar. 1, 


1892 


173 


William Sellecks 


Driver 


18 Peckham St. 


" 


Dec. 13. 


1898 


171 


John H. Galligan 


" 


62 Durfee St. 


• 



24 



FIRE DEPAR 



HOOK AXD LADDER COMPANY No. 3. 



Date of 


3C 

r3 










Jotaing 


.2 


Nice 


Ri=k 


Residence 


Occupatioa 


Dept. 


"5 

6 

z 

232 










Dec- 15. 1892 


diaries E. Greene 


Isc lieat. 


77 Dirtmoatii St. 


Fireman 


Not. 1. 1891 


218 


Jota O'Xea 


lad. Lieat. 


16 Bedford St. 


Qaa*CQtter 


Miy 3, 190t 


22T 


Chas. .A. McAvoy 


Qerk 


25 Welcome St. 


Mercltaat 


Sot. 1, 1891 


219 


Daald E. Ndtoa 


Laddennia 


Ill County St. 


Mason 


XoT. 1, 1891 


222 


Heary R- Liadsey 




211 Cooaty St. 


Carpenter 


Attg. 13, 1904 


233 


\Gcliael Qsiaa 




103 Rockland St. 


Laborer 


Jnae 5, 1899 


224 


Orea J. Dowd 


" 


1039 S. Water St. 


Barber 


Oct 51, 1882 


221 


ManhaO S. Greene 


M 


233 RiTct St- 


Majon 


Oct. 31, 1882 


228 


Frederick S- Nelson 


" 


43 Sherman St. 


Mason 


Jan. 13, 1898 


229 


F. C. Edmondson 


" 


32 Winsor St. 


Grinder 


Jaly 9. 1907 


230 


Waiiam. Batler 




2 Sears St. . 


Merchant 


Sept. 12, 1905 


220 


Edgar F. Ho»land 




181 GrianeU St. 


Rigger 


Mi7 ^ 1899 


234 


MiUiam C. DeMeQo 




211 Accsiinet Are. 


Foreman 


May 21. 1911 


226 


Jofen E- McDonald 


iiUennan 


149 Bonney St. 


Fireman 


Oc-.. •.-. t*^?? 


:?i 


vr::ii- ;. G-rbs. jr. ' 


Driver 


400 0::hiri St 


" 



5 ='-5 

3 or= 



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THIRTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF 



THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



OF THE 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD 



To the City Council for the Year 1915 




NEW BEDFORD, MASS.: 

NEW BEDFORD PRINTING CO., PRINTERS 
1916 



Board of Health 



REIPORT 



New Bedford, January 1, 1916. 
To His Honor, the Mayor and Gentlemen of the City Council -. 
The Board of Health submits herewith its report for the 
year 1915: 

THE DEATH RATE. 

The whole number of deaths during the year 1915 was 1719, 
against 1750 in 1914. The rate for last year, based on the 
census population of 109,652, was 15.67 for each 1,000 in- 
habitants. The rate for 1914, based on the estimated popula- 
tion that year of 110,000 — which was probably too high — 
was 15.90. 

The deaths of children under one year of age number 495, 
as against 534 in 1914. a decrease of 39. The infant death 
rate is usually figured on the basis of each thousand of 
births, and as the exact number of births is not available, no 
death rate can be given. 

EDUCATIONAL WORK. 

Health ot^cers are coming more and more to realize that 
the promotion of the public health and the prevention of 
disease — both of which are duties imposed upon boards of 
health — must depend in large measure on the people them- 
selves. There is a point beyond which, inspection, the en- 
forcement of regulations, the supervision of sources and 
supplies of food and drink, cannot be carried. That point 
has very nearly ])een reached. The activities of boards of 
health in the past have been largely along these lines. They 
have produced excellent results which prove that they were 



4 Board of Health 

aimed in the right direction, and that they must be carried 
on in the future with patience and diligence. They must 
be supplemented, however, by an attempt to awaken among 
the people M^hat some one has called the sanitary conscious- 
ness. The public health officer can fight disease, and in 
some cases he can do a great deal in the way of preventing 
disease, as by safeguarding the milk and water supplies ; but 
at a certain point the limit of his effectiveness is reached, 
and the responsibility of the individual begins. The preven- 
tion of disease, both of communicable diseases and of the 
degenerative or so-called wear and tear diseases of middle 
life, is in the last analysis in the hands of the people them- 
selves. Each person in the community should be a volun- 
teer health officer, and if that ideal situation is so striven 
for, it is essential that two things be done; the interest of 
the people must be awakened, and they must be instructed 
how to avoid the diseases which now levy such a heavy toll of 
lives. 

It would be hard to say whether indifference or ignorance 
is the more serious obstacle. Certainly the former is more 
difficult to overcome. The person who does not know can 
be taught: the one who does know but does not care is a 
hard problem. One thing is sure — to educate the ignorant, 
and to arouse the indifferent to a sense of their responsibility 
in this important work of promoting the health, and thereby 
the efficiency and happiness of the community, the most ef- 
fective agency is publicity. 

Printer's ink, it has been said, has been one of the most 
potent instruments at the disposal of the health officer. At 
the beginning of the year, the present board determined to 
make use of printer's ink to the fullest extent its means per- 
mitted. It had been the board's policy to send, to families 
from which cases of typhoid fever and tuberculosis were 
reported, circulars stating the precautions to be observed 
with reference to these diseases. Their policy was carried 
further by drawing up similar circulars relative to scarlet 
fever, measles, whooping cough and diphtheria. For the 



Board of Health 5 

guidance of teachers in the public schools, the rules of the 
board and of the school committee, as agreed upon in con- 
ference were published in book-form, and along with them 
was reprinted a comprehensive outline of the symptoms of 
diseases common among school children first published by 
the State Board of Education. At the beginning of the 
school year in September 18,000 copies of a circular entitled 
"To the Parents of School Children" were distributed in 
the public and parochial schools. From time to time during 
the year Health Bulletins relating to timely subjects and to 
diseases during the season of their prevalency, were pub- 
lished in all the papers of the city. In all twenty-five of 
these bulletins were printed during the year. The week 
after Christmas the Baby Welfare exhibit of the State De- 
partment of Health was displayed in the Free Public Library 
and a considerable quantity of literature relating to the care 
of babies was distributed. In the fall, we began the display 
of brief health bulletins on the screens of six of the moving 
picture theatres, the proprietors of which generously agreed 
to enable us to reach the public in this way without charge. 
The only expense in this has been the cost of the lantern 
slides. The theatres which are co-operating with the board 
in this work are the New Bedford, the Orpheum. Thevien, 
the Savoy, the Pastime and the Comique. Finally, in this 
connection, mention should be niade of a lecture on the work 
of the public health officer given by the agent of the board, 
William G. Kirschbaum, before the Howard M. E. Church 
Brotherhood upon its invitation. 

In all of the publicity work the purpose has been chiefly to 
teach people how to avoid catching and spreading disease, to 
awaken their interest in public health matters, to secure 
their co-operation, to instruct them in personal hygiene and 
to spread the gospel of good health generally. Progress 
along this line must necessarily be slow, but we believe that 
the work is valuable and that if continued, as it will be, it 
must be productive of good. We have not done as much as 
we should have liked to do; that we did as much as we did 



6 Board op Health 

was due in large measure to the liberality of the newspapers 
which published the Health Bulletins free of charge. 

FOOD INSPECTION. 

A rather unusual use of newspaper publicity was made in 
connection with the board's efforts to improve the conditions 
under which foods were prepared and handled. Attention 
was directed chiefly to ice cream manufactories and to baker- 
ies. In both we found, along with places in which the con- 
ditions under which it was handled were all that could be 
desired, other places which were highly objectionable and a 
few which were positively revolting. Af.ter the ice cream 
investigation, which was undertaken first, had been under 
way for some time, we came to the conclusion that the de- 
partment's efforts to improve conditions would gain in ef- 
fectiveness if the general public knew what the conditions 
were. Here again the question of the responsibility of the 
public came in. If there was to be any public demand for 
clean ice cream, it was felt, the public must first know the 
facts. Accordingly, through co-operation with the New Bed- 
ford Sunday Standard, a writer was detailed to accompany 
the board on its inspections, and to publish, with pictures, 
an account of the conditions, bad as well as good, as he 
found them. Subsequently the same course was pursued 
with reference to the bakeries, some of which were found to 
be unsanitary and otherwise objectionable. By these means, 
public interest in ice cream manufactories and bakeries was 
aroused, and a public sentiment for greater cleanliness cre- 
ated which reinforced the efforts of the department to 
remedy the evils found. 

The board personally visited the ice cream manufactories 
and many of the bake-shops. In one or two cases where it 
was found that ingredients deleterious to health were being 
used the manufacturers were induced to go out of business. 
The cleaning up of dirty plants was insisted upon; and 
samples of ice cream were taken from time to time and 
tested as to the percentage of milk fat contained. Copies of 



Board of Health 7 

existing regulations were sent to each manufacturer of ice 
cream, and a set of rules setting forth what the board re- 
quired under the regulations was formulated. 

In all, the board and the inspector of milk and provisions 
made 186 inspections of bakeries during the year, with the 
result that conditions were appreciably improved, and one 
unsanitary bakeshop was abandoned. The number of mar- 
ket inspections was 702, and here as well many improve- 
ments were effected. It was found that regulations are of 
slight value in this kind of health work. Dependence must 
be placed in frequent inspections, the number of these was 
increased as compared with the previous year, and an ef- 
fort will be made to increase the number still further in 
1916. 

MEDICAL SCHOOL INSPECTION. 

Early in the year a committee representing the board con- 
ferred with a committee representing the school committee 
and drafted rules governing medical school inspection. 
These rules, we believe, have worked well. With them, as 
we have stated, we published suggestions to teachers to en- 
able them the more efficiently to perfect medical inspection 
of school children by recognizing symptoms of diseases 
which call for the attention of the physician or nurse. 

OPHTHALMIA NEONATORUIM. 

Up to 1915, the practice of the board has been to have 
cases of ophthalmia neonatorum and bad eyes in infants 
treated by oculists whose services were engaged as needed at 
a fiat charge of two dollars a visit. There was paid to oculists 
in 1914 the sum of $5,311.87 for 2.655 visits. The board last 
February concluded that a saving to the city could be ef- 
fected by supplying an oculist at a fixed annual compensa- 
tion in return for which he was to perform all services re- 
quired of him. The compensation was fixed at $2,000. Up 
to January 1 he had made 1,969 visits, which under the old 
system would have cost $3,938, a saving of $1,938. 



S Board of Health 

PLUMBING ORDINANCE. 

The plumbing ordinance drafted by the board in 1914 and 
sent to the city council was referred back to the board in 
February for a conference with the master and journeymen 
plumbers. At this conference a few minor changes were 
agreed upon, and the ordinance was enacted to go into effect 
the first of July, 

A CLEAN CITY. 

In the early spring complaints were received of the con- 
dition of the public dumps which, it was alleged, constituted 
a nuisance. With the idea of remedying conditions, and of 
making the streets, lanes and yards in the city cleaner, a 
conference was called with the Superintendent of Streets, 
the Chief of Police and the Chief of the Fire Department. 
The result was an improvement in conditions at the dumps, 
and, at the suggestion of the board, the cleaning of the 
streets in the centre of the city early Sunday morning, the 
Superintendent of Streets co-operating to that end. What 
was particularly desired was the active co-operation of the 
police in the abatement of minor nuisances. The chief prom- 
ised his assistance along this line, and the police have on 
many occasions rendered valuable service. We feel, though, 
that more can be done in this direction, and that the police 
department can without neglect of its other duties enforce 
health ordinances and regulations to the improvement of 
sanitary conditions in the city, 

BABY WELFARE WORK. 

The infant death rate, which has long been a source of 
concern to the health department, was lower in 1915 than 
in 1914. At least, the total number of deaths of children un- 
der one year of age was materially reduced and was the 
smallest in many years despite the increase in population. 
Incomplete birth returns make it impossible to figure the in- 
fant mortality rate, but we have reason to believe that that 



Board of Health 9 

has also been reduced. Even so, the number of babies 
dying from pi-eventable causes is high, and the problem of 
infant mortality demands the best efforts of the department 
and the community. 

It is difficult to determine how this problem can most 
effectively be attacked. The system of milk supervision, we 
believe, and the milk stations maintained in the summer by 
the New Bedford Instructive Nursing Association, safeguard 
the milk supply upon which so many babies are dependent. 
There is no relaxation in the effort to maintain good general 
sanitary conditions. Housing is probably a factor, and here 
something may be accomplished under the statute which 
gives the board a better control of tenement houses. It is 
gratifying to note that the efforts of the department and of 
other agencies havje resulted in reducing the number of in- 
fant deaths each year since 1911. 

During the past year, a corps of investigators working 
under the direction of the federal government made a sur- 
vey of the deaths of infants in this city for the year 1913. 
The findings of these investigators may, when they are pub- 
lished, shed some light on the factors which contribute to 
making New Bedford's infant death rate higher than that 
of most cities in the state. Meanwhile, it seems probable 
that these factors include improper feeding and unfavorable 
prenatal conditions. The carg of the baby must begin before 
it is born if it is to have a fair chance in the world. If 
feeding after the baby comes is important, so are the pre- 
cautions which the mother should observe before it comes, 
for her own sake as well as for the baby's. How far the 
industrial conditions, under which women are employed in 
the cotton factories, in many cases up to within a few days 
of confinement, affect the infant death rate, we have no 
means of knowing, but they are undoubtedly a factor of 
importance. 

If our conclusions are correct, our main reliance must be 
placed in educational work. Mothers must be instructed 
in the care of the baby both before and after it is born. The 



10 Board of Health 

physician can contribute to this, but as doctors are often not 
called except at child-birth, and sometimes not even then, 
other ways of reaching the mothers must be tried. The 
obvious ways are through printed instructions and public 
nurses, and of these the latter are by far the more helpful. 

For some time the board has been sending to each family 
from which a birth is reported a brief circular printed in 
English and foreign languages, explaining how the baby 
should be cared for. Much excellent work has been done 
by the Instructive Nursing Association, whose nurses have 
in many cases visited mothers of the newly-born, and have 
instructed them in the proper care and feeding of the 
babies. Some attention is also being given by the district 
and the department nurses to women who expect to be con- 
fined. Copies of the book entitled "The Baby and You," 
furnished by the Division of Hygiene of the State Depart- 
ment of Health, are being placed in the hands of prospective 
mothers, while the nurses personally explain the instructions 
therein given. Special attention will be paid the coming 
year to this sort of prenatal work. 

The problem of infant mortality is a community problem, 
and the community should unite in this as in other phases of 
public health work. The complete birth returns, when they 
are available, will furnish the basis for a useful classifica- 
tion of the baby deaths as to nationality and residential dis- 
tricts. In the meantime the promotion of the Baby "Welfare 
work offers a splendid opportunity for public service to the 
fraternal, religious and philanthropic organizations of the 
city. 



Board of Health H 



MONTHLY EXPENDITURES. 

December ^o'roi'co 

January I'Alii 

Sc^^::::::::::::::::: I'Ml.u 

AprTl 8,680.43 

May ■ 9,150.26 

June 9,707.76 

iufy .■.'.'•■ •• 12,602.52 

August 8,836.74 

September ?'ai S'vr 

October lillil 

November ^,QiQ.06 

$111,460.62 

PRINCIPAL ITEMS OF EXPENDITURE. 

Office Supplies and Postage !}'???' kI 

Ophthalmia Neon I'oosqa 

Isolation Hospital 49304 

Automobiles -, Ain'oa 

St. Luke's Hosp. (Cont. Dis.) AlAl 

St. Luke's Hosp. (T. B.) lilHi 

Other Sanatoria. ^0729 45 

New Bedford Sanatorium 24 99200 

Salaries '97f:iQ 

Derby Hospital • Ha'kl 

Other Cities and Towns (T. B.) VoaI no 

Other Cities and Towns (Cont. Dis.) I'lin'^t 

Small Pox I 025 99 

Vaccination '; nTor 

Outside Relief (Cont. Dis.) I?ic5 

Outside Relief (T. B.) . . . ^'lllnl 

Child Welfare ttn r^n 

Car tickets oor'^i 

Traveling expenses cAAAn 

New Bedford Extractor Co 25,500.00 

*Not including salary of Oculist. 

VACCINATIONS. 
During the year there were 1,631 free vaccinations per- 
formed by the board. 

TEMPORARY INSANE. 

During the year there were four examinations under Chap. 
394, Acts of 1911. 



12 Board of Health 



PLUMBING. 

During the year there were issued 1,029 permits for plumb- 
ing work of all kinds, 595 being for old buildings and 434 for 
new structures. The work is classified as follows : 

Water closets 1561 

Sinks 1382 

Bathtubs 830 

Washbowls 974 

Washtubs 298 

Urinals 41 

Drains 50 

Deep traps 11 

Surface traps 17 

Conductors 59 

Soda fountains 6 

Shower baths 8 

Stables 4 

LICENSED UNDERTAKERS. 

The following are the undertakers in this city : 

Frank L. Rogers, Joseph S. Williams, 

Henry J. McDonald, John E. Moriarty, 

A. P. Lagasse & Son, Charles H. Sullivan, 

Aldege Chausse, William A. Payette, 

Peleg H. Sherman, Vital Girard, 

W. C. Vaughan, Jr., Edward D. Murphy, 

Rodolphe J. Carrier, Thomas E. Greene, 

Jeremiah F. Sullivan Harris & Dustan, 

W. S. Dillingham, Henry P. Wilson Est., 
Henry J. Proulx, E. T. Wilson, 2nd, Mgr. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. UBALDE PAQUIN, M. D. 
COOPER GAW, 
JOSEPH R. GLENNON, 

Board of Health. 



Board of Health 13 

REPORT OF AGENT AND EXECUTIVE OFFICER. 

New Bedford, January 1, 1916. 
To the Board of Health : 

Gentlemen : — The statistical record of the work performed 
in this department under my supervision is herewith ap- 
pended. 

The value of the services of the nurses connected with the 
department is more apparent with each year, and as the State 
Department of Health has relieved the local board from the 
care of all forms of tuberculosis, other than pulmonary and 
laryngeal, more attention can be given to the follow-up work 
of cases discharged from the various sanatoria. Mrs. Chace, 
who has charge of this work, has rendered valuable aid in 
many homes. In addition to these visits to sufferers from 
tuberculosis, she has made 2,331 visits to the homes of the 
newly born, where midwives have officiated. The following 
table gives the detail of this work: 

No. of 

Births. 

January 276 

February 271 

March 3 21 

April 277 

May 255 

June 325 

July 262 

August 313 

September .... 258 

October 256 

November .... 245 

December 251 



Reported 


Visits 


Reports 


Reports 


by 


by 


of 


of 


Midwives. 


Nurse. 


Ophth. Neon. 


Sup. Conj, 


73 


170 


4 


2 


76 


214 


7 


6 


76 


206 


6 


14 


76 


223 


4 


7 


50 


176 


5 


13 


82 


247 


5 


14 


62 


179 


4 


6 


75 


193 


3 


7 


63 


191 


4 


5 


60 


188 


1 


7 


58 


171 


5 


11 


60 


173 


4 


9 



Totals 3310 811 2331 52 101 

MILK SUPERVISION. 

During the year there were made 408 inspections of dairy 
farms, supplying this city with milk. This work was accom- 
plished with Dr. H. B. Hamilton, milk inspector. With but 



14 



Board of Health 



few exceptions milk rooms and cow stables were found to 
be in good condition. As I have stated in previous reports 
there are always some producers who need continual watch- 
ing, and the sooner such dairies are stricken from the list 
the better it will be for the inhabitants of New Bedford. It 
is gratifying to report that a number of the principal dealers 
are now pasteurizing the milk distributed by them. In 
addition to the above inspections there were made 45 in- 
spections of the sources of bad milk. The following table is 
self-explanatory : 



%Vi 



og 



0*0 



so 

> u 
o u 

.Q Q. 
< 



January .... 
February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August .... 
September . . . 
October .... 
November . . . 
December . . . 

Totals 



63 

31 

85 

215 

206 

49 

54 

187 

132 



31 

1 



15 

2 

4 

23 

30 

17 

10 

20 

32 



1 





48 

29 

81 

192 

176 

32 

44 

167 

100 



30 

1 



7 


14 
20 
1 
5 
7 

15 






54 

30 

82 

183 

174 

42 

46 

167 

107 



27 





5 





16 

22 

3 

4 

11 

14 



3 

1 



1054 



154 



900 



69 



912 



79 



SMALL POX. 

Twenty-three cases of this disease developed in the south 
part of this city with ten deaths. This epidemic broke out 
in what is known as the Cape Verde Colony, the first case 
discovered being a woman in an advanced eruptive stage 
of the disease. She claimed to have been vaccinated eight 
years prior to this event, but there was no evidence of vac- 
cination, and it is presumed that she had been treated but 
without success. She was found in a boarding house in 
one of the thickly settled sections on South Water street. 



Board of Health 15 

The next day after discovery, a similar case was found a 
short distance from the above location, and on this same day 
it developed that the parties had visited at a friend's house 
in the neighborhood, in which was found a man recovering 
from a mild type of the disease. It was impossible to trace, 
the origin of the disease in this man. but all cases which de- 
veloped later were directly traceable to this one mild case, 
the man having been successfully vaccinated thirteen years 
prior to his attack. The subsequent spread was due to va- 
rious causes: concealment of cases, ignorance, carelessness 
and indifference — the last phase of the situation being very 
noticeable from the fact that these people insisted upon 
calling at each other's houses during the early stages of the 
disease and prior to the time of quarantine. It was only 
after the authorities had prevailed upon the pastors in 
charge of these people to impress upon them the necessity 
of keeping away from houses of friends until the epidemic 
was under control, that the authorities were able to check 
the spread, so inherent is the practice of neighborly calls by 
this class of people. The vigorous action of the board in 
locating, removing, quarantining, vaccinating and segre- 
gating the cases finally arrested the progress of the disease, 
but not until the fatalities were in excess of 43%. 

The epidemic was of unusual violence as evidenced by the 
percentage of deaths noted. In most eases the type of the 
disease was confluent and of the twenty-three treated at the 
small-pox hospital four were of the haemorrhagie type. The 
case first treated, from which others contracted the disease, 
as stated, was mild, and the tenth case found was also of a 
mild form, this patient having been successfully vaccinated 
a few years prior to the attack. Complications in the ma- 
jority of cases were not infrequent. 

A serious phase of the epidemic, one which was not gen- 
erally known rests in the fact that pupils in the Donaghy. 
Thomas A. Greene and Cedar Street Schools had been ex- 
posed to the disease and they were closely watched for the 
usual period, the School Inspectors of these schools giving 



16 Board of Health 

almost their whole time in supervising scholars daily in the 
rooms affected. Fortunately not a single case developed and 
this fact was undoubtedly due to recent vaccinations as the 
children under observation had but recently entered the 
public schools. 

In addition to the school children mnetioned above, 165 
persons exposed to the disease were quarantined the usual 
period, 

TUBERCULOSIS. 

The financial year, ending November 30, 1915, gave us the 
highest record yet attained in the treatment of persons 
suffering with this disease, necessitating a large expenditure 
of money. In 1914 the expenditure was large, but the past 
year with its increased demands, brought the expenditures 
up to $37,255.83, an increase of $3,220.37. The fact that 
during the year 29 persons Avere discharged as arrested from 
the disease, should encourage the people of this city to keep 
on in the good work. The arresting of the disease in 29 
persons is a record to be proud of, for it means that that 
number of persons were discharged as able to engage in some 
favorable occupation. Otherwise, if neglected, they would 
have become a continuous charge on the public funds. 

During the year there were treated 278 cases, the New 

Bedford Sanatorium caring for 210 suffering with pulmonary 

tuberculosis. Treated at their respective homes were 74, 35 

of whom were sent to the Sanatorium to complete treatment. 

Eighteen were given treatment at St. Luke's and Derby 

Hospitals, most of these cases being for other forms of the 

disease, while 16 so called State cases were removed to the 

State Infirmary at no expense to the city. The disposition 

of these cases, exception being made to State patients and 

those treated at St. Luke's and Derby Hospitals is as follows : 

New Bedford Sanatorium 210 

Tewkesbury 1 

Lakeville 7 

Westfield 1 

North Reading 2 

Treated at home 74 



Board of Health 17 

"We began the financial year of 1916 on December 1st with 
77 patients at the local institution, 24 at their homes, and one 
each in Westfield, Lakeville and the Acushnet Sanatorium. 

The nativity of the patients treated last year follows : 

New Bedford 71 

United States 46 

Canada 39 

Azores 3 5 

England 15 

Cape de Verde 10 

Poland 10 

Ireland 9 

Austria 8 

Portugal 6 

Italy 3 

Prince Edward Island 2 

Sweden 2 

Germany 1 

Russia 1 

Scotland 1 

Belgium 1 

Wales 1 

Brazil 1 

The occupations of these patients are classified as follows : 

Mill operatives 120 

Housewives 29 

School children 50 

Laborers 10 

Painters 5 

Shoe workers 5 

Carpenters 3 

Salesmen 4 

Grocery store 3 

Teamers 3 

Farm hands 2 

U. S. R. R 2 

ONE EACH. 

Reporter Clerk 

Second girl Steamfitter 

Laundress Linotype operator 
Electrical worker Dressmaker 

Fireman Theatrical manager 

Cracker cutter Stone cutter 

Soap factory Page boy in Library 

Ship steward Insurance agent 

Drill cutter Lumberman 

Florist Inspector cut glass 

Bartender Paper hanger 

Solderer Tailor 



18 Board op Health 

It will be noticed that the mill operatives were by far 
the greatest sufferers, and this fact should impress every 
textile worker in the community to the necessity of a stricter 
observance of the laws of hygiene. Too often the textile 
worker who is forced to take his noonday meal in the mills, 
prefers to linger within the walls of the mill after eating. Tf 
instead, the balance of the noon hour was utilized by Avalking 
in the open air, breathing in pure air, great good would 
result. 

At different times during the year there have been long 
waiting lists for admission to the New Bedford Sanatorium. 
In some instances attempts were made to find places for the 
sick at the State Sanatoria, but the policy of the State Trus- 
tees of Hospitals for Consumptives forbids the admission of 
patients in the advanced stage of the disease. Not only do 
they refuse to take New Bedford cases of this type, but also 
cases which the Commonwealth is bound by law to support. 
By this action beds often times have been monopolized by 
strangers, while our own people, those who have a settle- 
ment here, have been forced to a long period of waiting and 
treatment at home. If this policy of the State Board is to 
continue, there must needs be a change in the local policy of 
treatment or increased facilities at the local institution. 

Under the old law the New Bedford Board of Health de- 
clared Pulmonary Tuberculosis a dangerous disease and 
made it reportable. This action was taken November 1, 
1905. For the two months of that year but few cases of Pul- 
monary Tuberculosis were reported — but the next succeed- 
ing year, 1906, the records show that 149 cases were re- 
ported with 124 deaths for that year. 

Then under an amended law the State Board of Health 
was given authority to declare communicable diseases to be 
reported to the various Boards of Health in the Common- 
wealth, and among the diseases so declared was Tubercu- 
losis. The record of cases reported and deaths (all forms") 
for each year since December 31, 1906, is as follows : 



Board of Health 19 

Year, Cases Reported. Deaths. 

1907 139 133 

1908 190 124 

1909 205 122 

1910 204 102 

1911 208 129 

1912 246 115 

1913 342 157 

1914 401 164 

1915 476 164 

When this city began its work of wiping out the ** Great 
White Plague" the outlay was not very large, but there has 
been a steady increase since that beginning, which was in 
1909. During the seven years ending November 30, 1915, 
there were treated from the public funds of New Bedford 
1,239 cases at an outlay of $148,932.52. Quite a sum when 
you stop to consider the matter. Prior to this work, say 
during the year 1908, the expenditures in the Health De- 
partment were $42,691.91, and since then there has been a 
steady increase year by year, largely due to this most com- 
mendable work, which should have the encouragement of 
every thoughtful citizen. The expenditures for the seven 
years mentioned above are as follows : 

1909 $50,332.80 

1910 60,436.09 

1911 67,977.75 

1912 81,288.99 

1913 97,806.55 

1914 101,518.59 

1915 111,460.62 

Of the above the following amounts were expended for the 
care and maintenance of persons suffering with tuberculosis : 

Year. No. of Cases. Expenditures. 

1909 81 $8,000.00 

1910 157 10,000.00 

1911 137 12,855.76 

1912 153 23,468.57 

1913 196 23,140.30 

1914 237 34,212.06 

1915 278 37,255.83 

The first payment to the city under the subsidy act for 
the care of persons suffering with tuberculosis was in 1913, 



20 Board of Health 

and the aniouut has increased with each year since. The 
total amount received from all sources in the care of tuber- 
culosis patients since 1908 is $31,430.18, of which sum 
$18,390.09 was paid under the subsidy act. 

OTHER CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

During the year this department was called upon to treat 
many cases of so called children's diseases, which came to 
us from the physicians of the Poor Department. At the 
Isolation Hospital we treated during the year, 10 cases of 
Scarlet Fever and nine cases of Diphtheria, the Scarlet 
Fever ward being opened 23 weeks, and the Diphtheria ward 
16 weeks. 

In addition to the regular investigations made by the 
Medical Inspector there have been made by me 641 investi- 
gations of communicable diseases, most of which were in 
the nature of visits to persons suffering with pulmonary 
tuberculosis, who needed material aid. 

The following tables give the records of communicable 
diseases together with deaths for the same, covering the year 
1915, together with the last nine years. 



Board of Health 



21 



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22 



Board of Health 



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Board of Health 23 

OPHTHALMIA NEONATORUM. 

For the year ending December 31, 1915, there were re- 
ported 291 eases of bad eyes in infants, a falling off in the 
number for 1914. The policy of employing an oculist perma- 
nently has proven a step in the right direction. Where 
necessary the services of a trained nurse were employed. 
In this connection I desire to say that Mrs. Edward L. 
Murphy, who has been employed on these cases, has per- 
formed excellent service, having made during the year 834 
visits. 

INFANT MORTALITY. 

There has been a gradual falling off in the deaths of chil- 
dren under one year of age since 1906, the mortality for the 
year ending December 31, 1915 being the smallest since the 
date mentioned above. During the past twelve months, with 
an increased population, the number of deaths was 495, which 
is the lowest figure since 1906, when was begun a supervision 
of the city's milk supply by the enactment of regulations 
governing the same. The following record for the last nine 
years will be read with interest: 

Year. Deaths. 

1907 535 

1908 509 

1909 543 

1910 689 

1911 589 

1912 552 

1913 536 

1914 534 

1915 495 

The nativity of the parents of children who have died 

under one year of age is as follows : 

Portuguese 243 

French 90 

American 74 

English 23 

Austrian 14 

Irish 13 

Russian 9 

Italian 7 

Polish 6 



24 



Board of Health 



Greek 6 

Syrian 4 

Hebrew 3 

Indian 1 

Swede 1 

Belgian 1 

Males 260 

Females 23 5 

From the records of births filed at this office, as required 
by law, infants of Portuguese parents, number 1,000. Com- 
pared with the deaths for the year, 495, it serves as an object 
lesson for more energetic measures in the Child Welfare 
campaign. Not quite one-third of the births during 1915 
were of Portuguese parents, yet 25% of that number (243) 
died under one year of age. 

It will be seen by the appended table that the critical 
period in the life of infants was between three and six 
months, and that Broncho-Pneumonia and Diarrhoea and 
Enteritis were the principal causes of death: 



YEAR 1915 



January 

February 

March 

April , 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . . 

October 

November 

December . . . . 

Totals 

White 

Colored 

Total Males . . 
Total Females 



AOES 






H 3 



6 
5 
11 
5 
6 
3 
9 
6 
7 
2 
3 
3 

66 

60 

6 



495 



260 
235 



100 

98 

2 



Board of Health 



25 



Causes of Death 





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1 

6 

8 
9 

18 

20 

28 

30 

31 

49 

61 

61a 

71 

74 

85 

87 

89 

91 

92 

93 

94 
104 
109 
120 
150 
151 
152 

167 
189 



Typhoid fever . . 

Measles 

Whooping cough 

Diphtheria 

Erysipelas 

Pyaemia 

Tuberculosis pul 
Tubercular meningitis. . 
Tubercular peritonitis.. 

Scurvy 

Meningitis 

Meningitis cer. spinal . . 

Convulsions infan 

Other diseases of nervous sys 

Epitaxis 

Laryngismus Stridulus 

Bronchitis 

Broncho pneumonia. . . 

Pneumonia 

Pleurisy 

Pul. congestion 

Diarrhoea and enteritis 
Intestinal obstruction . 

Kidney disease 

Malformation 

Infan. debility icterus . 

Other diseases peculiar to early 

infancy . 

Burns 

Cause of death not specified 



27 



16 




2 
1 
1 
2 

1 
3 
1 

4 
1 
1 



6 

105 

10 





175 



3 

1 

19 

103 

3 



26 Board op Health 



MEDICAL SCHOOL INSPECTION. 

The work in this department has been carried on since 
the new school year in a more systematic manner than for- 
merly, rules governing the conduct of physicians, nurses and 
teachers, having been adopted by the Health and School 
departments jointly, the same printed in booklet form and 
distributed to all concerned. 

The following are the number of cases of comriiunicable 
diseases which have been found in the public and parochial 
schools since 1909 : 



Scarlet 


Dipth- 






Vari- 


wnoop- 
ing 


Tuber- 


German 


Fever 


theria 


Mumps 


Measles 


cella 


Cough 


culosis 


Measles 


1910.. 7 





17 


7 


8 


2 


3 





1911. .12 


1 


8 


5 


43 


45 


2 


2 


1912. .19 





98 


88 


16 


8 


4 


25 


1913. .25 


2 


79 


66 


29 


30 


1 





1914. .28 








4 


58 


12 


1 





1915*. 8 


6 


32 


163 


22 


19 


1 






*In addition, pupils in three schools kept under close observa- 
tion because of exposure from smallpox. 

Eight here it might be said that Miss Catherine F. Lowney, 
the department nurse for the parochial schools, has given 
valuable assistance in this feature of the work, her visits to 
the homes of pupils being most beneficial. 

EXPENDITURES— CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The expenditure for contagious disease during the year 
is summed up as follows, and was the largest in the historv 
of the city: 

Tuberculosis: 

New Bedford Sanatorium. . $30,729.45 

Other Sanatoria 1,573.27 

St. Luke's Hospital 1,348.29 

Derby Hospital 72.80 

Paid other cities 1,218.84 

Treated at home 3,532.02 

Court judgment 1,221.54 



Board op Health 27 

Contagious Diseases: 

Smallpox 7,979.25 

Ophthalmia Neon 3,846.99 

Isolation Hospital 4,606.77 

Paid other cities 1,236.87 

St. Luke's Hospital 1,497.44 

Derby Hospital 203.39 

Treated at home 319.24 



$59,385.16 



REIMBURSEMENTS— CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The amounts which should be credited to the department, 

due the City of New Bedford, are as follows : 

Subsidy $9,074.26 

Commonwealth of Mass 4,957.36 

Cities and Towns 1,471.99 

Other sources 419.24 



$15,922.85 



The following table gives the expenditures on account of 
contagious diseases for the last six years : 

1910 $13,000.00 

1911 17,580.80 

1912 33,306.31 

1913 41,874.58 

1914 46,606.79 

1915 59,385.16 

The following is a monthly record of the work performed 
during the year : 



28 



Board of Health 



Contagious diseases investigated.... 

Houses placarded 

Rooms disinfected 

Schoolrooms disinfected 

Nuisances abated 

Privy vault nuisances 

Garbage complaints 

Bakeries inspected 

Stables located 

Stable inspections 

Notices issued 

Yard inspections 

Hen yard inspections 

Tenement houses inspected 

Piggeries inspected 

Inspection milk peddlers' plants 

Dairy farms inspected 

Inspection of bad milk 

Nurses' visits 

Nurses' visits to homes 

Milk samples taken 

Notices to mothers mailed 

Market inspections 

Public dumps 

Houses quarantined for small pox. . . 

Fire menaces reported 

Ice cream plants inspected 

Oculist's visits 

Nurse's (O. N.) visits 

Investigations of milk plants for 
typhoid fever 



47 

22 

210 

1 

28 
1 

38 
6 
1 

34 
2 

28 
1 
1 
1 
4 

57 

3 

326 

45 

63 
276 

20 



43 

20 

102 

1 

11 

3 

41 

10 

1 

30 

2 

245 

3 

4 



2 



I 

346 

69 

31 

271 

25 



51 

33 

147 

3 

25 

3 

61 

18 

3 

335 

6 

1168 

1 
3 

11 



8 



441 

56 

85 

321 

163 



223 
144 



53 

25 

199 



24 

18 

61 

14 

3 

242 

7 

391 

5 

9 

3 

10 

2 

12 

417 

64 

215 

277 

77 

12 



197 
106 



49 

8 

108 

6 

19 

7 

32 



2 

435 

4 

243 

8 

6 

15 

12 

4 

6 

338 

52 

206 

255 

50 



5 

5 

10 

221 

85 



54 

20 

198 

1 

27 
9 

43 

34 

2 

204 

4 

18 
2 


17 

45 

6 

2 

367 

72 

49 
325 

30 
6 
7 


18 
209 

84 



69 

5 

154 



17 

12 

101 

30 

1 

185 

30 

246 

4 

1 

7 

30 

24 

3 

301 



54 

262 

35 

7 

1 



6 

132 

42 



58 
7 

52 


19 
3 

85 

9 

1 

219 

20 

04 
4 

6 

16 

54 

12 

338 



187 

313 

51 
4 

3 
2 
192 

60 



(/3 



45 

15 

70 



25 

10 

79 

20 

3 

223 

11 

72 

2 

3 

2 

16 

46 

6 

307 

20 

132 

258 

63 

2 



1 

8 

160 

60 



50 

24 

123 

2 
12 

2 
51 
20 

1 
197 

7 
37 

4 

2 

5 
20 
12 


314 

;8 



256 

62 

6 







165 

54 



69 

25 

158 



15 

1 

48 

10 



341 

9 

73 

3 

3 

1 

15 

16 



303 

72 

31 

245 

52 

2 



2 



235 

95 

2 



53 
34 

159 



9 

4 

52 

15 



293 

129 

367 

1 

2 

2 

5 

4 



339 

75 

1 

251 

64 







235 

104 





Respectfully submitted, 



WM. G. KIRSCHBAUM, 

Agent and Executive Officer. 



Board of Health 29 

MEDICAL INSPECTOR'S REPORT. 

New Bedford, January 1, 1916. 
To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit the following report as 
Medical Inspector and as attending physician for contagious 
cases for the board for the year ending January 1st. 1916. 

Released 120 cases Scarlet Fever. 

Took 139 cultures for Diphtheria. 

Diagnosed 179 cases of Tubercidosis. 

Investigated the following cases: 

Typhoid 104 

Measles 45 

Whooping Cough 15 

Smallpox 3 

T. B. Meningitis 1 

Varicella 2 

Urticaria 2 

C. S. Meningitis 2 

Anterior Poliomyelites 3 

Pityriasis rosea 2 

Myocarditis 1 

Vaccinated 165 persons exposed to Small-pox and nine 
exposed to Typhoid Infection. 

Treated 47 cases of Tuberculosis ; 7 of Scarlet Fever ; 9 of 
Diphtheria; 10 of Measles; 9 of Whooping Cough. Also 
signed 30 death certificates. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. N. SENESAC, 

Medical Inspector. 



REPORT OF OCULIST. 

New Bedford, January 1, 1916. 
To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen : — In submitting my annual report of the work 
performed by me as oculist to the Board, I desire to say that 
I began my duties March 1, 1915, and for the ten months 
ending December 31, 1915, I made nineteen hundred and 
sixty-nine (1969) visits to infants suffering with sore eyes, 
as required by law, and it is my pleasure to add that in no 
instance Avas the vision of a child impaired. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ALPHONSE NORMANDIN. 

Oculist. 



30 Board of Health 

REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF MILK AND PROVISIONS. 

New Bedford, January 1, 1916. 
To the Board of Health : 

Gentlemen : — I herewith submit my report as Inspector of 
Milk and Provisions for the year 1915. During the year I 
have issued 155 team licenses and 276 store licenses for the 
sale of milk and 6 team licenses and 31 store licenses for the 
sale of oleomargarine, making a total of 468 for which the 
regular fee of 50c. each has been collected and paid to the 
City Treasurer. In company with Agent Kirschbaum I have 
made 408 inspections of dairy farms and also traced source 
and cause of 45 samples of bad milk. The stores where milk 
is sold have all been inspected and instructions given, when 
necessary, as to the proper care and handling of same. 

The ice cream plants have all been under inspection during 
the season with reference to their sanitary condition and their 
various formulas for making cream. A few who were using 
artificial flavoring, including the hokey pokey people, gave 
up the business rather than meet the requirements which 
were in the interests of health. Samples were taken from 
each manufacturer and analyzed to ascertain the per cent, 
of butterfat. With very few exceptions they were above 
the standard and the few whose product was below very 
willingly added the necessary cream to comply with the law. 
There have been 702 market inspections made, the larger part 
of which have been made among the markets where in- 
spection is most needed and a great deal of progress has been 
made along the line of neatness and cleanliness. There have 
also been many improvements in the bake shops, one baker 
having abandoned an unsanitary shop and built an up-to-date 
plant. Several others have put in new floors, plastered walls 
and ceiling and made various other improvements, such as 
changing toilets so that they would not open into workrooms, 
in fact, in most every case when improvements have been 
asked for in the interests of cleanliness and better sanitary 
conditions the owners have been willing to carry out the 
suggestions. 

Respectfully submitted. 

H. B. HAMILTON, 

Inspector. 



Board of Health 31 

NURSE'S REPORT. 

New Bedford, January 1, 1916. 
To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen : — I herewith submit my report for the year 
ending December 31, 1915. During the year I have made 
4,137 calls, 2,331 of which were upon the newly born reported 
to this department by physicians and midwdves ; the balance 
of visits being made upon persons suffering with tuberculosis. 
In several instances among the last named, the persons 
afflicted suffered with infected bones, which required 
frequent dressing and close attention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SARA W. CHACE, R. N. 



REPORT OF NURSE FOR THE PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS. 

New Bedford, January 1, 1916. 
To the Board of Health : 

Gentlemen : — I herewith submit my report for the year 
ending December 31, 1915. In addition to the regular inspec- 
tions in the Parochial schools, I have, during the year, made 
592 visits to the homes of pupils, besides investigating other 
cases in connection with this work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CATHERINE W. DOWNEY. 



32 Board of Health 

REPORT OF BACTERIOLOGIST. 

New Bedford, January 1, 1916, 
To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit my report of the year 
ending December 31, 1915: 

Diphtheria — 

Whole number of cultures taken 348 

Whole number of cultures positive 77 

Whole number of cultures negative 271 

Whole number of first cultures positive 100 

Whole number of first cultures negative 153 

Tuberculosis Pul.^ — • 

Whole number of specimens examined 256 

Whole number of specimens positive 70 

Whole number of specimens negative 172 

Whole number of specimens unsatisfactory.... 14 

Tuberculosis Pul. cases examined from the New 
Bedford Sanatorium: 

Whole number of specimens examined 278 

Whole number of specimens positive 105 

Whole number of specimens negative 173 

Typhoid Fever — 

Whole number Widal Test 10 

Whole number positive 4 

Whole number negative 6 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. H. IklANDELL. M. D., 

Bacteriologist. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF SLAUGHTERING. 

New Bedford, January 1, 1916. 

To the Board of Health : 

GENTTiEMEN :— I herewith submit my report as Inspector of 

Slaughtering for the year ending December 31, 1915 : 

Number of Beef Cattle slaughtered. . 163 

Number of Swine slaughtered 471 

Number of Calves slaughtered 340 

Number of Sheep slaughtered 3 5 

There were 14 beef cattle and 7 calves condemned as until 
for food. The pigs and sheep all passed inspection. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. B. HAMILTON, 

Inspector of Slaughtering. 



Board of Health 33 

PLUMBING INSPECTORS' REPORTS. 

New Bedford, January 1, 1916. 
To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen : — Following is the work performed by me for 
the year ending December 31, 1915 : 

Inspections, including investigations of nuisances and defec- 
tive plumbing 2224 

Inspections in Marion 2 

Respectfully snbmitted, 

LOUIS H. RICHARDSON, 

Inspector of Plumbing. 



New Bedford, January 1, 1916. 
To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen : — I herewith submit my report of the year 
ending December 31, 1915 : 

Inspections of plumbing 2206 

Inspections of plumbing in Marion 13 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM DEACON, 

Inspector of Plumbing. 



NEW BEDFORD EXTRACTOR COMPANY'S REPORT. 

New Bedford, J.vnuary 1, 1916. 
To the Board of Health : 

Gentlemen : — We herewith submit our report for the year 
ending December 31, 1915 : 

Garbage collected (tons) 8,690 

Horses 281 

Dogs 3 51 

Pigs 16 

Cows 9 

Deer 7 

Calf 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

NEW BEDFORD EXTRACTOR CO.. 

By C. M. Schindler, Supt. 



34 



Board of Health 



MORTUARY REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1915. 



I. 



1 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

9a 

10 

18 

20 

28 

29 

30 

31 

34 

36 

37 

40 

41 



42 
43 
45 

46 

50 
51 
54 
55 
56 



60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 



Cause of Death 



General Diseases; 



Typhoid fever 

Variola 

Measles 

Scarlet fever 

Whooping cough 

Diphtheria and croup 

Diphtheria including Croup 

Influenza 

Erysipelas 

Purulent infection and septicaemia 

Tuberculosis of the lungs 

Acute miliary tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis meningitis 

Abdominal tuberculosis 

Tuberculosis of other organs 

Rickets 

Syphilis 

Cancer and other malignant tumors 

of the stomach and liver 

Cancer and other malignant tumors 

of the peritoneum, intestines and 

rectum 

Cancer and other malignant tumors 

of the female genitals 

Cancer and other malignant tumors 

of the breast 

Cancer and other mahgnant tumors 

of other organs and organs not 

specified 

Other tumors (tumors of the female 

genitals excepted) 

Diabetes 

Exopthalmic, Goiture.. 

Anaemia, chlorosis 

Other General Diseases 
Alcoholism, acute or chronic 



11. Diseases of the Nervous 
System and of the Organs 
OF Special Sense. 



Encephalitis 

Simple meningitis 

Locomotor Ataxia. 

Other diseases of the spinal cord 
Cerebral Hemorrhage, Apoplexy 

Softening of the Brain 

Paralysis without specified cause 



14 



13 



14 



Board of Health 



35 



MORTUARY REPORT, 1915. (Continued). 



II. 



67 
68 
69 
71 

74 



III. 



76 
79 
80 
81 

82 
83 

84 

85 



IV. 



87 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 

95 
97 
98 



Cause of Death 



(Continued). 



General Paralysis of the Insane . 
Other forms of Mental Alienation 

Epilepsy 

Convulsions of infants 

Other diseases of the nervous 
system 

Diseases of the 
Circulatory System. 



Acute endocarditis 

Organic diseases of the heart 

Angina pectoris 

Affections of the arteries (atheroma 

aneurism, etc.) 

Embolism and thrombosis 

Diseases of the Veins (Varices, 

Hemorrhoids, Phlebitis, etc.) . 
Diseases of the Lymphatic System 

(Lymphangitis, etc.) 

Hemorrhage; other diseases of the 

circulatory system 

Diseases of the 
Respiratory System. 



Diseases of the larynx 

Acute bronchitis 

Chronic bronchitis 

Broncho-pneumonia 

Pneumonia 

Pleurisy 

Pulmonary congestion, pulmonary 

apoplexy 

Gangrene of the lung 

Pulmonary Emphysema 

Other diseases of the respiratory 

system (phthisis excepted) 

Diseases of the 
Digestive System. 



100 Diseases of the pharynx 

102 Ulcer of the stomach 

103 ' Other diseases of the stomach 
I (cancer excepted) 



< S 



1 1 
14 10 8 



< 



1 1 



17 



2 
1 
3 
5 

10 



14 

147 

2 

64 
11 

1 

1 

6 



G 

18 

6 

217 

78 
4 

4 
2 
1 



36 



Board of Health 



MORTUARY REPORT, 1915. (Continued). 



Cause of Death 


c 
a 

•— > 


V 

3 

1 
1 

1 

1 
6 

2 

1 

. 

1 


C 

3 

1 
2 

1 
1 

2 

4 

2 

1 

1 


ex 

< 

3 
2 

1 

1 

1 
3 

5 


6 

2 
1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

5 
1 

1 


1) 

c 

3 
•— > 

7 

1 
2 

1 
2 

2 
4 

6 

1 


"a 

•— > 

35 

2 
1 

1 

1 
2 

3 
2 

1 


bio 

3 
< 

39 
2 

2 
2 


a. 
v 

in 
61 

2 

1 
1 

3 
1 

1 
1 


tj 
O 

30 
1 

1 
4 

1 


> 

o 

8 

1 

3 
3 

2 
3 

1 
1 


u 
u 

Q 

1 

2 
1 

4 
3 

1 

1 

1 
1 


"rt 


V. (Continued). 


^ 


104 


Diarrhoea and enteritis (under two 
years) 


4 

1 
1 

■ 
1 

4 

1 

1 
1 


■5,00 


105 


Diarrhoea and enteritis (two years 
and over) 


5 


108 


Appendicitis and typlilitis 


4 


109 
110 
113 
Il3a 
114 
115 
117 


Hernias, intestinal obstructions. . . 

Diseases of the intestines 

Cirrhosis of the Hver 

Including: Due to Alcoholism 

Biliary calculi 

Other diseases of the liver 

Simple peritonitis (non-puerperal). 


14 
1 

8 
1 

1 
7 
.9 


VI. Non-Venereal Diseases of 
THE Genito-Urinary System 

AND AnNEXA. 




IIP 


Acute nephritis 


19 


T?0 


Bright's disease . . . 


35 


122 


Other diseases of the kidneys and 
annexa 


26 


1?4 


Diseases of the bladder 


2 


l?fi 


Diseases of the prostate 


1 


130 
131 


Other diseases of the uterus 

Cysts and other tumors of the 


1 
2 








VII. The Puerperal State. 




134 
135 
137 
138 




1 


Puerperal hemorrhage 


2 




3 


Puerperal albuminuria and convul- 
sions 


2 


VIII. Diseases of the Skin and 
of the Cellular Tissue. 




142 


Gangrene ■ 


2 


143 
145 


Furuncle 

Other diseases of the skin and 
annexa 


1 
1 


IX. Diseases of the Bones and of 
THE Organs of Locomotion. 




146 


Diseases of the bones (tuberculosis 
excepted) 


2 



Board op Health 



37 



MORTUARY REPORT, 1915. (Continued). 



Cause of Death 



X. 



Malformations. 



150 



Congenital malformations (still 
births not included) 



XI. Diseases of Early Infancy. 



151 
152 
153 



Congenital icterus, debility and 
sclerema 

Other diseases peculiar to early 
infancy 

Lack of care 



XII. 



Old Age, 



154 Senility 



XIII. Affections Produced by 
External Causes. 



156 

157 

158 
159 
163 
167 
168 

169 
170 
172 
175 

179 
181 
182 
185 
186 



Suicide by asphyxia 

Suicide by hanging or strangula 

tion. ... 

Suicide by drowning 

Suicide by firearms 

Other suicides. 

Burns (conflagration excepted). . . . 
Absorption of deleterious gases 

(conflagration excepted) 

Accidental drowning 

Traumatism by firearms 

Traumatism by fall 

Traumatism by other crushing (ve 

hides, railroads, landslides, etc.) 

Effects of heat • 

Electricity (lightning excepted) 

Homicide by firearms 

Fractures (cause not specified) . 
Other external violence 



XIV. 



Ill-Defined Diseases. 



187 
188 
189 



Ill-defined organic diseases 

Sudden death 

Cause of death not specified or ill- 
defined 



89 

34 
3 



1 
1 
1 

2 
1.5 



3 

11 



_16 

1719 



148 162 155 153 133 



145 



149 133 148 



137 



138 



Population, 109,562. Death rate per 1000, 15.67. 

Respectfully submitted, SUSAN J. SMALL, Clerk. 



38 



Board of Health 



DEATHS BY AGES, 1915. 









Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


Apr. 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 


Total 




M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 


M 


F 
1 


M 

2 


F 

5 


M 

4 


F 

2 


M 

3 


F 
1 


M 

5 


F 


M 

2 


F 


M 
1 


F 

1 


M 

3 


F 


M 

7 


F 

4 


M 

32 


F 


Under 1 day. . . 


2 


3 


2 


2 


1 


2 




21 


1-2 days . 






1 


1 


2 




2 




2 


1 


1 


, 






1 


1 


2 




2 








1 






2 


14 


5 


2-3 days . 






1 






2 










2 


1 




1 


3 


2 


1 






2 














7 


8 


3 days-1 wk 
















1 


1 


1 


2 




. 


2 


1 


1 




2 


2 






1 






1 


, 


7 


8 


1-2 wks. . 






1 




1 


3 


1 


1 






. 


2 


1 


2 


, 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 








2 


1 


9 


11 


2-3 wks. . 






2 




1 




2 








1 




1 






2 










2 






1 






9 


3 


3 wks.-l mo. 










2 


1 






, 


2 


2 


1 


, 




1 




1 


1 






2 


1 






1 




9 


6 


1-2 mos. . 






1 


3 


3 


1 


3 


5 


2 


2 




2 


1 


3 


2 


1 


2 


1 


2 


9 


7 


4 


1 


4 


1 




25 


35 


2-3 mos. . 






1 


4 


1 


1 






2 


6 


2 


2 


, 




2 


1 


5 


5 


3 


4 


3 


2 


1 


2 






20 


27 


3-6 mos. . 






4 


1 


1 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


1 


2 


4 


2 


6 


9 


6 


9 


1011 


4 


2 


3 


2 


2 


4 


47 


53 


6-9 mos. . 






, 


2 


6 


1 


3 


6 


9 


3 


5 


1 


3 


2 


1 


2 


3 


7 


8 


3 


3 


2 


2 




3 




52 


29 


9-12 mos. 






4 


2 


1 


4 


4 


7 


3 


2 


6 


3 


1 


2 


7 


2 


4 


2 4 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


38 


31 


lyr. . . 






7 


3 


7 


7 


10 


7 


4 


6 


2 


1 


6 


7 


7 


9 


2 


4 3 


6 


10 


2 


7 


4 


1 


4 


66 


60 


2 yrs. . . 






3 


1 


1 


4 


1 


3 


2 






3 


2 


6 




3 






1 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


15 


26 


3 yrs. . . 








2 


2 






1 


3 




3 


1 


1 




1 


1 






2 




1 




1 




3 


1 


17 


6 


4 yrs. . . 






1 


1 








1 




1 


1 


2 


2 


2 












1 






2 


1 






6 


9 


5-9 yrs. . 






2 


1 


3 






1 


2 


1 




2 


3 


2 










1 


2 


4 


2 


4 


1 


1 


2 


20 


14 


10-14 yrs. 








1 




2 




1 


1 






1 


1 


1 






1 






1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


7 


10 


15-19 yrs. 






3 


2 


3 




2 


2 


4 


1 


5 


2 




T 


3 


1 


6 




2 




1 


4 




1 


1 


4 


30 


18 


20-24 yrs. 






1 




4 


1 


3 


2 


2 


2 




1 


3 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 . 




3 


2 


1 


5 


1 


1 


21 


18 


25-29 yrs. 






1 


3 


6 


3 


2 


2 


. 




1 


3 


2 


3 


3 


2 


1 


. 4 


2 




3 


1 


5 


2 




33 


26 


30-34 yrs. 






2 


2 


1 


4 


4 


2 4 


3 


2 


2 


4 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 2 


4 


3 


1 


2 


3 




2 


31 


35 


35-39 yrs. 






4 


4 


7 


2 


3 


1 4 


3 


2 


3 


3 


2 


1 


1 




2 8 


2 


2 


1 


2 


3 


1 


2 


37 


26 


40-44 yrs. 






3 


8 


5 


1 


4 


6 4 


2 


2 


3 


2 


4 


1 


1 


2 


. 2 




6 


2 


5 


3 


1 


2 


37 


32 


45-49 yrs. 






5 


1 


5 


3 


3 


1 5 


1 


7 


1 


1 




4 


2 


3 


5 1 


3 


4 




3 


3 


7 


6 


48 


26 


50-54 yrs. 






3 


3 


2 


5 


4 


2 3 


3 


3 


5 


2 


4 


2 


2 


6 


2 1 


3 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


4 


31 


36 


55-59 yrs. 






2 


6 


4 


2 


3 


2 


5 


6 


4 


3 


3 


3 


4 


2 


5 


2 2 


1 


6 


5 


8 


3 


3 


4 


49 


39 


60-64 yrs. 






4 


8 


2 


6 


6 


4 




1 


3 


3 


2 


1 


5 


2 


1 


3 4 


2 


3 


3 


7 


5 


6 


5 


43 


43 


65-69 yrs. 






2 


1 


1 


3 


4 


2 


2 


10 




6 


1 


10 


4 


3 


4 


5 3 


2 


2 


5 


4 


3 


5 


1 


32 


51 


70-74 yrs. 






5 


4 


1 


5 


3 


2 


5 


6 


2 


3 


2 


2 


1 


5 


3 


. 3 


5 


2 


2 




3 


6 


4 


33 


41 


75-79 yrs. 






6 


7 


5 


4 


2 


4 


2 


6 


3 


1 


4 


4 


3 


4 


1 


3 2 




4 


5 


2 


1 


3 


5 


37 


44 


80-84 yrs. 






1 




1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


3 






2 






1 


1 


. 


2 


2 


4 


2 


2 


15 


16 


85-89 yrs. 








1 




1 




2 


1 


1 


1 




2 


5 


1 






2 












2 


1 


3 


6 


17 


90-94 yrs. 




























1 








1 


1 








1 






2 


2 


4 


95-99 yrs. 








1 












1 






1 














1 




1 






1 




2 


4 


100 + yrs. 








. 




















































Unknown. 












































. 
















Stillborn 






3 


5 


9 


4 


10 


5 


8 


5 


3 


3 


6 


4 


5 


6 


7 


6 


4 


8 


7 


6 


4 


5 


4 


2 


— 


— 


Whole No. . . . 


72 


76 


80 


72 


76 


79 


77 


76 


6"^ 


66 


65 


80 


77 


67 


71 


62 


77 


71 


79 


58 


69 


64 


69 


69 


879 


840 



Total deaths, 1719 



Respectfully submitted, 



S. J. SMALL, Clerk. 



Board op Health 39 



INDEX 



"AGE 

Agent's Report 13-28 

Baby Welfare 8-10 

Bakeries 6. 28, 30 

Births 10.13.23,24 

Board's Report 3-12 

Contagious Diseases — Reimbursements 27 

Contagious Diseases 7, 14, 27 

Contagious Diseases (1915) 21 

Contagious Diseases (nine years) 22 

Contagious Diseases — Expenditures 26 

Dairy Farm Inspection 13,14,28,30 

Death Rate 3 

Educational Work 3-5 

Examination for Insanity - 11 

Expenditures 11 

Expenditures (monthly) 11 

Food Inspection 6, 7, 30 

Isolation Hospital 26, 27 

Medical School Inspection 7, 26 

Milk 13, 14, 30 

Milk (bacterial count) 14 

Monthly Record 28 

Mortuary 34-37 

Mortuary (by ages) 38 

Mortuary (Infantile) ' 23-25 

Ophthalmia Neonatorum 7,23 

Plumbing 8, 12 

Report Bacteriologist 32 

Report Medical Inspector 29 

Report Inspector of Slaughtering 32 

Report Milk Inspector 30 

Report Nurses .... 31 

Report New Bedford Extractor Co 33 

Report Plumbing Inspectors 33 

Small Pox 14-16 

Stables 28 

Tuberculosis 16-20 

Tuberculosis (subsidy) 19-20 

Tuberculosis nativity 17 

Undertakers 12 



City of New Bedford. 

In Board of Aldermen, 

Jan. 27, 1916. 

Received, ordered printed in City Documents, and sent 
down for concurrence. 

W. H. B. REMINGTON, City Clerk. 



In Common Council. 

Jan. 27, 1916. 

Concurred. 

LILY F. DARCY, Clerk Pro Tern. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Inspector of Animals 




From April 1st to December 31st 
1915 



Report of Inspector of Animals. 



January 1st, 1916. 

To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen : 

My report as inspector of animals for the City of 
New Bedford from April 1st, 1915 to December 31st, 
1915 is herewith submitted. There have been during 
that time eight cases of glanders in horses and three 
cases of tuberculosis in cows disposed of, the carcasses 
of same rendered and the premises where these animals 
were found were thoroughly cleansed and disinfected as 
were also the shops where the horses were shod. All 
horses brought into the city from New York and Rhode 
Island have been examined and a report made to the 
Commissioner of Animal Industry by whom all the 
duties of this office are assigned and to whom reports 
are made on each assignment immediately on its 
completion. The principal duties of this office viz. 
the examination of all ne,at cattle, sheep and swine 
and reporting as to their health and stable conditions 
has not yet been ordered but will probably come in 
January and February the account of which will be 
embodied in a later report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. B. HAMILTON, 

Inspector of Animals. 



Annual Report 



OF THE 



Inspector of Wires 



OF THE 



City of New Bedford, Mass. 



For the Year 1915 




NEW BEDFORD 

The A- B. Coffin Press, Printers 
1916 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 



ANNUAL REPORT. 



New Bedford, February 9, 1916. 

To His Honor, the Mayor, and the City Council of the City 
of New Bedford. 
Sirs : 
I respectfully submit my annual report of this depart- 
ment from December 7, 1914, to December 5, 1915. 

INSPECTION OF INSIDE WIRING. 

During- the year have inspected 1,800 installations, 
making: 6,480 inspections. 

Have issued to the N. B. Gas & Edison Lt. Co. 1,992 
permits to connect electric service. 

Sent out to contractors and property owners 2,056 
reports on defective wiring. 

REMOVAL OF OVERHEAD WIRES AND 
CONSTRUCTION. 

On January 22, 1915, after several meetings of the 
Inspector of Wires, City Engineer and Superintendent ox 
Streets, the following letter was sent to the Mayor and 
Board of Aldermen: 

To His Honor the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. 
Gentlemen: 

In compliance with Section 3 of Chapter 3 3 5, Acts of 1914, 
as follows: 

The Inspector of Wires, City Engineer and Superintendent 
of Streets shall, annually, in the month of January, present to 
the Mayor and Board of Aldermen a list of public ways and 
places specified in section two, or parts thereof, from which, 
in their judgment, the overhead wires and construction shall 
be removed in accordance with the provisions of this Act. 

We herewith present to you the following list: 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 



School St. Purchase to Sixth, 460 ft.; Spring St., Purchase 
to Sixth, 465 ft.; Pleasant St., School to Spring, 223 ft.; Sixth 
St., School to Spring, 2 2,5 ft.; Sixth St., Mechanics Lane to 
Elm, 140 ft.; and Elm to Middle, 180 ft.; Pleasant St., Elm 
to High, 3 90 ft.; Elm St., Purchase to County, 1180 ft.: 
Middle St., Purchase to County, 1170 ft.; William St., County 
to Sixth, 740 ft. Total, 5173 feet. 

On February 10, 1915, after a hearing, the following order 
was sent to the several wire-using companies as follows: 

City of New Bedford. 

In Board of Aldermen, 

February 10, 1915. 
Whereas, Under the provisions of Chapter 33 5 of the Acts 
of 1914, due notice has been given, and a hearing has been 
held l)y this Board; it is herel)y 

Ordered, That all telegraph, telephone, electric light, electric 
motor or power, and all other wires, cables and conductors, 
in and above the hereinafter designated street, and all poles 
and structures in said streets used for the support of the same, 
excepting such structures, poles, cables, wires and conductors 
as are excepted by said Chapter 33 5, Acts of 1914, shall be 
removed, within the time named in said chapter, or that said 
wires, cables or conductors shall be placed, maintained and 
operated in underground conduits. 

Locations for said underground conduits shall be petitioned 
for in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 5 09, Acts of 
1911, and all acts in addition thereto or in amendment thereof. 

The streets or parts of streets designated and affected by 
this order are as follows, to wit: — 

School Street, Purchase to Sixth 460 feet; 

Spring Street, Purchase to Sixth 465 feet; 

Pleasant Street, School to Spring. ... 223 feet; 

Sixth Street, School to Spring 22 5 feet; 

Sixth Street, Mechanics Lane to Elm. . 140 feet; 

Sixth Street, Elm to Middle 180 feet; 

Pleasant Street, Elm to High 3 90 feet; 

Elm Street, Purchase to County 1180 feet; 

Middle Street, Purchase to County. . .1170 feet; 

William Street, County to Sixth 740 feet; 

Total 5173 feet. 



INSPECTOR OF WIRES 



And the City Clerk is liereby directed to serve notice of tiie 
adoption of this order upon the owners of all wires, cables or 
conductors, in and above said streets, and all poles and struc- 
tures in said streets used for the support of the same, by mail- 
ing to each of said owners, by U. S. registered letter mail, an 
attested copy of this order. 

And the City Clerk is hereby further directed to cause this 
order to be recorded in the Book of Location Order Records, 
as povided in Chapte 5 09, Acts of 1911, and to furnish a copy 
of this order to the Inspector of Wires, the City Engineer and 
the Superintendent of Streets of the City of New Bedford. 

In BOARD OF ALDERMEN, Feb. 10, 1915. 
Adopted and ordered recorded in Book of Location Order 
Records. 

A true copy. Attest: W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 

I hereby certify that the foregoing order was adopted at a 
meeting of the Mayor and Aldermen of the City of New Bedford, 
Mass., held on the tenth day of February, 1915. 

Attest: W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 

Received and entered in the records of Location Orders of 
the City of New Bedford, Mass., Book 5, Page 2 00. 

Attest: W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 

I hereby certify that on Wednesday, the tenth day of Febru- 
ary, 1915, at eight o'clock P. M., at Room 309, Municipal 
Building, a public hearing was held on the order herewith 
recorded, and that public notice thereof was given, according 
to law, and that thereupon said order was adopted. 

Attest: W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 

A true copy of order and certificate recorded in Book of 
Location Order Records, City of New Bedford, Mass., Li1)ro 5, 
Folio 200. 

Attest: W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 



g INSPECTOR OF WIRES 

OUTSIDE WORK. 

Petitions of the Automatic Telephone Co. asked for 
240 feet of conduit and 3 manholes. 

Petitions of the N. B. Gas & Edison Light Co. asked for 
9,100 feet of conduit and 14 manholes. 

Petitions of the Southern Mass. Telephone Co. asked for 
5,286 feet of conduit and 7 manholes. 

Summary of poles as follows : 

New locations 264 poles 

Joint locations 424 poles 

Attachment of wires of one company 
to poles owned by another 349 poles 

1037 poles 

Of the 424 joint locations, there were already installed 
395, therefore making 29 new additional poles. 

There were 293 new poles set in streets during the 
year. 

During the year I have investigated and reported to the 
INIayor and Board of Aldermen on 322 petitions of wire 
using companies, involving 1,037 poles, 14,626 feet of 
conduit and 24 manholes. 

POLICE SIGNAL SYSTEM. 
The system when put under this department on Decem- 
ber 7, 1915, was in poor condition, not at all dependable, 
due to the bad condition of central apparatus, police boxes, 
line and underground cable. The boxes have been over- 
hauled and put in order. Much work has been done on 
the overhead lines and the underground cables; the mosr 
serious trouble with cable was the joints, these having 
been made up with tape. These have been replaced by 
proper lead sleeve joints. I have on hand ten thousand 
feet of lead cable and ten miles of overhead iron wire, 
so that this year much more can be done on the line ana 
cable work. Very truly yours, 

WILLIAM P. BRIGGS, 

Inspector of Wires. 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 

In Board of Aldermen, 

February lO; 1916. 

Received, ordered printed in the City Documents 
and sent down for concurrence. 

W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 



Concurred. 



In Common Council, 

February 10, 1916. 

LILY F. DARCY, 

Clerk pro tern. 



The Sixty-Fourth Annual Report 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES 



OF THE 



Free Public Library 



OF THE 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

TO THE CITY COUNCIL 
FOR THE YEAR 1915. 




NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

THE J. E. BUDLONG PRESS, PRINTERS. 
1916. 



Officers of the Free Public Library 
FOR THE YEAR 1916. 

Trustees. 
Ex-Officio. Term expires, January, 1917. 

EDWARD R. HATHAWAY, Mayor of the City. 

JOHN H. HOLLIHAN, . . . President of the Common Council. 
ELZEAR H. CHOQUETTE, . Chairman of the Committee of the 

City Council on Education. 
Elected by the City Council. 
FRANCIS M. KENNEDY, Term expires April, 1916. 
OTIS SEABURY COOK, Term expires April, 1916. 

JIREH SWIFT, Jr., Term expires April, 1917. 

ABBOT P. SMITH, Term expires April, 1917. 

FRANK A. MILLIKEN, Term expires April, 1918. 

SAMUEL F. WTNSPER, Term expires April, 1918. 

President of the Board. Clerk. 

THE MAYOR. GEORGE H. TRIPP. 

CofYltft'l t t€CS 

On Library . . MESSRS. KENNEDY, COOK, And MILLIKEN. 
On Finance . . MESSRS. SWIFT, KENNEDY, And WINSPER. 
On the Building . . MESSRS. COOK SMITH And MILLIKEN. 
On Branch Reading Rooms . MESSRS. WINSPER And SWIFT. 

Librarian. 
GEORGE H. TRIPP. 

Chief Assistant and Supt. of Binding and Branches. 
CLEMENT L. YAEGER. 
Cataloguer. Librarian's Secretary and Stenographer. 

ANNA M. DeWOLF. MINERVA F.'MAXFIELD. 

Heads of Departments. 

MARY A. CHASE Reference Librarian 

JANE E. GARDNER Art Librarian. 

JANE E. THUMAN, .... Children's Librarian. 

Desk Attendants and Assistants. 

JOSEPHINE A. MERRICK, . Accession and Genealogical Room. 

EDITH H. COBB Ingraham Hall. 

ANNA W. CLEVELAND, .... Accession and Ingraham Hall. 

GRACE D. SHERMAN, Delivery Desk. 

EDITH H. BRODHEAD, Delivery Desk. 

MARION BRIGGS, Accession and Delivery Desk. 

L. GERTRUDE WILCOX , Genealogical Room and Delivery Desk. 
ELLEN F. DOLLARD, . Assistant Art Room and Children's Room. 

ETHEL WILCOX, Assistant Children's Room. 

ARTHUR J. ROGERS, Repairs and Periodicals. 

B TQfftchc S 

North .... ELSIE COLLINS, AMANDA DION. 

South JOHN WILKINSON. 

West MARY ELIZABETH BROWN. 

HARPER WEST. JOHN HULTON. 

CHARLES SMITH. OVILA BLANCHETTE. 

Elevator. 
JOHN R. GORDON. 

^ dflttOTS 

DENNIS J. MAHONEY. ' JOHN BURNS. 

GEORGE SUTHERLAND. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



To the Honorable, the City Council of the City of New 
Bedford, Mass. 

The trustees present their sixty-fourth annual report 
to the City Council in the Report of the Librarian, which 
has been adopted by the Board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES, 

George H. Tripp, 

Clerk of the Board. 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Free Public Library. 

At the dedication of our library building five years 
ago last December, in an address by Dr. Frank P. Hill, the 
Librarian of Brooklyn, N. Y., he said, "It is evident 
that the Public Library in New Bedford has had a normal 
and gradual growth. There have been no radical changes 
in either methods or management, the plan upon which 
the original work was inaugurated being practically identi- 
cal with the present ideal of what a public library should be." 

In presenting these annual reports to the Board of 
Trustees, the story of each year's progress and achievement 
is essentially along the path outlined sixty-five years ago 
when the library was established. During the past year, 
as in every year since we have moved into this building, 
there has been an increase not only in the circulation of 
books, but in the use of books. Noticeably during the 
past year every month shows a numerical gain over the 
corresponding month of the preceding year. From the 
open shelves in Ingraham Hall alone there was a gain of 
nearly one thousand for each month. 

There have been few changes in the mechanical equip- 
ment of the library. The elevator has been repaired to 
conform to the requirements of the state police. A display 
case of ornate design and in harmony with the furniture of 
the Art Room has been installed in the upper corridor. 
This gives an opportunity for displaying in a dust proof 
case some of the choicer rarities in the library collection. 
There has also been purchased a revolving frame for show- 
ing prints. This is an attractive piece of furniture, and 
admirably adapted for its purpose. 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



To accommodate the greatly increasing demand for 
illustrative material for use in the schools, one of the study 
rooms has been filled with boxes and drawers in which are 
arranged systematically, pictures mounted and unmounted 
that can be used to illustrate almost any desired subject. 
In the report of the Art Librarian it will be noticed that 
several thousand such pictures have been mounted and 
added to the collection during the past year. 

A satisfactory arrangement of the large number of 
pieces of sheet music, the gifts of various organizations and 
individuals, has been made by devoting the southeast 
study room to that purpose, where cabinets around the 
walls accommodate the sheets. There has been a noticeable 
increase in the additions to our music collection, and more 
interest has been shown in the books which we have on 
that subject. 

The constantly increasing use of the lecture room is 
worth noticing. A tabulated list of all the events scheduled 
for that room will be given in an appendix, but it is worth 
while to note the large number of organizations which with 
more or less regularity have had their meetings in that room. 
Among these are the Horticultural Society, the Parliamen t- 
ary Law Class of the Woman's Club, a class for the study of 
Current Events, Stamp Collector's Club, Committee for 
Work with the Blind, Equal Suffrage League; Medical 
Society, Astronomical Club, Teacher's Benefit Association, 
Young Men's Hebrew Association, St. John's Ambulance 
Fund, Smith College Club, Framingham Normal School 
Club, Charity Organization Class, New Bedford Peace 
Society, and the Forestry Association. 

To formulate the rules regulating the use of the room, 
the Trustees at their meeting in December passed the fol- 
lowing vote. 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



The use of the Lecture Room shall be granted for 
lectures or conferences on educational, artistic, literary 
and allied subjects without charge, provided that no tickets 
of admission or money shall be taken at the door. Ad- 
mission to such meetings shall be entirely free. 

Societies or clubs of similar aims, but of restricted 
membership miay be granted the use of the Hall, but no 
tickets of admission or money shall be taken at the door, 
nor shall such meetings be advertised in the public press. 

In all cases, application for the use of the Hall shall be 
made to the Librarian who shall have power to grant the 
privilege, subject to revision by the Committee on the Li- 
brary. 

[In granting the privilege to societies of restricted 
membership, it shall be understood that admission shall 
not be refused to any person who seeks entrance.] 

The Lecture Course has proved popular. During the 
year there have been eighteen lectures given. 

All were held in the High School Hall, with the except- 
ion of two in foreign languages which were given in 
our own lecture room. The two foreign lectures were 
given, one by Alberto Pecorini in Italian, and the other by 
Mrs. Euphrosyne Corinna Canoutas, in Greek. Accom- 
panying the Italian lecture there was prepared by the library 
a card which was widely circulated among the Italian resi- 
dents, calling attention to the opportunities offered by the 
library to citizens and residents of New Bedford of that 
nationality. 

A unique entertainment was held in the lecture room 
last month, when a pianola concert for the blind was given 
which drew out a large attendance, and was much enjoyed. 

As in previous years there have been numerous ex- 
hibits in the rotunda and the art room, mainly furnished by 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



the American Federation of Arts. A list of these will 
be given in an appendix. The most recent of these ex- 
hibits was the one on Household Decoration, which was 
supplemented by a printed list of books in the library on 
the same subject. ' 

An exhibition of etchings is still continuing. This 
collection was loaned by the Chicago Society of Etchers. 

Also during the month of December there was a Child 
Welfare Exhibit shown by the State Board of Health. This 
collection attracted attention and undoubtedly the result 
will be beneficial. The same exhibit will be later shown in 
the North and South ends of the city. 

The Juvenile Room has followed its usual custom of 
making a special display of Christmas books, and in this 
connection printed lists have been circulated under the im- 
print of the library, giving titles of books for Christmas 
suitable for the children. 

Among other publications of the year have been a list 
of stories and story-telling for juveniles and a list of dental 
books in the library, prepared by the Dental Society. 

In order to increase the vital connection between the 
schools and the library, the Librarian and the Children's 
Librarian have at various times addressed classes and teach- 
ers, the director of the children's work especially having 
made many visits to the schools to give instruction to the 
higher grammar grades in the use of reference books, on 
the arrangement of books, on the use of the catalogue. 
This work has been well received by the schools and will 
unquestionably prove of mutual advantage. 

By arrangement with the City Clerk, municipal re- 
ports received by his department are stored in the library, 
so that the library is accumulating, in addition to its 
extensive collection of United States government reports 



8 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

and state reports, the municipal reports of many cities and 
towns. The municipal reference work continues and seems 
to be appreciated. 

Work on the new bookplate, which has been authorized 
by your Board, has progressed favorably, and in alb pro- 
bability the completed design will await your approval at 
the next meeting. 

Continuing the work started on the publication of 
marriages and deaths in the local papers, it has now been 
carried down to 1874, which will prove increasingly valuable 
to students of genealogy. The librarian of one of the most 
important antiquarian societies in the country, on a visit to 
New Bedford most highly commended the work, and stated 
that he was able to find material here that he had been 
searching for in vain for a long time. 

The pleasant relations with other libraries continue, 
evidenced in part by the mutual interchange of 
books. We borrow very largely from the Boston Public 
Library, and from others when needed, and lend books very 
freely to other libraries in this vicinity, and sometim es at 
a distance. We have especially sent many collections of 
books to Wareham, Chatham, Vineyard Haven, Nantucket, 
etc. 

It is perhaps not as well known as it should be that 
groups of individuals are given an opportunity of having 
collections of books which may be kept out for several 
months at a time, and which can be renewed at pleasure. 
Such collections have been sent to the schools, engine houses, 
the telephone exchange, and elsewhere. There are nearly 
200 such deposits in various parts of the city. The libiary 
would be glad to supply such collections of books to any 
reliable persons, to department stores, factories, etc. 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



In May there was a new registration of borrowers 
made necessary by many of the card holders having chang- 
ed their residences, or left the city. Such registrations 
seem to be necessary every few years to keep the list of 
active card holders up to date. 

Owing to with the increase from one cent to two, 
in the daily fines for overdue books, there has been a large 
decrease in the number of overdue postals sent from the 
library. 

The newspapers have given the library a good degree 
of publicity during the year, and they are always very ready 
to print interesting notices concerning library activities. 
The Standard has made special features in their Sunday 
editions of the lectures in our course, and has given ex- 
tended and illustrated notices of the lectures and their sub- 
jects. 

In the work of the Reference Department, the assistant 
in charge reports that in addition to answering requests 
for information from local inquirers, material has been fur- 
nished on all sorts of subjects to people from Barnstable, 
Chatham, Acushnet, Cotuit,pairhaven, Falmouth, Hyannis 
Oak Bluffs, Vineyard Haven, Wareham, Wood's Hole, and 
other places. 

She sayS; "The European war has furnished many sub- 
jects for essays and debates, and questions concerning 
armament and the financial resources of the warring 
countries, international law, etc., have been frequent." 

An up to date map of Europe has hung in the Reference 
Room all the year, and has been studied by young and old 
alike. Two reproductions of old New England maps of 
1680 and 1775 have attracted much attention and comment. 

A list of books and papers of interest to the business 
men of the city was printed and distributed. 



10 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



The question of publicity which has caused a good 
deal of comment in library circles has not been a disturb- 
ing feature in our library management. As the Reference 
Librarian has expressed it "We consider a well served patron 
our best advertisement". 

The work with foreign readers has continued as for- 
merly in increasing volume. Besides the minor languages 
which are represented by a few books, the citizens of New 
Bedford should understand that the library has very large 
collections of books in French, Portugese, Yiddish, German, 
and a reasonably large supply of books in Swedish, Greek, 
Arabic, and Polish. 

The Director of the Art Room reports :- 

"The customary work of this department has continued 
and increased during 1915, and considerable interest has 
been manifested in the various exhibitions. Much appre- 
ciation of the selection of new books has been expressed, 
many having been examined here which do not circulate 
frequently. Many places have drawn upon our collection 
of books and pictures. 

The removal of the entire collection to one floor 
has facilitated our service, though with its constant growth 
[3426 pictures having been mounted last year] we are 
needing still more space. 

The frequent request for open shelf space for the entire 
music collection continues, but foremost among the needs 
of the art department is lighting for the tables and book 
shelves." 

The children's Librarian at the opening of school sent 
out a circular letter to be distributed among all the children 
in the rooms served by the school collections of books: 
probably from 6,000 to 7,000 of these circulars were dis- 
tributed to the children to read and take home to their 
parents. These circulars outlined the opportunities offered 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 11 



to the young, and in alluring form presented the trea- 
sures in store for the children on the shelves of their, library. 
A copy of this letter is printed in an appendix. She writes 
"The Juvenile Room is conducted with a view to interest- 
ing and improving the children who frequent it, and both 
in that room and in the lists of books sent to the teachers 
suggestions of new titles are w'elcomed by the library, and 
such books are bought when possible." 

.When the available funds for the use of the library 
are sufficient, it would be desirable to have a Reference 
Librarian, absolutely under the control of the library but 
stationed at the High School, to act as an intermediary be- 
tween the two institutions, and to assist in the reference 
work demanded by the higher grade pupils. This would 
not be intended to relieve in any way the work of the Re- 
ference Librarian, but would supplement her work greatly, 
increase its efficiency, and bring about a still closer relation 
between the High School students and the library which is 
supplied with the material c nstantly needed in their 
school work. 

The work of the staff has been satisfactory, and they 
haye shown enthusiam and interest in their work. There 
has been an esprit de corps which is necessary for the best 
work, and I can give hearty commendation to their efforts. 

The Librarian wishes to express to the members of the 
Board appreciation of the interest which they they have 
always manifested in the general and detailed work of the 
library, and the interest they have shown by attendance on 
sub-committee meetings aud the monthly meetings of the 
Board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE H. TRIPP, Librarian. 



12 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

REPORT OF THE JUVENILE ROOM 



The activities of the Juvenile Department, such as the 
circulation of books through the Juvenile Room, the branch- 
es, the public schools, and Sunday Schools, have progressed 
as usual. 

The important feature of the work this year has been 
the starting of classes for the purpose of instructing children 
in the use of the library. This has been made possible 
through the cordial co-operation of the superintendent of 
schools and the teachers. Pupils from the graduating 
classes in the grammar schools come with their teachers 
to the library where a laboratory lesson is given on the fol- 
lowing topics: 

1. Free Public Library— its meaning. 

2. Arrangement of books. 

3. Use of the catalogue. 

4. Reference books. [Dictionary, encyclopedia. World 

almanac, magazine indexes, etc.] 

The instruction is necessarily simple as the time given is 
only one hour. It does however, mark a step in the direc- 
tion of helping the children to become intelligent users of 
the library. 

In order to make the visit as practical as possible, each 
child is given a question to answer covering one of the points 
made in the lecture. The teachers have received the move- 
ment with enthusiasm and have helped materially in its suc- 
cess. One teacher gave her class a preliminary talk on 
the library and followed up the subject by giving the child- 
ren topics to look up on their own responsibility. 

The problem of the intermediate reader is making it- 
self felt. The period of transition from the use of the Ju- 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 13 



venile Room to that of the main library is a difficult one 
to adjust. We have attempted to solve the problem by 
placing on the open shelves in Ingraham Hall a collection 
of adult books suitable for young people. 

Our annual exhibit of Christmas books for children 
was held this year in co-operation with the movement start- 
ed by the Boy Scout organization for interesting people 
in purchasing better books for children. Attractive print- 
ed catalogues were distributed and in many instances the 
attendants in the Juvenile Room were able to help people 
in selecting good books. One of our local bookstores felt 
the results of our efforts to encourage the buying of better 
books, thus bringing to the front again a way in which the 
library may help the bookseller. 

When the new sets of books were sent out to the schools 
in September, a letter was sent to every child in the rooms 
where there are class-room libraries for the purpose of em- 
phasizing the source from which the books came. These 
letters were read in school and then taken home for the 
parents to read. The letters aroused much interest in the 
library among the children ,and many came to register. 
The children from one room answered the letter and their 
comments were very interesting. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JANE E. THUMAN. 

Children's Librarian. 



14 



F*REE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



APPENDIX A. 



ADDITIONS BY CLASSES IN YEAR 1915. 





NEW 


TITLES 




General Works, 


15 


History, 


122 


Ethics and Philosophy, 


36 


Fiction, 


304 


Religion, 


37 


French Fiction and Literature 


69 


Sociology, 


115 


German Fiction 


1 


Education, 


40 


Yiddish Fiction and Literature 


; 61 


Language, 


15 


Greek Literature [modern] 


39 


Science, 


67 


Polish Fiction and Literature 


42 


Useful Arts, 


147 


Italian Fiction and Literature 


20 


Fine Arts, 


93 


Portugese Fiction and Liter. 


27 


Music, 


22 


Roumanian Literature 


1 


Amusements and Sports, 


30 


Books for Children, 


119 


Literature, 


101 


Books for the Blind, 


12 


Description and Travel, 


83 






Individual Biography, 


57 




1714 


Collective Biography and 




Periodicals and Newspapers 




Genealogy, 


39 


bound 


337 






Government Documents 


471 



APPENDIX B. 



CIRCULATION. 







No. of 


Percent 






Books. 


of Whole. 


^ain Collection, Adult. 








Classification. 








Miscellaneous, and 


periodicals. 


12,829 


6.89 


Philosophy, 




1,503 


.80 


Religion, 




1,307 


.70 


Sociology, 




3,896 


2.09 


Language, 




1,226 


.65 


Science, 




2,001 


1.07 


Useful Arts, 




5,195 


2.79 


Fine Arts, 




5,486 


2.94 


English literature, 




4,002 


2.15 


Foreigh literature. 




1,513 


.81 


Biography, 




2,673 


1.43 


History, 




3,157 


1.69 


Travel and descript 


ion. 


3,350 


1.80 


English fiction. 




132,834 


71.40 


Foreign Fiction, 




5,056 

18( 


2.71 
S.028 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 15 



Juvenile Room, 






Classification. 






Fairy Tales, 8,556 




15.53 


Biography, 786 




1.42 


History, 2,043 




3.70 


Travel and description, 1,374 




2.49 


Fiction, 30,538 




55.43 


Miscellaneous, including Bible Stories, 






Literature, Science, Useful Arts, etc 11,793 


55,090 


21.40 






Branches, 


71,836 




Schools, 


102,264 




Miscellaneous, 


1,022 




Total circulation, 


416,240 




Pictures loaned: 






Art photographs, 483 






Prints, 183 






Prints [color] 43,401 






Architecture, 91 






Sculpture, 90 






Stereographs 50,204 






Miscellaneous, 12,362 


in^ Q^^ 





APPENDIX C. 

GENERAL STATISTICS FOR 1915. 

Books Added. 
Volumes purchased. Main Collection, 
Volumes purchased. Juvenile Room, 
Volumes purchased, School Collection, 
Volumes added by gift, 

Phamphlets Added 
Pamphlets purchased, 
Pamphlets added by gift, 



4,210 

1,141 

1,033 

632 


66 
3,259 



7,016 



3,325 



Other Additions. 

Prints, and process pictures, purchased, 583 

Photographs, etc., [gifts], 12 

Postcards [gifts], 31 

Atlas folios, maps, charts, [inch gifts] 190 

Stereographs, 199 

Miscellaneous [gifts] 13 



16 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Volumes worn out and withdrawn* 
Main Collection 
Juvenile Room, 
School Collection, 



568 

856 

1081 



*63 on account of being exposed to contagious diseases. 

Volumes replaced: 

Main Collection, 342 

Juvenile Room, 755 

School Collection, 1,033 

Net addition to the Library in volumes. 

Number of volumes in Library, January 1, 1916, 

Volumes bound, including periodicals and books rebound: 
Main Collection 3,070 

Juvenile Room, 1,112 

School Collection, 1,232 



Periodicals in Reading Room, 

Newspapers in reading Room, 
New cards issued: 

Old Registration: 

Adult, Central Library 

Through Branches 



2,505 



2,130 

4,511 

154,511 



5,414 



801 
304 


377 
52 

1,105 
690 


344 
346 


7839* 
1627 


1,795 
9466 
3707 


2740 
967 





Juvenile, Central Library 

Through Branches 

New Registration :-[From May 17] 
Adult, Central Library 

Through Branches 

Juvenile, Central Library 

Through Branches 

*Includes 81 Juvenile transfers. 

Books drawn for home use. Central Library, Main Collection, 
Including, [Main Desk 79,793*, Ingraham Hail 
91,638, Reference Room 9,874, Art Room 
4277+, Genealogical Room 301, Teachers' 
Room, 145] 

*Including 345 through Branches, 
tincluding 46 books for Bhnd 
Books circulated from Juvenile Room, 
Books circulated from School Collection, 
Books circulated directly from Branch Reading, 

Rooms, 
Inter-Library loans 

Other Agencies [Including Engine Houses, 
Sunday Schools, Clubs, etc. 



13,173 



186,028 

55,090 
102,264 

71,836 
85 

937 



Total circulation of books 



416240 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 17 



Pictures circulated from Art Room: 

Art Photographs 483, Prints 183, Color Prints 
[including Phostints] 43,401, Architecture 
91, Sculpture 90, Stereographs 1,279 
Miscellaneous 12,362 57,889 

Pictures circulated from Juvenile Room: 

Stereographs, in sets of 25 and 50, 48,925 
Pictures, 6 48,931 

106,820 



Notices sent out for over due books: 

Main Library— Postal cards 3,893; letters 179 4,072 

Juvenile Room — Postal cards 692; letters 45 737 

Branches [N&S] Postal cards 786; letters 63 849 5,658 

Messenger sent 65 

BRANCH READING ROOMS IN DETAIL. 

NORTH. 

Attendance, adult, 24,351; Sundays, 2,023 26,374 
Attendance, children 40,526; Sundays, 6,012 46,538 

72,912 

Books circulated,— adult 24,461 

Juvenile 15,679; Central 164 40,304 

Cards issued through Central; 

Old Registration, Adult 170; Juvenile 196 366 

New Registration, Adult 991 ; Juvenile 444 1435 

Periodicals in Reading Room, 29 

Newspapers in Reading Room, 19 

SOUTH. 
Attendance, adult, 9,934; Sundays, 1,174 11,108 
Attendance, children 22,997; Sundays, 3,857 26,854 

37,962 

Books circulated, -adult 7,746 

Juvenile 10,118; Central 119 17,983 
Cards issued through Central; 

Old Registration, Adult 30, Juvenile 144 174 

New Registration, Adult 339.iuvenile 484 823 

Periodicals in Reading Room, , 27 

Nev/spapers in Reading Room, 15 

WEST. 
Attendance, adult, 7,098 Sundays, 573 7,671 

Attendance, children 8,441 Sundays, 2,033 10,474 



18,145 

Books circulated, -Adult 12,337 

Juvenile 1,495; Central 62 13,894 

Cards issued through Central: 

Old Registration, Adult 104, Juvenile 6 110 

New Registration, Adult, 297, Juvenile, 39 336 

Periodicals in Reading Room 29 

Newspapers in Reading Room 9 



18 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

APPENDIX D. 
FORM OF LIBRARY STATISTICS. 

Compiled by the A. L. A. Committee on Library Administration. 

Annual report for year ended, December 31, 1915 

Name of Library, Free Public. 
Name of Librarian, George H. Tripp 
City or town. New Bedford, Mass. 
Population served, 115,000. (estimated.) 

Terms of use — 

Free for lending 
Free for reference 
Total number of agencies 

Consisting of - Central library,. One. 
Branches, Three. 

Other Agencies, 35 schools, 172 rooms in 
schools, with average of 48 books in 
each room; -1 engine houses. 2 clubs. 1 
inn. 
Number of days open during year (Central library) , 365. 
Hours open each week for lending (Central library), 72. 
Hours open each week for reading (Central library ( 79 
Total number of staff (counting as full time, adding together those 
giving less than full time as fractions and reporting nearest 
whole number), 22. 
Total valuation of library property, $551,400 

INCRE.ASE. 

Adult Juvenile Total 
Number of volumes at beginning of year 131,700 *18,300 150,000 
Number of volumes added during year 

bv purchase 4,210 2,174 6 384 

Number of volumes added during year 

by gift and exchange 632 632 

*Including school libraries 

Number of volumes lost or withdrawn 

during year 568 1,937 2,505 

Total number at end of year 154.511 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



19 



Number of pamphlets at beginning of year, Uncounted, over 25,000 
Number of pamphlets added during year, 3,325 

Number of maps and charts added during year, 2 

Total number of maps at end of year (not including 

geodetic survey) 274 

Number of photographs added during year, including 

prints and pictures, 626 

Stereographs, 199 

Miscellaneous, 13 

Total number of photographs at end of year. Uncounted, many thou- 
sands. 
Number of sheets of music added during year. Uncounted 

Total number of sheets of music at end of year, " 

Number of clippings added during year, " 

Total number of clippings at end during year, " 



USE 

Total number of volumes lent for home 

use. 
Number of volumes of fiction lent for 
home use from Central library. See 
Appendix B & C. 

Number of prints lent for home use. 
Recorded use in reading rooms. 
Number of exhibitions held. 
Number of lectures given. 
Number of publications issued 



Adult Juvenile Total 



416,240 



174.475 47,723 



222,198 
106,820 



Uncounted 



6 
22 
15 



REGISTRATION. 



Adult 



Juvenile Total 
4.397 14,968 



Number of borrowers registered during 

year 10,571 

Total number of registered borrowers 

(New registration in May) 
Registration period, 5 years. 

Number of preiodicals (including newspapers and transactions of so- 
cieties) currently received 

(Give both number of titles and copies-not pieces) 

539 copies with 377 titles of magazines 

and 86 copies, with 52 titles of newspapers 

Number of persons using library for reading and study. Not counted 



20 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



FINANCE. 

Receipts from Payments for 

Unexpended Balance .. . 6,785.93 Maintenance 

Local taxation 26,289.60 Books 7,669.45 

Endowment Funds Net.. 12,606.08 Periodicals 1,737.63 

Fines and sales of public- Salaries, library ser- 

ations. See Appendix F. vice 17 956.24 

Other sources. Dog fund 2,684.37 Salaries. Engineers,. 

etc 8,865.43 

Insurance 302.40 

Light in branches 551 42 

Other maintenance. . . 7 397. 3 



Total 



5,365.98 Total Maintainance $44,480.20 



Jan. 


14 


Jan; 


15 


Jan. 


17 


Jan. 


18 


Jan. 


19 


Jan. 


19 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 21 



APPENDIX E. 

LECTURE AND STUDY ROOMS, 1915. 

Jan. 4 New Bedford Horticultural Society. 

Jan. 5 Woman's Club. Parliamentary Law Class. 

Jan. 6 Smith College Club. 

Jan. 6 Equal Suffrage League. 

Jan. 7 Lecture. Frederick Monsen, F. R. G. S. 

Recent Mexican History. 
Jan. 7 New Bedford Medical Society, Dr. E. W. 

Taylor, Ass't. Neurologist Massachusetts General Hospital 
"Relation of the general practitioner to the neurologist". 

Astronomical Club. ' 

Teachers' meeting. 

Young Men's Hebrew Association. Debate. 

Current events. 

Woman's Club. Parliamentary Law Class. 

Old Colony Branch of the Congregational Woman's Board of 
Missions. 
Jan. 20 Stamp Collectors. 

Poultry Association; illustrated lecture by C. W. Whitney, 

Woman's Club Executive Board. 
Jan. 21 Charity Organization class. 

Teachers' meeting. 
Jan. 25 Current events. 

Jan. 28 Lecture. Kate Ryan. "Old Boston Museum days". 
Jan. 29 Dr. David Snedden, Commissioner of education for Massa- 
chusetts, "Possibilities of the home-making course in 
vocational schools". 
Feb. 1 Current events. 

New Bedford Horticultural Society. 

Woman's Club. Parliamentary Law Class. 

Current events. 

New Bedford Medical Society. Dr. A. R. 

MacAusland, "Fractured hip, its diagnosis and treatment". 

Astronomical Club. 

Lecture. A. C. Crosman. "India, the land of mystery". 

Y. M. H. A. 

Current events. 

Woman's Club. Parliamentary Law Class. 

Lecture. Prof. A. S. Isaacs. An evening with Heine. 

Stamp collectors. 

Poultry Association. 

Charity Organization Society Class. 

Charity Organization Society Class. 

Hearing on civic charter. 

Lecture. R. C. Coggeshall. "Japanese life,and character". 

Current events. 

New Bedford Horticultural Society. 

Woman's Club. Parliamentary Law Class. 

Equal suffrage. 

Woman's Club Executive Board. 



Feb. 


2 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


8 


Feb. 


11 


Feb. 


11 


Feb. 


14 


Feb. 


15 


Feb. 


16 


Feb. 


17 


Feb. 


18 


Feb. 


25 


Feb. 


25 


Feb. 


25 


Mar. 


1 


Mar. 


2 


Mar. 


3 



22 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Mar. 8 New Bedford Medical Society. 

Dr. C. H. Dunn of Children's Hospital 
Boston. "Fat indigestion in infants". 
Old Dartmouth Historical Society Directors. 
Mar. 10 Woman's Club Executive Board. 
Mar. 10 Poultry Association. 
Mar. 11 Astronomical Club. 

Charity Organization Society Class. 
Mar. 14 Y. M. H. A. Rabbi Solomon Schieffer 
"Moses Mendelsohn and his times". 
Mar. 15 Teachers' meeting. 
Mar. 16 Woman's Club. Parliamentary Law Class. 

College Club. 
Mar. 17 Woman's Club Executive Board. 
Homeopathic physicians. 
Stamp Collectors' Club. 
Mar. 18 Lecture. M. L. Perrin, Ph. D. "Norse mythology and 
origin of Christmas legends". 
[Evening High School class in book-keeping. 
Mar. 21 Y. M. H. A. Lecture. "Mental hygiene". 
Mar. 22 Old Dartmouth Historiacal Society annual meeting. 

Evening High School class in book-keeping. 
Mar. 24 Woman's Club Executive Board. 

Woman's Club Lecture. D. C. Potter. 
Mar. 25 Homeopathic physicians. 

Master Plumbers illustrated lecture. 
Forestry association. 

C. W. Young. Tree planting. 
Evening High School class in book-keeping. 
Mar. 31 Woman's Club Executive Board. 

April 1 Lecture. W. E. Griff is. "Pilgrims and Puritans; differ- 
erences between them in 1620 and to-day". 
Homeopathic physicians. 
April 5 New Bedford Horticultural Society. 
April 7 Equal Suffrage. 

Teachers' meeting. 
April 8 Charity Organization Society Class. 

Astronomical Club. 
April 9 Poultry Association. 
April 11 Y. M. H. A Lecture. Dr. Nathan Stern of Providence, 

"Reformed Judaism." 
April 12 Framingham Normal School Club. 

New Bedford Medical Society; Dr. E. H. Nichols. 
Brain surgery". 
April 14 "St. Johns Ambulance Association. First aid and ambu- 
lance work. 
Woman's Club Executive Board. 
Poultry Association. 
April 15 Homeopathic physicians. 
April 16 Lecture. Conferenzia Italiana. 

Prof. Alberto Pecorini. "I Vantaggi in America per gl' 
Italiani." 
April 21 Stamp Collectors. 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 23 



April 22 Charity Organization Society Class. 

Lecture. I. B. S. Holborn, M. A. [Oxon.] "Story of 

Marathon and how the Greeks saved our civilization". 

Teachers' meeting. 

St. John's Ambulance Association. 

New Bedford Horticultural Society. 

Equal Suffrage. 

Charity Organization Society Class. 

Council of Jewish women. 

Lecture. Mary B. Seabury and Helen Seabury. 
"Lake Mohonk and its conference". 

New Bedford Medical Society. 

St. John's Ambulance Association. 

Astronomical Club. Lecture by Mr. Jepson. 

Stamp Collectors. 

Charity Organization Society Class. 

New Bedford Medical Society. 

St. John's Ambulance Association. 

Poultry Association. 

Woman's Club Executive Board. 

Equal Suffrage. 

New Bedford Horticultural Society. 

Astronomical Club. 

Old Dartmouth Historical Society, directors meeting. 

New Bedford Medical Society. 

Stamp Collectors. 

St. John's Ambulance Association. 

Peony Show. 

Equal Suffrage. 

Woman's Club Executive Board. 

Rose Show. 

New Bedford Medical^ Society. 

St. John's Ambulance Association. 

Woman's Club Executive Board. 

New Bedford Horticultural Society. 

New Bedford Horticultural Society. 

College Club Committee. 
12 Dahlia Show. 

Teachers' Benefit Association. 

St. John's Ambulance Association. 

High School Class Lecture on use of library. G. H. Tripp. 

Committee from Woman's Club - work with blind. 

Woman's Club - Executive Committee. 

Framingham Normal School Club. 

New Bedford Horticultural Society. 

Weekly readings for blind resumed. 

Lecture. J. C. Powys, M. A. "Florentine Art." 

American Red Cross. 

New Bedford Medical Society. Annual Meeting. 

Woman's Club Executive Board. 

Lecture. A. T. M de Andria "Constantinople". 

Astronomical Club. 
Oct. 21 Lecture. Mrs. Euphrosyne C. Canoutas "Constantinople 
and Turkey". — in Greek. 



April 


26 


April 


28 


May 


3 


May 


5 


May 


6 


May 


7 


May 


10 


May 


12 


May 


13 


May 


19 


May 


21 


May 


24 


May 


26 


June 


2 


June 


7 


June 


10 


June 


14 


June 


16 


June 


17 


June 


18 


June 


23 


June 


25 


June 


28 


June 


30 


July 


12 


Sept. 


13 


Sept. 


14 


Sept. 


21, 


Sept. 


22 


Sept. 


22 


Sept. 


27 


Sept. 


28 


Sept. 


29 


Oct. 


4 


Oct. 


4 


Oct. 


6 


Oct. 


7 


Oct. 


11 


Oct. 


13 


Oct. 


14 



24 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Oct. 28 Lecture. G. P. Serviss. "How suns and worlds are made." 

Board of Trade. Richard Knowles. 
Nov. 3 Woman's Club - Executive Board. 

Equal Suffrage. 
Nov. 4 Lecture. C. W. Furlong. "Brazil". 

Red Cross. Cranston Brenton. 
Nov. 8 Charity Organization. Annual Meeting. 
Nov. 9 Peace Society. C. E. Beals. "Function of war in the 

evolution of man". 
Nov. 10-11 Chrj'santhemum show. 
Nov. 11 Bristol Co., Medical Association. 

Mass. Medical Association. , 

Nov. 11 Lecture. Prof. B. R. Baumgardt. 

"Romance of man". 
Nov. 15 Current events. 

College Club. 
Nov. 16 Lecture. Franklin Matthews. 

"Some unpublished reminiscences of a journalist". 
Nov. 17 Woman's Club. Executive Board. 
Nov. 18 Astronomical Club. Vincent Francis. 

Nov. 21 Y. M. H. A. Dr. Max Huntenberg. "Anti-Semitism". 
Nov. 22 Current events. 

New Bedford Medical Association. 

Dr. Allen Greenwood, "With the Harvard Unit in France". 
Nov. 23 Peace Society. 
Nov. 24 Lecture. Prof. Alberto Pecorini. 
"O Tutti Americani. 
O Tutti Stranieri". 
Nov. 26 Dora Keene, F. R. G. S. "Where rail meets trail". 
Nov. 29 Current events. 

Teachers' meeting. 
Nov. 30' Board of Trade. 
Dec. 1 Equal Suffrage. 

Woman's Club Executive Board. 
Dec. 2 Lecture. Mrs. Minna E. T. Peck. 

Holland, and the Art of Rembrandt". 

Board of Trade. 
Dec. 6 New Bedford Horticultural Society. 

Committee for work with blind. 
Current events. 

Woman's Club. 

Lecture. A. E. Bartlett. "Indian cities of the southwest." 

Astronomical Club. 

Y. M. &. Y, W. H. A. L. W. Feezer of State Bd. Health. 

Current events. 

Old Dartmouth Historical Society Directors. 

Lecture. L. C. Elson. "Sailors' songs and chanties". 

Current Events. 

Woman's Club. Executive Board. 

New Bedford Medical Society. Dr. T. W. Harmer of 
Boston. "Diagnosis and treatment of sarcoma". 

Current events. 

Child Welfare Exhibit. 
Dec. 29 Child Welfare Lecture postponed. 

Concert for blind. 

Woman's Club Executive Board. 



Dec. 


9 


Dec. 


12 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


13 


Dec. 


16 


Dec. 


20 


Dec. 


22 


Dec. 


27 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 25 



APPENDIX F. 



CITY APPROPRIATION. 

Appropriation, $25,000.00 

Transfers, * 1,289.60 



$26,289.60 



Salaries, $16,120.29 

Wages, 7,721.41 

Supplies, 860.21 

Lighting, branches, 504.22 

Repairs and labor, ' 168.91 

Printing, 16.41 

Telephone, 47.66 
Express and freight, • 125.61 

Furniture, 194.00 

Incidentals, 182.95 

Insurance, 201.60 

Water rates, 126.33 

Copying records, 20.00 



$26,289.60 



KEMPTON FUND 



Balance, $3,525.68 

Income, ^ 10,015.00 



$13,540.68 



Books, 6,650.86 

Periodicals, 1,629.56 

Pictures and work on, 326.87 

Binding, 2,319.05 

Printing, 150.60 

Incidentals, 42.19 

Copying records, 40.00 

Stereoscope-, 11.40 

Art Furniture, 760.00 

Library Cards, 117.01 

$12,047.54 

Balance, 1,493.14 



$13,540.68 



26 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



OLIVER CROCKER FUND 

Balance, ' 48.90 

Income, 40.00 



Salaries, 58.35 

Repairs and labor, * 3.35 

Supplies, 6.50 

Express and freight, .30 



Salaries, 58.35 

Wages, 328.90 

Supplies, 19.09 

Repairs and labor, 2.00 

408.34 
Balance, 1.02 



DOG FUND. 



88.90 



68.50 
Balance, 20.40 88.90 

GEORGE O. CROCKER FUND. 

Balance, 9.36 

Income, 400.00 



409.36 



$409.36 



Balance, ' $180.49 

Income, 2,684. 37 

$2,864.86 

Salaries, $1,719.25 

Wages, 815.12 

Express and freight, 28.01 

Repairs and labor, 47.13 

Incidentals, 35.46 

Light, 47.20 

Telephone, 3.84 

Supplies, 56.58 

Insurance, 100.80 

$2,853.39 

Balance, 11-47 $2,864,86 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



27 



SYLVIA ANN ROWLAND FUND. 



Balance, 
Income, 



Books, 

Lectures, 

Binding, 

Periodicals, 

Printing, 

Pictures, 

Incidentals, 



Balance, 



$1,018.59 

782.70 
313.39 
108.07 
486.25 
64.33 
39.50 

$2,812.83 
1,922.09 



12,707.84 
2,027.08 

4,734.92 



1,734,92 



Balance, 
Income, 



GEORGE HOWLAND, JR. FUND. 



No expenditures. 
Balance, 



$132.14 
64.00 

$196.14 
$196.14 



JAMES B. CO.NGDON FUND. 



Balance, 
Income, 



No expenditures. 
Balance, 



$100.83 
20.00 

$120.83 
$120.83 



Balance, 
Income, 



CHARLES W. MORGAN FUND. 



No expenditures, 
Balance, 



$80.69 
40.00 

120.69 

120.69 



28 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



TOTAL EXPENDITURES. 

Salaries, $17,956.24 

Wages,V' 8,865.43 

Books, 7,669.45 

Periodicals, 1,737.63 

Binding, 2,632.44 

Pictures, and work on, 391.20 

Furniture, 954.00 

Lighting branches, 551.42 

Supplies, 942.38 

Repairs and labor, 221.39 

Telephone, 51.50 

Printing, 653.26 

Incidentals, 300.10 

Express and freight, 153.92 

Water rates, 126.33 

Lectures, 782.70 

Copying records, 60.00 

Insurance, 302.40 

Stereoscopes, 11.40 

Library Catalogue cards, 1 1 7 .01 

$44,480.20 



FINES ACCOUNT. 

Balance Dec. 1,1914, $ 67.80 

Receipts from fines to Dec. 1, 1915. 1,119.00 

Paid City Treasurer, $1,109.00 

Balance Dec. 6, 1915. 77.80 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 29 

APPENDIX G. 
GIFTS. 

List of Donors — 1915. 

Vols. Pphs. 

Abington, Mass., Town of 1 

Adams., Charles Francis, Boston 3 

Akin, Thomas B., New Bedford 117 

Alden, Charles E., New Bedford Photograph 

Allen, N. H., Worcestor Portfolio of pictures 1 

Alliance Francaise, Paris, France 2 

American Association for International Conciliation 

New York, N. Y 1 15 

American Association for Labor Legislation, 

New York, N. Y 3 

American Association on Unemployment, New York, N. Y. . . 1 

American Economic Association, New York, N. Y 1 

American Electric Railway Association, New York, N. Y 1 

American Flint Glass Workers' Union 1 

American Geographical Society, New York, NY 2 

American Institute of Electrical Engineers, New York, N. Y. 2 

American-Irish Historical Society, New York, N. Y 1 

American School Peace League 1 

American Social Hygiene Association, New York, N. Y 2 

American Telephone and Telegraph Co., New York ,N. Y. . . . 12 

American Trust Co., Boston 6 

Amherst College, Amherst 1 

Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Massachussetts, 

Boston 1 1 

Andover Theological Seminary, Cambridge 1 

Andreae, Percy, Cincinnati, 1 

Annals de la Regie Directe, Geneve 1 

Anonymous, Boston 1 

Anthony, Mrs. Benjamin, New Bedford 5 

Associated Factory Mutual Fire Insurance Companies, 

Boston 1 

Association of American Portland Cement Manufacturers, . . 

Philadelphia, Pa 2 15 

Association of Life Insurance Presidents, New York, N. Y. . . 5 

Attleborough, Mass., Town of 1 

Austro-Hungarian Consulate, New York, N. Y 1 



30 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Austro-Hungarian Red Book, ( Publishers ) 3 

Bancroft-Whitney Co., San Francisco 3 

Bangor and Aroostook Railroad, Bangor, Me., 1 

Bank of the Manhattan Company, New York, N. Y 1 

Barney, Charles W., New Bedford 2 Periodicals 9 

Barron, Heriberto 1 

Bates College, Lewiston, Me., 4 

Baylor University, Waco, Texas 4 

Benneville, James S. de, Yokohama, Japan 1 

Berkshire County, Mass 1 

Better County Government in New York State, New York, . . 

N. Y 1 

Bible Training School, South Lancaster, Mass., 5 

Bohemian Societies in New Bedford 1 

Boston, Massachussetts, City of 1 

Boston Public Library, Boston 3 

Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 1 

Boston Port and Seamen's Aid Society, Boston 1 

Boston University, Boston 2 

Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Me., 2 

Bradford Durfee Textile School, Fall River 1 

Bratu, Petru B., Cleveland, O., 1 

Brentanos, New York, N. Y , 2 

Bristol County, Massachusetts 1 

Brooklyn Bureau of Charities, Brooklyn 1 

Brown , Frank E., New Bedford 2 

Browne and Sharpe Manufacturing Co.. Providence, R. 1 1 

Brown University, Providence, R. I., 2 2 

Buffet, Edward P., Jersey City, N. J., 1 

Bunker Hill Monument Association., Boston 1 3 

Bureau of Railway News and Statistics, Chicago, 111 2 

Burke, Mrs. Matthew, Acushnet 2 

Butler Hospital, Providence, R. I., 

Canada, Department of Interior 2 maps . . 

Cancer Commission of Harvard University, Boston 

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 

Washington, D. C 3 

Carnegie Hero Fund Commission, Pittsburg, Pa 

Carnegie Institute of Technology, Pittsburg, Pa 1 

Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington ,D. C, 

Carney Hospital, South Boston 

Central Labor Union of New Bedford 4 

Carver, Mass. , Town of ^ 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 31 



Chalif, Louis H., New York ,N. Y 1 

Chapin, Howard M., Providence, R. 1 1 

Chicago, Illinois, City of 1 g 

Chicago Association of Commerce, Chicago, 111 1 

Chicago College of Osteopathy, Chicago, 111 3 

Chicago School of Civics and Philanthropy, Chicago, 111 3 

City Plan Commission, Newark, N. J 1 

Clifford, Charles W., New Bedford 4 

Colorado, State of 5 

Columbia University, New York, N. Y 1 6 

Committee on Railway Mail Pay, New York, N. Y 9 

Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, Conn 1 

Connecticut State Medical Society 3 

Cosby, Joseph T., New York, N. Y 1 . 

Crapo, Hon. William W.. New Bedford 2 

Cronan, Rudolf, New York, NY 1 

Dartmouth, Mass., Town of 1 

Dartmouth Christian Assiciation. Hanover, N. H 1 

Dartmouth College, Hanover, N. H 1 4 

Denham, Edward, New Bedford 1 

Dennison Manufacturing Co., Boston 2 

Detroit, Michigan, City of 1 

Detroit Housing Association, Detroit, Mich 3 

pietz, R. E., Company, New York, N. Y 1 

Dingee and Conrad Co., West Grove, Pa 2 

District of Columbia 1 

Donlan, Thomas J., New York, N. Y Sheet Music . . . 

Draper Co., Hopedale, Mass 9 

Duxberry, Mass., Town of 1 

Eliot, Dr. Charles W 1 

Fairhaven, Mass., Town of 1 

Farquhar «& Co., Boston 1 

Farnham, Joseph F. C, Providence, R. 1 1 

Farnsworth, Edward C, Portland, Me 1 

Fatherland. The, New York, N. Y 1 

Fess, Hon. S. D., Ohio 2 

Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, 111 2 

Fish, Andrew, New Bedford Periodical 

Fitchburg Board of Trade, FItchburg, Mass 5 

Fleishmann Co., New York ,N. Y 1 2 

Forbes, Allan, Boston 1 

Fort Phoenix Chapter D. A. R., Fairhaven 4 

Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, Pa 2 



32 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Freetown, Mass., Town of 1 

General Education Board, New York, N. Y 1 

General Electric Co., Schenactady, N. Y 2 

General Society of Mechanics and Tradesmen of the City of 

New York 1 

General Socity of the War of 1812, Baltimore, Md 1 

Gerhard, Dr. William P., New York, N. Y 1 

Globe- Wernicke Co., Boston 1 

Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa 2 

Hale Memorial Fund, Milwaukee. Wis... 1 

Hall Estate, New Bedford 35 5 

Hampden County, Massachusetts 1 

Harriman, Rev. C. C , Albany, N. Y 1 

Hart, Schaffner & Marx, Chicago Illustrative Material 

Hartford Seminary Foundation, Hartford, Conn 1 

Harvard University, Cambridge 2 1 

Haskins and Sells, New York, N. Y 1 

Hawaii Promotion Committee, Hawaii 1 

Haywood, Harry Jr., New Brunswick, N. J 1 

Hebrew Union College, Cincinnati, 2 

Hervas Laboratories of American Linguistics, St. Louis, Mo. . . 2 

Hinds, Noble & Eldredge, New York. N. Y 3 

Hispanic Society of America, New York, N. Y 1 1 

Home and School League, Philadelphia, Pa 1 

Hough, Dr. Garry de N. , New Bedford Periodical 

Hough, George A., New Bedford 7 Photographs 

Howland, John J., New Bedford 2 Sterio. Views 

Hueffer, Ford Madox, New York, N. Y 2 

Human Betterment Co., Lancaster, Penn 1 

Hunting, H. R., Springfield, Mass 1 

Illinois, State of 1 

India Association, Victoria; B. C 1 

Indian Rights Association, Philadelphia 2 

Indianapolis, Md., Chamber of Commerce 1 

Industrial Commission of Ohio 1 

International Institute of Agriculture, Rome, Italy, Periodical 

International Woman Suffrage Alliance, London, England ... 1 

Interstate Commerce Commission, Washington. D. C 1 

Janet, Charles, Paris, France 2 

Japan Society, New York, N. Y 3 3 

Jersey City Chamber of Commerce 2 

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md 1 

Kansas State Board of Agriculture, Topeka, Kan 1 2 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 33 



Lake Mohonk Conference, Mohonk Lake ,N. Y 2 

Lakeville, Mass., Town of 1 

Leland Stanford University, Cal 1 

Libraries, State Library Commissions and Similar Institutions. 

(Gifts including Reports, Bulletins or like publications have been 
received from the following institutions.) 

Albany, N. Y., New York State Library. 

Andover, Mass., Memorial Hall Library, 

Augusta, Maine, Maine State Library. 

Baltimore, Md , Enoch Pratt Free Library. 

Boston, Mass. 

[Massachusetts] State Library. 
Public Library. 

Braddock, Pa., Carnegie Free Library. 

Branford, Conn., James Blackstone Memorial Library. 

Brockton, [Mass.,1 Public Library. 

Brookline [Mass ] Public Library. 

Brooklyn [N. Y.] Institute of Arts and Sciences. 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Pratt Institute Free Library. 

Brooklyn [N. Y.] Public Library. 

Buffalo [N. Y.] Public Library. 

Burlington, Vt., Fletcher Free Library. 

Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Library. 

Canton, [Mass.] Public Library. 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Free Public Library. 

Chelsea [Mass.] Public Library. 

Chicago, 111., American Library Association. 
Municipal Reference Library. 
Chicago Public Library. 
John Crerar Library. 

Chicopee [Mass.] Public Library. 

Cleveland [Ohio] Public Library. 

Clinton, Mass., Bibelow Free Public Library. 

Concord [N. H.] Public Library. . 

Danvers. Mass., Peabody Institute. 

Dayton. Ohio, Public Library and Museum. 

Dover [N. H.] Public Library. 

East Orange [N. J.] Free Public Library. 

Elizabeth [N. J.] Free Public Library. 

Fairhaven, Mass., The Millicent Library. 

Fitchburg [Mass.] Public Library. 

Galveston, Texas, Rosenburg Library. 

Gary [Ind.] Public Library. 



34 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Germantown, Phila., Friends' Free Library. 
Grand Rapids [Mich.] Public Library. 
Groton [Mass.] Public Library. 
Hartford, Conn., Connecticut State Library. 

Hartford Public Library. 
Haverhill, Mass., Massachussetts Library Club. 

Haverhill Public Library. 
Hopedale, Mass., Bancroft Memorial Library. 
Huntington, Conn., Plumb Memorial Library. 
Indianapolis [Ind.] Public Library. 
Jacksonville [Fla.] Public Library. 
Jersey City [N. J.] Free Public Library. 
Lancaster, Mass., Town Library. 
Lansing, Mich., Michigan State Library. 
Leominster [Mass.] Public Library. 
Lincoln, Neb., City Library. 

Nebraska Public Library Commission. 
Los Angeles [Cal.] Public Library. 
Louisville [Ky.] Free Public Library. 
Lynn [ Mass.] Public Library. 
Madison, Wis., Wisconsin Library. 
Maiden [Mass.] Public Library. 
Manchester, N. H., City Library. 
Medford [Mass.] Public Library. 
Middleboro [Mass.] Public Library. 
Milton [Mass.] Public Library. 
Milwaukee [Wis.] Public Library. 

Montpelier, Vt., Vermont Free Public Library Commission. 
New Britain [Conn.] Institute Library. 
New Haven [Conn.] Free Public Library. 

Yale University Library. 
New Orleans [La.] Public Library. 
New York, N. Y. 

New York Mercantile Library Association. 

Public Library. 

Russell Sage Foundation Library. 
Newark N. J. Free Public Library. 
Newport R. I. Redwood Library and Athenaeum. 
Newton [Mass.] Free Library. 
Northampton, Mass., Forbes Library. 
Northfield, Vt., Norwich University Library, 
Oberlin [O.] College Library. 
Passaic [N. J.] Public Library. 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 35 



Paterson [N. J.] Free Public Library. 
Pawtucket R. I. Deborah Cook Sayles Library. 
Philadelphia Pa. Apprentices' Library Company. 

Free Library of Philadelphia. 

Library Company of Philadelphia. 
Pittsburg Pa. Carnegie Library. 
Portland [Me.] Public Library. 
Poughkeepsie N. Y. Adriance Memorial Library. 
Providence R. I. John Carter Brown Library. 

Providence Athenaeum. 

Providence Public Library. 
Quincy Mass. Thomas Crane Public Library. 
Riverside [Cal.] Public Library. 
Rochester [N. Y.] Public Library. 
St. Louis, Mo. Mercantile Library Association. 

St. Louis Public Library. 
Salem [Mass.] Public Library. 
Salt Lake City [Utah] Public Library. 
San Francisco [Cal.] Public Library. 
Savannah [Ga.] Public Library. 
Schenactady [N. Y.] Public Library. 
Scranton [Pa.] Public Library. 
Seattle [Wash.] Public Library. 
Somerville [Mass.] Public Library. . 
Spokane [Wash.] Public Library. 
Springfield, Mass., City Library Association. 
Syracuse [N. Y.] Public Library. 
Tacoma [Wash.] Public Library. 
Taunton [Mass.] Public Library. 
Waltham [Mass.] Public Library. 
Washington, D. C. Library of Congress. 

Public Library of the District of Columbia. 
Westminister, City of [London, Eng.] Public Library. 
Wilmington, Del., American Library Association. 

Wilmington Institute Free Library. 
Winchester [Mass.] Public Library. 
Worcester Mass Clark University Library. 

Free Public Library. 

Longmans Green & Co., New York, N. Y 1 

Lowney, Walter M. Co., Boston Illustrative Material 

Luke, Miss Elizabeth, New Bedford 6 

Market World & Chronicle, New York, N. Y 



36 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Massachussetts, Commonwealth of 

Board of Commissioners on F"isheries and Game 1 

Board of Education 1 

Board of Gas and Electric Light Commissioners 1 

Bureau of Statistics 3 16 

Civil Service Cimmission .. 3 

District Police 3 

Industrial Accident Board 5 

Ofifice of the Secretary 56 84 

State Board of Agriculture 1 

State Board of Conciliation and Arbitration 2 

State Department of Health 4 

Massachussetts Anti-Tuberculosis League, Boston 1 

Massachussetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston . . 2 

Massachussetts General Hospital Boston 2 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston 3 

Massachusetts Nautical School, Boston 2 

Massachusetts Peace Society, Boston 6 

Massachusetts Woman Suffrage Association, Boston 1 

Mattapoisett, Mass.. Town of 2 

Meadeville Theological School, Meadeville, Pa 4 

Meeker, Ezra, San Francisco, Cal 1 

Merchants' Exchange of St. Louis, Mo 1 

Meriden Britannia Co., Meriden, Conn 1 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Co., New York, N. Y 4 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, N. Y 3 

Minneapolis, Minn. City of 2 

Minnesota State Normal Schools 1 

Montessori Association, Washington, D. C 1 

Moore, Charles Chilton, New York, N. Y . 1 

Morgenstein, Julian, Cincinnati, 1 

Moses Brown School, Providence, R. 1 1 

Mosher, Charles E. E., New Bedford Music 

Mt. Holyoke College, So. Hadley, Mass 1 

Municipal Ownership Publishing Co., New York, N. Y 2 5 

National Academy of Sciences, Washington, D. C 1 

National Association of Corporation Schools, New York, N,Y. 9 

National Association of Wool Manufacturers 1 

National Automobile Chamber of Commerce, New York, N. Y 1 

National Board of Fire Underwriters, New York, N. Y 1 

National Child Labor Committee, New York, N. Y 8 

National Civic Federation, New York, N. Y 1 

National Civil Service Reform League, New York, NY.... 1 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 37 



National Collegiate Athletic Association 1 

Nantucket County, Massachusetts 1 

National Education Association ,Ann Arbor Mich 5 

National Fire Protection Association, Boston 1 

National Home Rule Association, Cincinnati, 1 

National Municipal League, New York ,N. Y 1 

National Retail Dry Goods Association, New York, N. Y 

National Society for the Study and Prevention of Tubercu- 
losis, New York, N. Y 9 1 

New Bedford, Mass., City of 

Board of Health 1 

Board of Park Commissioners 1 

Chief Engineer of Fire Department 1 

City Auditor 1 

City Clerk 36 

Clerk of Committees 4 

Engineering Department 1 

New Bedford Industrial School 2 

School Department Periodicals 

Street Department 1 

New England Society in City of New York 1 

Newport Historical Society, Newport . R. 1 5 

New York Association for Improving the Condition of the 

Poor, New York, N. Y 2 

New York, City of, N. Y, 2 

New York Civil Service Reform Association, New York, N. Y. 1 

New York Farmers, New York, N. Y 1 

New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Co., New 

York, N. Y 15 

New York State Board of Charities, Albany, N. Y 4 

New York State Education Department, Albany, N. Y 2 

New York State School for the Blind, Batavia, N. Y 1 

New York Stock Exchange, New York, N. Y 1 1 

New York University, New York N. Y., 1 

New Zealand, Government of, Map 2 

Nichols, L. N., New York. N. Y Newspaper Repro. 

Norfolk County, Massachusetts 1 

North, R. H., Philadelphia, Pa 1 

North American Civic League for Immigrants, Boston 1 

Norton, Oliver W., Chicago, 111 1 1 

O. E. Library League, Washington, D. C 2 

Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station, Wooster, 1 4 

Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, 1 1 



38 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Old Dartmouth Historical Society, New Bedford 5 

Oregon State Immigration Commission, Portland, Oregon .... 4 

Panama Canal Commission, Washington, D. C 1 

Panama Pacific International Exposition 1 

Panama- Pacific Managers for 

Massachusetts, Board of, 1 3 

Paris Chamber of Commerce, Paris, France 10 

Parker, Sir Gilbert, London, Eng 5 1 

PauU, Florence E., New Bedford 3 Broadsides 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md 1 

Pennsylvania Institution for the Instruction of the Blind, 

Philadelphia, Pa 1 

Pennsylvania Prison Society, Philadelphia, Pa 2 

Pennsylvania Railroad System, Philadelphia, Pa 2 

Perkins Institution for the Blind, Watertown, Mass 2 

Philadelphia, Pa., City of 2 

Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, N.H 4 

Playground and Recreation Association of America, New 

York, N. Y 1 

Plymouth County, Massachusetts 1 

Pollit, E. C, New Bedford Periodical 

Portland Chamber of Commerce, Portland , Oregon 1 

Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y 4 

Prescott, Mrs. Henry D., New Bedford 5 

Prescott, Oliver, Jr., New Bedford Set Periodical 

Prince, Morton, Boston 2 3 

Princeton Theological Seminary, Princeton, N. J 2 

Princeton University, Princeton, N.J 1 

Pringle Publishing Co., Chicago, 111 1 

Prohibition National Committee, Chicago, 111 1 

Providence, R. L, City of 1 

Publishers or Institutions issuing the following publications: 

Advocate of Peace, Washington, D. C. 

A Alvorada, New Bedford. 

Ambition, Scranton, Pa. 

Americas, The, New York, N. Y. 

O Arauto, Oakland, Cal. 

Autumn Leaves, Lamoni, Iowa. 

Brown Alumni Monthly, Providence, R. I. 

Canal Record, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, Isthmus of Panama 

Chase Chronicle, The, Boston. 

Chicago Banker, The, Chicago, 111. 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 39 



Child Labor Bulletin, The, New York, N. Y. 

Christian Science Journal, Boston. 

Christian Science Sentinel, Boston. 

Church Militant, Boston. 

City of Lexington, The, Lexington, Ky. 

City Plan, Boston. 

Concerning Municipal Ownership, New York, N. Y. 

Concrete, Cement Age, Detroit, Mich. 

Crockery and Glass Journal, New York, N. Y. 

Deseret Evening News, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Dog Fancier, Battle Creek, Mich. 

Eastern and Western Review, Boston. 

Eternal Progress, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Facts About Sugar, New York, N. Y. 

General Electric Review, Schenactady, N. Y. 

Good Goverment, New York, N. Y. 

Gospel Trumpet, Anderson, Ind. 

Gregg Writer, Chicago, 111. 

Grinnell Review, Grinnell, Iowa. 

Health and Temperace, Washington, D. C. 

Holy Cross Purple, Worcester. 

Independent, Kansas City, Mo. 

International Crop Report and Agricultural Statistics, Rome. 

Johns Hopkins LTniversity Circular, Baltimore, Md. 

Journal of Zoophily, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Labor Digest, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Manchester Unity, I. O. O. F. Bulletin, New Bedford. 

Matilda Ziegler Magazine for the Blind, New York, N. Y. 

Mill Supplies, Chicago, 111. 

Monthly Bulletin of the American Iron and Steel Institute, New 

York, N. Y. 
New Church League Journal, Chicago 111. 
North Queensland Register, Townsville, Australia. 
Nurse, The, Jamestown, N. Y. 
Onward, Lynn. 

Our Four Footed Friends, Boston. 
Owl, The, Kewanee, Wis. 
Primitive Methodist Journal, Fall River. 
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, 

D. C. 
Protestant Magazine, Washington, D. C. 
Providence Magazine, Providence, R. I. 
Record, The. New York, N. Y. 



40 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Script, The, Los Angeles. 

Sea Breeze, Boston. 

Short Ballot Bulletin, New York, N. Y. 

Signs of the Times, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Socialist, The, Fitchburg and Boston. 

Stenotypist, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Textile Manufacturers Journal, New York, N. Y. 

Transactions, Royal Society of Canada, Ottawa, Canada. 

Tuskeegee Student, Tuskeegee, Ala 

Two States, Boston. 

A Uniao Portuguesa, Oakland, Cal. 

Union Signal, Evanstown, III. 

Universalist Leader, Boston. 

Vedanta Monthly, Boston. 

Volunteer's Gazette New York N. Y. 

World Blind, St. Louis, Mo 

Wort, Das, St, Louis, Mo. 

Railroad Commission of California, San Francisco, Cal 1 

P^ailroad Presidents, Committee of 1 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y 1 

Reynolds, George, New Bedford 1 

Rhode Island Historical Society, Providence, R. 1 2 

Rhode Island Hospital Trust Co. , Providence, R. I.. 1 

Rhode Island School of Design, Providence, R. 1 5 

Richards, Lysander S., Marshfield Hills, Mass 1 

Richmond Journal Co., Richmond, Va • . . 1 

Rockefeller Foundation, New York, N. Y 1 

Rockefeller Sanitary Commission, Washington, D. C 1 

Rosenberger, J. L., Chicago, 111 1 

Ross, Worth Gwynn, Capt., New Bedford 1 

St. Lukes' Hospital, New Bedford 1 

Seabury, Mary, B. New Bedford 1 

Sells Ltd., London. Eng 1 

Shaw, Mrs. Franklin, New Bedford Periodical 

Simmons College, Boston 1 

Simms, Capt. Joseph M., New Bedford Atlas 6 

Singer Sewing Machine Co., New York, N. Y 1 

Sinnet, Rev. Charles M., Washta, Iowa 1 

Smith, Edgar F., Philadelphia, Pa 1 

Smith, Llewellyn Tarbox, Boston 1 

Smoke Abatement League, Cincinnati, O 1 

Soldiers' Home in Massachusetts, Chelsea, Mass 1 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



41 



Spokane, Wash., City of 

State Charities Aid- Association of New York, New York, N.Y. 

Stechert, G. E. & Co., New York, N.Y 

Stilke, Georg, Berlin, Germany 

Storer, Miss A. C, Newport, R. I 

Sturgis, Roger F., Boston 1 

Swain Free School of Design, New Bedford 

Sj'nfleur Scientific Laboratories, Monticello, N. Y 

Teacher's College, Columbia University, New York, N. Y 

Teachers Institute of the Hebrew Union College Cincinnati, O. 

Testimony Publishing Co., Chicago, 111 

Thurston, Lorrin A 

Tillinghast, Mrs. Ada W., New Bedford, Satuette 

Trinity Church Men's Committee, New York, N.Y 

Tripp, George H., Fairhaven 

Trustees of Public Reservations, Boston 

Tucker, Jesse R., No. Dartmouth, Mass Old Newspaper 

Tufts College, Boston 1 

United No License Committee, Fairhaven Periodical 

United States Government — (Publications of the following 
departments, most of which were received from 
the Superintendent of Documents)— Pamphlets 
and leaflets grouped: 

Agriculture, Department of.- 

Civil Service Commission 

Commerce Department 

Commision on Industrial Relations 

Congress of United States 

Court of Claims 

District of Columbia 

Federal Reserve Board 

Federal Trade Commission 

Government Printing Ofifice 

Interior Department Atlas folios and maps 

Interstate Commerce Commission Chart 

Justice Department 

Labor Department 

Library of Congress 

National Academy of Sciences 

Navy Department 18 

Pan-American Union 



7 


588 


1 


27 


34 


630 


1 


2 


81 


3 


1 




5 


1 


2 


3 




1 


2 


36 


40 


258 


9 


50 


2 


1 


11 


42 


13 


193 


4 





12 



42 FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Post Office Department 2 

Smithsonian Institution 11 21 

State Department 6 3 

Superintendent of Documents 15 

Treasury Department 12 88 

War Department 21 20 

United States Brewers' Association, New York, N. Y 1 

United States Steel Corporation, New York N. Y 1 

University of Chicago, Chicago, 111 2 4 

University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, 6 

University of Illinois, Urbana, 111 2 

University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb 22 

University of North Dakota, University, N. D 1 

University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pa 1 

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa 1 

University of Texas, Austin, Texas 16 

University of Washington, Seattle, Wash 1 

Untermyer, Samuel, New York, N. Y 1 

Venn, Theodore J., Chicago, 111 1 

Vocation Bureau, Boston 1 

Wait, William B., New York, N. Y 4 

Walker, Mrs. Mary W., New Bedford 1 

Warbasse, James P., M. D., Brooklyn, N. Y 3 

Ward, John and Son, New York, N. Y 1 

Washburn- Crosby Co., Minneapolis. Minn 1 

Washington Herald, Washington, D. C Newspaper 

Wasson, Rev. E. A., Newark, N. J 1 

Waterman, William H., New Bedford Periodical 1 

Waxweiler, Emile, New York, N. Y 1 

Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass 1 

Wells, Frederick Howard . . 

Frank Richardson Wells 

Bertha Wells Jackson, Burlington, Vt 1 

Wentworth Institute, Boston 1 

Welseyan University, Middletown, Conn 4 

West Publishing Co , St. Paul, Minn 2 1 

Western Theological Seminary, Chicago, 111 1 

Westinghouse Department of Publicity, East Pittsburgh, Pa. 1 

Weston Electrical Instrument Co., Newark. N J 3 

Westport, Mass., Town of 1 

Whitehead, Russell F., New York ,N. Y 3 

Whitridge, F W.,.New York, N Y 1 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 43 



Williams College. Williamstown, Mass 2 3 

Wing, William Arthur, New Bedford. .Genealogical Material 

Winslow, George F., M. D., Nev/ Bedford 1 

Women's Anti- Suffrage Association of Massachusetts, Boston 1 

Worcester County, Massachusetts 1 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worce.ster, Mass 1 1 

World Peace Foundation, Boston 27 

Yale University, New Haven, Conn 1 4 

Zerbone, Antonio, New Bedford Periodical 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 

In Board of Aldermen, 

February 25, 1916. 

Received. Placed on file; ordered printed in the 
City Documents, and sent down for concurrence. 

W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 



Concurred. 



In Common Council, 

February 25, 1916. 

CHARLES P. SAWYER, 
Clerk. 



TWENTY- SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Department of ParKs 

OF THE 

CITY OF NEW BEDFORD 
MASSACHUSETTS 

For the Year ending December 31, 1915 




new bedford 

The a. E. Coffin Press, Printers 

1916 



BOARD OP PARK COIMMISSIONERS. 

1914—1915. 

SAMUEL P. RICIBIOND. 

WILLIAM F. CASWELL. 

ANTONE L. SYLVIA. 

GEORGE H. HEDGE. 

WILLIA:\I KEITH. 

Officers. 

SAMUEL P. RICHMOND. Chairman. 
WILLIAM P. CASWELL. Secretary. 
THOMAS W. COOK. General Superintendent. 

Consulting Engineer. 
GEORGE H. NYE, City EnLnneer. 



DEPARTIMENT OF PUBLIC PARKS. 



COMMTSSTOXEPS' REPORT FOR IDlf). 

To His Honor flic Mayor and the City Council of New 
Bedford: 

111 aecordaiiee with the Revised Laws ol' the ( 'oiniuon- 
wealth of Massaehnsetts, 1902. Chapter 28, Section ^■^. tlie 
title "Pulilie Parks, Playgrounds, and Pvihlie Domain" the 
Park Commissioners of the (Jity of New Bedfoi'd, I'espeet- 
fully submit their Annual Report. 



City op New Bedford. 

Office of Board of Park Commissioners. 

'^ 

December 1, 1915. 

To His Honor the Matjor and the City Council of New 

Bedford: 

GENTLEMEN! — We have the. honor in accordance 
with the re(|iiirements of the \n\x and with the usual cus- 
tom, of snl)mitting to you the Annual Report of the Park 
Connnissioners in relation to the maintenance, conditions, 
and rt'(|uiremcn1s of the Department for the year 1915. 

The financial report presents the condition of our re- 
sources as follows : — 

Appro])riation by the City Council $80,000, leaving a 
balance of $89.15. Of this amount $20,(i92.05 was expended 
for labor, and .$9,208.80 for materials in maintenance of 
the parks. The work, care, and maintenance of the parks 
has been much the same as in former years, but little new 
work has been accomplished, yet the general condition of 
the parks show an annual improvement and with an ap- 
l)ropriation commensurate with the necessities and require- 
ments of the people who visit the parks and expect to 
find what the present up-to-date conditions of public parks 
should be, our City could well invite criticism. The appro- 
priation of $30,000.00 being the income of the Park Com- 



PARK DEPART]\IENT 



mission, the public will readily understand the impossi- 
bility of makiiio' any o-reat improvements, but can only 
maintain and keep in order that which they already liave. 
The expenditures for improvements in ])roportion to the 
amount expended for maintenance is small and must con- 
tiiuie to be so until larger amonnts are allowed by the City 
Council for park purposes. Already our parks have done 
a surprising amount of practical work for the amusement 
and recreation of the pu])li(' and are oidy waiting for the 
opportunity to do more and greater things and we can 
urge truthfully and with all our eiuu-gy the benefit that 
would arise if the department had some comprehensive 
plan for the development of the future park system, under 
some such system tliis department Avould work with pleas- 
ure and satisfaction and the people would realize more 
conelus'ively the advantages they were receiving for their 
money and the greater practical results that would be 
sure to be evident from such a course. In the park depart- 
ment the growth and prosperity of the City is evident as 
much or more than any other department, and therefore 
we feel we can justly appeal to the City Council for ade- 
(luate appropriations, and they fully realize the conditions 
under which we work to inaintain and improve the parks 
entrusted to our care. 

Among the most urgent needs and to which immediate 
attention should be given is a Shelter and Comfort build- 
ing at Buttonwood Park containing toilet facilities, de- 
signed in a park like manner, with all modern con- 
veniences. 



PARK DEPARTIMENT 



The park and thf i)Oi'tions of other parks set apart 
for games and atldetic sports, have been in contimial use 
dnring the season, and the efforts of the Board to answer 
all the demands satisfactory by accommodating all the 
clnl)s, and organizations wanting base])all diamonds, tennis 
conrts, and space and room for other games and recrea- 
tions, aeconniiodations were insiifdeieiit to satisfactory 
answer all the re([nests made to them. 

The laying of lirownell avemie on tlie west of liiitlon- 
wood Pai'k would l)e a great reason for opening np for 
development llie large tract of land west of the \)i\vk. It 
will iiol be long befoi'c ibis entire section, which is now 
unimproved woodland, will be Iniilt up making a very 
desirable residential part of the Cits'. Ihei'efoi'e, it would 
seem good to comi)lete the avenue, as it would improve 
the ])ai'k and place within reach of people who would 
luiild ;it ouce and make a most desirable ])art of the ('it\' 
to live in. Small areas foi' i)ark jiurposes should be i)ro- 
vided and maiutaiued in all the mannfactnring parts of 
our City, so that the workmen may not after theii' day's 
woi-]< is ovei-, be obliged to ti'avel a long distance to I'each 
a large park to enjoy the ontdoor, health-giving, rest and 
recreation, which they are deprived of, by nature of their 
emi)loyment. After being shnt np in a factory all day, 
they have no time or iiicliuation to travel far to find that 
opportunity, but with small areas provided with seats or 
athletic apparatns in different parts of the City, they could 
find enjoyment there, rather than seeking it in places less 
conducive to the welfare of the city, their families or 
themselves. 



10 PARK DEPARTMENT 



Among the many things that uncinestionably are 
greatly to be desired especially by the younger portion 
of our eomnuinity and we might add a considerable part 
of the older ones, is an addition of a considerable number 
of base])all diamonds, and tennis courts. The desire to 
play is so great and the demands for diamonds and courts 
so numerous and persistent that all sorts of rules and regu- 
lalions are devised by the Commissioners to the exigencies, 
and the Board most earnestly hope that the time is not 
fai' (listanl wIkmi the arrangement of Huttonwood Park, 
hiid out 1)y Mr. Williams. Engineer, can be accomplished 
and the same might be said in a degree of Brooklawn 
Park, both parks having splendid vacant lots of which 
almost perfection might be attained. 



PARK DEPARTIMENT 11 



PLANS BY WM. F. WILLIAMS. 



Chairman and Board op Park Commissioners. City of 
New Bedford. 

GENTLE]\IEN :— At your request I have made a eare- 
I'li] survey of the hir.ue recreation ground at P)Uttonwood 
Park and prepared the accompanying phin for draining 
and grading the same. I also sul)mit for your consichn-a- 
tion the following explanation of the plan ami an estimate 
of the cost of ])erforming the work re(|uii'e(l by the plan. 

The area of the recreation ground as shown by the 
plan is 463,000 square feet or 10 acres and 100 rods. This 
includes all of the cleared hind south of Court street and 
west of Rockdale avenue to the grove of i)ine trees. At 
present the general surface of this ground slopes to the 
south and west at a fairly uniform grade. The north and 
east half, being the highest, is comparatively dry during 
the summer months. The south and west portion of tht^ 
field is wet and spongy during most of the year. There 
are also a great many small inequalities in the present sur- 
face that are very objectionable in a field for playing 
football, baseball, or tennis. The southern portion of the 
field has been recently cultivated and is not only quite 
rough but has little or no grass. The top soil of the entire 
field is rather shallow and the greater part underlain by 
a hard bed of fine sand and clay which is practically im- 



PARK DEPARTMENT 13 



pervious to the passage of water. As a result there is no 
natural under-drainage and the surface water is retained 
in the top soil until it dries out b\' evaporation. 'I'lie tield 
should first be 1 liorouizhly undcr-drjiincd by constructing 
drains of porous land tile about .") to '■)'/:: feet Im'Iow the 
finished surface of the ground. The location and size of 
these drains is shown on the plan. The general direction 
of (he ilow ol' this underground draiiuigc will l)c soulhcrly 
to a I'oUccling di'ain running easterly in Arnohl street to 
a brook which now crosses that street about !.")() IVet east 
of the park. The fall is sutficient to secure a good flow., 
and wheJle^'er the (irape street sewer is extendetl to this 
point the drain can be entered into it. 

In estinuding the cost of draining tliis tield I have 
assumed that the work will be done by local labor without 
particular exi)erience in laying tiles. 1 have no doubt, 
however, l)ut what th(> work can be done by experiencetl 
tile layers for very much less than my estinnite. 

After the field is under-drained it should be graded 
to a uniform and smooth surface, sloping gradually to the 
south and crowning slightly from east to west, as shown 
by the red contour lines on the plan which fix the gra<le 
of the finished surface. This will re(piire tilling the low 
ground of the west half of the field, cutting off some of 
the high ground on the east and north portions of flu; 
field to secure the material. The cuts and fills have been 
carefully calculated to balance each other. If. however, 
good soil can be bought at a reasonable price I should 
prefer to reduce the amount of cutting on the high ground 



14 PARK depart:\iext 



and iiicreaye the filling on the low sections, to avoid re- 
moving so mnch ol' the good soil on the high land. 

After the surface of the field has beeii l)rought ap- 
proximately lo the new grade a heavy coat of stable dress- 
ing should be spaded in. the surface carefully raked to the 
true cross section, all stones removed, and then sowed witli 
grass seed and rolled. 

The Avork of draining and grading this field can be 
car)-ied on without interfering with the present use of 
the north part of the sanu' and grading the south half of 
the field one year and the north half the next. 

This will enable the new grass to get well started 
before the field is put into use. and it is the only methoil 
l)y which a smooth surface and a good sward can be 
secured. 

This field will make a si)lendid recreation ground and 
when completed it will afford ample room to lay out four 
rootl)all fields or four l)aseball fields, or two of each, be- 
sides a number oL' tennis courts. 

ESTIMATED COST. 

Under drainage $3,150.00 

Grading 3,500.00 

Top dressing 500.00 

Seeding 500.00 

Total $7,650.00 

Respectfully sulnnitted, 
WILLIAjM F. WILLIA.MS. Citv Entrineer. 



PARK DEPARTMENT 15 



In the construction of baseball diamonds and tennis 
courts, the need of them as growing requirements for the 
pleasure and recreation of all communities where public 
parks are maintained cannot be gainsaid. 

We have a most desirable city for all purposes, of a 
delightful residence, or a sui)erior one for all manufac- 
turing projects, and its parks today assist in making it 
a judicious investnuMit for people to purchase and improve 
their ])roi)erty not only in proximity to the [)arks but 
throughout the City, therefore, there is seemingly great 
necessity that all the parks should be as rapidly improved 
as the tinancial condition of our city Avill allow. 

The [playground ajiparatus of the ditferent parks has 
been found by (Experience to be used by the greatest num- 
ber ol' children during Ihc afternoon and early evening. 
The merry-go-round erected at the suggestion of Mr. 
Wirth. Superintendent of Parks, of Minneapolis, has 
proved to be a great entertainer for the children. It con- 
sists of a circular i)latform some twelve feet in diameter, 
the outer edge being used as a seat, ami is provided with a 
platform l)y means of which the children can get on or off 
safely even when it is in motion. This i)latform rests 
upon ball bearings so that the slightest effort puts it in 
motion and enables it to run a long tinu\ no moti\e poM<'r 
is retpiired except that furnished by the children. We 
are in hopes that they can be installed in all the pai'ks 
as soon as possible as they surely are a great contrivance 
for the pleasure of the little ones. The swings for the 



16 PARK DEPARTMENT 



smaller eliiklren have been a very pleasiupj source of 
amusement. 

Reiiuests For permission to use tlu' hall ii;roiiii(ls were 
(luring the season. t)eing constantly received by varions or- 
ganizations wiio desired to i)lay matched ganus on Satnr- 
(hiy afternoons. The re((iies1s were gninted when the us(^ ol" 
the grounds had not been pi'cN'ionsly t'lirnishctl to other 
parties. Every Saturd;iy i'or severnl months when the 
weather Avas suitable some kind ol" ganu's were being 
phiyed, ;ind at m;iny of the games the attenihincc amoniit<'d 
to several thonsands. 

The sid)jeet of balliing, wiiding-pools. and water 
sports, has long occnjjii'd the attention of the Parle Com- 
missioners for it seenu'd that the splemlid shore of Hazel- 
wood Park would certainly offer ideal opportunities for 
the construction of bath houses and all the necessary re- 
(piirements for superior accommodations, and facilities for 
safe and delightful bathing and swimming, would meet 
witli the approval of a large majority of the visitors to 
this beautiful park and shore. The Commissioners are glad 
to learn that the City Council has taken the nuitter in 
hand. Connnittees of the government have been ap- 
l)ointed to consider the matter and if considered feasilile 
construct a modern bath house to answer satisfactory all 
the recpiirements of such an edifice, and they have sought 
the approval of the Legislature for permission to take 
land from the i)ark for that purpose and the ])rospeet is 
that another year nmy see the swinnning prol)lem solved 



PARK DEPARTMENT , 17 



to the infinite delight of thousands of people who delight 
in salt-water sports. 

We might go on extolling our parks and what they are 
eapable of becoming, but what is most desiral)le now. is 
the financial al)ility to transform the incomplete and un- 
attractive portions of them into complete park attractive- 
ness. Although our city has certainly received a rapid 
growth, it does not follow that we should accjuire an ex- 
tension of park acres for when it becomes imperative to 
enlarge our park area, it will be so api)arent that our 
citizens will readily ac(iuiesce to the necessary expendi- 
ture. 

The condition of parks has to some extent improved 
annually, some of them more than others. 

A gratifying increase in the attendance at all the 
parks has from year to year been very noticeable, and it is 
apparent that the people are well satisfied with their park 
possessions and their management. Picnicing. baseball, 
teiniis. and cpioits .have been great attractions. The fa- 
cilities for them should be enlarged and increased as the 
demand's for them are annually increasing. Sunday after- 
noon concerts should be added to the attractions as when 
they were provided, they were well attended and enjoyed 
by thousands of people. A nearer street ear approach to 
Buttonwood Park is greatly to be desired, though it does 
not prevent its use, it would greatly increase it. 



18 PARK DEPARTMENT 



The sad and unwelcome news of the death of i\lr. 
George D. Barnard of St. Louis, IMo.. who claimed New 
Bedford as his birthplace and whose youth and early man- 
hood was passed in our midst and wlio commemorated the 
event by presentint;' to the city a beautiful monument rep- 
resenting the whaling industry to which our city owes so 
much of its success and progress, was received early in 
the summer, and it is Avilh sorrow and regret that Ave have 
to chronicle the same in this report, for our City has cer- 
tainly lost a devoted friend and a character whom Ncav 
Bedford is proud to claim as a product of our City. In 
connection with this allusion to jMr. Barnard, we present 
from one of the daily papers the story of his life, and in 
the future as the mutlitudes of people who visit Button- 
Avood Park as they pass and gaze upon the beautiful mon- 
ument, the name of the generous donor, George D. Bar- 
nard, will be active in their thoughts. 




MR. GEORGE D. BARNARD 



20 PARK DEPARTMENT 



MR. GEORGE D. BARNARD. 



George D. Barnard of St. Louis, a native of New 
Bedford and the donor of the >$50,000 monument at But- 
tonwood Park to commemorate New Bedford's develop- 
ment from a whaling town into the great manufacturing 
city it is today, died at his liome yesterday from tubercu- 
losis of the bladder. ]\Ir. Barnard was 69 years old. 

^Ir. Barnard was born in this city in 1816. He spent his 
boyhood here and attended the public schools. He was 
employed in Parson's bindery on Union Street. Shortly 
after the Civil War ended he went west, and there rapidly 
rose to be head of the firm of George D. Barnard & Co., 
nuiuiiracliiring stationers. In 1908 he founded the St. 
Louis Skii] and Cancer Hospital, to which he gave $200,000. 
He was one of the original committee of 200 in charge of 
the world's fair in St. Louis and was a former president 
of the IMerehants' exchange of St. Louis. He was also in- 
terested in other St. Louis enterprises. In 1874 he mar- 
ried Mary L. Tindall of Alton, 111. There are no children. 

Mr. Barnard visited New Bedford last September 
when the monument at Buttonwood was dedicated. 

Years before the government took upon its shoulders 
the enormous duty of collecting the mails, Mr. Barnard 
found it his duty each morning, as an employee of the 
New Bedford post-office, to collect the mail from several 



PAEK DEPARTIMENT 21 



boxes fixed in establishments about the center oi: the city. 
He was 14 years of age at the time and his office hourjs 
began at G o'eloek in the morning in the sorting ot mail. 
On the occasion of his visit here Mr. Barnard recalled the 
post-office incident as he was passing the corner of Middle 
and Pleasant Streets, and it wa.s in a store at "the corner 
tliat one of the l)Oxes was located by Mr. Chapman, who 
was then postmaster. 

"When I was a l)ov in the early 60 's, there was a drng 
store over on that corner," said Mr. Barnard, indicating 
the northwest corner with a sweep of the hand. "]\Ir. 
Cha])man was postmaster at the time, and he placed locked 
wooden boxes in that store, the Parker House, and one or 
two other places about town. On my way to the ofliee 
each morning at 6 o'clock it was my duty to uulock llu' 
store and remove the mail, which I carried to the oCnee to 
sort a few minutes later. This was years before the gov- 
ernment took over the collecting of mails, so that what- 
ever expense was involved in the system was defrayed b\' 
Mr. Chapman. 

"Mr. Chapman provided me with a leather bag which 
I believe was identical with the leather bags now used by 
the letter carriers. At that tinu^ there were probably half 
a dozen employes at the office. For my work I received 
four dollars a week. 

"Previous to and following my employment at the 
postoffice I worked for a stationer named Parsons, who 
had an establishment on Union street. Here M'as the 
place where I got a start in the business which I was to 
follow as a life uuflertaking. that of a stationer. 



22 PARK DEPART]\IENT 



"My schooling was at the AVilliam street, INFaxfielil 
street. Bush street ami later the Fifth street schools. At 
the William street school, Miss Avery was heail teacher 
and here I remember well the time when 1 pushed my 
seatmate, Robert W. Taber, into the aisle, and g'ot 'licked' 
for it. Mr. Ilntchinson, father of the stationer, was prin- 
cipal of the Fifth Street School from which I graduated 
fifty-three years ago this coming .Vovendx-r. to enter High 
School. 

"I do not know whether it is a custom now, but in 
those days, as a newsi)a])er carrier, I went to the depot 
every night to get the lioston papers. F had a regular 
route and many prominent peoi)le were among my cus- 
tomers. One of them was the Hon. Thomas Dawes p]liot, 
congressman from this district. Later, wheu I left New 
Bedford ami tinally settled in St. Louis, one of the lii'st 
men that I met was Rev. William C. Eliot, brother of 
Congressman Eliot and ])astor of the Unitarian (Jhureh. 

"The City of New Bedford is honoi'cd with the fact 
that it was one of her native citizens who founded the 
free school system of the City of St. Louis. Rev. Eliot 
went from New Bedford to St. Louis when a young man 
and taught a class in the basement of his church, compris- 
ing the children of members of his congregation. Later 
he taught the children of others, and still later he made a 
visit through New England soliciting funds with which 
he was enabled to employ a teacher in Boston to accom- 
pany him to St. Louis to take over his duties in the school. 
The City then contributed and finally took over the school 
as one of its departments." 



PARK DEPARTMENT 23 



Mr. Barnard said during his visit here that, although 
he has traveled extensively, particularly throughout the 
west, he had not seen any cities that have done better than 
New Bedford. He spoke of the comfortable home condi- 
tions in which he had found many of his acquaintances. 
He pointed out that there we're a large number of build- 
ings on Purchase Street that were standing when he was 
a boy and spoke of the street widening operations as "tre- 
mendous," but that the residents of the city would appre- 
ciate in years to come. 

Determined to make a mark in that stationery bus- 
iness, young Barnard left this City for New York and 
later changed from New York to Cliicago, where he en- 
tered the same business. Prom l)oth New York and 
Chicago, ho went on tlie road as salesman, although 
but 18 years of age. At the lime of the Chicago fire, he 
Avas sent from Chicago to St. Louis to take charge of a 
branch establishment of the tirm. This was in 1871, and 
since then he liad lieen in business there. 

The name of George D. Barnard was one that was 
widely known, far beyond prescribed craft lines, and was 
everywhere respected. Through business tact, in its moral 
application, and the observance of stern principles, JMr. 
Barnard has long been a successful man commercially, and 
by the inheritance and cultivation of higher ideals, he had 
always been socially prominent. 




BARNARD MONUMENT — BUTTONWOOD PARK 



PARK depart:\ient 



25 



The area of tho City's Parks is as follows: 

Hnttoiiwood l*ark. 94 acres 75.02 s(i. rds. 

Prooklawii Park, 88 acres 82.45 sif. rds. 

Hazelwood Park, 23 acres 8.89 sq. rds. 

Water Front, 1 acre 121.94 S(i. rds. 

Ashley Park, 4 acres 51.39 S(i. I'ds. 

Common, 7 acres 32.00 S(|. rds. 

Bridge Approach. 1 acre 1 3.8(5 s(|. rds. 

Grove Park, 149.54 s(i. rds. 

Triangle Park, 25.87 scj. rds. 



221 acres 80.46 sq. rds. 



Respeetfnlly snbmitted, 



SAMUEL P. RICHMOND, Chairman. 
WILLIA:\I p. CASWELL, Secretary. 
GEORGE H. HEDGE, 
WILLIAIM KEITH, 
ANTONE L. SYLVIA. 



PARK DEPARTI\IENT 27 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



December 1, 1915. 

To ihe Board of Pari,- Cominissionfrs: — 

Gentlcinen: — As i"e(|nir('(l l)y l;n\ . I hcrewitli pre- 
sent t'oi" \om' coiisiderjiliou my g'eiKM-jil report of tlie man- 
agement of tile (lei);ii'tmeiit of parks for the past \»'ar, and 
while I do not Ihinlc il ahsolntely necessary to make a 
detailed report on the (^xi)eiiditnre for each park sep- 
arately, yet I have achh'd a tahnlated at'eonnt givino' the 
exact amonnt that \v;is expended for each park for its 
mainteinince the past year and the average cost per acre. 
It w'\\\ not differ much from former >'ears. 

Baseball diamonds are maintained on ;dl the parks, also 
teiniis courts and other games allowed on the lawns where 
it could he done without badly damaging the grounds. 
Saturdays and holidays it is impossible to accommodate 
all who desire to engage in the sport of the games as there 
is not sufficient area. Footl)all fields are laid out and goal- 
posts erected, and everything done to facilitate and pro- 
mote the desire for clean, sane and respectable sport by the 
l)ark visitors. The following rules and regulations are 
posted conspicuously about the baseball diamonds and 
fields and enforced l)y the officers of the parks. 



aAiS ;snra ;nq ';irajad iio^^i.iay pioi{;iAV ps^^iuiaad aq ^jiav 
saunas puB aoipead ,(qiuog,, -pa^jmaad aq ^oii j^tav 'A\>a\ 
aaq|o Aub ui ab s^uBuuad .10 suuojiitu no Suisi;jaApy 

•PT8U 
n^q aq; jo asu aq; pasuja.i aq ypAV MaxiiiRm a'iih ui auiBS 

aq) no SniiquiKS .10 a>|i!;s a'.iiioiu h .ioj SiiiA'iqd S'liii^aj^ 

'Pl^y IP'U ^*in P ^sn .laqj.Tiij ino.ij p:s'SMtnsip ;un]sin 
joj asnna ;uaiaijjus pajapiscioa aq |pAV ajiduiii ]m\i s.iaAH{d 
uaa.w:^aq jo sja.CB]d naaAV^aq .§[I![Suk.ia\ |na;sisjaj 

•s.io|R;aadK piiK s.TaAK[d 
JO auqdiasip pni; a.Tiipajo.id jo .lap.io aq) 40 aSji?qa ni 
aq ipAV UBmaai|od q.uMl aqj^ -^iiasajd aq ariu \\n\} qiqa 
Xiw 01 paiiSissR aq \\ia\ \\ \nui} \r.i\\ ;\p. paidnaao ;oii j[ 
•aiiiBS aq^ joj papipaqas ami; aq; aa;;ij juoq aiio paAjasa.i 
aq \[]M. puoiuBip aq; pun 'j^aaAV SuiAvonoj aq; aiires aq; 
JO asn aq; joj Suuuoui A'Bpnoj\[ jyaoja^o i Ja;jK ami; a'iih 
:>[aBd aq; jo jadaaq aq; o; ajcUIb ;siim s>|.TBd aq^ iii 8ptiiio.iS 
||i;q aq; aSBSiia o; SniqsiAV sai;.iBd |[y -aaB^d .iiaq; pauSis 
-SB aq ipAV 'noiss'imjad .iado.id aq; [laAiaaa.i aABq oqAv ptiB 
•ami; pa;04{B aq; ;b A*B{d o; A'pBa.i puuo.iS aq; no smBaj^ 



S^fJ-B^ UI SaiU'BO H'SCl^S'Ba SuiUJ3A0f) S8in^ 



62 jLNaHJLaVciaa ^ravj 



PARK DEPARTMENT 31 



BUTTONWOOD PARK. 

But little ill the way of iinproveruniis has been done 
in this park during the past year. While there are a great 
many ways to ini[)rov(^ and render it more attractive and 
desirable to the peoi)le, yet the times do not seem aus- 
picious especially tinancially so. Closely allied to this 
subject is that of extending or opening for use Browned 
Avenue from Kempton Street to llawlhorii Street. Avhile 
the project is distinctly and entirely outsid'' of the prov- 
ince of the Parlv Board and must be carried into execution 
if at all, by the City Council, nevertheless, the Commission. 
is most heartily in favor of such impi-ovenui'nts earnestly 
believing tliat th(> same ^vill open up and (h-velop a large 
amount of property which at present, is practically idle 
and non-productive, and at the same time alt'ord a much 
needed thoroughfare for this large and growing section 
of the City, and present a frontage to the park that would 
greatly convenience a very large part of the community 
living in that section of tluM'ity, and considering it from 
a money i)oint of view, it would be a -wise and desirable 
operation for the City to undertake. 

The labor expended npdn this park Avas about the 
same and of similar nature as in former years. During 
the Aviiiter when the pon<l was in good condition 
thousands of people, old and young, enjoyed themselves 
indulging in the healthful exercises of skating and seemed 
to appreciate the arrangements made for their comfort 
and pleasnre by the Park Board. 



PAEK DEPART]\IENT 33 



The animal i)art of the itark remains about the same 
Avith the exception of an addition of three black bears 
about fifteen months old, which by their antics have af- 
forded great amusement for the children. This park 
continues to be a great favorite and the attendance in- 
creases in numbers auuuallv. 



Labor $4,982. (J7 

Maintenance 2.49-4.00 

Total $7,476.67 

Average cost per acre $79.54 



BROOKLAWN PARK. 

Nothing has been done the past year towards the im- 
provement of the north side of the park which needs so 
much to put it into proper condition for nse and respect- 
able appearance. I Avould suggest as a plan for the im- 
provement of that section of the park, along the north 
road side a double roadway, the north roadway to be 
used for a trafificway and the south roadway for park 
purposes or pleasure driving. The year has not been an 
eventful one, no unusual events have occurred, but in 
most respects the season was most gratifying. Parties 
from neighboring towns and cities visited the park in 
large nundjers. which showed the popularity of the park 



34 PAEK DEPARTMENT 



not only to our own citizens but visitors from out of the 
City. There are many improvements that the Board could 
and would be glad to recommend to the honorable City 
Council whenever the financial condition of our city will 
warrant it, as the Board is assured that the feelings of the 
City Fathers are in full sympathy with the Board and the 
citizens in having Brooklawn Parlv the most beautiful 
spot of the park system, easily accessible and full of 
pleasing opportunities. 

We are called upon to allude to the death of Holden 
B. Remington, Assistant Superintendent of the Park, ap- 
pointed by Mayor Parker, June 1-4, 1895. Mr. Reming- 
ton's health had not been good for sometime and in 
August asked to be relieved from the responsibilities of 
the position. He continued in feeble health until Novem- 
ber 15th, when he died, and so passed away a valuable 
member of our department, whose earnest and serious 
efforts in behalf of the park made it what it is, a valuable 
part of the department of parks. 



Labor $5,914.61 

Maintenance 3,892.55 



Total $9,807.16 

Average cost per acre $111.45 



3g PARK DEPART]\IENT 



HAZELWOOD PARK. 

This park is located between Brock Avenue on the 
east and French Avenue on the west. It contains twenty- 
eight acres and was purchased by the City and placed 
in charge of the Park Board, November 19th, 1901. It 
has proved a wise and profitable purchase for the Cit.y, 
wise, in that by its situation on the seashore, it gives to 
the people what no other park in the City can, an exten- 
sive marine and landscape view, and by its location and 
surroundings invites all lovers of the ocean-view an ad- 
mirable opportunity to enjoy all that the river, harbor 
and bay can oft'er. This park has become a favorite place 
for picnic parties, Sunday schools, and organizations of 
many kinds from our own City and many of the towns 
nearby, w^ho come and enjoy the day in an outing, sur- 
rounded by the best possible conditions for summer 
pleasure, and it must be, therefore, for the children, a 
health-giving recreation resort. 

The park commissioners realize with pleasure that 
the constant increase in its patronage from year to year 
is evidence of its superiority as a public park. The 
health argument in favor of such a park is apparent and 
a powerful one and sufficient why the City should con- 
sider little else in providing such a place as this park. 

Tennis courts are provided and the demand for them 
so urgent that the Board are strongly importuned for 



PARK DEPARTMENT 37 



more. Truly Hazelwood is a seashore resort, and capable 
of great results. 

Labor $1,892.46 

Maintenance 263.82 

Total $2,156.28 

Average cost per acre $93.75 



GROVE PARK. 

As our City increases in population and therefore be- 
comes more and more congested, the good results derived 
from parks and playgrounds are becoming more appre- 
ciated, and each succeeding year finds greater and more 
numerous demands to meet this increasing desire for 
more facilities, pleasure, and recreation afforded by the 
parks. Being located in a very thickly settled part of the 
City, it has proved to be a welcome and most desirable 
acquisition to the park system of our City and should be 
graded and equipped with the most up-to-date athletic 
apparatus for the pleasure and interest of the boys and 
girls as well as the older people. 



PARK DEPARTMENT 



]\rore lilicral {ip])ropriation should be allowed for in- 
stalling' playgi'ound ai)paratiis on all the parks. At pres- 
ent only ver\' limited amount of athletic apparatus is to 
be found on any of the parks, and while the demands for 
them are great the desire of constantly growing numbers 
of children who make playgrounds the raecca of their 
oiildooi' desires and ambitions, should be heeded. T\\[' 
present apjjaralus on this park is made of wood and has 
been in existence sonu^, twelve years, every year needing 
many repairs until it has become so dilapidated and dan- 
gerous that we are constantly in fear of accidents. An 
up-to-date modern steel equipment should be installed at 
once so that it would be available for use earh" in the 
spring. I can conceive of no more worthy, beneficial, 
good, or more conducive to the health and happiness of 
the multitude of children living in that portion of the 
City, llian tlie complete renovation and provision for a 
perfect playground. The parents in that neighborhood 
are justified in insisting that it should be supplied for 
Iheir children. At the request of the Park Commission- 
ers, Mr. William P. Williams, Engineer, made a report to 
the Board as to the cost of putting in order and fitting this 
little park for a playground, as follows : — 



40 PARK DEPARTMENT 



"Thomas W, Cook, Esq., 

Supt. of Parks. 

Dear Sir: — In reply to your request for an estimate 
of the cost of curbing the Grove Park and grading same 
with loam, I beg to state that it will cost about $540.00 to 
curb the lot with curbing similar to that used by the City 
on its streets. I would suggest that the corners be 
rounded similar to the street cvirb corners. 

I find from inspection of my contour jilan of this 
])ark that the lot is a little below the grade of the side- 
walk. I estimate, therefore, that it will require an average 
fill of one foot in depth to bring the lot to a uniform 
grade six inches above the present grade of the side- 
walks. This will require about 1.500 cubic yards of 
material. To be safe I estimate that this will cost $1.00 
per cubic yard or total of $1,500.00. This seems a very 
liigh figure, but I have no knowledge where you can get 
this material convenient to the park; in fact, you will 
prol)a])ly have to buy it and cart it some distance, but if 
you know of any location you can get the material from, 
1 can give you a more careful estimate of the probable 
cost. My estimate of total cost for curbing and grading 
this park will therefore be .$2,040.00. 

Very truly yours. 

WILLIAM P. WILLIAMS, 

City Engineer." 



Labor $524.25 

Maintenance 254.09 

Total $778.34 

Average cost per acre $778.34 



PAEK DEPARTMENT 41 



COMMON. 

This piece of park property remains about the same 
as heretofore. It has been well maintained, and is in 
excellent condition. But the fact remains that in remov- 
ing the flower beds some years ago, a great mistake was 
made and they should l)e replaced at once. The Common 
should be considered the public garden of the City and 
properly present a beautiful display of lawns, flower- 
beds, and shrubbery, with a view of making it more at- 
tractive than ever. It is a very important part of the 
park department, situated in a popular part of the City 
and surrounded by handsome residences, and a thorough- 
fare for thousands of people passing da.ily through it, and 
the throngs that occupy the seats when the weather 
permits. 

These grounds could be made the peer of any in tlie 
Country, and I would recommeiul such a change and im- 
provement as soon as possible, such a consideration of tlie 
possibilities of the Common, should be considered by the 
Board, and on account of its situation and surroundings 
render that vicinity as beautiful and attractive as it can 
well be. The shrub beds are in a very delapidated condi- 
tion and should be made entirely new or material addi- 
tions made to them. 

The Greenhouse is too small for the work that is to 
be done and should be replaced on one of the larger parks 
by a more modern one. Though small and delapidated, it 
has provided about all the plants used on the several parks 



PARK DEPARTMENT 43 



which before its construction were purchased in open mar- 
ket of the local florists. 

It is to be hoped that the Common may be made to 
assume a somewhat better appearance the coming- season, 
at least, some effort will ])e made to attain that end, but 
it will depend upon how well the City Council <'onsider the 
wants and necessities of the department. 

Labor st?4,034.89 

IMainlenance 1 .505.98 



Total $5,540.87 

Average cost per acre $791.50 



44 PAEK DEPARTMENT 



ASHLEY PARK. 

The trees in this park as well as in the other parks have 
received proper attention dnring the past snnimer and 
winter, in the removal of dead wood, imperfect, and 
diseased portions, and careful pruning, and many portions 
of the park have been improved by relieving tliem of this 
crowded condition and poor and unsightly growths. Such 
as could be used for lumber was sawed into proper lengths, 
tlie limbs and dead wood being cnt into firewood. The 
eastern })art of the grounds was very low and some very 
large holes had to be filled which was done to a very large 
extent by the street department, thus relieving the burden 
of expense to tlie park department. Yet some time will 
elapse before the park can assujne the shape and condition 
it should be, and such it is destined to be, for it is in a most 
desii'able location to afford park desirabilities to the people 
living in that part of the City. Seats have been provided 
and they were occupied about all the time and many re- 
(juests were made for more, but until improvements and 
the place is put in a little better condition, the present 
number is considered sufficient. The Commissioners would 
gladly avail themselves of the opportunity to place the 
little park in a condition satisfactory to the citizens in 
that section of the City, 



46 PARK DEPARTMENT 



BRIDGE PARK. 

This little piece of park property in the very midst of 
a large and busy part of the city, is indeed a welcome 
place to all who by business or pleasure have occasion to 
visit it. 

The many flowers and slirub beds maintained here 
are very much admired, and aft'ord much pleasure to the 
large number of people who enter the city by way of the 
bridge. The grass always cut, trees and shrubs properly 
cared for, roadways neat and clean, is evidence of the de- 
votion of the caretaker's pride in his eflt'orts to have little 
Bridge Park receive the plaudits of the people. 

IMaintenancc of the Park. 

Labor $808.25 

Maintenance 83. 10 

Total $886.35 

Average cost per acre $886.35 



Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS W. COOK, 

General Superintendent of Parks. 



PAIIK DEPARTlMENT 49 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 



New Bedford, Mass., December 1, 1915. 

To the Board of Park Commissioners: — 

(jIentlemen: — The twenty-second annual tinaiicial re- 
port of the receipts and expenditures of the department 
of parks for the year ending November 30, 1915. which I 
now have the honor to submit contains in detail informa- 
tion regarding the finances of the department, including 
the receipts, expenses and disbursements of the park 
commission, and affords in this summary, which is given 
herewith, an opportunity for those who are interested in 
parks and their management, maintenance and improve- 
ment, a correct and defined explanation of all moneys pro- 
vided by the taxpayers and expended by the Park Board 
for park purposes, not only for the past year, but the to- 
tal amount charged to the department since the adoption 
of the park system, is comprehensively made apparent by 
this report and submitted to our citizens for their con- 
sideration. 



50 



PARK DEPARTMENT 



STATEMENT OF PARK EXPENDITURES 



Comparative Statement. 

1S92 77,936.87 

1893 .5,734.79 

1894 24,458.95 

1895 21,321.17 

1896 10,054.26 

1897 14,834.89 

1898 20,620.70 

1899 18,879.33 

1900 20,581.53 

1901 51,011.63 

1902 43,503.17 

1903 42,042.33 

1904 44,999.25 

1905 20,000.00 

1906 15,040.78 

1907 24,998.47 

1908 24,995.56 

1909 25,129.25 

1910 33,034.19 

1911 39,564.23 

1912 48,517.24 

1913 45,661.39 

1914 42,133.09 

1915 29,960.85 



Itemized Statement. 



Buttonwood Park 
Brooklawn Park 
Common .... 
Marine Park . 
City Hall. . . . 
Triangle Park 
Grove Park . . 
Pine Park . . . 
Hazelwood Park 
Rridge Approach 

Office 

Ashley Park .... 



228,152.56 

221,378.68 

117,416.14 

8,546.16 

615.25 

1,726.13 

18,505.96 

632.58 

86,960.67 

10,911.50 

48,419.01 

1,749.28 



$745,013.92 



$745,013.92 



PARK DEPARTMENT 



51 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE YEAR. 

Dr. 

lUittonwood Park $7,476.67 

Barnard Monument 859.26 $8,335.93 

Brooklawn Park 9,80 7.16 

Common 5,540.87 

Hazelwood Park 2,156.28 

Grove Park 778.3 4 

Bridge Api)roaeh 886.35 

Triangle Park 50.00 

Office 3,265.18 

Balance on hand 409.54 

$31,229.65 
Cr. 

Appropriation $3 0,000.00 

Special Appropriation ( Balance from 

1914) . . . 862.93 

gale of Milk ; . . . 88.89 

Sale of rabbits and ducks 3 4.18 

Rent, cafe privileges 175.00 

Sale of oil barrels 5.40 

"Revenue 1915" (Sewage disposal)... 63.25 



$31,229.65 



OFFICE EXPENSES AND MISCELLANEOUS. 

Dr. 

Superintendent and Clerk $2,539.92 

Telephone 90.61 

Supplies 97.26 

Auto Hire 12.50 

Annual Report 273.86 

Traveling Expenses 62.63 

Typewriter 70.00 

Miscellaneous 118.40 

$3,265.18 
Cr. 
Net Expenditures $3,265.18 



52 PARK DEPARTMENT 



MAINTENANCE OF THE COMMON. 

Dr. 

Assistant Superintendent $1,001.50 

Police 1,059.75 

Common Laborers 1,974.14 

Rent 240.00 

Lights 240.12 

Seeds 129.73 

Dressing 72.40 

Water 489.23 

Teaming 92.00 

Repairs . 89.15 

Coal 63.70 

Miscellaneous 89.65 



$5,540.87 
Cr. 
Net Expenditures $5,540.87 



MAINTENANCE OF HAZELWOOD PARK. 

Dr. 

Labor and Keeper $1,892.46 

Telephone 3 2.00 

Teaming 75.25 

Water 54.51 

Repairs 37.06 

Miscellaneous 65.00 



$2,156.28 
Cr. 
Net Expenditures $2,156.28 



PARK DEPARTMENT 53 



MAINTENANCE OF TRIANGLE PARK. 

Dr. 
Labor $.50.00 

Cr. 
Net Expenditures $50.00 



MAINTENANCE OF GROVE PARK. 

Dr. 

Labor $524.25 

Teaming 5.50 

Road Oil 45.35 

Repairs 143.11 

Water 7.20 

Miscellaneous 52.93 



$778.34 
Cr. 
Net Expenditures $778.34 



MAINTENANCE OF BRIDGE APPROACH. 

Dr. 

Lal)or $803.25 

Plants and Shrul)S 46.80 

Water 10.00 

Coal 6.84 

Miscellaneous 19.46 



$886.35 
Cr. 
Net Expenditures $886.35 



54 PARK DEPARTMENT 



MAINTENANCE BUTTONWOOD PARK. 

Dr. 

Keeper , $1,001.00 

Police 9rj8.20 

Labor 3,023.47 

Telephone 32.00 

Lights 258.51 

Animal Food 872.26 

Teaming 15 9.00 

Skating (cleaning ])on(l) 60.75 

Purchase of animals 157.25 

Water 111.54 

Repairs 3 21.37 

Painting 15.80 

Tennis Nets 18.75 

Seeds 14.75 

Coal 27.36 

Lights around pond for skating 96.10 

Wagon 45.00 

Tools, etc 4 8.23 

Miscellaneous 255.33 

$7,476.67 
Cr. 
Net Expenditures $7,476.67 



RARNARn MONUMENT, $85 9.2 6. 

Dr. 

Lamp Posts $538.04 

Wiring, etc 52.28 

Screenings 146.99 

Miscellaneous Bills 65.70 

Labor 56.25 

$859.26 
Cr. 
Net Expenditures. . $85 9.26 



PARK DEPARTMENT 55 



MAINTENANCE OF BKOOKLAWN PARK. 

Dr. 

Assitant Superintendent $1,001.00 

Police 1,933.89 

Lal)or 2,979.72 

Telephone 32.00 

Lights 8 7.37 

Teaming 125.13 

Animal Food 620.84 

Repairs 261.28 

Water 7 4.2.^i 

Sewer 1,864.76 

Coal 96.97 

Miscellaneous 99.7.') 



, '. $9,807.16 

Cr. 
Net Expenditures $9,807.16 



MONTHLY EXPENDITURES, MATERIALS, 
AND SUPPLIES. 

1914. December $442.44 

1915. January 824.48 

February 2,363.47 

March 596.26 

April 952.16 

May 660.15 

June 836.35 

July 335.03 

August 317.60 

September 293.3 4 

October 862.50 

November 785.02 



Total $9,268.80 



56 PARK DEPARTMENT 



PAY ROLL. 

1914. ' 

Decemlter I, 2, ;;, $966.52 

1915. 

January 1, 5, 6, 7, <S, 1,682.76 

February 9, JO, 11, 12, 1,184.87 

March i:!, 14, 1-^, u; 1,255.72 

April 17, 18, 19, 20, 1,601.80 

May 21, 22, 2;',, 24, 25, . . . 2,708.04 

June -'6, 27, 28, 29, 2,272.56 

July ;](), ;!1, 32, ;J3, 34, . . . 2,282.43 

August 35, 36, 37, 38, 1,776.59 

Sei)teml)er 39, 40, 41,42 1,628.12 

October 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, . . . 1,746.94 

November 48, 49, 50, 51 1,284.99 

December 52, 300.71 



Respect Fully submitted. 



$20,692.05 



THOMAS W. COOK, 

Clerk. 



58 PARK DEPARTMENT 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 
'^ 

In Board of Aldermen, 

March 9, 1916. 

Received, ordered printed in the City Documents 
and sent down for concurrence. 

W. H. B. REMINGTON. 

City Clerk. 



Concurred. 



In Common Council, 

March 9, 1916. 

CHARLES P. SAWYER. 

Clerk. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



THE 



CHIEF OF POLICE 



OF THE 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1915. 




new bedford 

The a. E. Coffin Press, Printers 

1916 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 

In Board of Aldermen, 

January 27, 1916. 

Received, ordered printed in the City Documents 
and sent down for concurrence. 

W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 



Concurred. 



In Common Council, 

January 27, 1916. 

LILY F. DARCY, 

Clerk pro tern. 



Annual Report. 



New Bedford, Mass., 
January 10, 1916. 

Tf> His Hunur, the Mayor, and the City Council of the City 
of New Bedford. 

Gentlemen : — I have the honor to herewith 
submit the annual report of the conditions and doings 
of the Police Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1915. 



This department consists of the following: 



Chief, 


1 




Traffic Officers, 


8 


Deputy Chief, 


1 




Emergency Officers, 


2 


Captains, 


3 




Wagonmen, 


3 


Chief Inspector, 


1 




Chauffeurs, 


5 


Inspectors, 


5 




Housekeepers, 


10 


Lieutenants, 


11 




Matron, 


I 


Sergeants, 


9 




Janitors, 


2 


Patrolmen, 


102 




Laborer, 


1 


Number of arrests during 


the year, 3514. 






Arrests by months. Males 


Females 


January, 




276 


239 


37 


February, 




256 


225 


31 


March, 




349 


304 


45 


April, 




270 


237 


33 


May, 




270 


243 


27 


June, 




308 


279 


29 


July, 




293 


268 


25 


August, 




335 


298 


37 


September, 




377 


347 


30 


October, 




285 


248 


37 


November, 




265 


237 


28 


December, 




230 


209 


21 



3514 



3134 



380 



POLICE REPORT. 



Americans, 


1541 


Minors, 


401 




Foreigners, 


1973 


Commitments, 


593 




Non-residents, 


598 


On Warrants, 


901 




NATIVITY OF PRISONERS. 






United States, 


1541 


Germany, 




14 


Albania, 


27 


Greece, 




24 


Argentine, 


1 


Hawaiian Islands, 




1 


Assyria, 


1 


Holland, 




1 


Austria, 


108 


Ireland, 




173 


Australia, 


2 


Italy, 




27 


Azores Islands, 


240 


Madeira, 




36 


Belgium, 


12 


Norway, 




5 


Bermuda, 


1 


Poland, 




64 


Bohemia, 


1 


Portugal, 




71 


Brazil, 


2 


Russia, 




89 


British Provinces, 


55 


Scotland, 




48 


Canada, 


397 


South America, 




1 


Cape de Verde Islands, 


121 


Spain, 




1 


Chile, 


1 


St. Helena, 




1 


China, 


8 


Sweden, 




9 


England, 


390 


Syria, 




18 


Finland, 


6 


Turkey, 




1 


France, 


5 


Wales, 
West Indies, 




3 
8 




OFFENCES 






Abandonment, 






1 




Adultery, 






7 




Arson, 






2 


. 


Assault, 






51 




Assault, and battery. 




163 




Assault felonious 


, 




6 




Assault indecent 






1 




Assault to rape. 






• 2 




Assault with wea 


)on. 




12 




Assault on officer. 




2 




Attempt to utter 


a forged 


order, 


1 




Bastardy, 






2 




Begging, 






1 




Being present at gaming. 




31 




Bribery of voters 


, 




2 




Breaking and entering an 


d larceny. 


59 




Breaking and entering an 


d larceny, attempt. 


3 





POLICE REPORT. 



Burglary, ,•'■ 

Carrying a weapon, 1" 

Concealing leased property, ' 

Concealing mortgaged property, 1 

9 

Conspiracy, 

Contempt of Court, " 28 
Corrupt conduct, 1 
Collecting junk without a license, 3 
Cruelty to animals, " 
Delinquents, 133 
Desertion, ■'■" 
Disturbing the peace, lo? 
Disturbing a religious worship, 1 
Drunkenness, 1933 
Enticing a female from home, 1 
Forgery, ^ 
Fornication, * 
Fraudulent hiring an automobile, 1 
Fraudulently obtaining a signature to a written in- 
strument, 1 

Gambling, "* 

1 9 
Gaming, 

Having cocaine in possession unlawfully, 2 

Having morphine in possession unlawfully, 1 

Having false scales in possession, 1 

Indecent exposure, " 

Idle and disorderly, "/ 

Injury to a shade tree, 1 

Illegal practice of medicine, 1 

Illegal use of a trade name and label, 1 

Illegal sale of liquor, 4 

T 9 

Insane, 

Interfering with ofhcer, 3 

Keeping common nuisance, 2 
Keeping common nuisance and admitting minor to 

pool room, '■ 

Keeping disorderly house, 23 

Keeping house of ill fame, 1 

Keeping liquor nuisance, 2 

Keeping liquor with intent to sell, 4 

Keeping a gaming house, 2 

Keeping an unlicensed dog, 2 
Kidnapping, 

Larceny, ^^' 

Larceny from the person, 1 



POLICE REPORT. 



Larceny felonious, 2 

Lewdness, 5 

Lewd and lascivious cohabitation, 11 

Lewd and lascivious behavior, 1 

Maliciously breaking glass, 1 

Malicious mischief, 1 

Malicious injur}' to real property-, 3 

Manslaughter, 1 

Murder, attempt, 1 
Neglect of family, 150 

Neglect of child, 14 

Neglect of parent, 12 

Neglected children, 28 

Night Walking, 37 

Open and gross lewdness, 2 

Peddling without a license, 3 

Printing and distributing obscene pictures, 1 

Perjury, 2 

Polygamy, 2 

Rape, 18 

Rape, attempt, 1 

Receiving stolen goods, 11 

Reckless driving, 1 
Refusing and neglecting to remove combustible 

materials, 1 

Robbery, 4 

Sale of Mortgaged property, 2 

School offender, 1 

Selling a horse unfit for labor, 1 

Stealing a ride, 4 

Stubbornness, 2 

Surrendered by probation officer, 16 

Surrendered by bondsman, 1 

Threats, 13 

Trespass, 1 

Unlawful use of milk bottles, 2 

Unnatural act, 3 

Vagabonds, 1 

Vagrants, 23 

Violation of the illegitimate children act, 33 

Violation of the postal law, 1 

Violation of the morphine law, 1 
Violation of the Town Ordinances of Mattapoisett, 2 

Violation of the motor vehicle laws, 61 

Violation of the city ordinances, 14 



i>OLlCE REPORf. 



Violation of the oleomargarine law, 1 

Violation of the labor laws, 3 

Violation of the health laws, 1 

Violation of the milk laws, 2 

Violation of the white slave laws, 2 

Violation of the offence against chastity, 1 

Violation of the food laws, 5 

Violation of the drug laws, 1 

Violation of the immigration laws, 1 

Violation of the Regulation of Fireworks law, 2 

\ iolation of parole, 2 

Wilful injury to real property, ^ 

Wilfully injuring a building, 1 

3514 

PRIMARY DISPOSITION OF CASES 

Placed on file, 790 

Sentenced to penal institutions, 659 

Fined, ^75 

Continued, 625 

Released by order of Court, 809 

Bailed and defaulted, 1^ 

Bailed to appear at Superior Court, . 1 

Bailed to appear out of Town, 17 

Bonded to keep the peace, 8 

Complaints dismissed, 17 

Delivered to out town officers, 44 

Delivered to keeper of jail, 2 

Delivered to State BoardXharity, 10 

Delivered to Superior Cou'rt, 4 

Insane Hospital, 8 

Not guilty, *7 

Probably guilty, 43 

Probable cause not shown, and discharged, 1 

Summons for out of town, 6 

Nolle prossed, ^^ 

Paid fines, 202 

Appealed, -^^' 

Sentence suspended, 2oo 



POLICE REPORT. 



MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS 

Accidents, 31 
Amount of property stolen in the city, $16,348.00 
Amount of property recovered, 13,445.69 

Ambulance calls, 1220 

Animals impounded, 8 

Bicycles found, 17 

Buildings found open and secured, 600 

Cases investigated, 30,275 

Dangerous buildings reported, 9 

Dangerous dogs reported, 10 

Dangerous wires reported, 55 

Dead bodies found, 4 

Defective streets and sidewalks, 307 

Defective hydrants, 3 

Defective water pipes, 1 

Disturbances suppressed, 998 

Dog notices served, 10 

Dogs killed, 44 

Fire alarms given, 19 

Fires extinguished without alarm, 43 

Horses found cast, 13 

Horses killed, 4 

Hours of extra duty, 2347 

Intoxicated persons helped home, 29 

Liquor search warrants served, 6 

Lost children found and returned, 449 

Notices served, 358 

Rescued from drowning, 2 

Still fire alarms given, 1 

Sick and injured persons assisted, 39 

Street obstructions reported, 75 

Street obstructions removed, 26 

Stray teams picked up, 21 

Stray teams put up, 12 

Search warrants served, 4 

Water running to waste, 5 



POLICE REPORT. 



INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

Property recovered, $9,253.67 

A . 343 

Arrests, 

Cases investigated, 3,657 

J S39 

Notices served. 

Search warrants served, 

Liquor search warrants served, 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER ALMOND, 

Chief Inspector. 



MATRON'S REPORT 



Prisoners, 
Lodgers, 
Lost children. 
Neglected children. 
Insane, 



292 
5 
9 
5 

4 



Respectfully submitted. 



MRS. SARAH M. BROWNELL, 

Matron. 



10 POLICE REPORT. 



PERSONNEL OF THE FORCE. 



CHIEF 
Timothy C. Allen 

DEPUTY CHIEF 
John C. Parker. 

CAPTAINS 

Daniel Deneen Harry D. Stow Thomas J. Taft 

CHIEF INSPECTOR 

Walter Almond 

INSPECTORS 
George R. Lawrence Albert E. Mosher 

Benjamin Lamothe Charles F. Smith 

Frank W. Sylvia 

LIEUTENANTS 

Lemuel D. Adams Charles L. McBay 

Narcisse A. Breault Jeremiah A4cCarthy 

Edward P. Doherty Samuel D. McLeod 

Thomas Fay William E. Roscoe 

William Fowler Willis C. Underwood 

Joseph B. Wing 

SERGEANTS 
Edmund Foley James W. Savage 

Arod B. HoUoway George A. Sherman 

James J. Moore Chester L. Tripp 

Frank L. Remington Augustine F. Velho 

William Welsh 

POLICE MATRON 
Sarah M. Brownell 



POLICE REPORT. 11 

PATROLMEN. 







Years of 


Patrolmen 


Age 


Service 


Ashley, Henry T. 


39 


11 


Aillery, Constance 


43 


6 


Allen, Charles E. 


47 


12 


Almond, William Jr. 


43 


20 


Barbour, Robert L. 


38 


6 


Boehler, Max F. 


31 


2 


Bolton, James E. 


37 


2 


Breault, Joseph A. 


41 


2 


Briggs, Myron S. A. 


41 


4 


Brightman, EUery E. 


47 


9 


Brophy, Edward 0. 


30 


4 


Butts, Henry 


31 


8 


Cash, James 


42 


4 


Caswell, Charles A. 


51 


10 


Chase, Raymond 


40 


4 


Cleary, William E. 


37 


9 


Cole, William T. 


46 


19 


Craft, James F. 


52 


11 


Crapo, Albert A. 


38 


11 


Cushing, William S. 


45 


11 


Daley, Charles F. 


51 


11 


Dean, James 


44 


6 


Doherty, Thomas 


40 


2 


Downey, Daniel 


46 


10 


Downey, John B. 


30 


2 


Downey, William M. 


39 


4 


Dupuis, Patrick H. 


30 


4 


Dupuis, Wilfred H. 


36 


11 


Durant, Lawrence J. 


47 


13 


Earley, Edward C. 


48 


19 


Ellis, Harry C. 


40 


9 


Evans, John 


39 


4 


Fanning, John F. 


39 


6 


Fay, John H. 


36 


9 


Fell, Charles 


30 


2 


Fernandes, Joseph A. 


29 


4 


Francis, Antone 


36 


2 


Freitas, Manuel 


37 


6 


Gatenby, James S. 


43 


6 


Gibbs, Nathaniel F. 


47 


13 


Glennon, William F. 


.43 


8 



12 POLICE REPORT. 



Corner, Arthur 
Grant, George P. 
Gregory, William 
Hafford, Stephen, Jr. 
Haggerty, Timothy F. 
Haran, Luke T. 
Haran, John F. 
Harding, James P. 
Harrington, Daniel 
Hayden, Abram L. 
Head, Edgar E. 
Hickey, William B. 
Horton, Eliphalet H. 
Howland, William A. F 
Hynes, Edward A. 
Irwin, Henry Jr. 
Ivey, James A. 
Jacobs, Ellsworth C. 
Jenkins, Thomas J. 
Johnson, Harry 
Karcher, Frederick Jr. 
Leahy, William T. 
Lentz,* Joseph A. 
Lowther, George H. 
MacKinstry, Albert B. 
Manning, Joseph S. 
McCarty, William H. 
McCrohan, John PI. 
McDonald, Daniel J. 
McEnnis, Robert B. 
McGoff, James E. 
McKay, John 1. 
Miller, John J. 
Mitchell, William 
AluUins, Enoch 
Murdy, Robert H. 
Murphy, Edward 
Murphy, Francis A. 
Murphy, Lawrence 
Nault, Joseph 
Nelson, Ivar V. 
Oliver, John F. 
Phinney, Charles E. 
Pieraccini, Raphael 
Place, Joseph A. 



32 


2 


39 


8 


44 


4 


58 


16 


33 


2 


35 


6 


36 


2 


43 


8 


49 


13 


43 


11 


38 


8 


33 


2 


51 


11 


48 


19 


42 


10 


45 


6 


60 


25 


40 


4 


29 


2 


38 


6 


55 


13 


40 


8 


31 


2 


57 


19 


36 


10 


36 


8 


30 


2 


32 


4 


53 


19 


59 


21 


39 


4 


33 


6 


41 


8 


36 


8 


48 


6 


48 


11 


33 


4 


38 


6 


41 


2 


31 


6 


32 


2 


51 


22 


44 


8 


35 


6 


52 


9 



POLICE REPORT. 



13 



Pollock, John H. 
Prifogle, Edward 
Raymond, Edward 
Raymond, Hiram E. 
Rooks, Albert H. 
Rooks, John C. 
Sanders, Joseph A. 
Searell, William E. 
Souza, William H. 
Spooner, John C. 
Staples, Walter C. 
Sullivan, James H. 
Sullivan, Matthew 
Sundin, Carl A. 
Sweeney, Daniel P. 
Sylvia, Antone F. 
Taber, Jeremiah M. 
Touchette, Hermes 
White, Albert B. 
Winterson, Henry B. 
Wilcox, Seth A. 
Williams, Benjamin F. 
Williams, Charles H. 
Wixon, James A. 
Woolfenden, Albert 



Jr. 



29 


2 


38 


4 


40 


8 


62 


23 


49 


15 


58 


29 


32 


4 


45 


4 


45 


2 


42 


13 


43 


2 


51 


15 


42 


8 


36 


6 


53 


25 


43 


8 


58 


20 


38 


8 


36 


8 


31 


2 


45 


11 


43 


8 


41 


8 


75 


44 


37 


6 



EMERGENCY OFFICERS 



Kennedy, Patrick 
Vogel, Robert F. 



81 
49 



31 
19 



WAGONMEN 



Murdy, Robert A. 


48 


11 


Nickerson, Charles F. 


42 


15 


Paige, George W. 


69 


34 


CHAUFFEURS 




Dalbec, Edmund 


38 


7 


Meade, James 


41 


9 


Patterson, Charles C. 


37 


8 


Ryan, William M. 


48 


19 


Turgeon, Joseph V. 


32 


6 



14 



POLICE REPORT. 



HOUSEKEEPERS 



Arnett, James VV. 
Astley, Thomas 
Cannavan, Patrick 
Dodds, James 
Humphrey, Daniel J. 
Kenney, Patrick 
Meehan, Daniel 
Smith, Andrew J. 
Sullivan, Timothy 
Wilson, Thomas H. 



76 


38 


50 


9 


79 


47 


62 


23 


74 


37 


61 


20 


68 


18 


72 


22 


68 


40 


79 


29 



PENSIONED UNDER VETERAN ACT 



Clough, George H. 
Comstock, Thomas W. 
Mason, Henry W. 



68 
72 
76 



18 
38 
18 



MATRON 



Brownell, Sarah M. 



Allen, Charles G. 
Drew, Moses 



JANITORS 



67 
71 



5 
26 



Atwood, William 



LABORER 



49 



RESERVE POLICE 



Astley, Maurice 
Benoit, William R. 
Bourgeois, Albini 
Brennan, Michael J. 
Burke, John E. 
Chausse, Onat A. 
Davies, John W. 
DeGrasse, Charles H. 
Dupuis, Bernard, 
Downey, Stephen P. 
Fay, Miles L. 
Faunce, Albert M. 
Gobiel, Joseph 
Hawes, Harry C. 



Date of 
Appointment 
Feb. 11, 1915 
Dec. 24, 1913 

Feb. 11, 1915 
Feb. 10, 1910 
Jan. 17, 1912 
Dec. 23, 1911 
Dec. 24, 1913 

Dec. 23, 1911 
Dec. 23, 1909 
Jan. 17, 1912 
Dec. 24, 1913 
Feb. 11, 1915 



POLICE REPORT. 



15 



Howes, Charles M. 
Kane, John 
Kelley, Michael J. 
Kinney, William E. 
Kinney, John R. 
Lemaire, Anthony C. 
Marder, James 
MacFarlin, Joseph A. 
McDonald, William F. 
McDonnell, James 
Mott, Cassius B. 
Muldonn, Thoinas 
Parkinson, John 
Perry, Anthony E. 
Ready, Michael J. 
Seddon, Thomas Jr. 
Stanley, Charles A. 
Turgeon, Francois X. 
Vincent, Charles H. 
Walsh, John P. 
Walsh, William P. 
Wooley, Thomas 



Dec. 24, 1914 



Feb. 11, 1915 
Feb. 10, 1910 
Dec. 27, 1907 
Dec. 24, 1914 



Dec. 23, 1909 
Dec. 23, 1911 
Dec. 24, 1913 

Dec. 23, 1911 



On September 13, 1915, Officer Edward Prifogle, was shot while 
in the discharge of his duties, by a man he was placing under arrest. 

He was shot at four times, being hit each time, the bones of his 
left arm being badly shattered. 

The plucky officer still clung to his prisoner until help arrived, 
when the prisoner was locked up and Officer Prifogle taken to the 
hospital. 

He is still suffering from his wounds. 



RETIRED ON HALF PAY 

Henry W. Mason Thomas W. Comstock 

George H. Clough 



16 POLICE REPORT. 



r >i 

Hn flDemorlam. 



OSCAR F. ALDRICH, . - HOUSEKEEPER 

Died March 24, 1915, 

Age 66 years, 4 months, 21 days. 



WASHINGTON A. ELDRIDGE, - HOUSEKEEPER 

Died April 25, 1915, 

Age 71 years, 11 months, 26 days. 



ARTHUR H. JONES, - - - CAPTAIN 

Died October 20, 1915, 

Aged 61 years, 3 months, 26 days. 

V / 



Respectfully submitted, 

TIMOTHY C. ALLEN, 

Chief of Police. 



m 




ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF OVERSEERS 
OF THE POOR 



OF THE 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD 



For the Year 1915 




MERCURY PUBLISHING COMPANY 
NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

1916 



OVERSEERS OP THE POOR 



MEMBERS OF THE BOARD. 
1915. 



ULRIC E. COLLETTE, Chairnuiii. 
CHARLES E. VAUGIIAN, 
ANTONIO A. FERNANDES. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD. 
1915. 



ULRIC E. COLLETTE, 

Chairman. 

DOUGLAS L. McGEE, 

Secretary and Almoner. 

ANTONE H. SENNA, 

Visitor and Portuguese Interpreter. 

JOSEPH A. DESJARDINS, 

Clerk and French Interpreter. 

LUCY E. BROADBENT, 

stenographer. 

M. CATHERINE ROGERS, 

Clerk 

ARTHUR L. BRUNELLE, M. D., 

Physician to the North District. 

CLARENCE E. BURT, I\I. D., 

Physician to the South District 
From Dec. 1st, 1914, to Mar. 14th, 1915. 

JOHN M. SALLES, M. D., 

Physician to the South District. 
From Mar. 15th, 1915,, to Mar. 23rd, 1915. 

FRANK W. MATIIEWSON, M. D., 

Pliysician to the South District, 
Appointed Jan. 1st, 1916. 

HARRY L. STEVENS. M. D., 

Physician to the Center District. 

EDWARD T. TUCKER, M. D., 

Physician at the Almshouse. 
Resigned Jan. 1, 1916. 

LOUIS A. PERRAS, M. D., 

Physician to the South District, 

From Mar. 22nd, 1915, to Dec. 31st, 1915. 

Appointed Physician to tlie Almshouse Jan. 1, 1916. 

THOMAS F. BROWN, 

Superintendent of Almshouse. 

KATHERINE E. BROWN, 

Matron of Almshouse. 

REV. CHARLES S. THURBER, 

Chaplain of Almshouse. 



OVERSEERS OP THE POOR 5 

Overseers of the Poor 
CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 

Oppice OP THE Overseers op the Poor, 
^ Municipal Building, 

New Bedford, April 17th, 191G. 

To His Honor tlie Mayor and City Council: 

Gentlemen: — We, the Overseers of the Poor, herewith 
sidjmit onr annual report for the year ending Nov. 30th, 1915. 

The principal reasons for the increased expenditures in 
this department over the previous year, were the general 
increase due to the continual growth of the city, and the 
business depression at the beginning of the year 1915, which 
was greater than it had been for a number of years previous, 
but later in the year the conditions improved and the result 
was that at the end of the year, conditions were about 
normal. 

MOTHERS' AID LAW. 

The continual increase in the number of applications 
for aid under Chapter 763, Acts of 1913, means that we have 
not yet reached the point whereby we could estimate in ad- 
vance the amount to be spent for this aid. 

While this law has been a great help to a number of 
widows and to mothers left to care for dependent children, 
it means a considerable increase to every Poor Depart- 
ment's expenses throughout the State. 

ALMSHOUSE. 

Conditions at the Almshouse are such that something 
will have to be done in the near future, to take care of the 
additional number of inmates, whom this board is called 
upon to care for, especially during the winter months. Dur- 
ing this last winter, every sleeping apartment was filled to 



b OVERSEERS OP THE POOR 

its capacity, and beds had to be put even in the chapel in 
order to take care of all onr inmates. While this board does 
not wish to recommend any definite plan, we do suggest 
that the City Property Committee and the Committee on 
Almshouse, Charities and the Poor, visit the Almshouse and 
see for themselves the needs of enlarging at least the sleep- 
ing quarters. 

The Board of Overseers of the Poor will be pleased to 
confer with either of the above Committees relative to 
changes or improvements at the Almshouse. 

The appended itemized tables under the several heads 
give full particulars as to the amount expended for each 
division. 

Respectfully submitted, 

TTLRIC E. COLLETTE. Chairman. 
CHARLES E. VAUGIIAX, 
ANTONIO A. FERNANDES, 

Overseers of the Poor. 
Douglas L. McGee, 

Secretary and Almoner. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



DR. 

To amount of appropriation, 

Received from State for support of paupers, 

Received from State for aiding Mothers, 

under Chap. 763. Acts of 1913 
Received from Cities and Towns 
Received from individuals and societies 
Received from sale of produce and stock 
Received from Soldier's Relief 



$125,000.00 

12,036.49 

5,798.00 

7,206.32 

1,685.62 

2,552.82 

681.13 

$154,960.38 



CR. 



Months 


Outside 
Relief 


State 
Institu'ns 


Cities 

and 

Towns 


Almshouse 


Totals 


1914, December 


$7,529.05 


$486.00 


$572.04 


$3,747.90 


$12,334.99 


1915, January 


9,461.-52 


71.20 


268.00 


3,461.96 


13,262.68 


February 


10,349.04 




339.27 


3,618.43 


14,306.74 


March 


10,668.10 


880.06 


23.77 


4,001.41 


15,573.34 


April 


9,375.27 


25.00 


24.29 


3,111.37 


12,535.93 


May 


8,400.36 


210.28 


177.68 


3,036.37 


11,824.69 


June 


8,488.33 


78.87 


293.89 


3,597.22 


12,458.31 


July 


7,743.77 




47.39 


2,830.18 


10,621.34 


August 


8,058.80 






3,233.44 


11,292.24 


September 


7,686.17 




158.63 


3,071.40 


10,916.20 


October 


8,598.00 


285.15 


17.37 


3,099.01 


11,999.53 


November 


8,923.06 




1,160.41 


3,310.61 


13,394.08 


Totals 


$105,281.4^ 


$2,036.56 


$3,082.74 


$40,119.30 


$150,520.07 



Unexpended balance $4,440.31 







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10 



OVERSEERS OP THE POOR 

GENERAL STATISTICS. 



Gross cost of persons outside of Almshouse, 

Gross expenses for Almshouse, 

Receipts from other sources. 

Amount paid persons in various cities and 

towns, chargeable to the city. 
Number of cases in 1915, 2,113 

Number of cases settled New Bedford, 1,313 

Number of cases settled elsewhere, 188 

Number of cases State paupers, 612 

Number of persons in 1915, 6,838 

Number of persons settled New Bedford, 4,137 

Number of persons settled elsewhere, 721 

Number of persons State paupers, 1,980 

Average cost of each case, yearly, 
Average cost of each person, yearly, 
Number of persons sent to local hospitals, 
Total cost for hospital patients, 
Average cost for each patient, 

CHAPTER 763, ACTS OF 1913. 
Number of families aided under Mothers' Aid Law, 
Total cost of aid under Chap. 763, Acts of 1913, 
Average cost of aid to each family, yearly, 
Average weekly allowance to each family, week 

ending Nov. 30th, 1915, 
Number of widows helped under this law, 
Number of deserted women helped, 
Number of women with husbands in institutions 

BOARD OP HEALTH. 
Number of histories procured and settlements 
determined by this office, 

TRANSPORTATION. 

Number of persons sent to State Institutions, 

BURIALS. 

Number of persons buried by this department, 

PAUPERS AIDED ELSEWHERE, 
But having settlement here, exclusive of the 
institutions. Cases 153, 



$110, 
40, 
29 



396 



99 



85 

10 

4 



>14 



139 



278 



400.77 
119.30 
960.38 



3,082.74 



10 



52.25 
16.15 



451.96 
26.40 



22,756.89 
229.87 

6.34 



3,082.74 



OVERSEERS OP THE POOR 



11 



ALMSHOUSE REGISTER. 

For the year ending Nov. 80, 1915. 



Month 


Admitted 


Discharged 


Remaining 


December, 


26 


23 


203 


January, 


23 


9 


217 


February, 


23 


23 


217 


March, 


25 


50 


193 


April, 


27 


34 


186 


May, 


33 


29 


190 


June, 


34 


24 


200 


July, 


30 


35 


195 


August, 


28 


25 


198 


September, 


28 


32 


194 


October, 


31 


27 


198 


November, 


41 


27 


212 


Totals, 


349 


338 


2403 



Number of inmates remaining Nov. 30, 1915, 200 
Number admitted during the year, 349 

Number discharged during year, 338 

Number remaining Nov. 30, 1915, 211 

Average number of inmates monthly, 200 

Per capita cost of each inmate per week, $3.85 



12 



OVERSEERS OP THE POOR 



PRODUCTS OF CITY FARM. 



Potatoes, 

Onions, 

Turnips. 

Carrots, 

Tomatoes, 

Parsnips, 

String Beans, 

Muskmelons, 

Spinach, 

Cabbage, 

Lettuce, 

Peas, 

Radishes, 

Rareripes, 

Table Beets, 

Celery, 

Fodder Corn, 

Sweet Corn, 

Hay, 

Mangles, 

Calves, 

Pigs, 

Milk, 

Eggs, 



1,542 bushels 

150 bushels 

no bushels 

50 bushels 

45 bushels 

60 bushels 

20 bushels 

80 bushels 

60 bushels 

15,000 head 

700 heads 

75 bushels 

50 doz. bunches 

2.000 doz. bunches 

20,000 lbs. 

1.500 plants 

4 acres 

4 acres 

90 tons 

30 tons 

16 

79 

36,665 qts. 

300 doz. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 13 



REPORT OF THE PHYSICIAN 

OF THE 

NORTH DISTRICT 

TO THE 

BOARD OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Gentlemen : — 

I have made during the year ending November 30th, 
1915, 1,117 house visits; 1,083 office calls; births 35; deaths 
12. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR L. BRUNELLE, M. D. 



REPORT OF THE PHYSICIAN 

OF THE 

CENTER DISTRICT 

TO THE 

BOARD OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Gentlemen : — 

From March 24th, 1915, to November 30th, 1915, I have 
made 1,020 house visits; 751 office calls; births 17, deaths 6. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY L. STEVENS, M. D. 

Appointed ]\Iarch 22nd, 1915. 



14 OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 

REPORT OF THE PHYSICIAN 

OF THE 

SOUTH DISTRICT 

TO THE 

BOARD OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Gentlemen : — 

From March 15th, 1915, to IMarch 2;jrd, 1015, I made 50 
house visits; received 24 office calls. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN M. SALLES, M. D. 

Appointed March 8, 1915. 



REPORT OF THE PHYSICIAN 

OP THE 

SOUTH DISTRICT 

TO THE 

BOARD OP OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Gentlemen : — 

From ]\lareh 24th, 1915, to November 30th. 1915, I have 
made 538 house visits; 508 office calls; births 18; deaths 3. 
Visited Almshouse 14 times. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LOUIS A. PERRAS, I\I. D. 
Appointed JMarch 22nd, 1915. 



OVERSEERS OP THE POOR 15 



REPORT OF THE PHYSICIAN 

OF THE 

SOUTH DISTRICT 

OP THE 

BOARD OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



(lENTLEMEN : 

Prom Dee. 1st, P)U, to I^Iareli 14tli, 1915, I nimle 258 
liouse visits; 217 offiee ealls; births 5; deaths 7. Visited Alms- 
house twice. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLARENCE E. PURT, M. D. 



TO THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR OP THE CITY OP 
NEW BEDFORD. 

Gentlemen : — 

During the year from December 1st, 1914 to November 
30th, 1915, I made 244 visits at the Almshouse. During that 
time there were, in all, 28 deaths, and 9 births. I made 14 
liouse visits and had 8 office calls. 

Respectfully sul)mitted, 

EDWARD T. TUCKER, M. D. 



16 OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 



In Board of Aldermen, 

April 27, 1916. 

Received, ordered printed in City Documents and sent 
down for concurrence. 

W. II. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 



Concurred. 



In Common Council; 
April 27, 1916. 



CHARLES P. SAWYER, 

Clerk. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS and MEASURES 



To the City Council 




For the Year 1915. 



REPORT OF 
SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



City of New Bedford. 

July 17, 1916. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the City Council of Neiv 
Bedford: 

Gentlemen : — On account of the fact that my appoint- 
ment to the position of Sealer of Weights and Measures 
took place late in the year of 1915, I have decided to 
make my report brief, and many recommendations 
which by this time I believe would tend to make the 
work of this department of greater value to the citizens 
of New Bedford will be deferred to my next report to 
your honorable body. There is, however, one feature 
I feel that needs to be called to your attention; the 
need of more assistance in this department to perform 
the work which the law now requires, and protect the 
purchasing public. It has now become a practical 
impossibility to perform all the sealing in a city of 
this size, not considering the inspection work (which 
in my opinion is of greater importance) take care of 
hawkers, peddlers and itinerant venders, and to see 
that the new laws and net weight laws are enforced. 

I sincerely hope that the members of the City 
Council will give me the additional help in this depart- 
ment as early as possible that is so urgently needed. 

A detailed report of the work performed for the 
past financial year is herewith submitted. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN HOBIN, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, 



Now 

Sealed Adjusted Condemned Sealed 

Platform scale over 5000 lbs.. 75 9 1 3 

Platform scale under 5000 lbs. 741 96 12 18 

Platform counter scale 209 31 2 4 

Computing scale 391 71 3 12 

Miscellaneous 349 30 4 6 

Spring balance scale 714 32 24 33 

Beam scale 135 12 ... 2 

Personal weighing scale 3 1. ... 1 

Oil pumps 117 24 2 1 

Weights, correct 4633 248 16 

Dry measures 195 ... 4 

Liquid measures 1871 ... 36 

Yardsticks 218 ... 19 

Ice cream cans 1815 ... 10 



Totals 11,466 554 133 80 

Fees turned in to City Tieasurer $970.01 

Work performed at office, no fees charged, value 145.21 

Total $1,115.32 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



TRIAL WEIGHING AND MEASUREMENTS. 

No. Tested Correct Under Over 

Charcoal 9 9 

Coke 46 38 2 6 

Coal (in wagons) 10 1 1 8 

Coal (in bags) 30 22 6 2 

Flour 51 42 4 '5 

Ice 4 3 ... 1 

Bread 64 38 14 12 

Dry groceries 102 80 15 7 

Gasoline 42 41 ... 1 

Butter, (print) 20 18 2 

Butter, (bulk) 41 40 1 

Berries 149 140 4 5 

Fruit 71 71 

Nuts 21 20 ... 1 

Liquid groceries 10 10 ... ... 

Milk jars 19 19 

Berry Baskets 116 110 6 

Barrels (potato) 10 8 1 1 

825 720 56 49 

Inspection in stores 46 

Inspection of hawkers and peddlers on streets 20 

Inspection of junk dealers on street 10 

76 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN HOBIN, 
Sealer of Weights and Measurer. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD 



For the Year 1915. 



NEW BEDFORD: 

THE J. E. BUDLONG PRESS, PRINTERS. 

1916. 



IN SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

DECEMBER 31, 1915. 

Voted, That the Superintendent and Secretary prepare the 
Annual Report of the School Board for the year 1915, and that 
1500 copies of the same be printed. 



Report of the Secretary. 



By direction of the School Committee, I submit to our 
fellow citizens the following report for the year 1915. 

STATISTICS. 

I. POPULATION AND VALUATION. 

The population of the city [census of 1890] was 40,705 

The population of the city [census of 1895] was 55,251 

The population of the city [census of 1900] was 62,442 

The population of the city [census of 1905] was 74,321 

The population of the city [census of 1910] was 96,652 

The population of the city [census of 1915] was 109,462 
Valuation of the taxable property [ 1915] was $111,465,763.00 

School houses and lots, 2,672,750.00 

Other school property, 23 1 ,858 04 

II. APPROPRIATION 

Rate of taxation, $23.00 

Amount for school purposes, not including new buildings, 483,000.00 

III. SCHOOL CENSUS. 

Location of children between five and sixteen years of age, 
and illiterates between sixteen and twenty-one years of age as 
to school attendance, as reported by the census enumerators, 
in accordance with the census record taken in September, 1915. 

Between 5 and 6 yrs. 3,662 
Between 7 and 14 yrs. 13,314 
Between 14 and 15 yrs. 3,313 
Between 16 and 21 yrs. [illiterates] 1,456 
Between 7 and 14 yrs. [not attending school, out with satisfactory ex- 
cuses] 66 



4 School Report 

IV. school organization, July 2, 1915. 

High School, 1 

Grammar schools,. 6 

Mixed schools-Grammar, Primary, and Ungraded, 9 

Primary schools, 14 

Suburban schools, 2 

Fresh Air schools, 2 

Cooking schools, 3 

Manual Training schools, I 4 

41 



V. SCHOOL BUILDINGS, JULY 2, 1915. 



Permanent school houses, 
Portable school houses, 



34 
15 



49 



VI. TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS. 

Whole number in service, January 1, 1916. 

High school: 47 teachers, 1 military instructor, 1 clerk, 49 

Elementary schools, 354 

Special teachers, 23 

School nurses, 3 

Evening High School, 14 

Evening Elementary schools, 93 

Total, 536 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 





1914 


1915 






Enrollment of pupils, 


14,214 


16,256 


increase 


2.042 


Average membership. 


13,037 


13,176 


increase 


139 


Average daily attendance, 


12,146 


12,431 


increase 


285 


Per cent, of attendance, 


931 


94.3 


increase 


1.2 


PRIVATE 


AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS. 




Enrollment of pupils. 


4,528 


4,479 


decrease 


49 


Average membership. 


4,020 


4,247 


increase 


227 


Average daily attendance, 


3,750 


3,909 


increase 


159 


Per cent, daily attendance. 


93.3 


92. 


decrease 


1.3 



School Report 



PUBLIC, PRIVATE, AND PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS. 



Enrollment of pupils, 


18,742 


20,735 


increase 


1,993 


Average membership. 


17,057 


17,423 


increase 


366 


Average daily attendance. 


15,896 


16,340 


increase 


444 


Per cent, daily attendance, 


93.1 

TABLE 


93.7 
I. 


increase 


.6 



The cost of instruction per scholar is based on the average 
number belonging and the total amount expended for the 
maintenance of each department, not including the expendi- 
tures from the Sylvia Ann Rowland Educational Fund or 
Dog Fund, during the year. 



High school. 
Elementary schools, 
Evening Elementary schools, 
Evening High school, 
Day school, 



$81.66 

31.21 

5.66 

7.83 

35.02 



6 School Report 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES. 

1914-1915. 
Summary. 

Total appropriations, general and subsequent, $483,565.44 

Total expenditures, 482,848.86 

Balances unexpended, $716.58 

RECEIPTS— APPROPRIATIONS FROM CITY COUNCIL. 
General appropriations, etc.: 
Teachers' salaries, $368,000.00 

Transferred to repairs, 330.03 

$367,669.97 

Incidentals— General, ,. 105,000.00 

Repairs— General, $6,000.00 

Subsequent, 1,000.00 

Transfer from Teachers Salaries 330.03 



7.330.03 

Playgrounds, 3,000.00 

New High school furnishings, balance from 1914, 05.89 

Katharine St. school furnishings, balance from 1914, 469.55 

Total $483,565.44 

EXPENDITURES— MONEY RAISED BY TAXATION. 
For teachers' salaries: 
Day schools, $357,638.91 

Evening schools, 9,641.50 

$367,280.41 



For incidentals: 
Salaries; Supt. and Sec, Asst. Supt., Grade Supervisor, 
Inspec. School Property, Dept. Machanic, 
clerks, attendance officers and janitors, $57,603.76 
Books and supplies, 13,297.85 
Janitors' supplies, 2,025.36 
Fuel, 19,506.92 
Lighting, 1,566.41 
Water rates, _ 3,700,17 
Printing and advertising, 1,214.09 
Freight and carting, , 329.34 
Transportation, 770.00 
Cooking school, 659.15 
Manual Training school, 303.28 
Bristol County Training school, 339.34 
Miscellaneous expenses [furniture, tele- 
phones, etc.], 3,664.86 



$104,980.53 

For repairs of buildings, 7,330.03 

For furnishing new buildings, 348.77 

Playgrounds, 2,909.12 

Total, $482,848.86 



School Report 7 

Balances Unexpended. 

Transferred to unappropriated funds, $499.91 

Special appropriations carried forward to 1916, 216.67 

Total, $716.58 

Receipts from other sources, paid to City Treasurer and 
credited to unappropriated funds: 
For tuition non-resident pupils, $2,362.25 

For tuition State Ciiarity pupils, 57.00 

For sale of books and supplies, 83.46 

For discarded books, old furniture, junk, etc. 227.48 

$2,730.19 



Income from Trust 


Funds, 


etc 




S. A. Howland Educational Fund, 






$6,337.97 


Jonathan Bourne Prize Fund, 






80.00 


Dog Fund, 






2,954.40 



),372.37 



1915. 

SYLVIA ANN HOWLAND EDUCATIONAL FUND. 
Balance of income on hand Dec. 5, 1914. $4,310.89 

Income during year, 2,027.08 



$6,337.97 

Expenditures for the year, 3,769.04 

Balance, Dec. 4, 1915 $2,568.93 

1915. 
JONATHAN BOURNE PRIZE FUND. 
Balance of income on hand Dec. 5, 1914 $20.00 

Interest for the year, 60.00 

$80.00 

Expenditures for prizes, 60.00 

Balance, Dec. 4, 1915 $20.00 

1915. 
DOG FUND. 
Balance, December 5, 1914 $270.02 

Income, 1915, 2,684.38 



$2,954.40 

Expenditures for the year, 1,890.33 

Balance Dec. 4, 1915, $1,064.07 



8 School Report 

summary of receipts and expenditures 
by departments. 

Receipts— 1915. 

General appropriations, etc. $483,565.44 

Stock on hand Dec. 5, 1914, 2,996.99 

S. A. Rowland Educational Fund, 6,337.97 

Dog Fund, 2,954.40 

Jonathan Bourne Prize Fund, 80.00 

Tuition of non-resident pupils and sales, 2,646.73 



$498,581.53 



Expenditures — 1915. 

High school, $83,554.12 

Elementary schools, 381,683.89 

Manual Training school [sloyd], 4,344.89 

Manual Training school [cooking], 2,804.43 

Playgrounds, 2,909.88 

Evening High school, 2,474.44 

Evening Elementary schools, 8,519.90 

Sale of books and supplies, 83.46 

Old High school, 14.50 

For all departments, 1,923.76 

High school furnishings, 95.89 

Katharine Street school furnishings, 252.88 

$488,662.04 

Stock on hand Dec. 4, 1915.. 2,922.65 

Tuition of non-resident pupils and sales, ' 2,646.73 

BALANCES. 

Howland Educational Fund, $2,568.93 

Dog Fund, 1,064.07 

Jonathan Bourne Prize Fund, 20.00 

Katharine Street school furnishings, 216.67 

Teachers' salaries, 389.56 

Playgrounds, 90.88 

$498,581.53 



School Report 

DETAILED STATEMENT. 

High school: 

Salaries: Teachers, regular, $58,162.50 

Salaries: Teachers, special and supervising, 1,815.96 

Salaries: Clerk, 632.50 

Salaries: Janitors, 9,033.44 

Fuel, 2,626.00 

Lighting, 162.41 

Water rates, 638.10 

Books, 2,556.98 

Stationery supplies, 1,738.26 

Science department, supplies, 365 .9 1 

Janitors' supplies, 300.40 

Furniture, 586.98 

Miscellaneous, 567.34 

Proportion of general expenses, 1,343.37 

Repairs, ordinary and alterations, 640.88 

Bourne Prize Fund — Essays, 60.00 

Dog Fund — supplies, 139.89 
Howland Fund — supplementary books, 

and supplies, 2,183.20 



Elementary schools: 




Salaries: Teachers, regular. 


$276,953.47 


Salaries: Teachers, special and supervising. 


13,984.98 


Salaries: Janitors, 


28,491.24 


Fuel, 


16,775.21 


Lighting, 


1,015.38 


Water rates. 


3,062.07 


Transportation, 


770.00 


Books, 


3,024.34 


Stationery supplies, 


5,273.76 


Sewing supplies. 


105.67 


Janitors' supplies. 


1,651.54 


Furniture, 


1,456.48 


Miscellaneous, 


! 443.19 


Proportion of general expenses, 


20,853.67 


Repairs, ordinary and alterations, 


6,398.66 


Dog Fund — supplies. 


130.08 


Howland Fund— supplementary books 




and supplies, 


1,294.15 



.554.12 



$381,683.89 



10 School Report 

Manual Training — Sloyd: 



Salaries: Teachers, 


$4,010.00 


Stationery supplies, 


31.61 


Tools, lumber, etc.. 


303.28 


Manual Training — Cooking; 




Salaries: Teachers, 


$2,079.50 


Stationery supplies, 


49.62 


Janitors' supplies. 


16.16 


Groceries, fuel, etc., 


659.15 



Evening High: 



Playgrounds: 

Salaries: Teachers, $1,948.50 

Salaries: Janitors, 547,14 

Apparatus and supplies, 136.47 

Janitors' supplies, .76 

Miscellaneous, 277.01 



Salaries: Teachers, 




$2,403.00 


Printing and advertising. 




19.23 


Stationery supplies. 




44.05 


Books, 




8.16 


Evening Elementary 


schools: 




Salaries: Teachers, 




$7,238.50 


Salaries: Janitors, 




560.50 


Books, 




64.53 


Stationery supplies. 




28.46 


Lighting, 




318.12 


Printing and advertising. 




84.79 


Proportion of general expenses. 


225.00 



Sale of books and supplies, $80.30 

Sale of janitors' supplies, 3.16 



$4,344.89 



$2,804.43 



$2,909.88 



$2,474.44 



$8,519.90 



$83.46 



School Report 11 



Old High school: 
Repairs, ordinary, $14.50 



For all departments: 

HowlandFund, $291.69 

Dog Fund, 1,620.36 

Miscellaneous, 11.71 



Special appropriations: 
High school furnishings, $95.89 

Katharine Street school furnishings, 252.88 



$14.50 



$1,923.76 



.77 



Total expenditures, $488,662.04 

Stock on hand, Dec. 4, 1915, books and supplies, $1,964.93 

Stock on hand, Dec. 4, 1915, janitors' supplies, 957.72 

Balances carried forward 1916: 

S. A. Howland Educational Fund, 2,568.93 

Dog Fund, 1,064.07 

Jonathan Bourne Prize Fund, 20.00 

Katharine Street school furnishings, 216.67 

Balances transferred to unappropriated funds: 

Teachers' salaries, 389.56 

Playgrounds, 90.88 

Tuition from non-resident pupils, and sales, 2,646.73 

$498,581.53 



I 



12 School Report 



SYLVIA ANN ROWLAND EDUCATIONAL 
FUND. 

Balance of income on hand, Dec. 5, 1914. $4,310.89 

Income during period, 2,027.08 



$6,337.97 
Expenditures for the year, 3,769.04 

Balance, Dec. 4, 1915, $2,568.93 

DETAILED STATEMENT. 

Outlay of the School Committee from the income of the 
Sylvia Ann Rowland Educational Fund, from Dec. 5, 1914, to 
Dec. 4, 1915. 

Books and periodicals, $1,053.97 

Music department, 351.80 

Art Department, 397.08 

Lectures, 50.00 

Miscellaneous, 1,916.19 



Total, 



$3,769.04 



Disbursements to the several schools and otherwise are as 
follows : 

101. High school, $2,183.20 

302. Parker Street Grammar school, 38.80 

303. Hosea M. Knowlton Grammar school, 19.63 

304. Middle Street Grammar school, 52.86 

305. Fifth Street Grammar school, 33.13 

306. Robert C. Ingraham Grammar school, 14.55 

307. James B. Congdon Grammar school, 52.42 

350. John H. Clifford, Mixed school, 82.85 

351. Thomas Donaghy, Mixed school, 60.50 

352. William H. Taylor, Mixed school, 32.38 

354. Thomas R. Rodman, Mixed school, 110.82 

355. Jireh Swift, Mixed school, 38.43 

356. Abraham Lincoln, Mixed school, 84.96 

357. Betsey B. Winslow, Mixed school, 272.83 

358. Harrington Memorial, Mixed s9hool, 44.97 



School Report 13 

359. Katharine Street, Mixed school, 32.25 

401. Philhps Avenue Primary school, 26.85 

402. Cedar Grove Street Primary school, 25.70 

403. Clark Street Primary school, 58.97 
404 Merrimac Street Primary school., 36.07 

405. Mary B. White Primary school, 17.60 

406. Horatio A. Kempton Primary school, 26.85 

407. Cedar Street Primary school, 6.63 

409. Sylvia Ann Howland Primary school, 22.15 

410. Thomas A. Greene Primary school, 25.96 

411. Acushnet Avenue Primary school, 23.37 

412. Thompson Street Primary school, 10.85 

413. Isaac W. Benjamin Primary school, ' 12.40 

414. Dartmouth Street Primary school, 12.88 

415. George H. Dunbar Primary school, 5.80 

605. Plainville school, 6.68 

606. Rockdale school, 4.01 
Office, 106.09 
Lectures, • 50.00 
Miscellaneous, 135.60 

$3,769.04 



14 



SCHOOL REPORT 



TEXT BOOKS, STATIONERY, AND 
JANITORS' SUPPLIES. 

STATEMENT FOR 1915. 



Dr. 





Purchased 
in 1915. 


Stock 
Dec. 5, 1914 


TOTALS 




Books, 

Stationery Supplies, 

Janitors' Supplies, 


$5,856.61 
7,441.24 
2,025.36 


$860.77 

1,210.00 

926.22 


$6,717.38 
8,651.24 
2,951.58 






$15,323.21 


$2,996.99 


$18,320.20 






Cr. 








Charged to 
Schools, 1915 


Stock 
Dec. 4, 1915 


Cash 
receipts, 1915 


TOTALS 


Books, 

Stationery Supplies, 

Janitors' Supplies, 


$5,659.33 
7,664.06 
1,990.70 


$987.04 

977.89 
957.72 


$71.01 
9.29 
3.16 


$6,717.38 
8,651.24 
2,951.58 




$15,314.09 


$2,922.65 


$83.46 


$18,320.20 



The cost in detail of text books, regular supplies and 
janitors' supplies furnished the several schools for the year 
1915, is as follows: 









Regular 


Janitors' 








Books 


Supplies. 


Supplies. 


Total. 


101. 


High school. 


$2,556.98 


$1,738.26 


$300.40 


$4,595.64 


Elementary Schools: 










302. 


Parker Street, 


114.27 


238.59 


61.61 


414.47 


303. 


H. M. Knowlton, 


519.70 


429.87 


92.69 


1,042.26 


304. 


Middle Street, 


251.06 


185.66 


48.84 


485.56 


305. 


Fifth Street, 


178.86 


93.11 


30.50 


302.47 


306. 


R. C. Ingraham, 


139.70 


174.12 


62.96 


376.78 


307. 


J. B. Congdon, 


167.77 


302.29 


88.38 


558.44 


350. 


J. H. Clifford, 


33.95 


259.14 


84.32 


377.41 


351. 


Thomas Donaghy, 


200.79 


130.69 


67.36 


398.84 


352. 


W. H. Taylor, 


84.60 


258.05 


64.71 


407.36 


354. 


T. R. Rodman, 


66.25 


213.37 


54.25 


333.87 


355. 


Jireh Swift, 


98.71 


171.78 


46.82 


317.31 



School Report 



15 



356. 


Abraham Lincoln, 


277.68 


444.24 


102.66 


824.58 


357. 


Betsey B. Winslow, 


111.14 


232.89 


66.36 


410.39 


358. 


Harrington Memorial, 


72.21 


218.74 


61.17 


352.12 


359. 


Katharine Street, 


19.67 


376.10 


66.63 


462.40 


401. 


Phillips Avenue, 


153.72 


132.30 


55.42 


341.44 


402. 


Cedar Grove Street, 


82,03 


164.54 


83.15 


329.72 


403. 


Clark Street, 


41.14 


121.59 


53.01 


215.74 


404. 


Merrimac Street, 


25.93 


73.10 


20.13 


119.16 


405. 


Mary B. White, 


23.77 


46.88 


12 33 


82.98 


406. 


H. A. Kempton, 


21.39 


111.07 


35.77 


168.23 


407. 


Cedar Street, 


30.25 


93.92 


25.14 


149.31 


409. 


S. A. Howland, 


29.01 


63.23 


37.34 


129.58 


410. 


T. A. Greene, 


44.11 


103.60 


32.06 


179.77 


411. 


Acushnet Avenue. 


24.43 


147.99 


50.58 


223.00 


412. 


Thompson Street, 


9.64 


131.98 


38.51 


180.13 


413. 


I. W. Benjamin, 


74.77 


229.41 


85.69 


389.87 


414. 


Dartmouth Street, 


32.48 


100.52 


44.74 


177.74 


415. 


G. H. Dunbar, 


42.77 


176.14 


55.53 


274.44 


605. 


Plainville, 


18.97 


15.97 


9.49 


44.43 


606. 


Rockdale, 


19.24 


20.76 


4.10 


44.10 


607. 


Sassaquin, 


14.33 


27.08 


9.29 


50.70 




Manual Training, 




31.61 




31.61 




Cooking, 




49.62 


16.16 


65.78 




Sewing, 




105.67 




105.67 




Playgrounds, 






.76 


.76 




Special Classes: 












James B. Congdon, 




29.20 




29.20 




Thomas Donaghy, 




26.71 




26.71 




Harrington Memorial, 




28.42 




28.42 




Cedar Grove Street, 




21.41 




21.41 




S. A. Howland, 




45.21 




45.21 


802. 


Evening High School, 
Evening Elementary 
Schools: 


8.16 


44.05 




52.21 


803. 


H. M. Knowlton, 


22.20 


9.33 




31.53 


804. 


Abraham Lincoln, 


5.21 


3.72 




8.93 


805. 


Parker Street, 










806. 


Fifth Street, 


9.60 






9.60 


807. 


R. C. Ingraham, 




6.92 




6.92 


808. 


Thomas Donaghy, 


27 52 


8.49 




36.01 




Office, 


5.32 


26.72 


21.84 


53.88 




Sales, 


71.01 


9.29 


3.16 


83.46 




Stock, 


987.04 


977.89 


957.72 


2,922.65 



3,717.38 $8,651.24 $2,951.58 $18,320.20 



16 



SCHOOL REPORT 



The average cost per pupil in the different departments of 
the schools, for text books and supplies, has been as follows: 



High school, 

Elementary schools. 

Average for day schools, 

Average for Evening Elementary schools. 

Average for Evening High school. 



$4.32 
.72 
.99 
.06 
.16 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

For the year beginning Sept. 9, 1914, ending July 2, 1915. 





Total 

Membership 


Average 

Membership 


Average 
Daily 

Attendance 


o «j 

§ 1 

1-. ■!-> 




High, 

Elementary, 
Manual Training, 
Cooking, 


1,175 

15,081 

1,376 

852 


994 

12,182 

1,242 

779 


965 
11,466 

34 
32 


97. 
94.1 
96.7 
95.6 




Evening schools: 












High, 
Elementary, 


623 
2,275 


316 
1,504 


246 
321 


77.4 
87.8 





School Report 



17 



AVERAGE AGE OF PUPILS IN VARIOUS GRADES. 
JULY 2, 1915. 



HIGH school. 


Yrs. 
.. 18 


Mos. 
1 




.. 17 


6 




.. 17 


3 




...16 


10 




.. 16 


9 




.. 15 


8 




.. 15 


2 




.. 14 


6 



Senior H. 

Senior I . 

Junior H. 

Junior I . 

Sophomore H. 

Sophomore I . 

Freshmen II. 

Freshmen I . 

Average for school 16 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Yrs. 

Grade VIII. A 14 

Grade VIII. B 13 

Grade VII. A 13 

Grade VII. B 12 

Grade VI. A 12 

Grade VI. B 12 

Grade V. A 11 

Grade V. B 11 

Grade IV. A ' H 

Grade IV. B 10 

Grade III. A 10 

Grade III. B 9 

Grade II. A 8 

Grade II. B 8 

Grade I. A 7 

Grade I. B 6 

Sub-Primary 5 

Kindergarten 5 

Ungraded 12 

Special Classes 12 

Average for elementary schools 10 



Mos. 
8 
7 
1 

10 
8 
6 

11 
8 
2 

11 



10 
3 
7 

11 

11 

6 

9 

6 



18 School Report 



AGE AND SCHOOLING CERTIFICATES. 

There were issued from the office of the Superintendent of 
Schools for the year 1915 the following age and schooling cer- 
tificates : 



To minors between 14 and 

16 years of age 

To literate minors between 

16 and 21 years of age . . . 
To illiterate minors between 

16 and 21 years of age. . . 
Time permits (to work until 

statement of birth may be 

procured) 119 224 



-1915 




1914 


Original. Additional. 


Original. 


Additional. 


1,327 1,313 


1,234 


1,178 


749 4,803 


985 


4,199 


393 944 


651 


1,099 



Totals 2,469 7,179 2,870 6,700 



Grand Totals 9,648 9,570 



SCHOOL REPORT 



19 



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20 School Report 



GRADUATES. 






1915. 






High School. 






G. Walter Williams, Principal 








Boys. 


Girls. 


)urses, 


26 


36 




15 


13 




2 


10 



College and General Courses, 
Commercial Courses, 
Partial Courses, 



Grammar Schools. 

Parker Street— Arthur F. Gilbert, Principal, 
Hosea M. Knowlton— Edward B. Gray, Principal, 
Middle Street— Elwyn G. Campbell, Principal, 
Fifth Street— Edgar Kaharl, Principal, 
Robert C. Ingraham— Alice C. Munsey, Principal, 
James B. Congdon— Raymond H. Cook, Principal, 
Thomas R. Rodman-Sarah A. Russ, Principal, 
Jireh Swift— Louis D. Cook, Principal, 
Abraham Lincoln-John W. Northcott, Principal, 
Betsey B. Winslow— Alice T. Corrigan, Principal, 



43 59 



Boys. Girls. 



47 


46 


22 


23 


41 


53 


23 


19 


19 


34 


21 


34 


4 


10 


15 


7 


20 


24 


12 


12 



224 262 



99 


103 


202 


7 


10 


17 


3 


4 


7 



PUPILS ENTERING THE HIGH SCHOOL— SEPTEMBER, 1914. 

Boys. Girls, Total. 

From New Bedford schools. 
From other schools in city. 
From schools out of city, 

109 117 226 

PUPILS ENTERING— FEBRUARY, 1915. 

From New Bedford schools, 
From other schools in city. 
From schools out of city, 

76 95 171 



Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


75 


94 


169 


1 




1 




1 


1 



School Report 



21 



1827-1915. 
NEW BEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL. 
GRADUATION EXERCISES. 
HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, 
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1915, AT 2.30 P. M. 

PROGRAMME. 



1. March. Monstrat Viam Hildreth 

High School Orchestra. Clarence W. Arey, Director 

2. Prayer. 

Reverend William B. Geoghegan. 

3. Invocation Old Litany, ISth Century 

Class of February, 1915. 

4. Salutatory and Essay. The Conservation of Forests. 

Ruth Edna Chace. 

5. Song. Jack Frost Arr. from A. R. Gaul 

Class of February, 1915. 

6. Essay. The Message of the Renaissance. 

Arthur Chace Watson. 

7. Overture. Das Brautfest Gruenwald 

High School Orchestra. 

8. Essay. New Bedford Yesterday and Today. 

Gertrude May Martin. 

9. Song. Battle On Arr. from "Joan of Arc.^* 

Class of February, 1915. 

10. Valedictory and Essay. The Red Cross. 

Constance Mary Loftus. 



22 School Report 

11. Awarding of Diplomas and Certificates. 

Honorable Edward R. Hathaway, 

Chairman of the School Committee. 

12. Singing of Class Ode Twelfth Century Music 

13. March. On the Alert Schubert 

High School Orchestra. 

CLASS ODE. 



Words by Anna Elizabeth Bailey. 



Dear Alma Mater, 
Life now bids us leave thee, 
Far o'er the earth our paths to lead. 
Hear softly sounding 
Those distant voices 
That call us forth to strange, new deed. 

Kind Foster Mother, 
Guide of our youthful days. 
Thy love for us our praise has wrought; 
Love that has trained us, 
Love that has taught us 
To use our hearts, our hands, our thoughts. 

Loved Alma Mater, 
May we ne'er forget thee. 
When on life's path we forward move, 
Thee let us honor 
With grateful praises 
For friends whom we have learned to love. 

True Alma Mater, 
Give us thy blessing. 
Our pledge, "Truth Conquers," is from thee. 
Stand thou beside us, 
Still whisper to us 
These words, our guidance, still to be. 



School Report 



23 



CLASS OF FEBRUARY, 1915. 

TRUTH CONQUERS. 

CANDIDATES FOR DIPLOMAS. 



Arthur Chase Watson 
Elizabeth May Holt 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE 
Wiih Highest Credit. 

Constance Mary 



With Credit. 



Loftus 
Gertrude May Martin 



Merle Chandler Cowden 
Paul Rupert Gast 
William Ellery Gifford 
Alfred Woledge Jackson 
Edmund Lenhart 
William Roos 

Caroline 



Hardy 



Irving Winthrop Smead 
William Thompson Smith 
Louis Nathaniel Stern 
Anna Elizabeth Bailey 
Dorothy May Baldwin 
Mildred Alice Riley 
Wilson 



William J. Kerwin, Jr. 
Julius H. Wolf son 
Sybil Burbank Diman 



Anna Leavitt Hunt 
Mary Louise Savage 
Dorothy Wheaton 



Sarah Wollison 

GENERAL COURSE. 

With Highest Credit. 

Ruth Edna Chace 

With Credit. 



Marion Porter Hindle 
Katherine Mary McDonald 
Marion Louise Brown 
Anna Marjorie Dunham 



Alice Frances Neary 
Isabella Wallner 
May Evelyn Hayden 
Hazel Ernine Riley 



COMMERCIAL COURSE 
With Highest Credit. 
Mary Sylvia Cabral 
With Credit. 
William Frederick Anthony 
Charles Hois 
John Francis Hughes 
William Henry Murdy 
Harold 



Abraham Rusitzky 
Charles Alfred Tripp 
Doris Grinnell Archer 
Louise Edesse Manseau 
John Lucian 



Harrop 

CANDIDATES FOR CERTIFICATES. 

Credits Credits 

Elizabeth Hall Turner 74 Susan Hathaway Thorpe 64 

Mildred Sturtevant 73 William Kenworthy [2 years] 34 

Bertha Estes Smith 72 



24 School Report 

1827--1915. 

NEW BEDFORD HIGH SCHOOL. 

GRADUATION EXERCISES. 

HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, 

FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1915, AT 2.30 P. M. 

PROGRAMME. 



1. March. Pilgrim Commandery Foss 

High School Orchestra. Clarence W. Arey, Director. 

2. Prayer 

Reverend Henry J. Noon. 

3. Song. Pride of America A. Peron 

Class of July, 1915. 

4. Salutatory and Essay. An Ideal City Government. 

Max Benjamin Walder. 

5. Song. Happy Days are Gliding Pflock 

Class of July, 1915. 

6. Essay. An Afternoon at an Acushnet Tavern. 

Charles Lyman Montague Thornton. 

7. Overture. Elisae Claudio Mercadante 

High School Orchestra. 

8. Valedictory and Essay. The Rise of the High School. 

Mary Elizabeth Carroll. 

9. Awarding of Diplomas and Certificates. 

Allen P. Keith, 
Superintendent of Schools. 

10. Singing of Class Ode. 



School Report 25 

11. March. The Forest King Peters 

High School Orchestra. 



CLASS ODE. 



By Madeline Eleanor Almy. 



I 

We have reached the day of parting. 
At the crossroads now we stand. 
Through the hardships of our journey, 
There's been oft a helping hand. 
Ever onward, ever onward. 
In that past, we've learned to see 
That with love, dear Alma Mater, 
We should think and work for thee. 

II 
Trails of pleasure we have followed, 
Trails of trouble and of strife. 
Now in sun and shade before us, 
Wind the untrod paths of light. 
Ever onward, ever onward. 
Stretch those paths o'er land or sea, 
Filled with thanks, dear Alma Mater, 
Oft our thoughts will turn toward thee. 

Ill 
Now we leave this scene of parting. 
One last glance and we are gone; 
Moved by sorrow at our sunset, 
Moved by gladness at our morn. 
Ever onward, ever onward. 
Yet from wheresoe'er we be, 
We'll return, dear Alma Mater, 
Some time, some day, home to thee. 



WINNERSpp THE JONATHAN BOURNE PRIZES. 

First Prize Essay, MARY ELIZABETH CARROLL, 

Class of July, 1915. 
Second Prize Essay, ARTHUR CHASE WATSON, 

Class of February, 1915. 
Third Prize Essay, CHARLES L. MONTAGUE THORNTON, 

Class of July, 1915. 



26 School Report 

CLASS OF JULY 1915. 



EVER ONWARD. 



CANDIDATES FOR DIPLOMAS. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE. 

With Credit. 
Julius Gleckman Madeline Eleanor Almy 

Charles Lyman Montague Thornton 
James King Donaghy Shirley Parker Eno 

Louis Herman Muriel Hudnut 

Allen Humphrey Hersom Mary A. McGuinness 

Florance Baker Alice Cecilia Ryan 

SCIENTIFIC COURSE. 
With Credit. 
David Mackler Max Benjamin Walder 

Carl Wilhelm Beckman Josiah Morton Briggs 

Carl Norman Beetle Emil Frederick Guba 

Charles Dillingham Booth William Bettencourt Souza 

Fred Albert Terwilegar 
GENERAL COURSE. 
With Highest Credit. 
Mary Elizabeth Carroll 
With Credit. 
Olive Gray Anderson Mabel Cohen 

Lydia Pearl Francis 
Edith Clifton Dunham Irene Elizabeth O'Leary 

Mary Veronica Flanagan Aletha Underwood Tripp 

Phebe Terry Wilcox 
COMMERCIAL COURSE. 
With Credit. 
Alberta May Dunlap Emmy Charlotte Johnson 

Sarah Catherine Margolis 
Albert Augustus Brown Florence May Brenneke 

Daniel S. Cantor Hazel lona Fairbrother 

Edward Frederick Dowd Grace Winifred Gorham 

Thomas Gleason Ennis Eleanor Frances Hoye 

Henry Joseph Karl Anna Rodic Johnson 

Daniel Joseph McAuliffe Winnifred Perkins 

Bradford Smith, Jr. Louise Benadette Shea 

CANDIDATES FOR CERTIFICATES. 

Credits Credits 

George Francis Egan 713^ Irene Croacher 64J^ 

Esther Grace Francis 67% Doris Elizabeth Hathaway [special] 

Ruth May Smith 66 Doris Richmond Neagus [2 yrs.] 26^^ 

Inez Francis Joseph 6SJ^ 



School Report 



27 



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28 School Report 

NEW BEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

Rates of tuition for non-resident pupils for school year, 
September 8. 1915, to June 30, 1916, same to be paid quarterly: 
High School, $75.00 



Grammar Schools, 
Primary Schools, 



SALARIES. 
January 1, 1916. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



30.00 
25.00 









Min. 


Max. 


Principal, 






$2,500 


$3,000 


Assistant Principal, 






1,800 


2,200 


Heads of Departments, 






1,400 


2,000 


Men assistants. 






1,000 


1,700 


Women assistants. 






800 


1,200 


Military instructor, 








400 


Increase $100 yearly 


until maximum 


is reached. 







ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Principals, Lincoln, Knowlton, Parker, Mid- 
dle, Fifth, Donaghy, Ingraham, Congdon, 

Katharine, $1,600 $2,200 
Principals, Swift, Clifford, Rodman, Taylor, 

Winslow, Harrington, 1,200 1,800 
Increase $100 annually until maximum is reached. 
Principals, primary schools: 

4 or 5 rooms occupied. Maximum salary $850 

6 or 7 rooms occupied, " " 900 

8 or 9 rooms occupied, " " 950 

10 or more rooms occupied, " " 1,000 

Assistants in eighth grades, " " 875 

Assistants in seventh grades, " " 800 

Assistants in grades one through six, " " 750 

Assistants in sub-primary and kindergartens" " 750 

Assistants in all grades, Minimum " 550 

Increase $50 per annum at close of first, second, third, and fifth 

years of experience. 



School Report 



29 



Minimum. 



Teachers of special classes, 
Teachers of ungraded classes, 
Teachers of dispiclinary classes, 



ROCKDALE SCHOOL. 
Principal, Maximum salary, 

PLAINVILLE SCHOOL. 
Principal, Maximum salary, 

SASSAQUIN SCHOOL. 
Principal, Maximum Salary, 

SUPERVISORS AND SPECIAL TEACHERS. 



Maximum. 

$900 

800 

875 



$750 







Minimum. 


Maximum. 


Supervisor of Music, 




$1,400 


$1,900 


Assistant Supervisor of Music, 




600 


900 


Supervisor of Drawing, 




1,400 


1,800 


Assistant Supervisor of Drawing, 




600 


900 


Supervisor of Sloyd, 




1,200 


1,800 


Teachers of Sloyd, 




600 


750 


Supervisor of Cooking, 




800 


900 


Teachers of Cooking, 




500 


750 


Supervisor of Sewing, 




800 


900 


Sewing Assistants, 




550 


750 


Physical Director, 






1,500 


Assistant Physical Director, 






800 


Teacher of Penmanship, 






200 


School Nurses, 






800 


Supervisors increase, $100 annually. 






Assistant supervisors increase, 


$5( 


) annually. 





30 School Report 



CALENDAR 1916-1917 



TERMS. 

Fall term begins Sept. 8, 1915; ends Feb. 4, 1916. 
Spring term begins Feb. 7, 1916; ends June 30, 1916. 
Fall term begins Sept. 6, 1916; ends Feb 2, 1917. 

VACATIONS. 

Spring vacation, one week, beginning April 17, 1916. 
Summer vacation, nine weeks, beginning July 3, 1916. 
Winter vacation, two weeks, beginning Dec. 25, 1916. 

HOLIDAYS. 

Washington's Birthday, February 22 

Patriots' Day, April 19 

Memorial Day, May 30 

Columbus Day, October 12 

From Wednesday noon before Thanksgiving the remainder of the week. 

SCHOOL SESSIONS. 

High school: 8.30 a. m. to 1.15 p. m. 

Grammar and Manual Training schools: Morning session 9.00 to 
11.45 o'clock. Afternoon session 1.30 to 3.45 o'clock, without recess. 

Primary and Kindergarten Classes: Morning session 8.45 to 11.45 
o'clock. Afternoon session 1.30 to 3.30 o'clock. Recess in these classes 
for every pupil: 15 minutes in the forenoon, 10 minutes in the afternoon, as 
near the middle of the session as practicable. 

In all other classes the sessions shall be prescribed by the Superinten- 
dent, subject to the approval of the Board. 



School Report 



31 



OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

166 William Street. 
Office open 8.30 a. m. to 4.30 p. m., except Saturdays. 
Saturdays, 8.30 a. m. to 11.00 a. m., 2.00 to 4.00 p. m. 



ALLEN P. KEITH, Superintendent. 
Office hours, 8.30 to 9.00 a. m., 12.00 to 1.00 p. m., except Saturdays. 
Saturdays, 8.30 to 10.00 a. m. 

JOSEPHINE B. STUART, Assistant Superintendent. 

Office hours, 8.30 to 9.00 a. m., except Saturdays. 

Mondays and Wednesdays, 4.00 to 5.00 p. m. 

ELIZABETH B. TRIPP, Grade Supervisor. 
Office hours, 8.30 to 9.00 a. m., except Saturdays. 
Thursdays, 4.00 to 5.00 p. m. 

Office Assistants. 
VIOLA C. MANSEAU, 30 Durfee street. 
CLARA S. BLAKE, 97 So. Sixth street. 
MARGARET F. GIBBONS, 560 County street. 
STELLA M. FERGUSON, 563 Union street. 



Inspector of School Property. 

DANIEL H. FERGUSON, 563 Union street. 

Office hours, 12.00 to 1.00 p. m., except Saturdays. 

Department Mechanic. 
WILLIAM O. MARTIN, 209 Summer street. 

Janitor. 
JOHN EGAN, 47 Independent street. 

Attendance Officers. 
JOHN S. SILVIA, 126 Campbell street 
FRANCIS N. HOWES, 318 Arnold street 
RALPH COVILL, 159 North street. 
Office hours, 8.30 to 9.00 a. m., except Saturdays. 



32 



School Report 



SCHOOL BOARD, 1915. 



EDWARD R. HATHAWAY, Mayor, Chairman ex-officio. 
JAMES P. DORAN, Vice-chairman. 



TERM EXPIRES 1916. 
Name. Place of Business. 

Caroline H. Wilson, 
James P. Doran, Masonic Building, 

TERM EXPIRES 1917. 
William B. Geoghegan, 
Clarence A. Cook, Taun.-N. B. Copper Co. 

TERM EXPIRES 1918. 
Anna W. Croacher, 
Napoleon Baaulieu, Nonquitt Spinning Co., 



Residence. 
152 William st 
76 Bedford st. 



47 So. Sixth St. 
277 Union st. 



325 Pleasant st. 
29 Nye st. 



SCHOOL BOARD, 1916. 



EDWARD R. HATHAWAY, Mayor, Chairman ex-officio. 
WILLIAM B. GEOGHEGAN, Vice-chairman. 



TERM EXPIRES 1917. 

Name. Place of Business. Residence. 

William B. Geoghegan, 47 So. Sixth st. 

Clarence A. Cook, Taun.-N. B. Copper Co., 277 Union st. 



Anna W. Croacher, 
Napoleon Beaulieu, 



Samuel F. Winsper, 
Edward W. Sherman, 



TERM EXPIRES 1918. 
Nonquitt Spinning Co., 

TERM EXPIRES 1919. 

City Mfg. Co., 

I. C. Sherman & Son, 



325 Pleasant st. 

29 Nye st. 



226 Grinnell st. 
61 Cottage st. 



School Report 



33 



Teachers and Janitors. 



IN SERVICE JANUARY 1, 1916. 









Principals. 


Assts. 


Clerk 


High school, 






1 




46 


1 


Elementary schools, 






29 




323 




Suburban schools, 






3 














Supervisors. 


Assts. 




Music, 






1 




1 




Drawing, 






1 




1 




Manual Training, 






1 




3 




Cooking, 






1 




2 




Sewing, 






1 




6 




Penmanship, 






1 








Grade supervisor, 






1 








Physical director. 






1 




1 




Gymnasium asst.. 










1 




Gymnasium pianist. 










1 




Military instructor. 






1 








Band and Orchestra 


director, 




1 








Nurses, 




-. 


3 










Janitors. 


Assts. 


Eng. 


Asst 


• Eng. 


Firemen 


High, 


1 


*7 


1 




1 


2 


Elementary schools. 


29 












Spare men, 


4 












Suburban schools, 


2 













*Includes 6 scrub women. 



34 SCHOOL REPORT 

TEACHERS. 

Following are the names of teachers who have resigned, 
have had leave of absence, and who have been appointed to 
the corps during the past year: 

RESIGNATIONS, 1915 

May Bryant Mary E. Martin 

John H. Card Helen T. Maxfield 

Maude G. Carlton Julia C. Maynard 

Adeline C. Damon Laura C. McCabe 

Jane M. Davis Mary E. McKay 

May A. Dolan Anne S. Palmer 

Elizabeth A. Dudgale* Ruth W. Pierce 

Katherine A. Dunn Phillips H. Ryder 

Ellen M. Hamilton Clara E. Sherman 

Marion I. Harrington Ellen A. Sibor 

George W. Jaffray Nancy M. Slade 

Mildred L. James Gertrude L. Sullivan 

Elsie M. Kelley Alice M. Sykes 
Edith M. B. Taber 

RETIRED WITH PENSION. 

Robert Arnett 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE. 

Anna I. Dexter Elizabeth A. Downey 

Helen C. Gleason 

APPOINTMENTS. 

Florence M. Addy Raymond M. Coleman 

Helen S. Anderson Mildred C. Deane 

Helen L. Ashley Winifred C. Duckworth 

George L. Beach Genevieve Dunphy 

Amy E. Clarke Edale B. Garside 



School Report 



35 



Alice S. Goldthrop 
Lucy S. Hathaway 
Ruth W. HoUoway 
Lillian J. Hopkins 
Elizabeth Hoxie 
Evelyn Kelley 
Frederick L Kelley 
May M. Kennedy 
Helen S. Kilburn 
Mary A. Kir win 
Olive P. Ladd 
Gertrude C. Lane 
Agnes E. Lewin 
Grace M. McKowen 
Bessie D. McMann 
Mary A. McNulty 



Beatrice L Nelson 
Elizabeth Norell 
Catharine F. O'Connor 
Sarah L. Pendleton 
Evelyn W. Perry 
Alice R. Porter 
Dana C. Sanborn 
Ruth E. Schermerhorn 
Marguerite Struthers 
Grace C. Taber 
James V. Toner 
Arthur D. Whitman 
Ernine M. Wilcox 
Harold E. WiUey 
Edna T. Wilson 
Esther F. Yates 
Bernice M. Young 



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School Report 



37 



3n Mvvxtitium 



TEA CHERS. 

LYDIA J. CRANSTON 

In service 1870-1915. 

MARY E. AUSTIN 
In service 1875-1914. 



PHILLIPS H. RYDER 
In service 1912-1915. 



38 School Report 



Report of the Superintendent. 



To THE Honorable School Committee: 

Dr. Croacher and Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit 
the fifty-fifth annual report of the Superintendent of Schools 
of this city. 

In the supervision and administration of the public school 
system it has been my aim to carry on the work as any good 
business is conducted, that is, strive for greater efficiency and 
economy that our dividends may be larger in proportion to 
the amount of money expended. As the dividend of the 
schools must be paid in well trained and efficient citizens I 
feel that our department represents the most important acti- 
vity in our public service. No matter how good our teaching 
may be the right kind of constructive criticism will make it 
better. Rigid economy, the kind that searches out our real 
needs and then supplies them liberally, must constantly be 
practised in the administration of the department. Constant 
surveys within the system should be made if we would benefit 
by experience. In all our work the active, constructive assis- 
tance of parents and friends is most cordially invited. 

The Cost of the Schools. 

In view of the constantly increasing cost of the school de- 
partment I wish to place before you the following information 
in order that the items which show additional expenditures 
may be set forth and the reasons for the larger appropriation 
explained. To do this I have prepared three tables, taking 
the years 1900, 1905, 1910 and 1915 as a basis of comparison. 



School Report 



39 



TABLE L 
SALARIES — INCIDENTALS 

1900 1905 



REPAIRS. 
1910 1915 



Teachers' Salaries, 
Day 
Evening 

Incidentals, 

Salaries 
Miscellaneous 

Repairs, 



$137,243.96 $181,126.71 $247,846.00 $357,638.91 

3,557.00 7,010.00 6,337.50 9,641.50 

$23,383.60 $30,598.67 $39,383.32 $57,603.76 

30,055.80 35,482.15 48.105.55 47,376.77 



$14,467.93 



),281.51 



),944.21 $7,330.03 



Valuation school prop.$906,964.00$l, 404,289. 00 $1,735,225.00 $2,888,083.04 

Teachers. High School 15 18 22 47 

Elementary 202 265 304 383 

Average no. pupils belonging 

High School 350 389 501 1,072 

Elementary 7,014 8,490 9,839 12,660 

TABLE II. 
AVERAGE COST PER PUPIL. 
Teachers Salaries, 

High School $51.54 $60.29 s$52.81 $55.94 

Elementary 16.99 18.57 22.50 23.51 

Incidentals, 

Salaries 3.17 3.44 3.81 4.19 

Miscellaneous 4.08 3.99 4.65 3.45 



TABLE III. 
TEACHERS' AND JANITORS' SALARIES. 

1910 



1900 

Teachers' Salaries 
High School, 

Principal $2700. 

First Asst. 1700. 

Dept. heads 1700. 

Maleassts. 1600. 

Female assts. 1000. 

Elem. Schools, 

Principals, Class A. 1900. 
Class B. 

Primary 600.-950 
Assistants. 600.-675 

Janitors' Salaries, 

High School, 1000. 

Elementary, 500.-800. 



1905 



$3000. 
1900 
1800. 
1600. 
1000. 

1900. 

1600. 
700.-900. 
625.-750. 

900. 
600.-800. 



$3000. 
1900. 
1800. 
1600. 
1000. 

2000. 

1600. 
775.-1000 
700.-825. 

900. 
700.-1100. 



1915 



$3000. 
2200. 
2000. 
1700. 
1200. 

2200. 

1800. 

850.-1000. 

750.-875. 

1200. 
750.-1225. 



40 School Report 

In table I it will be noted that in each period there has been 
a large increase in the teachers' salaries account. The in- 
creased per capita cost in high school teaching for 1905 is 
hard to explain. The 1915 cost, while much lower than in 
1905 is due to the general increase in salary granted the high 
school teachers in 1912. The per capita cost in the elemen- 
tary grades is due to increases in salary as follows: twenty- 
five dollars in the first period; seventy-five dollars in the se- 
cond period; fifty dollars in the third period and to the re- 
vision of the supervisors' and principals' schedules. The rapid 
growth in the school population has made it impossible for 
us to reduce the number of pupils in each room to the standard 
which we have tried to establish, that is, single grades forty- 
five, double grades thirty-six, ungraded thirty, fresh air 
twenty-five, special fifteen. 

The incidental account includes all salaries other than teach- 
ers' salaries and the miscellaneous running expenses of the 
department. A steady increase in the salary account is 
shown in each period and is explained by revised salary sche- 
dules and the large additional overhead cost of the engine 
room and janitor service at the new high school over similar 
cost at the Summer street building. 

The miscellaneous account in table II shows a per capita 
cost of three dollars and forty-five cents in 1915 as compared 
with four dollars and eight cents in 1905, notwithstanding the 
increased cost of fuel, books and all other materials. City 
water was furnished free until 1909 but last year we paid 
thirty-seven hundred dollars and seventeen cents for water. 
The large per capita cost for 1910 is explained by the large 
number of new books needed in the high school due to the 
admission of the first mid year class. 

The valuation of our shcool property has advanced over two 
hundred per cent, in the past fifteen years and yet, by referr- 
ing to table I it will be seen that the appropriation for the up- 
keep of this property in 1915 was fifty per cent, of the appro- 
priation in 1900. This small appropriation has made it ne- 



School Report 



41 



cessan,- to make temporan.' repairs in many cases and such a 
course is decidedly wasteful. Our inspector will again make 
a detailed estimate of necessary- repairs and I trust that this 
year the appropriation asked for may be granted. 

Fire H.\zard. 

The report of Inspector Gibbs and Chief Dahill must be 
^ er\- gratifying to the School Committee and reassuring to 
our citizens. Fire prevention has been the watchword of 
all the employees of the department and the fact that the 
Harrington school fire was extinguished A\"ith slight dajnage 
is due to the care excerised in the disposition of inflammable 
material. In considering the recommendations of the special 
committee I would suggest that metal paper balers be substi- 
tuted for metal containers. This would allow us to take 
care of all waste paper in a fire proof receptacle at a profit 
and eliminate the troubles that arise from burning the rubbish. 
At present we have a uniform fire signal for New Bedford but 
I beheve most heartily in the recommendation that we have 
a uniform signal for the state. 

A special appropriation to cover the cost of installing new 
fire gongs, automatic sprinklers and fire proof stair towers as 
recommended should be promptly granted that the work may 
be completed at the earliest possible date. 

Fresh Air Class. 

The special committee. Dr. Croacher and Mr. Geoghegan. 
appointed to investigate the advisabilir\- of establishing fresh 
air classes in connection with the regular school work recom- 
mended, at the September meeting, that such class rooms be 
opened for pupils who are in special need of fresh air treatment. 
The superintendent was instructed to open one such class 
as an experiment. A portable building was made available 
at the Thomas Donaghy school and a class of twent\-tv\o 
pupils began work on Monday. October eighteenth, with Miss 
Marguerite E. Budgen as teacher. The extra equipment 



42 School Report 

consists of thirty movable and adjustable desk chairs, thirty 
steamer chairs, a Jones bath room scale and thirty warm 
blankets. The blankets were prepared by the girls at the 
Industrial school and with the dishes necessary to serve the 
lunches were donated to the class by the New Bedford Anti- 
Tuberculosis Association. The lunch is prepared at the 
Industrial school and is served to the pupils at a cost of two 
cents per day. The candidates for the class were selected 
by the school physicians and nurses, their homes visited and 
the plans explained to the parents. Membership is voluntary 
and it is pleasing to note that in every instance parents were 
glad to take advantage of the opportunity. I desire to ex- 
press my appreciation of the co-operation of physicians, 
nurses and principals and especially of Miss Jenkins and her 
assistants at the Industrial school. 

As opportunity offers additional classes should be opened 
at the north and west ends of the city. I look forward to the 
time when these classes shall have proven of such great bene- 
fit to the pupils in attendance upon them that the value of 
fresh air will have been sufficiently well demonstrated to 
lead all of our teachers to make the rooms over which they 
preside fresh air rooms. 

The fresh air class at Sassaquin now has a home of its own in 
the new portable building erected in November. This class 
now numbers twenty-six pupils and is meeting with great 
success under the leadership of Miss Hoxie. 

Summer Schools. 

It is a matter of regret that it was necessary to discontinue 
the summer classes during the year 1915. These classes, 
made up of children who for one cause or another failed of 
promotion, have done much to reduce retardation in the grades. 
The more experience we have in this work the more effective 
it is and just how much is accomplished for those pupils, 
who through illness or slowness, have failed in the regular 
classes, is difficult to measure. The encouragement to the 



School Report 43 

pupil which comes from promotion with the class coupled 
with the financial gain to the city certainly warrants the con- 
tinuation of these classes. 

Conservation of Eyesight. 

The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind has during 
the past year made a careful study of the records of the eye 
tests annually made by the teachers in our schools. The 
serious cases were selected and investigated by our school 
nurses and the Commission has recommended the opening of 
a special class for the benefit of those children who, under 
present conditions, are losing ground and who, if given proper 
treatment, might conserve and improve their sight. Twenty- 
two children have been recommended as candidates for the 
class and more names are to be added as the investigation 
progresses. I heartily endorse this recommendation and 
trust that such a room may be opened near the center of the 
city. 

Naturalization Classes. 

Increased interest in the education of the adult immigrant 
has been very marked during the year just closed. The fact 
that his preparation for citizenship was a legitimate part of the 
work of our evening schools has been recognized in many of 
our cities and in New Bedford two classes, the special work of 
which is to prepare for citizenship, have been established. 
The Bureau of Naturalization at Washington is co-operating 
with the department that we may search out those in need 
of this training and place its advantages before them in the 
right way and through the proper channel, the public school 
system. I am sure that the success of the two classes opened 
this year will lead to a demand for such training in every 
evening school in the city. 

Special Class Work. 

An exhibition of the hand work of the special classes of the 
department was held in the Board rooms in June. The quality 



44 School Report 

of the work proved that the Committee was justified in es- 
tablishing such groups. Every pupil in the school is benefited 
by the separation into special groups of those pupils who 
cannot do the regular work, but who, when given work suited 
to their capacities and special needs make marked progress. 
Through the special syllabus prepared by Miss Stuart and 
the special teachers, children who have been in the habit of 
depending on others have come to have confidence in their 
ability to stand alone. 

School Gardens. 

Mr. Ralph Gaskill, County Agent for the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture, visited oii.r large schools early in the spring 
term and gave a most practical talk on home gardening 
This fall we had an exhibit of the garden products raised by 
school children at the Jireh Swift, Abraham Lincoln, Parker 
street, Fifth street, William H. Taylor, James B. Congdon, 
Betsey B. Winslow and Thomas R. Rodman schools. Ribbon 
prizes were furnished by the Massachusetts State Board of 
Agriculture. This general exhibition was a revelation to the 
principals, teachers and friends of the schools and proved 
decidedly that we could benefit in a substantial way by 
expert supervision of the home garden. Mr. Gaskill pro- 
nounced the work of the pupils as superior to that which had 
received expensive press notices and commendation in other 
communities. Productive work which will keep the boys 
pleasantly employed and off the streets should receive every 
encouragement. 

Summer Playgrounds. 

With the excellent park system which the city owns it 
seems to me that we are duplicating our work more or less 
when we establish an independent system of playgrounds. 
The parks are so located that with slight additional expense 
the playgrounds could be taken over by the Park department, 
thus making the parks of more actual use to the community 



School Report 45 

with decided gain to the children of the city. Few cities have 
such an excellent park system and it has been a source of 
regret to the writer that the people as a whole do not make 
more use of this means of recreation. 

No School Signal. 

At the regular meeting of the Committee held January 29, 
1915, it was voted to discontinue the no session signal. The 
buildings are now open on every school day and the respon- 
sibility for the attendance of the pupils rests with the parents. 
The records of attendance have not been greatly affected and 
I believe that this action has been a decided benefit to the 
children attending our schools. 

Use of School Buildlngs. 

The rule of the Committee allowing the use of our school 
halls for any legitimate purpose that can be called educational 
and for which no admission fee is charged is not taken advant- 
age of by the people of the city to any extent with the ex- 
ception of the auditorium at the high school, which is in al- 
most constant use. Outside activities cannot be taken up 
by this department without a special appropriation for such 
purposes and under the existing financial conditions I do not 
feel that we can justly ask for an appropriation for this form 
of extension work. 

Buildings. 

Six new portable school buildings have been purchased and 
equipped during the past year. All are located at the north 
end of the city. The need of a new building located near the 
lot recommended east of Acushnet avenue, is imperative and 
should be planned for at once. A building located on the site 
suggested would relieve crowding at the Cedar Grove street, 
John H. Clifford, Phillips avenue and Abraham Lincoln 
buildings. At the latter building we are now using one room 



46 School Report 

for two classes and conditions are not at all satisfactory for 
the best work. 

A sixteen room building on the old high school lot will 
relieve conditions temporarily in the west end but the time is 
not far distant when a new school on the North-Hillman street 
lot will be necessary to relieve classes at the Thomas R. Rod- 
man and Harrington Memorial buildings. 

I would again call your attention to the need of additional 
room at the south end of the city between the I. W. Benjamin 
and William H. Taylor schools. With new tenement houses 
constantly being erected in this district it will be a difficult 
matter to properly care for the pupils in this section of the city. 

The rapid growth of the high school during the past five 
years has completely filled the new building and we are face 
to face with the problem of additional accomodations. As we 
already have an ample heating and lighting plant the erection 
of a building for commercial school purposes at the rear of the 
present building would seem to be the economical plan. 
This would allow also the use of the auditorium and laborato- 
ries of the present school and the whole plant would be under 
one administrative head. 

The land at the rear of the Jireh Swift school which was pur- 
chased for playground purposes should be put in condition 
for such use at once by the City Property Committee and 
turned over to the school department. 

New Bedford offers rare opportunities to its young people 
through the day and evening classes of its elementary and high 
schools, with many varied and special programs, the Industrial 
school with its well equipped shops, the Textile school with 
no superior of its kind, the Swain Free School of Design, an 
exceptional institution to be located in an industrial city, each 
ably supported by one of the best public libraries in the country. 
Let us all unite in awakening the citizens of this^ community 
,to a realization of the advantages here offered to the end that 
each institution may be constantly used to its fullest capacity. 



School Report 47 

Such success as may have been attained during the past 
year has been made possible by the constant and sympathetic 
support of all interested in the work of our public schools and 
I take this opportunity to express my appreciation for such 
assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALLEN P. KEITH. 



48 School Report 



Report of the Assistant Superintendent of Schools. 



Mr. Allen P. Keith, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: — In compliance with your request I herewith 
present the tenth annual report of the assistant superintendent 
of schools. 

In many parts of the country there is an increasing demand 
that while the annual report concerning school matters should 
contain facts of interest to the School Board, yet since tax- 
payers and parents as well as teachers are definitely responsible 
for and hence vitally interested in the schools of a community, 
they also are entitled to a report which will furnish a clear- 
cut and truthful picture of the aims, the achievements, the 
progress, the deficiencies, and the needs of their schools. 

Achievement and progress are dependent upon no one offi- 
cial or group of officials but must be wrought out through the 
combined efforts of each individual connected with the schools, 
but often the needs and deficiencies which hinder progress 
can be supplied through administration or remedied through 
supervision or can be healthily influenced by public opinion. 
Because of this these needs and deficiencies may appropriate- 
ly be presented in a school report, though not till effort has 
been made to remove the cause without this publicity. 

Progress. 

At the close of the first half-decade of supervision in the 
primary grades a report was presented which reviewed the 
progress made in that department during the five years of 
supervision. The present year which marks the close of the 



i 



School Report 



49 



decade is an equally appropriate time for such a survey. The 
cumulative effect of the work accomplished by the schools 
during these years has accelerated the rate of advance, but in- 
stead of reporting this progress in detail it may be more pro- 
fitable to survey the work with thoughts turned toward our 
deficiencies rather than toward the progress. Special super- 
vision in grade work has been given for a much shorter period 
in the grammar grades yet it may be equally profitable 
to note here the hindrances as well as the growth. 



The Course of Study. 

One of the disadvantages attending the use of a definite 
course of study is that some teachers and principals will hold 
to a too literal interpretation of its aims and bounds. Again, 
we may teach a subject or topic because the course calls for 
it and yet may fail to teach the child, for the memory drill 
which enables the pupil to give back the fact or words present- 
ed by the teacher may leave him still untaught along the 
broader lines of real education. A third objection to a 
definite course of study is sometimes voiced in the complaint 
that teachers working with such a course feel their lack of 
freedom to be a disadvantage. 

A lack of freedom may seriously hamper a teacher and may 
even suppress that element of inspiration which is the medium 
for the contagion of ideals as well as of knowledge. But on 
the other hand unlimited freedom may work as a detriment. 
Uncontrolled freedom permits a teacher to spend time and 
energy upon teaching facts which the concensus of educational 
opinion would assign to higher grades, or it allows her to use 
the subject matter and text of the grades immediately follow- 
ing, thus robbing the pupil of the freshness of approach which 
should be conserved for the work of each grade. 

The present course of study for the primary grades aims to 
meet the needs of the schools in the matter of freedom. While 
outlining the minimum requirements in subject-matter, in 
methods of teaching and discipline, and in standards for the 



50 School Report 

promotion of pupils, it allows freedom to modify the time 
assignment when in the judgment of teacher and principal 
this adjustment is required to meet individual or class needs, 
leaves freedom for much opportunity for project-work on the 
part of each teacher, and it sets no limits to the amount of 
work parallel to the course which may be accomplished as a 
maximum. 

Freedom should not be interpreted as freedom to evade or to 
fail to meet the minimum requirements of the course, require- 
ments which call for training in habits as well as in knowledge. 
The teacher whose method of teaching fails to reach these 
minimum requirements is not granted freedom to continue 
the unproductive use of her method and for a time she may 
protest against this lack of freedom. The teacher who has 
previously measured her success by knowledge alone feels at 
a loss when she is required to develope iniative and self- 
direction in her pupils; but the teacher who studies the course 
in its entirety, who perceives, in its connection with the whole, 
the part the work of her grade is expected to perform in the 
child's education will recognize that the organized freedom in- 
dicated by the course is more productive of results than dis- 
organized freedom can be. 

Yet we must be upon our guard that the desire to secure 
unification does not lead us into the straight-jacket of uniform- 
ity, that the letter of its instructions shall not be substituted 
for its aim and its spirit. 

In a great measure the progress in this department during 
the past decade has been due to the teachers' comprehension 
of the aims of the course of study and to their loyal adoption 
of it as the foundation of their work. This progress can best 
be measured by those who can recall the time lost, the effort 
wasted, the confusion due to varying standards, the irritation 
and discouragement resulting from transfers, and the not in- 
frequent demotion of pupils, which hindered the work before 
these minimum essentials were understood and insisted upon. 

At present our chief hindrances to good results to be gained 
from the course of study are: — too little familiarity with the 



School Report 51 

course as a whole and a consequent failure to review the work 
of earlier grades and to build upon this foundation ; failure to 
recognize that the progress of the duller section of the class is 
the real test of teaching power; failure to recognize the habits 
which are being inculcated by the teacher's methods; too 
great a dependence upon supervision for the help which should 
have been made a part of the teacher's preparation or which 
might be obtained through the teacher's personal effort and 
study; and too great a tendency to neglect the methods which 
will secure not only the knowledge but "the essential habits, 
ideals, and attitudes for individual and community needs." 

In the grammar grades some adjustment of the present 
course is needed to secure a closer coordination between these 
grades and those below. This is specially needed in language 
and arithmetic in the lower grammar grades, and a revision 
of the over-crowded course in history is needed here. The 
teachers and principals of the grades from 4 A through 6 A 
are now engaged in making a study of the work in arithmetic 
and in language as a basis for this readjustment. 

A thorough revision of the course in geography has already 
been accomplished. The prominent features of the new course 
are the motivation of the subject— the work being based upon 
the needs of mankind— and the motivation of the pupil which 
has shifted a large part of the work from the teacher's to the 
children's shoulders and has made the pupil's work less weari- 
some and more vital. Instead of hours spent as formerly in 
filling notebooks with comparatively unrelated facts, care- 
fully collected and arranged by the teacher, half-learned and 
half-digested by the pupil but faithfully copied by him from 
blackboard and text-book, the present course seeks to give the 
pupil so clear a memory picture of the map of the country 
studied, so firm a memory grip upon the essential facts needed 
by any intelligent person, and such skill in finding in text- 
books and other books of reference the facts he needs to 
learn or recall that it will be unnecessary and unprofitable to 
spend time in compiling note-books. It is sometimes claimed 
that a note-book is desirable that the pupil may take it with 



52 SCHOOL REPORT 

him to higher grades and have it at hand to refresh his memory. 
The present course aims to teach the subject so intelligently 
and effectively that the pupil will be able to take these facts 
with him not only into the higher grades but into adult life, 
not in note-books but as a part of his mental equipment for 
life. The habit of turning to standard works of reference rather 
than to individual note-books is a valuable part of this equip- 
ment. 

This method of teaching the subject has greatly widened the 
scope of the knowledge gained by the majority of the pupils, 
resulting in a thoroughness of knowledge and a richness of 
detail undreamed of under the note-book plan, and it has 
helped the slower pupils to reach the minimum requirements 
of the course more successfully and in less time than under 
the old plan. It has lifted the pupil from the passive state of 
a recipient, often an unwilling one, and has used his intelli- 
gence, his craving for activity, and his interest in acquisition, 
as active forces in his education. In the hands of some of 
the teachers it is resulting in an increased attention to and 
power in oral expression in good English, and in addition to 
the marked gain in knowledge and in thoroughness, there is 
noticed some development of "gumption" and common-sense. 

It is the lack of "gumption" and common-sense, these two 
products of thought and experience, which is usually the 
foundation for the complaints brought against the graduate^ 
of our schools. These are products which knowledge alone 
will not bring and the individual whose time has been spent 
mainly in acquiring knowledge is not infrequently lacking 
in the ability to adjust himself to new conditions, to exercise 
judgment, or to fulfil requirements not explicitly defined. 

The teaching in geography is intended to strengthen the 
pupil's judgment, to throw him upon his own resources in 
meeting a given requirement, and to develope self-confidence 
and self-direction, these to be the result of and to be gained 
through the facts he commits to memory. 

It should be recognized that we have but made a beginning 
in the application of this method and it must be admitted that 



School Report 53 

thus far it has been followed with widely varying degrees of 
success. Yet the least satisfactory work is an improvement 
upon that teacher's former results, and greater familiarity with 
the aim will do much to lessen the gap between the best work 
and the least successful. The teachers who have been most 
successful in adapting the new course to the needs and abili- 
ties of their pupils have been those who were already awake to 
the present day trend in education. 

Motivation of the Subject. 

Training in judgment and common-sense as well as in 
knowledge is being secured through the experience gained by 
means of the project-work which the more thoughtful and 
skillful teachers in each grade are employing. A recent visit 
to one of the sub-primary and kindergarten rooms furnished 
an illustration of what may be done in this direction even at 
the beginning of the child's school course. Last spring the 
class had visited some of the school-and-home gardens and 
had watched the planting of the corn and in later visits they 
had observed its growth. 

In the fall stalks of corn bearing the ears were brought into 
the school room. Some of the ears were hung up to dry for 
seed while others were shelled and some of the kernels ground 
between stones till the children saw how meal is obtained. 
Later the pupils made paper bags to hold the corn and paste- 
board carts to represent the vehicles used for carrying the 
corn to the mill. 

From pieces of unbleached cloth and from paper towels they 
contrived aprons and caps which were intended to insure 
cleanUness while they were churning cream into butter and 
cooking the corn meal. (The neighboring day-nursery had 
invited them to store their butter in its ice-chest till they were 
ready to use it) . When the children were ready for their 
Thanksgiving party they mixed the corn-meal with water and 
made johnny-cakes which they cooked at school and ate with 
the butter they had made. 



54 School Report 

In the special classes this idea of project-work dominates all 
the hand-work executed by the pupils. The work executed 
by these classes last June showed that nothing was made 
merely for the training which the making furnished but that 
each article was intended to supply some need of daily life 
and that while its worth was enhanced by the excellency of 
the workmanship yet its main value lay in its fitness to satisfy 
some need, for use or for beauty. 

The same aim is shown in the hand-work executed by the 
pupils in the open air class at Sassaquin. The child recognizes 
the need for the article or the use to which it can be put before 
beginning to make it. 

In the regular grades the making of an article, the playing 
of a game, some field lesson or class trip is often made the 
basis of language work; actual measuring, building, buying, 
estimating, in other words experience, is made the basis of 
some of the work in arithmetic. 

Far too little advantage of this means is taken in teaching 
this subject and our work should be strengthened by moti- 
vation in each subject. 

Progress. 

One of the factors tending toward progress in the last half- 
decade has been the adoption of the plan which placed each 
large school in the primary department in charge of a super- 
vising principal. This has not only strengthened these schools 
through the opportunity it offered for more efficient adminis- 
tration but the quickening of mental life and progress in each 
school has been measured by the extent to which the principal 
has grasped and applied the best in present day thought and 
practice. The course of study with its frequent revisions to 
adapt it more closely to our needs has been a means of progress, 
as has been shown by the work of those teachers who have 
made themselves most familiar with its aims. Another means 
of progress has been the extension of closer supervision into 
the grammar grades and the appointment of a grade super- 
visor to assist in supervision. 



School Report 55 

Conclusion. 

The definite aims toward which our efforts are now being 
directed are: — 1. to use the child's mind "not only as a store 
house but as a power-house." 2. to measure our teaching 
power by the progress of the duller half of the class. 3. to 
widen the scope of our teaching so that it shall include the aim 
to furnish "the essential knowledge, habits, ideals, and atti- 
tudes for individual and community needs". 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPHINE B. STUART, 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools. 



56 School Report 



Report oi the Principal of the High School. 



Mr. Allen P. Keith, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: — I respectfully submit my sixth annual report 
on the New Bedford High School. 

The total number of pupils enrolled from September 1914 
to June 1915 was 1140; but this included the class which grad- 
uated in mid-year. Of this total number enrolled 152 left 
school for various reasons, and 102 graduated. The highest 
average membership of any month in the year was 1075, 
in the month of February; and the lowest was 929, in the 
month cf January. The total number of teachers employed 
was 47 regular and 4 special teachers. The increase in the 
number of pupils enrolled over the preceding year was 133, and 
the increase in the total number of teachers employed was 6. 

The large increase in the enrollment of the school made it 
necessary for us to make several changes in the weekly 
time schedule of classes. The practice we had followed for 
several years of taking the last period each Wednesday for 
military drill and band rehearsal had to be discontinued, and 
the period assigned to regular class recitations. The cadets 
and band now practice each Wednesday from 1:15 to 1:45. 
The former custom of having only five recitation periods with 
a school assembly period on Friday had to be changed to six 
short recitation periods with a school assembly period. The 
number of pupils electing singing had become so large that it 
was necessary to provide an additional period for singing, 
making the singing periods the fifth and sixth each Wednesday. 



School Report 57 

The problem of providing a sufficient number of rooms to 
accomodate the increase in the number of classes has become 
a very serious one. There are only 38 class-rooms in the build- 
ing. These include the science laboratories and typewriting 
rooms, which are unsuitable for ordinary recitation work. 
We have 46 teachers who teach from 20 to 27 periods a week. 
This lack of sufficient number of rooms has compelled us to 
reorganize the school for each day's classes. It is evident that 
within a year or two we shall not be able to accomodate the 
increasing number of pupils unless we use the library and au- 
ditorium for class rooms, or hold afternoon sessions. 

TEACHERS' Professional Reading. 

During the year the faculty of the High School has under- 
taken to stimulate greater interest on the part of teachers in 
professional reading and study. A committee has been appoint- 
ed to select and recommend books from the latest educational 
publications for purchase by teachers; the books thus select- 
ed are to be intensively studied and then criticized under the 
direction of a leader at each monthly teachers' meeting. The 
first book selected by the teachers is, "Methods in Teaching 
in High Schools", by Samuel C. Parker, Dean of the College 
of Education of the University of Chicago. 

Revision of English Courses. 

I have appointed two committees of English teachers to 
revise our courses of study in English. These commit- 
tees are to submit new outlines of the English work to be 
done in the High School in each semester. They are to out- 
line the work in composition [written and oral], rhetoric, 
and literature. They are to consider and offer plans for the 
differentiation of the English work in the college, scientific, 
general, and commercial curricula; and they are to select the 
several books to be read and studied in the four groups of curri- 
cula, and plan for better co-operation with the work of the 
grammar schools. 



58 School Report 

School Organizations. 

The High School orchestra, school band, girls' glee club, 
and boys' glee club help greatly in the musical instruction of 
our pupils. They all are doing excellent work. The concerts 
given by the orchestra and band, and the singing on several 
occasions by the glee clubs have been greatly enjoyed. The 
debating society debated several times before the school at 
Friday morning assemblies. The past year was one of the 
most successful in the history of the society. 

Miss Mary E. Austin 

AND 

Miss Lydia j. Cranston. 

The past year was one of the saddest in the history of the 
High School, because of the loss by death of two of our old- 
st teachers. Miss Austin died January 20, 1915, and Miss 
Cranston followed her on July 5, 1915. The new Bedford 
High School never had on its faculty two more efficient and 
loyal teachers than Miss Austin and Miss Cranston. New 
Bedford was highly favored by having two women of so 
high professional ability and strength of character to serve 
its High School for so many years. Miss Austin taught here 
nearly forty years, and Miss Cranston taught here forty-three 
years. Because of the unusually long terms of their ser- 
vice, and the powerful influence they had exerted on the 
lives of their pupils and friends, appropriate memorial exer- 
cises were held by the school in the auditorium; and the 
school paper published many testimonials sent by pupils 
and teachers. My appreciation of the character and ability 
of Miss Austin and Miss Cranston has been expressed several 
times during the past year. I add again that I hold in 
grateful remembrance the fact that I had the honor and 
pleasure of associating with them as a teacher. 



School Report 

Following are the statistics for the school year: 



59 



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60 



School Report 



GRADUATES, 1915. 








FEBRUARY. 








Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


College preparatory course, 


12 


12 


24 


General course, 





9 


9 


Commercial course. 


8 


3 


11 


Partial pupils [certificate] 


1 


4 


5 




21 


28 


49 




JULY. 






College preparatory course. 


5 


6 


11 


Scientific course, 


9 





9 


General course. 





9 


9 


Commercial course. 


7 


10 


17 


Partial pupils [certificate] 


1 


6 


7 



22 



31 



53 



NUMBER OF PUPILS WHO HAVE LEFT THE HIGH SCHOOL 



8's 
7's 
6's 
5's 
4's 
3's 
2's 
I's 



DURING SCHOOL YEAR 1914-15. 



Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 





5 


5 


6 


4 


10 


8 


5 


13 


8 


12 


20 


10 


8 


18 


7 


12 


19 


14 


23 


37 


18 


12 


30 



71 

CAUSES FOR LEAVING. 
Boys. 
Death. 2 

Illness, 8 

Needed at home, 

Neglect of school v/ork, 8 

Trouble at school, 8 

Went to work, 41 

Moved from city, 2 

Went to other schools, 2 

Causes unknown, 



81 



152 



Girls. 


Total. 





2 


29 


37 


12 


12 


7 


15 


4 


12 


13 


54 


11 


13 


3 


5 


2 


2 



71 



81 



152 



School Report 



61 



GRADUATES ENTERING HIGHER INSTITUTIONS. 



Boys. 



Beloit College, 

Brown University, 

Boston University, 

Colby College, 

Colgate University, 

Dartmouth College, 

Harvard University, 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 

University of the City of New York, 

Radcliffe College, 

Simmons College, 

Smith College, 

Wellesley College, 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 

Bridgewater Normal School, 

Framingham Normal School, 

Lynn General Electric School, 

Kindergarten Schools, 



Girls. 


Total. 





1 


1 


2 





2 





1 





1 





1 





3 





1 





1 





1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 





2 


11 


11 


1 


1 





1 


2 


2 



16 



22 



38 



COMPARATIVE RECORD OF PUPILS LEAVING SCHOOL 
DURING THE PAST TEN YEARS. 



Year. 


Total 


Number 




Enrollment. 


Left. 


1906 


428 


71 


1907 


461 


65 


1908 


471 


57 


1909 


539 


120 


1910 


541 


56 


1911 


635 


162 


1912 


706 


81 


1913 


816- 


95 


1914 


1007 


127 


1915 


1140 


152 



Respectfully submitted, 



G. WALTER WILLIAMS, 
Principal. 



62 SCHOOL REPORT 



Evening High School. 



Mr. Allen P. Keith, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: — I respectfully submit the following report of the 
Evening High School for the year 1914-1915: 

The school opened on the evening of October 5 and continued 
for twenty weeks, closing on the evening of March 13. Dur- 
ing the Christmas recess the school was not in session for a 
period of three weeks. 

The total enrollment, 596, was over forty per cent greater 
than the preceeding year and nearly the same per cent 
greater than the largest enrollment the school has ever had. 
The average attendance was also very good, being nearly 
sixty per cent greater than the preceding year, thus showing 
an increased tendency on the part of the pupils to attend the 
sessions more regularly. The enrollment continues to show 
a balance in favor of the male sex, the registration being 
349 males and 247 females. 

Classes were conducted in Bookkeeping, Stenography, 
Typewriting, Penmanship, Arithmetic, Civil Service, Mathe- 
matics and French. All these classes were well attended with 
the exception of the French class. While this class started out 
well, it was necessary to drop it before the end of the year 
because of lack of attendance. I recommend that in the 
future when new classes are requested by a group of pros- 
pective students, a deposit be required to insure their good 
faith. The class in mathematics had a fine record in 
attendance and accomplished some very good results, 
especially along the line of solutions of practical problems 



School Report 63 

brought in by members of the class, many of whom are 
employees in machine shops. 

From the point of view of enrollment and attendance the 
school has, during the past year, made the most successful 
record in its history. If it were possible to accurately estimate 
the value of that which has been acquired by the pupils during 
this same time, I am sure the school would register a success 
from this standpoint also. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. R. DORMAN, 

Principal. 



64 School Report 



Report of the Supervisor of Drawing. 



Mr. Allen P. Keith, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: — Not long ago the writer had occasion to consult a 
workman in regard to placing some plaster casts upon the 
wall. As we talked he drew on paper the section of a bracket, 
showing how it supported the cast, the position of the bolts 
necessary for security, the depth and curve of the moulding— 
a shorthand sketch speaking to the eye, giving more direct 
and definite information than any expenditure of words 
addressed to the ear. It was the natural action of the man 
trained to work with his hands who wished to express structure 
so that another might realize it. We get our impressions of 
the outside world through our senses, more especially those of 
sight, hearing, and touch. Many of us are more dependent 
upon eye impressions than we are aware. Describe an 
object and our mental image is still vague. Give us sometihng 
to look at, as a sketch or diagram, and we at once endow the 
object with form and structure. "Seeing is believing", in 
more senses than one. Thus drawing is a language — a sort of 
visible speech. When the writer was teaching in a school for 
the deaf and watched children gain power to use this silent 
speech of form the parallel was often in mind. 

Many persons seem to think that ability to draw is a heaven- 
bestowed gift dependent upon something called "talent". 
Artistic expression does depend upon sensitiveness to impress- 
ions and is conditioned by individual power to express effect- 
ively, but drawing pure and simple, plain representation of 
the appearance of form or the setting forth of structur- 
al facts is within the grasp of anyone who will make the ne- 



School Report 65 

cessary effort to use his eyes and train his hand. It does re- 
quire some effort and patience; so does success in any field. 
Good drawing calls for attention, observation, comparison, 
judgment, imagination, feeling, concentration, decision. 
Skill of hand comes with practice, like playing the piano or 
violin, in this case the pencil or brush being the instrument. 

Everyone accustomed to work with children in school rec- 
ognizes that they need training in habits of accuracy. Draw- 
ing is excellent as a means of teaching careful observation, 
clear thinking and accuracy of expression. 

Drawing gives training in expressing the facts of form. 
Ability to read and to make a working drawing is necessary 
in the skilled trades. Drawing with the tool is the basis of 
all constructive work. 

Nature has clothed animals and birds and decided the 
matter of their color, although even they have worked changes 
in protective coloring, but we human beings have the privilege 
and responsibility of selecting the color of our clothing and 
the furnishings of our homes. A girl needs to know what 
colors are harmonious and how to combine them. The future 
homemaker may be helped to distinguish between well de- 
signed and badly made furniture, a carpet which by reason of 
crude color and pattern has the effect of striking one in the 
eye or that keeps its proper place on the floor, and wallpaper 
which provides patients for the oculist or one that is restful 
and comfortable to live with, to select table furniture adapt- 
ed to its purpose, pleasant to handle, agreeable to look at. 
A knowledge of some practical principles of design should help 
both boys and girls to appreciate what is well designed and 
structurally beautiful. When criticism is made of the design 
and color of fabrics or other articles for sale in the shops deal- 
ers invariably say that manufacturers supply what purchasers 
will buy. 

Quite as important is it to lead the average boy and girl to 
see beauty of form and color in nature. Beauty lies about us 
on every side but often our eyes are closed until they are open- 



66 School Report 

ed for us by the finer vision and skilled hand of the artist. 
A knowledge of the principles underlying correct representa- 
tion of the appearance of form leads to appreciation and en- 
joyment of good book illustration and of the work of the 
painter and sculptor. 

Pupils should study the exhibition shown at the Swain 
Free School of Design and the New Bedford Public Library. 
The Public Library is most generous in its co-operation with 
the schools by lending photographs and prints, plates and books 
of reference. 

Drawing touches all sides of school work. The supervisors 
wish it might be possible some time to have space in the 
annual report to illustrate by photographs the inter-relation of 
drawing with the various school activities. Such illustra- 
tion would demonstrate more plainly than pages of descrip- 
tion the aim and vitality of school drawing. 

In primary and grammar grades drawing has to be done at 
the ordinary desks in the class rooms. An ideal arrangement 
would be to have a drawing room properly lighted and equip- 
ped in each grammar building where the pupils could work in 
charge of a special teacher, but in the present crowded state 
of the schools that is out of the question. In the High School, 
however, pupils work under conditions more like those of the 
studio and there are opportunities for craft work in metal, 
leather, embroidery. Students who are to enter technical 
schools may prepare themselves in mechanical drawing. 

Students who possess special ability should take advantage 
of the excellent instruction offered by the Swain Free School of 
Design either in the Saturday morning or evening classes. 
It is greatly to be desired that the young people should realize 
the privileges afforded them which may be theirs for the ask- 
ing and for the manifestation of an earnest desire for artistic 
cultivation. 

High School pupils who are preparing for Normal School 
should be required to take drawing. In the elementary schools 
drawing must be taught by the grade teacher and some know- 



School Report 67 

ledge of the subject and practice to go with it is a necessary 
part of professional equipment. 

The teacher's preparation for a drawing lesson should be 
as careful as that for a lesson in arithmetic or geography. 
The teacher's interest kindles the pupils' interest. A teacher 
who can draw is sure of an enthusiastic class. 

There is a subtle influence which comes from environment; 
for that reason we try to make our school buildings attractive 
and beautiful and to have the pupils feel a pride in the appear- 
ance of the school. During the past year appropriate decora- 
tions have been placed in some of the schools, notably the 
library of the High School. 

This leads to the thought of civic art and the development of 
a beautiful city. New Bedford is rapidly growing in industrial 
importance. It is beautifully situated and in common with 
many old New England towns is fortunate in possessing some 
stately buildings, dignified houses, and delightful gardens. 
While welcoming what is new we must not fail to hold in ap- 
preciation the fine things that have come to us from former 
days. As the city expands we must see that the new build- 
ings are good in architecture, that streets are well planned and 
well kept, that there are sufficient breathing spaces and 
parks and that we may feel well-founded pride in our city. 
This spirit may be cultivated in the schools. The making of 
home gardens and the effort to beautify yards in which the 
children have shown such interest are ways in which they can 
help towards the city beautiful. The children of today are 
the future citizens and in their hands lie great possibilities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

LUCY C. BEDLOW. 



68 School Report 



Report of the Supervisor of Music. 



Mr. Allen P. Keith, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: — I herewith submit my report for the first com- 
plete year of my service as Music Supervisor in the New Bed- 
ford Schools. Since my first report there have been few 
changes in the schedule except an increase of five hundred per 
cent, in the time devoted to the High School, and the discon- 
tinuance wherever possible of the grouping of two or more 
classes. Where one hundred children sing together and are 
visited once a month by the supervisor a personal knowledge 
of the individual work done in the class room is impossible. 
I hope by a slight further change in the program to visit se- 
parately all classes except the eighth grades. I must report 
also that the supervisor's time is so required in the actual work 
of teaching in the class room that there is no time for supervi- 
sion in its real sense. Under the present schedule the music 
teacher is in each room about one-half hour per month, and 
until there is an increase in the number of rooms this allot- 
ment of time can be maintained. The pupils have been 
uniformly courteous and there has been no lack of interest or 
enthusiam in any class throughout the city. 

Work in the primary grades is, in some respects, quite sat- 
isfactory but is handicapped by a lack of printed material 
preparatory to the use of our first book. The children enter 
the grammar grades as a rule with a very good idea of the way 
to use their voices. The methods used for the proper treat- 
ment of children's voices is so radically different from that 
used for adults that few appreciate the importance of this 
training. There is a decided improvement in the interest and 



School Report 60 

love of music. The time allowance for music in these grades 
in somewhat less than the general practice in this country. 

In the grammar grades I am pleased to report that we have 
eliminated the study of the purely theoretical problems which 
are of little interest except to the professional musician. This 
has been of great benefit to the work. Classes have more 
time to sing, and are making good use of their time, and such 
tests as I have been able to give show that there has been no 
falling off in the knowledge of the really essential. The 
four upper grades are all using the same book which answer 
for the first three, but with the increased power to read and 
intelligently interpret these songs, more material is necessary 
for efficient work in the eight A grade. I would recommend 
the introduction of an additional book for that grade. While 
the day is long passed when public demonstrations of the value 
of school music were necessary, it is still desirable as a part of 
the musical training of children that they should sing in public 
more frequently than has been the local custom. 

I am able to report a considerable gain in the music in the 
High School. The number of those electing music has in- 
creased from ten per cent, of the membership to about fifty 
per cent, and the interest has shown a corresponding improve- 
ment. The chorus has been divided into two sections of over 
two hundred each ; the senior cla^sses have also given one period 
a week to singing and about one-half of the members of the 
two glee clubs are availing themselves of that opportunity for 
music because conflicting studies prevent their attendance at 
the regular classes. While the growth of the work during the 
year has been very marked, it is necessary, if the music in 
the High School is to have the same high standing maintained 
in its other branches, that it be furnished with equippment in 
proportion to the number of pupils electing it and also suitable 
to the increased ability to appreciate good music. A number 
of musical selections have recently been furnished the school, 
and with additions to this from time to time we shall be able to 
avoid repetitions in the work. The two divisions are now 
ready to undertake the grade of work which high schools in 



70 School Report 

general have adopted and given the right material and oppor- 
tunity, I am quite certain the High School would do its part 
toward the musical culture of the city. 

The two glee clubs, which are entirely independent, have 
made a good start for boys and girls not having any previous 
musical training except that furnished by the schools; but like 
all new organizations, need the financial and moral encourage- 
ment which is naturally given older activities. While this is 
to be expected, the members have shown by their regular 
attendance after school hours, their faithful work, and their 
self support that no consideration except their interest in 
music has been the inducement for membership. I ask for 
them an increasing support for new music and an opportunity 
to appear befor the public under favorable conditions. 

The immense amount of money spent every year by the 
parents of pupils in our schools for private instruction in music 
in one form or another, seems to warrant the conclusion that 
the schools are not meeting the demand for musical training 
the majority of the parents desire their children to have. 
And if the wishes of the parents are to govern in this matter, 
it seems that the time has come for the schools to broaden 
somewhat in their relation to music. Practically every high 
school of the size of ours has introduced an elective course in 
music in some form in addition to the choral work. Such a 
course is especially needed by those who through the study of 
any one instrument have reached a point where they feel 
they have had a broad musical training. It would therefore 
seem desirable if our High School is to rank in music as it does 
in other subjects that the matter of the introduction of courses 
in Musical History, Appreciation and Harmony be investigat- 
ed thoroughly, and if the number of those desiring such courses 
is such as to bring the cost per capita to a reasonable figure, 
that such work be added to our High School curriculum. 

The value of musical instruments owned by the city and 
used in the various schools is considerable, and the Supervisor 
is making an effort to familiarize himself with those instru- 



School Report 71 

ments not so frequently under his observation as those with 
which he has to work in his routine visits. It is his intention 
to be of assistance to the principals in the care and proper use 
of this equipment, and also to have available such data regard- 
ing its length of service and efficiency as may be required. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY E. WHITTEMORE. 



72 School report 



Report of Playground Supervisor. 



Mr. Allen P. Keith, Superintendent op' Schools: 

Dear Sir : — I herewith submit the report of the Supervisor 
of Playgrounds for the season of 1915. 

The sessions opened on July 12 and continued for a period of 
six weeks, closing on August 20. This was one week less than 
the session of the preceding year. In order not to take too 
much of the limited playtime of the children for organized 
classes, most of that type of work was eliminated. In 
its place was substituted athletics for the older girls. Classes 
in dancing were organized only where requests were sufficient 
in number to warrant taking the time. This allowed more 
latitude in the entertainment of the children and did not force 
work upon them that they considered disagreeable. The 
athletics for the girls was decidedly popular and proved to be a 
very satisfactory addition to the list of sports. Four grounds 
held special classes in dancing and all taught the dancing games 
to the smaller children. 

The athletic meets were better conducted this year than ever 
before and a larger number of children participated in them. 
I believe one reason for this is that the men instructors were 
older and more experienced in teaching, and consequently were 
respected more by the children and more interest was taken in 
the undertakings they presented. Also the fact that the 
girls competed along with the boys added interest to the meets. 

While there are faults that can be found with individual mem- 
bers of the playground corps, on the whole it was an exception- 
ally good force. The instructors were always ready to co-oper- 



School Report 73 

ate with the supervisor and they maintained very good disci- 
pline on the grounds throughout the session. The results they 
accomplished were demonstrated at the field-day. 

The annual field-day was held at Buttonwood Park on 
Thursday, August 19. It was very largely attended and one 
of the most successful and satisfactory the playgrounds have 
ever held. Weather, the Park Authorities and the Teaching 
Corps united in giving the children a time to be remembered. 
The exercises were lengthened in order to keep the children 
occupied until six o'clock ,as it was impossible to get the re- 
turn trolley cars until that time. However, the day was occu- 
pied with some form of amusement up to the last minute. One 
of the most pleasing features of the day was the concert, from 
1.30 to 4.30 given by the New Bedford School Band. The 
supervisor and the instructors are very grateful to the boys for 
their services. 

Following is the program for the day: 

Morning. 

Athletics. 

Boys' 75 yd. Dash. 
Girls' 50 Yard Dash. 
Boys' Potato Race. 
Girls' Relay Race. 
Boys' High Jump. 
Girls' Baseball Throw. 
Boys' Standing 3 Jumps. 
Boys' Running Broad Jump. 

Afternoon. 

1. Free Arm Exercises. All schools. 
Norwegian Mountain March. Knowlton School. 

[a] Swedish Schottische 

[b] Dutch Dance 

Lincoln School. 

Gipsy Dance. Kempton School. 



74 School Report 

[a] Clap, Clap, Clap. 

[b] How Do You Do, My Partner. 

[c] Hop Mor Anika. 

All Schools. 

2. Championship Newcombe Game. 
Lincoln [North] vs. Congdon [South]. 

3. Championship Baseball Games. 

First Teams- 
Lincoln [North] vs. Hathaway [South]. 

Second Teams- 
Lincoln [North] vs. Hathaway [South]. 

Winners- 
Athletics — Lincoln School. 
Newcombe — Congdon School. 
Baseball — First Teams, Hathaway. 
Second Teams, Lincoln. 

I wish to thank Mr. Keith for his interest and kindly advice, 
and Mr. Ferguson, Inspector of School Property, for his 
valuable assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. R. DORMAN. 



School Report 75 



Report of School Nurses. 



Mr. Allen P. Keith, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: — I respectfully submit the following report for 
the schools of the centre. 

Number of visits to the schools, 581 

Number of visits to the homes, 760 

Casesof defective vision, 205 

Cases of defective hearing and breathing, 89 

Tubercular tendencies, 10 

The number of cases receiving attention are as follows : — 

Defective vision, 125 

Defective teeth, 64 

Adenoids and tonsils, 61 

Tubercular tendencies are having treatment at the Clinic. 

For the kindly co-operation I wish to thank the Superin- 
tendent, Principals, and Teachers, also the Charity Organ- 
ization, Children's Aid and the Tubercular Clinic. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FLORENCE RICKETSON, R. N. 



76 School Report 

Mr. Allen P. Keith, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: — The report of the school nurse for the north 
end schools the past year is as follows: — 

Number of visits to schools, 395 

Number of visits to homes, 913 

Number of cases of defective vision, 141 

Number of cases of defective teeth , 317 
Number of cases of adenoids and tonsils \ 
Number of cases of defective hearing j 



151 



The number of cases that have received special medical 
attention, for defective eyes, teeth, adenoids, tonsils and ears 
are: 

Defective vision, 88 

Defective teeth, 350 

Adenoids, tonsils, and ears, 70 

The large increase in the number of cases of defective vision 
this year, comes from the investigation made by the Mass- 
achusetts Commission for the Blind. Although numbers of 
these cases had been treated and were wearing glasses, many 
had to be re-examined and new glasses provided. 

The Charity Organization Society has more than met all our 
demands on their time and co-operation, and has supplied 
glasses in many of these cases. 

A great need is felt in this work, by the school nurses, for a 
general clinic, where prompt medical attention may be given 
in all cases, thus avoiding long delays, which under the present 
system are unavoidable. 

I wish to extend my thanks to the various clinics, organiza- 
tions, teachers, principals, and all others to whom I am indebt- 
ed for kindly co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET J. DIAZ, R. N. 



School Report 77 

Mr. Allen P. Keith, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: — ^The report of the school nurse of the south end 
schools for the year past, is as follows: 

Number of visits to schools, 376 

Number of visits to homes, 876 

Number of cases defective vision, 252 

Defective eyes with scars on cornea, 12 

Conjunctivitis, 55 

Keratitis, 15 

Glasses provided for children, 174 

Defective hearing, 54 

Otitis Media, 54 

Adenoids and tonsil cases, 135 

Number of such cases operated upon, 80 

Children in need of fresh air class, 24 

An analysis of this report shows there are three needs which 
ought to be met. 

First: — A greater number of fresh air classes so that 
all necessary cases may be sent to them. 

Second:— An eye clinic is most urgently desired. This need 
si manifested by the great number of cases of 
defective vision. In such cases where glasses have 
have been provided, there has been a noticeable 
improvement. 

Third: — If there could be a nose, throat, and ear clinic, 
the health of many children would be better, and 
there would be fewer excluded cases. Many chil- 
dren have Otitis Media which involves a running 
ear. A clinic would take care of these cases and 
remove a cause of further disease, a certain bad odor 
from the school room, and a source of exclusion. 

I wish to express my appreciation of the hearty co-operation 
of the Superintendent of Public Schools, Principals, and Teach- 
ers. My work has been made a great deal more effective by 



78 School Report 

the aid of the Charity Organization Society, Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Children, Children's Aid, and several 
private charities. In addition to these, the Dental Clinic has 
continued its very satisfactory work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

M. THERESA McGRATH, R. N. 



School Report 79 



INDEX to report OF SECRETARY. 



Calendar, 1916-1917 30 

Cost 

Books, etc. [Howland Fund] 12-13 

Books, regular and janitors' supplies 14-15 

Per pupil, total expenditures 5 

Per pupil, expenditures for books and supplies 16 

Expenditures 

Bourne Prize Fund 7 

by departments 8-11 

Dog Fund 7 

General [taxation] 6 

Howland Income Fund 7 

Graduates 20-23-26 

Graduation programs 

High school 21-22-24-25 

Memoriam, In 37 

Receipts 

from City Council 6 

Bourne Prize Fund ". 7 

Dog Fund 7 

Howland Income Fund 7 

Other sources 7 

Schedule 

Rates of tuition 28 

Salaries 28-29 

School Board, organization of 32 

Statistics 

Appropriation 3 

Attendance: comparing public, private and parochial schools 5 

Age and schooling certificates 18 

Enrollment, etc., public schools 16 

Janitors 33 



80 School Report 

Population and valuation 3 

Report of attendance officers 19 

School census : 3 

School organization 4 

Teachers, number of 33 

Superintendent of schools, office of 31 

Tables 

Ages of children in grades 36 

Average ages 17 

Description of school houses 27 

Teachers: appointments 34-35 

" leave of absence 34 

" resignations 34 



INDEX TO REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 
OF SCHOOLS. 



Report of Superintendent 38-47 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools 48-55 

Supervisor of Drawing 64-67 

" Music 68-71 

" " Playgrounds 72-74 

Principal of High School 56-61 

" " Evening High School 62-63 

School nurses 75-78 

Tables 

Comparison of expenditures 1900-05-10-15 39 



yiiiiiilff^'liiiifp'^" 




ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

OF THE 

New Bedford 
Independent Industrial School 

FOR THE YEAR 1914-1915. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

EDGAR B. HAMMOND, Chairman 
ALLEN P. KEITH /Secretary 
FRANK H. TRIPP CALVIN T. BOSWORTH 

NAPOLEON BEAULIEU PATRICK SWEENEY 

ROBERT L. BAYLIES MRS. CAROLINE H. WILSON 

DR. ANNA W. CROACHER 
WILLIAM S. DAVENPORT 



NEW BEDFORD: 

THE J. E. BUDLONG PRESS, PRINTERS, 

1916. 



Industrial School Report 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

NOVEMBER 30, 1915, TO THE BOARD OF 

TRUSTEES OF THE NEW BEDFORD 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



This report covers the period from November 30, 1914 to 
December 1st., 1915. 

BOYS' Day School. 

There has been real progress in all departments of the 
school during the past year, but it is clearly evident that 
much greater progress should have been made. 

No manufactured product that can be readily marketed has 
yet been found for the Electrical Department, although some 
advancement has been made on definite lines. Mr. N. S. 
Rounds who was promoted to the position of Head of the de- 
partment has given some evidence of fitness and potential 
ability to bring his department up to a high standard of effi- 
ciency. There have been but two instructors in that depart- 
ment since September 1st., making necessary a waiting list of 
pupils desiring to enter, and retarding the development of 
some product which has been started. 

Some satisfactory progress in the matter of a marketable 
product has been made in the Machine Department, as a re- 
sult of the liberal policy of the Board in the purchase of 
modern equipment, and also because of the conscientious 
efforts of the men in that department. 

The three story addition 20ft. x 29ft. in size, planned and 
built by the boys in the Carpentry Department and located 
on the south side of the Cannon Street building, is practically 



Industrial School Report 5 

finished and the Machine Shop tool room has been moved from 
the center of the Machine Shop, where it covered valuable 
floor space, to the lower story of that addition. This change 
has made possible a new and much more practicable arrange- 
ment and location of the machines in that department. 

In the Carpentry Department there is decided improvement 
in the quality of the work turned out. The faculty has been 
strengthened by the employment of E. M. McCracken as 
assistant, and he has been given classes in pattern making and 
cabinet work, also some classes in related subjects. 

The product of the Power Department must of necessity 
consist of service to the school. The operation of the boilers 
and gas producer and the steam and gas engines for furnish- 
ing power, heat and light, with the care of steam, water and 
gas piping in all the school buildings, afford productive 
work of much educational value. When the real value of 
the opportunity in this department is better realized by the 
community, there will be a much larger renrollment there. 

Under the Department of Related Work comes the arrange- 
ment and teaching of all class work, which includes the fol- 
lowing; Mathematics, English, Drawing, Science, Civics and 
Business Law. The course of sudy in each department is 
carried out under the Head of that Department. 

It is an advantage, whenever possible, to have the shop 
man teach the classes in Mathematics and Trade Science, 
because of their intimate connection with the work, and al- 
though for economic and other reasons, it has been found ab- 
solutely necessary to form classes, the school does provide 
special instruction, where it appears to be best for the pupil, 
up to the full capacity of the institution. 

In the last year, the time given to drawing has been shorten- 
ed, and Trade Science work introduced in its place. Under 
a more systematic method of teaching, the time now given to 
drawing is producing better results than formerly. This we 
are confident is a step toward the more efficient training of 
boys who will be skilled and capable mechanics, due to their 
technical knowledge and mechanical ability. 



6 Industrial School Report 

All pupils are now accepted on probation for one month, 
and this period may be extended at the request of the head of 
the department. At the end of this period of probation, the 
head of the department recommends the boy either for accep- 
tance on regular standing in his department, trial in some other 
department, or that he go into some other school or employ- 
ment. If at any time during his course a boy is not making 
reasonable progress in his work and studies, his parents are 
advised of the fact, and if after this notice there is no permanent 
improvement, the parents are requested to take the boy out 
of the school. This method has resulted in the prompt elimi- 
nation of those boys who for any reason demonstrate that they 
are not fitted for the Industrial School work at that time, and 
by insistence on real progress and efficiency of the pupils, the 
quality and value of the school is increased, rather than its 
size. 

As may be seen by the table of enrollment, the number of 
advanced boys in the school capable of commercial grade 
work was in 1913 ten, in 1914 fifteen and in 1915 thirty-one, 
a condition which is one of the factors making for increased 
efficiency in the school. 

Girls Day School. 

The most important change in the method of instruction 
the past year has been to organize the second year cooking 
class with the purpose of developing speed. The noontime 
meal for the ten teachers who patronize the lunch room has 
been put in charge of these girls, but instead of using the 
whole class as heretofore, this luncheon is assigned to four 
girls for a month, who do the marketing, plan the menus, pre- 
pare the food and keep the accounts. The cost must com.e 
within the twenty cents per meal paid by each teacher. This 
plan gives to each girl in the class such training that both 
teachers and girls feel confident that the girls are gaining a 
greater efficiency in the preparation of meals than they 
gained from last year's method of class work. 



Industrial School Report 7 

In the interests of health, with a six and a half hour day, 
these girls from fourteen to sixteen should have definite hours 
of physical training, especially when some of these days are 
given over so largely to sewing. A tentative arrangement is 
being worked out by which Miss Parker, the assistant in phy- 
sical training in the public shcools, will give what time she 
can spare to classes in the industrial school. When we can 
make these periods regular and frequent enough, the girls are 
sure to receive great benefit. Miss Mae Chandler, one of the 
regular teachers of the school, has this year volunteered to 
give much extra time to organizing and coaching a basketball 
team. 

The development of the homemaking course throughout the 
state is in the line of developing the broader interests and 
sympathies of the girl as well as her skill in cooking, sewing 
and millinery. The registration this year again demonstrates 
the wisdom of shortening the course to two years. Only five 
girls returned this fall to enter on third or fourth year work. 
If there could be added to the two years homemaking course 
a term or a year's training for a specific occupation, there is 
little doubt that some of our more promising girls would avail 
themselves of this opportunity. A survey of the occupations 
in New Bedford open to girls from sixteen to twenty years of 
age, giving in detail the preparation required, working condi- 
tions, range of wages, opportunity for advancement, etc., 
would be a great help to trustees, advisory council and teach- 
ers, in developing a course in the school which would meet the 
needs of girls over sixteen who have completed the two years 
homemaking course. One possibility is a course in salesman- 
ship, if co-operation can be established between the school and 
the merchants. But some certainty of employment at good 
wages would be a necessary incentive to the girls to prepare 
themselves for the work. The employment of several of our 
girls in the Little House-keepers Classes at the City Mission 
is giving valuable training. The girls might also get practice 
work in connectionwith the Day Nurseries of the city. 



8 Industrial School Report 

WOMEN'S Evening Classes. 

In the evening classes for women the work has been syste- 
matized and given definite direction. 

The registration fee with the requirement of the State Board 
of Education that in the interests of good work no new member 
shall be admitted to any unit course after the third meeting 
of the class, is having its effect on the enrollment in the 
classes. A comparison of the figures for 1914 and 1915 is 
of interest in this connection. 

1914 1915 

Registered in October and November 870 530 

Number of classes organized, 37 33 

Placed on waiting list, 130 35 

Dropped out of classes between 

October and the Christmas vacation 350 58 

These figures show that with better organization of the work, 
we are avoiding the unnecessary work and expense of provid- 
ing classes for girls who enroll without serious motive. 

There is persistent request for admission to the evening 
classes by girls under seventeen years of age. As the State will 
not reimburse a class for such girls, the suggestion is made 
that the Trustees consider establishing such classes under 
separate ordinance. 

MEN'S EVENING CLASSES. 

A smaller number registered for the evening classes in 1915 
than in 1914, due in part to the registration fee required, for 
the first time this year, but in larger measure to the fact that 
many of our mills and factories are working at high pressure, 
and all mechanics, with the possible exception of the carpent- 
ers, are working full time, or more, at good wages. 

The above report, together with the following statistical 
information, is respectfully submitted. 

ARTHUR S. ALLEN, 
Director. 



Industrial School Report 

COMPARITIVE TABLE OF 
ENROLLMENT IN BOYS' DAY SCHOOL. 



1st year boys 
2nd year boys 
3rd year boys 
4th year boys 



Dec. 1,1913. 
80 
23 

6 

4 

113 



Dec. 1,1914. Dec. 1,1915. 



96 

40 

12 

3 

151 



72 

24 

22 

9 

127 



EVENING SCHOOL ENROLLMENT. 
MEN. 



1914 



1915 



No. registered 

Oct. - Dec. 1st - qualified 
unqual. 
No. Classes 
No. admitted to classes 

first night 
No. admitted between 1st 

night and Dec. 1st. 
No. left between 1st night 

and Dec. 1st. 
No. in classes Dec. 1st. 
Waiting list- Dec. Ist.-qual. 



In 1914, 36 of the number admitted the first night dropped 
out before December 1st, 1914. 

In 1915, 26 of the number admitted the first night dropped 
out before December 1st., 1915. 



447 


264 


161 


108 


18 


17 


229 


181 


92 


43 


82 


47 


239 


177 


114 


14 



10 Industrial School Report 



MACHINE DEPARTMENT. 

FACULTY. 

George W. G. Poole, Head of Dept., appointed Dec. 7, 1914. 
Colin B. Robertson, Assistant, appointed Jan. 1, 1915. 
W. A. Pittendriegh, Assistant, appointed February 1, 1915. 



Dec. 1, 1914 


Equipment Inventory 


Dec. 1,1915. 






Buildings 






$ 9,479.97 




Machinery 




$12,558.78 


368.60 




Furniture 




228.10 


723.18 




Apparatus 




1,554.54 


1,334.95 




Tools 




1,933.62 




Maintenance 1 


[nventory 




1,302.61 


Shop 


material & supplies 
TOTAL 


1,068.19 


$13,209.31 


$17,343.23 



Cash received from work and products, ^ 192.41 
Credits given on work and products for the school 

itself. 1.358.59 

Credits given on work and products for personal use 37.99 





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12 Industrial School Report 



CARPENTRY DEPARTMENT. 

FACULTY. 

Oliver H. Gardner, Head of Dept., appointed Aug. 3, 1909. 
Charles A. Wilson, Assistant, appointed November 30, 1909. 
E. M. McCrackern, Assistant, appointed July 7, 1915. 



Dec. 1, 1914 


Equipment Inventory 
Buildings 


Dec. 1, 1915. 


$ 1,305.10 


Machinery 


$1,325.10 


168.50 


Furniture 


215.38 


392.58 


Apparatus 


380.48 


816.55 


Tools 
Maintenance Inventory 


659.71 


1,155.12 


Shop Material and Supplies 
TOTAL 


593.79 


$3,837.85 


$3,174.46 


Cash received 


from work and products 


$ 212.44 



Credits given on work and products for the school 

itself 2,391.96 

Credits given on work and products for other mu- 
nicipal departments • 1 2 

Credits given on work and products for personal use 150.74 





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14 Industrial School Report 



POWER DEPARTMENT. 

FACULTY 

H. Percy Arnold, Head of Dept., appointed Aug. 29, 1911, 
Clarence N. Potter, Assistant, appointed Sept. 24, 1911. 
Charles A. Foley, Assistant, appointed February 1, 1915. 



Dec. 1, 1914 


Equipment Inventory 


Dec 


. 1, 1915. 


$1,500.00 


Buildings 




$1,500.00 


6,041.23 


Machinery 




6,598.43 


203.25 


Furniture 




173.25 


957.88 


Apparatus 




1,042.85 


197.62 


Tools 
Maintenance Inventory 




216.78 


386.14 


Shop Material and Supplies 




260.73 



$9,286.12 TOTAL $9,792.04 

Credits given on work and products for the school 

itself $1,052.05 



Course of Study, POWER DEPT., 323^ hours per week=100% 


SUBJECTS 


FIRST YEAR 


SECOND YEAR 




1st. HALF 2nd. HALF 


1st. HALF 2nd. HALF 


SHOP WORK 
TIME 


Operation of Steam and Gas 
70 % 70 % 


^lant and Steam Heating 
69 % 69 % 


MATHE- 
MATICS 

TIME 


Fractions—Decimals 

Based on Jobs 

in Shop 

7 % 7 % 


Mensuration 

Figuring Heat 

Surfaces 

Volumes 

7 % 7 % 


ENGLISH 
TIME 


Shop Reports 

Sentence Work 

Spelling 

5 Vo 5 % 

1 


Shop Reports 

Composition Work 

Spelling 


DRAWING 

TIME 


Lettering 
Sketching 
Problems 

9% 


Detail D 

of Mach 

Engine 

<7 
^f /c 


rawings 
me and 
Parts 

9% 


Assembly 

Drawings of 

Dash Pots, Etc. 

9 % 


CIVICS 
TIME 




- 


Protection-Hea 

Transportati 

General Go 

Beginning with 

Topics and end 

4% 


th-Education 
Dn-Charities 
I'ernment. 
Boy's Idea o f 
with Nat. Org. 
4 % 


STEAM 

PRACTICE 

TIME 




Principals of Steam Generation 

9 % 9% 


9 % 



16 Industrial School Report 



ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT. 

FACULTY. 

Nathaniel S. Rounds, Head of Dept., appointed June 7, 1915. 
John Knight, Assistant, appointed February 26, 1912. 



Dec. 1,1914. 


Equipment Inventory 
Buildings 


Dec. 1, 1915. 


$1,583.50 


Machinery 


$1,409.50 


135.00 


Furniture 


147.00 


651.25 


Apparatus 


1,062.87 


183.45 


Tools 
Maintenance Inventory 


252.90 


294.78 


Shop Material and Supplies 
TOTAL 


250.77 


$2,857.98 


$3,321.54 


Cash received 


from work and products 


$5.60 



Credits given on work and products for the school 

iteslf $2,090.36 

Credits given on work and products for personal use $ 24.78 



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Commercial Plant 
Maintenance Work 
80 % 1 80 % 


Currents 

Phase 

phase 

6% 




ly Work 

House 

Out 

9% 


Engines 
• Tests 

5% 






Alternating 

Single 

Poly 

6% 




Assemh 

Power 

Lay 

9% 


Study of 
Machim 

5% 






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Construction and Plant 

Maintenance 
76 % 1 76 % 


Right Triangle 
applied to 
Formulae 

6% 




Plans 
Motor 

ts 

9 % 


Machine 

Shop 
Practice 

5% 


portation 

nd ending with 

2% 


Contracts 

2% 


Solution of 

Algebra— as 

Shop 

6% 




Wiring 

Detail of 

Par 

9% 


Study of 
lUumation 

5% 


ucation— • Trans 
Government 
of the Topics a 
Drganizations 

2% 


Notes 

Checks 

Etc. 

2% 


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Speeds of 

Pulleys 

Motors 

Levers, etc. 

8% 


Shop R eports 

Composition Work 

Spelling 

Current Events 

5 % 5 % 


Detail of 

Machine 

Parts 

Blue Printing 

9% 


Study of Metals 
Foundry Practice 

5 % 1 5 % 


— Health — Ed 

ities — General 

the Boy's Idea 

National 

4% 






U 

(U 

IF 


Wire 

Computations 

Ohm's Law 

8% 


Lettering 
Sketching 
Problems 

5% 


Protection 

Chai 

Beginning with 

4% 




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Mensuration 

Wire 
Computation 

5% 


Reports 
-Work 
ling 

5% 










Fractions 
Decimals 
Based on 
Shop Jobs 

5% 


Shop 

Sentenc 

Spel 

5% 










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MATHE- 
MATICS 

TIME 


ENGLISH 
TIME 


DRAWING 

TIME 


TRADE 

SCIENCE 

TIME 


CIVICS 
TIME 


BUSINESS 
LAW 

TIME 



18 Industrial School Report 

GIRLS' DEPARTMENT. 

FACULTY. 

Elizabeth C. Jenkins, Head of Dept., appointed July 6, 1914. 
Anita Jennings, Teacher of Sewing, appointed June 26, 1913. 
Jessie S. Weaver, Teacher of Sewing and Design, appointed 

September 8, 1914. 
Mrs. Nellie F. Dunn, Teacher of Sewing, appointment temp. 
Mildred G. Home, Teacher of Cooking, appointed Aug. 3, 1914 
Mae F. Chandler, Teacher of Cooking, appointed Oct. 7, 1914. 
Mrs. Lillian M. Browning, Teacher of Millinery, part time 
Bessie Highet, Teacher of Millinery, part time 
Florence Ricketson, Teacher of Hygiene, part time 



Dec. 1,1914 


Equipment Inventory 
Buildings 


Dec. 1,1915. 


$1,015.50 


Machinery 


$1,025.05 


993.72 


Furniture 


889.95 


1,709.91 


Apparatus 
Tools 
Maintenance Inventory 


1,935.88 


148.61 


Shop Material and Supplies 


152.90 



$3,867.74 TOTAL $4,003.78 

Cash received from work and products — Cooking $ 878.66 
Credits given on work and products for the school 

itself Sewing 1.40 

Credits given on work and products for other Mu- 



nicipal Departments 


Sewing 




33.45 




Cooking 




4.80 


Credits given on work and products for personal 


use 






Sewing 




734.47 




Millinery 




155.25 




Cooking 




912.73 



Course of Study, HOMEMAKING DEPT., 323^ hours per week=100 % 



SUBJECTS 



FIRST YEAR 



1st. HALF 



2nd. HALF 



SECOND YEAR 



2nd. HALF 



COOKING 



TIME 



Preparation of Soups, Stews, Breads, 
Vegetables and Simple Desserts 
for Cafetevia Lunch 
IS % I IS % 



Marketing, Planning, Cooking and 
Estimating Costs of Teachers' Lunch 
Served Family style. 
10 % I 10 % 



SEWING 



TIME 



Mending, Darning, Simple Renovation, 
Making Underwear. Shirt Waists 
and Cotton Dresses 



42% 



42% 



Renovation of Dresses and Coats 

Making Woolen Dresses. 

Fancy Cotton Dresses. 

Embroidered Underwear 

43 % I 43 % 



DESIGN 



Simple Line Printing— Model Form— 

IStudy of Line, Proportion. Spacing and 

Color. Christmas Cards. Sketching 

designs of Underwear and Simple 

10 % Dresses 10 % 



Designing Underwear, Dresses 

and Hats. Place and Menu Cards, 

Posters 



7% 



7% 



MILLINERY 



Practice Work 

Trimmimg Felt 

Hats 

7% 



Renovating 
Spring Hats 

Making 
Summer Hats 

7% 



Maiking 
Velvet Hats 

7% 



Making 
Summer Hats 



HOUSEHOLD 
MANAGE- 
MENT 



Housewifery 
10% 



Laundry 
10% 



Planning and Systematizing House- 
work. Discussion of Family Budget 

S % 5 % 



HYGIENE 

and 

HOME 

NURSING 



Personal Hygiene— Bed Making 
Bandaging— First Aid— Discussion 
of Infant Care 
3 % I 3 % 



ARITH- 
METIC 



Reckoning Recipes— Fractions 
Decimals 

3 % 1 3 % 



Personal accounts— Cooking accounts 
Household accounts 

6 % I 6 % 



ENGLISH 



Spelling— Letter Writing— Oral and 
Written Reports— Magazine Reading 
10 % 10 % 



Business English— Current Events 
Debating 
10 % I 10 % 



CITIZENSHIP 



Study of Government and Social 
Work of the City 

7 % I 7 % 



VOCATIONS 

FOR 

GIRLS 



Study of Employments— Preparation 

required— Conditions of Work 

5 %, Wages, Etc. 5 % 



20 Industrial School Report 



ADMINISTRATION DEPARTMENT. 

FACULTY 

Arthur S. Allen, Director, appointed July 30, 1913. 

Russell B. Leonard, Head of Dept. of Related Work, appointed 

September 29, 1913. 
Florence S. Bliss, Assistant, appointed June 1, 1914. 
Pauline C. Clarke. Clerk, appointed December 21, 1911, 



Dec. 1, 1914 


Equipment Inventory 
Buildings 


Dec. 1,1915. 


$ 616.00 


Machinery 


$ 649.50 


780.23 


Furniture 


679.40 


481.57 


Apparatus 
Tools 
Maintenance Inventory 


486.77 


567.12 


Shop Material and Supplies 


508.85 



!,444.92 TOTAL $2,324.22 



Industrial School Report 21 

COST OF SCHOOL FROM DEC. 1st, 1914 
TO DEC. 1st, 1915. 



Equipment items, 




Rent, 


$ 3,000.00 


Equipment & Tools 


5,710.06 


Maintenance items 




Salaries & Labor, 


28,922.48 


Fuel, water, gas & electricity 


2,217.03 


Office, Janitor & Class Room 




Supplies, 


1,515.07 


Material for shops. 


4,947.86 


Repairs & replacements, 


916.29 




$47,228.79 



STATEMENT OF SCHOOL CASH 

Cash on hand Dec. 1,1914 $ 216.44 

Receipts Dec. 1, 1914 - Dec. 1, 1915 2,139.30 



$ 2,355.74 
Disbursements Dec. 1, 1913 - Dec. 1, 1915 $2,117.56 

Cash on hand Dec. 1,1915 238.18 



Total inventory Dec. 1, 1915. 

Buildings, $ 1,500.00 

Machinery, 23,566.36 

Furniture, 2,333.08 

Apparatus, 6,463.29 

Tools, 3,063.01 

Shop material & supplies, 2,834.93 

$39,760.77 



!,355.74 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Superintendent of Streets 



OF THE 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 



TO THE 
CITY COUNCIL 



FOR THE YEAR 1915. 



new bedford 

The a. E. Coffin Press, Printers 

1916 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



Report of the Superintendent. 



To His Honor the ]Mayor and City Council of tlu' City of 
New Bedford, ]\lass. — 

Gentlemen: — In eonii)liance with the re(inirenients of 
the City Ordinances, I have the honor to sul)mit herewith 
the annual report of the Street and Sewer Departments 
for the year ending Nov. 30, 1915. 

ADMINISTRATIVE.. 

Pursuant to the policy adopted by the administration, 
contract work was i)ractically eliminated during the year, 
two contracts only having been awarded for construction 
work, one for wood block paving and the other for 
granolithic sidewalks. It has been demonstrated that 
the construction work of the department can be done 
by the cit}^ forces as cheaply and as well as by contract. 

STREETS. 

During the year an asphalt plant was purchased for 
the purpose of mixing our own asphalt i)avements and 
while the men employed on this work were without expe- 
rience, the results obtained were generally satisfactory. 
I anticipate a marked improvement in this type of con- 
struction next season due to the experience gained this 
year. 

A laboratory is being established at the City yard 
where materials of construction will be tested and proper 
mixtures secured. 

Bituminous macadam has supplanted water bound 
construction and will gradually decrease the cost of main- 
tenance, by reducing the amount of worn out stone (which 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



becomes mud when wet and dust when dry) that event- 
ually tiuds its way into the gutters and catch basins, mak- 
ing this branch of street cleaning extremely expensive. 
The bituminous surface will also overcome the necessity of 
street oiling to lay the dust. 

STREET CLEANING. 

Bearing in miud tbat public health and comfoi't de- 
pend to a large degree upon the sanitary condition of the 
streets, the matter of street cleaning has been given con- 
siderable attention and study, and the various methods 
have been investigated, to determine if possible, the most 
suitable method to ])ursu(' in this city. From the expe- 
rience of other cities, tlic conchision readied is that per- 
manent pavements should he Hushed with water- at least 
three times weekly . at night, supplemented by hand 
sweeping during the day. 

In order to carry out this system the cit>' i)urchased 
a power tiusher which was used to good advantage and 
gave general satisfaction. 

COLLECTION OF ASHES AND REFUSE. 

Owing to the increasing difficulty in seciu'ing suitable 
dumi)ing places and to the numerous complaints made 
relative to odors, smoke, loose papers, etc.. coming from 
the dumps, the matter of disposal is one which will re- 
(luire serious consideration in the near future. The ques- 
tion of separate collection and disposal of ashes and com- 
l)ustible waste is being studied with a view to either burn- 
ing the combustible materials or baling for commercial 
purposes. 

An appreciable reduction in the cost of collection and 
disposal was made this year and it is hoped that a further 
reduction can be made in 1916. 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



BRIDGES. 

It was found necessary during the year to lay a new 
deck on the Pairhaven bridge draw and on orders from 
the United States Government Engineers the cables carry- 
ing the power to operate the draw were lowered to a 
depth of five feet below the bottom of the channel. It 
will be necessary to replace about 700 feet of the railing 
on this bridge next season. 

Considerable repairs were necessary to the floor of 
the Coggeshall Street bridge and the under structure was 
painted. It will be necessary to lay a new u]iper Hoor on 
this bridge early in 1916. 

A reinforced concrete bridge of 10' span and a 
causeway 350 feet long with masonry slopes was built 
during the summer to replace the old double culvert and 
bank walls at Turner's Pond on Shawmut Avenue. 

FORESTRY. 

The work of this division has been carried on in a 
satisfactory manner throughout the year and I am 
pleased to state that the agent of the State Forester re- 
ports conditions throughout the city as being excellent. If 
probably will be necessary to expend a larger amount of 
money on spraying next season, in order to prevent an 
increase of insect pests, and to properly care for the young 
trees set out during the last two or three years. There 
is also an increasing demand for removal of trees. 

SEWERS. 

A comparatively small amount of sewer construction 
was done in 1915. The Tripps Brook Relief Sewer was 
completed to Kempton street and a 36" inch segment block 
sewer was built in Orchard street. The balance of sew- 
ers built were of vitrified clay pipe of various sizes. The 
department is well equipped to do this work efficiently 
and economically. 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



EQUIPMENT. 

Although about $14,000 was spent for new equipment 
during the year, further additions are required before the 
department can be brought up to date. 

A tractor for hauling materials for construction, 
street oiling and flushing, is very much needed, as is also 
a larger truck for the street cleaning division, the small 
truck now in use to be used for delivering tools, etc., to 
the various jobs. A maintenance roller can be used to 
great advantage for rebuilding macadam streets, and a 
considerable saving in the cost of this work can be marie 
thereby. 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

The following recommendations are made for your 
consideration: 

That the lot on Noi'th street owned by the City be 
sold and the two lots adjacent to the City Yard, which are 
now hired for storage purposes, be purehMsed. 

That pockets for the storage of broken trap rock be 
erected on one of the City wharves or at a suitable point 
on the railroad. 

That a ncAv building be erected in the City Yard for 
storage of machinery and cement, it now being necessary 
to leave nuich of the ;i])]iaratus in the oi)en during the 
winter months. 

CONCLUSION. 

I should indeed be ungrateful did I not at this time 
express my appreciation of the many courtesies and as- 
sistance given me by His Honor, the Mayor, and the 
Heads of the various departments, and of the cooperation 
of my assistants and the men of the department to 
whom is due in a large degree whatever success has been 
achieved during the year. To these I extend my sincere 
thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. P. HAMMERSLEY, 

Superintendent. 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



NEW BEDFORD — 1915. 
GENERAL STATISTICS. 



Population, estimated 111,000. 

Valuation, $111,346,538.00. 

Area, about 19.39 sq. miles. 

Accepted streets 186.60 miles. 

Three bridges over the Acushnet River. New Bedford and 
Fairhaven bridge, 70 feet wide and %o mile long; % 
maintained by New Bedford. Coggeshall Street 
bridge, % maintained by New Bedford. Concrete 
bridge between New Bedford and Acushnet, built by 
County Commissioners in 1913. 

11 . 13 miles granite block paving, area 166,959 sq. yds. 
0.02 miles asphalt block paving, area, 273 sq. yds. 

10.96 miles bitulithic and similar paving, area, 181,906 sq. 
yds. 

0.34 miles brick paving, area, 12, 128 sq. yds. New Bedford 

and Fairhaven Bridge. 

0.04 miles cement concrete paving 261.00 sq. yds. 

6.45 miles cobble paving, 67,874 sq. yds. 
94.94 miles water-bound macadam 1,269,122 sq. yds. 
10.24 miles bituminous macadam, 54,288 sq. yds. 
136.02 miles curbing. 
30.53 miles flag walks 89,908 sq. yds. 
32.94 miles tar concrete walks, 142,547 sq. yds. 
28.60 miles granolithic walks, 123,662 sq. yds. 
126,223 miles Sewers. 
Cost of sewer system to date (including intercepting sewer) 

$3,099,454.73. 
1526 catch basins. 
792 eye-holes. 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES. 

Year 1915. 

Net 
Appropriations Expenditures 
Highways and Streets: 

Appropriation $187,000.00 

Excise Tax : — 

Union St. Ry. Co. $9,998.39 

Bay State 2,788.84 $12,787.23 



$199,787.23 $196,759.86 

Highway improvements No. 1, 2, 3 210,000.00 201,068.13 

Macadam Loan 100,000.00 95,335.16 

Sewers and Drains, • 15,000.00 18,825.11 

Bridges, 10,000.00 11,860.23 

Forestry, 5,500.00 5,538.68 

Turner's Pond Bridge, 10,000.00 6,150.65 

Cove Road Retaining Wall 2,000.00 1,671.36 



$552,287.23 $537,209.18 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



Highways and Streets 
Accounts 



lO STREET DEPARTMENT 

RECAPITULATION — HIGHWAYS AND STREETS. 

GROSS EXPENDITURES. 

Cost. 

Ashing $45,806.62 

Accidents 2,684.90 

Automobiles 11,854.60 

("credits for auto rent and material ($2,194.29) 

Building repairs 343.06 

Crosswalks 81.66 

Curbing, relaid 1,182.78 

Concrete walks repaired (tar) 464.67 

Driveways 1,024.09 

Dust prevention — Oiling streets 18,520.07 

" " Watering streets 3,061.59 

Equipment 3,140.60 

Filling holes and washouts 2,634.16 

Flag walks repaired, 986.97 

Fences 249.64 

Filling and grading 3,811.02 

Granolithic walks repaired 53.06 

Gutters, repaired 2,175.08 

Heating (City Yard) 1,540.48 

Lights 76.99 

Main office and Salaries 7,353.60 

Macadam, repaired 14,332.21 

Miscellaneous 3,807.03 
Bitulithic pavement repaired ) 

Block " " }■ 3,001.20 
Cobble " " ) 

Pension 1,099.28 

Removing snow and ice 2,619.59 

Stable office ' 3,196.60 

Stable yard 1,075.11 

Sweeping and cleaning streets 60,478.81 

Sidewalks, cinder and gravel 21,349.59 

Tools, new and repaired 4,610.41 

Yard tool house 862.98 

Walls (retaining walls) 951.20 

Water supply 468.87 
Charges — Labor and stock for other departments and 

sundry parties $70,182.06 



Stock on hand Dec. 4, 1915 — $2,849.43 

Cr. 

Appropriation $187,000.00 

Excise tax 12,787.23 

Receipts 98,220.72 



$294,980.58 



$298,007.95 
Balance to Highways 3,027.37 



$294,980.58 



STREET DEPARTMENT H 



TURNER'S POND BRIDGE 

Appropriation $12,000.00 

Transferred to Cove road retaining wall $2,000 00 

Expenditures for Turner's pond bridge 6,150.65 8,150.65 

* Balance $3,849.35 

*(Not finished) 



COVE ROAD RETAINING WALL 

Appropriation $2,000.00 

Expenditures 1,671 36 

* Balance $328.64 

*(Not finished) 



12 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



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14 STREET DEPARTMENT 



DUST PREVENTION. 



WATERING STREETS. 

Trolley Car Sprinkler and ) 

City Water Carts \ Total Cost $3,061.59 



OILING STREETS. 

Cost 
Sq. Yds. Cost PerSq.Yd. 

Asphaltic Oil 421,806.00 $5,623.47 $0.0133 

Non-AsphalticOil 1,145,136.00 12,766.35 0.0111 

Receipts for material sold. . 130.25 

$18,520.07 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



15 



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STREET DEPARTMENT 19 



Macadam Loan. 



20 STREET DEPARTMENT 



MACADAM ACCOUNT. 



Appropriation $100,000,00 

Receipts 30,586.29 

Total $130,586.29 

Expenditures $125,921.45 

Balance $ 4,664.84 

Expenditures 

Bituminous Macadam $ 60,055.99 

Water Bound Macadam 11,992.04 

Equipment 13,294.15 

Charges — Stock and Labor, and Stock on Hand 40,579. 27 



$ 125,921.45 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



21 



MACADAM, NEW 



Street 


Location 


Length 
Feet 


Area 

Sq. Yds. 


Cost 


Brock Ave. 


\ West of First 


776.0 


2,069.33 


$ 349.29 




/ West of County 


1,125.0 


2,500.00 


187.68 


Dudley 


West of Brock Ave. 


1,052.0 


2,805.33 


378.27 


Hatch 


West of Belleville Ave. 


242.6 


652.32 


39.35 


Jennv Lind 


Kempton to Hillman 


472.5 


945.00 


75 87 


Lake 


Rockdale to Buttonwood 


460.0 


925.10 


31.93 


Nausett 


Purchase to Mt. Pleasant 


1,646.5 


4,482.14 


513.47 


Palmer 


i Ryan to Hawthorn 


607 . 8 


1,620.79 


81.15 




( Court to Elm 


462.0 


924.00 


8.00 


Rockdale Ave. 


Court to Lake 


389.0 


1,426.33 


262.42 


State 


Hillman to Willis 


1,275.2 


2,522.06 


106 78 


Tarklin Hill Rd. 


East of Bowditch 


2,708.10 


5,074.60 


993.29 


Lighting 








42.63 


REBUILT : 










Cedar Grove 


No. Front to Belleville Ave. 


245.0 


490.00 


S6.74 


Rockdale Ave. 


North of Court 






3.44 


Teaming 








57.61 



11,461.70 26,437.00 



Stone. . 
Rolling 



.1 7,482.12 
. 1,292.00 



8,774.12 



Total cost $ 1 1,992 .04 



22 



STREET DEPARTMENT 

BITUMINOUS MACADAM 



Street 


Location 


Length 
Feet 


Area 
Sq. Yds. 


Cost 


Ash 


North of Bedford 


384.00 


768.00 


$ 519.41 


Arnold 


Rotch to Rounds 


590.60 


1,224.40 


899.07 


Bedford 


West of Cottage 


285.00 


570.00 


454.52 


* Bolton 








296.07 


Bridge Lane 


East of Water 


' 167.86 


344.96 


242.64 


Brock Ave. 


West of Bonney 


1,073.50 


2,147.00 


3,128.24 


Brownell 


\ Union to Arnold 










] Hawthorn to Maple 


1,328.00 


3,520.47 


2,878.09 


( Chancery 


Arnold to Union 


653.00 


1,306.00) 




•j Union 
( Chancery 


Chancery to Newton 


717.00 


1,912.00 - 




Parker to Tilton 


680.00 


1,360.00 ) 


4,159.88 


* Church 


North of Nash Rd. 


738.70 


2,462.33 


2,920.46 


Coggeshall 


West of Summer 


357.30 


952.80 


1,337.99 


* County 








1,189.48 


* Court 








533.30 


\ Hawthorn 
I Grove 


( West of Cottage 








"( East of Ash 


837.50 


1,449.60 


864.00 


Hussey 








177.30 


James 


South of Kempton 


' 323.50 


' 647.66 


480.16 


Jenney 


North to Hillman 


288.00 


768.00 


716.14 


Kane 


Bolton to Hemlock 


419.00 


838.00 


599.04 


Maple 


j Cottage to Ash 










l Rotch to Rounds 


1,228.00 


2,880.30 


1,622.03 


Middle 


Pleasant to County 


929.60 


1,859.20 


2,309.25 


Mill 


Cedar to Liberty 


1,582.00 


3,164.00 


3,113.13 


Myrtle 


Adams to Sawyer 


237.00 


250.30 


598.06 


Newton 


Union to Court 


229.50 


459.00 


228.64 


Peckham 


Myrtle to Summer 


353.50 


746.20 


475.14 


Princeton 


Acushnet Ave. to Bowditch 


1,894.00 


4,629.70 


5,390.32 


* Prospect 








154.54 


Riverside Ave. 


N. & S. of Belleville Rd. 


" 804.66 


2,272. io 


2,8,57.73 


Rockdale Ave. 


South of Kempton 


616.00 


2,279.88 


2,387.52 


Rodney 


Brock Ave. to Cleveland 


529.00 


1,410.70 


1,650.43 


Rounds 


Arnold to Court 


887.30 


2,375.10 


1,637.54 


Sagamore 


Hemlock to Dartmouth 


672.50 


1.793.33 


1,534.23 


Spencer 


Willis to Parker 


315.50 


631.00 


569.23 


Stapleton 


Brock Ave. to Cove 


468.20 


1,274.55 


1,169.84 


Tarkiln Hill Rd. 


West of Acushnet Ave. 


2,588.00 


5,470.10 


6,205.39 


Thompson 


County to Purchase 


238.20 


476.40 


545.86 


Tilton 




222.50 


445.00 


202.29 


Whitman 


Acushnet Ave. to Bowditch 


597.20 


1,532.81 


1,560.26 


Labor on tarvia, 


lighting and mis. accounts 






4,448.77 






23,234.90 


54,220.17 


$60,055.99 



Average Cost per sq. yd. $1.06. 
* Unfinished. 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



STONE CRUSHERS. 



CENTER CRUSHER : 

Tons Total Tons 

Stone on hand Dec. 1, 1914 961 

Stone bought in 1915 30,941 

Stone received from Citv work 4,290 

36,192 

SOUTH CRUSHER : 

Stone on hand Dec 1, 1914 2,000 

Stone bought in 1915 7,197 

Stone received from City work 182 

9,379 

NORTH CRUSHER : 

Stone on hand Dec. L 1914 . 1,009 

Stone bought in 1915 7,679 

Stone received from Citv work 561 

9,249 

Total amount of stone at the three crushers 54,820 

Crushed stone on hand Dec. 2, 1915 : 

Center Crusher .' 100 

South Crusher 15 

North Crusher 75 

— ■ 190 

Amount of stone crushed during the year 54,630 

Total cost of crushed stone $54,867.59 

Cost per ton 1.03 



STREET DEPARTMENT 25 



Highway Improvement 
Account. 



26 STREET DEPARTMENT 



HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENT, NO. 1, 2, 3. 

Appropriation $210,003.00 

Receipts 23,524 . 86 

Total $233,524.86 

Expended 224,592 .99 

Balance $ 8,931.87 

EXPENDITURES 

Curbing $ 17,164.16 

Gutters 6,210.92 

Granolithic walks 24,162 . 75 

Endurite 874.10 

Granite block paving. . . 67,551.47 

Concrete pavement 666.14 

Bituminous concrete. . . 31,989.15 

Wood block pavement.. 50,736.96 

Filling and Grading 18,517. U 

Widening Sixth St., Elm 

to Middle 563.99 

Equipment 2,110.00 

Charges and service trans- 
fers partly returned by 
receipts 4,046.24 

$224,592.99 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



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28 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



GRANITE BLOCK PAVING 



Street 


Location 


Sq. Yds. 


Cost 


Brock Ave. 


W. of Bonney 


220.00 


$ 865.80 


Coffin Street 


E. of Water 


1,122.00 


2,781.18 


Kempton " 


Acush. Ave. to Purchase 


462.00^ 






Purchase to County 


2,498.00 > 


9,946.21 


Middle " 


Second to Purchase 


1,233.00 


4,325.22 


Manomet " 


E. of Riverside Ave. 


799.00 


2,237.77 


School " 


Water to Second 


1,032.00^ 






Second to Acushnet Ave 


507.00 \ 


3,508.12 




Acushnet Ave. to Purchase 


419.00 


1,584.62 


Second " 


South to Grinnell 


1,205.00/ 






Howland to Madison 


4,197.00 i 


22,765.28 


Weld 


Purchase to Pleasant 


1,294.00 


2,956.00 


Willis 


Acushnet Ave. to Pleasant 


1,200.00 


3,898.52 


Water " 


Spring to Madison 


2,378.00 


10,731.08 


Miscell. charges - 


— Tools and supervision 




1,950.67 










18,566.00 


$67,551.47 



Average cost per sq. yd. $3.64 



Union Street 



UNION STREET WIDENING. 
Purchase to Sixth 1,559.00 



5,649.59 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



29 



WOOD BLOCK PAVEMENT. 



Street 


Location 


Sq. Yds. 


Cost 


* Purchase 
**Purchase 
Purchase 
** William 


So. L of Union to Bedford 
E. S., No. of Maxfield 
Campbell to Weld 
Purchase to Pleasant 


7,483.00 
178.00 

5,135.00 
667.00 


$25,313.90 

967.99 

20,194.92 

2,797.10 


Miscall, charges,- 






1,463.05 








13,463.00 


$50,736.96 



* Contract Work. 
**Incomplete. 



Purchase Street 



WIDENING PURCHASE STREET 
Union to Elm 1,986.99 



$9,706.99 



30 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



CURBING - NEW - 1915 



street 


Location 


Length ft. 


Aciishnet Ave. 


Near Brooklawn Park 


r.T.so 




W. S., S. of Phillips Ave. 


10.70 




Sq. of Princeton 


132.90 




S. W. Cor. School. 


15.75 


Adams 


S. S., E. of Mt. Pleasant 


231.75 




S. S., W. of Mt. Pleasant 


85.80 


Arnold 


N. S., James to Rotch 


44.70 




N. S., W. of .lames 


95.00 




N. W. Cor. Rounds 


12.90 




S. W. Cor. Rounds 


12.60 




S. E. Cor. Rounds 


13.00 




S. S., W. of Rotch 


102.10 




S. S., W. of Tremont 


45.85 


Armour 


E. S., N. of Arnold 


42.25 


Ashley 


E. S., N. of Ruth 


121.20 




W. S., N. of Ruth 


133.30 


Belleville Ave. 


W. S., S. of Phillips Ave. 


100.20 


Belleville Rd. 


Acushnet Ave. to Bowditch 


78.85 




N. W. Cor. Church 


12.40 




S. W. Cor. Church 


12.60 




N. W. Cor. Edison 


12.20 


Bolton Rd. 


S. E. Cor. Swift 


12.60 




N. E. Cor. Swift 


12.75 


Bonney 


N. E. Cor. Brock Ave. 


2 5.80 




N. E. Cor. Jouvette 


12.90 




S. E. Cor. Jouvette 


11.30 


Brock Ave. 


Bonney, West 


86.80 


Brigham 


E. S., S. of Hawthorn 


47.00 




E. S., S. of Hawthorn 


40.28 


Brownell 


E. S., N. of Arnold 


43.20 




W. S., S. of Carroll 


44.30 




W. S., N. from Cor. of Maple 


74.50 




W. S., S. of Ryan 


52.20 


Buttonwood 


E. S., S. of Kempton 


47.00 


Carroll 


S. S., Brigham to Brownell 


44.00 




N. S., W. of Brigham 


127.30 




S. S., W. of Brigham 


37.95 




S. S., W. of Brownell 


67.10 


Chancery 


W. S., Union to Arnold 


28.30 




W. S., N. of Parker 


61.40 




E. S., N. of Tilton 


43.70 


Cleveland 


S. W. Cor. Rodney 


8.60 




N. W. Cor. Rodney 


9.70 




S. E. Cor. Rodney 


12.80 




N. E. Cor. Rodney 


11.65 


Clifford 


S. S., E. of Bowditch 


90.00 


Clinton 


N. S., W. of Brownell 


41.30 




N. S., W. of Rotch 


44.70 




S. S., E. of Rotch 


68.50 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



31 



CURBING — NEW — Continued 



Street 


Location 


Length 


Coffin 


S. E. Cor. Water 


12.50 




N. E. Cor. Water 


8.50 




S. S., E. of Water 


87.70 




N. S., E. of Water 


288.90 




S. W. Cor. of Water 


10.75 




N. W\ Cor. of Water 


12.40 




N. S., E. of Water 


12.55 


Coggeshall 


N. S., E. of Mt. Pleasant 


141.40 




S. S., E. of Mt. Pleasant 


97.20 




S. S., W. of Summer 


44.20 


Collette 


S. S., E. of Acushnet Ave. 


143.00 


Columbia 


S. of Allen 


39.80 




W. S., S. of Allen 


39.80 


Concord 


E. S., N. of Princeton 


75.60 


Cottage 


E. S., N. of Robeson 


47.70 




W. S., S. of Robeson 


41.85 


County 


E. S., S. of Blackmer 


32.95 




E. S., Elm to Middle 


15.60 


Court 


S. S., W. of Rotch 


84.30 


Crapo 


N. W. Cor. Jouvette 


14.00 


Dartmouth 


E. S., Dunbar to Swift 


86.80 




W. S., Edward to Babbitt 


192.40 




N. E. Cor. Fruit 


12.60 




S. E. Cor. Fruit 


12.62 




E. S., Fruit to Thompson 


273.16 




N. W. Cor. Hollyhock 


18.46 




W. S., Hollyhock to Stowell 


158.70 




N. E. Cor. Jenkins 


12.80 




S. E. Cor. Jenkins 


13.25 




N. E. Cor. Rockdale 


26.29 




N. E. Cor. Larch 


12.33 




S. E. Cor. Larch 


12.75 


Dartmouth 


E. S., Larch to Rivet 


159.40 




W. S., Mathew to Hollyhock 


96.50 




N. E. Cor. Rivet 


12.72 




E. S., Rockdale Ave. to Jenkins 


786.80 




E. S., Jenkins to Sagamore 


166.40 




E. S., Rivet to Fruit 


160.40 




E. S., Sagamore to Sidney 


164.10 




E. S., N. of Sagamore 


9.76 




S. E. Cor. Sagamore 


12.85 




S. E. Cor. Sidney 


12.45 




N. B. Cor. Sagamore 


12.76 




N. W. Cor. Stowell 


8.35 




W. S., Stowell to Edward 


222.60 




S. E. Cor. Swift 


12.58 




N. E. Cor. Swift 


12.80 




E. S., Swift to Larch 


154.70 




N. E. Cor. Thompson 


12.63 



32 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



CURBING — NEW —Continued 



Street 


Location 


Length 


Dartmouth 


S. E. Cor. Thompson 


12.63 




E. S., N. of Thompson 


104.50 




W. S., N. of Weaver 


560.00 


Davis 


N. S., W. of Diman 


171.20 


Diman 


W. S., Davis to Earle 


180.46 


Dudley 


S. S., E. of Brock Ave. 


29.90 


Earle 


S. S., W. of Diman 


149.22 


Ellen 


S. S., W. of Brock Ave. 


49.20 




S. E. Cor. Freeman 


14.60 


Emerson 


E. S., S. from Cor. Sycamore 


88.4 


Eugenia 


S. S., W. of Bowditch 


181.70 




N. E. Cor. Brook 


12.50 




S. E. Cor. Brook 


13.20 


First 


E. S., N. of Grinnell 


27.75 


Florence 


E. S., S. of Elm 


28.20 


Glennon 


N. E. Cor. Edison 


12.50 




S. E. Cor. Edison 


8.10 


Hathaway 


S. S., E. of Brook 


102.10 


Hawthorn 


S. S., W. of Brigham 


36.70 




S. S., E. of Brigham 


47.00 


Hillman 


N. S., Foster to State 


112.45 


Hussey 


E. S., S. of Kempton 


103.50 


Hussey 


E. S.,N. of Lake 


44.80 


Irving 


W. S., Hawthorn to Clinton 


86.25 


James 


W. S., N. of Arnold 


15.30 


Jenney 


S. E. Cor. Hillman 


12.20 




N. E. Cor. North 


12.70 


Jouvette 


N. S., W. of County ' 


61.70 


Junior 


W. S., N. of Arnold 


61.15 




W. S., N. of Arnold 


52.85 


Kane 


N. W. Cor.Bolton Rd. 


9.30 




S. E. Cor. Hemlock 


12.60 




N. E. Cor. Hemlock 


12.40 


Keene 


N. S., Park to Hussey 


38.60 


Kempton 


S. S., Buttonwood to Hussey 


81.00 




S. E. Cor.County 


12.80 




N. E. Cor. County 


12.80 




S. S., County to Summer 


208.00 




N. W. Cor. Crescent Mill 


14.90 




N. W. Cor. Crescent Mill 


9.30 




N. E. Cor. Hill 


13.00 




N. S., Hill to County 


352.55 




S. S., Hill to County 


345.45 




S. S., W. of Hussey 


^2.89 




S. S., B. of Hussey 


58.50 


~ 


N. S., Jenny Lind to Cemetery 


912.00 




N. S., Jenny Lind to Cemetery 


602.10 




N. S., Jenny Lind, easterly 


89.65 




N. S., Jenny Lind, easterly 


43.15 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



33 



CURBING — NEW — Continued 



Street 


Location 


Length 


Kempton 


N. S., at Cemetery Gate 


30.50 




Cor. of Mill 


2.60 




S. S., Purchase to Pleasant 


155.40 




N. E. Cor Summer 


12.80 




S. E. Cor. Summer 


12.50 




N. S., Watson to Jenny Lind 


240.80 


Linden 


N. S., County to State 


133.95 


Madison 


N. S., County to Seventh 


25.25 




S. W. Cor. Purchase 


29.00 


Manomet 


S. S.. E. of Riverside 


263.50 




N. S., E. of Riverside 


233.10 




N. E. Cor. Riverside 


11.20 


Maple 


N. S., W. from Cor. of Brownell 


47.00 




N. S., W. from Cor. of Brownell 


46.60 




S. S., Rotch to .James 


56.90 




S. S., E. of Rotch 


45.00 




S. S., E. of Rotch 


45.00 


Mapleview Ter. 


Both Sides 


426.90 


Meclianics Lane 


West of Purchase 


58.20 




S. S., W. of Purchase 


61.45 


Metcalf 


E. S., N. of Tarkiln Hill Rd. 


5.70 


Mill 


S. E. Cor. Cook 


12.70 




N. S., Kempton, Easterly 


64.65 




James to Lindsey 


167.30 


Mt. Pleasant 


E. S., S. of Adams 


150.20 




W. S., N. of Adams 


85.35 




E. S., S. of Coggeshall 


52.30 




E. S., N. of Coggeshall 


42.85 




S. E. Cor. Coggeshall 


14.30 




S. of Sawyer 


85.35 


Mt. Vernon 


S. S., E. of Richmond 


47.80 




S. S., W. of Richmond 


89.60 


North 


N. S., E. of Kempton 


30.70 


Palmer 


E. S., N. of Arnold 


88.40 




E. S., S. of Ryan 


. 55.10 


Park 


S. W. Cor. Smith 


12.90 




W. S., S. Smith 


47.60 




W. S., Sycamore to Smith 


54.40 




E. S., N. of Sycamore 


26.30 


Penniman 


N. S., E. of Summer 


100.40 


Phillips Ave. 


S. S., W. of Acushnet Ave. 


108.30 


Pierce 


W. S., N. of Court 


42.00 


Plymouth 


N. S., W. of Brownell 


105.80 




S. S., Brigham to Brownell 


42.80 




S. S., Brownell to Palmer 


45.50 




N. S., W. of Palmer 


43.00 


Pope 


N. S., W. of County 


23.70 


Princeton 


N. S., W. of Acushnet Ave. 


44.90 




N. S., W. of Acushnet Ave. 


44.60 



34 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



CURBING — NEW — Continued 



Street 


Location 


Length 


Princeton 


S. S., W. of Acushnet Ave. 


42.16 




S. W. Cor. Arlington 


12.80 




S. E. Cor. Arlington 


12.80 




S. W. Cor. Concord 


12.80 




S. E. Cor. Concord 


12.80 




N. S., E. of Concord 


42.80 


Priscilla 


N. E. Cor. Gould 


50.70 




S. S., W. of West 


48.20 


Purchase 


S. E. Cor. Elm 


15. .50 




N. E. Cor. Madison 


12.00 




W. S.,S. of Mechanics Lane 


49.80 




N. W. Cor. Russell 


1.64 




N. E. Cor. Russell 


13.00 




W. S., Bedford to Russell 


214.80 




E. S., Russell to Bedford 


291.68 




S. E. Cor. Russell 


13.00 




E. S., School to Walnut 


217.50 




E. S.. N. of School 


7.70 




N. E. Cor. School 


13.00 




W. S., Spring to Union 


106.40 




N. E. Cor. Union 


15.70 




W^ S., S. of Union 


92.00 




W. S., Union to Sears Ct. 


41.30 




E. S., Walnut and Madison 


245.15 




S. E. Cor.Wamsutta 


12.70 




E. S., S. of Wamsutta 


2.40 




N. B. Cor. William 


16.25 




E. S., Elm to William 


294.00 




S. W. Cor. William 


16.10 




N. W. Cor. William 


16.30 




S. E. Cor. William 


15.70 




W. S.. William to Sears Ct. 


82.50 




E.S., William to Union 


359.62 




W. S., N. of William 


86.25 




W. S., S. of William 


68.30 


Query 


S. W. Cor. Edison 


12.95 




S. E. Cor. Edison 


12.70 


Reed 


W. S., S. of Union 


43.65 




W. S., S. of Union 


45.15 




E. S., S. of Union 


46.46 


Rockdale Ave. 


S. W. Cor. Court 


12.50 




S. E. Cor. Court 


12.50 




S. E. Cor. Kempton 


12.80 


Ruth 


N. S., W. of Ashley 


89.25 


Rotch 


E. S., S. of Clinton 


74.80 




W. S., S. of Court 


92.00 




E. S., Hawthorn to Maple 


48.35 


Rounds 


W. S. Union to Arnold 


83.24 




E. S., Union to Court 


42.60 




W. S., Arnold to Union 


82.65 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



35 



CURBING — NEW — Continued 



Street 


Location 


Length 


Ryan 


S. S., W. of Brownell 


84.30 


• 


S. S., E. of Palmer 


42.70 


Sagamore 


N. W. Cor. Hemlock 


9.60 




S. W. Cor. Hemlock 


12.85 


School 


N. S., Acushnet Av. to Purchase 


181.90 




S. S., Acushnet Av. to Purchase 


15 6.10 




S. W. Cor. Acushnet Ave. 


15.70 




N. W. Cor. First 


12.90 




N. S., First to Second 


100.95 




N. B. Cor. Purchase 


15.70 


Second 


N. W. Cor. Cannon 


12.80 




W. S., Cannon to Madison 


34.70 




N. W. Cor. Howland 


11.30 




S. W. Cor. Madison 


13.00 


Sixth 


E. S., Elm to Middle 


177.70 


Spencer 


E. S., S. of Parker 


28.40 




E. S., S. of Parker 


116.60 




W. S., S. of Parker 


139.00 


Stackhouse 


N. E. Cor. Rockdale Ave. 


8.60 


Summer 


N. W. Cor. Coggeshall 


14.50 




E. S., Linden to Durfee Ct. 


49.40 




E. S., N. of Penniman 


100.35 


Swift 


S. S., E. of Dartmouth 


7.05 


Sycamore 


S. S., E. from Cor. Emerson 


67.70 




S. E. Cor. Emerson 


12.80 


Tal)er 


S. S., W. of West 


5.10 


Tarkiln Hill Rd. 


N. S., E. of Metcalf 


5 8.80 




N. E. Cor. Metcalf 


12.60 


Tremont 


E. S., at No. 102 


91.50 




E. S., Union to Arnold 


53.5 




W. S., Union to Arnold 


53.40 




E. S., N. of Maple 


65.55 




E. S., S. of Union 


5 4.95 


Union 


S. S., W. of Purchase 


124.70 




N. S., E. of Sixth 


26.60 


U. S. Post Office 


Rear, Sixth 


103.00 


Valentine 


N. S., E. of W. French Ave. 


108.00 


Walden 


E. S., N. of Hillman 


25.00 


Walnut 


N. S., W. of Pleasant 


20.20 


Wamsutta 


S. S., E. of Purchase 


23.80 




S. S., E. of Purchase 


21.40 


Water 


E. S., S. of Gifford 


28.55 




E. S., N. of Hamilton 


62.20 




S. E. Cor. Hamilton 


13.00 




N. E. Cor. Hamilton 


13.20 


West 


W. S., S. from Cor. of Taber 


77.60 


W. French Ave. 


E. S., N. of Valentine 


90.40 




N. E. Cor. Valentine 


13.00 



36 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



CURBING — NEW — Continued 



Street 


Location 


Length 


Whitman 
William 


N. S., Acush. Ave. to Bowditch 
N. S., County to Sixth 


139.30 
5.50 




21,622.44 



Total cost of new curbing $17,164.16 

Cost per foot 0.91 

Cost per foot of stone 0.53 



Street department 



37 



GUTTERS — NEW — 1915 



street 


Location 


Length 
Feet 


Area 
Sq. Yds. 


Acushnet Ave. 


Near Brooklawn Park 


141.50 


47.10 


Arnold 


N. S., Rounds to Palmer 


80.00 


26.66 




S. S., W. of Brownell 


192.80 


64.26 


Bolton Rd. 


E. S., at Swift 


32.00 


12.04 


Brock Ave. 


N. S., W. of Bonney 


1,077.80 


406.30 


Clinton 


B. S., W. of Brownell 


1.58.50 


61.64 


Coggeshall 


B. S., W. of Summer 


685.90 


266.08 




N. S., Myrtle to Summer 


334.70 


130.16 


Cook 


W. S., Mill to Kempton 


165.00 


45.80 


Edison 


B. S., Belle. Ave. to Query 


1,048.70 


407.82 


Eugenia 


B. S., W. of Bowditch 


1,260.40 


490.16 


Hawthorn 


B. S., Tremont to Rotch 


872.50 


290.82 


Ingraham* 


E. of Acushnet Ave. 


142.50 


55.41 


Jenney 


B. S., North to Hillman 


419.60 


139.86 


.Touvette 


B. S., Crapo to Bonney 


502.40 


195.36 


Kane 


B. S., Bolton to Hemlock 


835.00 


278.20 


Mapleview Terrace 


B. S., W. of Tremont 


426.90 


142.20 


Middle 


B. S., Pleasant to Sixth 


497.70 


165.90 


Mt. Vernon 


At Shawmut Ave. 


31.60 


14.05 


Myrtle 


W. S., Sawyer to Adams 


222.00 


74.00 


Perry 


N. S., E. of Acushnet Ave. 


192.00 


74.60 


Princeton 


B. S., Acush. Ave. to Bowditch 


3,505.50 


1,557.97 




Around Cor. of Concord 


97.70 


32.56 


Riverside Ave. 


E. S., N. of Manomet 


556.60 


205.34 


Rockdale Ave. 


E. S., Lake to Kempton 


661.50 


294.00 




S. of Kempton 


604.50 


268.60 




N. S., Stackhouse to Bank 


80.00 


31.11 




E. S., Union to Court 


332.20 


129.17 


Sixth 


E. S., Elm to Middle 


178.50 


59.50 


Spencer 


B. S., Parker to Willis 


588.00 


196.00 


Stackhouse 


B. S., N. of Rockdale Ave. 


1,520.50 


506.80 


Weaver 


B. S., Dartmouth to Field 


455.40 


177.10 


W. French Ave. 


W. S., S. of David 


259.40 


100.88 




E. S., N. of Valentine 


240.50 


80.17 


Whitman 


B. S., W. of Acushnet Ave. 


1,147.00 


446.10 




20,036.30 


7,605.82 



Total cost of new gutters $6,210.92 

Cost per square yard 0.77 

Cost per lineal foot 0.29 



38 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



FILLING AND GRADING 



street 


Location 


Cost 


Arlington 


Query to Irvington 


$ 142.76 


Armour 




73.93 


Arnold 


Rotch to Palmer 


95.29 


Bolton 




174.01 


B'wditch & L'rence 




1,807.86 


Brock Ave. 


Bonney to Orchard 


159.34 


Carlisle 


West of Bowditch 


539.28 


Caroline 


North of Durfee 


216.37 


Chancery & Tilton 




80.11 


Charles 


East of Brock Ave. 


918.79 


Church 


North of Nash Rd. 


211.14 




North of Belleville Rd. 


113.53 




North of Tarkiln Hill Rd. 


156.88 


Cleveland 


Clara to Butler 


206.73 


Clinton 


East and west of Reed 


88.18 


Coggeshall 


Myrtle to Mt. Pleasant 


173.51 


Concord 


Shaw to Irvington 


70.75 


Cook 


Kempton to Mill 


91.43 


Court 


East of Rockdale Ave. 


62.72 


Dartmouth 


Rivet to Spooner 


481.03 


DeWolf 




62.47 


Diman 




84.90 


Edison 


North of Belleville Rd. 


478.06 


Ellen 




407.89 


Eugenia 


Bowditch to Brook 


464.42 


Garfleld 


Myrtle to Ashland 


145.97 


Hall 


Corner Rockland 


308.40 


Hawes 


North of Tarkiln Hill Rd. 


137.95 


Hillman 


Rockdale Ave. to Jenny Lind 


143.67 


Ingraham 


Kearsarge to Acushnet Ave. 


636.97 


James 




112.08 


Jenney 




231.33 


Kane 


East of Hemlock 


131.10 


Kempton & Oneida 




115.66 


Kings Highway 




69.75 


Maple 




109.80 


Mill 


East of Rockdale Ave. 


293.34 


Mt. Vernon 


West of Shawmut Ave. 


236.04 


Myrtle 


Peckham to Sawyer 


73.23 


Palmer 


Union to Arnold 


707.26 


Princeton 


West of Acushnet Ave. 


541.15 


Prospect 


South of Potomska 


256.03 


Reed 


Allen to Hawthorn 


1,657.24 




South of Arnold 


237.05 




South of Kempton 


56.12 


Riverside Ave. 




66.94 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



39 



FILLING AND GRADING — Continued 



Street 


Location 


Cost 


Rockdale Ave. 


Sq. Kempton and south of 






Kempton 


282.27 




North of Hawthorn 


527.53 


Rodney 


l?rock Ave. to Cleveland 


89.19 


Rounds 


Court to Arnold 


98.00 


Stackhouse 


Rockdale Ave. to Mathews 


1,271.25 


Stapleton 




79.58 


Stei)lien 


Mathew to Rockdale Ave. 


405.32 


Tarkiln Hill Rd. 


Bowditch to Lawrence 


553.10 


Union 


West of Reed 


55.39 


West Elm 


Reed to Rockdale Ave. 


172.41 


West French Ave. 




321.88 


Wood 


East of Acushnet A\e. 


71.37 


Sundry 


Costing less than $50.00 


429.12 


Miscellaneous 


Charges 


532.24 




$18,517.11 



40 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



GRANOLITHIC — 1915 



street 


Location 


A.rea Sq. Yds. 


Acushnet Ave. 


E S -S Earle 


47.81 


Acushnet Ave. 


S E cor Collette 


148.42 


Acushnet Ave. 


N E cor Hicks 


51.98 


Acushnet Ave. 


E S -N Hicks 


62.62 


Acushnet Ave. 


S W cor Phillips 


201.08 


Adams 


S S -E Highland 


27.30 


Adams 


S S -E Highland 


27.10 


Adams 


S E cor Mt. Pleasant 


185.62 


Adams 


S S -E Mt. Pleasant 


28.25 


Acushnet Ave. 


E S -N Kempton 


16.62 


Allen 


No. 167 


25.56 


Armour 


No. 82 


24.14 


Armour 


E S -S Union 


26.51 


Arnold 


No. 321 


26.44 


Arnold 


N W cor James 


60.11 


Arnold 


S S -W Rotch 


24.19 


Arnold 


S S -W Rotch 


25.26 


Arnold 


S S -W Tremont 


22.69 


Arnold Place 


No. 23 


33.40 


Arnold Place 


No. 29 


36.86 


Ashley 


N Ruth No. 26 


45.24 


Ashley 


N Ruth No. 28 


45.26 


Ashley 


No. 29-31 


56.14 


Ashley 


No. 30 


42.75 


Bay 


N S -W Dartmouth 


24.56 


Bay 


N S -W Dartmouth 


22.23 


Bay 


N S -E Cottage 


32.60 


Bay 


N S -W Dartmouth 


21.54 


Bedford 


No. 129 


33.85 


Belleville Ave. 


No. 425-433 


149.24 


Belleville Rd. 


N S -W Acushnet Ave. 


47.69 


Belleville Rd. 


S S -W Acushnet Ave. 


4.70 


Bridge Park 




19.74 


Brownell 


W S -S Carroll 


29.86 


Brownell 
Ryan 


W S -S Ryan 


92.75 






Brownell 


No. 200 


27.95 


Bullock 


No. 29 


28.56 


Buttonwood 


No. 15 


29.82 


Buttonwood 


No. 28 


29.73 


Buttonwood 


No. 30 


28.73 


Campbell 


N S -W County 


7.77 


Carroll 


No. 47 


28.36 


Carroll 


No. 51 


29.00 


Carroll 


No. 5 5 


27.51 


Carroll 


S S -W Brigham 


27.33 


Carroll 


S S -W Brigham 


26.16 


Carroll 


S S -W Brownell 


59.32 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



41 



GRANOLITHIC — Continued 



Street 


Location 


Area Sq. Yds. 


Chancery- 


N Arnold No. 73 


31.04 


Chancery 


No. 471 


27.54 


Chancery 


No. 129-131 


34.04 


Clifford 


No. 104 


27.20 


Clifford 


S S -W Acushnet No. 100 


26.42 


Clinton 


No. 383 


34.79 


Clinton 


N S -E Brownell 


24.03 


Clinton 


S E cor Rotch 


101.91 


Coggeshall 


S S -W Summer 


29.72 


Collette 


S S -E Acushnet Ave. 


165.35 


Columbia 


W S -S Allen 


27.31 


Columbia 


No. 45 


31.01 


Cottage 


No. 528 


39.81 


Cottage 


No. 5 73 


40.72 


Cottage 


E S -N Morgan 


38.18 


County 


N E cor Linden 


307.92 


County 


W S -S Weld 


42.77 


County 


No. 71-73 


111.76 


County 


No. 122-124 


106.19 


County 


No. 691 


89.37 


County 


No. 695 


90.46 


County 


W S -N Madison 


4.23 


County 


W S -S South 


51.39 


Court 


S S -W County 


3.03 


Court 


S S -W Rotch 


29.95 


Dudley 


No. 40 


28.79 


Earle 


N S -E Acushnet Ave. 


76.04 


Earle ) 






Davis 




387.61 


Diman ) 






Ellen 


S E cor Freeman 


34.07 


Elm 


N S -W Cottage 


34.61 


Elm 


N S -Sixth to Eighth 


5.92 


Elm 


No. 159 


51.11 


Elm 


No. 163-165 


47.42 


Elm 


No. 169 


37.29 


Elm 


No. 171 


43.08 


Eugenia 


S S -W Bowditch 


119.39 


First 


W S -Howland South 


37.79 


Florence 


No. 36 


23.32 


Grinnell 


N E cor First No. 77 


117.78 


Hathaway 


No. 168 


64.00 


Hawthorn 


S E cor Brigham No. 203 


103.86 


Hawthorn 


S S -W Brigham 


40.06 


Hawthorn 


S S -E Brigham 


33.90 


Hillman 


E State No. 71-73 


137.89 


Howland 


S E cor Second 


5.88 


Howland 


S W cor Second 


4.13 


Hussey 


E S -N Lake 


27.60 



42 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



GRANOLITHIC — Continued 



Street 


Location 


Area Sq. Yds. 


Irving 


W S -N Hawthorn 


83.76 


Junior 


W S -N Arnold 


26.52 


Junior 


W S -N Arnold 


26.89 


Keene 


N S -E Liberty 


27. 9S 


Kempton 


S E cor Hussey 


91.00 


Kempton 


W Hussey No. 92 6 


43.45 


Kempton 


W Chestnut No. 333 


3.37 


Kempton 


S S -E Buttonwood 


18.92 


Kempton 


No. 934-936 


33.67 


Lincoln 


W S No. 25 


33.10 


Madison 


S S -W County 


9.29 


Madison 


S S -E Purchase 


13.15 


Maple 


N W cor Brownell 


86.96 


Maple 


W Brownell No. 2 93 


30.73 


Maple 


S S -E Rotch 


30.30 


Maple 


S S -E Rotch 


30.19 


Mapleview Ter. 


No. 15 


15.07 


Mechanics Lane 


N S Pleasant to Sixth 


15.37 


Mill 


S S James to Lindsay 


102.77 


Morgan 


W County 


8.75 


Mt. Pleasant 


E S -S Adams 


32.13 


Mt. Pleasant 


N Adams No. 233-235 


94.71 


Mt. Pleasant 


S E cor Coggeshall 


104.18 


Mt. Pleasant 


E S -S Sawyer 


48.39 


Mt. Pleasant { 


No. 212-214 




Coggeshall \ 


N E cor Mt. Pleasant 


116.60 


Mt. Vernon 


No. 72 


33.28 


Mt. Vernon 


S S -W Richmond 


21.86 


Mt. Vernon 


S S -W Richmond 


28.38 


Palmer 


S Union No. 196 


27.86 


Palmer 


E S -S Union 


35.89 


Park 


N Sycamore No. 402 


25.99 


Park 


No. 407 


29.69 


Park 


S W cor Smith No. 413 


32.63 


Parker 


S E cor Spencer 


57.42 


Pierce 


W S -N Court 


22.15 


Pleasant 


E S -S Sears Ct. ; 


23.84 


Pleasant 


E S at Sears Ct. 


11.56 


Pleasant 


E S at Sears Ct. 


25.31 


Pleasant 


W S Elm to Mechanics Lane 


146.12 


Plymouth 


No. 5 5 


27.23 


Plymouth 


S S -W Brigham 


24.18 


Plymouth 


S S -W Brownell 


29.97 


Plymouth 


N W cor Palmer 


38.66 


Pope 


No. 227 


34.18 


Princeton 


E Bowditch No. 144 


26.46 


Princeton 


E Bowditch No. 155 


26.66 


Princeton 


E Bowditch No. 171 


27.43 


Princeton 


N E cor Concord No. 71 


86.39 



Street department 



43 



granolithic — Continued 



Street 


Location 


Area Sq. Yds. 


Priscilla 


W of West street No. 2 


30.32 


Priscilla 


N E cor Gould 


30.14 


Purchase 


W S School to Spring 


11.29 


Purchase 


E S -S Wamsutta 


71.44 


Purchase 


W S -S Nausett 


65.24 


Purchase 


W S Union to Spring 


116.70 


Reed 


W S -N Elm 


10.34 


Reed 


W S -S Union 


27.94 


Reed 


E S -S Union 


29.38 


Reed 


W S -S Union 


26.29 


Richmond 


N Robeson No. 87 


30.18 


Richmond 


S Willow No. 91 


31.42 


Rivet 


S B cor Bonney 


271.65 


Rotch 


S W cor Court 


86.81 


Rotch 


E S -N Hawthorn 


37.84 


Rounds 


W S -N Arnold 


47.11 


Rounds 


N Court No. 81 


21.98 


Rounds 


N Court No. 85 


22.23 


Rounds 


N Union No. 120 


23.95 


Rounds 


N Arnold 


25.89 


Rounds 


N Arnold 


24.70 


Ruth 


N W cor Ashley No. 89 


145.93 


Ryan 


S E cor Palmer 


64.86 


School 


No. 108 


29.41 


Social 


N S -W McGurk 


30.19 


Spencer 


S S -S Parker 


26.62 


Spencer 


No. 17-19 


83.18 


Spring 


S S -W Purchase 


99.90 


Spring 


N W cor Purchase 


83.67 


Sycamore 


S E cor Emerson 


109.43 


Summer 


N Merrimac No. 304 


39.47 


Summer 


S Durfee 


24.69 


Summer 


N E cor Penniman 


138.09 


Swift 


S S -E Dartmouth 


13.30 


Tallman 


S W cor Front 


192.02 


Tallman 


S S -W Acushnet 


2.65 


Tarliiln Hill Rd. 


No. 239 


46.56 


Tremont 


E S -N Arnold 


25.35 


Tremont 


S E cor Maple 


29.92 


Tremont 


S Union No. 106-108 


28.32 


Union 


No. 558-560 


32.34 


Walnut 


No. SO 


1.60 


Water 


W S -N Cove 


34.21 


Water 


S W cor Delano 


123.61 


Water 


S Gifford No. 1012 


49.35 


So. Water 


No. 1031-1033-1035 


39.93 


So. Water 


N. 55 7 


39.54 


West 


S W cor Taber 


58.98 


W. French Ave. 


N E cor Valentine 


148.89 



44 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



GRANOLITHIC — Continued 



Street 


Location 


Area Sq. Yds. 


Whitman 


W Acushnet Ave. No. 183 


31.80 


Whitman 


W Acushnet Ave. No. 185 


31.93 


Whitman 


W Acushnet Ave. No. 189 


38.00 


William 


No. 175 


35.41 


William 


S S -W Purchase 


35.20 


William 


S S Purchase to Pleasant 


49.54 


Willis 


N E cor Spencer 


93.24 


Widenings 


f Purchase — W S at Mechanics 


21.32 




1 Purchase — E S William to Elm 


97.00 




J Purchase — W S William south 


34.01 




] Purchase — W S Wm. & Union 


102.77 




Purchase — E S Wm. & Union 


117.56 




Union — S S -W Purchase 


102.74 


Intercep. Sewer 


Second — W S Grinnell-Howland 


473.35 




j Second — E S Grinnell-Howland 


442.44 




1 Water — E S Elm north 


50.09 




■Water— E S Rodman-Elm 


174.52 




11,784.29 



Contracted Bills — Laying Granolithic $10,605.87 

Miscellaneous 12.45 

Driveways — Extra thickness 83.08 



$10,701.40 



Labor Excavating — Preparing foundation, tools and 

supervision for 11,784.29 square yards 13,461.35 

Total cost $24,162.75 

Average cost per square yard $2.05 



STREET DEPARTMENT 45 



Bridges. 



46 STREET DEPARTMENT 



BRIDGES. 

Appropriation $10,000 . 00 

Expenditures 11,860.23 



Dr. Balance $1,860.23 

* Total expenditure of N. B. & F. Draw Bridge, $ 11,453.73 

** Total expenditure of Coggeshall St. Bridge, 406.50 



.1,860.23 



* One-fifth share to Town of Fairhaven, $ 2,290.75 

** One-fourth share to Town of Fairhaven, 101.62 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



47 



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STREET DEPARTMENT 49 



Forestry. 



50 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



CITY FORESTRY. 

Appropriation $5,500 . 00 

Expenditures 5,538 . 68 

Dr. Balance $38.68 



EXPENDITURES. 

Cutting, spraying, removing and trimming trees, $3,466.14 

Brown Tail moth hunting, 249.13 

Tree planting, (labor) 623.39 

Gypsy moth hunting 121.38 

Supplies, repairing tools, etc. 1,078.74 

$5,538.68 



STREET DEPARTMENT 5^ 



Sewers and Drains. 



52 ^ STREET DEPARTMENT 



SEWERS AND DRAINS. 



Appropriation $15,000.00 

Receipts 28,698 . 88 

$43,698.88 

Expenditures 47,523.99 



GROSS EXPENDITURES. 



Dr. Balance, 3,825.11 

NET EXPENDITURES. 

Appropriation, $15,000.00 

Dr. Balance, 3,825.11 



18,825.11 









Total. 


Auto truck, 






$1,975.08 


Boiler Repairs, 






17.41 


Catch-Basins cleaned. 






8,596.62 


Catch-Basins Repaired, 






561.34 


Culverts, repaired 






38.39 


Culverts, cleaned 






♦ 41.52 


Culverts, new 






141.99 


Eyeholes, repaired, 






32.12 


Eyeholes, new 






1,025.74 


Manholes, repaired 






143.70 


Manholes, cleaned 






2.77 


Manholes, new 






71.97 


Main and Stable Office work 






1,783.22 


Miscellaneous, 






557.74 


Rebates, 






50.00 


Sewers cleaned 






150.38 


Sewers repaired 






167.01 


Surface Drains [ 


512 


.11 




Liberty St. Drain J 


329. 


98 


842.09 


Surface Drains cleared 






21.56 


Surface Drains repaired 






77.36 


Stock, Carting and Handling 






316.58 


Sewer Machinery repairs, 






1,392.97 


Tools, new and repaired 






964.13 


Drains, to Houses, new, repaired, 


and cl( 


;ared 


16,122.05 


Stock, Labor and Supplies on han 


id 




12,430.25 



$47,523.99 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



53 



DRAINS LAID. 



Number 


Size Pipe 


Length Feet 


Cost 


1 

437 

5 

1 


5 inch 

6 inch 
8 inch 

10 inch 


100 

15,143 

128 

14 

15,385 


$ 90.16 

9,148.17 

489.58 

279.05 


444 




$10,006.96 



New drains laid, cost, $10,006 . 96 

349 drains cleared, cost 1,043 . 70 

50 drains repaired, cost 669.30 

( New, repaired and cleared ) $1 1,719.96 



STREET DEPARTMENT 55 



Sewer Construction 
Account* 



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STREET DEPARTMENT 59 



Sewer Loan Account. 



60 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



CATCH BASINS — NEW 



street 


Location 


Cost 


Acushnet Ave. 


N. ^V. cor. School 


$ 62.74 


Allen 


N. W. cor. County 


90.57 




S. W. cor. Rockdale Ave. 


105.72 




N. W. cor. West 


52.86 


Armour 


N. E. cor. Arnold 


92.64 


Arnold 


N. E. cor. Brownell 


110.91 


Brock Ave. 


Front of Page Mill (4) 


184.58 




N. W. cov. Bonney 


80.02 


Cleveland 


S. W. cor. Clara 


101.22 




S. W. cor. Norman 


94.98 




S. E. cor. Norman 


106.52 




N. E. cor. Norman 


93.33 




N. W. cor. No 1 man 


108.56 


Coffin Ave. 


N. W. cor. Church 


93.33 


Coggeshall 


S. W. cor. Summer 


77.85 


Collins 


N. E. cor. Cedar 


75.70 


Cove 


S. E. cor. Ashley 


46.94 




S. E. cor. Cleveland 


41.87 




S. E. cor. Harbor 


36.71 




S. E. cor. McGurk 


44.28 




S. E. cor. Roosevelt 


41.88 




S. E. cor. Salisbury 


46.10 




S. E. cor. Viall 


49.72 


Dartmouth 


N. W. cor. Mathew 


71.50 


Dim an 


N. W. cor. Davis 


102.83 


Durfee 


X. E. cor. Highland 


92.74 


Elm 


N. W. cor. Pleasant 


94.94 




N. S., east of Sixth 


95.43 




Elm, cor. First 


145.93 


Foster 


S. W. cor. Kempton 


51.14 


Glfford 


S. S., east of Harbor 


56.38 


Glennon 


Head of Edison 


98.70 


Grinnell 


N. W. cor. Purchase 


70.05 


Hathaway Rd. 


\ S. W. cor. Highland 






1 N. W. cor Highland 


106.14 


Hill 


N. W. cor Kempton 


81.40 


Hillman 


S. W. cor. Je'nney 


84.47 


Kempton 


S. E. cor Commonwealth 


132.22 




West of Watson 


67.58 


Lake 


N. E. cor Jenny Lind 


132.89 


Madison 


S. S., west of Purchase 


79.05 


Manomet 


Near Riverside Ave. 


118.05 


Maxfield 


j N. E. cor. Liberty 






1 N. W. cor. Liberty 


150.47 


Mechanics Lane 


S. W. cor. Purchase 


41.97 


Middle 


S. W. cor. Pleasant 


88.51 


Mt. Pleasant 


W. S., head of Sawyer 


99.86 




S. W. cor. Hathaway Ave. (2) 


213.52 


North 


S. S., west of Rockdale Ave. 


124.59 



STREET DEPARTMENT 



61 



CATCH BASINS — Continued 



Street 


Location 


Cost 


North 


N. E. cor. Rockdale Ave. 

N. S., between Rockdale Ave. & 


97.76 




Jenny Lind 


77.33 


Princeton 


S. W. cor. Concord 


66.98 




N. W. cor Concord 


88.39 


Purchase 


W. S., north of Beacon Mill (2) 


177.81 




W. S., Dean-Sawyer 


30.55 




S. W. cor. Grinnell 


68.56 




N. E. cor. South 


44.44 




S. W. cor. William 


43.57 


Rivet 


N. W. cor. Orchard 


45.31 


Rockdale Ave. 


N. W. cor. Lake 


78.64 


Russell 


S. S., west of Purchase 


51.82 


School 


S. S., west of Purchase 


81.07 




S. W. cor. Second 


84.39 


Shore 


S. E. cor. Brock Ave. 


11.59 


Stackhouse 


\ W. S., north of Rockdale Ave. 






) E. S., north of Rockdale Ave. 


90.53 


Summit 


N.W. cor. Mill 


44.51 


Tall man 


S. S., west of Acushnet Ave. 


89.78 


Tarkiln Hill Rd. 


N. S., east of R. R. Tracks 


72.84 


Water 


S. E. cor. Hazzard's Lane 


75.93 




E. S., Pine-Leonard 


114.32 


West 


E. S., Bedford-Elizabeth 


41.98 


W. French Ave. 


S. E. cor. Cove (2) 


285.92 




W. S., south of David 


78.00 




E. S., south of David 


109.85 




N. E. cor. Valentine 


88.67 


William 


N. W. cor. Purchase 


36.46 


Willis 


N. W. cor. Purchase 


98.70 




N. E. cor. Spencer 


64.84 


Willow 


N. E. cor. Cedar 


82.55 


Wing 


N. W. cor. Purchase 


10.00 


Miscel. Charges 




2,072.02 




$8,744.50 



Number of Catch Basins built 87 



62 STREET DEPARTMENT 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 



In Board of Aldermen, 

March 23, 1916. 

Received, ordered printed in the City Documents 
and sent down for concurrence. 



W. H. B. REMINGTON, 

City Clerk. 



Concurred. 



In Common Council, 

March 23, 1916. 

CHAS. P. SAWYER, 
Clerk. 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 



Forty -sixth Annual Report 



OF THE 



NEW BEDFORD 

WATER BOARD 



TO THE 

CITY COUNCIL 

CONTAINING 

I 
THE REPORT OF THE WATER BOARD FOR 1915 

II 
THE REPORT OF THE WATER REGISTRAR 

III 
THE REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



January 1, 1916 



NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

E. Anthony & Sons, Incorp., Printers 

1916 



NEW BEDFORD WATER BOARD 
1916 



Edward R. Hathaway, 

John H. Hollihan, 
Frederic H. Taber, 
Lettice R. Washburn, 
William H. Pitman. 



C 31 ay or of City and 
I President of Water Board. 
President of Common Council. 

Term expires June, 1916. 

Term expires June, 1917. 

Term expires June, 1918. 



Robert C. P. Coggeshall, 
Clifford BAYiiiEs, 
Adoniram S. Negus, 
John C. DeMello, Jr., 
Arthur R. Weeks, 
Damon W. Rice, 
Rupert Kobza, 
Warren Tattersall, 
Frank ]\r. Hamlin, 
Alfred Bradley, 
John B. Wilbur, 
Gilbert B, Borden, Jr., 
Alonzo W. Spooner, 
Justin C. Perkins, 
Arthur F. Col\vell, 
Thomas Rawclifpe, 
Lester F. Spooner, 
Henry D. Backus, 
Robert G. Refuse, 
George Hutchinson, 



Clerk of Board and Supt. 

Water Registrar. 

Pumping Engineer. 

Foreman, Distributing System 

Siiperiutendent's Clerk. 

Clerk. 

Bookkeeper. 

Water Registrar^ s Clerk. 

Clerk. 

Inspector. 



REPORT 



City of New Bedford, ]\Iass., 

Office of the New Bedford Water Board, 

January 1, 1916. 

To the City Council of the City of New Bedford: 

Gentlemen : — In accordance with the provisions of 
the Water Ordinance, the New Bedford Water Board re- 
spectfully submit their forty-sixth annual report. Accom- 
panying it, will be found the reports of the Water Registrar 
and the Superintendent. 

The following abstract, drawn from the report of the 
Water Registrar, shows the financial operations of the past 
3^ear in condensed form: 



RECEIPTS. 
Balance December 1, 1914, $ 4,241.07 

Receipts from water rates, $304,717.29 

Receipts from other sources, 39, 221. .50 343,938.79 



$348,179.86 



PAYMENTS. 

Management and repairs, less in- 
terest, bonds paid, and sinking 
funds, ' $117,479.76 

Extension of works, 80,897.97 

Interest paid, 75,300.00 

Interest paid Sylvia Ann Rowland 

fund, 0,000.00 

Bonds paid, 21,000.00 

Sinking funds 27,930.00 322,607.73 

Balance December 1, 1915, 25,572.13 



$348,179.86 



The actual outlay for the construction of these works, 
exclusive of debt, interest and management and repairs 
account is $4,730,909.48. 



4 WATER REPORT. 

On June 26th, William H. Pitman was elected a mem- 
ber of this Board for a term of three years ending June, 
1918. 

On September 23rd, Frederic H. Taber was elected 
a member of this Board to fill a vacancy caused by the 
death of Francis P. Washburn for the term ending June, 
1916. 

Of the forty-five petitions for the extension of main 
pipes received, forty have been granted, and the main pipes 
have been extended 3.08 miles. 

In the matter of furnishing a supply of water to the 
To^\Ti of Dartmouth, we stated in our last report that on 
November 4th, 1914, we had sent a copy of a form of pro- 
posed agreement to the Water Supply Committee of the 
Town of Dartmouth for their consideration. On May 21st, 
a conference M^as held with a delegation of said Water 
Supply Committee, at which City Solicitor Woodward was 
present, for the purpose of adjusting all details covered by 
said agreement. At a meeting held on July 2nd, the fol- 
lowing action was taken : 

Voted: — Whereas the City of New Bedford proposes 
to supply metered water to the Town of Dartmouth, under 
authority granted by Chapter 188 of Legislative Acts of 
1914, and upon the terms and conditions contained in an 
agreement dated July 1st, 1915, which has been executed 
between said City of New Bedford and said Town of Dart- 
mouth, it is now. 

Ordered: — That the Superintendent be instructed to 
proceed with the installation of the necessary piping, in- 
cluding the meter installations required to deliver water 
to the Town of Dartmouth, in Dartmouth Street and 
Kempton Street, at approximately the boundary line be- 
tween New Bedford and Dartmouth. After the installa- 
tion of pipes is completed and all terms and conditions com- 
plied with, the Superintendent shall, upon application from 
the officials of the Towti of Dartmouth, deliver the water. 

This order has been executed. The installation of 
piping in the Town of Dartmouth has been made in two 
sections, one in Dartmouth Street in the vicinity of Bliss 
Corner, supplied by the Dartmouth Street pipe, which 
supply was turned on October 1, 1915; the other in Kemp- 
ton Street in the vicinity of Smith Mills, which supply was 
turned on November 12, 1915. 



WATER REPORT. O 

On February 5th, a hearing was held before the Legis- 
lative Committee on Water Supply at the State House, 
Boston, on a proposed bill authorizing the City of New 
Bedford to supply water to the Town of Acushnet. As 
the proposed bill was drawn in similar form to the enact- 
ment in favor of the Town of Dartmouth at the previous 
session of the Legislature, no objection was offered by the 
City, who was represented at the hearing by the Clerk of 
this Board. Tlie following enactment was passed later. 

[Chap. 129.] 

An Act to authorize the city of new Bedford to supply 

water to the town of acushnet. 

Be it enacted, etc., as folloivs: 

Section 1. The city of New Bedford may furnish and 
sell by meter water to the town of Acushnet at the bound- 
ar}^ line between said city and town at a rate to be agreed 
upon by the city and tow^u, but which shall not be less 
than that prevailing in New Bedford. 

Section 2. The town of Acushnet may at its own ex- 
pense install mains, service pipes and all other equipment 
in the highways and other places of the to^vn necessary to 
receive and distribute water purchased from the city of New 
Bedford. [Approved March 8, 1915. 

At this date no further move in the direction of intro- 
ducing water into the Town of Acushnet has been made. 

The long drawn out controversy between the United 
States Engineers and this department in regard to the 
removal of the syphon pipe upon river bottom, across the 
draw channel, south of the New Bedford and Fairhaven 
bridge, which pipe has for many years furnished the water 
supply to Popes Island, has been brought to a conclusion 
by the removal of said pipe and the dredging of the bottom 
to the depth prescribed h\ the government. 

A complete history of this undertaking from the be- 
ginning is outlined in our last two annual reports. Last 
year we reported that the project for tunnelling the draw^ 
channel for the purpose of accommodating the passage of 
cables and pipes of the New Bedford Gas and Edison Light 
Co.. the cables of the Union Street Railwav Co.. and the 



b WATER REPORT. 

pipes of this department, had. after a long study of the 
conditions been abandoned, and that the City Engineer 
had been requested to prepare plans for the installation of 
a new flexible jointed pipe to be located at sufficient depth 
to conform with all requirements set forth by the United 
States Government Engineers. 

It was apparent early in the year that the govern- 
ment expected the removal of the pipe in question as 
speedily as possible as will be seen by the items which 
follow : 

January 26th. Col. John Millis inquires regarding pres- 
ent status of the subject of pipe and when it is likely 
to be adjusted. 
February 15th. Col. John ^Millis suggests that perhaps it 
would assist in the solution or facilitate some action 
if it were made known that the government suspends 
all channel improvement above the bridge until the 
pipe question is adjusted. 
May 17th. Col. John Millis states that it does not appear 
profitable to pursue the subject further and accord- 
ingly no further (dredging) work at the pipe or 
above the bridge will be contemplated by the Govern- 
ment until such time as the City may be in position 
to correct the obstruction caused by the pipe. 
May 21st. The New Bedford Water Bi3ard 

Voted : — That the Superintendent be directed to pro- 
ceed with the work of installing a proposed inter- 
mittent supply for Popes Island, and upon completion 
of same to remove the pipe upon the river bottom in 
accordance with plan outlined at this meeting. 
July 14th. Superintendent requests permission of Col. 
Millis to delay removal of pipe for the period required 
by the Union Street Railway Co. to install salt water 
fire protection facilities at their car house on Popes 
Island. 
July 23rd. Col. Millis names October 1st as the date that 
the removal of pipe will be satisfactory to the Gov- 
ernment. 
August 30th. Contract signed with Frank C. Taylor for 
a suitable lighter with appurtenances necessary for 
removal of water pipe from river bottom, including 
services of diver. 



WATER REPORT. Y 

September 27th. Shut off supply on river bottom and com- 
menced to remove pipe. 

September 30th. Pipe entirely removed from river 
bottom. 

October 2nd. Contract signed with John R. Burke of 
Boston, for dredging draw channel at location where 
pipe was removed, as agreed upon with Col. Sanford 
in 1908. 

October 27th. Dredging contract comi)leted. 

December 14th. Under date of December 20th. Col. ]\lillis 
writes that by direction of the Chief of Eugineers and 
approval of the War Department, the Federal revok- 
able permit issued to this City, August 12th, 1903, to 
lay a six-inch water main in the Acushnet River from 
Fish Island to Popes Island, was revoked on December 
14th. 1915. 
The total cost and maintenance of this Popes Island 

syphon pipe from the beginning of its service to the time 

of its complete removal this year has been : 

FIRST PIPE 1898 — 1903. 

1898, April-JulyPipe and Installation.... $2, 673. .5.5 

1899. April Repair leaks 303.92 

1899, Nov. -Dec. Repair leaks 1,079.54 

1903, Removing pipe 490.30 

$4,547.31 



SECOND PIPE 1903-1915. 

1903-1904 Pipe and installation... .$4,571.06 

1905, May Repair leaks...' 86.30 

1908, October Repair leaks 278.52 

1912, August Repair leaks 697.51 

1915, Sept. Removing pipe. .$ 262.11 

1915, October Dredging contract 1 ,010.80 1,272.91 

$6,906.30 
Less value of scrap rescued 79.67 6,826.63 



;il,373.94 



The completion of the removal of the pipe from the 
river bottom, and the dredging of draw channel to a depth 
satisfactory to the United States Engineers, brings a long 
standing controversy to a final close. 



8 WATER REPORT. 

The placing- of a new permanent flexible jointed pipe 
beneath the river bottom and at a depth sufficient to be 
well below all government requirements we found to be 
such an expensive proposition that when we considered 
the small revenue assured by this supply we decided not 
to proceed in this direction at present. 

As a substitute we have had a temporary intermittent 
supply placed. This consists of a two inch wrought iron 
pipe located on the south side of the bridge and crossing 
the draw. Detachable joints are maintained at both ends 
of the draw. This small pipe allows only a limited supply 
and it can be operated only in the night when the draw is 
not being used. The idea is to fill at night such tanks, 
cisterns or reservoirs as the users on Popes Island choose 
to maintain. They to apply this stored water for their 
daily requirements. This two inch pipe was laid during 
the summer. It was first used on September 27th. Its 
installation cost $490.10. This cost includes changes in 
the brick well in Popes Island abutment, whereby a fire 
engine may attach suction and ol)tain a salt water supply 
through pipe which formerly connected ^^•ith the fresh 
water syphon pipe. 

In our last report we devoted considerable space to the 
recommendations otiPered by State Forester, F. W. Rane, in 
the direction of suppressing the spread of the gypsy moth 
within the forest reservations bordering upon the Quittacas 
Ponds. Immediate action was deemed necessary at that 
time to prevent the destruction of all the trees. P. D. 
Kneeland, Assistant State Forester, reports as follows re- 
garding the operations of the past year: 

"In view of the serious moth infestation threatened 
on the lands of the Water Works and after a thorough 
examination and inspection by the State Forestry Depart- 
ment, it was decided by the Water Department to cooperate 
with the State Forester in carrying on cutting operations 
along the lines suggested in the last annual report. These 
operations had the intention of removing most of the oak 
from the Water Slied and leaving and encouraging the 
pine so that in the future no further trouble from the 
moths could be anticipated, and the land could be put into 
the best possible condition, both from the forestry and 
aesthetic standpoints, as well as from the standpoint of 
eonsendng the water supply in its purity. The operations 



WATER REPORT. 9 

were two fold. They consisted first in lumber and cord- 
wood cutting, and second, in spraying with modern ap- 
paratus which was purchased for the purpose, of such oak 
and infested trees as were left uncut. To carry on the 
lumber operation a camp was built in regular ]Maine woods 
majiner, a saw mill hired to put into lumber all the logs 
which were suitable. The remainder were chopped up 
into cordwood; about 600,000 feet of lumber were sawed 
up, much of which has already been sold to the railroads as 
ties and car stock, and the remainder is now drying in the 
lumber yard, and will soon be ready for sale. Over 3,000 
cords of wood were cut and all of that is now either sold 
or under contract for sale at a price which will result in 
a small profit to the Water Works. The brush was all 
cleaned up and the land left in an orderly condition. It 
is already springing up to pine in many places, and in other ' 
places where it was possible to leave seed trees, it is con- 
fidently expected that pine will result. In a few places it 
will be necessary to plant. This year it is planned to con- 
tinue the operation so as to complete practically the whole 
work. Not quite as much luml^er or cordwood will be cut 
this year, but much of it is of better quality and so it is 
lioped that the operation will yield a larger profit to the 
city. 

When the operation this year is finished, practically 
the whole area will be cleaned up and the moth problem 
will be solved. No future work need be expected except 
in a few cases where it was necessary for reasons of 
beanty to leave oaks, and also in a few places where brush 
cutting or planting are indicated. 

A short time ago a working plan was made for these 
lands in which it was planned to accomplish these results 
in fifteen or twenty years. They are being done instead in 
two years and the results will be much better. ' ' 

At a meeting of this Board held on October 20th, it 
was decided to continue the work of improving the forestry 
conditions through the coming winter. 

In February last, the State made an appropriation to 
be distributed throughout the State for the benefit of the 
needy unemployed class who were willing to accept work 
upon the State Forest lands. . Mr. Kneeland appeared be- 
fore us with the statement that the State Forester, ]\Ir. 
Eane, desired to allot a portion of this appropriation to the 



10 



WATER REPORT. 



work of thinning and clearing up along the roadside on the 
Qiiittacas Water Shed. The State to take charge of the 
hiring and payment of the men, and the City to pay the 
State $1.50 per cord for each cord that should be produced 
that way. We accepted this proposition. 

Twice, during the year, our opinion has been sought 
concerning the advisability of using the reservoir on 
Coggeshall Street for swimming and skating purposes. In 
both instances we replied at considerable length, stating 
that such use would render the water totally inifit for dis- 
tribution to the Avater takers and consequently should not 
be considered as it would render useless, a most valuable 
asset which the City now possesses. 

The following are the principal contracts which have 
been executed this year: 



Dat 
191 

Feb. 


e. 
5 

8 


Feb. 


10 


Mar. 


26 


April 


3 


April 


24 


June 


12 


July 


1 


July 


23 



Contractor. 

The J. E. Bud- 
long Press, 
New Bedford, 
Mass. 

Fitzhenry-Guptill 
Co., Boston, 
Mass. 

E. Anthony «6; 
Sons, Inc., New 
Bedford, Mass. 

Greene & Wood, 
New Bedford, 
Mass. 

The Grasselli 
Chemical Co., 
Boston, Mass. 

New Bedford 
Boiler & Ma- 
chine Co., New 
Bedford, Mass. 

The B. F. Smith 
Co., New Bed- 
ford, Mass. 

The B. F. Good- 
rich Co., Bos- 
ton, Mass. 



Supply. 

Printing reports 



Spraying m a - 
chine. 

Printing books, 
"Location of 
Stop Gates." 
Cypress planks 
Cypress boards 
Spruce planks 
Spruce boards 
4000 lbs. arsenate 
of lead 

Genuine wrought 
iron galvan- 
ized pipe 



Repairing 
ney 



chim- 



Rubber jacketed 
fire hose 



Consideration. 

700 complete pam- 
phlets $185.00 

400 extra printed 
sheets $20.00 

$1769.00 



30 complete books 
$109.00 

$51.50 per M. 
$4 7.00 per M. 
$27.00 per M. 
$27.00 per M. 
$0,041/2 per lb. 



19 3 4 /1 00c per lineal 
foot 



$890.00 



70c per lineal foot 



WATER REPORT. 



11 



Aug. 


30 


Frank C. Taylor. 


Removal of C. I. 






New Bedford, 


pipe from riv- 






Mass. 


er bottom of 
channel be- 
tween Popes & 
Fish Islands. 


Oct. 


2 


John R. Burke, 
Boston, Mass. 


Dredging 


Nov. 


10 


Donaldson Iron 


C. I. pipe and 






Co., Emaus, 


special cast- 






Pa. 


ings 


Nov. 


22 


The Darling 
Pump & Mfg. 
Co., Ltd., Wil- 
llamsport, Pa. 


Water valves 



Labor per day for oper- 
ation of lighter 
$35.00. For diver 
and necessary ap- 
paratus $20.00 per 
day 

.50c per cu. yd. meas- 
ured in scow 

30" pipe $25.80 per ton 

10" pipe $27.10 per ton 
8" pipe $27.10 per ton 
6" pipe $27.10 per ton 

Specials $54.00 per ton 

24 inch $217.00 



On July 12tli, a contract was made by the Fuel Com- 
mittee of the City Council with Garfield & Proctor Coal 
Co. for fourteen hundred gross tons of best quality 
Pocahontas coal, for use at the Little Quittacas Pumping 
Statioil, the same to be delivered at Braley's Station, at 
the rate of $-4.20 per gross ton. 



ITn flDemodam 



FRANCIS PETER WASHBURN. 
Born September 23rd, 1842. 
Died September 5th, 1915. 

WHEREAS, A vacancy has been suddenly created in the 
membership of this Board by the decease of our highly 
esteemed associate, Francis P. Washburn. 

RESOLVED: That we feel it to be fitting to testify our 
appreciation of the just conception of official duties 
and the thoroughness of their discharge which has 
always characterized ]Mr. Washburn's actions. Quick 
to perceive that which public interests required, he 
was equally prompt in taking measures to secure them. 
It is simple justice to his memory to record our full 
conviction of his clear perception, his practical good 
sense, his fidelity and integrity: and our regret at the 
loss which the public sustains in the death of so ener- 
getic and public-spirited a citizen. 

RESOLVED: That in our official and personal relations 
with Mr. Washburn he has won our affection, respect 
and esteem by his admirable qualities and cheery dis- 
position. He was always the optimist. The value of 
such a life is no more to be measured than the sun- 
shine, for like the sunshine it brought joy to those with 
whom he came in contact and its wholesome influence 
will endure long beyond the sunset. To us his death 
is that of the loss of a cherished associate and friend. 

RESOLVED : That these resolutions be spread upon the 
records of this Board, and a copy be transmitted to 
the family of the deceased. 

Respectfully submitted, 

'EtDW. R. Hathaway, ] 

James F. Collins, / Neiv Bedford 

Frederic H. Taber, / Water Board. 

Lettice R. Washburn,! 

William H. Pitman. ,' 



WATER REPORT. 13 

REPORT OF THE WATER REGISTRAR 



City of New Bedford, 

Water Registrar's Office, 

December 1, 1915. 

To the Neiv Bedford Water Board: 

Gentlemen :■ — I herewith present to you a detailed 
statement of the receipts and expenditures of the Water 
Works Department for the year ending at this date : 

RECEIPTS. 

Balance December 1, 1914, .$4,241.07 

Receipts for Water: 

Rates, domestic me- 
ters, $163,327.18 

Rates, domestic esti- 
mated, 83 2.9,'^ 

Rates, building pur- 
poses, 1,788.08 

Meter rentals, 11,066.84 



$177,015.03 
Domestic fixtures re- 
bated, 304.57 



Total domestic, $176,710.46 

Rates, manufacturing 

meters, 128,006.83 



Other receipts: 
Services, $4, 5 2 9.- 5 7 
Mains, 21,733.89 
Meters, 5,057.24 
Mill piping, 394.19 
Lands, buildings, etc., 273.68 
Gypsy Moth, 5,127.54 
Forestry operations, 1,458.05 
Roads, walls and fences, 102.00 
High Hill reservoir, 10.00 
Workshop. 10.35 
Sealing mill fixtures, 231.10 
Maintenance of horses, 65.45 
Quittacas Pumping Sta- 
tion, 75.07 
Fountains, 4.17 
Fines, 64.00 



$304,717.29 



14 WATER REPORT. 

Railroad, 60.00 

Miscellaneous, 25.20 

$39,221.50 $343,938.79 



Total, $348,179.86 

Expenditures for the year ending Dec 1, 1915, 322.607.73 



Balance cash in treasury Dec. 1, 1915, $25,572.13 



EXPENDITURES. 

Management and Repairs: 
Superintendent's department, salaries, $10,183.55 
Water Registrar's department, salaries, 12,675.71 

Pumping expenses, engineers, 
firemen and watchmen: 
Salaries and labor, $10,224.25 



Fuel, 


6,216.15 




Oil, waste, packing 






and lighting, 


584.55 




Tools, and other sup- 






plies. 


470.24 




Repairs of engines, 


202.68 




Repairs of boilers, 


186.25 




Other repairs. 


2,820.29 




Buildings and grounds, 


1,770.21 




Miscellaneous, 


206.38 


22,681.00 


Mains: 






Cast iron pipe, 


$3,428.55 




Stop gates. 


707.10 




Hydrants, 


935.25 




Flushing and inspect- 






ing. 


792.87 


5,863.77 


Services: 






Pipe, 


$897.74 




Renewing and driving 






stop-boxes, 


500.03 




Clearing stops, taps 






and pipe. 


486.96 




Water cart hydrants. 


9.05 


1,893.78 


Fountains: 




896.32 


Meters: 




5,777.44 


General Maintenance 






Printing, stationery, i 


advertising. 




and postage. 




1,668.66 


Carfares, express, tele 


phone, tele- 




graph. 




831.93 


Horses, carriages and automobiles, 


6,902.28 


Labor at workshop. 




1,860.36 


Materials at workshop. 




300.33 


Fuel and lighting at workshop, 


298.42 


Repairs, workshop, bu 


ildings and 




pipe yard. 




833.02 



WATER REPORT. 15 



Miscellaneous, 729.27 

Lands, buildings, taxes, 2,579.18 

Roads, walls, fences, 4,513.08 

Forestry, nursery, 323.40 

Forestry, cutting, planting, etc., 5,072.10 

Gypsy moth, 22,592.63 

Great Quittacas pond and connection, 32.92 

Little Quittacas pond and intake, 1,655.42 

48-inch steel force main, 206.45 

High Hill reservoir, 2,294.79 

Private way, 155.10 

Storing reservoir and surroundings, 552.21 

Conduit, 32.87 

Receiving reservoir, 42.09 

Mt. Pleasant distributing reservoir, 121.00 

Engineer's house, .3 5 

Railroad, 1,658.98 

Purchase street station. 1,896.08 

Sealing fixtures, 323.71 

Garage, Quittacas pumping station, 31.56 



$117,479.76 



Interest paid, $75,300.00 

Bonds paid, 21,000.00 

Sinking funds. 27,930.00 $124,230.00 $241,709.76 



Mains: EXTENSIONS. 
Main pipe and special 

castings, $32,118.99 

Stop gates, 2,607.43 

Hydrants, 1,348.37 

Lead and gasket, 80.04 

Tools, 4,233.31 

All other supplies, 4,871.00 

Freight and carting, 44.11 

Labor, 18,295.^5 63,598.90 

Services: 

Pipe, 2,385.15 

Taps and stops, 20.95 

All other supplies, 861.99 

Labor, 3,998.34 

Plumbing, 1,194.83 8,461.26 

Meters: 

Cost of meters, 7,808.79 

Cost of setting, 695.31 8,504.10 

Mill piping, 333.71 80,897.97 



Total expenditures for the year, $322,607.73 

Whole outlay on the works to this date, $8,440,524.57 

Balance December 1, 1915, 25,572.13 



$8,466,096.70 



16 WATER REPORT. 

For many years an itemized list of the actual cost of 
construction has been omitted from this report. I have 
realized its importance, but urgent matters incidental to 
our rapid growth had to receive first attention. 

This statement has not been compiled in itemized form 
since 1893, which was previous to the commencement of 
the "Further Supply," and several years before I took 
charge of this office. 

In studying the last published itemized list I was con- 
\Tinced that many of the items were distributed into the 
wrong accounts. 

For many months, as opportunity admitted, I have 
been engaged in an exhaustive examination of every item 
of expenditure from the commencement of the Water 
Works activities in 1869 up to the present time, in the 
determination of the proper classification of each item. 

The result is shown in the following statements : 

It will be noticed that there is no change in the total 
expenditure, but that many items belonging to mainten- 
ance appeared upon the construction account and vice- 
versa. The itemized list of costs herewith presented is 
based upon my work of revision. 



CHANGES IN MANAGEMENT AND REPAIR ACCOUNT. 

Deducted. Added. 

1879 Storing reservoir, $161.80 
Conduit, 250.00 

1880 Storing reservoir, 114.20 

1881 Repairs, distributing reservoir, $4,547.79 
Repairs, engine house, 5,769.85 

1884 Repairs, old gate house, 1,385.28 
Repairs, engines and engine 

house, 1,078.13 

1885 Repairs, engines and engine 

house, 128.61 

Repairs, culvert, 106.94 

Repairs, old gate house, 15.52 

Grading engine house lot, 921.79 

1886 Repairs, engine house, 3,648.74 
Grading engine house lot, 57.76 

1895 Connection with Little Quit- 

tacas, 1,271.51 

1899 Engineer's dwelling house, 2,683.01 
Telephone lines, 1,546.94 

1900 Engineer's dwelling house, 6,789.35 

1901 Engineer's dwelling house, 96.15 



WATER EEPOBT. 17 



1902 New workshop land Ark Lane 

1895, 3,500.00 

1903 New workshop, 28,480.49 

1910 Garage, No. Water St., 2,847.22 
Duplicate supply main, 836.65 

1911 Garage, No. Water St., 1,759.12 
Land bought for workshop, 4,678.38 

1913 Garage. No. Water St., 2.203.11 

1914 Garage, No. Water St., 285.80 
Quittacas Pumping Station 

Garage, 287.45 



$57,791.18 $17,660.41 

17,660.41 



Amount of balance deducted, $40,130.77 

Annual report 1914 gives Management and Re- 
pairs, $1,646,022.53 
Add Credits 1881 and previous, 4,084.99 



$1,650,107.52 
Deduct above amount, 40,130.77 



Management and repairs as per revised list 1914, $1,609,976.75 



EXPENDITURES PROM THE BEGINNING OF THE WORKS. 

Payments. Credits. Net. 
Conduit, $205,391.80 $592.50 $204,799.30 
Dam, 18,845.24 18,845.24 
Distributing reservoir, 65,292.66 2,209.76 63,082.90 
Standpipe, 6,109.93 6,109.93 
Distribution, 2.080,947.02 442.184.03 1,638,762.99 
Engine house, 97,798.95 97,798.95 
Engines, 81,234.47 81,234.47 
Storing reservoir, 60,958.71. 60,958.71 
Receiving reservoir, 31,959.47 31,959.47 
Pump well and culvert, 16,561.41 16,561.41 
White homestead, 4,000.00 4,000.00 
Peckham road, 512.00 512.00 
Preliminary outlay, 2,605.34 2,605.34 
Engine trial, 3,799.95 3,799.95 
Engineering, 23,511.88 23,511.88 
Salaries of Commis- 
sioners, 9,225.00 9,225.00 
Engine house lot, 17,152.89 17,152.89 
Incidentals, 7,843.18 7,843.18 
Management and re- 
pairs, 1,727,424.95 53,665.65 1,673,759.30 
Fountains, 1,919.62 100.00 1,819.62 
Coal shed, 2,972.56 2,972.56 
Inspectors, 5,570.39 5,570.39 



18 WATER REPORT. 

Connection with Lit- 
tle Quittacas, 23,503.76 23,503.76 

Workshop, 5,598.75 5,598.75 

Land, State St., 350.00 350.00 

Land, No. Water St., 900.00 900.00 

Preliminary, further 

supply, 5,158.57 26.25 5,132.32 

Engineer's house. Lit- 
tle Quittacas, 9,568.51 9,568.51 

New workshop. No. 

Water St., 36.658.87 1,001.25 35,657.62 

Garage, No. Water St., 7,095.25 7,095.25 

Further supply, in- 
cidentals, 28,922.48 28,922.48 

Lands around ponds, 118,294.28 118,294.28 

Pumping station and 

conduit connection, 362,049.49 362,049.49 

Force main, 376,046.47 376,046.47 

High Hill reservoir, 181,405.06 181,405.06 

Distributing main 

from High Hill, 166,076.33 166,076.33 

Railroad, 73,631.64 73,631.64 

Telephone lines, 2,168.64 2,168.64 

Dam at Pocksha Pond, 26,020.70 26,020.70 

Duplicate supply main 

1910, 250,836.65 250,836.65 
Special extensions, 

1911, 151,391.78 151,391.78 
Special extensions, 

1912, 161,019.78 161,019.78 



$6,458,334.43 $506,278.19 $5,952,056.24 
Interest 

paid, $867,948.14 
Bonds 

paid, 553,000.00 
Sinking 

funds, 561,242.00 1,982,190.14 1,982,190.14 



$8,440,524.57 $506,278.19 $7,934,246.38 

$6,458,334.43 $506,278.19 
Cross entries: 

Duplicate supply main. 1910, $836.65 $836.65 

Interest account, 1912, 2.000.00 2,000.00 

$6,461,171.08 $509,114.84 

Credits 1881 and previous, included in above. 

Distribution, $56,813.66 

Conduit, 592.50 

Management and repairs, 4,084.99 



WATER REPORT. 19 

Fountains, 100.00 

Distributing reservoir, 2,209.76 



$63,800.91 



The receipts from the commencement of the works 
have been as follows, viz : 

Appropriations by the City Council, $1,038,000.00 

Net appropriations tor further supply, 1,316,639.60 

Appropriations for duplicate supply main, 1910, 2.50,836.6-5 

Appropriations for special extensions, 1911, 151,391.78 

Appropriations for special extensions, 1912. 161,019.78 

Receipts for water, $5,080,414.13 

Receipts from other 

sources, $509,114.84 

Less duplicate 

supplv main, 

1910, $836.65 

Less interest 

account, 

1912, 2,000.00 2,836.65 506,278.19 5,586,692.32 



$8,504,580.13 



Less water receipts taken by City Council in 

1913 for other than Water Works use. 3 8,483.43 



$8,466,096.70 
Deduct total outlay, 8,440,524.57 



Balance as above December 1. 1915, $25,572.13 

Outlay, 

Deduct from Outlay: - $8,440,524.57 

Paid for management and repairs, $1,727,424.95 

Interest paid, 867,948.14 

Bonds paid, 553,000.00 

Sinking funds, 561,242.00 3,709,615.09 



Actual net cost of works, $4,730,909.48 

Total receipts from water and other sources, $5,586,692.32 

Deduct management and repairs, 
debt, interest, and sinking 
funds, $3,709,615.09 

Amount used bv City Council in 

1913 outside of Water Works, 38,483.43 3,748,098.52 



Water receipts applied to construction, $1,838,593.80 



20 WATER REPORT. 

The funds for the construction of these works have 
been derived from the following sources: 

Investment of Sylvia Ann Howland educational 

bequest, $100,000.00 

Sylvia Ann Howland water bequest, 100,000.00 

Received from sale of bonds, 815,000.00 

Net receipts applied to construction, 1,838,593.80 

Appropriation for construction in 1885, 23,000.00 

Net proceeds of bonds, etc., sold, further supply, 1,316,639.60 
Net proceeds of bonds, etc., sold, duplicate supply 

main, 1910, 250,836.65 
Net proceeds of bonds, etc., sold, special exten- 
sions, 1911, 151,391.78 
Net proceeds of bonds, etc., sold special exten- 
sions, 1912, 161,019.78 



$4,756,481.61 
Deduct balance, December 1, 1915, 25,572.13 



Cost of works as stated above, $4,730,909.48 



The water debt to date is as follows : 

Water bonds, 4 per cent., $140,000.00 

Water bonds, 4 per cent., (further supply), 1,200,000.00 
Water bonds, 4 per cent., (duplicate supply 

main), 200,000.00 
Water bonds, 4 per cent., (special extension, 

1911). 130,000.00 
Water bonds, 4 per cent., (special extension, 

1912), 142,000.00 

Water bonds, 3 i/4 per cent., 48,000.00 

Sylvia Ann Howland bequest, 6 per cent., 100,000.00 



Total, $1,960,000.00 

Less sinking funds in treasury 
No. 9 $20,000.00 bonds due 

April 1st, 1918, $20,000.00 

No. 23 $120,000.00 bonds due 

April 1st, 1924, 84,365.26 

$200,000.00 bonds due 

Dec. 15th, 1924, 
■M^ 94 ' $400,000.00 bonds due 
^^- "^^ ' April 1st. 1926, 719,483.56 

$600,000.00 bonds due 

Jan. 1st, 1927, 
No. 38 $48,000.00 bonds due 

June 1st, 1930, 25,158.47 849,007.29 



Net water debt Dec. 1, 1914, $1,110,992.71 



WATER REPORT. 21 

Outlay for debt and management and repairs in 

1915, 241,709.76 

Outlay for extensions in 1915, 80,897.97 



$322,607.73 
Less receipts other than water rates, 39,221.50 



Net expenditures in 1915, $283,386.23 

Water receipts in 1915, $304,717.29 

Water receipts in 1914, 303,487.60 



Increase in 1915, $1,229.69 

Received from City Departments: 
Water rates, $9,502.36 

Miscellaneous accounts, labor, material, etc., 12,358.78 

There remains unpaid of 4 per cent interest : $40.00 
of 1914, and $1,820.00 of 1915. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Clifford Baylies, 

Water Registrar. 



22 WATER REPORT. 



EEPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT. 



New Bedford Water Works, 

Superintendent 's Office, 

December 1, 1915. 



To ihe Sew Bedford ^Vatcr Board: 

Gentlemen : — The forty-sixth annual report of the 
Superintendent, for the year ending November 30, 1915, is 
herewith submitted : 

Copies of the rainfall records at the Little Quittacas 
Pumping' Station, and at the Long Plain Storage Reservoir 
appear upon the following pages. 

The quality of the water continues to be excellent. 
The result of chemical examinations, made by the State 
Department of Health, of samples taken at various locations 
indicated is given in the following pages. The following- 
communication received from X. H. Goodnough, Chief 
Engineer, State Department of Health, is in reply to an 
in(iuiry made by your Superintendent : 

' ' In response to your request for an examination of the 
water supply of New Bedford, concerning which a recent 
communication to your department states that the chemical 
analyses made by this Department indicate considerable 
pollution, the State Department of Health lia.s caused your 
sources of supply to be examined b}^ its engineer and has 
considered the results of analyses of water as shown by the 
records in this Department and by samples collected 
recently from various parts of the system. 

The water supply of New Bedford is taken from Little 
Quittacas Pond, which is supplemented idth water trowing 
from Great Quittacas Pond, the water of these ponds being 
derived from an aggregate watershed area of 12.85 square 
miles, of w^hich the area of the ponds comprises 2.35 square 
miles. 

Analyses of the water of Great Quittacas Pond, which 
is the larger of the sources, show that there has been little 



WATER REPORT. 23 

variation in tlie quality of this source for many years. The 
amount of chlorine in the Avater is approximately normal 
for the region, and the average amount present in the 
samples of water examined in 1914, for example, was a little 
less than was present in the samples examined in the year 
1897, indicating that there has been no increase in the 
pollution of the water at least within a period of seventeen 
years. In other respects there is no evidence of deterior- 
ation within the long period covered by the examinations 
of this source. 

The water of Little Quittaeas Pond also, which has 
normally a low color, shows no material change for many 
years, except a slight increase in color due to an increasing 
admixture of the water of Great Quittaeas Pond, which has 
a higher color. 

A careful examination of the entire area of the water- 
sheds of these ponds shows no evidence that pollution is 
entering the ponds or their tributaries at any point through- 
out the extent of their watersheds. At the extreme upper 
end of Black Brook, a tributary of Great Quittaeas Pond, 
there are two small villages, but no pollution was found to 
be entering the streams from any of these buildings, and 
a very few of them are located in the neighborhood of the 
streams. 

]\Iany years ago the city wisely purchased the shores of 
these ponds throughout their extent and thus secured 
immunity from danger of pollution of the water by settle- 
ments in the neighborhood of the ponds. Their shores are 
clean and free from debris, and the works in general are in 
excellent condition from a sanitary point of view. The 
only dwellings in the country about the ponds are located 
remote from their shores in a region composed of a porous 
gravelly soil, from which there is no danger that serious 
pollution can find its way into the ponds. 

Finally, bacterial examinations of the water at different 
points throughout the system during the present year show 
that the number of bacteria is very low and that the objec- 
tionable kinds are absent. 

The results of these investigations show that the water 
supply of New Bedford as taken from these ponds is 
entirely satisfactory from a sanitary point of view and that 
no treatment of Avater, whether by chlorine or any other 
process, is necessary. ' ' 



24 



WATER REPORT. 



Rainfall at Quittacas Pumping Station for 1915. 











^ 


















Day 








a. 


>> 


c 

s 

1-3 






4J 


O 


> 
o 


o 
Q 


1 








2 




1.13 












.64 




1.01 






3 








.57 


.05 




.66 










.05 


4 
















1.58 










5 










.14 




.15 






.73 


.12 




6 




1.53 




.07 




.40 




1.95 


.05 




.18 




7 


.72 
























8 










.44 




.98 






.50 




.12 


9 














.03 


.18 










10 








.11 








.05 










11 








.14 






.10 












12 










.27 












.13 




13 


2.51 








.55 






.86 








1.36 


14 














.09 












15 


.08 






.10 












.62 


.68 




16 




.29 










.10 












17 










.14 


.32 


.26 




.06 








18 


3.13 






















1.04 


19 














.10 




.10 




.65 




20 


.03 










.Of) 








1.02 






21 










.60 




.24 




1.72 








22 






.10 




.13 






.72 










23 


1.06 






.10 




.20 












.23 


24 










.05 












.10 




25 


1.50 


.97 


.05 










1.04 










26 








.29 


.12 


.67 






.18 






.60 


27 




















.07 






28 


.04 
























29 














.45 


.25 






.12 


1.12 


30 






.03 


1.13 






2.53 


.11 










31 


1.00 
























Totals 


10.07 


3.92 


.18 


2.51 


2.49 


1.64 


5.69 


7.38 


2.11 


3.95 


1.98 


4.52 



Total fall for the year 46.44 



WATER REPORT. 



25 



Rainfall at Acushnet Storing Reservoir for 1915. 



Day 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 



Totals 



2.78 
.68 

.12 



3.88 

.06 

1.38 

1.72 



.43 



1.61 



1.21 
1.47 



11.93 



.47 



.95 



5.71 





< 


^ 

§ 


c 

s 

•-5 




< 


4-3 

a, 


4J 

O 






.90 




.50 


.72 




1.06 




2.52 

.05 


.15 


.29 


.18 


2.06 
2.40 




.88 






.34 




.84 


.43 




.49 




.18 


.39 




.05 


.67 




.61 


.06 




.14 


.43 


.02 




.05 








.86 


.20 


.43 


.64 


1.81 








.08 


.52 




.78 


.10 










-. 


.53 


.22 

.04 




.20 


.06 


2.75 


2.86 


1.44 


2.55 


7.96 


1.96 


3.24 



.27 



.69 



.84 



.06 



.20 



2.00 



1.89 



1.03 



.23 



.78 

.13 
1.70 



5.82 



Total fall for the year 48.28 inches. 



26 



WATER REPORT. 







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1IN 



WATER REPORT. 



27 



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28 



WATER REPORT. 



o 
o 

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OO 



WATER REPORT. 



29 



W 

H 
< 

w 

o 

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o 22 

.11 



a ® 



30 WATER REPORT. 

The surface of Great Quittacas Pond has varied from 
elevation 48.55 on January 1st, to elevation 51.80 on Febru- 
ary 14th. At this date it is at elevation 49.65. 

The surface of Little Quittacas Pond has varied from 
elevation 50.14 on January 26th, to elevation 43.79 on 
November 30th. At this date it is at elevation 43.81. 

The forestry operations of the past year have been 
mentioned elsewhere. The planting of seedlings has been 
continued on a large scale. 

The Quittacas Pumping Station, the Force Main, and 
the High Hill Distriliuting Reservoir are in excellent con- 
dition. 

It was found necessary to further repair the chimney 
at the Purchase Street Pumping Station by removing the 
outside course of brick and replacing same with new brick 
and providing a new top. This was done under contract 
with the B. F. Smith Co., consideration $890.00. 

The distributing mains have been increased 24,250 feet 
and 7,983 feet of pipe laid in previous years have been 
removed. The total length of distributing mains at this 
date is 165.55 miles. 

The thirty inch Encircling ^lain is now fully completed 
from Union Street south. The installation of this year 
included that portion in First Street, from Rivet to South ; 
South Street, from First to Second: Second Street, from 
Lladison to Union. To fully complete the plan of this 
Encircling Main there remains for installation that portion 
which lies between Union Street on the south and Bowditch 
Street, a short distance north of Weld Street at the north. 
I recommend that plans be made to do at least half of this 
work the coming year with the anticipation of fully com- 
pleting the main in 1917. 

The execution of your order for supplies to the Town 
of Dartmouth required the extension of our mains in Dart- 
mouth and Kempton Street to the town line. In both cases 
the supplies are furnished through a six inch Hersey 
Detector meter, located upon a by-pass. These meters are 
placed in a brick pit and are easily accessible. Insulated 
joints have been placed by the Town of Dartmouth every 
550 feet in the pipe line in Dartmouth Street from Rock- 
dale Avenue to the end of the pipe, south of Bliss Corner 
and in Kempton Street from the town line to west of Smith 
Mills. There are six of these joints in Dartmoutli Street 



WATER REPORT. 



31 



and fifteen in Kempton Street. This department lias also 
placed one insulated joint in Kempton Street, 33yo feet 
east from the Dartmouth town line. 



There have been twenty-five leaks upon the mains the 
past year as herewith shown : 



Date Size 


Locations 


Cause | 


Cost 


1914. 1 




1 




Dec. 


17j 6 in. 


Blaclimer st., W. of Second 


Joint started 1$ 


7.72 


Dec. 


19 6 in. 


Lucas St., at W. line Brock av. 


Joint started 1 


6.67 


Dec. 


27 8 in 


Acushnet av., S. of Coggesliall 


Joint started! 


24. 8S 


1915. 1 1 




1 




Jan. 


11! 8 in. 


Parker st., E. of Summer 


Joint started! 


7.80 


Feb. 


lOjie in. 


Cedar St., S. of Hillman 


Pipe l)roken | 


34.83 


Feb. 


11 j 6 in. 


Atlantic st., S. of Union 


Pipe broken | 


14.94 


Mai". 


13|12 in. 


Belleville av., N. of Sylvia 


Joint started! 


14.57 


Mar. 


13| 6 in. 


Hickory st., W. of Dartmouth 


Joint started! 


3.84 


Mar. 


26|36 in. 


Tarkiln Hill rd., W. of N. Y., 


Wooden joint 






1 


N. H. R. R. 


started | 


6.63 


May 


19i 6 in. 


Eugenia St., at Brook 


Joint started 


6.34 


Aug. 


20il0 in. 


Belleville av., N. of Holly 


Pipe broken 1101. 77 1 




1 




Cinder fill 1 




Aug. 


21136 in. 


Tarkiln Hill rd., W. of N. Y., 


Wooden joint 








N. H. R. R. 


started 1 


22.79- 


Aug. 


23110 in. 


First St., at South 


Joint started! 


6.68 


Aug. 


27116 in. 


Acushnet av., N. of Ball's Cor.. 


Wooden jointi 
started 


4.12 


Sept. 


7j36 in. 


Shawm ut av., feast main) S. of 


Wooden joint! 






1 


Turners Pond 


started 


9.93 


Sept. 


13j 6 in. 


Shawmut av., N. E. cor. Plain- 


1 






1 


ville rd. 


Joint started! 


12.70 


Sept. 


20| 6 in. 


Second st., S. of Maxfield 


Joint started! 


3.92 


Sept. 


22|36 in. 


Bowditch St., S. of Belleville rd. 


Joint started! 


6.34 


Sept. 


24136 in. 


Shawmut av., S. of Turner's 


Wooden joint 








Pond 


started i 


7.99 


Oct. 


12110 in. 


Riverside av., S. of Hathaway 


Pipe broken 


53.67 


Oct. 


25 4 in. 


Steamboat wharf 


Joint started! 


8.94 


Nov. 


15|10 in. 


Allen St., E. of Reed 


Joint started 


7.09 


Nov. 


161 8 in. 


Acushnet av., S. of High 


Joint started 


7.70 


Nov. 


16| 8 in. 


Kilburn st., E. of Belleville av. 


Joint started 


41.33 


Dec. 


1 6 in. 

1 


Coffin av., W. of Riverside av. 


Pipe broken ! 
Cinder fill 1 


27.33 



One thousand seventy-eight feet of small sized dis- 
tribution pipe (less than four inch) has been laid. The 
total lenath now in use is 5,800 feet. 



32 WATER REPORT. 

Eighty-eight new stop gates have been set and twenty 
of those previously set have been removed. The total num- 
ber now in use is 2,207. 

Four new small sized stop gates have been set and one 
of those previously set has been removed. The total num- 
ber now in use is 109. 

Four new waste gates have been set. The total num- 
ber now in use is 168. 

Twenty-five new stop gates for private supplies have 
been set and eight of those previously set have been re- 
moved. The total number now in use is 346. 

Three new air taps have been set. The total number 
now in use is 170. 

Seventy-five new hydrants have been set and twenty- 
nine of those previously set have been removed. The total 
number now in use is 1,350. 

One watering cart hydrant of those previously set 
has been removed. The total number now in use is 73. 

Four hundred thirty-one new service pipes have been 
laid and sixty-eight of those previously laid have been 
removed. The total number now in use is 14,770. 

Two hundred nine service taps have been cleaned as 
follows : Sediment, 176 ; rust, 31 ; trouble inside, 1 ; eels, 1. 



The total number of meters set in 1915 was 467 

Number removed, 115 



To be added, 352 

Number in use December 1, 1914, 13,788 



Number in use December 1, 1915, 14,140 

This list may be divided as follows : 
Manufacturing supplies, 226 

Domestic supplies, 13,914 

14,140 

The following is a list of the different makes of meters 
in commission: Crown, 216; Empire, 199; Empire Com- 
pound, 12; Nash, 423; Gem, 6; Trident Compound, 13; 
Trident Crest, 16 ; Trident Disc, 242 ; Hersey Torrent, 15 ; 
Hersey Rotary, 95 ; Hersey Disc, 3,007 ; Hersey Compound, 
4 ; Hersey Detector, 5 : Watch Dog, 5 ; Union Rotary, 118 ; 



WATER REPORT. 



33 



King, 7,312; Lambert, 1,276; Thompson, 3; Wortliington 
Turbine, 7 ; Worthington Disc, 1,161 ; Keystone, 5. 

Total Cost of Repairing of ]\Ieters During Year 1915. 





Damaged 




Total 


Total 


Average 


Size. 


by 


Other 


Number 


Cost of 


Cost of 




Frost. 


Repairs. 


Repaired. 


Repairs. 


Repairs. 


6 inch 





3 


3 


$22.53 


$7.51 


4 inch 





8 


8 


154.42 


19.30 


3 inch 





4 


4 


23.01 


5.75 


2 inch 


2 


10 


12 


80.19 


6.68 


IVz inch 





o 


3 


38.82 


12.94 


1 inch 


1 


24 


2.5 


88.36 


3.53 


% inch 


20 


109 


129 


361.13 


2.79 


% inch 


170 


853 


1023 


2572.42 


2.51 


Totals, 


193 


1014 


1207 


$3340.88 





In my last report I stated that all of the horse drink- 
ing fountains throughout the City had been closed by rea- 
son of requests received from the Commissioner of Animal 
Industry, State House, Boston, and the local Board of 
Health. This was occasioned by the rapid increase of 
glanders in this City, it being suspected that the horse 
bowls were a contributing factor in the spread of the disease. 
Early in the Spring came many requests for a resumption 
of the service, but the bodies named above, together with 
the large owners of horses in this City, strongly advised 
against any measure which would allow two or more horses 
to drink from the same receptacle. We were requested to 
devise a fountain that would serve horses through individual 
pails, to be supplied by the driver. This we investigated, 
and found that it was not an easy matter to maintain such 
a type of fountain through freezing weather. We finally 
decided upon the type recently adopted by the Boston 
Water Department to meet exactly their condition. Most 
of the fountains in this City were of the horse bowl type 
known as the H. F. Jenks pattern. The horse bowls upon 
all of this type of fountain have been removed and new 



34 



WATER REPORT. 



castings containing three or more self closing faucets have 
been placed on the standard formerly supporting the horse 
bowl. This is designed to be a non-freezable device and no 
trouble is expected from that cause. The accompanying 
photograph gives a good idea of their appearance. I may 
add that this apparatus, as now maintained, is giving entire 
satisfaction to the community. I herewith include a list of 
these fountains. 



Following is a complete list of the drinking fountains 



now m use 



8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 

14. 
15. 



West French ave., at Cove st., 
Bolton St., at junction of Rivet St., 
Sixth St., at junction of County St., 
Allen St., at junction of Dartmouth st., 
Front St., at corner of School st., 
Union st., at corner of Bethel st., 
Hathaway rd., 1,964 ft. E. of Rockdale ave., 
Kempton st., at junction of Mill st., 
County St., at corner of Smith st., 
Shawmut ave., at corner of Durfee st., 
Acushnet ave., at junction of Weld st., 
Acushnet ave., south of Tarkiln Hill rd., 
Belleville rd., between Acushnet ave. and No. 

Front St., 
Acushnet ave., at junction of Water st., 
Acushnet ave.. at corner of Braley rd.. 



3 Faucets 

3 Faucets 

4 Faucets 
3 Faucets 
3 Faucets 
3 Faucets 

Horse bowl 
3 Faucets 
Nash 

3 Faucets 
3 Faucets 
3 Faucets 

3 Faucets 

4 Faucets 
2 Faucets 



WATER REPORT. 



35 



Monthly Consumption op Water. 





Monthly 


Daily Average 




Consumption 


Consumption 


1915 






Gallons 


Gallons 


January 


211,726,886 


6,829,899 


February 


193,611,036 


6,914,680 


March 


219,244,354 


7,072,399 


April 


206,253,262 


6,875,109 


May 


226,311,394 


7,300,367 


June 


246,528,362 


8,217,612 


July 


251,388.672 


8,109,312 


August 


245,305,470 


7,913,079 


September 


244,637,502 


8,154,583 


October 


243,859,816 


7,866.445 


November 


247,687,982 


8,256,266 


December 


255,101,042 


8,229,066 


Total, 


2,791,655,778 




Averages, 


232.637.981 


7.648.372 



Maximum daily consumption, September 16th, 10,441,506 gallons. 

Minimum daily consumption. April 18th, 3,894,900 gallons. 

Average daily consumption, 6 A. M. to 6 P. M., 5,445,314 gallons 

Average night consumption, 6 P. M. to 6 A. M., 2,203,058 gallons 



36 



WATER REPORT. 



Comparison of the Consumption of the Year 1915 With the 
Record of the 33 Previous Years 







3 

"S ? 
■^ o 


5? 

1 


O o 


■^ .2 
^ 3 


si ^ 

O o 


11 

O o 




03 

<D 

a 

O 

t-i 

g 

3 


1882 


28,500 


20,424 


4,203 


859,119,622 


2,826,352 


82 


114 


553 


41 


1883 


30,000 


22,249 


4,465 


849,059,700 


2,326,191 


78 


105 


521 


49 


1884 


33,000 


23,749 


4,691 


867,815,595 


2,371,080 


72 


100 


506 


60 


1885 


33,700 


25,375 


4,965 


1,049,801,050 


2,876,167 


85 


113 


579 


67 


1886 


34,500 


28,480 


5,225 


1,086,534,615 


2,976,807 


86 


104 


569 


82 


1887 


36,000 


30,080 


5,495 


1,112,302,789 


3,047,404 


85 


101 


555 


102 


1888 


37,500 


31,826 


5,785 


1,229,841,794 


3,360,223 


89 


109 


581 


108 


1889 


40,000 


34,000 


6,104 


1,310,488,214 


3,590,379 


90 


106 


588 


120 


1890 


41,500 


35,740 


6,394 


1,485,143,213 


4,066,200 


98 


114 


636 


123 


1891 


45,000 


38,500 


6,742 


1,513,161,482 


4,145,648 


92 


108 


615 


135 


1892 


50,000 


41,776 


7,134 


1,607,955,166 


4,393,320 


88 


105 


616 


144 


1893 


55,000 


44,158 


7,531 


1,824,275,536 


4,998,015 


99 


113 


664 


172 


1894 


56,000 


44,661 


7,767 


1,747,167,532 


4,786,760 


85 


107 


616 


221 


1895 


56,300 


46,154 


8,027 


1,719,830,979 


4,711,866 


84 


102 


587 


254 


1896 


59,000 


48,570 


8,447 


1,924,800,313 


5,259,017 


89 


108 


623 


366 


1897 


60,000 


50,000 


8,860 


2,071,702,478 


5,675,897 


95 


113 


641 


621 


1898 


58,000 


50,000 


9,014 


2,156,277,643 


5,907,610 


102 


118 


655 


734 


1899 


58,000 


50,000 


9,151 


2,261,115,500 


6,194,837 


107 


124 


677 


1,098 


1900 


62,500 


55,000 


9,280 


2,306,997,774 


6,320,542 


101 


115 


681 


1,429 


1901 


65,000 


57,000 


9,447 


2,150,199,262 


5,890,957 


91 


103 


624 


1,566 


1902 


70,000 


61,000 


9,612 


2,325,807,038 


6,372,074 


91 


104 


663 


1,771 


1903 


72,000 


62,000 


9,927 


2,535,280,580 


6,945,974 


96 


112 


700 


1,954 


1904 


73,000 


63,000 


10,166 


2,570,360,6.14 


7,001,520 


96 


111 


689 


2,145 


1905 


75,000 


66,000 


10,477 


2,586,640,683 


7,093,187 


95 


107 


677 


2,434 


1906 


83,000 


76,000 


10,764 


2,524,786,872 


6,916,880 


83 


91 


643 


2,803 


1907 


88,000 


81,000 


11,107 


2,711,824,444 


7,435,572 


84 


91 


670 


3,196 


1908 


89,000 


82,000 


11,516 


2,740,666,728 


7,488,160 


84 


91 


653 


3,628 


1909 


95,000 


88,000 


12,043 


2,727,327,230 


7,472,129 


79 


85 


621 


4,572 


1910 


99,000 


92,000 


12,769 


2,870,478,148 


7,864,323 


79 


85 


616 


6,106 


1911 


102,700 


96,000 


13,311 


2,910,369,438 


7,973,615 


78 


83 


599 


8,206 


1912 


103,000 


97,000 


13,643 


3,030,739,034 


8,280,707 


80 


85 


607 


9,998 


1913 


104,000 


99,000 


14,055 


2,832,828,204 


7,761,173 


75 


78 


552 


12,340 


1914 


108,000 


103,000 


14,407 


2,712,726,402 


7,432,127 


69 


72 


516 


13,788 


1915 


110,000 


107,000 


14,770 


2,791,655,778 


7,648,372 


70 


71 


518 


14,140 



WATER REPORT. 37 

An unusually interesting test of the capacity of the 
distributing system was made on Saturday afternoon, June 
5th, 1915, in the yard of the ]\Ianomet Mills in this city. 
The underground yard systems of four mills, ^lanomet, 
Nonquitt Spinning Co., Nashawena, and Whitman are con- 
nected by 10" and 12" mains. The valves in these con- 
necting pipes are normally kept shut, but when opened for 
an emergency, the combined fire protective equipment has 
available for a primary supply, public water through one 
8" and six 10" connections, and for a secondary supply 
six 1000 gallon and four 1500 gallon Underwriter steam 
pumps, taking suction from the Acushnet River. In the 
test, hose streams were concentrated at the yard of the 
jManomet ^lill where the fire pumps alone delivered 13,600 
gallons per minute at an average hydrant pressure of 

85 lbs., the public water supply alone 5,300 gallons per 
minute at 70 lbs. hydrant pressure, and fire pumps and 
public water supply combined gave a total discharge of 
15,000 gallons per minute at 71 lbs. hydrant pressure. 

The test was conducted by the Inspection Department 
of the Associated Factory iMutual Fire Insurance Com- 
panies, assisted by the officials of this department, in the 
presence of a large delegation of interested parties. The 
test was divided into three sections. In the first test, the 
fire pumps supplied all the water; in the second, the fire 
pumps and city water were combined ; and in the third, the 
city water alone was used. 

No attempt was made to make a spectacular demon- 
stration by running the pumps at high speed and al)nor- 
mally high pressure. In fact, the pressures were purposely 
kept down to those ordinarily used for fire duty and after 
the test it was found that some of the pumps had actually 
been run below normal speed. 

The length of hose lines varied from 50 to 150 feet, 
according to location of hydrant. 

The normal pressure upon the city hydrants in River- 
side Avenue hydrants in front of the ^lanomet ^Nlill is 

86 lbs. This pressure was lowered only twelve pounds hy 
the maxinuun draft, and on Bowditch Street it was lowered 
about two pounds. The gauge at the office of the Water 
Department, ^Municipal Building, about two miles distant, 
recorded a drop of only two pounds during maximum draft. 

In the third test the excellence of the city water supply 



38 WATER REPORT. 

was demonstrated when twenty IVs'' streams were obtained 
at 70 lbs. hydrant pressure, delivering more than 5000 
gallons per minute. 

A searching investigation of the fire protective facilities 
of this city was made in August last by Engineei*s represent- 
ing the Committee on Fire Protection of the National Board 
of Underwriters. Every detail of the Water Works plant 
was carefully inspected. All records and plans were ex- 
amined and in some instances copies for future use of the 
committee were made. Tests of the capacity of the dis- 
tributing system in various selected locations throughout th"ie 
city were taken, and methods of operation in case of emer- 
gency were reviewed. 

The published report of the work of this Committee 
is dated October, 1915. It states that the special recom- 
mendations contained in their previous report (March 
1908), which they considered of such importance as to urge 
an early adoption had been complied with. The only sug- 
gestions, macle in the report just issued, were those in the 
direction of continuing the best recognized practice in the 
installation of all new work. 

It is safe to conclude, as the result of the two unusual 
tests just described, and from the complimentary state- 
ments which those conducting these tests have made to the 
writer that the entire plant is "up-to-date" and ample in 
capacity for present requirements, and that all parts are in 
excellent condition. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. C. P. COGGESHALL, 

Superintendent. 




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WATER REPORT. 



39 



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40 



WATER REPORT. 



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WATER REPORT. 



41 



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42 



WATER REPORT. 



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44 



WATER REPORT. 








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WATER REPORT. 



45 



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46 



WATER REPORT. 






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WATER REPORT. 



47 



TABLE C. 

Location and Size of Small Sized Distribution Pipe 
Laid in 1915. 



Streets 



Lombard st., from Rockland to 23 2 ft. X. of 
Rockland 

Bridge (N. B. and Fairhaven), from east end of 
6x6x6 branch, 83 ft. west of iron plate over 
Fish Island east abutment, east, south and 
up, to surface of bridge, 2 ft. 2" brass pipe, 
thence east, over draw, 7 79 ft. 2" galv. iron 
pipe to Popes Island west alnitment, thence 
down and north, 18 ft. 2" l)rass pipe to 
6x6x4 branch, 18 ft. east of iron plate over 
west abutment 

Located in Freetown: — 

Quittacas ave., from 44 ft. E. of 4" Middlelioro 
rd. main, east 



Totals. 



2 in. 

brass and 
gralv. iron 


2 in. 

cast iron 


l>^in. 

galv.iron 


817 


258 


3 


817 


258 


3 



In use previous to 1915 
Laid in 191.5 



4722 feet 
1078 feet 



Total in use December 1, 1915 5800 feet or 1.09848 miles 



48 WATER REPORT. 

TABLE D. 
Location and Size of Stop Gates Set in 1915. 



Streets 



30 



Acushnet av., north side Wall 

Acushnet av., S. of Wamsutta, 82 ft 

Acushnet av., south side Wamsutta 

Acushnet av., north side Wamsutta 

Acushnet av., N. of Wamsutta, 125 ft 

Adams st., east side Mt. Pleasant 

Aquidneck St., west side Brock av 

Arnold St., west side Rounds, (south) 

Baylies st., north side Wood 

Belleville av., S. of Bullard, 22 ft 

Bonney st., south side Windsor, (main E. side 

sewer) 

Brock av.. at hydt., N. side, W. of Bonney, 

163 ft 

Brock av., W. of Bonney, 227 ft 

Brock av., at hydt., N. side, W. of Bonney. 

293 ft 

Brock av., W. of Bonney, 324 ft 

Brock av., at hydt., N. side, W. of Bonney, 

660 ft 

Brock av., east side Orchard 

Brock av., N. of S. line Rockdale av., 2 9 ft. . 

Brock av., south side Rockdale av 

Brock av., at hydt., N. side, W. of Rockdale 

av., 379 ft 

Brock av., at hydt., N. side, W. of Rockdale 

av., 764 ft 

Brock av., W. of Rockdale av., 768 ft 

Brock av., at hydt., N. side, W. of Rockdale 
av., 1138 ft 

Brock av., at hydt., N. side, W. of Rockdale 
av., 1529 ft 

Brownell st., north side Hawthorn 

Brownell st., south side Arnold 

Chancery St., north side Smith 

Coggeshall st., east side Mt. Pleasant 

Concord st., north side Princeton 

Cottage St., north side Elm 

First St., at hydt, W. side, S. of South, 33 2 ft. 

First St., south side South 

First St., north side South 

First St., south side Grinnell 

First St., north side Grinnell 

Front St., north side Potomska 

Front St., south side South 

Front St., north side South 

Front St., south side Grinnell 

Front St., north side Grinnell 



12 



10 8 
in. in. 



WATER REPORT. 



49 



TABLE D — CONTINUED. 



30 12 10 8 6 4 



in. 


n. 


in. 


m. 


in. 


in. 


Front St., south side Rowland 








1 






Gosnold St., east side Hemlock 










1 




Grinnell St., west side Prospect 






1 








Hemlock st., north side Rockdale av 








1 






Holly St., west side Belleville av 






1 








Kempton st., west side Purchase 






1 








Kempton st., at hydt., S. side, E. of N. B. 


and Dartmouth line, 31 ft 










1 




Landry st., south side Wood 












1 


Liljerty st., south side Kempton 










1 




Lowell St., north side Tarkiln Hill rd 










1 




Maxfield st., west side Emerson 








1 


1 




Middle st., at hydt., S. W. cor. Pleasant 


Middle st., east side Cottage 












1 


Myrtle st.. south side Sawyer 










1 




Orchard st., north side Brock av 






1 








Orchard st., at hydt., N. W. cor. Brock av . . . . 










1 




Palmer st., north side Arnold 








1 






Phillips rd., at hydt., S. side, E. of Church, 


4 64 ft 










1 

1 




Phillips rd., at hydt., S. E. cor. Church 


Phillips rd., east side Church 






1 








Phillips rd., north side Phillips rd., (east) . . . 






1 








Phillips rd., at hydt., W. side, N. of Phillips 














rd., (east) 519 ft 










1 




Potomska st., east side First 








1 






Potomska St., west side First 








1 






Rockdale av., west side Brock av 






1 








Rockdale av., at hydt., S. W. cor. Brock av. . 










1 




Rockdale av., at hydt., S. side, W. of Brock 














av., 23 7 ft 










1 




Rockdale av., at hydt., S. side, E. of Bolton. 














1 7 7 ft 






1 




1 




Rockdale av., east side Bolton 


Rounds St., north side Hawthorn 








1 






Rounds St., south side Arnold 








1 






School St., east side Purchase 










1 




Second st., south side SchooL 


1 












Second st., at hydt., S. E. cor. Union 








1 






Second st south side Union 


1 












Second st., south side Maxfield 










1 




South st east side First 








1 






Spring St., east side Second 










1 




Spring St., west side Second 










1 




Sycamore st. west side Emerson 










1 




Tarkiln Hill rd., at hydt., S. side, opp. Lowell 










1 




Union st., east side Second '. 




1 










Union st., west side Second 




1 










Union st east side Palmer 










1 




Valentine st., east side West French av 










1 




Walnut St., east side Second 










1 





50 



WATER REPORT. 
TABLE D CONTINUED. 



30 12 10 8 6 4 
in. in. in. in. in. in 



Walnut St., west side Second 

Water st., north side Leonard. 






1 
14 


21 


1 
39 


2 


Totals 


S 









WATER REPORT. 



51 



TABLE D CONTINUED. 



Location and Size of Stop Gates Removed in 1915. 



Streets 



Acushnet av., at hydt., west side, S. of Warn 

sutta, 250 ft 

Acushnet av., south side Wamsutta 1 

Acuslmet av., north side Wamsutta 

First St., north side Potomsli^a 

r^irst St.. S. of South, 20 ft 

First St., south side Grinnell 

First St., nortli side Grinnell 

Fi'ont St., north side Potomslva 

I^'ront St., south side South 

Front St., south side Grinnell 

Front St., nortli side Grinnell 

Holly St., west side Belleville av 

Kempton st., west side Purchase 

Liberty st., south side Kempton 

School St., east side Purchase 

Second st., soutli side Walnut 

Second st., north side Walnut 

Second st., south side Union . 

Spring St., west side Second 

Union st., at liydt., S. W. cor. Second 

Totals 



12 


10 


6 


4 t 


in. 


in. 


m. 
1 


in. 


1 








1 






1 
1 






1 






1 








1 








1 






1 


1 




1 






1 
























































1 




2 


2 


3 


13 



TAIjLE D — concluded. 



Number of stop gates set in 1915 88 

Numl)er removed 2 

Number to be added 68 

Num1)er in use Decemlier 1, 1914 2139 

Number in use December 1, 1915.... 2207 



52 



WATER REPORT. 



TABLE E. 

Location and Size of Small Sized Stop Gates Set in 1915. 



Streets 


2 in. 


IK in. 


Bridge, Popes Island, E. of E. line oi" iron plate 
over W. abutment, 18 ft 

Bridge, Fish Island, W. of W. line of iron plate 
over B. abutment, 82 ft 

Lombard st., north side Rockland 

Located in Freetown: — 
Quittacas av., E. of W. line Middleboro rd. 
(fence), 46 ft 


1 

1 
1 


1 


Totals 


3 


1 





Location and Size op Smai^l Sized Stop Gates 
Removed in 1915. 



Streets 


2 in. 


First St., at wateringcart hydrant, 
Grinnell, 2 8 ft 


south of 


1 


Total 




1 





Number set during 1915 
Number removed 



To be added 3 

Number in use December 1, 1914 106 



Number in use December 1, 1915 



109 



WATER REPORT. 



53 



TABLE F. 

Location and Size of Waste Gates Set in 1915. 



streets 


4 in. 


2 in. 


Bridge, Popes Island, E. of E. line of iron plate 
over W. abutment Popes Island, 17 ft 

Bridge, Fish Island, W. of W. line of iron plate 
over E. abutment Fish Island, 82 ft 

Middle st., W. of Pleasant (north), 28 ft 

Second St., at School 


1 
1 


1 
1 


Totals 


2 


2 





Number of waste gates set in 1915 
Number removed 



Number to be added 4 

Number in use December 1, 1914 164 



Number in use December 1, 1915 16? 



54 WATER REPORT. 

TABLE G. 

Location and Size of Private Stop Gates Set in 1915. 



streets 



Coffin av., at Whitman Mills, E. of Riverside 

av., 243 ft., (to correct error report 1896, 

entered as 8 in. gate) 

Dartmouth St., at Town of Dartmouth Supply, 

N. from S. line Rockdale av., 7.5 ft. . . . 
Dartmouth st., at Town of Dartmouth Supply, 

N. from S. line Rockdale av., 14.4 ft. . . . 
Dartmouth st., at Town of Dartmouth Supply, 

N. from S. line Rockdale av., 14.9 ft. . . . 
Elm St., at Harry M. Chapman Bldg., E. of 

Pleasant, (north), 7.8 ft 

Front St., at Merchants' Terminal Warehouse 

Co., N. of Elm, 14 ft 

Grinnell St., at City Mfg. Co., E. of Prospect, 

125 ft 

Kempton St., at Town of Dartmouth Supply, 

E. from N. B. and Dartmoutli line, 9.2 ft. 
Kempton St., at Town of Dartmouth Supply, 

E. from N. B. and Dartmouth line, 21.6 ft. 
Kempton st., at Town of Dartmouth Supply, 

E. from N. B. and Dartmouth line, 23 ft. 
Kempton st., at Town of Dartmouth Supply, 

E. from N. B. and Dartmouth line, 31 ft. 
Mechanics lane, at Merchants National Bank, 

W. of Purchase, 3 8.6 ft 

North St., at Holy Family High School, E. of 

Summer, 55 ft 

Pope St., at Z. B. Davis's, E. of Acushnet av., 

15 ft 

Second St., at J. Rubin's, S. of Coffin, 88.6 ft. 
Union St., at Steiger, Dudgeon Co., W. of 

Purchase, (north). 2 6.7 ft 

Union st, at Masonic Bldg., E. of Pleasant, 

(north), 90.8 ft 

Union St., at N. B. Dry Goods Co., E. of 

Pleasant, (south), 76.2 ft 

Union st., at First National Bank, W. of 

Pleasant, 86.7 ft 

Union St., at First National Bank, W. of 

Pleasant, 89.7 ft 

Union st., at Elks' Building, E. of Sixth, 

65.2 ft 

Union st., at Elks' Building, E. of Sixth, 

63 ft 

Water st., at N. E. Cotton Yarn Co., N. B. 

Spinning Dept., S. of Hillman, 59.3 ft. . . 



10 8 



WATER REPORT. 
TABLE G — CONTINUED. 



55 



10 8 6 4 3 2 
in. in. in. in. in. in. 



William St., at Cummings Building, W. of 
Purchase, 47.6 ft 

William St., at Cummings Building, W. of 
Purchase, 50.6 ft 

Totals 



2 


6 


4 


1 
7 


4 


1 
2 



56 



WATER REPORT. 



TABLE G — CONCLUDED. 



Location and Size of Private Stop Gates Removed in 1915. 



Streets 



Coffin av., at Whitman Mills, E. of Riverside av.. 
243 ft., (to correct error report 1896, entered 
as 8 in. gate, should be 10 in.) 

Front St., at Pier No. 4, Rotch's N. wharf, on N. 
line Hamilton, 40.3 ft. E. of N. Y., N. H. & 
H. R. R. Co fence 

Hillman st., at N. E. Cotton Yarn Co., (N. B. Spin- 
ning Dept.), W. of Water, (south), 91.5 ft. . . . 

Kilburn St., at Grinnell Mfg. Corp., E. of Belleville 
av., 3 42 ft 

Kilburn st., at Grinnell Mfg. Corp., E. of Front. 

146.7 ft 

Nve St., at St. Anthony's Church, E. of Bowditch, 

217.8 ft 

Prospect St., at , City Mfg. Corp., N. of South, 

86.4 ft 

William St., at Merchants Bank Bldg., W. of 
Purchase, 68.5 ft 



Totals. 



8 


6 


3 


2 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 
1 


1 


1 


2 


3 


2 


1 



Number set during 1915 25 

Number removed 8 



To be added 17 

Number in use December 1, 1914 329 



Number in use December 1, 1915 346 



WATER REPORT. 



57 



TABLE H. 
Location and Size of Am Taps Set in 1915. 



streets 



First St., in south side 30-" gate box, S. of Soutli, 16 ft. 

Second st., in south side 30" gate box, on S. line School 

Second St., in south side 3 0" gate box, S. of Union, 

14 ft 



Total 



Va. m. 



Number of air taps set in 1915 
Number removed 



Number to be added 3 

Number in use December 1.1914 167 



Number in use December 1,1915 170 



58 WATER REPORT. - ' 

TABLE I. 

Location of Hydrants Set in 1915. 

Aquidneck st., south side, 3 04 ft. W. of Brock av. 

Arnold St., south side, opp. Palmer. 

Bank St., S. W. cor. Matthew. 

Baylies st., S. W. cor. Hersom. 

Bedford st., S. W. cor. Brigham. 

Bedford St., south side, 3 27 ft. W. of Brigham. 

Bonney St., east side, 173 ft. S. of Winsor. 

Brock av., north side, 163 ft. W. of Bonney. 

Brock av., north side, 293 ft. W. of Bonney. 

Brock av., north side, 660 ft. W. of Bonney. 

Brock av., north side, 3 79 ft. W. of Rockdale av. 

Brock av., north side, 764 ft. W. of Rockdale av. 

Brock av., north side, 1138 ft. W. of Rockdale av. 

Brock av., north side, 15 29 ft. W. of Rockdale av. 

Brownell st., N. W. cor. Hawthorn. 

Brownell st., N. W. cor. Maple. 

Charles St., south side, 2 82 ft. E. of Brock av. 

Coggeshall St., S. W. cor. Summer. 

Concord st., S. W. cor. Irvington. 

Cottage St., S. W. cor. Elm. 

Edison st., west side, 4 4 ft. N. of Glennon. 

Edward st., south side, 200 ft. E. of Field. 

Emerson st., S. W. cor. Sycamore. 

First St., west side, 332 ft. S. of South. 

First St., N. W. cor. South. 

First St., S. W. cor. Grinnell. 

First St., N. W. cor. Maiden lane. 

Front St., west side, 330 ft. S. of South. 

Front St., S. W. cor. South. 

Front St., west side, 2 83 ft. S. of Rowland. 

Front St., S. W. cor. Rowland. 

Glennon st., S. E. cor. Edison. 

Gosnold St., S. E. cor. Hemlock. 

Grinnell St., S. W. cor. Prospect. 

Hersom st., south side, 104 ft. E. of Baylies. 

Junior st., west side, .526 ft. S. of Union. 

Junior St., west side, 3 01 ft. S. of Union. 

Kempton st., S. W. cor. Purchase. 

Kempton st., south side, 2 7 ft. E. of N. B. and Dartmouth line. 

Landry st., west side, 456 ft. S. of Wood. 

Liberty st., S. W. cor. Middle. 

Lowell St., west side, 315 ft. N. of Tarkiln Hill rd. 

Maple St., south side, 86 ft. W. of Reed. 

Middle St., S. W. cor. Pleasant. 

Oaklawn st., south side, 589 ft. W. of Brock av. 

Oaklawn st., south side, 884 ft. W. of Brock av. 

Orchard St., N. W. cor. Brock av. 

Palmer st., west side, 272 ft. S. of Union. 



WATER REPORT. 59 

Phillips rd., soutli side, 4 61 ft. E. of Church. 

Phillips rd., S. E. cor. Church. 

Phillips rd., west side, 516 ft. N. of Phillips rd. (east). 

Pontiac St., south side, 116 ft. W. of Acushnet av. 

Potomska St., S. W. cor. First. 

Princeton St., south side, 99 9 ft. W. of Bowditch. 

Query st., south side, 3 07 ft. W. of Bowditch. 

Query st., south side, 491 ft. W. of Bowditch. 

Reed St., S. W. cor. Maple. 

Reed st.. west side, 235 ft. S. of Union. 

Rochambeau st., west side, 487 ft. N. of Irvington. 

Rockdale av., south side, 177 ft. E. of Bolton. 

Rockdale av., south side, 23 7 ft. W. of Brock av. 

Rockdale av. , S. W. cor. Brock av. 

Rounds St., S. W. cor. Maple. 

Ryan st., S. E. cor. Palmer. 

School St., S. W. cor. Second. 

Second st., S. E. cor. Union. 

Smith St., S. W. cor. Chancery. 

Spring St., S. W. cor. Second. 

Tarkiln Hill rd., south side, opp. Lowell. 

Valentine St., S. E. cor. West French a v. 

Walnut St., S. W. cor. Second. 

Wamsutta st., S. W. cor. Acushnet av. 

Weaver st., south side, 511 ft. W. of Dartmouth. 

Willard St., S. E. cor. West French av. 

Winsor st., S. E. cor. Bonney. 



Hydrants Removed ix lOlo. 

Acushnet av., west side, 250 ft. S. of Wamsutta. Post. 

Bank st., west side, 225 ft. S. of Matthew. Post. 

Bedford st., south side, 243 ft. W. of Brigham. Post. 

Brownell st., west side, 117 ft. S. of Maple. Post. 

Charles st., south side, 122 ft. E. of Brock av. Post. 

Edward St., south side, 157 ft. W- of Dartmouth. Post. 

Edward St., south side, 90 ft. E. of Field. Post. 

First St., N. W. cor. Potomska. Post. 

First St., west side, 187 ft. S. of Howland. Post. 

Front St., west side, 3 30 ft. S. of South. Post. 

Front St., west side, 2 68 ft. S. of Howland. Post. 

Glennon st., south side, 408 ft. W. of Brook. Post. 

Gosnold St., south side, 431 ft. W. of Bolton. Post. 

Hemlock St.. west side, 249 ft. S. of Winsper. Post. 

Kempton st., S. W. cor. Purchase. Post. 

Liberty st., S. W. cor. Middle. Post. 

Middle st., S. W. cor. Pleasant. Post. 

Oaklawn st., south side, 183 ft. W. of Brock av. Post. 



60 



WATER REPORT. 



Query st., south side, 179 ft. W. of Bowditch. Post. 

Reed St., west side, 189 ft. N. of Hawthorn. Post 

Ryan st., south side, 126 ft. W. of Brownell. Post. 

Second st., west side, 74 ft. S. of Spring. Plush. 

South St., S. W. cor. First. Post. 

Tarkiln Hill rd., south side, 125 ft. W. of Bowditch. Post. 

Union St., S. W. cor. Second. Post. 
Valentine St., south side, 118 ft. E. of West French av. Post. 

Walnut St., S. W. cor. Second. Post. 

West French av., east side, 65 ft. S. of Willard. Post. 

Winsor st., south side, 130 ft. W. of Crapo. Post. 



Number set during 1915 75 

Number removed during 1915 29 

Number to be added 46 

Number in use December 1, 1914 1304 

Number in use December 1, 1915 1350 



TABLE J. 

Location of Watering Cart Hydrant Removed in 1915. 

First St., west side, 2 8 ft. S. of Grinnell. Flush. 

Number in use December 1, 1914 74 

Number removed during 1915 1 

Number in use December 1, 1915 73 



WATER REPORT. 



61 



TABLE K. 

Statement of Work Done by the Service Department 
FOR the Year Ending December 1, 1915. 



Kind and Size. 


Number 
of 

Services 


Length 

on 
Taker. 


Length 

on 

City. 


Lead pipe, 1 inch heavy 


10 
103 

6 
168 
123 

1 

3. 

2 

7 

4 

2 



1 

1 


479.0 

1991.5 

60.0 

2460.0 

1692.0 

20.5 

656.5 

151.5 

339.0 

49.0 

96.5 

272.0 

204.0 

90.0 


212.0 
2268.0 

147.0 
3899.0 
2953.5 


Lead pipe, % inch liglit 


Lead pipe, % incli heavy 

Lead pipe, % inch light 


Lead pipe, % inch lieavy 

Cast iron pipe, 10 inch 


Cast iron pipe, 8 inch 


Cast iron pipe, 6 inch 


Cast iron pipe, 4 inch 


Cast iron pipe, 3 inch 


Cast iron pipe 2 inch 


Galvanized pipe, 1 1/4 inch 

Galvanized pipe. 1 inch 

Galvanized pipe, % inch 


Totals 


431 


8561.5 


9479.5 



Two % inch iron services have been removed and replaceu 
with % inch light lead. 

One % inch tin lined service has been removed and re- 
placed with % inch heavy lead. 

One % inch heavy lead service has been removed and re- 
placed with 1 inch heavy lead. 

Three % inch iron services have been removed and re- 
placed with % inch heavy lead. 

Two % inch heavy lead services have been removed and 
replaced with 1 inch heavy lead. 

One % inch light lead service has been removed and re- 
placed with % inch light lead. 

One % inch light lead service has been removed and re- 
placed with % inch heavy lead. 

Two % inch heavy lead services have been removed and 
replaced with % inch heavy lead. 

Five connections to services previously laid have been 
made by the owners. 

Ten connections to services previously laid have been made 
l)y the city, using 3 feet % inch light lead, 12 6.5 feet % inch 
light lead, 191 feet % inch heavy lead, 54.5 feet V2 inch heavy 
lead. 



62 WATER REPORT. 

Twenty-four extensions to services previously laid have 
been made by the city, using 3 6 feet 12 inch cast iron, 168 
feet 10 inch cast iron, 2 62 feet 8 inch cast iron, 109 6 feet 6 
inch cast iron, 249 feet 4 inch cast iron, 83 feet 2 inch cast 
iron, 33 feet % inch heavy lead. 67 feet % inch light lead, 
42 feet % inch heavy lead, 65 feet % inch light lead, 26 feet 
Yz inch heavy lead. 

Eight connections to services previously laid by the owners 
have been discontinued. 

Six connections to services previously laid by the city have 
been discontinued. 

One 8 inch cast iron, three 6 inch cast iron, one 3 inch 
cast iron, one 2 inch galvanized iron, one 1 1/4 inch heavy lead, 
one 1 inch heavy lead, two 1 inch light lead, six % inch heavy 
lead, seven % inch light lead, one % inch iron, seventeen % 
inch heavy lead, ten % inch light lead, seventeen % inch heavj^ 
lead services have been removed. 

Length of service pipe laid during the year, 20,570 feet. 

Number of services laid in 1915 431 

Number removed 68 

Number to be added 363 

Number in use December 1, 1914 14,407 



Number in use December 1, 1915. . . . 14,770 



WATER REPORT. 6.^ 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 1915. 

IN FORM RECOMMENDED BY THE NEW ENGLAND 
WATER WORKS ASSOCIATION. 



NEW BEDFORD WATER WORKS. 

NEW BEDFORD, 

BRISTOL COUNTY, MASS. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 191.^, 109,-568. 

Date of construction, 1866 to 1869, inclusive. Further supply, 
189 5 to 1901, inclusive. 

By whom owned, City of New Bedford. 

Source of supply. — Water was first introduced on Nov. 2 6, 1869. 
From that date until July 10, 1899, the supply was taken 
from a storing reservoir artificially formed by constructing 
a dam across the valley of the Acushnet River, seven miles 
north of the centre of the City. • This supply was aug- 
mented by a connection made in 1886 with Little Quittacas 
Pond. 

Since July 10. 1899, the whole supply has been taken from 
Great and Little Quittacas Ponds, eleven miles north of 
the centre of the city. 

Mode of supply. — Previous to July 10, 1899, the water flowed 
by gravity from the Acushnet Storing Reservoir (grade 
4 0' + high water New Bedford Harbor) through a brick 
conduit 3 feet wide, 4 feet high, 5 6-10 miles long to a 
receiving reservoir (capacity 3 million gallons: grade 30') 
located opposite the Purchase Street Pumping Station. 
Thence it was pumped into the Mt. Pleasant Distributing 
Reservoir (capacity 15 Mnillion gallons; grade 154') 
located 1,879 feet distant, from whence it flowed by 
gravity into the city"s distributing system. 

Since July 10, 1899, the entire supply has been pumped from 
Little Quittacas Pond (grade 52' through a 4 8-inch steel 
force main SV4, miles long) to a distributing reservoir 
(capacity 67 millions gallons; grade 216') located upon 
High Hill, in the town of Dartmouth. From this reservoir 
it flows into the city's distributing system by gravitation 
through two 3 6-inch cast iron pipes averaging 4 1-17 miles 
in length. 

The first named system is not now in use, but is held in reserve 
to meet any emergency which might occur. 



64 WATER REPORT. 

PUMPING STATISTICS. 

1. Builders of Pumping Machinerj-. 
Purchase Street Station: 

a. McAlpine engine, 

built by Quintard Iron Works, Cap. 5,000,000 gals, per 24 hrs. 

b. Duplex engine, 

built by Henry R. Worthington, Cap. 3,000,000 gals, per 24 hrs. 

c. High duty engine, 

built by Henry R. Worthington, Cap. 5,000,000 gals, per 24 hrs. 
Little Quittacas Station: 

a. b. Leavitt engines in duplicate, Capacity of the two engines 
built by Dickson Mfg. Co., 20,000,000 gallons per 24 hrs. 

2. Description of fuel used. 

a. Kind — bituminous. 

b. Brand of coal — Pocahontas. 

c. Price of coal per gross ton — delivered Little Quittacas 

Station, $4.41. 

d. Percentage of ash — 7. 

e. Wood, price per cord — none used. 



LITTLE QUITTACAS STATION — Engine B. 

3. Coal consumed for the year — 3,264,220 lbs. 

4. [Pounds of wood consumed] ^3 =equivalent amount of 

coal — none used. 

5. Total equivalent coal consumed for the vear = (3 ) + (4) , 

3,264,220 lbs. 

6. Total pumpage for the year — 2,759,787,006 gallons, with 

allowance for slip. 

7. Average static head against which pumps work — 168.62 

feet. 

8. Average dynamic head against which pumps work — 185.43 

feet. 
9a. Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent coal 

(5) — 844. 
9b. Number of gallons raised 100 feet per pound of equivalent 

coal (5) — 1565. 

10 nv.fyizr^ g'i's. pumppd (6)xS.34 (Ihs. x lOOx dynamic head (h )^-iqq ycQ 140 
Total fuel cou;^umed (5) ' ' 

Cost ofptimping, figured on pumping station expenses, viz.: 
$22,681.00 

11. Per million gallons pumped — $8.22 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic)— 4^ ki cents 
Cost of pumping figured on total maintenance and interest on 

bonds, {see financial CC-^-DD) viz.: $192,779.76 

13. Per million gallons pumped — $69.85 

14. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — 37 Vio cents 



WATER REPORT. 



65 



FINANCIAL STATISTICS. 





RECEIPTS. 






EXPENDITURES. 




Bala 


ice brought fonrard: 


$4,241.07 


Water worls maintenance: 




(a) 


From ordinary (main- 




AA. 


Operation, 






tenance) receipts, 


$39,221.50 




(management 




(b) 


From extraordinary re- 






and repairs), $117,479.76 






ceipts (bonds, etc.) 




CC. 


Total maintenance, $117,479.76 








DD. 


Interest on bonds. 


75,300.00 




Total, 


$43,462.57 








From water rates: 






(CC + DD), $192,779.76 


A. 


Fixture rates, 




EE. 


Payments of bonds. 


21,000.00 


B. 


Meter rates, $291,029.44 




FF. 


Sinking fund, 


27,930.00 


C. 


Total from consumers, 


$291,029.44 








D. 


For hydrants, 




Water works construction : 




E. 


For fountains, 




GG. 


Extension of 




F. 


For street watering. 


764.22 




mains, $63,598.90 




G. 


For public buildings, 




HH. 


Extension of 




H. 


For miscellaneous uses, 


68.71 




services, 8,461.26 




I. 


General appropriations, 




II. 


Extension of 




J. 


Total from municipal 






meters, 8,504.10 






departments. 




JJ. 


Special : 333.71 




K. 


From tax levy, 




K.K. 


Total construction, 


80,897.97 


L. 


From bond issue. 




LL. 


Unclassified expenses : 




M. 


From other sources : 




MM. 


Balance : 






For building purposes. 


1,788.08 




(aa) Ordinary, $25,572.13 




For meter rentals. 
Total, 


11,066.84 


N. 


Total balance. 


25,572.13 


N. 


$348,179.86 


Total, $348,179.86 



Disposition of balance, --- 

O. Net cost of works to date - 
P. Bonded debt at date 
Q. Value of sinking fund at date 
R. Average rate of interest 



$4,730,909.48 

1,960,000.00 

849,007.29 

-f-per cent. 






66 



WATER REPORT. 



9. 
10 
11, 

12 



STATISTICS OF CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

Estimated total population at date 110,000 

Estimated population on lines of pipe 108,000 

Estimated population supplied 107,000 

Total consumption for the year. . . .2,791,655,778 gallons 

Passed through meters 2,368,916,167 gallons 

Percentage of consumption metered 85 per cent. 

Average daily consumption 7,648,372 gallons 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant 70 

Gallons per day to each consumer 71 

Gallons per day to each tap 518 

Cost of supplying water, per million gallons figured 

on total maintenance (item CC) $42.09 

Total cost of supplying water, per million gallons, 
figured on total maintenance + interest on 
bonds $69.06 



STATISTICS RELATING TO DISTRIBUTING SYSTEM. 



MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe, cast iron and steel. 

2. Sizes, from 4 inch to 48 inch. 

3. Extended 24,250 feet during the 

year. 

4. Discontinued 7,9 83 feet during 

year. 

5. Total now in use 165 _5 5o_5_6 

miles. 

6. Cost of repairs per mile, $36.67. 

7. Number of leaks per mile, .1510. 

8. Length of pipes less than 4 

inches diam., ly^f-^§^ miles. 

9. Number of hydrants added dur- 

ing year (public and pri- 
vate), 47. 

10. Number of hydrants (public and 

private) now in use, 173 7. 

11. Number of stop gates added 

during the year, 68. 

12. Number of stop gates now in 

use, 2,207. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller 

than 4 inch, 109. 

14. Number of blow offs, 168. 

15. Range of pressure on mains, 25 

lbs. to 95 lbs. 



SERVICES. 

16. Kind of pipe: lead, wrought iron 

and cast iron, 

17. Sizes, Vz inch to 10 inch. 

18. Extended 20,570 feet. 

19. Discontinued 3,759 feet. 

20. Total now in use, 104.45 miles. 

21. Numl)er of service taps added 

during year, 3 63. 

22. Number now in use, 14,770. 

23. Average length of service, 37.3 

feet. 

24. Average cost of service for the 

, year: 

a. Gross, $19.63. 

b. Net, $9.12. 

25. Numl)er of meters added, 352. 

26. Number now in use, 14,140. 

27. Percentage of services metered, 

95-1-. 

10 

28. Percentage of receipts from 

metered water (B^C), 100. 



CITY ORDINANCES 



PASSED BY THE CITY COUNCIL 



CITY OF NEW BEDFORD, 



MASSACHUSETTS 




FROM JUNE 1, 1915 TO JUNE 1, 1916 



ORDINANCES. 



ONE WAY STREETS. 



AN ORDINANCE REPEALING AN ORDINANCE ENTITLED 
"AN ORDINANCE REGULATING TRAFFIC ON CERTAIN 
STREETS." 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of New 
Bedford as follows: 

Section 1. An ordinance entitled "An Ordinance Regu- 
lating Traffic on Certain Streets" passed to be ordained October 
27, 1910, and approved October 28, 1910, is hereby repealed. 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its pas- 
sage. 

In Board of Aldermen, .June 16, 1915. Passed to be ordained. 

Edw. R. Hathaway, Mayor. 

In Common Council, Jxuie 16, 1915. Passed to be ordained. 

James F. Collins, President. 

Presented to and aj-proved by the Mayor, June 17th, 1915. A 
true copy attest: — W. 11. B. Remington, City Clerk. 



AN ORDINANCE AMENDING AN ORDINANCE ENTITLED 
"AN ORDINANCE REGULATING THE PASSAGE OF 
VEHICLES IN THE STREETS." 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of New 
Bedford as follows: 

Section 1. Section 1, paragraph 31 of an Ordinance en- 
titled, "An Ordinance Regulating the Passage of Vehicles in 
the Streets;" passed to be ordained September 11, 1913, and 
Approved September 12, 1913, is hereby amended by striking 
out the whole of said section, the said section being under the 
heading "One Way Streets." 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its pas- 
sage. 

In Board of Aldermen, June 16, 1915. Passed to be ordained. . 
Edward R. Hathaway, Mayor. 

In Common Council, June 16, 1915. Passed to be ordained. 

James F. Collins, President. 

Presented to and approved by the Mayor, June 17tli, 1915. A 
true copy attest: — W. H. B. Remington, City Clerk. 



ORDINANCES. 



JITNEY ORDINANCE. 



AN ORDINANCE REGULATING THE TRANSPORTATION OP 
PASSENGERS, FOR HIRE, BY MEANS OF MOTOR 
VEHICLES. 

Be it ordained by tlie City Council of tlie City of New 
Bedford as follows: 

Section 1. On and after July 1, 1915, no person shall 
engage in the business of transporting in the City of New 
Bedford passengers for hire by means of any motor vehicles, 
not running on tracks or rails, and operated for the purpose 
of affording a means of treet transportation similar to that 
ordinarily afforded by street railways by accepting and dis- 
charging passengers along the route traversed by such vehicle, 
without first ol)taining from the city clerk of said city a special 
annual license for each vehicle to be employed by such person 
in said business, and unless such license for such vehicle is in 
force. Such vehicle so employed in said business is termed a 
"motor bus," and is not deemed a hackney carriage, but is a 
vehicle subject to all street traffic regulations so far as appli- 
cable and consistent herewith. 

Section 2. The city clerk of said city, in accordance with 
the provisions of Chapter 141 of the Acts of the Legislature 
of 1914, is hereby authorized to grant to any persons including 
individuals, firms and corporations, residents within this state, 
applying therefor and deemed by him suitable to conduct such 
business, such special license for such vehicle, but said city 
clerk shall not grant such license for any such vehicle until 
the same has been inspected by the chief of police, or some 
person designated by said chief of police, and until it has 
beefi reported by the said chief of police to the city clerk, in 
writing, that the said vehicle is in safe and proper < condition 
for use in said business. Such license shall expire at twelve 
o'clock, midnight, on the thirtieth day of June next succeeding 
the date thereof. The name, place of residence and postoffice 
address of the licensee, a brief description of the vehicle 
licensed, the serial number of the license and the term of the 
license shall be stated on the license. The application for such 
license shall be on a blank furnished by said city clerk, and 
said city clerk may require such application to be sworn to 
before an officer authorized to administer oaths. Said city clerk 



ORDINANCES. 



shall keep a record of each such license issued. A fee of one 
dollar shall be charged for said examination by said chief. 

Section 3. Said license for such bus shall be carried, at 
all times during the "operation of said bus in any public street 
or place, by the driver thereof, and said driver shall, at all 
times, upon request of any police officer of the City of New 
Bedford, display said license. Failure or refusal to display 
eaid license shall be cause for revocation of said license at the 
discretion of the Board of Aldermen of the City of New Bed- 
ford. 

Section 4. The license fee for such license, which shall 
be paid to the. city clerk before the issuance thereof, shall be 
one dollar. Said city clerk shall issue to the licensee a metal 
seal bearing the words "Licensed Motor Bus No — '" setting 
forth the serial number of the license, and for said seal shall 
collect one dollar before the issuance of said license. Said seal 
shall be attached to and kept on the dash of the bus at all 
times during the license term when said bus is in use in any 
street or public place in said city. 

» 

Section .5. No person shall drive, operate or be in charge 

or any motor bus in any street or public place in said city 
without first obtaining a special motor bus driver's license from 
the city clerk, who is hereby authorized to issue the same. 
No such license shall be granted to any person under the age 
of eighteen years, or not a resident of the state, and no such 
license shall be granted to any person who does not possess 
a chauffeur's license, issued to him by the Massachusetts High- 
way Commissioners, and in force at the time when such ap- 
plication is made. Such special motor bus driver's license shall 
expire at twelve o'clock, midnight, on the thirtieth day of 
June next succeeding the date thereof. The application for 
such motor bus driver's license shall be made on a blank fur- 
nished by the city clerk, and said city clerk may require such 
application to be sworn to before an officer authorized to admin- 
ister oaths. The name, place of residence and postoffice ad- 
dress of the licensee, a brief personal description of the licensee 
sufficient for identification, the serial number of the license, 
and the term of the license, shall be stated in the license. It 
shall be a condition of the license that the licensee shall, at all 
times, during his operation of any motor bus in any public 
street or place, display such license upon request of any police 
officer of the City of New Bedford. Failure or refusal to dis- 



ORDINANCES. 



play said license shall be cause for the revocation of said 
license at the discretion of the board of aldermen of the City 
of New Bedford. The city clerk shall keep a record of each 
such license issued. The fee for such license shall be one 
dollar. 

Section 6. The city clerk, at the time of issuing such 
motor bus driver's license shall deliver to the licensee a dis- 
tinguishing badge, made of metal or other suitable material, 
bearing the words "Motor Bus Driver's License, No. — , New 
Bedford, Mass.," setting forth the serial number of the license, 
and shall collect therefor, from the licensee, before the issue 
of the license, one dollar. Said badge shall be worn upon the 
right breast of the outer garment of the licensee at all times 
when he is driving or in charge of any motor bus in any street 
or public place of the city. No such licensee shall permit any 
other person to wear such badge, nor shall any person wear 
the badge of any other licensee while driving or in charge of 
any motor bus in any street or public place of the city. 

Section 7. The west side of Pleasant street, adjacent to 
the curb, between Elm and Mechanics streets, is hereby desig- 
nated as a stand for motor buses whose route is from the center 
of the city northerly and return. The west side of Pleasant 
street, adjacent to the curl), between Mechanics and William 
streets, is hereby designated as a stand for motor buses whose 
route is from the center of the city southerly or westerly and 
return. In using said stands, every motor bus shall face to 
the south. In approaching said stands, every motor bus shall 
proceed to the south from Elm street. In leaving said stands, 
every motor bus shall proceed southerly on Pleasant street to 
William street, and so on. No motor bus shall stand or wait 
for passengers in any other location in the area bounded by 
Middle street, Acushnet avenue. Spring street and Sixth street. 
No motor bus shall stand or wait for passengers in the places 
here indicated, for a period of more than ten minutes, and the 
driver of every motor bus, on request of any police officer of 
the City of New Bedford, shall forthwith move said bus, as 
directed by said police officer. Failure to so remove said bus 
shall be cause for the revocation of the license granted for the 
use of said bus, and cause for the revocation of the license 
granted to the driver, within the discretion of the Board of 
Aldermen. 

The Board of Aldermen may, from time to time, by order 
adopted at any meeting of said board, change the locations of 



ORDINANCES. 



said stands, and designate new stands in any part of tlie city, 
as in their judgment the convenience of the public requires, 
mailing such traffic rules in connection with such designations , 
as they may deem necessary. 

Section 8. No person shall drive or cause to be operated 
any motor bus unless the same l)e equipped with proper non- 
skidding devices when operated in any public street or place 
where there is snow or ice, or where the surface of the street 
is in such condition that travel by motor is dangerous with- 
out the use of non-skidding devices. Violation of this section 
shall be cause for the revocation of the motor bus license and 
the driver's license in the discretion of the Board of Aldermen. 

Section 9.. Violation of any law of the Commonwealth 
made with relation to the operation of automobiles, or viola- 
tion of any traffic ordinance of the City of New Bedford, shall 
be cause for the revocation of any motor bus license, or the 
revocation of any motor bus driver's license, granted and issued 
under authority of this ordinance. 

Section 10. Every licensed motor bus shall be held sub- 
ject to examination by the Chief of Police, or some person 
designated by him, without expense to the owner, if said Chief 
of Police deems such examination expedient and desirable for 
the safety of the public. 

Section 11. No greater number of passengers shall be 
carried at any one time in any motor bus, and no person driv- 
ing or in charge of any motor bus shall take on or suffer 
or permit any more persons to ride or be carried therein at any 
one time than such bus has seating capacity for according to 
the manufacturer's rating thereof; providing that in addition 
thereto children under seven years of age may be carried 
therein in arms or seated on the laps of parents or adult per- 
sons accompanying them, but no passenger with a child in 
arms or seated on the lap shall be admitted to any front seat 
beside the driver. 

Section 12. No person driving or in charge of any motor 
bus shall permit any person to stand on the running board 
or step thereof, or to sit on any fender, dash or door thereof, 
while the bus is in motion. 

Section 13. No driver or person in charge of any motor 
bus shall stop the same to receive or discharge any passenger 
except at the street curb, or permit any passenger to enter or 
leave the same except from the side thereof nearest the street 



ORDINANCES. 



curb, but this latter provision shall not apply to a passenger 
on the front seat where the driver's seat is on the side of the 
curb. 

Section 14. No person driving or in charge of any motor 
bus nor in any way connected with any motor bus shall solicit 
passengers by outcry or operate any noise or other device for 
the purpose of soliciting passengers. 

Section 15. No person driving or in charge of a motor 
bus shall refuse to carry any person offering to be carried 
as a passenge therein, unless the seats of the same are fully 
occupied, except any person intoxicated or acting in a bois- 
terous manner or at the time using profane or obscene lan- 
guage. 

Section 16. Every person driving or in charge of a motor 
bus shall report to the Chief of Police every article left therein 
by any passenger, in addition to fulfilling the requirements of 
Chapter 94, Revised Laws. 

Section 17. Any person violating any of the within rules, 
restrictions, requirements or regulations shall be liable to a 
fine of not exceeding twenty dollars ($20.00) for each offence. 
Conviction in any court in the Commonwealth of such viola- 
tion shall also be cause for revocation or suspension of his 
license by the Board of Aldermen, and no new license to 
engage in the business set forth in Section 1 of this ordinance 
shall be issued until after the expiration of the term for which 
the revoked license was issued. The Board of Aldermen may, 
without notice or hearing", suspend any license granted and 
issued under the provisions of this ordinance for cause deemed 
by them sufficient, such suspension to be for not more than 
thirty (30) days; and the Board of Aldermen may, after notice 
and hearing, said notice to be mailed to the address given by 
the licensee in his application for said license not less than 
five days prior to said hearing, revoke any such license for 
cause deemed by said Board to be sufficient. 

Section 18. This ordinance shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

In Board of Aldermen, June 24, 191.5. Passed to be ordained. 

Edward R. Hathaway, Mayor. 
In Common Council, June 24, 1915. Passed to be ordained. 

James F. Collins, President. 

Presented to and approved by the Mayor, June 2.5, 1915. A 
true copy attest: — W. H. B. Remington, City Clerk. 



ORDINANCES. 



CITY ORDINANCE. 



AN ORDINANCE AMENDING AN ORDINANCE REGULAT- 
ING THE PASSAGE OF VEHICLES IN THE STREETS. 

Be it ordained by tlie City Council of tlie City of New 
Bedford as follows: 

Section 1. An ordinance entitled "An Ordinance Regu- 
lating the Passage of Vehicles in the Streets," passed to be 
ordained September 11, 1913, and approved September 12, 
1913, is hereby amended by adding at the end of Paragraph 
L3 of Section 1 of said ordinance, the following: "No vehicle 
shall pass a corner where there is stationed a traffic officer in 
uniform, without a signal from the officer. This provision 
shall apply to street cars." So that said paragraph shall read 
as follows: "13, At all times drivers of vehicles must stop 
the same on a signal from a police officer in uniform. No 
vehicle shall pass a corner where there is stationed a traffic 
offifcer in uniform, without a signal from the officer. This pro- 
vision shall apply to street cars." 

Section 2. Paragraph 36 of Section 1 of said ordinance 
is hereby amended by inserting after the words "street cars," 
the words "unless specifically included," said that said para- 
graph shall read as follows: "36. The word 'vehicle" herein 
shall include horses hitched to vehicles, horses ridden or led, 
motor vehicles of all kinds, bicycles, tricycles propelled by 
hand, and everything on wheels or runners, except street; cars 
unless specifically included, and light carriages for the convey- 
ance of children." 

Section 3. This ordinance shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

In Board of Aldermen, June 23, 1915. Passed to be ordained, 
Edward R. Hathaway, Mayor. 

In Common Council, June 24, 191.5. Passed to be ordained. 

James F. Collins, President. 

Presented to the Mayor for approval June 2.5, 1915. Approved 
by the Mayor July 2, 191 5. A true copy, attest: — 

W. H. B. Remington, City Clerk. 



10 ORDINANCES. 



Assistant Superintendent of Public 
Buildings. 

CITY OF NEW BEDFORD. 
In the Year One Thousand Nine Hundred and Sixteen. 

AN ORDINANCE AUTHORIZING THE APPOINTMENT OF AN 
ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of New 
Bedford as follows: 

Section 1. Annually in the month of April, the Superin- 
tendent of Public Buildings may appoint, sul)ject to confirma- 
tion by the City Council in convention, an Assistant Superin- 
tendent of Public Buildings, who may be removed, for cause, 
after hearing, by the Superintendent of Public Buildings and 
whose compensation shall be fixed by the City Council. 

Section 2. The Assistant Superintendent of Public 
Buildings shall be under the direction of the Superintendent of 
Public Buildings and shall' assist him in his duties; and in the 
absence of the Superintendent of Public Buildings or a vacancy 
in that oflfice he shall discharge the duties of Superintendent 
of Public Buildings. 

Section 3. All ordinances and parts of ordinances in- 
inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed. 

Section 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

In Board of Aldermen, April 4, 1916. Passed to be ordained. 
Edward R. Hathaway, Mayor. 

In Common Council, April 4, 1916. Passed to be ordained. 

John H. Hollihan, President. 

Presented to and approved by the Mayor, April 6, 1916. A 
true copy attest: — W. H. B. Remington, City Clerk. 



ORDINANCES. H 

Moving Buildings and Obstructing 
Sidewalks and Streets. 



AN ORDINANCE RELATING TO MOVING BUILDINGS AND 
OBSTRUCTION OF SIDEWALKS AND STREETS FOR 
BUILDING PURPOSES. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of New 
Bedford as follows: 

Section 1. Every application for the moving of a building 
in any street in the city shall be in writing, signed by the 
owner or by some person by him duly authorized in writing 
so to do, and shall state: — 

(a) The dimensions of the building and the materials 
of its exterior and roof. 

(b) The location from which and to which it is to be 
moved, with street and number in each case. 

(c) The use to which it has been and is to be applied. 

(d) The route over which it is proposed to move the 
building, and the method of said moving. 

(e) The trees and other property liable to injury upon 
the streets or ways through which the building is to be moved. 

(f) Whether the moving will require the cutting of 
electric wires or the obstruction of street railway traffic. 

Such application shall be accompanied by the written con- 
sent of the superintendent of streets, and a written statement 
of the superintendent of public buildings that the proposed 
location and use will not be a violation of the laws and ordi- 
nances relating to buildings and if in his opinion the building 
is of sufficient strength to be safely moved. 

Section 2. Every application for the obstruction of the 
whole or part of any sidewalk or street in the city for building 
purposes shall be in writing, signed by the owner or the con- 
tractor or builder, or by some person by him or them duly 
authorized in writing so to do, and shall state: — 

(a) The approximate size of the lot and the ground 
dimensions of the building to be constructed, rebuilt or re- 
paired. 



12 ORDINANCES. 



(b) The number of said building on the street and the 
side of the street by compass designation. 

(c) The materials of the outside walls of said building. 

(d) The time provided in the contract for the construc- 
tion of said building, if no contract the estimated time required 
to complete the construction, rebuilding or repairs. 

(e) The space proposed to be obstructed in the street 
or sidewalk and the time for which said space is applied for. 

(f) The nature of the obstruction and provision to be 
made for foot travelers in the highway. 

Such application shall he accompanied by the written con- 
sent of the superintendent of streets, and the superintendent of 
public buildings. 

Section 3. No permit shall be granted for the moving of 
a building in the streets of the city until the requirements of 
section one have been complied with, and if granted, the permit 
shall be granted upon the following terms: — 

(a) That sufficient barriers and lights shall l)e main- 
tained wherever the building is in the streets. 

(h) That streets shall not be unnecessarily obstructed, 
and, so far as possible, safe and convenient ways for the use 
of foot travelers and vehicles shall l)e maintained around the 
building. 

(c) That all chimneys be. removed down to the roof. 

Section 4. No permit shall be granted for obstructing 
the sidewalks or streets of the city for 1)uilding purposes until 
the requirements of section two have been complied with, and 
if granted, the permit shall be granted upon the following 
terms: — 

(a) That sufficient l)arriers and lights shall be main- 
tained. 

(b) That sidewalks or streets, shall not be unnecessarily 
obstructed, and so far as possible, safe and convenient ways 
for the use of foot travelers and vehicles shall be maintained 
around or under the obstructions. 

Section 5. In case of injury or damage to a street, way 
or property caused by the moving of said building, or by the 
o))struction of said sidewalks and streets, the owner of such 



ORDINANCES. 13 



building or the contractor or builder shall at his own expense 
restore streets, ways and property to a lil^e condition as before 
such moving and to the satisfaction of the superintendent of 
streets. Provided ; however, that when a street has been paved 
or laid with naacadam, asphalt, granite, wood block, or other 
^Daving material, the work of putting the street in condition 
for travel shall be done by the City of New Bedford, and the 
person, firm or corporation to whom the permit is granted shall 
pay the cost of the work so done, which may be recovered in 
an action of contract. The owner of said building or the con- 
tractor or liuilder shall hold the City of New Bedford harmless 
and indemnified from all loss, cost, damage, expense and lia1)il- 
ity on account of the moving of said building or of the obstruc- 
tion of said sidewalks and streets and give a bond to said City 
of New Bedford of not less than five hundred dollars satisfac- 
tory to the city clerk therefor, substantially in the following 
form: — - 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS that 



are holden and stand firmly bound unto the City of New Bed- 
ford, a municipal corporation duly established according to law, 
in the sum of 

dollars to the payment of which to the said City of New Bed- 
ford, its successors and assigns, we hereby bind ourselves, our 
successors, heirs, executors and administrators. The condition 
of this Obligation is such that, 

WHEREAS the said 

has been granted a permit for moving a building or obstruction 
cf sidewalks and streets in the City of New Bedford. 

NOW THEREFORE, the Condition of this Obligation is 
such that if the said 



to whom said permit has l)een granted shall keep and perform 
all the requirements of the ordinances of the City of New Bed- 
ford relating to the moving of buildings, or the obstruction 
of sidewalks and streets for building purposes, and of said per- 
mit, and save said city harmless and indemnified from all loss. 



14 ORDINANCES. 



cost, damage or expense in consequence of the moving of said 
building or the obstruction of said sidewallvs and streets and 
the occupation of ways therefor, then this obligation shall be 
void, otherwise it shall l)e and remain in full force and virtue. 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF we hereunto set our hands and 

seals this day of A. D. 1 9 . 

Signed and sealed in the presence of 

Approved 

City Clerk of New Bedford. 

Section 6. Such permit shall not be in force until the 
bond required herein has been duly executed and approved by 
the city clerk. 

Section 7. The owner and all persons engaged in the 
moving of said building, or obstruction of said sidewalks and 
streets shall at all times during such removal or such obstruc- 
tion observe the instructions relative thereto given by the 
superintendent of streets, without in any manner invalidating 
the bond required in the preceding section nor involving the 
superintendent of streets or the City of New Bedford in any 
liability on account of such instructions. 

Section 8. Any permit for moving a building or ob- 
struction of sidewalks and streets as herein provided may be 
revoked by the mayor and aldermen, under the provisions of 
laws. 

Section 9. Permits for moving a building or obstruction 
of sidewalks and streets shall be issued by the city clerk, sub- 
ject to ratication by the mayor and aldermen, said permit to 
be provisional until ratified as aforesaid. Any owner who has 
been refused a provisional permit shall have the right to a 
hearing before the mayor and aldermen. 

Section 10. The license fee for such permit to move a 
building or for the obstruction of sidewalks and streets for 
building purposes, which shall be paid to the city clerk before 
the issuance thereof, shall be five dollars, said fee if the mayor 
and board of aldermen refuse to ratify the provisional permit, 
shall be refunded to the owner. 

Section 11. The owner, contractor or builder, who re- 
ceives a permit for the obstruction of sidewalks and streets 
for building purposes shall post in a conspicuous place on said 
obstruction or on the building connected therewith, a card 



ORDINANCES. 15 



furnished by the city clerk, said card shall state the 
time for which the permit is granted, to whom granted, and 
the space to be occupied by the obstruction. 

Section 12. This ordinance shall take effect upon its 
passage. 

Section 13. All ordinances, or parts of ordinances, inconsistent 
herewith, are hereby repealed. 

In Board of Aiderjiien, April 27, 1916. Passed to be ordained. 
Edward R. IIathaavay, Mayor. 

In Common Council, April 27, 1916. Passed to be ordained. 

John H. Hollihan, President. 

Presented to and approved by the Mayor, April 28, 1916. A 
true copy attest : — W. II. B. Remington, City ClerK. 



Licensing of Fish Pecllers. 



AN ORDINANCE RELATIVE TO THE LICENSING OF FISH 

PEDLERS. 

Be it ordained by the City Council of the City of New 
Bedford as follows: 

Section 1. The City Clerk is hereby authorized, under 
the provisions of law, to grant and issue to any person, 21 
years of age and over, and deemed by him suitable, a license 
as a hawker and pedler of fish within the limits of the City of 
New Bedford; no person shall hawk and peddle fish, within 
said city limits, without such license. Such license shall run 
for one year from the date of issue, unless sooner revoked. The 
licensee shall at all times when in the exercise of his license, 
conspicuously wear a badge, which shall be furnished by the 
City Clerk, and shall display two wagon plates, which shall be 
furnished by the City Clerk, one on either side of the body 
of the vehicle, of whatever description, used by him in the 
exercise of said license. Each license, badge and wagon plate, 
issued by the City Clerk shall be numbered and a record 
thereof kept by the City Clerk. A fee of ten (10) dollars, 
which shall be in full payment for the license, badge and 



16 ORDINANCES. 



wagon plates, shall be collected by the City Clerk before the 
issue of the license. Duplicate badges and wagon plates, if 
required to be issued, shall be charged for at the following 
rates: Badges, fifty cents each; wagon plates, one dollar per 
pair. 

SECTION 2. Every licehse issued under the provisions 
of Section 1 of this ordinance shall be subject to the follow- 
ing sanitary conditions: Every vehicle used for the pedling 
of fish shall be kept at all times in a clean and wholesome 
condition. From June 1 to October 1 of each year, fish sold 
by hawkers and pedlers shall be properly iced while in trans- 
portation. Each vehicle shall be provided with a covered 
pail to contain offal, and it shall be unlawful to throw any 
such offal into or upon any street or way of the city of New 
Bedford. 

SECTION 3. No license shall be issued under the pro- 
visions of section 1 unless the applicant files with his ap- 
plication a certificate signed by the sealer of weights and 
measures of the City of New Bedford that the weights and 
measures to be used in the exercise of the license have been 
sealed in accordance with law. 

SECTION 4. Any license issued under the provisions of 
section 1 may be suspended by the Board of Mayor and Alder- 
men without hearing, or may be revoked by the Board of 
Mayor and Aldermen after hearing, notice of said hearing 
having been mailed to the licensee at the address given in his 
application for the license, at least seven days prior to said 
hearing. No license shall be issued to a person whose license 
has been revoked for a period of one year after the date of 
revocation. 

SECTION 5. Violation of any of the provisions of this 
ordinance shall be punished by a fine not exceeding twenty 
dollars. 

SECTION 6. This ordinance shall take effect on the first 
day of July, 1916. 

lu Board of Aldermen, June 22, 1916. Passed to be ordained. 
Edward R. Hathaway, Mayor. 

In Common Council, June 22, 1916. Passed to be ordained. 

John H. Hollihan, President. 

Presented to and approved by the Mayor, June 23, 1916. A 
true copy, attest: — James Dignam, Asst. City Clerk. 



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