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Full text of "City in a garden : homes in the Lincoln Park community"

L I B RA PLY 

OF THE 

U N IVERS ITY 

or ILLl NOI5 

917^731 



IIUNOIS HISTCRiCAL SURVEY 



CITY IN A GARDEN 



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LlISrCOLN PAKK CON5EI\VATIOM AKEA. 



LINCOLN PARK CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 

William A. Hutchison, M.D.. President, Amos H. C. Brown, 1st Vice President, 
Dr. William A. Waters. 2nd Vice President, Mrs. Anthony Sassano, Secretary, 
James Maltman, Jr., Treasurer. 

ADVISORY COUNCIL 

Paul Angle, Edward A. Cudahy, William Harrison Fetridge, Dr. Arthur R. 
McKay, Chester McKittrick, Rev. Comerford J. O'Malley, CM.. Stanley Par- 
gellis, Robert C. Preble, Sr., William Wood Prince, George M. Proctor, Arthur 
Reebie. Robert Sargent Shriver. David Wallerstein. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Mrs. John Bergan, Pierre Blouke, J. Paul Brislen, Amos H. C. Brown. Gabe W. 
Burton, S. T. Chavez, John A. Cook, Howard Donaldson, Jack L. Ellison, 
Maurice Forkert, Rev. Gerald E. Forshey, Gerald B. Frank, Madge Friedman, 
James Gaughan, M. P. Geraghty, Paul Gerhardt, Jr.. Rev. Gerhard Grauer, 
Mrs. Thomas Griffin, Charles Grundhoefer, Edwin B. Hadfield, Daggett Harvey, 
John A. Holabird, Jr., Joseph Hollerbach, William A. Hutchison, M. D., Mrs. 
Elmer Johnson, Rev. Preston Kavanagh, Gerard A. Koch, Mrs. John F. Lang- 
don, William E. Locke, James Maltman, Jr., Lyle R. Mayer, Mrs. Phillis 
Muzzillo, Mrs. Charles McLean, Rev. Henry J. Novak, Jonathan Pugh, Virgil 
Reginato, Marvin A. Rosner, M.D., Roy M. Russinof, Michael Sappanos, Mrs. 
Anthony Sassano, Malcolm D. Shanower, Robert S. Study, Sr., Rev. Alva 
Tompkins, Thomas Walsh, Rev. T. J. Wangler, Dr. William A. Waters, Sarajane 
Wells, Dr. Robert C. Worley, Masao V. Yamasaki. 

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 

William Friedlander 

PRESIDENTS EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS 

Paul Gerhardt, Jr. 1954-1955 Emil F. Hubka, Jr. 1954-1955 

George M. Proctor 1956-1957 Armond D. Willis 1955-1957 

George B. Cooke 1958-1959 Malcolm D. Shanower 1958-1961 

John A. Cook I960 William Friedlander 1961- 

Marshal L. Scott 1961-1962 
William A. Hutchison. M.D. 1962- 

AFFILIATED NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATIONS: 

Old Town Triangle Association 1948 

Roy M. Russinof. President 
Mid North Association 1950 

Dr. Marvin A. Rosner. President 
Park West Association 1955 

Gerald Frank, President 
Sheffield Neighborhood Association 1958 

Rev. Robert Worley, President 
Lincoln Central Association 1958 

Joseph Hollerbach, President 
Ranch Triangle Association 1959 

Rev. Gerald Forshey, President 
Wrightwood Neighborhood Association 1962 

James Gaughan, President 



CITY 

IN A 
GARDEN 



Homes in the Lincoln Park Community 



PAULA ANGLE. Editor 

THOMAS J. MULHANEY. Photographic Consultont 

O. MAURICE FORKERT, Compiler 




1963 

SPONSORED BY THE LINCOLN PARK CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION 

CHICAGO 



CONTENTS 



PAGES 

OLD TOWN 6-19 

LINCOLN CENTRAL 20-27 

RANCH TRIANGLE 28-32 

MID NORTH 33-45 

SHEFFIELD NEIGHBORS 46-52 

WRIGHTWOOD NEIGHBORS 53-55 

PARK WEST 56-64 



Copyright. 1963, by 

The Coach House Press, Incorporated 

Chicago 4. Illinois Lithographed in the U.S.A. 



7/7.73/ c^'(- 

FOREWORD 



THIS VOLUME PRESENTS A PICTORIAL STORY of neighbor- 
hood conservation. Home owners and tenants in the Lincoln Park 
Conservation area voluntarily supplied over a thousand photographs 
and slides from which were chosen those that appear here. It was 
their cooperation that made this publication possible. 

This is typical of good neighborhood planning. It is not some- 
thing done entirely by the city, nor by local associations, nor by 
individuals. It is something everybody does — together. 

To show characteristic variations in approaching neighborhood 
improvements, the photographs from each of the seven areas which 
form the Lincoln Park Conservation Association were grouped to- 
gether. 

The reader will notice that communities differ in their solutions 
of the many conservation problems. Some excel in creating beautiful 
gardens and patios, others in restoring old and quaint architectural 
features. In each instance people improved their neighborhood. And 
in so doing they have indicated the validity of an established principle 
that "the welfare of any neighborhood is dependent upon the welfare 
of all other neighborhoods and the city as a whole." 

This book documents only a very small portion of the vast pro- 
gram of improvements carried out during the last fifteen years in the 
Lincoln Park Conservation area. The Chicago Department of Build- 
ings reports that the rnoney spent for improvements, repairs, new 
additions and dwellings by private and institutional owners in the 
Lincoln Park Community reached a total of over $6,695,000 in 1962 
alone. This sum does not include the thousands of dollars spent on tree 
planting and other non-permit activities for neighborhood beautifi- 
cation. 

While much remains to be done, this volume attempts to show 
that the rebirth of the Lincoln Park area is no longer idle theory, and 
that the beauty and charm of old Chicago are experiencing an exciting 
rebirth through the civic interest and pride of its citizens. 



WILLIAM A. HUTCHISON. M. D. 

President 
Lincoln Park Conservation Association 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



THE SPONSORS AND PUBLISHERS OF THIS BOOK wish to 
express their gratitude and sincere thanks to the following for the 
valuable suggestions and practical help that made this work possible: 

PLANNING 

Amos H. C. Brown, chairman of the Book Committee of the Lincoln Park 
Conservation Association; Paula Angle and Thonuis J. Mulhaney, who gave 
generously of their time and talent in selecting and organizing the pictorial 
material. 

RESEARCH 

Donna Lee Johnson, for her assistance in the search for photographs; Amy C. 
Forkert. for keeping the records of this project; the many writers of the Chicago 
press, who have given thorough coverage to developments in the Lincoln Park 
Conservation area; the Chicago Historical Society, for its cooperation in authen- 
ticating pictures and historical data; Imogene Johnson, who identified many of 
the photographs; and many other active members of the seven neighborhood 
associations, who facilitated the search for good pictures and accurate source 
information. 



PHOTOGRAPHY* 

pp. 6. 28, 30-b. 31, 32, 45, 47-b, 48, 

49-t. 50, 51. 52, 53-b, 54-bl, 54-br, 

55-b, 58, 59, 61-b, 62-1, 63-r 

Donna Lee Johnson 

pp. 7, 8-b, 14-tl Bert Murray 

p. 8-t, 1 0-1, 18-r.M. Jean Middlebrook 

p. 9-t Russel Du Bois 

p. 9-b William G. Loewe 

pp. 1 1-t. 23-br, 29, 30-1. 30-t. 49-b. . . 

Franz Altschuler 

pp. 1 1 -bl, 1 5-tr David Landis 

p. 1 1-br Lawrence Dobson 

pp. 12-t, 17, 18-t, 25. Chicago Tribune 

p. 12-b Gabe W. Burton 

p. 13, Dust Jacket 

Clarence John Laughlin 

pp. 10-1, 14-tr, 61-t 

Chicago Historical Society 

p. 14-b. .Town Country Photographers 
pp. 15-tI, 15-b, 46, 47-t 

Howard Friedman 

p. 16-1 Frank Nesbitt 

p. 16-br Mercer Sullivan 

p. 18-b Moval Investment Corp. 

*K.ey: t-top. b-bottom, tl-top left, tr-top right, bl-bottom left, br-bottom right. 



p. 19 Cyril P. Ferring 

pp. 20, 2 1-t. 22-r, 23-1, 24-b, 26-b 

Ruth Welty 

pp. 21-b. 22-1. 23-tr, 26-t and 

Front Cover Frank Sokolik 

p. 27-t Charles McLean 

p. 27-b Lyie Mayer 

pp. 33, 37-t J. Curtis Mitchell 

pp. 24-t, 34, 35. 36. 37-b. 38. 54-t. 

55-t. 57-b, 60. 62-r, 63-tl, 64 

Thomas Mulhaney 

p. 39 Herrlin Studio 

p. 40 Norman F. Barry 

p. 4I-t James Swann 

p. 41-b C. Franklin Brown 

43-t Charles Reynolds 

43-b Stella Jenks 

44 Edward ZagRodny 

53-t Felicitas Brueck 

56 Chicago Sun-Times 

57-1 Louise Robinson 

p. 61-t Henry Reichel 

p. 63-bl K.' Varnelis 



FORMAT AND PRODUCTION 

Donald A. Blome and Stanley Kazdailis, for valuable suggestions in design and 
typography; Bernard T. Beckman. for technical assistance; Trade Service Type- 
setting Company, for composition; Gregg-Moore Lithographing Co., for printing; 
and Spinner Brothers Company, for binding. 



THE COACH HOUSE PRESS, INC., Publishers 



INTRODUCTION 



THE OFFICIAL SEAL OF THE CITY OF CHICAGO proudly 
proclaims its motto as "Urbs in Horto" — City in a Garden. Few of 
the town's inhabitants in the 1830's, when the motto originated, could 
have foreseen the metropolis that was to sprawl over miles of swampy 
Lake Michigan shoreline — or the slums, industrial grime, and traffic 
chaos that would make their bucolic Latin phrase seem at best charm- 
ingly naive. The garden idea, however, was never entirely discarded. 
Even when they built close to the Loop, where space was at a premium, 
Chicagoans planted trees and left space for front and back yards. An 
example is what has come to be called the Lincoln Park community. 

Bounded roughly by North Avenue on the south, Lincoln Park 
on the east. Diversey Avenue on the north, and the Milwaukee tracks 
and Clybourn Avenue on the west, the area was first settled in the 
1850's by German truck gardeners. Prior to 1871 buildings were 
fairly scattered, and most of them were leveled during the Chicago 
Fire of that year. 

It was during the next 25 years that most of the structures in this 
neighborhood went up, from wooden "relief shanties" and brick cot- 
tages in the south and west to the elaborate stone mansions of the 
northern sector. The area became the home of De Paul University and 
McCormick Theological Seminary, numerous hospitals, churches, and 
schools, and the Chicago Historical Society — not to mention the garage 
that witnessed the St. Valentine's Day Massacre. 

With time, portions of the Lincoln Park area, rundown and 
shabby, began the downhill slide into urban blight. A report as late 
as 1948 characterized the section as "predominantly in a state of 
deterioration." Even before this time, however, energetic and enter- 
prising residents had begun to retrieve, restore, and rescue. What has 
happened since is described in the Foreword and illustrated in the rest 
of this book. The people who made it possible proved that at least one 
Chicago community has made a reality of the old motto — C/7.v in a 
Garden. 

PAULA ANGLE, Editor 




A rcmodckd house on Lincoln Park West. Ihc 
cherub and wrought-iron fence and railing are addi- 
tions, the paneled door original. 



More cherubs, also on Lincoln Park West. These 
carvings grace doors brought to Chicago from 
Europe in the late 19th century. The heads are big 
for the bodies, and one architecture expert has called 
the figures "charmingly disproportionate." 



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A two-family garden on Orleans Street. 
Especially noteworthy are the rock gar- 
den, a collection of over 150 lilies, and a 
variety of trees — crabapple, redbud, June- 
berry, and Russian olive. 



I'roni Wisconsin Avenue, which these 
apartment buildings face, passersby are 
imawarc of the charming porches at the 
back. Petunias and ivy are window box 
favorites. 



The piping satyr at right, a detail from 
the scene below, is an Italian import. 






An Old Town landmark is this wooden 
farni-style house at the corner of Lincoln 
Park West and Menomonee. The interior 
has been remodeled, but the exterior has 
changed little since the house was built, 
shortly after the Chicaeo Fire of 1S71. 



The side patio of the house shown above. 
Window boxes sport geraniums, petunias, 
and ivy; nicotiana plants grow beneath. 



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Menomonee Street interior, 
remodeled by an artist 
couple. The hanging chim- 
ney formerly extended only 
a few inches below the ceil- 
ing; it was built downward 
and a Franklin stove set 
into it. 





Living room of a once-abandoned house 
on Orleans Street, extensively remodeled. 




Formal living room in a Wisconsin Street 
home. Olive-green, red, and black are the 
predominating colors, with white walls. 




A four-story house on La Salle Street has 
this curving stairway leading from the 
first to the second floors. 







