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V 1830. jJ" 

REFERENCE LIBRARY, 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. 

Room.JzT.*-^../. 

Book Case 

Division Shelf 

No 

This book is the property of the Public 
Works Department, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. 

Persons using this book must take due 
care of it, and return it to its proper loca- 
tion in the bookcase after using. 

None of the books to be taken from the 
City Hall Annex, without permission and 
receipt given therefor. 

All persons will be required to observe 
the above regulations.;, 

.;..•; N-rJyy^^ 

Commissioner. 






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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/cityrecord1935bost 



INDEX TO THE CITY RECORD, 

JANUARY S, 1935 — DECEMBER 28, I93S. 



Page 
A. 

Airport traffic growing 477 

Airport, increased use of 1287 

Airport, bad weather flying rules 1587 

Animal Rescue League reports on taking un- 
licensed dogs 997 

Appropriations, transfer of. . .33, 83, 197, 266, 274 
Assessing Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 7, 12, 28, 62; Feb., 110, 140, 193; 
March, 308; May, 505; June, 838; 
July, 948; Aug., 1083; Nov., 1444; 
Dec, 1527, 1584. 

board denies charge of favoritism 1529 

Assessments, revision of: 

109, 288, 340, 429, 453, 769, 794, 861, 899, 
937, 1006, 1092, 1343. 
Auditing Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 7; Feb., 168; March, 250; April, 

380; June, 863; July, 979; Aug., 1083; 

Sept., 1136, 1210; Oct., 1229, 1286; 

Dec, 1590. 

comments and suggestions relative to new 

disbursement system 3 

auditor appeals for cooperation in closing 

accounts 1533 

B. 

Bear, grizzly, dies at Franklin Park Zoo. . . . 313 
Bennington street, Street Lights Approved. . 340 

Bequests to City Reported 1372 

Bids for Boston Notes 538 

Bid, new low, for Boston Bonds 292 

Boston Common Tercentenary Committee. . . 363 

complete organization 383 

Boston Common Tercentenary Plans 327 

Boston's dollar, how expended, with chart.. . 377 
Boston Federal Projects must be almost 

wholly Federal financed 491 

Boston notes sold readily 1465 

Boston, population of 713, 817, 1144 

Boston prevented by law from aiding Pren- 

dergast Preventorium 419 

Boston secures loan at low rate 488 

Budget Department: 
changes in personnel of: 
Sept., 1186. 

Budget, 1935 - 525 

Budget Commissioner, Mayor names Francis 

J. Murray 1291 

Building Department: 
changes in personnel of: 
June, 894; Oct., 1286; Dec, 1527. 
Buildings Razed: 

13, 28, 94, 139, 174, 201, 234, 257, 284, 314, 
345, 355, 383, 432, 455, 475, 512, 527, 
770, 840. 899, 928, 954, 985, 1004, 
1021, 1034, 1079, 1095, 1109, 1152, 
1173, 1185, 1215, 1227, 1286. 1312, 
1337, 1362, 1423, 1456, 1572. 

C. 

Citt Clerk Department: 
changes in personnel of: 
Aug., 1028; Oct., 1286. 

City Departments contribute to charity 33 

City's dollar, how expended, with chart 377 

City Planning Board submits more interesting 

facts 975 

City Tax Bill, how divided 1207 

City to finish planting E. R. A. trees 1006 

City Hall structure found menace to occu- 
pants 1285 

City Planning Board releases two volumes of 

inventory of real property 1291 

Collecting Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 7, 89; Feb., 110, 168; March, 219, 
308, 334; April, 445; May, 505; Aug., 
1028; Sept., 1186; Oct., 1305. 

Consolidation of departments proposed 1573 

County Court House (new), moves to secure, 1209 

Cows, herd of, for Deer Island 422 

Credit Union, City of Boston, annual report 

n of v 1523 

Claims, Award of, for: 

Autos, trucks, horses, damage to: 

Freeman, John 1448 

Buxton, Fred 1448 

Byrne, Harry E 1448 

Carlson, Eleanor L 879 

Ciccarelli, Rachel L 1448 

Colbert. James D 431 

Cunniff , Philip F ' 1524 

DashofT, Jacob 879 

Dillon, Robert A 879 

Dillon, Schuyler 879 

Farren, Marguerite 1382 

Fogg, Lester R 200 

Gillis, John J 384 

Harwood, Harry P 431 

Holden, William F., Jr 18 

Hunt, Helen C 879 

Madow, Rose 1524 

McLaughlin, Laurence J 1382 



Claims, Award of, for: Page 

Autos, trucks, horses, damage to: 

McShane, Ruth M 1524 

Phelan, Gerald J 927 

Rankin, Frederick S 1524 

Scovilli Manufacturing Company 1587 

Shank, Harry A 1144 

Sweeney, James H - 384 

Taylor, Thatcher D 879 

injuries, personal: 

Bielinki, Freida 1144 

Bloom, Minnie 879 

Bortolin, Ann 1448 

Bradley. Carolyn 200 

Byrne, George R 879 

Caulfiels, John T 1211 

Crandall, Clara 1382 

Fishman, Bessie 1382 

Cronin, Jeremiah A 384 

DelGrosso, Josephine 200 

Doherty, Alice 879 

Early, Walter Manning 384 

Findlay, Mabel I 1144 

Flanagan, Mary E 927 

Freedman, Rose 1144 

Goddard, Jenny B 384 

Graumann, Amelia M 384 

Harpel, Dora 927 

Kelley, Mary 1587 

Kelly, Margaret E 1524 

Latorella, Rose 384 

Lee, Bridget 200 

Long, Edward 233 

Matta, Violet 200 

Mills, Katherine 384 

Murphy, William F 200 

Stead, Myra G 1587 

Tangherlini, Rose 1524 

Tighe, William A 1468 

Winslow, Gertrude 233 

money, refund: 

Bailey, Joseph 879 

Bailey, Thomas F : 1144 

Bay State Belting Company 1144 

Candakes, Peter 200 

Chapman, George L 879 

Cohen, I., & Son 384 

Deeran, Caspar 927 

Dole, Edward J 879 

Eager, Edward 1382 

Felton Turner Heating Company 1382 

Freedman, S 384 

Gagin, Henry A 200 

Gilchrist Company 1 144 

Gordon Supply Company 200 

Goudy, John P 879 

Kimmel, David H 175 

Jessup, Harry 233 

Levenson, Harry 879 

Leventhal Morris 1524 

Memmolo Stefano 1211 

Michell, Fred 879 

Morrison, Mary 1382 

Morrin, John 531 

Mt. Lebanon Cemetery Association. . . . 950 

Mulkerin, Patrick 1211 

O'Connor, Patrick J 1144 

O'Toole, Martin J 175 

Pacific Coast Lumber Company 879 

Pike, Hyman 1382 

Rumrill, Lawrence G 200 

Sadie Kelly Spa 1382 

Shapiro, Hyman 1211 

Somerset Farms Creamery Company. . . 879 

Strathmore Woolen Company 1211 

Surrey, William N 879 

Synadinos, Cosmas 1144 

U. S. Motor Vehicle Service 233 

Weadick, Edward F 175 

Wernick, Samuel 384 

Weston, Elliot 927 

Zieman, Mrs. M 1144 

property, damage to: 

Adams, Melvin O., Estate 384 

Blake, J. A. Lowell 384 

Breslin, Ella E 200 

Colbert, Mary 431 

Cunningham, Maria L 1144 

Donahue, Michael J. and Mary E 879 

Foley, Mary A 1468 

Goudreau, Charles 1600 

Kelley, George A. and Nora J 531 

Loughran, Patrick 1144 

Maglio, Ralph 200 

Maloney, Michael 431 

Mulhern, Thomas J 927 

Nelson, Lavinia B 879 

Santosuosso, Emilia M 200 

Sullivan, Mrs. J 1406 

Synadines, Zina 927 

collapse of boiler, Kanz, John E 200 

damage to clothing, Ironside, Mrs. J 1524 

damage to trench, Nawn, Hugh, Incor- 
porated 200 

damage to water boiler, O'Leary, John. . . . 531 

loss of overcoat, Dwyer, John J 175 

personal property damage, Burns, Mary A., 989 



Claims, Award of, for: Page 

service (snow) : , 

Noone, Michael 927 

Sullivan, Michael J 927 

LoScinto, Thomas Leo 927 

Contracts Awarded: 
Assessing Department: 

tax lists, typewritten 385 

Fire Service: 

underground construction 1015, 1289 

laundry work 8 

Hospital Department: 

additions to Power Plant 1447 

generator, electric, Power House 1447 

heating 195, 1469 

purchase of bones, trimmings, etc 67 

vermin, extermination of 147 

tank, hot water storage 195, 286 

window cleaning 507 

new drain line 1432 

Institutions Department: 

tile work, Long Island 507 

Library Department: 

transportation service . 8 

Park Department: 

footbridge, Airport 951 

Penal Institutions Department: 

repairs, Deer Island 1231 

wharves, repairing of, Deer Island 1135 

Public Works Department: 
Central Office: 

repairs, Summer Street Draw 1231 

steps, stone, etc 1104 

replacing sidewalks 1395 

repairs, Albany Street Station 1337 

sprinkler system for ferries 1306 

repairs, steamer "Daniel A. Mac- 

Cormack " 1469 

Bridge Service: 

repairs, Chelsea North ■ 67 

rebuilding Chelsea Street 1529 

Ferry Service: 

repairs, "General Sumner" 1063 

repairs, " Lieutenant Flaherty" 8 

reconstruction piers, South 10 15 

Paving Service: 

sheet asphalt 1370 

Districts 1,2 . 765 

Faneuil street 1085 

Hyde Park avenue . . . • 171 

La Grange street 309 

Payson avenue 1085 

Savin Hill avenue 814 

Weld street 1188 

Sanitary Service: 

garbage removal 8, 1601 

manure removal 1601 

snow and ice removal 8, 9 

Sewer Service: 

Calf Pasture 1000 

Circuit street et al 359 

Dent street 67 

Pershing road 1529 

Tenean creek 447, 929 

Tennis road 900 

' Water Service: 

pipes, water, La Grange street 309 

repairs at Calf Pasture 790 

hydrants 929 

Providence turnpike 900 

labor to assemble gates 1529 

Department of School Buildings: 
alterations: 

Dorchester High (Boys) 877 

Girls' Trade 1031 

Jeremiah E. Burke High 951 

Mechanic Arts High 1000 

Prescott 22 

Robert Gould Shaw 1475 

Roxbury Memorial High 877 

bolts, etc 350 

class rooms, new Brighton High 877 

cooking room, Charlestown High 930 

erecting and completing: 

Dudley district 1585 

John Marshall 1585 

Phillips Brooks 15S5 

South Boston High (additions) 15S5 

Washington Irving 1135 

fire escapes: 

Benjamin Pope 1063 

Wait S38 

William Wirt Warren 1031 

fuel oils S76 

furniture: 

various schools 171, 225, 2S5, 1102 

heating: 

Bowditch 951 

Hemenway .' 980 

Old Thornton Street 1000 

Oliver Wendell Holmes 951 

various schools 1063 

Weld 950 

insulating materials 1031 

lockers: 

East Boston High 1135 

Jeremiah E. Burke High 9S0, 1031 



CITY RECORD INDEX. 



Contracts Awarded: Page 

Department of School Buildings: 
lockers : 

Roxbury Memorial 1063 

various schools 533 

machinery, metal working 1102 

masonry, Warren 1031 

paving, etc., Joshua Bates 950 

painting: 

Andrew Jackson 951 

Girls' High 1063 

Henry Vane 951 

High, Commerce 951 

plumbing: 

English High 1135 

Mary E. Curley 1102 

Old Edward Everett 1015 

Phillips Brooks 1000 

pumps, temperature control 1063 

regrading. etc.: 

Mary Hemenway 980 

Quincy 951 

William Eustis 951 

repairs: 

Bigelow 1015 

John Marshall 1015 

roofing: 

Old Edward Everett 951 

Roger Wolcott 951 

sewing room, Joseph H. Barnes 950 

supplies, electrical 447 

teachers' and nurses' room. Holden 950 

history of department soon to be ready . 1389 
School Committee: 

ashes and refuse, removal of 67 

books, rebinding of 478 

coal 875, 876, 1539 

football supplies 1396 

groceries 1064 

lamp bulbs, incandescent 67, 1588 

lumber 896 

paper, blank books, etc 869 

pencils, pens, etc 900 

physical education supplies 507 

pianos 1529 

shop supplies 1371 

supplies, art and manual training 1063 

transportation for pupils 1529 

uniforms, etc 1085 

Supply Department: 

asphalt, road 509 

asphalt emulsion 1530 

alcohol (denatured) 1475 

batteries, flashlight 229 

butter, eggs, etc 9, 230, 336, 452, 790, 931 

1016, 1106, 1221, 1369, 1448 

brick, sidewalk 92 

bricks, sewer 1 17 

cable (lead-covered) 1000 

capes, uniform 230 

cars. Ford, Fire Department 31 

cars, Ford, Park Department . 335 

cases, industrial and medicinal 172 

castings, etc 533, 1064 

catch-basin cleaning machines 1586 

chains, Weed 1475 

coal, chestnut 1137 

concrete, bituminous 1472 

concrete, mixed 1064 

coke 878 

cement, Portland 171 

cement, asphaltic 534 

cloth 68, 148, 403 

clothing, hospital 403 

coal 451 

coats, rubber 229 

coffee 335, 1220 

drinking cups, paper 117 

drugs 385 

edgestones 878 

electrical material 1216 

ether 92 

fence 68 

flour 67,448,980,1266 

fruit and vegetables, 10, 118, 231, 359. 478, 792 
930, 1016, 1136, 1232, 1368, 1469 

Ford coupe 1231 

fuel testing, etc . 9 

gasoline 980 

groceries, etc 396 ,1395 

hay, grain and straw. .230, 335. 448, 766, 932 
1016, 1105, 1220, 1369, 1471 

hose, fire 1370, 1471 

ice cream mix 403 

incinerator (Long Island) 1234 

kitchen equipment, City Hospital 1363 

kitchen equipment. Long Island 1370 

lamps, incandescent 1064 

loam 336 

lumber 309 

lead, arsenate of 359 

lead, pig 68 

lead, in oil 68 

meats 9, 147, 253. 361, 479, 790, 929 

1031, 1135, 1232, 1367. 1470 

meters, water 510 

milk, etc 449 

oil, asphalt road 533 

oil, fuel 1188,1215,1368 

oil, motor 509 

oil, non-asphaltic 765 

oil, range 1140. 1362 

overcoats, uniform (Fire) 1448 

paint, white traffic 791 

paper, toilet 117 

patching mixture, bituminous 478 

pipe, sewer, and fittings 116 

pipe, lead 68 

pipe, cement-lined 1601 



Contracts Awarded: Page 

Supply Department: 

pipes, water _ 1530 

pipe and fittings, wrought iron 877 

polish, metal 149 

relay panels and parts (Traffic Tunnel), 1474 

salt 1473 

seed, grass 359 

shoe shop materials 31, 931 

signal equipment 1231 

sods 451 

stone, crushed _ 286 

surgical supplies 195, 225, 423 

sand and gravel 447, 480 

suits, Long Island Hospital 878 

tea 31,930 

tires 32 

toweling 254 

traffic signal equipment 509, 1472 

turkeys 1447, 1601 

uniforms (Fire Department) 197, 449 

uniforms (Deer Island Guards) 951 

ventilating equipment 149 

waste, and wiping cloths _. _93 

ex-Ray apparatus 115, 1586 

Traffic Department: 

oil, motor 1474 

Contracts Awarded Without Advertising: 
11, 68, 93, 118, 150, 172, 232, 287, 310, 
336, 362, 403, 453, 481, 510, 534, 766, 
793, 814, 873, 900, 932. 952, 980, 1001, 
1018, 1033, 1065, 1086, 1107, 1143, 
1165, 1188, 1234, 1289, 1306, 1371, 
1403, 1475, 1530, 1586, 1602. 
Contracts, Changes in: 

94, 133, 144, 154, 303, 332, 433, 456, 804, 
891, 946, 1014, 1034, 1066, 1093, 
1094, 1108, 1153, 1190, 1256, 1264, 1362, 
1372, 1379, 1455. 
Contracts Awarded, Additions to and 
Deductions from: 
Hospital Department: 

surgical, City 151, 252, 283, 1002, 1155 

1*189, 1213, 1289, 1302, 1458, 1538 

kitchen, City 151, 288, 511, 879, 1108 

Department of School Buildings: 

Beethoven. . . .288, 363, 511, 535, 767, 901, 981 

Dorchester High (Boys) 1189 

East Boston High 151, 954, 1155, 1458 

Hyde Park High 311, 535 

Joseph H. Barnes School 337, 1188 

Oliver Holden 1189 

Roxburv Memorial High 1189 

Shurtleff 337, 511, 767, 901 1014 

1108, 1289, 1458 

Warren 151, 1458 

Courts: 

changes in personnel: 

Suffolk County Court House, 

June, 864. 
Suffolk Court Civil Business, 

June, 864. 
Sheriff's Office, 

Dec, 1585. 
Superior Court Clerk, 

Dec, 1585. 
Municipal Court, Brighton, 

July, 927. 
Municipal Court, Charlestown, 

June, 864. 
Municipal Court, Dorchester, 

June, 864. 
East Boston District, 

June, 864. 
Clerk, Probation Office, 

Jan., 29. 
Municipal Court, West Roxbury, 

June. 864. 
Boston Juvenile, 

June, 864. 
Municipal, 
June, 864. 

D. 

Damages and abatements assessed 1308, 1318 

Deer Island guard, former, denied reinstate- 
ment 1468 

Department of School Buildings: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 89; April, 445; July, 998; Oct., 
1229, 1305; Nov., 1332; Dec, 1584. 
Dodge, Robert C, to represent city in 

Dolan suit 1600 

Dollar, Boston's, how expended, with chart. . 377 
Dorchester shows greatest increase in popu- 
lation in past five years 941 

Dorchester Unit, New, for Welfare purchases, 218 



Election Department; 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 28, 89; Feb., 110,140, 193; March, 
250, 281, 308; April, 380, 422. 
McKinney, Francis B., named Election 

Commissioner 1287 

Elevated Structure: 

Mayor receives report Joint) of Transit 
Commission and Planning Board as 

per removal 1061 

Removal of, under consideration 1009 

Employee relationship committee named. . . . 307 
E. R. A. to share in Boston Common Ter- 
centenary 303 

F. 

Fire Department: 

changes in personnel of: 

March, 250, 281; May, 476; June, 894; 
July, 948, 979; Aug., 1013, 1083; 
Sept., 1132, 1164, 1186; Oct., 1286; 
Nov., 1332, 1260; Dec, 1527, 1599. 



Page 
Fox, Charles J., City Auditor, at Knoxville, 

Tenn., discusses municipal finance. . . 1303 
Fox, City Auditor, urges that account be 
liquidated and records completed as 

early as possible 1259 

Field Day for benefit of Welfare Department, 

Mayor La Guardia expected 836 

Ferryboat "Ralph J. Palumbo" sold 422 

U. S. Navy praises department 1404 

Sale of old lead cable 338 

Flag Day Proclamation by Mayor 842 

Fish canning project (City) suggested 861 

H. 

Health Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 62, 90; March, 250, 281; April, 353, 
380; July, 948, 998; Aug., 1013, 1061; 
Sept., 1210; Oct., 1229, 1286; Nov., 
1332, 1360, 1394, 1444; Dec, 1465, 
1527, 1584. 

Homeless men, service for 1093 

Hospital Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 7, 28, 62, 90; Feb., 110, 140, 168, 
193; March, 219, 250, 281, 308, 343; 
April, 353, 380, 422, 445; May, 476, 
505, 530, 763; June, 789, 813, 838, 862 , 
894; July, 926, 948, 979, 998; Aug., 
1013, 1028, 1061, 1083, 1101; Sept., 
1132, 1165, 1187, 1210; Oct., 1229, 
1263, 1286; Nov., 1332, 1361, 1394, 
1440; Dec, 1465, 1527, 1534, 1599. 
(Sanitarium, see above.) 
Sale of old X-Ray films 280 

I. 

Institutions Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 7, 29, 62, 90; Feb., 110, 141, 168, 
193; March, 220, 251, 281, 308, 334; 
April, 353, 381, 422, 445; May, 476, 
505, 530, 763; June, 789, 813, 862; 
July, 926, 949, 979, 999; Aug., 1013, 
1028, 1961, 1083, 1101; Sept., 1132, 
1165, 1186, 1210; Oct., 1229, 1263, 
1286, 1305; Nov., 1335, 1360, 1445; 
Dec, 1466, 1527, 1584, 1599. 

K. 

Knitting of flag on Common completed 1109 

L. 

Law Department: 

changes in personnel of: 

Feb., 168; May, 477; June, 789; July, 
949; Aug., 1062. 1101; Oct., 1229, 
1286; Nov., 1335, 1361, 1445; Dec, 
1466, 1599. 

Work by Tax Title Division 1002 

Department reports much progress in 

settlement of tax titles, etc 765 

Library Department poll tax record 100 per 

cent 1285 

Low bids on Boston loan 248 

M. 

Market Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Feb.. 168; May, 530; Aug.. 1029. 
Mayor's Office: 

changes in personnel of: 
Dec, 1585 
Mayor, Activities of. Social Service 
and Miscellaneous: 
acts to provide for handling tax title 

property 1264 

again asks City Council to pass order for 

snow removal equipment 1329 

aids infantile paralysis victim 1189 

appeals for E. R. A. funds 146 

appeals to Director Hopkins for Federal 

grants 379 

appointments by 477 

approves permission to advertise for Public 

Works supplies 419 

approves vote of Street Commissioners 
revoking oil license of White Fuel 

Corporation 179 

approves cancellation of assessed benefits. . 175 
approves order of Street Commissioners 

regarding coasting on streets 139 

approves order to sell junk 488 

approves annual labor picnic 537 

approves request to fill vacancy in Public 

Works Department 6 

approves Parcels Post Building 13 

asked aid in locating mother 13 

asks Public Utilities Commission to investi- 
gate Boston gas rates 28 

asks citizens to patronize automobile 

show 60 

bans beano racket 1528 

bans play, "Within the Gates" 71 

bestows police hero medals 95 

challenges sincerity of Finance Commis- 
sion in snow removal matter 859 

Christmas wish to people of Boston 1599 

complies with Council request in Sinking 

Fund probe 173 

confers with Gas and Edison Companies 

on rates 170 

corrects false press statement as to his 

stand on tax rate 314 

deeply interested in plans for New Eng- 
land 1161 

defends expenditures proposed for Quincy 

Market repairs 1343 



CITY RECORD INDEX. 



Mayor, Activities of, Social Service Page 

AND MlSCELLANEDS: 

demands of Finance Commission testi- 
mony in Logan case 1281 

designates "Clean-Up Week" 1126 

drafts bill seeking razing of Elevated 

structure 1025 

eases conditions for out-patients at City 

Hospital ; ... 1335 

economies more than justified by figures 

compiled by City Auditor 216 

evolves a works relief project calling for 

830,000,000 expenditure 857 

expresses grief over death of Oliver 

Wendell Holmes 258 

gets inventory conducted by Planning 

Board 941 

heads committee from Massachusetts 

League of Municipalities 249 

investigates dumping of ashes at World 

War Memorial Park 60 

invites Governor Curley to attend Athletic 

and Musical Carnival -. . 923 

issues warning to Dog Track promotors 

as to building 233 

list of legislative bills for 1935 87 

lists of 14 projects for P. W. A. employ- 
ment 325 

locates relatives of English family 1362 

makes provisions to amend gas contract.. . 363 

making plans to handle work relief 443 

mourns passing of Joseph J. Hurley 1133 

names Citizens' Committee for proposed 

tax drive . 406 

names Corporation Counsel Foley to Com- 
mission on Boston Finances 1109 

names committee on snow removal 1194 

names committee to improve ambulance 

service .•••••. 1 189 

names his employees relationship com- 
mittee 307 

not to be candidate for Senator or Gov- 
ernor 1532 

opposes merger of Penn. and B. &. M. 

roads 503 

orders regarding new disbursement system, 18 
permits Public Works Department to read- 

vertise street lighting contract 1 230 

plans field day at Fenway Park 794 

planning for study of infantile paralysis as 

W. P. A. project. 1100 

plans for loans on tax titles 354 

plans many improvements at Deer Island, 787 

places wreath on Lafayette tablet 981 

pleads cause of E. R. A. workers 1587 

praised by Councilor Norton 977 

praises heroism of city employees 1355 

proposes consolidation of City Depart- 
ments 1574 

proposes names of Housing Authority. . . . 1290 

replies to Councilor Norton 1002 

replies to Finance Commission 218 

replies to Municipal Research Bureau .... 223 
receives Planning Board surveys for vari- 
ous sections of the city 889 

renews demand for evidence in Dolan 

case ; 1297 

renews demand that Finale Commission 

produce proof of graft 1524 

responds to protest against raise of gas 

rates 921 

scores out-of-town critics of play banning. . 1577 

scores trading in jobs for politics 1419 

scores Finance Commission for certain 

suggestions 1336 

scores councilors for rejection of loan 

order 811 

secures grants of S669.210.54 for P. W. A., 1463 

secures temporary loan 925 

seeks appropriation to provide for probing 

electric rates 762 

seeks to clean streets by halting refuse 

scattering habits 506 

seeks to stop removal of produce market . . 488 
seeks to amend tunnel act to take care of 

excess costs 835 

seeks to hasten Post Office Building Fund, 55 
seeking plans for removal of Elevated struc- 
ture 842 

secures cooperation of Senator Coolidge 

in Mexican matter 198 

sends greeting to all Boston citizens 1599 

signs order for new Courthouse 446 

submits report from Committee on Snow 

Removal 1257 

submits lists of projects for P. W. A 1085 

submits order to Council to borrow 

86,000,000 on uncollected taxes 503 

submits 1935 budget 525 

takes exceptions to statement from Wash- 
ington on high per capita costs 1308 

takes exceptions that new City Hall should 

have new location _. 1301 

thanks Omaha for flowers sent city 375 

to aid South Boston residents in protest 

over Housing decision 1301 

to play leading part in celebration of estab- 
lishment of Common 1163 

urges action against Mexico's religious ban, 175 6 
vetoes Council order relative to married 

women employees 483 

vetoes increase of salaries of probation 

officers 1146 

vetoes items in School Department budget, 809 
vetoes proposal to increase salaries of pro- 
bation officers 1 100 

warns of pay cuts for teachers 355 

welcomes new broadcasting station 1099 

will provide for unemployed 1572 



Mayor, Activities of, Social Service Page 

vnd Miscellaneous: 
wires condolences on death of Senator Long, 1 162 
Work Projects Board and Mayor approve 

new projects 985 

welcomes Elks Goodwill Tour 793 

Mayor, Addresses by: 

annual to City Council 21 

at "Maine Memorial" exercises at Faneuil 

Hall 191 

at Crispus Attucks Monument, March 5. . 245 
Acting Mayor Fitzgerald greets Hair- 
dressers' Association 95 

at gathering of delegates from seaport cities 

at New York 833 

before meeting of Assessing Department, 

urging more care in valuing 1 

Boston Park Department plans for indoor 

work for winter 1299 

Boston port activities shown 1575 

commends Scott Furriers, Inc 215 

felicitates Cardinal on occasion of receiving 

French honor 1057 

opening drive for Emergency Relief 61 

welcomes Canon A. Malcolm Cook of 

Boston, England 1183 

by radio. 
Acting Mayor Fitzgerald pleads for welfare 

relief 925 

appeals for interest in "Clean-Up Week" . . 1205 
announces plans for additional food for 

welfare recipients 1441 

appeals for a Greater Boston 213 

at Flower Show 353 

bargains in real estate plentiful now 1225 

Boston meets its snow removal problem 

with greater success than other cities, 103 

Boston's port very much alive. . 441 

Boston's program for safeguarding health. 165 
City Treasurer Dorsey broadcasts in 

interests of baseball 351 

denounces Governor Curley and announces 

inauguration of campaign against him, 1181 
discusses functions of Health Department 

service 1331 

discusses "Further Welfare Facts" 329 

establishes real estate division in Welfare 

Department 57 

finding jobs for welfare recipients 137 

"Further Welfare Facts" conferences have 
served to harmonize solution of 

problem 759 

how Boston distributes food to needy 417 

insurance adjustments saving thousands 

for welfare citizens 501 

proposes method for obtaining needed 

revenue for city 107 

proposes plan to protect creditors and poor 

debtors 277 

opens drive for sale of tickets for Roosevelt 

Birthday Ball 59 

relief recipients eager for real work 1461 

social service work in Public Welfare work, 189 
summarizes his accomplishments for the 

city in 1934 85 

wants New England railroads free from 

Pennsylvania lines 757 

Welfare Department one of Boston's 

valued investments 785 

Mayor, Communications Received By: 
complimentary, from Camp LaGuardia, 

N. Y 1002 

from Director Dowling, as to a fish canning , 

project 861 

from Senator Walsh, on P. W. A. appro- 
priations 831 

from Superintendent Loomis, regarding gas 

and oil contracts 946 

from President Harrington, of Health In- 
spectors, complimenting Mayor 946 

from Commissioner Long, Park Depart- 
ment, as to recreation grounds 463 

from J. C. L. Dowling, relative to proposed 

canning project 475 

from Paul V. Betters, relative to Federal 

Works Program 475 

from Corporation Counsel Foley, regard- 
ing rights of Council in damage cases. . 331 
from Director Dowling, announcing open- 
ing of Jamaica Plain Unit 19 

from Corporation Counsel, denying lack of 

diligence in handling cases 279 

from Corporation Counsel, on race tracks 

for dogs and horses 247 

from food inspectors, indorsing sales tax 

bill 248 

from Commissioner Carven, on test of snow- 
loaders 173 

from Commissioner Sullivan, and answer, 

giving high praise to same 59 

from City Treasurer Dorsey, as to bond 

sale 990 

from Corporation Counsel Foley, in re tax 

exemption on South Boston project. . 135 
from John L. Hall, in re New Haven road 

relationship with Port of Boston 1525 

Maine Shriners want to present a salmon. . 813 
resignation of Warren W. Loomis, Super- 
intendent of Supplies 1294 

Welsbach Company will abide by code 865 

Mayor, Communications Sent By: 

asks President Lowell to head investigating 

committee • ■ • 1 185 

to Legislature, giving reasons for opposing 

adoption of tax rule 527 

to Commissioner Callahan, as to guarding 

life at beaches 1078 



Mayor.'Communications Sent By: Page 

to City Hospital, proposing home for single 

men on West Roxbury site 354 

to City Council, anent difficulties in lower- 
ing tax rate 350 

to editor of Herald, for misleading headlines, 1059 
to Governor Curley, taking exceptions to 

charges regarding Courthouse 1097 

to John L. Hall, showing how New Haven 

road has injured Port.' 1333 

to Finance Commission, charging sniping 
and unfair attitudes toward the admin- 
istration 1157 

to Finance Commission, reply on snow re- 
moval 1211 

to Senators Walsh and Coolidge, plea for 

Port of Boston. 338 

to Commissioner McSweeney, refusing to 

appoint or allow for extra police 473 

to Commissioner Callahan of Public 
Works, regarding dangerous condition 

of waterfront piling 943 

Mayor, Public Statements: 

abandons efforts for removal of Elevated 

structure 1129 

announces successes at Washington in 

securing promises of improvements. . . 1159 

as to bids for milk, cream, etc 470 

books for Deer Island received 1305 

Boston digging way out of snow 119 

Boston to be denied relief by government. . 420 
clarifies situation arising over Chelsea 

North Drawbridge 23 

comments on action of Elevated directors, 1100 
comments on Finance Commission yielding 

in Dolan matter 1372 

cooperates to secure new Courthouse 1572 

corrects false impression as to snow re- 
moval 215 

declines to give Council snow-removal 

information 1465 

defends Administrator Rotch on handling 

pay rolls 1602 

disclaims responsibility for Boston's finan- 
cial condition 1521 

favors Colonel Gow to head project plans, 483 
forced to close Chelsea North Drawbridge, 65 

gain in tax collections 1572 

in re bond sale 1419 

names James J. Egan, Commissioner of 

School Buildings 1468 

Naval Affairs committee accepts invitation 

to visit Boston. . ' 380 

New Year message 13 

no reimbursements of relief contributions, 504 

pays tribute to Will Rogers 1083 

plans to collect delinquent taxes 339 

plans for snow removal 198 

proposed removal of Elevated structure. . 993 
protests against order disbanding pur- 
chasing agency 1359 

regarding removal of Elevated structure. . . 1009 
regrets adverse action on show-removal 

equipment by City Council 1300 

releases letter from J. C. L. Dowling rela- 
tive to making gardens on unimproved 

tax titles land 488 

riddles charge of favoritism in award of 

contracts 997 

strong credit of city shown in bond sales. . 167 
work on Quiney Market repairs to begin. . 1572 
Mayor's Circular Letters: 

202, 446, 515, 516, 760, 840, 842, 1002, 1014 
1133, 1161, 1221, 1312, 1359, 1604 
Municipal Employment Bureau: 
changes in personnel of: 

Feb., 193; Aug., 1029, 1062; Sept., 1186; 
Oct., 1286. 
Municipalities, Massachusetts League of, 

plans relief from tax burdens 281 

N. 
New York City Employees' ball team want 

return game 1006 

new disbursement system, notes on 97 

O. 

Overtime Allowed: 
Assessing Department: 

June, 864. 
Hospital Department: 

Sept., 1187; Oct., 1263; Nov., 1467. 
Institutions Department: 

Jan., 7; Feb., Ill, 194; April, 446; 
July, 999. 
Park Department: 

Feb., Ill, 142, 169, 194; March, 220, 232. 
Penal Institutions -Department: 

Feb., 142; March, 252; Sept., 1133, 
1188; Oct., 1306. 
Printing Department: 

June, 789. 
Public Works Department: 
Bridges: 

Jan., 29, 63; Feb., Ill, 142, 194. 
E. R. A.: 

Jan., 30. 
Ferrv: 

Feb., Ill, 142. 194; July, 950. 
Highway: 
March, 220. 

Pa janT 30, 63; Feb., Ill, 112, 142; 

March, 282. 
Sanitary: 

Jan., 30, 64; Feb.. Ill, 112, 114; 

March, 220, 252. 2S2. 



CITY RECORD INDEX. 



Overtime Allowed: Page 

Public Works Department: 
Sewerage: 

Jan., 30; Feb., 13; March, 222, 309, 
334; April, 353; May, 477, 530; 
June, 838, 864; Sept., 1133, 1188. 
Traffic Tunnel: 

Jan., 30; Feb., 194. 

P. 

Park Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 7, 29, 63; Feb., Ill, 141; March, 
2S1; April, 353, 381, 422, 445; May, 
477, 505, 530; June. 789, 814, 863; 
Julv, 927, 949, 989; Aug., 1013, 1030, 
1062, 1084, 1101; Sept., 1133, 1165, 
1210; Oct., 1263, 1286, 1305; Nov., 
1335, 1362, 1395, 1447; Dec, 1455, 
1585, 1600. 
Commissioner Long commends life guards, 1100 
department employees praised by Long. . . 977 

exchange of Zoo animals approved 1451 

football league reports good season. . . . . . . 1568 

special gardens for growing rare medicinal 

plants ••■ 1027 

Patriots' Day plans announced 355 

Penal Institutions Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 7, 90; Feb., Ill, 169; March, 25, 
282; April, 353, 381; May, 445, 505, 
530, 764; June, 789, 814, 864; July, 
927, 949, 999; Aug., 1013, 1084, 1101; 
Sept., 1133, 1186, 1210; Oct., 1229, 
1286, 1305; Nov., 1335, 1394, 1447; 
Dec, 1406, 1585. 
Planning Board: 

inventory completed and abstract pre- 
sented to Mayor of findings; 86,391 

dwelling structures surveyed 995 

Prado, in North End, named Paul Revere 

Mall 191 

Port of Boston activities shown 1575 

Printing Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Feb.. 194; March, 252; May, 764; July, 
927, 950; Sept., 1210; Oct., 1236; 
Nov., 1447; Dec, 1600. 
Public Buildings Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

May, 506; June, 864, 950; July, 999; 
Sept., 1187; Oct., 1229, 1286; Nov., 
1335; Dec, 1600. 
real estate, division of, being rapidly or- 
ganized. . . 1419 

Public Works Department: 

(Central Office.) 
changes in personnel of: 

Feb., Ill, 141; June, 789, 814, 838; 
Aug., 1013, 1030; Sept., 1133, 1210; 
Oct., 1263; Nov., 1362; Dec, 1467. 
(Bridge Service.) 
Jan., 7; Feb., 151, 169, 194; March, 282; 
May, 506; June, 838, 864, 894; July, 
950, 979; Nov., 1447; Dec, 1467. 
(Ferry Service ) 
Jan . 29, 63, 90; Feb., Ill; March, 220, 
309; April, 353; June, 814; July, 950, 
999; Aug., 1062; Oct., 1229, 1263, 
1286. 

(Paving Service.) 
Jan., 7; Feb., Ill, 194; March, 282; 
May, 477, 506, 530; June, 838, 864; 
July, 927, 950. 979; Aug., 1030, 1062, 
1101; .Sept., 1133, 1187; Oct., 1229, 
1305; Dec, 1467, 1527, 1585, 1600. 
(Sanitary Service.) 
Jan., 29; Feb., Ill, 169; May, 477; 
June, 864; July, 950, 999; Aug., 1013, 
1030, 1062, 1084; Oct., 1286; Dec, 
1600. 

(Sewerage Service.) 
Feb., 141, 194; May, 794; June, 789; 
July, 950; Aug., 1062, 1084; Sept.. 
1187; Oct., 1229, 1286, 1305; Nov., 
1335, 1394; Dec, 1467, 1527. 

(Sumner Tunnel Service.) 
July, 950; Aug., 1030; Oct., 1305; 
Dec, 1467. 

(Water Service.) 
Jan., 91; March, 282, 334; April, 446; 
May. 530, 764; June, 789, 814, 895; 
July, 950, 979; Aug., 1030, 1062; Oct., 
1229, 1263, 1286; Nov., 1394; Dec, 
1487, 1585, 1600. 
(Water Service, Income Division.) 
Auk., 1030, 1062. 
given permission to advertise for bids for 

dredging 1602 

work done by department forces: 

Conley street 818 

R. 

Race ti ■: by Corporation Counsel, 247 

Registry Department: 
change- in personnel of: 

July. 950, 979; Oct., 1286, 1305, Nov., 
1447. 
Registry of Deeds: 
Changes in personnel of: 
June, 838; Nov., 1362. 
Retirement Board: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan.. 7; Oct., 1229. 
reports: 

C, 139, 254, 351, 483, 827, 936, 975, 
1014, 1145, 1227, 1381, 1464. 



Page 



S. 
School Committee: 

report of Adelbert H. Morrison on attend- 
ance at Atlantic City • 338 

report of John P. Sullivan, supervisor of 

health education • • 92 

report of Bertha A. O'Connor, at Wash- 
ington 101 1 

reports of officials approved 467 

Snow removal, report of committee on. . . .57, 1329 
Soldiers' Relief Department: 

changes in personnel of: ' 

Jan.. 7, 63; March, 220; April, 353; 
May, 506, 530; June, 814, 895; July, 
927; Aug., 1062; Sept., 1133; Oct., 
1229; Nov., 1447; Dec, 1467, 1600 

report of, for March, 1935 437 

report of, for June and July 1066 

South Boston not neglected by W. P. A 1584 

Street Laying-Out Department: 

changes in personnel of: 

May, 506; Aug., 1030; Nov., 1362. 

street'betterments, assessments for: 

Boyd street 197 

Cedarwood road 197 

Goodway road 1185 

Greaton road 197 

Peak Hill road 197 

land-taking: 

Addington road 1036 

Alder street 84 

Alley No. 801 831 

Alley No. 803 868 

Alley No. 807A 1077 

Alley No. 923 1287 

Alley No. 924 1287 

Alteresko avenue 354 

Annavoy street 91 

Arbor View road 114 

Ashmont circle 1455 

Atkins street 114 

Bayswater street 134 

Bellaire road 1230 

Bickford avenue 1022 

Bogandale road 1602 

Boston place 831 

Brunswick street 1518 

Caltha road 897 

Carroll street 1267 

Chapin avenue et al. (school) 454 

Charlesbank road 1572 

Chester place 938 

Clare avenue 1020 

Claymont terrace 879 

Cowper street 514 

Cranston road 1222 

Crockett avenue 89 

Deaconess road 1301 

Deforest street 470 

Dent street 484 

Druid street 26 

Duncklee street 91 

Durland street 1268 

Dwinell street 345 

Eastbourne street 134 

Edgemere road 1293 

Ely road 470 

Englewood street 793 

Esther road 818 

Eulita terrace 1089 

Everdean street 1381 

Faneuil street 198 

Francis street 132 

Furnival road 769 

Glenburne road 1 155 

Grayson street 1594 

Green Hill avenue '. . 223 

Grotto Glen road 536 

Harmon street (extension) 19 

Hatherley road 1038 

Haven avenue (sewerage) 1455 

Hemman street 532 

Humphreys place 1587 

Hyde Park avenue et al. (sewerage) 1209 

Iola street 470 

Kenmere road 485 

Kemp street 1325 

La Grange street 339 

Lake Shore road 455 

Libbey street 132 

Lindall street 866 

Lyne road 1468 

Malcolm road 1 14 

Malta street 333 

Marden street 1228 

Milton square '. 1209 

Martin'street 1165 

Montmorenci avenue 26 

Moody street 862 

Morton street et al. (sewerage) 816 

Nancia street 91 

Olivia road 381 

Payson avenue 532 

Parkman street 515 

Penniman street 1230 

Pine Ridge road 1018 

Pleasantview street 363 

Pond Circle . 1193 

Public Alley No. 718 1167 

Public Alley No. 719 1168 

Ralston street 1302 

Ravenna road 1312 

Redgate road 1014 

Richmond road 146 

Rockne avenue 1167 

Rose Garden Circle 381 

Ruskin road 483, 1450 

Russett road 531 



Page 



Street Laying-Out Department: 
land taking: 

Rutledge road 1162 

St. Botolph (Roxbury) 1054 

Thatcher street 1076 

Tiverton road 866 

Tokio street 91 

Undine road 928 

Violante street. '. 1185 

Walbridge street .' 1451 

Waldemar avenue 928 

Warren avenue (Hyde Park) 1077 

Washington Heights avenue 1013 

Welton road 1533 

Wentworth terrace 65 

Whitridge street 96 

Willowdean avenue 1192 

Winslow street 96 

land taking, damages awarded for: 

Adams street 134 

Allston street 1583 

Ashland street 487 

Baker street 170 

Berwick street 91 

Boyd street 985 

St. Brendan's road , 1571 

Cedarwood road 431, 487, 1013 

Central street 1380 

Centre street 531 

Clare avenue 767 

Delano park 443 

Edgemere road et al 767 

Faneuil street 224 

Freeland street 443, 1004, 1307 

Freeport street 201 

Goodway road 1152 

Greaton road 313, 523, 767, 902, 1084 

Grove street 91 

Hawthorne street et al (school), 946. 1468, 2545 

Hillsboro road 443 

Hyde Park (sewerage) 1193 

Kingsley street 338 

La Grange street 356, 767, 1592 

Larch street 1467 

Lila road 97, 284 

McKone street 1235 

Montelair avenue 1161 

Oakland and Ashland streets 1343 

Orange street 298 

Peak Hill road 355, 767, 1004 

Pleasant avenue 463, 1528 

Royen (Calvin) road 811 

Savannah avenue 1450 

Savin Hill avenue -. 1612 

Seminole street 97 

St. Theresa avenue 1084 

Travis street 97 

Weld street 925, 1468 

Westchester road 443 

West Seventh street 1235 

Wilmington street 13 

streets, location of approved 217, 531 

new streets to cost $459,700.39 1359 

Supply Department: 
changes in personnel of: 
Feb., Ill; Aug., 1030. 
D. Frank Doherty, named purchasing 

agent 1291 

Sullivan, Colonel, replies to critics 1448 

Sumner Traffic Tunnel, expenses and 

revenues 1283 

Sumner Traffic Tunnel, deficit of 429 



Tax sales, delinquent .345-755, 1174-1179 

Tercentenary, Boston, preliminary report of, 1417 

Thanksgiving for homeless 1456 

Traffic Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

April, 446; Mav, 530; June, 814; Sept., 
1132. 

Rules and Regulations 1489-1545 

Treasury Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 29; Feb., Ill; May, 477; June, 864; 
Oct., 1229, 1263. 

U. 
Unlicensed dogs taken in by Animal Rescue 

League 

Utility expert chosen to aid Law Department, 

W. 

Waterfront piling being eaten by marine 

insects 

Weights and Measures Department: 
changes in personnel of: 
March, 282. 
Welfare Department: 
changes in personnel of: 

Jan., 7, 29, 62; Feb., 110, 141, 168, 194; 
March, 220, 251, 281, 309, 334; April, 
353, 381, 445; May, 477, 505, 530, 768; 
June, 813, 838, 863; July, 926, 949, 
979,999; Aug., 1029, 1084, 1101; Sept., 
1183, 1210; Oct., 1229, 1286, 1305; 
Nov., 1361, 1394, 1445; Dec, 1466, 
1528, 1585, 1599. 

annual report of 

Boston leads in care of needy 

Feinberg, Philip J., named to board 

Walsh, John J., appointed overseer 

new leaflet directory of 

notice to merchants et al 

opens branch stations 

plans aid in spring clean-up work 

Doctor Washburn replies to Finance Com- 
mission query as to Long Island kit- 
chen equipment 



997 
108 



943 



1081 

209 

1221 

1152 

1290 

4 

173 

375 



1034 



CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



CITY RECORD 



Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affaibs. 



Vol. 27. Saturday, January 5, 1935. No. 1 



MAYOR MANSFIELD URGES MORE CARE IN ASSESSING PERSONAL PROPERTY 
AS MEANS OF RELIEVING REAL ESTATE OF HUGE BURDEN IN ADDRESS 
TO ASSESSORS — ADDRESSES THEM IN COUNCIL CHAMBER MEETING - 
POINTS TO REDUCTIONS IN VALUATIONS DURING YEARS SINCE 1929 
AND SUGGESTS TIME IS NOW RIPE FOR A GREATER EQUALIZATION OF 
BURDENS — ASKS THAT FAIRNESS AND JUSTICE BE METED OUT TO ALL. 



Mayor Mansfield spoke as follows at the meeting of the Assessing Department, held in the City Council 
Chamber on the morning of December 31: 

The assessments for 1935 are to be made for the first time under date of January 1. This is a radical change 
from the old custom, when April 1 was the taxing date. 

The efforts of the assessors should be directed towards careful and equal assessments, and to obtain as much 
additional revenue from the assessment of personal property as possible, so that the burden upon real estate may 
be relieved. 

Since 1929, when the peak was reached on real estate values, there have been reductions in the valuation 
of real estate amounting to $351,000,000. It may be that these reductions have reached the low-water mark, and 
if so the efforts of the assessors from this time on should be towards an equalization of value. 

In the course of your canvas there should be a very earnest effort made to assess property of similar character 
upon an equal basis. 

Groups of similar property should be considered, to the end that there should be a relation between assess- 
ments on properties of like character. Hotels, for instance, office buildings, apartment houses, stores and single 
dwellings should be compared and proportionate assessments made on each. 

Frequent consultations with deputies and principal assessors will allow for these comparisons, and when 
the valuations are completed there will be well-balanced assessments that will not be subject to attack. 

The efforts of the assessors, in every case, should be to determine a fair and proportionate assessment on all 
property that it is their duty to assess. 

Another condition to be carefully observed, as the result of this taxing date as of January 1, will be the con- 
sideration of proper assessments on stocks of merchandise. There may be found to be more or less on hand because 
of this new taxing date. Stocks of merchandise, particularly after the Christmas holidays, may be depleted, but, 
on the other hand, certain other personal property of a more staple character and less subject to changes by removals 
and transfer may show larger amounts on hand than under the April date. 

Tax Commissioner's Aid. 

The Tax Commissioner, I am advised, is to cooperate with the assessors in assisting them in the assessment 
of stocks of merchandise on hand January 1. There is available at his office much information that will be of great 
assistance to the assessors in determining values, and the data will be furnished to them. 

Taxpayers should be immediately advised of the change in the taxing date, so that they may be fully ac- 
quainted with the due date of the tax bills, which will be one-half on July 1 and one-half on October 1. These tax 
bills are to be delivered on or before June 14, and it is desirable that the taxpayers be encouraged to make payments 
when the June bills are issued. 

The taxpayers should also be encouraged to file with the assessors a list of the tangible personal property 
on hand January 1. To the extent of the taxpayers cooperating with the assessors will be measured the equality 
and fairness with which the tax burden can be spread. 

The assessing of property as of January 1 starts a new period of tax history, and presents to the Board of 
Assessors the necessity of bringing universal compliance with the law, which compels the fifing, by each taxpayer 
with the assessors, a fist of all their tangible personal property on hand on or before February 15. 

The 1935 tax bill will be the amount that each taxpayer is obligated to pay for the cost of running his local 
government from January 1 to December 31, 1935. The question was often raised as to whether the tax bill covered 
a period of nine months or a year, or whether it ran from January to January or April to April. This is 
now explained, as the tax bill is dated on January 1 and the money received used to pay the costs of operating the 
city to the end of the calendar year. (Continued on page 4*) 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 5 




"0 Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 

queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship- 
teeming plain of the ocean, 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene, 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotion!" 
From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

HaU. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription $2.00 Per Year 

Single Copies 10 Cents 

IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES. 
Old South News-stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 
A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 

MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
January 7, 1935, at 2 p. iu. 

A regular meeting for organization of 
the School Committee of the City of 
Boston will be held in the Administra- 
tion Building, 15 Beacon street, on 
Monday, January 7, 1935, at 6 o'clock 
p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 

MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows : 

To the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of rear 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 



for the storage or sale of merchandise in 
public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasolene, oil, 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To the Boston Traffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To the Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To the Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue, Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds dn general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 



charges made for such service. Applica- 
tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Department of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Statistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To the Wire Division of the Fire 
Department, 60 Bristol street, for all in 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



For the week ending December 29, 1934: 
Population estimated July, 1934, 
United States Census Bureau estimate, 
795,256; number of deaths (stillbirths 
excluded): Residents, 178; nonresidents, 
42- total, 220. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 14.38; nonresidents deducted, 
11.64. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
Last week, 14.00; corresponding week 
last year, 15.95. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 18; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 6; sixty years and over, 116. 
Total deaths: Male, 103; female, 117; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 125; 
deaths of colored, 10. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DEATHS* 



Diseases. 


Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Dec. 29, 1934. 


Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Dec. 30, 1933. 




Cases. 


Deaths. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 




6 

4 

15 

37 

7 

5 

1 

37 


2 

1 

7 

8 
1 


3 

205 

45 

53 

29 

3 

44 











1 




2 













37 




1 




10 




1 











Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 5 



CITY RECORD 



DISBURSEMENT PLANS FOR CITY DEPARTMENTS INAUGURATED BY BUDGET 
COMMISSIONER CHARLES J. FOX, AT DIRECTION OF MAYOR MANSFIELD 
INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING INSTALLATION OF NEW SYSTEM OF 
ACCOUNTS ISSUED AND PUT INTO EFFECT BY EXECUTIVE ORDER OF THE 
MAYOR EXPECTED TO SIMPLIFY KEEPING OF ACCOUNTS AND PROVIDE 
FOR GREATER SAVINGS. 



The Auditor has issued the following communications to the heads of departments relative to the installa- 
tion of the new disbursement system that is being instituted at the direction of Mayor Mansfield: 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 

Boston, December 26, 1934. 

Comments and Suggestions Relating to New Disbursement System. 

Foreivord. 

The primary purpose of the new disbursement system is to make available in this office a complete record 
of departmental expenditures and commitments "before the fact" as well as "after the fact." The new system 
is not intended in any way to interfere with the independence and prerogatives'of department heads, does not change 
in any way the procedure followed at present in the actual payment of invoices or drafts, and should not impose 
any great amount of additional work on departmental forces. 

Selection of the media through which articles or services shall be secured will continue to rest with depart- 
ment heads and officials. Departments who have carefully observed in the past all requirements of a proper com- 
mitment procedure, namely, the issuance of requisitions for purchases through the Supply and Printing Depart- 
ments, the issuance of orders for direct purchases of articles and services, together with the proper and adequate 
checking of receipts and performances, will continue this procedure. The only additional requirements for such 
departments under the new system is that at the beginning of each month they will be required to submit estimates 
of recurring monthly charges, and on the receipt of complete or partial deliveries or performances send a notice 
to the Auditing Department in proper form. 



Forms. 
All necessary forms may be secured from the Printing Depart- 
ment. The following guide is offered for the information of 
department officials: 

1. Forms required by all departments. 

Departmental Receiving Notice. 
Recurring Charges Notice. 

2. Departments purchasing through Supply Department. 

Purchase requisition. — In duplicate-For close-knit de- 
partments. 
In triplicate-For departments 
spread over a large area. 

3. Departments purchasing direct from vendors. 

Service order. 

4. Departments purchasing through Printing Department. 

Use regular printing or stationery requisitions furnished 
by Printing Department. 

Use of Forms. 
The following summary is intended to indicate the manner in 
which departments will use the different forms: 

1. When using facilities of Supply Department to secure 
equipment, supplies, or materials, use* "Purchase Requisition," 
which is prepared in duplicate for closely-knit departments, and 
in triplicate for thoso departments whose activities are spread 
out over a large area. When filled out the first copy of this 
form should be forwarded to the Superintendent of Supplies, 
and the others, retained in the departmental files. 

2. When using facilities of Printing Department to secure 
printing and office supplies, use the regular requisition forms 
which are now supplied by the Printing Department. 

3. When ordering services, equipment, supplies, or materials, 
direct from the vendor, use the "Service Order." When filled 
out, the first three copies of this form should be sent to the 
Auditing Department and the other two copies retained in 
departmental files. After each "Service Order" has been prop- 
erly recorded in the Auditing Department, the first two copies, 
in the case of departments located outside City Hall, will be 
forwarded direct to the vendor. No "Service Order" will be 
deemed complete unless the "estimated cost" of the service is 
placed on the 3d and 4th copies. In the event it is impossible 
to estimate in advance the cost of the proposed service, the 
copies of the "Service Order" when forwarded to the Auditing 
Department should be accompanied by a letter from the depart- 
ment head stating the reason why no advance estimate is 
furnished. 



4. When services are performed or articles delivered, the 
employee directly in contact with the performance or delivery 
should fill out the "Departmental Receiving Notice" and for- 
ward same to the head of the department. If it appears from 
this notice that complete performance or delivery has taken 
place, the head of the department should then forward to the 
Auditing Department one of the following forms: 

No. 6. Copy of "Purchase Order" if articles have been 
secured through the Supply Department. 

No. 3. Copy of "Printing or Stationery Order" if service 
or articles have been secured from Printing Department. 

No. 5. Copy of "Service Order" if service or articles have 
been ordered directly. 

If a partial performance or delivery is indicated, the "Depart- 
mental Receiving Notice" should be forwarded to the Auditing 
Department, after proper notation has been made on the No. 6, 
No. 3, or No. 5 copy retained in the departmental files. I pon 
final completion of the performance or delivery, this latter 
notice will be forwarded to the Auditing Department, where- 
upon all partial delivery notices will be returned to the depart- 
ment involved. 

5. At the beginning of each month the "Recurring Charges 
Notice" will be prepared by department heads. On this notice 
should be listed an estimate of all charges which recur more or 
less automatically from month to month. In general, charges 
to be listed on this notice should include all expenditures of a 
more or less constant and fixed nature which occur regularly 
without the issuance of an order of any sort. This notice should 
be forwarded without delay to the Auditing Department. 

Modifications. 

The color scheme originally announced to apply (o the different 
forms has been modified as follows: 

Vendors' 2d copy — orange instead of pale blue. 

Auditor's 3d copy — pale blue instead of yellow. 

Supply Department copy —green instead of orange. 

Departmental Receiving Notice — yellow instead of green. 

The original and fourth copies remain as announced, namely. 
white and pink. 

With the consent of the Superintendent of Supplies, depart- 
ments may list items chargeable to different appropriations on 
the same purchase requisition. 

On all E. R. A. purchases or commitments (chargeable to 
the H Budget group), the same requisition as is now in use will 
be prepared by departments and forwarded .is at present to 
80 Joy street. " 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 5 



Departments using the "Service Order" will forward to the 
Auditing Department only the first three copies, retaining in 
their own files the fourth and fifth copies. If the individual 
department is located outside City Hall, in order to save time 
and avoid delay in the placing of orders, the Auditing Depart- 
ment, after making a proper entry of the service order, will 
forward the same direct to the vendor. 



Respectfully, 



Charles J. Fox, 

City Auditor. 



AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 

Boston, December 26, 1934. 
To Department Heads mid Officials. 

The pay roll week ending January 3, ]935, will be a split 
or divided week, in that for salaried employees four days will 
be charged to the December 31. 1934, supplementary draft, 
and throe days against the January 31, 1935, draft, and for 
:/ or per diem employees, three days will be charged to the 
December 31, 1934, supplementary draft, and three days will 
be charged to the January 31, 1935, draft. This split or division 
must be indicated on the pay roll and budget subdivision sheets, 
and two separate sets of pay roll requisitions must be submitted 
to the Auditing Department covering each period. 

The "dead line" for submitting invoices or pay rolls to be 
paid on the December 31, 1934, supplementary draft has been 
fixed as ,1a nuary 15, 1935. Positively no bills or pay rolls charge- 
able against 1934 will be received after that date to be included 
in the December 31, 1934, supplementary draft. This rule will 
be strictly enforced because of the necessity of clearing up at the 
earliest possible date the accounts of the old year and thus per- 
mit this department to direct its entire attention and effort to 
the new disbursement system. 

Invoices covering telephone, gas and electricity charges, where 
the monthly period for rendering of bills varies, should be sub- 
mitted to the Auditing Department with the closing date nearest 
to December 31, in order to assure their being placed on the 
supplementary draft. Bills received from public service cor- 
porations after the submission of the supplementary draft to 
the Auditing Department, and covering charges for a portion 
of the month of December, 1934, will have to be included on the 
January 31, 1935, draft. 

To facilitate the handling of the December 31, 1934, supple- 
mentary draft in this office, the larger departments of the city 
are requested to submit from time to time between now and the 
fifteenth of next January any substantial number of invoices 
that represent proper charges against the final draft for the 
year 1934. Each batch of invoices submitted should, of course, 
be accompanied by the usual requisitions and subdivision sheets. 

Respectfully, 

Charles J. Fo t, 

City Auditor. 



AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 

Boston, January 2, 1935. 
To Department Heads and Officials. 

The following notes and instructions are issued for 3'our 
information and consideration: 

1. The regulation providing that departments in submitting 
bills for payment during 1935 should told them into packages 
before sending them tc this department has been temporarily 
suspended. Bills on the January 31, 1935, draft may be sub- 
mitted without being folded. 

2. In order that the records of the Disbursement Section 
may reflect every obligation pertaining to 1935, department 
heads are requested in the case of commitments made during 
the latter part of 1934 which will not be consummated, or com- 
pleted, until 1935, to issue immediately requisitions, or orders, 
covering the portion of the commitment which is still out- 
standing. In short, every 1935 charge should be covered by 
an order irrespective of the time when the charge was initiated. 

3. Service orders, issued by departments under the new 
disbursement procedure, should be accompanied by agreements 
with the vendor, or contractor, whenever they can be secured. 

4. Employees receiving goods should make an actual count 
of each shipment before filling out the Departmental Receiving 
Notice. 

5. As far as possible all materials are to be purchased under 
the new disbursement procedure f. o. b. Boston. If, however, 
material is received with charges collect, which should have 
been shipped f. o. b., the freight or express bills after being paid 
should be sent immediately to the Disbursement Section, Audit- 
ing Department. Notation should also be made on the receiving 
notice to indicate that deductions are to be made on invoice. 

6. Letters addressed to the Mayor requesting his permission 
to award a contract to a specified contractor should be sent 
direct to the Mayor's office. 

7. The carbon paper which will be found between Service 
Order copies should not be destroyed. Being of standard letter 
size, it may be used several times before losing its effectiveness. 
By utilizing it in this fashion departments will reduce the neces- 
sity for purchasing an additional supply of carbon paper for 
correspondence purposes. 

S. In the lower right hand section of the Departmental 
Receiving Notice, departments are required to indicate whether 
the shipment represents "1st, 2d, or Final Shipment." Since 
employees actually receiving, goods may not have sufficient 
information with which to complete this entry, it is suggested 
that this information be furnished in the Central Office of the 
department concerned. 

9. The submission of bills for payment on monthly drafts, 
under the new disbursement procedure, will be made as in the 
past. No change has been made in the methods which have 
prevailed for many years in this respect, except that the "Sched- 
ule of Bills" and "Subdivision Sheet" have been combined into 
one form. Departments may secure this new form from the 
Printing Department. 

Respectfully, 

Charles J. Fox, 

City Auditor. 



MAYOR'S ADDRESS TO ASSESSORS. 

{Continued from page 1.) 

Chance Radical. 

Because of this radical change, it is 
incumbent upon the assessors to be as 
courteous and considerate as possible, 
and they should advise the taxpayer 
in regard to the taxing date and also as 
to their rights and obligations. 

The assessors should be fair and just, 
and have the courage to place upon their 
books a full and fair valuation. In this 
way the burden is equitably spread, 
inequalities are avoided, and the number 
of abatements lessened. 

'lira.' are certain sections of the city 
that have already received substantia] 
reductions in the past few years. If it 
appears that these reductions have been 
sufficient, no further- abatements should 
be considered. If, however, the relief 
given has been insufficient, then it is 
your duty to carefully consider what 



further changes should be made in order 
to bring about fair and proportionate 
assessments. 

The assessors will adapt themselves to 
the change from April to the January 
date of assessing in a short time, and 
much valued information may be ob- 
tained by a study of maps and plans now 
on file in the department and daily con- 
fo ion cos with the principal assessors and 
deputies regarding conditions in general 
and in particular the district to which 
you are especially assigned. 

Give special attention to the taxation 
of tangible personal property to the end 
that real estate may not be unjustly 
burdened because of any neglect in the 
taxing of other property which, under 
existing laws, is liable for and should pay 
its proper and proportionate share of the 
cost of government. 

Assessment of real estate and polls 
are taken as of January 1 of the current 
year instead of April 1 as has been the 
custom for many years past. This is also 
line of police listing and the people are 
requested to take notice of this in order 
to have their information at hand when 
the assessors call or police listers call. 



NOTICE TO MERCHANTS, ETC. 

Overseers of Public Welfare, 
Boston, December 28, 1934. 

To All Merchants, Druggists and Store- 
keepers. 
It will be necessary for you to have 
all sales slips, vouchers and statements 
for all purchases or deliveries made in 
1934 in our office on or before January 
3, 1035. 

Failure to comply with this request 
will mean that we will be unable to pay 
your bill as early in January, 1935, as 
possible. 

Thanking you for your cooperation in 
this matter, I am, 

Yours truly, 

Thomas J. Dwyer, 

Bookkeeper. 



TAX LEVY, 1932. 

Total, $67,574,773 ($5,414,540 more than 
in 1931) or $62,260,762 on realty, $4,834,- 
415 on personalty, and $479,596 on male 
polls. 



Jan. 5 



CITY RECORD 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Department op School Buildings. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing, 
delivering and setting up pupils' school 
furniture in the various school houses. 
Surety bond will be required in the sum 
of $5,000. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Department of School Buildings, 11 
Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$500, to be filed at the same office. Du- 
plicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 7, at 2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing, 
delivering and setting up opera chairs 
in the halls and galleries of the various 
school buildings. Surety bond will be 
required in the sum of $1,000. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Department of School 
Buildings, 11 Beacon street, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $500, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 7, at 2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering various parts of pupils' 
furniture to the Department of School 
Buildings storehouse, 838 Summer street, 
South Boston. Surety bond will be 
required in the sum of $1,000. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Department of School 
Buildings, 11 Beacon street, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $500, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 11, at 2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
various parts of pupils' furniture to the 
Department of School Buildings. Surety 
bond will be required in the sum of $1,000. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Department of 
School Buildings, 11 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $500, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 11, at 2 p. m. 

Police Department. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering gasolene to the Police De- 
partment. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to 50 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $500, to be filed at 
the office of the Police Commissioner, 154 
Berkeley street, Boston. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 16, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering fuel oil to the Police De- 
partment. (Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to 50 per cent of the 



contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of the 
Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at the 
office of the Police Commissioner, 154 
Berkeley street, Boston. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 16, at 
12 m. 

Advertises fcr proposals for furnishing 
and delivering lubricating oil to the Police 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 50 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office of 
the Property Clerk. 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at the 
office of the Police Commissioner, 154 
Berkeley street, Boston. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 16, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for cleansing 
and repairing summer uniforms. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Property Clerk, 
154 Berkeley street, Boston. Bids, acT 
companied by certified check in the sum of 
$200, to be filed at the office of the 
Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 16, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering tires and tubes to the 
Police Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 50 
per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Property Clerk, 154 
Berkeley street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$100, to be filed at the office of the Police 
Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 16, at 
12 m. 

Public Works Department. 
Advertises for proposals for sheet 
asphalt or bitulithic pavement in Hyde 
Park avenue, Section B, from Cummins 
Highway to Metropolitan avenue. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Public Works Department, Room 
508, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $3,000, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January IS, at 12 m. 

Public Works Department (Sewer 
Service) . 

Advertises for proposals for sewerage 
works in Dent street, between Lasell 
street and Glenham street, West Rox- 
bury. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to the full amount 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Public Works Department, Room 
508, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the sum 
of $100, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 8, at 12 in. j 



Supply Department. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
toilet paper to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank' forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $300, 
to be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 7, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
paper drinking cups to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 7, at 12 m. 

Advertises for furnishing surgical dress- 
ings to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall An- 
nex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $200, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 8, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
khaki cloth to the Penal Institutions 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$1Q0, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 9, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
flour (bread and pastry) to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the sum 
of $300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesay, January 0, at 
12 in. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
industrial and medicinal gist's to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in ;i sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room SOI, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with (he City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 10, at 
IS in. 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 5 



Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
sewer pipe to the Sewer Division of the 
Public Works Department. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per rent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $300, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 10, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
the various city departments with Port- 
land cement. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
S300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 11, at l.J m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
sewer brick to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $200, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 11, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
metal polish to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $300, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 1/,, at I.' in. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
lead pipe to the Water Division, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cut of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
•S200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bid clost Monday, .1 miliary 1 ',, ill 12 ill. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
engine, machine and cylinder oils to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 25 
per rent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
thr office of the Supply Department, 
Room S(j], City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
ill'' sum of S200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
b<- Bled with thi' City Auditor. 

Hal. rli,. ■ '/',,, day, January !■', <il 1 : m. 



Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
waste and wiping cloths to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per' 
cent of the estimated contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 15, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
various kinds of materials to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the estimated contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without- 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 10, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
flash light equipment to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the estimated contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $100, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 17, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical and hypodermic needles for the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the estimated contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $100, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 18, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical supplies for the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the estimated contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $300, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 21, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
drugs (medicines of all kinds) to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the estimated contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply De- 
partment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 22, at 12 m. 



TO FILL VACANCIES. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
request of the Commissioner of Public 
Works: 
To the Mayor of Boston. 

Temporary vacancies caused by sickness 
of tollmen-guards employed in the Sumner 
Tunnel have been occurring with such 
frequency of late that our operating 
schedule has been affected by reason of the 
absentees. At present we have two men 
on sick leave without pay who will be 
absent for an indefinite period, and it is 
absolutely necessary that their places be 
filled in order that the full complement be 
on duty at all times. 

I, therefore, recommend for your 
approval, that requisition be made on the 
civil service list for two permanent- 
intermittent tollmen-guards at $5.50 
a day to fill the intermittent vacancies as 
they occur. This will not entail any 
additional expense as absentees are not 
paid during the period of their absence. 

Yours respectfully, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



RETIREMENT BOARD REPORT. 

To the Auditor. 

At meetings of the Boston Retirement 
Board, held on December 14 and Decem- 
ber 26, 1934, the retirement from active 
service of the following-named members 
of the Retirement System was approved, 
to become effective at the close of busi- 
ness, December 31, 1934: 

Collecting Department. 

Lillian L. Feurtado, clerk, salary at 
time of retirement, $1,615. 

Park Department. 

Cornelius M. Crowley, laborer, salary 
at time of retirement, $1,404. 

Cornelius Shields, pipefitter, salary at 
time of retirement, $1,456. 

Public Works Department. 

John T. Cashman, carpenter, salary at 
time of retirement, $1,576. 

James J. Doyle, instrumentman, salary 
at time of retirement, $1,785. 

Thomas P. Driscoll, assistant drawten- 
der, salary at time of retirement, $1,445. 

Patrick J. Keefe, laborer, salary at 
time of retirement, $1,404. 

Robert J. Mason, inspector of horses, 
salary at time of retirement, $1,445. 

Matthew Mooney, laborer, salary at 
time of retirement, $1,404. 

John J. Ryan, laborer, salary at time 
of retirement, $1,404. 

Thomas J. Sruhan, cement finisher, sal- 
ary at time of retirement, $1,576. 

School Committee. 

William L. Anderson, master, salary at 
time of retirement, $3,794. , 

Ellen L. Barry, trade assistant, salary 
at time of retirement, $2,040. 

Street Laying-Out Department. 

Laurence J. Monahan, senior engineer, 
salary at time of retirement, $2,900. 
Attest : 

Wilfred J. Doyle, 

Chairman. 



Jan. 5 



CITY RECORD 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES, 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the Week 
ending Thursday, January 3: 

Assessing Department. 

The following-named first assistant as- 
sessors have been employed at $1,700 
a year, effective January 1 : 

George D. Leavitt, John F. Maher, 
Frank A. Duggan, Thomas B. Fitzpat- 
rick, Paul H. Halloran, Cesare L. Para- 
boschi, Edward F. Wallace. 

The following-named have been ap- 
pointed temporary street clerks, for a 
period of ten days, effective January 2, 
at $4, a day: 

John A. Long, Michael Kerrigan, 
Emery Douglas, Thomas Costello, Wil- 
liam Gallagher, William G. Hall, Henry 
G. Gormley, David D. Kenney, George 
Anderson, Thomas Carroll, George J. 
Kenely, Jr., Kenneth Mathews, John B. 
Lee, Warren Cavanagh, Edward Hutchin- 
son, Vincent Birmingham, Henry Ma- 
guire, John J. O'Brien, Thomas Kyrou, 
James P. Neal, Ernest A. Gooding, Jr., 
George L. Ammidown, James A. Colahan. 

Herbert A. Ellis has been appointed 
first assistant assessor, to fill a vacancy, 
vice John F. Maher, at $1,700 a year. 

Auditing Department. 

Permission has been given to continue 
the employment of John F. J. Tobin as 
a temporary clerk, for a period of three 
months beginning January 8, at $1,100 
a year. 

Edward M. Herlihy has been appointed 
as stenographer at $1,000 a year, effective 
January 4. 

Collecting Department. 
Four clerks at '$1,000 a year have 
been appointed in place of two vacant 
deputy collector positions which are not 
to be filled. 

Hospital Department. 
The following persons have been em- 
ployed at the Boston City Hospital for 
the week ending Thursday, December 27 : 

To Fill Vacancies. 

Permanent. — Lucy Kelliher, floor nurse, 
$25.89 a week; Dr. Samuel Weaver, resi- 
dent physician, $950 a year; Paul Ma- 
guire, assistant engineer, $40.80 a week. 

Temporary. — Edith Casey, clerk, $15.20 
a week; William Blais, orderly, $15.68 
a week; Margaret Donovan, ward assist- 
ant, $14.25 a week; Mary Byrne, cleaner, 
$15 a week; Frank Gediman, Edward 
Goff, Joseph Foley, orderlies, $15.68 a 
week; P'riscilla Beckwith, Julia Ryan, 
Catherine Tuxbury, Katherine Mc- 
Namara, Adelaide Carroll, Lucy Kelliher, 
Grace Scott, Mary Sullivan, Ethel Mc- 
Innis, Mary Bedard, special nurses, $4.05 
a day; William Carey, Fred Corbo, Mi- 
chael McAuliffe, James McDonald, 
Thomas O'Brien, ambulance drivers, 
$29.33 a week. 

The following changes have occurred: 

Frances Cutting, table girl to chamber- 
maid (no change in pay) ; Lila Colburn, 
head nurse at $18.64 to $20.71 a week; 
Dr. Charles Boyajian, assistant resident 
surgeon, $1,700 a year. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 

Division). 
The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division, sub- 



ject to the approval of the Mayor, for 
the week ending Thursday, December 27 : 

Grace Ripley, clerk (temporary), $3 a 
day ; Charles E. Martin, choreman, $16.63 
a week; Thomas H. Thompson, relief 
supervisor (temporary), $4 a day; Lewis 
Sheffield, relief supervisor, $3.80 a day; 
George Clark, night watchman (tempo- 
rary), $3.75 a day; Thomas Espasito, 
Henry O'Brien, male nurses (patients), 
(temporary), $456 a year; Fred Spry, 
male nurse (patient), $456 a year; Wil- 
liam Allard, maid (patient), $228 a 
year; William Twomey, George Cocki- 
nos, Mary Dagle, George Hodge, Julia 
Powers, maids (patients) (temporary), 
$228 a year; Edward Harrington, en- 
gineer, assistant (temporary), $38.25 a 
week. 

The following person has ceased to be 
employed: 

Fred Spry, maid (patient), $228 a year. 

Institutions Department. 

The following changes have been made 
for the week ending Thursday, December 
27: 

Long Island Hospital. 

Appointments : Margaret R. Doherty, " 
institution employee, cook, $600 a year, 
to succeed Annie F. Brown; Leontine 
E. Beaudin, institution employee, at- 
tendant, $600 a year, to succeed Mary 
R. Cates; Harriet G. Babcock, institution 
employee, attendant, temporary, $600 a 
3 r ear, on account of vacation period; 
Philip E. Leavitt, institution employee, 
meat cutter, temporary, $700 a year, on 
account of absence of Thomas Powell. 

Transfers: Alice Hannaberry, institu- 
tion employee, wardmaid, .$526 a year, 
from waitress at $316 a year; Luke K. 
McCarthy, fireman, temporary, $33.50 a 
week and board, from helper in engine 
room at $600 a year. 

Discharge: Joseph M. Coyle, institu- 
tion employee, attendant, $600 a year, 
unsatisfactory. 

The following changes have been made 
for the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ary 3: 

Steamers "Hibbard" and "O'Meara." 

Transfer: Livaus J. Burriss, marine 
engineer, temporary, $1,900 a year, from 
marine engineer at $1,600 a year. 

Resignation: Emil F. Winnerberg, 
marine engineer, temporary, $1,400 a 
year. 

Overseers of Public Welfare. 

Approval has been given to an in- 
crease in salary for Pauline A. Smith, 
permanent clerk, from $1,000 to $1,100 a 
year, during the period January 1, 1934, 
to June 29, 1934. 

Approval has been given to the tem- 
porary employment of the following per- 
sons to the position of clerk, for a period 
of three months, at $900 a year : Samuel 
G. Berger, Frederick T. Hurley. 

Approval has been given to the per- 
manent-intermittent appointment of 
Alice M. Byrne as stenographer at $1,000 
a year. 

Approval has been given to the per- 
manent appointment of Sadie Cohen as 
clerk at $1,000 a year. 

Approval has been given to the tem- 
porary employment of Mary R. Kelley 
as clerk-typist, for a period of three 
months from December 26, at $900 a 
year. 

Approval has been given to the per- 
manent appointment of the following 



persons as clerks at $1,000 a year: Mar- 
garet M. Morgan, Carmella A. Rizzo, 
Mayna H. Yudin. 

Lillian Morris, permanent social 
worker, has recently been married and 
her name should now appear as Lillian 
Gideon. 

Approval has been given to the tem- 
porary continued employment of Wil- 
liam A. Danforth as social worker, for 
a period of three months, at $1,000 a 
year. 

Park Department. 
Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary employment, for a 
period of thirty days from December 
22, of Helen M. Corcoran, telephone 
operator at $20 a week less 10 per cent. 

Penal Institutions Department. 
The following appointments have been 
made : 

House of Correction M. & M. for 

Manufacturing. 
George H. Donovan, shoe supervisor, 
$1,600 ($1,440) a year and maintenance, 
temporary. 

Steamer "Michael J. Perkins." 
John J. Corumbo, fireman (emergency, 
absence of Firemen Keeley and Lawler), 
six days, $41.50 ($35.28) a week, tempo- 
rary. 

Public Works Department (Bridge 
Service). 

Approval has been given for the fol- 
lowing promotions to fill vacancies, ef- 
fective January 4 : 

William J. Lynch, from first assistant 
drawtender at $1,800 a year to draw- 
tender at $2,000 a year, to fill vacancy 
caused by the retirement of Timothy J. 
Shea; William P. Kelleher, from assist- 
ant drawtender at $1,700 a year to first 
assistant drawtender at $1,800 a year, in 
place of William J. Lynch. 

Public Works Department (Paving 
Service) . 

James J. Doyle, transitman in the 
Highway Division, has been retired, ef- 
fective at the close of business December 
31, but permission has been given to ex- 
tend his employment for a period of 
thirty days at $2,100 a year. 

Retirement Board. 
Change of rating of Daniel F. Moj-ni- 
han, from messenger to that of clerk, 
without change in salary, beginning De- 
cember 21, has been approved. 

Soldiers' Relief Department. 
William J. Murphy has been appointed 
temporary visitor, for a period of three 
months beginning December 28, at $1,700 
a year. 

Overtime Allowed. 
The heads of the various departments 
whose employees have received payment, 
for overtime state in connection there- 
with that if any laborer has been allowed 
to work more than eight hours per day 
it has been only in ease of emergency 
under the law. 

Institutions D< parlment. 

For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ary 3 : 

Long Island Hospital. 

Luke McCarthy, fireman, Hi hours, 
$12.16. 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 5 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Fire Department. 

Upon December 2S the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with the Merchants 
Laundry Company to do the laundry 
work of the Boston Fire Department for 
the year 193."). Bids, opened December 
21, tt'ere as follows: 

Merchants Laundry Company. — Sheets, 
2 cents each; slips, 1' cents each; towels, 
| cent each; spreads, 2J cents each; 
single blankets, 12 cents each; double 
blankets, 15 cents each. 

White Linen Service Company. — Sheets, 
slips, towels, 2 cents each; spreads, 3 cents 
each; blankets, 10 cents each. 

Hub Laundry Company. — Sheets, pillow 
slips, towels, spreads, 2 cents each; 
blankets, 19 cents each. 

Based on the estimated amount of 
work for the year, the approximate totals 
of the foregoing bids are as follows: 

Merchants Laundry Company, 

S2.619.93; White Linen Service Company, 
S3. 172.60; Hub Laundrv Company, 
53^249.76. 

The estimated amount of laundry work 
to be done for the Fire Department is as 
follows : 

5,580 sheets per month; 5,145 pillow 
slips per month; 1,917 towels per month; 
107 bedspreads per month; 1,000 blankets 
annually. 

Library Department. 

Upon December 27 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Egleston Square 
Auto Livery, Incorporated, for trans- 
portation service between the Central 
Library and the branch libraries. Bids, 
opened December 12, were as follows: 

Egleston Square Auto Livery, Incorpo- 
rated. S127 a week; Reynolds Contract- 
ing Company, S192 a week. 

Public Works Department (Ferry 
Service). 

Upon December 27 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Quincy Dry Dock 
and Yacht Corporation for repairing hull, 
etc., of ferryboat "Lieutenant Flaherty," 
The following bids were received Friday 
December 21 : 

Quincv Dry Dock and Yacht Corpora- 
tion, §11,221.50; The Marine Company, 
S12,810.29; Bethlehem Ship Building 
Corporation, Ltd, 814,416. 

Public Works Department (Sanitary 
Service). 
Upon December 28 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Alvin J. Pieczkowski, 
for collecting and removing garbage and 
refuse in the West Roxbury District. 
The following bids were received Decem- 
ber 14 

Alvin J. Pieczkowski, 82,490 a month; 
Martino DeMatteo, 82.549 a month; 
David W. Norton, 82,578 a month; R. E. 
Cunniff, Incorporated, S2,595 a month; 
John J. Moore Company, S2,700 a month; 
Reynolds Contracting Company, 
a month; M. Doyle A: Co., Incorporated, 
S3,200 a month. 

Upon December 31 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Baker, Matz ifc Co. for 
removing snow and ice in District No. 3. 
The following bids were received Novem- 
ber 26: 

Joseph P. McCabe, Incorporated, 41 
cents per cubic yard; C. Reppucci & Co., 



46 cents per cubic yard; Baker, Matz 
& Co., 47 cents per cubic yard; P. De- 
Cristofaro Company, Incorporated^ 50 
cents per cubic yard; Martin J. Kelly, 
50 cents per cubic yard; John Williams, 
50 cents per cubic yard; National En- 
gineering and Construction Company, 
50 cents per cubic yard; Leo J. Nawn, 
Incorporated, 55 cents per cubic yard; 
A. G. Tomasello and Son, Incorporated, 
58 cents per cubic yard; F. J. Jacobs 
Company, 5S cents per cubic yard; 
C. J. Maney Company, Incorporated. 59 
cents per cubic yard; George A. Baker 
A Co., Incorporated, 59 cents per cubic 
yard; Dooley Brothers, Incorporated, 60 
cents per cubic yard; Capitol Contracting 
Company, 60 cents per cubic yard; 
J. J. Callahan, 60 cents per cubic yard; 
Coleman Brothers, Corporation, 70 cents 
per cubic yard; M. McGinnis Company, 
70 cents, per cubic yard; State Construc- 
tion Company, 81 per cubic yard. 

Upon December 31 the Mayor approved 
a contract with A. Singarella for removing 
snow and ice in District No. 10. The fol- 
lowing bids were received November 26: 

A Singarella, 40 cents per cubic yard; 
J. P. McCabe, Incorporated, 40 cents per 
cubic yard; National Engineering and 
Construction Company, 45 cents per 
cubic yard; Martin J. Kelly, 46 cents 
per cubic yard; Baker, Matz & Co., 47 
cents per cubic yard; New England Con- 
tracting Company, 48 cents per cunic yard 
C. Reppucci & Co., 50 cents per cubic 
yard; Capitol Contracting Company, 
50 cents per cubic yard; Dooley Brothers, 
Incorporated, 52 cents per cubic yard; 
F. J. Jacobs Company, 53 cents per cubic 
yard; M. McGinnis Company, 54 cents 
per cubic yard; Leo J. Nawn, Incorpo- 
rated, 55 cents per cubic yard; J. J. Cal- 
lahan, 55 cents per cubic yard; E. J. 
Hickey, 55 cents per cubic yard; C. J. 
Maney Company, Incorporated, 57 cents 
per cubic yard; A. G. Tomasello & Son, 
Incorporated, 58 cents per cubic yard; 
A. R. Doyle, Incorporated, 5S cents per 
cubic yard; Coleman Corporation, 59 
cents per cubic yard; Coleman Brothers 
Corporation, 60 cents per cubic yard; 
Hugh Nawn, Incorporated, 60 cents per 
cubic yard; Central Construction Com- 
pany. 63 cents per cubic yard; J. J. Ben- 
kert. 64 cents per cubic yard; P. De- 
Cristofaro Company, Incorporated, 70 
cents per cubic yard; James A. Stretch 
Corporation, 80 cents per cubic yard; 
State Construction Company, 81.10 per 
cubic yard. 

Upon December 31 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with Joseph P. McCabe, 
Incorporated, for removing snow and ice 
in District No. 11. The following bids 
were received November 26: 

Joseph P. McCabe, Incorporated, 40 
cents per cubic yard; J. A. Singarella, 
Incorporated, 44 cents per cubic yard; 
A. Singarella, 45 cents per cubic yard; 
Martin J. Kelly, 46 cents per cubic yard; 
Baker, Matz & Co., 48 cents per cubic 
yard; Ward General Contracting Com- 
pany, 50 cents per cubic yard; J. J. 
Callahan, 50 cents per cubic yard; New 
England Contracting Company, Incor- 
porated, 51 cents per cubic yard; Capitol 
Contracting Company, 52 cents per cubic 
yard; F. J. Jacobs Company, 53 cents 
per cubic yard; Dooley Brothers, Incor- 
porated, 54 cents per cubic yard; Leo J. 
Nawn, Incorporated, 55 cents per cubic 
yard; C. J. Maney Company, Incor- 
porated, 57 cents per cubic yard; A. G. 
Tomasello & Son, Incorporated, 58 cents 
per cubic yard; A. R. Doyle, Incor- 
porated, 58 cents per cubic yard; P. 



DeCristofaro Company, Incorporated, 58 
cents per cubic yard; Coleman Brothers 
Corporation, 59 cents per cubic } r ard; J. J. 
Benkert, 59 cents per cubic yard; Hugh 
Nawn, Incorporated, 60 cents per cubic 
yard; M. McGinnis Company, 60 cents 
per cubic yard; J. A. Sprissler, 65 cents 
per cubic } r ard; George A. Baker Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 65 cents per cubic 
yard; J. A. Stretch Corporation, 82 cents 
per cubic yard; State Construction Com- 
pany, SI. 105 per cubic yard. 

Upon December 31 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with the Ward General 
Contracting Company for removing snow 
and ice in District No. 7. The following 
bids were received November 26: 

Ward General Contracting Company, 
44 cents per cubic yard; Baker, Matz & 
Co., 49 cents per cubic yard; J. P. 
McCabe, Incorporated, 50 cents per cubic 
yard; Martin J. Kelly, 52 cents per cubic 
yard; F. J. Jacobs Company, 53 cents 
per cubic yard; Dooley Brothers, Incor- 
porated, 55 cents per cubic yard; J. J. 
Callahan, 55 cents per cubic yard; M. 
DeMatteo, 57 cents per cubic yard; New- 
England Contracting Company, Incor- 
porated, 57 cents per cubic yard; C. J. 
Maney Company, Incorporated, 59 cents 
per cubic yard; P. DeCristofaro Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 60 cents per cubic 
yard; M. McGinnis Company, 60 cents 
per cubic yard; Leo J. Nawn, Incor- 
porated, 60 cents per cubic yard; A. G. 
Tomasello & Son, Incorporated, 60 cents 
per cubic yard; C. J. Kiley Company, In- 
corporated, 63 cents per cubic yard; 
Central Construction Company, 65 cents 
per cubic yard; Coleman Brothers Cor- 
poration, 65 cents per cubic yard; A. R. 
Dojde, Incorporated, 75 cents per cubic 
yard; State Construction Company, 
$1.15 per cubic yard. 

Upon December 31 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with Martin J. Kelly 
for removing snow and ice in Dis- 
trict No. 8. The following bids were 
received November 26: 

Coleman Brothers Corporation, 45 
cents per cubic yard; J. P. McCabe, 
Incorporated, 48 cents per cubic yard; 
Baker, Matz & Co., 49 cents per cubic 
yard; Ward General Contracting Com- 
pany, 50 cents per cubic yard; National 
Engineering and Construction Company, 
50 cents per cubic yard; Martin J. Kelly, 
52 cents per cubic yard; F. J. Jacobs 
Company, 53 cents per cubic yard; Leo 
J. Nawn, Incorporated, 55 cents per 
cubic yard; J. J. Callahan, 55 cents per 
cubic yard; M. DeMatteo, 58 cents per 
cubic yard; New England Contracting 
Company, 59 cents per cubic yard; C. 
J. Maney Company, Incorporated, 59 
cents per cubic yard; Dooley Brothers, 
Incorporated, 60 cents per cubic yard; 
P. DeCristofaro Company, Incorporated, 
60 cents per cubic yard; M. McGinnis 
Company, 60 cents per cubic yard; A. 
G. Tomasello & Son, Incorporated, 60 
cents per cubic yard; A. R. Doyle, In- 
corporated, 63 cents per cubic yard; 
Central Construction Company, 68 
cents per cubic yard; Coleman Brothers 
Corporation, 75 cents per cubic yard; 
State Construction Company, $1.05 per 
cubic yard. 

Upon December 31 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with C. Reppucci & 
Co. for removing snow and ice in District 
No. 5. The following bids were received 
November 26: 

C. Reppucci & Co., 46 cents per cubic 
yard; J. P. McCabe, Incorporated, 48 
cents per cubic yard; Dooley Brothers, 



Jan. 5 



CITY RECORD 



Incorporated, 55 cents per cubic yard; 
Baker, Matz & Co., 57 cents per cubic 
yard; P. DeCristofaro Company, Incor- 
porated, 58 cents per cubic yard; Martin 
J. Kelly, 58 cents per cubic yard; A. 
G. Tomasello & Son, Incorporated, 
60 cents per cubic yard; J. J. Callahan, 
60 cents per cubic yard; C. J. Kiley & 
Co., Incorporated, 63 cents per cubic 
yard; Leo J. Nawn, Incorporated, 65 
cents per cubic yard; C. J. Maney Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 65 cents per cubic 
yard; F. J. Jacobs Company, 65 cents 
per cubic yard; Capitol Contracting 
Company, 70 cents per cubic yard; M. 
McGinnis Company, 70 cents per cubic 
yard; Coleman Brothers Corporation, 
75 cents per cubic yard; State Construc- 
tion Company, .$1.25 per cubic yard. 

Supply Department. 

Upon December 27 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Arthur D. Little, Incor- 
porated, for fuel testing and expert en- 
gineering advice concerning fuel pur- 
chases for the City of Boston for the year 
1935. Three bids were received, as 
follows: 

Skinner & Sherman, Incorporated, 
$5,880; Arthur D. Little, Incorporated, 
$5,9-10; Perry Barker Engineering Com- 
pany, $8,500. 

All bids were based on an estimated 
number of samples of each type of fuel 
used by the city to be taken and analyzed, 
plus a certain sum to cover expert fuel 
engineering advice as required. 

Should the number cf samples, actually 
taken and analyzed, be greater or less than 
the basic estimated number, the total item 
for fuel analysis will increase or decrease 
accordingly. 

Previous to the present time this service 
to the city has not been covered by a con- 
tract, but the Supply Department be- 
lieves a contract carrying a performance 
bond should be executed. 

Upon December 27 the Mayor ap- 
proved contracts with lowest bidders, as 
indicated, for furnishing butter, eggs, etc., 
to the various city departments during 
January, 1935. The approximate totals 
of awards will be as follows: 

Doe-Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, 
$8,608.37; Lewis-Mears Company, $6,- 
976.84; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Companv, $79.50; Armour & Co., $47.84 
—$15,712.55. 

Bids, opened December 21, were as 
follows : 

Approximate Amounts on All Items. 

935 Cases, 28,050 Dozen, Nearby Fresh 
Hennery Eggs, Per Dozen. — Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 33.15 
cents; Doe-Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, 
29.97 cents*; Lewis-Mears Company, 
34.7 cents. 

30 Cases, 900 Dozen, Boston 1st Eggs, 
Per Dozen. — Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, 27 cents; Doe-Sullivan 
& Co., Incorporated, 27.97 cents; Lewis- 
Mears Company, 24.5 cents.* 

319 Tubs Butter, 20,416 Pounds, 90 
Score, Per Pound. — Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Company, 32 cents; Doe- 
Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, 29.97 cents; 
Armour & Co., 30.37 cents; Lewis-Mears 
Company, 29.1 cents.* 

45 Tubs Butter, 2,880 Pounds, 88 Score, 
Per Pound. — Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, 29.5 cents; Doe-Sullivan 
& Co., Incorporated, 28.97 cents; Armour 
& Co., 28.87 cents; Lewis-Mears Com- 
pany, 28.1 cents.* 

10 Pounds Cream Cheese, 5-Pound 
Bricks, Per Pound. — Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Company, 24 cents; Doe- 



Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, 23 cents*; 
Armour & Co., 25.96 cents; Lewis-Mears 
Company, 24 cents. 

60 Boxes Philadelphia Cream Cheese, 
12 3-Ounce Packages to Box, Per Box. — 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, 80 cents; Doe-Sullivan & Co., In- 
corporated, 90 cents; Armour & Co., 
74.90 cents*; Lewis-Mears Company, 85 
cents. 

150 Pounds Young American Cheese, 
Per Pound. — Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, 19 cents; Doe-Sullivan 
& Co., Incorporated, 15.40 cents*; Ar- 
mour & Co., 15.90 cents; Lewis-Mears 
Company, 16.5 cents. 

30 Pounds Pimento Cheese, Per Pound. — 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, 24 cents; Doe-Sullivan & Co., In- 
corporated, 22 cents; Armour & Co., 
20.90 cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 20 
cents.* 

1,000 Pounds Medium Old Yellow 
Cheddar Cheese, Per Pound. — Batchelder, 
^Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 16 cents; 
Doe-Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, 15.97 
cents *; Armour & Co., 16.35 cents; 
Lewis-Mears Company, 17 cents. 

1 5-Pound Cake Roquefort Cheese, Per 
Pound. — Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, 68 cents; Doe-Sullivan & Co., 
Incorporated, 60 cents; Armour & Co., 
58 cents*; Lewis-Mears Company, 60 
cents. 

120 Pounds Puff Paste Compound, Per 
Pound. — Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, 14.5 cents; Doe-Sullivan & Co., 
Incorporated, 13.90 cents*; Armour & 
Co., 15 cents. 

600 Pounds 3X Top Quality Oleo- 
margarine, Per Pound. — Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 13.25 
cents*; Doe-Sullivan & Co., Incorporated, 
13.40 cents; Armour & Co., 15 cents. 

Remarks. — Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, deliveries not to exceed 
25 percent beyond estimates, except with 
bidder's written permission; Armour & 
Co., tax clause. 

* Contract awarded. 

Upon December 29 the Mayor approved 
a contract with lowest bidders, as indi- 
cated, for furnishing meats to the various 
city departments during January, 1935, 
which bids were publicly opened on 
December 21, 1934. The approximate 
totals of awards will be as follows: 

Wald-Baram Company, .$11,131.79; 
Armour & Co,, $6,802.36; Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, Debtor, 
$4,771.10; Bornstein & Co., $4,273.13; 
The Cudahy Packing Company, $1 ,435.46; 
F. H. Hosmer & Co., $1,362.90; Albert 
Richards Company, Incorporated, $936; 
John P. Squire Company, $857.08; 
Swift & Co., $823.78— $32,393.60. 

Bids, opened December 21, were as 
follows: 

Approximate Amounts on All Items. 
Per Hundredweight. 

5,700 Pounds Corned Beef Brisket. — 
Swift & Co., $17.73; Bornstein & Co., 
$14*; Wald-Baram Company, $15.23; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doc Com- 
pany, Debtor, $21 ; Armour & Co., $16.74; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $15.90. 

2,625 Pounds Fresh Beef Brisket. — 
Swift it Co., $17.75; Bornstein & Co., 
$14.50*; Wald-Baram Company, $15.47; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, Debtor, $20; Armour * Co., 
$16.74; New England Dressed Meat and 
Wool Company, $20.98; Faneuil Beel 
Company, $16.85. 

1 Pounds licet Faces.— Swift & Co., 
$19.98; Bornstein & Co., $18; Wald- 
Baram Companv, $17.25*; Batchcldi r. 



Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, Debtor, 
$24; Armour & Co., $19.97; New Eng- 
land Dressed Meat and Wool Company, 
$23.47; Faneuil Beef Company, $18.75. 

22,250 Pounds Beef Hinds.-— Swift & 
Co., $15.90; Bornstein & Co., $15.50; 
Wald-Baram Company, $14.17*; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 
Debtor, $17.50; Armour & Co,. $15.74; 
New England Dressed Meat and Wool 
Company, $17.50; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $15. 

400 Pounds Beef Liver.— Swift & Co., 
$6.50*; Wald-Baram Company, $7.17; 
Batchelder, Sn3'der, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, Debtor, $14; The Cudahy Packing 
Company, $9; Armour & Co., $7.47, 
frozen; Faneuil Beef Company, $7.50. 

4,800 Pounds Beef Loins, Suet In. — 
Swift & Co., $19.95; Bornstein & Co., $21 ; 
Albert Richards Company, $19.50*; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, 
Debtor, $26.50; Armour & Co., $19.97; 
New England Dressed Meat and Wool 
Company, $25; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$20. 

2,500 Pounds Beef Loins, Suet Out. — 
Swift & Co., $25.95; Bornstein & Co., 
$28; Albert Richards Company, $26.48; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, Debtor, $36.50; Armour & Co., 
$25.67*; New England Dressed Meat and 
Wool Company, $33; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $25.80. 

10,000 Pounds Beef Rumps and Loins. — ■ 
Swift & Co., $20.90; Bornstein & Co., 
$20; Wald-Baram Company, $17.47*; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, Debtor, $23; Armour & Co., 
$19.87; New England Dressed Meat and 
Wool Company, $24; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $19.45. 

14,100 Pounds Beef Ribs.— Bornstein & 
Co. $17*; Albert Richards Company, 
$18.36; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, Debtor, $23.50; Armour & Co., 
$17.87; New England Dressed Meat and 
Wool Company, $23; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $19.50. 

1,600 Pounds Beef Rounds with Flank, 
but Cod Out.— Swift & Cc, $12.95; Bern- 
stein & Co., $12; Wald-Baram Company, 
$10.95*; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, Debtor, $13.50; Armcur & Co., 
$11.94; New England Dressed Meat and 
Wool Company, $14.50; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $11.75. 

2,500 Pounds Beef Shoidders.—Swiit 
& Co., $17.72; Bornstein & Co., $16; 
Wald-Baram Company, $15.47*; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doc Companv, 
Debtor, $22; Armour & Co., $16.94; 
New England Dressed Meat and Wool 
Company, $19.47; Fanueil Beef Com- 
pany, $17.45. 

9,800 Pounds Beef Stickers.— Swift 
& Co., $8.92; Bornstein & Co., $7.50*; 
Wald-Baram Company, $7.88; Batch- 
elder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Companv, 
Debtor, $11.50; Armour & Co., $7.89: 
New England Dressed Meat and Wool 
Company, $10.46; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $10.25. 

700 Pounds Peel' Undercuts. — Swift it 
Co., $16.72; Wald-Baram Companv. 
$14.42; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, Debtor, $19.50; Armour A Co., 
$14.35*; New England Dressed Meat 
and Wool Company, $18.43; Faneuil 
Beef Company, si 5. 

'maids Calf's Liver. — Swift & Co., 
$17.05*; Wald-Baram Company, $24.80; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, Debtor, $45; The Cudahy Packing 
Company) $30; Armour .<& Co., sir.oT. 
frozen; Faneuil Beef Company, S35. 

1 Pounds Lamb Carcass, s. Swift 

it Co., $16.95; Wald-Baram Company, 
si MS; Batchelder, Snyder, Don- & Doe, 



10 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 5 



Debtor, $15.35; Armour & Co., $13.34*; 
New England Dressed Meat and Wool 
Company, $16; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$13.80. 

Pounds Lamb Carcasses, Fores 
Boned, Racks Split.— Swift & Co., $17.05; 
Wald-Baram Company, $14.90; Batchel- 
der, Snyder, Dcrr & Doe Company, 
Debtor, $15.50; Armour & Co., $13.87*; 
Faneuil Beef Company, 815.25. 

.500 Pounds Lamb Fore Quarters.— 
Swift & Co., SI 1.96; Wald-Baram Com- 
pany, S9.25; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, Debtor, $11.50; Ar- 
mour & Co., $7.47*; New England Dressed 
Meat and Wool Company, $11; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $8.75. 

1 000 Pounds Lamb Chops.— Swift & 
Co $20.44; Wald-Baram Company, 
$17!95; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, Debtor, $18.60; Armour & 
Co., $15.87*; New England Dressed 
Meat and Wool Company, $30; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $16.75. 

/ 300 Pounds Lamb Chops, Racks 
Split.— Swift & Co., $20.64; Wald- 
Baram Company, $18.20; Batchelder, 
Snvder Dorr & Doc, Company, Debtor, 
$18.75; Armour & Co., $16.17*; New 
England Dressed Meat and Wool Com- 
pany, 825; Faneuil Beef Company, $16.90. 
1,000 Pounds Lamb Legs. — Swift & Co.j 
* S21.44; Wald-Baram Company, $17.22*; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, Debtor, $19.25; Armour & Co., 
$17 47; New England Dressed Meat and 
Wool Company, $20; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $17.50. 

20 000 Pounds Lamb, Hind Saddles. — 
Swift & Co., $19.96; Wald-Baram Com- 
pany $17.14; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, Debtor, $18.75; Armour 
& Co., $15.20*; New England Dressed 
Meat and Wool Company, $20; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $16.45. 

500 Pounds Eastern Veal, Saddles — 
Swift & Co., $12.40*; Wald-Baram Com- 
pany, $15.12; Armour & Co., $14.97; 
New England Dressed Meat and Wool 
Company, $17; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$17.50. 

6'00 Pounds Veal Legs. — Swift & Co., 
$17 96; Wald-Baram Company, $15; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, Debtor, $17.50; Armour & Co., 
$12.87*; Faneuil Beef Company, $18.25. 
6 1 '5 Pounds Bacon, 8 to 10 Pounds — 
Swift & Co., $25.10; Wald-Baram Com- 
pany, $22.12; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe, Company, Debtor, $24.60; The 
Cudahv Packing Company, $21.97*; 
Armour & Co., $23.93; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $25.50; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, $23.99. 

750 Pounds Bacon, 12 to 14 Pounds.— 
Swift & Co., $25.60; Wald-Baram Com- 
pany, $22.25*; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, Debtor, $24.10; Armour 
& Co., $23.93; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$24.50; John P. Squire Company, $24.49. 
11,300 Pounds Smoked Hams, 14 to 16 
Pounds.— Swift & Co., $20.95; Wald- 
Baram Company, $17.38*; Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, Debtor, 
$19.80; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
$18.72; Armour & Co., $18.47; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $21; John P. Squire 
Company, 819.74. 

600 Pounds Fresh Hams. — Swift & Co., 
$18.85; Wald-Baram Company, $17.50*; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, Debtor, $19.60; Armour & Co., 
$17.93; Faneuil Beef Company, $18.25; 
John P. Squire Company, $17.69. 

600 Pounds Smoked Ox Tongue.— 
Swift & Co., $18.65*; Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Company, Debtor, $24.15; 



The Cudahy Packing Company, $19; 
Armour & Co., $27.90; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $24.50. 

18,250 Pounds Pork Loins, 8 to 10 
Pounds.— Swift & Co., $14.92; Wald- 
Baram Company, $13.92*; Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, Debtor, 
$18.20; The Cudahv Packing Company, 
$16.60; Armour & Co., $15.22; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $16.45; John P. Squire 
Company, $15.24. 

450 Pounds Salt Pork, 50 to 60 Pieces.— 
Swift & Co., $19.25; Wald-Baram Com- 
pany, $15.50; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, Debtor, $16.70; Armour 
& Co., $14.97*; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$15.20; John P. Squire Company, $17.49. 
1,400 Pounds Fresh Pork Shoulders. — 
Swift & Co., $11.32; Wald-Baram Com- 
pany, $11.25; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, Debtor, $13.20; The 
Cudahv Packing Company, $14.60; Ar- 
mour & Co., $11.17; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $12.50; John P. Squire Company, 
810.49.* 

700 Pounds Corned Pork Shoulders. — 
Swift & Co., $11.35; Wald-Baram Com- 
pany, $10.42; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, Debtor, $11.90; The 
Cudahy Packing Company, $10.12; Ar- 
mour & Co., $9.42*; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $12.25; John P. Squire Company, 
$10.29. 

3,100 Pounds Smoked Shoulders. — Swift 
& Co., $12.42; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, Debtor, $12.80; The 
Cudahy Packing Company, $11.47; Ar- 
mour & Co., $10.48*; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $13.40; John P. Squire Company, 
$11.69. 

1,100 Pounds Corned Spare Ribs. — 
Switt & Co., $11.90; Wald-Baram Com- 
pany, $10.47; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, Debtor, $13.20; Armour 
& Co., $9.67*; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$12.75; John P. Squire Company, $11.29. 
2,200 Potmds Lard.— Swift & Co., 
$12.75*; Wald-Baram Company, $13.49; 
Batchelder, Snyder. Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, Debtor, $13.25; The Cudahy Pack- 
ing Company, $13,875; Armour & Co., 
$13.10; Faneuil Beef Company, $14.80; 
John P. Squire Company, $12.89. 

500 Pounds Dried Sliced Smoked Beef. — 
Swift & Co., $25.94; Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Company, Debtor, $27.60; 
The Cudahv Packing Company, $17.96*; 
Armour & Co., $20.61 ; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $26.50. 

300 Pounds Unsliced Dried Beef. — 
Swift & Co., $20.62; Batchelder, Snyder, 
Dorr & Doe Company Debtor, $21.25; 
The Cudahy Packing Company, $19.45; 
Armour & Co., $17.95*; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $24.50. 

300 Pounds Luncheon Loaf. — Swift & 
Co., $13.40; Batchelder. Snyder, Dorr & 
Doe Company, Debtor, $14.30; Fred W. 
Baldau Company, $13.50; Armour & Co., 
$13.45; Faneuil Beef Company, $18.25; 
John P. Squire Company, $12.49.* 

1,030 Pounds Broilers, Two to Two and 
One-Half Pounds Each.— Swift & Co., 
$24.99: Craig, Hapgood Company, Incor- 
porated, $22.36; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, Debtor, $27; Armour 
& Co., $21.90*; 'Faneuil Beef Company, 
$26.75. 

18,050 Pounds Chicken, Four to Four 
and One-Half Pounds Each.—Sv/iit & Co., 
$19.50, withdrew bid; Craig, Hapgood 
Company, Incorporated, $22.36; F. H. 
Hosmer & Co., $22.98; Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, Debtor, 
$22*; Armour & Co., $23.90, frozen; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $26.80; Lewis- 
Mears Company, $23.60. 

92 Pounds Fresh Duckling, 5 to 6 
Pounds Each. — Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 



& Doe Company, Debtor, $22; Armour 
& Co., $19.90*; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$23.50. 

7,000 Pounds Fowl, 5 Pounds Each. — 
Swift & Co., $21.94; Craig, Hapgood 
Company, Incorporated, $20.36; F. H. 
Hosmer' & Co, $19.47*; Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, Debtor, 
$22; Armour & Co., $21.40; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $22.75; Lewis-Mears Company, 
$20.90. 

600 Pounds Turkeys, 14 to 17 Pounds. — 
Craig, Hapgood Company, Incorporated, 
$33.50; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe 
Company, Debtor, $33; Armour & Co., 
$29.94*; Faneuil Beef Company, $33.50. 

3,300 Pounds Beef Chucks.— Swift & Co., 
$7.42; Wald-Baram Company, $7.23*; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Dee Com- 
pany, Debtor, $9; Armour & Co., $7.47; 
New England Dressed Meat and Wocl 
Company, $8.73; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$8. 

120 Pounds Lamb Fores.— Swift & Co., 
$11.96; Wald-Baram Company, $9.25; 
Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr & Doe Com- 
pany, Debtor, $11; Armour & Co., 
$7.97*; Faneuil Beef Company, $8.25. 

Sausages, 500 Pounds Long Island, 
2,000 Pounds City Hospital, 300 Pounds 
Sanatorium, 125 Pounds, Deer Island. — 
John P. Squire Company, $23.* 

Deer Island, 1,100 Pounds Bologna, 
2,080 Pounds Frankfurts.— Swift & Co., 
$17*, bologna; Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, Debtor, $17,* frank- 
furts. 

All Other Departments, 500 Pounds 
Bologna, 2,350 Pounds Frankfurts. — 
Swift & Co., $19,* bologna; Batchelder, 
Snyder, Dorr & Doe Company, Debtor, 
$19,* frankfurts. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — Albert 
Richards Company, Incorporated, 2 
per cent; New England Dressed Meat and 
Wool Company, 2 per cent. 

Remarks. — Batchelder, Snyder, Dorr 
& Doe Company, Debtor, deliveries not 
to exceed 25 per cent beyond estimates, 
except with bidder's written permission; 
Fred W. Baldau Company both copies 
of bid filed with supply Department; 
Armour & Co., tax clause. 

Upon December 28 the Ma3 r or ap- 
proved a contract with lowest bidders, 
as indicated, for furnishing fruits and 
vegetables to the various city departments 
during January, 1935. The approximate 
totals of awards will be as fellows: 

G. Giovino & Co., $6,304.85; The 
Northern Fruit Company, $1,611.57; J. 
Jacobs & Co., $1,358.81; Faneud Fruit 
Exchange Company, $263.92; Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $166.71; 
Fruit Service, Incorporated, $147.20 — 
$9,853.06. 

Bids, opened December 20, were as 
follows : 

Approximate Amounts on All Items. — 
Per Hundredweight. 

3,000 Pounds Cooking Apples. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $4.37; Fruit 
Service, Incorporated, t $3.60*; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $3.77; G. Gio- 
vino & Co., $3.71. 

6,800 Pounds Table Apples— The 
Northern Fruit Company, $4.45; Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $5.98 
Fruit Service, Incorporated,! $4.80 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $5.34 
G. Giovino & Co., $4.14.* 

1,500 Pounds Bananas, Bunch. — 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $4.50; 
Meloripe Fruit Company, $4.50; G. Gio- 
vino & Co., $4.43.* 



Jan. 5 



CITY RECORD 



1 1 



5,300 Pounds Bananas, Cartons. — 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $5.50; 
Meloripe Fruit Company, $5; G. Giovino 
& Co., 14.23.* 

2,800 Pounds Green Beans.— The North- 
ern Fruit Company, $20; Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $20; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $18.78; G. 
Giovino & Co., $17.91.* 

1,600 Pounds Wax Beans. — Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $18.78; G. 
Giovino & Co., $17.91.* 

4,400 Pounds Beeis, Bunch.— The 
Northern Fruit Company, $3.92; Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $4.06; 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $6.47; 
G. Giovino & Co., $3.81*; $2.41, cut. 

550 Pounds Broccoli. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $7.98; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $7.96; G. Gio- 
vino & Co., $6.41.* 

2,400 Pounds Brussels Sprouts. — Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $12.40; G. 
Giovino & Co., $9.91.* 

16,950 Pounds New Cabbage. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $4.37; 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $1.52, 
old; G Giovino & Co., $3.41.* 

4,700 Pounds Carrots, Cut Off.— Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $2.06; 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $1.89; 
G. Giovino & Co., $1.51.* 

5,000 Pour.ds Carrots, Bunch. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $4.41; 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $5.42; 
G. Giovino & Co., $3.81.* 

4,900 Pounds Cauliflower. — Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $9.77; G. 
Giovino & Co., $6.71.* 

5,400 Pounds Celery. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $6.49; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $5.89; G. 
Giovino & Co., $5.71.* 

2,150 Pounds Cranberries. — The North- 
ern Fruit Company, $20.94 *; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $21; G. 
Giovino & Co., $21. 

1,100 Pounds Cucumbers. — Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $25; G. 
Giovino & Co., $15.91.* 

5,900 Pounds Grapefruit.— -The North- 
ern Fruit Company, $3.60; Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $3.33; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $3.93; 
G. Giovino & Co., $3.21.* 

4,100 Pounds Grapes. — The Northern 
Fruit Company, $10; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $14.96; Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $10,97; G. Giovino 
&Co., $7.11.* 

2.200 Pounds Lemons. — The Northern 
Fruit Company, $7.42*; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $6.97, 2 per cent dis- 
count; Faneuil Fruit PCxchange Company, 
$6.98; G. Giovino & Co., $6.91. 

2,350 Pounds Iceberg Lettuce. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $7.30; 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $6.97; 
G. Giovino & Co., $6.41.* 

1,500 Pounds Native Lettuce. — The 
Northern Fruit Company, $8; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $10.48; G. 
Giovino & Co., $5.91.* 

6,800 Pounds Cooking Onions. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $2.98; Fan- 
euil Fruit Exchange Company, $2.92; G. 
Giovino & Co., $2.79.* 

6,000 Pounds Table Onions. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $3.69; 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $3.32; 
G. Giovino & Co., $3.09.* 

5,600 Pounds Sunkist Tabic Oranges, 216 
Count. — The Northern Fruit Company, 
$4.75, navel; Beacon Fruit and Produce 
Company, $5.87; Faneuil Fruit Exchange 
Company, $4.97, navel; G. Giovino & 
Co., $4.49. 

17,160 Pounds Sunkist Table Oranges, 
176 Count.— The Northern Fruit Com- 



pany, $4.59, navel; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $5.43; Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $4.G7, navel; G. 
Giovino & Co., $4.49. 

8,000 Pounds Red Ball Juice Oranges, 
176 Count.— The Northern Fruit Com- 
pany, $4, navel ; Beacon Fruit and Produce 
Company, $4.66; Faneuil Fruit Exchange 
Company, $4.32, navel; G. Giovino & 
Co., $3.91. 

4,400 Pounds Red Ball Juice Oranges, 
252 Count.— The Northern Fruit Com- 
pany, $4, navel; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $4.76; Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $4.32, nave!; G. 
Giovino & Co., $3.91. 

640 Pounds Red Ball Juice Oranges, 
216 Count.— The Northern Fruit Com- 
pany, $4, navel ; Beacon Fruit and Produce 
Company, $4.66; Faneuil Fruit Exchange 
Company, $4.32, navel; G. Giovino & 
Co., $3.91. 

Alternate Bid, 5,600 Pounds Florida 
Table Oranges, 216 Count. — The Northern 
Fruit Company, $3.78*; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $4.70; Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $4.04; G. Giovino 
& Co., $3.81. 

Alternate Bid, 17,160 Pounds Florida 
Table Oranges, 176 Count. — The Northern 
Fruit Company, $4.06*; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $4.70; Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $4.57; G. Giovino 
& Co., $4.21. 

Alternate Bid, 8,000 Pounds Florida 
Juice Oranges, 176 Count. — The Northern 
Fruit Company, $3.49; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $3.82; Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $4.57; G. Giovino & 
Co., $3.21.* 

Alternate Bid, 4,400 Pounds Florida 
Juice Oranges, 252 Count. — The Northern 
Fruit Company, $3.49; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $3.82; Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $4.04; G. Giovino & 
Co., $3.11.* 

Alternate Bid, 640 Pounds Florida 
Juice Oranges, 216 Count. — The Northern 
Fruit Company, $3.49; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $3.82; Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $4.04; G. Giovino & 
Co., $3.11.* 

73 Pounds Parsley. — Faneuil Fruit Ex- 
change Company, $15; G. Giovino & Co., 
' $14.* 

3,200 Pounds Parsnips. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $5; Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $2.97; G. Giovino & 
Co., $2.31.* 

1,700 Pounds Pears.— The Northern 
Fruit Company, $6.64*; Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $7.02; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Companv, $7.73; G. Gio- 
vino & Co., $6.91. 

/ ,600 Pounds Gi een Peas. — Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $16.35*; G. 
Giovino & Co., $22. 

640 Pounds Green Peppers. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $14.20; 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $13.88; 
G. Giovino & Co., $10.91.* 

130,400 Pounds Maine Potatoes.— Bea- 
con Fruit and Produce Company, $1.10; 
Roy G. Spark, Incorporated, $1.03; 
J. Jacobs & Co., 90 cents*; Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, 97 cents; G. Gio- 
vino & Co., 97 cents. 

4,300 Pounds Street Potatoes. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $3.94; 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Companv, $3.30; 
G. Giovino & Co., $3.17.* 

7,800 Pounds Spinach. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $6.75; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $7.48; G. 
Giovino it Co., $4.11.* 

13,200 Pounds Hubbard or Marrow 
Squash. — Beacon Fruit and Produce Com- 



pany, $4.50; Faneuil Fruit Exchange 
Companv, $1.62; G. Giovino & Co., 
$1.41.* 

3,000 Pounds Tangerines.— The 
Northern Fruit Company, $4.67*; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $7.43; G. 
Giovino & Co., $5.91. 

3,850 Pounds Tomatoes. — Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $9.98; G. Giovino 
& Co., $9.41.* 

14,300 Pounds Yellow Turnips. — Bea- 
con Fruit and Prbduce Company, $1.96; 
J. Jacobs & Co., $1.27*; Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $1.89; G. Giovino 
& Co., $1.57. 

Park Department. 

1,400 Pounds Apples. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $4.37; Fruit 
Service, Incorporated,! $2.80*; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $3.77; G. 
Giovino & Co., $3.71. 

1,500 Pounds Bananas. — Faneuil Fruit 
Exchange Company, $4.50; Meloripe 
Fruit Company, $4.50; G. Giovino & Co., 
$3.87.* 

1,700 Pounds Beets. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $2.97, cut; 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $2.28; 
G. Giovino & Co., $1.61.* 

800 Pounds Cabbage. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $4.37; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, $1.52; G. 
Giovino & Co., $1.41.* 

2,800 Pounds Carrots. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $2.06, cut; 
Faneuil Fir.it Exchange Companv, $1.89; 
G. Giovino & Cc, $1.51.* 

15 Pounds Celery. — Faneuil Fruit Ex- 
change Company, $5.89; G. Giovino & 
Co., $5.71.* 

300 Pounds Lettuce. — Faneuil Fruit- 
Exchange Companv, $10.48; G. Giovino 
& Co., $5.91.* 

350 Pounds Oranges. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $3.82*. Florida; 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $1.04; 
G. Giovino & Co., $3.91. 

30 Pounds Pears. — Faneuil Fruit Ex- 
change Companv, $7.73*; G. Giovino 
& Co., $10. 

600 Pounds Sweet Potatoes. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $3.94; 
Faneuil Fruit Exchange Company, $3.30; 
G. Giovino* Co., $3.17.* 

400 Pounds White Potatoes. — Beacon 
Fruit and, Produce Company, $1.10; 
J. Jacobs & Co., 90 cents*; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, 97 cents; 
G. Giovino & Co., 97 cents. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — The North- 
ern Fruit Company, 1 per cent; Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, 2 per cent; 
Roy G. Spark, Incorporated. 1 per cent; 
J. Jacobs & Co., 1 per cent; Faneuil 
Fruit Exchange Company, 1 per cent ; 
G. Giovino & Co., 1 per cent. 

* Contract awarded. 

t Fruit Service, Incorporated, bid on Massa- 
chusetts apples. 

WITHOUT ADVERTISING. 

Upon varying dates as indicated the 
Mayor has approved contracts with 
Several linns and establishments tor work 
and supplies. Communications from tin- 
heads of the several departments in- 
terested were as follows : 

l'i blic Works Department. 

Boston, December 21. 193 I. 
To tin- Mayor of Boston. 

At present there are ten electric lamps, 
boulevard type, on Washington street, 
between Broadway and Stuart street. 

To make said street a "White Way," 
etc., there should be installed sixteen new 

1,500 ean.lle power lamps, These lamps. 



12 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 5 



at the request of the city, are installed by 
the Edison Electric Illuminating Com- 
pany without cost as to installation. The 
maximum cost per lamp per year is SS4.40 
and if the additional lamps are installed 
the yearly expense will add to the lamp 
service appropriation 81,350.40 per year. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 28, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — On December 6, 

1934, I transmitted to you copies of con- 
tracts between the city and the Boston 
Consolidated Gas Company for furnishing 
illuminating gas for street lighting and for 
equipment and the lighting and extin- 
guishing of gas lamps fcr street lighting 
in the city for a term of five years be- 
ginning January 1, 1935, for your ap- 
proval and that cf the City Council. I 
understand that the City Council has 
not yet set down a date for a hearing on 
said contracts. 

In order that there may be no inter- 
ruption in the service of lighting the city 
streets, I hereby respectfully request your 
authority to award the following contracts 
•« without inviting proposals therefor by 
advertisement: 

1. Contract for furnishing illuminating 
gas for street lighting to the Boston Con- 
solidated Gas Company for a term of 
one month from Januaiy 1, 1935, at the 
present rate of sS.42 per lamp per year for 
single burner, 60 candle power lamps; 

2. Contract for equipment and the 
lighting and extinguishing of gas lamps for 
the City cf Boston, excluding Hyde Park, 
to the Boston Consolidated Gas Company 
fcr a term of one month from January 1, 

1935, at the present rate of 814.70 per 
lamp per year — 

with the provision in each of said contracts 
that, in the event that the five-year con- 
tracts, above mentioned, are given the 
approval necessary tc make them effective, 
the payments made under the one-month 
contracts shall be credited as payments on 
the respective five-year contract. 

Respectfully, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 27, 1934 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — In place of considering the 
bids received on December 17, for receiv- 
ing and disposing of garbage in the 
Jamaica Plain district, which the low 
bidder was to be paid a price of 89.75 per 
month for removing the garbage, de- 
posited in a truck at the Highland Street 
Yard I have today received an offer from 
Anthony Bushman, 122 New Boston 
street, North Woburn, Mass., in which he 
offers to take the garbage from the City 
of Boston at the traasfer point — the 
Roxbury Yard — and to pay the city the 
sum of 840 per month for the garbage so 
obtained. This is a far better proposi- 
tion than paying some one to take the 
garbage away. 

I respectfully request your approval 
lor entering into a contract with Anthony 
Bushman in which he will pay to the city 
monthly S40, and we will transfer to his 
truck tlie garbage hauled to the Highland 
Street Yard. He is also willing to furnish 
a bond to the amount of 81 ,000, to gua ran- 



tee the fulfillment of the contract, and I 
consider the proposition worth accepting. 

Respectful^ yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
( 'ommissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 31, 1934. 

To the Mayor of Boston. 

Supplementing my letter to you of 
December 8, 1934, requesting your 
approval to the award of a contract for 
removing snow and ice in District No. 6, 
to the National Engineering and Con- 
struction Company, the second lowest 
bidder, and confirming my earlier oral 
statement to you, please be advised that 
I have not recommended the award of 
said contract to Baker, Matz & Co., 
because said latter contractor has been 
awarded a contract for removing snow 
and ice in District No. 3. 

In my opinion Baker, Matz & Co., can 
handle only one district in a proper and 
efficient manner to the greatest benefit of 
the public using the streets during and 
after a snow storm. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 31, 1934. 
To the Mayor of Boston. 

Supplementing my letter to you of 
December S, 1934, requesting your 
approval to the award of a contract for 
removing snow and ice in District No. 2, 
to Leo J. Nawn, Incorporated, the 
fourth lowest bidder, and confirming my 
earlier oral statement to you, please be 
advised that I have not recommended 
the award of said contract to J. A. 
Singarella,. Incorporated, because said 
latter contractor has been awarded a 
contract for removing snow and ice in 
District No. 1, with reference to which 
he was the lowest bidder, nor have I 
recommended the award of said contract 
to J. P. McCabe, Incorporated, because 
said latter contractor has been awarded 
a contract for removing snow and ice in 
District No. 11, with reference to which 
he was the lowest bidder, nor have 1 
recommended the award of said contract 
to Baker, Matz & Co., because said 
latter contractor has been awarded a 
contract for removing snow and ice in 
District No. 3. 

In my opinion, J. A. Singarella, In- 
corporated, J. P. McCabe, Incorporated, 
and Baker, Matz & Co. can only handle 
one district in a proper and efficient 
manner to the greatest benefit of the 
public using the streets during and after 
a snow storm. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 31, 1934. 
To the Mayor of Boston. 

Supplementing my letter to you of 
December <8, 1934, requesting your 
approval to the award of a contract for 
removing snow and ice in District No. 4, 
to Dooley Brothers, Incorporated, the 
fourth lowest bidder, and confirming my 
earlier oral statement to you, please be 
advised that I have not" recommended 
the award of said contract to Baker, 
Mat/, & Co., because said latter con- 
tractor has been awarded a contract for 
removing snow and ice in District No. 3, 
nor have I recommended the award of 
said contract to J. P. McCabe, Incorpo- 
rated, because said latter contractor has 



been awarded a contract for removing 
snow and ice in District No. 11, with 
reference to which he was the lowest 
bidder, nor have I recommended the 
award of said contract to Martin J. 
Kelly, because said latter contractor has 
been awarded a contract for removing 
snow and ice in District No. 8. 

In my opinion, Baker, Matz & Co., 
J. P. McCabe, Incorporated, and Martin 
J. Kelly can handle only one district in 
a proper and efficient manner to the 
greatest benefit of the public using the 
streets during and after a snow storm. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 31, 1934. 
To the Mayor of Boston. 

Supplementing my letter to you of 
December 8, 1934, requesting your ap- 
proval to the award of a contract for 
removing snow and ice in District No. 9, 
to F. J. Jacobs Company, the second 
lowest bidder, and confirming my earlier 
oral statement to you, please be advised 
that I have not recommended the award 
of said contract to J. P. McCabe, Incor- 
porated, because said latter contractor 
has been awarded a contract for remov- 
ing snow and ice in District No. 11, with 
reference to which he was the lowest 
bidder. 

In my opinion J. P. McCabe, Incor- 
porated, can handle only one district in a 
proper and efficient manner to the 
greatest benefit of the public using the 
streets during and after a snow storm. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Supply Department. 
Boston, December 20, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of November 
21, 1934, the City of Boston entered into 
a contract with Jacob Thurman relative 
to the purchase of flour (bread and 
pastry) for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantity of said 
flour as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1934. This 
privilege is extended to Januaiy 29, 1935." 

I respectfully request that you ap- 
prove the purchase on behalf of the City 
of Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of flour (bread and pastry) 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1934, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to January 29, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 27, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Permission is 
respectfully requested to award a contract, 
without publicly advertising same, to 



Jan. 5 



CITY RECORD 



13 



Charles J. McCarty Company, Incorpo- 
rated, for furnishing to the Sewer Service 
the following: 

One Model 105 Ingersoll-Rand por- 
table gasolene engine driven compressor 
unit, at a delivered price of $1,875. 

The following prices were received from 
the various bidders: 

Ingerscll-Rand Company of New Eng- 
land, $1,875; Charles J. McCarty Com- 
pany, Incorporated, $1,875; Walter W. 
Field & Son, $1,875; Chicago Pneumatic 
Tool Company, $1,875. 

The division engineer of the Sewer 
Service recommends the purchase cf an 
Ingersoll-Rand machine, as he feels that 
through familiarity with this machine 
that better results can be obtained from 
his working force. 

The reason for asking for an award, 
without advertising, is that the Sewer 
Service intends to pay for this machine 
from funds in their 1934 budget, and the 
public advertisement would necessitate 
such a delay that delivery could not be 
effected in the year 1934. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



BUILDINGS RAZED. 

The Mayor has approved the request 
of the Building Department to raze the 
following structures as fire menaces or 
nuisances: 

The building at 229 Bowen street, 
Ward 6. 

The building at 242 Paris street, rear, 
Ward 1. 

The building at 145 Albany street, 
Ward 3. 

The building at 259 Eustis street, 
Ward 8. 

The building at 145 Albany street. 
Ward 3. The front wall is settled and 
bulged, with finish, particularly cornice, 
in bad condition; first floor at rear set- 
tled; unsafe and a fire hazard. The 
owner, Annie G. McNamara, ux. Daniel, 
of 688 Washington street, Brookline, has 
been notified of the unsafe condition of 
the building, but nothing has been done 
to remove the cause of complaint. 

The building at 259 Eustis street, Ward 
8, is in a dilapidated condition ; unsafe 
and dangerous and a fire hazard. The 
owner, Mollde Barenberg of 108 Zeigler 
street, Roxbury, has been notified of 
the unsafe condition of the building, but 
nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 229 Bowen street, 
Ward 6, is in. an unsafe and dangerous 
condition, dilapidated and a fire hazard. 
The owners, John F. and Honora T. 
Freeman, aire of Honora T. Freeman of 
141 P street, South Boston, have been 
notified of the unsafe condition of the 
building, but nothing has been done to 
remove the cause of complaint. 

The church building and steeple at 
19 Elm street, corner of 91 Seavems ave- 
nue, Jamaica Plain, damaged by fire on 
December 27, 1934, are in an unsafe and 
dangerous condition. The steeple is in 
such an immediately unsafe condition 
that the Building Department ordered 
the American Building Wrecking Com- 
pany of 144 Western avenue, Brighton, 
to enter the premises and remove the 
steeple at a cost of $4,000. 

The building at 237 and 239 Silver 
street, Ward 6, is in an unsafe and dan- 
gerous condition; dilapidated and a fire 



hazard. The owner, Lois C. Amsden 
et al. of 368 West Fourth street, South 
Boston, has been notified of the unsafe 
condition of the building, but nothing 
has been done to remove the cause of 
complaint. 



AMENDED DAMAGES. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
votes of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners : 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of June 14, 
1933, determining damages caused by the 
making of the public improvement con- 
sisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Delano Park, formerly Clarendon 
Park, be, and the same hereby is, 
amended, by striking from said order 
the amount $30 awarded to Daniel J. 
Sullivan and Mary J. Sullivan in said 
order and inserting in place thereof the 
amount $75; that the amount $75 be, 
and the same hereby is, awarded to Dan- 
iel J. Sullivan and Mary J. Sullivan for 
the damages so sustained. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of December 
30, 1932, determining damages caused by 
the making of the public improvement 
consisting of the extension of Wilming- 
ton street, Dorchester district, be, and the 
same hereby is, amended, by striking 
from said order the amount $146 
awai'ded to Thomas E. Currivan and 
Sarah L. Currivan in said order and in- 
serting in place thereof the amount $175 
and the name Shawmut Co-operative 
Bank in Liquidation; that the amount 
$175 be, and the same hereby is, awarded 
to Shawmut Co-operative Bank in Liq- 
uidation, for the damages so sustained. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of June 13, 
1933, as amended January 29, 1934, de- 
termining damages caused by the mak- 
ing of the public improvement consist- 
ing of the laying out of Orange street, 
be, and the same hereby is, amended, 
by adding to said order the amount $100 
as an award to Frederick C. Neithold; 
that the amount $100 be, and the same 
hereby is, awarded to Frederick C. Niie- 
thold for the damages so sustained. 



ASKS MAYOR TO AID IN 
LOCATING MOTHER. 

The following is a copy of letter re- 
ceived by Mayor Mansfield from Leonard 
McLean of 192 Sherman street, Perth 
Amboy, New Jersey: 

192 Sherman Street, 
Perth Amboy, N. J., 
December 27, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I trust you will forgive me 
for writing, but after you have read my 
letter you will understand how important 
it is to me. 

Back in 1903, my mother, Jennie Edith 
McLean, resided in your city in the Rox- 
bury area. She was born in Restigouche 
County, New Brunswick, Canada, August 
1, 1884. 

I was born in Boston, March 10, 1904. 
On May 20, 1900, she turned me over to 
the New England Home for Little Wan- 
derers. Since thai time 1 have doI heard 
from her. Through anonymous letters I 
have recently learned she is alive. 



I wonder, Mr. Mayor, if you would 
grant me the favor of asking your local 
papers to help me find her. I have a 
feeling that she is in need and I want to 
help her. It is true that I have not had 
contact with her for 28 years, but still I, 
as her son, wish to help her. 

I am prepared to give a cash reward of 
fifty dollars ($50) to the person who will 
communicate either with your office or 
direct to me any definite information that 
will disclose her present whereabouts. 

I know I ask a great deal of you and 
your city papers in granting me this 
great favor. All I ask is that I find my 
mother and put my mind at rest as to her 
circumstances. 

Thanking you for your interest in my 
behalf, 

Very truly yours, 

Leonard McLean. 



MAYOR MANSFIELD'S NEW YEAR 
MESSAGE. 

The following is Mayor Mansfield's 
New Year message to the citizens of 
Boston: 

In the closing hours of the old year our 
minds naturally turn with anxiety to the 
future, and to what 1935 holds in store 
for us. There is no gainsaying the fact 
that 1934 has been a hard year — but I 
do not think it was as hard a year as 1933. 
Unless the stories carried in the commer- 
cial pages of the metropolitan press are 
mere propaganda and therefore to be 
discounted as such, there appears to be a 
decided improvement in private industry. 
Reports from the retail trades show a 
very busy holiday season for 1934. 
Apparently there is still a great deal of 
money to be spent, and many of the 
people who have that money are entirely 
willing to spend it. 

With Federal aid our unemployment 
problem seems less difficult than it has 
been in the past. In April, 1934, when 
E. R. A. was first instituted, Boston's 
monthly allotment was $453,000. By 
constant demands this amount has 
gradually been raised until for January, 
1935, the Federal Government has allotted 
$1,130,000 with which to put the unem- 
ployed to work in Boston. Where we 
have been employing 13,000 men this 
would mean that we can employ about 
22,000, and this in turn means that many 
men now forced to accept welfare aid 
will disappear from the welfare rolls. 

The outlook is better for private busi- 
ness and for a larger measure of aid from 
the Federal Government. I confidently 
expect that the year 1935 will be much 
more encouraging than its predecessor. 
As Mayor of the City of Boston I shall 
do all in my power to make- it so and extend 
to the people of the city my heartfelt 
wish for a Happy and Prosperous New 
Year. 



PARCEL POST BUILDING 
APPROVED FOR M A VOR 
MANSFIELD. 

The following is a copy of telegram re- 
ceived by Mayor Mansfield from Con- 
gressman' John W. McCormack : 

W VSHINGTON, December 27, 3.34 P. M. 

"Clad to advise was just notified by 
Public Works Administration they have 
approved allocation eight hundred forty 

thousand dollars for Parcel Post Building, 
Boston, which will make- possible con- 
struction this building according to 
original plans." 



14 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 5 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED DECEMBER 27, 1934, TO JANUARY 2, 1935. 



December 27. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Angelo S. Miceli 

Anita S. Ward et al 

A. Waterman Estate 

John DeMatteo 

Gilchrist Company 

Business Real Estate Trust.. . 

Joseph Walker 

Flora Leverone 

Catherine Burns 

Ellen R. O'Brien 

Shawmut Realty Trust 

Thomas Hills Estate 

Lorenzo Lavorgna 

E. D. Codman, Trustee 

City Institution for Savings 
of Lowell. 



112 Blue Hill avenue 

8 Newbury street 

1290-1298 Hyde Park ave. . 
761 American Legion High- 
way 

13 Winter street 

426 Washington street 

120 Boylston street 

56 Clarendon street 

2 Oakhurst street 

56 Mora street 

56 Falmouth street 

50 Village street 

61 Clifford street 

176 Tremont street 

405 Marlborough street 



8 Alterations, dwelling $15 

5 Alterations, offices 2,000 

18 Alterations, stores 300 

18 Second-class dwelling 6,000 

3 Alterations, restaurant, 500 

3 Alterations, store 24,000 

5 Alterations, offices 1,500 

4 Fire escapes 100 

14 Alterations, dwelling 250 

17 Alterations, dwelling 250 

4 Alterations, store and offices. . 650 

5 Alterations, animal hospital. . 100 

18 Third-class dwelling 2,800 

3 Alterations, theater 1,000 

5 Alterations, tenements 1,000 



December 28. 



Flax Realty Company 

Flax Realty Company 

Marjorie DeWitt 

M. F. Foley 

M. Talaman 

Reconstruction Clinic Associ- 
ation. 

H. J. Stowe 

East Bridgewater Savings 
Bank. 

James A. Dann 

Home Savings Bank 

Chilton Club, Incorporated.. 

Alexander Beradi 

A. W. Perry, Incorporated.. 



1103 Morton street 

1099 Morton street 

31 Delle avenue 

3 Friend street 

1284 Hyde Park avenue. 
452 Beacon street 



68 Leverett street 

117 and 119 Fulton street.. . 

258 and 260 West Fifth st. . 
127-131 Clarendon street. . . 
152 Commonwealth avenue. 
212 and 214 Lincoln street. . 
6 and 8 Haymarket place. . 



Charles Jones 308 Bolton street . 

Jessie L. Ferman 310 Bolton street. 

Uphams Corner Co-opera- 64 Edson street. . . 
tive Bank. 



17 Second-class garage $400 

17 Second-class garage 400 

10 Alterations, dwelling 1,100 

3 Alterations, mercantile 280 

18 Alterations, mercantile 20 

5 Alterations, dwelling None 

3 Fire escapes S30 

3 Alterations, elevator 350 

6 Change occupation None 

4 Alterations, stores and offices, Si, 505 

5 Change occupation None 

22 Change occupation None 

3 Alterations, light manufac- $300 
turing. 

6 Take-down, dwelling 800 

6 Take-down, dwelling 1,000 

17 Alterations, dwelling 600 



December 29. 



None. 



December 31. 



Sylvanus Stokes 645 Beacon street 

Herman Schneider 580 Blue Hill avenue . 

Herman E. Brunkau 9 Perham street 

Posse Normal School 779 Beacon street . . . . 

Frank Ryfa 47 Billerica street .... 

Thomas Keefe 27 Wordsworth street. 

Letila Oarofalo 9 Davis street 



Ellen Keller 157 Warren avenue 

Henry C. Brookings 245 Marlborough street. . . 

A. W. Perry. Incorporated. . 597-601 Washington street. 

David Sherman et al 52 Garden street 

Maurice M. Miller 4 Abbot street 

Goodyear Tire and Rubber 57-61 Brookline avenue. .. . 

Company. 

Maria Moredo 58 Green street 



Central Congregational 91 Seaverns avenue. . . 

Church Society. 
Somerville Trust Company. . 149 Cambridge street. 
Ida Rosenbloom 42-48 Erie street 



A. Levenson 86 Milton avenue. 

J. Ziernan 177 Allston street . 



January 2. 



Doris Hynes 601 Commonwealth avenue, 

A. Martins 288 East Eighth street 



Joseph Colobro 30 Lynde street 

Dora M. Gottfried 11 Rhoades street 

Charles F. Ayer et al., Trus- 109 Federal street 

tees. 

Woodley Supply Company. . 39 Norfolk avenue 

Lawrence O'Brien 177 Highlands street 

Valantine Oberlander 9 Beryl street 

DeBlois & Maddison 135 and 137 Federal street . 



5 Alterations, hotel $12,500 

14 Alterations, dwelling None. 

20 Third-class garage S400 

5 Dumb-waiter 150 

3 Fire escapes 225 

1 Alterations, dwelling 500 

3 Alterations, stores and tene- 175 

ments. 

4 Alterations, lodging 1,400 

5 Alterations, dwelling 5,000 

3 Alterations, stores and offices, 1,900 

5 Alterations, tenements 900 

14 Alterations, dwelling 300 

21 Alterations, manufacturing. . . 100 

3 Alterations, dwelling and 700 
store. 

19 Take-down, church 4,000 

22 Take-down, dwelling 100 

14 Alterations, stores and tene- 900 

ments. 

17 Alterations, stores and tene- None. 

ments. 

21 Alterations, store None 

5 Second-class dwelling $3,500 

7 Alterations, store and dwell- 60 

ing. 

3 Alterations, tenements 900 

14 Alterations, garage 2,000 

3 Alterations, stores and 500 
offices. 

8 Take-down, storeage 460 

11 Alterations, dwelling 300 

20 Alterations, garage 300 

3 Alterations, stores and 5.600 

offices. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 1. 

The Police Commissioner for the City 
of Boston, Honorable Joseph J. Leonard, 
appointed by his Excellency, Governor 
Joseph B. Ely, under provisions of chap- 
ter 291 of the Acts of 1906, as amended, 
to succeed the Honorable Eugene C. 
Hultman, took the oath of office on Friday, 
December 28, 1934, and assumed his 
duties on that date. 

The Rules and Regulations for the 
Government of the Police Department for 
the City of Boston now in force are here- 
by continued until otherwise ordered. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 2. 

Patrolmen Francis C. Coleman and 
Frank A. Catarius, both of Division 10, 
are commended and each is given three 
days' additional vacation for meritorious 
police duty performed on December 17, 
1934, while off duty, in connection with 
the capture of three persons who had 
committed an armed holdup in a gasolene 
station. 

The commissioner is pleased to recognize 
the excellent police duty performed by 
these officers in apprehending these 
dangerous characters. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 3. 

A trial board consisting of Captains 
Campbell, Gleavy and Casey, having 
heard by reference a complaint made by 
John J. Hanrahan, captain, Division 17, 
against John E. Striplin, patrolman, 
Division 17, for alleged violation of Rules 
36 and 41 of the Rules and Regulations 
of the Police Department, to wit: 

Charge 1 : Conduct unbecoming an 
officer. 

Specification: In that on the 4th day 
of December, 1934, about 2.30 a. m., the 
said John E. Striplin, while in uniform 
and not on duty, did meet one Mary 
Buckley and her brother Howard J. 
Buckley of 636 West Roxbury Parkway 
on Centre street, near Police Station 
No. 17, and did go with them in their 
automobile to the Arborway Cafe, 59 
Hyde Park avenue, Division 13, and 
before entering the said Arbcrway Cafe 
did put on a civilian overcoat of the said 
Howard J. Buckley over his uniform coat 
and did remove his uniform cap, leaving 
it in the automobile, and did enter the 
said Arborway Cafe with the said Howard 
J. Buckley, and while inside the Arborway 
Cafe did get involved in an altercation 
with several unknown men, as a result of 
which he received injuries, had his 
revolver and police club taken away 
from him and was taken to the Forest 
Hills Hospital by the said Mary Buckley 
in her automobile where he was held for 
treatment, and by so doing did bring into 
disrepute and criticism himself and his 
associates in the Police Foice, and the 
Police Department as a whole. 

Charge 2: Untruthfulness. 

Specification: In that on the 4th day 
of December, 1934, when questioned by 
Deputy Superintendent John M. Anderson 
and his commanding officer, the said 
John E. Striplin did state that he met 
one Mary Buckley at Corinth and Wash- 
ington streets at about 2.30 a. m., Decern- 



Jan. 5 



CITY RECORD 



15 



ber 4, 1934, and, at her request, went 
with her in her automobile to the Arbor- 
way Cafe at 59 Hyde Park avenue, to 
get her brother, Howard J. Buckley, to 
leave the cafe, and that he did enter the 
said cafe in full uniform, when in fact and 
in truth he, the said John E. Striplin 
knew his statement was false, and by so 
doing did commit an act contrary to good 
order and discipline, — 

has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation : 

•'The Board having heard and carefully 
consideied all the evidence as presented, 
accepts the plea of guilty by Patrolman 
Striplin. Patrolman Striplin was off his 
own division and off duty at the time the 
offense was committed, and in effect did 
what amounted to removal of his uniform, 
and in view of the evidence presented the 
Board would be inclined to inflict the 
strict penalty of dismissal as required by 
Rule 36, section 11, but considering the 
fact that in being untruthful he harmed 
nobody but himself, and also in view of 
the recommendation of Deputy Super- 
intendent John M. Anderson and Captain 
John J. Hanrahan, who was at that time 
his commanding officer, the Board respect- 
fully recommends that the commissioner 
waive the dismissal clause and that the 
said Patrolman John E. Striplin be ordered 
to perform 210 hours of punishment duty." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trial 
Board and hereby orders that the said 
Patrolman John E. Striplin perform 210 
hours of punishment duty. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

Commissioner. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1935. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Monday, January 7. 
Lowell, Wednesday, January 9. 
Boston, Monday, February 4. 
Worcester, Wednesday, February 6. 
Boston, Monday, March 4. 
Fall River, Wednesday, March 6. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 7. 
Boston, Monday, April 8. 
Springfield, Wednesday, April 10. 
Boston, Monday, May 6. 
Worcester, Wednesday, May 8. 
Boston, Monday, June 3. 
Boston, Monday, September 16. 
Worcester, Wednesday, September 18. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 17. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 18. 
Boston, Monday, November 4. 
Lowell, Wednesday, November 6. 
Boston, Monday, December 2. 
New Bedford, Wednesday, December 4. 
New Bedford, Thursday, December 5. 

Rules for Examinations. 
All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent in 
the installation of wires, conduits, appa- 
ratus, fixtures and other appliances for 
carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat or power purposes. 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED DECEMBER 27, 1934, TO JANUARY 2, 1W5. 

December 27. 



Plumber. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



A. S. Wortman 

M. Ahern 

Louis Kornetsky 

John T. Meehan 

E. O. Irving 

Max Hyman 

David Mandelsyg 

Samuel Segel 

J. B. Farnsworth Company. 

David H. Lane 

R. F. Rodenhiser 



146 Commonwealth avenue. 
744-750 Harrison avenue. . . 

164 South street 

31 Vaughan avenue 

516 East Second street 

124 Glenway street 

817 East Broadway 

1 1 West Broadway 

645 Beacon street 

790 Beacon street 

15 Royal street 



5 New fixtures $375 

8 New fixtures 26,000 

11 New fixtures 50 

14 New fixtures 185 

6 New fixtures 50 

14 New fixtures 175 

6 New fixtures. ; 450 

6 New fixtures 55 

5 New fixtures 1.000 

21 New fixtures 475 

22 New fixtures 46 



December 28. 



John Sussenberger 73 Everett street 22 

John Sussenberger 3 and 5 Blaine street 22 

Hyman Lappin 53 Roland street 2 

George D. Ross 149 Newbury street 5 

M. J. Neary 609 Rutherford avenue 2 

H. A. Rowell 15 Burnside avenue 20 



D. B. Karger 1070 Blue Hill avenue. 

Samuel Segal 252 E street 

Louis Kornetsky 5 and 7 Weldon street. 

A. R. Houghton 398 Atlantic avenue. . . 

George Sulprizio 1 Maverick square. . . . 

George Sulprizio 145 Blackstone street . 

R. F. Rodenhiser 7 Greenwood park. . . . 



14 
6 

12 
3 
1 
3 

16 



New fixtures $500 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures 350 

New fixtures 50 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 600 

New fixtures 175 

New fixtures 75 

New fixtures 175 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 65 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 650 



December 29. 



None. 



December 31. 



Simon Kramer 35 Waumbeck street 12 New 

H. A. Rowell 651 Walk Hill street 18 New 

Harry A. Rosen 818 Harrison avenue 8 New 

Fritz Brunell 1109 Adams street 17 New 

A. J. Granama 130 Fulton street 3 New 

Louis Monto 6 Lawrence place 22 New 

Thomas P. McCarthy 548 Medford street 2 New 

Max Hyman 21 Nelson street 17 New 

E. L. Maurer 72 Hyde Park avenue 19 New 

Harold Kaplan 158A Humboldt avenue .... 12 New 

A. Shleman 132 Harrishof street 12 New 

John J. Vogel 45 Dimock street 11 New 

C. E. Bevelander 635 Huntington avenue .... 10 New 

John Sussenberger 7 and 9 Blaine street 22 New 

Louis Miller 31 Charles street 5 New 

H. E. Chefalo 459 River street 18 New 

H. E. Chefalo 26 Safford street 18 New 

D. B. Karger 44 and 46 Erie street 14 New 

H. A. Ballace 25 Concord street 2 New- 
Benjamin Port 330 Dartmouth street 5 New- 



fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures . 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures . 
fixtures . 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures . 



January 



E. M. Duggan 106 Huntington avenue 

Joseph Weinberg 3 Harrison avenue 

James D. O'Neil 15 Tyler street 

S. G. Cort 254 West Third street 

George F. Crawford 154 Commonwealth avenue. 

William N. McKenna 23 Joy street 

James McKinnon 149 Poplar street 

William N. McKenna 59 and 61 Exeter street 

F. H. Densmore 555 Talbot avenue 



18 
3 
3 



$200 

900 

275 

50 

75 

95 

175 

100 

350 

50 

190 

85 

250 

250 

45 

85 

90 

300 

150 

95 



New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 



$195 

90 
1 .".(I 
700 
100 
75 
85 
100 



Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
years' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for carrying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a Master or Journeyman Cer- 
tificate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be 
required to obtain at least 70 per cent in 
order to obtain a certificate. 

Applicants who fail to obtain the re- 
quired 70 per cent will not be entitled to 
re-examination until a period of three 



months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent, or who fail 
on the practical demonstration, will not 
be re-examined for a period of six months. 

Any person found referring to notes or 
books, or misbehaving during an exami- 
nation, will be debarred from that exami- 
nation. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held, and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day. 

James M. Hikley, 
Payson Smith, 
Stephen C. Garrity, 
State Examiners of Electricians. 

For application blanks or other infor- 
mation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 413A, State H 
Boston, Mass. 



16 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 5 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 619. 

The report entitled "Return A, Monthly 
Return of Offences Known to the Police," 
for the month of November, has been 
forwarded to Mr. J. E. Hoover, Director, 
Division of Investigation, Department of 
Justice, Washington, D. C. 

This monthly return is composed of 
the following offences : 

1. Criminal Homicide. 

a. Murder and non-negligent 

manslaughter. 

b. Manslaughter by negligence. 

2. Rape. (Abuse of female child.) 

(Rape, assault to.) 



3. Robbery. (Assault to, robbery 

armed and unarmed.) 

4. Aggravated assault. (Assault and 

battery with dangerous weapon, 
mayhem.) (Assault with intent 
to murder.) 

5. Burglary, breaking and entering. 

6. Larceny, theft (except auto theft). 

a. S50 and over in value. 

b. Under S50 in value. 

7. Auto theft. (Larceny of auto- 

mobile and attempted larceny 

of automobile.) 
Divisions of this department reported 
on the above-mentioned offences col- 
lectively for the month of November as 
follows: 



Division. 


Number of Offences 
Reported. 


Unfounded. 


Actual. 


Cleared. 


Per Cent 
Cleared. 


1 


74 

55 

22 

52 

29 

41 

107 

20 

4 

57 

79 

167 

187 

22 

84 


49 
28 

8 
30 
14 
16 
SO 
12 

4 

26 

34 

98 

108 

6 
48 


25 
27 
14 
22 
15 
25 

~8 

31 
45 
69 
79 
16 
36 


28 
32 
14 
26 
17 
27 
37 
9 

42 
44 
67 
76 
13 
28 


100.00 


6.... 


100.00 


7.... 


100.00 


11.... 


100.00 


14 


100.00 




100 00 


16 


100.00 


17... . 


100.00 


18 


100 00 


10... . 


100.00 


10 


97.77 


4 


97 10 


9 


96 .20 


13 


81 .25 


■: 


77 77 







It will be noted that ten divisions 
attained a mark of 100 per cent, which is 
an excellent showing. The total per- 
centage of cleared cases by all the divisions 
was 96.67, a gain of more than 9 points 
over the month of October. The com- 
bined averages of divisions by districts 
were as follows: 

Per Cent 
Cleared. 
District B: (Divisions 6, 9, 10, 14 

and 16) 98.79 

District C: (Divisions 11, 13, 17, 

18 and 19) 96.25 

District A: (Divisions 1, 2, 4, 7 

and 15) 94.97 

The commissioner is pleased to note the 
fine showing of the various divisions of the 
department in the percentage of cases 
cleared during the month of November, 
particularly the perfect score attained by 
ten of the fifteen divisions. 



The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene C. Hultman, 

Commissioner. 



City of Boston, 
Police Department, 

December 27, 1934. 
To Members of the Department. 

It is with profound regret that I leave 
the department. 

I want to express my heartfelt appre- 
ciation to all members of the department 
for their loyalty and service during the 
period of my administration. 

I bespeak the same loyalty and co- 
operation for my successor, the Honorable 
Joseph J. Leonard, who was this day 
appointed and confirmed as Police Com- 
missioner for the City of Boston. 

Ku<;ene C. Hultman. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 80. 
I. Parking Regulations. 
A new edition of the Parking Regula- 
tions issued by the Boston Traffic Com- 
mission is being distributed to the depart- 
ment today. One copy will be placed 
with each company in the department. 

If. American District Telegraph 
Assignments. 

Permission has been granted the 
American District Telegraph Company 
to add to their assignment cards the 
following: 

Signal Xo. 139: Spaulding-Moss Com- 
pany, 113 arid 115 Purchase street and 
50 and 52 Hartford street. Apparatus 
to respond: Engine 25. Ladder 8, District 
3. Nearest city box, 1291. 

Signal No. 124: Gerstein & Cooper 
Company, 1 West Second street. Ap- 
paratus to respond: Engine 15, Ladder 5, 
District 6. Nearest city box, 7136. 



III. Boston Automatic Fire Alarm 
Company. 

The following correction is to be made 
in the assignment cards of the Boston 
Automatic Fire Alarm Company: 

Signal Xo. 419: 96-104 Purchase street, 
corner Oliver street. Nearest city box 
should be 1291 instead of 1421. 

Signal No. 529: 109 and 111 Purchase 
street. Nearest city box should be 1291 
instead of 1421. 

IV. Commendations. 

The Fire Commissioner is pleased to 
publish the following letters which he has 
received concerning services rendered by 
members of the Fire Department. 

The first letter, from Mr. Gordon W. 
Russell of the James Russell Boiler 
Works, is in appreciation of services 
rendered by members of this department 
at a fire at the Russell Boiler Works on 
December 19, 1934: 

December 20, 1934. 
Edward F. McLaughlin, 
Fire ( 'ommissioner. 
Dear Sir, — Not in our twenty years 
of experience have we had the reason to 



watch your department work, from a 
personal and interested standpoint, until 
last evening. 

We had a threatening blaze around 
some valuable machinery, and wish to 
compliment you and District Chief 
Montgomery upon the manner in which 
the whole matter was handled. 

The officers and personnel sensed the 
whole situation immediately, and used 
such care in handling their streams that 
instead of a mass of cracked cast iron, we 
have the original machinery, damaged to 
some extent, of course, but still in such 
condition that we will be able to use it 
after making some repairs. 

We were impressed with the thorough- 
ness of the men in extinguishing every 
spark and going over the entire property. 

Trusting we will not bother you and 
your good men for another twenty years, 
we are, 

Yours very truly, 
James Russell Boiler Works 
Company, 
Gordon W. Russell. 

The second letter, from the American 
Red Cross, is in appreciation of the 
services rendered by the members of the 
Fire Department in connection with the 
recent roll call of that organization: 

December 22, 1934. 
Mr. Edward F. McLaughlin, 
Fire Commissioner. 

Dear Mr. McLaughlin, — Today we 
are closing the downtown office which has 
been the temporary headquarters of the 
Industrial Division of the Red Cross Roll 
Call. The remaining details of the drive 
will be handled at the Metropolitan 
Chapter Headquarters, 347 Common- 
wealth avenue. 

However, before bringing our personal 
activities to a close for this year, we want 
jointly to acknowledge our sincere appre- 
ciation for the splendid help and assist- 
ance which you have given us. We can 
safely say that the showing of your 
department was the outstanding accom- 
plishment of the drive, and we know that 
this was due to your personal efforts and 
interest in its success. 

You will be pleased and gratified to 
know that the Industrial Division Roll 
Call has been a substantial success. 
There has been, thanks to you and others 
who have served as chairmen and who 
have given either their name or active 
support, or both, to the campaign, a very 
fine reaction to our efforts in both mem- 
berships and contributions. 

Your help has made a difficult task 
much easier, and we want to express to 
you our sincere thanks and appreciation. 

May we take this opportunity of wish- 
ing you hearty Season's Greetings! 
Sincerely yours, 

Henry J. Nichols, Chairman. 
William J. Fortune, Vice Chairman. 

The commissioner is also in receipt of a 
letter from Merchants and Miners Trans- 
portation Company, in which commenda- 
tion is given to the members of the depart- 
ment for the splendid work performed by 
them at the recent fire in the steamship 
''Ontario. " 

The commissioner wishes to add his 
personal commendation to the men of the 
department for the excellent services per- 
formed by them on the occasion of this 
fire. It is a generally recognized fact that 
fire in cargo on shipboard is most difficult 
to combat, as well as accompanied by 
many hazards. Nevertheless, it was evi- 
dent to all interested that the members of 



Jan. 5 



CITY RECORD 



17 



the Boston Fire Department performed 
their duty heroically and efficiently. 

Capt. Jacob Berninger of Engine Com- 
pany 9 is hereby commended for respond- 
ing to still alarm on December 12, 1934, 
fcr accident to an automobile truck 
loaded with range oil. Captain Berninger 
assisted Engine Company 11 in shutting 
off the oil supply and flushing the street, 
he being off duty at the time. 

Ladderman William O. Cheswell of 
Ladder Company 1 is hereby comjnended 
for assisting in recovering a purse which 
had been taken from a woman at about 
6.45 p. m., December 12, 1934. Ladder- 
man Cheswell turned the purse over to 
the police at Station 2 who returned it to 
the woman who owned it. 

Hoseman Francis P. Wilcutt of Engine 
Company 48 and Ladderman James J. 
Sreenan of Ladder Company 28 are hereby 
commended for responding to a call for 
assistance while off duty on December 12, 
1934, when a boy was drowned in Nepon- 
set river. 

Laddermen Walter S. Fields and 
Edward J. Russell of Ladder Company 9 
are hereby commended for responding to 
and working at fire, Box 3139, second 
alarm, December 12, 1934, while off duty. 

Hoseman Ernest L. Alexander of 
Engine Company 5 is hereby commended 
for extinguishing a fire in an automobile 
truck, opposite 452 Meridian street, East 
Boston, December 14, 1934, while off 
duty. 

District Chief Joseph W. Shea of 
District 11 is hereby commended for 
responding to and working at fire, Box 
5155, December 25, 1934, while off duty. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edward 
F. McLaughlin. 

Henry A. Fox, 

Chief of Department. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Lubricating Oil. 

The Police Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing and delivering 
lubricating oil. The bidder must use the 
form of proposal to be obtained at the office 
of the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston, and deposit with his bid, at the office 
of the Police Commissioner, a properly certi- 
fied check for $200, payable to and to become 
the property of the Police Commissioner for 
the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out. Proposals will be publicly opened 
and read on Wednesday, January 16, 1935, at 
12 o'clock noon, at the office of the Police 
Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, Boston. 
The Police Commissioner reserves the right 
to accept or reject any or all proposals, or 
any part of a proposal, and to award the 
contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the Police Department of the City of 
Boston. Surety bond will be required from 
the successful bidder in an amount equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the estimated contract 
amount. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

(Jan. 5.) Police Commissioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



To Taxpayers. 
Assessors' Notice, City Hall Annex, 

Boston, January 1, 1935. 
Attention is called to the Assessors' Notice 
posted upon City Hall and various other places 
throughout the city, relative to making re- 
turns on personal property subject to taxation. 
Returns should be made not later than Feb- 
ruary 15. 

Edward T. Kelly, 
Timothy W. Murphy, 
Michael J. Brophy, 

Assessors of Boston. 
(Jan. 5-12-19-26-Feb. 2-9.) 



HOUSING CORPORATION HAS $123,670,500 
AVAILABLE. 

Transfer to the Public Works Emer- 
gency Housing Corporation of §23,670,500 
previously allotted to seven low-cost 
housing and slum clearance projects was 
announced by Public Works Admin- 
istrator Harold L. Ickes. The housing 
corporation now has $123,670,500 avail- 
able for housing and slum clearance 
projects. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Tires and Tubes. 

The Police Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing and delivering 
tires and tubes. The bidder must use the 
form of proposal to be obtained at the office 
of the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston, and deposit with his bid, at the office 
of the Police Commissioner, a properly certi- 
fied check for $100, payable to and to become 
the property of the Police Commissioner for 
the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out. Proposals will be publicly opened 
and read on Wednesday, January 16, 1935, at 
12 o'clock noon, at the office of the Police 
Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, Boston. 
The Police Commissioner reserves the right 
to accept or reject any or all proposals, or 
any part of a proposal, and to award the 
contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the Police Department of the City of 
Boston. Surety bond will be required from 
the successful bidder in an amount equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the estimated contract 
amount. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

(Jan. 5.) Police Commissioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Fuel Oil. 

The Police Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing and 
delivering fuel oil. The bidder must use the 
form of proposal to be obtained at the office 
of the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston, and deposit with his bid, at the office 
of the Police Commissioner, a properly certi- 
fied check for $200, payable to and to become 
the property of the Police Commissioner for 
the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out. Proposals will be publicly opened 
and read on Wednesday, January 16, 1935, at 
12 o'clock noon, at the office of the Police 
Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, Boston. 
The Police Commissioner reserves the right 
to accept or reject any or all proposals, or 
any part of a proposal, and to award the 
contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the Police Department of the City of 
Boston. Surety bond will be required from 
the successful bidder in an amount equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the estimated contract 
amount. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

(Jan. 5.) Police Commissioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Gasolene. 

The Police Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing and 
delivering gasolene. The bidder must use the 
form of proposal to be obtained at the office 
of the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston, and deposit with his bid, at the office 
of the Police Commissioner, a properly certi- 
fied check for $500, payable to and to become 
the property of the Police Commissioner for 
the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out. Proposals will be publicly opened 
and read on Wednesday, January 16. 1935. at 
12 o'clock noon, at the office of the Police 
Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, Boston. 
The Police Commissioner reserves the right 
to accept or reject any or all proposals, or 
any part of a proposal, and to award the 
contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the Police Department of the City of 
Boston. Surety bond will be required from 
the successful bidder in an amount, equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the estimated eon:: 
amount. 

Joseph J. Leonard. 

(Jan. 5.) Police Commissioner. 



MOTOR VEHICLE ACCIDENTS IN 1933. 

It is estimated that in 1933 there were 
30,500 motor vehicle deaths — 1,000 more 
than in 1932 ; this remaining otherwise, 
however, the lowest number since 1928, 
when 27,996 deaths occurred. These 
figures are given by the National Safety 
Council, Inc., in "Public Safety" for 
February., 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 



National Industrial Recovery Project, 
P. W. A. Docket No. 4205-K. 



Proposals for Sheet Asphalt or Bitulithic 
Pavement in Hyde Park Avenue, Sec- 
tion B, Ward 18, from Cummins High- 
way to Metropolitan Avenue. 
The Commissioner of Public Wor ks of the City 
of Boston, hereinafter designated as Commissioner, 
Room 508. fifth floor, City Hall Annex, invites 
proposals from citizens of the United States and 
corporations or other legal associations wherein 
the controlling interest to the extent of at least 
one half thereof is owned by a citizen or citizens 
of the United States, for sheet asphalt or bitulithic 
pavement in Hyde Park avenue, Ward 18, from 
Cummins Highway to Metropolitan avenue. 
Each proposal should be inclosed in an envelope, 
sealed, marked "Proposal for Sheet Asphalt or 
Bitulithic Pavement in Hyde Park Avenue," 
and left at Room 508, fifth floor. City Hall Annex , 
before 12 m. standard time, on Tuesday, January 
15, 1935, accompanied by a properly certified 
check on, or a certificate of deposit issued by, a 
responsible bank or trust company in the sum of 
three thousand dollars (S3, 000), payable to the 
City of Boston. Checks will be returned after 
execution of the contract on demand. The 
proposals will there and then be publicly opened 
and read. Proposals must be made in duplicate, 
the sealed duplicate, without check, to be deposited 
by the bidder with the City Auditor previous to 
the time named for opening the proposals. Bids 
must be made upon the prescribed proposal form. 
Special attention of the bidders is called to all 
provisions of the Federal Emergency Administra- 
tion of Public Works, which form a part of the 
contract, including the prescribed minimum rate 
of Sl-20 per hour for skilled labor and SO. 50 per 
hour for unskilled labor, and to the special provi- 
sions as to semi-skilled labor. Pursuant to 
executive order 6646, dated March 14, 1934, no 
bid will be considered unless it includes or is 
accompanied by a certificate (worded in accordance 
with P. W. A. 61, revised March 19, 1934), duly 
executed by the bidder. Plans, specifications and 
contract forma may be obtained at Room 508, 
City Hall Annex, upon the deposit of the sum of 
five dollars (So). A surety bond by an approved 
surety company will be required from the successful 
bidder in an amount not less than the full amount 
of the contract. The right is reserved to reject 
any and all proposals, or to accept any proposal 
deemed best for the interest cf the City of Boston 
and no award can be made without the approval 
of the State Engineer, P. W. A. The name and 
address of the Local Registration Office of the 
National Re-employment Service, from which 
employee lists for this contract shall be obtained, 
is as follows: State Public Employment Office 
(Everett L. Hanna. Manager). 100 Nashua street, 
Boston. 

C. ,T. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 
(Dec. 29-Jan. 5.) 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Cleansing and REPAIRING 

Summer Uniforms. 
The Police Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for cleansing and repairing 
summer uniforms. The bidder must use the 
form of proposal to be obtained at the office 
of the Property Clerk. 151 Berkeley street. 
Boston, and deposit with his bid, at the office 
of the Police Commissioner, a properly certi- 
fied check for $200, payable to and to b 
the {property of the Police Commissioner for 
the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out. Proposals will be publicly opened 
and read on Wednesday.' January 16, 1 
12 o'clock noon, at the office of the 
Commissioner. l.Vl Berkeley street, Boston. 
The Police Commissioner re-serves the ritrht 
to accept or reject any or all proposals, or 
any part of a proposal, and to award the 
contract as he deems for the best interests 
of ilie Police Department of the City of 
Boston. Surety bond will be required from 
ccessful bidder in an amount equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the estimated contract 
amount. 

Joseph J. Leob 
(Jan. 5.) nonor. 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 5 



EXECUTIVE ORDERS. 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, 

December 27, 1934. 

Acting under the authority vested in 
him bv the provisions of section 23 of 
chapter 486 of the Acts of the year 1909, 
the City Auditor proposes to install and 
maintain in the Auditing Department, 
commencing with the beginning of the 
financial year 1935, a system of records 
and accounts on which daily entries of 
obligations incurred and expenditures 
made by city departments shall be re- 
corded, and from which daily unencum- 
bered and unexpended balances may be 
obtained. To maintain this system the 
City Auditor further proposes that 
officers and boards in charge of city de- 
partments shall present to the Auditing 
Department, before liability is incurred 
and expenditure is made, all orders and 
contracts for services, materials, and sup- 
plies, or involving any other proposed 
expenditure or obligation, for certifica- 
tion as to the availability of sufficient 
funds in the appropriations affected to 
warrant the making of a commitment 
for. and the expenditure of, the amount 
stated in the order. 

The details and elements of the pvo- 
A cedure which the City Auditor proposes 
to establish are contained in a document 
entitled "A Proposed Disbursement Pro- 
cedure Designed to Secure More Effec- 
tive Control Over Departmental Expendi* 
tures," which was presented for my con- 
sideration and approval under date of 
Xovember 15, 1934. Having given care- 
ful consideration to the procedure as 
outlined in this document, I hereby in- 
dicate my approval of the same and 
direct all heads of departments and mem- 
bers of municipal boards to cooperate 
with the City Auditor in establishing 
and maintaining this new S3^stem of rec- 
ords and accounts. 

' By order of 

Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 



City of Boston, 
Auditing Department, 

December 27, 1934. 
To County Officers and Officials. 

Acting under the authority vested in 
me by the provisions of section 42 of 
chapter 35 of the General Laws, and sec- 
tion 23 of chapter 486 of the Acts of the 
year 1909, I propose to install and main- 
tain in the Auditing Department, com- 
mencing with the beginning of the finan- 
cial year 1935, a system of records and 
accounts on which daily entries of ob- 
ligations incurred and expenditures made 
by county departments shall be recorded, 
and from which daily unencumbered and 
unexpended balances may be obtained. 
To maintain this system I propose that, 
officials in charge of county officer and 
departments shall present to the Audit- 
ing Department, before liability is in- 
curred and expenditure is made, all 
orders and contracts for services, ma- 
terials and supplies, or involving any 
other proposed expenditure or obliga- 
tion, for certification as to the availa- 
bility of sufficient funds in the appropri- 
ations affected to warrant the making of 
a commitment for, and the expenditure 
of, the amount stated in the order. 

The details, procedure, and elements 
of the proposed system are contained in 
a document entitled "A Proposed Dis- 
bursement Procedure Designed to Secure 
More Effective Control Over Depart- 



mental Expenditures," which was pre- 
sented to Honorable Frederick W. Mans- 
field, Mayor of Boston, under date of 
November 15, 1934. The attention of 
count}' officials is directed to this docu- 
ment and their cooperation in establish- 
ing and maintaining this new system of 
records and accounts is respectfully re- 
quested. 

Charles J. Fox, 
Auditor of County oj Suffolk. 



CLAIMS ALLOWED. 

The Mayor, upon recommendation of 
the Corporation Counsel, has approved 
the following claim: 

William F. Holden, Jr., 68 Glendale 

road, North Weymouth, in the sum of 
S85, as compensation for damage to auto- 
mobile caused by manhole extending ap- 
proximately 11 inches above grade of 
street opposite 16 Sherbrook street, West 
Roxbury, October 18, 1933. 



LAND=TAKINQ IN BRIGHTON. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Lake Shore road, 
Brighton district, as a highway, from 
Lake street, northwesterly and westerly 
for a distance of about 1,245 feet, 
bounded and described as follows: 

A highway named Lake Shore road is 
hereby laid out, from Lake street west- 
erly, thence southwesterly, thence west- 
erly for a distance of about 1,245 feet, 
and ordered constructed; the cost there- 
of to be charged to Federal Funds al- 
located under the Federal Emergency 
Relief Administration program for 
Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is 
bounded and described as follows: 

Southeasterly by Lake street, by two 
measurements, seventy-eight and 93-100 
feet on a curve of one hundred eightv- 
two and 23-100 feet radius, and fifty-five 
and 22-100 feet; westerly the westerly 
line of said Lake Shore road as hereby 
laid out, fifty-nine and 12-100 feet on a 
curve of two hundred and fifty feet 
radius; southerly by the southerly line 
of said Lake Shore road as hereby laid 
out, bv two measurements, thirty-five 
and 28-100 feet and sixty and 7-100 feet 
on a curve of sixty feet radius; south- 
easterly by the southeasterly line of said 
Lake Shore road as hereby laid out, by 
two measurements, seven hundred nine- 
teen and 11-100 feet and sixty-nine and 
10-100 feet; again southerly by the south- 
erly line of said Lake Shore road as 
hereby laid out, two hundred sixty-five 
and 90-100 feet on a curve of two hun- 
dred forty -nine and 89-100 feet radius; 
again westerly by the westerly line of 
said Lake Shore road as hereby laid out, 
forty feet; northerly by the northerly 
line of said Lake Shore road as hereby 
laid out, two hundred twenty-three and 
34-100 feet on a curve of two hundred 
nine and 89-100 feet radius; northwest- 
erly by the northwesterly line of said 
Lake Shore road as hereby laid out, by 
two measurements, sixty-three and 83- 
100 feet and seven hundred thirteen and 
84-100 feet ; again northerly by the north- 



erly line of said Lake Shore road as here- 
by laid out, by three measurements, one 
hundred and 12-100 feet on a curve of 
one hundred feet radius, one hundred 
four and 56-100 feet and thirty-nine and 
64-100 feet on a curve of thirty-two and 
86-100 feet radius. 

Voted, That this Board determines 
that no person sustains damages in his 
estate by the making of the public im- 
provement consisting of the laying out 
and construction of Lake Shore road, 
as a highway, from Lake street westerly, 
thence southwesterly, thence westerly, 
for a distance of about 1,245 feet, under 
the order of the Board of December 26, 
1934, and awards no damages therefor. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

Food Inspector, Department of Public 
Health, February 9, 1935. 

Last date for filing aplications, Satur- 
day, January 26, 1935, at 12 noon. 

The minimum salary is $1,800 a year; 
the maximum salary is $2,400 a year. 

Duties: Under general direction, to 
examine premises in an assigned district 
where foods or drugs are manufactured, 
stored, sold, or handled, in order to en- 
force sanitary standards and classification 
as to quality prescribed by law; and to 
perform related work as required. 

Entrance Requirements : Applicants 
must have education equivalent to gradu- 
ation from a standard four-year high 
school. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience (3) ; practical questions (4) ; 
personality and fitness, as determined 
by an oral interview (3); total (10). 

Passing Requirements : Applicants must 
obtain at least 70 per cent in each sub- 
ject of the examination in order to be- 
come eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

Clerical Service, for State and Cities 
and Towns Outside of Boston and 
Vicinity, February, 16, 1935. 
Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 2, 1935, at 12 noon. 

For Boston and Vicinity, March 2, 
1935. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 16, 1935, at 12 noon. 

Warning: If all applicants cannot be 
accommodated on the above dates, they 
will be notified to appear on subsequent 
Saturdays. Applicants should note the 
exact date given on their notification 
cards. 

The usual entrance salary for clerks 
for State service is S90O a year. 

Persons qualifying in the examination 
may have their names placed on the 
State list as well as on the list for the 
city or town in which they reside. 

Applicants must be not less than six- 
teen years of age at the time of filing 
application. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience (2) ; spelling (2) ; arithmetic 
(including problems) (2) ; grammar (in- 
cluding penmanship) (2) ; filing (1) ; 
word knowledge (1); total (10). 

Passing Requirements : Applicants 
must obtain a mark of at least 65 per 
cent in spelling, at least 50 per cent in 
each of the other subjects, and at least 
70 per cent in general average in order 
to become eligible. 



Jan. 5 



CITY RECORD 



19 



LAND-TAKING IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of an extension of Harmon 
street, Dorchester district, as a highway, 
to Greenfield road, bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: 

An extension of the highway -named 
Harmon street is hereby laid out to 
Greenfield road, and ordered con- 
structed; the cost thereof to be charged 
to Federal Funds allocated under the 
Federal Emergency Relief Administra- 
tion program for Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement 
for street purposes is hereby taken, is 
bounded and described as follows: 

Northeasterly by another part of said 
Harmon street, forty and 28-100 feet; 
southeasterly by the southeasterly line 
of said extension of said Harmon stTeet 
as hereby laid out, seven hundred 
seventy-five and 73-100 feet; westerly by 
Greenfield road, forty-two and 7-100 
feet, and northwesterly by the north- 
westerly line of said extension of said 
Harmon street as hereby laid out, seven 
hundred sixty-seven and 51-100 feet. 



JAMAICA PLAIN WELFARE UNIT 
OPENED. 

The following is a copy of letter re- 
ceived by Mayor Mansfield from John 
C. L. Dowling, Executive Director, Over- 
seers of the Public Welfare: 

Boston, December 22, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston 

Sir, — I desire to inform you that the 
Jamaica Plain unit of this department 
will open for business on Friday, Decem- 
ber 28, 1934. 

The unit is located in the basement of 
the Library Building at Sedgwick and 
South streets, Jamaica Plain. We plan 
to open a branch of the Jamaica Plain 
unit in the Roslindale Municipal Building 
to serve the 214 cases in the West Rox- 
bury and Roslindale district. 

Work on the Morton street branch of 
the Dorchester district, which will serve 
the people in lower Dorchester, has 
already been started and will be com- 
pleted in January, 1935. 

The main office of the Dorchester unit 
is to be located in a building of the Public 
Works Department on Hancock street, 
but inasmuch as the changes there are 
extensive, it will be sometime in the 
latter part of February or early in March 
before this unit will be in full operation. 

Yours truly, 

John C. L. Dowling, 

Executive Director. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, parking of vehicles is pro- 
hibited in Washington street, east aide, 
from Kneeliand street to a point eighty 
(80) feet south of Kneeland street, ef- 
fective from January 2, 1935, to Janu- 
ary 26, 1935, inclusive. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, the following rales which were 



effective December 3, 1934, for a trial 
period of thirty (30) days, are hereby ex- 
tended for a trial period of thirty (30) 
days from January 3, 1935: 

The operator of a vehicle proceeding 
in a northerly direction in Congress 
street shall make only a right turn from 
Congress street into Dock square. 

Faneuil Hall square, westerly side, is 
a one-way street from South Market 
street to North Market street. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of the Guber- 
natorial Inauguration Exercises, parking 
of vehicles is prohibited in the following 
streets on January 3, 1935, from 8 a. m. 
to 3 p. m.: 

Mt. Vernon Street. 
Both sides, from Joy street to Louis- 
burg square. 
Park Street. 
Both sides, from Beacon street to 
Tremont street. 



BOSTON AS A TOWN. 

From its foundation until 1755, or a 
period of 125 yeara, Boston was not only 
the most outstanding but the most 
populous town in the American colonies. 
In 1760, Philadelphia's population wag 
ahead, viz., 18,756, Boston's then being 
15,631 and New York's about 14,000. 
In the last year of town government, 
viz., 1821, Boston's population was about 
45,000 and its public debt $100,000, all 
incurred for new county buildings. 

The history of Boston as a town dur- 
ing a period of nearly two centuries 
surpasses in civic interest that of Boston 
as a city because of the untiring zeal 
and successful efforts of its townsmen to 
realize more of tra-s democracy than had 
ever been attained before. Their obliga- 
tions were held as sacred as their liber- 
ties. 



RECREATION, ADEQUATE AS TO KIND 
AND AVAILABILITY. 

Although the ratio of park acreage to 
population has been used as the simplest 
measure of the extent to which cities 
provide areas for the recreation of their 
people, it is by no means an accurate 
basis for determining this. If most of 
the total acreage is in one large park, if 
the parks are poorly distributed, or if 
they do not provide various types of 
recreation facilities, the park system may 
be inefficient even though the acreage 
is large. The efficiently planned park 
and recreation system will involve 
balanced relationship and well-distributed 
location of several types of properties, 
namely, children's playgrounds, neigh- 
borhood playfield parks, neighborhood 
parks, reservations, boulevards, and park- 
ways. 

(Bureau of Labor Statistics, Publica- 
tion No. 462.) 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE FOR BOSTON. 

Number of children 7-13 years old, 
91,758, of whom 90,347, or 985 per cent 
were attending school ; 14 and 15 yeara, 
25,659, of whom 24,507, or 95.5 per cent, 
were attending school ; 16 and 17 years, 
25,932, of whom 16,912, or 65.2 per cent, 
were attending school; IS to 20 years, 
41,282, of whom 10,991, or 26.6 per cent, 
were attending school ; total children 7 
to 20 years old, 184,631, of whom 142,757, 
or 77.3 per cent, were attending school. 
Number of persons attending school who 
were 21 years of age and over was 10,966. 



POPULATION 21 YEARS OLD AND OVER, 
BY SEX, RACE, NATIVITY AND CITI- 
ZENSHIP BY DIVISIONS AND STATES, 
APRIL 1, 1930. 

For the United States there are 72,943- 
624 (37,056,757 males and 35,886,867 fe- 
males) persons 21 years old and over, 
of whom 52,762,391 (26,418,580 males and 
26,343,811 females) are native white; 
foreign-born white, 12,637,643 (6,797,494 
males and 5,840,149 females), of whom 
7,627,436 (4,217,576 males and 3,409,860 
females) are naturalized; 1,218,416 (926,- 
454 males and 291,962 females) have first 
papers, 3,342,837 (1,435,309 males and 
1,907,528 females) are alien and 448,954 
(218,155 males and 230,799 females) citi- 
zenship not reported; Negroes, 6,531,939 
(3,235,441 males and 3,296,498 females) 
and other races, 1,011,651 (605,242 males 
and 406,409 females). 

For New England there are 5,095,074 
(2,481,494 males and 2,613,580 females) 
persons 21 years old and over, of whom 
3,309,557 (1,596,613 males and 1,712,944 
females) are native white; foreign-bom 
white, 1,721,714 (851,225 males and 870,- 
489 females), of whom 889,577 (456,052 
males and 433,525 females) are natural- 
ized, 142,894 (107,250 males and 35,644 
females) have first papers, 648,976 (270,- 
709 males and 378,267 females) are alien 
and 40,267 (17,214 males and 23,053 fe- 
males) citizenship not reported; Negroes, 
58,770 (29,595 males and 29,175 females) 
and other races, 5,033 (4,061 males and 
972 females). 

For Massachusetts there are 2,686,487 
(1,287,970 males and 1,398,517 females) 
persons over 21 years of age, of whom 
1,656,040 (787,645 males and 868,395 fe- 
males) are native white; foreign-born 
white, 994,411 (481,255 males and 513,156 
females); Negroes, 32,898 (16,406 males 
and 16,492 females) ; other races, 3,138 
(2,664 males and 474 females). Of the 
foreign-born white, 513,787 (260,530 males 
and 253,257 females) are naturalized; 
85,892 (62,821 males and 23,071 females) 
have first papers; 371,508 (148,351 males 
and 223,157 females) are aliens; for 
23,224 (9,553 males and 13,671 females), 
citizenship was not reported. 

For Suffolk County there are 566,051 
(276,761 males and 289,290 females) per- 
sons over 21 years of age, of whom 305,- 
311 (148,703 males and 156,60S females) 
are native white; foreign-born white, 
244,674 (119,403 males and 125,271 fe- 
males) ; Negroes, 14,614 (7,343 males and 
7,271 females); other races, 1,452 (1,312 
males and 140 females). Of the foreign- 
born whites, 128,825 (66,813 males and 
62,012 females) are naturalized; 24,775 
(17,766 males and 7,009 females) have 
first papers; 83,112 (31,732 males and 
51,380 females) are aliens; for 7,962 (3,092 
males and 4,S70 females), citizenship 
was not reported. 

For Boston there are 507,711 (247,490 
males and 260,221 females) persons over 
21 years of age, of whom 275,616 (133,937 
males and 141,679 females) are native 
white; foreign-born white, 216,349 (105,- 
080 males and 111,269 females) ; Negroes, 
14,330 (7,193 males and 7,137 females); 
other races, 1,416 (1.2S0 males and 136 
females). Of the foreign-born white, 
114,119 (58,651 males and 55.46S females) 
are naturalized; 22,254 (15.S17 males and 
6,437 females) have first papers; 72,974 
(27,901 males and 45.073 females') are 
aliens; for 7,002 (2.711 males and 4,291 
females), citizenship was not reported. 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY. 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

Room 27, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 1100. 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 
Joseph F. Mellyn, Secretary. 
William C. S. Healey, Assistant Secretary. 
Cyro, G. Cummings, Assistant Secretary 
John F. Gdlmore, Jr., Assistant Secretary. 
Edward U. Lee, Assistant Secretary. 
Bernard J. Dunn, Assistant Secretary. 
Thomas E. Cimeno, Assistant Secretary. 
Arthur J. O'Keefe, Assistant Secretary. 
Mary L. Thompson, Assistant Secretary. 
John F. Gilmore, Chief Clerk (Acting). 
Herbert L. McNary, Chief Licensing Division. 
Joseph Mikolajewski, Assistant. 

CITY COUNCIL. 

Ward 1. Henry Selvitella, 80 Orient avenue. 

Ward 2. Thomas H. Green. 117 Baldwin st. 

Ward 3. John I. Fitzgerald, 7 Allen st. 

Ward 4. George W. Roberts, 20 Hemenway st. 

Ward 5. Henry L. Shattuck, 15 River st. 

Ward 6. George P. Donovan, 508 East 
Broadway, South Boston. 

Ward 7. John E. Kerrigan, 213 West Eighth 
street, South Boston. 

Ward 8. John F. Dowd, 22 Greenville st. 

Ward 9. Richard D. Gleason, 11 Ruggles St. 

Ward 10. John J. Doherty, 67! Wyman st. 

Ward 11. Edward L. Englert, 18 Iffley road, 
Jamaica Plain. 

Ward 12. David M. Brackman, 89 Waumbeek 
street. 

Ward 13. Joseph McGrath, 9 Castle Rock st. 

Ward 14. Maurice M. Goldman, 11 G Hazleton 
street. 

Ward 15. Martin H. Tobin, 70 Westville st. 

Ward 16. Albert L. Fish, 12 Rowena st. 

Ward 17. Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr., 57 
Codman Hill avenue. 

Ward 18. Clement A. Norton, 8 Austin st. 

Ward 19. Peter A. Murray, 7 St. John st. 

Ward 20. James F. Finley, 231 Cornell st. 

Ward 21. James E. Agnew, 92 Wallingford 
road. 

Ward 22. Edward M. Gallagher, 21 Oak 
Square avenue. 

Clerk of Committees. 
John E. Baldwin, Room 56, City Hall. Tel. 

Lafayette 5100. 

City Messenger., 
Edward J. Leary, Room 55, City HalL Tel. 

Lafayette 5100. 

ART DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Faneuil Hall. 

Arthur A. Shurcliff, Secretary. 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, City Hal] Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Edward T. Kelly, Chairman. 
Timothy W. Murphy, Secretary. 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 

Room 20, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Charles J. Fox, City Auditor. 

Daniel J. Falvey, Assistant City Auditor. 

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOL 
BUILDINGS. 

Richard J. Lane, Chairman. 

Department of School Buildings. 
Office, 11 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 5750. 
William W. Drummey, Superintendent of Con- 
struction. 

BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT. 

Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 30 City Hall. 
H. Murray Pakulski, Secretary. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 

134 North street. Tel. Capitol 2125. 
William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 

BUDGET DEPARTMENT. 

47 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Charles J. Fox, Commissioner. 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 901 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Edward W. Roemer, Building Commissioner. 
John H. Glover, Acting Clerk of Department. 

Board of Examiners. 
Office, 907 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
John F. Hickey, Chairman. 
Mary C. Dowd, Secretary. 

Board of Appeal. 
Office, City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Joseph A. Tomasello, Chairman. 
James A. McElaney, Jr., Secretary. 

CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 
Room 31, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, City Clerk. 
John B. Hynes, Assistant City Clerk. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD. 
Room 30, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 
Elisabeth M. Herlihy, Secretary. 



CITY RECORD. 

Office, 73 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Frank H. Cushman, Editor. 
Joshua H. Jones, Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 
City Hall. 

COLLECTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 200 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
John F. Doherty, City Collector. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 111 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
David B. Shaw, Chairman. 
Daniel H. Rose, Commissioner. 
Peter F. Tague, Commissioner. 
Charles T. Harding, Commissioner. 

FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Office, 24 School street. Tel. Lafayette 1622. 
Jacob J. Kaplan, Chairman. 
Robert E. Cunniff, Secretary. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters, Bristol street, South End. Tel. 

Kenmore 1100. 
Wire Division, 103 City Hall Annex. TeL 

Lafayette 5100. 
Edward F. McLaughlin, Commissioner. 
Herbert J. Hickey, Executive Secretary. 
Henry A. Fox, Chief of Department. 
Peter F. Dolan, Superintendent of Wire 

Division. 

THE FRANKLIN FOUNDATION. 

Office, Franklin Union, Appleton and Berkeley 

streets. Tel. Hancock 6590. 
Henry B. Sawyer, Vice President. 
W. B. Russell, Director. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1107 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Francis X. Mahoney, M. D., Commissioner. 
Joseph A. Cahalan, Secretary. 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 

City Hospital, 818 Harrison ave. Tel. Ken. 8600. 
Relief Hospital, Haymarket Sq. Tel. Cap. 0753. 
Relief Hospital, East Boston. Tel. E. B. 86. 
West Department, West Rox. Tel. Parkway 68. 
Joseph P. Manning, President. 
John J. Dowling, M. D., Superintendent. 

INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 808-811 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Frederic A. Washburn, M. D. Commissioner. 
Elizabeth G. Nelson, Chief Clerk. 

Child Welfare Division. 
800 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Registration Division. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Long Island Hospital Division. 
Long Island, Boston Harbor. Tel. President 
1371. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 
Room 1003, Lawyers Building, 11 Beacon 

street. Tel. Lafayette 6200. 
Henry E. Foley, Corporation Counsel. 
Margaret G. O'Neill, Secretary. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Library Building, Copley square. TeL 

Kenmore 1500. 
William Cardinal O'Connell, President of 

Trustees. 
Milton E. Lord, Director. 

LICENSING BOARD. 

Office, 1 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 2470. 
David T. Montague, Chairman. 
Louis Epple, Secretary. 

MARKET DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Quincy Market. Tel. Capitol 5382. 
Frank J. Kiernan, Superintendent. 

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

Men and Women, 25 Church street. Tel. 

Liberty 8607. 
Samuel W. Warren, Director. 

OVERSEERS OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

Office, Charity Building, 43 Hawkins street. 

Tel. Capitol 8320. 
Temporary Home, Chardon street. Tel. Laf. 

2337. 
Wayfarers' Lodge, 30 Hawkins street. Tel. 

Lafayette 3198. 
James A. McMurry, Chairman. 
John C. L. Dowling, Executive Director. 

PARK DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 
William P. Long, Chairman. 
Daniel J. Byrne, Secretary. 
Park, Public Grounds, Bath and Music 
Divisions. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 

Cemetery Division. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 805 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
William G. O'Hare, Commissioner. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters, 154 Berkeley street. Tel. Ken- 
more 6700. 
Joseph J. Leonard, Commissioner. 
Augustine J. Gill, Secretary. 
Martin H. King, Superintendent. 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 174 North street. Tel. Lafayette 6363. 
William J. Casey, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1005 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Roswell G. Hall, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

C. J. Carven, Commissioner. Office, 509 City 
Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

John J. Connelly, Secretary and Chief Clerk. 
Room 509, City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 6100. 

Bridge and Ferry Division. 
Leo B. Reilly, Division Engineer. Office, 602 
City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Highway Division. 
Joshua Atwood, Division Engineer. Office, 
501 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Sanitary Division. 
Adolph J. Post, Division Engineer. Office. 
City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Sewer Division. 
George W. Dakin, Division Engineer. Office, 
701 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Water Division. 
Daniel M. Sullivan, Division Engineer. Office, 
607 City Hall Annex. TeL Laf. 5100. 

Water Income Division. 
James A. McMurry, Division Engineer. Office, 
604 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 

REGISTRY DEPARTMENT. 

Office. 1008 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Hilda H. Quirk, Registrar. 

RETIREMENT BOARD. 

Room 66. City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, Chairman. 
J. George Herlihy, Secretary. 
William D. Kenney, Executive Officer. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Office. 15 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 5500. 

Maurice J. Tobin, Chairman. 

Ellen M. Cronin, Secretary. 

Patrick T. Campbell, Superintendent of 

Schools. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, Business Manager. 

SINKING FUNDS DEPARTMENT. 

Room 20, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 510ft. 
Eliot Wadsworth, Chairman. 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 60 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Charles H. Carey, Commissioner. 

STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 76 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Charles J. Fox, Acting Chairman. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Secretary. 

STREET LAYING-OUT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 401 City Hall Annex. Tel. La£. 5100. 
Owen A. Gallagher, Chairman. 
Cornelius A. Reardon, Secretary. 

SUFFOLK, COUNTY OF. 

Offices, Court House, Pemberton square. Tel. 

Capitol 0351. 
William J. Foley, District Attorney. Tel. 

Capitol 9500. 
John A. Keliher, Sheriff. Tel. Capitol 2451. 
W. T. A. Fitzgerald, Register of Deeds. TeL 

Capitol 0519. 
Arthur W. Sullivan. Register of Probate. 

Tel. Capitol 9110. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 801 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Warren W. Loomis, Superintendent. 

TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1 Beacon St., 7th floor. Tel. Capitol 5860. 
Thomas F. Sullivan, Chairman. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Room 21, City Hall. TeL Lafayette 5100. 

John H. Dorsey. Treasurer. 

Arthur F. Swan, Assistant Treasurer. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 105 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
James A. Sweeney, Sealer. 



city of boston printing department 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol. 27. Saturday, Jausttjary 12. 1935. No. 2 

MAYOR MANSFIELD FORECASTS EFFORTS FOR IMPROVING BOSTON'S 
CONDITION AS A CITY IN 1935 — IN ANNUAL ADDRESS TO NEW CITY 
COUNCIL HE REVIEWS PROGRESS OF FIRST YEAR OF HIS ADMIN= 
ISTRATION AND PROMISES TO WORK FOR GREATER PROGRESS IN 
SECOND YEAR — TO CONTINUE IMPROVEMENT OF CITY'S CREDIT 
AND ITS ADMINISTRATIVE MACHINERY, TO COOPERATE IN ALL 
REASONABLE PLANS FOR REDUCING UNEMPLOYMENT AND ADVANC= 
ING NATIONAL RECOVERY — ALSO TO BUILD UP PORT OF BOSTON 
AS WELL AS IMPROVE GENERAL CONDITIONS IN THE CITY — 
METROPOLITAN BOSTON PLAN TO BE STUDIED. 



In his annual address to Boston City Council, January 7, 1935,. Mayor Frederick W. Mansfield spoke as 
follows : 

When I took office as Mayor on January 1, 1934, three great problems confronted me: 

1 . The maintenance and improvement of the credit of the city. 

2. The relief of the unemployed. 

3. The task of striving to make Boston once again a prosperous city and a better one in which to five. 
I am pleased to report that substantial progress has been made. 

I have frequently stressed the vital importance of maintaining the credit of the city. Money must in each 
year be borrowed in anticipation of revenue. If the credit of the city should become impaired or collapse, this 
money could not be borrowed. The necessary result of inability to borrow in anticipation of revenue would be 
that many municipal services demanded by and important to the welfare of the people of Boston would have to be 
curtailed, thousands of city employees would be obliged to work without pay or their discharge from the city's 
service would become imperative; and the city would find itself unable properly to care for the poor, the needy 
and the unemployed. The plight of many cities in the country today bears testimony to the real dangers which 
attend the impairment of municipal credit. 

The borrowing in 1933 of $7,600,000 added $1,800,000 to the city's obligations in 1934 and necessarily contrib- 
uted to an increased tax rate. It was obvious that the city could not continue borrowing on a short term basis; 
that a Federal grant could not be relied on in 1934; that the cost of materials and supplies, due to a rising market, 
would impose greater burdens on the city in 1934 than in 1933; and that further decline in real estate values 
would reduce the base of the city's main source of revenue. 

Situation Grave. 

The situation, therefore, facing the city in the early days of 1934 was grave. 

I was confronted with the necessity of permitting the imposition of an increased tax rate on real estate in 
1934 that would have been out of all bounds, or of borrowing large sums of money as was done in 1933, or of ob- 
taining new sources of revenue, or of cutting expenditures. To permit an increased tax rate on real estate in 
1934 greater than was permitted would, I think, have rendered the tax in large part uncollectible — it would have 
further impaired real estate values and it would have been most unfair to the home owner and would have injured 
the business of the city. To continue borrowing in 1934 on the 1933 scale with no likelihood of finding revenue 
to meet such borrowings would have spelt disaster. The Legislature showed no inclination to furnish new sources 
of revenue. The only recourse left to me, therefore, was that of curtailing expenses. 

It was possible through the retrenchments made in 1934 to cut the gross sum of $2,500,000 from the city's 
operating budget for the year. Many factors, however, not under the control of the Mayor, including decreased 
real estate values, increased cost of purchases due to the rising market, an increase in Boston's debt requirements 
and in its share of the State tax and of the Metropolitan District assessment, made it impossible to keep the tax 
rate down. Were it not, however, for the savings made in the city's operating budget, the tax for 1934 would have 
been nearer $39 than $37, and were it not for these savings and the administrative improvements, the credit of the 
city might have been hopelessly impaired with the disastrous effects heretofore outlined. As it is, Boston's credit 
has unquestionably improved. This improvement is evidenced by the fact that Boston has been able to borrow 
during the year 1934 at an average rate of interest as low as 1.6 per cent on loans in anticipation of taxes as com- 
pared with 4.25 per cent in 1933 and at a rate of interest as low as 3 per cent on long term loans. The improve- 
ments in city administration, such as the control of expenditures and receipts through the new system of budget 
control, and changes in the Public Welfare Department which have been inaugurated during the past year, will be 
of permanent value to the city and its people. 

I wish at this time, however, to discuss with you the problems of 1935 and to lay before you some of my 
plans for the coming year and to present to you fairly and frankly the serious difficulties with which we are now 
confronted. (Continued on pa<j< 



22 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 




"0 Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 
queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship= 

teeming plain of the ocean, 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene, 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotion!" 
From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

Hall. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
■Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 78, 

City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Po3t 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



$2.00 Per Year 
10 Cents 



IN ADVANCE 



STREET AGENCIES. 

Old South News-stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 

A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
January 14, 1935, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of rear 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 



for the storage or sale of merchandise in 
public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasolene, oil, 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To the Boston Traffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To the Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the Water charges 
of the city. 

To the Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Board of Park Commis- x 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue, Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 



charges made for such service. Applica- 
tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Department of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Statistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To the Wire Division of the Fire 
Department, 60 Bristol street, for all in 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of tht, City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 



For the week ending January 5, 1935: 
Population estimated July, 1934, 
United States Census Bureau estimate, 
797,568; number of deaths (stillbirths 
excluded): Residents, 195; nonresidents, 
42; total, 237. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 15.43; nonresidents deducted, 
12.70. 



Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
Last week, 14.38; corresponding week 
last year, 17.26. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 21; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 7; sixty years and over, 113. 
Total deaths: Male, 120; female, 117; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 130; 
deaths of colored, 12. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 


Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 5, 1935. 


Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 6, 1934. 




Cases. 


Deaths. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 




4 

6 

22 

39 

21 

3 

22 


1 

13 
1 

7 


3 

234 

1 
48 
42 
22 

4 

27 




Diphtheria 




Encephalitis Lethargica 






2 


Measles 




Meningitis Epidemic 


1 


Pneumonia (lobar) 


11 


Scarlet Fever 




Tuberculosis (pulmonary) 


9 


Tuberculosis (other forms) 


1 


Typhoid Fever 




Whooping Cough 









: Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



23 



MAYOR MANSFIELD CLARIFIES SITUATION ARISING OVER CHELSEA NORTH 
DRAWBRIDGE — POINTS OUT FALLACIOUS STATEMENTS ISSUED IN PRESS 
IMPUTING TO BOSTON AND THE MAYOR ATTITUDES NOT BASED ON 
FACTS — THESE SHOW STATEMENTS MADE PUBLIC REFLECT NOT ON 
BOSTON AND MAYOR BUT ON CHELSEA AND HER MAYOR — WHICH 
CITY STILL HAS $625 TO APPROPRIATE BEFORE REPAIRS CAN BE 
MADE. 

My attention has just been called to a press item purporting to describe the action taken by the Chelsea 
Board of Aldermen last evening relative to the Chelsea North Drawbridge. Assuming that the story is true, 
I can only say that I am astonished and wholly mystified by the statements made and the action taken. 

For example, it is related that the "Chelsea Board of Aldermen unanimously refused to pay the bill sub- 
mitted by the Boston Mayor to cover our proportionate share of the expenses." I submitted no bill of any 
kind to the Chelsea Board of Aldermen. I have communicated solely with Mayor Quigley and any communication 
which reached the Chelsea Aldermen undoubtedly came from Mayor Quigley. 

This bridge was provided for by an act of the Legislature, and under the terms of that bill the City of 
Boston was to pay 62| per cent of one half of the cost of the bridge, or $84,375, and the City of Chelsea was to 
pay 37§ per cent of one half of the cost, or $50,625, the remaining one half to be paid by the Commonwealth 
out of the Highway Fund. The act further provides that unless the full appropriation is made by each city 
no work is to be done on the repairing of the bridge. 

Boston made its appropriation promptly. The City of Chelsea instead of appropriating the full amount 
of $50,625 did appropriate $50,000, leaving $625 unappropriated. This sum being a small percentage of the whole 
amount involved holds up all work on the bridge because of the provision in. the statute above referred to, and, further, 
because the State Public Utilities Board will refuse to approve of the matter until the entire appropriation is made. 

The press item further refers to a message which I sent to the aldermen and to Mayor Quigley stating that 
unless Chelsea paid its share for the repair work, I would close the bridge next Monday because it was unsafe. 
This statement is wrong in two particulars. I sent no message whatever to the Board of Aldermen. I did send a 
telegram to Mayor Quigley, which has already appeared in the press, and in that telegram I said that Public Works 
Commissioner Carven, upon whose shoulder the responsibility for the safety of the bridge lies, had informed me 
that he (not I) would close the bridge in the interest of public safety if the appropriation was not made. 

The press item further says that President Hanlon said "that Mayor Mansfield had the nerve to ask for the 
$50,625 when Boston owed Chelsea $90,000 on welfare settlements." I can only say that I haven't asked Chelsea 
for any money whatever but have asked Mayor Quigley to try to secure an appropriation of the remaining $625, 
which is holding up the very necessary repair upon this bridge. As to the welfare settlements the Overseers of 
the Public Welfare inform me that Chelsea has billed Boston for $68,000 and that we have counterclaims against 
Chelsea for welfare aid to its citizens in the amount of $79,500. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. /+. 

A trial board, consisting of Captain s 
Campbell, Casey and Daley, having 
heard by reference a complaint made by 
Perley S. Skillings, captain, Division 16, 
against William F. Burke, patrolman, 
Division 16, for alleged violation of Rule 
41 of the Rules and Regulations of the 
Police Department, to wit: 

Charge: Conduct unbecoming an officer. 

Specification: In that on the 11th day 
of December, 1934, the said Patrolman 
William F. Burke, while in uniform and on 
duty, was under the influence of intoxi- 
cating liquor to the extent he was unable 
to perform police duty if called upon so 
to do, — 

has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation : 

"The Board having heard and care- 
fully considered all the evidence as 
presented, accepts the plea of guilty made 
by the said Patrolman William F. Burke. 
The Board has considered the recom- 
mendation of Patrolman Burke's com- 
manding officer, the fact that Burke has 
not previously been before a trial board 
charged with a violation of the rules and 
regulations of the department, his promise 
to take a pledge to abstain from the use 
of intoxicating liquor in the future, and, 
therefore, respectfully recommends that 
the said Patrolman William F Burke be 
suspended from duty for a period of 
thirty days, effective as of December 12, 



1934, at 7.45 o'clock, a. m., and that at 
the expiration of the said period of sus- 
pension the said Patrolman William F. 
Burke be ordered to perform 210 hours of 
punishment duty." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the trial 
board and hereby orders that the said 
Patrolman William F. Burke be suspended 
from duty for a period of thirty days, 
effective as of December 12, 1934, at 
7.45 o'clock, a. m., and that at the expira- 
tion of the said period of suspension the 
said Patrolman William F. Burke perform 
210 hours of punishment duty. 

Civil Service Rule 23, Section 3, 
requires approval of the Civil Service 
Commission before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 
Section 3. With the consent of the 
Commissioner upon good cause shown, 
an appointing officer may reinstate in 
the same position or in a position in the 
same class and grade any person who has 
been separated from the service; provided, 
however, that the Commissioner shall not 
allow reinstatement of a person discharged 
for cause. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 
Commissioner. 

General Order No. 5. 
Sergt. John T. Corcoran of Division 14 
having arrived at the age of sixty-two and 



five-twelfths years, having performed 
faithful service in the Police Department 
for thirty-four and two-twelfths years, and 
having requested to be retired from active 
service, it is hereby 

Ordered, His Honor the Mayor having 
approved the same, that the said Sergt. 
John T. Corcoran be retired from active 
service and that his name be placed upon 
the department pension roll with pay at 
the rate of twelve hundred and fifty 
(1,250) dollars per annum (payable 
monthly), said sum being one half of 
the amount of compensation received by 
him in the office from which he is retired; 
to take effect at 7.45 o'clock a. in., 
AVednesday, January 9, 1935. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 
Commissioner. 



CLAIMS DISAPPROVED. 

The Law Department has disapproved 
thirty-three claims against the City of 
Boston. These claims arc classified as 

follows: 

Fire Department, three claims. 

Park Department, seven claims. 

Hospital Department, three claims. 

Police Department, one claim. 

Public Works Department, seventeen 
claims. 

Department of School Buildings, one 
claim. 

Traffic Department, one claim. 



24 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



ANNUAL ADDRESS OF MAYOR MANSFIELD. 

{Continued from page 21.) 



Reduction of the Tax Rate. 

In 1934 the tax rate in the City of Boston was $37.10. 
This rate is attributable to many factors some of 
which I have already indicated. One factor, how- 
ever, cannot be ignored and that is the amount 
expended for relief of the poor, the needy and the 
unemployed. Expenditures for such relief amounted 
in 1928 to less than S2,900,000. In 1934 these expen- 
ditures exceeded $13, 100,000, an increase of more than 
$10,000,000. This increase represents approximately 
$6 in the tax rate. 

In 1928, relief expenditures constituted less than 
6 per cent of the operating budget of the city (includ- 
ing all school and city requirements except debt, 
pension accumulations and certain special items of an 
insignificant amount). In 1934 relief expenditures 
constituted approximately 35 per cent of the operating 
budget, an increase of almost 500 per cent over 1938. 

The authority conferred upon the Mayor by chap- 
ter 121 of the Acts of 1933 to effect pay cuts terminated 
'on December 31, 1934. On January 1, 1935, full pay, 
therefore, was restored to city employees. Salary 
restorations continued through the year will add to 
the city's burden to the extent of about $5,000,000. 
This represents approximately $3 in the tax rate. 
The East Boston Tunnel deficit may be as great as 
$600,000. If this deficit occurs and the state does 
not assume this burden, it must be borne by the city. 
This deficit will represent about 40 cents additional in 
the tax rate. An increase in the State tax upon 
municipalities has been threatened and an estimate 
made that the increase would amount to $2,500,000, a 
sum representing almost $1.50 in the tax rate. There 
is, therefore, a real danger that new burdens on the 
city will increase the tax rate almost $5. 

A $42 tax rate would not only be grossly unfair to 
home owners, would not only seriously interfere with 
business and, therefore, with employment in the city, 
but it would tend to drive home owners from the city 
and thus further reduce real estate values. More- 
over, it is extremely doubtful that such a tax could 
be collected. It has been the experience in Boston 
and in other cities that there is a limit beyond which 
tax rate increases will not produce added revenue. 
Tax delinquency is a growing menace and while every 
effort must be made to collect outstanding taxes, the 
indications are definite that further increases in 
property taxation are likely to produce less revenue 
rather than more. 

An increase in the tax rate for 1935 must be avoided, 
if it is humanly possible, and every effort must be 
made to decrease the rate. We are, therefore, faced 
with the problem of further curtailing expenditures or 
of obtaining new and substantial sources of revenue. 
In connection with the question of curtailing expenses 
I wish to point out that the operating budget of the 
city, exclusive of welfare expenditures, is now 23 per 
cent less than in 1931. 

The principal items of expenditures in the budget 
are expenditures for salaries and welfare. While there 
are many economies which can and must still be 
practised in city government, yet after such economies 
are put into effect it would require a rigorous curtail- 
ment in either welfare or salary expenditures, or both, 
to prevent an increase at this time in the tax, and a 
much more drastic curtailment to reduce the tax. 



Needy Must be Aided. 

Nothing is clearer, however, than that the poor, the 
needy, and the unemployed must be cared for and 
that we cannot curtail the amount needed for relief, 
unless better conditions operate to relieve the rolls. 
While we hope that conditions will improve, yet we 
cannot plan with any reasonable degree of assurance 
that there will be substantially lessened relief rolls in 
the current year, and the load will undoubtedly be 
heavy for many years to come. National recovery 
will probably be slow, and gradual. Relief expendi- 
tures at the present time exceed those of a year ago at 
this time. 

Curtailment in expenditures for salaries and wages 
can be made in only two ways — suspensions from 
service or reductions in salary. Suspension of suffi- 
cient employees to effect a reduction in the tax rate, 
or even to prevent an increase, would mean the sus- 
pension of thousands of employees at a time when 
every effort is being made by the Federal Government 
to stimulate employment and would require the elimi- 
nation of many services of great benefit to the com- 
munity. Ultimately such action would be most 
costly. 

General reductions in the salaries of city employees 
are, in my opinion, sound only as a last resort, unless 
city employees are being paid a higher salary than the 
work they are performing calls for during the period of 
performance. I do not believe that city employees 
are as a rule paid such excessive salary. If they 
render faithful service, they should not be reduced in 
pay, unless it is impossible for the city to pay them their 
full wage. The times are against such reductions and 
costs of living do not justify it. In 1934 it was im- 
possible to obtain new sources of revenue. Salary 
reductions initiated in April, 1933, were therefore 
necessary in 1934. I trust that conditions which 
made this necessary will not prevail in 1935. 

I do not mean to indicate that reasonable economies 
should not be practised. They must. But without 
drastic curtailments in one way or another of salaries, 
or wholesale suspensions and elimination of important 
municipal services, such economies cannot prevent an 
increased tax rate, unless new sources of revenue can 
be found. I shall, therefore, petition the Legislature 
for relief by providing such new sources of revenue. 

State Must Aid. 

Massachusetts has done little to aid the munici- 
palities to bear the tremendous welfare load cast upon 
them. It is my purpose to ask the Legislature to 
grant to the cities and towns of the Commonwealth a 
sum equal to two thirds of the increase in the welfare 
expenditures of the year 1934 over the expenditures 
of the year 1928, this money to be raised by the Com- 
monwealth by borrowing. That increase amounted 
to $38,000,000. Two thirds of that would be, roughly, 
$25,000,000. 

To meet its loan the Commonwealth must ultimately 
assess the annual payments thereon to the cities and 
towns, unless some other source of payment is provided. 
It is, therefore, essential that new revenue be found 
from which to meet these loans. Such new revenue 
should be sufficient to enable the cities and towns to 
lessen the excessive burden of property taxes which 
must otherwise be imposed by them to meet welfare 
costs in succeeding years, and to retire debts created 
because of welfare needs. An increased income tax 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



25 



alone will not, at least in these times, furnish adequate 
relief, — since under our Constitution it cannot be 
graduated. There is, I believe, only one form of tax 
which would be adequate for present needs and that is 
a tax on retail sales. Such a tax has been enacted and 
is now in effect, in one form or other, in approximately 
one half of the states of the Union. I propose, there- 
fore, to ask the Legislature to follow the precedent 
these states have set and to enact a two per cent retail 
sales tax for a period of five years. This will spread 
the burden of taxation so that it will not be too great 
on anyone. I shall, however, ask for exemptions 
with respect to sales of food, drugs and medicines, 
water delivered in pipes, newspapers, magazines 
selling for 5 cents or less, — and gasolene and liquor 
which are already taxed. I do not believe that in 
these times even a 2 per cent tax should be imposed on 
the sale of food. While these exemptions may create 
some difficulties in administration which would not 
otherwise be present and while they will decrease the 
revenue attainable from what has been estimated to be 
$20,000,000 to approximately $12,000,000 the exemp- 
tions appear justified. To meet the loss in revenue 
thus resulting, but needed, I shall recommend to the 
Legislature an additional income tax upon 1934 and 
1935 incomes of 3 per cent on interest and dividends, 
of three quarters of 1 per cent on annuities and taxable 
earned income and of If per cent on gains from sales 
of securities. The loss of possible revenue resulting 
from the exemption of food will thus be met in the year 
1935 and 1936, when the strain on municipalities will 
probably be greatest, from the revenue which such 
additional income tax will produce. 

A term of two years only will be recommended for 
the additional income tax because of the danger that 
a longer term may induce residents of the state to 
change their domicile to neighboring states where no 
income tax laws are in force or may cause persons to 
invest more heavily than otherwise in tax-exempt 
securities, thus injuring business without increasing 
revenue. I do not believe that a two-year additional 
tax would have this possible effect and there is a 
precedent for such a tax in the years 1918 and 1919. 

If this program is enacted by the Legislature we 
will be enabled not only to avoid an increase in the 
1935 tax rate but we will be able to effect an appre- 
ciable reduction in the present rate of $37.10. With- 
out such assistance our position in 1935 will be far 
more serious than in 1934. 

Consolidation. 

The Legislature at last year's session authorized the 
City Council and the Mayor, acting jointly, to con- 
solidate and reorganize the departments of the city. 
There are at the present time forty-six separate de- 
partments in the city government and 135 department 
heads. Many of these departments perform similar 
functions and yet, because of the multiplicity of de- 
partments, many improvements in one department 
are unknown to others and much of the benefit of the 
experiences of one department is lost to other depart- 
ments performing similar functions. This system is 
antiquated and inadequate. There are ten executive 
departments in Washington; there are twenty in the 
Commonwealth. Many large cities operate with from 
five to fifteen departments. It is obvious that a con- 
solidation of departments is essential for the proper 
and efficient administration of city affairs. 

Shortly after the enactment of legislation authorizing 
such consolidation, a detailed study of the possibilities 
for a plan of consolidation was commenced. President 



Compton of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
at my request, designated a committee headed by 
Colonel Robert C. Eddy, a member of the faculty of 
that institution, to study the engineering departments 
of the city. This study has not yet been completed, 
but I am advised that it will be finished in the near 
future. A committee of eminent members of the 
medical profession headed by Dr. Joseph P. Howland, 
superintendent of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, 
have, at my request, studied the functions of the 
Health, Hospital and Institutions Departments. 

When the various surveys that are under way have 
been completed I will present to the City Council my 
recommendations. It is not my purpose to propose 
consolidation in order to eliminate from the pay roll 
of the city persons now employed by it. No one will 
be discharged from the service because of consolida- 
tion. Consolidation, however, will enable the Mayor 
to have a small and valuable cabinet, will protect 
against waste and duplication of effort, will facilitate 
a more efficient and economical performance of munici- 
pal functions and will enable the taxpayer to get 
more for his money than is possible under our present 
departmental system. 

Housing. 

The Federal Government has definitely commenced 
a program for the clearance of depreciated areas and 
construction thereon of low cost housing. This pro- 
gram has two main values. First, it will, as soon as 
it can get more fully under way, supply substantial 
employment in a field where private enterprise is 
unlikely to take action. It should, therefore, stimu- 
late employment and activity in the building trades 
without competing with private business. Second, if 
properly executed, it will not only reclaim areas which 
are a social handicap to the community, which are 
costly charges upon municipal government, and which 
tend to breed disease and crime, but it will make availa- 
ble to persons of low income decent living conditions 
at low cost. 

A survey of the possibilities for such a program in 
Boston has been made and it is apparent therefrom 
that large amounts can be expended on such work if 
the Federal Government is wiling to undertake it. 
One such project is already being developed in Boston. 

As a part of its housing program, the Federal Gov- 
ernment contemplates that local housing authorities 
be established in each community where housing 
projects are carried on, such housing authority, when 
established, to take over the construction and opera- 
tion of the project with Federal aid. The obligations 
of the authority will not be municipal obligations. 

To cooperate with the Federal Government in its 
program to endeavor to increase opportunities for 
employment and to secure for persons of low income 
in Boston the benefits of such a plan, I propose to 
petition the Legislature to permit the establishment 
in the cities and towns of the Commonwealth of such 
local housing authorities and, if such permission is 
given, to recommend to you the establishment of such 
an authority in Boston. 

Public Works and Work Relief. 

President Roosevelt in his recent message to 
Congress has indicated that the burden of oaring for 
the needy who are unemployable must rest upon the 
local governments, not upon the Federal Government. 

In Boston this burden has always rested upon the 
city and the decision thai it must continue so to rest 
will in no way effect a local change. The President 



26 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



has further indicated that the problem of caring for 
persons who are needy but employable is national in 
scope, that such persons must be cared for by the 
Federal Government, that the care should be in the 
form of work relief rather than the dole and that the 
relief should be conducted through a program of public 
works, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration 
to be abolished. 

The extent to which local governments are to be re- 
quested to contribute to this program has not been 
indicated. 

At the present time there is a program in operation 
in Boston which involves the expenditure of more than 
$7,000,000. The largest part of this program still 
remains to be completed. 

Until Federal plans develop further it is impossible 
to predict either what the Federal Government may 
expect the municipalities to do or what Boston can do. 

It is my purpose, however, to secure for the employ- 
ment of residents of Boston a fair and adequate share 
of all Federal funds granted for relief purposes. 
Through my repeated efforts more than 15,000 Boston 
residents heretofore unemployed are now employed on 
E. R. A. projects and new projects will provide for 
the employment of 7,000 more. So long as the Federal 
Emergency Relief Administration continues to operate 
I shall do all in my power to have formulated, and to 
supply materials, for projects adequate to provide 
work for all persons that the funds provided will employ. 
It is my purpose to see to it that these projects will be 
of real value to the city. 

Port of Boston. 

In 1933 the Supreme Court of the United States by 
a five to four decision determined that a port was not 
a "locality" within the meaning of that term in section 
3 of the Interstate Commerce Act which forbade undue 
preference for and undue discrimination against 
localities. The effect of this decision has been greatly 
to limit the ability of the city and of the Boston Port 
Authority to oppose discriminations against the Port 
of Boston. 

I shall cause to be introduced in Congress within the 
next few days a bill to change the Interstate Commerce 
Act so that ports will be protected. If and when this 
change is made, I shall do all in my power to eliminate 
unfair practices at other ports which practices are in- 
jurious to the Port of Boston. I shall in addition 



•endeavor to upset the control of the New England 
railroads by the Pennsylvania Railroad and shall strive 
to secure local control of New England roads or in the 
event of national consolidation of railroads, a consolida- 
tion that will be favorable to Boston and New England 
to the end that the Port of Boston may become a 
thriving and flourishing port and receive the full benefit 
of its natural advantages. 

County Government. 

Last year I urged upon the Legislature the appoint- 
ment of a recess committee to study county govern- 
ment and to make recommendations with reference 
thereto. This request was denied. A careful study 
of county government in Massachusetts may well 
disclose it to be outworn, expensive and unnecessary 
machinery which should be abandoned. Even if 
retained, many improvements can undoubtedly be 
made. I propose, therefore, to make again this year 
a request for legislative consideration of this matter 
and to give immediate attention to the problem pre- 
sented. 

Metropolitan Boston. 
There are more than forty cities and towns, each 
with separate governments, comprising what is pop- 
ularly known as Greater Boston. The waste and 
inefficiency of so many separate units of government 
in so relatively small a territory is obvious. Yet 
repeated efforts to combine these cities and towns 
into one unit has always met with defeat. 

It is not my desire to attempt to coerce other cities 
and towns into a union with Boston and that such a 
union is desirable has not been established beyond 
doubt. But there are so many considerations in 
favor of such a union and so many indications of 
mutual benefit to Boston and these cities and towns 
that I shall ask the Legislature to appoint a body to 
examine fully into the question and report its con- 
clusions with recommendations, if any, for legislation. 

Summary. 

In substance it is my purpose to continue to improve 
the credit of the city and of its administrative machin- 
ery, to cooperate in all reasonable plans for securing 
employment for the unemployed and national re- 
covery, to build up the Port of Boston, and to improve 
the conditions of our city. 



LAND-TAKING IN EAST BOSTON. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of an extension of Mont- 
morenci avenue, East Boston district, as 
a highway, to Tower street, bounded and 
described as follows: 

An extension of the highway named 
Montmorenci avenue is hereby laid out 
to Tower street and ordered constructed, 
the cost thereof to be charged to Federal 
Funds allocated under the Federal Emer- 
gency Relief Administration program for 
Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive of 
trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, for which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Westerly by another part of Mont- 
morenci avenue, forty feet; northerly by 
the northerly line of said extension of said 



Montmorenci avenue as hereby laid out, 
by two measurements, seven hundred 
forty-eight and 44-100 feet and fifteen 
a,nd 71-100 feet on a curve of ten feet 
radius; easterly by Tower street, sixty 
and 60-100 feet; and southerly by the 
southerly line of said extension of said 
Montmorenci avenue, as hereby laid out, 
by two measurements, fifteen and 71-100 
feet on a curve of ten feet radius and seven 
hundred thirty-nine and 93-100 feet. 



LAND=TAKING IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor has approved the order o* 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Druid street, Dorchester 
district, as a highway, from Gallivan 
Boulevard to Morton street, bounded 
and described as follows: 

A highway named Druid street is 
hereby laid out, from Gallivan Boulevard 
to Morton street, and ordered con- 



structed, the cost thereof to be charged 
to Federal Funds allocated under the 
Federal Emergency Relief Administration 
program for Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows : 

Northerly by Gallivan Boulevard, forty- 
three and 54-100 feet; easterly by the 
easterly line of said Druid street as 
hereby laid out, six hundred fifty-three 
and 22-100 feet; southerly by Morton 
street, fifty-four and 26-100 feet; and 
westerly by the westerly line of said 
Druid street as hereby laid out, six hun- 
dred thirty-three and 76-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Druid street, Dorchester 
district, as a highway, from Gallivan 
Boulevard to Morton street, under the 
order of the Board of January 4, 1935, 
and awards no damages therefor. 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



27 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Police Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering gasolene to the Police De- 
partment. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to 50 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $500, to be filed at 
the office of the Police Commissioner, 154 
Berkeley street, Boston. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 16, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering fuel oil to the Police De- 
partment. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to 50 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of the 
Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at the 
office of the Police Commissioner, 154 
Berkeley street, Boston. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 16, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering lubricating oil to the Police 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 50 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office of 
the Property Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at the 
office of the Police Commissioner, 154 
Berkeley street, Boston. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 16, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for cleansing 
and repairing summer uniforms. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Property Clerk, 
154 Berkeley street, Boston. Bids, ac- 
companied by certified check in the sum of 
$200, to be filed at the office of the 
Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 16, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering tires and tubes to the 
Police Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 50 
per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Property Clerk, 154 
Berkeley street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$100, to be filed at the office of the Police 
Commissioner, 154 Berkeley street, 
Boston. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 16, at 
12 m. 

Public Works Department. 
Advertises for proposals for shoot 
asphalt or bitulithic pavement in Hyde 
Park avenue, Section B, from Cummins 
Highway to Metropolitan avenue. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 



the Public Works Department, Room 
508, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $3,000, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 15, at 12 m. 

Supply Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
metal polish to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $300, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 14, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
lead pipe to the Water Division, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 14, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
engine, machine and cylinder oils to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 25 
per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 15, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
waste and wiping cloths to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the estimated contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 15, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
various kinds of materials to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the estimated contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be tiled at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 16, at 

/..' VI. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
Hash light equipment to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
til' the estimated contract price. Blank 
forms I'm- proposals may be obtained at 
the office of tin- Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall \nnex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 



the sum of $100, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 17, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical and hypodermic needles for the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the estimated contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $100, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 18, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical supplies for the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the estimated contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $300, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 21, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
drugs (medicines of all kinds) to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the estimated contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply De- 
partment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
meats to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $300, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 23, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
fruit and vegetables to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $300, to be tiled at the sam< 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be tiled 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January .J',, a! 
IS »>. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
bay, grain and straw to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
S01, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S'-'OO, to he filed at the same office. 
Duplicate hid, without cheek, to he tiled 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 25, <i/ ij m. 



28 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
butter, eggs, etc., to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 25, at 12 m. 



BUILDINGS RAZED. 

The Mayor has approved the request of 
the Building Department to raze the 
following structures as fire menaces or 
nuisances: 

To vacate the building at 186 West 
Fourth street, Ward 6. 

The building at 186 West Fourth 
street, Ward 6. 

The building at 1586 Hyde Park 
avenue, rear, Ward 18. 

The building at 237 and 239 Silver 
street, Ward 6. 
■* The building at 1586 Hyde Park 
avenue, rear, Ward 18, is in an unsafe 
and dangerous condition and a fire 
menace. The sills are rotted letting the 
building sag. The boards on side walls 
are broken and missing. Boys play on 
the premises and owing to the open con- 
dition of the structure it is a fire menace. 
The owner, Joseph H. Bloom of 180 
Spruce street, Chelsea, has been notified 
of the unsafe condition of the building, 
but nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 186 West Fourth 
street, Ward 6, is in an unsafe and danger- 
ous condition, dilapidated and a fire 
hazard. The owner, Bernard P. Duffy 
Estate, will to Catherine Mahoney, care 
of Charles J. McCarthy, Executor, of 
27 School street, Boston, has been notified 
of the unsafe condition of the building, 
but nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 169 Silver street, 
Ward 6, is in an unsafe and dangerous 
condition, dilapidated, caused by fire, 
and a fire hazard. The owner, Marie A. 
Connolley, Joseph F. Connolley, adminis- 
trator, of 876 East Fourth street, South 
Boston, has been notified of the unsafe 
condition of the building, but nothing 
has been done to remove the cause of 
complaint. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of the Gov- 
ernor's Inaugural Ball and Reception, 
parking of vehicles is prohibited in the 
following streets on January 3, 1935, from 
5 p. m. to 12 o'clock, midnight: 

Arlington Street. 

Both sides, from Columbus avenue 
to Isabella street. 
Columbus Avenue. 

East side, from Arlington street to 
Isabella street. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of drain lay- 
ing, estimated to be three (3) days, ve- 
hicles are excluded from Seneca street, 
between Harrison avenue and Albany 
street, effective January 3, 1935. 



MAYOR MANSFIELD, THROUGH CORPORATION 
COUNSEL HENRY E. FOLEY, ASKS PUBLIC 
UTILITIES COMMISSION TO INVESTIGATE AND 
READJUST BOSTON GAS RATES TO CITIZEN 
CONSUMERS. 



At the hearing held on January 7 before 
the Public Utilities Commission with 
reference to rates of the Boston Consoli- 
dated Gas Company, Corporation Coun- 
sel Henry E. Foley appeared on behalf of 
Mayor Mansfield and demanded that a 
thorough investigation be made by the 
commission of the amounts paid by the 
Boston Consolidated Gas Company to 
its parent company, the Massachusetts 
Gas Companies. 

Mr. Foley stated in part: "After last 
year's Legislature had directed the elimi- 
nation of the 50 cents service charge 
imposed by the Boston Consolidated Gas 
Company, that company frustrated the 
intent of the legislators by adding a charge 
of 50 cents additional on the price for the 
first 100 feet of gas sold to domestic 
consumers, under the guise that without 
such a charge its income would be less 
than a fair return on its investment." 

Mr. Foley further stated that in 
examining into the expenditures of the 
Boston Consolidated Gas Company it 
appeared that practically all gas sold by 



the company was purchased from its 
parent company, the Massachusetts Gas 
Companies; that the relation between 
these companies prevented the Boston 
Company from obtaining a lower price 
of gas than that paid by it; that every 
effort made to ascertain the cost to Massa- 
chusetts Gas Companies of the gas which 
it sold to the Boston Company and the 
profit on such sale was resisted and no 
information in this regard was furnished. 
Decisions of the Supreme Court of the 
United States were cited by Mr. Foley, 
including the recent Chicago case involving 
the Illinois Bell Telephone Company, to 
support the proposition that it was the 
duty of the Public Utilities Commission 
in passing on rates to determine the 
profits made by the Massachusetts Gas 
Companies from its dealings with the 
Boston Company, and to prevent a 
double profit on the sale of gas. Mr. 
Foley pointed out that without such 
investigation by the commission it was 
impossible to prevent the great abuses 
possible from intercompany holdings and 
the pyramiding of profits. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, January 10: 

Assessing Department. 
The following-named temporary clerks 
have been appointed, for a period of ten 
days, at $4 a day: Patrick J. Glennon, 
William F. Connor. 

Election Department. 

The employment of Martin J. Mellyn 
as temporary assistant registrar has 
been extended for a period of 90 days, 
expiring on April 8, at $5 a day. 

Francis J. Tibert and William J. 
Murphy have been granted an extension 
of employment as temporary assistant 
registrars for a period of ninety days, 
expiring on April 12, at $5 a day. 

Hospital Department. 

The following persons have been 
employed at the Boston City Hospital 
for the week ending Thursday, January 
3: 

To Fill Vacancies. 

Permanent. — John P. Frye, ambulance 
driver, $30.60 a week. 

Temporary. — John Anderson, kitchen- 
man, $16.63 a week; John J. Davis, 
sculleryman, $16.63 a week; Thomas 
Gannon, John Bolger, cook's assistants, 
$16.63 a week; John Lawlor, James 
McCarthy, baker's assistants, $16.63 a 
week; Samuel Odiorne, male nurse, 
$27.62 a week; Lawrence Donegan, 
porter, $17.50 a week; William Carey, 
Fred Corbo, Henry Cottle, James Mc- 
Donald, Michael McAuliffe, ambulance 
drivers, $34.50 a week; Marie Schulz, 
clerk, $16 a week. 

The following changes have occurred: 



Flora Kraus, record clerk, name is 
now Flora Bankoff; Pauline Levy, stenog- 
rapher, name is now Pauline Smith. 

South Department. 

Margaret Shea, kitchenwoman, $16.15 
a week; Edward Healey, Charles McLeod, 
kitchenmen, $16.63 a week; Thomas 
O'Brien, ambulance driver, $34.50 a 
week; Ruth Howe, nurse, affiliate, no 
pay. 

Main Department. 

Helen Walsh, nurse, affiliate, $10.26 
a month; Rita C. Flynn, nurse at $11.88 
to $15.84 a month. 

Special Nurses : Mary Bowdering, Leone 
Kirby, Madeline Finnegan, Priscilla Perry, 
Mary B. McAuley, Irene McAllister, Mar- 
garet Brown, Josephine Sullivan, Cather- 
ine Cunningham, Marie Young, Adelaide 
Carroll, Agnes Krishfield, Jean Peppard, 
Stella Polofsky, Laura Dufan, Edna 
Kolus, Mary McDonald, Mary Flynn, 
Alice Carter, Julia Ryan, Sarah McCaigue, 
Esther Pennington, Iris Simioni, Ethel 
Clifford, Tina Ventham, Marie Carlson, 
Rose Pelletier, Jennie Politakis, Francis 
Burdick, Mary Bedard, Agnes Sullivan, 
Priscilla Beckwith, Alice Cosgrove, Edith 
Donohue, Nora Conley, Jane Regan, 
Eleanor Broggi, Flora Hamilton, Ruth 
David, Mary Tiemey, Carolyn Collier, 
Katherine Reynolds, Madeline Younger, 
Florence McMasters, Catherine McDon- 
ald, Mary Sullivan, Gladys Drake, Mary 
Kuss, Marion Shea, Mary Maher, Frances 
O'Connor, Lorinda McAuley, $4.05 a day; 
Florence Johnson, $4.50 a day. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 
Division). 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division, 
subject to the approval of the Mayor, 
for the week ending Thursday, January 3: 

Frances J. Woods, relief supervisor, 
$3.80 a day; Hazel Walsh, nurse (tem- 
porary), $950 a year; Claire Sweeney, 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



29 



nurse (temporary), $1,020 a year; Mary 
Dagle, maid (patient) (temporary), $228 
a year; Henry O'Brien, male nurse 
(patient) (temporary), $456 a year; 
George Hodge, male nurse (patient) (tem- 
porary), $480 a year; Walter Wiggin, 
George Cockinos, maids (patients) (tem- 
porary), $228 a year; Robert Fitzgerald, 
fireman (temporary), $5.88 a day; Ed- 
ward Harrington, assistant engineer (tem- 
porary), $6.37y a day; Mary C. Canny, 
clerk (temporary), $3 a day. - 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed: 

James E. Bovaird, M. D., resident 
medical officer, fourth assistant, $1,080 a 
year; John J. Crowley, interne, $1,080 a 
year; Dorothy Ryan, nurse, $950 a year; 
Thomas O'Leary, choreman (patient), 
$456 a year; Frances Burtonne, maid 
(patient), $228 a year. 

Institutions Department. 
The following change has been made 
in the personnel for the week ending 
Thursday, January 3 : 

Child Welfare Division. 
Appointment: Dorothy L. Stetson, 
stenographer, temporary, $1,000 a year, 
time extended for three months, account 
of changes due to death of Margaret 
Lyons. 

The following changes have been 
made in the personnel for the week 
ending Thursday, January 10: 

Long Island Hospital. 

Appointments: Nora Lavoie, institu- 
tion employee, waitress, $316 a year; 
Paul T. Haran, institution employee, 
attendant, $600 a year, to succeed Joseph 
Coyle; Thomas L. Cody, institution em- 
ployee, attendant, $600 a year, to succeed 
William J. Burke. 

Resignations: Gertrude A. McGrady, 
student nurse, $600 a year, resigned from 
affiliate course at Boston City Hospital; 
Dennis F. Sullivan, institution employee, 
porter, $700 a year, on account of death; 
William J. Burke, institution employee, 
attendant, $600 a year, voluntary. 

Course Completed: Antoinelle S. Pas- 
cucci, student nurse, $600 a year. 

Overseers of Public Welfare. 

Approval has been given to the con- 
tinued temporary employment of the 
following persons as clerks, for a period of 
three months, at $900 a year: 

Robert E. Burns, Anthony J. Bushlow, 
Levon DerHohannesian, Maiy E. Dillon, 
Celia Glaser, Frank X. Grossi, Anne 
Halligan, William J. Keane, Kathryn V. 
Kennealy, Dorothea B. Monaghan, 
Eugene L. McMorrow, Ralph Steuber, 
Rita C. Trainor, Arthur D. Wildes. 

Approval has been given to the con- 
tinued temporary employment of Dorothy 
Greenwald as aid and settlement agent, 
for a period of three months, at $1,000 
a year. 

Approval has been given to the tem- 
porary appointment of the following per- 
sons as clerks, for a period of three months, 
at $900 a year: Pauline Costal, George 
W. Stuart. 

Approval has been given to the con- 
tinued temporary employment of the 
following persons as stenographers, for 
a period of three months, at $900 a year: 

Grace Badessa, Anna J. Crotty, Ger- 
trude E. Doherty, Sadye E. Feingold, 
Camilla C. Gibbons, Marguerite Rooney. 

Approval has been given to the tem- 
porary appointment of the following per- 



sons as clerks, for a period of three months 
from January 2, at $900 a year. 

Marion Coppock, Patrick L. Hurley, 
Margaret E. Leahy, Blanche J. Long, 
William V. McCarthy, Hazel L. McCoy, 
Edward T. Quinn, Helen G. Skapinsky, 
Leo F. Smith. 

Approval has been given to the perma- 
nent appointment of Kathleen P. Ballem as 
clerk at $1,000 a year, effective January 2. 

Approval has been given to the perma- 
nent-intermittent appointment of the 
following persons as stenographers at 
$1,000 a year: Grace C. Cunningham, 
Faith M. Fraser. 

Approval has been given to the perma- 
nent-intermittent appointment of Vernon 
I. Wides as bookkeeper at $1,000 year, 
effective January 2. 

Approval has been given to the rein- 
statement of Jeremiah J. Downey as 
temporary aid and settlement agent, 
effective January 2. 

Alma Schwartz, permanent visitor, is 
resuming her maiden name of Alma 
Robbins. 

Approval has been given to the per- 
manent appointment of Rose W. West 
as clerk at $1,000 a year, effective Jan- 
uary 4. 

Approval has been given to the per- 
manent-intermittent appointment of the 
following persons as stenographers at 
$1,000 a year, effective January 4: Anna 
T. Hannon, Marion E. Keating. 

Catherine A. Sheehan has recently 
married and her name should now appear 
as Catherine A. Pentoney. 

Approval has been given for the tempo- 
rary employment of the following social 
workers, for a period of three months 
beginning January 7, at $1,000 a year: 
Helen W. Coates and Antonette Marto. 

Approval has been given for the 
permanent-intermittent appointment of 
Mary B. Kenney as stenographer at 
$1,000 a year, effective January 4. 

Approval has been given for the 
permanent appointment of the following 
person as clerk at $1,000 a year, effective 
January 7: Mary J. Sullivan. 

Approval has been given for the 
permanent-intermittent appointment of 
Mary A. McCarthy as stenographer at 
$1,000 a year, effective January 7. 

Approval has been given for the 
provisional temporary appointment of 
Josephine Sullivan as aid and settlement 
agent, effective December 21, 1934, for a 
period of three months. 

Approval has been given for the 
temporary employment of the following 
persons as clerks, for a period of three 
months from January 7, at $900 a year: 
Harry B. Chase, Joseph Hartman. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons as aid and 
settlement agents, for a period of three 
months, at $1,000 a year: 

Helen Gleason, Edward H. Healey, 
William L. Kelley, Joseph Leonard, 
John P. Mungovan, Daniel J. McCarthy, 
Mary Robbins, Mary Roche, Agnes C. 
Towle, William S. Gushee. 

Park Department. 

Approval has been given for the exten- 
sion of the temporary employment of the 
following employees: 

Mary A. Herbert, temporary matron, 
for a period of six months from January 
5, at $22 a week; Laurence A. Hughes, 
temporary chauffeur, for a period of tun 
months from January 5, at $30 a week; 
Frank J. Mullen, temporary engineer, 
for a period of three months from ,tan- 
uary 5, at $25 a week; Frank Pettiti, 



temporary checker, for a period of two 
months from January 5, at $30 a week. 

Public Works Department (Ferry 
Service). 

Approval has been given to reappoint 
the following, now temporary in the 
Sumner Tunnel, as electrical engineering 
inspectors at the following specified salaries 
for a period of three months from Jan- 
uary 4: 

Lester D. Singleton, $2,700 a year; 
Albert L. O'Bannion, Harry Kiernan, 
James H. Sunton, Edward P. Shannon, 
Malcolm P. McLellan, $2,100 a year. 

Public Works Department (Sanitary 
Service.) 
John M. Fogarty of 26 Winslow street, 
Roxbuiy, formerly employed as teamster- 
chauffeur at $5 a day in the Sanitary 
Division, and who voluntarily resigned 
his position on April 6, 1934, has been 
reinstated as teamster-chauffeur at S5 a 
day, to fill the vacancy, effective 
January 4. 

Treasury Department. 

Permission has been given for the tem- 
porary appointment of Louis F. Lambert, 
for sixty days from January 2, at $18 a 
week. 

Approval has been given for the employ- 
ment of temporary typists and clerks in 
the Treasury Department during the year 
1935. Payment of bills on the monthly 
draft necessitates the intermittent employ- 
ment of these typists and clerks. 

Clerk of Probation Office. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
request from the office of the Municipal 
Court, Roxbury District: 

Boston, December 24, 1934. 
Mr. Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 

Dear Sir, — Mr. Aubrey E. Cox of 
15 Johnson street, West Roxbur3 r , has 
been a temporary clerk in the Probation 
Office of this court for nearly two years. 
During this time he has acted as assistant 
cashier and auditor, as well as performing 
other routine work of the office. His 
services have been very satisfactory and 
there is a great need that his status be 
made permanent. 

With your approval, I will appoint him 
a permanent clerk in the Probation Office, 
effective January 1, 1935. 

In view of the special fitness of this 
young man for the work to which he is 
assigned, and his satisfactory performance 
of the same, I would recommend that his 
rate of compensation be fixed at other 
than the lowest, rate for his class, as estab- 
lished by the compensation and classifica- 
tion plans for employees of Suffolk County, 
and would suggest $1,200 yearly as his 
entrance salary. 

Very truly yours, 
Albert F. Hayben, 
Standing Justice. 

Overtime Allowed. 
The heads of the various departments 
whose employees have received payment 
for overtime state in connection there- 
with that if any laborer has been allowed 
to work more than eight hours per day 
it has been only in ease of emergency 
under the law. 

Public Works Dcpnrttncnt {Bridge 
Serv 

For the week ending Tuesday. Janu- 
ary S: 

J. D. O'Brien, subforeman, 2 days. 
S13.33; J. J. Graham, subforeman, 1 day, 



30 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



S6.66; J. T. Mahan, A. W. Clancy, M. J. 
Donohoe, carpenters, 2 days, $12 each; 
J. J. Murphy, carpenter, 1 day, S6; J. J. 
Gately, P. Maguire, carpenter, 2 days, 
S12; C. E. Melanson, E. Hayes, car- 
penters, 1 day, S6 each; P. J. Jacobs, 
carpenter, 2 days, S12; J. A. McKenna, 
carpenter, 1 day, S6; J. Delore}', M. J. 
Landrigan, painters, 1 day, $6 each; P. 
R. Tully, chauffeur, 2 days, S10.50. To- 
tal, S138.48. Net cost to city, §138.48. 
Reasons for the foregoing: Snow re- 
moval and sanding dry bridges. 

Public Works Department {Paving Service). 

For the week ending Thursday, Jan- 
uarj' 3: 

Michael Costello, laborer, If days, 
§7.88; Harold J. Grant, George Huber, 
laborers, 1 day, §4.50 each; William P. 
Sheehan, laborer, lj days, §7.88; H. 
Furey, teamster, 1 day, §4.50; J. Mc- 
Carthy, laborer, 1 day, §4.50; J. J. Walsh, 
J. McGough, chauffeur-laborers, 1 day, 
§4.50 each; J. J. Barry, laborer, 1 day, 
§4.50; T. Lydon, chauffeur-laborer, 1 day, 
§4.68; John J. Ward, chauffeur, 1 day, 
§4.68; Martin Connelly, laborer, 2f days, 
§12.93; John Meehan, laborer, 3| days, 
V S15.18; William Riley, laborer, 1 day, 
§4.50; John McGillen, Michael Carney, 
laborers, If days, §8.43 each; Mark A. 
Foley, chauffeur, 1| days, §8.77; John 
Carney, Thomas J. Conlon, Charles 
Sheehan, Joseph Yitelli, laborers, § day, 
§2.25 each; Thomas J. Hanely, chauffeur, 
| day, S2.25; James Hooley, chauffeur- 
laborer, 2 days, §9.36; Edward Murdock, 
chauffeur-laborer, \ day, §2.34; Frederick 
Hohm, chauffeur-laborer, \\ days, S6.75; 
James Maloney, Frederick McCarthy, 
laborers, 2 days, §9 each; James Horgan, 
laborer, l\ days, §6.75; Michael Scanlan, 
laborer, \ day, §2.25; Michael Kelley, 
laborer, \\ days, §6.75; Edward Leslie, 
chauffeur-laborer, 2 days, §9; Charles 
Doherty, laborer, 2 days, §9; W. Brottie, 
laborer, \\ days, $6.75; J. Brooks, chauf- 
feur, \\ days, §7.02; Eugene Sullivan, 
laborer, 1 day, S4.50; H. Brennan, chauf- 
feur, 1 day, §4.68; N. Huber, T. Berrane, 
laborers, 1 day, §4.50 each; Eugene 
O'Keefe, chauffeur, 2f days, §12.37; James 
Dowdall, Edward Monahan, laborers, f 
days, §3.94 each; Thomas McLaughlin, 
laborer, If days, §6.19; William Gleavey, 
laborer, f day, §3.37; James W. O'Brien, 
Thomas Cashman, chauffeur-laborers, 2f 
days, §9.56 each; E. C. Putnam, M. Mc- 
Gough, chauffeur-laborers, 2-j, days, §11.70 
each; M. Carroll, B. Corcoran, S. Hughes, 
laborers, 2f days, §9.56 each; A. J. Burke, 
First, laborer, If days, §7.31; John 
McGavin, chauffeur-laborer, 2f days, 
§12.81; Patrick Connors, laborer, \ day, 
§2.25; Patrick Joyce, Charles Abramson, 
laborers, 2\ days, §9.56 each; Albert Day, 
chauffeur, 1£ days, §7.02; William Jeffers, 
Thomas King, William G. McGee, Roger 
O'Connor, chauffeurs, f day, §3.51 each; 
M. J. Maguire, laborer, li days, §6.75; 
William Curran, James Craig, E. V. 
Cunningham, A. Deamore, Thomas Mc- 
Donough, Richard McGrath, laborers, 
f day, §3.38 each; Thomas Whalen, 
laborer, lj days, §6.75; William Smith, 
Nate Harris, laborers, f day, §3.38 each; 
Frank Englert, mechanic, 1 day, §5.10; 
Thomas Byron, John Blake, chauffeurs, 
lj days, §5.85 each; Joel Shapiro, Frank 
Nicolette, Nathan Goldstein, chauffeurs, 
l\ days, §5.63 each; Bernard Flynn, Mark 
Gilmartin, John Connors, Martin Mitch- 
ell, Joseph Yout, laborers, 1£ days, §5.63 
each; Thomas McDonough, Raymond 
Chamberlain, laborers, 5 day, §2.25 each; 
E. Ryan, T. Iverson, chauffeur-laborers, 
1 day, §4.68 each; J. Cavanaugh, chauf- 



feur-laborer, li days, §6.75; J. Crowley, 
T. Lynch, J. Flaherty, M. Pulsoni, W. 
Blivens, laborers, 1 day, §4.50 each; P. 
Boretti, laborer, 1| days, §6.75. Total, 
§544.06. 

Reasons: Sanding streets, December 22 
to 29, 1934. 

Public Works Department (Sanitary-C 
Service) . 

For the week ending Thursday, January 
3: 

H. Barry, C. Sullivan, chauffeurs, 
f day, §2~93 each; T. Langdon, E. 
McLaughlin, chauffeurs, 5 day, §2.31 
each; H. Bently, laborer, f day, §2.83; 
J. Monohan, E. Noonan, F. Kelley, 
W. Eastman, J. Jones, laborers, i day, 
§2,25 each; W. Earley, chauffeur, 2 days, 
§9.24; J. McLean, laborer, If days, §6.18; 
B. Murphy, laborer, 2 days, §9; J. 
Reardon, chauffeur, 5 day, §2.31 ; J. Carey, 
laborer, 2 days, §9; J. Carr, T. Christo- 
pher, J. Daley, laborers-, If days, §6.18 
each; J. Hanley, laborer, 1| days, §6.75 
R. Jennings, chauffeur, 2 days, §9.36; 
B. Maraghy, laborer, If days, §6.18; 
M. Norton, laborer, i day, §2.25; 

F. Walsh, laborer, 2 days, §9; J. Gately, 
chauffeur, 2 days, §9.24; J. Madden, 
laborer, 2 days, §9; J. Glasheen, chauffeur, 
2 days, §9.24; W. Courtney, M. Coakley, 

G. Golden, chauffeurs, 1 day, §4.68 each; 
J. Harnett, laborer, f day, §1.75. Total, 
§155.64. 

To be charged to Snow Removal 
appropriation. 

Public Works Department (Sanitary-S 
Service). 

For the week ending Thursday, Jan- 
uary 3: 

M. Kaezka, chauffeur, 1 day, §5.50; 
J. "V. Ross, G. F. Smith, chauffeurs, f 
day, §4.81 each; J. Fulford, chauffeur, 
f day, §4.13; L. J. O'Neill, chauffeur, 1 
day, §5.50; A. F. Beahn, J. J. Connors, 
chauffeurs, 1 day, §5.25 each; J. D. Fer- 
guson, chauffeur, 1 day, §5; J. Carroll, 
J. J. Clancy, P. J. Connelly, P. J. Loftus, 
J. McKenzie, teamster-laborers, 1 day, 
§5 each; R. L. Cass, Max Levine, Wil- 
liam White, J. McDonald, teamster- 
chauffeurs, 1 day, §5.50 each; L. V. Kil- 
duff, teamster-chauffeur, 1 day, §5.25; 
R. F. Booth, teamster-chauffeur, 1 day, 
§5; A. P. Charbonner, J. Charbonner, 
H. Collett, Ed. Davis, T. W. Gallagher, 
J. L. Gould, P. W. Sheehan, D. Kelley, 
teamster-laborers, 1 day, §5 each; Michael 
Roche, horseshoer, 1 day, §16; George 
Brookfield, Thomas F. Conlon, W. H. 
Haugh, M. Herrity, J. Hohn, T. B. 
Kelley, J. P. Kolf, W. J. Lyons, G. J. 
Mitsiaris, T. Murphy, J. H. McDonald, 
Henry McFadden, M. F. McGinley, P. 
McKinnon, Redmond Watson, teamster- 
chauffeurs, 1 day, §5.50 each; H. Ber- 
tocchi, S. J. Doherty, D. Dolan, teamster- 
chauffeurs, 1 day, §5.25 each; G. M. 
Freeman, teamster-chauffeur, 1 day, §5.50; 
John Ryan, Patrick Ryan, teamster- 
chauffeurs, 1 day, §5.25 each; Alfred 
Buckley, W. Cadigan, Edward R. Casey, 
Dennis Collins, J. W. Costello, James 
Donaghue, J. A. Donovan, John Handren, 
Christopher King, Ed. Knight, Bernard 
Manning, John A. Mullen, John Shine, 
T. J. Twomey, teamster-laborers, 1 day, 
§5 each; J. McNutt, teamster-chauffeur, 
1 day, §5.50; W. Cassell, feeder, § day, 
§2.50; J. J. Bellew, teamster-chauffeur, 
-| day, §2.75; J. Considine, teamster- 
chauffeur, f day, §4.81; M. T. Cotter, 
T. Killion, teamster-chauffeurs, J day, 
§2.75 each; W. McNulty, teamster- 
chauffeur, 1 day, §5.50; J. Repucci, 
teamster-chauffeur, J day, §2.75; T. 



Watson, teamster-chauffeur, f day, §4.81; 
M. Picco, teamster-chauffeur, i day, 
§2.62; J. Cassidy, teamster-chauffeur, 
2 day, §2.50; W. J. Kinsman, teamster- 
chauffeur, 1 day, §5; W. C. Mackie, 
teamster-chauffeur, J| day, §4.69; J. 
McKenna, teamster-chauffeur, i day, 
§2.50; H. Applcbaum, F. Cassidy, J. 
Climo, teamster-laborers, \ day, §2.50 
each; T. Dargin, teamster-laborer, 1 day, 
§5; J. Dargon, teamster-laborer, \ day, 
§2.50; E. L. Duffv, teamster-laborer, \% 
day, §4.69; W. C. Gardner, J. J. Gorman, 
P. Hession, L. Keegan, teamster-laborers, 
h day, §2.50 each; William E. Leary, 
teamster-laborer, f day, §4.37; A. Luper, 
teamster-laborer, 1 day, §5; J. A. McMen- 
imen, teamster-laborer, f day, §3.12; 
M. J. Ridge, teamster-laborer, \ day, 
§2.50; W. J. Rogers, teamster-laborer, 
f day, §3.12; J. F. Sullivan, W. F. Car- 
mody, teamster-laborers, \ day, §2.50 
each; J. J. Lavin, blacksmith, 1 day, §6; 
J. J. Best, R. H. Brown, teamster- 
chauffeurs, f day, §4.81 each; B. Clem- 
ents, P. Cunningham, P. Napoletano, 
teamster-chauffeuis, 1 day, §5.50 each; 
A. B. Nuzzo, teamster-chauffeur, f day, 
§4.13; C. Melendy, stableman, 1 day, §5; 
C. Capillo, J. Collins, T. Dwver, W. Green, 
R. E. Griffin, A. J. McDonald, D. F. 
McLaughlin, teamster-laborers, 1 &&y, 
§5 each; A. Rogers, vard laborer, 1 da}', 
§5; G. P. Heath, laborer, 1 day', §5; J. 
Keohane, teamster-laborer, 1 day, §5; 
T. F. Hunt, chauffeur, 1 day, §5.50. 
Total, §528.73. 

To be charged to snow removal 
appropriation. 

Public Works Department {Sewer 

Service). 
For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ary 3: 

Edward Borgusch, James Giblin, sewer 
cleaners, 11 days, $9.75 each; Dana Cur- 
rier, chauffeur, If days, §8.53; Louis 
Brunetto, laborer, ll days, $8.13; Joseph 
Farettro, Thomas Duffy, sewer cleaner, 
1 day, §6 each ; Louis Paglia, sewer 
cleaner, 1 day, §5 ; Charles Caffrey, chauf- 
feur, 1 day, §5.50. Total, §58.66. 

Removing snow from manholes and 
catch-basins at Boylston and Providence 
streets, January 1. Removing snow from 
catch-basins at Dover and Washington 
streets, January 1. 

Public Works Department (Sumner 
Traffic Tunnel). 

For the week ending Tuesday, Jan- 
uary 8: 

D. J. Galvin, chauffeur, 1 day, S5.25; 
Net cost to city, $5.25. 

Reasons for the foregoing: Snow re- 
moval. 

P. W. A. Projects {Public Works 
Department). 

In accordance with P. W. A. rules and 
regulations in connection with various 
projects under construction, permission 
has been given for the approval of 
overtime of various employees working 
on said projects and payment of all 
hours over forty hours per week being 
termed as overtime by the P. W. A. 
officials. Said overtime covers various 
days between July 1 and December 6, 
1934: 

Charles N. Ryan, cement tester, 
§164.70; Norman MacCuspie, assistant 
cement and pipe tester, §124.20; Frank 
T. Sullivan, blueprinter, §131.94; Jean 
L. E. Baril, draftsman, §1.18. Total, 
$422.02. 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



31 



THE OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE, CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE WEEK 
ENDING DECEMBER 29, 1934. 





Dependent 
Aid. 


Mothers' 
Aid. 


Old Age 

Assistance. 


Administrative. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Total. 




24,991 

517 

66 

25,442 

24,714 


1.447 

6 

3 

1,450 

1,483 


3,794 

58 

16 

3,8.36 

3,738 






30,232 


last week. 






581 








85 


tinued.* 






30,728 


this week. 






29,935 











Financial. 



Expended during week. . 

Last week 

Same week last year .... 

Appropriations 

Expended to date 

Unexpended balance .... 

Appropriations unex- 
pended. 



5185,674 50 
182,671 50 
177,177 00 



$21,887 00 


$24,428 00 


$11,192 41 


21,623 4)0 


24,040 00 


11,304 03 


21,662 00 


24,254 00 


9,162 25 


,400.000 00 




476,007 00 


,372,426 64 




474,649 83 


27,573 36 




1,357 17 


27.573 36 




1,357 17 







$105,987 50 
80,172 10 
25,815 40 
25,815 40 



$243,181 91 

239,638 53 

232,255 25 

12,981,994 50 

12,927,248 57 

54,745 93 

54,745 93 



* Applicants who would ordinarily be paid on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday were paid two weeks' 
money during the week December 17 to 22. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Supply Department. 
Upon January 7 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Martin L. Hall Company 
and the Dalco Distributing Company 
for six months' supply (January 1, 1935, 
to June 30, 1935) of tea for the various 
city institutions. The samples submitted 
were tested by a tea expert and his report 
is as follows: 

900 Pounds Formosa Oolong. 
The best value, based on price and 
quality, is offered by the Martin L. Hall 
Company at a price of 19| cents per 
pound. Total value approximately 
$175.50. 

9,300 Pounds Ceylon Pekoe. 

The best value, price and quality con- 
sidered, is offered by the Dalco Distribut- 
ing Company at a price of 28' cents per 
pound. Total value approximately 
$2,673.75. 

Bids, opened December 26, 1934, were 
as follows: 

Approximate Amounts. 

900 Pounds Formosa Oolong, in Bulk, 
Original Packages. Per Pound. — Web- 
ster-Thomas Company, 23.5 cents; Stand- 
ard Brands, Incorporated, 18.65 cents; 
W. S. Quimby Company, 25.20 cents; 
Rival Foods, Incorporated, 24 cents; 
Berry, Dodge Company, 22.75 cents; 
Martin L. Hall Company, 19.5 cents.* 

9,300 Pounds Ceylon Pekoe, Original 
Packages, Garden Pack and Garden Marks 
to be Used, Per Pound. — Webster- 
Thomas Company, 30.4 cents in auditor's 
copy, 28.4 cents; Standard Brands, In- 
corporated, 29.5 cents; W. S. Quimby 
Company, 31.30 cents; Rival Foods, 
Incorporated, 34 cents; A. J. Powers, 29 
cents; Dalco Distributing Company, 



28.75 cents*; Berry, Dodge Company, 
27.25 cents; Martin L. Hall Company, 
30 cents. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — Webster- 
Thomas Company, 1 per cent; W. S. 
Quimby Company, 2 per cent in auditor's 
copy; Rival Foods, Incorporated, 3 per 
cent; A. J. Powers, 3 per cent; Dalco 
Distributing Company, 1 per cent; Berry, 
Dodge Company, 1 per cent; Martin L. 
Hall Company, 2 per cent. 

Upon January 7 the Mayor approved a 
contract with Lalime & Partridge, In- 
corporated, for five Standard Commercial 
Pick-Up Ford cars with closed cabs for 
the Fire Department, at a price of 
$2,666.85 for the five cars less an allow- 
ance of $414 for the old cars to be traded 
in, making a net total price of $2,252.85. 

Bids, opened December 27, 1934, were 
as follows : 

Five Standard Commercial Pick-Up Ford 
Cars With Closed Cabs, New 1935 Type, 
Fully Equipped With Five Wheels, Spare 
Tires and Tubes. Painted Fire Depart- 
ment Red, Lettered and Striped as per 
Boston Fire Department Standard, Each. — 
Bowers Motor Sales, $545.60; Hayward 
Motors, Incorporated, $539.80; Reardon 
& Woodward, Incorporated, $544. 9S6; 
Stilphen Motor Company, $542.10; Pres- 
cott Motor Company, $521; Lalime & 
Partridge, Incorporated, $533.37.* 

Total.— Bowers Motor Sales, $2,728; 
Hayward Motors, [ncorporated, $2,699; 
Reardon it Woodward, Incorporated, 
$2,724.93; Stilphen Motor Company, 
$2,710.50; Prescott Motor Company, 
$2,605; Lalime iV Partridge, [ncorporated, 
$2,666.85.* 

Less Allowance On. 

No. 43S Ford Car. 1929, for Main- 
tenance Division, Each. Bowers Motoi 
Sales, $30; Hayward Motors, Incor- 
porated, $70; ReaxdOD & Woodward. 
Incorporated, $70; Stilphen Motor Com- 
pany, $70; Prescott Motor Company, 
$35; Lalime & Partridge, Incorporated, 
$70.* 



No. 440 Ford Car, 1929, for Main- 
tenance Division, Each. — Bowers Motor 
Sales, $30; Hayward Motors, Incor- 
porated, $70; Reardon & Woodward. 
Incorporated, $70; Stilphen Motor Com- 
pany, $70; Prescott' Motor Company, 
$35; Lalime & Partridge, Incorporated, 
$70.* 

No. 436 Ford, 1929, for Fire Alarm 
Division, Each. — Bowers Motor Sales, 
$30; Hayward Motors, Incorporated, $70; 
Reardon & Woodward, Incorporated, $70; 
Stilphen Motor Company, $70; Prescott 
Motor Company, $35; Lalime & Par- 
tridge, Incorporated, $70.* 

No. 443 Ford, 1930, for Fire Alarm 
Division, Each. — Bowers Motor Sales, 
$50; Hayward Motors, Incorporated, 
$102; Reardon & Woodward, Incor- 
porated, $102; Stilphen Motor Company, 
$102; Prescott Motor Company, $50; 
Lalime & Partridge, Incorporated, $102.* 

No. 444 Ford, 1930, for Fire Alarm 
Division, Each. — Bowers Motor Sales, 
$50; Hayward Motors, Incorporated, 
$102; Reardon & Woodward, Incorpo- 
rated, $102; Stilphen Motor Company, 
$102; Prescott Motor Company, $50; 
Lalime & Partridge, Incorporated, $102.* 

Total Allowance. — Bowers Motor Sales, 
$190; Hayward Motors, Incorporated, 
$414; Reardon & Woodward, Incorpo- 
rated, $414; Stilphen Motor Company, 
$414; Prescott Motor Company, $205; 
Lalime & Partridge, Incorporated, $414.* 

Net Total— Bowers Motor Sales, $2,538; 
Hayward Motors, Incorporated, $2,285; 
Reardon & Woodward, Incorporated, 
$2,310.93; Stilphen Motor Company, 
$2,296.50; Prescott Motor Company, 
$2,400; Lalime & Partridge, Incorporated, 
$2,252.85.* 

♦Contract awarded. 

Upon January 7 the Mayor approved a 
contract with bidders, as indicated, for shoe 
shop materials for Deer Island, Penal 
Institutions Department. Five proposals 
were received, although all bidders did not 
bid on all items, with approval of awards 
of items checked on the lowest acceptable 
materials, as indicated on list attached. 
Total approximate awards will then be as 
follows: 

Atlantic Leather Corporation, $1,091; 
Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings 
Company, $120.75; Samuel Zoll Company. 
$2,315.70; Samuel Lebow Company, 
$66.50— $3,593.95. 

Bids, opened December 17, were as 
follows : 

40 Dozen Black Elk Skins, I', r Dozen. — 
Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings 
Company, $33.60, approximately 240 
feet; Samuel Zoll Company, 17 cent- a 
foot, approximately 220 feet to dozen*; 
Samuel Lebow Company. 20 cents a foot; 
Washington Tanning Company, 19 cents 
a foot. 

26 Dozen Black Slurp Skins. Per 
Dozen. — Gordon Leather and Shoe Find- 
ings Company, $9, approximately 10<> 
feet; Samuel Zoll Company, 9.5 cents a 
foot, approximately 90 feet to dozen*; 
Samuel l.ebow Company, 13 cents a foot. 

/.) Dozen Black Cabrella Skins, Per 
Dozen. Gordon Leather and Shoe find- 
ings Company. S14.50, approximately 100 
feet; Samuel Zoll Company, 17 cents a 
foot, approximately 85 feet to dozen*: 
Samuel Lebow Company, 20 cents a foot. 
\00 Pairs Inner Soles, S : V No. 6 
Iron, Xo. ■: Grade, Per Pair. Atlantic 
Leather Corporation, A. 18 cents. B, 16 
cents. ('. II cents; Cordon Leather and 
Shoe Findings Company, 13 cents; 
Samuel Zoll Company, 10.75 cents*; 
Samuel Lebow Company, 17 cents. 



32 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



800 Pairs Inner Soles, Size 11, No. 6 
Iron, No. 3 Grade, Per Pair. — Atlantic 
Leather Corporation, A, 19 cents, B, 17 
cents, C, 12 cents; Gordon Leather and 
Shoe Findings Company, 13 cents; 
Samuel Zoll Company, 10.75 cents*; 
Samuel Lebow Company, 17 cents. 

1,000 Pairs Inner Soles, Size 1,1, 
No. 6 Iron, No. 3 Grade, Per Pair. — 
Atlantic Leather Corporation, A, 20 
cents, B, 18 cents, C, 13 cents; Gordon 
Leather and Shoe Findings Company, 13 
cents; Samuel Zoll Company, 10.75 cents*; 
Samuel Lebow Company, 17 cents. 

Pairs Small Molded Counters, Per 
Pair. — Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings 
Company, 5.5 cents*; Samuel Zoll Com- 
pany, 6.5 cents; Samuel Lebow Company, 
6.5 cents. 

500 Pairs Small Flat Counters, Per 
Pair. — Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings 
Company, 7 cents; Samuel Zoll Company, 
6.5 cents; Samuel Lebow Company, 
6.5 cents.* 

250 Pairs Medium Flat Counters, Pet- 
Pair. — Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings 
Company, 7 cents; Samuel Zoll Company, 
6.5 cents; Samuel Lebow Company, 

6 cents.* 

1,000 Shoe Cartons, Large Size, Per M.— 
Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings Com- 
pany, $35*; Samuel Lebow Company, 
S38.50. 

500 Pairs Small Steel Shanks, Per Pair. 
— Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings 
Company, 2 cents; Samuel Zoll Company, 
1.5 cents*; Samuel Lebow Company, 
3 cents. 

1,500 Pairs Medium Steel Shanks, Per 
Pair. — Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings 
Company, 2 cents; Samuel Zoll Company, 
1.5 cents*; Samuel Lebow Company, 
3 cents. 

1,000 Pairs Large Steel Shanks, Per 
Pair. — Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings 
Company, 2 cents; Samuel Zoll Company, 
1.5 cents*; Samuel Lebrow Company, 

200 Pairs 8-Hole Heels, Size 15, Per 
Pair. — Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings 
Company, 6 cents*; Samuel Zoll Com- 
pany, 6.5 cents; Samuel Lebow Company, 

7 cents. 

500 Pairs 8-Hole Heels, Size 17, Per 
Pair. — Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings 
Company, 6 cents*; Samuel Zoll Com- 
pany, 6.5 cents; Samuel Lebow Company, 
7 cents. 

500 Pairs 8-Hole Heels, Size 18, Per 
Pair. — Gordon Leather and Shoe Find- 
ings Company, 6 cents*; Samuel Zoll 
Company, 6.5 cents; Samuel Lebow 
Company, 7 cents. 

100 Pounds 8/8 Rubber Heel Nails, Per 
Pound. — Gordon Leather and Shoe Find- 
ings Company, 10 cents; Samuel Zoll 
Company, 7.5 cents*; Samuel Lebow 
Company, 14 cents. 

100 Pounds One and One Quarter 
Ounce Machine Tacks, Per Pound. — 
Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings Com- 
pany, 22 cents; Samuel Zoll Company, 
19 cents; Samuel Lebow Company, 19 
cents.* 

25 Pounds 3/8 Loose A T ails, Per Pound. 
— Gordon Leather and Shoe Findings 
Company, 18 cents; Samuel Zoll Com- 
pany, 17 cents.* 

100 Pounds 3 Ounce Hand Tacks, Per 
Pound. — Gordon Leather and Shoe Find- 
ings Company, 14 cents; Samuel Zoll 
Company, 12.5 cents*; Samuel Lebow 
Company, 17 cents. 

1,000 Pairs Beckmth, or Equal, Box 
Toe, Sizes 8, 9, Per Pair. — Gordon Leather 
and Shoe Findings Company, 3 cents; 
Samuel Zoll Company, 1.31 cents.* 
• 500 Pairs Beck with, or Equal, Box Toe, 
Sizes 9, 10, Per Pair. — Gordon Leather 



and Shoe Findings Company, 3 cents; 
Samuel Zoll Company, 1.37 cents.* 

No. 1 Scratch. 
500 Pairs Outer Soles, 10 Iron, Size S, 
Per Pair. — Atlantic Leather Corporation, 

26 cents*; Gordon Leather and Shoe 
Findings Company, 30 cents; Samuel 
Zoll Company, 31.75 cents; Samuel 
Lebow Company, 30-34 cents. 

500 Pairs Outer Soles, 10 Iron, Size 9, 
Per Pair. — Atlantic Leather Corporation, 

27 cents; Gordon Leather and Shoe 
Findings Company, 32 cents; Samuel 
Zoll Company, 31.75 cents; Samuel Lebow 
Company, 30-34 cents. 

700 Pairs Outer Soles, 10 Iron, Size 10, 
Per Pair — Atlantic Leather Corporation, 

28 cents*; Gordon Leather and Shoe 
Findings Company, 34 cents; Samuel 
Zoll Company, 31.75 cents; Samuel Lebow 
Company, 30-34 cents. 

700 Pairs Outer Soles, 10 Iron, Size 11, 
Per Pair. — Atlantic Leather Corporation, 

29 cents*; Gordon Leather and Shoe 
Findings Company, 37 cents; Samuel 
Zoll Company, 31.75 cents; Samuel 
Lebow Company, 30-34 cents. 

700 Pairs Outer Soles, 10 Iron, Size 12, 
Per Pair. — Atlantic Leather Corporation, 

30 cents*; Gordon Leather and Shoe 
Findings Company, 40 cents; Samuel 
Zoll Company, 31.75 cents, Samuel 
Lebow Company, 30-34 cents. 

700 Pairs Outer Soles, 10 Iron, Size 13, 
Per Pair. — Atlantic Leather Corporation, 

31 cents*; Gordon Leather and Shoe 
Findings Company, 43 cents; Samuel 
Zoll Company, 31.75 cents; Samuel 
Lebow Company, 30-34 cents. 

200 Pairs Outer Soles, 10 Iron, Size 14, 
Per Pair. — Atlantic Leather Corporation, 

32 cents; Gordon Leather and Shoe 
Findings Company, 45 cents; Samuel 
Zoll Company, 31.75 cents*; Samuel 
Lebow Company, 30-34 cents. 

Cash Discount, 10 Days. — Gordon 
Leather and Shoe Findings Company, 
2 per cent; Samuel Zoll Company, 2 per 
cent; Samuel Lebow Company, 2 per 
cent; Washington Tanning Company, 
2 per cent. 

* Contract awarded. 

Upon January 9 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Allan Motors, In- 
corporated, for pneumatic and solid tires 
for the various city departments for the 
year 1935. Of the bids received that of 
the Allan Motors, Incorporated, of 225 
Rutherford avenue, Charlestown, is the 
most advantageous to the city, based on 
a tire of acceptable quality. This com- 
pany is the low bidder and will furnish 
tires made by the Lee Tire and Rubber 
Company, which make of tire has been 
used with satisfactory results by the city 
during the year 1934. Prices will be 
guaranteed against advance or decline 
until August 1, 1935. List price only 
subject to change thereafter. Bids, 
opened December 31, were as follows: 

Tires and Tubes for the Various City 
Departments. — Merchants Tire Company, 
Kelly-Springfield; Firestone Tire and 
Rubber Company, Firestone high speed 
heavy duty; Consumers Oil Company, 
Goodrich Silvertown; Norwalk Tire and 
Battery Company, Norwalk Gold Stand- 
ard; The Goodyear Tire and Rubber 
Company, Incorporated, Goodyear heavy 
duty all-weather; General Tire Company, 
General; Goodrich Tire Service, Good- 
rich; Joseph H. Clancy, Incorporated, 
Hood; Pennsylvania Rubber Company 
of America, Incorporated, Pennsylvania 
advanced line; Green & Swett Company, 
Fisk; Allan Motors, Incorporated, Lee 



of Conshohockcn; Colonial-Beacon Oil 
Company, Atlas, 6-ply; Barrabee Serv- 
ice Stores, Incorporated, Firestone high 
speed heavy duty; Lee Tire and Rubber 
Company, Lee; Thomas E. Hogan, In- 
corporated, Fisk; George W. McLaren, 
Miller DeLuxe, geared to the road; James 
A. Travers Company, Mohawk pneu- 
matic tires and Firestone solid and 
cushions; Sears, Roebuck & Co., Allstate; 
New England Tire and Supply Company, 
United States; James M. Linnehan Com- 
pany, United States. 

Discount from Standard Consumers' 
Price List Dated November 1, 1934- — 
Merchants Tire Company, net; Fire- 
stone Tire and Rubber Company, no 
discount; Consumers Oil Company, no 
discount; Norwalk Tire and Battery 
Company, no bid on solid tires, no dis- 
count; The Goodyear Tire and Rubber 
Company, Incorporated, 10 per cent 
and Federal excise tax deducted; 
General Tire Company, see net price 
list, 10 per cent less tax; Goodrich Tire 
Service, 10 per cent off November 1, 1934, 
list price Qess t ax ) un t,jl June 30, 1935; 
10 per cent off existing list price, July 1 
to December 31, 1935, prices for cities 
net; Joseph H. Clancy, Incorporated, 
net, tax included; Pennsylvania Rubber 
Company of America, Incorporated, net; 
Green & Swett Company, prices include 
Federal excise tax; 10 per cent, tax free; 
Allan Motors, Incorporated, prices in- 
clude Federal excise tax; 27| per cent 
5 per cent tires pneumatic; 33^ per cent 
5 per cent tubes; 30 per cent 5 per cent 
solids; Colonial-Beacon Oil Company, 
Atlas list price less excise tax less 10 per 
cent; Barrabee Service Stores, Incor- 
porated, net; Lee Tire and Rubber Com- 
pany, 10 per cent plus Government excise 
tax from pink list prices dated November 
1; see green list for nets; Thomas E. 
Hogan, Incorporated, 10 per cent plus 
deduction for excise tax; see, also, net 
prices attached; George W. McLaren, 
10 per cent less Federal excise tax; James 
A. Travers Company, retail price list less 
10 per cent less tax; see, also, net price 
list; Sears, Roebuck & Co., no bid on 
solid tires, 10 per cent and 20 per cent; 
New England Tire and Supply Company, 
10 per cent less Federal excise tax; see, 
also, net price lists; James M. Linnehan 
Company, 10 per cent less Federal excise 
tax; see, also, net price lists. 

Cash Discount, Federal Excise Tax De- 
ducted. — Merchants Tire Company, 2 
per cent; Firestone Tire and Rubber 
Company, 2 per cent 10th proximo; city 
to receive benefit of decrease in prices; no 
guarantee against increase in prices; prices 
include application of solids; Consumers 
Oil Company, 2 per cent; price protection 
to June 30, 1935, thence Federal excise tax 
to be deducted less 10 per cent from pre- 
vailing standard consumers' price list; 
Norwalk Tire and Battery Company, 2 
per cent 10th proximo; no guarantee on 
prices; guarantee same discount to apply 
to list prices in effect at time of pur- 
chase; The Goodyear Tire and Rubber 
Company, Incorporated, 2 per cent 10th 
proximo; prices subject to change; dis- 
count of 10 per cent guaranteed from 
price list in effect at time of purchase; 
General Tire Company, 2 per cent; no 
guarantee on prices; Goodrich Tire 
Service, 2 per cent; Joseph H. Clancy, 
Incorporated, 2 per cent 10th proximo 
or 30 days; prices guaranteed to 
June 30, 1935; Pennsylvania Rubber 
Companv of America, Incorporated, 
2 per "cent; until June 30, 1935; 
Green & Swett Company, 2 per cent; 
prices subject to change without notice; 
discounts remain the same; Allan Motors, 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



a 



Incorporated, 2 per cent; prices guaran- 
teed until August 1, 1935; in event of 
change in manufacturer's list price after 
August 1, 1935, the same discount struc- 
ture will remain in force; Colonial-Beacon 
Oil Company, 2 per cent; Atlas list is 10 
per cent less than standard consumers' 
price list; Barrabee Service Stores, In- 
corporated, 2 per cent; no guarantee 
against increase in price; city will receive 
the benefit of decrease in price; prices in- 
clude application of solids; Lee Tire and 
Rubber Company, 2 per cent 10th 
proximo; no price guarantee; Thomas E. 
Hogan, Incorporated, 2 per cent; no 
guarantee against increase in prices; dis- 
counts guaranteed on prevailing list 
prices; George W. McLaren, 2 per cent; 
prices guaranteed to June 30, 1935; dis- 
count quoted guaranteed for one year; 
James A. Travers Company, 2 per cent 
10th proximo; discount guaranteed' for 
one year; no guarantee against increase in 
prices; Sears, Roebuck & Co., net; no 
guarantee against increase in prices;, 
price list attached is lower than Standard 
consumers' price list; New England Tire 
and Supply Company, 5 per cent 10th 
proximo ; auditor's copy deposited at 
Supply Department; no price protection 
or guarantee of price; James M. Linne- 
han Company, 2 per cent 10th proximo; 
no price protection or guarantee of price; 
no copy of bid at auditor's. 



TRANSFERS IN APPROPRIATIONS. 

City Auditor Charles J. Fox an- 
nounces the following transfers in appro- 
priations in departments of the City of 
Boston and County of Suffolk, indorsed 
by Budget Commissioner Charles J. Fox 
and approved by his Honor the Mayor: 

Boston Traffic Commission. 
Boston, December 7, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appropria- 
tions of the Boston Traffic Commission: 
From the appropriation for H, Emer- 
gency Relief Projects, $925.87, to the 
appropriation for A-l, Personal Service, 
$925.87. 

This transfer is being made at the 
direction of City Auditor Charles J. Fox- 
in order to provide funds to eke out the 
money in A-l which was reduced earlier 
in the year. 

Respectfully, 

William P. Hickey, 

( (innnissioner. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 26, 1934. 

Election Department. 

Boston, December 20, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City .1 uditor. 

Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer in the appropriation 
of the Election Department: 

From (lie appropriation for Reserve 
Fund, $2,124, to the appropriation for 
Election Department, A-2, Temporary 
Employees, $2,124. 

To enable us to meet, paymenl "I paj 
roll covering sen ices of supervisors 
appointed by his Excellency, the Gov- 
ernor, 6 supervisors having served at the 



State Primary, September 20, 1934, and 
230 supervisors having served at the 
State Election, November (i, 1934. No 
provision for such payment having been 
made in our budget for the current year, 
inasmuch as the expense was not 
anticipated. 

Respectfully, 

David B. Shaw, 
Commissioner. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 21, 1934. 

Finance Commission. 
Boston, December 14, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 

Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following 
request for transfer within the appro- 
priations of the Finance Commission: 

From the appropriation for B-4, Trans- 
portation, $19.45, to the appropriation 
for B-13, Communication, $19.45. 

From B-4, Transportation, $20.30, to 
C-10, Library, $20.30. 

From C-7, Furniture and Fittings, 
$25, to C-10, Library, $25. 

From C-2, Miscellaneous, $785, to 
A-l, Permanent Employees, $785. 

From B-4, Transportation, $8.55, to 
C-9, Office Equipment, $8.55. 

These expenditures beyond the original 
allotment by items were made necessary 
on account of a special investigation 
made in accordance with law, as requested 
by the City Council. 

Respectfully, 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

Chairman . 

The above transfers were made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor, December 26, 1934. 

Registry of Deeds. 
Boston, November 16, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following 
request for transfer within the appro- 
priations of the Registry of Deeds: 

From the appropriation for Supreme 
Judicial Court, B-35, $1,400, to the 
appropriation for Registry of Deeds, 
A-2, Temporary Employees, $1,400. 

It is urgently necessary that this work 
be continued for the public convenience 
and the appropriation for this item is 
exhausted. 

Respectfully, 

William T. A. Fitzgerald, 

Register. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor. 

Boston, November 16, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. M wok, It is very im- 
portant that the evening force in tins 
department on the index work should be 
continued for another month this year, 
if possible. This work was discontinued 
a month ago, because the appropriation 
had been exhausted. I, therefore, re- 
spectfully request that a transfer appro- 
priation of SI, 100 be made to Item A-2, 
Temporary Employees, from any source 
available. 



Thanking you for your attention to 
this matter, I am, 

Very truly yours, 

William T. A. Fitzgerald. 

Medical Examiner Service (Southern 
Division). 
Boston, December 31, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor- 

Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below- 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following 
request for transfer within the appro- 
priations of the Medical Examiner, 
Southern, Suffolk County: 

From the appropriation for C-4, Motor 
Vehicle Equipment, $72.50, to the appro- 
priation for D-l, Office Supplies, $72.50. 

From C-4, Motor Vehicle Equipment, 
$27.50, to D-ll, Motor Vehicle Supplies, 
$27.50. 

From C-13, Tools and Instruments, 
$10.50, to D-ll, Motor Vehicle Supplies, 
$10.50. 

From C-12, Laboratory Equipment, 
$53, to D-5, Laboratory Supplies, $53. 

From C-13, Tools and Instruments, $13, 
to D-5, Laboratory Supplies, $13. 

From B-39, General Plant, $6, to D-5, 
Laboratory Supplies, $6. 

C-4 to D-l, demands for printing an 
unusual amount of blanks for reports 
requires this transfer. C-4 and C-13 to 
D-ll, bills for gasolene and oil, anti-freeze 
mixture, etc., require these transfers. 
C-12 and C-13 to D-5, bills for photo- 
graphic material and for C02 gas for 
frozen sections, etc., require this transfer. 

Respectfully, 

Timothy Leary, 
Medical Examiner. 

The above transfers were made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 26, 1934. 



CITY DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTE 
TO CHARITIES. 

City Treasurer John H. Dorsey called 
a meeting of the representatives of City 
and County Department Heads in the 
City Council Chambers on January 4 in 
order that he might explain the details of 
the drive for funds for the Emergence- 
Campaign for the benefit of deserving 
private charities 

The meeting was addressed by Oscar 
W. Haussermann, the general chairman 
of the Emergency Campaign for 1935. 
Mr. Haussermann explained the financial 
straits of the various institutions and the 
very great need of funds for continuing 
these institutions during the year 1935. 

The collection of voluntary contribu- 
tions From city and county employees will 
officially commence on January 11. 

A 100 per cent representation of 
department heads was evident at this 
meeting. It was construed that all those 
who can afford to do so are most willing 
to contribute, within their means, to this 
campaign. 



HOUSING CORPORATION HAS SJ23.670.S00 
AVAILABLE. 

Transfer to the Public Works Emer- 
gency Bousing Corporation of $23,1 
previously allotted to seven low-cost 
housing and slum clearance projects was 
announced by Public Works Admin- 
istrator Harold L. [<jkes. The housing 
corporation now has $123,670,500 avail- 
able for housing and slum clearance 
projeet.s. 



34 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 3, TO JANUARY 9. 

January 3. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Arthur P. Pearce. Jr 

Cabot. Cabot & Forbes 

\V. M. Lvberts 

H. A. Moore 

Brown. Russell Realty Trust , 

Walter Skinner 

Meredith <fe Grew 

H. U. Holzer 

Peter Bonanna 

Tito Galerto 

Central Congregational 

Church. 
Parker H. Kemble 

Williams & Bangs 138 and 140 Commercial st . 



65 South street 

77 and 79 Chauncey street. 
166 Metropolitan avenue. . 
11 North Monroe terrace. . 
1098 Commonwealth ave. . 
101 West Springfield street. 

89 Franklin street 

33 Davison street 

694 East Fifth street 

85 Liverpool street 

91 Seaverns avenue 



512 Shawmut avenue. 



3 Alterations, mercantile S400 

3 Elevator 3,725 

18 Alterations, dwelling 500 

16 Alterations, dwelling 250 

21 Alterations, restaurant 300 

9 Alterations, dwelling 250 

3 Alterations, offices 500 

18 Alterations, dwelling 400 

6 Alterations, dwelling 420 

1 Alterations, dwelling 250 

19 Take-down, church 750 

9 Alterations, store and dwell- 900 

ing. 

3 Alterations, mercantile 150 



January 4. 



S. Hirshberg el al 

Jane T. Dustin 

Morgan's, Incorporated .... 
H. L. Shattuck H al. .Trustees, 
First National and Suffolk 

Banks. 
DeBlois & Maddison. Agents, 

Thompson's Spa 

E. A. Randall Estate 

E. A. Randall Estate. . . 

Rpman Catholic Archbishop 

of Boston. 

Marie Cudde 

Ada Schucker 

Mrs. Polly Moses 

Charles W. Gillette 

James C. Reed 

William Reardon 

Hotel Essex. Incorporated.. . 



140 Meridian street 1 

272 Washington street 22 

10 Dore street 3 

48-54 Canal street 3 

29-51 Brattle street 3 

25 and 27 Brattle street 3 

44 Temple place 3 

120 Border street 1 

120 Border street 1 

1677 Centre street 20 

42 Round Hill street 10 

71 Dorchester street 6 

3 Robinson street 15 

58 Regent street 12 

64 Reed street 8 

347 West Second street 6 

685 Atlantic avenue 3 



Alterations, store and club . . . None 

Alterations, storage S300 

Alterations, club 500 

Alterations, stores and offices, 2,800 

Take-down, hotel 2,350 

Take-down, restaurant 750 

Dumb-waiter. . . 100 

Alterations, coal pocket 700 

Alterations, unloading tower, 5,000 

Alterations, storage 600 

Alterations, dwelling 800 

Fire escapes 35 

Alterations, dwelling 90 

Alterations, dwelling 100 

Take-down, dwelling 1,400 

Alterations, dwelling 150 

Alterations, hotel 350 



January 5. 


None. 


January 7. 



Edith P. Hausen 136 Beacon street 

Andrew Dutton Company. . . 60 Canal street 

Hilda N. Alexander 5 and 7 Savin Hill avenue . . 

St. Francis Xavier College . . 39 Dover street 

John Philopolus et al 1667-1671 Blue Hill avenue, 

Frank Logan 318 Tremont street 

National Shawmut Bank. ... 26 Baird street 

Philip Weinstein 51 and 53 Edgewood street, 

David Stern 7 Cleaves street 

Rebecca Segaloff 65 Waumbeck street 

St. Margaret's Hospital 90 Gushing avenue 

David Rubin 1245 Commonwealth ave 



5 


Alterations, 


3 


Alterations, 


13 


Alterations, 




mg._ 


3 


Alterations, 


18 


Alterations, 


5 


Alterations, 


14 


Alterations, 


12 


Alterations, 


11 


Alterations, 


12 


Alterations, 


13 


Alterations, 


21 


Alterations, 



dwelling S4.000 

store 250 

store and dwell- 4,000 

rooming house. .. 350 

stores 2,000 

stores 150 

dwelling 550 

dwelling 600 

tenements 200 

dwelling 125 

hospital 1.200 

store None 



January 8. 



Apollo Theatres, Incorpo- 1050 Washington street . . 
rated. 

Methodist Episcopal Church, 10 Saratoga street 

Home Savings Bank 127-131 Clarendon street . 

Posse Normal School 777-781 Beacon street . . . 



3 Alterations, theater S20.000 



Philip V. Adams 1 and 3 Savin Hill avenue . 

George C. Appleton & Son. . . 635 Atlantic avenue 

Rachael Shapiro 60 East Canton street 

Henry Baker 1476 Tremont street 

Jacobs Levine 36 Rochester street 

Max Goldberg 24 Normandy street 



15 



Alterations, 
Alterations, 
Alterations, 

rant. 
Alterations, stores and dwell 



church 

stores and offices, 
stores and restau- 



Alterations, 
Alterations, 
Alterations, 
Alterations, 
Alterations, 



stores and offices. 

storage 

office 

tenements 

dwelling 



300 

4,842 

75 

2,000 

800 
100 
200 
2,100 
250 



January 9. 



Bristol County Trust Co. 

Boston University 

E. H. Walker 

Thompson's Spa 

Leon C. Goodell rl ,:l 

Robert Michelson 

Phoenix Realty Trust . . 
Phoenix Realty Trust. . . 
Shell Eastern Petrol Co. 
Anthony J. Kupsis 



1331 Blue Hill avenue 14 

688 Boylston street 4 

122 Boylston street 5 

44 Temple place 3 

15 Euclid street 17 

558 Columbus avenue 4 

97 Francis street 4 

99 Francis street 4 

155 Cummings street 8 

238 and 240 D street 6 



Charles B. Wiggin 

State Street Trust Company, 

Flavian Serafini 

Flavian Serafini 

Flavian Serafini 

James Ginsberg 

Donald Malaguti 

William R. Murphy 

C. H. Packard 



15 Erie place 11 

402 East First street 6 

32 Fay street 3 

36 Fay street 3 

40 Fay street 3 

142 Friend street 3 

104 Gardner street 20 

1267 Hyde Park avenue 18 

46 Maverick square 1 



Alterations, dwelling 

Fire escapes 

Alterations, stores and offices, 

Dumb-waiters 

Special garage 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, oil storage 

Alterations, stores and dwell- 
ing. 

Alterations, dwelling 

Take-down, dwelling 

Alterations, tenements 

Alterations, tenements 

Alterations, tenements 

Alterations, manufacturing.. . 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, restaurant 

Alterations, store 



$347 
160 
950 
270 
440 
800 
1,250 
1.250 
200 
375 

300 
50 
500 
800 
500 
500 
1.500 
400 
800 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

Food Inspector, Department of Public 
Health, February 9, 1935. 

Last date for filing aplications, Satur- 
day, January 26, 1935, at 12 noon. 

The minimum salary is $1,800 a year; 
the maximum salary is §2,400 a year. 

Duties: Under general direction, to 
examine premises in an assigned district 
where foods or drugs are manufactured, 
stored, sold, or handled, in order to en- 
force sanitary standards and classification 
as to quality prescribed by law; and to 
perform related work as required. 

Entrance Requirements : Applicants 
must have education equivalent to gradu- 
ation from a standard four-year high 
school. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience (3) ; practical questions (4) ; 
personality and fitness, as determined 
by an oral interview (3); total (10). 

Passing Requirements : Applicants must 
obtain at least 70 per cent in each sub- 
ject of the examination in order to be- 
come eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

Clerical Service, for State and Cities 
and Towns Outside of Boston and 
Vicinity, February, 16, 1935. 
Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 2, 1935, at 12 noon. 

For Boston and Vicinity, March 2, 
1935. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 16, 1935, at 12 noon. 

Warning: If all applicants cannot be 
accommodated on the above dates, they 
will be notified to appear on subsequent 
Saturdays. Applicants should note the 
exact date given on their notification 
cards. 

The usual entrance salary for clerks 
for State service is $900 a year. 

Persons qualifying in the examination 
may have their names placed on the 
State list as well as on the list for the 
city or town in which they reside. 

Applicants must be not less than six- 
teen years of age at the time of filing 
application. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience (2) ; spelling (2) ; arithmetic 
(including problems) (2) ; grammar (in- 
cluding penmanship) (2) ; filing (1) ; 
word knowledge (1) ; total (10). 

Passing Requirements : Applicants 
must obtain a mark of at least 65 per 
cent in spelling, at least 50 per cent in 
each of the other subjects, and at least 
70 per cent in general average in order 
to become eligible. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 

(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1935. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Monday, February 4. 
Worcester, Wednesday, February 6. 
Boston, Monday, March 4. 
Fall River, Wednesday, March 6. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 7. 
Boston, Monday, April 8. 
Springfield, Wednesday, April 10. 
Boston, Monday, May 6. 
Worcester, Wednesday, May 8. 
Boston, Monday, June 3. 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



35 



Boston, Monday, September 16. 
Worcester, Wednesday, September 18. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 17. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 18. 
Boston, Monday, November 4. 
Lowell, Wednesday, November 6. 
Boston, Monday, December 2. 
New Bedford, Wednesday, December 4. 
New Bedford, Thursday, December 5. 

Rules for Examinations. 

All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent in 
the installation of wires, conduits, appa- 
ratus, fixtures and other appliances for 
carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
years' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for carrying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a Master or Journeyman Cer- 
tificate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be 
required to obtain at least 70 per cent in 
order to obtain a certificate. 

Applicants who fail to obtain the re- 
quired 70 per cent will not be entitled to 
re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent, or who fail 
on the practical demonstration, will not 
be re-examined for a period of six months. 

Any person found referring to notes or 
books, or misbehaving during an exami- 
nation, will be debarred from that exami- 
nation. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held, and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day. 

James M. Hurley, 
Payson Smith, 
Stephen C. Garrity, 
• State Examiners of Electricians. 

For applicatiou blanks or other infor- 
mation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 413A, State House, 
Boston, Mass. 



FINANCING SEWAGE WORKS BY SPECIAL 
ASSESSMENT IN IOWA. 

The cost of constructing sewage dis- 
posal plants in a number of states, and 
in Iowa in particular, may be levied 
against the various lots, parts of lots or 
parcels of ground draining to, or sus- 
ceptible to drainage to, the site of the 
disposal plant. Such assessments must be 
in proportion to the benefits to each prop- 
erty and must not, in any case, exceed 
one-fourth of the fair value of the property 
in question. These special assessments 
are payable in the same manner as othei 
municipal improvement costs; that is, 
in ten annual equal installments, paid 
at the same time and place as the March 
1 installment of ordinary taxes in Iowa. 
Any property owner may pay off the 
unpaid portion of such tax at any time. 
Interest on the deferred payments must 
not exceed G per cent. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY .? TO JANUARY 9. 

January 9. — Continued. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Frank D. Orlando 79 Portland street 

L. Epstein 293 and 295 Warren street. 

William F. Scott et al 13 Wabon street 

Mary Creed 32 Belfort street 

J. Brown 146 Central avenue 

W. J. Breede 199 Washington street 

Ida E. Dunn 18 Maxwell street 

Elizabeth Klueber 105 Chestnut avenue 

Hyde Park Cooperative Bank 55 Oak street 

Hyde Park Cooperative Bank 3 Tracton avenue 



3 Alterations, manufacturing.. . $500 

12 Alterations, stores 200 

12 Special garage 250 

13 Alterations, dwelling 179 

18 Alterations; dwelling 274 

14 Alterations, dwelling and 135 

store. 

16 Alterations, dwelling 150 

19 Alterations, dwelling 195 

18 Alterations, dwelling 200 

18 Alterations, dwelling 200 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 3, TO JANUARY 9. 

January 3 



Plumber. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Barney Levine 

John W. Dean 

Louis S. Koufman. . . . 

M. A. Ambrose 

Harold Kaplan 

Maurice Miller 

John J. Riley 

James A. Dickerson. . 

Max Hyman 

Thomas F. Nolan 

Walter Schmitt 

J. Harry Kurhan 

Barnet Shillman 

Joseph Wallace 

A. F. McCarthy 

Daniel J. McDonald. . 

Harry Kingsberg 

John Cook 

A. P. Courtney 

Frederick E. Whitney 
Samuel Cohen 



30 Lynde street 3 

548 West Park street 17 

361 Columbus avenue 4 

249 West Broadway 6 

436 Main street 2 

17 Seneca street 3 

70 Bristol street 3 

28 Belvidere street 4 

105 Beach street 3 

1457 Centre street 20 

278B Tremont street 3 

1898 Centre street 20 

January 4- 

372 Warren street 12 

22 Mountain avenue 14 

31 Burt street 17 

159A Tremont street 3 

6 and 8 Letterfine terrace.. . 13 

1 Ivy street 21 

1612 Blue Hill avenue 18 

28-40 Chelsea street 2 

149 Charles street 5 



New fixtures SI, 000 

New fixtures 80 

New fixtures 2,000 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 50 

New fixtures 25 

New fixtures 125 

New fixtures 850 

New fixtures 65 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures 75 

New fixtures 50 

New fixtures $50 

New fixtures 35 

New fixtures 1,000 

New fixtures 90 

New fixtures 425 

New fixtures 75 

New fixtures 90 

New fixtures 25 

New fixtures 100 



January 


5. 


None. 


January 


7. 



James D. O'Neil 39 Pearl street 

Louis Miller 81 Blackstone street 

John S. Pagington 10 Maple street 

A. T. Milligan 166 Metropolitan avenue. 

Joseph J. Riley 15 Dean street 

A. E. Roberts 15 East street 

Joseph P. Vogel 791 Tremont street 

D. J. Nolan 47 Allston street 



January 8. 



William Cooper. 
John ,1. Daniels. 
David Carlin . . 
Samuel Nathan 
Ma I to & Rosen. 



1 15 Staniford street 3 

13 Rosa street IS 

46 Tolman street 16 

Hi I Huntington avenue 4 

93 I [oraer street 1 



January 9. 



II. F. Faunce 

\i:ii to & Rosen 

James McKinnon 

Joseph Weinberg 

Thomas F. MacDonald. 

Mai i" & Rosen 

Patrick Langone 

Joseph Nessell 

Thomas V. McMahon. . 
P. s. Larkin 



7 I i Ireen hi reel 

35 t !helsea Btreel 

1515 w i« oingti ir 

1245 ( !olumbu9 avenue . 

320 Ruggles street 

13 Thacher si reet, 

60 Leyden street 

198 St, Boltolph street.. . 
417 Marlborough street. 

S Newbury street 



3 New fixtures S180 

3 New fixtures 350 

18 New fixtures 40 

18 New fixtures 90 

13 New fixtures 200 

3 New fixtures 600 

9 New fixtures 300 

3 New fixtures 450 

New fixtures 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 96 

New fixtures ."ill 

New fixtures 125 

New fixtures 

New fixtures i 3 

: urea W 

New fixtures 

New fixtures 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 300 

New fixtures 1.000 

New fixtures 1 10 
New fixtures 



20 

11 
4 

:; 
1 
I 



36 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



POPULATION OF NEW ENGLAND. 1930. 

Total population. 8,166,341 (4,024,657 
males and 4,141,684 females) ; total white, 
8,065,113 (3,972,465 males and 4,092,648 
females); total native white, 6.230,803 
(3,067,723 males and 3,163,080 females) ; 
native white of native parentage, 3,167,- 
082 (1,572,8S5 males and 1,594,197 fe- 
males) ; native white of foreign or mixed 
parentage, 3,063,721 (1,494,838 males and 
1,568,883 females); foreign-born white 
1,834,310 (904,742 males and 929,568 fe- 
males) ; Negro, 94,086 (46,963 males and 
47,123 females); Indian, 2,466 (1,273 
males and 1,193 females); Chinese, 3,794 
(3,233 males and 561 females) ; Japanese, 
352 (277 males and 75 females) ; Mexican, 
107 (69 males and 38 females) ; all other 
races, 423 (377 males and 46 females). 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order Xo. 1. 

I. The Emergency Relief Campaign 

of 1935. 

An appeal for funds for the Emergency 
Campaign is being made to the people of 
Metropolitan Boston in order that various 
major hospitals, private charities and 
social agencies may be maintained during 
the year. Four million dollars is actually 
needed to provide resources for these 
charitable organizations which, during 
the past three years have been obliged 
to curtail expenses and drain financial 
reserves to the extent that they are now 
crippled and handicapped by lack of 
funds. Throughout the city all persons 
in private employ are being canvassed 
to make a contribution amounting to at 
least one per cent of their annual salary 
to the fund. Because of the worthiness 
of the cause and because employees out- 
side the public service are willingly mak- 
ing their contributions, the employees of 
the City of Boston have been asked to 
participate in this appeal and make a 
similar donation to the fund, in other 
words, each member of the Fire Depart- 
ment is asked to join with other city em- 
ployees and contribute one per cent of his 
annual salary to the Emergency Cam- 
paign. His Honor, Mayor Mansfield, 
has already given this campaign his 
earnest and hearty indorsement, and 
has expressed the hope that every city 
and county employee will contribute 
within his means to the end that the 
employees of the city will make a sub- 
stantial contribution to the fund. Mayor 
Mansfield states that the contributions 
are voluntary but that the appeal is 
absolutely necessary and should receive 
unanimous support. 

In view of the fact that the employees 
of the Fire Department have enjoyed 
uninterrupted employment and the statu- 
tory reductions in the pay schedule have 
been restored as of January 1, 1935, it 
is hoped that members of the department 
will give this appeal careful and favorable 
consideration. The Fire Commissioner 
looks to the members of the department 
to show the same generous spirit of co- 
operation which has characterized their 
response to worthy appeals in the past. 
In order that the sacrifice will not impose 
a hardship upon the contributors it has 
been arranged that the payment of the 
total sum may be divided in twenty 
equal payments for twenty weeks, begin- 
ning with the week of Friday, January 

II, 1935. The following table illustrates 
the total payment to be made for the 
different rates of pay together with the 
weekly payment: 



Annual 
Salary. 


Total 

Contribution 

One Per Cent 

of Annual 

Salary. 


Weekly 

Contribution 

for Twenty 

Weeks. 


$7,500 

6,500 

4,500 

4.000 

3,600 

3,500 

3.300 

3,000 

2.900 

2,800 

2,700 

2,600 

2.500 

2,400 

2,300 

2,200 

2,100 

2,000 

1,900 

1.800 

1,700 

1,600 

1,500 

1.400 

1,200 

1,100 


S75 00 
65 00 
45 00 
40 00 
36 00 
35 00 
33 00 
30 00 
29 00 
28 00 
27 00 
26 00 
25 00 
24 00 
23 00 
22 00 
21 00 
20 00 
19 00 
18 00 
17 00 
16 00 
15 00 
14 00 
12 00 
11 00 


S3 75 

3 25 

2 25 

2 00 

1 80 

1 75 

1 65 

1 50 

1 45 

1 40 

1 35 

1 30 

1 25 

1 20 

1 15 

1 10 

1 05 

1 00 

95 

90 

85 

80 

75 

70 

60 

55 



Weekly 
Rate. 


Total 

Contribution 

One Per Cent 

of Annual 

Wages. 


Weekly 

Contribution 

for Twenty 

Weeks. 


S48 30 

45 00 

42 00 (7 days) 
42 00 (6 days) 

39 00 

37 50 

36 00 

35 00 (7 days) 

33 00 

18 00 


S25 16 
23 40 
21 90 
21 00 
19 50 
18 75 
18 00 
18 25 
16 50 
9 36 


SI 26 

1 17 

1 09 

1 05 

97 

94 

90 

91 

82 

47 



Pledge cards are being distributed to 
the department today. Company com- 
manders and heads of divisions will 
personally interview each member of his 
command, explaining to him the purpose 
of the appeal and ask him to make the 
contribution requested. All cards are to 
be returned to the Fire Commissioner on 
or before Wednesday, January 9, 1935. 
In no case are deductions to be made on 
the pay roll. Company commanders and 
heads of divisions, for their own informa- 
tion, will make a list of all who contribute 
to the Emergency Campaign. Each week 
on the regular pay daj' the money donated 
will be collected from the contributors, 
and company commanders and heads of 
divisions will forward the receipts to 
headquarters once each week. Miss 
Mary C. Kelley has been assigned by 
the commissioner to accept the money 
and give a receipt for it. Delivery of 
money at headquarters should be made 
any week day between 9 and 11 a. m. 

It does not seem necessary for the Fire 
Commissioner to emphasize the fact that 
the object of this appeal is most worthy 
and deserves the unqualified support of 
all to contribute in a small way to relieve 
the strain under which the charitable 
organizations of our community have 
been laboring. What the members of 
the department do in this instance will 
reflect great credit upon themselves 
individually and on the Fire Department 
as a unit. 

II. Boston Automatic Fire Alarm 

Signals. 
Notice has been received that the 
following signal numbers of the Boston 
Automatic Fire Alarm Company have 
been discontinued: 
. Signal 212—12-18 Pittsburgh street. 



Signal 373—156-166 Oliver street; 
88-90 Purchase street. 

Signal 531—74-78 Canal street. 

Signal 535—168-170 Oliver street. 

Signal 536—172-174 Oliver street, 
corner Atlantic avenue. 

III. A. D. T. Company. 
Referring to Signal No. 124, published 
in paragraph 2, General Orders No. 80, 
series of 1934, the correct location for 
this signal is Gerstein & Cooper, 1 West 
Third street; nearest city box is No. 7135. 
Company commanders will make the 
necessary corrections on the assignment 
cards of the A. D. T. Company. 

IV. Commendations. 

Hoseman Charles E. Travis of Engine 
Company 42 is hereby commended for 
responding to and working at fire, Box 
2466, fourth alarm, December 28, 1934, 
while off duty. 

Ladderman William E. Keenan of 
Ladder Company 31 is hereby commended 
for responding to and working at fire, 
Box 6153, second alarm, December 28, 
1934, while off duty. 

Apparatus Operator John F. Fox of 
Engine Company 19 is hereby commended 
for responding to and working at fire, 
Box 3564, January 1, 1935, while off 
duty. 

By order of Fire Commissioner 
Edward F. McLaughlin. 

Henry A. Fox, 
Chief of Department. 

The last General Order, series of 1934, 
was numbered 80. 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS. 

Public Works Department. 

The Prompt Contractors, Incorporated, 
have been granted an extension of the 
time of completion of contract for laying 
and relaying water pipes in Soldiers 
Field road, northwesterly from North 
Harvard street, Brighton, from December 
29, 1934, to March 1, 1935; 

Leo J. Nawn, Incorporated, has been 
granted an extension of the time of com- 
pletion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in District No. 2, dated 
December 31, 1934, from December 31, 
1934, to May 1, 1935. 

J. A. Singarella, Incorporated, has been 
granted an extension of the time of com- 
pletion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in District No. 1, dated 
December 28, 1934, from December 
31, 1934, to May 1, 1935. 

Frank J. Jacobs Company has been 
granted an extension of the time of com- 
pletion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in District No. 9, dated 
December 31, 1934, from December 31, 
1934, to May 3, 1935. 

The Capital Contracting Company 
has been granted an extension of the 
time of completion of the contract for 
removing snow and ice in District No. 12, 
dated December 28, 1934, from December 
31, 1934, to May 1, 1935. 

Dooley Brothers, Incorporated, have 
been granted an extension of the time of 
completion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in District No. 4, dated 
December 31, 1934, from December 31, 
1934, to May 1, 1935. 

Frank J. Jacobs Company has been 
granted an extension of the time of com- 
pletion of the contract for laying sheet 
asphalt pavement in Goodway road, 
Ward 19, from Florence street to Bourne 
street, contract dated December 6, 1934, 
from December 31, 1934, to June 1, 1935. 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



37 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

FINAL MEETING. 

Saturday, December 29, 1934. 
Closing meeting of the City Council of 1934, 
in the City Council Chamber, City Hall, at 11 
a. m., President DOWD in the chair. Absent, 
Coun. Gleason, McGrath, Murray, Tobin. 



PROPOSED LEASE TO WOMEN'S NATIONAL 
CIVIC FEDERATION. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 19, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Corporation Counsel, in reference to a recent 
order adopted by your honorable body, concerning 
the proposed lease to the Women's Department of 
the National Civic Federation, or its nominee, 
of certain premises numbered 2150 Dorchester 
avenue and known as the Convalescent Home. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Law Department, December 13, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Some time ago you suggested 
that I prepare a form of order for submission to the 
City Council authorizing a lease to the Women's 
Department of the National Civic Federation, 
or its nominee, of certain premises numbered 
2150 Dorchester avenue and known as the Con- 
valescent Home. This property was purchased by 
the City of Boston under an order approved by 
the Mayor on March 18, 1890, for " the purposes of 
a convalescent home for the City Hospital." I 
understand that the City Council or some members 
thereof at a recent meeting raised a question as 
to whether, in view of the circumstances under 
which the land was acquired, the lease in question 
may properly be entered into. Before submitting 
to you the above-mentioned form of order we 
examined into the title of the city to this property. 
The deed contains no restriction and we are of the 
opinion that the city may properly enter into the 
proposed lease. 

I have been informed by Doctor Dowling that 
the trustees consider that the premises in question 
are no longer needed for hospital purposes and 
that he has advised you and the City Council to 
this effect. My conclusion that the lease is 
proper rests on the assumption that the trustees 
have made this determination. 
Very truly yours, 

Henry E. Foley, 
Corporation Counsel. 

Placed on file. 



MILK FOR WELFARE RECIPIENTS. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 28, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Overseers of the Public Welfare, relative to 
your order of December 10, 1934, concerning the 
establishment of a system whereby milk is f urnished 
for a price of 8 cents a quart or thereabouts to 
welfare recipients. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Note. — Mr. Dowling informs me that the 3 cents 
a quart discount means a discount from the 
current retail price which at the present time is 
1 1 cents. But if the retail price fluctuated and 
dropped to 10 cents, for example, the net cost to 
families on the welfare rolls would be 7 cents. 

F. W. M. 

City of Boston, 
Overseers of Public Welfare, 

December 21, 1934. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary, Mayor's Office. 
Dear Sir, — This is to acknowledge receipt of 
your communication of December 15, 1934, in- 
closing the following order from the City Council, 
dated December 10, 1934: 

"Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston be re- 
quested to consider the advisability of conferring 
with the Overseers of Public Welfare with a view 
to establishing a system whereby milk is furnished 
to welfare recipients for a price of 8 cents a quart 
or thereabouts, similar to the system now in vogue 
in New York City." 

I wish to say that I am at present studying tin" 
matter and have received from some of the chain 
stores in Boston an agreement to allow a discount 
of 3 cents a quart to families on our rolls. Bi 
any general plan can be put into effect, the depai i 
ment will have to have the approval of Mr. Samuel 
W. Tator, the Federal Milk Administrator of New 
England. 

1 am in correspondence with him on the matter. 
Yours truly, 
John C. L. Dowling, 
Executive Director. 
Placed on file. 



MEN TRANSFERRED TO E. R. A. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 28, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Soldiers' Relief Commissioner, relative to 
your order of December 17, 1934, concerning the 
number of men transferred to the E. R. A. from the 
rolls of that department from September 1, 1934, 
to that date. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Soldiers' Relief Department, 

December 26, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — In reply to your Honor's communica- 
tion of December 20, 1934, with reference to the 
order of the City Council dated December 17, 1934, 
pertaining to transfers to E. R. A. from September 
1, 1934, I wish to submit the following information. 
Beneficiaries of this department transferred from 
relief to E. R. A.: 

September 43 

October 35 

November 40 

Beneficiaries under E. R. A. projects returned to 
soldiers' relief rolls because of loss of employment: 

September 31 

October 27 

November 59 

Inasmuch as the month of December has not 
expired I cannot at this time give you figures for 
that particular period. 

Respectfully yours, 

Charles H. Carey,- 
Commissioner. 
Placed on file. 



ASSIGNMENT OF GRAVES. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 28, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Boston Park Department, relative to your 
order of December 3, 1934, concerning the assign- 
ment of graves in city cemeteries to those unable 
to pay for the graves, such as welfare recipients 
and others. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Park Department, December 21, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I have your memorandum of De- 
cember 15, with inclosure, order from the City 
Council that the Park Commission assign graves 
in city cemeteries to those unable to pay for the 
graves, as welfare recipients and others. 

Some years ago similar orders were presented 
and the orders were referred to the Law Depart- 
ment, and that department ruled it was illegal to 
give away city property without recompense. 

Recently the Overseers of the Public Welfare 
purchased graves and the deeds were made in 
their name. This latter department paid us for 
the cost of the graves, but no perpetual care was 
provided, and this department has to care for 
these graves for all time without recompense. 
From my knowledge of the situation I am satis- 
fied that the assigning of graves free or even at a 
reduced price, assuming that the illegality was 
not in question, will result in the application for 
such graves by those residing in the city and out- 
side and we would have no means of determining 
the worthiness of the applicants; the time between 
death and burial leaves but little chance for any 
investigation and which is. not in our province to 
conduct. 

Very respectfully yours, 

William P. Long, Chairman. 

Placed on file. , 



BURIAL OF WELFARE RECIPIENTS. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 28, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Overseers of the Public Welfare, relative to 
your order of December 3, 1934, concerning a 
more liberal policy regarding the burial and conse- 
quent funeral expenses of welfare recipients. 
Respectfully. 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Overseers of Public Welfare. 

1 lecember 21, 1934. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assisfa E i ry, Mayor's Offio 
Dear Sir — [his to t ackecw: 1 -.■• t 

your communication of December 1">, 1934, in- 
closing the following order trom the City Council, 
dated December 3, 1934 

"Ordered. That the Mayor of Boston be re- 
quested to consider the advisability of requesting 

tlic Department of Public Welfare to work out a 



more liberal policy regarding the burial and conse- 
quent funeral expenses of welfare recipients." 

Please be informed that the schedule of al- 
lowances for funeral expenses of persons buried by 
this department is as follows: 

$15 for persons under sixteen years of age, which 
includes $1.50 for opening the grave and an 
honorarium of SI. 50 for religious services. 

$25 for persons over sixteen years of age, which 
includes $3 for opening the grave and an hono- 
rarium of $2 for religious services. 

Not more than $40 is contributed by this de- 
partment towards burial expenses of State cases. 
Yours truly, 

John C. L. Dowling, 
Executive Director. 

Placed on file. 



FLOODING OF COLUMBUS PARK. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 28, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Boston Park Department, relative to vour 
order of December 17, 1934, concerning the flood- 
ing of Columbus Park for the skating season. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Park Department, December 21, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — I have your memorandum of Decem- 
ber 20, with inclosure, order from the City Council, 
that the Park Commission be requested to properly 
flood the skating area at Columbus Park, South 
Boston. 

Pleased be informed that the skating area at 
Columbus Park has been flooded for some little 
time and has been enjoyed by the skating public 
when the weather permitted. 

Very respectfully yours, 

William P. Long, 

Chairman. 
Placed on file. 



ELIMINATION OF STIGMATIZIXG 
DESIGNATION. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 28, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Overseers of the Public Welfare, also a letter 
from the Park Department, relative to your order 
of December 3, 1934, concerning the elimination 
from all records, as a designating phrase, "Pauper's 
Grave" and "Pauper's Burial," or other like 
stigmatizing designations. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Overseers of Public Welfare, 
December 21, 1934. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary, Mayor's Office. 
Dear Sir, — This is to acknowledge receipt of vour 
communication of December 15, 1934, inclosing 
the following order from the City Council, dated 
December 3, 1934: 

"Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston be re- 
quested to consider the advisability of conferring 
with the proper authorities relative to the matter 
of eliminating from all records, as a designating 
phrase the words, 'Pauper's Crave' and 'Pauper's 
Burial,' or other like stigmatizing designations." 

I beg to report that the word "pauper" was 
eliminated from the Relief Laws, chapter 155, 
Acts of 192S, since which time that designation 
has not appeared on any of our official records, 
outside of the Trust Fund case of Brighton, which 
according to its terms is still carried as Bolton 
Protestant Pauper Fund for Brighton residents. 

Such designation, of course, is mandatory l>v the 
terms of the will. 

Yours truly, 
Jons- C. I.. Dowlino, 

Executive Director. 

City of Boston, 
Park Department. December 21, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
\i tyor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — I have your memorandum of Decem- 
ber 1? v.ith mlosiir ,\l,-r fr m th. City ( mi It 
to eliminating from all records, as a desig- 
nating phrase, "Pauper's Grave" ami "Pauper's 
Burial." or other like stigmatising designations. 

For many years certain set lions of Mount Hope 
Cemetery has been set aside and under dil 

Iverseers of the Public Welfare burials arc 
made, and tins latter department reimburses tin- 
Park Department for burials at a . 

adults and SI for children. There is no charge 
them for the graves anil this department 
takes care oi Buch without recompense. 

Burials arc made after investigation by the 
Beers, and that department reimburses the under- 
takers for funeral expenses. 

ins are called by this department 
"City Graves, "and a careful record is made of 
each burial so that if the family later desires to 



38 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



remove the body to a purchased grave this can 
be done with a surety, and has been done. 

It has always been our policy since the Cemetery 
Division was taken over by this department to 
call these graves "City Graves," and I have asked 
the newspapers of Boston to refrain from referring 
to them as paupers's graves or pauper's burials. 
The newspapers very kindly complied with this 
request. 

The objectionable terms are entirely false and 
erroneous. Persons buried in these sections are 
not paupers and are rightly considered by this 
department as those who at the time of burial 
have not left sufficient means and their families 
are unable to purchase a grave and pay the ex- 
penses of a private funeral. 

Very respectfully yours, 
William P. Lonc, 

Chairman. 

Placed on file. 



LOW-COST PUBLIC STREETS. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 28, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Commissioner of Public Works, relative to 
your order of December 10, 1934, concerning a 
program for the installation of low-cost public 
streets in Boston. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Public Works Department, 
December 28, 1934. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary Mayor's Office. 
Dear Sir, — I beg leave to acknowledge receipt 
of your note of December 15 with attached City 
Council order dated December 10, and reading 
as follows: 

"Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston be re- 
quested to confer with the Commissioner of Public 
Works relative to working out a program for the 
installation of low-cost public streets in Boston" — 
and to state that the Public Works Department 
does not take the initiative in working out the 
acceptance of private streets or ways. 

A program for the installation of accepted 
streets is a duty devolving on the Board of Street 
Commissioners and only after said acceptance 
and an order to construct given by the Board of 
Street Commissioners do tie Public Works De- 
partment enter any private street and perform 
any work. 

t respectfully add that the Board of Street 
Commissioners are now preparing a list of private 
ways and have already forwarded to this depart- 
ment six such private ways to be laid out and 
constructed. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 
Placed on file. 



VETO OF NONANTUM STREET 
SIDEWALK. 

The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mavor, December 18, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I am returning herewith dis- 
approved, and without my signature, the order 
adopted by your Honorable Body on December 3, 
1934, for the making of a granolithic sidewalk 
with granite edgestones on Nonantum street, Ward 
22. It appears from a report submitted to me 
by the Commissioner of Public Works and dated 
December 17, which I also inclose, that Nonantum 
street is 2,055 feet long and the width of the road 
varies from 26 to 34 feet. The estimated cost for 
the new granolithic sidewalk and granite edgestones 
is $9,055. 

It also appears that there is some uncertainty 
as to the exact location of the street lines and 
that there appear to have been several encroach- 
ments by abutters. Furthermore, the Board of 
Survey has recommended a uniform width of 50 
feet throughout the entire length of the street 
but that only one half of the street length could 
be built to this width at the present time, the 
length of the remaining half being in doubt until the 
matters above mentioned are finally disposed of. 

There is no money available to make this im- 
provement at the present time and this fact, 
coupled with the difficulties above mentioned, 
constrain me to veto the order. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Public Works Department, 

December 17, 1934. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary, Mayor's Office. 
Dear Sir, — I beg leave to acknowledge your 
note of December 5 with attached City Council 
order of sidewalk construction (lien order) for 
Nonantum street, Ward 22, and to state that the 
length of Nonantum street is 2,055 linear feet and 
the width of the roadway varies from 26 to 34 
feet. The estimated cost of the new granite edge- 
stones and artificial stone sidewalks is $9,055. 
Nonantum street has been in existence since 



1840 and at the present time the matter of street 
lines is being looked up to find out their exact 
location, as there appears to be several encroach- 
ments. 

The Board of Survey recommended a uniform 
width of 50 feet throughout the entire length 
and at the present time one half of the street 
length could be built to this width. The length 
of the remaining half is in doubt and until these 
matters are fully disposed of I respectfully recom- 
mend that an order for construction be suspended 
until the entire matter of a new street line and 
proper grade is prepared, otherwise any construc- 
tion might involve the city in litigation in con- 
nection with the present street lines and grades. 
Respectfully yours. 
C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works, 

Placed on file. 



VETO - 



MUNICIPAL BUILDING, EAST 
BOSTON. 



The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 26, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I return herewith disapproved, 
and without my signature, an order adopted by 
your Honorable Body on December 17, 1934, 
accepting chapter 178 of the Acts of 1934, which 
provides for the construction of a municipal build- 
ing in East Boston. 

The statute referred to authorizes the purchase 
of land and the construction thereon of a municipal 
building in East Boston at a cost of $100,000, to 
be raised by sale of bonds providing an additional 
sum of 10 per cent should be added thereto to be 
raised by tax levy; but the whole amount of this 
expense would fall eventually upon the real estate 
taxpayers of Boston. In view of the existing high 
tax rate and the prospect of a rate as high if not 
higher for the year 1935, it is plain that no further 
burden should be added to that already being carried 
by the real estate taxpayer; nor is a municipal build- 
ing in East Boston an absolute necessity at the 
present time. Later when money is more plentiful 
and the times more propitious it might be well to 
erect a suitable municipal building in East Boston 
but under existing conditions I am constrained to 
veto the order. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Placed on file. 



present economic conditions it is certainly inad- 
visable to purchase same for playground purposes. 
Very respectfully yours, 
William P. Long, Chairman. 
Placed on file. 



VETO — EAST BOSTON PLAYGROUND. 

The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 26, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I am returning herewith disap- 
proved and without my signature the order adopted 
by your Honorable Body on December 17 which 
appropriated $10,000 for the establishment of a 
playground in the Fourth Section of East Boston. 
The Park Commissioner has reported to me that 
he knows of no available site that could be ac- 
quired in the section referred to which would be 
of sufficient area and otherwise suitable to afford 
proper facilities for playground purposes and he 
adds that there seems to be a sufficient number of 
playgrounds to accommodate the needs of the 
public at least until the times are more propitious. 

The amount appropriated here is substantial 
and would merely mean an additional burden 
upon the taxpayers. Economic conditions being 
what they are and the Fourth Section of East 
Boston being apparently adequately supplied 
with playgrounds, there seems to be no pressing 
need for the spending of this money at the present 
time. Therefore I feel constrained to veto the 
order. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Placed on file. 



LAND FOR WARD 7 PLAYGROUND. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 22, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Park Department relative to your order of 
December 10, 1934, concerning the proposed taking 
of a vacant lot of land bounded by Story and Fifth 
streets, Ward 7, for playground purposes. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City jf Boston, 
Park Department, December 20, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I have your memorandum of Decem- 
ber 15, with inclosure, order from the City Council, 
requesting the Park Commission, through your 
Honor, to consider the advisability ot taking the 
vacant lot of land bounded by Story and Fifth 
streets, Ward 7, for playground purposes. 

The land in question contains five lots, each lot 
containing approximately 5,700 square feet, is 
assessed for $1,700 or a total of $8,500 for the 
entire five lots containing approximately 28,387 
square feet or 0.65 acre. 

The area is entirely too small for a playground, 
is not properly located for such and under the 



APPROPRIATION, CITY PRINTING 

PLANT. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 20, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — Because of additional work which 
the City Printing Plant has been called upon to do 
in recent months the original appropriations in 
certain items of the departmental budget have 
proved inadequate. In order to close out the 
accounts of the department for the current financial 
year the Superintendent of the Plant has requested 
that an additional appropriation be made from 
Printing Department revenue. I submit herewith 
the necessary appropriation order and respectfully 
recommend its adoption by your Honorable Body. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Printing Department, 
December 19, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — Your Honor is respectfully requested 
to recommend an additional appropriation of 
$30,077.56 from the revenue of the Printing De- 
partment to meet the current year's expenses in 
the following budget items: 

A-l $4,100 00 

B-l 1,000 00 

B-5 30 00 

B-6 175 00 

B-8 350 00 

B-12 42 26 

D-3 300 00 

D-8 50 00 

E-15 15,000 00 

F-7 30 30 

G-3 7,000 00 

G-4 2,000 00 

$ 30,077 56 

The expense for the above enumerated budget 
items vary from year to year, dependent entirely 
on the amount and nature of the work required of 
the department to execute. 

Respectfully, 

William J. Casey, 
Superintendent of Printing. 

Ordered, That to meet the current expenses 
payable during the financial year beginning with 
the first day of January, 1934, an additional sum 
of $30,077.56 be, and the same hereby is, appro- 
priated from the income of the Printing Depart- 
ment, for: 

Printing Department. 

A-l, Permanent Employees $4,100 00 

B. Service Other than Personal 1,597 26 

D, Supplies 350 00 

E, Materials 15,000 00 

F-7, Pensions and Annuities 30 30 

G, Miscellaneous 9,000 00 

$30,077 56 



The order was passed, yeas 15, nays — Coun. 
Selvitella— 1. 

INSTALLATION OF TRAFFIC LIGHTS. 

The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 21, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit four letters from 
the Boston Traffic Commission, relative to orders 
adopted by your Honorable Body concerning the 
installation of traffic lights or signals at the follow- 
ing junctions: 

Traffic lights at — 

1. Perkins street and Jamaicaway. 

2. Perkins street and South Huntington 
avenue. 

3. Moraine, Centre, South Huntington avenue 
and Boylston streets. 

Traffic signals at — 

4. Crawford street and Humboldt avenue. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Traffic Commission, December 18, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — I have the honor to acknowledge 
receipt of Council order dated December 3, 1934, 
which reads as follows: 

" Ordered, That the Traffic Commissioner, 
through Iub Honor the Mayor, be requested to 
install traffic lights at Perkins street and the 
Jamaicaway." 

There are no funds available for the installation 
of these lights. 

Very truly yours, 
William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



39 



City of Boston, 
Traffic Commission, December 18, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — I have the honor to acknowledge 
receipt of Council order dated December 3, 1934, 
which reads as follows: 

"Ordered, That the Traffic Commissioner, through 
his Honor the Mayor, be requested to install 
traffic lights at Perkins street and South Hunting- 
ton avenue." 

There are no funds available at the present time 
for the installation of these signals. 

Very truly yours, 
William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 

City of Boston, 
Traffic Commission, December 18, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — I have the honor to acknowledge 
receipt of Council order dated December 3, 1934, 
which reads as follows: 

"Ordered, That the Traffic Commissioner, 
through his Honor the Mayor, be requested to 
install traffic lights at the junction of Moraine, 
Centre, South Huntington avenue and Boylston 
streets." 

There are no funds available at the present 
time for the installation of signals at the above 
location. 

Very truly yours, 
William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 

City of Boston, 
Traffic Commission, December 18, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — I have the honor to acknowledge 
receipt of Council order dated December 3, 1934, 
which reads as follows: 

"Ordered, That the Traffic Commissioner be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to install 
automatic traffic signals at the junction of Crawford 
street and Humboldt avenue, Ward 12." 

There are no funds available for the installation 
of the above signals at the present time. 
Very truly yours, 
William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 

Placed on file. 



WITHDRAWAL OF OFFER IN RE 
CONVALESCENT HOME. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 29, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — The Massachusetts Section, of the 
Women's Department of the National Civic 
Federation has informed me that on account of 
the opposition which they have encountered, they 
have withdrawn from the project of housing single 
women in the property in Dorchester known as 
the Convalescent Horn'"- and about which I sent a 
message to your Honorable Body on November 19. 
In view of this communication from the Massa- 
chusetts Section of the Women's Department of 
the National Civic Federation the order which, if 
adopted, would have authorized leasing of the 
premises in question to that body, is withdrawn. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 
Placed on file. 

TRANSFER FROM PARKMAN FUND. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 27, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I am in receipt of the attached 
communication from the Board of Park Commis- 
sioners requesting the transfer of the sum of 
$786.04 from the income of the George F. Park- 
man Fund to the maintenance and improvement 
of the Common and parks in existence on Janu- 
ary 12, 1887. 

I submit herewith an appropriation order and 
respectfully recommend its immediate passage by 
your Honorable Body. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Park Department, December 2ti, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — By vote of the Board of Park Com- 
missioners, you are respectfully asked to request 
the City Council to transfer from the income of 
the George F. Parkman Fund the sum of $785.04, 
which is the final amount of accrued income for the 
year 1934 and is now available, to be expended 
under the direction of the Board of Park Com- 
missioners as follows: 

Common and Parks in Existence on 
January 12, 1887, Maintenance and 

Improvement of $78(1 1 

When the budget estimates were made up for 
the year 1931, a sum equal to the total yearly 
income of the George F. Parkman Fund was 
deducted from Item A.-1, Permanent Employees, 
with the understanding that this deduction was li> 
be replaced by the total yearly income of said 
Parkman Fund for 1934, to be transferred as it 



accrued from time to time during the year to 
the regular maintenance appropriation of the 
Park 'Department. 

Respectfully yours, 
William P. Long, Chairman. 

Ordered, That the sum of $786.04 be, and hereby 
is, appropriated from the income of the George 
F. Parkman Fund, to be expended under the 
direction of the Park Commissioners, for the 
maintenance and improvement of the Common 
and parks in existence on January 12, 1887, as 
follows: 

Common and Parks in Existence on 
January 12, 1887, Maintenance and 
Improvement of $786 04 

The rule was suspended, and the order was 
passed, yeas 16, nays 0. 



FINANCE COMMISSION REPORTS IN 
RE TUNNEL TAKINGS. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 20, 1934. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I inclose herewith a letter from the 
Finance Commission accompanying a report 
transmitted in compliance with the order adopted 
by your Honorable Body on November 19, 1934, 
relative to the takings of land for the East Boston 
Tunnel approaches and which your Honorable 
Body requested me to forward to the Finance 
Commission. 

Yours truly, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
The Finance Commission, 

December 19, 1934. 
To the Honorable the Mayor. 

Sir, — On November 22, 1934, your Honor 
transmitted to the Finance Commission a copy of 
an order adopted by the City Council at its meet- 
ing held on November 19, 1934, which read as 
follows: 

"Ordered, That the Finance Commission be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, in its 
study of land-takings by the City of Boston, to 
give special consideration to the takings for the 
East Boston Tunnel approaches, considering 
among other things the extent to which settle- 
ments were made in excess of the true value of the 
parcels taken, as evidenced by bona fide sales in the 
neighborhood, including sales by former owners 
of lands so taken to persons who after a short 
period of ownership or under option unloaded on 
the city at large profits, and following these profits 
so far as possible to the ultimate recipients. 

In City Council November 19, 1934. Passed. 
Attest* 

W. J. Doyle, City Clerk." 

In your Honor's letter of transmittal accompany- 
ing this order, you requested that the commission 
"make the survey and report to me at your earliest 
convenience." As stated to you in a letter under 
date of November 23, 1934, at the time this request 
was received the commission already had in its 
possession a large amount of material gathered in 
an almost continuous investigation of the tunnel 
project, which began with the presentation of the 
bill to authorize construction of the tunnel in then 
1928 legislative sessions, and has been carried on 
down to the present day. The commission has 
issued many reports dealing with different phases 
of the project. 

Because certain aspects of it had not been com- 
pletely set forth in a form available to the general 
public, and because there appeared to be wide- 
spread demand for complete information, the 
commission decided that it would retain special 
counsel to assemble and digest the information 
already in the commission's possession, and to 
supplement this with such other information as 
would be pertinent and obtainable. The com- 
mission selected in the person of George R. Far- 
num, Esq., an attorney of considerable experience 
in legal practice and of sufficient knowledge of 
public affairs as to warrant the confidence that 
he would be capable of carrying out this assign- 
ment. Though Mr. Farnum had represented the 
Federal Government as counsel in important 
matters for several years, he had not been con- 
nected with municipal administration in any way, 
and therefore, by reason of this fact and the pre- 
viously mentioned qualifications, was, in the 
opinion of the members of the Finance Commis- 
sion, qualified to make an impartial survey of this 
tunnel project and of other matters which the 
commission has decided to make report upon. 

Mr. Farnum lias had the facilities of the Finance 
Commission at. his disposal, has examined many 
witnesses before the commission, and has made a 
careful study "f all the information obtainable to 
date, lie has presented to the commission a 
report dealing with certain general aspects of the 
tunnel takings. The commission has examined 
this report and is satisfied that it portrays the 
facts within the scope of it as set forth. 

llie commission submits Mr Farnum's report 
with this letter as the commission's response 
the present nine, to your honor's request. 

EtespSOtfufij submit ted, 

Tut: Finani i i Commission, 
Joseph .1. Leonard, 
Chairman, 



Boston, December 13, 1934. 
To the Finance Commission of the City of Boston. 
Gentlemen, — Pursuant to instructions received 
by me at the time of my engagement to conduct 
an investigation into matters pertaining to the 
administrative affairs of the City of Boston, I 
submit herewith a report covering certain features 
of the taking of properties by the Transit Com- 
mission in connection with the construction of the 
East Boston Vehicular Tunnel. This report, as 
will be evident from its character and scope, is 
limited to certain general aspects of the East 
Boston Vehicular Tunnel takings and will be fol- 
lowed from time to time by other reports dealing 
with various significant and material transactions 
in extended detail. 

Preliminary Considerations. 

Proposals to provide a quicker and easier route 
from Boston proper to East Boston than those 
supplied by the ferries and bridges have been con- 
sidered and discussed by public and private bodies 
in and out of City Hall and the State House for 
almost a quarter of a century. Sometimes a 
bridge was advocated, sometimes a tunnel. The 
first definite, concrete proposition to be given 
substantial consideration, however, was included 
in the presentation for legislative discussion of a 
plan for a vehicular tunnel worked out by a com- 
bination of municipal and state officials interested 
in public planning in connection with the effort to 
secure authorization for an intermediate highway. 
This engaged the attention of legislative authorities 
principally in the years 1925 to 1927. 

The ultimate rejection in 1927 of proposed 
legislation to authorize construction of such a 
highway and to provide a vehicular tunnel to 
East Boston as the connection between North 
Shore municipalities and this highway, resulted 
in the final separation of the two projects. 

The vehicular tunnel was decided upon as the 
most likely part of the whole to receive legislative 
authorization. Accordingly, with the complete 
project blocked by the Legislature of 1927, the 
principal advocates took up the job of getting it 
piecemeal by the introduction of a bill into the 
1928 legislative session authorization construction 
of a vehicular tunnel alone. 

Tunnel Acts Adopted by the Legislature. 

Alvan T. Fuller, then Governor, took a hand in 
this agitation and the first act authorizing con- 
struction of a vehicular tunnel was drawn to meet 
his ideas on the subject and adopted by the 1928 
Legislature with his approval. 

This act provided for the execution of the 
undertaking under state auspices with the City 
of Boston standing the financial responsibility. 
It required acceptance by the City Government 
of Boston, Mayor and Council. 

Malcolm E. Nichols, as Mayor, disapproved of 
the act principally on the ground that, inasmuch 
as the City of Boston had to pay for it, the city 
should have charge of its construction. 

The acceptance of the 1928 act thus defeated. 
Mayor Nichols offered a new bill to the 1929 
Legislature. This gave authority to construct to 
the Transit Department of the City of Boston. 
The act, as adopted, required acceptance by 
Mayor and Council, but by its terms the Council 
was thereafter eliminated from further participa- 
tion. 

Planning of Tunnel. 

Under the authorization of this act the City 
Planning Board, acting more or less jointly with 
the Metropolitan Planning Board, set to work on 
plans for the project. Likewise the Transit 
Department made studies and plans. 

Late in the year 1929 it developed that the 
Transit Department had one plan, and the City 
Planning Board and Metropolitan Planning Board 
jointly had another. The Planning Boards had 
worked out and considered several plans, but 
finally were committed to one definitely. It was 
estimated by the Transit Department that its 
plan would be much the cheaper for the city and 
would furnish a more suitable tunnel than the 
plan advocated by the joint planning boards. 

The Harriman-Fay or Nichols Plan. 
Notwithstanding this opinion, the Mayor 
favored the plan advocated by the City Planning 
Hoard and the Metropolitan Planning Board. 
This plan provided for a tunnel coming out at a 
point slightly north of Hanover street with a 
circle centering at or about the junction of Salem 
and Cross streets with a widening of Cross street 
to Haymarket square and another circle in Hay- 
market square. The adoption of this plan 
vigorously opposed by the Finance Commit 
and others at the time on the ground that the 
amount authorised for the project by the 192U 
Legislature, namely, - 0, would not be 

sufficient to pay the ebsl of it; also on the ground 
that a tunnel constructed in accordance with that 
plan would not be the safest and most efficient 
that could be built: and also on the ground that 
execution of it would require extensive demolition 

of municipal buildings and public places which 
must necessarily be replaced in other locations 

great expense. the extensive publicity given 
to tiie controversial discussion of the various plans 

was permeated with charges made officially ami 

Unofficially thai many of the parcels of real estate 
lo be affected by the Nichols plan had been 
acquired by the speculators, and that the same 
Speculators had been successful on may occasions 

in obtaining large profits by capitalising advance 



40 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



information of contemplated city takings. The 
Nichols administration expired with the execution 
of this plan tied up by litigation and Mayor Curley 
came into office in 1930 with the entire project 
still open to whatever action he felt it necessary 
to take. 

The Transit Department Plan. 
As an alternative to the so-called Nichols 
tunnel plan, the Transit Commission had developed 
a plan which provided that the plaza of the tunnel 
would be located south of Hanover street between 
Cross and North streets, and provided for no 
circle or street widening. 

Discussion of Plans During Curley 
Administration. 

For more than three months thereafter there 
was considerable discussion, usually at conferences 
held at the Mayor's office, in regard to the adop- 
tion of a vehicular tunnel plan. Messrs. Henry I. 
Harriman and Frederic H. Fay, who had sponsored 
and advocated the so-called Nichols tunnel plan, 
continued during this interval to advocate the 
adoption of that particular plan. On April 4, 
1930, a conference was held in the Mayor's office 
as the result of which it was reported in the Press 
the next morning that it appeared that the Harri- 
man-Fay tunnel plan, which was the so-called 
Nichols tunnel plan, was to be adopted. The article 
related that this plan had been warmly advocated 
at the conference the day before at the Mayor's 
office and it indicated that the opinion of the 
writer of the article, presumably after discussion 
with participants, was that the Harriman-Fay 
plan was preferred over the Transit Department 
plan, although the Mayor had not committed 
himself to either plan. 

On April 16 the newspapers reported the an- 
nouncement officially by the Mayor and Transit 
Commissioners that the Transit Department's 
plan for the construction of a tunnel had been 
formally decided upon and adopted. This action 
was, of course, contrary to the impression created 
by the newspaper reports of the April 4 conference. 

Some very significant real estate transactions 
relating to the project took place between these 
two dates, April 4 and 16, and the recital of the 
record of them will appear in a subsequent report . 

First Order of Taking. 

During the next few months there was con- 
siderable discussion and speculation on the prob- 
able takings, but official action first came to public 
notice by the adoption by the Transit Commis- 
sion on August 4, 1930, of an order of taking of 
31 properties on the Boston side, comprising 
48 parcels separately listed by the assessors. 
These takings consisted of the land with build- 
ings thereon located on the easterly side of Cross 
street, between Hanover and North streets; on 
the northerly side of North street, between Cross 
and Richmond streets; a parcel fronting on Rich- 
mond street and one on Hanover street, all of 
which were contained in the block bounded by 
Cross, North, Hanover and Richmond streets, and 
comprised the major portion of the block; the 
parcels on the southeasterly side of North street 
between Cross street and Dock square, and two 
takings east of Cross street on the northeast side 
of North street. 

There were 28 properties or 45 separately 
assessed parcels taken at this time from private 
owners, two properties from unknown owners, 
one owned by the City of Boston. One parcel 
owned by a City of Boston Trust, the taxes on 
which were paid from the income of the Trust, is 
included in the 28 properties referred to. 

By this order of taking, property subject to 
municipal taxation in the total valuation of 
$3,106,900 was diverted from the taxable valua- 
tion of the city and, in addition, a city police 
station valued at S150.000 was doomed, making 
it necessary to provide another location and 
another building for the police needs of the North 
End. 

Of the 27 properties taken from private owners, 
four were taken from speculators who had pur- 
chased them either after or while the legislation 
for the tunnel authorization was pending, or who 
acquired the property while the legislation for 
authorization of the intermediate highway was 
pending. More specific details of these purchases 
and their relation to the tunnel takings will be 
given in subsequent reports. 

The total valuation of these four properties on 
the books of the assessors at the time of the 
taking was SI, 225,000, which amounted approxi- 
mately to 39 per cent of the assessed value of the 
entire 27 privately owned properties taken at that 
time. 

Settlement for First Takings. 

Immediately after public announcement of the 
taking it was decided by the municipal authorities 
that settlement for damages would be offered on 
the following basis: 

To those owners willing to accept assessed valua- 
tion plus 10 per cent, the city offered to make 
immediate award in that amount. 

To those unwilling to accept assessed valuation 
plus 10 per cent, the city would award one dollar 
and compel the owner to institute court proceed- 
ings and have the court assess damages. 

In the one case, it meant immediate payment 
without expense of court costs or delay. In the 
other, it meant long drawn-out legal proceedings 
with attendant heavy expense for legal and other 
services. 

Four of the properties included in this order 
were at this time taken only in part, but the re- 



mainder of each was taken in a subsequent order. 
In each of these four cases payment, w r hen made, 
was for the whole parcel. The figures of the pay- 
ment for each are included here for convenience in 
picturing the complete transaction. 

With this notation, the salient facts in regard to 
this first order of taking are as follows: 

There were 27 privately owned properties in the 
first order of taking. 

The assessed valuation of these 27 properties in 
1930 was S3, 106,900. 

The cost of these 27 properties to the city was 
83,209,090. 

Four of these 27 properties were owned by 
speculators at the time of the taking. Three 
of the four were purchased by the speculators 
while the tunnel plan was in the making, and after 
the authorizing act had been adopted. 

The assessed valuation of the four properties 
owned by speculators was SI, 225,000. 

The cost to the speculators of these properties 
was S991.700. 

The cost to the City of Boston of these four 
properties was Sl.378,300. 

The city paid to the speculators 83S6.600 more 
than the speculators paid for the properties. 

Analysis of these facts shows that in this first 
order of taking the speculators owned approxi- 
mately 15 per cent in number and 39 per cent in 
valuation of the 27 privately owned properties. 

To show more clearly these particular trans- 
actions, the following data is offered : 

1. Property known as 109-111 North street 
was purchased on September 16, 1929, by Wil- 
liam I. Schell, acting for Abram Lipp and Joseph 
Paul, for S39.200. Its assessed valuation was 
840,000. It was taken by the city for tunnel pur- 
poses on August 4, 1930, and the city paid 844,000, 
which gave the speculators a profit of 84.S00, or 
12 per cent. 

2. Property known as 106-10S Cross street 
and 108-122 North street, consisting of five parcels, 
was purchased by Samuel L. Lowe for 8272,500 in 
March, 1925. The assessed valuation in 1930 
was 8282,000. The property was taken by the 
City of Boston for tunnel purposes on August 4, 
1930. The city paid S341.000 for it by mutual 
agreement between Lowe and the City Law De- 
partment, which gave Lowe a profit of S68.500, or 
25 per cent, on the purchase price. 

3. Property known as 35-39 North street and 
34-40 Blackstone street, assessed as two parcels, 
was purchased by Abram Lipp and Joseph Paul — ■ 
it is claimed by William I. Schell that he was 
an equal partner, but that is denied by Lipp and 
Paul— on June 10, 1930, for 8180,000, under 
option previously taken. The assessed valuation 
was $283,000. The city took the property for 
tunnel purposes on August 4, 1930, which was less 
than two months after acquisition by Lipp and 
Paul, and paid S311.300 by mutual agreement 
between the Law Department and the owners, 
which gave Lipp and Paul a profit of S13 1,300, or 
73 per cent on the purchase price. 



4. Property known as 17-27 North street, 
47-51 North Market street and 38-52 Merchants 
row, consisting of two parcels, was purchased by 
Abram Lipp and Joseph Paul (William I. Schell 
claiming one third interest) on June 10, 1930, 
under option previously taken, for 8500,000. The 
assessed valuation in 1930 was S620.000. It was 
taken by the city for tunnel purposes on August 4, 
1930, which was less than two months after 
acquisition by Lipp and Paul, and the city paid 
S6S2,000 by mutual agreement, which gave Lipp 
and Paul (Schell claiming one third interest) a 
profit of S1S2,000, or 36 per cent on the purchase 
price. 

The record of the transactions between specu- 
lators is so cluttered with straw conveyances, 
mortgages, assignments and attachments that an 
explanation of them at this time would unduly 
extend this report without any compensating 
advantages. 

It is sufficient to point out that in two cases in 
particular the speculators turned over a profit for 
themselves of S3 13, 300 within sixty days after 
taking title, that three of the properties were 
acquired by the speculators after the tunnel had 
been authorized and the plans were in the making, 
and that a total profit to the speculators was 
8386,600. 

During the succeeding months some takings 
in whole or in part were made on the East Boston 
side and easements were taken on the Boston 
side, which will be dealt with separately. 

Second Order of Taking. 
The next order of taking on the Boston side 
was adopted on November 26, 1930. The prop- 
erties taken at this time were for a site for the 
ventilation shaft on the Boston side, and were 
as follows: 

(a) Property assessed as 308-310 North street 
in the name of James Fitzgerald in the amount 
of 815,000. The city paid S16.500 by mutual 
agreement between the city and owner. 

(b) Property assessed as 316-328 North street 
in the name of Angelina and Charles Rotondo 
in the amount of 866,000. The Transit Com- 
mission awarded the assessed valuation which 
was not accepted by the owner. As a result of 
subsequent negotiation, the city ultimately paid 
SS1.000 for it, which was approximately 22 per 
cent above assessed value. 

Third Order of Taking. 
The next order relating to takings on the Boston 
side was adopted on February 3, 1931. The 
properties taken, the owners of record, the assessed 
valuations, and the ultimate payment by the 
city, which resulted from negotiations with the 
Law Department after the Transit Commission 
had made a nominal award of one dollar in each 
case, were as follows: 



Property. 


Owner. 


Assessed 
Value. 


City 
Paid. 


Per Cent of 
Excess Over 
Valuation. 


148-150 North street 




$18,000 
29,000 


$19,800 
35,000 


10 per cent. 


138-144 North street . 




20 per cent plus. 









The order adopted at this time included takings 
of small remainders of four other properties which 
were taken in part on August 4, 1930. The facts 
of the combined takings are given earlier in this 
report under the August 4, 1930, takings. 

Fourth Order of Taking. 
The next taking on the Boston side was by an 
order adopted on May 11, 1931. The properties 
taken were on the easterly side of Cross street, 
between North street and Commercial street, 
and on Commercial street opposite the end of 
Cross street as it existed at that time. This con- 
stituted the widening of Cross street through 
Commercial street to Mercantile street and was 
for the purpose of making a wide approach to the 
plaza of the tunnel from the southerly direction. 
It should be remembered that a widening of Cross 
street from this direction was intended and in- 
cluded in all the tunnel plans, that is, those which 
were ultimately merged into the so-called Nichols 
or Harriman-Fay plan, which was rejected by 
Mayor Curley, and the Transit Department's 
plan which was accepted by Mayor Curley. 
Thirteen properties were included in this taking. 
The owners of some accepted the city's offer of 
assessed value plus 10 per cent The owners of 
others refused to accept, entered suit, and obtained 
awards from the court. 

More Speculators' Parcels. 

Four of these properties were taken from the 
speculators and the principal facts in regard to 
them are as follows: 

1. Property assessed as 63-65 Commercial 
street was purchased by Abram Lipp and Joseph 
Paul (William I. Schell claiming one third interest) 
in May, 1928. It was assessed for S63.000. The 
speculators paid 854,000 for it. The city paid 
$77,000 for it on May 22, 1932, or eleven days 
after the adoption of the order of taking. The 
speculators' profit was $23,000, or approximately 
42 per cent on the purchase price. 



2. Property known as 24-30 Fulton street and 
136 Cross street was purchased by Abram Lipp 
and Joseph Paul (William I. Schell claiming one 
third interest) in August, 1929, which was about 
the time that the Harriman-Fay or Nichols plan 
was being worked out. The assessed valuation 
was $100,000, but the speculators purchased it for 
875,000. The city paid 8110,000 for it on May 
15, 1931, which was four days after the adoption 
of the order of taking. The profit to the specu- 
lators was 835,000, or 46 \ per cent on the purchase 
price. 

3. Property assessed as 55-57 Commercial 
street was purchased by Abram Lipp and Joseph 
Paul (William I. Schell claiming one third interest) 
in December, 1930, which was just at the time that 
the Nichols plan was formally adopted. The 
assessed valuation was $45,000. The speculators 
paid $30,000. The city paid $71,500 for it on 
May 19, 1931, or eight days after the adoption of 
the order of taking. The profit to the speculators 
was $41,500, or approximately 139 per cent on the 
purchase price. 

4. Property assessed as 56-60 Commercial 
street was purchased by Abram Lipp and Joseph 
Paul (William I. Schell claiming one third interest) 
in November, 1930, which was about the time the 
Harriman-Fay or Nichols plan was decided upon. 
The assessed valuation was $75,000. The specu- 
lators paid 841,000. The city paid 890,200 for it 
on May 14, 1930, or three days after adoption of 
the order of taking. The profit to the speculators 
was 849,200. In this case the speculators received 
approximately 120 per cent on the purchase price. 

On these four parcels, all of which were ob- 
tained by the speculators while the plans for the 
tunnel were in the making, the speculators obtained 
a total profit of $148,700. 

In addition, the same group purchased on October 
25, 1929, which was also just before the Nichols 
tunnel plan was announced, the property known 
as 128-134 Cross street for $250,000. It was 
assessed for $225,000. This property was occupied 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



41 



by F. H. Roberts Company, candy manufacturer, 
as lessee; the building thereon being a part of a 
large plant which extended to Ferry street. The 
Roberts Company subsequently, on December 29, 
1930, bought the Cross street parcel from the 
speculators and paid them 8275,000, which gave 
the speculators a profit of 825,000. Mention is 
made of this private transaction here only to bring 
out the fact that the speculators sought and ob- 
tained it and made a profit on it after the tunnel 
was authorized and the plans for the tunnel were in 
the making. 

The facts in regard to the ultimate cost to the city 
will be shown in an exhibit at the end of this report . 

Fifth Order of Taking, 

The next order of taking on the Boston side was 
for the property assessed in the name of George H. 
Pettee Heirs at 117-121 North street in the amount 
of S134.000. It was taken on October 1, 1932, 
and paid for on October 19, 1932. On the official 
records it appears to be a taking from the Pettee 
Heirs, but actually the Pettee Heirs had given an 
option on the parcel to William K. Bean, a specula- 
tor who was an employee of Cabot, Cabot & Forbes. 
Bean and other representatives of this firm have 
testified that Bean held this option as an individual. 
The property was taken by the city from Bean 
within the life of an option given by Pettee. The 
price named in the option was 885,000. The city 
paid S134.000 for it, which was the assessed valua- 
tion. This gave Bean a profit of 849,000, or 
approximately 58 per cent on the purchase price; 
but inasmuch as the option was obtained without 
any cash payment and the city took and paid for 
the parcel before Bean was required by the terms 
of his agreement to take title, the profit named 
was without investment of a penny by Bean. 

The five orders above recorded completed the 
takings for the plaza at the Boston entrance to the 
tunnel and for the approaches thereto from the 
south along Cross street and from the west along 
North street. 

In these five orders of takings the number of 
properties thus shown as belonging to speculators 
and the gain to them over the purchase price by 
the settlements with the city were as follows; 







>. 










& . 






~°.l 




d t 


■£> g 


Date of Order. 


o"3 S 

-TOO 


188 




SH-a 




B a. 1 - 


£ 9 




3 3iftl 






£ 



August 9, 1930 


4 
None 
None 

4 

1 


S386.600 


November 26, 1930 




February 3, 1931 




May 11, 1931 


148,700 


October 1, 1932 


49,000 






Total 


9 


8584,300 







The Widening of Merrimac and Cross Streets and 
the Haymarket Square Circle. 
At the time that the Nichols plan was under 
consideration in 1929, it was brought out by in- 
vestigation by the Finance Commission that the 
speculators owned some properties that would be 
required in the execution of that plan. These 
had been purchased by the speculators at or about 
the time that legislative authorization was sought 
to construct an intermediate highway to provide 
a wide avenue for traffic through the downtown 
section of the city connecting the arteries to the 
south of the city with arteries to the north of the 
city. It was generally known, and frequently 
stated by the Finance Commission, that the 
speculators acquired parcels in anticipation of 
making profits either by the sale of them to the 
city for the highway, or by sale to private interests 
which might desire locations on that highway. 
The rejection of the authorizing act in 1927 left 
the speculators with these parcels on their hands 
with little possibility of advantageous sale. Many 
other parcels were acquired similarly at that time 
and eventually allowed by the speculators to revert 
to the original owners by foreclosure proceedings, 
expiration of options, etc. In addition, many 
others were acquired by the speculators in 1928 
and 1929 when, legislation to authorize construc- 
tion of the tunnel having been adopted, it was 
apparent that the Nichols administration favored 
the location of the plaza on the Boston side at a 
point north of Hanover street on Cross street with :i 
circle radiating from the junction of Cross and 
Salem streets, with a widening of Cross street 
as it led into Haymarket square, and with another 
circle at Haymarket square. If the tunnel was 
constructed in accordance with the Nichols plan, 
all of these speculators' parcels would have been 
taken, but the opposition to ihe Nichols plan 
eventually resulted in a ten taxpayers' petition 
to the Supreme Court to restrain the city officials 
from carrying it out. The Nichols administra- 
tion expired while action on this petition was 
pending. After .Mayor Curlcy assumed 
the Transit Commission held in abeyance execa 
li"ii of any plan until the adoption on April Iti, 
1930, of the plan which was subsequently carried 
out. 



This decision left the speculators with still more 
properties on their hands without possibility of 
advantageous sales. In addition, there were 
some parcels between Canal and Merrimac streets 
in which the speculators had previously acquired 
interest. 

Though the agitation for a circle in Haymarket 
square subsided somewhat for a short time, as far 
as the public knew, with the defeat of the Nichols 
plan, it never really died. It took new form in 
1931 in a movement to secure legislation for an 
approach to the tunnel from the north by a widen- 
ing of Merrimac street, a wide circle in Haymarket 
square, and a widening of Cross street between 
Haymarket square and Hanover street. A bill 
to authorize this project was introduced into 
the 1932 legislative session. This bill provided 
for a bond issue of S4, 500, 000 to be added to the 
S16.000.000 already appropriated for the tunnel 
and specifically designated the lines of the widen- 
ing. The Finance Commission opposed this on 
the ground that the necessity for this approach 
had not been adequately proven and that there 
was doubt that the city would receive enough in 
tunnel tolls to pay for the heavy expense already 
incurred. However, the Legislature reduced the 
bond authorization to 83,000,000 and adopted 
the act, and the Governor signed it on June 16, 
1931. Six days before the Governor signed the 
act, the speculators added one more parcel to 
those already acquired by them. This particular 
parcel was indirectly designated in the act, then 
in its final stage, to be taken by the Transit 
Commission. 

Adoption of Merrimac Street Widening Plan. 
On May 31, 1933, the Transit Commission 
adopted an order involving takings of 34 proper- 
ties. These properties consisted of parcels on the 
southerly side of Merrimac street, between Port- 
land and Friend streets, including a small triangular 
area bounded by Market, Portland and Merrimac 
streets; a portion of another triangular area 
bounded by Friend, Merrimac and Sudbury 
streets; properties facing Canal street on one side 
and Merrimac street on the other; properties 
fronting on Washington Street North in Hay- 
market square, north and south of Cross street, 
and properties on Cross street between Hay- 
market square and Hanover street. Some were 
takings of properties in whole, others were partial 
takings. 

One of these 34 properties in this taking was 
owned by the City of Boston. A comparison of 
assessed valuation and cost to the city on this 
entire group is not feasible because of the number 
of properties which were taken only in part. It 
is not possible to subdivide the assessed valuation 
on each property so as to give the portion which 
would represent the assessed valuation of the 
part taken. 

In the exhibit at the end of this report will 
appear such figures as are obtainable and relevant. 
Previous to the adoption of this order, the Fi- 
nance Commission had interposed objection to 
the policy of settling for land-takings by any such 
arbitrary method as was used in the first settle- 
ment, namely, paying assessed value plus 10 per 
cent. The commission called attention to the 
fact that many parcels had recently been pur- 
chased by speculators for fractional parts of the 
assessed value; that under such circumstances 
there was no obligation on the city to make as- 
sessed value the basis of the award; that the 
earning power of the properties was not in all 
cases in the same proportion to the assessed value; 
and that, in many cases, by negotiations based on 
fairness to the taxpayers as a whole and to the 
particular owners of these parcels, the city could 
acquire some for substantially less than assessed 
value plus 10 per cent. The city authorities 
rejected the Finance Commission's recommenda- 
tion. Instead of negotiating first and endeavoring 
to arrive at a fair price, the Transit Commission 
made the takings, awarded a nominal sum, and 
left the negotiations to be conducted by the Law 
Department after suit had been entered in court 
on behalf of each owner. 

An examination of the payments made in such 
cases as have been finally settled and comparison 
of prices paid with assessed valuations merits 
little comment, at this time. In all but a few- 
cases the total payment by agreement between 
the city and the owner's attorney does not of 
itself give evidence of undue liberality by the 
city. The method by which a settlement was 
obtained is of more significance. 

Effort was made by the representatives of the 
majority of the owners to obtain settlement during 
the months following il"' takings in May, but it 
was not until December that the first of th< i 



cases was settled. Then, for a period of about 
three weeks, or until the termination of the ad- 
ministration on December 31, 1933, settlement 
was made at irregular intervals to the number 
of 14 of the 33 privately owned properties taken. 

The principal facts of these 14 settlements are 
as follows: 

1. Property known as 5 Market street, 42-40 
Merrimac street, 99-103 Portland street, taken 
in part, was owned by C. W. Whittier. The 
assessed valuation was 8130,000. The city took 
1,338 square feet of a total area of 3,559, necessi- 
tating alteration of the building and paid S100.000 
as damages on December 26, 1933. 

2. Property known as 2-10 Canal street, 1-9 
Merrimac street, taken in whole. It was owned 
by C. W. Whittier et al., trustees. The assessed 
valuation was 8140,000. The city paid $175,000 
on December 19, 1933. 

3. Property known as 20-22 Canal street and 
19-21 Merrimac street, taken in whole. Title was 
in the name of Frances E. O'Brien, as straw for 
Samuel L. Lowe, Abram Lipp and G. Augustus 
Holzman, who purchased it on October 15, 1924, 
for S76,0O0. The assessed valuation was S105,00o' 
The city paid 8126,000 on December 29, 1933, a 
gain of 850,000 on the purchase price. 

4. Property known as 14 Canal street was 
taken in whole. Title was held in the name of 
Samuel Williamson, who acted as straw for Samuel 
L. Lowe and Adolph I. Dinner who controlled 
through mortgage ownership. The assessed valua- 
tion was S80.000. The city paid S96.000 for it on 
December 30, 1933. 

5. Property known as 9-10 Washington Street 
North, taken in part, and property known as 7-8 
Washington Street North, taken in whole. The 
owner was Harold L. Niles et al. The combined 
assessed valuation of the two was 8115,400. The 
area of 9-10 Washington Street North was 2,280 
square feet, of which 418 square feet were taken. 
The city paid S120.000 by agreement on Decem- 
ber 11, 1933, for the two takings. 

6. Property known as 7 Cross street, 135-191 
Blackstone street, taken in whole. Title was in 
the name of Frances E. O'Brien, -as straw for 
Abram Lipp, Joseph Paul, G. Augustus Holzman 
and Samuel L. Lowe, when it was acquired in 
1925 for 8145,000. The assessed valuation was 
8170,000. The city paid 8187,000 for it on 
December 29, 1933, which was a gain of 842,000 
over the purchase price. 

7. Property known as 15-19 Cross street, 46 
Endicott street was taken in whole. It was owned 
by executors under will of Marks I. Cohen. The 
assessed valuation was 852,000. The city paid 
865,000 on December 19, 1933. 

8. Property known as 26-34 Cross street and 
51 Endicott street, taken in whole. It was owned 
by executors under will of Marks I. Cohen. The 
assessed valuation was 871,000. The city paid 
S90.000 on December IS, 1933. 

9. Properties known as 3S-40 Cross street, 
rear 36 Cross street, 40-44 Cross street, 42-44 
Cross street, 46-50 Cross street, 52-54 Cross 
street, taken in whole. Previous to acquisition 
by William I. Schell in September, 1929, for Abram 
Lipp and Joseph Paul, they were assessed as three 
separately owned properties. The assessed valua- 
tion was S132.300. Schell paid 8119,000 and 
took title in the name of Hvman E. Bass. The 
city paid 8145,530 on December 30, 1333, for all 
three. The gain on the combined purchase prices 
was S26.530. 

10. Property known as 64-70 Cross street, 
taken in whole. It was owned by Abbott J. 
Epstein. The assessed valuation was 823,500. 
The city paid 828,200 on December SO, 

11. Property known as 76 Cross street, 192-196 
Hanover street, taken in whole. It was owned i 
by Stabile & Co., Inc., and occupied by Stabile 
Bank and Trust Companv. The assessed valua- 
tion was $130,800. The city paid 8175,000 for 

it on December 30, 1933, this payment being di- 
vided between (lie owner of the buildings and the 
lessor. 

The foregoing lists the properties that wore 
settled by agreement, 14 properties in all of a total 
of 33 taken from private owners. All these set- 
tlements were made in December, 1933, which 
was the last month of the administration which 
authorized the takings. In all of th, 
either the properties wire owned by speculators 
or the settlements were negotiated by attorni 
whom the Finance Commission has already de- 
scribed as "political lawyers." 

In this list of 11 properties there were four 
which were owned or controlled by the specu- 
lators. In these eases the amount realised In 
the speculators in excess of the purchase price 
was $123,530, as follows: 



1': 1 I'IMtTV. 


Owner. 


- over 

Purchase Price, 


20 22 Canal street 


Lowe, I.ipp. Holzman 

(through mortgage transaction),,.. 


! 000 

o.lXH) 
1 ! 000 




7 Cross stie.-i . is."- I'M i;|aekstone street 






°6 530 












Si".; 









42 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



Thus, it may be seen that in the taking of land 
for the East Boston Vehicular Tunnel on the Boston 
side the total amount realized by speculators in 
excess of the purchase price was $707,830, as fol- 
lows: 

On the takings for the Tunnel proper ..... §584,300 
On the takings for the widening of Merri- 
mac street and Haymarket square cir- 
cle 123,530 

Total $707,830 

A tabular record of all the takings with relevant 
details is annexed to this report. (See page 45.) 
Respectfully submitted, 
George R. Farnum. 
Placed on file. 

The following additional reports were also 
received: 

City of Boston, 
The Finance Commission, 

December 27, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Sir, — The Finance Commission transmits to 
your Honor the inclosed copy of a second report 
by George R. Farnum, Esq., as special counsel, 
relating to the investigation of the East Boston 
Vehicular Tunnel land-takings. 

This report is submitted as additional reply to 
your Honor's request which was made in accord- 
ance with an order adopted by the City Council 
on November 19, 1934. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph J. Leonard, Chairman, 
Joseph Joyce Donahce, 
Charles M. Storey, 
Alexander Wheeler, 

The Finance Commission. 

Boston, December 26, 1934. 
f o the Finance Commission of the City of Boston. 

Gentlemen, — My report, dealing with the East 
Boston Vehicular "Tunnel land-takings, submitted 
on December 18 last, contained the statement 
that "it will be followed from time to time by 
other reports dealing with various significant and 
material transactions in extended detail." I sub- 
mit herewith the first of such detailed supple- 
mentary reports. It is confined to a consideration 
of the circumstances leading up to the taking by 
the city of the so-called Hammond and Squire 
properties, in which the speculators made an 
aggregate profit of S313.300, an analytical study 
of the manner in which the settlements were con- 
summated, and, in particular, to the effort to 
trace the proceeds accruing to the speculators 
from the takings. In this last connection, may I 
call your attention to the fact that in the order 
passed by the City Council on November 19 last, 
the Finance Commission was requested in its 
study of land-takings, to follow these proceeds — 
or "profits," to use the word employed in the 
order — "so far as possible, to the ultimate 
recipients." 

As stated in rny report of December 18, 1934, 
for several months after Mayor Curley assumed 
office on January 1, 1930, there were many con- 
ferences, usually in the Mayor's office, and much 
public discussion of a suitable tunnel plan. The 
Nichols plan, execution of which had been pre- 
vented by litigation, was still being warmly ad- 
vocated in slightly modified form by Messrs. 
Harriman and Fay, representing the Metropolitan 
Planning Board and the City Planning Board. 
Additionally, the Transit Commissioners were 
also advocating the acceptance of their plan 
which Mayor Nichols had rejected. It was a 
matter of serious financial concern both to the 
city and to the land owners in the neighborhood, 
whose property might be taken, which plan was 
adopted. 

On April 4, 1930, an important conference was 
held in the Mayor's office at which these plans 
were discussed. This meeting was attended by 
representatives of the Finance and Transit Com- 
missions, among others. Newspaper reports 
following this conference gave the impression 
that the Harriman-Fay plan was to be adopted. 
It should be borne in mind that this Harriman- 
Fay plan called for extensive taking of land 
north of North street, while the Transit Commis- 
sion plan required the taking of land on the 
southerly side of North street. 

On or about this time Abram Lipp and Joseph 
Paul were negotiating for options with the owners 
of two large properties on the southerly side of 
North street. Negotiations were being conducted 
through Frederic Viaux as broker in one case and 
through William K. Bean, of the office of Cabot, 
Cabot & Forbes, as broker in the other. Finally, 
on April 11, according to documents in the posses- 
sion of the Finance Commission, Viaux obtained 
the signature of Robert H. Gardiner for himself 
and for John G. Palfrey, co-trustees, to an agree- 
ment to sell to Elizabeth C. Hyland, an employee 
of Lipp, and straw for Lipp and Paul, the prop- 
erty known as 17-27 North street, 38-52 Mer- 
chants row, 47-51 North Market street. This 
property was owned by the Samuel Hammond 
Estate of which Gardiner and Palfrey were the 
trustees. According to the terms of the agree- 
ment, Hyland undertook to pay $10,000, at the 
time it was signed, and to take title on or before 
June 10, 1930, when in consummation of the deal 
Hyland was to pay the balance of the agreed 
purchase price of $500,000 (that is, $490,000), 
by assuming an outstanding mortgage of $100,000 



held by the Provident Institution for Savings, 
and paying $390,000 in cash. Later this contract 
was revised so as to call for the payment of an 
additional deposit of $10,000 by Hyland, and the 
taking back of a second mortgage by the trustees 
for a part of the purchase price. 

Mr. Gardiner has stated to the Finance Com- 
mission that at the time of the giving of the option 
he had made careful inquiry of the likelihood 
of the taking of his property by the city, and con- 
cluded that it was not to be done. Regarding the 
real purchaser, he had been given only the informa- 
tion that it was wanted for investment. It was 
assessed for $620,000. 

On the next day, April 12, 1930, through Wil- 
liam K. Bean, the State Street Trust Company, 
trustee under the will of John P. Squire, made 
an agreement with William J. Stober, as straw for 
Abram Lipp and Joseph Paul, to sell the property 
known as 35-49 North street. By the terms of the 
agreement $2,000 was to be paid in cash when 
signed, and the balance by a note of $125,000, 
secured by a mortgage on the property, and $53,000 
in cash, when the papers were passed. The agent 
who represented the bank in the negotiations 
informed the Finance Commission that he had no 
knowledge whatsoever of the probability of a 
taking of that parcel by the city, though he was 
acquainted with the tunnel agitations. Bean 
testified before the Finance Commission that he 
was led to believe, by such inquiry as he himself 
had made, that this parcel would not be taken by 
the city. The assessed value was $283,000. 

IP 773 00 P a y a ble to William J. Stober and indorsed back to the city in payment of taxes and water bills; 
126,770 83 payable to Stober and indorsed over to the State Street Trust Company, trustee of the John P. 

Squire Estate, in payment of a mortgage of $125,000 and accrued interest; 
174,656 73 payable to Stober and indored over to Frances R. Cohen, secretary to John S. Slater, the 

attorney who represented Lipp and Paul in the transaction. This check Slater deposited 

in his account. 



On April 15, three days after the Squire property 
was tied up by option to Lipp and Paul, and four 
days after the Hammond property was tied up by 
the same speculators, formal announcement was 
made by the Mayor and Transit Commissioners 
that the Transit Commission's plan of a tunnel 
was adopted, which called for the widening of 
North street on the southerly side — or the side 
where these properties were situated. William K. 
Bean gave the curious testimony before the Finance 
Commission that as he came away from the State 
Street Trust Company, with the signed agreement 
in his pocket, he learned for the first time that he 
had been misinformed as to the supposed improb- 
ability of the city's taking the Squire property. 

The city being thus committed to a taking that 
included these properties, Lipp and Paul took title 
to the Hammond parcel on June 10, 1930, in the 
name of Louis Binda, and, on the same day, to the 
Squire property, in the name of William J. Stober. 

The city formally took both these parcels by the 
order of August 4, 1930, and, on August 6 paid 
$682,000 for the Hammond property for which Lipp 
and Paul paid $500,000, and $311,300 for the 
Squire property, for which Lipp and Paul paid 
$180,000. 

On August 6, 1930, the city settled for the Squire 
property. This property was acquired by Lipp 
and Paul for $180,000, was assessed for $283,000 
and the city paid therefor $311,300. 

In settling for it, the city issued the following 
checks: 



$311,300 00 total paid by the city. 

In addition to the foregoing $174,656.73, Lipp gave Slater a check for an additional amount of $9,565.67, 
making a total of $184,222.40. This money Slater disbursed as follows: 
$50,000 00 to Abraham Werby, a relative of Paul, in payment of mortgages held by Werby on other prop- 
erty on Cross street; 
91,277 00 to Irving Karpis, a brother-in-law of William I. Schell, who claimed to be interested as a partner 
in this deal as well as that involving the Hammond property, on account of a certain mortgage; 
41,445 30 was retained by Slater in satisfaction of the principal and accrued interest on mortgages which 
he personally took to accommodate Lipp and Paid on this property and property on Com- 
mercial street; 
1,500 10 retained by Slater for legal services and disbursements. 



$184 222 40 



The net proceeds from this settlement accruing 
to Lipp and Paul that was thus disbursed in satis- 
faction of mortgages on other property in which 
they had an interest, will be dealt with in the 
continued course of the investigation, if and so far 
as the facts discoverable may indicate that they 
have any particular significance. It must be 
remembered that the limited amount of capital 
available to the speculators in laying out their 



various operations, required them to constantly 
raise the necessary funds for options, deposits at 
first payment or passing of papers, by raising loans 
on the security of second or third mortgages on 
other properties. 

In putting through the settlement for the Ham- 
mond property on August 6, 1930, the city issued 
the following checks: 

$100,037 50 payable to Binda and which was indorsed over to the Provident Institution for Savings in 

payment of mortgage on the property; 
(19,220 00 payable to Binda and indorsed back to the City of Boston in payment of unpaid taxes on 
(10,872 74 the two parcels included in the property taken; 
301,100 00 payable to Binda and indorsed over to the trustees of the Hammond Estate in satisfaction of 

a mortgage taken back by them to accommodate Lipp and Paul at the time they acquired 

title; 
250,769 76 payable to Binda and indorsed over to Lipp. 

$682,000 00 total paid by the city. 

Lipp deposited this last check of $250,769.76 in 
his account at the Bank of Commerce and Trust 
Company (now United States Trust Company) on 
August 7. His account showed a balance the pre- 
vious day of $1,070.75. On this same day Lipp 
made a payment of $100,000 to the Bank of Com- 
merce and Trust Company in reduction of a 
mortgage previously placed on property owned by 
Lipp and Paul on Exchange street. At the same 
time he purchased through the bank for the sum 
of $79,706.58, which was charged against his 
account, the following unregistered bonds: 

$10,CO'0 Phillips Petroleum Corporation. 

$25,000 Boston Elevated Railway Company. 

$44,000 United States Treasury Bonds. 

Delivery was made to Lipp on the same day, 
August 7. These bonds forthwith disappeared, 
and the result of the effort to ascertain their dis- 
position by Lipp and to discover their present 
whereabouts will now be related. 

Lipp testified that upon receipt of the bonds he 
took them to his office at No. 27 State street where 
he delivered one half of them, consisting of $40,000 
of United States Treasury Bonds, to Paul. He 
stated that this transaction took place in private 
and that he neither requested nor received any 
receipt. Paul, on the other hand, flatly contra- 
dicted this and swore positively that none of these 
bonds were ever given to him, either on August 7, 
as claimed by Lipp, or at any other time. In fact, 
he swore tha.t he never knew that any bonds had 
been purchased out of the proceeds of the property 
until some time afterwards when he pressed Lipp 
for an accounting. 

On Lipp's story, this left the balance of the 
bonds, consisting of $10,000 Phillips Petroleum 
Corporation, $25,000 Boston Elevated Railway 
Company, and $4,000 remaining of United States 
Treasury Bonds, to be accounted for. Interro- 



gated as to the disposition of these, he swore that 
he loaned them to his wife's brother, Jacob L. 
Beckman of Cadillac, Michigan. He testified that 
Beckman, who was proprietor of what he called a 
chain of department stores in Michigan, was in 
trouble with his creditors and came to Boston and 
appealed for help. Though his testimony was 
extremely vague as to the precise details, he 
claimed that, as he remembered, the bonds were 
delivered to Beckman in two lots. Though he 
declared that there was a receipt or agreement 
obtained from Beckman at the time, he explained 
his inability to produce it by the curious assertion 
that he had returned it to Beckman "because he 
had trouble with his creditors and he had to make 
a statement, he didn't want to have any liabilities 
any more than he had in his business." 

Between May 11 and May 22, 1931, the city 
took title to three parcels of land, 24-30 Fulton 
street, 55-57 Commercial street, and 56-60 Com- 
mercial street, and settled with Lipp and Paul 
therefor. On these transactions the speculators' 
profits aggregated $125,700. John S. Slater 
represented Paul and Lipp in these transactions, 
and received for them the city awards. Among 
other checks, in disbursement of the awards, he 
issued on May 15, 1931, one on his "Clients' 
Account" for $50,000 payable to Lipp. This 
check was certified at the Atlantic Notional Bank, 
upon which it was drawn. Now, at the time of the 
settlement for the Hammond parcel, Lipp deposited 
the check representing the net proceeds, in his 
account in the Bank of Commerce and Trust 
Company, and drew against it. In this instance, 
however, he did something quite different. In- 
stead of depositing this check in his account, he 
apparently cashed it over the counter. Out of the 
proceeds he purchased through the bank $25,000 
United States Treasury Bonds and took away the 
balance of $25,000 in cash." The transcript of his 

(Continued on page 45.) 



Jan. 12 



C ITY RECORD 



43 



East Boston Vehicular Tunnel Land-Takings — Boston Side — Acts 1929 — Chap. 297. 



No. 



Location. 



Owner of Record. 



Real Owner. 



Area, 

Square 

Feet. 



Assessed 
Valuation 

at Time 
of Taking. 



Date of 
Taking. 



Payment by 
City. 



19-20 Blackstone street, 22 
John street. 

2-8 Clinton street, 37 Mer- 
chants row. 

55-57 Commercial street 



56-60 Commercial street. 
59-61 Commercial street . 
62-64 Commercial street. 
63-65 Commercial street . 
66-68 Commercial street. 
67-69 Commercial street. 



84-86 Cross street, 201-207 

Hanover street. 
96-102 Cross street 



106-108 Cross street, 108-122 

North street. 
128-134 Cross street 



136 Cross street, 24-30 Fulton 

street. 
30-38 Dock Bquare 



32-34 Fulton street. 

35 Fulton street 

37-39 Fulton street. 
41-43 Fulton street. 



15-31 Mechanic court (part 

taking). 
6 Mechanic street 



9-10 Mechanic street 

5 North street, 62 North 

Market street. 
13 North street, 54-60 North 

Market street 
17-27 North street; 47-51 

North Market street; 38-52 

Merchants row. 
31-33 North street 



35-49 North street, 34-40 Black- 
stone street. 

41-45 Merchants row 1 

67-73 North street; 21-221 
Blackstone street; 24 Johnl 

75-79 North street, 41-17 John 

83-91 North street 



93-101 North street, 123 Cross 
109- 111' North street 



115-121 North street. . 
124-126 North street. 
128-136 North street.. 
138-144 North Btreet. . 
148-150 North street.. 
152-158 North street. 
160-166 North street.. 



168- 172 North street, rear 1-4 

Keith's alley. 
174-178 North street, 130-140 

Richmond street. 
308-310 North street 



316-328 North street. 
209 Hanover street . . , 



15 North Btreet, 53 North Mar- 

120-124 Cross street, 105 North 
street. 



Slayton Boynton, Inc 

Cudahy Packing Company . 

William J. Stober 

William J. Stober 

Nathan Cushing, Trustee. . 
Moras Real Estate Trust . . , 

Elizabeth C. Hyland 

Morss Real Estate Trust. . . 
Peter B. Brigham Hospital . 

Harry F . Ratshesky 

Vincent Tassinari 

Mary M. Mulvey 

F . H. Roberts Company 

Marion K. Mullen 

William J. Spinney 

Abram Re 



John H. Lyons and Isaac 

Heller. 
Ida Cohen, Zelda Greenhood, 



Bessie R. Cohen et al. . . . 

Enrico DeStefano 

Giuseppe Arancio 

Millie Siegel 

Fanny P. Friedrich et al. 
Annie T. Tarbell etal... 
Louis J. Binda 



William A. Muller et al. 
William J. Stober 



Abraham Lurensky. 



Max E. and Charles E. Wyzan- 

ski, Trustees, et al. 
Morris Gordon Estate Trust, 

Albert I. Gordon et al., 

Trustees. 
Max E. and Charles E. Wyzan- 

ski, Trustees, et al. 
Gladys T. Besarick 



(George H. Pettee) A. Bertha 

Pettee, Frederick B. Pettee. 

Rosemary McCarthy et al . . . . 



Boston Real Estate Trust. , 

Adelaide C. Bellizia 

Enrico Tassinari 

Samuel Shpunt 

Boston Real Estate Trust . 

Leon Cangiano 

Walter A. Holman 

James FitzGerald 



Angelina and Charles Rotondo, 

Trustees. 
City of Boston 



City of Boston, Trustee. . 
Trustees of Tufta College. 



Slayton Boynton, Inc 

Cudahy Packing Company. . . 

Abram Lipp, Joseph Paul et al. 

Abram Lipp, Joseph Paul el al. 

Nathan Cushing, Trustee 

Morss Real Estate Trust 

Abram Lipp, Joseph Paul et al. 

Morss Real Estate Trust 

Peter B. Brigham Hospital . . . 

Harry F . Ratshesky 

Vincent Tassinari 

Samuel Lo we 

F. H. Roberts Company 

William I. Schell etal 

William J. Spinney 

Abram Re 

John H. Lyons and Isaac 

Heller. 
Ida Cohen, Zelda Greenhood. . 

Beasie R. Cohen et al 

Enrico DeStefano 

Giuaeppe Arancio 

Millie Siegal 

Fanny P. Friedrich et al 

Annie T. Tarbell etal 

Abram Lipp, Joseph Paul et al., 



William A. Muller et al 

Abram Lipp, Joseph Paul et al., 

Abraham Lurenskv. . 



Max E. and Charlea E. Wyzan- 

aki, Trustees, et al. 
Morris Gordon Estate Truat, 

Albert I. Gordon et al., 

Truateea. 
Max E. and Charles E. Wyzan- 

aki, Trustees, etal. 
William I. Schell etal 



William K. Bean 

Rosemary McCarthy et al. 
Boston Real Estate Trust . 

Adelaide C. Bellizia 

Enrico Tasainari 

Samuel Shpunt 

Boaton Real Eatate Trust . 

Leon Cangiano 

Walter A. Holmnn 

James FitzGerald 



Angelina and Charles Rotondo, 

Trustees. 
City of Boston 



City of Boston, Trustee. . 
Trustees of Tufts College. 



1,322 
1,320 
2,197 
1,635 
2,562 
1,397 
2,562 
1,400 
2,562 
2,000 
2,532 
15,173 
10,314 
2,975 
70 
1,203 
1,557 
1,483 
1,400 
5,805 
2,391 
5,064 
1,270 
3,848 
8,727 

913 
4,813 

11,240 
\ 1,450 

2,240 

4,500 

4,194 
1,500 
4,554 
2,S42 
6,391 
2,219 
1,1.52 
3,500 
5,782 
6,005 
6,500 
2,200 
11,113 
6.1S8 
1.75S 
2,450 



Total asaeaaed valuation, at time of taking, of all properties taken. . . 
Deduct; 
♦Assessed valuation of property previously owned by City of Boston. 

Aaseaaed valuation, at time of taking, of private properties taken. . . 



.$65,000 

105.0C0 

45,000 

75,000 

60,000 

48,500 

63,000 

44,600 

70,000 

75,000 

35,000 

282,000 

225,000 

100,000 

11,000 

33,000 

52,000 

37,000 

35,000 

28,500 

13,000 

19,400 

83,000 

246,000 

620,000 

$73,000 
283,000 

67,000 
78,000 

70,000 

100,000 

90,500 
40,000 

134,000 
39,000 

110,000 
29,000 
18,000 
55,000 
68,000 
50,000 

115,000 
15,000 
80,000 

150,000 

118,000 
57,000 



Aug. 4, 
Aug. 4, 
May 11, 
May 11, 
May 11, 
May 11, 
May 11, 
May 11, 
May 11, 
Aug. 4, 
Aug. 4, 
Aug. 4, 
May 11, 
May 11, 
Aug. 4, 
May 11, 
May 11, 
May 11, 
May 11, 
Aug. 4, 
Aug. 4, 
Aug. 4, 
Aug. 4, 
Aug. 4, 
Aug. 4, 



1930 
1930 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1930 
1930 
1930 
1931 
1931 
1930 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1930 
1930 
1930 
1930 
1930 
1930 



Aug. 4, 1930 
Aug. 4, 1930 



Aug. 
Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug. 



4, 19301 
4, 1930/ 



1930 
1930 



Aug. 4, 1930 

Aug. 4, 1930 

Oct. 1, 1932 

Aug. 4, 1930 

Aug. 4, 1930 

Feb. 3, 1931 



Feb. 


3, 


1931 


[Aug. 


4, 


1930 


IFeb. 
Aur. 


3, 


19.". 1 


4, 


l'.r.'.O 


I'd.. 


3. 


L931 


\n- 


4, 


1930 


1 i b 


3, 


1931 


(Aug. 
[Feb. 


4, 


1930 


3. 


1931 


Nov. 


•jr. 


1930 



Nov. 26, 1930 
Aug. •!. 1030 
Auk. I. 1930 
Aug. I. 1930 



$4,296,000 
180,000 



$4,146,000 



$106,968 90 

115,500 00 

71,500 00 

90,200 00 

73,000 00 

53,350 00 

77,000 00 

49,060 00 

77,000 00 

92,400 00 

38,500 00 

341,000 00 

480,315 25 

110,000 00 

12,000 00 

36,300 00 

57,200 00 

40,700 00 

42,687 87 

29,000 00 

17,000 00 

24,512 00 

91,300 00 

334.76S 15 

682,000 00 

SS5.000 00 
311,300 00 

183,750 00 

91,740 00 
140,000 00 

102,190 00 
44,000 00 

134,000 00 
18,763 44 

121,000 00 
35,000 00 
19.S00 00 
70,951 17 
74,800 00 
60.500 00 

120,000 00 
16,600 00 
72,600 00 

118,000 00 
158 07 



514 55 



44 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



Merrimac Street Widening Land-Takings, Acts 1932 — Chap. 287. 



Location. 



Owner of Record. 



Real Owner. 



Area, 
Square 
Feet. 



Assessed 
Valuation 

at. Time 
of Taking. 



Date of 
Taking. 



Payment 
by City. 



Takings (in Whole) and Settlements. 



1.... 

2 
3 


1S5-191 Blackstone street, 7 
Cross street. 

2—4 Cross street, 1-6 Washing- 
ton Street North. 






4,172 
3,300 
1,200 
2,640 

1,065 
3,133 

7,234 


S170.000 

107,000 

18,500 

52,000 

34,000 
71,000 

68,S00 

34,700 
28,800 
44,500 
34,500 
23,500 

130.S00 
21,600 

140,000 
80,000 
91,200 

105,000 
17,000 


May 31, 
May 31, 
May 31, 
May 31, 

May 31, 
May 31, 

May 31, 

May 31, 
May 31, 
May 31, 
May 31, 
May 31, 
May 31, 
May 31 
May 31 
May 31, 
May 31, 


1933 
1933 

1933 
1933 

1933 
1933 

1933 

1933 
1933 
1933 
1933 
1933 
1933 
1933 
1933 
1933 
1933 


8187,000 00 


Barnet and Henry Nemrow. . . 

Barnet and Henry Nemrow. . . 

Charles Cohen, Bertha Tay- 
lor, Executors under will 
Marks I. Cohen. 

Charles Cohen, Bertha Tay- 
lor, Executors under will 
Mark I. Cohen. 


Barnet and Henry Nemrow. . . 

Barnet and Henry Nemrow. . . 

Charles Cohen, Bertha Tay- 
lor, Executors under will 
Marks I. Cohen 


* 154,249 45 

t 


4 


15-19 Cross street, 46 Endicott 
street. 

21-23 Cross street, 4S Endicott 

street. 
26-34 Cross street, 51 Endicott 

street. 

36 rear Cross street; 3S-10 
Cross street; 42-44 Cross 
street. 


65,000 00 


5.. .. 
6 

7 




42,500 00 


Charles Cohen, Bertha Tay- 
lor, Executors under will 
Marks I. Cohen. 

William I. Schell 


90,000 00 
145,000 00 




















s 


56 Cross street, 40—46 Salem 

street. 
60-62 Cross street, 43-45 Salem 

street. 
64-70 Cross street 

76 Cross street, 192-196 Han- 
over street. 
144-146 Friend street. . . 






1,450 
1,150 
1,956 
2,886 
1,486 
3,000 
1,732 
2,031 
2,352 
982 


52,794 55 


9 






49,631 95 


10 


Abbot T. Epstein 




23,200 00 


-* 
11 


Stabile & Co., Inc 

Elizabeth C. Hyland 

Charles W. Whittier et al 

Fourteen Canal Street, Inc., 

Samuel Williamson. 
Edward H. Eldridge et al., 

Trustees. 


Stabile & Co., Inc. . . 


175,000 00 


12 


Abram Lipp, Joseph Paul et at., 
Charles W. Whittier et al 


23,027 67 


13 ... . 

14. . 


1-9 Merrimac street, 2-10 

Canal street. 
11-13 Merrimac street, 12-14 

Canal street. 
15-17 Merrimac street, 16-18 

Canal street. 
19-21 Merrimac street, 20-22 

Canal street. 


175,000 00 
96,000 00 


15 

16 


Edward H. Eldridge et at., 
Trustees. 


109,440 00 
126,000 00 


17 






17,500 00 














$1,442,900 


81,536,873 62 













Takings 


(in Part) and Settlements. 










1 


37 Cross street 

42—46 Merrimac street; 5 
Market street; 99-103 Port- 
land street. 

7-8 Washington Street North, 
9-10 Washington Street. 
North. 


Charles W. Whittier 

Harold L. Niles et al., Trus- 
tees Estate of Louville V. 
Niles. 




1,402 
3,359 

2,318 

2,280 


$30,400 
130,000 

55,400 
60,000 


May 31, 1933 
May 31, 1933 

May 31, 19331 
May 31, 1933/ 


$18,000 00 


2 


Charles W. Whittier 


100,000 




Harold L. Niles el al., Trus- 
tees Estate of Louville V. 
Niles. 


120,000 00 



Takings (in Part) with No Damage. 



140-142 Friend street 

6 Cross street . . . 

25-33 Cross stree 

cott street. 
200 Hanover stre 

6-12 Merrimac s 

Friend street. 
20-38 Merrimac i 

48-50 Merrimac 
Portland street 

116 Portland stre 

47 Salem street. . 

48 Salem street. . 
51 Salem street. . 

148 Friend street 



Union Savings Bank of Bos- 
ton. 



Union Savings Bank of Bos- 
ton. 



1,994 



840,000 May 31, 1933 None 







Takings (in Whole or in Part) in Litigation or Not Settled. 










1 


6 Cross street 

25-33 Cross street, 37-45 Endi- 
cott street. 


Lillian R. Alford 


Lillian R. Alford. . . . 


500 
2.90S 
3,795 
3,000 
3,702 

2,080 

13,735 

1,350 

850 

1,400 


811,000 
51,000 
70,000 

125,000 
90,000 

74,000 

300,000 

21,403 
13,000 
28,000 


May 31, 
May 31 
May 31, 
May 31, 
May 31, 

May 31, 

May 31, 

May 31, 
May 31, 
May 31, 


1933 
1933 
1933 
1933 
1933 

1933 

1933 

1933 
1933 
1933 




2 


Meyer Cauman et al 






3 




Stephen F opiano 

John D. Long Heirs or Dev- 
isees. 

Townsend W. Thorndike el al., 
Trustees William H. Thorn- 
dike Trust. 

Townsend W. Thorndike et al.. 
Trustees William H. Thorn- 
dike Trust. 

Warner R. Crowell and Elea- 
nor Bowker, Trustees of 
Bowdoin Real Estate Trust. 

Henry Heller, Trustees 




4... 
5 

6.... 

7 


6-12 Merrimac street, 117-123 
Friend street. 

48-50 Merrimac street, 105 
Portland street. 


John D. Long Heirs or Dev- 
isees. 

Townsend W. Thorndike el al.. 
Trustees William H. Thorn- 
dike Trust. 

Townsend W. Thorndike et al., 
Trustees William H. Thorn- 
dike Trust. 

Warner R. Crowell and Elea- 
nor Bowker, Trustees of 
Bowdoin Real Estate Trust, 

Henry Heller, Trustees 




8.... 
9 


47 Salem street 




10.... 


51 Salem street 


Benjamin Starr et al 




Not Settled. 











Taking Previously Owned by City of Bostc 



City of Boston. 



City of Boston. 



1,676 



340,000 May 31, 1933 



* Includes settlement on 11 Cross street. 
t See 2-4 Cross street above. 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



45 



(Continued from -page 42.) 

bank account, therefore, does not show anything 
of these transactions. The bonds, he testified, he 
loaned to his brother-in-law, Beckman, as he 
alleged he had done with $40,000 of the bonds 
purchased the preceding August. The cash, he 
swore, he paid over to Paul, explaining that the 
latter didn't wish bonds because — "he got sick of 
playing the stock market." Paul categorically 
denied that he received a nickel of this cash. 

Beckman's explanation (taken by disposition in 
Michigan) of these transactions, given after Lipp's 
testimony and after Lipp had had an opportunity 
to communicate with him, proves how lightly the 
oath constrained him when called upon to explain 
an awkward transaction. Beckman testified that 
in 1930 and 1931 he was in business both at Cad- 
illac and at Manton, Michigan. He deposed that 
he came to Boston several times in 1930. Though 
he was extremely vague as to just when, he thought 
one of these visits was in the summer. On one 
of these occasions he said that he asked for a 
"little loan," and that Lipp replied that he had 
no money but "if bonds will help you out a little, 
I will help you out" and that Lipp gave him some 
bonds, the amount of which he could not recall. 
Asked what kind of bonds they were, he replied: 
"Gosh, I couldn't tell you exactly what they 
were," though he recalled that there were three 
or four different kinds. He was not certain as 
to the amount, but "it must have been around — 
I am not positive, but around $50,000 or $60,000 
in bonds." He said these bonds were given him 
"on three or four or five times," though unable 
to recall the exact amount that he received on 
any one of these occasions. Though Lipp had 
sworn that he received from Beckman a receipt 
or agreement at the time, the latter testified that 
he gave no receipt or any other paper in that 
connection. Asked as to what he did with the 
bonds, he replied: "Well, sir, I don't know what 
I did with them. Some of them, I guess, I traded 
off to some people who came in the store and 
traded them off for what I could get for them. I 
didn't think they were very good." He explained 
that these people were perfect strangers to him. 
Asked what he sold the bonds for, he replied that 
he "sold some of them for little or nothing" and 
that he used the money in his business. Asked 
what he received for the $10,000 in Phillips Petro- 
leum Bonds that Lipp swore were included in 
what he gave Beckman, the only information 
extracted from him was that he "didn't receive 
as much as $1,000 for the lot and didn't know if 
he received as much as $500." 

Interrogated specifically as to the $25,000 of 
Boston Elevated Railway Bonds that Lipp swore 
he delivered to him, he said he thought that the 
amount was around $10,000 or $15,000, that these 
were disposed of to strangers and as to what he 
received from them, he replied: "I couldn't 
exactly tell you, but it wasn't very much because 
everybody told me they were no good." Asked 
if he received $1,000 for these bonds, he replied 
"No," and additionally, that he didn't know how 
much he received. 

Asked as to the $29,000 United States Liberty 
Bonds in all that Lipp swore he gave to him, he 
testified that he thought the "amount was around 
$25,000 or $40,000—1 wouldn't say for sure. 
I didn't keep track of them." As to these bonds, 
he said he didn't know how he sold them but 
that it was at a sacrifice. Specifically and in par- 
ticular to the question — "And you want it to go 
into the record that you don't know how you 
sold those bonds," he replied: "I do." To the 
further question: "And that you don't know 
what you received for them," his answer was: "I 
don't know exactly — I don't remember." He 
further testified that he used the proceeds to pay 
some business bills, but that his books and records 
didn't show that he received or sold any bonds 
because that had nothing to do with his business. 
He finally testified that he never made any attempt 
to find out what the bonds were worth before he 
disposed of them. 

All efforts to trace these bonds — $80,000 pur- 
chased by Lipp on August 7, 1930, and the $25,000 
by him on May 19, 1931, — have been futile. The 
ten Phillips Petroleum Bonds (5J's of 1939) were 
numbered from 18449 to 18458, inclusive. The 
coupons mature on June 1 and December 1. 
According to the best information obtainable, but 
one coupon has been presented for payment since 
June 1 last — a coupon on bond 18451. The 
Elevated Railway Bonds bore the numbers 895 
to 919, inclusive. Their coupons mature on 
February 1 and August 1. The August 1 coupons 
on six of the bonds were presented for payment. 
It was impossible, however, to identify the person 
or persons cashing these coupons, as after their 
removal from the deposit envelopes the connection 
is broken. The United States Treasury Bonds 
were not earmarked in any such way as to enable 
them to be traced at all. 

On August 7, 1930, the day the city's check of 
$250,709.76 was deposited, as above related, by 
Lipp in his account at the Bank of Commerce and 
Trust Company and the $80,000 bonds were pur- 
chased, he withdrew from the bank $50,000 in 
cash. Called to account for this large cash with- 
drawal from the net proceeds of the taking, (he 
only information that he could, or would give the 
commission was that "I couldn't tell you at 
present." Furthermore, on May 19, 1931, the 
day he purchased the second lot of bonds — $25,000 
United States Treasury Bonds — he withdrew, as 
stated, $25,000 in cash. He swore he paid this 



cash to Paul. The latter, however, flatly denied 
under oath, as previously stated, that he received 
any of the cash. 

Thus $105,000 in gilt edge bonds ($80,000 
bought on August 7, 1930, and $25,000 on May 19, 
1931), and cash withdrawals of $75,000 ($50,000 on 
August 7, 1930, and $25,000 on May 19, 1931), are 
not satisfactorily accounted for. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George R. Farnum, 

Special Counsel. 
Placed on file. 

City of Boston, 
The Finance Commission, 

December 29, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor, 

Sir, — The Finance Commission transmits to 
your Honor the inclosed copy of a third report by 
George R. Farnum, Esq., as special counsel, relat- 
ing to the investigation of the East Boston Vehicu- 
lar Tunnel land-takings. 

This report is submitted as additional reply to 
your Honor's request which was made in accord- 
ance with an order adopted by the City Council on 
November 19, 1934. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Joseph Joyce Donahue, 
Charles M. Storey, 
Alexander Wheeler, 
The Finance Commission. 

Boston, December 28, 1934. 
To the Finance Commission of the City of Boston. 

Gentlemen, — I submit herewith my second 
supplementary report dealing with the East 
Boston Vehicular Tunnel land-takings. It is, as 
was my first supplementary report of December 
26, confined to a study of the material facts in- 
volved in the taking of specific properties, in- 
cluding a consideration of what preceded the 
takings and a report of the results of my efforts to 
trace the proceeds of the city payments "so far as 
possible to the ultimate recipients," to quote from 
the order passed by the City Council on November 
19 last. 

The report deals with the takings of two 
properties: 

1. 63-65 Commercial street, purchased by 
speculators in May, 1928, for $54,000, and for 
which the city paid $77,000 on May 2, 1932. 

2. 117-121 North street, upon which specu- 
lators obtained options to purchase for $85,000 
and /or which the city paid $134,000 on October 
19, 1932. 

63-65 Commercial Street. 

On May 11, 1931, the city took over the property 
numbered 63-65 Commercial street. As related 
in my previous report of December 19, this prop- 
erty was assessed for $63,000, was purchased by 
the speculators, Abram Lipp and Joseph Paul, for 
$54,000, and the city paid therefor $77,000. As 
the title to the property when originally acquired 
by Lipp and Paul had been taken in the name of 
Elizabeth C. Hyland, an employee in Lipp's office, 
as a straw, the interests of Lipp and Paul were 
actually represented by a protection mortgage in 
the amount of $50,000, securing two notes of 
$25,000 each given by Hyland to Lipp and Paul at 
the time the property was purchased. The prop- 
erty was paid for by the city on May 22, 1931. 
After the payment of certain mortgages and other 
encumbrances on the property, there remained 
out of the $77,000 paid by the city, a balance of 
$31,868.07 due to Lipp, who had shortly prior 
thereto obtained an assignment of the interest of 
Paul. At the time of the settlement with the 
city, by reason of this assignment by Paul of his 
interest in the property to Lipp and by the latter 
thereafter to Elsie Albertson, an employee of the 
Exchange Trust Company, this mortgage stood 
in the name of the last named. The tracing of 
these proceeds of $31,868.07 will now be attempted. 
Incidentally, the details of what occurred will il- 
lustrate the complexity of these transactions and 
the difficulty of ascertaining all the material facts. 

For an understanding of what occurred, it is 
necessary to deal with certain antecedent matters. 
On October 1, 1930, Robert J. Bottomry, an at- 
torney, with offices at No. 209 Washington street, 
Boston, and who appeared as counsel in many of 
the city land-takings for the tunnel, — had bor- 
rowed from the Exchange Trust Company, where 
he had an account, $10,000 on his personal note, 
payable in sixty-one days. The proceeds of the 
discount of this note, amounting to $9,898.33, had 
been deposited in the bank in an account opened 
that day in the name of Robert J. Bottomly, 
trustee. As security for this note, Bottomly had 
caused to be indorsed over to Elsie Albertson, a 
clerk in the employ of the bank, a $40,000 demand 
note given by said Elizabeth C. Hyland to Lipp, 
secured by a second mortgage on property at 
49-50 South Market street. This mortgage 
Bottomly also had caused to be assigned to Albert- 
son. On December 1, 1930, Bottomly had ob- 
tained a renewal of this nolo from the bank, and 
again on various occasions thereafter, As addi 
tional security Bottomly put up the two $25,000 
notes, above referred to, and the $50,000 mort- 
gage. To adequately secure the bank this mort- 
gage was assigned to Elsie Albertson. 

This Bottomly note for $10,000, with accrued 
interest, of $17.50, was paid on May 22, 1931, the 
day the city p:iid for t;.'S fiS Commercial street, 
out of the net proceeds of $31,868.07, This left a 
balance of S21.S50.57 to be accounted for. In the 
mechanics of the settlement, this money was paid 



to the Exchange Trust CTmpany by reason of the 
fact that it held, as above related, an assignment of 
the protection mortgage on the property as se- 
curity for the Bottomly note. Instead of credit- 
ing Bottomry's account with this balance, at his 
request they paid this money over to him in cash 
on the day of settlement, May 22, by a treasurer's 
check drawn to the order of the paving teller and 
immediately cashed. Bottomlv testified that he 
gave $15,000 of this $21,850.57 in cash to the late 
William Flaherty, an attorney, and that he kept 
the balance himself. He said he obtained no re- 
ceipt from Flaherty for this cash payment. Mr. 
Flaherty had died before his name was first brought 
into this matter. 

Bottomly's explanation of the transaction was 
that he and F laherty had , for a considerable length 
of time, been performing various kinds of legal 
services for Lipp, involving among other things, 
matters growing out of land transactions of Lipp in 
Florida and in Washington, D. C, and that as a 
result' Lipp was indebted to them for a large 
amount. He testified that it was agreed between 
them, that the net proceeds of the city taking of 
this property at 63-65 Commercial street should be 
accepted by Flaherty and Bottomly in full settle- 
ment of their claims against Lipp. He swore he 
paidFlaherty the $15,000 in cash atFlaherty's own 
request, and because Flaherty had stated "to him 
that, "he (Flaherty) wanted to be paid, but he 
didn t want to be connected with Lipp in any way, 
shape or manner whatever." Interrogated as to 
why he, (Bottomly) took the balance coming to him 
after the payment of his note and the payment to 
Flaherty, in cash, he replied that it was "because I 
wished to." Pressed for a further explanation, 
however, he testified as follows: 

"I said to myself: 'This land-taking I have 
nothing to do with. It's security for a past debt. 
If I have it transferred directly to me, imme- 
diately, why, somebody then will circulate the 
story that I am interested in a land-taking. If 
they circulate a story that I am interested in a land- 
taking, they will circulate a false story.' To avoid 
circulation of a false story may have been my 
motive. It's the one that occurs to me now that 
influenced me. " 

Q- — "I don't understand why — whether that 
money went into your account with this bank, or 
whether it was taken by you over the counter — it 
should have any effect on the circulation of any 
false story. 

A. — "If you don't, you are not familiar with the 
stories given this body as I am. Probably some- 
body would run up here to start an inquiry and 
waste a lot of your time. 

Q. — "Don't you think they would have been 
less likely to have you up here for an inquiry, if 
you had gone through the transaction in the usual 
way? 

A. — "I carried out Mr. Flaherty's instructions 
in so far as that was concerned. We split it 
about 50-50." 

Lipp, who was interrogated about this settlement 
prior to Bottomry's testimony — and who admits 
he had seen Bottomly between the time that he 
testified and the appearance before the commis- 
sion of Bottomly — testified that he had had con- 
siderable dealings with Bottomly and Flaherty, 
principally as lawyers, in connection with specula- 
tions in Washington and Florida real estate, and 
that it was agreed that the net proceeds due him 
from this land-taking by the city, should be 
kept by Bottomly and Flaherty in full settlement 
of what he owed them. In that connection an 
attempt was then made to check this story. 

There appeared to have been no records made — 
or at least preserved — of these dealings either bv 
Lipp or Bottomly. At least, none were produced 
and none were discovered. Bottomly testified 
that he never sent Lipp a bill for this work and 
admitted that Lipp was given no receipt for the 
money or any release from the indebtedness to 
Bottomly and Flaherty it was claimed was therebv 
settled. Asked — "Have you anything that you 
could refer to — correspondence, records or any- 
thing which would enable us to pass on any charges 
you made for services rendered Lipp in connection 
with Florida or Washington real estate," he 
replied: "No. I think you can only take m\ 
word for it; that's all." 

From neither Bottomly nor Lipp were any de- 
tails of these alleged h lorida and Washington 
transactions obtained, either as to the property 
involved or the persons dealt with, that could be 
clicked. Former partners of Lipp in land specu- 
lations were examined and interviewed. Nolle 
of them had ever heard that Lipp was in anv way 
concerned during the years they were in touch 
with him, in Florida or Washington land deals, 
and all slated emphatically that because of their 
relations with him they would have been likely 
to have heard something about it hid he been bo 
involved. 

Law associates of Flaherty, during the period 
in which these transactions were said to have 
occurred, were also examined or interviewed 
Thej staled that they had never heard of 1-' laherty 
representing Lipp in collaboration with Bottomly 

or otherwise. 111 am matters involving Florida 
or Washington real estate, and that they could 
find no papers relating thereto 111 his files \ 
transcript of t lie 1' laherty account at the Atlantic 
National Bank branch of The Firs I National Hank 
showed no deposit at or about the tunc of the 

alleged payment to him of $15,000 in cash In 
Bottom!] thai could be identified therewith. 



46 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



117-121 North Street. 
As set forth in my report of December 19 last, the 
property numbered 117-121 North street, and 
owned by the heirs of George H. Pettee, was 
taken by the city on October 1, 1932. Control 
of this property had been obtained by William 
K. Bean, a speculator and employee in the office 
of Cabot, Cabot & Forbes, by a series of options, 
the last of which he had obtained on September 
29, 1932. This option enabled Bean to purchase 
the property for SSo.OOO. Three days later, on 
October 1, the Transit Commission took this 
property, and on October 19 the city paid Bean 
§134,000 therefor, which was the assessed value. 

This property had been in the Pettee family for 
many years and for some time before the taking 
the Pettees had been trying to dispose of it. Prior 
to the time Bean succeeded in tying it up, other 
speculators had obtained options on it, ranging 
in amount from 850,000 to §100,000, and still 
others were angling for options. 

Charles P. Abbott, a man of diverse interest and 
activities, whose connection with the deal will be 
hereinafter explained, testified before the com- 
mission that he was informed by Bean that "Bot- 
tomly called up and wanted to buy the property 
for a client and Mr. Lipp also was down there." 
(Providence.) He also deposed that Bean in- 
formed him that Harris Poorvu and Joe Paul 
were also down there. The options, however, 
had been allowed to expire as the city made no 
move during their life to take the property. 

On or about July 1, 1932, Bean began negotia- 
tions w r ith the Pettee heirs. As an employee of 
Cabot, Cabot & Forbes, Bean was engaged, at 
this time, in the care and management and the 
collection of rents for the Transit Commission 
of other properties on the same side of North 
street, already taken by the city for the tunnel. 

Bean succeeded, without the payment down of a 
nickel as a deposit, in obtaining his options for the 
purchase of this property for §85,000. This was 
§49,000 less than the city paid for it. The original 
option was taken in the name of Hyman Yaffe, a 
North street marketman, as a straw. Abbott 
testified that Bean acted for him, Abbott, and 
took this first option in the name of Yaffe, without 
either his knowledge or consent. He further 
testified that the first arrangement between them 
was that Bean was to receive 30 per cent of the 
profits, but that this was finally revised to a 50-50 
basis. This first option was subsequently re- 
newed on several occasions and finally in the name 
of Bean alone, and so stood at the time of the 
taking. Abbott contended that Bean deceived 
him in getting this option in his own name, and 
Abbott brought a suit in the courts to substantiate 
this claim. Bean, however, denied this before 
the Finance Commission. 

Incidentally, Abbott testified before the com- 
mission that the contracts that were ultimately 
drawn defining their respective interests in the 
speculation were reduced to writing and that each 
received a duplicate original. He asserted that 
Bean insisted upon the subsequent destruction 
of these contracts to prevent their existence and 
contents becoming known, but that he, Abbott, 
retained his copy intact until an occasion when 
Bean was at his office, when their presence in 
his safe was discovered by Bean. Abbott further 
testified that he then tore them up, upon the 
insistence of Bean, and threw the fragments into 
a waste basket in his office. Several weeks later, 
Abbott deposed, he was at Bean's house and 
discovered in Bean's desk an envelope containing 
these fragments, and when he questioned Bean, the 
latter explained that he had obtained them from 
Abbott's office by use of a master key which he 
had to the office building, and which Bean had 
obtained from the office of Cabot, Cabot & Forbes, 
who were the agents of the building. Bean denied 
that anything of this sort took place. 

Upon discovery of the fact that the city was 
proposing to pay §134,000 for property upon which 
Bean had an option for §85,000, the Finance Com- 
mission filed on October 18, 1932, a vigorous 
protest _ with the Mayor. The commission's 
communication, among other things, contained 
the statement that — 

" . . . the commission believes that the pay- 
ment of §134,000 for this parcel at the present time 
will be an outright squandering of almost §50,000 
of the city's money, and the commission is pending 
your Honor these facts in the hope that you will 
take immediate action to prevent this uncon- 
scionable award." 
and concluded with the statement that — 

"If the city pays §134,000 now for this taking, 
in the opinion of the Finance Commission it will 
be an outright gift of §49,000 of the taxpayers' 
money by the city to a group of speculators." 

On the very next day, October 19, the city settled 
with Bean for the property, paying him §134,000. 

Bean was represented at the passing of papers 
by Charles Hamilton, an attorney associated with 
the firm of Poland & Davis, at 27 State street, 
Boston. As the title to the property had never 
been transferred from the Pettee heirs to Bean, 
the checks issued by the city in settlement were 
made payable to A. Bertha Pettee and Herbert B. 
Pettee, the record owners. The following checks 
were issued by the city: 

§50,360.00, which was indorsed over to the Boston 
Five Cents Savings Bank in payment 
of an outstanding mortgage upon 
the property; 



§37,548.50, which was retained by the Pettees, and 

$46,091.50, which was indorsed over to the order 

of Charles Hamilton. 

This last check represented the net amount, 
after certain adjustments, coming to Bean from 
the settlement. The history of what was done 
with this check and its sequel furnishes an inter- 
esting story which will now be recounted. 

On October 19, 1932, Hamilton took this check 
for S46.091.50 to the First National Bank, on 
which it was drawn, and obtained in exchange 
therefor §6.091.50 in cash, and four cashier's 
checks of §10,000 each, payable to the order of 
Charles Hamilton or F. H. Davis (the latter being 
a partner in the firm of Poland & Davisj. §4,000 
of this cash was immediately deposited in the 
account of Poland & Davis in the First National 
Bank and the balance was paid over to Bean. 
At the same time two of the §10,000 cashier's 
checks were endorsed over to Poland & Davis and 
likewise deposited in their account. Thus Poland 
& Davis came into possession of §24,000 for the 
account of Bean. §2,000 of this money was 
retained by them for professional services. Of the 
§22.000 remaining, they paid to Bean from time to 
time various amounts aggregating S6.006.45. 
The balance they disbursed on instructions from 
Bean in payment of various of his outstanding 
bills. Of the cash received by Bean, he testified 
that he gave Hamilton §2,500, S1.000 as a present 
and SI, 500 for legal services. 

The two remaining cashier's checks for S10,000 
each were endorsed over to Bean by Hamilton and 
cashed by Bean on October 15. 1934. What 
transpired between October 19, 1932, the day the 
city settled for the property, and this date, two 
years later, will now be related. 

Both Abbott and his attorney, William S. 
Kinney, of 40 Court street, Boston, testified before 
the commission that at a hearing in the Superior 
Court, upon the application of Abbott for an 
injunction, Hamilton claimed these checks as 
his own. Specifically, Abbott testified that Hamil- 
ton stated that "these two S10.000 checks were 
his own personal property, for fees." Kinney 
deposed that Hamilton told Judge Hammond 
that "they were his." Hamilton stated to the 
commission that upon his best present recollec- 
tion, what he said in substance was that he was 
entitled to the checks for his fees for past services 
and for future services that he was obligated to 
render. At all events, these checks were delivered 
by Hamilton to Francis T. Leahy, an attorney at 
40 Court street. At this point. Abbott, having 
heard that the settlement with the city had been 
put through, brought a bill in equity against Bean 
to establish his interest in the proceeds of the 
speculation and joined in that proceeding Hamil- 
ton, Leahy, Poland & Davis and the First National 
Bank. There was a hearing in the Superior 
Court on his application for a preliminary injunc- 
tion, and as a consequence, an injunction was 
issued which held up the cashing of these two 
checks of §10,000 each. It was at this hearing 
that Hamilton gave the testimony that has been 
referred to. 

After some vicissitudes, this case finally reached 
the Massachusetts Supreme Court and was decided 
against Abbott on a point of law. Though sub- 
sequent proceedings were brought by Abbott 
against Bean and are still pending — there never 
having been a determination by the Court as to 
the facts of the transactions between them — the 
injunction was dissolved and these two checks 
were returned by Leahy to Hamilton and by the 
latter indorsed over the Bean, and by Bean cashed 
as related above. 

At the time that he received these last two 
S10.000 cashier's checks. Bean had an account in 
the State Street Trust Company. He also had a 
safe deposit box there. He likewise had a safe 
in his office. These checks were not deposited 
in his account, but their proceeds, when cashed, 
were placed in the bank vault or in a box in his 
office safe. To be more specific, his testimony 
thus describes what he did: " I put it first, I think, 
in my office box and then afterwards I switched 
it from the office to the State Street Trust and 
then back to the office." He claimed that with 
the exception of §9,000 still remaining this money 
has been entirely used up. first in another pay- 
ment of §5,000 to Poland & Davis for legal serv- 
ices; secondly, in settling three executions against 
him aggregating about 82,000, and finally in 
meeting various current expenses. 

It is not possible to check satisfactorily the 
accuracy of Bean's story or the disbursement of 
the proceeds of these checks amounting to §20,000, 
and received by him on October 15 last, or to 
trace the money after it was placed by him in his 
safe deposit box. 

That Bean had made the whole or a greater 
part of the payments claimed cannot be doubted. 
That these payments came entirely from this par- 
ticular money, however, is quite another matter. 
An examination of Bean's bank account indicates 
clearly that he did not bank all of his income and 
receipts. He always cashed the checks he received 
periodically from Cabot, Cabot & Forbes for 
salary and commissions which averaged §7,500 a 
year. Additionally, he admitted the further in- 
come of about §1,000 a year from other sources. 
Some of this money was paid out from time to 
time in cash. Hence, the impossibility of attribut- 
ing any specific payment made to any particular 
money received. 

Perhaps, in fairness, it ought to be added that 
Bean explained his use of a deposit box or his 



dealings in cash to the necessity of protecting 
himself from numerous and importunate creditors. 
The facts above set forth, with the inferences to 
be reasonably drawn therefrom, clearly establish 
the following conclusions: 

1. That the city officials paid an unconscion- 
able profit of §49,000 to Bean as part of an award 
to the Pettee heirs from whom Bean had only 
acquired a mere right to buy the property and had 
actually paid nothing for that right; 

2. That Bean only obtained this right to buy 
because he felt certain that the property would 
be taken by the city before he would be required 
to finance the purchase; and 

3. Finally, that the city officials responsible for 
this payment plainly disregarded the best interest 
of the taxpayers when they awarded and paid 
§134,000 for property that almost all the real 
estate men in Boston knew could be had from 
the owners for §85,000 or less. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George R. Farnum, 

Special Counsel. 
Placed on file. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

The following petitions were received and re- 
ferred to the committees named, viz.: 

Claims. 

Frank Bertino. for compensation for damage to 
property at 2586 Washington street, caused by leak 
in water pipe. 

Francis L. Cronin, for compensation for damage 
to car by fire chief's car. 

Harold Currier, for compensation for damage to 
car by ash cart. 

D'Orlando & Co., Ltd., for compensation for 
damage to car by city truck. 

N. M. Hatch Auction Works, for compensation 
for damage to car by city truck. 

Harry Jessup, for return of money found and 
turned over to police. 

Patrick Loughran, for compensation for damage 
to water boiler at 32 Boutwell street, Dorchester, 
caused by turning off water. 

B. F. Macy, for compensation for damage to 
truck by city truck. 

Michael Maloney, for compensation for damage 
to property at 190 Hillside street, Roxbury, by 
city truck. 

Violet Matta, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect at 32 Oak street. 

Margaret M. Nally, for compensation for damage 
to car caused by an alleged defect at 98 Gains- 
borough street, Boston. 

Mihran Ohaman, for compensation for damage 
to property at 2584 Washington street, caused by 
defective water pipe. 

Americo Sarno, for compensation for damage to 
car by city car. 

Myra 6. Stead, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect at 49 Monadnock 
street, Dorchester. 

Samuel Wernick, for refund on refuse tickets. 

George Winer, for compensation for damage to 
car by city truck. 

David Webb, for compensation for damage to 
property at 1173 Adams street, caused by blasting 
work done by Tomasello Company. 

John Sheridan, for compensation for damage to 
property at 62 Round Hill street, Jamaica Plain, 
caused by falling branch of tree. 



CHILDREN'S PERMIT GRANTED. 

A petition was received of R. H. White Company 
for children to appear at R. H. White Company's 
establishment on January 12, 1935. 

Leave was granted under suspension of the rule. 



LEASE OF CONVALESCENT HOME. 

The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Law Department, December 20, 1934. 
To the Honorable the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — There has been transmitted to me 
today a copy of the following order passed by your 
Honorable Body on December 17, 1934: 

"Ordered, That the Corporation Counsel be 
requested to ascertain and inform the City Council 
whether or not the land on Dorchester avenue 
formerly used by the Hospital Department for a 
Convalescent Home was purchased by the city 
or was devised as a part of the Churchill Estate 
with a condition that it was to be used only for 
hospital purposes." 

It is my understanding that the premises re- 
ferred to in the above quoted order are the prem- 
ises numbered 2150 Dorchester avenue, formerly 
used by the Boston City Hospital as a Conva- 
lescent Home. This property was purchased by 
the city from Asaph Churchill under the authori- 
zation of an order passed by the Common Council 
and Board of Aldermen and approved by the 
Mayor on March 18, 1890. 

The order recited that the purchase be made — 

". . . for the purpose of a convalescent home 
for the city hospital." 

The deed from Asaph Churchill to the City of 
Boston is dated April 19, 1890, and is recorded 
with Suffolk Deeds, Book 1930, page 548. The 
deed contains no restrictions. 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



47 



I am therefore of the opinion that the premises 
referred to in the above quoted order were pur- 
chased by the city and are held by it without re- 
strictions and that said premises were not devised 
as part of the Churchill Estate with a condition 
that they were to be used only for hospital pur- 
poses. 

Yours very truly, 

Henry E. Foley, 
Corporation Counsel. 
Placed on file. 



DOCTOR MAHONEY REAPPOINTED 
HEALTH COMMISSIONER. 

Notice was received of the appointment by the 
Mayor of Francis X. Mahoney, M. D., of 22 Lake 
street, Brighton, to be Health Commissioner for 
the term expiring April 30, 1938. 

Placed on file. 



STATE HIGHWAY TO DEDHAM LINE. 

A copy was received from the Department of 
Public Works of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts of the lay-out of a state highway com- 
mencing at the junction of Brook Farm Parkway 
and Spring street, in the City of Boston, and 
extending in a southerly direction, on a new 
location, to the dividing line between the City 
of Boston and the town of Dedham, with copy of 
the order of taking. 

Plated on file. 



MINORS' LICENSES. 

Petitions for minors' licenses were received from 
thirty-six newsboys and one bootblack. 

Licenses granted under suspension of the rule. 



CONFIRMATION OF EXECUTIVE 
APPOINTMENTS. 

President DOWD called up, under unfinished 
business, Nos. 1 and 2 on the calendar, viz.: 

1. Action on appointments submitted by the 
Mayor December 17, 1934, of Frederick J. Brad- 
ford, Warren F. Tapley, Richard P. Stanton, John 
J. Neville, to be Weighers of Coal. 

2. Action on appointments submitted by the 
Mayor December 17, 1934, of Thomas J. Hayes 
and Ashod Donabedin, to be Constables, author- 
ized to serve civil process. 

The question came on confirmation. Commit- 
tee, Coun. Gallagher and Selvitella. Whole 
number of ballots 1 1 ; yeas 11, and the appointments 
were confirmed. 



SCHOOL BUILDINGS PROJECT. 

A copy of the vote of the State Emergency 
Finance Board approving the Public Works Project 
for the construction of school buildings was received 
and placed on file. 

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS. 

Coun. BRACKMAN, for the Committee on 
Claims, submitted the following: 

The Committee on Claims respectfully submit 
the following report showing the disposition of 
claims during the municipal year 1934: 

Claims pending January 1, 1934 2.142 

Claims received during year 1934 774 

Total 2,916 

Claims approved during year 118 

Claims disapproved during year 445 

Claims returned from Law Depart- 
ment to Committee on Claims on 
which Statute of Limitations had 
expired 1 ,047 

Total 1,610 

Claims pending December 31, 1934 1,306 

Amount paid out on approved claims, $14,358 31 
The report was accepted and ordered printed as 
a public document. 



INSPECTION OF PRISONS. 

Coun. DONOVAN, for the Committee on In- 
spection of Prisons, submitted the following: 

Annual Report of the Committee on Inspection 
of Prisons. 
In accordance with the provisions of chapter 126 
of the General Laws, the Committee on Inspection 
of Prisons of the City Council submits herewith its 
annual report. 

Suffolk County Jail. 

The usual semi-annual inspections of the Suffolk 
County Jail were made. 

Your Committee finds that conditions at this 
institution continue along the same lines of clean- 
liness and order that have characterized it for the 
past several yenrs. 

The dangerous condition of the back wall and 
temporary gate makes it important that a new 
wall and permanent entrance be provided imme- 
diately. 



House of Correction. 
The customary number of visits were made by 
your Committee to the House of Correction dur- 
ing the year, and conditions at this institution were 
found very satisfactory. 

Your Committee suggests that a survey or study 
might, be made with reference to the housing con- 
ditions and dining facilities at the institution with 
a view to improving the living conditions of the 
inmates in general. 

For the Committee, 
Richard D. Gleason, Chairman. 
The report was accepted and ordered printed 
as a city document. 



UNEXPENDED BALANCES FOR SINKING 
FUNDS. 

Coun. GALLAGHER called up, under unfinished 
business, No. 3 on the calendar, viz.: 

3. Ordered, That in accordance with the 
provisions of chapter 174 of the Acts of 1928, the 
City Treasurer, with the approval of the Mayor, 
be authorized to pay over to the Board of Com- 
missioners of Sinking Funds of the City of Boston 
the following unexpended balances of ioans issued 
outside of the limit of indebtedness which are no 
longer required for the purposes specified in the 
authorization of such loans. 
Lowell street, Nashua street and 

Causeway street $125,374 73 

Charles street widening, etc 22,229 76 

Morton street improvement 16,306 65 

Dock square and Faneuil Hall square 

improvement 14,964 58 

Kneeland street improvement 8,852 45 

East Boston Pumping Station and 

outlet . . 4,456 36 

Summer and L streets, widening and 

construction of 1,714 04 

On December 10, 1934, the foregoing order" was 
read once and passed, yeas 20, nays 0. 

The question came on the second and final 
passage of the order. 

Coun. AGNEW— Mr. President, I would like 
just a word of explanation of this order. 

President DOWD— For the benefit of the 
Council the Chair will state that these are matters 
that were explained by the City Auditor at the last 
meeting, that we have alresdy given one reading to 
the order, and that it simply provides this disposi- 
tion of unexpended balances, under the law. 

The order was given its second and final reading 
and passed, yeas 17, nays 0. 



TRANSFERS TO LONG ISLAND 
HOSPITAL, ETC. 

President DOWD called up, under unfinished 
business, No. 4 on the calendar, viz.: 

4. Ordered, That under authority of chapter 
261 of the Acts of 1893 the City Auditor be, and 
hereby is, authorized to transfer: 

From the appropriation for Recreation Building, 
Long Island Hospital, Establishment of, $5,380.28; 
Steamer "Stephen O'Meara," Alterations and 
Additions, $313.83; Garage Police Station 14, 
$512.12; Dock Square and Faneuil Hall Square, 
Improvement $14,964.58; Kneeland Street, Im- 
provement, $8,852.45, to the appropriation for 
Long Island Hospital, Kitchen and Laundry 
Improvements, etc., $30,023.25. 

On December 10, 1934, the foregoing order was 
read once and passed, yeas 20, nays 0. 

The order was given its second and final reading 
and passage, yeas 15, nays — Coun. Agnew — 1. 



DISPOSITION OF CONVALESCENT 
HOME PROPERTY. 

On motion of Coun. FISH No. 5 was taken from 
the table, viz.: 

5. Whereas, The Trustees of the Boston City 
Hospital has the care and custody of a certain 
parcel of land belonging to the City of Boston 
and situated on the easterly side of Dorchester 
avenue, together with the buildings thereon, and 
being numbered 2150 on said Dorchester avenue, 
and known as the Convalescent Home; and 

Whereas, The said Trustees of the Boston City 
Hospital has no present need of the said premises 
for public purposes; now, therefore, it is hereby 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be. and he 
hereby is, authorized, in the name and behalf of 
the City of Boston, in consideration of fifty dollars 
paid to the City of Boston by the Massachusetts 
Section of the Women's Department of the 
National Civic Federation, to lease, by a written 
instrument satisfactory in form to the Law De- 
partment of the City of Boston, to the said Massa- 
chusetts Section of the Women's Department of 
the National Civic Federation, or its nominee, for 
tlie purposes of using and operating the said 
premises as a home for unemployed single girls 
and women having a settlement, in Boston and 
for no other purpose, for a period of live months 
beginning with the first, day of January, 1935, 
and ending with the first, day of June. 1935, the 
said premises numbered 2150 Dorchester avenue, 
Bituuted on the easterly side of said Dorchester 
avenue, in that, part of Huston called Dorchester; 
and i! is hereby further 



Ordered, That the said lease contain a provision 
authorizing the Mayor of Boston to terminate 
and cancel the said lease by sending to the said 
said Massachusetts Section of the Women's De- 
partment of the National Civic Federation a 
thirty-day notice of his intention so to do, mailed 
to or delivered at the above leased premises to 
the said Massachusetts Section of the Women's 
Department of the National Civic Federation. 

Coun. FISH — Mr. President, I move that this 
be indefinitely postponed, inasmuch as the request 
for the use of this hospital has been withdrawn. 

The order was indefinitely postponed. 



CONGRATULATIONS TO COUNCILOR 
GOLDMAN. 

Coun. WILSON and Coun. FINLEY offered 
the following: 

Resolved, That the Boston City Council, in 
meeting assembled, desire to congratulate our 
colleague, Maurice M. Goldman, on his appoint- 
ment as Assistant Attorney-General for the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, and to wish hirn 
success in his high office; and be it further 

Resolved, That it is the sense of the City Council 
that the interests of the city will be best served if 
Councilor Goldman continues to serve as councilor 
from Ward 14 for the remainder of his elected term, 
both on the premises of his value to the city and 
the great expense involved in the holding of a 
special election, which would be necessary in the 
event of Councilor Goldman's resignation. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, I may say, 
with reference to that resolution congratulating 
the councilor from an adjoining ward, that the 
appointment referred to, of which we have read 
with some pleasure, is not only an honor to the 
member of the City Council but also reflects credit 
on the judgment of the voters of Ward 14 who 
elected this young man to fill the position he holds 
in this body. I feel personally that the resigna- 
tion from the Council of Councilor Goldman, after 
his short service in this body, necessitating a special 
election on Ward 14, would be nothing more nor 
less than an empty gesture, involving an unneces- 
sary expense to the City of Boston, because I see 
no reason why he cannot carry on in the City 
Council until the close of his term and at the same 
time fulfill his duties at the State House. Also, it 
is not impossible or improbable that his appoint- 
ment as Assistant Attorney-General may prove of 
some value to City Hall, through his contacts 
with matters taken up by his department in which 
the city is interested. 

The resolutions were passed by a unanimous 
vote. 



EAST BOSTON PLAYGROUND. 

Coun. SELVITELLA offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to reconsider his action in vetoing the loan 
order adopted by the City Council, December 17. 
1934, relative to the establishment of a playground 
in the Fourth Section of East Boston. 

Coun. SELVITELLA— Mr. President, I am 
going to be very brief. We have received from 
his Honor the Mayor this morning a communica- 
tion in which he has returned without his signature 
and has vetoed a loan order passed by this body on 
December 17 relative to a playground in the Fourth 
Section of East Boston. For purposes of the 
record let me say that, until it became necessary to 
take it away in order to build a new state highway 
in East Boston, the Fourth Section had a play- 
ground. It seems unfair that the children of that 
section who had a playground before it was taken 
and for which the city received $17,000 from the 
state, should now be deprived of a playground. 
In the letter we have received the Park Com- 
missioner is reported as stating that he knows of no 
available site. I want to say to the Park Com- 
missioner that it was at his suggestion that I tiled 
the loan order, and at that time he informed me .•: 
an available site, having received a communica- 
tion from the pastor of the Star of the Sea Church 
in East Boston, who is very much interested in this 
project. I cannot, therefore, understand what the 
Mayor or the Park Commissioner mean when they 
say that there is a sufficient number of playgrounds 
in the Fourth Section of East Boston. The city 
received $17,000 from tho state lor this play- 
ground, and it is now unfair and unjust to tho 
children of that section that, they should he de- 
prived of a playground. Therefore. I am asking 
his Honor the Mayor to reconsider his action in 
vetoing the loan order and he can take up with 
the Park Commissioner the question of whether 
tie is rip, Tied to have selected a site, and 
whether it was not at his suggestion that 1 tiled 
the loan order. 

(The order was read for the information of Coun. 

Shattuck.) 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



EMPLOYEES OF EMPLOYMENT Bl REAU. 

Coun. WILSON Mr. President, may I ask 

Unanimous consent to make a statement ' ll will 
be very brief. It is with relation to some of the 
statements contained in the newspapers the past 
week on the subject of the apparent ueed ol 



48 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



certain departments of the City of Boston, as they 
see it, calling upon the services of private employ- 
ment agencies to fill such jobs as orderlies when we 
have available a free employment bureau. The 
particular instances I intend to bring out when 
the Council reconvenes after the first of the year. 
But in some of the messages of the Mayor today 
I heard again and again the splendid word "pro- 
pitious," to the effect that "this is not a propitious 
time to expend money," in view of the hard times 
and the difficulties under which the city is laboring. 
Having heard that time after time, that the time 
was not "propitious," I wondered if the 21st of 
December, just before Christmas, was a pro- 
pitious time to slide into the Employment Bureau 
at S25 each per week a married lady and her 
daughter as inside clerks, the parties living at 
255 Berkeley street, when we remember that the 
head of the Employment Bureau pointed out 
recently that he could get along with a much 
smaller personnel this year than last year, that, 
in fact, he had been getting along very well up to 
that time, including himself, with two men and 
two women, so far as the inside work was con- 
cerned, whereas the only way in which the Munic- 
ipal Employment Bureau can really function is to 
have some outside solicitors, instead of appointing 
more inside help at this time. So I think, under 
the circumstances, this is a very appropriate time 
to call attention to this matter, when we see a 
married woman and her daughter added to the 
inside force. I believe this is a matter which we 
can well at this time call to the attention of his 
Honor the Mayor, who is really running the office 
and making the appointments. I certainly be- 
lieve if there are to be any additional appointments 
made to that Bureau they should be such as will 
assist it in its work. 



HISTORY OF POLICE COMMISSIONER 
APPOINTMENTS. 

■•Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, I would ask 
unanimous consent to make a statement. While 
looking over some old files of the Boston Journal 
in the Boston Public Library recently, I came 
across a statement that seemed very pertinent in 
view of the present situation in regard to the Police 
Commissionership of Boston. It showed the 
position taken at that time by the incumbent of 
the Police Commissionership. who set the standard 
of the conduct of that office, I think, for all time. 

"When Governor Foss was elected in November, 
1910 (by 30,000 votes), over Governor Draper, 
it was suggested at that time that since the term 
of the then Boston Police Commissioner, the late 
Stephen J. O'Meara, was to run out in the following 
May. Mr. O'Meara should resign before Governor 
Draper went out of office, and then, technically, 
under the law, Mr. O'Meara could be reappointed 
for another five-year term. The incoming Gover- 
nor Foss could not then remove the Police Com- 
missioner. Commissioner O'Meara replied: 

" Resign and be reappointed for another five- 
year term so as to thwart the appointive power of 
the incoming Governor! That would be contem- 
tible!' " 

And the following May Governor Foss re- 
appointed Commissioner O'Meara for another 
five-year term. 



CLOSING PROCEEDINGS. 

Coun. ROBERTS offered the following: 

Resolved, That the thanks of the members of 
the City Council be extended to President John F. 
Dowd for the able and impartial manner in which 
he has presided over the deliberations of the 
Council during the present municipal year. 

The question came on the passage of the 
resolution. 

Coun. ROBERTS— Mr. President, at this time 
I want to express my appreciation, and in doing so 
I know that I am voicing the feeling of all the 
members of this body, of the service that the 
President of the Council has given us during this 
past year. True, this year, due to the financial 
stress under which we have been laboring, the 
affairs of the city have been in a very different 
condition from what they normally would be. 
But I feel that not only as President of the body 
but as Mayor on occasions when the Mayor has 
been absent from the city, our President has 
shown remarkable ability and talent in dealing 
with all questions coming before the Council and 
all matters in which the city was interested. I 
know that this order will be passed unanimously, 
in appreciation and recognition of his services. 

Coun. BRACKMAN — Mr. President, time has 
flown bo rapidly that it seems hardly a year since 
the President of this honorable body was escorted 
to the chair as our presiding officer. In reviewing 
niir \wjrk of the paBt year briefly, while the 
economic program has been somewhat different 
from what we have experienced in more prosperous 
years, I am strongly impressed, as are all the other 
members, with the fairness with which our Presi- 
dent has dealt with the membership. Like my 
ie from the adjoining district, I have had 
in to observe our President for many years 
in political life, and I want to reiterate that his 
i : have always been guided with 
such fairness, such ability, such sincerity, such 
devotion to the public interest, as to deserve our 
highest public commendation. I move you, 
therefore, sir, that the members of this body rise 
and pay tribute to the President of the Council. 



The resolutions were passed by a unanimous 
rising vote, amid applause. 

President DOWD — Fellow members, may I 
state that I have throughout the year thoroughly 
appreciated the exceedingly great honor of advance- 
ment to the presidency of this body. It is a great 
honor for any young man to be President of the 
Boston City Council. This is my ninth consecu- 
tive year as member of the body, and I can say 
that, not only as President for the past year but 
as a member of the body in previous years, I have 
enjoyed every minute of my service. As Presi- 
dent, I have tried to be fair and impartial, and I 
have been greatly helped in my administration of 
the duties of the office by the kindly consideration 
and courtesy extended to me by every member 
of the Council. I' have tried to fulfill the duties 
of the position as they have been fulfilled by my 
predecessors in the past eight years, and as I 
know they will be fulfilled during the year 1935 
by my successor. I again thank you, fellow mem- 
bers, for your helpfulness and courtesy to me 
during the year and at all times, something that 
I shall certainly remember no matter how long 
I may remain in public life. (Applause.) n„ a 

Adjourned at 12.13 p. m., on motion of Coun. 
GALLAGHER, to meet on Monday. January±7, 
1935, at 2 p. m. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 
SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Meats. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various city departments, meats as per 
specifications to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. There will be a charge of twenty- 
five cents ($0.25) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bidder must leave his proposal 
with a certified check for $300, payable to and 
to become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out, at the above 
office. A duplicate bid, without check, must be 
left at the office of the City Auditor prior to 
the time named for opening bids. The bids 
will be publicly opened and read on Wednesday, 
January 23, 1935, at 12 m., at Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. The successful bidder must fur- 
nish a bond for one quarter the total estimated 
amount of the contract with a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts as 
surety for the faithful performance of the 
contract. The Superintendent reserves the 
right to accept or reject any or all bids, or 
any part of a bid, and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 
All contracts made subject to appropriations 
to meet payments thereunder. 

Warren W. Loomis, 

(Jan. 12.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Hay, Grain and Straw. 

Sealed proposals will be received at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, until 12 m., Friday, January 
25, 1935, at which time and place they will 
'be publicly opened and read, for furnishing 
hay, grain and straw to the various city de- 
partments. There will be a charge of twenty 
cents ($0.20) for each set of blank proposals 
taken out. The bidder must include the cost 
of delivery. The bidders are requested to 
bid on United States No. 2 timothy hay. 
Hay must be no less than 40 per cent green. 
The grade of hay must comply with the 
federal hay grades, and No. 2 white oats to 
test no less than thirty-six pounds to bushel 
graded under federal standards. The hay and 
oats must be ■weighed by sworn weighers and 
on the scales designated by the Superintendent 
of Supplies. All articles covered by this con- 
tract shall be the growth production of the 
United States. The bidder must use the form 
of proposals to be obtained at Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. Proposals must be accompanied 
by a certified check for $200. A duplicate bid, 
without check, must be left at the office of the 
City Auditor prior to the time named for open- 
ing bids. The successful bidder must furnish a 
bond for one quarter the total estimated amount 
of the bid with a surety company authorized 
to do business in Massachusetts as surety for 
the faithful performance of the contract. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to accept 
or reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, 
and to award the contract as he deems for the 
best interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. No reservations or stipulations 
submitted by the various bidders will be con- 
sidered by the Superintendent. 

Warren W. Loomis, 
(Jan. 12.) Superintendent of Sujiplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES DEPARTMENT. 



Notice. 
In compliance with provisions of section 41, 
chapter 98 of the General Laws of Massachu- 
setts, as amended Iby chapter 32 of the Acts 
of 1923. I hereby give notice to all inhabitants 
or persons having usual places of business in 
Boston using weighing or measuring devices 
for the purpose of buying or selling goods, 
wares or merchandise, for public weighing or 
for hire or reward, to bring in such weighing 
and measuring devices to be tested, adjusted 
and sealed. I shall be at the office of Sealer 
of Weights and Measures every day during 
regular business hours to attend to this duty. 
James A. Sweeney, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures, 

105 City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Office hours, 9 to 5, except Saturdays, 9 to 12. 
(Jan. 12.) 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



To Taxpayers. 
Assessors' Notice, City Hall Annex, 

Boston, January 1, 1935. 
Attention is called to the Assessors' Notice 
posted upon City Hall and various other places 
throughout the city, relative to making re- 
turns on personal property subject to taxation. 
Returns should be made not later than Feb- 
ruary 15. 

Edward T. Kelly, 
Timothy W. Murphy, 
Michael J. Brophy, 

Assessors of Boston. 
(Jan. 5-12-19-26-Feb. 2-9.) 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Butter, Eggs, Etc. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals ■ for furnishing to the 
various city departments, butter, eggs, etc., as 
per specifications to be obtained at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex. There will be a charge of 
twenty cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bidder must leave his pro- 
posal with a certified check for $300, pay- 
able to and to become the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the above office. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids will be publicly opened and 
read Friday, January 25, 1935, at 12 m., 
at Room 801, City Hall Annex. The successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
the total estimated amount of the contract 
with a surety company authorized to do 
business in Massachusetts as surety for the 
faithful performance of the contract. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to accept 
or reject any or all bids, or any part of a 
bid, and to award the contract as he deems 
for the best interests of the city. All con- 
tracts made subject to appropriations to meet 
payments thereunder. 

Warren W. Loomis, 

(Jan. 12.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Fruits and 
Vegetables. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various city departments, fruits and vegetables, 
as per specifications to be obtained at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex. There will be a charge of 
thirty cents ($0.30) for each blank pro- 
posal taken out. The bidder must leave his 
proposal with a certified check for $300, pay- 
able to and to become the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the -above office. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids will be publicly opened and 
read on Thursday, January 24, 1935, at 12 m., 
at Room 801, City Hall Annex. The successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
the total estimated amount of the contract 
with a surety company authorized to do 
business in Massachusetts as surety for the 
faithful performance of the contract. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to accept 
or reject any or all bids, or any part of a 
bid, and to award the contract as he deems 
for the best interests of the city. All con- 
tracts made subject to appropriations to meet 
payments thereunder. 

Warren W. Loomis, 

(Jan. 12.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



49 



PROCEEDINGS OF 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Dec. 17, 1934. 

A regular meeting of the School 
Committee of the City of Boston 
was held in the Administration 
Building, 15 Beacon Street, at 8:40 
o'clock P. M., the Chairman pre- 
siding. 

Present: Messrs Hurley, Lyons, 
Mackey, Sullivan, and Tobin. 



APPROVAL AND AMENDMENT 
OF MINUTES 

The reading of the minutes of 
the previous meeting was omitted, 
the Committee approving them as 
printed. 

On motion, the minutes of previ- 
ous meetings were amended as 
follows: 

Nov. 19, 1934, on page 204, to pro- 
vide that the appointment from the 
eligible list of Joseph P. Donovan 
as assistant, manual training, ele- 
mentary, in the Department of 
Manual Arts, to take effect Jan. 2, 
1935, shall read to take effect "Dec. 
3, 1934." 

Nov. 26, 1934, on page 217, to pro- 
vide that the appointment from the 
eligible list of Wallace M. Clark as 
junior master, in the English High 
School, to take effect Dec. 10, 1934, 
shall read to take effect "Jan. 2. 
1935." 

DEATHS 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named teach- 
ers who had been retired on pen- 
sion: 

Gilbert Stuart District— Caroline 
F. Melville, Nov. 23, 1934. 

Wells District— Hattie A. Watson, 
Dec. 7, 1934. 

Placed on file. 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named 
teacher who had been retired on 
pension under the provisions of 
the Boston Retirement System: 

Agassiz District — Lena L. Car- 
penter, Dec. 7, 1934 

Placed on file. 



RESIGNATION 

The following resignation, re- 
ported by the Superintendent to 
take effect on the date stated, was 
presented: 

Edward Everett District — Cath- 
erine B. Day, assistant, kindergar- 
ten, Oct. 25, 1934. 

Accepted. 

APPOINTMENTS AND TRANS- 
FERS 

The folio-wing appointments and 
transfers by the Superintendent, 
certifiied by him as being in ac- 
cordance with the rules and regu- 
lations, to take effect on the dates 
stated, were presented: 

(FROM THE ELIGIBLE LIST) 

(To fill vacancies caused by in- 
crease in numbers). 
Department of Household Science 
and Arts — Kathryn A. Hurley, 
teacher of sewing, elementary, Jan. 
2. 1935. 



Beethoven District— Katherine A. 
McTiernan, assistant, elementary, 
Jan. 2, 1935. 

Dearborn District — Mary A. Mul- 
len, assistant, elementary, Jan. 2, 
1935. 

Jefferson District — Louise M. Col- 
burn, assistant, elementary, Jan. 2, 
1935. 

Theodore Lyman District— Helen 
M. Daley, assistant, elementary, 
Jan. 2, 1935. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointments approved. 

(To fill vacancies caused by 
deaths and resignations). 

South Boston High School— E. 
Patricia McCulloch, assistant. Jan. 
2, 1935. 

Department of Household Science 
and Arts— Katherine M. Nelson, 
teacher of sewing, elementary, Jan. 
2, 1935. 

Department of Physical Educa- 
tion — Edna M. Coburn, assistant in- 
structor, physical education, Jan. 2, 
1935. 

Abraham Lincoln District — Eva 
G. Averbuck, assistant, elementary, 
Jan. 2, 1935. 

Christopher Gibson District — 
Eleanor B. Colleton, assistant, ele- 
mentary, Jan. 2, 1935. 

Edward Everett District — Lillian 
F. Horrigan, assistant, elementary, 
Jan. 2, 1935. 

Francis Parkman District — Kath- 
ryn P. Fallon, assistant, elementary, 
Jan. 2, 1935. 

Henry L. Higginson District — 
Nina M. Forsythe, assistant, ele- 
mentary, Jan. 2. 1935. 

Hyde District — Virginia M. Fur- 
long, assistant, elementary, Jan. 2, 
1935. 

Minot District — Margaret I. 
Dacey, assistant, elementary, Jan. 
2, 1935. 

Oliver Hazard Perry District — 
Eileen M. Mullen, assistant, ele- 
mentary, Jan. 2, 1935. 

The rules were suspended and the 
appointments approved. 

(To fill vacancies caused by pro- 
motions and transfers). 

Boston Trade School— William T. 
Miller, senior instructor (from as- 
sistant, intermediate, Solomon 
Lewenberg Intermediate District), 
Jan. 2, 1935. 

Chapman District — Estelle M. 
White, assistant, elementary, Jan. 
2, 1935. 

Gaston District — Sara M. Curran, 
Mary V. Kelleher, Althea I. 
Rymarczick, assistants, elemen- 
tary, Jan. 2, 1935. 

Mary Hemenway District— Agnes 
K. Birmingham, assistant, ele- 
mentary, Jan. 2, 1935. 

Mather District— Helen G. Keat- 
ing, Catherine P. McKeon, assist- 
ants, elementary, Jan. 2, 1935. 

Roger Wolcott District— Agnes 
J. Coyne, assistant, elementary, 
Jan. 2, 1935. 

Washington Irving Intermediate 
District— Pauline E. Madden, as- 
sistant, intermediate (from assist- 
ant, elementary, Gaston District), 
Jan. 2, 1935. 

Department of Manual Arts- 
Lemuel C. Compton, assistant, man- 
ual training, elementary, Jan. 2, 

The rules were suspended and the 
appointments approved. 



(BY PROMOTION) 

(To fill vacancy caused by increase 
in numbers) 

Department of Manual Arts — 
Francis T. Martin, shop instructor, 
(from assistant, manual training, 
elementary), Jan.' 2, 1935. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointment approved. 

(RE-ENTRY INTO SERVICE) 

(To fill vacancy caused by 
increase in numbers) 
Agassiz District — Florence O. 
Ridlon, assistant, elementary (re- 
signed from Henry L. Pierce Dis- 
trict, Aug. 31, 1928). Dec. 18, 1934. 

The rules were suspended and the 
appointment approved. 

(To fill vacancy caused by 
resignation) 
Henry L. Higginson District — 
Blanche Smith Field, assistant ele- 
mentary (resigned from Robert 
Gould Shaw District, Aug. 31, 1928), 
Dec. 18, 1934. 

The rules were suspended and the 
appointment approved. 

LIST OF TEACHERS APPROVED FOR 
TEMPORARY SERVICE 

The Superintendent submitted 
under the provisions of section 265, 
paragraph 2, of the regulations, the 
following additions to the list of 
teachers approved by him from 
which assignments may be made 
for temporary service: 

Day High Schools — Frances E. 
Castleman, Edith Keeler. 

Day Intermediate Schools — Eu- 
gene G. Branca, Mary E. Haverty, 
John T. Murphy, Eben Rosenfield. 

Kindergartens — Dorothy G. Mul- 
doon. 

Boston Trade School — Sidney 
Bluhm. 

Trade School for Girls — Marie L. 
Daly. 

Continuation School — Eugene G. 
Branca, Simeon J. Domas, Edith 
H. McPeake, Marie A. L. Pacht, 
Eben Rosenfield, David E. Rosen- 
gard, Frank W. Sullivan, Louis A. 
Verde. 

Classes for Conservation of Eye- 
sight — Margaret H. Tracy. 

Department of Household Science 
and Arts — Marie L. Daly, Edna L. 
Purcell, Marie A. L. Pacht, Mary 
E. Sullivan. 

Department of Physical Educa- 
tion—Mary R. Carvcn, Henry J. 
Griffin. 

Special Classes— Catherine M. 
Dacey, Catherine J. Harrington. 
Anna T. O'Connell. 

Teaching Assistants 
Day Elementary Schools— Eliza- 
beth M. Flynn. Doris A. Warner. 
Approved. 

TEMPORARY TEACHERS 

Mechanic Arts High School- 
Francis P. Assmus, junior master, 
Dec. 4, 1934. 

Continuation ' School— William O. 
Johnstone, shop instructor. Dee. 
3, 1934. 

Boston Trade School — Bernard 
P. Dockray, shop instructor, 1 
3, 1934. 

Department of Manual Arts— 
Sumner Meredith, instructor, man- 
ual training, elementary, Dec. l, 
1934. 

Approved. 



50 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



EMERGENCY EMPLOYMENT OF 
TEMPORARY TEACHER 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the employ- 
ment of Sumner Meredith as tem- 
porary co-operative instructor in 
the East Boston High School on 
Nov. 16. 1934 (one day), is hereiby 
authorized. 

SPECIAL ASSISTANT 

(New Appointment) 
Jamaica Plain High School- 
Margaret M. Fallon, industrial de- 
partment, Nov. 26, 1934. 
Approved. 

EVENING SCHOOLS 

Term 1934-35 

Central Evening High School- 
Paul F. Pearson, assistant, Dec. 6, 
1934 (one evening). 

Girls' Evening Commercial High 
School — Mary A. McMahon, assist- 
ant, Dec. 10, 1934 (one evening). 

Roxbury Evening Commercial 
High School— Archibald Taylor, 
assistant, Dec. 10 and 13, 1934 (two 
evenings). 

Bigelow Evening School — Alice 
R. Geary, assistant, Dec. 10 to 13, 
1934 (three evenings). 
■* Brighton Evening School — Mary 
J. Carroll, assistant, Dec. 4, 1934 
(one evening). 

Grover Cleveland Evening School 
— Lilliam F. MacConnachie, assist- 
ant, Dec. 11, 1934. 

Joseph H. Barnes Evening School 
— Margaret M. Fitzgerald, assistant, 
Dec. 6 to 13, 1934, (four evenings); 
Mary J. Carroll, assistant, Dec. 6, 
1934, (one evening). 

Lewis Evening School — Helen F. 
McCarthy, assistant, Dec. 6 to 13, 
1934, (four evenings). 

Michelangelo Evening School — 
Margaret E. Gray, assistant, Dec. 
3 to 13, 1934, (six evenings); Mary 
E. Vaughan, assistant, Dec. 10, 
1934. 

Roger Wolcott Evening School — 
Grace V. Sloan, assistant, Dec. 6 to 
13, 1934, (four evenings). 

Washington Evening School — 
Helen M. Friedel, assistant, Dec. 6 
to 13, 1934, (four evenings). 

Approved. 

Boston Trade School (Evening 
Classes) — Harold E. Atkinson, 
Howard W. Lloyd, assistants, Jan. 
7, 1935; Percy J. Paley, toolkeeper, 
Jan. 7, 1935. 

Approved. 

On motion of the Superintendent, 
it was 

ORDERED, That the employ- 
ment of Gertrude E. McCarthy as 
assistant in the Girls' Evening 
Commercial High School on Dec. 6, 
1934 (one evening), is hereby au- 
thorized and that she be paid for 
her services at the rate established 
for such rank in the salary sched- 
ule 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 17, 1934, reporting that, 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has appointed 
the following-named clerical assist- 
ant for the evening school term 
1934-1935: 

Boston Trade School (Evening 
Classes) — Mary P. McGillicuddy 
(temporary), Nov. 13, 1934. 

Approved, 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTENDED USE 
OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Term 1934-1935 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 17, 1934, reporting 
that subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
the following-named persons to 
serve in the Department of Ex- 
tended Use of the Public Schools, 
for the term 1934-1935: 

Club Leader — Thomas Francis 
Burke, Nov. 28, 1934. 

Leaders — Josephine A. Cogan, 
Isabel P. Orr, Nov. 14, 1934; John 
Elberfeld, Nov. 21, 1934; Gertrude 
E. McManus, Nov. 23. 1934: Charles 
E. McKenzie, Nov. 28, 1934; Mary 
Campbell. Anna Fenton, Charles 
H. Francis, William J. Hunt, A. 
Dorothea McLaughlin, Alice 
O'Hanasian, Frederick S. Reis, 
Dec. 3, 1934. 

Assistant Leaders — Clarence J. 
A'Hearn, John F. Burke, Frederick 
P. Carmody, Peter A. Hoban. Nov. 
16. 1934. 

Operator — Edward F. Pickett 
Nov. 16, 1934. 

General Helpers— Clarence J. 
A'Hearn, John F. Burke, Frederick 
P. Carmody, Peter A. Hoban. Nov. 
19. 1934. 

Attendants— Edward F. Laner- 
gan, Henry F. Lyons, John J. Van 
Wart. Nov. 19, 1934. 

Approved. 

TRANSFERS 

Mary T. Beahan, assistant, ele- 
mentary. Robert Gould Shaw Dis- 
trict, to the same position in the 
Prince District, Jan. 2, 1935. 

Ruth E. Condon, assistant, inter- 
mediate, Washington Intermediate 
District, to the same position in 
the Mary E. Curley Intermediate 
District, Jan. 2, 1935. 

Evelyn L. Houghton, assistant, 
elementary, Beethoven District, to 
the same position in the Robert 
Gould Shaw District, Jan. 2, 1935. 

Marion T. Hughes, assistant, ele- 
mentary, Roger Wolcott District, 
to the same position in the Bee- 
thoven District, Jan. 2. 1935. 

Kathleen T. Murphy, assistant, 
kindergarten, one session, Samuel 
Adams District, to the same posi- 
tion in the Oliver Hazard Perry 
District, Jan. 2. 1935. 

Approved. 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE 
On the report of the Superin- 
tendent, leave of absence was 
granted each of the following- 
named teachers for the term speci- 
fied: 

Roxbury Memorial High School 
(Boys)— William J. Bond, junior 
master, Nov. 22, 1934, one day, 
court summons. 

Chapman District— Grace M. 
Strong, assistant, elementary, Nov. 
8, 1934, one-half day, court sum- 
mons. 

Edmund P. Tileston District- 
Marion L. Scannell, assistant, ele- 
mentary, Nov. 8, 1934, one-half day, 
court summons. 

Julia Ward Howe District — Irene 
M. Devine. assistant, elementary, 
Nov. 16, 1934, one-half day, court 
summons. 



Robert Gould Shaw District — 
Frances M. Murphy, master's 
assistant, Nov. 9, 1934. one-half 
day, court summons. 

On the report of the Superinten- 
tendent, leave of absence under a 
suspension of the regulations was 
granted the following-named secre- 
tary for the term specified: 

Roxbury Memorial High School 
(Girls) — Margaret C. Morris, secre- 
tary, from Nov. 1 to Dec. 31, 1934, 
without pay. 

On the report of the Superintend- 
ent, leave of absence for study 
was granted the following-named 
teacher for the term specified, said 
period, under the provisions of 
Section 322 of the regulations, to 
count as one full year's leave: 

Dearborn District — Helen F. 
Denehy, assistant, elementary, Feb. 
1, 1935, to Aug. 31, 1935. 



ASSIGNMENTS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 17, 1934, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
the following-named teachers of 
sewing, elementary, in the Depart- 
ment of Household Science and 
Arts, to the high schools indicated, 
without change of rank or salary, 
to take effect on the dates stated 
and to continue for the school 
year ending Aug. 31, 1935, unless 
earlier terminated by the Super- 
intendent with the approval of the 
School Committee: 

Mary V. Murtaugh to the Dor- 
chester High School for Girls, Dec. 
10, 1934. 

Kathryn A. Hurley to the Dor- 
chester High School for Girls, Jan. 
2, 1935. 

Katherine M. Nelson to tne Jere- 
miah E. Burke High School for 
Girls, Jan. 2, 1935. 

Placed on file and the assign- 
ments approved, to take effect on 
the dates stated 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 17, 1934, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
the following-named teachers to 
classes attended exclusively by boys 
in grades above the third in the 
districts herein stated: 

Michelangelo Intermediate Dis- 
trict — John J. Landrigan, assist- 
ant, intermediate, Dec. 12, _932. 

Thomas N. Hart District — Anna 
M. Sheehan. master's assistant. Dec 
1, 1932. 

Placed on file and the assigr.- 
ments approved, to take effact on 
the dates stated. 



HOME INSTRUCTION OF PHYS- 
ICALLY HANDICAPPED 
CHILDREN 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 17, 1934, reporting 
that subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
Kathleen H. Fox, temporary 
teacher, for home instruction of 
physically handicapped children, to 
take effect Dec. 10. 1934. 

Approved. 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



51 



EXTENSION OF CHRISTMAS 

VACATION OF EVENING 

SCHOOLS 

The Superintendent offered the 
following. 

ORDERED, That for the current 
school year, the Christmas vaca- 
tion of the evening schools is 
hereby extended up to and in- 
cluding Thursday, Jan. 3, 1935. 

The rules were suspended- and 
the order passed 



CLOSING OF ADMINISTRATIVE 
OFFICES 
The following was ordered: 
ORDERED, Th: * the adminis- 
trative offices and the supply room 
of the School Committee are hereby 
closed on Monday, Dec. 24, 1934, 
and Monday, Dec. 31, 1934. 

The rules were suspended and 
the order passed. 



PETITION FOR ADDITIONAL 
LEGISLATION 

On motion it was 

ORDERED, That the Chairman 
is hereby authorized, for and in 
behalf of this Committee, to peti- 
tion the General Court for legisla- 
tion to provide: 

(a) For increasing appropriation 
power 

(b) For authority to establish' 
the salaries of certain teachers 

(c) For the repeal of Chapter 
111 of the Acts of 1931— An Act 
Authorizing the School Committee 
of the City of Boston to Expend 
Money for Athletic Wearing Ap- 
parel and Clothing, and for Repair- 
ing and Maintaining the Same for 
Use by Pupils of the Public Schools 
of Said City and for other Inciden- 
tal Expenses. 

(d) Such legislation for the con- 
struction of new buildings as the 
Committee shall deem necessary. 



RESIGNATION 

A communication was received 
from the Secretary, under date of 
Dec. 17. 1934, reporting the resigna- 
tion of Helen J. Lynch, assistant in 
the offices of the Superintendent- 
Secretary, to take effect Dec. 8, 1934. 

Placed on file and the resigna- 
tion accepted, to take effect on the 
date stated. 



ELIGIBLE LIST 

A communication was received 
from the Board of Superintendents, 
under date of Dec. 17, 1934, report- 
ing the following successful candi- 
date of the 1934 examinations for 
certificate IV. High School (Office 
Practice), as reported by the Board 
of Examiners. 

This name should be inserted in 
School Document No. 5, 1934, 
page 10. 

IV. High School 
Office Practice 
Rating. Name. Certificate Expires. 
854 Mary F. A. Kelly Dec. 31. 1940 
Placed on file. 



AMENDMENT TO REGULA- 
TIONS 

The Superintendent offered the 
following: 

ORDERED, That the regulations 
are hereby amended as follows: 

Renumber Section 337, paragraph 
4, as paragraph 4a and insert the 
following as new paragraph 4b: 

4b. Teachers absent from duty 
on leave without pay for a con- 
tinuous period in excess of two 
months shall have the dates of 
their anniversaries advanced by 
that period of time for which the 
absence is without pay, provided 
that when this procedure brings 
the anniversary date subsequent 
to the first day of any month, such 
anniversary date shall be the first 
day of such month. 

Laid over. 



AUTHORIZED LIST OF TEXT 
BOOKS 

The Superintendent offered the 
following five orders authorizing 
changes in and additions to the 
authorized list of text books: 

1. ORDERED, That the follow^ 
ing-named books are hereby au- 
thorized for use as text books as 
indicated: 
Walker, Alberta and 

Summy, Ethel. Fairy 

Find-Out's Book. Chas. 

E. Merrill Company, cpt. 

1934. Grade II net $.51 

Walker, Alberta and 

Summy, Ethel. Book 

Brownie's Book. Chas. E. 

Merrill Company. cpt. 

1934. Grade III net .58 

2. ORDERED, That the revised 
editions of the following-named 
text books are hereby authorized 
for use as indicated to take the 
place of the old editions of the 
same: 

CIVICS-HISTORY-GEOGRAPHY 

Allen, Nellie B. Europe. 
Ginn and Company, cpt. 
1934. Grade Vin net .75 

Allen, Nellie B. Geographi- 
cal and Industrial Stud- 
ies. South America, rev. 
Ginn and Company, cpt. 
1934. Grade VI net .75 

Carpenter, Frank G. Car- 
penter's New Geographi- 
cal Reader. South Amer- 
ica. American Book Com- 
pany, cpt. 1932. Grade 
V net .75 

Nida, William L. and Nida, 
Stella H. Pilots and Path- 
finders. The Macmillan 
Company. cpt. 1934. 
Grade VI net .90 

Tryon, Rolla M. and Ling- 
ley, Charles R. The 
American People and Na- 
tion. Ginn and Company, 
cpt. 1933. Grade VIL.net 1.29 

Williamson, Thames Ross. 
Civics at Work; rev. by 
William A. Hamm. D. C. 
Heath and Company, cpt. 
1934. Grade VII net .928 

Woodburn, James A. and 
Hill, Howard C. Historic 
Background of Our Unit- 
ed States. Longmans, 
Green and Company cpt. 
1934. rev. Gr. VI net .90 



COMMERCIAL 

Bowman, Charles E., Percy, 
Atlee L. and Nichols, 
Frederick G. Fundamen- 
mentals of Bookkeeping 
and Business ,(with ac- 
companying blanks). 
American Book Company, 
cpt 1934. Grade X...net 1.11 
f.o.b Bloomfield, N. J. 

DICTIONARIES 

Funk & Wagnalls. Concise 
Standard Dictionary. 
Funk & Wagnalls Com- 
pany, cpt. 1934. Grade 
IV net .55 

f.o.b. N. Y. 
Funk & Wagnalls. The 
High School Standard 
Dictionary. Funk & 
Wagnalls Company, cpt. 
1934. Grade IX net 1.50 

f.o.b. N. Y. 

ENGLISH 

Bolenius, Emma M. The 
Bolenius Readers. rev. 
Houghton Mifflin Com- 
pany, cpt. 1934. 

Fourth Reader. Grade 

IV net .64 

Fifth Reader, Grade V., 

net 67 

LaRue, Mabel G. Little 
Indians. The Macmillan 
Company. cpt. 1934. 
Grade II net .60 



3. ORDERED, That the follow- 
ing-named dictionary is hereby 
authorized for reference use in ail 
schools: 

Webster's New Interna- 
tional Dictionary of the 
English Language; ed. by 
William A. N e i 1 s o n, 
Thomas A. Knott and 
Paul W. Carhart. G. & C. 
Merriam Company, cpt. 
1934. Himtting edition. 

All Schools net 20.50 

reinforced 

4. ORDERED, That the revised 
editions of the following-named 
dictionaries are hereby authoric-d 
for reference use as indicated to 
take the place of the old editions of 
the same; 

Funk & Wagnalls. The Col- 
lege Standard Dictionary 
ed. by Frank H. Vizetelly 
Funk & Wagnalls Com- 
pany, cpt. 1934. All 

Schools net 4.00 

f.o.b. N. Y. 

Funk & Wagnalls. The 
Desk Standard Dictionary 
(Without index). Funk 
& Wagnalls Company, cpt 
1934. All Schools, .'...net 1.50 
f.o.b. X V 

Funk & Wagnalls. The New 
Standard Dictionary 
(unabridged). Funk & 
Wagnalls Company. C pt 
1932. All Schools. '....no,' i,., 
f.o.b. N. Y 
(buckram bind 

The New Century Diction- 
ary. 2 vols. D. Appleton- 
Century Company, cpt 
1934. All School... ..... n et v 

set 
r r.T^r^^ C&rtoraft binding) 

. 5. ORDERED. That the follow- 

ing-named books. now author! 

ioi use as text books, are hereby 



52 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



dropped from the list, no further 
copies to be purchased: 
Walker, Alberta and 
Summy, Ethel. The Study 
Readers. Chas. E. Merrill 
Company. 

Second Year. cpt. 1928. 
Third Year. cpt. 1926. 
The five orders were laid over. 

APPOINTMENT AND SALARY 
OF FUEL ENGINEER 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Dec. 17, 1934, reporting that 
the Division of Civil Service has 
certified the following-named per- 
sons as eligible for appointment as 
Fuel Engineer: 

William H. Flynn, Patrick J. 
Downey, William D. Kendrick. 

Placed on file 

The Chairman stated the ques- 
tion was on the election of a fuel 
engineer to fill the existing 
vacancy and the Secretary was di- 
rected to call the roll. 

The members as their names 
were called respectively stated that 
they voted as follows: 

For WILLIAM L. KENDRICK— 
* Messrs. Hurley, Mackey, Sullivan 
and Tobin — 4. 

For WILLIAM H. FLYNN— Dr. 
Lyons — 1. 

The Chair declared William L. 
Kendrick duly elected fuel en- 
gineer, to take effect Dec. 24, 1934. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the salary of 
the fuel engineer in the office of 
the Business Manager is hereby es- 
tablished at the rate of three thou- 
sand dollars ($3,000) per annum, to 
take effect Dec. 24, 1934, with the 
reduction provided for in Chapter 
121 of the Acts of 1933. 



RE-CERTIFICATION OF AREAS 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Dec. 17, 1934, trans- 
mitting a re-certification of the 
areas of the Glenway School- 
house, upon which the compensa- 
tion for custodian service is based, 
to take effect Dec. 9, 1934. 

Placed on file and the Chairman 
authorized to approve re-certifica- 
tion, to take effect on the date 
stated. 



LEAVE OF ABSENCE TO 
CUSTODIAN 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Dec. 17, 1934, recom- 
mending that Emil W. Meyer, 
custodian, Theodore Roosevelt 
School-house, be granted leave of 
absence on one-half net compen- 
sation for the period Dec. 4, 1934, to 
Mar. 2, 1935, inclusive, because of 
personal illness. 

Placed on file and leave of ab- 
sence on one-half net compensation 
granted for the period specified. 

Dr. Mackey offered the follow- 
ing: 

ORDERED, That this Commit- 
tee hereby expresses to Mr. Wil- 
liam W. Drummey, Superintendent 
of Construction, Department of 
School Buildings, its commenda- 



tion of the good work done by him 
in connection with the E. R. A. 
activities of his department and 
the splendid entertainment which 
he sponsored in behalf of the E. 
R. A workers at the Boston Opera 
House last Saturday evening, and 
at the same time extends its con- 
gratulations upon his appointment 
to the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology as special lecturer on 
the Economics of Architecture. 
Passed unanimously. 

Mr. Sullivan: It was with the 
greatest pleasure that I learned 
that the fine record made by the 
graduates of the Public Latin 
School at Harvard University has 
been continued this year. Forty 
graduates of the Latin School are 
listed as honor students. This num- 
ber ranks as the highest on the list, 
over any other school in the coun- 
try. 

Not very long ago notice was re- 
ceived that the students graduating 
from English High School had led 
all others in the number of honor 
students at the Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. 

I think it is well to call attention 
to these records as they indicate 
the very excellent work which is 
being done by the head masters 
and the faculties of these two 
schools. I feel that such showings 
indicate that the Boston schools 
hold a high place among the pre- 
paratory schools in the country. 

The statement was ordered 
spread upon the records and a copy 
sent to the head masters of the 
Public Latin and English High 
Schools. 

The Committee adjourned. 
Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN, 

Secretary. 



A SQUARE DEAL IN ASSESSMENTS FOR 
TAXATION. 

Many cities are finding it greatly to 
their advantage to have their tax valua- 
tions periodically overhauled. The first 
criterion of any assessment is equity. 
For every citizen who wants through 
"pull" or however else to get off easy, 
there are twenty, nay a hundred, who 
want a fair and square deal for all. 

The appraisal of city real estate is 
a highly technical affair. 

Few things are more important than 
the equalization of assessments. Par- 
ticularly in cities that are cramped by 
an inflexible debt or tax limit, an hon- 
est, full value assessment may be a 
great boon. Without the slightest raise 
in the tax rate a substantially greater 
tax yield may be had. 

FOREIGN-BORN WHITES, 1930, WITH 
COUNTRY OF BIRTH. 

Total foreign-born whites, 229,356 or 
9,563 less than in 1920. Born in Ireland, 
50,381 (6,630 less than in 1920), 6,449 of 
these being born in Northern Ireland; 
in Canada, 45,558 (3,550 increase) ; Italy, 
36,274 (1,905 decrease from 1920) ; Russia, 
31,359 (6,662 decrease); England, 10,316 
(2,092 decrease) ; Poland, 9,903 (2,253 
increase); Lithuania, 5,869; Scotland, 
5,637 (558 increase) ; Sweden, 5,432 (1,348 
decrease) ; Germany, 5,381 (534 de- 
crease) ; Greece, 3,416 (362 increase) ; 
all others, 19,830. 



POPULATION 21 YEARS OLD AND OVER, 
BY SEX, RACE, NATIVITY AND CITI- 
ZENSHIP BY DIVISIONS AND STATES, 
APRIL 1, 1930. 

For the United States there are 72,943- 
624 (37,056,757 males and 35,886,867 fe- 
males) persons 21 years old and over, 
of whom 52,762,391 (26,418,580 males and 
26,343,811 females) are native white; 
foreign-born white, 12,637,643 (6,797,494 
males and 5,840,149 females), of whom 
7,627,436 (4,217,576 males and 3,409,860 
females) are naturalized; 1,218,416 (926,- 
454 males and 291,962 females) have first 
papers, 3,342,837 (1,435,309 males and 
1,907,528 females) are alien and 448,954 
(218,155 males and 230,799 females) citi- 
zenship not reported; Negroes, 6,531,939 
(3,235,441 males and 3,296,498 females) 
and other races, 1,011,651 (605,242 males 
and 406,409 females). 

For New England there are 5,095,074 
(2,481,494 males and 2,613,580 females) 
persons 21 years old and over, of whom 
3,309,557 (1,596,613 males and 1,712,944 
females) are native white; foreign-born 
white, 1,721,714 (851,225 males and 870,- 
489 females), of whom 889,577 (456,052 
males and 433,525 females) are natural- 
ized, 142,894 (107,250 males and 35,644 
females) have first papers, 648,976 (270,- 
709 males and 378,267 females) are alien 
and 40,267 (17,214 males and 23,053 fe- 
males) citizenship not reported ; Negroes, 
58,770 (29,595 males and 29,175 females) 
and other races, 5,033 (4,061 males and 
972 females). 

For Massachusetts there are 2,686,487 
(1,287,970 males and 1,398,517 females) 
persons over 21 years of age, of whom 
1,656,040 (787,645 males and 868,395 fe- 
males) are native white; foreign-born 
white, 994,411 (481,255 males and 513,156 
females); Negroes, 32,898 (16,406 males 
and 16,492 females) ; other races, 3,138 
(2,664 males and 474 females). Of the 
foreign-born white, 513,787 (260,530 males 
and 253,257 females) are naturalized; 
85,892 (62,821 males and 23,071 females) 
have first papers; 371,508 (14S,351 males 
and 223,157 females) are aliens; for 
23,224 (9,553 males and 13,671 females), 
citizenship was not reported. 

For Suffolk County there are 566,051 
(276,761 males and 289,290 females) per- 
sons over 21 years of age, of whom 305,- 
311 (148,703 males and 156,608 females) 
are native white; foreign-born white, 
244,674 (119,403 males and 125,271 fe- 
males) ; Negroes, 14,614 (7,343 males and 
7,271 females) ; other races, 1,452 (1,312 
males and 140 females). Of the foreign- 
born whites, 128,825 (66,813 males and 
62,012 females) are naturalized; 24,775 
(17,766 males and 7,009 females) have 
first papers; 83,112 (31,732 males and 
51,380 females) are aliens ; for 7,962 (3,092 
males and 4,870 females), citizenship 
was not reported. 

For Boston there are 507,711 (247,490 
males and 260,221 females) persons over 
21 years of age, of whom 275,616 (133,937 
males and 141,679 females) are native 
white; foreign-born white, 216,349 (105,- 
080 males and 111,269 females) ; Negroes, 
14,330 (7,193 males and 7,137 females) ; 
other races, 1,416 (1,280 males and 136 
females). Of the foreign-born white, 
114,119 (58,651 males and 55,468 females) 
are naturalized; 22,254 (15,817 males and 
6,437 females) have first papers; 72,974 
(27,901 males and 45,073 females) are 
aliens; for 7,002 (2,711 males and 4,291 
females), citizenship was not reported. 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



53 



THE OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE, CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR WEEK 
ENDING JANUARY 5, 1935. 





Dependent 
Aid. 


Mother's 
Aid. 


Old Age 

Assistance. 


Administrative. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 




25,442 

328 

1,142 

24,628 

24,604 


1,450 

5 

8 

1,447 

1,482 


3,836 

28 

18 

3,846 

3,745 






30,728 


last week. 






361 








1,168 


tinued. 






29,921 


this week. 






29,831 









Financial. 



Expended during week 


$178,479 50 
185,674 50 
182,464 00 


821,866 00 
21,887 00 
21,880 00 


$24,475 00 
24,428 00 
24,290 00 


$12,004 06 

11,192 41 

9,129 73 




$236,824 56 




243,181 91 






237,763 73 










178,479 50 


21,866 00 


24,475 00 


12,004 06 




236,824 56 






Appropriations unex- 
pended. 



























CONTRACTS EXTENDED. 

The Mayor has approved the request 
of the Supply Department to extend 
contracts as follows : 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of October 4, 
1934, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with Turner Centre System, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase 
of milk, cream, etc., for delivery to the 
Boston City Hospital and the Sanatorium 
Division. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantity of said 
milk, cream, etc., as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1934. This privilege is extended to 
March 31, 1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of milk, cream, etc., referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1934, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to March 31, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of October 9, 
1934, the City cf Boston entered into a 
contract with Herlihy Brothers, Incor- 
porated, relative to the purchase of milk, 
cream, etc., for delivery to the Long 
Island Hospital, Institutions Department. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 



purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantity of said 
milk, cream, etc., as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1934. This privilege is extended to 
March 31, 1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of milk, cream, etc., refened 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1934, 
for the extended period permitted therebv, 
to wit, to March 31, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of December 
19, 1934, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with the Webster-Thomas 
Company relative to the purchase of 
groceries for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
groceries as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1934. 
This privilege is extended to March 31, 
1935." 

I respectfully request that .you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, 
such quantities of groceries referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, L934, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to March 31, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

\\ \hren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of Novem- 
ber 21, 1934, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with the Lincoln Oil Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of auto- 
mobile motor oils for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
motor oil as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1934. 
This privilege is extended to March 30, 
1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of automobile moter oils re- 
ferred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1934, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 30, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of June 6, 1934, 
the City of Boston entered into a contract 
with the New England Electrical Supply 
Company relative to the purchase of large 
incandescent lamps for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
large incandescent lamps as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1934. This privilege is extended 
to May 25, 1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of large incandescent lamps 
referred to therein as may not havi 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1934, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to May 25, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
terintendent cf Suppl 

Boston', January 1, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of October 2. 
1934, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Turner Centre System. 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
ice cream for delivery. to the various city 
ments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January I. 1935, at its option. 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
ice cream as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December .SI, 1934. 
This privilege is extended to March 31, 

1 



54 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of ice cream referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1934, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to March 31, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayer of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of June 13, 
1934, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Boston Ice Company 
relative to the purchase of ice for delivery 
to the various city departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantity of said 
ice as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1934. This 
* privilege is extended to May 31, 1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of ice referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1934, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to May 
31, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mai/or of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of October 11, 
1934, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Petroleum Heat and 
Power Company relative to the purchase 
of heavy and medium fuel oil for delivery 
4o the various city departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
fuel oil as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1934. 
This privilege is extended to September 

30. 1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities cf heavy and medium fuel oil 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 

31, 1934, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to September 30, 
1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — L T nder date of October 23, 
1934, the City of Boston entered into a 



contract with the White Fuel Corpora- 
tion relative to the purchase of light fuel 
oil for delivery to the various city de- 
partments. Included in the contract is 
the following clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
fuel oil as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1934. 
This privilege is extended to September 
30, 1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of light fuel oil referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1934, for 
the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to September 30, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date cf November 
26, 1934, the City of Boston entered into 
a contract with Socony-Vacuum Oil 
Company, Incorporated, relative to the 
purchase of fuel oil for delivery to the 
fireboat "Matthew J. Boyle" and the 
Institutions Department boat "Stephen 
J. O'Meara." Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said fuel oil as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1934. 
This privilege is extended to September 
30, 1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchsae on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of fuel oil referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1934, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to September 30, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of October 25, 
1934, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the East Boston Coal Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of range oil 
for delivery to the Overseers of the Public 
Welfare Department. Included in the 
contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
fuel oil as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1934. This 
privilege is extended to April 30, 1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 



option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of range cil referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1934, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to April 30, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of November 
13, 1934, the City of Boston entered into 
a contract with the Hanley Oil Company, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
range oil for the Overseers of the Public 
Welfare Department. Included in the 
contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
fuel oil as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31,11934. 
This privilege is extended to April 30, 
1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of range oil referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1934, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to April 30, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston, 

Dear Sir, — Under date of November 7, 
1934, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with Alfred E. Ventola relative 
to the purchase of range oil for the Over- 
seers of the Public Welfare Department. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
fuel oil as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1934. 
This privilege is extended to April 30, 
1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of range oil referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1934, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to April 30, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — Under date of November 7, 
1934, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Lynch Super Service 
Station relative to the purchase of range 



Jan. 12 



CITY RECORD 



55 



oil for delivery to the Overseers of the 
Public Welfare Department. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
fuel oil as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31,- 1934. 
This privilege is extended to April 30, 
1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of range oil referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1934, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to April 30, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of October 31, 
1934, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with the Pennyslvania Oil Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of range oil 
for the Overseers of the Public Welfare 
Department. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
fuel oil as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1934. 
This privilege is extended to April 30, 
1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of range oil referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1934, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to wit, 
to April 30, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of October 31, 
1934, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with E. F. Loonie, Jr., distributer 
for Quincy Oil Company, relative to the 
purchase of range oil for the Overseers of 
the Public Welfare Department. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees 
to deliver, upon the same terms and 
conditions as aforesaid, such quantities 
of said fuel oil as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1934. This privilege is extended 
to April 30, 1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 



quantities of range oil referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1934, for the ex- 
tended period permitted thereby, to wit, 
to April 30, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of August 24, 
1934, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with Charles H. Emerson relative 
to the purchase of wood for delivery to 
the Overseers of the Public Welfare 
Department. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1935, at its option, 
purchase, and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
wood as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1934. This 
privilege is extended to August 15, 1935." 

I respectfully request that you approve 
the purchase on behalf of the City of 
Boston, pursuant to the above-quoted 
option, upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as are stated in said contract, such 
quantities of wood referred to therein as 
may not have been ordered up to and in- 
cluding December 31, 1934, for the ex- 
tended period permitted thereby, to wit, 
to August 15, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



MAYOR MANSFIELD SEEKS TO 
HASTEN POST OFFICE BUILD= 
ING'S FUND. 

The following is a copy of a telegram to 
Harold L. Ickes, Secretary of the Interior, 
sent by Mayor Mansfield: 

Boston, January 5, 1935. 
Harold L. Ickes, Secretary of the Interior, 
Washington, D. C. 
Have just been informed that although 
eight hundred thirty thousand dollars 
has been allocated for erection of parcel 
post building at Boston the money has 
not actually been paid over from Interior 
Department to Treasury Department. 
Can you expedite this payment so that 
construction can begin at once? Many 
building trade employees in Boston and 
vicinity out of work for a long time very 
anxious to have this building started. 

Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of Boston. 



BOSTON INCORPORATED AS A CITY, 1822. 

The act of incorporation was passed 
by the Legislature on February 23, 1822. 
On March 4 following, the voters of 
Boston accepted said act, chapter 110, 
1821-22, as its first city charter by a 
majority of 916 in a total vote of 4,678. 
The vote was 2,797 yens, 1,881 nays. 
Previous attempts to incorporate as n 
city had been made in 1650, 1659, 1667. 
1708, 1744, 1762, 1784, 1791, 1804 and 
1815. The charter was revised in 1851, 
1885 and 1909. Amendments to the 1909 
charter were enacted in 1910, 1912, 1914, 
1918, 1919, 1921, 1922 and lastly in 1924 
(see "Municipal Register" for 1928, page* 
19-43). 



EMPLOYEES FOR LONG ISLAND 
HOSPITAL SECURED FROM 
MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT 

BUREAU. 

The following is a copy of communica- 
tion received by Mayor Mansfield from 
Dr. Frederic A. Washburn, Commis- 
sioner of the Institutions Department: 

Boston, January 4, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

My dear Mr. Mayor, — In reply to 
your communication about the statement 
of Councilor Robert G. Wilson, Jr., as 
to the employment of orderlies at Long 
Island Hospital I would say that I 
cannot find any record that the Commer- 
cial Reference Association, 221 Tremont 
street, has been called from this office 
to furnish applicants for any vacant 
positions. I cannot be absolutely sure 
of this as one of the young ladies from 
this office who has this matter in hand 
will not be here again until Monday. 

It is possible that the Commercial 
Reference Association have sent people 
to this office to apply for jobs and that 
we were unaware of it and considered 
that the applicants had come in of their 
own account. 

I believe that it is a statement of fact 
that we have always called the Municipal 
Employment Agency in the first place 
and have only gone to other agencies 
when the Municipal Employment Bureau 
had no one fitted to fill the vacancy. 

It should be understood that orderlies 
and attendants who care for the sick 
should be people of some training, if it is 
possible to obtain them. 

We have applied once or twice to 
other hospitals and Nurses' Registration 
Bureaus for applicants of this description. 
We have, however, obtained very few 
from these as the job is not very attrac- 
tive to those who can choose. 

Yours very sincerely, 

Frederic A. Washburn, 

Commissioner. 



POPULATION OP UNITED STATES, NEW 
ENGLAND AND MASSACHUSETTS. 

Continental United States (i. e., 48 
states and the District of Columbia) in 
1930, 122,775,046; outlying possessions, 
14,233,389; total, 137,008,435; New Eng- 
land, 8,166,341; Massachusetts, 4,249,614 
or 52.04 per cent of New England and 
ranking eighth in the Union. In density 
of population Massachusetts ranks sec- 
ond, i. e., 528 per square mile of land, 
Rhode Island ranking first, with 644 per 
square mile of land. 

Population of the other New England 
States in 1930, ranking from the highest 
total: Connecticut, 1,606,903; Maine, 
797,423; Rhode Island, 6S7.497; New 
Hampshire, 465,293; Vermont, 359,611. 
Density for New England, 132 per sq. 
m.; for U. S. (4S states and the District 
of Columbia) 41 per sq. in. 

The population of the United States 
increased 16.1 per cent since 1920; that 
of New England 10.3 per cent and that 
of Massachusetts 10.3 per cent. 



CHICAGO POLICE. 



Although the numerical strength of the 
Chicago police department has been re- 
duced in the last two years from approxi- 
mately 6.700 to 6.000. the number of men 
on foot patrol has boon increased 150 per 
cent, or about 1,900. 



56 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 12 



NUMBER AND ESTIMATED COST OF NEW BUILDINGS AND ALTERATIONS, ADDITIONS, ETC., FOR WHICH 
APPLICATIONS HAVE BEEN FILED FOR MONTH ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1934. 





Apartment 

and 

Tenement 

Houses. 


Apartment 

and 

Tenement 

Houses 

and Stores. 


Churches. 


Dwellings. 


Dwellings 
and Stores. 


Garages. 


Character. 


u 

a 

3 


-0 

Eg 


u 
£1 

B 

3 


■a 

sg 
w 


£> 

s 

3 
S5 


T3 

Eg 
"■go 


u 

a 

S 

3 ■ 


T3 
0) 

B o 

■•go 


3 
IS 


■a 

a 

Eg 

"■go 


V 

S 

3 


T3 
<D 

Eg 

'■go 










































1 

5 


$3,500 
20,800 






1 
5 
1 


$600 




















1,375 




















400 








































6 
150 


$24,300 
47,758 






7 
9 


$2,375 




12 


$14,900 


10 


$5,171 


1 


$160 


25 


$5,777 


12,150 








12 


$14,900 


10 


$5171 


1 


$160 


156 


$72,058 


25 


$5,777 


16 


$14,525 






• 


Hotels. 


Hospitals. 


Lodging 
Houses. 


Lodging 

Houses 

and Stores. 


Mercantile 
Buildings. 


Manu- 
facturing 
Buildings. 


Character. 





Eg 


£ 

3 


T3 

Eg 

■•go 


£ 
o 

.a 
S 

3 


T3 

Sg 


1 

E 

3 
2 


T3 

a) 

8 -p 

E O 


J5 

S 
3 


T3 

Eg 

'i u 


u 

V 
£> 

S 
3 

•z 


■o 

E o 

'■go 

H 


First Class 








1 










i 

































Third Class 














































































Total New Work 




























8 


$14,005 


2 


$1,300 


4 


$2,050 


2 


$750 


75 


$114,438 


8 


$8,594 








8 


$14,005 


2 


$1,300 


4 


$2,050 


2 


$750 


75 


$114,438 


8 


$8,594 






Office 
Buildings. 


Public 
Buildings. 


School 
Houses. 


Theatres. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


Character. 


u 

E 
3 

S5 


T3 
-*> . 

C3 tJ 

s§ 
••go 

H 


ffi 

s 

3 


Eg 


.0 

E 

3 


T3 

Sg 

& 


g 


T3 
a 

E o 


E 

3 


-a 

A) 

**: 

Eg 

••go 


V 

S 
3 


■a 

V 

"8-^ 

Eg 

'■go 














































1 

2 
1 


$3,500 

125 

3,800 


3 
12 

9 


$7 600 




















22,300 
4 200 






























































4 
20 


$7,425 
7,362 


17 


$34,100 
259,075 




13 


S13.935 


3 


$1,000 


2 


$5,000 


6 


$4,725 


350 






13 


$13,935 


3 


$1,000 


2 


$5,000 


6 










$293,175 





















CITY OP BOSTON PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



CITY RECORD 



Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 



Vol. 27. Saturday, January 19, 1935. No. 3 



MAYOR MANSFIELD ESTABLISHES REAL ESTATE DIVISION OF PUBLIC WEL= 
FARE DEPARTMENT TO BRING AID TO TITLE HOLDERS OF PROPERTY 
WHERE THAT PROPERTY IS NONPRODUCTIVE, THUS FORCING OWNERS 
TO SEEK RELIEF — DISCUSSES PLANS AND THEIR OPERATION AS WELL 
AS THEIR INTENT AND PURPOSE IN RADIO ADDRESS FROM CITY HALL 
BROADCASTING STATION OF WNAC — AIM TO KEEP FAMILIES INDE= 
PENDENT. 



The following is the radio address of the Mayor, from the Mayor's Office, City Hall, Boston, at 4 p. m., 
Tuesday, January 15, 1935, over Station WNAC: 

The Property Owner and Welfare Relief. 

In the midst of all the activity to supply necessary relief to persons without means, the plight of the property 
owner has been largely overlooked. His property may be non-productive; it may be mortgaged for more than 
it is worth; it may be occupied by tenants who do not pay rent; it may, instead of being an asset, be a decided lia- 
bility to the owner — yet because he does own property the owner is refused relief. 

This problem has become so acute in Boston that at my suggestion the Overseers of the Public Welfare have 
established a Real Estate Division to study the problems of real estate owners who are forced to apply to the city 
for relief — "because they cannot eat their houses." This division is under the direction of Edward B. Steele, 
a young man with real estate experience and a graduate of the Harvard Law School. 

The idea of an applicant for public welfare relief owning real estate seems at first somewhat incongruous. 
The immediate impulse is to say emphatically that any property owner should be barred automatically from becom- 
ing a welfare recipient, because people regard realty as they do a bank account. It has the intrinsic value of actual 
money, for it can be rented, mortgaged, sold, or used in various ways to raise money and to become income- 
producing. 

When property was at its old level and when work and wages were normal, it was a valuable asset from any 
angle of investment. But during the past ten years, property valuation has undergone a complete change. Be- 
tween 1925 and 1929 it was at its peak; and it is estimated that since then it has decreased from 30 per cent to 40 
per cent, so that today many property owners face the reverse of the picture. They must meet the problem of 
upkeep, including taxes, interest on mortgages, insurance, and repairs on realty which is making no valid return 
on its investment; property which may be untenanted or for which the tenants are paying minimum rents, and 
may be in arrears even for these. So that what was once an asset has now become, at least temporarily in many 
cases, a liability. The fact that during the past two months the Real Estate Division of the Overseers of the Public 
Welfare has investigated 150 property cases, and has been called upon to help distracted home owners who believed 
themselves to be at the end of their financial rope, indicates that the establishment of such a division was a timely 
attempt to meet one of the inevitable results of the long drain on family resources. 

Keeps Families Independent. 

The outstanding value of this service to the city is its influence in keeping families independent, and showing 
them that resources may still exist in their property if they will follow directions and make some necessary inquiries 
and adjustments. There are several ways in which the division is able to help to keep property owners self-support- 
ing and to do away with the necessity for their being given public aid. One is to secure a suspension of principal 
payments on homes being bought through cooperative banks, another is to direct property owners to institutions 
which will take second mortgages; still another is to put them in touch with real estate and renting agencies, \\ hich 
will find tenants or purchasers. One of the important phases of the work is to give the owner a clear picture of 
the state of his possessions, and apprise him of their current value and possibilities. 

No effort is used to make applicants sell, mortgage, or otherwise dispose of property, but every incentive is 
provided, and every help given, to see if there is not some last avenue open whereby they can hold their property 
and make it income-producing. 

Banks and real estate firms are interviewed for applicants. The Co-operative Bank League, the Savings 
Banks Association of Massachusetts, the Real Estate Exchange, as well as numerous neighborhood banks and realty 
dealers, have already helped to solve some problems for the department's applicants, and to put inquirers on the 
road to a better understanding and use of the channels through which they can act to save their property. 

{Continued on page 60.) 



58 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 




"0 Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 
queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship- 
teeming plain of the ocean, 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene, 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotion!" 
From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

Hall. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



$2.00 Per Year 
10 Cents 



IN ADVANCE 



STREET AGENCIES. 

Old South News-stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 

A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its, publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
January' 21, 1935, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of rear 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 



for the storage or sale of merchandise in 
public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasolene, oil, 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To the Boston Traffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To the Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To the Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue, Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as ' to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 



charges made for such service. Applica- 
tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other rjublic cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Department of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, a:lteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Statistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To the Wire Division of the Fire 
Department, 60 Bristol street, for all in 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 



For the week ending Januarv 12, 1935: 
Population estimated July, 1935, 
United States Census Bureau estimate, 
798,568; number of deaths (stillbirths 
excluded): Residents, 234; nonresidents, 
53; total, 287. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 18.59; nonresidents deducted, 
15.24. 



Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
Last week, 15.43; corresponding week 
last year, 17.00. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 21; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 8; sixty years and over, 154. 
Total deaths: Male, 152; female, 135; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 163; 
deaths of colored, 5. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 


Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 12, 1935. 


Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 13, 1934. 




Cases. 


Deaths. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Anterior Poliomyelitis 


4 

9 

68 
51 

27 
2 

47 


1 
4 

17 

7 

1 


1 
2 

245 

39 
67 
23 
9 
1 
67 




Diphtheria 












Measles 


1 


Meningitis Epidemic • 

Pneumonia (lobar) 


12 


Scarlet Fever 


1 




9 




1 


Typhoid Fever 




Whooping Cough 










* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



59 



MAYOR MANSFIELD OFFICIALLY OPENS DRIVE FOR SALE OF TICKETS TO 
PRESIDENT'S BIRTHDAY BALL, FUNDS FROM WHICH WILL BE USED TO 
FIGHT INFANTILE PARALYSIS SCOURGE — HOPES AFFAIR IN BOSTON 
GARDEN WILL BE BIGGEST AND MOST SUCCESSFUL IN NATION AND 
HISTORY OF SUCH AFFAIRS -70 PER CENT OF PROCEEDS TO BE APPLIED 
LOCALLY THIS YEAR. 



The following is the radio address of Mayor Mansfield, January 14, over Station WNAC, relative to the 
President's Birthday Ball: 

Mr. Peters, Ladies and Gentlemen of the Radio Audience. 

I am pleased, as Mayor of the City of Boston and as General Chairman of the Birthday Ball for the 
President Committee, officially, tonight, over the lines of WNAC, to open the drive for the sale of tickets for 
this most worthy cause. 

President Roosevelt has again consented to lend his birthday as the occasion for another nation-wide series 
of benefits to raise additional funds to combat infantile paralysis. At the President's own suggestion, which is 
also the recommendation of the trustees of the Warm Springs Foundation, no part of this year's proceeds will 
go to the foundation. A year ago, birthday parties throughout the country provided a fund of $1,000,000 for 
Warm Springs. 

As Mr. Peters has informed you, and which I feel should be repeated, 70 per cent of the proceeds of the 
ball will be distributed locally to care for needy infantile cases. The local committee will retain that amount to 
be expended in the local community. It will give the local authorities the opportunity to concentrate their 
monies with those hospitals, doctors and societies that are putting forth every effort to combat this dreaded 
disease. The remaining 30 per cent will be turned over to the National Committee of the Birthday Ball for 
delivery to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, to be presented by him to a National Commission to widen research 
efforts to bring under control the disease itself. 



Leading Citizens Aid. 

Leaders from all walks of life have 
accepted the invitation to serve on the 
National Committee and here locally I 
have received a whole-hearted response 
from all who have been asked to serve. 

Former Mayor Andrew J. Peters has 
kindly consented to serve as chairman of 
the Birthday Ball to be held here in 
Boston, and Mr. Paul D. Rust is giving 
of his time to serve as vice-chairman. 
Last year a most successful ball was held 
under the direction of Mr. Rust. Sur- 
rounding these gentlemen is a most 
excellent committee of 150 ladies and 
gentlemen who are giving willingly of 
their time so that this most worthy cause 
might be a great success. To all members 
of the committee I extend my heartfelt 
thanks for their willing assistance and 
cooperation. To the press and radio 
stations of this city I am deeply grateful, 
for without the valuable aid of these two 
agencies we could not hope for success. 
To all the musical units, military organi- 
zations, decorators and to all others who 
are assisting I extend my sincere thanks. 



As for the ball itself. It will take place 
on the evening of January 30 (Wednesday) 
at the Boston Garden. It is expected 
that over 20,000 persons (the largest 
ever assembled at an affair of this kind) 
will be in attendance that evening. Two 
famous orchestras and two well known 
bands have indicated their willingness to 
take part, and those attending will enjoy 
the finest music to be presented in Boston 
in years. Music will be but one feature 
of the evening, which in addition to danc- 
ing will include a military drill, personal 
appearances of famous men and women 
of stage and screen, as well as carefully 
selected entertainment. 

One of the features of the evening will 
be the attendance of the consuls of all the 
foreign countries having consulates in 
Boston. Each representative of a foreign 
country will have a box and the front of 
each box will be draped with the colors 
of the country that he represents. 

It is the desire of our National Leader, 
President Roosevelt, that the tickets for 
these social events of January 30 be 
priced at a low figure, and accordingly 
the committee here in Boston have set 
the price of SI each per ticket. In this 



way a vast majority of our fellow citizens 
can contribute to this most worthy cause 
and at the same time receive the greatest 
value for their money in the way of 
entertainment and enjoyment that has 
ever been held in this city. 

One of the real features of the evening 
will be a special radio message by Presi- 
dent Roosevelt to all those assembled in 
the Garden at 11.30 p. m. It is expected 
that the President will speak to over 
4,000,000 at that time, over the entire 
country. 

I am informed by the National Com- 
mittee that 5,600 balls and entertain- 
ments will be held throughout the country 
on the evening of January 30 and it is 
my hope that the gala affair to be held at 
the Boston Garden will be the most 
successful of all, from both a financial 
and attendance standpoint. I urge upon 
my fellow citizens to show by their 
attendance and the purchase of tickets 
that they are interested in this most 
worthy cause and that they are willing 
to give their cooperation to the end thai 
we of Boston may assist in combating 
one of the most dreaded diseases menacing 
our nation and thus help to rehabilitate 
the victims of infantile paralysis. 



HIGH PRAISE FOR TRANSIT 
COMMISSIONER. 

The following is a copy of letter re- 
ceived by Mayor Mansfield from Arthur 
V. Sullivan, Commissioner, Transit 
Department: 

Boston, January 14, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Your Honor, — I have been invited by 
the Attorney-General Elect to serve as 
Assistant Attorney-General of the Com- 
monwealth during the coming two years. 

Therefore, it is with deep regret that I 
submit herewith my resignation as a 
member of the Boston Transit Commis- 
sion, to take effect at your pleasure. 



May I take this occasion to thank you 
for the opportunity of service during the 
past year on a commission engaged in a 
public work of such importance as the 
development of the transportation system 
of Boston. 

Yours respectfully, 

Arthur V. Sullivan. 



Copy of letter sent by Mayor Mansfield 
to Mr. Sullivan: 

Boston, January 15, 1935. 
Hon. Arthur V. Sullivan, Transit De- 
partment, 1 Beacon Street, Huston. 
My dear Mr. Sullivan, — I have just 
received, and of course accept, your 
resignation as a member of the Boston 
Transit Commission to take effect at tli<~ 
close of business today. 



While I, in common with all of your 
friends, congratulate you upon becoming 
one of the assistants to the Attorney- 
General of the Commonwealth, it is with 
the deepest regret that I witness your 
departure from the heads of departments 
of the City of Boston and from my official 
family. 

Your service during the months you 
have been commissioner has been of a 
high quality, conscientiously performed 
and of great importance. 

May I take this opportunity to thank 
you for your public service so well and 
loyally rendered and to express the wisB 
that in your new line of endeavor, success 
and happiness may be your portion. 

Yours truly, 

Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 



60 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



BROADCAST BY THE MAYOR. 

(Continued from page 57.) 

The very fact that the inquiry comes 
from the Overseers helps the applicant 
to gain an audience, and the friendly in- 
tervention of the division is tremendously 
appreciated by the bewildered men and 
women whose lives are shadowed by the 
fear of the loss of their homes, into which 
they may have poured the savings of a 
lifetime. 

Discussing the services that the Real 
Estate Division has been able to give to 
applicants during the two months of its 
existence, Mr. Steele said: 

"One object of the department is to 
convince many property owners, who are 
in desperate straits, that something can 
be done to save their property, and that 
they do not have to seek city aid but can 
retain independence by utilizing the re- 
sources that still exist. Another object 
is to help those who have no equity left 
in their property and tide them over 
financially for the time being." 

Cases Aided. 

The cases come to us through the three 
divisions of relief which- are under the 
control of the Overseers of the Public 
Welfare — Dependent Aid, Mothers' Aid 
■< and Old Age Assistance. In each classi- 
fication of aid there is a slight difference 
in our judgment of facts, because Mothers' 
Aid and Old Age Assistance are based on 
state laws, and there is some latitude 
with regard to a small equity in property. 

The important division, from which 
come most of our cases of those who are 
in desperate straits for immediate help of 
some kind is the Dependent Aid Division. 
Often our help takes the form of advice, 
and an introduction to a real estate cor- 
poration or a bank that will help. 

Many of our most recent cases seem 
to be cases of panic caused by inability 
to rent property, or to collect rents. The 
property owner has, for the most part, 
paid the interest on his mortgage, and 
taxes are up-to-date, but his income has 
been entirely devoted to carrying the 
property, and he and his family face 
actual want, especially when there are 
arrears in rentals of his store or tenement 
piled up, and when, perhaps, he owes 
rent himself, and is in debt for other 
necessities. Then he thinks of the Wel- 
fare. Many of the applicants come in 
and ask us if we will take over and handle 
their property for them; they seem to 
have exhausted their resources and lost 
all initiative. Of course, we tell them 
the city cannot take over any property. 

All the applicants come to us from 
the district visitor who has been to the 
home to get their "history" and see what 
she can suggest in the way of help. As 
soon as the visitor comes upon the in- 
formation that the applicant owns or 
has interest in property, she sends the 
name and the facts she is able to gather, 
with regard to this part of the case 
history, into us asking us to look into the 
matter further for her. 

We have the visitor fill in a complete 
account of the applicant's property, 
giving such information as purchase 
price, date of purchase, type of property, 
income from rentals, type of heating, 
condition of property, name of realtor 
trying to rent or sell the property, the 
price asked, the number of mortgages, 
and the amount paid off on them. In- 
formation regarding cooperative mort- 
gages and non-cooperative mortgages 
and the amount of insurance paid each 
year is required. Then we verify these 
facts and look up the records. 



One of the first steps in handling 
cases for those who hold cooperative 
mortgages is to find out whether or 
not they have availed themselves of 
the privilege of having monthly dues 
suspended for a period of six months. 
We very often find that they did not 
know that this could be done, if 1934 
taxes have been paid; and so that case 
is settled without delay, and the ap- 
plicant, instead of being admitted to 
welfare, has six months free from the 
burden of having to pay principal charges 
on his property. 

Each individual case must be gone 
into thoroughly from the point of view 
of property possibilities, as well as from 
the angle of temporary aid. The ques- 
tion of aid is decided by the assistant 
supervisor who has all the other facts 
and future of the family situation in 
her possession. It is always the policy 
of the department to relieve acute and 
immediate necessity while a study of 
resources, such as real estate holdings, 
is being made. In the event that the 
property is mortgaged to the limit and 
there is no means of making it produc- 
tive at present, the applicant is given 
aid, and becomes a welfare client just 
as if he had no property, until such time 
as he will be able to get work, or get aid 
elsewhere. 

The chief reason for the difficult 
financial position in which applicant 
owners, in common with all property 
owners, find themselves today is that 
in this most serious of depressions, 
property owners are paying a pre-depres- 
sion rate of interest on their mortgages 
and a real estate tax which, in the past 
year, was $9 higher per thousand than 
it was in 1929. Even though assessed 
valuations have been somewhat lowered 
since 1929, the reductions have been 
neither general nor uniform. This pre- 
depression interest rate and very high 
tax rate must both be met out of the 
income from the property rentals, which 
have shrunk about 25 per cent since 1930. 

Even when tenements are rented, there 
is often difficulty in collecting in full 
every month. Due also to the fact that 
the courts are lenient towards unemployed 
tenants, who are not able to pay their 
rents, landlords are forced to accept a 
greatly reduced rent to avoid ejectment 
proceedings and the bother of securing 
another tenant. The property owners 
today who are receiving even a 4 per 
cent return on their property are few and 
fortunate. 



CITIZENS ASKED TO PATRONIZE 
AUTOMOBILE SHOW AS AN 
AID TO BUSINESS RECOV- 
ERY AND A DEFEAT OF THE 
DEPRESSION BY ENCOURAG- 
ING EMPLOYMENT. 

On January 16 the following was 
issued from the office of the Mayor: 

The whole comprehensive program of 
President Roosevelt, contemplating, as it 
does, the expenditure of such huge sums 
of money, has been based solely upon the 
assumption that such artificial aids were 
necessary to give adequate employment 
to the people during the depression and 
until such time as private industries 
might recover sufficiently to carry on the 
work as they always have done in normal 
times. It is the intention of the Federal 
Government gradually to withdraw this 
artificial aid as soon as it can be shown 
that private industries can safely assume 
the burden of supplying employment to 
the people of the nation. 



One of the largest of all branches of 
industry is the automobile branch and it 
has been one of the first to show very 
distinct evidence of improvement in 
business and of its ability, at no distant 
date, to resume normal production. 
Indeed, one of the largest manufacturers 
in this country and in the world stated 
recently that for him the depression was 
over and that he planned to build a 
million new cars in 1935. Such courage 
and confidence in the future ought to be 
encouraged by all of us. The automobile 
show which will open at Mechanics Build- 
ing on Saturday affords a timely oppor- 
tunity to show that we appreciate such 
courage and vision. 

Prosperity in this particular line means 
prosperity in so many affiliated industries 
that the good to be derived from a suc- 
cessful automobile season can hardly be 
exaggerated. It will not only supply 
employment to automobile mechanics 
who actually put the cars together but 
it will provide employment for men in 
the industries which make up the mate- 
rials which go into the cars. Those 
industries are many, such as leather, 
cotton, fabrics, rubber, iron, brass, steel, 
paint, woodwork and glass. The number 
that would be thus employed is, of course, 
incapable of ascertainment, but it is 
unnecessary to produce proof to show 
that the aid given such workers would 
be tremendous, and the burden upon the 
government and upon the municipalities 
would be correspondingly lighter. 

The success of the automobile show, 
which seems to be foreshadowed, will 
indicate to what extent the country has 
recovered and is recovering from these 
years of depression and it will prove to 
be a very efficient barometer by which 
to judge the immediate future for Ameri- 
can industries. 

Let us all cooperate heartily to make 
this show a success and to help its sponsors 
achieve their goal which is to make it 
the very finest automobile show that has 
ever been held, not only in Boston but 
anvwhere. 



THE MAYOR INVESTIGATES COM- 
PLAINT OF EAST BOSTON CITI- 
ZENS ON REFUSE DUMPING 
AT PARK. 

The Mayor went personally on January 
11 to World War Memorial Park at East 
Boston to view the dumping ashes and 
refuse which has been complained of 
by some East Boston residents. He 
found that the dumping consisted mostly 
of ashes and paper and was in a limited 
area at the extreme northerly edge of 
the park. 

He was informed by Commissioner 
Long that this is merely a preliminary 
fill of a light nature which it is necessary 
first to spread upon the mud flats before 
a heavier fill of rich loam is placed over 
the top and that if the heavy fill were 
placed on the flats direct it would sink 
through and that this light fill is the 
customary and necessary kind that is 
used in such fillings. 

The Mayor found that this whole 
matter had been very much exaggerated 
and is satisfied that while it may be 
temporarily offensive while the fill is 
being put in, in the spring and summer 
when the park will be in use by the citi- 
zens it will all have been covered by solid 
fill and loam and that the place will be 
much beautified and no vestige will 
remain of the objectionable fill which is 
now being put in. 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



61 



MAYOR MANSFIELD OPENS DRIVE FOR EMER= 
QENCY RELIEF IN 1935 WITH ADDRESS 
TO WORKERS ASSEMBLED IN COLONIAL 
THEATRE, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12 -NINETY= 
SEVEN CHARITY ORGANIZATIONS, WHOSE 
FUNDS HAVE BEEN DEPLETED THROUGH 
DEPRESSION, ARE TO BENEFIT, THUS RE= 
LIEVING OVERBURDENED TAXPAYERS. 



I am very glad to have this oppor- 
tunity to urge most earnestly upon my 
fellow citizens the necessity that exists 
for supporting this Emergency Relief 
Campaign for 1935. Every one of the 
charitable organizations that is included 
in the list of ninety-seven that are to 
receive benefits from the drive is doing a 
most worthy work. I wish that I had 
the power to make every one who is 
listening to this program realize that the 
work that these organizations is doing 
must go on, and if it is not sustained by 
the voluntary charitable contributions 
of the citizens, that the burden must fall 
directly upon the shoulders of the tax- 
payers, who, as everyone knows, are 
already heavily overburdened. 

If the people who are asked to con- 
tribute would only reflect a moment and 
would realize that although these organi- 
zations are private and not public insti- 
tutions, yet they and their relatives and 
friends, their children, are often the ones 
who benefit by the great work that is 
being done, there would then be no 
question about the success of this drive. 

Let us picture for a moment what 
would happen if all of these charities 
were to be abandoned for lack of proper 
support. If such a catastrophe should 
happen, the City of Boston would, of 
necessity, be compelled to take over all 
of the activities, burdens and respon- 
sibilities now so cheerfully assumed by 
these various societies, the enormous 
expense would have to be met out of 
taxation and there would be no escape 
from it. In other words, these ninety- 
seven charities are taking from the 
shoulders of the real estate taxpayers a 
huge burden which otherwise would be 
wholly unbearable. One simple illus- 



tration will explain clearly to the tax 
payer what this would mean: The Boston 
Dispensary has been supplying medi- 
cines and medical visitation and treatment 
of the sick poor at their homes for over 
a century. Because of the depression this 
excellent institution has found it neces- 
sary to notify the city that it could no 
longer carry on this work unless it re- 
ceived some financial aid from the city. 
In this emergency, as Mayor of the city 
I examined into the matter and found 
that in order to supply the place of the 
Boston Dispensary by visiting physi- 
cians from the Boston City Hospital, if 
that plan should be adopted, it would 
cost the City of Boston between $35,000 
and $50,000 a year. Fortunately, we 
are not compelled to decide this question 
this year because the managers of this 
emergency campaign have agreed to 
supply to the Boston Dispensary the 
necessary money this year. Thus you 
will see that if this drive is successful in 
this one instance alone $35,000 to $50,000 
is saved to the taxpayers of Boston. 

I have asked all municipal and county 
employees to contribute 1 per cent of 
their yearly earnings to this campaign 
and I earnestly urge all such employees 
to contribute through the heads of their 
various departments. The contribution 
may be made in divided payments so that 
it will not be felt by the employee. The 
experience of similar drives in other cities 
this year indicates an over-subscription, 
whereas last year the general story was a 
failure to collect the required amount. 

Let us be able to say for Boston that 
our city, too, this year, has oversub- 
scribed its allotted amount so that the 
excellent and wholly indispensable work 
which these charitable institutions per- 
form may not be hampered in any way. 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

School Committee. 
Advertises for proposals for rebinding 
books for the Boston public schools. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 50 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Business 
Manager, School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 30, 
at 12 in. 



Supply Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical supplies for the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the estimated contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified cheek in 
the sum of $300, to be filed at the same 
oilice. Duplicate hid, without chock, to 
be filed with the ( Jity Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 21, at I,.' in. 

Advertises for proposals lor furnishing 
drugs (medicines of all kinds) In tin- 
various city depart incuts. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the estimated contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the oilice o( the Supply De- 
partment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200. to be iiled at I lie 



same office. Duplicate bid, without 

check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
meats to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $300, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 23, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
fruit and vegetables to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 24, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
hay, grain and straw to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 25, at 12 in. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
butter, eggs, etc., to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 25, at 1 8 in. 

Readvertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing metal polish to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $300, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January .'!). al IS in. 

Readvertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing and delivering industrial and medicinal 
gases to the various oi\ deportments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 

equivalent to 25 per cent o\ the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 

I >epartment, Room 801 . City Hall Annex. 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at 
the same Office. Duplicate bid. without 
check, to be Iiled with the City Auditor. 

Bids (•/<).«• Thursday, •' '■ . "t 

12 m . 

Readvertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing engine, machine and cylinder oils tot ho 



62 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of S200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, February 1, at 12 m. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, January 17: 

Assessing Department. 

The following-named temporary street 
clerks have been granted a further ex- 
tension of employment for a period of 
ten days, effective Monday, January 14, 
at S4 a day: 

John A. Long, Michael Kerrigan, 
Emery Douglas, Thomas Costello, Wil- 
liam Gallagher, William J. Hall, Henry 
G. Gormley, David D. Kenney, Thomas 
Carroll, George J. Kenely, Jr., Kenneth 
Mathews, Warren Cavanagh, Edward 
4 Hutchinson, Vincent Birmingham, Henry 
Maguire, John J. O'Brien, Thomas 
Kyrou, James E. Neale, Ernest A. Good- 
ing, Jr., George L. Ammidown, James 
A. Colahan, Patrick J. Glennon, William 
F. Connor. 

The following-named have been ap- 
pointed temporary street clerks, for a 
period of ten days, effective January 14, 
at S4 a day: Charles Marden, Robert 
H. Triggs. 

Health Department. 
Dr. M. Victor Safford, deputy com- 
missioner, has been designated to act as 
Health Commissioner, during absence of 
the commissioner from the city, for three 
weeks from January 14. 

Hospital Department. 
The following persons have been em- 
ployed at the Boston City Hospital for 
the week ending Thursday, January 10: 

To Fill Vacancies. 

Permanent. — Dr. George T. Mullen, 
assistant resident surgeon, §1,200 a year; 
Dr. Albert Peacock, South Department, 
assistant physician, SI ,500 a year. 

Temporary. — Dr. Edward Reynolds, as- 
sistant resident surgeon, $2,500 a year; 
Dr. -Charles Boyajian, assistant resident 
surgeon, $2,000 a year; Edward Culhane, 
Murray Finklestein, John Flatly, John 
Meyers, Edmund Parquette, Robert 
Ritchie, kitchenmen, $17.50 a week ; Frank 
Burdick, male nurse, $32.00 a week. 

The following changes have occurred: 

Frank Griffin, orderly to transfer porter 
at $16.50 a week (no change in pay) ; 
Samuel Kramer, orderly to temporary 
transfer porter at $16.50 a week (no 
change in pay) ; George Kendall, X-ray 
orderly at $17.50 to technician at $30 
a week, X-Ray Department; Dominick 
Fredestefano, center orderly at $14 to 
$16 a week. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 
Division). 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division, sub- 
ject to the approval of the Mayor, for 
the week ending Thursday, January 10: 

Charles Reese, M. D., resident medical 



officer, third assistant, $1,920 a year; Wil- 
liam O. Fowler, M. D., resident medical 
officer, fourth assistant, Sl,800 a year, 
Eugene R. Sullivan, M. D., resident in- 
terne, $1,200 a year; Edward Harrington, 
engineer (temporary), $45 a week; Mary 
Lysoght, ward maid, $10.50 a week; Dan- 
iel Hubley, choreman, $14 a week; Jo- 
seph F. Keefe, waiter, $14 a week; Pat- 
rick Doherty, maid (patient), $240 a 
year; Thomas Espasito, George Hodge, 
male nurses (patients) (temporary), 
$480 a year; George Cockinos, Julia 
Powers, maids (patients) (temporary), 
$240 a year; Walter Wiggin, choreman, 
(patient) (temporary), $240 a year. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed : 

Mary Lyshoght, ward maid (tempo- 
rary), $10.50 a week; Daniel Hubley, 
waiter, $14 a week; Mary A. Sullivan, 
Mary McKinnon, nurses (temporary), 
$1,020 a year; Wilfred Keenan, maid 
(patient), $240 a year. 

Institutions Department. 
The following changes have been made 
in the personnel for the week ending 
Thursday, January 10: 

Steamers "Hibbard" and "O'Meara." 
Appointments: Raymond R. Smith, 
marine engineer, temporary, $1,400 a 
year, on account of repairs to steamer 
"O'Meara"; John J. Colum'bo, fireman, 
temporary, $1,400 a year, on account of 
repairs to steamer "O'Meara." 

Overseers of the Public Welfare. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons until Janu- 
ary 10: 

Frances A. Bousard, Jeannette Burke, 
Helen Clancy, Katherine Connolly, Mary 
A. Crossen, bookkeeper's assistants; Wal- 
ter Dennis, social worker; Mary Dowd, 
bookkeeper's assistant; Joseph Fallon, 
social worker; Geraldine F. Fitzgerald, 
Agatha Francis, bookkeeper's assistants; 
Arthur Gold, Allan W. Grant, Stephen 
Hill, social workers; Margaret Lamb, 
Harriet Mainzer, bookkeeper's assistants; 
James Manion, social worker; Sarah Mc- 
Caffrey, bookkeeper's assistant; James J. 
McKiernan, John C. Piggott, social 
workers ; Claire T. Heavey, Flora G. Sul- 
livan, Mary J. Sullivan, Rose S. Suk 
livan, Mary Sutton, bookkeeper's assist- 
ants; William Walsh, social worker. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons until Feb- 
ruary 1 : 

Mary Breen, Marie F. Curran, Helen 
Dooley, bookkeeper's assistants; Thomas 
Doyle, social worker; Edna M. Driscoll, 
Mary R. Feeney, Anna E. Foley, Edith 
Fontaine, Helen E. Ford, Angeline 
Georgione, Jeannette Ginsberg, Delia 
Hatton, Mary R. Holmes, Eleanore T. 
Hurley, Esther M. Jackson, Muriel A. 
Jordan, bookkeeper's assistants; Kath- 
erine H. Keane, social worker; Mary J. 
Kennedy, Amelia Killion, Katherine G. 
Krohn, bookkeeper's assistants; David 
F. Leahy, social worker; Helen F. Lene- 
han, Gertrude Mansfield, Florence Mar- 
tineau, bookkeeper's assistants; Fred- 
erick Mattern, John Molineaux, social 
workers; Florence M. Muldoon. Cath- 
erine E. Mullen, Gladys M. Murray, 
Katherine G. McAdams, Marion E. Mc- 
Auley, Dorothy R. Macdonald, Kathryn 
McGrath, Mary L. MacDonald, Florence 
Norton, Elenore J. Nowell, Anna G. 



O'Hare, bookkeeper's assistants; Tim- 
othy O'Leary, John E. Powers, social 
workers; Elizabeth Ratigan, bookkeeper's 
assistant ; Joseph Reardon, social worker ; 
Margaret M. O'Reilly, Mary R. Smith, 
Katherine V. Sullivan, Mary E. Sullivan, 
Katherine T. Toomey Mary T. Town- 
send, bookkeeper's assistants; Grace L. 
Rogers, social worker; Margaret M. War- 
ren, Genevieve Waters, bookkeeper's as- 
sistants; Albert Beck, social worker; 
Katherine E. Gordon, bookkeeper's as- 
sistant; John J. Piscitelli, Austin J. Mc- 
Carthy, social workers; Josephine Sulli- 
van, bookkeeper's assistant; Walter F. 
Sullivan, social worker; Marie Brooks, 
Mary E. Norton, bookkeeper's assistants. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of Edward B. Steele as social 
worker, for a period of three months, 
at $1,000 a year. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary employment of Martha 
C. Paul as social worker, for a period 
of three months, at $1,000 a year, ef- 
fective January 30. 

Approval has been given for the tem- 
porary employment of the following per- 
sons as clerks, for a period of three 
months from January 11, at $900 a year: 

Ruth Ames, Thomas J. Connoughton, 
Helen T. Padden, Francis B. Greelish, 
Thomas P. Keeley, Joseph R. McHugh, 
Alfred C. Troy. 

Approval has been given for the per- 
manent-intermittent appointment of the 
following persons as stenographers at 
$1,000 a year, effective January 4: Cath- 
erine M. English, Mary F. Doherty, 
Mary A. Kennedy. 

Approval has been given for the per- 
manent appointment of the following 
persons as clerks at $1,000 a year, effec- 
tive January 4: 

Grace P. Bell, Grace M. Conte, Esther 
Gordon, Geraldine C. Harris, Rose N. 
Peters, Anna Robinson. 

Approval has been given for a leave 
of absence for one year, without salary, 
to George P. Donovan, social worker, 
effective January 1. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons as social 
workers, for a period of three months, 
at $1,000 a year: 

Joseph McCarthy, Frederick McLaugh- 
lin, John H. McNulty, Peter Siragusa, 
John F. Smith, Mary Elizabeth Sullivan. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons until 
January 17 : 

Frances A. Bousard, Jeanette Burke, 
Helen Clanc3'-, Katherine Connolly, Mary 
A. Crossen, bookkeeper's assistants; Wal- 
ter Dennis, social worker; Mary Dowd, 
bookkeeper's assistant; Joseph Fallon, 
social worker; Geraldine F. Fitzgerald, 
Agatha Francis, bookkeeper's assistants; 
Arthur Gold, Allan W. Grant, Stephen 
Hill, social workers; Margaret Lamb, 
Harriet Mainzer, bookkeeper's assistants; 
James Manion, social worker; Sarah Mc- 
Caffrey, bookkeeper's assistant; James 
J. McKiernan, John C. Piggott, social 
workers; Claire T. Reavey, Flora G. 
Sullivan, Mary J. Sullivan, Rose S. Sul- 
livan, Mary Sutton, bookkeeper's assist- 
ants; William Walsh, social worker. 

Approval has been given for the tem- 
porary employment of Eben Rosenfield 
as clerk, for a period of three months 
from January 15, at $900 a year. 

Approval has been given for the pro- 
visional temporary appointment of the 
following persons to the position of so- 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



63 



cial worker, for a period of three months 
beginning January 11, at $1,000 a year: 
Virginia Prout, James P. Doherty. 

Approval has been given for the tem- 
porary employment of the following per- 
sons as stenographers, for a period of 
three months beginning January 14, at 
$900 a year: Cecelia E. Batchelder, 
Frances V. Clarke, Rose Mary Elms, 
Mary B. McGowan. 

Approval has been given for the tem- 
porary employment of the following 
persons as clerks, for a period of three 
months from January 14, at $900 a year: 

Mary M. Cauley, Mary E. Cronin, 
Timothy H. Donohue, Anna M. Doyle, 
Stanislavia Kiwaczynska, Michael J. Riz- 
zo, George N. Starbird, Mario E. Tarallo. 

Approval has been given for the pro- 
visional temporary appointment of the 
following persons to the position of so- 
cial worker, for a period of three months 
beginning January 14 at $1,000 a year: 
Eva R. Sacco, Helen F. O'Oonnell. 

Park Department. 

Approval has been given for the fur- 
ther temporary extension of the follow- 
ing temporary employees : 

Joseph J. Regan, statistical clerk, $20 
a week, for a period of three months, 
from January 5, to be charged to Airport 
Improvements; Fred Neal, statistical 
clerk, $18 a week, for a period of three 
months from January 5, to be charged 
to A-2, Temporary Employees; Charles 
K. Williams, statistical clerk, $18 a week, 
for a period of three months from Janu- 
ary 5, to be charged to A-2, Temporary 
Employees. 

Approval has been given for the tem- 
porary employment, for a period of three 
months, of Edward G. Richardson, tem- 
porary forester, at $28 a week, effective 
January 11. 

Public Works Department (Ferry 
Service). 

Aproval has been given to transfer 
Walter A. Schlier from the Transit De- 
partment to the Sumner Tunnel as me- 
chanic at $7 a day in charge of the op- 
eration and maintenance of the mechan- 
ical equipment therein, effective Janu- 
ary 11. 

Mr. Schlier is a permanent employee 
of the Transit Department and Was 
loaned temporarily to the tunnel service 
last June but carried on the Transit 
pay roll and charged to the tunnel ap- 
propriation. It is now proposed to trans- 
fer him permanently to our tunnel serv- 
ice rolls. 

Soldiers' Relief Department. 
John D. Connors has been named as 
acting commissioner during the period 
beginning January 15 and ending Febru- 
ary 11. 

Overtime Allowed. 
The heads of the various departments 
whose employees have received payment 
lor overtime state in connection there- 
with that if any laborer has been allowed 
to work more than eight hours per day 
it has been only in case of emergency 
under the law. 

Public Works Department (Bridge 
Service). 

For the week ending Thursday. Janu- 
ary 17: 

J. D. O'Brien, suibforeman, 1 day, 
S6.66; J. T. Mahan, E. Hayes, P. J. 
Jacobs, J. J. Gately, A. W. Clancy, J. A. 



McKenna, T. V. Sullivan, J. J. Shea, 
carpenters, 1 day, $6 each. Total, $54.66. 
Reason for the foregoing: Emergency 
on account of closing Chelsea North 
Bridge. 

Public Works Department (.Paving 
Service). 

For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ary 10: 

Stephen Donahue, Patrick Fitzpatrick, 
pavers, 1 day, $6 each; John O'Toole, 
paver, -£- day, $3 ; Stephene Earner, paver, 
1 day, $5.50; Thomas Butler, auto me- 
chanic, If days, $10.50; S. Flanagan, 
carpenter, 1 day, $6; Alfred Flannery, 
chauffeur-laborer, If days, $9.62; Edward 
Walaschek, laborer, If days, $8.75; Set- 
timio Arcieri, paver, 1 day, $5; Michael 
Abruzzi, laborer, li days, $6.25; Bartley, 
Cronin, laborer, 1 day, $5; Thomas Du- 
ran, Harold Grant, laborers, If days, 
$8.75 each; William Hurley, laborer, •£ 
day, $2.50; Thomas Jones, laborer, 1? 
days, $8.75; John Joyce, laborer, 1 day, 
$5; Patrick Joyce, laborer, If days, 
$8.75; James McGuire, Michael Mylett, 
laborers, 1 day, $5 each; William P. 
Sheehan, laborer, If days, $8.75; Michael 
Varieka, laborer, i- day, $2.50; Thomas 
Broderick, Michael" Costello, laborers, If 
days, $8.75 each ; George Huber, laborer, 
f day, $3.75; M. McDonough, laborer, 
U days, $625; G. T. King, G. L. Gomes, 
W. A. Riley, W.H. Flaherty, W. J. Dorin, 
E. J. Maher, chauffeurs-laborers, 2-V_ days, 
$12.50 each; W. Hamilton, chauffeur-la- 
borer, 2 days, $10; V. Desmioni, chauffeur- 
laborer, li days, $7.50 ; A. Loconti, A. Cor- 
rado, J. P. Feeley, L. C. Timmins, F. D. 
O'Brien, chauffeur j laborers, 1 day, $5 each ; 
W. T. Murray, laborer-chauffeur, 1^ days, 
$7.50; M. McAuliffee, stonecutter, 2 days, 
$12; F. Collins, paver, 2 days, $11; J. 
M. Doherty, carpenter, 2 days, $12; H. 
Fuery, teamster, 2 days, $10; J. Mc- 
Carthy, laborer, 4 days, $20 ; J. J. Barry, 
teamster, 3 days, $15; T. Lydon, chauf- 
feur-laborer, 3 days, $16.50; William Mc- 
Laughlin, laborer, 1 day, S5; J. Cum- 
in ings, laborer, 2 days, $10; Thomas 
Ring, chauffeur and auto mechanic, H 
days, $9; John J. O'Sullivan, chauffeur 
and auto mechanic, 1 day, $6; John 
Noonan, paver, 1 day, $6; William Mul- 
len, blacksmith, IV days, $9; Mark A. 
Folev, chauffeur, 2 days, $11; Charles 
Conlon, chauffeur, IV days, SS.25; Rich- 
ard Scannell, chauffeur and auto me- 
chanic, 14 days, $9; John McGillen, 
Martin Connelly, Fred Eaton, laborers, 
IV days, $7.50 each; Thomas J. Hanley, 
chauffeur, IV days, $7.50; Sgnazio Giglio, 
laborer, 1 day, $5 ; John Median, laborer, 
21 days, $12.50; Michael Callahan, David 
Nicholson, Thomas J. Conlon, Michael 
Griffin, Joseph Vitelli, MichaelJ. Carney, 
laborers, IV days, $7.50 each; Alexander 
McDonald, paver, 11 days, $9; John Dcn- 
ner, carpenter, IV days, $9; Henry 
Brennan, auto-mechanic, 1' days, $825; 
John Brooks, chauffeur-laborer, IV days, 
$8.25; Frederick Holm, chauffeur- 
laborer, 1 '• days, $7.50; .lames Hooky, 
chauffeur-laborer, I ! d ■•■ $855; Wil- 
liam Huber, chauffeur-laborer, 1' days, 
$7.50; Edward Murdock, chauffeur-la- 
borer, l ' days, $835 . James Mai >ney, 
Thomas Beriane, Fred McCarthy, Joseph 
Horgan, laborers, 1' days, $7.50 each; 
Earnest Kelley, laborer, 1 day, $5; Mi- 
chael Kelley, laborer, 1' days, $7.50; Ed- 
ward Leslie, chauffeur-laborer, 1' days, 
$7.50; Eugene Sullivan, laborer, 1 day, 
$5; Charles Doherty, laborer, !' days, 
$7 50 Thorn is Mol tonough, P itrick Mc- 



Laughlin, pavers, li days, $7.50 each; 
John Connolly, paver, \\ days, $6.25 ; 
Edward Barrett, blacksmith, I day, $5.25; 
H. Bierkant, James Doherty, James 
Fallon, Patrick Connor, laborers, \\ 
days, $7.50 each;' James Heneberry, 
chauffeur, 1 day, $5.50; Joseph Smith, 
chauffeur, ^ day, $2.75 Patrick Grady, 
paver, % day, $3; Frank Galida, 
paver, | day, $3.44; William Mc- 
Cartney, paver, f day, $4.50; Alexander 
Cassidy, blacksmith, 1 day, $6; Basiko 
Comforti, stonecutter, 1 day, $5; John 
Mahoney, John H. McGee, engineers, f 
day, $5.19 each; William A. Lyons, stone- 
cutter, 1 day, $6; Walter Clancy, auto- 
mobile mechanic, 1 day, $5.50; William 
J. Mahoney, chauffeur, 1 day, $6; James 
Stewart, chauffeur, li days, $9; Albert 
Day, chauffeur, 1J days, $6.88; James 
Gallagher, chauffeur, }£ day, $3.78; 
Peter Kilduff, Thomas King, William C. 
McGee, Thomas Minton, chauffeurs, 1 
day, $5.50 each; Roger O'Connor, chauf- 
feur, HO days, $10.66; Michael Maguire, 
laborer, Hi days, $9.69; Edward Barnes, 
laborer, 1 day, $5; Michael Barrett, la- 
borer, i day, $2.50; E. V. Cunningham, 
laborer, 1 day, $5; James Craig, laborer, 
i day, $2.50; Miohael Curley, Anthony 
Deamore, laborers, 1 day, $5 each; Mat- 
thew Farrell, laborer, f day, $3.75; Fred 
Jenness, laborer, 1 day, $5; Pasqualc 
Landolfi, paver, 1 day, $5; Thomas Mc- 
Donough, laborer, \h day, S3.44 ; Richard 
McGrath, laborer, 1 day, $5; Neil Mc- 
Laughlin, paver, f day, $3.75; Bernard 
Rogan, laborer, 1 day, $5; Thomas 
Whalen, laborer, Hi days, S9.69; Mat- 
thew Russell, Robert Cogan, Nate Har- 
riss, laborers, 1 day, $5 each; Dom Pol- 
lini, stonecutter, 1 day, $6; Don Salvucci, 
paver, 1 day, $6; Lawrence Shanney, la- 
borer, 1 day, $5; Sib Seleitella, battery- 
man, 1-V. days, $9; Fred Doyle, laborer, 
1 day, $5 ; John Curley, mechanic, 1 day, 
$6; Joseph Lamothe, Bartholomew Bad- 
ger, mechanics, If days, $10.50 each : 
Daniel Beny, William Connolly, John 
Crowley, Joseph MacLean, mechanics, 1 
day, $6 each; Harry Marshall, mechanic, 
1^ days. $9.75; Henry Ferncr, mechanic, 
1 day, $6; Frank Englert, mechanic, Is 
days, $9.75; Richard Vincent, mechanic, 
1-V- days, $9; John Murray, William Dow- 
ney, mechanics, .; day, $5.25 each ; Ber- 
nard Cunningham, mechanic. IV days, 
S9; John Blake, chauffeur, J day* -I--'. 
Thomas Byron, chauffeur, Ij days, $7.57; 
Martin Mitchell, John Connors, laborers, 
1| days, $0.SS each: Nathan Goldstein, 
laborer, IV days, $7.50; Edward Mc- 
Kenna, laborer, 1 day, $5: Joel Shapiero, 
laborer, LA 57.82; Mark Gilmartin, 

laborer, 1 \ days, $7.50; Thomas Kilduff, 
Bernard Flynn, laborers, lj days, $6.88 
each; Raymond Chamberlain, laborer, 
'■ day, s2.50: John J. Murray, laborer, ^ 
day, S4.37; Joseph Hout, laborer, li days, 
$5.63; Cornelius Courtney, Edward Gar- 

vey, laborers, IJ days, $6.88 each: John 
Reardon, laborer, '■ day, $2.50; Andrew 
McGann, laborer, 1 .'. days, $8.44; 
i us Met; inn, laborer, 1 ft days, 
$7.82; Thomas McDonough, laborer, i 
day, $4.37; M. Burke, F. Downey, me- 
chanics, li days, $6.75 e ich : F. T. I 
chauffeur-laborer, IV days, $6.19; •'■ 
inaugh, chauffeur-laborer, li days, 
$6.88; J I Barry, P. Barretti, J. 
Crowley, laborers, It days. -h ; 

E. Feeney, laborer, 1 55; J. Fla- 

herty, laborer, 1', days 
gibbons, laborer, I day, $5; \. Gilling- 
In mi, laborer, U d >; T. Lynch, 

laborer, 1 day, $5: S. Plataman, laborer. 
1! days. $6. ■_>:»: M. Pulsoni, laborer, IV 
days, $5.65; M. K >rer, l\ d 



64 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



56 25- J Wiegers, laborer, 1 day, '$5; 
W Blivens, laborer, i day, $2.50. Total, 

^Reasons: Snow removal and sanding 
streets, January 1 to 3, 1935. 

For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 

"Thomas P. Butler, auto mechanic, ll 
days, S9.75 ; Alfred T 'Flannery ^uffeur- 
laborer, I day, $3 44; Edward Cj 
schek, Thomas F. Duran, Harold J 
r'mnt Thomas F. Jones, laboieis, 2 
chv $2.50 e"xc h; William P. Sheehan 
£er,ll days, $8.13; George H Huber, 
laborer, § day, $313 ; George , T Km^ 
chauffeur-laborer, U days $6.25 , Wil 
liam H. Riley, teamster, ll days $6.25 , 
William Flaherty, carpenter's he per, U 
dlvs $625; William J. Doran, laborer, 
fdiys $6.25; John J. OJSulhvan, chauf- 
feur-auto mechanic ll days $9.75. 
William Mullen, blacksmith, 11 days 

57 50- Herbert Gunning, chauffeur 1* 
davs $7 56; Charles Conlon, chauffeur, 
1 days '$8.25; John McGillen, laborer 

I davs $8.12; John Carney, laborer, 1 
Hav $312; Martin Connelly, laborer, U 
lavs $8 12 ; Thomas J. Hanley, chauffeur, 
S y days, $8.12; Ignazio Gigho Giuseppe 
fenoto, laborers 1* days, $6.87 each, 
Thomas J. Conlon, laborer, Is days, 
«8 12- Joseph Vitelh, laborer, If days, 
S\ Gaetlno Vincent:, laborer ■ 1 day, 
=;9 50- John Danner, carpenter, 1* days, 
$7 50 John Brooks, Henry Brennan 
James Hoalev, chauffeurs-laborers 1* 
daS! $6.87 each; Fred Holm chauffeur- 
laborer, 11 day, $6.25 Edward Murd°ck 
chauffeur-laborer, ll day, $6.87, James 
Maonev, Michael Kelley, laborers, ll 
days! $6 y 25 each; Edward , Lesh* *£»**; 
feur-laborer, ll days, $625, limothy 
Sullivan, Charles Doherty, laborers, U 
days $6.25 each; Thomas Tivenan, 
chauffeuV, 2f days $15.81 Thoma. 
Cleary, chauffeur, If days $7 56 , J ohn 
Donovan, chauffeur, 1 day, $5.50; James 
MeCabe, chauffeur, 1* days $6.87 
Richard Kilduff, chauffeur, 1 clay, $o.25 
Eugene O'Keef e, chauffeur, 11 days, $6.25 , 
Thomas Lamer, Walter Boltz James 
Donovan. James Dowdall, Martm Fitz 
Patrick, William Gleavey, Herman Ho- 
dapp, Thomas Joyce, Edward Monahan, 
Thomas McLaughlin, Dennis Walsh, 
laborers, ll days, $6.25 each; Joseph 
Eh chauffeur, 1* days, $6.19; John 
McGee engineer, 1 day, $6.92; James 
Stewart chauffeur, ll days, $9 Albert 
Day, chauffeur, 1| days, $6.19; William 
J Jeffers, chauffeur, 1 day, $5.50; Thomas 
King, chauffeur, 1* days, $5£4; Roger 
O'Connor, chauffeur, 1 day, $5.50; ; Mi- 
chael Maguire, laborer, lft days 3»o.dl, 
John Quirke, laborer, 1 day, $5; Thomas 
Whalen, laborer, ll days, $5.63; Alex- 
ander Cassidy, blacksmith, H days, 
$7 50; Nicholas J. Dunn, laborer, i day, 
S2 50; Joseph Z. Lamolhe, Bertram Bul- 
ger, Daniel F. Berry, William H. Con- 
nolly, John C. Crowley, mechanics If 
days, $8.25 each; Joseph MacLean, Har- 
ry' Ferner, mechanics, IV days, $9 each; 
Michael Sullivan, Frank Englert, me- 
chanics, If days, $8.25 fact; Bernard 
Cunningham, mechanic, lis $7.88, Al- 
fred Wilson, teamster, lft day, $6.56; 
Thomas Byron, chauffeur, lft days $7.22; 
Cornelius Courtney, John Doyle, la- 
borers, lft days, $6.56 each; Thomas 
Kilduff, laborer, ll days, $5.63; Andrew 
McGinn, laborer, lft days, $6.56; John 
Connors, teamster, li day, $5.63; Mar- 
tin Mitchell, Joseph Yout, teamsters, lft 
days, $6.56 each; John Blake, chauffeur, 



lft days, $7.22; Nathan Goldstein, 
Thomas Lyons, Joel Shapiro, chauffeurs, 
lft days, $6.56 each. Total, $579.14. 

Reason: Snow removal, January 13 
to 14. 

Public Works Department (Sanitary -C 
Service). 
For the week ending Monday, Janu- 
ary 7: 

P. F. Scanlon, teamster-laborer, 1 day, 
$5; C. F. Prior, teamster-laborer, i day, 
$2.50; Frank Dias, chauffeur, 1 day, $5.25; 
Herbert Lawrence, machinist, 1 day, $5; 
Owen Ahem, broom man, 1 day, $5 ; Ber- 
nard Callahan, stableman, 1 day, $5; 
Martin Connolly, helper, 1 day, $5; 
Henry Corny, broom man, 1 day, $5; 
James W. Delhanty, helper, 1 day, $5; 
Richard Doherty, dumpman, 1 day, $5; 
William Gallagher, Michael Joyce, team- 
sters, 1 day, $5 each; Giovini Meola, 
broom man, 1 day, $5; Edward Mer- 
chant, teamster, 1 day, $5; Edward 
Murphy, chauffeur, 1 day, $5; John D. 
Murphy, teamster, 1 day, $5; John C. 
Murry, yard laborer, 1 day, $5; Al. 
Pourier, stableman, 1 day, $5; James 
Shea, teamster, 1 day, $5; Jeremiah 
Donnelly, machinist, 1 day, $5; James 
Johnson, teamster, 1 day, $5; Edward 
M. Batson, broom man, 1 day, $5; Neal 
J. Murphy, teamster, 1 day, $5; Charles 
Woods, broom man, 1 day, $5; Samuel 
Rotondo, chauffeur, 1 day, $5; Louis 
Kerrigan, helper, 1 day, $5; John Ryan, 
teamster, 1 day, $5 ; John Collins, helper, 
1 day, $5; John McGuire, broom man, 
1 day, $5; Melvin Melanson, watering 
cart, 1 day, $5; Maria Sanartra, Samuel 
Pulco, teamsters, 1 day, $5 each; H. 
J. Kane, H. J. Pitts, L. L. Duffy, 
teamsters-laborers, 1 day, $5 each; W. 
J. Rose, chauffeur, 1 day, $5.50; Edward 
Sweeney, chauffeur, 1 day, $5.25; John 
Barnes, laborer, 1 day, $5; J. Collins, 
teamster, 1 day, $5; Frank Deacon, la- 
borer, 1 dav, $5 ; Michael Doherty, team- 
ster, 1 day, $5; J. P. McLaughlin, 
Thomas Smith, laborers, 1 day, $5 each; 
James J. Shea, Feed and Tools, 1 day, $5 ; 
Cornelius Sullivan, teamster-chauffeur, 1 
day, $5; James Golden, laborer, 1 
day, $5; John J. Jones, teamster-laborer, 
1 day, $5; George McCorkle, laborer, 1 
day,"$5; Robert Reidl, teamster-laborer, 
1 day, $5; Edward McLaughlin, team- 
ster-chauffeur, 1 day, $5.25; Harold 
Bently, laborer, 1 day, $5 ; Francis White, 
teamster-chauffeur, 1 day, $5.25; War- 
ren Eastman, laborer, 1 day, $5; Hugh 
Barry, chauffeur, 1 day, $5.50; Francis 
Kelley, Richard Kelley, Edward Noonan, 
Michael Ryan, Francis Archiles, la- 
borers, 1 day, $5 each; George Turner, 
chauffeur, 1 day, $5; Charles Daly, la- 
borer, 1 day, $5; John Martin, Frank 
Williams, chauffeurs, 1 day, $5 each; 
Joseph Mudge, Andrew Morrissey, 
teamsters, 1 day, $5 each; Angelo Fop- 
piano, chauffeur, 1 day, $5; Patrick Sul- 
livan, laborer, 1 day, $5 ; Joseph Eugano, 
teamster, 1 day, $5; Cornelius Sullivan, 
John Sullivan, John McHugh, stable- 
men, 1 day, $5 each; Frederick Ham- 
den, J. Waugh, Hyman Miller, teamsters, 
1 day, $5 each; Walter Donovan, John 
Carter, Gordon Morrill, teamsters-chauf- 
feurs, 1 day, $5.25 each; John Rogers, 
L McGahan, C. Campo, D. P. Minehan, 
J. T. Kearney, L. Pace, teamsters, 1 day, 
$5 each; F. Walsh, laborer, 1 day, $5; 
W. G. Earley, M. Leahy, chauffeurs, 1 
day, $5 each; W. T. Maloney, chauffeur, 
1 day, $5.25; B. F. Murphy, laborer, 1 
day, $5; J. H. Reardon, C. A. Calderara, 
chauffeurs, 1 day, $5.25 each; J. J. Carey, 
J. A. Carr, T. Christopher, J. J. Daley, 



W. P. Donnelly, E. J. Gill, A. Gouleas, 
laborers, 1 day, $5 each; R- M. 
Jennings, chauffeur, 1 day,' $5.50; 
B. Maraghy, J. M. O'Rourke, T. C. 
Ryan, M. A. Weidman, P. G. Kelley, 
laborers, 1 day, $5 each; J. B. Gately, 
chauffeur, 1 day, $5.25; J. H. Madden, 
J. J. Mulvey, laborers, 1 day, $5 each; 
W. T. Courtney, H. J. Doherty, G. F. 
Golden, M. Giovenella, J. Harnett, chauf- 
feurs, 1 day, $5.50 each; H. J. Foley, 
laborer, 1 day, $5; J. J. Marshall, chauf- 
feur, 1 day, $5.50; J. J. Glancy, teamster, 
1 day, $5. Total, $575.25. 

To be charged to 'Snow Removal ap- 
propriation. 

For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ary 17: 

H. Barry, chauffeur, 21 days, $12.37; 
F. Kelley, R. Kelley, E. Noonan, M. 
Ryan, laborers, ll days, $8.12 each; H. 
Bently, laborer, 11 days, $6.25; C. Sul- 
livan, chauffeur, 1 day, $5.50; T. Lang- 
don, chauffeur, 1 day, $5.25; P. Killoran, 
chauffeur, 1 day, $5.50; G. Turner, chauf- 
feur, 2f days, $13.06; J. Martin, chauf- 
feur, 2ft days, $14.10 ; F. Williams, A. 
Foppiano, chauffeurs, 1 day, $5.50 each; 
W. Davis, chauffeur, li days, $6.19; J. 
Carter, G. Morill, W. Donovan, F. Harn- 
den, chauffeurs, 1 day, $5.25 each ; L. Mc- 
Gahan, H. Bourdon, L. Brennan, G. 
Campo, N. Gesso, F. Corvino, teamsters, 
1 day, $5 each; P. Costello, chauffeur, 1 
day, $5.50; G. DeFillippo, J. Doherty, 
W. Gillen, J. Glancy, J. Bannon, M. 
Lyons, G. Marcantonio, D. Minihan, L. 
Pace, D. Pattinello, G. Salemi, F. Fitz- 
patrick, J. Kearney, C. Neff, J. Harton, 
P. Potenza, teamsters, 1 day, $5 each; 
W. Earley, M. Leahy, J. Reardon, C. 
Calderara, chauffeurs, 1 day, $5.25 each; 
R. Jennings, chauffeur, If days, $9.62; 
J. Gately, J. Glasheen, chauffeurs, 1 day, 
$5.25 each; W. Courtney, chauffeur, 21 
days, $11.69; H. Doherty, chauffeur, 31 
days, $17.19; M. Coakley, chauffeur, 1 
day, $5.50; G. Golden, chauffeur, 2J days, 
$13.75; M. Giovanella, J. Harnett, chauf- 
feurs, 11 days, $10.31 each; J. Marshall, 
chauffeur, 11 days, $6.29; H. Foley, 
chauffeur, li days, $7.50; J. Donaghue, 
chauffeur, li days, $8.25. Total, $380.01. 
To be charged to Snow Removal ap- 
propriation. 

Public Works Department (Sanitary-S 
Service). 

For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ary 17: 

Michael Kacka, James V. Ross, George 
F. Smith, chauffeurs, lft days, $6.53 
each; Andrew F. Beahm, James J. Con- 
nors, chauffeurs, 1 day, $5.25 each; Ed- 
ward L. Kelly, teamster-laborer, 1 day, 
$5; L. J. O'Neill, chauffeur, i day, $1.38; 
R. L. Cass, teamster-chauffeur, If days, 
$9.63; Max Levine, teamster-chauffeur, 
f day, $4.13; John J. McDonald, team- 
ster-chauffeur, 1 day, $5.50; William A. 
White, teamster-chauffeur, If days, $7.56; 
F. C. Barry, teamster-chauffeur, 1 day, 
$5.50; Louis V. Kilduff, teamster-chauf- 
feur, 1 day, $5.25; Michael Herrity, Jo- 
seph Hohn, Thomas Kelley, Joseph P'. 
Kolb, William Lyons, Patrick R. Man- 
ning, George Mitaiaria, chauffeurs, If 
days, $6.18 each ; Thomas Murphy, chauf- 
feur, 21 days, $11.68; James McDonald, 
Henry McFadden, chauffeurs, 11 days, 
$6.18 each ; Michael McGinley, chauffeur, 
1 day, $5.50; Redmond Watson, chauf- 
feur, 11 days, $6.18; Alfred Buckley, 
teamster-laborer, 1 day, $5; John W. 
Costello, teamster-laborer, li days, $7.50; 
John Handrew, John J. Hillen, teamster- 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



65 



laborers, 1-g- days, $5.62 each; William 
R. Standigle, teamster-laborer, 1^ days, 
S7.50; James 'McNutt, teamster-chauf- 
feur, ll days, $8.25; Daniel Dolan, John 
Marley, John Ryan, George Freeman, 
teamster-chauffeurs, 1 day, $5.25 each; 
John A. Donovan, John Shine, Thomas 
J. Twomey, teamster-laborers, 11 days, 
$5.62 each; Thomas F. Hunt, chauffeur, 
i day, $2.75; E. dime, B. F. O'Rourke, 
teamsters-chauffeurs, 2£ days, $11.68 
each; William C. Hughes, carpenter, 21 
days, $12.75; M. S. McNeil, wheelwright, 
li 7 5 days, $8.62; G. T. Walsh, wheel- 
wright, 21 days, $12.75; G. E. Campbell, 
J. M. O'Leary, blacksmiths, 21 days, 
$12.75 each; J. F. Beath, drillman-re- 
pairer, 21 days, $12.75 ; T. F. McGrath, 
blacksmith's assistant, 21 days, $11.68; 
J. J. O'Neil, blacksmith's assistant, 1 day, 
$5.50; W. F. Mendum, wagon repairer, 1 
day, $5; J. P. Considine, teamster-chauf- 
feur, 2| days, $13.06; William P. Mc- 
Nulty, teamster-chauffeur, lit days, 
$9.97; T. J. Watson, teamster-chauffeur, 
If days, $7.56; T. A. Bowes, teamster- 
chauffeur, U days, $6.25; William J. 
Kinsman, teamster-chauffeur, 2| days, 
$11.87; J. J. McKenna, teamster-chauf- 
feur, li days, $7.50; D. Cashman, team- 
ster-laborer, 11 days, $5.62; J. G. Climo, 
teamster-laborer, H days, $7.50; T. W. 
Dargin, teamster-laborer, f day, $1.87; 
William E. Leary, teamster-laborer, 1^ 
days, $6.25; A. Luper, teamster-laborer, 
2§ days, $11.87; J. M. Fogarty, teamster- 
laborer, li days, $7.50; P. Napoletano, 
teamster-chauffeur, 2| days, $13.06; A. 
B. Nuzzo, teamster-chauffeur, 1 day, 
$5.50. Total, $466.41. 



To be charged to Snow Removal ap- 
propriation. 



CONTRACTS AMENDED. 

Public Works Department. 

Martin J. Kelly has been granted an 
extension of the time of completion of the 
contract for removing snow and ice in 
District No. 8, dated December 31, 1934, 
from December 31, 1934, to May 1, 1935. 
This extension is requested in order that 
this contractor may be available for snow 
and ice removal for the balance of the 
winter. 

Baker, Matz & Co. have been granted 
an extension of the time of completion 
of the contract for removing snow and 
ice in District No. 3, dated December 
31, 1934, from December 31, 1934, to 
May 1, 1935. This extension is requested 
in order that this contractor may be 
available for snow and ice removal for 
the balance of the winter. 

C. Rcppucci & Co have been granted 
an extension of the time of completion 
of the contract for removing snow and 
ice in District No. 5, dated December 
31, 1934, from December 31, 1934, to 
May 1, 1935. This extension is requested 
in order that this contractor may be 
available for snow and ice removal for 
the balance of the winter. 

National Engineering and Construction 
Company has been granted an extension 
of the time of completion of the contract 
for removing snow and ice in District 
No. 6, dated December 31, 1934, From 
December 31, 1934, to May 1, 1935. 
This extension is requested in older that 
this contractor may be available for snow 
and ice removal for the balance of the 
winter. 



MAYOR MANSFIELD FORCED TO CLOSE IMME= 
DIATELY CHELSEA NORTH DRAWBRIDGE 
BECAUSE OF DANGEROUS CONDITION AND 
TO PREVENT POSSIBLE DISASTER OR DEATH 
TO THOSE ATTEMPTING TO USE IT. 



On January 11 the following state- 
ment was issued by the Mayor's Office: 

On returning from East Boston the 
Mayor went over the Chelsea North 
Drawbridge and was so impressed by the 
dangerous condition of the bridge that 
he was almost moved to order it closed 
immediately. The part immediately 
south of the North Drawbridge is in an 
extremely dangerous condition. The piles 
and the whole bridge structure have sunk 
about four or five feet below the original 
grade and the stream of traffic in both 
directions was so heavy that the bridge 
was visibly swaying and trembling. 
Upon his return to his office the Mayor 
communicated with the Police Depart- 
ment, as a result of which a traffic officer 
was placed at each end of the bridge to 
thin out the traffic and to allow only one 
heavy truck to pass at a time and only 
one trolley car to be on the dangerous 
part at a time. This will slow the traffic 
very considerably, but it was either a 
question of doing that or closing the 
bridge immediately. 

A committee representing the Metro- 
politan Coal Company waited upon the 
Mayor to see if the bridge could not be 
kept open for a longer time, but the per- 
sonal examination which the Mayor had 
made had impressed him so deeply that 
he had refused to keep the bridge open 
after midnight on Sunday. 

In the meantime the Mayor has been 
informed that the Chelsea Board of 



Aldermen sitting as a committee of the 
whole had voted to recommend the 
appropriation of the remaining $625 
and that this vote would be reported to 
the Board of Aldermen in Chelsea on next 
Monday night where it would probably 
be adopted. But Chelsea acts altogether 
too late. It is immaterial now whether 
it should appropriate the $625 or not. 
If it had acted promptly some months 
ago and made this appropriation it would 
have been unnecessary to close the bridge 
entirely. But during the delay the 
bridge has deteriorated so rapidly that 
it has now become necessary to close the 
bridge in any event. 

The Public Works Department is satis- 
fied that enough money had already been 
appropriated without this $625 to defray 
the entire expense of repairing and 
strengthening the bridge, and accordingly 
approved the contract. 

A further development in relation to the 
bridge, — the Mayor was informed by 
Henry C. Attwill, Chairman of the De- 
partment of Public Utilities, that it had 
granted to the Eastern Massachusetts 
Street Railway Company a temporary 
permit for sixty days to allow it to trans- 
port passengers from Chelsea square 
through the Sumner Tunnel to Haymarket 
square, Boston, and that the new schedule 
of rates had been approved. 

The bridge will be kept open for foot 
passengers and if necessaiy a small 
temporary footbridge will be built. 



LAND=TAKING IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Wentworth terrace, Dor- 
chester district, as a highway, from 
Wentworth street easterly, bounded and 
described as follows: 

A highway named Wentworth terrace 
is hereby laid out, from Wentworth street 
easterly for a distance of approximately 
four hundred and eighty-five feet, and 
ordered constructed, the cost thereof to 
be charged to Federal Funds allocated 
under the Federal Emergency Relief 
Administration program lor Massa- 
chusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive of 
trees or structures .standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easemenl for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Westerly by Wentworth street, thirty- 
three feet; northerly by the northerly 
line of said Wentworth terrace as hereby 
laid out, four hundred eighty-four and 
SS 100 feet; easterly by the easterly line 
of said Wentworth terrace as hereby laid 
out, sixty-three ami 98 100 feet; and 

southerly by the southerly line of said 
Went wort li terrace as hereby laid out, 

by two measurements, one hundred forty- 
four and 86 lot) feel on a curve of three 
hundred thirty-three and 43 100 feel 
radius and three hundred forty-four and 

53 100 feet. 

I oted, Thai this Board determines that 

no person sustains damages in his estate 

by t be making of the public improvement, 



consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Wentworth terrace, Dorchester 
district, as a highway, from Wentworth 
street for a distance of approximately 
four hundred and eighty-five feet easterly, 
under the order of the Board of January 
16, 1935, and awards no damages therefor. 



POPULATION OF BOSTON, BY SEX, NA- 
TIVITY, ETC., 1930. 

Total population, 7S1.1SS (3S3.454 
males and 397,734 females) ; ratio of 
males to females, 96.4 to 100 as against 
97.2 l,o 100 in 1920. Native while, 
529,400 (260,419 males and 26S,9S1 fe- 
males) or 67.77 per cent; sex ratio, 96.8 
to 100. Of the 529,400 native whites, 
200,130, or 37,80 per cent, are of native 
parentage; 248,653, or 46.97 per cent, are 
of foreign parentage and S0.617, or 15.23 
per cent., arc of mixed parentage 
one half native). Foreign-born whites, 
229,356 (111,261 males ami 118.095 fe- 
males) or 9,563 less than in 1920; sex 
ratio 94.2 to 100. The foreign-born 
whites are 29.36 per cent of total popula- 
tion. Negroes, 20,574 (10,223 males and 
10,351 females) or 2.63 per cent of 
Is on; sex ratio, 98.8 to 100. The 
population has increased 4,224 .since 1920 
Mini 4,993 since 191,"). Other races. 1,858 
females); 55 to 61 years, 63,416 
(1. 551 males am! 307 females), 1 

:\t, comprise 1,595 Chinese, 69 Jap- 
13 Indian, 26 Mexican and 125 
miscellaneous. Total foreign white 
stock, 178.009 (\ : ■ . 229,356 plus 24{ 

Jvhich is 61.19 per cent of all inhabitants. 



66 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



NUMBER AND ESTIMATED COST OF NEW BUILDINGS AND ALTERATIONS, ADDITIONS, ETC., FOR WHICH 
APPLICATIONS HAVE BEEN FILED FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1934. 





Apartment 

and 

Tenement 

Houses. 


Apartment 

and 

Tenement 

Houses 

and Stores. 


Banks. 


Churches. 


Dwellings. 


Dwellings 
and Stores. 


Garages. 


Character. 


X ■ 

s 

3 
2 


-a 
11 


a 

x 

6 

3 
2 


T3 
03 +» 

as 
■■go 

w 


oj 
X 
S 

3 
2 


■a 

oj 
+j . 

es 
■■go 

w 


u 

qj 

X 
S 
3 

2 


■a 

a) 

03 +i 

es 
■■go 


X 

S 

3 
55 


■a 

11 
■go 
a 


C 

0J 

X 

e 

3 

2 


1 

es 
■-go 


c 

OJ 

ja 
2 


■a 

03 +J 

e s 
■•go 
w 




























26 
71 
76 
19 


$93,430 
















1 


$100,000 


3 

128 


$14,500 
627,200 


1 


$4,000 


51,705 


Third Class. . 


2 


$14,000 










21,085 




















4,895 






























Total New Work 


2 
198 


1 
$14,000 

242,410 










1 

20 


$100,000 
4S.505 


131 
2,613 


$641,700 
909,631 


1 

240 


$4,000 
88,296 


192 
86 


$171,115 




141 


$96,134 


8 


$341,300 


54,220 




Grand Totals to Date 


200 


$256,410 


141 


$96,134 


8 


$341,300 


21 


$148,505 


2,744 


$1,551,331 


241 


$92,296 


278 


$225,335 




Hotels. 


Hospitals. 


Lodging 
Houses. 


Lodging 

Houses 

and Stores. 


Mercantile 
Buildings. 


Manu- 
facturing 
Buildings. 


Office 
Buildings. 


Character. 


x 

6 

3 

2 


OJ 
c o 

■■go 


S 

3 

z 


-a 

es 
■■go 


OJ 
X 

S 

3 
2 


-a 

CJ 

■■go 

w 


X 

6 

3 

2 


■a 

0J 
03 -w 

es 
■■■go 

H 


OJ 

3 
2 


-a 

0J 
03 -*J 

eg 
■■go 

H 


OJ 
X 

6 

3 

2 


-a 

OJ 

+j . 

03-U 

es 
■■go 
w 


u 

0J 

X 

e 

3 


•a 
BS 

■■go 

H 








1 


$1,383,000 










5 
34 

9 
15 


$415,000 

221,175 

13,000 

24,425 


1 
1 


$100,000 
8,000 












1 


$75,000 










Third Class 














1 


$300 




















































Total New Work 






1 

25 


$1,383,000 
327,475 


1 

72 


$75,000 
60,742 






63 

848 


$673,600 
1,121,443 


2 
98 


$108,000 
204,595 


1 

123 


$300 




49 


$248,101 


IN 


$38,850 


143,827 








49 


$248,161 


26 


$1,710,475 


73 


$135,742 


18 


$38,850 


911 


$1,795,043 


100 


$312,595 


124 


$144,127 








Public 
Buildings. 


Public 
Halls. 


School 
Houses. 


Stables. 


Theatres. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


Character. 


•— 

X 

E 

3 

y. 


-3 

0J 

2 o 
'gO 
W 


0J 

s 

3 

2 


T3 
0J 

03 4J 
3 w 
3 o 

■go 

H 


u 

X 

e 

3 
2 


■a 

0J 

ES 

••go 


0J 

Xi 

6 

3 
55 


■a 

0J 

11 
■■go 


X 

6 

3 

2 


■a 

QJ 

3 w 

3 o 

■■go 

H 


0J 

,£5 

e 

3 

2 


-a 

0J 
C3 -t^ 

es 
■go 

w 


OJ 

X 

6 

3 

2 


■a 

QJ 

e s 
■go 

H 












2 


$730,000 










12 

8 

43 

38 


$57,950 
21,050 
26,185 
57,124 


47 
120 
259 

72 


$2,779,380 




















495,430 


Third Class. 






















701,770 
























86,444 


























Total New Work 










2 
30 


$730,000 
190,579 










101 
170 


$162,309 
166,262 


498 
4,797 


$4,063,024 




n 


$5,584 


10 


$10,150 


18 


$6,225 


19 


$36,025 


4,340,414 




Grand Totals to Date 


li 


$5,584 


10 


$10,150 


32 


$920,579 


18 


$6,225 


19 


$36,025 


271 


$328,571 


5,295 


$8,403,438 





Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



67 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Hospital Department. 

Upon January 16 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Rand & Byam, Incorpo- 
rated, for the purchase of bones, trim- 
mings, grease, suets and cods at Boston 
City Hospital. Bids, opened at the 
Hospital on Wednesday, December 26, 
were as follows: 

Trimmings, Per Pound. — Rand & Byam, 
Incorporated, 3 cents; Boston Soap Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 2 cents; James F. 
Morse & Co., 2? cents; Independent 
Tallow Company, 1£ cents; John E. King, 
2j cents; Independent Grease Company, 
1 i cents. 

Bones, Per Pound. — Rand & Byam, 
Incorporated, 1 cent; Boston Soap Com- 
pany, Incorporated, § cent; James F. 
Morse & Co., \ cent; Independent Tallow 
Company, 25 cents per hundred; John E. 
King, j cent; Independent Grease Com- 
pany, 30 cents per hundred. 

Grease, Per Pound. — Rand & Byam, 
Incorporated, 4 cents; Boston Soap Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 3| cents; James F. 
Morse & Co., 3 cents; Independent Tallow 
Company, 2| cents; John E. King, 2§ 
cents; Independent Grease Company, 
2 j cents. 

Suets, Per Pound. — Rand & Byam, In- 
corporated, 5 cents; Boston Soap Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 5 cents; James F. 
Morse & Co., 4 cents; Independent 
Tallow Company, 4 cents; John E. King, 
3| cents; Independent Grease Company, 
3 1 cents. 

Cods, Per Pound. — Rand & Byam, In- 
corporated, 5 cents; Boston Soap Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 6 cents; James F. 
Morse & Co., 4 cents; Independent Tallow 
Company, 4 cents; John E. King, 3j 
cents; Independent Grease Company, 3^ 
cents. 

Trap Grease, Per Pound. — Rand & 
Byam, Incorporated, nothing; Boston 
Soap Company, Incorporated, no bid; 
James F. Morse & Co., nothing; Independ- 
ent Tallow Company, \ cent; John E. 
King, nothing; Independent Grease Com- 
pany, i cent. 

Public Works Department (Bridge 
Service). 

Upon January 11 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Coleman Brothers Cor- 
poration for repairs to Chelsea North 
Bridge. A communication from C. J. Car- 
ven was as follows: 

Boston, January 11, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Pursuant to chap- 
ter 342 of the Acts of 1934, authorizing 
the City of Boston to repair and strengthen 
the Chelsea North Bridge over the Mystic 
river, between the cities of Boston and 
Chelsea, at a cost not exceeding $270,000, 
an invitation for bids under two alter- 
nates was advertised in the City Record. 
Alternate A provided for the repair and 
strengthening of the bridge while main- 
taining street ear trallie on one track, and 
Alternate B provided for the repair and 
strengthening of the said bridge with the 
bridge closed to pedestrian and vehicular 
trallie. The following bids were received 
and opened by this department on 
October 10, 1934: 



Alternate A, Maintaining Car Travel 
on One Track. — Coleman Brothers Cor- 
poration, $380,770; M. F. Gaddis, 
$292,222.50; T. Stuart & Son Company, 
$393,400; Blakeslee Rollins Corporation, 
$348,285. 

Alternate B, Bridge Closed. — Coleman 
Brothers Corporation, $243,820; M. F. 
Gaddis, $275,632.50; C. J. Maney & Co., 
Incorporated, $269,442.50; T. Stuart & 
Son Company, $309,800; Blakeslee Rol- 
lins Corporation, $311,287.50. 

On October 26, 1934, I requested your 
approval, which was granted to me on 
the same day, to award a contract to 
Coleman Brothers Corporation for re- 
pairing and strengthening said bridge 
with the specifications called for in Alter- 
nate A at an estimated cost to the city 
of $243,820, the amount bid for Alternate 
B. Said request was based upon the 
desire of the Eastern Massachusetts 
Street Railway to keep its street car 
service uninterrupted during the period 
of reconstruction of the bridge and I 
understand that private arrangements 
were to be made between the railway and 
Coleman Brothers Corporation whereby 
the railway was to pay Coleman Brothers 
Corporation an amount for keeping said 
street car service uninterrupted. 

In view of the unsafe condition of the 
bridge, it is my opinion that the bridge 
should be closed to all traffic, including 
street car traffic, until repairs are made 
and the bridge strengthened. 

As I have stated herein the bid of 
Coleman Brothers Corporation was the 
lowest bid under Alternate B (bridge 
closed). 

I am of the opinion that further adver- 
tising would not produce any more 
advantageous bids to the city since this 
work has already received sufficient 
publicity. Furthermore, the emergency 
nature of the work in view of the closing 
of the bridge makes immediate action 
essential. I therefore respectfully re- 
quest your approval to award, without 
further inviting proposals therefor by 
advertisement, a contract to Coleman 
Brothers Corporation for repairing and 
strengthening Chelsea North Bridge under 
Alternate B at an estimated cost to the 
city of $243,820, based upon fixed unit 
prices for quantities estimated by the 
division engineer, as originally bid by the 
contractor. 

In view of the new reduced schedule of 
tolls and charges in the Sumner Traffic 
Tunnel during the period of the repair 
and strengthening of the Chelsea North 
Bridge, the public inconvenience result- 
ing from the necessity of closing the bridge 
is minimi/.ed. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Punnc Works Department (Sewer 
Service). 

Upon January 17 the Mayor approved 
a contract wilh M. DeSisto Company for 
sewerage works in Dent street, between 
Lasell street and Glenham street, Wesl 
Roxbury. The following bids were re- 
ceived January 8: 

M. DeSisto Company, $1,362: Joseph 
Capone, $1,380.50; Roxbury Concrete 
Construction Company, $1,446.87; J. 
D'Amico, Incorporated. $1,471.94; Sul- 
mona Construction Company, S1.52S.S7; 
The Prompt Contractors. Incorporated, 
$1,637; Keystone Engineering and Con- 
tracting Company, $2,072.50. 



School Committee. 

The School Committee has appi 
proposals for furnishing large incandes- 
cent electric lamps for Host on pi 
schools opened Tuesday, Dccembci 
1934. Bids were received from the 
following concerns: 

American Electric Supply < 
Arvedon Brothers, Incorporated, Bigelow 
& Dowse Company, Consolidated Elect 
Lamp Company, Cutter Wood A: Sander- 
son Company, Decatur & Hopkins Com- 
pany, Eagle Electric Supply Company, 
Edison Electric Illuminating Company of 
Boston, General Electric Supply Cor- 
poration, Grainger-Rush Company, Gray- 
bar Electric Company, Hardy Company, 
Loman Electric Supply Company, .Massa- 
chusetts Gas & Electric Light Supply 
Company, Milhender, Incorporated, New 
England Electrical Supply Company, 
Simons Brothers Company, Voye Elect ric 
Supply Company, Wetmore-Savage Divi- 
sion, Westinghouse Electric Supply Com- 
pany. 

Award was made to the New England 
Electrical Supply Company, under date 
of December 21, 1934. 

The School Committee has approved 
proposals for removing ashes and rubbish 
from certain of the Boston public school- 
houses opened Monday, December 17, 
1934. Bids were received from the fol- 
lowing concerns: 

Dooley Brothers, M. Doyle & I 
Incorporated, Gold Key Trucking Com- 
pany, Eugene Ricciardelli, Roslindale 
Contracting Company. 

Contract was awarded to M. Doyle 
& Co., Incorporated, the lowest bidder, 
under date of December 27, 1934. Bids 
were as follows: 

Roslindale Contracting Company, $643; 
Gold Key Trucking Company," $550; 
Eugene Ricciardelli, $490; Dooley Broth- 
ers, $408; M. Doyle & Co., Incorporated, 
$200. 

Supply Department. 

Upon January 16 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the low bidders as indi- 
cated for ninety days' supply of bread and 
pastry flour for the various city depart- 
ments. The Amendt Milling Company 
of Monroe, Mich., represented in Boston 
by F. K. Hatfield Company of 131 
State street, Boston, is low bidder on the 
bread flour, and Thurnian & Co. of 131 
State street, Boston, is low bidder on the 
pastry flour. The market price of flour 
has dropped 5 cents per barrel since bids 
were opened, so that all bids if taken 
today would be 5 cents per barrel lower 
than bids originally submitted. The low- 
bidders, however, on bread and pastry 
flour have revised their respective prices 
to $6.61 and $6.05 per barrel. IVn 
sion has been given to make the following 
awards, without readvertising, in order 
to take advantage of this saving to the 
city: 

To \mendt Milling Company, approxi- 
mately 1,277 barrels bread (lour at So. 61 
per barrel, $8,440.97. 

To Thurnian & Co.. approximately 157 
barrels pastry Hour at $6.05 per barrel. 
$949.85. 

Bids, opened January II. ue> 
Follows: 

Approximately 1,277 barrels of bread 
Hour to be delivered in ninety days: 
315 barrels Long Island, 500 
Deer Island, 1 12 barrels - uin 

Division. 350 barrels Citj Hospital. 

Amend! Mill 
Company, $6.76, deliveries from 
house: $6.66, delivered from cms on 
arrival in Boston; Valier & Spies Mil 



68 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



Corporation, $6.80; American Flour Com- 
pany, Incorporated, $6.81, Dittlinger 
Roller Mills, New Brawnfels, Texas. 

60 Days, Per Barrel — Amendt Milling 
Company, $6.76, deliveries from ware- 
house; $6.66, delivered from cars on 
arrival in Boston; Valier & Spies Milling 
Corporation, $6.80; American Flour Com- 
pany, Incorporated, $6.81, Dittlinger 
Roller Mills, New Brawnfels, Texas. 

90 Days, Per Barrel. — Washburn- 
Crosby Company, Incorporated, $7.12, 
spring wheat Gold Medal; $6.93, hard 
spring wheat; Amendt Milling Com- 
pany, $6.76,* deliveries from warehouse; 
$6.66, delivered from cars on arrival in 
Boston; Thurman & Co., $6.79, Falstaff 
hard winter wheat; $6.84, Challenge; 
$7.09, Sentinel hard wheat; $7.24, hard 
spring wheat, Commander Milling Com- 
pany; Atlas Flour Company, Incor- 
porated, $6.77, Safeguard hard winter 
wheat; Valier & Spies Milling Corpora- 
tion, $6.80; American Flour Company, 
Incorporated, $6.81, Dittlinger Roller 
Mills, New Brawnfels, Texas; Rival 
Foods, Incorporated, $7.15, Success; B. 
Rothstein & Co., Incorporated, $7.55, 
spring wheat flour. 

Approximately 157 barrels of pastry 

flour to be delivered in ninety days: 32 

., barrels Long Island, 50 barrels Deer 

Island, 25 barrels Sanatorium Division, 

50 barrels City Hospital. 

SO Days, Per Barrel. — Amendt Milling 
Company,! $6.38, delivered from ware- 
house; $6.28, delivered from cars to 
destination; American Flour Company, 
Incorporated, $6.17. 

60 Days, Per Barrel. — Amendt Milling 
Company,! $6.38, delivered from ware- 
house; $6.28, delivered from cars to 
destination; American Flour Company, 
Incorporated, $6.17. 

90 Days, Per Barrel. — Amendt Milling 
Company,! $6.38, delivered from ware- 
house; $6.28, delivered from cars to desti- 
nation; Thurman & Co., $6.14,* White 
Rose; American Flour Company, In- 
corporated, $6.17; Rival Foods, Incor- 
porated, $6.55, Golden Poppy; B. Roth- 
stein & Co., Incorporated, $6.25. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — Washburn- 
Crosby Company, Incorporated, 1 per 
cent; Thurman & Co., quarter of 1 per 
cent; American Flour Company, Incor- 
porated, 1 per cent. 

Remarks. — Washburn-Crosby Com- 
pany, Incorporated, prices quoted on exact 
amount; notice of award to be made 
within seventy-two hours; see processing 
tax note; Amendt Milling Company, 
minimum car of 205 barrels at one time; 
prices good only until 9.30 a. m. on 
January 15, 1935; Rival Foods, Incor- 
porated, to be notified of award by 4 p. m. 
of January 14, 1935; see processing tax 
note; deliveries not to vary more than 10 
per cent from estimates; B. Rothstein & 
Co., Incorporated, see processing tax 
clause; prices based on $1.05| per bushel 
of wheat; every cent change will mean 
5 cents a barrel to city. 



* Contract awarded. 

t Bid contingent on award of bread flour. 



Upon January 16 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Raymond E. Henchey for 
pig lead for the various city departments 
until December31. Bids, opened January 
4, were as follows: 

Approximately lfl,200 Pounds Omaha, 
Grout or St. Joseph, or Equal, Brands, 
Prime Lead, Not Remelted. 

Per Hundredweight over American Smell- 
ing owl Refining Company's New York 
Price for Pig Lead on Day Order is Re- 



ceived. — Cambridge Street Metal Com- 
pany, 40 cents, St. Joe lead; Cambridge 
Smelting Company, 40 cents; National 
Boston Lead Company, 43 cents; Ray- 
mond E. Henchey, 38 cents, minimum 
lot of 50,000 pounds. 

State America?! Smelting a?id Refining 
Company's New York Price on Day of the 
Opening of the Bids, Per Hundredweight. — 
Cambridge Street Metal Company, $3.70; 
Cambridge Smelting Company, $3.70; 
National Boston Lead Company, $3.70. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — Cambridge 
Street Metal Company, half of 1 per cent; 
Cambridge Smelting Company, 1 per 
cent; National Boston Lead Company, 
half of 1 per cent; Raymond E. Henchey, 
1 per cent. 

Upon January 17 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the National Boston Lead 
Company for lead pipe for the Water 
Division. Bids, opened January 14, were 
as follows: 

Must be Prime Quality, Perfectly Fabri- 
cated, Uniform Wall Thickness. 

10 Tons Lead Pipe Five-Eighths Inch 
Diameter, 3 Pounds to Foot, per Hundred- 
iveighi Over the American Smelting and 
Refining Company's Price of Pig Lead in 
New York on the Day Order is Received. — 
Cambridge Smelting Company, $1.55; 
National Boston Lead Company, 98 cents. 

State American Smelting and Refining 
Company's Price of Pig Lead in New York 
on the Day of the Opening of the Bids. — 
Cambridge Smelting Company, $3.70; 
National Boston Lead Company, $3.70. 

Approximate Amount of Contract. — 
Cambridge Smelting Company, $1,050; 
National Boston Lead Company, $936. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — Cambridge 
Smelting Company, 2 per cent; National 
Boston Lead Company, 1 per cent. 

Upon January 17 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the National Boston 
Lead Company for white lead in oil and 
dry red lead required by the various 
city departments during 1935. Bids, 
opened January 4, were as follows: 

Approximate Amounts on All Items, 
23,300 Pounds White Lead; 4,150 
Pounds Red Lead. 

In 100-Pound Kegs, Per Hundred- 
weight. — Wadsworth, Howland & Co., 
Incorporated, $8,415, white lead in oil; 
$9.40, dry red lead; National Boston 
Lead Company, $8.06,* white lead; 
$7.50,* dry red lead; The Glidden Com- 
pany, $8.25, Easton white lead in oil. 

In 50-Pound Kegs, Per Hundredweight. 
— Wadsworth, Howland & Co., Incor- 
porated, $8.61, white lead in oil; $9.63, 
dry red lead; National Boston Lead 
Company, $8.26,* white lead; $7.75,* 
dry red lead; The Glidden Company, 
$8.45, Easton white lead in oil. 

In 25-Pound Kegs, Per Hundredweight. 
— Wadsworth. Howland & Co., Incor- 
porated, $8.88, white lead in oil; $9.63, 
dry red lead; National Boston Lead 
Company, $8.26,* white lead; $7.75,* 
dry red lead; The Glidden Company, 
$8.45, Easton white lead in oil. 

In Twelve and One-Half Pound Kegs, 
Per Hundredweight. — Wadsworth, How- 
land & Co., Incorporated, $9.41, white 
lead in oil; $9.84, dry red lead; National 
Boston Lead Company, $8.46,* white 
lead; $8,* dry red lead; The Glidden 
Company, $8.65, Easton white lead in oil. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — Wadsworth, 
Howland & Co., Incorporated, 2 per cent; 
National Boston Lead Company, net, 
white lead; 1 per cent, dry red lead. 

Remarks. — Wadsworth, Howland & Co., 



Incorporated, subject to acceptance with- 
in one week; tax clause; National Bos- 
ton Lead Company, Dutch Boy, Boston 
Star, Forest River Brands, heavy paste 
and All Purpose soft paste. 

♦Contract awarded. 

Upon January 17 the Mayor approved 
a contract with P. J. Dinn & Co. for 
fence required by the Public Buildings 
Department for the Hyde Park Municipal 
Building and the Codman Square Library. 
A communication from Warren W. 
Loomis read as follows: 

"P. J. Dinn & Co., at $2,536, plus a 
charge of $48 for supervision and rental 
of necessary erecting tools per 24-hour 
week, is the lowest bidder. 

" Based on the authority given me by 
your approval on June 13, 1934, of my 
request, dated June 12, 1934, for per- 
mission to award, without advertising, 
purchases for F. E. R. A. activities 
amounting to $1,000 or over, I respect- 
fully request that you approve this 
award to P. J. Dinn & Co." 

Material to be delivered to site, painted 
one shop coat of paint ready to assemble 
in field by others. All to be graded and 
curved where needed to conform to 
existing contour. Bids were as follows: 

Hyde Park Municipal Building. — Bos- 
ton Iron Works, $1,740; Brayton-Wilson- 
Cole, $1,925; P. J. Dinn & Co., $1,576. 

Codman Square Library. — Boston Iron 
Works, $1,075; Brayton-Wilson-Cole, 
$1,351; P. J. Dinn & Co., $960. 

Total— Boston Iron Works, $2,815; 
Brayton-Wilson-Cole, $3,276; P. J. Dinn 
& Co., $2,536. 

Rental of Necessary Erecting Tools and 
Supervision for 24-Hour Week. — Boston 
Iron Works, $48; Brayton-Wilson-Cole, 
$60; P. J. Dinn & Co., $48. 

Upon January 17 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Sparrow r -Chisholm 
Company for khaki cloth (30 inches wide) 
for Deer Island. Bids, opened January 9, 
were as follows: 

Approximately 5,000 Yards Khaki Cloth 
(SO Inches Wide). — National Coat and 
Apron Supply Company, A, 31.5 cents a 
yard; B, 32 cents a yard; Sparrow- 
Chisholm Company, 29.5 cents a yard. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — National 
Coat and Apron Supply Company, A, 
2 per cent; B, 2 per cent. 

WITHOUT ADVERTISING. 

Upon varying dates as indicated the 
Mayor approved contracts with firms 
and contractors for work and supplies. 
Communications from the heads of the 
several departments were as follows: 

Penal Institutions Department. 
Boston, January 2, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Your approval is respect- 
fully requested for the award of a con- 
tract without advertising to the Para- 
mount Laboratories of 123 Heath street, 
Roxbury, Mass., for the extermination of 
vermin at the House of Correction, Deer 
Island, Boston Harbor, from January 1, 
1935, to December 31, 1935, inclusive, at a 
cost of eleven hundred seventy-six (1,176) 
dollars. 

The Paramount Laboratories performed 
this work at Deer Island during ten 
months of 1934 in a very satisfactory man- 
ner. This is an important matter in an 
institution and I believe it advisable to 
retain a company whose services have 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



69 



proven satisfactory rather than make any 
change. In my opinion this is a fail- 
price. 

Respectfully yours, 

William G. O'Hare, 
Penal Institutions Commissioner. 

Public Works Department. 
Boston, December 28, 1934. 
To His Honor the Mayor. 

I respectfully request permission to 
renew for the period of one year from 
January 1, 1935, the lease with Annie V. 
Loonis for property on Gibson street, 
Dorchester, occupied by this department 
as a Paving Service district yard. The 
rental will be at the rate now being paid, 
namely, $1,800 per year, in addition to 
which the city reimburses the owner for 
the taxes paid. 

This property is used as the yard which 
covers a large area of the Dorchester 
district, and its continued use is necessary 
for carrying on our activities. 

Yours respectfully, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 31, 1934. 
To the Honorable Mayor. 

Supplementing my letter to you of 
December 24 requesting your approval of 
the award of a contract for the removing 
of snow and ice in District 3 to Baker, 
Matz & Co., the third lowest bidder, and 
confirming my earlier oral statement to 
you, please be advised that I have not 
recommended the award of said contract 
to Joseph P. McCabe, Incorporated, be- 
cause said latter contractor has been 
awarded a contract for removing snow 
and ice in District 11, in reference to 
which he was the lowest bidder; nor have 
I recommended the award of said con- 
tract to C. Reppucci & Co., because said 
latter contractor has been awarded a 
contract for removing snow and ice in 
District 5, with reference to which he 
was the lowest bidder. 

In my opinion, Joseph P. McCabe, In- 
corporated, and C. Reppucci & Co. can 
only handle one district in a proper and 
efficient manner to the greatest benefit 
of the public using the streets during and 
after a snow storm. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, January 2, 1935. 
To the Honorable Mayor. 

Supplementing my letter to you of 
December 26, 1934, requesting your ap- 
proval to the award of a contract for 
removing snow and ice in District 8 
to Martin J. Kelly, the fifth lowest 
bidder, and confirming my earlier oral 
statement to you, please be advised 
that I have not recommended the award 
of said contract to Coleman Corporation, 
because said latter contractor, Mr. Cole- 
man, informed me that the price bid 
was inadequate and he wished not to be 
considered; nor have I recommended (he 
award of said contract to .1. P. McCabe, 
Incorporated, because said latter con- 
tractor has been awarded a contract for 
removing snow and ice in District 11, 
with reference to which he was the lowest 
bidder; nor have I recommended the 
award of said contract to Baker, Matz 
& Co., because said latter contractor lias 
been awarded a contract for removing 
now and ice in District 3; nor have I 
recommended the award of said contract 



to the Ward General Contracting Com- 
pany because said latter contractor has 
been awarded a contract for removing 
snow and ice in District 7, in which he 
was the lowest bidder, nor have I recom- 
mended the award of said contract to 
the National Engineering and Construc- 
tion Company, because said latter con- 
tractor has been awarded a contract 
for removing snow and ice in District 6. 

In my opinion J. P. McCabe, Incor- 
porated, Baker, Matz & Co. and the 
National Engineering and Construction 
Company, can only handle one district 
in a proper and efficient manner to the 
greatest benefit of the public using the 
streets during and after a snow storm. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Supply Department. 

Boston, January 14, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Permission is respectfully 
requested to award a contract, without 
publicly advertising for same, to the 
Burroughs Adding Machine Company 
for the purchase of two Class 7800 
bookkeeping machines, at a price of 
■11,890 each, to be delivered to the 
Auditing Department, City of Boston. 

The City Auditor has notified this de- 
partment that the Burroughs machines 
were selected after a series of tests in 
competition with other standard makes. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



POPULATION OF MASSACHUSETTS, 1930. 

Total population, 4,249,614 (2,071,672 
males and 2,177,942 females; total white, 
4,192,926 (2,042,213 males and 2,150,713 
females) ; total native white, 3,138,290 
(1,532,751 males and 1,605,539 females) ; 
native white of native parentage, 1,429,- 
7S4 (702,983 males and 726,801 females) ; 
native white of foreign or mixed parent- 
age, 1,708,506 (829,768 males and 878,738 
females); 1,202,191 (584,705 males and 
617,486 females) of them being of foreign 
parentage; foreign-born white, 1,054,636 
(509,462 males and 545,174 females) ; Ne- 
gro, 52,365 (26,097 males and 26,268 fe- 
males) ; Indian, 874 (458 males and 416 
females) ; Chinese, 2,973 (2,530 males and 
443 females); Japanese, 201 (151 males 
and 50 females) ; Mexican, 66 (43 males 
and 23 females) ; all other races, 209 (180 
males and 29 females). 



A SQUARE DEAL IN ASSESSMENTS FOR 
TAXATION. 

Many cities are finding it greatly to 
their advantage to have their tax valua- 
tions periodically overhauled. The first 
criterion of any assessment is equity. 
For every citizen who wants through 
"pull" or however else to get oil easy, 
there are twenty, nay a hundred, who 
want a lair and square deal for all. 

The appraisal of city real estate is 
a highly technical affair. 

Few things are more important than 
the equalization of assessments. Par- 
ticularly in cities that are cramped by 
an inflexible debt or tax limit, an hon- 
est, full value assessment may be a 
great boon, Without the slightest raise 
in the tax rate a substantially greater 
tax yield may bo had. 



OWNED AND RENTED HOMES IN 
UNITED STATES, NEW ENGLAND AND 
MASSACHUSETTS, 1930— ALSO BOSTON. 

Total homes in United States, 29,904,- 
663, of which 14,002,074 or 46.8 per cent 
were owned, 15,319,817 or 51.2 per cent 
were rented, and 582,772 were of un- 
known tenure. Native white families, 
20,968,803; foreign-born white families 
(the head of the family being a foreign- 
born white person), 5,736,491; Negro 
families, 2,803,756; other races, 395,613. 

The native white families owned 10,- 
255,682 homes and rented 10,314,500 
homes; the foreign-born white families 
owned 2,968,707 homes and rented 2,690,- 
300 homes ; the Negro families owned 669,- 
645 homes and rented 2,050,217 homes; 
the other races owned 108,040 homes and 
rented 264,800 homes. 

Total homes in New England, 1,981,- 
499, of which 915,441 or 46.2 per cent 
were owned, 1,042,521 or 52.6 per cent 
were rented, and 23,537 were of un- 
known tenure. Native white families, 
1,203,304; foreign-born white families, 
753,231; Negro families, 22,864; other 
races, 2,100. 

Total homes in Massachusetts, 1,021,- 
160, of which 439,238 or 43.0 per cent 
were owned, 569,645 or 55.8 per cent 
were rented, and 12,277 were of unknown 
tenure. Native white families, 579,751 
(306,978 or 30.06 per cent were native 
white of native parentage and 272,773 or 
26.71 per cent were native white of 
foreign or mixed parentage) ; foreign- 
born white families, 427,385 or 41.85 per 
cent; Negro families, 12,637 or 124 per 
cent; other races, 1,387 or 0.14 per cent. 

Total homes in Boston, 179,200, of 
which 45,986 or 25.66 per cent were 
owned, 130,140 or 72.62 per cent were 
rented and 3,074 were of tenure unknown. 
Divided by color and nativity of head of 
owner-families, 7,741 were native white 
of native parentage; 11,137 were native 
white of foreign or mixed parentage; 
26,366 were foreign-born white; 726 were 
Negro and 16 were of other races. 

Of the renter-families, 27,267 were na- 
tive white of native parentage; 36.42S 
were native white of foreign or mixed 
parentage; 61,505 were foreign-born 
white ; 4,431 were Negro, and 509 were of 
other races. 



PUBLIC DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1933. 

Gross funded debt, January 1, 1933, 
$165,758,499.95 (including SI 19,999.95 is- 
sued by State for enlargment of Court 
House) ; sinking funds, §35,737,619.21 ; 
other redemption means, S3.07S.263.2S; 
net debt, S126.942.617.46 or S7.5SS.429.94 
more than on January 1, 1932. Of said 
debt (net) S79,310,526.63 or 62.4S per 
cent was City debt; S16.199.623.96 or 
36.39 per cent, Rapid Transit debt (rep- 
resenting 4^ per cent investment); $994,- 
466.S7 or 6.7S per cent, Countv debt; 
i H)0 or 0.35 per cent. Water debt. 

Debt paid in 1932 was $9,935,301 but 
there was an increase in total gros 
oi $5,4 17,698.99. 

Net debt per capita, $160.62 (approx.) ; 
net debt, exclusive of R ipid Transit debt, 
SS0.7 12,993.50 or $102.17 per capita (ap- 
prox.). 

Per capitas are based on U. S. Census 
Bureau's estimated population on Janu- 
ary 1, 1933. 

as authorized but not issued (with- 
in debt limit), $1,898,000; same outside 
of debt limit. S2,6SO,000; total. $1,578,000. 



70 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 10 TO JANUARY 16. 

January 10. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Massachusetts Catholic Order 075 East Fourth street. . . . 
of Foresters. 

City of Boston 230 Dartmouth street 

Paufilo Leopardi 29 and 31 Priscilla road. . . 

Dr. Allen Greenwood 82 Commonwealth avenue. 

Dr. Allen Greenwood S4 Commonwealth avenue. 

William Ludlam 20 Birch street 

Mishan Marigan 64 Moreland street 

United Drug Company 716 Columbus avenue 



A. Scalia & Co 74 and 76 Commercial street, 

Gertrude M. Cole 24 Woodbury street 

West Roxbury Co-operative 25 Rochester street 

Bank. 
M. Grabowski 534 Dorchester avenue 

Thomas Sprio 31-37 Lancaster street 

Thomas Speirs 75 Causeway street 



January 11 



Ida M. Bengston 39 Fayette street 

Columbian National Life 13 South Russell street 

Insurance Company. 

Herbert R. Habenicht 12 Lexington avenue 

A. W. Pern,-, Incorporated. . 453-461 Washington street. 

Kane Furniture Company. . . 740 Washington street 

Benjamin Marks 395 Blue Hill avenue 

Abraham Daniel 359 Blue Hill avenue 

B. Feinsilver 2S1 Blue Hill avenue 

M. Andrew 320 Blue Hill avenue 



Eleanor Thomas 13 King street 

Mrs. Vernie Elliott 24 Unity street 

Modern Blue Print Company, 51 Cornhill 

R. Jones 45 Munroe street. . . 

John J. Norton 93 Brown avenue. . . 

Renner Slade 950 Tremont street. 

W. Zimmerman 1 Russell place 



6 Alterations, lodge rooms $2,000 

4 Alterations, library 57S 

21 Third-class dwelling 7,000 

5 Alterations, offices and dwell- 100 

ing. 

5 Alterations, offices and dwell- 3U!i 

ing. 

20 Alterations, stores None 

12 Alterations, dwelling 1,800 

9 Alterations, manufacturing 300 

and offices. 

3 Alterations, store 125 

9 Take-down, dwelling 1,100 

3 Take-down, dwelling 2,600 

7 Alterations, store and dwell- None 

ing. 

3 Alterations, theater 1,000 

3 Alterations, stores and offices, 3,000 

3 Alterations, dwelling '. S300 

3 Alterations, tenements 500 

15 Alterations, gymnasium 600 

3 Alteration, offices 900 

3 Alterations, store 2,300 

12 Alterations, store and dwell- 100 

ing. 

12 Alterations, store and dwell- 100 

ing. 

12 Alterations, store and dwell- 100 

ing. 

14 Alterations, store and dwell- 100 

ing. 

16 Alterations, dwelling 200 

3 Alterations, dwelling 250 

3 Alterations, stores and offices, 150 

12 Alterations, dwelling 450 

19 Alterations, dwelling. ....... 498 

9 Sign 200 

3 Alterations, tenements 950 



January 


12. 


None. 


January 


14. 



D. Charles Noone 

Boston Co-operative Build- 
ing Company. 

Fairbanks Pharmacy 

M. Sletzer 

Franklin Pharmacy 

North Harvard Spa 

E. W. Burt 

Stilphen Motor Company. . . 

Albert Geiger 

Tremont Co-operative Bank, 
S. Berman et al., Trustees. . . 

Meledones Brothers 

Mrs. G. Rotch 

Franklin Savings Bank 

Franklin Savings Bank 

Franklin Savings Bank 

John A. McLeod 

Green Brothers Realty Trust, 



2 Putnam street 

110 East Canton street. 



Alterations, garage. . . 
Alterations, dwelling. 



I 1 



535 Washington street. . 
1961 Columbus avenue. . 

109Franklin street 22 

223 Cambridge street 22 

17 West street 3 

370 Columbia road 14 

489A Tremont street 5 

182 I street 7 

90 Fowler street 14 

873 South street 20 

33 Aspinwall road 17 

2 Humboldt avenue 12 

4 Humboldt avenue 12 

6 Humboldt avenue 12 

87 Willowdean avenue 20 

2337 Washington street 9 



Sign 

Sign 

Sign 

Sign 

Alterations, store and storage, 

Alterations, garage 

Alterations, store and lodging, 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, store 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Alterations, dwelling 

Third-class dwelling 

Alterations, commercial 



January 15. 



Maria Trugala 24 Chilcott place 

Lea Berenberg 245 Norfolk avenue 

Max Friedman 430—436 Geneva avenue 

Augustus P. Loring, Trustee, 747-751 Washington street . 

E. D. Steincrugger 115 Sumner street 

E. D. Steincrugger 115 Sumner street 

Mary Dugan 288 K street 

Annie M. Titus et al 143J Main street 

Mrs. H. Dunbar et al 7 Harrison avenue 

Avery and Saul Company. . . 297 Dorchester avenue 

Fifty Associates 541 Boylston street 



11 Alterations, 

8 Alterations, 

15 Alterations, 



dwelling 

storage 

store and dwell- 



Alterations, 
Take-down, 
Take-down, 
Alterations, 
Alterations, 

Sign 

Alterations, 
Alterations, 



mercantile. . . . 

stable 

storage 

dwelling 

store and lofts. 



storage 

hotel and stores. 



January 16. 



C. R. Berry 250 Itasca street 

S. C. Speed 24 and 26 Commonwealth av. 

James L. Pearce 385 Mt. Vernon street 

B. D'Agostino 531 and 533 East Third st. . . 

Augustus Casasa 226 Cornell street 

Saringo Siargione 189 Princeton street 

Nora Flynn 37 Dale street 

Nora Flynn 39 Dale street 

Kennedy Company, Inc 38 Summer street 

Frank S. Mason 7A Homestead place 

Oreo Realty Trust 87 Salem street 



Anthony J. Conde 8 Bay State place 

Mary Murphy 510 EastFourth street. 

John J. Murphy 41 Haverford street. . . . 

Eliot Savings Bank 15 Harold park 

City of Boston 55 Play stead road 

Hannah Richards 135 Spencer street 



S600 
50 

100 

100 

100 

100 

150 

2.S00 

250 

1,000 

None 

None 

300 

200 

200 

125 

4,000 

1,000 



$25 
1,000 
1,500 

3,000 

2,100 

1,000 

500 

150 

150 

1,000 

3,000 



18 Third-class dwelling §4,000 

5 Fire escapes 200 

13 Take-down, dwelling 75 

6 Alterations, dwelling 1,500 

20 Alterations, dwelling 375 

1 Alterations, dwelling and 200 

store. 

12 Alterations, dwelling 300 

12 Alterations, dwelling 300 

3 Alterations, stores and offices, 400 

2 Alterations, dwelling 100 

3 Alterations, store and tene- 125 

ments. 

6 Alterations, dwelling 230 

6 Alterations, dwelling 149 

11 Alterations, dwelling 100 

12 Alterations, dwelling 350 

13 Take-down, bathhouse 400 

17 Alterations, dwelling 1,500 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

Food Inspector, Department of Public 
Health, February 9, 1935. 

Last date for filing aplications, Satur- 
day, January 26, 1935, at 12 noon. 

The minimum salary is §1,800 a year; 
the maximum salary is $2,400 a year. 

Duties: Under general direction, to 
examine premises in an assigned district 
where foods or drugs are manufactured, 
stored, sold, or handled, in order to en- 
force sanitary standards and classification 
as to quality prescribed by law; and to 
perform related work as required. 

Entrance Requirements : Applicants 
must have education equivalent to gradu- 
ation from a standard four-year high 
school. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience (3) ; practical questions (4) ; 
personality and fitness, as determined 
by an oral interview (3); total (10). 

Passing Requirements : Applicants must 
obtain at least 70 per cent in each sub- 
ject of the examination in order to be- 
come eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
plrysical examination. 

Clerical Service, for State and Cities 
and Towns Outside of Boston and 
Vicinity, February, 16, 1935. 
Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 2, 1935, at 12 noon. 

For Boston and Vicinity, March 2, 
1935. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 16, 1935, at 12 noon. 

Warning: If all applicants cannot be 
accommodated on the above dates, they 
will be notified to appear on subsequent 
Saturdays. Applicants should note the 
exact date given on their notification 
cards. 

The usual entrance salary for clerks 
for State service is §900 a year. 

Persons qualifying in the examination 
may have their names placed on the 
State list as well as on the list for the 
city or town in which they reside. 

Applicants must be not less than six- 
teen years of age at the time of filing 
application. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience (2) ; spelling (2) ; arithmetic 
(including problems) (2) ; grammar (in- 
cluding penmanship) (2); filing (1); 
word knowledge (1); total (10). 

Passing Requirements: Applicants 
must obtain a mark of at least 65 per 
cent in spelling, at least 50 per cent in 
each of the other subjects, and at least 
70 per cent in general average in order 
to become eligible. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1935. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Monday, February 4. 
Worcester, Wednesday, February 6. 
Boston, Monday, March 4. 
Fall River, Wednesday, March 6. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 7. 
Boston, Monday, April 8. 
Springfield, Wednesday, April 10. 
Boston, Monday, May 6. 
Worcester, Wednesday, May 8. 
Boston, Monday, June 3. 
Boston, Monday, September 16. 
Worcaster, Wednesday, September 18. 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



71 



Springfield, Thursday, October 17. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 18. 
Boston, Monday, November 4. 
Lowell, Wednesday, November 6. 
Boston, Monday, December 2. 
New Bedford, Wednesday, December 4. 
New Bedford, Thursday, December 5. 

Rules for Examinations. 

All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent in 
the installation of wires, conduits, appa- 
ratus, fixtures and other appliances for 
carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
years' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for carrying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a Master or Journeyman Cer- 
tificate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be 
required to obtain at least 70 per cent in 
order to obtain a certificate. 

Applicants who fail to obtain the re- 
quired 70 per cent will not be entitled to 
re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent, or who fail 
on the practical demonstration, will not 
be re-examined for a period of six months. 

Any person found referring to notes or 
books, or misbehaving during an exami- 
nation, will be debarred from that exami- 
nation. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held, and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day. 

James M. Hurley, 
Payson Smith, 
Stephen C. Garrity, 
State Examiners of Electricians. 

For application blanks or other infor- 
mation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 413A, State House, 
Boston, Mass. 



MAYOR MANSFIELD BANS PLAY 
"WITHIN THE GATES." 

The Mayor, on January 10, issued the 
following statement: 

As the result of reading the play 
"Within the Gates" by Sean O'Casey 
and protests against it being permitted 
to show in Boston by Father Russell M. 
Sullivan, S. J., representing the Boston 
College Council of Catholic Organiza- 
tions, which includes all Catholic state- 
wide and archdiocesan-widc organiza- 
tions, from Bishop Charles Wesley Burns 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church of the 
Boston area, inclosing a vote of the 
Methodist Preachers Meeting of Greater 
Boston held on January 14, 1935, and by 
Rev. John Van Schaick, representing the 
''Christian Leader," journal of the Uni- 
versalist Church, as well as protests from 
other Catholic priests, I have requested 
the proprietor of the Shubert Theatre not 
to allow this show to be presented in 
Boston. 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 10 TO JANUARY 16. 



January 10. 



Plumber. 


Location. Ware 


Nature. 


Estimated 


Daniel Polit. . . 




14 
3 
3 
1 
3 

14 
8 
5 
5 
5 
5 




$200 


James Woolfall. . . . 


54 Long Wharf 

27 Wordsworth street 


New fixtures. . . 

New fixtures 

New fixtures. . . 


90 


Charles V. Warren 

Matto & Kosen 


00 
175 


Abraham Katz 


New fixtures . . . 


45 


A. Smith &Co 




New fixtures. . . 
New fixtures. . . 


75 
70 


George W. Rigby 

William Dustan 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


85 

1,650 


405 Marlborough street. . . . 




New fixtures 

New fixtures 


35 




84 Commonwealth avenue. . 


200 








January 11. 




60 Beacon street 


5 

4 

19 

9 

1 

14 

18 

22 

5 

22 

21 


New fixtures. . . 


$307 




83 Huntington avenue 


300 




New fixtures. . . 


500 




750 Morton street 


New fixtures. . . 


450 


Ray Martin 


New fixtures. . . 


150 


Edward Sawyer 


New fixtures. . . 


145 


C. C. Best 


1071 Blue Hill avenue 

31 Peterborough street 

306 Washington street 

1S8 Brighton avenue 


New fixtures. . 


200 


C. E. Bevelander 


New fixtures . . . 


150 


H. E. Smith 


New fixtures. . . 
New fixtures. . . 
New fixtures. . . 


550 

175 

50 


January 12. 


None. 


January 14. 


David Craft.. . 


26 Merchants row 


3 

3 

7 

3 

3 

7 

3 

3 

4 

3 

14 

20 

12 

4 

4 

10 

9 

3 

18 

21 




S150 






75 








270 


F. J. Brown 

F. J Brown. . . 


73 Albany street 

67 Albanv street 


New fixtures 


75 

75 






550 


F. C. Odenweller 


148 Prince street 


New fixtures. . . 
New fixtures. . . 


50 


Con Mahoney 


500 


E. H. Marchant 


New fixtures. . . 


300 




New fixtures. . . 


(iOO 


Joseph K. Gordon 


New fixtures. . . 


140 






160 




55 Shattuck street 


New fixtures. . . 


230 


W. H. Pickering 






W. H. Pickering 


240-250 Longwood avenue,. 

1513 Washington street. . . . 
945 Washington street 

25 Ashford street 


New fixtures. . . 


200 




New fixtures. . . 


830 


Walter A. Mitton 


New fixtures. . . 


300 




New fixtures. . . 






New fixtures 

New fixtures 


250 




150 








January 15. 




22 Belvidere street 


4 
12 

21 
3 
5 
5 

13 
1 

17 

10 
8 


Xcw fixtures 

New fixtures 






25 North Anderson street.. . 
30 Newburv street 


28 


pany. 


New fixtures 


60 




New fixtures . . . 


::iii 










189 Princeton street 

689 Washington street 

495 Freeport street 

3S5 Dudley street 


New fixtures 


2.000 


New fixtures 






New fixtures . 


45 


E. Rothenberg 


New fixtures 


125 


New fixtures 


100 




New fixtures 


50 


January 10. 


M s Penn 


144 SI. Botolph street 

1 16 St. Botolph street 

100 Chestnut Hill avenue. . . 

is Maxwell street 


4 

4 

5 

22 

_ 4 
10 
17 

:; 

:; 
13 

1 

10 
4 
14 

1:; 
It 

20 
20 
21 

3 


New futures 


$S00 


M s Penn 




800 




New fixtures 


S5 


Reginald P. Holmes 


New fix! lire-; 


100 


New fixtures 








'JO 




New fixtures . . : 






53 State street 

i .id 111 Federal si i 




SO 






200 






500 


12 Round Hill street 

359 Massachusetts avenue. 








New fixtures 


510 


.1. 1'. McTomnej 

David B. Karger 

H E Smith 


New fixtures 


90 










185 




New fixtures 




16 i Ulnndale street 

1098 Commonwealth avenue 








150 













72 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



PROCEEDINGS OF SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 

Dec. 27, 1934 
A special meeting of the School 
Committee of the City of Boston 
was held in the Administration 
Building, 15 Beacon Street, at 9:12 
o'clock p. m., the Chairman pre- 
siding. 

Present: Messrs. Hurley, Lyons, 
Mackey, Sullivan and Tobin. 



APPROVAL OF MINUTES 
The reading of the minutes of the 
previous meeting was omitted, the 
Committee approving them as 
printed. 



DEATHS 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named 
teacher: 

William Barton Rogers Inter- 
mediate District— Edith M. Snow, 
Dec. 17, 1934. 

Placed on file. 

* The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named 
teacher who had been retired on 
pension under the provisions of the 
Boston Retirement System: 

Dearborn District— Abby W. Sulli- 
van, Dec. 8, 1934. 
Placed on file. 



RESIGNATIONS 

The following resignations, re- 
ported by the Superintendent to 
take effect on the dates stated, 
were presented: 

Beethoven District — Dorothy M. 
Connell, assistant, elementary, Dec. 
21, 1934. 

Mather District — Etta Perlmut- 
ter, assistant, elementary, Dec. 21, 
1934. 

Accepted. 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 27, 1934, reporting 
that, subject to the approval of 
the School Committee, he has ter- 
minated the services of Mary E. 
Forrest, assistant, elementary, m 
the Francis Parkman District, to 
take effect Dec. 31, 1934. Miss For- 
rest has been absent on leave for 
more than two years because of 
ill-health and there is apparently 
no likelihood of her immediate re- 
turn to teaching. 

Placed on file and the termina- 
tion of service approved. 

RETIREMENT ON PENSION 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 27, 1934. reporting the 
retirement from active service 
of the following-named member of 
tha Boston Retirement System, to 
take effect on the date indicates, 
as certified by the Boston Retire- 
ment Board under date of Dec. 
14, 1934: 

Dorchester High School for Giris 
—William L. Anderson, master, 
head of department, Dec. 31. 1934. 

Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENTS 

The following appointments by 
the Superintendent certified oy 
him as being in accordance witn 
the rules and regulations, to take 
effect on the dates stated, were 
presented: 

(FROM THE ELIGIBLE LIST) 

(To fili vacancies caused by in- 
crease in numbers) 

Charlestown High School— Mar- 
tin E. Keane. cooperative instruc- 
tor, Jan. 2, 1935. 

Jamaica Plain High School- 
Margaret M. O'Connell, assistant 
(from assistant, intermediate 
Lewis Intermediate District), Jan. 
2. 1935 

South Boston High School— Mary 
F. A. Kelly, assistant, Jan. 2. 1935 

Boston Trade School— Joseph A 
Mullen, shop instructor, Jan. 2. 
1935. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointments approved. 

(MODEL SCHOOL) 

(To fill vacancy caused by 
promotion) 
Martin District (Model School)— 
Margaret C Crimmins, assistant, 
elementary (from assistant, ele- 
mentary, Edmund P. Tileston Dis- 
trict), Jan. 7, 1935. 

The rules were suspended and the 
appointment approved. 

TEMPORARY TEACHERS 

South Boston High School — Vin- 
cent J. Murphy, co-operative in- 
structor, Dec. 14, 1934 Francis P. 
Assmus, co-operative instructor. 
Dec. 18, 1934 

Department of Manual Arts — 
Sumner Meredith, instructor, man- 
ual training, elementary, Dec. 10, 
1934; Samuel Draisen, shop instruc- 
tor, Dec. 14, 1934; Sumner Meredith, 
assistant, manual training, inter- 
mediate, Dec. 14, 1934. 

Approved. 

EVENING SCHOOLS 

Term 1934-1935 

Bigelow Evening School — Helen 
R. Smith, assistant, Dec. 3 to 13, 
1934 (four evenings) 

Approved. 

LEAVE OF ABSENCE 

On the report of the Superin- 
tendent, leave of absence under a 
suspension of the regulations 
was granted the following-named 
teacher for the term specified: 

Francis Parkman District — Mary 
E. Forrest, assistant, elementary, 
Sept. 1 to Dec. 31, 1934. without 
pay. 

ESTABLISHMENT OF CLASSES 
IN PIPEWELDING 

On motion of the Superintendent, 
it was 

ORDERED, That during the 
school year ending Aug. 31, 1935, the 
Superintendent is hereby author- 
ized, in his discretion and ir. co- 
operation with the State Depart- 
ment of Education, to conduct 
classes in pipe welding for plum- 
bers and steamfitters, in the Bos- 
ton Trade School on school after- 
noons from 4 o'clock to 6 o'clock, 
on Wednesday and Friday evenings 
from 7:30 o'clock to 9:30 o clock, 
and on Saturday mornings from 3 



o'clock to 10 o'clock and from 10:15 
o clock to 12 o'clock, the cos', of 
the instructors salaries to be cov- 
ered by federal funds administered 
by the Commissioner of Education, 
by special distribution to the City 
of Boston, and reimbursement 
made by the State Department of 
Education to the City of Boston 
for all other expenses in connec- 
tion with the maintenance of the 
classes in the amount of fifty per 
cent (50%). 

On motion of the Superintendent, 
it was 

ORDERED, That the employ- 
ment of not more than four in- 
structors in the classes in pipe- 
welding for plumbers and steam- 
fitters, conduct?! in the Boston 
Trade School is hereby authorized; 
compensation to be at the rate of 
four dollars ($4) per session oi two 
hours. 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 27, 1934, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee and in accord- 
ance with the foregoing orders, he 
has appointed the following-named 
persons to the classes in pipeweld- 
ing for plumbers and steamfitters 
in the Boston Trade School, to take 
effect on the dates stated: 

J. Walter Callahan, George V. 
Sharp, Romulus J. Stuart, tem- 
porary instructors, Jan. 7, 1935. 

Placed on file and the appoint- 
ments approved, to take effect on 
the date stated. 



ADVANCE IN DATE OF GRADU- 
ATING EXERCISES 

The Superintendent offered the 
following: 

ORDERED, That for the current 
school year, the Superintendent is 
hereby authorized to advance the 
date of the graduating exercises of 
The Teachers College Latin and 
day high schools, from Thursday 
and Friday, June 27 and 28, 1935. 
to Thursday and Friday, June 13 
and 14, 1935. 

The rules were suspended and the 
order passed. 



AUTHORIZED LIST OF TEXT 
BOOKS 

The Superintendent offered the 
following: 

ORDERED, That the revised edi- 
tion of the following-named text 
book is hereby authorized for use 
as indicated to take the place of 
the old edition of the same: 

ENGLISH 

Pupin, Michael. From Im- 
migrant to Inventor. 
Charles Scribner's Sons. 

cpt. 1934. Grade IX net $.75 

f.o.b. N. Y. 
Laid over. 



SALARY SCHEDULE 

The following preamble and or- 
der were offered: 

WHEREAS, the appropriating 
power of the School Committee and 
the financial situation of the City 
of Boston, in the judgment of the 
School Committee, now warrant 
that the salary schedule appended 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



73 



to Orders 1 to 5 inclusive, passed on 
July 30. 1934, be effective as of ana 
from January 1, 1935 to and includ- 
ing such time as the School Com- 
mittee shall further order. 

Now, Therefore, ORDERED. 
That said salary schedule shall be 
effective as of and from January 
1, 1935 to and including such time 
as the School Committee shall fur- 
ther order; provided, however, that 
no such further order shall reduce 
the salary schedule below the 
amounts fixed in the salary sched- 
ule effective for the period from 
September 1, 1934, to and including 
Decemoer 31, 1934 (as provided in 
Order No. 3 passed on July 30, 
1934 J 

The preamble was adopted and 
the order passed unanimously. 



ELIGIBLE LIST 

A communication was received 
from the Board of Superintendents, 
under date of Dec. 27, 1934, report- 
ing that Martin E. Keane, holder 
of certificates of qualification 
XXX., XXXI. A., and XXXI. B., 
has presented evidence of the pos- 
session of a license issued by the 
Federal Communications Commis- 
sion: "Radio Telephone Operator — 
E'irst Class," which license was is- 
sued at Boston on Dec. 17. 1934. 

The Board, therefore, reported 
the amendment of School Docu- 
ment No. 5. 1934 — Candidates Eligi- 
ble for Permanent Appointment as 
Teachers — by striking out on pages 
39, 41, and 43. the asterisk and ac- 
companying footnote — "Not eligible 
for service in state aided schools" 
— against the name of Martin E. 
Keane. 

Placed on file. 



CHANGE IN RANK 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Dec. 27, 1934, recommend- 
ing that the rank of Mary E. Mc- 
Sweeney, assistant, Group D, in his 
office, be changed to that of 
voucher clerk, Group D, in that 
office, to take effect Dec. 21, 1934, 
and that her salary be established 
at the rate of thirty-five dollars 
($35) per week. 

Placed on file. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the rank of 
Mary E. McSweeney, Assistant, 
Group D, in the office of the Busi- 
ness Manager, is hereby changed 
to that of Voucher Clerk, Group 
D, and her compensation fixed at 
thirty-five ($35) per week, to take 
effect Dec. 21, 1934, with the re- 
duction provided for in Chapter 
121 of the Acts of 193.1. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND 

EXPENDITURES TO DEC. 1, 

1934 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Nov. 30, 1934, submitting a 
statement showing the appropria- 
tions, the expenditures, and the 
balances for maintenance of the 
public schools for the first eleven 
months of the current financial 
year, the expenditures for the first 
eleven months of financial year 



1933, and the increases and de- 
creases in the several items. 
Placed on file. 



TRANSFER OF CUSTODIAN 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian 
under date of Dec 27, 1934, rec- 
ommending that James J. Bulman, 
custodian of the Donald McKay 
School-house, who stands at the 
head of the list, be appointed to 
the custodianship of the Jeremiah 
E. Burke High School for Girls, 
to cake effect Dec. 28, 1934. 

Placed on file and the transfer 
approved, to take effect on the 
date stated. 

On motion, all unfinished busi- 
ness was referred to the next Com- 
mittee. 

The Committee adjourned. 
Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN, 

Secretary. 



POPULATION BY AGE PERIODS, 1930. 

For the United States. " 

Under 1 year, 2,190,791 (1,112,171 males 
and 1,078,620 females) ; under 5 years, 
11,444,390 (5,806,174 males and 5,638,216 
females) ; 5 to 9 years, 12,607,609 (6,381,- 
108 males and 6,226,501 females) ; 10 to 
14 years, 12,004,877 (6,068,777 males and 
5,936,100 females) ; 15 to 19 years, 11,552,- 
115 (5,757,825 males and 5,794,290 fe- 
males) ; 20 to 24 years, 10,870,378 (5,336,- 
815 males and 5,533,563 females) ; 25 to 
29 years, 9,833,608 (4,860,180 males and 
4,973,428 females) ; 30 to 34 years, 9,120,- 
421 (4,561,786 males and 4,558,635 fe- 
males) ; 35 to 44 years, 17,198,840 (8,816,- 
319 males and 8,382,521 females) ; 45 to 
54 years, 13,018,083 (6,803,569 males and 
6,214,514 females) ; 55 to 64 years, 8,396,- 
898 (4,367,500 males and 4,029,398 fe- 
males) ; 65 to 74 years, 4,720,609 (2,409,- 
459 males and 2,311,150 females) ; 75 years 
and over, 1,913,196 (915,752 males and 
997,444 females) ; age unknown, 94,022 
(51,816 males and 42,206 females). 

For New England. 
Under 1 year, 129,208 (65,750 males 
and 63,458 females) ; under 5 years, 6S9,- 
782 (350,581 males and 339,201 females) ; 
5 to 9 years, 768,842 (389,036 males and 
379,806 females) ; 10 to 14 years, 761,595 
(383,610 males and 377,985 females); 15 
to 19 years, 715,562 (355,108 males and 
360,454 females) ; 20 to 24 years, 657,383 
(314,992 males and 342,391 females) ; 25 
to 29 years, 605,870 (290,485 males and 
315,385 females) ; 30 to 34 years, 601,S04 
(291,034 males and 310,770 females) ; 35 
to 44 years, 1,182,S14 (5S7.924 males and 
594,890 females) ; 45 to 54 years, 944,235 
(470,29S males and 473,937 females) ; 55 
to 64 years, 684,005 (335,978 males and 
348,027 females) ; 65 to 74 years, 3SS,150 
(183,736 males and 204,414 females) ; 75 
years and over, 161,140 (69,090 males and 
92,050 females) ; age unknown, 5,159 
(2,785 males and 2,374 females). 

For Massachusetts. 
Under 1 year, 65,034 (33,070 males and 
31,964 females); under 5 years, 319,640 
(177,5-13 males and 172.097 females) ; 5 
to 9 years, 390,657 (197.6SS males and 
192,909 females) ; 10 to 11 years. ;;n7.00;! 
(194.537 males and 192,466 females) ; 15 
to 19 years, 366,149 (1S0.953 males and 



185,196 females) ; 20 to 24 years, 345,573 
(163,089 males and 182,484 females); 25 
to 29 years, 324,135 (153,341 males and 
170,794 females) ; 30 to 34 years, 321,499 
(153,998 males and 167,501 females) ; 35 
to 44 years, 631,445 (310,975 males and 
320,470 females) ; 45 to 54 years, 499,662 
(244,622 males and 255,040 females) ; 55 
to 64 years, 356,608 (171,669 males and 
184,939 females) ; 65 to 74 years, 196,447 
(90,032 males and 106,415 females); 75 
years and over, 77,748 (31,596 males and 
46,152 females) ; age unknown, 3,048 
(1,629 males and 1,419 females). 

For Boston. 

Under 1 year, 11,704 (5,920 males and 
5,784 females) ; under 5 years, 62,374 
(31,568 males and 30,806 females); 5 to 
9 years, 66,229 (33,359 males and 32,870 
females) ; 10 to 14 years, 64,998 (32,359 
males and 32,639 females) ; 15 to 19 years, 
65,965 (32,198 males and 33,767 females) ; 
20 to 24 years, 70,757 (33,057 males and 
37,700 females); 25 to 29 years, 67,585 
(32,814 males and 34,771 females) ; 30 to 
34 years, 62,998 (31,242 males and 31.756 
females) ; 35 to 44 years, 119,508 (60,419 
males and 59,089 females) ; 45 to 54 
years, 93,436 (46,266 males and 47,170 
females); 55 to 64 years, 63,416 (30,671 
males and 32,745 females) ; 65 to 74 
years, 31,722 (14,590 males and 17,132 
females) ; 75 years and over, 10,915 (4,186 
males and 6,729 females) ; age unknown, 
1,285 (725 males and 560 females). 

Number of families in Boston, 180,451 
or 15,666 more than in 1920; popula- 
tion per family, 4.3; families having 
radio sets, 101,273 or 56.1 per cent of 
total. Number of families in Massa- 
chusetts, 1,024,527, an increase of 149,729 
over 1920; population per family, 4/2; 
families having radio sets, 590,105 or 
57.6 per cent of total. 



RECREATION, ADEQUATE AS TO KIND 
AND AVAILABILITY. 

Although the ratio of park acreage to 
population has been used as the simplest 
measure of the extent to which cities 
provide areas for the recreation of their 
people, it is by no means an accurate 
basis for determining this. If most of 
the total acreage is in one large park, if 
the parks are poorly distributed, or if 
they do not provide various types of 
recreation facilities, the park system may 
be inefficient even though the acreage 
is large. The efficiently planned park 
and recreation system will involve 
balanced relationship and well-distributed 
location of several types of properties, 
namely, children's playgrounds, neigh- 
borhood playfield parks, neighborhood 
parks, reservations, boulevards, and park- 
ways. 

(Bureau of Labor Statistics, Publica- 
tion No. 402.) 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE FOR BOSTON. 

Number of children 7-13 years old. 
91,758, of whom 90,347, or 98.5 per cent 
were attending school; 11 and 15 years, 

I, of whom 24,507, or 95.5 pel 
were attending school; 16 and 17 
25,932, of whom 16,912, or 655 per cent, 
were attending school; is to 20 years, 
11,282, o\ whom 10.991, or 26.6 

attending school; total children 7 
to 20 years old, 184,631, of whom l 
or 77.3 per cent, were attending school. 
Number oi persons attending school who 
were 21 years of age and over was 10.966. 



74 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Monday, January 7, 1935. 
First meeting of City Council in 1935 in the 
Council Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m., Coun. 
GALLAGHER, senior member, in the chair. 
Absent, Coun. Tobin. 



ELECTION OF PRESIDENT. 

Coun. GREEN offered the following: 

Ordered, That we now proceed to elect the 
President of the City Council for the year 1935. 

The order was passed. The clerk called the 
roll, each member as his name was called announc- 
ing his choice for President for the ensuing year, 
with the following result: 

For John I. Fitzgerald — Coun. Agnew, Brack- 
man, Doherty, Donovan, Dowd, Englert, Finley, 
Fish, Fitzgerald, Gallagher, Gleason, Coleman, 
Green, Kerrigan, McGrath, Murray, Norton, 
Roberts, Selvitella, Shattuck, Wilson — 21. 

Coun. John I. Fitzgerald was declared elected 
President of the City Council for 1935, and a com- 
mittee consisting of Coun. Green and Agnew es- 
corted him to the chair, amidst applause. 

Coun. DOHERTY — Mr. President, this morn- 
ing while I had occasion to visit the City Hospital 
to see Councilor Tobin, who was operated upon 
Saturday morning for appendicitis, he informed 
me that if he were present at our meeting today 
he would cast his vote for John I. Fitzgerald for 
President. I would like to have that in the 
record. (Applause.) 



ELECTION OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 

.Notice was received from the Board of Election 
Commissioners certifying election of William T. A. 
Fitzgerald of Boston as Register of Deeds for 
County of Suffolk for term of six years. 

The notice was placed on file. 

At this point, in accordance with law, Register 
William T. A. Fitzgerald and his assistant, John J. 
Attridge, were sworn by the President of the 
Council. 

President FITZGERALD at this point an- 
nounced that he was in receipt of bonds of William 
T. A. Fitzgerald as Register and of John J. Attridge 
as Assistant Register that they would perform 
their duties as such faithfully. 

The bonds were approved. 



MAYOR'S ANNUAL ADDRESS. 

President FITZGERALD— The Chair will now 
appoint a committee consisting of Councilors 
Agnew and Roberts to notify his Honor the Mayor 
that the Council is in session and prepared to re- 
ceive his annual message. 

The committee retired, escorted by the City 
Messenger, and presently returned accompanying 
his Honor the Mayor and suite. 

President FITZGERALD— Before his Honor 
the Mayor proceeds to deliver his annual address, 
I desire at this time to extend my sincere thanks to 
my fellow members of the Council who have so 
signally honored me today by electing me to the 
presidency of the City Council. I trust that I will 
carry out the duties thus entrusted to me to the 
satisfaction of all. I extend to you all best wishes 
for a prosperous and happy New Year, and I know 
that we will all work in cooperation with his 
Honor the Mayor for the best interests of our city, 
realizing that we are living in times such as we 
have never experienced before, and that the 
duties placed upon us may be correspondingly 
difficult. (Applause.) 

I notice that we have here in the gathering a 
former mayor of the city, and I will ask Coun- 
cilors Green and Gallagher to escort former Mayor 
Daniel A. Whelton to the chair. 

(The committee performed the duty assigned 
amid applause.) 

President FITZGERALD— It now gives me 
great pleasure to present to the City Council and 
to the department heads, as has been customary 
from the early beginning of our city, his Honor the 
Mayor, to deliver to us his annual address. It 
gives me, therefore, great pleasure to present at 
this time his Honor the Mayor of the City of 
Boston. (Applause.) 

Mayor MANSFIELD— Mr. President and 
members of the Council, heads of departments 
and citizens of Boston: We are slightly ahead of 
our schedule, and I have half a minute to say just 
a word, filling in the time while we are waiting. 
Let me extend to the newly elected President of 
the City Council for 1935 my congratulations, 
bringing to him the greeting of the City of Boston, 
and expressing the wish that this year 1935 may be 
a happy and successful one. (Applause.) 

When I took office as Mayor on January 1, 
1934, three great problems confronted me: 

1. The maintenance and improvement of the 
credit of the city. 

2. The relief of the unemployed. 

3. The task of striving to make Boston once 
again a prosperous city and a better one in which 
to live. 

I am pleased to report that substantial progress 
has been made. 



I have frequently stressed the vital importance 
of maintaining the credit of the city. Money 
must in each year be borrowed in anticipation of 
revenue. If the credit of the city should become 
impaired or collapse, this money could not be 
borrowed. The necessary result of inability to 
borrow in anticipation of revenue would be that 
many municipal services demanded by and im- 
portant to the welfare of the people of Boston 
would have to be curtailed, thousands of city 
employees would be obliged to work without pay 
or their discharge from the city's service would 
become imperative; and the city would find itself 
unable 'properly to care for the poor, the needy 
and the unemployed. The plight of many cities 
in the country today bears testimony to the 
real dangers which attend the impairment of 
municipal credit. 

The borrowing in 1933 of $7,600,000 added 
SI. 800.000 to the city's obligation in 1934 and 
necessarily contributed to an increased tax rate. 
It was obvious that the city could not continue 
borrowing on a short-term basis; that a Federal 
grant could not be relied on in 1934; that the 
cost of materials and supplies, due to a rising 
market, would impose greater burdens on the 
city in 1934 than in 1933; and that further de- 
cline in real estate values would reduce the base 
of the city's main source of revenue. 

The situation, therefore, facing the city in the 
early days of 1934 was grave. 

I was confronted with the necessity of per- 
mitting the imposition of an increased tax rate 
on real estate in 1934 that would have been out 
of all bounds, or of borrowing large sums of money 
as was done in 1933, or of obtaining new sources 
of revenue, or of cutting expenditures. To permit 
an increased tax rate on real estate in 1934 greater 
than was permitted would, I think, have rendered 
the tax in large parts uncollectible — it would have 
further impaired real estate values and it would 
have been most unfair to the home owner and 
would have injured the business of the city. To 
continue borrowing in 1934 on the 1933 scale with 
no likelihood of finding revenue to meet such bor- 
rowings would have spelt disaster. The Legis- 
lature showed no inclination to furnish new sources 
of revenue. The only recourse left to us, therefore, 
was that of curtailing expenses. 

It was possible through the retrenchments made 
in 1934 to cut the gross sum of §2,500,000 from the 
city's operating budget for the year. Many 
factors, however, not under the control of the 
Mayor, including decreased real estate values, 
increased cost of purchases due to the rising 
market, an increase in Boston's debt requirements 
and in its share of the state tax and of the Metro- 
politan District assessment, made it impossible 
to keep the tax rate down. Were it not, however, 
for the savings made in the city's operating budget, 
the tax for 1934 would have been nearer S39 than 
$37, and were it not for these savings and the 
administrative improvements, the credit of the 
city might have been hopelessly impaired with 
the disastrous effects heretofore outlined. As it 
is, Boston's credit has unquestionably improved. 
This improvement is evidenced by the fact that 
Boston has been able to borrow during the year 
1934 at an average rate of interest as low as 1.6 
per cent on loans in anticipation of taxes as com- 
pared with 4.25 per cent in 1933 and at a rate of 
interest as low as 3 per cent on long-term loans. 
The improvements in city administration such as 
the control of expenditures and receipts through 
the new system of budget control, and changes in 
the Public Welfare Department which have been 
inaugurated during the past year, will be of per- 
manent value to the city and its people. 

I wish at this time, however, to discuss with you 
the problems of 1935 and to lay before you some 
of my plans for the coming year and to present to 
you fairly and frankly the serious difficulties with 
which we are now confronted. 

Reduction of the Tax Rate. 

In 1934 the tax rate in the City of Boston was 
$37.10. This rate is attributable to many factors 
some of which I have already indicated. One 
factor, however, cannot be ignored and that is the 
amount expended for relief of the poor, the needy 
and the unemployed. Expenditures for such 
relief amounted in 1928 to less than $2,900,000. 
In 1934 these expenditures exceeded $13,100,000, 
an increase of more than $10,000,000. This in- 
crease represents approximately $6 in the tax rate. 

In 1928, relief expenditures constituted less than 
6 per cent of the operating budget of the city 
(including all school and city requirements except 
debt, pension accumulations and certain special 
items of an insignificant amount). In 1934, relief 
expenditures constituted approximately 35 per 
cent of the operating budget, an increase of almost 
500 per cent over 1928. 

The authority conferred upon the Mayor by 
chapter 121 of the Acts of 1933 to effect pay cuts 
terminated on December 31, 1934. On January 1, 
1935, full pay, therefore, was restored to city 
employees. Salary restorations continued through 
the year will add to the city's burden to the extent 
of about $5,000,000. This represents approxi- 
mately $3 in the tax rate. The East Boston 
Tunnel deficit may be as great as $000,000. If 
this deficit occurs and the state does not assume 
this burden, it must be borne by the city. This 
deficit will represent about 40 cents additional in 
the tax rate. An increase in the state tax upon 
municipalities has been threatened and an estimate 
made that the increase would amount to $2,500,000, 
a sum representing almost $1.50 in the tax rate. 



There is, therefore, a real danger that new burdens 
on the city will increase the tax rate almost $5. 

A 342 tax rate would not only be grossly unfair 
to home owners, would not only seriously interfere 
with business and, therefore, with employment in 
the city, but it would tend to drive home owners 
from the city and thus further reduce real estate 
values. Moreover, it is extremely doubtful that 
such a tax could be collected. It has been the 
experience in Boston and in other cities that 
there is a limit beyond which tax rate increases 
will not produce added revenue. Tax delinquency 
is a growing menace and while every effort must be 
made to collect outstanding taxes, the indications 
are definite that further increases in property 
taxation are likely to produce less revenue rather 
than more. 

An increase in the tax rate for 1935 must be 
avoided, if it is humanly possible, and every effort 
must be made to decrease the rate. We are, 
therefore, faced with the problem of further cur- 
tailing expenditures or of obtaining new and sub- 
stantial sources of revenue. In connection with 
the question of curtailing expenses I wish to point 
out that the operating budget of the city, exclusive 
of welfare expenditures, is now 23 per cent less than 
in 1931. 

The principal items of expenditures in the budget 
are expenditures for salaries and welfare. While 
there are many economies which can and must 
still be practised in city government, yet after 
such economies are put into effect it w r ould require 
a vigorous curtailment in either welfare or salary 
expenditures, or both, to prevent an increase at 
this time in the tax, and a much more drastic cur- 
tailment to reduce the tax. 

Nothing is clearer, however, than that the poor, 
the needy, and the unemployed must be cared for 
and that we cannot curtail the amount needed for 
relief, unless better conditions operate to relieve 
the rolls. While we hope that conditions will 
improve, yet we cannot plan with any reasonable 
degree of assurance that there will be substantially 
lessened relief rolls in the current year, and the 
load will undoubtedly be heavy for many years to 
come. ■ National recovery will probably be slow f 
and gradual. Relief expenditures at the present 
time exceed those of a year ago at this time. 

Curtailment in expenditures for salaries and 
wages can be made in only two ways — suspensions 
from service or reduction in salary. Suspension 
of sufficient employees to effect a reduction in 
the tax rate, or even to prevent an increase, would 
mean the suspension of thousands of employees 
at a time when every effort is being made by the 
Federal Government to stimulate employment 
and would require the elimination of many serv- 
ices of great benefit to the community. Ulti- 
mately such action would be most costly. 

General reductions in the salaries of city em- 
ployees are, in my opinion, sound only as a last 
resort, unless city employees are being paid a 
higher salary than the work they are performing 
calls for during the period of performance. I 
do not believe that city employees are as a rule 
paid such excessive salary. If they render faithful 
service, they should not be reduced in pay, unless 
it is impossible for the city to pay them their 
full wage. The times are against such reductions 
and costs of living do not justify it. In 1934 it 
was impossible to obtain new sources of revenue. 
Salary reductions initiated in April, 1933, were 
therefore necessary in 1934. I trust that con- 
ditions which made this necessary will not prevail 
in 1935. 

I do not mean to indicate that reasonable econ- 
omies should not be practised. They must. 
But without drastic curtailments in one way or 
another of salaries, or wholesale suspensions and 
eliminations of important municipal services, 
such economies cannot prevent an increased 
tax rate, unless new sources of revenue can be 
found. I shall, therefore, petition the Legislature 
for relief by providing such new sources of revenue. 

Massachusetts has done little to aid the munic- 
ipalities to bear the tremendous welfare load 
cast upon them. It is my purpose to ask the 
Legislature to grant to the cities and towns of the 
Commonwealth a sum equal to two thirds of the 
increase in the welfare expenditures of the year 
1934 over the expenditures of the year 1928, 
this money to be raised by the Commonwealth 
by borrowing. That increase amounted to 
$38,000,000. Two thirds of that would be, 
roughly, $25,000,000. 

To meet its loan the Commonwealth must 
ultimately assess the annual payments thereon 
to the cities and towns, unless some other source 
of payment is provided. It is, therefore, essential 
that new revenue be found from which to meet 
these loans. Such new revenue should be sufficient 
to enable the cities and towns to lessen the ex- 
cessive burden of property taxes which must 
otherwise be imposed by them to meet welfare 
costs in succeeding years, and to retire debts created 
because of welfare needs. An increased income 
tax alone will not, at least in these times, furnish 
adequate relief, — since under our Constitution 
it cannot be graduated. There is, I believe, only 
one form of tax which would be adequate for 
present needs and that is a tax on retail sales. 
Such a tax has been enacted and is now in effect, 
in one form or other, in approximately one half 
of the states of the Union. I propose, therefore, 
to ask the Legislature to follow the precedent 
these states have set and to enact a 2 per cent 
retail sales tax for a period of five years. This 
will spread the burden of taxation so that it will, 
not be too great on anyone. I shall, however, 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



7 5 



ask for exemptions with respect to sales of food, 
drugs and medicines, water delivered in pipes, 
newspapers, magazines selling for 5 cents or less, — ■ 
and gasolene and liquor which are already taxed. 
I do not believe that in these times even a 2 per 
cent tax should be imposed on the sale of food. 
While these exemptions may create some diffi- 
culties in administration which would not other- 
wise be present and while they will decrease the 
revenue attainable from what has been estimated 
to be $20,000,000 to approximately §12,000,000 
the exemptions appear justified. To meet the 
loss in revenue thus resulting, but needed, I shall 
recommend to the Legislature an additional 
income tax upon 1934 and 1935 incomes of 3 
per cent on interest and dividends, of three-quar- 
ters of 1 per cent on annuities and -taxable earned 
income and of 1J per cent on gains from sales 
of securities. The loss of possible revenue re- 
sulting from the exemption of food will thus be 
met in the year 1935 and 1936, when the strain 
on municipalities will probably be greatest, from 
the revenue which such additional income tax 
will produce. 

A term of two years only will be recommended 
for the additional income tax because of the danger 
that a longer term may induce residents of the 
state to change their domicile to neighboring states 
where no income tax laws are in force or may cause 
persons to invest more heavily than otherwise in 
tax-exempt securities, thus injuring business with- 
out increasing revenue. I do not believe that a 
two-year additional tax would have this possible 
effect and there is a precedent for such a tax in 
the years 1918 and 1919. 

If this program is enacted by the Legislature 
we will be enabled not only to avoid an increase 
in the 1935 tax rate but we will be able to effect 
an appreciable reduction in the present rate of 
S37.10. Without such assistance our position in 
1935 will be far more serious than in 1934. 

Consolidation. 

The Legislature at last year's session authorized 
the City Council and the Mayor acting jointly to 
consolidate and reorganize the departments of 
the city. There are at the present time forty-six 
separate departments in the City Government 
and 135 department heads. Many of these de- 
partments perform similar functions and yet, be- 
cause of the multiplicity of departments, many 
improvements in one department are unknown 
to others and much of the benefit of the experi- 
ences of one department is lost to other depart- 
ments performing similar functions. This system 
is antiquated and inadequate. There are ten 
executive departments in Washington; there are 
twenty in the Commonwealth. Many large cities 
operate with from five to fifteen departments. 
It is obvious that a consolidation of departments 
is essential for the proper and efficient adminis- 
tration of city affairs. 

Shortly after the enactment of legislation author- 
izing such consolidation, a detailed study of the 
possibilities for a plan of consolidation was com- 
menced. President Compton of the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, at my request, 
designated a committee headed by Col. Robert 
C. Eddy, a member of the faculty of that institu- 
tion, to study the engineering depantments of the 
city. This study has not yet been completed but 
I am advised that it will be finished in the near 
future. A committee of eminent members of the 
medical profession, headed by Dr. Joseph P. 
Hqwland, superintendent of the Peter Bent 
Brigham Hospital, have, at my request, studied 
the functions of the Health, Hospital and Insti- 
tutions Departments. 

Housing. 
The Federal Government has definitely com- 
menced a program for the clearance of depreciated 
areas and construction thereon of low-cost housing. 
This program has two main values. First, it will, 
as soon as it can get more fully under way, supply 
substantial employment in a field where private 
enterprise is unlikely to take action. It should, 
therefore, stimulate employment and activity in 
the building trades without competing with private 
business. Second, if properly executed, it will 
not only reclaim areas which are a social handicap 
to the community, which are costly charges upon 
municipal government, and which tend to breed 
disease and crime, but it will make available to 
persons of low income decent living conditions at 
low cost. 

A survey of the possibilities for such a program 
in Boston has been made and it is apparent there- 
from that large amouuts can be expended on such 
work if the Federal Government is willing to 
undertake it. One such project is already, being 
developed in Boston. 

As a part of its housing program, the Federal 
Government contemplates that local housing 
authorities be established in each community 
where housing projects are carried on, such hous- 
ing authority, when established, to take over the 
construction and operation of the project with 
Federal aid. The obligations of the authority 
will not be municipal obligations. 

To cooperate with the Federal Government in 
its program to endeavor to increase opportunities 
for employment and to secure for persons of low 
income in Boston the benefits of such a plan. 1 
propose to petition the Legislature to permit the 
establishment in the cities and towns of the Com- 
monwealth of such local housing authorities and, 
if such permission is given, to recommend to you 
the establishment of such an authority in Boston. 



Public Works and Work Relief. 

President Roosevelt in his recent message to 
Congress has indicated that the burden of caring 
for the needy who are unemployable must rest 
upon the local governments, not upon the Federal 
Government. In Boston this burden has always 
rested upon the city and the decision that it must 
continue so to rest will in no way effect a local 
change. The President has further indicated that 
the problem of caring for persons who are needy 
but employable is national in scope, that such 
persons must be cared for by the Federal Govern- 
ment, that the care should be in the form of work 
relief rather than the dole and that the relief should 
be conducted through a program of public works, 
the Federal Emergency Relief Administration to 
be abolished. 

The extent to which local governments are to 
be requested to contribute to this program has 
not been indicated. 

At the present time there is a program in opera- 
tion in Boston which involves the expenditure of 
more than $7,000,000. The largest part of this 
program still remains to be completed. 

Until Federal plans develop further it is im- 
possible to predict either what the Federal Govern- 
ment may expect the municipalities to do or what 
Boston can do. 

It is my purpose, however, to secure for the 
employment of residents of Boston a fair and 
adequate share of all Federal funds granted for 
relief purposes. Through my repeated efforts 
more than 15,000 Boston residents heretofore un- 
employed are now employed on E. R. A. projects 
and new projects will provide for the employment 
of 7,000 more. So long as the Federal Emergency 
Relief Administration continues to operate I shall 
do all in my power to have formulated, and to 
supply materials, for projects adequate to provide 
work for all persons that the funds provided will 
employ. It is my purpose to see to it that these 
projects will be of real value to the city. 

Port of Boston. 

In 1933 the Supreme Court of the United States 
by a five to four decision determined that a port 
was not a "locality" within the meaning of that 
term in section 3 of the Interstate Commerce Act 
which forbade undue preference for and undue 
discrimination against localities. The effect of 
this decision has been greatly to limit the ability 
of the city and of the Boston Port Authority to 
oppose discriminations against the Port of Bostonl 

I shall cause to be introduced in Congress 
within the next few days a bill to change the 
Interstate Commerce Act so that ports will be 
protected. If and when this change is made, I 
shall do all in my power to eliminate unfair prac- 
tices at other ports which practices are injurious 
to the Port of Boston. I shall in addition en- 
deavor to upset the control of the New England 
railroads by the Pennsylvania Railroad and shall 
strive to secure local control of New England 
roads or in the event of national consolidation of 
railroads, a consolidation that will be favorable 
to Boston and New England to the end that the 
Port of Boston may become a thriving and flourish- 
ing port and receive the full benefit of its natural 
advantages. 

County Government. 
Last year I urged upon the Legislature the ap- 
pointment of a recess committee to study county 
government and to make recommendations with 
reference thereto. This request was denied. A 
careful study of county government in Massachu- 
setts may well disclose it to be outworn, expensive 
and unnecessary machinery which should be 
abandoned. Even if retained, many improve- 
ments can undoubtedly be made. I propose, 
therefore, to make again this year a request for 
legislative consideration of this matter and to give 
immediate attention to the problem presented. 

Metropolitan Boston. 

There are more than forty cities and towns, each 
with separate governments, comprising what is 
popularly known as Greater Boston. The waste 
and inefficiency of so many separate units of 
government in so relatively small a territory is 
obvious. Yet repeated efforts to combine these 
cities and towns into one unit has always met with 
defeat. 

It is not my desire to attempt to coerce other 
cities and towns into a union with Boston and 
that such a union is desirable has not been estab- 
lished beyond doubt. But there are so many 
considerations in favor of such a union and so 
many indications of mutual benefit to Boston and 
those cities and towns that I shall ask the Legis- 
lature to appoint a body to examine fully into the 
question and report its conclusions with recom- 
mendations, if any, for legislation. 

Summary. 

In substance it is my purpose to continue to 
improve tho credit of the city and of its adminis- 
trative machinery, to cooperate in all reasonable 
plans for securing employment for the unemplo] ed 
and national recovery, to build up the Tort of 
Host en, and < i prove the conditions of our city. 

In departing, I repeat what 1 s:iid just before 1 
began, Mr. President, that I wish to you and to 
the members of the Council a very happy and 
congenial time in VXi'i. ( V p | ■ I 

The Mayor began his address a( 2.30 p. m. and 
ended at 3 p. m., after which he and his suite left 
the Council Chamber. 



President FITZGERALD— The Council will 
be in order. Communications from his Honor the 

Mayor. 



TEMPORARY LOAN IN ANTICIPATION 
OF TAXES. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 7, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with the established 
practice of introducing at the first meeting of the 
Council in each -year an order authorizing the 
borrowing from time to time during the year of 
temporary loans in anticipation of taxes, I submit 
herewith an order authorizing the City Treasurer 
to issue and sell during the current financial year 
temporary notes or certificates of indebtedness of 
the city to the amount of $40,000,000. This 
amount is §12,500,000 less than the total author- 
ized by the City Council for the year 1934. 

I respectfully recommend the adoption of this 
order by your honorable body. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Ordered, That to provide temporarily money 
to meet the appropriations for the financial year 
1935, the City Treasurer issue and sell, at such 
time and in such amounts as he may deem best, 
t notes or certificates of indebtedness of the City 
of Boston not exceeding $40,000,000 in the total, 
in anticipation of the taxes of the current munici- 
pal year; that all such notes or certificates of 
indebtedness be dated the day the money for the 
same is received, be made payable with the in- 
terest thereon within one year of their date, and 
bear interest from their date until the same are 
made payable at such rate as the City Auditor, 
the City Treasurer, and the Mavor may determine. 

Coun. McGRATH— Mr. President, I move 
suspension of the rule and passage of the order 
transmitted to us by his Honor the Mayor, as 
it must have two readings and we will have time 
to look it over before final action. 

The rule was suspended and the order was given 
its first reading and passage, yeas 19, nays 0. 



APPOINTMENTS BY THE MAYOR. 

Subject to confirmation by the Council, the 
Mayor submitted the following appointments, viz.: 

Weighers of Coal: Alice Bennett, 26 Worcester 
square, Boston; Benjamin Waldman, 33 Almont 
street, Mattapan; Rose Pritzker, 105 Townsend 
street, Roxbury. 

Weigher of Goods and Inspector of Pressed 
and Bundled Hay and Straw: John Lydon, 20 
Essex street, Charlestown. 

Severally laid over a week under the law. 



APPROPRIATION FOR MUNICIPAL EM- 
PLOYMENT BUREAU. 

The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mavor, January 2, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I am advised by the Director of 
the Municipal Employment Bureau that funds 
available for the operation of the bureau arc 
completely exhausted, and that an additional 
appropriation should be made at this time to 
permit the carrying on of the activities of the , 
bureau. According to an estimate prepared 
by the director, an appropriation of $15,000 will 
be required to cover the work of the bureau for 
a full year. Of this amount $12,000 will be re- 
quired to meet pay roll requirements, and the 
balance for stationery, postage, office equipment, 
advertising, and motor vehicle expenses. In 
my opinion the activities of the bureau should 
be continued for another year, especially in view 
of the reduced cost at which the work is now 
being carried on. I, therefore, submit herewith 
an order providing for the appropriation of $15,000. 
rmd respectfully recommend its adoption by your 
honorable body- 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor, 

Ordered. That the sum of $15.0 id hereby 

i". appropriated, to be expended by the Municipal 
Employment Bureau, under the direction of the 
Mayor, in the prosecution of its duties, said sum 
to be charged to the Reserve Fund, when made. 

Referred to Executive Committee, when ap- 
pointed. 



BIRD STREET GRADE CROSSING 

The following was received: 

City of Boston. 
Office of the Mayor. January I l 

To the City Council 

Gentlemen. I herewith transmit A letter from 
the Commissioner of Public Work", rel 

your order of December :;. 1934, concert 

elimination of Bird street gradl 
Chester. 

pectfuily, 

FrbDBRICK \V. M w.ikiei.p. M.i;. 



76 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



City of Boston, 
Public Works Department, January 2, 1935. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary, Mayor's Office. 

Dear Sir, — I beg leave to acknowledge your note 
of December 15, 1934, with attached order of 
City Council dated December 3, 1934, and reading 
as follows: 

"Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the Mayor, 
to negotiate with the engineers of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad to jointly prepare 
plans for the elimination of the Bird street grade 
crossing in Dorchester, which is a great hazard; 
the said plans could then be presented to the 
Federal authorities as a public works administra- 
tion project," 

and to state that in a conference with representa- 
tives of the New York, New Haven & Hartford 
Railroad said representatives while of the opinion 
that the abolition of the grade crossing would be a 
benefit to the community they do not see how the 
railroad at this time could find the money to con- 
tribute towards the expense of the abolition of this 
crossing, and is of the opinion that the Interstate 
Commerce Commission would not approve the 
expenditure of the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad's money for this purpose 
owing to the financial condition of said railroad; 
consequently, the entire expense, if started at this 
time, would have to be borne by the City of 
Boston. 

Under chapter 417, section 1, of the Acts of 
1930, the Department of Public Works is author- 
ized to submit a list of proposed abolition of grade 
crossings to the Public Utilities Commission. 
This list must be submitted on October 1 of any 
year. The Utilities Commission then holds hear- 
ings and may authorize the abolition of the grade 
crossing and distribute the cost among the state, 
city, county and the railroad. 

To avoid the City of Boston bearing the entire 
expense I respectfully suggest that the Honorable 
Ma*yor petition the Department of Public Works, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to include in 
its October 1, 1935, list the abolition of the Bird 
street grade crossing. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Placed on file. 



INSTALLATION OF SAND BOXES. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 5, 1935. 

To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Commissioner of Public Works, relative to 
your order of December 3, 1934, concerning the 
installation of sand boxes at the junction of Wash- 
ington street and the West Roxbury Parkway, 
Ward 20, for sanding the incline when the surface 
becomes icy and slippery during the winter season. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 



City of Boston, 

Public Works Department, December 31 ; 1934. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary, Mayor's Office. 

Dear Sir, — I beg leave to acknowledge your note 
of December 15, with attached order of City 
Council dated December 3, and reading as follows: 

"Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the Mayor, 
to install sand boxes at the junction of Washington 
street and the West Roxbury Parkway, Ward 20, 
said sand to be used on the Washington street 
incline at this point, to eliminate the hazard of 
serious automobile accidents when the surface 
becomes icy and slippery during the winter season," 
and to state that Washington street, West Roxbury 
Parkway to the Dedham line, is a state highway 
and consequently comes under the maintenance 
of the Department of Public Works, Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, 

Contact has been made with said department 
and they assure us that they will take care of the 
sanding on this nighway during the winter season. 
Respectfully yours, 
C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Placed on file. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 
The following petitions were received and re- 
ferred to the committees named, viz.: 

Claims. 

Elizabeth Ann Bosfield, for compensation for 
injuries caused by revolving doors at City Hall. 

Burgess Express Company, Inc., for com- 
pensation for damage to truck by city car. 

Peter Candakes, for refund on fruit license. 

Theresa Carpenalla, for compensation for in- 
juries received on ferryboat. 

Jacob Charles, for compensation for damage to 
car caused by an alleged defect in Seaver street. 

Elizabeth A. Clayton, for compensation for 
damage to car by city truck. 



James D. Colbert, for compensation for damage 
to car caused by an alleged defect at 738 Atlantic 
avenue. 

Frank Corigliano, for compensation for damage 
to property at 59 East Springfield street, caused by 
falling tree. 

Johnson-Collins Company, for compensation for 
damage to car by fire apparatus. 

Nathan Krantz, for compensation for damage to 
car by city truck. 

Sara M. Krauth, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect in Hawley street. 

Louis Lipsky, for compensation for damage to 
property by city car. 

Patrick Saraceno, to change seven-day malt 
license to six-day malt license. 

Arthur W. Sims, for compensation for damage to 
car by city truck. 

Jacob Sorojko, for compensation for damage to 
property by city truck. 

Pasquale Stanziani, for compensation for damage 
to property at 2993 Washington street, caused by 
bursting of water pipe. 

Way Leather Company, Inc., for compensa- 
tion for damages to car by car of Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Kerkor Zakonan. for refund on refuse tickets. 



WAGE REDUCTIONS BY E. R. A. 
Coun. DOWD offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor interview 
the Federal Administrator of the E. R. A. in 
Massachusetts in an effort to stop wage reductions 
this week. 

Coun. DOWD — Mr. President, while I realize 
that we have no authority in so far as E. R. A. is 
concerned, it seems rather unnatural, when the 
governors of the states and the mayors of cities 
are doing their best to keep wages up in order to 
help relieve the present situation, those in authority 
should take it upon themselves to reduce pay. I 
understand that orders have been issued by Federal 
Administrator Rotch to the timekeepers, in the 
case of 300 or 400 men, to reduce their wages from 
$18 to $14.40 a week. As a matter of fact, these 
men would be better off on Welfare, rather than 
obtaining starvation wages. I wonder what 
would happen to the City Council if all city laborers 
of the City of Boston from now on were to receive 
only $18 a week. The fact is that these social 
service operators don't know what it is to be 
hungry. I presume that some of them can go to 
the Copley-Plaza and spend $20 or $25 for a dinner, 
and then say to the men and women of the City 
of Boston, "If we give you $12 or $14 a week, that 
will be sufficient." But I don't think it was the 
intention of the Federal Government or of President 
Roosevelt to say to people, "You must work for 
$12 a week." I say that a man like Mr. Rotch 
should use a little better judgment than to treat 
these men and women in this way. As I say, 
however, I suppose some of these men have not 



in their own lives experienced the troubles that 
the ordinary man has in getting along. I think 
it would be illuminating to many people to go 
around to the E. R. A. offices and see men coming 
up in Packards and Cadillacs, while these poor 
fellows are told that they should get only $12 or 
$14 a week. I say that in many respects the 
E. R. A. has been a great benefit to the country 
and to the state, but that it has been grossly 
mismanaged in the State of Massachusetts. I feel 
that if there is to be any money spent in this way 
in Massachusetts it should be spent by those 
representing the people, by those who know 
something of the problems of the everyday people, 
who can feel the common pulse and heart throbs of 
the people of Boston and of other parts of the 
state. I say to you, Mr. President, that the E. R. A. 
money allotted by the Federal Government to 
Massachusetts should be handled by the Governor 
of Massachusetts. There are only three states, I 
understand, that do not have that authority 
placed in the hands of the Governor, and he 
should have it here. I trust that the Mayor will 
confer with Mr. Rotch to see if something cannot 
be done to prevent the E. R.' A. cuts going into 
effect this week. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

Coun. KERRIGAN submitted an order for 
payment of aid to soldiers and sailors and their 
families in the City of Boston for the month of 
January, 1935. 

Order passed under suspension of the rule. 



OPEN-AIR PARKING SPACE LICENSES. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 5. 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Board of Street Commissioners, relative to 
your order of December 17, 1934, for information 
concerning open-air parking space licenses. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 



Boston, January 2, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of the City of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — Inclosed please find copy of City 
Council order requesting information concerning 
open-air parking space licenses, together with 
your request for report on same. In accordance 
with the order the specific information on each 
license is stated. 

Respectfully, 
Owen A. Gallagher, Chairman. 



Name. 



Albert Wingersky 

Connolly's Garage '. 

Alfred M. Greenhood 

Mount Auburn Renting Service 

Ray S. Spencer 

Richard Keenan, "Trustee". . . . 

Ball Parking Company 

Harry H. Levine 

John A. O'Connell 

First National Bank. 

Clifford NeweU 

Tremont Auto Park 

Brewster Doggett 

Geni Firrero 

James Worthen 

Merrimac Park space 

Colonial-Beacon Oil 

Chardon Auto Park 

Symphony Auto Park 

W. T. Van Nostrand 

William Lyndon 



5,150 

10,000 

7,000 

30,000 

2,000 

4,000 

12,000 

15,000 

10,000 

4,000 

10,000 

10,000 

6,000 

1,000 

15,000 

9,883 

7,170 

4,500 

9,500 

15,000 

5,000 



Address. 



52-58 La Grange st. . . 
163 Chestnut Hill ave 

200 Cambridge st 

427 Tremont st 

86 Nashua st 

281 Tremont st 

4-6 Congress st 

130 Leverett st 

332 Chestnut Hill ave 

10-16 Staniford st 

344 Atlantic ave 

371 Tremont st 

29-35 Common st . . . . 

1 9 Webber st 

Lovejoy pi 

Corner Portland st. . . . 

35 Eliot st 

86 and 88 Chardon st. 

37 Westland ave 

30-40 Alfordst 

257 South st., City . . . 






50 

50 
200 
10 
25 
75 
75 
50 
25 
50 
50 
50 
5 
75 
50 
50 
25 
50 
75 
40 



■go 

O 



$30 
40 
40 

100 
20 
30 
50 
50 
40 
30 
40 
40 
40 
10 
50 
40 
40 
30 
40 
50 
30 



1934 
1933 
1934 
1932 
1931 
1931 
1934 
1932 
1931 
1934 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1933 
1931 
1931 
1932 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



77 



Name. 



A. ,T. Bernian 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Publix Oil Company 

Standard Oil Company 

Standard Oil Company 

Standard Oil Company 

Standard Oil Company 

Boylston Street Land Company 

Rosie Resha 

Shiben Besha 

Minnie Levin 

G. B. Simon 

Patrick F. Murphy. . . 

Z. D'Alossio 

Z. D'Alossio 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

General Trading Co 

Charles H. Newton 

Standard Oil Company 

Van Ness Parking Co 

Janette Couris 

W. ,T. Connell 

Charles II. Newton 

( lharles II. Nowton 

A. A. Seagraves 

K. Soloman 

Charles King 

Standard Oil Company 

William F. Greene 

George G. O'Brien 



Address. 



2,000 

4,000 

8,500 

5,000 

31,412 

130,000 

16,000 

3,500 

4,500 

10,400 

15,000 

5,000 

5,000 

10,800 

4,000 

5,000 

5,000 

4,000 

5,000 

2,000 

3,478 

1,000 

5,000 

25,000 

5,000 

5,000 

23,259 

3,600 

2,000 

5,000 

15,000 

2,500 

3,000 

15,000 

120,000 

10,000 

8,558 

2,000 

14.000 

10,000 

2,000 

98,418 

5,000 

34,000 

34,810 

15,000 

10,000 

10,000 

32,639 

7,500 

15,000 

3,000 

9,000 

6,048 





to 


to 

So 


o 

fe 


J5 


i"s 




55 


!*-< 



S3 



4-5-6 Hersey pi 

110 Federal st 

474 Atlantic ave 

436 Atlantic ave 

421 Stuart st 

319 Stuart st 

15 Broadway 

146 Portland st 

137 Beach St.. 

59-65 Scollay sq 

174-178 Congress st 

75 India st 

181-185 Franklin st 

29-37 Pemberton sq 

270 Columbus ave 

1301 Boylston st 

55 Dorchester ave 

586 Commercial st 

87 Jersey st 

16 Nashua st 

8-10 Pitts st 

244 Humboldt ave 

238 St. Botolphst 

20 Washington st., Brighton . . 

10-18 Atlantic ave 

42 Eastern ave 

210-212 Columbus ave 

36-40 Nashua st 

1-3 Ashburton pi 

92-98 Bowdoin St., City 

80 High st 

8 Avery pi 

73-77 Beach st 

90 Beach st 

185 Berkeley st 

240 Stuart st 

120-130 Stuart st 

150 Stuart st 

340 Tremont st 

48 Trinity pi 

99-105 Warrenton st 

95 Brookline ave 

983-991 Massachusetts ave. . . 

30 Van Ness st 

20 Van Ness st 

117 Brookline ave 

270 Babcock st 

615 Newbury st 

55 Jersey st 

30 Curve st 

14 Fargo st 

263 Hover st 

977 Commonwealth ave 

1325 Boylston st 



10 


20 


25 


30 


50 


40 


25 


30 


200 


100 


500 


250 


100 


75 


25 


30 


25 


30 


75 


50 


75 


50 


25 


30 


25 


30 


75 


50 


25 


30 


25 


30 


25 


30 


25 


30 


25 


30 


10 


20 


25 


30 


5 


10 


25 


$30 


200 


100 


25 


30 


25 


30 


200 


100 


25 


30 


10 


20 


25 


30 


75 


50 


25 


30 


25 


30 


75 


50 


500 


250 


50 


40 


50 


40 


10 


20 


75 


50 


50 


40 


10 


20 


100 


75 


25 


30 


75 


50 


75 


50 


75 


50 


75 


50 


75 


GO 


7"> 


50 


50 


40 


75 


50 


25 


30 


50 


40 


50 


in 



1931 
1933 
1932 
1931 
1931 
1933 
1934 
1932 
1933 
1931 
1932 
1932 
1932 
1931 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1931 
1931 
1934 
1933 
1933 
1932 
1934 
1934 
1934 
1932 
1932 
1931 
1931 
1932 
1932 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1933 
1932 
1931 
1931 
1931 
1934 
1934 
1931 
1931 
1034 
1931 
L033 
L932 
i g 1 1 
1934 
1934 
1931 
L934 



CERTIFICATION OF STATE APPOINT- 
MENTS. 

Communications were received from F W. 
Cook, Secretary of the Commonwealth, certifying 
to following appointments December 27, 1934, viz.: 

Joseph J. Leonard of Boston, Police Commis- 
sioner, for the term of five f years. 

Jacob J. Kaplan, member of Finance Com- 
mission, for remainder of five-year term, ending 
August 18, 1935. 

Edwin D. Gallagher of Boston, member of 
Licensing Board, for term of six years, ending on 
first Monday in June, 1940. 

Severally placed on file. 



NOTICES FROM ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 

Notices were received from the Assessing De- 
partment of the following appointments: 

George D. Leavitt, Frank A. Duggan. Paul W. 
Halloran, John F. Maher, Thomas B. Fitzpatrick, 
Cesare L. Paraboschi, salary 81,700 per annum, 
effective January 1, 1935. 

Herbert A. Ellis, 20 Moss Hill road, Jamaica 
Plain, First Assistant Assessor, salary 81,700 per 
annum, effective January 2, 1935. 

Severally placed on file. 



TRACK LOCATION. 

Notice was received from the Board of Si net 
Commissioners of track location (87tM to Boston 
Elevated Railway Company, double (rack, in 
Hyde Park avenue. 

Placed on file. 



JURORS DRAWN. 

Jurors were drawn under the law, Coun. 
ROBERTS presiding at the box in the absence 
of the Mayor, as follows: 

Twenty traverse jurors, Superior Criminal Court, 
Second Session, to appear February 4, 1935: 

William H. Sexton, Ward 1; James E. Dullahan. 
Ward 3; Joseph H. O'Keefe, Ward 3; Walter C. 
Blasser, Ward 4; II. Daland Chandler. Ward 5; 
Charles F. Remington. Ward 5; William C. Gould, 
Jr., Ward 10; Charles D. McQuaid, Ward 10; 
Lewis Alward, Ward 12; John J. O'Donnell. Ward 
13; Francis J. McGovern, Ward 14; John J. Rilev, 
Jr., Ward 16; John J. Ryan, Ward 16; Carl S. 
Aldrich, Ward 17; Friend L. Brown, Ward 17; 
Joseph G. Fletcher, Ward 19; James S. Rvan, 
Ward 19; Stephen J. Lent. Ward 20; Clifford E. 
Taylor, Ward 21; L. Michael Curley, Ward 22. 

Twenty-six traverse jurors, Superior Criminal 
Court, Third Session, to appear February 1 1 . 1935: 

John A. Barry, Ward 2; William Moschella, 
Ward 3; Robert E. Smith, Ward 0; Walter .1. 
Burns, Ward S; Augustus A. Fay, Ward 8; Andrew 
C. Valley, Ward 9; John T. Eldraeher, Ward 10; 
Christopher S. Maloncy, Ward 10; Frederick C. 
Matthies, Jr., Ward 10; Laurence H. Fitzpatrick, 
Ward 11; Thomas I. Funis, Ward 12; .lames A. 
O'Connell, Ward 12; John .1. Powers. Ward 13; 
Michael L. Conroy, Ward 15; Roger F. McManus, 
Ward 15; Elmer L. Young, Ward 16; Everetl I 
MacKenzic. Ward 17; Charles W. Robinson, Ward 
17; Ernest H. Shortwell, Ward 17; Earl S. Palmer, 
Ward 17; Thomas .1. Collins, Ward 19; Douglas 
G. Wood, Ward 19; John E. Doherty, Ward 20; 
William H. O'Brien, Ward 21 ; Jeremiah R. i I'Neil, 
Ward 21: Edgar S. Finch. Ward 21. 

Twenty-nine traverse jurors. Superior Crimina 
Court, Fourth Session, to appear February 4, 
1935 

Egidio Galluccua, Ward 1 ; Edmund Days Jones. 
Ward 1; Edward F. Lynch, Ward I: Patrick J. 
O'Brien, Ward I; Charles II. Smith. Ward I: 
John E. Liddell, Ward I; ( ieorge J. 
Ward 4; William .1. Weare. Ward 7: Frank A. 
Murphy, Ward S; John .1. Sheran, Ward S; 
Walter F. Duggan, Ward 10; John F. Herlihy, 
Ward 10; Adam I,. Riemer, Ward 10; John VV. 
Gonlin, Ward i": Herberl J. Fogarty, Ward 12: 
Thomas P. Smallcomb, Ward 12; Edgar 1 
Ward 12; Maurice G erst ein, Ward it: Fi 
M. Sturnick, Wind II; Harrison R. Norton. 
Win,! 16; Henry I'. Lahey, Ward 17; Francis W. 
Mahoney, Ward 17; Paul .1 Weber. Ward 17; 
Henry V. Beyer, Ward 18; llberl r. Lawrence, 
Ward is; Joseph P, Lynch, Ward IS; Frederick J. 

cer, Ward 18; William Lichenstein, V 
Byron M. Goodenough, Ward 22. 

Twenty-nine traverse jurors, Superior Criminal 
Court, Fifth Session, to appear February t. 1935; 

Peter F. Judge, Ward l : Edward Long, Ward I : 
Klvillc II. Gray, V Ion, Ward 5; 

Arthur T. Haoen, Ward 5; William W. Ormsbce, 
Ward 5: Harold T. Mi Oarthy, Ward 6; 
Ryan, Word 7; James M. Ilcndrirken, Word 8; 
Dennis War, I 9; Michael J. ransoy, 

Ward-9; Edward H. Gilligan, Ward 10; Arthur F. 
Mueller. W aid Hi; Mori i ' ird 10; 

E. Martin, Ward 12: Harrj 5 

Ward I I; rlnll|> Calhuid. 'V 

Duncklee, Ward 16; Jack Arthur \ 

John Sidney W hidden. Ward 17: 
Joseph A. Gleason, Ward 3 Saunders 

Word is; Rudolph F. Dunkcl, Ward 2 



78 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



Leland, Ward 20; George W. Blacklock, Ward 21; 
Francis G. Cusack, Ward 22; Maurice H. Gerrits, 
Ward 22; James E. McNulty, Ward 22; John D. 
Morrison, Ward 22. 

Twenty-four traverse jurors, Superior Civil 
Court, First Session, January Sitting, to appear 
February 4, 1935: 

Arthur J. Foster, Ward 1; Maurice T. O'Brien, 
Ward 1; John F. Donnelly, Ward 2; Harry Glenn, 
Ward 2; Charles A. Foster, Ward 3; John H. 
Noonan, Ward 3: James P. Moroney, Ward 7; 
George E. Callahan, Ward 8; Joseph Corcoran, 
Ward 10; William V. Bell. Ward 11; James M. 
O'Brien, Ward 11; Robert C. Tate, Ward 11; 
Charles A. Nichols, Ward 15; James R. Hilson, 
Ward 16; Frank R. Thompson, Ward 16; Harry D. 
Lockhart, Jr., Ward 18; Bernard W. Schlichting, 
Ward 18; Louis F. Gebhardt, Ward 19; Fred 
DeYere Laffoley, Ward 19; Andrew Sullivan, Ward 
19; Edward J. Oilman. Ward 20; Patrick J. 
Glvnn, Ward 20; Barnard F. Long, Ward 22; 
Andrew R. Scott, Ward 22. 

Twenty-two traverse jurors, Superior Civil 
Court, Third Session, January Sitting, to appear 
February 4, 1935: 

Maurice Drinan, Ward 2; Joseph Morrissey, 
"Ward 2; Frederick E. Rochnig, Ward 2; Michael 
Giarle. Ward 3; Ronald J. McDonald, Ward 7; 
Henry D. Fisher, Ward 9; Melvin Cole Masse, 
Ward 10; William G. Cass, Ward 11; Hachig 
Sarkesian, Ward 11; William Callman, Ward 14; 
Morris H. Cohen. Ward 14; Walter J. Ford, 
Ward 16; Arthur L. Bridgham, Ward 17; Daniel 
Joseph Hagerty, Ward 17; Thomas W. Gamble, 
Ward 18; Edward F. Goff, Ward IS; Leonard W. 
Hannett, Ward 18; William R. Duff, Ward 19; 
John A. Gillis, Ward 19; Frank A. Kraft, Ward 19; 
August Runge, Ward 19; John T. Waters, Ward 20. 

Nineteen traverse jurors. Superior Civil Court, 
Fourth Session, January Sitting, to appear Feb- 
ruary 4, 1935: 
* Uriel White. Ward 1; Joseph T. Lvnch, Ward 
2; Hugh F. Wallace. Ward 2; Richard J. Haley. 
Ward 4; Roy T. Foisey, Ward 5; Jeremiah F. 
McCarthy, Ward 6; John J. Kenney, Ward 9; 
John E. Nelson, Ward 12; Joseph H. Ward, Ward 
12; Walter G. Jones, Ward 13; David B. Johnson, 
Ward 15; Roy O. Bishop, Ward 16; Charles J. 
McMorrow, Ward 16; David W. Ross. Ward 16; 
William Goldberg. Ward 18; John J. Waite, Ward 
18; Dwmht S. Bentley, Ward 20; Gilbert A. 
Mitchell, Ward 21; Clifford M. Phipps, Ward 21. 

Twenty-one traverse jurors, Superior Civil 
Court, Fifth Session, January Sitting, to appear 
February 4, 1935: 

Leo Colton, Ward 3; James W. Lyons. Ward 4; 
Paul J. Wheeler, Ward 5; James J. O'Brien, Ward 
6; William P. Hines, Ward 7; Aaron Swart, Ward 
7; William J. Dwyer, Ward 8; Dennis J. Crowley, 
AVard 9; Frank Meredith, Ward 9; Willard C. 
Pickett, Ward 9; Walter G. Ash, Ward 10; John 
G. Blatz. Ward 10; William J. Corcoran, Ward 10; 
Jeremiah A. Hallaren. Ward 11 ; Elmer E. Johnson, 
Ward 15; Lewis A. Carver, Ward 16; Albert C. 
Chambers, Ward 16; Guy W. Davis, Ward IS; 
James Smith, Ward 16; Arthur Franklin, Ward 
21; Gordon H. Griffin, Ward 22. 

Twenty-two traverse jurors, Superior Civil 
Court, Sixth Session, January Sitting, to appear 
February 4, 1935: 

Stephen G. Allen, Ward 5; Archie S. Potter, 
Ward 5; John T. Kelly, Ward 7; Thomas J. Gill, 
Jr., Ward 8; John A. MacDonald, Jr., Ward 10; 
William McGee, Ward 12; Joseph C. Toland, 
Ward 12; Louis Bravman, Ward 14; Abraham I. 
Weinberger, Ward 14; Clarence L. Gwvnn. Ward 
16; John F. Baker, Ward 16; James N. Ellard. 
Ward 17; George J. Graves, Ward 18; William J. 
Sheehan. Ward 18; John L. Beyer, Ward 19; John 
A. Higgs, Ward 19; John J. Cronin. Ward 20; 
Albert J. Kutz. Ward 20; Harold E. Wilson, Ward 
20; Harry C. Davis, Ward 21; Charles H. Davis, 
Ward 22; George E. Tew, Ward 22. 

Twenty-three traverse jurors, Superior Civil 
C'ourt. Seventh Session. January Sitting, to appear 
February 4, 1935: 

Robert F. Testa, Ward 1 : William D. Forrest, 
Ward 5; David H. Hill, Ward 9; Donald Mc- 
Lennan, Ward 9; Mark Shack, Jr., Ward 10; 
Joseph G. Kelley, Ward 13; William Lebowich. 
Ward 13; Simon Goodman, Ward 14; Walter 
Wilson. Ward 14; Thomas C. Rosnoskv. Ward 14; 
William E. Pickering. Ward 16; Richard* L. O'Lalor, 
Ward 17; John W. Purssell, Ward 17; George W. 
Woodward. Ward 17; John O. Bryett, Ward 18; 
Thomas S. Dobbins, Ward 18; Thomas F. Lalor, 
AVard 18; Frank J. Savage, Ward 18; AA'inslow 
Carlson. A\"ard 19; Malcolm D. Blue, AVard 20; 
AVilliam B. McLeod, AA'ard 20; Fred A. Zerbel, AVard 
20; Harry AV. Davies, AVard 22. 



REFUNDING OF EMPLOYEES' PAY. 

Coun. DOWD offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to instruct all department heads to make arrange- 
ments to refund to all city employees who are in 
the classified labor service the one week's pay 
which was deducted against the provisions of 
chapter 60 of the Acta of 1915. 

(Continued on page 79.) 



Name. 


8® 

< 


Address. 


to 

lo 




03 QJ 

.St* 
o 




5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
10,000 
15.000 
3,000 
5,000 
8,000 
8,000 

15,000 
10,000 
3.368 
6,000 

12,000 
3,400 
1,000 
3,000 
4,000 
2,000 
8,241 
3,000 
5,000 
2,000 
2,252 
1,500 

20,000 

14,000 
8,360 
6,592 
1,000 
5,000 
5.000 
8,700 
8,000 
9,038 
3,500 

10,000 
4,000 

15,000 
2,000 
4,000 

10,500 
4,000 
5,000 
8,000 

35.000 
4,384 
5,000 
3,172 
5,000 . 

20,000 
4,000 

10,000 
1,000 




25 
25 
25 

75 

75 
25 
25 
50 
75 
75 
50 
25 
25 
75 
25 

5 
25 
25 
10 
50 
10 
25 
10 
25 

5 
75 
75 
50 
50 

5 
25 
25 
50 
50 
50 
25 
50 
20 
75 
10 
25 
50 
20 
25 
50 
175 
25 
50 
25 
25 
100 
25 
50 

5 


30 
30 
30 
50 
50 
30 
30 
40 
50 
50 
40 
$30 
39 
50 
30 
10 
30 
30 
20 
40 
20 
30 
20 
30 
10 
50 
50 
40 
40 
10 
30 
30 
40 
40 
40 
30 
40 
25 
50 
20 
30 
40 
30 
30 
40 
100 
30 
40 
30 
30 
75 
30 
40 
10 


1931 




24-30 Hudson st 


1934 






1934 




55 A'an Ness st 


1933 




11 Morton st 


1934 




37-41 Warrenton st 


1931 




48 Huntington ave 


1931 




16 Motte st 


1931 




11 Lehigh st 


1933 






1931 




50 Lewis st 


1934 






1932 


A. M. Rushforth 


184 Adams St., Dorchester 

379 Tremont st 


1934 




1932 






1934 


F. F. Debon 




1934 






1932 




15 Stoneholm st 


1:134 




City sq., Charlestown 


1934 




1934 




1286 Boylston st 


1934 




329 Charles St., City 


1931 




355 E. Eighth st 


1932 




1-21 North st 


1934 






1934 




75 A T an Ness st 


1934 






1934 






1934 




1931 


Clotilde Flamnio 




1934 


North End Auto Park .... 




1933 






1931 






1931 


North End Auto Park 




1932 


C. Minichello 


12 North Grove st 


1931 






1932 






1932 






1934 






1931 






1931 






1934 




61 Bristol st 


1934 




16-18 Bowdoin st 


1934 






1932 


B and Q Parking 


125 Nashua st 


1932 


Publex Sta., Inc 


85-107 Pearl st 


1934 


F. J. McDonald 


6 Eliot st 


1931 


E. R. Berry 


Rear 290 Huntington ave 

184-18S Cambridge st 


1931 




1934 


Mrs. D. Volante 


200 N. Harvard St., Brighton . . . 
400 Huntington ave 


1931 


O. Ranck 


1934 




6-8 Dore st 


1934 






1932 


H. H. Tashjian 


18 Dillaway st 


1932 









Placed on file. 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



79 



REFUNDING ON EMPLOYEES' PAY. 
(Continued from page 78.) 

Coun. DOWD— Mr. President, chapter 60 of 
the Acts of 1915, as accepted by the City Council, 
specifically provides that department heads shall 
give two weeks' vacation with pay to all those in 
the labor service of the City of Boston. Last 
summer all those in the labor service in some of our 
institutions, such as the City Hospital, the Boston 
Sanatorium, and Long Island, were given their 
two weeks' vacation, but with only one week's pay. 
That is absolutely against the provisions of 
chapter 60 of the Acts of 1915, and no department 
head has the right to assume any such authority 
under the charter. I have talked with the Depart- 
ment of Labor, and they absolutely agree with me 
that for the 1,500 employees who had two weeks' 
vacation with only one week's pay, the extra 
week's pay must be allowed. It will amount to 
826,000. I have talked with the Budget Commis- 
sioner, and he says that the action of the depart- 
ment heads in that respect was absolutely against 
the law. My order merely calls upon his Honor the 
Mayor to instruct department heads to live up to 
the provisions of the act and to give this one 
week's pay to the employees concerned. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



INDOOR GYMNASIUM, WARD 7. 

Coun. KERRIGAN offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to include in his P. W. A. program a sum sufficient 
to provide for the erection of an indoor gymnasium 
on Columbus Park, Ward 7. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



RESTORATION OF STREET COMMIS- 
SIONERS' POWER. 

Coun. GREEN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Committee on Legislative 
Matters of the City Council be requested to draft 
a bill for presentation to the incoming Legislature 
which will restore the powers taken from the 
Board of Street Commissioners and given to the 
Boston Transit Commission, particularly with 
reference to street widenings, as covered by section 
one of chapter 297 of the Acts of 1929, as amended 
by section one of chapter 287 of the Acts of 1932. 
Referred to the Committee on Legislative Mat- 
ters, when appointed. 



COMMISSARY STATION, WARD 2. 

Coun. GREEN offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor request the 
School Committee to open a commissary station 
at the Thomas Starr King School at Baldwin and 
Bunker Hill streets, Ward 2. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



ANNUITY TO THOMAS E. GOGGIN. 

Coun. DONOVAN offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation for 
the payment of an annuity to Thomas E. Goggin, 
formerly an employee of the City of Boston and 
County of Suffolk, who was injured in the course 
of his employment. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



MUNICIPAL LIGHTING PLANT FOR 
BOSTON. 

Coun. GOLDMAN offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation 
authorizing the City of Boston to borrow money 
outside the debt limit for the purpose of establish- 
ing a Municipal Lighting Plant. 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor apply to 
the Federal Public Works Administration for 
funds with which to secure a Municipal Power 
Plant for the City of Boston. 

Severally referred to the Committee on Municipal 
Lighting, when appointed. 

(In connection with the above Coun. GOLD- 
MAN submitted the following for inclusion in the 
record : 

President Roosevelt issued statements to the 
press stating in substance that he would approve 
municipal lighting projects where such projects 
could operate substantially cheaper than present 
private operation. This statement was issued in 
connection with the proposed New York lighting 
plant. 

Councilor Goldman wired the President on 
Thursday, December 20, 1934, as follows: 
"President Franklin D. Roosevelt, 

White House, Washington, D. C. 

Press reports state that you would authorize 
government funds for cities to build power plants 
if cheaper than private concerns. Stop. 1 am 



heartily in favor of municipal lighting plant for 
Boston. Stop. If Boston can qualify, _ will 
Administration favor application for such project? 
Stop. Would deeply appreciate reply prior to 
Boston City Council meeting December 24th. 
City Councillor Maurice M. Goldman, 
114 State Street, Boston." 

A letter dated December 22, 1934, received 
from Special Assistant Graham to the Adminis- 
trator of the Federal Public Works reads as follows: 
"Mr. Maurice M. Goldman, City Councillor, 

114 State Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 
My dear Mr. Goldman: 

The President has referred to this office for 
consideration and reply your telegram of Decem- 
ber 20, addressed to him, inquiring as to the 
availability of Public Works funds for constructing 
a municipal lighting plant in Boston. 

The Administration has always looked with 
favor on projects of this type where they are able 
to conform with our legal, engineering, and finan- 
cial standards of eligibility and where there is a 
social need for the construction. Unfortunately 
due to the limited funds at our disposal, we have 
not been accepting new applications since last 
February. In connection with the proposed New 
York power project to which you refer, the appli- 
cation has not been filed with the Public Works 
Administration. 

If the City of Boston cares to prepare such 
application on its own responsibility, Public Works 
will be glad to consider such application, when 
and if an additional appropriation is granted by 
Congress. Of course it is impossible to forecast 
what the Congress may do in this matter. 
Sincerely yours, 

Leona B. Graham 

Special Assistant 
For the Administrator." 

Mayor LaGuardia estimated that New -York 
power plant would result in a forty per cent saving 
for the city of New York in a statement issued 
last week. 

Councilor Goldman, as a result of study con- 
ducted on municipal lighting problems, has esti- 
mated that there are almost one hundred munici- 
palities in the United States which have no local 
city taxes because of revenues derived from 
municipally owned public utilities. Even in these 
cases, the charges for power are almost fifty per 
cent below the rate now charged by private public 
utility ownership. Councilor Goldman declared 
that it is no wonder that the public utilities are 
willing to spend millions each year in "slush 
funds" in order to combat public ownership. It is 
an established fact that the public utility combines 
employ highly paid propagandists to protect 
their interest. The Councilor pointed out that 
as a practical proposition, the Boston Elevated 
Railway Company has two power plants upon 
which we are now paying for the deficiencies. He 
urges the use of these power plants by the City of 
Boston for city fighting purposes. He declared 
that engineering surveyors have shown that there 
is enough power that can be generated from these 
plants to provide the City of Boston with its light 
for municipal purposes. 

Under date of February 19, 1934, Councilor 
Goldman offered the following order in the City 
Council, which was passed and has not as yet 
been acted upon by the Mayor: 

"Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to consider the advisability of utilizing 
the unused or spare capacity of the South Boston 
and Lincoln power stations of the Boston Elevated 
Railway Company as a source of power for part 
of or all of the municipal requirements of the 
City of Boston and take such steps as may be 
necessary for the enactment of legislation providing 
for the use of said plants." 

Councilor Goldman declared that such a power 
project would be consistent with the principles of 
the Roosevelt administration in that it would 
result in great benefits to the harassed taxpayers 
and citizens of the City of Boston. The earnings 
on such would enable the city to eliminate pay 
cuts, maintain all its normal municipal functions, 
reduce taxes, and solve the financial problems of 
the city. 

Over twenty-five hundred municipalities in the 
United States now own their own electric li;_;lit and 
power systems. Why not Boston?) 



LOCATION OF CONTRACTORS' DUMPS. 

Coun. FISH offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Public Works Commissioner 
be requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to 
furnish the City Council with a statement showing 
the location of the dumps used by the contractors 
engaged in collecting refuse and ashes in the City 
of Boston. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



RESURFACING PARK STREET, WARD if.. 

Coun. FISH offered the following: 

Ordered. That the Public Works Commissioner 

bo requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to 
resurface Park Street, from Dorchester avenue to 

Freeporl street . Ward 16. with a smooth pavement. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



SURVEY OF CITY LICENSES. 

Coun. WILSON offered the following: 

Ordered, That the President of the City Council 
be requested to appoint a special committee, com- 
posed of five members of the City Council, to make 
a complete survey and detailed investigation of any 
and all licenses and permits now issued by any and 
all departments of the City of Boston, whether or 
not a fee is now charged but as to which the pro- 
visions of chapter 297 of the Acts of 1931 may be 
applicable, with a view to determining and fixing 
fair and proper fees in each case. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, this supple- 
ments an order passed last year under which a 
committee was appointed that did not finish its 
work; and this order is presented at this time with 
the hope that the new President will name the 
same committee to complete the work of gathering 
the information. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



INFORMATION FROM ASSESSORS IN RE 
OPEN-AIR PARKING. 

Coun. WILSON offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Board of Assessors be re- 
quested, through his Honor the Mayor, to advise 
the City Council promptly as to each of the 129 
locations named as open-air parking spaces in a 
communication of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners dated January 2. 1925, and contained in the 
City Council minutes of January 7, 1935, the total 
assessed value placed on each of said parcels of 
real estate, separately, for each of the years 1932, 
1933 and 1934, and in each case the amount of the 
tax, and whether or not same has been paid. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, that perhaps 
supplements the first order. It will be one of the 
matters taken up by the committee — namely, the 
fairness of the present fees charged for these open- 
air parking spaces in the City of Boston, determin- 
ing whether or not the fee is, as rather appears to 
be the case, woefully small. We want to supple- 
ment the information received concerning the fee 
by information from the Assessing Department, to 
see just what these 129 vacant spaces in the heart 
of the city have been assessed for the past three 
years, knowing, as we do, that more than one 
building in the city has been torn down and more 
than one parking space established on land pre- 
viously occupied by a building in view of the 
local assessment, and that those paying the license 
fee for the resulting parking space have been 
making more money apparently on the land used 
in that way than when it was covered by a building. 

Coun. ROBERTS— Mr. President. I would like 
to add a word to what the councilor has said. As 
I understand, these licenses are limited to a certain 
number of cars that can be stored we will say 
fifty, and that places which have been allowed to 
take care of fifty cars have loaded up to one hun- 
dred. I understand that to have been the case. 
I would like to obtain information from the Traffic 
Commissioner or the Police Commissioner, whoever 
keeps track of these places, to see whether they are 
not paying a small fee and parking a large number 
of cars. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



SELECTION OF JURORS. 

Coun. WILSON offered the followng: 
Ordered, That the Hoard of Election Commis- 
sioners be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to advise the City Council with reference 
to the selection of jurors in the City of Boston, 
and the basis, if any, for the recent Bar N 
tion criticism of the present methods of choice of 
prospective jurors for service in the Suffolk Superior 
Court. 

Coun. WILSON Mr. President . since disputes 
between citizens, under our modern form of gov- 
ernment, are no loiiL-er settled on the field of 
battle or by any ordeals of lire, but by the deter- 
mination of jurors in unanimous vote. I believe 
thai any legitimate ground for criticism in the 
drawing or the choice of Suffolk County jurors is 
a matter of most serious importance. No doubt 
there have been dishonest jurors, just OS there 
have been dishonest lawyers and. for that 
matter, dishonest business men. It may be that 
our jury system should be changed. Possibly 
ild have highly trained, professional jurors, 
or a change in the requirement of a unanimous 
vote. Hut for the trial of jury eases our present 
is based on the choice of twelve men, 
without criminal records, of average and not 
spceiah I ence, representing a fair exoss- 

section of the community. Such a jury, for 
example, in automobile accident 

ect some judgment as to the ordinary 
eare .and prudence which would have been dis- 
played under like circumstances by such average 
men as the jurors themselves. As a member of 
the bar myself, I congratulate the Ha 
on its effort to Improve conditions in our courts 

and the thought Behind many of the splendid 

constructive suggestions made. Hut 1 do feel 
that it is unwise, if not unfair, to blame thi 
1 1, oi Commissioners for some inherent we 
in the system calculated to produce juries 
should represent a 
tnunity and yet not include any men 
mental or moral weakness. 1. for one, would be 
cd to hear the answer of the 1 



80 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



Department to the charge that because the mem- 
bers of the Board represent political appoint- 
ments, they cannot, or do not, compile honest or 
reasonably intelligent jury lists, and have no 
realization of the importance of well-qualified 
jurors. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



WARD 20 IMPROVEMENTS. 

Coun. FINLEY offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to accept and lay out, under the E. R. A. 
plan of construction, Addington road, Ward 20, 
as a public highway. 

Ordered, That the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to accept and lay out, under the E. R. A. 
plan of construction, Bogandale road, Ward 20, 
as a public highway. 

Severally passed Tinder suspension of the rule. 



E. R. A. EMPLOYEES IN BOSTON WARDS. 

Coun. ROBERTS offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to start a new E. R. A. project the pur- 
pose of which shall be to determine and report to 
the City Council with reference to the number of 
E. R A. employees in each district and ward of 
the City of Boston. 

Coun. ROBERTS— Mr. President, in regard to 
that order I would simply like to say that there 
has been some talk to the effect that certain dis- 
tricts in Boston have been individually discrimin- 
ated against, and some of us may have a feeling 
.,that such has been the case in our own district. 
It seems to me that this order is eminently fair. 
It may cost a little money, but it will give us some 
idea of the fairness exercised in apportioning jobs. 
Certainly it is a great deal more fair than a pro- 
ject that has been started for determining whether 
there are wage earners in families at the present 
time. Five different cases have been called to my 
attention where people have been thrown off the 
E. R. A. program because there was another wage- 
earning member of the family at the present time, 
and in each of those cases I made an investigation 
and found that there was no wage-earning member. 
In this number was included a case where there 
were parents and children and the parents had no 
work, and where, unjustly, they had not received 
anything for two weeks, before they were put 
back again. Of course, such cases are obviously 
wrong, and I trust, therefore, that this project 
will be started, and I hope it will be conducted in 
accordance with a fairer plan. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



QUESTIONS RE LONG ISLAND 
HOSPITAL. 

Coun. WILSON— Mr. President, I would like, 
with unanimous consent, to make a statement. 
We all make mistakes, but I have always felt that 
the really big man, and the man who went forward, 
was the man who could admit that he was wrong, 
and possibly profit by the experience. About ten 
days ago I stated that it had been called to my 
attention by sources which I considered to be 
reliable that men holding very low-paid jobs at the 
Long Island Hospital had been placed there 
through the offices of one or more paid private 
employment agencies. I said that no such ar- 
rangement should be necessary with a free Munic- 
ipal Employment Bureau available, not to men- 
tion thousands of hungry men registered on the 
lists of the E. R. A. His Honor the Mayor, with- 
out any apparent investigation whatever, promptly 
characterized the report as "malicious and untrue." 
If true, the practice should be at once stopped, 
whether the report was malicious or not. If un- 
true, I know of no fair reasoning whereby the re- 
port should at once be referred to as malicious. 
But the statement is neither untrue nor malicious. 
Orderlies paid less than S12 a week, I am informed, 
have been so placed at the Long Island Hospital 
by the Commercial Reference Association of 231 
Tremont street, for instance, and a weekly charge 
made. I, of course, do not blame the men. Good 
luck to them, getting any job these days. And the 
information did not come from them, and they 
should not be penalized for it. But I again repeat, 
it should not be necessary for any city department 
to resort to paid private employment agencies to 
fill any vacancies available. And while we are 
talking about the Long Islanf Hospital, I hope one 
report that has come to me is untrue. I only hope 
that you will brand this report as "malicious and 
untrue," Mr. Mayor, and this time be right. Tell 
us, Mr. Mayor, that it is not really true that you 
contemplate a transfer of the Long Island Infirm- 
ary to Albany street, adjacent to the City Hospital 
laundry and the morgue. Tell us that it is untrue, 
and that not for one moment have you planned or 
even considered bringing inmates of the Long 
Island Infirmary to any building to be constructed 
on that part of Albany street overlooking the site 
of the old so-called Roxbury Canal. That rumor, 
Mr. Mayor, must be both malicious and untrue. I 



implore you, Mr. Mayor, — tell us that there is 
nothing to the report that a firm of architects has 
already been even tentatively working on plans for 
such a building at that location. Tell us that no 
patient or inmate of any city institution will be 
given the site of an abandoned sewerage system to 
look out upon. 

Adjourned at 4 p. m., on motion of Coun. 
ENGLERT, to meet on Monday, January 14, 
1935, at 2 p. m. 



CITY PURCHASING UNDER THE CODES. 

Caught between two fires, American 
cities are feeling the influence of the 
National Industrial Recovery Act codes 
in their purchasing in a way they had 
not foreseen. On one side taxpayers ask 
for economy in budget-making. On the 
other, application of codes, which has re- 
sulted in collective price-fixing, has in- 
creased prices of supplies for city use 
to an almost prohibitive point. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 



Changes in Traffic Regulations. 
Voted, That the Traffic Regulations are 
amended as follows, effective January 28, 
1935: 

That section 16, Part 9, is amended by 
striking out the following words in the first 
phrase of the paragraph : 

"In front of a Boston Elevated Railway 
Company bus stop." 
That section 16, Part 9, is amended by 
adding the following words at the beginning 
of the paragraph : 

"In front of a Boston Elevated Railway 
Company or Eastern Massachusetts 
Street Railway Company bus stop." 
William P. Hickey, 
(Jan. 19-26.) Commissioner. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



To Taxpayers. 
Assessors' Notice, City Hall Annex, 

Boston, January 1, 1935. 
Attention is called to the Assessors' Notice 
posted upon City Hall and various other places 
throughout the city, relative to making re- 
turns on personal property subject to taxation. 
Returns should be made not later than Feb- 
ruary 15. 

Edward T. Kelly, 
Timothy W. Murphy, 
Michael J. Brophy, 

Assessors of Boston. 
(Jan. 5-12-19-26-Feb. 2-9.) 



READVERTISEMENT. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Industrial and Medicinal 
Gases. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing in- 
dustrial and medicinal gases to the various city 
departments. The bidder must use the form of 
proposal to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, and the successful bidder must 
furnish a bond for one quarter the total esti- 
mated amount of the bid with a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts as 
surety for the faithful performance of the 
contract. There will be a charge of twenty 
cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal taken 
out. The bid, with a certified check for $200, 
payable to and to become the property of the 
City of Boston if the proposal is not carried 
out, must be left at the office of the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, before 12 m., Thursday, 
January 31, 1935, at which time and place they 
will be publicly opened and read. A duplicate 
bid, without check, must be left at the office 
of the City Auditor prior to the time named 
for opening bids. The Superintendent reserves 
the right to accept or reject any or all bids, 
or any part of a bid, and to award the eon- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of 
the city. All contracts made subject to ap- 
priarions to meet payments thereunder. 



(Jan. 19.) 



Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



READVERTISEMENT. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Metal Polish. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various city departments, metal polish, as per 
specifications to be obtained at the office of 
the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex. There will be a charge of 
twenty cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bidder must leave his pro- 
posal with a certified check for $300, payable 
to and to become the property of the City of 
Boston if the proposal is not carried out, at 
the above office. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids will be publicly opened and 
read Tuesday, January 29, 1935, at 12 m., at 
Room 801, City Hall Annex. The successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter of 
the total estimated amount of the contract with 
a surety company authorized to do business 
in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made sub- 
ject to appropriations to meet payments there- 
under. 

Warren W. Loomis, 

(Jan. 19.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

READVERTISEMENT. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Engine, Machine and Cyl- 
inder Oils. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing engine, 
machine and cylinder oils, as required, to the 
various city departments. The bidder must use 
the form of proposal to be obtained at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, and the successful bidder 
must furnish a bond for one quarter the total 
estimated amount of the bid with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract. There will be a charge of 
twenty cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bid, with a certified check 
for $200, payable to and to become the prop- 
erty of the City of Boston if the proposal is 
not carried out, must be left at the office of 
the Superintendent of Supplies, 'before 12 m., 
Friday. February 1, 1935, at which time and 
place they will be publicly opened and read. 
A duplicate bid, without check, must be left 
at the office of the City Auditor prior to the 
time named for opening bids. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as be deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made sub- 
ject to appropriations to meet payments there- 
under. 

Warren W. Loomis, 

(Jan. 19.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE 
CITY OF BOSTON. 



Administration Building, 15 Beacon Street, 
Office of the Business Manager. 



Proposals for Rebinding Books for the 
Boston Public Schools. 

The School Committee of the City of Boston 
invites bids on rebinding approximately 40,000 
books. Proposal forms are obtainable at the 
office of the Business Manager of the School 
Committee, tenth floor, 15 Beacon street. 
Envelopes containing proposals must be sealed 
and plainly marked "Proposal for Rebinding 
Books." The bid must be in duplicate. One 
copy signed by the bidder and accompanied 
by a certified check for $100, payable to the 
City of Boston, must be left at the office of 
the Business Manager on or before 12 o'clock 
m. on Wednesday, January 30, 1935. Copies 
filed with the Business Manager will be pub- 
licly opened and read at 12 o'clock m. (of 
the day stated. The other copy also signed 
by the bidder, must be filed with the City 
Auditor, City Hall, Boston, Mass., previous to 
the time named for the opening of the bids. 
The School Committee reserves the right to 
reject any or all bids and to accept such bid 
as may be deemed best for the interests of 
the city. The successful bidder will be required 
to furnish a bond for not less than 50 per cent 
of the estimated amount of the contract. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, 

Business Manager of the School Committee. 

(Jan. 19.) 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



81 



THE OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE, CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR WEEK 

ENDING JANUARY 12. 





Dependent 
Aid. 


Mothers' 
Aid. 


Old Age 

Assistance. 


Administrative. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 




24,628 

518 

165 

24,981 

24,045 


1,447 

8 

2 

1,453 

1,492 


3,846 

21 

3 

3,864 

3,763 






29,921 


last week. 






547 








170 


tinued. 






30,298 


this week. 






29,300 











Financial. 



Expended during week. . . . 


$179,041 00 
178,479 50 
178,734 50 


$21,931 00 
21,866 00 
21,960 00 


$24,437 00 
24,475 00 
24,369 00 


$12,994 56 

12,004 06 

9,119 68 




$238,403 56 




236,824 56 






234,183 18 








Expended to date 


357,520 50 


43,797 00 


48,912 00 


24,998 62 




475,228 12 






Appropriations unex- 
pended. 



























POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 6. 

Rule 61 (relating to dog licenses) of the 
Rules and Regulations of the Boston 
Police Department is hereby amended 
by striking out the whole of said rule and 
inserting in its place a new rule as follows: 

(Words in italics are new.) 

Rule 61. Dog Licenses. 

1. Applications for dog licenses 
shall be received at the station house 
of the division in which the dog is to be 
kept, and shall be accompanied by the 
fee established by law. Applications in 
emergency cases when accompanied by 
the license fee may be received by the 
commanding officer of a police division 
other than the division in which the dog 
is to be kept. But in such cases and in 
all cases in which payment is received in 
cash a written receipt shall be given to 
the applicant in return for money re- 
ceived; the application with the fee shall 
be forwarded to the chief clerk within 
twenty-four hours, except that if the 
application is made and the license fee 
paid on a Sunday or legal holiday, the 
application, with the fee, shall be for- 
warded to the chief clerk on the next 
regular business day, and a receipt for 
the license fee shall be taken from the 
chief clerk and kept on file at the station 
house at which the application was 
received. 

2. Commanding officers shall fill out 
and countersign licenses and forward the 
same to the chief clerk daily by the 
morning mail. Licenses, after they have 
been signed by the police commissioner, 
shall be returned to the divisions from 
which they were sent, along with metal 
tags, for delivery to the licensees. Com- 
manding officers shall be charged with the 
number of signed licenses returned to 
them, and shall account therefor. 

3. The commanding officer of each 
division shall keep a record of all dog 
licenses issued upon his division, con- 
taining the names of the keepers or owners 
of dogs so licensed, and the names, 
registered numbers and descriptions of all 
such dogs. The commanding officer of 



each division shall also keep a record of 
all dogs relicensed on account of 'permanent 
removal into Boston from another city or 
town within the Commonwealth, in accord- 
ance with General Laws, chapter 140, sec- 
tion 146, as amended. 

4. Amounts collected for fees shall be 
forwarded to the chief clerk, who shall 
receipt therefor in the book provided for 
the purpose. 

5. The commanding officer of a division, 
within his respective territory, is hereby 
designated as the officer of police of the 
City of Boston who shall receive the 
information and do the acts specified in 
General Laws, chapter 140, sections 
161-165, as amended. 

Appendix to Rule 61; Statutes. 

The owner or keeper of a dog which is 
three months old or over shall annually 
on or before March thirty-first, cause it to 
be registered, numbered, described and 
licensed for one year from the first day of 
April following, if the dog is kept in 
Boston, in the office of the Police Com- 
missioner, or if kept in any other town, 
in the office of the clerk thereof. 

The license shall be subject to the con- 
dition expressed therein that the dog 
which is the subject of the license shall be 
controlled and restrained from killing, 
chasing or harassing live stock or fowls. 
The owner or keeper of a licensed dog shall 
cause it to wear around its neck or body 
a collar or harness of leather or other 
suitable material, to which shall be securely 
attached a tag of a prescribed form, ami 
upon which shall appear tin lieens, num- 
ber, the name of the (city) issuing such 
license and the year of issue. (Gin, ml 
Laws, chapter 11)0, chapter 1S7, as 
amended.) 

Such tags shall be furnished in the same 
manner as the license blanks, and if any 
such lag shall be lost the owner or keeper 
of such dog shall forthwith secure a sub- 
stitute lag from the (Police Commiss 
at a cost oj ten cents. General La 
chapter t.',0, section 187, as amended.) 

Any person may bring or cause to be 
brought from another state or country any 
dog licensed under the lairs thereoj and 
keep such dog in this Com man wealth for a 



period not exceeding thirty days without 
licensing it hereunder, and during such 
period the provisions of the three foregoing 
paragraphs, as to licensing, shall not apply 
to such dogs. (General Laws, chapter 140, 
section 137, as amended by chapter 320, 
Acts of 1934.) 

The owner or keeper of a kennel may 
apply for a kennel license. Such license 
shall be in lieu, of any other license required 
to be taken out for any dog while kept at 
such kennel during any portion of the period 
for which such kennel license is issued. 
Such owner or keeper shall cause each dog 
so kept to wear, while it is at large, a collar 
or harness of leather or other suitable 
material, to which shall be securely attached 
a tag upon which shall appear the number 
of such kennel license, the name of the 
(city) issuing such license and the year of 
issue. Such tags shall be of a prescribed 
form, and shall be furnished to such licensed 
kennel owner or keeper in Boston by the 
Police Commissioner in quantities not less 
than the number of dogs kept in such kennel. 
The fees for each kennel license shall be 
twenty-five dollars if not more than ten dogs 
are kept in a kennel, and fifty dollars if 
more than ten dogs are kept therein; pro- 
vided, that for the purpose of determining 
the amount of such fee dogs under the age 
of six months shall not be included in the 
number of dogs kept in a kennel. (General 
Laws, 140, section 137A, as added by 
chapter 320, Acts of 1934.) 

Any holder of a kennel license may 
operate a boarding kennel. The name and 
address of the owner of each dog kept in 
such a kennel shall be kept on file thereat 
and available to inspection by any police 
officer. (General Laws, 140, section 137 A, 
as added by chapter 320, Acts of 1934-) 

The Police Commissioner shall upon 
application issue without charge a kennel 
license to any domestic charitable corpora- 
tion incorporated exclusively for the purpose 
0] protecting animals from cruelty, neglect 
or abuse and for the relief of suffering 
among animals. (General Laws, 140, 
chapter 140, section 137A, as added by 
chapter 320, Acts of 1934.) 

Every holder of a kennel license, on 
delivering an unlicensed dog to a purchaser 
or to any other person, shall attach to 
such dog a collar or harness which shall 
carry a tag marked with name and address 
of such kennel licensee, and a number, 
which number shall be properly recorded 
on the records of such licensee, and shall 
also furnish to the person to whom the dog 
is delivered a certificate bearing the same 
number and a description of the dog. 
(General Laws, 140, chapter tS7B, as added 
by chapter 820, Acts of 1934.) 

Such certificate shall bear the date of 
purchase, exchange or gift and, with the tag, 
shall, lor a period of two weeks following 
such date, be a legal substitute for a license. 
(General Laws, IJfi, chapter 1S7B, as 
added by chapter 320, Acts of 1984.) 

The purchaser or other recipient of a dog 
shall, within two weeks of the purchase or 
receipt of such dog, either return the same 
to the licensee from whom it was received, 
together with the collar or harness, tag and 
certificate, or return to such licensee said 
tag, and a certificate signed by the clerk of 
the town where the dog is to be kept {in 
Boston, the Police Commissioner) and 
certifying that the dog has been licensed 
in the name of such purchaser or ree 
or of some other person. (General 
140, chapter t87B, as added by chapti 
Aels oj 19 I 

If any such purchaser or recipient Jails 
to comply with the preceding sentence, 
licensee shall notify the clerk of th( 
(in Boston, the Police Commissioner) in 
which he is lie - / the purchase. 



82 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



exchange or gift of such dog and shall 
furnish to such clerk {in Boston, the Police 
Commissioner) the date thereof, and the 
name and address of the purchaser or 
recipient. (General Laws, chapter 140, 
section 137B, as added by chapter 320, 
Acts of 1934.) 

The Police Commissioner may at any 
time inspect or cause to be inspected any 
kennel and if, in his judgment, the same is 
not being maintained in a sanitary and 
humane manner, or if records are not 
properly kept as required by law, the Police 
Commissioner shall by order revoke or 
suspend and in case of suspension may 
reinstate, such license. Written notice of 
such revocation, suspension, or reinstate- 
ment of a license shall be mailed forthimth 
to the holder of such license. (General 
Laws, chapter IJfi, section 137C, as added 
by chapter 320, Acts of 193 A.) 

Within ten days after such order the 
holder of such license may bring a petition 
in the district court within the judicial dis- 
trict of which the dog is owned or kept, 
addressed to the Justice of the court, praying 
that the order may be reviewed by the court, 
and, after such notice to the officer or officers 
involved as the court may deem necessary, it 
shall review such action, hear the witnesses 
and affirm such order unless it shall appear 
that it u-as made without proper cause or in 
1 bad faith, in which case such order shall be 
reversed. (General Laws, chapter llfi, 
section 137C, as added by chapter 320, 
Acts of 1934.) 

The decision of the court shall be final 
and conclusive upon the parties. Any 
person maintaining a kennel after the 
license therefor has been so revoked, or while 
such license is so suspended, shall be pun- 
ished by a fine of not more than fifty dollars. 
(General Laws, chapter 140, section 137C, 
as added by chapter 320, Acts of 1934-) 

The owner or keeper of a dog may at 
any time have it licensed until the first 
day of April following, and a person who 
becomes the owner or keeper of a dog after 
April first which is not duly licensed, and 
the owner or keeper of a dog not duly 
licensed which becomes three months old 
after March thirty-first in any year, 
shall, when it is three months old, 
cause it to be registered, numbered, 
described, licensed, collared or harnessed 
and tagged as required by General Laws, 
chapter llfi, section 137. (General Laws, 
chapter 140, section 138, as added by 
chapter 320, section 4, Acts of 1934.) 

The fee for every such license shall, 
except as otherwise provided be two dollars 
for a male dog and five dollars for a female 
dog, unless a certificate of a registered 
veterinarian who performed the operation 
that said female dog has been spayed and 
has thereby been deprived of the power of 
propagation has been filed with the clerk 
of the city or town, in which case the fee 
shall be two dollars. A certified copy of 
such certificate on file in the office of the 
city or town clerk within the Common- 
wealth may be accepted as evidence that 
the said operation has been performed. 
(General Laws, chapter 140, section 139, 
as amended by chapter 320, section 5, Acts 
of 1934- 

A license duly recorded shall be valid 
throughout the Commonwealth, except 
that in case of the permanent removal of a 
dog into another town (or city) within the 
Commonwealth such dog shall be licensed 
within thirty days in the office of the Clerk 
of such other town (in Boston, of the Police 
Commissioner) and the clerk thereof (in 
Boston, the Police Commissioner) shall 
issue a new license and tag for such dog 
upon the payment of twenty-five cents. 



(General Laws, chapter 140, section 146, 
as set out by chapter 320, section 10 of 
Acts of 1934.) 

Said clerk (in Boston, the Police Com- 
missioner) shall take up the original 
license and tag of such dog in lieu of 
requiring payment of the full fee provided 
for such a license by section 139 of chapter 
140, General Laws, as amended by chapter 
320, Acts of 1934. 

lor further provisions as to dogs and 
damages done by dogs and authorized 
destruction of certain dogs, see General 
Laws, chapter 140, sections 147-175, as 
amended by chapter 320, Acts of 1934- 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

Commissioner. 

General Order No. 7. 
A Board of Merit, consisting of Superin- 
tendent Martin Ii. King and Deputy 
Superintendents James McDevitt, John 
M. Anderson and William W. Livingston, 
has brought to the attention of the Police 
Commissioner the following outstanding 
cases in which police officers of this de- 
partment especially distinguished them- 
selves in the performance of their duty 
during the year 1934. The commis- 
sioner, therefore, makes the following 
awards : 

The Walter Scott Medal for Valor for 
1934 and a Department Medal of 
Honor to Patrolman James J . Mooney 
of Division 2. 
Patrolman James J. Mooney, formerly 
of Division 19, now of Division 2, for 
meritorious police duty performed in 
connection with the capture on January 
27, 1934, of a dangerous character, who, 
with two others, subsequently appre- 
hended, had committed an armed holdup 
and robbery and taken the victim's 
automobile. Patrolman Mooney ob- 
served the automobile with three men 
in it. With his revolver in hand he 
stepped from the rear of a building and 
ordered the occupants to surrender. 
Immediately two shots were fired at 
Patrolman Mooney from within the auto- 
mobile, the officer returned the fire 
and wounded one of the occupants, the 
other two making a temporary escape. 

Department Medal of Honor to 
Patrolman James F. Mulhern of Divi- 
sion 2 for meritorious police duty per- 
formed on July 21, 1934, while ofl duty, 
in rescuing two small boys from drowning 
in Scarboro Pond, Franklin Park. 

The commissioner notes with pleasure 
the courageous acts of the patrolmen 
named in this order, shown in emer- 
gencies where prompt action on their 
part was required. 

The presentation of the Walter Scott 
Medal for Valor and the Department 
Medals of Honor to the patrolmen herein 
awarded will be made by the commis- 
sioner on the occasion of the concert and 
ball of the Boston Police Relief Associa- 
tion to be held at Mechanics Building 
on the evening of January 15, 1935. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. S. 

A trial board, consisting of Captains 

Gleavy, Kavanagh and Casey, having 

heard by reference a complaint made by 

John J. Mullen, captain, Division 1, 



against Charles C. Cowhig, patrolman, 
Division 1, for alleged violation of Rule 
41 of the Rules and Regulations of the 
Police Department, to wit: 

Charge: Conduct unbecoming an officer. 

Specification: In that on the fifth day 
of January, 1935, the said Patrolman 
Charles C. Cowhig, while on duty and 
in uniform, was under the influence of in- 
toxicating liquor to such an extent that 
he was unable to perform his duty as a 
police officer and in so doing was guilty 
of an act contrary to good order and 
discipline which tended to bring into dis- 
repute and criticism his associates on the 
force and the department as a whole, — 
has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation : 

"The Board having heard and carefully 
considered all the evidence as presented 
finds the said Patrolman Charles C. Cow- 
hig guilty as charged. Patrolman Cowhig 
is at the present time performing punish- 
ment duty, but in view of the fact that 
he has never previously been before a 
trial board on a complaint similar to the 
foregoing charge, the Board has considered 
the recommendations of this officer's 
captain and other superior officers that 
he (Cowhig) be given another opportunity 
as they feel he will prove to be a good 
police officer and that he should be re- 
tained in the Police Department; the 
Board has also considered Patrolman 
Cowhig's promise to refrain from the use 
of intoxicating liquor in the future and, 
therefore, respectfully recommends that 
the said Patrolman Charles C. Cowhig 
be suspended from duty for a period of 
thirty days, effective as of January 7, 
1935, at 7.45 o'clock a. m., and that at 
the expiration of the said period of sus- 
pension the said Patrolman Charles C. 
Cowhig be ordered to perform 210 hours 
of punishment duty." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trial 
Board and hereby orders that the said 
Patrolman Charles C. Cowhig be sus- 
pended from duty for a period of thirty 
days, effective as of January 7, 1935, at 
7.45 o'clock a. m., and that at the expira- 
tion of the said period of suspension the 
said Patrolman Charles C. Cowhig per- 
form 210 hours of punishment duty. 

Civil Service Rule 23, section 3, requires 
approval of the Civil Service Commission 
before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 
"Section 3. With the consent of the 
Commissioner upon good cause shown, 
an appointing officer may reinstate in 
the same position or in a position in the 
same class and grade any person who 
has been separated from the service; 
provided, however, that the Commis- 
sioner shall not allow reinstatement of 
a person discharged for cause." 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

Commissioner. 



NEW YEAR'S GREETING CARD 
FOR MAYOR, FROM GERMANY. 

The Mayor received a New Year's card 
containing an engraving of the Cologne 
Cathedral in Germany, — 

"With hearty greetings and sincere good 
wishes for Christmas and the coming year." 

and inclosed in it were three one-dollar 
bills and the following, "Please apply 
the inclosed money to the Conscience 
Fund." 



Jan. 19 



CITY RECORD 



83 



TRANSFERS IN APPROPRIATIONS. 

City Auditor Charles J. Fox an- 
nounces the following transfers in appro- 
priations in departments of the City of 
Boston and County of Suffolk, indorsed 
by Budget Commissioner Charles J. Fox 
and approved by his Honor the Mayor: 

Art Department. 
Boston, December 29, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
-~Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appropria- 
tions of the Art Department: 

From the appropriation for D-l, Office, 
$1.25, to the appropriation for H, Emer- 
gency Relief Projects, SI. 25. 

To adjust excess expenditures for 
E. R. A. projects. 

Respectfully, 

Robert P. Bellows. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

Assessing Department. 

Boston, December 27, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
Dear Sir, — Eor the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appropria- 
tions of the Assessing Department : 

From the appropriation for A-l, Per- 
manent Employees, $185.84, to the 
appropriation for A-2, Temporary Em- 
ployees, $185.84. 

To provide ample funds within the 
various segregations. 

Respectfully, 

T. W. Murphy. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

Board of Appeal. 
Boston, December 27, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appropria- 
tions of the Board of Appeal: 

From the appropriation for B, Service 
Other than Personal, $8.81, to the 
appropriation for D, Supplies, $8.81. 

D-l, Office Supplies, every possible 
economy was practised to keep the 
expenses for supplies down, but it was 
necessary to go over the amount allowed 
by $8.81. 

Respectfully, 

Joseph A. Tomasello. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

Boston Traffic Commission. 
Boston, December 17, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appropria- 
tions of the Boston Traffic Commission : 
From the appropriation for E-10, Elec- 
trical Materials, $400, to the appropria- 
tion for D-ll, Motor Vehicle Supplies, 
$400. 



To provide sufficient funds where ap- 
propriation has been found insufficient. 

Respectfully, 

William P. Hickey, 

Commissioner. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

City Planning Board. 
Boston, December 15, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appropria- 
tions of the City Planning Board: 

From the appropriation for A-l, Per- 
manent Employees, $131.74, to the ap- 
propriation for C-10, Library, $131.75. 
In order to provide for necessary ad- 
justments incident to closing accounts for 
the year. 

Respectfully, 

Frederic H. Fay, 

Chairman. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

Health Department. 
Boston, December 27, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 

Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appropria- 
tions of the Health Department: 

From the appropriation for B-l, Serv- 
ice Other than Personal, $10,650, to the 
appropriation for A-l, Personal Service, 
$10,650. 

From A-l, Permanent Employees, Care- 
takers, Laborers, etc., 45 (44) at $4.50 a 
day, $0, to A-l, Permanent Employees, 
Inspectors, 5 (6) at $1,700 a year, $0. 

To cover deficit. To provide for the 
permanent appointment of one veterinary 
medical inspector by increasing the pres- 
ent number of inspectors from 5 to 6 and 
decreasing the number of caretakers, on 
account of vacancy, from 45 to 44. 

Respectfully, 

F. Mahoney, 
Commissioner . 

The above transfers were made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

Market Department. 
Boston, December 27, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following request 
for transfer within the appropriations of 
the Market Department: 

From the appropriation for B, Service 
Other than Personal, $75, to the appro- 
priation for D, Supplies, $75. 

Increase in business necessitated ex- 
penditures for telephone, stationery and 
cleaning supplies beyond budget allot- 
ments. 

Respectfully, 

Frank ,1. Kikrn w, 

Superintendent. 

The above transfer w:is made by the 
City Auditor with tin- approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 



Public Works Department (Bridge 

Service;. 

Boston, December 27, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 

Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appropria- 
tions of the Public Works Department, 
Bridge Service: 

From the appropriation for A-2, 
Temporary Employees, $2,200, to the 
appropriation for B, Services Other than 
Personal, $1,500; D, Supplies, $700. 

To make up deficits in budget items. 

Respectfully, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

Public Works Department (Sewer 
Service) . 
Boston, December 27, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appro- 
priations of the Public Works Depart- 
ment, Sewer Division: 

From the appropriation for B-l 8, 
Cleaning, $1,000, to the appropriation for 
E-5, Sewer, $1,000. 

To cover expenditures which were in 
excess of the amount anticipated. 

Respectfully, 

C. J. Carven, 

Commissioner. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

Soldiers' Relief Department. 

Boston, December 12, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appropria- 
tions of the Soldiers' Relief Department: 
From the appropriation for B-4, Trans- 
portation of Persons, $25.30; C-9, Office 
Equipment, $12.45, to the appropriation 
for C-17, General riant. $37. 75. 

The above is necessary to take care of 
the purchase of firearms for the protection 
of funds of the Soldiers' Relief Depart- 
ment. 

Respectfully. 

Charles H. Carey, 

Colli'!! is* 

Tin- above transfers were made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

Municipal Court, Charleston n 
Distrn t. 
Boston, December 28, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
Ctty Auditor. 
Dear Sir,- For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the follow 
request for transfer within the appro- 
priations of the Municipal Court oi the 
Charlestown District : 

From the appropriation for D, Item l. 
$100. to the appropriation for B, [tern I. 
$100. 



84 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 19 



From D, Item 1, §3.39, to B, Item 13, 
§3.39. 

The amount allowed for the expense of 
transporting prisoners to the Common 
Jail and to the House of Correction at 
Deer Island has proved insufficient owing 
to the fact that the number of criminal 
cases brought before the court this year 
has been one thousand in excess of last 
year and the number of prisoners trans- 
ported has increased correspondingly. 

Respectfully, 

James J. Mullen, 

Clerk. 

The above transfers were made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

Municipal Court, Roxbury District. 

Boston, December 15, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 

Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following 
request for transfer within the appro- 
priations of the Municipal Court of the 
Roxbury District of the City of Boston: 

From the appropriation for A-2, Tem- 
porary Employees, §120, to the appro- 
priation for G-l, Probation Officers' 
Expenses, §120. 

From C-10, Library, §30, to C-9, 
Equipment, §30. 

From C-10, Library, §160, to D-l, 
Office, §160. 

Insufficient appropriation. 

Respectfully, 

Fred E. Cruff, Clerk. 

The above transfers were made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

Superior Court for Civil Business. 
Boston, December 27, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
Dear Sir, — To meet the cost of re- 
placement of a certain number of type- 
writers, which has been the policy of 
this office as suggested by the Budget 
Department, a transfer is requested as 
follows : 

From the appropriation for B-l, §300, 
to the appropriation for C-9, §300. 

Very truly yours, 

Francis A. Campbell, 

Clerk. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 

Registry of Probate. 
Boston, December 12, 1934. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 

Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following 
request for transfer within the appro- 
priations of the Registry of Probate: 

From the appropriation for B, §3,000, 
to the appropriation for C, §200; D, 
§2,800. 

The transfer of §200 from B group to C 
group is necessitated by the fact that my 
appropriation for typewriters and library 
was reduced and purchases in excess of 
the amount approved were necessary. 
As a result of an understanding with the 
Budget Commissioner, two uniforms were 
purchased for court officers. 



New rules of the Probate Court required 
the printing of new citations on all, or 
practically all probate proceedings. I 
had no appropriation to cover the cost of 
same. The cost of printing amounted to 
approximately §3,000. The money being 
available in Group B, I find it necessary 
to transfer §2,800 to Group D. 

Respectfully, 

Arthur W. Sullivan, 

Register. 

The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1934. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of the funeral 
of the Reverend Father McHugh, park- 
ing of vehicles is prohibited in Harrison 
avenue, both sides, from East Newtcn 
street to East Concord street, on January 
11, 1935, from 8 a. m. to 11.30 a. m. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of sewerage 
construction, estimated to be three (3) 
months, vehicles are excluded from 
Everett street (lower level), between 
Braintree street and the southerly end of 
the high level bridge, effective January 
11, 1935. 

Voted-, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of bridge 
repairs, estimated to be eight (8) months, 
vehicles are excluded fiom Chelsea Bridge 
North, between Shed No. 50 of the 
France and Canada -Steamship Line and 
the Chelsea abutment of the bridge, 
effective January 14, 1935. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, the following temporary rule 
which was adopted and was effective 
December 18, 1934, for a trial period of 
thirty (30) days, is hereby extended for 
a further trial period of thirty (30) days 
from Janaury 18, 1935: 

The operator of a vehicle shall not 
make the following left turn: 

From 

Hanover Street. 

Into Scollay square, southerly. 

Voted, That the Traffic Regulations are 
amended as follows, effective January 28, 
1935: 

That section 16, Part 9, is amended by 
striking out the following words in the 
first phrase of the paragraph: 

"In front of a Boston Elevated Rail- 
way Company bus stop." 
That section 16, Part 9, is amended by 
adding the following words at the begin- 
ning of the paragraph: 

"In front of a Boston Elevated Rail- 
way Company or Eastern Massa- 
chusetts Street Railway Company 
bus stop." 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during a trial period of six (6) 
months, parking of vehicles is prohibited 
in Melrose street, south side, from Broad- 
way to a point fifty-four (54) feet west of 
Broadway, effective January 23, 1935. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of pubhc safety and con- 
venience, during a trial period of six (6) 
months, parking of vehicles is prohibited 



in Cambridge street, south side, from 
Howard street to a point eighty (80) 
feet west of Howard street, effective 
January 23, 1935. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during a trial period of thirty 
(30) days, North Market street is a one- 
way street, from Commercial street to 
Merchants row, effective January 23, 
1935. 

Voted, Under authority granted the 
Boston Traffic Commission by Acts of 
1929, chapter 263, section 2, the com- 
mission hereby authorizes the Eastern 
Massachusetts Street Railway Company, 
on behalf of the commission, to erect and 
maintain at locations authorized by the 
commission, to be marked with yellow 
paint applied to the adjacent curb or 
street, traffic signs bearing the following 
legend, "Bus Stop — No Parking — Boston 
Traffic Commission," and such other 
legend as the commission may authorize, 
and no operator shall stop, stand or park 
any vehicle except an Eastern Massachu- 
setts Street Railway Company bus at 
such locations so marked. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of the Auto- 
mobile Show, January 19, 1935, to 
January 26, 1935, inclusive, vehicles 
must be parked with right rear wheels 
to the curb in Huntington avenue, north- 
west roadway, northwest side, from 
opposite Garrison street to West Newton 
street, and parking of vehicles is pro- 
hibited in West Newton street, southwest 
side, from Falmouth street to Huntington 
avenue. 



LAND=TAKING IN WEST 
ROXBURY. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Alder street, West Rox- 
bury district, as a highway, from Vermont 
street to Keith street, with the name of 
Albright street or some other distinctive 
name; bounded and described as follows: 

A highway named Albright street is 
hereby laid out, from Vermont street to 
Keith street, and ordered constructed; 
the cost thereof to be charged to Federal 
funds allocated under the Federal Emer- 
gency Relief Administration program for 
Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Southeasterly by Vermont street, forty 
feet; southwesterly by the southwesterly 
line of said Albright street as hereby 
laid out, three hundred seventy and 
24-100 feet; northwesterly by Keith 
street, forty and 7-100 feet; northeasterly 
by the northeasterly line of said Albright 
street as hereby laid out, three hundred 
seventy-two and 3-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines 
that no person sustains damages in his 
estate by the making of the public im- 
provement, consisting of the laying out 
and construction of Albright street (for- 
merly Alder street), West Roxbuiy district, 
as a highway, from Vermont street to 
Keith street, under the order of the Board 
of January 16, 1935, and awards no 
damages therefor. 



CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol. 27. Saturday, January 26, 1935. No. 4 

MAYOR MANSFIELD SUMMARIZES HIS ACCOMPLISHMENTS FOR THE 
CITY IN 1935 -IN RADIO BROADCAST FROM CITY HALL STATION 
OF WNAC HE GIVES ACCOUNT OF HIS STEWARDSHIP, SHOWING 
THAT CITY'S CREDIT HAS IMPROVED, UNEMPLOYMENT HAS BEEN 
LESSENED AND ALL NEEDY HAVE BEEN CARED FOR THROUGH 
BENEFICENT PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS UNDERTAKEN TO PROVIDE 
WORK AND OTHER MEANS. 



The following is the radio address of Mayor Frederick W. Mansfield over Station WNAC on January 21 : 

When I was inaugurated as Mayor of the City of Boston I promised to keep you informed as to the affairs 
of your city. Accordingly I have, from time to time, spoken with you over the radio in weekly broadcasts and it 
is now my purpose to summarize briefly the accomplishments of 1934: 

The three great problems which confronted me when I took office were the maintenance and improvement 
of the credit of the city which had suffered severely, the relief of the unemployed, and the task of bringing pros- 
perity back again to Boston. 

I have frequently stressed the vital importance of maintaining the credit of the city. Under the law, the 
money needed to carry on all municipal activities is not received by the city until late in the year which makes it 
necessary to borrow money in anticipation of the receipt of such revenue. It is obvious if the credit of the city 
should become impaired or collapse, this money could not be borrowed, with the necessary result that many munic- 
ipal services would have to be curtailed, thousands of employees would be obliged to work without pay or be sus- 
pended from the city service, and the city would find itself unable properly to care for the poor, the needy and the 
unemployed. 

In my inaugural address on January 1, 1934, I called attention to the critical financial condition of the city, 
some of the reasons for it and the vital importance of maintaining the city's financial stability. Although the tax 
rate for 1933 was $32.80, this figure was artificial and did not accurately reflect the true state of affairs. The 1933 
rate was made possible only through the borrowing by the city of $7,600,000 for a term of five years and a grant 
to the city by the Federal Government of approximately $2,000,000. Were it not for such borrowing and grant, 
the tax rate in 1933 would have been in excess of $38.25, or more than $1.25 higher than the tax rate for 1934. 
Moreover, the effect of borrowing $7,600,000 in 1933 was to impose upon the city the obligation to pay back the 
amount borrowed with interest in 1934 and the four following years. This added $1,800,000 to the city's obliga- 
tions in 1934 and necessarily contributed to an increased tax rate. It was obvious that the city could not con- 
tinue borrowing on a short-term basis; that a Federal grant could not be relied on in 1934; that the cost of materials 
and supplies, due to a rising market, would impose greater burdens on the city in 1934 than in 1933; and that 
further decline in real estate values would reduce the base of the city's main source of revenue. 

1934 Critical Year. 

The situation, therefore, facing the city in the early days of 1934 was most critical. 

I was confronted with the necessity of permitting the imposition of an increased tax rate on real estate in 
1934 that would have been out of all bounds, or of borrowing large sums of money as was done in 1933, or of obtaining 
new sources of revenue, or of cutting expenditures. To permit an increased tax rate on real estate in 1934 greater 
than has been permitted would, in my opinion, have rendered the tax in large 1 part uncollectible, it would have 
further impaired real estate values, it would have been most unfair to the home owner and injured the business of 
the city. To continue borrowing in 1934 on the 1933 scale with no likelihood of liiuling revenue to meet such 
borrowings would have spelt disaster. The Legislature showed no inclination to furnish new sources of revenue. 
The only recourse left to me, therefore, was that of curtailing expenses. 

It was possible through the retrenchments made in 1934 to cut the gross sum of $2,500,000 from the city's 
operating budget for the year. Many factors, however, not under the control of the Mayor, including decreased 
real estate values, increased cost of purchases due to the rising market, an increase in Boston's debt requirements 
and in its share of the State tax and of the Metropolitan District assessment made it impossible to keen the tax 
rate down. Were it not, however, for the savings made in the city's operating budget, the tax for 1934 would 
have been nearer $50 than $37, and were it not for these savings and the administrative improvements previously 
indicated, the credit of the city might have been hopelessly impaired, with the disastrous effects heretofore outlined. 
As it is, Boston's credit has unquestionably improved. 

(Continual on page SS.) 



86 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 26 




"O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 
queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship- 

teeming plain of the ocean, 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene, 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotion!" 
From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

Hall. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Po3t 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



$2.00 Per Year 
10 Cents 



IN ADVANCE 



STREET AGENCIES. 

Old South News-stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 

A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
January 28, 1935, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows : 

To the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of rear 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 



for the storage or sale of merchandise in 
public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasolene, oil, 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To the Boston Traffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the Oity .of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To the Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To the Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue, Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 



MORTALITY 

For the week ending January 19, 1935: 
Population estimated July, 1935, 
United States Census Bureau estimate, 
798,568; number of deaths (stillbirths 
excluded): Residents, 189; nonresidents, 
41: total, 230. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 14.68; nonresidents deducted, 
12.31. 



charges made for such service. Applica- 
tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Department of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and " repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Statistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To the Wire Division of the Fibe 
Department, 60 Bristol street, for all jn 
formation relative to the erection of 
(poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, Oity Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of tht City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to cbange3 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



REPORT. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
Last week, 18.69; corresponding week 
last year, 16.15. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 7; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 6; sixty years and over, 119. 
Total deaths: Male, 125; female, 105; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 139; 
deaths of colored, 4. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 



Anterior Poliomyelitis 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis Lethargica 

Influenza 

Measles 

Meningitis Epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet Fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) . . 
Tuberculosis (other forms) . 

Typhoid Fever 

Whooping Cough 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 19, 1935. 



Cases. Deaths. 



1 
46 
33 
25 

1 

1 

44 



20 
2 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 20, 1934. 



Cases. Deaths. 



344 

69 
73 

15 
5 
1 



2 
16 
10 



* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 26 



CITY RECORD 



87 



LIST OF 25 LEGISLATIVE BILLS LOOKING TO BETTERMENT OF BOSTON 
AND HER CITIZENS IN 1935 AND FUTURE PRESENTED TO LEGIS= 
LATURE BY MAYOR MANSFIELD - SEVERAL OF FAR=REACHING IM= 
PORT DRAFTED BY LAW DEPARTMENT AT REQUEST OF MAYOR 
INCLUDED IN LIST - ALL PREPARED ON BASIS OF BROAD STUDY 
OF BOSTON'S MUNICIPAL NEEDS. 



The following is the list of legislative bills petitioned for by Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor of Boston, and 
filed January 10 and 11, 1935. 

1. Resolve providing for the establishment of a special unpaid commission to investigate the desirability 
of abolishing county governments in the Commonwealth and transferring the functions performed by them to the 
Commonwealth or other political subdivisions thereof; the desirability of consolidating and reorganizing the several 
counties, and re-establishing the boundaries thereof, what changes may be made in performance of functions now 
performed by county government, and ways and means of establishing more effective control of county budgets 
as will make for greater efficiency and economy in government. 

2. Resolve providing for the appointment of a special unpaid commission to investigate and study the 
desirability of re-establishing the boundary lines of the County of Suffolk, by detaching therefrom the territories 
of the town of Winthrop and of the cities of Chelsea and Revere, of incorporating such detached territories with 
some other county or counties of the Commonwealth, or of establishing a new county to consist of such detached 
territories. 

3. Resolve providing for the establishment of a special unpaid commission to investigate and study the 

desirability of enlarging the territorial boundaries of the City of Boston and incorporating with said city certain 

other cities and towns, under one municipal government or under a borough system. 

4. An Act relative to _the operating required prior to the breaking up or meet certain appropriations for public 

altering any vessel or floating structure 



costs including Sinking Fund require- 
ments in connection with the operation 
of the vehicular tunnel between Boston 
proper and East Boston. 

5. An Act relative to appropriations 
by the City of Boston for municipal pur- 
poses. 

6. An Act relative to appropriations 
by the City of Boston for municipal pur- 
poses. 

7. An Act relative to the preparation 
and verification of lists of officials and 
employees of the City of Boston and 
County of Suffolk. 

8. An Act relative to the payment of 
interest on taxes abated after the pay- 
ment thereof. 

9. An Act relating to the appointment 
and tenure of office of certain heads of 
divisions in departments of the City of 
Boston. 

10. An Act relative to violations of 
reasonable health regulations adopted by 
boards of health. 

11. An Act prohibiting the discharge 
of oils and their products, refuse and 
certain other matter into or on certain 
waters and flats. 

12. An Act relative to the obstruction 
of harbors by the grounding of vessels and 
other floating structures, and providing 
a penalty for a failure to obtain a license 



lying within the limits of any harbor of 
the Commonwealth. 

13. An Act providing for the suspen- 
sion of certain assessments made in con- 
nection with public improvements by 
cities and towns of the Commonwealth, 
on certain real estate exempt from taxa- 
tion. 

14. An Act relating to the public 
operation of the Boston Elevated Rail- 
way Company. 

15. An Act providing for modification 
of the terms and conditions under which 
the Boston Elevated Railway Company 
is using certain alterations in and exten- 
sions to the Boylston Street Subway. 

16. An Act changing the period of the 
operating year in connection with the 
operation and maintenance of the vehicu- 
lar tunnel between Boston proper and 
East Boston. 

17. An Act providing a grant to cities 
and towns of the Commonwealth for the 
purpose of assisting them to provide for 
public welfare and soldiers' benefits. 

18. An Act to provide for the raising 
of revenue by imposing an excise upon 
certain sales of tangible personal property 
and to provide for the distribution of said 
revenue to the cities and towns of the 
Commonwealth so as to enable them to 



welfare, soldiers' relief and maturing debt. 

19. An Act to provide for the raising 
of revenue by imposing a temporary 
additional tax upon certain incomes, and 
to provide for the distribution of said 
revenue to the cities and towns of the 
Commonwealth. 

20. An Act providing for the creation 
and organization of housing authorities 
and the powers and duties thereof in 
connection with slum clearance and low- 
cost housing. 

21 . An Act to codify, revise and amend 
laws relative to the construction, altera- 
tion and maintenance of buildings and 
other structures in the City of Boston. 

22. An Act relative to the storage of 
petroleum or other inflammable liquids 
in a general business district in the City 
of Boston. 

23. An Act relative to the recovery of 
charges for the support of certain patients 
admitted to the Pondville Hospital and 
to the giving of notice of the admission of 
such patients to the place of their settle- 
ment. 

24. An Act to provide for the appoint- 
ment by the Mayor of a Police Commis- 
sioner for the City of Boston. 

25. An Act providing for the care, 
control and maintenance by tin- Metro- 
politan District Commission of certain 
bridges over the Charles River. 



MASSACHUSETTS CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMINATIONS. 

The Massachusetts Civil Service Com- 
mission announces examinations for 
desirable positions open in the Boston 
and Metropolitan districts as follows: 

Assistant Registrar of Voters, Bos- 
ton Election Department, Feb- 
ruary 23, 1935. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 9, 1935, at 12 noon. 

Requisition is for a male, but the 
examination is open to both males and 
females. 

This examination is open to both 
Democrats and Republicans. 



Salary: The minimum salary is $1,600 
per year, with increases operating on a 
sliding scale basis up to $2,200 per year. 

It is desirable that applicants have a 
knowledge of the laws relating to the 
requirements for qualifying as voters; and 
also the steps necessary for registration. 
They should also have a knowledge of the 
laws relating to the .slatus of citizens, 
obtained by operation of the naturaliza- 
tion laws, with special emphasis on thai 
portion of the law relating particularly 
to married women. 

tail ranee Requirements: To lie eligible 

for appointment to this position, appli- 
cants are required by law to file with the 
Commissioner of Civil Service, a cerl ificate 
signed by a member of the Board of 
Election Commissioners of Boston of the 



same political party affiliation as the 
applicant, which shall certify to the 
applicant's enrollment in the said party 
for the three consecutive years next 
preceding the date oi his application. 
(Sec chapter 105, Vets of 1920.) 

Applicants must have education equiva- 
lent to graduation From a standard four 
year high school. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, ;i: 
clerical examination, 2; total 8 

Passing Requirements: Applicants must 
:n [east obtain 70 per cent in each subject 
m order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to he determined by 
physical examination. 



88 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 26 



BROADCAST BY MAYOR. 

(Continued from page S5.) 

This improvement is evidenced by 
the fact that Boston has been able to 
borrow during the year 1934 at an average 
rate of interest as low as 1.6 per cent 
on tax anticipation loans as compared 
with an average rate of 4.74 per cent 
in 1933, and at a rate of interest as low as 
3 per cent on long-term loans. The 
improvements in city administration 
which have been inaugurated will be of 
permanent value to the city and its 
people. The first achievement, therefore, 
of the past year has been the maintenance 
and improvement of the credit of the 
city and the permanent improvement of 
administrative conditions, and this de- 
spite the most serious obstacles. 

But the major problem facing all 
governments in this country today, 
Federal, state and local, is the problem of 
providing for the unemployed and assist- 
ing in national recovery. Although there 
are definite signs indicating a trend 
upwards in business conditions during 
the past year, the number of persons 
who have been obliged to look to the 
Government for assistance has increased. 
Expenditures for public welfare in Boston 
have increased from approximately 
$2,900,000 in 1928 to $14,300,000 in 1934, 
an increase of more than $11,000,000. 
This represents an increase in the tax 
rate of approximately $6. 

Municipal Burden Great. 

The burden of caring for the employable 
but unemploved is one so great that 
the municipalities of the country have 
been unable to carry it unaided. Recog- 
nizing this fact, the Federal Government, 
and in most other states, the state govern- 
ment, has cooperated in assisting the 
municipalities. 

As a member of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the United States Conference 
of Mayors, I have strongly urged upon 
the Federal Government the necessity 
of its caring for the unemployed but 
employable, leaving to the cities and the 
states the care of the unemployables. 
I have also stressed the importance of a 
work relief program rather than a dole. 
While a work relief program is undoubt- 
edly more costly, the expense is one which 
( tovernment should incur. Most persons 
who are unemployed would far prefer 
employment to the dole. A work relief 
program aids men in maintaining their 
self-respect, avoids a waste of their 
talents and, if properly directed, will 
produce lasting benefits to the com- 
munity. 

When it became apparent that Boston 
was receiving an altogether inadequate 
amount of Federal funds for work relief 
projects, 1 made every effort to secure and 
succeeded ultimately in securing greater 
aid, and I am now pleased to advise you 
that there are about 15,000 heretofore 
unemployed residents of Boston em- 
ployed on work relief projects, that 
projects have been developed which 
should in the near future employ many 
more thousands (weather permitting), 
and that, while the city has been required 
to bear the cost of the materials used 
upon these projects, the projects are to be 
devised to be of definite value to the city 
and its people. 

Shortly after taking office, I recom- 
mended ' to the Federal Government 
Public Works projects calling for an 
expenditure of over $7,000,000. These 
projects are now under way and will 
afford substantial employment for some 



time to come. They contemplate con- 
struction and reconstruction of streets 
and sewers, the reconstruction of the 
Northern Avenue Bridge, two new steel 
water mains, two new intermediate 
schools, one in Roslindale and one in 
South Boston, an addition to an existing 
intermediate school in West Roxbury, 
a new surgical building at the Boston 
City Hospital, and a new police commu- 
nications system, including two-way radio. 
This program has enabled the city to 
make many improvements of permanent 
value, to cooperate in the Federal pro- 
gram and to afford increased opportu- 
nities of employment. 

The auditing system and budget con- 
trol which was in force in Boston when 
I took office was antiquated and wholly 
inadequate. In addition to that, the 
city was not obtaining the full benefits of 
centralized purchasing. The Welfare De- 
partment was poorly organized. There 
were forty-six separate departments and 
135 department heads. The City Auditor 
under my instructions has prepared a 
plan whereby a modern budget system 
and an up-to-date auditing system has 
been put into effect. 

Federal Projects. 

When it became apparent that the 
Federal Government was to undertake 
projects for the clearance of depreciated 
areas and low-cost housing, I immediately 
requested a committee of the City 
Planning Board to prepare projects for 
such work in Boston. Upon receiving 
the report of this committee showing the 
great need for such a rehabilitation and 
housing program in Boston, I submitted 
the report to the Federal authorities and 
I am advised that for the last two months 
plans have been developing at Washington 
to commence work here on one such 
project in the immediate future and that 
other projects are under consideration. 

I am, therefore, able to report to you 
that not only are many public improve- 
ments now under way in Boston but that 
employment has been obtained for thous- 
ands of persons heretofore out of employ- 
ment, and that every effort has been made 
to assist those who are unable to work or 
cannot yet obtain employment. 

For some time prior to my taking office 
there had been considerable complaint 
as to the administration of the Department 
of Public Welfare, which has since been 
reorganized. A vigorous campaign has 
been waged by the reorganized depart- 
ment, in conjunction with the Law 
Department of the city, to prosecute 
persons who were improperly taking 
welfare funds intended for the poor and 
needy. Every prosecution has resulted in 
conviction. A new staff of trained and 
sympathetic workers have been employed 
in the Welfare Department to eliminate 
unworthy cases and to assist, advise and 
aid the worthy. Branch offices have been 
established in many districts to eliminate 
the necessity of needy persons coming 
for assistance from suburban districts to 
Hawkins street in the City Proper and to 
be of more service to those in need. 

Immediately upon taking office, I filed 
with the Legislature a petition asking for 
authority to consolidate many depart- 
ments which could not then, under the 
City Charter, be consolidated. Late in 
the legislative year this power was vested 
in me and the City Council, joint action 
being required. It is obviously impossible 
for any Mayor to function efficiently 
through 135 department heads, and forty- 
six separate departments. My purpose 
is to limit city departments to a relatively 



small number, the department heads to 
form a cabinet for the Mayor. Under such 
an arrangement the city can be assured 
of far better service than is now possible. 
To this end I have appointed a commit- 
tee, nominated at my request by Presi- 
dent Compton of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, to make a sur- 
vey of the engineering departments of 
the city, and a committee of leading 
physicians and experts in hospital and 
health work to survey the hospital and 
health functions of the city. When plans 
for consolidation are more definitely 
outlined, I shall report to you more fully. 
Time does not permit a review of other 
activities that have been undertaken by 
the present administration. One of the 
chief basic troubles in Boston is the loss 
of its shipping business. But that is a 
long story and I will tell you something 
about that with other matters of general 
interest in my radio talk to you on next 
Thursday night, at the same hour from 
this same station, where I will speak to 
you about the outlook for 1935 and my 
program for the year. 



CONSTRUCTION WORK. 

The Mayor has approved the request 
of the Public Works Department for the 
following construction work: 

A surface drain of 15-inch and 18-inch 
pipe, E. R. A. project, in Hyde Park 
avenue, between Dellmore road and Larch 
place, in the West Roxbury district, at an 
estimated cost of $9,207. 

A sanitary sewer of 10-inch pipe, 
E. R. A. project, in Walk Hill street, 
between Canterbury street and 1,800 feet 
northwesterly, in the West Roxbury dis- 
trict, at an estimated cost of $16,267. 



LAND=TAKING IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of an extension of Crockett 
avenue, Dorchester district, as a highway, 
over and including the private way known 
as Cushing Hill road, from Gallivan 
Boulevard to Milton street, bounded and 
described as follows: 

An extension of the highway named 
Crockett avenue is hereby laid out, from 
Milton street to Gallivan Boulevard, over 
and including the private way known as 
Cushing Hill road, and ordered con- 
structed; the cost thereof to be charged 
to Federal Funds allocated under the 
Federal Emergency Relief Administration 
program for Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Southerly by Milton street, forty feet; 
westerly by "the westerly line of said 
extension of said Crockett avenue as 
hereby laid out, seven hundred and 
twenty-five feet; northerly by Gallivan 
Boulevard, forty and 13-100 feet; and 
easterly by the easterly line of said 
extension of said Crockett avenue as 
hereby laid out, seven hundred twenty- 
one and 91-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvement 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of an extension of Crockett avenue, 
Dorchester district, as a highway, from 
Milton street to Gallivan Boulevard,under 
the order of the Board of January 16, 
1935, and awards no damages therefor. 



Jan. 26 



CITY RECORD 



89 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Police Department. 

Advertises for proposals for. furnishing 
dry stencils to the Police Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 50 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Property 
Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $100, to be filed at the office of 
the commissioner. 

Bids close Tuesday, February 5, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
paper towels to the Police Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a. sum 
equivalent to 50 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Property 
Clerk, 154 Berkeley street, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the sum 
of $100, to be filed at the office of the 
commissioner. 

Bids close Tuesday, February 5, at 12 in. 

School Committee. 
Advertises for proposals for rebinding 
books for the Boston public schools. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 50 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be o'btained at the office of the Business 
Manager, School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January SO, 
at 12 m. 

Supply Department. 

Readvertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing metal polish to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $300, to be filed at the 
same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 29, at 12 m. 

Readvertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing and delivering industrial and medicinal 
gases to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, Jim nary .11, at 
12 m. 

Readvertises for proposals for furnish- 
ing engine, machine and cylinder oils to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified cheek in 
the sum of $200, to be tiled at the same 



office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, February 1, at 12 m. 

Readvertises for proposals for furnishing 
the various city departments with Port- 
land cement. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, February 1, at 12 in. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, January 24 : 

Collecting Department. 
John F. Murphy has been transferred 
from the Transit Department to clerk 
at $1,000 a year in the Collecting De- 
partment. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Approval has been given to appoint 
Thomas F. Hogan, now employed as a 
furniture repairman at $1,800 a year, to 
foreman furniture repairman and re- 
finisher, for a period of three months, at 
$2,000 a year. 

Election Department. 

Approval has been given for the ap- 
pointment of the following persons, for 
a period of ninety working days, for 
office services in the Decennial Census 
in the year 1935 in the City of Boston, 
beginning January 9 and ending April 
25, 1935, at pay set forth below: 

William J. Miller, Peter P. Porter, 
chief supervisors, $10 a day; Rose F. 
Healy, chief enumerator, S7 a day ; Agnes 
A. Bench, Anna Bonner, Ruth Buckley, 
Rose Caputo, Evelyn G. Collins, Eva M. 
Condon, Margaret G. Daly, Mary T. 
Donovan, Alice R. Dority, Rose P. 
Dwyer, Elizabeth Francis, enumerators, 
$4 a day; James F. Graham, watchman, 
$4 a day; Florence C. Grant, Eileen F. 
Kelly, Margaret Kenne3 r , Henry Loughary, 
Catherine F. Lubinsky, Mary C. Lynch, 
Anne E. McGillvary, Joseph McTiernan, 
Gertrude M. Magrath, Mary Moriarty, 
Rita T. Murtha, enumerators, S4 a day; 
Louis R. O'Neill, watchman, S4 a day; 
Nora C. Ryan, Jeanne Segal, Allison F. 
Walsh, enumerators, S4 a day. 

Approval has been given for the ap- 
pointment of the following persons as 
supervisors and enumerators in the De- 
cennial Census in the year 1935 in the 
City of Boston, for a period of twenty- 
four working days, beginning January 
14 and ending February 9, 1935. Com- 
pensation for supervisors to be at S."> :i 
day, and enumerators at, .5-1 a day: 

Supervisors: Thomas J. McDonald, 
William E. McNabb, Phyrne X. McCann, 
Joseph F. Monahan, Owen J. McCoy, 
Alfred Winick. William H. Fitzgerald. 
George L. Southwell, James W. Bot- 
tornlev. Bernard Walsh, Charles F. Green. 
Timothy F. Murphy, Carl J. Gill, Arthur 
Brennan, William il. Dolan, rhom <- 1'. 
C. DeRos i, Josi ph P. Kelley, Louis 
Goldstein, Justin McCarthy, Thomas 
McTiernan, Francis J. Eyre, Walter M. 
Costello. John J. Burke, Howard F. Buf- 



I ler, Edward F. McCarthy, Arthur Bar- 
I low, Bernard R. Murphy, Albert F. Hen- 
neberry. 

Enumerators: Louise Amend, Thomas 
Andrew, Julius Ansell, James Barry, 
Lorne Bernard, Charles Bischoff, Fred 
A. Bithony, Harry A. Bixby, Charles F. 
Boback, Samuel Bonaccorso, Christopher 
M. Bond, John H. Boyle, Andrew Martin 
Brackman, Charles J. Bradley, Bernard 
Brawley, Catherine C. Breen, Harry A. 
Breen, Walter J. Brennan, Charles A. 
Buchanan, Alfred A. Buckley, Daniel J. 
Buckley, Charles E. Burdell, Lillian C. 
Butler, Rita Butler, Mary L. Butters, 
Edward J. Cain, William P. Callahan, 
Victor Camia, Mary Campbell, James 

D. Canaris, Joseph J. Cannon, George 
R. Cavanagh, Charles W. Carney, Joseph 
Carr, George T. Carroll, Harry Chapman, 
Leo R. Chute, Susanne Cimeno, Edward 
F. Clark, Joseph W. Clark, James J. 
Cochrane, Harold S. Cohen, Jacob Cohen, 
Frank J. Coleman, Frank J. Collins, 
Martin T. Concannon, Michael J. Con- 
cannon, John A. Conley, James Connell, 
John F. Connell, John Connolly, Ben- 
jamin Costello, Henry J. Cotty, F. J. 
Cracknell, Daniel I. Cronin, George Wil- 
liam Cuddy, Jr., Richard E. Cuddy, 
Paula E. Cummins, Claire Cunningham, 
Richard F. Cunningham, Edgar L. Cur- 
ran, James J. Curran, George J. Currie, 
John J. Dahill, Paul J. Dailey, Francis 
A. Danahy, Emilio DeNietolio, Charles 
Deacos, James A. Delay, Lawrence De- 
Lovey, Theodore Desmond, Arthur De- 
saulniers, J. William Dobbins, Anna 
Doherty, James M. Doherty, N. Ambrose 
Donahue, John Joseph Donovan, Joseph 
T. Donovan, Josephine F. Donovan, 
Hugh J. Dorcey, Mack T. Dowling, John 
J. Driscoll, William T. Driver, Leonie 
F. Dubuc, James V. Duley, James F. 
Dunn, James T. Dunn, Margaret C. 
Dwyer, Edward R. Eagar, Samuel Ep- 
stein, Ann Factor, Robert B. Farley, 

E. James Farrell, George T. Farrell, 
George E. Ferreira, Gilbert A. Finn, Mil- 
dred Finn, William V. Finnegan, Mary 
Fitzpatrick, Morgan P. Flaherty, Pat- 
rick J. Fleming, Herbert E. Fogerty, 
John J. Foley, Charles L. Forristall, 
Mary Fraser, Paul A. Freed, Frank 
A. Gafney, D. Harold Gallagher, John 
Gallagher. Joseph A. Gallagher, Louis 

E. Gallagher, James J. Galvin, Frank J. 
Canity, John E. Garrity. Morton S. Gar- 
son, Thomas M. Gavin, William Gilmore, 
Francis P. Gilrain, Maurice J. Goggin, 
Helen Goldriek. James Goldrick, Arthur 
C. Gonyea, Mary Grealy. George H. 
Griffin, Irene Griffin, Michael Griffin, 
George F. Guittand, Michael H. Haddad, 
Fred J. Hadge, Henry J. Hagan, Thomas 
K. Hamsey, John Francis Hannigan, Wil- 
liam P. Hardiman, John W. Hargrove, 
John F. llarty. James P. Hayes, Thomas 
A. Hegner, Philip Higgins, Simon Hir- 
shon, Bernard S. Qobdell, William 
Hadge, William II. Hogan, William J. 
Holland. Katherine A. Hughes. James 
H. Hutchinson, John Jackson, 

JclYers. Barney Kaiser man, Walter S. 
Keefe, Edw ird F. Keenan, John F. Kel- 
leher. Earl C. Kelley, John D. Kelliher, 
Catherine T. Kelly. Oswald Kelly. John 

F. Keyes. William A. Krim. Dorothy 
Kunze, Madge \ I uae, Mary F. Laracy, 
John V. Larkins, Tony Laroilb. Edity 
J. Lazzaro, Emile LeBranc, Elisabeth F. 
Leonard, Joseph W. Leonard, Frank 

lie. Henry William Leslie. Albert 1 
Edwin A. Lewis. Maud F. Lindsey, Ed- 
ward Locke, James Lombard. 11 
Lundgren, David MacArthur, Jami 
Call. Helen M McCarthy. John Mc- 
Carthy. John W. McCormack, J. Edward 



90 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 26 



McCracken, John J. McDermott, Thomas 
McDonald, William Mcintosh, Jessie C. 
Mclntyre, Cameron C. McKeil, Mary 
McKenna, Thomas McManus, Francis 
X. MacNeill, Edward J. McTieman, 
Ellen B. Magaum, Helen M. Mahoney, 
Maurice J. Mahoney, William F. Ma- 
honey, Francis Maloney, J. L. Maloney, 
James C. Maloney, Helen J. Maloof, 
James G. Maloof, John J. Markham, 
William D. Martin, Frances P. Mason, 
George Masters, Eugene S. Mehegan, 
John C. Miller, Leo J. Miller, Frank 
J. Mitchell, James W. Mogan, William 
Moglia, Edward Morey, John A. Mullin, 
George W. Murphy, Marguerite M. Mur- 
phy, Joseph P. Murphy, Frederick W. 
Murray, William M. Murray, Jr., Wil- 
liam M. Murray, John Myers, Minnie 
C. Nagle, Ellen N. Nason, William C. 
Nixon, Philip K. Nofel, William F. No- 
lan, Blanche M. Noonan, Joseph R. No- 
vello, Marion C. Nugent, William B. 
Nugent, Irene H. O'Banyoun, William 
C. O'Brien, John O'Connell, Lawrence 
B. O'Connor, Jr., John F. O'Hare, John 
Joseph O'Keefe, Mary T. O'Neill, Robert 
Orenson, Arthur T. Ormsby, Joseph 
O'Rourke, Maurice F. O'Shea, Jr., Mary 
E. OToole, Fred Paul, Louis B. Peluco, 
., Phyllis Pfroetzchner, Aurelio Ficardi, 
Willard B. Pickett, Joseph S. Pickford, 
Abraham Polin, Clarke Pomeroy, Con- 
stantino Porzio, John J. Power, Eileen 
M. Powers, Herbert C. Pratt, F. Patrick 
Quinn, Laurence J. Quinn, Hyman Ras- 
nick, Mary Rowan, Dorothy K. Regan, 
Frank M. Regan, Edward G. Richard- 
son, Frank A. Richardson, Edmund F. 
Roche, Leonard J. Rogers, Genevieve 
Ross, Byron A. Rowell, Warren F. Rus- 
sell, Henry Ryan, Walter J. Ryan, Wil- 
liam J. Sampey, John T. Sampson, Elsie 
R. Sandy, Patsy Sarpi, George H. Sexton, 
John Shaheen, John J. Shay, Barbara 
Claire Shea, Kathryn Shea, Mary L. Shea, 
John C. Sheehan, Benjamin R. Shippie, 
William C. Siney, Hilda G. Smith, John 
Spellman. Frank L. Spiegel, Joseph 
Stuart, Daniel Sughrue, Barbara L. 
Sullivan, Jennie Blaikie, Michael Bradley, 
Alfred A. Buckley, Paul C. Buckley, 
James J. Craven, John J. Driscoll, 
Charles D. Foote, Ruth Garber, Mary 
Kelleher, Frank Leslie, Leo J. Mulleary, 
John J. O'Brien, Joseph F. Whalen, John 
E. Cassidy, John J. Feeney, John J. 
Kelly, John J. McCarthy, Frank Per- 
rone, Leo M. Webb, Anna Butler, Charles 
L. Forristall, Elizabeth M. Gill, Mi- 
chael J. Kennedv, Mary F. Kirk, Joseph 
P. O'Rourke, John J. Ward, Evelyn C. 
Webb, Andrew G. Wiswell, John E. 
Johnston, George F. Murrin, Frank E. 
Driscoll, William J. O'Connell, Patrick 
J. Tague, Isaac W. Sharkey, Charles 
Moses, Charles C. Sullivan, James P. Sul- 
livan, Jerome Sullivan, John A. Sullivan, 
John F. Sullivan, John P. Sullivan, Jo- 
seph J. Sullivan, Phyllis K. Sullivan, Mi- 
chael J. Sullivan, Patrick F. Sullivan, 
Thomas A. Sullivan, John F. Sweeney, 
Bernard F. Tague, Stanley Tarplin, Nel- 
son F. Tatro, Charles E. Thebado, 
Christine Thompson, Charles Tobin, 
Thomas J. Underwood, John J. Walsh, 
Maurice Joseph Walsh, Thomas P. 
Walsh, John J. Ward, Henry P. Welby, 
Anna T. Welch, James J. Welch, Charles 
E. Wellington, Charles W. Wentworth, 
Muriel Wharton, Charlotte F. White, 
Doris Woolfle, Edward J. Wrenn, John 
Wright, Isabelle Zawstski. 

Approval has been given for the ap- 
pointment of the following persons, for 
a period of ninety working days, for 
office services in the Decennial Census 



in the year 1935 in the City of Boston, 
beginning January 9 and ending April 25, 
1935, at $4 a day. 

John J. Duffy, Ellen G. Spillane. 

Also the appointment of the following 
persons as supervisor and enumerators 
in the Decennial Census in the year 1935 
in the City of Boston, for a period of 
twenty-four working days, beginning 
January 14 and ending February 9, 1935. 
Compensation for supervisor at S5 a day 
and enumerators at $4 a day. 

Supervisor: George W. Bragan. 

Enumerators: Max Baker, James N. 
Barrett, Jaul J. Carolan, Daniel Clancy, 
John J. Cotter, Henry J. DeMers, Bertha 
Doherty, James V. Dooley, John J. Dris- 
coll, Walter F. Duggan, Morris Foley, 
Francis Hagerty, James F. Keaney, 
Catherine T. McLaughlin, Patrick F. 
Morgan, James J. Riley, Michael 
Stephan, Francis Sullivan, Leo Sullivan, 
Edward F. Sweeney. 

Health Department. 
Approval has been given for the per- 
manent appointment of Dr. James T. 
Hanley as veterinary medical inspector 
at $2,000 a year, effective January 18. 

Hospital Department. 
The following persons have been em- 
ployed at the Boston City Hospital for 
the week ending Thursday, January 17: 

To Fill Vacancies. 

Permanent. — Dr. Paul Shannon, resi- 
dent surgeon, .$1,000 a year; Dr. William 
Butler, resident radiologist, $1,000 a year. 

Temporary. — Margaret Moran, cleaner, 
$15 a week; Katherine Burke, technician, 
$18 a week ; William Carey, ambulance 
driver, $34.50 a week; Guy Morrill, male 
nurse, $32 a week. 

The following changes have occurred: 

Winifred Gibson, head nurse at $29.92 
a week at Main to assistant superintend- 
ent of nurses at $1,300 a year, at East 
Boston Relief Station; Dr. Henry Bakst, 
executive assistant at Main at $2,200 to 
assistant resident surgeon at $2,200 a 
year, at East Boston Relief Station; 
Dr. Arthur Holland, resident surgeon at 
$2,900, at East Boston Relief Station, 
to executive assistant at $2,500 a year, 
at Main department; Dr. James Sachetti, 
assistant resident surgeon at $2,000, at 
East Boston Relief Station, to assistant 
resident surgeon at $2,000 a year, at Hay- 
market Square Relief Station; Hannah 
Crosby, assistant supervisor of nurses at 
$1,300 a year, at East Boston Relief Sta- 
tion, to head nurse at $23.01 a week at 
Main Department; Dr. Samuel Sidell, as- 
sistant resident surgeon at $2,500, at Hay- 
market Square Relief Station, to resident 
surgeon at $2,900 a year, at East Boston 
Relief Station; Marguerite Welch, tem- 
porary cleaner at $15 to temporary 
chambermaid at $15 a week; Samuel 
Kramer, temporary transfer porter at 
$16.50 to temporary house porter at 
$16.50 a week; Joseph Beth, temporary 
porter at $17.50 to temporary kitchen- 
man at $17.50 a week; Evelyn Hennes- 
sey, Elizabeth O'Brien, floor nurses at 
$28.77 to $29.92 a week (step increase) ; 
Anne Cawley, head nurse at $29.92 to 
$32.22 a week (step increase). 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 

Division). 
The following persons have been ap- 
- pointed at the /Sanatorium Division, 



subject to the approval of the Mayor, 
for the week ending Thursday, January 
17: 

Jacob Golding, choreman, $17.50 a 
week; Josephine Carroll, maid, $12 a 
week; Joseph Coburn, X-ray technician 
(temporary), $25 a week; Frank Gagnon, 
choreman, $17.50 a week; Walter Wig- 
gin, Martin Kehoe, maids (patients), 
$240 a year; George Hodge, male nurse 
(patient) (temporary), $480 a year; 
Charles Corkum, maid (patient), $240 a 
year. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed : 

Peter Wallace, choreman, $17.50 a 
week; Norma Bullis, Josephine Carroll, 
maids, $12 a week. 

Institutions Department. 
The following changes have been 
made in the personnel for the week 
ending Thursday, January 17: 

Child Welfare Division. 
Appointment: Mary J. O'Toole, typist, 
temporary, 40 cents an hour, worked 61 
hours in emergency. 

Long Island Hospital. 

Appointments: Ida A. Hibbert, insti- 
tution employee, waitress, temporary, 
$316 a year, on account of illness of 
Dorothy O'Connell; Austin L. Hennes- 
sey, institution employee, cook, tempo- 
rary, $600 a year, on account of leave of 
absence of John Moynihan; Isabelle 
Walsh, institution employee, waitress, 
temporary, $600 a year, on account of 
absence of Dorothy Shea; Frederick W. 
Schultz, institution employee, attendant, 
$600 a year, on account of transfer of 
Arthur Brennan. 

Transfers: Frank B. Sullivan, institu- 
tion employee, helper in kitchen, $526 a 
year, from helper in kitchen at $600 a 
year; Arthur P. Brennan, institution em- 
ployee, porter, $600 a year, from attend- 
ant at $600 a year. 

Employment Terminated: Philip E. 
Levitt, institution employee, meatcutter, 
temporary, $700 a year. 

Discharge: John S. Gallagher, insti- 
tution employee, helper in kitchen, $526 
a year, unsatisfactory. 

Steamers "Hibbard" and "O'Meara." 
Transfer: Livaus J. Burriss, marine 

engineer, temporary, $1,400 a year, from 

marine engineer at $1,900 a year. 
Employment Terminated: John J. 

Columbo, fireman, temporary, $1,400 a 

year. 

Penal Institutions Department. 

Continued leave of absence, for one 
month from January 7, with pay, has 
been granted, owing to illness, to Dr. 
Bernard F. McGaffigan, physician at the 
House of Correction, Deer Island. 

The following appointments have been 
made: 

House of Correction. 

Margaret Dolan, matron and cook, 
$1,300 and maintenance, provisional 
temporary (vice Came Bragg, deceased). 

George H. Schwartz, M. D., physician, 
$2,500 a year and maintenance, tempo- 
rary (owing to continued illness of Doc- 
tor McGaffigan). 

Public Works Department (Ferry 

Service) . 
Approval has been given to appoint 
the following as permanent-intermittent 



Jan. 26 



CITY RECORD 



91 



tollmen-guards in Sumner Tunnel at 
$5.50 a day, to fill vacancies, effective 
January 18: Frederick J. Dix, Joseph 
F. Baxter. 

Public Works Department (Water 
Service). 

Approval has been given to continue 
the temporary employment of the fol- 
lowing as plumbers at $6 a day, for three 
months from January 20: John J. Cal- 
lahan, William P. Sullivan. 



LAND=TAKING IN EAST BOSTON. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for the 
taking-of land for a public improvement 
consisting of the laying out and con- 
struction of Annavoy street, East Boston 
district, as a highway, from Saratoga 
street to Bayswater street, bounded and 
described as follows: 

A highway named Annavoy street is 
hereby laid out, from Saratoga street to 
Bayswater street, and ordered con- 
structed; the cost thereof to be charged 
to Federal Funds allocated under the 
Federal Emergency Relief Administra- 
tion program for Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Northeasterly by Saratoga street, forty 
feet; southeasterly by the southeasterly 
line of said Annavoy street as hereby laid 
out, five hundred twenty-one and 51-100 
feet; southwesterly by Bayswater street, 
forty and 14-100 feet; and northwesterly 
by the northwesterly line of said Annavoy 
street as hereby laid out, five hundred 
twenty-four and 92-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvement 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Annavoy street, East Boston 
district, as a highway, from Saratoga 
street to Bayswater street, under the order 
of the Board of January 17, 1935, and 
awards no damages therefor. 



tion of Nancia street, East Boston, as a 
highway, from St. Andrew road to Bays- 
water street, under the order of the Board 
of January 17, 1935, and awards no 
damages therefor. 



LAND-TAKING IN EAST BOSTON. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and con- 
struction of Nancia street, East Boston 
district, as a highway, from St. Andrew 
road to Bayswater street, bounded and 
described as follows: 

A highway named Nancia street is 
hereby laid out, from St. Andrew road to 
Bayswater street, and ordered con- 
structed; the cost thereof to be charged to 
Federal Funds allocated under the Federal 
Emergency Relief Administration pro- 
gram for Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive of 
trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is 
bounded and described as follows: 

Northeasterly by St. Andrew road, 
forty feet; southeasterly by the south- 
easterly line of said Nancia street as 
hereby laid out, three hundred one and 
30-100 feet; southwesterly by Bayswater 
street, forty and 32-100 feet; and north- 
westerly by the northwesterly line of said 
Nancia street as herein' laid out, two 
hundred ninety-six and 25-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines thai 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvement 
consisting of the laying out ami construe- 



LAND=TAKING IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor has approved the vote of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Tokio street, Dorchester 
district, as a highway, from River street 
to Edgewater drive, bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: 

A highway named Tokio street is 
hereby laid out, from River street to 
Edgewater drive, and ordered con- 
structed; the cost thereof to be charged 
to Federal Funds allocated under the 
Federal Emergency Relief Administra- 
tion program for Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Northwesterly by River street, forty- 
one and 8-100 feet on a curve of seven 
hundred and 4-100 feet radius; north- 
easterly by the northeasterly line of said 
Tokio street as hereby laid out, four hun- 
dred one and 70-100 feet; northerly by 
the northerly line of said Tokio street as 
hereby laid out, sixteen and 56-100 feet 
on a curve of ten feet radius; southeast- 
erly by Edgewater drive, fifty-one and 
4-100 feet; and southwesterly by the 
southwesterly line of said Tokio street as 
hereby laid out, four hundred six and 
.66-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Tokio street, Dorchester 
district, as a highway, from River street 
to Edgewater drive, under the order of 
the Board of January 17, 1935, and 
awards no damages therefor. 



LAND=TAKINQ IN BRIGHTON. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for the 
taking of land for a public improvement 
consisting of the laying out and con- 
struction of Duncklee street, Brighton 
district, as a highway, from Harriet street 
to Madeline street, bounded and described 
as follows: 

A highway named Duncklee street is 
hereby laid out, from Harriet street to 
Madeline street, and ordered con- 
structed; the cost thereof to be charged to 
Federal Funds allocated under the Federal 
Emergency Relief Administration pro- 
gram for Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive of 
trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street, purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Southerly on Harriet street, fort\ feet; 
westerly by the westerly line of said 
Duncklee street as hereby laid out, by 
two measurements, ninety-live and 1 1 100 
feet and ninety-eighl and 59 100 feel on a 
curve of ninety feet radius: northwesterly 
by the northwesterly line of said Duncklee 
Street as hereby laid out, two hundred 

fifty-nine and 6 LOO feet; northeasterly by 
Madeline si reel, forty and 67 100 feet: 
southeasterly by the southeasterly line ot 

said Duncklee street as hereby laid Out, 
two hundred sixty-six and oS 100 feet ; 
and easterly by the easterly line of said 
Duncklee street as hereby laid out, bj two 
measurements, fifty-four and 77 100 feet 



on a curve of fifty feet radius and ninety- 
five and 11-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the" public improvement 
consisting of the laying out and con- 
struction of Duncklee street, Brighton 
district, as a highway, from Harriet street 
to Madeline street, under the order of the 
Board of January 17, 1935, and awards no 
damages therefor. 



DAMAGES ASSESSED. 

The Mayor has approved the follow- 
ing votes of the Board of Street Com- 
missioners: 

In the matter of application for revision 
of assessment levied on account of the 
construction of sewerage works in Ber- 
wick street, West Roxbury, the Board 
of Street Commissioners, acting under 
the provisions of chapter 359 of the 
Acts of the year 1896, and deeming it 
just and proper that such action should 
be taken on said application, 

Ordered, That the amount hereinafter 
specified, being the annual apportion- 
ment of said assessment for the year 

1933, be, and the same is hereby, abated. 
Katherine E. Geary, Lot 1, $13.96, 

assessed June 4, 1932, Plan 1932-1, Part 3. 

In the matter of application for revision 
of assessment levied on account of the 
construction of sewerage works in Grove 
street, West Roxbury, the Board of Street 
Commissioners, acting under the provi- 
sions of chapter 559 of the Acts of the 
year 1896, and deeming it just and proper 
that such action should be taken on said 
application, 

Ordered, That the amounts hereinafter 
specified, being the annual apportion- 
ments of said assessment for the under- 
mentioned years, be, and the same are 
hereby, abated. 

Peter Gallagher Heirs or Devisees, 
Lot 7, assessed March 31, 1930, Plan 
1928^5, Part 1, 1932 apportionment, 
$30.80; 1933 apportionment, $29.60. 

In the matter of application for revision 
of assessment levied on account of the 
construction of sewerage works in Edge- 
mere road, West Roxbury, the Board of 
Street Commissioners, acting under the 
provisions of chapter 359 of the Acts of the 
year 1896, and deeming it just and proper 
that such action should be taken on said 
application, 

Ordered, That the amount hereinafter 
specified, being the annual apportion- 
ment of said assessment for tin 1 year 

1934, be, and the same is herein - , abated. 
Sophia C. Peterson, Lot 27. $9.24; 

Sophia C. Peterson, Lot 28, 
assessed February S, L933, Plan 1932 2, 
Part 7. 

Voted, That this Hoard determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvemenl 
consisting of the laying-out and construc- 
tion of an extension of Montmorenci 
avenue, East Boston district, as a high- 
way, to Tower street, under the order of 
the Hoard of January l. 1935, and awards 
no damages therefor. • 

Voted, That in the matter oi Thomas 

A. Regan ei al., petitioners for damages 

oned their estate by the widening 

of V-hland street under the order oi the 

Street Commissioners and Mayor oi June 

7, 1927, alter consultation with th( 
Department, and on its- advice, the Hoard 
assesses the petitioners' damages in the 
sum oi seven hundred and fifty (750) 
dollars; and consents that the Corpora- 
tion Counsel agree to judgment in said 
Case on the terms herein stated. 



92 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 26 



REPORT OF JOHN P. SULLIVAN, SUPERVISOR OF 
HEALTH EDUCATION, ON CONVENTION OF 
THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE 
ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE. 



The following report of the Supervisor 
of Health Education for the Boston Pub- 
lic Schools, John P. Sullivan, at Pitts- 
burgh, has been received by the School 
Committee. 

January 8, 1935. 

I was present at all sessions of the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, and attended the Educa- 
tion (Q) and Psychology (I) sections. I 
read a paper before the Education Section 
on "The Relation of Health Education 
and Science in the Curriculum." This 
organization is the official scientific 
organization in the United States. Over 
five thousand delegates were present at 
this convention representing every state 
and every large city. 

The highlights of the Education Section 
(Q)were: 

1. The sponsoring of science and 
health education in the curriculum by this 

A national scientific organization. 

2. The recognition of the needs for 
basing the science and health education 
program on sound scientific facts which 
appeal to the intellect in order to over- 
come the popular appeal to the imagina- 
tion and emotions. 

A digest of some interesting papers 
follow: 

Naturally no topic discussed by the 
groups attending the meetings were of 
more general interest to the public than 
those relating to the battle against human 
disease. For instance, the claim is now 
being made with increasing confidence 
that infantile paralysis has been con- 
quered, and a new clue to the cause of 
cancerous growths has been announced. 

The human brain and nervous system 
can be best compared to a radio broad- 
cast heard by thousands of receiving sets, 
and not to a telephone switchboard as 
commonly taught. This was the con- 
clusion of Prof. Paul Weiss, University of 
Chicago, who demonstrated "The Reso- 
nance Principle of Nervous Control." 

People are right-eyed or left-eyed, just 
as they are right or left handed. It is 
known that most of the people do their 
seeing with only one eye. First the 
dominant eye focuses on the object, 
much like a camera, and then the other 
almost instantly follows. Such were 
some of the facts about his study of the 
relative neuro-muscular efficiency of the 
dominant and non-dominant eye in 
binocular vision which Dr. Carleton F. 
Scofield, University of Buffalo, revealed 
to the group. 

Brains rule the muscles, or in the 
words of Dr. Gannt and Dr. Light of 
Johns Hopkins University, "You can learn 



to do some things without actually practis- 
ing the movements, which proves it is the 
brain that does the real learning." 

Dr. William A. White, superintendent 
of St. Elizabeth's Hospital, gave one of 
the main addresses on "Man, The Great 
Integrator," in which he told of his 
adaptability. When the teachings of 
astronomers overthrew the idea that man 
was the center of all things, to compensate 
himself for the loss of self-esteem, he 
begin to study the universe to master it, 
and became an astronomer, Dr. White 
said. When evolution struck another, — 
man's dominance among animals, — he 
became a biologist, and when he was 
told he was like all other men, he became 
a psychologist, the speaker said. In psy- 
chiatry, he concluded, lie the answers to 
many of the vexatious problems still 
unsolved. 

The writer was fortunate in obtaining 
a ticket to hear Prof. Albert Einstein 
present his theoiy that matter and energy 
were identical things in two different 
forms. 

Stressing the importance of chemistry 
in modern living, five scientists urged 
greater enrollment for the subject in 
high schools. Chemistry teaches "the 
scientific method of thought" and the 
techniques employed give the student 
practical means of handling other prob- 
lems of life, asserted Professor Simon. 
The solution of any problem, he pointed 
out, involves the element of judgment 
and the careful selection of facts, and the 
training in chemistry is of particular 
value because it emphasizes these factors. 
The cultural value of chemistry, an 
attribute formerly restricted to the 
classics and the arts, was stressed by 
Professor Hopkins. 

My name was accepted by the Govern- 
ing Council, as forwarded by the chair- 
man of the Education Section, as a 
Fellow of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science, which honor 
I expect to formally receive in the near 
future. 

Attendance at this convention has 
given me a fresh viewpoint, renewed 
courage and strengthened convictions to 
carry on the Health Education Program 
in Boston. I feet that the expense 
involved will more than be repaid with 
interest by a broader vision and the 
ability to help the teachers to the end 
that the pupils may be benefited. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. Sullivan, 
Supervisor of Health Education. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Upon January 21 the Mayor approved a 
contract with J. N. Fish for alterations to 
passageway at the Prescott School in 
Charlestown. Bids, opened December 
27, were as follows: 



Joseph N. Fish, $2,984; R. J. Connolly, 
Incorporated, $3,737; P. J. Cantwell & 
Son, $3,939; Klayman Construction Com- 
pany, $4,024; Maurice M. Devine, Incor- 
porated, $4,195; M. Solimando, $4,556; 
D'Amore Construction Company, $4,750. 

Supply Department. 

Upon January 21 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the C. H. Spring Com- 
pany, Incorporated, for sidewalk brick. 
A communication was as follows: 



Boston, January 8, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — In view of the 
authority given me by your approval on 
June 13, 1934, of my request, dated 
June 12, 1934, for permission to award, 
without advertising, purchases for 
F. E. R. A. activities amounting to 
$1,000 or over, I respectfully request 
that you approve an award, without 
advertising, of a contract for sidewalk 
brick, amounting to $1,306.25, to 
C. H. Spring Company, Incorporated. 
This concern is the lowest bidder. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Bids were as follows: 

Brick to be delivered to any of the fol- 
lowing yards as needed. Delivery, Paving 
Divisions: District 1, Columbia road, 
South Boston; District 2, East Eagle 
street, East Boston; District 3, Ruther- 
ford avenue, Charlestown; District 4, 
Chestnut Hill avenue, Brighton; Dis- 
trict 5, Child street, Jamaica Plain; Dis- 
trict 6, Hancock street, Dorchester; 
District 7, Highland street, Roxbury; 
District 8, Albany street, Boston; Dis- 
trict 9, Gibson street, Dorchester; Dis- 
trict 11, Dana street, Hyde Park. 

50,000 Sidewalk Brick.— C. H. Spring 
Company, Incorporated, $27.50 per M., 
select waters truck brick; William C. Nor- 
cross Company, $27.50 per M., water 
struck brick; J. P. O'Connell Company, 
$27.50 per M., water struck brick; 
Eastern Clay Goods Company, $27.50 
per M., water struck brick, delivery of 
2,000, or more, brick; New England 
Brick Company, $27.50 per M., water 
struck brick, delivery of 2,000, or more, 
brick. 

Total. — C. H. Spring Company, Incor- 
porated, $1,375; William C. Norcross 
Company, $1,375; J. P. O'Connell Com- 
pany, $1,375; Eastern Clay Goods Com- 
pany, $1,375; New England Brick Com- 
pany, $1,375. 

Discount. — C. H. Spring Company, In- 
corporated, 5 per cent, as authorized on 
government, state and municipal work; 
William C. Norcross Company, $1 per M.; 
J. P. O'Connell Company, $1 per M.; 
Eastern Clay Goods Company, $1 per M.; 
New England Brick Company, $1 per M. 

Net Total. — C. H. Spring Company, In- 
corporated, $1,306.25; William C. Nor- 
cross Company, $1,325*; J. P. O'Connell 
Company, $1,325*; Eastern Clay Goods 
Company, $1,325*; New England Brick 
Company, $1,325.* 

* Net, thirty days from date of invoice, or ship- 
ments from the 1st to the 15th of each month are 
discountable on the 25th of same month. Ship- 
ments from the 16th to the last day of the month 
are discountable on the 10th of the following month. 

Upon January 21 the Mayor approved 
a contract w r ith contractors as indicated 
for ether required by the various city de- 
partments during the year ending De- 
cember 31, 1935. 

It is recommended that award for 
Squibb 's ether be made to E. R. Squibb 
& Sons, 150 Causeway street, Boston, at 
the prices shown on the bid summary. 

The bid of the Mallinckrodt Chemical 
Works, of 72 Gold street, New York City, 
is irregular, as no copy was filed with the 
City Auditor as required by law. 

Inasmuch as there would be no ad- 
vantage to the city in readvertising, as 
only the Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 
of New York will bid on the ether speci- 
fied, I respectfully request your approval 



Jan. 26 



CITY RECORD 



03 



of an award, without further advertis- 
ing, for the Mallinckrodt ether to the Mal- 
linckrodt Chemical Works. 

Under these awards the City of Boston 
will be protected both against reductions 
and increases in price during the contract 
period. 

Approximate amount of awards will be 
as follows: 

E. R. Squibb & Sons, $122.08; Mallinck- 
rodt Chemical Works, $3,247.02— 
$3,369.10. 

Bids, opened January 4, were as follows: 

Approximate Amounts on All Items. 
The City to be Given Advantage on 
Any Drop in Price. 

Squibb's. 

150 Half-Pound\ Cans, Per Can — 
E. R. Squibb & Sons, 33.25 cents,* f. o. b. 
destination. 

400 Quarter-Pound Cans, Per Can. — E.R. 
Squibb & Sons, 18.05 cents,* f. o b. 
destination. 

Mallinckrodt. 

12,000 Half-Pound Cans, Per Can.— 
Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, 25 cents.* 

1,500 Quarter-Pound Cans, Per Can. — 
Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, 16 cents.* 

2 Drums Commercial, in Drums, Per 
Drum. — Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, 
27-pound drum, $3.51.* 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — Mallin- 
ckrodt Chemical Works, no copy of bid at 
auditor's, 1 per cent, 10th proximo; 
E. R. Squibb & Sons, 1 per cent. 

* Contract awarded. 

Upon January 21 the Mayor approved 
a contract with lowest average bidders 
on waste and wiping cloths for the various 
city departments for the year 1935. 
Three bids were received, two from con- 
cerns located in Chelsea and one from 
the Robert Bishop Manufacturing Com- 
pany located in South Boston. Two 
bidders, of which the Robert Bishop 
Manufacturing Company is one, bid 
on all items. The third bidder, the 
Textile Waste Supply Company of 
Chelsea, bid on seven items only. 

If all items are awarded to the Robert 
Bishop Manufacturing Company of South 
Boston the total cost will be approxi- 
mately $2,767.74 less 2 per cent, or 
$2,712.38. If items are awarded to 
lowest bidders, the Robert Bishop Manu- 
facturing Company award will amount 
to approximately $1,578.50 less 2 per 
cent, or $1 ,546.93, and the Textile Waste 
Supply Company award will amount 
to approximately $1,082.84 less 1 per 
cent, or $1,072.01. The total of these 
two low bids would be approximately 
$2,618.94, or $93.44 less than if the 
total contract were awarded to Robert 
Bishop Manufacturing Company. 

In view of this very slight difference, 
and the fact that the Robert Bishop 
Manufacturing Company is the only 
bidder located in Boston, it is recom- 
mended that a contract, amounting to 
approximately $2,712.38, be awarded 
to them as the lowest average bidder. 

Privilege of purchasing on same terms 
and conditions extended to February 
1, 1936. Bids, opened January 15, 
werejis follows: 

No. 1 Machine-Picked Cotton Waste. 

15 200-Pound Bales, Per Pound. 
Beacon Wiper Supply Company, 8.25 
cents; Textile Waste Supply Company, 
7.08 cents; Estate of Robert Bishop, 
8 cents. 

70 100-Pound Bales,' Per Pound. 
Beacon Wiper Supply Company, 8.25 



cents; Textile Waste Supply Company, 
7.08 cents; Estate of Robert Bishop, 
8 cents. 

10 50-Pound Bales, Per Pound. — 
Beacon Wiper Supply Company, 8.25 
cents; Textile Waste Supply Company, 
7.08 cents; Estate of Robert Bishop, 
8 cents. 

No. 1 Whole Cop Waste. 

84 100-Pound Bales, Per Pound.— 
Beacon Wiper Supply Company, 10.5 
cents; Estate of Robert Bishop, 10.25 
cents. 

200 40-Pound Bales, Per Pound — 
Beacon Wiper Supply Company, 10.5 
cents; Estate of Robert Bishop, 10.25 
cents. 

160 25-Pound Bales, Per Pound. — ■ 
Beacon Wiper Supply Company, 10.5 
cents; Estate of Robert Bishop, 10.25 
cents. 

Clean White Cotton Wiping Cloths. 

21 100-Pound Bales, Per Pound.— 
Beacon Wiper Supply Company, 11.95 
cents; Textile Waste Supply Company. 
11.46 cents; Estate of Robert Bishop, 
11.75 cents. 

5 50-Pound Bales, Per Pound. — 
Beacon Wiper Supply Company, 11.95 
cents; Textile Waste Supply Company. 
11.46 cents; Estate of Robert Bishop, 
11.75 cents. 

Colored Cotton Wiping Cloths. 

5 100-Pound Bales, Per Pound. — 
Beacon Wiper Supply Company, 9.70 
cents; Textile Waste Supply Company, 
9.35 cents; Estate of Robert Bishop, 
9.75 cents. 

5 50-Pound Bales, Per Pound. — 
Beacon Wiper Supply Company, 9.70 
cents; Textile Waste Supply Company, 
9.35 cents; Estate of Robert Bishop, 
9.75 cents. 

Approximate Total. — Beacon Wiper 
Supply Company, $2,836.83; Textile 
Waste Supply Company, $1,082.84, bid 
on seven items only; Estate of Robert 
Bishop, $2,767.74. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — Beacon 
Wiper Supply Company, 2 per cent; 
Textile Waste Supply Company, 1 per 
cent; Estate of Robert Bishop, 2 per 
cent. 

WITHOUT ADVERTISING. 

Upon varying dates as indicated the 
Mayor approved contracts with firms 
and concerns for supplies. Communi- 
cations from the heads of the several 
departments were as follows: 

Supply Depahtment. 

Boston, January 22, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Deab Mr. Mayor, — In accordance 
with authority given and approved bj 
you permitting me to award F. E. R. A. 
contract in excess of $1 ,000, wit houl adver- 
tising, I respectfully request that you 
approve the award to (lie Massachu- 
setts Welding Company of a contract 
covering tin- use, three days per week 
for a period of ten weeks, from January 
22, 1935, to March 31, 1935, of three 
welding machines with operators, at thi 
rate of s:;:i per day each, or a total of 
$2,970. The following bids wen- received: 

Three welders, each per day, Corilli 
Construction Company, $40; Massachu- 
setts Welding Company, s:>:>; C. M. 
Callahan Company, $36: three opera- 
tors, each per hour, Corilli Construction 
Company, $5; Massachusetts Welding 
Company, included; C. M. Callahan 
Company, $ 1.50. 



Inasmuch as the Massachusetts Welding 
Company is the lowest bidder, I recom- 
mend this award to them. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 22, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. M axsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — In accordance 
with authority given and approved by 
you permitting me to award contracl 
for F. E. R. A. purchases in excess of 
$1,000, without advertising, I respect- 
fully request that you approve an award 
to Brown-Wales Company of South 
Boston for a miscellaneous lot of steel 
to be used at the City Hospital on Project 
2235-B4-41E. Three bids were received 
as follows: 

A. C. Harvey Company, $1,058.20; 
Scully Products, $1,241.23; Brown-Wales 
Company, $1,012.88. 

Inasmuch as Brown- Wales Com pane- 
ls the lowest bidder, I recommend this 
award to them. 

Respectfully yours, 

Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 22, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — In accordance with 
authority given and approved by you to 
place contracts for F. E. R. A. pur- 
chases amounting to $1,000 or more, with- 
out advertising, I respectifully request 
your approval- of an award to the Quincy 
Sand and Gravel Company covering 
crushed stone and sand for Long Island 
F. E. R. A. Projects 2235-B1-190 and 
2235-B4-183. Materials to be delivered 
by lighter. The following bids were 
received: 

240 tons 1-inch crushed stone, Quincy 
Sand and Gravel Company, S2.95 per net 
ton; Boston Sand and Gravel Company, 
$3.75 per net ton. 125 cubic yards sand, 
Quincy Sand and Gravel Company. 
$3.68 per cubic yard; Boston Sam! and 
Gravel Company, $4.35 per net ton. Total 
amount, Quincy Sand and Gravel Com- 
pany, $1,168; Boston Sand and Gravel 
Company, $1,443.75. Discount, Quincy 
Sand and Gravel Company, 2 per cent. 
ten days; Boston Sand and Gravel Com- 
pany, lor payment on eleventh of month 
following delivery the following discounts: 
Stone, 2 cents per net ton; sand. 2\ cents 
per cubic yard. 

Inasmuch as the Quincy Sand and 
Gravel Company is the low bidder, 1 
recommend tin- contract In- gi\en to this 
concern. 

Respectfully yours, 

\\ \i;ki:.n \V. LOOMIS, 
Superintendent of Suppl 

Bos ton, January 22, 1935. 
Hon. Iii derick \\ . M \\-i 
Mayor if Boston; 
l)i: vr Mi:. M vi>'k. In accordance 
with authority given and approved by 
you to place contracts tor I. r i; \. 
purchases amounting to 
without advertising, 1 i 
your approval of an award to the Quit 
Sand and Gravel Companj c 
crushed tone and sand nu 

Project 2235 B3 

delivered by lighter. The fellow ■ 
were recei\ ed . 

i-inch crushi d 
Sand and Gravel Companj . - act 



94 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 26 



ton; Boston Sand and Gravel Company, 
S3.75 per net ton. 110 cubic yards sand, 
Quincy Sand and Gravel Company, $3.68 
per cubic yard; Boston Sand and Gravel 
Company, $4.35 per cubic yard. Total 
amount, Quincy Sand and Gravel Com- 
pany, $1,171.80; Boston Sand and Gravel 
Company, $1,453.50. Discount, Quincy 
Sand and Gravel Company, 2 per cent, 
ten days; Boston Sand and Gravel Com- 
pany, stone, 2 cents per net ton, sand, 
2i cents per cubic yard for payment on 
eleventh of month following delivery. 

Inasmuch as the Quincy Sand and 
Gravel Company is the low bidder, I 
recommend this contract be given to this 
concern. 

Respectfully yours, 
Warren W. Loomis, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS. 

Penal Institutions Department. 

The Marine Company has been granted 
an extension of the time of completion of 
their contract of ten additional working 
days. This extension is requested due to 
the extras found necessary on opening up 
the boiler and engine, as additional time 
was needed to properly complete the 
work. 

The following work is in addition to 
contract: 

1. Starboard main engine, dismantle 
high pressure piston, furnish and install 
new bull rings, piston rings and reassemble 
same, grind off shoulder in high pressure 
cylinder, drill out and renew follower 
bolt in low pressure piston, for the sum 
of $140. 

2. Port main engine, build up low 
pressure valve stem by electric welding 
for turning, for the sum of $52. 

3. Dynamo engine, dismantle cylinder, 
remove to shop, bore cylinder and valve 
cages, furnish and install new piston rings, 
new valve, and reassemble same, for the 
sum of .$220. 

4. Circulating engine, dismantle bore 
cylinder, furnish and install new piston, 
new rings, new rod and valve stem bush- 
ing in stuffing box, for the sum of $130. 

5. Removing old angles from eight 
ship frames under boiler and reinforcing 
same with 3 by 3 by f angle, for the sum 
of $250. 

6. Remove all front boiler casting 
from fire doors down to base and part of 
one boiler leg and renew same, for the 
sum of $215. 

7. Furnish and install three new ash- 
pan door frames and fit old doors to same, 
for the sum of $130. 

8. Testing and repairing pilot house 
radiators, relocate and replace speaking 
tube, repair stair rail, for the sum of $46. 

9. Relocate flag pole, furnish bronze 
deck socket for same, renew broken canvas 
on shelter deck after moving pole, for the 
sum of $68. 

10. Reefing and calking seams and 
paying with marine glue as directed, for 
the sum of $30. 

11. Fairing bent stanchions and bul- 
warks, furnishing and installing three oak 
fenders 8 by 8, fastening to bulwarks and 
shelter deck with f-inch U-straps, for the 
sum of $130. 

12. Remove six sections of circular 
ship rail aft, furnish stock and renew 
same, scale and red lead bulwark angle 
before setting rail, for the sum of $200. 

13. Remove old scupper pipe and 
replace same with lead, renew canvas 
before installing new scupper, for the 
sum of $30. 

14. Remove old canvas mast coat and 
replace same with sheet lead, install lead 



chafing piece under life raft, repair life 
boat as directed, for the sum of $75. 

15. Repair linoleum throughout saloon 
decks, remove bulges where necessary, 
furnish and install brass binding on seams, 
cut out and repair cracks in cement floor 
of main deck, for the sum of $90. 

16. Furnish and install brass chafing 
pieces along floor and above foot rest of 
pilot house seats, furnishing new brass 
pulley and lead sleeve when making 
repairs to whistle pull, for the sum of $45. 

17. Fit and repair doors throughout 
ship, including storm shutters on forward 
cargo deck, installing sixteen pairs new 
galvanized hinges with brass pin, one 
brass door stop and eight pairs of 3j by 
3h extra heavy brass hinges, for the sum 
of $156. 

18. Furnish and install one section of 
4-inch lead pipe for toilet waste, for the 
sum of $37. 

Total extras, $2,044. 

The same not being required by contract 
with the City of Boston dated December 
15, 1934, and the amount of two thousand 
forty-four (2,044) dollars will be added 
therefor, making the account as follows: 
Contract price, $1,383; total additions, 
$2,044; amount of contract, $3,427. 

Public Works Department. 

The Eagle Sign Company has been 
granted an extension of the time of com- 
pletion of the contract for the installation 
of two signs for Sumner Tunnel from 
January 15, 1935, to February 15, 1935. 
This further extension is requested for the 
reason that the pole which is to carry 
these signs has not been installed. 

A. Singarella has been granted an 
extension of the time of completion of the 
contract for removing snow and ice in 
District No. 10, dated December 31, 1934, 
from December 31, 1934, to May 1, 1935. 
This extension is requested in order that 
this contractor may be available for snow 
and ice removal for the balance of the 
winter. 



owner, Nantucket Institutions for Sav- 
ings, in care of Peter M. Hussey of 
Nantucket, Mass., has been notified of 
the unsafe condition of the building, but 
nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 



BUILDINGS RAZED. 

The Mayor has approved the request 
of the Building Commissioner to raze 
the following structures as fire menaces 
or nuisances: 

The building at 169 Silver street, 
Ward 6. 

The building at 21 Prospect street, 
Ward 3. 

The building at 1 Wendell place, 
Ward 7, is in an unsafe and dangerous 
condition, dilapidated and a fire hazard. 

The owner, Morgan F. Foley of 13 Mer- 
cer street, South Boston, has been notified 
of the unsafe condition of the building, 
but nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 146 Havre street, 
Ward 1, the foundation is rotted, gutter 
off, glass out, dilapidated and a fire 
menace. The owner, Michael D. Collins 
Estate, Walter L. and Albert S. Collins, 
trustees, of 18 Tremont street, Boston, 
have been notified of the unsafe condition 
of the building, but nothing has been done 
to remove the cause of complaint. 

The building at 21 Prospect street, 
Ward 3, has been vacant for several 
years, open to trespass, a fire menace and 
dangerous. The owner, Catherine Farley 
Estate, Frederick Farley, trustee, of 37 
Joy street, Boston, has been notified of 
the unsafe condition of the building, but 
nothing has been done to remove the 
cause of complaint. 

The building at 70 Cedar street, Ward 
11, is neglected, the shingles are off the 
roof and windows boarded up on first 
floor; it constitutes a fire menace. The 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 

(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1935. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Monday, February 4. 
Worcester, Wednesday, February 6. 
Boston, Monday, March 4. 
Fall River, Wednesday, March 6. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 7. 
Boston, Monday, April 8. 
Springfield, Wednesday, April 10. 
Boston, Monday, May 6. 
Worcester, Wednesday, May 8. 
Boston, Monday, June 3. 
Boston, Monday, September 16. 
Worcester, Wednesday, September 18. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 17. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 18. 
Boston, Monday, November 4. 
Lowell, Wednesday, November 6. 
Boston, Monday, December 2. 
New Bedford, Wednesday, December 4. 
New Bedford, Thursday, December 5. 

Rules for Examinations. 

All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent in 
the installation of wires, conduits, appa- 
ratus, fixtures and other appliances for 
carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
years' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for carrying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a Master or Journeyman Cer- 
tificate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be 
required to obtain at least 70 per cent in 
order to obtain a certificate. 

Applicants who fail to obtain the re- 
quired 70 per cent will not be entitled to 
re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent, or who fail 
on the practical demonstration, will not 
be re-examined for a period of six months. 

Any person found referring to notes or 
books, or misbehaving during an exami- 
nation, will be debarred from that exami- 
nation. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held, and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day. 

James M. Hurley, 
Payson Smith, 
Stephen C. Garrity, 
Stale Examiners of Electricians. 

For application blanks or other infor- 
mation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 413A, State House, 
Boston, Mass. 



Jan. 26 



CITY RECORD 



95 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 9. 

The report entitled "Return A, Monthly 
Return of Offences Known to the Police," 
for the month of December, 1934, has 
been forwarded to Mr. J. E. Hoover, Di- 
rector, Division of Investigation, Depart- 
ment of Justice, Washington, D. C. 

This monthly return is composed of the 
following offences: 

1. Criminal Homicide. 

a. Murder and non-negligent 

manslaughter. 

b. Manslaughter by negligence. 

2. Rape. (Abuse of female child.) 

(Rape, assault to.) 



3. 



robbery, 



4. 



Robbery. (Assault to, 

armed and unarmed.) 
Aggravated assault. (Assault and 

battery with dangerous weapon, 

mayhem.) (Assault with intent 

to murder.) 

5. Burglary, breaking and entering. 

6. Larceny, theft (except auto theft.) 

a. $50 and over in value. 

b. Under $50 in value. 

7. Auto theft. (Larceny of automo- 

bile and attempted larceny of 
automobile.) 
Divisions of this department reported 
on the above-mentioned offences col- 
lectively for the month of December as 
follows: 



Division. 


Number of Offences 
Reported. 


Unfounded. 


Actual. 


Cleared 


Per Cent 
Cleared. 


1 


51 
88 

141 
43 
59 
30 
40 

101 
5 
20 
23 
77 
32 
48 

208 


27 

41 

85 

26 

47 

17 

22 

84 

2 

8 

9 

38 

9 

27 

133 


24 
47 
56 
17 
12 
13 
18 
17 
3 
12 
14 
39 
23 
21 
75 


25 
48 
63 
20 

14 
16 
20 
18 
3 
11 
12 
33 
19 
17 
60 


100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100 .00 

100.00 

91 .66 

85.71 

84.61 

82.60 

80.95 

80.00 


2 


4 


6 


11 


13 


15 


16 


18 


17 


7 


10 


14 


19 


9 





The total percentage of cleared cases by 
all the divisions was 93.70, which, although 
not as high an average as the previous 
month, is a good showing for the depart- 
ment as a whole. The mark of 100 per 
cent attained by nine divisions particu- 
larly is worthy of commendation. 

The combined averages of divisions by 
districts were as follows: 

Per Cent 
Cleared. 
District A. (Divisions 1, 2, 4, 7, 

15) 97.14 

District C. (Divisions 11, 13, 17, 

18, 19) 94.52 

District B. (Divisions 6, 9, 10, 14, 

16) 89.44 

The commissioner is pleased to note the 
fine showing of the various divisions of 
the department in the percentage of cases 
cleared during the month of December, 
1934. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 10. 
The resignation of Leo Schwartz, Esq., 
legal adviser to the Police Commissioner, 
has been accepted, to take effect at the 
close of business on January 21, 1935. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

Conwnissioner. 



General Order No. 11. 

The Corporation Counsel of the City 
of Boston will attend to legal matters 
connected with the Police Department 
of the City of Boston. 

Charles S. Sullivan, Jr., Esq., Assistant 
Corporation Counsel, has been desig- 
nated for this particular duty. 

He will be accorded every assistance 
and courtesy by division commanders 
and members of the department, and any 
questions which he may ask will be 
answered promptly and with correctness. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

Commissioner. 



ACTING MAYOR FITZGERALD 
ADDRESSES MASSACHUSETTS 
STATE HAIR DRESSERS' ASSO- 
CIATION. 

The following is the address of Acting 
Mayor John I. Fitzgerald to the conven- 
tion of Massachusetts State Hair Dressers' 
Association, Sunday, January 20, 1935, at 
two o'clock p. m.: 

Madam President and Delegates to the 

Second Annual Convention of the 

Massacliusetts State Hair Dressers' 

Association. 

My first duty is to thank you for your 

kind greeting of welcome and to thank 

you on behalf of Mayor Frederick \Y. 

Manslield for your invitation to him 

to be present on this occasion. 

It is with keen regret that his Honor 

the Mayor finds it impossible to be with 

you this afternoon and therefore as t In- 



Acting Mayor of this great city I bring 
to all assembled here the official greetings 
of the city government and the citizens 
of Boston. 

As the representative of the city gov- 
ernment I desire to welcome all those 
who come from other sections of the 
Commonwealth as well as those present 
here from Boston; to welcome you all to 
this hallowed spot where American liberty 

had its birth ami which lias been a 
shrine ever since the Boston Massacre ol 
March 5, 1770. 

I understand that the delegates to this 
convent ion are to be in Boston For the 
next three days and 1 trust while you are 
here that you may have an opportunity 
to visit the many famous historic spots 
for which our city is noted and to ob- 
serve the progressive and forward-looking 
activities ol our leaders in business and 
public life and thus carry away From this 



city many satisfying and happy recollec- 
tions of your stay here. 

I am informed that your state body 
now represents over one thousand mem- 
bers and is growing steadily, for your 
business is one of the newer lines that 
have come to the front in recent years. 
I understand that in the shops owned by 
your members in this Commonwealth 
you have some six thousand employees. 
This shows that your business has be- 
come one of the real lines of activity 
in this state and through your employ- 
ment of these thousands you are helping 
to put into circulation many thousands 
of dollars. 

Our great President, Franklin D. 
Roosevelt, has said, "Faith in our gov- 
ernment and what it is endeavoring to 
accomplish, will bring prosperity." You 
show by your presence here today that 
you have faith in our government and its 
leader when you assemble here to discuss 
new ways of improving your business so 
that you might attract more customers 
to your shops, which inevitably will lead 
to more employment in your line. 

The strength of your organization is 
shown by the representatives that will 
gather here in the next few days from 
New York, Chicago and other sections to 
display the latest equipment being used 
in your business. Many of your mem- 
bers will purchase this new equipment and 
in this way will bring employment to 
persons manufacturing this equipment. 
Truly it can be said that you have faith 
in our President and what he is endeavor- 
ing to accomplish. 

I realize that you have much business 
to transact here and therefore I feel I 
should not extend my remarks beyond 
this point. However, I assure you that 
it has been a pleasure to address you and 
I trust that the activities of this con- 
vention, as well as all your efforts of 
the coming year, will be crowned with 
success. 



MAYOR MANSFIELD BESTOWS 
POLICE HERO MEDALS. 

The Mayor has received the following 
letter: 

Boston, January 15, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of Jan- 
uary 18, 1935, 1 sent you a copy of a 
proposed General Order enumerating tin- 
members of this department who had been 
awarded Department Medals of Honor 
for conspicuous meritorious service per- 
formed, and in which it was stated that an 
honorarium of $25 shall be paid annually 
to each of the police officers thereinafter 
named, and which 1 am informed was the 
result of your suggestion. 

There is to lie awarded on Tuesday, 
January 15, 1935, at the ball of the Police 
belief Association, a Walter Scott Medal 
and two Department Medals of Honor to 
members o[ the department who have 

especially distinguished themscb. 
meritorious service during the year ot 
1934: 

Patrolman .lames J. Mooney, Division 
2, 

rolman James F. Mulhern, Division 
■j 

Therefore. 1 respectfully reque.-t your 

approval for the additional payment ot 

ch as an honorarium to these two 

officers on account o\ the Department 

Medal o! Honor awarded. 

\ cry truly yours, 

Joseph J 1 bon uu>, 
Police Comn 



96 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 26 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 17 TO JANUARY 23. 



January 17. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



No. 1950 Beacon street, J. G. 
Mazar, trustee. 

National Can Company 

Ralph Haliburton 

Massachusetts Savings Bank. 

J. F. Cudmore 

F. Abramson 

Mary Warshek 

Jacob Patsetchan 

Harry Goorno 

S. Kamelakis 

N. Kouloplos 

Sakey Brothers 

H. Kardoore 

Victor Drug Company 

A. Gordon 

A. S. Putnam 

Howard E. Rhodes, Agent . . 

J. Deperri 

Leopold Morse Company 

DeBlois & Maddison 

Joseph Saytasac 



3 Sutherland road 21 

71 Locust street 7 

13 Rockland street 12 

45 Pinckney street 5 

1050-105S Dorchester ave. .. 13 

185 Chestnut Hill avenue.. . 21 

645 Huntington avenue .... 4 

695 Shawmut avenue 9 

2039 Washington street .... 8 

388 Tremont street 3 

414 Tremont street 5 

382 Tremont street 3 

694 Tremont street 8 

760 South street 20 

34 Atlantic avenue 3 

37 Park street 2 

136 Harrison avenue 3 

68 Dresser street 6 

137 Washington street 3 

22 Beacon street 3 

8 Sparhawk street 22 



Alterations, stores and tene- SI ,000 
ments. 

Special, can storage 13,000 

Alterations, dwelling 900 

Alterations, dwelling 7,500 

Alterations, stores 2,000 

Sign 100 

Sign 100 

Sign . 100 

Sign 100 

Sign 200 

Sign 100 

Sign 100 

Sign 100 

Sign 100 

Sign 100 

Sign 100 

Alterations, commercial 130 

Alterations, dwelling 500 

Alterations, store 350 

Alterations, offices 550 

Alterations, dwelling 150 



January 18. 



Michael Gogos 436 Huntington avenue. ... 4 

Thomas Hession 3 Morse street 14 

P. Dugan 7 Bunker Hill street 2 



Salvatore Asgrizzo 303 Saratoga street 1 

Boston Consolidated Gas Co., 19 Williams street 11 



Alterations, 
Alterations, 

ments. 
Alterations, 


restaurant 

stores and tene- 

stores and dwel- 


S200 
400 

175 


Alterations, 
Special wat 


d welling 

chman's shelter. . 


100 
145 



January 


19. 


None. 


January 


21. 



Ralph G. Carpenter 610 Washington street 3 

Sears Estate 181 State street 3 

Nathan Pearlman 212 and 214 Alain street .... 2 

East Bridgewater Savings 94 and 96 Commercial st 3 

Bank. 

Crown Shade and Screen Co., 44 Lochdale road 19 



Alterations, stores and sales- S375 
rooms. 

Alterations, mercantile 100 

Alterations, mercantile 750 

Alterations, mercantile 700 

Alterations, manufacturing. . . 200 



January' 22. 



Esther Margolis 

James W. Cullen 

Olga W. Ohman 

White Fuel Corporation 

Boston Elevated Railway 
Company. 

Michael Billis 

Isaac Dunkeless 

Charles W. Reed. 

Felton & Sons, Incorporated, 

J. Shapior. .-. 

Paul B. Watson 

John Samuels. . ; 



639 Harrison avenue. . . . 

23 Churchill road 

•'>."> ( Ireen Hill avenue. . . 

!t()0 East First street 

809 Gallivan Boulevard. 



94 Armandine street 

9 Balsam street 

45 Concord square 

516 East Second street 

350 Harrison avenue 

114 Commercial street . . . . 
219 West Springfield street . 



8 Second-class storage S150 

20 Third-class dwelling 6,000 

19 Third-class dwelling 7,000 

6 Special class shelter 350 

16 Special class dining car- 5,000 

kitchen. 

17 Fire, repair dwelling 900 

14 Fire, repair tenement 1,000 

4 Alterations, lodging 300 

6 Alterations, warehouse 850 

8 Alterations, store and dwelling 800 

3 Alterations, manufacturing. . 300 

4 Fire, repair dwelling 1,880 



January 23 



572 Columbus avenue. 



Marie McNeil. ..:.... 

Marie McNeil 574 Columbus avenue 4 

John F. McNamara 184 Friend street 3 

Boston Penny Savings Bank, 98 Hemenway street 4 

Nesahn Maragian 64 Moreland street 12 

Max Kabatznick 3205 Washington street 11 

New England Trust Co 241 Washington street 14 

City Institution for Savings. 1368 Commonwealth ave. . . 21 

City Institution for Savings, 1384 Commonwealth ave. . . 21 

3 

:; 

5 

in 
5 

is 



Muirfield Storer 

Provident Institute n for 

Savings. 
Trimount Co-operative Bank, 

Canada Dry Company 

Andrew T. Malloy 

James Lynch 

Knights of Columbus. ...... 

M. Mullen 

M. J. Hamilburg 

John J. Hall. 

Joseph Demas , 



230 Tremont street . 
36 Temple place 



24 and 26 Albion street . 

117 Heath street 

37 Pinckney street 

42 Hollingsworth street. 

44 High street 

23 Sackville street 

45 Essex street 

122 Harvard avenue. . . . 
1033 Washington street . 



Alterations, store and dwell- S2.000 

ing. 

Alterations, store and lodg- 150 

ing. 

Alterations, mercantile 300 

Alterations, apartments 10,000 

Alterations, dwelling 200 

Fire, repair store 100 

Take-down, dwelling 100 

Alterations, passenger eleva- 800 

tor, apartments. 

Alterations, passenger eleva- 800 

tor, apartments. 

New D. W. Merc 125 

New passenger elevator, bank, 4.770 

Fire escape, tenement 100 

Fire escape, manufacturing. . 100 

Fire escape, lodging 50 

Alterations, dwelling 300 

Alterations, clubhouse 390 

Alterations, dwelling 150 

Sign, cafe and offices 15 

Sign, stores , . , . . 25 

Sign, stores and offices 10 



LAND=TAKING IN WEST 
ROXBURY. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Winslow street, West Rox- 
bury district, as a highway, from La 
Grange street to Dent street, with the 
name of Sherbrook street or some other 
distinctive name, bounded and described 
as follows: 

A highway named Sherbrook street is 
hereby laid out, from La Grange street to 
Dent street, and ordered constructed, the 
cost thereof to be charged to Federal 
Funds allocated under the Federal Emer- 
gency Relief Administration program for 
Massachusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive of 
trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Northeasterly by La Grange street, 
forty and 1-100 feet; southeasterly by the 
southeasterly line of said Sherbrook street 
as hereby laid out, four hundred sixty and 
97-100 feet; southwesterly by Dent street, 
forty feet; and northwesterly by the 
northwesterly line of said Sherbrook 
street as hereby laid out, four hundred 
sixty-one and 75-100 feet, 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvement, 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Sherbrook street (formerly Wins- 
low street), West Roxbury district, as a 
highway, from La Grange street to Dent 
street, under the order of the Board of 
January 21, 1935, and awards no damages 
therefor. 



LAND=TAKING IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Whitridge street, Dor- 
chester district, as a highway, from 
Milton street to Hill Top street, bounded 
and described as follows: 

A highway named Whitridge street is 
hereby laid out, from Milton street to 
Hill Top street, and ordered constructed; 
the cost thereof to be charged to Federal 
Funds allocated under Federal Emergency 
Relief Administration program for Massa- 
chusetts. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 
. Northerly by Milton street, forty feet; 
easterly by the easterly line of said Whit- 
ridge street as hereby laid out, five hun- 
dred seventeen and 89-100 feet; southerly 
by Hill Top street, forty-one and 69-100 
feet on a curve of eight hundred thirty- 
one and 58-100 feet radius; and westerly 
by the westerly line of said Whitridge 
street as hereby laid out, five hundred 
twenty-nine and 70-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Whitridge street, Dor- 
chester district, as a highway, from Milton 
street to Hill Top street, under the order 
of the Board of January 10, 1935, and 
awards no damages therefor. 



Jan. 26 



CITY RECORD 



97 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 17 TO JANUARY 23. 





January 


17 








Plumber. 


Location. 


Ward 


Nature. 


Estimated 
Cost. 


Joseph W. Ahern 

W. S. Emerson Company. . 

Daniel A. MacLean 

Schwebr & Co 


. 57 South street 




3 
3 

11 
9 

17 
3 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


$75 


. . 2 Prince street 

. 10 Westminster avenue. . . 

. 1723 Washington street. . . 

127 and 129 River street . 


130 
200 

76 


Vincent A. Bolger 


New fixtures 


148 
55 










January 


18. 










. 412 Talbot avenue 

1276 Hyde Park avenue. . 
. 53 Dale street 




17 

18 

12 

14 

3 

21 

1 

7 

5 

3 

5 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 

New fixtures 


S550 


D. B. Karger 


195 

250 

50 


A. Yorks 


. 398 Atlantic avenue 

1589 Commonwealth ave. 

. 980 Saratoga street 

. 141 L street 

245 Marlborough street . . 
. 249-321 Charles street . . . 


170 


A. M. Smith 

A. Yorks 

Henry Melgoli 

F. J. Boutin 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


190 
150 
150 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 

New fixtures 


1.500 
5,000 








100 










January 


19 








None. 




January 


21 








Louis Litwalk 

James D. O'Neil 


202A Bunker Hill street. . 

103-109 Brighton avenue. 

. 10 St. Lukes road 




2 
21 
21 
21 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 

New fixtures 

New fixtures 


$30 

90 

165 




150 










January 


22. 














5 

4 

4 

4 

21 


New fixtures 


$100 








400 




. 99 Francis street 

103 Gainsborough street. . 
. 3 Sutherland road 






400 




290 






60 








January 


23 








John J. Doresy 

Joseph Seigel 






5 
4 
20 
16 
3 
3 
3 
3 




$100 


. 221 Columbus avenue. . . . 




95 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


550 






750 








80 


Charles H. Flanigan 

Bernard J. Bishop 

John F. McGee 








250 


. 945 Washington street 

9 and 10 Washington Street 
North. 




350 




95 



NOTES ON NEW DISBURSEMENT 
SYSTEM. 

Auditing Department. 

1. Prompt Return, on Receiving Notices 
Necessary. — The new disbursement plan 
cannot function efficiently unless the 
various city and county departments 
cooperate to the fullest degree. At the 
present time the system is working 
smoothly, except in one respect, namely, 
the return of receiving notices by de- 
partments. As a result of this delay the 
iiles of this department contain a large 
number of bills received from vendors 
which cannot be returned to the depart- 
ments for checking and verification until 
the receiving notice is returned. Depart- 
ment heads and officials will render 
material assistance to the carrying for- 
ward of the new plan by insisting and 
making certain that receiving notices 
will be forwarded to the Auditing De- 
partment within twenty-four hours after 
the actual receipt of commodities or 
services. 

2. Departmental Requisitions. — Requi- 
sitions sent by departments to either the 
Supply or Printing Department should 
be numbered, and should indicate budget 
items involved. Complaints have been 
received from officials in the Supply and 
Printing Departments to the effect that 
this detail has been overlooked in a large 



number of cases. The numbering of 
requisitions is essential for identification 
purposes, and should, therefore, not be 
overlooked or omitted. 

3. Discount Procedure. — The follow- 
ing suggestion is offered to departments 
submitting bills bearing cash discounts 
for prompt payment. The two columns 
appearing on the requisition form sub- 
mitted with the hills should be used as 
follows: The left-hand column should 
contain the name of the vendor and the 
net amount of the bill; the right-hand 
Column should show (he term discount 
and the amount of the discount to lie 
taken. At the top of the requisition 
the gross amount of the bills covered 
by the requisition should be shown. 
'the statement of invoices accompanying 
(he requisition and hills .should indicate 
the net amount of (lie payment to be 
made to the vendor involved. 

4. Pay Roll Requisitions. — In sub- 
mitting pay loll requisitions departments 
are earnestly requested to indicate on (he 
requisition (he subdivision of (he total 
charge in case more than one Persona] 

Service or pay roll item is involved. 

In shot!, if pay rolls submitted by de- 
partments cover charges against \ I. 

A L\ A 3, V 7 and V 11. each of these 

iiems should be shown on die requisition, 
and (he amount to he chained against 



each clearly indicated opposite the re- 
spective items. Attention to this detail 
will be of material assistance to this 
department in the posting of the various 
charges. 

Charles J. Fox, 

City Auditor. 
January 17, 1935. 



AMENDED DAMAGES. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
votes of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners : 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of May 22, 
1933, determining damages caused by the 
making of the public improvement con- 
sisting of the taking of an easement in 549 
square feet of land in the rear of Lila road 
for sewerage purposes, be, and the same 
hereby is, amended, by striking from said 
order the amount S32.94 awarded to Neil 
Mcintosh in said order and inserting in 
place thereof the amount $54.90; that the 
amount $54.90 be, and the same hereby is, 
awarded to Neil Mcintosh for the dam- 
ages so sustained. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of September 
18, 1930, as amended July 13, 1931, 
determining damages caused by the 
making of the public improvement con- 
sisting of the laying out of Seminole 
street, be, and the same hereby is, 
amended, by adding to said order the 
amount $120 as an award to Lillian V. 
Ardini, that the amount of S120 be, and 
the same hereby is, awarded to Lillian X . 
Ardini for the damages so sustained. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of May 10, 

1933, determining damages caused by the 
making of the public improvement con- 
sisting of the laying out of Travis street 
be, and the same hereby is, amended, by 
striking from said order the amount $150 
awarded to Nicholas L. Burke in said 
order and inserting in place thereof the 
amount $350; that the amount $350 be, 
and the same hereby is, awarded to 
Nicholas 1.. Burke for the damages so 
sustained. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of October 11, 

1934, determining that no person -u-lains 
damage.- by the making of the public im- 
provement consisting of the laying out 
of Boyd street, formerly Bowdoin square, 
he, aiid the same hereby is, amended, by 
striking out in the first and second lines of 
said order the words: "that no | 
sustains in his estate," and by striking 
otit in the last line of said Older the word: 
"no." 

That said order he further amended by 
adding thereto Joseph V. Connolly, $42o 
That the amount $425 lie. and the same 
hereby is, awarded to Joseph V, Connolly, 
for (lie damage- sustained by (he making 
of the said improvement. 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of July 27, 
determining damage- caused by the 
making of the public improvement con- 
sisting of ihe laying out of Cedarwood 

road, be. ami (he same hereby is, 
amended by -Hiking from said order the 

amount $90 awarded to Catherine \. 

■ iv in .-aid order and inserting in 
place thereof the amount $150; thai the 
amount $150 lie, and the same hereby is, 

awarded (o Catherine \ . Mel bun for 

(he damages so sustained. 



98 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 26 



THE OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE, CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR WEEK 

ENDING JANUARY 19. 





Dependent 
Aid. 


Mothers' 
Aid. 


Old Age 

Assistance. 


Administrative. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 




24,981 

509 

380 

25,110 

23,984 


1,453 

11 

8 

1,456 

1,496 


3,864 

40 

14 

3,890 

3,746 






30,298 


last week. 






560 








402 


tinued. 






30,456 


this week. 






29,226 











Financial. 





$179,686 50 
179,041 00 
178,778 00 


$21,900 00 
21,931 00 
22,004 00 


$24,692 00 
24,437 00 
24,344 00 


$13,243 20 

12,994 56 

9,081 40 




$239,521 70 






238,403 56 






234,207 40 










507,948 00 


54,884 00 


66,242 00 


38,241 82 




667,315 82 





































FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 8. 
I. George W. Shinney. 

It is with deep regret that the Fire 
Commissioner announces the death of 
Hoseman George W. Shinney of Engine 
Company 27 on Thursday, January 17, 
1935. 

Hoseman Shinney was appointed to the 
department on February 25, 1918. 

The funeral was held from his late 
home, 31 Monument square, Charles- 
town, at 8.15 a. m. on Saturday, Janu- 
ary 19, 1935, followed by services at St. 
Mary's Church at 9 a. m. The chief of 
department arranged for the customary 
detail to act as a funeral escort and 
Engine Company 27 was excused from 
duty in order to attend the funeral. 

II. Transfer. 

The following transfer which took 
effect at 6 p. m. on Monday, January 21, 
1935, is hereby announced: 

Capt. Patrick F. O'Neil, from Engine 17 
to Engine 24. 

III. Laundry. 

The contract for doing the laundry 
work of the Boston Fire Department with 
the Hub Laundry Company will be 
discontinued on Saturday, January 26, 
1935. A new contract has been made 
with the Merchants Laundry Company, 
which becomes effective on Monday, 
January 28, 1935. 

On and after January 28, 1935, com- 
pany commanders will deliver laundry 
only to the Merchants Laundry Com- 
pany. The Hub Laundry Company will 
have one delivery to make of finished 
laundry during the week of January 28, 
1935 

The Merchants Laundry Company will 
establish regular days for calling and 
delivering laundry at each station. 

IV. Income Tax. 
Report cards on income tax are being 
distributed to the department today. 
These cards are to be made out by chief 
officers, captains and lieutenants and all 
others whose salary without the reduction 



was more than $2,300 on December 31, 
1934. Members whose basic salary was 
.$2,300 or less will not make out these 
cards. 

All that is necessary to fill in is the name 
and address in the space provided at the 
top of the card. The company to which 
the signer was attached on December 31, 

1934, is to be placed in the upper right- 
hand corner of the card. No other infor- 
mation on the card is to be filled out. 
All cards are to be returned to Head- 
quarters not later than Tuesday, Janu- 
ary 29, 1935. 

V. Inventory. 
Form No. 1, Inventory form, is being 
issued to the department today. These 
forms are to be filled out as of January 1, 

1935, and returned to the office of the 
Fire Commissioner on or before Tuesday, 
January 29, 1935. 

In houses M'here more than one com- 
pany is located, the senior officer in com- 
mand- of the houses will include in his 
inventory all articles which are used in 
common by the various companies in 
the stations. He will note on the last 
page of the inventory the fact that his 
inventory includes the house equipment. 

VI. American District Telegraph 

Company. 

The following addition is to be made 
to the assignment cards of the American 
District Telegraph Company: 

Signal No. 118, 199 Washington street, 
Webster and Atlas National Bank. 
Apparatus to respond, Engine 4, Ladder 
24, District 5. Nearest city box, 1271. 

The following change is to be made in 
the American District Telegraph assign- 
ment cards. The only change is in the 
name of the subscriber: 

Signal No. 84 should read C. C. Bailey 
Company. 

Signal No. 412 should read Columbia 
& Myers Upholstering Company. 

VII. Boston Automatic Fire Alarm 

Company. 
The following addition is to be made to 
the assignment cards of the Boston 
Automatic Fire Alarm Company: 



Signal No. 322, 197-201 Congress 
street. Apparatus to respond, Engine 25, 
Ladder 8, District 3. Nearest city box, 
1421. 

Signal No. 334, 49 and 51 Franklin 
street. Apparatus to respond, Engine 25, 
Ladder 8, District 5. Nearest city box, 
1273. 

The nearest city box for signal No. 52 
at 59-63 Franklin street should be changed 
to 1273. 

The following signal number of the 
Boston Automatic Fire Alarm Company 
has been discontinued: 

No. 1249, 234-238 Devonshire street. 

VIII. Commendations. 

Lieut. Daniel P. Connor of Engine 
Company 21 is hereby commended for 
responding to and working at fire, Box 
3251, January 1, 1935, while off duty. 

Apparatus Operator William E. Kelley 
of Engine Company 2 is hereby com- 
mended for responding to and working 
at fire, Box 3516, while off duty. 

Hoseman Joseph W. Gorham of Engine 
Company 46 is hereby commended for 
responding to and working at fire, Box 
3291, three alarms, January 5, 1935, while 
off duty. 

Hoseman Frank P. Willcut of Engine 
Company 48 is hereby commended for 
reporting to and working at fire, Box 
3743, January 15, 1935, while off duty. 

Hoseman Charles D. Travis of Engine 
Company 43 is hereby commended for 
the assistance rendered by him at fire, 
Box 2463, at 55 Brookley road, January 
19, 1935, while off duty. Hoseman Travis 
notified the Fire Alarm Office by telephone 
of the fire, then entered the building and 
removed a young girl and infant to safety. 
Following this he worked with his com- 
pany until the fire was extinguished. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edward 
F. McLaughlin. 

Henry A. Fox, 

Chief of Department. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

Clerical Service, for State and Cities 
and Towns Outside of Boston and 
Vicinity, February, 16, 1935. 
Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 2, 1935, at 12 noon. 

For Boston and Vicinity, March 2, 
1935. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 16, 1935, at 12 noon. 

Warning: If all applicants cannot be 
accommodated on the above dates, they 
will be notified to appear on subsequent 
Saturdays. Applicants should note the 
exact date given on their notification 
cards. 

The usual entrance salary for clerks 
for State service is $900 a year. 

Persons qualifying in the examination 
may have their names placed on the 
State list as well as on the list for the 
city or town in which they reside. 

Applicants must be not less than six- 
teen years of age at the time of filing 
application. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience (2) ; spelling (2) ; arithmetic 
(including problems) (2) ; grammar (in- 
cluding penmanship) (2); filing (1); 
word knowledge (1) ; total (10). 

Passing Requirements: Applicants 
must obtain a mark of at least 65 per 
cent in spelling, at least 50 per cent in 
each of the other subjects, and at least 
70 per cent in general average in order 
to become eligible. 



Jan. 26 



CITY RECORD 



99 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Monday, January 14, 1935. 
Regular meeting of the City Council in the 
Council Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m., President 
FITZGERALD in the chair. Absent, Coun. 
Dowd and Tobin. 

SALE OF FERRYBOAT. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston; 
Office of the Mayor, January 12, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — With the opening of the new 
Sumner Traffic Tunnel to East Boston about six 
months ago, the Commissioner of Public Works 
placed the ferryboat "Ralph Palumbo" out of 
commission. It is now the opinion of the Com- 
missioner of Public Works that the services of this 
boat are no longer needed, and it would be to the 
best advantage of the city to dispose of the same 
at public auction, thus saving the expense of main- 
tenance while out of commission. I am, therefore, 
submitting herewith an order for the sale of this 
ferryboat at public auction at an upset price of 
$25,000, and respectfully recommend adoption by 
your honorable body. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be, and hereby is, authorized to sell at a 
duly authorized public auction, at an upset price 
of $25,000, the ferryboat "Ralph Palumbo." 

Referred to Executive Committee. 



WAITING ROOM, WARD 13. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 11, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Boston Elevated Railway, relative to your 
order of November 19, 1934, concerning the pro- 
posed installation of a waiting room on the new 
bus platform now being constructed on South 
Sydney street, Ward 13. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Boston, December 10, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — In relation to the memo, of 
November 22 concerning installation of a waiting 
room on the new bus platform now being con- 
structed on South Sydney street, the trustees have 
considered the matter today and do not believe it 
wise to take action until experience of the operation 
of this new loop has demonstrated exactly what 
ought to be done. They feel if something Bhould 
be done prematurely at this time at some cost, 
which would have to be undone later, it would be 
unwise. The matter will be closely followed after 
operation has begun. 

Very truly yours, 

Edward Dana, 
Executive Vice President and General Manager. 
Placed on file. 



REMOVAL OF SUBWAY ENTRANCE, 

WARD 6. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 11, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Boston Transit Department, with inclosed 
communication from the Boston Elevated Railway, 
relative to your order of December 3, 1934, con- 
cerning the proposed removal of the subway 
entrance at Dorchester avenue, West Fourth and 
Dover streets, Ward 6. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Transit Department, January 7, 19.""). 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — In reply to your letter of the loth 
ultimo inclosing copy of order passed by the City 
Council on the 3d ultimo, wherein the Transit 
Department was requested, through your Honor, 
to take up the matter of removing the unsightly 
and unnecessary subway entrance at Dorchester 
avenue, West Fourth and Dover streets, Ward r>, 
I respectfully report that by reason of the lint 
that tho location in question is a part of the 
premises of the Dorchester Tunnel, leased to the 
Boston Elevated Railway Company under author- 
ity of chapter 741 of tho Acts of 1911, it was 
necessary to obtain the views of that company on 
the question of such removal, and whether in that 
event it would agree to the cost. 

A roply has now been received from Edward 
Dana, Executive Vice President and General 
Manager of the company, copy of which I inclose. 



In view of the declination of the company to 
assume for rental purposes the cost of this work, 
this department cannot proceed. 

Yours respectfully, 

T. F. Sullivan, Chairman. 

Boston Elevated Railway, 

Public Trustees, 

Park Square Building, 

Boston, January 3, 1935. 
Col. Thomas F. Sullivan, 

Chairman, Boston Transit Department. 
Dear Sir, — Referring to your letter of December 
17, the trustees understand the inquiry to have 
reference to the raised exit platform and exit 
stairs and covering at West Fourth street and 
Dorchester avenue and not the incline in itself. 

They have no objection to the removal of this 
canopy and granolithic sidewalk provided it is 
not charged to the Dorchester Tunnel cost, as 
they do not see why the car riders should be charged 
double both for the construction of the project 
and then for its demolition for other public pur- 
poses. 

Very truly yours, 
Edward Dana, 
Executive Vice President and General Manager. 
Placed on file. 



HEATERS IN POLICE CARS. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 11, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Police Commissioner, relative to your order of 
December 17, 1934, concerning the advisability of 
installing heaters in police cars now in operation. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Police Department, January 4, 1935. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary, Mayor's Office. 
Dear Sir, — Replying to your communication of 
December 20, 1934, inclosing an order of the City 
Council dated December 17, relative to the ad- 
visability of installing heaters in police cars now 
in operation, I am in receipt of a report from the 
superintendent advising me that it would take 
some time to install heaters of any comfort to the 
officers riding in these cars, and, further, if they 
were installed at this season they may interfere 
with the installation of the two-way radio system. 
Therefore, I am reluctant to proceed at once 
to equip all cars of this department with heaters. 
However, when the two-way radio system is 
installed, the question of heaters will have my 
careful consideration. 

Very truly yours, 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

Police Commissioner. 
Placed on file. 



RESIGNATION OF GEORGE J. SWIDLER. 
The following was received.: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 12, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I have this day accepted the 
resignation of George J. Swidler as a constable of 
the City of Boston. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 
Placed on file. 



REMOVAL AND APPOINTMENT OF 
CONSTABLKS. 

The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of tho Mayor, January 14, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — The following-named persons have 
been removed by me from the office of Constables 
fur I In- City of Boston authorized to serve civil 
process, for failing to file the required bond: 

Jacob Goldberg, •">•'!() Harvard street. Dorchester; 
Robert C. Mains, :si Justin road, Brighton; Charles 
Horowitz, 540 Warren street, Roxbury. 

Subject to confirmation by your I orable body 

I hereby appoint the following-named persons as 
Constables of the City of Boston authorized to 
ii .. e civil process upon filing bond: 

George Katz, 12 Crowell Btreet, Dot 
Benjamin Rot arten, 282 Columbia road. Dor- 
chester; Robert E. Webb, 85 Kenwood streot, 
Dorchester. 

Reaped fully, 

FlUDDEIUCK \Y. \l \n i m i D, \l ivor. 

Tho appointments won- severally laid over for a 
week, under the law. 



APPOINTMENT OF \\ I ICIII'i: Kl oool'S 

Notice was received from tho Mayor of the 
following appointment, viz.: 

w, gher ol Goods: Andrew P, Thompson, 11 
Leveret! si reel . I Irookline, Mass. 

i aid ovei a week under the lav, . 



STATISTICAL INFORMATION FROM 
WELFARE DEPARTMENT. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 11, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit letters from 
the Overseers of the Public Welfare, which were 
received at the Mayor's office, January 7, relative 
to certain statistical information concerning 
Dependent Aid, Mothers' Aid and Old Age Assist- 
ance cases, for the months of October, November 
and December, 1934, as requested in an order 
passed by your honorable body. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Overseers of the Public Welfare, 

January 3, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — Replying to the City Council order 
requesting that the Board of Overseers of the 
Public Welfare be requested to furnish the City 
Council monthly, as soon as may be after the end 
of each month, beginning with the month of 
January, certain statistical information, the 
following statement is respectfully submitted. 

1. 

Case Load at the End of October. 
Number of cases being aided at end of October: 

Dependent Aid 23,503 

Mothers' Aid 1,449 

Old Age Assistance 3,738 

Total 28,690 

2. 
Number of recipients dropped from the rolls 
during the month, 1,627. 

3. 

Number of recipients of aid added to the rolls 
during the month, 1,702. 

4. 

The expenditures for the month, (a) care of 
dependents, (b) mothers' aid, (c) old age assistance. 
Expenditures for October: 

Dependent Aid 8813,268 34 

Mothers' Aid 98,968 83 

Old Age Assistance 110,641 00 

Total 81,022,878 17 

Respectfully, 
John C. L. Dowling, Executive Director. 

City of Boston, 
Overseers of the Public Welfare, 
January 3, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — Replying to the City Council order 
requesting that the Board of Overseers of the 
Public Welfare be requested to furnish the City 
Council monthly, as soon as may be after the end 
of each month, beginning with the month of 
January, certain statistical information, the fol- 
lowing statement is respectfully submitted: 

1. 

Case Load at the End of November. 

Number of cases being aided at end of November: 

Dependent Aid 24,125 

Mothers' Aid 1,456 

Old Age Assistance 3,788 

Total 29.369 



Number of recipients dropped from the rolls 
during the month, 1,323 

3. 

Number of recipients of aid added to rolls 
during the month, 2,002. 

4. 

The expenditures for the month, (a) pare of 
dependents, (b) mothers' aid, (c) old ago assistance: 
Expenditures for November: 

Dependenl Vid $81 1,556 64 

Mothers' \ul 9."... MS no 

Old \ ge Usistanoe 104,868 

1 81.014,943 14 

Respectfully, 
John c I. Dowlino, Exeoutive Director. 

City of Boston, 
Overseers of the Public Welfare. 
January 3 I 
Hon Frederick W. Mansfield, 

i] of Boston. 
Dear .'sir. Replying to the City Council order 
requesting that the Board ol ' 
Public Welfare be requested to furnish t: 

'• monthly, aa soon as may be after the end 
of each month, be th the month ol 

January. certain statistical information, the 
following, statement ia respectfully submitted: 



100 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 26 



1. 

Case Load at the End of December. 
Number of cases being aided at end of December: 

Dependent Aid 25,442 

Mothers' Aid 1,450 

Old Age Assistance 3,836 

Total 30,728 

2. 
Number of recipients dropped from the rolls 
during the month, 1,164. 

3. 

Number of recipients added to the rolls during 
the month, 2,522. 

4. 

The eNpenditures for the month, (a) care of 

dependents, (b) mothers' aid, (c) old age assistance. 

Expenditures for December: 

Dependent Aid S924.410 96 

Mothers' Aid U2,<117 81 

Old Age Assistance 120,138 83 

Total $1,157,476 60 

Respectfully, 
John C. L. Dowlinc, Executive Director. 
Placed on file. 



E. R. A. WORK FOR SINGLE PERSONS. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 14, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter 
received from the Local Administrator of the 
E R. A., in reference to your order of December 
3, 1934, concerning a proposal to include single 
men and women with one or more dependents in 
the eligible class for employment on E R A. 
projects in Boston. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Federal Emergency Relief Administration, 
80 Joy Street, 
Boston, December 20, 1934. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston, 
Dear Sir, — I return herewith order from the 
City Council of December 3 requesting that his 
Honor the Mayor take up with the Federal Emer- 
gency Relief Administration in Washington the 
matter of including single men and women with 
one or more dependents in the eligible class for 
employment on E. R. A. projects in Boston. 

Your Honor was present at a conference of the 
Mayors of the larger cities in Massachusetts in 
Mr." Rotch's office on December 13 when the 
matter of providing single men and women with- 
out dependents with employment was taken up. 

At this conference State Administrator Rotch 
read a communication from Federal Administrator 
Hopkins stating that he did not consider it was 
possible to increase the allotment for the State of 
Massachusetts. 

In view of this situation, Mr. Rotch stated that 
funds for employment of single persons without 
dependents could only be obtained by the discharge 
of persons with two or more dependents. It was 
the consensus of opinion of those present that such 
action would be inadvisable. 

Very truly yours. 

T. F. Sullivan, 
Local Administrator. 
Placed on file. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

The following petitions were received and 
referred to the committees named, viz.: 

Claims. 

Krokyn, Browne & Rosenstein, for compensa- 
tion for damage to property at 120 Milk street, 
caused by bursting of water main. 

Bernard A. Carroll, for compensation for damage 
to car by car of Fire Department. 

Charles Cohen, for compensation for damage to 
car by city team. 

Mary Colbert, for compensation for damage to 
property at 5 Sunset street, Roxbury, caused by 
city truck. 

Anna Goldberg, for compensation for damage 
to water boiler at 105 Woodrow avenue, 
Dorchester, caused by water being shut off. 

Edward J. Hickey, for compensation for damage 
to truck by employees of Park Department. 

Alice R. Hooley, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect at 496 Atlantic avenue. 

Charles Indingaro, for compensation for house 
at 87 Morris street, East Boston, being out of line. 

Little, Brown & Co., for compensation for 
damage to property at 34 Beacon street, caused by 
stoppage in city drain. 

Angelo Messia, for compensation for damage to 
property at 4 Bowditch court, caused by city truck. 

Anna J. Nichols, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect at 103 Aldrich street. 

Jane C. O'Callaghan, for compensation for 
damage to property at 55 Leonard street, Dor- 
chester, caused by bullet fired by policeman. 



Emerico Sarno, for compensation for damage to 
car by city car. 

Ernest Shapiro, for refund on refuse tickets. 

J. A. Singarella, Inc., for compensation for 
failure of city to return compressor and drills 
hired by Supply Department. 

Elizabeth L. Vozzella, for compensation for 
damage to car caused by an alleged defect in 
Clarendon avenue. 

Elizabeth F. Welch, for compensation for in- 
juries caused by an alleged defect in Fenway. 

William J. Williams, for compensation for 
injuries caused by an alleged defect in stairway 
connecting Columbia circle and Carson street. 

John Yesulaitias. for compensation for damage 
to property at 697 East Sixth street, South Boston, 
caused by tree beating against building. 

William J. McCarthy, to be reimbursed for 
execution issued against him on account of his acts 
as an employee of Police Department. 



LOCATION TO UNITED DRUG COMPANY 

Notice was received from the Board of Street 
Commissioners of track location on Forsyth 
street. 

Placed on file. 



HEARING TO GRANITE AVENUE BRIDGE 
COMMISSION. 

Notice was received from the State Commis- 
sioner of Public Works of hearing to be given 
January 16 at 2 p. m. on application of Granite 
Avenue Bridge Commission for license to lay and 
maintain submarine cable. 

Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENT OF WALTER A. MURRAY. 

Notice was received from the Mayor of appoint- 
ment of Walter A. Murray, 242 Foster street, 
Brighton, to be a member of Board of Street 
Commissioners for term ending January 1, 1938. 

Placed on file. 



BUS LICENSE TO EASTERN MASSA- 
CHUSETTS STREET RAILWAY COM- 
PANY. 
Notice was received from the Department of 
Public Utilities of order of department granting to 
Eastern Massachusetts Street Railway Company 
temporary bus license in cities of Boston and 
Chelsea. 

Placed on file. 

APPROVAL OF CONSTABLE'S BOND. 

The constable's bond of Ashod Donabedian, 
having been duly approved by the City Treasurer, 
was received and approved. 



APPOINTMENT OF FREDERICK T. McNEIL. 

Notice was received from the Mayor of appoint- 
ment of Frederick T. McNeil. 69 Hiawatha road, 
Mattapan, as a member of Board of Examiners, 
for term ending April 30, 1937, to take the place 
of John F. Hickey whose term has expired, said 
appointment to take effect January 11, 1935. 

Placed on file. 

INTEREST IN CONTRACT OF WILLIAM 
STANLEY PARKER. 

Notice was received from William Stanley 
Parker, member of City Planning Board, of in- 
terest of firm of Sturgis Associates, Inc., of which 
he is a member, in contract for architectural 
services in connection with construction of inter- 
mediate school in Washington Irving District. 

Placed on file. 

MINORS' LICENSES. 

Petitions were received for licenses for 153 
newsbovs and 5 bootblacks. 

Licenses granted on usual conditions. 



APPOINTMENT OF EXECUTIVE COM- 
MITTEE. 

President FITZGERALD announced the ap- 
pointment of the entire Council as Executive Com- 
mittee, with Coun. Gallagher as chairman. 



APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEE ON 
RULES. 
President FITZGERALD announced the ap- 
pointment of the following as members of the 
Committee on Rules: Coun. Wilson, Finley, 
Roberts, Green, McGrath. 



DUMPING ON CITY LAND. 

Coun. SELVITELLA offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Park Commissioner, through 
his Honor the Mayor, be requested to stop dump- 
ing of all kinds on city-owned land at the World 
War Memorial Park, or any other city land in 
East Boston. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



CESSATION OF FINANCE COMMISSION 
HEARINGS. 

Coun. SELVITELLA offered the following: 

Whereas, The Boston Finance Commission has 
publicly admitted that any investigations which 
they might conduct into the East Boston Tunnel 
land-takings will not restore the alleged profits 
made by speculators to the city and taxpayers; 
therefore, be it 

Resolved, That the Boston City Council at this 
time extends its thanks to the said commission for 
its three reports thus far with reference to the tak- 
ings and requests that no further investigations 
and expenses be incurred in further probings into 
this matter. 

Coun. SELVITELLA— Mr. President, on Octo- 
ber 29, 1934, this Council, under suspension of the 
rule, went, on record as favoring investigation of 
the so-called land-takings in connection with the 
building of the Sumner Tunnel. At that time I 
voted in favor of the order because I felt, I sup- 
pose like a good many members of this Oouncil, 
that the investigation would disclose something 
that had never been reported or matters which 
were not before known to the public. Since the 
investigation has been going on we have found, 
much to our sorrow, that the members of this 
"holier-than-thou" commission are under sus- 
picion themselves and that since the order was 
passed one of the members has been removed 
for committing acts which should have been 
investigated by the body at that time. I have 
reason to believe that another member will also 
be removed for acts which were not only unethical 
but contrary to sworn official duty. If this 
investigation after its completion would restore 
these alleged profits to the city I would be in favor 
of a continuation of this investigation, but, regard- 
less of the outcome of the investigation, it is a 
foregone conclusion that these profits will not be 
restored to the city. This is a fact-finding com- 
mittee. What has been brought out was a matter 
of knowledge and record before. It is costing the 
city close to $500 a week for this investigation, 
and I can see no reason why the taxpayers of 
Boston should pay this amount of money for an 
investigation that will do the city no good. These 
members themselves ought to be investigated. 
I have here a report from the auditor's office show- 
ing that during the past six weeks that this inves- 
tigation has been going on, George R. Farnum, 
the special attorney for the Finance Commission, 
has received a total of SI, 500 for his services, 
S250 a week, besides expenses which are added to 
his bill. He saw fit to engage the services of one 
Frederick J. Bradlee, a so-called expert on bonds, 
and for a period of three weeks the services of this 
man as charged have cost the city S300 in connec- 
tion with this investigation. There is no limit 
as to the time during which this investigation 
will go on; they have 550,000 at their disposal, 
and there is nothing to prevent these special 
investigators from taking the §50,000 from the 
taxpayers of Boston, spending it, and getting noth- 
ing in return. Where the members themselves 
are under suspicion, it seeme to me it is about 
time that this Council went on record to put a 
stop to this needless and wasteful expenditure of 
the city's money. Therefore, I say that this 
investigation, in view of the recent happenings, 
ought to stop, saving the taxpayers from any 
further expenditure of money. 

President FITZGERALD— The order will be 
referred to the Committee on Rules. 

Coun. SELVITELLA— Just a moment, Mr. 
President. I want to know why it has to go to the 
Committee on Rules. 

President, FITZGERALD— Under Rule 12 of 
the Council. 



RETENTION OF MARTIN H. KING. 

Coun. SELVITELLA offered the following: 
Resolved, That it is the opinion of the Boston 
City Council that the good of the city requires 
the retention as Superintendent of Police of 
Martin H. King, and that any efforts made to 
remove Superintendent King on any specious pre- 
text will not only seriously affect the morale of 
the Police Department, but will be an open invi- 
tation to crooks, gangsters, gambiers, thugs and 
others who survive on the proceeds of crime and 
vice to congregate in Boston, to the great and 
lasting detriment of the city and its citizens. 

Coun. SELVITELLA— Mr. President, the 
morale of the officers and men of the Boston 
Police Department is now at a low ebb. Men 
who have performed meritorious and faithful 
service to the city are becoming the victims of 
political chicanery and political deals. Two 
weeks ago a new Police Commissioner, with no 
previous police experience, being himself appointed 
as commissioner through one of the worst political 
scandals ever engineered at the State House, as 
one of his first official acts announced that he 



Jan. 26 



CITY RECORD 



101 



would remove the present Superintendent of 
Police, Martin H. King. Despite the fact that 
Superintendent King had ability and integrity, 
and his every act was above reproach, neverthe- 
less, regardless of his thirty-three years of police 
work and experience, he must step aside in order 
to put into effect a deal that was made several 
weeks ago. I believe we owe it to the people of 
our districts to do what we can to discourage acts 
of this kind, displayed toward men who have 
performed faithful and long service, in order that 
the men in the department may be encouraged 
to perform their duties efficiently and for the best 
interests of the city. I move a suspension of the 
rule and passage of the resolution. 

The resolution was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



PRESENT STATUS OF POLICE RADIO. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following: ■ 

Ordered, That the Police Commissioner be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to advise 
the Council regarding the present status of police 
radio. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, this Council 
has appropriated $350,000 for police radio in 
Boston. We are now informed that that has 
equipped but fi'.-e cars out of eighty. Therefore, 
in this order I have requested the Police Commis- 
sioner, through his Honor the Mayor, to advise 
us as to the present status of police radio in Boston. 
I understand that most of the money has been 
used for police cables and police telephones, for 
intercommunication between police stations in 
Boston, whereas when we appropriated the money 
it was with the understanding that it was to fully 
equip the Police Department with radio. At the 
time the Police Commissioner felt that red lights 
on boxes and telephonic communication between 
stations were far better than police radio. He 
reported to us long ago that the time had not yet 
arrived in the progress of the art when radio should 
be so introduced, that there was too much inter- 
ference, as a practical matter, in different parts 
of the city, and he based that on what he said 
he had learned from New York — where, inci- 
dentally, they^ have ten times the interference 
that we have in Boston. That was several years 
ago. The following year the Police Commissioner 
said that crooks could listen in, and that therefore 
it was of no use, and again the following year he 
felt that it was better to provide red lights on the 
boxes to notify officers that something was going 
on. And so it has gone, Mr. President. And 
now, after the commissioner secured an appro- 
priation of S350.000, we find but five cars out of 
eighty in Boston equipped with two-way police 
radio, while an immense amount of the money 
has been used for underground cables and inter- 
communication between stations, for work that 
may in the next few years be rendered absolutely 
obsolete by police radio. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



REQUEST FOR NON-REMOVAL OF 
SUPERINTENDENT KING. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston consider the 
matter of publicly requesting the Police Commis- 
sioner of Boston not to remove Police Superin- 
tendent Martin King at this time. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, I would like 
to amend that order. Since coming into the 
Council Chamber I have been informed that the 
Mayor of Boston has waited on the Police Com- 
missioner in regard to this matter. Therefore, 
I would like to have the Mayor of Boston inform 
the Council just what the status is, as far as he is 
concerned, concerning the possible removal by the 
Police Commissioner of Superintendent Martin H. 
King. I, for one, object to any man who has been 
but two weeks on the job of Police Commissioner 
being willing to throw on the scrap heap our 
efficient Superintendent of Police, Martin H. King, 
who has devoted thirty-three years of faithful 
service to the Police Department of the City of 
Boston. I know something of Mr. King's ability. 
He is an incorruptible, honest police official. As 
a police captain in Division 6, South Boston, he 
cleaned up the waterfront section of joints and 
dives, hitherto considered an impossible assign- 
ment. He is a man who has come up through 
the ranks and is one of the few high police officials 
in Boston upon whom there is unanimity of agree- 
ment that he is absolutely incorruptible and 
honorable. The latest impartial report on the 
Boston Police Force, written by the Harvard Law 
School and published in 1934, states that the 
Boston Police Force compares favorably with any 
force in the country. Martin II. Kin;' was the 
head of the force at the time when this was written. 
What has he done in the meantime to warrant, 
letting him go? And I say that when his removal 
is threatened by a man with no experience in police 
work, wlio has been hut two weeks on the job. it 
is unfair to the people of Boston that they should 
be compelled to stand for such political procedure 
at this time. 

The order was passed under suspension of iho 
rule. 



CHECK-UPS ON ELEVATED MEN OF 
SIXTY-FIVE. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston be re- 
quested to consider the matter of conferring with 
officials of the Boston Elevated Railroad relative 
to frequent and thorough check-ups on all men 
sixty-five or over who are operating street cars or 
elevated trains in Boston. 

Coun. NORTON — Mr. President, yesterday we 
had an accident in Copley square, one car on the 
Elevated road crashing into another. The man 
running the car that crashed into the other was 
sixty-seven years of age. It does seem that there 
should be a thorough check-up on the men run- 
ning the Elevated cars to see that they are fully 
equipped and possessing the necessary physical 
and mental qualities for the position. I believe 
officials of the Boston Elevated Railroad should 
be requested to have a thorough physical check-up 
made on all men over the age of sixty-five who are 
operating cars in Boston today. Some of us 
remember the awful accident in 1916 on the 
Summer Street Bridge going to South Boston, 
when thirty-eight people lost their lives. Cer- 
tainly, where there is but one man on a car, taking 
fares and operating, it behooves the officials of the 
road to be extremely careful in their check-up of 
men sixty-five years or over. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



RECALL OF AMBASSADOR TO MEXICO. 
Coun. NORTON offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston, be re- 
quested to consider the matter of calling on our 
Secretary of State for the United States to recall 
Ambassador Josephus Daniels from Mexico. 
Referred to Committee on Rules. 



RE-EMPLOYMENT OF DROPPED EM- 
PLOYEES. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston be re- 
quested to consider the matter of placing back on 
the pay rolls of the city all city employees whom 
his administration has let go during the past 
year, provided said employees performed their 
work satisfactorily while with the city. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, I want, 
first, to thank the Mayor of Boston for taking 
cognizance of various orders introduced in the 
Council looking to putting back on the pay roll 
of the city building inspectors who had been for 
ten or more years in the employ of the city and 
who had been suspended. Those men have 
been out since last March. I requested that 
they be placed back, under various orders, in 
preference to having new employees placed on 
the pay rolls. I am now asking the Mayor of 
Boston, under this order, to consider placing back 
on the pay roll old city employees who were let 
go for no good reason than politics by the ad- 
ministration during the past year, — men such as 
Charles Bogan, over thirty years with the city, 
Philip Chapman, twenty years in various city 
positions, John A. Sullivan, graduate of Harvard, 
over nineteen years in the Ferry Service and 
bearing a name that has been particularly honored 
in East Boston, Rudolph Watson, over thirty years 
in the city service, and Mr. Balfe, over ten years 
in the service. The Mayor of Boston has seen 
fit to change his mind in regard to the building 
inspectors, placing over twenty of them back at 
work, after nearly a year's absence from the city's 
pay roll, and perhaps he will do the same in these 
cases. I certainly trust that he will put back 
these men. It will mean no increase in cost to 
the city if it is arranged so that these men can 
do the work of new employees. I would ask 
his Honor the Mayor, now that the hustle and 
bustle of the campaign is over and perhaps political 
grudges are forgotten, if he will not examine into 
the cases of these men whom I have enumerated, 
and others, lending a somewhat more beneficent 
ear to their cases. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 

LOAN IN ANTICIPATION OF TAXES. 

President FITZGERALD called up. under 

unfinished business. No. •> on (he calendar, viz.: 

2. Ordered, That to provide temporarily 
money to meet (lie appropriations for the onam i u 
year 1935, the City Treasurer issue and Bell, at 

such time and in such amounts as he may deeru 

best, notes or certificates of indebtedness of the 
City of Boston not exceeding forty million dollars 
in the total, in anticipation of the (axes of the 
current municipal year; (hat all such notes or 
certificates of indebtedness be dated the day die 
money for the same is received, lie made payable 

with the interest thereon within one year of their 
date, and bear interest from their dale until the 

same are made payable •<< such rate as the City 
Auditor, the City Treasurer ami the Mayor may 

determine. 

On January 7. 1935, the foregoing order was 
read once and passed, yeas p.). nays 

The order was given us BOcond and filial reading 
and passage, yeas 20, nays o. 



CONFIRMATION OF EXECUTIVE 
APPOINTMENTS. 

President FITZGERALD called up, under 
unfinished business, No. 1 on the calendar, viz.: 

1. Action on appointments submitted by the 
Mayor January 7, 1935, of Rone Pritzker, Alice 
Bennett and Benjamin Waldman, to be Weighers 
of Coal; and John Lydon, to be a Weigher of Clouds 
and an Inspector of Hay and Straw. 

The question came on confirmation. Com- 
mittee, Coun. Selvitella and Gallagher. Whole 
number of ballots 18. yeas 18, and the appoint- 
ments were confirmed. 



INTEREST RATE ON TAXES. 

Coun. MURRAY offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the. Mayor be re- 
quested to instruct the Legislative Agent for i In- 
City of Boston to draft a bill for presentation to 
the Legislature reducing the present rale of interest 
on taxes remaining unpaid from 6 and 8 per cent to 
4 and 5 per cent. 

Coun. MURRAY — Mr. President, the Governor 
of the State of Massachusetts is trying to have the 
banks reduce the interest on mortgages, and I be- 
lieve we should try to have the interest reduced on 
unpaid taxes, because otherwise I do not believe 
many of the people affected will be able to meet the 
bills. Certainly a charge of 6 to 8 per cent seems 
exorbitant, and I believe the rate should be re- 
duced to 4 and 5 per cent. I know that the 
Governor, if appealed to, will help in this matter, 
taking action looking to reduction of the interest 
on unpaid taxes to 4 and 5 per cent, thereby giving 
to home owners who cannot now pay the charges a 
better opportunity to do so. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



MUNICIPAL REGISTER FOR 1935. 

Coun. GLEASON offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Statistics Department be 
authorized, under the direction of the Committee 
on Rules, to prepare and have printed the Munic- 
ipal Register for the current year; and that the 
Clerk of Committees be authorized to prepare and 
have printed a pocket edition of the Organization of 
the City Government; the expense of said register 
and organization to be charged to the appropria- 
tion for City Documents. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



CONTINUED INVESTIGATION BY 
FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Coun. SHATTUCK offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Finance Commission, through 
his Honor the Mayor, be requested to continue with 
the utmost diligence all investigations now pending 
before it, resisting all efforts, from whatever s< >urce, 
to divert it from the full performance of its duties, 
to the end that the public may know, as it is en- 
titled to know, the full facts with respect to the 
transactions under investigation, as to some of 
which certain preliminary reports have recently 
been made. 

Coun. SHATTUCK— Mr. President, I wish to 
call attention briefly to some of the recent reports 
that have been made by the Finance Comi 
I shall refer to two groups of properties only, i Ine 
is the so-called Hammond properly, at 17 -27 North 
Street, on the southerly i2 Merchants 

row, and 47-51 North Market street. It is one 
parcel, containing several lots. On April 1 1. 1930. 
it appears from these reports that Elisabeth C. 
Eyland, a straw for Lipp and Paul, got an option 
on this property for $500,000. A few days before 
that, on April 4, 1930, there had been a meeting in 
the Mayor's office, as a result of which rep 
the newspapers indicated tti.it the takings would 
be on the north side, but just after that, at the time 
of llus option, it was suddenly announced thai the 
takings would be on the south side, the side on 
which this option was taken. Lipp and Paul on 
June 10 look the title in the name of bonis Bind I, 
On August I there was the taking by the city, 
and on \ugusl 6, two days later, the cil 
(682,000 for the properly, or $182,000 over the 
option, in whu-h i here was practically DO 
investment. \ par) of this paymon! ■■■ 

cheek payable to Bindn and indorsed lo I ipp, 
for S-50.7ti9.7ii. This he deposited in his account 
at the Hank of Commerce and rrusl Company, 
and with a pari of tins he purchased 
bonds. $10,000 Phillips Petroleum Corp 
$25,000 Boston Eleva.ted, and $44,000 United 
States Treasury bonds, lie claimed in his testi- 
mony that he gave the $44,000 I'reisury i- 
Paul, taking no receipt, but Paul said thai ho 
never gol (he bonds. The resl of (he bonds I ipp 

claimed he loaned to his wife's brother, Jacob 1 . 
Beckntan, of Cadillac, Michigan, bui 
could be produced, For s >me time 'in- coup 

the Phillips Petroleum and I ' Is have 

60 cashed. ■. 

Prom the bank deposit, which was pud with the 

cheek. $50,000 - " ithdrnn •■ 

unusual procedure. Vsked what he did with it, 

d. " I could not tell you at pi 

ly tins transaction should be turdier 

investigated. There .ire sonic other propel ., 



102 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 26 



which the same persons were engaged in getting 
options, — 24-30 Fulton street, 136 Cross street, 
55-57 Commercial street and 56-60 Commercial 
street. On those properties options were ac- 
quired by Lipp and Paul in August, 1929, Decem- 
ber, 1930, and November, 1930, respectively. 
They were all taken by the city between May 14, 
1931, and May 19, 1931, at a profit to the specu- 
lators of S125.700. In these properties, also, no 
cash investment was made, except possibly on the 
first one. John S. Slater represented Paul and 
Lipp in these transactions, and received for them 
the city awards. Among the checks he issued was 
one of May 15, 1931, on "Clients account," for 
S50.000, payable to Lipp. This check appears to 
have been cashed by Lipp over the counter and 
not to have gone through his bank account. With 
the proceeds he bought S25.000 of United States 
Treasury bonds, and took away the balance of 
S25.000 in cash. He claimed that he loaned the 
bonds to his brother-in-law and gave the cash to 
Paul, but Paul denied receiving it. Asked what 
he did with the bonds, Beckman (Lipp's brother- 
in-law, who had a little chain store somewhere 
out in Michigan, loaning small amounts to people 
in connection with his store) said, "Well, sir, I 
don't know what I did with them. Some of them, 
I guess, I traded off to some people who came in 
the store and traded them off for what I could get 
for them. I didn't think they were very good." 
Boston Elevated bonds, selling at par, Phillips 
Petroleum Corporation bonds, now slightly over 
par and slightly under par at that time! And the 
Finance Commission report on December 26 
concludes: 

"Thus, S105.000 in gilt-edged bonds (S80.000 
bought on August 7, 1930, and S25.000 on May 19, 
1931) and cash withdrawals of S75.000 (550,000 
on August 7, 1930, and S25.000 on May 19, 1931) 
are not satisfactorily accounted for." 

And the most suspicious, the most peculiar 
thing is the disposal of the proceeds. Where 
^people are carrying on an honest transaction in 
real estate, receiving money for it, they do not 
draw large amounts in cash out of the bank, and if 
they do, know what they did with it and can show 
what they did with it. There is not all this mystery 
about it, one person saying that he gave it to 
another, and the other saying he never got it, and 
the man getting bonds saying he didn't think they 
were worth much and that he traded them off to 
people who came into the store. The whole thing 
is very "fishy," it seems to me. This investiga- 
tion should go on, and go on to the utmost limit. 
Then we have the recent effort to obtain the testi- 
mony of E. L. Dolan, former City Treasurer, to 
verify certain facts already brought out. He was 
a partner in and connected with E. L. Dolan Com- 
pany, stock brokers, in the same suite of offices 
as the Legal Securities Corporation, apparently 
with straw officers, and controlled by the E. L. 
Dolan Company. The Legal Securities Corpo- 
ration, it appears, sold bonds to the city, sinking 
and trust funds, to the amount of about two 
million. There were large payments between the 
two companies, the Dolan Company and the 
Legal Securities. Most of the payments to the 
Dolan Company were in cash, sometimes running 
to large sums, — another most extraordinary pro- 
cedure. Ask any broker how he does his business, 
and he will tell you that it is by exchange of checks, 
by checks paid and checks received, and that it 
is not on a cash basis, as a rule. But here were 
large amounts of cash going into the Dolan account. 
But what does Dolan say, when they try to get 
him before the commission? He says he is en- 
gaged in court, and then he is sick, that he will 
come in a day or two, and then he is sick again, 
and then all of a sudden he runs off to Florida, 
where he is now, and the officers of the so-called 
Legal Securities Corporation have also gone to 
Florida or somewhere else. Whether it is for 
their health or not, I don't know. But in the 
meantime Dolan's books and the books of the 
Legal Securities Corporation cannot be found, nor 
can the officers of the Legal Securities Corpo- 
ration be found. Now, we ought to follow this 
thing through. This thing ought not to be 
squashed at this time. It should be followed 
through vigorously, and that is the purpose of 
this order. I ask the Finance Commission to 
continue its investigations with diligence, not to 
be diverted from its course, and to let the people 
know what the facts are in those transactions, 
developing the facts in connection with these 
extremely suspicious transactions, so that the 
public may know what happens, and that this 
partial investigation may be brought up to date. 

Coun. McGBATH — Mr President, I have no 
knowledge in regard to the subject matter of the 
order that has been introduced, but I do feel 
individually, sir, that there should be, in view 
of what we have heard recently, some suspicion 
on the part of the Council as to whether this 
Finance Commission is a proper body to in- 
vestigate anybody. I have been reading the news- 
papers lately, and I have been astounded to read 
about the character of some of the men making 
up this commission, men who, acting as police- 
men, having themselves stolen the watch, are 
yelling "Stop, thief." I think the expression used 
by the attorney in the case, "Investigate the 
investigators," was a very good one. So far as 
land dealers and speculators are concerned, the 
public i9 aroused over the fact that large banks 
and wealthy trustees and political speculators 
for years have been profiting at the expense of 
the small home owner, and I was pleased to see 



in the inaugural address of our Governor that, 
for the first time on Beacon Hill in such an ad- 
dress, he takes cognizance of this fact and asks 
the Legislature, the law-making body of this 
state, to pass a law* whereby any man or any 
bank or trustee who purchases a piece of property 
within one year of a talcing, when the fact that 
there is to be such a taking is publicly known, 
shall be forced to turn over 75 per cent of the 
profits to the city, town or state paying for the 
property taken. For years we have heard people 
say, "This land speculation is bad business; we 
ought to do something about it." And yet it 
ends there. Now, for the first time a man comes 
into the office of Governor on Beacon Hill who 
does not merely say, "This thing is wrong and 
we should do something about it," but who makes 
the very simple and trite suggestion — in fact, so 
simple that it amazes the legal mind,- which for 
years claims to have been trying to stop this 
practice, that when this sort of thing is done 
75 per cent of the profits must be turned over 
to the town, city or state making the taking. 
When that goes into effect, it will not be worth 
while for these speculators to continue what 
they have been doing in this city for 100 years. 
The practice must be stopped, and I am glad 
that a practical method has been suggested for 
stopping it. But I wonder why this body should 
call upon the Finance Commission to do its duty, 
and I wonder if the Finance Commission today 
stands well enough in the minds of the public of 
our city to carry on an honest investigation. If 
these things are going on that it is claimed are 
going on, why isn't action taken by men elected 
as prosecutors, in the public interest, — the Dis- 
trict Attorney of the County, the Federal District 
Attorney? Why is it always this body that is 
called upon to wash the dirty linen of the city? 
It seems to me either the Finance Commission 
is on the job and should do this without sugges- 
tion from this or any other body, or should resign. 
Why should men in unpaid positions on this com- 
mission fight for their very lives to protect their 
positions? One reason is that they get fees, I 
understand, as high as S22.000 from men doing 
business with the city. I think either that such 
men should resign from the Finance Commission 
or that we should have an investigation of the 
investigators. It is too bad, Mr. President, that 
in our city, perhaps the cleanest big city of America, 
those who have profited most in the past, now 
that they are losing control in certain quarters, 
hold up our city to ridicule. I am sorry that it 
has been deemed necessary to bring in our Police 
Department in the way we have seen today. We 
have the finest Police Department of any city in 
the world. Even though the heads are changed, 
it does not seem to change the character of the 
rank and file, officers and men. And yet there 
are certain men who are always parading our 
shortcomings. Men elected to office in the first 
city in the country are the first to stand and raise 
the cry, first, of "graft," and, second, that the 
city is not a fit city to live in. I am proud that 
I was born in Boston. I love this city. 1 have 
faith in Boston, regardless of who the Mayor is 
or who the Police Commissioner may be, because 
the people who make up the great element of this 
city are clean, God-fearing, home-loving people, 
and, so long as the fires that rise to heaven con- 
tinue to summon their many thousands of the 
faithful, don't fear for Boston. God bless you, 
Boston. You are a great city, and all your 
detractors cannot tear you down! 

Coun. MURRAY— Mr. President, I would like 
to ask the gentleman who introduced the order a 
question. Have you the details of the Lowe 
transaction there? 

Coun. SHATTUCK— There is a report on the 
Lowe transaction among the reports of the Finance 
Commission. I have only mentioned two of the 
outstanding cases. The Lowe case is among the 
cases dealt with. 

Coun. MURRAY — I thought the reason why he 
did not bring that out was because he thought 
somebody might get burned. 

Coun. GREEN — Mr. President, in justice to my 
colleague from East Boston (Coun. Selvitella), who 
earlier in the session introduced an order along 
tnis same line which was referred to the Committee 
on Rules, I think that action should be taken on 
this order also. I move, therefore, at this time 
that Councilor Shattuck's order be referred to the 
Committee on Rules. 

President FITZGERALD— The order offered by 
Councilor Selvitella before Councilor Shattuck 
came into the chamber was referred to the Com- 
mittee on Rules, a similar order. 

Coun. SELVITELLA— Mr. President, for pur- 
poses of the record, let me say that my order was 
not similar. 

Coun. Shattuck's order was referred to the 
Committee on Rules. 



REPAVING OF WARD 12 STREETS. 

Coun. BRACKMAN offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the Mayor, 
to repave with smooth pavement the following 
streets in Ward 12: 

Ruthven street, Hollander street, Cheney street, 
Howland street, Warren to Harold street; Rock- 
land street, Warren to Rock street. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



DELAY IN HIGH-PRESSURE WATER 
SYSTEM. 

Coun. BRACKMAN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to inform the City Council as to the reason 
for the delay in completing the installation of the 
high-pressure water system in the Elm Hill district 
of Roxbury. 

Coun. BRACKMAN— Mr. President, that 
order calls upon the commissioner to explain 
to the Council the delay in the construction of 
the high pressure system in connection with 
Fisher Hill, Roxbury. There were two contrac- 
tors who received the awards on this high pres- 
sure system over a year ago. One of the con- 
tractors has completed his work for some time. 
We are still waiting for the man who has the part 
of the contract in connection with my district 
to finish his work. He has opened up several 
streets and has left them in a condition much to 
the inconvenience and annoyance of the people 
who live in that section. Therefore,' I would 
like to have the commissioner inform us as to 
what progress is being made. 



REFUND TO DANIEL F. McCARTHY. 

Coun. GREEN offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation to 
I authorize the refunding to Daniel F. McCarthy 
of the amount paid for a retail package license, 
provided that said legislation includes a refer- 
endum to the Mayor and City Council. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



MUNICIPAL BUILDING, CHARLESTOWN. 

Coun. GREEN offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation to 
extend the time within which the city may borrow 
money for the erection of a municipal building 
in Charlestown, provided that said legislation 
includes a referendum to the Mayor and City 
Council. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



REMOVAL OF ELEVATED STRUCTURE. 

Coun. GREEN offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation to 
authorize the extension of the Washington Street 
Tunnel to Sullivan square and the removal of the 
elevated structure in Charlestown, provided that 
said legislation includes a referendum to the Mayor 
and City Council. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



NAMING OF PHILIP L. DOYLE 
PLAYGROUND. 

Coun. ENGLERT offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Park Commissioners, through 
his Honor the Mayor, be instructed to change the 
name of the Cornwall Street Playground to the 
Philip L. Doyle Playground, Ward 11. Philip L. 
Doyle was a World War veteran, a public-spirited 
citizen, and recently died. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



BUDGET PLAN, E. R. A. EMPLOYEES. 

Coun. ROBERTS offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to ask the E. R. A. authorities to investigate 
the operation of the so-called "Budget Plan" 
on E. R. A. employees to the end that there may 
be no unjust discrimination. 

Coun. ROBERTS— Mr. President, I am afraid 
that the Council members know too little about 
the operation of the so-called E. R. A. in this city, 
and one of my purposes in introducing this order 
is to have it at least on the record that the Council 
has nothing to do with the creation of some of the 
particular jobs under this item. Two weeks 
ago we were given to understand that a budget 
plan was put into operation on E. R. A. and my 
information at the present time in connection 
with several projects is that there is now a so- 
called budget plan. I don't believe that the 
Mayor or any other city official is connected with 
it, but I do think an investigation should be made 
to find out about the operation of the so-called 
budget plan, and also the job of supervision of so- 
called non-relief. I do not believe the public 
know that there is today a class classified as non- 
relief, so classified because their special training 
is supposed to enable them to take over some special 
job. So far as we know, there are many unem- 
ployed in Boston with no means of livelihood who 
should take over these jobs, and when the Mayor 
is investigating the so-called budget plan, I think 
the matter of the so-called non-relief workers 
affected by these activities should be investigated. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



Jan. 26 



CITY RECORD 



103 



RECESS. 

By direction of President FITZGERALD the 
Council, at 3.11 p. m., went into executive session. 
The members reassembled in the Council Chamber 
and were called to order by President FITZ- 
GERALD at 4.19 p. m. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS. 

Coun. GALLAGHER, for the Executive Com- 
mittee, submitted the following: 

1. Report on communication and order from 
his Honor the Mayor (referred January 7) with 
reference to appropriation for Municipal Employ- 
ment Bureau — recommending passage of accom- 
panying new draft, viz.: 

Ordered, That the sum of $I,UC0 be, and hereby 
is, appropriated, to be expended by the Municipal 
Employment Bureau, under the direction of the 
Mayor, in the prosecution of its duties, said sum 
to be charged to the Reserve Fund, when made. 

Report accepted; order passed, yeas, 16, nays 2. 

Yeas — Coun. Agnew, Brackman, Doherty, Don- 
ovan, Englert, Finley, Fish, Fitzgerald, Gallagher, 
Goldman, Green, Kerrigan, McGrath, Murray, 
Selvitella, Shattuck — 16. 

Nays — Coun. Norton, Wilson — 2. 

2. Report on petition of Alice M. Ralph (re- 
ferred November 19, 1934) to be paid annuity 
on account of death of her husband, John G. 
Ralph, late member of Boston Police Department 
— recommending passage of accompanying order, 
viz.: 

Ordered, That under the provisions of chapter 
340 of the Acts of 1933, an annuity of nineteen 
hundred dollars be allowed and paid to Alice M. 
Ralph, widow of John G. Ralph, a member of the 
Police Department who died on October 7, 1934. 
from injuries received in the performance of his 
duty: said annuity being made up of allowance 
as follows: 

For the widow, Alice M. Ralph, so long as she 
remains unmarried, $1,000 per annum. 

For the following-named children, during such 
time as they are under the age of eighteen or over 
said age and physically or mentally incapacitated 
from earnings, S900 per annum. 

John G, Ralph, born July 5, 1918; Dorothy M. 
Ralph, born August 5, 1920; Irene F. Ralph, born 
January 9, 1922; Thomas V. Ralph, born Feb- 
ruary 14, 1926; Agnes E. Ralph, born December 
19, 1930; William J. Ralph, born December 5, 
1932,— 

the payments to date from October 8, 1934, and 
to be charged to the appropriation for Police De- 
partment, Pensions and Annuities. 

Report accepted; said order passed. 

3. Report on petition of Edith C. Brickley 
(referred December 2, 1934) to be paid annuity on 
account of death of her husband, James Brickley, 
late member of Boston Police Department — 
recommending passage of accompanying order, 
viz.: 

Ordered, That under the provisions of chapter 
340 of the Acts of 1933, an annuity of fourteen 
hundred dollars be allowed and paid to Edith C. 
Brickley, widow of James Brickley, a member of 
the Police Department who was killed in the 
performance of his duty on November 25, 1934; 
said annuity being made up of allowances as 
follows: 

For the widow, Edith C. Brickley, so long as she 
remains unmarried, 51,000 per annum. 

For each of the following-named children, 
during such time as she is under the age of eighteen 
or over said age and physically or mentally in- 
capacitated from earning, S200 per annum. 

Edith C. Brickley, born August 10, 1921; Janet 
H. Brickley, born July 24, 1931 — 
the payments to date from November 26, 1934, 
and to be charged to the appropriation for Police 
Department, Pensions and Annuities. 

Report accepted; said order passed. 



LOCKER BUILDING, CHESTNUT HILL 
PLAYGROUND. 

Coun. AGNEW offered the following: 
Ordered, That the sum of twenty-five thousand 
dollars be, and the same hereby is, appropriated, 
to be expended, under the direction of the Park 
Commission, for the construction of a locker 
building, etc., on the Chestnut Hill Playground, 
and that to meet said appropriation the City 
Treasurer be authorized to issue, from time to 
time, upon the request of the Mayor, bonds or 
certificates of indebtedness of the city to said 
amount. 

Referred to the Committee on Finance. 



COMMITTEE ON FERRYBOAT 
"RALPH PALUMBO." 

Coun. GREEN and Coun. SELVITELLA 
offered the following: 

Ordered, That the President be requested to 
appoint a special committee of five members of 
the City Council for the purpose of inspecting and 
ascertaining the condition of the ferryboat " Ralph 
Palumbo" and reporting their findings to the 
City Council. 



Passed under suspension of the rule, and the 
President appointed as said committee Coun. 
Doherty, Kerrigan, Finley, Green and Selvitella. 



CLOSING OF CHELSEA NORTH BRIDGE. 
Coun. GREEN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the Mayor, 
to immediately close the Chelsea North Bridge, 
which has been declared unsafe and a menace to 
life and property, until proper repairs have been 
made, or a new bridge erected. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



RESTORED POWERS TO CITY COUNCIL. 
Coun. GREEN offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
favors the enactment of Legislation that will 
restore to the City Council the powers and 
duties taken away with the revision of the present 
City Charter, provided said legislation includes a 
referendum to the Mayor and City Council. 

Referred, on motion of Coun. WILSON, to the 
Committee on Legislative Matters, when ap- 
pointed. 

SAVIN HILL BATH HOUSE. 
Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Park Commissioners, through 
his Honor the Mayor, be requested to repair the 
Savin Hill Bath House, damaged recently by fire, 
in order that it may be available for bathers when 
the bathing season opens this summer. 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to make application for a P. W. A. loan to 
construct a new bath, house at Savin Hill Beach. 

Severally passed under suspension of the rule. 



INCLOSING COLUMBUS STADIUM. 
Coun. KERRIGAN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Park Commission be re- 
quested, through his Honor the Mayor, to con- 
sider the advisability of inclosing the Columbus 
Stadium to conform to the plan suggested by the 
chairman of the School Committee, in order that 
all schoolboy game3 may be played on city-owned 
playgrounds. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



GAS AND ELECTRIC RATES IN BOSTON. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to advise the City Council as to what 
steps he is taking in regard to the gas and electric 
light rates in Boston. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, New York 
City is in a turmoil over its electric light rates, 
which are higher than those of Boston, and the 
President of the United States has entered into 
that controversy through Secretary Ickes. Yester- 
day Mayor LaGuardia of New York made a blanket 
request that the rates of New York City, which as I 
say, are higher than those of Boston, be reduced 
20 per cent. I ask his Honor the Mayor on this 
burning question to tell us what he is doing or pre- 
paring to do. The Legislature has met, and I 
understand that the time for filing bills expired 
last Saturday, but I suppose it is still not too late 
to take action in the matter. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



PLANS FOR UNACCEPTED STREETS. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works, through his Honor the Mayor, be requested 
to consider the advisability of making plans now 
for the repairing of unaccepted streets in the 
suburban wards of Boston in tho near future. 

Passed under suspension of the rule, 



PROPERTY PREVIOl SL"5 ["AX-EXEMPT. 
Coun. NORTON offered tho following: 
Ordered, That the Board oi Assessors, through 

his Honor the Mayor, advise the Council regarding 
the location of each piece of property or building 
placed on the tax rolls tins year thai "as tax- 
exempt last year, together with the assessment of 
said piece of property. This order to apply only 
to pieces of property assessed at $20,000 or more 
in value. 
Coun. NORTON Mr. President, 1 understand 

that for the first time in our municipal history tho 
City of Boston is going to attempt to collect taxes 
from certain property that in past years has been 
tax-exempt. I am interested to know, and 1 

: the ( lounoil should be kept inter 
to just how the matter stands at the present time. 



The chances are that the city will have to go into 
court, and perhaps new legislation will be needed. 
The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



OFFICIAL PARTICIPATION IN LATIN- 
SCHOOL ANNIVERSARY. 

Coun. WILSON offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be, and 
hereby is, respectfully requested to arrange at 
once for suitable and appropriate official partici- 
pation, on April 22 and 23, 1935, by the City of 
Boston in the 300th anniversary of the founding 
of the Boston Public Latin School in 1635 as the 
first public school in America. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, I believe that 
a city which prides itself on being the educational 
center of the country, Boston, can well afford to 
take steps looking to some official participation in 
this anniversary of the first free public school in 
America. This order supplements an order which 
I introduced as early as February 3, 1934, in 
which I endeavored to call the attention of his 
Honor the Mayor to this matter. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



APPROPRIATION FOR GRANOLITHIC 
SIDEWALKS. 

Coun. WILSON offered the following: 

Ordered, That the sum of $50,000 be, and 
hereby is, appropriated, to be expended, under the 
direction of the Commissioner of Public Works, 
for the construction of granolithic sidewalks, and 
that to meet such expense the City Treasurer be 
authorized to issue, from time to time, upon the 
request of the Mayor, bonds or certificates of in- 
debtedness of the city to said amount. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, a substantial 
amount of street work was done last year, and 
more is contemplated this year, with government 
aid, as part of the E. R. A. Residents on the 
streets so favored, of course, welcome any real 
degree of relief, especially during such periods of 
the year as the streets would be otherwise im- 
passable. But the government authorizes and 
agrees to pay for no sidewalks and no edgestones. 
We will hope that eventually every public street, 
in a city as old and as large as Boston, will have 
modern, up-to-date sidewalks. I believe that, not 
only as a matter of ordinary comfort and con- 
venience but from a safety viewpoint, edgestones 
on any macadam street are a modern necessity. 
The economical and sensible time to set the edge- 
stones is when the street is first laid out, accepted 
and constructed. I believe that is economy and 
ordinary common sense. I therefore urge that 
arrangements be independently made by the city 
for the setting of edgestones in all streets which 
are being laid out and built as part of the Federal 
E. R. A. I believe such construction work is 
more in the nature of a necessity than a luxury, 
and any construction work in the nature of a real 
public improvement, especially in hard times, 
which may be contemplated to last fifteen or 
twenty years, I believe justifies a loan order rather 
than a lumpappropriation. There is ample prece- 
dent for such a loan order. A similar order, 
which I introduced during 1929 was finally passed 
by the City Council and received the Mayor's 
approval on August 27, 1929. I make this state- 
ment at this time trusting that the Finance Com- 
mittee of the City Council, when appointed, will 
consider this particular matter as soon as possible, 
in order that it may be considered as a possible 
item in the budget appropriation for the year we 
are now beginning. I repeat that I wish to call 
to the attention of the Finance Committee, when 
and if appointed, that there is plenty of precedent 
for a loan order for sidewalks and edgestones, in 
view of the action we have already taken in the 
past, and which I have referred to. 

The order was referred to the Committee on 
Finance, when appointed. 

Adjourned, at 4. 35 p. m., on motion of Coun. 
FISH, to meet on Monday, January 21, 1935, at 
2 p. m. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during a trial period «'l thirty 
(30) days, Public Uley No. 908 is one 
from Massachusetts avenue to 
Marlborough street, effective January 22, 
i <>.;-, 



CHIC Mil) POI ICI 

Although the numerical strength of the 
Chicago poliee department has been re- 
duced in the last two years from ap 
mately 6,700 to 6.000. the number oi men 
on foot patrol his been increased 150 per 
cent, or about 1,900. 



104 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 26 



OWNED AND RENTED HOMES IN 
UNITED STATES, NEW ENGLAND AND 
MASSACHUSETTS, 1930— ALSO BOSTON. 

Total homes in United States, 29,904,- 
663, of which 14,002,074 or 46.8 per cent 
were owned, 15,319,817 or 51.2 per cent 
were rented, and 582,772 were of un- 
known tenure. Native white families, 
20,968,803; foreign-born white families 
(the head of the family being a foreign- 
born white person), 5,736,491; Negro 
families, 2,803,756; other races, 395,613. 

The native white families owned 10,- 
255,682 homes and rented 10,314,500 
homes; the foreign-born white families 
owned 2,968,707 homes and rented 2,690,- 
300 homes; the Negro families owned 669,- 
645 homes and rented 2,050,217 homes; 
the other races owned 108,040 homes and 
rented 264,800 homes. 

Total homes in New England, 1,981,- 
499, of which 915,441 or 46.2 per cent 
were owned, 1,042,521 or 52.6 per cent 
were rented, and 23,537 were of un- 
known tenure. Native white families, 
1,203,304; foreign-born white families, 
753,231; Negro families, 22,864; other 
races, 2,100. 

Total homes in Massachusetts, 1,021,- 
160, of which 439,238 or 43.0 per cent 
were owned, 569,645 or 55.8 per cent 
were rented, and 12,277 were of unknown 
tenure. Native white families, 579,751 
(306,978 or 30.06 per cent were native 
white of native parentage and 272,773 or 
26.71 per cent were native white of 
foreign or mixed parentage) ; foreign- 
born white families, 427,385 or 41.85 per 
cent; Negro families, 12,637 or 1.24 per 
cent; other races, 1,387 or 0.14 per cent. 

Total homes in Boston, 179,200, of 
which 45,986 or 25.66 per cent were 
owned, 130,140 or 72.62 per cent were 
rented and 3,074 were of tenure unknown. 
Divided by color and nativity of head of 
owner-families, 7,741 were native white 
of native parentage; 11,137 were native 
white of foreign or mixed parentage; 
26,366 were foreign-born white; 726 were 
Negro and 16 were of other races. 

Of the renter-families, 27,267 were na- 
tive white of native parentage; 36,428 
were native white of foreign or mixed 
parentage; 61,505 were foreign-born 
white ; 4,431 were Negro, and 509 were of 
other races. 



PUBLIC DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1933. 

Gross funded debt, January 1, 1933, 
8165,758,499.95 (including 8119,999.95 is- 
sued by State for enlargment of Court 
House) ; sinking funds, 835,737,619.21 ; 
other redemption means, 83,078,263.28; 
net debt, S126,942,617.46 or S7,588,429.94 
more than on January 1, 1932. Of said 
debt (net) S79,310,526.63 or 62.48 per 
cent was City debt; S46,199,623.96 or 
36.39 per cent, Rapid Transit debt (rep- 
resenting 4^ per cent investment) ; S994,- 
466.87 or 0.78 per cent, County debt; 
8438,000 or 0.35 per cent, Water debt. 

Debt paid in 1932 was 89,935,301 but 
there was an increase in total gross debt 
of S5,437,698.99. 

Net debt per capita, S160.62 (approx.) ; 
net debt, exclusive of Rapid Transit debt, 
880,742,993.50 or 8102.17 per capita (ap- 
prox.) . 

Per capitas are based on U. S. Census 
Bureau's estimated population on Janu- 
ary 1, 1933. 

Loans authorized but not issued (with- 
in debt limit), 81,898,000; same outside 
of debt limit, 82,680,000; total, 84,578,000. 



SAND, CINDERS AND SALT IN DULUTH. 

About 385 miles of sidewalk are sanded 
every year and about 250 miles of streets 
are snow-j lowed and sanded. Ordi- 
narily, flat grades are not sanded, this 
work being confined to steep grades where 
dangerous ice conditions exist. During 
the past season the maintenance depart- 
ment used about 500 cubic yards of cin- 
ders, 500 cubic yards of sand, and 5 tons 
of calcium chloride on the streets. 

The use of salt, or sodium chloride, 
has been discontinued entirely, because 
of its injurious effect on concrete walks 
and pavements. The action of salt is 
not clearly understood, but it is much 
more active during cold weather than 
in summer, and is apparently due to the 
formation of crystals after penetrating 
the surface, the force of which disin- 
tegrates the concrete. Calcium chloride 
does not seem to be entirely free from 
this difficulty, but is much less active 
than sodium chloride. 



JAMAICA SPENDS $1,000,000 ANNUALLY 
ON ROAD CONSTRUCTION AND MAIN- 
TENANCE. 

Jamaica, an English possession, has 
a highway system which is almost en- 
tirely constructed of waterbound mac- 
adam, some 70 miles of which has been 
surface-treated. Many of the roads are 
under the supervision of the Department 
of Public Works and various parochial 
boards. There are about 2,500 miler, of 
bridle and foot paths. The highway 
system connects all parts of the island 
in a very satisfactory manner, and the 
problem is not that of the construction 
of new roads, but the improvement of old 
ones, the surfacing and widening of these 
roads, and protective coatings. The roads 
are well maintained and, as there are 
not many heavy trucks, the maintenance 
is satisfactory. There are approximately 
4,000 miles of highways, or 1.11 square 
miles of area to one mile of highway. 

About a million dollars per year is 
spent on new construction and maiote- 
nance, the machinery used being both 
European and American. 

(From a report of the American Road 
Builders' Association.) 



READVERTISEMENT. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Portland Cement. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various city departments, Portland cement, as 
per specifications, to be delivered in such 
quantities as required. The bidder must use 
the form of proposal to be obtained at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, and the successful bid- 
der must furnish a bond for one quarter of 
the total estimated amount of the bid with a 
surety company autnonzed to do business in 
Massachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract. There tvill be a 
charge of twenty cents ($0.20) for each set of 
proposals taken out. Bids, with a certified 
check for §300, payable to and to become the 
property of the City of Boston if the proposal 
is not carried out, must be left at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, before 12 m., Friday, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1935, at which time and place they 
will be publicly opened and read. A duplicate 
bid, without check, must be left at the office 
of the City Auditor prior to the time named 
for opening bids. The Superintendent of Sup- 
plies reserves the right to accept or reject any 
or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to award 
the contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the city. All contracts made subject to 
appropriations to meet payments thereunder. 
Warren W. Loomis, 

(Jan. 26.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



Proposals for Furnishing Paper Towels. 

The Police Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing paper towels. 
The bidder must use the form of proposal to 
be obtained at the office of the Property Clerk, 
154 Berkeley street, Boston, and deposit with 
his bid, at the office of the Police Commis- 
sioner, a properly certified check for $100, 
payable to and to become the property of the 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. Proposals 
will be publicly opened and read on Tuesday, 
February 5, 1935, at 12 o'clock noon, at the 
office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley 
street, Boston. The Police Commissioner re- 
serves the right to accept or reject any or all 
proposals, or any part of a proposal, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interest of the Police Department of the City 
of Boston. Surety bond will be required from 
the successful bidder in an amount equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the estimated contract 
amount. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 
(Jan. 26.) Police Commissioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 



Changes in Traffic Regulations. 
Voted, That the Traffic Regulations are 
amended as follows, effective January 28, 
1935: 

That section 16, Part 9, is amended by 
striking out the following words in the first 
phrase of the paragraph : 

"In front of a Boston Elevated Railway 
Company bus stop." 
That section 16, Part 9, is amended by 
adding the following words at the beginning 
of the paragraph : 

"In front of a Boston Elevated Railway 
Company or Eastern Massachusetts 
Street Railway Company bus stop." 
William P. Hickey, 
(Jan. 19-26.) Commissioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Dry Stencils. 

The Police Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing dry stencils. 
The bidder must use the form of proposal to 
be obtained at the office of the Property Clerk, 
154 Berkeley street, Boston, and deposit with 
his bid, at the office of the Police Commis- 
sioner, a properly certified check for $100, 
payable to and to become the property of the 
Police Commissioner for the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out. Proposals 
will be publicly opened and read on Tuesday, 
February 5, 1935, at 12 o'clock noon, at the 
office of the Police Commissioner, 154 Berkeley 
street, Boston. The Police Commissioner re- 
serves the right to accept or reject any or all 
proposals, or any part of a proposal, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interest of the Police Department of the City 
of Boston. Surety bond will be required from 
the successful bidder in an amount equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the estimated contract 
amount. 

Joseph J. Leonard, 

(Jan. 26.) Police Commissioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



To Taxpayers. 
Assessors' Notice, City Hall Annex, 

Boston, January 1, 1935. 
Attention is called to the Assessors' Notice 
posted upon City Hall and various other places 
throughout the city, relative to making re- 
turns on personal property subject to taxation. 
Returns should be made not later than Feb- 
ruary 15. 

Edward T. Kelly, 
Timothy W. Murphy, 
Michael J. Brophy, 

Assessors of Boston. 
(Jan. 5-12-19-26-Feb. 2-9.) 



CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DEPARTMENT 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol. 27. Saturday, February 2, 1935. No. 5 

BOSTON MEETING HER PROBLEM OF SNOW REMOVAL WITH FAR GREATER 
SUCCESS THAN OTHER ATLANTIC SEABOARD CITIES— MAYOR MANS= 
FIELD POINTS OUT TO CRITICS THAT ALL MUNICIPALITIES OF EAST AND 
NEW ENGLAND HAVE BEEN HAMPERED, AND WHILE PLACES LIKE NEW 
YORK, PHILADELPHIA AND BALTIMORE HAVE LITERALLY THROWN UP 
HANDS, BOSTON IS MEETING SITUATION WITH GREATER SUCCESS THAN 
THEY, EVEN IN MEN EMPLOYED AND HIGHWAYS OPENED TO TRAFFIC - 
GIVES FACTS IN BROADCAST OVER CITY HALL STATION. 



The following is the radio address of Mayor Frederick W. Mansfield, over Station WNAC, Tuesday? 
January 29: 

Just at the moment the people of Boston in common with all of the other people in New England and in 
the Atlantic seaboard states are snow-minded. That is to say, snow, and the removal of snow, and the criticisms 
of persons thought to be responsible for failure to remove it, seems to. be uppermost in everyone's mind. They 
say that the conditions in the City of Boston have been bad. I admit that they have been bad, very bad, but 
they have been bad everywhere, not only in New England but farther south even than Baltimore and the criticism 
for failure promptly to remove the snow has been freely made not only in Boston but in New York, Philadelphia, 
Baltimore and in every town and city in New England. 

But I do not admit that conditions are or have been any worse in Boston than in these other municipalities. 
An attempt has been made to compare Boston with New York. I shall be very happy to accept this comparison, 
because from what I can learn from the press clippings and other sources Boston is doing a much better job than 
New York. New York, for example, contains nearly 8,000,000 people where Boston has 780,000. Based on com- 
parative size, then, New York ought to have ten times the equipment that Boston has. It ought to use ten times 
as many snow shovelers and ought to give employment to ten times as many men. But New York does nothing of 
the kind. The press clippings show that on Thursday there were 30,000 snow shovelers working in New York, 
40,000 on Saturday, and that Mayor LaGuardia estimated that when his plans were completed all of his workers 
would range from 30,000 up to 50,000 men. 22,000 of these recruits were from the New York welfare rolls and 
5,500 were E. R. A. workers. 

Now, in comparison with New York, what has Boston done? On last Thursday we had 9,000 snow shovelers 
at work, on Saturday 10,000, yesterday 15,600, and today there are actually at work 20,253. In order to equal 
Boston, New York, being ten times as large, would have had to have 90,000 at work last Thursday, 100,000 on 
Saturday and 202,500 at work today. Whereas, all they expect to employ is 50,000 when all their plans are com- 
pleted, and those plans are not completed yet. 

These 20,253 workers include 1,780 regular city men, 5,350 E. R. A. workers, 2,687 welfare men, 7,936 tem- 
porary men assigned to various Public Works Department yards and 2,500 men working for contractors in snow 
removal districts. 

Snow Fighting Equipment. 

The equipment that the City of Boston is fighting this storm with is as follows: 8 snow loaders; 70 hired 
snowplows; 30 city snowplows; 718 hired trucks; 125 city teams; 14 tractors; one steam shovel and 3 towboats. 

These eight snow loaders are machines which load the snow into trucks and can only work as fasl as we can 
supply trucks to take away the snow. We have, as I have just said, 718 trucks and we have hired every available 
truck that we can find, not only in Boston but in surrounding cities and (owns. We are ready to hire more trucks. 
and if you know anyone who has trucks the city will rent them, if they will apply to the Public Works Department. 
The city is paying $3 an hour for trucks of a capacity of five tons or over. Rates for smaller trucks may be obtained 
at the Public Works Department. 

We are dumping snow so fast into the channel behind the South Station that it is necessary to keep three 
tugs churning up and down the channel in order to keep it tree from snow. 

The last new snow equipment was purchased in 1926 and it consisted merely of sixty large trucks. Many 
of those are now useless and the remainder are not of very much use. It is plain that Boston needs, and must 
have, a complete and modern equipment for removing snow in order thai future storms may be adequately coped 
with. To this end, yesterday I introduced an order in the City Council for $800,000 for the purchase o\ new s 
equipment and it will be approximately as follows: 

50 five-ton trucks, costing about $375,000. 

21 snow loaders, costing about 888,000. 

60 three-ton trucks, costing about S2U),000. 

10 trailers, to be used with the snow loaders for side loading, costing about $30,000. 

10 ten-ton tractors, costing about $60,000. 

2 five-ton tractors, costing aboul $8,000. 

50 V-shaped plows, costing about $25,000. 



106 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 2 




"O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 
queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship= 

teeming plain of the ocean, 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene, 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotion!" 
From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD, 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

Hall. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 78, 

City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



.00 Per Year 
10 Cents 



IN ADVANCE 



STREET AGENCIES. 

Old South News-stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 

A rate of S2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
February 4, 1935, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows : 

To the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of rear 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 



for the storage or sale of merchandise in 
public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasolene, oil, 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To the Boston Traffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To the Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To the Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden. Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue, Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 



charges made for such service. Applica- 
tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Department of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Statistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To the Wire Division of the Fire 
Department, 60 Bristol street, for all in 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of . conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 



For the week ending January 26, 1935: 
Population estimated July, 1934, 
United States Census Bureau estimate, 
798,568; number of deaths (stillbirths 
excluded): Residents, 221; nonresidents, 
44; total, 265. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 17.25; nonresidents deducted, 
14.39. 



Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
I^ast week, 14.98; corresponding week 
last year, 16.41. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc. : Under 
one year, 14; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 7; sixty years and over, 153. 
Total deaths: Male, 145; female, 120; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 150; 
deaths of colored, 0. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 



Anterior Poliomyelitis 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis Lethargica . . . 

Influenza 

Measles 

Meningitis Epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet Fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary). 
Tuberculosis (other forms) 

Typhoid Fever 

Whooping Cough 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 26, 1935. 



Cases. Deaths. 



42 
39 
34 

1 
38 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 27, 1934. 



Cases. Deaths. 



1 

- 3 

2 

326 

47 

66 

32 

8 

1 



14 
1 

13 
2 

1 
1 



! Residents and nonresidents included. 



Feb. 2 



CITY RECORD 



107 



MAYOR MANSFIELD PROPOSES METHODS OF OBTAINING NEEDED ADDI = 
TIONAL REVENUE FOR CITY AND THUS RELIEVE REAL ESTATE OWNERS 
OF SOME OF BURDEN — SUGGESTS, IN RADIO BROADCAST FROM CITY 
HALL STATION, THAT A SALES TAX BE INAUGURATED AND AN ADDI = 
TIONAL INCOME TAX OVER A PERIOD OF TWO YEARS - HOPES THUS 
TO EASE BURDEN NOW SO OPPRESSIVE TO HOME OWNERS. 



The following is the radio address of Mayor Frederick W. Mansfield over Station WNAC, January 24, 1935 : 

I have explained so many times that the real estate owner cannot pay a higher tax rate than that which he 
is paying now that I deem it unnecessary to rehearse again the story of the real estate tax rate of Boston. It is 
enough to say that it is agreed on all hands that the real estate taxpayer has reached, if he has not exceeded, his 
ability to pay any higher taxes. But we must have money to conduct the affairs of the city. We cannot curtail 
on health protection, fire and police protection, education, or any of the important activities of the municipal govern- 
ment. It follows, then, that we must find money elsewhere than by taxing the real estate owner. I am satisfied 
from discussions of this subject with experts that an income tax will not fill the bill, nor a pay roll tax, nor a long time 
bond issue by the Commonwealth. But if we cannot obtain new and substantial sources of revenue, then furl her 
curtailment of expenses is absolutely necessary. And in passing I wish to point out that the operating budget of 
the city, exclusive of welfare expenditures, is 23 per cent less now than it was in 1931. 

The principal items of expenditures in the budget are expenditures for salaries and welfare. While there 
are many economies which can and must still be practised in city government, yet after such economies are put 
into effect it would require a vigorous curtailment in either welfare or salary expenditures, or both, to prevent an 
increase at this time in the tax, and much more so to reduce the tax. 



Retail Sales Tax. 

There is, I believe, only one form of 
tax which would be adequate for present 
needs and that is a tax on retail sales. 
Such a tax has been enacted and is now 
in effect, in one form or other, in approxi- 
mately one half of the states of the Union. 
I propose, therefore, to ask the Legislature 
to follow the precedent these states have 
set and to enact a 2 per cent retail sales 
tax for a period of five years. This will 
spread the burden of taxation so that it 
will not be too great on any one. I shall, 
however, ask for one main exemption and 
that is an exemption with respect to sales 
of food. I do not believe that in these 
times even a 2 per cent tax should be 
imposed on the sale of food. 

While this exemption may create some 
difficulties in administration which would 
not otherwise be present, and while it will 
decrease the revenue attainable from 
what has been estimated to be $20,000,000 
to approximately $12,000,000, the exemp- 
tion appears justified. To meet the loss 
in revenue thus resulting, but needed, I 
shall recommend to the Legislature an 
additional income tax upon 1934 and 
1935 incomes, of 3 per cent on interest and 
dividends, of J of 1 per cent on annuities 
and taxable earned income, and of li per 
cent on gains from sales. The loss of 
possible revenue resulting from the 
exemption of food will thus be met in the 
years 1935 and 1936, when the strain on 
municipalities will probably be greatest, 
from the revenue which such additional 
income tax will produce. 

I recommend a term of two years only 
for the additional income tax because oi 
the danger that a longer term may induce 
residents of the state to change their 
domicile to neighboring states when no 
income tax laws are in force, or may 
cause persons to invest more heavily 
than otherwise in tax exempt securities, 
thus injuring business without increasing 
revenue. I do not believe that a two- 
year additional tax would have this 
possible effect and there is a precedent 
for such a tax in the years 1918 and 1919. 

If this program is enacted by the 
Legislature we will be enabled not only 
to avoid an increase in the 1935 tax rate 
but. we will be able to effect an appreciable 
reduction in the present rate of $37.10. 



Without such assistance our position in 
1935 will be far more serious than in 
1934. 

Consolidation. 

The Legislature at last year's session 
authorized the City Council and the 
Mayor, acting jointly, to consolidate and 
reorganize the departments of the city. 
There are at the present time forty-six 
separate departments in the city govern- 
ment and 136 department heads. Many 
of these departments perform similar 
functions and yet, because of the mul- 
tiplicity of departments, many improve- 
ments in one department are unknown to 
others and much of the benefit of the 
experiences of one department is lost to 
other departments performing similar 
functions. This set-up is antiquated and 
inadequate. There are ten executive 
departments in Washington; there are 
twenty in the Commonwealth. Main- 
large cities operate with from five to 
fifteen departments. It is obvious that 
a consolidation of departments is es- 
sential for the proper and efficient admin- 
instration of city affairs. I have in 
preparation a plan for such consolidation 
which will not mean the discharge of 
personnel but which will, I am confident, 
mean a substantial saving to the city. 

Shortly after the enactment of legis 
Iation authorizing such consolidation, a 
detailed study of the possibilities for a 
plan of consolidation was commenced. 
President Compton of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, at my request, 
designated a committee headed by Col. 
Robert ('. Eddy, a member of the faculty 
of thai institution, to studj the engineer- 
ing departments of the city. This study 
has not ye\ been completed but 1 am 
advised that it will be finished in the 
near future. A committee of eminent 
members of the me. heal profession headed 
by Dr. Joseph 1'. Howland, Superin- 
tendent of the Peter Benl Brigham 
Hospital, have, at my request, studied 
the functions of the Health, Hospital 
ami Institutions Departments. 

When ih(~ various surveys thai are 
under way have been completed 1 will 
present to the City Comical my recom 
mendations. It is not my purpose to 
propose consolidation in order to elim- 
inate From the pay roll of the City persons 
now employed by it. I will discharge 



no one from the service because of con- 
solidation. Consolidation will, however, 
enable the Mayor to have a small and 
valuable cabinet, will protect against 
waste and duplication of effort, will 
facilitate a more efficient and economical 
performance of municipal functions and 
will enable the taxpayer to get more for 
his money than is possible under our 
present departmental set-up. 

Housing. 

The Federal Government has definitely 
commenced a program for the clearance 
of slum or depreciated areas and con- 
struction thereon of low cost housing. 
This program has two main values. 
First, it will, as soon as it can get more 
fully under way, supply substantial em- 
ployment in a field where private enter- 
prise is unlikely to take action. It 
should, therefore, stimulate employment 
and activity in the building trades with- 
out competing with private bu 
Second, if properly executed, it will not 
only reclaim areas which are a social 
handicap to the community, which are 
costly charges upon municipal govern- 
ment, and which breed disease and 
crime but it will make available to 
persons of low income decent living 
c litions at low cost. 

A survey of the possibilities for such a 
program in Boston has been made and 
it is apparent therefrom that large 
amounts can lie expended on such work 
if the federal Government is willing to 
undertake it. One such project is already 
being developed in Boston. 

To cooperate with the federal Oovern- 

ment in its program to endeavor to in- 
crease opportunities for employment and 
to secure for persons of low income m 
Boston the benefits of such a plan. 1 havo 
petitioned the Legislature to permit the 
establishment in the cities and towns of 
i In- Commonwealth of such local housing 
authorities and, if such permission is 
given, to establish such an authority in 
Bosl 

I'l Bl n \\ OHKS \M> ^ ORK RELIEF. 

President Roosevelt in bis recent 

Congress has indicated that 

the burden of caring for the needy who 

are unemployable must real upon the 

governments, not upon the federal 



108 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 2 



Government. In Boston this burden 
has always rested upon the city and the 
decision that it must continue so to rest 
will in no way effect a local change. 
The President has further indicated that 
the problem of caring for persons who 
are needy but employable is national 
in scope, that such persons must be cared 
for by the Federal Government, that the 
care should be in the form of work relief 
rather than the dole and that the relief 
should be handled through a program 
of public works, the Federal Emergency 
Relief Administration to be abolished. 

It is my purpose, however, to secure 
for the employment of residents of Boston 
a fair and adequate share of all Federal 
funds granted for relief purposes. So 
long as the Federal Emergency Relief 
Administration continues to operate I 
shall do all in my power to have formulated 
and to supply materials for projects 
adequate to provide work for all persons 
that the funds provided will employ. 
It is my purpose to see to it that these 
projects will be of real value to the city. 

Port of Boston. 

In 1933 the Supreme Court of the 
United States by a five to four decision 
determined that a port was not a "local- 
A ity" within the meaning of that term 
in section 3 of the Interstate Commerce 
Act which forbade undue preferences 
for and undue discrimination against 
localities. The effect of this decision 
has been greatly to limit the ability of 
the city and of the Boston Port Authority 
to oppose discrimination against the 
Port of Boston. 

I have caused to be introduced in 
Congress a bill to change the Interstate 
Commerce Act so that ports will be pro- 
tected. When this change is made, I 
shall do all in my power to eliminate 
unfair practices at other ports which 
practices are injurious to the Port of 
Boston. I shall in addition endeavor 
to upset the control of the New England 
Railroads by the Pennsylvania Railroad 
and shall strive to secure local control 
of New England roads to the end that 
the Port of Boston may become a thriv- 
ing and flourishing port and receive the 
full benefit of its natural advantages. 

Metropolitan Boston. 

There are more than forty cities and 
towns, each with separate governments, 
comprising what is popularly known as 
Greater Boston. The waste and inef- 
ficiency of so many separate units of 
government in so relatively small a 
territory is obvious. Yet repeated efforts 
to combine these cities and towns into 
one unit has always met with defeat. 

It is not my desire to attempt to 
coerce other cities and towns into a 
union with Boston and that such a 
union is desirable has not been established 
beyond doubt. But there are so many 
considerations in favor of such a union 
and so many indications of mutual 
benefit to Boston and these cities and 
towns that I shall ask the Legislature 
to appoint a body to examine fully 
into the question and report its conclu- 
sions with recommendations, if any, for 
legislation. 



CHICAGO POLICE. 



Although the numerical strength of the 
Chicago police department has been re- 
duced in the last two years from approxi- 
mately 6,700 to 6,000, the number of men 
on foot patrol has been increased 150 per 
cent, or about 1,900. 



BROADCAST BY MAYOR. 

(Continued from page 105.) 

Machinery on Way. 

Some of the snow loaders are on the 
way to Boston now from Illinois, where 
they are manufactured. Six of them will 
be shipped on February 6, six more on 
February 13, and five on February 20. 
And by that time we expect to have all 
of the trucks which will be contracted for 
delivered, if the City Council approves 
of the appropriation, which I have no 
doubt that it will veiy promptly. 

The number of 20,250 men employed 
by the City of Boston, and working both 
day and night, is the largest number of 
snow shovelers ever employed by the 
city and, as I have already said, it is 
proportionately many times larger than 
the number employed in New York. 
But I want to speak very plainly about 
hand labor in the removal of snow. 
Storms such as the one we have just had, 
and which by the way is the worst we 
have had for fifteen years, cannot be 
cleared with hand labor. In the first 
place, many of the men who are employed 
are unfit for the work. Many of them are 
under-fed, improperly clothed, are sick 
and weak from months of insufficient 
nourishment, and they cannot toss a 
shovelful of snow into the high tracks 
that are necessary for snow removal. In 
addition to that, a great many of the 
men do practically no work whatever, as 
any citizen may observe if he merely 
watches a gang of men on snow removal. 
He will find only a few shovels moving at 
a time, and that by far the larger pro- 
portion of the men who are supposed to 
be working are idle and are not producing 
one pound of energy in the removal of 
snow. 

I want to employ as many men as I 
can to remove snow, but it must be 
remembered that the chief object here 
is to get rid of the snow at the earliest 
possible moment. Experience has shown 
that human labor will not and cannot do 
the job and for that reason it is necessary 
to have modern machine equipment. 
We will keep at work as many men as we 
possibly can consistent with the utmost 
speed in removing the snow. 

We are mobilizing to effect snow re- 
moval. It is my intention to form a 
permanent division of the Public Works 
Department for this purpose. Public 
Works Commissioner Carven will be in 
charge and stationed at his office in City 
Hall. Working with him will be Col. 
Thomas F. Sullivan, the Transit Com- 
missioner, who is helping the Public 
Works Department in this emergency. 
They have divided the city into five 
departments: 

East Boston and Charlestown, to be 
under Daniel Sullivan of the Water 
Department; 

South Boston and Dorchester, to be 
under Baylies Reilly of the Bridge and 
Ferry Department; 

Roxbury and West Roxbury, to be under 
George Dakin of the Sewer Department; 

Brighton and Hyde Park, to be under 
Adolph Post of the Sanitary Depart- 
ment; 

And the City Proper, to be under 
Joshua Atwood of the Paving Division 
and Chief Engineer William Morrissey 
of the Public Works Department. 

The plan thus mapped out while 
serving in the present emergency will 
also become permanent and equipment 
will be allotted, men assigned to the 
various units, and the forces so trained 
and adapted that they will be ready to 



meet any sudden emergency in the future. 
Even in the summer they will be required 
to keep their equipment in order and, of 
course, much of the equipment, such as 
trucks and tractors, can be used con- 
tinually throughout the year in city work. 

A word to the motorists: 

They are the worst offenders that we 
have and constitute the very worst 
hindrance to snow removal. They park 
their cars in snow piles and on the sides 
of roads and prevent the workers from 
getting at the snow. They use plowed 
streets where trolley cars are and then 
when they break down or get stuck the 
delay is blamed upon city employees. I 
honestly urge them to cooperate with us 
and to leave their cars at home in this 
emergency. 

Above all, I ask the people to be patient 
and to realize that a storm such as we 
have had cannot be disposed of by 
oratory or by argument, or denunciation 
and criticism in a nicely heated apart- 
ment, while city authorities are struggling 
with the elements. Within a very few 
days I expect to have reports from 
all sections showing that all roads are 
open and that transportation is gradually 
improved. 



UTILITY RATE EXPERT CHOSEN 
TO AID LAW DEPARTMENT 
IN PROBE OF QAS, ELECTRIC 
AND TELEPHONE RATES FOR 
BOSTON. 

Mayor Mansfield has authorized Cor- 
poration Counsel Henry E. Foley to re- 
tain the services of Dr. John Bauer, 
nationally known utility rate expert, to 
assist the Law Department in its investi- 
gation of gas, electric and telephone rates. 

The Law Department has already com- 
menced proceedings to secure reductions 
in the rates of the Boston Consolidated 
Gas Company and notions are now pend- 
ing that the Department of Public Utili- 
ties examine into the relations between 
the Massachusetts Gas Companies and the 
Boston Consolidated Gas Company. 

Doctor Bauer will be asked to assist in 
this proceeding as well as to prepare for 
proceedings against the Edison Electric 
Illuminating Company of Boston and the 
New England Telephone and Telegraph 
Company in the drive of the Mayor for 
reduced utility rates. Mayor Mansfield 
stated that he believed that an investiga- 
tion would indicate that utility rates 
could be appreciably reduced without 
causing any reduction in the pay of utility 
company employees. 

Doctor Bauer is director of the Ameri- 
can Public Utilities Bureau which serves 
municipalities and other public bodies in 
utility matters. He was at one time pro- 
fessor of economics in Princeton Univer- 
sity and statistician of the Public Service 
Commission of New York State and is the 
author of many publications dealing with 
rate making. During the past ten years 
Doctor Bauer has served almost con- 
tinuously as financial and rate expert to 
the City of New York in its public utility 
cases, including the five-cent fare litiga- 
tion. He has testified as expert in rate 
cases before numerous commissions and 
courts, including New York, Connecticut, 
Massachusetts, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
Indiana, Missouri, Alabama, Georgia, 
South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia 
and the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion. In 1929 he was economic adviser 
to the New York Legislative Commission 
on the Revision of the Public Service 
Commission Law.' 



Feb. 2 



CITY RECORD 



109 



ASSESSMENT LIENS CANCELED. 

The Mayor has approved the following votes of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners: 

January 29, 1935. 

Voted, That the assessment liens created by the orders of the Board of Street Com- 
missioners and Mayor for the laying out and construction of the following stree