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Full text of "City record"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/cletails/cityrecord1936bost 



INDEX TO THE CITY RECORD, {^ 

JANUARY 4, 1936 — DECEMBER 26, 1936. 



Page 
A. 

Animals purchased for Franklin Park Zoo. . . 1315 

Xnti-Noise law proving success 1006 

Xirport Developments under Mayor Mans- 

■ field .■ •• 1321 

Airport, One of busiest American air terminals, 735 

Appropriations, Transfer of 55 1385 

Assessing Department: .„ ^ 

John P. O'Hearn named to Board 441 

Assessed valuations, Methods to fix 173 

Assessments abated 24 

\ssessments, revision of . . . .55, 84. 129, 160, 245 
304, 684, 693, 739, 793, 1162, 1427. 1440 

Assessments, betterments 29, 247 

Changes in personnel. . .53, 82, 124, 176, 308, 449 
762,912, 1186 
Auditing Department: 
Changes in personnel 25, 912, 1094 

B. 

Boston in most healthy condition. National 

Municipal Review proves 819 

Boston observes 306th anniversary of found- 
ing, Wilfred E. Kelley delivers address, 1119 

Boston Port Aitthority: 

change in personnel .-; ' ' ' 

Boston revokes billboard license at Cam- 
bridge street and Lindall place 1289 

Boston showing signs of building boom . . . . . . 970 

Boston not owner of Cambridge street bill- 
board site 1263 

Brophy. Michael J., East Boston Park 

named for 384 

Building, estimated cost for year ending 

December, 1935 65 

Buildings razed 119, 929, 1024 

1220, 1246, 1385, 1440 

Budget, estimates for 1936 445 

Building Department, Changee in personnel . . 449 

C. 

Columbus Day Observance, Patrick J. 

Moynihan, orator 1205 

Conference on Quabbin Reservoir matter. . . . 1122 
Credit Union shown in flourishing condition 

at annual meeting 1377 

City Messenger, changes in personnel 1009 

City Clerk, changes in personnel 1094 

City Council, changes in personnel. . . .1060, 1186 

Collecting Department. changes in personnel .4. 259 

336. 365, 666, 692, 821. 850, 1358 

Claims allowed, 57, 64, .SO, 85. 89, 113, 119, 149, 246 

247, 318, 338, 358, 369, 395, 714, 851, 1065 

Contracts Awarded: 

Assessing Department: 

typing ta.\ lists 287, 347 

Building Department, razing buildings. .316, 913 
925, 949, 974, 1062, 1239 
1240, 1327, 1415, 1438 
Fire Department: 

doing laundy work 5 

doing underground construction work . . 1081 

remodeling of uniforms 157 

Hospital Department: 

bones and trimmings, etc., sale of 5, 1438 

garbage, removal of 1438 

dishwashing equipment, furnishing and 

installing (Sanatorium) 1288 

furniture and equipment. Surgical Build- 
ing 1287 

selling old brass, etc 1063 

window cleaning. . 451, 852, 1438 

vermin, extermination of 127 

Institutions Department: 

installing fire escapes at Long Island .... 127 
making repairs to "Stephen J. O'Meara" 64 
Library Department: 

transportation of books to branches 5 

Long Island Hospital: 

clothing (men's) 310 

Park Department: 
erecting new control tower at Airport. . . 1063 

repairing pavement 697 

repairing timbers, seaplane ramp. Air- 
port 852 

steel framing, installation on club-house 

roof 913 

Penal Institutions Department: 

repairs to House of Correction 157 

reparis to "Michael J. Perkins" 1096 

repairs to "George A. Hibbard" 440 

installing sprinkler system. Long Island 

Hospital 1256 

Public Works Department: 
Central Office: 

construction, Chelsea North Bridge. . . 167 

dredging, .Albany street dump 64 

excavating, boxes, etc . .887, 949 

repairs to Administration Building 

(Tunnel) 852 

trench ledge drilling 925 

Bridge Service: 

repairs to Chelsea North Draw 440 

repairs to Milton Street Bridge 925 

repairs to Meridian Street Bridge. . . . 1063 
repairs to AUston Bridge 1256 



Contracts Awarded: Page 
Public Works Department: 
Ferry Service: 

repairs to "Charles C. Donoghue". . . 451 

repairs to " Lieutenant Flaherty" .... 1063 

repairs to "Ralph J. Palumbo" 1361 

Paving Service: 

snow removal, various districts 6 

paving Centre street (West Roxbury), 1327 

paving Fremont street 1213 

paving Nonquit street 1240 

paving Toledo terrace 1313 

paving White Oak road 1240 

Sanitary Service: 

removal of garbage 1438, 1439 

removal of snow and ice 1438 

Sewer Service: 

cleaning catch-basins. 831, 852, 1288 

cleaning sewers .Atlantic and Neponset 

avenues 1313 

new floors. Pumping Station. 668 

new pumps. Summer Street station. .-. 1045 

pumps, repairing of 246 

work on sewer in: 

Cheney street 451 

Cornaiiba Street Extension 1240 

East Springfield street 974 

Estes place 697 

Archdale road 1213 

Bellevue Hill road 1063 

Everett Extension 1063 

Mercer street 1327 

.North street 887 

Pondred circle 1430 

Stimson street 1189 

Washington street (West Roxbury), J240 

Stony Brook 287 

Water Service: 

assembling gate valves 1288 

School Buildings Department: 

alterations in schools 925 

blue printing work 27 

furnishing electrical supplies. .......... 341 

erection and completion (English High 

addition) 64 

furniture for schools 83 

R. G. Shaw addition 885 

Washington Irving school 1010 

East Boston High school 1062 

Washington school 1062 

English High school 1062 

John Marshall District 1062 

Phillips Brooks District 1 123 

South Boston High school (addition). 1253 

Dudley District school 1254 

furnishing pupils' lockers. 1188 

furniture, transferring various schools. . . 1026 
fire escapes, erecting of: 

Williams school 1256 

.Abby W. May school 1256 

installing boilers, Winship school 887 

repairing boilers, various schools 1026 

ShurtlefT school work 20 

tran.sferring equipment, etc 1 149 

School Conimittee: 

drawing supplies 1313 

furnishing groceries, various schools 949 

furnishing pianos 1415 

furnishing paper, etc 342 

furnishing paper (toilet) 440 

furnishing paper (groundwood-sulfite) . . . 289 

furnishing pens, pencils, etc 397 

furnishing physical education supplies. . 287 

furnishing towels (paper) 289 

furnishing uniforms, (baseball) 451 

rebinding books 287 

.Supply Department: 

air compressors, purchase 157-158 

asphalt purchase 396 

automobiles (Park Department).. 439-675-712 

ambulance chassis 1.361 

automobile dump trucks 864-1361 

bituminous concrete 974 

blankets, etc. (Hospital) 1416 

bricks, (sewer) 180 

building material 288 

butter, eggs, etc 6, 114, 208, 292, 402 

743,951, 1048, 1151, 1259 

case (industrial and medicinal) 263 

castings, (iron) 29, 264 

castings (composition) 315 

castings (various) (PubUc Works De- 
partment) 743, 764, 839, 1240, 888 

cement (asphaltic) 396 

cement (Portland) 289 

cloths, waste and wiping 179 

cloth (khaki) 457. 852 

coats (overcoats, Fire Department) 1214 

coal (semi-bituminous) 455, 853 

coal (welfare, etc.) 1327 

coke (for Deer Island) 840 

crushed stone. 1013 

cup (paper drinking) 179 

alcohol (denatured) 1214 

alcohol (ethyl) 1259 

dental supplies 312 

dressings (surgical) 315 

drugs 423 



Contracts .Awarded: Page 

.Supply Department: 

electrical supplies (Park Department).. . 856 

ether 264 

fence (chain link) 437, 1081 

fill (hard, dry, Park Department).. ..208, 439 

1439 

fire hose 1415 

flashlight equipment 402 

flooring, rubber 182 

flour 115, 399, 854, 1149 

fruits and vegetables. . ..8, 127, 208, 310, 400 
743, 887, 950, 1045, 1250, 1362 

garage equipment 438 

grass seed (E. R. A.) 128 

groceries, canned goods, etc 697, 1214 

hay, grain and straw 6, 114, 208, 291 

396. 744, 888, 1047, 1151, 1259, 1333 
furnishing dining hall equipment, City 

Hospital 838, 888 

furnishing laundry baskets. City 

Hospital 949 

installing food conveyors, City Hos- 
pital 1153 

ice (various departments). 806, 927 

^A|buratury equipment, (Hospital) 7 

^■undry work (Wayfarers' Lodge) 367 

lead (arsenate) 439 

lead cable (Fire Department) 914 

lead (pig) 181 

lead (pipe) 182 

lead (red and white) 181 

lumber 451 

meats 7, 115, 289, 209, 342, 435, 745 

855. 951, 1046, 1149, 1257, 1361 

meats (turkey), etc 1222 

milk and cream 367, 1213 

mix (ice cream) 179 

oil (asphaltic road) 439, 396, 1013 

oil (fuel) 1169, 1170 

oil (kerosene) 457 

oils (engine, machine, cylinder) 314 

oil (gasoline) 457, 913 

oil (motor) 398, 1219 

oil (patching mixture) 1013 

oil (range, for Welfare Department, 

Soldiers' Relief) 1330 

paint (Traffic) 397 

paper (toilet) 182 

patching mixture (bituminous) 347 

pipes (sewer) 183 

plumbing supplies (Park Department) . . 1314 

polish (metal) 264 

.sand and gravel 841, 311 

sand (loam. Park Department), 457, 841, 1154 

service testing 315 

soap, baths, chips, etc 183, 1152, 1153 

snowplows (Park Department) 1383 

snow removal equipment 27, 28, 29 

stone, crushed 183 

surgical supplies 703 

hypodermic and surgical needles 831 

dressings. 713, 1189 

surveyors' transits 1081 

tea and coffee 127, 855, 346, 1152 

tires and tubes 397 

toweling, towels (paper) 288, 1384 

traffic signal equipment 438 

directional signals 1096 

trucks (Ford dump, etc.) 182, 127 

transmitters (radio) 179 

uniforms, etc. (Fire Department), 

180, 182, 1439 

water meters ^^f^ 

X-ray materials 180 

apparatus ^^^§ 

revenue notes • 128 

Supply Department (P. W. A.): 

plumbing supplies (Park Department) . . 668 

reinforcing steel 927 

oak panels (for Welfare Department). . . 952 
hard dry fill (for Park Department) . . . 975 
Contracts .Awarded Without Advertising: 
9, 129, 158, 183, 211, 228, 246, 264, 292, 347 
84, 368, 440, 458, 675, 953, 975, 1026, 1096 
1126, 1171, 1220, 1288, 1289, 1384, 1385 
1416. 
Contracts, Changes In: 

56 126. 161, 207, 247, 283, 338, 349, 417, 450 
472, 676, 883, 911, 954, 1014, 1025, 1065 
1097, 1201, 1209, 1240, 1292, 1,315, 1326 
1440. _ 

CoNTR.ACTS .Awarded, Additions to and De- 
ductions from: 
Department of School Buildings: 

Dudley District 851, 883, 910, 954 

1025, 1172, 1417 

English High ^805 

John Marshall 1417 

Phillips Brooks school 1416 

R. G. Shaw district 793, 980, 1363, 1417 

.South Boston high 1172, 1245, 1440 

Washington school 1259 

Washington Irving school 1154, 1417 

Wells school 1416 

WiUiam Blackstone school 1380 

Market Department: „„_ ,,^„ 

Quincy Market 884, 114Q 



CITY RECORD INDEX. 



CoNTBACTs Awarded, Additions to Page 

AND DedCCTIONS, FROSl: 
Public Works Department : 

repniriiiR ferryboat . 1 100 

Covrth: 

chiiiigea in personnel (Hec salurv incTeaAe>). 

795-805, 823-827, 851, 883 

D. 

Damages, amended, assessed 667. 805, 870 

1082. 1119, 1252. 1294. 1.3.56. 1364 
^ 1202. 1260. 1385 

Department of School Bdildings: 

Department in new location 1252 

Deviii. William, facts concerning employ- 
ment of 392 

Dollar, Boston's, how expended, with chart. 877 

E. 

Election Department: 
changes in personnel 203. .308. 882. 912 

F. 

Fire Department: 

changes in personnel 53. 82, 112, 124. 243 

.365. 416. 762. 850. 882. 912. 1044. 1080, 1094 
1186, 1286. 1.3.58. 1414 

appointments of Chief, etc 1405 

permission given to sell junk 159 

Finance Board approves Boston's borrowing 

for Welfare 686 

Fox. Charles J., suggests to heads of depart- 
ments how savings for the city can be 
made 847 

Fox, Charles J., opposes constitutional $25 
tax limit for cities and towns in debate 
with Rodney W. Long 1235 

Fox, Charles J., makes preparations for clos- 
ing departments yearly accounts, 
instructs city officials 1379 

H. 

Health Department: 

changes in personnel 25, 53. 112. 260. 336 

365, 392, 416, 449, 666. 795. 850. 882, 912 
923, 973, 1060, 1080, 1121, 1147, 1168 
1186, 1239. 1251, 1286. 
Dr. William E. Keeler, named Commis- 
sioner 97 

Hospit.\l Department: 

changes in personnel 25, 53, 82, 112, 124 

152. 176, 203, 221, 243, 260, 284, 336, 365 
416. 449, 666, 692, 736. 795, 821, 850, 882 
923. 973. 1009. 1044. 1060. 1080. 1095. 1121 
1147. 1168, 1186, 1239, 1251, 1286, 1311 
1358, 1383. 1414. 1437. 
(Sanatorium Division, see above.) 

discarded X-ray film sale approved 92 

hospital data shows depression ending. . . . 149 
new surgical building dedication 201 

I. 
Index Commissioners: 

changes in personnel 823 

iNSTiTtnioNs Department: 

changes in personnel 4. 25. 53. 82, 113 

124, 152, 176, 221, 244, 260, 284, .308, 336 
365, 416, 449, 666, 692, 736, 762. 795, 821 
gSO, 882, 947, 973, 1009, 1044. 1060. 1080 
1121, 1148, 1186. 1239, 1252, 1286, 1312 
1.326, 1359, 1414, 1437. 
more room needed for paitents at Long 

Island 193 

visitors barred from Island (quaratine) . . . 155 

fire protection at Long Island 1401 

inmates at Fort Strong barracks cared for, 1348 

meningitis victim at Long Island 687 

meningitis, no new cases at Long Island. .178, 685 

L. 

Law Department: 

changes in personnel 26. 260. 416. 449 

947. 1044. 1286 
disposes of 420 tort cases in first half of 

year 945 

rules Mayor and Council have right to 

revoke jitney licenses 1024 

Licensing Board: 

changes in personnel. 912 

M. 
Malouf, Faris F.: 

delivers Independence Day Address 905 

^L^KKET Department: 

changes in personnel 152, 666 

Mayor, Activities of. Social Service and 

Miscellaneous: 
act for citizens in Quabbin Reservoir 

matter 1440 

again chairman Roosevelt birthday ball. . . 1415 

aids in charity drive 271 

announces Boston's tax rate for 1936 789 

appointments made by 458 

appoints committee on dinner to honor 

Joseph P. Manning 686 

approves streets for coasting 123 

approves advisors to Health Committee. . 349 
approves contracts for Welfare Depart- 
ment buildings 3 

battles for more W. P. A. work for Boston. 696 
buys Democratic National Convention 

Committee Book 686 

rails meeting of city and town officials on 

Quabbin Reservoir matter 1097 

(Notifies Cit.\- Councilor Sbattuck of 

meeting) 1102 



Mayor. Activities of. Social Sebvice Pace 
and Miscellaneous: 
calls special meeting of Council to act on 
proposed $4,000,000 tax title loan 

order S43 

cites snow removal figures to refute 

Finance Commission 118 

chosen general chairman Roosevelt Ball 

Committee i 

comes to aid of .\dministrator Rotch 118 

confers with officials in effort to settle strike 

of longshoremen 1304 It- 
demands retraction of charges by Finance 

Commis-sion head 3 

denies intimation of salary increases 338 

drafts legislation to restore police bead 

choice power to Mayor 141 1 ■♦ 

eager to check coal frauds 33S 

gets opinion in law for auto horn ordinance, 283 
gets pledge from Wa.shington of flood aid. 281 

honors J. P. Maiming with dinner 791 

indorses Y. M. C. A. swimming campaign. 68S 

invites Honolulu mayor to Boston 68S 

legislation petitioned for 79 

makes known facts concerning employment 

of William H. Devin 392 

makes old age applications provide back 

payments 1409 

moves to make highways safer to public . . 3 
presents legislation seeking better govern- 
ment for Boston 77 

names Irving Le«-is to Board of E.xaminers. 687 
names Faris S. Malouf Independence Day 

orator 843 

names new Library Trustee 696 

names Milk Fund Committee 694 

names constables 369 

names committee for flood aid 283 

offers services of Health Department in 

flood disaster 283 

opposes increasing police force at this time, 458 
orders strict supervision of elections to 

check frauds 1305 

pleads cause of W. P. A. workers 458 * 

promulgates regulations to check "Beano" 

craze 1022 

provides for acceptance of Governor Ende- 

cott statue 361 

receives suggestions for names for Muddv 

River 840 

receives messages of thanks for city 

contributions 389 

receives communication from President 

Compton, M. I. T 322 

refutes charges as to censorship 349 

remembers 'Texans on birthday 304 

saves city S23.000 in gas contracts 307 

seeks redress for sale of inferior coal 440 

seeks reduction in fire insurance rates .... 738 
seeks to modernize citv buildings heating 

system 1097 

secures promise of continued work for 

citizens 422 

secures affidavit exposing Finance Commis- 
sion methods 759 

shares in East Boston Memorial Daj- 

exercises 741 

signs School Committee budget in part . . . 766 
submits order borrowing $4,000,000 for 

welfare 335 

submits budget estimates for 1936 445 

vetoes bus line proposal (Dedham line to 

Park square) 415 

thanked for kindness to child at parade. . . 1380 
thanked by Red Cross for flood aid by city 

employees 443 

wants public hearings by Metropolitan 
District Water Commission on large 
expenditures involving cities and 

towns 1415 

within rights in Finance Commission 

matter 24 

M.AYOR, ADDRE.SSES BY: 

announcement as to President's ball 109 

annual message to City Council 17 

at Herald-Trai'i-ler spelling bee 447 

at spelling bee at Faneuil Hall 333 

at Emmanuel College commencement .... 757 
at cornerstone laying, Fitchburg school . . . 690 
pays tribute to Syrian and Lebanese people, 909 
at American Bar Association Convention. 1059 
tribute to Charles F. Hurley, urges election, 1281 
to school teachers employed in W. P. A. 

instruction 414 ♦* 

terms Governor Curley, "Kingfish " of 

Massachusetts 1117 >yi 

welcomes delegates to American Bar Asso- 
ciation Convention 1057 

Mayor, CoMMu^^CATI0N8 Received and 
Sent by: 
aid sought in securing American husband. . 1 13 
calls on Council for quick action in new 

court house matter 1095 

from City Auditor Fox on debt and sinking 

funds requirements 737 

plans for new court house work 892 

not a candidate for office 805 

promises fair hearing on coal situation .... 693 
receives word of funds for new court house 

918, 927, 975 
refuses salary approval East Boston court 

probation officer 693 

regrets resignation of Cardinal O'Connell 

as library trustee 696 

rejects proposal to buy Young's hotel as 

City Hall unit 733 

resubmits plans for reorganizing city 

departments 1079 



Mayor, Comiktnications Received Page 

AND i^ENT BY: 

saves city funds in fuel oil purchase 8.30 

submits coal evidence to District Attorney, 889 
to city council on gas contracts sav:ngs.. '. 307 
to Governor Curley. that Boston needs no 

flood aid 283 

Mayor, ■■vtatements by: 
announces aid for evicted Chinese family. . 90 
answers Finance Commission charge of 

gift of street to telephone company. . . 121 

announces wedding plans of son 1074 

arou.sed over charges of illegal registration. 1249 
blames Governor Curley for Quabbin con- 
tract troubles 1162 

calls attention of citizeiLs to real estate 

investment opportunities 845 

calls on citizens to revive civic pride in 

interest of clean streets 1165 

calls to attention of department heads 

the six-day week law for employees . . . 1093 
charges Gas Company's rate booklet gives 

wrong impression m 

community campaign fund by city and 

county employees over-subscribed .... 119 
concerning Finance Commission and 

attacks on him by chairman 51 

denies testimony on coal probe surrendered 

to him 696 

denies charge of Finance Commission on 

coal inquiry 684 

department reorganization not to oust 

employees 3 

indorses Boston's Foreign Trade week 

program 684 

expresses plea.sure at nomination of Charles 

F. Hurley for Governor 805 

moves to secure boathouse for West 

Enders 92 

Municipal Government per capita costs not 

as high as claimed 492 

no money at present for court house 119 

not in move to abolish Teachers College.. . 1417 
not to bandy words with Finance Commis- 
sion 696 

opposes proposed increases in state budget, 676 
orders collection of deUnquent taxes to 

prevent deficit 1 165 

orders purchase of snow removal machin- 
ery 89 

points to Census Bureau inaccuracies on 

Boston 691 

refuses to approve Huntington avenue 

subway project 1249 

refuses Finance Commission claim of jug- 
gling budget figures 817 

says Finance Commission putting on show- 
over purchase of snow removal equip- 
ment 123 

scores Finance Commi.ssion for adWsing 

illegal action on welfare coal 1289 

scores Finance Commission report as unre- 
strained vituperation and abuse 661 

statement on continuance of Dolan case.. 665 
Mayor .and Mrs. M.assfield, Soci.il 
.Activities: 
Mrs. Mansfield addresses Boston City Fed- 
eration at luncheon 417 

attend reception of Cardinal Pacelli 1289 

patrons of Guild supper dance 1289 

welcomed bv citizens after European vaca- 
tion 1025 

M.AYOR. Acting. Activities by: 

asks sane observance of July 4 915 

campaigns against long-time parkers in 

city streets 907 

seeks to provide employment for citizens . . 948 

appeals made for Olympic team funds 927 

warns of dangers to citizens at Charles 

and Cambridge streets 923 

warns, in address, against internal foes and y 

agitators 911 

warning sounded against inroads of com- y 

munism 1209 ' 

welcomes President Roosevelt to Boston ^ 

on Common 1233^ 

MuNicip.AL Court: 

changes in personnel (see also salary in- 
creases) 1169 

JIuNicip.AL Employment Bureau: 

changes in personnel 416. 194. 1121 

N. 
New City Hall, final action awaiting return 

of President to Washington 1364 

O. 

O'Hearn, John P., named to Board of Asses- 
sors 441 

Old age assistance, appUcants lose aid because 

of lack of proof of age or citizenship ... 1 139 
Overtime .\llowed: 

Hospital Department 170, 222, 337, 417 

851, 883, 1062, 1287 

Institutions Department 1414 

Municipal Court 1080 

Park Department 113. 125. 177, 205. 285 

Penal Institutions Department 1437 

Printing Department 54, 924. 974. 1149, 1252 

Public Works Department: 

Bridge Service 126. 177. 203. 222 

Ferry Service 126, 177. 203. 1045. 1383 

Paving .Service 54. 153, 177. 222, 244. 269 

Sanitary Service 54. 154. 177. 178 

204, 224. 225, 286, 1415 



CITY RECORD INDEX. 



Overtime Allowed: Page 

Public Works Department: 

Sewer Ser\-ice 54. 126, 178, 205, 245 

366, 417, 7.37, 795, 948, 974 
1169,1188,1239,1287 1415 

Sumner Traffic Tunnel 178. 205 

Water Service 113, 126, 205 

P. 

Park Department: 

changes in personnel. . . .28, 53, 83, 113, 125, 260 

284, .366, 416, 450. 629. 666. 737 

822, 850. 882. 912, 947. 973. 1081 

1148, 1152. 1169. 1286, 1312, 1359 

Penal Institutions Department: 

changes in personnel. . . .5. 53, 83, 113, 125. 152 

203. 244. 260, 285, 337, 366, 416, 450 

666, 692. 763. 795. 850. 882. 913. 973 

1010, 1045, 1062, 1080, 1095, 1148, 1169 

1187, 1209, 1239, 1287, 1312, 1359, 1414 

Printing Department: 

changes in personnel 53, 285, 416 

450, 948, 1080, 1095, 1152, 1187 
Public Buildings Depart.ment: 

chances in personnel 5, 26, 53, 83, 125, 176 

285, 416, 450, 795. 850. 882, 912, 948 
1062, 1122, 1187, 1239, 1252, 1287, 1326 
Public Works Department: 
changes in personnel: 

Central Office 260, 308, 392 

692, 795, 822, 948, 973, 1122. 1187 

Bridge Service 5. 260, 308 

366. 416. 450. 795. 822. 850. 882, 973 
1045, 1095, 1149, 1169, 1187, 1326 

Ferry Service 26, 83 

337, 366. 795, 882, 912, 948 
1095, 1122, 1149, 1187, 1287. 1359, 1414 

Highway Division 83, 125, 244, 822, 1239 

Paving Division 5, 26 

113, 125, 152, 285. 308, 337, 366 

450, 666, 7.37. 763. 795. 912. 973 

1045. 1095. 1122. 1239. 1287, 1313, 1326, 1383 

Sanitary Di\-ision 5. 26. 83. 152, 176, 244 

309, 337, 450, 667, 693, 850, 882, 912 
1010, 1045, 1080, 1049, 1095 
1169, 1239, 1287, 1313, 1359 

Sewer Service 5, 83, 152 

260, 309, 366, 667, 693, 7.37, 795. 882 

912, 973, 1045, 1122, 1169, 1187 

1252, 1287. 1326. 1359. 14.37 

Water Division 5. 26. 53. 83, 125. 153 

222, 244, 260, 361, 416, 450, 737, 882 
912, 973, 1081, 1169, 1360, 1437 

Water Income Division 26, 153, 244, 309 

366, 417, 667, 693, 737, 795, 822, 850 

882, 912, 1010, 1045, 1080, 1169, 1188 

1239, 1287. 1313, 1360, 1414 

R. 

Registry Department: 

changes in personnel 1149, 1287 

Registry of Deeds: 

changes in personnel 54, 882, 1287 

Report, annual, Boston Retirement system, 13. 486 
members 1023 

Report, annual. Department of School 

Buildings for the year 1935 1 181 

Report. Supt. Patrick J. Campbell, on 
National Civic Federation meeting at 
New York 842 

Report. Dr. Frederick J. Gillis. on National 

Education Association Convention.. . 695 

Report, Susan J. Ginn, on Vocational Guid- 
ance meeting 663 



Page 
Report, Edward J. Rowse, on conference at 

Washington 841 

Report, Chairman Sullivan and Engineer 
Mahar on School Business Officers' 
Annual Meeting 1374 

S. 

Salary increases (general), all departments, 

795-805, 823-827, 851, 883 
School Buildings, Dep.\rtment of: 

changes in personnel 25, 53, 112, 124, 152 

221, 260. 365, 392, 762, 795, 882, 912 
947, 1080, 1121, 1168, 12.39. 1286 
•Soldiers' Relief Department: 

changes in personnel 26. 54. 83. 153. 309 

366. 667. 795, 912, 1313 
.Street Lating-Out Department: 

changes in personnel. . .5, 125, 285, 450, 667, 912 
land-taking: 

Ajles road and Westminster street 1154 

Belnel road 395 

Belton street 176 

Brighton (sewerage) 417 

Chiswick terrace 261 

Coronado road 479 

Cowing street 1356 

Dale street 1162 

Dwinnell street 72 

Emerson avenue 1292 

Euston road 292 

Everett street (extension) 1050 

Flagg street or Cenacle road 889 

Friendship road (Hyde Park) 418 

Grant or Grantley street 694 

Hallowell street 211 

Haven avenue 1368 

Hay ward road 1062 

Humes road 47 1 

Irwin avenue 5 

Kemp street (extension) 1436 

La Grange street 918 

Livermore street 1191 

Madeline street 384 

Mt. Calvary road 419 

Maynard street (extension) 84 

Needham street 1442 

Nevada street 14 

Newfield street. 1285 

Notre Dame street 10 

O'Connell road 1053 

Oldfields road 293 

Penryth street 891 

Pheasant street and others 24S 

Pleasant Hill avenue 685 

Pine street (Hyde Park) 129 

Ralston street 1174 

Ralston street (extension) 1437 

Rendall road et at 293 

Roanoke road 129 

Ridge road Ill 

Roseberry street 263 

Ruth road 31 

Sagamore street (extension) 1052 

Wakefield street 1445 

White Oak road 1052 

land-taking, damages: 

Arundel park 1065 

Bragdon street (extension) 90 

Centre street 246 

Central street (West Roxbury) 309 

Chelsea street 80, 89 

Colbert street (formerly Central) 119 

Cornauba street 1291 

Faneuil street 29 

Freemont street 1066 



■Street Lating-Out Department: Page 

land-taking, damages: 

Fremont street (extension) 1 173 

Good way road 384 

Hart street. Prospect street, etc 1318 

La Grange street 246 

Linden and other streets 1263 

Magdala street 84 

Maple terrace 829 

Medford street 276 

Mercer street 1316 

North Harvard street 155 

North Harvard street 246 

Payson avenue 384 

P6ak Hill road 246 

Perkins street 36() 

Pleasant avenue 276 

Public Alley 808 304, 309 

Stirason street, etc 1294 

Stratford street (extension) 1446 

Taylor terrace or Toledo street 1319 

Toll Gate road 827 

Washington Heights avenue 1388 

Weld street 12, US 

Whipple avenue 842, 843 

Woodward road 54 

streets, location and relocation of 126, 225 

276, 1014, 1097 

streets, designated for coasting 105, 1442 

Shubow, Rabbi, address at Washington- 
Lincoln exercises, Faneuil Hall 217 

snow contracts for removal of 15 

Spanish War Veterans, Boston honors 178 

Suffolk County Jail: 

changes in personnel 850 

Sumner Tunnel: 

changes in personnel 113, 260, 692, 795 

822, 850, 912, 1080, 1122 
Supply Department: 

changes in personnel 113, 125, 1.53 

244, 260, 392, 417, 795, 973 
1095. 1252, 1287, 1414 
furnishing hard and soft wood. Welfare 
Department 1190 



Tax sales, delinquent 473, 656 

Tax dollar, diagram and statement showing 

division and disbursement 877, 879, 880 

Traffic Department: 

changes in personnel 88. 366. 693. 912 

948, 1062, 1122 
Transit Department: 
additional subway platform at Park street, 14 

W. 
Weights and Measures Department: 

changes in personnel. . . .' 913 

Welfare Department 

changes in personnel. 4, 26, 82, 113, 124, 152, 221 
244. 260. 284, 308, 337, 366, 449. 666 
762, 822, 850, 882, 912, 924, 1009 
1045, 1060, 1080. 1095. 1121 
1148. 1169, 1187, 1286 
1312, 1359, 1383, 1437 
reports showing definite progressive de- 
cline in problem 240. 305, 1077, 1309 

unit in East Boston opens for service. . . . 1065 
Welfare, relief methods in years following 

Revolution 19 

Welfare, supplementary aid for W. P. A. 

workers 97 

White way. operation begun in East Boston. 126 
Work omitted under contract, Chelsea Street 

Bridge 1010, 1244 



CITY OF BOSTON PP.INTINC DEPABTMENT 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Aff.urs. 
Vol. 28. Saturday, Janxjary 4, 1936. No. 1 



MAYOR MANSFIELD AGAIN CHOSEN GENERAL CHAIRMAN OF BOSTON 
COMMITTEE FOR PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT BIRTHDAY BALL — AT HIS 
SUGGESTION HON. JOSEPH A. MAYNARD HAS BEEN APPROVED AS EX= 
ECUTIVE CHAIRAIAN AND WILL IMMEDIATELY NAME HIS COOPERATING 
STAFF— CHOICE OF MAYOR TO HEAD COMMITTEE MADE BY HENRY 
L. DOHERTY, NATIONAL CHAIRMAN, WHO PRAISES MAYOR'S EFFORTS 
AND SUCCESS OF LAST YEAR. 



The following is a copy of letter from Henry L. Doherty, National Chairman, Birthday Ball for the President, 
to Mayor Mansfield : 

Dear Mayor Mansfield: 

It makes me very happy to be able to ask you for the contribution of your fine services as Chairman of the 
Birthday Ball Committee in your community. 

This year again infantile paralysis has stalked through the land. It has added thousands of new victims 
to the enormous number already existing. Epidemics struck in all but a few of the counties of North Carolina, in 
Virginia, in Maryland, and in the District of Columbia. Its spread is too wide, so serious that the Surgeon-General 
of the U. S. Public Health Service caused the President to call off the Boy Scout convention in Washington. This 
undoubtedly broke the hearts of many thousands of Boy Scouts who had been looking forward with such keen 
anticipation to their jamboree — probably some of the boys in your communtiy felt this way, too. The epidemic 
then continued through New Jersey and New York, hitting 2,100 persons in New York City alone. The epidemic 
jumped to Connecticut, Rhode Island, Kentucky, Michigan, California, Massachusetts; in other words, here — 
there — everywhere. 

Ever forward — ever faster — ever stronger must we go to bring under control this devastating specter 
which is a constant threat over the household of yourself and your fellow citizens. 

Fighting Disease. 

Using the money secured from the celebration of the President's birthday last year, the President's Birthday 
Ball Commission for Infantile Paralysis Research has made grants to many of the leading research laboratories, 
such as the Hooper Foundation, San Francisco; Now York University; Western Reserve University, Cleveland; 
University of Chicago; University of Southern California, Los Angeles; Long Island College of Medicine, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. ; University of Pennsylvania; Harvard University, Massachusetts; Stanford University, Palo Alto, Cahfornia; 
Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. 

The scientific research men in these laboratories are struggling vahantly to discover the virus and bring it 
under control. 

The Georgia Warm Springs Foundation has used the money which was received from the celebration of the 
President's birthday in 1934 to develop its own studies on after-treatment and the whole nation-wide fight against 
infantile paralysis. Its national program includes the following agencies: American Medical Association, American 
Orthopedic Association, American Pediatric Society, U. S. Public Health Service, American Academy of Orthopedic 
Surgeons, American Academy of Pediatrics, President's Birthday Ball Commission for Infantile Paralysis Research, 
National Committee for the Birthday Ball for the President, Orthopedic Advisory Committee, the Foundation's 
institution at Warm Springs, Ga., and the Committee Against Infantile Paralysis. 

As a member of this great work, through your chairmanship of the committee for the Birthday Ball for the 
President in your community, you are blazing a trail along with all of us — you are a pioneer. 

In view of the great seriousness of the infantile paralysis problem, I, on behalf of the National Committee, 
asked the President again to loan us his birthday for the purpose of affording the American public an opportunity 
to devote one day to participating in the furtherance of the solution of infantile paralysis by purchasing tickets 
and attending a nation-wide Presidential levee in honor of a man's fine leadership in a fight against a human ailment 
— in honor of the highest office in the land — and in honor of their own community's determination to insure the 
future of their own families against the horrible and costly aftermath of infantile paralysis. 

54th Birthday. 

President Roosevelt, after requesting the recommendations of the Board of Trustees of the Georgia Warm 
Springs Foundation, has granted my request that he loan us his 54th birthday which will be on January 30, 1936, 
so that all of us can carry on our work through this celebration. {Continued on page S.) 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 4 




"O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 
queen, 

From thy hills lookinc down on the ship- 
teeming plain of the ocean, 

May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 
with light all serene, 

Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters 
unselfish devotion!" 

From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 

FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

Hall. , . . I.JV 

Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 16, 

City Hall. 

Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 

. . . $2.00 Per Year 
10 cents 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES 
Old South News-SUnd. Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 
A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 

Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

A regular meeting for organization of 
the School Committee of the City of 
Boston will be held in the Admimstra- 
tion Building, 15 Beacon street, on 
Monday, January 6, 1936, at 5 o'clock 
p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. r. , ■ 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
he«rings and executive, meetings arc 
held on the first Friday of each month. 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Bo.SRD OF StREET COMMIS- 
SIONERS, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways ; the taking of rear 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 



public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasoline, oil 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Traffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
waj-s, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
is.suing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To THE He.\lth Dep.artment, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Bo.ard of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue. Back Bay 
Fens. Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 
charges made for such service. Applica- 



tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools in the city. 

To THE Department of School BL^LD- 
INCS, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To THE Bo.\RD of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To THE St.ATISTICS DEPARTMENT, RoOm 

76, Citj' Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To THE Wire Division of the Fire 
Dep.artment, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Bo.^rd of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



For the week ending December 28, 1935: 
Population as of July, 1935, Massa- 
chusetts State Census, 817,713; popula- 
tion estimated July, 1935, United States 
Census Bureau, 798,568; number of 
deaths (stillbirths excluded) : Residents, 
182; nonresidents, 54; total, 236. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 15.37; nonresidents deducted, 
11.85. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
Last week, 15.82; corresponding week 



last year, 14.38. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 20; one j'ear to four years, in- 
clusive, 6; si.xtv years and over, 125. 
Total deaths: Male, 133; female, 103; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 147; 
deaths of colored, 9. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: C.\SES AND DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 


Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Dec. 28, 1935. 


Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Dec. 29, 1934. 




Cases. 


Deaths. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 




1 

1 

35 

50 

67 

19 

2 

3 

3 


1 

1 
1 
18 
2 
6 


6 

4 

15 

37 

7 

5 

1 

37 






, 


Encephalitis lethargica . . . . 




Influenza 


2 








1 


Pneumonia (lobar) 


7 


Scarlet fever 




Tuberculosis (pulmonary) (2 cases childhood type T. B.) 

Tuberculosis (other forms) 


8 
1 


Typhoid fever 














* Residents and nonresidents included. 



jAJf. 4 



CITY RECORD 



MAYOR MANSFIELD APPROVES CONTRACTS FOR 
CONSTRUCTION OF TWO BUILDINGS FOR 
OVERSEERS OF PUBLIC WELFARE — TO PRO= 
VIDE FOR OFFICES IN EAST BOSTON AND 
ON HANCOCK STREET, DORCHESTER. 



Contracts have been awarded, with the 
approval of the Mayor, for the construc- 
tion of two new buildings for the Overseers 
of the Public Welfare. One of the build- 
ings is to be erected at Bremen and 
Maverick streets, East Boston, and the 
other on Hancock street, Dorchester. 

In connection with the awarding of the 
contracts, the following communications 
were sent to Mayor Alansfield and the 
requests therein were given his approval: 

Boston, December 18, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — The Board of Overseere of 
the Public Welfare respectfully requests 
your permission to award a contract to 
R. J. Connolly, Incorporated, 114(j Dor- 
chester avenue, Dorchester, for the 
erection of an office building on Hancock 
street, Dorchester, at a cost of $54,951. 

Bids were received by this department 
on November 27, 1935. This company 
was the lowest bidder. 

Very truly yours, 
James A. McMurry, Chairman. 



Boston, December 18, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — The Board of Overseers of 
the Public Welfare respectfully recjuests 
your permission to award a contract to 
P. J. Cantwell & Son, 644 Ejist Fourth 
street, South Boston, for the erection of 
an office building on the corner of Bremen 
and Maverick streets. East Boston, at a 
cost of $54,918. 



Bids were received by this department 
on November 27, 1935. This company 
was the lowest bidder. 

Very truly yours, 

James A. McMurry, Chairman. 



The proposed new buildings for the 
Overseers of the Public Welfare at No. 
170 Hancock street, Dorchester, and at 
Maverick and Bremen streets. East 
Boston, will be of first-class constmction, 
three stories high, without basement, and 
will be thirty-nine feet wide by seventy- 
two feet long. 

The floors will be concrete and in the 
offices and clerical spaces will be covered 
with linoleum. The exterior of the build- 
ings will be a modified Georgian design. 
The walls will be of water-struck brick and 
the trim will be of cast stone. The 
buildings are so situated that natural light 
will be obtained on all four sides of each. 

The first story in each building will con- 
tain a paying unit, a storeroom and the 
boiler room. The second story will con- 
tain the District Supervisor's office, a 
reappliciition room and four social workers' 
units. In each unit there will be a social 
worker's room, in which the case records 
are kept, a waiting room for recipients and 
a small room in which the individual re- 
cipient is interviewed by the social worker. 
The toilets for the men employees are on 
this floor. 

The third story contains the offices for 
the clerical and stenographic force, dictat- 
ing rooms, a conference room and the 
toilets for the women employees of the 
department. 

Joseph G. McCiann of 129 Newbury 
street is the architect. 



MAYOR MANSFIELD MOVES TO 
MAKE HIGHWAYS SAFER FOR 
PUBLIC. 

Upon December 27 the Mayor i.s.sucd 
the following statement: 

A greater measure of safety on the 
public highways is one of the most press- 
ing public problems of the hour. It is 
unnecessarv to repeat statistics to show 
that more" civilians are killed and in- 
jured within a given time upon our high- 
ways than during a similar space of time 
in war. Everyone knows the facts and 
they are appalling. 

Recently at the United States Con- 
ference of "Mayors a paper on this subject 
was read bv a delegate from New \ ork 
City and the debate was quite general. 
All' agreed upon the necessity for a re- 
duction in traffic casualties. It was 
suggested that committees be appointed 
in the various cities and it is my intention 
to appoint such a committee which will 
begin to function shortly after the New 
Year in an endeavor to attract public 
attention to the necessity for greater 
care and the preservation of human life 
and limbs. 

With a campaign properly advertised 
and conducted, I am very sure we can 
do a great deal in Boston to bring about 
the desired end and if such a committee 
should be appointed in every citv in the 



Commonwealth and in every large town 
and if we all work in harmony, the per- 
centage of casualties from traffic accidents 
in Ma.ssachusetts can be very substan- 
tially improved. 



MAYOR DEMANDS RETRACTION 
OF CHARGES BY FINANCE 
COMMISSION HEAD. 

The following is a copy of a letter from 
the Mayor to E. Mark Sullivan, Chairman 
of the Boston F'inance Commission: 

Boston, December 27, 1935. 
E. Mark Sullivan, Esq., 

Care of Finance Commission, 24 
School Street, Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Recently in the Boston press 
you charged, on what j'ou alleged was 
"authority," that offers of money in the 
form of graft had been made in connection 
with the bids for equipment for the Bo.ston 
Fire Department. 

I immediately demanded that you 
produce the proof of those charges or that 
you retract them. Up to the moment 
you have produced no proof and I now 
renew my demand that the charges be 
retracted. 

Yours truly, 

Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 



COMMUNICATION TO THE 
MAYOR. 

{Continued front pane 1.) 

As a result of your committee's experi- 
ence with what could be accomplished 
with the 70 per cent left with you, I am 
sure that you have every opportunity for 
even greater accomplishment this year. 
The plan for this year's distribution is as 
follows: 

1. 70 per cent to be retained locally 
for the after-treatment of infantile 
paralysis, this money to be disbursed 
through those local or adjacent orthopedic 
hospitals, services or doctors upon which 
the community depends under ordinary or 
epidemic conditions. 

2. 30 per cent to be turned over to 
you for presentation to the Georgia Warm 
Springs Foundation, for the continuance 
and extension of its part in the nation- 
wide fight against infantile paralysis. 

In the event that you have not dis- 
bursed all of the money which you kept 
in your treasury from last year's ball, 
may I suggest that you put this money 
into your 70 per cent fund this year, to 
be spent as per the definite program out- 
lined for this year's proceeds. Even 
though no orthopedic hospital or doctor 
exists in your community, there is an 
orthopedic hospital or doctor somewhere 
in your county, state or section to which 
you must turn for treatment of your 
average cases, or service in the event of 
an epidemic. These are the hospitals, 
these are the doctors who should receive 
the benefits of your fund and it will be 
very simple for you to make an arrange- 
ment whereby they agree to help you. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Henry L. Doherty, 
National Chairman. 



The following message was received by 
the Mayor: 

Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Deeply appreciate all the cooperation 
you have given. Am appointing Mr. 
Maynard Chairman of Boston at once. 

Sincerely, 

Henry L. Doherty. 



DEPARTMENT REORGANIZATION 
NOT TO OUST EMPLOYEES 
FROM JOBS. 

Upon December 23 the Mayor issued 
the following statement: 

I am in receipt of a formal written 
opinion from Corporation Counsel Foley 
that, under Civil Service Rule 27, officers 
and employees of any of the departments 
included in the proposed ordinance 
submitted to the City Council providing 
for a reorganization of the Public Works 
Department could be reappointed with 
their consent and the con.sent of the 
Civil Service Commissioner to similar 
positions in any new department that 
may be formed. 

CITY PURCHASING UNDER THE CODES. 

Caught between two fires, American 
cities are feeling the influence of the 
National Industrial Recovery Act codes 
in their pui'chasing in a way they had 
not foreseen. On one side taxpayers ask 
for economy in budget-making. On the 
other, application of codes, which has re- 
sulted in collective price-fixing, has in- 
creased prices of supplies for city use 
to an almost prohibitive point. 



CITY RECORD 



Jan, 4 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED, 

Bids have l)ccn askod bj' advertisc- 
mont in the City Record for the follow- 
inc (lp]):irtinrnts. Tho attention of con- 
Iraclors and others is ospocially called to 
the closing time of rccei])t of such pro- 
posals. This will bo published weekly. 

Department of School Buildings. 

.\dvertises for proposals for addition 
and alterations to the English High 
School. Surety Ixind will be reciuired in 
a sum etiuivalcnt to the full amount of 
the contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Department of School Buildings, 
11 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
.?5,000, to be filed at the same office. 
I)u|)licate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Txiesday, January H, at 
2 p. m. 

Institutions Department. 
Advertises for proposals for repairs to 
steamer "Stephen J. O'Meara." Surety 
bond will be recjuired in a sum equivalent 
to the full amount of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Institutions 
Department, Room 809, City Hall An- 
nex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by cer- 
tified check in the sum of $100, to be filed 
at the same office. Duplicate bid, with- 
out check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 9, at 12 m. 

Public Works Department. 
Advertises for proposals for constructs 
ing a water pipe trestle and fender at the 
Chelsea Bridge North. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to the 
full amount of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Public Works Depart- 
ment, Room 508, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $1,500, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 21, at 12 m. 

Public Works Department (Sanitary 
Service). 
Advertises for proposals for dredging 
dock at garbage dump station at Albany 
street, Boston. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to the full 
amount of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Public Works Depart- 
ment, Room 508, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of 15200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 13, at 12 m. 

School Committee. 
.Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
interfolded paper towels and roll towels 
for the Boston public schools. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum ecjuivalent 
to 50 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for i)roposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Business Manager, 
School Committee, 15 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .1100, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 1/f, at 12 m- 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
I)loyccs have been made during the week 
ending Tlnusday, January 2; 

.V.ssEssiNG Department. 
.A))i)roval has been given for the pro- 
visional temporarj' employment of Paul 
M. Finan as a first assistant assessor, for 
a throe months' period, effective Thurs- 
day, January 2, 1936, at Sl,700 a year. 

Boston Port Authority. 
Mona Anderson has been appointed 
research clerk at 81,560 a year. 

Collecting Department. 
Leave of ab.sence, without paj', granted 
Peter C. Quinn, clerk, from September 
13, 1935, to December 31, 1935, has been 
continued to March 31, 1936. 

Fire Department. 

Additional appointment to the exterior 
inspection force of the Wire Division at 
81,600 a year, increasing the number of 
exterior inspectors in the Wire Division 
from ten to eleven, has been approved, 
with Walter Englert appointed to the 
place. 

John J. Riley, foreman of plumbers in 
the Maintenance Division has been re- 
tired, to take effect Wednesday, January 
15, at 81,100 a year. 

Hb.\lth Department. 
Leave of absence, without pay has 
been granted Anna C. McCormack, 
nurse, because of personal illness, said 
leave of absence effective January 15, 
and to continue for six months. 

Hospital Department. 

Permission has been given for the 
transfer of Edward A. Devir, laundry- 
man at $24.50 a week to laundryman at 
830 a week, to fill the vacancy caused 
by the retirement of John Daly, in the 
South Department. Also to promote 
Richard Burns from laundry porter at 
$23 a week to laundryman at 824.50 a 
week, to fill Mr. Devir's vacancy. 

Permission has been given to employ 
the following nurses temporarilv: 

Adeline Carroll, Edna Kolus, Cath- 
erine D3-er, Margaret Wynne, Arlene 
Case, Eileen Buckley, Stella Polofsky. 

The following persons have been em- 
ployed at the Boston City Hospital dur- 
mg the week ending Thui-sday, Decem- 
ber 26: 

Permanent.— Sa.dye Luren.skv, recon- 
.?truction aide, $30 a week, half time. 
Temporary. —Edna Geigle, Irene Grif- 
. fen, Marie CarLson, Grace McKay, Gene- 
vieve Ploski, Louise Bums, Carroll 
Bi-isgs, Madeline Cavanaugh, Catherine 
Flynn, Anna Doyle, Gladys Maccaione, 
Jo,sepbine Hayes, Mildred Wilkins, 
Lorinda Mc.iuley, Priscilla Beckwith. 
Elizabeth Doherty, Mary A. Sullivan, 
Eddie Twilley. Josephine Kass, Mary 
Maher, Evelyn Mason, Margaret Kellev, 
Anna Ward, E\-clyn SacaJeau, Esther 
Pennington, Harry Plenty, Sylvia Ton-e, 
Mary K. Burke, Doris Broadbridge] 
Marion Costa, Marion Cuzner, Louise 
Fallon. Gladys Goulet, Irene McDonnell, 
Samuel Odiorne, Kathryn Silva, Charles 
Toye. Georgia LeBlanc, Anne Forman, 
special nurses, S4..50 a dav; John White[ 
ordcrl\-, 816.50 a week; Wilma Berg, 
cleaner, 815 a week; .\lice Connors,' 
clerk, ■ S12 a week; Lillian Bibbey, 



Eleanor Robi.shaw, wardmaids, $15 a 
week; Mary Grifi&n, clerk, S16 a week; 
Soi)hia Tapanai, Alma Johnson, cleaners, 
815 a week; Carl Briggs, male nurse, 
81.200 a year. 
The following changes have occurred: 
Lucy Kelliher, floor nurse at $1,500 
to 81,560 a j'ear; James O'Xeil, tempo- 
rary center orderly, Haymarket, SI 1.50 to 
Main at 811.50 a week. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 
Division). 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division for 
the week ending Thursday. Decc^mber 26: 

John Daly, Michael Connors, Fred 
McLean, Louis Flavio. Lena DeSolo. An- 
thony DeSista, Jo.seph Coveney, maids 
(patients) (temporarjO, 8240 a year; 
Daniel O'Donnell, Sydney McQueen, Jo- 
seph Merciante, male nurses (patients) 
(temporarj'), $480 a year; John O'Con- 
nor, Patrick Barr}-, maids (patients) 
(temporary), .8240 a j'ear. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed : 

William Gilmartin, kitchenman, S14 a 
week; Glenn Ladd, maid (patient) (tem- 
poraiy), .8240 a year; John Toland, 
choreman, 817.50 a week. 

Institutions De^p.^rtment. 
The following changes have been made 
in the personnel for the week ending 
Thursday, December 26: 

Long Island Hospital. 

Appointments: William F. Gorman, 
institution employee, porter, 8526 a year, 
temporary; John R. Crandell, institution 
employee, cook, 8600 a year, temporary. 

Resignations: Harriet G. Babcock, 
institution employee, helper, sen'ice 
room, 8526 a year, voluntary; Katherine 
V. Murphy, institution emploj'ee. house- 
maid, 8500 a year, voluntarj'^; John M. 
Monahan, institution employee, attend- 
ant, 8600 a year, voluntary. 

Employment Terminated: Frank D. 
Myers, institution employee, helper, 
kitchen, temporary, -8526 a year. 

Overseers of the Public Welfare. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary emplo.yment of the 
following persons as stenographers, for 
a period of three months, at 8900 a year : 

Cecilia E. Batchelder, Marie J. Bertsch, 
Frances V. Clarke, Lillian I. Coulton, 
Gertrude E. Doherty, Camilla C. Gib- 
bons, Mary B. McGowan, Frances J. 
Montello, Marguerite Rooney, Esther 
Taranto, Rose G. Waters. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporarv employment of the 
following persons as assistant paymasters, 
for a period of one month from January 
6. at $1,500 a year: John V. Condon, 
Samuel Elman, Maurice Gortlin, Morris 
Katz. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary- emploj^ment of John 
K. Russell as aid and settlement agent, 
from December 29, for a period of three 
months, at $1,000 a year. 

.\l)pro\al has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary employment of the 
following persons as clerks, until January 
31, 1936, at 8900 a year: 

Mary M. Cauley, John N. Chagaris, 
Thomas J. Connaughton, William P. 
Cox, Mary E. Cronin, Russell E. CuUi- 
van, Helen A. Curley, Mary E. Dillon. 
Timothy H. Donohue, Anna M. Doyle, 
Helen T. Fadden, Anne Halligan, 
Thomas F. Keeley, Stanislavia Kiwaczs'n- 



Jan. 4 



CITY RECORD 



ska, Margaret M. Leahy, William J. 
Miller, Edward F. Murphy, William V. 
McCarthy, Hazel L. McCoy, Julius 
Neidleman, Thomas W. Quigley, Michael 
J. Rizzo, Eben Rosenficld, Lillian Welsh, 
Lazard H. Seiff, Helen T. Severance, 
Helen G. Skapinsky, George Stuart, Mars^ 
A. Tatro, Alfred C. Troy, Ruth H. 
Walker, John T. Scanlon. 

Penal Institutions Department. 

The following salarj' increase for the 
chaplain at the House of Correction, 
Penal Institutions Department, has been 
approved : 

Howard P. Kellett, from $800 to S900 
a year. 

Public Buildings Department. 
Susan L. O'Brien has been transferred 
from the Boston City Hospital as a 
cleaner at $18 a week. 

Public Works Department (Bridge 
Service). 

Approval has been given for the fol- 
lowing promotions in the Bridge Service, 
to fill permanent vacancies, effective 
Monday, December 23, 1935: 

Bernard J. Dillon, from first assistant 
drawtendcr at SI ,800 a year to draw- 
tender at $2,000 a year. 

Patrick J. McGonigle, from assistant 
drawtender at $1,700 a year to first assist- 
ant drawtendcr at $1,800 a ye-ar. 

PixBLic Works Department (Paving 
Service). 

Approval has been given to promote 
John R. Power from inspector at $2,100 
a year in the Paving Service to district 
foreman at $2,300 a year to fill a per- 
manent vacancy cau.sed by the death of 
John J. McGinn in the South Boston 
paving district, effective January 1, 1936. 

Public Works Department (Sanitary 
Service). 

Approval has been given for the fol- 
lowing promotions in the Sanitary Divi- 
sion, effecti\'e January 1, 1936: 

John F. Higgins, from inspector at 
$2,100 a year to district foreman at 
S2,300 a year, in South Boston district, 
in place of James A. Guthrie, deceased. 

Henry J. Savage, from inspector at 
$2,100 a year to district foreman at $2,300 
a year, in the West End Sanitarj' dis- 
trict, in place of Patrick J. McNulty, 
retired. 

Charles J. McCoy, from inspector at 
$2,100 a year to district foreman at $2,300 
a year, at the Fort Hill disposal station 
of Sanitary Service, in place of James 
E. Crowley, retired. 

Edmund A. Connelly, from inspector 
at $2,100 a year to district foreman at 
$2,300 a year, in the East Boston street 
cleaning di.^trict, in place of Michael J. 
Pumphret, retired. 

David J. Cronin, from inspector at 
$2,100 a year to district foreman at $2,300 
a year, in the Dorchester street clean- 
ing district, in place of Francis J. Dowd, 
dcceai5cd. 

Public Works Department (Sewer 

Service). 
Approval has been given for the trans- 
fer of Daniel A. Sweeney from Boston 
Institutions Department to the Sewer 
Division as laborer at $5 a day. to fill 
a permanent vacancy, effective January 
3, 1936. 



PiBLic Works Department (Water 
Service). 

Appro\aJ has been given for the fol- 
lowing transfers, to fill permanent va- 
cancies in the position of laborer at $5 
a day, effective January 3, 1936: 

Bernard P. Gaffney, from the Boston 
Institutions Department. 

John B. Sweeney, from the Boston 
City Hospital Department. 

Street Laying-Out Department. 
Leave of absence, without pay, has 
been granted to Joseph P. Donohoe, 
junior draughtsman, for one year from 
January 1, 1936. 

District Attorney's Office. 
Leo J. Manning, secretary and chief 
clerk, has been allowed an increase in 
salary from $3,500 to $3,800 a year. 



LAND-TAKINQ IN ROXBURY. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commi.ssioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Irwin avenue, Roxbury 
district, as a highway, from Blue Hill 
avenue northwesterly, bounded and de- 
scribed as follows: 

A highway named Irwin avenue is 
hereby laid out, from Blue Hill avenue 
northwesterly for a distance of approxi- 
mately three hundred feet and ordered 
constructed, the cost thereof to be charged 
to Federal Funds. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive of 
trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows; 

Southeasterly by Blue Hill avenue, 
thirty and 51-100 feet; southwesterly by 
the southwesterly line of said Irwin 
avenue as hereby laid out, three hundred 
fourteen and 90-100 fe(?t; northwesterly 
by the northwesterly line of said Irwin 
avenue as hereby laid out, thirty-three 
and 51-100 feet; and northeasterly by 
the northeasterly line of said Irwin avenue 
as hereby laid out, two hundred ninety- 
four and 40-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the pubhc improvement, 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Irwin avenue, Roxbury district, as 
a highway, from Blue Hill avenue north- 
westerly for a distance of approximately 
three hundred feet, under the order of the 
Board of December 30, 1935, and awards 
no damages therefor. 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACT. 

Public Works Department. 
The Worthington Pump and Ma- 
chinery Corporation have been granted 
an extension of the time of completion 
of the contract for new pump for No. 1 
Pumping Unit, Calf Pasture pumping 
station, dated August 19, 1935, from 
December 19, 1935, to January 31, 1936, 
a period of forty-three days. This exten- 
sion of time is occasioned by the fact 
that upon making an official factory test 
it was decided that certain adjustments 
and changes would be required, and also 
that the schedule of erection will need 
to be arranged to fit conditions at the 
station. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Fire Department. 

Upon January 13, 1934, the Mayor 
approved a contract with the Hub Laun- 
dry Company, Incorporated, for doing 
the laundry work of the Fire Department 
for the year 1934. The following pro- 
posals were received: 

Hub Laundry Company, Incorporated. — 
Sheets, pillow slips, towels, spreads, \\ 
cents each; blankets (gray aqd blue), 12 
cents each. 

John D. Sheehy & Son. — Sheets, pillow 
slips, towels, spreads, 2| cents each; 
blankets (single and double), 15 cents 
each. 

Based on the estimated amount of 
work for the year the approximate totals 
of the foregoing bids are as follows: 

Hub Laundry Company, Incorporated, 
$2,414.79; John D. Sheehy & Son, 
$3,592.23. 

The estimated amount of laundry work 
to be done for the Fire Department is as 
follows : 

5,580 sheets per month; 5,145 pillow 
sUps per month; 1,917 towels per month; 
107 bedspreads per month; 1,000 blankets 
annually. 

Hospital Department. 

Upon December 27 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with E. P. Robitaille 
Company for the purchase of bones, 
trimmings, grease, suets and cods at 
Boston City Hospital. Bids, opened 
Wednesday, December 18, were as follows: 

Trimmings, Per Pound. — E. P. Robi- 
taille Company, 5 cents; Rand & Byam, 
Incorporated, 4 cents; James F. Morse 
& Co., 3J cents; John E. King, 3j cents. 

Bones, Per Pound. — E. P. Robitaille 
Company, 1 cent; Rand & Byam, In- 
corporated, Ij cents; James F. Morse 
& Co., Ij cents; John E. King, IJ cents. 

Grease, Per Pound. — E. P. Robitaille 
Company, 6 cents; Rand & Byam, In- 
corporated, 5 cents; James F. Morse 
& Co., 4 cents; John E. King, 4^ cents. 

Suets, Per Pound. — E. P. Robitaille 
Company, 8 cents; Rand & Byam, In- 
corporated, 62 cents; James F. Morse 
<Sr Co., 65 cents; John E. King, 6 cents. 

Cods, Per Pound.— E. P. Robitaille 
Company, 71 cents; Rand & Byam, In- 
corporated, 62 cents; James F. Morse 
& Co., Oj cents; John E. King, 6 cents. 

Trap Grease, Per Pound. — E. P. Robi- 
taille Company, j cent. 

Library Department. 

Upon January 2 the Mayor approved a 
contract with C. G. Giles for the trans- 
portation of books and other library 
materials between the Central Library 
and the branch libraries for 1936. Bids, 
opened December 4, were as follows: 

Reynolds Contracting Company, $123 
per week- C. E. Giles Company, $6,500 
per year ($125 per week); Egleston Square 
Auto Livery, Incorporated, $157 per 
week. 

The specifications for bidding provided 
that each bid be accompanied by a certified 
check for two hundred dollars ($200). 
The lowest bidder, the Reynolds Contract- 
ing Company, did not submit a certified 
check. In reply to a request for an 
opinion as to the validity of this firm's 
bid, the Law Department of the city 
stated that the "bid was not therefore a 
valid bid and should not be accepted as 
such." 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 4 



In view of the above the trastecs at a 
meeting hold Friday, December 20, 1935: 

Voleil, That there be awarded to C. E. 
Giles, 24 Custom Hoa^c street, Boston, 
the lowest (lualified bidder in the i)ublic 
bidding, the eontract for the transporta- 
tion of l)ooks and other materials between 
the Central Library and the branch 
libraries for the year 193G, at the amount 
of $(i,5(K) per year. 

Public \Vork.s Dei'.\rtment (Paving 

Service). 

Upon December 30 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with Edward M. Matz 
for removing snow and ice in snow area 
No. 3 at 40 cents a cubic yard. The fol- 
lowing bids were received December 20: 

Edward M. Matz, 40 cents a cubic 
yard; -\. Singarella, 45 cents a cubic yard; 
Baker & Co., 48 cents a cubic yard; Hugh 
Nawn, Incorporated, 49 cents a cubic 
yard; Martin J. Kellv, 50 cents a cubic 
yard; C. Reppucci & Co., 55 cents a cubic 
yard; Ward General Contracting Com- 
pany, 58 cents a cubic yard; A. G. Toma- 
sello & Son, Incorporated, 58 cents a cubic 
yard; Joseph P. McCabe, Incorporated, 
58 cents a cubic yard; C. J. Maney Com- 
pany, Incoriwrated, 59 cents a cubic yard; 
C. & R. Construction Company, 60 cents 
a cubic yard; M. McGinnis Company, 
60 cents a cubic yard; Coleman Brothers 
Corporation, 60 cents a cubic yard; M. Y. 
Gaddis, Incorporated, 62.5 cents a cubic 
yard; Paul Caputo Construction Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 63 cents a cubic 
yard; J. J. Callahan, 65 cents a cubic 
yard; Dooley Brothers, Incorporated, 
65 cents a cubic j-ard. 

Upon December 30 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with Hugh Nawn, In- 
corporated, for removing snow and ice in 
snow area No. 2 at 48 cents a cubic yard. 

The low bidders, Edward M. Matz and 
A. Singarella, have been awarded other 
areas. The next bidder, M. F. Gaddis, 
Incorporated, did not comply with the 
.specifications to the extent that the equip- 
ment which he submits as available for 
hire enumerated only thirty trucks of 
various sizes, whereas the specifications 
state that the contractor must be pre- 
pared to furnish at least seventy trucks. 
The next bidders are Baker & Co., Hugh 
Nawn, Incorporated, Joseph P. McCabe, 
Incorporated, all bidding 48 cents per 
cubic yard. 

The following bids were received 
December 20 : 

Edward M. Matz, 40 cents a cubic 
yard; A. Singarella, 41 cents a cubic yard; 
M. F. Gaddis, Incorporated, 45 cents a 
cubic yard; Baker & Co., 48 cents a cubic 
j'ard; Hugh Nawn, Incorporated, 48 cents 
a cubic yard; Joseph P. McCabe, Incor- 
porated, 48 cents a cubic yard; Martin J. 
Kelly, 50 cents a cubic yard; Coleman 
Brothers Corporation, 50 cents a cubic 
yard; A. G. Tomasello & Son, Incorpora- 
ted, 59 cents a cubic yard; C. J. Maney 
Company, Incorporated, 59 cents a 
cubic yard; C. & R. Construction Com- 
pany, 60 cents a cubic yard; C. Reppucci 
& Co., 60 cents a cubic yard; M. Mc- 
Ginnis Company, 60 cents a cubic yard; 
Dooley Brothers, Incorporated, 60 cents 
a cubic yard; J. J. Callahan, 60 cents a 
cubic yard; Paul Caputo Construction 
Company, Incorporated, 64 cents a cubic 
yard; Central Construction Company, 
73 cents a cubic yard. 

Upon December 30 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Coleman Brothers Cor- 
poration for removing snow and ice in 
snow area No. 1, the second bidder, at 



50 cents a cubic yard. The following 
bids were received December 20: 

Edward M. Matz, 47.5 cents a cubic 
yard; A. Singarella, 50 cents a cubic j'ard; 
Coleman Brothers Corporation, 50 cents 
a cubic yard; Baker & Co., 52 cents a 
cubic j'ard; J. J. Callahan, 55 cents a 
cubic yard; M. F. Gaddis, Incorporated, 
55 cents a cubic yard; Martin J. Kelly, 
55 cents a cubic yard; Hugh Nawn, In- 
corporated, 57 cents a cubic yard; Joseph 
P. ^IcCabe, Incorporated, 58 cents a cubic 
yard; C. J. Maney Companv, Incorporated, 
59 cents a cubic yard; C. <fe R. Con- 
struction Company, 60 cents a cubic 
yard; C. Reppucci & Co., 00 cents a 
cubic yard; .■\. G. Tomaaello & Son, In- 
corporated, 62 cents a cubic yard; Ward 
General Contracting Companj', 64 cents 
a cubic yard; M. McGinnis Companj', 
65 cents a cubic j-ard; Doolej' Brothers, 
Incorporated, 65 cents a cubic yard; Paul 
Caputo Construction Company, Incorpo- 
rated, 70 cents a cubic j'ard; Central 
Construction Company, 82 cents a cubic 
yard. 

Upon December 30 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with A. Singarella for 
removing snow and ice in snow area No. 4, 
the lowest bidder, at 45 cents a cubic 
yard. The following bids were received 
December 20: 

A. Singarella, 45 cents a cubic yard; 
vStandard Contracting Company, 47 cents 
a cubic yard; Edward M. Matz, 49.5 cents 
a cubic yard; Baker & Co., 52 cents a cubic 
yard; Martin J. Kell}% 54 cents a cubic 
yard; C. Reppucci & Co., 55 cents a cubic 
yard; Joseph P. McCabe, Incorporated, 
58 cents a cubic yard; C. &: R. Construc- 
tion Company, 60 cents a cubic yard; 
Coleman Brothers Corporation, 60 cents 
a cubic yard; Hugh Nawn, Incorporated, 
63 cents a cubic j'ard; M. McGinnis Com- 
pany, 65 cents a cubic yard; Doolej^ 
Brothers, Incorporated, 65 cents a cubic 
yard; A. G. Tomassello & Son, Incorpo- 
rated, 65 cents a cubic yard; M. F. Gaddis, 
Incorporated, 65 cents a cubic yard; J. J. 
Callahan, 70 cents a cubic yard; Paul 
Caputo Construction Company, Incorpo- 
rated, 70 cents a cubic yard; C. J. Maney 
Companj^, Incorporated, 72 cents a cubic 
yard. 

Supply Dep.\rtment. 

Upon December 30 the Maj-or approved 
a contract with lowest bidders as in- 
dicated for furnishing hay, grain and 
straw for the various citj' departments 
during Januarj-, 1936. Bids were opened 
December 20. The approximate totals 
of awards were as foUows: 

William Culkeen & Sons Company, 
Sl,064.40; Ogden & Thompson, $351.90; 
John J. White Company, S334.70; The 
Whittemore Companv, $59.20. Approxi- 
mate total, 81,810.20'; 

Bids were as follows: 

Approximate Amounts on All Items. Per 
Hundredweight. 

90,000 Pounds Hay, Large Baks.— 
William Culkeen & Sons Companv, 
$1.02*; John J. White Companv, $1.04; 
Ogden lis,' Thompsson, $1.05. 

30,000 Pounds Hay, Small Bales.— 
W^illiam Culkeen & Sons Companv, 
Sl.Ol; John J. White Company, S1.03; 
Ogden & Tliompson, 81.* 

15,000 Pounds Oats, No. 2 White— 
William Culkeen & Sons Companv, 
$1,495; John J. White Company, $1.45*; 
The Whittemore Companv, $1.47. 

6,000 Pounds Straw.— ^'\\\\&m. Culkeen 
& Sons Companv, 90 cents; John J. 
White Company, 81.02; The Whittemore 
Company, 99 cents; Ogden & Thompson, 
86.5 cents.* 



2,000 Pounds Bran.— William Culkeen 
& Sons Company, $1.35*; John J. White 
Company, $1.40; The Whittemore 
Company, $1.40; Ogden & Thompson, 
12.85. 

2,000 Pounds Cottonseed JlfeaZ.— William 
Culkeen & Sons Company, $1.84; John 
J. White Company, $1.80*; The Whitte- 
more Company, $1.85. 

2,000 Pounds lAnseed Meal. — William 
Culkeen & Sons Companj', $1.80; John J. 
White Company, $1.80*; The Whittemore 
Companv, $1.82. 

2,000 Pounds Gluten .Urr//.— William 
Culkeen & Sons Companv, SI. 85*; John 
J. White Company, $2; the Whittemore 
Company, $2. 

2,000 Pounds Corn .Vea/.— William 
Culkeen & Sons Company, $1.56*; John J. 
White Companv, $1.64; The Whittemore 
Companv, .$1.58; Ogden & Thompson, 
$1.80. 

I,o00 Pounds Cracked Corn. — William 
Culkeen & Sons Companv, $1.56*; John J. 
White Company, 81.64; "The Whittemore 
Compan}', $1.58; Ogden & Thompson, 
$1.80. 

300 Pounds Whole Corn. — William 
Culkeen & Sons Companv, $1.56*; John J. 
White Company, $1.64; 'The Whittemore 
Companj^ $1.63; Ogden <t Thompson, 
$1.80. 

500 Pounds Kaffir Corn.— William Cul- 
keen & Sons Companv, $2.40; John J. 
White Company, $2.40*; The Whitte- 
more Company, $2.45. 

500 Pounds Wheat. — WilUam Culkeen 
& Sons Company, 81.79; John J. White 
Company, $1.79*; The W'hittemore Com- 
pany, $1.84. 

500 Pounds Buckwheat. — William Cul- 
keen & Sons Company, $1.83; Jolui J. 
White Companj^, $1.80*; The Whitte- 
more Company, $1.90. 

300 Pounds Sunflower Seed. — William 
Culkeen & Sons Companj^, $4.50*; John 
J. White Company. $5.95; The Whitte- 
more Company, 86.10. 

100 Pounds White French Millet.— 
William Culkeen & Sons Companv, $9; 
John J. White Company, $8.75*;" The 
Whittemore Company, 88.95. 

200 Pounds hempseed. — William Cul- 
keen & Sons Company, $3.25*; John J. 
White Company, $3.45; The Whittemore 
Company, 83.50. 

4,000 Pounds Crushed Oats. — William 
Culkeen & Sons Company, $1.51; John 
J. White Company, 81.50; The Whitte- 
more Company, 81.48.* 

100 Pounds Canary Seed. — WiUiam Cul- 
keen & Sons Companj', 87; John J. 
W^hite Company, S6.50*; The Whitte- 
more Company, $7.20. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — William 
Culkeen & Sons Companj', one half of 
1 per cent; John J. White Companj% 
one half of 1 per cent; The Whittemore 
Company, one half of 1 per cent; Ogden 
&• Thompson, one half of 1 per cent. 

* Contract awarded. 

Upon December 30 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with lowest bidders as 
indicated for furnishing butter, eggs, etc., 
to the various cit}' departments during 
January, 1936. The approximate totals 
of awards w^ere as follows: 

Armour &: Co., $6,299.28; Lewis-Mears 
Company, $6,155.53; Bolton-Smart 
Companj-, $29.20. Approximate total, 
$12,484.01. 

Bids, opened December 23, were as 
follows: 

Approximate Amounts on All Items. 

684 Cases, 20,520 Dozen, Nearby Fresh 
Hennery Eggs, Per Dozen. — Batchelder & 
Snyder Company, Incorporated, 32.90 



Jan. 4 



CITY RECORD 



cents; New England Food Products Com- 
pany, 32.5 cents; Bolton-Smart Company, 
34.60 cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 
28.7*; Swift & Co., 33.80 cents. 

34 Cases, 1,020 Dozen, Boston First 
Eggs, Per Dozen. — Batchelder & Snyder 
Company, Incorporated, 29 cents; New 
England Food Products Company, 28.5 
cents; Bolton-Smart Company, 30 cents; 
Lewis-Mears Company, 25.2 cents*; Swift 
& Co., 28.80 cents. 

228 Tuba, 14,592 Pounds, 90-Score 
Butter, Per Pound.— rBatcheMcr & Snyder 
Company, Incorporated, 34 cents; Armour 
& Co., 33.60 cents*; New England Food 
Products Company, 34.75 cents; Bolton- 
Smart Company, 35 cents; Lewis-Mears 
Company, 34.7 cents; Swift & Co., 33.99 
cents. 

55 Tubs, 3,520 Pounds, SS-Score Butter, 
Per Pound. — Batchelder & Snyder Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 33.25 cents; Armour 
& Co., 32.60 cents*; New England Food 
Products Company, 34.25 cents; Bolton- 
Smart Company, 35 cents; Lewis-Mears 
Company, 34.4 cents; Swift & Co., 32.99 
cents. 

40 Boxes Philadelphia Cream Cheese, 
12 3-Ounce Packages, Per Box. — Batch- 
elder & Snyder Company, Incorporated, 
90 cents; Armour & Co., 78 cents; Bolton- 
Smart Company, 73 cents*; Lems-Mears 
Company, 88 cents. 

10 Pounds Cream Cheese, in 5 Pound 
Bricks, Per Pound. — Batchelder & Snyder 
Company, Incorporated, 27 cents; Armour 
& Co., 26.94 cents*; Bolton-Smart Com- 
pany, 28 cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 
28 cents. 

50 Pounds Young America Cheese, Per 
Pound. — Batchelder & Snyder Company, 
Incorporated, 25 cents; Armour & Co., 
19.97 cents; Bolton-Smart Company, 20 
cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 18.5 cents.* 

90 Pounds Pimento Cheese, Per Pound. 
— Batchelder & Snj'der Company, In- 
corporated. 27.5 cents; Armour & Co., 
24.97 cents*; Bolton-Smart Company, 
26 cents; Lewis-Mears Company, 25 
cents. 

650 Pounds Medium Old Cheddar 
Cheese, Per Pound. — Batchelder & Snyder 
Company, Incorporated, 22 cents; Ar- 
mour & Co., 18.86 cents*; Bolton-Smart 
Company, 20 cents; Lewis-Mears Com- 
pany, 20.5 cents. 

500 Pounds SX Top Quality Oleomar- 
garine, Per Pound. — Batchelder <Sr Snyder 
Company, Incorporated, 17 cents; Ar- 
mour & Co., 16.5 cents*; Swift & Co., 
17 cents. 

120 Pounds Puff Paste Compound, Per 
Pound. — Batchelder & Snyder Company, 
Incorporated, 18 cents; Armour & Co., 
15.5 cents*; Swift & Co., 16 cents. 

Remarks. — Swift & Co., no deductions 
on account of taxes. 

* Contract awarded. 

L'pon December 31 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with Thomas W. Reed 
Company for laboratory equipment for 
the Boston City Hospital. Bids, opened 
December 19, were as follows: 

Numbers refer to .A. H. Thomas & Co. 
catalogue. 

1, Only, Zeiss Binocular D. S. G. Mi- 
croscope, A pro chroma tic Objectives. — Spen- 
cer Lens Company of New England, 
$550.50, Spencer No. 3 LPK; S550.50, 
with compensating oculars; .1530, with 
aplanatic condenser; mechanical stage R 
may be substituted for mechanical stage 
P at an additional price of Sll; Howe & 
French, , Incorporated, $635.50; Bausch 
& Lomb Optical Company, $520.50, B. & 
L. GBE; $10 extra, monocular tube; 
$20 extra, binocular inclined body; 
E. F. Mahady Company, $635.50; alter- 



nate, $520.50, B. & L. GBE; $10 extra, 
monocular tube; $20 extra, with inclined 
binocular body; $550.50, Spencer 3-LPK; 
$20.50, deduct if aplanat condenser 
supplied; Thomas W. Reed Company, 
.$635.50*; alternate, S550..50, Spencer No. 
3 LPK; $530, same as above, substitute 
aplamitic instead of achromatic; Central 
Scientific Company, $635.50. 

/, Only, Zei.ss D. S. G. Microscope, 
Achromatic Objectives. — Spencer Lens 
Company of New England, $308.25, 
Spencer 13 LH; $252.25, without me- 
chanical stage; Howe & French, In- 
coqjorated, $341; Bausch & I^omb 
Optical Company, $318.75, B. & L. 
GBE; $10 extra, monocular tube- $20 
extra, binocular inclined body; E. F. 
Mahady Company, $341; alternate, 
$318.75, B. & L. GBE; $10 extra, mo- 
nocular tube; $20 extra, with inclined 
binocular body; $308.25, Spencer 13- 
LPH; Thomas W. Reed Company, 
$341*; alternate, $308.25, Spencer No. 13 
LH; Central Scientific Company, .$341. 

1, Only, Zeiss E. S. G. Microscope, 
230. — Spencer Lens Company of New 
England, $200, Spencer No. 33 H; $144, 
without mechanical stage; Howe & 
French, Incoiporated, .$229; Bausch & 
Lomb Optical Companv, .$209, B. it L. 
(IBS; E. F. Mahady" Company, $229; 
alternate, $209. B. & L. (IBS; $200, 
Spencer 33 PH; Thomas W. Reed Com- 
pany, $229*; alternate, $200, Spencer 
No. 33 H; Central Scientific Company, 
$229. 

/ , Only, Electric incubator Thelco No. 5, 
17 Inches by 27 Inches by 18 Inches, Com- 
plete en Stand. — Howe <fe French, Incorpo- 
rated, $130; E. F. Mahady Company, 
$130; Thomas W. Reed Company, $130.* 

1, Only, Clinical Centrifuge, Interna- 
tional Clinical Model. — Howe & French, 
Incorporated, $60; E. F. Mahady Com- 
pany, $60; Thomas W. Reed Company, 
$60*; Central Scientific Company, $60, 
see change in specifications. 

1, Only, Centrifuge, International Elec- 
tric Centrifuge, Size 1, Type S. B. — 
Howe & French, Incorporated, $319.50; 

E. F. .Mahady Company, $319.50; Thomas 
W. Reed Company, $319.50*; Central 
Scientific Company, $319.50. 

* Contract awarded. 

Upon December 31 the Mayor approved 
contracts with lowest bidders as indicated 
for furnishing meats to the various city 
departments during January, 1936. The 
approximate totals of awards were as 
follows: 

VVattendorf & Co., .$8,011.98; Armour 

6 Co., .$7,046.92; Wald, Baram Company, 
$4,057.47; Swift & Co., $3,434.10; Al- 
bert Richards Company, Incorporated, 
$2,031.10; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany, $1,880.68; Bornstein & Co., $964.35; 

F. W. Baldau Company, .$689; Faneuil 
Beef Company, $581.40; Craig, Hapgood 
Company, Incorporated, $422.88; John 
P. Squire Company, $177.43. Approxi- 
mate total, $29,297.31. 

Bids, opened December 24, were as 
follows: 

Approximate Amounts on .Ml Items. 

Per Hundredweight. 
3,700 Pounds Corned Beef Brisket, 

7 /ii6s.— Wattendorf & Co., $16.93*; 
Bornstein & Co., $18.78; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $17.12; Armour & Co., $19.97; 
Batchelder & Snyder Company, Incorpo- 
rated, $24.75; Swift & Co., $20.35; Wald, 
Baram Company, $18.71. 

2,000 Pounds Fresh Beef Brisket. — 
Wattendorf & Co., $17.70*; Bornstein & 
Co., $19; Faneuil Beef Company, $18.98; 
Armour & Co., $18.47; Batchelder & 



Snyder Company, Incorporated, $23.75; 
Swift & Co., $19.90; Wald, Baram Com- 
pany, $19.09. 

4,500 Pounds Beef Faces.— Wattendorf 
& Co., .$21.25; Bornstein & Co., $21.43,* 
2 per cent; Faneuil Beef Company, $23; 
Armour & Co., $23.94; Batchelder & 
Snyder Company, Incorporated, $29; 
Swift & Co., $22.30; Wald, Baram Com- 
pany, $22.67. 

13,500 Pounds Beef Hinds. — Wattendorf 
& Co., $18.73; Bornstein & Co., $18.93; 
Faneuil Beef Company, $19; Armour & 
Co., $18.82; Batchelder & Snyder Com- 
pany, Incorporated, $21.50; Swift & Co., 
$17.60; Wald, Baram Company, $17.36.* 

200 Pounds Beef Liver, Frozen. — Wat- 
tendorf & Co., $16.20; Armour & Co., 
$17.49; Batchelder & Snyder Company, 
Incorporated, $17; Swift & Co., $15.84; 
Wald, Baram Company, $15.38.* 

4,500 Pounds Beef Loins, Suet In. — 
Wattendorf & Co., $22.40*; Bornstein & 
Co., .$25.97; Faneuil Beef Company, $23; 
Armour & Co., $22.94; Batchelder & 
Snyder Company, Incorporated, $32.50; 
Swift & Co., $22.40; Albert Richards Com- 
pany, Incorporated, $23.46. 

250 Pcunds Beef Loins, Suet Out. — 
Wattendorf & Co., .$25.72*; Bornstein & 
Co., $34; Faneuil Beef Company, $30; 
Armour & Co., .$28.92; Batchelder & 
Snyder Company, Incorporated, $42; 
Swift & Co., .$26.05; Albert Richards 
Company, Incorporated, $29.87. 

3,000 Pounds Beef Rumps and Loins. — 
Wattendorf & Co., $21.93; Bornstein & 
Co., $23.49; Faneuil Beef Company, $23; 
Armour & Co., $20.97; Batchelder & 
Snyder Company, Incorporated, $27.50; 
Swift (fe Co., .$21.40; Wald, Baram Com- 
pany, $20.88.* 

9,500 Pounds Beef Ribs, 5 Ribs.— 
Wattendorf & Co., $22.70; Bornstein & 
Co., $21.67; Faneuil Beef Company, 
$21.62; Armour & Co., $21.87; Batchelder 
& Snyder Company, Incorporated, $29.50; 
Swift & Co., $21.50; Albert Richards 
Company, Incorporated, .$21.38.* 

2,000 Pounds Beef Rounds With Flank, 
But Cod 0«<.— Wattendorf & Co., $14.63; 
Bornstein & Co., $15.90; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $15; Armour & Co., $14.84; 
Batchelder & Snvder Company, Incorpo- 
rated, $17.50; Swift & Co., $14.20; 
Wald, Baram Company, $14.33,* 2 per 
cent. 

3,(J00 Pounds Beef Shoulders.— Watten- 
dorf & Co., .$21.40; Bornstein & Co., 
$19.94; Faneuil Beef Company, $19.38*; 
Armour & Co., $19.97; Batchelder & 
Snyder Company, Incorporated, $26.50; 
Swift & Co., $19.95; Wald, Baram Com- 
pany, $19.60. 

9,000 Pounds Beef Slickers. — Watten- 
dorf & Co., $11.57*; Bornstein & Co., 
$13.65; Armour & Co., $12.62; Batchelder 
& Snyder Company, Incorporated, $15.50; 
Swift & Co., $12.25; Wald, Baram Com- 
pany, $12.71. 

600 Pounds Beef Undercuts. — Watten- 
dorf & Co., $19.45; Bornstein & Co., 
.$21.94; Faneuil Beef Company, $19; 
Armour & Co., $20.84; Batchelder & 
Snyder Company, Incorporated, $24.50; 
Swift <fc Co., $19.95; Wald, Baram Com- 
pany, $18.4.5.* 

75 Pounds Calf's Liver, Fresh. — Watten- 
dorf & Co., $48.75; Batchelder & Snyder 
Company, Incorporated, $52; Wald, 
JBaram Company, $45.90.* 

300 Pounds Calf's Liver, Frozen. — 
Wattendorf & Co., $42.15; Armour & Co., 
.$41.95; Batchelder & Snyder Company, 
Incorporated, $45; Swift & Co., $38.97; 
Wald, Baram Company, $37.98,* 2 per 
cent. 

300 Pounds Sheep's Liver, Frozen. — 
Wattendorf & Co., $15.40; Armour & Co., 



8 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 4 



$11.98; Hatchelder iV: Snyder Company, 
Incorporated, $18.85; Swift A: Co., 
$11.59*; Wald, Harajn Company, $17.44 
S,J()() I'oiukIs Lamh CarcaxxcH. — Wat- 
tendorf & Co., $19.93; Faneuil Heef Com- 
pany. $19; .Armour iV: Co., $19.23; Hatch- 
elder iV: Snvder Company, Incorporated, 
$21; Swift It Co., $18.45*; Wald, Haram 
Company, $19.30. 

^,(J()0 l'()uiiil.i Lamb Carcasses, Fores 
Bcnvd, Racks ,S'/'/''— Wattendurf & Co., 
$20.72; Armour ..V Co., $19.23; Hatchelder 
it Snvder Company, Incorporated, $21; 
Swift"cV: Co., $21.30; Wald, Baram Com- 
pany, $19.54*, 2 per cent. 

20U rounds Lamh Chops. — Wattendorf 
it Co., $20.92; Armour & Co., $19.97*; 
Hatchelder it Snyder Company, Incor- 
porated, $23; Swift it Co., $22.10; Wald, 
Baram Company, .$22.28. 

l,.iUU Pounds Lamb Chops, Racks 
.S/>/i7.— Wattendoi-f <t Co., $20.95; 
Armour it Co., $20.24*; Batchelder it 
Snyder Company, Incorporated, $23; 
Swift & Co., $22.30; Wald, Baram Com- 
pany, $22.42. 

600 Pounds Lamb Legs. — W'attendorf 
& Co., $23.40*; Armour <t Co., $23.47; 
Batchelder & Snvder Company, Incor- 
porated, $25.50; Swift <t Co., $24.40; 
W'ald, Baram Company, $23.95. 

10,000 Pounds Lamb, Hind Saddles.— 
Wattendorf & Co., $22.73; Faneuil Beef 
Company, $22.50; Armoui- <S:Co., $20.42*; 
Batchelder & Snyder Company, Incor- 
porated, $24.50; Swift & Co., $22.45; 
Wald, Baram Company, $21.86. 

800 Pounds Eastern Veal, Saddles. — 
Wattendorf & Co., $19.25; Armour & Co., 
$18.57*; Wald, Baram Company, $19.40. 
800 Pounds Veal Legs. — Wattendorf & 
Co., $19.70; Armour & Co., $19.37*; 
Batchelder <t Snyder Company, Incor- 
porated, $22; Swift & Co., $20.60. 

4,500 Pounds Bacon, 8 to 10 Pounds.^ 
Wattendorf & Co., $31.75; Armour & Co., 
$31.23; Batchelder & Snyder Company, 
Incorporated, $32.75; Swift & Co., $33.69; 
John P. Squire Company, $33.03; Wald, 
Baram Company, $32.50; The Cudahy 
Packing Company, $30.43.* 

900 Pounds Bacon, 12 to 14 Pounds. — 
Wattendorf & Co., $29.50; Armour & Co., 
$30.34; Batchelder & Snyder Company, 
Incorporated, $32.25; Swift & Co., $33.14; 
John P. Squire Company, $32.88; Wald, 
Baram Company, 130.84; The Cudahy 
Packing Company, $28.27.* 

400 Pounds Fresh hams, I4 to 16 
Pounds Average. — Wattendorf <t Co., 
$25.20; Armour & Co., $20.87*; Batchelder 
& Snyder Company, Incorporated, $27.75; 
Swift & Co., $21.64; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, $21.38. 

7,700 Pounds Smoked Hams, I4 to 16 
Pow/jds.— Wattendorf & Co., $27.70; 
Armour & Co., $26.62*; Batchelder & 
Snyder Company, Incorporated, .$29.50; 
Swilt & Co., $27.44; John P. Squire Com- 
pany, $27.37; Wald, Baram Company, 
$27.51; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
$26.90. 

9,100 Pounds Pork Loins, 8 to 10 
Pounds.— Waitendori <t Co., $21.40; 
Armour it Co., $23.92; Batchelder & 
Snyder Company, Incorporated, $24.75; 
Sw-ift it Co., $20.73*; John P. Squire 
Company, $22.50; Wald, Baram Com- 
pany, $22.21; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany, .$22. 

450 Pounds Salt Pork, 50 to 60 Pieces.-^ 
Wattendorf <t Co., $19.40; Armour it Co., 
$15.62*; Batchelder & Snyder Company, 
Incorporated, $19.25; Swift it Co., $19.70; 
John P. Squire Company, $39.25; Wald, 
Baram Company, $19.09; The Cudahy 
Packing Company, $17.50. 

2,000 Pounds Fresh Pork Shoulders. — 
Wattendorf <t Co., $18.25; Armour & 



Co., $16.97*; Batchelder & Snyder Com- 
pany, Incorporated, $19.87; Swift <t Co., 
$18.94; John P. Squire Company, $18.87; 
Wald, Baram Company, $18.14; The 
Cudaliy Packing Companj', $19.50. 

1,000 Pounds Corned Pork Shoulders. — 
Wattendorf & Co., $16.75; Armour & 
Co., $15.92*; Batchelder & Snyder Com- 
pany, Incorporated, $19.50; Swift & Co., 
$17.48; John P. Squire Company, $17.38; 
The Cudahy Packing Company, $18.90. 

3,700 Pounds Smoked Shoulders. — 
Wattendorf <t Co., $19.95; Armour & 
Co., $19.23*; Batchelder <t Snyder Com- 
pany, Incorporated, .$21.75; Swift & Co., 
.$20.74; John P. Squire Company, $20.88; 
The Cudahy Packing Company, $20.24. 
1,100 Pounds Corned Spare Ribs. — 
Wattendorf it Co., $17.40: Armour & 
Co., $17.49; Batchelder <t Snyder Com- 
pany, Incorporated, $19.25; Swift & Co., 
$16.39; John P. Squire Company, $16.13.* 
2,700 Pounds Lard. — Wattendorf & 
Co., $14.25; Armour & Co., $13.12*; 
Batchelder & Snyder Company, In- 
corporated, $14.25; Swift & Co., $13.24; 
John P. Squire Company, $13.25; Wald, 
Baram Company, $13.96; The Cudahy 
Packing Company, $14. 

350 Pounds Pressed Ham. — W^attendorf 
it Co., $16.40*; Armour & Co., $23.22; 
Batchelder <t Snj^der Companj^, In- 
corporated, $18.25; Swift & Co., $24.89; 
John P. Squire Company, .$24.62; F. W' . 
Baldau Company, .$24; Colonial Pro- 
vision Company, $22. 

400 Pounds Dried Sliced Smoked Beef. — 
Wattendorf & Co., $29.72; Armour & 
Co., $30.61; Batchelder & Snyder Com- 
pany, Incorporated, $34.50; Swift & Co., 
$32^90; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
.$26.89.* 

600 Pounds Unsliced Dried Beef. — 
Wattendorf & Co., $26.95; Armour & 
Co., $27.99; Batchelder & Snyder Com- 
pany, Incorporated, $29.50; Swift & Co., 
$29.94; The Cudahy Packing Company, 
.$24.89.* 

60 Pounds Broilers, One and Three 
Quarters Pounds Each. — W^attendorf & 
Co., $33.50; Armour & Co., $32.47*; 
Batchelder & Snyder Company, In- 
corporated, $38. 

15,200 Pounds Fresh Chilled Chicken.— 
Wattendorf & Co., $27.40*; Armour & 
Co., $28.60; Lewis-Mears Company, 
.$28.70; Batchelder & Snvder Company, 
Incorporated, $29.60; Swift & Co., 
$31.28, frozen; Craig, Hapgood Com- 
pany, Incorporated, $27.83; F. H. Hos- 
mer Company, $28.70. 

SO Pounds Fresh Duckling, 5 to 6 
Pounds Each. — Wattendorf & Co., 
$23.50.* 

600 Pourids Turkeys, A'o. 1 Northern 
Bzrdi'.— Wattendorf & Co., $31.93*; 
Armour & Co., .$31.37; Batchelder & 
Snyder Company, Incorporated, $34; 
Sw'ift & Co., .$30.98, frozen; Craig, Hap- 
good Companv, Incorporated, $32; F. H. 
Hosmcr Company, .$32.60. 

1,600 Pounds Fresh Chilled Fowl.— 
Wattendorf & Co., $27.43; Armour & Co., 
$27.43; Lewis-Mears Company, .$27.90; 
Batchelder & Snyder Companv, Incor- 
porated, $29; Swift & Co., $27.28, frozen; 
Craig, Hapgood Company, Incorporated, 
$26.43*; F. H. Hosmer Company, $26.60. 
3,40U Pounds Beef Chucks.— Watten- 
dorf & Co., $9.90*; Faneuil Beef Com- 
pany, $11; Armour & Co., $11.24; Batch- 
elder it Snyder Company, Incorporated, 
$12.50; Swift it Co., " $10.40; Wald, 
Baram Company, $10.93. 

100 Pounds Lamb Fores. — Wattendorf 
it Co., $12.40*; Armour it Co., $13.87; 
Batchelder it Snvder Company, Incor- 
porated, $14.50; "Swift it Co!, $14.95; 
Wald, Baram Company, $13.48. 



120 Pounds Fresh Beef Liver. — Watten- 
dorf & Co., $14.20*; Batchelder & Snyder 
Company, Incorporated, $22.50; Swift & 
Co., $15.84; Wald, Baram Company, 
$15.53. 

Sausages, City Hospital, 1,500 Pounds; 
Sanatorium, 250 Pounds; Long Island, 
450 Pounds; Deer Island, 150 Pounds. — 
Armour & Co., $26.* 

Deer Island, 860 Pounds Bologna, 960 
Pounds Frankfurls. — F. W. Baldau Com- 
pany, $17.* 

AU Other Departments, 650 Pounds 
Bologna, 1,330 Pounds Frankfurls. — F. 
W. Baldau Company, $19.* 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — Wattendorf 
& Co., 1 per cent; Bornstein & Co., 2 
per cent; Faneuil Beef Company, 2 per 
cent; Armour & Co., no deductions will 
be allowed on account of taxes; Batch- 
elder & Snyder Company, Incorporated, 
no deductions will be allowed on account 
of taxes; Swift & Co., no deductions will 
be allowed on account of taxes; John P. 
Squire Company, no deductions will be 
allowed on account of taxes; W'ald, 
Baram Company, 2 per cent; no deduct- 
ions will be allowed on account of taxes; 
•Albert Richards Company, Incorporated, 
2 per cent; Colonial Provision Company, 
2 per cent; The Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany, no deductions will be allowed on 
account of taxes. 

* Contract awarded. 

Upon January 2 the Mayor approved 
contracts with the lowest bidders for 
fruits and vegetables for the various city 
departments during January, 1936. The 
approximate totals of awards were as 
follows: 

G. Giovino & Co., $6,045.72; J. Jacobs 
& Co., $2,502.12; The Northern Fruit 
Company, $457.91; Meloripe Fruit Com- 
pany, $237.50; Beacon Fruit and Produce 
Company, $110.53. Approximate total, 
$9,353.78. 

Bids, opened December 26, were as 
follows: 

Approximate Amounts on All Items. 
Per Hundredweight. 

6,800 Poutuls Table Apples.— The 
Northern Fruit Company, $5; Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $5.95; G. 
Giovino & Co., $4.43.* 

88 Pounds Cooking Apples. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $3.25*; G. 
Giovino & Co., $3.43. 

1,300 Pounds Bananas, Bunch. — G. 
Giovino & Co., $4.43*; Meloripe Fruit 
Company, $4.50. 

5,000 Pounds Bananas, Cartons. — G. 
Giovino & Co., $4.93; Meloripe Fruit 
Company, $4.75.* 

1,900 Poujids Green Beans. — G. Giovino 
& Co., $15.93.* 

90 Pounds Wax Beans. — G. Giovino 
& Co., $15.93.* 

600 Pounds Broccoli. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $10; G. Giovino 
& Co., $7.93.* 

2,100 Pounds Beets, Cut.— The Northern 
Fruit Company, $2.65; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $2.80; G. Giovino & 
Co., $4.93, bunch; $2.13, cut.* 

1,100 Pounds Brussels Sprouts. — G. 
Giovino it Co., $12.43.* 

18,000 Pounds Xew Cabbage.— The 
Northern F>uit Company, $4; Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $4.19; G. 
Giovino <t Co., $2.43, old; $3^23, new.* 

9,900 Pounds Carrots, Cut Off.— The 
Northern Fruit Company, $2.50; Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $2.96; G. 
Giovino & Co., $1.93.* 

3,000 Pounds New Carrots, Bunch. — 
Beacon Fruit and Produce Companv 
$4.93; G. Giovino & Co., $3.73.* 



Jan. 4 



CITY RECORD 



4.100 Pounds Cauliflower. — G. Giovino 
& Co., $7.43.* 

4,100 Pounds Celery. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $8; G. Giovino 
& Co., $7.43.* 

650 Pounds Cranberries. — The Northern 
Fruit Company, $15; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $15.97; G. Giovino & 
Co., $12.93.* 

600 Pounds Cucumbers. — G. Giovino & 
Co., $9.93.* 

5,700 Pounds Grapefruit. — The North- 
em Fruit Company, $3.65; Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $3.66; G. Giovino 
& Co., $3.23.* 

1,600 Pounds Grapes. — The Northern 
Fruit Company, $15; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Companv, .S12; G. Giovino & 
Co., $9.93.* 

700 Pounds Lemons. — The Northern 
Fruit Company, $9.32*; Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $10.60; G. 
Giovino & Co., $9.73. 

2,200 Pounds Iceberg Lettuce. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $6.93; 
G. Giovino & Co., $5.43.* 

400 Pounds Native Lettiuce. — G. Giovino 
& Co., $12.93.* 

7,200 Pounds Cooking Onions. — The 
Northern Fruit Company, $3; Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $3.40; 
G. Giovino & Co., .$2.83.* 

6,000 Pounds Table Onions.— The 
Northern Fruit Company, .$4; Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $3.96; 
G. Giovino & Co., $3.83.* 

6,600 Pounds Sunkist Table Oranges, 
216 Count.— The Northern Fruit Com- 
pany, $5.33; Beacon Fruit and Produce 
Company, $5.80; G. Giovino & Co., 
$4.93.* 

10,800 Pounds Sunkist Table Oranges, 
176 Count.— The Northern Fruit Com- 
pany, $5.06; Beacon Fruit and Produce 
Company, .$5.80; G. Giovino & Co., 
$4.93.* 

6,000 Pounds Juice Oranges, 176 
Count. — The Northern Fruit Company, 
$3.49; Beacon Fruit and Produce Com- 
pany, $4.37; G. Giovino & Co., .$3.23.* 

4,400 Pounds Juice Oranges, 252 
Count. — The Northern Fruit Company, 
$3.70; Beacon Fruit and Produce Com- 
pany, .$4.37; G. Giovino & Co., $3.23.* 

800 Pounds Juice Oranges, 216 Count. — 
The Northern Fruit Company, $3.70; 
Beacon Fruit and Produce Companj' 
$4.37; G. Giovino & Co., $3.23.* 

32 Pounds Parsley. — Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $14*; G. Giovino & 
Co., $17.93. 

2,100 Pounds Parstiips. — G. Giovino & 
Co., $2.83.* 

1,400 Pounds Pears.— The Northern 
Fruit Company, $6; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, $6.50; G. Giovino & 
Co., $5.73.* 

400 Pounds Green Peas. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $15; G. Giovino 
& Co., $14.43.* 

600 Pouiuls Green Peppers. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Companv, $14.40*; 
G. Giovino & Co., $14.43. 

135,700 Pounds Green Mountain Pota- 
toes.—i. Jacobs & Co., $1.69*; Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $1.89; 
G. Giovino & Co., $1.73. 

2,300 Pounds Sweet Potatoes.— The 
Northern Fruit Company, $3.68; Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $3.92; 
G. Giovino & Co., $3.13.* 

6,900 Pounds Spinach.— The Northern 
Fruit Company, $7.31; Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $7; G. Giovino 
& Co., $4.83.* 

9,700 Pounds Squash, Hubbard or 
Marrow.— G. Giovino & Co., .$4.93.* 

2,7(Xj Pounds Tangerines.— The North- 
em Fruit Company, $4.21*; Beacon Fruit 



and Produce Company, $5; G. Giovino 
& Co., .$4.43. 

.3,100 Pounds Tomatoes. — The Northern 
Fruit Company, $9*; G. Giovino & Co., 
.$9.73. 

13,700 Pounds Yellow Turnips. — J. 
Jacobs & Co., $1.45*; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Companv, $1.98; G. Giovino 
& Co., $1.63. 

Park Department. 

1,400 Pounds Table Apples. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $3.50; 
G. Giovino & Co., $2.93.* 

1,700 Pounds Bananas, Bunch. — G. 
Giovino & Co., $4.43*; Meloripe Fruit 
Company, $4.50. 

2,200 Pounds Beets, Cut. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, .$2.80; G. 
Giovino & Co., $2.13.* 

800 Pounds Cabbage. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $2.50, old; G. 
Giovino & Co., .$2.23.* 

3,0(J0 Pounds Carrots, Cut. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $2.96; G. 
Giovino & Co., $1.93.* 

2-5 Pounds Celery. — G. Giovino & Co., 
$14.43.* 

6VJ Pounds Grapes. — G. Giovino & Co., 
$14.43.* 

450 Pounds Iceberg Lettuce. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, $6.93*; 
G. Giovino & Co., $11.43. 

3-50 Pounds Oranges. — Beacon Fruit 
and Produce Company, $5.33; G. Giovino 
& Co., $4.93.* 

40 Pounds Pears. — G. Giovino & Co., 
$14.43.* 

6'00 Pourtds Sweet Potatoes. — Beacon 
Fruit and Produce Company, .$3.92; Vi. 
Giovino & Co., $3.13.* 

600 Pounds Green Mountain White 
Potatoes.— J. Jacobs & Co., $1.69*; 
Beacon Fruit and Produce Company, 
$1.89; G. Giovino & Co., $1.73. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — The North- 
ern Fruit Company, 1 per cent; J. Jacobs 
& Co., 2 per cent; Beacon Fruit and 
Produce Company, 2 per cent; G. 
Giovino & Co., 2 per cent. 

* Contract awarded. 

WITHOUT ADVERTISING. 

Upon varying dates, as indicated, the 
Mayor has approved contracts with vari- 
oas firms and contractors for supphes, 
commodities, etc. Communications from 
the heads of the several departments were 
as follows: 

Public Buildings Department. 
Boston, October 22, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Under date of July 16, 
1935, your Honor approved an order of 
the City Council for the repairing and 
strengthening of the second floor joists at 
the Quincy Market which had been found 
to be in a very dangerous and hazardous 
condition. Tiiis order transferred the 
sum of .$20,000 from the Reserve Fund 
to the general appropriation of the Public 
Buildings Department, and on July 23, 
1935, a contract for doing this structural 
reinforcing was awarded. 

As the contractor progressed with his 
work it wa.s found that several sections of 
the framing had at some previous date 
suffered from a very .serious fire and the 
framing in these sections had never been 
replaced, although severely weakened. 
(See attached letters of Building In- 
.sjjector.) 

In order to correct this serious condi- 
tion, due to the charred timbers, it will 



be necessary to replace these sections with 
new framing, an item which was not con- 
templated in the original work and which 
could not have been discovered until the 
work was actually under way. 

It will further become necessary, in 
order to repair the joists over the re- 
frigerators in nineteen of the stalls, to 
remove the second floor boarding and 
work from above the joists instead of 
from the ceiling below. This will cost 
considerably more than was anticipated 
at the time of awarding the contract. 

Because of these unforeseen conditions 
only about 60 per cent of the joists have 
been strengthened and the appropriation 
of $20,000 has been exhausted. 

Abandoning this work at this stage 
would leave a considerable section of the 
building in an extremely hazardous condi- 
tion and it would constitute a serious 
menace to the tenants in the market and 
to the general public. 

Therefore, in accordance with the fore- 
going facts, and in order to eliminate ail 
possibihty of a catastrophe occurring in 
the (iuincy Market, I respectfully request 
an additional appropriation of $15,000, 
which, I estimate, will enable me to have 
the entire job completed in a satisfactory 
manner. 

Respectfully yours, 

RoswELL G. Hall, 
Superintendent of Public Buildings. 

Bo.ston, .Vugust 1, 1935. 
Ro.swELL G. Hall, 

Super intendeid of Public Buildings. 

Dear Sir, — I hereby submit for your 
information the following report: 

ri)on the removal of a portion of the 
ceiMng in the office of stalls 41 and 43, I 
examined the floor joists and' found them 
to be 3 inches by 12 inches, spaced 8 
inches o. c. These timbers are badly 
charred and the ends of the majority of 
them have been cut, thereby destroying 
the full bearing vahie. In my opinion 
to allow this condition to exist is danger- 
ous, therefore, I recommend that the 
floor joists within this area be entirely 
removed and new joists installed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas L. Flynn, 

Inspector Assigned in Charge of Work. 

Boston, August 9, 1935. 
Roswell G. Hall, 

Superintendent of Public Buildings. 

Dear Sir, — On Wednesday, .\ugust 7, 
the ceiling was removed over the door 
opening between stall 36 and 38 and also 
in the stall area, exposing the floor joists 
which are very badly charred. It would 
not increase the efficiency of these mem- 
bers to splice the wall ends, because the 
fire has leduced these members from 
4 inch to practically 2-inch timbers. 
Furthermore, one timber was so badly 
burned that a hole appeared through it. 
The floor planking on the second floor 
has been badly gutted and serves no 
value for a tie. The members over the 
columns on which these floor joists are 
framed are badly burned. Evidently a 
fire at some time badly gutted this area 
which runs from this section to stalls 
41 and 43 which I reported on August 1st. 

In my opinion this area is structurally 
unsafe and I recommend that the entire 
section be replaced with new members. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas L. Flynn, 
Inspector Assigned in Charge of Work. 



10 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 4 



Boston, October 14, 1935. 
RoswELL (i. Hall, 

SiiiHriiiUiitlrnl of Public liiiildingx. 

Dkah Hih, — At the (^uincy Market 
HuiUling, 29 Merchants row, a portion 
of the metal t-eilinK was removed over the 
public corridor between stalls 37-39 and 
38-10 and an examination by me dis- 
closed the following condition: 

The floor joists have been so badly 
charred that what was originally 4-inch 
by 13-inch hard pine timbers, spaced 
ll; inches on center, has been reduced to 
such an extent by fire, that now we 
actually have 2-inch by 11-inch hard pine 
timbers, spaced 18 inches on center. 
The floor planking of the second floor 
has iieen badly gutted and serves no 
further value as a tie, con.sequently 
the carrying value of these timbei-s has 
been reduced approximately 50 per cent 
and the original load imposed upon them 
remains unchanged. 

-As a result of this examination I ordered 
the contractor to place temporary shoring 
under this section to in.sure safety and 
these shores should not be removed until 
these burnt members have been replaced 
with members capable of carrying the 
load. 

In my opinion a condition such as this 
is an emergency and should not be 
neglected, because, directly under this 
area the public corridor is in constant 
use by patrons of the market and the 
occupants and employees of the adjacent 
stalls. Over this area on the second 
floor is occupied as a public corridor 
by the lessees of the various offices to 
conduct their business. 

This condition must be corrected by 
the removal of the entire burnt .section 
as it is dangerous and I consider this 
area structurally unsafe. 

Respectfully submitted, 

TnoiLvs L. Fltnn, 
Inspector Assigned in Charge of Work. 

Boston-, December 22, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Supplementing my letter of 
October 22, regarding the structural 
reinforcing at the Quincy ]Market which 
work is of an emergency nature, I respect- 
fully request permission of your Honor to 
continue and complete the work. 

Inasmuch as the Codman Hill Con- 
struction Company has already performed 
so much of the work as was possible 
under its original contract, and because 
the said company is thoroughly familiar 
with the work remaining to be done, I 
respectfully request permission to award 
a contract to the said company, the 
Codman Hill Construction Company, in 
the sum of 815,000, without the usual 
form of advertising. 

Respectfully yours, 

Ro.swTELL G. Hall, 

Superintendent of Public Buildings. 

Public Works Department. 
Boston, December 30, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston . 
Dear Mr. Mayor,— On June 10, 1935, 
the City Council disapi)roved two pro- 
posed contracts submitted to it for 
consideration between the City and the 
Boston Consolidated tlas Company, one 
for furnishing illuminating gas for street 
lighting and the other for equipment and 
the lighting and extinguishing of gas 



lamps for street lighting in the city, each 
being for a term of five years beginning 
January 1, 1935. 

.\t the present time the Boston Con- 
.solidated (ias Company is the only 
company that can furnish gas for the 
street lamps covered by sjiid disapproved 
contracts, and to make any chiinge in 
the lamps would require the lapse of a 
considerable length of time. In order 
that there may be no interruption in the 
service of lighting the city streets and 
in order that I may have ample op- 
portunity to negotiate with the Edison 
P^lectric Illuminating Company of Boston 
and the Boston Consf)lidated Gas Com- 
pany with regard to new proposed 
contracts or rates and to study more 
completelj' the entire situation with 
regard to street lighting, I respectfully 
request your authority to award the 
following contracts, without inviting pro- 
posals therefor by advertisement: 

1. Contract for furnishing illuminating 
gas for street lighting to the Boston 
Consolidated Gas Company for a term of 
one month, beginning Januarj' 1, 1936, 
at the present rate of 88.42 per lamp per 
year for single burner, 60 candle power 
lamps. 

2. Contract for equipment and the 
lighting and extinguishing of gas lamps 
for the Citj- of Boston to the Boston 
Consolidated Gas Company for a teim 
of one month, beginning Januaiy 1, 1936, 
at the present rate of SI 4.70 per lamp 
per year. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 28, 1935. 

To the Mayor of Boston. 

I respectfully request permission to 
renew for the period of one year from 
January 1, 1936, the lease with Annie V. 
Loonie for propertj^ on Gibson street, 
Dorchester, occupied by this department 
as a paving service district yard. The 
rental will be at the rate now being paid, 
namely, 81,800 per 3'ear, in addition to 
which the city reimburses the owner for 
the taxes paid. 

This property is used as the yard which 
covers a large area of the Dorchester dis- 
trict, and its continued use is necessary 
for carrying on our activities. 

Respectfully j'ours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Boston, December 28, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — The Sanitary Division has 
been using a Ford truck with a special 
body for paper collection to travel all over 
Boston daily and collect papers disposed 
of in catch-all boxes at street corners, said 
truck furnished by M. H. Loonie at a cost 
of 81.50 per hour or 812 per eight-hour 
day. It is veiy desirable that the Ford 
truck equipped with this special body be 
continued in use. 

I respectfully request permission to dis- 
pense with advertising and enter into a 
contract with M. H. Loonie for the use of 
a special Ford truck at a price of SI. 50 per 
hour equal to .$12 per day and at the rate 
of 8360 per month for a period of one j'ear, 
total expenditure being 84,320. 

Respectfully j'ours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



Supply Department. 
Boston, December 17, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Permission is 
respectfully requested to award a con- 
tract, without publicly advertising for 
same, to Neil H. Cronin, Old Colony 
Boulevard, Boston, Mass., to deliver to 
the Supply Department the following: 

One ^Iodel 81 Buick Sedan, fully 
equipped, and delivered at a price of 
81,493; heater, 819.15— $1,512.15; tax 
rebate, $26.80; net amount of contract, 
$1,485.35. 

As Neil H. Cronin is the direct agent 
of the manufacturers, nothing would be 
gained by publicly advertising. 

The money is available for this purchase 
in the 1936 budget. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintenderd of Supplies. 

Boston, December 26, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Permission is 
respectfully requested to award a con- 
tract, without publicly advertising for 
same, to the Walsh Holyoke Steam 
Boiler Works, Incorporated, 320 Massa- 
chusetts avenue, Arlington, Mass., to 
deliver to the Sanitary Service the 
following : 

Thirty Blackhawk hydraulic lifting 
devices, including Blackhawk jack, ram, 
hose and necessarj' framework to adapt 
them to city present lifting devices, 
clamps and brace chains at 870 each, 
82,100; 20 per cent discount, $420— 
$1,680; 2 per cent, ten days. 

As the Walsh Holyoke Steam Boiler 
Works, Incorporated, are the manufac- 
turers, nothing would be gained by 
publicly advertising. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



LAND=TAKINQ IN ROXBURY. 

The Maj'or has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Notre Dame street, Rox- 
buiy district, as a highwaj^ from Dimock 
street to Bragdon street, bounded and 
described as follows: 

A highway named Notre Dame street 
is hereby laid out, from Dimock street to 
Bragdon street, and ordered constructed; 
the cost thereof to be charged to Federal 
Funds. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive of 
trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street puiposes is hereby- taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Northeasterly by Dimock street, thirty 
and 56-100 feet; southeasterly by the 
southeasterly line of said Notre Dame 
street as hereby laid out, six hundred 
sixty and 44-100 feet; southwesterly by 
Bragdon street, thirty and 27-100 feet; 
and northwesterly by the northwesterly 
line of said Notre Dame street as hereby- 
laid out, sLx hundred fifty and 63-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvement, 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Notre Dame street, Roxbury dis- 
trict, as a highwaj', from Dimock street to 
Bragdon street, under the order of the 
Board of December 26, 1935, and awards 
no damages therefor. 



Jan. 4 



CITY RECORD 



1 1 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED DECEMBER 26 TO DECEMBER 31. 



December 26. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



John A. Hope 1540 Columbus avenue 11 

G. E. Lothrop Theatres Co.. 1176 Wa.shington street. ... 3 

Mary A. Curley 27 Druid street 18 

Francis Gallagher 9 Druid street ; . . 18 

Louise LaSares eiah 54 Clayton street 15 

Philip Fowler 176 Beacon street 5 

Shawraut Realty Trust 14 Clearway street 4 

Adolph Poirier. 5 Cambridge terrace ....... 21 

William Kelley 50 Evans street 17 

E. J. Gilman 40 Green street 19 

A. J. Bowker 34 Gay Head street 10 



City of Boston 

Harvard College 

Hugh McGinley 

Herman M. Funke 

Kennedy's, Incorporated. . . . 
Pine Lodge Realty Company, 

H. Lasky et nl 

City of Boston 

City of Boston 

United States Leather Co. , . 



77 Lawrence avenue 14 

695 Huntington avenue .... 4 

63 Moulton street 2 

75 Maxwell street 17 

32 Summer street 3 

1 40 St . Theresa avenue .... 20 

40 Sherwood street 19 

Thomas Park 7 

22 Regina road 17 

313 Congress street 6 



Alterations, garage $500 

Take-down, theatre 2,500 

.^Iterations, dwelling: 250 

.\lterations, dwelling 250 

.\lferations. light manufac- 1,500 

taring. 

-Alterations, tenements 1,000 

.Alterations, tenements 650 

Special garage 100 

Fire escapes 200 

Fire escapes 150 

Alterations, store and dwell- 500 

ing. 

First-class school 700,000 

Special toolhouse 100 

Take-down, stable 60 

Alterations, dwelling 300 

.■Vlterations, elevator 1,200 

Third-cla-ss dwelling 5,000 

Second-class garage 825 

Alterations, school 450.000 

First-class school 1,50.000 

-Alterations, oflfices and stor- 1,000 

age. 



DECE.UBER 27. 



Charlestown Five Cents .Sav- 3536 Washington street .... 11 

ings Bank. 

Hyde Park .Savings Bank . . . 1404 River street 18 

W. P. Lyle 390 Commonwealth ave. ... 5 

C. Marchehski 35 Locust street 7 

B. Kahn 186 Callender street 14 

Nantucket Institution for .36 and 38 Dennison street . . 11 

Savings. 



-Alterations, dwelling $100 

Take-down, dwelling 200 

.Alterations, hotel 100 

Alterations, dwelling 180 

-Alterations, dwelling 700 

.Alterations, dwelling 250 



Deceuber 28. 



City of Boston Park Depart- 
ment. 

John H. Graham 

Emile Beonat Sons Yarn 
Company. 

Dana Gilbert 

Wildey Savings Bank 

Blackstone .Savings Bank . . . 

David Rubin. Trustee 

George .A. Brooks 

Bertina B. Fraher 

P. Ballantine and .Son 

Somerville Savings Bank .... 

Somerville .Savings Bank .... 

Somerville .Savings Bank .... 

J. S. Johnson 



176 West Fifth street. 



167 Maple street 20 

89 Bickford street 10 

43 St. James street 12 

582 Blue Hill avenue 14 

77-83 Boylston street 19 

1460 Dorchester avenue. ... 15 

10 Joy street 5 

14 Beeket street 16 

54 Clayton street 15 

129-137 Border street 1 

146 Liverpool street 1 

112-144 Liverpool street ... 1 

355 Newbury street 5 

.A. J. Wilson 221 Rutherford avenue 2 

William C. McKinJey. ...... 61 Russett road 20 

A. W. Flock 22 Smith street 10 

Frank I.asardo 31 Wind-sor street 18 

Rose Pesotta 615 Warren street 12 

Donnelly Company 3190 Washington street .... U 



December 30. 



Ellen McDonough 83 Rossmore road II 

Timothy Finn 27 Trescott street 13 

Walter Baker Company 1208 -Adams street 17 

-American Mutual Life Insu- 142 Berkeley street 4 

ranee Company. 

John Hancock Mutual Life 197 Clarendon street 4 

Insurance Company. 

George Lawley & Sons Cor- 21 Ericsson street 16 

poration. 

City of Boston 29 Merchants row 3 

B. Quoret 131 Morton street 11 

City of Boston 25 North Market street .... 3 

City of Boston 60 South Market street 3 



City of Boston 80 South Market street . 

City of Boston 70 South Market street . 



Abraham Tarmaray 

Chester .A. Baker 

Sarah Robinson 

David -Arthur 

United States Realty Com- 

_ Pany- 

H. I. Golden. 



Franklin Savings Bank. 

F. E. Johnston 

A. 0. Tomasello 



294 .Shawmut avenue .3 

687 Walk Hill street 18 

32 Woodbury street 9 

79 Dale street 12 

151 Kilsyth road 21 

393 Harrison avenue 3 

400 Newbury street 5 

185 Canal street 3 

23Arborway 19 



Second-class playground, sani- $7,000 
tary. 

.Alterations, garage 120 

Alterations, factory 200 

Alterations, dwelling 1.000 

.Alterations, dwelling 130 

Alterations, dwelling 420 

Erect sign 800 

-Alteration.", lodging 40 

Special garage 200 

.Alterations, storage 125 

Take-down, shop 250 

Take-down, shop 150 

Take-down, shop. 100 

.Alterations, dwelling and 1,000 
garage. 

Special garage 750 

.Alterations, dwelling 1,700 

Alterations, dwelling 195 

Third-class dwelling 4,000 

.Alterations, dwelling None 

-Alterations, bakery 1,600 

Third-class garage -$375 

-Alterations, dwelling 1,500 

-Alterations, manufacturing. . . 1,000 

-Alterations, offices 35 

Alterations, offices and ball . . .^0 

Alterations, club bouse 1,500 

-Alterations, markets 400,000 

Alterations, club 3,000 

Third-class temporary sani- 1,000 

tary. 

Third-cla.ss temporary mar- 9,000 

ket. 

Third-class temporary mar- 9,000 

ket. 

Third-class temporary mar- 9,000 

ket. 

-Alterations, lodging 350 

-Alterations, dwelling 150 

-Alterations, dwelling 250 

-Alterations, dwelling 200 

Take-down, dwelling 150 

Sign 200 

Alterations, garage 300 

Take-down, store 100 

Take-down, dwelling 100 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

St.ate Ex.vminers of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1936. 
Examinations will bo held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 
Boston, Monday, January 6. 
Lowell, Wednesday, January 8. 
Boston, Monday, February 3. 
Worcester, Wednesday, February 5. 
Boston, Monday, March 2. 
Fall River, Wednesday, March 4. 
Fall River, Thursdaj', March 5. 
Boston, Monday, April 6. 
Springfield, Wedncsdaj', April 8. 
Boston, Monday, May 4. 
Worcester, Wednesday, May 6. 
Boston, Monday, June 8. 
Boston, Monday, September 14. 
Worcester, Wednesday, September 16. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 15. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 16. 
Boston, Monday, November 2. 
Lowell, Wednesday, November 4. 
Boston, Monday, December 7. 
New Bedford, Wednesday, December 9. 
New Bedford, Thursday, December 10. 

Rules for Examinations. 

All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent 
in the installation of wires, conduits, 
apparatus, fixtures and other appliances 
for carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
j-ears' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for carrying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a master or journeyman certifi- 
cate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be re- 
quired to obtain at least 70 per cent in 
order to obtain a certificate. 

Applicants who fail to obtain the re- 
quired 70 per cent will not be entitled 
to re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent, or who fail 
on the practical demonstration, will not 
be re-examined for a period of six 
months. 

Any person found referring to notes 
or books, or misbehaving during an ex- 
amination, will be debarred from that 
examination. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day- 

Stephen C. Garuity, 
Payson Smith, 
James M. Hurley, 
Albert Fr.^nk, 
Walter J. Kenefick, 
Stale Examiners oj Electricians. 

For application blanks or other in- 
formation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 303, 14 Beacon St., 
Boston, Mass. 



12 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 4 



RETIREMENT BOARD REPORl. 

IJcccmber 31, 1935. 
To the Treasurer. 

At mcotinRS of the Boston Rptircment 
Board, lu-ld on December 13, and Decem- 
ber 27, the retirement from active service 
of the following-named members of the 
Retirement System was approved to be- 
come effective at tlie close of business, 
December 31, 1935: 

Health Department. 
John J. Lindsay, caretaker, salary at 
time of retirement SI, 800 a year. 

Hospital Department. 

John Daly, laundryman, salary at time 
of retirement SI, 976 a j-ear. 

Timothy J. Murphy, chief of staff, 
salary at time of retirement $2,100 a year. 

Park Department. 

John D. Canney, gardener-laborer, 
salary at time of retirement SI, 560 a year. 

Emma E. Kennedy, matron, salary at 
time of retirement $1,144 a year. 

Police Department. 
Daniel McWiUiams, hostler, salary at 
time of retirement, 81,600 a j'ear. 

Public Works Department. 

Stephen H. Carty, inspector, salary at 
time of retirement $2,100 a year. 

Denis Donovan, teamster, salary at 
time of retirement, SI, 560 a year. 

Bartholomew Dunn, stableman, salary 
at time of retirement SI, 560 a j'ear. 

Patrick J. Fitzpatrick, paver, salary at 
time of retirement $1,872 a year. 

William E. Flynn, inspector, salary at 
time of retirement S2,2()0 a year. 

Thomas R. Melville, assistant to en- 
gineer, salary at time of retirement 
$2,200 a year. 

Patrick J. McXulty, foreman, salary at 
time of retirement S2,500 a year. 

John J. Norton, inspector, salary at 
time of retirement 82,100 a year. 

William M. Tracy, assistant draw- 
tender, salary at time of retirement 
$1,800 a year. 

Registry Department. 
Grace E. Bliss, clerk, salary at time of 
retirement $1,700 a year. 

School Department. 

George F. Barry, custodian, salary at 
time of retirement, $3,120 a year. 

Clara D. Crandall, sewing teacher, 
salary at time of retirement $2,304 a j'ear. 

LiUian Tishler, assistant, salary at time 
of retirement 82,304 a year. 

Suffolk County. 
George L. Twombly, comt officer, 
salary at time of retirement $2,484 a year. 
A. Grace Small, second assistant reg- 
istrar, salary at time of retirement 83,600 
a year. 

Attest: 

W. J. Doyle, 
Chairman. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of street con- 
struction, estimated to be thirty (30) 
days, vehicles are excluded from the 
following street, effective December 31, 
1935: 

Rozella Street, Dorchester. 

From Adams street to Elm Dale 
street. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED DECEMBER 26 TO DECEMBER 3L 



December :il. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Xature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Dorchester Co-operative 14 Rawson street 7 

Bank. 

Philip J. Dorethy 6 Clermont street 17 

C. Regan 29 Cobden street 11 

Thomas H. Murphy 2005 Dorchester avenue. ... 17 

Thomas J. Loughlin 8 Ely road 16 

Edward Daly 78 and 80 Gallivan Boule- 17 

vard. 

Ernest J. Gn^Jiert 19 Minden street 10 

Ralph F. Whitehead 77 N'onantum street 22 



.■^Iterations, dwelling $150 

Alterations, dwelling 75 

.Alterations, dwelling 225 

Alterations, dwelling 75 

Alterations, dwelling 100 

Alterations, dwelling 350 

Alterations, dwelling 100 

Third-class dwelhng 6,000 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED DECEMBER 26 TO DECEMBER 31. 

December 26. 



Plumber. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



William Cooper 77 .Sudbury street 3 

William J. O'Brien 151 Summer street 3 

David H. Lane 1 Waterlow street 14 

Joseph Weinberg 25 Grant street 13 

John R. Huney 15 Matchett street 22 

Dai'id H. Lane 25 Greenwich park 4 

Ray Martin 96 Wheatland avenue 17 

Robert C. Nickerson 34 Emerald street 5 



December 27. 



S. G. Cort 

Pierce and C&x 

L. W. Boyden 

E. M. Duggan 

John J. O'Toole 

C. J. Glynn 

Da\-id Carlin 

James -A. Donnelly. . 
John M. McMahon . 



443 Beacon street 5 

18 Somerset street 3 

141 Brookline avenue 21 

94 Sawyer street 9 

53 P street 6 

557 East Eighth street 7 

43 West Walnut park 11 

29 Laurel street 12 

7 Pond street 18 



December 28. 



Domenic Naimo . 

E. F. Rogers 

E. F. Rogers 

E. W. Siegfriedt . . 
Francis J. Brown. 



66 Walker street 2 

1595 Commonwealth ave. . , 21 

1612 Commonwealth ave. . . 21 

73 Wilmington avenue 17 

54 Ruthven street 12 



December 30. 



F. L. Gustafson 

Fred E. Whitney 

J. Preston Perham ... 
Harold Richardson. . . 
William N. McKenna. 
Thomas J. Johnson. . . 

.Samuel Segel 

James D. O'Neil 



167 Russett road 20 

34 Binford street 6 

392 West Roxbury Parkway, 20 

30 Hanson street 3 

129 Maiden street 8 

300 Summer street 6 

42 West Sixth street 6 

1 13 West Third street 6 



December 31. 



John Matto 

J. F. Reed 

George S. Patey 

Louis Freedman 

Edward Sawyer 

George G. LaConte. . . 

Harry .Abrams 

S. J. Sands 

J. Harry Kurhan 

Joseph Weinberg 

Louis Friedenberg. ... 

E. J. Fennessey 

Samuel .Segel 

E. Rothenberg 

G. W. .McDonald 

James D. O'Neil 

James D. O'Neil 

Alax Hyman 

William N. McKenna. 
Louis Bonaceto 



3 Chelsea street 2 

61 Beacon street 5 

328 Beacon street 5 

197 Beacon street 5 

113 Bay State road 5 

1014 Bennington street 1 

8 Orchardfield street 15 

46 South Market street .... 3 

172 Tremont street 3 

Rear 61 1 Washington st 3 

866 Huntington avenue. ... 10 

3 Irwin avenue 12 

44 West Sixth street 6 

1878 Centre street 20 

9 Valentine street 11 

34 Gay Head street 10 

32 Gay Head street 10 

459 Brookline avenue 4 

630 Washington street 3 

6 Calvin road 19 



New fixtures $46 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures 400 

New fixtures 108 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 500 

New fixtures $2,700 

New fixtures 130 

New fixtures : 400 

New fixtures 350 

New fixtures 50 

New fixtures 75 

New fixtures 400 

New fixtures 125 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures $100 

New fixtures 60 

New fixtures 60 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures 160 

New fixtures $500 

New fixtures 50 

New fixtures 175 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 50O 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures $50 

New fixtures 40 

New fixtures 2,300 

New fixtures 2,500 

New fixtures 1,200 

New fixtures 60 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 600 

New fixtures 40 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures 20 

New fixtures 185 

New fixtures 50 

New fixtures 35 

New fixtures 180 

New fix-tures 200 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures 50 



AMENDED DAMAGES. 

The Maj'or has approved the following 
vote of the Board of Street Commissioners: 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of .\ugust 29, 
1933, as amended, determining damages 
caused by the making of the public 



improvement consisting of the laying out 
and construction of Weld street, be, and 
the same hereby is, amended, b.v adding 
to said order the amount 8405 as an 
award to William E. Brennan and 
Katherine M. Brennan; that the amount 
8405 be, and the same hereby is, awarded 
to William E. Brennan and Katherine M. 
Brennan for the damages so sustained. 



Jan. 4 



CITY RECORD 



13 



OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE, CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR WEEK 
ENDING DECEMBER 28, 1935. 





Dependent 
Aid. 


Mothers' 
Aid. 


Old Age 
Assistance. 


Administrative. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 


Number of active cases 

last week. 
Number of cases added . 

Number of cases discon- 
tinued. 

Number of active cases 
this 'week. 

Same week last year , . . 


23,738 

536 

2,134 

*22.140 
25,442 


1,582 

5 

6 

1,581 

1,450 


4,347 

12 

19 

4,340 

3,836 






29,667 






553 






2 159 






28,061 






30,728 









Financial. 



Expended during week. . 

Last week 

Same week last year . . . 

Appropriations 

Expended to date 

Unexpended balances.. . 

Collections from Com- 
monwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, outside cities 
and towns, and re- 
funds.f 



$145,946 


71 


157,452 


36 


185.674 


60 


7.965.000 Ool 


8.028.688 


39 


§ 63.688 39 


1,717.733 


57 



$23,950 00 


23.770 


00 


21.887 


00 


1.255.000 


00 


1.218.476 


98 


36.523 


02 


406,136 


20 



$27,167 05 


/:$6,596 18 
1 14,502 14 


27,197 50 


13.407 22 


24.428 00 


11.192 41 


1.430.000 00 


779,611 81 


1,383,021 05 


743,963 98 


46,978 95 


35,647 83 


476,957 93 









$32,414 00 
70,269 53 
52,144 47 



$218 

221 

243 

1 1 ,662 

11,544 

117 

2,600 



.162 08 
,827 08 
.181 91 
.025 81 
,419 93 
605 88 
827 70 



♦ 1,602 E. R. A. supplementaries. 

t Collections on account of Boston City Hospital, $62,877.01. 

♦ Retroactive. § Overdrawn. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 

General Order \o. 1J9. 
It gives the commissioner great pleasure 
to publish the following letter for the 
information of the department: 

Retail Trade Board, 

80 Federal Street, 

Boston, Mass. 

December 23, 1935. 
Police Commissioner McSweeney, 
154 Berkeley Street, Boston. 
Dear Commissioner McSweeney, — 
We wish to take this opportunity of ex- 
pressing the unanimous thanks of the 
Retail Trade Board to you and to the 
police officers who are handling traffic in 
the retail district for the unusually effi- 
cient manner in which they have done 
their work during the past few weeks. 

The efficiency of the police is par- 
ticularly notable, in view of the heavy 
increjise in the amount of traffic, both 
vehicular and pedestrian, in the district. 
The shopping public and Boston mer- 
chants greatly appreciate your part and 
that of your able staff in making this 
Christmas an outstanding one in help- 
fulness to the public. 
With best wishes for the season, I am, 

Very cordially yours, 

Daniel Bloomfield, Manager. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene M. McSweeney, 

Commissioner. 



General Order Xo. 1.30. 
A trial board, consisting of Captains 
Campbell, Killen and Towle, reconvened 
on December 23, 1935, in the case of the 
complaint made by Perley S. Skillings, 
captain, Division 16, against Ambrose T. 
Forde, patrolman, Division 16, which 



case was continued from December 13, 
1935, for final disposition, to wit: 

Charge 1 : Conduct unbecoming an 
officer. 

Specification: In that on the seven- 
teenth day of November, 1935, the said 
Patrolman Ambrose T. Forde, while on 
a day off, not in uniform or on duty, was 
under the influence of into.xicating liquor 
to such an extent that he was unable to 
perform police duty if called upon so 
to do. 

Charge 2: Violation auto law. 

Specification: In that on the seven- 
teenth day of November, 1935, the said 
Patrolman Ambrose T. Forde, while 
under the influence of intoxicating liquor, 
not in uniform or on duty, did operate a 
Chevrolet automobile and was involved in 
an accident, — 

has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation : 

"The Board, having heard and care- 
fully considered all the evidence as pre- 
sented, accepts the plea of guilty, and in 
consideration of the fact that this officer 
was convicted by the Court, the Board, 
ordinarily, would be inclined to inflict 
the extreme penalty of dismissal but as a 
result of the recommendation of Patrol- 
man Forde's commanding officer and the 
justice who presided in the case, the Board 
respectfully recommends that Patrolman 
Ambrose T. Forde be suspended from 
duty for a period of forty-five days, effec- 
tive as of November 18, and that at the 
expiration of the said period of suspension 
he be ordered to perform 210 hours of 
punishment duty." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trial 
Board and hereby orders that the said 
Patrolman Ambrose T. Forde be sus- 
pended from duty for a period of forty-five 
days, effective as of November 18, 1935, 
at 5.45 p. m., and that at the expiration of 
the said period of suspension the said 



Patrolman Ambrose T. Forde perform 
210 hours of punishment duty. 

Civil Service Rule 23, Section 3, re- 
quires approval of the Civil Service 
Commission before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 
Section 3. With the consent of the 
Commissioner upon good cause shown, an 
appointing officer may reinstate in the 
same position or in a position in the same 
class and grade any person who has been 
separated from the service; provided, 
however, that the Commissioner shall not 
allow reinstatement of a person discharged 
for cause. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene M. McSweeney, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 131. 

A trial board, consisting of Captains 
Campbell, Killen and Gleavy, having 
heard by reference a complaint made by 
Thomas M. Towlc, captain, Division 2, 
against Arthur E. Eldridge, patrolman, 
Division 2. for alleged violation of the 
Rules and Regulations of the Police De- 
partment, to wit: 

Charge: Conduct unbecoming an officer. 

Specification 2: Tn that on the 17th 
day of December, 1935, the said Patrol- 
man Arthur E. Eldridge, while not in 
uniform and not on duty, was under the 
influence of intoxicating liquor to such 
an extent that he would be unable to 
perform police duty, if called upon so to 
do, tending to bring into disrepute and 
criticism himself and his associates in the 
Police Department, — 
has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation : 

"The Board having heard and carefully 
considered all the evidence as presented 
finds the said Patrolman Arthur E. 
Eldridge not guilty of Specification 1 of 
said charge, and guilty of Specification 2 
of said charge. The Board has con- 
sidered the recommendations of Deputy 
Superintendent Anderson and Captain 
Towle, and the fact that Eldridge has 
never previously been before a trial board 
during his sixteen years' service as a 
police oflicer. Notwithstanding these fav- 
orable recommendations and his good 
record heretofore, the Board feels that 
this officer committed a serious offense 
which warrants the imposition of severe 
punishment. The Board therefore re- 
spectfully recommends that the said 
Patrolman Arthur E. i^ldridge be sus- 
pended from duty for a period of fifteen 
days, effective as of December 19, 1935, 
at 5.45 o'clock p. m., and that at the 
expiration of the said period of suspen- 
sion the said Patrolman Arthur E. PJl- 
dridge be ordered to perform 250 hour of 
punishment duty." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trial 
Board and hereby -orders that the said 
Patrolman Arthur E. Eldridge be sus- 
pended from duty for a period of fifteen 
days, effective as of December 19, 1935, 
at 5.45 o'clock p. m., and that at the expi- 
ration of the said period of suspension 
the said Patrolman Arthur E. Eldridge 
perform 250 hours of punishment duty. 

Civil Service Rule 23, Section 3,^ re- 
quires approval of the Civil Service Com- 
mission before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 

"Section 3. With the consent of the 
Commissioner upon good cause shown, 
an appointing officer may reinstate in 



14 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 4 



the same position or in a position in the 
same class and grade any person who has 
been separated from the service; pro- 
vided, however, tliat the Commissioner 
shall not allow reinstatement of a person 
discharged for cause." 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene M. McSweeney, 

(^07iimissio7ter. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 

(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

P.sKOLE Okkicek, Dep.\ht.\ie\t of Cor- 
rection, .I.wiARY 25, 1936. 

Iviist day for filing applications, Satur- 
day, .January 11, 1936, at 12 noon. 

This examination is open to both males 
and females. 

The minimum salary, without mainte- 
nance, is $1,860 a year; the maximum 
salary, without maintenance, is S2,460 a 
j'ear; the minimum Siilary, with mainte- 
nance, is SI, .500 a year; the maximum 
salary, with maintenance, is S2,100 a 
year. 

Duties: Under general supervision, to 
follow up cases of prisoners and inmates 
paroled from State penal or reformatory 
institutions and aid them to normal living 
and readjustment to life in the com- 
munity; to procure and serve warrants 
in cases of parole violations and return 
the parolees to institutions; to transfer 
prisoners between institutions and on 
occasion to return prisoners on extradi- 
tion from other states; and to perform 
related work as required. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 4; per- 
sonality and fitness, as determined by 
an oral interview, 3; total, 10. 

Passing Recjuirements: At least 70 
per cent in each subject in order to 
become eligible. 

Phj-sical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

Industri.'VL iNSTRtirTOH (Plumber), 
Massachusetts Reformatory, De- 
partment OF Correction, January' 
25, 1936. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 11, 1936, at 12 noon. 

The minimum salary, without mainte- 
nance, is 81,680 a year; the maximum 
salary, without maintenance, is S2,160 a 
year; the minimum salary, with mainte- 
nance is Sl,320 a year; the maximum 
salary, with maintenance, is SI, 800 a year. 

Duties: To instruct a class, consisting 
of eighteen to twenty prisoners, in shop 
work and the maintenance of the plumb- 
ing plant in the institution. To coach 
them so they will be able to apply for a 
plumber's license. To repair and install 
new plumbing whenever required. To 
estimate and order stock needed for new 
installations and the maintenance of old. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must possess a journeyman's or master 
plumber's license. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 1; practical questions, 1; 
total, 2. 

Passing Requirements: Applicants 
must obtain at least 70 per cent in each 
subject in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

FIRE SERVICE. 

Cities and Towns Outside of Boston 
AND Metropolitan District, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1936. 
Last date for filing a[)plications, Satur- 
day, January 18, 1936, at 12 noon. 



Boston and Metropolitan District, 
February 15, 1936. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 1, 1936, at 12 noon. 

.\pplicants for the service of Boston 
must be not less thiin twenty-two nor 
over thirty-five years of age at the time 
of filing application. Applicants for all 
other cities and towns in the Common- 
wealth must be not less than twenty-one 
nor over thirty-five years of age at the 
time for filing application. Callmen and 
substitute callmen may make such deduc- 
tions from their ages as are provided for 
in Civil Service Rule 8, Class 21. A 
certificate of date of birth must be filed 
with the application, aniens one has been 
filed with a previous application. 

Applicants for Worcester are required 
to be not less than 5 feet 5 inches in 
height. -Vpplicants for Brockton must be 
not less than 5 feet 6 inches in height, 
and weigh not less than 135 pounds at 
the time of appointment. Applicants for 
Winchester must be not less than 5 feet 
8 inches in height, and weigh not less than 
135 pounds. Applicants for Lynn must 
be not less than 5 feet 5j inches in height, 
and weigh not less than 135 pounds. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; general information, 3; 
practical questions, 4; total, 10. 

Physical fitness to be determined hy 
phj'Sical examination and strength tests. 

Educational test, 3; physical test, 2; 
total, 5. 

Applicants will be required to obtain at 
least 50 per cent in each subject of the 
examination and at least 70 per cent in 
the educational average and in the 
strength test in order to become eligible. 

The practical questions will be based 
upon information contained in a manual 
known as the "Red Book." This manual 
may be obtained from the Secretary of 
State, Room 118, State House, at ten 
cents a copy. It is necessary that appli- 
cants obtain a copy of this manual and 
study it carefully. 



LAND=TAKING IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of an extension of Nevada 
street, Dorchester district, as a highway, 
from Wilmington avenue to Gallivan 
Boulevard, bounded and described as 
follows : 

An extension of the highway named 
Nevada street is hereby laid out, from 
Wilmington avenue to Gallivan Boule- 
vard, and ordered constructed, the cost 
thereof to be charged to Federal Funds. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Part between Wilmington avenue and 
Codman Hill avenue: 

Northerly by Wilmington avenue, fifty 
and 38-100 feet; easterly by the easterly 
line of .said extension of said Nevada 
street as hereby laid out, by two measure- 
ments, one hundred fourteen and 34-100 
feet and one hundred thirteen and 2-100 
feet; .southerly by Codman Hill avenue, 
fifty feet; and westerly V)y the w^esterly 
hne of said extension of said Nevada 
street as hereby laid out, by two measure- 
ments, one hundred tliirteen and 30-100 
feet and one hundred eight and 49-100 
feet. 

Part between Codman Hill avenue and 
Gallivan Boulevard: 

Northerly by Codman Hill avenue. 



fifty feet; easterly by the easterly line of 
.said extension of said Nevada street as 
hereby laid out, four hundred thirty-nine 
and 87-100 feet; southerly bj' Gallivan 
Boulevard, fifty and 32-100 feet on a 
curve of nineteen hundred and sixty feet 
radius; and westerly by the westerly line 
of said extension of said Nevada street as 
herebv laid out, four hundred thirtj'-four 
and 23-100 feet. 

Included in the above-described land 
(taken hereunder) are parts of certain 
parcels of land registered in the Land 
Court, said parcels being shown on the 
plan hereinbefore referred to, and said 
parts being the portions of said registered 
parcels which lie between the side lines of 
said Nevada street and the middle hne 
thereof; the owners of said portions, the 
number of the certificate of title and the 
book and page where the same is registered 
are as follows: 

Thomas McGagh, Cert. No. 19159, 
Book 91, page 159. 

.lohn Kennedy el al, Cert. No. 22254, 
Book 107, page 54. 

Louise B. Rose, Cert. No. 19499, Book 
93, page 99. 

Walter A. McLean, Cert. No. 29270. 
Book 142, page 70. 

Andrew O'Malley el at., Cert. No. 
31322, Book 152, page 122. 

Roger F. Austin et al., Cert. No. 20901, 
Book 100, page 101. 

Patrick Hennessy et al., Cert. No. 
21044, Book 101, page 44. 

Annie G. Sullivan, Cert. No. 24762, 
Book 119, page 162. 

William H. Crocker et al., Cert. No. 
25089, Book 121, page 89. 

Amy P. Macint%Te, Cert. No. 20795, 
Book 99, page 195. 

Charles C. Parker et al., Cert. No. 
29532, Book 143, page 132. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sastains damages in his estate 
by the making of the pubUc improvement, 
consisting of the laying out and con- 
struction of an extension of Nevada 
street, Dorchester district, as a highwaj', 
from Wilmington avenue to Gallivan 
Boulevard, under the order of the Board 
of December 26, 1935, and awards no 
damages therefor. 



ADDITIONAL SUBWAY PLAT- 
FORM AT PARK STREET. 

His Honor, Mayor Mansfield, an- 
nounced on December 31 that he had 
approved a W. P. A. project, providing 
for an additional platform at Park Street 
Station of the Tremont Street Sub- 
wav, for northbound through cars, at 
a cost of 8343,944.02, of which amount 
the Federal Government will provide 
funds amounting to 8210,553.25. The 
remainder of the cost eventually wiU 
be paid by the rental and in no sense 
will be a burden upon the people and 
the taxpayers. 

This work will provide employment 
for an average of 400 men per month 
for a period of seven months. 

This improvement has been urged 
for many yeare to relieve congestion 
existing during the rush hour period on 
this platform, where pa-ssengers are com- 
pelled to alight and board cars on the 
same side. It will also eliminate the 
present need of crossing Tremont street 
on the surface by permitting Park street 
passengers to continue underground and 
to come to the surface on the easterly 
sidewalk of Tremont street. 

Work will be started without delay 
and will be so conducted that car traffic 
in the Tremont Street Subway will ba 
interfered with in no waj'. 



Jan. 4 



CITY RECORD 



1 5 



MASSACHUSETTS CIVIL SERVICE 
EXAMINATIONS. 

The Massachusetts Civil Service Com- 
mission anuounces examinations for 
desirable positions open in the Boston 
and Metropolitan districts as follows: 

Superintendent of Temporary Home 
FOR Women, Boston Public Welfare 
Department, January 18, 1936. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 4, 1936, at 12 noon. 

This examination is open to females 
only. 

Salary: $1,020 per year. 

Duties: To cooperate with social 
agencies. To supervise employees and 
inmates in their work assignments. To 
be responsible for the smooth running 
of the entire institution, with special 
attention to be given food supply, ab- 
solute cleanliness and laundry work. To 
supervise the care given to children, 
particularly infants. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must have at least one year's experience 
in institutional work. Applicants must 
be not less than thirty^five years of age 
at the time of filing application. A 
certificate of date of birth must be filed 
with the application unless one has been 
filed with a previous application. 

Subject and Weights: Training and 
experience, 4; oral interview, 1; total, 5. 

The examination will consist of a state- 
ment of the applicant's training and ex- 
perience in complete and accurate detail. 

After applications have been filed, ex- 
perience sheets will be sent to all ap- 
plicants. These statements must be 
filled out and returned to the office of 
the Civil Service Commission, Rooms 
143-152, State House, Boston, not later 
than Saturday, January 18, 1936, at 12 
noon. No papers will be accepted after 
this date. No amendments or correc- 
tions will be allowed. 

Passing Requirements: Applicants 
must obtain at least 70 per cent in each 
subject in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

Civil Service Rule 9, Section 4: Any 
person possessing the required qualifica- 
tions who has taken an examination 
may make new application for the same 
service at any time, and his status shall 
be determined by the result of the last 
examination taken. If any person fails 
to fulfill all the requirements his exam- 
ination shall be treated as a failure. 



CONTRACTS FOR SNOW 
REMOVAL. 

On December 30 the Mayor approved 
the award of contracts for snow removal 
as follows: 

District No. 1. — Beginning at Broad- 
way and Fort Point Channel; by and 
including Broadway; by and including 
Tremont street; by and including Beacon 
street; by and including Brookline ave- 
nue; by and including Xewhury street; 
by and not including Charlesgatc West; 
by and not including the Fenway; by 
and including Ruggles street; by and 
including Huntington avenue; by and 
including Gainsborough street; by and 
including St. Botolph street; by and 
including Mas.sachusetts avenue; by and 
including Albany street to Broadway and 
Fort Point Channel, to Coleman Brothers 
Corporation, second lowest bidder, at 
50 cents per cubic yard. The lowest 



bidder, Edward M. Matz, was passed 
over because District No. 3 was awarded 
to him. 

District No. 2. — Beginning at Broad- 
way and Fort Point Channel; by and 
not including Broadway; by and not 
including Tremont street; by and in- 
cluding Court street; by and including 
State street to Boston Harbor to Northern 
avenue; by and including Northern ave- 
nue to the Viaduct; by and not includ- 
ing the Viaduct; by and including 
Summer street; by and including D 
street; by and including Dorchester 
avenue; by and including Andrew square; 
by and not including Southampton 
street; by and not including Albany 
street to Broadwaj' and Fort Point 
Channel, to Hugh Nawn, Incorporated, 
at 48 cents per cubic yard. Two lower 
bidders were passed over because otlier 
districts have been awarded to them and 
one becau.se specifications have not been 
complied with. 

District No. 3. — Beginning at the junc- 
tion of State street and Atlantic avenue; 
by and not including State street; by 
and not including Court street; by and 
including Scollay square; by and in- 
cluding Cambridge street to Charles river 
to Boston Harbor to State street and 
Atlantic avenue; also specified streets in 
Charlestown as follows: Chelsea street, 
City square, Main street, Warren street, 
Rutherford avenue, Charlestown and 
Warren Bridges, to Edward M. Matz, low 
bidder, at 40 cents per cubic yard. 

District No. 4- — Beginning at the junc- 
tion of Charles river and Cambridge street; 
by and not including Cambridge street; 
by and not including Scollay stiuare; by 
and not including Tremont street; by and 
not including Beacon street; by and not 
including Embankment road to Charles 
river and Cambridge street, to A. Singa- 
rella, low bidder, at 45 cents per cubic 
j-ard. 

In District No. 1, Coleman Brothers' 
bid of 50 cents was against their bid of 
67 cents on December 2. 

In District No. 2, Hugh Nawn, Incor- 
porated, price of 48 cents was the .same as 
their bid of December 2. 

In District No. 3, Edward M. Matz's 
price is 40 cents as against his bid of 42.2 
cents on December 2. 

In District No. 4, A. Singarclla's price is 
45 cents as against his bid of 55 cents on 
December 2. 



36,000 TRAFFIC DEATHS IN I9J4. 

The automobile casualty toll for 1934 
was 36,000 persons killed in 882,000 
personal-injury collisions on streets and 
highwaj's, according to the Travelers 
Insurance Company). Pedestrians ac- 
counted for 44 per cent of the fatalities. 

The death gain was 16 per cent against 
an increase of only 6 per cent in regis- 
trations and gasolene consumption. Fast 
driving is given as the dominant factor. 
Alcohol is known to have figured with 
3.16 per cent of the drivers and 4.46 per 
cent of the pedestrians, compared with 
2.43 and 2.99 per cent respectively in 
1933. 

Despite figures indicating that nine out 
of ten cars involved in accidents were in 
good condition, three out of every four 
cars inspected were found to be defective, 
says the report. Defects were as follows: 
Brakes bad on 29 per cent of the cars; 
tires fair to poor on 56 per cent; lamps 
needed adjustment or replacement on 
63 per cent. 



URBAN POPULATION, APRIL I, 19J0. 

As defined by the Census Bureau, the 
urban population is, in general, that re- 
siding in cities and other incorporated 
places having 2,500 inhabitants or more, 
the remainder being classified as rural. 

The total urban population of the 
United States is 68,954,823 (34,154,760 
males and 34,800,063 females), of whom 
62,836,605 (31,162,570 males and 31,674,- 
035 females) are white; of these whites 
52,109,746 (25,520,483 males and 26,589,- 
263 females) are native; 33,497,232 (16,- 
515,816 males and 16,981,416 females) of 
these latter are of native parentage and 
18,612,514 (9,004,667 males and 9,607,847 
females) are of foreign or mixed parent- 
age; there are 10,726,859 (5,642,087 males 
and 5,084,772 females) foreign-bom 
white; there are 5,193,913 (2,479,158 males 
and 2,714,755 females) Negroes; other 
races, 924,305 (513,032 males and 411,273 
females). 

The urban population is 56.2 per cent 
of the total population of the country; 
native white, 54.6 per cent and foreign- 
born white, 80.3 per cent; Negroes, 43.7 
per cent. 

The total urban population of New 
England is 6,311,976 or 77.3 per cent of 
the total population of New England. 
Of the 4,660,339 native white, 2,089,031 
are of native parentage and 2,571,308 are 
of foreign or mixed parentage; foreign- 
born whites number 1,564,769; Negro, 
81,443; other races, 5,425. 



DOUBLE TAXATION NOT THE WHOLE 
TAX CONFLICT. 

Double taxation, which to most people 
means two taxes on the same thing from 
different sources, — Federal and State or 
two states, — is only a part of the problem 
of conflicting taxation, says James W, 
Martin, Research Director of the Inter- 
state (Commission on Conflicting Taxa- 
tion. The commission, set up by the 
Interstate Assembly representing the 
various states, which was called together 
by the American Legislators' Association 
in 1933, will report results of its subse- 
quent study of conflicting taxation early 
in 1935. 



NO COST CONTROL FOR REFUSE 
DISPOSAL. 

American cities on the whole may be 
clean housekeepers, but they don't know 
how much it is costing them to be clean 
or whether they are spending too much. 
Only a few cities are able to report 
accurately the unit cost of removing 
garbage and other refuse and of cleaning 
streets, according to the Public Adminis- 
tration Service of Chicago, 111., which 
further reports that at least 90 per cent 
of the cities in this country have no cost 
control over this service. 



SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT CON- 
STRUCTION ON THE INCREASE. 

Owing to the economic conditions pre- 
vailing during the past year, there was 
but a relatively small volume of sewage 
treatment plant construction. Within 
recent months, however, there has been 
a decided impetus to new construction 
of this type growing out of the 
Public Works Administration allotments. 
Nearly 700 cities have received allot- 
ments of funds from the P. W. A. for 
sewerage or sewage treatment, involving 
an aggregate expenditure of well over 
$200,000,000. 



1 6 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 4 



JAMAICA SPIiNDS $1,000,00U ANMJAl.LY 
ON ROAD CONSTRUCTION AND MAIN- 
TENANCH. 

Jamaica, an Knglish possession, hae 
tt liinliway system wliicli is almost en- 
tirely constructed of \vaterl)ound mac- 
adam, some 70 miles of which has been 
surface-treated. Many of the roads are 
under the supervision of the Department 
of Pui)lic Works and various parochial 
boards. 'Ihere are about 2,500 mileii of 
bridle and foot paths. The highway 
system connects all parts of the island 
in ;i vcrv satisfactory tiiiiniicr, and the 
problem is not that of the construction 
of new roads, but the improvement of old 
ones, the surfacing and widening of these 
roads, and protective coatings. The roads 
are well maintained and, as there are 
not many heavy trucks, the maintenance 
is satisfactory. There are approximately 
4,000 miles of highways, or 1.11 si|uare 
miles of area to one mile of highway. 

About a million dollars per j'ear is 
spent on new construction and mainte- 
nance, the machinery used being both 
European and American. 

(From a report of the American Road 
Builders' Association.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 



National Industrial Recovery Project 
P. W. A. Docket No. Mass. 1123-R. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Notice to Contractors. 
Sealed proposals addressed to the Commis- 
sioner of Public Works and indorsed "Proposal 
for Constructing a Water Pipe Trestle and 
Fender at Chelsea Bridge North" will be re- 
ceived at Room 508, City Hall Annex, until 
12 m. (E. S. T. ) on Tuesday, January 21, 
1936, and at that time and place will be 
publicly opened and read. Specification and 
contract forms may be obtained at Room 508, 
City Hall Annex, upon payment of the sum 
of two (2) dollars (non-returnable). Each 
proposal must be accompanied by a properly 
certified check in the sum of fifteen hundred 
(1,500) dollars payable to the City of Boston. 
Proposals must be made in duplicate, the 
sealed duplicate, without check, to be de- 
posited by the bidder with the City Auditor 
previous to the time named for opening 
the proposals. All checks except that of the 
bidder to whom the contract is awarded, will 
be returned within three (3) days after the 
awarding of the contract. The project is to 
be financed and constructed under the terms 
of the National Industrial Recovery Act, 
Emergency Relief Appropriation Act of 1935, 
and chapter 366 of the Acts of 1933, as amended, 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and 
attention is called to the construction regula- 
tions prescribed by the P. W. A. 

The rate per hour of the wages to be paid 
to mechanics, teamsters, chauffeurs and laborers 
in the work to be performed under the con- 
tract shall not be less than the rate of wages 
in the schedule determined by the Commis- 
sioner of Labor and Industries of the Common- 
wealth, a copy of which schedule is annexed 
to the form of contract referred to herein. 
Copies of said schedule may be obtained, with- 
out cost, upon application therefor, at Room 
508, City Hall Annex. 

The employment agency designated by the 
Government is the State Public Employment 
Office, 100 Nashua street, Boston. The right 
is reservefl by the City of Boston, Mass., act- 
ing through its Commissioner of Public Works, 
to reject any or all bids, or to accept any bid 
which he deems most advantageous, subject 
to the approval of the State Director, P. W. A. 
No bidder may withdraw his bid for a period 
of thirty (30) days after the date set for 
the opening thereof. A surety bond by a 
company satisfactory to the Commissioner and 
the State Director P. W. A. and in an amount 
e<iual to one hundred (100) per cent of the 
contract price will be required from the success- 
ful bidder. 

C. J. Carvbn, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 
(Jan. 4-11.) 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 



Pboi'osaus for Dredging Dock at Garbage 
Dump Station at Albany Street, Boston. 
The Commissioner of Public Works of the 
City of Boston, office 508 City Hall Annex, 
invites proposals from citizens of the United 
States and corporations or other legal associa- 
tions wherein the controlling interest to the 
extent of at least over one-half thereof is 
owned by a citizen or citizens of the United 
States, for dredcing dock at garbage dump 
station at Albany street. Boston, and giving 
bond therefor of a surety company approved 
by the Commissioner in the sum of 100 per 
cent of the amount of the contract, to secure 
the due performance of the contract and the 
full protection of the city. Forms of pro- 
posals may be obtained at Room 508, City Hall 
Annex. Each proposal should be inclosed in 
an envelope, sealed, marked "Bid for Dredg- 
ing Dock at Garbage Dump at Albany Street," 
and left at Room 508, fifth floor, City Hall 
Annex, before 12 o'clock m. of Monday, Jan- 
uary 13, 1936, with a certified check for two 
hundred (200) dollars, payable to and to 
become the property of the city if the pro- 
posal, after acceptance, is not carried out. 
The proposals will then and there be publicly 
opened and read. Proposals must be made in 
duplicate, the sealed duplicate, without check, 
to be deposited by the bidder with the City 
Auditor previous to the time named for open- 
ing the bids. There will be a charge of two 
(2) dollars for each set of plans and specifica- 
tions taken out. If the price of any item 
appears to the Commissioner to be abnor- 
mally high or low, or the bidder neglects to 
bid on each and every item, it may lead to 
the rejection of the proposal containing such 
price. The undersigned reserves the right 
to reject any or all proposals or to award 
the contract as he deems best. 

C. J. Carvbn, 
• (Jan. 4.) Comm.issioner of Public Works. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 



Proposal for Repairs to Steamer "Stephen 
J. O'Meara." 
The Commissioner of Institutions of the 
City of Boston invites proposals for repairs 
to steamer "Stephen J. O'Meara." A bond 
will be required for doing the work of a 
surety company approved by the Ck>mmis- 
sioner in the sum of 100 per cent of the 
contract price, to secure the due performance 
of the contract and the fuU protection of 
the city. Forms of proposals may be obtained 
at Room 809, City Hall Annex. Each proposal 
should be inclosed in an envelope, sealed, 
marked, "Proposal for Repairs to Steamer 
"Stephen J. O'Meara," and left at Room 
809, City Hall Annex, before 12 m. of Thurs- 
day, January 9. 1936, with a certified check 
for one hundred (100) dollars, payable to 
and to become the property of the city if the 
proposal after acceptance is not carried out. 
■The proposals will then and there be publicly 
opened and read. Proposals must be made in 
duplicate, the sealed duplicate, without check, 
to he deposited by the bidder with the City 
Auditor previous to the time named for open- 
ing the bids The Commissioner reserves the 
right to reject any or all proposals or to award 
the contract as he deems best. 

Frederic A. Washburn, M. D., 
(Jan. 4.) Commissioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ASSESSING BEPARTMENT. 



To Taxpayers, 
Assessors' Notice, City Hall Annex, 

Boston, January 1, 1936. 
Attention is called to the Assessors' Notice 
posted upon City Hall and various other 
places throughout the city, relative to mak- 
ing returns on personal property subject to 
taxation. Returns should be made not later 
than February 15. 

Edward T Kelly, 
Timothy W. Murphy, 
Michael J. Brophy, 

Assessors of Boston. 
(Jan. 4-11-18-25— Feb. 1-8-15.) 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



P. W. A. Project Numboi Mass. 1092. 
1 Sealed 1 Separate Sealed proposals for 
the following Item : 

(A) 0>nstruct and complete an addition 
and alterations to the English High School, 
Montgomery street, in the City of Boston, Mass., 
prepared in accordance with instructions con- 
tained in the contract documents, will be re- 
ceived at the office of the Department of 
School Buildings at 11 Beacon street in Bos- 
ton, Mass., until 2 o'clock p. m.. Eastern 
Standard 'Time, January 14, 1936, and at 
that time and place publicly opened and read. 
The additional copy of the proposal form 
shall be removed from the book of specifica- 
tions and after filling out shall be sealed in 
an envelope and delivered to the Auditor of 
the City of Boston, at the City Hall, School 
street, Boston, Mass., before the time for the 
opening of the proposals. 

Plans, specifications and other contract 
documents may be secured at office of Super- 
intendent of Construction at the above address, 
11 Beacon street, upon the deposit payment of 
$100 certified check for Proposal A, payable 
to the City of Boston. 

Said deposit will be refunded when such 
documents are returned in complete and good 
condition. 

Eiach proposal must be accompanied by a 
certified check for the sum of $5,000 for 
Proposal A, made payable to the City of 
Boston. 

All checks, except that of the bidder to 
whom the contract is awarded, will be re- 
turned within seventy-two hours after the 
awarding of the contract and receipt must be 
given therefor. 

The project is to be financed and constructed 
under the terms of the Emergency Relief Ap- 
propriation Act of 1935 and chapter 366, 
Massachusetts Acts of 1933, as amended, and 
attention is called to the "Construction Regu- 
lations" prescribed by the P. W. A. 

Attention is called to the fact that minimum 
wage rates are established for the project and 
are set forth in the contract documents. 

The office of the United States Employment 
Bureau designated by the Government for 
this project is E. L. Hanna, 100 Nashua 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

The right is reserved by the City of Boston, 
Mass., acting through its Superintendent of 
Construction, to reject any or all bids, or to 
accept any bid which it deems most advan- 
tageous, subject to the approval of the State 
Director, P. W. A. 

No bidder may withdraw his bid for a period 
of thirty (30) days after the date set for the 
opening thereof. 

A surety bond by a company satisfactory to 
the State Director, P. W. A., and in an amount 
equal to one hundred (100) per cent of the 
contract price, will be required from the 
successful bidder. 

Wm. W. Drummey, 
(Jan. 4.) Sujyerintendent of Construction. 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY 
OF BOSTON. 



Administration Building, 15 Beacon Strbbi, 

Office of the Business Manager. 
Proposals for Furnishing Interfolded Paper 

Towels and Roll Towels for the Boston 

Public Schools. 
The School Committee of the City of Bos- 
ton invites bids for furnishing paper towels 
for the Boston public schools. Proposal forms 
are obtainable at the office of the Business 
Manager of the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, tenth floor. Envelopes containing pro- 
posals must be sealed and plainly marked 
"Proposal for Furnishing Paper Towels." The 
bid must be in duplicate. One copy signed 
by the bidder and accompanied by a certified 
check for SlOO, payable to the City of Boeton, 
must be left at the office of the Businese 
Manager on or before 12 o'clock m. on Tues- 
day, January 14, 1936. Copies filed with the 
Business Manager will be publicly oipened and 
read at 12 o'clock m. of the day stated. The 
other copy, also signed by the bidder, must 
be filed with the City Auditor, City Hall, 
Boston, Mass., previous to the time named 
for the opening of bids. The School Com- 
mittee reserves the right to reject any or 
all bids, and to accept such bid or part of 
bid as may be deemed best for the interest* 
of the city. The successful bidder will be 
required to furnish a bond for not less than 
50 l>er cent of the amount of the contract. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, 
Business Manager of the School Committee. 
(Jan. 4.) 



city of boston PRINTINQ DBFARTHBNT 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol. 28. Saturday, January 11, 1936. No. 2 

"BOSTON MUST GO FORWARD AND NOT BACKWARD," SAYS MAYOR MANS= 
FIELD IN ANNUAL MESSAGE TO CITY COUNCIL GIVEN AT ORGANIZATION 
SESSION FOR 1936 — RECOUNTS ACHIEVEMENTS OF PAST TWO YEARS 
OF HIS ADMINISTRATION AND OUTLINES WORK OF REMAINING YEARS — 
CONCLUDES ADDRESS WITH PLEA FOR COOPERATION OF ALL CITIZENS 
WITH VIEW TO MAKING BOSTON BETTER PLACE IN WHICH TO WORK 
AND LIVE. 

The following is the annual message of Mayor Frederick W. Mansfield delivered to the Honorable the City 
Council, January 6, 1936: 

The first two years of my term of office as Mayor of the City of Boston have been concluded and we are 
now commencing on the second half of that term. The two years which have passed have been years of marked 
improvement in the affairs of this city. I propose today to give you a summary of the accomplishments of those 
years and to discuss with you some of the problems of the immediate future. 

I. THE PAST TWO YEARS. 
A. The Financial Condition of the City. 

I have frequently stressed the importance of maintaining the credit of the city. Under the laws of this 
Commonwealth, the revenue necessary to carry on municipal government, to maintain our schools, to pay city 
employees and to assist the poor and needy is not received by the city until late in the calendar year. Money, 
therefore, must always be borrowed in anticipation of such revenue. If the credit of the city should be impaired 
this money could not be obtained, with the necessary result that many municipal services demanded by and 
important to the welfare of the people of Boston would have to be curtailed, thousands of city employees would 
be obliged to work without pay and their discharge from the city's service would become imperative and the city 
would find itself unable properly to care for the poor, the needy and the unemployed. 

Every effort, therefore, has been bent during the last two years on preserving the credit of the city. 

There are certain factors peculiar to cities and towns in the Commonwealth which must be borne in mind in 
any consideration of Boston's financial situation. Welfare expenditures throughout the depression have been and 
are being borne by the cities and towns of the Commonwealth with but very limited assistance from the state. 
While these expenditures have increased in tremendous proportion, falling valuations of real estate and decreased 
income tax collections distributable to municipalities have sharply cut the revenue to meet the added expenditures. 
The net result has been a drastic increase in tax rates throughout the Commonwealth. Five towns in the Com- 
monwealth had a tax rate in 1935 of over S50 a thousand ; fifty-six cities and towns a tax rate of between .$40 and 
$49; eighty a tax rate of between $35 and S39, and one hundred and eleven a tax rate of between $30 and $34. 

Welfare expenditures in Boston during 1928 aggregated $2,800,000. In 1935 they aggregated approxi- 
mately $13,000,000, although less than in 1934 or 1933. The increase in welfare expenditures represents $6 in the 
tax rate. In the meantime valuations have decreased to an amount representing about $5 on the tax rate and revenue 
collected by the Commonwealth and distributable to Boston has decreased to an amount representing about $3 on 
the tax rate. 

No substantial new sources of revenue and no adequate state assistance have been afforded to the city to 
meet its added welfare expenditures and decreased income. 

The city has, therefore, been faced with the alternative of vigorous curtailment of services and salaries or 
with reasonable curtailment and borrowing. The hardship to employees and the adverse effect on local business 
involved in the first alternative has led us to adopt the second. 

When I took office there was no adequate system of budget control. To improve this situation I instructed 
the City Auditor to prepare a plan whereby a modern budget system with proper control of expenditures and a 
inore adequate method of checking receipts could be put in operation. This plan is now in operation and further 
improvements will be operative in 1936 as I shall later more fully explain. 

The Department of Public Welfare was reorganized late in 1934 and every effort has been made to guard 
against disbursements to persons not entitled to relief. Vigorous prosecutions of offenders and the employment 
of trained workers in the department have tended to conserve against a waste of city funds. 

Wherever possible, I have maintained a policy of not filling vacancies and of reducing purchases of equip- 
ment, materials and supplies to a minimum consistent with the proper rendering of public service. 

Not only has effort been made to keep expenditures within reasonable limits but attention has been given 
to the enforcement and collection of tax and other claims of the city. 

In 1935 approximately $6,000,000 more was received by the City Collector than in 1933 and there has been 
a definite improvement in current tax collections. The trend of collections has at last been turned in the right 
direction. 

Pursuant to my request, an ordinance was passed in 1935, after considerable delay, which will enable the 
city to conserve and dispose of properties acquired through tax title foreclosures made mandatory by statute. 

{CorUinued on page 21.) 



1 8 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. U 




"O Ho-ston. fair City enthroned like a radiant 

queen, ^. . , 

Prom thv hills lookinn down on the ship- 

teemini; plain of the ocean, 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene, ^ j u. . 

Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters 

unselfish devotion!" 

From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 

FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

Joshua H. Jones, Jr.. Associate Editor^^ 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent. Room 73, 

City Hall. 

Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 

Office. 

By subscription S2.00 Per Ye^ar | 

Single Copies 

IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES 
Old South News-SUnd. Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 
A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 

Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73. City Hall. 

MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
Januarj^ 13, 1936, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 



public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issumg of 
licenses for the storage of gasoline, oil 
and other inflammable substances or cx- 
plosive compoimds; (he u.se of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tcm- 
poniry obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE BCSTON Tr.\FFIC COMMISSION, 

134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To THE He.^lth Dep.^rtment, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Bo.^rd of P.^rk Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue, Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 
charges made for such service. Applica- 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows : 

To the Bo.^rd of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of rear 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 



tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools in the city. 

To THE Department of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the St.atistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To the Wire Division of the Fire 
Department, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To THE Bo.\RD of ZoNING ADJUSTMENT, 

Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established bv 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



For the week ending January 4, 1936: 
Population as of July, 1935, Massa- 
chu.setts State Census, 817,713; popula- 
tion estimated July, 1935, United States 
Census Bureau, 798,568; number of 
deaths (stillbirths excluded): Residents, 
219; nonresidents, 51; total, 270. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 17.51; nonresidents deducted, 
14.20. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 

Death rate per 1 ,000 of population : 
Last week, 15.37; corresponding week 



last year, 15.43. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc. : Under 
one j'ear, 17; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 8; sixty years and over, 134. 
Total deaths: Male, 145; female, 125; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 158; 
deaths of colored, 8. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 


Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 4, 1936. 


Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 5, 1935. 




Cases. 


Deaths. 

i 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


Anterior poliomyelitis 


1 

28 

99 
61 

24 
2 

6 


1 

23 

16 
3 


3 

6 

. 22 

39 

21 

3 

22 








Encephalitis lethargica 




Influenza 


1 


Measles 




Mcnincitis epidemic 




Piioumoniii (lobar) 


13 


Srarlet fever 


1 


Tuberculosis (pulmonary) (3 cases childhood type T. B.) 

Tuberculo-sis (other forms) 


7 


Tvphoid fever , 




W hooping cough 






- 





* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



19 



METHODS OF PUBLIC RELIEF IN YEARS FOLLOWING REVOLUTION AND PRES= 
ENT CONTRASTED — RECORDS OF OLD BOSTON ALMSHOUSE FROM 1768 
TO 1805, NOW BEING CATALOGUED, PRESENT INTERESTING DOCUMEN= 
TARY INFORMATION CONCERNING HABITS AND CUSTOMS OF TIME — 
CITIES AS FAR AWAY AS NEW YORK WERE BILLED FOR COST AND UPKEEP 
OF FORMER RESIDENTS LATER LIVING IN BOSTON. 



(he 



The following article on Public Welfare in former years by the City of Boston has been prepared by 
Board of Public Welfare: 

Records of the old Boston Almshouse from 1768 to 1805 are being catalogued in the office of the Public Wel- 
fare Department, and throw many historical sidelights on the dispensation of pul)lic relief as given in the years 
following the Revolution, whicii were in sharp contrast to the methods of today. 

The records, consisting of a petty ledger, day book, and register, give a vivid and detailed picture of habits 
and customs in the days just following the Revolution. They show that the Almshouse adopted the method, which 
is followed today, of charging the upkeep and maintenance of its guests to outside cities and towns where they had 
previous habitation — a feature now emlx)died in the Settlement Laws of the Conunonwealth. 

The records indicate that the Overseers of those days were hospitable to slaves and to Indians, as well as to 
white residents who had fallen on evil days. Inmates of the Almshouse were not only provided with food, clothing 
and shelter but were given medical care; and even wines and other liquors were provided with great frequency 
for "ye sick." 



The women's clothing seems to have 
been limited to one or two varieties of 
material, and its cost, in view of ex- 
penditures of today, was very modest — 
a little more than a penny a yard for some 
materials. .Apparently, the women were 
giirbed in "baize" in the winter; and in 
.summer they blo.ssomed forth in "callico." 
One entry in 1792 calls for .seventy j-ards 
of "tow cloth" at a pistareen (an old 
Spanish coin amounting to a few cents) a 
yard. .\t another time we find the 
Overst^ers paying eighteen shillings and 
eight pence for a "side of sole leather." 

The men seemed to fare better, for in 
May, 1792, a "hatt" was bought for one 
William Peck for eight shillings, and the 
following day there is an entry in the day 
book — "to a jacket and a pair of breeches 
bought for Peek at twelve shillings." 

Such items as "sand" for the .Almshouse 
floors, thread and pins at eight pence, 
two dozen brooms at six pence each, four 
quires of writing paper at the high cost of 
five shillings and eight pence, and four 
baskets of "charcole," attest to the 
simple housekeeping and business admin- 
istration needs of the early days. 

Rkcords Cat.\logued. 

In cataloguing these old records, John 
J. Bench, Supervisor of the Settlement 
Division, has unearthed a wealth of ma- 
terial of interest to antiquarians as well 
as to relief workers with a flair for re- 
search. 

Mr. Bench has located, through the 
Boston ian Society, the exact sites of the 
first almshouses in Boston, and has dis- 
covered that the primitive colonial at- 
tempts to care for tiie poor and alleviate 
human suffering and the effects of unem- 
ployment were centered in the original 
poorhouse on Park street, opposite the 
Common, erected in 1682. This building 
was burned but later rebuilt, and then 
sold in 1785. .V new almshouse was built 
in 1799 at Barton's Point, and the poor 
were removed to it in 1802, to South 
Boston in 1825, to Deer Island in 1853, 
later to Rainsford Island, and then to 
Ix)ng Island, where the .Almshouse was 
established as a larger and more modem 
institution, as we know it today. 

As a result of delving into the old 
volumes, Mr. Bench has revealed the 
following interesting high lights which 
merely give glimpses of the ways of our 
ancestors in dealing with those whom 



the Over.'seers now call "clients." We 
quote from his notes. 

"The Boston .Mmshouse Register, con- 
taining the adini.ssions and discharges 
from 1768 U) 1788, is probably the 
oldest and most interesting book, for 
this is the period before, during and 
after the Revolutionary War. 

"John Hancock was selectman in 
1768-69 together with Samuel Pem- 
berton, Jo.seph Jjickson, Jonathan Msuson 
and John Scollay. Their names appear 
frequc^ntly in the Register, as one or more 
selectmen signed the orders for admission. 

"Many of those admitted were evi- 
dently dissatisfied with their treatment, 
quarters or food, for in the language of 
the Rt>gi.ster 'they jumpt the fence' — 
meaning they ran away. 

"The records were scanned for any 
reference to the war in 1775, but nothing 
could lie found. No admi.ssions were 
recorded on March 5 or .\i)ril 19; and 
while one man was admitted on June 17, 
no reference to the battle of Bunker Hill, 
then raging in Charlestown just across 
the Charles river, was noted. 

"As to the number of admissions, we 
note that in February, 1796, there were 
9 admissions; in January, 1777, 23; and 
in July, 1788, 35. This would .seem to 
indicate that there was an increase from 
year U) year in the number of applicants 
for relief. 

"Evidently some of the inhabitants of 
Boston were slaveholders during this 
period, as on March 1, 1771, a free negro 
was admitted; on June 15, 1771, (!eorge, 
a negro slave, was taken in; on January 
26, 1773, Cuff, a slave, was admitted; and 
on .lanuarj' 4, 1800, .lohn Houston was 
charged with the board 'of his negro 
woman.' 

".\nother book contains the .Almshouse 
exp<;n.ses from 1792 to 1794, which 
enlightens us as to the food supplied and 
the prices paid in tho.se days. 

"Ox heads were frequently purcha.sed 
at six pence each, presumably to be made 
into .soup. In February, 1794, 63 wen; 
furnished, and on another occasion, 55 
were purchased on one day. 

".About cveiy two months a hogshead 
of molas.ses was .supplied, averaging 125 
gallons, and costing between two and 
three shillings a gallon. This was prob- 
ably used as a .substitute for sugar. 

"Rice, also, was purchased by the cask, 
averaging three hundred pounds each. 



about every month, co.sting five cents a 
pound. Wine, rum and brandy were 
bought 'for j-e sick.' In March, 1794, 
eight gallons of wine wei-e furnished at 
four shillings a gallon, and two gallons of 
West India rum at the same price; but a 
gallon of brandy cost eight shillings. It 
is jOTssiblc that ale was brewed in the 
Almshouse, as malt and hops were 
frequently {)urchased. One entry for 
five bushels of malt was noted, followed 
by thirty pounds of hops. 

"The occasional purchase of turkeys, 
ge(!se and fowl was seen, these items 
probably being for tli(> table of the master 
and his sussistants. The prices of these 
would be interesting to the housekeeper 
of today, for the turkeys cost two to three 
shillings apiece, according to weight; 
geese the same; but fowl cost but a 
shilling apiece. 

"N'egetables were also cheap in price, 
for we note that on October 25, 1793, 
twenty bushels of potatoes cost 32 cents 
a bu.sliel; sixteen bushels of turnips cost 
one shilling; one and a half bushels of 
onions cost one shilling. On November 
7, 1793, there is an item of ten shillings 
for poulti-y and sundries for Thanks- 
giving. 

" Fish must have been plentiful in 
Boston at this time, for about every week 
three hundred pounds of fresh fish was 
purchased at one pence a pound, and 
occasionally salmon at four pence a 
pound. 

"In May, 1792, 'sparrow-grass' was 
served five times, costing five pence on 
each occasion; and we also find greens, 
radishes and watermelon in their season 
at eight pence. 

"The spinning wheels were con.stantly 
in need of repair, as there is frequent 
mention of one shilling four pence for 
'mending spinning wheel.' 

"Religious services were held each 
Sunday in the Almshouse, and we find 
that Rev. Thos. Williams officiated from 
May 30 to July 11, 1803, at .S3 a Sunday; 
Rev. Peter Nurse, August 6, 1803, to 
-April 7, 1804, with the same remunera- 
tion; but Rev. Henry Edes, who officiated 
from April 7, 1804, to April, 1805, re- 
ceived $4 a Sunday, as did Andrew E. 
Thayer and E. Pratt. 

Medical Service. 
"While there was constant demand for 
medical service, and many bills for same 



20 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 11 



arc noted, tlio names of the attending 
doctors were not given. On May 3, 
1S05, the town of Xinalhavcn was charged 
SIO for the removal oi tiie leg of Roger 
Merrithcw in the Almshouse. The town 
of Kandoli)h was charged SO 'for curing 
Mary Cole and two children of tiie itch.' 

"On January 25, 1803, Jas. Lovcring 
& Co. was paid .S23.(>1 for two hundred 
jiounds of tallow, which made 59'. pounds 
of candles. This item reminds us that 
candles were ])r()l)al)ly tlie only lights 
in use at that time, ami also testifies to 
the economy of the Overseers in having 
the candles made in the Almshouse 
instead of purchasing them. 

"We are reminded in the Alm.shouse 
petty ledger, 1795 to 1805, that Maine 
was then part of Massachusetts, and 
that Portland, Bath, Kittery, Hallowcll 
and other towns were charged for the 
board of inmates of the Almshouse who 
were settled in those towns. 

"New York City was also billed, and 
paid for the burial of a body who had 
.settlement there. The cost of burial 
for adults was S7, and board in the Alms- 
house was charged at S2 a week. 

"There is no mention of salaries paid 
to employees, except that Polly Dunn 
on October 21, 1793, was paid three 
pounds twenty-four shillings for twenty- 
four weeks' service at three shillings a 
week. This petty ledger is signed 
March 8, 1805, 'Errors Excepted', by 
Constant Freeman, Master of Almshouse." 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS. 



ADDITIONS TO CONTRACT. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Rugo Construction Company, Incorpo- 
rated, has been allowed to add to the 
contract for the Shurtleff Intermediate 
School as per the following: Furnish and 
install two (2) tie rods in each lunchroom 
table top, 146 tops in all, for the sum of 
$238.48; and the amount of S238.48 will 
be added therefor, making the account 
as follows: Contract price, S636,800; 
total additions, $8,933.23; amount of 
contract, $645,733.23. 

URBAN POPULATION. APRIL 1, MM. 

As defined by the Census Bureau, the 
urban population is, in general, that re- 
siding in cities and other incorporated 
places having 2,500 inhabitants or more, 
the remainder being classified as rural. 

The total urban population of the 
United St.«es is 68,954,823 (34,154,760 
males and 34,800,063 females), of whom 
62,836,605 (31,162,570 males and 31,674,- 
035 females) are white; of these whites 
52,109,746 (25,520,483 males and 26,589,- 
263 females) are native; 33,497,232 (16,- 
515,816 males and 16,981,416 females) of 
these latter are of native parentage and 
18,612,514 (9,004,667 males and 9,607,847 
females) are of foreign or mixed parent- 
age; there are 10,726,859 (5,642,087 males 
and 5,084,772 females) foreign-bom 
white; there are 5,193,913 (2,479,158 males 
and 2,714,755 females) Negroes; other 
races, 924,305 (513,032 males and 411,273 
females). 

The urban population is 56.2 per cent 
of the total population of the country; 
native white, 54.6 per cent and foreign- 
born white, 80.3 per cent; Negroes, 43.7 
per cent. 

The total urban population of New 
England is 6,311,976 or 77.3 per cent of 
the total population of New England. 
Of the 4,660,339 native white, 2,089,031 
are of native parentage and 2,571,308 are 
of foreign or mixed parentage; foreign- 
born whites number 1,564,769; Negro, 
81,443; other races, 5,425. 



Pi lu.ic W 
Joseph B. Fi 
extension of the 
contract for re 
.Mbany .street 
from December 
1936. 

W. 11. Ellis 
been granted a 
time of eomph 
reconstructing i 
from Decemi)er 
1936. 



ORKS DeI'AUTMENT. 

ish has been granted an 

time of comjiletion of the 

])airing high platf(jrm at 

disposal station, Boston, 

29, 1935, to February 1, 

<fe Son CJompany have 
further extension of the 
tion of the contract for 
md improving ferrv i)iers 
28, 1935, to Januarv 25, 



1934 PAVING BRICK SHIPMENTS DOUBLE 
1933. 

According to reports received in De- 
cember by the National Paving Brick 
Association, Washington, D. C, the total 
shipments of paving brick used in 1934 
were expected to attain a total of 
125,000,000, at least double the quantity 
used in brick pavements in 1933. 0. W. 
Renkert, of Canton, Ohio, president of 
the association, accounts for this 100 per 
cent increase over the previous year by 
citing several factors responsible for ex- 
panding the use of vitrified brick as a 
street and highway surfacing material. 
The construction of widened arteries of 
traffic in and through municipalities has 
been favorable to the heavy-duty type of 
pavement, such as brick. Relief to traffic 
is provided where there is the most con- 
gestion, and employment is afforded in 
poulated districts where distress is the 
greatest. 



36,000 TRAFFIC DEATHS IN 1934. 

The automobile casualty toll for 1934 
was 36,000 persons killed in 882,000 
personal-injury collisions on streets and 
highways, according to the Travelers 
Insurance Company'. Pedestrians ac- 
counted for 44 per cent of the fatalities. 

The death gain was 16 per cent against 
an increase of only 6 per cent in regis- 
trations and gasolene consumption. Fast 
driving is given as the dominant factor. 
Alcohol is known to have figured with 
3.16 per cent of the drivers and 4.46 per 
cent of the pedestrians, compared with 
2.43 and 2.99 per cent respectively in 
1933. 

Despite figures indicating that nine out 
of ten cars involved in accidents were in 
good condition, three out of every four 
cars inspected were found to be defective, 
says the report. Defects were as follows : 
Brakes bad on 29 per cent of the cars; 
tires fair to poor on 56 per cent; lamps 
needed adjustment or replacement on 
63 per cent. 



CITIES MAY SHARE VIRGINIA LIQUOR 
PROFITS. 

Virginia cities are likely to have a 
new source of revenue if the state con- 
tinues to pile up profits at the present 
rate. The liquor control act gives them 
two-thirds of the profits above $1,675,000 
per year after deducting sums for creat- 
ing a surplus up to 81,000,000. Profits 
from the liquor stores, says the United 
States Municipal News, have upset all 
previous estimates and "have con- 
founded, as well, estimates of the mem- 
bers of the A. B. C. Board themselves 
who at the outset of the state's experi- 
ment said they feared no profits at all 
would result during the first year of 
operation." 



CLAIMS DISAPPROVED. 

The Law Department has disapproved 
thirtj'-three claims against the City of 
Boston. These claims are classified as 
follows: 

Building Department, one claim ; Fire 
Department, two claims; Hospital De- 
partment, two claims; Institutions De- 
partment, one claim ; Park Department, 
five claims; Penal Institutions Depart- 
ment, one claim; Public Works Depart- 
ment, nineteen claims; Traffic Commis- 
sion, one claim; Welfare Department, 
one claim. 



BOSTON AS A TOWN. 

From its foundation until 1755, or a 
period of 125 years, Boston was not only 
the most outstanding but the most 
populous town in the American colonies 
In 1760, Philadelphia's population wa 
ahead, viz., 18,756, Boston's then beinj 
15,631 and New York's about 14,00( 
In the last year of town govemmen" 
viz., 1821, Boston's population was about 
45,000 and its public debt $100,000, aii 
incuiTed for new county buildings. 

The history of Boston as a town dur- 
ing a period of nearly two centurie 
surpasses in dvic interest that of Bostoi 
as a city because of the untiring zea' 
and successful efforts of its townsmen iu 
realize more of {,v^^i democracy than had 
ever been attained before. Their obliga- 
tions were held as sacred as their liber* 
ties. 



RECREATION, ADEQUATE AS TO KIND 
AND AVAILABILITY. 

Although the ratio of park acreage to 
population has been used as the simplest 
measure of the extent to which citiea 
provide areas 'for the recreation of their 
people, it is by no means an accurate 
basis for determining this. If most of 
the total acreage is in one large park, if 
the parks are poorly distributed, or if 
they do not provide varioua types of 
recreation facilities, the park system may 
be inefficient even though the acreage 
is large. The efficiently planned park 
and recreation system will involve 
balanced relationship and well-distributed 
location of several types of properties, 
namely, children's playgrounds, neigh- 
borhood playfield parks, neighborhood 
parks, reservations, boulevards, and park- 
ways. 

(Bureau of Labor Statistics, Publica- 
tion No. 462.) 



LOW FATALITY RATE IN PROVIDENCE. 

The fatality rate in Providence in 
1934 was the lowest in all the years 
since modern traffic problems have 
existed, according to figures compiled 
by the city's traffic bureau. It is be- 
lieved that the activity herein described 
was one of the many which have con- 
tributed toward this result. Certainly, 
if speeds can be consistently held down 
or reduced, there is small doubt that 
accidents will be decreased. 

Traffic authorities in Providence de- 
cided in 1932 that a plan of monthly 
"sampling" of vehicular speeds by actual 
measurements be carried out, covering 
about fifty-four locations, none of which 
should be in congested traffic. This sys- 
tem was worked out and tested in that 
year, and has been in full operation 
during 1933 and 1934. 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



21 



ANNUAL ADDRESS OF MAYOR MANSFIELD. 



City Borrowings. 

While the city borrowfed approximately 810,000,000 
for welfare purposes in 1935 and must to some extent 
make borrowings for this purpose in 1936 unless whole- 
sale discharges or payouts are to be countenanced, it 
is worthy of note that the borrowings by the cit}' in 
1934 and 1935 were less than the borrowings by the 
city in the year of 1933 alone; that large amounts of 
debt have been retired in both 1934 and 1935, a fact 
frequently overlooked by critics; and that the net 
funded debt of the city is now less than when I took 
office on January 1, 1934. 

That the credit of the city has improved in the 
last two years is evidenced to some extent by the 
fact that interest on temporary loans has decreased 
from an average of 4.03 per cent in 1933 to 1.55 per 
cent in 1934 and .85 per cent in 1935 — and the 
interest requirements of the city for temporary borrow- 
ings were approximately $600,000 less in 1935 than in 
1933. Moreover, interest rates on long term borrow- 
ings have decreased from an average rate of 4.32 per 
cent in 1933 to 3.29 per cent in 1934 and 2.36 per cent 
in 1935. 

B. Temporary Relief for the Unemployed. 

In my annual message to your Honorable Body in 
1935, 1 stated that: 

"It is my purpose, however, to secure for the em- 
ployment of residents of Boston a fair and adequate 
share of all Federal funds granted for relief purposes. 
Through my repeated efforts more than 15,000 Boston 
residents heretofore unemployed are now employed 
on E. R. A. projects and new projects will provide for 
the employment of 7,000 more. So long as the Federal 
Emergency Relief Administration continues to operate 
I shall do all in my power to have formulated, and to 
supply materials for projects adequate to provide for 
all persons that the funds provided will employ. 
It is my purpose to see to it that these projects will be 
of real value to the city." 

In May of 1934, when the Federal Emergenc}^ 
Relief Administration commenced work in Boston, 
8,544 persons were cared for on works projects. I 
have, since that time, made every effort to secure a 
maximum of Federal funds for the assistance of Boston 
residents. 

Constant contact with Washington officials has 
been essential and, while we have not received all 
the assistance for which I hoped and to which I believe 
we are entitled, we have secured from time to time 
increased funds for employment in Boston so that by 
December of 1934 the number of employed was in- 
creased to 13,831, in June of 1935 to 26,923 and at 
present more than 27,000 persons are employed. 

To further this work and to secure projects which 
would be of real benefit to the city, I caused to be 
formed a board, known as the Works Projects Board, 
to develop, coordinate and prepare for submission 
to the Fed-ral Government useful and needed projects. 

■This boa; ' jirepared both a Public Works and 
a Works Prcj-cts program. Projects were submitted 
to the Federal Government amply sufficient to employ 
usefull, :ill unemployed persons in the city capable of 
employment. 

While the >\'deral Government has not provided 
work for all employables on our welfare roll and the 
city has been obhged to expend over .11,000,000 
in 1935 for materials to be used on these projects, 



(Continued from page 17.) 

there can be no doubt that the rehef rolls of the city 
have been saved from greater burdens, that a vast 
amount of useful work has been done for the city' 
and that the lot of thousands of men and women 
has been materially reheved pending what I hope 
will soon be their absorption into private employment. 



C. Public Improvements. 

Many improvements have been made during the 
last two years, all of which tend to make Boston a 
better place in which to live and conduct business. 
These improvements were made possible partly by 
]-:. R. A., P. W' . A. and W. P. A. funds and partly 
by city funds, but they are so numerous that I shall 
take the liberty of calling some of them to your atten- 
tion. 

One hundred and fifty new streets were accepted 
by the city and constructed in various sections of 
Boston, covering approximately twelve miles in length. 
Ten main traffic arteries were entirely reconstructed, 
covering approximately twelve additional miles in 
length. These latter arteries include Alford street 
in Charlestown, Savin Hill avenue, Adams street 
and Ashmont street in Dorchester, Old Colony avenue 
in South Boston and Dorchester; Walk Hill street 
in Mattapan; Hyde Park avenue in Hyde Park; 
Southampton street in Roxbury; La Grange street 
in West Roxbury and Woodrow avenue in Dorchester. 

Northern Avenue Bridge, connecting Boston Proper 
and South Boston, has been reconstructed; Chelsea 
North Bridge, connecting Boston and Chelsea, has 
been repaired and strengthened; substantial repairs 
have been made on both the Summer Street Bridge 
across Fort Point Channel and the Granite Avenue 
Bridge between Boston and Milton. Preparations 
are now being made for a new Chelsea Street Bridge 
connecting East Boston and Chelsea. This new 
bridge is to have a roadway seventy feet in width 
with a hundred-foot draw span sufficiently wide to 
accommodate the passage of any vessel Ukely to use 
Chelsea creek. 

Many open brooks, such as Stony brook in West 
Roxbury, Shephard brook in Brighton, Tenean creek 
in Dorchester and Maywoods brook in Roxbury, 
have been confined to underground conduits for the 
purpose of preventing the continuance of past recur- 
ring floods and the damages which those floods create. 

The existing high force water service system in 
Roxbury has been reinforced by more than three miles 
of forty-eight inch steel water pipe and six thousand 
feet of forty-eight inch steel water pipe has been laid 
in Brookhne avenue to replace pipe laid there in 1860. 

In addition, almost eleven miles of pipe have been 
laid in various parts of Boston to strengthen the 
water system. 

Ash removal contractors have been notified that 
they must comply with their contracts and that they 
can no longer insist on barrels being carried for them 
by householders to and from the sidewalk. 

A new white way has been set up on Washington 
street between Stuart street and Broadway. Modern 
concrete posts with better lighting have been pro- 
vided on Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park, and im- 
proved fighting service has been furnished on Ben- 
nington street. East Boston. 

The East Boston Airport has been enlarged, sur- 
faced, drained and developed, and its area increased 
and longer runways provided. A modern flood fight- 



22 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 11 



ing system is now installed and a seaplane runway has 
boon perfected adequate for the needs of modern 
seaplanes. 

The CJeorge A\'ii}i;ht (!olf C.'ourse will be ready for 
opening in 193G as one of the finest courses in the 
Connnonwealth. A rough wild tract of land, useless 
for building purposes, has been converted into land 
of use and beauty — a distinct improvement to the 
neighborhood and a self-sui)porting enterprise. 

Alany improvements have tx^en made both in the 
larger and smaller parks and playgrounds. Walks 
have been resurfaced, areas graded, tennis courts 
built, seats installed, drainage and irrigation systems 
installed. Baseball diamonds have been laid out 
and marsh lands reclaimed. Every effort has been 
made to develop open spaces in congested sections 
of the city and these efforts have tended to improve 
entire neighborhoods. 

Extensive gymnastic programs have been put in 
operation and swimming instruction given daily at 
city beaches and swimming pools. Despite the wide 
expanse of our beaches, not one fatality occurred in 
1935. 

The planting of 8,250 trees has tended to beautify 
many streets and a new wading pool in Hyde Park, 
the first of its kind in this section of the country, 
has furnished recreation and relief to children and a 
resting spot for mothers. 

Prior to 1934, Faneuil Hall Market was heated 
by contract from a State street building. We have 
since installed there a new heating plant at an esti- 
mated saving to the city of about $4,000 a year. 

No thorough renovation of the Quincy Market 
has been made in one hundred and ten years. As 
a result, this important historic and income-pro- 
ducing property had structural and sanitary defects 
so serious that its renovation became essential. This 
work is now being undertaken. 

Much attention has been given the Deer Island 
House of Correction in the last two years. With 
inmate labor the Roman Catholic chapel has been 
renovated and redecorated in appropriate style and an 
Episcopal chapel established. One room of the insti- 
tution has been remodeled and refinished and is now 
used by the inmates for the first time as a library. 
Machine, electric and paint shops, and a stocking shop 
have been constructed with inmate labor. Every 
effort is being made to provide facilities for inmates to 
render useful service. 

Fire prevention work has been vigorously under- 
taken during the past two years. School Depart- 
ment cooperation has been obtained and over 500,000 
inspections have been made to eliminate fire hazards. 
It is pleasing to note that the fire loss for 1934 in Boston, 
the last year for which figures are available, is the lowest 
in any year since 1912 and represents a reduction of 
almost fifty per cent of the losses of but a few years ago. 

AVelfare Department activities have been decen- 
tralized to bring its services to people in the com- 
munities in which they live and eleven district offices 
have been established in abandoned city buildings or 
in other city properties. 

To guard against frauds, reregistration has been 
required, accurate records insisted on, skilled em- 
ployees retained and prosecutions of abuses vigorouslj' 
maintained. 

The Wayfarers' Lodge and the Temporary Home 
for Women have been rehabilitated, the city's rights 
to reimbursement from the state and other munici- 
palities enforced and every effort made to assist 
recipients to obtain private employment. 



During the past year I have vigorously protested 
against increased rates proposed by the Boston Con- 
solidated (Jas Company and, through the Law Depart- 
ment, presented an elaborate analysis of the position 
of that company and the effect of the proposed rates 
upon consumers. 

Great progress has been made in the business of the 
Port of Boston through the past year. The domestic 
business of the port has steadily increased. In 1935 
our port once again has become an important dis- 
tributing point for inbound grain. From July 1, 1935, 
to date approximately 30,000,000 pounds of wool have 
been handled over Boston piers as compared with 
some 4,000,000 pounds for a similar period last year. 
Three new steamship companies now participate in 
the trade of the port and five have improved their 
services. 

These are but some of the achievements of the 
past two years. They show definite accomplishment, 
but there are many things yet to be done. I shall, 
therefore, devote myself briefly to a discussion of some 
of my plans for the immediate future. 

II. THE IMMEDIATE FUTURE. 

One of the major problems which confronted me as 
a new Mayor was the task of assisting to make Boston 
again a prosperous city. It is still a major problem, 
although business conditions have improved. The 
stimulation of business and industrial activity are 
essential to local recovery. As a correlated fact, 
business recovery is the only permanent means of 
reducing unemployment and its incidental cost. 

I propose to aid this recovery by inaugurating a 
financial plan for Boston. Its purpose will be to 
stabiHze tax and debt conditions so that home owners 
and business enterprises may confidently look to 
Boston as a favorable place in which to live and do 
business. In this program the city must have the 
cooperation of the county, schools and state. 

The tendency of the times of closing eyes to un- 
mistakable trends evident in our community will 
delay recovery. We should realize that these trends 
indicate that attention must be centered on retaining 
present residents and business and creating a situation 
which will stimulate commercial activity and restore 
real estate values. 

A. Borrowing. 

As the first step in launching this rehabilitation 
program, I propose to reduce substantiallv the net debt 
in 1936. During the year we will retire §8,627,000 
of funded debt. It will be my purpose to limit new 
indebtedness to the amount required for P. W. A. 
projects heretofore authorized, but not issued, together 
with a limited amount for welfare loans. The latter 
will be limited to an amount substantially less than 
half of this year's loans. 

During the next five years Boston will retire 
$37,000,000 of its present bonded indebtedness. If 
this policy is followed in subsequent years and new 
issues limited to emergencies, it should be possible to 
reduce the bonded debt to a point where future borrow- 
ings could be eliminated altogether, and the city 
placed on a pay-as-you-go basis. This would save 
millions in interest payments. 

B. Taxation. ' 

The city will do its part to keep the tax rate at $37 
per $1,000 of assessed valuation in 1936 the same 
as in 1935, despite reduced assessed valuations. In 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



23 



this move the city vdW need the cooperation of all 
taxing units whose rates are included in this cumu- 
lative tax levy. In 1935 the portion of the city levy 
required for city debt service and maintenance pur- 
poses was $22.58, for school maintenance S9.35, for 
the city's share of the state tax $2.93, and for county 
debt and maintenance .$2.14. 

To accomplish these ends, that is, to decrease sub- 
stantially borrowings and yet keep the tax rate from 
rising despite decreasing valuations, an increase in 
sources of revenue other than the real estate tax 
must be developed and substantial retrenchments 
made. New revenues, to some extent, are expected 
from the Commonwealth while other funds will be 
obtained by more strenuous collection of available 
income or by the revision of existing sources. Re- 
trenchments to be recommended will be such as can 
most readily be made to meet the demands of the 
situation. I do not intend to effect salary reductions 
for or discharges of permanent employees. City 
employees are not being paid excessive salaries. Money 
paid to them for services performed is an important 
factor in the business life of the comnumity. The 
dollar spent by a city employee is just as important 
to the merchant as that spent by any other individual. 
When retrenchments are made, there may be some 
inconvenience resulting, but there will be no material 
loss in needed municipal services. 

Of course, if new sources of revenue are providetl 
by the Conuuonwealth in sufficient amount to enable 
a decrease in the tax rate, .such decrease will be made. 

C. Budget Control. 

To as.sist in accomplishing these ends, I have in- 
structed the City Auditor to set up an allotment 
system to control expenditures during the six months 
prior to the passage of the 1936 budget. Depart- 
mental encumbrances will be controlled by limiting 
them on a quarterly basis. A sum less than the 
1935 expenditure record will be taken as the basis 
for determining allotments. This is an important 
step forward in establishing budgetary control. It 
should eliminate overspending during the first six 
months' period, and maintain stability throughout 
the year by planning and limiting expenditures. 

D. Reorganization. 

There are at the pre.sent time forty-six separate 
departments in the city government and 135 depart- 
ment heads. Many of these departments perform 
similar functions and yet, because of the nmltiplicitj' 
of departments, many improvements in one depart- 
ment are unknown to others and much of the benefit 
of the experiences of one department is lost to other 
departments performing similar functions. This set- 
up is antiquated and inadequate. There are ten 
executive departments in Washington; there are 
twenty in the Commonwealth. Many large cities 
operate with from five to fifteen departments. It 
is obvious that a consolidation of departments is 
essential for the proper and efficient administration 
of city affairs. 

I recently submitted to the City Council a plan 
of reorganization of the engineering departments of 
the city. This plan was prepared by a committee 
appointed at my request by President Compton of 
the Ma.s.sachusetts Institute of Technology. Its merits 
lie in the coordination of engineering activities, the 
elimination of unnece.ssary duplication and better 
arrangement of functions. It should enable far more 
economical administration through the facilities af- 



forded for more coordinated planning and activity, 
through the lessening of the necessity for filling va- 
cancies in the event of death or retirement of em- 
ployees, and through the improvement in the service 
rendered to the public. 

I shall resubmit this plan to your Honorable Body 
in the near future. 



E. New Legislation. 
(I.) New Revenues and Relief from the State Tax. 

At present the city nuist include in its tax rate 
approximately three dollars representing the tax 
assessed upon it by the Commonwealth. This state 
tax ultimately imposed on real estate should be elim- 
inated or new revenues provided the city by the state 
to compensate therefor. The Commonwealth should 
also share the burden of financing relief as tlo many of 
the other states and I will support again a measure 
to accomplish this end. Borrowing for relief places a 
mortgage upon the future. The state has within its 
power the means of financing a substantial portion of 
the annual cost through currently collected revenue. 
Such a step would .substantially reduce debt require- 
ments now burdening real estate and pay the cost from 
the increased bu.siness re.sulting from the disbursement 
of millions to relief recipients. 

(2.) Revision of the Tax Limitation Provisions Affecting 
Boston. 

The special commission on municipal finance estab- 
lished by the C.eneral Court in 1935 has recommended 
the abolition of the present tax limitation upon Boston. 
The present law is ob.solete and should be revised so 
as to enable the early adoption of a city budget and 
so as to make positive budgetary control in Boston a 
reality. The report of the commission clearly pointed 
out that present legislative control over school and 
municipal appropriations is more of a handicap to 
sound financing than a safeguard. 

The absolute veto power over school appropriations 
recommended will, if enacted, enable a mayor to pro- 
tect more effectively the city's finances for which he is 
now held politically responsible and will place the 
Mayor of Boston in a position with reference to school 
appropriations more ckxsely analogous to the position 
of the mayors of other cities of the Commonwealth. 

(3.) Discount for Early Tax Payment. 

At the present time property taxes are payable one 
half in July and one half in November. No penalty, 
however, is imposed for failure to pay in July. The 
result is that July collections are relatively small and 
the city must continue as heretofore to borrow sub- 
stantial sums in anticipation of revenue. Money may 
be borrowed at low interest rates for the time being 
but even now interest payments for temporary borrow- 
ings are .substantial. I shall recommend to the Legis- 
lature that a slight discount be allowed for payment 
on July 1, the amount of the discount to be less than 
the interest which the city must pay on temporary 
loans but sufficient to serve as an incentive to early 
payment. In this way temporary borrowings may be 
curtailed and the savings passed on to the taxpayers. 

Ultimately we must look to the day when taxes will 
be paid at the beginning of the year and not at the 
end, but legislation for this must cover a .substantial 
period of time so as not to work undue hardship on 
the taxpayer. The potential savings to taxpayers in 
early payment through the elimination of temporary 
borrowings is tremendous. Interest payments on 



24 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 11 



temporary loans from 1925 through 1934 cost the 
taxpayers of Boston approximately $3,275,000. 

(4.) Revision of Assessment Procedure. 

Other improvements are needed to modernize 
Boston's financial structure. 'WTiile no definite legis- 
lative program has been formulated at this date cor- 
recting these weaknesses, I call them to your attention. 

The present assessment procedure is cumbersome, 
and prevents the city from beginning any fiscal year 
with a definite financial program. Moreover, it en- 
courages abatement litigation. Boston's method of 
assessment should be worked out on a scientific and 
modern basis and I expect to be able to accomplish 
this during the coming year with the assistance and 
cooperation of experts in this field from Harvard and 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ^Yhen 
this is accompUshed, I shall seek the enactment of 
legislation which will enable the completion of assess- 
ments and the finaUty of valuations prior to the first 
day of each new fiscal year. While a Board of Tax 
Appeals with machinery to review decisions of the 
assessors would be maintained, it is my belief that if 
a scientific method of assessment is adopted, the Legis- 
lature can limit the time for hearing appeals in such a 
way that all appeals can be adequately disposed of 
before the commencement of a fiscal year. The pres- 
ent practice of including an item of 2 per cent or 2| per 
cent of the total appropriation for "overlay," which is 
used primarily for rebates made after the taxes are 
le\ded, adds to the tax burden of those who receive no 
adjustments. Any adjustments in assessed valua- 
tions should be made before the tax rate is established, 
then the city will know its tax base and the tax rate 
will fall equitably upon all taxpayers. 

F. Collections. 

While tax collections improved during 1935, the 
accumulated burden of dehnquency is heavy. Prompt 
action must and will be taken to reduce the outstanding 
delinquency. I intend to emphasize this activity 
from the very beginning of this year and to set up a 
definite program of action. There is no desire upon 
our part to use force in collection. Every cooperation 
possible will be offered to delinquents but no con- 
cessions will be made which would penalize the prompt 
taxpayer. I reahze that economic conditions are 
responsible for much of the delinquency and will be 
sympathetic with those who show any effort to work 
out a plan of payments. The task of tax collector is 
not a pleasant one but a necessary function if the 
credit of Boston is to be maintained. 



Q. Relief for the Unemployed. 

We have already commenced on a new program 
of work relief for the unemployed with the cooperation 
of the Federal (government. This program is one of 
useful and needed works for the city. 

No effort will be spared by me in securing for 
Boston residents the fullest share possible of Federal 
funds for the relief of the unemployed and in seeing 
to it that those funds are devoted to worth-while uses. 



H. Port of Boston. 

In my annual address to your Honorable Body 
in 1935, I stated: 

"I shall, in addition, endeavor to upset the control 
of the New England railroads by the Pennsylvania 
Railroad and shall strive to .secure local control of 
New England roads or in the event of national con- 
solidation of railroads, a consohdation that will be 
favorable to Boston and New England to the end 
that the Port of Boston may become a thriving and 
flourishing port and receive the full benefit of its 
natural advantages." 

Progress has been made along this fine in the past 
year despite unexpected opposition. I shall continue 
the struggle against outside domination of our rail- 
roads during the coming year and continue to lend 
full support and assistance to the efforts of the Boston 
Port Authority in building the business of our port. 



Conclusion. 

Gentlemen, I have discussed at some length the 
accomplishments of the past two years and the prob- 
lems, past and present, of our city. The City of Boston 
is a great public ser\dce corporation, the activities 
of which touch everj^ phase of social and economic 
hfe in the community and are vital to the welfare of 
every inhabitant. Boston has much to boast of, yet, 
we must not assume that it can exist on its accom- 
phshments. I intend to follow, and I am sure you will 
join in following, a positive program which will recog- 
nize the problems facing us and meet them squarely. 
It is our first responsibility to see that every aid is 
extended to improve the government of this city. 
Improved government will aid business. Better busi- 
ness means a progressive Boston. 

Boston must go forward or backward. The direc- 
tion rests partially in our hands. Each of us must 
do our part and ask all others to cooperate in the 
endeavor and in a united effort to make Boston a 
better place in which to Hve and work. 



MAYOR MANSFIELD WITHIN 
RIGHTS IN FINANCE COM- 
MISSION MATTER. 

Upon January 7 the Mayor issued 
the following statement: 

The intemperate tone of the state- 
ment of the Finance (yommission makes 
it unnecessary for me to reply except- 
ing to that part wherein I am accused 
of violating the law and of intimidating 
witnesses. 

I am advised by the Corporation 
Counsel that I was completely within 
my rights in declining to give in ad- 
vance to tlie City Council information 
about snow-removal equipment bids. 
Furthermore, Councilor Dowd in a speech 
to the Council upon that occasion stated 
that never since he had been a member 
of the Council had any such information 

I .J„™.>.,^orI r.f n Mnvnr nnd that 



unless the charter was changed that my 
position was entirely sound. 

The other statement that requires .at- 
tention is that I imposed the restriction 
that no records of the city could be 
examined by the Finance Comnassion 
unless my "personal representative sat 
in on the investigation" and that this 
was done to intimidate city employees. 
I never had a personal representative 
before any investigation of the Finance 
Commission. A member of the Law 
Department of tlie City of Boston was 
there in custody of the records. No 
one was intimidated nor was there any 
intention to intimidate any one. 



ASSESSMENTS ABATED. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
vote of the Board of Street Commis- 

sinnprs of tlip Cif v nf Bn^tnn • 



In the matter of the applications for 
revision of assessments levied on account 
of the construction of sewerage works, 
the Board of Street Commissioners, 
acting under the provisions of chapter 
359 of the Acts of the year 1896, and 
deeming it just and proper that such 
action should be taken on said appli- 
cations. 

Ordered, That the amounts hereafter 
specified, being the annual apportion- 
ments of said assessments for the years 
specified below, be, and the same are 
hereby abated: 

Avard L. Porter et al. Lots 34 and 35, 
Savannah avenue. 1923-15, assessed 
December 5, 1923. 1933 apportionment. . $5 32 

Wilfred E and Rose E. Jansen, Lots 
20-21-22, High view avenue, assessed 
May 23, 1930, 1930-33, 1934 apportion- 
ment 23 28 

Sarah Mahoney, Lot 2, Myrtlebank avenue, 
1926-16, assessed December 20, 1926, 

inS.'i nnnnrti'nnnipnt. 10 08 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



25 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Advertises for proposals for addition 
and alterations to the English High 
School. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to the full amount of 
the contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Department of School Buildings, 
11 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
?5,000, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 14, at 
2 p. m. 

Public Works Department. 

.\dvertises for proposals for construct- 
ing a water pipe trestle and fender at the 
Chelsea Bridge North. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to the 
full amount of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Public Works Depart- 
ment, Room 508, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $1,500, to be filed at 
the sjime office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 21, al 12 m. 

PuBuc Works Department (Sanitary 
Service). 

Advertises for proposals for dredging 
dock at garbage dump station at Albany 
street, Boston. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to the full 
amount of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Public Works Depart- 
ment, Room 508, City Hall .\nnex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .?200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 13, at 12 to; 

School Committee. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
interfolded paper towels and roll towels 
for the Boston public schools. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Business Manager, 
School Committee, 15 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of -SlOO, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January I4, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
fK'ncils, pen.s, penholders, chalk, ink and 
other items for the public schools. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Business 
Manager. School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
.Vuditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 21, al 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
paper, blank books and envelopes for the 



public schools. Surety bond will be | 
required in a sum equivalent to 50 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Business Manager, School 
Committee, 15 Beacon street, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of .llOO, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 22, at 
12 m. 

Supply Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
flour to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for propo.sals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall .\nnex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .$300, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 17, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
meats to the various city departments. 
Suiety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for propo.sals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .$300, to be filed at 
the .same oflTice. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 20, al 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
fruits and vegetables to the various 
city departments. Surety Iwnd will be 
required in a sum ecjuivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposiils may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $300, to be filed at the siime office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City .Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 21, at 12 m. 

.Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
hay, grain and straw to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, lioston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duphcate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 22, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
butter, eggs, etc., to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $300, to be filed at the same office, 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 22, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
two f)ortable air compressors for the 
Water Division of the Public Works 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 



office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of .1300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, Jajiuary 23, at 
12 m. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, January 9: 

Assessing Department. 

The following named have been ap- 
pointed temporary street clerks, for a 
period of forty-five working days, effec- 
tive January 2, at $4 a day: 

Fred A. Bithoney, Henry L. Brady, 
James A. Colahan, Fred J. Connell, Jr., 
William H. Fitzpatrick, M. Francis 
Flynn, Frederick S. Flynn, John J. Flynn, 
Daniel Hartnetfc, Michael H. King, Henry 
W. Maguire, Edward J. McCarthy, 
William C. McNary, Thomas Morrissey, 
Mathias T. O'Malley, Samuel L .Pearl, 
George J. Philpott, Joseph M. Scanlin, 
Bernard L. Watson, Charles Williams. 

Auditing Dhpartment. 

The following changes in ratings for 
two employees have been approved: 

Thomas M. Lannon, from disburse- 
ment and draft clerk, to chief of dis- 
bursement section. 

Martin A. Fulton, from clerk to assist- 
ant chief of disbursement section. 

Department of School Buildings. 
Approval has been given for the em- 
ployment of the following-named per- 
sons as clerks of work: J. Francis 
Roemer, John B. Barry, Joseph M. 
Norton. 

Health Department. 
Approval has been given for the pro- 
motion of Delia Trayers from cleaner 
at S14 a week to cleaner at $18 a week, 
vice Catherine Lawton, promoted. 

Hospital Department. 

The following persons have been em- 
ployed at the Boston City Hospital dur- 
ing the week ending Thursday, January 
9: 

To Fill Vacancy. 

Permanent. — Dr. Charles Bradford, 
resident surgeon, $1,000 a year. 

Temporary. — Thomas Freeley, eleva- 
torman, $16 a week; Mary Ernest, 
clerk, .S16 a week; Phillip Fay, super- 
visor, $32 a week; John McDonell, fire- 
man, $41.50 a week; Mary Olsen, Mar- 
garet McLean, clerks, $16 a week; James 
Meehan, porter, $17.50 a week; Wilham 
Jordan, fireman, $41.50 a week; A.Kath- 
erine Daly, technician, $25 a week; 
Dr. Charles Freed, resident physician, 
$1,000 a year; Samuel Odiorne, male 
nurse, $32 a week. 

The following changes have occurred: 

Dr. George Mullen, assistant resident 
surgeon at $1,200 to temporary resident 
surgeon at $1,500 a year. 

Special Nurses: Josephine Boisvert, 
Margaret Eiifczgilbbons, Rita Hurfey, Riichr 
ard Gillis, Harry Plenty, Viola McAdam, 
Mae Bowdering, Elizabeth Healey, Sara 
McCaigue, Georgia LeBlanc, Mary 
Deane, Genevieve Ploski. 



26 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 11 



South Department. 

Henry Swim, kitchcnman, temporary, 
$17.50 a week; Dorothy Haines, special 
nurse, $4.50 a day. 

Nurses employed at $12.50 a month: 
Mary Alden, Mary Cutress, Edna 
E>urkoe, Eleanor McDermott, Mar>' Mc- 
Grath, Rose Noamy, Ada Butterfield, 
Ruth CarLson, Veronica Jordan, Dorothy 
McDormott, Franulia Matthews, Mar- 
garet Sullivan, Evelyn Coakley, Miriam 
Denzer, Frances LaRock, Dorothy Mc- 
Grade, Rita Moriarty, Sophie Young. 

Hospital Dkpartmext (Sanatorium 
Division). 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division dur- 
ing the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ai-y 9 : 

Mazie Maclntyre, Elizabeth Cough- 
lin, Sally Quirk, nurses, $1,020 a year; 
Heniy Gutterman, choreman (tempo- 
rary), S14 a week; Diego Pedione, chore- 
man, 817.50 a week ; James Tobin, chore- 
man (temporary), S17^ a week; Thomas 
Thompson, Charles Williams, night su- 
jjervisors (temporary), $4 a night; Jo- 
seph Coveney, John O'Connor, John 
Daly, Michael Connors, Lena DeSolo, 
maids (patients) (temporarjO, $240 a 
year; John O'Connor, Joseph Merciante, 
Sydney McQueen, John Crafts, male 
nurses (patients) (temporarjO, $480 a 
year; Paul Curtis, night super\'isor (tem- 
porary), S4 a night; Timothy F. Keane, 
watchman, $25 a week. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed: 

Mazie Maclntyre, Elizabeth Coughlin, 
Sally Quirk, nurses (temporary), $1,020 
a year; Henry Gutterman, Robert Bu- 
bear, choremen (temporary), $17.50 a 
week; Samuel H. Cohn, M. D., resident 
medical officer, fourth assistant, $1,800 
a year; John H. Warner, M. D., interne, 
$1,200 a year. 

Institutions Department. 

Dr. Sherburne Krieger has been ap- 
pointed house officer at the Long Island 
Hospital, for the period January 15 to 
June 30, to take the place of Doctor You, 
who has resigned. 

The following changes will be made in 
the personnel for the week ending Thurs- 
day, January 9: 

Long Island Hospital. 

Appointments: Marguerite A. Moli- 
neaux, institution employee, housemaid, 
$500 a year, temporary; Ellen Mackie, 
institution employee, attendant, S600 a 
year, temporary; Evelyn Porter, institu- 
tion employee, waitress, $316 a year, 
temporary; Norman J. Barry, institution 
employee, attendant, $600 a year, tempo- 
rary ; James A. Waldron, institution em- 
ployee, watchman, $600 a 3'ear, tempo- 
rary; William L. Maguire, institution 
employee, cook, $600 a year, temporary. 

Resignations: Patrick J. Murphy, in- 
stitution emplo.yee, helper in paint shop, 
$700 a year, voluntary; Alexander Mac- 
Neil, institution employee, cook, tempo- 
rary, $600 a year voluntary; Margaret 
Reid, institution employee, wardmaid, 
$526 a year, voluntary. 

Transfers: Lewis A. Gorrell, institu- 
tion employee, attendant, $600 a year, 
from porter at $526 a year; Walter A. 
Tower, institution employee, porter, $526 
a year, from cook, at $600 a year, tempo- 
rary; Rachel A. Pelletier, institution em- 
ployee, waitress, $316 a year, from house- 
maid at $500 a year. 



Steamers "Hibbard" and "O'Meara." 

Appointment: John J. Columbo, in- 
stitution employee, deckhand, $1,700 a 
year, temporarj'. 

Transfer: John J. Columbo, institu- 
tion employee, oiler, temporary, $1,900 a 
year, from deckhand, temporary, $1,700 
a year. 

Kmploj'mcnt Terminated: John J. 
Columbo, in.'Sf.itution employee, oiler, 
temporary, $1,900 a year. 

Law Department. 

Joseph C. McLaughlin has been re- 
appointed as special assistant investi- 
gator at $22 a week, for the period be- 
ginning January 1 and ending January 
24. 

Overseers of the Public Welfare. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons as social 
workers, up to and including January' 
31, at 81,000 a year: 

Phoebe Cannon, Kathleen Conley, 
Margaret Connors, Virginia Grimes, 
Mary F. Kenney, John H. McNulty, 
Mary E. Norton, Helen F. O'Connell, 

E. Frances O'Neil, Howard Pierce, Vir- 
ginia E. Prout, Mary E. Robertson, Eva 
R. Sacco, Peter Siragusa. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons as assist- 
ants to social workers, up to and in- 
cluding January 31, at $1,()()0 a year: 

Daniel I. Cronin, James F. Dunn, 
Domenic Esposito, Frederick Hadge, 
Frances G. Kelly, Edward V. Lahey, 
James B. Mullin, Francis X. Morrissey, 
Charles A. Saya, Mary R. Shea, Lillian 
R. Zilg. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons as aid 
and settlement agents, up to and in- 
cluding January 31, at $1,000 a year: 

Harold Aronson, Frances A. Broussard, 
Charles Brack, Mary Breen, Doris L. 
Burke, Helen J. Clancy, Eleanor M. 
Crosby, Marie F. Curran, Helen M. 
Dooley, Edna M. Driscoll, Mary R. 
Feeney, Joseph I. Feldman, Geraldine 

F. Fitzgerald, Agatha Francis, Angeline 
M. Giorgione, Katherine F. Gordon, 
Allan A. Grant, William S. Gushee, 
Alice D. Hart, Delia Hatton, Mary Hur- 
ley, Aimie E. Immick, Esther N. Jack- 
son, Coleman Joj'ce, Katherine I. Joyce, 
William L. Kelley, Margaret Kiley, 
Katherine G. Krohn, David F. Leahy, 
Helen F. Lenehan, Joseph P. Leonard, 
Gertrude E. Mansfield, Rita M. Ma- 
roney, Betty Mller, John Minton, John 
A. Molineaux, Katherine E. Mullen, 
Henrj' G. Mullowney, John F. Mungo- 
van, Joseph W. Murphy, Dorothy E. 
Macdonald, Mary L. Macdonald, Marion 
E. McAuley, Edmund J. McCarthy, Ste- 
phen J. McMahon, Hugh W. McNulty, 
Lillian McPeake, Elenore J. Nowell, John 
C. Piggott, John E. Powers, Joseph Rear- 
don, (Srace L. Rogers, Edward S. Ryan, 
Thomas Ryan, Joseph W. Scally, Mary 
R. Smith, Sam Steinman. Josephine Sul- 
livan, Mary E. Sullivan,' Walter F. Sul- 
livan, Lillian Taylor, Katherine P. 
Toomey, Agnes G. Towle, Mildred A. 
Walker, Margaret Warren, L. Lorimer 
Williams, Kathryn McGrath. 

Park Dep.\rtment. 

Approval has been given for the ex- 
tension of the temporary emplojTnent, 



from December 25 to December 31, 1935, 
of Margaret M. Hall, as a matron at 
.$22 a week. 

PuBUC Buildings Department. 

The change in rating of George J. 
Higgins from electric elevator repairman 
at ^,600 a year to wire inspector and 
electrician at $2,700 a year, retroactive 
to January 1, 1935, has been approved. 

The temporarj' employment of John 
F. Craven as ambulance driver, at $30 
a week (seven days a week), has been 
extended for a period of two months be- 
ginning November 1. 

Thomas Costello has been appointed 
for a temporarj' period of three months 
as clerk of works at $50 a week. 

Public Works Department (Ferry 
Service). 

Approval has been given to continue 
the temporary emplojTnent of Thomas 
F. Nolan as stockkeeper at $1,600 a j'ear, 
for three months from January 12. 

Approval has been given to continue 
the temporarj' emploj-ment of the fol- 
lowing as temporary deckhands at $5.25 
a day, to fill vacancies that may occur 
during the winter months in the deck- 
hand force, from January 4 to April 4: 
Lawrence Lane, Frank M. Trinchitella. 

Public Works Department (Paving 
Service). 

Approval has been given to transfer 
Leo W. Reagan from the Boston Librarj' 
Department to the Albany street garage 
of the Paving Ser\'ice, as stockroom 
helper (laborer) at $23 a week, effective 
January 10. 

Public Works Department (Sanitary 
Service). 

Approval has been given to employ 
John O'Neill as temporary wheelwright- 
carpenter at 86 a day, for three months 
from January 3. 

Pltblic Works Department (Water 
Service). 

Approval has been given to transfer 
Alfred J. Torpey from the Boston City 
Hospital to the Water Division of this 
department as laborer at $5 a day, to fill 
a ^'acancy, effective January 10. 

Public Works Department (Water 
Income Di^'ision). 

Approval has been given to continue 
the temporary employment of Herman 
A. Tigges as temporary water meter 
reader at 81,700 a j'ear, for three months 
from Januarj' 8. 

ApproN'al has been given to continue 
the temporarj' emploj'ment of the fol- 
lowing as plumbers at 86 a day, for 
three months from Januaiy 12, installing 
new and taking out old water meters for 
repairs: Frank P. Giordano, Joseph A. 
Sullivan, John P. Finnegan. 

Soldiers' Relief Department. 

Lillian Donovan has been continued 
as temporary clerk for a period of ten 
daj's beginning Wednesday, January 8, 
at S3 a day. 

Approval has been given to appoint 
William Duncan, Jr., and Joseph P. Her- 
nan as temporary clerks, for a further 
period of ten daj's beginning Wednesday, 
January 8, 1936, at $4 a day. 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



27 



OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE, CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR WEEK 
ENDING JANUARY 4, 1936. 





Dependent 
Aid. 


Mothers' 
.Aid. 


Old Age 
Assistance. 


Administrative. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 


Number of active cases 

last week. 
Number of cases added . 

Number of cases discon- 
tinued. 

Number of active cases 
this week. 

Same week last year , . . 


22.140 

521 

234 

*22,427 

24.628 


1.581 

10 

2 

1,589 

1,447 


4.340 

29 

5 

4.364 

3,846 






28,061 






560 






241 






28,380 






29,921 









Financial. 



Expended during week.. 


$149,111 87 
145,946 71 
178.482 50 


$24,017 00 
23,950 00 
21.866 00 


$27,226 20 
27,167 05 
24,475 00 


$13,923 22 
14,502 14 
12,004 06 




$214,278 29 
211,565 90 


Same week last year . . 




236,827 56 








Elxpended to date- 1936 


76.998 10 


113 00 


18,979 88 


3,695 14 




99,786 12 


Unexpended balances. . . 






1936 Collections 


14.690 20 

























* 1,7.59 E. R. A. supplementaries. 

Total collections for 19.35, $2,607,715 62. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Department of StHooL Buildings 

Upon January 3 the Mayor approved 
a contract with lioston Blue Print Com- 
pany for blueprinting for the year 1936. 
The following communication has been 
received. 

Boston, December 31, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

De.\r Sir, — The bids for blueprinting 
for the year 1936 for the department, 
submitted to me and opened December 
27, 1935, were as follows: 

Charles Bruning Company, Incorpo- 
rated, 3 cents a square foot*; Spaulding- 
Moss Company, 3 cents a square foot; 
Modem Blue Print Company, 3 cents a 
square foot; B. L. Makepeace, Incorpo- 
rated, 3 cents a square foot; Hutcheson 
Company, Incorporated, 3 cents a square 
foot; Boston Blue Print Company, Incor- 
porated, 3 cents a square foot. 

The discount offered by the Charles 
Bruning Companv would seem to make 
them the favorable contractor and it was 
our intention to award them the bid. 
However, under date of December 28, 
we hold a letter from that firm stating, 
in part, "as a result of a misunderstanding 
at this office we have submitted a bid on 
your blueprint requirements which is in 
error. We have indicated on our bid a 
quantity discount which is applicable 
only to our regular square foot price, 
whereas we intended to quote you a 
special price of three cents per square foot 
net. .\s a result of this unfortunate 
error we request your permission to with- 
draw our bid assuming, of course, that 
our certified check will be returned." 

I believe that it is to the best interests 
of the city to allow these people to with- 
draw their bid and to award the contract 



to the lk)ston Blue Print Company, which 
have had it for the past several years and 
whose service is entirely satisfactory in 
all respects. 

Your Honor's approval is respectfully 
re(iueste<l. 

Respectfully yours, 
Wm. W. Drummf,v. 
SufHrinUndcnt of Construction. 
* Quantity di-siount applicable to each month's 
busines.s: Up to $50, net; from $50 to $200, 10 per 
cent: from $200 to $400. 20 per cent; from $400 
up, 30 per cent. 

Supply Department. 
Upon .January 4 the Mayor approved 
contracts with several firms for furnishing 
snow-removal equipment. Communica- 
tions upon which the awards were based 
were received from D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies, as follows: 

BosTO.v, January 2, 1936. 
Ho.N. Frederk-k W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boaton. 

De.\r Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
propcj.sals wore opened and read at this 
office, ciiUiiig for snow-removal equip- 
ment, to be delivered to the Public Works 
Department and the Park Department, 
City of Boston. \ committee was ap- 
pointed t^) consid(!r bids and make 
recommendations as to the equipment 
best -suited to the needs of the.se depart- 
ments. The recommendations of this com- 
mittee have been followed in general, but 
in some instances I have made recommen- 
dations which differ in some respects 
from the findings of the committee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that permis- 
sion be granted me to award a contract 
to the Stewart Motor Truck :Company 
of New England, 525 Harvard street, 
Brofikline, Mass., for the following: 

Eight 3^ to 5 ton dump trucks 
for ashes (Public Works Department), 
$42,112.40. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, calling for snow-removal equip- 
ment, to be delivered to the Public Works 
Department and the Park Department, 
City of Boston. .4 committee was 
appointed to consider bids and make 
recommendations as to the equipment 
best suited to the needs of these depart- 
ments. The recommendations of this 
committee have been followed in general, 
but in some instances I have made recom- 
mendations which differ in some respects 
from the findings of the committee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that per- 
mission be granted me to award a con- 
tract to the Massachusetts Motor Car 
Company, 989 Commonwealth avenue, 
Boston, Mass., for the following: 

Five I'-ton dump trucks, Dodge 
(Park Department), .S4,271.30. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, .January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, calling for snow-removal equip- 
ment, to be delivered to the Public Works 
Department and the Park Department, 
City of lioston. .\ committee was ap- 
pointed to consider bids and make 
recommendations as to the equipment 
best suited to the needs of these depart- 
ments. The recommendations of this 
committee have been followed in general, 
but in some instances I have made recom- 
mendations which differ in some respects 
from the findings of the committee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that per- 
mission be granted me to award a con- 
tract to the Barber-Greene Company, 
27 Commercial avenue, Cambridge, Mass., 
for the following: 

Eight snow loaders (Public Works 
Department), .127,535.04. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor,— Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, calling for snow-removal equip- 
ment, to be delivered to the Public Works 
Department and the Park Department, 
City of Boston. -V committee was ap- 
pointed to consider bids and make recom- 
mendations as to the equipment best 
suited to the needs of these departments. 
The recommendations of this committee 
have been followed in general, but in some 
instances I have made recommendations 
which differ in .some respects from the 
findings of the committee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that per- 
mission be granted me to award a con- 
tract to the Good Roads Machinery Cor- 
poration, Kennett square, Pennsylvania, 
for the following: 

Thirty snowplows. Model 10-F (Public 
Works Department), $7,226.10; three 
snowplows, Model 30-X, with frame at- 
tachment (Park Department), .f464.53; 



28 



CITY RECORD 



Jax. U 



five sno\vi)l()\v8, Model 10-F (Park De- 
Iiaitnient), SI, 204. 35; three snowplows, 
Model 10-F, with special push frame, 
four-wheel drive (Park Department), 
$820.26. Total, 89,715.24. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

SuperinlcniU'iii of i^iiij) plies. 

Bo.sTON, January 2, 1936. 
HOiN. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mnijor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, jjublicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, calling for snow-removal equip- 
ment, to be delivered to the Public Works 
Department and the Park Department, 
City of Boston. A committee was ap- 
pointed to consider bids and make recom- 
mendations as to the equipment best 
suited to the needs of these departments. 
The recommendations of this committee 
have been followed in general, but in 
some instances I have made recommenda- 
tions which differ in some respects from 
the findings of the committee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that permis- 
sion be granted me to award a contract 
to the Monarch Manufacturing Com- 
pany, 36 Pleasant street, Watertown, 
Mass., for the following: 

Ten heavv dutv Monarch plows (Pub- 
lic Works Department), 84,702.05; one 
Monarch Big Chief plow (Park Depart- 
ment), S637.07. Total, §5,339.12. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

De.\r Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, calling for snow-removal equip- 
ment, to be delivered to the Public 
W'orks Department and the Park Depart- 
ment, City of Boston. A committee 
was appointed to consider bids and make 
recommendations as to the equipment 
best suited to the needs of these depart- 
ments. The recommendations of this 
committee have been followed in general, 
but in some instances I have made recom- 
mendations which differ in some respects 
from the findings of the committee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that per- 
mission be granted me to award a contract 
to the Four-Wheel Drive Auto Company, 
130 North Beacon street, Brighton, Mass., 
for the following: 

Four 7 to 10 ton dump trucks, four- 
wheel drive, including full plowing 
equipment (Public Works Department), 
$46,312.84. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mai/or of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
oflBce, calling for snow-removal equip- 
ment, to be delivered to the Public 
Worli Department and the Park Depart- 
ment, City of Boston. .\ committee was 
appointed to consider bids and make 
recommendations as to the e(iuipment 
best suited to the needs of these depart- 
ments. The recommendations of this 



committee have been followed in general, 
but in some instances I have made recom- 
mendations which differ in some respects 
from the findings of the committee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that per- 
mission be granted me to award a contract 
to the Sandberg Truck Equipment Com- 
pany, 44 Amherst street, Cambridge, 
Mass., for the following: 

Five Model T. A. -40, McCormick-Deer- 
ing tractors, with bulldozer, cab and 
plow, complete (Public Works Depart- 
ment), 821,115. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, calling for snow-removal equipment, 
to be delivered to the Public Works De- 
partment and the Park Department, City 
of Boston. A committee was appointed 
to consider bids and make recommenda- 
tions as to the equipment best suited to 
the needs of these departments. The 
recommendations of this committee have 
been followed in general, but in some 
instances I have made recommendations 
which differ in some respects from the 
findings of the committee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that per- 
mission be granted me to award a con- 
tract to the Charles N. Wood Company, 
276 Third street, Cambridge, Mass., for 
the following: 

One 7 to 10 ton dump truck, four- 
wheel drive and full plowing equipment, 
Walter (Park Department), $11,591.91; 
two 3j to 5 ton dump trucks, including 
full plowing equipment, four-wheel drive, 
Walter (Park Department), $12,177; one 
3j to 5 ton platform truck, including full 
plowing equipment, four-wheel drive, 
Walter (Park Department), $6,040.48; 
six 3^ to 5 ton dump trucks, four-wheel 
drive, Walter (Public Works Depart- 
ment), $36,531 ; two sand spreaders, Hvass 
(Park Department), $737.55. Total, 
$67,077.94. 

Respectful]}' yours, 

D. Frank Doherty', 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, calling for snow-removal equip- 
ment, to be delivered to the Public Works 
Department and the Park Department, 
City of Boston. A committee was 
appointed to consider bids and make 
recommendations as to the equipment 
best suited to the needs of these depart- 
ments. The recommendations of this 
committee have been followed in general, 
but in some instances I have made recom- 
mendations which differ in some respects 
from the findings of the committee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that per- 
mission bo granted me to award a con- 
tract to the ^Iack Motor Truck Company, 
75 North Beacon street, Boston, Mass., 
for the following: 

Twenty 3i to 5 ton dump trucks, 
Model BMS (Public Works Department), 
$118,137.50; four 3| to 5 ton dump trucks, 



Model BMS (Park Department), §22,860; 
one 3i to 5 ton platform truck, Alodel 
BMS (Park Department), $5,340. Total, 
8146,337.50. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, calhng for snow-removal equip- 
ment, to be delivered to the PubUc Works 
Department and the Park Department, 
City of Boston. A committee was 
appointed to consider bids and make 
recommendations as to the equipment 
best suited to the needs of these depart- 
ments. The recommendations of this 
committee have been followed in general, 
but in some instances I have made 
recommendations which differ in some 
respects from the findings of the com- 
mittee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfullj' request that per- 
mission be granted me to award a con- 
tract to the Bowers Motor Sales, 1337 
Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park, Mass., 
for the following: 

One fuel truck, Ford (PubUc Works 
Department), $1,462.43; one fuel truck. 
Ford (Park Department), $1,462.43. To- 
tal, $2,924.86. 

Respectfully jours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publiclj- advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, caUing for snow-removal eqtiip- 
ment, to be dehvered to the PubHc Works 
Department and the Park Department, 
City of Boston. A committee was 
appointed to consider bids and make 
recommendations as to the equipment 
best suited to the needs of these depart- 
ments. The recommendations of this 
committee have been followed in general, 
but in some instances I have made 
recommendations which differ in some 
respects from the findings of the com- 
mittee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that per- 
mission be granted me to award a con- 
tract to the P. I. Perkins Company, 
376 Dorchester avenue, Boston, Mass., 
for the following: 

Three Standard tractors, including 
bulldozer, cab and plow, complete (Park 
Department), 813,080.06; four Nelson 
snow loaders (Public Works Depart- 
ment), $14,327.60. Total, $27,407.66. 

RespectfuUy yours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. May'or, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, calling for snow-removal equif)- 
ment, to be delivered to the PubUc 
W'orks Department and the Park Depart- 
ment, City of Boston. A committee was 
appointed to consider bids and make 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



29 



recommendations as to the equipment 
best suited to the needs of these depart- 
ments. The recommendations of this 
committee have been followed in general, 
but in some instances I have made 
recommendations which differ in some 
respects from the findings of the com- 
mittee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that per- 
mission be granted me to award a contract 
to the Brockway Motor Company, 
Incorporated, 217 North Beacon street, 
Brighton, Mass, for the following: 

Four 3§ to 5 ton dump trucks for ashes 
(Public Works Department), 819,974. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. FR.^^NK DOHERTY, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

De.\r Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, calling for snow-removal equip- 
ment, to be deUvered to the Pubhc Works 
Department and the Park Department, 
City of Boston. A committee was ap- 
pointed to consider bids and make 
recommendations as to the equipment 
best suited to the needs of these depart- 
ments. The recommendations of this 
committee have been followed in general, 
but in some instances I have made 
recommendations which differ in some 
respects from the findings of the 
committee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that per- 
mission be granted me to award a con- 
tract to the Autocar Sales and Service 
Company, 1168 Commonwealth avenue, 
Boston, Mass., for the following: 

Twelve 3| to 5 ton dump trucks, 
for ashes (Pubhc Works Department), 
$78,840. 

Respectfully j'ours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 2, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\^nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 8, 1935, publicly advertised 
proposals were opened and read at this 
office, calling for snow-removal equip- 
ment, to be delivered to the Public 
Works Department and the Park Depart- 
ment, City of Boston. A committee was 
appointed to consider bids and make 
recommendations as to the equipment 
best suited to the needs of these depart- 
ments. The recommendations of this 
committee have been followed in general, 
but in some instances I have made recom- 
mendations which differ in some respects 
from the findings of the committee. 

In view of the explanation given above, 
I would respectfully request that per- 
mission be granted me to award a con- 
tract to the White Motor Company, 930 
Commonwealth avenue, Boston, Mass., 
for the following: 

One 3-ton dump truck (Park De- 
partment), S3,030; fifty-two 2\ to 3^^ 
ton dump trucks. Model 709.V (Public 
Works Department), $164,211.35. Total, 
$167,241.35. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Upon January 3 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Mechanics Iron 



Foundry Company for iron castings and 
bronze fittings for the Sewer Division. 
Bids, opened December 31, were as 
follows: 

Approximate Amounts on .\11 Items. 
Item 1. 

Class A, 263,750 Pounds Common 
Castings, Per Pound. — Gibby Foundiy 
Company, 2.25 cents; Mechanics Iron 
Foundry Company, 2.20 cents.* 

Class D, 22,010 Pounds Catch-Basin 
Traps and Pipe Inlets Complete, or Parts, 
Per Pound. — Gibby Foundry Company, 
6 cents; Mechanics Iron Foundry Com- 
pany, 5.5 cents.* 

Itetn S. 

200 Bronze Pins, Per Pin.— Gibby 
Foundry Company, 35 cents; Mechanics 
Iron Foundry Company, 30 cents.* 

Item 3. 
125 Pounds Bronze Fittings, Bolts, Nuts, 
Etc., Per Pound. — Gibby Foundry Com- 
pany, 65 cents; Mechanics Iron Foundry 
Company, 60 cents.* 

Item 4- 

125 Pounds Tobin Bronze, Per Pound. — 
Gibby Foundry Company, 60 cents; 
Mechanics Iron Foundry Company, 55 
cents.* 

Total. — Gibby Foundry Company, 
$7,481.22; Mechanics Iron Foundry Com- 
pany, S7,216.80.* 

* Contract awarded. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY.) 

FIRE SERVICE. 
Cities and Towns Outside of Boston 
AND Metropolitan District, Feb- 
ruary 1, 1936. 
Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 18, 1936, at 12 noon. 

Boston and Metropolitan District, 
February 15, 1936. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 1, 1936, at 12 noon. 

Applicants for the service of Boston 
must be not less than twenty-two nor 
over thirty-five years of age at the time 
of filing application. Applicants for all 
other cities and towns in the Common- 
wealth must be not less than twenty-one 
nor over thirty-five years of age at the 
time for filing application. Callmen and 
substitute callmen may make such deduc- 
tions from their ages as are provided for 
in Civil Service Rule 8, Class 21. A 
certificate of date of birth must be filed 
with the application, unless one has been 
filed with a previous application. 

Applicants for Worcester are required 
to be not less than 5 feet 5 inches in 
height. Applicants for Brockton must be 
not less than 5 feet 6 inches in height, 
and weigh not less than 135 pounds at 
the time of appointment. Applicants for 
Winchester must be not less than 5 feet 
8 inches in height, and weigh not less than 
135 pounds. Applicants for Lynn must 
be not less than 5 feet 5g inches in height, 
and weigh not less than 135 pounds. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; general information, 3; 
practical questions, 4; total, 10. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination and strength tests. 

Educational test, 3; physical test, 2; 
total, 5. 

Applicants will be required to obtain at 
least 50 per cent in each subject of the 
examination and at least 70 per cent in 
the educational average and in the 
strength test in order to become eligiblei 



The practical questions will be based 
upon information contained in a manual 
known as the "Red Book." This manual 
may be obtained from the Secretary of 
State, Room 118, State House, at ten 
cents a copy. It is necessary that appli- 
cants obtain a copy of this manual and 
study it carefully. 



ASSESSMENT OF BETTERMENTS, 
BY THE BOARD OF STREET 
COMMISSIONERS. 

Faneuil Street, Brighton. 

Lot. Assessment. 

1. Vera W. Lowell $216 75 

2. Annie .\. Brogie 2,39 19 

3. John A. Johnson 171 66 

4. Home Owners Construction Com- 

pany 255 75 

5. Home Owners Construction Com- 

pany 251 70 

6. Home Owners Construction Com- 

pany 246 90 

7. Home Owners Construction Com- 

pany 242 10 

8. Home Owners Construction Com- 

pany 237 35 

9. Home Owners Construction Com- 

pany 232 55 

10. Home Owners Construction Com- 

pany 227 75 

11. Home Owners Construction Com- 

pany 222 95 

12. Home Owners Construction Com- 

pany 249 70 

13. William S. J. White. Josephine M. 

White 269 28 

14. Boston Elevated Railway Com- 

pany 2,792 75 

15. Abraham Jacobsen etal 193 75 

16. Charlestown Trust Company l.TO 27 

17. Max Bloom 71 55 

18. David Shapiro, .-Vnaie Shapiro 143 45 

19. John Connolly, Nora Connolly 182 40 

Total $6,597 80 

Payson Avenue, Dorchester. 

Lot. Assessment. 

1. Natale Sacco, Angelin Sacco $79 14 

2. Ashmont Realty Associates, In- 

corporated 112 00 

3. .\ntonio Bonanno 109 35 

4. Mary J. Lynch 109 35 

5. Fannie Silljerman 168 00 

6. Annie R. Cook 114 25 

7. James M. Green, Jr., Etta C. Green, 112 45 

8. Catherine F. Cooley 118 80 

9. Frederick T. Shurtleff, Susie B. 

Shurtleff 107 50 

10. Lucie J. MacDonald 122 90 

11. Lucie J. MaoDonald 112 60 

12. Lucie J. MacDonald 115 00 

13. Richard L. Cartwright 362 50 

14. .lames E. Thomson 288 00 

15. Mary Martin, Elizabeth R. Mar- 

tin 133 23 

16. Salvina Falla, Leontina Nalli 74 40 

17. Barbara L. Brennan 122 20 

18. James P. Walsh. Ann V. Walsh ... 124 60 

19. Susie B. Shurtleff 132 90 

20. Helen V. Breen 150 35 

21. Horace S. Payson 697 85 

22. Horace S. Payson 206 80 

23. Celestia F. Humphrey 430 00 

24. Pauline Crisafi 300 00 

25. Quinto Ceppi, Mary Ceppi 178 50 

26. Quinto Ceppi, Mary Ceppi 85 47 

Total $4,668 14 



AMENDED DAMAGES. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
vote of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners : 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of February 
19, 1935, determining damages caused by 
the making of the public improvement 
consisting of the widening of Faneuil 
street, be, and the same hereby is, 
amended, by striking from said order the 
amount $1 awarded to William S. J. and 
.losephine M. White in said order and 
inserting in place thereof the amount 
,1700; that the amount $700 be, and the 
same hereby is, awarded to William S. J. 
and Josephine M. White for the damages 
so sustained. 



30 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. U 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 2 TO JANUARY 8. 

Januauv 2. 



OwNEn. 



Location. 



Ward 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Coet. 



E. .Sohier Welch, trustee. , . . 
Fiduciary 'I'ruBt Company. .. 

Annie HitMcrsky 

Priscilln Norton 

.\rlin|?ton Street Church .... 
Shuwiiiut Hardware and 
Paint Company. 

Henry Schlichte 

Kleanor Saltonstall 

J. (i. MontRoiiiery 

Mrs. S. Smoekler 

A. W'. Perry, Incorporated . . 

A. C. C. Corporation 

Frederick H. Viaux 

Mrs. Leah Tavale 

.1. Hamburg 

City of Boston 

Minot. Williams & BanBS.-- 

Mrs. H. Gilmarnick 

K. L. Huckins 

David .\rthur 

Franklin Savings Bank 

South Terminal Trust 

EUiabeth .\. Murphy 

Dorchester Savings Bank . . . 
Milton Savings Bank 



277 Washington street '.i 

214 and 216 State street :< 

220 Sumner street 1 

141 .\rlington street .5 

20 .Arlington street 5 

94-106 Terrace street 10 

16 .Armstrong street 10 

915-921 Boylston street 5 

411 Columbus avenue 4 

274 Walnut avenue 12 

44 Broiiifield street .3 

8 Brimmer street .5 

10 Brimmer street 5 

48 Thorndike street 8 

160 Newburn street !> 

Long Island (dormitory) ... 1 

19-25 High street 3 

1 1 Irving street 3 

229 West Third street 6 

79 Dale street 12 

400 Newbury street 5 

240 .Summer street 3 

86 Buttonwood street 7 

766 Morton street 14 

1090 Washington street .... 17 



Alterations, store and offices. $350 

.Alterations, mercantile 900 

.Alterations, dwelling 300 

.Alterations, lodging 800 

.Alterations, church 200 

.Alterations, brewery 3,000 

.Alterations, dwelling 200 

.Alterations, college 1,000 

.Alterations, store and dwell- 650 
ing. 

.Alterations, dweUing .tOO 

Alterations, offices 600 

-Alterations, dwelling 750 

Alterations, dwelling 750 

Alterations, dweUing 200 

Alterations, tenements 900 

.Alterations, dormitory 500 

-Alterations, mercantile 150 

Alterations, tenements ,300 

.Alterations, dwelling 100 

Alterations, dweUing 200 

.Alterations, garage 300 

.Alterations, offices .500 

.Alterations, dweUing 250 

.Alterations, dwelling 300 

Take-down, dweUing 150 



J.\NUARY 3. 



9 and 1 1 Hatherley road 
31 Milk street 



91 Bay State road. . . 

71 Ocean street 

44 West Sixth street. 

42 West Sixth street . 



A. Sbadella 

Beacon Building Corpora- 
tion. 

The Sheraton, Incorporated, 

Ethel M. Brown et al 

T r i ni o u n t Co-operative 
Bank. 

T r i ni o u n t Co-operative 
Bank. 

C. H. Sprague & Son Co 

D. J. Swartz 

Arlington Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank. 

Puritan Ice Cream Company, 

F. C. M. Taylor 

A. & C. Weigold 

Alfred Francis 

J. Gordon 

Patrick Doherty 11 Trenton street 

Pasquale VertuUo 84 Fainnount avenue .... 

Mrs. Grace Boush 48.A Priesing street 

Chevrolet Company 10 -Alcorn street 

William O'Brien 551 East Seventh street . . 

F Wynne 4 Blackwell street 

Patrick Heaiey 5 Spring Park avenue 

C LaRosa 348 MetropoUtan avenue. 



482 Atlantic avenue . . . . 
288-292 Hyde Park ave. 
379 Columbus avenue. . . 



3875 Washington street . 

21 Benton street 

230 -Amory street 

4499 Washington street . 
225 Dudley street 



22 Second-class garage $600 

3 Alterations, bank and offices, 1,813 

5 Alterations, hotel 3.000 

17 Alterations, dwelling 150 

6 Alterations, dwelling 35 

6 -Alterations, dweUing 35 

3 Take-down, coal pocket 1 .200 

19 Alterations, stores 1,625 

4 -Alterations, stores and tene- 600 

ments. 

19 .Alterations, ice cream parlor, 400 
9 Alterations, dwelling 255 

11 Alterations, dwelling 488 

20 .Alterations, dwelling 150 

8 .Alterations, dwelling and 200 

office. 

2 .Alterations, dweUing 180 

18 .Alterations, store 785 

10 -Alterations, store 200 

21 Sign 150 

7 .Alterations, dwelling 300 

16 Alterations, dweUing 540 

19 Alterations, dwelling 220 

18 .Alterations, dwelling 355 



January 4. 



David Sears Real Estate 630 Washington street 

David Sears Real Estate 634 Washington street 
Trust. _ . 

J. Connor etal 32 Erie street 

Bessie E. Williams 60 Hill Top street 



3 Alterations, mercantile $900 

3 Alterations, mercantile 600 

14 Alterations, dwelling 35 

16 Alterations,lumberstorage. . . 4,000 



Jancary 6. 



Walter S. Fields etal 10 Salem street 

Harry Marcus 50 Castle street 

Sadie Klayman 180 Seaver street 

United Drug Company 73 Leon street 

Dora Kossman 81 WiUowwood street . . . 

Mary T. Murphy 3916 Washington street . 

Mrs W. A. -Applegate 41 School street 

Realty, Incorporated 297 Cambridge street . . 

Louis Grebb 8 Orchardfield street . . . . 

Rachael Strachran 81 Intervale street 

N. C. Candie Company 228 Tremont street 



2 


-Alterations, 


dwelling 


$900 


3 


Alterations, 
ing. 


stores and dwell- 


60 


12 


.Alterations, 


tenements 


1,000 


4 


Alterations 


manufacturing . . 


880 


14 


.Alterations. 


dweUing 


150 


19 


.Alterations, 


dweUing 


200 


17 


.Alterations, 


dwelling 


400 


3 


Alterations 
ments. 


, store and tene- 


200 


15 


.Alterations, 


dweUing 


200 


14 


.Alterations, 


dwelling 


45 


3 


-Alterations, 


stores and offices. 


250 



■January 7. 



Harlow Daly 235 Bellevue street 

Susan K. Evans 356 .Massachusetts avenue. 



WiUiani Van Brooklin 

Epicurean Club, Incorporated 

C. E. Hudson 

WiUiam McDonalgh 

Ames Heal Estate Trust. . . . 

R. S. Ward 

James Barrie 

Vail's Lunch 

C. L. Batchelder, agent 

Boston Real Estate Trust. . . 
City of Boston 



1036 South street 

375 Columbus avenue 

6 Lester place 

1,")8 Boston street 

1-1 1 Court street 

128 Myrtle street 

6 Salem Street avenue 

215 Massachusetts avenue. 

214 State street 

32-46 Canal street 

170 Hancock street 



20 
4 

20 
4 

19 
7 
3 



.Alterations, dwelling $800 

.Alterations, stores and tene- 5,000 
ments. 

.Alterations. dweUing 180 

.Alterations, lodging 400 

-Alterations, dwelling 175 

.Alterations. dweUing 700 

.Alterations, offices 600 

-Alterations, dwelling 100 

-Alterations, dwelUng 450 

SiRi 200 

Alterations, mercantile 100 

-Alterations, mercantile 950 

First-class welfare office .54,951 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1936. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 
Boston, Monday, February 3. 
Worcester, Wednesday, February 5. 
Boston, Monday, March 2. 
Fall River, Wednesday, March 4. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 5. 
Boston, Monday, April 6. 
Springfield, Wednesday, April 8. 
Boston, Monday, May 4. 
Worcester, Wednesday, May 6. 
Boston, Monday, June 8. 
Boston, Monday, September 14. 
Worcester, Wednesday, September 16. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 15. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 16. 
Boston, Monday, November 2. 
Lowell, Wednesday, November 4. 
Boston, Monday, December 7. 
New Bedford, Wednesday, December 9. 
New Bedford, Thursday, December 10. 

Rules for Examinations. 

-All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent 
in the installation of wires, conduits, 
apparatus, fixtures and other appliances 
for carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
years' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for carrying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appH- 
cant'e knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a master or journeyman certifi- 
cate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be re- 
quired to obtain at least 70 per cent in 
order to obtain a certificate. 

Applicants who fail to obtain the re- 
quired 70 per cent will not be entitled 
to re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent, or who fail 
on the practical demonstration, will not 
be re-examined for a period of six 
months. 

Any person found referring to notes 
or books, or misbehaving during an ex- 
amination, will be debarred from that 
examination. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day- 

Stephen C. Garrity, 
Patson Smith, 
James M. Hurley, 
Albert Frank, 
Walter J. Kenefick, 
State Examiners oj Electricians. 

For application blanks or other in- 
formation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 303, 14 Beacon St., 
Boston, Mass. 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



3 1 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 2 TO JANUARY 8. 



January 8. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Chloe Conatantuce 

Leopold Waynes . . 

Leopold Waynes 

William .\. Gaston, Trustee, 

Trustees of George White 
Gould Fund. 

Boston Five Cents Savings 
Bank. 

Joseph T. Walker 

Brookline .\venue Delica- 
tessen. 

F. Sadie Margus 

City of Boston 

William Fidrocki 

William Fidrocki 

William Fidrocki 

Isaac Fishman 

C. A. Johnson 

M. J. McSoUa Estate 



123 Brooks street 

52 Townsend street 

50 Townsend st reet 

Ill Devonshire street 

1 Providence street 

3 Melville avenue 

55 Pinckney street 

459 Brookline avenue .... 

18 Middleton street 

154 Maverick street 

615 Massachusetts avenue. 
613 Massachusetts avenue. 
617 Massachusetts avenue. 

54 Charles street 

119 Lenox street 

687 East Second street .... 



22 Alterations, dwelling $500 

1 1 .^Iterations, dwelling None 

1 1 -\lterations. dwelling None 

3 .^Iterations, offices 400 

5 Dumb waiter 200 

17 .\lterations, dwelling None 

5 Fire escapes 75 

4 Dumb waiter 120 

14 Alterations, dwelling 250 

1 Second-class welfare office .. . 54,918 

9 .\lteration8, lodging 75 

9 .^Iterations, lodging 75 

9 .■^Iterations, lodging 1,000 

5 .^Iterations, store 200 

9 .\lterations, dwelling 125 

6 .Alterations, dwelling 175 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 2 TO JANUARY 8. 





January : 


)_ 






Plumber. 


Location. 


Ward. Nature. 


Estimated 
Cost. 


H. A. Rowell 

Joseph Weinberg 


. 647 West Roxbury Parkway, 
. 119 Stuart street 


20 
5 

1 
11 
11 

1 
17 


New fixtures 


$300 

.... 75 


. 75 Maverick street 

. 3190 Washington street . . . 

. 1245 Columbus avenue 

. 1 Ipswich place 




125 


Samuel Morse 


New fixtures 


400 


E. F. Mycue 


New fixtures 


.... 120 


John R. Runey 

A P Russo 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


400 




200 








J.VNUARY 3. 


S. Gould 

P. F. Cronin 


. 530 and 532 Conmionwealth 
avenue. 

. 582 Blue Hill avenue 

. 40 Warren street 


.5 

14 
8 
5 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


$1,000 
50 


E. H. Marchant 


New fixtures 


.... 250 


Eli Parad 


New fixtures 


1,500 






January 4. 


George C. Torngren 

H. A. Ballace 


. 286 .\shmont street 

. 282 Berkeley street 

. 63 Faneuil street 


16 
5 
22 
12 
14 
17 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


$1,450 

50 


Frank T. McDonald 




250 


M.H.Myers 

A. Kellem 


. 12 Rockland street 

. 378 Norfolk street 


New fixtures 


600 




300 


E. W. Siegfriedt 


. 69 Wilmington avenue 


New fixtures. . 


300 








January 6. 




. 1000 Washington street .... 

. 285 Columbus avenue 

. 300 West Broadway 


3 
4 
6 
7 
4 




$350 


T. P. Travers 




125 


F. C. Odenweller 


New fixtures 


.... 500 


E. W. Bertram 




135 


C. E. Bevelander 


. 30 Clarendon street 


New fixtures 


38 


January 7. 


J. Harry Kurhan ... 


. 42 Court street 


3 
20 
3 
7 
10 


New fixtures 

New fixtures . . . . 


$175 


H. A. Howell 


. 134 Montclair avenue 

. 100 Tremont street 

. 14 Rawson street 

7.56 Parker street 


485 


J. Harry Kurhan ... 


New fixtures 


600 


A. F. McCarthy 

Samuel Seigel 




400 


New fixtures 


90 










January 8. 






5 
5 
2 
21 
22 
6 
6 
6 
6 




$475 


Benjamin Port 

Domenic Naimo .... 


72 West Cedar street 

312 Main street 

74 Allston street 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


1 ,600 

75 


Lewis Haner 




75 


E. W, .Siegfriedt 


45 Montcalm avenue 

675 East Sixth street 

313 Congress street 

186 West Seventh street 

28 West Broadway 


New fixtures 


230 


F. J. Mac Donald 




51 


P. W. Donoghue Company. 
Floyd A. Johnson 


New fixtures 

New fixtures 


500 
450 


J. J. Savage 




150 









LAND=TAKING IN BRIGHTON. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for the 
taking of land for a public improvement 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Ruth road, Brighton district, as a 
highway, northeily from Faneuil street, 
with the name of Bonnie road or some 
other distinctive name, bounded and 
described as follows: 

A highway named Bonnie road is 
hereby laid out, northerly from Faneuil 
street for a distance of approximately 
five hundred and fifteen feet, and ordered 
con.structed, the cost thereof to be charged 
to Federal Funds. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Southerly by Faneuil street, thirty- 
nine and 74-100 feet; westerly by the 
westerly line of said Bonnie road as 
hereby laid out, by two mea.surements, 
two hundred thirty-one and 4-100 feet 
and two hundred ninety-seven and 30-100 
feet; northerly by the northerly line of 
said Bonnie road as hereby laid out, 
thirty-five and 73-100 feet; and easterly 
by the easterly line of said Bonnie road 
as hereby laid out, by two measurements, 
two hundred and ninety feet and two 
hundred twelve and 11-100 feet. 

Included in the above described land 
(taken hereunder) are parts of certain 
parcels of land registered in the Land 
Court, said parcels being shown on the 
plan hereinbefore referred to, and said 
parts being the portions of said registered 
parcels which lie between the side lines of 
said Bonnie road (Ruth road) and the 
middle line thereof; the owners of said 
portions, the number of the certificate of 
title and the book and page where the 
same is registered are as follows: 

Annie A. Brogie, Cert. No. 27993, Book 
135, page 193. 

Annie A. Brogie, Cert. No. 31549, 
Book 153, page 149. 

Timothy A. Hallahan and Delia 
HaUahan, Cert. No. 27493, Book 133, 
page 93. 

Annie M. Murray, Cert. No. 27228, 
Book 132, page 28. 

Charles E. Kavanagh and Agnes B. 
Kavanagh, Cert. No. 27394, Book 132, 
page 194. 

James Squires, Cert. No. 33328, Book 
162, page 128. 

Annie A . Brogie, 
Book 128, page 135. 

John A. Johnson, Cert. No. 
Book 164, page 12. 

Florence Crittenton League of Com- 
passion, Cert. No. 12803, Book 60, page 3. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvement, 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Bonnie road (formerly Ruth road), 
Brighton district, as a highway, northerly 
from Faneuil street for a distance of 
approximately five hundred and fifteen 
feet, under the order of the Board of 
January 3, 1936, and awards no damages 
therefor. 



Cert. No. 26535, 
33612, 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of street 
construction, estimated to be thirty (30) 
days, vehicles are excluded from the fol- 
lowing street, effective January 6, 1936: 
Brewster Street, South Boston. 
From East Seventh street to East 
Eighth street. 



32 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 11 



NUMBER AND ESTIMATED COST OF NEW BUILDINGS AND ALTERATIONS, ADDITIONS, ETC., FOR WHICH 
APPLICATIONS HAVE BEEN FILED FOR THE A\ONTH OF DECEMBER, 1935. 





Apartment 

AND 

Tenement 
Houses. 


Apartment 

AND 

Tenement 

Houses 
AND Stores. 


Churches. 


Dwellings. 


Dwellings 

AND 

Stores. 


Garages. 


Character. 


.a 
E 
s 
Z 


1. 

is 


1 

1 


1. 

is 

r 


SI 

e 

3 


1 
SS 

r 


S 

3 


1 
1. 

Is 


i 

SI 

B 

3 

z 


•a 
o 

OS . 

SS 


1 

3 

z 


-0 
v 

■3 .J 

SS 

r 


First niftjLtt .... 


























5^pf«nnH PInJtfl 






















1 

15 
7 


$600 
















9 


$44,500 






4,145 




















2,450 


























Total Npw Work 














9 

214 


$44,500 
95,215 






23 
6 


$7,195 




22 


$15,990 


7 


$11,400 


2 


$250 


15 


$8,311 


2,120 






Grand Totals 


22 


$15,990 


7 


$11,400 


2 


$250 


223 


$139,715 


15 


$8,311 


29 

1 


$9,315 








Hotels. 


Hospitals. 

i 


1 Lodging 
Houses. 


Lodging 

Houses 

AND Stores. 


Mercantile 
Buildings. 


Manu- 
facturing 
Buildings. 


Character. 


e 

3 

■z 


s 

E§ 
•so 


i 

S 

3 


s 
ss 

•so 
w 


1 


1. 
SS 

r 


S 

3 


•a 
■S . 

SS 

r 


SI 

S 

3 

z 


•a 

S . 

SS 

r 


S! 

i 

z 


•3*.; 
ES 

r 


First Class 


























Second Class 


















1 

4 


$4,000 
28,000 




$15,000 


Third Class 






















































































5 
45 


$32,000 
420,720 


14 


$15,000 




3 


$3,700 


6 


$75,600 


7 


$2,725 


1 


$75 


17,770 






Grand Totals 


3 


$3,700 


6 


$75,600 


7 


$2,925 


1 


$75 


50 


$452,720 


15 


$32,770 






Office 
Botldings. 


PtJBLIC 
BxnLDINGS. 


School 
Houses. 


Stables. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


Character. 


i 

.a 

e 

3 


ES 
••so 




•t! 

S o 1 
H 1 


e 

3 

2 


1 

SS 
••SO 


i 

SI 

S 

3 

z 


1 

SS 
••SO 


s 

3 

z 


T3 

a*: 

SS 

so 


o 

S: 
S 

3 

z 


■so 


First Class 


1 


S135,000 


2 


1 
$109,869 














3 
14 
31 
10 


$244 869 












11 

3 

2 


$194,000 
400 

225 ' 

1 


213,600 

77,045 

4,675 


Third Class. 


















Special Class 


1 


2,000 






















1 






Total New Work 


2 
2 


$137,000 
15,233 


2 
4 


$109,869 
16.453 






1 


16 
12 


$194,625 
11,786 


58 
377 


$540,189 
1 1 TT 638 


Alterations, etc 


4 


$451,700 


3 


$6,600 






Grand Totals 


4 


$152,223 


6 


$126,322 


4 


$451,700 


3 


«A Ann 


OQ 


conft 411 


4*3!^ 


$1,695,827 


















1 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



33 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Monday, December 30, 1935. 
Regular meeting of the City Council in the 
Council Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m., President 
FITZGERALD in the chair. Absent, Coun. 
Dowd and Murray. 



SALARIES OF CHOREMEiSr AT 
SANATORIUM. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston. 
Office of the Mayor, December 28, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith a communica- 
tion from the trustees of the Boston City Hospital, 
relative to your order of December 2, 1935, con- 
cerning a request that the choremen at the Boston 
Sanatorium be placed on the same salary basis as 
those employed in the City Hospital. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Hospital Department, December 20, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — .\t a meeting of the Board 
of Trustees held today, an order of the City 
Council was presented in regard to placing of 
choremen at tne Boston Sanatorium on the same 
salary basis as those employed in the City Hospital. 
The trustees feel that the work at the Sana- 
torium is not comparable with the work at the 
Main Hospital. 

The present scale of wages for choremen at the 
Sanatorium has continued unchanged for a long 
time. If an increase in salary was given it would 
represent $194 per week, which would run into a 
considerable amount of money during the year. 

As a matter of economy, the trustees prefer to 
allow the salaries to remain unchanged at least for 
this year. 

Respectfully yours, 

Joseph P. Manning, 
President, Board of Trustees. 
Placed on file. 



CROSSING OF STREETS BY 
PEDESTRIANS. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 26, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith a communica- 
tion from the Traffic Commissioner, relative to 
your order of December 16, 1935. concerning the 
request that a sur\'ey be made of all signal lights 
for the purpose of determining whether or not the 
pedestrians can be given a longer period of time 
to cross the street. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Traffic Commission, December 26, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — This will acknowledge receipt of a 
letter dated December 19, 1935, from John F. 
Gilmore, Jr.. .Assistant Secretary to your Honor, 
ordering consideration and report of Council 
order of December 16, 1935, requesting this com- 
mission to make a "survey of all signal lights and 
make the necessary changes in the timing of the 
pedestrian light, whereby pedestrians may have 
time to cross the intersection before the light 
changes for other traffic." 

In the spring of this year the engineers of this 
commission made a survey of the timing at all the 
traffic signals in the City of Boston. At that 
time, wherever practicable and consistent with 
moving vehicular traffic, pedestrian intervals were 
lengthened in the traffic signals. 

At present a complete study of the timing at all 
signals is being made in collaboration with the 
engineers of the State Department of Pubhc 
Works. 

It is regrettable that it is impossible at certain 
locations to give exclusive intervals to pedestrians 
as long as desirable because of the fact that the 
delay to vehicular traffic would result in conges- 
tion and confusion which would increase rather 
than lessen the hazard to pedestrians. 

Respectfully yours, 
William P. Hicket, Commissioner. 

Placed on file. 



WARD 7 TRAFFIC SIGNALS. 
The following was received : 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 26, 1935 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith a communica- 
tion from the Traffic Commissioner, relative to 
your order of December 16, 1935, concerning the 



request to install automatic traffic signals at 
certain locations in Ward 7. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Traffic Commission, December 26, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to acknowledge 
receipt cif Council order dated December 16, 1935, 
which reads as follows: 

"Ordered, That the Traffic Commission be re- 
quested, through his Honor the Mayor, to install 
automatic traffic signals at the following locations 
in Ward 7: Dorchester and Eighth streets; L and 
Eighth streets; Old Colony road and Preble street; 
Andrew square; Edward Everett square." 

I regret to say that there are no funds available 
at this time for the installation of automatic 
traffic signals at these locations. 

Three of the intersections, namely. East Eighth 
and L streets. Old Colony avenue and Preble 
street, and Andrew square, are on a list of locations 
where this commission has recommended the 
installation of traffic signals when funds are made 
available. 

Respectfully yours, 
William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 

Placed on file. 



COOPERATION IN SAFETY CAMPAIGN. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 21, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I herewith transmit a letter from 
the Traffic Commissioner, relative to your order of 
December 2, 1935, concerning a request that the 
Traffic Commission cooperate with the Parkway 
Transcripi and the Roslindale Board of Trade and 
other civic organizations in their safety campaign. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Traffic Commission, December 19, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — Re letter of December .5, 1935, from 
John F. Gilmore, Jr., Assistant Secretary to your 
Honor, ordering consideration and report on 
Council order dated December 2, 1935, requesting 
the Traffic Commission to cooperate with the 
Parkway Transcript and the Roslindale Board of 
Trade and other civic organizations in their safety 
campaign by placing suitable markings on the 
surfaces of the streets at the entrances to West 
Ro.xbury and Roslindale, as a warning to motorists 
to drive slowly and look out for children. 

The efficacy of painted legends on roadways 
toward reducing accidents is doubtful. 

The roadway painting program has been com- 
pleted for the year. Painted lines obviously are 
not visible during the season when snow and ice 
are on the surface of streets. 

I suggest that the civic organizations referred 
to in the Council order contact this department in 
the early spring and we will be happy to cooperate 
with them in any effort being made to promote 
safety for the children of the districts they rep- 
resent. 

Respectfully yours, 
William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 

Placed on file. 



BORROWING AGAINST TAX TITLES. 

The following was received: 

Citv of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 30, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — In order to comply with require- 
ments of the Emergency Finance Board as to the 
form of the order pertaining to the borrowing from 
the Commonwealth of §3,000,000 against tax 
titles, which borrowing was approved by your 
Honorable Body under date of December 16, 1935, 
I submit herewith an appropriation order providing 
that the proceeds of the loan in question shall be 
applied to the payment of revenue loans issued 
during the current year. This order supplements 
the loan order of December 16, and since it is 
required by the Emergency Finance Board before 
final consideration of the proposed loan, I respect- 
fully recommend its adoption by your Honorable 
Body. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Ordered, That the proceeds of tax title loans to 
be issued under the authority contained in the 
order passed by the City Council under date of 
December 16, 1935, and approved by the Mayor 
December 17, 1935, be, and hereby are, appro- 
priated to pay revenue loans of 1935. 

Referred to Executive Committee. 



CLASSIFICATION PLANS FOR SUFFOLK 
COUNTY EMPLOYEES. 
The following were received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 27, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit for consideration by 
your Honorable Body the addition proposed by the 



Budget Commissioner to the Compensation and 
Classification Plans for the Officers and Employees 
of Suffolk County. 

Re-spectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Budget Department, December 27, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — Under the provisions of Rule 3, 
"Classification of New Positions," of the Compen- 
sation and Classification Plans for the Officers and 
Employees of Suffolk County, "whenever a new 
position is established . . . the appointing 
authority shall forthwith report this fact to the 
Budget Commissioner with a full statement of the 
circumstances and a description of the duties as 
changed " Under the provisions of this rule the 
Penal Institutions Commissioner has requested 
that the position of working foreman-farmer be 
established at the House of Correction. After 
investigation of the actual and proposed duties • 
and responsibilities, the following new position is 
proposed: 

Title of Class: Working Foreman-Farmer. 

Duties: Under supervision to have charge of, 
and be responsible for, the work in connection with 
the farming operations at the House of Correction; 
to supervise and instruct inmates as to the proper 
methods of planting, care, cultivation and har- 
vesting of garden truck and other crops; and to 
perform other related work as required. 

Range of Compensation: Annual $1,800-.S1,900- 
$2,000-$2,100-$2,200. 

Respectfully, 

Francis J. Mdrhay, 

Budget Commissioner. 

Ordered, That the Compensation and Classifi- 
cation Plans for the Officers and Employees of 
Suffolk County, as adopted by the City Council 
on April 13, 19.31, and approved by the Mayor on 
April 15, 1931, lie, and the .same hereby are, 
amended to include the following new position: 

Title of Class: Working Foreman-Farmer. 

Duties: Under supervision to have charge of, 
and be responsible for, the work in connection with 
the farming operations at the Hou.se of Correction; 
to supervise and instruct inmates as to the proper 
methods of planting, care, cultivation and harvest- 
ing of g.arden truck and other crops; and to per- 
form other related work as required. 

Range of Compensation: Annual $1,800-81,900- 
$2,000-$2, 100-52,200. 

Citv of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 30, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit for consideration by your 
Honorable Body the amendment proposed by the 
Budget Commi.ssioner to the Compensation and 
Classification Plans for the Officers and Employees 
of Suffolk County. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W Mansfield, Mayor, 

City of Boston, 
Budget Department, December 30, 1935. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — Under the provisions of Rule 7, 
"Amendment to the Compensation Plan," of the 
Compensation and Classification Plans for the 
Officers and Employees of Suffolk County, "when- 
ever in his judgment the compensation for any 
class or group of classes, as provided in the com- 
pensation plan, is in need or revision, the Budget 
Commissioner shall report such fact, in writing, 
to the City Council, together with his reasons 
therefor and with revised schedules of compensa- 
tion for such class or classes . . ." Under the 
provisions of this rule I have made an investiga- 
tion and study of the dental work necessary at 
the House of Correction, and in my opinion the 
dentist, under the present range of compensation 
which provides for approximately one day per 
week, is unable to give sufficient attention to the 
vast number of inmates requiring dental treatment. 
I therefore recommend that provision be made for 
approximately two days per week and that the 
Compensation Plan be amended as provided in 
the accompanying order. 

Respectfully, 

Francis J. Mx^rray, 
Budget Commissioner. 

Ordered, That the Compensation and Classi- 
fication Plans and Rules for the Officers and 
Employees of Suffolk County as adopted by the 
City Council on April 13, 1931, and approved by 
the Mayor on April 15, 1831, be, and the same 
hereby is, amended as follows: 

In the class "Dentist" under the "Range of 
Compensation," strike out the amount 81,000 and 
insert in its place the amount $2,000, so as to 
read as follows: 

"Annual, maximum not to exceed $2,000." 

Severally referred to the Executive Committee. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

The following petitions were received and re- 
ferred to the committees named, viz.: 

Claims. 
Kate Bornstein, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect at 183 Chestnut Hill 
avenue. 



34 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 11 



Hoeton Leather Company, for refund on refuse 
ticketR. 

JuniOH J. DelJHMe. for eonipoMHiilion for diiniuRe 
to property ut 107 CanibridKe street, caused by 
broken water pipe. 

M. P. Wliite Company, for conipeasation for 
daniiiKo to property at 55 Stuart street, caused 
by defective water pipe. 

Horten.se Myers, for compensation for damage 
for loss of coat at City Hospital. 



APPOINTMENT OF CLERK. E.\ST BOSTON 
COURT. 

Notice was received from the .Secretary of the 
Commonwealth of appointment of William H. 
Barker as Clerk of District Court of East Boston 
District. 

Placed on file. 



DESIGX.XTION OF REV. THOMAS R. 
REYNOLD,S. 

Notice was received from the Massachusetts 
State Board of Housing of appointment of Rev. 
Thomas R. Reynolds, St. Stephen's Rectory, 24 
Clark street. Boston, as its representative member 
of Baston Housing Authority for term of three 
years. 

Placed on file. 



MINORS' LICENSES. 

Petitions were received for minors' licenses for 
eleven newsboys. Licenses granted under usual 
conditions. 



.SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

Coun. KERRIGAN, for the Committee on 
Soldiers' Relief, submitted report recommending 
passage of order for payment of aid to soldiers 
and sailors and their families in the City of Boston 
for the month of December. 1935. 

Report accepted; said order passed. 



APPROPRIATION FOR .SOCIAL LAW 
LIBRARY. 

Coun. ROBERTS offered the following: 
Ordered, That there be allowed and paid to the 
proprietors of the .Social Law Library the sum of 
one thousand dollars for the maintenance and 
enlargement of said library, said sum to be charged 
to the appropriation for County of Suffolk, Social 
Law Library. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



RECESS. . 

The Council voted at 2.42 p. m., on motion of 
Coun. SELVITELLA, to take a recess subject to 
the call of the Chair. The members reassembled 
in the Council Chamber and were called to order 
by President FITZGERALD at 4.18 p. m. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS. 

Report on message of Mayor and order (referred 
today) amending Compensation and Classification 
Plans and Rules for Otficers and Employees of 
Suffolk County in re compensation for dentists — 
that same ought to pass. 

Report accepted; order passed. 

2. Report on message of Mayor and order 
(referred today) that proceeds of tax title loans to 
be issued under authority in order passed Decem- 
ber 16 be appropriated to pay revenue loans of 
1935 — that same ought to pass. 

Report accepted; said order passed. ye.is 19, 
nays 0. 



ADDITIONAL COURTHOUSE FACILITIES. 

Coun. GOLDMAN— Mr. President, I move that 
at this time we take the courthouse order from the 
Executive Committee. 

(The order referred to, referred to the committee 
at the last regular meeting of the Council, was 
"That chapter 474 of the Acts of 1935 — being an 
act to pro\-ide additional courthouse accommoda- 
tions and facilities for the courts and other officials 
in the County of Suffolk by the use of Federal, 
State and City of Boston fund.s — be and the same 
is hereby accepted.") 

I feel that we absolutely ought to have new- 
courthouse accommodations and that the matter 
ought not to lie dormant. I. as an outgoing 
member, would like to see at least one thing accom- 
plished while I am serving as a member of the body. 

The question came on recalling the order from 
the Executive Committee. 

Coun. BRACKMAN— Mr. President, I voted 
in committee to lay this matter on the table and 
I am going to vote that way at least until Saturday. 
I think we ought to have some official word besides 
that of the second under-secretary that this is to be 
granted as a P. W. .\. fund before we cast our votes 
on the matter. 



Coun. SHATTUCK— Mr. President. I think, as 
the gentleman who has just taken his seat has 
said, that this should lie on the table until we 
receive some further information. I have on my 
desk an order a-sking the .Mayor to furnish to the 
Council full information as to precisely how far 
the Federal Government has committed it.self to a 
grant towards the proposed courthouse addition, 
giving the names of the officials to whom the pro- 
ject has been submitted and the written or oral 
approval, if any. given and b.v whom, and furnish- 
ing the Council with a copy of the application with 
full description of the project on which approval 
has been requested. 1 believe that we should 
have all that information before we act upon this 
important measure. I hope, therefore, that it will 
lie on the table until we have obtained such 
information. 

Coun. WILSON— Mr. President, while I have 
fought for years in the past for new .Suffolk County 
Courthouse accommodations, I am inclined to 
agree with the two gentlemen who have spoken 
that we should have more information upon the 
matter before voting. I thought the matter had 
been settled in Executive Committee for the time 
being by laying it on the table. In the first place, 
those who appeared before us, the commission that 
has had this matter under consideration, had only 
one copy of the proposal submitted so far as the 
Government is concerned, which included general 
plans, and they conveyed to us merely the general 
assurance that it did not involve any land-taking, 
and a copy of the proposal has been promised to 
us within a couple of days. We were also addressed 
by a representative of the Building Trades Council 
who assured the Council that this would mean 
work for 2,000 mechanics for two years. Without 
any reflection upon the particular delegate who 
addressed us, my past experience in the Council 
has shown me that before we vote, on the basis of 
very extensive promises of jobs for the unemployed 
of Boston, we should obtain something definite in 
the way of information as to what is actually 
going to happen. In such cases we frequently 
find that Boston men are very much out of the 
picture. If I gathered the assurance correctly, 
only .American citizens will be included in the 
2,000 on this great project, and at least 90 per 
cent will be residents of Boston, although to me, 
at least, I frankly admit that the gentleman who 
addressed the Executive Committee still left it 
rather hazy as to whether the 2,000 mechanics 
who will go to work on the project for two years or 
upwards will come from the lists at 100 Nashua 
street, under the auspices of Mr. Graham, an 
employee of the State of Massachusetts, or whether 
the men will be obtained primarily from the 
various labor unions of Boston. I am not par- 
ticularly interested in who names the 2,000 men. 
except that, under the circumstances, I assume 
that the men wiU be American citizens, and that 
by far the greater number will be Boston residents. 
We were assured also by the gentlemen who 
appeared before us that in the course of the next 
couple of days we would receive a copy of the act 
and assurances that in voting this money we would 
be really helping to provide work for Boston 
citizens. 

Coun. Goldman's motion to take the order 
from the Executive Committee prevailed by a 
rising vote of 14 to 5. 

Coun. GOLDMAN — Mr. President, I now move 
the passage of the order. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, I am a little 
surprised at the action proposed at this time, 
particularly in view of the action taken in Execu- 
tive Committee where, by a very substantial 
majority, the matter was laid on the table pend- 
ing the information desired by the members of 
the Council, and especially in view of the fact 
that we had been promised within a couple of 
days further detailed information in regard to the 
project I am, therefore, surprised, in view of the 
doubt that still prevails in our minds with regard 
to this whole thing, as to whether citizens of 
Boston shall do the work and otherwise, that we 
should now reverse our action of today in the 
Executive Committee, particularly when we have 
until the morning of the 6th of January to pass 
upon the matter, which need not be voted upon 
until the loth of January. Bearing all this in 
mind and having also in mind so far as I am 
personally concerned, the fact that I have favored 
and have fought for action upon this courthouse 
matter since 1926, I urge that the order lie on the 
table. 

Coun. GALLAGHER— Mr. President, I move 
that a committee of three be appointed to wait 
upon the Mayor and see what he has to say upon 
the matter and that awaiting their report we take 
a recess. 

Coun. Gallagher's motion was carried, and 
President FITZGERALD appointed Coun. Shat- 
tuck, Goldman and Fitzgerald said committee to 
wait on his Honor the Mayor. 

Awaiting the report of the committee, a recess 
was taken at 4.30 p. m., the members reassembling 
in the Council Chamber at 4.57 p. m., when 
Coun G.ALL.AGHER took the chair. 

Chairman GALLAGHER— The meeting will be 
in order. 

Coun. SHATTUCK — Mr. Chairman, your com- 
mittee met with his Honor the Ma.vor and his 
Honor communicated with Mr. Peterson, in charge 
of local Federal projects. -After a conversation 
with Mr. Peterson over the telephone his Honor 
had this memorandum written down: 

"In response to a question by his Honor the 
Mayor, Mr. Peterson of the W. P. A. office stated 



that the only information he has was that there 
was a long-djstance call from his office to Colonel 
Hackett in Washington. During the telephoue 
conversation Colonel Hackett said the project 
was under examination and that he was in favor 
of it. Colonel Hackett is sending a man up here 
either Thursday or Friday to look into it further." 
We were told, I believe through word received 
from Congressman McCormack, that this man, 
Mr. Bowman, was expected Thursday. He was 
to come today or tomorrow, but there has been 
a delay on account of the holiday. The report 
further says: 

" Mr. Peterson's office has had a conference 
with the Courthouse Commission, which a.ssured 
him that the cost of the courthouse would be 
around 84,000,000 or 84,250,000, and on that 
basis the Federal contribution would be about 
$2,000,000, and that word to that effect had been 
sent to Washington, and the only thing since then 
is the assurance that this engineer is coming here 
Thursday or Friday. In answer to Mayor Mans- 
field's query whether or not there had been any 
formal commitment, Mr. Peterson said appar- 
ently not, but he said when this gentleman from 
Washington comes here and goes over the ground 
and approves the project, which Mr. Peterson 
thinks he will, he will report back to Washington 
and then he thinks the formal commitment would 
be made. Mr. Peterson stated to the Mayor that, 
as he understood it, accepting the act involves no 
obligation on the part of the city, but it is neces- 
sary in order to have the approval amount to 
anything when it is made by Federal authorities." 
His Honor also communicated with Mr. Logue 
of the commission, whom we beard earlier this 
afternoon, and Mr. Logue said that the plans on 
which they submitted the project were plans 
obtained by Mr. Wyman when he was a member 
of the former commission, I think, some six years 
ago, and which were found among the files. As 
was generally explained this afternoon, those 
plans call for the tearing down of the lower end of 
the existing courthouse and substituting an 
eighteen-story building, and, when that is done, 
altering the present structure, and modernizing it 
in the matter of elevators, plumbing and rearrang- 
ing space. It will be observed that really nothing 
has been done, so far as Washington approval is 
concerned, except that Mr. Peterson, the local 
man here, favors the project and that he has 
spoken of it in Washington to Colonel Hackett 
and that Colonel Hackett is going to send somebody 
up here Thursday or Friday to look it over. j\Ir. 
Peterson thinks the person who will be sent up 
here Thursday or Friday to look it over will ap- 
prove it, but, of course, he does not know. He 
thinks he will, but, of course, there is nothing oral 
or in writing to support that. Washington will 
undoubtedly do as it sees fit. 

Coun. WILSON— Mr. President, I would Uke 
to ask a question. Do I understand that the 
tentative approval by the local man of the Govern- 
ment is on the basis of §4,000,000 or around 
§5,000,000, or do I get that part of it wrong? 

Coun. SHATTUCK— The figure in the memo- 
randum prepared by the Mayor as the result of his 
conversation with Mr. Peterson was §4,250,000. 
I assume that that figure probably omits the 
§200,000 odd to be used in hiring other office 
space, and that there is some spread. 

Coun. WILSON — Do I understand that action 
by the Council today or at a later date will not 
necessarily close it, that the question of a formal 
grant to be approved by the city is to come back 
to the Council? Will there be a later vote of the 
Council on the courthouse project, assuming that 
we vote today, Saturday or Monday on it? 

Coun. SH.\TTUCK— I think under the terms 
of the act there would be no further action by the 
Council. Certainly, the bonds could be issued 
without any approval by the Council. I am told, 
although I cannot cite book or page, and I don't 
know myself what the authority in the statute is, 
but his Honor so stated and it has been stated by 
several members of the Council, that if the Federal 
Government acts favorably upon the matter, in 
line with the action taken by the Massachusetts 
Legislature, they would submit the project for 
subsequent approval. I am not sufficiently 
familiar with the way with which they do things 
in Washington, however, or what their rulings 
may be, to know whether that understanding is 
correct or not. 

Coun. FITZGERALD— Mr. President, I want 
to add this to what Councilor Shattuck has stated. 
The Mayor take; the stand, and I understand that 
the Washington authorities in these matters take 
the stand, that these things should first be accepted 
by the local authorities here. Now, we know that 
Massachusetts has suffered a great deal in the 
past in the matter of allotments by the Federal 
Government as compared with other parts of the 
country, that we have been behind. We know- 
that the feeling in Washington has been against 
Massachusetts and that we have lost millions 
that have gone to the South and other parts of the 
country. Let me call the attention of the Council 
to page 2 of this report on additional courthouse 
accommodations for Suffolk County. 

"In case the act is not accepted by the Council 
the §2,151.000 will revert for use on other projects 
located elsewhere in the state, or perhaps outside 
the state, and the large pay rolls and other building 
activities which this project means for Boston 
will go elsewhere. Incidentally, of course, Boston 
will pay its share of the carrying charges of 
the $2,151,000 wherever it is spent," — -as we 
always do. 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



35 



We sll know, of course, that much of the Federal 
money, even for Massachusetts, has been spent 
outside of Boston and that Boston has obtained 
very little benefit from it. Now. the fact remains 
that we will have to pay. anyway. Anybody who 
knows conditions in the lower part of the court- 
house knows that they are most disgraceful, that 
they are probably the worst to be found in the 
entire United States. Those conditions have been 
severely criticized in reports by different com- 
mittees. Anybody who has ever visited the 
Tombs will certainly call it a chamber of horrors. 
There is nothing to compare with conditions there 
anywhere else. We have heard about Blackwell's 
Island, in New York, but anybody who has 
visited that island knows that the conditions 
criticized there do not compare with the condi- 
tions in the Tombs in Boston. Now. if we are 
going to get this we ought to act. The Mayor 
has abandoned the idea of a new City Hall. That 
is out. We as a body have not been as progressive 
as we might have been. We have allowed plenty 
of opportunities to get away. We are a part of 
the government. We are the Board of Directors 
of the city and share in the responsibility for what 
is done or what is not done, and it is up to the 
City Council to at least exercise the power it has. 
Certainly, no harm can be done by accepting the 
act. The Courthouse Commission is made up of 
responsible men. The Supreme Court is repre- 
sented by a member; the Governor and the Mayor 
are represented by members. Much should have 
been done for the district I represent before this, 
not only in the matter of the courthouse, but in 
other ways. For instance, Somerset street should 
have been extended to Cambridge street, and it 
has been a mistake not to do it. There is no 
question whatever that steps to increase the 
courthouse accommodations should be taken 
at once. The courthouse should be enlarged. 
There should be better accommodations for the 
Probate Court. Juveniles should not be handled 
in the present Juvenile Court. It is a court. The 
present quarters should be abandoned. These 
social workers and reformers who want to reform 
everything certainly cannot reform these boys 
by putting them down into that dingy basement. 
The place has been an eyesore, and there are many 
other serious criticisms to be made of the present 
conditions up there. The city government ought 
to seize this opportunity. Let us pass the order, 
and if nothing is given to us no harm can be done. 
Let us at least accept the act and we will then be 
on the safe side of the picture. I think Mr. 
Shattuck was a member of the last commission 
that dealt with this matter. These plans have 
been in existence for some time. I feel, repre- 
senting that district, as I do. the district where 
the courthouse is located, that thLs work should 
be put through as soon as possible. We have 
better courthouses in the outlying districts. 
I think any lavvyer who is familiar with the Nor- 
folk County Courthouse and the Middlesex, 
Worcester and Hampden County Courthouses 
knows perfectly well that our courthouse here 
in Boston is a monstrosity compared with those 
beautiful buildings. The accommodations here 
for the .Supreme Court are a disgrace. This is an 
opportunity to accept the act and. if no money is 
forthcoming, at least no harm is done. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, the councilor 
from Ward 3 (Coun. Fitzgerald), for whom I have 
the highest respect, does not need to sell to me the 
idea of a Suffolk County Courthouse because I 
have fought frequently along with him and others 
for such a building, sometimes almost alone. 
And yet, as a member of the City Council and 
thereby a member of the Board of Directors of the 
City of Boston, I don't assume that there is any 
harm in asking today whether I am voting for 40 
per cent of $4,000,000 or $.5,000,000. It is. I 
admit, most humiliating to find that we. the Board 
of Directors of the City of Boston, only obtain 
most of the information we obtain in this and 
other similar matters from the Chief Executive 
when it sort of leaks out. as it has today. For 
example. I. for one. learned today for the first time 
that the proposed new City Hall, against which I 
voted, has now been abandoned by the Mayor, 
and I would assume that that would make it much 
easier for the average member of the body to vote 
for the proposed courthouse, having in mind that 
what we supposed was the favorite project of the 
Mayor, a new City Hall, has been given up. I now 
find, as a director of the city, that the information 
has finally leaked through to us that the proposed 
new City Hall is out the window. I wish, before 
I vote on this matter, that I could learn whether, 
in voting for this matter, I would be voting for 40 
per cent on $4,000,000 or $5,000,000. and I wish 
we could find out about that, perhaps either 
through the Mayor or Governor, by Thursday or 
Friday. I also wish I knew — and perhaps we could 
learn about this from the office of Corporation 
Counsel Foley, whether, if we vote for this today, 
there will come back to us, under government regu- 
lations, some paper or document which may help 
to clear up some of the hazy details and which will 
be subject to approval by the City Council. I 
don't like to feel that I am finicky in standing on 
this ground. I like to feel, as a reafOnable man. 
that I and the other members of the body are 
entitled to information of that nature. I say 
again, as I said in the first place, that we have not 
got to vote upon this today, that no action of the 
Council is required until January 15, if I read it 
correctly. Councilor Goldman would like to see 
the present Council vote on the matter. Well, 
we have until January 6 to vote on it. I under- 



stand, through the Mayor, that a representative 
from Washington is going to have a conference 
here upon the matter on Thursday or Friday of 
this week. The information so gained ought to be 
somewhat illuminating on the question of whether 
this project is going to cost $4,000,000 or $5,000,000. 
Perhaps by that time, also, we may be able to glean 
the further information, on advice of the Corpora- 
tion Counsel, as to whether a government document 
will later come through to >is, this matter being 
again submitted to the City Council. Bearing 
these things in mind, even though I agree that a 
new courthouse is a necessity. I personally urge 
that this matter lie on the table until the next meet- 
ing of the Council. 

Coun. FITZGERALD— Mr. President, I wish 
to state further what the Mayor wishes to do in 
reference to City Hall. The City Council will 
probably have to move from their headquarters to 
Faneuil Hall while probably sometning like 
•SoOO.OOO is spent to put this building, City Hall, 
in proper condition. That will have to be done 
on orders from the Building Commissioner. 

Coun. ROBERTS— Mr. President, perhaps it 
is true that a small courthouse is better than 
none at all. I think we all thoroughly realize the 
importance of enlarged accommodations in our 
courthouse, but I also think that we are entitled 
to certain information before we are called upon 
to act, and we will still have an opportunity to 
act upon this matter before the present Council 
goes out of existence. I think we should have a 
clearer idea of the situation. I understand that 
it is proposed to tear down the lower part of the 
courthouse and to erect an eighteen-story building 
and also to remodel the present courthouse. 
Certainly, something should better be done for 
offices oif the clerks of the Superior Criminal and 
Superior Civil Courts, and of the municipal 
criminal and civil courts. I realize thoroughly 
that the hard working clerks are entitled to such 
offices and quarters as they can obtain in such a 
new building as is proposed, and I would like to 
see them obtain that recognition. The idea, 
however, that this is to be a whollj- new court- 
house is not true. For ordinary purposes it 
mean.s that litigants will go into an old courthouse 
remodeled, where probably the Registry of Deeds 
and the clerks' offices will be more conveniently 
located. In other words, the problem is, among 
other things, to provide proper office space for the 
clerks of the Commonwealth. Whether that is 
the best we can do, I don't know. But I think, 
in any event, it will do no harm to havte three o 
four days in which to think the matter over and 
perhaps to have what in proposed properly set 
forth and covered by the press. 

Coun. BR.\CKMAN— Mr. President. I would 
like to say jast a word on this matter. As a 
matter of fact, the City of Boston does not seem 
to have had the opportunity to take advantage of 
these projects that have been undertaken in differ- 
ent parts of the country. I have sat here when we 
have voted for millions of projects that never went 
into effect, that were afterwards killed by some- 
body that sat on them, a state or other board. 
'This is another case where we have no definite 
approval of the project by a Federal authority. 
We are simply asked to vote upon something which 
we don't know will ever ^o into effect. I am 
rather tired of votng for millions and getting no 
results. So I am going to wait on this matter 
until we get some definite information. 

Coun. GOLDMAN — Mr. President, there is 
practically no doubt that every member of this 
body wants a new courthouse. The question here 
seems to be merely whether we will vote for the 
order accepting the act today or whether we will 
pass it at our next meeting. I am able to sense 
from the remarks of the Mayor that the gentleman 
coming from Washington later in the week is 
going to make an independent investigation and 
then report back to Colonel Hackett with the 
probability that the project will be approved. 
The suggestion made that this gentleman is a 
friend of Congressman McCormack may indicate 
something in the matter, although I do not know 
as to that. It does, however, seem to be the 
sense of every man here that we do want an en- 
larged courthouse. I cannot see any possible 
objection to the passage of the order today. A 
delay of three or four days will not help. On the 
contrary, it may have a bad effect, for this reason. 
If the gentleman who makes the independent 
survey goes back to Washington and reports 
that the act has been accepted by the Council, 
that all the members apparently want the court- 
bouse, I feel that there would not be any objection 
to it. On the other hand, if he says, "I am in 
favor of it, but the City Council of Boston has not 
yet approved it," Washington may again assume 
its past policy of forgetting the Bay State, and we 
may be sidetracked. We want this. Let us 
have it. 

Coun. WILSON— Mr. President, may I ask the 
third member of the committee whether he is 
desirous of voting on a $4,000,000 or a $5,000,000 
courthouse? 

Coun. GOLDMAN— Mr. President, in the light 
of the discussion in the Mayor's Office I am inclined 
to think the expense will be $4,200,000 and some 
odd, not taking in the 25 per cent that Councilor 
Shattuck spoke about. 

The report was accepted and the order accepting 
the act was declared passed. 

Coun. SHATTUCK— Mr. President, I doubt 
the vote and ask for the yeas and nays. 
Coun. WILSON— Mr. President. 



Chairman GALLAGHER — No debate is in order. 

Coun. WILSON— Mr. President, I rise to a 
point of order, that before that last motion I made 
a motion to lay on the table, which was not put to 
the body. 

Chairman GALLAGHER — The gentleman 
urged that the matter lie on the table, but did not 
make the motion. 

Coun. WILSON — Then, following up my point 
of order, Mr. Chairman, may I ask the Council to 
reject the order at this time, in order that a motion 
to lay the matter on the table may be passed? 

Chairman GALLAGHER— The Chair will have 
to rule that debate is out of order. 

The order accepting the act was passed, yeas 16, 
nays 4: 

Yeas — Coun. Agnew, Brackman, Doherty, 
Donovan, Englert, Finley, Fish, Fitzgerald, 
Gallagher, Gleason, Goldman, Green, Kerrigan, 
McGrath, Selvitella, Tobin— 16. 

Nays — Coun. Norton, Roberts, Shattuck, Wilson 
— 4. 

Later in the session Coun. WILSON moved a 
reconsideration of the vote passing the order; 
declared lost. 

Coun. WILSON doubted the vote and asked for 
a rising vote. A rising vote was taken and the 
motion to reconsider was lost, 2 to 5. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON JITNEY 
LICENSES. 

Coun. MURRAY, for the Committee on Jitney 
Licenses, aubmitted the following: 

1. Report on petition (referred December 21) 
of Boston Elevated Railway Company to operate 
motor vehicles between junction of Brooks and 
Faneuil streets and junction of Washington and 
Matehett streets — that license be granted. 

Report accepted; license granted on usual 
conditions. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS. 

_ Coun. GOLDMAN, for the Committee on 
Claims, submitted the following: 

1. Report on petition of Walter J. Clancy (re- 
ferred December 9) to be reimbursed for execution 
issued again.st him on account of his acts as operator 
of motor vehicle belonging to Paving Division, 
Public Works Department — recommending pa.s- 
sage of accompanying order, viz.: 

Ordered. That the sum of one hundred sixty-four 
dollars and forty-five cents be allowed and paid to 
Walter J. Clancy in reimbursement for execution 
issued against him on account of his acts as operator 
of a motor vehicle belonging to the Paving Divi- 
sion, Public Works Department, said sum to be 
charged to the Reserve Fund. 

Report accepted ; said order passed. 

2. Report on petition of Walter J. Clancy 
(referred December 9) to be reimbursed for execu- 
tion issued against him on account of his acts as 
operator of motor vehicle belonging to Paving 
Division. Public Works Department — recommend- 
ing passage of accompanying order, viz. : 

Ordered. That the sum of sixty-five dollars 
and seventy-eight cents be allowed and paid to 
Walter J. Clancy in reimbursement for execu- 
tion issued against him on account of his acts 
as operator of a motor vehicle belonging to the 
Paving Division. Public Works Department, 
said sum to be charged to the Reserve Fund. 

Report accepted; said order passed. 

3. Report on petition of Mclvin T. Rogers 
(referred December 2) to be reimbursed for 
execution i.ssued against him on account of his 
acts as operator of motor vehicle belonging to 
Sanitary Division, Public Works Department — 
recommending pas.sage of accompanying order, 
viz.: 

Ordered. That the sum of thirty-.seven dollars 
and fifty cents be allowed and paid to Melvin T. 
Rogers in reimbursement for execution issued 
against him on account of his acts as operator of a 
motor vehicle belonging to the Sanitary Division. 
Public Works Department, said sum to be charged 
to the Reserve Fund. 

Report accepted; said order passed. 

4. Report on petition of Martin J. McDonough 
(referred November 25) to be reimbursed for 
execution issued against him on account of his 
acts as operator of motor vehicle belonging to 
Paving Division, Public Works Department — • 
recommending passage of accompanying order, viz. : 

Ordered. That the sum of three hundred dollars 
be allowed and paid to Martin J. McDonough in 
reimbursement for execution issued against him 
on account of his acts as operator of a motor vehicle 
belonging to the Paving Division, Public Works 
Department, said sum to be charged to the Reserve 
Fund. 

Report accepted; said order pa.ssed. 



PURCHASE OF SNOW EQUIPMENT- 
Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor request the 
Purchasing Agent to furnish this Council forth- 
with information as to what action has been taken 
on the purchase of snow equipment. 



36 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 11 



Coun. lyicGRATH— Mr. President, on Decem- 
ber 3 thix Council psMted an order involving 
nearly $700,000 for the purchase of Bnow equip- 
ment. Venterdny. by the grace of God, a snow- 
Htorm headed for l)o.ston, that would liave tied up 
traffic -the one that I guess Mr. Shaw wa,s waiting 
for — wa.s blown out to sea. This morning again — 
and Providence must be with the Mayor in these 
matters bo far — another threatening storm was 
blown somewhere else. But they are not going to 
keep blowing away from Boston, and some day or 
other a big storm will land here. I have been 
making in(|uiries as to what has been done with 
that appropriation, in connection with which 
several meetings of the Council were called. They 
wanted us to have the appropriation ready some 
months ago, and, in their haste to get this etiuip- 
ment to meet an emergency that might arise, they 
adverti,sed for the equipment previous to the time 
when the Council finally passed the order. There 
was a concern that had e<iuipment in Boston all 
ready to deliver. Then something happened. 
Perhaps they failed to get delivery, because they 
are now out in the open market looking for equip- 
ment. We will have to have that equipment to 
handle the first storm that comes along, but still 
they have waited a month apparently without 
doing anything about it. I would like at our last 
meeting of the Council on Saturday of this week to 
have a report from the Purchasing -Agent, through 
the Mayor, as to just what has been done and 
when we may expect our snow-removal equipment. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



APPROPRIATION FOR ARCHITECTS' FEES, 
CITY HALL. 

Coun. McGR.\TH offered the following: 

Ordered. That his Honor the Mayor inform the 
Council what disposition has been made of the 
$60,000 appropriation for architects' fees for anew 
City Hall, now that the building of a new City Hall 
has been abandoned. If payment has been made 
to inform the Council to whom, in what amount, 
and on what date payment was made. 

Coun. McGRATH— Mr. President, with a great 
deal of haste this Council a short while ago passed 
an appropriation of $60,000 as the first payment 
on some $120,000 for architects' fees for the erection 
of a new City Hall, because, based on the report 
of the Building Commissioner, but forty-eight 
hours would elapse before this Hall would collapse. 
They were at that time talking about closing 
the doors of this chamber because the building 
and the room were unsafe, and we were whipped 
into line so that they could get the appropriation. 
"Then, almost as though we had never discussed 
that appropriation, one of the gentlemen on the 
Courthouse Commission said, "We are talking now 
of taking old Young's Hotel for temporary accom- 
modations for the courthouse, because of the fact 
that, since the Mayor has abandoned the building 
of a new City Hall, there will be no need of using 
Young's Hotel for a City Hotel." That was the 
first intimation that any member of the Council 
got that there was not to be a new City Hall built. 
.\nd so I ask now this very innocent question, 
through this order, as to what has been done with 
the $60,000. I am very hesitant about accepting 
what was told to me in the outside room, that 
the $60,000. or a substantial part of it, has already 
been paid over to an architect. If that is so. it 
comes about as near taking money under false 
pretences as anything I have heard of. So I now 
want to find out from the Mayor what the situa- 
tion is with regard to the $60,000. 

Coun. WILSON— Mr. President, I would like 
to ask the councilor whether it is safe to hold our 
meeting here on next Saturday? 

Coun. McGR.\TH— Well, Mr. President, from 
what I know of the Hall, it is always safer on the 
fourth floor than on the second floor! (Laughter.) 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



INCREASED CAR SERVICE. 
Coun. KERRIG.AN offered the following: 
Ordered. That the trustees of the Boston Ele- 
vated Railway Company be requested, through 
his Honor the Mayor, to increase the service on tne 
Dudley street-City Point line. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



SOUTH BOSTON GYMNASIUM. 

Coun. KERRIGAN and Coun. DONOVAN 
offered the following: 

Ordered. That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to arrange, either through a P. W. A. loan, or 
through a loan within the debt limit, for the con- 
struction of a municipal gymnasium in the South 
Boston district. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



TWO COMMUNITY CENTERS. 
Coun. KERRIGAN offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to consider the ad\nsabiUty of proN-iding 
sufficient funds for the erection of two community 



centers, one in .South Boston and one in the Dor- 
chester end of Ward 7. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



PROPOSED DEPART.MENT RE- 
ORGANIZATION. 

Coun. McGR.ATH called up, under unfinished 
business, No. 1 on the calender, viz.: 

1. Action on ordinance submitted by the 
Mayor December 16, 193.5, as printed in City 
Document 91, for the aboUtion of certain depart- 
ments and the reorganization of the Public Works 
Department. 

Coun. McGRATH— .Mr. President, I have 
called that up for the purpose of rejecting it. We 
have had no further information, except this 
lengthy booklet presented to us today. I think 
this will become purely the duty of the new Coun- 
cil, which will come in within a week's time and 
will have an opportunity to appoint committees 
early, to study the matter, and to know something 
about it before it goes into effect under the sixty- 
day rule and I move its rejection. 

Coun. FITZGERALD- 1 would suggest that a 
motion might be made to refer it to the next City 
Council. 

Chairman GALLAGHER— The Chair will 
state that the Mayor may resubmit it. 

Coun. NORTON- -Mr. President, I have seen 
no evidence whatever that the Mayor is legiti- 
mately back of this consolidation plan. In other 
words, what he has done is this: when representa- 
tives of the Chamber of Commerce or the Real 
Estate Exchange have come to him and said, 
"Mr. Mayor, you have the power to do this, and 
nothing has been done," he will simply say that 
he has put it up to the Council, that it is up to 
them. The fact is that the Mayor can do about 
as he pleases with any Council. There is. how- 
ever, one thing that the Mayor should and must 
write into this ordinance, and I submit it because 
of what was done by the state in a similar matter, 
\mder the late Calvin Coolidge, and that is that 
no employees shall be disturbed in their civil serv- 
ice rights. That is a thing that must be done, 
and the Mayor should know that. But this is 
merely passing the buck to the Council; merely 
giving the Mayor an opportunity to say to certain 
people, "I have done my duty, having put it up 
to the Council." I answer that the JIayor can 
get anything he wants from the Council and he 
knows it. 

Chairman G.\LL.\GHER — The question comes 
on the rejection of the ordinance. 

Coun. SHATTUCK— Mr. President, I have 
read this report upon the proposed consolidation 
with some care, and for the most part I am in favor 
of it. I think it is a constructive change. There- 
fore, I am not in favor of rejecting it right off the 
bat without hearing or examination. We have 
never even looked at it or given it any considera- 
tion in the Council. I should think that some 
amendments ought to be considered — among 
others, an amendment along the line referred to 
by the gentleman from Hyde Park (Coun. Norton), 
a section such as was contained in the law of 1919, 
under which the state departments were reorgan- 
ized. In that section they prodded for the 
maintenance of the civil service rating of the 
employees and the maintenance of their pension 
rights and privileges, and for their protection in 
their jobs. I believe that something of that 
nature should be inserted in this act. But for the 
most part, at least from my reading of it, it seems 
to me it represents a healthful and constructive 
change, one that would bring about greater effi- 
ciency and economy in the city's business. It has 
been studied very carefully by a competent body 
of men and I believe we should not reject it in this 
summary manner. I shall, therefore, vote against 
rejection. 

Coun. BRACKMAN— Mr. President, we have 
not even had time to read this voluminous docu- 
ment, and there is a question that suggests itself 
here. Nobody understands whether the sixty-day 
limit starts from the time when the ordinance was 
first submitted and goes right along, or whether it 
starts anew with the new Council. This is too 
important a matter to deal with on the basis of a 
moot question, and I think the only thing to do 
is to reject it and then have the Mayor send it in 
to the new Council. 

Coun. ROBERTS— Mr. President, I would like 
to insert in the motion to reject that it be rejected 
without prejudice. 

Chairman G.ALLAGHER- The Chair will put 
the question in that form. The question is on the 
rejection of No. 1 on the calendar without prejudice. 

The ordinance was rejected without prejudice. 



THE NEXT MEETING. 

"The Council voted, on motion of Coun. SEL- 
VITELL.A, that when it adjourn it be to meet on 
Saturday, January 4, 1936, at 11 a. m. 



FINANCE COMMISSION REPORT ON 
ARCHITECTS' FEES. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Finance Commission report 
to the Council regarding the S60,000 appropriated 
for architects' fees on the proposed new City Hall. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



EMPLOYEES' CIVIL SERVICE STANDING. 
Coun. NORTON offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston consider 
recommending a provision in the proposed ordi- 
nance for consolidation of departments, to the effect 
that no employee will lose his ciWI service standing, 
similar to the provision written into the law when 
the State of Mas.sachuset ts consoUdation plan went 
into effect under the then Governor, the late Calvin 
Coolidge. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



CENSUS OF UNEMPLOYED IN BOSTON. 

Coun. NORTON offered the foUowing: 

Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston consider the 
advisabiUty of requesting the Police Commissioner 
to ascertain the number of unemployed in Boston 
when taking the census. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, I am simply 
asking that the police make a note of the unem- 
ployed, "yes" or "no." We know how many 
automobiles and how many horses there are in 
Boston, but never have known how many unem- 
ployed were in Boston. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



REQUEST NOT TO REDUCE WELFARE. 
Coun. NORTON offered the foUowing: 
Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston consider the 
advisability of requesting the directors of Public 
Welfare not to reduce welfare at this time. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



HEARING OF BOSTON BONDING 
BUSINESS. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following. 

Ordered. That the Boston Finance Commission 
be requested to hold an open, public hearing on the 
matter of the so-called City of Boston bonding 
business. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, that is dyna- 
mite! I understand that the Finance Commission 
is holding private hearings on something upon 
which I asked an investigation a year ago. I am 
requesting the Finance Commission to hold a 
public hearing on this matter. There is some 
evidence, and let it be public. Let the public 
decide who is right on this thing. This has to do 
with the so-called bonding racket. The Mayor 
of Boston promised in his campaign that he would 
stop the bonding racket. Let us find out what 
has happened in the last two years and who is 
getting the bonds. There is a private investi- 
gation going on at the present time, and I am ask- 
ing that commission to make the investigation 
public. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



REPAIR OF STREETS. 

Coun. NORTON offered the foUowing: 

Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston consider the 
advisabiUty of fixing every street in Boston under 
the present Federal W. P. A. set-up. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, it is too bad 
that nothing is being done. It is too bad when 
we can fix every street in Boston, 670-odd miles, 
with the Government paying the men to do the 
work, that nothing is being done. We wiU never 
again get such an opportunity. AU we need is to 
furnish 4 inches of crushed stone. Here is an 
opportunity to fix every street, and we are prac- 
tically lying down under it. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



PREFERENCE TO FORMER E.MPLOYEES. 
Coun. NORTON offered the foUowing: 
Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston consider the 

ad\isability of giving preference in employment 

to those city employees let go during the first part 

of his administration. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



BURIAL OF PAUPER POOR. 
Coun. NORTON offered the foUowing: 
Ordered. That the Mayor of Boston consider 
the advisability of conferring with the directors of 
Public Welfare relative to the matter of working 
out a more equitable policy relative to the burial 
of the city's pauper poor. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, I understand 
that the city this year will have made between 
four hundred and fifty and five hundred of such 
burials. That is the latest information I save 
been able to get in regard to those who have been 
unable to pay for burial. -At present, there is 
S20 paid for a pine box and they pay for the open- 
ing of the grave. It does seem as though it 
should be possible to work out some equitable 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



37 



system, — instead of carting the bodies out to 
the paupers' section of the cemetery, — have it 
worked out in some better and more equitable 
way. as is done in other larger cities. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



IMMEDI.iTE PAYMENT OF BONUS. 

Coun. AGNEW offered the following: 

Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby favors the immediate payment of the cash 
bonus to all veterans of the World War and favors 
the passage of any appropriate legislation for 
this purpose; and be it further 

Resolved, That copies of this resolution be sent 
to the United .States .Senators and Members of 
Congress from Massachusetts. 

Referred to the Committee on Rules. 



MEETINGS OF .SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
Coun. WILSON offered the following: 
Ordered. That the School Committee be re- 
quested, through his Honor the Mayor, in the 
future to hold its official meetings in public in 
accordance with the usual practice of legislative 
bodies. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



.\djoumed at 5.43 p. m., on motion of Coun. 
TOBIN, to meet on Saturday, January 4, 1936, 
at 11 a. ra. 



COST OF UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF. 

The annual cost of various typea of 
unemployment relief made by the 
National Industrial Conference Board, 
based on 3,500,000 relief cases, have been 
estimated at from a little less than 
$1,000,000,000 for direct relief of the type 
received by more than half of the per- 
sons now on the relief rolls to over 
$8,000,000,000 for public works relief, with 
full-time employment, at the "prevail- 
ing wage" rate. According to the re- 
port released February 28 the story is: 

"The average cost of direct relief per 
case during the third quarter of the past 
year was at the rate of slightly over $280 
per year. At this annual rate the total 
cost for 3,500,000 cases would amount 
to $989,000,000. The average cost of 
work relief has been around 50 per cent 
greater than the cost of direct relief. 
The average for the third quarter of 1934 
was slightly over $35 per month, or 
around $420 per year. Continuous em- 
ployment for 3,500,000 persons during a 
period of twelve months would cost 
$1,475,000,000. 



GOVERNMENT REPORTS ON ELECTRIC 
RATES. 

Two government bodies reported on 
electric rates in February. Indeed, the 
joint legislative committee of New York 
included gas as well as power and light 
rates, finding them all unfavorable to 
the consumer. This was on February 15, 
and twelve days prior to this the Elec- 
tric Rate Survey of the Federal Power 
Commission made public a set of com- 
parative tables showing the widely dif- 
fering rates effective on January 1, 1935, 
in the 191 cities of 50,000 or more, con- 
stituting 49 per cent of the residential 
customers in the United States. All 
communities of 1,000 or more will eventu- 
ally be covered by June 30 next. 

This latter survey, under the direction 
of William E. Mosher, shows that cities 
owning their own plants charge less than 
do the commercial utilities. In cities of 
100,000 or more having the lowest rates, 
thi/ was invariably the case. In these 
cities where rates were highest, Jackson- 
ville was the only municipally served 
city. 



PROCEEDINGS OF SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 

Dec. 16, 1935 
A regular meeting of the School 
Committee of the City of Boston 
was held in the Administration 
Building, 15 Beacon Street, at 9:.'30 
o'clock P. M., the Chairman pre- 
siding. 

Present: Messrs. Lyons, Mackey, 
Sullivan and Tobin. 



APPROVAL OF MINUTES 

The reading of the minutes of 
the previous meeting was omitted, 
the Committee approving them as 
printed. 



APPROVAL OF APPOINT- 
MENTS 

The Chairman stated the ques- 
tion was on approving the ap- 
pointments of teachers, as reported 
by the Superintendent and laid 
over at the previous meeting. 

The appointments were aj)- 
proved. 

DEATHS 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named 
teachers: 

Bigelow District — Mary M. Rue- 
sell, assistant, elementary, Dec. 
15, 1935. 

Hancock District — Kathryn E. 
G Barry, Nov. 30, 1935. 

Placed on file. 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named 
teacher who had been retired un- 
der the provisions of the Boston 
Retirement System: 

Lawrence District — Mary E. 
Flynn, Dec. 14, 1£ j. 

Placed on file. 



RESIGNATIONS 

The following resignations re- 
ported by the Superintendent to 
take effect on the dates stated, 
were presented: 

Gaston District — Regina M. 
Cronin, assistant, elementary. Nov. 
27. 1935. 

Gilbert Stuart District — Eliza- 
beth A. Byrne, assistant, kindergar- 
ten, Dec. 6, 1935. 

Accepted. 

The Superintendent reported the 
resignation of the foUowing-nam-j-l 
clerical assistant: 

Edmund P. Tileston and Edward 
Everett Districts — Alice K. Grea- 
lish, clerical assistant, Dec. 6, 1935. 

Accepted. 

RETIREMENT ON PENSION 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935, reporting the 
retirement from active service of 
the following-named member of 
the Boston Retirement System, to 
take effect Dec. 31, 1935, as certi- 
fied by the Boston Retirement 
Board, under date of Dec. 13, 1935: 

Department of Household Science 
and Arts — Clara D. Crandall, teach- 
er of sewing, elementary, Dec. 31, 
1935. 

Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENTS 

The following appointments by 
the Superintendent, certified by 
him as being in accordance with 
the rules and regulations to take 
efiject on the dates stated, were 
presented: 

(FROM THE ELIGIBLE LIST) 

(To fill vacancies caused by in- 
crease in numbers) 

Public Latin School — Cyril J. 
Neville, junior master, Jan. 2, 1936. 

Robert Gould Shaw District — 
Catharine H. McDonagh, assistant, 
intermediate (from assistant, ele- 
mentary, Agassiz District), Jan. 2, 
1936. 

Laid over. 

(To fill vacancy caused by transfer) 
Longfellow District — Jessie G. 

Wilkinson, assistant, kindergarten, 

one session, Jan. 2, 1936. 
Laid over. 

(To fill vacancy caused by promo- 
tion) 

Thomas A. Edison Intermediate 
District — Mary G. Diaz, assistant, 
intermediate, Jan. 2, 1936. 

Laid over. 

(To fill vacancy caused by retire- 
ment on pension) 

Department of School Hygiene — 
Mary V. Hicks, school nurse, Jan. 
2, 1936. 

Laid over. 

(BY PROMOTION) 

(Director) 
(To fill vacancy caused by retire- 
ment on pension) 
Department of Music — James A. 
Ecker, director (from assistant di- 
rector), Jan. 2, 1936. 
Laid over. 

(To fill vacancies caused by deaths) 
Rice District— Marie I. Daly, first 
assistant, kindergarten, one session 
(from assistant, kindergarten, one 
session, Wililam E. Endicott Dis- 
trict), Jan. 2, 1936. 

Warren District— Elizabeth L. 
McCarthy, master's assistant (from 
assistant, intermediate, Clarence R. 
Edwards Intermediate District), 
Jan. 2, 1936. 
Laid over. 

(To fill vacancy caused by transfer) 
Longfellow District— Marie A. 
Gordon, first assistant, kindergar- 
ten, one session (from assistant, 
kindergarten, two sessions, Roger 
Wolcott District), Jan. 2, 1936. 
Laid over. 

(MODEL SCHOOL) 

(To fill vacancy caused by 
resignation) 
Martin District (Model School)— 
Grace M. Sweeney, assistant, ele- 
mentary (from assistant, elemen- 
tary, Minot District), Jan. 2, 1936. 
Laid over. 

(ASSISTANT. INTERMEDIATE, FROM 
ASSISTANT, ELEMENTARY) 

(To fill vacancy caused by increase 
in numbers) 
Grover Cleveland Intermediate 
District— Josephine M. Gately, as- 
sistant, intermediate (from assis- 



38 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 11 



tant, elementary, Theodore Roose- 
velt Intermediate District), Dec. 18, 
1935. 
Laid over. 

LIST OF TKACHERS APPROVED FOR 
TEMPORARY SERVICE 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935, submitting 
under the provisions of Section 365, 
paragraph 2 of the regulations, the 
following additions to the list of 
teachers approved by him from 
which assignments may be made 
for temporary service: 

Day High Schools — Adelaide A. 
Connors, Catherme T. Frazier, Mary 
M. Hatton. Mary I. Masterson, Ed- 
ward McCrensky, Carl Miller, 
Francis X. Murphy, Ethna J. Sil- 
very. 

Day Intermediate Schools — Gen- 
evieve M. Connor, Ruth G Folc 
Dorothy E. Mackenzie, Sylvia 
M. Maffeo, Florence Magner, Fhv 
S. Margolis, Freda S. Nathanson, 
Judith Revitt, Domenica M. St'it- 
niolo, Rebecca L. Wolf. 

Day Elementary Schools —Eliza 
beth M. MacNeil, Mary K. Pheian 

Continuation School — Georjre 
Gold, Alice M. Smith. 

Boston Clerical School — Francps 
A. Scoff. 

Disciplinary Day School — Heien 
M. Lynch, Michael Gilarde. 

Approved. 

TEMPORARY TEACHERS 

Mechanic Arts High School — 
Louis L. DeGiacomo, junior mas- 
ter, Nov. 8, 1935. 

South Boston High School — Sam- 
uel Draisen, co-operative instruc- 
tor, Nov. 25, 1935. 

Continuation School — Attilia 
Vena, trade assistant, Nov. 18, 1935. 

Department of Manual Arts — 
George Thomson, instructor, man- 
ual training, elementary, Dec. 4, 
1935; George Thomson, assistant, 
manual training, intermediate, 
Dec. 6, 1935. 

Approved. 

SPECIAL ASSISTANTS 
(New Appointment) 
Boston Trade School — Albert T. 
Erhardt, mechanical department, 
Dec. 9, 1935. 
Approved. 

Day School for Immigrants — M. 
Evelyn Russell, Dec. 4, 1935. 
Approved. 

EVENING SCHOOLS 

Term 1935-36 

Brighton Evening Commercial 
High School — Maurice F. Murphy, 
assistant, Dec. 3, 1935 (one eve- 
ning) ; Matthew P. Butler, assist- 
ant, Dec. 5 and Dec. 12, 1935 (two 
evenings). 

Dorchester Evening Commercial 
High School — Mary M. P. Twomey, 
assistant, Dec. 2, 1935 (one eve- 
ning) ; Mary M. (3-ainard, assistant, 
Dec. 3, 1935 (one evening); Paul F. 
Pearson, assistant, Dec. 9, 1935 (one 
evening). 

Girls' Evening Commercial High 
School— Mary M. P. Twomey, as- 
sistant, Dec. 3 to Dec. 10, 1935 (four 
evenings). 

Brighton Evening School — Louise 
H. Best, assistant, Dec. 5, 1935. 

Franklin Evening School — Charles 
O. Halloran, assistant, Dec. 2, 1935. 



Michelangelo Evening School — 
Kate V. Tiernay, assistant, Dec. 5, 
1935 (one evening). 

Washington Evening School — 
Cathryn J. Lauinger, assistant, Dec. 
2, 1935 (one evening); Alice E. Mc- 
Murrough, assistant, Dec. 10, 1935 
(one evening). 

Approved. 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935. reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has ap- 
pointed the following-named clerical 
assistant for the period specified: 

South Boston Evening Commer- 
cial High School — Catherine A. Gil- 
dea, Dec. 9 to Dec. 12, 1935 (three 
evenings). 

Approved. 

DEPARTMENT OF EXTENDED USE OF 
PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Term 1935-36 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
the following-named persons to 
serve in the Department of the Ex- 
tended Use of the Public Schools, 
for the term 1935-36: 

Leaders — John Elberfeld, Samuel 
Levin, Charles J. Moloney, Joseph 
P O'Reilly, Nov. 15, 1935; Stanley 
F. Sikora, Dec. 4, 1935; John A. 
Halloran, Jan. 8, 1936. 

Assistant Leaders — Fred W. 
Ramsey. Andrew J. Walsh, Nov. 
22, 1935: Henry J. Lawler, Dec. 
6, 1935. 

General Helpers — Albert J. Kel- 
ley. Henry J. Lawler, Fred W. 
Ramsey. Andrew J. Walsh, Nov. 
26, 1935. 

Helpers — Nonie C. Ahern. Anna 
J Connelly, Charles F. Devlin, Nov. 
26. 1935. 

Attendants — Nonie C. Ahern, 
Anna J Connelly, Dec. 4, 1935. 

Approved. 

TRANSFERS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935. reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has made the 
following transfers of teachers: 

Dorothy M. DeCourcey. assistant, 
elementary. Longfellow District, to 
the same position in the Agassiz 
District. Jan. 2, 1936. 

Miriam K. O'Shea. assistant, ele- 
mentary. Hyde District, to the 
same position in the Agassiz Dis- 
trict Jan 2, 1936. 

Approved. 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935. reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has made the 
following transfer of an evening 
school teacher: 

Bernice M. Atkins, assistant, 
Brighton Evening School, to the 
same position in the Washington 
Irving Evening School, Dec. c?, 
1935. 

Approved. 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

On the report of the Superinten- 
dent, leave of absence under a sus- 
pension of the regulations was 



granted each of the following- 
named teachers for the teim speci- 
fied: 

Boston Clerical School — Marion 
L. McCarthy, senior assistant, Nov. 
13, 1935 to Feb. 28, 1936, without 
pay. 

Clarence R. Edwards Intermedi- 
ate District— Louise C. Leary, as- 
sistant, intermediate. Dec. 1, 1935 
to Feb. 12, 1936, without pay. 

Theodore Lyman District — Thom- 
as F. Luby, sub-master, Dec. 1, 1935 
to Feb. 28, 1936, without pay. 



ASSIGNMENT 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
A. Isabelle Timmins. assistant, ele- 
mentary, Washington Allston Dis- 
trict, to Speech Improvement 
Cla.sses, without change of rank or 
salary, to take effect Jan. 2, 1936, 
and to continue during the school 
year ending Aug. 31, 1936, unless 
earlier terminated by the Superin- 
tendent with the approval of the 
School Commttee. 

Placed on file and the assignment 
approved, to take effect on the ilate 
stated. 

DESIGNATIONS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935, reporting that 
he has made the following designa- 
tions of teachers to serve in the 
positions indicated until such time 
as they shall be filled otherwise in 
accordance with the rules and reg- 
ulations, but not beyond Aug. 31, 
1936: 

Dwight District — Marion A. Burn- 
ham, assistant, special class, as 
acting master's assistant, special 
classes (vice Nellie E. Powers, ab- 
sent on leave), Nov. 18, 1935. 

Mary Hemenway District — Gladys 
M. Carnegie, assistant, elementary, 
as acting master's assistant (vice 
Mary E. Marron, absent on leave), 
Dec. 3, 1935. 

Placed on file. 



TEACHERS OF PHYSICALLY 
HANDICAPPED CHILDREN 

A communication was receiv-3d 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935, reporting that 
subject to the approval of th-3 
School Committee, he has assigned 
the following-named temporary 
teachers for home instruction of 
physically handicapped children, to 
take effect on the dates stated: 

Therese D. Dunigan, Charlotte 
G. Carver, Dec. 9. 1935; Ruth Y- 
Guthrie, Mary H. Lee, Anna C. 
Welsh, Dec. i7, 1935. 

Approved. 

PAYMENT TO ACTING NUTRI- 
TION CLASS ATTENDANTS 
On motion of the Superintend- 
ent, it was 

ORDERED. That there be al- 
lowed and paid the following- 
named assistant nutrition class at- 
tendants, in addition to the regu- 
lar compensation of their ran.k, 
one dollar ($1) per day for each 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



39 



day of actual service during tho 
periods specified, this additional 
compensation to Oe allowed 'or 
service as acting nutrition class 
attendants: 

Mary A. Conley. May 6 to June 
14. 1935. inclusive; Gertrude fi. 
Deming, Mar 11 to May 3, 1935. in- 
clusive: Elizabeth T. Kenney, Mar. 
11 to May 10. 1935. inclusive. 



PAYMENT OF SALARIES D t- 
AT DEATH 

On motion of the Superintenci 
ent, it was 

ORDERED, That the salarv 
due Alice B. Poor, late assistant, 
elementary, in the Mary Heme." 
way District, be paid to hei sisc: 
Lillian B Poor. 

On motion of the Superintend- 
ent, it was 

ORDERED. That the amount 
due Lillie J. Davis, pensioned as- 
sistant, formerly in the Bennett 
District, be paid to Laura A. Os 
born. 

CLOSING OF ADMINISTRATIVE 
OFFICES. 
The following was offered: 
ORDERED, That the adminu- 
trative offices and supply room of 
the School Committee are hereby 
closed on Tuesday, Dec. 24, 1935. 

The rulee were suspended ar.l 
the order passed. 



APPOINTMENT OF CLERICAL 
ASSISTANT 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935, reporting 
that subject to the approval of 
the School Committee and with the 
approval of the Commissioner of 
Civil Service and the Deputy Com- 
missioner of Public Health, Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, he 
has appointed Florence R. Ma- 
honey as clerical assistant in the 
Edmund P. Tileston and Edward 
Everett Districts, by transfer from 
the Department of Public Health, 
to take effect Jan. 2, 1936. 

Placed on file and the appoint- 
ment approved, to take effect on 
the date stated. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF 
SUPERINTENDENT 

A communication was receive' 
from the Superintendent, under date 
of Dec. 16, 1935. submitting thr- 
fifty-third annual report of the 
Superintendent of Public Schools. 
The report covers the school year 
ending Aug. 31, 1935. 

The report was accepted. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That this Committee 
hereby adopts as its Annual Repor* 
for the year 1935, the Annual Re- 
port of the Superintendent, beiny 
School Document No. 15, 1935, and 
that twelve hundred fifty (1,250) 
copies be printed. 

AUTHORIZED LIST OF TEXT 
BOOKS 

The Superintendent offered the 
following six orders: 



1. ORDERED, That the revised 
edition of the following-named text 
book is hereby authorized for use 
in The Teachers College of the City 
of Boston, to take the place of the 
old edition of the same: 
Auslander, Joseph and Hill, 

ENGLISH 

Frank Ernest. The 
Winged Horse (educa- 
tional edition.) Double- 
day, Doran and Com- 
pany, Inc. cpt. 1930 net $1.20 

f.o.b. Garden City, N. Y. 

2. ORDERED, That the revised 
editions of the following-named 
text-books are hereby authorized 
for use as indicated, to take the 
place of the old editions of the 
same: 

ENGLISH 

Baker, Clara B. and Baker, 
Edna D. Bobbs-Merrill 
Readers. The Fifth Read- 
er. Bobbs-Merrill Com- 
pany, cpt. 1935. Grade 

V net .63 

Chapman, Lucy H. Using 
English. Harcourt, Brace 
and Company, cpt. 1935, 
Grade IX. Book One . .net 1.184 

First Year net .928 

Second Year net .928 

f. o. b. N. Y. 

Grady, William E. and 
Klapper, Paul, eds. Read- 
i n g for Appreciation. 
Book One. Charles Scrib- 
ner's Sons. cpt. 1935. (Not 
more than 45 copies to be 
purchased for a school or 
district.) 
Part One, Grade VII, 

net .66 
Part Two, Grade VII. 

net 66 
f.o.b. N. Y. 
Read, Warren W., ed. Com- 
parative Essays, Present 
and Past. Noble and No- 
ble, Inc. cpt. 1935. Grade 
IX. (Not more than 45 
copies to be purchased for 
a school or district), .net .90 
f.o.b. N. Y. 
Shimer, Edgar Dubs, Fairy- 
land Reader. Noble and 
Noble, Inc. cpt. 1935. 
Grade III net .72 

GEOGRAPHY 

Comfort, Mildred Hough- 
ton. Peter and Nancy in 
Europe. Beckley-Cardy 
Company, cpt. 1935. Grade 
VI. (Not more than 45 
copies to be purchased 
for a school or district.) 

net .56'4 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

Delano, Jane A. American 
Red Cross Text-book on 
Home Hygiene and Care 
of the Sick. P. Blakis- 
ton's Son & Company, 
Inc. cpt. 1933. High 
School of Practical Arts. 

Cloth net $1.12 

Paper net .60 

f. o. b. Philadelphia. 

HISTORY 

Fite, Emerson David. His- 
tory ot the United States. 
Henry Holt and Company, 
cpt. 1935 . . . Grade X. net 1.47 

Guitteau, William Backus. 
History of the United 



States Houghton Mifflin 
Company, cpt. 1935. Grade 

XI net 1.568 

Muzzey, David Saville. His- 
tory of the American 
People. Ginn and Com- 
pany, cpt. 1935. Grade 
X net 1.59 

SCIENCE 

Brownlee, Raymond B., Fuller, Rob- 
ert W., Hancock, William J.. 
Sohon, Michael D. and Whitsit, 
Jessie E. First Principles of 
Chemistry. Allyn and Bacon, cpt. 

1934. Grade XI net 1.35 

Dull, Charles E. Modern Physics. 
Henry Holt and Company, cpt. 

1934. Grade X net 1.35 

Meister, Morris. Living in a World 
of Science. Charles Scribner's 
Sons. cpt. 1935. Grade VII. (Not 
more tlian 45 copies to be pur- 
chased for a school or district) 

Book One net 1.02 

Water and Air 
Heat and Health 

Book Two net 1.02 

Magnetism and Electricity 
Energy and Power f.o.b. N.Y. 
Meister, Morris. Living in a World of 
Science. Charles Scribner's Sons, 
cpt. 1935. Grade VII. (Not more 
than 45 copies to be purchased 
for a school or district) 

Energy and Power net .81 

Heat and Health net .81 

f.o.b. N. Y. 

3. ORDERED, That the revised 
editions of the following-named 
text books are hereby authorized 
for use in the Boston Trade School, 
to take the place of the old editions 
of the same: 

Brownlee, Raymond B., Ful- 
ler, Robert W., Hancock, 
William J., Sohon, Mich- 
ael D. and Whitsit, Jesse 
E. First Principles of 
Chemistry. Allyn and Ba- 
con, cpt. 1934 net $1.35 

Fite, Emerson David. His- 
tory of the United States. 
Henry Holt and Com- 
pany, cpt. 1935. (Not 
more than 45 copies to be 
purchased for a school or 
district) net 1.47 

4. ORDERED, That the revised 
edition of the following-named text 
book is hereby authorized for use 
in the Trade School for Girls, to 
take the place of the old edition 
of the same: 

.\uslander, Joseph and Hill, 
Frank Ernest. The Winged 
Horse (educational edition). 
Doubleday, Doran and Com- 
pany, Inc. cpt. 1930. (Not 
more than 45 copies to be 
purchased for a school or 

district) net $1.20 

f.o.b. Garden City 

5. ORDERED, That the follow- 
ing-named text book is hereby 
authorized for use as indicated, to 
take the place of any and all previ- 
ous authorizations of the same 
book: 

Smith, E. Ehrlich, Lo- Orton 
and Simpson, I. Jewell. Adventures 
in Reading. Grade VI. Double- 
day, Doran and Company, cpt. 1930. 
Grade VI. (Not more than 45 copies 
to be purchased for a school or dis- 
trict) net $.71 

6. ORDERED, That the follow- 
ing-named books, now authorized 



40 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. U 



for use as text books, are hereby 
dropped from the list, no further 
copies to be purchased: 

Grimm. Fairy Tales, Part I and 
II. edited by Sara E. Wiltse. Ginn 
and Company. 

Winslow, C. E. A. Healthy Liv- 
ing. Charles E. Merrill Company. 

The six orders were laid over. 

The Superintendent offered the 
following: 

ORDERED, That the following- 
named book, now authorized for use 
as a text book in Grade VII, is 
hereby dropped from the list, no 
further copies to be furnished: 

Wirth, Fremont P. and Thomp- 
son, Waddy. A History of American 
Progress. D. C. Heath & Co. 

Superintendent: In connection 
with the foregoing, I would state 
that a group of our colored fellow- 
citizens recently protested against 
the use of certain books in our 
public schools because these books, 
they felt, placed the colored race in 
an unfavorable light before the 
school children. 

The Superintendent then asked 
a committee of the Board of Su- 
perintendents to consider the pro- 
test and hear the group represen- 
tatives. After listening to the 
members of the group, the com- 
mittee made report to the Board 
of Superintendents and the Board 
of Superintendents finally recom- 
mended to the Superintendent that 
one book — "A History of American 
Progress" — above referred to, h<^ 
dropped from the authorized list 
and no longer l;e furnished to tho 
schools. 

The order was laid over. 

The Superintendent offered the 
following 

ORDERED, That School Docu- 
ment No. 8. 1925— Course of Study 
in English, Grades VII, VIII, IX 
and X — is hereby amended on page 
77 by striking from the list of 
books for "Prose Narrative for 
Class Study and Rapid Reading" 
in Grade LX, "Captains Coura- 
geous," by Rudyard Kipling. 

Superintendent: After careful 
consideration and study, the Board 
of Superintendents recommended 
to the Superintendent that "Cap- 
tains Courageous" be removed 
from the list of ten books included 
in the course of study in English 
for Grades VII to X, inclusive, listed 
for Class Study and Rapid Read- 
ing. The foregoing order will, if 
passed, carry that recommendation 
into effect. 

The order was laid over. 

Superintendent: There was a 
third book — "The First Book in 
United States History," by Waddy 
Thompson, used in Grade VI, of 
which the group complained, but 
the Board of Superintendents found 
no good reasons for discarding 
that book since the particular 
pages referred to are not used in 
Grade VI. 

The report was accepted. 



TERMINATION OF SERVICE OF 
SCHOOL PHYSICIAN 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935, reporting the 



termination of service of Dr. 
George E. Schwartz as school 
physician, Department of School 
Hygiene, to take efect Nov. 7, 1935, 
because of his transfer to the Penal 
Institutions Department, City of 
Boston. 

The report was accepted and the 
communication placed on file. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EX- 
PENDITURES TO DEC. 1, 1935 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Nov. 30, 1935, submitting a 
statement showing the appropria- 
tions, the expenditures and the bal- 
ances for maintenance of the pub- 
lic schools for the first eleven 
drafts of the current financial 
year, the expenditures for the first 
eleven drafts of the financial year 
1934, with the increases and de- 
creases in the several items. 

Placed on file. 



PROMOTIONS OF EMPLOYEES 
IN SUPPLY ROOM 

A communication was received 
from the Busines- Manager, under 
data of Dec. 16, 1935, recommend- 
ing with the approval of the Com- 
missioner of Civil Service, the pro- 
motic"- of William F. Butler to the 
rank of Deputy Chief Storekeeper 
in the Supply Room, at a salary 
of fifty-five dollars ($55) per week, 
to take effect Dec. 20, 1935. 

Placed on file. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the rank of 
William F. Butler, Assistant Chief 
Storekeeper, is hereby changed to 
Deputy Chief Storekeeper, and his 
salary fixed at fifty-five dollars 
($55) per week, tc take effect 
Dec. 20, 1935. 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Dec. 16, 1935, recommend- 
ing with the approval of the Com- 
missioner of Civil Service, the pro- 
motion of George A. McKendry to 
the rank of Assistant Chief Store- 
keeper in the Supply Room, at a 
salarj of fifty dollars ($50) per 
week, to take effect Dec. 20, 1935. 

Placed on file. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the rank of 
George A. McKendry, Receiver, is 
hereby changed to Assistant Chief 
Storekeeper, and his salary fixed 
at the rate of fifty dollars ($50) 
per week, to take effect Dec. 20 
1935. 

DEATH OF CUSTODIAN 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Dec. 16, 1935, re- 
porting the death on Dec. 11, 1935, 
of Robert T. F. Griffin, custodian. 
William Brewster School-house, 
and recommending that the salary 
due him be paid his widow, Agnes 
J. Griffin. 

Placed on file. 

On motion, it was 
ORDERED, That the salary due 
Robert T. F. Griffin, late custodian 



of the William Brewster School, be 
paid his widow, Agnes J. Griffin. 



NAMING OF NEW SCHOOL 

Dr. Lyons, for the Committee on 
Naming of School Buildmgs, of- 
fered the following- 

ORDERED, That the new inter- 
mediate school on Dorchester and 
Seventh Streets, South Boston, in 
the Shurtleff District, is hereby 
named the Patrick F. Gavin School, 
in memory of Patrick F. Gavin 
who was born in Roscommon, Ire- 
land, in 1844. He attended the 
Classical School in Roscommon 
and in 1863 came to the United 
States with his parents who took 
up their residence in South Bos- 
ton where he resumed his studies. 
He entered Harvard Medical School 
in 1867, and finished the course in 
1870. He was an assistant interne 
at the Boston City Hospital in 1871. 
In that year he returned to his 
birthplace where he pursued the 
study of surgery for sixteen 
months under Dr. Peyton. He 
next attended Kings and Queens 
College of Pnysicians and Sur- 
geons in Dublin. He then entered 
Sir William Wildes' Eye and Ear 
Hospital, after long service there 
attended Mme. Stephen's Hospital, 
and later did service in Meath Hos- 
pital in Dublin. 

He went from Dublin to York- 
shire, England, and from there to 
Devonshire, spending two and one- 
half years at these places in con- 
tinuance of his studies. He then 
returned to South Boston where 
he continued practicing up to the 
time of his death. He was medical 
examiner for several organizations, 
and was a member of the Charit- 
able Irish Society, the American 
Irish Historical Society, the United 
Irish League, Division 57 of the 
American Order of Hibernians, and 
other societies. 

Dr. Gavin was noted for his out- 
standing professional reputation, 
for his all-embracing charity, and 
for his unselfish service in all good 
civic works in the district. His 
family also was distinguished for 
eminent service, having given lo 
the medical profession four broth- 
ers and three nephews. Dr. Gavin 
died Dec. 22, 1909. 

Laid over. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTEND- 
ENT OF RESULT OF INVEST- 
IGATION OF CHARGES 
AFFECTING PRIOR ELE- 
MENTARY LIST. 

Chairman: I would ask the Su- 
perintendent for a report of the 
investigation which he has hec-i< 
making at the request of the School 
Committee. 

Superintendent: Mr. Chairman, 
the investigation conducted by the 
School Committee has been 
brought to a conclusion. 

Through counsel, a candidate on 
the Elementary Prior List has ad- 
mitted that she met, at a Boston 
hotel, a man who proposed to give 
her assistance in securing a per- 
manent appointment to the Bos- 
ton school system. During the 
meeting, this man called on the 
telephone a friend, locating him 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



41 



finally at another hotel, to which 
the young woman and first man 
repairod 

There a conference of the three 
was held and a proposition was, 
laid down by the two men tnnt 
any girl on the list who would pay 
$50 down and promise to pay Sl'jO 
when appointed, would be assu; '■:'< 
an appointment without regard 
to her position on the eligible lut 

The young woman, on her part, 
called a meeting for Sunday, No- 
vember 17, of seven or eight other 
candidates on the Elementary Pri- 
01 List. Each of these young 
women declared that the scheme 
was ridiculously impossible and re- 
fused to have anything to do with 
it. No money wa^ promised or paid. 

The findings of the Committee, 
together with the names of the can- 
didates concerned and the names 
of the two men alleged to have 
made the proposition, will be plac- 
ed in the hands of the District 
Attorney tomorrow morning. 

Dr. Lyons: I wish to take this 
occasion to express publicly my ap- 
preciation of the very thorough 
manner in which, at the order of 
the School Committee, the Super- 
intendent of Schools, Dr. Campbell, 
has brought this investigation to a 
successful conclusion. I regret ex- 
ceedingly that such a situation as 
that witn which we are confronted, 
could be possible. 

On April 29, 1935, an order to 
freeze the first 200 names on the 
prior list was presented to my Com- 
mittee. I find this order is again 
on our conference list, and when 
it is presented, as I consider it 
now a matter of public interest, I 
shall ask that it be discussed in a 
public meeting I shall always op- 
pose it as I consider it detrimental 
to the best interests of the educa- 
tion of our children because of the 
breaking down of the principle of 
competition by which I believe the 
best teachers have been selected. 

I want to state in conclusion that 
my sympathy goes out to that fine 
body of young women who have 
labored so hard and long in our 
school service, to think that even 
a breath of suspicion should be 
pointed at tliem. I want them to 
know that I have the 3ame implicit 
confidence in them that I have al- 
ways had. 

Mr. Tobin: I feel that it is most 
unfortunate that the freezing of the 
list has appeared in the public press 
as the feature of the brazen at- 
tempt to defraud the girls on the 
Elementary Prior List. 

The real proposition, as reported 
by Superintendent Campbell as 
the result of ,".iis nvestigation was 
that, regardless of their position on 
the l:st, those who paid the stipu- 
lated price would be appointed on 
the grounds of special qualification. 

Anyone knowing Superintendent 
Campbell knows that such a propo- 
sition could never possibly succeed, 
and I am very sorry that any refer- 
ence has been made at any time to 
a question of the freezing of the 
list. From the moment when 1 first 
heard of this brazen attempt to ex- 
tort money from pro^pect've teach- 
ers on tfie promise that the eligible 
list cou'.i be manipulated for the 
benefit r' those who pa-d the price. 
I felt that it was the plain duty of 



the School Committee to bend every 
effort to locate and expose the 
guilty persons. 

For that reason I sponsored the 
original questioning of representa- 
tive teachers on the eligible list as 
to their knowledge of the affair, 
and thai is why I subsequently 
moved to place the investigation in 
the hands of Superintendent Camp- 
bell. 

Still later, when Dr. Campbell was 
having difficulty in pushing his in- 
vestigation, I issued a statement 
promising that if the Superintend- 
ent was unable to get to the bottom 
of the plot before the next regular 
meeting of the School Committee, 
I would offer an order which would 
compel the examination of all 
teachers on the Elementary Prior 
List, under oath and in public. I 
am glad to say that such a hearing 
will not be necessary. 

Thanks to Dr. Campbell's untiring 
efforts and the able manner in 
which he, with the Committee's sup- 
port, has conducted his investiga- 
tion, the plot is exposed. We have 
received a statement from the 
young woman who was unfortunate 
enough to allow herself to be used 
as a cat's-paw in this racket, and 
she has disclosed the names of those 
who were behind the proposal. 

The School Committee is turning 
the complete evidence over to the 
proper law enforcement agency, the 
District Attorney, and I believe the 
school administration has been vin- 
dicated in the eyes of the public and 
the teachers. 

Chairman: As Chairman of this 
Committee, I wish to thank Su- 
perintendent Campbell and the 
other members for their untiring 
efforts to bring this investigation 
to a successful completion. 
Through the information received 
by members of the Committee and 
the Superintendent, we have come 
to the bottom of this plot. I also 
thank the members of the Commit- 
tee for their help in plans to elim- 
inate any other corrupt devices 
that may develop in relation to our 
schools. 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS 

The order laid over at the meet- 
ing of NOV. 18, 1935 (see p. 161), 
authorizing the revised edition of 
Webster's Elementary Dictionary, 
was taken up and passed, the four 
members voting in the affirmative. 

The order laid over at the meet- 
ing of Dec. 2, 1935 (see p. 172), 
transferring the sum of $40,000 
from the amount appropriated for 
one new intermediate school in the 
Shurtleff District to the amount 
appropriated for the addition to the 
Robert Gould Shaw Intermediate 
School, was taken up and passed 
by the following vote: 

YEAS — Messrs. Lyons, Mackey, 
Sullivan, and Tobin — 4. 

NAYS— 0. 

On motion, all unfinished busi- 
ness was referred to the next Com- 
mittee. 

The Committee adjourned. 

Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN, 

Secretary. 



PROCEEDINGS OF SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 

Dec. 27, 1935. 

A special meeting of the School 
Committee of the City of Boston 
was held in the Administration 
Building, 15 Beacon Street, at 1:20 
o'clock p. m., the Chairman pre- 
siding. 

Present: Dr. Lyons, Dr. Mackey, 
Messrs. Sullivan and Tobin. 

The Chairman stated that the 
meeting was called for the purpose 
of passing a transfer appropriation 
order, as indicated in the call. 



TRANSFER OF APPROPRIA- 
TION 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Dec. 27, 1935, reporting that 
the appropriation for Fuel and 
Light, including electric current for 
power, for the current fiscal year 
will have to be increased by a 
transfer in the sum of $8000, as 
the balance now remaining in this 
appropriation will not meet the ex- 
penditures that will have to be 
made for the remainder of the 
present fiscal year. 

The Business Manager recom- 
mended the passage of an accom- 
panying order transferring the sum 
of $8000 to the appropriation item 
"Fuel and Light, including electric 
current for power" from the ap- 
propriation item "Supplies, Equip- 
ment and Incidentals" (sub-item 
"Reserve"). 

Placed on file. 

The following was offered: 
ORDERED, That the following 
transfer is hereby made in the 
Budget and Annual Appropriation 
Order for the fiscal year 1935: 

From the appropriation item "Sup- 
plies. Equipment and Incidentals" 
to the appropriation Item "Fuel 
and Light including electric cur- 
rent for power" $8,000 

Passed by the following vote: 
YEAS — Messrs. Lyons, Mackey, 
Sullivan, and Tobin— 4. 
NAYS— 0. 

The Committee adjourned. 
Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN, 

Secretary. 



TAX COLLECTIONS FOR MUNICIPALI- 
TIES IMPROVE. 

The results of a nation-wide survey 
of tax collections covering reports from 
106 cities throughout the United States, 
just completed by Frank H. Morse of 
Lehman Brothers, New York, show that 
there has been a definite improvement 
in tax collections in 1934 over 1933. 

Questionnaires were sent to the finance 
offices of the principal cities in each sec- 
tion of the country and 106 replies were 
received from city officials throughout 
the country. Of the 106 cities which 
reported, 82, or 77.3 per cent, showed 
an improvement in 1934 collections over 
those of 1933, as against 24 cities, or 
22.7 per cent, which reported a decrease 
in 1934 collections. (.From the American 
City Magazine.) 



42 



PKOCEEDINCJS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Saturday, January 1, 1Q3G. 
Final mectini; of the City Council in the 
Council Chamber, City Hall, at 11 a. m. Presi- 
dent FITZGEKALD in the chair. Absent, 
Coun. Dowd and Murray. 



ASH-REMOVAL CONTRACTS. 
The rolluwinR was received: 

City of Itoston, 
OITice of the Mayor. January 3, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen.- — I herewith transmit a letter 
from the Commissioner of Public Works, rel- 
ative to your order of December 2, l'J35, con- 
cerning a request that specilications for 1936 
ash-rem»val contracts contain certain provi- 
sions. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Public Works Department, 

December 31, 1935. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary, Mayor's Office. 

Dear Sir, — I beg leave to acknowledge re- 
ceipt of your note of December 5 with attaehe<i 
order of City Council dated December 2, 1935, 
and reading as follows : 

"Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to provide in specifications for 1936 
ash-removal contracts that failure to comply 
with a requirement that ashes and rubbish con- 
tained in receptacles placed in easily acces- 
sible spots shall be carried to the street by the 
contractor's men and thereafter promptly re- 
turned, shall constitute a breach of contract", 
and to state that Section 2 of the contracts for 
the year 1936 amongst other requirements 
state that : 

"The Contractor shall once a week through- 
out the year, as the Commissioner shall so 
direct, collect and remove all house dirt, ashes 
an<l refuse, when so placed as to be easily 
accessible on the level of the lot on which 
the building stands, which have been placed 
in suitable receptacles. The Contractor shall 
not put the receptacles on the street until one 
hour before time for collecting, and ^hall 
remove all refuse so placed on the same day. 
After emptying the receptacles they are to be 
returned to the places from which they were 
taken." 

Article 7 of the contracts for the year 1936 
provides : 

"That if the work is not done properly the 
Commissioner, acting at his discretion, may 
terminate the contract and have the work 
performed as said Commissioner designates." 
Respectfully yours, 
C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Placed on file. 



ARC LIGHT, LEEDS STREET. 
The following was received : 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 3, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith a communi- 
cation from the Commissioner of Public Works, 
relative to your order of December 2, 1935. 
concerning a request to install an arc light 
on Leeds street, in the rear of St. Monica's 
Church. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Public Works Department, 

December 30, 1935. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary, Mayor's Office. 
Dear Sir, — I beg leave to acknowledge re- 
ceipt of your note of December 5 with attached 
City Council order dated December 2, 1935, and 
reading as follows: 

■■Ordere<l, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to install an arc light on Leeds street, 
in the rear of St. Monica's Church", 
and to state that after investigation it was 
ascertained that a gas lamp would furnish 
all the necessary light required and conse- 
ciuently a gas lamp was installed and placed 
in service December 13, 1935. 

Respectfully yours, 
C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 
Placed on file. 



CITY RECORD 



PETITIONS KETEBRED. 

The following petitions were received and 
referred to the committees named, viz. : 

Claims. 

Joseph Catania, for refund on dog license. 

A. Ferullo, for compensation for damage to 
car by city cart. 

Everett W. Francis, for compensation tor 
damage to boat by steamer "George A. Hib- 
bard." 

William J Hart, to be reimbursed for execu- 
tion issued against him on account of his 
acts as operator of car of Police Department. 

William J. Hart, to be reimbursed for execu- 
tion issued against him on account of his acts 
as operator of car of Police Department. 

Ethel Hasbrouck, for compensation for in- 
juries caused by an alleged defect at 1122 
Boylston street. 

Joseph M. Ray, for compensation for damage 
to car by city car. 

Martin F. Walsh, to be reimbursed for 
execution issued airainst him on account of his 
acts as operator of car of Park Department. 

Martin F. Walsh, to be reimbursed for exe- 
cution issued against him on account of his 
acts as operator of car of Park Department. 

Lillian Ginsberg, for compensation fo' in- 
juries caused by an allesed defect at 286 
Tremont street. 

George Frederick Smith, to be reimbursed 
for execution issue<l against him on account of 
his acts as operator of car of Paving Division. 

Committee on Jitney Licenses. 
Boston Elevated Railway, to operate motor 
vehicles between Sullivan square and Everett 
line. 



Jan. 11 



APPROVALS BY STATE EMERGENCY 
FINANCE BOARD. 

Notice was received from the State Emer- 
gency Finance Board of approval of tax title 
loan of $3,000,000 ; of loan and grant for 
alterations at English High School ; and of 
loan and crant for water pipe trestle, Chelsea 
North Bridge. 

Severally placed on file. 



NOTICE OF INTEREST IN CONTRACT. 

Notice wa.s received from Frederic H. Fay, 
member of City Planning Board, of his interest 
in contracts on Lucy Stone School and Chelsea 
Street Bridge. 

Placed on file. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON INSPEC- 
TION OF PRISONS. 

Coun. GLEASON, for the Committee on 
Inspection of Prisons, submitted the follow- 
ing annual report: 

In accordance with the provisions of chap- 
ter 126 of the General Laws, the Committee 
on Inspection of Prisons of the City Council 
submits herewith its annual report. 

Suffolk County Jail. 

The customary semiannual inspections of the 
Suffolk County Jail were made. 

Conditions at this institution were found 
very satisfactory by your committee, particu- 
larly along the lines of cleanliness and sani- 
tation. 

Tiie dangerous condition of the back wall 
and temporary gate makes it imperative that 
a new wall and permanent entrance be pro- 
vided as soon as possible. 

House of Correction. 
Your committee made the usual number 
of visits to the House of Correction and con- 
ditions in general were of the same high order 
that have characterized this institution for 
the past several years. 

Repairs were made on the roofs of several 
of the buildings and also to the wharf. 
For the Committee, 
Richard D. Gleason, Chairman. 

.Appended were reports to the committee 
from the Suffolk County Jail and the House 
of Corrections. 

The report was accepted and ordered 
printed. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON JITNEY 
LICENSES. 

Coun. KERRIGAN, for the Committee on 
Jitney Licenses, submitted a report on peti- 
tion of New England Transportation Com- 
pany (referred December 9, 1935) for. license 
to operate motor vehicles between Spring 



Street and the Dedham line — recommen<iing 
that license be granted. 

Report accepted ; license granted under usual 
conditions. 



ATTENDANCE AT OL-YMPIC GAMES. 

Coun. BRACKMAN — Mr. President, I move 
that the resolution about attending the Olympic 
games be recalled from the Committee on 
Rules at the present time. 

President FITZGERALD— The Chair wiU 
have to rule that the motion is out of order. 
The reference was made under Rule 12, 
which cannot be suspended. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS. 

Coun. GOLDMAN, for the Committee on 
Claims, submitted the following: 

Annual Report of Committee on Claims. 

Claims pending January 1, 1935 1,306 

Claims received during 1935 709 

Claims approved during 1935 139 

Claims disapproved during 1935 407 

Claims returned to Committee on Claims 
on which Statute of Limitations had 

expired 370 

Reimbursements (suits against city em- 
ployees ) 39 

Amount paid out on reimbursements, $11,348.63 
Amount paid out on approved claims.. 5,365.61 

Total amount paid out on cfaims 16,714.24 

Claims pending December 31, 1935.... 1,060 

The report was accepted and ordered 
printed. 



BOSTON CONSOLIDATED GAS RATES. 

Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to file a protest against the pro- 
posed new Boston gas rate which places the 
heaviest burden on the smallest consumers. 

Coun. McGRATH — Mr. President, this morn- 
ing I received in the mail, the same as many 
thousands of other citizens, a little pamphlet 
giving the story of a young housewife asking 
questions of the gas company, that company 
now being controlled outside of Boston by 
the Koppers Company, as to what her bill 
would be in the future under the proposed 
new schedule. A part of the story is this: 

"Every customer with a gas bill over $4.50 
a month will save money with the new rate. 
The small increase to others still keeps gas 
the most economical and convenient fuel — 
those with §4 bills paying only 10 cents a 
month more, those with $3.50 bills only 20 
cents more, those with $2.50 bills only 40 
cents more." 

Then this statement that follows is very im- 
portant. 

"People with bills less than $2.50 will not 
at the most pay over 2 pennies a day more — 
Many of them even less." 

That is. this means that those with the 
smallest income, living in the smallest homes, 
under this new schedule will pay 60 cents a 
month more, and the only man protected is 
the big consumer who uses over $4.50 worth of 
gas a month. I don't know who wrote that 
storj', but I want to file the complete story 
for the record, sir, to show how far afield 
those complaining about "soaking the rich" 
have gone, when a company of the size of this 
Koppers Company, owned by Andrew Mellon, 
sends this message today to thousands of 
small consumers in the city of Boton. 

Following is a copy of "Boston Gas News" 
referred to : 

"Boston Gas News" 
Published each month by the Boston Consoli- 
dated Gas Company to tell you about its 
work and its meaning to you. 
The Proposed New Boston Gas Rate. 

A youn^ housewife came to one of our 
public desks : 

"I hear my gas bill is going up," she said 
to the clerk. "I want to know why." 

The clerk leaned politely forward. 

"May I see the stub of your bill, please?" 
he asked. 

She handed it to him. 

"Mrs. Smith," he said after a moment, "your 
monthly bill here is $6.75. Under the pro- 
posed new gas rate which the Gas Company 
is petitioning for, you would save about 45 
cents a month." 

"But I thought— 1" 

"The company is very anxious to explain 
the real facts about the company and its rate 
problems to its customers, Mrs. Smith," the 
young man said. "A proposed new rate has 
been filed with the Massachusetts Department 
of Public Utilities. May I tell you something 
about it?" 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



43 



every- 



"Surely. iGo ahead. I understood 
body's eas bills were going up." 

"Every customer with a gas bill over $4.50 
a month will save money with the new rate. 
The small increase to others still keeps gas 
the most economical and convenient fuel — those 
with $4 bills paying only 10 cents a month 
more, those with $3.50 bills only 20 cents more, 
those with $2,50 bills only 40 cents more. 
People with bills less than $2.50 will not at 
the most pay over 2 pennies a day more — 
many of them even less." 

"Well, I'll say this," Mrs. Smith declared 
unexpectedly: "We all get lots of help and 
save lots of work with gas appliances for 
little enough money compared with what we 
spend on other things. But why are some 
people's bills going to be increased, even if it 
is very small?" 

"Because, unbelievable as it may seem, a 
great many of the company's customers — for 
example, those living in apartment-hiuses 
where hot water and heating are supplied by 
the landlord ; occupants of small offices and 
others — require so little gas that under the 
present rate they do not pay the fixed monthly 
costs of serving them — " 

"1 don't understand this business about 
'fixed costs,' " Mrs. Smith interrupted. "All 
you have to do is to sell them the gas and — " 
"It isn't that easy. We wbh it werel Do 
you realize that, whether a customer uses gas 
or not, gas mu^t be there — ready every 
minute for that one minute when he will 
want it? It lakes lots of money for labor, 
materials and plant to do that." 

"Well — no. I hadn't thought of it just that 
way." 

"Then the customer's meter must be read, 
his account handled, service given him — no 
matter how little gas he uses. These are all 
fixed costs — and the actual fact is that a 
great many of our customers require so little 
gas that they are now receiving gas service 
at less than the cost to the company. This 
fact, together with the heavy taxes we must 
pay, reduces the company's needed income — 
and prevents lower gas rates by which thou- 
sands of our customers could give up incon- 
venient and old-fashioned fuels they're now 
using and enjoy more of the modern benefits 
of gas." 

"I suppose a company like this does pay 
pretty bis taxes," Mrs. Smith reflected. 

"Yes. Taxes have been growing steadily. 
The company's taxes have increased from 
$1,570,000 in 1932 to over $1,700,000 in 1934. 
That's 16 cents out of each dollar of the 
company's revenue — and it amounts to 5S cent's 
a month per customer." 
"That's pretty steep." 

"It's too steep, " the clerk answered. "But 
it has to be paid. It's one more important 
reason why this company must have a<lded 
income to keep its credit and thus be able to 
continue and improve the quality of its service 
to the public." 

"My, there's quite a lot to this business of 
running a gas company, isn't there?" Mrs. 
Smith said. "I can see you people have your 
problems too. Why don't you explain these 
things to your customers? They don't know 
your side of the story ..." 

A book explaininfi in greater detail these 
and other facta about this com]>any v>iU soon 
he aent to earh of our cuatomera. May we 
ask sincerely that you reatl it ? The statcTncnts 
which it makes are of interest to every user 
of gas 111 Greater Boston. 

Boston Consolidated Gas Company, 100 Arl- 
ington street. Hubbard 7600. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



RECESS. 

By direction of President FITZGERALD, the 
Council at 11.34 a. m. took a recess to go 
into executive session. 

The members reassembled in the Council 
Chamber and were called to order by Presi- 
dent FITZGERALD at 12.18 p. m. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS. 

Coun. GALLAGHER, for the Executive 
Committee, submitted the following : 

1. Report on ordinance (referred December 
21) increasing the salaries of the two stenog- 
rapher-clerks attached to the city council, re- 
commending the passasre of the ordinance 
with an amendment making the salaries two 
thousand dollars. 

The report of the committee was accepted, 
the ordinance was amended as recommended, 
and as amended was passed. 



2. Report on the message of the Mayor 
and order (referred December 30, 1935) amend- 
ing the county classification plan to include 
a foreman-farmer at the House of Correction 
— that the order ought to pass. 

The report was accepted, and the question 
came on the passage of the order. 



Coun. GALLAGHER in the chair. 



Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, I under- 
stand that this is a gentleman who was at 
the island some time ago and did not get 
along with the officials down there. I under- 
stand that there was some difficulty about 
him. I understand also that there is no need 
of a farmer there, that at the present time 
there are at the island men enough to carry 
on this work, that the ground for farming 
purposes is limited, that they have a herd 
of cows there that use up quite a considerable 
pasturage area. The matter was called to my 
attention yesterday. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, in refer- 
ence to this particular order, perhaps I might 
repeat what I said in the executive session. 
Certainly, the Mayor cannot need a tutor for 
agricultural prisoners at Deer Island, and I 
don't assume that they will do much farming 
there, anyway, until next spring. We have 
not heard any demand for this from the 
Master at the island or anybody in authority 
down there. We have received this order from 
the Mayor at a time when building inspectors 
and other employees of the city, men who 
have been employed by the city for years, 
have within a year or two, before they had 
acquired thoir right to a pension, been fired 
by this administration. Still, it is now pro- 
posed that we need a new position of this 
sort, installing down there such an officer 
as is here proposed. Well, we have got along 
without this position for five or six years, 
and I don't see why we should now be ex- 
pected to vote, in the middle of winter, for 
an agricultural position of this kind, for tutor- 
ing, inspection, or whatever may be the intent. 
If it is intended to have somebody down there 
who can teach the inmates how to handle a 
hoe or a pick or to sprinkle seeds about, it 
would seem as though, in any event, it should 
not be put into elTect until next spring. I 
frankly feel that there is no rush requiring 
the passage of this order today, without even 
hearing anything as to its necessity from 
the M.-istir at the island. 

The order was declared passed. Coun WIL- 
SON doubted the vote and asked for the yeas 
and nays. 

The order was passed on roll call, yeas 
17, nays — Coun. Goldman, Norton, Wilson — 3. 



President FITZGERALD in the chair. 



SOOT IN SOUTH BOSTON. 

Coun. DONOVAN and KERRIGAN offered 
the following : 

•Ordered, That the Health Commissioner be 
re<iuested, through his Honor the Mayor, to in- 
vestigate the unhealthful conditions caused by 
soot and coal dust from property of public 
utilities corporations in the City Point sec- 
tion of South Boston. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



REFERENCE TO UNFINISHED BUSINESS. 

Coun. DONOVAN offered the following: 
Ordered, That all matters of an unfinished 
nature pending before the committees of this 
City Council be referred to the City Council of 
1936. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



THANKS OF COUNCIL TO PRESIDENT 
FITZGERALD. 

Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 

Resolved, That the thanks of the City Coun- 
cil be extended to Councilor John I. Fitzgerald 
for the able and impartial manner in which 
he has presided over the deliberations of the 
City Council during the present municipal 
year. 

The question came on the passage of the 
resolve. 

Coun. McGRATH— Mr. Piesident, I think it 
is fitting on this last official day of the City 
Council of 1935 to say a word on the manner 
on which you have conducted yourself as 
president of this body. I have had experience 
as presiding officer of the body and I know 
there are times when it is liard for some of 
the warring factions to appreciate the fact 
that your position is one in which you must 
be impartial and fair. I think it is very 
much to your credit and to the credit of the 
City Council that you have conducted your- 



self m such an impartial and fair manner, 
an attitude which has also been extremely 
helpful in the business conducted by the Coun- 
cil during the past year. It is not necessary. 
of course, for me to sing any swan song, be- 
cause it was through preference that I left 
the body. But I do know, as you know, that 
on the closing day of any session, when some 
of the boys are not coming back, there is 
always a little note of sadness. I will, how- 
ever, simply say to the members of the Coun- 
cil this, that, Mr. President, you and I and 
Tom Green of Charlestown have had the honor 
of ten years of membership in this body, 
since the system of electing members by wards 
has been in vogue, and perhaps it might be 
well for just a moment, looking back over the 
years, to say just a word in memory of some 
who have served with us and who have now 
passed beyond. We all have in our hearts 
memories of Tim Donovan, of Ward 1, of 
John Heffernan from Councilor Gallagher's 
ward, and of Frank B. Sullivan of Ward 13. 
We also hold enshrined in our memory Major 
Lynch, who went from here to the position of 
clerk in one of our courts, where he will 
unquestionably render as faithful service as 
he did in political life : memories also of 
our old friend from Ward 5, Henry Parkman, 
dear to us all as a friend, and, we now feel, 
destined to go on to other fields where he can 
render even more splendid service. We think 
fondly, too, of Doc. Arnold, who sacrificed his 
professional life as long as he felt that he 
was able to do so, in the interest of the people 
of his ward. We also have very clearly in 
mind at the moment our old friend Tom Green, 
who has served in this body during the life 
of the Council in its present form. These 
men and others — and I do not need to go 
over the roll ward by ward — always stood 
ready here to help in any way they could and 
I know that any and all of them, if their 
services should be required by any of our 
members, would stand ready to serve to the 
utmost, because serving together in a body 
of this kind brings men into more intimate 
contact than membership in a club or a frater- 
nal bo<ly. I have always felt that our present 
system of representation was a splendid one, 
because it brings into this chanil>er men with 
a greater insight into the life of the people 
of their wards than could be the case with any 
man who served as Mayor or as a member of 
a body of men elected at large throughout the 
city. Our constituencies send here men who 
represent the older families of the City of 
Boston ; they send here men who are sons 
of immigrants, Irish, Jewish, and Italian, men 
from the Canadian provinces, men typical of 
every phase of Boston life. I always like to 
look back to the time when the question of 
an increase in the pay of members of the 
City Council from $1,500 to $2,000 was placed 
on the ballot in the City of Boston. On that 
same day the citizens of Cambridge had on their 
ballot a proposition to increase the pay of 
their councilors from $750 to $1,000. In Cam- 
bridge that question was roundly defeated, but 
in Boston 75,000 citizens vote<l in favor of 
that increase as against 42.000 who voted 
against it. It was perhaps the only increase 
of its kind given at the hands of our voters, 
and it is the greatest single tribute ever paid 
to a legislative bo<ly. We serve here as mem- 
bers of this body having a lot in common be- 
cause a chain is no stronger than its weakest 
link, and there is nothing that can happen to 
an individual member of the Council that is 
not detrimental to all the members. We are 
here as one family. We sink or swim to- 
gether, and so we all have responsibility as 
individuals to the group. I know that we 
have conducted ourselves here as a body as 
well as the members of the Legislature or the 
members of Congress. We are average men, 
representatives of our community. Though I 
have fought with some men who have been 
Mayors of Boston, I pride myself on the fact 
that in all my service here I have not uttere<l 
a word detrimental to any member of this 
Council. As we leave the Council, Tom Green 
goes into one of the most important positions 
in the State of Massachusetts, as Civil Service 
Commissioner, and Morry Goldman continues 
in the office of the Attorney-General, with all 
its power. Conducting myself as chairman of 
the Democratic State Committee I know that 
I can be helpful to George Donovan, to Edward 
Englert and to Al Fish, and they are welcome 
to call upon me at any time, and I know that 
other members of the body who are going 
from here to different activities have the same 
feeling that I have in that respect toward 
our fellow members, regardless of party. I 
extend to my successor, to other new members 
who are about to enter the body, and to those 
who are still continuing as members, the hand 
of fellow.ship and a Godspeed. Good luck to 
you all, and at any time when I can be of 



44 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 11 



service to any of the members here, regardless 
of party, I shall lu- more than pleased to serve. 
These have been the most plea-sant days of 
my life, and wherever my footsteps may carry 
me I shall always fondly remember them : and 
I trust that you, Mr. President, and the other 
members here will continue to have the respect 
which you merit of the department heads 
and of your constituents. This is a sound 
body, aM<l you may well hold up your heads 
unil march on. You were electe<l to office by 
your fellow citizens, not by some of the self- 
constituted critics who may at times try to 
condemn you. You are here because, through 
the exercise of the right of citizenship by 
your fellows, you were elected to serve. In 
endinK my days in the Council, I wish for 
you, Mr. President, the very best in life, what 
you so well deserve because of your service 
here, the best of luck and the best of health ; 
and to the other members of the Council, both 
old and new, I wish the greatest of success 
in the years 1936 and 1337. (Applause.) 

Coun. ENGLERT— Mr. President, 1 wish to 
say just a word to my coUcasues here before 
leavinc I have always enjoyed their friend- 
ship and I am slad to leave here today know- 
ing that I still carry with me the friendship 
of my colleagues. Having been a member 
of the City Council for eight years. I merely 
wish to say that I have appreciated those 
eight years to the full and that I now wish to 
you all a happy and prosperous new year. 
(Applause.) 

Coun. FISH— Mr. President, today, after 
eight years of service in the City Council, I 
leave. I have enjoyed my eight years of service 
here very much and I shall always cherish 
memories of the time I have spent in this 
body. I wish to extend to all my colleagues 
wishes for a very prosperous and happy New 
Year. 

Coun. DONOVAN— Mr. President and fellow 
members of the Boston City Council, I too 
want to add my word of appreciation of the 
many friendships I have formed in the last 
four years. I take deep pleasure that I have 
served with a group of the finest men whom 
the citizens of Boston can send to this Honor- 
able Body. I thank our former president, 
now chairman of the Democratic State Com- 
mittee, for his kind words to those of us 
who are going out ; and I wish to express to 
our president and to everybody here my th;inks 
for their courtesy and kindness to me during 
the past four years, and to wish to them all 
a very happy and prosperous New Year. 
(Applause. I 

Coun. GOLDMAN— Mr. President and fel- 
low colleagues, I. too. share the same feelings 
thait have been expressed by other members 
who are leaving the Council. Two years that 
I have spent here have been the most pleasant 
years of my life. I have learned much in 
this limited period of service that I have ren- 
dered on behalf of my district. I can frankly 
and honestly say that my promotion to the 
Attornev-General's office was the result of 
my service in the City Council. I appreciate 
the contacts I have been able to make and 
the friendships I have formed here as a mem- 
ber of the body, a trustee of the City of Bos- 
ton, contacts and friendships which are es- 
pecially valuable to ourselves and to our com- 
munities in a cosmopolitan city such as ours. 
I can truthfully say that as I go through life 
the friendships I have made here in the Coun- 
cil will ever remain here with me, and I trust 
that the new members and my old colleagues in 
the years to come will successfully continue the 
valuable service that they have so well rendered 
in the past. (Applause.) 

The resolutions were adopted by a unani- 
mous rising vote, amid applause. 

President FITZGERALD- 1 desire to thank 
the members for their kind expressions and 
for their loyalty to me during the past year. 
The ground has been pretty well covered by 
the previous speakers. In fact. Councilor Mc- 
Grath has not left much to be said. It has 
not always t)een an easy task for us, as pub- 
lic officials, to satisfy our constituents, espe- 
cially in districts where a large number are 
out of employment. Those representing the 
outlying wards have had an easier task than 
those coming from in-town. At this time I 
wish to express my appreciation oi the 
esteem in which my fellow members hold me, 
as set forth in this resolution, and also to 
particularly express my appreciation of one 
l)it of recognition that has been extended to 
a member of this body. The Governor of this 
Conunonwealtli showed great courage when he 
appointed to the position of Civil Service 
Commissioner a man who, to use the vernacu- 
lar of the day, is a so-called "gang polititian." 
I heard Curtis Guild say at one time, walking 
down School street, that there are t\vo statues 
out in front here, one representing the ma- 
chine and the other the reformer in politics. 
The people decided that there should be two 
statues and they evidently believed that the 



most successful man in politics, if good go- 
vernment and keeping taxes down was desired, 
was a man who was in active politics. And 
so our Governor appointed as Civil Service 
Commis.iioner Tom Green of Charlestown, a 
man who has served in the State House of 
Representatives and Senate, and who has given 
ten years of service in this body. Personally, 
I don't know how he stood up under it. 
Whenever I came here, there were always 
one hundred looking for Tom Green. There 
was always a crowd here, and I never could 
understand how he weathered it. But he al- 
ways rendered good service, service that is 
particularly important and necessary in these 
trying times. So we will now have in the 
office of Civil Service Commissioner a practi- 
cal man, a man who knows both sides, who 
can distinguish between the man who is really 
in need and the man who is merely looking 
for favors. A man occupying his position can 
do the judicious and proper thing, and can 
act for a worthv friend. That has always 
been something held to be justifiable since 
the beginning of time, the question merely 
being whether a man acts judiciously or has 
an ulterior motive, whether he is giving the 
taxpayers a fair run for their money or 
whether he is acting from selfish motives. 
Thomas N. Hart, one of the greatest Mayors 
that Boston over had, used to say that he 
was not as much concerned in the question 
of whether somebody might be making a dollar 
on a land-taking as he was in the question 
of whether the taxpayers were geting a fair 
deal. And he was a man who had a broad 
outlook on life, living to ripe old age. We now 
see a man wlio is interested in the plain 
people getting this high office, and we know 
that he \vill perform the duties of that office 
with the greatest credit to himself and benefit 
to the community. Tom, it gives me great 
pleasure at this time to extend to you this 
token of esteem from some of your friends. 

(President FITZGERALD here presented to 
Councilor Green a handsome floral tribute.) 

Coun. GREEN— Mr. President, I am really 
overcome. If I had the vocabulary of a 
Norton or the eloquence of a McGrath, I might 
be able to convey to you, sir, some idea of 
what this splendid testimonial, this beautiful 
gift, means to me. I realize and appreciate, 
Mr. President and members of the body, the 
friendships I have made over a period of ten 
years and hold them as a priceless possession 
today. I hope that I will measure up in my 
new position to everything that the great 
Governor of this Commonwealth expects of 
me. In leaving this body today, I do so with 
a heavy heart. I am going to bring this 
bouquet of flowers to the Legislature, to my 
office as Civil Service Commissioner at the 
State House. Every time when I look at it 
I will think of all you fellows — of the Gal- 
laghers, of the Agnews, of the Finleys, of 
the Murrays, of the McGraths, of the Wilsons, 
of the Goldmans, of t!ie Tobins, of the Brack- 
mans, the Englerts, the Gleasons, the Dowds, 
the Kerrigans, the Donovans, the Shattucks, 
the Roberts, the Selvitellas, and of you, Mr. 
President. It is almost impossible for me to 
make a response, other than to say that I 
hope I will not be a stranger to the members 
of the body and I hope I will be in a position 
on many occasions to do something worthwhile 
for the members of this Honorable Body of 
which I have had the pleasure of being a mem- 
ber for ten years. I have enjoyed every min- 
ute of my service here, with the finest lot of 
men on (5od's green earth. I will miss them, 
and I know some of them will miss me. But 
all I can say, speaking from a grateful heart, 
is that I wish for the New Year Godspeed and 
prosperity to you, Mr. President, to aU the 
older members and to the new members who 
are coming in. (Applause.) 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, the end of 
an epoch in political lite is always more or 
less of a great event. Tom Green epitomized 
a while ago the situation, in so far as his 
new duties are concerned, when he said, to 
me, "Norton, I feel like a kid leaving home." 
It rather seems to me that that expresses the 
situation of everyone of us here today, in 
severing some of the old associations in this 
body. I have often thought the finest de- 
scription of our services rendered here is 
that we are serving in the trenches of po- 
litical life in Boston. My friend John T. 
Flynn, one of the greatest writers on economic 
subjects, once told me, "Norton, there are 
high political officers, but as one sitting on 
the bleachei-s of political life it seems to me 
that I would rather serve in the New York or 
Boston City Council than any other, because 
there come the opportunities to assist in 
hospitalization and other humane services for 
the people in whom we are interested." And 
what finer opportunities can be presented 
than those which are offered in city life to 
make the lives of our citizens, whom we serve, 
a little better? I thought when I graduated 
from evening college years ago that it was 
a great event in my life, coming, as I did, 
from people who had never before in my 
family had that opportunity. I thought when 



an opportunity offered to serve in the army in 
the World War that that was the greatest 
event in my life. But after serving for eight 
years in this body I feel that the greatest 
honor that has come my way has been the 
chance to serve in this city government the 
section in which I live. I have often said, 
not only in this country, but abroad this sum- 
mer, speaking to a group of Bostonians and 
New Yorkers, that if I were to go on trial 
for my life I would feel that I would receive 
more fair and intelligent consideration at the 
hands of a jury selected from members of 
this City Council than from any other. If I 
had to select a group to consider any of the 
important questions with which we are faced 
in our daily lives. I would select them, as I 
would select a jury, from such men as gather 
here as members of the Boston City Council. 
I believe there is a higher percentage of real 
humanity existing in this body than in any 
other irroup of people with whom I have had 
the honor of coming in contact. We quarrel, 
we struggle, we feel envious and discontented 
at times. We have our disagreements with one 
another. But the moment we step out of the 
door it is all forgotten. It is human at times 
to be anirry, to attack, to have discords, but I 
have never seen a group that forgets such 
disagreements and differences so quickly as 
do the members of this Council. They are an 
outstanding group. If I had my way, no 
college student would receive a diploma until 
he had served in the battle of life in some 
such way as is afforded here. Where else 
can such an opportunity be offered for human 
service? We are down in the trenches of life 
itself. We see the family in its happy times 
. and also in its bad hours. A man who can 
stay in this Council for half a dozen terms, 
representing 70,000-odd people with all their 
hopes and aspirations, is certainly a man who 
has a chance to plumb the depths of society 
and of human nature. I am talking now as 
I have spoken to crowds all over the city. 
The Council is frequently attacked, and our 
reputations are sometimes endangered. Our 
service in the body is sometimes looked upon 
with disdain. Nevertheless, it is a great 
service. No service can be finer than the 
service of ones people. People representing 
the outstanding groups in the city. And 
what an honor it is for a member of this 
body to go through half a dozen terms here ! 
Tom Green, I have known you and your family 
for years. I never had the pleasure of a per- 
sonal acquaintance with your old father, but 
I knew a longshoreman who knew your father, 
and nobody could have spoken in higher terms 
of another human being than he spoke of 
him. Georgie Donovan, a kinder fellow never 
came to the Council. As Gardiner Wilson 
said to me, "It is too bad that that boy is 
leaving here !" Those off-the-record lemarks 
mean much. Al Fish, you have been here a 
number of years, have rendered good and faith- 
ful service, and we will miss you more than 
I can express. You, too, have had your dif- 
ferences at times with some of your fellow 
members, honest differences, but you have 
always been inclined to forgive and forget. 
Eddie Englert, I have always wished that I 
had your personality, that I could adopt the 
attitude you have adopted on certain occasions. 
You have always believed nice things of every- 
body and nothing bad of anybody. You have 
never stood on the floor and said anything 
which would make anybody grieve. As for 
Joe McGrath, I was talking with the manager 
of the Commander Hotel awhile ago, and, 
pointing to a certain man in the hotel, he 
said to me, "Norton, there is our leading man. 
and his strong point is personality. You 
watch him meet these folks. We have handled 
tens of thousands of people in our hotels in 
the last ten years, and this fellow is about 
as good as we have." I said to him, "You 
should come to Boston. We have there a 
fellow who cannot be beaten in personality." 
He said, "Who is that?" I said, "A member 
of our City Council, Joe McGrath. I will 
take Joe and dress him up, put him here and 
let him take charge, and before he has been 
here a week j'ou will agree with me." Joe, 
we all wish you the greatest success. I do 
not speak in these terms to embarrass you, 
but what I say comes from the heart. Morry 
Goldman, you also come from the Dorchester 
section of the city. You came with a saiile 
and you are going out with a smile. I have 
found you one of the ablest and finest repre- 
sentatives that your section of the city has 
ever sent here. It is natural, of course, to 
say nice things of fellow members on an 
occasion like this, but I wish to say that 
every word I have uttered here comes from 
the heart, and they are words that I '^ould 
truthfully repeat five years from now. As 
for you, Mr. President, you and I had a little 
disagreement here one day. We are both 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



45 



Irish, and the nature of the Celt is such that 
at times we explode! That was one occasion, 
since I came to the Council, when I said some- 
thing I was sorry for, and it you then felt 
that I was unjust, I certainly want to say 
now that in all your dealings with me I have 
found you a gentleman and a man who it all 
times wished to do the right thing. I will 
wind up with this statement. I have recently 
been brought into a newspaper controversy 
in connection with our city tribunal across 
the street. My name was brought in by a 
contractor in my section and another individual 
well known in Boston. As a result of what 
this contractor said, I was summoned bsfor» 
the Finance Commission, But I would like 
to say here for the record that, while I have 
criticized the present administration and while 
I have vigorously disagreed with many of the 
aims and methods of the present administra- 
tion and its ways of carrying out its aims, 
after listening to the various claims of those 
who felt that they have been unjustly dealt 
with by the citv in the last few years and 
after listening to the contractors before the 
Finance Commission making certain claims, 
none of those claims of men coming from my 
ward and to whose story I have listened by 
the hour, and none of the other stories I have 
heard, in any way alter mv opinion of our 
present chief e.xecutive, our present Mayor. 
I feel that he is personally an honest man. 
(Applatise. ) 



Adjourned without day at 12.45 p. m. 



SAND, CINDERS AND SALT IN DULUTH. 

About 3S5 miles of sidewalk are sanded 
every year and about 250 miles of streets 
are sno\v-| lowed and sanded. Ordi- 
narily, flat grades are not sanded, this 
work being confined to steep grades where 
dangerous ice conditions exist. During 
the past season the maintenance depart- 
ment used about 500 cubic yards oi' cin- 
ders, 500 cubic yards of sand, and 5 tons 
of calcium chloride on the streets. 

The use of salt, or sodium chloride, 
has been discontinued entirely, because 
of its injurious effect on concrete walks 
and pavements. The action of suit is 
not clearly understood, but it is nmch 
more active during cold weatlier than 
in summer, and is apparently due to tiie 
tormation of crystals after ()enetrating 
the surface, the force of wliich disin- 
fegrates the concrete. Calcium chloride 
does not seem to be entirely free from 
this difficulty, but is much less active 
than sodium chloride. 



PUBLIC DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1933. 

Gross funded debt, January 1, 1933, 
$165,758,499.95 (including $119,999.95 is- 
sued by State for enlargment of Court 
House); sinking funds, $35,737,619.21; 
other redemption means, $3,078,263.28; 
net debt, $126,942,617.46 or $7,588,429.94 
more than on January 1, 1932. Of said 
debt (net) $79,310,526.63 or 62.48 per 
cent was City debt; $46,199,623.96 or 
36.39 per cent, Rapid Transit debt (rep- 
resenting 4i per cent investment) ; S994,- 
466.87 or 0.78 per cent. County debt; 
$438,000 or 0.35 per cent. Water debt. 

Debt paid in 1932 was $9,935,301 but 
there was an increase in total gross debt 
of $5,437,698.99. 

Net debt per capita, $160.62 (approx.) ; 
net debt, exclusive of Rapid Transit debt, 
$80,742,993.50 or $102.17 per capita (ap- 
prox.) . 

Per capitas are based on U. S. Census 
Bureau's estimated population on Janu- 
ary 1, 1933. 

Loans authorized but not issued (with- 
in debt limit), $1,898,000; same outside 
of debt limit, $2,680,000; total, $4,578,000. 



POPULATION OF COUNTIES. 1930. 

(1) Middlesex (11 cities and 43 
towns), 934,924 or 156,572 over 1920; 
(2) Suffolk (3 cities and 1 town), 879,- 
536 or 44,014 over 1920; (3) Essex (8 
cities and 26 towns), 498,040 or 15,884 
over 1920; (4) Worcester (4 cities and 
57 towns), 491,242 or 36,107 over 1920; 
(5) Bristol (4 cities and 16 towns), 364,- 
590 or 5,585 over 1920; (6) Hampden (4 
cities and 19 towns), 335,496 or 35,191 
over 1920; (7) Norfolk (1 city and 27 
towns), 299,426 or 80,345 over 1920; (8) 
Plymouth (1 city and 26 towns), 162,311 
or 5,343 over 1920; (9) Berkshire (2 
cities and 30 towns), 120,700 or 7,667 over 
1920; (10) Hampshire (1 city and 22 
towns), 72,801 or 3,202 over 1920; (11) 
Franklin (26 towns), 49,612 or 251 over 
1920; (12) Barnstable (15 towns), 32,- 
305 or 5,635 over 1920; -(13) Dukes (7 
towns), 4,953 or 581 over 1920; (14) Nan- 
tucket (1 town), 3,678 or 881 over 1920. 
Total for the 14 coimties (39 cities and 
316 towns), 4,249,614 or 397,258 (i. e., 
10.3 per cent) over 1920. Of said total, 
2,940,335 (i. e., 69.19 per cent) were in 
the cities and 1,309,279 (i. e., 30.81 per 
cent) in the towns. The four counties, 
Suffolk, Middlesex, E.ssex and Bristol, 
contain 63.00 per cent of the State's in- 
habitants. 

If the municipalities having a popula- 
tion of 5,000 or over are properly called 
urban, then the percentage of urban 
population in the entire State reaches 
the notable figure of 90.71, while the rural 
shows but 9.29 per cent. 



POPULATION OF NEW ENQLAND, 1930. 

Total population. 8,166,341 (4,024,657 
males and 4,141,684 females) ; total white, 
8,065,113 (3,972,465 males and 4,092,648 
females); total native white, 6,230,803 
(3,007,723 males and 3,163,080 females); 
native white of native parentage, 3,167,- 
082 (1,572,885 males and 1,594,197 fe- 
males) ; native white of foreign or mixed 
parentage, 3,063,721 (1,494,838 males and 
1,568,883 females); foreign-bom white 
1,834,310 (904,742 males and 929,568 fe- 
males) ; Negro, 94,086 (46,963 males and 
47,123 females); Indian, 2,466 (1,273 
males and 1,193 females) ; Chinese, 3,794 
(3,233 males and 561 females) ; Japanese, 
352 (277 males and 75 females) ; Mexican, 
107 (69 males and 38 females) ; all other 
races, 423 (377 males and 46 females). 



POPULATION OF UNITED STATES, 1930. 

Total inhabitants of continental 
United States, 122,775,046, or 62,137,080 
males and 60,637,966 females. Total na- 
tive white, 95,497,800 or 48,010,145 males 
and 47,487,655 females; native white of 
native parentage 70,136,614 or 35,460,001 
males and 34,676,613 females; native 
whites of foreign parentage, 16,999,221 
(8,438,676 males and 8,560,545 females); 
native whites of mixed parentage, 8,361,- 
965 (4,111,468 males and 4,250,497 fe- 
males) ; foreign-born whites, 13,.366,407, 
or 7,153,709 males and 6,212,698 females; 
total foreign white stock, 38,727,593, or 
19,703,853 males and 19,023,740 females; 
Negroes, 11,891,143, or 5,855,669 males 
and 6,035,474 females; Mexicans, 1,422,- 
5^3, or 758,674 males and 663,859 females ; 
Indians, 332,397, or 170,350 males and 
162,047 females; Japanese, 138,834, or 
81,771 males and 57,063 females; Chinese, 
74 954, or 59,802 males and 15,152 fe- 
males; all others, 50,978, or 46,960 male* 
and 4,018 femalea. 



ANNEXATIONS OF BOSTON. 

East Boston in 1637; South Boston m 
1804, being set off from Dorchester; Rux- 
bury in 1808, a city of Norfolk County 
since March, 1846; Dorchester in 1870, 
a town since September, 1630; Charles- 
lown in 1874, a city of Middlesex County 
since February, 1847; Brighton in 1S74, 
set off from Cambridge and incorporated 
as a town of Middlesex County in I'eb- 
ruary, 1807; West Rox'bury in 1874, set 
off from Roxbury and incorporated us u 
town of Norfolk County in May, 1851, 
Hyde Park in 1912, a tovra of Norfolk 
County since April, 1808. 

These annexations, which added 
24,312 acres of land to the original land 
of Boston, were by area as follows: East 
l3oston, 1,435 acres; South Boston, 795; 
Roxbury, 2,450; Dorchester, 5,600; West 
Roxbury, 8,075; Brighton, 2,664; Charles- 
town, 424 ; Hyde Park, 2,869. Filled land 
increased the area later by 1,396 acrej. 
In 1875 the annexed territory had a 
population of 201,250, or 58.86 per cent 
of city's total; in 1910 its population had 
incieased to 477,311, or 71.18 per cent, 
Hyde Park not included. By 1915 tl>e 
total was 549,139, or 73.67 per cent of 
city. By 1925 the total was 607,519, or 
77.92 per cent. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 



National Industrial Recovery Project 
P. W. A. Docket No. Mass. H23-R. 



Notice to Contractors. 
Sealed proposals addressed to the Commis- 
sioner of Public Works and indorsed "Proposal 
for Constructing a Water Pipe Trestle and 
Fender at Chelsea Bridge North" will be re- 
ceived at Room 508, City Hall Annex, until 
12 m. (E. S. T.) on Tuesday, January 21, 
1936, and at that time and place will be 
publicly opened and read. Specification and 
contract forms may be obtained at Room 508, 
City Hall Annex, upon payment of the sum 
of two (2) dollars (non-returnable). Each 
proposal must be accompanied by a properly 
certified check in the sum of fifteen hundred 
(1,500) dollars payable to the City of Boston. 
Proposals must be made in duplicate, the 
sealed duplicate, without check, to be de- 
posited by the bidder with the City Auditor 
previous to the time named for opening 
the proposals. All checks except that of the 
bidder to whom the contract is awarded, will 
be returned within three (3) days after the 
awarding of the contract. The project is to 
be financed and constructed under the terms 
of the National Industrial Recovery Act, 
Emergency Relief Appropriation Act of 1935, 
and chapter 366 of the Acts of 1933, as amended, 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and 
attention is called to the construction regula- 
tions prescribed by the P. W. A. 

The rate per hour of the wages to be paid 
to mechanics, teamsters, chauffeurs and laborers 
in the work to be performed under the con- 
tract shall not be less than the rate of wages 
in the schedule determined by the Commis- 
sioner of Labor and Industries of the Common- 
wealth, a copy of which schedule is annexed 
to the form of contract referred to herein. 
Copies of said schedule may be obtained, with- 
out cost, upon application therefor, at Room 
508, City Hall Annex. 

The employment agency designated by the 
Government is the State Public Employment 
Office, 100 Nashua street, Boston. The right 
is reserved by the City of Boston, Mass., act- 
ing through its Commissioner of Public Works, 
to reject any or all bids, or to accept any bid 
which he deems most advantageous, subject 
to the approval of the State Director, P. W. A. 
No bidder may withdraw his bid for a period 
of thirty (30) days after the date set for 
the opening thereof. A surety bond by a 
company satisfactory to the Commissioner and 
the State Director P. W. A. and in an amount 
e<iual to one hundred (100) per cent of the 
contract price will be required from the success- 
ful bidder. 

C. J. Carvbn, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

(Jan. 4-11.) 



4 6 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 11 



CITY OF HOSTON. 



SIM'IM.Y DEPARTMKNl 



PnorOMALS FOK KlIINIMHINU HuTTEIl. l'.i.<,H. l/ri . 

The Supply I)pp;irtini'iit <if tlie f'ily of 
Kontoii invii™ priipiwaU fur fiirniahiiiK to the 
VHriouB fity depurtriieiils. butler, ckkh. ctr.. 
US per Bpi'ridiatioiiB to be obtained at the 
office of liip Superiiileudenl <)f Supplies, Hooiii 
801, City Hall Annex. Th<rr will lie ii rhirgi- 
of tirinlll riiitx (tu.^O) for r.ir/i hliinl: pro- 
posiil tiikrii out. I'tie bidder must leave his 
propo8:il witli a rprlified ilie<k for $.'tOO. pay- 
able to and to beroiiie llie property of tbe 
City of hoslon. if the proposal is not <arried 
out, at the above office. A duplicate bid, 
without check, must be left at the office of 
the City .\udilor prior to the time name<l 
for openinB bids. The bids will be publicly 
opened and read Wednesday. .l3nuar>' 22, MKJ6, 
at 12 m., at Hoom S()l, City Hall .Annex. The 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
(|uarter the total estimated amount of the 
contract with a surety company authorized to 
do business in Massjichusetts as surety for 
the faithful performance of the contract. The 
Superintendent reserves the risht to accept 
or reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, 
and to award the contract as he deems for the 
beat interests of the city. .Ml contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

<Jan. 11.) Siipcrintcndetit of Supplies. 

CITY OF HOSTON. 
SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals koh Hay, Grain and Straw. 

Sealed proposals will be received at the office 
of the ,Superintendent of .Supplies. Room 801, 
City Hall .\nnex, until 12 m., Wednesday. .lanu- 
ary 22. HK56. at which time and place they will 
be publicly opened and read, for furnishing hay. 
erain and straw to the various city departments. 
There trill be o charfje of twenty cent.-< (S0..^0) for 
each hlnnk proposal taken out. The bidder must 
include the cost of delivery. The bidders are 
requested to bid on United States No. 2 timothy 
hay. Hay must be no less than 40 per cent t;reen. 
The prade of hay must comply with the federal 
hay grades, and No. 2 white oats to test no less 
than thirty-six pounds to bushel graded under 
federal standards. The hay and oats must be 
weighed by sworn weighers and on the scales 
designated by the .Superintendent of .Supplies. 
\\\ articles covered l>y this contract shall be 
the growth production of the United .States. 
The bidder must use the form of proposal to 
be obtained at Room 801. City Hall .Annex. 
Propo.sals must be accompanied by a certified check 
for $200. .\ duplicate bid. without check, mn.-i 
be left at the office of the City .Auditor prior tc 
the time named for opening bids. The success ui 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter the 
total estimated amount of the bid with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Ma.ssachu- 
setts as surety for the faithful performance of 
the contract. The .Superintendent re.serves the 
right to accept or reject any or all bids, or any 
part of a bid. and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. .All 
contracts made subject to appropriations to meet 
payments thereunder. No reservations or stipu- 
lations submitted by the various bidders will be 
considered by the Superintendent. 

D. Frank Dohertv, 

(Jan. 11.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

CITY OF BO.STO.\. 



.SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Two Portable .Air 
c0.mpres8or8. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing two portable 
air compressors to the Public Works Department, 
Water Division. The bidder must use the form 
of propasal to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of .'Supplies, Room 801. City 
Hall .Annex, and the successful bidder must 
furnish a bond for one quarter the total esti- 
mated amount of the bid with a surety com- 
pany authorized to do business in Massachusetts 
as surety for the faithful performance of the 
contract. There irill he a charge of ttrenti/ cent.^ 
{$0.20) for each blank proposal taken out. The bid. 
with a certified check for $.'500. payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston if the 
proposal is not carried out, must be left at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, before 
12 m.. Thursday. .lanuary 2.'5, 19,'56. at which time 
and place they will be publicly opened and read. 
.A duplicate l>id. without check, must be left 
at the office of the City .Auditor prior to the 
time named for opening bids. The Superintendent 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or all 
bids, or any part of a bid. and to award the con- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of the city. 
.All contracts made subject to appropriations to 
meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty. 

(Jan. 11.) Superinteiiiteiit of Supplies. 



THE .SC'HOOL CO.M.MITTEE OF THE CITY 
OF BO.STON. 

-Administration Building, 15 Beacon .Street, 
f)FhirE of the Busi>(Ees Manager. 

Proposals for Furnishing Paper. Blank 
Books and Envelopes for the Bo.ston 
Public ,S( hools. 
The School Committee of the City of Boston 
invites bids for furnishing and delivering at the 
■■^upply l{oom of the .School Committee. 440 
Brookline avenue. Brxston. paper, blank bo<jks 
and envelopes as per schedule. Proposal forms 
are obtainable at the office of the Business Man- 
ager of the .School Committee, tenth Hoor. ■]5 
Beacon street. Envelopes containing proposals 
must be sealed and plainly marked "Proposal for 
Paper. Blank Books and Envelopes." The bid 
must be in duplicate. One copy signed by the 
bidder and accompanied by a certified check for 
$10('. payable to tlie C'iiy of Boston, must be left 
at the office of the Business Manager on or before 
12 o'clock m. on Wednesday. January 22. I'J.'iB. 
Copies filed with the Business Manager will be 
publicly opened and read at 12 o'clock m. of 
the d:»y stated. The other cop.v, also signed by 
the bidder, must be filed with the City .Auditor, 
City Hall. Boston, .Mass.. previous to the time 
named for the ofkning of the bids. The .School 
Committee r?.serves the right to reject any or all 
bids, and to accept such bid or part of bid as 
may be deemed best for the interests of the city. 
The succe.ssful bidder will be required to furnish 
a bond for not less than .50 per cent of the amount 
of the contract. 

.Alexander M. Sullivan, 
Business Manager of the School Committee. 
(Jan. 11.) 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY 
OF BOSTON. 



-Administr.vtion Building. 15 Beacon Street, 
Office of the Business Manager. 



Proposal for Furnishing Pencils, Pens, Pen- 
holders. Chalk. I.vk and Other Items for 
the Boston Public .Schools. 

The School Committee of the City of Boston 
invites bids for furnishing and delivering at the 
Supply Room of the .School Committee. 440 
Brookline avenue. Boston, pencils, pens, pen- 
holders, chalk, ink and other items as per sched- 
ule. Proposal forms are obtainable at the office 
of the Business Manager of the School Com- 
mittee. 15 Beacon street, tenth floor. Envelopes 
containing proposals must be sealed and plainly 
marked "Proposal for Furnishing Pencils. Pens, 
Penholders. Chalk. Ink and Other Items." The 
bid must be in duplicate. One copy signed by 
the bidder and accompanied by a certified check 
for $100. paj'able to the Citv of Boston, must be 
left at the office of the Business Manager on or 
before 12 o'clock m. on Tuesday. January 21, 
19'?6. Copies filed with the Business Manager 
will be publicly opened and read at 12 o'clock m. 
of the day stated. The other copy, also signed 
by the bidder, must be filed with the City .Auditor. 
City Hall. Boston. Mass., previous to the time 
named for the opening of the bids. The School 
Committee reserves the right to reject any or all 
bids, and to accept such bid or part of bid as 
may be deemed best for the interests of the city. 
The successful bidder will be required to furnish 
a bond for not less than 50 per cent of the amount 
of the contract. 

-Alexander M. Sullivan. 
Btusiness Manager of the School Committee. 

(.Jan. 11.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPART.MENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Me.\ts. 

The .Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing to the various city 
departments, meats as per specifications to be 
obtained at the office of the Superintendent of 
Supplies. Room SOI, City Hall .Annex. There will 
bg a charge of twcnty-fre cents {^0.25) for each blank 
proposal taken out. The bidder must leave his 
proposal with a certified check for $300. pay- 
able to and to become the propert.v of the City of 
Boston if the proposal is not carried out. at the 
above office. -A duplicate bid. without check, 
must be left at the office of the City .Auditor prior 
to the time named for opening bids. The bids will 
be publicly opened and read on -Mondav. January 
20, 19:J6. at 12 m.. at Room 801. City Hall .Anne.\. 
The successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the total estimated amount of the contract 
with a surety company authorized to do business 
in Mass:ichusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract. The .Superintendent 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids, 
or any part of a bid. and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. .AH 
contracts made subject to appropriations to meet 
payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 11.) Supcrintendail of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Fruits and 
Vegetables. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various city departments, fruits and vegetable*, 
as per specifications to be obtained at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801. City Hall -Annex- There will be a cliarge 
of thirt'/ cents {tO.-iO) for each blank proposal taken 
out. The bidder must leave his proposal with a 
certified check for $-300. payable to and to become 
the property of the City of Boston if the pro- 
pf>sal is not carried out, at the above office. -A du- 
plicate bid. without check, must be left at the 
office of the City -Auditor prior to the time named 
for opening bids. The bids will be publicly 
opened and read on Tuesday, January 21, 19.36. 
at 12 m.. at Room 801. City Hall .Annex. The 
succes.sful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the total estimated amount of the con- 
tract with a surety company authorized to do 
business in Massachusetts as surety for the faith- 
ful performance of the contract. The .Super- 
intendent re.serves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid. and to award 
the contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the city. -All contracts made subject to appro- 
priations to meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty. 

(Jan. 11.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Flour (Bread and 
Pastry) to the X'.^rious City Depart- 
ments. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing flour (bread 
and pastry) to the various city departments 
according to specifications to be obtained from 
the office of the Supply Department, I?oom 801, 
City Hall .Annex. There will be a charge of twenty 
cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal taken out. 
Bidder must use the form of proposal to be ob- 
tained at this office, and the successful bidder must 
furnish a bond for one cjuarter the total esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract. Bids, with a certified check 
for S300. payable to and to become the property 
of the City of Boston if the proposal is not carried 
out. must be left at the office of the Superintendent 
of Supplies. Room 801. City Hall -Annex, before 
12 m.. Friday. January 17. 1936, at which time 
and place they will be publicly opened and read. 
-A duplicate bid. without check, must be left with 
the City -Auditor prior to the time named for 
opening bids. The Superintendent reserves the 
right to accept or reject any or all bids or any part 
of a bid, and to award the contract as he deems for 
the best interests of the city. .All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 11.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES DEPARTMENT. 



Notice. 
In compliance with provisions of section 41, 
chapter 98 of the General Laws of Massachu- 
setts, as amended by chapter 32 of the Acts 
of 1923. I hereby srive notice to all inhabitants 
or persons having usual places of business in 
Boston using weighing or measuring devices 
for the purpose of buying or selling goods, 
wares or merchandise, for public weighing or 
for hire or reward, to bring in such weighing 
and measuring devices to be tested, adjusted 
and sealed. I shall be at the office of Sealer 
of Weights and Measures everj' day during 
regular business hours to attend to this duty. 
James A. Sweeney, 
Sealer of Weights and Measures, 

105 City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Office hours, 9 to 5, except Saturdays, 9 to 12. 
(Jan. 11.) 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



To Taxpayers 
Assessors' Notice. City Hall Annex. 
Boston, January 1, 1936. 
Attention is called to the Assessors' Notice 
posted upon City Hall and various other 
places throughout the city, relative to mak- 
ing returns on personal property subject to 
taxation. Returns should be made not later 
than February 1.5, 

Edward T Kelly, 
Timothy W. Murphy, 
Michael J. Brophy, 

Assessors of Boston. 
(Jan. 4-11-18-25— Feb. 1-8-15.) 



Jan. 11 



CITY RECORD 



47 



VALUATIONS WITH PER CAPITA, LEADING CITIES, 1932. 



New York. . . 
Philadelphia. 

Detroit 

Boston 

Los Angeles.. 

Cleveland 

Pittsburgh . . . 

Baltimore 

Buffalo 

San Francisco 
St. Louis 



Valuation. 



♦Per Capita. 



$19,977, 
3,454 
2,125 
1,814, 
1,394 
1,225 
1,209 
1,182, 
1,125 
1.049 
1,021 



,095,815 
,008,026 
,031,525 
,789,000 
,226,820 
,265,830 
,147,860 
904,212 
,853,030 
,308,153 
,606,508 



$2,777 48 
1,747 63 
1,262 15 
2,303 58 
1,126 15 
1,330 15 
1,762 32 
1,444 18 
1,920 15 
1,590 01 
1,228 23 



NET DEBT WITH PER CAPITA. LEADING 


CITIES, 1932. 






Net Debt. 


*Fer Capita. 


New York 


$1,759,391,564 

428,440,297 

322,828,578 

163,367,070 

161,906,200 

154,552,356 

124.310,457 

84,662,797 

72,760,671 

66,363,984 

57.163.597 


$244 61 


Philfidplnhia 


216 78 


Dptroit 


191 74 




157 79 




124 84 




91 91 




83 32 


Plpvpland 


199 45 




124 09 


St Tenuis 


245 34 




79 79 







• Per capita figures are approximate, population totals being estimated. Compiled from the 
World Almanac. 



POPULATION OF BOSTON, BY 


DISTRICTS 


• 




District: 


U.S. 

Census 

1920. 


State 

Cenpus 

1925. 


U. S. 

Census 

1930. 


Boston Proper 


181,193 
63,051 
63,815 
128,525 
156,006 
63,067 
42.102 
34,272 
18,029 


172,101 
66,534 
64,803 
129,883 
167,015 
73,621 
47,900 
37,918 
19.845 


151.818 


£a6t Boston 


61,454 




58,039 




122,509 


Dorchester . 


187,103 




88,327 




58,362 


Charlestown 


31,663 


Hye Park 


23,913 






All Boston 


748.060 


779.620 


781.188 







CITY AND COUNTY FUNDED DEBT, DECEMBER 31, 1934. 

Gross funded debt December 31. 1933 $172,450,999 95 

Add funded debt issued in 1934: 

City Debt t$3.879,000 00 

Water Debt t600,000 00 

Traffic Tunnel Debt 800,000 00 

Traffic Tunnel Debt, Series B 500,000 00 

5.679,000 00 



Deduct funded debt paid in 1934: 

City Debt 

County Debt 

Hyde Park Water Debt 

Water Debt 

Rapid Transit Debt 



$9,667,000 00 
84,666 67 
16,000 00 
34,000 00 
56,000 00 



$178,129,999 95 



9,857,666 67 



Gross funded debt December 31, 1934 *$168,272,333 28 

Sinking Funds December 31, 1933 $34,178,338 97 



Receipts during 1934. 
Payments during 1934. 



Premiums on loans: 
City 



2,421,251 79 

$36,599,590 76 
2,482,806 60 

$34,116,784 16 

1.557 55 



34,118,341 71 



Total redemption means December 31 , 1934 

Xet funded debt December 31, 1934 $134.153,991 57 



City Debt t$88,431.300 00 



Gross Debt. Sinking Funds, etc. 



County Debt. 

Water Debt 

Traffic Tunnel Debt 

Traffic Tunnel Debt, Series B. 



Rapid Transit Debt . 



1.562.333 28 

5838,000 00 

16,000,000 00 

2,500,000 00 

$109.331,6.33 28 
58,940,700 00 



$19,062,490 72 
811,297 01 



$19,873,787 73 
14.244,553 98 



Net Debt. 

$69,368,809 28 

751,036 27 

838.000 00 

16,000,000 00 

2,500,000 00 

$89,457,845 55 
44,696,146 02 



$168,272,333 28 $34.118..341 71 $134,153,991 57 



* Includes $81.3.33.28 issued by the Commonwealth under chapter 534 of the .\ctB of 1906. 

t Includes $2,3.50.000 Public Works Administration Projects, chapter 366, .\cts of 1933, as amended by 
chapter 21. Acts of 1934. 

X Public Works .administration Projects, chapter 366. Acts of 1933, as amended by chapter 21. .\ct8 of 
1934. 

I Includes $500,000 Public W'orks .\dministration Projects, chapter 366. .\cts of 1933, as amended by 
chapter 21, Acts of 1934. 



A SQUARE DEAL IN ASSESSMENTS FOR 
TAXATION. 

Many cities are finding it greatly to 
their advantage to have their tax valua- 
tions periodically overhauled. The first 
criterion of any assessment is equity. 
For every citizen who wants through 
"pull" or however else to get off easy, 
there are twenty, nay a hundred who 
want a fair and square deal for all. 

The appraisal of city real estate is a 
highly technical affair. 

Few things arc more important than 
the equalization of assessments. Par- 
ticularly in cities that are cramped by 
an inflexible debt or tax limit, an hon- 
est, full value assessment may be a 
great boon. Without the slightest rai.se 
in the tax rate a S'lhstantially greater 
tax 3'icld may be had. 



HISTORICAL DATA ABOUT WARDS. 

The term "ward" first appears in a 
fire-protection order, approved by the 
Town on August 29, 1079, dividing the 
Town into 4 quarters with 2 wards each. 
The 8 wards had previously been mil- 
itary districts. 

On August 11, 1713, the Selectmen 
"agreed upon a distribution of the Town 
into distinct Wards or Precincts." 

On February 1, 1715, it was "voted to 
make a new division of the Town iiil.o 
eight distinct Wards." 

On March 9, 1735, it was voted to 
divide the Town into 12 wards to facili- 
tate the work of the Overseers of the 
Poor. 

On March 13, 1822, the Selectmen di- 
vided the Town into 12 wards on the 
basis of the U. S. Census of 1820. 

By an ordinance which took effect on 
the second Monday of December, 1838, 
there was a revision of the wards. 

On April 29, 1850, the City Council 
accepted Chap. 167 of the Acts of 1850, 
which altered the wards on the basis of 
legal voters rather than on the number 
of inhabitants. 

By ordinance taking effect on Novem- 
ber 15, 1865 new ward lines were es- 
tablished. 

In the annexation period, 1865-1875, 
the number of wards was increased from 
twelve to twenty-one. 

By Chap. 243, Acts 1875, the City 
Council was ordered to cause a new di- 
vision of the City into twenty- four wards 
in the year 1875 in such manner as to 
include an equal number of voters in 
each ward. This division was made, tak- 
ing effect on December 13, 1875. On 
May 27, 1876, the City Council, in ac- 
cordance with Chap. 242, Acts of 1876, 
divided one of the wards in two, making 
a total of 25 wards for the City. 

By ordmance passed April 20, 1895, 
under authority of Chap. 437, Acts of 
1888, and Section 96 of Chap. 417, Acts 
of 1893, ward lines were established on 
the basis of the number of voters reg- 
istered at the City election of 1894, 
there still being 25 wards. 

The annexation of Hyde Park, effective 
January 1, 1912, made an additional 
ward. 

By enactment of December 28, 1914, 
under authority of Chap. 630, Acts of 
1914, the City Council redivided the 
City into 26 wards. 

The latest redivision, established De- 
cember 30, 1924, under authority of 
Chap. 410, Acts of 1924, consists of 22 
wards. 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY, 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

Room 27, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 1100. 
KRniHKicK W. Manskipxi). Mayor. 
JoMRIMI K. MkllyN. Srrretarv- 
William C. S. HKALfnr. Amutanl Secretary. 
Cyril G. CliMMI.Nr,.s. /ImtiWan/ Srrrelary. 
John K. Gilmork. Jr.. A»iii»lant Secretary. 
KdwaRD U. Lkk. Amtislant Secretary. 
UeatNARI) J. Dunn. Amiiiilaxt Secretary. 
Thomas K. C'IMKNo. Anxi-iitant Secretary. 
Artiii'R J. O'Kbijfb. /l««ij)(aJi( Secretary. 
Mary L. Thompson. .\giii»tant Secretary. 
John F. Gilmokk. Chief Clerk (Acting). 
Herhert L. MoJ4ary, Cliief Liceiuiina Diviswn. 

JOSM'II .MiKOl.AJKW.SKI. .'\8Hi«tant. 

Martin J. Conroy, Measrnaer. 
CITY COUNCIL. 
War.l 1. Ht-nry Selvitella, 80 Orient avenue. 
Ward 2. James J. Mellen. 18 Tremont st. 
Ward 3. John L FitziteraUl. 7 Allen st. 
Ward 4. Georne W. Roberts, 20 Hemenway 

street. , „. 

Ward 5. Henry L. Shattuck, 15 River st. 

'Ward 6. Georiie A. Murray, 223 West 
Second street. , „. , ., 

Ward 7. John E. Kerrigan, 213 West Eighth 

Ward 8. John P. Dowd, 22 Greenville st. 
Ward 9. Richard D. Gleason, 15 Rugt'les 

Ward 10. John J. Doherty. 674 Wyman st. 
Ward 11. Jamei J. Kilroy, 1301 Columbus 
avenue. ^ ... , < 

Ward 12. David M. Brackmart, 89 Waumbeck 

Ward 13. Peter J. Fitzgerald, 39 Belfort St. 
Ward 14. Sidney Rosenberg, 576 Blue HiU 
avenue. .,, 

Ward 15. Martin H. Tobin, 70 WestviUe st. 
Ward 16. John J. MeGrath, 2 Glenrose road. 
Ward 17. Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr., 57 
Codman Hill avenue. „. „ 

Ward 18. Clement A. Norton, 34 Myopia 
road. 

Ward 19. Peter A. Murray, 7 St. John st. 
Ward 20. James F. Finley. 231 Cornell si. 
Ward 21. James E. Agnew, 92 WaUmgford 
road. _^ 

Ward 22. Edward M. Gallagher, 21 Oak 
Square avenue. 

Clerk of Committees. 
John E. Baldwin, Room 56, City Hall. lei. 
Lafayette 5100. 

City Messenger. 
Edwakd J. Leary, Room 55, City Hall. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

ART DEPARTMENT. 
Office, Faneuil Hall. 
Arthur .\. Shurclipf, Secretary. 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Edward T. Kelly, Chairman. 
Timothy W. Murphy, Secretary. 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 
Room 20, City HaU, Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Charles J. Fox, City Auditor. 
Daniel J. Falvey, Deputy City Audit-or. 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOL 

BUILDINGS. 
Richard J. Lane, Chairman. 

Department of School Buildings. 
Office, 11 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 5750. 
William W. Drummey, Superintendent of Con- 
struction. 
BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT. 
Frederic H. Fay. Chairman. 30 City Hall. 
H. Murray Pakulski, Secretary. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 
134 North street. Tel. Capitol 2125. 
William P. Hickey. CommissioTicr. 
BUDGET DEPARTMENT. 
47 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Francis J. Murray, Com-miasioner. 
BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 901 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Edward W. Roemer. Building Commissioner. 
John H. Glover, Acting Clerk of Department. 

Board of Examiners. 
Office. 907 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
Thomas K. Reynolds, Chairman. 
Mary C. Dowd, Secretary. 

Board of Appeal. 
Office. City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Joseph A. Tomasello, Chairman. 
James A. McElaney, Jr., Secretary. 

CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 
Room 31, City Hall. Tel. Laiayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, City Clerk. 
John B. Hynes, Assistant City Clerk. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD. 
Room 30, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 
Elisabeth M. Herlihy, Secretary. 



CITY RECORD. 

Office, 73 City Hall. Tel. I^fayette 5100. 
Frank H. Cushman, Editor. 
Jo.sHUA H. JONm. AHsociatc Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd. liusineas Ayent, Room 73. 
City Hall. 

COLLECTING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 200 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
John F. Doherty, City Collector. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 111 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
David B. Shaw, Chairman. 
Daniel H. Rose, Commissioner. 
Francis B. MoKinney, Commissioner. 
Frederic E. Dowli.ng, Commissioner. 

FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Office, 24 School street. Tel. Lafayette 1622. 
E. Mark Sullivan, Chairman. 
Robert E. Cunniff, Secretary. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters, Bristol street. South End. Tel. 

Kenmore 1100. 
Wire Division, 103 City Hall Annex. Tel. 

Lafayette 5100. 
Edward F. McLaughlin, Commissioner. 
Herbert J. Hickey, Executive Secretary. 
Henry A. Fox, Chief of Department. 
Petter F. Dolan, Superintendent of Wire 

Division. 

THE FRANKLIN FOUNDATION. 

Office, Franklin Union. Appleton and Berkeley 

streets. Tel. Hancock 6590. 
Henry B. Sawyer, President. 
W. B. Russell, Director. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1107 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Francis X. Mahoney, M. D., Commissioner. 
Joseph A. Cahalan, Secretary. 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 

City Hospital, 818 Harrison ave. Tel. Ken. 8600. 
Relief Hospital, Haymarket Sq. Tel. Cap. 0753. 
Relief Hospital, East Boston. Tel. E. B. 86. 
West Department, West Rox. Tel. Parkway 08. 
Sanatorium Division, 249 River St., Mattapan. 

Tel. Blue Hills 7900. 
Joseph P. Manning, President. 
James W. Manary, M. D., Superintendent. 

INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 808-811 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Frederic A. Washburn. M. D., Commissioner. 
Elizabeth G. Nelson, Chief Clerk. 
Child Welfare Division. 
800 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Registration Division. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Long Island, Hospital Division. 
Long Island, Boston Harbor. Tel. President 
1371. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Room 1003, Lawyers Building, 11 Beacon 

street. Tel. Lafayette 6200. 
Henry E. Foley, Corporation Counsel. 
Margaret G. O'Neill, Secretary. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Library Building, Copley square. Tel. 

Kenmore 1500. 
Frank W. Buxton, President of Trustees. 
Milton E. Lord, Director. 

LICENSING BOARD. 

Office, 1 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 2470. 
David T. Montague, Chairman. 
Louis Epple, Secretary. 

MARKET DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Quincy Market. TeL Capitol 5382. 
Frank J. Kiernan, Superintendent. 

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

Men and Women, 25 Church street, Tel. 

Liberty 8607. 
Samuel W. Warren, Director. 

OVERSEERS OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

Office, Charity Building, 43 Hawkins street. 

Tel. Capitol 8320. 
Temporary Home, Chardon street. Tel. Laf. 

2337. 
Wayfarers' Lodge. 30 Hawkins street. Tel. 

Lafayette 319S. 
James A. McMurry, Chairman. 
John C. L. Dowling, Executive Director. 

PARK DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 
William P. Long, Chairman. 
Daniel J. Byrne, Secretary. 

Park, Public Grounds, Bath and Music 

Divisions. 

Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 

Cemetery Division. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 805 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
JOH.s J. Douglass, Commissioner. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters, 154 Berkeley street. Tel. Ken- 
more 6700. 
Eugene M. McSweeney, Commissioner. 
Andrew J. Gorey, Secretary. 
Martin H. King, Superintendent. 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 174 North street. Tel. Lafayette 6363. 
William J. Casey, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1005 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Roswell G. Hall, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

C. J. Cabven, Commissioner. Office, 509 City 
HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

John J. Connelly, Secretary and Chief Clerk. 
Room 509, City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 

Bridge and Ferry DrvisiON. 
Leo B. Reilly, Division Engineer. Office, 602 
City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Highway Division. 

Joshua Atwood. Division Engineer. Office, 

501 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Sanitary Division. 

Adolph J. Post, Division Engineer. Office, 

501 City Hall Annex. TeL Lafayette 5100. 

Sewer Division. 

George W. Dakin, Division Engineer. Office, 

701 City Hall Annex. TeL Lafayette 5100. 

Water Division. 
Daniel M. Sullivan, Division Engineer. Office, 
607 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 

Water Income Division. 
Jambs A. McMurry, Division Engineer. Office, 
604 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 

REGISTRY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1008 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Hilda H. Quirk, Registrar. 

RETIREMENT BOARD. 

Room 65, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, Chairman. 
J. George Herlihy, Secretary. 
William D. Kenny, Executive Officer. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Office, 15 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 5500. 

Frederick R. Sullivan, Chairman. 

Ellen M. Cbonin, Secretary. 

Patrick T. Campbell, Superintendent of 

Schools. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, Business Manager. 

SINKING FUNDS DEPARTMENT. 

Room 20, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Eliot Wadsworth, Chairman. 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 60 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Charles H. Carey, Commissioner. 

STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 76 City HalL Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Walter A. Murray, Acting Chairman. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Secretary. 

STREET LAYING=OUT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 401 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Owen A. Gallagher, Chairman. 
C0BNE1,IUS A. Re.akdon, Secretary. 

SUFFOLK, COUNTY OF. 

Offices. Court House, Pemberton square. Tel. 

Capitol 0351. 
William J. Foley, District Attorney. TeL 

Capitol 9500. 
John A. Keliher, Sheriff. Tel Capitol 2451. 
W. T. A. Fitzgerald, Register of Deeds. Tel. 

Capitol 0519. 
Arthur W. Sullivan, Register of Probate. 

Tel. Capitol 9110. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 801 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
D. Frank Doherty, Superintendent. 
TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 

Office. 1 Beacon st., 7th floor. Tel. Capitol 5860. 
Thomas F. Sullivan, Chairman. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Room 21, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

John H. Dorsbty, Treasurer. 

Arthur F. Swan, Assistant Treasurer. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 105 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
James A. Sweeney, Sealer. 



cm 07 BOSTON PBINTINQ OBPABTKKMT 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol.. '2,i5. Saturday, January IH, 1936. No. 3 

PER CAPITA COST OF MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT IN BOSTON FOUND 
NOT TO BE AS HIGH AS CLAIMED BY OUTSIDE ORGANIZATION — 
COMMITTEE APPOINTED BY MAYOR MANSFIELD, AT REQUEST OF 
CITY COUNCIL, CHARGES STATEMENT ISSUED, BASED ON CENSUS 
BUREAU TABLE, NOT RELIABLE BECAUSE OF THE MATHEMATICAL 
PROCESS THAT DOES NOT TAKE INTO CONSIDERATION CONDITIONS 
AND QUALITY OF SERVICES RENDERED IN BOSTON AS COMPARED 
WITH OTHER CITIES WITH WHICH IT IS CONTRASTED. 



The following is the statement issued in refutation of claim that Boston's cost of government is greater than 
other cities: 

The undersigned were appointed a committee by his Honor the Mayor, at the request of the City Council, 
to examine into the statement that the per capita cost of municipal government in Boston is greater than in any 
other large city in this country. 

This statement has been widely quoted and is ba.sed on a Census Bureau table issued by the Federal Govern- 
ment covering the thirteen largest cities in the United States for the year 1933. The per capita cost for each city is 
obtained by dividing the total of its expenditures (excluding public service enterprises) for the year 1933 by the 
figure corresponding to the population as shown by the latest United States census. The quotient is assumed to be 
the px'r capita cost of municipal government in each of the cities to which the process is applied and the resulting 
figures range from $36.84 for St. Louis to S76.02 for Boston. 

The arithmetic is probably correct but the results are of little, if any, practical value. The table is nothing 
more than it purports to be, the result of a mathematical process, but, like a great many other statistical tables, it is 
open to various interpretations depending on the particular line of argument advanced by the person using it. 

To make a fair comparison of the cost of municipal government among several cities it is necessary to take 
into account, first, how many, and what quality of services are furnished in each city at the public expense and what 
items of expense not strictly municipal are included in the costs of one city and not in another, and, second, the 
character and extent of the population served. 

So far as Boston is concerned the two factors involved in this table are not comparable with any of the other 
large cities. ^Municipal expenditures in this city cover expenditures for county government, metropohtan expenses, 
and other items which in other cities are not included in the city expense. In addition, the city is obliged to incur 
expenses not for a resident population of 781,188, which is the figure used in the table, but for a daytime population of 
at least 500,000 more who live in the suburbs but come to business in Boston each day. Using this daytime popula- 
tion figure, it brings the per capita cost down to S46, and omitting from the total expense several items peculiar to 
Boston we can bring the per capita figure down to less than .$40. 

Of course this process and conclusion is more or le-ss ridiculous but it is advanced for the purpose of showing 
the lack of importance or value of statistics of this kind. 

Another table recently compiled by Dun & Bradstreet gives the net debt of Boston per capita as $108, which 
is $36 less than the average for the thirteen cities having more than 500,000 population. This kind of table is 
equally valueless and for the same reason, that is, that the bases and factors involved are not comparable. 

As we have indicated, several sets of tables can be prepared based on authentic figures, some of which tables 
show on their face that the cost of municipal government in Boston is less than the cost in most of the other large 
cities and others show just the opposite. We reiterate that such tables are worthless because they are founded on 
bases which are not fairly comparable. In one city ashes and garbage may be collected as a municipal function 
while in another it is a private expense. One city may have to expend milHons for snow removal while another 
has practically no snow expense. Streets and sewers may be constructed at the public expense in one city while 
in another the abutters have to pay the cost. The taxpayers in one city may have furnished to them as a matter 
of course pubhc baths and gymnasia which are absent in another city. While presumably all large cities have 
a traffic problem to some extent, the difficulties may be so increased in one city by narrow and illogically laid out 
streets that a police officer is required at almost every intersection in the business district while in another with 
wide avenues and rectangular blocks traffic officers are hardly necessary. 

In one city the pubhc welfare expenses are assumed by the county and do not appear as a municipal expense. 
In others the greater portion of the public welfare costs have been paid during the depression by the State or the 
Federal Government but in Boston nearly all the expense of public welfare has been the burden of the municipality. 
Every other large city has missing from its municipal expense account one or more of the elements which are included 
in the cost of municipal government in this city. 

Taking these matters into consideration we think it is evident that a table of per capita costs is of no value 
either for comparative purposes or as an argument for reduction of expenditures. 

The force of this statement can better be appreciated when it is realized that a survey of per capita cost 
tables compiled during the past thirty years shows that with only one or two exceptions Boston has always been 
credited or charged with the highest per capita cost among the larger cities of the country. In other words, the 
position of Boston as shown in the 1933 table issued by the Census Bureau is not a new development. It has existed 
for at least three decades and must necessarily continue so long as per capita costs are computed on the present 

John F. Dow'd, City Councilor — Chairman. 
Charles J. Fox, City Auditor. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, City Clerk. 



50 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 




"O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 

({uecn, 
From tliy hills lookinst down on the shlp- 

teemins plain ol the ocean, 
May thy luture be bright, thy skies beam 

with IlKht all serene. 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 

unselHsh devotion!" 
From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskeil Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 

FR.'VNK H. CUSHMAN. Editor, Room 73, City 

Hall. 
Joshua H. Jo.nbs, Jb.. Assoctate Editor. 
Edwakd F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73. 

City Hall. 

Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



$2.00 Per Year 
10 cents 



IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES 
Old South News-stand. Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 
A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City HaU. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
Januaiy 20, 1936, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hail, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal dep.art- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Bo.\RD OF StREET COMMIS- 
SIONERS, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the di.scon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 



public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of g.a.soline, oil 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Tiuffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the suppb'ing or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To THE Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To THE Board of P.ark Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue. Back Bay 
Fens. Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 
charges made for such service. Applica- 



tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public baths 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To THE School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools in the city. 

To the Dep.\rtment of School Build- 
INCS, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To THE Bo.ARD OF EX-AMINERS, RoOm 

1001, Cit}' Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To THE St.\tistics Dep.artment, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Librarj'. 

To THE Wire Division of the Firb 
Department, 60 Bristol street, for all is. 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To THE Bo.\RD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT, 

Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



For the week ending January 11, 1936: 
Population as of July, 1935, Massa- 
chusetts State Census, 817,713; popula- 
tion estimated July, 1936, United States 
Census Bureau, 801,880; number of 
deaths (stillbirths excluded): Residents, 
241; nonresidents, 44; total, 285. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
-All deaths, 18.48; nonresidents deducted, 
15.63. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 



Last week, 17.51; corresponding week 
last year, 18.69. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 18; one year to four 5'ears, in- 
clusive, 6; sixty years and over, 147. 
Total deaths: Male, 149; female, 136; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 167; 
deaths of colored, 16. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AXD DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 



Cases and Deaths i Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week Reported Week 

Ended Ended 

Jan. 11. 1936. Jan. 12. 1935 



Cases. Deaths. 



.interior poliomyelitis 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis lethargica 

InHuenza 

Measles 

Meningitis epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) (8 cases childhood type T. B.) 

Tuberculosis (other forms) 

Typhoid fever 

Whooping cough 



43 

100 
86 
22 

2 



27 
1 
8 



Cases. Deaths. 



68 

51 

27 

2 

47 



1 
4 

17 

7 



* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



51 



"PUBLIC MIND NOT TO BE DIVERTED FROM REAL ISSUE," MAYOR 
MANSFIELD DECLARES IN STATEMENT ISSUED CONCERNING FINANCE 
COMMISSION AND ATTACKS BEING MADE ON HIM BY CHAIRMAN 
OF BODY — EXHIBITION OF FEELING CARRIES ITS OWN CONDEM= 
NATION — CALLS ATTENTION TO FLAGRANT ABUSES OF POWER BY 
COMMISSION AND ANNOUNCES THAT HE PROPOSES AT ALL TIMES 
TO EXERCISE HIS OWN JUDGMENT IN MUNICIPAL MATTERS WHERE 
RESPONSIBILITY IS HIS. 



Upon January 8 the Mayor issued the following statement : 

It must be plainly evident by the savage and unguarded attacks upon me by the Chairman of the Finance 
Commission, apparently without dissent from other members of the Commission, that he has disqualified himself 
and them from acting fairly and impartially in any proceeding which involves the Mayor. For men holding such 
important quasi-judicial positions which require judicial calmness and a lack of bias, the exhibition of such intense 
feeling against me carries with it its own condemnation. 

But the people will not be deceived. This packed and prejudiced board is putting on a show in order to 
divert the public's mind from the Dolan case and in a frantic effort to force me to abandon that litigation. But the 
people may rest easy on that score. That litigation will go on despite all of these unfair attacks upon me. 

It is impossible for me to reply to all of the billingsgate that is hurled at me by the Chairman of the Finance 
Commission, but lest the people be stunned by so much loud noise and be deceived by this smoke screen I feel that 
I ought to call attention to some very flagrant abuses of power by the Commission. 

His examination of witnesses has been obviously unfair. He is not satisfied with any answer from any 
witness unless it is unfavorable to me. He receives the rankest kind of hearsay testimony, and the old familiar 
dodge of the mysterious voice over the telephone is again resorted to in order to create an impression that sinister 
influences were at work in order to shake down unsuccessful bidders. Only a short time ago the Finance Com- 
mission itself issued a report upon the investigation of snow removal for la.st winter. The pubhc thought that was 
a closed incident but it is dragged out again and unfair innuendo is indulged in by the Finance Commission that 
members of my family profited by those contracts. It will not be forgotten that the man appointed to make that 
investigation was himself repudiated by Chairman Sullivan. 

Both Mr. Sullivan and Mr. Chapman are members of the bar and are supposed to be lawyers, but I think 
that if they had taken competent legal advice they would not have gratuitously advised a disappointed bidder 
to stir up htigation. That advice was not given officially in a report of the Finance Commission but was volun- 
teered by two individuals not acting officially. It is possible that able counsel might have advised these two 
gentlemen that such stirring up of litigation would make them personally liable. But it is all part of the same 
picture. Every possible effort will be exerted to force a discontinuance of the Dolan case. Every effort will be 
made to adduce evidence which will be made to look suspicious and every effort will also be made to suppress any- 
thing which may appear favorable to me. 

Some one with practical common sense ought to advice the Chairman of the Finance Commission and its 
other members to be a little more guarded and restrained in their expressions of fierce animosity against me. They 
are overplaying their hand and the people know it. 

And the responsibihtj' for the purchase of proper snow-removal equipment rests upon me and not upon 
the Finance Commission. Having that responsibility I propose to exercise my judgment and not theirs in the 
purchase of equipment. 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Institutions Department. 

Advertises for proposals for erecting fire 
escapes at Long Island Hospital, Boston 
Harbor. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to the full amount of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Institutions Department, Room 809, 
City Hall .\nnex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Buk close Tiiesrlai/, January 28, at 12 m. 

Public Works Department. 

Advertises for proposals for construct- 
ing a water pipe trestle and fender at the 



Chelsea Bridge North. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to the 
full amount of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Public Works Depart- 
ment, Room 508, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $1,500, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 
Bids close Tuesday, January 21, at 12 m. 

School Committee. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
pencils, pens, penholders, chalk, ink and 
other items for the public schools. Surety 
bond will be required in a .sum equivalent 
to 50 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Business 
Manager. School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of .$100, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 21, at 12 m. 



Advertises for proposals for fuinishing 
paper, blank books and envelopes for the 
public schools. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 50 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Business Manager, School 
Committee, 15 Beacon street, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of .$100, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 22, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for jiroposals for rebinding 
books of the Boston public schools. 
Surety bond will be reciuired in a sum 
equivalent to 50 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Business 
Manager, School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $100, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 28, at 12 m. 



52 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



Supply Department. 

Advortisos for i)ropt).sals for furni^iliiiiK 
niciits to tlip various city <lci)artinciit.'<. 
Suicty bond will he r<'f|uir("(l in u sum 
t-quivulcnt to 25 per rent of tin- contract 
price. Hlank forms for proposals may !«• 
obtained at tlu; office of the Su[)ply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall .Annex, 
Boston. Kids, accompanied l)y certified 
cheek in the sum of §300, to be filed at 
th(? same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

liidn close Monday, January JO, al I J m. 

Advertises for propos;\ls for furnishing 
fruits !ind vegetables to the various 
city departments. Surety lx)nd will be 
re(iuired in a sum eciuivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price, l^lank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Suppiv I3epartment, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of .'J300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 21, at 12 vi. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
hay, grain and straw to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Suppiv Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 22, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
butter, eggs, etc., to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may lie obtained at the 
office of the Suppiv Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 22, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
two portable air compressors for the 
Water Division of the Public Works 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Suppiv Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of .S300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 23, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
toilet paper to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will bo required in 
a sum of 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply De- 
partment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S300, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 27, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
metal polish to the various city depart- 



ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $300, to 
be filed at the same oflRce. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 27, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
drinking cups to the various citj^ depart- 
ments. Surety bond will Ije required in a 
sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied bv certified 
check in the sum of .S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 27, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
ether to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 27, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
the Sewer Division with sewer pipe. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S300, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 28, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
sewer brick to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in a 
sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Supply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, Boston, l^ids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of .S200, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 28, at 12 m. 

.Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
Portland cement to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of S300, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 28, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
lead pipe to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals maj' be 
obtained at the office of the Supply De- 
partment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at 



the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City AucUtor. 
Bids close Wednesday, January 29, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
bank gravel and sand to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 29, 
at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
pig lead to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 29, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
white and red lead to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of S200, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 29, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
uniforms to the Fire Department. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supph' Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the Citj' Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 30, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
uniform caps to the Fire Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $100, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 30, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
crushed stone to the various citj- depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Supply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of S200, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, , 
without check, to be filed with the City \ 
Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January SO, at 
12 m. 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



53 



Advertises for propo&ils for furnishing 
mbber coats to the Fire Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January SO, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
waste and wiping cloths to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
witn the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January SI, at 12 m_ 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
industrial and medicinal gases to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids dose Friday, January 31, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
ice cream mix to the City Hospital and 
Long Island. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $100, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 31, at 12 m. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, January 16: 

Assessing Department. 
John J. Berry has been appointed tem- 
porary clerk for the balance of the forty- 
five days, vice Samuel L. Pearl, retired, 
at $4 a day. 

Department of School Buildings. 
Permission has been given to extend 
for sixty days, from December 27, 1935, 
the services of Joseph L. Quinn, an archi- 
tectural draftsman. 

Fire Department. 

Permission has been given to promote 
Hoseman John J. Martin of Fireboat 
Engine 44 to third engineer, without 
increase in salary, at 81,900 a year. 

Walter W. Englert has been appointed 
provisionally as an inspector in the Ex- 
terior Division, Wire Division, at $1,600 
a year. 

Health Department. 

Approval has been given for the per- 
manent appointment of Mildred E. Cos- 



tello as media woman in the Laboratory 
Division at 81,000 a year. 

Hospital Department. 

Charles Lydon, orderly at $13 a week, 
has been transfeired to supply man at 
$832 a year, (o fill a vacancy. 

The following persons have been cm- 
ployed at the Boston City Hospital, for 
tlip week ending Thursday, January 9: 

To Fill Vacancy. 

P e r m a n e n t. — Catherine Fitzgerald, 
.stenographer, $12 a week. 

Temporary. — Frances McNerlin, Mil- 
dred O'Harc, ward helpers, $15 a week; 
Samuel Odiornc, lualo nurse, $32 a week; 
Mary B. Mc.\ulpy, Margaret Cavanaugh, 
Sarah Bower, special nurses, $4.50 a day. 

The following changes have occurred : 

Mildred Havey, stenographer at $12 
a week to $1,000 a year; Mildred O'Hare, 
tcmporarj' ward helper at S15 to tempo- 
rary cleaner at 815 a week; Eileen Jor- 
dan, tablegirl, name is now Eileen Foley. 

South Departmcnl. 
.\lice Nelson, cleaner at $15 a week to 
$12..50 a week ; Stephen Kerr, temporary 
kitclienman, $17.50 a week. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 
Division). 

Approval has been given for the pro- 
motion of James McKensie from chore- 
man at $17.50 a week and meals to store- 
room porter at $30 a week. 

The following persons have been ap- 
l)ointed at the Sanatorium Division for 
the week ending Thursday, January 9: 

John Ando.sca, M. D., interne, $1,200 
a year; Arthur Springer, M. D., resident 
medical officer, fourth assistant, $1,800 
a year; Eileen O'Malley, nurse, $1,020 
a year; Mary Denning, Hazel Walsh, 
nurses, substitute, $1,020 a year; Garrett 
Laughlin, choreman (patient), .$240 a 
year; Martin Malloy, Frank Moore, male 
nurses (patients), $480 a year; John 
O'Connor, Sydney McQueen, John Crafts, 
male nurses (patients) (temporary), $480 
a year; Lena DeSoio, Michael Connors, 
maids (temporary) (patients), 8240 a 
year; Paul Curtis, night supervisor 
(temporary), $4 a night. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be emploj'ed : 

Timothy J. Murphy, M. D., chief of 
staff, $2,500 a year; Mary Denning, Hazel 
Walsh, nurses (tem])orary), $1,020 a j'ear; 
James O'Rourke, refrigerator man, .$17.50 
a week; John Kane, choreman (patient), 
$240 a year; Martin Maloy, Frank Moore, 
male nurses (patients) (temporary), 
$480 a year; Joseph Coveney, maid (pa- 
tient) (temporarj'), $240 a year. 

Institutions DeIpartment. 

The following have been appointed 
house officers at Long Island Hospital for 
the term of one year beginning July 1, 
1936, for the fir.st three, and September 
1, 1936, for the fourth and fifth named: 

Dr. Robert W. Tower, Dr. George E. 
Sullivan, Dr. C. S. IngalLs, Dr. Mark E. 
Adams, Dr. Heniy F. Sullivan, with 
maintenance and a .salary of $600 a year. 

The following changes were made in 
the personnel for the week ending 
Thursday, January 16: 

Child Welfare Division. 
Employment Terminated: Sadye E. 
Feingold, clerk and stenographer, tem- 
porary, $1,200 a 5'ear. 



Reappointment: Sadye E. Feingold, 
clerk and stenographer, temporary, $1,200 
a year, due to accumulation of work 
caused by absence of Miss McPeake. 

Lo7ig Island Hospital. 

Appointment: Ann M. Goggin, insti- 
tution employee, telephone operator and 
clerk, $600 a year; Wilma Robinson, in- 
stitution employee, waitress, temporary, 
$316 a year, temporary. 

Resignation: Norman J. Barry, insti- 
tution employee, attendant, temporary, 
$600 a year, voluntary. 

Transfers : Daniel Sweeney, institu- 
tion employee, teamster, $600 a year, 
to Public Works Department; Bernard 
P. Gaffney, Institution employee, helping 
plumber, $600 a year, to Public Works 
Department; Catherine A. Lyons, Insti- 
tution employee, ward maid, $526 a year, 
from waitress at $316 a year; Luke K. 
McCarthy, fireman, temporary, $33.50 a 
week and board, from helper, engine 
room, at $600 a year; Luke K. McCarthy, 
institution employee, helper, engine 
room, $600 a year, from fireman, tempo- 
rary, at $33.50 a week and board; Austin 
F. Grogan, institution employee, helper, 
paint shop, $600 a year, from helper, 
laundry, at $526 a year. 

Steamers "Hibbard" and "O'Meara." 
Appointment: John J. Columbo, 
deckhand, temporary, $1,700 a year, tem- 
porary. 

Park Department. 
Permi.ssion has been given to promote 
Patrick Foley from life guard and helper 
to custodian. 

PtxAL Institutions De^partment. 

Approval has been given for the trans- 
fer of John D. Murphy from laborer in 
the Sanitary Service, Public Works De- 
partment, to working foreman-farmer at 
the House of Correction, Penal Insti- 
tutions Department, at $1,800 a year and 
maintenance. 

Approval has been given for the fol- 
lowing appointment: 

Cornelius M. Manning, clerk at $1,500 a 
year, to .succeed John A. Drea. 

The following appointments have been 
made : 

Edward M. Feeney, $1,600 a year and 
maintenance, temporary for three 
months. 

Philip McDonough, $1,600 a year and 
maintenance, temporaiy for three 
months. 

Printing Department. 
Approval has been given to extend the 
temporary employment of Caesar Don- 
narumma as a linotype operator at $44 
a week, for three months, effective from 
January 13. 

PuBUc Buildings Department. 
Approval has been given to extend 
the temporary employment of Cecile V. 
Doyle as telephone operator at $1,200 a 
year, for a period of one month from 
January 15. 

Public Works Department (Water 
Service). 

Approval has been given to continue 
the temporary employment of John J. 
Callahan as plumber at $6 a day, for 
three months from January 20. 

Approval has been given to appoint 
Herbert P. Barton as temporary 
plumber at $6 a day, for a period of 
three months from January 13. 



54 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



Reoistry of Deeds. 

The following have been appointed to 
fill vucuncies: 

Jolin A. Long, temporary clerk, $1,500 
a year, to be inado clerk at $1,500 a 
year. 

Margaret A. Keyes, piecework copyist, 
(o be made olerk at $1,500 a year. 

Margaret M. Donovan, piecework 
coijyist, to be made clerk at $1,500 a 
year. 

Soldiers' Relief Dep.art.ment. 

William li. Nugent has been appointed 
provisional permanent visitor at $1,600 
a vear, etTcctive Friday, January 17. 

Albert L. Fish has been appointed 
provisional permanent Deputy Commis- 
sioner at S2,500 a year, effective Friday, 
January 17. 

Overtime Allowed. 
The heads of the various departments 
whose employees have received payment 
for overtime state in connection there- 
with that if any laborer has been allowed 
to work more than eight hours per day 
it has been only in case of emergency 
under the law. 

Printing Department. 

For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ary 9: 

Renforth C. Bleakney, compositor, 3i 
hours, S4.78; Frank Nicholson, com- 
positor, 4 hours, S6.12; Daniel Cadigan, 
compositor, 2 hours, S2.88; Annie 
Delaney, compositor, 1 hour, S1.44; 
James J. Dillon, compositor, 5 hours, 
S7.20; Kerrens J. Finn, compositor, 31 
hours, S5.04; Albert Koven, compositor, 
3 hours, .S4.32; Michael McKeen, com- 
positor, 31 hours, S4.55; Edward Timilty, 
compositor, 3J hours, S5.04; Joseph Mc- 
Quade, apprentice, 1 hour, S1.30; George 
Hanrahan, apprentice, 1 hour, 81.19; 
Theresa Morrison, apprentice, 1 hour, 
S0.99; Dorothy SclJicht, copyholder, 3* 
liours, S3.47; Anna Whitney, copyholder, 
1 hour, S0.99 ; Julia Donohue, proofreader, 
1 hour, SI .44; Elizabeth F. Grant, proof- 
reader, 3i hours, S5.04; Julia G. Tobin, 
head proofreader, 2 hours, S3.20; Mau- 
rice Murph}% Helen Taylor, operators, 2 
houi-s, §2.88 each; Wilbur Limdberg, 
monotjiie caster, li hours, S1.06; Dan- 
iel Sullivan, monotype caster operator, 
A hour, S0.55; James H. Sullivan, mono- 
type caster operator, 2^ hours, $324; 
William Beck, monotj-pe caster, i hour, 
S0.26; Michael Cooney, press feeder, 4 
hours, S6.72; Richard Morrison, cylinder 
pres-sman, 4 hours, S8.36. Total, 884.94. 

Public Works Department {Paving 
Service). 

For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
aiy 9: 

Stephen H. Cartj% Jr., laborer, -J 
day, S2.50; Michael McGonigle, chauf- 
feur-laborer, i day, $2.75; Michael Car- 
roll, Patrick J. Burke, 1st, Patrick Joj'ce, 
laborers, \ daj', S2.50 each; Albert J. 
Day, chauffeur-laborer, 1 day, $5.50; 
Roger J. O'Connor, chauffcm-laborer, la 
days, S6.19; Mathew Farrell, Dennis 
Reagan, Nathaniel Harris, laborers, 1 
day, $5 each. Total, $39.44. 

Public Works Department {Sanitary-C 
Service). 

For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ar>' 16: 

H. Barrj', chauffeur, 1 day, S5.50; E. 
McLaughlin, chauffeur, 1 day, S5.25; P. 
Manning, chauffeur, 1 day, $5.50; F. 



Kelley, R. Kelley, E. Noonan, M. Ryan, 
W. Gavin, J. Craven, laborers, 1 day, $5 
each. Total, $46.25. 

Public Works Department (.Sewer 

Service). 
For the week ending Thursday, Janu- 
ary 16: 
Patrick Gleason, fireman, 1 day, $6.92. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 1. 
I. Executive Secret.ary Herbert J. 

HlCKEY. 

It is with deep regret that the Fire 
Commissioner announces the death, on 
Wednesday, January 8, 1936, of Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Department Her- 
bert J. Hickey. 

Executive Secretary Hickey was ap- 
pointed to the department on January 
16, 1911. He w-as promoted to Secretary 
on May 28, 1920, and to Executive 
Secretary on December 17, 1926. 

The funeral will be held from his 
late residence, 29 Adams street, Dor- 
chester, at 9 a. m., Saturday, January 
11, 1936, followed by services at St. 
Peter's Church, Meeting House Hill, at 
10 a. m. 

The Acting Chief of Department will 
arrange for a detail of thirty men to act 
as funeral escort. The detail will report 
at the quarters of Engine Company 17, 
Meeting House Hill, at 9 a. m., to 
District Chief Daniel J. Hurley of Dis- 
trict 10, who will be in command. Reg- 
ulation uniform with overcoats and 
white gloves will be worn. 

The following-named officers of the de- 
partment will act as pallbearers: 

Deputj' Chief John J. Kenney, Divi- 
sion 1 ; Deputy Chief Samuel J. Pope, 
Fire Prevention Division ; District Chief 
William A. Donovan, District 3; Capt. 
John J. Crehan, Headquarters; Lieut. 
George R. Hennessej', Engine Company 
17; Aide to Commissioner James J. 
Donovan, Headquarters. 

II. Lieut. Edw.ard J. Hartig.an. 

It is with deep regret that the Fire 
Commissioner announces the death, on 
December 27, 1935, of Lieut. Edward J. 
Hartigan of Ladder Company 27. 

Lieutenant Hartigan was appointed to 
the department on April 17, 1896, and 
was promoted to lieutenant on Septem- 
ber 12, 1913. 

The funeral was held from his late 
residence, 900 Washington street, Dor- 
chester, at 8.30 a. m., December 30, 1935, 
followed by services at St. Gregory's 
Church, Dorchester avenue, Dorchester, 
at 9 a. m. The Chief of Department 
made the customary detail to act as a 
funeral escort and the members of Lad- 
der Company 27 were relieved from 
duty in order to attend the funeral. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edward 
F. ^IcLAUGHn^^ 

Thomas H. Downey, 
Acting Chief oj Department. 

The last General Order, Series of 1935, 
was numbered 56. 



General Order No. 2. 
I. Ch.\rces. 
Hoseman Leo M. Myott of Engine 
Company 5 has been suspended from 
duty in the Boston Fire Department, 
without pay, for sixty (60) days, begin- 
ning at 8 a. m., Friday, January 10, 1936, 



because of the following charge preferred 
against him by Capt. Peter J. Dunn of 
Engine Company 5: 

Charge: Violation of Rule 374, Sec- 
tion J. 

Specification: At 9 p. m., January 7, 
1936, I found Hoseman Myott on house 
patrol under the influence of liquor or 
drug so much as to unfit him for duty. 

Hoseman Harry Eastwood of Engine 
Company 9 has been suspended from 
duty in the Boston Fire Department, 
without pay, for thirty (30) days, begm- 
ning at 8 a. m., Friday, January 10, 1936, 
because of the following charges pre- 
ferred against him by Lieut. Gustave A. 
.\msler of Engine Company 9: 

Charge 1 : Violation of Rule 374, Sec- 
tion J. 

Si>ecification : In that Hoseman East- 
wood reported for duty on the night 
platoonatOp. m., Januarj' 8, 1936, notice- 
ably under the influence of liquor or 
drugs. I spoke to Hoseman Eastwood 
about his condition and have warned 
him in the past about his drinking of 
liquor while on duty. 

Charge II: Violation of Rule 374, 
Section B. 

Specification: About 7.30 p. m., Jan- 
uary 8, 1936, Hoseman Eastwood left 
quarters without leave and returned to 
quarters at 8.20 p. m., January 8, 1936, 
under the influence of liquor so as to be 
unfit for duty, being absent without 
leave fifty minutes. District Chief 
Donovan was notified. 

Ladderman Thomas R. McConologue 
of Ladder Company 22 has been 
suspended from duty in the Boston Fire 
Department, without pay, for fourteen 
(14) days beginning at 8 a. m., Friday, 
January 10, 1936, because of the follow- 
ing charge preferred against him by 
Lieut. John J. Sullivan of Ladder Com- 
pany 22: 

Charge: Violation of Rule 374, Sec- 
tion B. 

Specification : In that Ladderman Mc- 
Conologue was on an off tour from 8 
a. m. to 6 p. m., January 8, 1936, and 
failed to report for duty at 6 p. m., 
January 8, 1936. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edward 

F. McL.AUGHLIN. 

Thomas H. Downey, 
Acting Chief of Department. 



LAND-TAKING IN WEST 
ROXBURV. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for the 
taking of land for a public improvement 
consisting of the la>nng out and con- 
struction of an extension of Woodard road, 
West Roxburj' district, as a highway, 
from Park street to Emmons road, 
bounded and described as follows: 

An extension of the highway named 
Woodard road is hereby laid out, from 
Park street to Emmons road, and ordered 
constructed, the cost thereof to be charged 
to Federal Funds. 

For the making of the aforesaid im- 
provement an easement for street pur- 
poses is hereby taken in the following 
described lands, exclusive of trees or 
structures standing upon or affixed 
thereto: 

A parcel of land, supposed to belong to 
Mary J. Rogers, bounded: Northeasterly 
by Park street, thirty and 13-100 feet; 
southerly by the southerh- line of Woodard 
road as established under this order, 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



55 



thirty-six and 63-100 feet on a curve of 
twentj' feet radius; southeasterly by the 
southeasterly line of Woodard road as 
established "under this order, by two 
measurements, forty-seven and 96-100 
feet and seventy and 70-100 feet on a 
curve of three hundred and sixty feet 
radius; and northwesterly by the south- 
easterly line of Woodard road as it 
existed previous to this extension, one 
hundred forty-five and 33-100 feet, 
containing seven hundred eighty-one 
square feet, more or less. 

A parcel of land, supposed to belong to 
.\manda S. Nelson, bounded: Southeast- 
erly by the northwesterly line of Woodard 
road as it existed previously to this 
extension, eighty-two and 97-100 feet; 
southwesterly by the northeasterly line of 
Woodard road as it e'xisted previous to 
this extension, eleven and 7-100 feet; 
and northwesterly by the northwesterly 
line of Woodard road as established 
under this order, eighty-four and 39-100 
feet on a curve of three hundred and 
twenty feet radius, containing three 
hundred and two square feet, more or less. 

The land, owners unknown, being the 
private way known as Woodard road, 
between Park street and Emmons road. 

Said extension of said Woodard road as 
hereby laid out is bounded: 

Part between Park street and Wren 
street: Northeasterly by Park street, by 
two measurements, thirtj'-four and 76-100 
feet and thirty-one and 47-100 feet; 
southerly by the southerly line of said 
Woodard road sis hereby extended, thirty- 
six and 63-100 feet on a curve of twenty 
feet radius; southeasterly by the south- 
easterly line of said Woodard road as 
hereby extended, by three measurements, 
forty-seven and 96-100 feet, two hundred 
fifty-two and 17-100 feet on a curve of 
tiu-ee hundred and sixty feet radius, and 
thirty-four and 36-100 feet; easterly by 
the easterly Une of said Woodard road as 
hereby extended, forty-five and 76-100 
feet on a curve of twenty feet radius; 
southwesterly by Wren street, one 
hundred eighty-eight feet; northerly by 
the northerly line of said Woodard road 
as hereby extended, one hundred seventy 
and 68-100 feet on a curve of two hundred 
feet radius; and northwesterly by the 
northwesterly line of said Woodard road 
as hereby extended, bj^ three measure- 
ments, twenty-two and 32-100 feet, two 
hundred twenty-four and 15-100 feet on a 
curve of three hundred and twenty feetr 
radius and seventy-six and 11-100 feet. 

Part between Wren street and Bellevue 
street: Northeasterly by Wren street, one 
hundred ninety-two and 60-100 feet; 
southerly by the southerly line of said 
Woodard road as hereby extended, twenty 
and 14-100 feet on a curve of twenty feet 
radius; southeasterly by the southeasterly 
line of said Woodard road as hereby ex- 
tended, by two measurements, two hun- 
dred two and 92-100 feet on a curve of 
three hundred and sixty feet radius, and 
two hundred ten and 34-100 feet; south- 
westerly by Bellevue street, forty feet; 
northwesterly by the northwesterly line 
of said Woodard road as hereby extended, 
three hundred and thirty-two feet; and 
westerly by the westerly line of said 
Woodard road as hereby extended, one 
hundred twenty-five and 66-100 feet on a 
curve of eighty feet radius. 

Part between Bellevue street and 
Emmons road: Northeasterly by Bellevue 
street, forty feet; southeasterly by the 
southeasterly line of said Woodard road 
as hereby extended, four hundred and 
twelve feet; southwesterly by Emmons 
road, forty feet; and northwesterly by 



the northwesterly line of said Woodard 
road as hereby extended, four hundred 
and twelve feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines 
that the undermentioned persons sustain 
damages in their estates by the making 
of the public improvement consisting of 
the laying out and construction of an 
extension of Woodard road. West Roxbury 
district, as a highway, from Park street to 
Emmons road, under the order of the 
Board of .January 9, 1936, in the amounts 
hereinafter respectively set against them; 
and awards said amounts therefor. 

Mary J. Rogers, 781 square feet, $1. 

Amanda S. Nelson, 302 square feet, $1. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of overpass 
construction at the intersection of Hunt- 
ington avenue, Jamaicaway and River- 
way, the following temporary rules, 
which were adopted and were effective 
November 13, 1935, for a trial period 
of sixty (60) days, are hereby extended 
for a period of eight (8) months from 
January 12, 1936: 

The Revised Traffic Rules and Regu- 
lations, as adopted by the Boston Traffic 
Commission on October 31, 1935, and 
on November 6, 1935, are amended as 
follows: 

Section 8. Part 2, is amended by add- 
ing the following: 

Jamaicaway, Roxbury. 
Both sides, from Huntington avenue 
to Craft street. 

Riverway, Roxbury. 
Both sides, from Brookline avenue 
to Huntington avenue. 

Voted, That the Revised Traffic Rules 
and Regulations, as adopted by the Bos- 
ton Traffic Commission on October 31, 
1935, and on November 6, 1935, are 
amended as follows, effective January 27, 
1936: 

Section 24, Part 1, is amended by add- 
ing the following: 

Foss Street, Charlestown. 

From Chelsea street to Water street. 
Temple Street. 
From Derne street to Cambridge 
street. 
Section 41 is amended by adding the 
following: 
North Beacon Street, Brighton. 
At Parsons street. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, for a trial period of thirty (30) 
days, the following temporary rule is 
effective January 15, 1936: 

Parking of vehicles is prohibited be- 
tween the hours of 7 a. m. and 6 p. m. 
in the following street: 
Congress Street. 
Both sides, from Purchase street to 

Atlantic avenue. 
Southwest side, from Atlantic avenue 
to Dorchester avenue. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of building 
construction at the Quincy Market, for 
a trial period of thirty (30) days, the 
following streets are one way in the 
direction indicated, effective January 13, 
1936: 

Merchants Row. 
From South Market street to State 
street. 



South Market Street. 

From Commercial street to Mer- 
chants row. 



TRANSFERS IN APPROPRIATIONS. 

City Auditor Charles J. Fox announces 
the following transfers in appropriations 
in departments of the City of Boston 
and County of Suffolk, indorsed by 
Budget Commissioner Francis J. Murray 
and approved by his Honor the Mayor: 

St.\tistics Department. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Ch.\rles J. Fox, 
Citi/ Auditor. 

Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appropria- 
tions of the Statistics Department: 

From the appropriation for D-1, Office, 
$4.50, to the appropriation for 15-1, 
Printing and Binding, .f4.50. 

This amount is nece.s.sary to pay for a 
bill for binding, which turned out to be 
■'$4.50 in excess of the amount anticipated. 

Respectfully, 

Walter A. Murray, 

Acting Chairman. 
The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1935. 

County of Suffolk Mlscell.aneous 

Expenses, Auditing Department. 
Boston, December 31, 1935. 
Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 

Dear Sir, — For the reasons as below 
explained, will you kindly approve and 
forward to the Mayor the following re- 
quest for transfer within the appropria- 
tions of the County of Suffolk Miscel- 
laneous Expenses, Auditing Department: 

From the appropriation for County of 
Suffolk, Miscellaneous Expenses, Auditing 
Department, Clerk, 1 at .$300, $27.54, to 
the appropriation for County of Suffolk, 
Miscellaneous Expenses, Auditing Depart- 
ment, Clerks 9 (10) at .11,000 a year, 
$24.25; Clerk, 1 at $1,200 a year, $3.29. 

To provide for payment of salaries to 
December 31, 1935, due to shortage in 
figuring appropriations. 

Respectfully, 

Charles J. Fox, 

City Auditor. 
The above transfer was made by the 
City Auditor with the approval of the 
Mayor December 31, 1935. 



REVISION OF ASSESSMENTS. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
order of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners of the City of Boston: 

In the matter of the application for 
revision of assessment levied March 5, 
1925, on account of the construction of 
sewerage works in Maverick street. East 
Boston, the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, acting under the provisions of 
chapter 359 of the Acts of the year 1896, 
and deeming it just and proper that such 
action should be taken on said applica- 
tion. Order, That the amounts hereinafter 
specified, being the annual apportion- 
ments of said assessment for the years 
specified below, be, and the same are 
hereby, abated. 

Pasquale and Filomena Luongo, lot 4, 
Plan 1923-41, 1933 apportionment, $7.08; 
1934 apportionment, $6.72; 1935 ap- 
portionment, .$6.36. 



56 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



EXTRA WORK UNDER 
CONTRACT. 

Standard Contracting Company has 
been directed to pt>rform the following 
extra work under the contract for laying 
sheet a>ii)hult pavement in Weld street, 
from Ccrdiin avenue and Morcy road to 
West Roxbury Parkway. Items ordered: 
Relay sewer iiousc drain at No. 200 Weld 
street. Price to be paid: For each linear 
foot of drain relaid, the sum of S3. Esti- 
mated cost of extra work, S90. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS 

General Order No. 132. 

A trial board consisting of Captains 
Campbell, C.leavy and Towle, having 
heard by reference a complaint made by 
Mathew Killcn, captain. Division 15, 
against William J. Sheehan, patrolman, 
Division 15, for alleged violation of the 
Rules and Regulations of the Police 
Department, to wit: 

Charge 1 : Neglect of duty. 

Specification: In that on the twenty-first 
day of December the said Patrolman 
Sheehan failed to bring to the station per- 
sons responsible for a serious auto acci- 
dent, allowed them to go, and failed to 
make a report of the occurrence. 

Charge 2: Disobedience. 

Specification 1 : In that on the twenty- 
first day of December the said Patrolman 
Sheehan when ordered by Sergeant 
Schultz to bring certain persons responsi- 
ble for a serious auto accident to the 
station he refused to do so. 

Specification 2: In that on the twenty- 
first day of December, 1935, the said 
Patrolman Sheehan when ordered by 
Lieutenant Miller to remain in the station 
left the station against his direct order and 
was absent for seventeen minutes. 

Charge 3: Conduct unbecoming an 
officer. 

Specification: In that the said Patrol- 
man Sheehan is an habitual user of intoxi- 
cating liquor to such an extent as to 
impair his efficiency as a police officer, — 
has submitted the following finding and 
recommen datio n : 

"The Board, having heard and carefully 
considered all the evidence as presented, 
finds the said Patrolman William J. 
Sheehan guilty of Charge 1 and Specifica- 
tion thereunder, and guilty of Charge 2 
and Specifications 1 and 2 thereunder; and 
not guilty of Charge 3 and Specification 
thereunder. The Board has considered 
the seriousness of the offence committed 
by Patrolman Sheehan in releasing from 
custody persons involved in an accident 
which involved serious personal injury, 
and the fact that Patrolman Sheehan 
subsequently disobeyed the order of a 
superior officer; however, in view of the 
fact that this is the first time this officer 
lias appeared before a trial board during 
his nine years of service, respectfully 
recommends that the said Patrolman 
William J. Sheehan be ordered to per- 
form 210 hours of punishment duty." 

The commi-ssioner accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trial 
Board and hereby orders that the said 
Patrolman William J. Sheehan perform 
210 hours of punishment duty. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

EuGEJfE M. McSwEENEY, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 133. 
A board of merit, consisting of Super- 
intendent Martin H. King and Deputy 



Superintendents James McDevitt, John 
M. Anderson, William W. Livingston and 
James R. Claflin, has brought to the 
attention of the Police Commis.'^ioncr the 
following out-standing cases in which 
|)olice officers of this department especially 
distinguished them.selves in the perform- 
ance of their duty during the year 1935. 
The commissioner, therefore, makes the 
following awards: 

The Walter Scott Med.\l for Valor 

FOR 1935 AXD A Dei'art.ment Medal 

of Honor to Patrolman John A. 

Leach of Division 16. 

Patrolman John A. Leach, without 

regard for his personal safety, entered a 

burning building in the early morning of 

November 9, 1935, arousing the occupants 

and removing several of them to a place 

of safety, including a woman who had 

collapsed on the fifth floor. 

Department Med.vl of Honor to: 

Patrolman Joseph Brooks, Jr., of 
Division 2 for meritorious service per- 
formed on July 10, 1935, while off duty, 
in swimming to and rescuing a small boy 
who was in imminent danger of drowning. 

Patrolman John J. Smith of Division 1 
for meritorious duty performed on March 
10, 1935, in swimming to the aid of a 
person who had jumped into the Charles 
river. 

The presentation of the Walter Scott 
Medal for Valor and the Department 
Medals of Honor to the patrolmen herein 
awarded were made by the commissioner 
on the occasion of the concert and ball of 
the Boston Police Relief Association, held 
at Mechanics Building on the evening of 
January 14, 1936. 

The Superintendent of Police wUl 
promulgate this order. 

Eugene M. McSweeney, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 134- 

A trial board, consisting of Captains 
Killen, Gleavy and Towle, having heard 
by reference a complaint made by Archi- 
bald F. Campbell, captain, Division 7 
against William F. Hurley, patrolman, 
Division 7, for alleged violation of Rule 
36 of the Rules and Regulations of the 
Police Department, to wit: 

Charge: Conduct unbecoming an 
officer. 

Specification: In that on the twentj'- 
ninth day of December, 1935, the said 
Patrolman William F. Hurley, when 
ordered to remain in the guard room of 
this station by Lieut. WiUiam D. 
Donovan, until he was examined bj^ a 
phj'sician, refused to remain in the guard 
room and left the station house, disobej-- 
ing the order of a superior officer, thereby 
committing an act contrary to good order 
and discipline, — 

has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation: 

"The Board, having heard and care- 
fully considered all the evidence as pre- 
sented, finds the said Patrolman William 
F. Hurley guilty as charged. The Board 
has considered the seriousness of this 
officer's refusal to obey the order of a 
superior officer, and believes that it is of 
such a nature as to warrant the imposition 
of the extreme penalty of dismissal, but 
having in mind all the circumstances 
connected with the case, the Board feels 
that Patrolman Hurley should be given 
an opportunitj' to redeem himself so tliat 
he may prove his ability to properly 
perform his duties and justify his retention 
in the department. The Board there- 
fore respectfully recommends that the 



said Patrolman William F. Hurley be 
ordered to perform 315 hours of punish- 
ment duty." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and recommendation of the Trial Board 
and hereby orders that the said Patrol- 
man William F. Hurley perform 315 
hours of punishment duty. 

The Superintendent of folice will 
promulgate this order. 

Eugent: M. McSween-ey, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 135. 

A trial board, consisting of Captains 
McGrath, Gleavy and Killen, having 
heard by reference a complaint made by 
Archibald F. Campbell, captain, Divi- 
sion 7, against John J. Lorden, patrolman. 
Division 2, detailed to Division 7, for 
alleged \'iolation of Rule 41, Rules and 
Regulations of the Police Department, to 
wit : 

Charge: Conduct unbecoming an officer. 

Specification: In that on the a. m. of 
the first day of January, 1936, the said 
Patrolman John J. Lorden, while in uni- 
form and off duty, in a public place was 
under the influence of intoxicating Hquor 
to such an e.xtent that he was unable to 
properly perform poUce duty, tending to 
bring into disrepute and criticism himself 
and his associates in the PoUce Depart- 
ment, — 

has submitted the following finding and 
recommendation: 

"The Board, having heard the evi- 
dence, accepts the plea of guilty. It has 
taken into consideration the fact that 
Patrolman Lorden was before a trial 
board on November 6, 1935, for a similar 
offense and he still has some unfinished 
punishment duty to perform; however, 
this officer has a large family- and, in the 
opinion of Captain Campbell, he has the 
qualifications of an excellent pofice officer; 
and Captain Campbell further believes 
that Patrolman Lorden has the abihty to 
make himself a valuable member of the 
department. Therefore, the Board feels 
that this officer should be given an oppor- 
tunity to redeem himself; and the Board 
respectfully recommends that the said 
Patrolman John J. Lorden be suspended 
from duty for a period of fifteen days as of 
January 4, 1936, and that at the expira- 
tion of the said period of suspension he be 
ordered to perform 420 hours of punish- 
ment duty." 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trial 
Board and hereby orders that the said 
Patrolman John J. Lorden be suspended 
from duty for a period of fifteen days, 
effective as of January 4, 1936, at 7.45 
o'clock a. m., and that at the expiration 
of the said period of suspension the said 
Patrolman John J. Lorden perform 420 
hours of punishment dutv. 

CivQ Service Rule 23, Section 3, re- 
quires approval of the Civil Service Com- 
mission before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 
"Section 3. With the consent of the 
Commissioner, upon good cause shown, 
an appointing officer may reinstate in the 
same position or in a position in the same 
class and grade anj- person who has been 
separated from the service; provided, 
however, that the Commissioner shall not 
allow reinstatement of a person discharged 
for cause." 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene M. IMcSween'et, 
Commissioner. 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



57 



OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE, CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE 
WEEK ENDING JANUARY II, 1936. 





Dependent 
Aid. 


Mothers' 
Aid. 


Old Age 
Assistance. 


Administhattve. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 


Number of active cases 

last week. 
Number of cases added , 

Number of cases discon- 
tinued. 

Number of active cases 
this week. 

Same week last year 


22,427 

578 

654 

*22.351 

24,981 


1,5S9 

2 

5 

1,586 

1,453 


4,364 

22 

20 

4,366 

3,864 






28,380 






602 






679 






28.303 






30,298 







Financial. 



Expended during week. 
Last week 


$148,703 49 
149,111 87 
179,041 50 


«24,051 00 
24,017 00 
21,849 00 


$27,200 12 
27,226 20 
24,437 00 


$12,873 62 
13,923 22 
12,945 36 




$212,828 23 




214,278 29 


Same week last year . . . 




238,322 86 






Expended to date 

Unexpended balances. . 


226,321 59 


24,164 00 


46,180 00 


16,568 76 




313,234 35 








12,046 82 


1,427 54 


539 33 






14,013 69 


of Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, out- 
side cities and towns 
and refunds.t 









* 1,509 E. R. A. supplementaries. 

t Collections on account of Boston City Hospital, $3,141.08. 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS. 

Supply Department. 

The following communications relative 
to the extension of contracts with various 
firms for furnishing supplies and materials 
to the several city departments, received 
by the Mayor from D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supphes, have been 
approved: 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.a.nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 26, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Thomas W. Reed 
Company relative to the purchase of 
drugs for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said drugs as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 
1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of drugs 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby to wit, to February 1, 1936. 
Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

B0.STON, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
Febraary 15, 1935, the City of Boston 



entered into a contract with Massachu- 
setts Envelope Company relative to the 
purchase of paper drinking cups for de- 
Uvery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
paper drinking cups as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This privilege is extended 
to Febmary 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request youi* approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of paper drink- 
ing cups referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 9, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Dwinell- 
Wright Company relative to the purchase 
of coffee for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor lay the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than March 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 



exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of coffee re- 
feried to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 14, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with United 
States Rubber Products, Incorporated, 
relative to the purchase of rubber coats 
for delivery to the Fire Department. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and 
conditions as aforesaid, such quantities 
of said rubber coats as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935. This privilege is extended to 
February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant 
to the above-quoted option, upon the 
same terms and conditions as are stated 
in said contract, such quantities of rubber 
coats referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to February 
1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
Febmary 23, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract vvith Massa- 
chusetts Lime and Cement Company 
relative to the purchase of Portland 
cement for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston? 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said Portland cement as may not have 
been ordered up to and including De- 
cember 31, 1935. This privilege is ex- 
tended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of Portland 
cement referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.ank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



58 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



Boston, January 8, 193fi. 
Hon. Fkedeuick \V. Mansfield, 
Mayor of lioaloti . 

Deah Mk. Mayou, — Unclr-r date of 
l''cl)ruary 15, 1935, the City of Boston 
cntprcd into a contract witli ,1. C. Bowden 
& Sons, Incor|)orat('(l, relative to the 
nurciiase of dotli (various kinds) for de- 
liverv to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with tlic approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning Jaiuiary 1, 193(1, at its option, 
purdiiuse ami the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaiil, such quantities of 
said cloth (various kinds) as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935. This privilege is 
extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully rccjuest your approval to 
exercise the option to purcha.se on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of cloth (various 
kinds) referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to February 1, 
193(5. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
February 15, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Sparrow- 
Chisholra Company relative to the pur- 
chase of cloth (various kinds) for delivery 
to the various city departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said cloth (various kinds) as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935. This privdege is 
extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as arc stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of cloth (various 
kinds) referred to therein as maj' not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to February 1, 
1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.vnk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 8, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with E. F. Mahady Com- 
pany, relative to the purchase of drugs 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 



drugs as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exerci.sc the option to purcha.se on behalf 
of the Cit}' of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-cjuoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are .stated in said 
contract, such quantities of drugs re- 
ferred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Man.sfield, 
.Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — TTnder date of 
May 8, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Berry & Withington 
Company relative to the purchase of 
drugs for delivery to the various city 
Departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the RIayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purcliase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
drugs as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1935. This 
privilege is extended to Februarj- 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purcha.se on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of drugs re- 
ferred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Ho.v. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 1, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Lederle Laboratories, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
drugs for deli\'ery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said drugs as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of drugs referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1935, for 
the extended period permitted therebj', 
to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, Januarj- 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
.Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
.\pril 26, 1935, the City of Boston en- 
tered into a contract with Kenmore 
Hospital Supply relative to the purchase 
of drugs for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clau.se: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with tlie approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning Januar>' 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said drugs as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request jour approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on l)ehalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of drugs 
referred to therein as may" not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully j-ours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 6, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Hoffmann-LaRoche, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
drugs for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Maj'or, may, 
beginning Januarj' 1, 1936, at its option, 
pm'chase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said drugs as maj' not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 
1, 1936." 

I respectfullj' request j'our approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pui'suant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of drugs 
referred to therein as maj' not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thcreb}', to wit, to Februaiy 1, 1936. 
Respectfully j-ours, 

D. Fr-\nk Doherty, 
Stiperintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 20, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Chester A. Baker, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
drugs for deliverj' to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the I\Iayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
drugs as maj' not liave been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 
1, 1936." 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



59 



I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of drugs 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and uicluding December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent c/ Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 27, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Suffolk 
Grocery Company relative to the purchase 
of groceries for delivery to the various 
city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clau.se: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than March 31, 1936." 

I respectfully re<]uest your approval to 
exercise tiie option to purcha.se on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frj\nk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Man-sfield, 
Mayor of Boston . 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 27, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Eldridge, 
Baker Company, relative to the purcha.se 
of groceries for delivery to the various 
city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end ofVhe term hereof to any date not 
later than March 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on bclialf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
t«rms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Douerty, 
Huperintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor,— T'nder date of 
Februarj' 15, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with National 
Coat and Apron Supply Company relative 
to the purchase of cloth (various kinds) 
for delivery to the various city de- 
partments. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 



with the approval of the Mayor, maj', 
beginning Januaiy 1,. 1936, at its option 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said cloth (various kinds) as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935. This privilege is 
extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on beiialf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of cloth (various 
kinds) referred to therein as may not. 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
P^ebruary 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, Januaiy 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayer of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 27, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Maier 
Brothers, Incorporated, relative to the 
purchase of denatured alcohol for deliveiy 
to the various city departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with tlie 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
t(?ndent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than Marcii 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on beiialf 
of the City of Boston, pureuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of denatured 
alcohol referred to therein as may not 
iiave been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for th(! extended 
period permitted tliereby, to wit, to 
March 31, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 17, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Trimount Bituminous 
Products Company relative to the pur- 
chase of 64-2 road asphalt for delivery to 
the Public Works Department. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, ma}% 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said 64-2 road asphalt as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This privilege is extended 
to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of 64-2 road 
asphalt referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 



period permitted thcrebv, to wit, to 
February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
February 23, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Portland 
Stone Ware Company relative to the 
purchase of sewer bricks for delivery to 
the various city departments. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the Citj' of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January I 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said sewer bricks as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935. This privilege is extended to 
February 1, 1936." 

I respectfullj^ request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of sewer bricks 
referred to tiierein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thoreb}', to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 14, 1935, the City of Boston en- 
tered into a contract with Donohue & 
Riordon relative to the purchase of uni- 
form caps for delivery to the Fire De- 
partment. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
jiurchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said uniform caps as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935. This privilege is extended to 
February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of uniform caps 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 28, 1935, the City of Boston en- 
tered into a contract with Socony- Vacuum 
Oil Company, Incorporated, relative to 
the purchase of asphaltic cement for de- 
livery to the Chestnut Hill Paving Yard, 
Public Works Department. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 



60 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



"It is aRrecd tliat the City of Boston, 
with tlic approval of tlic Mayor, may, 
hcKiiiniiiK January 1, 1930, at its option, 
purchase and tiic Contractor agrets to 
dchver upon the .same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such (juantities of 
said asphaltic cement as may not have 
been ordered up to and including De- 
cember 31, 1935. This privilege is 
extended to February 1, 1930." 

I respectfully re(|uest your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Bo.ston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of asphaltic cement 
referred to tlierein, as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Vnder date of 
September 17, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with East Boston 
Coal Company relative to the purchase 
of chestnut coal for delivery to the 
Overseers of the Public Welfare Depart- 
ment and Soldiers' Relief Department. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than May 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of chestnut coal 
referred to therein, as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to May 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
September 24, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Babcock 
Coal Company relative to the purchase 
of chestnut coal for delivery to the 
Overseers of the Public Welfare Depart- 
ment and Soldiers' Relief Department. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to anj- date 
not later than May 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of chestnut coal 
referred to therein, as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to IMay 1, 1936. 
Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.vnk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Bo.ston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 

.Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — I'nder date of 
May 8, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Tremont Coal and 
Ice Company relative to the purchase of 
anthracite (buckwheat) coal for delivery 
to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the ISIayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
anthracite (buckwheat) coal as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935. This privilege is 
extended to April 30, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of anthracite 
(buckwheat) coal referred to therein as 
may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1935, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to April 30, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 8, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with ^Metropohtan Coal 
Company relative to the purchase of semi- 
bituminous coal for delivery to the fire 
and police boats. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
semi-bituminous coal as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This privilege is extended 
to April 30, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
teiTQS and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of semi-bitu- 
minous coal referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and in- 
cluding December 31, 1935, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to April 30, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. M.\yor, — Under date of 
May 17, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Staples Coal Com- 
pany, doing business as City Fuel Com- 
pany, relative to the purchase of semi- 
bituminous coal for dehveiy to the 
Harbor Institutions. Included in the 
contract is the following clause: 

" It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 



purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
.semi-bituminous coal as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This privilege is extended 
to April 30, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of semi- 
bituminous coal referred to therein as 
may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1935, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to April 30, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Dohertt, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, Januarj' 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
February 27, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with S. S. White 
Dental Manufacturing Company relative 
to the purchase of gases (medicinal) for 
dehveiy to the Boston City Hospital. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Maj-or, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
dehver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
gases (medicinal) as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935. This privilege is extended to 
February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the Citj' of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of gases 
(medicinal) referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to February 
1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 
_ / 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 8, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Burroughs, Wellcome 
& Co., Incorporated, relative to the 
purchase of drugs for dehvery to the 
various citj' departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Maj'or, maj', 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said drugs as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of drugs referred 
to therein, as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935, 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



61 



for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 8, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Edwin J. Marsh 
Estate relative to the purchase of drugs 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, be- 
ginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
dehver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
drugs as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1935. This 
privilege is extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of drugs referred 
to therein, as may not have been ordered 
up to and incluchng December 31, 1935, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully j'ours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston . . 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 26, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Parke-Davis Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of drugs for 
delivery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said drugs as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of drugs referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 26, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Brewer & Co., In- 
corporated, relative to the purchase of 
drugs for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option' 



purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
drugs as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1935. This 
privilege is extended to February 1, 1936." 
I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to pm'chase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of drugs referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1935, for 
the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, .January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
September 17, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Adams Coal 
and Wood Company, Incorporated, rela- 
tive to the purchase of chestnut coal for 
deUvery to the Overseers of the Public 
Welfare and Soldiers' Relief Department. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than May 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of chestnut coal 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to May 1, 1936. 
Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
September 17, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Western 
Coal Company relative to the purchase 
of chestnut coal for deUvery to the Over- 
seers of Public Welfare and Soldiers' 
Relief Department. Included in the 
contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of SuppHes, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than May 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of chestnut 
coal referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to May 1, 1936. 
Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 12, 1935, the City of Boston 



entered into a contract with Reid-Murdoch 
& Co., relative to the purchase of gro- 
ceries for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than March 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein, as may not have been 
oi'dered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 12, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Libby, Mc- 
Neill & Libby relative to the purchase of 
groceries for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than March 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request youi- approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions. as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintenaent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 8, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 24, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Green & 
Swett Company relative to the purchase 
of St. Pierre chains, etc., for delivery to 
the various city departments. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than March 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pm'suant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of St. Pierre 
chains, etc., referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
March 31, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



62 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. I'uKDFnicK W. Manskield, 
Miiijiir iif Huston. 

Deah Mu. Mayor, — Under diite of 
AuKU>it 7, 1935, tlio City of Boston 
I'ntcTcd into a contr:ict witli Tlu- (^uincy 
Oil Company relative to tlu; purclia.se of 
Kasoline for delivery to the varioas citj' 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause; 

"The City of lioston may, with the 
approval of tlu' Mayor, hy written notice 
Hiven to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than July 14, 1930." 

I respectfully re(iuest your approval 
to exercise the option to purcha.se on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such (juantities of gasoline 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to July 14, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 193(5. 
Ho\. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Muijor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
Marcli 8, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with The Lindo Air 
Products Company relative to the pur- 
chase of gases (indastrial) for delivery to 
the various city departments. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said gases (industrial) as may not have 
been ordered up to and including De- 
cember 31, 1935. This privilege is ex- 
tended to Februarj' 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of gases (industrial) 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. M.\yor, — Under date of 
February 27, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Mallinckrodt 
Chemical Works relative to the purchase 
of ether for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning .lanuary 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
ether as may not have been ordered up to 
and including Decemlier 31, 1935. This 
privilege is extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully retjuest your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 



and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such {juantities of ether referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1935, for 
the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.\.nk Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplie.s. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
.May 8, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Tidewater Coal 
Company relative to the purchase of 
scnii-bituminous coal for delivery to the 
South Ferry, Public Works Department. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
semi-bituminous coal as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This privilege is extended 
to April 30, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, ui)on the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of semi-bitumi- 
nous coal referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
April 30, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 8, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Standard Coal Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of anthracite 
and semi-bituminous coal for delivery to 
the various city departments. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, be- 
ginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said anthracite and semi-bituminous coal 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1935. This privi- 
lege is extended to April 30, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of anthracite 
and semi-bituminous coal referred to there- 
in as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1935, for the ex- 
tended period permitted therebv, to wit, to 
April 30, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintejulent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
.Mayor of Bo.'iton. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
July 2, 1935, the City of Boston entered 



into a contract with T. H. McVey relative 
to the purchase of granite edgestones for 
delivery to the Public \A'orks Depart- 
ment. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at fts optionj 
l)urchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
granite edgestones as may not hiive been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935. This privilege is extended to 
February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of lioston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of granite 
edgestones referred to therein, as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, lor the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
Febmary 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.vxk Doherty, 
Superintemlent of Supplies. 

Bo.sTON, Januarj- 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 12, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Washburn- 
Crosby Company, Incorporated, relative 
to the purchase of bread flour for delivery 
to the various citj' departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may. with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than January 27, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-named option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of brejid 
flour referred to therein, as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
January 27, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. ]\Iansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear ;\Ir. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 12, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Jacob 
Thurman relative to the purchase of 
pastry flour for deliverj' to the various 
city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The Cit}' of Boston maj', with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to anv date not 
later than January 27, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the ; 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of pastry flour re- 
ferred to therein, as may not have been 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



63 



ordered up to and including December 31. 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to January 27, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

De.^R Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 15, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Westinghouse-X-Ray 
Company, Incorporated, relative to the 
purchase of X-Ray materials for delivery 
to the various city departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1 1936, at its option 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
X-Ray materials as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935. This privilege is extended to 
February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of X-Ray materials 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1930. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
February 27, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with the Robert 
Bishop Manufacturing Company relative 
to the purchase of wiiste and wiping 
cloths for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Maj'or, may, 
beginning Januaiy 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
waste and wiping cloths as may not have 
been ordered up to and including De- 
cember 31, 1935. This privilege is 
extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as aie stated in said 
contract, such quantities of waste and 
wiping cloths referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
Februaiy 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendejit of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor,— Under date of 
December 28, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Independent 
Importing Company relative to the pur- 
chase of groceries for dehvery to the 



various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than March 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to March 31, 
1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 12, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with the Globe 
Grocery Company relative to the pur- 
chase of groceries for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than March 31, 1936." 

I rosixjctfuUy request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1936. 
Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, Januai-y 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 12, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with H. A. John- 
son Company relative to the purchase of 
groceries for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than March 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request j'our approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pur.suant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1936. 
Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
August 29, 1935, the City of Boston 



entered into a contract with New England 
Electrical Supply Company relative to 
the purchase of incandescent lamps for 
delivery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than July 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of incandescent 
lamps referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to July 31, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 15, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with the Boston Ice 
Company relative to the purchase of ice 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1930, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said ice as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1935. This 
privilege is extended to May 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of ice referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1935, for 
the extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to May 31, 1936. 

Respectfully youis, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 14, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with New England 
Electrical Supply Company relative to 
the purchase of flashlight equipment for 
delivery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
flashlight equipment as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This privilege is extended 
to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of flashlight 



64 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



equipment referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and includ- 
ing December 31, 11)35, for the extended 
period permitted therebj-, to wit, to 
February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1930. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boxtoii. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 9, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Francis L. 
Cronin Com])any relative to the purchase 
of hard and soft wood for delivery to the 
Overseers of Public Welfare. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Maj'or, bj' written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than August 15, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of hard and 
soft wood referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
.\ugust 15, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.^nk Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 12, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with George D. 
Emerson Company relative to the pur- 
chase of groceries for dehvery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than March 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request yom- approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pm-suant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 3 1 , 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1936. 

Respectfully youi-s, 

D. Frank Doherty', 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, Januaiy 9, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 7, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Webster- 
Thomas Company relative to the purchase 
of groceries for delivery to the various 
city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than March 31, 1936." " 



I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purcha.se on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
ternLs and conditions as are stated in .said 
contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1936. 

RespectfuU}' yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Hon Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. M.\yor, — Under date of 
February 27, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with E. K. 
Medical Gas Laboratories, Incorporated, 
relative to the purchase of gases (medici- 
nal) for deliveiy to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning Januaiy 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same ternis and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said gases (medicinal) as may not have 
been ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935. This privilege is extended to 
Februarj' 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request j'our approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of gases 
(medicinal) referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to Februarj' 
1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 9, 1936. 
Ho.v. Frederick W. IMansfleld, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
February 27, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with the Ohio 
Chemical and Manufactuiing Company 
relative to the purchase of gases (medici- 
nal) for dcUveiy to the Boston City 
Hospital. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the Citj^ of Boston, 
with the approval of the Maj-or, may, 
beginning Januaiy 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said gases (medicinal) as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This privilege is extended 
to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of gases 
(medicinal) referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted therebj', to wit, to 
February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of S^lpplies. 



The Warren Foundry and Pipe'Corpora- 
tion have been granted an extension of 
the contract dated December 27, 1935, 
for furnishing cast-iron water pipes and 
special castings to the Water Service, 
from December 31, 1935, to June 1,, 1936. 

Public Works Department. 

Coleman Brothers Corporation have 
been granted an extension of the time of 
completion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in snow area No. 1, from 
December 31, 1935, to May 1, 1936. 

A. Singarella has been granted an ex- 
tension of the time of completion of the 
contract for removing snow and ice in 
snow area No. 4, from December 31, 
1935, to May 1, 1936. 

Edward M. ]\Iatz has been granted an 
extension of the time of completion of the 
contract for removing snow and ice in 
snow area No. 3, from December 31, 
1935, to May 1, 1936. 

Hugh Nawn, Incorporated, has been 
granted an extension of the time of 
completion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in snow area No. 2, from 
December 31, 1935, to May 1, 1936. 

The Metallicoat Corporation has been 
granted an extension of the time of 
completion of the contract for repairs to 
steel work of Huntington Avenue Bridge, 
over the Boston & Albanv Railroad, from 
December 18, 1935, to March 14, 1936. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Department of School Buildln-gs. 

Upon January 15 permission was given 
to award a contract to A. Piotti Company 
for erecting and completing an addition 
and alterations to the English High School, 
Montgomerj' and Warren streets, Boston 
(P. AV. A. Docket Number 1092R). 
Bids, opened January 14, were as follows: 

A. Piotti Company, 885,898; M. Slot- 
nick, §86,943; R. J. Connollj', Incorpo- 
rated, S87,400; John F. Hvnes, Incorpo- 
rated, 887,960; Grande & Volpe, 889,948; 
Crane Construction Company, Incorpo- 
rated, 891,700; M. S. Kelliher Company, 
.893,646; M. Sohmando, 893,726; P. J. 
Cantwell & Son, 894,734; John Bowen 
Company, 894,900; J. Slotnick Company, 
895,480.* 



* Did not submit a list of subcontractors as 
called for in the specifications. 

Institutions Department. 

Upon January 10 permission was given 
to award a contract to the BetlJehem 
Shipbuilding Corporation for repairs to 
the steamer "Stephen J. O'Meara." 
Based upon estimated quantities the bids 
were as follows: 

Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation, 
82,350; Quincv Dry Dock and Yacht 
Corporation, 82,385; The Marine Com- 
pany, §2,730. 

Public Works Department. 

Upon Januarj' 15 permission was given 
to award a contract to the Bay State 
Dredging and Contracting Company for 
dredging rock at garbage dump, station, 
Albany street, Boston. The following 
bids were received January 13: 

Bav State Dredging and Contracting 
Company, $1,850; T. S. Packard Dredg- 
ing Company, $2,590. 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



65 



NUMBER AND ESTIMATED COST OF NEW BUILDINGS AND ALTERATIONS, ADDITIONS, ETC., FOR WHICH 
APPLICATIONS HAVE BEEN FILED FOR YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1935. 



Character. 



Apartment 

AND 

Tenement 
H0U8ES. 






Apartment 

AND 

Tenement 

H0D8E8 
AND Stores. 



C3*J 
O 



Banks. 






Chttrches. 



ss 



Dwellings. 



Dwellings 

AND 

Stores. 






Garages. 



i" 
H 



First Class.. . 
Second Class. 
Third Class.. 
Special Class. 



$8,000 



$138,000 
30,000 



3 

135 



$18,500 
700,800 



$136,867 
50,150 
20,085 
11,495 



Total New Work . 
Alterations, etc 



198 



$200,291 



1 
139 



$8,000 
165,221 



$9,343 



$168,000 
36,774 



138 
3,600 



$719,300 
1,321,699 



266 



$130,364 



177 
78 



$218,597 
122,791 



Grand Totals. 



198 



$200,291 



140 



$173,221 



$9,343 



42 



$204,774 



3,738 



$200,999 



266 



$130,364 



255 



$341,388 



Character. 



Hotels. 



6 01 
O 

•■SO 



Hospitals. 



S3 



Lodging 
Houses. 



03 *^ 

d c> 

a o 

■■go 



Lodging 

Houses 

AND Stores. 



as 



Mercantile 
Buildings. 



Manu- 
pactuhino 
Buildings. 



Office 
Buildings. 



W 



■■SO 



First Class.. . 
Second Class. 
Third Class. . 
Special Class. 



$35,000 



$79,000 

234,850 

42,300 

15,375 



$30,000 



$171,635 
35,200 



2,000 



Total New Work. 
Alterations, etc 



Grand Totals. 



30 



$54,655 



21 



$137,516 



$35,000 
94,497 



12 



$13,795 



64 
694 



$371,525 
1,188,211 



3 
112 



$30,000 
224,439 



7 
131 



$208,835 
162,321 



30 



$54,655 



21 



$137,516 



78 



$129,497 



12 



$13,795 



758 



$1,559,736 



115 



$254,439 



138 



$371,156 



Character. 



Public 
Buildings. 



Sn 
O 

w 



Public 

HAI.LS. 



as 



School 
Houses. 



Stn 
O 



Stables. 



SCO 
o 



Theatres. 



SCO 
o 

•■go 

H 



Miscel- 
laneous. 



•■go 



Totals. 



as 
•go 



First Class... 
Second Class. 
Third Cla.ss . . 
Special Class. 



Total New Work. 
Alterations, etc 



Grand Totals. 



$234,869 
75,000 



$309,869 
75,281 



18 $385,150 



$2,192,000 

115,000 

12,245 



$8,250 



$2,319,245 
1,360,582 



$8,250 



48 



$3,679,827 



23 



$16,000 



$16,000 
20,514 



$36,514 



10 



$11,225 



128 
158 



10 



$11,225 



286 



$22,900 

509,450 

69,985 

364,520 



34 
141 
268 

94 



$966,855 
205,626 



537 
5,649 



$1,172,481 



6,186 



$2,837,271 

1,249,150 

891.415 

393,390 



$5,371,226 
5,543,395 



$10,914,621 



66 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 9 TO JANUARY 15. 



Janoarv it. 



OWNKIl. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



John J. Patleii, Jr. . . S I^>tlirop street 22 

C. Beniiell 702 Treiiiont street 9 

Home SaviiiKS Hank 61 Phillips street 5 

\. HikIi.v 47 fhurch street 5 

Federal National Bank S5 Devonsliire street .3 

Children's Hospital .'JOO l,oiiKwood avenue 4 

Northeastern University ... . Rear 2HS St. Kotolph st 4 

.\. H. Perry 42 Court street .3 

.■\. W. Perry, Incorporated... 7 and 8 Haymarket place. . . 3 



Special, carage $400 

.Alterations, lr>dging 350 

Alterations, dwelline 500 

.Mterations, store and office. . . 100 

.Alterations, offices 1,000 

.Mterations, hospital 500 

Tuke-down, storage 1(X) 

Signs 75 

Signs 100 



J.\NUAHY 10. 



Joseph Pollak Corporation . . 9i>-!lil Freeport street 15 

O'Malley Associates, Incor- 87 West Fifth street 6 

porated. 

Jane M. Shea 81 .Albany street 3 

Jane M. Shea 74 Harvard street 3 

Domenie Falzarano 199 Havre street 1 

J. Wcibretcht 41 Tolman street 16 

Mary .Mcl^aughlin 2 Westmoreland street 16 

W. Millen 107 South street 3 

J. G. llornbrook 4(i Mansfield street 22 

J. G. llornbrook 42 Maii.sficld street 22 

H. Pappas 577li Washington street. ... 17 

John C. Kiley 20 Nashua street 3 

John Ueatty 14 Haverford street 11 



Alterations, laundry $1,000 

Alterations, storage 300 

Alterations, store and dwell- 150 

ing. 

Alterations, store and dwell- 150 

ing. 

Alterations, dwelling 100 

Alterations, dwelling (iOO 

Alterations, dwelling 200 

-Alterations, stores 75 

.Alterations, dwelling 350 

Alterations, dwelling 350 

Alterations, store.". 100 

Alterations, offices 100 

Alterations, dwelling 1.50 



J.\NUAnV 11. 



R. F. Whitehead. 
Whiting Estate . . 
Silvesto Nogro. . . 



75 Nonantum street . 
5 Purchase street . . . . 
10 .Austin street 



City of Boston 

Siiiith-Howland Company. . 
National Pickle Company. . 
SulTolk Co-operative Bank . 

Harvard ColleKe 

Dr. F. 1{. Ober 

Francis Borasky el al 

\ictor Picaret 



30 Dighton street 22 

590 Chelsea street 2 

82 Gerard street 8 

67 Florence street 19 

139 Summer street 3 

232 Marlborough street .... 5 

218 Sumner street 1 

19 Sudan street 13 



Third-class dwelling $6,000 

Alterations, manufacturing... 800 

Alterations, store and dwell- 75 
ing. 

Alterations, school 200 

.Special, storage 300 

.Alterations, pickling plant. . . 200 

.Alterations, dweUing 4,000 

Alterations, stores and offices, 800 

.Alterations, office 275 

Dumlj-waiter 125 

.Alterations, dwelling 525 



January 13. 



James O. Graves 

Liboro Cannata 

Florence E. Carver 

Home Savings Bank 

W. .A. Hettman 

Ferdinand Drauschke 

Charlcstown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank. 

Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank. 

D. Kravitsky 

Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank. 

P. L. Buxton 

Edmond Donlon 

E. Sohier Welch et al., Trus- 
tees. 

P. B. Watson, Trustee 

L. Salvi 

James F. Lenehan 

William Flaherty 

James Tucker 

George Carpenter Estate. . . . 



.3 Lindall place 

77 Woodard road 

30 Sun.set Hill road 

836 Washington street. . 

54 Danfortli street 

3 .Alvah Kittredge park. 
98 Winthrop street 



96 Winthrop street . 



27 .Allen street . 
8 .Adams street. 



214 West First street. 

176 Park street 

38-42 Joy street 



102 and 104 Commercial St. 
3524 VVashington street . . . . 

31 .Alpine street 

19 CliiTord street 

12 Brook avenue 

8 Winter street 



5 Alterations, dwelling S2.000 

20 Third-cla.ss dwelling 4..500 

20 Third-class dwelling o..>00 

3 Alterations, store 100 

19 .Alterations, dwelling 150 

9 -Alterations, lodging 450 

8 -Alterations, dwelling 2,000 

8 -Alterations, dwelling 2.000 

3 -Alterations, tenements 125 

2 -Alterations, dwelling 300 

6 Take-down, storage .50 

20 -Alterations, dwelling 600 

3 .Alterations, studios and tene- 600 

ments. 

3 Alterations, store 175 

11 -Alterations, dwelling 300 

12 -Alterations, dwelling 500 

18 -Alterations, dwelling 400 

8 -Alterations, dwelling 150 

3 Sign 500 



Jantarv 14. 



Shawmut Really Trust 

City of Boston 

William Filenc's Sons Com- 
pany. 

William Filene's Sons Com- 
pany. 

Employers Liability Corpo- 
ration. 

J. Stern 

Chandler & Co 

.Sun Oil Company 

Paul Hakemian 

Reginald Ward 

Frieda Lipkind 

.'^aiiiuel .A. Harris 

Paddock Building Trust 

Lucy E. Smith 

Madam Ruth's 

John S. C. Nickles 

Dedham Institution for Sav- 
ings. 

A. E. Murphy Trust 

-A. E. -Murphy Trust 

Ella V. Pring 

Ciardner Bates. 

Nan Cabot Candies 



12 Clearway street 

174 North street 

400 Washington street . . . . 

426 Washington street . . . . 

1 Liberty square 

300B and 300C Centre st. . 

1.50 Tremont street 

1833-1837 Centre street. . . 
37 lOast Brookline street. . . 

128 Myrtle street 

1726-1736 Dorchester ave. 

18 Windsor street 

100 Tremont street 

28 Holyoke street 

613 Centre street 

1 18 Lexington street 

106 Ivittredge street 

41 Washington street 

43 Washington street 

80 .Arlington street 

105 Norfolk avenue 

228 Treniont street 



4 -Alterations tenements $6.50 

3 Alterations. Printing Plant. . . 1,800 

3 -Alterations, store 2.000 

3 -Alterations, store l ,000 

3 Alterations, offices 3,000 

10 -Alterations, stores 840 

3 Alteration, store 135 

20 Special, office 850 

8 Fire escapes 175 

5 Dumb-waiter 136 

17 -Alterations, stores 30O 

9 -Alterations, dwelling 150 

3 -Alterations, stores and offices, 5.000 

4 -Alterations, dwelling 700 

19 Sign 35 

1 -Alterations. dwcUinK 75 

18 -Alterations, dweUing 100 

2 -Alterations, dwelling 200 

2 -Alterations, dwelling 200 

18 -Alterations, dwelling 250 

8 -Alterations, dwelling 260 

3 Sign ; "90 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

Jl-MOK Ji.\C'rKHI0I.O<;iST, DEP.MtTMENT OF 

Pi ULic HE.\LrH, Febkuakv 29, 1936. 

Lu.^t (late for filing application.?, Satur- 
day. Ft'l)niarj' 15, 1936, at 12 noon. 

(Requisition is for a female, but the 
e.\aiuination is open to both males and 
females.) 

The minimum salary is SI, 680 a year; 
the maxiriuim salary is 82,160 a year. 

Duties: To assist in preparation of 
smallpox vaccine. To supervise filling, 
labelling, and packing of biologic pro- 
ducts. To supervise distribution of bio- 
logic products and the records of distri- 
bution. To assist in planning for 
seasonal changes in distribution, by 
analysis of distribution records. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, (1); jjractical questions, (1); 
total, (2). 

Passing requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in each subject in order to become 
eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
jjhj'sical examination. 

Junior Chemist, Boston Psychop.athic 
Hospital, February 29, 1936. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day. February 15, 1936, at 12 noon. 

(Requisition is for a female, but the 
examination is open to both males and 
females.) 

The minimum salary, with main- 
tenance, is 81,320 a year; the maximum 
salary, with maintenance, is 81,800 a 
year; the minimum salary, without main- 
tenance, is 81,680 a year; the maximum 
salary, without maintenance, is 82,160 a 
year. 

Duties: To examine blood and spinal 
fluid, quantitativel}^ for non-protein-ni- 
trogen, total protein, urea, chlorides, 
dextrose, calcium, etc., and particularly 
for blood oxj-gen saturation and carbon 
dioxide combining power; and alcohol, 
bromides, barbital, ether and carbon 
monoxide. To examine urine, feces, and 
\omitus qualitatively for lead, mercury, 
arsenic, etc. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must have had two years' technical 
laboratory experience. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, (3) ; practical questions, (4) ; 
personality and fitness, as determined bj' 
an oral interview, (3); total, (10). 

Passing requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in each subject in order to become 
eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
l)hysical examination. 

STENOGRAPHIC SERVICE. 

For State and Cities and Towns Out- 
side OF Boston and \'icinity, March 
7, 1936. 
Last date for filing applications, Mon- 
day, February 24, 1936, at 5 p. m. 

For St.ate, Boston, and Cities and 
Towns in the Vicinity of Boston, 
M.ARCH 21, 1936. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
ilay. March 7, 1936, at 12 noon. 

This is the regular examination for the 
stenographic service of the state and of 
all cities and of such towns in the state 
as are classified under Civil Service. On 
March 7, the examination will be held 
in various centrally located cities. On 
March 21, the examination will be held 
in Boston, and all persons who reside 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



67 



withiu commuting distance will be noti- 
fied for examination on this da}'. 

Persons qualifying in the examination 
may have their names placed on the 
state list as well as on the list for the 
city or town in which they reside. 

Applicants must be not less than six- 
teen years of age at the time of filing 
application. 

The subjects of examination with their 
respective weights will be as follows: 
Training and experience, (2) ; spelling, 
(2) ; arithmetic, (2) ; grammar, (2) ; 
filing, (1); word knowledge, (1); steno- 
graphy, (10); total, (20). 

The dictation is given at the following 
rates of speed : 80, 100 and 120, the dicta- 
tion at each rate of speed consisting of 
a letter of about 300 words in length. 
Each applicant may select any two of 
the three speed tests for transcription. 
The transcription is marked for both 
speed and accuracy. Applicants are re- 
quired to obtain at least 70 per cent 
in accuracy of transcription of one speed 
test. 

Applicants will also be required to 
obtain at least 65 per cent in spelling, at 
least 50 per cent in each of the other 
subjects, and at least 70 per cent in 
general average in order to become 
eligible. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY.) 

FIRE SERVICE. 

Boston and ]Metropolit.\n District, 
Februaky 15, 1936. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 1, 1930, at 12 noon. 

Applicants for the service of Boston 
must be not less than twenty-two nor 
over thirty-five j'ears of age at the time 
of filing application. Applicants for all 
other cities and towns in the Common- 
wealth must be not less than twenty-one 
nor over thirty-five years of age at the 
time for filing application. Callmen and 
substitute callmen may make such deduc- 
tions from their ages as are provided for 
in Civil Service Rule 8, Class 21. A 
certificate of date of birth must be filed 
with the application, iinlcss one has been 
filed with a previous application. 

Applicants for Worcester are required 
to be not less than 5 feet 5 inches in 
height. Applicants for Brockton must be 
not less than 5 feet 6 inches in height, 
and weigh not less than 135 pounds at 
the time of appointment. Applicants for 
Winchester must be not less than 5 feet 
8 inches in height, and weigh not less than 
135 pounds. Applicants for Lynn must 
be not less than 5 feet 5i inches in height, 
and weigh not less than 135 pounds. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; general information, 3; 
practical questions, 4; total, 10. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination and strength tests. 

Educational test, 3: physical test, 2; 
total, 5. . . H ^ 

Applicants will be required to obtain at 
least 50 per cent in each subject of the 
examination and at least 70 per cent in 
the educational average and in the 
strength test in order to become eligible. 

The practical questions will be based 
upon information contained in a manual 
known as the "Red Book." This manual 
may be obtained from the Secretary of 
State, Room 118, State House, at ten 
cents a copy. It is neccssarj' that appli- 
cants obtain a copy of this manual and 
study it carefully. 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 9 TO JANUARY 15. 

.January 15. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Watertown Co-operative 121 Parsons street 22 

Bank. 

.John Beal 145 and 147 Hanover street, .3 

\. Poirier 16 Dover street 3 

F. \. Stevens Estate 45 Corey street 2 

William .1. Stober 1 Winter place 3 

Realty, Incorporated 44 and 46 Lowell street .... 3 

Ellen Mulcahy 12 East street 15 

.lames Maines 145 Ruskin road 18 

Mary Ryan 33 Linden Park street 9 



Alterations, dwelling $1,200 

.^Iterations, commercial 125 

Fire escapes .50 

Alterations, dwelling 100 

Alterations, store 160 

Alterations, store and tene- 150 
ments. 

-Alterations, dwelling 250 

.iterations, dwellins 500 

-■Mterations, dwelling 168 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 9 TO JANUARY 15. 

January 9. 



Plu.mber. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Samuel Cohen 4 Wilkins place 19 

L. W. Polit 40 .\nderson street 5 

F. D. Carr 54 Pinckney street 5 

Hyman Lappin 12S .Myrtle street 5 

A. .Shleman 54 Charles street 5 

Walter Schmitt 1S3 Bunker Hill street 2 

W. S. Emerson 22 .\llston street 2 

William N. McKenna 240 Summer street 3 

F. W. McCarthy 245 West Second street (i 

Emilio Pascucci 92 Sumner street 1 

Emilio Pascucci 9.S Sumner street 1 

.Joseph F. Murphy 27 Trcscott street 13 

B. R. Gellis 72 .Northampton street 8 

Louis Miller 9 Williams street 9 

( )scar F. -Mctcalf 1890 Centre street 20 



New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 



J.\.NUARY 10. 



George F. Crawford . 

E. H. Marchant 

.John .1. Voftcl 

Israel Howitz 

David Carlin 

■Joseph Rinella 

Horace W. Orr 

-Nathan Katz 

John J. Vogel 



355 Newbury street 5 

217 Friend street 3 

4272 Washington street. ... 18 

l*:i:i Blue Hill avenue 14 

8 Brewster street 7 

24 liennington street 1 

SO Liingdcn street 8 

122 Huntington avenue. ... 4 

40 Ledjard road 20 



New 
New 
New 
New 
New 
-New 
New 
New 
New 



fixtures. 

fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures. 



.Arthur W. Comeau. 
Walter P. Jones. ... 

Hyman Lappin 

R. Fliegelman 



91 Bay State road 5 New fixtures. 

443 Geneva avenue 17 .New fixtures. 

2.561 Washington street. .. . 9 New fixtures. 

31 Ilannon street 14 New fixtures. 



January 14. 



Max Hyman 

William F. .McAuliffe. . . . 

Samuel Litman 

H. A. Rowell 

H. A. Rowell 

Frederick W. McCarthy. 

Louis FeruUo 

William F. -McAulifle.... 

Thomas J. Cady 

Thomas J. Cady 

P. F. Russo... 

George Sulprizio 

James J. McCarriston. . . 

Leonard Cirrillo 

C:iiarles M. Gravallese. . . 

Earl A. King 

Louis Kornetsky 

M. Riceman 

James D. O'Neil 

James D. O Neil 



35 Vaughan avenue 14 New fixtures. 

687 East Second street 6 New fixtures. 

115 Chiswick road 21 New fixtures. 

19 Brimmer street 5 New fixtures. 

17 Brimmer street 5 New fixtures. 

197 Beacon street 5 New fixtures. 

120 Lake street 22 New fixtures. 

421 East Third street 6 New fixtures. 

27 Windsor street 18 New fixtures. 

28 Windsor street 18 New fixtures. 

3867 Washington street. .. . 19 New fixtures. 

102 and 104 Commercial St., 3 New fixtures. 

Ill Gainsborough street. .. . 4 New fixtures. 

334 -North street 3 New fixtures. 

Ill Webster street 1 New fixtures. 

86 Endicolt street 3 New fixtures. 

29 Lawrence avenue 14 New fixtures. 

IS Wabon street 12 New fixtures. 

24 Hannon street 14 New fixtures. 

22 Hannon street 14 New fixtures. 



January 15. 



R. Fliegelman 

P. H. McKeagney 

Bartholomew Dorsey 

Carl I. Stevens 

K. N. Lindemann 

Thomas C. Kelly 

(,'. W. Lanagan 

John J. McCormack 

Joseph P. Vogel 

Richard J. .Merrick 

R. C. Nickerson 

R. P. Slattery Company . 
Samuel Morse. . 



951 Dorchester avenue 13 New 

50 Castle street 3 New 

429 Dorchester avenue 7 New 

5'J Cushing avenue 13 New 

5 Washington court 16 New 

71 .\nawan avenue 20 New 

210 Weld street 20 New 

1000 Washington street. .. . 3 New 

121 West Brookline street. . 9 New 

615 Tremont street 4 New 

504 Tremont street 3 New 

50 ScoUay square 3 New 

160 Newbury street 5 New 



fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fi-xtures. 



$250 

1,400 

75 

35 

3.50 

25 

150 

150 

500 

110 

110 

175 

150 

225 

125 



S300 
400 

60 

47 
262 

55 
125 

40 
100 



J.vnuary 11. 


F. C. Odenweller 

Joseph Seigcl 


117 L street (i New fixtures 


.S690 


122 Marlborough street 5 New fixtures 


1,500 




Januauv 13. 





$400 

30 

1,200 

125 



$100 
125 

75 

750 

675 

2,600 

90 
825 
450 
450 

60 

75 
400 

50 
150 

75 
250 
350 
300 
300 



$150 

160 

75 

200 

225 

100 

500 

100 

50 

40 

300 

125 

500 



68 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



ADDITIONAL DEBT INCURRING POWER, DECEMBER 31, 1W4. 

(Chapter 366, Acts of 1933, as amended by Chapter 21, Acts of 1934.) 



Dule of Order. 


Object. 


Amount. 


Total. 




Total Debt Incurring Power within the Debt 
Limit under chapter 366. Acts of 1933 




S18.437.449 00 


Feb. 27. 1934 

Feb. L>7, 1934 


I.*88 authorized eince (inside debt limit) : 

Ueplacemenis of Brookline Avenue Water Main, 
from the Urooliline Line to Beacon Street. . . . 

School Committee. One New High School and 
One New Intermediate School 


$350,000 00 

2.000,000 00 
1.000,000 00 

1.500,000 00 

1,000.000 00 
700,000 00 
350,000 00 
375,000 00 

1,200,000 00 




Fob. 27. 1934 

Feb. 27. 1934 






Hospital Department. New Buildings and Altera- 




Feb. 27. 1934 

Feb. 27. 1934 

March 2. 1934 

May 2 1934 


Construction. Reconstruction and Replacement 
of Sewers and Covering of Open Water Courses. 

Water Main Construction 








Northern Avenue Bridge, Reconstruction 

Construction of One Intermediate School in the 
West Roxbury District and an .addition to the 
Robert Gould Shaw School in the West Rox- 




July 24, 1934 








8.475.000 00 








$9,962,449 00 



PUBLIC WORKS ADMINISTRATION PROJECTS. 
(Chapter 366, Acts of 1933, as amended bv Chapter 21, Acts of 1934.) 



Object of Appbopriations. 



Hospital Department. New Buildings and 
Alterations and Equipment 



Police Communication System 

Northern Avenue Bridge. Reconstruction . . . 
Reconstruction of Streets 



Construction. Reconstruction and Replace- 
ment of Sewers and Covering of Oi>en Water 
Courses 



Replacement of Brookline Avenue Water 
Main from the Brookline line to Beacon 
Street 



Water Main Construction 

School Committee, one new High School and 
one new Intermediate School 



Total 
Credits. 



December 31 
Draft. 



$700,000 00 
200,000 00 
200,000 00 
500,000 00 

750,000 00 

150,000 00 
350,000 00 



$2,850,000 00 



$38,112 38 
16,160 19 
41,603 59 

178,219 76 

65,931 20 

974 13 
67,095 16 

3,465 75 



$411,562 16 



Expenditures 
for 1934. 



$115,923 04 

65,417 40 

45,391 97 

360,022 45 

176,372 98 

5,862 24 
209,099 23 



$978,089 31 



Balances 
Unexpended. 



$584,076 96 
134.582 60 
154,608 03 
139,977 55 

573,627 02 

144,137 76 
140.900 77 



$1,871,910 69 



CITY AND COUNTY FUNDED DEBT, DECEMBER 31, 1934. 

Total Funded Debt. City and County *$168,272,333 28 

Funded debts outside the debt limit (debts exempted from the operation of the law limiting 
municipal indebtedness): 

City debt $38,636,800 00 

Water debt 338,000 00 

Traffic Tunnel debt 16,000,000 00 

Traffic Tunnel debt. Series B 2,500.000 00 

County debt 981,333 28 

Rapid Transit debt 58.940,700 00 

117.396.833 28 

Funded debt within the debt limit $50,875,500 00 

Offsets to funded debt: 

Sinking funds $34,116,784 16 

Less Sinking Funds for debt outside the debt limit: 

City Sinking Funds $13,338,475 94 

Countv Sinking Fund 811.297 01 

Rapid Transit Sinking Funds 14,244,553 98 

28,394,326 93 

$5,722,457 23 

Premium on loans $1,557 55 

Less on loans outside debt limit 14 75 

1.542 80 

Offsets to funded debt witliin the debt limit 5.724,000 03 

Net indebtedness within the debt limit S45.151 .499 98 



* Includes $81 ,333.28 issued by the Commonwealth under chapter 534 of the Acts of 1906. 



OWNED AND RENTED HOMES IN 
UNITED STATES. NEW ENGLAND AND 
MASSACHUSETTS, 1930— ALSO BOSTON. 

Total homes in United States, 29,901,- 
663, of which 14,002,074 or 46.8 per cent 
were owned, 15,319,817 or 51.2 per cent 
were rented, and 582,772 were of un- 
known tenure. Native white families, 
20,968,803; foreign-bom white families 
(the head of the family being a foreign- 
bom white person), 5,736,491; Negro 
families, 2,803,756; other races, 395,613. 

The native white families owned 10,- 
255,682 homes and rented 10,314,500 
homes; the foreign-born white families 
owned 2,968,707 homes and rented 2,690,- 
300 homes; the Negro families owned 669,- 
645 homes and rented 2,050,217 homes; 
the other races owned 108,040 homes and 
rented 264,800 homes. 

Total homes in New England, 1,981,- 
499, of which 915,441 or 46.2 per cent 
were owned, 1,042,521 or 52.6 per cent 
were rented, and 23,537 were of un- 
known tenure. Native white families, 
1,203,304; foreign-born white families, 
753,231; Negro families, 22,864; other 
races, 2,100. 

Total homes in Massachusetts, 1,021,- 
160, of which 439,238 or 43.0 per cent 
were owned, 569,645 or 55.8 per cent 
were rented, and 12,277 were of unknown 
tenure. Native white families, 579,751 
(306,978 or 30.06 per cent were native 
white of native parentage and 272,773 or 
26.71 per cent were native white of 
foreign or mixed parentage) ; foreign- 
born white families, 427,385 or 41.85 per 
cent; Negro families, 12,637 or 1.24 per 
cent; other races, 1,387 or 0.14 per cent. 

Total homes in Boston, 179,200, of 
which 45,986 or 25.66 per cent were 
owned, 130,140 or 72.62 per cent were 
rented and 3,074 were of tenure unknown. 
Divided by color and nativity of head of 
owner-families, 7,741 were native white 
of native parentage; 11,137 were native 
white of foreign or mixed parentage; 
26,366 were foreign-bom white; 726 were 
Negro and 16 were of other races. 

Of the renter-families, 27,267 were na- 
tive white of native parentage; 36,428 
were native white of foreign or mixed 
parentage; 61,505 were foreign-bom 
white ; 4,431 were Negro, and 509 were of 
other races. 



POPULATION OF UNITED STATES. NEW 
ENGLAND AND MASSACHUSETTS. 

Continental United States (i. e., 48 
states and the District of Columbia) in 
1930, 122,775,046; outlying possessions, 
14,233,389; total, 137,008,435; New Eng- 
land, 8,166,341; Massachusetts, 4,249,614 
or 52.04 per cent of New England and 
ranking eighth in the Union. In density 
of population Massachusetts ranks sec- 
ond, i. e., 528 per square mile of land, 
Rhode Island ranking first, with 644 per 
square mile of land. 

Population of the other New England 
States in 1930, ranking from the highest 
total: Connecticut, 1,606,903; Maine, 
797,423; Rhode Island, 687,497; New 
Hampshire, 465,293; Vermont, 359,611. 
Density for New England, 132 per sq. 
m.; for U. S. (48 states and the District 
of Columbia) 41 per sq. m. 

The population of the United States 
increased 16.1 per cent since 1920; that 
of New England 10.3 per cent and that 
of Massachusetts 10.3 per cent. 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



69 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Monday, January 6, 1936. 

First meeting of the City Council for the year 
1936 in the Council Chamber, City Hall, at 10 
a. m. Coun. -Elect Gallagher, senior member, 
called the meeting to order. Absent, Coun.- 
Elect Peter A. Murray. 

Chairman GALLAGHER— The Council wiU 
be in order. _ 

Coun.-Elect KERRIGAN— Mr. President, I 
move that a committee of two be appointed by 
the Chair to escort the Mayor to the Council 
Chamber. j t ^v ■ 

The motion was earned, and the Chairman 
appointed Coun.-Elect Kerrigan and Shattuck 
said committee. The committee retired from the 
body at 10.06 a. m. and at 10.14 a. m. returned 
accompanying the Mayor and suite. 

Mayor ISL4NSFIELD took the chair and said: 

The meeting will please come to order. You 
will now give your attention while the Chaplain, 
Rev. Ernest J. Dennen, Archdeacon of the Episco- 
pal Church of Boston, leads us in prayer. 

Archdeacon DENNEN— O God, Father of us 
all, look «ith favor, we beseech thee, upon thy 
servants assembled here. As citizens make us 
loyal, as patriots incorruptible, as servants de- 
termined to serve the common good. In particular 
we implore thy blessing upon this Honorable 
Body facing today the duties of office. Make 
them staunch in their stand for the right and 
successful always on the side of truth and justice. 
Hear our prayer, we beseech thee, through Him 
who has ever led man aright, thy Son, our Saviour, 
Jesus Christ. .\men. 

Mayor M.A.NSFIELD— The City Clerk will 
now read the communication from the Election 
Commissioners certifying as to the new members 
elected to the City Council and will call the roll. 

City Clerk DOYLE read the communication, 
as follows : 

Board of Election Commissioners, 
City Hall Anne.'c, Court Square, 

Boston. December 5, 1935. 
Mr. Wilfred J. Doyle, Esq., 
City Clerk, Boston. 

Dear Sir, — We certify that at the City Election 
held in the City of Boston on November 5, 1935, 
for the choice of one member of the City Council 
from each ward, for the term of two years, that the 
following were elected from the wards as set forth 
against their names: 

Ward 1, Henry Selvitella, 80 Orient avenue. 

Ward 2, James J. Mellen, 18 Tremont street. 

Ward 3, John I. Fitzgerald, 7 Allen street. 

Ward 4, George W. Roberts, 20 Hemenway 
street. 

Ward 5, Henry L. Shattuck, 15 River street. 

Ward 6, George A. Murray, 223 West Second 

Ward 7, John E. Kerrigan, 213 West Eighth 
street. 

Ward 8, John F. Dowd, 22 Greenville street. 

Ward 9, Richard D. Gleason, 15 Ruggles street. 

Ward 10. John J. Dohertv, 67i Wyman street. 

Ward 11, James J. Kilroy, 1301 Columbus 
avenue. 

Ward 12, David M. Brackman, 89 Waumbeck 

Ward 13, Peter J. Fitzgerald, 39 Belfort street. 
Ward 14, Sidney Rosenberg, 576 Blue Hill 
avenue. 

Ward 15, Martin H. Tobin, 70 Westville street. 
Ward 16, John J. McGrath, 2 Glenrose road. 
Ward 17, Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr., 57 Cod- 
man Hill avenue. 

Ward 18, Clement A. Norton, 34 Myopia road. 
Ward 19, Peter A. Murray, 7 St. John street. 
Ward 20, James F. Finley, 231 Cornell street. 
Ward 21, James E. Agnew, 92 Wallingford road. 
Ward 22, Edward M. Gallagher, 21 Oak Square 
avenue. 

Respectfully yours, 

David B. Shaw, 
Daniel H. Rose, 
Frederic E. Dowling, 
Francis B. McKinnev, 
Board of Election Commissioners. 

Following the re.iding of the communication, 
the City Clerk called the roll and all but Coun - 
Elect Peter A. Murray were found to be present. 

The Mayor then administered the oath of office 
to the members of the Council. 

The Mayor thereupon delivered his message 
to the Council, as follows: 

ANNUAL ADDRESS OF HON. FREDERICK 
W. MANSFIELD. 

The first two years of my term of ofiSce as Mayor 
of the City of Boston have been concluded and 
we are now commencing on the second half of 
that term. The two years which have passed 
have been years of marked improvement in the 
affairs of this city. I propose today to give you 
a summary of the accomplishments of those 
years and to discuss with you some of the problems 
of the immediate future. 

I. The Past Two Years. 

A. The Financial Condition of the City. 

I have frequently stressed the importance of 

maintaining the credit of the city. Under the 

laws of this Commonwealth, the revenue necessary 



to carry on municipal government, to mainta,in 
our schools, to pay city employees and to assist 
the poor and needy is not received by the city 
until late in the calendar year. Money, there- 
fore, must always be borrowed in anticipation of 
such revenue. If the credit of the city should be 
impaired this money could not be obtained, with 
the necessary result that many municipal services 
demanded by and important to the welfare of the 
people of Boston would have to be curtailed, 
thousands of city employees would be obliged to 
work without pay and their discharge from the 
city's service would become imperative and the 
city would find itself unable properly to care for 
the poor, the needy and the unemployed. 

Every effort, therefore, has been bent during 
the last two years on preserving the credit of the 
city. 

There are certain factors peculiar to cities and 
towns in the Commonwealth which must be borne 
in mind in any consideration of Boston's financial 
situation. Welfare expenditures throughout the 
depression have been and are being borne by the 
cities and towns of the Commonwealth with but 
very limited assistance from the state. While 
these expenditures have increased in tremendous 
proportion, falling valuations of real estate and 
decreased income tax collections distributable 
to municipalities have sharply cut the revenue 
to meet the added expenditures. The net result 
has been a drastic increase in tax rates throughout 
the Commonwealth. Five towns in the Com- 
monwealth had a tax rate in 1935 of over $50 a 
thousand; fifty-six cities and towns a tax rate of 
between S40 and S49; eighty a tax rate of between 
S35 and 839, and one hundred and eleven a tax 
rate of between S30 and .S34. 

Welfare expenditures in Boston during 1928 
aggregated .52,800,000. In 1935 they aggregated 
approximately §13,000,000, although less than in 
1U34 or 193.3. The increase in welfare expendi- 
tures represents S6 in the ta.x rate. In the mean- 
time valuations have decreased to an amount 
representing about So on the tax rate and revenue 
collected by the Commonwealth and distributable 
to Boston has decreased to an amount repre- 
senting about $3 on the tax rate. 

No substantial new sources of revenue and no 
adequate state assistance have been afforded to 
the city to meet its added welfare expenditures 
and decreased income. 

The city has, therefore, been faced with the 
alternative of vigorous curtailment of services 
and salaries or with reasonable curtailment and 
borrowing. The hardship to employees and the 
adverse effect on local business involved in the 
first alternative has led us to adopt the second. 

When I took office there was no adequate system 
of budget control. To improve this situation I 
instructed the City Auditor to prepare a plan 
whereby a modern budget system with proper 
control of expenditures and a more adequate 
method of checking receipts could be put in opera- 
tion. This plan is now in operation and further 
improvements will be operative in 1936 as I shall 
later more fully explain. 

The Department of Public Welfare was reor- 
ganized late in 1934 and every effort has been made 
to guard against disbursements to persons not 
entitled to relief. Vigorous prosecutions of 
offenders and the employment of trained workers 
in the department have tended to conserve against 
a waste of city funds. 

Wherever possible, I have maintained a policy 
of not filling vacancies and of reducing purchases 
of equipment, materials and supplies to a minimum 
consistent with the proper rendering of public 
service. 

Not only has effort been made to keep expendi- 
tures within reasonable limits but attention has 
been given to the enforcement and collection of 
tax and other claims of the city 

In 1935 approximately $6,000,000 more was 
received by the City Collector than in 1933 and 
there has been a definite improvement in current 
tax collections. The trend of collections has at 
last been turned in the right direction. 

Pursuant to my request, an ordinance was 
passed in 1935, after considerable delay, which 
will enable the city to conserve and dispose of 
properties acquired through tax title foreclosures 
made mandatory by statute. 

While the city borrowed approximately 
$10,000,000 for welfare purposes in 1935 and 
must to some extent make borrowings for this 
purpose in 1936 unless wholesale discharges or 
pay cuts are to be countenanced, it is worthy of 
note that the borrowings by the city in 19.34 and 
1935 were less than the borrowings by the city in 
the year of 1933 alone; that large amounts of 
debt have been retired in both 1934 and 1935, a 
fact frequently overlooked by critics; and that the 
net funded debt of the city is now less than when 
I took office on January 1, 1934. 

"That the credit of the city has improved in the 
last two years is evidenced to some extent by the 
fact that interest on temporary loans has decreased 
from an average of 4.03 per cent in 1933 to 1.55 
per cent in 1934 and .85 per cent in 1935 — and 
the interest requirements of the city for temporary 
borrowings were approximately $600,000 less in 
1935 than in 1933. JNIoreover, interest rates on 
long term borrowings have decreased from an 
average rate of 4.32 per cent in 1933 to 3.29 per 
cent in 1934 and 2.36 per cent in 1935. 

B. Temporary Relief for the Unemployed. 
In my annual message to your Honorable Body 
in 1935, I stated that: 



"It is my purpose, however, to secure for the 
employment of residents of Boston a fair and 
adequate share of all Federal funds granted for 
relief purposes. Through my repeated efforts 
more than 15,000 Boston residents heretofore 
unemployed are now employed on E. R. A. projects 
and new projects will provide for the employment 
of 7,000 more. So long as the Federal Emergency 
Relief Administration continues to operate I shall 
do all in my power to have formulated, and to 
supply materials for projects adequate to provide 
for all persons that the funds provided will employ. 
It is my purpose to see to it that these projects 
will be of real value to the city." 

In May of 1934, when the Federal Emergency 
Relief Administration commenced work in Boston, 
8,544 persons were cared for on works projects. 
I have, since that time, made every effort ^ to 
secure a maximum of Federal funds for the assist- 
ance of Boston residents. 

Constant contact with Washington officials has 
been essential and, while we have not received all 
the assistance for which I hoped and to which I 
beheve we are entitled, we have secured from time 
to time increased funds for employment in Boston 
so that by December of 1934 the number of em- 
ployed was increa.sed to 13,831, in June of 1935 to 
26,923 and at present more than 27,000 persons 
are employed. 

To further this work and to secure projects 
which would be of real benefit to the city, I caused 
to be formed a board, known as the Works Projects 
Board, to develop, coordinate and prepare for 
submission to the Federal Government useful and 
needed projects. 

This board prepared both a Public Works and 
a Works Projects program. Projects were sub- 
mitted to the Federal Government amply sufficient 
to employ usefully all unemployed persons in the 
city capable of employment. 

While the Federal Government has not provided 
work for all employables on our welfare roll and 
the city has been obliged to expend over $1,000,000 
in 1935 for materials to be used on these projects, 
there can be no doubt that the relief rolls of the 
city have been saved from greater burdens, that 
a vast amount of useful work has been done for the 
city and that the lot of thousands of men and 
women has been materially relieved pending what 
I hope will soon be their absorption into private 
employment. 

C. Public Improvements. 

Many improvements have been made during the 
last two years, all of which tend to make Boston a 
better place in which to live and conduct business. 
These improvements were made possible partly by 
E. R. A., P W. A. and W. P. A. funds and partly 
by city funds, but they are so numerous that I shall 
take the liberty of calling some of them to your 
attention. 

One hundred and fifty new streets were accepted 
by the city and constructed in various sections of 
Boston, covering approximately twelve miles in 
length. Ten main traffic arteries were entirely 
reconstructed, covering approximately twelve 
additional miles in length. 'These latter arteries 
include Alford street in Charlestowi'i. Savin Hill 
avenue, Adams street and Ashmont street in 
Dorchester, Old Colony avenue in South Boston 
and Dorchester; Walk Hill street in Mattapan; 
Hyde Park avenue in Hyde Park; Southampton 
street in Roxbury; La Grange street in West 
Roxbury and Woodrow avenue in Dorchester. 

Northern Avenue Bridge, connecting Boston 
Proper and South Boston, has been reconstructed; 
Chelsea North Bridge, connecting Boston and 
Chelsea, has been repaired and strengthened; 
substantial repairs have been made on both the 
Summer Street Bridge across Fort Point Channel 
and the Granite Avenue Bridge between Boston 
and Milton. Preparations are now being made for 
a new Chelsea Street Bridge connecting East 
Boston and Chelsea. This new bridge is to have 
a roadway seventy feet in width with a hundred- 
foot draw span sufficiently wide to accommodate 
the passage of any vessel likely to use Chelsea creek. 

Many open brooks, such as Stony brook in West 
Roxbury, Shephard brook in Brighton, Tenean 
creek in Dorchester and Maywoods brook in 
Roxbury, have been confined to underground con- 
duits for the purpose of preventing the continuance 
of past recurring floods and the damages which 
those floods create. 

The existing high force water service system in 
Roxbury has been reinforced by more than three 
miles of forty-eight inch steel water pipe and six 
thousand feet of forty-eight inch steel water pipe 
has been laid in Brookline avenue to replace pipe 
laid there in 1860. 

In addition, almost eleven miles of pipe have 
been laid in various parts of Boston to strengthen 
the water system. 

Ash-removal contractors have been notified that 
they must comply with their contract.s and that 
they can no longer insist on barrels being carried 
for them by householders to and from the side- 
walk. 

A new white way has been set up on Washington 
street between Stuart street and Broadway. 
Modern concrete posts with better lighting have 
been provided on Hyde Park avenue, Hyde Park, 
and improved lighting service has been furnished 
on Bennington street. East Boston. 

The East Boston Airport has been enlarged, 
surfaced, drained and developed, and its area in- 
creased and longer runways provided. A modern 



70 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



flocxl liRhtini; HyHlt^m jh iinw inxlalled and a neaplnne 
runwiiv liiiM lii'pii pprfeiled iidcquuto for tlie iiecdn 
of iiHMlorii ^e:lplallrw. 

Tlic Ceorue Wrifilit Golf C'ourxe will be ready 
for oppiiiiiR ill I'.I'IO as one of tlie fiiipnt courxas in the 
Cnniiiionwrallli. A roueli wild tract of land, 
UHclon-s for liuildiiiR purposes, has hpoii rorivcrled 
into land of use and licauty — a distinct improyc- 
iiicnt to the ncighburhuod und a self-supporting 
enterprise. 

Many improvements have been made both in the 
larger and smaller parks and playgrounds. Walks 
liave been resurfaced, areas graded, tennis courts 
liuilt, seats installed, drainage and irrigation 
systems installed. Ba.schall diamonds have been 
laid out and marsh lands reclaimed. Kvery effort 
has been made to develop open spaces in congested 
sections of the city and tliesc cITorts have tended to 
improve entire neighborhoods. 

Extensive gymniustic programs have been put in 
operation and swimming instruction given daily at 
city beaches and swimming pools. Despite the 
wide e.xpanse of our beaches, not one fatality 
occurred in 1'.).'J.5. 

The planting of 8,250 trees has tended to 
h'autify many streets and a new wading pool in 
Hyde I'ark, the first of its kind in this section of the 
country, has furnished recreation and relief to 
ciiildren and a resting spot for mothers. 

Prior to l!):i4 Faneuil Hall Market was heated 
liy contract from a State street building. We 
have since in.stalled there a new heating plant at 
an estimated saving to the City of about §4,000 a 
year. 

No thorough renovation of the Quincy Market 
has been made in one hundred and ten years. As 
a result, this important historic and income-pro- 
ducing property had structural and .sanitary 
defects so .serious that its renovation became 
essential. This work is now being undertaken. 

Much attention has been given the Deer Island 
House of Correction in the last two years. Willi 
inmate labor the Homan Catholic chapel has been 
renovated and redecorated in appropriate style 
and an Episcopal chapel established. One room 
of the institution has been remodeled and re- 
finished and is now used by the inmates for the 
first time as a library. Machine, electric and paint 
.shops, and a stocking shop have been constructed 
with inmate labor. Every effort is being made to 
provide facilities for inmates to render useful 
service. 

Fire prevention work has been vigorously under- 
taken during the past two years. School Depart- 
ment cooperation has been obtained and over 
■500,000 inspections have been made to eliminate 
fire hazards. It is pleasing to note that the fire 
loss for l'.):54 in Boston, the last year for which 
figures are available, is the lowest in any year since 
1912 and represents a reduction of almost fifty 
per cent of the losses of but a few years ago. 

Welfare Department activities have been decen- 
tralized to bring its services to people in the com- 
munities in which they live and eleven district 
offices have been established in abandoned city 
buildings or in other city properties. 

To guard against frauds, reregistration has been 
required, .iccurate records insisted on, skilled em- 
ployees retained and prosecutions of abuses vigor- 
ously maintained. 

The Wayfarers' Lodge and the Temporary Home 
for Women have been rehabilitated, the city's 
rights to reimliunsement from the state and other 
municipalities enforced and every effort made to 
a-ssist recipients to obtain private employment. 

During the pa.st year I have vigorously pro- 
tested against increased rates proposed by the 
Boston Consolidated Gas Company and, through 
the Law Department presented an elaborate 
analysis of the position of that company and the 
effect of the proposed rates upon consumers. 

Great progress has been made in the business 
of the Port of Boston through the past year. The 
domestic business of the port has steadily increased. 
In 193.5 our port once again has become an im- 
portant distributing point for inbound grain. 
From July 1, 193-5, to date approximately 
30,000,000 pounds of wool have been handled 
over Boston piers as compared with some 4,000,000 
pounds for a similar period last year. Three new 
steamship companies now participate in the trade 
of the port and five have improved their services. 

These are but some of the achievements of the 
past two years. They show definite accomplish- 
ment, but there are many things yet to be done. 
I shall, therefore, devote myself briefly to a dis- 
cussion of some of my plans for the immediate 
future. 

II. The Immediate Future. 

One of the major problems which confronted me 
as a new Iilayor was the task of a.ssisting to make 
Boston again a pro.sperous city. It is still a major 
problem, although business conditions have im- 
proved, ilie stimulation of business and indus- 
trial activity are essential to local recovery. As 
a correlated fact, business recovery is the only 
permanent means of reducing unemployment and 
its incidental cost. 

I propose to aid this recovery by inaugurating a 
financial plan for Boston. Its purpose will be to 
stabilize tax and debt conditions so that home 
owners and business enterprises may confidently 
look to Boston as a favorable place in which to 
live and do business. In this program the city 
must liavc the cooperation of the county, schools 
und state. 



The tendency of the times of closing eyes to 
unniistaluible trends evident in our community 
will delay recovery. We should realize that these 
trends indicate that attention must be centered 
on retaining present re.sidents and business and 
creating a situation which will stimulate commer- 
cial activity and restore real estate values. 

A. Borrowing. 

As the first step in launching this rehabilitation 
program, I propose to reduce substantially the 
net debt in 1936 During the year we will retire 
$8,627,000 of funded debt. It will be my pur- 
pose to limit new indebtedness to the amount 
required for P. W. A. projects heretofore author- 
ized, but not i.ssued, together with a limited 
amount for welfare loans. The latter will be 
limited to an amount substantially less than half 
of this year's loans. 

During the next five years Boston will retire 
$.'17,000,000 of its present bonded indebtedness. 
If this policy is followed in subsequent years and 
new issues limited to emergencies, it should be 
possible to reduce the bonded debt to a point 
where future borrowings could be eliminated alto- 
gether, and the city placed on a pay-as-you-go 
basis. This would save millions in interest 
payments. 

B. Taxation. 

The city will do its part to keep the tax rate at 
$37 per -Sl.OOO of assessed valuation in 1936 the 
same as in 193.5, despite reduced assessed valua- 
tions. In this move the city will need the coopera- 
tion of all taxing units whose rates are included in 
this cumulative tax levy. In 1935 the portion of 
the city levy reijuired for city debt service and 
maintenance purpo.ses was $22.58, for school 
maintenance $9.35, for the city's share of the 
state tax $2.93 and for county debt and mainte- 
nance $2.14. 

To accomplish these ends, that is, to decrease 
substantially borrowings and yet keep the tax 
rate from ri.sing despite decreasing valuations, an 
increase in sources of revenue other than the real 
estate tax must be developed and substantial 
retrenchments made. New revenues, to some 
extent, are expected from the Commonwealth 
while other funds will be obtained by more strenu- 
ous collection of available income or by the re- 
vision of exi.sting sources. Retrenchments to be 
recommended will be such as can most readily be 
made to meet the demands of the situation. I do 
not intend to effect salary reductions for or dis- 
charges of permanent employees. City employees 
are not being paid excessive salaries. Money paid 
to them for services performed is an important 
factor in the business hfe of the community. "The 
dollar spent by a city employee is just as impor- 
tant to the merchant as that spent by any other 
indi\'idual. When retrenchments are made, there 
may be some inconvenience resulting, but there 
will be no material loss in needed municipal 
services. 

Of course, if new sources of revenue are pro- 
vided by the Commonwealth in sufficient amount 
to enable a decrease in the tax rate, such decrease 
will be made. 

C. Budget Control. 
To assist in accomplishing these ends, I have 
instructed the City Auditor to set up an allotment 
.system to control expenditures during the six 
months prior to the passage of the 1936 budget. 
Departmental encumbrances will be controlled by 
limiting them on a quarterly basis. A sum less 
than the 1935 expenditure record will be taken as 
the basis for determining allotments. This is an 
important step forward in establishing budgetary 
control. It should eliminate overspending during 
the first six months' period, and maintain stability 
throughout the year by planning and Hmiting 
expenditures. 

D. Reorganization. 

There are at the present time forty-six separate 
departments in the city government and 135 
department heads. Many of these departments 
perform .similar functions and yet, because of the 
multiplicity of departments, many improvements 
in one department are unknown to others and 
much of the benefit of the experiences of one de- 
partment is lost to other departments performing 
similar functions. This set-up is antiquated and 
inadequate. There are ten executive depart- 
ments in Washington; there are twenty in the 
Commonwealth. Many large cities operate with 
from five to fifteen departments. It is obvious 
that a consolidation of departments is essential for 
the proper and efficient administration of city 
affairs. 

I recently submitted to the City Council a plan 
of reorg.anization of the engineering departments 
of the city. This plan was prepared by a com- 
mittee appointed, at my reijuest, by "President 
Compton of the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology. Its merits lie in the coordination of en- 
gineering activities, the elimination of unnecessary 
duplication and better arrangement of functions. 
It should enable far more economical administra- 
tion through the facilities afforded for more co- 
ordinated planning and activity, through the 
lessening of the necessity for filling vacancies in 
the event of death or retirement of employees, and 
through the improvement in the service rendered 
to the public. 

I shall resubmit this plan to your Honorable 
Body in the near future. 



E. New Legislation. 

(1.) New Revenues and Relief from the Stat* 
Tax. 
.\t present the city must include in its tax rate 
approximately $3 representing the tax assess^ 
upon it by the Commonwealth. This state tax 
ultimately imposed on real estate should be eUmi- 
nated or new revenues proWded the city by the 
state to compen.sate therefor. The Commonwealth 
should also share the burden of financing relief as 
do many of the other states and I will support 
again a measure to accomplish this end. Borrow- 
ing for relief places a mortgage upon the future. 
The state has within its power the means of financ- 
ing a substantial portion of the annual cost through 
currently collected revenue. Such a step would 
sub,«tantially reduce debt requirements now bur- 
dening real estate and pay the cost from the in- 
creased business resulting from the disbursement of 
millions to relief recipients. 

(2.) Revision of the Tax Limitation Provisions 
Affecting Boston. 

The special commi.s.sion on municipal finance 
established by the General Court in 1935 has recom- 
mended the abolition of the present tax limitation 
upon Boston. The present law is obsolete and 
should be revised so as to enable the early adoption 
of a city budget and so as to make positive budget- 
ary control in Boston a reahty. The report of the 
commission clearly pointed out that present legi.s- 
lativ-e control over school and municipal appropria- 
tions is more of a handicap to sound financing than 
a safeguard. 

The absolute veto power over school appropria- 
tions recommended will, if enacted, enable a mayor 
to protect more effectively the city's finances for 
which he is now held politically responsible and will 
place the Mayor of Boston in a position with refer- 
ence to school appropriations more closely analo- 
gous to the position of the mayors of other cities of 
the Commonwealth. 

(3.) Discount for Early Tax Payment. 

At the present time property taxes are payable 
one half in July and one half in November. No 
penalty, however, is imposed for failure to pay in 
July. The result is that July collections are rela- 
tively small and the city must continue as hereto- 
fore to borrow substantial sums in anticipation of 
revenue. Money may be borrowed at low interest 
rates for the time being but even now interest pay- 
ments for temporary borrowings are substantial. I 
shall recommend to the Legislature that a slight 
discount be allowed for payment on July 1, the 
amount of the discount to be less than the interest 
which the city must pay on temporary loans but 
sufficient to serve as an incentive to early payment. 
In this way temporary borrowings may be curtailed 
and the savings passed on to the taxpayers. 

I'ltimately we must look to the day when taxes 
will be paid at the beginning of the year and not at 
the end, but legislation for this must cover a sub- 
stantial period of time so as not to work undue 
hardship on the taxpayer. The potential sa\'ings 
to taxpayers in early payment through the elimina- 
tion of temporary borrowings is tremendous. 
Interest payments on temporary loans from 1925 
through 1934 cost the taxpayers of Boston ap- 
proximately 83,275,000. 

(4.) Revision of Assessment Procedure. 

Other improvements are needed to modernize 
Boston's financial structure. While no definite 
legislative program has been formulated at this 
date correcting these weaknesses, I call them to 
your attention. 

The present assessment procedure is cumber- 
some, and prevents the city from beginning any 
fiscal year with a definite financial program. 
Moreover, it encourages abatement litigation. 
Boston's method of assessment should be worked 
out on a scientific and modern basis and I expect 
to be able to accomplish this during the coming 
year with the assistance and cooperation of experts 
in this field from Harvard and the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. When this is accom- 
plished, I shall seek the enactment of legislation 
which will enable the completion of assessments 
and the finality of valuations prior to the first day 
of each new fiscal year. While a Board of Tax 
Appeals with machinery to review decisions of the 
assessors would be maintained, it is mj' belief that 
if a scientific method of assessment is adopted, the 
Legislature can limit the time for hearing appeals 
in such a way that all appeals can be adequately 
disposed of before the commencement of a fiscal 
year. The present practice of including an item of 
2 per cent or 2| per cent of the total appropriation 
for "overlay." which is used primarily for rebates 
made after the taxes are levied, adds to the tax 
burden of those who receive no adjustments. 
Any adjustments in assessed valuations should be 
made before the tax rate is established, then the 
city will know its tax base and the tax rate will 
fall equitably upon all taxpayers. 

F. Collectiorts. 
While tax collections improved during 1935. the 
accumulated burden of delinquency is heavy. 
Prompt action must and will be taken to reduce 
the outstanding delinquency. I intend to em- 
phasize this activity from the very beginning of 
this year and to set up a definite program of 
action. There is no desire upon our part to use 
force in collection. Every cooperation possible 
will be offered to delinquents but no concessions 
will be made which would penalize the prompt 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



71 



taxpayer. I realize that economic conditions are 
responsible for much of the delinquency and will 
be sympathetic with those who show any effort to 
work out a plan of payments. The ta.sk of tax 
collector is not a pleasant one but a necessary 
function if the credit of Boston is to be maintained. 

G. Relief for the Unemplojed. 

We have already commenced on a new program 
of work relief for the unemployed with the coopera- 
tion of the Federal Government. This program is 
one of useful and needed works for the city. 

No effort will be spared by me in securing for 
Boston residents the fullest share possible of 
Federal funds for the relief of the unemplojed and 
in seeing to it that those funds are devoted to worth- 
while uses. 

H. Port of Boston. 

In my annual address to your Honorable Body 
in 1935 I stated: 

"I shall, in addition, endeavor to upset the 
control of the New England railroads by the 
Pennsylvania Railroad and shall strive to secure 
local control of New England roads or in the event 
of national consolidation of railroads, a consolida- 
tion that will be favorable to Boston and New 
England to the end that the Port of Boston may 
become a thrivmg and flourishing port and receive 
the full benefit of its natural advantages." 

Progress has been made along this line in the 
past year despite unexpected opposition. I shall 
continue the struggle against outside domination 
of our railroads during the coming year and con- 
tinue to lend full support and assistance to the 
efforts of the Boston Port Authority in building 
the business of our port. 

Conclusion. 
Gentlemen, I have discussed at some length the 
accomplishments of the first two years and the 
problems, past and present, of our city. The City 
of Boston is a great public service corporation, the 
activities of which touch every phase of social and 
economic life in the community and are vital to 
the welfare of every inhabitant. Boston has much 
to boast of, yet we must not assume that it can 
exist on its accomplishments. I intend to follow, 
and I am sure you will join in following, a positive 
program which will recognize the problems facing 
us and meet them squarelj-. It is our first respon- 
sibiUty to see that every aid is extended to improve 
the government of this city. Improved govern- 
ment will aid business. Better business means a 
progressive Boston. 

Boston must go forward or backward. The 
direction rests partially in .our hands. Each of 
us must do our part and ask all others to cooperate 
in the endeavor and in a united effort to make 
Boston a better place in which to live and work. 
tApplause.) 

Tne reading of the Mayor's message commenced 
at 10.19 a. m. and ended at 10.55 a. m. 

After the Mayor and suite had retired from 
the chamber, the Council was called to order by 
Chairman GALLAGHER, as follows: 

The Council will be in order, and the clerk will 
call the roll to ascertain the presence of a quorum. 

The clerk called the roll, and all the members 
except Coun. Peter A. Murray and Coun. Shat- 
tuck were found to be present. 

Chairman GALLAGHER— The Chair awaits 
the pleasure of the Council. 



ADOPTION OF TEMPORARY RULES. 

Coun. DOWD offered the following: 
Ordered, That the rules of the City Council 
of 1935, except Rule 34, be adopted as the rules 
of this body until permanent rules are adopted. 
The order was passed. 



ELECTION OF PRESIDENT. 

Coun. KERRIGAN— Mr. Chairman, I make a 
motion that we proceed to elect a president for 
the year 1936. 

Coun. Kerrigan's motion was carried, and 
the clerk called the roll on election of President, 
with the following result: 

For John I. Fitzgerald: Coun. Agnew, Dowd, 
Finley, John I. Fitzgerald, Peter J. Fitzgerald, 
Gallagher, Gleason, Kerrigan, Kilroy, Roberts, 
Rosenberg, Selvitella, Wilson — 13. 

For Martin H. Tobin— Coun. Brackman, 
Doherty, McGrath, Mellen, George A. Murray, 
Norton, Tobin— 7. 

Chairman GALLAGHER— John I. Fitzgerald 
has received thirteen votes, Martin H. Tobin 
seven, and Councilor Fitzgerald is elected Presi- 
dent of the City Council for the year 1936. 
(Applause.) 

Chairman GALLAGHER appointed Coun. 
Kerrigan and Coun. Peter J. Fitzgerald a com- 
mittee to escort the newly elected president to 
the chair, and they performed the duty assigned. 
. President FITZGERALD— The Council will be 
m order. There is a paper from his Honor the 
Mayor. 



LOANS IN ANTICIPATION OF TAXES. 
The following was received : 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 6, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with the established 
practice of introducing at the first meeting of the 



Council in each year an order authorizing the 
borrowmg from time to time during the year of 
temporary loans in anticipation of taxes, I submit 
herewith an order authorizing the city treasurer 
to issue and sell during the current financial 
year temporary notes or certificates of indebted- 
ness of the city to the amount of $40,000,000. 
This amount is $12,000,000 less than the total 
authorized by the City Council for the year 1935, 
and S4, 500.000 less than the actual total of tem- 
porary loans issued during that year. 

I respectfully recommend the adoption of this 
order bj' your Honorable Body. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Ordered, That to provide temporarily money to 
meet the appropriations for the financial year 
1936, the City Treasurer issue and sell, at such 
time and in such amounts as he may deem best, 
notes or certificates of indebtedness of the City of 
Boston not exceeding §40.000,000 in the total, in 
anticipation of the taxes of the current municipal 
year; that all such notes or certificates of indebted- 
ness be dated the day the money for the same is 
received, be made payable with the interest thereon 
within one year of their date and bear interest 
from their date until the same are made payable 
at such rate as the City Auditor, the City Treas- 
urer, and the Mayor may determine. 

The rule was suspended and the order was 
given its first reading and passage, yeas 20, nays 0. 



LOAN ORDERS FOR P. W. A. PROJECTS. 
The following was received: - 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 6, 1936. 
To the Honorable the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — Your Honorable Body has passed 
orders approving, and loan orders, for each of 
the following P. W. A. projects: 

1. Construction and equipping of additions 
and alterations to English High .School, includ- 
ing cafeteria (P. W. A. Docket No. JIass. 1092); 
and 

2. Reconstruction of water pipe trestle at 
Chelsea North Bridge, including demolition of 
present structure and relaying of pipe (P. W. A. 
Docket No. Mass. 1123). 

Said orders have been approved by me; and 
said projects have been approved by the Em- 
ergency Finance Board and the Governor. 

The cit.v has received offers by the United 
.States of .America to aid in financing the construc- 
tion of each of the above projects by making 
grants to the City of Boston in the amount of 
45 per cent of the cost of each of such projects, 
but not to exceed, in any event, the following 
respective amounts: 

1. Additions and alterations to English 

High School $48,825 

2. Water pipe trestle at Chelsea North 
Bridge 14,490 

I am transmitting herewith to your Honorable 
Body the following: 

1. Copy of offer by the United States of 
America, 

2. Copy of rules and regulations (P. W. A. 
Form No. 179); and 

3. Form of order of acceptance of said offer 
relating to each of the above projects. 

Because prompt action is necessary to obtain 
the initial payment on account of the grant by 
the United States of America and to commence 
with the work on the above projects, I urgently 
recommend prompt consideration and passage 
by you of the accompanying orders. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Ordered, That the offer of the United States 
of America to the City of Boston to aid by way 
of grant in financing the reconstruction of water 
pipe trestle at Chelsea North Bridge, including 
demoUtion of present structure and relaying of 
pipe, a copy of which offer reads as follows: 

"Federal Emergency Administration of Public 

Works. .. 
Washington, D. C, December U, 1935. 

State File No. Mass. 1123. 
City of Boston, 
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. 

Subject to the Rules and Regulations (P. W. A. 
Form No. 179, July 22, 1935, as amended to date) 
which are made a part hereof, the United States 
of America hereby offers to aid in financing the 
reconstruction of water pipe trestle at Chelsea 
North Bridge, including demolition of present 
structure and relaying of pipe (herein called the 
"Project") by making a grant to the City of 
Boston in the amount of 45 per cent of the cost 
of the Project upon completion, as determined 
by the Federal Emergency Administrator of 
Public Works, but not to exceed, in any event, 
the sum of $14,490. 

United States op -America, 
Federal Emergency Administrator of Public 
Works, 
by Horatio B. Hackbtt. 

Assistant Administrator." 
be and the same is hereby in all respects accepted. 
And Further Ordered, That said City of Boston 
agrees to abide by all the rules and regulations 



relating to such grant, a copy of which rules and 
regulations were annexed to the Government's 
offer and made a part thereof. 

Ordered, That the offer of the United States of 
America to the City of Boston to aid by way of 
grant in financing the construction and equipping 
of additions and alterations to English High School 
including cafeteria, a copy of which offer reads as 
follows : 

"Federal Emergency Administration of 

Public Works. 
Washington, D. C, December 11, 1935. 
„., , „ State File No. Mass. 1092. 

City of Boston. 
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts. 

Subject to the Rules and Regulations (P. W A 
Form No. 179, July 22, 1935. as amended to date) 
w-hich are made a part hereof, the United States 
of America hereby offers to aid in financing the 
construction and equipping of additions and alter- 
ations to English High School, including cafeteria 
(herein called the "Project") by making a grant 
to the City of Boston in the amount of 45 per cent 
of the cost of the Project upon completion, as 
determined by the Federal Emergency Adminis- 
trator of Public Works, but not to exceed, in any 
event, the sum of $48,825. 

United States of America, 

Federal Emergency Administrator 

of Public Works. 

by Horatio B. Hackett, 
Assistant Administrator." 
be and the same is hereby in all respects accepted 
And Further Ordered, That said City of Boston 
agrees to abide by all the rules and regulations 
relating to such grant, a copy of which rules and 
regulations were annexed to the Government's 
offer and made a part thereof. 

The orders were severally passed, yeas 20 
nays 0. 



FREE MILK FOR UNDERNOURISHED 
CHILDREN. 

Coun. GLEASON offered the following- 
Ordered. That the Overseers of Public Welfare, 
through his Honor the Mayor, be requested to 
resume the distribution of free milk to the under- 
nourished children of Boston. 

The order was pa.ssed under a suspension of the 
rule. 



ACTING STATISTICS TRUSTEE. 

Notice was received of the appointment by the 
Mayor of Walter A. Murray to be an acting member 
and chairman of the Statistics Trustees. 

Placed on file. 



APPOINT.MENT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEES. 

Coun. DOWD offered the following: 

Ordered, That special committees to consider 
the subjects named in the title of the committee 
be appointed by the President, viz.: 

Constables, three members. 

Unclaimed Baggage, three members. 

License Fees, five members. 

Hospitals, five members. 

Parks and Playgrounds, five members. 

Public Safety, five members. 

Public Welfare, five members. 

Municipal Lighting, five members. 

Tax Title Property, five members. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



AMBULANCE STATION, CHARLESTOWN. 

Coun. MELLEN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the City Hospital Trustees, 

through his Honor the Mayor, be requested to 

establish an ambulance station in the Charlestown 

district. 

The order %vas passed under a suspension of the 

rule. 



REFERENCE OF 1935 MATTERS. 

Coun. BRACKMAN offered the following: 
Ordered, That all matters referred to this City 
Council by the City Council of 1935 be referred 
to the appropriate committees of this body, when 
appointed. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



PAYMENT TO DAVID McDONALD. 

Coun TOBIN offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby favors the enactment of legislation authoriz- 
ing said city to pay a sum of money to the mother 
of David McDonald, who was killed by a police 
officer of said city, provided that such legislation 
includes a referendum to the Mayor and City 
Council. 
Passed. 



72 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



COMMITTEE ON RILES. 

Coun. WU-SOX offerctl the followiiiR: 
Ordercil. Tliiit a I'lmiiiiittec of five ineiiil>ers be 

iippoiiited by tlie President to prepare and report 

rules for the pri><'ee<liiiKx of tlie City Council. 
Pa.sxed under ^u.'•I>ellsion of liie rule, and 

President FITZGKR.U.I) later nppoinled Couti. 

WiUon. Giillaelicr, Kerricm. I'<'t<r .1 Fitzgerald 

and AKnew Maid coniinittei' 



CHAIRM.AN OF EXECUTIVE CO.MMITTEE. 

President FITZGER.\LD appointed Coun' 
Gallagher ehairnmn of the Executive Committee- 



BIDS ON WEST ROXBURY ASH-REMOVAL 
CONTR.\CT. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Mayor of Boston be requested 
to consider the advi.sabilit.v of throwing out all 
bids on the West Hoxbury ash and garbage re- 
moval contract and ordering new bids in view of 
the allegations made public in regard to said bid. 

Coun. FINLEV — Mr. President, may I ask 
at this time that that order be referred to the 
E.xecutive Committee? 

The order was referred to the Executive Com- 
mittee. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE ELECTION. 

Coun. NORTON offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Mayor be requested to con- 
sider the advisability of requesting the Legislature 
to consider the matter of holding a new election 
for the Boston School Committee in November, 
1936, in view of the recent report of the Suflfolk 
County Grand Jury. 

President FITZGER.\LD— The order will be 
referred to the Committee on Rules, under Rule 12. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President 

President FITZGER.-VLD— No debate is in 
order. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, I think I 
have a right to discuss this order at the present 
time. 

President FITZGER.\LD— You can ask unani- 
mous consent to make a statement- 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, I will ask, 
then, unanimous consent to make a statement at 
this time. 

President FITZGER.\LD— Is there objection? 

Coun. AGNEW— Mr. President, I object to 
debate on that order. 

Coun. NORTON— Mr. President, this is simply 
an order, I might say 

President FITZGERALD— The gentleman is 
out of order. It is against the rules unless Coun- 
cilor Agnew withdraws his objection. 



CARETAKER FOR FEN.NO ESTATE. 

Coun. BRACKMAN offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to instruct the Public Buildijigs Commis- 
sioner to place a caretaker in charge of the so- 
called Fenno estate in Roxbury. 

Tlie order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



Coun. GALL.\GHER in the chair. 



On motion of Coun. FINLEY the Council ad- 
journed at 11.55 a. m., to meet on Monday, 
January 13, 1936, at 2 p. m. 



Tuesday, January, 7, 1936. 

Special meeting of the City Council in the 
Council Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m., for the 
purpose of drawing jurors. 

President FITZCKU.VLD presided, and a 
quorum was present. 

In the absence of the Mayor, the President 
appointed Coun, Selvitella and Kerrigan to preside 
at the jury box. 

Jurors were drawn as follows: 

Sixteen additional traverse jurors, Superior 
Criminal Court, to appear January 13, 1936: 

Edward T. Connolly, Ward I ; Henry De-\ngelis- 
Ward 1; David H. Mitchell, Ward 2; Leroy F, 
Wyiie, Ward 6; Cleorge A. Heger, Ward 7; Joseph 
Petkus, Ward II; Da\-id Diamond, Ward 14; 
Harry Sanders, Ward 14: John A. Bruce. Ward 18; 
Morris Sanderson. Ward 18; Robert L. Hunter, 
Ward 20; Thomas J. Tobin, \\ard 20; Frank E. 



Kenney. Ward 21; Howard A. Hammond, Ward 
22; William W. Johnston, Ward 22; Edward C. 
-McNulty, Ward 22. 

Eighty-two traverse jurors, Superior Criminal 
Court, to appear February 3, 1936: 

John Famolare. Ward I : John A. Hanley, 
Wardl: William L. McDonald. Ward I; Frank .*. 
Perry, Ward 1; Joseph J. Cavanaugh, Ward 2; 
Michael J. Clancliy, Ward 2; John C. Crowley, 
Ward 2; Robert .\I. Daley. Ward 2; John F. 
Flynn, Ward 2; Michael Bevilacqua, Ward 3; 
Michael Tedesco, Ward 3; Percy C. Simmons, 
Ward 5; Joseph S. Oliver, Ward 6; James J. 
Bresnehan. Ward 7; Bartholomew J. Connolly, 
Ward 7; Joseph H. Fallon. Ward 7; William E. 
Kolarik. Ward 7: Edward J. Moore. Ward 7; 
David Peters, Ward 7; Thomas W. Deltufo, 
Ward 8; Hurace H. Norton, Ward 8; James 
O'Connor. Ward 8; William H. Rupert, Ward 8; 
Edward J. Tibhetts, Ward 8: Raymond Goss, 
Ward 9; Donald P. MacKae. Ward 9; Benjamin 
HershofT. Ward 10: Peter J. Kilday. Ward 10; 
Harry F. Lougee, Ward 10; Harold O. Venstrom, 
Ward 10; Frank P. Broderiok. Ward 1 1; Francis P. 
Heaney. Ward 11; Frank J. .McCarthy, Ward 11; 
.\lbert Neale, Ward 11; James P. Tierney. Ward 
\ 11; Thomas S. Runci, VVard 11; James J. Welch, 
I Ward 11; Angus Cameron. Ward 13; Joseph A. 
Curran. Ward 13; Thomas H. Berch, Ward 14; 
Morris Trainor. Ward 14; John H. Burke, Ward 
15; Andrew T. -McFarland. Ward 15; Stanley F. 
O'Kane, Ward 15; William D. Renner, Ward 15; 
Earle R. Roswell, Ward 15; Charles W. .Savage, 
Ward 15; Judah E. Bellows. Ward 16; Percy W. 
Glover, Ward 16; Charles T. Graney, Ward 16; 
Patrick Lonergan, Ward 16; Charles F. McGrath, 
Ward 16; Thomas A. O'Rourke, Ward 16; George 
H. Roberts. Ward 16; Lester P. Sherman, Ward 16; 
Patrick J. Brennan, Ward 17; John J. Lombard, 
Ward 17; Charles D. Styrnbrough, Ward 17; 
William Wilson. Ward 17; Carl A. .\nderson. 
Ward 18; Hans C. Hall, Ward 18; John F. Ken- 
nedy. Ward 18; Henry W. Konetsky. Ward 18; 
Percival A. LittleBeld, Ward 18; William H. 
Monarch, Ward 18; Bernard Silber. Ward 18; 
Victor Weiman. Ward 18; John A. Hofling. Ward 
19; Otto Koenig, Ward 19; .\lbert E. Sprague, 
Ward 19; Earl A. Car\-ill, Ward 20; Albert B. 
Crawford, Ward 20; John E. Eckberg, Ward 20; 
George R. JIcNeil. Ward 20; Francis B. Nolan 
Ward 20; Eric Olson, Ward 20; Gustave W. 
Priesing, Ward 20; A. Russell Robertson, Ward 20; 
Leonard H. Travis, Ward 20; George E. Crosby, 
Ward 21; Eugene S. Howe. Ward 21; Charles 
Robinson, Ward 21. 

Ninety-eight traverse jurors. Superior Civil 
Court, to appear February 3, 1936: 

Wilfred M. CuUeton, Ward 1; Leo Duval, Ward 
1; James Boushell, Ward 2; Richard F. Crowley, 
Ward 2; Timothy J. Doherty. Ward 2; Francis L. 
Hawkins. Ward 2; Frank A. Hinde, Ward 2; 
Thomas Reddy. Ward 2; Generoso Fuaco, Ward 
3;_ Eugene Massolini. Ward 3; John J. Minot, 
Ward 3; Michael Tiorano. Ward 3; James J. 
Crowley, Ward 4; Charles M. Carney, Ward 5; 
Sylvester S. Gioia, Ward 6; Roland G. Glazier, 
Ward 6: Daniel G. Kendrick, Ward 6; James J. 
Ryan, Ward 6; James F. Shea. Ward 6; Richard G. 
Clayton, Ward 7; Louis F. Kunz. Ward 7; Leo J. 
MuUer, Ward 7; David Norton, Ward 7; .\lbert J. 
Walter. Ward 7; Thomas H. Brown. Ward 8; 
Peter J. Griffin, Ward 8; Arthur F. Kucherer, 
Ward 8; Thomas J. McGrail, Ward 8; John L. 
Powers. Ward 8; Leo F. Walsh, Ward 8; George R. 
Bell, Ward 9; Herbert J. Salter, Ward 9; William 
Shaw, Ward 9; Frank J. Kummel, Jr., Ward 10; 
Theodore R. Douglas. Ward 11; Jacob Gateman, 
Ward 11; Percy R. Nelson. Ward 11; Chalmer F. 
Pray, Ward 11; Patrick Smith. Ward 11; Daniel J. 
Coffey, Ward 12; .\braham Cohen, Ward 12; 
Frederick E. Hall. Ward 12; Barney John Harris, 
Ward 12; Hugh J. Coyne, Ward 13; Robert J. 
Kates. Ward 13; Joseph P. Kerrigan, Ward 13; 
Hugh F. Mains, Ward 13; Benjamin Welansky, 
Ward 13; John Middleton, Ward 14; Arthur W. 
Pearce, Ward 14; Matthew ^■. Ward. Ward 14; 
Patrick J. Kennedy, Ward 15; Robert V. Leonard, 
Ward 15; Frederick N. Worthen. Ward 15; -Axel F. 
Floodstrom, Ward 16; John T. Kennedy. Ward 16; 
Charies E. Mann, Ward 16; John F. O'Brien, 
Ward 16; Daniel S. O'Neill, Ward 16; ilaurice P. 
Broderick, Ward 17; Louis N. Daum, Ward 17; 
George T. Day. Ward 17; John Dolan, Ward 17; 
James A. McGuire. Ward 17; James Ironside, 
Ward 17; Harry Wassernian, Ward 17; Karl W. 
Battis, Ward 18; Lawrence Cataldo, Ward 18; 
Harold F. Dwyer. Ward 18; Joseph F. Forsyth, 
Ward 18; Justus A. Hatfield, Ward 18; Reginald 
L. Howard, Ward 18; Daniel H. O'Shea. Ward 18; 
Robert J. Zinck. Ward 18; Clarence M. Carlson. 
Ward 19; Thomas II. Donnelley, Ward 19; Carl 
Kornatis, Ward 19; Carl O. Roemer, Ward 19; 
Samuel C. .•\lexander. Ward 20; Harrison .\. 
Cutts. Ward 20; William F. Draheim, Ward 20; 
John E. Dunn, Ward 20; Emil Fiebelkon, Ward 20; 
James T. Forgie, Ward 20; Joseph H. Fruh. Ward 
20; James R. Haigh. Ward 20; .August R. Johnson, 
Ward 20; Martin Kelly, Ward 20; Frederick J. 
Mueller. Ward 20; Frederick H. Schlichting. Ward 
20; William J. Doube, Ward 21; Philip .S. Silbert, 
Ward 21; William J. Campbell. Ward 22; Reuben 
C. Gardeth, Ward 22; W. Irving Monroe, Jr., 
Ward 22: John G. Murray. Ward 22; Roy B 
Steward, Ward 22; Harry M". White, Ward 22. 

The drawing haN-ing been completed, the Council 
adjourned at 2.44 p. m., to meet on Monday, Janu- 
ary 13, 1936, at 2 p. m. 



LAND-TAKING IN WEST 
ROXBURY. 

The Mayor ha.s approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment, consisting of the discontinuance 
of a part of Dwinell street, West Ro.x- 
bury district, as a highway, at junction 
of Addington road, bounded and described 
as follows: 

A part of the highway named Dwinell 
street is hereby discontinued at junction 
of Addington road. 

Said part of said highway as hereby 
discontinued is bounded: 

Easterly and northerly by the easterly 
and northerly lines of said Dwinell 
street as hereby discontinued, sixty-one 
and 35-100 feet on a curve of t went j- -one 
and 68-100 feet radius; southeasterly 
by the northwesterly line of said Dwinell 
street as heieby established, thjrtj--eight 
feet; southerlj- and westerly by the north- 
erly and easterly lines of said Dwinell 
street as hereby established, forty-four 
and 46-100 feet on a curve of fifteen and 
71-100 feet radius; and northwesterly 
by the southeasterly line of Addington 
road as hereby established, thirty-eight 
feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines 
that no person sustains damages in his 
estate by the making of the public im- 
provement, consisting of the discontinu- 
ance of a part of Dwinell street, West 
Roxburj' district, as a highway, at junc- 
tion of Addington road, under the order 
of the Board of Januarj' 10, 1936, and 
awards no damages therefor. 



CONSTRUCTION WORK. 

The Mayor has approved the request 
of the Public Works Department for the 
following construction work: 

A surface drain of 18-inch pipe and 
seven catch-basins (W. P. A. Project 
65-14-4953, Work Project 5770) in Fair- 
mount avenue, between Highland street 
and Summit street, in the Hyde Park 
district, at an estimated cost of 820,000. 



NO COST CONTROL FOR REFUSE 
DISPOSAL. 

American cities on the whole may be 
clean housekeepers, but they don't know 
how much it is costing them to be clean 
or whether they are spending too much. 
Only a few cities are able to report 
accurately the unit cost of removing 
garbage and other refuse and of cleaning 
streets, according to the Public Adminis- 
tration Service of Chicago, 111., which 
further reports that at least 90 per cent 
of the cities in this country have no cost 
control over this service. 



RELIEF=ROLL EMPLOYEES FOR SNOW 
REMOVAL. 

It was good news to cities throughout 
the country when the Federal Emer- 
gency Relief Administration notified 
State Emergency Relief Administrations 
that men on relief rolls might be used 
for snow-removal projects in all com- 
munities where there was need for such 
labor. This action gave work to thou- 
sands of men who were in urgent need 
of help, and at the same time it aided 
materially in keeping streets and side- 
walks open for traffic in many com- 
munities where street cleaning depart- 
ments were financially unable to cope 
with the storm. 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



73 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1936. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Monday, February 3. 
Worcester, Wednesday, February 5. 
Boston, Monday, March 2. 
Fall River, Wednesday, March 4. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 5. 
Boston, Monday, April 6. 
Springfield, Wednesday, April 8. 
Boston, Monday, May 4. 
Worcester, Wednesday, May 6. 
Boston, Monday, June 8. 
Boston, Monday, September 14. 
Worcester, Wednesday, September 16. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 15. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 16. 
Boston, Monday, November 2. 
Lowell, Wednesday, November 4. 
Boston, Monday, December 7. 
New Bedford, Wednesday, December 9. 
New Bedford, Thursday, December 10. 

Rules for Examinations. 

All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent 
in the installation of wires, conduits, 
apparatus, fixtures and other appliances 
for carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat tor power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
years' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for carrying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persona desiring to be examined, 
either for a master or journeyman certifi- 
cate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be re- 
quired to obtain at least 70 per cent in 
order to obtain a certificate. 

Applicants who fail to obtain the re- 
quired 70 per cent will not be entitled 
to re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent, or who fail 
on the practical demonstration, will not 
be re-examined for a period of six 
months. 

Any person found referring to notes 
or books, or misbehaving during an ex- 
amination, will be debarred from that 
examination. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day- 

Stephen C. G.\rrity, 
Payson Smith, 
James M. Hurley, 
Albert Frank, 
Walter J. Kenefick, 
Stale Examiners of Eleclricians. 

For application blanks or other in- 
formation apply to State Examiners of 
Wectricians, Room 303, 14 Beacon St., 
Boston, Mass. 



URBAN POPULATION, APRIL, I, 1930. 

As defined by the Census Bureau, the 
urban population is, in general, that re- 
siding in cities and other incorporated 
places having 2,500 inhabitants or more, 
the remainder being classified as rural. 

The total urban population of the 
United States is 68,954,823 (34,154,760 
males and 34,800,063 females), of whom 
62,836,605 (31,162,570 males and 31,674,- 
035 females) are white; of these whites 
52,109,746 (25,520,483 males and 26,589,- 
263 females) are native; 33,497,232 (16,- 
515,816 males and 16,981,416 females) of 
these latter are of native parentage and 
18,612,514 (9,004,667 males and 9,607,847 
females) are of foreign or mixed parent- 
age; there are 10,726,859 (5,642,087 males 
and 5,084,772 females) foreign-bom 
white; there are 5,193,913 (2,479,158 males 
and 2,714,755 females) Negroes; other 
races, 924,305 (513,032 males and 411,273 
females). 

The urban population is 56.2 per cent 
of the total population of the country; 
native white, 54.6 per cent and foreign- 
born white, 80.3 per cent; Negroes, 43.7 
per cent. 

The total urban population of New 
England is 6,311,976 or 77.3 per cent of 
the total population of New England. 
Of the 4,660,339 native white, 2,089,031 
are of native parentage and 2,571,308 are 
of foreign or mixed parentage; foreign- 
born whites number 1,564,769; Negro, 
81,443; other races, 5,425. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



GOVERNMENT REPORTS ON ELECTRIC 
RATES. 

Two government bodies reported on 
electric rates in February. Indeed, the 
joint legislative committee of New York 
included gas as well as power and light 
rates, finding them all unfavorable to 
the consumer. This was on February 15, 
and twelve days prior to this the Elec- 
tric Rate Survey of the Federal Power 
Commission made public a set of com- 
parative tables showing the widely dif- 
fering rates effective on January 1, 1935, 
in the 191 cities of 50,000 or more, con- 
stituting 49 per cent of the residential 
customers in the United States. All 
communities of 1,000 or more will eventu- 
ally be covered by June 30 next. 

This latter survey, under the direction 
of William E. Mosher, shows that cities 
owning their own plants charge less than 
do the commercial utilities. In cities of 
100,000 or more having the lowest rates, 
thi/ was invariably the case. In these 
cities where rates were highest, Jackson- 
ville was the only municipally served 
city. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



To Taxpayers, 
Assessors' Notice, City Hall Annex, 
Boston, January 1, 1936. 
Attention is called to the Assessors' Notice 
poste<l upon City Hal] and various other 
places throughout the city, relative to mak- 
ing returns on personal property subject to 
taxation. Returns should be made not later 
than February 15. 

Edward T Kelly, 
Timothy W. Murphy, 
Michael J. Brophy, 

Assessors of Boston. 
(Jan. 4-11-18-25— rFeb. 1-8-15.) 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Toilet Paper. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing toilet paper to the 
various city departments. The bidder must use 
the form of proposal to be obtained at the office of 
the Superintendent of Supplies, 801 City Hall 
.\nnex, and the successful bidder must furnish a 
bond for one quarter the total estimated amount 
of the bid with a surety company authorized to do 
business in IVIassachusetts as surety for the faith- 
ful performance of the contract. There will be a 
charge of twenty cents (SO.:iU) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bid, with a certified check for $300, 
payable to and to become the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, must 
be left at the office of the Superintendent of Sup- 
plies, before 12 m.. Monday. ,Ianuary 27, 1936, at 
which time and place they will be publicly opened 
and read. A duplicate bid, witfiout check, must 
be left at the office of the City Auditor prior to 
the time named for opening bids. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject any 
or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to award the 
contract as he deems for the best interests of the 
city. .\1I contracts made subject to appropriations 
to meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Supperintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Uniforms to 
THE Fire Department. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing to the Fire Depart- 
ment, Bristol street, uniforms, as per specifications 
to be obtained at the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall .\nnex. There will he a charge of 
twenty cents (SO. 20) for each blank proposal taken 
out. Delivery to be made as required. The 
bidder must use the form of proposal to be obtained 
at said office, and the successful bidder must 
furnish a bond for one quarter the total estimated 
amount of the bid with a surety company author- 
ized to do business in Massachusetts as surety 
for the faithful performance of the contract. 
Bids, with a certified check for $200, payable to 
and to become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out, must be left at 
the office of the .Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall .A.nnex, before 12 m.. Thursday, 
January 30, 1936, at which time and place the 
bids will be publicly opened and read. A duplicate 
bid, without check, must be left at the oHice of 
the City Auditor prior to the time named for 
opening bids. The Superintendent reserves the 
right to accept or reject any or all bids, or any 
part of a bid. and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. All 
contracts made subject to appropriations to meet 
payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals fob Pig Lead. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing pie 
lead, as required, to the various city depart- 
men/ts. The bidder must use the form of pro- 
posal to be obtained at the office of the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, and the successful bidder must furnish 
a bond for one quarter the total estimated 
amount of the bid with a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts as 
surety for the faithful performance of the 
contract. There will be a charge of twenty 
cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal taken 
out. The bid, with a certified check for $200, 
payable to and to become the property of the 
City of Boston if the proposal is not carried 
out, must be left at the office of the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies before 12 m., Wednesday, 
January 29, 1936, at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and read. A 
duplicate bid, without check, must be left at 
the office of the City Auditor prior to the time 
named for opening bids. The Superintendent 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or 
all bids, or any part of a bid, and to award 
the contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the city. All contracts made subject to 
appropriations to meet payments thereunder. 
D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



74 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 18 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Ice Cream Mix. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
inmates proposals for furnishing ice cream mix 
to the Boston City Hospital and Long Island; 
The bidder must use the form of proposal to 
be obtained at the office of the Superintendent 
of .Supplies, Room 801, City Hall Annex, and 
the successful bidder must furnish a bond for 
one quarter the total estimated amount of the 
bid with a surety company authorized to do 
business in Massachusetts as surety for the faith- 
ful performance of the contract. There will be 
a charge of twenty cents (S0.20> for each blank 
proposal taken out. The bid, with a certified 
check for SlOO, payable to and to become the 
property of the City of Boston if the proposal 
is not carried out, must be left at the office of 
the .Superintendent of Supplies, before 12 m., 
Friday, January ,'51, 1936, at which time and 
place they will be publicly opened and read. 
A duplicate bid, without check, must be left at 
the office of the City .Auditor prior to the time 
named for opening bids. The Superintendent 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or all 
bids, or any part of a bid, and to award the con- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of the 
city. All contracts made subject to appropriations 
to meet payments thereunder, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan, 18,) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proi-osals kcb Furnishing Etheji. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proi>osals for furnishing to the 
various city department*, ether as per speci- 
fications to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. There icill he a charye of twenty 
rents ($0.iii) for each blank proposal tak<n 
out. The bidder mu-st leave his proposal with 
a certifie<i check for $200, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out, at the 
above office. A duplicate bid, without check, 
must be left at the office of the City Auditor, 
prior to the time named for opening bids. 
The bids will be publicly opened and read 
Monday, January 27, 1936, at 12 m., at Room 
801, City Hall Annex. The successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter of 
the total estimate<l amount of the contract with 
a surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract. The Superintendent | 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or I 
all bids, or any part of a bid, and to award i 
the contract as he deems for the best interestj \ 
of the city. All contracts made subject to 
appropriations to meet payments thereunder. 
D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



Proposals for Paper Drinking Cups. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing paper 
drinking cups, as required, to the various city 
departments. The bidder must use the form 
of proposal to be obtained at the office of 
the Superintendent of Supplies, Room i;01. 
City Hall Annex, and the successful bidder 
must furnish a bond for one quarter the total 
estimated amount of the bid with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract. There will be a charge of 
twenty cents (#0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bid, with a certified check for 
$200, payable to and to become the property 
of the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out, must be left at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, before 12 m., Mon- 
day, January 27, 193G, at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and read. A 
duplicate bid. without check, must be lot! 
at the office of the City Auditor prior to the 
time named for opening bids. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the beat 
interests of the city. All contracts made sub- 
ject to appropriations to meet payments there- 
under. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



Proposals for Furnisbinq Bank Gravel and 
Sand. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing bank 
gravel and sand to the various city depart- 
ments until December 31, 1936, dehveries to 
be made as re<iuired. The bidder nmst use 
the form of proposal to be obtained at the 
office of the .Superintendent of .Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall .\nnex, and the successful bid- 
der must furnish a bond for one quarter the 
total estimated amount of the contract with a 
surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract. There will be a 
charge of twentu-five cents (SO. 2.5) for each 
blank proposal taken out. Bids, with a certified 
check for $200, payable to and to become the 
property of the City of Boston if the proposal 
is not carried out, must be left at the above office 
before Wednesday, January 29, 1936, at 12 ni,, 
at which time and place they will be publicly 
opened and read. .\ duphcate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City .\uditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. The 
.Superintendent of Supplies reserves the right to 
accept or reject any or all proposals, or any part of a 
proposal, and to award the contract as he deems 
for the best interests of the city. All contracts 
made subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superititendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Sewer Brick. 
The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various city departments, sewer brick, to be 
delivered as required. The bidder must use 
the form of proposal to be obtained at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, and the successful bidder 
must furnish a bond for one quarter the esti- 
mated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract. There will be a charge of one 
dollar ($1.00) per set for each set of proposals 
taken out. Bids, with a certified check for 
$200, payable to and to become the property 
of the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out, at the above office, must be left 
at the office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, before 12 m., Tuesday, 
January 28, 1936, at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and read. A 
duplicate bid, without check, must be left 
at the office of the City Auditor prior to the 
time named for opening bids. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 
(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Sttpplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Sewer Pipe. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing the .Sewer 
Division, sewer pipe, to be delivered as required. 
The bidder must use the form of proposal to be 
obtained at the office of the Superintendent of 
Supplies, Room 801, City Hall Annex, and the 
,'iuccessful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
<|uarter the total estimated amount of the con- 
tract with a surety company authorized to do 
business in Massachusetts as surety for the faith- 
ful performance of the contract. There ivill be a 
charge of twenty cent.^ ($0.20) for each blank pro- 
posal taken out. Bids, with a certified check for 
$300, payable to and to become the property 
of the City of Bo.ston if the proposal is not carried 
out at the above office, must be left at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
.\nnex, before 12 m., Tuesday. January 28, 1936, 
at which time and place they will be publicly 
opened and read. .\ duplicate bid. without check, 
must be left at the office of the City .\uditor prior 
to the time named for opening bids. The .Superin- 
tendent re.serve.s the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to award 
the contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the city. .■VU contracts made subject to ap- 
propriations to meet payments thereunder. 
D. Frank Doherty. 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for White and Red Lead. 

The Supply Department of the City o€ Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing white 
and red lead, as required, to the various city 
departments. The bidder must use the form 
of proposal to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, and the successful bidder must 
furnish a bond for one quarter the total es- 
timated amount of the bid with a surety com- 
pany authorized to do business in Massachu- 
setts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract. There will be a charge of 
twenty cents (SO. 20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bid. with a certified check 
for $200, payable to and to become the prop- 
erty of the City of Boston if the proposal is 
not carried out, must be left at the office of 
the Superintendent of Supplies before 12 m., 
Wednesday, January 29, 1936, at which time 
and place they will be publicly opened and 
read. A duplicate bid, without check, must be 
left at the office of the City Auditor prior to 
the time named for opening bids. The Super- 
intendent reserves the right to accept or re- 
ject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and 
to award the contract as he deems for the 
best interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Rubber Coats to 
the Fire Department. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
Fire Department, Bristol street, rubber coats, 
as per specifications to be obtained ^t the 
Supply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, There will be a charge of twenty cents 
($0.20) for ea^h blank proposal taken out. 
Delivery to be made as required. The bidder 
must use the form of proposal to be obtained 
at said office, and the successful bidder must 
furnish a bond for one quarter the total 
estimated amount of the contract with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract. Bids, with a certified check 
for $200, payable to and to become the prop- 
erty of the City of Boston if the proposal 
is not carried out, must be left at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, before 12 m., Thursday 
January 30, 1936, at which time and place 
the bids will be publicly opened and read. 
A duplicate bid, without check, must be left 
at the office of the City Auditor prior to the 
time named for opening bids. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made sub- 
ject to appropriations to meet payments there- 
under. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON, 



SUPPLY DEP.\RTMENT, 



Proposals for Furnishing Metal Polish. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing to the various 
city departments, metal polish, as per specifica- 
tions to be obtained at the office of the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
There will be a charge of twenty cents (S0.20) for 
each blank proposal taken out. The bidder must 
leave his proposal with a certified check for $300, 
payable to and to become the property of the 
City of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the above office. .\ duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City -Auditor 

Crior to the time named for opening bids. The 
ids will be publicly opened and read Monday. 
January 27, 1936, at 12 m., at Room 801, City 
Hall .\nnex. The successful bidder must furnish 
a bond for one quarter of the total estimated 
amoimt of the contract with a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts as 
surety for the faithful performance of the contract. 
The Superintendent reserves the right to accept 
or reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid. and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best in- 
terests of the city. .\11 contracts made subject 
to appropriations to meet payments thereunder. 
D. Frank Doherty, 
(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



Jan. 18 



CITY RECORD 



75 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Industrial and Medicinal 
Gases. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing industrial 
and medicinal g^ses to the various city de- 
partments. The bidder must use the form of 
proposal to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, and the successful bidder must 
furnish a bond for one quarter the total es- 
timated amount of the bid with a surety com- 
pany authorized to do business in Massachu- 
setts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract. There will be a charge of 
twenty cents (.$0.20) for each blank -proposal 
taken out. The bid, with a certified check 
for $200, payable to and to become the prop- 
erty of the City of Boston if the proposal is 
not carried out, must be left at the office of 
the Superintendent of Supplies, before 12 m., 
Friday, January 31, 1936, at which time and 
place they will be publicly opened and read. 
A duplicate bid, without check, must be left 
at the office of the City Auditor prior to the 
time named for opening bids. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made sub- 
ject to appropriations to meet payments there- 
under. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Uniform Caps to 
THE Fire Department. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposjils for furnishing to the Fire De- 
partment. Bristol street, uniform caps, as per 
specifications to be obtained at the Supply Depart- 
ment, Boom 801, City Hall .Annex. There will 
be a charge of twenty cents {S0.2U) for each blank 
proposal taken out. Delivery to be made as 
required. The bidder must use the form of pro- 
posal to be obtained at said office, and the suceess- 
lu] bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter the 
total estimated amount of the bid with a surety 
company authorized to do busine.'is in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract. Bids, with a certified cheek 
for $100. payable to and to become the prop- 
erty of the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out. must be left at the office of the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, before 12 m., Thursday, January 30. 
1936. at which time and place they will be publicly 
opened and read. .-V duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the otiice of the City .Auditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. The 
Siiperintcndent reserves the right to accept or 
reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. .All contracts made sub- 
ject to appropriations to meet payments there- 
under. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE 
CITY OF BOSTON. 



Administration Building. 15 Beacon Street, 
Office op the Business Manager. 

Proposals for Rbbinding Books for the Bos- 
ton Public Schools. 

The School Committee of the City of Boston 
invites bids on rebindingr approximately 40,009 
books. Proposal forms are obtainable at the 
office of the Business Manager of the School 
Committee, tenth floor. 15 Beacon street. En- 
velopes containing proposals must be scaled 
and plainly marked "Proposal for Rebinding 
Books." The bid must be in duplicate. One 
copy signed by the bidder and accompanied 
by a certified check for $100, payable to the 
City of Boston, must be left at the office of 
the Business Manager on or before 12 o'clock 
m. on Tuesday. January 28, 1936. Copies filed 
with the Business Manager will be publicly 
opened and read at 12 o'clock m. of the day 
stated. The other copy also signed by the 
bidder, must be filed with the City Auditor, 
City Hall, Boston, Mass., previous to the time 
named for the opening of the bids. The School 
Committee reserves the right to reject any 
or all bids and to accept such bid as may be 
deemed best for the interests of the city. 
The successful bidder will be required to 
rarnish a bond for not less than 50 per cent 
of the estimated amount of the contract. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, 

B-wrineas Manager of the School Committee. 
(Jan. 18.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Erecting Fire Escapes at Long 
Island Hospital, Boston Harbor. 

The Commissioner of Institutions of the City 
of Boston invites proposals for erecting fire 
escapes at Long Island. Boston Harbor. A 
bond will be required for doing the work of 
a surety company approved by the Commis- 
sioner in the sum of 100 per cent of the con- 
tract price, to secure the due performance of 
the contract and the full protection of the 
city. Forms of proposals may be obtained at 
Room 809, City Hall Annex. Each proposal 
should be enclosed in an envelope, sealed, 
marked "Proposal for Erecting Fire Escapes 
at Long Island, Boston Harbor," and left at 
Room 809, City Hall Annex, before 12 m. of 
Tuesday, January 28, 1936, with a certified 
check for two hundred (200) dollars, payable 
to and to become the property of the city if 
the proposal, after acceptance, is not carried 
out. The proposals will then and there be 
publicly opened and read. Proposals must be 
made in duplicate, the sealed duplicate, with- 
out check, to be deposited by the bidder with 
the City Auditor previous to the time narprd 
for opening the bids. The Commissioner re- 
serves the right to reject any or all proposals 
or to award the contract as he deems best. 

The rate per hour of the wages to be paid 
to mechanics, teamsters, chauffeurs and labor- 
ers in the work to be performed under the 
contract shall not be less than the rate of 
wages in the schedule determined by the 
Commissioner of Labor and Industries of the 
Commonwealth, a copy of which schedule is 
annexed to the form of contract referred to 
herein. Copies of said schedule may be ob- 
tained without cost, upon application there- 
for at the office of the Institutions Depart- 
ment, 809 City Hall Annex. 

Frederic A. Washburn, M. D., 

(Jan. 18.) Commissioner. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Waste and 
Wiping Cloths. 

The Supply Department of the City oi 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to tne 
various city departments waste and wiping 
cloths as per specifications to be obtained at 
the office of the Superintendent of Supplies, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex. The bidder 
must leave his proposal with a certified check 
for $200, payable to and to become the prop- 
erty of the City of Boston if the proposal is 
not carried out, at the above office. There will 
be a chary e of twenty cents ($0.20) for each 
blank proposal taken out. A duplicate bid, 
without check, must be left at the office of 
the City Auditor prior to the time named for 
opening bids. The bids will be publicly opened 
and read Friday, January 31, 1936, at 12 m., 
at Room 801, City Hall Annex. The successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
of the total estimated amount of the contract 
with a surety company authorized to do busi- 
ness in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made sub- 
ject to appropriations to meet payments there- 
under. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 



Changes in Traffic Regul.\tions. 
Voted. That the Revised Traffic Rules and 
Regulations, as adopted by the Boston Traf- 
fic Commission on October 31, 1935, and on 
November 6, 1935, are amended as follows, 
effective January 27, 1936 : 

Section 24, Part 1, is amended by adding 
the following : 

Foss Street, Charlestown. 

From Chelsea street to Water street. 
Temple Street. 

From Derne street to Cambridge street. 
Section 41 is amended by adding the follow- 
ing: 

North Beacon Street, Brighton. 
At Parsons street. 

William P. Hickey, 
(Jan. 18-25.) Commissioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



PROPoaALS for Furni.shing Crushed Stone. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing crushed stone to 
the various city departments until December .31, 
1936, deliveries to be made as required. The 
bidder must use the form of proposal to be ob- 
tained at the office of the Superintendent of Sup- 
plies. Room 801. City Hall Annex, and the 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the total cstin-.2t3d amount of the con- 
tract with a surety company authorized to do 
business in .Massachusetts .as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract. There will be a 
charge of twentiz-five cents (SO.i.j) for ruck blank 
proposal taken out. Bids, with a certified check 
for $200. payable to and to become the property 
of the City of Boston if the proposal is not carried 
out, must be left at the above office before Thurs- 
day, January .30, 1936, at 12 m., at which time 
and place they will be publicly opened and read. 
-A duplicate bid, without check, must be left at 
the office of the City Auditor prior to the time 
named for opening bids. The Superintendent of 
Supplies reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all proposals, or any part of a proposal, 
and to award the contract as he deems for the 
best interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 
SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Portland Cement. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various city departments, Portland cement, as 
per specifications, to be delivered in such 
quantities as required. The bidder must use 
the form of proposal to be obtained at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, and the successful bidder 
must furnish a bond for one quarter of the 
total estimated amount of the bid with a 
surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachu-setts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract. There will be a 
char ye of forty cents {,$0..',0) for each set of 
proposals taken out. Bids, with a certified 
check for $300, payable to and to become the 
property of the City of Boston if the proposal 
is not carried out, must be left at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, before 12 m., Tuesday, 
January 28, 1936, at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and read. A 
duplicate bid, without check, must be left at 
the office of the City Auditor prior to the time 
named for opening bids. The Superintendent 
of Supplies reserves the right to accept or 
reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, 
and to award the contract as he deems for 
the best interests of the city. All contracts 
made subject to appropriations to meet pay- 
ments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Fdrnishing Lead Pipe. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing to the Water 
Division lead pipe, as per specifications, to be 
delivered in such quantities as required. The 
bidder must use the form of proposal to be ob- 
tained at the office of the Superintendent of 
.Supplies. Room 801, City Hall -Annex, and the 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter of the total estimated amount of the 
bid with a surety company authorized to do 
business in Massachusetts as surety for the 
faithful performance of the contract. There 
will be a charge of twenty cents ($0.20) for each 
blank proposal taken out. Bids, with a certified 
check for $200, payable to and to become the 
property of the City of Boston if the proposal 
is not carried out, must be left at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Rojm 801, City Hall 
Annex, before 12 m.. Wednesday, January 29, 
1936, at which time and place they will be publicly 
opened and read. .A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City Auditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. The 
Superintendent of Supplies reserves the right to 
accept or reject any or all proposals, or any part 
of a proposal, and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. All 
contracts made subject to appropriations to meet 
payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 18.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY. 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

Room 27, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 1100. 
FRrairadi'K W. Manskiklu, Mayor. 
Jo.sEJ'ii F. Mbllyn, Secretaru- 
William C. S. Hkalby. Astiatant Secretary. 
CvKiL c;. Cr.M.MiNi;s. ,\«ifiji(an( Secretary. 
Joil.N K. GiLMiiiii':, J|(., Aasiatant Secretary. 
EuWAItl) U. Lkk, Aaidiitant Secretary. 
hKHSMW J. Dunn, ABumtant Secretary. 
TituMAH K. ClMKNo, Asuuitant Secretary. 
Arthuk J. O'Kkkfe, Aenigtant Secretary- 
Mary L. Thomi-so.n, .AimMtant Secretary. 
John !•". Uilmoice, Chief Clerk (Acting). ^ 
Hehueiit L. McNary, Chief Licensing Division. 
Jii.su-ll .MiKoi.AJKWSKI. Aanialaiit. 
Mabtin J. CONROY, Meaaenger. 

CITY COUNCIL. 

Ward 1. Hi-nry Selvitellu, SO Orient avenue. 

Wiiril 2. James J. Melli-n, IS Tremont Bt. 

Ward 3. John I. KitzKerald, 7 Allen St. 

Ward 4. Gcortfe W. Roberts, 20 Hemenway 
street. 

Ward 5. Henry L. Shattuck, 15 River st. 

Ward 6. George A. Murray, 223 West 
Second street. 

Ward 7. John E. Kerrigan, 213 West Eighth 
street. 

Ward S. John F. Dowd, 22 Greenville st. 

Ward 9. Richard D. Gleason, IB Ruggles 
street. 

Ward 10. John J. Doherty, 67J Wyman st. 

Ward 11. James J. Kilroy, 1301 Columbus 
avenue. 

Ward 12. David M. Brackman, 89 Waumbeck 
street. 

Ward 13. Peter J. Fitzgerald, 39 Belfort st. 

Ward 14. Sidney Rosenberg, 576 Blue Hill 
avenue. 

Ward 15. Martin H. Tobin, 70 Wcstville st. 

Ward 16. John J. McGrath, 2 Glenrose road. 

Ward 17. Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr., 57 
Codman Hill avenue. 

Ward 18. Clement A. Norton, 34 Myopia' 
road. 

Ward 19. Peter A. Murray, 7 St. John st. 

Ward 20. James F. Finley, 231 Cornell st. 

Ward 21. James E. Agnew, 92 Wallingford 
road. 

Ward 22. HMward M. Gallagher, 21 Oak 
Square avenue. 

Clerk of Committees. 
John E. Baldwin, Room 66. City Hall. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

City Messenger. 
Edward J. Leary, Room 55, City Hall. Td. 
Lafayette 5100. 

ART DEPARTMENT. 
OflSce, Faneuil Hall. 
ARTHini A. Shurclipf, Secretary. 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayet*e 6100. 
Edward T. Kelly, Chairman. 
Timothy W. Murphy, Secretary. 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 
Room 20, City Hall, Tel. Lafayette 6100. 
Charles J. Fox, City Auditor. 
Daniel J. Falvby, Deputy City Audit^yr. 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOL 

BUILDINGS. 
Richard J. Lane, Chairman. 

Department of School Buildings. 
Office, 11 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6750. 
William W. Drummey, Superinterident of Con- 
struction. 
BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT. 
Fbbderic H. Fay, Chairman. 30 City HaB. 
H. Murray Pakulski, Secretary. TeL 
Lafayette 5100. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 
184 North street. Tel. Capitol 2126. 
William P. Hickby, CommissioTier. 
BUDGET DEPARTMENT. 
47 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Francis J. Murray, Commissioner. 
BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 901 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 6100. 
Edward W. Roemer, Building Commissioner. 
John H. Glover, Acting Clerk of Department. 

Board of Examiners. 
Office, 907 City Hall Annex. TeL Lafayette 

6100. 
Thomas K. Reynolds, Chairman. 
Mary C. Dowd, Secretary. 

Board of Appeal. 
Office, City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Joseph A. Tomasello, Chairman. 
James A. McElaney, Jr., Secretary. 

CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 
Room 81, City Hall. TeL Lafayette 6100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, City Clerk. 
John B. Hynes, .Assistant City Clerk. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD. 
Room 80, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 
Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 
EUSABBTH M. Herliry, Secretary. 



CITY RECORD. 

Office, 73 City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 
Frank H. Cushma.n, Editor. 
Joshua H. Jo.nes, Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 78. 
City HaU. 

COLLECTING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 200 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Joii.s F. DoilBKTY, CUy CoUector. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 111 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
David B. Shaw, Chairman. 
Daniel H. Rose, Commissioner. 
Fka.scis U. McKi.n.ney, Commissioner. 
Frederic E. Dowli.vg, Commissioner. 

FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Office. 24 School street. Tel. Lafayette 1622. 
E. Mark Sullivan, Chairman. 
Robert E. Cunnitf, Secretary. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters. Bristol street. South End. Tel. 

Kenmore 1100. 
Wire Division, 103 City Hall Annex. Tel. 

Lafayette 5100. 
Edward F. McLaughlin, Commissioner. 

, Executive Secretary. 

He.nry a. Fox, Chief of Department. 

Peter F. Dolan, Superintendent of Wire 

Division. 

THE FRANKLIN FOUNDATION. 
Office, Franklin Union, Appleton and Berkeley 

streets. Tel. Hancock 6590. 
Henry B. Sawyer, President. 
W. B. Russell, Director. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1107 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Frederic A. Washburn, M. D., Acting Com- 

miasioner. 
Joseph A. Cahalan, Secretary. 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 

City Hospital, 818 Harrison ave. Tel. Ken. 8600. 
Relief Hospital, Haymarket Sq. Tel. Cap. 0768. 
Relief Hospital, East Boston. Tel. E. B. 86. 
West Department, West Rox. Tel. Parkway 68. 
Sanatorium Division, 249 River St., Mattapan. 

Tel. Blue Hills 7900. 
Joseph P. Manning, President. 
James W. Manary, M. D., Superintendent. 

INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 808-811 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Frederic A. Washburn, M. D., Commissioner. 
Elizabeth G. Nelson, Chief Clerk. 
Child Whlpare Division. 
800 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Registration Division. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Long Island, Hospital Division. 
Long Island, Boston Harbor. Tel. President 
1871. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 

Room 1003, Lawyers Building, 11 Beacon 

street. Tel. Lafayette 6200. 
Henry E. Foley, Corporation CounaeL 
Margaret G. O'Neill, Secretary. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Library Building, Copley square. TeL 

Kenmore 1500. 
Frank W. Buxton, President of Trustees. 
Milton E. Lord, Director. 

LICENSING BOARD. 

Office, 1 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 2470. 
David T. Montague, Chairman. 
Louis Epple, Secretary. 

MARKET DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Quincy Market. TeL Capitol 6382. 
Frank J. Kihrnan, Superintendent. 

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

Men and Women, 25 Church street, TeL 

Liberty 8607. 
Samuel W. Warren, Director. 

OVERSEERS OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

Office, Charity Building. 43 Hawkins street. 

Tel. Capitol 8320. 
Temporary Home, Chardon street. TeL Laf. 

2337. 
Wayfarers' Lodge, 30 Hawkins street. TeL 

Lafayette 3198. 
James A. McMurry, Chairman. 
John C. L. Dowling, Executive Director. 

PARK DEPART.MENT. 

Office, 33 Beacon street. TeL Capitol 6940. 
WiLUAM P. Long, Chairman. 
Daniel J. Byrne, Secretary. 
Park, Public Grounds, Bath and Music 
DrvisiONS. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 

Cemetery Division. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 805 City Hall Annex. TeL Laf. 6100. 
Joii.N J. Douglass, Commiasioner. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters, 154 Berkeley street. Tel. Ken- 
more 6700. 
Eugene M. McSweeney, Commissioner. 
A.NDRBW J. Gorey, Secretary. 
Martin H. King, Superintendent. 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 174 North street. Tel. Lafayette 6363. 
William J. Casey, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1005 City Hall Amnex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
RoswELL G. Hall, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

C. J. Carven, Commissioner. Office, 509 City 
Hall Annex. TeL Lafayette 5100. 

John J. Connelly, Secretary and Chief Clerk. 
Room 509, City Hall Annex. TeL Laf. 6100. 

Bridge and Ferry Division. 
Leo B. Reilly, Division Engineer. Office, 502 
City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Highway Division. 

Joshua Atwoou, Divusion Engineer. Office, 

501 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Sanitary Division. 

Adolph J. Post, Division Engineer. Office, 

501 City Hall Annex. TeL Lafayette 5100. 

Sewer Division. 

George W. Dakin, Division Engineer. Office, 

701 City HaU Annex. TeL Lafayette 5100. 

Water Division. 
Daniel M. Sullivan, Division Engineer. Office, 
607 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 6100. 

Water Income Division. 
James A. McMurry, Division Engineer. Office. 
604 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 

REGISTRY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1008 City Hall Annex. TeL Laf. 5100. 
Hilda H. Quirk, Registrar. 

RETIREMENT BOARD. 

Room 65, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, Chairman. 
J. George Heruhy, Secretary. 
Willlam D. Kenny, Executive Officer. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Office, 15 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 5500. 

Frederick R. Sullivan, Chairman. 

Ellen M. Cronin, Secretary. 

Patrick T. Campbell, Superintendent of 

Schools. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, Business Manager. 

SINKING FUNDS DEPARTMENT. 

Room 20, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Eliot Wadsworth, Chairman. 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 60 City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Charles H. Carey, Commissioner. 

STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 76 City HalL Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Walter A. Mubray, Acting Chairman. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Secretary. 

STREET LAYING-OUT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 401 City HaU Annex. 

Commissioners, Owen A. Gallagher, Chair- 
man; Walter A. Murray; Thomas A. Fitz- 
gerald ; Cornelius A. Reardon, Secretary. 

SUFFOLK, COUNTY OF. 

Offices, Court House, Pembcrton square. Td. 

Capitol 0351. 
William J. Foley, District Attorney. TeL 

Capitol 9500. 
John A. Khliher, Sheriff. Tel Capitol 2451. 
W. T. A. Fitzgerald, Register of Deeds. TeL 

Capitol 0519. 
Arthur W. Sullivan, Register of Probate. 

TeL Capitol 9110. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 801 City HaU Annex. TeL Laf. 5100. 
D. Frank Doherty, Superintendent. 
TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 1 Beacon st., 7th floor. TeL Capitol 5860. 
Thomas F. Sullivan, Chairman. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Room 21, City HalL TeL Lafayette 5100. 

John H. Dorset, Treasurer. 

Arthur F. Swan, Assistant Treasurer. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 105 City HaU Annex. Tel. L^f. 6100. 
James A. Sweeney, Sealer. 



CRT OF BOSTON PBINTINQ DCPASnCHMT 



CITY RECORD 

Offictal Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol. 28. Saturday, January 25, 1936. No. 4 



MAYOR MANSFIELD PRESENTS TO GENERAL COURT SEVERAL MEASURES 
SEEKING BETTER GOVERNMENT FOR BOSTON — AMONG BILLS LISTED 
ARE: ONE TO TAX FEDERAL LAND WHICH WAS CONSTITUTIONALLY 
EXEMPT; ANOTHER FOR NAMING OF POLICE COMMISSIONER BY MAYOR; 
ABOLITION OF TAX LIMIT; REIMBURSEMENT OF CITIES AND TOWNS FOR 
WELFARE AND RELIEF DISBURSEMENTS — FOR STUDY OF COUNTY GOV= 
ERNMENT; FOR RELOCATING BOUNDARY LINES FOR SUFFOLK COUNTY 
WITH CHELSEA, REVERE AND WINTHROP OUT, AND ALSO A MEASURE 
SEEKING A GREATER BOSTON UNDER A BOROUGH SYSTEM — UNPAID 
COMMISSIONS WOULD STUDY AND RECOMMEND ON THESE SUBJECTS IF 
LAWS ARE PASSED. 

The following is a list of and brief statement concerning legislation petitioned for before the General Court 
by the Mayor of Boston, January 9, 1936: 

A. Taxation of Federal Land Not Constitutionally Exempt. 

An Act Relative to Property Exempt from Taxation. 
Note.— The present statutes of the Commonwealth exempt from local property taxation all propertj-- of the 
United States. Taxation by cities and towns of Federal land owned and used for housing projects is thus rendered 
impossible. This creates a danger of withdrawing substantial amounts of property from taxation and increases 
the burden of other property owners. The petition seeks legislation abolishing the statutory exemption and leaving 
subject to local taxation Federal property which is not exempt under the Federal Constitution from taxation. 

B. Police Commissioner to be Appointed by the Mayor. 

An Act Providino for the Appointment by the Mayor of a Police C^ommissioner for the City of Boston. 

Note.— Petition seeks legislation giving the Mayor of Boston power to appoint a Police Commissioner for 

the city. 

C. Abolishing of City Tax Limit and Veto Power Over School Appropriations. 

An Act Abolishing Tax and School Appropriation Limits for the City of Boston. 

Xote.— This petition seeks legislation abolishing City of Boston tax limit and the School Committee appro- 
priation limit; leaves appropriating powers for school purposes in the School Committee but provides that the 
Mayor shall have the same power of veto of school appropriations that he has over appropriations by the City 
Council. 

D. Reimbursement of Cities and Towns for Welfare and Other Relief Disbursements. 

An Act Relative to the Reimbursement of Cities and Towns for Aid, Support and Relief Given by Them 

TO Certain Aged Citizens and Other Persons. 
Note.— Petition seeks legislation dividing the burden of carrying welfare and other relief disbursements 
to persons having settlements in the Commonwealth equally between the cities and towns where such persons 
have their settlements and the Commonwealth. The purpose of the suggested change is to relieve in part real 
estate of the burden of relief which it now bears. 

E. Discount for Early Tax Payments. 

An Act Relative to the Allowance of Discount on Taxes Paid Before the Date Upon Which Interest 

Becomes Payable for the Nonpayment Thereof. 
Note.— Petition seeks legislation allowing cities and towns to give a discount for prepayment of taxes for 
the purpose of inducing early payment and thus to lessen the amount of interest which cities and towns must pay on 
temporary loans. {Continued on page 79.) 



78 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 




"O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 

queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship- 

tecminK plain ol the ocean. 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene, 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 

unselfish devotionl" 
From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Room 73, City 

HaU. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City HaU. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies . 



$2.00 Per Year 
10 cents 



IN ADVANCE 

STREET AGENCIES 

Old South News-Stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 

A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the Citv Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
January' 27, 1936, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month. 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in wTiting to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 



public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasoline, oil 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE BosTO>f Traffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traflBc on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To THE He.\lth Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To THE Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue. Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 
charges made for such service. Applica- 



tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public baths 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To THE School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools in the city. 

To THE DeP.\RTMENT OF ScHOOL BUILD- 
INGS, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To THE Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To THE Statistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To the Wire Division of the Firb 
Dep.artment, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection (rf 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To THE Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



For the week ending January 18, 1936: 
Population as of July, 1935, Massa- 
chusetts State Census, 817,713; popula- 
tion estimated July, 1935, United States 
Census Bureau, 801,880; number of 
deaths (stillbirths excluded): Residents, 
191; nonresidents, 44; total, 235. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 15.24; nonresidents deducted, 
12.38. 



MORTALITY REPORT. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 



Last week, 18.48; corresponding week 
last year, 14.98. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one j'ear, 16; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 5; sixty vears and over,- 129. 
Total deaths: Male, 136; female, 99; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 130; 
deaths of colored, 9. 



REPORTABLE DISEASE.S: CASES AND DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 


Cases and Deaths i 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 18. 1936. 


Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 19, 1935. 




Cases. 


Deaths. 


Cases. 


Deaths. 


.interior poliomyelitis 


1 

4 

66 
4 

68 
109 

25 
3 
3 
7 


1 
21 

6 

1 


5 

5 

1 

46 

33 

25 

1 

1 

44 

1 




Diphtheria 





Encephalitis lethargica 





Influenza 


4 


Measles 




Meninfiitis epidemic 





Pneumonia (lobar) 


20 


^Scarlet fever 


2 


Tuberculosis (pulmonary) (8 cases childhood type T. B.) 

Tuberculosis (other forms) 


8 


Typhoid fever 





W hooping cough 










* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



79 



LEGISLATION PETITIONED BY 
MAYOR MANSFIELD. 

(Continued from page 77.) 

F. County. 

1. Resolve Providing for the Es- 
tablishment OF A Special Unpaid 
Commission to Study the General 
Subject of County Government 
in the Commonwealth. 

Note. — Petition requests the establish- 
ment of a special unpaid commission to 
study the entire system of county govern- 
ment in the Commonwealth; to consider 
whether it would be in the public interest 
to transfer all or part of existing functions 
now performed by counties to the Com- 
monwealth or to municipal governments 
and what methods of administrative and 
financial control should be adopted to 
promote greater efficiency and economy 
in the performance of functions of county 
government. 

2. Resolve Providing for the Ap- 
pointment OF A SPECI.1.L Unp.UD 
Commission to Study the Desir- 
ability OF Re-establishing the 
Boundary Lines of County of 
Suffolk, by Detaching therefrom 
the Territories of the Town of 

WiNTHROP and the CitIES OF 

Revere and Chelsea. 
Note. — At the present time Suffolk 
County is comprised of the town of Win- 
throp, and the cities of Chelsea and 
Revere and Boston. Winthrop, Chelsea 
and Revere derive the benefits of Suffolk 
County government, but the entire finan- 
cial burden of the government thereof is 
borne by the taxpayers of Boston. This 
is neither just nor equitable to the tax- 
payers of Boston. To remedy this situa- 
tion this petition requests establishment 
of a special unpaid commission to study 
desirability of detaching Winthrop, Chel- 
sea and Revere from Suffolk County, and 
of attaching them to another county or 
counties, or creating a new county to be 
compsode of Winthrop, Chelsea and 
Revere. 

Q. Greater Boston. 

Resolve Providing for the Establish- 
ment OF A Special Unpaid Com- 
mission to Study the Desirability 
of Enlarging the Territorial 
Boundaries of the City of Boston 
and Incorporating with said City 
Certain Other Cities and Towns, 
Under one Municipal Govern- 
ment or Under a Borough System. 
Note. — Petition seeks the establishment 
of a special unpaid commission to study 
the desirability of the creation of a 
greater Boston by enlarging the terri- 
torial Umits of Boston, by incorporating 
Boston and the forty-three cities and 
towns of the Metropolitan district into 
one municipal government or under a 
borough system. 

H. Collection of Existing Excise 
Taxes upon Motor Vehicles. 

An Act to Facilitate the Collection 
OF Excise Tajxes Assessed and 
Levied Upon Motor Vehicles. 
Note. — Petition seeks legislation analo- 
gous to that now in force in Connecticut 
which would facilitate motor vehicles 
excise collections. No additional tax is 
suggested. 

I. Further Distribution of Race 
Track Receipts by the Common- 
wealth. 

An Act Relative to the Distribution 
TO the Cities and Towns of the 



Receipts Paid into the State 
Treasury Under the Act Author- 
izing the Licensing of Horse and 
Dog Races on Which the Pari- 
mutuel System of Betting Shall 
BE Permitted. 
Note. — Petition seeks a 50 per cent 
instead of the present 25 per cent dis- 
tribution by the Commonwealth of such 
receipts collected by it. 

J. Miscellaneous Special Legislation. 

1. Tax Limit for 1936. 
An Act Relati\'e to Appropriations by 
THE City of Boston for Munic- 
ipal Purposes. 
Note. — Petition seeks the annual estab- 
lishment of a tax limit for the City of 
Boston as a basis for appropriations for 
the year 1936. If the tax limit is not 
abolished this legisUition will, of course, be 
necessary. 

2. Civil Service. 
An Act Authorizing the City of Bos- 
ton TO Provide for the Re- 
appointment TO Similar Positions 
without Civil Service Examina- 
tion .\nd \\ith Retention of Rights 
to Retirement with Pension of 
Employees of Departments 
Abolished in Whole or in Part. 
Note. — Petition seeks legislation which 
would enable the City of Boston to pro- 
vide in a reorganization or consolidation 
ordinance that all of the employees of any 
department or division abolished should 
be reappointed to similar positions with 
similar status in any new department or 
division established by the reorganization 
or in any existing department or division 
without civil service examination or 
enrollment. 

3. Publication of List of Officials 

AND Employees. 
An Act Relati\T} to the Preparation 

AND VeRIFIC.\TION OF LiSTS OF 

0fficl\ls AND Employees of the 
City of Boston and County of 
Suffolk. 
Note. — Petition seeks legislation doing 
away with the requirement of publishing 
every two years a copy of the list of 
officials and employees of Boston and 
Suffolk County. The Legislature some 
time ago did away with the requirement 
that such a list of state officials and 
employees be published. The require- 
ment that such a list be published every 
two years involves a needless expense to 
the taxpayers of Boston, is never up to 
date, owing to the numerous changes 
which constantly take place, and is open 
to use by anyone who may desire to harass 
persons whose names appear therein. 

4. Inspection op Wires. 
An Act to Further Facilitate the 
Inspection of Wires in Buildings 
IN the City of Boston. 
Note. — Petition seeks legislation which 
will enable the Fire Commissioner to con- 
trol more effectively the unpermitted use 
of wires for the distribution of electric 
current. 

5. Removal of Wires. 
An Act to Further Provide for Re- 
moving or Placing Underground 
Certain Wire and Electric Appli- 
ances IN THE City of Boston. 
Note. — Petition seeks legislation author- 
izing the Fire Commissioner to continue 
for five years more to remove poles 
from the streets of Boston and bury wires 
underground. 



K. Miscellaneous General Legisla- 
tion. 

1. Health Regulations. 

An Act Relative to Violations of 
Reasonable Health Regulations 
Adopted by Boards of Health. 
Note. — This petition seeks the enact- 
ment of legislation which will enable 
Boards of Health more effectively to 
enforce reasonable health regulations 
adopted by them under the provisions of 
section 31 of chapter one hundred and 
eleven of the general laws, by providing 
a penalty for a violation of such health 
regulations in cases where no such 
penalty is otherwise provided. 



2. Welfare Matters. 

(a) .\n Act Requiring the Furnishing 
OF Information to Local Boards 
OF Public Welfare. 

Note. — This legislation seeks an amend- 
ment of existing law so as to require 
employers to disclose the wages or com- 
pensation earned by persons requesting 
or receiving relief. 

(6) An Act Relating to the Reim- 
bursement OF Cities and Towns 
by the Commonwealth for the 
Care of Sick Persons. 

Note. — This petition seeks legislation 
to increase the amount which the Com- 
monwealth may pay to cities and towns 
for the care of sick persons who are 
charges of the Commonwealth and are 
cared for in city or town hospitals from 
$10.50 to $17.50 per person a week, an 
amount nearer to the cost in such hospitals. 

(c) An Act Relative to the Recovery 
OF Charges for the Support of 
Certain Patients Admitted to 
the Pondville State Hospital. 

Note. — Petition requests changes in the 
law relating to the Pondville Hospital, a 
State institution, and deals with matters 
of charges for care at that institution. 

(d) An Act Relative to the Giving 
OF Notice of Temporary Aid 
Rendered to Certain Persons 
and to the Reimbursement of 
Cities and Towns Therefor and 
Relative to the Question of 
Settlement of Such Persons. 

Note. — The present law provides for the 
furnishing by towns and cities of tem- 
porary aid to persons not having a settle- 
ment in the Commonwealth and for 
notification to the State Department of 
Public Welfare of aid so rendered and 
such towns and cities are entitled to be 
reimbursed by the Commonwealth for aid 
so rendered. There is, however, no pro- 
vision requiring the State Department to 
notify towns and cities that it questions 
the settlement status of persons aided. 
Because of this, municipalities have in 
many instances lost their right to reim- 
bursement for expenses so incurred. 
This legislation requires the State De- 
partment to deny the settlement status 
within sixty -days of notice and unless 
settlement is so denied would bar the 
state from questioning such settlement 
status. The legislation proposed would 
permit the state to make denial subse- 
quent to sixty days, and enable towns and 
cities to make similar denials subsequent 
to one month after notice so as to more 
equitably protect the state and munici- 
palities in such cases. 



80 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



3. Tax Collection Matte hs. 
(a) An A<t Kelatinq to Sales ok 
Real Estate kok the Nonpayment 
OF Taxes ArrEU the Assignment 
OF A Tax Title Held hv a City ok 
Town. 
jVo<e. — This petition seeks legislation 
Xiving to cities and towns after the assign- 
ment of tax titles held by them all the 
rights and powers to take or sell the real 
eshite affected thereby for the nonpay- 
ment of taxes, which they would have 
p )sscssed had the city or town never been 
the holder of such tax titles. This legis- 
lation would clarify existing law. 

(/)) .Vn Act Rel.\tive to the .Assess- 
ment OF Taxes ox Land Taken or 
Purchased hy a City or Town. 
Note. — An assignment divests a city or 
town of its tax title and the city or town 
should have all the rights to make assess- 
ments thereafter which it ordinarily has. 
The legislation petitioned for will clarify 
this situation. 

(c) -\x Act Relative to Liens Upon 
Real Estate and Taxes or Other 
Ch.\rges. 

A^oie.— This petition seeks to clarify the 
law with regard to the preservation of 
the liens of cities and towiis upon real 
estate for unpaid taxes. 

(d) An Act Rel.\tive to Liens for 
Taxes on Real Est.vte Taken by 
Right of Eminent Domain. 

Note. — Last year the Legislature pro- 
vided for the protection of the hens of 
municipalities for unpaid taxes in the 
event of taking by eminent domain. 
This petition seeks legislation which will 
protect not only the liens for taxes but 
also hens for betterment assessments and 
other charges. 

(e) An Act Relative to Certain 
Expenses of the L.^^d Court. 

Note. — Under existing law the city is 
required to provide books, printed blank 
forms, etc., for the Land Court. The 
volume of business in the Land Court has 
been greatly increased by the foreclosure 
of tax titles by cities and towns and is 
hkely to continue to increase. Moneys 
received by the court as fees are paid 
to the State Treasurer. The Land Court 
is not a county com-t and its jurisdiction 
is state-wide. This petition seeks legis- 
lation by which the expenses of the Land 
Court for the foregoing will be borne by 
the Commonwealth. 



LAND=TAKINQ in EAST BOSTON 
AND CHELSEA. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the widening, reloca- 
tion and construction of Chelsea street 
and Chelsea Street Bridge, East Boston 
and Chelsea, as a highway, from south of 
Addison street, East Boston district, to 
Eastern avenue, Chelsea, bounded and 
described as follows: 

The highway named Chelsea street is 
hereby w^idened, relocated and ordered 
constructed, from south of .Vddison 
street. East Boston district, to Eastern 
avenue, Chelsea. 

For the making of the aforesaid im- 
provement, an ea.sement for street pur- 
poses is hereby taken in the following 
described lands, exclusive of trees or 
structures standing upon or affi.xed 
thereto: 



A parcel of land, suppo.sed to belong to 
the Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, In- 
corporated, bounded: 

Easterly by the easterly line of Chelsea 
street, as established under this order, 
two hundred and one and 2-100 feet 
on a curve of four hundred sixty-three 
and 32-100 feet radius; westerly by 
another part of Chelsea street, one 
liundred seventy-nine and 83-100 feet 
on a curved line; northwesterly by land 
hereinafter described as taken from 
owners unknown, thirty-seven and 94-100 
feet, containing twenty-two hundred and 
forty-four square feet, more or less. 

.V parcel of land, owners unknown, 
bounded: 

Southerly by Chelsea street, fifty and 
80-100 feet; northwesterly by land 
suppo.sed to belong to the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, seventy-four and 43-100 
feet; easterly by the easterly line of 
Chelsea street, as established under this 
order, fifty-five and 22-100 feet, on a 
curve of four hundred sixty-three and 
32-100 feet radius, and southeasterh^ by 
land hereinbefore described as taken 
from Socony-Vacuum Oil Company, In- 
coporated, thirt\'-seven and 94-100 feet, 
containing twenty-eight hundred and 
thirty-nine square feet, more or less. 

A parcel of land, supposed to belong 
to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
bounded: 

Southeasterly by land hereinbefore 
described as taken from owners unknown 
and by Chelsea street, seventy-seven and 
76-100 feet; westerly by the westerly line 
of Chelsea street, as established under this 
order, fifty and 60-100 feet; southwest- 
erly by the southwesterly line of Chelsea 
street, as established under this order, 
sixty-one and 18-100 feet; northwesterly 
by Pierhead and Bulkhead line, seventy- 
two and 11-100 feet; northeasterly by 
the northeasterly line of Chelsea street 
as established under this order, seventy- 
eight and 51-100 feet; and easterly by 
the easterly line of Chelsea street as estab- 
lished under this order, twenty-two and 
93-100 feet, containing seventy-four hun- 
dred and fourteen square feet, more or 
less. 

A parcel of land, partly situated in 
Chelsea, supposed to belong to the Com- 
monwealth of Massachusetts, bounded: 

Southeasterly by land hereinbefore 
described as taken from the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, seventy-two 
and 11-100 feet; southwesterly by the 
southwesterly line of Chelsea street, as 
established under this order, three hun- 
dred thirty-one and 56-100 feet; north- 
westerlj' by Pierhead and Bulkhead line, 
seventj'-five and 11-100 feet; and north- 
easterly by the northeasterly line of 
Chelsea street, as estabUshed under this 
order, three hundred fortj'-onc and 46-100 
feet, containing twenty-three thousand 
five hundred and fiftj'-six square feet, 
more or less. 

A parcel of land, situated in Chelsea, 
supposed to belong to the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, bounded: 

Southeasterly by land hereinbefore 
described as taken from said Common- 
wealth, seventy-five and 11-100 feet; 
southwesterly by the southwesterly line 
of Chelsea .street, as established under 
this order, two hundred and thirty-six 
and 90-100 feet; southerly by the south- 
erly line of Chelsea street, as established 
under this order, one hundred and 21-100 
feet on a curve of forty and 31-100 feet 
radius; westerly by Eastern avenue, one 
hundred eighty-nine and 97-100 feet; 
northerly by land hereinafter described 
as taken from the American Oil Com- 
pany, thirty-four and 22-100 feet; and 



northeasterly by the northeasterly line 
of Chelsea street, as established under this 
order, three hundred sixty-three and 
14-100 feet, containing twenty-nine thou- 
sand one hundred thirty-one square feet, 
more or less. 

A parcel of land, situated in Chelsea, 
supposed to belong to the American Oil 
Company, bounded: 

Southerly by land hereinbefore de- 
scribed as taken from the Commonwealth 
of MassachiLsetts, thirtj'-four and 22-100 
feet; westerly bj' Eastern avenue, seventy- 
seven and 42-100 feet; easterly by the 
easterly line of Chelsea street, as estab- 
lished under this order, sixty-five and 
56-100 feet; and northeasterly by the 
northeasterly line of Chelsea stieet, as 
established under this order, twenty-two 
and 10-100 feet, containing eight hun- 
dred and sixty-five square feet, more or 
less. 

Trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed to the aforedescribed land shall be 
removed therefrom within sixty days 
following a notice of the city's intention 
to enter upon said land for the purpose of 
constructing said improvement. 

Said Chelsea street as hereby widened 
and relocated is bounded: 

Southerly by another part of Chelsea 
street, seventy feet; westerly by the west- 
erly line of said Chelsea street as hereby 
widened and relocated, two hundred 
thirty-six and 99-100 feet on a curve 
of three hundred ninety-three and 32-100 
feet radius; southwesterly by the south- 
westerly line of said Chelsea street as 
hereby widened and relocated, six hundred 
twenty- nine and 64-100 feet; southerly 
by the southerlj' line of said Chelsea 
street as hereby widened and relocated, 
one himdred and 21-100 feet on a curve of 
forty and 31-100 feet radius; westerly 
by Eastern avenue, tw^o hundred sixty- 
seven and 39-100 feet; easterly by the 
easterly line of Chelsea street as hereby 
widened and relocated, sixty-five and 
56-100 feet on a curve of one hundred 
feet radius; northeasterl}' by the north- 
easterly line of Chelsea street as herebj' 
widened and relocated, eight hundred five 
and 22-100 feet; and easterly by the 
easterly line of said Chelsea street as 
hereby widened and relocated, two 
hundred seventj'-nine and 17-100 feet, 
on a curve of four hundred sixty-three 
and 32-100 feet radius. 



CLAIMS ALLOWED. 

The Ma3'or, upon recommendation of 
the Corporation Counsel, has approved 
the following claims: 

Cliloe Carry's Food Shop, 481A Ge- 
neva avenue, Dorchester, in the sum of 
S2, as refund on awning permit for 
which the fee was paid twice. 

Charles P. Abbott, 60 State street, Bos- 
ton, in the sum of S56, as compensation 
for damage to automobile caused by 
striking an unlighted traffic beacon on 
Lewis street, East Boston, on the way 
to the South Ferry, June 12, 1934. 



CONSTRUCTION WORK. 

The Maj'or has approved the request 
of the Public Works Department for the 
following construction work: 

A sanitary sewer of 10-inch pipe and a 
surface drain of 10-inch pipe in Haven 
avenue, between 641 feet southwest of 
Blue Hill avenue (from existing sewer) 
and 50 feet southwesterly, in the Dor- 
chester district, at an estimated cost of 
S700. 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



81 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Fire Department. 

Advertises for proposals for remodeling 
uniform sack coats for the Fire Depart- 
ment. Sui'ety bond will be required in a 
sum equivalent to 40 per cent of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the Fire 
Commissioner, 50 Bristol street, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of .'5200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, February 5, at 
12 m. 

Institutions Department. 

Advertises for proposals for erecting fire 
escapes at Ijong Island Hospital, Boston 
Harbor. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to the full amount of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Institutions Department, Room 809, 
Cit}- Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
.$200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 28, at 12 m. 

School Committee. 

Advertises for proposals for rebinding 
books of the Boston public schools. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 50 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Business 
Manager, School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of .SlOO, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
-Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 28, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
supplies and equipment for physical 
education in the schools. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
50 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Business Manager, School 
Committee, 15 Beacon street, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied bj' certified check in 
the sum of 1550, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, February 6, at 12 m. 

Supply Department. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
toilet paper to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum of 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply De- 

gartment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
loston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .5300, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 
Bids close Monday, January 27, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
metal polish to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 



posals may be obtained at the office''of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $300, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 27, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
drinking cups to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in a 
sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .$200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 27, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
ether to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be retjuired in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, Citj' Hall Annex, 
Boston. Jiids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 27, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
the Sewer Division with sewer pipe. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $300, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

BidLs close Tuesday, January 28, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
sewer brick to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in a 
sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the con- 
tract price. Blank i^orms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Supply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $200, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 28, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
Portland cement to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $300, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 28, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
lead pipe to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply De- 
partment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .$200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 29, at 
12 m. 



Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
bank gravel and sand to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 29, 
at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
pig lead to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 29, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
white and red lead to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $200, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 29, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
uniforms to the Fire Department. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 30, at 12 rn. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
uniform caps to the Fire Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $100, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January SO, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
crushed stone to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Supply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $200, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January SO, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
rubber coats to the Fire Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 



82 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Hoston. Hids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at 
the Siinie office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 30, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
waste and wiping cloths to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
witn the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 81, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
industrial and medicinal gases to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids dose Friday, January 31, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
ice cream mix to the City Hospital and 
Long Island. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $100, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 31, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
hard, dry fill to the Boston Airport, Park 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, ac- 
companied by certified check in the sum 
of $300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 31, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
flashlight equipment to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$100, to be filed at the same office. Dupli- 
cate bid, without check, to be filed with 
the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, February 4, a' ^2 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
engine, machine and cylinder oils to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same office. 



Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, February 5, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
X-ray materials to the various city de- 
partments. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $300, to be filed 
at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, February 6, at 12 m. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, January 23: 

Assessing Department. 

Approval has been given to appoint 
Hilda G. Smith, second assistant assessor, 
by reinstatement from the list of 
suspended second assistant assessors, to 
fill a vacancy, vice James F. Burke, at 
$5 a day. 

Fire Department. 

Captain Patrick J. Laffey of Ladder 
Company 11 has been placed on the pen- 
sion roll at 81,350 a year. 

Hospital Department. 

The following persons have been em- 
ployed at the Boston City Hospital for 
the week ending Thursday, January 16: 

Permanent. — Eileen Buckley, Adeline 
Carroll, Mabel Case, Catherine Dyer, 
Edna Kolus, Stella Polofsky, Margaret 
Wynne, floor nurses, $1,200 a year; John 
Laffey, orderly, temporary, $16.50 a 
week; Dr. W. C. Smith, executive as- 
sistant, 82,200 a year; Mary Maiming, 
cleaner, S15 a week. 

Temporary. — Luigi DellaRusso, trans- 
fer porter, $16.50 a week; Roy Casavant, 
supervisor, S32 a week; John McDonell, 
fireman, $41.50 a week; Fulton Wesson, 
kitchenman, $17.50 a week ; Helen Spil- 
lane, Anne Galligan, Evelyn Bums, 
Louise Sachs, Priscilla Beckwith, Marie 
Welch, Florence Johnson, Elizabeth 
Healy, Leola Bertrand, Catherine Dona- 
hue, Christine Bruce, W. Graves Piper, 
Doris Broadbridge, Mildred Moxon, 
Rhetta Hurley, Ruth Bozner, Ina Nulty, 
Mildred Crowley, Millie Quan, Lrene 
Bergeron, Marie Carlson, Eleanor Sexton, 
Catherine Re3'nolds, special nurses, 84.50 
a day. 

The following changes have occurred: 

Dr. Francis McNamara, temporary ex- 
ecutive assistant at $2,200 to assistant 
resident sui-geon at 81,200 a year; John 
Sullivan, temporary porter, supplying at 
East Boston and Haymarket Relief Sta- 
tion, transferred to Main Hospital ; Gor- 
don Dalton, transfer porter at $13, at 
Haymarket, transferred to Main Hospital 
as orderly at 816.50 a week; Richard 
Byrnes, porter at $23 to laundryman at 
$24.50 a week at South Department. 

South Department. 
Edward Dever, laundryman at 824.50 
to $30 a week. 

Haymarket Square Relief Station. 
John Dahill, temporary ambulance 
driver, 834.50 a week; Dr. Charles Boy- 



ajian, temporary assistant resident Bur- 
geon, $2,000 a year. 

Hospital Department (Sanatorium 
Division). 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division for 
the week ending Thursday, January 16: 

Francis A. Day, choreman, $14 a week; 
James McKensie, storeroom porter, $30 
a week; Joseph Coveney, Lena DeSolo, 
Michael Connors, Margaret Corcoran, 
maids (patients) (temporary), $240 a 
year; John Crafts, Sydney McQueen, 
male nurses (patients) (temporary), 
$480 a year. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed: 

AJbert Stackpole, assistant engineer 
(temporary), $45 a week; Robert Fitz- 
gerald, fireman (temporary), $41.50 a 
week; Henry Gutterman, choreman 
(t€mporary), 814 a week; James Tobin, 
James McKensie, choremen (temporary), 
$17.50 a week. 

Institutions Department. 

Dr. William T. Hyslop has been ap- 
pointed house officer at the Long Island 
Hospital for the term of one year begin- 
ning September 1, 1936, to take the place 
of Dr. Henry F. Sullivan, appointed on 
January- 11 for this period, but who re- 
signed before his service begins. 

The following changes have been made 
in the personnel for the week ending 
Thursday, January 16: 

Long Island Hospital. 

Appointments: Marie Barsky, insti- 
tution employee, laundress, $600 a year, 
temporary; Edward J. O'Meara, institu- 
tion employee, watchman, $600 a year, 
temporary; John J. Kuntz, institution 
employee, squad leader, $526 a year. 

Resignations: Thomas Connolly, fire- 
man, temporary, $33.50 a week and main- 
tenance; Rachel A. Pelletier, institution 
employee, waitress, temporary, $316 a 
j'ear. 

Transfers: Luke K. McCarthy, fire- 
man, temporar}-, $33.50 a week and main- 
tenance, from helper in engine room, 
8600 a year; Michael Curtin, institution 
employee, teamster, $600 a year, from 
squad leader at $526 a year. 

Employment Terminated: Wilma 
Robinson, institution employee, waitress, 
temporary, $316 a year. 

The following changes will be made in 
the personnel for the week ending Thurs- 
day, January 23: 

Long Island Hospital. 

Transfer: Helen Doherty, institution 
employee, waitress, $316 a year, from tele- 
phone operator at $600 a year. 

Resignations: Walter A. Tower, insti- 
tution employee, porter, 8526 a year, 
voluntary; Eugene D. Simmons, interne, 
$600 a j"ear, voluntary. 

Employment Terminated: Ellen 
Mackie, institution employee, attendant, 
temporary, 8600 a year. 

Steamers "Hibbard" and "O'Meara." 
Employment Terminated: John J. 
Columbo, deckliand, temporary, $1,700 a 
year. 

Reappointment: John J. Columbo, 
fireman, temporary, $1,800 a year, tempo- 
rary. 

OraRSEERS OF THE PCBLIC WeLFAKB. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary employment of Anna 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



83 



M. Galvin as a bookkeeper's assistant at 
$1,000 a year, for a period of iJiree 
months from February 23. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary employment of the 
following persons as assistant paymasters 
at $1,500 a year, for a period of one 
month from February 6: John V. Con- 
don, Samuel Elman, Maurice Gertlin, 
Morris Katz. 

Park Department. 
Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary emiployment, for a 
period of three months of John T. Ste- 
vens as third-class engineer at $38 a 
week. 

Penal Institutions DEfp.yjTMENT. 

The following appointment has been 
made: 

House of Correction. 

William J. Rourke, fireman, $11.50 a 
week, temporary. 

Public Buildings Department. 
George P. Donovan has been ap- 
pointed permanent plant superintendent 
at $2,700 a year. 

Public Works Department (Ferry 
Service). 

Approval has been given to appoint 
the following as deckhands to serve a.s 
water tenders at $5 a day for three 
months from January 20: George Hol- 
land, George H. Reynolds. 

Public Works Department (Highway 

Division). 

Approval has been given to continue 

the temporary employment of William 

D. Pierce as rodman at $1,200 a year, 

for three months from January 26. 

Public Works Department. (Sanitary 
Service) . 
Approval has been given to reinstate 
Thomas C. Earl to his former position 
as chauffeur-teamster at $5.50 a day 
when operating heavy duty trucks and 
at S5 a day when not so operating, to 
fill a permanent vacancy, effective Janu- 
ary 24. 

Public Works Department (Sewer 
Service) . 

Approval has been given to transfer 
John J. Shea from the Boston City Hos- 
pital to the Sewer Division as laborer at 
S5 a day, to fill a permanent vacancy, 
effective January 20, or as soon after as 
he reports. 

Public Works Department (Water 
Income Division). 

Approval has been given to appoint 
Albert B. Colantonio as meter reader at 
Sl,700 a year, for three months from 
January 24. 

Soldiers' Relief Dep.\rtment. 
John D. Connors has been appointed 
acting commissioner during the period 
beginnmg Tuesday, January 21, and end- 
ing February 17. 

Traffic Commission. 
. Approval has been given for the re- 
instatement of David Jacobs as clerk 
at S2,100 a year, who, on account of ill 
health, resigned on September 19, 1932. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Upon January 21 the Mayor approved 
the request of the Department of School 
Buildings for permission to award a con- 
tract to the low bidder on each item for 
furnishing and delivering parts of pupils' 
furniture to the department storehouse, as 
ordered during the year 1936. Bids, 
opened December 27, were awarded as 
follows : 

McCarthy Brothers. 

Item 1000, unfinished, 72 cents, finished, 
82 cents; Item lOOOA, unfinished, 73 
cents, finished, 83 cents; Item lOOOB, 
unfinished, 83 cents, finished, 93 cents; 
Item lOOOC, unfinished, 93 cents, finished, 
$1.05; Item 1001, unfinished, 25 cents, 
finished, 32 cents; Item lOOlA, unfinished, 
27 cents, finished, 34 cents; Item lOOlB, 
unfinished, 27 cents, finished, 34 cents; 
Item lOOlC, unfinished, 26 cents, finished, 
33 cents. 

Kenney Brothers. 

Item 1002, unfinished, $1.19, finished, 
$1.39; Item 1002A, unfinished, $1.39, 
finished, $1.59; Item 1003, unfinished, 
$1.28, finished, $1.48. Pencil rack mold- 
ing, one and three-quarters cents a foot. 

J. J. Keliher. 
Item 1002B, unfinished, $2.10, finished, 
$2.60; Item 1002C, unfinished, $2.40, 
finished, $2.90. 

John F. Hynes, Incorporated. 
Item 1002D, unfinished, $2.75, finished, 
$2.90; Item 1003A, unfinished, $1.20, 
finished, $1.40; Item 1003B, unfinished, 
$1.10, finished, $1.30. 

13J by 23 Desk Lids. 
Item 1000. — McCarthy Brothers, un- 
finished, 72 cents, finished, 82 cents; John 
F. Hynes, unfinished, 82 cents, finished, 
90 cents; Kenney Brothers, unfinished, 
89 cents, finished, 99 cents; J. J. Keliher, 
unfinished, $1, finished, $1.15. 

131 by 24 Lids. 

Item lOOOA. — McCarthy Brothers, un- 
finished, 73 cents, finished, 83 cents; John 
F. Hynes, unfinished, 86 cents, finished, 
95 cents; Kenney Brothers, unfinished, 
89 cents, finished, 99 cents; J. J. Kehher, 
unfinished, $1.05, finished, $1.20. 

15 by 26 Lids. 
hem lOOOB. — McCarthy Brothers, un- 
finished, 83 cents, finished 93 cents; John 
F. Hynes, unfinished, 96 cents, finished, 
$1.04; Kenney Brothers, unfinished, $1.09, 
finished, $1.19; J. J. Keliher, unfinished, 
$1.20, finished, $1.35. 

17 by 26 Lids. 
Item lOOOC. — McCarthy Brothers, un- 
finished, 93 cents, finished, $1.05; John F. 
Hynes, unfinished, $1.05, finished, $1.15; 
Kenney Brothers, unfinished, $1.19, fin- 
ished, $1.29; J. J. Keliher, unfinished, 
$1.35, finished, $1.50. 

Desk Rails. 
Item 1001. — McCarthy Brothers, un- 
finished, 25 cents, finished, 32 cents; John 
F. Hynes, unfinished, 36 cents, finished, 
40 cents; Kenney Brothers, unfinished, 
39 cents, finished, 44 cents; J.J. Keliher, 
unfinished, 45 cents, finished, 55 cents. 



4i by 24 Desk Rails. 

Item 1001 A. — McCarthy Brothers, un- 
finished, 27 cents, finished, 34 cents; John 
F. Hynes, unfinished, 38 cents, finished, 

43 cents; Kenney Brothers, unfinished, 

44 cents, finished, 49 cents; J. J. Keliher, 
unfinished, 55 cents, finished, 65 cents. 

5| by 26 Desk Rails. 

Item /OOiB.— McCarthy Brothers, un- 
finished, 27 cents, finished, 34 cents; John 
F. Hynes, unfinished, 40 cents, finished, 

45 cents; Kenney Brothers, unfinished, 
54 cents, finished, 59 cents; J. J. Keliher, 
unfinished, 70 cents, finished, 80 cents. 

3| by 26 Desk Rails. 
Item /OOiC— McCarthy Brothers, un- 
finished, 26 cents, finished, 33 cents; 
John F. Hynes, unfinished, 38 cents, 
finished, 43 cents; Kenney Brothers, un- 
finished, 54 cents, finished, 59 cents; 
J. J. Keliher, unfinished, 60 cents, fin- 
ished, 70 cents. 

13 by 21 Desk Boxes. 
Item 1002. — Kenney Brothers, unfin- 
ished, $1.19; finished, $1.39; John F. 
Hynes, unfinished, $1.65, finished, $1.90; 
McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, $1.78, 
finished, $2.16; J. J. Keliher, unfinished, 
$1.80, finished, $2.30. 

15 by 26 Desk Boxes. 

Item 1002 A. — Kenney Brothers, unfin- 
ished, $1.39, finished, $1.59; J. J. Keliher, 
unfinished, $1.80, finished, $2.30; Mc- 
Carthy Brothers, unfinished, $1.86, fin- 
ished, $2.30; John F. Hynes, unfinished, 
$2.65, finished, $2.90. 

16 by 23 Desk Boxes. 

Item 1002B. — J. J. Keliher, unfinished, 
$2.10, finished, $2.60; Kenney Brothers, 
unfinished, $2.49, finished, $2.74; John F. 
Hynes, unfinished, $2.65, finished, $2.90; 
McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, $3.37, 
finished, $3.88. 

18 by 24 Desk Boxes. 

Item 1002C. — J. J. Keliher, unfinished, 
$2.40, finished, $2.90; John F. Hynes, un- 
finished, $2.65, finished, $2.90; Ken- 
ney Brothers, unfinished, $2.74, finished, 
$2.99; McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 
$3.70, finished, $4.23. 

19 by 25 Desk Boxes. 

Iteyn 1002D. — John F. Hynes, unfin- 
ished, $2.75, finished, $2.90; J. J. Keliher, 
unfinished, $2.80, finished, $3.40; Ken- 
ney Brothers, unfinished, $2.94; finished, 
$3.24; McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 
$3.91, finished, $4.48. 

No. 1 Large Spindle Back Chaii- Seats. 

Item 1003. — Kenney Brothers, unfin- 
ished, $1.28, finished, $1.48; John F. 
Hynes, unfinished, $1.30, finished $1.50; 
J. J. Keliher, unfinished, $1.45, finished, 
$1.65; McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 
$1.50, finished, $1.81. 

No. 2 Medium Spindle Back Chair Seats. 
Item 1003 A. — John F. Hynes, unfin- 
ished, $1.20, finished, $1.40; Kenney 
Brothers, unfinished, $1.23, finished, $1.43; 
J. J. Keliher, unfinished, $1.40, finished, 
$1.60; McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 
$1.41, finished, $1.66. 

No. 3 Small Spindle Back Chan Seats. 
Item 1003B. — John F. Hynes, un- 
finished, $1.10, finished, $1.30; Kenney 
Brothers, unfinished, $1.23, finished, $1.43; 
McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, $1.29; 
finished, $1.60; J. J. Keliher, unfinished, 
$1.40, finished, $1.60. 



84 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



Pencil Rftck Molding. 
Kcnncy Brothers, IJ cents ii foot; John 
V. Hynes, 5 cents a foot; J. J. Keliher, 
(5 cents a foot; McCarthy Brothers, 8 
cents a foot. 

WITHOUT ADVERTISING, 

Upon varying dates as indicated the 
Mayor approved permission to award 
contracts for supplies, etc., from several 
firms. Communications from the heads 
of tile departments interested were as 
follows: 

Institutions Department. 

Boston, January 4, 1936. 
Hon. Fredeuick W. Mansfield, 

Maijor of Boston. 

My Dear Mr. Mayor, — Your per- 
mission is respectfully requested to 
award a contract to the Almy Water 
Tube Boiler Company of Providence, 
Rhode Island, for furnishing all labor and 
materials necessary to re-tube the boiler 
on the steamer "George A. Hibbard," 
for a sum not to exceed twenty-six hundred 
($2,600) dollars, without advertising. 

This is an emergency situation as the 
repairs have been ordered by the U. S. 
Bureau of Navigation. The Almj^ Water 
Tube Boiler Company are the makers of 
the boiler on the "Hibbard" and the only 
concern which can furnish the necessary 
parts. There would, therefore, be no 
advantage in advertising, which would 
mean unnecessary delay. 

The steamer is now out of commission 
and is urgently needed for transportation 
of W. P. A. workers. After authority is 
received it will take at least two (2) weeks 
to have the work done. 

"\'ery truly yours, 

Frederic A. Washburn, 

Commissioner. 

Penal Institutions Department. 
Boston, December 31, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir,^ — Under date of August 13, 
1935, 3'our Honor approved a contract 
with the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Limited, amounting to S6,950, 
for repairs to the steamer "Michael J. 
Perkins," the work to be completed by 
August 17, 1935. 

All of the work, with the exception of a 
generator installation, was completed in 
the specified time. Due to the fact that 
the Bethlehem Company could not re- 
ceive delivery of the generator all of the 
work was not actually completed until 
September 30, 1935. 

In view of the above facts, permission 
is requested to extend the time of com- 
pletion of this contract to September 
30, 1935. 

Respectfully, 

John J. Douglass, 
Penal Institutioiis Co7nmission(r. 



LAND-TAKING IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for the 
taking of land for a public improvement 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Magdala street, Dorchester dis- 
trict, a& a highway, from G alii van Boule- 
vard to Van Winkle street, bounded and 
described as follows: 

A highway named Magdala street is 
hereby laid out, from Gallivan Boulevard 
to Van Winkle street, and ordered con- 
structed, the cost thereof to be charged to 
Federal Funds. 



For the making of the aforesaid im- 
l)rovement, an ea.sement for street pur- 
poses is hereby taken in the following 
described lands, cxclasive of trees or 
.structures standing upon or affixed 
thereto: 

A parcel of land, suppo.sed to belong to 
Anthony Cliabinowski, bounded: 

Northerly by Van Winkle street, five 
and 1-100 feet; easterly by the westerly 
line of Magdala street as it existed pre- 
viously to this lay-out, ninety feet; south- 
erly by the northerly line of Magdala 
street as it existed previously to this lay- 
out, five feet; and westerly by the westerly 
line of Magdala street as established under 
this order, ninety and 28-100 feet, con- 
taining four hundred and fifty-one square 
feet, more or less. 

A parcel of land, supposed to belong to 
Mary M. Green, bounded: 

Westerly by the westerly line of Mag- 
dala street as established under this order, 
forty-three feet; northerly by the south- 
erly line of Magdala street as it existed 
previously to this lay-out, five feet; east- 
erly by the westerly line of Magdala 
street as it existed previously to this lay- 
out, forty-three feet; and southerly by 
the northerly line of Magdala street as it 
existed previously to this lay-out, five 
feet, containing two hundred and fifteen 
square feet, more or less. 

A parcel of land, supposed to belong 
to Catherine J. Murphy, bounded: 

Westerly by the easterly line of Magdala 
street as it existed previously to this 
lay-out, forty feet; northerly by the 
southerly line of Magdala street as it 
existed previously to this lay-out, five 
feet; easterly by the easterly line of 
Magdala street as established under this 
order, forty feet; and southerly by the 
northerly line of Magdala as it existed 
previously to this lay-out, five feet, con- 
taining two hundred square feet, more or 
less. 

The land, owners unknown, being the 
private way known as Magdala street, 
between Gallivan Boulevard and Van 
Winkle street. 

Said Magdala street as hereby laid out 
is bounded: 

Southerly by Gallivan Boulevard, 
forty and 28-100 feet; westerly by the 
westerly line of said Magdala street as 
hereby laid out, five hundred seventy-five 
and 57-100 feet; northerly by Van Winkle 
street, thirty-five and 11-100 feet; east- 
erly by the easterly line of said Magdala 
street as hereby laid out, one hundred 
thirty and 92-100 feet; northerly by the 
northerly line of said Magdala street as 
hereby laid out, five and 1-100 feet; and 
easterly by the easterly line of said 
Magdala street as hereby laid out, four 
hundred forty-six and 32-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines 
that the undermentioned persons sustain 
damages in their estates by the making 
of the public improvement, consisting 
of the laying out and construction of 
Magdala street, Dorchester district, as a 
highway, from Gallivan Boulevard to 
Van Winkle street, under the order of the 
Board of January 16, 1936, in the amounts 
hereinafter respectively set against them, 
and awards said amounts therefor: 

Anthony Cliabinowski, 451 square 
feet, $1. 

Mary M. Green, 215 square feet, $1. 

Catherine J. Murphy, 200 square 
feet,$l. 

REVISION OF ASSESSMENTS. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
votes of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners: 



In the matter of the application for 
revision of assessments levied on account 
of the construction of sewerage works, the 
Board of Street Commissioners, acting 
under the provisions of cliapter 359 of the 
Acts of the year 1896, and deeming it 
just and proper that such action should 
be taken on said application, order, That 
the amount hereinafter specified, being 
the annual apportionment of said assess- 
ment for the year specified below, be, and • 
the same is hereby, abated. 

Margaret L. O'Brien, 1933 apportion- 
ment. Plan 1929-9, lot 54, Sanborn 
avenue, October 4, 1929, S10.65. 

In the matter of the application for 
revision of assessments levied on account 
of the construction of sewerage works, the 
Board of Street Commissioners, acting 
under the provisions of chapter 359 of 
the Acts of the year 1896, and deeming it 
just and proper that such action should 
be taken on said applications, order, That 
the amounts hereinafter specified, being 
the annual apportionments of said assess- 
ments for the years specified below, be, 
and the same are herebj', abated: 

Luigi and Leonilda Colaizzi, Washing- 
ton Heights avenue, Plan 1929-21, lot 
12 (assessed February 21, 1930), 1933, 
$12.07; 1934, $11.56. 



LAND-TAKING IN WEST 
ROXBURY. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of an extension of MajTiard 
street. West Roxburj' district, as a high- 
way, from Metropolitan avenue to Dale 
street, bounded and described as follows: 

An extension of the highway named 
Maynard street is hereby laid out, from 
Metropolitan avenue to Dale street, and 
ordered constioicted, the cost thereof to 
be charged to Federal Funds. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is 
bounded and described as follows: 

Northeasterly by Metropolitan avenue, 
forty feet; southeasterly bj^ the south- 
easterly line of said extension of said 
Maynard street as hereby laid out, two 
hundred sixty-three and 17-100 feet; 
easterly bj^ the easterly line of said ex- 
tension of said Maynard street as hereby 
laid out, one hundred sixty-seven and 
92-100 feet; again southeasterly by the 
southeasterly line of said extension of 
said Maynard street as hereby laid out, 
one hundred thirty-five and 92-100 feet; 
southwesterly by Dale street, forty-one 
and 90-100 feet; northwesterly by the 
northwesterly line of said extension of 
said Maynard street as hereby laid out, 
one hundred forty-three and 69-100 feet; 
westerly by the westerly line of said 
extension of said Maj'nard street as 
hereby laid out, one hundred seventy- 
two and 39-100 feet, and northwesterly 
bj' the northwesterly line of said exten- 
sion of said Ma3'nard street as hereby 
laid out, two hundred seventy-two and 
37-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines 
that no person sustains damages in his 
estate by the making of the public im- 
provement, consisting of the laying out 
and construction of an extension of May- 
nard street, West Roxburj^ district, as a 
highway, from Metropolitan avenue to 
Dale street, under the order of the Board 
of January 15, 1936, and awards no 
damages therefor. 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



85 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS. 

Supply Department. 

The following communications relative 
to the extension of contracts with various 
firms for furnishing supplies and materials 
to the several city departments, received 
by the Mayor from D. Frank Dohorty, 
Superintendent of Supplies, have been 
approved : 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 14, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Donohue & 
Riordan relative to the purchase of 
uniforms for delivery to the Fire Depart- 
ment. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said uniforms as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935. This privilege is extended to 
February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of uniforms 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to February 1, 
1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 17, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Rcsenfield Uniform 
Company relative to the purchase of 
uniforms for delivery to the Fire Depart- 
ment. Included in the contract is the 
following clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said uniforms as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935. This privilege is extended to 
February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as arc stated in said 
contract, such quantities of uniforms 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to February 1, 
1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor,— Under date of 
February 15, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Fort Hill 
Paper Company relative to the purchase 
of toilet paper for delivery to the various 



city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January I, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
toilet paper as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to Febiuary 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant 
to the above-quoted option, upon the 
same terms and conditions as are stated 
in said contract, such quantities of toilet 
paper referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to February 1, 
1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston . 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
February 12, 1935, the City of Bo.ston 
entered into a contract with Stone & 
Forsyth Company relative to the pur- 
chase of toilet paper for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the Citj' of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning Januarj' 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions a-s aforesaid, such quantities of said 
toilet paper as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to Februaiy 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of toilet paper 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to Febmaiy 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 2, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with West Roxbury Trap 
Rock Company relative to the purchase 
of stone for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purcliase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
stone as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1935. This 
privilege is extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, puisuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of stone re- 
ferred to therein as may not have been 



ordered up to and including Deccmbei' 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 30, 1935, the City of Boston en- 
tered into a contract with William J. 
Barry Company relative to the purchase 
of stone for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
l^urchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
stone as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1935. This 
privilege is extended to February 1, 1936." 

I lespectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, piu'suant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of stone referred 
to therein sus may not hav(! been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 2, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Rowe Contracting 
Company relative to the purchase of stone 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said stone as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of stone referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor,— Under date of 
March 26, 1935, the City of Boston en- 
tered into a contract with Metropolitan 
Crushed Stone Company relative to the 
purchase of stone for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 



86 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
stone as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of stone referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1935, for 
the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
August 13, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with George H. 
Noone Sand and Gravel Company rela- 
tive to the purchase of sand for delivery 
to the various city departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
sand as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1935. This 
privilege is extended to February 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant 
to the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of sand referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935, 
for the extended period permitted there- 
by, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 17, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Trimount Bituminous 
Products Company relative to the pur- 
chase of bituminous patching mixture for 
delivery to the Public Works Depart- 
ment. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January L 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
bituminous patching mixture as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935. This privilege is 
extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of bituminous 
patching mixture referred to therein as 
may not have been ordered up to and 



including December 31, 1935, for the 

extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
February 12, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with National 
Boston Lead Company relative to the 
purchase of lead pipe for delivery to the 
Water Division. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tioas as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
lead pipe as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
belialf of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of lead pipe 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
February 27, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Portland 
Stone Ware Company relative to the 
purchase of sewer pipe for delivery to the 
Sewer Division. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
sewer pipe as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to Februaiy 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of sewer pipe 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 3, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Needham Sand and 
Gravel Company, Incorporated, relative 
to the purchase of sand for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 



"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
sand as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1935. This 
privilege is extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of sand referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, Januarj' 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 21, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Boston Sand and 
Gravel Company relative to the purchase 
of sand for deliverj' to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
sand as may not have been ordered up to 
and including December 31, 1935. This 
privilege is extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of sand referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to Februarj^ 1, 1936. 



Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, January 10, 1936 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 28, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with E. F. Mahady Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of surgical 
supphes for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January I, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deUver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said surgical supphes as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This privilege is extended 
to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of surgical 
supplies referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



87 



December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 15, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with M. E. Lemery rela- 
tive to the purchase of non-asphaltic road 
oil for delivery to the Park Department. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as afore.said, such quantities of said 
non-asphaltic road oil as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This privilege is extended 
to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, .such quantities of non- 
asphaltic road oil referred to therein as 
may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1935, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Stipplics. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

De.vr Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 28, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Flanders-Day Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of surgical 
supplies for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said surgical supplies as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This privilege is extended 
to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request j'our approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical 
supplies referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 28, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Thomas W. Reed 
Company relative to the purchase of 
surgical supplies for delivery to the 



various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said surgical supplies as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This privilege is extended 
to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical 
supplies referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, January 10, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 31, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Charles W. Broadbent 
Company relative to the purchase of 
surgical supplies for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purcliase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
surgical supplies as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935. This privilege is extended to 
February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of surgical supplies 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Ho.n. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 26, 1935, the City of Boston. entered 
into a contract with Tide Water Oil Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of engine, 
machine and cylinder oils for deliveiy to 
the various city departments. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"It Ls agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning Januaiy 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
engine, machine and cylinder oils as 
may not have been ordered up to and in- 
cluding December 31, 1935. This priv- 
ilege is extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of engine, ma- 
chine and cylinder oils referred to therein 



as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1935, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 26, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Westland Farms, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
ice cream mix for delivery to the Boston 
City Hospital and Long Island. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
claasc: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
ice cream mix as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935. This privilege is extended to 
February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of ice cream mix 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 9, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Thomas W. Reed 
Company relative to the purchase of 
surgical and hypodermic needles for 
delivery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
suigical and hypodermic needles as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935. This privilege is 
extended to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purcha.se on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of surgical and 
hypodermic needles referred to therein as 
may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1935, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
February 15, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with National 
Boston Lead Company relative to the 
purchase of white and red lead for de- 



88 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



livery to the various city departments. 
Included in tiie contract is the following 
clause: 

"It is agnn-d that the City of Boston, 
with the a|)i)r()val of tiie Mayor, may, 
hcKinninK .January 1, 1930, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
(l(>liver upon the sam(> terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such (juantities of 
said whit(> and red lead as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935. This priviliege is extended 
to February 1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purcha.se on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of white and 
red lead referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted therebv, to wit, to 
February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

De.-vr Mr. M.\yor, — Under date of 
February 8, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Raymond 
R. Henchey relative to the purchase of 
pig lead for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
pig lead as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 
1, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of pig lead 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully youi-s, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 28, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Herlihy 
Brothers, Incorporated, relative to the 
purchase of milk, cream, etc., for delivery 
to the various city departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than April 15, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of milk, cream, 
etc., referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 



ber 31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to April 15, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 4, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Whiting 
Milk Company relative to the purchase 
of milk, cream, etc., for delivery to the 
Boston City Hospital. Included in the 
contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than April 15, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purcha.se on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of milk, cream, etc., 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to April 15, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 17, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Alfred H. 
Ventola relative to the purchase of range 
oil for deliveiy to the Overseers of the 
Public Welfare Department. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than April 30, 1936." 

I respectfully request youi- approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of range oil 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to April 30, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 17, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with R. F. Piper, 
relative to the purchase of range oil for 
delivery to the Overseers of the Public 
Welfare Department. Included in the 
contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than April 30, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of range oil 
referred to therein as may not have been 



ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended jicriod permitted 
ther(!by, to wit, to April 30, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

S uperintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 27, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Lincoln 
Oil Company relative to the purchase of 
automobile motor oil for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than March 31, 1936." 

I respectfullj' request your approval to 
exercLse the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of automobile 
motor oil referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted therebv, to wit, to 
March 31, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. May'or, — Under date of 
December 17, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Ljmch Super 
Oil Company relative to the purchase of 
range oil for delivery to the Overseers of 
the Public Welfare Department. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than April 30, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of range oil 
referred to theiein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1935, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to April 30, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendeni of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 17, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Tidewater 
Coal Company relative to the purcha.se of 
range oil for delivery to the Overseers of 
the Public Welfare Department. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than April 30, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



89 



to the above-quoted option, upon the 
same terms and conditions as are stated 
in said contract, such quantities of range 
oU referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1935, for tlie extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to April 30, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 25, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Petroleum 
Heat and Power Company relative to 
the purchase of heavy and medium fuel 
oil for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terras and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said heavy and medium fuel oil as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935. This privilege is 
extended to September 30, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as arc stated in said 
contract, such quantities of heavy and 
medium fuel oil referred to therein as 
may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1935, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to September 30, 1936. 

Respectfully j'ours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 9, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with White Fuel 
Corporation relative to the purchase of 
light fuel oil for delivery to the various 
city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
light fuel oil as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to September 30, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of light fuel oil 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to September 30, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of Boston . 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 7, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Socony- 
Vacuum Oil Company, Incorporated, 
relative to the purchase of fuel oil for 



delivery to the fireboat and Institutions 
Department boat. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than September 30, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of fuel oil 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1935, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to September 30, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
.\pril 26, 1935, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with (Jilman Brothers, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
drugs for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1936, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
drugs as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1935. 
This privilege is extended to February 1, 
1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in .said 
contract, such quantities of drugs referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1935, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 31, 1935, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Socony- 
Vacuum Oil Company, Incorporated, 
relative to the purchase of automobile 
motor oil for deUvery to the varioas city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than March 31, 1936." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of automobile 
motor oil referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1935, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
March 31, 1936. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 



Public Works Department. 

The Marine Company has been granted 
an extension of the time of completion of 
the contract for repairing hull, etc., of 
ferryboat "Daniel A. MacCormack," 
from Januai-y 13, 1936, to Januai-y 24, 
1936. 

The Grinnell Company, Incorporated, 
has been granted an extension of the 
time of completion of the contract for 
installing sprinkler systems on ferryboats, 
from December 27, 1935, to January 16, 
1936. 

The John F. Shea Company, Incorpo- 
rated, has been granted an extension of 
the time of completion of the contract for 
repairing the Summer Street Draw, over 
the Reserved Channel, from January 18, 
1936, to February 28, 1936. 



MAYOR MANSFIELD ORDERS PUR- 
CHASE OF SNOW-REMOVAL 
MACHINERY. 

Upon January 10 the Mayor issued the 
following statement : 

I have directed the Superintendent of 
Supplies to disregard the vote of the 
Finance Commission that he should not 
make formal awards or issue formal con- 
tracts for the purchase of snow-removal 
equipment until the Finance Commission 
investigation is concluded. 

The city must be prepared to remove 
the snow when it comes, but if the wishes 
of the Finance ('ommission were to be 
followed, and since no one knows when 
the investigation may terminate, the city 
might be without equipment if the vote 
of the Finance Commission were to be 
observed. And accordingly I have in- 
structed the Superintendent of Supplies 
to proceed without delay to purchase the 
equipment as already planned and to 
execute formal contracts therefor. 

And I take this opportunity of asking 
the public to reserve their judgment on 
the snow-removal equipment investiga- 
tion until the evidence is all in. The 
Finance Commission is having its innings 
now. Mine will come presently. 

In the meantime let me assure the 
people of Boston that the only end 
sought by me in the approval of the pur- 
chase of this equipment was the best in- 
terests of the City of Boston. I think 
the people will be satisfied of this fact 
when the evidence is all in and the com- 
mission's investigation finished. 



DAMAGES SUSTAINED. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
vote of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners: 

Voted, That the undermentioned per- 
sons sustain damages in their estates by 
the making of the public improvement 
consi.sting of the widening, relocation and 
construction of Chelsea street, from south 
of Addison street, East Boston district, 
to Eastern avenue, Chelsea, under the 
order of the Board of even date herewith 
in the amounts hereinafter respectively 
set against them and awards said amounts 
therefor: 

Socony Vacuum Oil Company, Incor- 
porated, 2,244 square feet SI 00 

Owners unknown (right of way), 2,839 

square feet 1 00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 74141 
square feet 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 23,5561 ^ ^qq qq 
square feet | ' 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 29,131 
square feet ) 

The American Oil Company, 865 square 

feet 1 00 



90 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 16 TO JANUARY 22. 

January 16. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost . 



Dorothy Barnett 

D. C. Cooney 

ChirkerinK Trust 

State Realty Trust 

George M. Ca.staldo 

DeHlois and Maddison 

Thorndike Trust 

Nirkolaa Sorrentino 

E. Tarbcll Pisani 

Boston Marine Works 

George D. Duplain 

City of Host on 

Louis Strauss. Trustee 

Jordan Marsh Company 

Minot. WiMianisand HanRS. . 

A. J. Kupstis 

Statler Oflice Building Co. . . . 
Hyde Park Co-Operative 

Bank. 
Hyde Park Co-Operative 

Rank. 
Hyde Park Co-Operative 

Bank. 
Hyde Park Co-Operative 

Bank. 

Alexander de Gerard 

Spalding-Morse Company. . . 
Franklin Savings Bank 



.'(32 Commonwealth avenue.. 

31 Cambria street 

175 Camden street 

1 1 1 Gainsborough street. . . . 

420 Commercial street 

2.5 School street 

25 Kliot street 

171 London street 

1.39 and 141 Tremont street. 

2 New street 

20 Creighton street 

352 Longwood avenue 

137 Washington street 

45 Summer street 

128 Tremont street 

168 West Seventh street. . . . 

70-80 Arlington street 

15 Mason street 



151 Mason street. 
17 Mason street. . 
17J Mason street. 



19 Brimmer street. . . 
50 Franklin street. . . 
10 Columbus square. 



FrankUn Savings Bank Columbus avenue 

Annie M. Gushing 28 Montclair avenue. 



5 Dumb-waiters $625 

4 Alterations, shop 300 

9 Alterations, store 600 

4 Alterations, tenements 400 

3 Take-down, dwelhng 200 

3 Sign 500 

5 Alterations, mercantile 565 

1 Alterations, dwelling 400 

22 Alterations, tenements 40 

1 Special, machine shop 1 ..500 

10 Alterations, dwelling 1.700 

4 Alterations, fire station None 

3 Alterations, store $150 

3 Sign 160 

3 Sign 2.50 

6 Alterations, dwelHng 100 

5 Alterations, stores and offices, 150 
18 Alterations, dwelling 300 

18 Alterations, dwelling 150 

18 Alterations, dwelling 150 

18 Alterations, dwelling 150 

5 Alterations, dwelling 200 

3 Sign 200 

4 Alterations, stores and tene- 200 

ments. 

4 Alterations, stores and lodg- 900 
ing. 

20 Alterations, dwelling 500 



Jandabt 17. 



City of Boston 105 Cejlon street 

Louis Cirillo 30 Sawjer avenue 

City of Boston 381 Chesntut B ill avenue. 

Minnie T. McLellan Rear 15 Howitt road 

Winifred R. Martin -. . Rear 19 Howitt road 



1848 Centre street 20 

11 Croftland avenue 17 

580 East Eighth street 7 

90 West Fifth street 7 



Lee Yong - 20 Hudson street. 



B. D. Riordan 

Cambridge Trust Company.. 

C. J. Tighe 

Mt. Washington Co-oper- 
ative Bank. 

Mt. Washington Co-oper- 
ative Bank. 

Mt. Washington Co-oper- 
ative Bank. 

Frances P. Burke 

Henry L. Martens 

Strand Cafe 



94 West Fifth street. 
92 West Fifth street . 



72 Button wood street 13 

11 Armstrong street 10 

374 West Broadway 6 



Second-class field house S20,000 

Alterations, stable 4,000 

Second-class field house 20,000 

Third-class garage 300 

Third-class garage 300 

Alterations, hotel and stores, 1,200 

Alterations, stores and dwell- 3,000 
ing. 

Alterations, office 125 

Alterations, dwelling 400 

Alterations, dwelling 253 

Alterations, dwelling 200 

Alterations, dwelling 150 

Alterations, dwelling 200 

Alterations, dwelling 200 

Alterations, dwelling 590 

Sign 200 



J.INUARY 18. 



City of Boston 1021 Adams street 

Socony Vaccum Oil Com- 641 Huntington avenue, 
pany. 

Ideal Grill 809 Beacon street 

Fifty Associates -. . . . 218 Clarendon street. . . . 

Wildey Savings Bank 40 Oriole street 



Second-class field house $20,000 

Second-class gas station 10,000 

Sign 150 

Alterations, stores and offices, 150 

Alterations, dwelling 400 

Alterations, dwelling 175 



January 20. 



C. D. Malaguh 104 Gardner street 

Mrs. M. G. Deckard 20 Wyoming street 

Healey Seaver Company 90 Freeport street 

Abraham Gold 55 Crawford street 

Lafayette Southard 920 Hyde Park avenue 

Lafayette Southard 922 Hyde Park avenue 

Lafayette Southard 916 Hyde Park avenue 

Lafayette Southard ...... 918 Hyde Park avenue 

Harry Brooks 2304-2308 Washington St. . . 

Loew's Theatres, Incor- 201-209 Massachusetts ave. 
porated. 

John J. Hope 1262 and 1264 Boylston St. . . 

Thomas Love Company 44 Summer street 



United Order of Odd Fellows. 1651 Washington street. 

Williams & Bangs 18-26 Scoliay 8<iuare. . . 

M. B. Brandegee 472 Boylston street. . . . 

Robert Jordan Estate 16 City Hall avenue 



20 


Alterations, dwelling 


$863 


12 


Alterations, dwelHng 


225 


15 


Alterations, glue factory 


500 


12 


Alterations, dwelling 


1.000 


18 


Alterations, dwelling 


300 


18 


Alterations, dwelling 


300 


18 


Alterations, dwelling 


300 


18 


-Alterations, dwelling 


300 


9 


Alterations, store and light 
manufacturing. 


100 


4 


Alterations, theater 


5,000 


5 


Alterations, stores 


400 


3 


Alterations, stores and manu- 
facturing. 


150 


9 


Alterations, halls 


1,000 


3 




300 


4 


Alterations, store and offices. 


100 


3 


Alterations, store and offices. 


150 



January 2 1 . 



City of Boston 14 Wainwright street 16 

City of Boston -i Morton street 3 

J. Satter 64 and 66 Cross street 3 

George M. Castaldo 499 Hanover street 3 



Devonshire Building Trus- 
tees. 
Minot, Williams and Bangs. . 



10 State street. 
7 Water street. 



Second-class field house $20,000 

Second-class field house 7.000 

Alterations, stores 400 

Take-down, store and dwell- 3.50 

ing. 

Alterations, store and office. . 200 

Alterations, mercantile 125 



MAYOR MANSFIELD AIDS EVICTED 
CHINESE FAMILY. 

Upon January 20 the Mayor issued the 
following statement: 

Jiramic Chin Kai Kwong and Col. 
William G. Moy, representing the Chinese 
Merchants' Association, conferred with 
me today, with Tom Yee, laundryman, 
who was recently evicted in .\ilston. 
Because of the strong competition among 
Chinese laundries and the low prices for 
laundry work the Association could not 
find work for Yee in a laundry. 

I talked with the Welfare Department 
and they are considering now whether 
they can establish Tom Yee in a new 
laundrj' so that his family may be kept 
together. If this can't be done he will be 
placed on the Welfare rolls so that he 
will not suffer for food, clothing and shel- 
ter. At the present time the oldest child 
is being cared for by a neighbor and the 
other six children with the mother are 
being cared for in the Chardon Street 
Home. Whether work is obtained for 
the father or not, neither he nor his 
family will suffer while they remain in 
Boston. 



LAND-TAKING IN ROXBURY. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a pubhc improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of an extension of Bragdon 
street, Roxbury district, as a highway, 
from Columbus avenue to Washington 
street, bounded and described as follows: 

An extension of the highway named 
Bragdon street is hereby laid out, from 
Columbus avenue to Washington street, 
and ordered constructed, the cost thereof 
to be charged to Federal Funds. 

For the making of the aforesaid im- 
provement, an easement for street pur- 
poses is hereby taken in the following 
described lands, exclusive of trees or 
structures standing upon or affixed 
thereto: 

A parcel of land, supposed to belong 
to New England Hospital for Women 
and Children, bounded: 

Southerly by Bragdon street, eight and 
7-100 feet; westerly by Columbus avenue, 
one and 41-100 feet; and northeasterly by 
the northeasterly line of Bragdon street 
as established under this order, nine and 
1-100 feet, containing four square feet, 
more or less. 

Said extension of said Bragdon street 
as hereby laid out is bounded: 

Westerly by Columbus avenue, eighty- 
one and 12-100 feet; northeasterly by the 
northeasterlj' line of said extension of 
said Bragdon street as hereby laid out, 
five hundred three and 41-100 feet; 
southeasterly by Washington street, forty 
and 37-100 feet; southwesterly by the 
southwesterly line of said extension of 
said Bragdon street as hereby laid out, 
four hundred fortj'-four and 17-100 feet: 
and southerly bj' the southerly line of 
said extension of said Bragdon street as 
herebj^ laid out, twenty-three and 61-100 
feet on a curve of ten feet radius. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
the undermentioned person sustains dam- 
ages by the making of the public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of an extension of Bragdon 
street, Roxbury district, as a highway, 
from Columbus avenue to Washington 
street, under the order of the Board of 
January 16, 1936, in the amount herein- 
after mentioned, and awards said amount 
therefor: 

New England Hospital for Women and 
Children, 4 square feet, SI. 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



91 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 16 TO JANUARY 22. 



January 21. — Continued. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



West Roxbury Trap Rock 10 Grove street 20 

Company. 

Charles Street Garage 144 Charles street 5 

Club Bagdad 684 Washington street 3 

H J. Scully 100 Washington street 3 

W. li. Kirk 7 Spring street 20 

Warren Motor Mart 298 Warren street 12 

Cambridge Street Garage.. . . 252 Cambridge street 3 

Solomon Cavalsky 26 Genesee street 3 

Agnes W. Gretch 127 Bellevue street 20 



Alterations, storage. . 

Sign 

Sign 

Sign 

Sign 

Sign 

Sign 

Take-down, dwelling. 
Alterations, dwelling. 



$300 

100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
145 



January 22. 



Charles A. Rodenhaven 

Leonard C. Wason 

Samuel Kingston 

Tidewater Oil Company .... 

New England Trust Co 

Glad.vs Young 

Franklin Savings Bank 

Cody Distributing Co 

Minot, Williams and Bangs . . 

F. Sbadella 

Saverio Nardelli 

Massachusetts Charitable 
Mechanics Association. 

F. L. & C. S. Whitcomb, In- 
corporated. 

T. H. Russell. Tre.Tsurer, 
Trustee. 

T. H. Rus.sell. Trea.surer, 
Trustee. 

H. and L. H. Dana 

C. F. Keating 



42 Pinehurst street 

123 Southampton street. . . . 

239 Warren street 

2 Cambridge street 

350 Boylston street 

44 Fenway 

20 East Springfield street 

54 Clavton street 

371 and 373 Washington St. 
5 and 7 Hatherley road .... 
481 and 481A Washington 

street. 
Ill Huntington avenue 

17 and 19 Wareham street, 



81 Beach street. 
79 Beach street. 



20 Alterations, dwelling. . . 
8 Third-class storage 

21 Special, store 

22 Alterations, office 

5 Alterations, store 

4 Alterations, dwelling. . . 

8 Alterations, dwelling. . . 

15 Elevator 

3 Alterations, mercantile. 

22 Third-class dwelling 

22 Third-class dwelling.... 



4 Alterations, halls. 



180 Harvard avenue. . . . 
1316 Washington street. 



8 Alterations, office and 

factorj-. 
3 Alterations, store and tene- 
ments. 
3 Alterations, store and tene- 
ments. 
21 Alterations, store 

9 Alterations, store and dwel- 

ling. 



$250 

700 

160 

830 

1,000 

8,000 

500 

2,000 

4,000 

6,000 

6,000 

250 

10,000 

1,000 

2,000 

250 
500 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order A'o. 136. 
Rule 68 (relating to "Hawkers and 
Peddlers") of the Rules and Regulations 
of the Boston Police Department is 
hereby amended by striking out sections 
5 and 6 of said rule, as appearing upon 
pages 232 and 233 of said Rules and 
Regulations, and inserting in place 
thereof new sections, which shall read as 
follows: 

Rule 68. Hawkers and Peddlers. 
(Words in Italics are New.) 



5. In the "Restricted Territory" they 
may carry on business at reasonable 
hours; but between 8 a. m. and 6.30 p. m. 
they may use only vehicles drawn by 
horses, or trays, baskets or other appli- 
ances not in the nature of stands carried 
by the persons using them. 

Exception. 

In thai part of the "Restricted Territory" 
(outside of the "Business Section"), 
described as North street, between Black- 
stone street and North square (westerly 
side), and North street, from North square 
to Clark street (both sides), between 3 p. m. 
and 11 p. m. on Saturdays and on the 
week day immediately preceding legal 
holidays and the Seventeenth Day of June 
in each year, respectively, hawkers and 
peddlers may stop and stand, subject to 
the direction of the police, for the sale of 
merchandise outside the curbstones. 

Between 3 p. m. and 11 p. m. at the times 
and places specified in the next preceding 
paragraph of this rule, hawkers and p&ldlers 
m the portion of "Restricted Section" 
therein described may use the same kind 
of vehicles and other appliances as are 
permitted, in the territory outside of the 
"Business Section" and "Restricted Ter- 
ritory," as slated in section 4- 

6. In the "Business Section" they 
may carry on business only before 8 a. m. 
or after 6 p. m., with the following 
exceptions: 

Between 3 p. m. and 11 p. m. on 



Saturdays and on the week day immedi- 
ately preceding legal holidays and the 
Seventeenth Day of June in each year, 
respectively, they may stop and stand, 
subject to the direction of the police, 
for the sale of merchandise outside the 
curbstone, in the following streets: Black- 
stone street, between Hay market square 
and Clinton street (both sides); North 
street, between Blackstone and Union 
streets (west side). 

Before 8 a. m. and after 6.30 p. m. on 
ordinary days and at the times and 
places specified in the next preceding 
paragraph of this rule, hawkers and 
peddlers in the "Business Section" may 
use the same kinds of vehicles and other 
appliances as are permitted in the same 
periods of the day outside the "Business 
Section" and the "Restricted Territory." 

Rule 68 (relating to "Hawkers and 
Peddlers") of the Rules and Regulations, 
is hereby further amended in section 7, 
as appearing upon page 233, by striking 
out the words: "Paragraph of section 
6" in the first and second lines of said 
section 7, and inserting in place thereof 
the words: "paragraphs of section 5 and 
6," — so that as amended said section 7 
shall read in part as follows: 

"7. Except as specified in the second 
paragraphs of sections 5 and 6 of this rule, 
as amended, no hawker or peddler, unless 
licensed at a designated stand by the 
board of street commissioners of the 
city of Boston ... shall in a public 
street and while offering merchandise for 
sale remain in one place . . . for 
more than five minutes ..." 



.\11 General Orders and Rules and 
Regulations inconsistent herewith are 
hereby rescinded. 

The Superintendent of Police will 
promulgate this order. 

Eugene M. McSweeney, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 137. 
A trial board, consisting of Captains 
Campbell, Killen and Towle, having 



heard by reference a complaint made 
by Jeremiah B. Sheehan, lieutenant, 
Division 11, against Daniel J. McCarthy, 
Patrolman, Division 11, for alleged 
violation of the Rules and Regulations 
of the Police Department, to wit: Con- 
duct unbecoming an officer, — has sub- 
mitted its finding and recommendation 
to the commissioner: 

The commissioner accepts the plea of 
guilty made before the Trial Board, but 
does not adopt the recommendation of 
punishment to be imposed. 

The commissioner wants every member 
of the force to fully realize that the serious 
violation of the rules and regulations 
committed by Patrolman McCarthy 
would ordinarily demand dismissal, as 
was justly and properly recommended 
by the Trial Board. 

The attention of the commissioner was 
called to the serious protracted illness of 
one of Patrolman McCarthy's children, 
w'hich had compelled his presence for 
some time at the child's bedside after 
finishing his daily tour of duty, and 
which, he maintained, undermined his 
resistance to the extent that he was 
unable to properly perform his duties. 
After confirmation of this information 
which was not brought out at the Trial 
Board hearing, the commissioner, upon 
recommendation of the superintendent, 
feels that the gravity of the offence com- 
mitted by Patrolman McCarthy is miti- 
gated to some degree, and that by impos- 
ing severe punishment the best interests 
of the department will be served. 

Therefore, it is hereby ordered that 
the said Patrolman Daniel J. McCarthy 
be suspended from duty for a period of 
sixty days, effective as of December 2, 
1935, at 5.45 o'clock p. m., and that at 
the expiration of the said period of sus- 
pension the said Patrolman Daniel J. 
McCarthy perform 420 hours of punish- 
ment duty. 

Civil Service Rule 23, section 3, re- 
quires approval of the Civil Service Com- 
mission before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 
"Section 3. With the consent of the 
Commissioner upon good cause shown, 
an appointing officer may reinstate in 
the same position or in a position in the 
same class and grade any person who 
has been separated from the service; 
provided, however, that the Commissioner 
shall not allow reinstatement of a person 
discharged for cause." 

The Superintendent of PoUce will 
promulgate this order. 

Eugene M. McSweeney, 

Comrnissioner. 



General Order No. 138. 

A trial board, consisting of Captains 
Campbell, Killen and Towle, having 
heard by reference a complaint made by 
Thomas F. Mulrey, captain. Division 11, 
against Neil A. McDevitt, patrolman. 
Division 11, for alleged violation of the 
Rules and Regulations of the Police De- 
partment, to wit: Conduct unbecoming 
an officer, — has submitted its finding and 
recommendation to the commissioner. 

The commissioner accepts the plea of 
guilty made before the Trial Board, but 
does not adopt the recommendation of 
punishment to be imposed. 

The commissioner desires that every 
member of the force thoroughly under- 
stand he does not condone the serious 
violation of the rules and regulations com- 
mitted by Patrolman McDevitt involving 
the use of intoxicating liquor while on 



92 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



duty wliidi, under ordinary circum- 
stances, would he sulfieient cause for dis- 
missal. 

Tlu^ recoinmenilation made by the Trial 
Board to the commi.ssioner, in view of tlie 
testimony adduced at tiie 'i'rial Board 
hearing, was a just and projK'r one. How- 
ever, the commissioner received informa- 
tion suhse(iuent to tiie Trial Board hear- 
ing that Patrolman McDevitt has been 
suffering for some time from a serious 
physical malady that now makes hospital- 
ization necessary and imjjerative. After 
confirmation of this infoimation which 
was not brought out at the Trial Board 
hearing, the commissioner, upon recom- 
mendation of the superintendent, feels 
that the gravity of the offence committed 
b}' Patrolnum McDevitt is mitigated to 
some degree, and that by imposing severe 
punishment the best interests of the 
ilei)artment will be served. 

Therefore, it is hereby ordered that the 
said Patrolman Neil A. McDevitt be 
suspended from duty for a period of sixty 
days, effective as of December fi, 1935, 
at 7.45 o'clock a. m., and that at the 
expiration of said period of suspension the 
said Patrolman Neil A. McDevitt per- 
form 420 hours of punishment duty. 

Civil Service Rule 23, section 3, re- 
quires approval of the Civil Service Com- 
mission before reinstatement. 

Rule 23. 
"Section 3. With the consent of the 
Commissioner upon good cause shown, an 
appointing officer may reinstate in the 
same position or in a position in the same 
class and gi-ade any person who has been 
separated from the service; provided, 
however, that the Commissioner shall not 
allow reinstatement of a person discharged 
for cause." 



The Superintendent 
promulgate this order. 



of Police will 



Eugene M. McSweeney, 

Commissioner. 



General Order No. 139. 

Deputy Superintendent William W. 
Livingston is hereby relieved as inspector 
of divisions in District B, comprising 
Divisions 9, 10, 13, 14, 10, 17, 18 and 19. 

Deputy Superintendent John M. 
Anderson, in addition to his present 
duties, is hereby assigned as inspector of 
divisions in District B. 

This order will take effect on Wednes- 
day, January 22, 193G, at 5.45 o'clock 
p. m. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Eugene M. McSweeney, 

Commissimier. 



SALE OF DISCARDED X=RAY 
FILMS. 

The Mayor has approved the fcjllowing 
request of the City Hospital Superin- 
tendent, Dr. James W. Manar}-: 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston: 

Dear Sir, — Your approval is respect- 
fully requested for the sale of discarded 
X-ray films at this hospital, the value 
of which, it is estimated, is in excess of 
one hundred dollars. 

This request is made in accordance 
with chapter 3, section 14, page 14, 
Revised Ordinances of 1925, of the City 
of Boston. 

Respectfully yours, 

James W. Manary, 

Superintendenl. 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 16 TO JANUARY 22. 

.I.\NUAHY 16. 



Plumber. 



I.oration. 



Ward. 



N'atu 



Estimated 
Cost. 



E. RotheiiherR .")-J7 Dudle.v street 13 New fixtures. 

.M. F. Karger 80.') River "street 18 New fixtures. 

H. .1. Coimell 5.31 Heaion street .5 New fixtures. 

I{. J. .McDonough .5.57B Washington street ... 17 New fixtures. 

D. J. Rull 80 K street 6 New fixtures. 



January 17. 



Fred E. Whitney 700 Commonwealth avenue. 21 

.John S. Pagington 36 Harvard avenue 18 

Frank S. Larkin 332 Summer street 6 

Frank .S. Larkin 368 Congre.ss street 6 

.loseph Rinella 571 Bennington street 1 

-Abraham Katz 3.56 Massacliusetts avenue. . 4 

D. H. Lane 8 Wellington street 9 

Horace E. Stevens 31 St. James avenue .5 

John Matto 408 Hanover street 3 

Harry .\lirams 11 and 13 Trenton street ... 1 

Herman F. Faunce 16 Irving street 3 

Joseph P. O'Hearn 43 Leon street 4 



New fi.xtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fi.xtures. 
New fixtures 



Jancarv 18. 



iM. H. Cat.siff.. 
E. H. Marchant. 
M. J. Finnegan. 
P. S. Monahan. . 
George Lambie. . 
Joseph Wallace . 



239-273 Broadway 3 New fixtures. 

30 Bay State road 5 New fixttires. 

113 Alurdock street 22 New fixtures. 

103 Arlington street 22 New fi.xtures. 

488 Columbus avenue 4 New fi-xtures. 



89 East Canton street. 



8 New fixtures. 



January 20. 



.\. B. Cassedy 

Otto L. Mizaras 

George Tack 

A. F. McCarthy 

Joseph Weinberg 

R. C. Nickerson 

William M. Collins 

D. J. Fitzgerald 

S. Shuman 

M. H. Myers 

E. H. Marchant 

P. W. Donoghue Company 



51 Sleeper street 6 New 

25 Albion street 8 New 

1608 Blue Hill avenue 18 New 

1 1 Florence street 3 New 

57 Gray street 5 New 

41 Middlesex street 5 New 

196 Summer street 3 New 

614 East Seventh street 7 New 

43 St. James street 12 New 

282 East Eighth street 7 New 

140 Federal street 3 New 

29 Merchants row 3 New- 



fix tures. 
fixtures, 
fi-xtures . 
fixtures . 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fi-xtures . 
fixtures, 
fi-xtures . 
fixtures, 
fixtures. 



Janu.^ry 21. 



Joseph K. Gordon 

John T. Meehan 

Edward H. Marchant. 



1243.\ Commonwealth ave. , 

45 Magazine street 

8 Winter street 



21 



New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
3 New fixtures. 



January 22. 



H. F. Rice 

Harry Kingsberg. . 
Horace E. Stevens. 
Thomas F. Hurley. 
Daniel G. Cotter. . , 
Frank C. Clark. . .. 
Joseph E. Smith. . . 
L. AL Richmond. . . 
Louis Bonaceto . . . . 

Samuel Barron 

George Lambie. ... 
Thomas C. Kelly . . , 

S. Gould 

H. A. Rowell 



1234 River street 18 New 

189 Norfolk street 14 New 

285 Columbus avenue 4 New 

29 Commonwealth avenue. . 5 New 

43 Haverhill street 3 New 

125 Templeton street 16 New 

95 Freeport street 15 New 

69 Humboldt avenue 12 New 

86 Harold street 12 New 

21 Castlegate road 14 New 

10.\ Columbus square 4 New 

84 Theodore Parker road. . . 20 New 

199 Massachusetts avenue . 4 New 

61 Wvcliff avenue 20 New 



fixtures . 
fi.xtures. 
fi.xtures. 
fixtures, 
fi-xtures. 
fixtures, 
fi-xtures. 
fi.xtures . 
fixtures . 
fixtures. 
fixtures . 
fi-xtures. 
fixtures, 
fi-xtures . , 



S200 

60 

100 

1.55 

300 



SI.'jO 
100 
1.50 
325 
115 
150 
1.35 
15 
300 
250 
385 
2.50 



S2,860 
700 
35 
1.55 
3.50 
200 



450 

160 

400 

40 

500 

100 

300 

1,000 

150 

250 

42,000 



S7o 
275 
250 



S65 
125 

70 

60 
125 
350 
500 
400 

60 
200 
200 

20 
135 
475 



MAYOR MANSFIELD MOVES TO 
SECURE BOATHOUSE FOR 
WEST END RESIDENTS. 

The following statement was issued by 
Mayor Mansfield on January 20: 

The Mayor was waited on today by a 
committee representing the West End 
Improvement Association, composed of: 

Rev. John T. Powers of St. Joseph's 
Church, Jo.seph Lee, Jr., Professor George 
Owen of M. 1. T., and Frieda Rogolsky, 
who were interested in having a boat- 
house for the use of the public built on 
the Boston side of the Charles river in 
the West End, somewhere near the 
Charlesbank Recreation Grounds. The 
Metropolitan District Commission, under 
Commissioner Hultman, has the neces- 
sary money left over from the Storrow 
Fund for the beautifying of the Charles 
River Basin, and the boathouse, if built. 



would be built entirely from that fund 
and be maintained by the Metropolitan 
District Commission. 

I am to confer with Park Commissioner 
Long and Commissioner Hultman about 
this and will communicate with the 
committee later. 

The object of building the boathouse is 
to have the river used more by small 
boats — sailboats, canoes and rowboats — 
and to provide a housing place where 
they will be protected. It seems like an 
excellent plan and unless there is objec- 
tion now unforeseen I shall probably 
favor it. 

This committee also requested tlie es- 
tablishment of a traffic light at the 
corner of Allen and Charles streets, which 
is a very dangerous crossing, and where 
many casualties have occurred. I re- 
ferred that request to the Traffic Com- 
mission for a report. 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



93 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Monday, January 13, 1936. 
Regular meeting of the City Council in the 
Council Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m., Coun. 
CiALLAGHER presiding in the temporary absence 
of President Fitzgerald. Absent, Coun. Brack- 
man, Peter A. Murray, Norton and Shattuck. 



MOSQUITO CONTROL. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 13, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I have received from the secretary 
of the State Reclamation Board notice that under 
the provisions of section 4 of chapter 112 of the 
Acts of 1931, the Board has fixed the amount of 
money to be raised and appropriated bj' Boston 
for the maintenance of mosquito control works 
during 1936 at $.300. 

To meet this certification I submit herewith an 
order providing for the appropriation of the re- 
quired amount from the Reserve Fund and respect - 
fully recommend the adoption of this order by 
your Honorable Body. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
State Reclamation Board. 

Boston, December 14, 193.5. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
IMayor of Boston. 

Dear Mayor, — Under the provisions of chapter 
112 of the .\cts of 1931, an act relative to carrying 
out mosquito control measures, the State Recla- 
mation Board is required by section 4 to certify 
the amounts to be raised and appropriated by 
each city and town for the maintenance of the 
mosquito control works constructed in each city 
or town. This section is as follows: 

"On or before December fifteenth in each year, 
the sums of money necessary to properly maintain 
during the ensuing year the mosquito control 
works originally constructed in any city or town 
hereunder shall be estimated by said board and 
certified by it to such city or town. The amounts 
so certified shall be raised and appropriated bj' 
such city or town during said ensuing year and 
shall be paid into the state treasury and disbursed 
therefrom on warrants drawn by said board." 

.■Vs directed by section 4 of chapter 112 of the 
Acts of 1931, the State Reclamation Board has 
made estimates of the necessary maintenance, and 
hereby certifies that $300 is the sum of money 
necessary to properly maintain during the ensuing 
year the masquito control works constructed in 
the City of Boston under the said act. 

The Board calls attention to the provisions in 
the latter part of said section 4 relative to paying 
the said amount into the state treasury and urges 
that this be done as soon as possible after your 
appropriation is meide. 

A form of suitable order is attached. 
Very truly yours, 
State Reclamation Board, 
GEORaE R. Str.\tton, Secretary. 

Ordered, That the sum of $300 be, and hereby 
is, appropriated, for the purpose of maintaining 
during the current year the mosquito control 
works as estimated and certified to by the State 
Reclamation Board, in accordance with the pro- 
visions of chapter 112 of the Acts of 1931, said 
sum to be charged to the Reserve Fund, when 
made. 

Referred to E.xecutive Committee. 



INVITATION FROM HARVARD COLLEGE. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
OfiBce of the Mayor, January 11, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith an invitation 
from the President and Fellows of Harvard Col- 
lege, addressed to his Honor and the City Council, 
requesting your participation in the Tercen- 
tenarj' Celebration of Harvard University in the 
College Yard on Friday, September 18, 1936, at 
10 o'clock a. m. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

The President and Fellows of Harvard College 

to 

Hia Honor the Mayor and the Honorable Council 

of the City of Boston. 
Greeting: 

It having pleased God to inspire the love of 
Learning amongst the first settlers of the Colony 
of Massachusetts Bay and, in the infancy of their 
community, to direct their labors towards the 
well-being of Church and State through the estab- 
lishment of foundations for the increase of knowl- 
edge and the education of youth, it is meet and 
proper that this Society of Scholars, founded in 
the Year of Our Lord one thousand six hundred 
and thirty-six, by Act of a Great and General 
Court of the Company of Ma.ssachusetts Bay con- 
vened in Boston the 8th/18th of September of 



that year, should celebrate in the company of 
friends and benefactors the Three Hundredth 
Anniversary of its foundation. 

To the watering of that tender plant in the 
wilderness of a great continent the faith, the 
courage, and the devotion of many were given. 
Amongst them John Harvard, a godly gentleman 
and a lover of learning, dying before his prime in 
the second year of the College, bequeathed to it 
the half of his estate and the whole of his library. 
In gratitude to him the General Court gave his 
name to the Foundation; and Harvard College it 
has since been called. Of him it has been written: 

"He will teach that one disinterested deed of 
hope and faith may crown a brief and broken life 
with deathle.ss fame. He will teach that the good 
which men do lives after them, fructified and 
multiplied beyond all power of measurement or 
computation. He will teach that from the seed 
which he planted in loneliness, weakness, and 
sorrow, have sprung joy, strength, and energy 
ever fresh, blooming year after year in this garden 
of learning, and flourishing more and more as time 
goes on." 

Thus joined with the destinies of the College, 
and of the University into which it blossomed, 
he shares the homage we would pay to the pious 
Founders, to the General Court of Colony and 
Commonwealth, to the Town and the City of 
Cambridge, to the City of Boston, and to the 
ancient and unending procession of Benefactors 
whom John Harvard led and still inspires. 

Our debt to the past does not begin with the 
record of our establishment; for in building their 
House of Learning in the New World our ancestors 
laid claim to a patrimony in the Old. To Em- 
manuel, the College of John Harvard, and to his 
University of Cambridge; to the University of 
Oxford; and through the British Universities to 
the ancient seats of Bologna and Paris, we are 
bound by lineage and tradition. In later years 
the Universities of Germany and of other European 
countries have contributed to the advancement of 
American scholarship, both by their hospitality 
to .-American students and by participating in 
fruitful exchanges of teachers. In these benefits 
Harvard University has largely shared. With 
all the Universities, Colleges, and Learned Socie- 
ties of the Old World and the New, we are held 
in the bonds of a common heritage and a common 
purpose. 

Wherefore we beg the favor of j'our participa- 
tion in the rites and festivities of our Tercentenary, 
to be held in Cambridge on September the six- 
teenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth, in the year 
of Our Lord the one thousand nine hundred and 
thirty-sixth. 

If so be that you will thus honor us, we pray 
that we may in due season be apprised of the 
names of your Delegates, whom, for your sake 
and in their own persons we shall gladly welcome 
to our Festival. 

Given at Harvard University, in the City of 
Cambridge, and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
this First Day of January, in the year of Our 
lyord the one thousand nine hundred and thirty- 
sixth and of Harvard College the Three Hundredth. 
Jaiies B. Conant, 

President. 
Jerome D. Greene, 
Secretary to the Corporation. 

Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENTS BY THE MAYOR. 

Subject to confirmation by the Council the 
Mayor submitted the following appointments, viz.: 

Weigher of Coal: John Mahoney, 194 Broad 
street, Weymouth, Mass. 

Weighers of Goods: Walter T. Curran, 85 Per- 
kins street, Somerville, Mass.; John J. Heavey, 
235 Beach street, Belmont, Mass.; William F. 
Heavey, 37 Cabot street, Milton, Mass 

Severally laid over a week under the law. 



APPROPRIATION FOR MUNICIPAL EM- 
PLOYMENT BUREAU. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
OflSce of the Mayor, January 10, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I am advised by the director of 
the Municipal Employnent Bureau that funds 
available for the operation of the Bureau are 
practically exhausted, and that an additional 
appropriation should be made at this time to 
permit the carrying on of the activities of the 
Bureau. According to an estimate prepared by 
the director, an appropii. .tion of $10,000 will be 
required to cover the work of the Bureau for 
approximately six months. In my opinion the 
activities of the Bureau »hould be continued, and 
I therefore submit herewith an order providing 
for the appropriation of $10,000, and respectfully 
recommend its adoption by your Honorable Body. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Ordered, That the sum of $10,000 be, and 
hereby is, appropriated, to be expended by the 
Municipal Employment Bureau, under the direc- 
tion of the Mayor, in the prosecution of its duties, 
said sum to be charged to the Reserve Fund, when 
made. 

Referred to the Executive Committee. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON PER CAPITA 
COST COMPARISONS. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 11, 1930. 
To the City Council. 

Gentleman, — I transmit herewith the report 
prepared for the Mayor and City Council by the 
committee appointed by rae to consider the matter 
of per capita cost comparisons of municipal 
expenditures in accordance with the order passed 
by your body October 21, 1935. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

The undersigned were appointed a committee 
by his Honor the Mayor, at the request of the 
City Council, to examine into the -statement that 
the per capita cost of municipal government in 
Boston is greater than in any other large city in 
this country. 

This statement has been widely quoted and is 
based on a census bureau table issued by the 
Federal Government covering the thirteen largest 
cities in the United States for the year 1933. 
The per capita cost for each city is oljtained by 
dividing the total of its expenditures (excluding 
public service enterprises) for the year 1933 by 
the figure corresponding to the population as 
shown by the latest United States census. The 
quotient is assumed to be the per capita cost of 
municipal government in each of the cities to 
which the process is applied, and the resulting 
figures range from $36.84 for St. Louis to $76.02 
for Boston. 

The arithmetic is probably correct, but the 
results are of little, if any, practical value. The 
table is nothing more than it purports to be. the 
result of a mathematical process, but like a great 
many other statistical tables, it is open to various 
interpretations depending on the particular line 
of argument advanced by the person using it. 

To make a fair comparison of the cost of munic- 
ipal government among several cities it is neces- 
sary to take into account, first, how many, and 
what (luality of services are furnished in each 
city at the public expense and what items of 
expense not strictly municipal are included in the 
costs of one city and not in another, and. second, 
the character and extent of the population served. 

So far as Boston is concerned, the two factors 
involved in this table are not comparable with 
any of the other large cities. Municipal expendi- 
tures in this city cover expenditures for county 
government, metropolitan expenses and other 
items which in other cities are not included in the 
city expense. In addition, th» city is obliged to 
incur expenses not for a resident population of 
781.188, which is the figure used in the table, 
but for a day-time population of at least 500,000 
more who live in the suburbs but come to business 
in Boston each day. Using this day-time popu- 
lation figures, it brings the per capita cost down 
to $46, and omitting from the total expense several 
items peculiar to Boston, we can bring the per 
capita figure down to less than $40. 

Of course this process and conclusion is more or 
less ridiculous, but it is advanced for the purpose 
of showing the lack of importance or value of 
statistics of this kind. 

Another table recently compiled by Dun & 
Bradstreet gives the net debt of Boston per capita 
as $108. which is $36 less than the average for the 
thirteen cities having more than 500,000 popu- 
lation. This kind of table is equally valueless 
and for the same reason, that is, that the bases 
and factors involved are not comparable. 

As we have indicated, several sets of tables can 
be prepared based on authentic figures, some of 
which tables show on their face that the cost of 
municipal government in Boston is less than the 
cost in most of the other large cities and others 
show just the opposite. We reiterate that such 
tables are worthless because they are founded on 
bases which are not fairly comparable. In one 
city ashes and garbage may be collected as a 
municipal function while in another it is a private 
expense. One city may have to expend millions 
for snow removal while another has practically 
no snow expense. Streets and sewers may be 
constructed at the public expense in one city 
while in another the abutters have to pay the 
cost. The taxpayers in one city may have fur- 
nished to them as a matter of cour.se public baths 
and gymnasia which are absent in another city. 
While presumably all large cities have a traffic 
problem to some extent, the difficulties may be so 
increased in one city by narrow and illogically laid 
out streets that a police officer is required at 
almost every intersection in the business district 
while in another with wide avenues and rectangular 
blocks traffic officers are hardly necessary. 

In one city the public welfare expenses are 
assumed by the county and do not appear as a 
municipal expense. In others the greater portion 
of the public welfare costs have been paid during 
the depression by the State or the Federal Gov- 
ernment, but in Boston nearly all the expense 
of public welfare has been the burden of the 
municipality. Every other large city has missing 
from its municipal expense account one or more 
of the elements which are included in the cost of 
municipal government in this city. 

Taking these matters into consideration we 
think it is evident that a table of per capita costs 
is of no value either for comparative purposes 
or as an argument for reduction of expenditures. 



94 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



The force of this statement can better be appre- 
riiitod when it is realized that a survey of per 
capita rost tables compiled during the past thirty 
years hhows that with only one or two exceptions 
Boston has always been credited or charKed with 
the hi|{h«.t per capita cost amonK the larger 
cities of the country. In other words, the posi- 
tion of Boston as shown in the 1933 table Lssued 
by the Census Bureau is not a new development. 
It has existed for at leiist three decades and must 
necessarily continue so long as per capita costs 
are computed on the present basis. 

John F. Down, City Councilor — Chairman. 

Charles J. Fox, City Auditor. 

WiLFHED J. Doyle. City Clerk. 

Placed on file. 



BIDS FOR STREET LIGHTING. 

The following w!is received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 13, 1936. 
To the Honorable the City Council. 

Gentlemen. — I transmit herewith letter from the 
Commissioner of Public Works dated December 30. 
1936. relating to bids received by him for (1) fur- 
nishing illuminating gas for street lighting and (2) 
lighting, extinguishing and maintaining gas lamps. 

Mr. Carven recommends the approval of a con- 
tract for the term of five years at the total price of 
$20.50 per lamp per year ($7.4() for gas furnished 
and $13.04 for lighting, extinguishing and main- 
tenance) for approximately 9,500 single burner 
lamps under Item 1 of the proposals to the Boston 
Consolidated Gas Company, the only bidder. 
Item 2 of the proposals providing for a contract of 
three years, sets forth a total price of $21.6(5 per 
lamp per year. Item 3 of the proposals, providing 
for a five-year contract, with the right in the city 
to reduce the number of lamps to 50 per cent of 
the total in operation at the beginning of the term, 
sets forth a total price of $26.21 per lamp per year. 
Item 4 of the proposals, providing for a three- 
year contract, with the right in the city to reduce 
the number of lamps to 50 per cent of the total in 
operation at the beginning of the term, sets forth a 
total price of $28.16 per lamp per year. 

Mr. Carven estimates that a contract under 
Item 1 for five vears will represent a saving to the 
city of approximately $11,020 per year over a 
three-year contract under Item 2; a saving of 
approximately $54,245 in the first year and of 
approximately $27,122 in each of the following four 
years over a five-year contract under Item 3; and a 
saving of approximately $72,770 in the first year 
and of approximately $36,385 in each of the follow- 
ing two jears over a three-year contract under 
Item 4. T . • 

If the five-year contract under Item 1 is ap- 
proved, the price will represent a saving over the 
present price of approximately $2.62 per lamp per 
year, or a total of approximately $24,890 per year, 
or approximately $124,450 for the five-year term. 

Moreover, if the five-year contracts under Item 
1 are approved by your Honorable Body and me 
prior to March 1. 1936, the company has agreed to 
give to the city a total discount or allowance from 
the purchase price of $12,607.60. 



The form of contract for furnishing gas (under 
Item 1) contains a provision that if at any time or 
times during the term thereof, the price to a general 
customer of the Boston Consolidated Gas Com- 
pan.v using 2.000 cubic feet of gas per month (the 
average customer, I understand, uses about 1,8(X) 
cubic feet per month) shall be deoresised to an 
amount below the present price of $2.50. the price 
of $7.46 provided for in said contract shall be de- 
creased in the siime ratio. The city will thereby 
have the benefit of any rate reductions to general 
consumers that may be ordered by the Department 
of Public Utilities or voluntarily made by the 
company. 

I accordingly submit the two contracts under 
Item 1 for your approval and recommend that 
.vour Honorable Body give a public hearing after 
seven days' notice in the City Record under the 
provisions of section 6 of chapter 486 of the Acts 
of 1909, as promptly as possible. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Public Works Department. 

December 30, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — Bids were received on December 26, 
1935. after public advertisement, for furnishing 
illuminating gas for street lighting and for equip- 
ment and the lighting and extinguishing of gas 
lamps in the City of Boston, excluding the Hyde 
Park district. Proposals were invited as follows: 

Item 1. For about 9,500 single-burner lamps 
for a five-year period. 

Item 2. For about 9,500 single-burner lamps 
for a three-year period. 

Item 3. For about 9,500 single-burner lamps 
for a five-year period with the city's option of 
making a oO per cent reduction in the number of 
lamps during said period. 

Item 4. For about 9,500 single-burner lamps 
for a three-\ear period with the city's option of 
making a 5(j per cent reduction in the number of 
lamps during said period. 

The Boston Consolidated Gas Company, the 
only bidder, submitted the following prices: 

Five-year period $20.50 per lamp, per year. 

Three-year period $21.66 per lamp, per year. 

Five-year period (with 50 
per cent reduction 

during said period). $26.21 per lamp, per year. 
Three-year period (with 
50 per cent reduction 

during said period), $28.16 per lamp, per year. 
I inclose a tabulation showing the estimated 
yearly cost under the various items. 

I respectfully recommend that the proposal for 
gas lighting for the five-year period be accepted, 
as it is the most economical for the city. 

(i'opies of the proposed contracts are sent here- 
with for presentation to the City Council for its 
approval as well as for that of your Honor as 
required bv section 6 of chapter 486 of the Acts of 
1909 (City Charter Amendments). 
Yours respectfully, 

C. J. Cab%'en, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



Bids for Fuhnishinq Illuminating Gas, Etc. — Opened December 26, 1935. 

Total 

Number Furnishing Per Year Total 

of Lamps. Gas. Equipment. Per Unit. Yearly Cost. 

9,500 $7 46 $13 04 $20 50 SI 94 750 00 



Item. Period. 
1 5-year 



2 3-year 

3 1st year of 5-year 

2nd-3rd-4th-5th year of 5-year 
Plus 4,750 electric lamps at $20.50 



9,500 


S7 46 
S7 46 
S7 46 


S14 20 
$18 75 
S18 75 


$21 66 
$26 21 
$26 21 


$205,770 00 


9.500 


*S24S,995 00 


Reduced oO% 
4,750 

50 


$124,497 50 
97,375 00 




$7 46 
$7 46 


$20 70 
$20 70 


$28 16 
$28 16 


$221,872 50 


9,i>00 

Reduced 50% 

4,750 

S20.50 


*$267,520 00 


8133,760 00 

97,375 00 

$231,135 00 



1st year of 3-year 

2nd and 3rd year of 3-year 

Plus 4,750 electric lamps at S20.50 



*The actual expense for the first year is more or less indeterminate, due to the fact that electric lamps 
will be substituted for gas lamps during the year. The above cost is the maximum. 

Ordered printed and referred to the Committee on Municipal Lighting. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

The following petitions were received and re- 
ferred to the committees named, viz.: 

Claims. 

Walter Davey, for compensation for collapse 
of water boiler at 48 Carrolton street, caused 
by shutting off water. 

Harry Fine, for compensation for damage 
to car by dump carts. 

Bartholomew Flvnn, for compensation for 
injuries caused by an alleged defect at Deer 
Island Prison. 

Samuel Ilertzig, Inc., for compensation for 
damage to property at 619 W ashington street, 
caused by break in water main. 



E. F. Hodgson, for compensation for damage 
to car by city truck. 

Sadie A. Jones, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect at Neponset avenue 
and Spaulding square. 

Rose C. Kelly, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect in Municipal Build- 
ing, Shawmut avenue. 

Virginia W. Matthews et al., for compensa- 
tion for injuries and damage to car caused by 
an alleged defect in Veterans of Foreign Wars 
Highway. 

Lena Meissler, for compensation for damage 
to car by city trucl<. 

The Sheraton, Inc., for refund on refuse tickets. 

Stainslaw G. Stanium, for compensation for 
injuries caused by city truck. 



Edith Wexler, for compensation for damage 
to property at 77 King street, caused by frozen 
water pipes. 

Ellen E. Young, for compensation for damage 
to property at 98 F street. South Boston, caused 
by broken water main. 

Executive. 

Petition of Howard Colson, employed in Boston 
City Hospital as suppl>Tnan, to be retired under 
chapter 765, Acts of 1914. 

Petition of Miriam L. .Staples, for children 
under fifteen years of age to appear at Statler 
Georgian Hall. Januarj' 7. 

Committee on Jitney Licenses. 
Petition of Eastern Massachusetts Street 
Railway Company, for license for operation of 
motor vehicles on Chelsea street, between Chelsea- 
Boston boundary line and in and around City 
square; on Washington Street North, between 
City square and Haymarket Square Circle; also 
on Warren avenue, between City square and 
Warren Bridge; on Warren Bridge, on Beverly 
street, between Warren Bridge and Washington 
Street North. 



BOND OF FRANCIS P. BUTLER. 

The bond of Francis P. Butler, appointed 
second assistant register of deeds January 2, 1936, 
in The Employers' Liability Assurance Corpora- 
tion, Limited, was submitted. 

Approved by the Council. 



INTEREST IN CONTRACT OF JOSEPH P. 
MANNING. 

Notice was received from Joseph P. Manning of 
his interest in contracts awarded to Joseph P. 
Manning Company. 

Placed on file. 



ORGANIZATION OF STREET COM- 
MISSIONERS. 

Notice was received from the Board of Street 
Commissioners of its organization on January 6, 
1936, by the election of Owen A. Gallagher to be 
chairman and Cornelius A. Reardon to be secretary. 

Placed on file. 



ABSENCE OF MAYOR FROM CITY. 

Notice was received from the Mayor of his 
absence from the city from Sunday, Januarj' 12, 
at 12 noon to and including W'ednesdav, January 
15. 1936. 

Placed on file. 



WHITE WAY LIGHTING, COLUMBUS 
AVENUE. 

Coun. ROBERTS offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the Mayor, 
to include in the current budget a sum sufficient to 
provide for the installation of a white way lighting 
system along Columbus avenue, from Park square 
to Massachusetts avenue. Ward 4. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



WEEKLY PAYMENT OF W. P. A. WORKERS. 

Coun. DOWD offered the following: 
Ordered. That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to consider the advisability of requesting the 
President of the United States to pay all W. P. A 
workers once a week instead of twice a month. 

Coun. DOW'D — Mr. President, some weeks 
ago I introduced an order, which was adopted by 
the Council, requesting the President of the 
United States to remove from office immediately 
the administrator of W. P. A. in this state. Arthur 
G. Rotch, on the ground that he was so inefficient 
in handling the situation that a general breakdown 
of the work was imminent. I also requested the 
President to remove Mr. Rotch because of the 
fact that he knew not any feeling of human kind- 
ness towards the people of Boston and of Massa- 
chusetts. Since that time the battle has been 
taken up, not by a mere City Councilor, but by 
Congressmen and by other men in this state, who 
have recommended that Mr. Rotch be removed 
from office. The breakdown in the W. P. A. has 
come. There is no question about that. We 
can see lines of hundreds and hundreds of men 
and women waiting to be paid, we can see lines of 
hundreds and hundreds of men and women who 
should get their pay, but who instead are forced 
to go to the pubhc welfare to have their income 
supplemented week in and week out. meaning 
thereby the expenditure of at least $100,000 of 
money of the taxpayers of Boston, which could 
be avoided if Mr. Rotch and his sociahtes, high- 
brows and bluebloods, who are running the W. P. A. 
at the present time were not on the job. What 
do we find in Boston? You can pick up any 
paper on any day in the week and will find the 
same old story,— that $600,000 or $700,000 has 
been appropriated for W. P. A. work. But what 
is the truth of the matter? The hundreds of 
men and women who are going to OUver street or 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



95 



Nashua street know what the answer is better 
than you or I. If there is anything in the world 
that is damnable, it is the attitude of the Federal 
Government towards our men and women who 
need aid. They expect employment. I have 
said in this Council for the last two months that 
they are not going to get any work, and I repeat 
it today. There are more men and women being 
laid off under W. P. A. than are being put on. 
I say to the President of the United States of 
America that Arthur G. Rotch should be removed 
from that oflfiee immediately and that someone 
who understands the poor people of America, of 
Boston and Massachusetts, should be placed in 
that position. Oh, it is a crying shame! Go to 
the Army Base, go to Park square, go to any 
W. P. A. project, and you will see them rolling 
up in their limousines, their Pierce- Arrows and 
other large cars, getting $40 or $50 a week, when 
men or women with five or six children go out 
for a laboring job and cannot get it. We are 
told that everybody will be put to work, but 
what is the result? On welfare there are within 
5,000 of the number who were there three years 
ago. I say to the people of Boston that they are 
being deceived by this government of ours. I 
repeat that there are more people getting laid off 
on the W. P. A. than there are being put on. 
There is not a man in the Council who is not up 
against the same proposition that I am. Day 
in and day out they listen to an account of the 
sufferings of hungry men and women, with children, 
who are wondering why they cannot get a job, 
why they cannot be employed, while individuals 
with a bank roll in some cases of $50,000 are 
working. They cannot understand it and, 
placing myself in their shoes, I cannot understand 
it, either. There is nobody who can understand 
it except the bluebloods. the socialites, who are 
running the W. P. A. at the present time. These 
people go into your home and my home and tell 
us now to raise our children, what we shall eat 
for breakfast and for dinner. They know not 
what it is to be hungry, not knowing where the 
next meal is coming from. The intent of W. P. A. 
was to give employment to men and women who 
need it. But that is not being done. Men and 
women with plenty of money are being placed at 
work in preference to men and women who really 
need the work. In the meantime, millions upon 
millions are being wasted, because the socialite 
Hopkins knows not what it is all about, and, 
furthermore, cares less. Let the President of 
the United States of America place at the head 
of that department, in so far as Massachusetts 
is concerned, a man who knows the beats of the 
human heart, a man who understands the every- 
day man and who knows what it is to be hungry. 
This gentleman. Rotch, goes to the Ritz-Carlton 
and spends more money for one meal than any 
of us, fellow members, get in a week. He does 
not care about the common people. They are 
just common trash, beneath his notice. It is 
time that we of the City Council, even without 
any power in the matter, placed the situation in 
regard to these socialites before the public. These 
poor men and women who want nelp from the 
W. P. A. are advised to sec their City Councilor — 
knowing well that not a member of the City 
Council can do anything for them. They care 
less for us than they do for the individual looking 
for work. There are 110,000 applications on 
file. None of them will go to work. Why don't 
they tell the truth, and why doesn't the President 
of the United States remove .\rthur G. Rotch as 
State Administrator? (.\pplause from the gal- 
leries.) 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



PRINTING OF MUNICIPAL REGISTER 

Coun. ROSENBERG offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Statistics Department be 
authorized, under the direction of the committee 
on rules, to prepare and have printed the Municipal 
Register for the current year; and that the Clerk 
of Committees be authorized to prepare and have 
printed a pocket edition of the organization of the 
city government ; the expense of said register and 
organization to be charged to the appropriation 
for City Documents. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

Coun. KERRIGAN submitted the following: 
Ordered, That under the provisions of chapter 
115 of the General Laws, and acts in amendment 
thereof or in addition thereto the amounts set forth 
m the list of allowances hereto annexed, for the 
month of January, 1936, of aid to soldiers and 
sailors and their families residing in the City of 
Boston or having a settlement therein, be hereby 
approved and paid until otherwise ordered, unless 
the person named shall previously become ineligible 
to receive said aid. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



PAYMENT OF ANNUITY TO THOMAS E. 
GOGGIN. 

Coun. KERRIGAN offered the foUowing: 
Rffiolved, That the City CouncU of Boston 
Hereby approves the enactment of legislation for 



the payment of an annuity to Thomas E. Goggin, 
formerly an employee of the City of Boston and 
County of Suffolk, who was injured in the course 
of his employment, provided that said legislation 
includes a referendum to the Mayor and City 
Council. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



REFUND TO DANIEL F. MCCARTHY. 

Coun. MELLEN offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation to 
authorize the refunding to Daniel F. McCarthy of 
the amount paid for a retail package license, 
provided that said legislation includes a referendum 
to the Mayor and City Council. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



PAYMENT TO MOTHER OF MARY 
DURANT. 

Coun. KERRIGAN offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby favors the enactment of legislation author- 
izing the city to pay a sum of money to the mother 
of Mary Durant, who lost her life at a South Boston 
bathing beach, provided that such legislation 
includes a referendum to the Mayor and City 
Council. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



PAY.MENT TO PARENTS OF JOHN 
McGRATH. 

Coun. KERRIG.\N offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby favors the enactment of legislation authoriz- 
ing said city to pay a sum of money to the parents 
of John NlcCirath, a minor, provided that said 
legislation includes a referendum to the Major 
and City Council. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



PAYMENT TO HENRY W. ROBERTS. 

Coun. KERRIGAN offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby favors the enactment of legislation authoriz- 
ing the payment of a sum of money by said city to 
Henry W. Roberts, provided that said legislation 
includes a referendum to the Mayor and City 
Council. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



AUTO.MATIC TRAFFIC SIGNALS, WARD 13. 

Coun. PETER J. FITZGERALD offered the 
following: 

Ordered, That the Traffic Commi.s.sion be re- 
quested, through his Honor the Mayor, to install 
automatic traffic signals at the junction of Savin 
Hill avenue and Dorchester avenue. Ward 13. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



AUTOMATIC TRAFFIC SIGNALS, 
DORCHESTER. 

Coun. McGR.\TH offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Traffic Commissioner be re- 
quested, through his Honor the Mayor, to install 
automatic traffic signals adjacent to St. Ann's 
Church, Neponset avenue, and St. Mark's Church, 
Dorchester avenue. 
Passed under saspension of the rule. 



EMPLOYMENT OF NONRESIDENTS AT 
RACE TRACKS. 

Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to instruct the Corporation Counsel to prepare 
suitable legislation for presentation to the present 
Legislature limiting employment of nonresidents 
of Massachusetts at the various horse and race 
tracks in this state to 10 per cent of the total 
number of persons employed on such tracks. 

Coun. McGR.\TH — Mr. President, in the state 
of Florida there is a rule that only 10 per cent of 
nonresidents of the state can be employed at 
horse or dog tracks. A friend of mine went down 
there from Massachusetts to secure a position, 
having been so employed here, and when he 
arrived in Florida he was told that he could not 
get a job there as long as he did not belong in the 
state, and he didn't even have his car fare home. 
I think if they set such a precedent in Florida we 
should set it in Massachusetts. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



COMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE 
RENDERING LICENSES. 

Coun. ROBERTS offered the following: 
Ordered, That the President of the City Council 
appoint five members of the Council as a committee 



for the purpose of investigating and supervising 
all petitions for licenses under chapter 111, sec- 
tion 151, of the General Laws, and also for the 
purpose of investigating any establishments or 
organizations doing business within the meaning 
of said act, whether they have petitioned for a 
license or not. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON RULES. 

Coun. KERRIG.\N, for the Committee on Rules, 
submitted accompanying draft of rules for City 
Council of 1936-37, being substantially the same 
rules as were in effect during the year 1935 — recom- 
mending their adoption, viz.: 

R0LES OF THE CiTT COUNCIL, 1936-37. 

Rule 1. Unless otherwise ordered from time to 
time the regular meeting of the city council shall be 
held on every Monday at two o'clock p. m. Special 
meetings may be called by the president at his dis- 
cretion, and by the city clerk for the purpose only of 
drawing jurors. No special meeting of the city 
council, except to draw jurors, shall be called except 
with the consent of all the members, upon less 
notice than twenty-four hours from the time the 
notices are mailed or dispatched by special 
messenger. 

President. 
Rule 2. The president of the council shall take 
the chair at the hour to which the council shall have 
adjourned and shall call the members to order, and, 
a quorum being present, shall proceed with the 
regular order of business. In the absence of the 
president the senior member by age present shall 
preside as temporary president, or until a presiding 
officer is chosen. 

Rule 3. The president shall preserve decorum 
and order, may speak to points of order in prefer- 
ence to other members and shall decide all questions 
of order, subject to an appeal. .4ny member may 
appeal from the decision of the chair, but no appeal 
shall be considered unless properly seconded. No 
other business, except a motion to adjourn or to lay 
on the table, shall be in order until the question on 
appeal has been decided. The question shall be 
put as follows: 

"Shall the decision of the chair stand as the 
judgment of the council?" The vote shall be by 
a roll call, and it shall be decided in the affirmative 
unless a majority of the votes are to the contrary 
Rule 4. The president shall propound all 
motions in the order in which they are moved, 
unless the subsequent motion shall be previous in 
its nature, except that, in naming sums and fixing 
times, the largest sum and the longest time shall 
be put first. 

Rule 5. The president shall, at the request of 
any member, make a division of a question when 
the sense will admit of it. 

Rule 6. The president shall, without debate, 
decide all questions relating to priority of business 
to be acted upon. 

Rule 7. The president shall declare all votes; 
but if any member doubts a vote, the president 
shall cause a rising vote to be taken, and, when 
any member so requests, shall cause the vote to 
be taken or verified by yeas and nays. 

I{ule 8. The president shall appoint all com- 
mittees, fill all vacancies therein, and designate the 
rank of the members thereof. 

Rule 9. When the president of the council or 
the president pro tempore shall desire to vacate 
the chair he may call any member to it; but such 
substitution shall not continue beyond an 
adjournment. 

Motions. 
Rule 10. Every motion shall be reduced to 
writing if the president shall so direct. 

Rule 11. A motion to strike out and insert shall 
be deemed indivisible; but a motion to strike out 
being lost shall not preclude amendment, or a 
motion to strike out an insert. 

Rule 12. No motion or proposition of a subject 
different from that under consideration shall be 
admitted under color of amendment. 

Any motion, order or resolution which in the 
opinion of the presiding officer does not have a 
direct bearing on the business of the council shall 
be referred without debate to the committee on 
rules and shall not be further considered by the 
council except upon report by that committee. 
There shall be no appeal from the decision of the 
chair hereunder, and this rule shall not be subject 
to suspension. 

The committee on rules may report that any 
motion, order or resolution so referred to it is out 
of order because not having a direct bearing on 
the business of the council, and its report shall be 
a final disposition of the matter, subject to an 
appeal which shall be governed by the same pro- 
visions as those governing appeals from rulings of 
the presiding officer. 

Rule 13. When an order or resolution relates 
to a subject which may properly be examined and 
reported upon by an existing committee of the 
city council, such order or resolution shall, upon 
presentation, be referred to such committee. 
When a motion is made to refer any subject, and 
different committees are proposed, the motions 
shall be put in the following order: 

1. To a standing committee of the council. 

2. To a special committee of the council. 

Any member offering a motion, order or resolu- 
tion, which is referred to a committee, shall be 
given a hearing on the same by the committee 



96 



C ITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



before a report is made thereon, provided he so 
request* iit ttie time of ufTeriiiK the order or before 
fjniil artioii by the committee. 

Any matter referred to a ('(.mmittce may be 
recallwl by a majority vote of all the members of 
the couiiiil, if surh matter is not reported upon 
within one month from the date of reference. 

Hule 14. .\fter a motion has been put by the 
president it shall not be withdrawn except by 
unanimous consent. 

Hule 15. When a question is under debate the 
followiuK motions only shall be entertained, and 
shall have precedence in the order in which they 
stjtnd arranged: 

1. To adjourn. 

2. To lay on the table. 

;{. The previous question. 

4. To close debate at a specified time. 

5. To postpone to a day certain. 
1). To commit. 

7. To amend. 

S. To postpone indefinitely. 

Rule It). .\ motion to adjourn shall be in order 
at any time, except on an immediate repetition or 
pending a verification of a vote; and that motion, 
the motion to lay on the table, the motion to take 
from the table, and the motion for the previous 
que.ll ion, shall be decided without debate. 

Readings. 
Rule 17. Every ordinance, order and resolution 
shall, unless rejected, have two several readings, 
both of which may take place at the same se.ssion 
unless objection is made, provided, however, that 
all orders for the expenditure of moneys, unless 
reported upon by a committee of the council, shall 
lie over for one week before final action thereons 
Whenever the second reading immediately follows 
the first reading, the document ma.v be read by its 
title only; provided, that all orders releasing rights 
or easements in or restrictions on land, all irders 
for the sale of land other than school lands, all 
appropriations for the purchase of land other than 
for school purposes, and all loans voted b.v the cil.v 
council shall require a vote of two-thirds of all the 
members of the city council, and shall be passed 
onl.v after two separate readings and b.v two 
.separate votes, the second of said readings and 
votes to be had not less than fourteen days after 
the first, except in the case of temporary loans in 
anticipation of taxes. 

Reconsideration. 

Rule 18. When a vote has been passed any 
member may move a reconsideration thereof at 
the sjime meeting. No member shall speak for 
more than ten minutes on a motion to reconsider. 

Rule lit. When a motion to reconsider h.as been 
decided, that decision shall not be reconsidered, 
and no question shall be twice reconsidered unles-s 
it has been amended after the reconsideration; 
nor shall any reconsideration be had upon the 
following motions; 

To adjourn. 

The previous question. 

To lay on the table. 

To t;ike from the table. 

To close debate at a specified time. 

A motion to reconsider may be laid on the table or 
postponed indefinitel.v, and the effect of such action 
in either case shall be to defeat the motion to 
reconsider. 

Conduct of Jlembers. 

Rule 20. Every member when about to speak 
shall rise, address the chair, and wait until he is 
recognized, and, in speaking, shall refrain from 
mentioning any other member by name, shall con- 
fine himself to the question and avoid personalities. 
.\ny member who, in debate or otherwise, indulges 
in personalities or makes charges reflecting upon 
the character of another member, shall make an 
apology in open session at the meeting at which 
the offence is committed or at the next succeed- 
ing regular meeting, and, failing to do so, shall be 
named b.v the president or held in contempt and 
suspended from further participation in debate until 
said apology is made. 

Rule 21. No member shall speak more than 
once on a question when another member who has 
not spoken claims the floor, and no member speak- 
ing shall, without his consent, be interrupted by 
another, except upon a point of order. 

Rule 22. No member shall be permitted to 
vote on any question, or to serve on any committee, 
where his private right is immediately concerned, 
distinct from the public interest. 

Rule 2.3. Ever.v member who shall be present 
when a question is put, unless he is excluded by 
interest, shall give his vote, unless the council for 
special reason shall excuse him. .Application to be 
so excused on any question must be made before 
the council is divided, or before the calling of the 
yeas and nays; and such application shall be 
accompanied b.v a brief statement of the reasons, 
and shall be decided without debate. 

Standing Committees. 
Rule 24. The following standing committees of 
the council, and all other committees, unless 
specially directed by the council, shall be appointed 
by the president: 

1. A committee, to be known as the Executive 
Committee, to consist of all the members of the 
council. . . 

2. .\ committee on -Appropriations, to consist 
of seven members of the council, to whom shall be 
referred such appropriation orders as may be sub- 
mitted to the council from time to time. 



3. A committee on Claims, to consist of five 
members of the council, to whom shall be referred 
all claims against the city arising from the act or 
neglect of any of its departments. They shall 
report annually an account of the claims awarded 
or approved by them, and the amount of money 
awarded or paid in settlements thereof. 

4. .\ committee on County Accounts, to consist 
of five members of the council. 

.5. A committee on Finance, to con-sist of seven 
members of the council, to whom shall be referred 
all applications for expenditures which involve a 
loan. 

6. A committee on Inspection of Prisons, to 
consist of five members of the council. 

7. A committee on Jitne.y Licenses, to consist 
of five members of the council. 

8. A committee on Legislative Matters, to 
consist of five members of the council, who shall, 
unless otherwise ordered, appear before the com- 
mittees of the General Court and represent the 
interest of the city; provided, said committee 
shall not appear unless authorized by vote of the 
city council, and shall not, unless directed so to 
do by the city council, oppose any legislation 
petitioned for by the preceding city council. 

'.). A committee on Ordinances, to consist of 
seven members of the council, to whom shall be 
referred all ordinances or orders concerning 
ordinances. 

10. A committee on Parkman Fund, to consist 
of five members of the council, to whom shall be 
referred all matters concerning the Parkman 
property, or the expenditure of the income from 
the Parkman Fund. 

11. A committee on Printing, to consist of 
five members of the council, who shall have the 
charge of all printing, advertising, or publishing 
ordered by the city council as one of its con- 
tingent or incidental expenses, and the supply of 
all stationery or binding for the same purpose. 
The committee shall fix the number of copies 
to be printed of any document printed as above, 
the minimum, however, to be four hundred; and 
they shall have the right to make rules and regu- 
lations for the care, custody and distribution of 
all documents, books, pamphlets and maps by the 
city messenger. 

i2. A committee on Public Lands, to consist 
of five members of the council, to whom shall be 
referred all matters relating to pubhc lands. 

13. A committee on Rules, to consist of five 
members of the council, to consider all matters 
concerning the rules, and to whom shall be referred 
all resolutions expressing opinions, principles, 
facts or purposes. 

14. A committee on Soldiers' Relief, to consist 
of five members of the council, who shall determine 
the amount of aid to be allowed to soldiers and 
sailors and their families and submit a schedule 
of the same to the city council monthly. 

Order of Business. 
Rule 2.5. At every regular meeting of the 
council the order of business shall be as follows: 

1. Communications from his honor the mayor. 

2. Presentation of petitions, memorials and re- 
monstrances. 

3. Reports of city officers, etc. 

4. Unfinished business of preceding meetings. 

5. Reports of committees. 

6. Motions, orders and resolutions. 

Spectators. 

Rule 26. No person, except a member of the 
council, shall be permitted to occupy the seat of any 
member while the council is in session. 

Rule 27. No person, excepting officials con- 
nected with the city council, and duly assigned 
reporters of the eight daily newspapers, shall be 
allowed in the anterooms or upon the floor of the 
council chamber while the council is in session. 
.Spectators will be allowed in the gallery of the 
council chamber when the council is in session, and 
no one will be admitted to said gallery after the 
seats are occupied. No demonstrations of approval 
or disapproval from the spectators shall be per- 
mitted, and if such demonstrations are made the 
gallery will be cleared. The city messenger shall 
enforce this rule. 

Burial Grounds. 

Rule 28. No permission for the use of land for 
the purpose of burial shall be granted until a public 
hearing shall have been given by the executive 
committee of the city council on the application 
for such permission, after due notice has been served 
upon abuttors. 

Smoking in the Council Chamber. 
Rule 29. No smoking shall be allowed in the 
council chamber when the council is in session. 

Committee Meetings. 
Rule .30. No meeting of any committee shall, 
without the consent of all the members thereof, be 
called upon less notice than twenty-four hours from 
the time the clerk shall have mailed the notices or 
dispatched them by special messenger, provided, 
however, that meetings of the executive com- 
mittee may be held in the recess period of any 
meeting of the council without such consent or 
notice. No committee, unless authorized by an 
order of the city council, shall incur any expense. 
No committee meetings shall be called later than 
one hour immediately preceding the time set for 
any regular meeting of the city council, nor shall 
any committee remain in session later than the 
hour named for any such regular meeting. 



Form of Votes. 

Rule 31. In all votes the form of expression 
shall be "Ordered" for everything by way of com- 
mand, and the form shall be "Resolved" for every- 
thing expressing opinions, principles, facts or 
purposes. 

Transfers. 

Rule 32. Every application for an appropria- 
tion to be provided for by transfer shall be re- 
ferred to the executive committee, unless otherwise 
ordered, and no such appropriation shall be made 
until the said committee has reported thereon. 

Use of Committee Rooms. 
Rule 33. No person except members and officer! 
of the city council and regularly assigned city hall 
reporters shall be admitted at any time to the west 
anteroom, the locker room, or the president's 
room, except when invited on official business or 
accompanied by a member of the council. 

Confirmation of .Appointments. 
Rule 34. The question of confirming appoint- 
ments by the mayor shall be decided by a yes and 
no ballot, unless otherwise ordered. 

Amendment and .Suspension. 

Rule 35. The foregoing rules shall not be 
altered, amended, suspended or repealed at any 
time, except by the votes of two-thirds of the mem- 
bers of the city council present and voting thereon. 

The report was accepted and the rules adopted. 



ACCEPTANCE OF WHITE OAK ROAD. 

Coun. FINLEY offered the following: 

Ordered, That the .Street Commissioners be re- 
quested, through his Honor the Major, to accept 
and lav out, under the W^. P. A. plan of construc- 
tion. White Oak road. Ward 20. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



RECESS. 

The Council voted at 2.40 p. m., on motion of 
Coun. ROBERTS, to take a recess subject to 
the call of the Chair. 

The members reassembled in the Council 
Chamber and were called to order by President 
FITZGERALD at 3.01 p. m. 



COMMITTEES APPOINTED. 

President FITZGERALD appointed the follow- 
ing committees, viz.: 

Legislative Matters. 
Henry L. Shattuck, chairman. 
Peter Fitzgerald. 
James J. Kilroy. 
John I. Fitzgerald. 
Richard D. Gleason. 

Jitneys. 
Peter A. Murray, chairman. 
Henry Selvitella. 
Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 
John F. Dowd. 
John E. Kerrigan. 

Municipal Lighting. 
John F. Dowd, chairman. 
Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr. 
Edward M. Gallagher. 
Sydney Rosenberg. 
George Murray. 



PENSIONS FOR CERTAIN POLICE 
OFFICERS. 
Coun. SELVITELL.A offered the foUowing: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby favors the enactment of legislation relative 
to pensions payable to certain police officers of 
the City of Boston heretofore retired on account 
of disabilit.v, provided that such legislation in- 
cludes a referendum to the Mayor and Cit.v 
Council. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



LOANS I.V ANTICIPATION OF T.AXES. 

President FITZGERALD called up, under un- 
finished business. No. 1 on the calendar, viz.: 

1. Ordered, That to provide temporarily mone.v 
to meet the appropriations for the financial .year 
1936, the City Treasurer issue and sell, at such 
time and in such amounts as he may deem besl, 
notes or certificates of indebtedness of the City of 
Boston not exceeding forty million dollars in the 
total, in anticipation of the ta.xes of the current 
municipal year; that all such notes or certificates 
of indebtedness be dated the day the money for 
the same is received, be made pa.vable with tb» 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



97 



interest thereon within one year of their date, and 
bear interest from their date until the same are 
made payable at such rate as the City Auditor, 
the City Treasurer and the Mayor may determine. 

On January 6, 1936, the foregoing order was 
read once and passed, yeas 20, najs 0. 

The order was given its second and final reading 
and passage, yeas 18, nays 0. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS. 

Coun. GALL.iGHER. for the Executive Com- 
mittee, submitted the following: 

1. Report on petition of Howard Colson 
(referred Jan. 13) to be retired, recommending 
passage of the accompanying order, viz.: 

Ordered, That the Retirement Board for Laborers 
be authorized and requested to retire, under the 
provisions of chapter 765 of the Acts of 1914, 
Howard Colson, employed as laborer in the Hospital 
Department, he having reached the retirement 
age and being incapacitated from further dutj-. 

Report accepted; order passed. 

2. Report on petition of Miriam L. Staples 
(referred today) for children under fifteen years 
of age to appear at Statler Georgian Hall, January 
7 — recommending that leave be granted under 
usual conditions. 

Report accepted; leave granted under usual 
conditions. 

3. Report on message of Mayor and order 
(referred today) appropriating sum of $.300 for 
maintaining mosquito control works as estimated 
by State Reclamation Board — that same ought to 
pass. 

Report accepted, said order passed, yeas 15, 
nays — Coun. Mellen, George A. Murray — 2. 

4. Report on message of Mayor and order 
(referred today) appropriating $10,000 to be ex- 
pended by Municipal Employment Bureau — that 
same ought to pass. 

Report accepted; sjiid order passed, yeas 15, 
nays — Coun. Mellen, George A. Murray — 2. 



Adjourned at 3.11 p. m., on motion of Coun. 
GALLAGHER, to meet on Monday, January 20, 
at 2 p. m. 



DR. WILLIAM E. KEELER NAMED 
HEALTH COMMISSIONER. 

Upon January 20 the following state- 
ment was issued t)y Mayor Mansfield: 

I have today appointed Dr. William 
B. Keeler of 5 Wyoming street, Roxbury, 
Health Commissioner of the City of 
Boston. He has been connected with the 
Health Department for fourteen years 
and has been in charge of the South 
Boston Units. He has done an excellent 
piece of work in South Boston and has 
shown distinct qualities of leadership and 
executive al)ility, and I am very sure he 
will make a very excellent successor to 
Doctor Mahoney. 



SUPPLEMENTARY AID FOR 
W. P. A. WORKERS. 

The following explanation of the rela- 
tion between the Welfare Department 
and W. P. A. workers has been made: 

On January 15, 1936, the Overseers of 
the Public Welfare adopted an order that 
after the first pay check was received by 
persons on W^ P. A. rolls aid from the 
Welfare Department would be termin- 
ated but that cases would continue to 
receive supplementary relief from the 
Welfare Department in the amount of 
$1, $2 or $3 per week in order to bring 
the income up to the Overseers' regular 
allowance for the family. 

It was also adopted that coal and car- 
fares for W. P. A. workers would be 
allowed at the discretion of the Executive 
Director but that no supplementary aid 
to W. P. A. cases would be granted if not 
on the rolls of the Welfare Department 
when E. R. A. or W. P. A. employment 
was secured. I am informed by Mr. 
McMurry, Chairman of the Board, that 
in cases where W. P. A. workers, through 
no fault of their own, have not received 
checks they will be taJcen care of by the 
Welfare Board with sufficient money, 
food or clothing to tide them over until 
their checks are cashed. 



PROCEEDINGS OF SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 

Jan. 6, 1936. 

The meeting for the organization 
of the School Committee of the 
City of Boston for the current mu- 
nicipal year was held in the Ad- 
ministration Building, 15 Beacon 
Sireet, at 5.35 o'clock P. M. 

Prssent: Messrs. Lyons, Mackey, 
Smith, Sullivan and Tobin. 



The meeting was called to order 
by Dr. Joseph V. Lyons, the senior 
member. 



Dr. Lyons: This, the first meeting 
of Che Boston School Committee 
for the year 1936. is the organir - 
tion meeting. Every year at this 
meeting officers of the Committee 
are elected to serve for one year, 
namely, the Chairman and the 
Treasurer The rules of the School 
Committee provide that the meot- 
ing for organization shall be called 
to order by the member present 
whose original election as a mem- 
ber of the School Committee is of 
the earliest date, who shall preside 
until a Chairman is chosen. Before 
the Secretary calls the roll for the 
election of a Chairman, I wan: lo 
say that on account of the inves- 
tigation now going on, I feel that 
it would not be fitting for me to 
vote for any officer of this Com- 
mittee until that investigation is . 
concluded and to the full satis- 
factioi 01 the citizens of Boston. 
I therefore will be recorded as not 
voting. 



MEMBERS-ELECT OF SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE 

The following communication 
was received: 

City of Boston 

Board of Election Commissioners 

City Hall Annex 

December 5, 1935. 
Miss Ellei. M. Cronin 
Secretary School Committee 
15 Beacon Street, Boston 
Dear Madam: 

We certify that at the City Elec- 
tion held in the' City of Boston on 
November 5th, 1935, for the choice 
of three members of the School 
Committee, for the term of four 
years, the following were elected to 
said office: 

Charles E. Mackey, 520 East 
Broadway. 

Maurice J. Tobin, 23 Bellvista 
Road. 

Henry J. Smith, 53 Nottinghill 
Road. 

Respectfully yours, 
David B. Shaw, 
Daniel H. Rose, 
Frederic E. Dowling, 
Francis B. McKinney, 
Board of Election Commissioners. 
Placed on file. 



ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN 

The Committee proceeded to the 
election of a Chairman, and the 
Secretary was directed to call the 
roll. 

As a result of roll call, Frederick 
R. Sullivan was elected Chairman 
by the following vote: 



For FREDERICK R. SULLIVAN 
— Dr. Mackey, Messrs. Smith, Sulli- 
van and Tobin — 4. 

NOT VOTINCJ— Dr. Lyons— 1. 

Dr. Lyons: By vote of four 
members, Mr. Sullivan is duly 
elected Chairman of the Boston 
School Committee for the year 1936. 

Mr. Sullivan assumed the Chair. 

Mr. Sullivan: I wish to thank my 
colleagues for the honor which they 
have conferred upon me. I shall 
do everything in my power to fill 
the high office of Chairman of the 
School Committee faithfully and 
well. 

Today my thoughts revert to the 
interest in public service which im- 
pelled mc to become a candidate 
for election to this Committee two 
years ago. I was then convinced, 
as I am now, that it is the duty 
of every citizen to take as active 
a par*, as possible iu the conduct 
of our City's administration. 1 
felt that advancement in public 
office could come as the reward 
for careful performance of duties. 
My every act as a member of this 
Committee for two years has been 
with these thoughts uppermost in 
my mind. They will continue of 
paramount importance during the 
remainder of my tenure of office. 

The School Committee has been 
most fortunate in the calibre of 
men and women who have served 
under it. To Superintendent of 
Schools, Dr. Patrick T. Campbell, 
to the Business Manager, Alexander 
M. Sullivan, to the Secretary, