(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "City record"

INDEX TO THE CITY l^Sl^QRD, e.o>^\n 

JANUARY 6, IQ34 — DECEMBER 3^, 1934. 



A Page 
Agreement between Boston Elevated Road 
and City, as to use of "L" structure 

for traffic signals 503 

Appropriations, transfer of 141, 186, 1035 

1142, 1216, 1237. 1264, 1297 
A88E88INO Department: 
chanees in personnel of: 

Feb., 181; May, 475; June, 520, 605; 
Dec, 1265, 1315. 1341 

Assessments, abatement of 158, 275 

1038, 1054, 1105, 1122 
AtjDiTiNO Department: 
cbangee in personnel of: 

June. 586; Sept., 989, 1009; Oct., 1072; 
Nov., 1197 

B 

Baseball game, annual. Welfare 921-946 

Boston citizens recreation minded, as result 
of efforts of Mayor and i'ark Depart- 
ment 909 

BcDOET Department: 
changes in personnel of: 
July, 724; Sept., 1028 

Budget requirements 513 

BciLDiNO Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 75; Feb., 156; April, 340; June, 586; 
July, 744; Aug., 921; Sept.. 947. 1028; 
Nov.. 1141; Dec. 1292 
Removal of old buildings proving of great- 
est value to city 1 137 

Summary of building operations for 1933. . 43 

Buildings razed 80, 103 

136. 155, 196, 208, 228, 256, 280, 310, 335 
358, 399, 474, 508. 550, 591, 631. 643, 679 
702, 729, 7.50, 782, 800, 915, 920. 948, 988 

1000, 1016. 1039, 1056. 1074. 1105, 1143 

1181, 1192, 1201, 1223. 1237. 1267, 1207 
1319. 1339. 

C 
Campbell. Patrick T.. Supt., report of at 

annual meeting of association 276 

City Hospital to have new nine-story ward 

building 769 

Claims, Award of. for: 

.\uto8, trucks, horses, damage to: 

Austin, Grace H 1035 

Barker. William H 1324 

Blotcher, Hyman 468 

Brown, Irving 1 182 

Bruce, George H 1035 

Caplan, Robert H 1 182 

Caracoslos, I'cler 923 

Castle, W. B 923 

Doiron, Arthur J 311 

Foley. WUIiam E 3U 

Ford. Eleanor S 179 

Foster. Grace 923 

Gerloff. Theodore 468 

Goggin. James K 311 

Greenough. Walter J 1182 

Halligan. Daniel 311 

Hammarlund H. K.. Manager.' 179 

Irish. Ernest C, Jr 179 

Maginnis. Vera T ,311 

Moynihan, Andrew J .528 

Murray, Helen A 458 

Pickering, D. H k 923 

Sbeerin, Joseph V 923 

Snyder, Charlee G 468 

Teton, Franlt> 1035 

Tocio. Barney 468 

Tulun, Jacob J 917 

injuries, personal: 

Alquist, Carl J 1140 

Archibald, Mrs. Annie E 223 

Baggs, Lydia 179 

Brooks, Lilhan 1140 

Cataldo. Helen 679 

Daft. Delia 1168 

Davis. Irene 179 

DeCourcey. Margaret F 311 

Driecoll. Mary V 468 

Dubay, Blanche 1168 

Fiorintino, Marift 1324 

Goldman, Samufel 179 

Greene, Mary 311 

Hill, Emily J 311 

HannoD, Genevieve G 923 

Hope, Agnes 923 

Johnson, Gladys M 1168 

Kantrow, Mr. and Mra. Harry 1168 

Kelley. Caroline 1324 

Kelly, Emma L 1324 

Locke. Ruth I. M 1182 

Leaman, Mrs. Mary 1324 

McGauley. Anna 311 

Mahoney, Margaret C 311 

Pepe, Lillian 923 

Perkins. Cynthia A 592 

PoweU, Mary E 923 

Regan, Walter W 179 

Sampson, Paul 311 

Sherman, Evelyn M 1324 

Sinopoli, Leo 923 

Sullivan, Hyadnthe Brady 360 



Claims, Award op, fob: . Paob 

injuries, personal: 

Swanson, Charles A 179 

Touhy, Arthur 179 

Webster, Eugene C 643 

Wheaton. Ernest H. . '. 1168 

money, refund: 

American Curtain Company 468 

Baker, Chester A., Inc 311 

Baron, Hyman 312 

Bianco, Lorenzo 801 

Boston Baking Company 1182 

Colbath, S. F 1324 

^ V Darcey, Matthew J 311 

^eSimone. Nicholas 1035 

H Deranian. Paul 801 

Drake. Edward 528 

, Edwards. T. J .............' 679 

. " 'Elliott, Brothers 311 

V Federici. Edmund E . . .> 1325 

Harrington, Charles H . /. 311 

Gem I>oan (^ompaiiy . .■ 46S 

Giorgio, .\ndrew 311 

Goggin, Maurice J 311 

Jackson Furniture Company 917 

Jones. J. A 311 

Kanuk.inelos. George M .312 

I^egelis. John 801 

I^xberg. Harney 801 

Libby. .Mrs. n 643 

.McDermott. Bridget .\ 1054 

Martin. James .\ 311 

Mongrain, U. George, assignee 1035 

Morgan Hrotliers Company 311 

Neptune Garage 1182 

OBrien, Frank A 801 

O'Lcury, Cornelius 312 

Paris, jncob 801 

Personal Hook Shop 179 

Queeny, James H 360 

Rosenzwici. John 1035 

RoBsville. Commercial .\lcohol Corpora- 
tion 312 

RusBo, Anthony E . . 923 

Sanderson. .Morris 468 

Sttlvato. n 1140 

Scarlata. Vincent 312 

Shultz. Samuel 311 

Smith. Lillian I. and William W 801 

Terranova. John 801 

TheFenwood 1182 

Thompson, Jennie 312 

Ware, Joseph V ft;7 

Weal Uoxbury Pharmacy, Inc 468 

Vee, Henrv . 917 

Zellman. Jack M 801 

property, damage to: 

Harry, William J 179 

Berry, John J 179 

Dangora, Joseph R 923 

Dufflev. Margaret E 1324 

Duncan, M. F 1182 

Duncan. M. F 1324 

Ekdahl, Elizabeth M 1199 

Foley, Winifred J 179 

Hoar. Stephen J 468 

Hurley. Bartholomew F 923 

McCarthy. Grace . . 1035 

Malonev. Mary R 179 

Mulkerin. Patrick 1199 

Schultz, Conrad H 179 

Smith. Arthur L 311 

Sullivan, Daniel P 923 

bill, Hovey & Co 923 

damage to clothing. Woodward, Mrs. 

G. M .. . 1182 

Columbus Day, city making plana for observ- 
ance ... 1051 

contract with Edison Company amended. . . 1015 
Contracts Awarded: 

Public Works (Bridges): 

repairs, Bennington street 503 

repairs, Charlestown 1173 

repairs. Northern Avenue 1010 

strengthening and redecking Granite 

Avenue 1117 

PubUc Works (Ferry): 

repairs, "Charles C. Donaghue" 227 

repairs, "Daniel A. MacCormack" 925 

repairs, "South Ferry" 608 

Fire Service: 

laundry work 56 

old materialj purchase of 264 

underground work 774 

Hospital Department: 

e:(termination of vermin, etc 23 

purchase of bones, trimmings, etc 23 

?* window cleaning (Sanatorium) 446 

' Institutions Department: 

Fire escape, erection of, at Long Island, 1233 

repairs, front wharf 608 . 

Library Department: 

cases, cabinet and drawers 774 

transportation service 66 

Park Department: 

fences, wire, Franklin Park 1198 



Contracts Awarded: Paoe 
Penal Institutions Department: 

insecticide ' 203 

repairs, etc., on boat 1076 

Public Works Department: 
Central Office: 

repairing masonry, etc 632 

repairing wall, Adams street .' 382 

repairs, "General Sumner" 476 

Paving Service: 

Adams street 990 

Alford street 551 

.\sbmont street 032 

Boyd street .' 1173 

Cedarwood road 976 

district 2 874 

Goodway road 1215 

Greaton road 11 17 

Hobson street 1215 

Hyde Park avenue , 1317 

La Grange street 1117-1343 

Old Colony avenue 1053-1 1 17 

Peak Hill road 1075 

Southampton street 990 

Walk Hill street 1343 

Woodrow avenue 1075 

Sanitary Service: 

garbage and refuse removal 1317 

manure, removal of 1317 

repairs. Fort Hill station 727 

snow and ice removal 1294. 1295, 1296 

Sewer Service: 

Alford strefet 524 

Ashiiiont street 774 

» Heaver place 1 143 

Camp Ground area 1117 

Cottage street 1198 

Everett court 503 

Everett street 976 

Florence street el al 551 

Goodway road 976 

Greaton road 926 

Hawthorne street 10 

Hooker street 1075 

Hyde Park avenue 925, 1 198 

Hyde Park branch 1101 

Keith street 1173 

La Grange street 774 

May wood brook 1198 

Orient avenue 727 

Peak Hill road 775 

Prescott street 10 

Hansom road 56 

Runiford road 1269 

Savin Hill avenue 925 

Stony Hrook section 674 

Walk Hill street 1010 

Windsor street 746 

Water Service: 

Addington road et al 608 

Albany street 357 

Arborway 775 

Brookline avenue 632 

Churchill road et al 976 

Cross St reet 588 

Forest Hills street et al 949 

Soldiers Field road 1269 

Department of School Buildings: 

air compressor, Boston Trade 746 

alterations, Dorchester High 913 

additions and alterations. East Boston 

High 1075 

alterations, Warren 1117 

chairs, opera 344 

chairs 588 

driveway, Morrison Building 694 

electrical supplies 382 

erection ana completion, Beethoven 

district 1117 

erection and completion, Sburtleff dis- 
trict 1101 

fences, chain link, Hobart street 694 

fire escapes 774 

fire escapes, Atherton 694 

fire escapes, Joshua Bates , 674 

fire escapes, Howard Avenue 746 

fire escapes, Wait 1075 

furniture, various schools 342 

gas ranges 182 

gymnasium equipment 105-632 

beating: 

Bunker HiU 694 

EUis Mendell 694 

Joseph Tuckerman 694 

. Savin HiU 774 

William A. Gaston 694 

various schools 774 

lockers: 

lockers, metal 503-746 

masonry, etc.. Dorchester High (Boys), 913 

masonr.v, etc., Hyde Park High 913 

motor, new Wyman 694 

plumbing: 

Louis Prang ;,-. .^ 746 

Savin HiU ' 746 

printing machinery, Frank V. Thompson, 774 

.«lM.i) 



Digitized by tiie Internet Arciiive 

in 2013 



littp://arcliive.org/details/cityrecord1934bost 



CITY REOOKD INDEX. 



CoNTBACTS Awabdbd; . \ Paoe 

Department of School Buildings: 

printing press, Trade 913 

relocation of master's office, Christopher 

Columbus : ^ 801 

roofing: 

Atherton 694 

Francis Parkman.- 746 

Frankiin 695 

High School of Commerce 746 

Hull 746 

Sjherwin 694 

Teachers College . ■ 7t6 

science room, etc , Mechanic Arts High, 727 

tables 58S 

teachers' rooms 746-913 

telephone. High School of Commerce . . . 913 
School Committee: 

books, rebinding of : . . 1010 

coal, anthracite 551 

coal, semi-bituminous 5'28 

foot ball uniforms, etc 1143 

groceries 1117 

lumber 383. 364, 385. 386 

oil. fuel 695 

paper, blanks, etc 446 

paper, newsprint 254 

pencils, pens, etc 534 

pianos 7'i8 

, removing ashes, etc^ 76 

art and niariuul training supplies. . .... .58t4 

art. education and drawing supplies. . . . lOlU 

physical education supplies 727 

shop supplies 1117 

towels paper 1173 

Supply Department: 

alcohol (dennturod) 1030 

asphalt, road . . ■ ■ 357 

athletic equipmeut 632 

blanks, corrugated, ef 633 

butter, eggs, etc . 10, .'>7, 107. :;06. '295. 423 
r.y.'-i. 670. 747. i).50. 1030. 1173, 1272 

cable, underground 'J2.'i 

castings, etc. (.'^e^er Depurtincnt) 1216 

cement. Portland 106 

chassis 131S 

cinders 674 1080 

rloth 10.1 

clothing, men's 608 

coal, unthrucilc .423 926 1234 

coats, rubber 182 

coffee . ..341-10.'«) 

coke J ••. ■ . 551 

cups, drinking. p:iper ... 207 

<ire9sing9. surgu-iil . . . 777 

drugs . . 302 

dry (ill. Airport . 10.>«t 

ellicr . _ MW 

edgeslones 470. 524 

eleiirnnl enpplic? . 117l> 

fertilizer, elc . -, . 'J28 

tiasliliK'il. ciiOipiiiciit 477 

Hour . .72'.!. 1145 

Ford 1 haseis 1215 

Ford sedans 1234. 1272 

Ford trn.ks __. . __.'.t4'.l.- 1215 

fruits and vcncliil>le.-<' . .■V'. 227. 2!l7. 422. 524 
oai. 777. '.I7tl, 1031, 1175. 1270 

furniture. oMicc 747 

go-tes Undusiriiil and incdiciiinl) 425 

gasolene and kornwiic 47(i 

gates (wilier scrvnc) li-l 

grtjccncs. clt- 23. 58. 450. 1075. 11711 

hay. train and si raw. 57. lO'.l. 207. 2'.I7. 3!m. .'.114 
t)74.677,74ti.77*).04'.l, 1031, 1174, 1271, 1343 

ice 55 1 

it-e cream 102tl 

lamps, inrandoscent . . .504 

lead, urscnale of ... . .503 

lead. r(Hl and white. ... HH 

lime. Iiyilraled . . 77t'> 

loam 391) 

meats 76. 107. 205. 295. 424. 551 

675.949. 1029, 1174, I2('.'.t 

meters, water 47t> 

milk, cream, etc 341, 1032 

mine safety appliance. 104 

narcotics. . .' 209 

needles, surgical, etc 203 

oil. fuel 1101. 1144 

oil. motor 503. 1 146 

oil. range 1080 

oil. road 382. 476 

oils, various 398 

paper (Public Library) 1216 

paper, toilet 57 

patch, roal tar. . 399 

patching mixture 382 

pipes, sewer, etc. .• 165 

posts, fire alarm 720 

potatoes 1272 

salt 1272 

sand and gravel .* 264 

shade material ...«.; 632 

seed, grass 399 

sewer cricks 109 

sewer pipe 109 

snow plows 1344 

soap 747 

sods 478 

atone, crushed 275, 340 

surgical supplies 298 

tea 10,695 

tires and tubes . .'. , 159 

towelling, crash 228 

i tractors > 608 

' . trucks, etc 1144. 1272. 1317 

turkeys 1319 

Weed chains, etc 1118 



Contracts Awabdeo: Page 

Supply Department: 

wood 913 

X-ray materials 105 

Transit Department: 

booths, toll, traffic tunnel 383 

cable, installation of 254, 345 

change-making machines 505 

fencing, traffic tunnel 479. 553 

finishing passageways 1053 

fire extinguishers 479 

panels, relay, etc 182 

paving. Hanover street 528 

paving. Haymarket s<)uare 633 

paving. Merrimac street 5,53 

signal units 182 

signal, systems, tratfic tunnel 478 

toil, collection e<|uipment 164 

wall finish, etc 78 

Traffic Department: 

signals, tor tunnel 780 

Welfare Department: 

laundry work. Wayfarers' I^odge 774 

wood 1 343 

Contracts Awaroed Without Advertisinq: 
10.57. 110. 182.275.355. 426. 479. 5.'.3. 588, 
608. 633. 078. 749. 779. 977. 990. 101 1. 
1033. 1053. 1102. 1149. 1198. 1236. 
1273. 1344. 
Contracts. Changes in: 

11.51. ,53. 112. 1 19. 127. 1.55, 1.S8. 202. '207. 
2.52. 272. 312. 335. 399. 405. 416. 421. 
479. 499. 5.">0. 5.")3. 588. 603. 609. 673. 
679. 695. 732. 783.913. 915. 1017. 1039. 
1054. 1100. lltM. 1192, 1199, 1202, 
1237. 
Collectino Department; 
('liiingrs in iNTSonncI i^f: 

J:in ..54:.luiic..5.S(): Vug . 912. 924; SepI , 
9«9;l)(l .1110; \ov . 1141; Dec- . i:U5. 
Credit Uiiiuii. Iloslon. annual report of . . . 1229 
Credit llnioii, llo.'tloii. notneof iiieeling of. 1 199 

CONTKMTH .XWARllEU. .\l)llIT10N» TO AND 

1)ei>i<'tioni» H(om; 
llnsiMtftl Depnrtinenl . 

adililioiK.. City Hospital 781.979. 1051 

I2(/. 1347. 1.177 
l)i'l>:irtMienl of Scliuol JluililitigM: 

:ilier:il ions: 

.losepli 11 Il:iriira 420. 749. 978. 951 .1 147 

Howaril .\ venue 979 

Williniii Miirtoii KogcrK 421) 

deductions: 

Meeilioveii l-l^" 

I'.iiHt lloxluii High. 1347 

D. 

Depvktment or Sciiooi. IIuilhinus: 
rliaiigc.'' in personnel of; 

J;in . .54. 75; Feb . MO. LSI : M:ir.li. 292; 

M:iy. .'ilHl; .luiie.i;05, (■):«): July. 744. 

roiiiplele ri'iiovMlioM of biiildiiig' during 

Kuminer of 1931 797 

praise for employees of 5.>0 

report of William W I )riiiiimey on survey 

and study Inp of prinripnl iilies 037 

r. 

Kiist lloiton tr:i(Gc luniicl to lie oi)ened 
.Miiy I Coniplelcd months ulicud of 

>chedulc 2.1 1 

Ki-EcrioN Depaktment: 
ch;inL'es in personnel of: 

March. 200; ,Sept.. 1009; Oct . 1072. 
111)9; .S.i/ . 1141; Dec. 12:i:i. 13ir>. 
I3H 
complainl.t ng:iiii'<t irregularities in regis- 

trntion riuinot l>c eiitert:iiiie<l 1 139 

Employment Uukeau: 
changes in personnel of: 
Oct.. 1072; Dec, 1342. 

I-. 

Fire Department: 

changes in penionnel of: 

Jan.. 9. 54. 75; Feb.. 102. 130. 156. 181: 

■March. 200. 274; April. 3.56. 397; May. 

4-20. 500; June, 520; July, 672, 694, 

744; \ug . 772. 800; Sept.. 939. 1009; 

Oct.. 1052. 1116; Nov., 1213; Dec, 

1266. 
Fire I'nder" riters. report of, on proposed 

reduction of companies 1 193 

Fourth of July oration by Cardinal O'Connell, 665 

G. 

Ginn, Miss Susan J., report of. on meeting of 
National Vocational Guidance Asso- 
ciation 285 

H. 

Health Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan.. 75; Feb., 157, 181; March, 274, 
292; April, 356, 382, 397; May, 445; 
June, 529, 586, 605; July, 694, 724, 
744; Aug.. 912. 924; Sept.. 947. 989, 
1009; Oct., 1052, 1072. 1100, 1116; 
Dec, 1266. 
Hospital Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan.. 9. 21, 54, 75; Feb., 102, 130, 157, 
181; March, 225, 274, 292; April. 340. 
356, 382. 397; May, 420, 445. 475, 
500; June, 520, 548. 586, 605. 630; 
July, 672, 694, 724, 744; Aug., 772, 
912, 924; Sept.. 947, 975. 989, 1009. 



Hospital Department: Paob 

changes in personnel of: 

1028; Oct.. 1052. 1072. 1092, 1116; 
Nov., 1141, 1171. 1213; Dec, 1233, 
1266. 1292, 1316. 
(Sanitorium Department. See above.) 
House of Correction: 
changes in personnel of: 
Felb.. 102. 
House ok Correction. M. & M, Manc- 
factdrinq: 
changes in personnel of; 
Feb., 102. 



Inspector, special st«el pipe, appointed 802 

Institutions Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan.. 9. 21. 55, 76; Feb., 102, 130. 157. 
182; March. 226, 253. 274. 292; April. 
340, 356, 382, 397; May, 420. 445, 475, 
500; June, 520, 548, 586, 605. 630; 
July. 672. 694. 744; Aug., 772. 800. 
912, 924; Sept., 939, 948, 975, 1009. 
1028; Oct.. 1053, 1072. 1100, 1116; 
Nov.. 1142, 1172, 1197. 1214; Dec. 
1233, 1266, 1293. 1316. 1341. 
for 5.1 le of junk ^ 427 

L. 

I. AW Department: 

changes in personnel of: 

Jnn . 21. 55; Feb. 130. March. 226; 
2.">3. 292; May. 475; June. 548, 605; 
Aug., 772; Oct.. 1053. 1116; Nov.. 
1213; Dec. 1266. 

"L" rond agrees with city as to use of struc- 
ture fur traffic signals 503 

M. 

Mayor's Office: 

changes m personnel of: 

Jan., 21; Feb., 102, 130, 157. '. 

Match, .Activities of. Social Service * 
AM> Miscellaneous: 
adopts new system for contruliiiig dis- 

bur.iciuenls of city funds 1209 

appeals for aid for C. A. A workers 230 

appeals for Ked Cross 1 182 

approves authority to terminate contract 

w ith Coleman Brolliers 104 

approves contract for new school for Girls 

111 South Boston i 1 169 

approves employment of e<tra men by 

Public Works DepartinSnt 232 

approves Neptune Garden p^ii 223 

approves request for boiler'for ambulance 

station 53 

approves reqiict.t to investigate Free Ports, 1182 
a.iks for voluntary contributions from 

higher siilaricd officials 395 

l>.ittlc.< to save sugar indii."'try 247 

Christmas greetings to citizens 1348 

entertains newsboys of Boston 771 

executive order, continuing salary cuts. ... 3 

executive order as to increments of salaries. 588 
felicitated by Building Department cm- 

plo\ ees 1348 

felicitates Cardinal O'Connell on anniver- 
sary. , . . . 1199 

inauguration of 3 

inaugural address of 1 

initiates plan to benefit 23,000 families on 
aid, better housing and savings on 

life insurance 1280 

inaugurates system of gainful employment, 1113 
invites convention of Atlantic Deeper 

Waterways .Association to Boston. . . . 1108 
issues orders terminating payless furloughs. 1007 

legislation proposed by 49 

makes public report of check-up on traffic 

in congested districts 1211 

moves to restore step-rate increases 17 

office contributes 100 per cent Emergency 

Relief Campaign 181 

pays tribute to Benjamin Franklin 53 

pays tribute to Gen. Joseph ilaller. noted 

Pole 73 

pays tribute to retiring Street Commis- 
sioner John J. O'CalTaghan 120 

plans for city supply purchases through 

Central Ageniy 78 

presents plan for clearance of sub-standard 

areas in Boston 1261 

puts 247 to work in Recreational Center. . 53 
saves jobs of 88Q C. W. A. workers in 

School Building Department 99 

seeks more relief funds 1182 

submits list of new C. W. A. work 183 

successful in secliring assurance of in- 
creased funds for reducing unemploy- > 

ment 1099 

thaHjced for honoring Frederick Douglass. 196 
to speak at Emergency Campaign com- 
mittee meeting January 12 1319 

to review West Point cadets 1182 

receives " medal of gratitude" . 1223 

vetoes increase in pay of probation officer. 119 

vetoes order for catch-basin equipment 1074 

wanU Post Office l^ork started 1320 

Mayor, Addresses br: 

at City Club on city employees 249 

at opening of Emergency Drive 61 

before Charitable Irish Society, March 17 . . 271 

budget message 613 

inaugural address of 1 

Labor Day, on C)mmon. deplores strikes, 971 
on Common, on JEoston Massacre 221 



"^^n^v^^^l^^l^*^^^' 



CITY RECORD INDEX. 



:s'' 



3 



Mator, Addbesses bt: Paob 

pays tribute to Jewish race at dedication 

of Helping Hand Home 1069 

to assessors, on March 29 337 

tells Chamber of Commerce his plans to 

help business 127 

Br RADIO. 

aims to restore Boston to its former 

leadership 125 

appeals to employees to take paylesfl 

furloughs 471 

■ Arbor Day and Its Signi6c8nce (Park 

CommissionerLong) 417 

as to discbarge of employees 331 

assails those who try to spoil or retard 

country's increasing prosperity 197 

battles for unemployed on C. W. A. and 

P. W. A. works 177 

Boston cemeteries rapidly ranking with the 

best 741 

citiiens supporting him in his efTorls 497 

administration entitled to support (Col- 
lector Doherty) 441 

Soldiers' Relief (Commissioner Carey) .... CS9 

transportation facilities of the city (Colonel 

Sullivan) 001 

Boston's Park system (Commissioner Long), 515 

discusses municipal pay roll '.'ti9 

explains features of measure he is asking 

legislature to pass to affect economy 280 

explains increase in tax rate 969 

City Sealer, Sweeney, substitutes for Mayor, 545 

library system discussed by Milton E. 

Lord, director ... C07 

Major Hall, of Public Buildings, substitutes 

for Mayor 583 

new City Hall and other major projects . . 153 

on collection of tuxes 377 

plans for new sclioolhouscs 1025 

plans reorganiintion of Welfare Depart- 
ment 97 

plans to improve Boston's housing condi- 
tions 9S5 

program for economy does not call for dis- 
charge of einpio) ees . 35.3 

replies to Ex-Mayor Curley's Tuiiimnny 

Ball speech 3'29 

takes battle of taxpayers to voters 4ti9 

to home owners 393 

Traffic Commission a<-coMipli8hiiieiits out- 
lined by Comniiftflioner Hicke_\ 721 

truth about Boston's high tax rate.. . . 10U5 
Mayor, Comml'.nicationh HECEivEn uv: 

from Corporation Counsel Foley, at Con- 
ference of Mayors at Chicago 1231 

from ("orporalion Counsel, sustaining in 
urging Council to approve new loan 
orders 170 

from Congressman Uouglas as to speeding 

work at Navy Yard 1091 

from Finance (.'ommission as to probing 

tunnel land takings 1250 

from French .Minister of Colonics with 

thanks for entertainment 1195 

from J. C. L. Dowliiig, regarding tare of 

needy nt City Hospital 1297 

from "L" road, no waiting room on new 

bus platform 1290 

from Paul V. Betters, director. Conference 

of .Mayors . 1324 

musicians thank .Mayor for aid 1211 

Mayor, Communications Sent uy: 

to City Council. March 10 257 

to the mayor of every city and chairmen 

of selectmen 123S 

to City Council, abandoning plans (or new- 
City Hall 199 

to Mayor Quigley of Chelsea, anent Chelsea 

Bridge repairs 1297 

message of condolence to Belgium lS.i 

Mayor, Public Statements: 

abolishing voluntary pay roll contributions, 1049 

appoints Ex-.Vlayor pjtzgerald to Port 

Authority 155 

city employees free to use judgment as to 

gifts to charity 137 

concerning recreational activities and 

facilities 273 

contract award for snow clearing held up . 1349 

explains 6nancial details of city conditions 

to teachers 581 

ill health nurse cared for by city 1 127 

views on manufacturers' sale tax 10 

Mayor's Circular Letters: 

9, 12, 26, 127, 2.30, 232. 258, 311, 421, 484, 643 
636, 716. 979, 1012, 1107, 1319 

O. 

O'Connell, William, Cardinal, delivers oration 

on July Fourth 665 

Ovektiue Allowed: 
Collecting Department: 

Feb.. 182. 
Hospital Department: 

Jan., 9, 55, 76; Feb., 103, 130; Nov., 
1172. 
Institutions Department: 

Jan., 9, 22; March, 253, 274. 673; Oct., 
1116; Dec, 1267, 1294. 
Printing Department: 

Jan.. 9, 55. 
Public Worka Department: 
Oct., 1116; Nov.. 1172; Dec.. 1317. 
1342. 



Paqe 
P. 

Park Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 22, 55, 76; Feb., 130. 182; March, 
200, 226, 253. 274, 292; May, 445, 475; 
June, 630, July. 673, 725; Aug., 773, 
912. 925: Sept., 948. 975, 989, 1010. 
1028; Oct., 1053. 1073, 1116; Nov., 
1142, 1172; Dec, 1267, 1317, 1342. 
pay, adjustments of, in public works depart- 
ment 1014 

tropical 6sh for Aquarium 550 

has garden of economic plants that is boast 

of countr>' 627 

Patriots' Day, Boston's celebration '*379 

Penal Institutions: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 55; Feb., 102, 130. 158; March, 
253, 274; April, 382, .398; May, 475; 
June, 521, 587. 631; July, 673, 744; 
Aug., 913; Sept , 948. 989, 1010, 1028; 
Oct., 1073; Nov., 1142. 1198, 1214; 
Dec, 12:i3, 1267, 12<J4. 
Probate Court: 

changes m personnel of: 
.May, 420. 
Public Bdildinos Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Feb.. 130. 158. 182; June, 631; July, 
673; Aug., 913: .'^ept.. 989; Oct., 
1053-, Nov.. 1142; Dec. 1267, 1242. 
Public Works Department: 

(Central Olfice ) 
cbangos in personnel of: 

Jan.. 55. 76; Feb., 130; March, 200, 293; 
June. 549; July. 673; Sept.. 948, 975, 
1028; Oct , 1053, 1116; Nov., 1214; 
Dec, 1267. 1317. 

(Bridge Service ) 
Jan., 22. 76; June. 587: July, 704; Aug., 
925; Sept., 948. 975. lUlH. 1028: Oct., 
1116; Nov.. 1142. 1172; Dec, 1233. 
(Ferry Service ) 
Jan.. 22. 55; Feb.. l.'iS; March. 220; 
June 549; July 073. 72."). 744; .^ug-. 
773; Sept., 925. 975, 1010, 10'28; 
Oct., 1073; Dec , 1317. 

(Paving Service. 1 
Jan.. 9,55; Feb.. 102, 182; March, 22fi. 
274;Juiie. 587; July. 74."): AuR.. 92.'); 
Sept., 9/5. 1028; l^ct . 10.")3. 1073, 
Nov., 1142, 1198. 1214; Dec. 1267. 
(Sanitary Service ) 
March, '200. 226; June. 587; Sept., 948; 
Dec. 1233. 

(Sewerage Service.) 
Jan.. 5.1. 76; Feb.. 103. 130. 182; March. 
200. 226. 253. 274; April. .340. 3«i2. 308; 
May. 445; June. 587, 605; July. 073; 
AiicUi.-): .^cpt..948;Ocl.. 1053. 1116; 
Nov.. 1142. 1214; Dec. 1233, 1294. 
(Street Cleaning Service.) 
Oct., 1110. 

(Water Service.) 
Jan., 55, 7B; Feb.. 135; March, >226: 
June, 587; July. 673 745; Aug . 925; 
Sept.. 948. 989. 1010. 1028; Oct.. 1053. 
1116; Dec. 1233. 1207. 

pcrmissinn to sell old rails 253 

plan to speed work 990 

projects undertaken in 19-34 1333 

Sumner Tunnel toll receipts 1214 

work done by department force: 

Bellcvue street 752 

Bertson avenue 1342 

Haven avenue 752 

High View avenue 61 

Holborn street 7.'i2 

Melville avenue 683 

R. 

1{egi8try Department: 
changes in personnel of: 
June. 605. 
Retireme.nt Board: 
changes in personnel of: 

Nov., 1142. 
reports of. for: 

Dec, 18. 1933; .Ian., 112; Feb., 292; 
March. 332: April, 428; May, 522; 
June, 680; July. 773; Aug., 979; Sept., 
1063; Oct., 1152; Nov., 1277; Dec, 
1097. 
Rose Garden, a great delight to citizens 691 

S. 
Street Layino-Oct Department: 

changes in personnel of: 

Jan.. 76; Feb.. 158, 182; March, 226, 
253, 274; April. 340. 398; June, 632; 
Aug., 773, 913; Dec, 1317. 

land-taking: 

Alexander street rt al. (sewerage) 1 152 

Alford street et al. (sewerage) 1216 

Alpheus road 183 

AUston street (Dorchester) 781 

Ashmont street 635 

Bates street 226 

Bayside street 80 . 

Berry street 165 

Boyd street 1105 

Bloomington street 1342 

Burard street • 78 

Butler avenue 194 

Caihbria road 1215 

Cary ro*l 76 



Street Lattno-Out Dbpabtment: Page 

land-taking: 

Dorchester street (school purposes) 934 

Esther road et aU. (sewerage) 1223 

Everett court " ligs 

Flavia street 1339 

Glenbrook street 168 

' Glide street 1346 

Goodway road 1000 

Hamilton street 1122 

Harmon street ^ . . . 1342 

Haven avenue (sewerage) . .' 80 

Hibbard avenue (sewerage) 139 

Hubbard road 123 

. Hyde Park avenue (sewerage) . .455. 484. 1245 

Hyde street , •. 58 

Keith street 182 

La Grange street (sewerage) 609 

Montmorenci avenue 1245 

Parker avenue 51 

Peak Hill road 633 

Phillips place (sewerage) . 257 

Orient avenue (extension) 10.54 

Ray street 930 

Reddy street . .'. 1361 

Roberts avenue 140 

Uumford road (sewerage) 1243 

Rutledge road (sewerage) 351 

Savin Hill avenue (sewerage) 389 

Scribner road 86 

Sea \ iew avenue 185 

Shubert street 86 

\ ictory road (sewerage) 212 

Welles terrace 230 

Weatbourne street 1340 

Windaor street 733 

land-taking, damages awarded for: 

Arlington street 403 

Ashlct eireel 81, 358 

Baker street., 589 

Beaver pl^:e (sewerage) 600 

BertraiM street 607 

Bonad road . 81 

Boyd SI reet 85 

Branchfield street 81 

( "alvin road 279, 589 

Cedarwood road 1267 

Centre street 79. 202. 279, 695 

Clare avenue 81, 357, 751 

Colborne road 1320 

Cranston street 1082 

Delano park 916, 1082, 1267 

Dorchester street Hal 726, 095 

Durant road 137 

Durnell avenue 79 

Eden street and avenue 1240 

Edgebrook road 81, 146 

Elnidale street 1267 

KImer road 751 

Fenton street 86 

Field street '. . . 81 

Francoiiia street ., . . . 589 

Freelaiid strert 781, 1013, 1073, 1267 

Gallivan Boulevard 202 

Gene street 81 

Gladstone street , 501 

Guernsey street 1013 

Hillsboro ro:id 1073 

Iluntoon street 81 

Kingslcy street ; 751, 1267 

Knoll street 279 

La Grange street 279 

Landseer street 155 

Laredo street 915 

Laurie avenue 81. 689. 781. 1073 

Lila road 148. 207, 589, 1180 

Louder's lane 915 

Macullar rood 1240 

McKone street 148, 607. 1230 

Monastery road 1073 

Mt. Bowdoin terrace 202 

North Mead street 1320 

Oakland street 1319 

Orange street. 148, 499. 643. 679. 751, 781 
915, 1073, 1082, 1089 

Orient avenue (sewerage) 104 

Perthshire road 294, 589, 691, 1082 

Poplar street (sewerage) 78 

Preble street , 3 

Princeton street 1180 

Ray street , . 923 

Royen rood 148 

Russett road 368 

St. Theresa avenue 1180 

School street (Dorchester). . ." 1192 

Sheridan street 751 

Shermont street 81 

South Crescent Circuit 403 

South Munroe terrace .^ 692 

Tennyson street .»1. 589 

Waldemar avenue • 148 

Weld street \. 81. 915 

Westchester road. 81. 128, 148, 279. 294,^83 
689. 753. 1082 

West Newton street 781 

Wilmington avenue. . 148. 473, 689. 607. 761 

781. 915 

street betterments, assessments for: 

Adams street 286 

Ashton street 185 

Bilodeau road 1 . . 386 

Bonad road 284 

Brsftichfield street 263 

BrantoD street 129 

Caledonian avenue 81 

Calvin road 224 

Clare avenue 186 

(Ilolborne road ,...:... . 286 






,-^t:. 



'^mm^ 



4 

■ » 'I 

Street I^tino-Odt De»awment: Paoe 

street beUe^ments, aesessraentB for: 

Creeton park 224 

Crockett avenue 286 

Delano park ^ 1121 

Elmdale street _ 2d 

Favre street , 833 

Freeland street '. 1103 

Glenmont road 26 

Groom street 26 

Hillsboro road 1121 

Holbom terrace :.. .^ 185 

Huntoon street ; 255 

KnoU street 189 

Lenoxdale avenue 224 

Lila road • 1 85 

McKone street .' ' 2'J4 

Monastery road 286 

Normandy street ... 129 

Orange street _. . 953 

Parklawn road '. . 1 193 

Pasadena road 81 

Perthshire road 286 

Pompeii street .^ 26 

Robey street 26 

Kussett road ; 129 

Sanborn avenue ^ 137 

Sbcrmont street 81 

St. Theresa avenue 294 

Tennis road .* " 294 

V Westche8t«r rood .... 913 

Wilmington avenue 913 

Woodfield street 120 

Zeller street 294 

construction approved 1240 

location o( .approved. .9. 202. 280. 589, 994. I3J4 

.Mayor approves vote^o build srule pil . . 09.i 



CITY RECORD INDEX. 



Street Layinq-Out Dbpartubnt: Page 

revision of assessment, Centre street 1054 

slum clearance starts 990 

SoFroLE ConNTT Jail: 
changes in personnel of: 
June, 549. 
Stn>EnioR Criminal Court: 
changes in personnel of: 
Nov.. 1214. 
Supply Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Feb.. 158; April, 359; July, 745; Dec.. 
1342. 
report of saving on contract for fruit and 

vegetables 1217 

School Couuittee: 

report on annual meeting, New York 1121 

report of Herllia A. O'Connor 505 

report of Dr. Lyons on rnfeteria system in 

Philadelphia wlioola 1217 

report of Helen F. <^le:ives 404 

report of Helen F. Mti(?KfTro\'. niirsp 456 

report uf l.illinn U. Poor, on Nn.'<hviUe . . 606 
report of Jiinie:» T, Mulro\- ou Kx tended 

INe of I'ul.lu' Sch.iol.- 1217 

Sol^UlCKs' HCLIEK DEPAItTUC.NT: 

i-hiinge:4 in porsiinnel of: 

Jiiii.. S.'i; JuMO. 6;)2; Julv. 694; .Aug., 
773; t)ct . 1116; Doc. 1317. 

T. 

Tax nile. Hoston. $.17.10. 1914 94.1 

Ticx siiliv, deliii>|ueiit 809, 907 

Tnm^lcr of fuiidj. from Piirkiiinii Fund to 

r.irk 1017 



Transit Department: Paoe- 

changes in personnel of: 

Feb., 103; March, 274, 293; April, 340; 
June, 521 ; Aug., 773; Oct., 1073. 

Tunnel . vehicular, open to public 625 

Tunnel, toll receipts 1105 

Tunnel tickets bought by Post Office depart- 
ment .'. . 803 

Traffic Department: 
changes in personnel of: 
Aug.. 800. 

loading cone permits changes 1 192 

part of Washington street made two-wa.v,. 1348 
State to cooperate with city in routjng 

tunnel traffic 1049 

Treabcrt Department: 
changes in personnel of: 
Jnu. j). 55. 

W. 

Weights and Me.\sure8 Departubnt: 
changes in personnel of: 

Feb., 182; Aug., 800, 913; Sept., 1010. 
Welfare Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 21. 55, 76; Feb., 130, 156, 182; 
March, 200. 225, 274, 292; April, 356. 
382,397; May, 420, 475; June. 649, 
587, 605, 630; July. 673, 726, 744; 
Aug., 773, 912. 925; Sept., 948, 975, 
1009, 1028; Oct.. 1053, 1073, 1100. 
1116; Nov., 1142, 1172, 1198, 1214; 
Dec. 1233. 1266. 1293, 1316, 1342. 
working plan (or sliding sciilc incrcoacs 603 



r 



I c 



CITY OP BOSTON PRINTINO OKFAKTMENT 



CITY RECORD 

Official, Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Voi-. 26. Saturday, Jaistxtary 6, 1934. No. 1 



HON. FREDERICK W. MANSFIELD TAKES OFFICE AS BOSTON'S 
FORTIETH MAYOR AMID SCENES THAT CHEER BOSTON 
AND FILL HER CITIZENS WITH HOPE FOR FUTURE-OUT= 
LINES HIS PROGRAM FOR RESTORING CITY TO PROSPERITY 
AND HAPPINESS IN ADDRESS THAT WARMS HEARTS OF 
ALL WHO HEAR HIM-SQUARE DEAL IN NEW DEAL IS 
KEYNOTE SOUNDED AS HE ASKS FOR COOPERATION FROM 
ALL CITIZENS OF THE GREAT METROPOLIS. 



The Inaugural address of Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield at the Symphony Hall exercises 
was as follows: 

It is with a very grave realization of the responsibilities resting upon the chief magistrate 
of our beloved city that I approach the duties which the people of Boston have placed upon me 
in electing me to be their Alayor. Even in times of ai)parently assured prosperity and of lavish 
expenditure those responsibilities are always great. But in such times as we are passing through 
at the moment, the burdens resting upon the mayor of any large city are many times multiplied. 

It is unnecessary for me to call attention to the troubled state of affairs not only in Boston 
and in our nation, but throughout the entire world. All civilized nations are wrestling with 
problems of government. Never in the long history of Boston has the prospect seemed more 
gloomy nor the outcome more doubtful. 

Aside from those conditions which are general throughout the country, 
the citizens of Boston know well that there are local conditions which are 
peculiar to Boston but not of their own making. The new administration 
must take over these conditions, — a heritage from my predecessors — result= 
ing from long years of extravagance and lavish expenditure and from an 
apparent assumption that the ordinary rules of prudence in conducting 
business affairs of importance did not apply to the City of Boston. 

THE FINANCIAL CONDITION OF THE CITY. 

Almost every mayor who has been inaugurated within recent years has referred to the 
financial condition of Boston. A perusal of their inaugural speeches shows that the apparently 
always alarming condition of Boston's finances has been a favorite theme of incoming mayors. 
But when the financial condition of the city in those other years is compared to that which exists 
toda}' as I assume the burdens of this great office, it is evident that most of those former refer- 
ences were more rhetorical than real, and that the incoming administration will be faced with 
more trj-ing and difficult problems than any other in Boston's history. 

THE CASH DEFICIT. 

The new administration assumes office under extremely critical conditions. As of the 
end of 1933, Boston's cash deficit or the shortage in the cash operations of the city, will probably 
be found to be in the vicinity of $15,000,000, an all-time peak in the history of the city. 
Uncollected taxes may amount to about $25,000,000, which is also far in excess of any previous 
year. 

While these uncollected taxes exceed the cash deficit, there is small consolation in this fact. 
In recent years the cash deficit and uncollected taxes have been increasing, and they have created 
progressively greater difficulty in financing the city's requirements. {Continued on page 4-) 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 6 




"0 Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 

queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship= 

teeming plain of the ocean. 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene. 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 

unselfish devotion!" 

From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

Hall. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City HaU. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



$2.00 Per Year 
10 Cents 



IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES. 
Old South News-stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 
A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR, 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
January 8, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 

MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 
public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 



trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasolene, oil, 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic waj's for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purpo.ses, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Traffic Commission, 
154 Berkeley street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the fen'ies. the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of a-shes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplj'ing or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To THE Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Bo.ard of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue^ Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, and the small parks 
and playgrounds in general throughout 



the city, and as to the extermination 
of gjT)sy moths and the charges made 
for such service. Application may be 
made to this department for informa- 
tion regarding the public baths and 
gj-mnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the Citj' of Boston. 

To the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Dep.\rtment of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To THE Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To THE Wire Dn'isioN of the Fire 
Department, Fire Department Head- 
quarters, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire di\ision. To 
Room 1007, Cit3^ Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the Citj^ 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the Citv of Boston as established bv 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY 

For the week ending December 30, 1 933 : 
Population estimated July, 1933, 
United States Census Bureau estimate, 
791,944; number of deaths fstillbirths 
excluded): Residents, 190; nonresidents, 
53: total, 243. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 15.95; nonresidents deducted, 
12.47. 



REPORT. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
Last week, 17.27; corresponding week 
last year, 15.82. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 14; one j'ear to four j'ears, in- 
clusive, 2: sixty years and over, 133. 
Total deaths: Male, 135; female, 108; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 140; 
deaths of colored, 7. 



REPORT.\BLE DISEASES: CASES AND DE.A.THS.* 



Diseases. 



.\nterior poliomyelitis. . . . 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis lethargica. . . 

Influenza 

Measles 

Meningitis epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary). 
Tuberculosis (other forms) 

Typhoid fever 

Whooping cough 



Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Dec. 30, 1933. 



Cases. Deaths. 



205 

45 

53 

29 

3 

44 



Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Dec. 31, 1932. 



Cases. Deaths. 



37 
1 

10 
1 



10 

26 
34 

29 
97 
26 
4 
2 
53 



14 

1 

12 



* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jax. 6 



CITY RECORD 



HON. FREDERICK W. MANSFIELD INDUCTED INTO OFFICE AS BOSTON'S 
FORTIETH MAYOR WITH SIMPLE BUT IMPRESSIVE SERVICES AT SYM= 
PHONY HALL ON NEW YEAR'S DAY. HOSTS OF HIS FRIENDS GATHER TO 
WITNESS CEREMONIES AND TO WISH HIS ADMINISTRATION SUCCESS AS 
WELL AS PLEDGE COOPERATION. 



Simple, and in keeping with the custom, Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, on Monday morning, January 1' 
was inducted into office as Boston's fortieth Mayor. The ceremonies were witnessed by a host of friends who 
jammed Symphony Hall for the exercises. 

Distinguished citizens, including Boston's fofmer Mayors, and citizens in the ordinary walks of life joined 
with the new Mayor's family in making the occasion one of pleasure to be remembered, each one happy to wish 
the new administration well and manifesting by their presence and applause that they were ready and willing to 
cooperate to the fullest in making Mayor Mansfield's administration one to be remembered as long as the city 
existed. 

The complete program was a.s follows: 

Preceding Inauguration 



Music was furnished by John .\. O'Shea 
at the organ, by members of the People's 
Symphony orchestra directed by Fabien 
Sevitzk}', and Maria Koussevitzky, soloist, 
in private life Mrs. Sevitzky. 

Participants in the inaugural exercises 
were the Rev. Fr. John E. O'Conncll. 
pastor of St. John's and St. Hugh's 
Churches, Koxbury, where the Mayor 
worships; Chief Justice .\rthur P. Kugg 
of the Supreme Judicial Court, who ad- 
ministered the oath of office to the 
Mayor, and City Clerk Wilfred J. Doyle, 
who read the certificates of election of 
the Ma\'or and councilors. The new 
Mayor swore in the twenty-two councilors. 

Members of the City Council attending 
and sworn in were: Henry Sclviteila, 
Ward 1; Thomas H. Creen, Ward 2; 
John I. Fitzgerald, Ward 3; George W. 
Roberts, Ward 4; Henry L. Shattuck, 
Ward 5; (leorge P. Donovan, Ward G; 
John E. Kerrigan, Ward 7; John F. 
Dowd, Ward 8; Richard D. (lleason. 
Ward 9; John J. Doherty, Ward 10; 
Edward L. Englert, Ward 11; David M. 
Brackman, Ward 12; .loseph McCIrath, 
Ward 13; Maurice Si. Cloldinan, Ward 
14; Nhirtin II. Tobin, Ward 1.5; .\lbert 
L. Fish, Ward 16; Robert (!. Wilson, Jr., 
Ward 17; Clement \. Norton, Ward 18; 
Peter A. Murray, Ward 19; James F. 
Finlev, Ward 20; James E. .\gnew. Ward 
21; Edward M. Gallagher, Ward 22. 



Organ Selection. 

Ceremonies. 

John A. O'Shea. 

1. Pomp and Circumstance. Elgnr 

2. Fantasie on Noel. Grison 

3. Transcription on Folk .Song. Oclts 

4. Tocatto from Fifth Symphony. Witlor 
Processional. Coronation March from opera 

" Prophet " Meyerbeer 

Members of the People's .Symphony Orchestra, 

Fabien Sevitzky, Conductor. 

Selection. "America." Smith 

Maria Koussevitzky, soprano. 

Assi8te<l by orchestra and organ. 

.\udience (Chorus only). 

Invocation. 

The Reverend John E. O'Connell, 
Pastor of St. John's and .St. Hugh's Churches, 

Roxbury. 
Reading certificate of election of the Mayor, 
Wilfred J. Doyle. City Clerk. 
Oath of Office. 

-Xdministered by The Hon. .\rthur Prentice Rugg, 
Chief Justice of the .Supreme Judicial Court of 
Massachusetts. 
Orchestral Selection. American Fantasia. 

Victor Herbert 

Members of the People's Symphony Orchestra, 

Fabien .Sevitzky. Conductor. 

Reading certificate of election of members of the 

City Council, 

Wilfre<l J. Doyle. City Clerk. 

The oath of office to the members of the City 

Council. 

.Administered by his Honor. Frederick W. 

Mansfield. .Mayor. 

Selection. Paraphrase of .Steplien Foster songs. 

(.Special arrangement for the occasion.) 

Membiers of the People's .Symphony Orchestra, 

FabicK .'^vitzky. Conductor. 

The Inaugural .Address, 

His Honor Fre<lerick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 
Postlude. "Star-Spangle<l Banner." Key 

Maria Koussevitzky. soprano, 
Assiste<l by orchestra and organ. 
.Audience (Chorus only). 
Organ Recessional. "March Picturesaue." Kroeger 
.Audience will please remain seated until retire- 
ment of the Mayor and Suite. 



Guests of the Mayor at Symphony 
Hall included: 



Former Fire Commissioner Edward F. 
McLivughlin and Mrs. McLaughlin, Maj.- 
Gen. Fox Conner, U. S. A., Coiiidr. Daniel 
J. Doherty, .\merican Legion, Comdr. 
Walter G. Howard, Veterans of Foreign 
Wars, Comdr. William G. Quirk, Spanish 
War Veterans, Comdr. Frederick H. 
Bishop, Grand -Army, Comdr. T. James 
Gallagher, Disabled Veterans of the 
World War, Mrs. John J. Douglass, 
Lt.-Gov. Caspar G. Bacon, Collector of 
the Port Joseph A. Maynard, Immigra- 
tion Commissioner Mary H. Ward, 
Hugh A. Ford, Consul for Great Britain, 
F. G. Foley, Consul for Irish Free State, 
Collector of Internal Revenue Joseph P. 
Carney, Eliot Wadsworth, Robert G. 
Dodge, Judge Frank W. Grinnell, Regi.ster 
of Deeds William T. A. Fitzgerald, 
Registrar of Probate .\rthur W. Sullivan, 
Clerk Francis A. Campbell of the Su- 
perior Civil Court, Judge Joseph A. 
Sheehan, Police Commissioner Eugene C. 
Hultman, Superintendent of Police Martin 
H. King, Deputy Superintendent James J. 
McDevitt, United States Attorney Francis 
J. W. Ford, George R. Nutter and Judge 
Richard M. Walsh. 



AMENDED ASSESSMENTS. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
votes of the Board of Street Commis- 



Vnle'I, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of June 2. 1933, 
determining damages caused by the 
making of the public improvement, con- 
sisting of the laying out of Perthshire 
road, be, and the same hereby is, amended, 
by striking from said order the amount 
$500 awarded to Florence Crittenton 
I^eague of Compassion in said order and 
in.serting in place thereof the amount 
$1,750; that the amount $1,750 be, and 
the ,siime hereby is, awarded to I'lorence 
Crittenton League of Compassion for the 
damages so sustained. 

Voterl, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of February 
3, 1931, determining damages caused by 
the making of the i)ublic improvement, 
consisting of the widening and relocation 
of Preble street, be, and the same hereby 
is, amended, by striking from said order 
the amount $6,000 awarded to Fred 
Krawec in said order and inserting in 



place thereof the amount $7,000; that the 
amount $7,000 be, and the same hereby is, 
awarded to Fred Krawec for the damages 
so sustained. 



EXECUTIVE ORDER. 

City of Boston, 
Mayor's Office, January 2, 1934. 
By virtue of the authority granted to 
mo by the provisions of chapter one 
hundred and twenty-one of the Acts of 
the year nineteen hundred and thirty- 
three, I, as Mayor of the City of Bo.ston, 
do hereby order and direct that the 
reductions in the .salary of every office 
and position, the salary of which is paid 
from the treasury of the City of Boston 
in whole or in part, made pursuant to 
the provisions of section three of chapter 
one hundred and twenty-one of the Acts 
of the year nineteen hundred and thirty- 
three, be, and hereby are, continued in 
effect for the calendar year nineteen 
hundred and thirty-four. 

By order of 

Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor. 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS. 

Public Works Department. 

Baker Matz & Co. have been granted 
an extension of the time of completion of 
the contract for removing snow and ice 
in district No. 5, from December 31, 
1933, to May 1, 1934. 

Hugh Nawn, Incorporated, have been 
granted an extension of the time of com- 
pletion of the contract for removing snow 
and ice in the streets and avenues as 
designated, from December 31, 1933 to 
May 1, 1934. 

Dooley Brothers, Incorporated, have 
been granted an extension of the time of 
completion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in district No. 4, from 
December 31, 1933, to May 1, 1934. 

Coleman Brothers Corporation have 
been granted an extension of the time of 
completion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in district No. 11, from 
December 31, 1933, to May 1, 1934. 

The Capital Contracting Company has 
been granted an exten.sion of the time of 
completion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in district No. 12, from 
December 31, 1933, to May 1, 1934. 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 6 



MAYOR'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

( Continued from page 1. ) 

The immediate problem facing the new 
administration is to maintain the solvency 
of the city and to guard against defaults on 
any of its obligations, both to city em= 
ployees and to private creditors. In order 
to finance the city's requirements until 
1934 taxes are paid next fall, it will be neces= 
sary to negotiate tax anticipation loans of 
many millions of dollars, under money 
market conditions which are far from 
auspicious. Whether we like this situation or 
not, it is a condition which we must face. 
We must act quickly and decisively to make 
certain that these loans can be negotiated 
and paid at maturity. We must put our 
financial house in order, keep our current 
expenditures within reasonably expected in= 
come, and reduce tax delinquency by every 
proper method. 

THE TAX RATE. 

In 1932, the tax rate was $35.50. A reduction 
to S32.80 was effected in 1933, but this figure did not 
represent the true state of affairs. The reduction of 
$2.70 was far more than accounted for by two loans 
and a grant, — a municipal relief loan of S3, 500, 000, 
a welfare department loan of $3,800,000, and a federal 
welfare grant of $1,994,000, or a total of $9,292,000. 
By means of these special financing methods, a tem- 
porary tax rate reduction was obtained. Without 
them the 1933 tax rate would have been higher than 
the rate for 1932. 

A number of factors, beyond the control of the 
incoming administration, darken the tax rate picture 
in 1934. There is no assurance or promise of federal 
grants in 1934, and no one can now prophesy what 
the future policy of the Legislature will be with refer- 
ence to further loans. Without further grants or 
loans, the tax rate will be increased substantially. 
In addition, the city must now commence the five- 
year task of meeting the interest and principal of 1933 
loans. There is also a probability of an increase in 
the state tax assessed on municipalities and of an 
increase in the requirements for purchases and con- 
tracts, due to advanced prices. 

Of course, it is impossible to forecast at 
the present moment with any accuracy what 
the tax rate for 1934 will be, but weighing the 
favorable and unfavorable factors as they 
are now apparent, the result points to an 
increase of not less than three to four dollars 
over the 1933 rate of $32.80. The increase 
may be even greater, because of factors which 
the incoming administration will be help= 
less to prevent, and powerless to avoid. 

It is not my intention to accept a tax rate 
increase without great effort to prevent it. 
I shall undertake every proper method at 
the city's disposal to keep the tax rate at the 
lowest possible figure. Non=welfare expendi= 
tures can be cut down; this will be done. 

Welfare expenditures are, of course, too 
definitely bound up with economic trends 
all over the nation to permit any definite 
promise. 

I want to practice broad and reasonable economy. 
I do not want to cause distress among any groups of 
our people or, in the absence of controlUng necessity, 



to withdraw from them services to which they have 
become accustomed and which are helpful to them. 
The strictest and narrowest economy is not a part of 
my program, for there is a danger that it will create 
new liabilities as acute as those now facing us. We 
must provide at all costs, both adequately and reason- 
ably, for such essential services as education, the 
preservation of the public health, and police and fire 
protection. We must accept the liabilities imposed 
upon us by forces outside our immediate control. 
On the other hand, these obligations compel us to 
recognize the imperative need of foregoing all luxury 
expenditures, of practising sound economies in every 
detail of municipal government, of inaugurating such 
changes as will improve services and reduce costs, 
and, above all else, of observing the most scrupulous 
honesty in every part of the city's spending. 

An additional phase of the tax rate problem is the 
stern necessity facing this administration of halting 
the pyramiding of our deficit. In recent years our 
expenditures have been exceeding our cash income 
in increasing amounts. This increasing cash deficit 
has been met by borrowing against delinquent taxes. 
Such a pyramiding is the chief defect in the city's 
credit structure. 



THE FEVER TO SPEND. 

Under conditions as they exist today in Boston 
and throughout the civilized world, most thoughtful 
and prudent men will agree that there is only one 
formula to pursue if municipal credit is to remain 
unimpaired and if our city is to prosper and to thrive. 
That formula is one of broad, practical economy. 
The times call for the safeguarding of all municipal 
funds, for the elimination of waste, for the reduction 
of taxes — if that can possibly be accomplished — 
and for a poUcy which will eliminate all municipal 
expenditures which are not necessary. 

The chief magistrates of this and of all other cities 
are between two fires. The necessity for eliminating 
expense and saving money is fully recognized. But 
an important part of the policy of the National Gov- 
ernment is to spend money liberally and to encourage 
state and local governments to do likewise. It is 
argued in support of this policy that government 
spending must prime the economic pump; that we 
are confronted with a national emergency akin to 
war; that the depression has assumed the proportions 
of a public peril and that extraordinary means must 
be adopted to meet it, — means that in ordinary times 
would be considered perilous by men of prudence and 
of expert knowledge in economics. 

Our President has embarked upon a great and 
breath-taking venture to restore prosperity. It is a 
valiant attempt to maintain the American standard 
of living. He himself admits the experimental nature 
of his program. While misgivings as to parts of that 
program have been expressed by some, all must 
applaud the courage and determination of the President 
and must reahze that no constructive alternative has 
been offered. 

So far as municipal governments are concerned, 
it is their patriotic duty to cooperate in furthering 
the national program in every reasonable way, but it 
must be remembered that national recovery will be 
hindered rather than helped if a municipality spends 
so freely that its credit is endangered. In the nature 
of things, the federal treasury can withstand abnormal 
emergency expenditures without impairing its solvency 
to a much greater extent than can municipal treasuries 
which must rely upon prostrated real estate for the 



Jan. 6 



CITY RECORD 



major part of their income. In so far as cooperation 
with the national program involves the expenditure 
of the money to be raised from local taxpayers, rules 
of prudent finance must not be abandoned. The in- 
come base of our municipal governments cannot stand 
an excessive load. 

Specifically, I am thoroughly in favor of a 
rational program of really necessary public 
works projects, chosen after careful planning, 
and anticipating future needs. We must 
be careful to avoid, as far as possible, proj= 
ects which will impose large increases in 
maintenance costs. 

A number of public works projects has 
already been authorized. In addition, Bos= 
ton has been given substantial grants for 
Civil Works Administration projects which 
will employ a large number of persons tem= 
porarily. Before committing the city to 
further public works projects, 1 propose to 
institute immediately a careful study of the 
city's needs and resources. 

THE TAXPAYERS. 

In municipalities the effect of this patriotic duty 
of upholding the national program of public works 
projects, as well as the regular expenses of govern- 
ment, will fall most heavily uix)n the taxpayer who 
owns tangible property. There is something radically 
and scientifically wrong in our method of raising 
money to defray the expenses of government. Not 
only does too much of the burden fall up(3n the owner 
of tangible property, but he must make up for the 
depression slump in other sources of revenue. More 
than three fourths of the total income available for 
meeting the regular expenditures of the city is now 
obtained from taxes upon real and personal property. 
It is clear that tangible property cannot continue 
indefinitely to bear this increa.sing burden. 

Even if all possible economies are effected, it is 
imperative that additional sources of revenue be found. 
High property taxes have a definite tendency to dis- 
courage home ownership. This tendency is socially 
objectionable. It is not insignificant that of all of the 
large cities of the country, Boston has the smallest 
percentage of home owners. Only a cjuarter of all 
of the families living in Boston own their own homes. 
The high property tax rate in Boston is, of course, not 
the only cause for this condition, but it is an important 
factor. 

But, even apart from the question of whether or 
not tangible property can continue to bear the increas- 
ing burdens placed upon it, and even apart from the 
tendency of the present system of taxation to dis- 
courage home ownership, a more equitable distribution 
of the burdens of municipal government should be 
made. Every person should bear his fair share of the 
burden. A wealthy man with little or no real estate 
ought to bear his fair share of the expen.ses of govern- 
ment. The real estate owner and the modest home 
owner who cannot conceal his home are compelled under 
the present conditions to pay far too large a share of 
the expenses of government. A more determined 
effort should be made to collect a larger share of the 
public tax from those persons able to pay so that the 
burden upon the owner of tangible property may be 
lessened. 

I propose to consider promptly and with great 
care and to recommend legislation with respect to 



possible additional sources of revenue which will relieve 
to some extent the burdens on tangible property and 
more equitably distribute the cost of government. 

SALARY REDUCTIONS. 

The restoration of salary levels is within the power 
of the Mayor. If he does nothing about them, the 
reductions will automatically be restored on this first 
day of January. To continue in effect the reductions 
instituted in April of 1933, the Mayor must act by 
executive order. A restoration of salaries to their old 
levels would mean the additional expenditure of 
approximately $3,400,000 for the year. This sum 
would represent about $2 additional in the tax rate 
which has been forecast for 1934. 

In order to lessen, as far as possible, an 
increase in the tax rate for 1934, it will be 
necessary to keep the salary reductions in 
effect during the entire period of 1934. But 
it is better to suffer pay reductions for another 
year, than, by restoring them, to hazard 
the chance of so impairing the financial 
position of the city that city and county 
employees might have to forego receiving 
any salary whatever. In other words, there 
would be danger of payless pay days. It is 
better to suffer the hardship and incon= 
venience of the reductions that have already 
been made and yet to receive reduced salaries, 
than to restore the original salaries, which 
would sound well to the ear of the employee, 
but which might result in terminating all 
salaries. Therefore, in the best interests 
of the city and of all of its people, prudence 
compels me to continue the pay cuts already 
made for the year 1934. 

I am confident that substantial economies may 
be realized in many departments of the city govern- 
ment during the next four years and even in the year 
1934. If it shall appear advisable and the financial 
position of the city warrants, it is always possible, 
while the Legislature is in session, to obtain needed 
legislation to restore pay cuts during 1934. 

RESUMPTION OF STEP=RATE INCREASES. 

There are certain classes of employees, such as 
school teachers, policemen and firemen, who have in 
effect suffered more than a simple reduction in salary. 
I refer to those who entered the employ of the city at 
a minimum rate under circumstances leading them to 
believe that they would receive annual increases in 
their salaries until the maximum was reached. When 
the salary reductions became effective in April of 1933, 
these classes of employees were doubly affected because 
they lost not only the reduction in their regular 
salaries but the yearly increase as well, which seemed 
to me to be so unjust that I made the specific promise 
to resume these yearly increases. 

I am aware that resuming the yearly increases to 
begin with the present year will add to our tax burden 
an amount, which, it is estimated, should not exceed 
$400,000. This represents about twenty cents in 
the tax rate. As I am persuaded that it is only simple 
justice to resume these increases, I shall endeavor to 
keep my promise. To the extent that I may have 
the power under existing law I shall order the resump- 
tion of these yearly increases; but if I have not the 
power then I shall seek requisite legislation to enable 
me to do this. 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 6 



CITY EMPLOYEES. 

It is not my dosiro to remove city employees in 
lar^c numbers from the city pay roll. But the con- 
tinuous rejwrts of padded pay rolls cannot be ignored 
entirely. As to the advisability of removing super- 
fluous employees, two elements are to be considered, — 
first, the hardship upon the person removed, and 
second, the hardship on the taxpayers if the person 
is not removed. The taxpayer must not be over- 
looked in this situation and his burden must be relieved 
if that can be accomplished. 

Except in flagrant cases of outright padding, I 
shall try to avoid wholesale discharges. The man or 
woman giving an honest day's work will be protected. 
There are ways of economizing without affecting pei-- 
sonnel. Consolidation of certain departments would 
eliminate high salaried officials and effect other econo- 
mies in operation but would not necessarily mean the 
separation of the rank and file of valuable and ex- 
perienced employees from the pay rolls. The policy 
of not filling vacancies caused by death or retirement 
will also effect gradual savings, and, so far as practi- 
cable, I shall continue that poUcy. There are numer- 
ous opportunities for economy in the everyday conduct 
of the city's work. In discovering and putting such 
economies into effect, employees themselves can be of 
invaluable assistance. Alay I call to their attention 
that their cooperation with me in this respect is the 
most certain guarantee of the security of their own 
positions. 

ACCOUNTING AND BUDGETING. 

For many years, Boston's accounting and budget- 
ing systems have been criticized. This criticism has 
in large part been justified. The accounts of this 
huge and important corporation are kept on an anti- 
quated cash book basis comparable to that employed 
by a crossroads country store of one hundred years 
ago. Any city administration which is unable to give 
an accurate, prompt, and easily understood statement 
of its financial condition at regular intervals, or which 
is careless or inefficient in planning and controUing the 
appropriation and expenditure of the public money, 
fails to fulfill the trust imposed upon it by the people. 

Immediate steps will be taken to inaugu= 
rate a modern accounting system which will 
give a true picture of the city's finances at all 
times. This will require encumbering ap= 
propriations with all charges against them as 
soon as the charges are incurred, and setting 
up the books of the city so that assets and 
liabilities may be known, and a correct and 
comprehensive balance sheet may be avail= 
able. 

During the past five years the State Division of 
Accounts has been at work on the installation of a 
new system in certain of the city departments. It 
is time that this work in all departments should be 
pressed to a conclusion. While continuing friendly 
cooperation with this state department, I shall take 
steps to have completed the modernization of the 
city's accounting system within a reasonable time. 
In addition, I propose to request an immediate audit 
by this state department of the city's accounts. It 
is only fair to the outgoing administration, to the in- 
coming administration, and to the people of Boston 
that such an audit be made, and I shall help formulate 
and urge the passage of legislation requiring a com- 
pulsory audit of the city's accounts and records at 
the end of each administration. 



Better budget contents, control and procedure are 
necessary in Boston, particularly' in these troubled 
times. In so far as possible, future budgets will in- 
clude a complete annual program of the city's receipts 
from all .sources and its expenditures for all purposes. 
They will also provide a better pict-ure of the pur- 
poses for which the expenditures are to be made. 
They will be supported by comparisons with prior 
years and the reasons for changes in budget items so 
as to give a clear understanding to all who are inter- 
ested. The city's budget calendar will also be im- 
proved so that the city will be operated under full 
budget control as soon as the fiscal year begins. In 
order that there may be proper control of expendi- 
tures to insure adherence to the original budget, 
thereby eliminating supplementary budgets during 
the year, I plan to establish a system of quarterly 
allotments which are based on departmental work 
programs expressed in units of work. The Auditing 
and Budget Departments will be instructed to see that 
such allotments are not exceeded. 

As a result of these changes, I hope that pubUc 
confidence in the city's finances will be improved, 
public knowledge thereof will be increased, the 
chances of wasteful expenditure will be minimized, 
and new opportunities for desirable economies will be 
uncovered. 

It is true that there are certain statutory and 
other impediments to the complete realization of 
this program. Informal methods of control are, 
however, available to the Mayor to achieve substan- 
tially the benefits desired until such time as permanent 
changes can be effected. 

CONTRACTS AND PURCHASES. 

Contract awards and the purchase of equip- 
ment and supplies occupy a prominent place in city 
administration. In recent years they have involved 
between $15,000,000 and $20,000,000 annually. This 
enormous expenditure requires honest, experienced 
officials in charge of such purchases and the best 
methods in order to secure the lowest prices. 

Whatever the past has been, Boston must receive 
full value for each dollar expended. 

I propose to adhere strictly to a system of 
contracts and purchases based upon abso= 
lutely honest awards to the lowest bids of 
reliable merchants and contractors. 1 pledge 
my administration to the elimination of all 
favoritism and the splitting of contracts. 
In line with my recommendations for im= 
proved budget prodecure it will be my policy 
to make volume purchases of supplies needed 
for relatively long periods. Proper inspection 
methods will be set up in order that Boston 
may receive what it pays for. Beyond all of 
this I hope to make cooperative arrange= 
ments with the . city and county officials 
who purchase supplies independently of the 
Supply Department, to the end that com= 
bination of total purchasing requirements 
may result in lower prices than would other= 
wise be the case. 

FINANCE COMMISSION. 

The Finance Commission, if properly constituted, 
may be of great benefit to the city. I express no 
opinion as to whether the present policy of a paid 
chairman and unpaid associate members should be 
changed to that of a board of paid members. But 



Jan. 6 



CITY RECORD 



I have a very decided opinion that in whatever form 
it may exist, if it is properly constituted, it is a most 
valuable asset to the Mayor and an important depart- 
ment of the city. Since the purpose of the Finance 
Commission is to prevent waste and to serve the city 
purely in the- interest of its citizens and taxpayers, 
I see no reason whatever for a continuous war between 
the chief magistrate of Boston and that commission. 
Such will not be my policy. So long as it is properly 
constituted and functions fairly and in accordance 
with its intended purpose, I shall welcome its sugges- 
tions and criticisms and shall cooperate in every way 
to the end that the best results may be obtained for 
Boston. 

PUBLIC WELFARE. 

During recent years the Department of Public 
Welfare has become the largest, in point of expendi- 
tures, of all departments under the control of the 
Mayor. In 1933, about $13,000,000 has been ex- 
pended, as compared with less than .S3, 000, 000 before 
the depression. Early in December of 1933, the 
number of pubhc welfare cases was about 32,700, 
almost twenty per cent of the total number of families 
in Boston. Civil works employment has temporarily 
reduced the load to some extent. 

Under my administration the city will give as 
liberal aid as possible to all worthy welfare recipients. 
I recognize the obligations of the city and I realize 
its social importance. Not only must we alleviate 
privation and sickness and maintain public morale 
at the present time, but we must look forward to the 
future, and make certain that our youth, and genera- 
tions yet unborn, shall not suffer mentally and physi- 
cally from the insufficiency of aid in these troubled 
times. 

The obligation of the city government to those who 
meet the tremendous cost of this work, cannot be 
overlooked. Relentless vigilance must be exercised 
to eliminate unworthy cases, and to effect an admin- 
istration of the department that is as efficient as it 
is humanly possible to achieve. I am apprehensive 
that, unless the growth of the welfare list is not only 
checked but welfare costs lowered, the city, by reason 
of a gradually reduced income resulting in part from 
lower tax values and failure to collect taxes, will be 
utterly unable to meet these costs without drastic 
curtailment of municipal functions whether under 
the control of the Mayor or other officials. I am not 
willing to believe that in meeting the city's obligation 
to welfare recipients the public money must be wasted, 
inefficiency must be tolerated, or a system which 
invites fraud must be permitted. 

Over a period of more than two years, many 
studies and investigations of the Public Welfare 
Department have been made. The Boston Finance 
Commission, the State Emergency Finance Board, 
the Police Department, the Budget Commissioner, 
the Boston Council of Social Agencies, and a number 
of private organizations have revealed serious defects 
in the work and have made definite recommendations 
for improvement. Whether or not all of the criticism 
has been justified, the fact remains that the depart- 
ment has been deplorably slow in effecting obviously 
necessary improvements so that its work can be ad- 
justed to the enlarged duties imposed on it by the 
depression. Conditions are still far from satisfactory. 
I shall take immediate steps to place the department 
on the most efficient basis possible. There must be 
competent executive direction, proper investigation of 
all new cases, adequate follow-up of cases as long as 



they are on the welfare rolls, and a modern system of 
administrative and financial control within the depart- 
ment. I shall not tolerate further delay in these 
matters. 

I recognize that the character of welfare work will 
change when economic conditions improve. A new 
type of problem will then appear, that of returning 
welfare recipients to gainful employment as speedily 
as possible and preventing any wholesale tendency 
toward seeking relief in preference to employment. 
We must prepare for this change. 

The problems are many and complicated. They 
must be worked out cooperatively, and always with 
proper regard to the city's obligations to welfare 
recipients and to the taxpayer. 

MAYOR'S ADVISORY COMMITTEE. 

Many of the present and future problems 
of the city will be difficult. I shall need, and 
I shall welcome the aid of all citizens in= 
dividually and collectively. As a practical 
method of obtaining that aid, I shall form a 
committee to be known as the "Mayor's 
Advisory Committee," and to consist of not 
more than ten citizens properly represen= 
tative of labor, business, and general com= 
munity interests. I shall feel free to submit 
to this committee problems for investigation, 
information, advice and guidance, always, 
of course, with the clear understanding that 
the reports of the committee shall be ad= 
visory only and that the responsibility for 
final action on any particular problem will 
rest entirely upon me. 

COOPERATION. 

Many public agencies having responsibility for 
the administrative and financial functions of the city 
are wholly or partly outside the control of the Mayor. 
The Governor, the Legislature, various state depart- 
ments, the School Committee, the PoHce Department 
and county officers can contribute in large measure to 
the solution of Boston's problems. I believe that 
the closest cooperation and a mutual understanding 
between the Mayor and these officials are indispensable 
to Boston's welfare. It will be my policy to work in 
harmony with them. I bespeak their cordial coopera- 
tion and I am confident that it will be forthcoming. 



Gentlemen of the Council: 

The pre.sent plight of the city, while grave, is by 
no means hopeless. The difficulties to which I have 
referred are not insurmountable. These problems can 
be solved. I am sure that with the hearty cooperation 
of your members I can steadily and surely improve 
the position and the credit of our city. It is my 
purpose frequently to address the Council personally 
or by message and the citizens of Boston through the 
Press and by radio broadcasts, to the end that you 
and the citizens may be informed of the condition of 
the city and may understand the exact nature and 
magnitude of the problems which must be solved. I 
shall do my best for Boston. I know that is your 
intention too. But in addition to the hearty coopera- 
tion of the Mayor and the City Council, we shall 
need always in these trying times that Divine Aid 
which has been so eloquently invoked here today. 
Fervently let us pray that it may always be with us. 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 6 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
niont in the Cily Record for the follow- 
ing departments. Tlie attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Advertises for proposals for gjinnasium 
equipment for the Public Latin School. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the De- 
partment of School Buildings, 11 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of -SSOO, 
to be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids dose Monday, January 15, at 2 p. m. 

Public Works Department (Sewer 
Service). 
Advertises for proposals for sewerage 
works in Ransom road, from Greenfield 
road 295 feet southwesterly, Hyde Park. 
Surety bond wiD be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Public Works Department, Room 508, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, ac- 
companied by certified check in the sum 
of SlOO, to be filed at the same office. 
Duphcate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 16, at 12 m. 

Supply Department. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
industrial and medicinal gases to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City HaU Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of 8200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 8, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
ether to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .S200, to he filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 8, at 12 in. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
soap to the Park Department. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equiva- 
lent to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of -SlOO, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 9, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
white lead and pig lead as required by the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 25 



per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 10, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
lead pipe to the Water Division, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 10, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
engine, machine and cylinder oUs to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of S200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 10, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
metal polish to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals maj' be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of S300, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 10, a* 

12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
waste and wiping cloths to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City HaU Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 12, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
cloth to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Fi-iday, January 12, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
toilet paper to the various city depart- 
ments. Suretj' bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 



the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of S300, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 12, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
tires and tubes to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in a 
sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 16, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical and hypodermic needles to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City HaU Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of SlOO, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 17, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
drugs (medicines of aU kinds) to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
wiU be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of 8200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 18, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical supplies to the various city de- 
partments. Surety bond wiU be required 
in a simi equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
HaU Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of 8200, to 
be filed at the same office. Duphcate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 19, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
uniforms to the Fire Department. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of 8200, to be fUed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
uniform caps to the Fire Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City HaU Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of SlOO, to be fUed at the 



Jan. 6 



CITY RECORD 



same oflSce. Duplicate bid, without 

check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Mondaij, Janvxiry 22, at 12 m- 

Advertises for proposals. for furnishing 
rubber coats to the Fire Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Transit Dep.\rtment. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and installing incline wall finish, grano- 
lithic sidewalks, conduits, junction boxes, 
etc., and installing lamp standards, 
Traffic Tunnel. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to the full 
amount of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Transit Department, 
1 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$5,000, to be filed at the same office. 
DupUcate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 10, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and installing brass frames, grilles and 
shdes for ceiling for Traffic Tunnel. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Transit Department, 1 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $1,000, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 m. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, January 4: 

Fire Dep.\rtment. 
Permission has been given to transfer 
Geraldine A. Skelley, stenographer in the 
Traffic Commission, to a similar position 
in the Fire Department at $1,000 a year 
less the 15 per cent deduction authorized 
by Executive Order of April 21, 1933. 

Hospital Department. 

The following persons have been em- 
ployed at the Boston City Hospital 
during the week ending Thursday, De- 
cember 28: 

Permanent. — Sidney Beck, transfer por- 
ter, $15.68 a week. 

Temporary. — Margaret Conlon, ward- 
maid, $14.25 a week; Joseph C. Pom- 
ponio, apothecary's assistant, $27 a week; 
Joseph Klien, male nurse, $27.62 a week; 
Herbert Varney, out-patient orderly, 
$15.68 a week; Ephrem E. Hudon, 
orderly, $15.68 a week; William Carey, 
ambulance driver, $29.33 a week; Dr. 
Charles Boyajian, assistant resident sur- 
geon, $1,080 a year; Guv Morrill, .super- 
visor, $27.62 a week; Thomas O'Brien, 
William Harvey, Thomas Freeley, am- 
bulance drivers^ $29.33 a week; Samuel 
Odione, male nurse, .$27.62 a week; 
Joseph Flaherty, elevatorman, S15.20 
a week; Edward Behnke, transfer porter, 
$15.68 a week; James McDonald, Fred 
Corbo, ambulance drivers, $29.33 a week; 



Eva Cunningham, cleaner, $15 a week; 
Dr. Harry Grohan, assistant resident 
surgeon, $1,700 a year; James Carroll, 
John T. O'Brien, Thomas Albison, kitchen- 
men, $16.63 a week; Margaret Galvin, 
kitchcnwoman, $16.15 a week; Helen 
Engewald, reconstruction aide, $27 a 
week; Lillian White, special nurse, $29.75 
a week. 
The following changes have occurred: 
Antonio Graziano, X-ray orderly at 
$16.63 to $22.50 a week; Edmond 
Norton, elevatorman at $15.20 to ele- 
vator repairman at $18.22 a week. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 
Division). 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division of the 
Boston City Hospital up to and including 
Thursday, December 28: 

Margaret Cavanaugh, maid, $9.98 
a week; J. F McGowan, Joseph Brown, 
Daniel Denehy, choremen (patients), $228 
a year; Ethyl Haviland, maid, (patient), 
$228 a year; Margaret Quill, maid 
(temporary), $12 a week; Martin Malloy, 
choreman (patient) (temporary), $228 
a year; Francis O'Toole, maid (patient) 
(temporary), $228 a year; John McDon- 
ough, James Kelley, Patrick McCarron, 
choremen (patients) (temporary), $228 
a year. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed: 

Christine Scully, maid, $11.40 a week; 
Helen Murraj', maid, $9.98 a week; 
Jeremiah F. Buckley, Dominic Barletto, 
choremen (patients), $228 a year; Mary 
Quinn, maid (patient), $228 a year; 
Frank Keardon, male nurse (patient), 
$456 a year. 

Institutions Department. 

The following changes have been made 
for the week ending Thursday, Decem- 
ber 28: 

Long Island Hospital. 

Appointments. — John J. Carey, insti- 
tution employee, porter, $600 a year; 
Ulysses T. Sullivan, institution employee, 
porter, $600 a year; George H. Green, 
institution employee, helper in kitchen, 
$600 a year; Elliott J. White, institution 
employee, porter, $700 a year. 

Transfer. — James J. Kelly, institu- 
tion employee, choreman, transferred 
from choreman at $700 a year, $800 a year. 

Steamers " Hibbard" and "O'Meara.'' 
Appointment. — Daniel Flanagan, fire- 
man, temporary, $1,400 a year. 

Resignation. — Patrick J. Murphy, deck- 
hand, temporary, $1,300 a year. 

The following changes have been made 
for the week ending Thursday, January 4: 

Long Island Hospital. 
Appointment. — Alfred C. Holland, in- 
stitution employee, attendant, $600 a 
year. 

The following appointments have been 
made for the week ending Thursday, 
January 4: 

Steainers "Hibbard" and "O'Meara." 
Michael F. Begley, oiler, $1,500 a year, 

made permanent. 

James E. Drever, engineer, transferred 

from oiler at $1,500 a year, $1,900 a year. 

Public Works Department (Paving 

Service). 
Approval has been given to employ 
Lawrence Jordan as temporary clerk- 
stenographer at $18.99 a week effective 



December 29, and to continue until the 
result of the civil service examination held 
for the position is determined. 

Treasury Department. 
Approval has been given to appoint 
William L Dowling, clerk in the Auditing 
Department at $1,400 a year, to pay roll 
clerk in the Treasury Department at 
$1,700 a year. 

Overtime Allowed. 
The heads of the various departments 
whose employees have received payment 
for overtime state in connection there- 
with that if any laborer has been allowed 
to work more than eight hours per day 
it has been only in case of emergency 
under the law. 

Hospital Department {Sanatorium 
Division). 
For the week ending Thursday, Decem- 
ber 28: 

Mary Killion, relief telephone operator, 
2 days, $5.70; Bessie Daly, telephone 
operator, 1 day, $2.85. 

Institutions Department. 
For the week ending Thursday, De- 
cember 28: 

Long Island Hospital. 

Frank Hagney, engineer, 1 day, $7; 
Charles Bird, fireman, $12.16; Edward 
Bouclin, fireman, $6.08; Luke McCarthy, 
fireman, $6.08. Total, .$31.32. 

Printing Department. 

For the week ending Thursday, De- 
cember 28: 

John J. Connolly, press feeder, 2f 
hours, $3.14; Peter Nelson, cylinder 
pressman, 2 J hours .$3.66. Total $6.80. 



LOCATION OF STREET. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
vote of the Board of Street Commissioners : 

Voted, That the assessment liens created 
by the order of the Board of Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of October 9, 
1931, recorded in the Suffolk Registry of 
Deeds October 29, 1931, for the widening, 
relocation and construction of Centre 
street, West Roxbury district, from Weld 
street to May street and Arborway; and 
by the order of the Board of Street Com- 
missioners and Mayor of April 23, 1931, 
recorded in the Suffolk Registry of Deeds 
May 6, 1931, for the widening, relocation 
and construction of Centre street. West 
Roxbury district, from Church street to 
Weld street, be, and the same hereby are, 
canceled. 



CIRCULAR LETTER NO. 29. 

City of Boston, 

Office of the Mayor, Dec. 29, 1933. 
To All Department Heads. 

The necessity for an increase in the 
supervisory or clerical forces of your 
department, as pointed out some six 
weeks ago, was today made painfully 
apparent by the failure of your depart- 
ment to submit its rolls of C. W. A. 
workers to the City Treasurer. 

As a consequence of this failure it was 
impossible for these men to receive the 
pay due them and to which they were 
entitled and wanted for the New Year's 
holiday. An important matter of this 
character should not be treated so lightly. 

Kindly take the necessary steps to 
prevent a repetition. 

Very truly yours, 

James M. Curlby, Mayor. 



10 



CITY RECORD 



Jax. 6 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance witli recommendations of depart- 
ment lieads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Public Works Department (Sewer 
Service). 

Upon December 28 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with Charles Struzziery 
for sewerage works in Hawthorne street, 
Prescott street and private land, Hyde 
Park. The following bids were received 
December 28 : 

Charles Struzziery, .S14,518.50; M. De 
Sisto Companv, $16,521.50; N. Cibotti 
& Co., .S16,616.50; John Williams, S17,- 
651.32; C. Andreassi & Co., S20,445.40. 

Supply Dep.\rtment. 
Upon December 20 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with lowest bidders as 
indicated for furnishing tea to the vari- 
ous city departments for six months, 
starting January 1, 1934. Bids, opened 
December 19, were as follows: 

Approximate Amounts on all Items, for 
Three Months' Period. 

340 Pounds Formosa Oolong Tea, Per 
Pound. — Parker, McCracken, Potter, In- 
corporated, 25 cents; W. S. Quimby 
Company, 24.74 cents; Webster-Thomas 
Company, 23 cents; Standard Brands, 
Incorporated, 34 cents; J. A. Daly & Co., 
29.5 cents; Berry, Dodge Company, 21 
cents; Martin L. Hall Company, 24 cents. 

94 Pounds Formosa Oolong Tea {1,504 
One-Ounce Bags), Per Pound. — Parker, 
McCracken, Potter, Incorporated, 36.5 
cents; W. S. Quimby Company, 36.28 
cents; Standard Brands, Incorporated, 
.S1.22; J. A. Daly & Co., 56.5 cents, in- 
cluding packing; Berry, Dodge Company, 
59.55 cents per lot. 

30 Cartons Orange Pekoe Tea Bags 
(.500 hags to Carton), Per Carton. — Parker, 
McCracken, Potter, Incorporated, $3; 
W. S. Quimby Company, S2.76; A. J. 
Powers, .f3.75; Webster-Thomas Com- 
panv, S2.62 Standard Brands, Incorpo- 
rated, bags, S7.45 per M., $3,725; J. A. 
Daly & Co., S6.70 per M., pot size; 
§6.35 per M., cup size; Berry, Dodge 
Company, $2.93, $3.08, $3.28. 

40 Pounds Orange Pekoe, "Tetley" or 
Equal, in One-half Pound Cans, Per 
Pound. — Parker, McCracken, Potter, In- 
corporated, 46 cents; W. S. Quimby 
Company, 45.40 cents per pound, La 
Touraine, one-half-pound canisters; Stand- 
ard Brands, Incorporated, 60 cents; J. A. 
Daly & Co., 58 cents; Berry, Dodge Com- 
pany, 48 cents, Garden of Allah Orange 
Pekoe. 

4,300 Pounds Ceylon Pekoe, Per Pound. 
— Parker, McCracken, Potter, Incorpor- 
ated, 30.2 cents, Sumatra Orange; W. S. 
Quimby Company, 32.64 cents; A. J. 
Powers, 35 cents; Webster-Thomas Com- 
pany, 31.5 cents; Standard Brands, In- 
corporated, 33.5 cents; J. A. Daly & Co., 
27.5 cents, Sumatra orange, 34.5 cents; 
Berry, Dodge Company, 37.5 cents, 
Wingate Flowery Pekoe; Alartin L. Hall 
Company, 27.5 Sumatra Orange Pekoe, 
34 cents, 32 cents. 

6'80 Pounds Formosa Oolong Tea, Per 
Pound. — W. S. Quimby Company, 24.74 
cents; Webster-Thomas Company, 23 
cents; Standard Brands, Incorporated, 
34 cents; J. A. Daly & Co., 29.5 cents; 
Berry Dodge Company, 21 cents.* 

ish Pounds Formosa Oolong Tea (3,008 
One-Ounce Bags), Per Pound. — W. S. 



(Quimby Company, 36.28 cents*; Standard 
Brands, Incorporated, 81.22; J. A. Daly 
&: Co., 56.5 cents, packing including; 
Berry Dodge Company, SI 19.10 per lot. 

60 Cartons Orange Pekoe Ten Bags (-500 
Bags to Carton), for Six Months' Period, 
Per Carton. — W. S. (^uimbv Company, 
$2.76; A. J. Powers, S3.75; Weh.ster- 
Thomas Company, $2.62*; Standard 
Brands, Incorporated, $3,725, bags, S7.45 
per M.; J. A. Daly & Co., .$6.70 per M., 
pot size; $6.35 per M., cup size; Berry 
Dodge Company, $2.93, $3.08, $3.28. 

80 Pounds Orange Pekoe, " Tetley," or 
Equal, in One-halJ Pound Cans, Per 
Pound. — W. S. (Juimby Company, 45.40 
cents,* La Touraine, one-half pound 
canisters; Standard Brands, Incorporated, 
60 cents, Seal Brand; J. A. Daly & Co., 
58 cents; Berry Dodge Company, 48 
cents. 

9,000 Pounds Ceylon Pekoe, foi 6 Months' 
Period, Per Pound. — W. S. Quimby 
Company, 32.64 cents; A. J. Powers, 
35 cents; Webster-Thomas Company, 
31.5 cents*; Standard Brands, IncoV- 
porated, 33.5 cents; J. A. Daly & Co., 
27.5 cents, Sumatra Orange, 34.5 cents; 
Berry, Dodge Company, 37.5 cents, 
Wingate Flowery Pekoe, 27.5 cents, 
Sumatra Orange Pekoe, 34 cents. 

Cash Discount for Payment in Ten 
Days. — Parker, McCracken, Potter, In- 
corporated, 4 per cent; W. S. Quimby 
Company, 2 per cent, tax clause; A. J. 
Powers, 3 per cent, prices not filled out 
in proposal filed at Supply Department; 
Webster-Thomas Company, 2 per cent; 
J. A. Daly & Co., 2 per cent; Berry, 
Dodge Company, 2 per cent; explana- 
tion on tea bags: 200 tea bags for each 
pound of tea, $5.86 per M.; 175 tea 
bags for each pound of tea, $6.16 per M.; 
150 tea bags for each pound of tea, $6.56 
per M.; Martin L. Hall Company, 3 
per cent. 



*Contract awarded. 

L'pon December 30 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Swift & Co. for furnishing 
butter to the various city departments, 
during the month of January, 1934. 
Bids, opened December 22, were as 
follows : 

Approximate Amounts L'sed Per Month, 
Per Pound. 

287 Tubs, 90 Score, 45 Tubs, 88 Score. 

For One Month, 90 Score. — Lewis- 
Mears Company, 18.4 cents; Swift & Co., 
17.99 cents;* Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, 18.43 cents; Armour 
& Co., 18.21 cents; Doe-Sullivan & Co., 
Incorporated, 18.67 cents. 

For One Month, 88 Score. — Lewis- 
Mears Companj% 17.4 cents; Swift & Co., 
16.74 cents;* Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, 17.17 cents; .\rmour & 
Co., 17.21 cents; Doe-Sullivan & Co., 
Incorporated, 17.25 cents. 

For Three Months, 90 Score. — Lewis- 
Mears Company, 18.9 cents; Swift & Co., 
18.74 cents. 

For Three Moidhs, 88 Score. — Lewis- 
Mears Company, 17.9 cents; Swift & Co., 
17.49 cents. 

For Six Months, 90 Score.— Swift & Co., 
19.49 cents. 

For Six Months, 88 Score. — Swift & Co., 
18.24 cents. 

Cash Discount. — Lewis-Mears Com- 
pany, net; Swift & Co., net, prices subject 
to acceptance within ten days of opening, 
tax clause; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, net; Armour <t Co., net; 
Doe-Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, net. 



WITHOUT ADVERTISING. 

Upon varying dates as indicated the 
Mayor approved contracts with several 
contract and business concerns for work 
and supplies for the city. Communica- 
tions from the heads of the several 
departments were as follows: 

Public Buildings Dep.\rt.men't, 
Bo.STO.v, December 28, 1933. 
Hox. J.\mes M. Curley, 
Mayor of Boston. 

De.\r Sir, — I respectfully request per- 
mission to award a contract to the 
L'-Dryvit Auto Rental Company, Incor- 
porated, for furnishing the required 
Drivurself Sendee during the year 1934 
at the following rates: 

Small cars, 9 cents per mile ; large cars, 
12 cents per mile. 

This contract to be awarded without 
the usual form of advertising on the 
grounds that the service rendered by the 
U-Dryvit Company during 1933 has 
been perfecth- satisfactorj- and no other 
company is in a position to furnish the 
surety bond and insurance features which 
are a part of the U-Dryvit contract. 

Respectfully yours, 

John P. Englert, 
Superintendent of Public Buildings. 

Public Works Dep.uitmext. 
Boston, December 28, 1933. 
To the Mayor of Boston. 

Permission is respectfully requested to 
the award of a contract, without adver- 
tising, to Hugh Xawn, Incorporated, 77 
Floy dell street, Roxbury, for removing 
snow and ice from the following streets: 
Washington street, from East Dedham 
street to Dover street; Albany street, 
from East Dedham street to Dover street, 
and all inclusive streets, not including, 
however. East Dedham street or Dover 
street, at the rate of 50 cents per cubic 
yard. 

This is emergency work and no ad- 
vantage would be gained bj"^ public 
advertisement. The price to be paid is 
reasonable. 

Respectfully yours, 
C. J. C.\r\t;n, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 28, 1933. 

To the Mayor of Boston. 

Permission is respectfully requested 
to the award of a contract, without adver- 
tising, to the Central Construction Com- 
pany for removing snow and ice from the 
following streets: Northampton street, 
from Washington street to Albany street; 
Washington street, from Northampton 
street to East Dedham street; East 
Dedham street, from Washington street 
to Albany street; Albanj^ street, from 
East Dedham street to Northampton 
street, and all inclusive streets, at the 
rate of 50 cents per cubic yard. 

This is emergency work and no ad- 
vantage would be gained by public adver- 
tisement. The price to be paid is reason- 
able. 

Respectfully j-ours, 

C. J. C.\RVEN, 

Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 28, 1933. 
To the Mayor of Boston. 

Your approval is respectfully requested 
to the award of a contract, without ad- 
vertising, to the U-Drj-vit Auto Rental 
Company, Incorporated, for furnishing 
trucks to the Public Works Department 
for a period of one year, beginning January 
1, 1934. 



Jan. 6 



CITY RECORD 



II 



This award is made without advertising 
on the grounds that the service rendered 
by the I'-Dryvit Com])any during 1933 
has been perfectly Siitisfactory and th;it 
no other company is in a position to fur- 
nish the surety bond and insurance fea- 
tures which are a part of the .I'-Dryvit 
contract. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carvex, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 28, 1933. 
To the Mayor of Boston. 

Your approval is respectfully requested 
to the award of a contract, without ad- 
vertising, to the U-Dryvit .Vuto Rental 
Company, Incorporated, for furnishing 
pleasure cars to the Public Works De- 
partment for a period of one year, begin- 
ning January 1, 1934. 

This award is made without advertising 
on the grounds that the service rendered 
by the U-Dryvit Company during 1933 
has been perfectly satisfactory and that 
no other company is in a position to fur- 
nish the surety bond and insurance 
features which are a part of the I'-Dryvit 
contract. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. C.\KVEN, 

Commissioner of I'libUc Works. 

Supply Dep.^rtment. 
BosTO.v, December 28, 1933. 
Hon. .I.\mes M. Curley, 

Mayor of Boston . 

De.\r Sir, — Your approval is respect- 
fully requested to award a contract, with- 
out" advertising, to the I'-Drjvit Company 
for sujiplying automobile service to this 
department during the year 1934. 

The service during the year 1933 has 
been satisfactorj- and no other comj)any 
is in a position to furnish the surety bond 
and insurance features which arc a part 
of the l-Dryvit contract. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Ch.\pman, 
Superintendent oj Supplies. 

Traffic Commission. 
Boston, December 28, 1933. 
Hon. James M. Curley, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — A circular letter received 
this moment from Mr. Charles J. Fox, 
Budget Commissioner, together \vith four 
copies of contract with the U-Dryvit 
Auto Rental Company, approved as to 
form by Samuel Silverman, Corporation 
Counsel, and signed by the president of 
the U-Dryvit Auto Rental Company, 
causes me to sign the contracts, which are 
respectfullv forwarded to you for approval 
with the language employed in the circu- 
lar of the Budget Commissioner, to wit, 
requesting the Mayor's approval to award 
the same, without advertising, on the 
grounds that the service rendered by the 
U-Dr>'vit Company during 1933 has been 
perfectly satisfactorj' and that no other 
company is in a position to furnish the 
surety bond and insurance features which 
are a part of the U-Dryvit contract. 

Very truly yours, 

Joseph A. Conry, 

Commissioner. 

Weights and Measures Department. 

Boston, December 28, 1933. 
Hon. James M. Curley, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Sir, — I am submitting herewith a 
contract between the U-Dryvit Auto 



Rental Corporation and this department 
for furnishing transportation in automo- 
bile service for the year 1934. 

.•\s lessee I have signed this contract and 
respectfully request your approval. I 
have made this contract without adver- 
tising because of the fact that for two years 
the company has furnished good service; 
no other comjiany is in a position to furnish 
the surety bond and the in.surance features 
which form a i)art of this particular 
contract. 

Trusting this action will meet with 
your approval, I am, 

Respectfully yours, 

James A. Sweeney, 

Sealer. 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS. 

PuRLic Works Dkpakt.mext. 

Central Construction Company has 
been granted an extension of the time of 
completion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in the streets and avenues as 
designated, from December 31, 1933, to 
May 1, 1934. 

F. J. Jacobs Company has been granted 
an extension of the time of completion of 
the contract for removing snow and ice in 
district No. 9, from ]>ecember 31, 1933, 
to May 1, 1934. 

Martin J. Kelly has been granted an 
extension of the time of completion of the 
contract for removing snow and ice in 
district No. 1, from December 31, 1933, 
to May 1, 1934. 

C. J. Manej- Company, Incorporated, 
have been granted an extension of the 
time of completion of the contract for 
removing snow and ice in district No. 10, 
from December 31, 1933, to May 1, 1934. 

The Murray Engineering Company 
have l)een granted an extension of time of 
the completion of contract for rebuilding 
wooden ramp at Albany Street Garbage 
Station, from December 23, 1933, to Jan- 
uary 23,1934. 

A. G. Tomasello and Son, Incorporated, 
have been granted an extension of the 
time of completion of the contract for 
removing show and ice in district No. (5, 
from December 31, 1933, to May I, 1934. 

Charles Capone has been granted an 
extension of the time of completion of 
the contract for constructing bitulithic 
pavement in Westchester road, from 
Centre street 1,900 feet northwesterly, 
from December 30, 1933, to June 1, 1934. 

lozza & Faraci have been granted an 
extension of the time of completion of 
the contract for constructing sheet asphalt 
pavement in Orange street and Zcller 
street, from December 31, 1933, to June 
1, 1934. 



EXTRA WORK UNDER CONTRACT. 

Charles Capone has been directed to 
perform the following extra work under 
the contract for laying bitulithic pave- 
ment in Wilmington avenue, from Gaili- 
van Boulevard to Milton avenue. Items 
ordered: Furnish and i)Iace gravel found- 
ation where directed in Wilmington 
avenue. Price to be paid, the sum of 
SI for each cubic yard of gravel founda- 
tion (including excavation) furnished and 
placed. Estimated cost of extra work, 
$115. 

Charles Capone has been directed to 
I)erform the following extra work under 
the contract for laying bitulithic pave- 
ment in Westchester road, from Centre 
street 1,900 feet northwesterly. Items 
orc^ered: Lower and connect house drains 



where directed. Price to be paid: 
For each linear foot of house drain low- 
ered and connected, the sum of $3. Esti- 
mated cost of extra work, .f93. 

Charles Capone has been directed to 
perform the following extra work under 
the contract for laying bitulithic pave- 
ment in Westchester road, from Centre 
street 1,900 feet northwesterly. Items 
ordered: Furnish and lay 2-inch addi- 
tional concrete base and do necessary 
excavation for as directed. Price to 
be paid: For each square j-ard of extra 
concrete base 2 inches deep, including 
excavation, the sum of 40 cents. Esti- 
mated cost of extra work, $180. 



CONTRACTS AMENDED. 

John Bowen Company has been al- 
lowed to amend a contract for erection 
and completion of additions and altera- 
tions to the Randall G. Morris Elementary 
School (second addition). Wren street. 
West Roxbury district, by striking out 
the second jiaragraph of Sec'tion 10, page 

3, and by striking out the words "twenty 
years" in paragraph J of Section (J, page 

4, under "guaranty for tar and gravel 
roofing" and substituting in paragraph J 
of Section 6, page 4, the words "five 
years" so that said paragraph J of Section 
0, page 4, shall read: "The tar and gravel 
roofing specified shall be guaranteed in 
the sum of fifty i)er cent of the cost of the 
roofing for a period of five years. All 
other work included in this section shall 
be guaranteed under a guarantee bond as 
provided in Section 3." 

The General Electric Supply Corj)ora- 
tion has been allowed to amend the con- 
tract for furnishing and dtUivering j)laza 
lighting e(]uij)ment. Traffic Tunnel, by 
striking out on page 7, third j)aragraph, 
the words "six weeks" and sul)stituting 
therefor the words "fourteen weeks," 
so that the contract as amended shall 
read on page 7, third paragrai)h :" Delivery 
will be completed within fourteen weeks 
of the delivery of the contract," and that 
all provisions of said contract, excepting as 
modified herein, shall continue in full force 
and eflect. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY.) 

Assistant on Veterinary Health, De- 
p.\ut.mknt of Conservation, Janu- 
ary 26, 1934. 

Last day for filing applications, Friday, 
January 12, 1934, at 5 p. m. 

The minimum salary is $1,380 a year; 
the maximum salary is $1,860 a year as 
reduced by statute. 

Duties To appraise cattle, to do in- 
vestigation work in the field, and to as- 
sist at the Brighton Quarantine Station. 
Applicants should have the ability to 
judge cattle intelligently as to ago, condi- 
tion of health, and their milk-producing 
qualities. Applicants should be familiar 
with the required sanitary conditions in 
the keeping of a herd of healthy cows, 
and have a knowledge of general diseases 
pertaining to domestic animals. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 4; 
personality and fitncs.s, as determined by 
an oral interview, 3; total, 10. 

Pa.s-sing Requirements: Applicants 
must obtain at least 70 per cent in each 
subject of the examination in order to 
become eligible. 

Phj'sioal fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 



12 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 6 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED DECEMBER 28, 1933, TO JANUARY 3, 1934. 





Dece.mber 


28. 






OWNKK. 


Location. 


Ward. Nature. 


Estimated 
Cost. 


Columbian National Life In 

surance Company. 
C L. Hichardson Company. 
Auto Finance Company .... 
F. H. Noyes, Trustee 

John Nelson 


- 30 Oleason street 

191 Summer street 

20 Columbus avenue 

406 Marlborough street. . . 

75A Clifton street 

6 Bowdoin park 

231 and 233 Grove street. . 
47 Everett street 


14 

3 
5 
5 

8 
. 15 
. 20 

1 


Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, stores and offices, 
Alterations, garage and office. 
Alterations, dwelling and 
office. 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, store 

Take-down stable 


$100 

500 

50 

1.800 

600 


Salvator DeFranco 

Mary E. McPherson 

Clyde H. Reynolds Estate. 


475 

150 

1 000 








December 


29. 






John Tullisk 


32 Cranston road 

17 Cheswick road 

27 Lindall street 


. 20 
. 20 
. 19 
. 19 
. 20 
. 3 
. 21 
. 3 

. 11 
. 3 

4 
. 14 

1 

8 
. 8 

1 

1 

5 
3 

. 21 
9 
9 
9 


Third-class garage 


$250 
200 




Third-class dwelling 


5,000 




31 Lindall street 


5,000 


Lionel Provencher 


142 Wren street 


Third-class garage 

Alterations, stores and hall.. . 

Alterations, dormitorv 

Alterations, mercantile 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, stores and ofEces, 

Alterations, home 

Alterations, dwelling 

Fire escapes 

Elevator 


200 


L. Lipson 

Dr. F. D. Donoghue 

Waldorf System, Incor- 
porated. 

James O'Leary 

DeBlois & Maddison 

Massachusetts Home 

Pearl Kravetz et al 

City of Boston — Hospital. . . 
City of Boston 


1173 Washington street . . . 

919 Beacon street 

647 Atlantic avenue 

192 Boylston street 

9 Scollay square 

6.5 Deaconess road 

50 Wildwood street 

Long Island 

791 .\lbany street 


None 

80 

600 

500 

None 

1,550 

60 

835 

780 


751 Albany street 

- 4 Pope street 


7.564 


Commonwealth of Massa 


Take-down, dwelling 

Take-down, dwelling 

Sign 

Alterations, market and 
offices. 


100 


chusetts. 
Commonwealth of Massa 


- 1 Pope street 


25 


chusetts. 
John Donnelly and Sons. . . 
City of Boston 

John M. Hardy 


97 Warrenton street 

35 South Market street. . . . 

39 and 4 1 Brackett street . . 
4.37 Shawmut avenue 


350 
1,000 

500 


K. Kinon 

William H. Quimby 

J W Lewis 


Alterations, laundry 

Take-down, dwellings 

Take-down, dwellings 


550 
1,600 
1 600 


81 Lenox street . . 










December 


30. 






None. 




Janu.\ry 


2. 






N. W. McCollom 

N. W. McCollom 


18 Keystone street 


. 20 
. 20 
3 
. 3 
. 3 

. 18 
. 19 
. 15 
. 5 
2 
3 

8 

. 3 

. . 4 

3 

14 


Second-class garage 

Second-class garage 

Alterations, theater 

Alterations, lodging 

Alterations, stores 


$300 
300 




547 Washington street .... 
56 Dwight street 


3.000 
50 


Misham Cartarian 


C. W. Whittier and Brother, 


11 School street 


150 


Agents. 


. 148 Readville street 

, 1779 Centre street 


Alterations, stores 

Alterations, store 




Dolly Madison Ice Cream Co. 

Rose Header 

John A McNamee 


600 


81 Coleman street 

13 Hereford street 


Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Take-down, storage 

Sign 

Alterations, machine shop. . . 

Sign 

Sign 

Take-down, dwelling and 

store. 
First-class garage 


150 
5 000 


United Creameries 


Rear of 98 Cambridge at . . 


200 
800 


Trustees. 
Mahony Laundry Machine 

Company. 

Adams Square Cafe 

M. Rabinowitch 

Jacob Selevsky 


33-39 Allerton street 

118 Washington street. . . . 
277 Massachusetts avenue. 
4 Wall street 


600 

150 

300 

1,500 

1,000 










Janu,\hy 


3. 








1 
. 6 
. 2 

22 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 

20 
3 
3 

.. 3 
4 
3 
3 


Alterations, storage 

Alterations, dwelling and 

store. 
Alterations, dwelling and 

store. 

Alterations, bakery 

Alterations, hotel 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, sales and storage. 
Alterations, stores 

Alterations, stores 


$S00 


Warehouse Company. 
Daniel J. Dooley 

Joseph Pozner 

Celect Baking Company .... 
Harris Poorvu 


831 East Sixth street 

20 Common street 

235 North Beacon street . . 
199 Massachusetts avenue. 

411 Frankfort street 

415 Frankfort street 

417 l-rankfort street 

409 Frankfort street 

553 La Grange street 

1 North Market street .... 
268 Friend street 

7 and 9 Cambridge street. . 

12 Columbus square 

7 Portland street 


1,000 

200 

285 
25,000 




900 


Lillian Scheenberg 

Lillian Scheenberg 


900 
900 
900 


J. F. Ungvarsky 

York and Whitney Co 

Union Savings Bank of 

Boston. 
Temple Beverage Company, 

M. Brown 

Real Estate Association 


900 
500 
400 

150 


Sign 

Alterations, stores and offices, 
Alterations, offices 


150 
125 


DeBlois & Maddison 


3029 Washington street . . . 


725 



CIRCULAR LETTER NO. I, 

City of Bostox, 
Mayor's Office, January 2, 1934. 

To All Department Heads, the Police Com- 
minsioner, the School Committee, the 
Board of Commissioners of School 
Buildings, the City Council, the 
Licensing Board, the Finance Com- 
mission, and the Boston Port Authority. 
Gentlemex, — I beg to advise j'ou that 
I have, by virtue of the authority granted 
me by the provisions of chapter one 
hundred and twentj'-one of the Acts of 
the year nineteen hundred and thirty- 
three, issued an Executive Order con- 
tinuing in effect for the calendar year 
nineteen hundred and thirty-four the 
salary reductions made pursuant to the 
provisions of section three of chapter one 
hundred and twenty-one of the Acts of 
the year nineteen hundred and thirty- 
three. 

Yours very tmly, 

Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



■ Proposals for Furnishing Uniforms to 
THE Fire Department. 

The Supply Depai^;ment of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
Fire Department, Bristol street, uniforms, 
as per specifications to be obtained at the 
Supply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex. There will be a charge of Uventy ceyits 
($0.20) for each set of blank proposals taken 
out. Delivery to be made as required. The 
bidder must use the form of proposal to be 
obtained at said office, and the successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
the total amount of the bid with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract, in case the amount of the 
contract awarded aggregates $2,000 or more. 
Bids, with a certified check for $200, payable 
to and to become the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
must be left at the office of the Superintendent 
of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall Annex, before 
12 m., Monday, January 22, 1934, at which 
time and place the bids will be publicly opened 
and read. A duplicate bid, without check, 
must be left at the office of the City Auditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. 
The Superintendent reserves the right to ac- 
cept or reject any or all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. All 
contracts made subject to appropriations to 
meet payments thereunder. 

Philip A. Chapman, 

(Jan. 6.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 



Chances in Traffic Regulations. 
Voted, That the Traffic Regulations are 
amended as follows, effective January 15, 1934 : 

Section 40, Part 1, is amended by adding 
the following : 
Forsyth Road. 

From Forsyth way to Fenway. 

Section 50 is amended by striking out the 
following : 

Winthrop Street, Charlestown. 

Common street to Warren street. 

Section 50 is amended by adding the follow- 
ing: 

Lexington Street, Charlestown. 

Bunker Hill street to Monument square. 
Monument Square (East Side), Charlestown. 

Tremont street to Winthrop street. 
Winthrop Street, Charlestown. 

Monument square to Warren street. 
Joseph A. Conry, 
(Jan. 6-13.) Commissioner, 



Jan. 6 



CITY RECORD 



13 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proposals for Furnishing and Installing 
Incline Wall Finish, Granolithic Sides- 
walks, Conduits, Junction Boxes, Etc., 
AND Installing Lamp Standards, Traffic 
Tunnel. 
The Transit Department of the City of Bos- 
ton, 1 Beacon street, seventh floor, invites 
proposals from citizens of the United States 
and corporations or other lefral associations 
wherein the controlling interest to the extent 
of at least one half thereof is owned by a 
citizen or citizens of the United States, for 
furnishinit and installing incline wall finish, 
granolithic sidewalks, canduits, junction boxes, 
etc., and installing lamp standards. Traffic 
Tunnel. A bond of an approved surety com- 
pany will be required for the faithf<il per- 
formance of the contract in a sum of the 
full amount of the total bid price. Proposals 
must be filled out and signed by the bidder on 
forms to be obtained at this office, inclosed in 
a sealed envelope, indorsed "Incline WaJl 
Finish, etc.. Traffic Tunnel," and delivered 
to the Department, or to its secretary, before 
12 o'clock noon on Tuesday, January 16, 1934, 
at which time and place they will be publicly 
opened and read. A properly certified check 
in the sum of five thousand (5,000) dollars, 
payable to the city, must accompany the pro- 
posal. This check shall become the property 
of the city if the contract is not executed by 
the bidder within the time prescribed after 
the date of the notification by the Department 
of the acceptance of the proposal and the 
i«adiness of the contract for signature. Pro- 
posals must be made in duplicate. The sealed 
duplicate, without check, is to be deposited 
by the bidder with the City Auditor, Room 20, 
City Hall, previous to the time named for 
opening the proposals. Plans, proposals, 
specifications and forms of contract may be 
obtained at this office on or after Wednesday, 
January 3, 1934. A deposit of $5, in cash 
or by certified check, will be required for a 
set of plans and two sets of the specifications. 
Mutilation of them will be deemed sufficient 
caiisc for the forfeiture of said deposits. The 
Department reserves the right to reject any 
or all proposals. 

By order of the CiTY op Boston Transit 
Department, 

Edward F. Condon, 
(Jan. 6.) Secretary. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Seiu'erage Works in Ransom 
Road, from Grbejnfield Road 295 Febt 
Southwesterly, Hyde Park. 
The Commissioner of Public Works of the 
City of Boston, office 508 City Hall Annex, 
invites proposals from citizens of the United 
States and corporations or other legal associa- 
tions wherein the controlling interest to the 
extent of at least over one half thereof is 
owned by a citizen or citizens of the United 
States, for sewerage works in Ransom road, 
from Greenfield road 295 feet southwesterly, 
Hyde Park. A bond will be re<iuired for doing 
the work of a surety company approved by 
the Commissioner in the sum of 100 per cent 
of the amount of the contract, to secure the 
due performance of the contract and the full 
protection of the city. Forms of proposals 
may be obtained at Room 508, City Hall Annex. 
Each proposal should be inclosed in an en- 
velope, sealed, marked "Proposal for Sewerage 
Works in Ransom Road," and left at Room 508, 
fifth floor. City Hall Annex, before 12 m. of 
Tuesday, January 16, 1934, with a certified 
check for one hundred (100) dollars payable 
to and to become the property of the city if 
the proposal after acceptance is not carried 
out. The proposals will then and there be pub- 
licly opened and read. Proposals must be 
made in duplicate, the sealed duplicate, with- 
out check, to be deposited by the bidder with 
the City Auditor previous to the time named 
for opening the bids. There will be a mini- 
mum charge of two dollars (#2) for each set 
of plans and specifications taken out. If the 
price of any item appears to the Commissioner 
to be abnormally high or low, or the bidder 
neglects to bid on each and every item, it 
may lead to the rejection of the proposal con- 
taining such price. The undersigned reserves 
the right to reject any or all proposals or to 
award the contract as he deems best. 



TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing and Installing 
Brass Frames, Grilles and Slides for 
Ceiling for Traffic Tunnel. 
The Transit Department of the City of Bos- 
ton, I Beacon street, seventh floor, invites 
proposals from citizens of the United States 
and corporations or other legal associations 
wherein the controlling interest to the extent 
of at least one half thereof is owned by a 
citizen or citizens of the United States, for 
furnishing and in.stalling brass frames, grilles 
and slides for ceiling for Traffic Tunnel. A 
bond of an approved surety company will be 
required for the faithful performance of the 
contract in a sum of the full amount of the 
tortal bid price. Proposals must be filled out 
and signed by the bidder on forms to be ob- 
tained at this office, inclosed in a sealed en- 
velope, indorsed "Proposal for Grilles, Frames 
and Slides for Ceiling for Traffic Tunnel," 
and delivere<l to the Department or to its 
secretary before 12 o'clock noon on Monday, 
January 22, 1934, at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and read. A 
properly certified check in the sum of one 
thousand (1,000) dollars, payable to the city, 
must accompany the proposal. This check 
shall become the property of the city if the 
contract is not executed by the bidder within 
the time prescribed after the date of the 
notification by the Department of the accept- 
ance of the proposal, and the readiness of the 
contract for signature. Proposals must be 
made in duplicate. The sealed duplicate, with- 
out check, is to be deposited by the bidder 
with the City Auditor, Room 20, City Hall, 
previous to the time named for opening the 
proposals. Plans, proposals, specifications and 
forms of contract may be obtained at this 
office on or after Monday, January 8, 1934. 
A deposit of $5, in cash or by certified check, 
will be required for a set of plans and two 
seta of the specifications. Mutilation of them 
will be deemed sufficient cause for the forfeiture 
of said deposit. The Department reserves the 
right to reject any or all proposals. 

By order of the City of Boston Transit 
Department, 

Edward F. Condon, 
(Jan. 6-13.) Secretary. 

Rewistry Department. 
1002 City Hall Annex. 
NOTICE TO PHYSICIANS AND MIDWIVES. 
Physicians and midwives can obtain blanks 
for return of births on application at this 
office, or they will be mailed on request. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



(Jan. 6.) 



C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



NOTICE TO PARENTS. 
Parents can obtain blanks for return of 
births on application at this office, or they 
will be mailed on request. 

REmsEK Laws, Chapteir 29. 
(Extract from Section 6.) 

Sex;t. 6. Parents, within forty days after 
the birth of a child, shall cause notice thereof 
to be given to the clerk of the city or town 
in which such child is born. 

The parent who neglects to give notice of a 
birth for ten days after the time limited there- 
for shall forfeit not more than five dollars for 
each offence. 

Superintendent's Circular No. 31. 
Boston Public Schools. 

"Pupils admitted for the first time must pre- 
sent a birth certificate, baptismal record, offi- 
cial governmental passport, containing proof 
or age, or evidence satisfactory to the princi- 
pal that none of these is obtainable. 

The importance of a birth record is shown 
in the above regulations. 

(Jan. 6-13.) J. J. Mulvby, Register. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 



Changes in Traffic Regulations. 
Votrd, That the Traffic Regulations are 
amended as follows, effective January 8, 1934 : 

Section 39-A is amended by adding the 
following : 

Townsend Street. 

At Harold street. 
Section 50 is amended by adding the follow- 
ing: 

Centre Avenue. 

Dorchester avenue to Centre street. 
Centre Street. 

Dorchester avenue to Washington street. 
Joseph A. Conry, 
(Dec. 30-Jan.6.) Com,missioner. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Rubber Coats to 
THE Fire Department. 
The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
Fire Department, Bristol street, rubber coats, 
as per specifications to be obtained at the 
Supply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex. There titill be a charge of twenty cents 
($0.20) for each set of blank proposals taken 
out. Delivery to be made as required. The 
bidder must use the form of proposal to be 
obtained at said office, and the successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
the total amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract, in case the amount of the 
contract awarded aggregates $2,000 or more. 
Bids, with a certified check for $200, payable 
to and to become the property of the Oity 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
must be left at the office of the Superintendent 
of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall Annex, before 
12 m., Monday, January 22, 1934, at which 
time and place the bids will be publicly opened 
and read. A duplicate bid, without cheek, 
must be left at the office of the City Auditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. 
The Superintendent reserves the right to ac- 
cept or reject any or all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. All 
contracts made subject to appropriations to 
meet payments thereunder. 

Philip A. Chapman, 
(Jan. 6.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Uniform Caps to 
THE FiRB Department. 
The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
Fire Department, Bristol street, uniform caps, 
as per specifications to be obtained at the 
Supply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex. There will be a charge of twenty cents 
if 0.20) for each set of blank proposals taken 
out. Delivery to be made as required. The 
bidder must use the form of proposal to be 
obtained at said office, and the successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
the total amount of the bid with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract, in case the amount of the 
contract awarded aggregates $2,000 or more. 
Bids, with a certified check for $100, payable 
to and to become the property of the Oity 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
must be left at the office of the Superintendent 
of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall Annex, before 
12 m., Monday, January 22, 1934, at which 
time and place they will be publicly opened 
and read. A duplicate bid, without check, 
must be left at the office of the City Auditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. 
The Superintendent reserves the right to ac- 
cept or reject any or all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. All 
contracts made subject to appropriations to 
meet payments thereunder. 

Philip A. Chapman, 
(Jan. 6.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES DEPARTMENT. 



Notice. 



In compliance with provisions of section 41, 
chapter 98, of the General Laws of Massachu- 
setts, as amended by chapter 32 of the Acts 
of 1923, I hereby give notice to all inhabitants 
or persons having usual places of business in 
Boston using weighing or measuring devices 
for the purpose of buying or selling goods, 
wares or merchandise, for public weighing: or 
for hire or reward, to bring in such weigliing 
and measuring devices to be tested, adjusted 
and sealed. I shall be at the office of Sealer 
of Weights and Measures every day during 
regular business hours to attend to this duty. 
James A. Sweeney, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures, 

105 City Hall Annex, Boston. 

Office hours, 9 to 5, except Saturdays, 9 to 12. 
(Jan. 6.) 



14 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 6 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Wednesday, December 27, 1933. 

Special meetintr of the City Council in the 
Council Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m.. Presi- 
dent McGRATH in the chair. Absent, Coun. 
Gallatrhcr. 

The meeting was held pursuant to the fol- 
lowinp: call: 

City of Boston, 

Office of the Mayor, December 21, 1933. 
To the Members of the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — You are respectfully requested 
to assemble in the City Council Chamber, City 
Hall, on Wednesday, December 27, 1933, at 
2 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of taking 
action on the order for a loan of $300,000 for 
Public Welfare Department, and on any other 
business that may be presented for your con- 
sideration. 

Respectfully, 
Jambs M. Curley, Mayor. 

Placed on file. 



LOAN FOR WELFARE DEPARTMENT. 

President McGRATH— We will now take up 
the order for $300,000 for relief of the needy 
and unemployed. 

(The order submitted by the Mayor and 
read once and passed, yeas 19, nays 1, by the 
Council, on December 11, 1933, is as follows: 

Ordered, That under the provisions of 
chapter 159 of the Acts of 1933 an emergency 
appropriation of $300,000 be, and hereby is, 
made, to be expended under the direction of 
the Overseers of Public Welfare, for relief of 
the needy and the unemployed, and that to 
meet such appropriation the City Treasurer be 
authorized to issue from time to time, upon 
request of the Mayor, bonds or certificates of 
indebtedness of the city to said amount, the 
same to be issued outside the limits of in- 
debtedness. ) 

The question came on the second and final 
reading and passage of the order. 

Coun. CURTIS— Mr. President, I would like 
to ask that the Mayor's letter originally sub- 
mitting that order be re-read to us. 

The Clerk read the message from the Mayor, 
under date of December 11, 1933, as follows: 

City of Boston, 

Office of the Mayor, December 11, 1933. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — From present indications it ap- 
pears as though there will exist at the close 
of the year in the three relief items of the 
Public Welfare Department deficits totalling 
approximately $400,000. It is questionable 
whether unexpended departmental balances at 
the close of the current year will exceed 
$100,000. In order that there will be no 
necessity for suspending relief payments be- 
cause of lack of funds, I deem it necessary 
to submit herewith an order providing that 
under the provisions of chapter 159 of the 
Acts of 1933 the sum of $300,000 be authorized 
to be applied against probable deficits in the 
relief appropriations of the Public Welfare 
Department. 

In view of the fact that two readings, four- 
teen days apart, must be given this order, I 
recommend that a first reading be given this 
order at today's meeting. Unless this is done, 
passage of the order will be endangered be- 
cause of the limited amount of time remaining 
before the close of the current year. I there- 
fore respectfully recommend immediate con- 
sideration and passage by your honorable body 
of the accompanying order. 

Respectfully, 
James M. Curley, Mayor. 

Coun. CURTIS— Mr. President, I should like 
to move that this matter be referred to the 
Executive Committee. Personally, I would like 
to hear what Mr. Carven has to say about 
it. That letter from the Mayor says that he 
does not expect that there will be unexpended 
departmental balances at the close of the year 
that can be transferred. I would like to 
know what the result would be if this went 
over. This is an important matter, and I 
would like to have it referred to the Executive 
Committee so that we may get some informa- 
tion upon it. 

The order was referred to the Executive 
Committee. 



CONFIRMATION OF EXECUTIVE 
APPOINTMENTS. 

President McGRATH called up the following 
appointments by the Mayor of December 18, 
1933: 

Sidney Cohen, 151 Woodrow avenue, Dor- 
chester, to act as constable and to serve civil 



process upon the filing of the proper bonds, 
for the term ending April 30, 1934. 

Jeremiah Melia, 250 Stuart street, Boston, 
and Sally Frank, 31 Wolcott street, Dorchester, 
to be Weighers of Coal for the term ending 
April 30, 1934. 

The question came on confirmation. Com- 
mittee, Coun. Burke and Barker. Whole num- 
ber of ballots, 16; yeas 16, and the appoint- 
ments were confirmed. 



ELECTION OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS 
COMMISSIONER. 

Notice was received from the Board of 
Commissioners of School Buildings of the elec- 
tion on December 21, 1933, of Francis R. 
Bangs of 190 Marlborough street, Boston, 
Mass., to be a Commissioner of School Build- 
ings for the term ending December 1, 1936, 
to take the place of Stephen W. Sleeper. 

Placed on file. 



MINORS' LICENSES. 

Applications were received for thirty-six 
newsboys' licenses. The licenses were granted 
under the usual conditions. 



ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES— ELECTION. 

The following was received : 
City of Boston, 

Office of the City Clerk, December 21, 1933. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith a petition 
requesting that a special election be called, 
under the provisions of section 3 of chapter 373 
of the Acts of 1933, and section llA of chapter 
376 of the Acts of 1933, to enable a vote 
to be taken on the questions of granting 
licenses for the sale of alcoholic beverages, of 
granting licenses for the sale of wines and 
malt beverages and of granting licenses for 
the sales of alcoholic beverages in taverns. 

This petition conforms to the provisions of 
section 38 of chapter 43 of the General Laws 
and of section 3 of chapter 373 of the Acts of 
1933, and is accompanied by a certificate of 
the Election Commissioners that it is signed 
by more than one per cent of the whole num- 
ber of registered voters of the city. 

The necessary formalities having been com- 
plied with said section 3 requires that a special 
election be called by the City Council prior 
to April 15, 1934, for the purpose of submitting 
these questions to the voters. 

Respectfully, 
W. J. Doyle, City Clerk. 

Placed on file. 

President McGRATH offered the following: 

Ordered, That meetings of the citizens of 
this city qualified to vote for city officers be 
held at the several polling places designated 
for the purpose by the Board of Election Com- 
missioners on Tuesday, January 23, 1934, to 
give in their votes "yes" or "no" in answer to 
the following questions ; 

Shall licenses be granted in this city for 
the sale therein of all alcoholic beverages 
(whiskey, rum, gin, malt beverages, wines 
and all other alcoholic beverages) ? 

Shall licenses be granted in this city for 
the sale therein of wines and malt beverages 
(wine and beer, ale and all other malt bever- 
ages) ? 

Shall licenses be granted in this city for 
the sale therein of alcoholic beverages in 
taverns ? 

The polls at said meeting shall be opened 
at 10 o'clock a. m. and closed at 8 o'clock p. m. 

Ordered, That the City Clerk be directed to 
give notice of said meetings by publishing the 
same as required by law. 

The order was referred to the Executive 
Committee. 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

President McGRATH submitted report of 
the Committee on Soldiers' Relief recom- 
mending passage of the order for payment 
of aid to soldiers and sailors and their families 
in the City of Boston for the month of De- 
cember, 1938. 

Report accepted ; order passed. 



RECESS. 

The Council voted at 2.43 p. m., on motion 
of Coun. ENGLERT, to take a recess subject 
to the call of the Chair. The members re- 
assembled in the Council Chamber and were 
called to order by President McGRATH at 
3.25 p. m. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS. 

Coun. LYNCH, for the Executive Com- 
mittee, submitted the following : 

1. Report on order (referred today) for 
election on January 23, 1934. to vote on al- 
coholic beverage question — that the same oueht 
to pass. 

Report accepted ; said order passed. 

2. Report on message of Mayor and order 
(referred back again today) for an emergency 

loan and appropriation of $300,000, to be 
expended under the direction of the Overseers 
of Public Welfare for relief of needy and 
unemployed — that the same ought to pass. 

Report accepted ; said order given its sec- 
ond and final reading and passage, yeas 19, 
nays — Coun. Curtis — 1. 



REQUEST THAT GARBAGE CONTRACT BE 
CANCELED. 

Coun. KELLY offered the following: 

Ordered, that the Mayor be requested to can- 
cel the contract for the year 1934 for the col- 
lection of ashes and garbage for the Dor- 
chester district to Coleman Brothers. 

Coun. KELLY — Mr. President, a short time 
ago the Mayor saw fit to sign the contract 
for collection of garbage and ashes in favor 
of the pet contractor of the present administra- 
tion, for the year 1934. I would not mind 
if Coleman was the low bidder, and I would 
not mind, perhaps, if he had given to the 
citizens of Dorchester the kind of service to 
which they are entitled under the terms of 
the contract. But on numerous occasions I 
have proven conclusively that Coleman 
Brothers never complied with the terms of 
their contract, and in 1932 the Council went 
unanimously on record asking the Mayor of 
Boston as a result of a public hearing to re- 
voke the contract with Coleman Brothers. I 
am now asking the Mayor in the closing days 
of his administration to do an act for which 
the people of Dorchester will perhaps hold 
him in high esteem, — to cancel the contract 
with Coleman Brothers. The amount of that 
contract is over $20,000 higher than the lowest 
bid. In fact, Coleman is not even the second 
lowest bidder, but is the third ; and here is a 
contract that must be paid for by the incoming 
administration. I feel that the incoming 
Mayor should have considerable say as to the 
concern that should have the contract, because 
his administration will have to pay out the 
money for it and will have to be responsible 
for the misdoings or wrongdoings of the con- 
cern that is awarded the contract. So I hope 
the Mayor will reconsider his previous de- 
cision giving the contract to Coleman Brothers 
for 1934, and that by canceling the contract 
he will save to the city the $20,000 of the 
Coleman bid in excess of the amount asked 
by the low bidder. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



REWARD IN ZUCKERMAN MURDER. 

Coun. BRACKMAN and RUBY offered the 
following : 

Ordered, that the Mayor be requested to 
offer a reward of $1,000 for the apprehension 
of the murderer of Ethel Zuckerman. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



PREFERENCE TO U. S. CITIZENS IN 
C. W. A. 

Coun. BRACKMAN offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to instruct those in charge of assign- 
ing welfare recipients to C. W. A. positions, 
that citizens of the United States be given 
preference. 

Coun. BRACKMAN— Mr. President, of 
course, there is no way by which we can 
avoid giving welfare aid to noncitizens of 
the United States, but I do think, inasmuch 
as the power lies with officials of the Welfare 
Department to select men to be sent on to the 
Civil Works program as registrations are made, 
that preference might at least be given to 
citizens of the United States. We realize that 
there is a great number of aliens on the wel- 
fare list, and that they are being given a 
great deal of consideration through being taken 
off the welfare list and given C. W. A. jobs. 
I hope the Mayor will intercede in the pro- 
gram and will see that our citizens at least 
are given preference. . 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



Adjourned, at 3.32 p. m., on motion of Coun. 
HEIN, to meet on Saturday, December 30, 
1933, at 11 a. m. 



Jan. 6 



CITY RECORD 



15 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED DECEMBER 28, 1933, TO JANUARY 3, 1934. 

December 28. 



Plumber. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Natu 



Estimated 
Cost. 



D. Meltzer 38 Scollay square 

M. Donoghue Company.. 150 Causeway street. 

M. Duggan 6 Morton place 

P. Gallagher 6 Converse street. 



3 
. 3 
. 10 

. 22 

. 17 

Frank Jordan 732 Dudley street 7 



John J. Norris 49 Withington street 



New fixtures $50 

New fixtures 700 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 170 

New fixtures 142 



December 29. 


Thomas P. Travers 

L J Towie 


. 428 Tremont street 5 


New fixtures 


$200 


. . . fil East Hrookline street .... 8 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


. . 25 


Hyman Lappin 


. . . 26 Kirkland street 5 


400 


December 30. 


None. 


jANU.tRV 2. 



George Tack 

James A. Donnelljv 

Frederick W. McCarthy 

R. Fliegelman 

L. M. Richmond 

Hugh M. Appleby 

J. A. Powers 

Samuel Shuman 

R. J. McDonough 

Louis Rubinovitch 



1 Rowes Wharf 3 

21 Stoughton street 13 

28 Chandler street 5 

21 Astor street 4 

10 Chestnut Hill avenue. . . 21 

842 Heacon street 21 

919 Beacon street 21 

22 Hawley street 3 

40 .Sprague street 18 

18 Marshall street 3 



New fixtures 


$100 


New fixtures 


250 


New fixtures 


250 




50 


New fixtures 


300 


New fixtures 


800 


New fixtures 


950 


New fixtures 


1S5 




125 


New fixtures 


50 



Jaku.xry 3. 



David Suvalle 

Oscar Simonson 

N. J. Le<loux 

A. E. Sardello 

Thomas P. McCarthy. 

G. L. McHale 

Louis H . Jacobs 



68 Taylor street 16 

24 Fayette street 5 

26 Winship street 22 

9 Lawrence avenue 14 

191 Dudley street 12 

547 Medford street 2 

159-165 (iuincy street 13 



New fixtures $S5 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 125 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 180 

New fixtures 375 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order So. M?. 

A trial board consisting of Captains 
Mullen, Gleavy and Casey, having heard 
by reference a complaint made by John 
McGrath, captain, Division 14, against 
Joseph Caspar, patrolman, Division 14, 
for alleged violation of the Rules and 
Regulations of the Police Department, 
to wit: 

Charge: Conduct unbecoming an officer. 

Specification 1 . In that on December 13, 
1933, and for some time prior to that date 
the said Patrolman Joseph daspar had 
possession of a key to a residence on his 
route, without the knowledge and consent 
of his commanding officer, said residence 
not being his home. 

Specification 2: In that on the twelfth 
day of December, the said Patrolman 
Joseph Claspar, while not on duty and 
his route, with a key he had in his posses- 
sion and did therein commit an assault 
and battery on one Theresa M. Rogers. 

Specification 3: In that on the night of 
December 13, 1933, the said Patrolman 
Joseph Gaspar, while not on duty and 
not in uniform, was under the influence 
of intoxicating liquor to such an extent 
that he would have been unable, had he 
been called upon to do so, to perform 
the duties of a police officer; all tending 
to bring into disrepute and criticism his 
associates in the Police Department and 
the Police Department as a whole, — 
has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation : 

"The Board having heard and carefully 
considered all the evidence presented, 
accepts the plea of guilty made by the 
said Patrolman Joseph Gaspar to Speci- 
fications 1 and 3 of said charge, and finds 
the said Patrolman Joseph Gaspar not 
guilty of Specification 2 of said charge. 
In view of the high recommendation given 



Patrolman Gaspar by his superior officers' 
his previous good record in the dejiart- 
ment as an honest, conscientious and 
sober officer, his explanation of his asso- 
ciation with the woman he is alleged to 
have assfiulted, and his promise to abstain 
from the use of intoxicating liquor in the 
future, the Board respectfully recommends 
that the said Patrolman Joseph tiaspar 
be suspended from duty for a period of 
twenty days, effective as of December 14, 
1933, at 5.45 o'clock p. m., and that at 
the expiration of the Siiid period of sus- 
pension the said Patrolman Joseph Gaspar 
be ordered to perform two hundred and 
ten hours of punishment duty." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trial 
Board and hereby orders that the said 
Patrolman Joseph Ciaspar be suspended 
from duty for a period of twenty days, 
effective as of December 14, 1933, at 5.45 
o'clock p. m., and that at the expiration 
of the said period of suspension the said 
Patrolman Joseph Gaspar perform two 
hundred and ten hours of punishment 
duty. 

Civil Service Rule 23, Section 3, re- 
quires approval of the Civil Service Com- 
mission before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 
"Section 3. With the consent of the 
commissioner upon good cause, shown, 
an a[)pointing officer may reinstate in the 
same position or in a position in the same 
class and grade any person who has been 
separated from the service; provided, 
however, that the commissioner shall not 
allow reinstatement of a person dis- 
charged for cause." 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 36S. 

A trial board consisting of Captains 
McKinnon, Gleavy and Fallon, having 
heard by reference a complaint made by 
John J. Mullen, captain. Division 1, 
against Patrick J. Freeley, sergeant. 
Division 1, for alleged violation of 
Rules 36 and 41 of the Rules and Regu- 
lations of the Police Department, to wit: 

Charge 1 : Conduct unbecoming an 
officer. 

Specification: In that on the 21st day 
of November, 1933, the said Sergt. 
Patrick J. Freeley, while not on duty, 
was under the influence of intoxicating 
liquor to such an extent that he was 
unable to properly perform police duty if 
called upon so to do. 

Charge 2: Alleged violation of law. 

Specification: In that on the 21st day 
of November, 1933, at or about 11.45 
a. m., the said Sergt. Patrick J. Freeley 
is alleged to have operated an auto- 
mobile while under the influence of 
intoxicating Ii<iuor on Centre street, in 
the Roxbury district, and while operating 
the said automot)ile is alleged to have 
collided with an automobile operated by 
one Pauline Staskywicz, — 
has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation. 

"The Board having heard and carefully 
considered all the evidence presented, 
finds the said Sergt. Patrick J. Freeley 
guilty of Charge 1 and specification 
thereunder and not guilty on Charge 2 
and sjjecification thereunder, this latter 
finding being in conformity with the 
finding of the Court where these charges 
were heard at length and in detail. The 
Board is mindful of the fact that any 
conduct unbecoming an officer on the 
part of an officer of rank is ;in aggravated 
attack on the morale of the depart- 
ment, but feels that in this case there 
are extenuating circumstances which 
warrant a recommendation of punish- 
ment less than the extreme penalty of 
reduction in rank or dismissal. Sergeant 
Freeley's previous record shows that he 
is an exceptional officer, both as a patrol- 
man and as a sergeant. Even during the 
recent period of relief from duty pending 
a hearing on these charges, he has shown 
himself to be instinctively a police officer, 
as manifested by his going to the assist- 
ance of an officer who was being attacked 
and in danger of being seriously injured 
by a group of j)ersons intent u|)on rescuing 
a prisoner in Division 14. Sergeant 
Freeley has been the recipient of two 
commendations in General Orders, his 
habits and his conduct have been at all 
times most exemplary, and his com- 
manding officer has recommended him 
highly as an officer and as a gentleman, 
and in the strongest terms urged that 
leniency be shown, particularly as it was 
pointed out that Sergeant Freeley was in 
poor physical condition and in distress of 
mind over news that his father was lying 
at the point of death at the time of this 
transgression. The Board therefore re- 
spectfully recommends that the said 
Sergeant PatricK ,1. Freeley })e suspended 
from duty with loss ot pay for a period of 
forty-five days, effective as of November 
21, 1933, at 5.4.'^ o'clock p. m." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trial 
Board and hereby orders that the said 
Sergeant Patrick J. Freeley be suspended 
from duty for a period of forty-five days, 
effective as of November 21, 1933, at 
5.45 o'clock p. m. 

Civil Service Rule 23, section 3, re- 
quires approval of the Civil Service 
Commission before reinstatement. 



16 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 6 



Rule 23. 
Section 3. With the consent of the 
commissioner upon good cause sho-.vn, 
an appointing oflicer may reinstate in 
the same position or in a position in the 
same class and grade any person who has 
been separated from the scr\-ice; pro- 
vided, however, that the commissioner 
shall not allow reinstatement of a person 
discharged for cause. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

(Commissioner. 



General Order No. 369. 

Sergt. Eeo C. J. Masuret of Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation and Patrolman 
Patrick F. P'innegan of Division 11 are 
both commended in General Orders and 
each is granted two days' additional 
vacation for meritorious police duty 
performed on December 18, 1933. 

While on their way to headquarters 
in a "Squad' car, and while stopped in a 
line of traffic, the officers were informed 
by a citizen of an assault and armed hold- 
up of a storekeeper on Washington street, 
and that one of the men ran up Dover 
street. 

The officers turned the car around 
and taking the informant with them 
started in pursuit, overtaking the crim- 
inal at Dover Street Bridge, where they 
alighted from the car and placed the man 
under arrest. He was searched imme- 
diately and a quantity of jewelry taken 
from the storekeeper was found on him, 
also a fully loaded automatic pistol. 
Subsequently another of the two was 
taken into custody. 

The commissioner is pleased to recog- 
nize the unusual alertness and devotion 
to duty show^n by these officers in the 
performance of this splendid police duty. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 370. 

Patrolman Thomas F. Londergan of 
Division 9 is commended in General 
Orders for effective pohce duty per- 
formed on December 18, 1933, in connec- 
tion with the capture of two persons who 
had broken into a school building. 

The commissioner is pleased to recog- 
nize the keen observation and good 
judgment shown by Patrolman Londer- 
gan in notifying the station to send 
assistance to prevent the possible escape 
of the felons. 

The I Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



CONSTRUCTION WORK. 

The Maj'or has approved the request 
of the Public Works Department for the 
following construction work: 

A sanitary sewer of 10-inch and 15- 
inch pipe, a surface drain of 6-inch pipe 
and six catch-basins in North Mead 
street, between Medford street and 264 
feet southwesterly in the Charlestown 
district, at an estimated cost of §1,900. 



MASSACHUSETTS CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMINATIONS. 

The Massachusetts Civil Service Com- 
mission announces examinations for 
desirable positions open in the Boston 
and Metropolitan districts as follows: 

Junior Soci.al Worker, Boston Public 
Welf.\re Department, Febru.\ry 10, 
1934. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 27, 1934, at 12 m. 

Salary: The entrance salary is 81,400 
a j'ear; the maximum salary is Sl,600 a 
year. 

Duties : Under immediate supervision, 
to investigate cases of persons who apply 
for relief under the several relief statutes 
and to perform social service case work 
in connection with their care and treat- 
ment. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must be not less than twenty-one nor 
over fifty years of age at the time of 
filing application. A certificate of date 
of birth must be filed with the applica- 
tion UNLESS one has been filed with 
a previous application. Applicants must 
have education equivalent to graduation 
from a standard four-year high school 
and either one year's experience in social 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY.) 

Foremen of Water, Sewer and High- 
ways, Etc., January 20, 1934. 

Last date for filing applications Wednes- 
day, January 10, 1934, at 5 p. m. 

This examination is for foremen of 
water, sewer and highways (or streets) in | 
the service of the state and of all cities 
and of such towns in the state as are 
classified under civil service; and of sani- 
tary and street cleaning in the service of 
Boston. 

(A) Highway (or Street) foremen in 
the service of the state, cities and of the 
towns classified under civil service: 
Training and experience, 14; arithmetic, 
4; report, 2; practical questions on street 
and road construction, grading, repairing, 
etc., 10; total, 30. 

(B) Sewer. The subjects and weights 
are the same as for (A) State Highway, 
except that the practical questions will 
concern the quality of materials, bracing 
and refilling of trenches, general mainte- 
nance and repair of sewers, catch-basins, 
etc. 

(C) W.\TER. The subjects and weights 
are the same as for (.A.) State Highway, 
except that the practical questions will 
concern the laying and maintenance of 
water mains and service pipes, time- 
keeping, accounting for material, etc. 

(D) Sanitary and Street Cleaning 
(in the service of Boston). The subjects 
and weights are the same as for (A) 
Street Foremen, except that the practical 
questions will concern the handling of 
ashes, garbage, etc., and the watering, 
oiling and cleaning of streets. 

Note. Applicants for all services may, 
if they wish, take an additional paper on 
the use of explosives, and if successful in 
passing it will have it so noted as a special 
qualification. 

Passing requirements: Applicants will 
be required to obtain a mark of at least 
60 per cent in practical questions and 
at least 70 per cent in experience and in 
general average in order to become 
eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by a 
physical examination. 



welfare work or one year's training in a 
school of social work. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 5; 
personality and fitness, as determined 
by an oral interview, 2; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements: Applicants 
must obtain at least 70 per cent in 
each subject in order to become eligible. 

Ph3'sical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

Note: An examination for Senior 
Social Worker in Boston will be held 
on this same date. Candidates for both 
positions should file a separate applica- 
tion for each position. 

Senior Social Worker, Boston Public 
Welfare Department, February 10, 
1934. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 27, 1934 at 12 m. 

Salary: The entrance salary is $1,600 
a year; the maximum salary' is $2,300 a 
year. 

Duties : Under immediate supervision, 
to investigate cases of persons who apply 
for relief under the several relief statutes 
and to perform social service case work 
in connection with their care and treat- 
ment. 

Entrance Requirements : Applicants 
must be not less than twenty-one nor 
over fifty years of age at the time of 
filing application. A certificate of date 
of birth must be filed with the applica- 
tion L'NLESS one has been filed with 
a previous application. Applicants must 
have education equivalent to graduation 
from a college or university and either 
two years' experience in social welfare 
work or two years' training in a school of 
social work. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 5; 
personalit}' and fitness, as determined 
by an oral inten'iew, 2; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements : Applicants 
must obtain at least 70 per cent in 
each subject in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
phj'sical examination. 

Note: An examination for Junior 
Social W'orker in Boston will be held 
on this same date. Candidates for both 
positions should file a separate applica- 
tion for each position. 



RETIREMENT BOARD REPORT. 

To the Auditor. 

At a meeting of the Boston Retirement 
Board, held on Friday, December 15, 
1933, the retirement from active ser\'ice 
of the following named members of the 
Retirement System was approved, to be- 
come effective at the close of business, 
December 31, 1933. 

Park Department. 
Daniel Sullivan, laborer, salary at time 
of retirement, SI, 404 a year. 

Public Works Department. 

James E. Bums, stableman, salary at 
time of retirement, -81,404 a year. 

John M. Shea, engineer of construc- 
tion, salary at time of retirement, S3,400 
a year. 

School Committee. 
John J. Sheehan, submaster, salary at 
time of retirement, 83,305 a j'ear. 

Attest : 

Wilfred J. Doyle, 
Chairman. 



cm OF BOSTON PBINIINa DB>ABniBNT 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municip^vl Affairs. 
Vol. 26. Saturday, Janxjary 13, 1934. No. 2 

MAYOR MANSFIELD MOVES TO RESTORE STEP=RATE INCREASES TO CITY 
EMPLOYEES — INFORMED BY CORPORATION COUNSEL FOLEY THAT 
LAW IN PRESENT FORM PREVENTS CARRYING OUT OF INAUGURAL 
PROMISE, MAYOR ORDERS LEGISLATION PREPARED THAT WILL ENABLE 
HIM TO FULFILL PLEDGE. 



Having been advised that there was some doubt that it was possible legally to put into effect his plan 
for restoring the step-rate increases for those city employees which formerly came in for that annual benefit, 
Mayor Mansfield has authorized the Law Department to draft legislation which, when passed, will give him the 
power to keep the only pledge made to the citizens of Boston during his inaugural address. 

Immediately upon taking office Mayor Mansfield began to make plans to put into effect the step-rate in- 
creases which had been abandoned under the previous administration. To make sure that he was legally able 
to do this he sought the opinion of Corpxjration Counsel Henry E. Foley. After consulting the law in the matter 
Mr. Foley informed the Mayor in an opinion that there was grave doubt about his power to do what he planned. 

When this opinion was handed to the Mayor he immediately ordered legislation prepared that would give 
him this right to aid the citizens. The opinion, in full, as presented to the Mayor by Mr. Foley was as follows: 

MR. FOLEY'S LETTER. 

Boston, January 8, 1934. 
Ho.\. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

De.\r Mr. M.wor, — You have asked my opinion as to whether the step-rate increases, formerly in effect 
but discontinued prior to action under chapter 121 of the Acts of the year 1933, can be reinstated in view of the 
exercise by you of the authority conferred by section 3 of said chapter. 

There are certain classes of employees such as school teachers, policemen and firemen who entered the city 
employ under circumstances leading them to expect a periodic increase in salary until a certain maximum was 
reached. These increases are frequently referred to as "step-rate" increases. It is my understanding that these 
increases were suspended by proper authority some time prior to April 21, 19.33. It is my opinion that, while the 
matter is not free from doubt, these step-rate increases cannot be reinstated while the reductions made pursuant 
to section 3 are continued in force. 

Section 3 provides that the Mayor taking office on January 1, 1934, may continue in force the reductions 
made pursuant to the provisions of section 3. The grant of authority contained in section 3 is broad and con- 
ferred large and unusual powers on the then mayor. While the problem we are now considering may never have 
occurred to the legislators enacting the statute in question and while the language is susceptible of more than one 
interpretation, it seems to me that any amelioration in the reductions originally put into effect by the Mayor or 
other persons pursuant to section 3 was not contemplated and that the authority given to the Mayor taking office 
on January 1, 1934, is only an authority to continue in effect the salary reductions in effect at the time of his action 
thereunder, without modification. In view of this it would seem that an attempt to reinstate step-rate increases 
will invite litigation likely to terminate unfavorably to such increases and might so far as participated in by the 
Mayor lay open to challenge the entire executive order. 

Even apart from section 3 certain step-rate increases are, of course, not within the jurisdiction of the Mayor. 

In view of the opinion herein stated I have not considered who would have the power to reinstate step-rate 
increases if section 3 were not controlling. 

I have requested legislative counsel to prepare a petition to the Legislature asking for legislation to enable 
the reinstatement of step-rate increases and I understand that this petition ig now being prepared. 

Yours truly, 

Henry E. Foley, 
Corporation Counsel, 



18 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 




"O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 
queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship= 

teeming plain of the ocean, 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene, 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotion!" 
From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Koom 73, City 

HaU. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription $2.00 Per \ear 

Single Copies 10 Cents 

IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES. 
Old South News-stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 

A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Roo m 73, City Hall. 

MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
January 15, at 2 p. m. 

A regular meeting of the School Com- 
mittee of the City of Boston will be 
held in the Administration Building, 
15 Beacon street, on Monday, Janu- 
ary 15, 1934, at 7.30 o'clock p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply withm a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Bo.^RD OF STREET COMMIS- 
SIONERS, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying ' 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the openmg of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 
public streets ; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 



trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasolene, oil, 
and other inflammable substances or cx- 
plo.sive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for anj' permanent or tem- 
porary obstniction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
hay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Tr.\ffic Commission, 
154 Berkeley street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
wa3's, roads and parkwaj's under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Pubuc 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning. 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the suppljdng or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To THE Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To THE B0.4RD OF P.\RK COMMIS- 
SIONERS, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park. Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue^ Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, and the small parks 
and pla3rgrounds in general throughout 



the city, and as to the extermination 
of g>'psy moths and the charges made 
for such service. Application may be 
made to this department for informa- 
tion regarding the public baths and 
gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To THE School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To THE DeP.\RTMEXT OF ScHOOL BUILD- 
INGS, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
straction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Wire Division of the Fire 
Dep.\rtment, Fire Department Head- 
quarters, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire di\nsion. To 
Room 1007, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the Citj^ 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Bo.ard of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundarj' lines of zoning districts 
of the Citv of Boston as established bv 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 



For the weekending Januarj' 6, 1934: 
Population estimated July, 1934, 
United States Census Bureau estimate, 
795,256; number of deaths (stillbirths 
excluded): Residents, 219; nonresidents, 
45; total, 264. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 17.26; nonresidents deducted, 
14.32. 



Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
Last week, 15.95; corresponding week 
last year, 14.97. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 24; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 5; sixty vears and over, 143. 
Total deaths: Male, 133; female, 131; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 157; 
deaths of colored, 12. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: C.\SES AND DE.A.THS.* 



Diseases. 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 6, 1934. 



Cases. Deaths. 



.\nterior poliomyelitis. . . . 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis lethargica, . . 

Influenza 

Measles 

Meningitis epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) . 
Tuberculosis (other forms) 

Typhoid fever 

Whooping cough 



234 

1 

48 

42 

22 

4 

27 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 7, 1933. 



Cases. Deaths. 



1 
11 



58 
42 

27 
77 
16 



34 



11 



10 



* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



19 



MANUFACTURERS' SALES TAX AS A MORE EQUITABLE MEANS OF RELIEV= 
INQ BOSTON'S TAX BURDEN HAS WON APPROVAL OF MAYOR MANS= 
FIELD — AFTER STUDYING QUESTION DEEPLY AND THE BILL TO BE 
PRESENTED TO CONGRESS BY HON. JOHN W. McCORMACK HE ISSUES 
STATEMENT EMBODYING HIS VIEWS ON QUESTION. 



The proposals for a manufacturers' sales tax as a means of relieving the burden that has been placed upon 
real estate in the City of Boston has been seriously studied by Mayor Frederick W. Mansfield as one of his first 
efforts to ease the tasks of the citizens. The purpose of the sales tax, as proposed and fostered by some of the most 
prominent men in Congress, including Congressman John W. McCormack and Senator David L Walsh, aims at a 
more equitable distribution of the wealth of the country for tax purposes. 

After considering the proposals and the bill that is being presented to Congress, Mayor Mansfield, on January 
11, issued the following statement: 

It has become very apparent in the last few years that the tax on incomes is not an equitable way to 
raise money. Recent investigations disclose that wealthy men have resorted to devious sharp practices to avoid 
the payment of their income taxes. It may be that these devices are within the letter of the law but it is certain 
that the moral sense of the people of this country has been profoundly shocked by the revelations of the examin- 
ing committees in Washington. Apparently only the man of moderate income is paying his income tax and the 
burden upon him seems to be unfair. 

A Federal manufacturers' sales tax such as is contemplated by the bill which Congressman John W. McCor- 
mack will sponsor and which meets with the approval of Senator David I. Walsh is probably the fairest and most 
equitable method by which the necessary taxes can be raised. The poor will not suffer under such a tax because 
the necessities of life are excluded from them and sales of food and clothing are exempt from taxation. The amount 
charged upon each sale will be so small and the tax distributed so generally that it will not be particularly felt. 
At any rate it ought to be tried and if it does not work well it can be abandoned. I am in favor of giving it a 
thorough trial and I think that with the necessaries of life excluded it will prove to be an impartial and very popu- 
lar and efficient method of raising funds necessary to carry on the projects of the national government. 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Advertises for proposals for gymnasium 
equipment for the Public Latin School. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the con- 
tract price. Blank fonns for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the De- 
partment of School Buildings, 1 1 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of iSSOO, 
to be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 15, at 2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering furniture of various kinds 
to the various school houses. Surety 
bond will be required in the sum of SI, 000. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of^ the Department of 
School Buildings, 11 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certi- 
fied check in the sum of S500, to be filed 
at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 2 p.m. 

Advertises for proposals for gym- 
nasium equipment at the Public I.atin 
School. Surety bond will be recjuired 
in a sum equivalent to the full amount 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 



of the Department of School Buildings, 
11 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$500, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday^ January 22, at 2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing, 
delivering and setting up pupils' school 
furniture in the various school buildings. 
Surety bond will be required in the sum 
of $5,000. Jilank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the De- 
partment of School Buildings, 11 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $500, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing, 
delivering and setting up in the halls of 
the various schools, opera chairs. Surety 
bond will be required in the sum of $1,000. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Department of 
School Buildings, 11 Beacon street, Boston 
School Buildings, 11 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certi- 
fied check in the sum of S500, to be filed 
at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 2 p. m. 

Police Department. 
AdvoHi.ses for propo.sals for furnishing 
and delivering fuel oil. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum etjuivalent to 50 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley 



street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 24, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for making 
and delivering uniforms. Surety bond 
will be recjuired in a sum equivalent to 
50 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Property Clerk, 154 
Berkeley street, ftoston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$500, to be filed at the same office. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 24, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering lubricating oil. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Property Clerk, 154 
Berkeley street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$100, to be filed at the same office. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 24, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for installing a 
two-way radio telephone system for the 
Police Department, City of Boston. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the con- 
trac price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of Jackson 
& Moreland, lOngineers. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$5,000, to be filed at the office of the 
Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. Proposal forms available after 
January 10. 

Bids close Monday, January 29, at 12 m. 



20 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



Advertises for proposiils for buildinR 
alterations to provide coiiununication con- 
trol room at Police Headquarters. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum ecjuiva- 
lent to the full amount of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Engineers, 
Jackson A: Moreland. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of SlOO, to 
be filed at the ofTice of the Police Com- 
missioner, 154 Berkeley street, Boston. 
Proposals available .January 10. 

Bidn close Mojidaij, January 29, at 12 m. 

Public Works Department (Ferry 
Service). 

Advertises for proposals for placing 
weighing and vending machines in two 
heiid houses of the Ferry Division. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Public Works 
Commissioner, Room 508, City Hall 
Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of -SlOO, to be 
■filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Public Works Dep.^rtment (Sewer 
Service). 

Advertises for proposals for sewerage 
works in Ransom road, from Greenfield 
road 295 feet southwesterly, Hyde Park. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Public Works Department, Room 508, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, ac- 
companied by certified check in the sum 
of SlOO, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 16, at 12 jn. 

Supply Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
tires and tubes to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in a 
sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .?200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 16, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical and hypodermic needles to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of SlOO, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close WcdneMlay, January 17, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
drugs (medicines of all kinds) to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January IS, at 
12 m. 



Advertises for proposals for fumi.shing 
surgical supplies to the various city de- 
partments. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of .S200, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 19, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
uniforms to the Fire Department. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
uniform caps to the Fire Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of SlOO, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals. for furnishing 
rubber coats to the Fire Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
fruit and vegetables to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall .\nnex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
S300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bills close Tuesday, January 23, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
meats to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supplj' 
Department, Room 801, City Hall An- 
nex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by certi- 
fied check in the sum of S300, to be filed 
at the same office. Duplicate bid, with- 
out check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 23, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
the Airport, Park Department, cinders as 
per specifications to be obtained at the 
Supply Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 



sum of S200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids dose Tuesday, January 23, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
haj', grain and straw to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall .\nnex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
S200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 24, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
butter, eggs, etc., to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may he obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied bv certified check in the sum of 
.S300, to" be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 24, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
the Water Service, Public Works De- 
partment, 200,000 pounds of iron castings 
(service pipe stockj. Surety bond wiD be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supplv Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of .S200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the Citj' Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 25, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
iron castings (300,000 pounds frames and 
covers) to the Water Service, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 
per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supplv Department, 
Room 801, City Hall .\nnex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of .S200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 23, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
450,000 pounds of gate and hydrant cast- 
ings to the Water Service, Public Works 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 25, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
350,000 pounds of iron castings, consist- 
ing of branches, curves, etc. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 25 
per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



21 



Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 25, at 
12 m. 

Readvertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing the Water Service, Class B, i)ipe in 
sizes and quantities as indicated in ad- 
vertisement. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 poT 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $500, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids dose Friday, January 26, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
iron castings to the Water Service, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals maj' be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Dejjartment, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 26, at 12 in. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
composition castings in sums and styles 
as indicated in advertisement. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposjils may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Suj)ply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 26, at 12 m. 

Transit Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and installing incline wall finish, grano- 
lithic sidewalks, conduits, junction boxes, 
etc., and installing lamp standards. 
Traffic Tunnel. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to the full 
amount of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Transit Department, 
1 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$5,000, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 16, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and installing brass frames, grilles and 
slides for ceiling for Traffic Tunnel. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Transit Department, 1 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $1,000, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for installing 
low tension cable, Traffic Tunnel. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to the full amount of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Transit Depart- 
ment, 1 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, ' 



accompanied by certified check, in th^ 
sum of .$500, to be filed at the same office- 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 29, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for installing 
electrical control for pump rooms, Traffic 
Tunnel. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to the full amount 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Transit Department, 1 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
.•\uditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 29, at 
12 m. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thui-sdaj', January 11: 

Hosi'iT.vL Department. 

The following persons have been 
emjjloyed at the Boston City Hospital 
during the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ary 4: 

Permanent. — Dr. John P. Murphy, 
resident surgeon, $950 a year; Dr. 
Henry E. (iroden, assistant resident 
surgeon, $1,080 a j'ear. 

Temporary. — James P. Ryan, fireman, 
$35.28 a week; Charles Toye, male nurse, 
$27.(52 a week; Rose CI. Rogers, ward 
maid, $14.25 a week; Mary Moynihan, 
clerk, $15.20 a week; Dr. Harry Byrnes, 
assistant resident surgeon, $1,700 a year; 
Thomas O'Brien, kitchenman, $1().03 a 
week; Stella Polofsky, Irene McAllister, 
Letitia Campfield, (leorgia LeBlanc, Bar- 
bara Greim, Catherine Cunningham, 
Esther Rubinovitz, (!race Powers, Kath- 
leen Sullivan, Margaret Bowers, .Agnes 
Wiltrakis, (iertrude (lleason, Nora I3en- 
nett, Margaret Mc.\nespie, I.orinda Mc- 
.\uley, Hattie Hoar, Ina Nulty, Mar- 
guerite DeWolfe, Ruby Childs, Stacia 
Morasky, N'iola MacAdam, special nurses, 
$29.75 a week. 

The following changes have occurred : 

Dr. John B. Leach, assistant resident 
surgeon at $1,080 to resident surgeon at 
$1,350 a year; Martin McCarthy,* 
jobber at .$27 a week to working foreman 
at $5.10 a day; Robert Pearson, f 
electrician's helper at $18.90 to $27 a 
week; Paul Roncary, X-ray orderly at 
$10.93 to $15.68 a week; George Kendall, 
X-ray orderly at $15.(58 to $16.63 a week; 
Ida Corey, Dorothy Ellsworth, nurses, 
$5.70 a month; .\lice Holmes, nurse, 
.$11.40 a month; Evelyn Hennessey, 
Robina Loring, floor nurses, $112.50 a 
month; Mildred Edgar, nurse, $15.84 a 
month; Catherine Dyer, Rita Hut- 
chinson, nurses, $11.88 to $15.84 a month; 
Pearl Kapola, nurse, advertised at .$8.55, 
should be $11.88 a month; Mary Pizio, 
nurse, advertised at $15.84, should be 
$11.88 a month; Mildred LeMaire, 
Jennie Politakis, nurses, $11.88 to $15.84 
a month. 



* Per written request of Mayor Curley. 
t Per telephone request of Mayor Curley. 
The permi-ssion of the civil service was received 
too late for incorporation in last week's letter. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 

Division). 
The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division of the 



Boston City Hospital up to and including 
Thursday, January 4: 

Edward C. ClafTey, M. D., resident 
medical officer, fourth assistant, $1,080 a 
year; Margaret Quill, maid (temporary), 
$12 a week; Patrick Breen, elevator opera- 
tor (temporary), $2.50 a day; Catherine 
Riley, maid, $11.40 a week; James Galvin, 
Patrick McCarron, choremen (patients), 
$228 a year; Thomas Manning, maid 
(patient), .$342 a year; John Crafts, Daniel 
O'Donnell, male nurses (patients), $456 
a year; Frank Reardon, male nurse 
(patient) (temporary), $456 a year; 
Francis O'Toole, maid (patient) (tem- 
porary), $228 a year; Frank McCarthy, 
James Kelley, choremen (patients) (tem- 
porary), $228 a year; Walter Quinlan, 
choreman (patient), ,$228 a year. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be emploj'ed : 

Donald R. Hazen, M. D., resident 
medical officer, fourth assistant, $1,080 a 
year; Hazel Walsh, Agnes L. Sullivan, 
nurses (temporary), $950 a year; Phillip 
Sullivan, Bernard Taylor, choremen 
(patients), .$228 a year; Frank Taylor, 
maid (patient), $342 a year; William 
Slattery, Bernard McNamara, male nurses 
(patients), $456 a year. 

In.stitutions Department. 
The following changes have been made 
for the week ending Thursday, January 4: 

Steamers "Hibbard" and "O'Meara." 
Appointments. — John Norcott, fireman, 

temporary, $1,400 a year; Patrick 

Murphy, deckhand, temporary, $1,300 a 

year. 

Resignation. — John Norcott, fireman, 

temporary, $1,400 a year. 

Law Department. 
Isadore H. Fox has been appointed 
special legislative counsel for the City of 
Bo.ston, as of January 3, at $5,000 ($4,250, 
reduced) a year. 

Mayor's Office. 

Henry E. Foley has been appointed 
Corporation Counsel in place of Samuel 
Silverman, as of January 2. 

Eliot Wadsworth has been appointed 
Sinking Funds Commissioner, for the term 
ending .\pril 30, in place of Frederic J. 
Crosby. 

Charles H. Carey has been appointed 
Soldiers' Relief Commissioner, in place 
of John J. Lydon, as of January 2. 

John M. Lanning has been appointed 
stenographer effective Friday, January 5, 
at $1,400 a year. 

Over.seers of the Public Welfare. 

.Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary employment of Patrick 
J. Reynolds as engineer for a period of 
three months at $42 a week. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary employment of William 
Kelly, as constable for a period of three 
months at $1,600 a year. 

,\pproval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employment 
of the following as bookkeepers for a 
period of three months at $1,000 a year: 
Evelyn F. Costello, Marie F. Curran, 
Alice F. Moran, Margaret R. Mulkerron, 
Mary F. Doherty and Mary E. Norton. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary employment of the 
following as stenographers for a period of 
three months at $1,000 a year: 

Ida C. Waitzkin, Helen T. Linehan. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following bookkeepers for a 
period of three months at $1,000 a year: 



22 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



Margaret Lamb, Lillian McPeake, 
Claire Reavey, Mary T. Carney, Mary T. 
Townsend, Charlotte M. Devin, Mary N. 
Martin, Helen M. Dooley, Katherine E. 
Gordon, Delia Hatton, Helen M. Keilly, 
Mary E. Sullivan, Rose S. Sullivan, 
Mildred A. Walker, (lenevieve Waters. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following junior social 
workers for a period of three months at 
$1,000 a year: 

Albert G. Murphy, John H. Murphy, 
William J. Dawe, John J. McKeon, 
James E. Lunny, Frederick McLaughlin, 
Timothy O'Lcary, Arthur J. Sweeney, 
Katherine V. Sullivan, John F. O'Brien, 
Thomas Robert, Joseph Camunas, Joseph 
G. Fallon. 

Park Department. 

Approval has been given for the tem- 
porary employment of the following men, 
as referees and scorers at the basketball 
games of the Park Department League 
for a period of ten weeks (four games per 
week) : 

Referees, SI. 25 per Game, Total of §550. 
— Garrett Lee, Edward Aaron, William 
Nj'han, Henry McGuiness, Vincent Plan- 
sky, John Kilroy, Timothy Linehan, 
Charles Bleiler, Ben Hurwitz, George 
O'Connell, Irving Neihmer. 

Scorers, 50 Cents per Game, Total of 
$220. — James O'Brien, Thomas Con- 
nolly, Bernard Rasmussen, Isadore Piatt, 
Harold DeMers, Joseph Conley, John 
Healy, Joseph McNeil, Charles Gould, 
Bart Mulhern, Robert Cusick. 

The above officials serve eighty basket- 
ball teams representing 1,000 boys, total- 
ing 372 games. The referees are all 
members of the Eastern Board of Basket- 
ball officials. 

Public Works Department. 
Bernard C. Kelley, chief clerk, has 
been continued on sick leave without loss 
of salary from January 5 to January 31, 
inclusive. 

Public Works Department (Bridge 
Service). 

Approval has been given to appoint the 
following as temporary assistant draw- 
tenders at $1,700 a year, less 15 per cent, 
for three months, to take effect January 
15, to fill vacancies caused by absentees 
on sick leave or other reasons as they 
occur from time to time during that 
period, in bridge service: Mark E. 
Keliher, Anthony Guarino, John J. 
Brearton. 

Approval has been given to continue 
the temporary employment of the fol- 
lowing as assistant drawtenders at $27.71 
a week for ten days: Francis Murray, 
Edward Kennedy. 

The above have been filling temporary 
vacancies caused by absentees on sick 
leave since December 26, and 29, re- 
spectively, and it has been necessary to 
ask for a further ten days' extension 
owing to the continued absence of the 
men whose places they are filling. 

Public Works Dep.artmext (Ferry 

Service). 
Approval has been given to appoint 
John J. Mullen as temporary deckhand 
at $4.62 a dav, for three months from 
January 5, to fill a vacancy in the Ferry 
Service. 

Overtime Allowed. 

The heads of the various departments 
whose employees have received payment 
for overtime state in connection there- 



with that if any laborer has been allowed 
to work more than eight hours per day 
it has been only in case of emergency 
under the law. 

Institutions Department. 
For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ary 4: 

Lona Island Hospital. 
Luke E. McCarthy, Patrick McLaugh- 
lin, firemen, 1 daj', S6.08 each. Total, 
S12.16. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDER. 

General Order No. 4- 
I. Commendation. 

The Fire Commissioner wishes to com- 
mend the officers and members of the 
department who responded to the fire at 
Fenway Park, Box 2344, five alarms, at 
1.10 p. m., Friday, January 5, 1934. 

It is quite evident that the fire had 
developed considerable headway before 
the alarm was given as it had extended to 
adjoining buildings before the arrival of 
the apparatus, and the efficient and 
capable operation of the department 
forces undoubtedly prevented a serious 
conflagration. 

The efficient manner in which the 
members performed their services reflects 
great credit upon the department, and 
the commissioner feels that individual 
credit is due to every member who 
assisted in the work at this fire. 

The commissioner also considers it 
worthy of note that the response of the 
apparatus was very prompt under most 
adverse weather conditions and was 
accomplished without a single breakdown 
or accident of any kind. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edward 
F. McLaughlin. 

Henry A. Fox, 
Chief of Department. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY.) 

Fire Service, Cities and Towns Out- 
side OF Boston and Metropolitan 
District, February 3, 1934. 
Last day for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 20, 1934, at 12 noon. 

Boston and Metropolitan' District, 
February 17, 1934. 

Last day for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 3, 1934, at 12 noon. 

Applicants for the service of Boston 
must be not less than twenty-two nor 
over thirty-five years of age at the time 
of filing application. Applicants for all 
other cities and towns in the Common- 
wealth must be not less than twenty-one 
nor over thirty-five years of age at the 
time of filing application. Callmen and 
substitute callmen may make such deduc- 
tions from their ages as are provided for 
in Civil Service Rule 8, Class 21. A 
certificate of date of birth must be filed 
with the application, unless one has been 
filed with a previous application. 

Applicants for Worcester are required 
to be not less than 5 feet 5 inches in 
height. Applicants for Brockton must 
be not less than 5 feet 6 inches in height, 
and weigh not less than 135 pounds at 
the time of appointment. Applicants for 
Winchester must be not less than 5 feet 
8 inches in height, and weigh not less 
than 135 pounds. Applicants for Lynn 
must be not less than 5 feet 5i inches 
in height, and weigh not less than 135 
pounds. 



The subjects of the examination with 
their respective weights will be as fol- 
lows: Training and experience, 3; prac- 
tical questions, 4; general information, 
3; total, 10. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination and strength tests. 

Educational test, 3; physical test, 2; 
total, 5. 

Applicants will be required to obtain 
at least 50 per cent in each subject of 
the examination and at least 70 per cent 
in the educational average and in the 
strength tests in order to become eligible. 

The practical questions will be based 
upon information contained in a manual 
known as the "Red Book." This manual 
may be obtained from the Secretary of 
State, Room 118, State House, at ten 
cents a copy. It is necessary that ap- 
plicants obtain a copy of this manual 
and study it carefully. 



URBAN POPULATION, APRIL 1, 1930. 

As defined by the Census Bureau, the 
urban population is, in general, that re- 
siding in cities and other incorporated 
places having 2,500 inhabitants or more, 
the remainder being classified as rural. 

The total urban population of the 
United States is 68,954,823 (34,154,760 
males and 34,800,063 females), of whom 
62,836,605 (31,162,570 males and 31,674,- 
035 females) are white; of these whites 
52,109,746 (25,520,483 males and 26,589,- 
263 females) are native; 33,497,232 (16,- 
515,816 males and 16,981,416 females) of 
these latter are of native parentage and 
18,612,514 (9,004,667 males and 9,607,847 
females) are of foreign or mixed parent- 
age; there are 10,726,859 (5,642,087 males 
and 5,084,772 females) foreign-bom 
white; there are 5,193,913 (2,479,158 males 
and 2,714,755 females) Negroes; other 
races, 924,305 (513,032 males and 411,273 
females). 

The urban population is 56.2 per cent 
of the total population of the country; 
native white, 54.6 per cent and foreign- 
born white, 80.3 per cent; Negroes, 43.7 
per cent. 

The total ' urban population of New 
England is 6,311,976 or 77.3 per cent of 
the total population of New England. 
Of the 4,660,339 native white, 2,089,031 
are of native parentage and 2,571,308 are 
of foreign or mixed parentage; foreign- 
born whites number 1,564,769; Negro, 
81,443; other races, 5,425. 

SCHOOL ATTENDANCE FOR MASSA- 
CHUSETTS. 

Number of children 5 years old, 77,159, 
of whom 27,096, or 35.1 per cent, were at- 
tending school; 6 years old, 77,629, of 
whom 64,919, or 83.6 per cent, were at- 
tending school; 7-13 years, 546,100, of 
whom 536,798, or 98.3 per cent, were 
attending school; 14 and 15 }'ears, 151,181, 
of whom 140,387, or 92.9 per cent, were 
attending school ; 16 and 17 j^ears, 147,- 
627, of whom 87,779, or 59.5 per cent, 
were attending school; 18-20 years, 213,- 
791, of whom 53,503, or 25.0 per cent, 
were attending school. Number of per- 
sons attending school who were 21 years 
of age and over was 47,029. 

Total number of bovs 5 to 20 years of 
age, 606,159, of whom 459,253, or 75.8 
per cent, were attending school; total 
number of girls 5 to 20 years of age, 
607,328, of whom 451,229, or 74.3 per cent, 
were attending school; total children 5 
to 20 years old, 1,213,487, of whom 
910,482, or 75.0 per cent, were attending 
school. 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



23 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment hcatis, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Hospital Dep.\rtment. 

Upon January 3 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Rand & Byam, Incor- 
porated, for the purchase of bones, trim- 
mings, grease, suets and cods at Boston 
City Hospital. Bids, opened at the 
hospital Tuesday, December 26, were as 
follows: 

Trimmings, per Pound. — Rand & Byam, 
Incorporated, 1 cent; Hinckley Rendering 
Company, f cent; .lames F. Morse & Co., 
1 cent; N. Ward Company, j cent; John 
E. King, 1 cent. 

Bones, per Pound. — Rand & Byam, 
Incorporated, j cent; Hinckley Rendering 
Company, i cent; James F. Morse & Co., 
J cent; N. Ward Company, \ cent; 
John E. King, J cent. 

Crease, per Pound. — Rand & Byam, 
Incorporated, 1 J cents; Hinckley Render- 
ing Company, Ik cents; .lamo.s F. Morse 
& Co., IJ cents; N. Ward Company, 
1\ cents; John E. King, 1 J cent.s. 

Suets, per Pound. — Rand tV- Byam, 
Incorporated, 3 cents; Hinckley Render- 
ing Company, 3 cents; James F. Morse 
& Co., 2J cents; N. Ward Company, 
2J cents; John E. King, 21 cents. 

Cods, per Pound. — Rand iV: Byam, 
Incorporated, 3 cents; Hinckley Render- 
ing Company, 3 cents; James F. Morse 
& Co., 21 cents; N. Ward Company, 
2J cents; John E. King, 2J cents. 

Upon January 3 the Mayor approved a 
contract with the Columbian Insecticide 
Company for extermination of all vermin 
(excepting rats and mice) at Main 
Hospital, South Department, Ilaymarket 
Square and Elast Boston Relief i>!tations, 
Boston City Hospital. Bids, opened at 
the hospital Tuesday, December 2t), 
were as follows: 

Colonial Laboratories, Incorporated, 
S348.35 per month; Beacon Insecticide 
Company, $335 per month; Paramount 
Laboratories, $335 per month; Siinitary 
Exterminating Company, Incorporated, 
S325 per month; Columbian In.secticide 
Company, $325 per n-.onth. 



.ADDITIONAL PURCHASES UNDER 
CONTRACTS. 

Supply Dep.\ut.vient. 
Upon January 5 the Mayor approved 
the requests of the Supply Department 
for the purchase of additional supplies 
of various kinds in accordance with con- 
tracts already approved and in force, these 
supplies being purcha.sed under contracts 
to run until March 31, 1934. Communi- 
cations were received from Philip A. Chap- 
man of the Supply Department as follows: 

BosTo.x, .January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
\ fay or of Boston. 

De.ar Sir, — Under date of November 
14, 1933, the City of Bo.ston entered into 
a contract with Webster-Thomas Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of groceries 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mavor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purcha.se, and the contractor jigrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 



said groceries, as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1 933. This privilege is extended to March 
31, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you apjjrove 
the purchase "on behalf of "the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as arc stated in said contract, .such 
quantities of groceries referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1933, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapm.\n, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Bo.ston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of Novem- 
ber 22, 1933, the City of licston entered 
into a contract with (leorge D. Emerson 
Company relative to the purchase of 
groceries for delivery to the various city 
tlepartmenfs. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforasaid, such (luantities of said 
groceries as may not have been ordered 
u[) to and including December 31, 1933. 
This privilege is extended to March 31, 
1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-tjuoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of groceries referred to therein, 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1933, for the 
extended period i)ermitted thereby, to 
wit, to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — L'nder date of October 17, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with J. L. McCormick & Co. 
relative to the purchase of coffee for 
delivery to the Boston City Hospital. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
coffee as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1933. 
This privilege is extended to March 31, 
1934." 

I respectfully reque.st that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
cjuantities of coffee referred to therein, as 
may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1933, for the ex- 
tended period permitted thereby, to wit, 
to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of May 25, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Standard Coal Company 
relative to the purchase of anthracite and 
semibituminous coal for delivery, by 
truck or team, to the various city depart- 
ments. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The contractor agrees to furnish and 
deliver for the prices per net ton of 2,000 
pounds named in the following schedules, 
all of the anthracite and semibituminous 
coal retiuired at the various places 
of delivery between May 1, 1933, and 
April 30, 1934. DeHveries shall be made 
strictly in accordance with the specifica- 
tions appended herewith, as ordered by 
the Superintendent of Supplies. It is 
agreed that the City of Boston, with the 
ai)proval of the Mayor, may, beginning 
Januaiy 1, 1934, at its option, purchase, 
and the contractor agrees to deliver upon 
the .same terms and conditions as afore- 
said, such (luantities of .said coal as may 
not have been ordered uj) to and including 
December 31, 1933." 

I respectfully recjuest that you approve 
the i)urchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, i)ursuant to the above-cjuoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
(luantities of anthracite ami semibitu- 
minous coal referred to therein, as may 
not have been ordered uj) to and including 
December 31, 1933, for the })eriod per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to April 30, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of October 11, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Standard Oil Company 
of New York, Incorporated, relative to 
the purchase of gasolene and kerosene for 
delivery to the various city departments. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as afore.said, such quantities of said 
gasolene and kerosene as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1933. This privilege is extended 
to March 31, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the pui'chase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of gasolene and kerosene le- 
ferred to therein, as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31 , 
1933, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — Under date of September 
23, 19.33, the City of Boston entered into 
a contract with the Standard Oil Com- 
pany of New York, Incorporated, relative 



24 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



to the purchase of automobile motor oil 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. 

Included in the contract is the follow- 
ing clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor iigrces to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
automobile motor oil as may not' have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1933. This privilege is extended 
to March 31, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of automobile motor oil re- 
ferred to therein, as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1933, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1934. 
Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapm.\n', 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hox. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of August 9, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with Jacob Thurman relative to 
the purchase of bread and pastrj- flour for 
delivery to the various city departments. 

Included in the contract is the follow- 
ing clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
flour as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1933. This 
privilege is extended to August 1, 1934." 

I respectfullj- request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of flour referred to therein, as 
may not have been ordered up to and in- 
cluding December 31, 1933, for the ex- 
tended period permitted thereby, to wit, 
to August 1, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

B0.STON, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of October 11, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Standard Oil Company 
of New York, Incorporated, relative to 
the purchase of fuel oil for delivery, into 
the bunkers of the fire boat "Matthew 
J. Boyle" and the steamer "Stephen J. 
O'Meara " of the Institutions Department. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said fuel oil as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1933. 
This privilege is extended to September 
30, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you ap- 
prove the purchase on behalf of the City 
of Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 



option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of fuel oil referred to therein, 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1933, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to September 30, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dea r Sir, — Under date of Septem- 
ber 23, 1933, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with the Petroleum 
Heat and Power Company, relative to 
the purchase of heavy and medium fuel 
oil for delivery to the various city 
departments. 

Included in the contract is the fol- 
lowing clause : 

"The contractor agrees to furnish and 
deliver for the prices named in the fol- 
lowing schedules, all of the fuel oil 
required at the various places of deliverj' 
between October 1, 1933, and December 
31, 1933. Deliveries shall be made 
strictly in accordance with the appended 
specifications, as ordered by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies. It is agreed that 
the City of Boston, with the approval of 
the Mayor, may, beginning January 1, 
1934, at its option, purchase, and the 
contractor agrees to deliver upon the 
same terms and conditions as aforesaid, 
such quantities of said fuel oil as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1933. This privilege is 
extended to September 30, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of heavy and medium fuel 
oil referred to therein, as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1933, for the period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to September 30, 193,i; 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of October 17, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Pennsylvania Oil Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of light 
fuel oil for delivery to the various city 
departments. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The contractor agrees to furnish and 
deliver for the prices named in the 
following schedules, all of the fuel oil 
required at the various places of de- 
livery between October 1, 1933, and 
December 31, 1933. Deliveries shall 
be made strictly in accordance with 
the appended specifications, as ordered 
by the Superintendent of Supplies. It 
is agreed that the City of Boston, with 
the approval of the Mayor, may, begin- 
ning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said fuel oil as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1933. 
This privilege is extended to September 
30, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 



Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as are stated in said contract' 
such quantities of light fuel oil referred 
to therein, as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1933. 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to September 30, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of June 2, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the White Fuel Corporation 
relative to the purchase of semibituminous 
coal for delivery, by truck or team, to the 
Ferry Service. 

Included in the contract is the follow- 
ing clause: 

"The contractor agrees to furnish and 
deliver for the prices per net ton of 
2,000 pounds named in the following 
schedules, all of the anthracite and 
semibituminous coal required at the 
various places of delivery between May 
1, 1933, and April 30, 1934. Deliveries 
shall be made strictly in accordance with 
the specifications appended herewith, 
as ordered by the Superintendent of 
Supplies. It is agreed that the City of 
Boston, with the approval of the Mayor, 
may, beginning January 1, 1934, at its 
option, purchase, and the contractor 
agrees to deliver upon the same terms 
and conditions as aforesaid, such quanti- 
ties of said coal as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1933." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as are stated in said contract, 
such quantities of semibituminous coal 
referred to therein, as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1933, for the period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to April 30, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick \V. M.^nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of May 25, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Metropolitan Coal 
Company relative to the purchase of 
semibituminous coal for delivery into 
the bins of the fire and police boats. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The contractor agrees to furnish and 
deliver for the prices per net ton of 2,000 
pounds named in the following schedules, 
all of the anthracite and semibituminous 
coal required at the various places of 
dehvery between May 1, 1933, and April 
30, 1934. Dehveries shall be made 
strictly in accordance with the specifica- 
tions appended herewith, as ordered by 
the Superintendent of Supplies. It is 
agreed that the City of Boston, with the 
approval of the Mayor, may, beginning 
January 1, 1934, at its option, purchase, 
and the contractor agrees to deliver upon 
the same terms and conditions as afore- 
said, such quantities of said coal as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1933." 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



25 



I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of semibituininous coal re- 
ferred to therein, as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1933, for the period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to April 30, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapm.'VN, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. ^Man.sfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of June 5, 
1933, the City of Jioston entered into a 
contract with the North American Coal 
Corporation relative to the purchase of 
semibituminous coal for delivery, by 
vessel, to the Harbor Institutions. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The contractor agrees to furnish and 
deliver for the prices per gross ton of 
2,240 pounds named in the following 
schedules, all of the semibituminous coal 
required at the various places of delivery 
between May 1, 1933, and April 30, 1934. 
Deliveries shall be made strictly in accord- 
ance with the specifications appended 
herewith, as ordered by the Superintend- 
ent of Supplies. It is agreed that the 
City of lk)st()n, with the approval of the 
Mayor, may, beginning January 1, 1934, 
atits option, purchase, and the contractor 
agrees to deliver upon the same terms 
and conditions as aforesaid, such quanti- 
ties of said coal as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1933." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same temis and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of semibituminous coal re- 
ferred to therein, as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1933, for the jicriod permitted there- 
by, to wit, to April 30, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip .\. Chapm.\n, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of May 25, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Tremont Coal and Ice 
Company relative to the purchase of 
anthracite coal for delivery, by truck or 
team, to the various citj^ departments. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The contractor agrees to furnish and 
deliver for the prices per net ton of 2,000 
pounds named in the following schedules, 
all of the anthracite and semibituminous 
coal required at the various places of 
delivery between May 1, 1933, and April 
30, 1934. Deliveries shall be made 
strictly in accordance with the specifica- 
tions ajjpended herewith, as ordered by 
the Superintendent of Supplies. It is 
agreed that the City of Boston, with the 
approval of the Mayor, may, beginning 
January 1, 1934, at its option, purchase, 
and the contractor agrees to deliver upon 
the same terms and conditions as afore- 
said, such quantities of said coal as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1933." 



I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above -quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of anthracite coal referred to 
therein, as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1933, for 
the period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
April 30, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Bo.sTON, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — Under date of September 
18, 1933, the City of Boston entered into 
a contract with .\shton-Dc\ecr, Incorpo- 
rated, relative to the purchase of weed 
chains, etc., for delivery to the various 
city departments. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
j)urchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
weed chains, etc., as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1933. This privilege is extended to 
March 31, 19.34." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in sjiid contract, such 
quantities of weed chains, etc., referred 
to therein, as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1933, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of November 
20, 1933, the City of Boston entered into 
a contract with the H. J. Heinz Com- 
pany of Massachusetts relative to the 
purchase of groceries for delivery to the 
various city departments. 

Included in the contract is the follow- 
ing clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said groceries as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1933. This privilege is extended to 
March 31, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as are stated in said contract, 
such quantities of groceries referred to 
therein, as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1933, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of November 
14, 1933, the City of Bo-ston entered into 
a contract with Reid, Murdoch & Co. 
relative to the purchase of groceries for 
delivery to the various city departments. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause ; 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said groceries as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1933. This privilege is extended to 
March 31, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as are stated in said contract, 
such quantities of groceries referred to 
therein, as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1933, for 
the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of November 
22, 1933, the City of Boston entered into 
a contract with the Eldridge, Baker 
Company relative to the purchase of 
groceries for delivery to the various city 
departments. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees 
to deliver upon the same terms and 
conditions as aforesaid, such quantities 
of said groceries as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1933. This privilege is extended to 
March 31, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purcha.se on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above -quoted 
option, ufjon the same terms and con- 
ditions as are stated in said contract, 
such quantities of groceries referred to 
therein, as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1933, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of December 13, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Suffolk Grocery Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of groceries 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the ai)proval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 



26 



C ITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



groceries as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1933. 
This privilege is extended to March 31, 
1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, [)ursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as are stated in said contract, 
such quantities of groceries referred to 
therein, as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1933, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully j'ours, 

Philip A. Ch.\pm.\n, 

Superinlenilerd oj Supplies. 



CIRCULAR LETTER NO. 2. 

City of Boston, 
Mayor's Office, January 4, 1934. 
To All Department Heads, the Police 
Commissioner, the School Com- 
mittee, the Board of Commissioners 
oj School Buildings, the City Coun- 
cil, the Licensing Board, the Finance 
Commission, Sealer oj Weights and 
Measures and the Boston Port Au- 
thority. 
Gentlemen, — The financial condition 
of the city makes it imperative that the 
budget for the year 1934 be reduced to 
the lowest possible minimum consistent 
with adequate maintenance of proper 
municipal service and standards. 

In order to accomplish this result you 
are requested to re-examine the proposed 
budget sheets for 1934 and to advise 
me at the earliest possible moment of 
items which may be scaled down or 
eliminated so that there maj' be a sub- 
stantial reduction in the budget require- 
ments for 1934. Is it possible to make 
a 20 per cent reduction in the budgets 
for 1934? I welcome suggestions from 
all heads of departments which may re- 
sult in such a saving and I would be 
especially pleased if the department 
heads would indicate to me wherein such 
reductions could be effected. 

Yours very truly, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor. 



MASSACHUSETTS CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMINATIONS. 

The Massachusetts Civil Service Com- 
mission announces examinations for 
desirable positions open in the Boston 
and Metropolitan districts as follows: 

Junior Soci.\l Worker, Boston Public 
Welfare Department, February 10, 
1934. 

Last date for filing applications, Satui'- 
day, January 27, 1934, at 12 m. 

Salary: The entrance salary is SI, 400 
a year; the maximum salary is Sl,600 a 
year. 

Duties : Under immediate supervision, 
to investigate cases of persons who apply 
for relief under the several relief statutes 
and to perform social service case work 
in connection with their care and treat- 
ment. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must be not less than twenty-one nor 
over fifty years of age at the time of 
filing application. A certificate of date 
of birth must be filed with the applica- 
tion UNLESS one has been filed with 
a previous application. Applicants must 



have education equivalent to graduation 
from a standard four-year high school 
and either one year's experience in social 
welfare work or one year's training in a 
school of social work. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 5; 
personality and fitness, as determined 
by an oral interview, 2; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements : Applicants 
must obtain at least 70 per cent in 
each subject in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

Note: An examination for Senior 
Social Worker in Boston will be held 
on this same date. Candidates for both 
positions should file a separate applica- 
tion for each position. 

Senior Social Worker, Boston Public 
Welfare Department, February 10, 
1934. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 27, 1934 at 12 m. 

Salary: The entrance salary is $1,600 
a year; the maximum salary is S2,300 a 
year. 

Duties : Under immediate supervision, 
to investigate cases of persons who apply 
for relief under the several relief statutes 
and to perform social service case work 
in connection with their care and treat- 
ment. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must be not less than twenty-one nor 
over fifty years of age at the time of 
filing application. A certificate of date 
of birth must be filed with the applica- 
tion UNLESS one has been filed with 
a previous application. Applicants must 
have education equivalent to graduation 
from a college or university and either 
two years' experience in social welfare 
work or two years' training in a school of 
social work. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 5; 
personality and fitness, as determined 
by an oral interview, 2; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements : Applicants 
must obtain at least 70 per cent in 
each subject in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

Note: An examination for Junior 
Social Worker in Boston will be held 
on this same date. Candidates for both 
positions should file a separate applica- 
tion for each position. 



ASSESSMENT OF BETTERMENTS 

BY BOARD OF STREET COM= 
MISSIONERS. 

Glenmoxt Road, Brighton. 

Lot. Amount. 

1. John Battles $470 75 

2. Annie B. Corliss 9160 

3. Nora A. Keneally 81 87 

4. Elizabeth B. Ranagan 176 67 

5. Helen M. Martin 199 88 

6. Mary E. Sullivan 19137 

7. John T. O'Neil, Mary F. O'Neil. . . 189 68 

8. Bridget T. Forrest, Margaret For- 

rest 173 97 

9. Susie Cavagnaro 78 12 

10. Mary A. Sullivan 74 22 

11. Percy R. Candage, mortgagee in 

possession 273 80 

12. William J. CoKord, Tamar R. Col- 

ford 145 60 

13. Ellen V. Hussey 93 82 

14. Boston Ecclesiastical Seminary 708 00 



Lot. 

15. 

16. 

17. 

18. 

19. 
20. 



Lot. 
1. 
2. 
3. 

4. 

5. 
6. 
7. 



10. 

11. 
12. 
13. 

14. 

15. 
16. 



Lot. 
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 



10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 



Lot. 
1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
9. 

10. 
II. 
12. 
13. 
14. 

15. 
16. 



Lot. 
1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 



9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 

17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 



.\mount 

Person or persons unknown $26 80 

Meredith W. Palmer 13 85 

Horace W. Baxter 535 00 

City of Boston (Thomas A. Edison 

.School) 1..351 21 

Horace W. Baxter 774 70 

Horace W. Baxter 806 25 

Total $6.457 16 

Elmdale Street, Dorchester. 

Amount 

Grace L. Hayward $50 00 

John B. Lynch 224 55 

Frederick T. and Katherine C. 

Linnehan 210 25 

Delia C. Donovan ux. M. F 210 25 

Mary E. Franzosa 210 25 

Sarah J. Parks 237 10 

Winifred i5. Holway 204 50 

Erwin B. and Adelia M. Merritt. ... 200 00 

Robert J. Kincade 225 00 

Timothy H. and Margaret A. Har- 
rington 225 OO 

Susan A. Coe, Harriet A. Winn 250 00 

Anna Nobile, Palma Calapa 141 00 

Peter F. Lament, Elizabeth W. 

Lamont 560 00 

Dennis D. Callahan, Ellen E. Calla- 
han 419 92 

Mary A. Carroll 175 50 

Flora M. Holbrook, Grace E. Hol- 

brook 175 50 

Total $3,718 82 

Groom Street, Dorchester. 

Amount 

Sabina Meehan $94 53 

John J. Meehan, Mary M. Meehan, 144 00 

Sabina Meehan 152 00 

Sabina Morrissey 152 00 

Jacob Breiva, Annie Breiva 152 00 

Thomas Meehan. Mary Meehan. . . 152 00 
Laurence J. \'arnerin and Josephine 

L. Varnerin 93 21 

Martha M., ux. Patrick J. Dwyer. . 77 10 

Delia G. Hart 140 00 

John J. and Julia A. Kelley 164 15 

Martin J. McDonough 167 40 

Anthony J. Crisafi 163 10 

Mary A. McGovern 97 95 

Total $1,749 44 

Robey Street, Dorchester. 

Amount. 

William F. Toomey $113 10 

John F. Ahern, Mary E. .\hern ... 98 00 

Dorchester Co-operative Bank. ... 114 70 

John McDavitt, Sarah McDavitt, 114 70 

Mayr J. Doherty 114 70 

James Grant 114 70 

Rose Rosenbloom 87 78 

Master Bakers Supply, Incor- 
porated 169 00 

Agnes Roche 107 00 

Esther F. Flexman Ill 20 

Esther F. Flexman Ill 60 

Ellen Cannon 11200 

Enrico Mazzuc c helli , Rosa 

Mazzucchelli 112 35 

Blanche Stanulewich 109 60 

Blanche Stanulewich 68 76 

Total $1,659 19 



Pompeii Street, Roxbury. 

Amount. 
John C. Cobb and William Minot 

Trustees of City Land Company, $875 00 

Annie Andoiino 75 00 

Salvatore Andoiino 75 00 

Luiei Tomasini 75 00 

Luigi Tomasini 75 00 

Salvatore and Marie Tardanico.. . . 75 00 
John C. Cobb and William Minot, 

Trustees of City Land Company, 135 00 
John C. Cobb and William Minot, 

Trustees of City Land Company, 225 87 

Francesco Lombardi 73 80 

.\nna .\ndolino 75 40 

Salvatore Tardanico 75 00 

Salvatore Tardanico 75 05 

Domenico Ferret ti, Celia Ferretti. . 94 85 
Domenico Ferretti, CeliaFerretti. . 86 90 
Francesco Rindone, Rosa Rindone, 75 25 
Giuseppe Rindone, Assuntina Rin- 
done 75 20 

Michelina Spataro 75 35 

Michelina Spataro 74 30 

John Bisazza, Angelina Bisazza... 76 75 

Epifania A. Andoiino 61 75 

Epifania .\. Andoiino „ . . 67 75 

Mary E. Kander 42 78 

Total $2,641 00 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



27 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 4 TO JANUARY 10. 

Janoary 4. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Mary Younis el nl Ill Tyler street 

\. Maloof IS Washington Heiehts ave. 

Charles F. Hall 95-101 Haverhill street 



.3 

20 

3 

Commonwealth Ice and Cold 212 Northern avenue 6 

Storage Company. 

Emanuel Nathan Ilfi4 Columbus avenue 9 

C. Prescott 19 Mt. Hood road 21 

Regina Knightly 115 H street 6 

Henry S. Kowe et al 161 Devonshire street 3 



Special storage $85 

Alterations, dwelling 700 

Alterations, manufacturing 3,000 

and stores. 

Erect marquee 700 

Sign 250 

.\lterations, tenements 60 

Take-down, dwelling 1,600 

-■Vlterations, office 150 



January 5. 



City of Boston 

H. B. Wyand 

Jennie Kramer 

Annie Brown 

Martin McHugh 

M. F. Martinex 

M. F. Martinex 

M. F. Martinex 

John J. Flynn 

Boston Consolidatefl Gas Co., 
Boston Lying In Hospital. . . 



145-155 London street 1 

50 Cerdan avenue 20 

16 Bunker Hill street 2 

36 Allston street 2 

1 19 W. Second street 6 

42 and 44 Lincoln street. ... 3 

40 Lincoln street 3 

36 and 3.S Lincoln street 3 

19 Parkton road 10 

100 .\rlington street 5 

221 Long wood avenue 4 



First-class garage and office. . . $25,000 

Third-class dwelling 5.000 

Take-down, dwelling 1.500 

Take down, dwelling 1,000 

Take-down, storage 900 

.^.Iterations, store and storage, 175 

.\lteration8, store and storage, 175 

Alterations, store and storage, 175 

First-class garage 500 

-•Mterations, offices 1,000 

-Alterations, hospital 2,000 



January 


f). 


None. 


January 


K. 



Mercantile Wharf Corpora- 36 Mercantile street, 
tion. 

George D. Shaw 6 Poplar place 

James Poulos 37 Rexford street. . . . 

W. M. Tracy 92 G street 

Mabel P. Chad wick 3 Decatur street 

P. Lyons 30 Torrey street 

Oliver Realty Company 53 Norman street 



Oliver Realty Company 140 Merrimac street . 

Oliver Realty Company 142 Merrimac street. 



E. C. Davis 11 Kendall street 

Adeline Mann 4.3 Oakland street 

Annie Frondelip 5 Liverpool avenue 

Thomas J. Walsh Heirs 9 Cambridge street 

Harvard College 254-256 Washington street.. 



3 Alterations, pro<lucc $325 

3 Alterations, tenements 800 

18 Alterations, dwelling 100 

7 .■Vlterations, dwelling 150 

2 Take-down, stable 2,050 

17 Alterations, duelling 75 

3 Take-iown, store and tene- 300 

ments. 

3 Take-down, store and tene- 300 

ments. 

3 Take-down, store and tene- 300 

ments. 

9 Take-down, dwelling 1,600 

22 Take-down, dwelling 1,000 

1 Take-down, dwelling 700 

3 -Alterations, hotel and store. . 1,000 

3 -Alterations, stores and offices. 2,000 



January 9. 



Angelo Pastore 406 Frankfort street. . . . 

R. Rosmak 34 Lome street 

City of Boston 149 (Juincy street 

Ye Brass Rail, Incorporated, 9-11 Boylston street. . . . 
Quincy .Market Cold Storage 48 Battery street 

and Warehouse Company. 
Quincy Market Cold Storage 50 Battery street 

and Warehouse Company. 

Israel Young 1051 Washington street . 

Butler Real Estate Trust 160-162 Canal street 

Louis Singer 320 Blue Hill avenue. . . , 

E. Sohier Welch, trustee. ... 59 Lincoln street 

Joseph Walker 112 Boylston street 

A. P. Levin 31 Howard street 

Lillian Clark 127 Charles street 

C. L. Richardson 191 Summer street 

E. H. Harding, trustee 119 Hanover street 



1 


Move dwelling 


$.S00 


14 


Alterations, dwellmg 


125 


13 


Alterations, school 


150 


3 


Alterations, hotel and stores. 


1,500 


3 


Take-down, stores and tene- 
ments. 


400 


3 


Take-down, stores and tene- 
ments. 


300 


3 


Alterations, factory 


150 


3 


Alterations, stores and offices. 


200 


12 


Alterations, stores and tene- 
ments. 


250 


3 


-Alterations, stores and offices. 


125 


5 


-Alterations, stores and offices. 


3,000 


3 


Alterations, stores and lodging, 


2.000 


5 


Alterations, dwelling 


3,200 


3 


-AJterations, stores and offices. 


350 


3 


Alterations, manufacturing.. . 


4,000 



January 10. 



Mary Waldman 31 and 33 Inten-ale street . 



Luigi Cataldo . . 

-A. Roily 

Joseph Gerberg. 
John DeMatteo. 



John Gaston ei al., trustees. 

Central Wharf Corporation. 

Frank .Mason 

Sarah .A. Kennedy 

Dr. G. -M. Balboni 



52 Byron street 

654 Washington street 

20 Phillips street 

763 -American Legion High- 
way. 
68 Harrison avenue 



Rear 244 .Atlantic avenue. . 

108 Fellows street 

25 Pratt street 

152 Leverett street 



I,eo Maske et al 98 Marginal street. . 

Boston & .Albany Railroad. . 1.32 Market street. . 

Jeremiah Johnson 51 Munroe street. . . 

Post Office Sriuare Building, 2-12 Federal street . 

Eliot Savings Bank 19 Violante street . . 

C. H. Graves & Sons 35 Hawkins street . . 



14 Alterations, stores and dwell- $300 
ing. 

1 -Alterations, dwelling 1,000 

17 Alterations, dwelling 60 

5 Alterations, tenements 50 

18 Second-class dwelling 5,000 

3 Alterations, light manufac- 3,000 

turing. 

3 Alterations, freight stalls. . . . 1,000 

8 Take-down, storage 900 

21 Alterations, dwelling 280 

3 Alterations, store and dwell- 100 

ing. 

1 Take-down, dwelling 500 

22 Talke-down. mercantile 50 

12 -Alterations, dwelling .300 

3 Sign 155 

18 Alterations, dwelling 300 

3 Alterations, distillery 1,900 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 2. 

I. Acting District Chief. 

Gapt. James E. Sheehan of Rescue 

Company 3 has been designated as acting 

district chief of District 4, to take effect as 

of December 18, 1933. 

II. Executive Order. 
The following executive order from 
his Honor Mayor Frederick W. Mansfield, 
dated January 2, 1934, is hereby published 
for the information of the department: 

By virtue of the authority granted to 
me by the provisions of chapter one 
hundred and twenty-one of the Acts of 
the year nineteen hundred and thirty- 
three, I, as Mayor of the City of Boston, 
do hereby order and direct that the re- 
ductions in the salary of every office and 
position, the salary of which is paid from 
the treasury of the City of Boston, in 
whole or in part, made pursuant to the 
provisions of section three of chapter one 
hundred and twenty-one of the Acts of 
the year nineteen hundred and thirty- 
three, be, and hereby are, continued in 
effect for the calendar year nineteen 
hundred and thirty-four. 

By order of 

Frederick W. Mansfleld, 
Maijor. 

III. New Box Circuit. 

A new box circuit, No. 87, has just 
been established. The following (changes 
will be made in the fire alarm circuits as a 
result: 

Circuit No. 87. 

2254 out of 52 circuit; 2337 out of 8 
circuit; 2351 out of 8 circuit; 12-2352 out 
of 8 circuit; 12-2429 out of (56 circuit; 
246 out of 66 circuit; 2488 out of 42 cir- 
cuit; 2491 out of 42 circuit; 2492 out of 
42 circuit; 2515 out of 72 circuit; 2519 
out of 65 circuit; 2562 out of 13 circuit; 
2567 out of 13 circuit; 262 out of 85 
circuit; 2623 out of 85 circuit; 2625 out of 
85 circuit; 2732 out of 75 circuit; 2734 
out of 71 circuit; 2742 out of 71 circuit; 

Other Changes. 
2476 on 65 circuit out of 85; 2615 on 85 
circuit out of 65; 2617 on 85 circuit out 
of 65; 2712 on 85 circuit out of 65; 2721 
on 65 circuit out of 85. 

IV. Reporting of Chief Officers. 

The attention of men assigned to 
house patrol is called to the rule that 
they must immediately report to Fire 
Alarm when chief officers arrive at quarters 
and when they leave. This rule must be 
strictly followed. 

V. Winding of Fire Al.\rm Registers. 
The attention of members of the de- 
partment is called to the necessity of 
winding fire alarm registers. Members 
should be careful in the winding of these 
registers to see that they are not wound 
too tight and broken. A little care will 
save considerable expense. 

VI. Commendations. 

The commissioner is pleased to publish 
the following letter which he has received 
from Mr. Albert Cocchi, 1 Webster 
place, East Boston, expressing appre- 
ciation of the service rendered by mem- 
bers of this department on December 31, 
1933: 

January 3, 1934. 
Fire Commissioner McSmteeney. 

Dear Sir, — In response to a still alarm 
on December 31, between 12 a. m. and 



28 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



1 p. m. at 1 Webster place, East Boston, 
I wish to praise the members of Engine 
40 and Ladder 2 for the heroic work of 
rescuing my six months' old boy, who was 
overcome by the fumes from an oil i)urncr. 
The (]uick work by these men with a 
pulmotor saved my child from death. I 
am very grateful to these members of the 
department of which you are commis- 
sioner for performing such heroic work. 
I remain, 

Yours truly, 

Albert Cocchi. 

The commissioner is pleased to publish 
the following letter which he has received 
from William J. Finn, in which he ex- 
presses his appreciation of the services 
rendered by members of this department 
during a fire at 36 Maple street, Hyde 
Park, on Tuesday, December 26, 1933: 

Dear Mr. Commissioner, — Yesterday, 
during the storm, my house caught fire 
and I wanted to write you a letter to tell 
you of the wonderful work done by Capt. 
Fred Adams and his men. Captain 
Adams came into the house when it was 
full of smoke, directed his men where to 
tear out the wall and cautioned them to 
be careful not to unduly wet up the 
house. They stopped the fire and we 
were able to move back to the house 
last night. We have a family of eleven 
children and you can realize how much 
we appreciate the care taken by the 
captain and his men. The writer felt 
that you would like to know that the men 
under your direction are giving the 
citizens of the City of Boston real service. 

Wishing you a very happy New Year, 
I remain. 

Respectfully yours, 

William J. Finn. 

The commissioner is also pleased to 
publish the following letter which he has 
received from Mr. C. B. Jones of the 
Standard Oil Company of New York, 
expressing his appreciation of the services 
rendered by the members of Ladder 
Company 21 when the captain of Standard 
Oil Barge No. 8 was overcome and 
rendered unconscious by coal gas fumes 
on December 16, 1933: 

December 28, 1933. 
Mr. Eugene M. McSweenet, 
Fire Commissioner. 

Dear Sir, — May I take this oppor- 
tunity to comrnend most highly the 
Boston Fire Department for the splendid 
work they rendered in saving the life of 
Thomas Neilson, captain of Barge 8. 
Without your efficient aid, he most 
surely would have died. I also want to 
take this opportunity to particularly 
commend the members of Ladder No. 21 
in command of Captain Crowley working 
under the direction of District Chief 
William F. Donovan and to extend our 
appreciation to Ladderman Christopher 
Dahnke whom we understand was the 
particular fireman who handled the 
inhalator for six hours and thirteen 
minutes. 

Mr. John W. Herbert, our superin- 
tendent at East Boston, has told us the 
story of how heroically your men did their 
duty and stood by in this emergency. 

Although Captain Neilson is reallj' an 
employee of the Standard Vacuum Trans- 
portation Company, he is nevertheless a 
member of our official family and I am 
sure you will accept my personal thanks 
and appreciation for a splendid service 
you so efficiently rendered. 

Very truly yours, 

C. B. Jones. 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 4, TO JANUARY 10. 





Janu.\ry 


4. 






Plumbkr. 


Location. 


Wan 


Nature. 


Eetimatcl 
Cost. 


Thomas A. Paradis 


27 Eliot street 


. 5 
. 13 
. 20 
. 20 
4 
G 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


. . . $150 


Louis H. .Jacobs 


159-165 Quiney street 

64 Murray Hill road 

7.'35 South street 


375 


George S. Trethewey 


New hxtures 


1,115 


Walter G. MilliKan . 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


100 




Ill Chandler street 

2'JO West Broadway 


100 


J. F. MacDonald 


New fixtures 


250 










J.\NCARY 


5. 








320 Norfolk avenue 

119A Green street 

48 School street 


. 7 
. 11 
. 11 
. 10 
. 14 




.... S165 


John L. Mellyn 

Samuel Lit man 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 

New fixtures 

New fi.xturea 


1,000 

400 


Leo Charles Le\'y 

Asa W. Walls 


904 Huntington avenue. . . 
30 Gleason street 


100 

100 




Janu.vry 


6. 






None. 




January 


8. 






M. Riceman 


19 Swallow street 

23 Swallow street 


. 6 
6 
3 
3 

2 
.' 2 


New fixtures 


$350 




New fixtures 


350 




56 Dwight street 


100 


Harry Abrams 

Thomas L. Delaney 

Domenic Naimo 


147 Causeway street 

154 Bunker Hill street ... 
543 Rutherford avenue. . . . 


New fi.xtures 

New fixtures 

New fixtures 


150 

1.50 

60 




January 


9. 






A. Yorks 


15 Perkins street 

268 Friend street 

9 Cambridge street 

218.\ Hanover street 

53 South Market street. . . 
167 Sumner street 


. 2 
3 

. 3 

. 3 
3 

. 3 


New fixtures 


$75 


Herman E. Kraus Company. 
Matto & Rosen 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 

New fi.xture3 


200 

400 




25 


J Harry Kurhan . . 


New fi.xtures 

New fixtures 


250 


J Harry Kurhan 


100 










Janu.^ry 


10. 






Thomas F. Hurley 


553 La Grange street 

7 Hazelmere road 

157 Harvard street 


. 20 
. 20 
. 14 
. 18 
. 3 
. 3 
1 
4 


New fixtures 


$40 


John A. Martensen 


New fixtures 


400 


L. W. Polit 


New fixtures 


250 


M. F. Kargir 


37 Rerford street 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 

New fixtures 


100 


Herman Finkelstein 

W. S. Emerson Company. . 


226 Cambridge street. . . . 

352 Hanover street 

52 White street 


50 

165 


T. T. Connolly 

M. -I. Grimes 


New fixtures 


. . . 800 


52A Gainsborough street . 


New fixtures 


135 









The commissioner has received a letter 
from Chief Henry J. Harrigan of the 
Dedham Fire Department, in which he 
expresses his thanks and appreciation to 
Hoseman Frederick V. Rasch of Engine 
Company 45 and Hoseman David Burke 
of Engine Company 49 for the assistance 
rendered by them at a fire in Dedham on 
December 22, 1933. Both men were off 
duty at the time. 

Ladderman Joseph P. Shea of Ladder 
Company 5 is hereby commended for 
responding to and working at fire. Box 
7223, December 19, 1933, while off duty. 

Hoseman George A. Cusack of Engine 
Company 41 is hereby commended for 
responding to and working at a fire. Box 
5266, December 23, 1933, while off duty. 

Hosemen Frank A. Fitzgerald, Walter 
E. Paris and John E. J. Broughton of 
Engine Company 7 are hereby commended 
for responding to and working at a fire, 
still alarm, 191 Summer street, December 
28, 1933, while off duty. 

Man on Probation Henry F. McDonald 
of Ladder Company 31 is hereby com- 
mended for responding to and working at 
fire, Box 6168, December 29, 1933, while 
off duty. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Eugene 
M. McSweeney. 

Henry A. Fox, 
Chief of Department. 



General Order Xo. 4- 
I. Commendation. 

The Fire Commissioner wishes to com- 
mend the officers and members of the 
department who responded to the fire at 
Fenway Park, Box 2344, five alarms, at 
1.10 p. m., Friday, January 5, 1934. 

It is quite evident that the fire had 
developed considerable headway before 
the alarm was given as it had extended 
to adjoining buildings before the arrival 
of the apparatus, and the efficient and 
capable operation of the department 
forces undoubtedly prevented a serious 
conflagration. 

The efficient manner in which the 
members performed their services reflects 
great credit upon the department and the 
commissioner feels that individual credit 
is due to every member who assisted in 
the work at this fire. 

The commissioner also considers it 
worthy of note that the response of the 
apparatus was very prompt under most 
adverse weather conditions and was ac- 
complished without a single breakdown 
or accident of any kind. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edward 
F. SIcLaughlin. 

Henry A. Fox, 
Chief of Department. 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



29 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 371. 
PatTolman Edward F. McFeeley of 
Division 4 is commended in General Orders 
and granted three days' additional vaca- 
tion for meritorious police duty performed 
on November 6, 1933, while off duty. 

Patrolman McFeeley, while on his way 
to the station to report for last half duty 
in civilian clothes, heard three or four 
shots and saw three men running on 
Dover street. Patrolman McFeeley left 
his automobile, gave chase, and appre- 
hended one of the men. Upon searching 
the prisoner a 32-caliber, long-barrel, 
blue-steel revolver was found. 

The commissioner is pleased to recog- 
nize the alertness and interest shown in 
department work by Patrolman McFeeley, 
while ofT duty, in performing this splendid 
police duty. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultm.\n, 

Comwissiorter. 



General Order .Vo. 372. 
Procedure for Cruising C.\rs. 
Certain cruising cars in this depart- 
ment will be equipped with radio receiving 
sets this p. m. Intil further orders, the 
procedure will be to keep the sets adjusted 
to receive State Police broadcasting. 
All orders received by the cars via the 
radio will be obeyed as though coming 
from the Superintendent of Police. All 
cars equipped with radio will carrj- two 
men, the driver and the observer. The 
observer shall make a complete log of 
all messages sent out by the State Police 
Broadcasting System. Until printed 
forms are provided, the log shall consist 
of a notel)Ook in which the obser\'er shall 
enter the place where his car is located 
when he receives the message, the time 
of the receipt of the message, and the 
message itself. If the messiige received 
applies to the territory in which the car 
receiving the message is operating, the 
observer shall promptly notify the head- 
quarters of his division or unit, and on 
completion of duty in connection with 
the order, shall include a complete report 
of the action taken. On completion of 
tour duty, the log shall be turned in to 
the officer in command of the division 
or unit to which the car is attached, who 
shall forward the same to the superin- 
tendent with the morning report. 

The receiving sets on the cars shall be 
open at all times to receive messages, but 
the regular broadcasts of the State Police 
occur at the following times: 

8 a. m. until approximately 8.30 a. m.; 
11 a. m. until approximately 12 noon; 
1.15 p. m. until approximately 2.15 p. m.; 
7.15 p. m. until approximately 8.15 p. m.; 
10.30 p.m. until approximately 11.30 p. m. 

Procedure for He.\dqu.\rters. 
During the period that cars of this 
department are receiving information by 
radio from the State Police, the officer in 
charge of headquarters on receipt of in- 
formation of the commission of serious 
crimes in this city shall prepare a message 
to be broadcast at once and send it on 
the State Teletype, marked "to be broad- 
cast by State Police." 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 373. 

A trial board consisting of Captains 
Campbell, McGrath and Daley, having 
heard by reference a complaint made by 
Perley S. Skillings, captain. Division 16, 
against Henry J. Demers, patrolman. 
Division 16, for alleged violation of the 
Rules and Regulations of the Police 
Department, to wit: 

Charge: Conduct unbecoming an officer. 

Specification: In that on the 22d day 
of December, 1933, the said Patrolman 
Henry J. Demers, while in uniform, and on 
a paying detail at the Copley-Plaza Hotel, 
was under the influence of intoxicating 
liquor to such an extent that he was 
unal)le to perform police duty if called 
upon so to do, — 

has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation: 

"The Board having heard and care- 
fully considered all the evidence as pre- 
sented accepts the plea of guilty made by 
the said Patrolman Henry J. Demers. 
The Board has considered the fact that 
this is the second time that the said 
Patrolman Henrj' J. Demers has been 
before a trial board, and the fact that on 
December 12, 1933, in General Order No. 
350, he was ordered to perform 210 hours 
of punishment duty, of which up to date 
he has performed only 28 hours. 

"However, in view of the strong appeal 
made by his captain not to inflict the 
extreme punishment of dismissal, and the 
fact that the patrolman has submitted a 
written promise that in the future he will 
refrain from the use of intoxicating 
liquor, the Board respectfully recommends 
that the s»id Patrolman Henry J. Demers 
be suspended from duty for a period of 
sixty days, effective as of December 29, 
1933, at 5.45 o'clock p. m." 

The commi.ssioncr accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trial 
Board and hereby orders that the said 
Patrolman Henry J. Demers be suspended 
from duty for sixty days, effective as of 
December 29, 1933, at 5.45 o'clock p. m. 

Civil Service Rule 23, section 3, requires 
approval of the Civil Service Commission 
before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 
"Section 3. With the consent of the 
commissioner upon good cause shown, an 
appointing officer may reinstate in the 
same position or in a position in the same 
class and grade any person who has been 
separated from the service; provided, 
however, that the commissioner shall not 
allow reinstatement of a person discharged 
for cause." 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 374. 
The following letter is published for the 
information of the department: 

Mayor's Office, January 2, 1934. 
Executive Order. 
By virtue of the authority granted to 
me by the provisions of chapter one 
hundred and twenty-one of the Acts of 
the year nineteen hundred and thirtj^-three, 
I, as Mayor of the City of Boston, do 
hereby order and direct that the reduc- 
tions in the salary of every office and 
position, the salarj' of which is paid from 
the treasury of the City of Boston in 
whole or in part, made pursuant to the 
provisions of section three of chapter one 
hundred and twenty-one of the Acts of 
the j'ear nineteen hundred and thirty- 
three, be and hereby are continued in 



effect for the calendar year . nineteen 
hundred and thirty-four. 

By order of 

Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Cominissioner. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That the Traffic Regulations 
are amended as follows, effective Janu- 
ary 15, 1934: 

Section 40, Part 1 , is amended by adding 
the following: 
Porsyth Road. 

From Forsyth way to Fenway. 
Section 50 is amended bv striking out 
the following: 

Winthrop Street, Charlestown. 

Common street to Warren street. 
Section 50 is amended by adding the 
following: 

Lexington Street, Charlestown. 
Bunker Hill street to Monument 
square. 
Monument Square (east side), Charles- 
town. 
Tremont street to Winthrop street. 
Winthrop Street, Charlestown. 

Monument square to Warren street. 

Voted, Under authority granted the 
chairman on December 4, 1930, and as 
urgently required by considerations of 
public safety and convenience, during 
the period of sewerage con.struction, esti- 
mated to be sixty (60) days, vehicles are 
excluded from Poplar street. West Rox- 
bury district, between Canterbury street 
and Metropolitan avenue, effective Janu- 
ary 5, 1934. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Saturday, December 30, 1933. 
Final meetine of the City Council of 1933 
in the Council Chamber, City Hall, at 11 a. m.. 
President McGRATH in the chair. Absent, 
Coun. Cox, Fitzgerald, Gallagher, Hein, Mur- 
ray, Norton. 



PARKMAN FUND INCOME. 
The following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor. December 30, 1933. 
To the City CouncU. 

Gentlemen, — I am in receipt of the attached 
communication from the Board of Park Com- 
missioners requesting the transfer of the sum 
of $2,225.36 from the income of the George 
F. Parkman Fund to the maintenance and 
improvement of the Common and parks in 
existence on January 12. 1887. 

I submit herewith an appropriation order 
and respectfully recommend its immediate 
passage by your honorable body. 
Kespectfully, 
Jambs M. Cublev, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Park Department, December 30, 1933. 
Hon. James M. Curley, 

Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir. — By vote of the Board of Park 
Commissioners you are respectfully asked to 
request the City CouncU to transfer from 
the income of the George F. Parkman Fund 
the sum of $2,225.36 which is the final bal- 
ance of the year 1933 and is now available 
to be expended under the direction of the 
Board of Park Commissioners as follows : 
Common and Parks in existence on January 

12, 1887, Maintenance and Improvement 

of $2,225.36. 

When the budget estimates were made up 
for the year 1933, a sum equal to the total 
yearly income of the George F. Parkman Fund 
was deducted from Item A-1, Permanent Em- 
ployees, with the understanding that this 
deduction was to be replaced by the total 
yearly income of said Parkman Fund for 



30 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



1933, to be transferred as it accrued from time 
to time durinir the year to the regular ap- 
propriation of the Park Department. 
Respectfully yours, 
Daniel J. Byrne, Secretary. 

Ordered, That the sum of $2,225.36 be, and 
hereby is, appropriated from the income of 
the George F. Parkman Fund, to be expended 
under the direction of the Park Commissioners, 
for the maintenance and improvement of the 
Common and parks in existence on January 
12, 18S7, as foUows: 

Common and Parks in existence on January 
12, 1887, maintenance and improvement of, 
$2,225.36. 

The order was passed, yeas 16, nays 0. 



PETITION FOR APPEARANCE OF 
MINOR. 

Petition of Charles L. Wagner for a per- 
mit for a child under fifteen years of age 
to appear at Symphony Hall, January 31, 1934. 

The permit was granted on the usual con- 
ditions. 



APPROVAL OF WELFARE APPROPRIA- 
TION. 

Notice was received from Finance Board 
of State of approval of emergency appropria- 
tion of $300,000 for Public Welfare purposes, 
and borrowins of said sum, loan to run for 
a period not to exceed five years as certified 
by Mayor, City Treasurer and City Auditor 
under date of December 29, 1933. 

Placed on file. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS. 

Coun. RUBY, for the Committee on Claims, 
submitted the following : 

December 30, 1933. 

The Committee on Claims respectfully sub- 
mits the following report showing the dispo- 
sition of claims during the municipal year 
1933: 

Claims pending January 1, 1933 2,071 

Claims received during 1933 747 

Total 2.818 

Claims approved during 1933 158 

Claims disapproved during 1933 518 

Total 676 

Amount paid out on approved 

claims $11,959 24 

Amount of disapproved claims $15,643 00 

Claims pending December 30, 1933, 2,142 

For the Committee, 

Israel Ruby, Chairman. 
Report accepted, and ordered printed. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PRISONS. 

Coun. BARKER, for the Committee on Pris- 
ons, submitted the following report : 

December 30, 1933. 

In accordance with the provisions of chap- 
ter 126 of the General Laws, the Committee 
on Inspection of Prisons of the City Council 
submits herewith its annual report. 

Suffolk County Jail. 

The usual semiannual inspections of the 
Suffolk County Jail were made. 

Your committee finds that conditions at 
this institution continue along the same lines 
of cleanliness and order that have character- 
ized it for the past several years. 

A new and more up-to-date system of keep- 
ing stock and purchase records has been in- 
stalled, replacing the old system, which had 
been in use for many years. 

In the matter of purchasing supplies for 
the jail, the officials of that institution are 
cooperating with the City of Boston Supply 
Department in an effort to effect substantial 
savings to the city. 

The need of a new and permanent entrance 
to the jail from North Grove street has be- 
come acute as the condition of the rear wall 
and temporary gate is such as to be ex- 
tremely dangerous. 

House of Correction. 

The customary number of visits were made 
by your committee to the House of Correction 
during the year, and conditions at this in- 
stitution were found very satisfactory. 
For the Committee, 
William H. Barker, Chairman. 
Report accepted and ordered printed. 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS BEFORE COM- 
MITTEES. 
Coun. DOWD offered the following: 
Ordered, That all matters of an unfinished 

nature pending before the committees of the 

City Council be referred to the City Council 

of 1934. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



EMPLOYMENT FOR NURSES. 

Coun. KELLY offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to take the necessary steps to provide 
employment for 500 nurses under the Civil 
Works Assistance. 

Coun. KELLY — ^Mr. President, if I may be 
allowed, I would like to make a motion that 
the Mayor be requested to do what he can 
to place 500 nurses at work, through request 
to the C. W. A. authorities in connection 
with the City Hospital program. A lot of 
nurses are out of work, this money is a 
gift, and I feel for one that this would not 
only be of benefit to unemployed nurses, hav- 
ing more nurses placed at work in the City 
Hospital, but would also be a benefit to the 
sick of our city. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PUBLIC 
LANDS. 

Coun. KELLY, for the Committee on Pub- 
lic Lands, submitted the following : 

1. Report on message of Mayor (referred 
December 18) relating to leasing of old Po- 
lice Station 4, La Grange street, recommend- 
ing passage of accompanying order, viz. : 

Whereas, The Police Department of the City 
of Boston has abandoned the premises oc- 
cupied by it on La Grange street, city proper, 
and has signified its intention of not further 
using said premises ; and 

Whereas, The building upon said land is 
antiquated and of no practical use to the 
city ; and 

Whereas, An offer has been made by Albert 
S. Wingersky to lease the land eitjjer with the 
structure thereon, or after the removal of said 
structure, and for the purpose of parking 
automobiles thereon ; and 

Whereas, It is advantageous to the said City 
of Boston to lease said premises ; 

Now, therefore, it is hereby ordered. That 
his Honor the Mayor be, and he hereby is, 
authorized to lease without alteration or im- 
provement the said parcel of land with the 
building thereon for a period of ten years 
at a yearly rental of nine hundred dollars, 
said parcel of land being described as follows : 

A certain parcel of land situated on the 
southwesterly side of La Grange street in 
Boston, in the County of Suffolk and Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, bounded and de- 
scribed as follows : Northeasterly by the south- 
westerly line of La Grange street, fifty-three 
feet five inches, more or less ; southeasterly 
by land supposed to belong now or formerly 
to R. J. Moody, fifty-five feet, more or less : 
westerly by land supposed to belong now or 
formerly to Alexander Steinert, four feet one 
inch, more or less ; southeasterly by the said 
land of Alexander Steinert, fifty-three feet 
five inches, more or less ; southwesterly by 
land supposed to belong now or formerly to 
D. T. Albiani, forty-seven and T8-100 feet, 
more or less ; northwesterly by land supposed 
to belong now or formerly to the Union In- 
stitution for Savings, one hundred six and 
37-100 feet, more or less ; containing 5,150 
square feet of land, more or less ; being a 
portion of the premises conveyed to the City 
of Boston by Elizabeth W. Stevens, by deed 
dated November 2, 1864, and recorded with 
Suffolk Deeds, Book 850, page 259, and the 
said above described premises being formerly 
known as Police Station No. 4, and 

It is hereby further ordered. That his 
Honor the Mayor be, and he hereby is, au- 
thorized to execute and deliver in the name 
and behalf of the City of Boston, and in form 
satisfactory to the Law Department of the 
City of Boston, a written instrument of lease, 
together with the right in said lessee to re- 
move said structure and improve the land, 
to Albert S. Wingersky for a period of ten 
years, at a yearly rental of nine hundred 
dollars. 
Report accepted, order passed, yeas 16, nays 0. 



FINAL PROCEEDINGS. 
Coun. CURTIS offered the following: 
Resolved, That the thanks of the City Coun- 
cil be extended to Councilor Joseph McGrath 
for the able and impartial manner in which 
he has presided over the deliberations of the 
Council during the present municipal year. 

The question came on the adoption of the 
resolution. 



Coun. CURTIS— Mr. President, as a retiring 
member of this body I feel it to be indeed a 
pleasure and an honor to offer this resolution 
expressing our appreciation of the fine im- 
partiality and fairness of our President dur- 
ing the year. I feel sure that this resolution 
expresses the heartfelt sentiment of every 
member of the body, and I hope that it will 
be unanimously adopted. 

Coun. ROBERTS— Mr. President, I would 
just like to add my word to Councilor Curtis's, 
not being a retiring member, but being a 
member of the opposite political party to the 
President. I think the finest thing that can 
be said about the Boston City Council is that 
it knows no party politics. For the two 
years that it has been my privilege to be a 
member of the body I have known of no 
body in the country of which it could be 
so truly said as of the City Council of the 
City of Boston, that its business has been 
handled in a fair and impartial manner and 
without regard to politics. I think that you, 
Mr. President, have done a fine job as Presi- 
dent of the Council, that you have been ab- 
solutely impartial in all matters, acting regard- 
less of party or sectionalism, and I think the 
members as a whole feel that your term in 
office has been an extremely successful one 
for the city. 

Coun. RUBY — Mr. President, as one who 
was a candidate for the office of president 
in this last term, I want to voice my approval 
and commendation of the activities and the 
impartial treatment of all members by the 
President of the body during the past year. 
I know that this has been at least one case 
where the man who was finally victorious in 
the election to the office which he sought has 
during the year treated all of the other 
twenty-one men in the body fairly and im- 
partially, in the designation of committee ap- 
pointments and on every other matter that 
has come up during the year. It is certainly 
a pleasure to me to voice my heartiest com- 
mendation of the wonderful treatment that 
has been accorded the other twenty-one mem- 
bers of the body by our President, Joseph 
McGrath. I sincerely trust that the office he 
now holds will not represent the peak of his 
political activities, that there will be further 
and greater honors in store for him, some- 
thing which he certainly deserves because of 
his marvelous treatment of his fellow citizens 
and of his colleagues in this body. 

The resolution was adopted by a unanimous 
rising vote. (Applause.) 

President McGRATH — Members of the City 
Council, I want first to thank you for your 
splendid demonstration and then to say to you 
that to my mind this is a sad day, as it 
means a parting of the ways of men who 
have worked in harness together for a period 
of two years. And yet there is something 
about service in political life that greatly 
differs from service in any other line of 
endeavor, in that the friendships are warmer 
and more lasting. It makes little difference 
where we may travel in the future on the 
highway of life, the friendships we have 
formed and the events that have transpired 
in this Council will always, I believe, remain 
the dearest possession of the members of the 
body. I still dearly cherish the friendships 
that I formed in the Legislature, and I will 
cherish perhaps even more dearly the friend- 
ships we have formed here. As Councilor 
Roberts has said, in this body we seem to 
be closer together, more like a little family, and 
the office of president would be an extremely 
hollow one were it not for the cooperation 
given to the President by all the members of 
the Council. We have had our differences of 
opinion, but yet, as the year ends, we al' 
have in our hearts the deepest love and 
affection for the men with whom we have 
served. Might I say this to those who criticize 
this body, that a few years ago there was one 
of the greatest demonstrations in the history 
of this city showing how the people of Bos- 
ton felt about the councilors elected from the 
twenty-two wards of Boston? On the same 
day, across the river in Cambridge, the people 
were overwhelmingly defeating a request there 
for an increase in the salaries of the coun- 
cilors, and yet in Boston 77,000 people voted 
"yes" on the question of increasing the sal- 
aries of members of this body as agamst 
40,000 who voted "no." They were votmg 
away their own money, and yet they by that 
demonstration, and by the size of that vote, 
gave the only stamp of approval that has 
ever been asked for by this body. I might call 
that fact to the attention of those who would 
change the Boston City Council by legislative 
act. May I say at this time to the members 
of the body, from my heart, that no matter 
how long I stay in political life, no matter 
how long I live in this great city of ours, 
the friendship and the affection demonstrated 
here by my fellow members will remain 
among my dearest treasures of memory. I 
thank you. (Applause.) 

Adjourned sine die. at 12.14 p. m. on motion 
of Coun. GLEASON. 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



31 



NUMBER AND ESTIMATED COST OF NEW BUILDINGS AND ALTERATIONS, ADDITIONS. ETC.. FOR WHICH 
APPLICATIONS HAVE BEEN FILED FOR THE MONTH OF DECEMBER, 1933. 







Apartment 

AND 

Tenement 

HOCSES. 


Apartment 

AND 

Tenement 

Houses 

AND Stores. 


Dwellings. 


Dwellings 
and Stores. 


Garages. 


Hotels. 




B 

3 


1. 

r 


a 

3 


1. 

is 


i 

H 

3 


c o 


J 

a 

3 

z 


1. 

is 

r 


J 

a 

3 

z 


■2 
ll 

r 


c 

S 

3 

z 


1. 

ii 


First Class 


























Second Class 










1 

14 


$12,000 
69,000 






6 
4 
2 


$2,050 

1,050 

700 






Third Class 


















Special Class 








































Total New Work 










15 
76 


$81,000 
39.667 






12 
4 


$3,800 
285 






Alterations, etc 


5 
6 


SI. 636 


12 


»9.745 


4 


$1,175 


5 


$28,900 






Grand Totals 




S1.636 


12 


S9.745 


91 


$120,667 


4 


$1,175 


16 


$4,085 


5 


$28,900 








Hospitals. 


LoDonro 
HousBe. 


LODOINO 

Houpes and 
Stores. 


Mercantile 

BuiLDINQS. 


Manu- 
facturing 
Buildings. 


Office 
Buildings. 


Character. 


1 
1 


■8 

a- 

as 


E 
1 


r 


J 

a 

3 


1. 


a 

3 

z 


a- 
£8 


i 

. 3 

z 


1. 

ill 

■so 


u 

a 

3 

z 


S . 

as 
■•go 


First Class 


























Second Class . . ... . ... 














1 


$2,500 










Third Class 






















Special Class 














1 


12,000 














































2 
43 


$14,500 
74,195 










Alterations, etc . 


3 


»1,775 


7 


$1,670 


2 


$2,045 


6 


$13,700 


5 


$2,950 






Grand Totals 


3 


$1,776 


7 


$1,670 


2 


$2,045 


45 


$88,695 


6 


$13,700 


5 


$2,950 








Public 
bcildinop. 


School 
HougES. 


Stables. 


Thfatres. 


MlBCBI^ 
LANE0U8. 


-Totals. 


Character. 


V 

S 

3 

z 


1. 

n 


£ 

3 


Estimated 
Cost. 


3 


1 

S§ 
•■go 


J 

a 

3 

z 


ll 

r 


u 

a 

3 

z 


•2 
c S 


1 

B 

3 

z 


73 
0) 

as 


First Class 












































1 

2 
2 


$7,000 

5,000 

485 


9 

20 

5 


$23,550 


Third Class 


















75,050 


Special Class 


















13,185 






















Total New Work 


















5 
9 


$12,485 
11,725 


34 
186 


$111,785 




1 


S600 


1 


S300 


1 


$150 


2 


$4,500 


195,018 










Grand Totals 


1 


S600 


1 


$300 


1 


$150 


2 


$4,500 


14 


$24,210 


220 


$306,803 
































_ 











1 





32 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Monday, January 1, 1934. 
INAUGUUAL EXERCISES. 

The ceremonies attending the inauguration of 
Mayor-elect Frederielv W. Mansfield and the City 
Councilors-elect of the City of Hostoii were held 
in iSymphony Hall at ten o'clock a. m,, the Mayor 
elect and the members-elect of the Council for 
1934 all being present. 

(The proceedings were interspersed with musical 
numbers. John O'Sliea presiding at the organ, 
Fabien Sevitzky conducting the People's Symphony 
Orchestra, and Maria Koussevitzky, soprano, 
singing.) 

City Clerk WILFRED J. DOYLE— Ladies and 
gentlemen, I have the honor of presenting the 
Reverend John E. O'Connell, pastor of St. John's 
and St. Hugh's Churches, Roxbury, who will open 
these exercises with the invocation. Father 
O'Connell. (Applause.) 

Father O'CONNELL— Almighty and Eternal 
God, Protector of all, and Inspirer of all the hopes 
of men, without Whom nothing is holy, nothing is 
strong, by Whose counsel and by Whose wishes we 
are sanctified and governed, in sincerity of mind 
and in humility of heart we acknowledge our 
dependence upon Thee. In times past Thou hast 
been to our fathers a beacon of light, calling and 
leading them always to the things that are highest 
and best, enlightening their counsels, inspiring 
their hearts with courage to do battle for the right, 
at times prospering, at other times chastening, yet 
ever protecting and preserving. For these Thy 
many favors, O God, it is but meet, just, right and 
salutary, that we both praise and glorify 'Thy 
blessedness, and if there have been transgressions 
we turn to Thee now, O Loving Father, with a 
pledge of better things, that we may with better 
right and a more chastened spirit approach Thy 
throne and invoke Thy continued grace upon our 
city and her people. Do Thou, therefore, O God 
of infinite wisdom and of everlasting mercy, impart 
to us, the rank and file of the citizenry, a more 
intense and more awakened regard for civic virtue, 
with respect for law, obedience to authority and 
love of our fellows, that we may the more faithfully 
fulfill our duties. Impart to those who are to 
share with our chief magistrate the government 
of our city Thy spirit of sympathetic understand- 
ing, of wholehearted cooperation, of fraternal 
charity, that, looking above all littleness of mind 
and all urge of personal interest, they may ever 
work together as one, for the common good of all. 
And, O Loving Father, may Thy spirit descend 
upon him who is to shortly assume the exalted, the 
high office of Mayor, so that he may at all times 
manifest a spirit of justice, a spirit of prudence, a 
spirit of fortitude ; and in all trying situations he may 
be guided by justice, giving to each his due, that 
with prudence he may ever decide what is proper 
and right, and that with fortitude he may ever 
stand for what is right in the government of our 
city. Give to him, O Lord, we beseech Thee, 
health of body and strength of soul; and grant, 
O Loving Father, that his years of administration 
may mark a golden era of both spiritual and 
material profit. These things we ask of Thee, O 
God, in the sweet name of Jesus our Saviour. 
Amen. 

City Clerk DOYLE read a communication from 
the iJoard of Election Commissioners certifying 
the election of Frederick W. Mansfield as Mayor. 

The oath of office was administered to Mayor- 
elect Frederick W. Mansfield by Chief Justice 
Honorable Arthur Prentice Rugg of the Supreme 
Judicial Court of Massachusetts. 

City Clerk DOY'LE read a communication from 
the Board of Election Commissioners certifying 
the election of members of the City Council, as 
follows: 

Ward 1, Henry Selvitella; Ward 2, Thomas H. 
Green; Ward 3, John I. Fitzgerald; Ward 4, George 
W Roberts; Ward 5, Henry L. Shattuck; Ward 6, 
George P. Donovan; Ward 7, John E. Kerrigan, 
Ward 8, John F. Dowd; Ward 9, Richard D. Glea- 
son; Ward 10, John J. Doherty; Ward 11, Edward 
L. Englert; Ward 12, David M. Brackman; Ward 
13, Joseph McGrath; Ward 14, Maurice M. Gold- 
man; Ward 15, Martin H. Tobin; Ward 16, Albert 
L. Fish; Ward 17, Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr; 
Ward 18, Clement A. Norton; Ward 19, Peter A. 
Murray; Ward 20, James F. Finley; Ward 21, 
James E. Agnew; Ward 22, Edward M. Gallagher. 

A rcll of the members-elect of the City Council 
was called by City Clerk DOYLE and as the 
names were read, the members arose, all being 
present. The oath of office was administered 
to them by Mayor Mansfield. 

Inaugural Addres.s of Hon. Frederick W. 
Mansheld. 

It is with a very grave realization of the responsi- 
bilities resting upon the chief magistrate of our 
beloved city that I approach the duties which the 
people of Boston have placed upon me in electing 
me to be their Mayor. Even in times of apparently 
assured prosperity and of lavish expenditure those 
responsibilities are always great. But in such 
times as we are passing through at the moment, 
the burdens resting upon the mayor of any large 
city are many times multiplied. 

It is unnecessary for me to call attention to the 
troubled state of affairs not only in Boston and in 
our nation, but throughout the entire world. All 
civilized nations are wrestling with problems of 



government. Never in the long history of Boston 
h.as the prospect seemed more gloomy nor the out- 
come more doubtful. 

Aside from those conditions which are general 
throughout the country, the citizens of Boston 
know well that there are local conditions which are 
peculiar to Boston but not of their own making. 
The new administration must take over these 
conditions, — a heritage from my predecessors — 
resulting from long years of extravagance and 
lavish expenditure and from an apparent assump- 
tion that the ordinary rules of prudence in con- 
ducting business afTairs of importance did not 
apply to the City of Boston. 

The Financial Condition of the City. 
Almost every mayor who has been inaugurated 
within recent years has referred to the financial 
condition of Boston. A perusal of their inaugural 
speeches shows that the apparently always alarm- 
ing condition of Boston's finances h.as been a fav- 
orite theme of incoming mayors. But when the 
financial condition of the city in those other years 
is compared to that which exists today as I assume 
the burdens of this great office, it is evident that 
most of those former references were more rhetor- 
ical than real, and that the incoming administration 
will be faced with more trying and difficult problems 
than any other in Boston's history. 

The Cash Deficit. 

The new administration assumes office under 
extremely critical conditions. As of the end of 
19.33, Boston's cash deficit or the shortage in the 
cash operations of the city, will probably be found 
to be in the vicinity of $15,000,000, an all-time 
peak in the history of the city. Uncollected taxes 
may amount to about $25,000,000, which is also 
far in excess of any previous year. 

While these uncollected taxes exceed the cash 
deficit, there is small consolation in this fact. In 
recent years the cash deficit and uncollected taxes 
have been increasing, and they have created pro- 
gressively greater difficulty in financing the city's 
requirements. 

■The immediate problem facing the new adminis- 
tration is to maintain the solvency of the city and 
to guard against defaults on any of its obligations, 
both to city employees and to private creditors. In 
order to finance the city's requirements until 1934 
taxes are paid next fall, it will be necessary to nego- 
tiate tax anticipation loans of many millions of 
dollars, under money market conditions which are 
far from auspicious. Whether we like this situa- 
tion or not, it is a condition which we must face. 
We must act quickly and decisively to make certain 
that these loans can be negotiated and paid at 
maturity. We must put our financial house in 
order, keep our current expenditures within reason- 
ably expected income, and reduce tax delinquency 
by every proper method. 

The Tax Rate. 

In 19.32 the tax rate was $35.50. A reduction 
to $32.80 was effected in 1933, but this figure did 
not represent the true state of aff'airs. The reduc- 
tion of $2.70 was far more than accounted for by 
two loans and a grant, — a municipal relief loan of 
$3,500,000, a welfare department loan of S3, 800.000 
and a federal welfare grant of $1,994,000, or a total 
of $9,292,000. By means of these special financing 
methods, a temporary tax rate reduction was 
obtained. Without them the 1933 tax rate would 
have been higher than the rate for 1932. 

A number of factors, beyond the control of the 
incoming administration, darken the tax rate 
picture in 1934. There is no assurance or promise 
of federal grants in 1934, and no one can now proph- 
esy what the future policy of the Legislature will be 
with reference to further loans. Without fiu-ther 
grants or loans, the tax rate will be increased sul> 
stantially. In addition, the city must now com- 
mence the five-year task of meeting the interest and 
principal of 1933 loans. There is also a proba- 
bility of an increase in the state tax assessed on 
municipalities and of an increase in the require- 
ments for purchases and contracts, due to advanced 
prices. 

Of course, it is impossible to forecast at the pres- 
ent moment with any accuracy what the tax rate 
for 1934 will be, but weighing the favorable and un- 
favorable factors as they are now apparent, the 
result points to an increase of not less than three to 
four dollars over the 1933 rate of $32.80. The 
increase may be even greater, because of factors 
which the incoming administration will be helpless 
to prevent, and powerless to avoid. 

It is not my intention to accept a tax rate in- 
crease without great effort to prevent it. I shall 
undertake every proper method at the city's dis- 
posal to keep the tax rate at the lowest possible 
figure. Non- welfare expenditures can be cut down; 
this will be done. Welfare expenditures are, of 
course, too definitely bound up with economic 
trends all over the nation to permit any definite 
promise. 

I want to practice broad and reasonable economy 
I do not want to cause distress among any groups 
of our people or, in the absence of controlling 
necessity, to withdraw from them 6er\ices to 
which they have become accustomed and which 
are helpful to them. The strictest and narrowest 
economy is not a part of my program, for there is a 
danger that it will create new liabilities as acute as 
those now facing us. We must provide at all costs 
both adequately and reasonably, for such essential 
services as education, the preservation of the public 
health, and police and fire protection. We must 
accept the liabilities imposed upon us by forces out- 



side our immediate control. On the other hand, 
these obligations compel us to recognize the impera- 
tive nee<l of foregoing all luxury exiJenditures, of 
practising sound economies in every detail of munic- 
ipal government, of inaugurating such changes as 
will improve services and re<luce costs, and above 
all else, of observing the most scrupulous honesty 
in every part of the city's spending. (Applause.) 

An additional phase of the tax rate problem is 
the stern necessity facing this administration of 
halting the pyramiding of our deficit. In recent 
years our expenditures have been exceeding our 
cash income in increasing amounts. This increas- 
ing cash deficit has been met by borrowing against 
delincjuent ta.xes. Such a pyramiding is the chief 
defect in the city's credit structure. 

The Fever to Spend. 

Under conditions as they exist today in Boston 
and throughout the civilized world, most thought- 
ful and prudent men will agree that there is only one 
formula to pursue if municipal credit is to remain 
unimpaired and if our city is to prosper and to 
thrive. That formula is one of broad, practical 
economy. The times call for the safeguarding of 
all municipal funds, for the elimination of waste, 
for the reduction of taxes — if that can possibly be 
accomplished — and for a policy yi'hich will eliminate 
all municipal expenditures which are not necessary. 

The chief magistrates of this and of all other 
cities are between two fires. The necessity for 
eliminating expense and saving money is fully 
recognized. But an important part of the policy of 
the National Government is to spend money lib- 
erally and to encourage state and local govern- 
ments to do likewise. It is argued in support of 
this policy that government spending must prime 
the economic pump; that we are confronted with a 
national emergency akin to war; that the depres- 
sion has assumed the proportions of a public peril 
and that extraordinary means must be adopted to 
meet it, — means that in ordinary times would be 
considered perilous by men of prudence and of 
expert knowledge in economics. 

Our President has embarked upon a great and 
breath-taking venture to restore prosperity. It is a 
valiant attempt to maintain the American standard 
of living. He himself admits the experimental 
nature of his program. While misgivings as to 
parts of that program have been expressed by 
some, all must applaud the courage and determina- 
tion of the President and must realize that no con- 
structive alternative has been ofiered. (Applause.) 

So far as municipal governments are concerned, 
it is their patriotic duty to cooperate in furthering 
the national program in every reasonable way, but 
it must be remembered that national recovery will 
be hindered rather than helped if a municipality 
spends so freely that its credit is endangered. In 
the nature of things, the federal treasury can with- 
stand abnormal emergency expenditures with- 
out impairing its solvency to a much greater extent 
than can municipal treasuries which must rely 
upon prostrated real estate for the major part of 
their income. In so far as cooperation with the 
national program involves the expenditure of the 
money to be raised from local taxpayers, rules of 
prudent finance must not be abandoned. The 
income base of our municipal governments can- 
not stand an excessive load. 

Specifically, I am thoroughly in favor of a 
rational program of really necessary public works 
projects, chosen after careful planning, and antici- 
pating future needs. We must be careful to avoid, 
as far as possible, projects which will impose large 
increases in maintenance costs. 

A number of public works projects has already 
been authorized. In addition, Boston has been 
given substantial grants for Civil Works Admin- 
istration projects which will employ a large 
number of persons temporarily. Before committing 
the city to further public works projects, I propose 
to institute immediately a careful study of the 
city's needs and resources. 

The Taxpayers. 

In municipalities the effect of this patriotic 
duty of upholding the national program of public 
works projects, as well as the regular e.xpenses of 
government, will fall most heavily upon the tax- 
payer who owns tangible property. There is 
something radically and scientifically wrong in 
our method of raising money to defray the expenses 
of government. Not only does too much of the 
burden fall upon the owner of tangible property, 
but h? must make up for the depression slump in 
other sources of revenue. More than three fourths 
of the total income available for meeting the regular 
expenditures of the city is now obtained from 
ta.xes upon real and personal property. It is clear 
that tangible property cannot continue indefi- 
nitely to bear tliis increasing burden. 

Even if all possible economies are effected, it is 
imperative that additional sources of revenue be 
found. High property taxes have a definite tend- 
ency to discourage home ownership. This tend- 
ency is socially objectionable. It is not insig- 
nificant that of all of the large cities of the country 
Boston has the smallest percentage of home 
owners. Only a quarter of all of the families 
living in Boston own their own homes. The 
high property tax rate in Boston is, of course, 
not the only cause for this condition, but it is an 
important factor. 

But, even apart from the question of whether 
or not tangible property can continue to bear the 
increasing burdens placed upon it, and even apart 
from the tendency of the present system of tax- 
ation to discourage home ownership, a more equit- 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



33 



able distribution of the burdens of municipal 
government should be made. Every person should 
bear his fair share of the burden. A wealthy man 
with little or no real estate ought to bear his fair 
share of the expenses of government. The real 
estate owner and the modest home owner who 
cannot conceal his home are compelled under the 
present conditions to pay far too large a share of 
the expenses of Kovernment. A more determined 
effort should be made to collect a larger share of 
the public tax from those persons able to pay so 
that the burden upon the owner of tangible prop- 
erty may be lessened. 

i propose to consider promptly and with great 
care and to recommend legislation with respect to 
possible additional sources of revenue which will 
relieve to some extent the burdeiis on tangible 
property and more equitably distribute the cost 
of government. (Applause.) 

Salary Heductions. 

The restoration of salary levels is within the 
power of the Mayor. If he does nothing about 
them, the reductions will automatically be restored 
on this first day of January. (Applause.) To 
continue in effect the reductions instituted in 
April of 1933, the Mayor must act by executive 
order. A restoration of salaries to their old levels 
would mean the additional expenditure of approx- 
imately $3,400,000 for the year. This sum would 
represent about $2 additional in the tax rate which 
has been forecast for 1934. 

In order to lessen, as far as possible, an increase 
in the tax rate for 1934, it will be necessary to keep 
the salary reductions in effect during the entire 
period of 1934. Hut it is better to suffer pay 
reductions for another year, than, by restoring 
them, to hazard the chance of so impairing the 
financial position of the city that city and county 
employees might have to forego receiving any 
salary whatever. In other words, there would be 
danger of payless pay days. It is better to suffer 
the hardship and inconvenience of the reducticjns 
that have already been made and yet to receive 
reduced salaries, than t > restore the original 
salaries, which would sound well to the ear of the 
employee, but which might result in terminating 
all salaries. (Applause.) Therefore, in the best 
interests of the city and of all of its people, pru- 
dence compels me to continue the pay cuts already 
made for the year 1934. (.Applause.) 

I am contident that substantial economies may 
be realized in many departments of the city 
government during the next four years and even 
in the year 1934. If it shall ap|)ear advisable 
and the Knancial position of the city warrants, it 
is always possible, while the Legislature is in 
session, to obtain needed legislation to restore pay 
cuts during 1934. (Applause.) 

Resumption of Step-Rate Increases. 

There are certain classes of employees, such as 
school teachers, policemen and firemen, who have, 
in effect, suffered more than a simple reduction in 
salary. I refer to those who entered the employ of 
the city at a mininmm rate under circumstances 
leading them to believe that they would receive 
annual increases in their salaries until the maxinmm 
was reached. When the salary reductions became 
effective in April of 1933, these classes of em- 
plcvees were doubly affected because they lost not 
only the r«luction in their regular salaries but the 
yearly increase as well, which seemed to me to be 
8o unjust that I made the specific promise to 
resume these yearly increases. 

I am aware that resuming the yearly increases 
to b^in with the present year will add to our tax 
burden an amount which, it is estimated, should 
not exceed $400,000. This represents about 
twenty cents in the tax- rate. .\s I am persuaded 
that it is only simi)le justice to resume these in- 
creases, I shall endeavor to keep my promise. 
To the extent that I may have the power under 
existing law I shall order the resumption of these 
yearly increases; but if I have not the power then 
I shall seek requisite legislation to enable me to do 
this, (.\pplause.) 

City Employees. 

It is not my desire to remove city employees in 
large numbers from the city pay roll. But the 
continuous reports of padded pa.v rolls cannot be 
ignored entirely. (Applause.) As to the advisa- 
bility of removing suiierfluous employees, two ele- 
ments are to be considered, — first, the hardship 
upon the person removed, and second, the hardship 
on the taxpayers if the person is not removed. 
The taxpayer must not be overlooked in this situa- 
tion and his burden must be reheved if that can be 
accomplished. 

Except in flagrant cases of outright padding, I 
shall try to avoid wholesale discharges. The man 
or woman gi\'ing an honest day's work will be pro- 
tected. (.\pplause.) There are ways of econo- 
rnizing without affecting personnel. Consolida- 
tion of certain departments would eliminate high 
salaried officials and effect other economies in 
operation but would not necessarily mean the 
separation of the rank and file of valuable and 
experienced employees from the pay rolls. The 
polic.v of not filling vacancies caused by death or 
retirement will olso effect gradual savings, and, 
so far as practicable, I shall continue that policy. 
(Applause.) There are numerous opportunities 
for economy in the everyday conduct of the city's 
work. In discovering and putting such economies 
into effc<t, employees themselves can be of invalu- 
able assistance. May I call to their attention that 



their cooperation with me in this respect is the 
most certain guarantee of the security of their own 
positions, (.\pplause.) 

-Accounting and Budgeting. 

For many years, Boston's accounting and 
budgeting systems have been criticized. This 
criticism has in large part been justified. The 
accounts of this huge and important corporation 
are kept on an antiquated cash book basis com- 
parable to that employed by a crossroads country 
store of one hundred years ago. .\n.v city admin- 
istration which is unable to give an accurate, 
prom|)t, and easily understood statement of its 
financial condition at regular intervals, or which 
is careless or inefficient in planning and controlling 
the appropriation and expenditure of the public 
money, fails to fulfill the trust imposed upon it by 
the people. 

Immediate steps will be taken to inaugurate a 
modern accounting system which will give a true 
picture of the city's finances at all times. This 
will require encumbering appropriations with all 
charges against them as soon as the charges are 
incurred, and setting up the books of the city so 
that assets and liabilities may be known, and a 
correct and comprehensive balance sheet may be 
available. 

During the past five years the State Division of 
Accounts has been at work on the installation of a 
new system in certain of the citv departments. It 
is time that this work in all departments should be 
pressed to a conclusion. While continuing friendl.y 
cooperation with this state department. I shall take 
steps to have completed the modernization of the 
city's accounting system within a reasonable time. 
In addition, I jjropose to request an immediate 
audit by this state department of the city's ac- 
counts. It is only fair to the outgoing administra- 
tion, to the incoming administration, and to the 
people of Boston that such an audit be made, and I 
shall help formulate and urge the pas.sj»ge of legis- 
lation requiring a compulsory audit of the city's 
accounts and records at the end of each adminis- 
tration. (.Applause.) 

Better budget contents, control and i)rocedure 
are necessary in Boston, particularly in these 
trouble.^ times. In so far as possible, future bud- 
gets will include a complete annual program of the 
city's receipts from all sources and its expenditures 
for all purposes. They will also provide a better 
picture of the purposes for which the expenditures 
ore to be made. The.v will be sui)ported by com- 
j)arisons with prior years and the reasons for 
changes in budget items so as to give a clear under- 
standing to all who are interested. The city's 
budget calendar will also be improved so that the 
city will be operated under full budget control as 
soon as the fiscal year begins. In order that there 
may be proper control of expenditures to insure 
adlierence to the original budget, thereby eliminat- 
ing supplementary budgets during the .year, I plan 
to establish a system of quarterly allotments which 
are based on departmental work programs ex- 
nres8e<l in units of work. The .Auditing and 
Budget Deijartments will be instructed to see 
that such allotments are not exceeded. 

.As a result of these changes, I hope that public 
confidence in the city's finances will be imi)roved, 
public knowledge thereof will be increased, the 
chances of wasteful expenditure will be mini- 
mized, and new opportunities for desirable econo- 
mies will be uncovered. 

It is true that there are certain statutory and 
other impediments to the complete realization of 
this program. Informal methods of control are, 
however, available to the Mayor to achieve sub- 
stantially the benefits desired until such time as 
permanent changes can be effected. 

Contracts and Purchases, 

Contract awards and the purchase of equip- 
ment and supplies occupy a prominent place in 
city administration. In recent years they nave in- 
volved between $1.5,000,000 and $20,000,000 
annually. This enormous expenditure retiuires 
honest, esperienced officials in charge of such pur- 
chases and the best methods in order to secure the 
lowest prices. 

Whatever the past has been, Boston must 
receive full value for each dollar expended. (Ap- 
plause.) 

I propose to adhere strictly to a system of 
contracts and purchases based upon absolutely 
honest awards to the lowest bids of reliable mer- 
chants and contractors. (.Applause.) I pledge 
my administration to the elimination of all favor- 
itism and the splitting of contracts. (.Applause.) 
In line with my recommendations for improved 
budget procedure it will be my policy to make 
volume purchases of supplies needed for relatively 
long periods. Proper inspection methods will be 
set up in order that Boston may receive what 
it pays for. (.Applause.) Beyond all of this I 
hope to make cooperative arrangements with the 
city and county officials who purchase supplies 
independently of the Supply Department, to the 
end that combination of total purchasing require- 
ments may result in lower prices than would 
otherwise be the case. 

Finance Commission. 
The Finance Ojramission, if properly consti- 
tuted, may be of great benefit to the city. I ex- 
press no opinion as to whether the present policy 
of a paid chairman and unpaid associate members 
should be changed to that of a board of paid 
members. But I have a very decided opinion 



that in whatever form it may exist, if it is prop- 
erly constituted, it is a most valuable asset to the 
Jlayor and an important department of the city. 
Since the purpose of the Finance Commission is to 
prevent waste and to serve the city purely in the 
interest of its citizens and taxpayers, I see no 
reason whatever for a continuous w-ar between 
the chief magistrate of Boston and that commis- 
sion. (.Applause.) Such will not be my policy. 
So long as it is properly constituted and functions 
fairly and in accordance with its intended pur- 
pose, I shall welcome its suggestions and criti- 
cisms and shall cooperate in every way to the end 
that the best results may be obtained for Boston. 
(.Applause.) 

Public W^elfare. 

During recent years the Department of Public 
Welfare has become the largest, in point of ex- 
penditures, of all departments under the control 
of the Mayor. In 1933, .about $13,000,000 has 
been expended, as compared with less than 
$3,000,000 before the depression. Early in De- 
cember of 1933, the number of public welfare cases 
was about 32,700, almost twenty per cent of the 
total number of families in Boston. Civil works 
employment has temporarily reduced the load to 
some extent. 

Under my administration the city will give as 
liberal aid as possible to all worthy welfare re- 
cipients. (.Applause.) I recognize the obliga- 
tions of the city and I realize its social imports 
ance. Not only must we alleviate privation and 
sickness and maintain public morale at the present 
time, but we must look forward to the future, 
and make certain that our youth, and genera- 
tions yet unborn, shall not suffer mentally and 
physically from the insufficiency of aid in these 
troubled times. 

The obligation of the city government to those 
who meet the tremendous cost of this work can- 
not be overlooked. Relentless vigilance must be 
exercised to eliminate unworthy cases, and to 
effect an administration of the department that 
is as efficient as it is humanly possible to achieve. 
I am apprehensive that, unless the growth of the 
welfare list is not only checked but welfare costs 
lowered, the city, by reason of a gradually re- 
duced income resulting in part from lower tax 
values and failure to collect taxes, will be utterly 
unable to meet these costs without drastic curtail- 
ment of municipal functions whether under the 
control of the JIayor or other officials. I am not 
willing to believe that in meeting the city's obli- 
gation to welfare recipients the public money 
must be wasted, inefficiency must be tolerated, or a 
system which invites fraud must be permitted. 
(.Applause.) 

Over a period of more than two years, many 
studies and investigations of the Public Welfare 
Department have been made. The Boston 
Finance Commission, the State Emergency Finance 
Board, the Police Department, the Budget Com- 
missioner, the Boston Council of Social Agencies, 
and a number of priv<ate organizations have 
revealed serious defects in the work an<l have made 
definite recommendations for improvement. 
Whether or not all of the criticism has been 
justified, the fact remains that the department has 
been deplorably slow in effecting obviously neces- 
sary improvements so that its work can be ad- 
justed to the enlarged duties imposed on it by the 
depression. Conditions are still far from satis- 
factory. I shall take immediate steps to place the 
department on the most efficient basis possible. 
There must be competent executive direction, 
proper investigation of all new cases, adequate 
follow-up of cases as long as thay are on the welfare 
rolls, and a modern system of administrative and 
financial control within the department. I shall 
not tolerate further delay in these matters. (Ap- 
plause.) 

I recognize that the character of ;yelfare work 
will change when economic conditions improve. A 
new type of problem will then appear, that of 
returning welfare recipients to gainful employ- 
ment as speedily as possible and preventing any 
wholesale tendency toward seeking relief in 
preference to employment. We must prepare for 
this change. 

The problems are many and complicated. They 
must be worked out cooperatively, and always 
with proper regard to the city's obligations to 
welfare recipients and to the taxpayer. 

Mayor's Advisory Committee. 
Many of the present and future problems of the 
city will be difficult. I shall need, and I shall 
welcome the aid of all citizens, individually and 
collectively. As a practical method of obtaining 
that aid, I shall form a committee to be known as 
the "Mayor's Advisory Committee," and to 
consist of not more than ten citizens properly 
representative of labor, business, and general 
community interest. I shall feel free to submit 
to this committee problems for investigation, 
information, advice and guidance, always, of 
course, with the clear understandig that the re- 
ports of the committee shall be advisory only and 
that the responsibility for final action on any 
particular problem will rest entirely upon me. 

Cooperation. 
Many public agencies having responsibility for 
the administrative and financial functions of the 
city, are wholly or partly outside the control of the 
Mayor. The Governor, the Legislature, various 
state departments, the School Committee, the 
Police Department and county officers can con- 



34 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



tribute in large measure to the solution of Hoston's 
problems. 1 believe that the closest cooperation 
and a mutual undcrstandinK between the Mayor 
and these oflicials are indispensable to Hoston's 
welfare. It will be my policy to work in harmony 
with them. I bcspealt their cordial cooperation 
and I am confident that it will be forthcoming. 

Gentlemen of the Council: 

The present plight of the city, while grave, is by 
no means hopeless. The difficulties to which I 
have referred are not insurmountable. These 
problems can be solved. I am sure that with the 
hearty cooperation of your members I can steadily 
and surely improve the position and the credit of 
out city. It is my purpose frequently to address 
the Council personally or by message and the 
citizens of Boston through the Press and by radio 
broadcasts, to the end that you and the citizens 
may be informed of the condition of the city and 
may umlerstand the exact nature and magnitude 
of the problems which must be solved. I shall do 
my best for Boston. (Applause.) I know that 
is your intention too. liut in addition to the 
hearty cooperation of the Mayor and the City 
Council, we shall need always in these trying times 
that Divine Aid which has been so eloquently 
invoked here today. Fervently let us pray that 
it may always be with us. (Great applause.) 

The Mayor began at 10.42 a. m., and ended at 
ll.:55 a. m. _ 

After the singing of the "Star- Spangled Banner' 
by Maria Koussevitsky, the audience joining in 
the chorus, the meeting adjourned at 11.42 a. m. 



Tuesday, January 2, 1934. 

First meeting of the City Council of 1934 
in the Council Chamber, City Hall, called to 
order by Coun. GALLAGHER, Senior Member, 
at 2 p. m. 

Present, all the members. 



CALL FOR MEETING. 
The Clerk read the call for the meeting, as 
follows : 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 1, 1934, 
To the Members of the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — You are hereby requested to 
assemble in the City Council Chamber, City 
Hall, on Tuesday, January 2, 1934, at two 
o'clock p. m. for the purpose of organizing 
and to take action on such matters of city 
business as may be submitted to your honor- 
able body. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 
Placed on file. 



ELECTION OF PRESIDENT. 

Coun. GREEN offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Council now proceed to 
the election of a president for the municipal 
year 1934. 

The order was passed. 

Chairman GALLAGHER— The Clerk will 
call the roll, and each member as his name is 
called will announce his preference. 

The Clerk called the roll, and the members 
announced their preference, as follows : 

For John F. Dowd — Coun. Agnew, Brackman, 
Doherty, Donovan, Dowd, Englert, Finley, Fish, 
Fitzgerald, Gallagher, Gleason, Goldman, Green, 
Kerrigan, McGrath, Murray, Norton, Roberts, 
Selvitella, Tobin, Wilson— 21. 

For John I. Fitzgerald — Coun. Shattuck — 1. 

And Coun. John F. Dowd was declared 
elected President for the municipal year 1934, 
amidst applause. 

Chairman GALLAGHER appointed Coun. 
McGrath and Wilson to escort President Dowd 
to the chair, and they performed the duty 
assigned. 



ADOPTION OF RULES OF 1933. 
Coun. ROBERTS offered the foUowing : 
Ordered, That the rules of the City Council 
of 1933, except Rules 13, 24 and 34, be adopted 
as the rules of this body until permanent rules 
are adopted. 

The order was passed. 



APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEE TO 

REPORT RULES. 
Coun. ROBERTS offered the following: 
Ordered, That a committee of five members 
of the City Council be appointed to prepare 
and report rules for the proceedings of the 
City Council. 

The order was passed, and President DOWD 
appointed as said committee Coun. Wilson, 
Green, McGrath, Gallagher and Roberts. 



LOANS IN ANTICIPA-nON OF TAXES. 
The following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 2, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with the attached 
request of the City Auditor, I submit herewith 



an order which it is customary to introduce 
at the first meeting of the City Council au- 
thorizing the City Treasurer to issue, from 
time to time, temporary loans in anticipa- 
tion of taxes in an amount not exceeding 
S30,000,000. This is the same amount as 
authorized by the City Council at the beginning 
of its session last year. In view of existing 
conditions I deem it expedient to request your 
approval of the same amount for 1934. 

I respectfully recommend adoption of this 
order by your honorable body. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Auditing Department, January 2, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — I submit herewith customary 
order for temporary loan in anticipation of 
taxes, and respectfully request same to be for- 
warded to City Council with recommendation 
for its adoption. 

Respectfully yours, 
Rupert S. Carven, City Auditor. 

Ordered, That to provide temporarily money 
to meet the appropriations for the financial 
year 1934, the City Treasurer issue and sell, 
at such time ajid in such amounts as he may 
deem best, notes or certificates of indebtedness 
of the City of Boston not exceeding thirty 
million dollars ($30,000,000) in the total, in 
anticipation of the taxes of the current munici- 
pal year ; that all such notes or certificates 
of indebtedness be dated the day the money 
for the same is received, be made payable with 
the interest thereon within one year of their 
date from the taxes of the year 1934, and bear 
interest from their date until the same are 
made payable at such rate as the City Auditor, 
the City Treasurer, and the Mayor may deter- 
mine. 

Coun. McGRATH— Mr. President, I would 
say for the benefit of the new members that 
this is the customary order which comes in 
at the first of every year, the purpose being 
to maintain the City of Boston during the 
time while we are anticipating the payment of 
taxes. 

The order was given its first reading and 
passage, yeas 22, nays 0. 



SALARY REDUCTIONS FOR 1934. 
The following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 1, 1934. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, 
City Clerk. 
Dear Sir, — I hand you herewith executive 
order dated January 1, 1934, continuing in 
effect for the calendar year 1934 the salary 
reductions made pursuant to the provisions of 
section 3 of chapter 121 of the Acts of the 
year 1933. 

Yours very truly, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor. 
Executive Order. 
By virtue of the authority granted to me by 
the provisions of chapter 121 of the Acts of 
the year 1933, I, as Mayor of the City of 
Boston, do hereby order and direct that the 
reductions in the salary of every office and 
position, the salary of which is paid from the 
treasury of the City of Boston in whole or in 
part, made pursuant to the provisions of sec- 
tion 3 of chapter 121 of the Acts of the year 
1933, be, and hereby are, continued in effect 
for the calendar year 1934. 
By order of 

Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 
Dated January 1, 1934. 
Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENT OF HENRY E. FOLEY 
AS CORPORATION COUNSEL. 

Notice was received of the appointment by 
the Mayor of Henry E. Foley, 7 Summit street, 
Hyde Park, Boston, to be Corporation Counsel, 
said appointment to take effect at close of 
business' January 2, 1934. 

Placed on file. 



JURORS DRAWN. 

Jurors were drawn under the law, Coun 
SHATTUCK and FISH presiding at the box 
in the absence of the Mayor, as follows : 

Twenty traverse jurors, Superior Criminal 
Court, Second Session, to appear February 5, 
1934 : 

Daniel J. MuUaley, Ward 1 ; Paul J. Murphy. 
Ward 1 ; James W. Ahearn, Ward 3 ; Frank 
P. Randall, Ward 4; Joseph Agustini, Ward 
5 : Charles J. Geier, Jr., Ward 6 : Joseph A. 
Green, Ward 7 ; James F. O'Neil, Ward 6 ■ 



Henry L. Carpenter, Jr., Ward 10 ; Stanley 

F. Miller, Ward 10; Ernest Wessly, Ward 11; 
Malcolm J. Campbell, Ward 13 ; Howard F. 
FiUebrown, Ward 13 ; Anthony A. Gallant, 
Ward 13 ; Frank L. Curtis, Ward 16 ; Otto 
C. Kretchman, Ward 18; Wendall C. Parker. 
Ward 18: Richard H. Schultz, Ward 18; 
Ernest A. Knight, Ward 21 ; William E. 
Smith, Ward 21. 

Twenty-six traverse jurors, Superior Crim- 
inal Court, Third Session, to appear Febru- 
ary 7, 1934: 

Henry F. McDonald, Ward 1 ; Charles H. 
Maginn, Ward 1 ; William J. Barry, Ward 2 ; 
Robert Buckley, Ward 2 ; Nicolo Malvone, 
Ward 3 ; Thomas F. McDavitt, Ward 3 ; Fred- 
erick Hitchens, Ward 7 ; Timothy Cronan, 
Ward 9; Eben A. Kinsman, Ward 10; Alex- 
ander Kisiel, Ward 10 ; William J. Baird, 
Ward 11; Donald, McKenzie, Jr., Ward 12; 
Joseph A. Crottendeck, Ward 13; John F. 
Cotter, Ward 14 ; Joseph Raine, Ward 14 ; 
Charles A. Collins, Ward 15 ; James L. Brown. 
Ward 16 ; Peter O'Hare, Ward 16 ; N. Henry 
Larson, Ward 18 ; Arthur F. Norton, Ward 
18 : William B. Smith, Ward 18 ; Joseph A. 
Klueber, Ward 19 ; Joseph W. Wood, Jr.. 
Ward 19 ; Andrew Nelson, Ward 20 ; Robert 
C. Lipson, Ward 21 ; WUliam N. Middleton, 
Ward 21. 

Twenty-nine traverse jurors, Superior Crim- 
inal Court, Fourth Session, to appear February 
5, 1934: 

Sylvester J. Murray, Ward 2 ; John J. 
Haughton, Ward 2 ; John T. Quinn, Ward 2 ; 
WiUard Moore, Ward 4 ; Joseph W. S. Weaver. 
Ward 4 ; Thomas H. Kilgallen, Ward 6 ; Frank 
L. Norton, Ward 7 ; John J. O'Connell, Ward 
8 ; Fritz C. Swenson, Ward 8 ; William F. 
Higgins, Ward 9 ; George A. Powell, Ward 9 ; 
Edward J. Cullinane, Ward 10 ; Philip B. Fox. 
Ward 10; WUliam Rooney, Ward 10; Alfred 

G. Erickson, Ward 11 ; Henry George Gaetre. 
Ward 11 ; Chester C. Chadwick, Ward 12 ; 
Albert O. Duncan, Ward 13 ; Charles E. 
Dwryer, Ward 13 ; Frederick P. Morrison, Ward 
13 ; Horace S. Thompson, Ward 13 ; Neil 
Thompson, Ward 13 ; Neil Curtin, Ward 14 ; 
Frank T. Smith, Ward 14; Frederick L. Sul- 
livan, Ward 16 ; Nestor F. Paradis, Ward 17 ; 
William E. Canon, Ward 18; William J. 
O'Brien, Jr., Ward 20 ; Carl A. Carlson, Jr., 
Ward 22 ; Thomas B. White, Ward 22. 

Twenty-nine traverse jurors, Superior Crim- 
inal Court, Fifth Session, to appear February 
5, 1934: 

James J. Curran, Ward 1 ; Eugene M. Mc- 
MuUen, Ward 2; Edward Clark Day, Ward 
3 ; James E. Graham, Ward 3 ; Edmund J. 
Whalen, Ward 3 ; Rubert Jacobs, Ward 4 ; 
George J. Hunt, Ward 5; James P. Donnelly, 
Ward 7 : Daniel N. Wagner, Ward 8 ; Peter 
McNiff, Ward 10 ; John T. Barrett, Ward 11 ; 
John P. Welch, Ward 11 ; WiUiam J. Le- 
Blanc, Ward 13 ; William P. Sweeney, Ward 
13 ; Thomas J. Lester, Ward 14 ; Raymond F. 
Wray, Ward 17; Stewart T. Allen, Ward 16; 
George E. Gormall, Ward 16; Thomas J. Mc- 
Adams, Ward 18 ; Joseph Colls, Ward 19 ; Sam- 
uel L. Ginsberg, Ward 19 ; Henry Zimmerman. 
Ward 19 ; Robert E. Martin, Ward 20 ; Alex- 
ander E. Pagol, Ward 20; Russell A. Sims, 
Ward 20 ; Mark S. Brown, Ward 21 ; John F. 
Havey, Ward 21 ; Harold E. Noal, Ward 21 ; 
Henry G. Ramsey, Ward 22. 

Ninteen traverse jurors, Superior Civil Court. 
First Session, January Sitting, to appear Feb- 
ruary 5, 1934: „ , _^ 

Joseph P. Morrissy, Ward 1 ; Herbert 
C. Pratt, Ward 4 ; Daniel L. Dailey, Ward 
8; George Edward Saul, Ward 8: Patrick 
J. Grace, Ward 9 : John Doonan, Ward 11 ; 
James J. Gilmartin, Ward 11 : Francis W. 
Huckham, Ward 11 ; Jacob Sashe, Ward 11 ; 
William J. Cossart, Ward 13 ; Harold E. 
Clarke, Ward 15; George A. Graham, Ward 
15 ; Jeremiah Walsh. Ward 15 ; Alfred A. 
Reardon, Ward 17 ; Jerome B. Norton, Ward 
19 ; Richard P. Murray, Ward 20 ; John G. 
Taylor, Ward 21 ; Seaward G. Brightman. 
Ward 22 ; George H. Maxon, Ward 22. 

Twenty-four traverse jurors, Superior Civil 
Court, Third Session, January Sitting, to ap- 
pear February 5, 1934 : 

Lawrence Holderried, Jr., Ward 4 ; Charles 
H. Pyne, Ward 4 : Harry L. Burrage, Ward 5 ; 
Joseph E. Delay, Ward 5 ; Frank L. Donovan, 
Ward 6 ; William J. Brothers, Ward 7 ; Anthony 
R. Standante. Ward 7 : George H. Whitley, 
Ward 7 ; Reuben A. Bibbey, Ward 8 ; Robert 
E. Mulcahy, Ward 10; Cornelius E. Murphy, 
Ward 11 ; Patrick Murray, Ward 11 ; Joseph 
H. O'Brien, Ward 11 ; James A. Sproul, Ward 
11 ; William F. Benjes, Ward 12 ; Carl E. 
Bond, Ward 12 ; Washington Cook, Ward 12 ; 
Patrick Kenny, Ward 15 ; Abraham M. Chein- 
stein. Ward 17; Francis E. Ballou, Ward 19; 
Robert P. Crellon, Ward 19 ; Bernard Fitz- 
patrick. Ward 19 ; Henry Krause, Ward 19 ; 
Carl J. E. Schoenherr, Ward 19. 

Twenty-six traverse jurors, Superior Civil 
Court, Fourth Session, January Sitting, to ap- 
pear February 5, 1934 : 



Jan. 13 



CITY R EIC O R D 



35 



John N. Lawrence, Ward 1 : Terrance F. 
McGowan, Ward 2 ; Joseph L. Ryan, Ward 2 ; 
Henry Stone, Ward 3 : Frank L. McAIlaster, 
Ward 4 ; William J. Welch, Ward 6 ; Jeremiah 
F Mulcahy, Ward 7; Charles A. Julius, Ward 
8- Joseph A. MacKay, Ward 9: Joseph Mc- 
Conville, Ward 10; John T. Davin, Ward 11; 
Julius Gudjons, Ward 11 : Randolph J. Len- 
non Ward 11 ; William M. Gair, Ward 12 ; 
William Reed, Ward 13 ; Owen F. J. Tucker, 
Ward 13 ; Abraham Gray, Ward 14 ; Louis 
Livingston, Ward 14; Oscar D. Rollins, Ward 
14 ; Walbert E. LaPlante, Ward 15 ; Ernest A. 
Yates, Ward 16 : Gordon J. Lee, Ward IS ; Carl 

F. Anderson, Ward 19; Chester W. Dyer. 
Ward 20 ; Frederick G. Hartwell, Ward 20 ; 
James S. Driseoll, Ward 21. 

Twenty-three traverse jurors, Superior Civil 
Court, Fifth Session, January Sitting, to ap- 
pear February 5, 1934 : 

Louis Cuozzi, Ward 1 ; Harold E. Fitzgerald, 
Ward 1 ; William P. Kelley, Ward 1 ; Michael 
Repucci, Ward 1 ; Lawrence Howard, Ward 2 ; 
Thomas J. McElaney, Ward 8 ; Edward J. 
Butler, Ward 10 ; John J. Crowley, Ward 10 ; 
Harold J. Kearns, Ward 11 ; Joseph H. Owen, 
Ward 11 ; Max Epstein, Ward 12 ; Edwin F. 
Manning. Ward 12; Robert W. Neely, Ward 
12 ; Lawrence F. Doucette, Ward 13 ; Joseph 
P. Flanagan, Ward 13; Vernon P. Mullaly, 
Ward 13 ; Joseph White. Ward 14 ; Parker R. 
Wylie, Ward 14; Herbert P. Bourne, Ward 15; 
Thomas B. Bradley, Ward 15 ; William R. Love, 
Ward 18: Peter J. Lehane, Ward 19; Edward 
P. O'Neil. Ward 21. 

Twenty-four traverse jurors, Superior Civil 
Court. Sixth Session. January Sitting, to ap- 
pear February 5. 1934 : 

Dennis J. Hayes, Ward 2 ; Patrick F. Collins, 
Ward G ; Joseph A. Slattery, Ward 6 ; Frank A. 
Leonard, Ward 7; William S. Rose, Ward 7; 
WilUam J. Sullivan, Ward 7 ; Edward T. Mc- 
Grath, Ward 10 ; James P. Robinson, Ward 10 ; 
Philip F. Danforth, Ward 13 ; William A. 
Coleman, Ward 14 ; Isadore Lesofsky, Ward 
14; Lenwood H. Bailey, Ward 15; Herbert H. 
Jones, Ward 15; Warren E. Williams, Ward 
16 ; Harry A. Golden, Ward 17 ; Perry T. 
Goodwin, Ward 17 ; Alfred H. Gedies, Ward 18 ; 
John J. Lauppe, Jr., Ward 18; Wesley P. 
Goudie, Ward 19 ; William E. Wilson, Ward 19 ; 
Albert G. Grow, Ward 20; Ernest W. Perkins, 
Ward 20 ; Melvin A. Mode, Ward 21 ; Samuel S. 
Smith. Ward 21. 

Twenty-two traverse jurors, Superior Civil 
Court, Seventh Session, January Sitting, to ap- 
pear February 5, 1934 : 

Charles F. Keenan, Ward 2; Frederick R. 
Kelley, Ward 2 ; Paul Calabro, Ward 3 ; Peter 
Cartsunis, Ward 4 ; Harry H. ForesUll, Ward 
4; David Michaels, Ward 4; Timothy J. Crow- 
ley, Ward 7 ; Thoma.s Toohey, Ward 8 ; Joseph 
H. L. Brehm, Ward 9; Daniel J. O'Brien, 
Ward 9; Thomas F. Loughry, Ward 10; James 

G. Bent, Ward 13 ; Israel Pearlmutter, Ward 
13; Albert A. Cook, Ward 15; Charles W. 
Dunham, Ward 16; Thomas P. Kelly. Ward 16; 
Francis C. Griffin. Ward 17; Thomas J. Mc- 
Carthy. Ward 18 ; Chester L. Doyle. Ward 19 ; 
Frank C. Nowell, Ward 20; Henry W. Lord. 
Ward 21 ; William E. Taft. Ward 21. 



MATTERS REFERRED FROM 1933. 

Coun. GALLAGHER offered the following: 

Ordered, That all matters referred to this 

City Council by the City Council of 1933 be 

referred to the appropriate committees of this 

body when appointed. 

Passed. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

The following petitions were received and 
referred to the committees named, viz. : 

Claims. 

Apollo Cake Specialties, Inc., for compensa- 
tion for damage to car by city team. 

Chester A. Baker, Inc., for refund on fee 
for druggist's license. 

Hyman Baron, for refund on license for sale 
of beer. 

Irving Brown, for compensation for damage 
to car caused by an alleged defect in Columbus 
avenue. 

Anne J. Cullinanc, for compensation for 
damage to property at 2 Parker Hill avenue, 
caused by bursting water pipes. 

Josephine Currcri, for compensation for dam- 
age to car by city truck. 

Marie Durant, for compensation for injuries 
on steamer "O'Meara." 

Samuel and Abraham Gold, for compensation 
for damage to property at 810 and 812 Tre- 
mont street, caused by break in water main. 



William A. Gormley, to be reimbursed for 
execution issued against him on account of 
his acts as an employee of the Public Works 
Department. 

Mrs. Marie Gould, for compensation for dam- 
age to car by fire truck. 

Walter Greenough. for compensation for 
damage to car caused by an alleged defect at 
391 Hyde Park avenue. 

Abraham S. Guterman, for compensation for 
damage sustained, caused by an alleged defect 
at 214 Bay State road. 

John E. Kanz, for compensation for col- 
lapse of water boiler at 8 Rambler road, 
caused by increase in water pressure. 

Morris and Sarah Mappen, for compensa- 
tion for injuries and damage to property 
caused by city car. 

Mattapan Citizen's Association, Inc., for 
refund on license to sell malt beverages. 

Helen E. Miller, for compensation for in- 
juries caused by an alleged defect at Atlantic 
avenue and State street. 

Theodore A. Muvrogiannis, for refund on 
license for sale of beer. 

Rossville Commercial Alcohol Corporation, 
for refund on liquor license. 

Lester B. Young, for compensation for dam- 
are to car by car of Fire Department. 



WARD 17 IMPROVEMENTS. 

Coun. WILSON offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to accept and lay out Wentworth ter- 
race in Ward 17. 

Ordered, That the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to accept and lay out Richard terrace 
in Ward 17. 

Ordered, That the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to accept and lay out Druid street, in 
Ward 17. 

Ordered, That the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to accept and lay out Emerson avenue, 
in Ward 17. 

Severally passed under suspension of the rule. 



REMOVAL OF UNUSED POLES AND 
WIRES. 

Coun. WILSON offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be, and 
he hereby is, respectfully requested, incident to 
the present emergency public works program, 
to take up with the Boston Elevated Street 
Railway Company, the early removal of all 
poles and overhead wires where surface street 
car service has been permanently discontinued. 

Coun. WILSON— Mr. President, I have in 
mind in the introduction of this order the 
fact that the Federal Government and other 
public authorities are looking around for op- 
portunities to have men do some work, and 
it strikes me that here is an opportunity to 
make a rather wide distribution of money for 
work in such districts as the Norfolk street 
section in my own ward and in other streets 
and highways of the City of Boston, where 
street car service has been discontinued and 
jitney service substituted therefor, the over- 
head wires and poles however, still remaining. 
In a number of cases the street car service has 
been permanently given up, and it seems to 
me there must come a day — and this is prob- 
ably as good a time as any, — to have action 
taken looking to the removal of such poles 
and wires along lines where the street car 
service has been discontinued, throughout the 
city, especially, as I say, having in mind that 
the Federal Government and other public au- 
thorities are looking for opportunities to fur- 
nish jobs for men who have been discharged 
or laid off. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



NEW SUFFOLK COUNTY COURTHOUSE. 

Coun. WILSON offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be, and 
he is, respectfully requested, incident to the 
present Federal Works program, to consider 
plans for a new Suffolk County Courthouse or 
an adequate addition to the same. 

Coun. WILrSON — Mr. President, my remarks 
will be very brief, especially on this first day, 
but I have in mind an order introduced on 
April 26. 1926. by Coun. Fitzgerald of the 
West End. looking to an investigation of the 
overcrowded conditions of the Suffolk County 
Courthouse by the Committee on County Ac- 
counts, the committee being requested to report 



their conclusions as to the relief which should 
be afforded. There was also an order which I 
introduced on May 9, 1927, requesting further 
investigation of the overcrowded conditions of 
the Suffolk County Courthouse and of the pos- 
sibility of purchasing certain adjoining prop- 
erty in Pemberton square which had become 
vacant for the purpose of constructing a suit- 
able modern annex and giving relief in the 
matter. There was also the order which I 
introduced on August 5. 1929, to accept chapter 
368 of the Acts of 1929, entitled ''An Act to 
provide additional courthouse accommodations 
and facilities for the courts and other officials 
in the county of Suffolk." That came under 
the head of emergency legislation looking to 
the erection of a new Suffolk County Court- 
house, and the only real difference that arose 
here in regard to it was with reference to the 
split, the Legislature proposing that the city 
stand 80 per cent of the cost of construction 
and the Commonwealth the 20 per cent balance, 
while it was felt by some of our members that 
the state should bear a larger proportion of 
the cost. There was also the order that I 
offered on August 3, 1931, that the Boston City 
Council accept chapter 384 of the Acts of 
1931, which, having in mind the objection 
that had previously been made to the division 
between the state and the city, provided that 
70 per cent should be borne by the city and 
30 per cent by the state. That was defeated, 
although it had gone through with an emer- 
gency preamble. Again, last summer, during 
the absence of Mayor Curley in Europe, al- 
though I was not a member of the Council, 
I took the opportunity to write Acting-Mayor 
McGrath suggesting that advantage be taken 
of the Federal grant of 30 per cent outright 
for public works, the balance to be divided 
between the state and the city. I felt that it 
was a good opportunity to take advantage of 
that grant and to carry through an important 
public project, for which we would have some- 
thing to show ; that we could thereby get a 
new county courthouse, which it had been 
agreed throughout all these years that the city 
should have, the only disagreement being as 
to the proportion that should be borne by the 
city and the state, and that the grant of 
Federal funds afforde<i us a good opportunity 
to avoid that issue. And so I now again 
urge the Mayor, incident to this Federal works 
program, to consider plans for a new county 
courthouse or an adequate addition to the same. 
At a time when the authorities are trying to 
double the 18,000 odd city employees, and when 
every effort is being made to put men at work 
and to accomplish something in the line of 
public projects, it seems to me, as long as the 
taxpayers will have to ultimately pay a good 
proportion of the amount granted, whether the 
amount is sent to Washington or to the City 
of Boston, we might try to see if we cannot 
obtain some tangible results for the money 
spent, something that will be really worth 
while. Therefore, I urge the attention of the 
present Mayor to this matter. Our present 
Mayor has been honored by election to presi- 
dency of the Bar Association, and he is natur- 
ally interested in having all possible decent 
facilities afforded for the transaction of the 
legal business of the county. I trust, there- 
fore, that he will interest himself in acting on 
behalf of a new or an improved Suffolk County 
Courthouse, something which will naturally 
appeal to him, and something of which he as 
much as any man sees the need. I trust 
that the initiative in this matter will be taken 
by the city, having in mind the delays that 
we see in the construction of such Federal 
buildings as the post office, with its inadequate 
elevators and inadequate heating system. I 
certainly feel, at a time like this, when we are 
all looking to work on public improvements 
to help us out of our present depression and 
to also furnish additional facilities for the 
public, this matter may be seriously considered, 
even although it means double or treble shifts. 
so that when we have spent millions of dollars 
in carrying through such a project we shall 
at least have something to which we can point 
with pride, one great public improvement that 
will stand there as a visible testimonial to the 
amounts that have been spent. 
The order was passed. 



HEIATBRS IN POLICE CARS. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following : 
Ordered. That the Police Commissioner of 
Boston be requested to consider the advis- 
ability of making an appropriation this year 
for the installation of heaters in police cars, 
used during the winter period. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



Adjourned at 3.07 p. m., on motion of Coun. 
NORTON, to meet on Monday. January 8, 
1934, at 2 p. m. 



36 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



procebdincjS of school 
committee. 

Dec. 18, 1933 
A regular meeting of the School 
Committee of the City of Boston 
was held in the Administration 
Building, 15 Beacon Street, at 8:57 
o'clock P. M., the Chairman pre- 
siding. 

Present: Messrs. Hurley, Mackey, 
Mrs. Pigeon, Messrs. Reilly and To- 
bin. 

AMENDMENT AND APPROVAL 
OF MINUTES 

On motion, the minutes of previ- 
ous meetings were amended as fol- 
lows: 

Sept. 18, 1933, on page 153, to pro- 
vide that the following-named text 
book authorized for use under 
Spanish in Order No. 2 shall read 
as follows: 

"Hills, Elijah Clarence, edi- 
tor. Spanish Tales for Be- 
ginners, revised edition. 
Henry Holt and Company, 
cpt. 1919. Grade X....net 1.088 
Sept. 18, 1933, on page 154, to 
provide that the following-named 
text book authorized for use under 
Science in Order No. 5, shall read 
as follows: 

"Moon, Truman J. and 
Mann, Paul B. Biology 
for Beginners, cpt. 1933. 
Henry Holt and Company. 
Grade IX net 1.29 

The reading of the minutes of 
the previous meeting was omitted, 
the Committee approving them as 
printed. 



DEATHS 

The Superintendent reported the 
deaths of the following-named 
teachers: 

Michelangelo Intermediate Dis- 
trict—Isabella J. Ray, master's as- 
sistant, Nov. 29, 1933. 

Sherwin District — Rose E. 
Conaty, assistant, elementary, Dec. 
5, 1933. 

Placed on file. 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named 
teacher, who had been retired on 
pension: 

Girls' High School— Elizabeth L. 
Smith. Dec. 6, 1933. 

Placed on file. 



RETIREMENT ON PENSION 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 18, 1933, reporting 
the retirement from active service 
of the following-named member of 
the Boston Retirement System, to 
take effect Dec. 31, 1933, as certi- 
fied by the Boston Retirement 
Board, under date of Dec. 15, 1933: 

Eliot District— John J. Sheehan, 
Dec. 31, 1933. 

Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENTS AND 
TRANSFERS 

The following appointments and 
transfers by the Superintendent, 
certified by him as being in ac- 



cordance with the rules and regu- 
lations, to take effect on the dates 
stated, were presented: 

(FROM THE ELIGIBLE LIST) 

(To fill vacancies allowed in budget) 

English High School — Joseph L. 
Kenney, junior master, eighth 
year, Jan. 2, 1934. 

Hyde Park High School— Rachel 
Kruger, assistant, Jan. 2, 1934. 

Jamaica Plain Hi '-! School — Cle- 
ment C. Maxwell, junior master, 
eighth year, Jan. 15, 1934. 

Roxbury Memorial High School 
(Boys) — George R. Faxon, junior 
master, Jan. 2, 1934. 

Beethoven District — Claire M. 
Carty, assistant, elementary, Jan. 2. 
1934. 

Clarence R. Edwards Intermedi- 
ate Di'Jtrict— Thomas J. F. Teehan. 
assistant, intermediate (from as- 
sistant, elementary, Henry Grew 
District), Jan. 2, 1934. 

Minot District — Marguerite M. 
Coughlan. assistant, elementary, 
Jan. 2, 1934. 

Thomas N. Hart District — Eve- 
lyn M. Chisholm, assistant, inter- 
mediate, Jan. 2, 1934. 

Department of Household Science 
and Arts — Catherine F. Farreli. 
teacher of sewing, elementary Jan. 
2, 1934. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointments approved. 

(To fill vacancy caused by in- 
crease in numbers) 

Boston Clerical School — E-Ieen 
M. Weller, senior assistant, Jan. 2, 
1934. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointment approved. 

(To fill vacancy caused by pro- 
motion) 

Donald McKay Intermedit.te Dis- 
trict — Dorothea M. Dinand, assist- 
ant, intermediate, Jan. 2, 1934. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointment approved. 

(To fill vacancies caused by 
transfers) 
Henry L. Higginson District — 
Elizabeth A. Scheele, assistant el- 
ementary. Jan. 2, 1934. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointment approved. 

(To fill vacancies caused by 
resignations) 

Charles Sumner District — Doro- 
thy A. Hynes, assistant, elemen- 
tary, Jan. 2, 1934. 

Elihu Greenwood District — Char- 
lotte A. Regele, assistant, elemen- 
tary, Jan. 2, 1934. 

Julia Ward Howe District — Dor- 
othy G. Cussen, assistant, elemen- 
tary, Jan. 2, 1934. 

Minot District — Elizabeth M. 
Corr, assistant, elementary, Jan. 2, 
1934. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointments approved. 

BY PROMOTION) 

(To fill vacancy caused by 
transfer) 
Edmund P. Tileston District — 
Cornelius J. O'Connell, sub-master 
(from assistant, intermediate, 
Blackinton District), Jan. 2, 1934. 
The rules were suspended and 
the appointment approved. 



(ASSISTANT. DAY HIGH SCHOOLS, 
FROM SENIOR ASSISTANT, BOSTON 
CLERICAL SCHOOL) 

(To fill vacancy caused by 

transfer) 

Dorchester High School for 

Girls — Edith Dvilnsky, assistant 

(from senior assistant, Boston 

Clerical School), Jan. 2. 1934. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointment approved. 

(SENIOR ASSISTANT, BOSTON CLERI- 
CAL SCHOOL, FROM ASSISTANT, 
DAY HIGH SCHOOLS) 

(To fill vacancy caused by 

transfer) 

Boston Clerical School — Marion 

L. McCarthy, senior assistant (from 

assistant, Dorchester High School 

for Girls), Jan. 2. 1934. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointment approved. 

(BOSTON DISCIPLINARY DAY SCHOOL) 

Boston Disciplinary Day School 
— Deborah F. Barry, assistant 
(from assistant, elementary, Hugh 
O'Brien District). Dec. 7, 1933. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointment approved. 

LIST OF TEACHERS APPROVED FOR 
TEMPORARY SERVICE 

The Superintendent submitted 
under the provision of section 2G5 
paragraph 2 of the regulations, the 
following additions to the lis* of 
teachers approved by him from 
which assignments may be m.ade 
for temporary service: 

Day High Schools — Edwina M. 
Barry, Helen M. Barry, Thomas R. 
Cunningham, Helen D. Curtin, 
Agnes C. Delaney, Dorothy G. De- 
war, M. Bernice Duffy, Marion C 
Fisher, Katherine M. Ford, Sdi'h 
M. Foster Ethel T. Greaney, Bea- 
trice E. Kingsley, Jacqueline M. 
Lamarca, Blanche J. Long, Mary 
I. Lord, Margaret E. Lynch, Marie 
T. MacNeil, Florence Magnv-T, 
Ruth M. Magnuson, Marie E. 
Malaguerra, Fay S. Margolis, 
Mabel C. McAnany, Elise Mcilale, 
Helen J Mitchell, Eleanor L. Mor- 
ris, Frances E. Murphy, Olive B. 
Nelson, Mary E. Nichols, Heler> T. 
O'Connell, Margaret Ricker, Kath- 
erine A. Riley, Margaret P. Ri'ey, 
Mary K. Riley, Mary G. Sweeney, 
Mary A. Tilley, Alice A. Tyner, 
Harriet A. White, Constance G. 
Willson. 

Day Intermediate Schools — El- 
eanor V. Amirault, Selma B. Axel- 
rod, Henry J. Ballem, Ida B. Baz- 
oll, Eleanor F. Blagdon, Dorothy 
G. Cushing, Marie J. Colpoys, Mary 
G. Diaz, Helen R. Finnegan, Nura 
Globus, Anna D. Gray, Kathleen E. 
Howard, Ralph C. lacapucci, Mar- 
garet 'V. MacKinnon, Caroline L. 
Mekelburg, Inez B. Miller, Eleanor 
L. Morris, C. Irene Murphy, Mar- 
garet Roberts, Katherine R. Sheer- 
in, Sara F. Silverman, Florence 
Skalsky, Sarah Spiegel, Marie F. 
Sullivan, Nora L. Sullivan, Joseph 
A. V. Tracy, Helen D. Walsh, Irene 
G. Welsh, Eunice M. A. Wilson. 

Day Elementary Schools — Anne 
E. Armstrong, J. Eileen Barrett, 
Eva A. Bertagna, Dorothy M. Bo- 
land, Anna G. Boudwin, Catherine 
I. Boylan, Louise V. Bryant, Marie 
H. Campbell, Catherine A. Carleton, 
Catherine P. Carty, Margaret M. 
Casey, Agnes A. Clancy, Ida Cohen, 
Marion D. Cohen, Helen M. Collins, 
Catherine B. Conners, Rita T. Con- 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



37 



way, Veronica A. Croke, Marie H. 
Crowley, Charlotte M. Crozier, Dor- 
othea E. Cusack, Catherine M. Da- 
cey, Kathryn F. Doherty, Isabel A. 
Downey, Ethel H. Duncan, Alice G. 
Dunne, Edith R. Eldracher, Loretta 
M. Feely, Dorothy G. Fetridge, 
Mary A. Fitzsimons, Elizabeth M. 
Flynn, Katherine L. Fogarty, Alice 
E. Gallagher, Elizabeth I. Garvin, 
Esther A. Grant, Frances E. Hee- 
nan, Ethel H. Heffron, 'Georgia L. 
Home, Katherine L. Jenness, Aga- 
tha G. Kearney, Mary F. Keefe, 
Margaret R. King, Gertrude Kra- 
mer, Marcella J. Laundrie, Mar- 
garet E. Leahy, Esther K. Leonard, 
Helen M. Lorenz, Helen M. Lynch, 
Mary R. MacDonald, Anna I. Ma- 
chado, Margaret E. MacNeil, 
Louise V. Maguire, M. Isabelle Ma- 
honey, Georgia M. Mangiaracina, 
Mary M. Manning, Evelyn J. Mar- 
tin, Merwyn E. McCormick, Mary 
E. McDermott, Catherine C. Mc- 
Grath, Mary M. Miller, Dorothy K. 
Morrill, Margaret M. Morse, Fran- 
ces E. Muphy, Marjorie C. Murphy, 
Veronica R. Murphy, Catherine E. 
O'Connor, Dolores M. A. O'Connor, 
Dorothy M. O'Day, Frances D. 
O'Leary, Amy L. Palladino, Evelyn 
V. Penta, Rose R. Rappaport, Eliz- 
abeth M. Reagan, Florence M. 
Reid, Sarah M. Rollo. Cecile B. 
Rubin, Florence E. Rubin, Mary A. 
Russell, M. Evelyn Russell, Ger- 
trude H. Schultz, Alice F. Seufert, 
Freda P. Shapiro, Helen F. Simon- 
ton, Ethel M. Smith, R. Emily 
Smith, Margarita M. Sturniolo, 
Margaret H. Sullivan, Miriam H. 
Sullivan, Mabelle K. Supple, Ger- 
trude Sussman, Agnes V. Sweeney, 
Helen E. Tarbox, Mary E. Terrio, 
Doris W. Tracy, Margaret H. 
Tracy, Mary J. Tracy, Mary E. 
Twomey, Clarissa Wall, Florence I. 
Walsh, M. Lillian Wantman, Doris 
A. Warner, Loretta M. Wellings, 
Marjorie M. Williams, Rosamond 

A. Wilson, Esther S. Winn, Lillian 
S. Wittenberg, Dorothy B. Yoffe. 

Kindergartens — Edith E. Drew, 
M. Claire Dukeshire, Thelma Gold- 
berg, Marcella J. Laundrie, Mar- 
garet A. Lavin, Mary R. MacDon- 
ald, Frances P. O'Shea, Gertrude 
Sussman, M. Lillian Wantman, 
Marion T. Welch. 

Continuation School — Sebastian 

B. Littauer. 

Special Classes — Mary M. Dooley, 
Pauline Ehrlich, Eileen M. Mc- 
Carthy, Ruth C. V'aggett, M. Lil- 
lian Wantman. 

Speech Improvement Classes — 
Hanna V. McLaughlin. 

Department of Household Science 
and Arts— Ellen Armstrong, Edith 
H. McPeake, Josephine E. Messina, 
Marie A. L. Pacht — teachers of 
sewing; J. Stanley Curran, print- 
ing. 

Department of Physical Educa- 
tion — Ruth E. Ambrose. 

Aproved. 

TEMPORARY TEACHERS 

East Boston High School— Frank 
Celona, co-operative - instructor, 
Dec. 8, 1933; Ralph J. Nielsen, co- 
operative instructor, Dec. 11, 1933. 

Department of Manual Arts — 
Raymond J. Pemberton, shop in- 
structor, Nov. 24, 1933; George 
Thompson, assistant, manual train- 
ing, intermediate, Dec. 4, 1933; 
Christopher J. Tosney, shop in- 
structor, Dec. 4, 1933. 

Approved. 



TOOLKEEPER 

On motion of the Superintend- 
ent, it was 

ORDERED, That the emergency 
employment of Thomas Radcliffe 
as toolkeeper, South Boston High 
School, for the period Nov. 15 to 

22, 1933, inclusive, is hereby au- 
thorized, compensation for such 
service to be at the rate of three 
dollais ($3) per day. 

EVENING SCHOOLS 

Term 1933-34 
Principal 
Roger Wolcott Evening School — 
Catherine J. Norton, Dec .11, 1933. 
Approved. 

Appointments 

Girls' Evening Commercial High 
School — Josephine Wentworth, as- 
sistant, Dec. 4, 1933, (one evening.) 

Roxbury Evening Commercial 
High School — Henry P. Moore, as- 
sistant. Dec. 12, 1933, to Dec. 14, 
1933 (two evenings.) 

West Roxbury Evening Commer- 
cial High School — Leo V. Halloran, 
assistant, Dec. 4, 1933 (one even- 
ing.) 

Bigelow Evening School — Mar- 
garet H. Sullivan, assistant, Dec. 12, 
to Dec. 14, 1933 (two evenings.) 

Brighton Evening Elementary 
School — Louise H. Best, assistant, 
Nov. 27. 1933: Marie L. Burke, as- 
sistant, Dec. 4, 1933 (one evening.) 

Dearborn Evening School — FJelen 
R. Smith, assistant, Dec. 14, 1!^33 
(one evening.) 

Grover Cleveland Evening School 
— Agnes L. Lally, assistant, Dec 4, 
1933, to Dec. 14, 1933 (four eve- 
nings.) 

Michelangelo Evening School — 
Marie L. Burke, assistant, Dec. 5, 
1933 (one evening.) 

Washington Evening Sibool-- 
Daisy D. McBurnie, assistant, Nov. 

23, 1933 (one evening.) 

Boston Trade School (Evening 
Classes) — Edward J. Oakes, assist- 
ant, Dec. 11 to 14, 1933 (three eve- 
nings.) 

Approved. 

DEPARTMENT OF EXTENDED USE OF 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 18, 1933, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
the following-named persons to 
serve in the Department of Ex- 
tended Use of the Public Schools, 
for the term 1933-34: 

Leaders — James M. Barry, 
George J. Taylor, Dec. 1, 1933; 
Theresa V. Minichiello, Anna T. 
Mulry, Dec. 4, 1933. 

Assistant Leaders — William W. 
Brooks, Dec. 8, 1933; George A. 
Kelley, Dec. 4, 1933; Anna T. 
Mulry. Dec. 6, 1933. 

General Helpers — William W. 
Brooks, George A. Kelley, Dec. 11, 
1933. 

Approved. 



TRANSFERS 

Louise F. Hill, assistant, elemen- 
tary. Harvard District, to the same 
position in the Warren District, 
Jan. 2, 1934. 

Approved. 



Mary A. Meely, assistant, Grover 
Cleveland Evening School, to the 
same position in the Dearborn Eve- 
ning School, Dec. 4, 1933 (one eve- 
ning). 

Approved. 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 18. 1933, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee and at the re- 
quest of the teacher, he has dis- 
continued the leave of absence 
without pay granted at the 
meeting of October 16. 1933 (see p. 
174) to take effect on the date 
stated: 

Thomas Gardner District — M. 
Grace Seymour, assistant, elemen- 
tary, Dec. 1, ■'.933. 

Placed on file and the leave of 
absence discontinued on the date 
stated. 

On the report of the Superin- 
tendent, leave of absence was 
granted each of the following- 
named teachers for the terms 
specified: 

The Tpachers College— Mary C. 
Shute, professor, Nov. 23 and Nov. 
24, 1933, two days, court summons. 

Dorchester High School for Boys 
—Robert C. Schimmel, junior mas- 
ter, Nov. 23, 1933. one-half day, 
court summons. 

Department of Manual Arts- 
George E. Cole, shop instructor, 
Nov. 22, 1933, one day, court sum- 
mons. 

Charles Sumner District— Mary 
E. Hughes, assistant, elementary, 
Nov. 3, 1933, one day, court sum- 
mons. 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 18, 1933, reporting that 
he has made the following designa- 
tions of teachers to serve in the 
positions indicated until such time 
as they shall be filled otherwise in 
accordance with the rules and regu- 
lations, but not beyond Aug. 31, 
1934: 

John Winthrop District— Mary E. 
Nugent, assistant, elementary, as 
acting master's assistant (vice 
Anna T. O'Brien, absent on leave), 
Nov. 9, 1933. 

Mather District— Dorothea A. 
Schiel, assistant, kindergarten, Lwo 
sessions, as acting first assistant, 
kindergarten, two sessions (vice 
Clara Ransom, absent on leave;, 
Oct. 9. 1933. 

Trade School for Girls— Margaret 
A. Sullivan, trade assistant, as act- 
ing head of department, Sept 15, 
1933. 

Placed on file. 



COURSE OF STUDY, TRAINING 

SCHOOL FOR TEACHERS OF 

MECHANIC ARTS 

On motion of the Superintendent, 
it was 

ORDERED. That the courses of 
study for the Training School for 
Teachers of Mechanic Arts, as 
adopted at the meeting of June 15, 
1931 (see pp. 96-97), are hereby 
amended to read as follows: 



38 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



THREE-YEAR COURSE 
First Year 



Approx. Hrs. 
Per Week 



3 3 

W 01 Cfi 0, 



3^ 



Design 1 2 2 1 

Educational Psychology I... 2 2 3 

English I 1 1 2 

General Science 1 1 1 

Mechanical Drawing 1 2 2 1 

Related Science 1 — | 

Vocational Guidance — 1 51 

Observation and Practice 

Teaching — 5 — 

Shopwork, Major Wood- \ 

working (including Home ( 

Mechanics) 21 — ( teH 

•Shopwork, Major Elective. — 16 ) 

Total 30 30 13 

•The student must take an elective major 
shop subject, either Electrical Work, Print- 
ing or Sheet Metal. The course also in- 
cludes Methods of Teaching Shopwork, and 
Classroom Management. 

Second Year 

Design II 2 2 1 

Educational Psychology II. . 2 2 3 

Applied Psychology 2 2 2 

English II 2 2 2 

History of Education 1 1 — 11 

Industrial History I — 1 5 

Mechanical Drawing II.... 2 2 1 

Shop Mathematics 2 2 2 

Observation and Practice 

Teaching 4 4 — 

•♦Shopwork, 2 Majors, 4 ) 

hrs. each 8 8 ^2 

••Shopwork, 1 Major 5 5 j 

Total 30 30 14 

••Work in the major shop subjects is 
continued, and in addition, a third shop 
subject as a minor, taken from the two 
remaining shop subjects not taken as 
majors. "Methods" and "Management" 
are continued. 

Third Year 
Design III (including Art 

Metal Work) 2 2 2 

English III 1 1 2 

History of Education II.... 1 — 1 

Industrial History II — ■ 1 jl 

Advanced Mathematics .... 1 1 1 

Character Education 1 1 1 

Observation and Practice 

Teaching 6 6 i 

•♦•Shopwork, 2 Majors, 6 ^ 

hrs 12 12 f4 

•••Shopwork, 1 Minor 6 6 j 

Total 30 30 13 

•••Work in the major shop subjects is 
continued and the student must take the 
fourth shop subject as a second major. 
"Methods" and "Management" are con- 
tinued. 

Note: The course covers three years in 
two major shop subjects, Woodworking aua 
one elective, and one year of each of the 
two remaining shop subjects as minors. 



TWO-YEAR COURSE 

First Year 

Approx. Hrs. 
Per Week 

3m 3k. ii 

to n- m ~ <;• 

^ q oK 

PTfo 

Design I 2 2 1 

Educational Psychology I . . 2 2 3 

English I 1 1 2 

General Science 1 1 1 

Mechanical Drawing 1 2 2 1 

Related Science 1 — 1 

Vocational Guidance — 1 51 

Observation and Practice 

Teaching — 5 — 

Shopwork, Major Woodwork, 
ing (including Home Me- 
chanics) 21 — J 

•Shopwork, Major Elective. . — 8 \i 

•Shopwork, Minor Elective. . — 8 5 

Total 30 30 13 

•The student must take an elective 
major shop subject, either Electrical work, 
Printing, or Sheet Metal: and one mmor 
shop subject from those not taken £ia 
majors. The course also includes methods 
of teaching shopwork, and class man- 
agement. 



Second Year 

Design II 2 2 1 

Educational Psychology II. . 2 2 3 

Applied Psychology 2 2 2 

English II 2 2 2 

History ot Education 1 1 — ^ 

Industrial History I — 1 51 

Mechanical Drawing II 2 2 1 

Character Education l 1 l 

Observation and Practice 

Teaching 4 4 1 

Shop Mathematics 2 2 2 

••Shopwork, 2 Majors 3% 

hrs. each 6 6 ) 

••Shopwork, Minor 6 6 51 

Total 30 30 15 

••Work in the shop major subjects is 
continued, and the remaining shop subject 
must be taken as a minor. (See note 
first year.) "Methods" and "Manage, 
ment" are continued. 

Note: Prior trade experience of six to 
eight years in either Woodworking, Elec- 
trical Work. Printing, or Sheet Metai 
will be credited in the second year in 
lieu of the corresponding major or m'lno- 
shop subject. The time thus gained j-ay 
be added to either a major or minor ^- lob 
subject. 



PAYMENT OF SALARY DUE 
AT DEATH 

On motion of the Superintendent, 
it was 

ORDERED, That the salary due 
Eleanor C. Fee, late assistant, 
kindergarten, Shurtleff District, 
be paid to her mother, Mrs. Agnes 
Fee. 



CLOSING OF ADMINISTRATIVE 
OFFICES 

The following was offered: 
ORDERED, That the administra- 
tive offices and the supply room 
of the School Committee are here- 
by closed on Saturday, Dec. 23, 
1933, and Saturday, Dec. 30, 1933. 
The rules were suspended and 
the order passed. 



AUTHORIZED LIST OF TEXT 
BOOKS 

The Superintendent offered the 
following four orders making 
changes in and additions to the 
authorized list of text books: 

1. ORDERED, That the follow- 
named books, now authorized for 
use as text books, are hereby 
dropped from the list, no further 
copies to be purchased: 

Harding, Maude B. The Junior 
Grammar. Marshall Jones, Inc. 
cpt. 1928. 

Mace, William H. and Bogardus, 
Frank S. School History. Rand, 
McNally and Company, cpt. 1920. 

Taylor, Frances L. Adventures 
in Storyland. Beckley-Cardy Com- 
pany. 

First Reader, cpt. 1928. 
Second Reader, cpt. 1930. 

2. ORDERED, That the follow- 
ing-named books are hereby au- 
thorized for use as text books as 
indicated: 

ENGLISH 
Harding, Maude B. New 
Junior Grammar. Noble 
and Noble, cpt. 1933. Grade 

VII net $ .68 

fob N. Y. 
Taylor, Frances L. Adven- 
tures in Child Land. Beck- 
ley-Cardy Company, cpt. 

1932. Grade I net .48 

Taylor, Frances L. Adven- 
tures in Happy Living. 
Beckley-Cardy Company, 
cpt. 1932. Grade II net .52 



3. ORDERED, That the revised 
editions of the following-named 
text books are hereby authorized 
for use as indicated, to take the 
place of the old editions of the 
same 

ENGLISH 
Bolenius, Emma M. Litera^ 
ture in the Junior High 
School. Book Two. 
Houghton Mifflin Com- 
pany, cpt. 1933. Grade 

VIII net $1,184 

Scott, Zenos E., Congdon, 

Randolph T., Peet, Harriet 
E. and Frazee, Laura. The 
Open Door Language Se- 
ries. Third Book. Success 
in Speaking and Writing. 
Houghton Mifflin Com- 
pany, cpt. 1933. Grade 

IX net .736 

Warren, Maude R. King 

Arthur and His Knights. 
Rand. McNally Company, 
cpt. 1933. Grade VI.. net .60 
Wiggin, Kate Douglas. Re- 
becca of Sunnybrook 
Farm. Houghton Mifflin 
Company, cpt. 1931. Grade 
VII net .64 

FRENCH 
Greenberg, Jacob. A Com- 
plete French Course. 
Charles E. Merrill Com- 
pany, cpt. 1930. Grade IX'. 1.31 
Malot, Hector. Sans Famille; 
ed. by Robert Foure and 
Helene Foure. Charles E. 
Merrill Company. cpt. 
1928. Grade X net .56 

GEOGRAPHY 
Barrows, Harlan H. Parker, 
Edith Putnam and Parker, 
Margaret Terrell. Europe 
and Asia. Silver Burdett 
and Company, cpt. 1933. 

Grade VI net 1.08 

f.o.b Newark 
Shepherd, Edith P. Geog- 
raphy for Beginners. 
Rand, McNally Company, 
cpt. 1933. Grade IV... net .72 

MERCHANDISING 
Rowse, Edward J. and Fish, 
Louis J. The Fundamen- 
tals of Advertising. South- 
western Publishing Com- 
pany, cpt. 1931. Grade 
IX net .99 



4. ORDERED, That the author- 
ization of the following-named text 
book for use in Grade VII is here- 
by extended to include Grade V: 
Bodley, G. R. and Thurston, 
E. L. North America and 
South America. Iroquois 
Publishing Company, cpt. 
1932. (Not more than 45 
copies to be purchased for 
a school or district), .net $1.11 
and accompanying work 

book, cpt. 1932 net .36 

f.o.b. Syracuse 
The four orders were laid over. 



ANNUAL STATISTICS 

The Superintendent presented 
the Annual Statistics for the Bos- 
ton Public Schools for the calen- 
dar year 1932 and school year 1932- 
1933, 'being School Document No. 
6. 1933. 

Placed on file. 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



39 



ADVISORY COMMITTEES 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 18, 1933, reporting the 
resignation of George A. Blan- 
chard as a member of the Advisory 
Committee. Cooperative Industrial 
Course, Brighton High School, be- 
cause of removal from the city. 

Placed on file and the resigna- 
tion accepted. 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 18, 1933, submitting 
the following appointment to an 
Advisory Committee for the term 
ending Aug. 31, 1935: 

Cooperative Industrial Course, 
Brighton High School 

A. M. Marston, Head of Used 
Car Depai^tment, Noyes Buick 
Company, 857 Commonwealth Ave- 
nue, Boston. 

Approved. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EX- 
PENDITURES TO DEC. 1, 1933 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Nov. 30, 1933, submitting 
a statement showing the appro- 
priations, the expenditures and the 
balances for maintenance of the 
public schools for the first eleven 
drafts of the current financial year, 
the expenditures for the fjrst 
eleven drafts of the financial year 
1932, and the increases and de- 
creases in the several items. 

Placed on file. 



CHANGE IN RANK, THOMAS J. 
O'KEEFE. 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Dec. 18, 1933, recommend- 
ing, with the approval of the De- 
partment of Civil Service and 
Registration, a change in rating of 
Thomas J. O'Keefe from junior 
messenger to assistant. 

Placed on file. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED. That the rank of 
Thomas J. O'Keefe, Junior Messen- 
ger in the office of the Business 
Manager, be changed to Assistant, 
to take effect Dec. 18, 1933. 

The Chairman stated that the 
foregoing involves no change in 
salary. 

RE-CERTIFICATION OF AREAS 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Dec. 18. 1933, .sj»- 
mitting a re-certification of the 
areas of the Robert Gould Shaw 
School, upon which the compensa- 
tion for custodian service is based, 
to take effect Nov. 1, 1933. 

Placed on file and the Chairman 
authorized to approve such re- 
certification, to take effect on the 
date stated. 



LEAVE OF ABSENCE TO 
CUSTODIAN 

A communication was recti veo 
from the Schoolhouse Cust.dian 
under date of Dec. 18, 1933, recom- 
menflung that John E. Murphy, 



custodian. Harvard School-house, 
be granted leave of absence oi; one- 
half net compensation for the peri- 
od Dec. 2, 1933 to Feb. 2, 1934, in- 
clusive, because of personal illn-^ss. 
Placed on file and leave of ab- 
sence on one-half net compei>ea- 
tion granted for the period speci- 
fied. 



APPOINTMENT TO PORTABLE 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Dec. 18, 1933, recom- 
mending that Daniel C. Danick, 
custodian, John A. Andrew School- 
house, be also appointed custodian 
of Portable No. 222, located in the 
yard of that school, to take effect 
Dec. 1, 1933. 

Placed on file and the appoint- 
ment approved, to take effect on 
the date stated. 



STUDY OF CAUSES OF HIGH- 
WAY ACCIDENTS 

On motion of Mr. Hurley, the 
following communication was or- 
dered sent to Dr. Karl T. Comp- 
ton. President, Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology: 

"The Boston School Committee 
has noted with approval the un- 
dertaking by your renowned Insti- 
tution of an exhaustive scientific 
study of the causes of highway ac- 
cidents, and wishes to express to 
you its appreciation of the spirit 
of j'ublic service so manifested. 
Particularly we thank you and 
your colleagues on behalf of the 
school children, always peculiarly 
exposed to peril on the highways, 
for this effort to create a greater 
condition of safety upon the public 
thoroughfares. 

"The piecemeal and sporadic 
surveys that are made from time 
to time perhaps serve a purpose. 
We would not wish to discourage 
or belittle any honest effort to de- 
crease the terrible toll of life that 
the motor vehicle exacts, the ratio 
of which to the number of cars on 
the roads is increasing steadily 
over a term of years. We merely 
consider this sort of campaign as 
falling lamentably short of achiev- 
ing any lasting results. 

"The only way that the position 
of the motor vehicle in our life 
will pioperly be aligned is through 
scientific study of the causes of 
accidents, carried out fearlessly 
and without regard to special in- 
terests — in a word, such a study 
as the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology is undertaking." 



DIVISION OF DEPARTMENT 
OF MANUAL ARTS 

Mrs. Pigeon: I have shared the 
feeling, Mr. Chairman, that many 
others have had for many years 
and my attention was called to it 
four years ago, that the title 
"Manual Arts" as applied to the 
Department of Manual Arts is mis- 
leading. The excellent idea of cor- 
relating shop work and design led 
former Superintendent Brooks to 
unite the two departments. Th'p 
names "manual training" and 
"art" wer^ combined to form 
"manual arts." Why the house- 
hold science and arts were not in- 
cluded at the same time, I do not 
know. Probably it was because 



the Director ct that time was a 
man and not supposed to sew and 
cook. Art teachers and supervi- 
sois have always cooperated with 
other departments in matters of 
design. The Director and assist- 
ants in the department have given 
talks to kindergartners, special 
class teachers, cookery and sew- 
ing teachers, i..s well as shop teach- 
ers. Design knowledge and art 
judgment are needed in all of 
these activities, but obviously the 
art director does not need to head 
all of these departments in order' 
to be of service. Would it not 
clarify the whole situation if the 
art department were made a unit 
in itself, free to lend its influence 
to all other departments in every 
grade of school life, as it does now, 
with a title which more nearly 
describes the character of the 
work? 

Although the "Department of 
Art Education" is generally used 
in the United States, I am recom- 
mending the term "Fine Arts De- 
partment," and also, for the other 
unit of that department, I am 
recommending either "Manual Arts" 
or "Mechanic Arts." 

Therefore, I offer the following 
motion: 

That the Department of Manual 
Arts be divided into two parts, — a 
Department of Fine Arts, or a De- 
partment of Art Education; and a 
Department of Mechanic Arts, or a 
Department of Manual Arts. 

Mr Hurley suggested that in 
view of the substantial changes 
that would be involved by this 
motion, it be referred for considera- 
tion to the Superintendent and the 
Board of Superintendents. Mrs. 
Pigeon concurred in the suggestion 
and the Chairman announced that 
the motion was so referred. 



APPRECIATION OF RETIRING 

MEMBERS, JUNIOR MASTERS' 

ASSOCIATION 

The Secretary read the follow- 
ing resolution adopted by the 
Junior Masters' Association: 

The Junior Masters' Association 
wishes to express its appreciation 
of the efforts of the retiring mem- 
bers of the School Committee, 
Mrs. Elizabeth W. Pigeon and Mr. 
Wm. Arthur Reilly, to maintain 
the standaids of the Boston public 
schools at high level. 

The high school men of Boston 
are especially grateful to the pres- 
ent Committee, and particularly to 
the Chairman, for setting the 
prec«dent of direct contact with 
representatives of the school serv- 
ice when salary matters are under 
discussion. 

Unanimously approved, Dec. 18, 

1933. 
The Junior Masters' Association 
by William J. Roche. 
President. 
Placed on file. 

The Chairman read the following 
statement: 

It does not seem as though four 
years have passed since I, at the 
age of twenty-six. first came to 
the School Committee, nor does it 
seem two years since I was elected 
chairman of this board. 

So much has taken place durmg 
these four years that it is hard to 



40 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



enumerate the important happen- 
ings in the School Board during 
these four years. On the pliysical 
side the School Department has 
been enlarged by the addition to 
the Public Latin School, by the 
construction of the Dorchester 
High School and by the imminent 
construction of the West Roxbury 
High School and the South Boston 
Intermediate School; also by the 
construction of the Thomas A. Edi- 
son Intermediate School, the Clar- 
ence R. Edwards, the Woodrow 
Wilson and the Mary E. Curley 
Intermediate Schools. Additions 
have been made to other buildings 
and other substantial construction 
has taken place during this term. 

We have appointed about two 
hundred new teachers, doctors, and 
custodians. We have elected a new 
superintendent, a new assistant 
superintendent, and reelected most 
of the Board of Superintendents. 
We have appointed a new Director 
of the Department of School Hy- 
giene and a Supervisor of Health 
Education. We have a new Superin- 
tendent of Construction and we 
have reelected a commissioner in 
the Department of School Build- 
ings. These are but a few of the 
additions that have been made to 
the staff and they are all the more 
interesting when we realize that 
the cost of maintaining the school 
department has reduced annusilly 
about twenty percent during this 
four year period. 

We had become accustomed to 
the spending of over twenty mil- 
lion dollars per year for the main- 
tenance of our school system but 
we are now getting along with ap- 
proximately sixteen million dollars. 
No doubt when the depression is 
.over, school expenses will increase 
with the resumption of increments, 
the abolition of the fifteen per 
cent pay cut for school employees 
and with the addition of new con- 
struction of school buildings out of 
current taxation. With reference 
to new construction I would say 
that within ten years we will have 
all the buildings that we will need 
for the average demands of our 
school population, so that annual 
expenses will not find this activity 
occupying a large part of our school 
budget. 

Construction Costs. 

In our attempt to catch up with 
the floating population, we have 
had to spend approximately three 
and one-half million dollars each 
year for new buildings and this 
added to our average expense of 
one and one-half million dollars 
for repairs and alterations and 
maintenance of school buildings 
has been a large portion of our 
school budget. 

Salary Schedule. 

Nothing has given me more re- 
gret than the existence of the pay 
cut for our loyal school service, 
and I look upon it as something 
which should be rectified at the 
very earliest possible moment, as 
soon as our funds and legal author- 
ity will permit. This applies not 
only to the fifteen per cent reduc- 
tion, but also to the loss of incre- 
ments which has caused many in 
our service very much hardship. 
Important Legislation. 

1. I have looked with particular 
pleasure upon the agreement to 
change the marking system during 
this past year. This new system 



will clarify ratings both for pupils 
and for teachers in subsequent 
years. 

2. The existence of an examined 
substitutes list has done away with 
the suspicion that there was fa- 
voritism in oui assignments for 
temporary teaching work. 

3. The adoption of the best rec- 
ommendations made by the two 
Survey Committees whose reports 
were rendered during the past 
four years has ass'ired everyone 
that our school system is function- 
ing on an efficient basis. It was 
inspiring to find that both survey 
committees, the first including in 
its membership the President of 
Harvard University, and the second 
under the auspices of the Finance 
Commission, found that substantial- 
ly there was nothing wrong with the 
school administration. Individual 
recommendations were made and 
most of them were put into effect 
by the School Committee. I doubt 
if there is any city department 
which can boast of equal efficiency 
with the school department as it 
stands today. 

4. Through the adoption of a 
Radio program, Boston schools 
have pioneered in a new form of 
dispensing knowledge without any 
increased cost to the school budget. 

Our schools are getting a maxi- 
mum result in the lines of educa- 
tion with a mimumum expense. 
Our educational efficiency has 
been approved by outside and in- 
dependent educators, and our fi- 
nancial expenditures have been ap- 
proved by representatives of our 
tax paying citizens. 

It IS interesting to note here that 
there has been absolutely no re- 
duction in personnel during these 
past rour years and this fact when 
considered with the fact that our 
maintenance of a full educational 
program without curtailment at the 
lowest expense this year that it has 
been possible to achieve, certainly 
reflects credit upon the School 
Committee which has functioned 
unselfishly in the interest of our 
citizens. 

Employment Problem 

The biggest problem which faces 
the new Committee is that of 
furnishing employment for the 
large number who are on our lista 
properly qualified for school teach- 
ing work. It is our hope that jn 
the near future the Civil Works Ad- 
ministration will permit us to avail 
ourselves of this fine talent, and I 
hope that the new Committee will 
find ways and means to permanent- 
ly enrol! all who are qualified m 
our regular and permanent service. 

Speaking personally, I wish to 
say that the character of service 
that I have rendered as a member 
and as chairman of the School 
Committee may be best judged by 
the opinion of my associates on 
the Committee, by the Superintend- 
ent of Schools, by the Business 
Manager and jy the other officials 
with whom I have had daily and 
weekly contacts. These officials 
know whether or not my efforts in 
behalf of the school system have 
been tinged wth any sharo practice 
in my official capacity, or with 
any personal prejudice. If any ap- 
praisal of my personal service is 
necessary I leave it those I have 
mentioned. The number of letters 
I have received during the past 
week from school authorities and 



the complimentary notice which the 
newspapers have given by editor- 
ials with eference tc my with- 
drawal from the School Committee 
have been most inspiring; and I am 
deeply grateful to all who have 
been so kind to me as to voice 
their compliments on my service. 
I. in turn, desire to pay my respects 
to some of those with whom I have 
come in contact most frequently. 
Committee Members 

Mrs. Pigeon has served with me 
for four years. She has occupied 
a most difficult position, being the 
only woman on a board of five, 
and with all due respect to the in- 
coming members, it is with sincere 
regret that I see her pass from 
this Committee. She has always 
given fair and mature, considera- 
tion to every problem that we have 
faced, and she has given an ex- 
ample of public service that will 
stand as a model of self sacrifice 
and high minded judgment. 

The remaining members are pos- 
sessed of experience and ability to 
continue the high standards of 
previous school committees. The 
school service, I am sure, will con- 
tinue to have every confidence in 
the logical mind of Mr. Hurley, in 
the analytical mind of Mr. Tobin 
and the ever ready sympathy of 
Dr. Mackey. The high regard 
which the people of this city have 
for the incoming members is testi- 
fied to by the vote received. Doc- 
tor Lyons returns to add to our 
experienced membership. My re- 
gard for him was expressed at the 
last meeting which he attended as 
a member of the Committee and i 
refer you to the record of those re- 
marks. Mr. Sullivan shows prom- 
ise of justifying the high hopes 
which his friends have in him, and 
I wish this new Committee the 
fullest measure of success during 
their term of service. 

Officers of the Committee. 

In our Superintendent I have 
found a man genial, able and sin- 
cere according to the best funda- 
mental ideals of education, assisted 
by a board of superintendents 
which commands respect from all 
who have had continuous experi- 
ence in dealing with that body. The 
Boston schools are safe in the 
hands of our present superinten- 
dent and his assisting board. 

In the Business Manager we have 
a man of "super-honesty," if I may 
coin such a phrase, an executive 
whose department is a model of 
efficiency and high integrity for 
all such public agencies to emulate. 
There has never been a shadow of 
suspicion on his department dur- 
ing his term of office and he has ef- 
fected tremendous savings for the 
people of Boston through his effi- 
cient service. 

In our Secretary, Miss Cronin, we 
have one of the most efficient 
women occupying a high place in 
any municipal government. For 
many years she has served the 
Board of Apportionment, the Board 
of Superintendents, the Superin- 
tendent and the School Committee 
with remarkable efficiency. No 
more complete tribute can be paid 
to any person than the presenta- 
tion of such a statement as this 
from one who has had occasion to 
intimately observe and benefit by 
that service during a period of four 
years. 

In our custodian service we have 
a beloved director in Mark Mulvey, 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



41 



whose department runs at a cost, 
per building, less than that of any 
other such department in the 
State of Massachusetts. He is as- 
sisted by Mr. Nagle, who will be 
recognized as years go on as one 
of the finest assets which the 
school department possesses with- 
in its ranks. 

I could go on with such tributes 
indefinitely, mentioning in par- 
ticulai Mr. Mulroy, director of the 
department of Extended Use, 
whose valuable service is often 
times rendered without the public 
recognition which it so well de- 
serves. He and othci directors 
have co-operated with us in every 
policy set down by the School Com- 
mittee. 

The Mayor 
Lastly, I would pay my respects 
to the Honorable James M. Curley, 
present Mayor of Boston, whose 
name will stand in the history ot 
this city among the greatest who 
have contributed to the welfare of 
our people. Under most difficult 
and trying conditions he has un- 
ceasingly labored to maintain the 
nigh standards of every depart- 
ment of the city and the School 
Committee has found in him a 
municipal authority ever co-oper- 
ative and understanding of current 
problems. 

I now leave the chair at this 
last regular meeting of the School 
Committee in the year 1933. I take 
with me only the happiest mem- 
ories of my associations in the 
school s'^rvice. I thank you all for 
having been so kind to me upon 
every occasion and 1 hope that 
my service has merited the confi- 
dence you have placed in me dur- 
ing the past four years. 

May 1 ask you to compare this 
statement with the one made by 
me at my first meeting as Chair- 
man of the School Committee, to 
see if I did what I then promised 
to do. 

Mr. Tobin: It is with regret 
that I s«e two of our fellow mem- 
bers leaving us tonight after hav- 
ing served the citizens of Boston 
on this Committee for the past 
four years. Mrs. Pigeon s loss will 
be especially great because for the 
first time in many decades the 
*■ .nmittee will be without the ad- 
vice and counsel of a woman on 
the many matters upon which ^ 
woman has a deeper insight. Dur- 
int. my years of service on the 
Commiftep. Mrs Pigeon has been 
faithful and punctual in attending 
every meeting and conf^^'ence of 
the Commit'.e,' with the exception 
o. three instances, in each of 
which s*- was attending either 
an educational convention as a 
rtpiesentative of this Board, or ^s 
a uelegate to the Mational Con- 
vention of he General F<^dTation 
of Women's Clubs. I havp pnioveri 
my years of service with Mrs. 
Pigeon, and in her passing from 
the Board, the children, the citi- 
zjns of Boston and the School 
Committee are suffering a great 
loss Mrs. Pigeon's four years of 
sPlf-sacrificing service withotit 
c.jrnn°n«ation hqv<? eix"-r> her an 
insight to public affairs that 
should make her a valuable asset 
' some appointive public position. 
It is my hope that .shi will not 
be permitted to remain in private 



life but that either the State or 
^.lunicipal government will take 
advantage of her wide and varied 
erperience jy appointing her to 
seme position worthy ,f her abil- 
1 V and talents. 

Our Chairman is likewise at- 
tending his last meeting of the 
Committee. It is my sincere belief, 
and 1 know it is also the belief of 
the other members and officers of 
the Board, that the Boston School 
Committee has had as its presiding 
officer during the last two years hs 
capable sincere and courteous a 
gentleman as has ever presided 
over the deliberations of this body 
in its history. Under his leadership 
the School Committee of Boston 
reduced its appropriation for the 
year 1933 approximately $5,500,000. 
or approximately twenty-five per- 
cent as compared with the budget 
of the year 1931. His every action 
as a member of the Committer has 
been one of dignity. During the 
most trying economic period 
through which the Boston School 
Committee has ever passed, he has 
maintained a congenial attitude 
that has been an inspiration fo all 
of us. 

In the retirement of Mrs. Pigeon 
and Mr. Reilly. the School Com- 
mittee is suffering a great loss. 

We now welcome to the Commit- 
tee two new members. Mr. Fred- 
erick R. Sullivan comes to us with 
a good background and from the 
high opinion in which he is held, 
I know he is going to be a distinct 
addition to the Committee in its de- 
liberations. 

Dr. Lyons is returning to an old 
love, service on the Boston School 
Committee, with a marvelous vote 
of approval. We welcome him back 
with the knowledge that his years 
of experience will greatly assist 
the Committee in its deliberations 
during the period of reconstruction 
through which we will pass in the 
next several years. We are com- 
ing out of a period of depression, 
probably the greatest this country 
has ever seen in its history. 

So I, personally, want to wel- 
come the two new members and 
wish the best of good fortune to 
the two retiring members. 

Mr. Hurley: There isn't much left 
for Dr. Mackey and me to say. I 
know Dr. Mackey will allow me to 
speak for him as well as for my- 
self at this time. I move that we 
adopt unanimously the sentiments 
expressed by Mr. Tobin as being 
the sentiments of all the Commit- 
tee, realizing that the retiring 
members cannot very well vote on 
the matter. 

The motion was seconded by Dr. 
Mackey and passed. 

Mrs. Pigeon: You and I, Mr. 
Chairman, have received a very 
beautiful verbal bouquet tonight 
and I second most heartily and sin- 
cerely the tribute paid you this 
evening. The complimentarv re- 
marks presented by Mr. Tobin for 
the Committee are obviously genu- 
ine. You have given most gener- 
ously of your time, vour ability, 
and your strength in order to face 
adequately the heavy responsibili- 
ties of "carrying on" wisely and 
intelligently as Chairman during 
the present serious economic situa- 
tion. 



I also deeply regret the fact that 
I am retiring from this Board. It 
has been a real joy, a rich expe- 
rience, and an education to per- 
form the duties required by so im- 
portant a branch of our municipal 
government, for I consider that 
this particular public service is the 
finest public service a citizen can 
give, because it deals with the ed- 
ucational welfare of the boys and 
girls of our city. 

Those who through participation 
or absorption become familiar with 
our own public school system of- 
tentimes are unmindful of the fact 
that a proportionately large group 
of citizens lack this intimate ac- 
quaintance. Therefore I have con- 
tinuously emphasized the slogan, 
"Know Your Public Schools." Re- 
alizing the importance of this 
credo, last spring I visited every 
building, every classroom in our 
school system. The opportunity to 
greet the Master in his school 
building, to meet the teacher and 
the child together in the class- 
room, and to see at first hand the 
diversified types of work planned 
to meet the needs of all the chil- 
dren of Boston, was a rich experi- 
ence. A day spent with each di- 
rector and each supervisor Tave 
further opportunity for a more 
comprehensive knc-.vledge of our 
school system. Although this was 
a stupendous task it was so worth- 
while I have found it invaluable 
as a background in deciding many 
important questions. I understand 
that I am a pioneer in this par- 
ticular undertaking. I am informed 
that I am the only School Commit- 
tee member who has ever contact- 
ed every classroom in the city. 

At this time I wish to thank the 
Chairman, my colleagues on the 
Board, the Superintendent, the Sec- 
retary, the Business Manager, our 
school administrators and teachers, 
and the entire school service, who 
have given their loyal support dur- 
ing these trying years through 
which we have recently passed. 
And although I shall sever my of- 
ficial contact with the Boston pub- 
lic schools the first of January, 
yet my interest will continue 
through the years. In the last 
analysis I think we should all re- 
member that a live public con- 
science and an assertive public 
opinion can always get and main- 
tain the kind of schools we feel 
our children in Boston deserve. 

Chairman: Thank you, Mrs. 
Pigeon. 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS 

The Chairman stated that the 
members would take up various 
items of unfinished business, as 
follows- 

Proposed athletic program for 
girls, laid over at the meeting of 
June 19, 1933 (see p. 105). 

Mrs. Pigeon: May I say that I 
have had a very satisfactory con- 
ference with the Superintendent 
and Mr. Snow, Assistant Superin- 
tendent in charge of that particu- 
lar work, and I have had submit- 
ted to me programs of procedures 
along this line from other cities 
which I, in turn, will submit to 
the Superintendent and Mr. Snow. 
I sincerely hope that they will 
plan definitely some program for 
the spring. 



42 



CITY RECOR D 



Jan. 13 



Chairman: List of available 
and suitable sites for a new giils' 
high school, referred to the Board 
of Superintendents at the meeting 
of Doc. 21, 1931 (see p. 326). That 
will be continued on the list. 

Chairman: Proposed establish- 
ment of six-year course at Cen- 
tral Evening High School, referred 
to the Board of Superintendents 
at the meeting of June 6, 1932 
(see p. 98). I introducpd this mo- 
tion on June 6. 1932 (p. 98) and 
while it was received with favor 
it was not formally voted upon, 
but the consensus of opinion was 
favorable. The question of expense 
has jrevented adoption of the 
plan which would enable evening 
hifirh school graduates to gain en- 
trance to college on the same ba- 
sis as graduates of the day high 
schools. That can be achieved 
only by a six-year evening high 
school course because of the lim- 
ited number of periods a week. I 
sincerely hope that as soon as 
funds ar? available this plan will 
be put into op'^ration so that those 
who are unabk to attend day 
schools, or are ambitious enough to 
attend the evening schools, may ob- 
tain a diploma which will admit 
them to colleges and schools of 
higher learning, if they desire to 
continue their education. 

Chairman: Establishment of 
Placement Bu:eau for Teachers, 
referred to th" Board ol Superin- 
* dents at the meeting of May 
1.5 1933 (-ee p. 69). 

I -ecommended this procedure 
on May 15 1933. At that time I 
believed that the Department of 
Vocational Guidance could proper- 
ly embrace within itself the func- 
tion of soliciting positions for 
graduates of our Teachers College. 
Since that time, as we all know 
the employment problem has be- 
come so complicated that it is prac- 
tically impossible for teachers to 
secure positions, so that has been 
held 'n abeyance. 1 hope that some 
time when conditions have changed, 
the Department of Vocational 
Guidance or some other depart- 
ment will vie with the private 
commission agencies where our 
candidates for teaching positions 
enroll, so that they may be able, 
through the Department of Voca- 
tional Guidance or this Placement 
Bureaa. to secure positions out- 
side of Boston and thus gain the 
expe"pnc€ required for examina- 
tion toi permanent Boston service. 
] am no' withdrawing the .-notion 
because I feel, as 1 lid at the time 
of Its introduction that it is a 
most worthy project, worthy ol the 
consideration of this Committee 
when :t is deemed advantageous 
to adopt the plan. So this will go 
over for consideration at some 
more favorable time. 

Chairman: Appointment by re- 
entry as result of examinations 
only of persons Having husbands 
living, referred to the Board of 
Superintendents at the meeting of 
June 5, 1933 (see p. 78). 

Mr. Hurley: I introduced that 
motion. I will not press for action 
in view of the later order that was 
passed which makes provision for 
the reappointment by way of re- 
entry of widows with dependent 
children, the converse of this mo- 
tion. 



Chairman: The motion will be 
placed on file. 

Chairman: Instruction on the ef- 
fect of alcohol and narcotics, re- 
ferred to the Board of Superin- 
tendents at the meeting of Dec. 4, 
1933 (see p. 209). 

This Item was introduced by 
Mrs. Pigeon at the last meeting 
and referred to the Board of Super- 
intendents. 

Mrs. Pigeon: I received, very 
soon after my request, a report 
from the Director of School Hy- 
giene and the Supervisor of Health 
Education, and tonight at the con- 
ference I recommended that a com- 
mittee be organized, appointed bv 
the Superintendent, to consider re- 
vampine our course of instruction 
along this line. 

Chairman: Course in Money 
Management, referred to the Board 
of Superintendents at the meeting 
of Dec. 4, 1933 (see p. 209). 

At the request of Mrs. Pigeon, 
the Secretary read the following re- 
report from a committee of the 
Board of Superintendents: 

"The Board of Superintendents 
has been asked to consider the ad- 
visability of establishing Money 
Management as a course in the 
public schooliS, and report back to 
the School Committee before the 
end of the year. Your committee 
would recommend that the Board 
report as follows: 

"The subject of Money Manage- 
ment is an important one and, 
especially in view of current finan- 
cial situation, is probably not be- 
ing given so much attention in con- 
nection with our courses of study 
as is desirable. 

"Thj course entitled 'Money Man- 
agement Method,' which has been 
brought to our attention, is ap- 
proved in principle and has many 
fine things about it. 

"So many problems present them- 
selves in connection with the ques- 
tion of establishing a new course 
throughout our schools, such as 
cost; appropriateness to the various 
grades; whether it should be intro- 
duced grade by grade or .simul- 
taneously through the grades: 
whether it should be experimented 
with in individual schools or cer- 
tain districts of the city; whether 
the course presented to the board 
or some other course should be 
adopted; whether such a course 
should have a separate time allot- 
ment or the time be taken from 
some existing subject allotment; 
that additional time is requested 
for consultation with supervisors 
and principals after they have .lad 
time to investigate the question. 

Mrs. Pigeon: I think it is obvious 
to all of us that it will take con- 
siderable time to cover a request of 
this sort. Therefore, I move that 
at some later date the Board of 
Superintendents report again to the 
next Committee. 

The motion passed. 

On motion, all unfinished busi- 
ness was referred to the next Com- 
mittee. 

The Committee adjourned. 
Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN, 

Secretary. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 

(STATE.) 

State Examinees of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1934. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Monday, February 5. 
Worcester, Wednesday, February 7. 
Boston, Mondaj^ March 5. 
Fall River, Wednesday, March 7. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 8. 
Boston, Monday, April 9. 
Springfield, Wednesday, April 11. 
Boston, Monday, May 7. 
Worcester, Wednesday, May 9. 
Boston, Monday, June 4. 
Boston, Monday, September 17. 
Worcester, Wednesday, September 19. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 25. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 26. 
Boston, Monday, November 5. 
Lowell, Wednesday, November 7. 
Boston, Monday, December 3. 
New Bedford, Thursday, December 6. 
New Bedford, Friday, December 7. 

Rules for Examin.^^tions. 

All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent in 
the installation of wires, conduits, appa- 
ratus, fixtures and other appliances for 
carrying or using electricity for light, heat 
or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
years' experience in the business of install- 
ing wires, conduits, apparatus, fixtures 
and other appliances for cariying or 
using electricitj' for light, heat or power 
purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a Master or Journeyman Cer- 
tificate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

-Applicants for examination will be 
required to obtain at least 70 per cent in 
order to obtain a certificate. 

Applicants who fail to obtain the re- 
quired 70 per cent will not be entitled 
to re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent, or who fail 
on the practical demonstration, will not 
be re-examined for a period of six months. 

Any person found referring to notes 
or books, or misbehaving during an ex- 
amination, will be debarred from that 
examination. 

Notice will be sent to appUcants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held, and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day. 

James M. Hurley, 
Payson Smith, 
Stephen C. Garrity, 
Slate Examiners of Electricians. 

For application blanks or other infor- 
mation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 413A, State House 
Boston, Mass. 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



43 



NUMBER AND ESTIMATED COST OF NEW BUILDINGS AND ALTERATIONS, ADDITIONS, ETC., FOR WHICH 
APPLICATIONS HAVE BEEN FILED FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER, 1933. 



Character. 


.\partuent 

AND 

Tenement 
House.". 


Apartment 

AND 

Tenement 

Houses 

AND Stores. 


Banks. 


Churches. 


DwELLINCi.a. 


Dwellings 
AND Stores. 


FOUNDRIFS. 


Garages. 


i 

B 

■s 


ll 


to 

E 

3 

z 


ll 


a; 

E 

3 

z 


■2 

la 


J 

E 

3 

z 


« 
ll 


c 

3 

Z 


ll 
IP 


u 
a; 

E 

3 

Z 


•o 

ll 


V 

E 

3 

z 


•o 

to 
ll 

w 


c 

£ 

3 

z 




First Class 






























53 
92 
93 
33 


$66 525 


Second Class 














3 


$185,000 


6 
280. 


$58,500 
1,381,800 


2 


$12,000 






48,060 


Third Class 


















27 945 


Special Class 


























10 305 






. 




























Total New Work . . . 














3 
17 


$185,000 
13.685 


286 
2,865 


$1,440,.'«)0 
880,029 


2 
224 


$12,000 
92,785 






271 
75 


SI. 52 ,835 




188 


S 176 .889 


144 


$112,250 


8 


$3,350 


1 


$600 


43.135 








Grand Totals 


188 


$176,889 


144 


$112,250 


8 


$3..3S0 20 


$198,685 


3.151 


$2,320,329 


226 


$104,785 


1 


$600 


346 


$195,970 




Hotels. 


HOSPITALI'. 1 


LODOINO 

Honi«E". 


LODGINO 

Houses 'Nd 
Stores. 


Mercantile 

BUILDINC.S. 


K 

B 


Manu- 




Okkicb 
Buildings. 




»C'IUH1N<1 
UILDING" 


Character. 


S 

2: 


ll 


1 

c 

3 

z 


ll 


9i 

E 

3 

Z 


ll 


J 

s 

3 

Z 


•a 

is 

= 


1 

E 

3 

Z 


1 


a; 

E 

3 

Z 


ll 


i 

E 

3 

z 


13 
0) 

SS 


First Class 

Second Class 










$360,000 










2 
25 

9 
15 


$6,250 

109,980 

13,000 

38,170 
















2 


$165,000 






1 

1 


$3,000 
3,000 


1 

1 
1 


$5,000 


Third Class 














5,000 


Special Class 


















200 


























Total New Work ... 






23 


$360,000 
1.18 400 


2 
58 


$165,000 
30,020 






51 
689 


$167,400 
739,486 


2 
104 


$6,000 
120,743 


3 

137 


$10,200 


Alterations, etc. . . , 


28 


$55,215 


10 


$7,135 


392,975 










Grand Totals 


28 


$55,215 


24 


$4 


08 400 


60 


$195,020 


10 


$7,135 


740 


$906,886 


106 


$126,743 


140 


$403,175 




1 






POBLIC 
BtJILDINCIS. 


Public 

H.*LL!i. 


School 
Houses. 


Starleb. 


THEATHtS. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


Chauacteb. 


B 

3 

2 


1 

T 


4> 

x> 
S 

3 

2 


ll 


i 

3 

z 


ll 


1 

S 

3 
2 


•s 

ll 


E 

3 

z 


■s 

ll 
T 


3 

z 


•2 
ll 


SI 

S 

3 

z 


ll 

S" 


First Class 




















2 
12 
41 
33 


$6,800 

23,450 

26,780 

216,580 


58 
144 
425 

82 


$439,575 


Second Class 




















609,990 


Third Class . 




















1 ,457,526 


Special Class 






















265,255 












— 














Total New Work . . 




















88 
122 


$273,610 
278.008 


709 

4,778 


$2 ,772 ,.345 


Alterations, etc 


10 


$17,810 


5 


$18,300 


38 


$1,086,964 


IS 


$.30,816 


13 


$27,140 


4,265.735 






Grand Totals .... 


10 


SI7RI0 


5 


S18300 


38 


$1,086,964 


19 


S30.816 


13 


$27,140 


210 


$55*1.618 


5,487 


$7,038,080 

























































44 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Monday, January 8, 1934. 
Regular meeting of the City Council in the 
Council Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m.. Presi- 
dent DOWD in the chair. Absent, Coun. 
lirackman and Fitzgerald. 



APPOINTMENT OF WEIGHER OF COAL. 

Subject to confirmation by the Council, the 
Mayor submitted the following appointment, 
for the term ending April 1, 1934, viz.: 

Weigher of Coal: John H. O'Brien, Jr., 
CO Carleton road, Newton. 

Laid over a week under the rules. 



APPROPRIATION FOR MUNICIPAL 
EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 
The following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 8, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen. — I am advised that the appropria- 
tion for the Municipal Employment Bureau 
is practically exhausted and that additional 
funds are necessary if the Bureau is to func- 
tion beyond the present week. 

Pending a decision as to the future of this 
Bureau I deem it expedient to continue its 
activities for one more month. Since the 
weekly expenditures of the Bureau are ap- 
proximately $500, I submit herewith, an ap- 
propriation order for $2,000. 

I respectfully recommend adoption of this 
order by your honorable body. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield. Mayor. 

Ordered, That the sum of $2,000 be, and 
hereby is, appropriated to be expended by the 
Municipal Employment Bureau, under the 
direction of the Mayor, in the prosecution of 
its duties, said sum to be charged to the Re- 
serve Fund, when made. 

On motion of Coun. McGRATH, the rule 
was suspended, and the order was passed, yeas 
18, nays 0. 



Domenico Porreca, for compensation for 
damage to car by sanitary car. 

Portland Elevator Company, Inc., to replace 
rubbish tickets destroyed by fire. 

Frederick Rankins, for compensation for 
damage to car by city car. 

Samuel Shultz, for refund on beer license. 

David Gilsomini, for compensation for dam- 
age to property at 6 Wall street, caused by 
city employees demolishing premises. 

James Feeney, for compensation for damage 
to property at 102 Brown avenue, Roslindale, 
caused by shot fired by police officer. 

Louise L. Lavery, for compensation for in- 
juries caused by an alleged defect in sidewalk 
on Dartmouth street, between Montgomery 
street and Warren avenue. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

The following petitions were received and 
referred to the committees named, viz. : 

Claims. 

William Albano, for compensation for damage 
to car by city truck. 

Lorenzo Bianco, for refund on beer license. 

Cities Electric Supply Company, for com- 
pensation for damage to property at 206 
Congress street, caused by break in water 
main. 

James T. Doherty, to be reimbursed for 
judgment issued against him on account of 
his acts as an employee of the Park Depart- 
ment. 

Matilda Duffy, for compensation for injuries 
to son caused by an alleged defect in Annabel 
street. 

Marie Durant, for compensation for injuries 
received on steamer "CMeara." 

James G. Earle, for compensation for dam- 
age to clothing in City Hall. 

Annie Fay, for compensation for injuries 
received at City Hospital. 

First National Stores, Inc., for compensa- 
tion for damage to property at 814 Tremont 
street, caused by bursting of water pipes. 

Maurice J. Goggin, for refund on beer 
license. 

Domenico Grannino, for refund on beer 
license. 

Genevieve G. Hannon, for compensation for 
injuries caused by an alleged defect at 115 
Woodrow avenue. 

Shirley Herson, for refund on beer license. 

John Jeffers, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect at 11 Meridian 
street. 

George Leon, for compensation for damage 
to property at 35 Alleyne street, caused by 
dynamite explosion. 

Andrew J. Lloyd Company, for compensation 
for damage to property at 300 Washington 
street, caused by seepage of water supply. 

Daniel J. McDonald, for compensation for 
damage to car by city truck. 

Personal Book Shop, for refund on refuse 
tickets. 

Edward J. Phaneuf, to be reimbursed for 
judgment issued against him on account of 
his acts as an employee of the Schoolhouse 
Department. 



STANDEES IN ELEVATED BUSES. 

A petition was received from the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company for an amendment 
to the ordinances so as to permit passengers 
to stand in motor buses. 

Referred to the Committee on Jitney Li- 
censes. 



APPROVAL OF CONSTABLES' BONDS. 

The constables' bonds of Sydney Cohen and 
William Schneider, having been duly approved 
by the City Treasurer, were received and 
approved. 



INTEREST IN CONTRACT OF JOSEPH A. 
TOMASELLO. 

Notice was received from Joseph A. Toma- 
sello, member of Board of Appeal, of interest 
in contract of firm of A. G. Tomasello & Son, 
Inc., with City of Boston for removing snow 
and ice. 

Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENTS BY THE MAYOR. 

Notices were received of the following ap- 
pointments by the Mayor : 

Eliot Wadsworth, 180 Marlborough street. 
Sinking Funds Commissioner, for term ending 
April 30, 1934. in place of Frederic J. Crosby, 
whose resignation was accepted January 2, 
1934. 

Charles H. Carey, 1957 Commonwealth ave- 
nue. Soldiers Relief Commissioner, in place of 
John J. Lydon, appointment to take effect 
at close of business January 2, 1934. 

Edward F. McLaughlin, 221 Pond street. 
Fire Commissioner in place of Edward M. 
McSweeney, appointment to take effect at 
beginning of business January 5, 1934. 

Hilda H. Quirk, 88 Mt. Pleasant avenue. City 
Registrar, in place of James J. Mulvey, ap- 
pointment to take effect at close of business 
January 6, 1934. 

Severally placed on file. 



TEMPORARY LOAN TO MEET 
APPROPRIATIONS. 

President DOWD called up, under unfinished 
business. No. 1 on the calendar, viz. : 

1. Ordered, That to provide temporarily 
money to meet the appropriations for the 
financial year 1934, the City Treasurer issue 
and sell, at such time and in such amounts 
as he may deem best, notes or certificates of 
indebtedness of the City of Boston not ex- 
ceeding thirty million dollars in the total, in 
anticipation of the taxes of the current munici- 
pal year ; that all such notes or certificates of 
indebtedness be dated the day the money for 
the same is received, be made payable with 
the interest thereon within one year of their 
date from the taxes of the year 1934, and bear 
interest from their date until the same are 
made payable at such rate as the City Auditor, 
the City Treasurer and the Mayor may deter- 
mine. 

On January 2, 1934, the foregoing order 
was read once and passed, yeas 22. 

The order was given its second and final 
reading and passage, yeas 19, nays 0. 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 
Coun. NORTON offered the following: 
Ordered, That under the provisions of chapter 
115 of the General Laws and acts in amend- 
ment thereof or in addition thereto, the 
amounts set forth in, the list of allowances 
hereto annexed, for the month of January, 
1934, of aid to soldiers and sailors and their 



families residing in the City of Boston or 
having a settlement therein, be hereby ap- 
proved and paid until otherwise ordered, un- 
less the person named shall previously become 
ineligible to receive said aid. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



COUNCIL RULES. 

Coun. WILSON, for the Committee on Rules, 
submitted the following : 

The Committee on Rules submit herewith 
and recommend for adoption the accompanying 
draft of the rules for 1934-35. 

The rules reported are unchanged from those 
of the last City Council so far as they relate 
to parliamentary procedure, but the committee 
has recommended some changes in the rules 
relating to spectators and to the use of the 
council rooms. It has always been understood 
that the rules prohibited the presence on the 
floor of the Council Chamber of persons other 
than the officials connected with the Council 
and the City Hall reporters, but for some years 
the observance of this rule has gradually re- 
laxed and at times the business of the Council 
has been interfered with and the attention of 
the members unwarrantly diverted by friends 
or constituents who are innocently in the 
Council Chamber, by invitation or otherwise. 
The rule reported by the committee definitely 
prohibits anyone except the members, the of- 
ficials connected with the Council, and the 
City Hall reporters of the eight daily news- 
papers from trespassing on the floor of the 
chamber while the Council is in session. If 
the rule is adopted the committee proposes 
to see that it is enforced, and in this con- 
nection would observe that in the case of the 
visit of some distinguished guest the rule can 
be suspended, if desired, for that particular 
occasion. In the same rule the committee has 
inserted a provision prohibiting demonstrations 
in the gallery. The necessity for this pro- 
vision has been shown on many occasions and 
the committee does not believe it conducive to 
good government to subject any members 
argnaments or vote to the pressure of approval 
or disapproval from spectators. 

The rule relating to the use of committee 
rooms, etc., has been rewritten. It is the 
intention of the President and the committee 
to retake possession of Rooms 49, 50 and 52, 
which have been temporarily loaned to other 
departments, and establish these rooms with 
Room 48A as waiting rooms and consultation 
rooms. When these arrangements are com- 
pleted it is proposed that no visitors be per- 
mitted in the east or west anteroom, the rooms 
formerly used by the President and the Ex- 
ecutive Committee room. The committee rec- 
ognizes the fact that the situation has been 
unprecedented but believes that on the comple- 
tion of these changes there will be no excuse 
for the intolerable conditions which have here- 
tofore existed. It is true that the unfortunate 
and the unemployed are entitled to every 
sympathy and consideration but it is also true 
that the members of the City Council are 
elected to transact the city's business and are 
entitled to unimpeded access to the City Coun- 
cil meeting for at least one day a week for the 
two or three hours required for a City Council 
meeting. 

For the Committee, 

Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr., 

Chairman. 

The two rules referred to in the report, as 
amended by the committee, are as follows : 

Rule. 27. No person, excepting officials con- 
nected \vith the city council, and duly assigned 
reporters of the eight daily newspapers shall 
be allowed in the anterooms or upon the floor 
of the council chamber while the council is 
in session. Spectators will be allowed in the 
gallery of the council chamber when the council 
is in session, and no one will be admitted to 
said gallery after the seats are occupied. No 
demonstrations of approval or disapproval from 
the spectators shall be permitted and if such 
demonstrations are made the gallery will be 
cleared. The city messenger shall enforce this 
rule. 

Use of Committee Rooms. 

Rule 33. No person except members and 
officers of the city council and regularly as- 
signed city hall reporters shall be admitted 
at any time to the west anteroom, the locker 
room, or the president's room, except when 
invited on official business. 

The draft of rules, as reported by the com- 
mittee, is printed as city document No. 39. 

In connection with the report Coun. WILSON 
also offered the following order : 

Ordered, That special committees to consider 
the subjects named in the title of the com- 
mittee be appointed by the President, viz. : 

Parks and Playgrounds — five members. 

Public Safety — five members. 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



45 



Unclaimed Baggage— three members. 

Hospitals — five members. 

Constables— three members. 

Municipal Lighting— five members. 

Coun WILSON— Mr. President, the Com- 
mittee on Rules last week went into the 
present unbearable situation at some length 
and we felt that, in fairness to the twenty-two 
members of the Council themselves, as well 
as to the thousands of people, unemployed and 
others, who come here daily, we should try, 
in view of the unusual situation, to arrange 
some system that will be reasonably satisfactory 
to all, subject, of course, to the unanimous ap- 
proval of the members of the Council. It 
was thought advisable, Mr. President and 
gentlemen of the Council, to suggest to you 
that this room and the adjacent rooms where 
we hold committee meetings and conferences 
should be reserved for the Council, so that 
there may be an unimpeded and unobstructed 
place for committee meetings, the transaction 
of city business, a place where we can use the 
telephone, dictate letters and attend to general 
city business. While we realize the rights of 
people coming here and looking for employment 
through the state and our own employment 
bureaus, we do feel, in the interest of the 
proper transaction of the business of the city, 
that the large hall across the floor and the 
green room shouM be set aside for a waiting 
room and for consultation purposes : arrange- 
ments being made through attaches of the 
City Messenger's Department — Messrs. Mc- 
Mahon, Green and Walsh — so that it will be 
possible to call up and get in touch with 
people outside and make appointments for 
meetings with the councilors, with a view in 
the whole arrangement to systematize the thing 
so that we will not have thousands hanging 
around City Hall aimlessly, as they are to be 
found at Nashua street and other places, but 
that they may come at certain times, according 
to appointments, meeting members of the body, 
transacting their business without delay and 
being able to then go on their way. We also 
felt that the councik>rs should have certain 
rooms where they can either go themselves or 
meet people, without unnecessary delay or in- 
terruption. This whole thing is suggested in 
fairness to the members of the Council, upon 
whose shoulders a large portion of such busi- 
ness falls, as well as in fairness to the general 
public. I urge, therefore, that this propose*! 
provision, as well as the rules as a whole, 
be adopted by roll call, because if this proposed 
rule is to work out properly it must not only 
be fair to the President but to the other 
twenty-one members of the body : and I trust, 
therefore, that there will be no objection and 
no exception to the rules. I ask, therefore, 
for adoption by roll call. 

The roll was called, and the proposed rules 
were adopted, yeas 20, nays 0. 



VISIT FROM MAYOR MANSFIELD. 

Notice was received by the Council to the 
effect that Mayor Mansfield desired to appear 
before the body, and City Messenger Leary 
retired and presently escorted the Mayor into 
the chamber, where he was greeted with ap- 
plause. , 

President DOWD— The Chair now has the 
honor of turning the gavel over to his Honor 
the Mayor. (Applause.) 

Mayor MANSFIELD— Mr. President and 
members of the Council, this is an unexpected 
honor that has been extended to me. I had 
not thought that the President would hand the 
gavel over to me. I merely came to pay my 
respects to the Council, and for no other 
purpose whatever. I am very sorry that last 
week, when our worthy and veteran City 
Messenger came to the Mayor's office and said 
there were jurors to be drawn, I was not in 
my office and did not have a chance to meet 
you on your first day. I was, besides, of 
course, very busy in organizing my own office. 
I thought, therefore, it would be better to 
defer this formal little visit of courtesy until 
you had elected your President and completed 
your permanent organization. So that is the 
reason why I have come here today to make 
this little formal visit of courtesy, in the hope 
that our beloved city may profit by our friendly 
cooperation this year. I shall do all I can 
to cooperate with the members of the City 
Council. I want to know the members of 
the Council, and have the strong and earnest 
noipe that we may all work together through- 
oiut the year. I enter the office of Mayor with 
an entirely open mind, free from all pre- 
judice, my only purpose being to do the best 
I can for the City of Boston, as I stated in 
my inaugural address. I want you to feel 
that the doors to my office are open to you at 
all times ; that you are sympathetic with me 
in my efforts, willing to give me a little time. 



realizing that we cannot undo in twenty min- 
utes what it has taken twenty years to 
do. And so I trust that you will be sympa- 
thetic with me and not too harsh in your 
criticism, bearing in mind all the time that 
my intentions are good. I believe, as I said 
at our little luncheon on inauguration day, 
that we should look upon the City of Boston 
as a whole, that we should regard its prob- 
lems as a whole, that we should deal with 
those problems as problems embodying and 
embracing the whole city, and not consider 
simply the separate sections into which our 
city is divided or the little local issues. If 
we can take a bird's-eye view of the city, seeing 
its needs as a whole, and seeing where those 
needs can be dealt with in a broad way, not 
merely feeling that we are representing par- 
ticular communities, — although, of course, we 
must all take good care of the communities we 
do represent, — I think we will do a better job 
for the City of Boston. And so, gentlemen, 
my little visit today is one of friendship and 
one intended to bespeak the cooperation of this 
Council with the efforts of the Mayor, that 
we may give to the City of Boston the kind of 
administration that it deserves, that it has long 
wanted, and that we now have a chance to 
see that it shall get. I thank you very much. 
(Applause.) 

Coun. MURRAY— Mr. President, I would 
like to ask leave of the Mayor to say just a 
word about the C. W. A. I believe the Mayor 
has a program, in which the Council is 
greatly intereste<l, for obtaining work for the 
citizens of Boston. The C. W. A. program 
has been under way for some time, there has 
been certain money allotted to the City of 
Boston in connection with that program, and 
I know, so far as this C. W. A. money is con- 
cerned, that there are many men who are 
not citizens of Boston who are working today 
under the C. W. A. program in Boston. I 
want to know, with the help of his Honor 
the Mayor, what we are going to do with the 
C. W. A. Is it true that all the men hired 
by the departments will come through your 
office? 

President DOWD — I might say to the mem- 
ber and to the body that there will be a con- 
ference on this matter between the Mayor and 
the President of the Council within ten min- 
utes, and that that matter is going to be 
discussed. Does that answer the question ? 

Coun. MURRAY— Well. Mr. President, we 
have a lot of people bothering us all the time, 
anxious to know what can be done for them, 
and I thought I would like to see if we could 
get some assurance before the Mayor left here, 
so that we could give some encouragement to 
our people. 

President DOWD — I have already made ar- 
rangements for a conference with the Mayor, 
and I shall be back here in half an hour. If 
there is now no further business before the 
Council the (Council stands adjourned. 



The Council stood adjourned at 2.52 p. m., 
to meet on Monday, January 15, 1934, at 
2 p. m. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals por Furnishing Cinhers. 
The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing the 
Airport, Park Department, Cinders, as per 
specifications to be obtaine<i at the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex. 
There vill he a charge of twenty cents ($0.20) 
a set for each set of bUink proposals taken 
out. The bidder must leave his proposal and 
a certified check for $200, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is Tiot carried out, at the office 
of the Supply Department. A duplicate bid, 
without check, must be left at the office of 
the City Auditor prior to the time named for 
opening bids. The bids will be publicly opened 
and read on Tuesday, January 23, 1934, at 
12 m., at Room 801, City Hall Annex. The 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the total amount of the contract with 
a surety company authorized to do business 
in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract, in case the 
amount of the contract awarded aggregates 
$2,000 or more. The Superintendent reserves 
the right to accept or reject any or all bids, 
or any part of a bid, and to award the con- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of 
the city. All contracts made subject to ap- 
propriations to meet payments thereunder. 
Philip A. Chapman, 
(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT— STATISTICS 
FOR YEAR 1932. 

Summaries for the 22 wards as of April 
1, 1932: Number of persons, partner- 
ships and corporations assessed on prop- 
erty, 105,240; number of dweUing houses 
assessed, 89,232; acres of land assessed, 
18,212. Number of men assessed for poll 
tax, 239,798. 

Cost of department maintenance in 
1932 was $414,239 or $46,662 more than in 
1931. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Composition 

Castings. 

Sealed proposals will be received at the office 

of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 

City Hall Annex, for 

15,000 pounds, more or less. No. 1 composition 

ca-stings. 
28,000 pounds, more or less. No. 2 composition 

ca.stings. 
2,000 pounds, more or less. No. 3 composition 

castings. 
Blank proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. The bidder must leave his pro- 
posal with a certified check for $200. payable 
to and to become the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the above office. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
-Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids will be publicly opene<l and 
read Friday, January 26, 1!)34. at 12 m.. 
at Room 801, City Hall Annex. The successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
the total amount of the bid with a surety 
company authorize*! to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract, in case the amount of the 
contract awarde<l aggregates $2,000 or more. 
The Superintendent reserves the right to accept 
or reject any or all proposals, or any part 
of a proposal, and to award the contract as 
he deems for the best interests of the city. 
All contracts made subject to appropriations 
to meet payments thereunder. 

Philip A. Chapman, 
(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 



Proi-osals por Weighing and Vending Ma- 
CHiNfs in Fbrryhouses. 
The Commissioner of Public Works of the 
City of Boston, office 508 City Hall Annex, 
invites proposals from citizens of the United 
States and corporations or other legal associa- 
tions wherein the controlline: interest to the 
extent of at least over one half thereof is 
owned by a citizen or citizens of the United 
States for the privilege of placing weighing 
and vending machines in the two headhouses 
of the Ferry Division for a term of three 
years, beginning February 1, 1934, and giving 
a bond approved by the Commissioner. All 
information relative to proposals which the 
bidder himself will furnish can be obtained 
at Room 508, City Hall Annex. The bidder 
will submit a price for each machine and 
the number to be placed in each headhouse 
and leave the same at Room 508, fifth floor. 
City Hall Annex before 12 o'clock m. of 
Monday, January 22, 1934, with a certified 
check for one hundred (100) dollars payable 
to and to be the property of the city if the 
proposal, after acceptance, is not carried out. 
The proposals will at said hour and place be 
publicly opened and read. The proposals 
should be enclosed in an envelope sealed and 
marked "Proposals for Weighing and Vending 
Machines," Proposals must be made in dupli- 
cate, the sealed duplicate, without check to 
be deposited by the bidder with the City 
Auditor previous to the time named for open- 
ing the proposals. If the price bid appears 
to the Commissioner to be abnormally high 
or low. it may lead to the rejection of the 
proposal containing such price. The under- 
signed reserves the right to reject any or all 
proposals or to accept any proposal should 
he deem it to be for the best interest of the 
City so to do. 

C. J. Carvbn, 
(Jan. 13.) Commissioner of Public Works. 



46 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE FOR SUFFOLK 
COUNTY. 

Number of children 7-13 years old, 105- 
675, of whom 104,085, or 98.5 per cent, 
were attending school ; 14 and 15 years, 
29,662, of whom 28,250, or 95.3 per cent, 
were attending school; 16 and 17 years, 
29,902, of whom 19,453, or 65.1 per cent, 
were attending school; 18-20 years, 47,- 
103, of whom 12,395, or 26.3 per cent, 
were attending school; total children 7 
to 20 years old, 212,342, of whom 164,189, 
or 77.3 per cent, were attending school. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Installing Low Tension 
Cable, Traffic Tunnel. 

The Transit Department of the City of Bos- 
ton, 1 Beacon street, seventh floor, invites pro- 
posals from citizens of the United States and 
corporations or other legal associations Vfherein 
the controlling interest to the extent of at 
least one half thereof is owned by a citizen 
or citizens of the United States, for installing 
low tension cable for the Traffic Tunnel. A 
bond of an approved surety company will 
be required for the faithful performance of 
the contract in the sum of the total bid price. 
Proposals must be filled out and signed by the 
bidder on forms to be obtained at this office, 
inclosed in a sealed envelope, indorsed "Low 
Tension Cable, Traffic Tunnel," and delivered 
to the Department, or to its secretary, before 
12 o'clock noon on Monday, January 29, 1934, 
at which time and place they will be publicly 
opened and read. A properly certified check 
in the sum of five hundred (500) dollars, 
payable to the city, must accompany the 
proposal. This check shall become the prop- 
erty of the city if the contract is not executed 
by the bidder within the time prescribed after 
the date of notification by the Department of 
the acceptance of the proposal and the readi- 
ness of the contract for signature. Proposals 
must be made in duplicate. The sealed dupli- 
cate, without check, is to be deposited by the 
bidder with the City Auditor, Room 20, City 
Hall, previous to the time named for opening 
the proposals. Plans, proposals, specifications 
and forms of contract may be obtained at 
this office on or after Monday, January 15, 
1934. A deposit of $5, in cash or by certified 
check, will he required for a set of plans and 
two sets of the specifications. Mutilation of 
them will be deemed sufficient cause for the 
forfeiture of said deposit. The Department 
reserves the right to reject any or all pro- 
posals. 

By order of the City of Boston Transit 
Department. 

Edward F. Condon, 

(Jan. 13-20.) Secretary. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Invitation to Bidders. 

Sealed proposals will be received at the 
office of the Police Commissioner of the City 
of Boston until twelve o'clock noon of 
January 29, 1934, to provide and install a two- 
way radio-telephone system for- the Police 
Department of the City of Boston. Specifi- 
cations and form of proposal will be available 
to prospective bidders at the office of Jackson 
& Moreland, Engineers, at noon, Wednesday, 
January 10, 1934, upon the deposit of twenty- 
five dollars ($25). Any inquiry regarding 
interpretation of the specifications or other 
contract documents should be in WTiting and 
addressed to Jackson & Moreland. Proposals 
must be accompanied by a certified check pay- 
able to Eugene C. Hultman, Police Commis- 
sioner, in the sum of five thousand (5,000) dol- 
lars. The successful bidder will be required to 
furnish a bond for an amount equal to the 
total contract price executed in accordance 
with the terms of the contract. This bond is 
to be obtained through a broker or agent of 
a reputable bonding company. The right is 
reserved to reject any or all bids and the 
acceptance of any bid will be subject to 
subsequent approval of the equipment by the 
Radio Commission in connection with the 
granting of necessary construction permits. 

By order of the Police Commissioner of 
Boston. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

(Jan. 13.) Police Commissioner. 

Jackson & Moreland, Engineers, 
31 St. James Avenue, 
Boston, Mass. 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE FOR BOSTON. 

Number of children 7-13 years old, 
91,758, of whom 90,347, or 98.5 per cent, 
were attending school; 14 and 15 years, 
25,659, of whom 24,507, or 95.5 per cent, 
were attending school; 16 and 17 years, 
25,932, of whom 16,912, or 65.2 per cent, 
were attending school; 18 to 20 years, 
41,282, of whom 10,991, or 26.6 per cent, 
were attending school; total children 7 
to 20 years old, 184,631, of whom 142,757, 
or 77.3 per cent, were attending school. 
Number of persons attending school who 
were 21 years of age and over was 10,966. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEP.4RTMENT. 



Proposals for Hay, Grai.v and Straw. 
Sealed proposals will be received at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hail Annex, until 12 m., on Wednes- 
day, January 24, 1934, at which time and 
place they will be publicly opened and read, 
for furnishing hay, grain and straw to the 
various city departments. There will be a 
charpe of twenty cents (SO. 20) for each set 
of blank proposals taken out. The bidder 
must include the cost of delivery. The bidders 
are requested to bid on United States No. 2 
timothy hay. Hay must be no less than 40 
per cent green. The grade of hay must com- 
ply with the federal hay grades, and No. 2 
white oats to test no less than thirty-six 
pounds to bushel, graded under federal stand- 
ards. The hay and oats must be weighed by 
sworn weighers and on the scales designated 
by the Superintendent of Supplies. All articles 
covered by this contract shall be the growth 
production of the United States. The bidder 
must use the form of proposals to be obtained 
at Room 801, City Hall Annex. Proposals 
I must be accompanied by a certified check for 
S200. A duplicate bid, without check, must 
be left at the office of the City Auditor prior 
to the time named for opening bids. The 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for 
one quarter the total amount of the bid with 
a surety company authorized to do business 
in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract, in case the 
amount of the contract awarded aggregates 
S2,000 or more. The Superintendent reserves 
the right to accept or reject any or all bids, 
or any part of a bid, and to award the con- 
tract as he deems "for the best interests of 
the city. All contracts made subject to ap- 
propriations to meet payments thereunder. 
No reservations or stipulations submitted by 
the various bidders will be considered by the 
Superintendent. 

Philip A. Chapman, 
(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



To Furniture Contractors. 

The Superintendent of Construction of the 
Department of School Buildings of the City of 
Boston invites sealed proposals for furnishing, 
delivering and setting up in the halls and 
galleries of the various schoolhouses opera 
chairs of the kind and quality as per specifi- 
cations and samples on exhibition at the 
Department of School Buildings storehouse, 
corner of Summer and East First streets. 
South Boston, and giving bond of a surety 
company, satisfactory to the Superintendent 
of Construction therefor in the sum of $1,000. 
Only proposals obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Construction, 11 Beacon 
street, Boston, Mass., signed by the bidder 
and left before 2 o'clock p. m. of Monday, 
January 22, 1934, at said office, with a certified 
check for S500, payable to the city if the pro- 
posal is not carried out, will then and there 
be publicly opened and read. The proposal 
shall be made in duplicate, the one with the 
check to be submitted as indicated above, the 
other to be deposited with the City Auditor, 
City Hall, previous to the time named for open- 
ing proposals. The Superintendent of Con- 
struction reserves the right to reject any 
or all proposals. A deposit of a certified check 
in the sum of $25 will be required in order to 
procure a complete set of specifications, said 
sum to be refunded if specifications are re- 
turned prior to noon of January 29, 1934. 
Mutilation of the specifications will be deemed 
sufficient cause for the forfeiture of the said 
deposit. 

Wm. W. Drummey, 

(Jan. 13. ) Superintendent of Construction. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing and Instalung 
Brass Frames, Grilles and Slides fob 
Ceiling for Traffic Tunnel. 
The Transit Department of the City of Bos- 
ton, 1 Beacon street, seventh floor, invites 
proposals from citizens of the United States 
and corporations or other legal associations 
wherein the controlling interest to the extent 
of at least one half thereof is owned by a 
citizen or citizens of the United States, for 
furnishing and installing brass frames, grilles 
and slides for ceiling for Traffic Tunnel. A 
bond of an approved surety company will be 
required for the faithful performance of the 
contract in a sum of the full amount of the 
total bid price. Proposals must be filled out 
and signed by the bidder on forms to be ob- 
tained at this office, inclosed in a sealed en- 
velope, indorsed "Proposal for Grilles, Frames 
and Slides for Oiling for Traffic Tunnel," 
and delivered to the Department or to its 
secretary before 12 o'clock noon on Monday, 
January 22, 1934, at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and read. A 
properly certified check in the sum of one 
thousand (1,000) dollars, payable to the city, 
must accompany the proposal. This check 
shall become the property of the city if the 
contract is not executed by the bidder within 
the time prescribed after the date of the 
notification by the Department of the accept- 
ance of the proposal, and the readiness of the 
contract for signature. Proposals must be 
made in duplicate. The sealed duplicate, with- 
out check, is to be deposited by the bidder 
with the City Auditor, Room 20, City Hall, 
previous to the time named for opening the 
proposals. Plans, proposals, specifications and 
forms of contract may be obtained at this 
office on or after Monday, January 8, 1934. 
A deposit of $5, in cash or by certified check, 
will be required for a set of plans and two 
sets of the specifications. Mutilation of them 
will be deemed sufficient cause for the forfeiture 
of said deposit. The Department reserves the 
right to reject any or all proposals. 

By order of the City of Boston Transit 
Department, 



(Jan. 6-13.) 



Edward F. Condon, 

Secretary. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Installing Electrical Control 
FOR Pump Rooms, Traffic Tunnel. 
The Transit Department of the City of Bos- 
ton, 1 Beacon street, seventh floor, invites pro- 
posals from citizens of the United States and 
corporations or other legal associations wherein 
the controlling interest to the extent of at 
least over one half thereof is owned by a 
citizen or citizens of the United States, for 
installing electrical control equipment for 
pump rooms. Traffic Tunnel. A bond of an 
approved surety company will be required for 
the faithful performance of the contract in 
a sum of the total bid price. Proposals must 
be filled out and signed by the bidder on forms 
to be obtained at this office, inclosed in a 
sealed envelope, indorsed "Proposal for Elec- 
trical Control Equipment, Traffic Tunnel," 
and delivered to the Department, or to its 
secretary, before 12 o'clock noon on Monday, 
January 29, 1934, at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and read. A 
properly certified check in the sum of one 
hundred (100) dollars, payable to the city, 
must accompany the proposal. This check 
shall become the property of the city if the 
contract is not executed by the bidder Within 
the time prescribed after the date of notifica- 
tion by the Department of the acceptance of 
the proposal and the readiness of the contract 
for signature. Proposals must be made in 
duplicate. The sealed duplicate, without check, 
is to be deposited by the bidder with the 
City Auditor, Room 20, City Hall, previous 
to the time named for opening the proposals. 
Plans, proposals, specifications and forms of 
contract may be obtained at this office on or 
after Monday, January 15, 1934. A deposit 
of $5, in cash or by certified check, will be 
required for a set of plans and two sets of 
the specifications. Mutilation of them will be 
deemed sufficient cause for the forfeiture of 
said deposit. The Department reserves the 
right to reject any or all proposals. 

By order of the City of Boston Transit 
Dbpaktmbnt. 

Edward F. Condon, 
(Jan. 13-20.) Secretary. 



Jan. 13 



CITY RECORD 



47 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



To Furniture Contractors. 

The Superintendent of Construction of the 
Department of School Buildings of the City of 
Boston invites sealed proposals for furnishing 
and delivering: in the various schoolhouses. fur- 
niture of various kinds, and givine bond of a 
surety company satisfactory to the Superin- 
tendent of Construction therefor in the sum of 
$1,000. Only proposals obtained at the office of 
the Superintendent of Construction, 11 Beacon 
street, Boston, Mass., .signed by the bidder and 
left before 2 o'clock p. m. of Monday, Janu- 
ary 22, 1934, at said office, with a certified 
check for $500, payable to the city if the pro- 
posal is not carried out, will then and there 
be publicly opened and read. The proposal 
shall be made in duplicate, the one with the 
check to be submitted as indicated above, the 
other to be deposited with the City Auditor, 
City Hall, previous to the time named for open- 
ing propo-sals. The Superintendent of Con- 
struction reserves the right to reject any 
or all proposals. A deposit of a certified check 
in the sum of $2.5 will be re<iuired in order to 
procure a complete set of specifications, said 
sum to be refunded if specifications are re- 
turned prior to noon of January 29, 1934. 
Mutilation of the specifications will be deemed 
suificient cause for the forfeiture of the said 
deposit. 

Wm. W. Drummey, 

(Jan. 13.) Sui>erintendfnt of Construction. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



To GyMNA.SIUM EtU'IHMENT CONTRACTORS. 

The Superintendent of Construction of the 
Department of School Buildings of the City of 
Boston invite sealed proposals for gymnasium 
equipment at the Public Latin School, Avenue 
Louis Pasteur, and giving bond of a surety 
company approved by the Superintendent for 
the full amount of the entire contract price. 
Only proposals obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent, eighth floor, 11 Beacon street, 
signed by the bidder and left before 2 o'clock 
p. m. of Monday, January 22, 1934, at said 
office, with a certified check for $500, payable 
to the city if the proposal is not carri«I out, 
will then and there be publicly opened and 
read. The proi>o8a] shall be made in duplicate, 
the one with the check to be submitted a.i 
indicated above, and the other to be deposited 
with the City Auditor, City Hall, previous to 
the time named for opening proposals. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to reject 
any or all proposals. Plans and specifications 
may be obtained at the office of Department of 
School Buildings, 11 Beacon street. A deposit 
of a certified check in the sum of $25 will 
be required in order to procure a complet set 
of plans and specifications, said sum to be 
refunded to all but the successful bidder. If 
all unused plans and specifications are not 
returned prior to noon of January 29, 1934, 
said deposit for plans and specifications shall 
be forfeited. Mutilation of plans or the specifi- 
cations will be deemed sufficient cause for the 
forfeiture of the said deposit. 

Wm. W. Drummey, 

(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Canatruction. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for LuBRicATrNC Oil. 

The Police Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing and 
delivering lubricating oil. The bidder must 
use the form of proposal to be obtained at 
the oflice of the Prorperty Clerk, 154 Berkeley 
street, Boston, and deposit with his bid, at 
the office of the Police Commissioner, a prop- 
erly certified check for $100, payable to and 
to become the property of the Police Commis- 
sioner for the City of Boston, if the proposal 
is not carried out. Proposals will be publicly 
opened and read on Wednesday, January 24, 
1934, at 12 o'clock noon, at the office of the 
Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, Bos- 
ton. The Police Commissioner reserves the 
right to accept or reject any or all proposals, 
or any part of a proposal, and to award the 
contract as he deems for the best interesU of 
the Police Department of the City of Boston. 
Surety bond will be required from the suc- 
cessful bidder in an amount equivalent to 
50 per cent of the estimated contract amount. 
EUOBNE C. HULTMAN, 

(Jan. 13.) Police Commissioner. 



Proposals for FuRiNIsiiing Butter, Eggs, Etc 
The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various city departments, butter, eggs, etc., as 
per specifications to be obtained at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex. There will be a charge of 
twentii cents (S0.20) for each set of blank 
proposals taken out. The bidder must leave 
his proposal with a certified check for $300, 
payable to and to become the property of the 
City of Boston if the proposal is not carried 
out, at the above office. .V duplicate bid. 
without check, must be left at the office of 
the Citv Auditor prior to the time named for 
opening bids. The bids will be publicly opened 
and read Wednesday, January 24, 1934, at 
12 m., at Room 801, City Hall Annex. The 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the total amount of the contract with 
a surety company authorized to do business 
in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract, in case the 
amount of the contract awarded aggregates 
$2,000 or more. The Superintendent reserves 
the right to accept or reject any or all bids, 
or any part of a bid. and to award the con- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of 
the city. All contracts made subject to ap- 
propriations to meet payments thereunder. 
Philip A. Chapman, 
(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Invitation to Bihdbrs. 

Sealed proposals will be received at the 
office of the Police Commissioner of the City 
of Boston until twelve o'clock noon of January 
29. 1934, for building alterations to provide a 
communication control room at Police Head- 
quarters for the Police Department of the 
City of Boston. Specifications and form of 
proposal will be available to prospective bid- 
ders at the office of Jackson & Moreland, 
Engineers, on January 10, 1934, upon the de- 
posit of fifteen dollars ($15). Any inquiry 
regarding interpretation of the specifications 
or other contract documents should be in writ- 
ing and addressed to Jackson & Moreland. 
Proposals must be accompanied by a certifier! 
check payable to Eugene C. Hultman, Police 
Cx)mmissioner in the sum of one hundred dol- 
lars ($100). The successful bidder will be 
require<l to furnish a bond for an amount 
equal to the total contract prict executed in 
accordance with the terms of the contract. 
This bond is to be obtaineil through a broker 
or agent of a reputable bonding company. The 
right is reserved to reject any or all bids. 

By order of the Police Commissioner of 
Boston. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

(Jan. 13.) Police Commissioner. 

Jackson & Moreland, Engineers, 
31 St. James Avenue, 
Boston, Mass. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Meats. 
The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various citj' departments, meats, as per specifi- 
cations to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City 
Hall .Annex. There will be a charge of twenty- 
five cents (S0.25) for each set of blank pro- 
posals taken out. The bidder must leave his 
proposal with a certified check for $300, pay- 
able to and to become the property of the 
City of Boston if the proposal is not carried 
out, at the above office. A duplicate bid, 
without check, must be left at the office of 
the City Auditor prior to the time named for 
opening bids. The bids will be publicly opened 
and read on Tuesday, January 23, 1934, at 
12 m., at Room 801, City Hall Annex. The 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for 
one quarter the total amount of the contract 
with a surety conipany authorized to do busi- 
ness in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract, in case the 
amount of the contract awarded aggregates 
$2,000 or more. The Superintendent reserves 
the right to accept or reject any or all bids, 
or any part of a bid, and to award the con- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of the 
i city. All contracts made subpect to appropria- 
' tions to meet payments thereunder. 
I Philip A. Chapman, 

1 (Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Fruits and 
■Vegetables. 

; The Supply Department of the City of 

] Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various city departments, fruits and vegetables, 
I as per specifications to be obtained at the 
I office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall Annex. There ivill he a charge 
of thirtii cents ($0.30) for each set nf blank 
proposals taken out. The bidder must leave 
his proposal with a certified check for $300, 
payable to and to become the property of the 
City of Boston, if the proposal is not carried 
out. at the above office. A duplicate bid, 
without check, must be left at the office of the 
City Auditor prior to the time named for 
opening bids. The bids will be publicly opened 
and read Tuesday, January 23, 1934, at 12 m., 
at Room 801, City Hall Annex. The success- 
ful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the total amount of the contract with 
a surety company authorized to do business 
in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract, in case the 
amount of the contract awarded aggregates 
$2,000 or more. The Superintendent reserves 
the right to accept or reject any or all bids, 
or any i)art of a bid, and to award the con- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of 
the city. All contracts made subject to ap- 
propriations to meet payments thereunder. 
Philip A. Chapman, 
(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



To Furniture (Contractors. 

The Superintendent of Construction of the 
Dei3artment of School Buildings of the City of 
Boston invites sealed proposals for furnishing, 
delivering and setting up pupils' school fur- 
niture in the various schoolhouses, giving bond 
of a surety company satisf.ictory to the Super- 
intendent of Construction therefor in the sum 
of $5,000. Only proposals obtained at the office 
of the Superintendent of Construction, 11 Bea- 
con street, Boston. Mass., signed by the bidder, 
and left before 2 o'clock p. m. of Monday, 
January 22, 1934, at said office, with a certified 
check for $500, payable to the city if the pro- 
posal is not carrie<I out, will then and there 
be publicly opened and read. The proposal 
shall bo made in duplicate, the one with the 
check to be submitte<l as indicated above, the 
other to be deposited with the City Auditor, 
City Hall, previous to the time nametl for open- 
ing proposals. The Superintendent of Con- 
struction of the Department of School Buildings 
reserves the right to reject any or all pro- 
posals. A deposit of a certified check in 
the sum of $25 will be re<iuired in order to 
procure a complete set of specifications, said 
sum to be refunded if specifications are re- 
turned prior to noon of January 29, 1934. 
Mutilation of the specifications will be deemed 
sufficient cause for the forfeiture of the said 
deposit. 

Wm. W. Drummey, 

(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Construction. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Fuel On.. 

The Police Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing and 
delivering fuel oil. The bidder must use the 
form of proposal to be obtained at the office 
of the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston, and deposit with his bid, at the office 
of the Police Commissioner, a properly certified 
check for $100, payable to and to become the 
property of the Police Commissioner for the 
City of Boston, if the proposal is not carric<l 
out. Proposals will be publicly opened and 
read on Wednesday, January 24, 1934, at 
12 o'clock noon, at the office of the Police 
Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, Boston. 
The Police Commissioner reserves the right to 
accept or reject any or all proposals, or any 
part of a proposal, and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the Police 
Department of the City of Boston. Surety 
bond will be required from the successful bid- 
der in an amount efiuivalent to 50 per cent 
of the estimated contract amount. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

(Jan. 13.) Police Commissioner. 



48 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 13 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Propo.sals for Cast-Iron Pipe. 
The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishinK to the 
Water Service: 

100 tons 6-inch Class B pipe, 
500 tons 8-inch Class B pipe, 
50 tons 10-inch Class B pipe, 
1,500 tons 12-inch Class B pipe, 
300 tons 16-inch Class B pipe, 
according to specifications, which must be ob- 
tained at the office of the Superintendent of 
Supplies, Room 801, City Hall Annex, and the 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the total amount of the bid with a 
surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract, in case the amount 
of the contract awarded aggregates $2,000 or 
more. Therr wUl he a charge of sixty cents 
(i0.60) for each proposal taken out. The bid, 
with a certified check for $500, payable to and 
to become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out, must be 
left at the oflfice of the Superintendent of 
Supplies, Room 801, City Hal! Annex, before 
Friday, January 26, 1934, at 12 m., at which 
time and place the bids will be publicly opened 
and read. A duplicate bid, without check, must 
be left at the office of the City Auditor prior 
to the time named for opening bids. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to accept 
or reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, 
and to award the contract as he deems for the 
best interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

Philip A. Chapman. 
(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Iron Castings. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing the 
Public Works Department, Water Service : 

300,000 pounds frames and covers. 
Blank proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex. The bidder must leave his 
proposal with a certified check for $200, pay- 
able to and to become the property of the 
City of Boston if the proposal is not carried 
out, at the above office. A duplicate bid, with- 
out check, must be left at the office of the 
City Auditor prior to the time named for open- 
ing bids. The bids will be publicly opened 
and read Thursday, January 25, 1934, at 
12 m., at Room 801, City Hall Annex. The 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the total amount of the contract with 
a surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract, in case the amount 
of the contract awarded aggregates $2,000 or 
more. The Superintendent reserves the right 
to accept or reject any or all proposals or any 
part of a proposal and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 
All contracts made subject to appropriations 
to meet payments thereunder. 

Philip A. Chapman, 

(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 



Changes in Traffic Regulations. 
Voted, That the Traffic Regulations are 
amended as follows, effective January 15, 1934 : 
Section 40, Part 1, is amended by adding 
the following : 
Forsyth Road. 

From Forsyth way to Fenway. 
Section 50 is amended by striking out the 
following : 

Winthrop Street, Charlestown. 

Common street to Warren street. 
Section 50 is amended by adding the follow- 
ing: 

Lexington Street, Charlestown. 

Bunker Hill street to Monument square. 
Monument Square (East Side), Charlestown. 

Tremont street to Winthrop street. 
Winthrop Street, Charlestown. 

Monument square to Warren street. 
Joseph A. Conry, 
(Jan. 6-13.) Commissioner, 



CITY OP BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Iron Castings. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing the 
Public Works Department, Water Service, 
350,000 pounds, more or less, iron castings, as 
follows : 

350,000 pounds branches, curves, etc. 
Blank proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. The bidder must leave his pro- 
posal with a certified check for $200, payable 
to and to become the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the above office. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids will be publicly opened and 
read at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, on Thurs- 
day, January 25, 1934, at 12 noon. The suc- 
cessful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the amount of the contract with a 
surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract, in case the amount of 
the contract awarded aggregates $2,000 or 
more. The Superintendent reserves the right 
to accept or reject any or all bids, or any part 
of a bid. and to award the contract as he deems 
for the best interests of the city. All contracts 
made subject to appropriations to meet pay- 
ments thereunder. 

Philip A. Chapman, 

(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Iron Castings. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing the 
Public Works Department, Water Service, 
500,000 pounds two-part boxes. Blank pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of the 
Supply Department, Room 801, City Hall An- 
nex. The bidder must leave his proposal with 
a certified check for $200, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston if 
the proposal is not carried out, at the above 
office. A duplicate bid, without check, must 
be left at the office of the City Auditor prior 
to the time named for opening bids. The bids 
will be publicly opened and read Friday, 
January 26, 1934, at 12 m., at Room 801, 
City Hall Annex. The successful bidder must 
furnish a bond for one quarter the total 
amount of the contract with a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts as 
surety for the faithful performance of the 
contract, in case the amount of the contract 
awarded aggregates $2,000 or more. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to accept or 
reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, 
and to award the contract as he deems for the 
best interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

Philip A. Chapman. 

(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



Registry Department, 
1002 City Hall Annex. 
NOTICE TO PHYSICIANS AND MIDWIVES. 
Physicians and midwives can obtain blanks 
for return of births on application at this 
office, or they will be mailed on request. 



NOTICE TO PARENTS. 
Parents can obtain blanks for return of 
births on application at this office, or they 
will be mailed on request. 

Revised Laws, Chapter 29. 

( Extract from Section 6. ) 

Sect. 6. Parents, within forty days after 

the birth of a child, shall cause notice thereof 

to be given to the clerk of the city or town 

in which such child is born. 

The parent who neglects to give notice of a 
birth for ten days after the time limited there- 
for shall forfeit not more than five dollars for 
each offence. 

Superintendent's Circular No. 31. 
Boston Public Schools. 
"Pupils admitted for the first time must pre- 
sent a birth certificate, baptismal record, offi- 
cial governmental passport, containing proof 
or age, or evidence satisfactory to the princi- 
pal that none of these is obtainable. 

The importance of a birth record is shoicn 
in the above regulations. 

(Jan. 6-13.) J. J. Mulvey, Register. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Iron Castings. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing the 
Public Works Department, Water Service, 
450,000 pounds, more or less, iron castings as 
follows : 

450,000 pounds gate and hydrant eastings. 
Blank proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. The bidder must leave his pro- 
posal with a certified check for $200, payable 
to and to become the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the above office. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids will be publicly opened and 
read at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, on Thurs- 
day, January 25, 1934, at 12 noon. The suc- 
cessful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the amount of the contract with a 
surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract, in case the amount of 
the contract awarded aggregates $2,000 or 
more. The Superintendent reserves the right 
to accept or reject any or all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he deems 
for the best interests of the city. All contracts 
made subject to appropriations to meet pay- 
ments thereunder. 

Philip A. Chapman, 

(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Iron Castings. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing the 
Public Works Department, Water Service : 

200,000 pounds service pipe stock. 
Blank proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. The bidder must leave his pro- 
posal with a certified check for $200, payable 
to and to become the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the above office. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids will be publicly opened and 
read Thursday, January 23, 1934, at 12 m., 
at Room 801, City Hall Annex. The successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
the total amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract, in case the amount of the 
contract awarded aggregates $2,000 or more. 
The Superintendent reserves the right to accept 
or reject any or all proposals, or any part 
of a proposal, and to award the contract as 
he deems for the best interests of the city. 
All contracts made subject to appropriations 
to meet payments thereunder. 

Philip A. Chapman, 

(Jan. 13.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Uniforms. 

The Police Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for making and 
delivering uniforms. The bidder must use the 
form of proposal to be obtained at the office 
of the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston, and deposit with his bid, at the 
office of the Police Commissioner, a properly 
certified check for $500, payable to and to 
become the property of the Police Commissioner 
for the City of Boston, if the proposal is not 
carried out. Proposals will be publicly opened 
and read on Wednesday, January 24, 1934, at 
12 o'clock noon, at the office of the Police 
Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, Boston. 
The Police Commissioner reserves the right 
to accept or reject any or all proposals, or 
any part of a proposal, and to award the 
contract as he deems for the best interests of 
the Police Department of the City of Boston. 
Surety bond will be required from the suc- 
cessful bidder in an amount equivalent to 
50 per cent of the estimated contract amount. 
Eugene C. Hultman, 

(Jan. 13.) Police Commissioner, 



CITY OP BOSTON PRINTING DEPABTMENT 



CITY RECORD 

Official Curonicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol. 26. Saturday, Ja^nttjary 20, 1934. No. 3 

MAYOR MANSFIELD PRESENTS 17 MEASURES TO GENERAL COURT FOR 
ACTION LOOKING TO BENEFITTING CITY AND CITIZENS — SLIDING 
SCALES OF SALARIES, TAX LIMIT, CONSOLIDATION OF DEPARTMENTS 
IN INTEREST OF EFFICIENCY AND IMPROVED SERVICE AMONG 
MORE IMPORTANT TO BE CONSIDERED — BILLS FILED BY CORPO= 
RATION COUNSEL FOLEY. 



Under instructions from Mayor Mansfield, Corporation Counsel Henry E. Foley has 
drafted several important measures to be presented to the Legislature looking to the putting 
into effect some of the ideas of the Mayor for the improvement of the service of the City of 
Boston and the benefit of her citizens. The bills presented to the General Court number 
seventeen. 

The legislation proposed by Mayor Mansfield is as follows: 

1. Bill relating to annual increment and sliding scales of salaries in the City of Boston. (Con- 

templates the restoration of step-rate increase to school teachers and others.) 

2. Bill to reorganize Public Welfare Department. (By the establishment of a single paid 

commissioner and two paid deputy commissioners and an unpaid advisory board 
of five members, to be appointed by the Mayor.) 

3. 4, 5 and 6. Four bills relating to appropriations by the City of Boston for municipal pur- 

poses, two for the year 1934 and two for the year 1935, one for each year fixing a tax 
limit, the other an appropriation limit. 

7. Bill relating to salary reductions in the City of Boston and County of Suffolk. (To give 

power to the Mayor to continue, if necessary, for 1935 the 1934 reductions, or make 
lesser reductions.) 

8. Bill to perfect ambiguities in the Zoning Law. 

9. Bill relating to plumbing in the City of Boston. 

10. Bill with regard to regulation of speed of vessels in Boston Harbor. 

11. Bill with regard to dredging of certain portions of Boston Harbor. (For the purpose of 

improving the harbor.) 

12. 13 and 14. Three bills for the consolidation of departments m the City of Boston. (Estab- 

hshing broader powers for departmental consolidations.) 

15. Bill enabling the Mayor to authorize advertising in newspapers as well as in the City 

Record for the purpose of giving greater publicity to proposals for bids on contracts 
and the like. 

16. Bill relative to the disposition of fines and forfeitures imposed by District Courts in the 

County of Suffolk. (Providing in substance that such fines and forfeitures shall be 
paid into the treasury of the City of Boston.) 

17. Bill relatiye.to interest on refunds of abated taxes. . .(To. fix rate at 4 per cent.) 



50 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 




"0 Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 
queen, 

From thy hills looking down on the ship- 
teeming plain of the ocean, 

May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 
with light all serene. 

Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters 
unselfish devotion!" 

From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

HaU. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Assocmte Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City Hall. 

Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription $2.00 Per Year 



Single Copies 



10 Cents 



IN ADVANCE 



STREET AGENCIES. 

Old South News-stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertisine. 

A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
Januarj' 22, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City HaU, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of mimicipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply withm a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways ; the takmg of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private wavs; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 
public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 



trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasolene, oil, 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Tr.\ffic Commission, 
154 Berkeley street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City HaU Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the suppljang or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To THE Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue^ Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, and the small parks 
and playgrounds in general throughout 



the city, and as to the extermination 
of gj-psy moths and the charges made 
for such service. Application may be 
made to this department for informa- 
tion regarding the public baths and 
gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Dep.\rtment of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Wire Drv'isiON of the Fire 
Department, Fire Department Head- 
quarters, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire di\'ision. To 
Room 1007, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Bo.\rd of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY REPORT, 



For the week ending January 13, 1934: 
Population estimated July, 1934, 
United States Census Bureau estimate, 
795,256; number of deaths (stillbirths 
excluded): Residents, 232; nonresidents, 
28; total, 260. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 17.00; nonresidents deducted, 
15.17. 



Death rate per 1 ,000 of population : 
Last week, 17.26; corresponding week 
last year, 18.52. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 16; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 4; sixty years and over, 143. 
Total deaths: Male, 135; female, 125; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 141; 
deaths of colored, 10. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DEATHS.* 



DlSE.^ES. 



Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Jan. 13, 1934. 



Cases. Deaths. Cases. Deaths. 



Anterior poliomyelitis .... 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis lethargica . . . 

Influenza 

Measles 

Meningitis epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary). 
Tuberculosis (other forms) 

T jrphoid fever 

Whooping cough 



245 

39 
67 
23 
9 
1 
67 



Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Jan. 14, 1933. 



59 

27 

1 

49 

101 

30 

1 

66 



1 

24 

1 

12 



* Residents and nonreaidents included. 



Jan. 20 



CITY RECORD 



51 



BOSTON NEVER HESITATES AND NEVER WILL HESITATE TO GIVE ITS 
GENEROUS AND PROPER ANSWER TO THE CALL OF SUFFERING — 
MAYOR MANSFIELD MAKES STIRRING ADDRESS AT OPENING OF 
EMERGENCY RELIEF DRIVE DURING MEETING AT SYMPHONY HALL- 
NO CAUSE, HOWEVER HUMBLE, EVER CALLS IN VAIN, HE TELLS AUDI= 
ENCE DURING INAUGURATION OF HUMANE MISSION. 



In the course of his address at the meeting at Symphony Hall which opened the Emergency Relief Drive for 
Boston on Monday, Mayor Mansfield spoke in part as follows: 

"The drive of the Emergency Relief Campaign is an appeal to the hearts of Metropolitan Boston. None 
of us can listen to the wail of the infant in the hospital or to the sob of the bed-racked man or woman, without a 
throb. None of us can listen to the tales of homeless men and women who wander about our streets seeking shelter 
on bitter cold nights, without being stirred in the deepest emotion. When we learn the story that young boys and 
girls among whom despair is beginning to find its victims due to long continuous unemployment are seeking some of 
the comforts of life among the institutions in this campaign, Boston will never hesitate to give its proper answer. 

Every phase of human suffering and misfortune is softened to a great degree by the wonderful work performed 
in the one hundred and ten institutions that have combined in making this drive a success. 

From first hand information I learned many of the touching incidents connected with the campaign of 1933 
one of which I must briefly relate to you: It was the last night of the drive and as the clock was tolling ten in came 
a widowed mother and signed up a pledge of .S15. The ward leader knew that out of her small salary for seven years 
she had given to her paralyzed son some of the small comforts of life. In answer to his protest that her donation 
was too large she answered, pointing to her heart, "Something here tells me I am doing the right thing. God has 
saved my son and I want to help to allay the sufferings of some other woman's boy." 

That is the spirit that has made Boston the City of the Great Cause. Throughout the country the con- 
science of our city has been looked upon as a principle from which we never deviate and no cause however humble 
has asked for help in vain among true Bostonians. From the Atlantic to the Pacific Boston has been ennobled 
by its conscience. Like a fixed star in the heavens it points the way. 

In the departments under the jurisdiction of the Mayor our city spends millions a year for the protection 
of its citizens in every branch of public welfare. Millions on hospitals, millions to preserve the family intact, 
millions to give clothes and food and shelter to the young, millions to keep warm the fireside. Boston truly does a 
tremendous work to bring comfort and happiness to its citizens, but there are thousands, tens of thousands who 
never come to the institutions under the direct control of the Mayor but who ask for some measure of help under 
the glorious one hundred and ten institutions enrolled under the banner of this great cause. 

This drive is the plea of humanity for humanity and to the broad liberal spirit of Boston I commend this 
glorious work. As Mayor of Boston I ask you to give generously that those who need may receive some of the 
softening influences of this great cultured city. 



LAND-TAKINQ IN BRIGHTON. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for the 
taking of land for a public improvement, 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Parker avenue, Brighton district, 
as a highway, from North Harvard street 
northeasterly, with the name of Park- 
more street or some other distinctive 
name, bounded and described as follows: 

An extension of the highway named 
Hooker street is hereby laid out, north- 
easterly from North Harvard street for a 
distance of approximately three hundred 
and seventy-four feet, over and including 
part of the private way known as Parker 
avenue, and ordered constructed; the 
cost thereof to be charged to Federal 
funds allocated under the Civil Works 
Administration program for Massachu- 
setts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive of 
trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Westerly by North Harvard street, 
forty and 75-100 feet; northerly by the 
northerly line of said extension of said 
Hooker street as hereby laid out, three 



hundred seventy and 48-100 feet; east- 
erly by the easterly line of said extension 
of said Hooker street as hereby laid out, 
forty feet, and southerly by the southerly 
line of said extension of said Hooker street 
as hereby laid out, three hundred seventy- 
eight and 44-100 feet. 

No betterments are to be assessed for 
the making of the aforesaid improvement. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of an extension of Hooker 
street, Brighton district, as a highway, 
northeasterly from North Harvard street, 
over and including part of the private 
way known as Parker avenue, for a dis- 
tance of approximately three hundred 
and seventy-four feet, under the order of 
the Board of January 17, 1934, and 
awards no damages therefor. 



CONTRACTS AMENDED. 

The New England Building Wrecking 
Company has been allowed to amend the 
contract for removing buildings on Wash- 
ington Street North and Cross street for 
the Traffic Tunnel, by striking out on 



page 5, first paragraph, the words "sixty 
days" and substituting therefor the words 
"eighty-three days," so that the contract 
as amended shall read on page 5, first 
paragraph, "The Contractor agrees to 
complete the work in this contract within 
eighty-three days from notification by the 
department to begin," and that all pro- 
visions of said contract, excepting as 
modified herein, shall continue in full 
force and effect. 

The Chelsea Building Wrecking Com- 
pany, Incorporated, has been granted 
permission for removing buildings on 
south side of Merrimac street and Friend 
street and on northeast side of Cross 
street, between Hanover street and 
Salem street, Boston, Traffic Tunnel, 
by striking out on page 5, first paragraph, 
the word "sixty" and substituting there- 
for the words "one hundred seventeen, " 
so that the contract as amended shall 
read on page 5, first paragraph, "The 
Contractor agrees to complete the work in 
this contract within one hundred seven- 
teen days from notification by the de- 
partment to begin," and that all pro- 
visions of said contract, excepting as 
modified herein, shall continue in full 
force and effect. 



52 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Department of ScnooL Buildings. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering furniture of various kinds 
to the various schoolhouses. Surety 
bond will be required in the sum of .$1,000. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Department of 
School Buildings, 11 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certi- 
fied check in the sum of .S500, to be filed 
at the same office. DupHcate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for gym- 
nasium equipment at the Public Latin 
School. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to the full amount 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Department of School Buildings, 
11 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$500, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing, 
delivering and setting up pupils' school 
furniture in the various school buildings. 
Surety bond will be required in the sum 
of .$5,000. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the De- 
partment of School Buildings, 11 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $500, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing, 
delivering and setting up in the halls of 
the various schools, opera chairs. Surety 
bond will be required in the sum of $1,000. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Department of 
School Buildings, 11 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certi- 
fied check in the sum of $500, to be filed 
at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 2 p. m. 

Park Dep.\rtment. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
not more than six double teams and not 
more than four single-team express 
wagons, and not more than five five-ton 
trucks, whenever required. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to the 
sum of $3,000. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Park Department, 33 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 30, at 12 m. 

Police Department. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering fuel oil. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 50 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
officeof the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley 



street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 24, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for making 
and delivering uniforms. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
50 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Property Clerk, 154 
Berkeley street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$500, to be filed at the same office. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 24, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering lubricating oil. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Property Clerk, 154 
Berkeley street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$100, to be filed at the same office. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 24, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for installing a 
two-way radio telephone system for the 
Pohce Department, City of Boston. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the con- 
trac price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of Jackson 
& Moreland, engineers. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
.$5,000, to be filed at the office of the 
Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. Proposal forms available after 
January 10. 

Bids close Monday, January 29, at 12 m. 

Advertises for propo-sals for building 
alterations to provide communication con- 
trol room at Police Headquarters. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equiva- 
lent to the full amount of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the engineers, 
Jackson & Moreland. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $100, to 
be filed at the office of the Pohce Com- 
missioner, 154 Berkeley street, Boston. 
Proposals available January 10. 

Bids close Monday, January 29, at 12 m. 

Public Works Department (Ferry 
Service). 

Advertises for proposals for placing 
weighing and vending machines in two 
head houses of the Ferry Division. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Public Works 
Commissioner, Room 508, City Hall 
Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. Dupficate bid, 
without check, to be fUed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 m. 

School Committee. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
newsprint paper in packages and blocks 
for the public schools. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 50 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Business Manager, School 
Committee, 15 Beacon street, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $100, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January SO, at 12 m. 



Supply Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
uniforms to the Fire Department. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .$200, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
uniform caps to the Fire Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of SlOO, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, Janvary 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals. for furnishing 
rubber coats to the Fire Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .$200, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
fruit and vegetables to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a smn equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$300, to be filed at the same office. 
Dupficate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 23, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
meats to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank fomas for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall An- 
nex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by certi- 
fied check in the sum of $300, to be filed 
at the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 23, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
the Airport, Park Department, cinders as 
per specifications to be obtained at the 
Supply Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, Jayiuary 23, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
hay, grain and straw to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
(Continued on page 64) 



Jan. 20 



CITY RECORD 



53 



MAYOR MANSFIELD PAYS TRIBUTE TO BENJAMIN 
FRANKLIN BY PLACING WREATH ON STATUE 
— SCHOOL PUPILS AND CITIZENS SHARE IN 
EXERCISES IN FRONT OF CITY HALL IN VEN= 
ERATION OF ONE OF WORLD'S GREATEST MEN. 



Upon January 17 the Mayor, in the 
presence of pupils from several of the 
Boston city schools, plaf-ed a wreath at 
the foot of the statue of Benjamin Frank- 
lin, in the yard of City Hall on School 
street. In "addressing the pupils and 
citizens who had gathered for the cere- 
monies Mayor Mansfield spoke in part 
as follows: 

In history, the memory of the mediocre 
—the ordinary— the averasc man grows 
dimmer until finally not even a shadow 
remains. 

But the extraordinary man, the really 
great man, the man of strong character, 
who has left his impress upon the age in 
which he lived looms larger as history 
unfolds. , „ . . 

Of this latter class was Benjamin 
I'"ranklin. Born in Boston on .January 
17 17(K), 228 vears ago, on Milk street, 
within a few steps of this historical statue 
erected by his native city as a memorial 
to his great ability and character, al- 
though he was denied many of the advan- 
tages^ which you young girls and boys 
enjoy, he was compelled to give up his 
s'-hool when he was a boy of tender years. 
He was practically a self-edu-ated man. 
He mimtered a delightful literary style 
by studying odd volumes of '■The S[)ec- 
tator." .\t the age of sixteen he mastered 
arithmetic without assistance and studied 
navigation. He contributed articles to 
the public press which early showed signs 
of talent and even of genius. As he at- 
tained to man's estate he became a man 
of mark, his great intelligence and indus- 
try and his ingenuity in devising systems 
of economy, education and civic improve- 
ment, won for him the respect and admir- 
ation of the early American colonists. 

He was a most versiitile genius. Pru- 
dent, thrifty, conservative and wuso, he 
was not only one of the ablest men that 
thiscountryever produced but he was one 
of the world's greatest men. He was not 



ADDITIONS TO CONTRACTS. 

Depaktmknt ok School Buii.oings. 

Hugo Construction Company, Incor- 
porated, has been allowed U) add for 
the following changes in the contract for 
the William Barton Rogers School: 
Furnishing and installing one (1 ) counter- 
weighted slide-up sash and frame com- 
plete; one fixed sash in present metal 
partition openings; remove metal gate 
and furnish and install one (1) single 
swing door (Dutch) similar to adjoining 
doors with all necessary glass and hard- 
ware, all as per estimate, $195; contrac- 
tor's 10 per cent, $19.50— $214.50; bond 
U percent, 13.22; insurance, 1 per cent, 
$2 18; total addition, $219.90, and the 
amount of $219.90 will be added therefor, 
making the account as follows: Contract 
price, $217,221; total additions, $24,- 
220.71; amount of contract, $241,441.71. 

Rugo Construction Company, Incorpo- 
rated, has been ordered to add for the 
following changes in the William Barton 
Rogers School addition: Taking up and 
resetting seventy-two stone stair treads 
and three landings, grouting stair supports 
at bearings on present bnck exterior 



only a great statesman representing his 
country faithfully and well but he was an 
inventive genius, too. His experiments 
in electricity are well known, but it is not 
so well known that he was the inventor 
of the Franklin stove still in use in those 
parts of the country where more modern 
methods of heating have not penetrated. 
His example is one that every young man 
might well note and emulate. Vou are 
not all blessed with his talents and genius, 
of course, but you can imitate the other 
lasting qualities which have made his 
memory secure and which have endeared 
him to the hearts not only of the American 
people but of the people in many foreign 
lands. 

When he died in 1790 at the age of 
eighty-four, his epitaph, written by him- 
self, became public. It has become 
famous in its characteristic of the man. 

He wrote: 

"The Body of Benjamin Franklin, Printer 

(Like the cover of an old book, 

Its contents torn out. 

and stript of its lettering and gildin?) 

Lies here food for worms. 

Yet the work itself shall not be lost, 

For it will (as he believed) appear on<-e more 

In a new 

And more beautiful Edition, 

Correcte<l and .\niende(l 

By 

The Author." 

Our faith teaches us that he has ap- 
peared in a new edition in another world. 
It is but fitting that we who remain after 
him in this world and that the people of 
Boston, through me as their Mayor, shall 
each year take note of his birth and his 
wonderful services to his native land and 
to the world. These wreaths with which 
we decorate his monument today are 
merely indicative of the veneration and 
esteem in which his memory is held. 



wall, $195; trowelling on two coats of 
ma.stic dampprooling to the exterior 
corridor wall of present building that is to 
be replastered, $235— $430; bond, IJ per 
cent, $t).45 — $43().45; insurance, 1 per 
cent, $4.30— total, $440.81, and the 
amoimt of $440.81 will be added therefor, 
making the account as follows: Contract 
price, $217,221 ; total additions, $24,060.51 ; 
amount of contract, $241,881.51. 

Rugo Construction Company, Incor- 
porated, has been ordered to add for the 
following changes in the contract for the 
William Barton Rogers School addition: 
Taking down present plaster and remov- 
ing same from building, on the exterior 
wall (approximately 195 square yards), 
between the angles of the bay window- 
where stairs are located and replastering 
same; paint new surface with one coat 
of sizing and two coats of lead and oil, 
all as per estimate approved, $670; 
contractor's 10 per cent, $67; bond, 
1^ percent, $11.16; insurance, 1 percent, 
$7.37; total, $755.53, and the amount of 
.$755.53 will be added therefor, making 
the account as follows: Contract price, 
$217,221; total additions, .$25,416,04; 
amount of contract, $242,637.04. 



D'Amore Construction Company has 
been ordered to add for the following 
changes in the contract for the Randall 
C.. Morris School addition: Bridge roof 
timbers in corridor space with 2 by 3, one 
row in the center, $75; grounds for addi- 
tional blackboard, $10.80; painting black- 
board trim, $12— .f97.80; additional black- 
board and cork tackboard, $40; additional 
metal trim, $27; additional wire lathing 
and plastering around chimney, $42 — 
$109; 10 per cent, $10.90— .1119.90; 
bond and insuranc?, .15.44; total, .1223.14; 
and the amount of $223.14 will he added 
therefor, making the account as follows: 
Contract price, $14,477; total additions, 
$1,752.44; amoimt of contract, $16,229.44. 

247 PERSONS TO BE PUT TO WORK 
AT RECREATIONAL CENTERS 
BY MAYOR MANSFIELD. 

Mayor Mansfield, at a dinner at the 
Hotel \\'estminster on the evening of 
January 18, pledged the cooperation of 
the Park Department and the city in a 
program to carry out recreational and 
health plans through C. W. A. projects. 
The dinner was ])lanned and carried 
through by a group of neighborhood 
leaders. 

The Mayor stated that the public rec- 
reation project, financed by the C. W. A., 
will begin next Monday and it is 
planned to put 247 persons to work in 
these recreational centers. 

Park Commissioner William P. I^ong, 
who has been named chairman of the 
City-Wide F^mergency Committee ap- 
pointed by the Mayor, was the next 
speaker. He said eleven centers were 
used last year and that thousands used 
the gymnasiums. This year he hoped 
to add four more buildings and extend 
the hours in which the gyms would be 
open. Two days a week would be given 
over to women. 

The session was attended by chair- 
men of the Boston section joint plan- 
ning committees, including Ulysses S. 
Harris, Brighton-AUston; James H. Bren- 
nan, Charlestown; John J. Dailey, Dor- 
chester; Samuel lOlberfeld, East Boston; 
Frank J. Morrison, Hyde Park; Robert 
F. Paul, .Jamaica Plain; CJabriel Pie- 
mcmte. North I'^nd; Julian Steele, South 
lOnd; Thomas B. Fitzpatrick, Roslindale; 
John J. Madden, Roxl)ury; Albert Stine- 
man. South F]nd; Dr. FJmmanuel Yovino, 
South Boston; Jacob Burnes, West End, 
and Arma A. Drew, West Roxbury. 
W. Duncan Russell of the Community 
Service of Boston i)resided. 

Building Commissioner Roswell G. 
Hall also spoke. 

BOILER IN AMBULANCE STATION. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
request of the Health Commissioner: 

Boston, January 5, 1934. 
Ho.\. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — I respectfully request your 
Honor's approval to award a contract to 
the Garvey Plumbing and Heating Com- 
pany, 254 Adams street, Dorchester, for 
the installation of a boiler for coal or oil 
at the Ambulance Station, 20 North Grove 
street, Boston, for the sum of three hun- 
dred dollars (.$.300.). 

The necessity for the above installation 
has arisen because of the recent cold spell, 
when the old boiler cracked and was ren- 
dered useless. Upon investigation, Mr. 
Garvey recommends the installation of a 
new boiler. 

Yours respectfully, 
r. X. Mahoney, M. D., 

Health Commissioner , 



54 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

(Continued from page 52.) 

panied by certified check in the sum of 
$200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January J4, at 
12 m. 

,\dvertises for proposals for furnishing 
butter, eggs, etc., to the various city 
departments. Suretj' bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall .\nnex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
§300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 24, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
the Water Service, Public Works De- 
partment, 200,000 pounds of iron castings 
(service pipe stock). Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 25, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
iron castings (300,000 pounds frames and 
covers) to the Water Service, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a simi equivalent to 25 
per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 25, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
450,000 pounds of gate and hydrant cast- 
ings to the Water Ser\'ice, Public Works 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 25, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
350,000 pounds of iron castings, consist- 
ing of branches, curves, etc. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 25 
per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 25, at 
12 m . 

Readvertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing the Water Service, Class B pipe, in 
sizes and quantities as indicated in ad- 
vertisement. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 



for i)roposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supplv Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $500, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 26, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
iron castings to the Water Ser\'ice, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 26, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
composition castings, in sums and stjdes 
as indicated in advertisement. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 26, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
the Health Department with dental sup- 
plies. Surety bond will be required in a 
sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the Sup- 
ply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 29, at 12 m. 

Transit Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and installing brass frames, grilles and 
sUdes for ceihng for Traffic Tunnel. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Transit Department, 1 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $1,000, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 22, at 12 ni. 

Advertises for proposals for installing 
low tension cable. Traffic Tunnel. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to the full amount of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Transit Depart- 
ment, 1 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $500, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 29, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for installing 
electrical control for pump rooms. Traffic 
Tunnel. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to the full amount 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Transit Department, 1 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 



filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 29, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering toll collection equipment, 
Traffic Tunnel. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to the full 
amount of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Transit Department, 1 
Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$1,000, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, February 5, at 12 m. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, Januarj' 18: 

Collecting Dep.artment. 
James S. McKenna, Deputy Collector, 
Collecting Department, to be retired on 
pension beginning February 1, has been 
employed in an emergency capacity for 
the period between February 1 and Feb- 
ruary 27, inclusive, at S170 a month. 

Dep.\rtment of School Buildings. 

Approval has been given to extend for 
a period of ninety days, from January 
13, the temporary employment of Francis 
J. Tumbull as a steamfitting draftsman 
at $40 a week. 

Permission has been given to grant 
additional sick leave, without pay, to 
Annie A. Donohue, for a period of one 
month from January 14. 

Fire Department. 
George F. Murphy, executive clerk in 
charge of motor apparatus, supplies and 
repairs, who is to be retired on pension 
beginning February 1, has been emplo3'ed 
in an emergency capacity for the period 
between Februaiy 1 and February 27, 
inclusive, upon a flat rate of compensa- 
tion equal to one twelfth of the yearly 
rate paid, or $198.33. 

Hospital Dep.artment. 

The following persons have been em- 
ployed at the Boston City Hospital dur- 
ing the week ending Thursday, January 
11: 

Permanent. — James B. McLean, labo- 
ratory technician, $14.73 a week; John 
J. Murphj-, electrician, 835.70 a week. 

Temporary. — Helen Enright, ward- 
maid, $1425 a week; Edwin Wright, 
kitchenman, $16.63 a week; Dr. Harry 
Bj-me, executive assistant, $1,870 a year; 
Hannah Donahue, Marjorie LaChapelle, 
Flora Hamilton, Esther Pennington, 
special nurses, S29.75 a week. 

The following changes have occurred: 
Eleanor Sullivan, ward assistant, to table 
girl at $14.25 a week. 

HospiT.'iL Department (Sanatorium 
Division). 

The following pei-sons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division of 
the Boston City Hospital up to and in- 
cluding Thursdaj^ January 11: 

Patrick Breen, elevator operator (tem- 
porar}'), $2.50 a day; Anna Tagan, maid, 
SI 1.40 a week; Mar}' E. Sullivan, maid. 



Jan. 20 



CITY RECORD 



55 



S9.98 a week; Joseph Hanley, Walter 
Wiggin, male nurses (patients), S456 a 
year; James Kelley, Patrick McGuinness, 
choremen (patients) (temporary), S228 a 
year; Francis O'Toole, maid (patient), 
S228 a year. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed: Catherine Holland, maid, 
$9.98 a week; Marj' Sullivan, ward maid 
(temporary), .S9.98 a week; Daniel 
Denehy, Ethyl Haviland, maids (pa- 
tients), $228 a year; Fred Budreau, John 
Sautkulis, Daniel O'Donnell, male nurses, 
(patients), S456 a year. 

Institutions Department. 

The following appointment has been 
made for the week ending Thursday, 
January 18: 

Long Island Hospital. 
Hany Thibodeau, institution employee, 
helper in kitchen, temporary, S600 a 
year. 

Law Department. 

Lewis H. Weinstein has been appointed 
Assistant Corporation Counsel as of 
January 11. at $3,500 a year ($2,975 re- 
duced), to fill the vacancy caused by the 
removal of Charles H. McGlue. 

Charles S. Sullivan, Jr., has been ap- 
pointed as Assistant Corporation Counsel 
at $4,500 a year ($3,825, reduced), as 
of January 15. 

Overseers of the Pubuc Welfare. 

Approval h;vs been given for the pro- 
visional temporary emploj'ment of 
Dorothy R. Macdonald as bookkeper for 
a period of three months from January 
12, at S1,000 a year. 

Park Depart.ment. 

Approval has been given for the ex- 
tension of the temporary employment of 
♦ he following employees for a period of 
three months at $38 per week, le.ss 15 per 
cent: Peter E. Cassidy, first-clas.s fire- 
man, from December 15; John F. Fitz- 
gerald, first-class fireman, from December 
19. 

Penal Institutions Dep.artment. 

The following appointment has been 
made: 

House of Correction. 

Joseph P. Doolin, officer-painter, .$1,300 
a year (-SI, 170 a year and maintenance), 
temporarj', in place of Officer Boland — 
absent on account of illness. 

Public Works Department (Central 
Office) . 

Approval has been given to transfer 
Edward M. Richardson from property 
inspector in Highway Division to super- 
visor of all departmental property of 
the department at $4,000 a year, effective 
Januarj- 15, and chained to Central OflBce 
appropriation. 

Public Works Department (Ferry 
Service). 

Approval has been given to continue 
the temporarj' employment of the fol- 
lowing as deckhands at S5.25 a day, less 
15 per cent, for three months from Janu- 
ary 13, to fill two temporary vacancies 
in the Ferry Ser\ice: James F. Langone, 
Fred Ferraro. 



Public Works Department (Paving 

Service). 
James J. Hooley, transitman in the 
Paving Service, has been continued on 
the pay roll for a further period of thirty 
days. 

Public Works Department (Sewer 
Service). 

Approval has been given to continue 
the temporary employment of Francis J. 
Lyons as electrician at S7 a day, less 
15 per cent, for three months from Janu- 
ary 12, to fill a vacancy at the Calf 
Pasture pumpdng station until an eli- 
gible list is established by civil service. 

Public Works Dep.artment (Water 
Service). 

Approval has been given to continue 
the temporary employment of Alvin E. 
Sexton as clerk-stenographer at SI, 100 a 
year, less 10 per cent, from January 13 
up to March 1, when the examination 
held by civil service will be determined. 

Soldiers' Relief Department. 
.Leave of absence, with pay has been 
granted to Josephine G. Fitzgerald, 
visitor, for one month beginning Friday, 
January 5. 

Treasury Department. 
Leave of absence for two weeks, with- 
out pay, has been granted to Arthur F. 
Swan, Assistant Treasurer, to take effect 
January 16. 

Overtime Allowed. 
The heads of the various departments 
whose employees have received payment 
for overtime state in connection there- 
with that if any laborer has been allowed 
to work more than eight hours per day 
it has been only in case of emergency 
under the law. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 
Divisio7i). 

For the week ending Thursday, January 
4: 

Edward L. Sullivan, relief supervisor, 
4 days, $15.20. 

For the week ending Thursday, January 
11: 

Arthur G. Pearse, assistant engineer, 
2 days, S12.76; Edward L. Sullivan, re- 
lief supervisor, 2 days, $7.60; Bessie Daly, 
Eleanor McCoy, telephone operators, 1 
day, $2.85 each. 

Printing Department. 

For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ary 4: 

James J. Dolan, compositor, 2^ hours, 
83.25; Michael Ck)oney, press feeder, 2 J 
hours, S3. 14; Richard Mondson, cylinder 
pressman, 2i hours, $3.88. Total, $10.27. 

FOREIGN-BORN WHITES. 1930, WITH 
COUNTRY OF BIRTH. 

Total foreign-bom whites, 229,356 or 
9,563 less than in 1920. Bom in Ireland, 
50,381 (6,630 less than in 1920), 6,449 of 
these being bom in Northern Ireland; 
in Canada, 45,558 (3,550 increase) ; Italy, 
36,274 (1,905 decrease from 1920) ; Russia, 
31,359 (6,662 decrease); England, 10,316 
(2,092 decrease); Poland, 9,903 (2,253 
increase); Lithuania, 5,869; Scotland, 
5,637 (558 increase); Sweden, 5,432 (1,348 
decrease) ; Germany, 5,381 (534 de- 
crease) ; Greece, 3,416 (362 increase) ; 
all others, 19,830. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDER. 

General Order No. 10. 

I. Change of Radio Frequency. 

In compliance with orders received 
from the Federal Radio Commission, the 
wave length of the four radio transmitters 
used by this department was changed 
January 17, 1934, from 192.5 meters 
(1,558 KG) to 184 meters (1,630 KG). 

II. Boston Automatic Assignments. 

The following additions are to be made 
to the assignment cards of the Boston 
Automatic Fire Alarm Company: 

Signal 524, building 68-78 Portland 
street, corner Sudbury street. 

Signal 525, building" 72 Portland street, 
first floor and basement. 

Signal 52(), building 74 Portland street, 
first floor and basement. 

Signal 527, building 76 Portland street, 
first floor and basement. 

Apparatus to respond: Engine 4, Lad- 
der 1 and District 4. Nearest city box 
is No. 1321. 

III. A. D. T. Assignments. 

The following addition is to be made 
to the assignment card of the American 
District Telegraph Company: 

Signal 393, 101 and 103 and 105-113 
Summer street, A. W. Perry, Incorporated. 

Apparatus to respond : Engine 7, Ladder 
8 and chief of District 5. Nearest city 
box is No. 1431. 

IV. Transfers. 

The following transfers are hereby 
announced to take etTect at 8 a. m., 
Friday, January 19, 1934: 

Walter E. Weston, from Engine 48 to 
Ladder 19. 

Francis P. Wilcutt, from Ladder 19 to 
Engine 48. 

.lames C. Harrington, from Ladder 26 
to Engine 13. 

Charles J. McGranachan, from Ladder 
1 to Ladder 29. 

Dennis J. McLaughlin, from Engine 6 
to Engine 49. 

John J. Mahoney, from Engine 49 to 
Engine 11. 

David E. Coyle, from Engine II to 
Rescue I. 

John P. Knox, from Rescue 1 to Engine 
41. 

William E. Daley, from Engine 12 to 
Ladder 28. 

Frank J. Gayeski, from Engine 35 to 
Engine 16. 

William J. Buckley, from Ladder 12 to 
Ladder 29. 

John J. McCrackin, from Ladder 29 to 
Ladder 12. 

Charles E. McCIuskey, from Ladder 13 
to Ladder 20. 

Cornelius W. A. Johnson, from Ladder 
13 to Engine 12. 

John E. Carey, from Engine 16 to 
Ladder 13. 

Philip J. Flynn, from Engine 10 to 
Ladder 13. 

V. Commendations. 

Operator James A. McCarron and 
Batteryman Edward G. Corliss of the 
Fire Alarm Division are hereby com- 
mended for the services rendered by them 
in rescuing a valuable dog which had 
broken through the ice in the middle of 
Muddy river on January 16, 1934. 
Operator McCarron and Batteryman 
Corliss performed this service at great 
risk to themselves. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edward 
F. McLaughlin. 

Henry A. Fox, 
Chief of Department. 



56 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

FiuE Department. 

Upon January 13 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with the Huh 
Laundry Company, Incorporated, for 
doing the laundry work of the Fire De- 
partment for the year 1934. The follow- 
ing proposals were received December 27: 

Hub I aundry Company, Incor- 
porated, sheets, pillow slips, towels, 
spreads, l\ cents each; blankets (gray and 
blue), 12 cents each; John D. Sheehy & 
Son, sheets, pillow slips, towels, spreads, 
2 J cents each; blankets (single and 
double), 15 cents each. 

Based on the estimated amount of 
work for the year the approximate totals 
of the foregoing bids are as follows: 

Hub Laundry Company, Incorporated, 
.152,414.79; John D. Sheehy & Son, 
$3,592.23. 

The estimated amount of laundry work 
to be done for the Fire Department is as 
follows: 5,580 sheets per month; 5,145 
pillow .slips per month; 1,917 towels per 
month; 107 bed spreads per month; 
1 ,000 blankets annually. 

LlBR.\RY DeP.VRTMENT. 

I^pon January 18 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Egleston Square Auto 
Livery, Incorporated, for transportation 
service between Central Library and the 
branches. Bids, opened December 13, 
were as follows: 

William P. Grace, $105 a week; T. P. 
Parr & Son, $124.18 a week; Egleston 
Square Auto Livery, Incorporated, .$127 
a week; Dooley Brothers, Incorporated, 
$135 a week; J. J. Callahan, $150 a 
week; Henry Jenkins Transportation 
Companv, $175.77 a week; Alfred G. 
Burkhardt, $200.46 a week. 

Public Works Dep.\rtment (Sewer 
Service). 
Upon January 18 the Mayor approved a 
contract with John DiBartolomeo & 
Cefalo for sewerage works in Ransom 
road, from Greenfield road 295 feet .south- 
westerly, Hyde Park, The following 
bids were received January 16: 

Clai/ Pipe. — John DiBartolomeo & 
Cefalo, $1,293.25; James D'Amico, In- 
corporated, $1,370.64; Joseph Capone, 
$1,381.25; Tufo & Yebba, Incon^orated, 
$1,452.52; F. Susi & DiSantis Company, 
$1,50(5.25; Roxbury Concrete Construc- 
tion Company, Incorporated, $1,469.07; 
Prompt Contractors, Incorporated, $1 ,531 ; 
Roslindale Contracting Company, In- 
corporated, $1,509.72; L. Balboni, 
$1,590.54; M. DeSisto Company, $1,- 
763.50; John Williams, $1,786.84; A. 
Grande, $1,880; C. Andreassi & Co., 
$2,037; N. Cibotti & Co., .$2,042.50; 
Appel & O'Toole Company, $2,357.50. 

Concrete Pi/je.— John DiBartolomeo & 
Cefalo, $1,293.25; James D'Amico, In- 
corporated, $1,361.04; Joseph Capone, 
$1,372.25; Tufo & Yebba, Incorporated, 
$1,452.52; F. Susi & DiSantis Company, 
$1,461.25; Roxbury Concrete Construc- 
tion Companv, Incorporated, $1,482.57; 
Prompt Contractors, Incorporated, 
$1,495; Roslindale Contracting Company, 
Incorporated, $1,500.72; L. Balboni, 
$1,595.04; M. DeSisto Company, $1,741; 
John Williams, $1,831.84; A. (irande, 
$1 898- C. Andrea.ssi & Co., $2,046; 
N.' Cibotti & Co., .$2,051.50; Appel & 
O'Toole Company, $2,312.50. 



Supply Dep.\rtmknt. 

Upon January 13 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the North End Fruit 
Company ;ind G. .\ngelo (S: Co. for fur- 
nishing fruits and vegetables to the 
various city departments during January, 
19.34. Bids, opened on December 21, 
were as follows: 

Approximate ,\mounts, Per 

Hundredweight. 

Vegetables. 

Group No. 1. 

4,000 Poll wis Snvou Cdbbage. — North 
End Fruit Company, $4.97*; G. .\ngelo 
& Co., $6; Lsaac Locke Company. $6. 

lfj,000 PoumJs Cabbage.—Novth End 
Fruit Company, $3.23*; G. Angelo & Co., 
$6; Isaac Locke Company. $4.35. 

0,000 Pounds Cooking Onions. — North 
End Fruit Company, .$2.96*; G. Angelo 
& Co., $3. .50; Isaac Ijocke Companv, 
.$3.50. 

■'J,C>00 Pniindx Table Onions. — North 
End Fruit Company, $3.34*; G. Angelo 
& Co., $4; Isaac Locke Company, $3.75. 

1,S00 Pounds Pnr.mips. — North End 
Fruit Company. $2.33*; G. Angelo & Co., 
$3; Isaac Locke Company, $4. 

144,300 Pounds Green Mountain Pota- 
toes.— 'North End Fruit Companv, $2.17*; 
G. Angelo & Co., $2.50; Isaac Locke 
Company. .$2. 

5,000 "Pounds Sweet Potatoes.—Novih 
End Fruit Company, .$2.60*; G. Angelo 
& Co., .$3; Isaac Locke Company, .$3.50. 

17,000 Pounds Hubbard or .Marrow 
Sqiiash. — North End Fruit Companv, 
$1.57*; G. Angelo & Co., $2; Isaac 
Locke Company, -$2. 

8,700 Pounds Yellow Turnips. — North 
End Fruit Company, $2.09*; G. Angelo 
& Co., $2.50; Isaac Locke Company, 
$2.50. 

Total. — North End Fruit Company, 
.$4,905.32*; G. Angelo & Co., $6,089; 
Isaac liOcke Company, $5,133. 

Group No. 2. 

3,000 Pouruis Green £J<,an.?.— North End 
Fruit Company, $9; G. Angelo & Co., 
$8*; Isaac Ijocke Companv, $7.50. 

4,800 Pounds Cut Bte/s.— North End 
Fruit Companv, $4; G. Angelo & Co., 
$3*; Isaac Locke Companv, $2.75. 

6,500 Pounds Carrots, Cut 0^.— North 
End Fruit Company, $3; G. .\ngelo & 
Co., $2.75*; Isaac Locke Companv, 
$2.75. 

2,500 Pounds Carrots, Bunches. — North 
End Fruit Company, $6; G. Angelo & 
Co., $5*; Isaac Locke Company, $4. 

6, -500 Pounds Cauliflower. — North End 
Fruit Company, $13; G. Angelo & Co., 
$10*; Isaac Locke Company, $12.75. 

5,400 Pounds Celery.— North End Jruit 
Company, $9; G. Angelo & Co., $8*; 
Isaac Locke Company, $7.50. 

400 Pounds Cucumbers. — North End 
Fruit Company, $7; G. Angelo & Co., 
$8*; Isaac Locke Company, $15. 

2,100 Pounds Iceberg Lettuce. — North 
End Fruit Company, $7; G. Angelo & 
Co., $6*; Isaac Locke Company, $6. 

1,000 Pounds Native Lettuce. — North 
End Fruit Companv, $11; G. Angelo & 
Co., $10*; Isaac Locke Company, $9.50. 

100 Penuuh Parsley. — North End Fruit 
Company, $6; G. Angelo & Co., $5*; 
Isaac Locke Company, $15. 

600 Pounds Green Peas. — Nortli End 
Fruit Company, $9; G. Angelo & Co., 
$8*; Isaac Ix)cke Company, $18. 

900 Pounds Green Pepper's. — North End 
Fruit Company. .$9; G. Angelo & Co., 
$8*; Isaac Locke Company, .$13. 

75 Pounds Rrulishes. — North End Fruit 
Companj', $6; G. Angelo & Co., $5*; 
Isaac Locke Company, $12. 



8,100 Pouruis S pi unch.— North End 
Fruit Company, $6; G. .\ngelo & Co., 
$5*; Isaac Locke Company, $6.50. 

2,80<J Pounds Tomatoes.— North End 
Fruit Company, $8; CJ. Angelo & Co., 
$7.50*; Isaac Locke Company, S9. 

700 Pounds Broccoli. — North End Fruit 
Company, $8; G. -Angelo & Co., $7*; 
Isaac Locke Company, $7. .50. 

50 Poundx Scallions. — North End P'ruit 
Company, $6; G. Angelo & Co., $5*; 
Isaac Ijocke Company, $10. 

3,400 Pounds BruJisels Sprouts. — North 
End Fruit Company, $14; G. .\ngelo & 
Co., $13*; Isaac Locke Company, $12.50. 

Total. — North End Fruit Company, 
$3,813.-50; G. Angelo & Co., .$3,265*; 
Lsaac Locke Company, $3,660.50. 

Fruit . 
Group No. 3. 

5,400 Pounds Bananas, Carlou.s. — North 
End Fruit Company, $5.33; G. Angelo 
& Co., to be bought in open market; Isaac 
Locke Company, to be bought in open 
market. 

1,600 Pouruis Bananas, Bunch. — North 
F:nd Fruit Company, $5.33. 

Total. — North End Fruit Companv, 
$373.10. 

Group No. 4. 

4,000 PoiDuls Cooking Apples. — North 
End Fruit Companj-, .$5; G. .Angelo & 
Co., .$4.50*; Isaac Locke Companv, -$3.25. 

7,.900 Pounds Table Apples.— North 
End Fruit Company, $7; G. .\ngelo & 
Co., $6.50*; Isaac Locke Company. $5.50. 

4,100 Pounds Grapes.— North End 
Fruit Company, $11; G. Angelo & Co., 
$10*: Isaac Locke Company, $15. 

3,200 Pouruis Cranberries. — North End 
Fruit Company, $10; G. .Angelo & Co., 
$9*; Isaac Locke Company, .$9. 

3,000 Pounds Honeydew Melons. — 
North End Fruit Company, $8; G. 
Angelo & Co., $2*; Isaac Locke Com- 
panv, $1.25. 

5,700 Pounds Pears.— North. End Fruit 
Company, $7; G. Angelo & Co., $6*; 
Isaac Locke Company, $8. 

Total. — North End Fruit Companv, 
$2,163; G. Angelo & Co., $1,793.50*; 
Isaac Locke Company, $1,961. 

Group No. 5. 

7 ,200 Poumls Grapefruit. — Jtonardi Orsi 
Companv, $3.62; North End Fruit Com- 
pany, .$3.53*; G. Angelo & Co., $4; 
Isaac Locke Company, $4.50. 

1,100 Pounds Lemons. — Bonardi Orsi 
Companv. .$7.10; North End Fruit Com- 
any, .$4*; G. Angelo & Co., .$9; Isaac 
Locke Company, $8.50. 

36,300 Pouruis Oranges. — Bonardi Orsi 
Companv, $3.72; North End Fruit Com- 
pany, $3.68*; G. Angelo & Co., $4; 
Isaac Locke Company, $4. 

5,200 Pounds Tangerines. — Bonardi Orsi 
Companv, $4.21; North End Fruit Com- 
pany, $4.50*; G. Angelo & Co., .$5; 
Isaac Ix)cke Company, $5.50. 

Total. — Bonardi Orsi Company, $1,- 
908.02; North End Fruit Company, 
$1,868*; G. Angelo & Co., $2,099; Isaac 
Locke Company, $2,155.50. 

Group No. 6, Park Department. 

2,200 Poutids Carrots.- North End 
Fruit Company, $3*; Isaac Locke Com- 
pany, $2.75. 

1,600 Pouruis Beets.— North End Fruit 
Companv, $3*; Isaac Locke Company, 
$2.75. 

300 Pounds White Potatoes.— North 
End Fruit Company, $1.50*; Isaac Locke 
Company, $2. 

600 Pounds Su'eel Potatoes. — North 
End Fruit Company, .$3*; Isaac Locke 
Company, .$3 50. 



Jan. 20 



CITY RECORD 



57 



600 Pounds Cabbage. — North End 
Fruit Company, $3*; Isaac Locke Com- 
panv, $4.35. 

l',300 Founds Apples. — North End 
Fruit Company, $3.23*; Issiac Locke Com- 
pany, $3.25. 

1,6(K> Pounds liananns. — North End 
p'ruit Company, $5.40*; Isaac Locke 
Company, $0. 

4(J(J Pounds Lettuce. — North End Fruit 
Company, $8*; Isaac Locke Company, $6. 

60 Pounds drapes. — North End Fruit 
Company, $7*; Isaiic Locke Company, 
$15. 

50 Pounds Pears. — North End Fruit 
Company, $5*; Isaac Locke Company, S8. 

Total.^ North End Fruit Company, 
$32L59*; Isaac Locke Company, $332.85. 

Cash Discount for Payment in Ten Days. 
— Bonardi Orsi Company, 1 per cent; 
North End Fruit Company, 1 per cent; 
G. Angelo & Co., 1 per cent; Isjiac Locke 
Company, 1 per cent. 

♦Contract awarded. 

Upon January 15 the Mayor approved 
contracts with lowest bidders as indicated 
for furnishing eggs, cheese, etc., to the 
various city departments during January, 
1934. Bids, opened Ueceniber 2(i, were 
as follows : 

Approximate .Vmounts on All Items. 

S/fO Cases, J//,.i.'}0 Dozen, S'earby Fresh 
Hennery Eggs, Per Doren. — Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doc Company, 24.62 
cents*; Doe-Sullivan A Co., Incorporated, 
24.67 cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 29.5 
cents. 

10 Pounds Cream Cheese, n-Pouiul 
Bricks, Per Ponntl. — Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Company, 19 cents*; Doe- 
Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, 21 cents; 
Lewis-Mears Company, 23 cents; Armour 
& Co., 21.94 cents. 

60 Boxes Philiflelphia Cream Cheese, 
12 .i-Ounce Packages, Per Box. — Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com[)any, 70 
cents; Doe-Sullivan it Co., Incorporated, 
71 cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 85 
cents; Armour & Co., 09.75 cents.* 

70 Pounds Twin Cheese, Per Pound. — 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, 13.10 cents; Doe-Sullivan & Co., 
Incorporated, 13.17 cents; Lewis-Mears 
Company, 13 cents; Armour & Co., 
11.44 cents.* 

160 Pounds Young America Cheese, 
Per Pound. — Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, 13.63 cents; Doe- 
SuIIivan & Co., Incorporated, 13.87 
cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 14 cents; 
Armour & Co., 11.97 cents.* 

30 Pounds Pimento Cheese, Per Pound. — 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, 18.96 cents; Doe-Sullivan & Co., 
Incorporated, 18.97 cents; I.«wis-Mear8 
Company, 19 cents; Armour & Co., 
17.96 cents.* 

300 Poumls Medium Old Yellow Cheddar 
Cheese, Per Pound. — Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Company, 14.43 cents*; 
Doe-Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, 14.77 
cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 18 cents; 
Armour & Co., 15.95 cents. 

120 Pounds PujJ Paste Compound, 
Per Pound. — Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, 10.45 cents*; Doe- 
Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, 10.97 
cents; Armour & Co., 10.50 cents. 

600 Poumls .?Ar, Top Quality, Oleo- 
margarine, Per Ponntl. — Batchelder, Sny- 
der, Dorr & Doe Company, 10.14 cents*; 
Doe-Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, 11.25 
cents; Armour & Co., 11.74 cents. 

Cash Diswunt. — Doe-Sullivan <fc Co., 
Incorporated, no copy of bid at auditor's; 
Armou r <fc Co., tax clause. 

•Contract awarded. 



Upon January 16 the Mayor approved 
contracts with lowest bidders, as indicated, 
for furnishing hay, grain and straw to the 
various city departments during January, 
1934. Bids, opened December 26, were 
awarded as follows: 

Approximate Amounts on All Items. 

80 Tons Hay, Large Bales, Per Ton. — 
William Culkeen & Sons Company, 
$25.20*; John J. White Company, $25.30. 

4 Tons Straw, iMrge Bales, Per Ton. — 
William Culkeen & Sons Company, 
$27.50; John J. White Company, $27.40; 
The Whittemore Company, $27.30.* 

54 Tons, 108,000 Pounds, Oats, Per 
Hundred Pounds. — William Culkeen & 
Sons Company, $1.91; John J. White 
Company, $1.89*; The Whittemore Com- 
pany, $1.92. 

4 Tons Bran, Per T'on.— William Cul- 
keen & Sons Company, $32; John J. 
White Company, $33; The Whittemore 
Company, $31.50.* 

/ Ton Cottonseed Meal, Per Ton. — 
William Culkeen & Sons Company, 
$41.50; John J. White Company, $41*; 
The Whittemore Company, $41.25. 

/ Ton Linseed Meal, Per Ton. — William 
Culkeen & Sons Company, $52; John J. 
White Company, $52; The Whittemore 
Company, $51.50.* 

/ Ton Gluten Meal, Per Ton. — William 
Culkeen «fc Sons Company, $56; John J. 
White Company, $46.50"; The Whitte- 
more Company, $45.75.* 

/ Ton Corn Meal, Per Ton. — William 
Culkeen &. Sons Company, .iL35; John J. 
White Company, $34.60; The Whitte- 
more Company, $34.* 

1,-500 Pounds Cracked Corn, Per Hun- 
dred I'ounds. — William Culkeen & Sons 
Company, $1 .75; John J. White Company, 
$1.73; The Whittemore Company, $1.70.* 

50U Pounds Whole Corn, Per Hundred 
I'ouiuls. — William Culkeen & S<3ns Com- 
pany, $1.75; John J. White Company, 
$1.73; The Whittemore Company, $1.70.* 

.500 Pounds Kaffir Corn, Per Hundred 
Poumls. — William Culkeen & Sons Com- 
pany, $3.25; John J. White Company, 
$3.15; The Whittemore Company, $3.* 

■500 PouTuls Wheal, Per H urulred Poumls. 
— William Culkeen & Sons Company, 
$2.50*; John J. White Company, $2.55; 
The Whittemore Company, $2.60. 

500 Pounds Buckwheat, Per Hundred 
Pounds. — William Culkeen & Sons Com- 
pany, $2.45; John J. White Company, 
$2.45; The Whittemore Company, .$2.35.* 

300 Pounds Sunflower Seed, Per Hundred 
Pounds. — William Culkeen & Sons Com- 
pany, $7; John J. White Company, $7; 
The Whittemore Company, $7.* 

100 Poumls White French Millet, Per 
Hundred Pounds. — William Culkeen & 
Sons Company, .$9.90; .John J. White 
Company, $9.90; The Whittemore Com- 
pany, $9.90.* 

200 Pounds Hempseed, Per Hundred 
Pounds. — William Culkeen & Sons Com- 
pany, $5.20; John J. White Company, 
$5.20; The Whittemore Company, .$5.20. 

2 Tons Crushed Oats, Per ron.— William 
Culkeen & Sons Company, $43; John J. 
White Company, $42*; The Whittemore 
Company, $42.50. 

100 Pounds Canary Seed, Per Hundred 
Pounds. — William Culkeen & Sons Com- 
pany, $6.85; John J. White Company, 
$6.85; The Whittemore Company, .$6.85.* 

Cash Discount for Payment in Ten 
Days. — William Culkeen & Sons Com- 
pany, one half of 1 per cent; John J. 
White Company, one half of 1 per cent; 
The Whittemore Company, one half of 
1 per cent. 

* Contract awarded. 



Upon January 18 the Mayor approved 
contracts to lowest bidders in Items No. 
1 and 2 and Items 3 and 4 to Hurlbert 
& Hatfield for furnishing toilet paper 
to the various city departments until 
December 31, 1934". Bids, opened Jan- 
uary 12, were as follows: 

Approximate Amounts on All Items. 

843 Cases, Oval, 100 Rolls to Case, Per 
Case.— Fort Hill Paper Company, $3.88; 
Casey, Bigley Company, $3.70, five or 
more cases at one time; $3.95, four or 
less cases; Hurlbert & Hatfield, $3.90, 
deliveries of one to four cases, inclusive; 
$3.55, deliveries of five cases or over; 
Stone & Forsyth Company, .$3.47*; A. 
P. W. Paper Company, .$3.65; H. J. 
Dowd Company, $3.04, spot delivery; 
$3.18, delivered in three months; $3.50, 
period of one yesir. 

50 Cases A. P. W., or Equal, 5 inches 
by 7 inches, Flat, 100 [Packages to Carton, 
1,000 Sheets to Package, Per Case— Fort 
Ilill Paper Company, .¥7.00; Casey, 
Bigley Company, .$7.15, not A. P. W.; 
Hurlbert & Hatfield, $6.75*; Stone & 
Forsyth Company, $7.75; -V. P. W. Paper 
Coitipany, ,$7.25; H. J. Dowd Company, 
$8.10. ' 

50 Cases A. P. W., or Equal, Machine, 
100 Packages to Carton, Four and One- 
Half Inches by Five Inches, Single Fold, 
Per Case. — Fort Hill Paper Company, 
$6.20; Casey, Bigley Company, $6.20, 
not A. P. W.; Hurlbert & Hatfield, 
$6.20, product No. 810*; Stone * For- 
syth Company, S6.20; A. P. W. Paper 
Company, $6.20; H. J. Dowd Company, 
$6.20. 

365 Cases A. P. W., or Equal, 100 
Packages to Carton, 5-Inch Twin Fold; 
Alternate, Four and One-H<df Inch Twin 
Fold, Per Case.— Vori Hill Pajjcr Com- 
pany, 4i inches $6.15, twin-fold or 
double fold; 5 inches, .ISO. 80, twin fold 
or double fold; Casey, Bigley Cotiipany, 
4i inches, -$6.15, not A. P. W.; 5 inches, 
$6.80, not A. P. W.; Hurlbert & Hat- 
field, 4 J by b\ inches, $6.15, No. 8 prod- 
uct*; 5 by 51 inches, .$6.80, No. 7 product; 
Stone & Forsyth Company, 4) by 5| 
inches, $6.15; 5 by 5J inches, .$6.80; A. 
P. W. Paper Con pany, A\ inches, .S6.15; 
5 inches, .$6.80; H. J. Dowd Coinpany, 
4 J inches, .$6.15, interfolded; 5 inches, 
$6.80, interfolded. 

Cash Discount for Payment in Ten 
Days. — Fort Hill Paper Con.pany, 2 
per cent; Casey, Bigley Company, 2 per 
cent; Hurlbert & Hatfield, 2 per cent; 
Stone & Forsyth Company, 2 per cent; 
A. P. W. Paper Coinpany, 2 per cent; 
H. J. Dowd Company, 2 per cent; as per 
letter of January 12, 1934, withdrew bid 
for package, interfold and oval. 

* Contract awarded. 

WITHOUT ADVERTISING, 

Upon the following dates, as indicated, 
the Mayor approved contracts with firms 
and concerns for supplies and work. 
Communications from the heads of the 
several departments were as follows: 

Election Department. 

Boston, January 2, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
De.\r Sir, — The Board of Election 
Commissioners respectfully request that 
permission be given them to award the 
contract for printing the "Special Elec- 
tion" ballots to the firm of Wright & Potter 
Printing Company of 32 Derne street, 
Boston, without advertising for bids, at 
a price of twenty-five hundred sixty-four 
dollars (.$2,564) for supplying not in 



58 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 



excess of 373,000 ballots (this being the 
quantity supplied at the last election), 
and the usual quantity of specimen 
ballots, the price being approximately 
six dollars and eighty-seven cents ($6.87) 
j)er thousand for the ballots. 

The ballots for this "Special Election" 
will contain three hundred sixty-two 
(362) precinct changes. Clreat care will 
be required on the part of the printer as 
the time for printing such ballots and 
making a delivery to this office is but 
twelve week days. Sample ballots for 
posting must also be delivered at this 
office three days after receipt of copy. 

The Wright & Potter Printing Company 
is the only printing concern especially 
equipped to do this work, having printed 
the State and City of Boston ballots for 
a long period of years. 

For the reasons as stated above, and 
to safeguard the voters of the city as far 
as possible against error, this request is 
made. 

Respectfully yoxirs, 

Bo.\RD OF Election Commissioners, 
Peter F. Tague, 

Chairman. 

Supply Department. 

Boston, January 8, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir,— Your approval is respect- 
fully requested to award a contract, 
without advertising, to F. W. Faxon 
Company of 83 Francis street, Boston, 
for furnishing the City Hospital medical 
and surgical journals. 

A large part of this order is for French, 
German, Scandinavian and English jour- 
nals and this is the only concern that I 
know that is able and willing to handle 
this order. 

Due to the fluctuation of foreign ex- 
change and the fact that it is impossible 
to secure the price of a few of the journals, 
the exact amount of this contract cannot 
be stated. However, it is estimated 
that it will total approximately SI, 100. 

Mr. BalLard, librarian of the Medical 
Librarj' at the hospital, has checked the 
prices and recommends award to this 
companv. 

In view of the above facts and as 
there is nothing to be gained by adver- 
tising, I respectfully request the award 
of this contract to the above-named 
concern. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 



ADDITIONAL PURCHASES UNDER 
CONTRACTS. 

Supply Department. 
Upon January 5 the Mayor approved 
the requests of the Supply Department 
for the purchase of additional supplies 
of various kinds in accordance with con- 
tracts alreadv approved and in force, these 
supplies being purchased under contracts 
to run until March 31, 1934. Communi- 
cations were received from Philip A. Chap- 
man of the Supply Department as follows: 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir,— Under date of October 11, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the United Farmers' Co- 
operative Creamerv Association, relative 
to the purchase of" milk, cream, etc., for 
delivery to the various city departments. 



Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
milk, cream, etc., as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1933. This privilege is extended to 
March 31, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of milk, cream, etc., referred 
to therein, as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1933, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — ■ Under date of October 11, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Standard Oil Company 
of New York, Incorporated, relative to 
the purchase of gasolene and kerosene for 
delivery to the various city departments. 

Included in the contract is the follow- 
ing clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
gasolene and kerosene as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1933. This privilege is extended 
to March 31, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of gasolene and kerosene re- 
ferred to therein, as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1933, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplier. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of November 
1, 1933, the City of Boston entered into 
a contract with Webster-Thomas Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of coffee 
for delivery to the Sanatorium Division, 
Deer Island and Long Island. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
coffee as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1933. 
This privilege is extended to March 31, 
1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 



quantities of coflTee referred to therein, 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1933, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapman, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 3, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of November 14, 
1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Globe Grocery Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of groceries 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. 

Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1934, at its option, 
purchase, and the contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said groceries as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1933. This privilege is extended to 
March 31, 1934." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of groceries referred to therein, 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1933, for the ex- 
tended period permitted thereby, to wit, 
to March 31, 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Philip A. Chapm.\n, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 



LAND=TAKINQ IN SOUTH 
BOSTON. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Hyde street, South Boston 
district, as a highwaj', from Dorchester 
avenue to Old Colony avenue, bounded 
and described as follows: 

A highway named Hyde street is hereby 
laid out, from Dorchester avenue to Old 
Colony avenue, and ordered constructed; 
the cost thereof to be charged to Federal 
funds allocated under the Civil Works 
Administration program for Massachu- 
setts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Westerly by Dorchester avenue, forty 
feet; northerly by the northerly line of 
said Hyde street as hereby laid out, 
eleven hundred and 28-100 feet; easterly 
by Old Colony avenue, forty feet, and 
southerly by the southerly line of said 
Hvde street as hereby laid out, eleven 
hundred and 90-100 feet. 

No betterments are to be assessed for 
the making of the aforesaid improvement. 

Vote I, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvement, 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Hyde street, South Boston dis- 
trict, as a highway, from Dorchester 
avenue to Old Colony avenue, under the 
order of the Board of January 16, 1934, 
and awards no damages therefor. 



Jan. 20 



CITY RECORD 



59 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

Gemrul Order No. 375. 
It gives the commissioner great pleasure 
to publish the following letter for the 
information of the department. 

Offick ok thk Mayor, 
City ok Boston, Mass., 
Fredf-hick W. Mansfiklu, Mayor, 
January 9, 1934. 
Mr. Martin H. King, 

Stiixrinkii/lent of Police. 
Dkar Superintendk.nt Kino, — I hope 
it is not too late to thank you for the 
excellent work done by you and your 
officers upon the occasion of my inaugural 
exercises held at Symphony Hall last 
Monday. The jwlice arrangements, so 
far as 1 could see, were perfect, and the 
aid and protection accorded to my own 
personal party and to the guests could 
hardly have been excelled. If you will 
accept my sincere thanks for yourself 
and convey the same to the officers who 
participated I shall be very nuich obliged 
to you. 

Yours truly, 

Frederick W. Man.sfield, 

The Superintendent of Police wil! 
prf)mulgafe this order. 

I'XGENE C. HULTMAN, 

Commissioner. 

General Order No. ii7G. 
.\ trial board consisting of Captains 
Campbell, Casey and Daley, having heard 
by reference a complaint made by Harry 
N. Dickinson, captain, Division II, 
against John V. Keefe, patrolman, Divi- 
sion 11, for alleged violation of Rules 27, 
36 and 41 of the Rules ami Regulations 
of the Police Department, to wit: 
Charge 1: Neglect of duty. 
Specification: In that the said Patrol- 
man John F. Keefe, on the 24th day of 
December, 1933, while on duty and in 
uniform, being assigned to routes No 21. 
and No. 22, did fail to signal his station 
for orders from 8 p. m. December 24 to 
12.30 a. m. December 25, a period of 
four and one half hours, although the 
police nile required him to so signal 
every forty minutes. 

Charge 2: Disrespect to his superior 
officer. 

Specification: In that on the 25th day 
of December, 1933, when (juestioned by 
his superior officer, Lieut. Thomas Mc- 
Murray, as to the reiison for his neglect 
of duty, the said Patrolman John F. 
Keefe did refuse to answer certain (|ues- 
tions and did speak in an insolent and 
disrespectful manner, — 
has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation: 

"The Board having heard and care- 
fully considered all the evidence pre- 
.sented, accepts the plefi of guilty made 
by the said Patrolman John F. Keefe to 
Charge 1 and specification thereunder, 
and the lioard finds the said Patrolman 
John F. Keefe guilty of Charge 2 and 
specification thereunder. In view of the 
fact that this officer has already been 
before a trial Iward on two occasions, 
his pronounced insulwrdiniition, the rec- 
ommendation of his commanding officer 
that the said Patrolman Keefe be dis- 
missed from the service, and in order to 
maintain the morale an(l discipline of the 
department, the lioard respectfully recom- 
mends that the said Patrolman .John F. 
Keefe be dismissed from the Police 
Department." 

The commissioner accepted the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trijil 



Board, and ordered that the said Patrol- 
man John F. Keefe be dismissed from the 
Police Department. Due written notice 
of such dismissal with the reasons there- 
for was duly and specifically given in 
hand on January 3, 1934, to the said 
John F. Keefe. 

()n January 6, 1934, the .said John F. 
Keefe requested, in writing, a public 
hearing as provided by law, and the 
Police Commissioner set down Thursdav. 
January II, 1934, at 9.30 o'clock a. iii.. 
at the office of the Police Commissioner, 
as the time and place of said hearing, 
and duly notified the said John F. Keefe, 

The said John F. Keefe was i)resent 
at said time and place with counsel and 
was heard with his witnesses. Where- 
upon, after hearing the case, the Police 
Conunissioner finds the s;ud John F. 
Keefe guilty as charged, and fiuther 
finds that the said John F. Keefe shall 
stand dismissed from the Police Depart- 
ment. 

The Superintendent of Police will i)ro- 
mulgato tiiis order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 377. 

The Superintendent of Police is hereby 
directed to make the following details 
for duty at the Special Election in this 
city on Tuesday, .January 23, 1934. 

1. Three ()atrolmen for duty in the 
office of the Board of Election Commis- 
.sioners. 111 City Hall Annex, on arrival 
of ballots for the Special Election at 
about 1 1 o'clfK'k a. m., Monday, January 
22, 1934, such detail to continue until all 
ballots cast at the election have been 
returned. 

2. .\n officer of rank above that of 
sergeant for duty at the City Hall Annex, 
to supervise the police detail for motor 
trucks from 7 o'clock a. m., Tuesday, 
January 23, 1934, until relieved, and a 
patrolman from 8 o'clock p. m., on the 
same date, until relieved, for duty at the 
same place, to keep clear the approaches 
to the office of the Board of Election 
Commissioners for motor vehicles return- 
ing from the polling places with ballot 
boxes, etc. 

3. The necessary number of patrol- 
men from the several police divisions to 
attend the several polling places in this 
city on Sp>ecial Election Day, to preserve 
order and protect voters in the full exer- 
cise of their rights. 

4. Twenty-three sergeants, one to a 
motor vehicle, to report at the office of 
the Board of Election Commissioners in 
ample season to be prepared to leave 
that office for their respective destina- 
tions, according to the following schedule, 
in such vehicle with ballot boxes, ballots, 
etc., and deliver such ballot boxes, ballots, 
etc , to the police officer detailed in each 
precinct. 

Schedule for Hours of Departure of 
Sergeants So Detailed, fro.m Of- 
fice of Board ok Election Com- 
missioners on Morning of January 
23, 1934. 
(One motor vehicle for each of the 

twenty-two wards, excepting Ward 1, 

East Boston, for which two trucks have 

been engaged.) 

Wards 1 to 7, both inclueii'e, 8 a. m. 

Wards 8 to 10, both inclusive, 7.30 a. m. 

Ward 11, 7 a. m. 

Ward 12, 7.45 a. m. 

Wards 1.3 to 17, both inclusive, 7.30 a. m. 

Ward 18. 6.45 a. m. 

Wards 19 and 20, 7.20 a. m. 

Ward 21, 7.25 a. m. 

Ward 22, 7..30 a. m. 



5. For proper coordination in the 
delivery of ballot boxes, ballots, etc., by 
the sergeants, as herein set forth, to the 
police officers detailed at the various 
precincts, it is of the utmost importance 
that su(!h sergeants leave the City Hall 
Annex jjromptly on time as per .schedule. 

(). One patrolman to report at each 
of the three hundred and sixty-two pre- 
cincts, as hereinafter set forth", on Tues- 
day, .January 23, 1934, to receive ballot 
boxes, ballots, etc., from the .sergeants 
detailed on motor trucks. 

Schedule of the Hour for Officer to 
Report in Each of the Precincts. 

Ward 1, 8.30 a. m. 

Ward 2, 8.30 a. m 

Wards 3 to 7, both inclusive. 8.45 a. m. 

Want 8, Precincts 1 to (i, both inclusive, 8am 

Ward 8, Precinct 7, 8.15 a. m. 

Wanl 8, Precincts 8 to 14, both inclusive, 8.20 a m 

Ward 9. Precincts 1 to (i, both inclusive, 8 a. m. 

Ward 9. Precincts 7 to 15, both inclusive, 8..30 a. m. 

Ward 10, Precincts 1 to 4, both inclusive, 8 a. m. 

Ward 10, PrecinctsS to 11, both inclusive, 8.1.">a iti 

Ward 10, Precincts 12 to 10, both inclusive 

8..30 a ni. 
Wartl 11. Precincts 1 to 4, both inclusive, 8 a. ni. 
Ward 11. Precincts 5 to 12, both inclusive, 8.15 a.m 
Ward 11, Precincts 13 to lu, both inclusive. 

8. 30 a. ni. 
Ward 12, Precincts 1 to 4, both inclusive, 8.30 a. m, 
Ward 12. Precincts 5 to 8, both inclusive. 8.40 a. ni. 
Want 12, Precincts 9 to 11, both inclusive, 8.45 a. m. 
Wanl 12, Precincts 12 to 17, both inclusive, 9 a. m. 
Ward 13, Precincts 1 to 5, both inclusive, 8 a. in. 
Ward 13, Precincts 6 and 7, 8.15 a. ni. 
Ward 13. Precincts 8 to 12, both inclusive, 8.30 a. ni. 
Ward 13, Precincts 13 to lU, both inclusive. 

,S.45 a. ni. 
Ward 14. Precincts 1 to 5, both inclusive, 8 a. ni. 
Ward 14. Precinct 6, 8.15 a. m. 
Ward 14, Precincts 7 to 19, both inclusive, 8..30 a. ni. 
Wanl 15. Pre<'incts 1 to 4, both inclusive, and 

Precinct 13, 8 a. ni. 
Ward 15, Precincts 5 to 8, both inclusive, 8.15 a. m. 
Wanl 15. Precincts 9 to 12, both inclusive, 8.30 a. ni 
Wanl 15, Precincts 14 and 15, 8.45 a. in. 
Ward 16. Precincts 1, 2, 5 and 15, 8.15 a. m. 
Ward 16, Precincts to 14, both inclusive, and 

Precincts Iti and 17, 8,30 a. m. 
Ward 16, Pre<-iiicts 3 and 4, 9 a. m. 
Ward 17, Precincts 1 to 6, botli inclusive, 8 a. m. 
Ward 17, Precincts 7 to 9, both inclusive, 8.15 a. m. 
Ward 17, Precinct 10 and Precincts 12 to 15, both 

inclusive, 8.30 a. m. 
Ward 17, Precincts 11 and 16 to 19, both inclusive, 

8.45 a. in. 
Ward 18, Precincts 1 to 4, both inclusive, 7.50 a. m. 
Ward 18, Precincts 5, 6 and 15, 8 a. m. 
Ward 18. Precincts 13, 14 and Precincts 16 to 0, 

both inclusive, 8.15 a. m. 
Ward 18, Precincts 8, 9 and 12, 8.,30 a. m. 
Ward 18, Precincts 7, 10 and 11, 8.45 a. m. 
Ward 19, Precincts 1 to 4, both inclusive, 8 a. in. 
Ward 19. Precincts 5 to 9, both inclusive, and 

Precinct 17, 8.15 a. m. 
Ward 19. Precincts 10 to 12, both inclusive, an 

Precinct 16, 8.30 a. m. 
Ward 19, Precincts 13 to 15, both inclusive, a. in. 
Ward 20, Precincts 1 to 5, both inclusive, 8 a. m. 
Ward 20. Precincts 6 to 9, both inclusive, 8.15 a. m. 
Ward 20, Precincts 10 to 16, both inclusive, 

8..30 a. ni 
Ward 20. Precincts 17 to 19, both inclusive, 

8.45 a. m. 
Ward 21. Precincts 1 to 5, both inclusive, 8 a. m. 
Ward 21, Precincts 6 to 11, both inclusive, 8.15 a. m. 
Wanl 21. Precincts 12 to 14, both inclusive, and 

Precincts 16 and 17, 8..30 a. ni. 
Ward 21, Precinct 15, 9 a. m. 

Ward 22, Precincts 1 to 5, both inclusive, 8.15 a. m. 
Ward 22, Precincts 6 to 9, both inclusive, 8.30 a. m. 
Ward 22, Precincts 10 to 12, both inclusive, and 

Precincts 15 and 16, 8.40 a. m. 
Ward 22, Precincts 13 and 14, 9 a. m. 

7. Commanding officers are to take 
notice that it is of the greatest importance, 
also, that the patrolmen herein detailed 
report at the polling places in the various 
precincts promptly according to schedule. 

Failure for any reason of an officer to be 
on hand at a polling place at the appointed 
time delays the sergeant in the motor 
vehicle in his delivery of the ballot boxes, 
ballots, etc., and interferes, as is plainly 
seen, with the balance of the delivery 
schedule. 

8. This detail of patrolmen at the 
various precincts will continue until the 
ballots are counted and the results de- 
clared. The officers are then to bring the 
ballots and returns to the Election Com- 
missioners' Office. 



60 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 



9. Cards with the ward and precinct 
number and location of voting booth 
printed thereon have been forwarded to 
the several jjolice divisions, on which the 
division commander will write the name, 
the division number, and the number of 
the officer detailed at the time stated on 
the morning of January 23, 1934, at the 
voting booth of each respective precinct 
on his division. This card, to be given to 
the officer so detailed at the voting booth, 
will be retained in his possession until de- 
Hvered by him to an employee of the 
Board of Election Commissioners, who 
will arrive accompanying a sergeant on 
motor vehicle from the Election Com- 
missioners' Office on the morning of Janu- 
ary 23, 1934, with ballot boxes, ballots, 
etc., as hereinbefore stated. 

This card, when returned by such em- 
ployee to the Office of the Election Com- 
missioners will be its receipt that the ballot 
boxes, ballots, etc., have arrived at their 
proper destination. 

10. On receipt by the patrolman from 
the sergeant, detailed on motor vehicle, as 
herein provided, of registering ballot box, 
ballots, voting lists and such other docu- 
ments as may have been received from 
the Election Conmiissioners, the patrol- 
man detailed at polling place will deliver 
same to the warden or clerk of the precinct, 
allowing no person to take or handle them 
before such deUvery, and hand the key of 
the registering ballot box to the warden. 
On delivery of the ballots to the warden, 
the patrolman will take from him a re- 
ceipt for the same, which receipt will be 
returned to the Election Commissioners. 

11. After the warden has opened the 
box and allowed the election officers and 
the public to see that it is empty, the box 
is to be again locked and the key given to 
the patrolman who is to retain it until 
after the polls have closed, except that, at 
the request of the warden, the patrolman 
may allow him to open the box for the 
purpose of pressing down the ballots, in 
order to make room for more ballots after 
which the patrolman will see that the box 
is again locked, and the key returned to 
the police officer. 

12. The patrolman will obtain from 
the warden copies of posters, which will 
be sent to the latter, in relation to smoking 
and the use of liquor in polling places, and 
post same in conspicuous places where 
they may be easily read. Tacks will be 
sent for the purpose. 

13. The warden will deliver to the 
patrolman detailed at the polling place 
for his use at that place a copy of the de- 
scriptive voting list, which nmst be re- 
turned to the warden at the close of the 
polls. 

14. When the polls are opened, the 
patrolman will mark in the place indicated 
on the tag attached to the key the figures 
which the register shows before any ballot 
are cast. 

15. At 8 p. m., Tuesday, January 23, 
when the polls close, one sergeant will re- 
port in each of the twenty-two wards 
(excepting Ward 1, East Boston, for 
which two sergeants and two motor trucks 
are provided), to meet motor vehicle at 
last point of morning distribution; thence 
to proceed to each of the several precincts 
in his respective ward, and receive register- 
ing ballot box (which must be locked) 
and kev thereof, voting lists envelope, 
signed by the warden and other election 
officers, receipts for ballots, unused ballot 
envelope, sealed and certified (containing 
unused and spoiled ballots), stamps for 
marking spoiled ballots, receipts for 
ballots and check lists, carry them to the 



Election Commissioners' office and deliver 
same to some member of the Jioard of 
Election Conunissioners. 

10. When the polls are closed, the 
I)atrolman will mark on the same tag the 
figures which the register shows after all 
ballots have been cast. He will then 
hand the key to the warden, who will 
open the box and take out all the ballots 
to be sorted and counted. The warden 
will then cause the voting lists, including 
the list used by the police officer, to be 
sealed up in an envelope and the envelope 
certified by the signatures of himself 
and the other election officers and the 
same returned to the Election Com- 
missioners, as described in section 15 
of this order. The patrolman will not 
allow this envelope to be put into the 
ballot box. The sergeant who will 
report on motor vehicle will keep it 
about his person until deliverj- at the 
office of the Election Commissioners. 
The unused and spoiled ballots are then 
to be put in the envelope for unused 
ballots, and the envelopes sealed and 
certified. 

17. When returning from polls, all 
motor vehicles must drive to the easterly 
side of City Hall Annex, Court square, 
where ballot boxes will be conveyed by 
chute to the basement. 

18. It is important that the patrolman 
sees that the voting lists envelope is 
signed by the warden, clerk, and all the 
inspectors. The patrolman will also 
see that the special book for signatures 
of voters is returned in the registering 
ballot box. 

19. In case a patrolman is detailed 
to relieve another after the close of the 
polls, the commanding officer will see 
that he is properly instructed as to the 
duty of bringing the official returns, the 
box of ballots cast, and the press return 
to the Election Commissioners' Office 
as soon as they are delivered to him bj' 
the election officers. 

20. When the ballots have all been 
counted, the ballots thus counted, tally 
sheets and nothing else, shall be placed 
b\' the warden in the leatheroid box for 
that purpose, which must be sealed up 
and signed by all the election officers. 
The patrolman will particularly see that 
this box is properly sealed up and that all 
the election officers have signed their 
names to the certificate on the box. 
The patrolman will then bring the box, 
official return, record book and press 
return to the City Hall Annex, Court 
square, and deliver same to the Election 
Commissioners. The patrolman is di- 
rected not to allow the official return, 
press return or record book to be placed 
in the leatheroid box. 

21. While the polls remain open, an 
officer of rank will visit the polling place 
in each division at stated intervals, to 
be designated by the captain, and in 
case of any disturbance will report the 
fact to the commanding officer of the 
station house without delaj-. If addi- 
tional men are needed bej-ond the number 
available in that division, the officer in 
charge will communicate immediate]}- 
with headquarters. 

22. Attention is called to the fact 
that the polls at the Special Election on 
Tuesday, January 23, 1934, shall open 
at 10 o'clock a. ra., and close at 8 o'clock 
p. m. 

23. Commanding officers of divisions 
will see that the officers detailed for 
duty on Special Election Day are fur- 
nished with a copy of the circular issued 



by the Board of Election Commissioners, 
entitled: "Ini5tructions to Police Officers 
on . . . Election Days." 

24. The counting of ballots will be 
done on one table only with two inspectors 
counting and two inspectors watching 
the count. 

Notes. 

1. Attention is again called to the last 
paragraph of the circular, "Instructions 
to Police Officers on . . . Election 
Days," which reads: "The police 
officer is directed not to allow the official 
return or record book to be placed in the 
leatheroid box." 

That this may not happen fas it has in 
the past, notwithstanding repeated in- 
structions) in any of the precincts of this 
city at the coming election, the officer of 
rank who will visit the polling places in 
each division (provided for in section 21 
of this order), shall, at an appropriate 
time, call to the attention of the police 
officer and of the warden on duty at the 
polls, that the official return, press return 
and record book are not to be placed in the 
leatheroid box. 

They shall be handed to the police 
officer who will deliver them as set out in 
the paragraph immediately following. 

2. The officer going to the office of 
the Board of Election Commissioners with 
the leatheroid box, after the counting of 
the ballots, will take with him, in a 
separate package, the official return, 
press return and record book, which he 
shall safely deliver to the election com- 
missioners with the leatheroid box, as 
provided in section 20 of this order. 

3. The police shaU enforce the order 
that smoking is prohibited within the 
confines of the polling places, during the 
entire daj-, while the polls are open, as 
well as after they are closed. 

The Board of Election Commissioners 
makes special request that the officers de- 
tailed at the 362 precincts be instructed 
to see that this is enforced. 

As polling places and their approaches 
and exits are, in many instances, in build- 
ings used for places of religious worship, 
to say nothing of the danger to valuable 
property from careless persons, the im- 
portance of these instructions is apparent. 

Commanding officers will take notice, 
and provide means to correct the follow- 
ing conditions set out in a paragraph of a 
letter received by the Police Commissioner 
from the Board of Election Commissioners : 

"May we again call your attention to 
the law which prohibits smoking in any 
polling place, and ask you to have the 
officers who are detailed to the three 
hundred and sixty-two (362) precincts 
make a special effort to see that there is 
no smoking during the entire day, while 
the polls are opened, as well as after thej' 
are closed." 

4. The following matter has been 
brought particularly to the attention of 
the Police Commissioner in writing b}' 
the Board of Election Commissioners. 

Commanding officers will see that this 
cause of complaint is corrected. 

"During the hours from 6 p. m. to 
8 p. m. there has been a large increase in 
the number of persons who congregate 
outside the polling places. This makes it 
disagreeable to voters who are entering 
and leaving the polling places. May we 
ask that the police use every effort to 
relieve this congregation?" 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



Jan. 20 



CITY RECORD 



61 



General Order No. 37S. 
The comniissioner is pleased to publish 
the following letters for the information 
of the department: 

The Expressmen's League, 

January 11, 1934. 

Hon. Eugene C. Hultman, 

Police Commtsxiuner. 
Dear Mr. Commissioner,— The help- 
ful cooperation of your department dur- 
ine the year just past has agam been 
called to our attention by the report ot 
our special agent and a copy of his report 
is attached for your information. 

We feel that the officers mentioned in 
this report and your entire department 
have done a wonderful piece of work in 
preventing thefts from trucks and in t_he 
arrest of twenty-two persons for this 
type of larceny. , u i i 

It is apparent that such a record should 
not pass without an expression of our 
sincere thanks and our wish that the 
present most pleasant relatitns nay be 
continued through the years to come. 
Yours respestfully, 
The E.xi'ressmen's League, 

Ira S. Nelson, 
Execidrw Secreldry. 

The Exi're.«;smen's League, 

January 9, 19:M. 
Mr. Ira Nelson, 

Expressmen's League, 
Dear Sir,— I wish to call to your atten- 
tion the valuable assistance received from 
Deputy Superintendent James McDevitt 
and Captain Stephen Flaherty in the 
creation of the permanent express detail 
of Sergt. Frank Bohmbach and Patrol- 
man William I'hilbrick with a private 
car. Your agent rejiorts to the officers 
each morning. The entire bu8ine.ss sec- 
tion is covered, including all freight 
terminals. 1 believe that an expression 
of thanks should be tendered to the Police 
Commis.sioner of Boston, as I consider 
this is the best piece of jwlice work done 
in years. 

The total reported losses for the past 
year amounted to $2,859.52. Of this 
amount S2,:i55.73 was stolen prior to the 
creation of the express scjuad. The total 
recoveries made in the arrest of criminals 
and found on the highways amount to 
$4,108.11. 

We arrested twenty-two persons for 
larceny (mm trucks, and four for re- 
ceiving stolen goods. Of these, sixteen 
were placed on a suspended sentence, 
three were sent to Concord Reformatory, 
two sentenced to six months, (me to twelve 
months, and one to thirty days in the 
House of Correction, one was sentenced 
to three to five years at State Prison, and 
two were discharged. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Lawrence W. Welch. 
The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commh-'fionet . 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY M TO JANUARY 17. 



.January 11. 



Owner. 



Loc.ition. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



AUTHORITY TO DO WORK. 

The Mayor has gi-anted the request of 
the Public Works Department for au- 
thority to build with the department 
force, a surface drain of 10-inch pipe m 
Washington street (southeast side), be- 
tween center line of High View avenue 
extended and 158 feet northeasterly. West 
Roxbury, without advertising, the esti- 
mated cost for labor and materials being 
$3,000. 



Cesara Callerani 376 Lovell street 

Edwin 8. Brooks, trustee ... 10 and 12 Kingston street.. 

City of Boston 52-58 La Grange street. . . . 

Krikor .\sjian 610 Washington street 

Massachusetts General Hos- 45 Broadway 

pitaL 

M. F. Lane 40 Stacey street 

C J. Maloof '713 Tremont street 

Mrs Sarah F. Connelly 90 G street 

.Jeremiah McCarthy 88 G street 

Baker Real Estate Trust. . . . 109 Maiden street 



January 12 



Thomas Giblin 

A. W'. Perry, Incorporated . 

E. B. Badger Company 

Bartley Curran 

Miss Jennie L McLellan 

George .\nderson 

L. V. Nilcs Estate 

Henley-Kimball 

Jacques Lunch 

Thonuis F. Smith 

Joseph Peterson 

Reeie Buttonhole Machine 

Company. 

Amy Wightmancf"? 

Fidelity Loan and Finance 

Corporation. 



735 Commonwealth .avenue. 

89-105 Bedford street 

75 Pitts street 

66 Byron street 

1841 Centre street 

36 ScoUay square 

137 Pearl street 

652 Beacon street 

79 Broadway 

41 Walker street 

50 Gardner street 

18 and 20 Randolph street . . 

37 Sackville street 

457 Stuart street 



1 .'^Iterations, dwelling $3,000 

3 Alterations, stores and offices. 1,500 

3 Take-down, police station. . . . 350 
22 .^Iterations, store 200 

5 Alterations, mercantile 400 

2 Take-down, storage 150 

4 Alterations, store and lodging. 200 
7 Alterations, dwelling 155 

7 -Alterations, dwelling 155 

8 Alterations, storage 400 

21 .Alterations, lunch cart $75 

3 Alterations, stores and offices. 800 

3 Alterations, manufacturing... 1,000 

1 Alterations, dwelling 250 

20 .Alterations, dwelling 150 

3 .Alterations, mercantile 1,000 

3 Alterations, mercantile 400 

5 .Sign 100 

5 Sign 150 

2 Take-down, dwelling 500 

21 -Alterations, dwelling 400 

3 Alterations, manufacturing. . . 1,500 

2 Alterations, dwelling 195 

4 .Sign 150 



Januaby 13. 



None. 



January 15. 



Aruid Fre.lrikson 66 Creststr eet 

Metropolitan Coal Company 944 Massachusetts avenue. 

Nicola Vitale et <il 

City ot Boston 

Angelo Boncore 



18 Breed street. 
127 Marion street. 
163 Chelsea street . 



American Houee 36 Hanover street 

M.F.Lane 40 .Stacey street. . 



J, F. Ginski. 
B. Smith.... 



15 and 17 Stoughton street . 
97 Chelsea street 



182 Harrison avenue. 
.300 Walnut avenue. . 
862 Morton street. . . 



F. W. Whitaker 

City of Boston 

Edward Dale . . 

IdaWillensky 15 Hazleton street^ 

J. .A. Cohen 182 Hanover tree t 

Merchants Ccvoperative Bank 142 Norwell street 
Cabot, Cabot and Forbes 



33 Bedford street. 



Richard Kennedy 328 Main street 



Thom Mc.An. 



114 Summer street. 



20 
8 
1 
1 
1 

3 

2 

13 

1 

3 
12 
14 
14 

3 
14 

3 

3 
3 



January 16. 



Al. Cannata 

Al. Cannata 

O. F. Oakes 

James T. Bjornaon... 

C & R- Construction Co ... . 
George C. Appleton & Son 

J. .A. MacDonald 

William J. Donelan 

Eva E. Tebbets • •■ ■ 

President and Fellows ol 
Har\ard College. 

M. Miner v,; V ' ' ' 

Tennis and Racquet Club. . . 

E. H. Gorman 

City of Boston 

B. Kaiser 

Samuel Rachewski et al. 



42 Keith street. . . . 
46 Keith street. . . . 
14 Hazelmere road. 

44 Bonad road 

53 Harrison street.. 
46 Warren street... 



45 Lansdowne street. 

6 Penryth street 

151 Dover street 

124 Hanover street . . 



526 and 528 Columbus ave. 

927 Boylston street 

29 South Russell street 

1480 Columbia road 

15 Ferndale street 

4 Genesee street 



Charlestown Five Cents foav 
ings Bank. 

.James E. Welch 

Joseph Guilfoyle 

Boys' Club of Boston 



- 18 Bunker Hill street 2 



12 Ceylon street . . . 
32 Moulton street. 
9-15 Green street. 



Third-class garage $400 

Alterations, garage 2,000 

Alteratons, dwelling 2.50 

Alterations, school 200,000 

Alterations, store and dwell- None 

ing 

Alterations, hotel 80 

Alterations, stable 50O 

Alterations, stores 6,000 

Alterations, stores and dwell- 1,000 

ing 

Fire escapes 45 

Alterations, school 985 

Alterations, store 250 

Alterations, dwelling 225 

Alterations, stores 15 

Alterations, dwelling 200 

Take-down, manufacturing 500 

and stores . 

Alteration, laundry 100 

-Alterations, stores 400 

Third-class dwelling $4,000 

Third-class dwelling 4,000 

Third-class dwelling 5,000 

Third-class dwelling 5.000 

Alterations, storage 2,000 

Alterations, store and dwell- 150 
ing. 

Alterations, mercantile 600 

Alterations, dwelling 1,400 

Alterations, mercantile 100 

Alterations, stores and offices. 15,000 

Fire escapes 50 

Fire escapes 36 

Fire escapes 100 

Alterations, storage 250 

Alterations, dwelling 300 

Alterations, store and tene- 700 

ments. 

Take-down, store and dwell- 1,000 

ing. 

Alterations, dwelling 388 

Alterations, dwelling 270 

Alterationss, club .300 



62 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY II TO JANUARY 17. 

.Ianl'akv 17. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Mexican Petroleum Corpora- 199 Warren street 

tion. 
Fannie Rubitsky .■!5-.'}9 Cross street 

Rose Shapiro 152 We.-tt .Seventh street . . . 

.^rcangelo Parziule 121 and 123 Clielsea street . 

William H. Milton 24 Stone street 



Margaret Burns 177 Norfolk avenue. 

Ideal Delicatessen Huffet ... . S 10 Beacon street. . 



J. A. Missell 141 1 Tremont street . . . . 

Pietro Folino Ifi Unity street 

George H. Tinkham, trustee. 6 Vernon place 

George H. Tinkham. trustee. 4 Vernon place 

George H. Tinkham, trustee, 2 X'ernon place 

.Angelina Polcari 12 Garden Court street 



Second-class e:is station $7,000 

Alterations, stores and tene- 8,000 

nients 

.Alterations, stores and dwell- 200 

ing. 

.Alterations, stores and dwell- 900 

ing. 

Take-down, dwelling and 1,000 

store. 

Alterations, store 400 

Alterations, store and tene- 150 

ments. 

Alterations, store 200 

.Alterations, dwelling 900 

Take-down, dwelling (iOO 

Take-down, dwelling (iOO 

Take-down, dwelling (iOO 

.Alterations, store and dwell- 200 

ing. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 6. 
I. Ch.arge.s. 

Hoseman Dennis J. McLaughlin of 
Engine Company 6 ha.s been suspended 
from duty in the Boston Fire Depart- 
ment, without pay, for seven (7) days, 
to take effect at 8 a. m., Monday, January 
15, 1934, because of the following charges 
preferred against him by Capt. .James F. 
Sheehan of Kescue Company 3, under 
date of January 3, 1934: 

Charge 1 : \'iolation of Rule 354, 
Sections A and C. 

Specification: In that Hoseman Dennis 
J. McLaughlin, while on an "off duty" 
period Decem})er 29, 1933, entered the 
quarters of Rescue Company 3 and took 
or was a party to the taking, without 
permission, spare car Xo. 080, used for 
salting hydrants. This car, while in his 
pos-session, was involved in an accident 
at 40 Staniford street, breaking the left 
front axle of the car and also a small 
plate glass window at 40 Staniford street, 
and bending a "no parking" sign at the 
same location. Hoseman McLaughlin 
failed to report these facts to his imme- 
diate superior. 

Charge 2: Violation of Rule 374, 
Section I. 

Specification: In that when Hoseman 
McLaughlin was informed Ijy his superiors 
in regard to this affair he refused to give 
the truth concerning it. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edw.ard 

F. McL.AUGULIN. 

Henry A. Fox, 

Chief of Department. 



General Orders No. S. 
I. Fire Prevention Inspection. 
Beginning Wednesday, January 17, 
1934, a system of district inspection will 
be inaugurated in the Fire Department 
to augment work now being done by the 
inspectors from the Fire Prevention 
Division. 

District chiefs will assign men from 
the various companies in their respective 
districts to perform daily inspection work. 
Different men will he assigned each tlay 
whenever i)ossible. The schedule of men 
to be a,ssigned from each district is as 
follows: 

District 1, 1 inspector. 

District 2, 1 ins[)ect<)r. 

District 3, 2 inspectors. 

District 4, 2 inspectors. 

District 5, 2 inspectors. 

District (i, 2 inspectors. 

District 7, 2 in.spectors. 



District 8, 2 inspectors. 

District 9, 2 inspectors. 

District 10, 2 inspectors. 

District 11,1 inspector. 

District 12, 1 inspector. 

District 13, 1 inspector. 

District 14, 1 inspector. 

District 15, 1 inspector. 
Each inspector will be furnished with a 
pad of notices which he is to use when 
conditions are found that are liable to 
cause fire. These notices are to be made 
out in duplicate. The original is to be 
delivered to the owner or manager of the 
building and the duplicate is to be for- 
warded to the Fire Prevention Division. 
The purpose of this augmented inspec- 
tion force is twofold, first, to make every 
possible effort on the part of the Fire 
Department to eliminate possible fire 
hazards; and, secondly, to make every 
effort to apprehend persons who are 
liable to set fires or to find places where 
conditions are such that fires may be 
set. 

The men assigned to this work will 
perform their inspections between 9 a. m. 
and 4 p. m. in the daytime, and district 
chiefs will carefully instruct these men in 
the proper method of making inspections. 
Men assigned to inspection work will 
be careful and neat about their appear- 
ance, and will be courteous at all times. 
By order of Fire Commissioner Edw.\rd 

F. Mf'L.MIGHLIN. 

Henry A. Fox, 

Chief of Department. 



General Order No. 0. 
I. Annu-\l B.\ll. 

The Fifty-fifth Annual Ball of the 
Boston Fire and Protective Departments 
will be held on Monday evening, February 
5, 1934, at the Boston Garden. Detailed 
information and instructions concerning 
the ball will be furnished later, liut in the 
meantime the Fire Commissioner desires 
to emphasize the fact that he is deeply 
interested in the success of the l)all and 
he expects every member of the depart- 
ment to manifest the .same interest. 
Everyone should do his part to make the 
ball a financial success. 

On the night of the ball the commis- 
sioner will expect to see every officer and 
private in the department who is off 
duty in attendance at Boston Garden in 
uniform, participating in the success of 
the affair, and every member of the 
department who is off duty should take 
part in the grand march. This year the 
department should present the longest 
and most colorful grand march in its 



history. The personal interest and co- 
operation of each man is necessary. It 
is an obligation the members of the 
dej)artment owe themselves. 

II. C. W. A. Project. 

During the progress of the Civil Works 
project of {)ainting interiors of certain 
buildings in this department company 
commanders will exercise due care and 
diligence in the protection of the materials 
and equipment which may be used in 
connection \\ith the work which are 
.stored in the various houses. 

This material and equipment is govern- 
ment property and a strict accounting 
must be made thereof. 

Civil Works employees will not be 
allowed to remain in the building after 
working hours and under no circumstances 
will they be allowed to have access to the 
supplies or materials outside of working 
liours. 

III. Wrong Box Number. 

In Cicneral Orders No. 2, c. s., regarding 
a new circuit. Box 12-2429 was given 
instead of 12-2459. Box 12-2459 is the 
correct number and company commanders 
should make this change immediatelj'. 

IV. Relocating Box 3134. 

Box 3134, formerly located on pole at 
Norfolk avenue and Clapp street, has 
been moved to Norfolk avenue and 
Burrell street, a distance of about 150 
feet from the old location. 

New cards for this box will be furnished 
later. 

V. Acting District Chief. 
Capt. Michael J. Aylward of Engine 

Company 32 is designated acting district 
chief of District No. 2, to take effect as of 
December 18, 1933. 

\'I. Commend.\tions. 

Within the past week members of 
the Boston Fire Department have dis- 
tinguished themselves by courageous and 
valiant service of a type characteristic of 
the history and traditions of the depart- 
ment. 

On Januarj' 10, 1934, the department 
responded to an alarm from Box 1662 at 
4.42 a. m. for a fire at 1819-1821 Wash- 
ington street. While Engine Company 
22 was running a line, Hoseman Patrick J. 
Flaherty observed a man standing on the 
coping of the sixth floor where he had 
climbed to escape from the building. 
Hoseman Flaherty proceeded to the roof 
via Ladder Company 12's aerial ladder 
and then to a position directly over the 
man. Lying on his stomach, Hoseman 
Flaherty reached down over the side of 
the building and after several attempts 
secured a hold on the man's wrists and 
raised the man to the roof. The rescued 
man was in a highly nervous state and 
bordering on collapse at the time. Hose- 
man Flaherty risked his own life in making 
this rescue and showed great courage and 
ability in accomplishing the act. Be- 
cause of his courage, coolness, atiility and 
efficiency in a most trying situation, 
Hoseman Patrick J. Flaherty is awarded 
seven days' additional vacation, is highly 
commended and this case is referred to 
the Board of Merit for further investiga- 
tion and recommendations. 

At about 1.25 p. m. January 11, 1934, a 
cry for helj) was heard at Fire Alarm 
Headquarters, and upon investigation a 
little girl (Dorothy O'Neil), about ten 
years of age, was seen about thirty feet 
from the shore hanging on the ice in 
Muddy river. Edward F. Corliss, 



Jan. 20 



CITY RECORD 



63 



Thomas A. Kelley and Caesar Mikola- 
jewski of the Fire Alarm Division, and 
Raymond T. Lonergan and Daniel J. 
Foley of the Maintenance Division, im- 
mediately responded. Kelley and Foley 
were soon floundering in the water but 
Mikolajewski by crawling on the ice 
managed to reach the spot where the girl 
was hanging when he went in. He 
grabbed the girl and held her until Cor- 
liss and Lonergan pushed a ladder out to 
him. The water is deep at this point and 
there was considerable hazard attached to 
this undertaking. The above-named men, 
with no thought of their own safety, re- 
sponded to the call for help. They are 
all highly commended and this case is 
referred to the Board of Merit for further 
investigation and recommendation. 

Lieut. Edward J. White of Engine 
Company 23, Lieut. George L. Evanson of 
Water Tower Company 2, Engineer 
George L. Lyons of the Motor Squad and 
Apparatus Operator William H. Lanigan 
of the Fire Prevention Division are 
hereby commended for responding to and 
working at tire. Box 2344, five alarms, 
January 5, 1934, while off duty. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edwwrd 
F. McLaughlin. 

Henry A. Fox, 
Chief of Deparlment. 



MASSACHUSETTS CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMINATIONS. 

The Massachusetts Civil Service Com- 
mission announces examinations for 
desirable positions open in the Boston 
and Metropolitan districts as follows: 

Junior Soci.m. Worker, Boston Public 
Welf.\re Dei'.artment, February 10, 
1934. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 27, 1934, at 12 m. 

Salary: The entrance salary is $1,400 
a year; the maximum salary is $1,600 a 
year. 

Duties: Under immediate supervision, 
to investigate cases of persons who apply 
for relief under the several relief statutes 
and to perform social service case work 
in connection with their care and treat- 
ment. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must be not less than twenty-one nor 
over fifty years of age at the time of 
filing application. A certificate of date 
of birth must be filed with the applica- 
tion unless one ha.s born tiled with 
a previous application. Applicants must 
have education equivalent to graduation 
from a standard four-year high school 
and either one year's experience in social 
welfare work or one year's training in a 
school of social work. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 5; 
personality and fitness, as determined 
by an oral interview, 2; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements : Applicants 
must obtain at least 70 per cent in 
each subject in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

Note: An examination for Senior 
Social Worker in Boston will be held 
on this same date. Candidates for both 
positions should file a separate applica- 
tion for each position. 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 11 TO JANUARY 17. 

January 11. 



Plumber. 



Location. 



W.->rd. 



Nature. 



Saul Tack 227 Manthorne road 20 

E. Deniarais Company 85 Navarre street IS 

C. A. Stamni 598 Du.lley street 8 

.A. Smith Company 70 Huntington avenue 4 

K. F. Rodenhiser Itil Brighton avenue 21 



P. A. Lang 94 Byron street . 

P. A. Lang 96 Byron street. . 

M. A. .\mbro8e 200 C street 

P. L. O'Neil 25 Granby street . 

Louis H. Jacobs 23 Burr street. 

Harry E. Kimball 



1 
1 

(i 
5 
19 

1 18 Knoll street 20 



New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 



January 12. 



John C. Kelly Plumbing Co., 

Ralph Zampitello 

J. T. Hagen 

Francis J. Brown 

R. F. Norwood 

James Woolfall 

James D. O'Neil 

George A. Renshaw 

A. F. .McCarthy 

T. P. Travers 

Barney Levine 

John J. Campbell 

Edward H. Marchant 



17 Highland Park avenue. . . 11 New 

62 Boylston street ;{ New 

193 .St. Botoph street 4 New 

541 Washington street 22 New 

901 Beacon street 21 New 

1497 Dorchester avenue. ... 16 New 

113 Brighton avenue 21 New 

24 Virginia street 13 New 

fil Everett street 21 New 

551 Tremont street 5 Now 

90 Berkeley street 5 New 

722 Commonwealth avenue, 21 New- 

9 .\shburton place 3 New 



fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures . 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures. 



A. .Minella 

A. E. Touohet 

G. Wilbur Thompson 
William .VIcDermott. 

.Arthur Stein 

Daniel McKenzie. . . . 

William Cooper 

Joseph Rosengard. . 

C. E. Trafton 

C. E. Trafton 

R. Bruce Strum 

Joseph Weinberg 

F. C. Odcnweller 

Louis Trehub 

W. L. .\mbroee 

Bart Dorsey 

J. Harry Kurhan 

James A. Sullivan. . . 

.s. J. Connolly 

A. P. Rufso 



105 and 107 Colborne road, 21 New fixtures. 

14-24 Charles street 5 New fixtures. 

1069 Boylston street 5 New fixtures. 

207 Newbury street 6 New fixtures. 

406 Marlborough street. . . 5 New fixtures. 

376 Massachusetts avenue. . 4 New fixtures. 

1 1.\ Elm street 3 New fixtures. 

19S State street 3 New fixtures. 



January 16. 



159 West .Springfield street, 
161 West .Springfield street.. 

50 .Shirley street 

579 Washington street 

70:{ East Fourth street 

i07 Northampton street .... 

211 West Eighth street 

1024 Dorchester avenue .... 
1138 Washington street .... 
1283 Dorchester avenue. . . . 
735 Commonwealth avenue. 
65 Water street 



9 New 

9 New 

8 New 

17 New 

6 New 
8 New 

7 New 
13 New 

3 New 

15 New 

21 New 

18 New 



fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures . 
fixtures 



January 17. 



.Samuel Shuman 

.M. B. Gradone 

Dorchester Plumbing Co 

Louis Rubinovitch 

J. Harry Kurhan 

Edwartl H. .Marchant. . . 

George D. Roes 

O. F. .Metcalf 

James H. Prieat 

Lewis Haner 

Samuel Landau 



1053 Dorchester avenue. . . . 
26 William K. Kelly square, 
1208 Dorchester avenue. . . . 

17-23 .Scollay square 

97 Summer street 

520 Boylston street 

149 Newbury street 

56 Roland street 

7-19 Mt. Hoo<l road 

21 Park Vale avenue 

31 Washington street 



New 
New 



15 New 

3 New 

3 New 

4 New 

5 New 
2 New 

21 New 

21 New 

21 New 



fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtutes. 
fixtures, 
fixtures . 
fixtures, 
fixtures. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



$425 
375 
150 

95 
150 
.300 
300 

50 

75 
115 

35 



$70 
400 

63 
160 
200 

65 
150 
120 
500 
300 
175 
150 
400 



Janu.krv 


13. 


None. 


January 


15. 



$800 
75 
150 
225 
400 
800 
100 
135 



82,250 

1,260 

125 

50 
590 
200 

60 
500 
100 
160 

60 
200 



$40 
ICO 

60 
125 

60 
200 
200 
100 
200 
250 

50 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, Under authority granted the 
chairman on December 4, 1930, and as 
urgently required by considerations of 
public safety and convenience, during 
the period of sewerage construction, 
estimated to be sixty (60) days, vehicles 
are excluded from Fellows street, Rox- 
bury district, between East Lenox street 
and Hunneman street, elToctive January 
1.-), 1934. 

Vnlcfl, Under authority granted the 
chairman on December 4, 1930, and as 
urgently required by considerations of 
public safety and convenience, dining 
the period of sewerage constniction, 
estimated to be seventy (70) days, ve- 



hicles are excluded from Shirley street, 
Roxbiny district, between Massachusetts 
avenue and Norfolk a\'enue, effective 
January 13, 1934. 

Vdted, Lender auMioi-ity grunted the 
chairman on December 4, 1930, and as 
urgently required by considerations of 
public safety and coiiNcniencp, dining 
the period of the Autoinobile Show, 
January 20, 1934, to January 27, 1934, 
inclusive, vehicles must be i)arkod with 
right rear wheels to the curb in Hunting- 
ton avenue, northwest roadway, north- 
west side, from opposite Garrison stret^t 
to West New-ton street, and parking of 
vehicles is prohibited in West Newton 
street, southwest side, from Falmouth 
street to Huntington avenue. 



64 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL, 

Monday, January 15, 1934. 
Regular meeting of the City Council in the 
Council Chamber. City Hall, at 2 p. m., Coun. 
GALLAGHKR, senior member, presiding. Ab- 
sent, President Dowd. 



EXECUTIVE APPOINTMENTS. 

Subject to confirmation by the Council, the 
Mayor submitted the following appointments : 

Weighers of Coal : Robert McGregor, 120 
Border street. East Boston : Fred Clements, 
120 Border street. East Boston ; David J. 
Connor, 21 Park street, Charlestown ; Margaret 
A. Steeves, 35 Spring street, Medford. 

Weigher of Goods: Warren Flynn, 370 
Princeton street. East Boston. 

Weigher of Coal and Coke : Joseph Dou- 
cette, 19 Sylvester road. Dorchester. 

Weigher of Goods and Measurer of Grain : 
John J. McCarthy, 60 LithgoTV street, Dor- 
chester. 

Constable : Cornelius L. Dundon, 181 Prince- 
ton street, without authority to serve civil 
process and to serve without bond, to be con- 
nected with an official position. 

Severally laid over a week under the law. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

The following petitions were received and 
referred to the committees named, viz. : 

Claims. 

Frank R. Barone, for compensation for dam- 
age to property at 280 and 282 Hanover street, 
caused by backing up of sewage. 

William Carlin, for compensation for in- 
juries caused by an alleged defect in Favre 
street. 

Rosa Cohen, for compensation for damage 
to property at 209 Walnut avenue, caused by 
ash truck. 

Edmund E. Federici, for rebate on beer 
license. 

Placida C. Femino, for compensation for 
damage to clothing while helping Fire De- 
partment. 

Furbush Motor Sales, for compensation for 
damage to car by city truck. 

James D. Gorman, to be reimbursed for 
judgment issued against him. 

Richard J. McNeill, for compensation for 
damage to car by police car. 

Lilly Nayfe, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect at 818 Washington 
street. 

Frank A. O'Brien, for refund on beer license. 

Gennaro Riccio, for compensation for dam- 
age to property at 294 Hanover street, caused 
by defective sewer. 

Bliss W. Robinson, to be reimbursed for 
execution issued against him. 

Samuel Scotch, for refund on beer license. 

Leo Sinopoli. for compensation for injuries 
and damage to car caused by an alleged de- 
fect in West Boston Bridge. 

Patrick J. Spillane, for compensation for 
damage to car by city truck. 

S. A. Valenti, for refund on ash tickets. 

M. W. Vye, for compensation for damage 
to car by city cart. 

Walker & Co., for compensation for damage 
to truck by ash truck. 



APPEARANCE OF CHILDREN. 

Petitions were received for children under 
fifteen years of age to appear at places of 
public amusement, viz. : 

Anne Marie Casey, South Boston Municipal 
Building. February 2. 

Roxbury Post 44 A. L. Auxiliary, Practical 
Arts High School. February 8. 

Leave was granted, under suspension of the 
rule, on motion of Coun. GLEASON. 



REMOVAL OF HARRIS HIRSHBERG. 

Notice was received from the Mayor of re- 
moval of Harris Hirshberg as constable of 
City of Boston to take effect January 13, 1934. 

Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENTS BY THE MAYOR. 

Notices of the following appointments were 
received from the Mayor, viz. : 

John H. Dorsey, 25 Melville avenue. City 
Treasurer, effective January 11, 1934. 

Roswell Gleason Hall, 44 Tremlett street. 
Dorchester, Superintendent of Public Build- 
ings, effective January 12, 1934. 

Walter A. Murray, 242 Foster street, mem- 



ber of Board of Street Commissioners, in place 
of Charles F. Bogan, effective January 9, 1934. 

Owen A. Gallagher. 17 Ocean street, Dor- 
chester, member of Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, in place of Theodore A. Glynn, ef- 
fective January 15, 1934. 

Christopher J. Carven, Commissioner of 
Public Works, to be acting head of Municipal 
Employment Bureau at 25 Church street, to 
take place of John J. Shields, effective January 
9, 1934. 

Severally placed on file. 



APPROVAL OF CONSTABLES BOND. 

The constable's bond of Gustav Spanier, 
having been duly approved by the City Treas- 
urer, was received and approved. 



REINSTATEMENT OF MRS. MARY E. 
GARFIELD. 

The following was received : 

School Committee of the City of Boston, 
Office of the Secretary, 

January 12, 1934. 
Mr. Wilfred Doyle. City Clerk, 

My dear Mr. Doyle. — Under the provisions of 
chapter 320 of the Acts of 1933. the School 
Committee of the City of Boston respectfully 
asks that the City Council approve the re- 
instatement of Mrs. Mary Evelyn Garfield 
as a clerk in the office of the Business Manager. 
The authority of the Commissioner of Civil 
Service for such reinstatement has been given, 
subject to the approval of the City Council. 

Mrs. Garfield resigned from service in the 
office of the Business Manager October 25, 
1927 to marry, and now has one child. Her 
husband has been out of work for more than 
two years, and Mrs. Garfield therefore is en- 
tirely dependent upon herself for support. 
She has placed her resignation in the hands 
of the Business Manager, undated, to become 
immediately effective when her husband shall 
succeed in obtaining a permanent position 
which will enable him to support his family. 

Under the circumstances the School Com- 
mittee is willing to reinstate Mrs. Garfield, 
and trusts that the City Council may take 
early and favorable action on the School Com- 
mittee's petition.. 

Very truly yours, 

Ellen M. Cronin, 

Secretary. 

In connection with the foregoing Chairman 
GALLAGHER offered the following: 

Ordered, That under the provisions of chap- 
ter 320 of the Acts of 1933 the reinstatement 
of Mary E. Garfield in the employment of the 
city as a clerk in the Schoolhouse Department 
be. and hereby is. approved. 

Pased under suspension of the rule. 



MUNICIPAL BUILDING. WARD 1. 

Coun. SELVITELLA offered the following: 

Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 

hereby favors the enactment of legislation 

authorizing the construction of a municipal 

building in Ward 1. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



PAYMENT TO MOTHER OF DAVID 
MCDONALD. 

Coun. TOBIN offered the following: 
Resolved. That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation 
to extend the time within which the city may 
accept chapter 226 of the Acts of 1932 con- 
cerning a payment to the mother of David Mc- 
Donald. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



PENSION FOR FRED W. CONNELLY. 

Coun. TOBIN offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation 
to authorize the payment of a pension to Fred 
W. Connelly, former teacher in the Franklin 
Union. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



TRAFFIC LIGHTS AT QUINCY STREET 
AND COLUMBIA ROAD. 

Coun. TOBIN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Traffic Commissioner be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to 
install traffic lights at the corner of Quincy 
street and Columbia road. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



SURVEY OF WELFARE DEPARTMENT. 
Coun. WILSON offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be, and 
he hereby is, respectfully requested to obtain 
authorization under the C. W. A. program for 
a systematic and detailed survey of the Wel- 
fare Department by the Statistics Department 
of the City of Boston, and for the enlargement 
and completion of the Consolidated Index 
Cross Reference System now being compiled by 
the Statistics Department. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, a week ago 
your committee was advised by Mr. McCartin, 
in the Mayor's office, that although over 
50.000 Boston men already registered with the 
State Employment Bureau have not been placed 
and although additional registrations are being 
accepted daily, there is no immediate prospect 
of further work. It is likewise unfortunate 
that with some 16,000 men already placed at 
work, there will be very little permanent value 
to show for the work done and the money paid 
out. The present financial condition of the 
City of Boston, in common with every other 
great city in the country, demands certain 
rigid economies. His Honor the Mayor is 
making valiant efforts toward that end. He 
recently urged from every department a budget 
20 per cent below tentative estimates. But 
even less drastic department cuts will be use- 
less without real correction -where the chief 
cause of higher taxes and reduced salaries 
exists. In 1928 the public welfare and 
soldiers' relief rolls roughly amounted to 
S2.650.000 : it rose to $3,840,000 in 1929. In 
1930 it was $4,310,000 : in 1931 it almost 
doubled to $7,550,000. For 1932 it ran almost 
twelve million and last year almost thirteen 
million. At the present time there are about 
32,000 current active cases in public welfare 
alone. With one out of every eight persons 
in the city on the public relief rolls, we are 
spending more than a million dollars a month, 
ostensibly to provide for the poor and the un- 
employed. During that period from April to 
September last year, when almost every other 
city in Massachusetts showed a drop in welfare 
lists anywhere from 40 to 60 per cent. Boston 
only showed a 4 per cent decrease. We were 
down to $200,000 per week in October, but up 
another $10,000 per week by Thanksgiving. 
For years we have been told that the workings 
and details of the Public Welfare Department 
are a sort of sanctified secret. Something to 
be referred to only in a hushed whisper, and 
with the light turned low. The motto has 
been, primarily, to jealously guard the secrecy 
of the confidential public welfare lists. 
Fraudulent cases have quickly sensed their 
security under a system which has hesitated 
to permit any close inquiry or check-up, lest 
some worthy case be caused embarrassment. 
But now the city government is embarrassed ! 
Embarrassed financially, which is an embar- 
rassment that can't blush unseen! I agree 
with the principle that of course the lists 
should not be available to the public ; but 
some degree of protection is due to the tax- 
payers of the city, and due to the many 
worthy cases where large families have been 
forced to exist on inadequate allowances, be- 
cause of the greedy demands of hundreds of 
families who have no proper place on the rolls. 
Even the disclosures of the successive partial 
investigations made last year, which only 
pecked at the situation, convinced everybody 
but the Department of Public Welfare that 
the present unwieldly and outgrown system, 
or lack of system, not only is wide open to 
fraud, but fraud actually exists. With any 
real regard for the financial health of the 
city at this time it is very apparent that the 
Public Welfare Department can stand an opera- 
tion. I don't ask his Honor the Mayor to 
cut the heart out of the Public Welfare De- 
partment budget, but I do believe we can 
spare a few of the light fingers ! I have 
no quarrel with Walter McCarthy. Especially 
with the additional burden of C. W. A. now 
placed on his shoulders, and with the present 
set-up in the Public Welfare Department and at 
least until there has been one thorough stock- 
taking of the business of this money-disbursing 
city agency, increased five times in volume since 
1928, no human being can handle it. It 
mounted too rapidly, and they've never been 
able to catch up with it. Apparently even 
the recent placing of over nine thousand men 
on C. W. A. work from the welfare and 
soldiers' relief lists has so far failed to 
reflect much in any reduction of total cases ! 
Hundreds of fraudulent cases have squeezed in 
with the rush. In short, before we start 
tinkering with a leak or two in the pipes of 
other departments, let us look to the break in 
the dike that exists in the Public Welfare 
Department. An immediate systematic check- 
up of these 32,000 current active cases in the 
Welfare Department and those still to come, 
in an effort to stop the deluge, isn't a question 



Jan. 20 



CITY RECORD 



65 



of economy, it's a matter of self-preservation 
and the solvency of the City of Boston ! I am 
not asking for an investigation. I ask for a 
systematic stocktaking. Under the C. W. A. 
this can be done at the government expense. 
It can be done by an enlarged force of com- 
petent men under the direction of the 
Statistics Department. Mr. Balfe probably 
won't thank this body for suggesting that 
this serious and important responsibility and 
burden be placed on his department, but most 
members of this body I assume are more or 
less familiar with the splendid system of cross 
references and data already compiled and 
available in that office. Separate personal cards 
for every person police listed in the entire City 
of Boston are on file by wards, precincts and 
streets. Different colored celluloid tags at- 
tached to the top of the various cards dis- 
close instantly the existence of any public 
welfare or soldiers' relief case, automobile 
ownership, city or county employment, hos- 
pitalization, communicable disease, real estate 
ownership, and other information of value. 
With that start, I therefore urge the ap- 
propriateness of a real 100 per cent survey 
and stocktaking of the Public Welfare and 
Soldiers' Relief Departments by the Statistics 
Department under C. W. A. auspices. Let 
these lists for once be systematically and com- 
pletely purged of all improper and fraudulent 
names, and the 4 per cent decrease in Boston 
cases will more nearly equal the 40 to 60 
per cent drop found in other industrial cities. 
Even a 20 per cent correction in this one 
department will, in total amount, more than 
equal a 5 per cent economy slash in all the 
other city departments combined ! It can 
absolutely be effected, without touching a 
single worthy case. And such use of an 
enlarged Statistics Department staff of workers 
would be a profitable investment for the city 
to undertake immediately with or without 
C. W. A. aid. I ask the adoption of the order, 
and I might say, incidentally, that the message 
that the members of the Council sent to the 
committee, to the President of the United 
States and Mr. Ickes, with reference to the 
situation here in Boston is still unanswered. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



CONFIRMATION OF EXECUTIVE 
APPOINTMENT. 

Chairman GALLAGHER called up, under 
unfinished business. No. 1 on the calendar, viz. : 

1. Action on appointment submitted by the 
Mayor January 8, 1934, of John H. O'Brien, 
Jr.. to be a Weigher of Coal. 

The question came on confirmation. Com- 
mittee, Coun. Fish and Sclvitella. Whole num- 
ber of ballots 15, yeas 15, and the appointment 
was confirmed. 



REPAYING OF PIKE'S ALLEY. 

Coun. FITZGERALD offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor instruct 

the Commissioner of Public Works to repave 

Pike's alley. Ward 3. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



OPPOSITION TO UNAPPROVED DEPART- 
MENT CONSOLIDATION. 

Coun. WILSON offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Legislative Committee of 
the City Council be instructed to oppose the 
passage of any bill by the Legislature for the 
consolidation of city departments not provid- 
ing for approval by the City Council. 

Coun. WILSON— Mr. President, I might say 
that the reason for offering that order is a 
report, which I have not verified, to the effect 
that a bill has been introduced into the Massa- 
chusetts Legislature to revamp the business 
structure of the city and consolidate various 
city departments. I presume that if there is 
any lack of reference to the City Council being 
given an opportunity to pass on the matter 
of consolidation of departments, it is through 
an oversight ; but, even though the powers of 
the City Council have been reduced in recent 
years, we are still asked to go over the annual 
budget in some detail, and I submit that the 
City Council is still an integral part of the 
government of the City of Boston, and that 
the Committee on Ordinances of the City 
Council might naturally expect an opportunity 
to look over such a proposition. I would 
assume that such a bill, if passed by the 
Legislature, should, of course, carry a pro- 
viso, therefore, that it receive the approval 
of the City Council. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



Adjourned, at 2.42 p. m., on motion of Coun. 
SELVITELLA, to meet on Monday, January 
22, 1934, at 2 p. m. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY.) 

Fire Service, Boston .\nd Metropolitan 
District, Febri'.\ry 17, 1934. 

Last day for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 3, 1934, at 12 noon. 

Applicants for the service of Boston 
must be not less than twenty-two nor 
over thirty-five years of age at the time 
of filing application. Applicants for all 
other cities and towns in the Common- 
wealth must be not less than twenty-one 
nor over thirty-five years of age at the 
time of filing application. Callmen and 
substitute callmen may make such deduc- 
tions from their ages as are provided for 
in Civil Service Rule 8, Class 21. A 
cortificale of date of birth must be filed 
with the application, unless one has been 
filed with a previous application. 

.•\l)plicants for Worcester are required 
to be not le.ss than 5 feet 5 inches in 
height. Ai)plicants for Brockton must 
be not less than 5 feet 6 inches in height, 
and weigh not le.ss than 13.5 pounds at 
the time of appointment. Applicants for 
Winchester must be not less than 5 feet 
8 inches in height, and weigh not less 
than 135 pounds. Applicants for Lynn 
must be not less than 5 feet 5i inches 
in height, and weigh not less than 135 
pounds. 

The subjects of the examination with 
their respective weights will be as fol- 
lows: Training and experience, 3; prac- 
tical questions, 4; general information, 
3; total, 10. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination and strength tests. 

Educational test, 3 ; physical test, 2 ; 
total, 5. 

Applicants will be required to obtain 
at least 50 per cent in each subject of 
the examination and at least 70 per cent 
in the educational average and in the 
strength tests in order to become eligible. 

The practical questions will be based 
upon information contained in a manual 
known as the "Red Book." This manual 
may be obtained from the Secretary of 
State, Room 118, State House, at ten 
cents a copj'. It is necessary that ap- 
plicants obtain a copy of this manual 
and study it carefully. 



MASSACHUSETTS CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMINATIONS. 

The Ma.s.sachusetts Civil Service Com- 
mi.ssion announces examinations for 
dpsiralde positions open in Boston and 
Metropolitan districts as follows: 

Senior Social Worker, Boston Public 
Welfare Department, February 10, 
1934. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day. January- 27, 1934, at 12 m. 

Salary: The entrance salary is $1,600 
a year; the maximum salary is $2,300 a 
year. 

Duties: Under immediate supervision, 
to investigate cases of persons who apply 
for relief under the several relief statutes 
and to perform social .service case work 
in connection with their care and treat- 
ment. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must be not less than twenty-one nor 
over fifty years of age at the time of 



filing application. A certificate of date 
of birth must be filed with the applica- 
tion unless one has been filed with 
a previous application. Applicants must 
have education equivalent to graduation 
from a college or university and either 
two years' experience in social welfare 
work or two years' training in a school of 
social work. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3 ; practical questions, 5 ; 
personality and fitness, as determined 
by an oral interview, 2; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements : Applicants 
must obtain at least 70 per cent in 
each subject in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

Note: An examination for Junior 
Social Worker in Boston will be held 
on this same date. Candidates for both 
positions should file a separate applica- 
tion for each position. 

School Physician, Mo.ston Sciujol 

DhiPAUTMiONT, Fehruaiiv 24, 1934. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 10, 1934, at 12 m. 

This examination is open to both males 
and females. 

Salary: $960 per year, less the statutory 
reduction. 

Duties: General knowledge of medicine 
and surgery; statutes relating to school 
hygiene and child hygiene; .sanitation; 
cau.ses, prevention, and correction of bad 
posture in school children; pediatrics, 
epidemiology; the difTerential diagnosis 
of the various comirunicable diseases and 
contagious skin diseases common to 
school children, including the prevention 
and methods of curing san^e; nutrition; 
malnutrition, its etiology, diagnosis, and 
treatment; childhood tuberculosis, diag- 
nosis and care of known cases; practical 
methods of exan ining the eyesight and 
hearing of school children; standards of 
admissions to classes for the conservation 
of eyesight and lip-reading classes; the 
ten-point examination used in connection 
with special cln.ss (mentally retarded) 
children; the Schick test and the Dick 
test; methods of inuminizing children 
against diphtheria by u'cans of toxin- 
antitoxin and toxoid nethrds; the j)ro- 
cedure to be followed in the examination 
of food handlers; the j)rocedure to be 
followed in detecting the diplococcus 
intraccllularis meningitis organism among 
healthy carriers; serology (in so far as it 
relates to typing of pneumonia); and 
disea.ses reportable to the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health. 

Entrance Rerjuireirents: Applicants 
must be regi.stered physicians under the 
State Division of Registration in Medicine. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 4; practical questions, 3; 
personality and fitness, as detern.incd by 
an oral interview, 3; total, 10. 

Pa.ssing Requirements: Applicants must 
obtain at least 70 per cent in each subject 
in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 



CONSTRUCTION WORK. 

The Mayor has ajjproved the request 
of the Public Works Department for the 
following construction work: 

A sanitary sewer of 10-inch pipe and a 
surface drain of 12-ineh pipe in Rjinsom 
road, between Clreenfield road and 300 
feet southwesterly, in the Hyde Park 
district, at an estimated cost of $2,000. 



66 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 



PROCEEDINGS OF SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 

Dec. 28, 1933. 

A special meeting of the Scliool 
Committee of the City of Boston 
was held in the Administration 
Building, 15 Beacon Street, at 8.25 
o'clock, the Chairman presiding. 

Present: Messrs. Hurley, Mackey, 
Mrs. Pigeon, Messrs. Reilly and 
Tobin. 

Chairman: This is a special 
meeting of the School Committee 
as a result of conference held this 
week at which time the Chairman 
and other members presented mo- 
tions which require action in pub- 
lic meeting to become effective. I 
will ask the Secretary to read the 
proposed orders and amendments 
to which the Committee agreed at 
the last conference. 



RESOLUTION ON DEATH OF 
MARY PARKER FOLLETT 
The following was offered: 
RESOLVED, That the School 
Committee has learned with sin- 
cere regret of the death on Dec. 
18, 1933, of Miss Mary Parker Fol- 
lett. 

Miss Follett was a woman of rare 
vision. She made her life's work 
one of service to the community 
in which she lived. Bom In Quincy, 
Massachusetts, she graduated tri.ni 
Radcliffe College, summa cum 
laude in 1898. After graduation, 
she studied abroad, specializing m 
history, philosophy, and govern- 
ment. In her early days, she be- 
came interested in the Boston pub- 
lic schools and was a pioneer in 
the field of vocational guidanc-^ 
for school pupils, and evening 
recreational centers for adults. 

As early as 1902, she was eager 
that Boston children should have 
the advantage of vocational guid- 
ance by competent authorities on 
the basis of work which she had 
seen abroad, and she readily ac- 
cepted membership on the first Vo- 
cation Bureau Committee. From 
1912 to 1917. she worked with and 
shared the expense of the Boston 
Placement Bureau, until it was -j!)- 
sorbed by the Department of Vo- 
cational Guidance. 

In 1912, as Chairman of the Edu- 
cation Committee of the Women's 
Municipal League of Boston, Miss 
Follett was largely instrumental in 
having the School Committee ob- 
tain the necessary legislation for 
the establishment and maintenance 
of the activities of the Department 
of Extended Use of the Public 
Schools, including the school cen- 
ters, home and school associations, 
and the wider use of the school 
plants for civic purposes. 

Because of her many years of de- 
voted service to the Boston public 
schools, the School Committee of 
the City of Boston orders this brief 
tribute to the memory of Miss 
Mary Parker Follett spread upon 
the records of this meeting. 

The resolution was adopted by 
unanimous vote and a copy ordered 
sent to Miss Follett's brother, Mr. 
George D. Follett, and to Dr. Rich- 
ard C. Cabot. 



AUTHORITY OF SUPERINTEND- 
ENT TO UNDERTAKE PRO- 
JECTS UNDER F. E. R. A. 
PROGRAM. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the Superin- 
tendent is hereby authorized to 
undertake under the F. E. R. A. 
program such projects as do not 
run counter to the established 
policies of the School Committee. 



ESTABLISHMENT OF RANK OF 
PRINCIPAL, BOSTON DISCIP- 
LINARY DAY SCHOOL 

The Secretary read the following 
order amending the regrulations: 

ORDERED, That the regulations 
are hereby amended as follows: 

Section 295, paragraph 1. In the 
second and third lines, strike out 
the words "one assistant in 
charge" and insert in place thereof 
"a principal" so that the paragraph 
shall read as follows: 

Sect. 295. 1. Teachers in the 
Boston Disciplinary Day School 
shall consist of a principal and as- 
sistants appointed or assigned by 
the superintendent from day ele- 
mentary or day intermediate 
schools. The number of such 
teachers shall not exceed one for 
each fifteen pupily belonging. 

Mr. Hurley: I move that the or- 
der be laid over under the rules. 

Chairman: I'd like to speak to 
this order. For many years the 
Disciplinary Day School has func- 
tioned with great success in that 
of the pupils who have been as- 
signed to the school, only a frac- 
tional percentage later reached the 
County school for delinquent chil- 
dren. The Disciplinary Day School 
receives children who are not sub- 
servient to what I might call good 
school habits. For one reason or 
another, they do not get along in 
the home school, therefore they 
are assigned to the Disciplinary 
Day School where, under special 
supervision, effort is made to re- 
establish good habits so that they 
may go ahead in their regular 
school work. 

This school has functioned so 
well that it has been emulated by 
other cities, notably Chicago which, 
on the precedent of our Disciplin- 
ary Day School, formed a similar 
school headed up with a principal. 

As a reward for the excellent serv- 
ice of the woman who has been in 
charge of this most difficult work, 
and in recognition of the success 
of the work as shown by the fact 
that only a fractional percentage 
of those who have attended this 
school later have been sent to the 
County School, and that a large 
percentage have been returned to 
the home schools where they have 
gone on successfully, I have moved 
that the rank of Principal of the 
Disciplinary Day School be estab- 
lished. This change involves no in- 
crease of salary for the present in- 
cumbent. I have recommended 
this rank because I think it is pro- 
portionate to the work done and 
the standing which this teacher 
has in the courts when she appears 
in the cases of delinquent children. 
It is the recognition due her from 
the school system. 

In view of Mr. Hurley's motion, 
the matter will go over to the next 



meeting, but I would state that I 
have asked that the present As- 
sistant in Charge be given the rank 
of Principal. The Superintendent 
has informed me that^ in this I am 
invading his right of nomination. I 
differ with him in that opinion be- 
cause I feel that the School Com- 
mittee is not nominating or ap- 
pointing anybody. The Committee 
merely will be giving a more des- 
criptive title to the teacher in 
charge, a more suitable title, with 
no increase in salary and no change 
in duties. I will therefore move that 
Miss Godvin, who is the present in- 
cumbent, be appointed Principal. 
Accordingly, I will ask the Secre- 
tary to present the order which was 
unanimously agreed upon by the 
School Committee at the last con- 
ference, and which will accomplish 
the purpose of my motion. 

Mrs. Pigeon: But the whole mat- 
ter is laid over. 

Mr. Hurley: I would suggest that 
the matter having been laid over, 
further discussion is not in order 

Superintendent: I should object 
strongly to any preliminary pro- 
cedure which will prevent the Sup- 
erintendent from defining his po- 
sition as he has a right to do under 
the rules, to join in this discus- 
sion and to present orders. 

After some further discussion, 
the motion to lay over the proposed 
amendment of section 295, was de- 
clared by the Chairman passed. 

Discussion followed. 

Mr. Hurley: I move that the 
other pending orders on this mat- 
ter be laid over until the next 
public meeting. 

Chairman: I wish it stated clear- 
ly on the records, as has been 
stated at some length here previ- 
ously, that my purpose in estab- 
lishing this rank is to give recog- 
nition to the person who has ably 
carried out the work of the Disci- 
plinary Day School, and I hope 
that the new Committee will bear 
that in mind and recognize the 
purpose of the motion in estah.- 
lishing the rank, and that the 
Superintendent, in conformity with 
the general policy, will nominate 
the present incumbent to the new 
rank. 

Dr. Mackey: I move that Miss 
Godvin now be appointed Princi- 
pal of the Boston Disciplinary Day 
School. 

Chairman: As a matter of pro- 
cedure that action would follow 
the amendment to the rules which 
will establish the rank. 

Mr. Toye, speaking from the 
floor: Mr. Chairman, may I as a 
citizen ask a question? Is there 
something more important than a 
mere transfer here tonight? I am 
sim.ply asking for information. 

Question came concerning the or- 
der which had been laid over, and 
it was read by the Secretary: 

ORDERED, That the regulations 
are hereby amended as follows: 

Section 295, paragraph 1. In the 
second and third lines, strike out 
the words "one as'sistant in 
charge" and insert in place thereof 
"a principal," so that the para- 
graph shall read as follows: 

Sect. 295. 1. Teachers in the Bos- 
ton Disciplinary Day School shall 
consist of a principal and assist- 
ants appointed or assigned by the 



Jan. 20 



CITY RECORD 



67 



superintendent from day elemen- 
tary or day intermediate schools. 
Tl.e number of such teachers shall 
not exceed one for each fifteen pu- 
pils belonging 

Chairman: I might say that I 
proposed this change two years ago 
to the present Superintendent, and 
before that I proposed it to the 
late Superintendent, Dr. Jeremiah 
E. Burke, and no action having 
been taken, I have presented it in 
public meeting. That will give you 
the background of the story. 

Mr. Hurley: What is before the 
house at this time? 

Chairman: The motion has been 
laid over and I have been requested 
to have the Superintendent make 
a statement. 

Mr. Tobin: As I understand the 
status of the question at the pres- 
ent time, the order has been laid 
over for consideration by the next 
Committee without this Commit- 
tee passing on the merits of the 
matter. I now move reconsidera- 
tion of the motion to lay over, for 
1 can see nothing to be accom- 
plished by that action. It is putting 
on the new Committee action which 
should be taken by this Committee. 
We should at least establish the 
rank tonight. 

Chairman: Mr. Tobin has moved 
reconsideration of the motion to lay 
over. 

Mr. Hurley: Would the Superin- 
tendent object if we created the 
rank? 

Superintendent: The Superin- 
tendent has no right to and there- 
fore would not object to the Com- 
mittee's making a new rank. That 
is clearly within its power. 

Chairman: Mr. Tobin's motion 
now is on reconsideration of the 
action on Mr. Hurley's motion, that 
the order to amend be laid over 
without discussion. 

Dr. Mackey: I second that motion. 

Chairman: The motion then is 
that the previous motion of Mr. 
Hurley be reconsidered. The motion 
passed. 

Chairman: Question comes now 
on the passage of the motion to 
amend section 295 to provide for 
the establishment of the rank of 
Principal, Disciplinary Day School. 

Superintendent: Mr. Chairman, 
the Superintendent would like to 
say a word on that point. I have 
no objection to the creation of 
this new rank. I think another 
order which the S'^cretary ha.s 
would be more effective in that it 
would not destroy the rank which 
now is held by the head of that 
school but would create a new one 
to which she might in due course 
be appointed. The order whicii the 
Secretary just read abolishei; the 
present position which this lady 
holds and creates a new positio: to 
which she has not been appoi.nted, 
and therefore leaves her without 
status. It would be much bett-jr 
if the order in the form which 
the Secretary is holding were 
passed. May I ask that the Sec- 
retary read the order? 

Secretary: ORDERED. That the 
rank of Principal. Boston Disciplin- 
ary Day School, is hereby estab- 
lished; and that the regulations be 
amended accordingly. 

Chairman: That motion is ac- 
ceptable to me and therefore T 
withdraw the previous motion and 



offer the order which the Secretary 
has just read. 

A roll call being ordered, the 
order passed by the following 
vote: 

YEAS — Messrs. Mackey, Tobin 
and Reilly — 3. 

NAYS— Mr. Hurley and Mrs. 
Pigeon — 2. 

The following was offered: 
ORDERED, That the salary of 
the principal of the Boston Disci- 
plinary Day School is hereby es- 
tablished for the remainder of the 
current school year, as follows: 

Minimum, $1728; annual incre- 
ment, $96; maximum, $3168. 

Chairman: There will be no 
change in salary and no change 
in duties involved. 

A roll call being ordered, the 
order passed by the following vote: 

Mr. Hurley: No. 

Dr. Mackey: Yes. 

Mrs Pigeon: Not voting, in 
view of the fact that she voted no 
on the creation of the rank. 

Mr. Tobin: Yes. 

Mr.'Reilly: Yes. 

The following was offered: 
That the rank of M. Gertrude 
Godvin, Assistant in Charge, Bos- 
ton Disciplinary Day School, is 
hereby changed to Principal, Boston 
Disciplinary Day School, to take 
effect Jan. 2, 1934, or such date as 
shall be determined. 

Mr. Hurley: I understand this is 
the Superintendent's prerogative. 

Chairman: Do you feel that it 
is? 

Mr. Hurley: I do, and through 
you I request the Superintendent's 
views on it. 

Superintendent: I feel of course 
perfectly sure that this is a mat- 
ter of appointment, and appoint- 
ment under the Rules rests in ori- 
gin with the Superintendent. An 
appointment to this rank should 
begin with and be recommended to 
the School Committee by tho 
Superintendent of Schools. 

Chairman: Having accepted the 
revised order upon the recommen- 
dation of the Superintendent, I 
am perfectly willing to have the 
matter stand, in view of the feel- 
ing of the Superintendent as just 
expressed. But it doesn't diminish 
my feeling as originally expressed, 
which my original motion would 
have achieved, that Miss Godvm, 
the present incumbent, should be 
given the new rank. Inasmuch as 
there is some doubt as to our right 
in the situation, I will withdr:i>v 
the motion which I offered and 
rely upon the Superintendent to 
make the appointment according to 
his best judgment. Therefore, the 
motion to change the rank of Miss 
M. Gertrude Godvin is withdrawn. 



APPOINTMENT OF 

SUPERVISOR OF NUTRITION 

CLASSES 

Mr. Hurley offered the follow- 
ing: 

ORDERED, that Dr. Carl F. M.a- 
raldi, school physician, be appoint- 
ed supervisor of nutrition classes, 
subject to the approval of the De- 
partment of Civil Service. 



Mrs. Pigeon: I move that the 
motion be laid on the table. 

Chairman: It is moved that the 
matter be laid on the table. Is 
the Committee agreeable? 

Mr. Hurley: I'd like to ask the 
mover of that motion what her 
reason is. 

Mr. Tobin: The motion to lay on 
the table is undebatable; it comes 
right to the body for vote. 

In answer to roll call on the 
matter of laying on the table the 
order presented by Mr. Hurley, the 
members voted as follows: 

YEAS — Mrs. Pigeon and Mr. 
Tobin— 2. 

NAYS — Messrs. Hurley, Mackey, 
and Reilly— 3. 

Mr. Hurley: Now that the mo- 
tion to lay on the table has been 
defeated, I move the original ques- 
tion. 

Superintendent: May the Super- 
intendent make the announcement 
that in not opposing this particu- 
lar motion, he is not surrender- 
ing his right of nomination, be- 
cause this particular office of 
Supervisor of Nutrition Classes 
does not lie within his province to 
nominate. That is entirely in the 
hands of the School Committee, as 
far as the practice of this Board 
has been concerned. 

In answer to roll call on the mo- 
tion that Dr. Carl F. Maraldi, 
school physician, be appointed to 
the position of Supervisor of Nutri- 
tion Classes, the members voted 
as follows: 

Mr. Hurley: Yes. 

Dr. Mackey: Yes. 

Mrs. Pigeon: I am not ready to 
vote. I don't know the qualifica- 
tions of the man so far a., nutri- 
tion work is concerned. I feel that 
we need somebody who is very 
well qualified in connection with 
this particular position. Therefore 
I am not voting. 

Dr. Mackey: As a matter of fact 
the qualifications were read by Mr. 
Hurley at the last conference. 
They can be made available for 
the press. 

Mr. Tobin: No. 

Chairman: Yes. I have in 
mind, with reference to this vote, 
that there were two other doctors 
mentioned for the same position. 
One is Dr. English for whom I 
have the greatest respect but who, 
I am informed, will not accept the 
position; the other is Dr. Moore, 
for whom I also have the greatest 
respect, but for whom I have no in- 
dication that there would be suf- 
ficient votes to carry a motion in 
her behalf. Therefore, I am voting 
for Dr. Maraldi. 

The Chairman declared the mo- 
tion passed. 

APPOINTMENT OF TWO ADDI- 
TIONAL ASSISTANT DIRECTORS 
OF PENMANSHIP. 

The following was offered: 

ORDERED That the regulations 
are hereby amended as follows: 

Section 307, paragraph 8. Strike 
out the paragraph and insert in 
place thereof the following: 

8. A director of penmanship and 
three assistant directors of pen- 
manship. 

Superintendent: The Superin- 
tendent at this point would like 



68 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 



to say that in his opinion there is 
no need of any additional assistant 
directors in the department of pen- 
manship; that one is sufficient, 
and three are not at all necessary. 
Mr. Tobin: I would like to ask 
the Superintendent, through the 
Chair whether he feels that the 
department requires the services 
of an assistant director? 

Superintendent: My personal 
opinion is that it does not require 
the services of an assistant direc- 
tor save if it is thought advisable 
to have someone with that rank 
who may in an emergency take 
over the duties of the director. As 
far as the functioning of the de- 
partment is concerned, I do not 
feel that the assistant director i= 
at all necessary. . 

Chairman: Does the Committee 
desire a suspension of the Rules 
to permit of action tonight on the 
order which has been read, or shall 
it be laid over? 

The rules were suspended and 
the order passed by the following 
vote: 

Mr. Hurley: No. 
Dr. Mackey: Mr. Chairman, I 
feel that in so far as the presen 
assistant director handles the first 
three grades and the assistants 
handle the higher grades, I am 
justified in voting in their favor, 
therefore I vote ;-es. 
Mrs. Pigeon: Yes. 
Mr. Tobin: Yes. 
Chairman: Yes. 

Chairman: With reference to 
the Superintendent's statement; .or 
the first time I feel called upon 
to voice a difference of opinion— 
which is only a difference of opin- 
ion The department as it is now 
constituted has a director, an as- 
sistant director, and two assistants. 
To my knowledge there is no dit- 
ference whateve" in the work done 
by the assistant director and the 
two assistants. The assistant di- 
rector covers the first two or three 
grades and the -Mstants cover the 
Sther grades. In conformity with 
my repeated statement that it was 
my hope to reduce the multiplicity 
of ranks in the department, I found 
no course open for me but to ayor 
a motion v;hich will reduce -he 
number of ranks even in one de- 
nartment. -therefore I have fav- 
ored this motion which will change 
the rank of the two assistants to 
that of assistant director and make 
in that departr -nt a Director and 
three assistant directors. 

Superintendent: To make the 
records clear and do justice to the 
assistant director: One of the 
members was in error when he 
seemed to infer that the work of 
the assistant director, because she 
is in the first three grades, is in- 
ferior to that of the assistants. 
As a matter of fact, the assistant 
director is doing the work in the 
lower grades at the order of the 
Assistant Superintendent in charge, 
because he and I believe that the 
work in penmanship here is or 
much more importance than the 
work in the upper grades. So that 
it isn't really true to say that the 
work is identically the same. In 
our opinion, the more important 
work is done in the first three 
grades in the formation of good 
penmanship habits. 

Chairman: Then the difference 
in work is only in the quality in 
your mind— the person who han- 
dles the early grades has a greater 



responsibility than those who han- 
dle the upper grades. That is the 
only difference ;n their work? 

Superintendent: Yes. 

Chairman: Therefore the logical 
conclusion to that argument would 
be that the first grade teacher 
should get more money than the 
third grade teacher. 
Superintendent: I agree with you. 

Mrs. Pigeon: I want to be re- 
corded as agreeing with the Super- 
intendent there. I think the teach- 
ers who are in our first three 
grades should have an added in- 
crement to their salary, because I 
believe that right there in the for- 
mative period we need the very 
best teachers we can find. 

Mr. Tob;n: I might comment here 
— unfortunately for the teachers of 
th- firtt three grades we are in a 
great depression; otherwise, judg- 
ing from the present temper ot 
th' Committee and of the Superin- 
tendent they would be treated very 
kindly by this Committee at to- 
night's meeting. 

Mr. Hurley: As the only member 
^f the School Committee who voted 
no. I'd like to be recorded in favor 
of the upper grade teachers. 

Chairman: You will be so re- 
corded. 

Chairman: Since by the amend- 
n.ent we have now adopted, we 
have abolished the rank of Assist- 
ant in Penmanship, I present the 
followino orders for action: 

1 ORDERED, That the rank of 
Margaret L. Nolan, assistant in 
penmanship, is hereby changed 
to assistant director of penman- 
ship, to take effect Jan. 2, 1934. 

2. ORDERED, That the rank of 
Julia E. Sullivan, assistant in pen- 
manship, is hereby changed to as- 
sistant director of penmanship, to 
take effect Jan. 2. 1934. 

Chairman: I do this because un- 
less we take this or some -Mch 
action, these two former assis'diits 
will be without any rank whatever, 
and inasmuch as it was the intent 
of the motion to secure a uniform- 
ity of ranks and since this to my 
mind is merely a change in rank, 
although the Superintendent de- 
clares me wrong in that belief; 
nevertheless I am still of that 
opinion, and I therefore logically 
present these two orders. 

Mr. Tobin: I'd like to make this 
statement. The department as 
now constituted has a total of four 
members, headed by a director 
with three subordinates, all per- 
forming identical duties, the only 
difference being that the assistant 
director supervises the penmanship 
work of the first two or three 
grades and the other two assistants 
supervise the work of the higher 
grades. Since they perform the 
same duties, their ranks should be 
identical and for that reason I am 
voting to give the same title to all 
three who are now working as 
subordinates to the director of pen- 
manship 

Superintendent: Speaking to Mr. 
Tobin's statement: I believe that 
there is no work for these two 
women comparable with the title, 
assistant director. They will not 
be assistant directors. They will 
give the director no more assis- 
tance than they are giving now. 
However, that is debatable. The 
right of the School Committee to 
promote these good women to a 



rank without the intervention of a 
rated list is the one to which 1 
wish to speak, and I wish to make 
this considered statement: 

"Through the tireless and unself- 
ish efforts of the School Com- 
mittees through the years, with the 
cooperation of the Superintendent 
and his subordinates, there has 
been built up in Boston a school 
system with no superior in the 
country, in which the citizens of 
Boston justly take pride. 

■'This gratifying situation, it is 
agreed, has come about almost 
wholly through the developonent of 
the merit system of appointment 
and promotion which puts beyond 
the reach of personal considera- 
tions initial appointment and pro- 
motion within the service. Those 
who are most deeply interested in 
the public schoois are unanimous 
in their belief that the very corner- 
stone upon which the merit system 
must rest is the establishment by 
the Board of Superintendents of 
rated lists for promotion within 
the service. The Board of Super- 
intendents is authorized to estab- 
lish such lists as are requested by 
the Superintendent and to deter- 
mine the eligibility of candidates 
for rating on such lists. In the 
cases in question, the Board of 
Superintendents has been ignored. 

"Equally important with the pro- 
vision for rated lists is the right 
of appointment vested in the Super- 
intendent of Schools. The provision 
of the statute has been embodied 
in the rules of the School Commit- 
tee in various places by implica- 
tion, and expressly by Section 58, 
paragraph 1, which reads: 'He (the 
Superintendent) shall appoint, re- 
appoint, designate, assign, promote, 
transfer, and remove teachers, 
members of the supervising staff, 
school physicians, school nurses, 
librarians, secretaries, clerical as- 
sistants, bookkeepers, and other 
persons employed in similar ca- 
pacities in the schools, in accord- 
ance with the regulations.' 

"This right of appointment, sub- 
ject to the approval of the School 
Committee, in so far as it relates 
to teachers, members of the super- 
vising staff, and all those con- 
cerned with the educational side of 
the department, has never been 
questioned in the history of the 
Boston public schools. Any suc- 
cessful attempt to take from the 
Snnerintendent this right of ap- 
pointment will open the door to 
all the evils attendant upon ap- 
pointment on any other than our 
r>re=ent basis. 

"The Superintendent believes that 
the action contemplated in the or- 
('erfi under discussion, if successful, 
will establish a most dangerous 
precedent that will inevitably lead 
tc action that will undermine the 
structu'e of the school system as 
i^ now exists and will work infin- 
ite harm to the children of Boston. 
The Superintendent feels that if 
he were not to oppose as vigor- 
ously as possible the adoption of 
the.qe orders, he would be false to 
his trust." 

Chairman: I would like to speak 
to the Superintendent's statement. 
To me it seems that we are making 
a mountain of a mole hill. Reduc- 
ing the thing to its simplest form; 
we have a group or department of 
people performing certain duties. 



Jan. 20 



CITY RECORD 



&9 



We are disagreed upon the relative 
importance of their duties. The 

hool Committee, elected by the 
people, comes together and decides 
that the relative importance of the 
duties of these women is such that 
they should be given equal rank. 
That being agreed, the ranks are es- 
tablished. Inasmuch as these peo- 
ple now are performing those du- 
ties which we have deemed impor- 
tant, I do not think that the Com- 
mittee is invading the rights of the 
Superintendent when it merely re- 
designates the title of the persons 
whose duties are not changed and 
whose salaries are not changed. If 
we were to set up a new rank in 
the department where there had 
been no such service rendered as 
that included in the new rank, and 
then proceed to name a person to 
that rank, I would say that we 
were then invading the Superin- 
tendent's rights and departing 
from the policy which has been fol- 
lowed by previous committees and 
which I have upon every occasion 
supported and endorsed. But this 
I think is a little different. Mr. 
Superintendent. I say sincerely 
that if I thought it was an invasion 
of your right, I would be the first 
to withdraw from my position in 
the situation. 

Superintendent: May I say one 
more word. You are promoting 
these two women, no doubt about 
that — you are promoting them from 
the rank of assistant to that of 
assistant director. Tnat is a pro- 
motion. The Rules and Regula- 
tions say that promo'ions shall be 
made in the first instance by the 
Superintendent of Schools. He has 
not done so in this case. Secondly, 
when the rank of assistant direnoi- 
was filled, it was filled from a 
rated list. The person appoinicd 
was No. 1 on that list and I firmiy 
believe that is the proper proced- 
ure. Of course 1 yield to your 
superior wisdom in creating the of- 
fice. The proper thing to do now 
is to establish a rating plan and 
a rated list for the position of As- 
sistant Director of Penman.ship. 
The people wno con.e out first and 
second would then be nominated 
in the regular way and no harm 
all'' no injustice would be done. It 
is clearly a promotion from one 
rank to another existing rank, 
and it seems to me that if 
the School Committee can do this 
properly, it can do anything it 'ikes 
in the way of appointment and 
promotion as long as there are four 
votes to suspend the regulations. 

Chairman: My distinction with 
you is this — and I am trying to be 
as fair as possible — my view of a 
promotion is something which im- 
plies increased responsibility and 
increased rank in relation to the 
department in which the person 
functions who is promoted. I claim 
that in this instance we are only 
more clearly designating the work 
which the person is doing, and that 
it is not a promotion, but is the es- 
tablishment of a title which is more 
clearfy descriptive of the work 
done. That is the view that I have 
with reference to your statement 
that the women are receiving pro- 
motions. They have no added dut- 
ies, no added salary, no change in 
any other way. 

Superintendent: The salary of 
the rank, assistant director of pen- 
manship is a different schedule 



from that of assistant in penman- 
ship, and therefore would carry 
some increase in salary. Clearl;» 
this is a promotion from one rank 
to the other. You say it is made 
because there is no difference in the 
work. Then why make it? No dif- 
ference in duties, no added re- 
sponsibilities, why the promotion? 

Chairman: Because there is nr 
distinction between the work of 
the present assistant director and 
the present assistants. 

Superintendent: Then why not 
reduce the present assistant direc- 
tor to the rank of assistant? 

Mr. Hurley: Will the Superintend- 
ent recommend that? 

Superintendent: I wouldn't be 
willing to do that off hand, without 
consideration. To present it at 
this moment would not be a wise 
thing, but I think it would be just 
as defensible as this elevation. 

Dr. Mackey: I think it was an 
injustice on the part of the School 
Committee to recommend a superi- 
or title and salary for the assistant 
director, without considering the 
assistants. 

Superintendent: I am not sure 
that the Doctor understands that 
the assistants were added after the 
assistant director was appointed, so 
there could be no injustice. 

Chairman: Now the question 
comes on the passage of the two 
orders, whether they shall be laid 
over or acted upon tonight. 

The Secretary read the orders as 
presented: 

ORDERED, That the rank of 
Margaret L. Nolan, assistant in 
penmanship, is hereby changed to 
assistant director of penmanship to 
take effect Jan. 2, 1934. 

ORDERED, That the rank of 
Julia E. Sullivan, assistant in pen- 
manship, is hereby changed to as- 
sistant director of penmanship, to 
take effect Jan. 2, 1934. 

Mr. Hurley: May that motion 
be separated since there are two 
persons concerned? 

Chairman: Very well. Question 
comes on the passage of order No. 
1, changing the rank of Margaret 
L. Nolan. 

In answer to roll call, the mem- 
bers voted as follows: 

YEAS— Dr. Mackey, Mrs. Pigeon, 
Messrs Tobin and Reilly — 4. 

NAY— Mr. Hurley— 1. 

The chair declared the motion 
pa.ssed. 

Chairman: With that vote, mv 
previous statement made with ref- 
erence to my difference in opinion 
with the Superintendent should be 
tied up. 

Que.'jtion came on passage of 
order No. 2. changing the rank of 
Julia E. Sullivan. 

In answer to roll call, the mem- 
bers voted as follows: 

YEAS— Dr. Mackey, Mrs. Pigeon, 
Messrs. Tobin and Reilly — 4. 

NAY— Mr. Hurley— 1. 

The Chair declared the motion 
passed. 

Superintendent: I'd like to an- 
swer one question that Mr. Hurley 
asked, in order to interject a pos- 
sibility here. The statute law says 
that the superintendent of schools 
shall recommend teachers to the 
School Committee. The Superin- 
tendent has not recommended any- 
one for these promotions. I won- 
der if that has any bearing upon 
this issue; in other words, is the 
Committee violating the law of 



Massachusetts in making these 
changes without a recommenda- 
tion from the Superintendent of 
Schools. 

Chairman: Is that a law'' 

Superintendent: It is a law of 
the General Court of Massachu- 
setts. 

Mr. Hurley: I rise now to say 
that there is no law giving to the 
Superintendent the power of nomi- 
nation. 

At the request of the Superin- 
tendent and Mr. Hurley, the Secre- 
tary read the following: 

Sect. 59, Chapter 71 of the Gen- 
eral Laws: 

"The school committee of a town 
not in a superintendency union or 
district shall employ a superinten- 
dent of schools and fix his com- 
pensation. A superintendent em- 
ployed under this section or sec- 
tion 60 or 63 shall be the executive 
officer of the committee, and un- 
der its general direction, shall 
have the care and supervision of 
the public schools, shall assist it in 
keeping its records and accounts 
and in making such reports as are 
required by law, and shall recom- 
mend to the committee teachers, 
textbooks, and courses of study." 

Mr. Hurley: Mr. Chairman, the 
word is "recommend" is it not? 

Chairman: Yes. Now, Mr. Su- 
perintendent, will you give us the 
law which gives you power to ap- 
point? 

Superintendent: I didn't say 
that. I said that the statute law 
said "The superintendent of schools 
shall recommend teachers the 
school committee . . ." Chap. 444, 
Acts of 1911, Sect. 2. Now that 
is the basis of the right of the 
Superintendent. The word in our 
regulations is "nominate." Now 
whether that really means that you 
cannot do it unless the Superin- 
tendent does recommend, I do not 
know, but the law does say the 
superintendent "shall recommend." 

Mr. Hurley. I happen to be a 
lawyer and the word "recommend" 
means merely recommend. By our 
rules and regulations we have dele- 
gated to the Superintendent the 
power of appointment. 

Superintendent: It seems to me 
that the Superintendent must 
recommend under the law, and in 
this instance the Superintendent 
has not recommended anybody. 

Mr. Toye, speaking from the 
floor: I feel rather humble about 
standing up here — if I am out of 
order — 

Chairman: It is a departure from 
our regular procedure but I recog- 
nize the gentleman. Because of the 
dignity of the office held by the 
gentleman and the friendly rela- 
tionship which the Committee has 
to him personally, I would be very 
pleased to hear what the editor of 
the Traveler has to say. 

Mr. Toye: I am here for a pur- 
pose tonight and the purpose is to 
try to translate to the public 
which this Committee has served 
very well, the Committee has 
served so well that it has given 
me personally a great deal of 
pleasure to inform the public that 
the Committee has had its best 
interests at heart, and I want to 
be as true to the public as the 
Committee has been, and I don't 
want to misinterpret. I have no 
partisanship. It has not been made 
clear to my dull mind whether 



70 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 



or not something extremely im- 
portant is occurring here tonight. 
I speak for nobody. I a«i just 
trying to fit myself to speak to 
somebody and that somebody is a 
portion of the public. I would not 
be worried about this Committee 
with the power of recommendation, 
but I am wondering what other 
committees might do, and I am 
wondering if I attach too great 
importance to what is going on 
here tonight. After listening, and 
coming here without any predis- 
position of seeing a very great 
danger, and I mean it quite sin- 
cerely when I say that I would 
have full confidence in any ap- 
pointment made by the present 
Committee — but I am going to 
write so«iething and I want it to 
be right. 

Mr. Tobin: I'd like to say this 
to Mr. Toye. First of all, I in 
common with all the other mem- 
bers of the Committee and the offi- 
cials at 15 Beacon Street, do appre- 
ciate the courteous treatrrrnt we 
have always receiver from the Bos- 
ton Traveler. They have always 
truly pictured every condition in 
regard to the schools in rs true 
light. I would say this, Mr. Toye; 
if this Committee were toriight to 
assign any of these individuals to 
new duties — to duties in which they 
had not proven themselves to be 
proficient, even minor changes, 
then 1 would say that we were 6.=!- 
tablishing a dangerous precedent: 
but since the duties are to be iden- 
tical, no change in duties, merely 
a clarification and standardization 
of ranks, no danger can result. 

Mr. Toye: I do want to have chis 
correct. I have in mind — let us as- 
sume that it wis thought that a 
person performed duties that ap- 
proximated in importance those of 
the Board of Superintendents, a 
subsequent Committee quite easily 
might appoint that person to the 
Board of Superintendents. Dofts 
it open up anything like that? 

Chairman: In ani-wer to that, I 
don't think your case brings out 
what you want because the School 
Committee has the right to appoint 
its officers — the superintendent, as- 
sistant superintendents, etc. But 
taking sor..e other rank, a teacher 
for example. You fear we might 
take a teacher and might make her 
director of a new department. If 
you mean that, this action doesn't 
make that poss-ible. In other 
words, our action tonight does not 
permit us to take any person in 
the city, or any teacher in the 
service, and appoint him to any 
rank we may desire to establish. 
Our action doesn't mean we can 
take a teacher out of the ranks 
and make her a director, or assist- 
ant director, or secretary, or any 
other title in the school Mrvice. 
Our action in no way means that 
we or subsequent Committees can 
do that. There is no precedent 
here for any such action. 

Mr. Toye: Repeating with em- 
phasis what I have said about this 
Committee — I am worried about 
the old bugaboo of schools in pol- 
itics. Being impersonal about this 
whole business, I wonder— and I 
may be out of order — I wonder if 
the Superintendent and Mr. Hur- 
ley, who seemed to have opposed 
this motion, can give me any evi- 
dence in support of my doubt. 



Chairman: I am going to ask the 
Superintendent and Mr. Hurley in 
turn whether or not they feel that 
politics has anything to do with 
this appointment. 

Mr. Toye: I didn't mean to be so 
emphatic. I am wondering if you 
are merely borrowing trouble in 
the future by the establishment of 
a precedent. You can help me out 
by showing me that in the future 
it couldn't be done. 

Superintendent: I'd like to carry 
out the argument which Mr. Tobin 
was using, that there was no 
change of duties. That has really 
no bearing on the issue at all. The 
issue is pretty clearly drawn. 
Has the School Committee the 
right to appoint directly any per- 
son to any rank without the ap- 
pointment originating with the 
Superintendent of Schools? 

Chairman: My distinction here 
is, if the Committee has the right 
to give the Superintendent powers 
of nomination, it also must have 
the right to take those powers 
away in certain cases if it so de- 
sires; but in this particular in- 
stance we are not taking away 
from you. We could if we wanted 
to, but we are not doing it. 

Dr. Mackey: As a matter of 
fact, the original rule or regulation 
was created by a former school 
committee. Hence I feel that we 
are justified in revising this rule 
or regulation if we feel warranted 
in so doing. 

Chairman: In this particular 
instance, we could if we wished, 
but we haven't had to do it. Some- 
body has drawn a red herring 
across the trail here. They are 
presuming that we have done 
something that we haven't done. 
They are assuming we have taken 
from the Superintendent a power 
which we have not taken. 

Superintendent: I don't see how 
you could possibly say otherwise. 
You have promoted people without 
nomination by the Superintendent. 
There was the rank of Assistant 
and these women are now placed 
in a higher rank, with a higher 
salary, and the Superintendent has 
not intervened at all. If that is 
not depriving him of his right of 
nomination, I don't know what it is. 

Chairman: Have you a nomina- 
tion to make? 

Superintendent: No. 

Chairman: Then how are we de- 
priving you of anything? 

Superintendent: You are ap- 
pointing people without the inter- 
vention of the Superintendent. The 
School Committee has a right to 
create the offices of two additional 
assistant directors. Then we 
should follow the regular custom 
and go through the regular proce- 
dure. The Superintendent of 
Schools should be directed to fill 
these places. He will do it under 
your orders. He will call for a 
rated list and the Tirst two people 
will be nominated. If these two 
ladies are the best in the service 
for the job, they will come out at 
the top and you haven't created a 
dangerous precedent. 

Mr. Tobin: I could heartily 
agree with the Superintendent if 
these were new positions with new 
duties, but since they are the self- 
same positions with the same du- 
ties and we only place them on 
the same standard with the assist- 
ant director who performs the 
same duties, I must disagree with 
him. I, as a member of this com- 



mittee, would never have placed 
anyone in a particular position 
that I felt was a position which 
should be the result of a nomina- 
tion by the Superintendent, but this 
is merely a clarification of the 
ranks of people performing the 
same duties and for that reason 
there is no invasion of the rights 
of the Superintendent. I think 
there has been a lot of hair-split- 
ting here tonight. The School 
Committee is a powerful body. 
They have great powers if they 
wish to exercise them. I think 
this Committee has used rare judg- 
ment and during my entire service 
on the Board they have at all times 
followed out and lived up religous- 
ly to a merit system beyond com- 
pare in the whole of the United 
States, or, I might dare say, in the 
world, and I hope the Boston pa- 
pers will not leave the impression 
in the minds of the public that 
this is a breaking down of the 
merit tystem. 

WATCHMAN, BOSTON TRADE 
SCHOOL 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Dec. 28, 1933, recommend- 
ing the passage of an accompany- 
ing order amending Section 14 of 
the Schedule of Compensation for 
Custodians of School Buildings for 
Regular Day School Service to pro- 
vide for the employment of a 
watchman at the Boston Trade 
School where valuable property, 
portable equipment, tools, etc., are 
housed, such amendment to take 
effect Jan. 2, 1934. 

Placed on file. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That Section 14 of 
the Schedule of Compensation for 
Custodians of School Buildings 
for Regular Day School Ser- 
vice — School Document No. 9, 1930 
—is hereby amended by adding the 
following paragraph, to take effect 
Jan. 2, 1934: 

Boston Trade School— Thirty-five 
dollars ($35) per week in addition 
to the compensation allowed under 
schedule rates for the purpose of 
providing day and night service 
for the building. 



SCHOOL LUNCHEONS 

Dr. Mackey: I'd like to ask the 
Superintendent if we have had any 
other reports in relation to the 
abandonment of lunch counters in 
our schools. The Women's Edu- 
cational and Industrial Union has 
abandoned certain lunch counters. I 
feel that the hralth and well-being 
of our children are concerned in 
this matter of vital importance. 
Therefore, I present the matter as 
I have previously done in confer- 
ence. 

The Superintendent stated that 
a committee of Head Masters is 
working with the Assistant Super- 
intendent in charge, Mr. Snow, and 
the women who represent the Wom- 
en's Educational and Industrial 
Union, in the hope that means 
will be found to make the project 
at least solvent; that it looks now 
as if they might possibly reach 
some satisfactory arrangement, and 
that they are not proposing to 
discontinue any other schools. 



Jan. 20 



CITY RECORD 



71 



Discussion followed with refer- 
ence to the problems with which 
the Committee is now faced in 
connection with withdrawal by the 
Union of luncheon service in cer- 
tain schools, namely, the Frothing- 
ham Annex of the Charlestown High 
School, the Donald McKay Inter- 
mediate School, and the Henry L. 
Pierce Annex to the Dorchester 
High School for Girls; and with 
reference to the problems with 
which the Union has had to deal — 
transportation, small sales in cer- 
tain districts, etc. 

Dr. Mackey offered the follow- 
ing: 

ORDERED, That the School 
Committee sever its contacts and 
break its contract or agreement 
with the Women's Educational and 
Industrial Union one month from 
today. January 28, 1934. 

After discussion, at Mr. Tobin s 
suggestion, Dr. Mackey's motion 
was made a matter of record and 
action was postponed pending re- 
ceipt of progressive reports from 
tlie committee which is now work- 
ing on the matter at the Superin- 
tendent's request. 



PROPOSED LEGISLATION PRO- 
HIBITING SALE OF LIQUOR 
NEAR SCHOOL HOUSES 

At the suggestion of Mrs. Pigeon, 
there was referred to the incoming 
School Committee question as to 
the advisability of requesting the 
Legislature to insert in the new 
law the provision which was pre- 
viously in effect prohibiting the 
sale of liquor within four hundred 
feet of a school building. 

The Committee adjourned. 
Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN, 

Secretary. 



BUILDINGS RAZED. 

The Maj'or has approved the request 
of the Building Commissioner for per- 
mission to demolish the following struc- 
tures, which are unsafe, and to demolish 
others under the Civil Works Adminis- 
tration : 

The building at 18 Bunker Hill street, 
Ward 2. The "rear wail is in an unsafe 
and dangerous condition and should be 
taken care of at once." 

The owner, Charlestown Five Cents 
Savings Bank of Charlestown. has been 
notified of the un.safe condition, and have 
ordered the tenants to vacate the building. 

The building at 47 Ward street, Ward 
7, is in an unsafe and dangerous condi- 
tion, dilapidated, and a fire menace, also 
open to the public and weather; basement 
and first floor unsafe; partitions removed, 
also rear piazza. 

A notice of the unsafe condition has 
been sent to the owner, Annie Leary of 
1788 Marine Drive, Vancouver, B. C, 
and a copy of the unsafe notice posted 
on the external wall of the building. The 
inspector now reports that the building 
is in a very dangerous condition, and 
should be razed. 

The building at 5 Wall street. Ward 3, 
is in a dilapidated condition caused by 
fire on February 9, 1932; doors and win- 
dows gone; plastering ofiF; partition 
floors ripped up; dangerous. 



The building is owned by the estate 
of Catherine Farley. The administrator, 
Frederick Farley of 37 Joy street, Boston, 
was notified of the unsafe condition, but 
nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 65 Gordon street, 
Ward 21 , is in a dilapidated and dangerous 
condition. 

The owners, Fred W. Sproul et al. of 
70 Allston street, Allston, have been 
notified of the unsafe condition, of the 
building, but neglect to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building is a fire menace, windows, 
doors and foundation broken and missing, 
and the inspector recommends that it be 
razed. 

The building at 25 Prescott street, 
Ward 2, is in a dilapidated condition; 
windows broken and open to the public; 
clapboards falling of; left-hand end of 
building, front side, all rotted and falling 
down. 

The owner, .James Neville of 65 Austin 
street, Charlestown, has been notified 
of the unsafe condition of the building, 
but neglects to remove the cause of 
complaint. 

The building at 282 Bremen street, 
Ward 1 , is unsafe, shed roof frame is badly 
deflected and walls out of plumb; stable 
walls settled, bulged and out of plumb; 
second floor frame deflected; sills and 
posts rotted; building dangerous and a 
fire menace. 

The owner Etta Goldberg of 171 
Paris street. East Boston, was notified 
of the unsiife condition of the building, 
but neglects to remove the cause of com- 
plaint. The inspector now reports that 
the building is unsjife and dangerous, 
and he recommends that it be razed. 

The building at 288 Dorchester street. 
Ward 7, is in an unsafe and dangerous 
condition; two sides of building bulging 
out. 

The owner, Richard M. Lyons of 551 
Massachusetts avenue, Boston, was noti- 
fied of the unsafe condition of the building, 
but neglects to remove the cause of 
complaint. The inspector now reports 
that the building is in an unsafe and 
dangerous condition; the brick under- 
pinning is overhanging, the left side wall 
is bulging out; the right side wall is 
caving in; building vacant and closed up. 
Heavy snow load on roof may cause 
same to collapse, and he recommends that 
the building be razed. 

The building at 570 Canterbury street. 
Ward 18, was destroyed by fire to such an 
extent as to leave the remaining portion 
in an unsafe and dangerous condition. 

"The owner of record, William E. Mac- 
Donald, has not been located, but a 
notice of the unsafe condition has been 
posted on the external wall of the building. 
Nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 354 Trenont street, 
Ward 3, is in a dilapidated condition; 
chimney on the roof falling down; front 
and rear walls lashed together with wire 
ropes, which was done by building 
wreckers: chimney on ell held up by 
plank; slate loose; 8-inch external wall 
soft brick falling out; windows and doors 
open. 

The owner of record, Bessie Bowman, 
has not been located, but a notice of ths 
unsafe condition has been posted on the 
external wall of the building. The 
inspector now reports that the building 
is in such a condition that it should be 
|.azed. 



The building at 143 Rutherford avenue. 
Ward 2, is in a dilapidated condition; 
rear ell falling down; cla])lioards falling 
off; windows broken; corner boards and 
casings falling off. The owner, A. J. 
Douglas of 1 Alonument street, Charles- 
town, has been notified of the unsafe con- 
dition of the building, but neglects to 
remove the cause of complaint. The 
inspector now reports that the building is 
in such a condition that it should be razed. 

The building at 67 River street, rear. 
Ward 17, is open to trespass at the ground 
level on sides and rear; sill on right side is 
rotted and the building settled; it is a 
fire menace. Unsafe and dangerous and 
should be taken down. Building boarded 
up on several occasions and reopened. 

The owner of record, William E. Mc- 
Donald, has not been located, but a 
notice of the unsafe condition has been 
posted on the external wall of the building. 
Nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 24 Stone street, Ward 2, 
is in a dilapidated condition; large store 
window glass gone, allowing free access 
to building; plaster falling from ceilings; 
chimney falling down; outlets from roof 
stopped up allowing water to stand on 
roof about 6 inches deep. The owner, 
William D. Milton of 212 Summer street, 
Boston, has been notified of the unsafe 
condition of the building, but neglects to 
remove the cause of complaint. The 
inspector now reports that the building 
is in such a condition that it should be 
razed. 

The building at 66 Washington street, 
reiir. Ward 2, used for two-car garage is 
in a dilapidated condition; sills, studding 
and boarding all rotten and falling down; 
building out of plumb about 12 inches. 

The owner, Herbert N. Hanson of 
58 Washington street, Charlestown, was 
notified of the unsafe condition of the 
building, but neglects to remove the 
cause of complaint. The inspector now 
reports that the building is in such a con- 
dition that it should be razed. 

(By C. W. A. Labor.) 

The buildings as 2-6 Vernon place. 
Ward 3. 

The building at 25 Prescott street, 
Ward 2. 

The building at 4 Hayden place, 
Ward G. 

The building at 351 West Second 
street. Ward 6. 

The building at 36-J and 36^ Sackville 
street, Ward 2. 

The ell of building, 518 Massachusetts 
avenue, Ward 9. 

The building at 41 Walker street, 
Ward 2. 

The building at 47 Ward street. Ward 7. 

The building at 3 Bay View place, 
Ward 7. 



OIL BURNER APPARATUS. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
request of the Health Department: 

Boston, January 5, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully request your 
Honor's approval for the award of a pur- 
chase of an oil burner apparatus for the 
new boiler at the Ambulance Station, 
North Grove street, to Petroleum Heat 
and Power Company for the sum of three 
hundred and seventy-five dollars ($375). 

Yours respectfully, 

F. X. Mahoney, M. D., 

Health Commissioner. 



72 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 20 



RECREATION, ADEQUATE AS TO KIND 
AND AVAILABILITY. 

Although the ratio of park acreage to 
population has beeu used as the simplest 
measure of the extent to which cities 
provide areas for the recreation of their 
people, it is by no means an accurate 
basis for determining this. If most of 
the total acreage is in one large park, if 
the parks are poorly distributed, or if 
they do not provide various types of 
recreation facilities, the park system may 
be inefficient even though the acreage 
is large. The efficiently planned park 
and recreation s>'stem will involve 
balanced relationship and well-distributed 
location of several types of properties, 
naniel}', children's playgrounds, neigh- 
borhood playfield parks, neighborhood 
parks, reservations, boulevards, and park- 
ways. 

(Bureau of Labor Statisticfl, Publica- 
tion No. 462.) 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE 
CITY OF BOSTON. 



Administration Building, 15 Beacon Street, 
Office op the Business Manager. 



Proposals for Furnishing Newsprint Paper 
in Packages and Blocks for the Boston 
Public Schools. 
The School Committee of the City of Boston 
invites bids for furnishing and delivering at 
the several school buildings, in accordance with 
orders, newsprint paper in "packages and blocks. 
Proposal forms are obtainable at the office of 
the Business Manager of the School Committee, 
tenth floor, 15 Beacon street. Envelopes con- 
taining proposals must be sealed and plainly 
rnarked ''Proposal for Newsprint Paper." The 
bid must be in duplicate. One copy signed by 
the bidder and accompanied by a certified check 
for $100 payable to the City of Boston, must 
be left at the office of the Business Manager 
on or before 12 o'clock m. on Tuesday, January 
30, 1934. Copies filed with the Business 
Manager will be publicly opened and read at 
12 o'clock m. of the day stated. The other 
copy, also signed by the bidder, must be filed 
with the City Auditor, City Hall, Boston, Mass., 
previous to the time named for the opening 
of the bids. The School Committee reserves 
the right to reject any or all bids, and to 
accept such bid or part of bid as may be deemed 
best for the interests of the city. The suc- 
cessful bidder will be required to furnish a 
bond for not less than 50 per cent of the 
amount of the contract. 

Alexander M. Sullivan, 
Business Manager of the School Committee. 
(Jan. 20.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Dental Supplies. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
Health Department dental supplies, as per 
specifications to be obtained at the office of 
the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. The bidder must leave his pro- 
posal with a certified check for $100, payable 
to and to become the property of the City of 
Boston if the proposal is not carried out, at 
the above office. There will be a charge of 
twenty cents ($0.20) for each set of blank 
proposals taken out. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids will be publicly opened and 
read Monday, January 29, 1934, at 12 m., at 
Room 801, City Hall Annex. The successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
of the total amount of the contract with a 
surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract, in case the amount 
of the contract awarded aggregates $2,000 or 
more. The Superintendent reserves the right 
to accept or reject any or all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. All 
contracts made subject to appropriations to 
meet payments thereunder. 

Philip A. Chapman, 

(Jan. 20.) Suiicrintendent of Supplies. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT— STATISTICS 
FOR YEAR 1932. 

Summaries for the 22 wards as of April 
1, 1932: Number of persons, partner- 
ships and corporations assessed on prop- 
erty, 105,240; number of dwelling houses 
a.sscssed, 89,232; acres of land assessed, 
18,212. Number of men assessed for poll 
tax, 239,798. 

Cost of department maintenance in 
1932 was $414,239 or $46,662 more than in 
1931. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Installing Low Tension 
Cable. Traffic Tunnel. 

The Transit Department of the City of Bos- 
ton, 1 Beacon street, seventh floor, invites pro- 
posals from citizens of the United States and 
corporations or other legal associations wherein 
the controlling interest to the extent of at 
least one half thereof is owned by a citizen 
or citizens of the United States, for installing 
low tension cable for the Traffic Tunnel. A 
bond of an approved surety company will 
be required for the faithful performance of 
the contract in the sum of the total bid price. 
Proposals must be filled out and signed by the 
bidder on forms to be obtained at this oflSce, 
inclosed in a sealed envelope, indorsed "Low 
Tension Cable, Traffic Tunnel," and delivered 
to the Department, or to its secretary, before 
12 o'clock noon on Monday, January 29, 1934, 
at which time and place they will be publicly 
opened and read. A properly certified checjc 
in the sum of five hundred (500) dollars, 
payable to the city, must accompany the 
proposal. This checlc shall become the prop- 
erty of the city if the contract is not executed 
by the bidder within the time prescribed after 
the date of notification by the Department of 
the acceptance of the proposal and the readi- 
ness of the contract for signature. Proposals 
must be made in duplicate. The sealed dupli- 
cate, without check, is to be deposited by the 
bidder with the City Auditor, Room 20, City 
Hall, previous to the time named for opening 
the proposals. Plans, proposals, specifications 
and forms of contract may be obtained at 
this office on or after Monday, January 15, 
1934. A deposit of $5, in cash or by certified 
check, will be required for a set of plans and 
two sets of the specifications. Mutilation of 
them will be deemed suflScient cause for the 
forfeiture of said deposit. The Department 
reserves the right to reject any or all pro- 
posals. 

By order of the City of Boston Transit 
Department. 

Edward F. Condon, 

(Jan. 13-20.) Secretary. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



PARK DEPARTMENT. 



Proposal for Furnishing Not More Than 
Six Double Teams and Not More Than 
Four Single-team Express Wagons, and 
Not More Than Five Five-ton Trucks, 
Whenever Required. 
Proposals on separate blanks obtained at 
the office of the Park Department, 33 Beacon 
street, Boston, for furnishing not more than 
six double teams and not more than four single- 
team express wagons, and not more than 
five five-ton trucks to be used during snow 
storms, etc., whenever required for a period 
of one year, with suitable drivers twenty years 
of age or older, signed by the bidder and left 
before 12 o'clock m. on Tuesday, January 30, 
1934, at said office, with a certified check for 
$200, payable to and to be the property of 
the city if the proposal is not carried out, 
will then and there be publicly opened and 
read. The successful bidder must furnish a 
bond for $3,000 as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract. A duplicate 
proposal, without check, must be deposited 
with the City Auditor previous to the time 
named for opening the proposals. Before an 
award is made of this contract, the Commis- 
sioners will insist upon an examination of the 
stock and equipment of each bidder and a 
report of the same must be made by a 
veterinarian assigned for this purpose. The 
Commissioners reserve the right to reject any 
part of or all proposals. 

William P. Long. Chairman, 
Theodore C. Hapfenrbffer, 
John J. Martin, 
(Jan. 20-27.) CoTnmissioners. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Instaixing Electrical Control 
for Pump Rooms, Traffic Tunnel. 

The Transit Department of the City of Bos- 
ton, 1 Beacon street, seventh floor, invites pro- 
posals from citizens of the United States and 
corporations or other legal associations wherein 
the controlling interest to the extent of at 
least over one half thereof is owned by a 
citizen or citizens of the United States, for 
installing electrical control equipment for 
pump rooms. Traffic Tunnel. A bond of an 
approved surety company will be required for 
the faithful performance of the contract in 
a sura of the total bid price. Proposals must 
be filled out and signed by the bidder on forms 
to be obtained at this office, inclosed in a 
sealed envelope, indorsed "Proposal for Elec- 
trical Control Equipment, Traffic Tunnel," 
and delivered to the Department, or to its 
secretary, before 12 o'clock noon on Monday, 
January 29, 1934, at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and read. A 
properly certified check in the sum of one 
hundred (100) dollars, payable to the city, 
must accompany the proposal. This check 
shall become the property of the city if the 
contract is not executed by the bidder Within 
the time prescribed after the date of notifica- 
tion by the Department of the acceptance of 
the proposal and the readiness of the contract 
for signature. Proposals must be made in 
duplicate. The sealed duplicate, without check, 
is to be deposited by the bidder with the 
City Auditor, Room 20, City Hall, previous 
to the time named for opening the proposals. 
Plans, proposals, specifications and forms of 
contract may be obtained at this office on or 
after Monday, January 15, 1934. A deposit 
of S5, in cash or by certified check, will be 
required for a set of plans and two sets of 
the specifications. Mutilation of them will be 
deemed sufficient cause for the forfeiture of 
said deposit. The Department reserves the 
right to reject any or all proposals. 

By order of the City of Boston Transit 
Department. 



(Jan. 13-20.) 



Edward F. Condon, 

Secretary. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing and Delivering 
Toll Collection Equipment, Traffic 

Tunnel. 

The Transit Department of the City of 
Boston, 1 Beacon street, seventh floor, invites 
proposals from citizens of the United States 
and corporations or other legal associations 
wherein the controlling interest to the extent of 
at least one half thereof is owned by a citizen 
or citizens of the United States, for furnishing 
and delivering toll collection equipment for the 
Traffic Tunnel. A bond of an approved surety 
company will be required for the faithful 
performance of the contract in a sum of the 
total bid price. Proposals must be filled out 
and signed by the bidder on forms to be ob- 
tained at this office, inclosed in a sealed 
envelope, indorsed "Toll Collection Equipment, 
Traffic Tunnel," and delivered to the Depart- 
ment, or to its secretary, before 12 o'clock 
noon on Monday, February 5, 1934, at which 
time and place they will be publicly opened 
and read. A properly certified check in the 
sum of one thousand (1,000) dollars, payable 
to the city, must accompany the proposal. 
This check shall become the property of the 
city if the contract is not executed by the 
bidder within the time prescribed after the 
date of the notification by the Department of 
the acceptance of the proposal and the readi- 
ness of the contract for signature. Proposals 
must be made in duplicate. The sealed dupli- 
cate, without check, is to be deposited by the 
bidder with the City Auditor, Room 20, City 
Hall, previous to the time named for opening 
the proposals. Plan, proposals, specifications 
and forms of contract may be obtained at this 
office on or after Tuesday, January 23, 1934. 
A deposit of $5, in cash or by certified check, 
will be required for a plan and two sets 
of the specifications. Mutilation of them will 
be deemed sufficient cause for the forfeiture 
of said deposit. The Department reserves the 
right to reject any or all proposals. 

By order of the City of Boston Transit 
Department. 



(Jan. 20-27.) 



Edward F. Condon, 
, Secretary. 



CITY of boston printing depabtmbnt 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol. 26. Saturday, Jantjary 27, 1934. No. 4 

MAYOR MANSFIELD PAYS NOTABLE TRIBUTE TO GEN. JOSEPH HALLER, 
NOTED POLISH GENERAL, UPON OCCASION OF VISIT TO BOSTON. 
ENTERTAINS DISTINGUISHED VISITOR AT LUNCHEON AFTER WEL= 
COME AT CITY HALL. POINTS TO HEROISM OF POLISH PEOPLE AND 
THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO GROWTH AND PROGRESS OF UNITED STATES. 



Upon the occasion of the visit of General Joseph Haller to the City of Boston, Mayor Mansfield, during the 
welcome luncheon tendered the visitor and his friends, spoke as follows: 

It matters not where one may turn in the pages of history, there is revealed the indomitable strength and 
courage of the Polish people. 

Since the dawn of civilization, the history of patriotism has known no land where sufferings, sacrifices, sorrows, 
and the struggle for liberty have been more enduring than in Poland. 

I acclaim the Polish nation, happily restored to an honored and fitting place in the family of nations, and 
I greet, in the name of the people of Boston, General Joseph Haller, Commander-in-Chief of the Polish Army in 
the World War. 

General Haller is not the first of Poland's heroes to be welcomed and honored by the people of America. Every 
schoolboy knows the story of Poland's immortal hero who, in the battle for human freedom, gave both to his native 
land and to America the devoted service of one of the greatest liberators in the history of mankind. At West Point 
rises the monument to him, bearing the words, "To the hero of two worlds"; and the City of Boston has seen fit, 
a few years ago, to erect in its Public Garden a memorial to serve for generations to come as an inspiration for all 
that human patriotism represents. The memory and deeds of General Thaddeus Kosciusko will forever remain 
enshrined in the hearts of the American people. Nor shall we ever forget another immortal of Poland, General 
Kazimierz Pulaski, who fell leading the American Army in a headlong charge at the battle of Savannah, in October, 
1779. 

But glorious days came to the Republic of Poland, under the guidance of Woodrow Wilson, with the procla- 
mation of independence in November, 1918, and with the first sitting of a National Assembly elected by the people, 
on February 10, 1919. The end of strife, however, was not yet, and in the same year, armed defence against the 
"Red" troops of Bolshevik Russia became imperative; but, in 1920, with Warsaw in peril of capture, a dramatic 
counter-attack by the Polish defenders of the front line in Europe against Bolshevik invasion from the East, re- 
versed the nature of the campaign, and Poland accepted a peace on favorable terms. 

The constitution of Poland was adopted on March 17, 1921, annexations of territory as the result of the 
war with Russia were recognized on March 14, 1923, and commercial agreements between Poland and the United 
States were made in 1925 and 1926. 

In Poland's fight for liberty and independence, it is gratifying to hear America's part expressed by another 
famous son of Poland, Ignace Paderewski — we all grieve with him today in the loss of his wife and helpmate, 
who passed away on Tuesday; during the war, she actively supported the International Red Cross, cared for the 
"War brides" of Poland, and established an asylum for five hundred women and children — Paderewski who, on- 
September 18, 1919, in a public address stated: " Poland has set up a democracy under the inspiration of the American 
people. Had it not been for American intervention in Europe we might possibly have had some semblance of 
independent government under an autocratic over-rule, but with American intervention and American help we 
have sought to establish not only the independence of the state, but also the internal liberty of our people, through 
the difficult road of democracy." 

General Haller,— popular hero of your native land, inspiring leader of 23,000 Americans of Polish extraction 
who followed you to war-torn Europe and fought under your banner in the Great War to save democracy, — Boston 
reaffirms its support to your beloved Republic of Poland, and pledges its assistance in your appeal for funds for the 
disabled veterans of the Polish Army. 



74 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 27 




"O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 

queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship= 

teeming plain of the ocean, 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene. 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 

unselfish devotion!" 

From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

HaU. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



$2.00 Per Year 
10 Cents 



IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES. 
Old South News-stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 
A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 

Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
Januarj' 29, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply withm a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways ; the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private wavs; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 
public streets ; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 



trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasolene, oil, 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, inckiding the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Traffic Commission, 
154 Berkeley street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the suppljang or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To the Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue^ Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, and the small parks 
and playgrounds in general throughout 



the city, and as to the extermination 
of gJT^sy moths and the charges made 
for such service. Application may be 
made to this department for informa- 
tion regarding the public baths and 
gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairviow and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Department of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To THE Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Wire Division of the Fire 
Department, Fire Department Head- 
quarters, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 1007, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the paj^ment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundarj' lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established bv 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 



For the week ending January 20, 1934: 
Population estimated July, 1934, 
United States Census Bureau efstimate, 
795,256; number of deaths (stillbirths 
excluded): Residents, 211; nonresidents, 
36; total, 247. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 16.15; nonresidents deducted, 
13.80. 



Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
Last week, 17.00; corresponding week 
last year, 20.09. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 10; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 5; sixty years and over, 121. 
Total deaths: Male, 140; female, 107; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 139; 
deaths of colored, 16. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: C.\SES AND DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 



Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Jan. 20, 1934. 



Cases. Deaths. 



Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Jan. 21, 1933. 



Cases. Deaths. 



.\nterior poliomyelitis .... 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis lethargica. . . 

Influenza 

Measles 

Meningitis epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary). 
Tuberculosis (other forms) 

Typhoid fever 

Whooping cough 



— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


13 


— 


— 


39 


344 


2 


28 
1 

74 


69 


16 


73 


— 


86 


1.5 


10 


26 


5 

1 

80 


— 


1 


— 


64 



3 
1 

30 

1 

12 



* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 27 



CITY RECORD 



75 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

P.^RK Dep.\rtment. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
not more than six double teams and not 
more than four single-team express 
wagons, and not more than five five-ton 
trucks, whenever required. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to the 
sum of $3,000. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Park department, 33 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 30, at 12 m. 

Police Dep.artment. 

Advertises for proposals for installing a 
two-way radio telephone system for the 
Police Department, City of Boston. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the con- 
tract price. Blank foniis for j)roi)osals 
may be obtained at the office of Jackson 
& Moreland, engineers. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$5,000, to be filed at the office of the 
Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. Proposjil forms available after 
January 10. 

Bidsclose Monday, January 29, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposjils for building 
alterations to provide comnmnication con- 
trol room at Police Headquarters. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equiva- 
lent to the full amount of the contract 
price. Blank forms for j)roposals may be 
obtained at the office of the engineers, 
Jackson & Moreland. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $100, to 
be filed at the oflice of the Police Com- 
missioner, 154 Berkeley street, Boston. 
Proposals available January 10. 

Bids close Monday, January 29, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for the listing 
of the residents of the City of Boston, 
beginning April 1. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by a 
certified check in the sum of $1,000, to 
to be filed at the same office. 

Bids close Thursday, February 1, at 
4.30 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
tires and tubes. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 50 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, February 7, at 
12 m. 

School Committee. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
newsprint paper in packages and blocks 
for the public schools. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 50 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 



office of the Business Manager, School 
Committee, 15 Beacon street, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $100, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate Ijid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 30, at 12 m. 

Supply Dep.\rtment. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
the Health Department with dental sup- 
plies. Surety bond will be required in a 
sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the Sup- 
ply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 29, at 12 m. 

Readvertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing rubber coats to the Fire Department- 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall .\nnex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of 25 per cent of the 
contract price to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids dose Monday, February 5, at 12 m. 

Transit Department. 

Advertises for proposals for installing 
low tension cable. Traffic Tunnel. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to the full amount of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Transit Depart- 
ment, 1 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, 
accomjianied by certified check in the 
sum of $500, to be filed at the same ofiice. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
witn the City Auditor. 

Bids close Mondai/, January 29, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for installing 
electrical control for pump rooms, Traffic 
Tunnel. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to the full amount 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Transit Department, 1 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 29, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering toll collection equipment, 
Trattic Tunnel. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to the full 
amount of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Transit Department, 1 
Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
jjanied by certified check in the sum of 
$1,000, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, February 5, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering carbon monoxide analyzers 
and recorders. Traffic Tunnel. Surety 
bond will be rendered in a sum equivalent 
to the full amount of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Transit Depart- 
ment, 1 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the sum 



of $500, to be filed at the same office.' 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, February 5, at 12 ?«. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, January 25: 

Building Department. 
Philip A. Chapman has been appointed 
clerk of department at $3,000 a year. 

Department of School Buildings. 

The change in rating of Hugh J. 
Mealcy, from inspector to assistant chief 
inspector, without any change in salary, 
has been approved. 

William F. Cronin has been given a 
change of rating from storekeeper to 
chief storekeeper, without any change in 
salarj'. 

Fire Department. 

Patrick F. Cronin of Rescue Company 
3 has been retired on half-pay at $1,050 
a year. 

Hoseman George E. Clemens of En- 
gine Company 40 has been retired on 
half-pay at $1,050 a year. 

Health Department. 

Cornelius L. Dundon has been ap- 
pounted as constable, for service in the 
Sanitary Division, at $1,600 a year, ef- 
fecti\e January 23. 

Indefinite leave of absence to William 
J. Healey on January 26 has been ap- 
proved. 

Hospital Department. 

The following persons have been em- 
ployed at the Boston City Hospital dur- 
ing the week ending Thursday, January 
18: 

Temporary. — ^Marion Costa, special 
nurso, S29.75 a week; Helen Neal, clerk, 
$15.20 a week ; Anna McElaney, elevatoi-- 
woman, $15.20 a week; Timothy Rcilly, 
kitchenman, $16.63 a week; Fred Corbo, 
ambulance driver, $29.33 a week; Dr. 
Charles Boyajian, assistant resident .siu- 
geon, $1,700 a year. 

The following changes have occurred: 

Mary E. McDougall, correct name of 
laundress, instead of Helen; Robert E. 
Pearson, electrician's helper at .$27 to 
$18.90 a week. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 
Division) . 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division of 
the Boston City Hospital up to and in- 
cluding Thursday, January 18: 

Gertrade Harrington, ward ni;iid (tem- 
porary), .S9.98 a week; John Kelloy, maid 
(patient), $228 a year; John Sautkulis, 
Martin Malloy, male nurses (patients), 
$456 a year; James Kelley, Patrick Mc- 
Guinnoss, choremen (patients), (tempo- 
rary), $228 a year; Daniel O'Donnell, 
male nurse (patient) (temporary), $456 
a year; Francis O'Toole, maid (patient) 
(temporaiy), $228 a year. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed: 

Margaret Grace, maid, $11.40 a week; 
Joseph McManaman, maid (patient). 
$228 a year; Walter Wdggin, Edward 
Gibbons, male nurses (patients), .$456 a 



76 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 27 



j'ear; Martin Malloy, choreman (patient) 
(temporarj), $228 a j'ear. 

Institutions Department. 

Arthur French has been appointed 
temporary fii-st-class fireman at the Long 
Ishmd Hospital for a ])eriod of three 
months, more or less, at $33.50 a week. 

The following changes have been made 
for the week ending Thursday, January 
18: 

Long Island Hospital. 

Appoinlmcnt. — ^Andrew B. Johnson, 
electrician, tempora:y, 81,900 a year. 

7Va?is/er.^William F. McDonald, in- 
stitutions employee, helper in paint shop 
(transferred from porter), $700 a year. 

Overseers of the Public Welfare. 

Approval has been given to the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons as junior 
social workers for a period of three 
months at S1,000 a j^ear: 

Joseph Camunas, Joseph G. Fallon, 
George M. Hughes, Edmund Lockney, 
Edwin Taylor, Stephen McMahon, Ben- 
jamin Abrams, John F. Cahill, James D. 
Canan, Joseph Cannon, Richard J. Con- 
don, John Costello, Paul J. Cummings. 
Walter Dennis, John J. Galvin, William 
J. Hearn, Michael Kiley, James Manion. 
Lorenzo Ripley, Thomas Ryan, Peter 
Siragusa, Bernard F. Smith, John Vaughn, 
Frederick R. Mattern. 

Approval has been given to the con- 
tinued provisional temporar\' employ- 
ment of the following per.sons as book- 
keepers for a period of three months at 
81,000 a year: 

Amelia Killion, Anne Levins, Sadie 
McCaffrey, Margaret O'Reilly, Cornelia 
Sullivan, Margaret WaiTen, Helen M. 
Rollins, Diamond T. Young, Marj' R. 
Feeney, Maiy F. Doherty, Mary E. Nor- 
ton, Mary Hurley, HaiTiet Mainzer, 
Agatha Francis, Catherine Sheehan, 
Frances A. Bousard, Edith Fontaine. 

Approval has been given to the con- 
tinued temporary' employment of the 
following persons as assistant paymasters, 
for a period of three months, at .81,500 a 
year: John V. Condon, Maurice Gertlin. 

Approval has been given to the tem- 
poraiy employment of Philip J. Mischler 
as an engineer, for a period of three 
months from January 16, at S42 a week. 

Approval has been gi\en to the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons as ste- 
nographers, for a i>eriod of three months, 
at $1,000 a year: William F. O'Brien, 
Lewis L. Williams, William E. Searson. 

Approval has been given to the pro- 
visional temporaiy employment of Jo- 
seph Reardon as a junior social worker, 
for a period of three months from Janu- 
ary 16, at $1,000 a year. 

Approval has been given to the pro- 
visional temporaiy employment of 
Eleanor T. Hurley as a bookkeeper, for 
a period of three months from Januan^ 
17, at Sl.OOO a year. 

Approval has been given to the pro- 
visional temporary employment of 
Rosemary Moloney as a bookkeeper, for 
a period of three months from Januai-v 
16, at 81,000 a j'ear. 

Approval has been given to the pro- 
visional temporaiy employment of 
Man,' Breen as a bookkeeper, for a 
period of three months from January 18 
at $1,000 a year. 



Approval has been given to the pro- 
visional femf)oraiy employment of 
Rita M. Moroney, as bookkeeper, for a 
l^eriod of three months from Januarj' 18, 
at 81,000 a year. 

Park Dep.artment. 

Ap|)roval has been given for the ex- 
tension of the temporary employment, 
for a i)eriod of three months from Janu- 
ary 20, of John T. Stevens, third-class 
engineer, at $38 a week less 15 per cent. 

Approval for the extension of the tem- 
poraiy employment, for a period of three 
months from December 22, 1933, of Mrs. 
Anna G. Donoghue as temporarj' tele- 
phone operator at 820 a week. 

Public Works Department (Central 
Office). 

Ajjproval has been given to transfer 
Louis J. Graham from the Department 
of Education of the Commonwealth to 
the Central Office of this department to 
fill a permanent vacancy in the po.sition 
of clerk at Sl.OOO a year less 10 per cent, 
effective January 26. 1934. 

Public Works Department (Bridge 
Service). 

Appi'oval has been given to continue 
the temporary employment of Harry F. 
Hunter as assistant drawtender at $1,700 
a year less 15 per cent, for three months 
from Januarj' 16, to fill temporaiy xa- 
cancies. 

Public Works Departm ent (Sewer 
Service). 

Approval has been given to continue 
the temporaiy emploj'ment of the fol- 
lowing as clerk-stenographers at 81,100 
a J'ear less 10 per cent: John F. Krim, 
David Sava. 

Approval has been given to appoint 
Patrick J. Fitzgerald as steam engineer, 
at -848 a week less 15 per cent, to fill 
a permanent vacancy in the Calf Pasture 
pumping station, effective January 22. 

Public Works Department (Water 
Service). 

Approval has been given to continue 
the temporary emploj'ment of Albert F. 
Henneberrv as water meter reader at 
$1,7(X) a year less 15 per cent, for three 
months from January 25. 

Street L.\ting-0ut Department. 
Patrick J. Kelley, Charies H. Mc- 
Laughlin and Thomas P. Smith have 
been appointed clerk-stenographers at 
$1.1(X) a jear, for three months from 
Januarj' 19. 

Overtime Allowed. 
The heads of the various departments 
whose emploj'ees have received paj'ment 
for overtime state in connection there- 
with that if any laborer has been allowed 
to work more than eight hours per day 
it has been onlj' in case of emergency 
under the law. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 
Division) . 

For the week ending Thursdav, Janu- 
ary 18: , 

Louis Clark, a.ssistant engineer, 1 daj', 
$6.38 ; Marj' K. Finnegan, relief telephone 
operator, 2 daj's, $5.70. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

School Committee. 
The School Committee has approved 
proposals for removing ashes and rubbish 
from certain of the Boston public school- 
houses opened Mondaj', December 11. 
Bids were received from the following 
concerns : 

Doolej' Brothers, Incorporated, Edward 
J. McHugh & Son. 

Contract was awarded to Dooley 
Brothers, Incorporated, the lowest bidder, 
under date of January 8, 1934. 

Bids were as follows: 

Dooley Brothers, Incorporated, $295; 
Edward J. McHugh & Son, $445. 

Supply Dep.vrtment. 
Upon Januarj' 24 the Mayor approved 
a contract with lowest bidders, except 
Wilson & Co., for furnishing meats to the 
various citj' departments during January, 
1934. As the meats delivered bj' Wilson 
& Co. during December, 1933, were 
below grade, the items that this companj' 
are low on have been awarded to the 
second lowest bidders. Bids, opened 
December 22, were as follows: 

Approxin^te Amounts on All Items, Per 
Hundredweight. 

5,700 Pounds Corned Beef Brisket, 7 
7?i6.«.— Wattendorf & Co., $10; Swift & 
Co., 89.50*; Wilson & Co., .$9.90; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $9.87; Batchelder, Sny- 
der, Dorr & Doe Company, 814; Born- 
stein & Co., .$9.50; Wald, Baram. Com- 
panv. $10.04; Armour & Co., $10.95. 

2,900 Pounds Fresh Beef Brisket.— 'New 
England Dressed Meat and Wool Com- 
panv, 811.73; Wattendorf & Co., $10; 
Swift & Co., $9.50*; Wilson & Co., .$9.90; 
Faneuil Beef Companj', .$9.85; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Companj', $14; 
Bornstein & Co.. $9.75; Wald, Baram 
Company, $10.07; Armour & Co., 810.95. 

£,800 Pounds Beef Faces. — New Eng- 
land Dressed Meat and Wool Companv, 
$16.32; Wattendorf & Co., $13.65; Swift 
& Co., 814; Wilson & Co., $15.20; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $14.73; Batchelder, Snj'- 
der, Dorr & Doe Companv, $18; Born- 
stein & Co.. $14; Wald, Baram Company, 
$14.15; Armour & Co., $13.62.* 

14,200 Pohnds Beef Hinds.— New Eng- 
land Dressed Meat and Wool Company, 
$10.70; Wattendorf & Co., $10.95; Swift 
& Co., $10.70; Wilson k Co., $11.30; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $10.14; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 
$12.50; Bornstein & Co., $10.50; Wald, 
Baram Companj', $10.08*; Armour & Co., 
$11.05; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
$11. 

300 Pounds Beef Liver. — Wilson & Co., 
$8.50; Faneuil Beef Company, $7.64; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
panv, $11; Armour <!t Co., .$7.45, frozen.* 

41800 Pounds Beef Loins, Suet /n.— New 
England Dressed Sleat and Wool Com- 
panv, $13.50; Wattendorf & Co., $14.95; 
Swift & Co., $]3.05; Wilson & Co., $16.10; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $13.83; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Companj', $18; 
Bornstein & Co., $15; Armour & Co., 
$12,94*; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
$15; Albert Richards Companv, Incor- 
porated, $13.28. 

3,700 Pounds Beef Loins, Suet Out. — 
New England Dressed Meat and Wool 
Companv, $18; Wattendorf & Co., $17.95; 
Swift & Co., $18; Wilson & Co., $22.40; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $17.95; Batch- 



Jan. 27 



CITY RECORD 



77 



elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, $26; 
Bornstein & Co., S19.50; Armour & Co., 
$17.71; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
$19; Albert Richards Company, Incor- 
porated, $18.05, 2 per cent.* 

8,000 Pounds Beef Rumps and Loins. — 
New England Dressed Meat and Wool 
Company, $13; Wattendorf & Co., $14.65; 
Swift & Co., $13; Wilson & Co., $15.10; 
Faneuil Beef Company, 813.70; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, $18; 
Bornstein A: Co., $14.50; Wald, Banim 
Company, $12.65; Armour & Co., $12.54*; 
The Cudahy Packing Company, $13.50. 

14,100 Pou7ids Beef Ribs, o Ribs. — New 
England Dres.sed Meat and Wool Com- 
pany, $13; Wattendorf & Co., $11.95; 
Swift & Co., $12.50; Wilson & Co., $13.20; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $12.23; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr <fe Doe Company, $17; 
Bornstein & Co., $12; Armour il- Co., 
$12.97; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
$13; Albert Richards Company, Incor- 
porated, $11.28.* 

1,200 Rounds Beef Rounds uith Flank, 
but Cod Out. — New England Dressed 
Meat and Wool Company, $9; Watten- 
dorf & Co., $7.95; Swift & Co., $8.50; 
Wilson & Co., $10; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $8.24; Batcheldcr, Snyder, Dorr <fc 
Doe Company, $10; Born.stein <fe Co., $9; 
Wald, Baram Company, $7.85*; .Arir.our 
& Co., $8.40; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany. $9. 

300 Pounds Beef Shoulders. — New Eng- 
land Dressed Meat and Wool Companj% 
$12.69; Wattendorf & Co., $12.95; Swift 
& Co., $12; Wilson & Co., $13.10; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $12.83; Batchelder, Sny- 
der, Dorr & Doe Company, $14; I3ornstein 
& Co., $12; Wald, Baram Company, 
111.94*; Armour & Co., $13.90. 

10,000 Pouwls Beef Stickers.— 'biew 
England Dressed Meat and W'ool Com- 
pany, $6.19; Wattendorf <fe Co., $6.35; 
Swift & Co., $7.18; Wilson & Co., $5.20; 
faneuil Beef Company, $6.15; Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr <fe Doe Company, $7.50; 
Wald, Baram Company, $5.67*; Armour 
& Co., $7.35. 

300 Pouruls Beef Undercuts. — New Eng- 
land Dressed Meat and Wool Company, 
$12.91; Wattendorf & Co., $12.95; Swi'ft 
& Co., $11.75*; Wilson & Co., $11.95; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $11.97; Batchel- 
der, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, $15; 
Wald, Baram Company, $11.90; Armour 
& Co., $14.90. 

400 Pounds Calf's /.icpr.— Wilson & Co., 
$40; Faneuil Beef Company, $39.90; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr <fe Doe Com- 
pany, $50; Armour & Co., $32.96, frozen.* 
8,800 Pounds I jamb Carcasses. — New 
England Dressed Meat and Wool Com- 
pany, $13.10; Swift & Co., $12.10; 
Wilson & Co., $12.50; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $11.40; Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr <fe Doe Company, $13.50; Armour & 
Co., $11.47; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany, $11.25*; Albert Richards Company, 
Incorporated, $12.50. 

2,000 Pounds Lamb Carca.'<.%es, Fores 
Boned, Racks Split.—Swift & Co., $12.47; 
Wilson & Co., $1 3; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$12.40; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, $14; Armour & Co., $12.09*; 
Albert Richards Company, Incorporated, 
$12.50. 

2,f:00 Pounds Lamb Chops. — New Eng- 
land Dressed Meat and Wool Company, 
$14.10; Wattendorf & Co., S14.65; Swift 
& Co., $14.60; Wilson & Co., $16.10; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $12.93; Batchel- 
der, Snvder, Dorr & Doe Cori.pany, $17; 
Armour & Co., $12.94; The Cudahv 
Packing Company, $12*; Albert Richards 
Company, Incorporated, $14.25. 

15,000 Pounds Lamb, Hin/l Sad/lies. — 
New England Dressed Meat and Wool 



Company, $15.87; Swift & Co., $14.57; 
Wilson & Co., $16.25; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $13.63*; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
<fe Doe Company, $16.75; Armour & Co., 
$13.87; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
51 *• 

500 Pounds Eastern Veal Saddles. — New 
England Dressed Meat and Wool Com- 
pany, $14*; Swift & Co., $16.97; Wilson 
& Co., $12.60; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$14.84; Wald, Baram Company, $15; 
Armour & Co., $16.95. 

200 Pounds Veal Ler;s.— Swift & Co., 
$18.77; Wilson & Co., $12.50; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $15.93*; Batchelder, Sny- 
der, Dorr & Doe Company, $17; Wald, 
Baram Company, $16.25; Armour (fe Co., 
$16.95. 

6,400 Pounds Bacon, 8 to 10 Pounds. — 
Swift & Co., $15.47; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, $15.37, Arlington; Wilson & Co., 
$13.10; Faneuil Beef Company, $13.55; 
Wald, Baram Companj', $13.25*; Armour 
<& Co., $13.94; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany, $13.77. 

700 Pounds Bacon. 12 to 14 Poxtnds.— 
Swift & Co., $15.27; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, $15, .\rlington; Wilson & Co., 
$12.50; Faneuil Beef Company, $13.25; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, $14.50; Wald, Baram Company, 
$13.20; Armour & Co., $13.68; The 
Cudahy Packing Company, $13.17.* 

600 'Pouruls Fresh Hams, 14 to 16 
Pounds.— ^\\\[i & Co., $11.75; John P. 
Squire Company, $11.70; Wilson & Co., 
$11.20; Faneuil Beef Company, $10.73*; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, $14.25; Wald, Baram Company, 
$12."l5; Armour & Co., $11.32; Adolf 
GoDel, Incorporated, $10.75; The Cudahy 
Packing Company, $12.50. 

10,400 Pounds Smoked Hams, 14 to 16 
Pounds.— ^\\\i% & Co., $13,125; John P. 
Squire Company, $13.75; Wilson & Co., 
$13.80; Faneuil Beef Company, $12.74*; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, $16.25; Wald, Barani Company, 
$14.10; Armour & Co., $13.24; Adolf 
Gobel, Incorporated, $13.10; The Cudahy 
Packing C'ompany, $12.87. 

600 Pounds Ox Tongue, Smoked. — 
Faneuil Beef Company, $20.64; Batchel- 
der, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 
$31.50; Armour & Co., $24.96; Adolf 
Gobel, Incorporated, $20.50; The Cudahy 
Packing Company, $19.97.* 

9,600 Pounds Pork Loins, 8 to 10 
PoMw/s.— Swift & Co., $10.47; Wilson & 
Co., $11.20; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$11.23; Wald, Baram Company, $10.25*; 
Armour & Co., $11.22; The Cudahy Pack- 
ing Company, $14.40. 

1,700 Pounds Pork Loins, 12 to 14 
Poiiw/.s.— Swift & Co., $10.22; Wilson & 
Co., $10.90; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$10.45; Wald, Baram Company, $10.15*; 
Armour & Co., $10.71 ; The Cudahy Pack- 
ing Company, $13.90. 

1,300 Pounds Salt Pork, 50 to 60 Pieces. 
—Swift & Co., $8.25*; John P. Squire 
Company, $16.50, barrel; Wilson & Co., 
$8.30; Faneuil Beef Company, $8.98; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, $10.50; 'Wald, Baram Company, 
$8.30; Armour & Co., $8.35; The Cudahy 
Packing Company, 88.67. 

700 Pounds Fresh Pork Shoulders. — 
Swift A' Co., .$7.75; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, $7.90; Wilson <^ Co., $8.80; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $7.62; Wald, Baram Com- 
pany, $8.15; Armour & Co., $8.20; Adolf 
Gobel, Incorporated, $7.04*; The Cudahy 
Packing Company, $8.90. 

1,400 Pouruls Corned Pork Shoulders. — 
Swift & Co., $7.67; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, $7.90; Wilson & Co., $9; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $7.23; Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Company, $8.75; Armour & 



Co., $6.73*; Adolf Gobel, Incorporated, 
$6.89; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
$6.97. 

5,200 Pounds Smoked Shoulders. — 
Swift & Co., $9.23; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, $9.37; Wilson & Co., $9.30; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $8.64; Batchelder, Sny- 
der, Dorr & Doe Company, $10.25; 
Armour & Co., $8.34; Adolf Gobel, 
Incorporated, $7.71; The Cudahy Pack- 
ing Company, $7.67.* 

300 Pounds Fresh Ground Hamburg. — 
Wattendorf & Co., $8; Wilson & Co., $11 ; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $7.25; Batchelder 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, $10; Wald, 
Baram Companj^ $6.10*; Armour & Co., 
$6.60; Albert Richards Company, In- 
corporated, $8.25. 

1,800 PomuJs Corned Spare Ribs. — 
Swift & Co., $7.75; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, $23, tierce; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $6.74; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, $8.25; Armour & Co., 
$5.99*; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
$7.43. 

3,100 Pounds Lard. — Swift & Co., 
$0.65, in tubs; John P. Squire Company, 
$6,375; Wilson & Co., $7.01; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $6.72; Batchelder, Sny- 
der, Dorr & Doe Company, $7.75; Armour 
& Co., $5.95*; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany, $6.90. 

400 Pounds Dried Sliced Smoked Beef. — 
Wilson & Co., $32; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $26.26; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, $28.50; Armour & Co., 
$21.15; The Cudahy Packing Company* 
$20.43.* 

500 Pounds Luncheon Loaf. — John P. 
Squire Company, $11.90; Wilson & Co., 
$11; Faneuil Beef Company, $12.70; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, $10.50; Armour & Co., $9.91; 
Adolf Gobel, Incorporated, $9.90*; Fred 
W. Baldau & Co., $10. 

900 Pounds Pressed Ham, Blade Meal. — 
Swift & Co., $15.93; John P. Squire 
Company, $15.90; Wilson & Co., $11.10; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $11.25; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 
$15.75; Armour & Co., $10.62*; Adolf 
CJobel, Incorporated, $14.90; Fred W. 
Baldau & Co., $17. 

300 Pouruls Broilers, Two and One-Half 
Pounds Each. — Craig-Hapgood Company, 
Incorporated, $18; Wilson & Co., $16.85; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $15.70*; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company $25; 
Armour & Co., $23.90; Albert Richards 
Company, Incorporated, $20, chilled. 

24,400 Pounds Chicken, Four and One- 
Half Pounds Each.— hewis-Mears Com- 
pany, $17.60; Craig-Hapgood Company, 
Incorporated, $17.30; Swift & Co., $18.59; 
Wilson & Co., $17.95; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $17.63; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, $21; Armour & Co., 
$16.89.* 

1.50 Pounds Z)mc/c.— Craig-Hapgood 
Company, Incorporated, $16; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $15.45*; Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, $19; 
Armour & Co., $17.90. 

1,000 Pounds Fowl, 5 Pounds Each. — 
Lewis-Mears Company, $17.80; Craig- 
Hapgood Company, Incorporated, $17.30; 
Swift & Co., $18.43; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $16.47; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, $20; Armour & Co., 
$16.44*; Albert Richards Company, In- 
corporated, $18. 

00 Pounds Goose.— Craig-Hapgood 
Company, Incorporated, $16; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $15.45*; Batchelder, Sny- 
der, Dorr & Doe Company, $19; Armour 
& Co., $19.94. 

1,660 Pounds Turkey.— hewis-MesLTS 
Company, $27; Wattendorf & Co., $23; 
Craig-Hapgood Company, Incorporated, 



78 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 27 



S23.40; Wilson & Co., $25; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $22.40*; Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Company, $25; Armour & 
Co., .$22.43. 

8,:^00 Poll wis Beef Chucks.— Wiittendorf 
& Co., $5.95; Swift & Co., $5.67; Wilson 
t*i: Co., $7.()0; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$5.45; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Comi)any, $7; Wald, Baram Company, 
.$5.90; Armour & Co., $5.32.* 

140 Pounds Lanih Fores. — Wattendorf 
& Co., .$6.15*; Swift & Co., .$7.88; Wilson 
•k Co., $8; Faneuil Beef Company, $7.25; 
Batchelder, Snvder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, $8.35; Armour & Co., $6.22. 

(Hti/ Hospital, 1 ,oU0 Pounds Sausages. — 
John P. Squire Company, $20.* 

Long Island, ■')()() Pounds Sausages. — 
Fred W. Baldau & Co., $17.* 

Sanatorium, 300 Pounds Sausages. — 
John P. Squire Company, $20.* 

Deer Island, 120 Pounds Sausages. — 
Fred W. Baldau & Co., $17.* 

Deer Island, 8^0 Pounds Bologna, 950 
Pounds Frankfurts. — Fred W. Baldau & 
Co., $15.* 

All Other Departments, 1,075 Pounds 
Bologna, 1,600 Pounds Frankfurts. — Fred 
W. Baldau & Co., $17.* 

Cash Discount for Payment in Ten 
Days. — Swift & Co., tax clause; auditor's 
copy unsigned; quantity not to exceed 
25 per cent except at their option; prices 
subject to acceptance within ten days. 
Armour & Co., tax clause; The Cudahy 
Packing Company, prices include tax 
on pork products; tax clause; Albert 
Richards Company, Incorporated, 2 per 
cent. 



* Contract awarded. 

Transit Dep.\rtment. 

Upon January 18 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Carilli Construction 
Company for furnishing and installing 
incline wall finish, granolithic sidewalks, 
conduits, junction boxes, etc., and install- 
ing lamp standards. Traffic Tunnel. 
Bids, opened January 16, were as follows: 

A. G. Tomasello & Son, Incorporated, 
$19,712.50; M. S. Kelliher Company, 
$17,247.50; M. Solimando, $15,545; 
A. R. Doyle, Incorporated, $14,667.50; 
Carilli Construction Company, $13,372.50. 



MAYOR MANSFIELD PLANS TO 
HAVE ALL CITY SUPPLIES 
PURCHASED THROUGH ONE 
CENTRAL AGENCY. 

Upon January 22 the Mayor i.ssued the 
following statement: 

I have accepted, to take elTect at the 
close of business today, the resignation of 
Philip A. Chapman as Superintendent of 
Supplies. I have appointed in his place 
Warren W. Loomis of 815 Webster street, 
Needham. Mr. Loomis is about fifty-six 
years of age, native of New Jer.sey, 
graduated from Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology in 1905 with an electrical 
engineer's degree. From 1905 he was 
employed by Stone & Webster and in 1906 
he was sciit to one of that company's 
Texas firms as purchasing agent and 
superintendent of railway department. 
He returned to Boston in 1909, where he 
was again assigned to the purchasing 
department, holding various jjositions in 
increasing importance until he became 
assistant to the purchasing agent and in 
1917 was n ade general purchasing agent, 
continuing in that position until 1933. 

During that time as general purchasing 
agent he was responsible for the ])uichase 



of from ten million to twenty million 
dollars' worth of supplies annually. His 
experience has been varied and his work 
in the purchasing department has given 
him very broad and wide experience with 
manufacturers, sources of supply and 
equipment of extensive range. He is 
very highly recommended for this position. 
The Superintendent of Supplies in 
Boston purchases between three and four 
million dollars' worth annually. Other 
departments j)urchase independently of 
the purchasing agent. I hope to be able 
to obtain the adoption of legislation so 
that all supplies may be bought through 
one central purchasing agent. Mr. 
Loomis will be admirably (jualified to 
undertake this larger woik. 

Mr. Robert D. Brewer of the Merchants 
National Bank says that there has been 
an inquiry from New York sources for a 
large block of Boston tax anticipation 
notes, indicating an improved demand for 
Boston paper. Details and further in- 
formation are not vet available. 



LAND=TAKINQ IN WEST 
ROXBURY. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for sewerage works, to be 
constructed as follows: 

The right and easement is taken to lay 
and maintain sewerage works in the fol- 
lowing described lands, exclusive of any 
interest in trees, buildings or other struc- 
tures standing thereon, reserving to the 
owners thereof the right to use the lands 
for any purpose except such as may 
injure or obstruct said works, and except 
for placing or maintaining any structure 
on said lands not authorized in writmg 
by the Mayor of said city; trees, build- 
ings or other structures standing upon or 
affixed to the land in which an easement 
is hereby taken are to be removed there- 
from within sixty days following a 
notice of the city's intention to enter 
upon said taking for the purpose of con- 
structing said sewerage works. Said 
lands are in that part of Boston formerly 
West Roxbury and are bounded as 
follows : 

.A parcel of land, supposed to belong to 
Boston District Developing Corporation, 
bounded: 

Easterly by Poplar street, ten feet; 
southerly by other land supposed to be- 
long to said corporation, one hundred 
feet; westerly by land supposed to belong 
to City of Bo.ston, ten feet, and northerly 
by other land supposed to belong to said 
corporation, one hundred feet, containing 
ten hundred square feet, more or less. 

The sewerage works to be constructed 
are as follows: One hundred linear feet 
of 12-inch pipe sanitary sewer and one 
hundred linear feet of 12-inch pipe sur- 
face drain, in the above described premi- 
ses, being private land between Poplar 
street and the Municipal Golf Course. 

No betterments are to be assessed for 
the making of the aforesaid improvement. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
the undermentioned estate sustains dam- 
ages by the tarcing of an easement for 
sewerage purposes in private land be- 
tween Poplar street and the Municipal 
Golf Course, West Roxbury district, 
under the order of the Board of January 
8, 1934, in the amount hereinafter men- 
tioned, and awards said amount therefor. 

Boston District Developing Corpora- 
tion, 1,000 .square teet, $50. 



LAND-TAKING IN WEST 
ROXBURY. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
I the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Burard street, West 
Roxbury district, as a highway, from La 
Grange street to Dent street, bounded 
and described as follows: 

A highway named Burard street is 
hereby laid out, from La Grange street 
to Dent street, and ordered constructed; 
the cost thereof to be charged to Federal 
Funds allocated under the Civil Works 
Administration program for Massachu- 
setts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Northeasterly by La Grange street, 
forty feet; southeasterly by the south- 
easterly line of said Burard street as 
hereby laid out, four hundred sixtj-eight 
and 92 100 feet; southwesterly by Dent 
street, forty and 1-100 feet; and north- 
westerly by the northwesterly line of 
said Burard street as hereby laid out, 
four hundred sixty-nine and 70-100 feet. 

No betterments are to be assessed for 
the making of the aforesaid improvement. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvement, 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Burard street, West Roxbury 
district, as a highway, from La Grange 
street to Dent street, under the order of 
the Board of Januarj^ 16, 1934, and 
awards no damages therefor. 



LAND=TAKINQ IN WEST 
ROXBURY. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Gary road, W^est Roxbury 
district, as a highway, from Williams 
street to Kenton road, with the name of 
Cardillo street or some other distinctive 
name, bounded and described as follows: 

A highway named Dungarvan road is 
hereby laid out, from Williams street to 
Kenton road, and ordered constructed; 
the cost thereof to be charged to 
Federal Funds allocated under the 
Civil Works Administration program 
for Massachusetts. 

For the making of the aforesaid im- 
provement an easement for street purposes 
is hereby taken in the following-described 
lands, exclusive of trees or structures 
standing upon or affixed thereto: 

A parcel of land, owners unknown, 
bounded: Northerly by Kenton road, 
thirty-eight and 77-100 feet; southeasterly, 
by the southeasterly line of said Dun- 
garvan road as established under this 
order, seventy-nine and 40-100 feet; 
southwesterly by Cary road, thirty-three 
and 11-100 feet, and northwesterly by 
the northwesterly line of said Dungarvan 
road as established under this order, 
sixty-eight and 44-100 feet, containing 
twenty-two hundred and fortj'-nine square 
feet, more or less. 

The land, owners unknown, being 
the private way known as Cary road. 

Said Dungarvan road as hereby laid 
out is bounded: Southwesterly by Wil- 
liams street, thirty-six and 73-100 feet; 
northerly by the northerly line of said 
Dungarvan road as hereby laid out, 
one hundred fifty-two and 30-100 feet; 



Jan. 27 



CITY RECORD 



79 



northwesterly by the northwesterly line 
of said Dungarvan road as hereby laid 
out, two hundred eleven and 50 100 
feet; again southwesterly by the south- 
westerly line of said Dungarvan road 
as hereby laid out, 43-100 feet; again 
northwesterly by the northwesterly line 
of said Dungarvan road as hereby laid 
out, ninety-three and 22-100 feet; north- 
erly by Kenton road, thirty-eight and 
77-100 feet; southeasterly by the south- 
easterly line jof said Dungarvan road 
as hereby laid out, three hundred forty- 
four and 90-100 feet, and southerly by 
the southerly line of said Dungarvan 
road as hereby laid out, by two measure- 
ments, thirty and 5fi-100 feet and one 
hundred and seven feet. 

No betterments are to be assessed for 
the making of the aforesaid improvement. 

Voted, That this Board determines 
that no person sustains damages in his 
estate by the making of the public 
improvement, consisting of the laying 
out and construction of Dungarvan road 
(formerly Gary road), West Koxbury 
district, as a highway, from Williams 
street to Kenton road, under the order 
of the Board of January 17, 1934, and 
awards no damiiges therefor. 

Owners unknown, 2,249 square feet, 
nothing. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order Xo. SOU. 
The Police Commi-ssioner, at the re- 
quest of his Honor the Mayor, Frederick 
W. Mansfield, orders that, commencing 
as of Thursday, .lanuary 18, 1934, at 7.45 
o'clock a. m., an honorarium of twenty- 
five (25) dollars shall be paid annually to 
each of the jjolice officers hereinafter 
named, who have been awarded by the 
Police Commissioner a Department Medal 
of Honor for conspicuous meritorious 
service performed. 

Sergeants. 

Frank E. Gilman, Division 7, medal 
awarded December 31, 1930. 

John P. J. Maune, Division 11, medal 
awarded December 31, 1931. 

Francis W. Russell, Bureau of Criminal 
Investigation, medal awarded January 10, 
1934. 

Patrolmen. 

Robert C. White, Division 1, medal 
awarded December 31, 1931. 

Joseph Gilleo, Division 1, medal 
awarded January 13, 1933. 

Owen F. Donovan, Division 2, medal 
awarded Decemijer 31, 1931. 

Edward W. Crickard, Division 2, medal 
awarded December 31, 1931. 

Andrew K. Adair, Division 2, medal 
awarded January Ki, 1934. 

George W. Burke, Division 2, medal 
awarded January 10, 1934. 

Archibald N. Rintoul, Division 4, 
medal awarded December 31, 1930. 

Daniel L. Donahue, Division 4, medal 
awarded December 31, 1931. 

Elmer R. Ogston, Division 4, medal 
awarded January 13, 1933. 

John J. Dever, Division 4, medal 
awarded January 10, 1934. 

Leo \. Devlin, Division 9, medal 
awarded January 13, 1933. 

I>ewis S. Morrissey, Division 10, medal 
awarded December 31, 1931. 

Fred V. Perry, Division 10, medal 
awarded January 13, 1933. 

Herbert J. Langlois, Division 10, medal 
awarded January 13, 1933. 

William B. Boyden, Division 10, medal 
aw-arded January 13, 1933. 

Thomas J. Mundy, Division 14, medal 
awarded January 16, 1934. 



Henry F. Brogan, Division 14, medal 
awarded January 16, 1934. 

Henry A. Weiss, Division 14, medal 
awarded January 16, 1934. 

Daniel Fitzgerald, Division 14, medal 
awarded January 10, 1934. 

Cyril Montgomery, Division 15, medal 
awarded January 13, 1933. 

Daniel J. Feeney, Division 10, medal 
awarded January 10, 1934. 

Chester .V. (luilford. Division 17, medal 
awarded December 31, 1931. 

The commissioner is pleased to publish 
the following letter for the information of 
the department: 

City of Bo.ston, 
M.wor's Office, January 23, 1934. 
Ho.v. Eugene C. Hultm.\n, 
Police Headquarters. 
Dear Com.missioner Hultman, — It 
gives me great pleasure to return to you 
with approval your General Order of 
January 18, wherein there is restored 
to officers who have been awarded the 
Medal of Honor of your department their 
annual honorarium of .'S25. I am glad to 
have an opportunity to extend to the 
members of your dejjartment this addi- 
tional encouragement, indicating the ap- 
preciation of the City of Boston of gallant 
conduct in the city's service. 

Yours truly, 

F'rederick W. Mansfield, 

yfayor. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



CONSTRUCTION WORK. 

The Ma^or has approved the request 
of the Public Works Department for the 
following construction work: 

.\ surface drain of 18-inch pipe in Pop- 
lar street, between Grew avenue and 
Whitford street, in the West Rtjxbury 
district, at an estimated cost of SS.-TOO. 

.\ surface drain of 10-inch pipe in Wash- 
ington .street (southe:tsterly side), between 
center line of High View avenue extended 
and 15S feet northeasterly, in the West 
Roxburv district, at an estimated cost 
of 83,0()0. 



DAMAGES ASSESSED. 

The Mayoi' lia.s aijjjrovod the following 
votes of the Boa id of Street Cominis- 



Volvd, That in the matter of Gwrgina 
H. Cleary, petitioner for damages occa- 
sioned her estate by the widening, reloca- 
tion and construction of Centre street, 
under the order of the Street C^oinmis- 
sioners and Mayor of .Vpril 23, 1931, after 
consultation with the Law Department, 
and on its advice, the Board assesses the 
petitioner's damages in the sum of six- 
teen hundred (1,600) dollars, and con.sents 
that the C-oijjoration Coun.sel agree to 
judgment in said ca.se on the terms herein 
stated. 

Voted, That in the matter of Nora A. 
Gibbons, petitioner for damages occa- 
sioned her estate by the laying out and 
construction of Durnell avenue (formerly 
Dudley avenue), West Roxbury district, 
under'the order of the Street Coimnis- 
sioners and Mayor of .August 13, 1931, 
after consultation with the Law Depart- 
ment, and on its advice, the Board 
a.s.sc.sses the petitioner's damages in the 
sum of seven hundred and fifty (750) 



dollars, and consents that the Corporation 
Coun.sel agree to judgment in said case on 
the terms herein stated. 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACT. 

Public Works Department. 
Joseph Botti & Son have been granted 
an extension of the time of completion of 
the contract for building sewerage works 
in private land, between Manchester 
street extension and Board of Survey 
street No. 541, at Clearwater drive, 
Dorchester, from January 12 to March 18. 



MASSACHUSETTS CIVILSERVICE 
EXAMINATIONS. 

The Mas.sachusotts Civil Service Com- 
mi.'^.'^ion announces examinations for 
desirable positions ojjcn in Boston and 
Metropolitan districts as follows: 

School Physician, Boston School 
Department, Feisruary 24, 1934. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 10, 1934, at 12 m. 

This examination is open to both males 
and females. 

Salary: .15960 i)er year, less the statutory 
reduction. 

Duties: General knowledge of medicine 
and surgery; statutes relating to school 
hygiene and child hygiene; sanitation; 
cau.ses, prevention, and correction of bad 
I)osture in school children; pediatrics, 
epidemiology; the differential diagnosis 
of the various coninuinicable diseases and 
contagious skin diseases common to 
school children, including the prevention 
and methods of curing same; nutrition; 
malnutrition, its etiology, diagnosis, and 
treatment; childhood tuberculosis, diag- 
nosis and care of known cases; practical 
methods of examining the eyesight and 
hearing of school children; standards of 
admissions to classes for the conservation 
of eyesight and lip-reading classes; the 
ten-point examination used in connection 
with special class (mentally retarded) 
children; the Schick test and the Dick 
test; methods of immunizing children 
against diphtheria by means of toxin- 
antitoxin and toxoid methods; the pro- 
cedure to be followed in the examination 
of food handlers; the i)rocedure to be 
followed in delecting the diplococcus 
intracellularis meningitis organism among 
he:ilthy carriers; serology (in so far as it 
relates to typing of pneumonia); and 
diseases reportable to the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health. 

Entrance Reciuirements: Applicants 
must be registered physicians under the 
Stat c Division of Registration in Medicine. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 4; practical (lucstions, 3; 
personality and fitness, as determined by 
an oral interview, 3; total, 10. 

Passing Reciuirements: ,4i)plicants must 
obtain at least 70 per cent, in each subject 
in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 



REVENUE RECEIPTS, PER CAPITA, IN 
TWELVE LEADING CITIES, 1928 (BY 
RANK). 

Los Angeles, $138.53; Detroit, $109.33; 
Boston, $101.74; New York, $90.86; Buf- 
falo, .$86.28; Cleveland, $85.17; Pitts- 
burgh, $79.85; Milwaukee, $76.52; San 
Francisco, $75.99; Chicago, $74.12; Phila- 
delphia, $68.90; St. Louis, $62.58. 

(See U. S. Census Bureau's Financial 
Statistics of Cities, 1928, p. 192.) 



80 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 27 



LAND-TAKING IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor ha» approved the order of 
the Hoard of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment eonsistinj: of the laying out and 
construction of Bayside street, Dorchester 
district, as a highwaj', from Savin Hill 
avenue southwesterly, bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: 

A highway named Bayside street is 
hereby laid out, from Savin Hill avenue 
southwesterly for a distance of approxi- 
mately two hundred and sixty feet, and 
ordered constructed; the cost thereof to 
be charged to federal Funds allocated 
under the Civil Works Administration 
program for Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Easterly by Savin Hill avenue, by two 
n.easurements, forty-three and 45-100 
feet on a curve of five hundred ninety- 
nine and 50-100 feet radius, and eighteen 
and 74-100 feet on a curve of one hundred 
fifty and 65-100 feet radius; southerly by 
the southerly line of said Bayside street 
as herebjf laid out, eighteen and 33-100 
feet on a curve of eight feet radius; south- 
easterly by the southeasterly line of said 
Bayside street as hereby laid out, two 
hundred twenty-eight and 87-100 feet; 
southwesterly by the southwesterly line 
of said Bayside street as hereby laid out, 
thirty feet, and northwesterly by the 
northwesterly line of said Bayside street 
as hereby laid out, two hundred seventy- 
nine and 50-100 feet. 

No betterments are to be assessed for 
the making of the aforesaid improvement. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvement, 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Bayside street, Dorchester district, 
as a highway, under the order of the 
Board of January 16, 1934, and awards 
no damages therefor. 



BUILDINGS RAZED. 

The Mayor has approved the request 
of the Building Department to tear down 
buildings as follows: 

The building at 107 West Second 
street. Ward 6, is in a dilapidated condi- 
tion, also a fire hazard. 

The owner, Ole Mathison of 111 Mont- 
clair aVenue, West Roxbur}-, was notified 
of the unsafe condition of the building, 
but neglects to remove the cause of 
complaint. 

The building at 70 Endicott street. 
Ward 3. ''Front wall is settled and 
cracked; floors are settled 6 inches; stairs 
from cellar to top floor are in an un.safe 
and dangerous condition; building is a 
menace." 

The owner, John A. McXamara of 82 
Devonshire street, was notified of the 
unsafe condition of the building, but 
neglects to remove the cause of complaint. 

The building at 60 Hecia street, 
Ward 15, is delapidated and defective, 
also a fire menace. 

The owner, Joshua P. Underwood of 
Arthabasca County, Alberta, Canada, 
has been notified of the unsafe condition 
of the Duilding, but neglected to remove 
the cause of complaint. 

The building at 209 West Second 
street. Ward 6, is in a dilapidated, unsafe 
and dangerous condition, also a fii-e 
hazard. 

The owner, Louis Shindler of 390 West 
Broadway, South Boston, has been 



served with notices relative to the unsafe 
condition of the building, but neglects to 
remove the cause of complaint. 

The building at 108 Margiiual street. 
Ward 1. "Front wall is badly bulged, 
partitions of interior removed; also 
plumbing; house open to wind and 
weather, and in a general dilapidated 
condition." 

The owner, Edward J. Hurley of 699 
Bennington street. East Boston, was 
notified of the unsafe condition of the 
building, but neglects to remove the cause 
of complaint." 

The building at 45 Beacham street, 
rear, Ward 2, is in a dilapidated condi- 
tion; clapboards falling off; corner board 
gone; sill and post exposed; windows gone. 

The owner, Thomas R. Flynn of 186 
Pond street, Winchester, was notified 
of the unsafe condition of the building, 
but neglects to remove the cause of 
complaint. 

The building at 6 Noyes place. Ward 3, 
is in a dilapidated condition; clapboard 
falling off; windows and glass broken; 
door smashed in. 

The owner of record, Pasquale Rossetti 
of Revere, is reported dead, but there is no 
record of a will or administration papers 
being filed in the Suffolk Registry of 
Deeds. A notice of the unsafe condition 
has been posted on the external wall of the 
building, but nothing has been done to 
remove the cause of complaint. 

The building at 13 Dorr street. Ward 1 1 . 
"Frame stable is in a dilapidated condi- 
tion; sills, girths and posts rotted; boards 
gone; clapboards off; window broken; 
bulkhead door gone; chimney brick 
loose; structure is dangerous and a fire 
menace." 

The owner, Mary A. ISL Owens, was 
notified of the uiLsafe condition of the 
building, but neglects to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 45 Beacham street. 
Ward 2, is in a dilapidated condition; 
windows all broken; clapboards falling 
off; corner boards gone; brick under- 
pinning falling down; corner post and 
sills rotten. 

The owner, Thomas R. Flynn of 186 
Pond street, Winchester, has been notified 
of the unsafe condition of the building, 
but neglects to remove the cause of 
complaint. 

The building at 67 River street, rear, 
Ward 17. 

The building at 143 Rutherford avenue, 
Ward 2. 

The Duilding at 24 Stone street. Ward 2. 

The building at 354 Tremont street, 
Ward 3. 

The building at 5 Wall street, Ward 3. 

The building at 18 Bunker Hill street, 
Ward 2. 

The building at 570 Canterbury street. 
Ward 18. 

The building at 282 Bremen street. 
Ward 1. 

The building at 288 Dorchester street. 
Ward 7. 

The building at 65 Gordon street, 
Ward 21. 

The building at 108 Marginal street, 
Ward 1. 

The building at 45 Beacham street, 
Ward 2. 

The building at 45 Beacham street, 
rear. Ward 2. 

The building at 209 West Second street, 
Ward 6. 

The building at 60 Hecla street. Ward 
17. 

The building at 66 Washington street, 
rear, Ward 2. 



LAND=TAKINQ IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for sewerage works, to 
be constructed as follows: 

The right and easement is taken to lay 
and maintain sewerage works in the fol- 
lowing described lands, exclusive of any 
interest in trees, buildings or other struc- 
tures standing thereon, reserving to the 
owners thereof the right to use the lands 
for any purpose except such as may 
injure or obstruct said works, and except 
for placing or maintaining any structure 
on said lands not authorized in writing by 
the Mayor of said city; trees, buildings or 
other structures standing upon or affixed 
to the land in which an easement is hereby 
taken are to be removed therefrom within 
sixty days following a notice of the city's 
intention to enter upon said taking for 
the purpose of constructing said sewerage 
works. Said lands are in that part of 
Boston formerly Dorchester and are 
boimded as follows: 

A parcel of land, owners unknown, 
being part of the private way known as 
Haven avenue, bounded: Easterly by 
easement taken by the City of Boston for 
sewerage purposes in Haven avenue, 
October 3, 1933, six feet; southerly by 
another part of Haven avenue, by three 
measurements, fifty-one and 89-100 feet, 
eighty-three and 63-100 feet and one 
hundred eighteen and 27-100 feet; west- 
erly by the same, six and 3-100 feet, 
and northerly by the same, by three 
measurements, one hundred nineteen and 
39-100 feet, eighty-four and 37-100 feet 
and fifty-two and 11-100 feet, containing 
fifteen hundred and twenty-nine square 
feet, more or less. 

The sewerage works to be constructed 
are as follows: 252 linear feet of 10-inch 
pipe sanitarj' sewer and 252 linear feet 
of 12-inch pipe surface drain, in the above 
described premises, being part of the 
private way known as Haven avenue, 
westerly from sewer easement taken 
October 3, 1933, for a distance of ap- 
proximately two hundred and fifty-five 
feet. 

Betterments are to be assessed for the 
making of the aforesaid improvement. 

Ordered, That this Board estimates that 
the abutting lots of land on the northerly 
and southerly sides of said Haven avenue, 
as shown on the plan hereinafter men- 
tioned, will receive benefit or advantage, 
beyond the general advantage to all real 
estate in said cit}% from the improve- 
ment herein ordered, each of said lots to 
the amount hereinafter respectively set 
against it, said lots and the supposed 
owners thereof being shown on a plan 
marked "City of Boston, Plan No. 1124, 
Sewerage Works, Haven Avenue, Dor- 
chester, December 12, 1933, William J. 
Sullivan, Chief Engineer, Street Laying- 
Out Department," and on file in the office 
of said department. 

Lot. Amount. 

1. Jennie Loitherstein $120 00 

2. Ruth Rosenberg 100 00 

3. Ruth Rosenberg 100 00 

4. Ruth Rosenberg 100 00 

5. AdaT. Havden 117 60 

6. Amelia Eichorn et al 1 17 60 

7. William Donaldson 117 60 

8. Fred F.Rhodes 117 60 

Total $890 40 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the taking of an easement for sewer- 
age purposes in Haven avenue, Dorchester 
district, under the order of the Board of 
January 19, 1934, and awards no damages 
therefor. 



Jan. 27 



CITY RECORD 



81 



AMENDED DAMAGES. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
votes of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners: 

Vot&l, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of September 
14, 1931, determining that no person sus- 
tains damages by the making of the public 
improvement consisting of the laying out 
of Field street, be, and the same hereby is, 
amended, by striking out in the first and 
second lines of said order the words: 
"that no person sustains in his estate," 
and by striking out in the last line of said 
order the word: "no." That said order 
be further amended by adding thereto 
Walter R. Whiting, $85; that the 
amount S85 be, and the same hereby is, 
awarded to Walter R. Whiting for the 
damages sustained by the making of the 
said improvement. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Maj'or of February 1 , 
1924, ab amended August 5, 1932, deter- 
mining damages caused by the making of 
the public improvement consisting of the 
extension of Ashley street, be, and the 
same hereby is, amended, by adding lo 
said order the amount S200 as an award 
to Carmine Carideo and Carolina Carideo; 
that the amount $200 be, and the same 
hereby is, awarded to Cannine Carideo 
and Carolina Carideo for the damages so 
sustained. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commis.sioners and Mayor of October 17, 
1932, as amended, determining damages 
caused by the making of the public im- 
provement consisting of the widening and 
relocation of Weld street, be, and the sixme 
hereby is, amended, by adding to said 
order the amount $25 as an award to 
Lester E. Archibald and Hazel M. Archi- 
bald; that the amount $25 be, and the 
same hereby is, awarded to I>ester E. 
Archibald and Hazel M. .Vrchibald for the 
damages so sustained. 

Voted, That the order of the Street Com- 
missioners and Mayor of June 12, 1933, 
detennining that no person sustains dam- 
ages by the making of the public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out of 
Shermont street, be, and the same hereby 
is, amended, by .striking out in the first 
and second lines of said order the words: 
"that no person sustains in his estate," 
and by striking out in the last line of said 
order the word: "no." That said order 
be further amended by adding thereto 
Patrick J. Collins, Hugh J. Collins, .\nna 
M. Collins and .Julia .\. Wood, heirs of 
Michael F. Collins, $80; that the amount 
$80 be, and the same hereby is, awarded 
to Patrick J. Collins, Hugh J. Collins, 
Anna M. Collins and Julia A. Wood, 
heirs of Michael F. Collins, for the dam- 
ages sustained by the making of the said 
improvement. 

Voted, That the order of the Street Com- 
missioners and Mayer of May 5, 1933, 
determining that no per.son sustains dam- 
ages by the making of the public im- 
provement consisting of the laying out of 
Huntoon street, be, and the same hereby 
is, amended, by striking out in the first 
and second lines of said order the words: 
"that no person sustains in his estate," 
and by striking out in the last line of said 
order the word: "no." That said order 
be further amended by adding thereto 
.\rthur J. Bean and Marion Al. Bean, 
$125; that the amount $125 be, and the 
same hereby is, awarded to Arthur J. 
Bean and Marion M. Bean for the dam- 
ages sustained by the making of the said 
improvement. 



Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of May 5, 1933, 
as amended December 18, 1933, de- 
termining damages caused by the making 
of the public improvement consisting of 
the laying out of Branchfield street, be, 
and the same hereby is, amended, by 
adding to said order the amount $338 as 
an award to Charles M, Murphy and 
Mary A. Murphy: that the amount $338 
be, and the same hereby is, awarded to 
Charles M. Murphy and \lary A. Murphy 
for the damages so sustained" 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mavor of June 14, 
1933, as amended December 21, 1933, 
determining damages caused by the mak- 
ing of the public improvement consisting 
of the laying out of Westchester (for- 
merly Winchester) road, be, and the same 
is, amended, by adding to said order the 
amount $945 as an award to Mary M. 
Everson; that the amount $945 be, and 
the same hereby is, awarded to Mary M. 
Everson for the damages so sustained. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of August 24, 
1932, as amended, determining damages 
caused by the making of the public im- 
provement, consisting of the laying out 
of Tennyson street, be, and the same 
hereby is, amended, by adding to said 
order the amount $25 as an award to 
Carlton W. Crook and Madeline B. 
Crook; that the amount $25 be, and the 
same hereby is, awarded to Carlton W. 
Crook and Madeline B. Crook for the 
damages so sustained. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of October 

24, 1932, determining that no person sus- 
tains damages by the making of the public 
improvement consisting of the laying out 
of (iene street, be, and the same hereby 
is, amended, by striking out in the first 
and second lines of said order the words: 
"that no person sustains in his estate," 
and by striking out in the last line of 
said order the word: "no." That said 
order be further amended by adding 
thereto Louisa Colombo, .$25; that the 
amount $25 be, and the same hereby is, 
awarded to Louisa Colombo for the 
damages sustained by the making of the 
said improvement. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of January 
19, 1933, determining damages caused 
by the making of the public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Clare avenue, formerly 
Huntington avenue, be, and the same 
hereby is, amended, by striking from said 
order the amount $96 awarded to Carl 
Emil Lawson in said order and inserting 
in place thereof the amount $157 and 
the name Sofi B. Lawson; that the 
amount $157 be, and the same hereby 
is, awarded to Sofi B. Lawson for the 
damages so sustained. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of September 

25, 1931, as amended December 18, 1933, 
determining damages caused by the mak- 
ing of the public improvement consisting 
of the laying out of Bonad road, be, and 
the same hereby is, amended, by adding 
to said order the amount $37 as an award 
to Katharine M. Hourihan; that the 
amount $37 be, and the same hereby is, 
awarded to Katharine M. Hourihan for 
the damages so sustained. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of September 
30, 1931, as amended November 6, 1933, 
determining damages caused by the mak- 
ing of the public improvement consisting 



of the laying out of Edgebrook road, be, 
and the same hereby is, amended, by 
adding to said order the amount $85 as 
an award to Evelyn K. Mann; that the 
amount $85 be, and the same hereby is, 
awarded to Evelyn K. Mann for the 
damages so sustained. 



ASSESSMENT OF BETTERMENTS 
BY BOARD OF STREET COM= 
MISSIONERS. 

Pasadena Road, Dorchester. 

Lot. Amount. 

1. Harry Siegel $316 98 

2. Rose Spiegel 329 30 

3. Sarah Goodman and William Green, 265 00 

4. Rose Richter 265 00 

5. Julia Shulkin 265 00 

6. Abraham and Frances S. Goldberg, 107 02 

7. .Jacob Swartz, Gertrude Burroughs, 275 64 

8. Frances Sobin 340 60 

9. Minnie Gerson 300 00 

10. Rose P. Winer 300 00 

11. Ida Sheff 124 48 

Total 82.889 02 

Shermont Street, Roxbury. 

Lot. Amount. 

1. Annie Prior $335 78 

2. Louise C. and Elizabeth M. Cleary. 414 22 

Total $750 00 

Caledonian Avenue, West Roxbury. 

Lot. Amount. 

1. Mary B. Hyde $192 99 

2. William B. Coombes 325 68 

14. Grace Killion 150 50 

15. Edward A. Scigliauo, City of Bos- 

ton T. T 182 00 

16. Joseph H. Ring, Anna S. Ring 84 00 

17. Joseph H. Ring, Anna S. Ring 84 00 

18. Dorothea M. Farrell 168 75 

19. Dorothea M. Farrell 225 00 

20. Jennie Cina, Gertrude Cina 174 36 

Total $1,587 28 



Edgebrook Road, West Roxbury. 

Lot. Amount. 

4. Julia V. Callahan, ui. Thomas A... $13126 

5. Archibald B. and Irene M. 

Cameron 250 00 

6. Mary D. Twomey 250 00 

7. Mable A. Murray 250 00 

X. Workingmen's Co-operative Bank. 250 00 

9. Mary E. Vey 250 00 

10. John A. McDonald 170 98 

32. Blanche C. Crehan 136 00 

33. Evelyn K. Mann 225 00 

34. Margaret McLaughlin 225 00 

35. James W. and Mary J. McConnell, 225 00 

36. James W. and Mary J. McConnell, 225 00 
:J7. Barbara M. Simon 214 00 

38. Charles F. and Marie C. Eldridge. . 191 95 

39. Gertrude Miles 90 14 

Total $3,084 33 

Laurie Avenue, West Roxbury. 

Lot. Amount. 

2. William E. Coombes $217 12 

3. Clifford Z. Christopher, trustee. 

City of Boston T. T 200 00 

4. Carl A. Benson, Anna P. Benson. . 200 00 

5. Henning G. Nelson, Helen 0. Nel- 

son 200 00 

6. Florence A. Tiernan 200 00 

7. JohnFrisvold 200 00 

8. George C. Irwin 120 00 

9. Clifford Z. Christopher, trustee 124 80 

10. Gustav Widestrom 208 00 

11. Ernest G. Franson 208 00 

12. Sophie Tulysewski 208 00 

13. Sophie Tulysewski 124 80 

21. Marie E. Flemming 180 00 

22. K. Eric Gustafson, Ester E. Gustaf- 

son 225 00 

23. Clifford Z. Christopher, trustee 225 00 

24. Katherine Bothwell 212 50 

25. Angelina M. Bird 127 50 

26. Eliza J. Dunn 132 00 

27. Clifford Z. Christopher, trustee. ... 200 00 

28. Louis A. Adams, Bertha W. Adams, 200 00 

29. Edward Berg, Helen V. Berg 132 00 

30. Fred I. Johnson, Ingred E. John- 

son 124 80 

31. Abbie S. Perry 208 00 

32. Abbie S. Perry 208 00 

33. Clifford Z. Christopher, trustee. ... 208 00 

34. Anna K. Cavagnaro 124 80 

Total $4,718 92 



82 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 27 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 379. 
A "Board of Merit," consisting of 
Superintendent Martin H. King, Deputy 
Hui)erinteiui(>nt.s .lames McDevitt, John 
M. Anderson and \\'illiain \V. Livingston, 
has brought to the attention of the Police 
Commissioner the following outstanding 
eases in which police officers of this 
department especially distinguished them- 
selves in the performance of their duty 
during the year 1933. The commis- 
sioner, therefore, makes the following 
awards: 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 
1933 and a Department Medal of 
Honor to Sergt. Francis W. Russell 
of Bureau of Criminal Investigation 
Sergt. Francis W. Russell of Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation, for meritorious 
police dutv performed and bravery shown 
on March'27, 1933. With the assistance of 
other officers, in the face of imminent 
danger to himself, Sergeant Russell 
entered an apartment and succeeded in 
holding at bay two desperate criminals 
armed with loaded revolvers, both of 
whom attempted to shoot Sergt. Fran- 
cis W. Russell. 

Department medals of honor to : 
Patrolmen Daniel Fitzgerald and 
Thomas J. Mundy of Division 14, John 
J. Dever of Division 4, Daniel J. Feeney 
of Division 16 (formerly of Division 9), 
Andrew K. Adair and George W. Burke of 
Division 2, Henry F. Brogan and Henry 
A. Weiss of Division 14. 

Patrolman Daniel Fitzgerald. 

Patrolman Daniel Fitzgerald of Divi- 
sion 14, for meritorious police duty per- 
formed on October 4, 1933, in rescuing a 
mother and several children from a burn- 
ing building. 

Patrolman Thomas J. Mundy. 
Patrolman Thomas J. Mundy of Divi- 
sion 14, for meritorious police duty per- 
formed on October 4, 1933, in rescuing a 
mother and several children from a burn- 
ing building. 

Patrolman John J. Dever. 
Patrolman John J. Dever of Division 4, 
for valor shown on September 20, 1933, 
by plunging into the water and rescuing 
two persons, one of whom had jumped 
into the water in an attempt to save the 
other who was attempting to commit 
suicide. 

Patrolman Daniel J. Feeney. 
Patrolman Daniel J. Feeney of Divi- 
sion 16, formerly of Division 9, for meri- 
torious police duty performed on the night 
of April 24, 1933, in the capture of two 
men, one of whom was armed with a 
loaded revolver, while in the act of 
robbing a storekeeper. By these arrests 
several armed robberies were solved. 

Patrolman Andrew K. Adair 
Patrolman Andrew K. Adair, attached 
to Division 2, for effective and energetic 
action shown on April 21, 1933, in the 
pursuit and capture of two desperadoes 
who were discovered while in the commis- 
sion of a felony. 

Patrolman George W. Burke. 
Patrolman George W. Burke, attached 
to Division 2, for effective and energetic 
action shown on April 21, 1933, in the 
pursuit and capture of two desperadoes 
who were discovered while in the commis- 
sion of a felony 



Patrolman Henry F. Brogan. 
Patrolman Henry F. Brogan of Divi- 
sion 14, for courage shown and outstand- 
ing service rendered on November 19, 
1933, when he swam to the rescue of three 
per.sons in the Charles river who were in 
imminent danger of drowning. 

Patrolman Henry A. Weiss. 

Patrolman Henry A. Weiss of Divi" 
sion 14, for courage shown and outstand" 
ing service rendered on November 19' 
1933, when he swam to the rescue of 
three persons in the Charles river who 
were in imminent danger of drowning. 

The commissioner notes with pleasure 
the courageous acts of the officers named 
in this order, shown in emergencies where 
prompt action on their part was required. 

Presentations of the Walter Scott 
Medal for Valor and the Department 
Medals of Honor to the officers herein 
awarded were made by the commissioner 
on the occasion of the concert and ball 
of the Boston Police Relief Association, 
held at Mechanics Building on the even- 
ing of January 16, 1934. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hcltm.\n', 

Commissioner. 



General Oricr No. 3S0. 

Patrolman Michael J. Kilgallon of 
Division 1 is commended in General 
Orders for his prompt response to the 
blinker flashing signal on the night of 
December 2S, 1933, which resulted in the 
capture of a person who had stolen a fur 
coat from a store. 

The commissioner is pleased to recognize 
the effectual police service rendered by 
Patrolman Kilgallon on this occasion. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 381. 

Patrolmen Frank T. Lamb, Paul ^I. 
Sances, Alfred J. Morrissev, Thomas E. 
Clegg, Martin W. Connolly, Walter J. 
Burkin.shaw, James J. Driscoll, Albert F. 
Varner, John T. Hennebury and John F. 
Smiley of Division 7, and William F. 
Ahern of Division 1, are hereby com- 
mended in General Orders for meritorious 
police duty performed on December 29, 
1933, on the occasion of a serious fire 
which occurred in East Bo.ston in the 
early morning, in which the lives of a 
large number of per.sons were endangered. 
In addition Patrolman William F. Ahern 
of Division 1 is granted two days' addi- 
tional vacation for prompt and effectual 
service rendered while off duty, having 
discovered the fire and, una.ssisted, 
rushed into the building warning several 
of the fainilie* and carrying down others 
who, because of excitement, were unable 
to make their way out of the building. 

The commissioner is pleased to recog- 
nize the splendid duty performed on thi.'. 
occasion which, but for the prompt and 
heroic service rendered by the police, 
maj^ have resulted in the loss of life. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
pronmlgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultm.\n, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 382. 
A trial board consisting of Captains 
Campbell, Grace and Daley having 
heard by reference a complaint made by 



Thomas F. Casey, captain. Division 10, 
against .Joseph P. Leahy, sergeant. Divi- 
sion 10, for alleged violation of Rule 41 
of the Rules and Regulations of the 
Police Dej)artment, to wit: 

Charge: Conduct unbecoming an of- 
ficer. 

Specification: In that on the 4th day 
of January, 1934, the .said Sergt. .Joseph 
P. Leahy, when not in uniform and not 
on duty, was under the influence of in- 
toxicating li(iuor to such an extent he 
was uruible to perform police duty if 
called upon .so to do. and that, by so do- 
ing, he was guilty of an act contrary to 
good order and discipline of the depart- 
ment and tended to bring into disrepute 
and criticism his associates on the force 
and the department as a whole, — 
has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation: 

"The Board having heard and carefully 
considered all the evidence as presented, 
finds the .said Sergt. .Joseph P. Leahy 
guilty as charged. Having in mind the 
recommendation of his captain as being 
a good, reliable police officer and never 
having occasion to warn him before of 
the use of liquor, also that he considered 
him a very valuable man in the depart- 
ment, and, further, Capt. Mathew Killen, 
who formerly was his commanding officer, 
testified as a character witness for Ser- 
geant J^eahy and stated that he was a 
thoroughly reliable officer and never 
having occasion to warn him of the u.se of 
liquor, in fact, never knew he used liquor, 
and Capt. Mathew Killen was so positive 
on that point, that he stated he would 
have to see the man under the influence 
of liquor before he believed it. Also 
Sergeant Leahy worked on a murder case 
in Division 10 on his regular tour of duty 
and other times, both day and night, on 
his own initiative with the purpose of 
cleaning up the murder, since December 
24, 1933, and after doing his first watch 
from 6 p. m. to 1 a. m. on Januarj"^ 3, 
1934, he remained on duty on his own 
initiative until 3 a. m., making an effort 
to secure a very important witness in the 
murder case, so as to be presented in the 
tirand Jury on January 4, 1934, and on 
January 4, 1934. while on a day off. 
Sergeant Leahy appeared before the 
Grand Jury and remained in the District 
Attorney's office until 4 p. m. It also 
appeared in the evidence that he was 
suffering from an ulcerated tooth, and 
also from stomach trouble. Ordinarily a 
sergeant having been convicted of being 
imdei- the influence of liquor would justify 
the extreme pimishir.ent of demotion or 
discharge, but, owing to the high recom- 
mendation given by his commanding 
officer, and also Capt. Mathew Killen, 
his foimer comm.anding officer, the Board 
respectfully recommends that he be sus- 
pended for a period of thirty days, be- 
ginning as cf January 5, 1934, at 7.45 
o'clock a. m." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and the lecommendation, of the Trial 
Board and hereby oiders that the said 
Seigt. Joseph P. Leahy be suspended 
from duty for thirty days, effective as of 
January .5, 1934, at 7.45 o'clock a. m. 

Civil Service Rule 23, section 3. re- 
([uires approval of the Civil Service Com- 
mission before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 
Section 3. With the consent of the 
Comniissioner, upon good cause shown, 
an appointing officer may reinstate in the 
same iw.-ilion or in a position in the same 
class and grade any person who has been 
separated from the .service; provided, 
however, that the Commissioner shall not 



Jan. 27 



CI TY RECORD 



83 



allow reinstatement of a person dis- 
eharged for nause. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate thi"* order. 

Im CKNi: C. Hum MAN, 

Commixsuiiiir. 



General Order No. 383. 

Patrolmen Francis J. O'Connor and 
Harvey B. Yates, both of Division 4, 
and Patrolmen Stanley A. Slack an(l 
William J. Crowley, both of Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation, are commended 
in General Orders for efficient police duty 
performed on December I, 1933, in con- 
nection with the murder of a person in 
the South End. 

The commissioner is pleased to recog- 
nize the prompt and intelligent manner 
in which these officers performed this 
splendid jjolice duty which resulted in 
the apprehension of the felon within a 
few hours after the commission of the 
crime. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. SS4. 

A trial board consisting of Captains 
Campbell, drace and Daley, having 
heard by reference a complaint made by 
Thomas S. .1. Kavanagh, captain. Divi- 
sion 9, against NajHileon J. Dubois, patrol- 
man, Division 9, for alleged violation of 
the Rules and Regulations of the Police 
Department, to wit: 

Charge: Conduct unbecoming an officer. 

Specification I: In that on the second 
day of January, 1934, Patrolman Xapoleon 
J. Dubois, being in uniform and not on 
duty, was under the influence of intoxicat- 
ing liquor to such an extent that he 
would have been unable, had he been 
called upon to do so, to perform the 
duties of a police officer. 

Specification 2: In that on the second 
day of January-, 1934, Patrolman Na- 
poleon J. Dubois, while in uniform and 
not on police duty, entered the Merry-Co- 
Round Room at the Copley-Plaza Hotel, 
a place where liquor is dispensed and sold, 
did sit at a table with another person who 
was under the influence of intoxicating 
liquors, and not being on any police busi- 
ness at the time, all tending to bring into 
disrepute and criticism his associates in 
the Police Department and the Police 
Department as a whole, — 
hiis submitted the following finding and 
recommendation: 

"The Board, having heard and carefully 
considered all the evidence as presented by 
witnesses, accepts the plea of guilty made 
by the said Patrolman Napoleon J. 
Dubois to Specification 2 of said charge, 
and the Board finds the said Patrolman 
Napoleon J. Dubois guilty on Specifica- 
tion 1 of said charge. In view of the 
statements of his superior officers and the 
recommendation made by Capt. Thomas 
S. J. Kavaniigh that Patrolman Dubois, 
if given another chance, will prove to be 
a good police officer, the Board respect- 
fully recommends that the said Patrolman 
Napoleon J. Dubois be suspended from 
duty for a i)eriod of thirty days, effective 
as of January tJ, 1934, at 5.45"o'clock, and 
that at the expiration of the said period 
of suspension the said Patrolman Na- 
poleon J. Dubois be ordered to perform 
210 hours of punishment duty." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and recommendation of the Trial Board 
and hereby orders that the said Patrolman 



Napoleon J. Dubois be suspended from 
duty for a period of thirty days, effective 
as of January 6, 1934, at 5.45 o'clock 
p. m., and that at the expiration of the 
said period of suspension the said Patrol- 
man Napoleon J. Dubois perform 210 
hours of punishment duty. 

Civil Service Rule 23, Section 3, re- 
quires approval of the Civil Service Com- 
mission before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 
Section 3. With the consent of the 
Commissioner ujjon good cause shown, an 
appointing officer may reinstate in the 
same position or in a position in the Siime 
class and grade any person who has been 
separated from the service; provided, 
however, that the Commissioner shall 
not allow reinstatement of a person dis- 
charged for cause. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. SH5. 
It gives the commissioner great pleasure 
to publish the following letter for the 
information of the department: 

Emergency Campaig.n of 1934, 
24 Federal Street, Boston, 

January 15, 1934. 
Commi.ssioner Eugene C. Hultman, 
Boston Police Department. 
My dear Commissioner, — I want to 
thank you not only on behalf of the 
campaign but also personally for the 
assistance your department is giving us 
in the preliminary work of the campaign. 
Lieutenant O'Dea has been most obliging 
as has Lieutenant Blaney. 

Coojjcration as we are receiving from 
your department is of infinite value to 
the campaign. 

Very truly yours, 

J. W. Farley, 
General Chairman. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Cotnmissioner. 



General Order No. 386. 

The city is hereby divided into three 
major inspectional districts, namely: 

District A: Divisions 13, 14, 17, 18 
and 19. 

District B: Divisions 1, 2, 7, 15 and Hi. 

District C: Divisions 4, 6, 9, 10 and 11. 

Each district shall be under the in- 
spectional supervision of a deputy super- 
intendent and his duties shall be as fol- 
lows: 

He shall inspect all divisions within 
his district for the purpose of ascertaining 
and noting how the members of each 
division are performing their duty. 

He shall make his visits at irregular 
intervals and unannounced. 

He shall observe the manner in which 
the officers in command and in charge of 
divisions perform their duty. 

He shall observe the manner in which 
the sergeants perform their duty. 

He shall observe the manner in which 
the patrolmen perform their duty. 

He shall observe the conditions in every 
division within his district and shall note 
whether all members of divisions are 
zealous in the enforcement of the laws 
of this Commonwealth. 

He shall report in writing on the first 
day of each week, and more frequently 
if required, to the superintendent, setting 



down the division or divisions that he has 
visited within his district, the time spent 
visiting each division, and in his report 
shall call specifically to the attention of 
the superintendent every matter of im- 
portance concerning j)roper police ad- 
ministration, conditions he observed, and 
whether or not the work of the divisons 
in his district is being properly carried out. 

He shall make suggestions and recom- 
mendations as to how the department can 
be of greater service to the public. 

He shall also perform any other duties 
which may be assigned to him by (he 
superintendent. 

The following assignments of Inspectors 
of Divisions are hereby made: 

Deputy Superintendent James Mc- 
Devitt is assigned to District A. 

Deputy Superintendent John M. An- 
tlerson is assigned to District B. 

Deputy Superintendent William W. 
Livingston is assigned to District C. 

All rules and regulations and General 
Orders inconsistent with this order are 
hereby repealed. 

This order will take effect Tuesday, 
January 23, 1934, at 7.45 o'clock a. m. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 



Eugene C. Hultman, 
Commissioner. 



General Order No. 387 . 

A trial board consisting of Captains 
Campbell, McGrath and Daley, having 
heard by reference a complaint made by 
Thomas F. Casey, Captain, Division 10, 
against Thomas F. Johnston, ])atrolman, 
Division 10, for alleged violation of Rule 
41 of the Rules and Regulations of the 
Police Dei)artment, to wit: 

Charge 1 : Conduct unbecoming an 
officer. 

Specification: In that on the ninth day 
of January, 1934, the said Patrolman 
Thomas F. Johnston, when in uniform 
and on duty, being assigned to prowler 
car covering routes 13 and 30 and the 
lower end of the division from 12.30 to 
8 a. m., was under the influence of in- 
toxicating liquor to such an extent that 
he was unable to perform police duty if 
called upon so to do, and that by so doing 
he was guilty of an act contrary to good 
order and discipline of the department 
and tended to bring into disrepute and 
criticism his associates on the force and 
the department as a whole. 

Charge 2 : Neglect of duty. 

Specification: In that on the ninth day 
of January, 1934, the said Patrolman 
Thomas V. Johnston was assigned to 
patrol duty between the hours of 12.30 
a. m. and 8 a. m. and did fail to properly 
perform said duty in that he left his tour 
of duty at about 4.15 a. m. without 
permission from his superior officers, — 
has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation : 

"The Board, having heard and care- 
fully considered all the evidence as pre- 
sented, finds the said Patrolman Thomas 
F. Johnston guilty as charged. The 
Board has also considered the fact that 
this officer has never before been before a 
trial board for a violation of the Rules 
and Regulations of the department, the 
good recommendation given him by his 
commanding officer; the fact that the 
officer was an observer in the prowler 
car and not an operator; and the fact that 
on the previous night Patrolman .lohnston 
probably prevented a suicide by cutting 
down a prisoner in a cell, and his promise 
to take a pledge with his spiritual advi.ser 
to abstain from the use of intoxicating 
liquors in the future. Therefore, the 



84 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 27 



Board respectfully recommends that the 
said Patrolman Thomas F. Johnston be 
suspended from duty with loss of pay for 
a period of thirty days, effective as of 
January 9, 1934, at 5.45 o'clock p. m., 
and that at the expiration of the said 
period of suspension the said Patrolman 
Thomas F. Johnston be ordered to per- 
form 210 hours of punishment duty." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trial 
Board and hereby orders that the said 
Patrolman Thomas F. Johnston be sus- 
pended from duty for a period of thirty 
days effective as of Januarj^ 9, 1934, at 
5.45 o'clock p. m., and that at the expira- 
tion of the said period of suspension the 
said Patrolman Thomas F. Johnston 
perform 210 hours of punishment duty. 

Civil Ser^'ice Rule 23, Section 3, re- 
quires approval of the Civil Service Com- 
mission before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 

Section 3. With the consent of the 
Commissioner upon good cause shown, 
an appointing officer may reinstate in the 
same position or in a position in the same 
class and grade any person who has been 
separated from the service; provided, 
however, that the Commissioner shall not 
allow reinstatement of a person dis- 
charged for cause. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultmax, 
Commissioner. 



General Order Xo. 388. 

By authority conferred upon the Police 
Commissioner by law, Patrolman John 
J. Dowd of Division 11, charged with 
conduct unbecoming an officer and un- 
truthfulness, was dismissed from the 
Police Department, effective as of Janu- 
ary 19, 1934, at 5.45 o'clock p. m. Writ- 
ten notice of such dismissal, with the 
reasons therefor, was duly and specifi- 
cally given in hand on January 19, 1934, 
• to the said John J. Dowd. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

EuGEXE C. Hultmax, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 389. 

The commissioner is pleased to pub- 
lish the following letter for the informa- 
tion of the department: 

Trustees of the 
Armexiax Apostolic Church 
of bostox. 
397 Shawmut A\'exue, Boston, Mass., 
January 19, 1934. 
Eugene C. Hultil\n, Esq., 
Commissioner of Police. 
Dear Sir, — The mass meeting com- 
mittee of the Armenian Apostolic Church 
thanks the Boston Police Department 
for the excellent manner in which they 
maintained order among the thousands 
of people attending the protest mass meet- 
ing at the Boston Opera House, and also 
at the services in the church on January 14 

Very truly yours, 

H. Habeshian, 

Chairman. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 18 TO JANUARY 24. 

Jancary 18. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



H. Weiner 209 Humboldt avenue 12 

L. Niden 19 Fessenden street 18 

.Adina McLarty et al 3 Wellington street 4 

Rose Cohen 80 Meridian street 1 

David Perry 56 Fulton street 3 

Ruth Lindsey 351 West Second street 6 

C. H. Cammack 3 Bay View place 7 

Charles Libby 4 Hayden place 6 

William J. Day 1780 Columbia road 7 

Robinson Estate 1.320 Tremont street 9 

Williams and Bangs 150 Summer street 3 

Nellie J. Crowley 9 Matchett street 22 



.Alterations, stores $600 

-Alterations, dwelling 55 

Alterations, dwelling 500 

Alterations, dwelling and 375 
store. 

Take-down, mercantile 75 

Take-down, dwelling 1 .500 

Take-down, dwelling 1 .000 

Take-down, dwelling 1 .000 

.^Iterations, dwelling 100 

.Alterations, store 115 

Alterations, store 350 

Third-class dwelling 5,000 



January 19. 



Mexican Petroleum Corp . 

James .A. Martin 

C. Paul Cronin 

Gertrude DePaulo 

Emilia M. Branca 

Louis B. Kaufman 

J. i'oung Company 

City of Boston 

John Doherty 

New England Trust Co, . 
Julius Rosenberg 



Elizabeth Donovan . 



676 Harrison avenue 8 

418 La Grange street 20 

322 Washington street 22 

Frankfort street 1 

151 Norfolk street 17 

38 Westland street 4 

85 and 87 Border street .... 1 

17 Childs street 11 

4 Chauncey place 2 

84 Friend street 3 

576 Columbus avenue 9 



P. F. McKenna. 



1750 Washington street . 
170 Canal street 



Second-class service station. . 82.000 

Second-class store 6,000 

Alterations, store 400 

Alterations, dwelling 1 ,000 

Alterations, stores 250 

-Alterations, tenements 600 

Take-down, shop 100 

-Alterations, stable 300 

-Alterations, dwelling 1,000 

-Alterations, hotel 350 

-Alterations, dwelling and 200 

stores. 

Alterations, store and tene- 400 

ments. 

-Alterations, store and hotel . . 6,000 



Janu.vry 


20. 


None. 


January 


22. 



August Isakson 

New i'ork. New Haven i 
Hartford Railroad. 

Sarah Kaiser 

Home for -Aged Women 

Joseph Rudnick 

Long Brothers 



Da\-id Perry 

Howard L. Baker 

Irving Trust 

Paul T. Babson 

Maude Brown 

William F. Finn 

South Boston Savings Bank, 
New York Building Wreck- 
ing Company. 

L. W. .Adie Estate 

Grove Hall Savings Bank. . . 

Frank Libratore 

Smith Estate 



40 Hill Top street . . . 
155 Northern avenue . 



1115 Blue Hill avenue . . . 

10 Eden street 

103 and 105 Dover street. 
723 Tremont street 



56 Fulton street 

.3 West Haven street. . . 
42 and 44 Irving street. 
210 Newbury street. . , . 
1186 River street 

36 Maple street 

327 E street 

37 Yeoman street 



159 and 161 Federal street. 
139-171 Ellington street. . . 

3 -Albert street 

69 J West Concord street . . 



16. . Third-class dwelling $4,500 

6. .-Alterations, loading platform, 230 

14. ..Alterations, stores 1,000 

2. .-Alterations, home 1,000 

3. .-Alterations, stores and offices, 250 

4. .-Alterations, stores and dwell- 1,400 

ing. 

3. .-Alterations, storage 110 

9 . . -Alterations, dwelUng 500 

3 . . Fire escapes 175 

5 . . Dumb-waiter 150 

18. .-Alterations, stores and hall, 900 

18. ..Alterations, dwelling 125 

6. .Alterations, machine shop . . . 600 

8. . Take-down dwelling 25 

3. .-Alterations, store and offices, 250 

14. .-Alterations, dwelling 300 

10. .-Alterations, dwelling 600 

9. ..Alterations, club 300 



Jancary 23. 



Carrie M. Cornwell 

Lionel Provencher 

-A. L. Patran 

Cabot, Cabot & Forbes. . . 

Muirfield-Storer 

James H. Frazer 

A. L. Patran 

Robert Shea 

C. W. Whittier & Brothers 
Otis Elevator Company. . . , 

N. B. Smith et al 

Jennie Lawton 

E. J. McGann 



24 Russett road 20 . 

117 Sanborn avenue 20. 

1561 Washington street .... 9. 

71-75 Chauncy street 3. 

230 Tremont street 3 . 

22 Montrose street 12. 

36 West Newton street 9. 

72 Dover street 3 . 

5 Market street 3 . 

130 Clarendon street 4 . 

13 Devonshire street 3 . 

99 Brooks street 22 . 

169 West Eighth street 7. 



.Third-class 
. Third-class 
.-Alterations, 

ing. 
Alterations. 
Alterations, 
Alterations, 
-Alterations, 

ing. 
-Alterations, 

ing. 
Take-down, 
-Alterations, 

office. 
.Alterations. 
-Alterations, 
-Alterations, 



garage $300 

dwelUng 4.000 

stores and lodg- 6,000 

lofts 4,000 

offices and stores, 1,000 

dwelling 400 

stores and lodg- 6,000 

stores and lodg- 100 

mercantile 800 

mercantine and 1,000 

store 145 

dwelling 200 

dwelling 250 



J.\NUARY 24. 



George M. Cushing etal 

Nathan H. Klarfield 

Shattuok Trust 

Everett Fuel Company 

Boselli & Comaski 

Myron P. Lewis et al.. 
Trustees. 

Copley Plaza Operating Com- 
pany. 

Harvard College 

Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Leonardo Ciaccio 



305 Washington street.. . . 
107 Northampton street. . 

55 Portland street 

305 Columbia road 

523 East Third street 

54 and 56 Chauncy street. 

13 S St. James street 



118-122 Hanover street. 
26 Curtis street 



311 Norfolk street . 



E. Sohier Welch, Trustee. . . . 33-37 Lincoln street. 



Alterations, store $1,000 

Alterations, store 160 

Alterations, mercantile 8,000 

Alterations, gas station 300 

-Alterations, dwelling 300 

-Alterations, stores and offices, 300 

-Alterations, hotel 600 

Fire escapes 1 .000 

Take-down, dwelling 30 

-Alterations, dwelling and 210 

store. 

Alterations, offices and sales 150 

rooms. 



Jan. 27 



C ITY RECORD 



85 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1934. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Monday, February 5. 
Worcester, Wednesday, February 7. 
Boston, Monday, March 5. 
Fall River, Wednesday, March 7. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 8. 
Boston, Monday, .-Vpril 9. 
Springfield, Wednesday, April 1 1 . 
Boston, Monday, May 7. 
Worcester, Wednesday, May 9. 
Boston, Monday, June 4. 
Boston, Monday, September 17. 
Worcester, Wednesday, September 19. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 25. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 26. 
Boston, Monday, November 5. 
Lowell, Wednesday, November 7. 
Boston, Monday, December 3. 
New Bedford, Thursday, December 6. 
New Bedford, Friday, December 7. 

Rules for Examinations. 

All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the etjuivalent in 
the installation of wires, conduits, appa- 
ratus, fixtures and other appliances for 
carrying or using electricity lor light, heat 
or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at leiist two 
years' experience in the business of install- 
ing wires, conduits, apparatus, fixtures 
and other appliances for carrying or 
using electricity for light, heat or power 
purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a Master or Journeyman Cer- 
tificate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be 
required to obtain at least 70 per cent in 
order to obtain a certificate. 

Apphcants who fail to obtain the re- 
quired 70 per cent will not be entitled 
to re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent, or who fail 
on the practical demonstration, will not 
be re-examined for a period of six months. 

Any person found referring to notes 
or books, or misbehaving during an ex- 
amination, will be debarred from that 
examination. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held, and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day. 

James M. Hurley, 
Payson Smith, 
Stephen C. Garrity, 
State Examiners of Electricians. 

For application blanks or other infor- 
mation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 413A, State House 
Boston, Mass. 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 18 TO JANUARY 24. 



January 18. 



Plumber. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



L. W. Polit 52A Gainsborough street ... 4 

James Woolfall 30.3 West Broadway C 

Walter Schmidt 31 Clayton street 15 

William G. Newman 25 .\rlington avenue 2 

Louis Baldassaro 10 Maverick square 1 

D. J. Farrell Company 227 High street 3 

Walter Schmitt 44 Laurel street 12 



New fixtures $85 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 600 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures 45 

New fixtures 300 

New fixtures 600 



Januarv 19. 



Louis Haldassaro 

Edward Sawyer 

Joseph E. Smith 

Joseph Nessell 

Edward H. Marchant 

Morse Brothers Company. 

John S. Pagington 

Edward Sawyer 

W. B. Long 

P. S. Monahan 



315 Hanover street 3 

11 Boylston street 3 

310 Congress street 6 

Humboldt avenue 12 

197 Massachusetts avenue. . 4 

40 Melrose street 5 

8 Pine street 18 

9 Lawrence avenue 14 

67 Allston street 21 

705 Cambridge street 22 



New fixtures 


$30 


New fixtures 


500 


New fixtures 


125 


New fixtures 


125 


New fixtures 


300 


New fixtures 


600 


New fixtures 


245 


New fixtures 


112 


New fixtures 


35 


New fixtures 


100 



January 20. 



None. 



January 22. 



P. S. Monahan 

Herbert A. Rowell. . 
Walter G. Milligan.. 

H. C. Greenlaw 

Simon Kramer 

A. Yorka 

A. Yorka 

John A. Martensen.. 

Edward Sawyer 

Frank C. Goldberg. . 
Frank C. Goldberg.. 
Frank C. Goldberg. . 
Frank C. Goldberg. . 
Thomas W. Casserly 
George Sulprizio. . . . 
Matto and Rosen . . . 



60 Henshaw 22 

52 Russett road 20 

7 Chester place 20 

667 Tremont street 4 

293 Blue Hill avenue 12 

42 Wordsworth street 1 

149 Bennington street 1 

66 Crest street 20 

36 Tremont row 3 

1880 Commonwealth ave. . . 21 

1868 Commonwealth ave. . . 21 

1122 Commonwealth ave. . . 21 

6 Braemore road 21 

83 Homer street 1 

18 Breed street 1 

288 Chelsea street 1 



New fixtures 

New fixtures 


$100 

400 




500 


New fixtures 


40 




50 




75 


New fixtures 


100 




400 


New* fixtures . . 


475 


New fixtures 


50 




50 


New fixtures 


50 




50 


New fixtures 


225 




450 


New fixtures. . . .■ 


225 



January 23. 



R. Flicgeliiian 

P. S. .Monahan 

Herman Finkelstein. 
William F. Berkeley 
John J. McCormacfc. 

John W. Dean 

Matto & Rosen 

A. Yorks 

Saul Tack 

A. T. Hapenny 

Ernest G. Bennett . . 



1101 Blue Hill avenue 14 

337 Washington street 22 

228 Cambridge street 3 

98 Cambridge street 2 

12 Vinson street 16 

26 Brent street 17 

6 Cooper street 3 

316 Chelsea street 1 

83 Green Hill avenue 1!) 

1378 River street 18 

34 Wenonah street 12 



New fixtures $50 

New fixtures 152 

New fixtures 25 

New fixtures -350 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures 70 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures 125 

New fixtures 550 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures 175 



January 24. 



John P. Murphy. . 
Simon Kramer. . . . 
Frank E. Carlson. 
A. D. Meltzer. . ., 
James .A. Sullivan 
E. M. Duggan. . . . 
John B. .\llan 



9 Irvington street 4 

410 Massachusetts avenue. . 9 

716 Columbus avenue 9 

107 Blue Hill avenue 12 

9 Otis street 3 

69 West Concord street .... 9 

71 Monastery road 22 



New fixtures $800 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 500 

New fixtures 600 

New fixtures 75 

New fixtures 350 

New fixtures 40 



LAND=TAKINa IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Bowdoin square, Dor- 
chester district, as a highway, from 
Westville street to Dakota street, with 
the name of Boyd street, or some other 
distinctive name, bounded and described 
as follows: 

A highway named Boyd street is hereby 
laid out, from Westville street to Dakota 
street, and ordered constructed, the cost 
thereof to be charged to Federal Funds 
allocated under the Civil Works Ad- 
ministration program for Massachusetts, 

Said highway and the land, exclusive or 
trees or structures standing upon of 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 



street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Northwesterly by Westville street, 
forty feet; northeasterly by the north- 
easterly line of said Boyd street as hereby 
laid out, two .hundred ninety-four and 
1-100 feet; southeasterly by Dakota 
street, forty feet, and southwesterly by 
the southwesterly line of said Boyd street 
as hereby laid out, two hundred ninety- 
four and 1-100 feet. 

No betterments are to be assessed for 
the making of the aforesaid improvement. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvement, 
consisting of the laying out and con- 
struction of Boyd street, Dorchester dis: 
trict, as a highway, from Westville street 
to Dakota street, under the order of the 
Board of January 3, 1934, and awards no 
damages therefor. 



86 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 27 



LAND-TAKINCi IN DORCHESTER. 

Tnn Mayor has approved tlio order of 
(he Moard of Street Coiiunissioneis for 
the takins; of land for a i)uhlic iiiiprove- 
inent consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Fenton street, Dorchester 
district, as a hij^hway, from Clayton 
street to Duncan street, homided and 
described as follows: 

A hifjliway named l'\'nton street is 
hereby laid out, from Clayton street to 
Duncan street, and ordeicd constructed; 
the cost thereof to be charged to Federal 
Funds allocated under the Civil Works 
Administration program for Mas- 
achusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing U[)on or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street j)uri)oses is hereby taken, is bounded 
and descriijcd as follows; 

lOasterly by Clayton street, forty-nine 
and 80-100 feet; southeasterly by the 
southeasterly line of said Fenton street 
as hereby laid out, six hundred thirty and 
94-100 feet; southwest erh' by Duncan 
street, forty and 23-100 feet, and north- 
westerly by the northwesterly line of 
said Fenton street as hereby laid out, six 
hundred fifty-six and '27-l60 feet. 

No betterments are to be assessed for 
the making of the aforesaid improve'uent. 

Voted, That this Hoard determines 
that no person sustains damages in his 
estate by the making of the public im- 
provement, consisting of the laying out 
and construction of Fenton street, Dor- 
chester district, as a highway, from Clay- 
ton street to Duncan street, under the 
order of the Board of January 3, 1934, and 
awards no damages therefor. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order Nc. 13. 
I. Bernard F. McNamara. 

It is with deep regret that the Fire 
Commissioner announces the death on 
.January 17, 1934, of Bernard F. 
IMcNamara of Engine Company 41. 
Hoseman McNamara was appointed to 
the departTuent on October 14, 1903. 

The funeral was held from his late res- 
idence, 671 Washington street, Brighton, 
at 9 a. m., January 20, 1934, followed 
by services at the Church of (Jur Lady of 
the Presentation. The Chief of Depart- 
ment made the usual detail to act as 
funeral escort and Engine Company 41 
was excused from duty in order to attend 
the funeral. 

II. William A. Baldwin. 

It is with deep regret that the Fire 
Commi.ssioner announces the death of 
William A. Baldwin of the Fire Prevention 
Division on Monday, January 22, 1934. 
Ladtlei'inan Baldwin was appointed to the 
Fire Department on February 10, 1S93. 

The funeral will be held fi-om his late 
residence, 120 Fuller street, Dorchester, 
at 8 a. m., Thursday, January 25, 1934, 
followed by services at St. Gregory s 
Church, Dorchester avenue, at 9 a. m. 
The Chief of Depaitn.ent will arrange to 
detail sixteen membeis fiom the uniform 
inspection force of the lire Prevention 
Division to act as an escort fiom this 
depart iiient . The detail will report at 
the corner of Washington anil I''ullei' 
streets, Dorchestei', at 8 a. m., to Caj)t. 
Michael Norton, who will he in charge of 
the detail. 

III. Tk.stinc DiKuts. 
On anil after Monday, Januaiy 29, 
1934, the practice of making weekly tests 
of the (ire alarm box doors will be limited 



to the 742 keyles.s doors now in service. 
The signature cards will l)e kept in these 
boxes and signeil by the men testing the 
doors, as usual. 

Weekly inspection and tests of boxes 
with (luick-action doors will be discon- 
tinued on and after Monday, January 29, 
1934. 

The practice of testing doors after a 
sleet storm, or duiing any kinrl of weather 
which may interfere with the proper 
operation of fire alarm box doors, will be 
continued. In other words, when doors 
are apt to freeze up, men will be .sent out 
to test all doors, including the old-style 
keyless doors and the quick-action doors. 

IV. Fire Extending to Propertv of 
Another. 
The practice of sending in special 
reports on I'orm 5 where a fire occurs in 
one building and extends to the property 
of another will be discontinued on and 
after this date. 

V. COMME.NDATIONS. 

In commending members of the Fire 
Alarm Division in (Jeneral Orders No. 10 
for the services lendered by them in 
rescuing a valuable dog who had broken 
through the ice on Muddy river on 
January 16, 1934, the name of CSeorge 
T. Scott, aid to the Superintendent of 
Fire .Alarm, was inadvertently omitted. 
George T. Scott, aid to the Superin- 
tendent of Fire .Alarm, is hereby com- 
mended for the services rendered by him 
on this occasion when the dog was 
re.5cued from Muddy river. 

The Fire Conmiissioner is in receipt 
of the following letter from Blair's Fcod- 
land. Incorporated, in which appreciation 
is expiessed of the services rendered by 
the memtjers of this department at the 
fire, Box 2124, three alanr.s, Januarv 18, 
1934: 

Boston, Mass., January 19, 1934. 
Hon. Edward F. McLaughlin. 
Fire Commlsaioucr. 

Dear Sit:, — I wish to take this oppor- 
tunity in thanking the Tire Department 
for the splendid work which they did in 
protecting our fire here. Our loss would 
have been far greater hadn't it been for 
the men in your department. 

Will you Ivindly express to those n.en 
overcome by smoke and gas, my n.ost 
sincere thanks and I trust none of them 
will suffer any ill effects. 

It is only through the fine efforts of 
your departnent that our cit\- is .so well 
protected. 

Very truly yours, 

Blair'.s Foodland, Inc., 

by M. Burg, Prcsulent. 

Lieut. John J. McLane of Engine Con.- 
pany 41 is hereby commended for re- 
sponding to and working at fire, still 
alarm, 324 and 326 Washington street, 
Brighton, Januarv 17, 1934, while off 
duty. 

l^adderman Timothy .1. Donovan of 
Ladder Company 14 and Man on I'ro- 
bation Thomas .J. Kavanaugh of Engine 
Company 34 are hereby commended for 
responding to and working at fire. Box 
5217, second alarm, January 18, 1934, 
while off duty. 

]>adderman John J. Devine of Ladder 
Company 4 is hereby commended for 
responding to anil working at fire, Box 
2124, January 18, 1934, three alarms, 
while off duty. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Ei)\\ahd 
F. McLaughlin. 

Henry A. Fox, 

Chief of Department. 



LAND=TAKING IN HYDE PARK. 

The Mayor has approved the orders 
of the Board of Street Commissioners 
tor the taking of land for a ()ublic im- 
|)rovement consisting of the laying out 
and construction of Shirley road, Hyde 
Park district, as a highway, from Sunny- 
side street northwesterly, "with the name 
of Shubert street or some other dis- 
tinctive name substantially as shown on 
a plan in the office of this Board, that 
it intends to i)ass an order for making 
said improvement, and that it appoints 
eleven o'clock a. m., of December 28, 
1933, and the office of this Board as the 
time and place for a public hearing in 
the matter. 

A true copy of an order passed by said 
Board on said day. 

Attest : 

Cor.nelius .\. Reardon, 

Secretary. 

In Board of Street Commissioners 
OF THE City of Boston, 

Januarj' 19, 1934. 
Orderel, That this Board, having 
passed the order of notice relating to 
the public improvement hereinafter de- 
scribed, and having caused a copj' of 
said order to be published December 
15, 16, 1933, and December 18, 19, 1933, 
in the Boston Post and the Boston 
American, two daily newspapers pub- 
lished in the City of Boston, and having 
given the public hearing, notice of which 
was given in said order, and being of 
the opinion that public convenience so 
requires, does hereby order the making, 
in said city of the public improvement, 
shown on a plan, marked "Citj^ of 
Boston, Scribner Road, Hvile Park, 
November 1, 1933, William .1. Sullivan, 
Chief Engineer, Street Laying-Out De- 
partment" deposited in the office of the 
Street Laying-Out Department of said 
city, and named, bounded and described 
as follows: 

A highway named Scribner road is 
hereby laid out, northwesterly from 
Sunnyside street for a distance of ap- 
{)roximately one hundred and ninety- 
five feet, and ordered constructed, the 
cost thereof to be charged to Federal 
F'unds allocated under the Civil Works 
Administration program for Massachu- 
setts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is hounded 
and described as follows: 

Southeasterly by Sunnyside street, 
forty feet; southwesterly by the south- 
westerly line of said Scribner road as 
hereby laid out, one hundred ninety-four 
and 71-100 feet; northwesterly by the 
northwesterly line of said Scribner road 
as hereby laid out, forty feet; and north- 
easterly by the northeasterly line of said 
Scribner road as hereby laid out, one 
hundred ninety-four and 44-100 feet. 

No betterments are to be assessed for 
the making of the aforesaid improvement. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public imjjrovement, 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Scribner road (formerly Shirley 
road), Hj-de Park district, as a highway, 
northwesterly from Sunnyside street for a 
distance of one hundred and ninety-five 
feet, under the order of the Board of 
January 19, 1934, and awards no damages 
therefor. 



Jan. 27 



CITY RECORD 



87 



PROCEEDINGS OF SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 

Jan. 2, 1934. 

The meeting for organization of 
the School Committee of the City 
of Boston for the current munic- 
ipal year was held in the Ad- 
ministration Building, 15 Beacon 
Street, at 7:25 o'clock, P. M. 

Present: Messrs. Hurley, Lyons, 
Sullivan, and Tobin. 

The meeting was called to order 
by Mr. Joseph J. Hurley, the 
senior member. 

Mr. Hurley: This meeting was 
called for the purpose of or- 
ganizing the School Committee of 
the City of Boston for the current 
municipal year. We have just re- 
ceived word that Dr. Mackey, about 
an hour and a half ago, was 
called to perform an emergency 
operation, and we have been de- 
liberating as to what we should 
do. Under ordinary circumstances 
we would proceed notwithstanding 
the absence of a member, since 
we have a quorum. However, 
since this is the meeting for or- 
ganization, we feel that out of 
courtesy to the Doctor who has 
been unavoidably detained, we 
shoiUd adjourn. We have adequate 
precedent for the action as evi- 
denced by the minutes of the 
meeting of Jan. 7, 1929, when, be- 
cause of the absence of a member, 
postponement of action was agreed 
upon. Therefore, a motion to ad- 
journ this organization meeting, 
which has been called in ac- 
cordance with the law, now is in 
order. 

On motion of Mr. Tobin, it was 
VOTED, To adjourn to Wednes- 
day, Jan. 3, 1934, at 7 o'clock, P. M. 



Attest: 



ELLEN M. CRONIN, 

Secretary. 



Jan. 3, 1934. 

The adjourned meeting for or- 
ganization of the School Committee 
of the City of Boston for the cur- 
rent municipal year was held in 
the Administration Building, 15 
Beacon Street, at 7:14 o'clock P. M. 

Present: Messrs. Hurley, Lyons, 
Mackey, Sullivan and Tobin. 

The meeting was called to order 
by Mr. Joseph J. Hurley, the senior 
member. 

MEMBERS-ELECT OF SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE 

The following communication 
was received: 

City of Boston 

Board of Election Commissioners 

City Hall Annex 

Nov. 27, 1933. 
Miss Ellen M. Cronin, 
Secretary, School Committee, 
15 Beacon Street, Boston. 
Dear Madam: 

We certify that at the City Elec- 
tion held in the City of Boston on 
Nov. 7th, 1933, that for the choice 
of two members of the School 
Committee for the term of four 
years, that the following were 
elected to said office: 



Joseph V. Lyons, 666 Columbia 
Road. 

Frederick R. Sullivan, 6 Adams 
Street. 

Respectfully yours, 
Peter F. Tague, 
Helen A. Macdonald, 
Chas. T. Harding, 
Daniel H. Rose, 
Board of Election Commissioners. 
Placed on file. 



ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN 

The Committee proceeded to the 
election of a Chairman, and the 
Secretary was directed to call the 
roll 

The members as their names 
were called respectively stated 
that they voted as follows: 

For JOSEPH V. LYONS— Dr. 
Lyons — 1. 

For MAURICE J. TOBIN— 
Messrs. Mackey, Sullivan and 
Hurley— 3. 

For JOSEPH J. HURLEY— Mr. 
Tobin— 1 

On motion of Dr. Lyons, the 
election of Mr. Tobin as Chairman 
of the School Committee was de- 
clared unanimous and Mr. Tobin 
assumed the chair. 

Chairman: Gentlemen, T thank 
you with all my heart. I thank 
you for '.he nonor you do me and 
the tribute you have paid to my 
humble efforts in the school serv- 
ice. You have made me your 
Chairman for this year and that 
title has its responsibilities. Thi.« 
Chair has been occupied by some 
of our most illustrious and able 
nitizens, and it wlil be my aim to 
live up to the standards that hav 
been set here by my predecessors 
during the past twenty years. I 
intend to serve but one term. It 
is my belief that this honor should 
be rotated among the members of 
the Committee. After my year of 
service I know that the Commit- 
tee will select an able successor. 
The Committee is made up of 
young men this year. There is no 
woman on the Board. We are on 
trial. Our actions will be judged 
by many who will know we are 
doing what is good for the school 
children, but others will question 
our motives, not seeing the true 
facts that have caused us to take 
certain actions. If we curry pub- 
lic favor, we may ag^riandi/t our- 
selves but we will i-.n* fully serve 
the purpose foi wnich we were 
placed here. We have a para- 
mount responsibility which id 
above all others in our decision 
here, that one wnich is rnsasured 
by the test— is the proposed meas- 
ure good for the children? 

The School Committee has many 
weighty problems to dispo.se of dur- 
ing the coming year: 

1. The schooi luncheon problem 
is a matter most vitally affecting 
the health and well-being of the 
children in our system, particular- 
ly as it pertains to the intermediate 
schools where the ages of the pupils 
range from ten to fourteen years. 

2. I would like to see the Com- 
mittee take advantage of Mr. 
Shepard's outstanding offer to 
make available for our use addi- 
tional radio Jme. I recommend to 
the Committee a series of broad- 
casts covering the modern eco- 
nomic trend in relation to the old 



doctrines of economics that have 
been thrown into the discard dur- 
ing the past year; for example, in- 
dustry under the "laissez faire" 
theory as compared with industry 
under the N. R. A., and, also, the 
single monetary standard as com- 
pared with the proposed dual mone- 
tary standard — such a course would 
fill a much needed want at this 
particular time. 

3. I would like to see in- 
augurated on Beacon Hill legisla- 
tion that will permit us to ap- 
{ ropriate money for the proper 
rutfitting of athletic teams, now 
financed largely through sale of 
candy in the separate schools. The 
passage of this legislation would 
ensure that no pupil would be sub- 
ject to injury through a failure to 
have proper equipment. 

4. The Department has many 
pressing building requirements. In 
an endeavor to cooperate with thj 
new Mayor in his attempt to keep 
the tax rate within reasonable 
limits, I suggest to the Com- 
mittee for its consideration the 
financing of major projects from 
moneys raised within the City's 
debt limit. This method will re- 
quire the cooperation of the 
Mayor, and I think I can speak 
safely for the other members of 
the Committee that it is the sense 
ot this Committee that we will 
5now every cooperation to the new 
administration, and 1 have great 
confidence that we will receive tne 
same cooperation from that source. 

5. The members of the Commit- 
tee are faced tonight with the 
new Administration's plan to re- 
store the annual increment to the 
teaching service. Last year in the 
preparation of our budget, antici- 
pating the possibility of such action 
by the incoming Administration, 
the Committee made provision for 
the increment in the salary sched- 
ule for the school year 1934 up to 
August 31. Therefore, no action by 
this Committee is necessary and 
automatically the increments will 
be given to the teaching service as 
soon as the Mayor issues his offi- 
cial pronouncement. 

6. This is a question which has 
always been dear to my heart and 
something that I think the school 
service and the entire city could 
assist in clearing up: 

Designation of a council of 
teachers to approve acceptable 
motion pictures in conjunction 
with social agencies doing this 
work at the present time, their 
approved list to be issued monthly 
to the parents, taken home by the 
children. Thus gangland pictures, 
sex i'tories, and other improper 
pictures may be discouraged in a 
tangible way by listing only films 
which are not objectionable accord- 
ing to normal standards of morals. 
Parents will know that their chil- 
dren should not be permitted to 
attend unlisted pictures. While 
this i£. essentially a social problem, 
it IS up to the schools to assist in 
n.aintaining and improving the so- 
cial order by guarding its pupils 
from false standards of conduct 
and law observance. The old dime 
nv.vel was a blessing compared to 
the glorified gentlemen gangsters 
ana flaunting actresses our school 
children are being impressed with 
today. 



88 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 27 



In conclusion, let us work in 
harmony without sacrifice of per- 
sonal convictions; let us debate all 
our questions openly and honestly, 
without hard feelings. Our re- 
sponsibility is mutual; and our 
task is clear. 



RULES INVOLVING EXPENDI- 
TURE OF MONEY. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the Rules of 
the School Committee and the Reg- 
ulations of the Public Schools of 
last year which involve the expen- 
diture of money, are hereby 
adopted for the present year until 
otherwise ordered. 



RULES NOT INVOLVING EX- 
PENDITURE OF MONEY 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the Rules of 
the School Committee and the 
Regulations of the Public Schools 
of last year which do not involve 
the expenditure of money, are 
hereby adopted for the present 
year until otherwise ordered. 

ELECTION OF TREASURER 

The Committee proceeded to the 
election of a Treasurer of the Cor- 
poration. 

The Secretary was directed to 
call the roll, and the members as 
their names were called respective- 
ly voted as follows: 

For FREDERICK R. SULLI- 
VAN— Messrs. Hurley, Lyons, 
Mackey, and Tobin — 4. 

For JOSEPH J. HURLEY— Mr. 
Sullivan — 1. 

The Chairman declared Mr. 
Frederick R. Sullivan duly elected 
Treasurer of the Corporation. 

Mr. Sullivan: I wish to express 
my thanks for the action of the 
Committee in electing me Treasurer 
of the Corporation. It is my hope 
that during my term as Treasurer 
I shall live up to the high standards 
of my predecessors. 



COMMITTEE ON NAMING OF 
SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

The Chair announced the appoint- 
ment of Dr. Joseph V. Lyons as the 
Committee on Naming of School 
Buildings for the current school 
year. 

APPROVAL OF MINUTES 

The reading of the minutes of the 
meetings on Dec. 18, Dec. 28, 1933, 
and Jan. 2, 1934, was omitted, the 
Committee approving them as 
printed. 

RESIGNATIONS 

The following resignations, re- 
ported by the Superintendent, to 
take effect on the dates stated, 
were presented: 

Gilbert Stuart District — Ruth P. 
Coughlin, assistant, elementary, 
Dec. 22, 1933. 

Jefferson District — Dora F. Ros- 
engard, assistant, elementary, Dec. 
22, 1933. 



Solomon Lewenberg Interme- 
diate District — Frances B. McMor- 
row, assistant, intermediate, Dec. 
22, 1933. 

Washington AUston District — 
Lillian C. Aronson, Elizabeth F. 
Sheehan, assistants, elementary, 
Dec. 22, 1933. 

Accepted. 

(APPOINTMENTS) 

The following appointments by 
the Superintendent, certified by 
him as being in accordance with 
the rules and regulations, to take 
effect on the dates stated, were 
presented: 

(FROM THE ELIGIBLE LIST) 

(To fill vacancies caused by in- 
crease in numbers) 

Dorchester High School for Boys 
— Ralph O. Haglund, junior master, 
Jan. 29, 1934; John J. Lynch, junior 
master, Feb. 5, 1934; John T. Ryan, 
junior master, Feb. 1, 1934. 

Laid over. 

TEMPORARY SCHOOL NURSE 

Department of School Hygiene — 
Ruth E. McGinnis, temporary 
school nurse, Dec. 4, 1933. 

Approved. 

HOME INSTRUCTION OF PHYSICALLY 
HANDICAPPED CHILDREN 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 3, 1934, reporting that, 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
the following-named temporary 
teachers for home instruction of 
physically handicapped children, to 
take effect on the date stated: 

Mary C. Duffy, Ruth P. Kenyon, 
Jan. 8, 1934. 

Placed on file and the assign- 
ment approved, to take effect on 
the date stated. 

DESIGNATIONS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 3, 1934, reporting that 
he has made the following designa- 
tions of teachers to serve in the 
positions indicated until such time 
as they shall be filled otherwise 
in accordance with the rules and 
regulations, but not beyond Aug. 
31, 1934; 

Bigelow District — Ruth E. Min- 
ton, assistant, kindergarten, as 
acting first assistant, kindergarten 
(vice Elizabeth A. Lyons, absent on 
leave), Dec. 4, 1933. 

Grover Cleveland Intermediate 
District — Margaret M. Hosman, as- 
sistant, intermediate, as acting 
master's assistant (vice Annie G. 
Scollard, absent on leave), Dec. 4, 
1933. 

Mary E. Curley Intermediate 
District — Francis J. Lyons, sub- 
master, as acting master (vice 
John F. McGrath, absent on leave), 
Nov. 20 through Dec. 8, 1933, in- 
clusive. 

Placed on file. 



TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That during the 
current financial year, the Super- 
intendent is hereby authorized to 
employ such temporary and emer- 
gency secretaries, clerical assist- 
ants, and librarians in the schools 
as he may deem advisable. 



On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That during the 
current financial year, the Secre- 
tary IS hereby authorized to em- 
ploy such temporary assistance in 
the offices of the Superintendent 
and the Secretary, and at such 
compensation as she may deem 
advisable. 

EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS, 
APPROVAL OF SUMMARIZED 
REQUISITION ON CITY AUDI- 
TOR, AND OTHER ITEMS. 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Jan. 3, 1934, recommending 
the passage of the accompanying 
nine orders, as follows: 

ORDERED, That the contracts 
for semi-bituminous coal between 
the School Committee and the 
Brighton Coal Company, the Tre- 
mont Coal and Ice Company and 
the White Fuel Corporation, under 
dates of May 18, 1933, June 15. 
1933, and May 19, 1933, and provid- 
ing for the delivery of semi- 
bituminous coal from June 16, 
1933, to December 31, 1933, ar^ 
hereby continued to June 15, 1934. 
as provided for in Section 1 of the 
contracts. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for anthracite coal between the 
School Committee and the Com- 
momvealth Fuel Company, under 
date of May 16, 1933, and providing 
for the delivery of anthracite coal 
from June 16, 1933, to December 31. 
1933, is hereby continued to June 
15, 1934, as provided for in Section 
1 of the contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for heavy fuel oil between the 
School Committee and the Shell 
Eastern Petroleum Products, In- 
corporated, under date of June 14, 
1933, and providing for the delivery 
of oil from June 16, 1933 to De- 
cember 31, 1933, is hereby con- 
tinued to June 15, 1934, as provided 
for in Section 1 of the contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract for 
medium fuel oil between the School 
Committee and Arthur H. Bal- 
lard, Incorporated, under date of 
June 8, 1933, and providing for the 
delivery of oil from June 16, 1933. 
to December 31, 1933, is hereby 
continued to June 15, 1934, as pro- 
vided for in Section 1 of the con- 
tract. 

ORDERED, That the School 
Committee hereby acknowledge.' 
the valuable assistance rendered 
by the Sealer of Weights and Meas- 
ures in checking the weights of 
coal delivered by contractors in the 
several school buildings during the 
past year. 

ORDERED, That the School 
Committee hereby requests the 
Sealer of Weights and Measures to 
check the weights of coal to be 
delivered to the several school 
buildings during the current year. 

ORDERED, That the Business 
Manager is hereby authorized to 
employ such temporary assistance 
in his office and at the Supply 
Room, at such compensation as he 
may deem advisable, during the 
current financial year. 

ORDERED, That during the 
financial year 1934 any member of 
the School Committee is hereby 
authorized to approve the sum- 
marized requisitions on the City 
Auditor, prepared by the Busines.s 
Manager, and covering all vouch- 
ers, pay rolls and other documents 



Jan. 27 



CITY RECORD 



89 



calling for the expenditure of 
money, each of which having been 
previously approved in writing by 
the Business Manager as provided 
for in the statutes. 

ORDERED, That under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 231 of the Acts 
of 1932, J. George Herlihy, Assist- 
ant Business Manager, shall act as 
Business Manager, during the cur- 
rent financial year, only during 
the time that the Business Man- 
ager is absent or otherwise unable 
to act, and shall, during such 
time, exercise all the powers and 
perform all the duties of said 
Business Manager 

The communication was placed 
on file and the nine orders passed. 



RETIREMENT OF CUSTODIAN 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Jan. 3, 1934, report- 
ing the retirement from active serv- 
ice of the following-named member 
of the Boston Retirement System, 
to take effect on the date stated: 

John J. Smith, custodian, Henry 
L. Pierce Schoolhouse, Nov. 30, 1933. 

Placed on file. 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE TO CUS- 
TODIANS 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Jan. 3, 1934, recom- 
mending that the following-named 
custodians be granted leave of ab- 
sence on one-half net compensa- 
tion for the periods specified be- 
cause of personal illness: 

John P. Barton, custodian, W. L. 
P. Boardman Schoolhouse, Dec. 4 
to 10, 1933, inclusive. 

Joseph J. Ridge, custodian, Clinch 
Schoolhouse, Dec. 20 to 31, 1933. 

Placed on file and leave of ab- 
sence on one-half net compensation 
granted for the periods specified. 

The Committee adjourned. 

Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN, 

Secretary. 



PUBLIC DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1932. 

Gross funded debt, January 1, 1932, 
$160,320,800.96 (including 8139,999.96 is- 
sued by State for enlargement of Court 
House); sinking funds, $37,826,498.18; 
other redemption means, 83.140,11.5.26; 
net debt, $119,354,187.52 or $8,857,026.70 
more than on January 1, 1931. Of said 
net debt $72,121,369.12 or 60.43 per cent 
was City debt; $45,626,311.48 or 38.22 
per cent, Rapid Transit debt (represent- 
ing 4i per cent investment) ; 81,118,506.92 
or 0.94 per cent, County debt ; $488,000 or 
0.41 per cent, Water debt. 

Debt paid in 1931 was $8,273,300 but 
there was an increa-se in total gross debt 
of $7,664,700. 

Per cent of net debt to valuation, 
6.31; net debt per capita, S15I.66 (ap- 
prox.) ; net debt, exclusive of Rapid 
Transit debt, $73,727,876.04 or $93.68 per 
capita (approx.). 

Per capitas arc based on U. S. Census 
Bureau's estimated population on Janu- 
ary 1, 1932. 

Loans authorized but not issued (with- 
in debt limit), $1,664,.500; same outside 
of debt limit, S6,9%,500; total, $8,661 000. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY.) 

Fire Sekvice, Boston .\nd Metropolitan 
District, February 17, 1934. 

Last day for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 3, 1934, at 12 noon. 

Applicants for the service of Boston 
must be not less than twenty-two nor 
over thirty-five years of age at the time 
of filing application. Applicants for all 
other cities and towns in the Common- 
wealth must be not less than twenty-one 
nor over thirty-five years of age at the 
time of filing application. Callmen and 
substitute callmen may make such deduc- 
tions from their ages as are provided for 
in Civil Service Rule 8, Class 21. A 
certificate of date of birth must be filed 
with the application, unless one has been 
filed with a previous application. 

Applicants for Worcester are required 
to be not less than 5 feet 5 inches in 
height. Applicants for Brockton must 
be not less than 5 feet 6 inches in height, 
and weigh not less than 135 pounds at 
the time of appointment. Applicants for 
Winchester must be not less than 5 feet 
8 inches in height, and weigh not less 
than 135 pounds. Applicants for Lynn 
must be not less than 5 feet 5i inches 
in height, and weigh not less than 135 
pounds. 

The subjects of the examination with 
their respective weights will be as fol- 
lows: Training and experience, 3; prac- 
tical questions, 4; general information, 
3; total, 10. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination and strength tests. 

Educational test, 3; physical test, 2; 
total, 5. 

Applicants will be required to obtain 
at least 50 per cent in each subject of 
the examination and at least 70 per cent 
in the educational average and in the 
strength tests in order to become eligible. 

The practical questions will be based 
upon information contained in a manual 
known as the "Red Book." This manual 
may be obtained from the Secretary of 
State, Room 118, State House, at ten 
cents a copy. It is necessary that ap- 
plicants obtain a copy of this manual 
and study it carefully. 



POPULATION OF BOSTON. BY SEX, NA- 
TIVITY, ETC., 1930. 

Total population, 781,188 (383,454 
males and 397,734 females) ; ratio of 
males to females, 96.4 to 100 as against 
97.2 to 100 in 1920. Native white, 
529,400 (260,419 males and 268,981 fe- 
males) or 67.77 per cent; sex ratio, 96.8 
to 100. Of the 529,400 native whites, 
200,130, or 37.80 per cent, are of native 
parentage; 248,653, or 46.97 per cent, are 
of foreign parentage and 80,617, or 15.23 
per cent, are of mixed parentage (i. e., 
one half native). Foreign-born whites, 
229,356 (111,261 males and 118,095 fe- 
males) or 9,563 less than in 1920; sex 
ratio 94.2 to 100. The foreign-born 
whites are 29.36 per cent of total popula- 
tion. Negroes, 20,574 (10,223 males and 
10,351 females) or 2.63 per cent of popu- 
lation ; sex ratio, 98.8 to 100. The Negro 
population has increased 4,224 since 1920 
and 4,993 since 1915. Other races, 1,858 
(1,551 males and 307 females), or 0.24 
per cent, comprise 1,595 Chinese, 69 Jap- 
anese, 43 Indian, 26 Mexican and 125 
miscellaneous. Total foreign white 
stock, 478,009 (viz., 229,356 plus 248,653) 
which is 61.19 per cent of all inhabitants. 



MASSACHUSETTS CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMINATIONS. 

The Massachusetts Civil Service Com- 
mission announces examinations for 
desirable positions open in the Boston 
and Metropolitan districts as follows: 

Bookkeeper, Bcston Public Welfare 

Department, February 24, 1934. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 10, 1934, at 12 m. 

Salary: $1,000 per year. 

Duties: .\pplicants should have a knowl- 
edge of the kee{)ing of journal, general 
ledger, accounts receivable, and should 
be able to take trial balances of accounts 
and reconcile bank balances. Applicants 
should also have a knowledge of chapters 
117, 118, 118A and section 42 of chapter 
121 of the General Laws. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions on 
welfare laws, 2; bookkeeping, 5; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements: Applicants must 
obtain at least 70 per cent in each subject 
in order to become eligible. 

Dental Hyoienist, Boston Institu- 
tions Department, February 24, 
1934. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 10, 1934, at 12 m. 

Requisition is for a female, but the 
examination is open to both males and 
females. 

Salary: $1,200 per year and found. 
This position is at the Long Island 
Hospital. 

Duties: To a.ssist the dental surgeon 
at the dental clinic; to clean patients' 
teeth; make appointments and keep 
dental records; to give instructive talks 
to children on oral cleanliness and diet. 
Applicants should have a knowledge of 
anatomy, physiology, histology, hygiene, 
materia medica, anasthesia, and aseptic 
sterlization. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must be registered dental hygienists under 
the State Division of Registration in 
Dentistry. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 4; 
personality and fitness, as determined by 
an oral interview, 3; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements: Applicants must 
obtain at least 70 percent in each subject 
in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 



POPULATION OF UNITED STATES, NEW 
ENGLAND AND MASSACHUSETTS. 

Continental United States (i. e., 48 
states and the District of Columbia) in 
1930, 122,775,046; outlying possessions, 
14,233,389; total, 137,008,435; New Eng- 
land, 8,166,341; Massachusetts, 4,249,614 
or 52.(V4 per cent of New England and 
ranking eighth in the Union. In density 
of population Massachusetts ranks sec- 
ond, i. e., 528 per square mile of land, 
Rhode Island ranking first, with 644 per 
square mile of land. 

Population of the other New England 
States in 1930, ranking from the highest 
total: Connecticut, 1,606,903; Maine, 
797,423; Rhode Island, 687,497; New 
Hampshire, 465,293; Vermont, 359,611. 
Density for New England, 132 per sq. 
m.; for U. S. (48 states and the District 
of Columbia) 41 per sq. m. 

The population of the United States 
increased 16.1 per cent since 1920; that 
of New England 10.3 per cent and that 
of Massachusetts 10.3 per cent. 



90 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 27 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE FOR MASSA- 
CHUSETTS. 

Number of children 5 years old, 77,159, 
of whom 27,096, or 35.1 per cent, were at- 
tendinf!; school ; 6 years old, 77,629, of 
whom 64,919, or 83.6 per cent, were at- 
tending school; 7-13 years, 546,100, of 
whom 536,798, or 98.3 per cent, were 
attending school ; 14 and 15 j'ears, 151,181, 
of whom 140,387, or 92.9 i)er cent, were 
attending school; 16 and 17 j'ears, 147,- 
627, of whom 87,779, or 59.5 per cent, 
were attending school; 18-20 years, 213,- 
791, of whom 53,503, or 25.0 per cent, 
were attending school. Number of per- 
sons attending school who were 21 years 
of age and over was 47,029. 

Total number of bovs 5 to 20 years of 
age, 606,159, of whom 459,253, or 75.8 
per cent, were attending school; total 
number of girls 5 to 20 years of age, 
607,328, of whom 451,229, or 74.3 per cent, 
were attending school ; total children 5 
to 20 years old, 1,213,487, of whom 
910,482, or 75.0 per cent, were attending 
school. 



FOREIGN=BORN WHITES, 1930, WITH 
COUNTRY OF BIRTH. 

Total foreign-bom whites, 229,356 or 
9,563 less than in 1920. Bom in Ireland, 
50,381 (6,630 less than in 1920), 6,449 of 
these being bom in Northern Ireland; 
in Canada, 45,558 (3,550 increase) ; Italy, 
36,274 (1,905 decrease from 1920) ; Russia, 
31,359 (6,662 decrease); England, 10,316 
(2,092 decrease); Poland, 9,903 (2,253 
increase); Lithuania, 5,869; Scotland. 
5,637 (558 increase) ; Sweden, 5,432 (1,348 
decrease) ; Germany, 5,381 (534 de- 
crease) ; Greece, 3,416 (362 increase) ; 
all others, 19,830. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing and Delivering 
Toll Collection Equipment, Traffic 
Tunnel. 

The Transit Department of the City of 
Boston, 1 Beacon street, seventh floor, invites 
proposals from citizens of the United States 
and corporations or other legal associations 
wherein the controlling interest to the extent of 
at least one half thereof is ovi'ned by a citizen 
or citizens of the United States, for furnishing 
and delivering toll collection equipment for the 
Traffic Tunnel. A bond of an approved surety 
company will be required for the faithful 
performance of the contract in a sum of the 
total bid price. Proposals must be filled out 
and signed by the bidder on forms to be ob- 
tained at this office, inclosed in a sealed 
envelope, indorsed "Toll Collection Equipment, 
Traffic Tunnel," and delivered to the Depart- 
ment, or to its secretary, before 12 o'clock 
noon on Monday, February 5, 19.34, at which 
time and place they will be publicly opened 
and read. A properly certified check in the 
sum of one thousand (1,000) dollars, payable 
to the city, must accompany the proposal. 
This check shall become the property of the 
city if the contract is not executed by the 
bidder within the time prescribed after the 
date of the notification by the Department of 
the acceptance of the proposal and the readi- 
ness of the contract for signature. Proposals 
must be made in duplicate. The sealed dupli- 
cate, without check, is to be deposited by the 
bidder with the City Auditor, Room 20, City 
Hall, previous to the time named for opening 
the proposals. Plan, proposals, specifications 
and forms of contract may be obtained at this 
office on or after Tuesday, January 23, 1934. 
A deposit of $5, in cash or by certified check, 
will be refiuired for a plan and two sets 
of the specifications. Mutilation of them will 
be deemed sufficient cause for the forfeiture 
of said deposit. The Department reserves the 
right to reject any or all proposals. 

By order of the City of Boston Transit 
Department. 

Edward F. Condon, 

(Jan. 20-27.) Secretary. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing and Delivering 
Carbon Monoxide Analyzers and Re- 
corders, Traffic Tunnel. 

The Transit Department of the City of Bos- 
ton, 1 Beacon street, seventh floor, invites 
proposals from citizens of the United States 
and corporations or other legal associations 
wherein the controlling interest to the extent 
of at least one half thereof is owned by a 
citizen or citizens of the United States, for 
furnishing and delivering carbon monoxide 
analyzers and recorders for the Traffic Tunnel. 
A bond of an approved surety company will 
be required for the faithful performance of 
the contract in the sum of the total bid price. 
Proposals must be filled out and signed by 
the bidder on forms to be obtained at this 
office, inclosed in a sealed envelope, indorsed 
"Carbon Monoxide .\naiyzers. Traffic Tunnel," 
and delivered to the Department, or to its 
secretary, before 12 o'clock noon on Monday, 
February 5. 1934, at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and read. A 
properly certified check in the sum of five 
hundred (500) dollars, payable to the city, 
must accompany the proposal. This check 
shall become the property of the city 
if the contract is not executed by the 
bidder within the time prescribed after the 
date of notification by the Department of the 
acceptance of the proposal and the readiness 
of the contract for signature. Proposals must 
be made in duplicate. The sealed duplicate, 
without cheek, is to be deposited by the bidder 
with the City Auditor, Room 20, City Hall, 
previous to the time named for opening the 
proposals. Proposals, specifications and forms 
of contract may be obtained at this office on 
or after Tuesday, January 23, 1934. A de- 
posit of •?5, in cash or by certified check, will 
be required for two sets of specifications. 
Mutilation of them will be deemed sufficient 
cause for the forfeiture of said deposit. The 
Department reserves the right to reject any 
or all proposals. 

By ordei- of the City of Boston Transit 
Department. 

Edward F. Condon, 

(Jan. 27.) Secretary. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



PARK DEPARTMENT. 



Proposal for Furnishing Not More Than 
Six Double Teams and Not More Than 
Four Single-team Express Wagons, and 
Not More Than Five Five-ton Trucks, 
Whenever Required. 
Proposals on separate blanks obtained at 
the office of the Park Department, 33 Beacon 
street, Boston, for furnishing not more than 
six double teams and not more than four single- 
team express wagons, and not more than 
five five-ton trucks to be used during snow 
storms, etc., whenever required for a period 
of one year, with suitable drivers twenty years 
of age or older, signed by the bidder and left 
before 12 o'clock m. on Tuesday, January 30, 
1934, at said office, with a certified check for 
$200, payable to and to be the property of 
the city if the proposal is not carried out, 
will then and there be publicly opened and 
read. The successful bidder must furnish a 
bond for $3,000 as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract. A duplicate 
proposal, without check, must be deposited 
with the City Auditor previous to the time 
named for opening the proposals. Before an 
award is made of this contract, the Commis- 
sioners will insist upon an examination of the 
stock and equipment of each bidder and a 
report of the same must be made by a 
veterinarian assigned for this purpose. The 
Commissioners reserve the right to reject any 
part of or all proposals. 

William P. Long, Chairman, 
Theodore C. Haffenrbffer, 
John J. Martin, 
(Jan. 20-27. ) Commissioners. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Notice to Bidders on Two-Way Radio 

Telephone System. 
The date set for opening of proposals to 
provide and install a two-way radio telephone 
system for the Police Department of the 
City of Boston has been extended from 12 
o'clock noon of January 29, 1934, to Thursday, 
February 1, 1934, at 12 o'clock noon. 
By order of 

Eugene C. Hultman, 
(Jan. 27.) Police Commissioner. 



READVERTISEMENT. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEP.\RTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Rubber Coats to 
the Fire Department. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishinir to the 
Fire Department, Bristol street, rubber coats, 
as per specifications to be obtained at the 
Supply Department. Room 801, City Hall 
Annex. There ivill be a charge of twenty 
cents ($0.20) for each set of blank proposals 
taken out. Delivery to be made as required. 
The bidder must use the form of proposal to 
be obtained at said office, and the successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
the total amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract, in case the amount of the 
contract awarded aggregates $2,000 or more. 
Bids, with a certified check for $200, payable 
to and to become the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried cut, 
must be left at the office of the Superintendent 
of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall Annex, before 
12 m., Monday, February 5, 1934, at which 
time and place the bids will be publicly opened 
and read. A duplicate bid, without check, 
must be left at the office of the City Auditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. 
The Superintendent reserves the right to ac- 
cept or reject any or all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. All 
contracts made subject to appropriations to 
meet payments thereunder. 

Warren W. Loomis. 

(Jan. 27.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



LISTING BOARD. 



Proposals for Performance of Work in 
Connection with the Listing of Resi- 
dents Twenty Y'eabs of Age or Over for 
THE Year 1934. 

The Listing Board for the City of Boston in- 
vites proposals for the performance of the work 
and to furnish the material in connection with 
the work of listing the residents of Boston, be- 
ginning April 1. 1934. The bidder must use the 
form of the proposal to be obtained at the office 
of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street. 
Boston, and deposit with his bid, at the office of 
the Police Commissioner, a properly certified 
check for $1,000, payable to and to become the 
property of the Listing Board for the City 
of Boston, if the proposal is not carried out. 
Proposals will be publicly opened and read on 
Thursday. February 1, 1934, at 4.30 o'clock 
p. m. at the office of the Police Commissioner, 
154 Berkeley street, Boston. The Listing 
Board reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all proposals, or any part of a pro- 
posal and to award the contract as it deems for 
the best interest of the Listing Board of the 
City of Boston. Surety bond will be required 
from the successful bidder in an amount equiv- 
alent to 25 per cent of the estimated contract 
amount. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 
Peter F. Tague, 
Listing Board of the City of Boston. 

(Jan. 27.) 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Tires and Tubes. 
The Police Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing and delivering 
tires and tubes. The bidder must use the form 
of proposal to be obtained at the office of the 
Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, Boston, 
and deposit with his bid, at the office of the 
Police Commissioner, a properly certified check 
for $100. payable to and to become the prop- 
erty of the Police Commissioner for the City 
of Boston, if the proposal is not carried out. 
Proposals will be publicly opened and read on 
Wednesday, February 7, 1934, at 12 o'clock 
noon, at the office of the Police Commissioner, 
154 Berkeley street, Boston, Mass. The Police 
Commissioner reserves the right to accept or 
reject any or all proposals, or any part of a 
proposal, and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the Police 
Department of the City of Boston. Surety 
bond will be required from the successful bid- 
der in an amount equivalent to 50 per cent of 
the estimated contract amount. 



(Jan. 27.) 



Eugene C. Hultman, 
Police Commissioner. 



Jan. 27 



CITY RECORD 



91 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Monday. January 22, 1934. 
Regular meeting of the City Council in the 
Council Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m.. President 
DOWD in the chair and all the members present. 



COMMITTEE .APPOINTMENTS. 

President DOWD announced the folIowinK 
conimttee appointments: 

Conmiittee on .Appropriations, Norton, .Shattuck, 
.\gnew, Roberts, Gallagher, Tobin, .Selvitella. 

Committee on Claims: Brackman, Selvitella, 
.\gnew, Roberts, Goldman. 

Committee on County Accounte: Fitzgerald, 
Green, Fish, Norton, Tobin. 

Executive Committee: Wilson and all members. 

Committee on Finance: Green, Shattuck, Fitz- 
gerald, Wilson, Brackman, McGrath, Kerrigan. 

Committee on Prisons: Gleason, Donovan, 
Doherty, Murray, Finey. 

Committee on Public Lands; Donovan, Englert, 
Agnew, Brackman, McGrath. 

Committee on Rules: Wilson, Gallagher, Roberts, 
Green, .McGrath. ,„,.,,.. xr . 

Committee on .Soldiers Relief: Kerrigan, Norton, 
Donovan, Gleason, Doherty. 

Committee on Parks and Playgrounds: Finlcy, 
Tobin. Goldman, Kerrigan, Englert. 

Commttee on Public Safety: Agnew, Selvitella, 
Green, Fitzgerald, Donovan, Englert, Brackman. 

Committee on .litney Licenses; Roberts, Selvi- 
tella, Murray, Fish, Kerrigan. 

Committee on Legislative Matters: shattuck, 
Fitzgerald, Green, Gleason, Tobin. 

Committee on Ordinances: Fish, Gleason, 
Donovan, Englert, Finley, Tobin, SeU-itella. 

Committee on Parkman Fund: Gallagher, 
-Murray, Doherty, Goldman. Shattuck. 

Committee on Printing: Englert, Finley, Murray, 
Kerrigan. .Selvitella. 

Committee on Unclaimed Baggage: Fitzgerald, 
Wilson. .McGrath. 

Committee on Hospitals: Doherty, Murray, 
Fish, Kerrigan, Finley. 

Committee on Constables: Goldman, .\gnew, 
Roberts. , , , . , . , . --. . . 

Committee on Municipal Lighting: McGrath, 
Norton, Brackman, Gallagher, Wilson. 



APPOINT.MENT BY THE MAYOR. 

Subject to confirmation by the Council, the 
Mayor submitted the following appointment for 
the term ending .\pril :!0. 1!>:U, viz.: 

Weigher of Coal: John W. Long, 770 Broadway, 
South Boston. 

Laid over a week under the law. . 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

The following petitions were received and 
rcferretl to the committees named, viz.: 

Claims. 

.Vcme .\ppliance Company, for compensation 
for damage to property at 120 High street, caused 
by bursting of water supply system. 

Gardner Bates, for compen-xatioii for damage to 
property at IH School street, Charlestown, caused 
by sanitary truck. 

Berraan & Co., Inc., to be reimbursed for 
expenses incurre<l in repairing plumbing at 11 
North .Market street. 

Laura B. Bigelow, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an allege<i defect at 159 Washington 

.Alfred Brenci, for refund on beer license. 

Charlestown Taxi Service, for compensation for 
damage to car by city cart. 

Katherine .\L Hartnett, for compensation for 
injuries caused by an alleged defect at 73 Birch- 
wood street. 

William J. Johnson, for compensation for dam- 
age to car by sanitary wagon. 

Nathan Kantrovitz, for compensation for dam- 
age to property at T.i Ruggles street, causetl by 
city truck breakng hydrant. 

Ruth Kozol, for compensation for injuries caused 
by an alleged defect at 2:58-246 South Huntington 
avenue. 

Betty .Starrett and Newell .Madcr, for compen- 
sation for injuries caused by city car. 

T. C. Marshalsea, for compensation for damage 
to property at 2H Partridge street. West Roxbury , 
causetf by blasting. 

Grace L. .McDermott, for compensation for 
damage to car caused by an alleged defect at 
Charles street and Embankment road. 

Samuel Miller, for compensation for damage to 
property at 77 Ruggles street, caused by broken 
nycfrant. . . 

Mary L. Nolan, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect in Foster street, 
Brighton. 

Alexander O'Kane, for wife, for compensation 
for injuries caused by an alleged defect in front of 
courthouse. West Roxbury. 

James H. Queeney, for refund on liquor license. 

Jacob Shapiro, for compensation for damage to 
car by city truck. 



Joseph V. Sheerin, for compensation for damage 
to car caused by an allege<l defect in Cummins 
Highway. 

.Arthur L. Smith, for compensation for injuries 
caused by city truck. 

Donald F. Whedon, for compensation for dam- 
age to car by ambulance of Public Buildings De- 
partment. 

.Andrew Sansone, for compensation for loss of 
fishing net, etc., while aiding in recovery of boy 
who was drowned at World War Memorial Park. 



CHILDREN APPEARING IN PUBLIC. 

.A petition was received for children under 
fifteen years of age to appear at places of public 
amusement, viz.: 

Ruth M. .McShane, Gate of Heaven Hall, 
February 9. The rule was suspended, and leave 
was granted under the usual conditions. 



MINORS' LICENSES. 

Petitions were presented of eighty-four newsboys 
and four bootblacks for licenses. 

.Approved by the Council under the usual 
conditions. 



APPOINTMENTS BY THE MAYOR. . 

Notices were received of the following appoint- 
ments by the Mayor: 

Colonel Frederic A. Washburn, M. D., of 190 
Bay State road. Institutions Commissioner, 
effective March 1. 19:54. 

William P. Hickey of 485 East First street. 
South Boston, Traffic Commissioner, to take the 
place of Joseph -A. Conry, resignefl, effective 
January l.S. 

David B. .Shaw of 101 Nottinghillroad, Brighton, 
to be principal assessor, to take the place of 
Henry L. Daily, resigne<l, effective January IN. 

Warren W. Loomis of K15 Webster street, 
Needhani, to be Superintendent of Supplies, to 
take the place of Philip A. Chapman, re8igne<l, 
effective January 2:5. 

.Arthur V. Sullivan of 59 Elm street, Charles- 
town, to be Transit Commissioner, to take the 
place of .Arthur B. Corbett, resigned, effective 
January 17. 

Severally placed on 61e. 



ORGANIZ.ATION OF SINKING FUNDS 
COM.MISSION. 

Notice was receive<I of the organization of the 
Boar<l of Commissioners of .Sinking Funds by the 
election of Eliot Wadsworth to be chairman and 
Rupert S. Car%-en to be secretary. 

Placed on file. 



PRINTING OF MUNICIPAL 
REGISTER, ETC. 

Couii. ENGLERT offerefl the following: 
Ordere<l, That the Statistics Department be 
authorized under the direction of the Committee 
on Rules to prepare an<l have printefl the Municipal 
Register for the current year; and that the ("lerk 
of Committees be authorized to prepare and have 
printed a pocket edition of the organization of the 
city government; the expense of said register and 
organization to be charge<l to the appropriation 
for City Documents. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



REINSTATEMENT OF MICHAEL 
McCORMACK. 

Coun. FISH offerc<l the following; 

Resolved, That the Cily Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation to 
authorize the reinstatement of Michael McCor- 
niack in the Police Department. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



INFORM.ATION REQUESTED OF WELFARE 
OVERSEERS. 

Coun. SH.ATTUCK offered the following; 

Ordered, That the Board of Overseers of Public 
Welfare be re(|ueste<l, through his Honor t)ie 
Mayor, to furnish the City Council with the 
following information: , , , 

1 Monthly expenditures of the <iepartment for 
(a) care of dependents, (b) mothers' aid and 
(c) old age assistance, during the years 19:52 and 
1933 

2. Monthly case load in 19.32 and 1933 for 
(a), (b) and (c) above. 

3. Number of recipients taken from dependent 
aid rolls to be employed in the Civilian Conserva- 
tion Corps. 

4 Number of recipients taken from aepenclcnt 
aid rolls to be employed on Civil Works projects. 

5. The schedule of rent allowances to recipients, 
and the (manner in which the payment of such 
allowances for rent is checked. 



(). The methods by which the department 
attempts to determine private emplo.vmeut of 
recipients or refusal of recipients to accept such 
employment. 

7. Tlie methods by which the department 
attempts to secure private employment for 
recipients. 

8. The basis of allowances made to recipients, 
and the means employed by the department to 
assure the expenditure of allowances to recipients 
in accordance with the specific allocation to food, 
fuel, clothing and other purposes. 

'.). The types of supplies purchased by the 
department for recipients and the manner in which 
such purchases are made, inspected and distributed! 

10. The improvements made and contem- 
plated by the department in its case and financial 
record systems. 

Ordered, That the Board of Overseers of Public 
Welfare be re(|uested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to furnish the City Council monthly, 
as soon as may be after the end of each month, 
beginning with the month of January, the follow- 
ing statistical information: 

1. The case load at the end of the month. 

2. The number of recipients of aid dropped 
from the rolls during the month. 

3. The number of recipients of aid added to 
the rolls during the month. 

4. The expenditure for the month for (a) care 
of dependents, (b) mothers' aid and (c) old age 
assistance. 

Coun. SHATTUCK— Mr. President, these are 
companion orders on the same subject matter. 
One asks for information concerning the past and 
the other for monthly information in the future. 
I should like for a moment to run over tlie items 
in the first order, asking for past information. The 
first two items call for the monthy expenditures of 
the department for care of dependents, mothers' 
aid and old age assistance, during the years 1932 
and 1933. and for the monthly case load in 1932 
and 1933 in these lines. On those matters we have 
only piecemeal information, when the annual re- 
ports come in, and they arrive so long after the 
event that thcv are of no great value. The third 
item asks for the number of recipients taken from 
dependent aid rolls to be employed in the Civilian 
Conservation Corps, and the fourth item for the 
number of recipients taken from dependent aid 
rolls to be employed on Civil Works projects. 
Last winter, during the peak of unemployment, 
neither of these enterprises was under way. except 
that I think the Conservation Corps had begun 
to function in a very small degree. But there 
have been many things done at the expense of the 
Federal Government and in other ways, through 
the N. R. -A., which have brought of about a 
large increase of employment and of aid from 
various sources, and yet that has been very 
slightl.v reflected, so far as one can see. in tlie 
monthly expense or the number of persons on the 
rolls of our public welfare. I think we should 
have those facts in order that we may see how 
things are going. Item 5 relates to the schedule of 
rent allowances to recipients, and the manner in 
which the payment of such allowances for rent is 
checked. I hear a great many complaints from 
landlords that they cannot pay their taxes, and 
that they cannot pay their taxes because they 
cannot collect their rents. If people are paid 
money for rent, does it go through for that pur- 
pose'? .And under Item (i. "The methods by whidi 
the department attempts to determine private 
employment of recipients or refusal of recipients 
to accept such employment" — that matter is 
exceedingly important at the present time, when 
there is increasing private employment, increasing 
use of public money in C. W. A. and other ways. 
Are these many people getting off the welfare rolls 
when they shouUi get off? That is a question that 
requires much greater study and more care than 
when unemployment was increasing and it couhl 
be almost assumed that a person did not have a job. 
Then there is the seventh item, information as to 
the methods by which the department attempts 
to secure private employment for recipients. 
.Also, under tlie eighth item, the extent to which 
the department knows whether the money is spent 
for the food, clothing, shelter, and so forth, for 
which it is given. Item 9 asks about the types 
of supplies purchased by the department for 
recipients and the manner in which such pur- 
chases arc made, inspected and <li8tributed. 
Probably one of the greatest lacks in the past has 
liccn a check-up in the matter of the purchasing of 
supplies — for instance, where there have been 
purchases from "phony" dealers, who have then gone 
to real dealers and obtained a reduced price of 
perhaps 50 per cent, or have given list prices when 
they could buy at wholesale rates, thus deceiving 
ill all sorts of ways. How does the Department 
of Public Welfare handle those matters".' .And 
finally, what improvement has the department 
made, and what does it contemplate, in its case 
and financial record system'? The second order, 
as I have said, simply covers the furnishing of 
monthly statistics as to the amount of money 
being spent, the number of people on the rolls, the 
number of ijeople taken from the rolls and the 
number a<Itled during the month. This informa- 
tion, Mr. President, is very similar to that asked 
for in a letter which I wrote to the Department 
of Public W'elfare on the fifth day of IJecember 
last, and of which letter, Mr. President. I have 
not even had an acknowledgment. That in itself 
indicates the high degree of efficiency in that 
department. I am not critical of the good in- 



92 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 27 



tentions of the members of the Board. So far ae 
1 know, they are conscientious men and women. 
I am not critical of Mr. McCarthy, the executive 
8ecretar>'. He is doubtless doing his best under a 
heavy load. I do criticize the system; and I 
criticize the Board for not seeing the need of a 
change in system, and for obstructive tactics 
whenever changes have been suggested. The 
system may have worked well enough when the 
Board was spending one or two millions a year. 
Now that the expenditures run to over a million 
a month, the system has completely broken down. 
This breakdown is particularly serious at the 
present time, a time of recovery, when every case 
should receive special scrutiny, and when the 
rolls should be rapidly reduced and promptly 
purged of those who no longer require aia, or who 
could help themselves if they had the will to do it. 
Control should be placed in the hands of a single 
and highly competent executive. A bill has been 
filed by the Mayor to permit such a reorganization. 
It should have the support of the Legislature, and 
that without delay. Prompt action is imperative. 
The malady which afflicts Boston and so many of 
our other cities and towns is curable. But it 
cannot be cured with a leaky system of expendi- 
tures. We must stop the leaks. Fortunately, we 
do not need to wait for legislation to obtain the 
information requested in the pending order. We 
should have it forthwith, and hereafter we should 
have monthly reports. My second order is to 
provide for these monthly reports. 

Coun. McGRATH— Mr. President, I think the 
gentleman from Ward 5 (Coun. Shattuck) is to 
be congratulated upon starting out on this very 
precarious course of daring to request of the 
Public Welfare Department information which 
is of vital importance to the citizens of Boston. 
I had no idea that he was going to introduce such 
an order, but I did know that when he intro- 
duced an order it would be in proper shape, as is 
the order which he has introduced today. Might 
I congratulate him, too, for his courage, because 
some seven years ago I stood on the floor of this 
Council, when the appropriation for public wel- 
fare had passed the one million dollar mark, and 
suggested that the time had arrived when we 
should pay some attention to the situation in the 
Public Welfare Department in Boston. Through 
the years we have seen those expenditures increase, 
and week after week I became almost a crank in 
asking information from the Welfare Department 
of the City of Boston, failing to get it, and then 
being told that I was baiting the poor and that 
the recipients of welfare were entitled to protec- 
tion rather than to criticism. And so it continued 
on, and the amount expended each month in- 
creased until a year ago, in this Council Chamber, 
at a meeting of the Committee on Appropriations, 
there sat before us Mr. Hecht, the chairman of 
the Board, and Mr. McCarthy, the secretary, 
and sitting at this table were Mr. Lydon, the Sol- 
diers' Relief Commissioner, and Mr. Kent, and 
upon our in\4tation there was sitting at another 
table the Corporation Counsel of Boston, Mr. 
Silverman. Upon questioning these gentlemen, 
for the first time Mr. Silverman learned to his 
astonishment that even the recipients of soldiers' 
relief in the City of Boston were never compared 
with the recipients of jwelfare from the same 
City of Boston. I questioned him on two specific 
cases where a man was receiving the full amount 
for his wife and children from the Soliders' Relief 
Department and the wife of that family was receiv- 
ing the full amount from the Public Welfare De- 
partment. I had been prompted to make a fight 
of this character because hundreds of men in 
the Dorchester section, who had spent their life- 
times attempting to buy a home and to place a 
roof over the heads of their little families, had 
had their roof trees swept away through taxation 
because of the number of fakirs who were on the 
public welfare rolls and on the rolls of the soldiers' 
relief. And when the time had arrived that 
practically every department of Boston had 
decreased its expenditures and that 18,000 city 
employees had to have their salaries cut, when 
the time had come that hundreds of faithful citi- 
zens were being threatened with loss of their 
homes because of the increase in the Public Wel- 
fare and Soldiers' Relief Departments, I felt that 
it was within the province of the Council to ask 
questions. There was a period of seven months 
when I could not get an answer of any kind from 
the Public Welfare Department, because there was 
no answer to be given. One day I appeared in 
this Council with a book from the Family Wel- 
fare Association, a private association at 43 
Tremont street, which thanked the Public Welfare 
Department of Boston for giving them this volumi- 
nous information, and said that in the past two 
months thay had had seven conferences with the 
Public Welfare officials, as a result of which they 
had obtained every bit of information that we had 
so long asked for. And then I started after a 
precinct arrangement, so that we could get away 
from these generalities arising from the fact 
that the Welfare Department gave out relief 
from the Winthrop line to the Dedham line and 
it was impossible to tell where the cancer spot of 
Boston really was. So I felt that it would be better 
to divide the thing into precincts. I followed the 
Board into the room across the hall, where Mayor 
Curley presided, and I asked Mr. Hecht what his 
appropriations were up to that time for the year. 
It seemed that his figures were a million out of 
the way. Later on, when his Honor the Mayor 
was aw"ay, I carried on an mvestigation, the re- 
sults of which appeared in the Boston papers from 



time to time, and although they said they had 
every single case in their files, it appeared that 
some of the cases had not been turned over and 
that they were 7,000 cases short. They laughed 
it away, but finally there passed through this 
Council an order which established upstairs, under 
Mr. Balfe of the Statistics Department, a listing 
of the City of Boston habitations, and the out- 
come was astounding. It was found that quite 
a number of people who were on Boston welfare 
were driving cars for pleasure; that in some in- 
stances there were fathers of families receiving aid 
who had a daughter and a son at home, each one 
of whom was driving an automobile for pleasure. 
It was found that people owning homes free and 
clear were yet receiving public welfare. When I 
gathered together these cases from Mr. Balfe, I 
turned them over to Corporation Counsel Silver- 
man and he turned them over to his investigators, 
and as a result of what they found in some thirty 
cases Corporation Counsel Silverman called a 
meeting in the Mayor's office, over which I pre- 
sided, and then something happened. Cases that 
had been found to be wrong suddenly became 
white as snow. For instance, there was a case in 
Dorchester — indeed in my own ward — where the 
landlady owning a home said that in the fourteen 
years she owned that home there never was a 
person of the name given as one recei\-ing aid from 
that home, who had lived there. Every few 
months some lady called and inquired about 
this family, and each time this landlady became 
very indignant and said there was never such a 
family living there. I was interested then in the 
visitor's report, — what had the visitor said about 
this particular case? Well, unfortunately the 
entire records had been lost, and Mr. Silver- 
man said. "Why investigate that case further?" 
We had another case at the South End where 
they said the thing could not go wrong because 
they were sending checks. "Well, who cashed 
the checks?" There was a little corner grocer 
who cashed them every week. They went into a 
place on Tremont street and inquired in regard to 
this particular recipient of aid. and the landlady 
said, "I never heard of her. As a matter of fact, 
over on .\ppleton street I own another house." 
But in that house there was no recipient of that 
name. Well, nothing was cleared up in an inves- 
tigation of that case for months. IJut peculiarly 
enough on the morning of the day when we held 
the last meeting downstairs, and when prac- 
tically every case under consideration had been 
investigated, although it was supposed to be a 
secret report, what did they find out from that 
landladj'? It seemed, although she had not pre- 
viously furnished the information, that she owned 
an additional house on Gray street, and the per- 
on receiving aid lived there. I also found that 
there were over one hundred men, voters in the 
City of Boston and receiving aid, who were sign- 
ing with a cross. There was a number of cases 
where people owned their own real estate, owned 
it free and clear, and yet they were recei%'ing aid. 
I merely say this, not wishing to prolong this 
debate unnecessarily, that, although there may not 
seem to be one plausible or reasonable answer to any 
particular question that the gentleman from 
Ward 5 (Coun. Shattuck) has asked, Walter Mc- 
Carthy can find 150 answers for every one. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, it is very 
encouraging to have the councilor from Ward 5 
(Coun. Shattuck) enlist his efforts in support of 
something that the members of the Council have 
attempted to remedy for the last four years. It is 
rather astounding that Cleveland, with over 
100.000 more population than Boston's 700.000, 
and that Baltimore, with 20.000 more people than 
Boston, are spending a much smaller amount than 
we are for welfare, an amount so small as to be 
entirely out of all proportion to our relative 
populations. No one. of course, wants anybody 
in Boston to go hungry or to go without aid. but 
the trouble seems to be that many are getting aid 
who should not get it and that many have not 
obtained aid who should get it. The trouble 
fundamentally has been this. We have 130.000- 
odd people at the present time living off the City 
of Boston, and yet we have less than sixty in- 
vestigators. In my ward alone there are hundreds 
of families who have needed aid and who have 
found great difficulty in obtaining it. The trouble 
has been largely one of administration. We have 
tried to have something done, and have the whole 
thing handled in a proper way, and nothing has 
been done. The moment objections have been 
raised, as the colleague from Dorchester has 
brought out, there were 150 answers. There has 
been opposition encountered all along the line. 
The colleague has just spoken of the diflSculty he 
had when he was .Acting Mayor of Boston in 
attempting to accomplish something, and being 
unable to do so. The group in power were able to 
stand off any remedial legislation or to prevent any 
order that might go through this body being put 
into effect. So it is encouraging to have the 
colleague from the Back Bay enlist in this cause. 
I hope, Mr. Shattuck, you will look carefully into 
this matter and if you do. I think you will realize 
the necessity of decentralizing the Welfare Depart- 
ment. There is no other welfare department in 
the country, I understand, that is not decentral- 
ized. The Boston Council of Social .Agencies in 
their report recommend decentralization, and I 
believe every other welfare agency will recom- 
mend decentralization of welfare work in the City 
of Boston. 'Take the case of a man in Hyde Park, 
who received S5 a week and who w-as compelled, 
in going back and forth between his home and the 



woodyard three times a week, to pay 60 cente 
carfare, thus receiving a mere pittance for food or 
for other things he might require. WTiy shouldn't 
that situation be handled all over the city from the 
municipal buildings? For three years I carried on 
this fight in connection with the public welfare 
system and was told that it could not be done, 
that I was a layman and did not understand the 
intricacies of the department, and that, therefore. 
I should not even make a suggestion. Chairman 
Hecht became quite irate in the matter on several 
occasions, when any councilor was presumptuous 
enought to offer suggestions. But the suggestion 
I offered in respect to decentralization was one that 
had been put into effect by the leading welfare 
authorities of the United States, and one that was 
also recommended by welfare authorities in 
Boston. I asked the former Mayor why he did 
not insist on decentralization, having the distri- 
bution carried on from municipal buildings or 
convenient points — in Charlestown, for in- 
stance. East Boston. Roxbur>-, South Boston. West 
Roxbury, Roslindale, Brighton; why he did not 
have the cumbersome, inefficient and unscientific 
system that was in vogue abolished, and have the 
work taken over in the different localities in some 
suitably located building. His answer was, "I 
have asked them down there time and time again 
to consider it, but they tell me it is impossible." 
We will never have a proper Welfare Department, 
in my humble estimation, until we have decentrali- 
zation, having the work handled from points in 
different sections of the City of Boston. There 
seems to be no earthly or proper reason why people 
from Dorchester, Hyde Park, Roshndale, West 
Roxbury, and other outljnng sections, should be 
compelled to either walk or travel down to this 
building now serving as headquarters for the 
department. They should be able locally and 
conventiently to put in their applications and have 
a report within forty-eight hours on their case. 
I have spoken of what the situation was in Hyde 
Park. A short time ago an arrangement was 
made so that the people of Hyde Park do not have 
to go to Hawkins Street, but the situation is 
handled locally there in the Hyde Park Municipal 
Building. That, however, is at the present time 
the only ward in Boston at some distance from the 
downtown section where unfortunates are not 
compelled when they are looking for welfare to go 
to Hawkins Street. If that arrangement can be 
made in Ward 18, why cannot it be made in every 
other ward of Boston with the exception of the 
ward where Hawkins Street is located? So, Mr. 
President, it is encouraging in this long battle 
which has been going on for so many years, to 
have the colleague from the Back Bay section 
taking an interest in the Welfare Department, 
with a veiw to cutting down the expenses of the 
City of Boston and administering aid in a more 
up-to-date and satisfactory way. I am sure that 
we will all wlecome a better system for handling 
the feeding, clothing and housing of the worthy 
unfortunates in our city. 

The orders were passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



EMPLOYMENT OF CITIZENS IN EAST 
BOSTON TUNNEL. 

Coun. SELVITELLA offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Boston Transit Commission 
be requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to 
confer with the C. M. Tyler Company with refer- 
ence to giving citizens of Boston preference in 
employment on tiling work to be done in the East 
Boston Traffic Tunnel. 

Coun. SELVITELL.A.— Mr. President, the C. 
M. Tvler Company have been awarded the con- 
tract, in the sum of $166,000, for the tiUng of the 
traffic tunnel to East Boston. The contract covers 
work for a period of six solid months. The con- 
tractor has already made arrangements and 
preparations are now going on whereby men from 
SomervUle, Cambridge, Chelsea and other munici- 
palities outside of Boston are being given pref- 
erence in work that properly belongs to residents 
of Boston. Under the terms of this contract. 
Article 6. there is a clause which reads that no 
person other than a citizen of the United States 
shall be employed on any public works being done 
under contract. I raise a serious question. Mr. 
President, as to the merits of that particular clause, 
because under its terms men from Kalamazoo, 
from California, from other parts of the United 
States, may come into Boston and be given work 
that properly belongs to the residents of Boston. 
We had a very unpleasant experience at the begin- 
ning of the building of this tunnel, when but 30 
per cent of residents of Boston were given work 
and 70 per cent was given to southerners who 
were flocking into Boston and taking work away 
from our citizens. At the present time, while I 
am speaking, there are over eight tile setters on 
the public welfare rolls who could very easily be 
taken off those rolls and given work, men who are 
deserving and in very needy circumstances, to 
say nothing of a large number of other men in the 
City of Boston who could do that work and should 
be placed upon it. I believe the Mayor of Boston 
and the Transit Commission will, if the matter is 
called to their attention, be glad to see that local 
work is given to local men, rather than to men 
from these other municipalities that I have men- 
tioned. I think it is fair and proper that something 
should be given to relieve the very acute conditions 
here in Boston, giving work to our needy citizens 
and residents. 



Jan. 27 



CITY RECORD 



03 



Coun. NORTON — Mr. President. I am afraid 
that nothing will be done. You are opposing a 
very powerful organization. I went before the 
Boston Finance Commission in regard to the con- 
tern you have mentioned. Every reputable tile 
concern in Boston bid on that work, and every 
concern went before the Finance Commission and 
said they felt that they had been fooled because of 
a very jiiisleading term in the specifications as 
drawn up. It is a very interesting case. The 
leading tile men of Boston were asked to bid on 
the tiling of the tunnel, which should have a certain 
amount of evaporation and of tensile strength. 
When the specifications were drawn up. they were 
so drawn up that terra cotta could meet the re- 
quirements of tiling. In other words, if they had 
known that terra cotta would be acceptable, they 
claim that they would have been able to give the 
city a nmch lower figure. The only concern that 
understood that terra cotta would be accepted 
instead of tile was this concern that got the con- 
tract, and I understand that tile costs 30 to 40 
per cent more than terra cotta. So this concern 
that has been mentioned was favored in that 
respect. They were powerful enough to obtain 
that contract and were fortunate enough to have 
that information. So. if they were powerful 
enough to do that. I wonder how far you are going 
to get now in holding them to what is fair in the 
matter of employment of Boston men. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



E.\ST BOSTON HOUSING DEVELOPMENT. 

Coun. SEL\ ITELLA offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be hereby 
requested to take immediate action in opposition 
to any e-tpenditure by the United States Uovcrn- 
ment or the State in aid of the proposed housing 
development in East Boston, especially in con- 
sideration of the fact that the district is now 
amply provided with dwellings and that any 
further large development would substantially 
depreciate real estate values. 

Coun. SELVITELLA— Mr. President. I hold in 
my hand here a newspaper containing a picture of a 
$3,500,000 East Boston housing development 
which has apparently met with the approval of the 
United States Public Works .\dministrator. Mr. 
President, at the present time there is no housing 
problem in East Boston. .\s a matter of fact. East 
Boston is no different from any other community 
in the city. There are at least 40 per cent of the 
tenements in East Boston and at least 23 per 
cent more of the homes in East Boston that are 
now in danger of being foreclosed on account of 
nonpayment of taxes and nonpayment of interest 
on mortgages. That particular problem is the 
problem of the Boston Port Uevelopment Com- 
pany, which has organized a subsidiary known 
as the Neptune Gardens, and they are attempting 
to unload upon the government this huge, gigantic 
proposition, which, if permitted to pass, will 
further embarrass the home owners of East 
Boston. It is a very serious state of affairs. Mr. 
President, and this Port Development Company 
has yet to pay one single penny of taxes to the 
City of Boston for the past three years. I hold 
in my hands the City Recurd, supposed to contain 
all the delinquent tax sales against property 
owners of the City of Boston. I have investi- 
gated this matter and have found that the Boston 
Port Development Company, who are behind 
this huge steal, have not paid their taxes upon 
this proposed land in East Boston to the City 
of Boston. The question now comes to my 
mind, why this company was not advertised in 
the Boston City Record for failure to pay taxes, 
when they have listed here a tax of $7.10 against 
some poor unfortunate property owner, another 
one for a tax of $16.60, and a dozen others for 
similar small amounts. Yet this company that 
is trying to promote a $3,500,000 project upon 
the flats of East Boston did not in 1932 pay a 
tax for $4,572.40. Under the law they should 
have been in this City Record, and the reason why 
they are not must be apparent — that William 
McDonald was closely associated with the last 
administration, and they made sure that that 
particular advertisement did not appear in the 
City Record. I hope that the authorities in 
Washington, through his Honor the Mayor, will 
stop this gigantic steal of public money, which 
will make the housing problem in East Boston 
100 per cent greater than it is at the present time. 
Coun. SHATTUCK— Mr. President. I wish 
to congratulate the gentleman from East Boston 
upon his attack on the Boston Port Develop- 
ment Company and its predecessor, the East 
Boston Land Company. They perpetrated one 
of the most scandalous jobs in the City of Boston. 
I congratulate the gentleman, and I wish he 
would go further, by introducing an order to 
have the question of taxes and assessments in- 
vestigated by the Corporation Counsel of the 
City of Boston. Fortunately, we have a man 
upon whose investigation we can rely. 

Coun. FITZGERALD— Mr. President, I also 
want to add my word against the Elast Boston 
housing proposition. It has been before the 
Council previously, and I think the Mayor would 
be doing a very good thing for the citizens of 
Boston in removing from the Planning Board 
Mr. Fay, one of the engineers who has been 
tied up with this proposition. The Mayor would 
certainly be doing a service to the city if he forth- 
with removed those who have participated in 
this scheme. I think the councilor ought to go a 



little farther and introduce an order calling on 
the Mayor to send the Corporation Counsel to 
Washington to represent the city and show to the 
administration the true condition of affairs here. 
The property owners of the city are now laboring 
under a heavy load. That is' true all over the 
entire city. These people have got away with too 
much. Those of us who have been members of 
the Council for any length of time know what 
has been going on. know something about the 
scheming that has been in progress. .-V few of 
us have opposed it here, but we have been in the 
niinority. The thing should be investigated. 
Time for action has not expired under the statute 
of limitations, and it is high time that the matter 
was taken up with the authorities in Washington. 
We have seen enough of these schemes, some of 
which have been very speciously advanced, 
apparently with noble purposes and with in- 
fluential men behind them. We have had some 
gentlemen, landscape architects, who are doing 
some of the work down at the West End now. 
The time has come to show this sort of work up. 
and I certainly hope that there will be a follow- 
up of the suggestion made by the gentleman from 
Ward 5 (Coun. Shattuck). Let us follow it up 
by asking the Mayor to have the Corporation 
Counsel represent the city at Washington, and 
let us oppose this thing with all the strength we 
can put behind it. 

The order was referred to the Committee on 
Rules. 



TRANSFER OF POLICE OFFICERS. 

Coun. AGNEW offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Police Commissioner be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to 
remove from the Municipal Court of the City 
of Boston and all district courts in the City of 
Boston police officers who are especially assigned 
to present and prosecute criminal cases in said 
courts, and transfer such officers to more active 
duty for the benefit of the City of Boston. 

Coun. AGNEW — Mr. Presicfent and gentle- 
men of the Council, at the present time in the 
municipal courts of the City of Boston and in 
the district courts the Police Commissioner has 
assigned special officers to prosecute criminal 
cases that are brought into the respective courts. 
Believing that the efficiency of the Police De- 
partment should be maintained and that the 
man power of the department should not be 
weakene<i, as I believe it is nee<led in more and 
in better ways than in these courts, I offer this 
order. I have also in mind the fact that the 
average police officer making an arrest, after 
his term in the police school, is fully capable of 
presenting a case to the court, and it is unneces- 
sary, in my opinion, to have these other officers 
taken from active duty and sent into the courts, 
assigned there for no other reason or purpose 
than to present the cases brought in, I ask the 
Police Commissioner, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to remove these police officers, and to 
allow the arresting police officers to present their 
own cases, returning the officers now assigned to 
these respective courts to their outside duties. I 
think that will be more beneficial to the citizens 
of Boston than the present practice. 

The order was referred to the Committee on 
Rules. 



REINSTATEMENT OF PETER 
CLOUGHERTY. 

Coun. AGNEW offere<l the following: 
Resolved, That the City of Boston hereby ap- 
proves the enactment of legislation to provide for 
the reinstatement of Peter Clougherty in the 
Police Department, provided that said legislation 
includes a referendum to the Mayor and City 
Council. 

Passed under suspension of the rules. 



SAFETY ISLAND ON NASHUA STREET. 

Coun. FITZGER.\.LD offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor direct 
the Commissioner of Public Works to place a 
safety island on Nashua street, between Cotting 
and Minot streets. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



REINSTATEMENT OF WILLIAM S. FOSTER. 

Coun. FITZGERALD, for Coun. Green, offered 
the following: 

Resolved, That the City Council of Boston here- 
by favors the enactment of legislation authorizing 
the reinstatement of William .S. Foster as a member 
of the Boston Police Department. 

Passed under suspension of the rulw. 



ANNUITY TO THOMAS E. GOGGIN. 

Coun. D0N0V.4N offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation for 
the payment of an annuity to Thomas E. Goggin, 



formerly an employee of the City of Boston and 
County of Suffolk, who was injured in the course 
of his employment. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



SALE OF DWELLING HOUSES. 

Coun. ROBERTS offered the following: 
Ordered, That the City Collector be instructed, 
through his Honor the Mayor, not to proceed to 
sell any dwelling house wherein the total amount fo 
taxes due is less than $25. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



CREDIT TO CITY EMPLOYEES AT 
HOSPITAL. 

Coun. ROBERTS offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Trustees of the Boston City 
Hospital be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to extend re:isonal)le credit to all regular 
employees of the city who become patients at the 
said hospital. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



FEDERAL AID FOR SLUM CLEARANCE. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston be re- 
quested to consider the advisability of requesting 
the Corporation Counsel to make a study of all 
Federal laws regardiiiK slum clearance, with a 
view to having the city request enabling legisla- 
tion from the Massachusetts Legislature, if such 
is found to be necessary, in order to have tlie city 
take full advantage of United States Government 
grants for slum clearance. 

Coun. NORTON~Mr. President, I believe that 
the matter of slum clearance here in Boston is 
worthy of the attention of city officials. Under 
certain conditions the Federal Government is 
granting money outright or loaning the same to 
cities and towns to build small homes. The 
.Subsistence Homesteads Division of the Depart- 
ment of the Interior is now establishing demon- 
stration homestead projects in sclecte<l areas with 
the $25,000,000 revolving loan fund made available 
for this purpose by the National Recovery Act. 
At Decatur, Indiana, $125,000 will be spent, 
building forty to forty-six homesteads, each with 
one to two acres of land. The occupants, to be 
selected from among the common people, will be 
given a contract for sale. They will make small 
monthly payments to acquire title to the home- 
steads, with the cost of each to range from $2,000 
to $2,(i00, including land, a small, low-cost home 
equipped with modern conveniences and soil suit- 
able for gardening. They will have an opportunity 
to produce garden foodstuffs for their own use. 
Governor Lehman of New York recently requested 
the New York State Legislature to pass enabling 
legislation so that New York State communities 
might take full advantage of the Federal grants 
for slum clearance. Boston is in need of low-cost 
homes for poor people. The splendid report issued 
by the Boston Council of Social Agencies, in March, 
1933, entitled "Social .Statistics," points out that 
in 1930 we had over seven hundred ninety-nine 
persons to the inhabited acre in the North End 
section, while in the Hyde Park area we had less 
than forty-six persons to the inhabited acre. West 
Roxbury, 46.6; Brighton, 79.1. Charlestown had 
255.8 persons to the inhabitable acre in 1930. 
Some results of this crowding may be gained from 
the fact that out of 454 babies born in Charlestown 
in 1931, fifty-two died during the first year of life. 
In Hyde Park, during 1930, with the same number 
of babies born, 454, we lost but seventeen during 
the first year. The Charlestown infant mortality 
rate was over three times that of Hyde Park. Out 
where there is more room and less crowding such 
as in West Roxbury, Brighton, Mattapan, Jamaica 
Plain and other suourban areas, the infant mortal- 
ity rate is much lower than what it is in the con- 
gested areas of Boston. The delinquency rate 
in the suburbs in some cases is half what it is in 
the crowded wards. In the South End section 
of Boston, in 1930, 20 per cent of the inhabitants 
lived in hotels or lodging houses, — mostly lodging 
houses. I often wonder if it would be possible to 
mitigate this situation somewhat by the erection 
of low-cost homes with modern conveniences in 
the suburban wards of Boston. On March 1, 
1933, 46.3 per cent of the families in the .South 
End were forced to ask for welfare. The Boston 
Council of Social Agencies admits that this figure 
may be high but it was what they arrived at after 
an investigation. Less than 12 per cent of the 
families in the Dorchester North section, less than 
6 per cent in the West Roxbury area, less than 6 
per cent in the Brighton area, were forced to seek 
aid from the city during the same period. These 
figures tend to show that those in the suburban, 
less crowded areas of the city have a better chance 
of escaping poverty than those in the crowded 
areas. Facts such as these tend to show that 
there is need for low-cost housing for our poor 
people out in the nonconjested areas. Therefore, 
it may be, that some steps might be taken at this 
session of the Legislature which would allow the 
city to take full advantage of all Federal appro- 
priations for slum-clearance and the erection of 
low-cost homes. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



04 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 27 



FREE PASSES ON EAST BOSTO^f FERRIES. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Comniissioner of Public 
Works, through his Honor the Mayor, be re- 
quested to advise the Council reeardinK the 
number of free passes issued, and the total num- 
ber of free rides given on the East Bost<jn ferries 
during the past fiscal year. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



weekly meetings with secret.xry 
McCarthy. 

Coun. NORTt^N offered the following: 
Ordered. Tliat Secretary Walter V. McCarthy 
of the Public Welfare Department be requested, 
through his Honor the Mayor, to set aside a 
definite period weekly to meet city councilors. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



INFORMATION AS TO TAXES OF BOSTON 
PORT DEVELOPMENT COMPANY. 

Coun. SELVITELLA offered the following: 
Ordered. That the City Collector, through his 

Honor the Mayor, furnish the City Council with 

the following information: 

1. Amount of taxes paid and unpaid by 
Boston Port Development Company on land in 
their name in East Boston during years 1930-33. 

2. Whether or not tax sales were held during 
those years on any property held by said concern 
in East Boston, and. if such sales were advertised 
in the City Record. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



CONFIRMATION OF EXECUTIVE 
APPOINTMENTS. 

Coun. G.\LLAGHER called up. under un- 
finished business. Nos. 1 and 2 on the calendar, 
viz. : 

1. Action on appointments submitted by the 
Mayor January 15. 1934. of Margaret A. Steeves, 
Robert MacGregor. Fred Clements, David J. 
O'Connor and Joseph Doucette, to be Weighers of 
Coal; Warren Flynn. to be a Weigher of Goods; 
and John J. McCarthy, to be a Weigher of Goods 
and a Measurer of Grain. 

2. .-Action on appointments submitted by the 
Mayor January 15, 1934. of Cornelius N. Dundon. 
to be a Constable, without authority to serve civil 
process. 

The question came on confirmation. Com- 
mittee. Coun. Agnew and Selvitella. Whole 
number of ballots. 18, yeas 18. and the appoint- 
ments were confirmed. 



MANAGERS OF OLD SOUTH ASSOCIATION. 

Coun. BRACKMAN offered the following: 

Ordered. That the Council now proceed to the 
election of the two managers of the Old South 
Association. 

The order was passed. 

President DOWD — The clerk will now call the 
roll, and each member as his name is called will 
announce his choice. 

The clerk called the roll, and Councilors Agnew. 
Brackman. Dohertv. Donovan. Dowd. Englert. 
Finley. Fish. Gallagher. Goldman. Kerrigan. 
McGrath. Murray. Norton. Roberts. Selvitella 
and Tobin. each voted for Coun. Donovan and 
Shattuck as Managers of the Old South Associa- 
tion, and the two members named were thereupon 
declared elected. 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

Coun. KERRIGAN, for the Committee on 
Soldiers' Relief, submitted report recomniending 
pas.sage of order for payment of aid to soldiers and 
sailors and their families in the City of Boston for 
the month of January. 1934. 

Report accepted; said order passed. 

.Adjourned at 3.17 p. m.. on motion of Coun. 
GOLDM.\N, to meet on Monday. January 29, 
1934, at 2 p. m. 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE FOR SUFFOLK 

COUNTY. 

Number of children 7-13 years old, 105- 
675, of whom 104,085, or 98.5 per cent, 
were attending school ; 14 and 15 years, 
29,662, of whom 28,256, or 95.3 per cent, 
were attending school ; 16 and 17 years, 
29,902, of whom 19,453, or 65.1 per cent, 
were attending school; 18-20 years, 47,- 
103, of whom 12,395, or 26.3 per cent, 
were attending school; total children 7 
to 20 years old, 212,342, of whom 164,189, 
or 77.3 per cent, were attending school. 



VALUATIONS WITH PER CAPITA, LEADING CITIES, 1930. 



New York . . . 
Philadelphia. . 

Detroit 

Los .Angeles. . 

Boston 

San J'rancisco 

Cleveland 

St. Louis 

Baltimore 

Pittsburgh. . . 
Buffalo 



Valuation. 



S19 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



118, 
451, 
,085, 
,876, 
,827 
,432 
,384, 
,286 
,175 
,160 
,107 



468,612 
528,364 
366,560 
277,195 
,460,600 
260,440 
140.624 
982,005 
,718,021 
422,500 
503.950 



*Per Capita. 



$2,758 62 
1.769 14 
1,966 88 
1,515 51 
2.339 34 
2.257 68 
1.537 20 
1,565 75 
1,460 75 
1,732 45 
1,932 56 



* Per capita figures 
World Almanac. 



are approximate, populatim totals being estimated. Compiled fr>-m the 



NST DEBT WITH PER CAPITA, LEADING 


CITIES. 1930. 




Net Debt. 


*Per Capita. 




$1,606,206,877 

407,153,400 

237,309,100 

148,247,947 

144.3 ?9,046 

137.875.348 

112,893,264 

102,431,853 

68,639,100 

63,226,606 

60.108,9.30 


S231 76 


Philadelphia. ... 


208 69 


Detroit 


151 66 




116 62 


Los .Angeles . 


131 12 


San Francisco * 


217 33 




125 38 




76 92 


Buffalo 


184 19 


St. Louis. ... 


89 74 


Pittsburgh . . . . 


119 77 







* Per capita figures are approximate, population totals being estimated. 
World Almanac. 



Compiled from the 



POPULATION OF CITIES OF OVER 300,000, 
1930. 

New York, 6,930,446, an increase of 
1,310,398 or 23.3 per cent over 1920, di- 
vided thus: Brooklyn Borough, 2,560,- 
401; Manhattan, 1,867,312; Bronx, 1,265,- 
258; Queens, 1,079,129; Richmond, S158,- 
346. Other cities, with increase over 
1920: Chicago, 3,376,438 (increase 674,- 
733 or 25.0 percent) ; Philadelphia, 1,950,- 
961 (increase 127,182 or 7.0 per cent); 
Detroit, 1,568,662 (inc. 574,984 or 57.9 per 
cent) ; Los Angeles, 1,238,048 (inc. 661,375 
or 114.7 per cent) ; Cleveland, 900,429 (inc. 
103,588 or 13.0 per cent) ; St. Louis, 821,960 
(inc. 49,063 or 6.3 per cent) ; Baltimore, 
804,874 (inc. 71,048 or 9.7 per cent) ; Bos- 
ton, 781,188 (inc. 33,128 or 4.4 per cent) ; 
Pittsburgh, 669,817 (inc. 81,474 or 13.8 
per cent) ; San Francisco, 634,394 (inc. 
127,718 or 25.2 per cent); Milwaukee, 
578.249 (inc. 121,102 or 26.5 per cent); 
Buffalo, 573.076 (inc. 66.301 or 13.1 per 
cent) ; AVashington, 486,869 (inc. 49,298 or 
11.3 per cent) ; Minneapolis, 464,356 (inc. 
83,774 or 22.0 per cent) ; New Orleans, 
458,762 (inc. 71,543 or 18.5 per cent) ; 
Cincinnati, 451,160 (inc. 49.913 or 12.4 
per cent); Newark, 442,337 (inc. 27,813 
or 6.7 per cent) ; Kansas City, Mo., 399,- 
746 (inc. 75,336 or 23.2 per cent) ; Seattle, 
365,583 (inc. 50,271 or 15.9 per cent) ; 
Indianapolis, 364,161 (inc. 49.967 or 15.9 
per cent); Rochester, N. Y., 328,132 
(inc. 32,382 or 10.9 per cent) ; Jersey City, 
316,715 (inc. 18,612 or 6.2 per cent) ; 
Louisville, 307.745 (inc. 72,854 or 31.0 
per cent) ; Portland, Oregon, 301,815 (inc. 
43,527 or 16.9 per cent). 



UNITED STATES, GROSS DEBT. 

November 30, 1932, total gross debt 
of the United States was S20,806,013,836, 
of which 820,476,034,190 was interest- 
bearing. This is a reduction of -SO. 120,- 
667,458 from the peak of 826,596,701,648 
on August 31, 1919. The gross debt on 
June 30, 1931, was $16,801,281,492. 



ASSESSED VALUATION. PER CAPITA, IN 
VARIOUS CITIES, 1928 (BY RANK). 

Providence, 82,655.09; New York, S2,- 
536J23; Detroit, 82,518.71; Boston, 82,- 
508.60; Cincinnati, 82,463,44; Youngs- 
town, Ohio, 82,444.11; New Haven, 82,- 
409.96; Philadelphia, 82,406.74; Hartford, 
82,278.84; Baltimore, $2,258.93; Cleve- 
land, 82,253.93; Springfield, Mass., 82,- 
159.12; Columbus, Ohio, 82,133.10; Lan- 
sing, Mich., 82,071.65; Stamford, Conn., 
■82,070.47; Schenectady, 82.040.91; Fort 
Wayne, Ind. 82,029.20; South Bend, Ind., 
82,002.97; Quincy, Mass., 82,002.10 Wheel- 
ing, W. Va., 82,001.47; New Haven, 81,- 
975.41; Holyoke, Mass., 81,968.30; Jersey, 
City, 81,945.53; Newark, 81,928.12; Buf- 
falo, 81,899.83; Indianapolis, S1.S96.50; 
Milwaukee, 81,850.24; Pittsburgh. Sl,- 
676.51 Los Angeles, 81,568.79; San Fran- 
cisco, 81.307.81; Chicago, 81,303.26. 

(See L^. S. Census Bureau's Financial 
Statistics of Cities, 1928, pp. 460-509.) 



POPULATION OF UNITED STATES, 1930. 

I'otal inhabitants of continental 
United States, 122,775,046, or 62,137,080 
males and 60,637,966 females. Total na- 
tive white, 95,497,800 or 48,010,145 males 
and 47,487,655 females; native white of 
native parentage 70,136,614 or 35,460,001 
males and 34,676,613 females; native 
whites of foreign parentage, 16,999,221 
(8,438,676 males and 8,560,545 females); 
native whites of mixed parentage, 8,361,- 
965 (4,111,468 males and 4,250,497 fe- 
males) : foreign-born whites. 13.366,407, 
or 7,153,709 males and 6,212,698 females; 
total foreign white stock. 38,727,593, or 
19,703,853 males and 19,023,740 females; 
Negroes, 11,891,143, or 5,855,669 males 
and 6,035,474 females; Mexicans, 1,422,- 
533, or 758,674 males and 663.859 females ; 
Indians, 332,397, or 170,350 males and 
162.047 females; Japanese, 138,834, or 
81,771 males and 57,063 females; Chinese, 
74,954, or 59,802 males and 15.152 fe- 
males; all others, 50,978, or 46,960 males 
and 4,018 females. 



Jan. 27 



CITY RECORD 



95 



ANNEXATIONS OF BOSTON. 

East JJor;l,on in 1G37 ; Soutli JJoston in 
1804, belli}; set oil Iruiii Uorcliester; Kox- 
huiy in 1868, a city of Noifolic County 
since March, 1846; Dorchester in 1870, 
a town since September, 1030; Charles- 
town in 1874, a city of Mi(l<ilese.K County 
since Februai-j', 1847; Hrighton in 1S74. 
set off from Cambridge and incorporute'i 
as a town of Middlesex County in IVd- 
ruary, 1807; West Roxbury in 1874, set 
olT from Roxbiny and incorporated as a 
town of Norfolk County in May, 1S.51, 
Hyde Park in 1912, a town of Norfolk 
County since April, 1868. 

These annexations, which fcdd^d 
24,312 acres of land to the original land 
of Boston, were by area as follows: Easi 
Boston, 1.435 acres; South Boston, 795; 
Roxbury, 2,450; Dorchester, 5,600; West 
Roxbury, 8,075; Brighton, 2,664; Charles- 
town, 424; Hyde Park, 2,869. Filled land 
increased the area later by 1,396 acrej. 
In 1875 the annexed territory had a 
population of 201,250, or 58.86 per cent 
of city's total; in 1910 its population had 
increased to 477,311, or 71.18 per cent. 
Hyde Park not included. By 1915 the 
total was 549,139, or 73.67 per cent of 
city. By 1925 the total was 607,519. or 
77.92 per cent. 



SAND, CINDERS AND SALT IN DULUTH. 

About 385 miles of sidewalk are sanded 
every year and about 2.50 miles of streets 
are snow-plowed and s-anded. Ordi- 
narily, flat grades are not sanded, this 
work being confined to steep grades where 
dangerous ice conditions exist. Du.-ing 
the past season the maintenance depart- 
ment used about 500 cubic yards o; cin- 
ders, 500 cubic yards of sand, and 5 tons 
of csilcium chloride on the streets. 

The use of salt, or sodium chloride, 
has been discontinued entirely, because 
of its injurious effect on concrete walks 
and pavements. The action of salt is 
not clearly understood, but it is much 
.more active during cold weather than 
'n summer, and is apparently due to the 
formation of crystals after penetrating 
the surface, the force of which disin- 
tegrates the concrete. Calcium chloride 
does not seem to be entirely free from 
this difficulty, but is much less active 
than sodium chloride. 



BOSTON AS A TOWN. 

From its foundation until 1755, or a 
period of 125 years, Boston was not only 
the most outstanding but the most 
populous town in the American colonies. 
In 1760, Philadelphia's population waj 
ahead, viz., 18,756, Boston's then being 
15,631 and New York's about 14,000. 
In the last year of town government, 
viz., 1821, Boston's population was about 
45,000 and its public debt $100,000, all 
incuiTed for new county buildings. 

The history of Boston as a town dur- 
ing a period of nearly two centuries 
surpasses in civic interest that of Boston 
as a city because of the untiring zeal 
and successful efforts of its townsmen to 
realize more of true democracy than had 
ever been attained before. Their obliga- 
tions were held as sacred as their liber« 
ties. 



JAMAICA SPENDS $1,000,000 ANNUALLY 
ON ROAD CONSTRUCTION AND AAAIN- 
TENANCE. 

Jamaica, an English possession, has 
a highway system which is almost en- 
tirely constructed of waterbound mac- 
adam, some 70 miles of which has been 
surface-treated. Many of the roads are 
under the supervision of the Department 
of Public Works and various parochial 
boards. There are about 2,500 mihr. of 
bridle and foot paths. 'Phe highway 
system connects all parts of the island 
in a very siitisfactory manner, and the 
problem is not that of the construction 
of new roads, but the improvement of old 
ones, the surfacing and widening of these 
roads, and protective coatings. The roads 
are well maintained and, as there are 
not many heavy trucks, the maintenance 
is satisfactory. There are approximately 
4,000 miles of highways, or 1.11 sn'iare 
miles of area to one mile of highway. 

About a million dollars per }'ear is 
spent on new construction and mainte- 
nance, the machinery used being both 
European and American. 

(From a report of the American Road 
Builders' Association.) 



MASSACHUSETTS BAY COLONY. 

The first chartered colony in New 
England, charter granted by Charles I 
on March 4, 1629. About a year before, 
a patent had been granted to six promi- 
nent men of Dorchester, west of England, 
among whom waa Capt. John Endicott. 
He sailed in June, 1628, with a party of 
fifty or sixty persons, arriving in Septem- 
ber and settling at Naumkeag, afterward 
named Salem. In the spring of 1629, 
the Bay Company fitted out three ships 
conveying about four hundred persons 
and arriving at Salem in June. Endicott 
sent a small party to effect a settlement 
on the Bay in Mishawum, afterward 
named by the settlers Charlestown, the 
first town in New England to assume the 
town polity, Plymouth and Salem being 
governed by a governor and council. 
Endicott was appointed in London as the 
first resident governor on April 30, 1629. 
The Massachusetts Bay Company was 
reorganized in London on October 20, 
1629, when John Winthrop was chosen 
as governor. lie aiTived at Salem on 
June 12, 1630, soon proceeded to Charles- 
town with a large following and finding 
that place unsuitable, finally settled in 
Boston. Winthrop served thirteen years 
as governor in four different periods end- 
ing in 1649 and Endicott fifteen years 
at various times ending in 1665. Other 
governors were Thomaj Dudley, Richard 
Bellingham, John Haynes, Henry Vane, 
John Leverett and Simon Bradstreet, 
the latter serving twelve years until 1692 
when the Bay Colony and the Plymouth 
Colony were merged, becoming the 
Royal Province of Massachusetts Bay, 
which existed eighty-two years to 1774, 
the governors being appointed by the 
King. 

The name, Massachusetts, is Indian 
and signifies "near the big hills." 



BOSTON INCORPORATED AS A CITY, 1822. 

The act of incorporation was passed 
by the Legislature on February 23, 1822. 
On March 4 following, the voters of 
Boston accepted said act, chapter 110, 
1821-22, as its first city charter by a 
majority of 916 in a total vote of 4,678. 
The vote was 2,797 yeas, 1,881 nays. 
Previous attempts to incorporate as a 
city had been made in 1650, 16.59, 1667. 
1708, 1744. 1762. 1784, 1791. 1804 and 
1815. The charter was revised in 1854. 
1885 and 1909. Amendments to the 1909 
charter were enacted in 1910, 1912, 1914. 
1918, 1919, 1921, 1922 and lastly in 1924 
(see "Municipal Register" for 1928, pages 
19^3). 



PUBLIC DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1931. 

Gross funded debt, January 1, 1931, 
$152,656,100.96 (including .$159,999.96 is- 
.suod by State for enlargement of Court 
House). Sinking funds, $38,990,246.22; 
other redemption means, $3,168,693.92, 
Net Debt, $110,497,160.82; or more than 
on January 1, 1930, by $8,320,376.01. 

Of said net debt $65,544,363.02 or 59.32 
per cent was City Debt; $43,191,696.73 
or 39.09 per cent Rapid Transit debt 
(representing i\ per cent investment) ; 
$1,223,101.07 or 1.10 per cent. County 
Debt; $538,000 or 0.49 per cent, Water 
Debt. 

Debt paid in 1930 was $7,423,550.00 
but there was an increase in total gross 
debt of $7,691,450.00. 

Per cent of net debt to valuation, 5.60; 
net debt per capita, $141.40 (approx.) ; 
net debt, exclusive of Rapid Transit debt, 
$67,305,464.09 or $86.13 per capita (ap- 
prox). 

Per capitas are based on U. S. Census 
Bureau's estimated population on Janu- 
ary 1, 1931. 

Loan.s authorized but not issued (with- 
in debt limit), $1,757,000; same outside of 
debt limit, $6,908,000; Total, $8,665,000. 

POPULATION OF COUNTIES, 1930. 

(1) Middlesex (11 cities and 43 
towns), 934,924 or 156,572 over 1920; 
(2) Suffolk (3 cities and 1 town), 879,- 
5.36 or 44,014 over 1920; (3) Essex (8 
cities and 26 towns), 498,040 or 15,884 
over 1920; (4) Worcester (4 cities and 
57 towns), 491,242 or 36,107 over 1920; 
(5) Bristol (4 cities and 16 towns), 364,- 
590 or 5,585 over 1920; (6) Hampden (4 
cities and 19 to\vns), 335,496 or 35,191 
over 1920; (7) Norfolk (1 city and 27 
towns), 299,426 or 80,345 over 1920; (8) 
Plymouth (1 city and 26 towns), 162,311 
or 5,343 over 1920; (9) Berkshire (2 
cities and 30 towns), 120,700 or 7,667 over 
1920; (10) Hampshire (1 city and 22 
towns), 72,801 or 3,202 over 1920; (11) 
Franklin (26 towns), 49,612 or 251 over 
1920; (12) Barnstable (15 towns), 32,- 
305 or 5,635 over 1920; (13) Dukes (7 
to^vns), 4,953 or 581 over 1920; (14) Nan- 
tucket (1 town), 3,678 or 881 over 1920. 
Total for the 14 counties (39 cities and 
316 towns), 4,249,614 or 397,258 (i. e., 
10.3 per cent) over 1920. Of said total, 
2,940,335 (i. e., 69.19 per cent) were in 
the cities and 1,309,279 (i. e., 30.81 per 
cent) in the towns. The four counties, 
Suffolk, Middlesex, Essex and Bristol, 
contain 63.00 per cent of the State's in- 
habitants. 

If the municipalities having a popula- 
tion of 5,000 or over are properly called 
urban, then the percentage of urban 
population in the entire State reaches 
the notable figure of 90.71, while the rural 
shows but 9.29 per cent. 



RURAL TEACHERS' SUPERVISION. 

Improving instruction in rural schools 
through promoting the efficiency and 
professional growth of teachers is the 
most important function of supervision 
in connection with the rural school move- 
ment. In the accomplishment of this 
purpose supervisors use different means 
and procedures usually designated as 
supervisory measures, according to 
the United Stated Office of Education. 
Among tho.se found particularly success- 
ful in rural communities are: County- 
wide teachers' meetings, circular letters, 
group conferences, visitations, individual 
conferences, and help rendered by teachers 
to colleagues. 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY. 

MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

Room 27, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 1100. 
FiiEDRRiCK W. Ma.nskiei.I). Mayor. 
JosKPll F. Mellyn. Secretary. 
William C. S. Healby, Assistant Secretary. 
Cykil G. Cu.m. MINOS, /Issisfajif Secretary. 
John V. Gilmore, Jr., Assistant Secretary. 
Edwarii U. Lbe. Assistant Secretary. 
Bernard J. Dunn, Assistant Secretary. 
John F. Gilmore, Chief Clerk (Acting). 
Herbert L. McNary. Chief Licensing Division. 
Joseph Mikolajewski. Assistant. 

CITY COUNCIL. 

Ward 1. Henry Selvitella, 80 Orient avenue. 

Ward 2. Thomas H. Green, 117 Baldwin st. 

Ward 3. John I. Fitzsrerald, 7 Allen street. 

Ward 4. Georpe W. Robert-s. 20 Hemenway st. 

Ward 5. Henry L. Shattuck, 15 River St. 

Ward 6. George P. Donovan, 508 East 
Broadway, South Boston. 

Ward 7. John E. Kerrigan, 213 West Eighth 
street. South Boston. 

Ward 8. John F. Dowd, 22 Greenville street. 

Ward 9. Richard D. Gleason, 66 Highland st. 

Ward 10. John J. Doherty, 671 Wyman st. 

Ward 11. Edward L. Englert, 18 Iffley road, 
Jamaica Plain. 

Ward 12. David M. Brackman, 89 Waumbeck 
street. 

Ward 13. Jo.^eph McGrath, 9 Castle Rock st. 

Ward 14. Maurice M. Goldman, 116 Hazleton 
street. 

Ward 15. Martin H. Tobin, 70 Westville st. 

Ward 16. Albert L. Fish, 12 Rowena street. 

Ward 17. Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr., 57 
Codman Hill avenue. 

Ward 18. Clement A. Norton, 8 Austin st. 

Ward 19. Peter A. Murray, 7 St. John St. 

Ward 20. James F. Finley, 231 Cornell st. 

Ward 21. James E. Agnew, 92 Wallingford 
road. 

Ward 22. Edward M. Gallagher, 21 Oak 
Square avenue. 

Clerk of CoMMiTTEEij. 
John E. Baldwin, Room 56, City Hall. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

City Messenger. 
Edward J. Leary. Room 55, City Hall. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

ART DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Faneuil Hall. 

Arthur A. Shurcliff, Secretary. 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Edward T. Kelly, Chairman. 
Fred E. Bolton, Secretary. 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 

Room 20, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Rupert S. Carven, City Auditor. 

Daniel J. Falvey. Assistant City Auditor. 

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOL 
BUILDINGS. 

Richard J. Lane, Chairman. 

Department op School Buildings. 
Office, 11 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 5750. 
William W. Drummey, Superintendent of Con- 
struction. 
BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT. 
Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 30 City Hall. 
H. Murray Pakulski, Secretary. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 

22 Court street. 

William P. Hickey, Commissioner. Tel. Cap. 
2125. 

BUDGET DEPARTMENT. 
47 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Charles J. Fox, Commissioner. 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 

Office. 90! City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
EDW.A.RD W. RoEMER, Building Commissioner. 
John H. Glover. Acting Clerk of Department. 

Board of Examiners. 
Office. 907 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
Joh.n F. Hickey. Chairman. 
Mary C. Dowd, Secretary. 

Board of Appeal. 
Office, City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Joseph A. Tomasello, Chairman. 
James A. McElaney, Jr.. Secretary. 

CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 
Room 31, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred .T. Doyle, City Clerk. 
John B. Hynes, Assistant City Clerk. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD. 

Room 30, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 
Elisabeth M. Herlihy, Secretary. 



CITY RECORD. 

Office, 73 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Frank H. Cushman, Editor. 
Joshua H. Jone.s. Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd. liusiness Agent, Room 73, 
City Hall. 

COLLECTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 200 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
William M. McMorbow, City Collector. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 

Office. Ill City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
Peter F. Tague, Chairman. 
Daniel H. Rose, Commissioner. 
Helen A. Macdonald, Commissioner. 
Charles T. Harding, Commissioner. 

FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Office. 24 School street. Tel. Lafayette 1622. 
Frank A. Goodwin, Chairman. 
Robert E. Cunniff, Secretary. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters, Bristol street. South End. Tel. 

Kenmore 1100. 
Wire Division, 1007 City Hall Annex. Tel. 

Lafayette 5100. 
Edward F. McL.aughlin, Commissioner. 
Herbert J. Hickey. Executive Secretary. 
He.nry A. F'ox, Chief of Department. 
Peter F. Dolan, Superintendent of Wire 

Division. 

FRANKLIN FUND MANAGERS. 

Office, Franklin Union, Appleton and Berkeley 

streets. Tel. Hancock 6590. 
Everett Morss, Chairman. 
W. li. Russell, Director. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1107 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Francis X. M.\honey, M. D., Commissioner. 
Joseph A. Cahalan, Secretary. 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 

Citv Hospital, 818 Harrison ave. Tel. Ken. 8600. 
Relief Hospital, Haymarket Sq. Tel. Cap. 0753. 
Relief Hospital. Ea^t Boston. Tel. E. B. 86. 
West Department. West Rox. Tel. Parkway 68. 
Joseph P. Manning. President. 
John J. Dowling, M. D., Superintendent. 

INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT, 

Office. 808-811 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Frederick A. Washburn, Commissioner. 
Winifred H. Burke, Secretary. 
Elizabeth G. Nelson, Fiscal Agent. 

Child Welfare Division. 
800 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Registration Division. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Long Island Hospital Division. 
Long Island, Boston Harbor. Tel. President 
1371. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 
Room 1003. Lawyers Building, 11 Beacon 

street. Tel. Lafayette 6200. 
Henry E. Foley, Corporation Counsel. 
Margaret G. O'Neill, Secretary. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Library Building, Copley square. Tel. 

Kenmore 1500. 
John L. Hall, President of Trustees. 
Milton E. Lord, Director. 

LICENSING BOARD. 

Office, 1 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 2470. 
David T. Montague. Chairman. 
Louis Epple, Secretary. 

.MARKET DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Quincy Market. Tel. Capitol 5382. 
Ambrose E. Woods, Superintendent. 

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

Men and Women. 25 Church street. Tel. 

Liberty 8607. 
. , Director. 

OVERSEERS OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

Office, Charity Building, 43 Hawkins street. 

Tel. Capitol 8320. 
Temporary Home, Chardon street. Tel. Laf. 

2337. 
Wayfarers' Lodge, 30 Hawkins street. Tel. 

Lafayette 3198. 
Simon E. Hecht, Chairman. 
Walter V. McCarthy, Executive Director. 

PARK DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 
William P. Long, Chairman. 
Daniel J. Byrne, Secretary. 

Park, Public Grounds, Bath and Music 
Divisions. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 

Cemetery Division. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 805 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
William G. O'Hare, Commissioner. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Head<iuarters, 154 Berkeley street. Tel. Ken- 
more 6700. 
Eugene C. Hultman. Commissioner. 
Augustine J. Oill. Secretary. 
Martin H. King, Superintendent. 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 174 North street. Tel. Lafayette 6363. 
William J. Casey, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1005 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
RoswelL G. Hall, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC CELEBRATIONS. 

Room 52, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 1110. 

, Director. 

Michael F. Curley. Assistant. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

C. J. Carven. Commissioner. Office, 509 City 
Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
General Office. 

Bernard C. Kelley, Secretary and Chief Clerk. 
Room 506, City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 

Bridge and Ferry Division. 

Leo B. Reilly, Division Engineer. Office, 602 

City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Highway Division. 
Joshua Atwood, Division Engineer. Office, 
501 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Sanitary Division. 
Adolph J. Post, Division Engineer. Office, 
City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Sewer Division. 
George W. Dakin, Division Engineer. Office, 
701 City Hall Annex. TeL Lafayette 5100. 

Water Division. 
Daniel M. Sullivan, Division Engineer. Office, 
607 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 

Water Income Division. 
James A. McMurry, Division Engineer. Office, 
604 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 

REGISTRY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1008 City Hall Annex. TeL Laf. 5100. 
Hilda H. Quirk, Registrar. 

RETIREMENT BOARD. 

Room 66, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, Chairman. 
J. George Herlihy, Secretary. 
William D. Kenney, Executive Officer. 

SCHOOL CO.MMITTEE. 

Office, 15 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 5500. 

Maurice J. Tobin, Chairman. 

Ellen M. Cronin, Secretary. 

Patrick T. Campbell, Superintendent of 

Schools. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, Business Manager. 

SINKING FUNDS DEPARTMENT. 

Room 20, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Eliot Wadsworth, Chairman. 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 60 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Charles H. Carey, Commissioner. 

STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 76 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
James P. Balfe, Chairman. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Secretary. 

STREET LAYING=OUT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 401 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Walter A. Murray, Chairman. 
Cornelius A. Reardon, Secretary. 

SUFFOLK, COUNTY OF. 

Offices, Court House, Pemberton square. Tel. 

Capitol 0351. 
William J. Foley, District Attorney. Tel. 

Capitol 9500. 
John A. Keliher, Sheriff. Tel. Capitol 2451. 
W. T. A. Fitzgerald, Register of Deeds. Tel. 

Capitol 0519. 
Arthur W. Sullivan, Register of Probate. 

Tel. Capitol 9110. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 801 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Warren W. Loomis. Sui>vrintcndent. 

TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1 Beacon st., 7th floor. Tel. Capitol 5860. 
Thomas F. Sullivan, Chairman. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Room 21, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

John H. Dorsey, Treasurer. 

Arthur F. Swan, .4ssis(on( Treasurer. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 105 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
James A. Sweeney, Sealer. 



CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol. 26. Saturday, February 3, 1934. No. 5 

MAYOR MANSFIELD BEGINS TASK OF REORGANIZING PUBLIC WELFARE 
DEPARTMENT IN EFFORT TO ERADICATE EVILS CHARGED TO SYSTEM 
OF AID FOR CITIZENS — TELLS CITIZENS IN HIS FIRST OF SERIES OF 
WEEKLY BROADCASTS WHAT HE BELIEVES, AFTER INVESTIGATION, TO 
BE FAULTS, AND REMEDIES HE PROPOSES. CORPORATION COUNSEL 
HAS BEEN INSTRUCTED TO DRAFT LEGISLATION DESIGNED TO UPROOT 
ABUSES AND PLACE DEPARTMENT ON BASIS THAT WILL, AS NEAR AS 
POSSIBLE, BE CRITICISM PROOF. 



Mayor Mansfield, on Monday, January 29, inaugurated a series of weekly broadcasts from Station WNAC, 
during which he plans to discuss municipal problems with the citizens of Boston. In his first address he spoke 
as follows: 

Good afternoon, radio audience, this is Mayor Mansfield speaking. Through the courtesy of Station WNAC 
I shall, from time to time, talk to you about the important business of the city. I am and shall continue to be 
that kind of public official who believes in setting forth to the people the trend of our city's activities and I 
shall be glad to learn of your views on all these subjects which I shall openly discuss. 

Today I am about to present to you my intended action on a matter that has been uppermost in the 
people's mind for the past three years. 1 refer to the administration of the Public Welfare Department, which 
department, as you know, is expected, among other things, to provide aid for thousands of families who through 
no fault of their own are out of work and, consequently, unable to purchase food and clothing for their loved ones 
and whose homes during the dreaded winter may even be without the comforts of heat. 

I am discussing this department in my first radio address because our children are affected — the little 
ones in our homes who are unable to protect themselves against the ravages of unemployment. Of course, grown-ups 
suffer terribly from enforced idleness, but even in extreme cases they have the physical power to battle for them- 
selves where young children and babies are helpless, and our first thoughts arc naturally of them and of their 
mothers. 

Citizens Generous. 

There is no doubt about the generous spirit of our city. We all feel that no family or individual should 
suffer through lack of food or clothing or the other necessaries of life. The expenditures of our city rising from 
about three million in 1929 to thirteen million in 1933 testify to the natural desire on the part of our citizens to help 
our neighbors during this industrial depression. We want, however, to be sure that a proper distribution of these 
funds is carried on, to the end that no unworthy persons are listed on the rolls of that department. As a result of 
many investigations the public is convinced that abuses of a flagrant nature have crept into this most humane 
branch of our Municipal Government. 

We may be called upon for a further investigation of all the activities of the Welfare Department and even if 
further evidence is produced it will be collateral in its nature and unless a radical change is made I fear that a renewal 
of the old abuses will result. After long and serious consideration, and as a result of countless conferences with 
those best able to inform me, I have come to the conclusion that the fundamental defect in the administration of this 
department lies in the machinery of the department itself. Now the natural question arises— "What is the real 
organization of this department, and wherein does its weakness lie as at present constituted?" The directing 
power of the department is placed under the control of a Board of Overseers who are unpaid and, naturally, are not 
required to give their full time to the tremendous amount of work of the department. That to my mind is the real 
fault which must be corrected — the general lack of responsibility which is found therein and in this view I am 
backed up by persons who have made a long study of the subject. Again the natural question arises in your mind, 
radio audience, "What has Mayor Mansfield to offer?" The answer is quite simple and sound. I have instructed 
my Corporation Counsel to present to the Legislature a bill that goes right to the root of the trouble, which, together 
with other necessary features, will give protection to the city, protection to the applicant for aid and will elimmate 
the unscrupulous individual and eradicate present abuses. 

Legislation Proposed. 

Now, let me slowly and carefully review the important parts of the proposed legislation which I hope will 
receive your support and which, I further hope, you will urge your Representatives and Senators to vote for at the 
State House. I favor the appointment of a department head who will give his entire working time to the affairs under 
his control — not part of his time, but his full time. That, of course, overcomes a radical defect in the department 
as at present organized, because the responsibiUty is immediately centered on the full working day. Further, I desire 
to have the department divided into two main branches, over each of which there should be a deputy commissioner 
appointed. The first branch to have control of the clerical, record keeping and financial work of the department, 
and the second, what might be called the field work or investigations necessary to be made when appUcations are 
presented and the follow-up of the same. (Continued on -page 101.) 



98 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 3 




"O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 
queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship- 
teeming plain of the ocean. 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene. 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotion!" 
From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 

CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

HaU. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription $2.00 Per Year 

Single Copies 10 Cents 

IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES. 
Old South News-stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 
A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City HaU. 

MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
February 5, at 2 p. m. 

A regular meeting of the School Com- 
mittee of the City of Boston will be 
held in the Administration Building, 
15 Beacon street, on Monday, Feb- 
iTiary 5, 1934, at 7.30 o'clock p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall , at 2 p. m. 

MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
oflBcials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows : 

To THE BO.'VRD OF StREET COMMIS- 
SIONERS, Room 401, City HaU Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 
public streets ; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 



trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasolene, oil, 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Tr.affic Commission, 
22 Court street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkwaj's under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner op Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplj'ing or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the cit3^ 

To THE Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To THE Bo.iRD OF P.\RK COMMIS- 
SIONERS, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue, Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, and the small parks 
and playgrounds in general throughout 



the citj% and as to the extermination 
of gJTJsy moths and the charges made 
for such service. Application may be 
made to this department for informa- 
tion regarding the public baths and 
gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt..Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To THE School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Dep.\rtment of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Ex,\miners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To THE Wire Division of the Fire 
Dep.vrtment, Fire Department Head- 
quarters, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire di\"ision. To 
Room 1007, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Bo.\rd of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the Citv of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 



For the week ending January 27, 1934: 

Population estimated July, 1934, 
United States Census Bureau estimate, 
795,256; number of deaths (stillbirths 
excluded): Residents, 209; nonresidents, 
42; total, 251. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 16.41. 



Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
Last week, 16.15; corresponding week 
last year, 17.92. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 19; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 5; sixtv vears and over, 130. 
Total deaths: Male, 132; female, 119; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 146; 
deaths of colored, 6. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DE.\THS.* 



DiSE.WES. 



Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Jan. 27, 1934. 



Cases. 



Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Jan. 28, 1933. 



Deaths. I Cases. 



Deaths. 



Anterior poliomyelitis. . . . 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis lethargica. . . 

Influenza 

Measles 

Meningitis epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) . 
Tuberculosis (other forms) 

Typhoid fever 

Whooping cough 



1 


— 


— 


3 

2 


— 


8 




18 


326 


1 


32 

1 
70 


47 


14 


66 


1 


102 


32 


13 


28 


8 


2 


8 


1 


1 


2 


89 


1 


62 



1 

34 
1 

12 



* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Feb. 3 



CITY RECORD 



99 



MAYOR MANSFIELD SAVES JOBS OF 880 C. W. A. WORKERS IN DEPARTMENT 
OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS BY PROVIDING FOR THEIR WAGES WHEN 
FEDERAL FUNDS WERE DEPLETED AND THEY WERE ABOUT TO LOSE 
EMPLOYMENT— ACTION TAKEN AND PLAN APPROVED AFTER CONFER= 
ENCE WITH SUPERINTENDENT WILLIAM W. DRUMMEY. 



Mayor Mansfield took quick and positive action to provide employment for C. W. A. workers in the Depart- 
ment of School Buildings who were about to lose their jobs because the funds provided by the Federal Government 
were found to be insufficient for carrying them longer. When informed of the situation by Superintendent of Con- 
struction, William W. Drummey, at a conference the Mayor approved the plan for carrying on the work and pay- 
ing out of municipal funds. This action was taken when the following letter was approved and the plan put into 

effect : 

Boston, January 25, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Bodon. 

Dear Sir, — Confirming, at your request, the meeting in your office, Tuesday, at 4.45 p. m., regarding the 
C. W. A. problem in this department, please receive below a synopsis of the facts. 

We get no information whatsoever from Mr. Bartlett or a written order we can rely on and his verbal orders 
are changed. Now tlio fund is running out and it will be necessary to lay off approximately eight hundred eighty 
men with only three weeks to run at four days a week at six hours a day. 

The work that these men are doing is exclusively repairs of school buildings throughout the entire plant, 
throughout the city. It is work that must be done anyhow. If it isn't done l)y these men it will have to be done 
by some others. We propose, with the approval of yourself, graciously given, and the advice of the auditor, the 
Corporation Counsel and the oral approval of Mr. Hurley, Civil Service Commissioner, to employ these approxi- 
mately eight hundred eighty men as temporary employees of this department, beginning next Monday, the 29th, 
for the same rate of pay for the same kind of work, for the same number of hours a day, for the period ending Feb- 
ruary 15. This is a net of twelve working days. 

No appropriation is necessary. We have the money on the basis of one third of last year's appropriation in 
accordance with the budget. It will show the city an actual saving because it is work that ordinarily we would 
have to pay a profit on to contractors. Appended to this letter is a li.st of men, by name and address, who are 
included in the eight hundred eighty plus or minus mentioned above. That there may be no hitch in their pay 
roll, which will be incidentally a separate pay roll, I respectfully request the approval as required on each of these 
individuals. 

Thanking you for your cooperation, I am. 

Respectfully yours, 

Wm. W. Drummey, 

Superintendent of Construction. 



Draftsmen.— Michael J. Honish, Daniel 
Buckley, John J. Casey, .Albert D. Coady, 
George P. Connor, Paul Cotty, .John V. 
CuUen, Richard L. Dwyer, James J. Fay, 
Donald Cullespie, John W. Gould, Francis 
H. Hanlon, Joseph Howard, -Axel H. 
Johnson, William H. l>ockman, .John 
MacNeil, Joseph Maguire, Francis A. 
Melaugh, Willard F. O'lirien, Joseph 
Rochon, W. P. Roniin. 

6'tocA- men. —James J. Ix)UKhlin, Wil- 
liam P. Morris, John Powers, Jviurence J. 
Roche. 

BncAr/ai/ers.— Willard Chapman, Walter 
Connelly, .John Darcy, Dominic De- 
.Angelo, Anthony J. Dee, Richard Dono- 
van, Frank Doyle, Antonio Ferrari, Am- 
brose Introine, Charles Jacobs, Guseeppe 
Luretta, Peter Martin, Thomas Morgan, 
William O'Connor, Daniel T. Sheehan, 
Edward Simpson, Angello Tucci, Lorenzo 
Zorio. 

Tetuler. — N. Antonellas. 

Cement Finiahe.rH. — .\ngello Cardillo, 
James DePanfilous, John Doty, Vincent 
J. Kelleher, Peter McCartin, Jeremiah 
Murphy, Otto Norgrien, William J. 
Phelan, Patrick R. Welch. 

Chauff eurs-Laborera. — William H. Arm- 
strong, John A. Mitchell. 

ftor/wen.— Edward Fitzgerald, Dennis 
Flanagan, Martin Kilgallon, Francis Mc- 
I>aughlin, Richard Shaw. 

Operator.— William A. Benker. 



EMPLOYEES LISTED. 

FurnUure Refinishers. — Edward A. 
,\l!en, Roland L. Boyce, Dennis Callahan, 
Roy H. Campbell, .Anthony Campiglia, 
.John Carey, Roderick Carey, Stephen J. 
Carroll, Furgus T. Casey, Howard W. 
Churchill, William F. Croke, Edward J. 
Cronin, Walter Delaney, Daniel Doherty 
Dennis I'\ Doherty, Arthur Donahue, 
Thomas F. Donnelly, Robert Douglas, 
Edward Finn, (Jeorge F. Finn, James 
Fontenoraso, Patrick Gately, Albert Guth- 
rie, George Hamilton, Frank lovanni, 
Harry Johnson, Michael J. Joyce, Thomas 
F. Kilroy, Alfred Kruger, Joseph Lafley, 
James P. Leonard, Thom.-is Linehan, 
John F. McBerney, John R. McCarthy, 
Thomas Maher, l^'rank Manseur, I'"rank 
.\. Meleady, Rassell Mealey, Richard 
Merick, Edward .J. Morgan, John T. 
Mullov, James G. Murphv, Robert Niven, 
Paul O'Brien, Thomas H. O'Neil, Hugo 
Opderbecke, James J. Partridge, George 
liyan, William F. Scanlon, J'aul Scheuller, 
George H. Smith, Marshall ViDito, 
John T. Weber. 

Glazier. — James Willis. 

Healing and Ventilating Engineers. — 
Thure L. Reenstierna, Charles E. Taylor. 

Iron Workers. — Vincent Courtney, Elza 
England, Frank J. Ford, Herbert J. 
Gallagher, John Galvin, John I'. Harring- 
ton, I'. J. Lundrigan, Archie E. McDonald, 
Arthur F. McDonald, Gustaf Matson, 
Christopher O'Brien, Olaf Olson, Rocco 
Schena, Roland R, Wade. 



Iron Worker's Helper. — Abraham Klee- 
banow. 

Landscape Gardeners. — Myles liurke, 
Joseph E. Conley, James F. Hyland, 
Edward Noyes. 

Lathman. — ^ Walter Sweeney. 

Locksmiths. — Patrick F. Anderson, Fred 
Frobese, Max Riffin. 

Machinists. — W. P. Cleary, Harry Deer- 
field, John Phillips. 

Marble Setters. — William Amato, Joseph 
Buono, Patrick Lally, Angelo Menchiello, 
Michael F. Mc.Auliffe, Michael Welby. 

Pipe Coverers. — Andrew Banks, John 
C. Brown, Thomas J. Butler, John J. 
Kilduff, R. E. Lindstrom, Edgar Milton. 

Plasterers. — Alexander Anastasio, An- 
thony Cervona Coleman J. Clonan, 
Harold J. Donnelly, .John J. Farrell, 
Lawrence Finn, Giusseppe Lorizzo, James 
F. Lynch, Chester R. Macauley, Charles 
W. Munroe, Andrew Murphy, l^eter 
Rabbitt, Eleso Rendini, .Joseph Rizzo. 

Plasterer's Helpers. — Florino Bertucelli, 
Carmine Ciampa, William Ferguson, 
Michael J. Martin, Thomas May, .Joseph 
Norris, Phillip O'Kane, J. C. Parker, 
Peter Shaughnessy. 

Steeplejacks. — John J. Hernon, Frank 
E. Simpson. 

Structural Engineer. — W. Leo Campion. 

Therrruislat Repairers. — William F. Hen- 
derson, John J. O'Donnell. 

Upholsterers. — Michael I'''laherty, Hy- 
man Krasow, James A. Urick. 



100 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 3 



Clerks. — William T. Ahern, James M. 
Barker, John Barron, Stanley Bayko, 
John J. Bcatty, James H. Casey, James 
J. Casey, Francis Chaisson, Herbert 
Chambers, William ]j. Cotter, Henry J. 
Cotty, William P. Cox, Edward L. Coy, 
Edwin L. Crowley, Francis J. Curran, 
Francis J. DeMarzio, John J. Donnelly, 
Clarence Dowling, Edward Bowling, 
William T. Dugan, Joseph M. Eich, (). 
T. Elliott, John Finn, Henry Finneran, 
(leorge L. Gainley, Robert Creene, 
Thomas Halloran, William J. Hanley, 
William Herlihy, Ernest L. Hines, John 
Kane, William T. Kearney, Rose M. 
Keegan, Edward F. Keenan, John Kelley, 
Frank E. Kramer, Robert J. Mc Brine, 
Edward G. McCaffrey, Charles E. McCar- 
thy, John T. McCullock, James P. 
McFarland, Arthur McCJearry, Andrew 
McGettrick, Thomas McGrath, Thomas 
F. McManus, Albert J. McQuade, Albert 
J. Massey, Francis E. Murphy, James 
B. Murphy, John A. Murphy," Thomas 
F. Murphy, James P. Noonan, James 

E. Quinlan, Richard Quirk, Daniel Rich- 
ardson, Charles Reardon, Martin R. 
Schofield, James A. Sharkey, Lawrence 
Sheehan, Richard C. Smith, James F. 
Wallace, William J. Walsh, John F. 
Welsh, Andrew G. Wiswell, Claire Craw- 
ford, Irving DeLapper, Edward P. Don- 
egan, Edward Hanlon, Francis J. Keat- 
ing, Margaret M. Kelley, Henry J. Milli- 
gan, Allen Ranson. 

La6orers.T— John Allavson, Martin Bod- 
kins, Richard Brighton, Harold J. Brown, 
J. F. Campbell, John J. Cody, William A. 
Cronin, Arthur Cross, William Davis, 
Benjamin Dickenson, Peter G. Dousette, 
Charles F. Driscoll, Henry Driscoll, 
George H. Edwards, Stephen Fallon, 
Leonard Flamingo, Walter Flannelly, 
Stephen Fraser, James Gaffney, Robert 
L. Gibbons, Harry Goldstein, John 
Griffin, George Hammett, Patrick Hanlon, 
Mathew Hanney, Frank Henry, Thomas 
Hughes, Peter Keane, Gerard Kelley, 
Joseph F. Kelly, James McDonough, 
George McLaughlin, Andrew McRaie, 
Bronie Marsua, John Mercury, Karl 
Meulenaire, Alexander Moscwick, Charles 
Murray, John C. Pitts, Maurice Powers, 
Leo Regan, Gusseppe Russo, Albert Silva, 
Albert Spalvero, William Tobin, Samuel 
Todora, Joseph Viscay, Charles Wagner, 
Frederick W. Wagner, Michael Wallace, 
Jeremiah R. Welch. 

Plumbers. — Sylvester P. Abinist, John 

F. Ambrose, John A. Carroll, Maurice J. 
Cronin, Peter Dcgnan, Edward Dubow, 
William Duncan, Thomas J. Fitzgerald, 
James L. Flanagan, Nathan D. Freeman, 
William M. Garrity, Joseph F. Gavin, 
Arthur W. Griem, Robert W. Hennessey, 
John B. Houlihan, Henry J. Jacobs, 
William J. Kearns, Charles R. Keith, 
Joseph H. Kenney, Thomas J. Kerwin, 
James McDonald, Edward McKenney, 
Mcrton J. McNeil, Joseph G. Maguirc, 
Thoma-s Maguire, Thomas F. Mathews, 
Hilamey Mcllyn, Joseph Nessel, Patrick J. 
Norton^ Thomas O'Reilly, Bernard Rey- 
nolds, Aaron Rosen, George V. Rull, 
John E. Rull, Michael H. Sculley, James 
A. Shea, Andrew J. Smith, James Stone, 
Joseph A. Sullivan, Phillip Sullivan, 
Thomas J. Sullivan. 

Plumbers' Helpers. — Francis J. Cole, 
John Finks, George J. Frawley, John 
Juliano, Theodore McLeod, Howard 
McNeil, George Mann, Nathaniel Murphy, 
John F. Murray, .Albert T. Rogers, Louis 
Scozzella, John F. Shea, Henry Trainor, 
Martin Woods. 

Roofers. — Robert Allen, Thomas E. 
Birmingham, John J. Connors, Arthur 
Deschamps, Malachi Duffy, Gcroge C. 
Hawkins, J. J. Malley, Michael J. Mul- 



kern, Robert Peterson, George J. Sullivan, 
Martin J. Tully. 

Roofers' Helpers. — Paul Brauneis, 
Th()ma.s Coyne, John J. Fitzpatrick 
Robert Fitzpatrick, Matthew Hennessey, 
Edward McLaughlin, Thomas J. O'Brien, 
Matthew O'Neil, John Rock, Irvin? 
\\'ermont. 

iSfieet Metal Workers. — Joseph F. Boo- 
dro, Walter Burke, Phillip Carrigan, 
Thomas Curran, James Fitzgerald, David 
Kalman, Daniel F. Lane. Hol)crt R. 
Mitton, Chester Morrelli, Francis J. 
McCJowan, Jeremiah McKinney, Claude 
Rhodes. 

Sheet Metal Worker's Hel//er. — Harold 
Pierce. 

Steamfitters. — Matthew J. .\rcher, Wil- 
liam L. Dickinson, D. S. Driscoll, Frank 
J. Foley, Ernest Franz, Samuel (!reen, 
Alexander Hamilton, James E. Hunter, 
Albert C. Jorgensen, William E. Kane, 
Thomas J. Kerr, Basil Love'y, .^lex F. 
McDougall, Thomas McGrath, .John H. 
Mack, .John J. Madden, Joseph Maguire, 
liichard Mahan, Joseph M. Manning, 
John J. Murphy, Samuel Murphy, Fred 
¥. O'Brien, John Rahilly, John Regan, 
Laurence Reynolds, Joseph Rutskey, 
Joseph F. Ryan, Michael Sheridan, James 
Simmons, William F. Toban, George E. 
\'oye, Leonard H. White, William White. 

Steamfitters' Helpers. — Phillip J. Bova, 
Wallace Campbell, James S. Casey, 
William C. Collins, Earl B. Cooper, 
Francis Cullen, Dennis T. Daley, John 
DeFreitas, Daniel J. Donovan, .Joseph 
Foote, Harold P. Fottler, George H. 
Green, Rubin Hancock, Edwin M. 
Kiewicz, Walter Lane, William McCann, 
Jeremiah McCarty, John Mcintosh, 
Harold IMcQuarrie, George F. Mc- 
Sweeney, Charles F. Mahoney, John J. 
Mooney, William J. O'Kane, Fred Pepper, 
Gustav H. Rathgeber, Navzarro Scarpa, 
William J. Toner, Benjamin Tynion, 
Anthony Ventola, James E. Whynot. 

Tree Surgeons. — John A. Beaton, Frank 
J. Bolane, James Bradbury, Charles 
Carroll, Thomas S. Cunningham, Edward 
H. Dalton, Albert Dobson, George R. 
Dunnar, John J. Gray, John Hanley, 
Robert V, Hennessey, John F. McGrath, 
John McNulty, John Maloney, John J. 
Murray, Thomas E. Raffery, Charles A. 
Stuzman, Thomas J. Watts, Lawrence J. 
Woods. 

Painters. — Joseph .\brams, William 
Acker, Gabriel Altimar, Frank Anderson, 
Rogan .\nderson, Louis Argengio, George 
.\tamian, Sylvester .\tencio, Lewis .\ubin, 
Daniel Ballem, Robert Barbour, John 
B. Barry, Frederick W. Berg, Pasqualle 
Bimbo, Lester H. Blanchard, Edward A. 
Bowers, Peter J. Brady, Curtis M. Brader, 
Cyrus H. Brown, William H. Byran, 
Pasqualle Buontempo, Charles F. Bugbee, 
William Burchstold, John J. Burke, 
George Burnett, Thomas J. Burns, 
William Carroll, Lloyd G. Carter, John 
Casey, Henry F. Casey, Albert Chichester, 
Guisseppe Cicio, John F. Clegg, Frank 
Coffee, Charles H. Coflin, Maurice 
Cohen, James CoUins, Joseph Coppinger, 
Michael B. Corliss, Thomas Coyne, 
John J. Creamer, John Cronan, Frank 
E. Cummings, John Cunningham, Dennis 
Denahey, James Dever, Emil Dietsch, 
Nicholas Dillon, Charles Dingley, Edward 
T. Dobbins, William Doherty, Francis 
Donaher, ^lichael J. Doyfe, Henry 
Dubois, George Emerson, Harry L. 
Emrich, Gerald Fallon, Edward Feeney, 
.Joseph Finigan, Edward T. Fitzgerald, 
Eugene M. I'lynn, Robert Forsj^th, 
James A. Garbarino, George Georgelis, 
John Gilbert, Edward J. Glennon, William 
E. Glennon, Joseph Ciorman, William H. 
Hanley, Hans Hansen, Henry W. Hans- 



john, .Mfred Harrington, Charles Herman - 
son, John Hoar,' John J. Hoar, William 
Holft, Harold Holm, William Hough, 
James Hunt, Thomas F. Hurley, .Arthur 
James, George D. .James, Joel W. Johnson, 
Frank Kennedy, John J. Kenney, John 
.1. Killion, Samuel Kubitzky, Peter C. 
Lawson, Thomas F. Lee, Edward Leonard, 
Antonio I^ueni, George Mack, Phillip 
Mahoney, Timothy IVIahoney, Naseib 
Maloof, Henry Meyer, Thomas Moore, 
Thomas Mulkern, Joseph A. Mullonej', 
Thomas Murray, Phillip McCole, Daniel 
McDonald, Fnink W. McDonald, .John 
McDonald, .John D. McDonald, .John J. 
McDonald, .John W. McDonald, Joseph 
Mc(!rath, Cleorge McLane, Anthonj' 
McNeil, William J. McNulty, .\rthur 
Nash, Charles L. Norton, Charles J. 
O'lirien, John J. O'Brien, William O'Con- 
nell, Daniel O'Leary, Emil Olson, Fred P. 
Paskell, Phillip Patenaude, Emil L. 
I'earson, I'eter Peterson, Harry Pruzon, 
Miles V. C^ualter, Michael Quinn, Walter 
Randall, Frank C. Regan, George H. 
Reynolds, Edward Roberts, Alexander 
L. Rose, Frank H. Rushton, John Scena, 
Joseph Schraffa, Ernest Schwenzfeier, 
Albert W. Sexton, Israel Shain, Walter 
Shaw, Daniel Shea, Jeremiah Shea, 
John Shea, Roland E. Sherwood, Harrison 
G. Smith, William Soule, Louis Spector, 
Thomas Sproules, Charles H. Steeger, 
Charles Stewart, James P. Stuart, John 
F. Sullivan, Michael Sullivan, Simon R. 
Swanson, Ernest Sweeney, Arthur Tacelli, 
William J. Tacelli, William Tenereillo, 
Richard F. Thompson, Thomas F. 
Trainor, Birger Turnberg, William P. 
L'mlah, Frederick W. Waller, Frederick 
Ward, Thomas Ward, Willard C. Warner, 
Samuel Weiner, William J. Welton, 
Joseph C. Wilkie, Myron L'. Winn, 
Fred J. Wright, Frank Zuccaro. 

Painters' Helpers. — H. R. Baasner, Fred 
E. Benson, Edward G. Brady, Peter F. 
Burke, Walter J. Burke, John Cassidy, 
George A. Cavanaugh, Henry W. Cedar- 
lund, Fred Connolly, George W. Crosby, 
William Curry, Eugene Ferris, George F. 
Ferry, Stephen Fitzsimmons, Thomas 
Flatley, Abraham Fleitman, Saul Foster, 
Dominick Freada, Harold Ciervan, Joseph 
Gildea, Sjdvester Green, John Hartnett, 
William E. Hayes, Phillip Hiltz, Harrison 
W. Hoban, Howard Houghtaling, James 
\. lerarti, Lawrence Keely, Frederick A. 
Jvelley, Joseph F. Kilmartin, Fred H. 
Koch, George J. Koch, Charles Leary, 
James Lombard, Thomas Lydon, Stephen 
L. Lynch, Thomas A. Lj-nch, Francis B. 
McGinn, John L. Mclvay, John Maloney, 
James B. Martin, John A. Martinelli, 
Robert F. Morey, Michael E. Mulkern, 
Fred O. Newman, Thomas O'Sullivan, 
Victor Reneghan, Joseph T. Sharkey, 
James Shea, Michael Thyne, Ernest 
Trudell, Ralph Vitello. 

Carpenters. — Louis .\ltman, Peter 
.\mato, Louis .\s\vad, Cecil Atkins, 
Michael Barr, William K. Beattie, Irving 
Benson, Zipky Bistany, William P'. 
Bremner, .\rthur Caravan, James E. 
Connors, Leo F. Cosgrove, John Costello, 
Louis Cullen, Michael D'.\more. Clayton 
Dauphine, Antoine Dennis, Maurice 
Finn, Everet J. I'lsh, Bertram Fowel, 
Isadore Gershengonn, Edward Holmes, 
Joseph M. Hubbard, J. D. Hughes, 
Jeremiah Hurley, \enturino lannetti, 
Oscar A. Ivarson, John Jordan, John 
Josselyn, Thomas J. Kane, .James S. 
Kelleher, Mark King, .Abraham Klebanoft, 
.Abraham Kurker, .A.H)ert H. Ladd, Henry 
A. Leighton, Timothy Leonard, Patrick 
Levett, Martin Lynch, Tobias McClos- 
key, John J. McDonald, William J. 
McDonald, Francis J. McGlone, Daniel 
McGonigle, B. D. McHugh, Joseph L. 



Feb. 3 



CITY RECORD 



101 



Edward 

William 

Alfred 



McLean, Lester MacMann, Wiliam L. 
Malone, Thomas H Maloney, -John AI. 
Miller George B. Milner, Rutus .I.^Mor- 
ton C T Murphv, Thomas J. Norris, 
Harry C. Northern, Laurence i- . O - 
Donnell, Thomas O'LauKhlin, Michael 
O'Mallev, James L. O'Hourke, Leander 
Panuet/C.eorge H. Pipping, Louis 1 otts, 
Charles S. Preble, Martin C. Quigley, 
leo Keardon, Harry Reed, Anthony 
Rose Abraham Roesov, John 1- Rush, 
Charles Sedlen, Maurice V. hhannon. 
Samuel Shellev, Harry Shurgeman John 
F Simpson, Herbert J. Sinnott, /-eorge 
E Stone, Alonzo Taber, Bernard Telis- 
zewski, Ravmond Tice, VViUiam Vassell, 
Fred P \aughan, Charles S. Welsh, 
Chester C. Wheaton, Charles Willett, 
Horace W. Vuill. , » u 

Carpenter's Helpers — Joseph Ashman- 
ski, Joseph J. Barry, Joseph Baxter, 
William Coleman, Joseph Conti, \\ illiam 
F Cullen, John Diloretti, Napoleon 
Larrabee, Paul J. Lyons, Patrick McHugh, 
William J. McRay, Martin Mara James 
.1 Murray, Rocco Panzini, Angello Pas- 
quantonio', Thomas R. Powers, Richard 
P. Shaner. 

Electricians.— ^ohn Albert , 
Bezzarro, John Bohling, 
Brooks, Richard Brundage, 
Br\'mer John Burns, Richard Carmody, 
Benjamin Carpenter, .loseph Connor, 
George Cronin, Michael Denaro, John 
Donahue, Francis Donnelly, Joseph 
Donovan, Harold Doyle, Morris Ev-^es 
George Farrell, John J. Farrell, Carl 
Field, Arnold Fisher, Leo GafTney, Joseph 
General, James Cdadney, Edward Gold- 
man, Martin Gottfredson, W dliam Hans- 
ford, Clyde Haryey, Warren B. JoUey, 
Timothy Keane, .letTrey Keating, Hugh 
King, thomtis A. Lacroix, Roger Long, 
Francis Mahoney, James Morrison, John 
McClorey, Robert McNabb, iTank 
O'Brien," Thomas O'Brien, James 
O'l.eary, Gustav Peterson, Samuel 
Phillips, Leonard Schuster, Laurence 
Seutlert, Samuel Shulk, John Shannon, 
John Smith. Roy Smith, Frank Spiyak, 
John Sulliyan, Patrick Sullivan, Louis 
Weinstein, Edward Welsh, Theodore 
Fanning, John A. Burke, Daniel Riley, 
Jeremiah Slieehaii, Ernest Swanson. 

Electricians' //<'//>er.s.— Joseph Banks, 
Charles Cannon, William Charles, ^^ illiam 
Copeland, William Galhigher, Anthony 
Gamboa, George F. Moore, Lloyd Murray, 
George Perkins, Phillii) Rynone, Harold 
Sheerin, William Sullivan. 

\/isce//«/(e«"s.— William Bush, laborer; 
Michael Maloof, plasterer's helper; (leorge 
F. McDonald, John McLaughlin, John 
E. Moore, painters' helpers; Carl H. 
Gustafson, carpenter; Gordon Dornty, 
elevator construction; Michael Feeney, 
radio electrician; Sydney Foley, gasfitter; 
James Graham, elevator construction; 
William F. Grace, gasfitter; James 
McDonnell, John F. iieardon, radio 
electricians; Charles Maloney, radio 
supervisor; Thomas Downey, clerk; 
Charles H. Wigley, draftsman; James F. 
O'Connell, steamfitter's helper. 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE FOR SUFFOLK 

COUNTY 



Number of children 7 
675, of whom 104,085 
were attending school ; 
29,662, of whom 28,256 
were attending school ; 
29,902, of whom 19,453 
were attending school ; 
103, of whom 12,395, 
were attending school 
to 20 years old, 212,342 
or 173 per cent, were 



-13 years old, 105- 

or 98.5 per cent, 

14 and 15 years, 

), or 95.3 per cent, 

; 16 and 17 years, 

J, or 65.1 per cent, 

; 18-20 years, 47,- 

or 26.3 per cent, 

; total children 7 

I, of whom 164,189, 

attending school. 



BROADCAST BY MAYOR. 

(Continued from page 97.) 

Both of these deputy commissioners 
are to be paid a decent salary with the 
necessity of giving full time to their posi- 
tions. In this legislation the direct re- 
sponsibility will be placed upon the 
shoulders of the commissioner and his 
two deputies, which cannot be avoided. 
This sounds like repetition but I must say 
again that the great difference between 
the department as organized now and the 
anticipated legislation is that the respon- 
sibility is placed upon persons who will 
be in constant touch with every action of 
the department — ready at all times to 
meet any emergency and to answer every 
question that might arise and from every 
angle. 

If, however, the Mayor could appoint 
political favorites or persons not qualified 
the value of this legislation would be mini- 
mized. I have provided for this, however, 
in the bill which requires the commis- 
sioner and the deputy commissioners to 
be persons who are experienced in their 
j)articular field.s — possessing administra- 
tive ability and professional training and 
experience in social vyelfare. One of the 
deputies, for instance, must have had at 
least five years' experience in office man- 
agement or accounting and the other 
deputy shall be a trained social worker. 
.All of the employees of the department 
now under civil service will have the full 
protection afforded them by law so that 
there will be no fear in their minds in 
the reorganization of the department. 

All of the aforesaid statement is in full 
accord with my public utterances wherein 
I have often stated that it was my inten- 
tion to place in charge of our city depart- 
ments only persons well qualified. 

Personal Re.sponsibility. 

The main point I wish to make, before 
I pass to another feiiture for your con- 
sideration, is that for the first time within 
memory, if this legislation passes, there 
can be no backing or filling by respon- 
sible he;ids of the department if any 
unethical [practice is uncovered — a paid 
public official must answer. 

I know that this department is so 
unlike any other in the city as the per- 
sonal element largely dominates its 
activities and I have inserted a provision 
that guards against what might be called 
the bureaucratic fonn of administration 
which generally leads to favoritism and 
other abuses. To prevent the recurrence 
of such perniciousness I have provided tor 
the appointment of an unpaid advisory 
Board of five members, who will advise 
with the commissioner concerning the 
policy and administration of the depart- 
ment This Board may by itself initiate 
or upon the request of the commissioner 
study and investigate broad questions of 
departmental policy and activity. Now 
we all know that for generations certain 
religious, charitable and similar agencies 
have given temporary and permanent aid 
to the poor. By the very nature of their 
work they have first-hand and reliable 
infonnation and a human understanding 
of the very pressing problems of the com- 
munity. From such bodies I shall select 
this advisory committee. They will be 
in a way a connecting link between the 
administrative officials and the applicants 



who desire to be aided — in fact, as I view 
it, they will be the advocates of those 
who apply for help. 

This, my radio audience, is the program 
which I desire to install in the Welfare 
Department for the protection of our city 
and for those who ask for help. It is a 
long stride in advance of the present 
system which has worn itself out and 
should have been discarded at least three 
years ago. 

District Relief Offices. 

It is also my intention, if the plan 
proves to be feasible, to establish district 
offices for welfare relief if this may be 
done without great expense to the city. 
By using municipal buildings where they 
exist in the various districts, or other city- 
owned property, I hope to relieve the re- 
cipients of vyelfare of the burden of visiting 
the central office on Hawkins street. 
Such visits at the present time are ex- 
pensive to the recipients if they are com- 
pelled to pay car fare and are a physical 
hardship if they cannot pay car fare and 
are compelled to walk from their homes 
and return. In addition to this they are 
often required to wait for a long time 
before they can be attended to at the 
central headquarters. By establishing 
the district offices I hope to make it easier 
for the welfare recipients and also relieve 
the principal office of some of its con- 
gestion. 

And this is an appropriate place for me 
to speak about something else. While 
we are on the subject of welfare and public 
relief we must not forget that there are 
many persons in this world who are suffer- 
ing not from unemployment alone but 
also from sickness and disease. Priva- 
tions caused by lack of employment and 
insufficient funds are difficult to bear, but 
when to these are added physical infirmi- 
ties the burden becomes almost intolerable. 
While we are resolved that our unfor- 
tunate unemployed and their dependents 
shall not be allowed to suffer, we must also 
resolve that those stricken by illness and 
wasting diseases must not be forgotten. 

One of the most insidious and saddest 
of afflictions is that of infantile paralysis. 
Tomorrow evening, in the Imperial Ball- 
room in the Hotel Statler, there will be a 
Roosevelt Birthday Ball, named in honor 
of our President, Franklin D. Roosevelt. 
But this ball is not intended merely as a 
social function. The proceeds are to be 
used for the establishment and main- 
tenance of suitable institutions at Warm 
Springs, Georgia, or elsewhere if it is 
deemed advisable, to give proper care 
and attention to those persons, particu- 
larly children, \yho have been afflicted 
with this terrible disease. Seventy-five 
per cent of the cases are charitable in 
their nature. Let me urge you to do 
your part to make this charitable enter- 
prise a great success. 

I am informed that the box tickets are 
practically all gone but that there are 
seats left at the tables at $5 each, which 
include supper. A regular admission 
ticket may be purchased for $2.50, which 
will include the dance and the shows 
which will be given in different parts of 
the Statler Hotel, but they will not 
include the supper. Arrangements may 
be made so that those holding admission 
tickets at $2.50 can purchase supper 
by paying for it in addition. 

As Mayor of the City of Boston I want 
to feel that when the returns come in 
from our beautiful city she will be first 
in proportion to size as we always have 
been first in every call for the relief of 
human suffering. 



102 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 3 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing, 
delivering and installing gas ranges in 
the Jeremiah E. Burke High School for 
Girls. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to the full amount 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Department of School Buildings, 

11 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
SI 00, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, February 15, at 
2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and setting up steel lockers in the Jeremiah 
E. Burke High School for Girls. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to the full amount of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Department of 
School Buildings, 11 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $1,500, to be filed 
at the same oflice. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, February 15, at 
2 p. m. 

Police Dep.artment. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
tires and tubes. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 50 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, February 7, at 

12 m. 

Supply Dep.^. rtment. 

Readvertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing rubber coats to the Fire Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of 25 per cent of the 
contract price, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, February 5, at 12 ?«. 

Readvertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing white lead to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of 
the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supplv Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
.'$200, to be filed at the same ofiice. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, February 9, at 12 ?n. 

Advertising for proposals for furnish- 
ing 75,000 vards, more or less, of toweling 
to the Park Department. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursda}', Febioiary 1 : 

Fire Dep.^rtment. 

Lieut. John F. Curley of Dadder Com- 
pany 19 has been retired on half pay 
effective at 8 a. m. Friday, February 2, 
at 81,250 a year. 

Capt. James W. D\vj'er of Engine Com- 
pany 19 has been retired on half pay, 
effective at 8 a. m. Friday, February 2, 
at SI, 350 a year. 

HospiT.^L Dep.\rtment. 
The following persons have been em- 
ployed at the Boston City Hospital dur- 
ing the week ending Thursday, January 

Temporary. — Katherine Kerr, Mary K. 
Burke, special nurses, S29.75 a week; 
Rose Linnehan, Catherine Gill, cleaners, 
S15 a week; Timothy Reilly, Edwin 
Wright, kitchenmen, S16.63 a week. 

The following changes have occurred 
an Main Department : Sidonia Rehwaldt, 
reconstniction aid at $27, temporary, to 



forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check 
in the sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, February 12, at 12 ni. 

Transit Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering toll collection equipment. 
Traffic Tunnel. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to the full 
amount of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Transit Department, 1 ' 
Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- ] 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$1,000, to be filed at the same office. I 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, February 5, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering carbon monoxide analyzers 
and recorders. Traffic Tunnel. Surety 
bond will be rendered in a sum equivalent 
to the full amount of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Transit Depart- 
ment, 1 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the sum 
of $500, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, February 5, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and installing pipe sewers, manholes 
and gravel fill in the Traffic Tunnel. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Transit Depart- 
ment, 1 Beacon street, Bo.ston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $1,000, to be filed at the same 
office. 

Bids close Monday, February 12, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing and delivering traffic signal units for 
the Traffic Tunnel. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $500, 
to be filed at the office of the Transit 
Department, 1 Beacon street, Boston. 

Bids close Monday, February 1.9, at 12 m. 



half-time, $1455 a week; Robert Pearson, 
electrician's helper at S18.90 to mechanic's 
helper at S27 a week; Lillian Shine, 
w^ard assistant at S14.25 to cleaner at S15 
a week; Eleanor Sullivan, tablegirl at 
$14.25 to ward assistant at $1425 a week; 
James B. Garin, temporarj' porter, name 
should be Gearin; Mary Wiltshire, tem- 
porary laundress, from Main Department 
to South Department; Elizabeth Ma- 
honey, as.sistant night super\'isor of 
nurses at .S21.60 a week to acting night 
supervisor of nurses at $1,395 a year. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 
Division). 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division of 
the Boston City Hospital up to and 
including Thursday, January 25: 

Robert Cornell, druggist (temporary), 
$30 a week; Edward Gibbons, Daniel 
O'Xeil, male nurses (patients), $456 a 
year; James Kellej^, Patrick McGuin- 
ness, choremen (patients) (temporarj'), 
$228 a year; Daniel O'Donnell, Malcolm 
McKenzie, male nurses (patients) (tem- 
jiorary), .S456 a year; Francis O'Toole, 
maid (patient) (temporary), $228 a year. 

Institutions Dep.artment. 
The following changes have been made 
for the week ending Thursday, January 
25: 

Long Island Hospital. 

Appointment: Arthur French, fireman, 
temporary, $33.50 a week and board. 

Resignations: Michael J. FljTin, in- 
stitutions employee, helper in laundry, 
S600 a year; Lucy M. McNiff, student 
nurse, $600 a j'ear. 

Mayor's Office. 

William J. Healey has been appointed 
stenographer at 82,600 a year, effective 
January 26. 

Thomas E. Cimeno has been appointed 
as a.ssistant secretary at $2,300 a year, 
effective Januarj' 29. 

Pexal Institutions Department. 
Approval has been given for the pro- 
motion of Michael J. Santiano from 
officer at $1,300 a year and maintenance, 
less 10 per cent, to electrician (with 
officer's duties) at 81,800 a year and 
maintenance, less 15 pter cent, effective 
January 26. 

House of Correction. 
Michael J. Santiano (transferred from 
officer at $1,300 (81,170) a year and 
maintenance), electrician (with officer's 
duties), 81,800 ($1,530) and maintenance, 
to succeed John J. Murphy. 

The following appointments have been 
made: 

House of Correction, M. and M. for 
Manufacturing. 

George H. Donovan (time extended b}' 
civil service 3 months, to April 13, 1934), 
shoe supervisor, $1,300 8(1,170) a year 
and maintenance, temporar}'. 

Michael Bi-adley (time extended by 
civil service to April 20, 1934), shoe 
machinen,- repairman, 81,300 8(1,170) a 
year and maintenance, temporar}'. 

Public Works Dep.artmext (Paving 

Service). 
Approval has been given to continue 
the temporary employment of Everett 



Feb. 3 



CITY RECORD 



103 



J. Cahill as clerk-stenographer at $1,100 
a year until the result of the civil service 
examination is determined. 

Approval ha."< been given to continue 
the temporary employment of Charles 
H. Foley as clerk-stenographer at 81,100 
a year less 10 per cent until the result 
of the civil service examination is de- 
termined. 

Public Wokks Dep.^ut.mext (Sewer 
Service). 

Appro\al has been given to promote 
Thomas F. Maher from first-cla.ss steam 
engineer at the Calf Pasture pumping 
station to chief steam engineer of that 
Station with increase in salary from $48 
a week to $3,000 a .year less 15 per cent, 
to fill vacancy cau.sed by the retirement 
of Bliss W. Robinson, effective Januar>' 
26. 

Tr.^nsit Department. 

Approval has been gi\'cn for the tem- 
porary ai)pointment, for a i)eriod of not 
exceeding two months beginning January 
30, of Theodore P. Bacciola as electrical 
draftsman at $1,785 a year. 

Overtime Alixjwed. 
The heads of the various departments 
whose employees have received, payment 
for overtime state in connection there- 
with that if any laborer has been allowed 
to work more than eight hours per day 
it has been only in case of emergency 
under the law. 

Hospital Dcpnrlmcnl (Saitnlurium 

Division ) . 
For the week ending Thursday, Jan- 
uar>' 25: 

Mary K. Finnegan, relief telephone 
operator, 3 days, .$8.55. 



BUILDINGS RAZED. 

The Mayor has appro\e(l the request 
of the Building Department to raze the 
following stnictures as menaces: 

The building ut 6 Noyes place. Ward 3. 

The building at 48 Fay street, Ward 3. 

The building at 41 Allston street, 
Ward 3. 

The building at 107 West Second 
street. Ward 6. 

The building at 13 Dorr .street, Ward 
11. 

The building at 258 Athens street, 
Ward 6, is in a dilapidated condition, 
also a fire hazard. 

The owner, Estate of Mary and Rich- 
ard Stack, care of Robert E. Bigney, ad- 
ministrator, 73 Tremont street, Boston, 
was notified of the un.safe condition of 
the building, but nothing has been done 
to remove the cause of complaint. 

The building at 2 Kelly's block. Ward 
2, is in a dilapidated condition, windows 
all out, doors open to public, a fire 
hazard. 

The owner, John P. Prendergast of 25 
Polk street, Charlestown, was notified 
of the unsafe condition, but he reports 
that he has no funds to remedy con- 
ditions. 

The building at 124 B street. Ward 6, 
is in an unsafe and dangerous condition, 
also dilapidated and a fire hazard. 

The owner, Dennis C. Loney of 871 
Washington street, Dorchester, has been 
notified of the un.'^afe condition of the 
building, but nothing has been done to 
remove the cause of complaint. 



The building at 120 B street, Ward 6, 
is in an unsafe and dangerous condition, 
also dilapidated and a fire hazard. 

The owner, Dennis C. Loney of 871 
Washington street, Dorchester, has been 
notified of the unsafe condition of the 
building, but nothing has been done to 
remove the cause of complaint. 

The building at 215 London street. 
Ward 1, has settled and is out of plumb, 
the second floor frame and roof are badly 
deflected and columns are out of plumb. 

The owner. Bertha Milder of 225 Lex- 
ington street. East Boston, has been 
notified of the unsafe condition of the 
building, but nothing has been done to 
remove the cause of complaint. 

The building at 41 Allston street. Ward 

2, is un.safe, dilapidated and a fire men- 
ace, open to trespass. 

The owner of record, Nora M. Kiley, 
has not been located, but a notice of 
the un.safe condition has been posted on 
the external wall of the building. 

The building is in a very unsafe con- 
dition and the street has been roped off 
by the Police Department. 

The building at 48 Fay street. Ward 

3. The east wall toward rear is bulged, 
cracked and settled at basement level, 
also bulged at top story toward the rear. 
Rear wall is cracked, bulged and settled 
from yard level to roof, particularly at 
cast end. Unsafe and dangerous. 

The owner, Joseph Silk of 168 Hum- 
boldt avenue, hds been notified of the 
un.safe condition of the building, but 
nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 36 B street. Ward 6, is 
in an un.safe an<l dangerous condition, 
dilapidated and a fire hazard. 

The owner, Joseph Silk of 168 Himi- 
boldt avenue, Roxbury, has been notified 
of the unsafe condition of the building, 
but nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 38 B street. Ward 6, 
is in an unsafe and dangerous condition, 
dilai)idated and a fire hazard. 

The owner, Joseph Silk of 168 Hum- 
boldt avenue, Roxbury, has been notified 
of the unsafe condition of the building 
but nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 34 B street, Ward 6, 
is in an unsafe and dangerous condition, 
dilapidated and a fire hazard. 

The owner, Joseph Silk of 168 Hum- 
boldt avenue, Roxbury, wa.s notified of 
the un.safe condition of the building, but 
nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 393 West Second street, 
Ward 6, is in an unsafe and dangerous 
condition, dilapidated and a fire hazard. 

The owner, Sarah J. Lynch of 110 
Ea.st Canton street, Boston, was notified 
of the unsafe condition of the buildmg, 
but nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 50 Taber street, Ward 
8, is in an unsafe and dangerous con- 
dition, dilapidated and a fire hazard. 

The owners, Lillian J. Franklin and 
Margaret U. Franklin, trustees, imdrr the 
will of Matilda J. Franklin of 16 Brim- 
mer street, Boston, have been notified of 
the unsafe condition of the building, but 
thev inform us that they are financially 
unable to repair or remove the building. 



The building at 49 Palmer street, Ward 
8, is in an unsafe and dangerous condi- 
tion, dilapidated and a fire hazard. 

The owners, Lillian J. and Margaret U. 
Franklin, trustees, under will of M. J. 
Franklin, 16 Brimmer street, Boston, 
have been notified of the unsafe condi- 
tion of the building, but they inform us 
they are financially unable to repair or 
remove the building. 



MASSACHUSETTS CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMINATIONS. 

The Massachusetts Civil Service Com- 
mi.ssion announces examinations for 
desirable positions open in Boston and 
Metropolitan districts as follows: 

School Physician, Boston School 
Department, February 24, 1934. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 10, 1934, at 12 in. 

This examination is open to both males 
and females. 

Salary: $960 per year, less the statutory 
reduction. 

Duties: General knowledge of medicine 
and surgery; statutes relating to school 
hygiene and child hygiene; sanitation; 
causes, prevention, and correction of bad 
posture in school children; pediatrics, 
epidemiology; the differential diagnosis 
of the various communicable diseases and 
contagious skin diseases common to 
school children, including the prevention 
and methods of curing same; nutrition; 
malnutrition, its etiology, diagnosis, and 
treatment; childhood tuberculosis, diag- 
nosis and care of known cases; practical 
methods of examining the eyesight and 
hearing of school children; standards of 
admissions to classes for the conservation 
of eyesight and lip-reading classes; the 
ten-point examination used in connection 
with special class (mentally retarded) 
children; the Schick test and the Dick 
test; methods of immunizing children 
against diphtheria by means of toxin- 
antitoxin and toxoid methods; the pro- 
cedure to be followed in the examination 
of food handlers; the procedure to be 
followed in detecting the diplococcus 
intracellularis meningitis organism among 
healthy carriers; serology (in so far as it 
relates to ty{)ing of pneumonia); and 
diseases reportable to the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Health. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must be registered physicians under the 
State Division of Registration in Medicine. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 4; practical questions, 3; 
personality and fitness, as determined by 
an oral interview, 3; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements: Applicants must 
obtain at least 70 per cent in each subject 
in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE FOR BOSTON. 

Number of children 7-13 years old, 
91,758, of whom 90,347, or 98.5 per cent, 
were attending school; 14 and 15 years, 
25,659, of whom 24,507, or 95.5 per cent, 
were attending school; 16 ancf 17 years, 
25,932, of whom 16,912, or 65.2 per cent, 
were attending school ; 18 to 20 years, 
41,282, of whom 10,991, or 26.6 per cent, 
were attending school ; total children 7 
to 20 years old, 184,631, of whom 142,757, 
or 77.3 per cent, were attending school. 
Number of persons attending school who 
were 21 years of age and over was 10,966. 



104 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 3 



REQUEST FOR AUTHORITY TO TERMINATE CON- 
TRACT OF COLEMAN BROS. CORPORATION FOR 
REMOVAL OF GARBAGE, ETC., IN DORCHESTER 
AND TO AWARD NEW CONTRACT TO JOSEPH P. 
McCABE, INC. —MAYOR MANSFIELD GIVES AP- 
PROVAL TO REQUEST OF PUBLIC WORKS COM- 
MISSIONER C. J. CARVEN. 



JMayor Mansfield has approved the 
retjuest of C. J. Carven, Commissioner of 
Public Works, to be allowed to terminate, 
in keeping with an understood agreement 
between parties to the litigation, the 
contract that had been awarded to Cole- 
man Bros. Corporation, for the removal 
of garbage and refuse in the Dorchester 
district, and to award a contract to Joseph 
P. jMcCabe, Inc. The Public Works 
Commissioner, in explanation of his 
request, states that if the contract is 
canceled it wUl be necessary to award a 
new contract. The letter to Mayor 
Mansfield is as follows: 

BosTOX, February 2, 1934. 
Honorable Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mayor, City Hall, Boston. 

De.\r Mr. M.^yor: — A proposal for 
bids for ■ the collection and disposal cf 
refuse and garbage in the Dorchester 
District was duly advertised in com- 
pliance with the provisions of law in 
December, 1933. Five bids were sub- 
mitted upon said proposal and were 
opened on December 12, 1933. The bid 
submitted by Joseph P. McCabe, Inc., 
was the lowest of these bids. I'pon 
this proposal I awarded the contract, 
with the approval of James M. Curley, 
then Mayor, to Coleman Bros. Corpora- 
tion, the third lowest bidder, having 
been advised by the then Corporation 
Counsel that the bid of Joseph P. McCabe, 
Inc., who was the lowest bidder, omitted 
certain information required to be sub- 
mitted by bidders with their bids. Were 
it not for this advice I would have awarded 
the contract to Joseph P. McCabe, Inc. 

Following the award of this contract to 
Coleman Bros. Corporation, a petition 
by ten taxpayers was filed in the Superior 
Court. The issue raised in said petition 
involved the validity of the contract. 
These proceedings are now pending and 
I am advised that the parties to said pro- 
ceedings are willing to consent to the 
entry of a decree therein dismissing said 
petition, provided that sjiid contract be- 
tween the City of Boston and Coleman 
Bros. Corporation be terminated as of 
Februarv 14, 1934, and a new contract be 



entered into between the City and 
Joseph P. McCabe, Inc., upon the terms 
and conditions set forth in its bid herein- 
before referred to, except that said con- 
tract shall be for the period from Februarj' 
15, 1934, to December 31, 1934, inclusive, 
and that pa\-ment shall })e made at the 
monthly rate set forth in said bid. I am 
also advised that Joseph P. McCabe, Inc., 
is willing to enter into such a contract. 

The state of the proceedings in this 
matter in the Superior Court may involve, 
if no compromise be made, appeals to 
the Supreme Judicial Court and uncer- 
tainty and delay. 

If the contract with Coleman Bros. 
Corporation is canceled, as suggested, it 
wiU be necessary to award a new con- 
tract for the collection and disposal of 
garbage and refuse in the Dorchester 
district for the period from February' 15, 
1934, to December 31, 1934, inclusive. 

In \iew of the desirability of terminat- 
ing the pending litigation, the importance 
of maintaining service in the Dorchester 
District, which may be impaired by 
further delay or uncertainty, the fact 
that Joseph P. McCabe, Inc., was the 
lowest bidder at the time the original 
bids were made and would have been 
awarded the original contract except for 
the reasons hereinbefore set forth, and 
in view of the City's best interests, I 
recommend and request your approval of 
my entering into an agreement of termina- 
tion of the contract with Coleman Bros. 
Corporation and of an award by me to 
said Joseph P. McCabe, Inc., of a con- 
tract, upon the terms and for the periods 
above stated and that in connection with 
doing the foregoing I be authorized to 
dispense with advertising. 

Yours very truly, 

C. J. Carven, 
Coyyimissioner of Public Works. 

Approved and authority to dispense 
with advertising is hereby given. 

Frederick W. M.^nsfield, 

Mayor. 



LAND-TAKING IN EAST BOSTON. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for sewerage works to 
be constructed as follows: 

The right and easement is taken to lay 
and maintain sewerage works in the fol- 
lowing described lands, exclusive of any 
interest in trees, buildings or other struc- 
tures standing thereon, reserving to the 
owners thereof the right to use the lands 
for any purpose except such as may in- 
.jure or obstruct said works, and except 
for placing or maintaining any structure 
on said lands not authorized in writing 
by the Mayor of said city trees, buildings 
or other structures standing upon or af- 
fixed to the land in which an easement 
is hereby taken are to be removed there- 



from within sixty da3's following a notice 
of the city's intenton to enter upon .said 
taking for the purpose of constnicting 
said sewerage works. Said lands are in 
that part of Boston known as East Bos- 
ton and are bounded as follows : 

A parcel of land, o^vners unknown, be- 
ing part of the private way known as 
Orient avenue, bounded: Northeast- 
erly by land supposed to belong to Orient 
Heights Company, by land hereinafter 
described as taken from Orient Heights 
Company and by land supposed to be- 
long to Orient Heights Company, twelve 
feet; southeasterlj' by another part of 
said Orient avenue, nineteen feet; again 
northeasterl}' by the same, two hundred 
thirty-two and 5-100 feet; again south- 
easterly by the same, twelve feet; south- 



westerly by the same, two hundred forty- 
four and 5-100 feet, and northwesterly 
by the same, thirty-one feet, containing 
thirty-one hundred and fifty-seven square 
feet, more or less. 

A parcel of land, supposed to belong 
to Orient Heights Company, bounded: 
Southwesterly by land hereinbefore de- 
scribed as taken from owners unknown 
(Orient avenue), six feet; northwesterly 
by land supposed to belong to said com- 
pany, one hundred nine and 10-100 feet; 
northerly by Faywood avenue, sLx and 
69-100 feet, and southeasterly bj' other 
land supposed to belong to said com- 
pany, one hundred twelve and 6-100 
feet, containing six hundred and sixty- 
three square feet, more or less. 

The sewerage works to be constructed 
are as follows: 265 linear feet of 10-inch 
pipe sanitary sewer and 265 linear feet 
of 10-inch pipe surface drain in Orient 
avenue, and 115 linear feet of 10-inch 
pipe sanitarj- sewer and 115 linear feet 
of 10-inch pipe surface drain in private 
land between Orient avenue and Fay- 
wood avenue. 

Betterments are to be assessed for the 
making of the aforesaid improvement. 

Ordered, That this Board estimates 
that the abutting lots of land on both 
sides of Orient avenue as shown on the 
plan hereinafter mentioned, will receive 
benefit or advantage, beyond the general 
advantage to all real estate in said city, 
from the improvement herein ordered! 
each of said lots to the amount herein- 
after respectively set against it, said lots 
and the supposed owners thereof being 
shown on a plan marked "City of Boston 
Plan No. 1125, Sewerage Works, Orient 
Avenue, Faywood Avenue, East Boston 
December 30. 1933, William J. Sullivan 
Chief Engmeer, Street Laying-Out De- 
partment," and on file in the office of 
said department. 

}'°^'r^ ■ .. TT ■ , Amount. 

1. Orient Heights Company $88 OO 

2. Orient Heights Company loo 00 

3. Henry W. Shafer loo 00 

4. Rose Carresi 203 30 

o. Paul Federieo joq qq 

%' TYr?.';''^" ^- Bumpus, Agnes Bump'us,' 100 00 

7. WiUiam W. Hochmuth, Eva A. 

Hochmuth jqq qq 

8. Orient Heights Company loO 00 

9. Orient Heights Company loO 00 

Total .$991 30 

Voted, That this Board determines 
that the undermentioned estate sustains 
damages by the taking of an easement 
for sewerage purposes in private land be- 
tween Orient avenue and Fa^•wood ave- 
nue. East Boston district, under the order 
of the Board of January 22. 1934, in 
the amount hereinafter mentioned, and 
awards said amount therefor. 

Owners unknown (Orient avenue) 

3.157 square feet [.Nothing 

Orient Heights Company, 663 square 

^^''t ?50 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT— STATISTICS 
FOR YEAR 19J2. 

Summaries for the 22 wards as of April 
1. 1932: Number of persons, partner- 
ships and corporations assessed on prop- 
erty, 105,240; number of dwelling houses 

Tofl'^^'J^-'^^'^' ''''^'■^s '^f 'and assessed. 
18,212. Number of men assessed for poll 
tax, 239,798. 

Cost of department maintenance in 
1932 was $414,239 or $46,662 more than in 



Feb. 3 



CITY RECORD 



105 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Dep.^rtment of School Buildings. 

Upon January 29 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Iver-,Johnson Com- 
pany for gymnasium equipment at the 
Public Latin School. Bids w^ere as 
follows: 

Frank Hedart Manufacturing Com- 
pany, 11,374.25; A. G. Spalding & 
Brothers, $1,415; Iver-.Johnson Com- 
pany, $1,444; Wright & Ditson, $1,485. 

Supply Depart.ment. 
Upon .January 26 the Mayor approved 
contract.*-" with lowest bidders for furnish- 
ing cloth to the various city departments 
until December 31. Bids, opened on 
.January 12, were as follows: 

I'enal InstUudons Deparlmeid (Deer 

Islawl). 
500 Yards Blue Denim, Per Yard. — 
National Coat and Apron Supply Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 1(5.5 cents.* 

4,000 Yards Canton Flannel, 28 Inches 
Wide, Per Yard. — National Coat and 
Apron Supply Company, Incorporated, 
13.5 cents, 36 inches.* 

ffOO Yards Bleached Cotton, 72 Inches 
Wide, Per Yard. — Sparrow-Chisholm Com- 
pany, 32 cents, CJold Bond; National Coat 
and Apron Supply Company, Incorpo- 
rated, 25.5 cents.* 

dOO Yards Bleached Cotton, /,2 Inches 
Wide, Per Yard. — Sparrow-Chisholm Com- 
pany, 18 cents, Gold Bond; National Coat 
and Apron Supply Company, Incorpo- 
rated, 14.5 cents.* 

4,000 Yards U nbleached Cotton, o.'f 
Inches Wide, Per Yard. — Sparrow-Chis- 
holm Companj', 19 cents, Bradford; 
National Coat and Apron Supply Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 16.5 cents.* 

2,0(J(J Yards Unbleached Cotton, 40 
Inches Wide, Per Yard. — National Coat 
and Apron Suj)ply Company, Incorpo- 
rated, 10.25 cents.* 

5,000 Yards Hickory Skirling, 29 
Inches Wide, Per Yard. — National Coat 
and Apron Supply Company, Incorpo- 
rated, 13.75 cents.* 

4,oO(J Yards Khaki, 36 Inches Wide, 
Per Yard. — National Coat and Apron 
Supply Company, Incorporated, 21.5 
cents.* 

2,500 Yards Pocket Drill, SO Inches 
Wide, Per Yard. — National Coat and 
Apron Supply Company, Incorporated, 
10.25 cents.* 

5,CXX) Yards Toweling, Inmate, Sixteen 
One-Half Inches Wide, Per Yard. — Spar- 
row-Chisholm Company, 8.5 cents; Na- 
tional Coat and Apron Supply Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 7.25 cents.* 

500 Yards Toweling, Officers, Sixteen 
One-Half Inches Wide, Per Yard. — Na- 
tional Coat and Apron Supply Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 10.5 cents.* 

150 Yanh Damask Tablecloth, Per 
Yard. — National Coat and Apron Supply 
Company, Incorporated, SI. 32, 72-inch 
linen.* 

Long Island Hospital. 

500 Yards Cheesecloth, Coarse, .JO 
Inches Wide, Per Yard. — National Coat 
and Apron Supply Company, Incorpo- 
rated, 6| cents.* 

3,00fJ Yards Bleached Cotton, 42 Inches 
Wide, Per Yard. — Sparrow-Chisholm 
Company, 18 cents. Gold Bond; National 
Coat and Apron Supply Company, In- 
corporated, 14.5 cents.* 



,3,000 Yards Bleached Cotton, 64 Inches 
H'lrfe, Per Fard.— Sparrow-Chisholm 
Company, 27 cents, Gold Bond; National 
Coat and Apron Supply Company, In- 
corporated, 24.5 cents, 63 inches.* 

2,000 Yards Bleached Cotton, 72 Inches 
nide. Per Fan/.— Sparrow-Chisholm 
Company, 30 cents, Gold Bond; National 
Coat and Apron Supply Company, In- 
corporated, 25.5 cents.* 

3,000 Yards Bleachel Cotton, SO Inches 
IJ ide, Per Farr/.— Sparrow-Chisholm 
Company, 32 cents, Gold Bond; National 
Coat and Apron Supply Company, In- 
corporated, 28 cents, 81 inches.* " 

1,000 Yards Gingham, Apron Check, 
32 Inches Wide, Per Yard. —National 
Coat and Apron Supply Company, In- 
corporated, 17 cents.* 

.JOO Yards Cambric, 36 Inches Wide, Per 
)ar</.— National Coat and Apron Supply 
Company, Incorporated, 7.25 cents.* 

5,000 Yards l' nbleached Cotton, 36 Inches 
Wide (Bedgowns), Per Forf/.— Sparrow- 
Chisholm Company, 10.75 cents, Bedford; 
National Coat and Apron Supply Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 8.5 cents.* 

3,000 Yards Unbleached Cotton, 42 Inches 
» vie (Pillow Cases), Per Farr/.— Sparrow- 
Chisholm Company, 16.5 cents, Gold 
Bond; National Coat and .\pron Supply 
Company, Incorporated, 13.5 cents.* 

6,000 Yards Unbleached Cotton, 64 Inches 
H ide. Per Far^/.— Sparrow-Chisholm 
Company, 21 cent.s, Durabilt; National 
Coat and Apron Supply Company, Incor- 
porated, 20 cents.* 

6,fXJ0 Yards Unbleached Cotton, 72 Inches 
Wide, Per >'ar(/.— Sparrow-Chisholm 
Company, 28 cents, Durabilt; National 
Coat and Apron Supply Company, In- 
corporated, 23.25 cents.* 
_ 2,000 Yards Diaper Cloth, Per Yard.— 
Sparrow-Chisholm Company, 7.25 cents; 
National Coat and Apron Supply Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 7.25 cents; L. P. 
Chandler, Incorporated, 7.25 cents, ten- 
yard pieces, 3 per cent.* 

1,000 Yards Dark Crash, 16 Inches 
II i<le. Per Forr/.— National Coat and 
-Apron Supply Company, Incorporated, 
10.5 cents.* 

1,000 Yards Gray Flannel, 36 Inches 
Wide, Per Farrf.— National Coat and 
-Apron Supply Company, Incorporated, 
11.5 cents.* 

500 Yards Flannelette, 32 Inches Wide, 
Same as Pamela Cloth, Per Yard. — Na- 
tional Coat and -Apron Supply Company, 
Incorporated, 11.5 cents.* 

l,0(XJ Yards Gingham Check, 32 Inches 
Witic, Per Yard. — National Coat and 
-Apron Supply Company, Incorporated, 
10 cents.* 

1,000 Yards Table Linen, 72 Inches 
Wide, Per Fari-y.— Sparrow-Chisholm 
Company, 92 cents, No. 317*; I>. P. 
Chandler, Incorporated, .SUeS, 72 inches, 
No. 915 or No. 928; $1.05, 72 inches. 
No. 333; National Coat and Apron Supplv 
Company, Incorporated, .SI. 32, Ivy 
pattern. 

2,000 Yards Pamela Cloth, 36 Inches 
Wifle, Per Farr/.— National Coat and 
.Apron Supply Company, Incorporated, 
11.5 cents.* 

5,000 Yards Ripplelte, 72 Inches Wide, 
Per Yard. — Sparrow-Chisholm Company, 
35 cents. No. 672*; National Coat and 
Apron Supply Company, Incorporated, 
36.5 cents. 

2,000 Yards .Meti's Shirting, 32 Inches 
Wide, Per Yard. — National Coat and 
-Apron Supply Company, Incorporated, 
10.75 cents.* 

1,000 Yards Striped Ticking, 36 Inches 
Wide, Per Yard. — Sparrow-Chisholm 
Company, 21.5 cents, Boa*; National 



Coat and Apron Supply Company, In- 
corporated, 22.5 cents. 

1,000 Yards White Twill, 36 Inches 
nide. Per Farrf.— National Coat and 
-Apron Supply Company, Incorporated, 
19.25 cents.* 

50 Yards White Irish Linen, 44 Inches 
n ide. Per Yard.—L. P. Chandler, Incor- 
porated, 82.5 cents. No. 726R; 85 cents, 
BR; 87.5 cents, CR; 95 cents, DR; 
97.5 cents, llOOR.* 

Sanaloriwm Division. 

50 Yards Bleached Cotton, Fruit of 
Loom, 42 Inches Wide, Per Yard.— Na- 
tional Coat and Apron Supply Company 
Incorporated, 19.25 cents, 36 'inches.* 

1,500 Yards Shroud Cotton, 50-Yard 
Pieces, 36 Inches Wide, Per Farrf.— Na- 
tional Coat and Apron Supply Company, 
Incorporated, 7.25 cents,* 

50 Yards Linen Crash, Blue Border, Per 
Fa/-./.— National Coat and Apron Supply 
Company, Incorporated, 16.5 cents.* 

50 Yards Linen Tra,?/;, Plain Border, 
Per Farr/.— National Coat and Apron 
Supply Company, Incorporated, 16.5 
cents.* 

300 Yards Linen Crash, Red Border, Per 
Farr/.— National Coat and Apron Supply 
Company, Incorporated, 16.5 cents.* 

oO Yards Linen Damask, 54 Inches 
II ide, Per Yard.—L. P. Chandler, Incor- 
porated, 85 cents; .SI. 10; National Coat 
and Apron Supply Company, Incorpo- 
rated, .$1.05.* 

50 Yards Domet Flannel, 30 Inches 
Witle, Per Fard.— National Coat and 
-Apron Supply Company, Incorporated, 
9.5 cents.* 

50 Yards Scrim, 36 Inches Wide, Per 
Yard. — National Coat and Apron Supply 
Company, Incorporated, 20.5 cents.* 

For Use in Laundry. 

200 Yards Cover Cloth, DO Inches Wide, 
Mitchell, Wing, or Equal, Per Yard.— 
National Coat and Apron Supply Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 68.5 cents.* 

Cash Discount for Payment in Ten 
Days. — Sparrow-Chisholm Company, all 
to be delivered or billed before March 1, 
1934; L. P. Chandler, Incorporated, 3 
per cent; prices on samples attached 
instead of in proposal. 

•Contract awarded. 

Upon January 29 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Picker X-Ray Corpo- 
ration for furnishing X-ray materials to 
the various city departments until Decem- 
ber 31. Bids, opened January 3, were 
as follows: 
Approximate Amounts on All Items. 

X-Ray Films. 
4,120 Dozen, 14 by 17, Per Dozen.- 
E. M. Parker, .$6.64; Eastman Kodak 
Stores, Incorporated, .$6.77; Picker X- 
Ray Corporation, .$6.64*; Kenmore Hospi- 
tal Supply, $6.64. 

230 Dozen, 11 by 14, Per Dozen.— E. M. 
Parker, .$4.37; Eastman Kodak Stores, 
Incorporated, .$4.46; Picker X-Ray Corpo- 
ration, .$4.37*; Kenmore Hospital Supply, 
$4.37. 

4,930 Dozen, 10 by 12, Per Dozen.— 
E. M. Parker, .$3.43; Eastman Kodak 
Stores, Incorporated, -$3.50; Picker X- 
Ray Corporation, .$3.43*; Kenmore Hos- 
pital Supply, $3.43. 

2,220 Dozen, 8 by 10, Per Dozen.— K M. 
Parker, $2.18; Eastman Kodak Stores, 
Incorporated, $2.23; Picker X-Ray Cor- 
poration, $2.18*; Kenmore Hospital 
Supply, .$2.18. 

24 Dozen DuPont Safety Films, 5 by 7, 
Per Dozen. — E. M. Parker, 99 cents; 
Eastman Kodak Stores, Incorporated, 



106 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 3 



$1.10; Picker X-Ray Corporation, 99 
cents*; Kenniorc Hospital Supply, 99 
cents. 

/ -•' Dozen Diil'ont Snfeli/ Filiii.s, S hi/ 
10, Per J)nzeii.~E. M'. Parker, $2.18; 
Eastman Kodak Stores, Incorporated, 
.<12.23; Picker X-Hay Corporation, S2.18*; 
Kenmore Hospital Supply, S3. 43. 

Go Dozen Denial Films (s? in a Packet), 
Two and One-Quarter fry Three, Per 
Dozen.— E. M. Parker, .Si.80; Eastman 
Kodak Stores, Incorporated, •SI. 80; Picker 
X-Hav Corporation, SI. 80*; Kenmore 
lIo.spi>al Supply, SI. 

KjO dross Dental Films (Eastman- 
Kodak) {Radiatized, Single Packet A 
Type), Per Gross.— E. M. Parker, .S3.5(); 
Eastman Kodak Stores, Incorporated, 
S3.()5; Picker X-Kay Corporation, $3.50*; 
Kenmore Hospital Supply, $3.50. 

X-Ray Film Hangers. 

.( Dozen, 14 by 17, Per Dozen. — E. M. 
Parker, $21.50; Eastman Kodak Stores. 
Incorporated, $21.00; Picker X-Ray Cor- 
Ijoration, $21.17*; Kenmore Hospital 
Supply, $21.47. 

4 Dozen, 10 by 12, Per Dozen.— E. M. 
Parker, $16.10; Eastman Kodak Stores, 
Incorporated, $H).20; Picker X-Ray Cor- 
poration, 815.98*; Kenmore Hospital 
Supply, $15.99. 

; Dozen Dental, Per Dozen.— E. M. 
Parker, $16.10; Eastman Kodak Stores, 
Incorporated, $16.20; Picker X-Ray Cor- 
poration, $15.98*; Kenmore Hospital 
Supply, $15.99. 

Exposure Holders. 

4 Dozen 14 by 17, Per Dozen.— E. M. 
Parker, $3.60; Eastman Kodak Stores, 
Inconwrated, .$3.60; Picker X-Ray Cor- 
poration, .$3.60*; Kenmore Hospital Sup- 
ply, $3.60. 

5 Dozen 10 by 12, Per Dozen.— E. M. 
Parker, .$2.40; Eastman Kodak Stores, 
Incori3orated, $2.40; Picker X-Ray Cor- 
poration, .$2.40*; Kenmore Hospital Sup- 
ply, $2.40. 

o Dozen 8 by 10, Per Dozen. — E. M. 
Parker, $1.80; Eastman Kodak Stores, 
Incorporated, $1.80; Picker X-Ray Cor- 
jioration, $1.80*; Kenmore Hospital Sup- 
ply, $1.80. 

Chemicals. 

2,000 Pounds Barium Sulphate, Per 
Pound. — E. M. Parker, 19 cents; Eastman 
Kodak Stores, Incorporated, 18 cents; 
Picker X-Ray Corporation, 17 cents*; 
Kenmore Hospital Supply, 18 cents. 

SOU Pounds Chrome Alum, Per Pound. — 
E. M. Parker, 18 cents; Eastman Kodak 
Stores, Incorporated, 18 cents; Picker 
X-Ray Corporation, 18 cents*; Kenmore 
Hospital Supply, 18 cents. 

540 Cans Developing Powder, No. 4 
Cans, Per Can.—E. M. Parker, $2.85, 
Eastman Kodak Stores, Incorporated, 
$2.80; Picker X-Ray Corporation, .$2.80*; 
Kenmore Hospital Supply, .$2.84. 

24 Cans Developing Powder, A'o 3 Cans, 
Per Can. — E. M. Parker, 69 cents; East- 
man Kodak Stores, Incorporated, 68 cents; 
Picker X-Ray Corporation, 68 cents*; 
Kenmore Hospital Supply, 69 cents. 

10,000 Pounds Hypo, Per Pound. — 
E. M. Parker, 4 cents; Eastman Kodak 
Stores, Incorporated, 4 cents; Picker 
X-Ray Corporation, 4 cents*; Kenmore 
Hospital Supply, 4 cents. 

140 Cans Hypo Fixing Powder, Per 
Can.—E. M. Parker, $2.02, No. 4 can; 
Eastman Kodak Stores, Incorporated, 
$2; Picker X-Ray Corporation, $2, No. 
4 can*; Kenmore Hospital Supply, 
.$2.04. 

7.5 Dozen Kerapheri and Shadocol, Per 
Dozen.— E. M. Parker, .$(5.30; Eastman 
Kodak Stores, Incorporated, $6.30; Picker 



X-Ray Corporation, $6.30*; Kenmore 
Ho.spi"tal Supply, $6.30. 

12 Dozen Xeoskiodan, Per Dozen. — 
E. jM. Parker, $33; Eastman Kodak 
Stores, Incor|)orated, $33; Picker X-Ray 
Corporation, $33*; Kenmore Hospital 
Supply, .$33. 

SOU Pounds Sodium Sulphite, Per 
Pound. — E. M. Parker, 16 cents; East- 
man Kodak Stores, Incorporated, 16 
cents; Picker X-Ray Corporation, 

16 cents*; Kenmore Hospital Supply, 
1 6 cents. 

120 Pounds Sulphuric Acid A, Pe'' 
Pound.— E. M. Parker, 50 cents; East- 
man Kodak Stores, Incorporated, 45 
cents; Picker X-Ray Corporation, 45 
cents*; Kenmore Hospital Supply, 

49 cents. 

Photographic Supplies. 

20 Dozen Commercial Film, o bi/ 7, Per 
Dozen.-E. M. Parker, $1.08; Eastman 
Kodak Stores, Incorporated, $1.12: Picker 
X-Rav Corporation, $1.08*; Kenmore 
Hospital Supply, $1.08. 

1 Pound Ferrotype Polish, Per Pound. — 
E. M. Parker, $1; Eastman Kodak 
Stores, Incorporated, $1; Picker X-Ray 
Corporation, $1*; Kenmore Hospital 
Supply, $1. 

4 Gross Hammer Lantern Slides, Per 
Gross.— E. M. Parker, .$6.10; Eastman 
Kodak Stores, Incorporated, $5.04; Picker 
X-Ray Corporation, $6*; Kenmore 
Hospital Supply, .$6.10. 

4 Gross Lantern Slide Covers, Per Gross. 
— E. M. Parker, .$3.85; Eastman Kodak 
Stores, Incorporated, $3.85; Picker X-Ray 
Corporation, $3.84*; Kenmore Hospital 
Supply, $3.90. 

G25 Lantern Slide Mats, Each.—E. M. 
Parker, 1 cent; Eastman Kodak Stores, 
Incorporated, 1 cent; Picker X-Ray Cor- 
poration, 1 cent*; Kenmore Hospital 
Supply, 1 cent. 

625~Red Dot Slide Labels, Each.—E. M. 
Parker, 25 cents per C. ; Eastman Kodak 
Stores, Incorporated, 10 cents per C; 
Picker X-Ray Corporation, 25 cents per 
C.*; Kenmore Hospital Supply, 25 cents 
per C. 

/ Gross Ortho Commercial Films, Per 
Gross.— E. M. Parker, $12.96; Eastman 
Kodak Stores, Incorporated, $13.44; 
Picker X-Ray Corporation, $12.96, 5 by 
7*; Kenmore Hospital Supply, $12.96. 

3 Gross Safely Process Films, Per 
Gross.— E. M. Parker, $12.96; Eastman 
Kodak Stores, Incorporated, $13.44; 
Picker X-Rav Corporation, $12.96, 5 bv 
7*; Kenmore" Hospital Supply, $12.96. 

Cassettes and Screen. 

S, 14 by 17, Each.—E. M. Parker, $50, 
Buck Cassettes, Patterson Hi-Speed 
Screens; Eastman Kodak Stores, Incor- 
porated, $55; Picker X-Ray Corporation, 
$50, Patterson or Buck*; Kenmore Hos- 
pital Supply, 850, Buck Bakelite Cassettes 
with Patterson Hi-Speed Screens. 

10, 10 by 12, Each.—E. M. Parker, 
$30, Buck Cassettes, Patterson Hi-Speed 
Screens; Eastman Kodak Stores, Incor- 
porated, $33; Picker X-Ray Corporation, 
.$30, Patterson or Buck*; Kenmore Hos- 
pital Supply, $30, Buck Bakelite Cassettes 
with Patterson Hi-Speed Screens. 

10, S by 10, Each.—E.. M. Parker, 
822, Buck Cassettes, Patterson Hi-Speed 
Screens; Eastman Kodak Stores, Incor- 
porated, $24; Picker X-Ray Corporation, 
$22, Patterson or Buck*; Kenmore Hos- 
[)ital Supply, $22, Buck Bakelite Cassettes 
with Patterson Hi-Spced Screens. 

Miscellaneous Items. 
/ Victor Interval Timer, E(tch. — E. M. 
Parker, .$5; Eastman Kodak Stores, In- 



corporated, $5; Picker X-Ray Corpora- 
tion, $5*; Kenmore Hospital Supplv, 
$5. 

/ Adjustalde Mask Printing Frame, 
Each.—E. M. Parker, $1.30; ' Eastman 
Kodak Stores, Incorporated, $1.12; Picker 
X-Ray Corporation, $1.25, 5 by 7*; Ken- 
more Hospital Supply, $1.35. 

/ 100-M illiampere Radiator Ti/pe Victor 
X-Ray Tube, Each.—E. M. Parker, S125; 
Eastman Kodak Stores, Incorporated, 
$125; Picker X-Ray Corporation, $125*; 
Kenmore Hospital Supply, $125. 

4 Radi-ator Type X-Ray Tubes, XP-4. 
Each. — E. M. Parker, $156; Eastman 
Kodak Stores, Incorporated, $156; Picker 
X-Ray Coi-poration, $156, tube only*; 
Kenmore Hospital Supply, $156, tube 
only. 

/ Rmliator Type X-Ray Tube, XP-DF, 
Each.—E. M. Parker, .$221; Eastman 
Kodak Stores, Incorporated, $221; Picker 
X-Rixy Coiporation, .$221, tube only*; 
Kenmore Hospital Supplv, $221. 

/ Radiator Type X-Ray Tube, XP-3, 
Each. — E. M. Parker, .$156; Eastman 
Kodak Stores, Incorporated, $156; Picker 
X-Ray Coiporation, $156*; Kenmore 
Hospital Supply, $156. 

1 Machlctt Deep Therapi/ Tube, Each. — 
E. M. Parker, .$250; Eastman Kodak 
Stores, Incoiporated, $250; Picker X-Riiy 
Coiporation, $250*; Kenmore Hospital 
Supply, .$250. 

2 Fluorosatpic Aprons, Each. — E. M. 
Parker, $11; Eastman Kodak Stores, In- 
coniorated, $10.80; Picker X-Ray Cor- 
poration, $10.80*; Kenmore Hospital 
Supply, $10.98. 

2 Pairs Fluoroscopic Gloves, Per Pair. — 
E. yi. Parker, $16.20; Eastman Kodak 
Stores, Incorporated, $16.20; Picker 
X-Ray Coiporation, $16.20*; Kenmore 
Hospital Supply, $16.20. 

8 Pairs Fluoroscopic Goggles, Per Pair. — 
E. M. Parker, .$2.50; Eastman Kodak 
Stores, Incoiporated, $2.24; Picker X-Ray 
Corporation, $2.25*; Kenmore Hospital 
Supply, $2.55. 

Cash Discount for Payment in Ten 
Days. — E. M. Parker, 2 per cent; East- 
man Kodak Stores, Incoiporated, 2 per 
cent; Picker X-Ray Coiporation, 2 per 
cent; Kemnore Hospital Supply, 2 per 
cent. 

Total.— E. N. Parker, $57,155.03; 
Eastman Kodak Stores, Incoiporated, 
$58,215.44; Picker X-Ray Corporation, 
$57,074.18*; Kemnore Hospital Supplv, 
$57,094.17. 

* Contract awarded. 

Upon January 29 the Mayor approved 
a contract with J. P. O'Connell Com- 
pany for furnishing appro .ximately eight 
thousand barrels Portland cement to the 
various city departments. Bids, opened 
January 5, were as follows: 

Each Barrel 380 Pounds Net, Delivered 
in Cloth Bags, Per Barrel—The Whitte- 
inore Company, $2.95; Eastern Clay 
Goods Company, $2.70, paper bags; 
Massachusetts Lime and Cement Com- 
pany, $2.95, cloth bags; $2.70, paper 
bags; William S. Simpson, Inconiorated, 
$2.70, paper bags; $2.95, cloth bags; 
William C. Norcross Company, $2.95, 
376-pound barrel, cloth bags, to .April 1, 
1934; after April 1, 1934, 33 cents a 
barrel over and above manufacturer's 
established dealer price, f. o. b. cars 
Boston; Portland Stone Ware Company, 
$2.95; J. P. O'Connell Company, $2.82, 
carloads, delivered by truck, cloth bags; 
•$2.95, tnickloads from warehouse, cloth 
bags*; .$2.57, carloads, delivered by truck, 
paper bags; $2.70, truckloads, from ware- 
house, paper bags. 



Feb. 3 



CITY RECORD 



107 



Cash Discount for Payment in Ten 
Days. — The Whitteiiiore Company, 2 per 
cent; Kjistern Clay Coods ('oinpany, 
2 per cent, 10th proximo; Massachusetts 
Lime and Cement Company, 2 per cent ; 
Wilham S. Simpson, Incorporated, 2 per 
cent, 10th proximo; William C. Norcross 
Company, 5.9 cents a barrel and in no 
case more or ie.ss than 2 per cent on deliv- 
ered price; Portland .Stone Ware Com- 
pany, 2 per cent, 10th i)roximo; ,J. I'. 
O'Connell Company, 10 cents per barrel 
on carloads delivered; 2 ])er cent on truck- 
loads from warehouse. 

Allowance on Enipiij Bags Returnetl in 
Gooil Condition, Each. — The Whittemore 
Company, 8 cents, three months, period 
only in accordance with cement code; 
Eastern Clay Cloods Company, expiration 
date, March 31, 1934; Massachusetts 
Lime and Cement C'ompany, 8 cents 
picked up at job, subject to change after 
May 31, 1934, in case of increase or de- 
crease by manufacturers; William S. 
Simpson, Incorporated, 8 cents, price 
protected to March 31, 1934, subject to 
increase by manufacturers after that 
date; William C. Norcross Com})any, 
8 cents; Portland Stone Ware ("ompany, 
8 cents, no protection against increase in 
price; March 1, 1934, (|Uotation can be 
extended to June .30, 1934; .1. P. OConnell 
Company, 8 cents picked iij) by con- 
tnictor; 10 cents returned by city to mill, 
freight collect, mill count anil inspection. 

• Contract aworjed. 

Upon .January 29 the Mayor approved 
contracts with lowest bidders as indicated 
for furnishing butter, eggs, etc., to the 
various city departments during Fel)ruar\'. 
Bids, oi)ened .lanuarj' 24, were jis follows: . 

Approximate .\mounts on All Items. 

7.ii> Cases, JJ/Jo(J Dozen, Xearhij Fresh 
Hennery Eggs, Per Dozen. — -Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 23.52 
cents; E. I". Deering Company, Incor- 
porated, 23.25 cents; Doe-Sullivim tt Co., 
Incorporated, 22.17 cents*; Lewis-Mears 
Company, 24. ()2 cents. 

Id Pounds Cream Cheese, o-Pound 
Bricks, Per Pound. — Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Com[)uny, 20. SO cents; 
E. F. Deering Company, Incorporated, 
21 cents; Doe-Sullivan cV Co., Incor- 
porated, 20 cents*; .\rmour iVc Co., 
21.92 cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 23 
cents. 

<>() Boxes Philadelphia Cream Cheese, 
I J .i-Ouuce Packages, Per Bos. — Bat- 
chelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 
()9.70 cents; E. F. Deering Company, 
Incorporated, 85 cents; Doe-Sullivan 
it Co., Incorporated, 09.74 cents; .Vrmour 
& Co., 09.70 cents*; Lewis-Mears Com- 
pany, 85 cents. 

?'> Pounds Twin Cheese, Per Pound. — 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, 14.11 cents; E. F. Deering Com- 
pany, Incorjjorated, 14.5 cents; Doe- 
Sullivan it Co., Incorporated, 12.67 
cents*; Armour & Co., 13.92 cents; 
Lewi.s-Mears Company, 14 cents. 

ISO Pounds Young America Cheese, 
f'er Pound. — -Batchelder, Snvder, Dorr 
iV- Doe Company, I3..S9 cerits*; E. F. 
Deering Company, Incorporated, 10.5 
:?ents; Doe-Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, 
14. .37 cents; Armour <t Co., 14.42 cents; 
Lewi.s-Mear8 Company, 14.25 cents. 

W Pounds Pimento Cheese, Per Pound. — 
Batchelder, Snvder, Dorr it Doe Com- 
pany, 18.31 cents*; Doe-Sullivan & Co., 
Incorporated, 20.74 cents; Armour <t Co., 
18.92 cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 19 
•ents. 

■m Pouwls Meilium Old Yellow Chet- 
lar Cheese, Per Pound. — Batchelder, Sny- 



der, Dorr <t Doe Company, 14.57 cents; 
Doe-Sullivan it Co., Incorporated, 14.39 
cents*; .Armour & Co., 15.40 cents; 
Lewis-Mears Company, 18 cents. 

/) I'ounds Poque/orl ( heese in o-l'onnd 
Cakes, Per Pound. — Batchelder, Snvder, 
Dorr it Doe Company, 08 cents*; E. F. 
Deering Company, Incorporated, 72 cents; 
Doe-Sullivan it Co., Incorporated, 6 
cents; .\rmour it Co., ()9.92 cents. 

'> 'Tubs, iitM) Pounds, Puff Paste Com- 
pound, Per Pound. — Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr (t Doe Company, 10.45 cents*; 
Doe-Sullivan it Co., Incorporated, 10.75 
cents; Armour it Co., 10.5 cents. 

J Pounds, I'nsallcd Butler, Per Pound. 
— Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr it Doe Com- 
pany, 29 cents; Doe-Sullivan it Co., In- 
corporated, 29 cents*; Lewis-Mears Com- 
panv, 32 cents. 

'>()!) Pounds 3 X Top Quality Oleo- 
margarine, Per Pound. — Batchelder, Sny- 
der, Dorr it Doe Company, 10.12 ccnt.s*; 
Doe-.Sullivan it Co., Incorporated, 10.75 
cents; Armour it Co., 11.05 cents. 

./SI Tubs Butter, 17,!)S.', Pounds, !>()- 
Score, Per Pound. — Batchelder, Snv<ler, 
Dorr it Doe Company, 20.31 cents*; 
E. l'\ Deering Companv, Incorporated, 
21.75 cents: Doc-Sullivan it Co., In- 
corporated, 20.75 cents; Armour it Co., 
21.72 cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 20.4 
cents. 

^'■i Tul>s Butler, I, .',7.' Pounds, .S'.V- .SV«re, 
Per /^H/ir/.— Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
it Doe Comjjany, 19.S0 cents; E. F. 
Deering Company, Incorporated, 20.25 
cents: Doe-Sullivan it Co., Incorporated, 
19.47*: .\rmour it Co., 20.72 cents; 
Lewis-Mears Company, 19.5 cents. 

Cash Discount lor Payment in Ten 
Days. — Batchelder, .Snyder, Dorr it Doe 
Company, net; E. F. Deering Company, 
Incorporated, net; Doe-.Sullivan it Co, 
Incorporated, net; .\rmour it Co., net; 
Lewis-Mears Company, net. 

*('onlracl(i awarded 

rf)on .January 29 the Mayor ap- 
proved contracts with lowest bidders as 
indicated for furnishing me;its to the 
various city de|)artments during Febru- 
ary, 1934. Bids, opened .January 23, 
were as follows: 

Approximate Amounts on .Ml Items, Per 
Hundredweight. 

J,Sf)0 Pound.-. Be,f r/,/(c/.-.s.— William 
T. Crowther it .Son, Incorporated, .110; 
F.ineuil Beef Company, S7.90; Batchel- 
der, Snvder. Dorr it Doe Companv, 
$9.25; .Armour it Co., S5.30*; Swift '<t 
Co., S7.45; Wald, l-iaram Company, 
$7.90; Wilson «t Co., .S7.75; W^attendorf 
<fc Co., Incorporated, .S8.50. 

S,OI)l) pounds Fr(:-<h Beef Briskets. — 
William T. Crowther it .Son, Incorporated, 
$12; Faneuil Beef Company, $11.24; 
Batchelder, .Snvder, Dorr it Doe Com- 
pany, $13.10; \Armour <t Co., $10.87; 
Swift it Co., $10.99; Bornstein «t Co., 
$11.50; New F^ngland Dressed Meat and 
Wool Companv, $12.23; Wald, Baram 
Company, $9.75; Wilson it Co., .$9.35*; 
Wattendorf <t Co., Incorporated, $10.50 

■l..iO(J Pound.'. Buf F«rc.s.— William T. 
Crowther it Son, Incorporated, $19; 
Faneuil Beet Company, $lt}.85; Batchel- 
der, Snyder, Dorr it Doe Company, $17.- 
50; Armour & Co., $16.42; Swift & Co., 
$15.12; Born-stein <t Co., $16.25; New 
England Dres.sed Meat and Wool Com- 
pany, $16..37; Wilson & Co., $14.60*; 
Wattendorf & Co., Incorporated, $14.95. 

13.S00 Pounds Be(f J finds. —WiUiiim 
T. Crowther & .Son, Incoiporated, $14; 
The Cudahy Packing Companv, $11.50; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $10.73;" Batchel- 
der, .Snyder, Dorr it Doe Company, 



$12.75; Armour it Co., $11.80; Swift 
it Co., $11.48; Bornstein & Co., $11.50; 
New England Dres.sed Meat and Wool 
Companv, $11.90; Wald, Barani Com- 
pany, $10.47*; Wilson it Co., .f 1 1.20; 
Wattendorf it Co., Incorporated, .$1 1.45. 
■300 Pounds Beef /viye/-.— William T. 
Crowther <t Son, Incor[)()rated, $9; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $7.74; Batchel- 
der, Snvder, Dorr it Doe Comjianv, 
$10.50; Armour & Co., $6.47, frozen*; 
.Swift it Co., .$8.73; Wilson & Co., $7.60. 
3,,io() Pounds Beef Loins, Suet In. — 
William T. Crowther & Son, Incorporated, 
$20; .\lbert Richards Companv, Incor- 
porated, $13.60, 2 per cent*; The Cudahy 
Packing Company, $15; I'^aneuil Beef 
Company, $13.73; Batchelder, .Snyder, 
Dorr it Doc Companv, $18; .Armour it 
Co., $13.71; Swift it Co., $13.48; Born- 
stein it Co., $16; New England Dressed 
Meat and Wool Companv, $15.25; Wil- 
.son & Co., $15; Wattendorf it C;o., In- 
corpoiated, $14.95. 

3,000 Pounds Beef Loins, Suet Out. — 
William T. (Crowther it .Son, Incorporjited, 
.$25; .Mbcrt Richards Company, Incor- 
porated, $18.12*; The Cudahy" Packing 
Companv, $19. .50; Faneuil Beef ("om- 
pany, $i8.25; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
it Doe CJompany, $26.50; Armour it 
Co., $18.69; .Swift it Co., $19.48; Born- 
stein it Co., .$20; New lOnglatid Dressed 
Meat and Wool Companv, .$22.25; Wil- 
son it Co., $21; Wattendorf it Co., In- 
corporated, $19.95. 

3,000 Pounds Beef Rumps and Loins. — 
William T. (Crowther it .Son, Incorjx)- 
rated, $19; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany, $14; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$13.24; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr it Doe 
Company, $17.50; Armour it Co., $13.23; 
Swift it Co., $13.60; Bornstein & Co., 
$15.10; New lOngland Dressed Meat and 
Wool Company, .SI 5; Wald, Baram 
Company, $13.i0*; Wilson it Co., $15; 
Wattendorf & Co., Incorporated, $14.75. 
L/,SOO Pounds Beef Ribs, .7 Ribs.— 
William T. Crowther & .Son, Incorpo- 
rated, $15.50; .Albert Richards Company, 
Incorpoiated, $1 1.23*; The Cudahy Pack- 
ing Company, $13; Faneuil Beef ('om- 
pany, $11.47; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
it Doe Company, $14.25; Armour & Co., 
.$13.40; Born.stein & Co., $12.50; New 
I'^ngland Dressed .Meat and Wool Com- 
pany, $13; Wilson it Co., $14; Watten- 
dorf <fc Co., Incorporated, $11.95. 

1,200 Pounds Beef Rounds with Flank, 
hut Cod 0(//.— William T. Crowther it 
.Son, Incorporated, $10; The Cudahy 
Parking Company, $9.50; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $8.25*; Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr it Doe Company, $9.85; .Armour it 
Co., .$9.17; .Swift it" Co., .$9.73; Born- 
stein it Co., $10; New England Dies.sed 
Meat and Wool Company, $9.50; Wald, 
Baram Company, .$8.25; Wilson & Co., 
$12; Wattendorf it Co., Incorporated, 
$8.45. 

2,400 Pounds Beef ,S7(r»^ir/cr.s.— -William 
T. Crowther & Son, Incorporated, $18; 
Faneuil Beef Comi)any, $13.72; Batchel- 
der, .Snvder, Dorr it Doe Company, 
.$15.50; "Armour & Co., $13.95; Swift & 
Co., $12.94; Bornstein & Co., $13; New 
England Dressed Meat and Wool Com- 
I)any, $12.78; Wald, Baram Company, 
$12.27*; Wilson & Co., $12.98; Watten- 
dorf & Co., Incorporated, $13.85. 

8,500 Pounds Beef Stickers.— William 
T. Crowther & .Son, Incorporated, $9; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $8.50; Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, $8.50; 
Armour & Co., .$6.91 ; Swift & Co., $6.45; 
Bornstein & Co., $6.50; New England 
I3ressed Meat and Wool Company, 
•$6.23; Wald, Baram Company, $5.37; 



108 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 3 



Wilson & Co., $5.18*; Wattendorf & Co., 
Incorporated, S5.95. 

J^QO I'oiDut.s Beef Undercuts. — William 
T. Crowther & Son, Incorporated, $14; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $12; Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, $15.75; 
.Vrmour <fc Co., $13.28; Swift & Co., 
$10.99*; New P^ngland Dressed Meat and 
Wool Company, $12.73; Wald, Baram 
Company, $12.25; Wilson & Co., $11.30; 
Wattendorf & Co., Incorporated, $14. 

275 Founds Calf's Ltyer.— William T. 
Crowther & Son, Incorporated, $27*; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $46.25; Batchel- 
der, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, $50; 
Armour & Co., $38.45, frozen; Sw-ift & 
Co., $36.16; Wilson & Co., $45. 

6,500 Pouruh Lamb Carcasses. — William 
T. Crowther & Son, Incorporated, 
$18; The Cudahv Packing Company, 
$12.75*; Faneuil Beef Company, $14.83; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, $14.65; Armour & Co., 
$13.61; Swift & Co., $14.25; New 
England Dressed Meat and Wool Com- 
pany, $15; Wilson & Co., $15. 

1,600 Pounds Lamb Carcasses, Fores 
Boned, Racks Split. — William T. Crowther 
& Son, Incorporated, $18; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $15.63; Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Company, $15.40; Armour 
& Co., $14.47*; Swift & Co., $14.55; 
Wilson & Co., $15. 

1,3S0 Founds Lamb Chops. — William T. 
Crowther & Son, Incorporated, $19; 
The Cudahy Packing Company, $15; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $16.74; Batchel- 
der, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 
$16.75; Armour & Co., $14.24*; Swift 
& Co., $16.45; New England Dressed 
Meat and Wool Company, $17; Wilson 
& Co., $16; Wattendorf & Co., Incor- 
porated, $16.50. 

130 Pounds Lamb Fores. — William T. 
Crowther & Son, Incorporated, $10; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $10.25; Batchel- 
der, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company,S9.50; 
Armour & Co., $6.97*; Swift & Co., $9.95; 
Wilson & Co., $9. 

15,000 Pounds Lamb, Hind Saddles. — 
William T. Crowther & Son, Incorporated, 
$21; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
$17; Faneuil Beef Company, $16.84; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, $18.10; Armour & Co., $14.94*; 
Swift & Co., $17.96; New England 
Dressed Meat and Wool Company, $19; 
Wilson & Co., $15. 

500 Pounds Eastern Veal, Saddles. — 
William T. Crowther & Son, Incoiporated, 
$14; Faneuil Beef Company, $16.75; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, $17.15; Annour & Co., $16.70; 
New England Dressed Meat and Wool 
Company, $14; Wald, Baram Company, 
$14.75; Wilson & Co., $12.* 

400 Founds Veal Legs. — William T. 
Crovyther & Son, Incorporated, $16; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $17.25; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 
$18; Armoui- & Co., $16.70; Swift & Co., 
$15.95; Wald, Baram Company, $15.50; 
Wilson & Co., $13.* 

5,100 Pounds Bacon, S to 10 Pounds. — 
William T. Crowther & Son., Incorpo- 
rated, $13.50; The Cudahy Packing 
Company, $13.72; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $13.40; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, $17.50; John P. Squire 
Company, $16,125; Armour & Co., 
$15.35, Star; Swift & Co., $16.10; Wald, 
Baram Company, $13.05*; Wilson & Co., 
$14.10. 

600 Pounds Bacon, 12 to 14 Pounds. — 
William T. Crowther & Son, Incorporated, 
$13.50; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
$13.72; Faneuil Beef Company, $13.20, 
2 per cent;* Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, $16.25; John P. Squire 



Company, $15,875; Armour & Co., 
$15.07, Star; Swift & Co., $15.80; Wald, 
Baram Company, $13.12; Wilson A: Co., 
$14. 

1,000 Pounds Bacon, 14 to 16 Pounds. 
— William T. Crowther & Son, Incorpo- 
rated, S13.50; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$12.90*; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, $15.75; John P. Squire 
Company, .$15,875; Armour & Co., 
$15.07, Star; Swift & Co., $15.80; Wald, 
Baram Company, $13.10; Wilson & Co., 
$13.60. 

4,200 Pounds Smoked Hams, 14 to 16 
Pounds. — William T. Crowther & Son, 
Incorporated, $13.50; The Cudahy Pack- 
ing Company, $12.17*; F"aneuil Beef 
Company, $13.20; Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Company, $15.25; John P. 
Squire Company, $12.25; Armour & Co., 
$13.46, Star; Swift & Co., $14.12; Wald, 
Baram Company, $13.95; Adolph Gobel, 
Incorporated, $12.85; Wilson & Co., 
$14.10. 

400 Pounds Fresh Hams, 14 to 16 
Pounds. — William T. Crowther & Son, 
Incorporated, $13.50; The Cudahy Pack- 
ing Company, $13.50; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, 812.45; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, $15; John P. Squire 
Company, $12.50"; Armour & Co., $12.67; 
Swift & Co., $13.25; Wald, Baram Com- 
pany, $12.15*; Wilson & Co., $12.40. 

600 Pounds Smoked Ox Tongue, Short 
C«;.— William T. Crowther & Son, In- 
corporated, $20; The Cudahy Packing 
Company, $21.96; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, .$22.50; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, .$28.50; Armour & Co., 
$22.72; Swift & Co., $27.50; Wilson & 
Co $19 * 

2,100 Pounds Pork Loins, 8 to 10 
Pounds. — William T. Crovyther & Son, 
Incorporated, $12.50; The Cudahy Pack- 
ing Company, $12.40; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $11.20; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, $15.50; Armour & Co., 
$10.97; Swift & Co., $10.44*; Wald, 
Baram Company, $11.70; Wilson & Co., 
$12 

1,400 Pounds Pork Loins, 12 to 14 
Founds. — William T. Crowther & Son, 
Incorporated, $12; The Cudahy Packing 
Company, $11.40; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $i0.90; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, $15; Armour & Co., 
$10.47; Swift & Co., $10.06*; Wald, 
Baram Company, $11.35; Wilson & Co., 
$11.20. 

1,050 Pounds Salt Fork, 50 to 60 Pieces. 
— William T. Crowther & Son, Incorpo- 
rated, $8; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany, $7.88*; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$8.25; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, $9.75; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, $16.50, barrel; Armour & Co., 
$8.23; Swift & Co., $8.17; Wald, Baram 
Company, $8; Wilson & Co., $8. 

700 Pounds Fresh Fork Shoulders. — 
William T. Crowther & Son, Incorpo- 
rated, $8.50; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany, $8.40; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$8.15; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, $9.75; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, .$6.75*; Armour & Co., $7.93; 
Swift & Co., $7.14; Adolf Gobel, Incor- 
porated, $7.71; Wilson & Co., $9. 

700 Pounds Corned Pork Shoulders. — ■ 
William T. Crowther & Son, Incorpo- 
rated, $8.50; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany, $7.48; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$6.95*; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, $9.50; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, $7.75; Armour & Co., $7.46; 
Swift & Co., $8.16; Adolf Gobel, Incor- 
porated, $6.97; Wilson & Co., $9. 

5,-300 Pounds Smoked Shoulders. — Wil- 
liam T. Crowther & Son, Incorporated, 
$9; The Cudahy Packing Company, 



$8.18; Faneuil Beef Company, $8.64; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, $10; John P. Squire Company, 
$9.25; Armour ,k Co., .$8.70; Swift A: Co., 
$9.80; Adolf Gobel, Incorporated, $7 91*- 
Wilson & Co., $9.50. 

250 Pounds Fresh Ground Hainburg. — 
William T. Crowther & Son, Incorporated, 
$5*; Faneuil Beef Company, .$6.50; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, $10.50; Armour A: Co., .$6.74; Wald, 
Baram Company, $6.12; Wilson & Co, 
$11. 

1,500 Pounds Corned Spare Ribs.— 
William T. Crowther & Son, Incorpo- 
rated, $8; Faneuil Beef Company, .$6.70; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, $9.50; John P. Squire Company, 
$18, tierce; Armour & Co., .$5.45*; Swift 
& Co., $6.15; Wilson & Co., $11. 

2,S00 Pounds Lar(/.— WiUiam T. 
Crowther & Son, Incorporated, $7.75; 
The Cudahy Packing Company, $7.45; 
Faneuil Beef Company, ,$6.74; Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, $8.25; 
John P. Squire Company, .$6.25*; Armour 
& Co., .$6.70; Swift A: Co., $6.48; Wilson & 
Co., $7. 

.300 Pounds Dried Sliced Smoked Beef.— 
William T. Crowther & Son, Incorpo- 
rated, $33; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany, $21.69; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$28.50; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr A: Doe 
pany, $28.50; Armour A: Co., .$20.95*; 
Wilson & Co., $32. 

500 Founds Luncheon Loaf. — William 
T. Crowther A: Son, Incorporated, $17; 
Fred W. Baldau A: Co., $10.50; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $9.90; Batchelder, Sny- 
der, Dorr A: Doe Company, $14; John P. 
Squire Company, $11; Armour & Co., 
$9.85; Adolf Gobel, Incorporated, $9.79*; 
Wilson A: Co., $11. 

600 Pounds Pressed Ham. — William T. 
Crowther & Son, Incorporated, $15; 
Fred W. Baldau & Co., $18; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $10.75; Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr A: Doe Company, $18.50; John P. 
Squire Company, $16; Armour A: Co., 
$10.62*; Adolf Gobel, Incorporated! 
$15.45; Wilson & Co., $11. 

340 Pounds Broilers, Two to Two and 
One-Half Pounds Each. — William T. 
Crowther A: Son, Incorporated, $23; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $20.25; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr A: Doe Companj', 
$23, frozen; Craig, Hapgood Company, 
Incorporated, $21; Armour & Co., $23.90, 
frozen; Swift A: Co., $22; Lewis-Mears 
Company, $20.80; Wattendorf & Co., In- 
corporated, $19.* 

17,550 Pomids Chicken, Four to Four 
and One-Half Pounds Each. — William T. 
Crowther & Son, Incorporated, $23; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $22.22; Craig, 
Hapgood Company, Incorporated, $18.87; 
.\rmour & Co., $18.44, frozen*; Swift & 
Co., $20.18; Levyis-AIears Company, 
$19.80. 

8,000 Pounds Fowl, 5 Pounds Each.— 
William T. Crowther A: Son, Incorpo- 
rated, $20; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$18.74; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, $19.50; Craig, Hapgood Com- 
pany, Incoi-porated, $17.43; Armour & 
Co., $16.92*; Swift & Co., $17.68; Lewis- 
Mears Company, $17.80. 

85 Founds, Ducks.— WiWmin T. 
Crowther & Son, Incoiporated, $15*; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $17.20; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr A: Doe Company, 
$19; Craig, Hapgood Companj-, Incor- 
porated, $16; Armour A: Co., $16.92, 
frozen. 

60 Founds Ducklings. — William T. 
Crowther A: Son, Incorporated, $15*; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $18.15; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr A: Doe Company, 
$20; Craig, Hapgood Company, Incor- 



Feb. 3 



CITY R E C o;R D 



109 



porated, $17; Armour & Co. $16.92, 
frozen; Swift & Co., $18. 

60 Pounds Turkey. — William T. 
Crowther & Son, Incorporated, $24*; 
Faneuil Beef Company, S26.50; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Coinpany, $27; 
Craig, Hapgood Company, Incorporated, 
$28; .\rniour & Co., $25.92, frozen; Swift 
& Co., $26. 

City Hospital, 1,500 Pounds Sausages. — 
•lohn P. Squire Company, $20.* 

Lotui hlaml, 400 Pounds Sausages. — 
Fred W. Baldau & Co., $17.* 

Sanatorium, MO Pounds Sausages. — 
John P. Squire Company, $20.* 

Deer Islam!, 120 Poumls Sausages. — 
Fred W. Baldau & Co., $17.* 

Deer Island, 840 Poujid.^ Bologna, 
1,000 Pounds Frankfurts. — Fred W. Bal- 
dau & Co., $15.* 

All Other Departments, 1,075 Pounds 
Bologna, 1,400 Pounds Frankfurts. — Fred 
W. Baldau & Co., $17.* 

Cash Discount for Payment in Ten 
Days. — Albert Richards Company, In- 
corporated, 2 per cent; The Cudahy 
Packing Company, tax clause; Faneuil 
Beef Company, 1 per cent; Annour & 
Co., tax clause; Swift & Co., prices sub- 
ject to acceptance within ten days, 
tax clause. 



* C ntracts awarded. 

Upon January 30 the Mayor approved 
a contract with J. P. O'Connell Company 
for furnishing approximately 425,000 
sewer bricks to the Sewer Division. Bids, 
opened January 5, were as follows: 

Approximately 4^5,000 Sewer Bricks, 
Per M. — New England Brick Company, 
$14; William S. Simpson, Incorporated, 
$14; Massachusetts Lime and Cement 
Company, $14; Eastern Clay doods Com- 
pany, $14; Con.solidated Brick Sales, In- 
corporated, $14; Portland Stone Ware 
Company, $14; J. P. O'Connell Company, 
$14*; The Whittemore Company, $14. 

Total. — New England Brick Company, 
$5,950; William S. Simp-son, Incorpo- 
rated, $5,950; Massachusetts Lime and 
Cement Company, $5,950; Eastern Clay 
(loods Company, $5,950; Consolidated 
Brick Sales, Incorporated, $5,950; Port- 
land Stone Ware Companv, $5,950; J. P. 
O'Connell Company, $5,950; The Whitte- 
more Company, $5,950. 

Ca.'ih Discount in Ten Days. — New Eng- 
land Brick Company, 2 per cent; William 
S. Simpson, Incorporated, 2 per cent, 
10th, proximo; Massachusetts I^ime and 
Cement Company, 2 per cent ; Eastern 
Clay Goods Company, 2 per cent, 10th, 
proximo; Consolidated Brick Sales. In- 
corporated, 2 per cent; Portland Stone 
Ware Company ,2 per cent, 10th, proxi- 
mo; J. P. O'Connell Company, 2 per 
cent; The Whittemore Company, 2 per 
cent. 

Upon January 30 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the J. P. O'Connell 
Company for furnishing sewer pipe to the 
Sewer Division. Bids, opened January 5, 
were as follows: 

Sewer Pipe, Branches, Bends, T's, 
Stoppers, Etc. 

Single Strength, Value of iS,000, Dis- 
count from Last Prices. — The Whittemore 
Company, 66 per cent off list cars on 
track; 63 per cent off hst cars delivered; 
58 per cent off list truckloads delivered; 
Eastern Clay Goods Company, 58 per 
cent; Portland Stone Ware Company, 
58 per cent; William S. Simpson, Incor- 
porated, 3-inch to 24-inch standard, 
inclusive, 2-foot lengths, 58 per cent; 
6-inch to 24-inch standard, inclusive, 
3-foot lengths, 55 per cent; 27 and 30 



inch standard, inclusive, 3-foot lengths, 

48 per cent; 33 and 36 inch standard, 
inclusive, 3-foot lengths, 43 per cent; 
J. P. O'Connell Company, 63 per cent, 
carloads delivered by truck; 58 per cent, 
truckloads from warehouse.* 

Double Strength, Value of i2,000, Dis- 
count from List Prices. — The Whittemore 
Company, 15-ineh double strength, car- 
loads on track, 57 per cent; 15-inch 
double strength, carloads delivered, 54 
per cent; 15-inch double strength, truck- 
loads delivered, 49 per cent; 18 to 24 inch 
double strength, cars delivered, 51 per 
cent; 18 to 24 inch double strength, cars 
onlrack, 54 per cent; 18 to 24 inch double 
strength, truckloads delivered, 46 per 
cent; Eastern Clay Goods Company, 
15-inch double strength, 49 per cent; 
18 to 24 inch double strength, inclusive, 
46 per cent; 15 inch, 49 per cent; 18 to 
24 inch, 46 per cent; Portland Stone 
Ware Company, 15-inch double strength, 

49 per cent ; 1 8 to 24 inch double strength, 
46 per cent; 15 inch, 49 per cent; 18 to 24 
inch, 46 per cent; William S. Simpson, 
Incorporated, 15-inch double strength, 
2-foot lengths, 49 per cent; 3-foot lengths, 
46 per cent ; 1 8 to 24 inch double strength, 
inclusive, 2-foot lengths, 46 per cent; 
3-foot lengths, 43 per cent; 27 and 30 
inch double strength, inclusive, 3-foot 
lengths, 37 per cent; 33 and 36 inch 
double strength, inclusive, 3-foot lengths, 
.32 per cent; J. P. O'Connell Company, 
15-inch double strength, truckloads, 49 
per cent*; 18 to 24 inch double strength, 
truckloads, 46 per cent*; 15-inch double 
strength, carloads delivered, 54 per cent; 
18 to 24 inch double strength, carloads 
delivered, 51 per cent. 

Cash IXscounl for Payment in Ten 
Days. — The Whittemore Company, 2 
per cent; Eastern Clay Goods Company, 
2 per cent, 10th proximo; Portland Stone 
Ware Company, 2 per cent, 10th proximo; 
William S. Simpson, Incorporated, 2 per 
cent, 10th of month following delivery; 
J. P. O'Connell Company, 2 per cent. 

* Contract awarded. 

Upon January 30 the Mayor approved 
contracts with the lowest bidders as 
indicated for furnishing hay, grain and 
straw to the various city departments 
during J'ebruarv. Bids, opened January 
24, were as follows: 

.Approximate Amounts on all Items. 
SO Tons Hay, Per Ton. — William 
Culkeen & Sons Company, $25.60*; 
John J. White Company, .$25.75. 

4 Tons Straw, Per Ton. — The Whitte- 
more Company, .$27.90; William Culkeen 
& Sons Company, $27.60; John J. White 
Company, $27.50.* 

54 Tons, 108,000 Pouruls Oats, Per 
Hundred Pounds. — The Whittemore Com- 
pany, $1.99*; William Culkeen & Sons 
Company, $2; John J. White Company, 
$2. 

4 Tons Bran, Per Ton.— The Whitte- 
more Company, $32.50; William Culkeen 
& Sons Company, $32.50; John J. White 
Company, $32.* 

/ Ton CottonSeed Meal, Per Ton. — 
The Whittemore Company, $42.50; 
William Culkeen & Sons Company, 
$42.25; .John J. White Company, $42.* 

/ Ton Lin.'ieed Meal, Per Ton. — The 
Whittemore Company, $52.50*; William 
Culkeen & Sons Company, $54; John J. 
White Company, $53. 

1 Ton Gluten Meal, Per Ton.— The 
Whittemore Company, .$46; William 
Culkeen & Sons Company, .$4§.50; John J. 
White Company, $45.50.* 

1 Ton Corn Meal, Per Ton.— The 
Whittemore Company, $36; William 



Culkeen & Sons Company, $36*; John J. 
White Company, $36. 

1,500 Pounds Corn Cracked, Per 
Hundred Pounds. — The Whittemore Com- 
pany, $1.80; William Culkeen & Sons 
Company, $1.80*; John J. White Com- 
pany, $1.80. 

500 Pounds Corn Whole, Per Hundred 
Pounds. — The Whittemore Company, 
$1.80; William Culkeen & Sons Com- 
pany, $1.80*; John J. White Company, 
$1.80. 

500 Pounds Corn Kaifir, Per Hundred 
Pounds. — The Whittemore Company 
$2.90; William Culkeen & Sons Company, 
pany, $2.80; John J. White Company, 
$2.75.* 

500 Pounds Wheal, Per One Hundred 
Pounds. — The Whittemore Company, 
$2.95; William Culkeen & Sons Company, 
$2.80; John J. White Company, $2.70.* 

500 Pounds Buckwheat, Per One Hun- 
dred Poumls. — The Whittemore Com- 
pany, $2.40*; William Culkeen & Sons 
Company, .$2.50; John J. White Com- 
pany, .$2.50. 

300 Pounds Sunflower Seed, Per One 
Hundred Pounds. — The Whittemore Com- 
pany, $7; William Culkeen & Sons Com- 
I)aiiv, $7; John J. White Company, 
$6.90.* 

100 Pounds While French Millet, Per 
One Hundred Pounds. — The Whittemore 
Company, $9.90; William Culkeen & Sons 
Company, .$9.85*; John J. White Com- 
pany, .$9.90. 

200 Pounds Hempseed, Per One Hun- 
dred Pounds. — The Whittemore Com- 
pany, .$5.20; William Culkeen & Sons 
Company, $5.20; John J. White Com- 
pany, .$5.15.* 

2 Tons Crushed Oals, Per Ton. — The 
Whittemore Company, .$44*; William 
Culkeen & Sons Company, $45; John J. 
White Company, $44.25. 

100 Pounds Caiuiry Seed, Per One 
Hundred Pounds. — The Whittemore Com- 
pany, $7; William Culkeen & Sons Com- 
pany, .$6.85; John J. White Company, 
.$6.75.* 

Cash Discouid for Payment in Ten 
Days. — The Whittemore Company, one- 
half of 1 per cent; William Culkeen & 
Sons Company, one-half of 1 per cent; 
John .J. White Company, one-half of 1 
per cent. 

Upon January 30 the Mayor approved 
contracts with the E. R. Squibb & Sons 
and the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, 
Incorporated, for furnishing ether to the 
various city departments. Bids, opened 
January 8, were as follows: 

Approximate Amounts on All Items. 

Squibb Ether, 300 Half-Pound Cans, Per 
Can.—E. R. Squibb & Sons, 33.25 cents.* 

Total.— E. R. Squibb & Sons, $99.75. 
56 1-Pound Cans, Mallinckrodt Ether, Per 
Can. — Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, In- 
corporated, 40 cents*; E. R. Squibb & 
Sons, 63.65 cents, Squibb. 

16,000 Half-Pound Cans, Mallirtckrodt 
Ether, Per Can. — Mallinckrodt Chemical 
Works, Incorporated, 25 cents*; E. R. 
Squibb & Sons, 33.25 cents, Squibb. 

2,300 Quarter-Pound Cans, Mallin- 
ckrodt Ether, Per Can. — Mallinckrodt 
Chemical Works, Incorporated, 16 cents*; 
E. R. Squibb & Sons, 18.05 cents, Squibb. 

Total. — Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, 
Incorporated, $4,390; E. R. Squibb & 
Sons, $5,770.16. 

Cash Discount for Payment in Ten 
Days. — Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, 
Incorporated, 1 per cent, 10th proximo; 
E. R. Squibb & Sons, 1 per cent; f. o. b. 
destination. 



* Contract awarded 



1 I 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 3 



Transit Departme.vt. 

Fpon Junu;ir\' 20 the Mayor approved 
a contract with E. T. Ryan Iron Works, 
Incorporated., for furnishing and install- 
ing frames, grilles and slides. Traffic Tun- 
nel. Bids, opened January 22, were as 
follows: 

T. F. McCJann and Sons Company, 
S29,834.24; Conwav-Cannon Company, 
§24,873.03; John "F. Shea Company, 
Incorporated, 822,971.95; Metal Clad 
Doors, Incorporated, 821,884.14; Peter- 
son & Neville, Incorporated, 820,981.50 
General Bronze Corporation, 818,891.08 
E. Van Xoorden Company, 818,251.25 
E. T. Ryan Iron Works, Incorporated, 
$18,177.10. 

Upon January 30 the Maj-or approved 
a contract with the Barnes Pope Com- 
pany for installing electrical control 
equipment for pump rooms, Traffic 
Tunnel. Bids, opened Monday, January 
29, were as follows: 

Lord Electric Company, Incorporated, 
81,548; H. M. Haley Electric Company, 
Incorporated, 81,242; G. and N. En- 
gineering Company, 81,116; Quinn Broth- 
ers, 8874; Barnes Pope Company, 8860. 

WITHOUT ADVERTISING. 

Upon varj'ing dates as indicated the 
Mayor approved contracts with several 
firms and persons for work and supplies. 
Communications from the heads of the 
several departments were as follows: 

DEP.\RTiIEXT OF ScHOOL BuiLDINGS, 

Boston, January 18, 1934. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I request permission to 
award without advertising, to John H. 
Oxley, 1104 Kimball Building, Tremont 
street, Boston, a contract for a sum not to 
exceed 82,000 for professional sei-vices to 
complete his survey work on all kinds of 
school furniture. 

Mr. Oxley has been employed by this 
department bj' me during the past year 
and previoxis to that by Sir. Rourke, for 
the same operation in three parts. This 
is the concluding part. By means of 
this study of all kinds of furniture for 
schools, including costs, sizes, drawings, 
etc., we have been able to show a verj* 
marked saving over a period of several 
years on furniture for aU schools. 

I consider it entirely necessary and 
request your approval. 

Respectfully yours, 

Wm. W. Drummey, 
Superintendent of Construction. 



Boston, January 22, 1924. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Bo-^ton. 

Dear Sir, — I respectfullj- request the 
approval of your Honor, under the 
provisions of section 30, chapter 486, of 
the Acts of 1909, to the awarding of a con- 
tract, without advertising, in the sum of 
§11,000, to Deskor Chair Sales Corpora- 
tion, RxDom 904, Park Square Building, 
for installing one thousand (1,000) Deskor 
chairs (four hundred and forty-four (444) 
of same to be convertible into desks) in the 
auditorium of the Jeremiah E. Burke 
Senior High School for Girls, Dorchester. 

These chairs have been requested by 
Superintendent of Public Schools Patrick 
T. Campbell. As this chair is a patented 
article, nothing can be gained bj' adver- 
tising, and I therefore believe that 
the best interests of the city will be 



served by awarding the contract as above 
set forth. 

Very truly yours, 

Wm. W. Drummey, 

Superintendent of Construction. 

Penal In.stitutions Department. 
Bo.sTON, January 18, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Because of the reports sub- 
mitted to me by the chief engineer of the 
House of Correction, Deer Island, Boston 
Harbor, and also because of the reports 
submitted by the Travelers' Insurance 
Company, through their supervising en- 
gineer, Mr. C. D. Paterson, repairs are 
needed at once on boiler designated as 
No. 2 boiler at the House of Correction, 
Deer Island. The work to be done con- 
sists of the following items: 

Rebuilding left side wall, rebuilding 
right side wall, rebuilding lower front wall, 
rebuilding arch over front wall, lowering 
peep-holes rear of boiler, repairing floor 
on bottom of boiler, pointing piers and 
grouting top of boiler. 

Since the work entailed is of an emer- 
gency nature, I respectfully request 
permission to award the work, without 
advertising, to B. F. Hanrahan, 26 
Bennington street. East Boston, in the 
sum of 81.100, which I believe to be a 
fair price. 

Sincerely yours, 

William G. O'Hare, 
Penal Instituticns Commi.%sioner. 



ADDITIONAL PURCHASES UNDER 
CONTRACTS. 

Supply Department. 
L'pon Januaiy 30 the Mayor approved 
the requests of the Supply Department 
for the purchase of additional supplies 
of various kinds in accordance with con- 
tracts already approved and in force, 
these supplies being purchased under 
contracts to run until March 31 and 
April 30, 1934. Communications were 
received from Philip A. Chapman of the 
Supply Department as foUows: 

Boston, January 19, 1934. 
Hex. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — L'nder date of May 11, 

1933, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the New England Coal 
and Coke Company relative to the 
purchase of semibitumin