Formal patio behind a Wisconsin Street home. The espaliered apple 
tree against the wall bears fruit. Because of prevailing shade, the 
owner specializes in such plants as pachysandra and impatiens. 



12 




Extremely wide eaves balance an overhanging ver- 
anda on this Lincoln Park West residence. It was 
built in 1872-73 for Chicago brewer Frederick 
Wacker. At one side stands a gate (shown on the 
front cover) originally built for Mecca House, home 
of important Oriental visitors to the Columbian Ex- 
position of 1893. 



13 





I he Crilly buildings — including eight homes 
and ten apartment houses — he between North 
Park, St. Paul, La Salle, and Eugenie, and 
have been called "the foundation stone of 
modern Old Town." Developer Daniel F. 
Crilly built them between 1877 and 1905. 
Above is a rustic corner near the Wells Street 
entrance to the Georgian Court apartments. 
Below, small but varied in treatment, are back 
porches of the Crilly Court apartments. A 
single porch is at left. 




Metal plays an important role in details from 
Victorian structures. The graceful doors at 
right, in an apartment building at Eugenie 
and La Salle, have been attributed to Chicago 
architect Louis Sullivan. Below, the bay of a 
brick house on Wells Street is sheet metal 
painted black. From the same building is the 
gate at the bottom of the page, topped by 
two birds and a basket of fruit. 








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A courtyard apartment on Wells 
Street. The carved door is by 
Chicago artist Edgar Miller. 

At left is the entrance to one of 
four row houses on Lincoln Park 
West designed by Louis Sullivan. 
The simple, dignified red brick 
buildings were erected in 1 884 
at a cost of $12,000. 




Rococo elegance in a Wisconsin 
Street living room, above. At 
right, from the same house, is the 
ceiling of the downstairs sitting 
room; it was painted a la Tiepolo 
bv the artist-owner. 





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A second-floor deck at the rear of a La Salle Street apart- 
ment provides spacious outdoor comfort. 




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This wrought-iron gate leads into a back- 
yard garden behind a Lincoln Avenue 
town house. Roses line the wooden fence. 



Owners gutted a former rooming house 
on Orleans Street, left, to create a twelve- 
unit apartment building. 



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At the side of a Crilly Court town house patio is a small 
Japanese style garden featuring shade-loving plants. The 
owners brought the stone lantern back from Japan and gave 
it a background of palm, moss, and ferns. 



19 




Decorative plantings and a pierced brick wall add interest 
to a flight of steps at a Lincoln Avenue house. 



20 



A simple backyard on Bur- 
ling, enhanced by the sound 
of softly splashing water. 



The garden below, at Mo- 
hawk and Armitage, was 
barren sand as late as 1961. 
The owners planted peren- 
nials, installed a pool and 
fountain at the rear, and 
surfaced the center with 
gravel and brick. 




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SiniplicitN is the keynote of this small house on 
Mohawk. The hntels above the door and windows 
are typical of the immediate post-Fire period. 



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11 



An effective combination of old and new 
elements make an interesting doorway on 
Lincoln Avenue. The garden of this house 
is shown on page 20. 





The paneled doors at right, on Cleveland 
Avenue, are set in an arch, decorated with 
a rope molding. Top right, on Mohawk, 
a boxlike house with metal cornice. 





Living room of a row house 
on Burling, built around 
1885. The artist-owners 
plastered, painted, and pap- 
ered throughout, but kept 
the original fireplace. 



At left, the backyard of a 
sculptor's studio on Wiscon- 
sin, with several cast stone 
figures. The head of Bac- 
chus is a brilliant red 
aszainst the concrete wall. 



Airy fretwork decorates the 
porch of a Dickens Avenue 
home, right. Builders used 
to select trim from mill 
catalogues. Note the rope 
molding on top window. 



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Lilacs 60 years old shade this Mohawk Street gar- 
den. Broi<en-cement paving is edged with phlox. 



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Stones from demolished buildings were 
used for the pool at left, in a Lincoln 
Avenue yard. The owners built it in 1957, 
added a waterfall the following year. Spe- 
cially constructed niches hold geranium 
and petunia plants. 






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Lush grass, an ivy-covered wall, and a back patio 
are features of a garden on Burling, below. 




A survivor of the Chicago Fire is the farmhouse 
above, set in spacious grounds at Mohawk and 
Armitaee. It was built in 1863 for about $800. 






27 




The entrance to a house on Dayton, above. Doors 
carved in a fanciful pattern are divided into sev- 
eral nicely proportioned panels. 



At left, two-legged dragons cavort around a sheet 
metal tower, one of a pair on a large building at 
Wisconsin and Fremont. Bricks for round towers 
like these were usually cast to a radius. 



29 









This unusually shaped house on Seminary reflects a variety 
of influences and the eclecticism of another age. 




Comer bay on an apart- 
ment at Dayton and Armi- 
tage. Note that decorations 
differ at each story. 



30 



Two houses on Bissell. Simpler details in- 
dicate that the one at left is probably the 
older of the two. 







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A wrought-iron railing edges the balcony of a residence on 
Fremont. The supporting corbel includes a female head. 




Side by Mdc. Uvc) housu> i)fi 1 rciuoiU rcpicNLiii 
widely different styles and periods of Chicago 
architecture. A balcony detail from the one at 
right is shown on page 31. 



32 



The Bellinger cottage on Hudson Avenue, right, 
is still known by the name of its first owner, who 
saved it from destruction in the Chicago Fire. 
Richard Bellinger, a policeman, soaked the roof 
of his (almost new) house for hours. Some say 
he used cider and vinegar; others, that he lugged 
water from nearby Ten-Mile Ditch. 



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A large backyard garden on Belden, left, is divided into 
three main sections. At lower left is a kitchen garden, 
where the owners raise herbs, fruits, and vegetables — 
including 47 '/2 pounds of tomatoes one year. Across from 
it is a flower plot. Dwarf honeysuckle separates these areas 
from the paved patio, with its waterfall and pool (made 
with stones from buildings wrecked in the Clark-La Salle 
urban renewal project ) . Above, ice cream chairs and table 
in the potting area, at the very back of the garden. 







35 




Living room-kitchen area in an apartment on Hudson. The 
owner — a developer who specializes in remodeling — gutted 
the interior, lowered ceilings, and modernized the fireplace. 
Additions include built-in hi fi equipment. 



36 




Hudson Gardens is a 13-unit town house development de- 
signed and financed by a local artist and built around a 
core of remodeled post-Fire residences. Above is a view 
of the central courtyard. Below, set in a paving-brick 
wall, are terracotta heads that spout water into a pool. 




37 




Simple panels, a plain transom, and heavy lintel create 
a dignified doorway in a Cleveland Avenue building. 



38 



In this Clark Street house, right, the 
owner stripped walls down to the bare 
studs and paneled them in a plastic-finish 
material, adding beams to the ceiling. The 
oak parquet floor is also new. 




The unusual doors of this Geneva Ter- 
race home had been taken down, and 
the owners salvaged them from a garage. 
Note the rope molding beneath the lintel. 



An interior view of the house at left. Be- 
cause of sagging, the stairway had to be 
jacked up several inches to restore its 
oricinal handsome curve. 



40 



A cast stone statue of the Japanese god- 
dess of mercy, Kwannon, graces a garden 
on Webster. Shade plants include ferns, 
begonias, and impaticns. 



A Sedgwick Street garden. Around a cen- 
tral area covered with crushed milk quartz 
are beds of tulips and lilies. 




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42 



Row houses on Grant Place. These were undoubtedly 
built as one-family units in a single development. 



Row houses on Cleveland, converted in 
1960 from a 31 -unit rooming house to 8 
apartments. Extensive remodeling took 
place, but the owner retained the 15- 
foot ceilings, marble fireplaces, exterior 
stone carvings, 'and wood shutters. 



Front entrances to two Cleveland Avenue 
homes, below. The owners removed old 
porches, stairs, and railings, replacing 
them with new ones and adding shutters 
and a carriage lamp. 





43 



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44 




Spacious living room of a Clark 
Street home which dates back to 
about 1907. The building has a total 
of four fireplaces. 



Stairway of the house pictured 
above. Structural changes included 
lowering the ceilings. 




One of the first remodeling projects in tlie Mid North area 
involved this five-story building on Cleveland Avenue, 
extensively altered in 1931-32. The windows glow with 
colored glass, and interiors boast marble, tile, carved 
wood, and wrought-iron details. 



45 




Architectural details add interest to many houses in 
the Sheffield area. On the opposite page is a three-story 
bay on an apartment building at the corner of Dickens 
and Halsted; at left, a stained glass window on Dayton. 
Below, on Fremont, is a house that combines wood 
and brick. Special features include beveled glass win- 
dows, terracotta trim between the first and second 
stories, and a parapet of corbeled brick. 



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Hallway ol .1 ii^mJciici: on Fremont built about 
1874. The present owners purchased it 15 years 
ago and have done much renovating. The break- 
front is antique, the lamp beside it a replica. 



48 




A Fullerton Avenue backyard. Sim- 
plicity of design and a broad ex- 
panse of carefully tended lawn 
create a restful atmosphere. 




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An effective touch on this Sheffield 
Avenue house is the trim beneath 
the windows, formed by bricks set 
at an angle. 



49 




At right, snow scene on the grounds 
of McCormick Theological Semi- 
nary. The campus — between Fuller- 
ton, Belden, Shellicld, and Halsted 
— includes private residences as well 
as school buildings. Some date back 
to the 188()"s; all are part of a con- 
tinual program of renewal. 



Left, wrought-iron fence and lan- 
tern at McCormick Seminary. Chal- 
mer's Place, at the center of the 
campus, is an oasis of calm reminis- 
cent of another era. 



Modification of roof, windows, and door- 
way give this house on Racine a contem- 
porary, almost suburban, appearance. 



50 

UNIVERSITY OF 
lUINOIS LIBRARY 







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Entrance foyer of a Belden 
Avenue house, completely 
renovated four years ago. This 
is one of several faculty homes 
owned by McCormick Theo- 
logical Seminary. 



Areaway between two build- 
ings on Fremont. The owner 
of the one at left purchased 
the property some 15 years 
ago, remodeled the house, and 
built a garden in back — com- 
plete with a greenhouse and 
what he calls "an American- 
ized torii gate." 






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This concrete lily pond on Montana — stocked 
with goldfish and surrounded by daisies, petunias, 
and four o'clocks — is five feet deep. The owner 
says, "1 want to show people what they can do 
to keep up their neighborhood. It just takes a 
little work and a little money." 

Old and new contrast on Lill Street. 




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Corinthian columns support an icicle- 
hung porch on Wrightwood. 





54 



A cottage on Aitgcld. Note the wood- 
en millwork and iron parapet. 



A house on Lill is decorated with 
wooden rosettes and a turret. 



■t>f^i>r'f«. 



A two-story home on Wrightwood com- 
bines brick with terracotta trim. The 
square tower, set against a mansard roof, 
has a kind of Palladian elegance. 




The simple wooden cottage at left — with 
its unusual second-story porch — con- 
trasts with a brick two-flat building on 
Lill Street. 



55 




56 



Hallway of a house on Fullerton, showing the fine stair- 
case paneling and newel post. Owners, who renovated the 
entire building, covered these walls with grasscloth. 




Entrance to the house shown on the opposite 
page. An ornate porch roof was removed to 
set off the beautiful carved fruitwood door 
to best advantage. 



On Deming, a brick and sandstone man- 
sion with Romanesque details. The bay 
window at the side is covered with sheet 
copper inscribed with fleur-de-lis. 




57 



A stately three-story town house at Lake- 
view and ArHngton. Terracotta trim adds 
elegance to the golden-brown brick. Be- 
low is the porte-cochere leading into an 
inner courtvard. 




5<S 




Living room of a large apartment on 
Lakeview, right. The exquisite carved 
fireplace, by Grinling Gibbons, was im- 
ported from England. Gibbons was wood- 
carver to Charles II and Christopher 
Wren and was noted for his delicate rep- 
resentations of birds, fruits, and foliage. 



'^fimmsmmmmmiiii 





Stone figures support the porch 
of a home buih in 1896 for Chi- 
cago brewer Francis J. Dewes. 
Located at Wrightwood and 
Hampden Court, it now houses 
the Swedish Engineers Society. 



60 




Full view of the building shown on the 
opposite page. Fine details inside in- 
clude oak paneling, painted ceilings, 
and tapestries. Ironwork was exhibited 
at the World's Columbian Exposition 
before installation. 



Spacious interior of an apart- 
ment on Lakeview. 





Contrasting sharply with the prevailing tone ot 
the Park West neighborhood is this angular build- 
ing on Arlington. 



False fronts with a Dutch flavor embellish row 
houses on Deming. Note the terracotta "candles'" 
at the sides of each. 



62 




Like many Park West buildings, this t)ne 
on Deming uses both stone and brick, 
with metal railings and gable decoration. 



In this interior on St. James, stark white walls 
combine with an arched wooden door and iron 
railings to create a Spanish atmosphere. 



63 






64 



An unusual porch-staircase, like a pagoda, graces a house 
on Pine Grove. Each tier is handled differently. 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOISURBANA 

917 731AN4C C001 

SItViN A GARDEN. HOMES IN THE LINCOLN P 

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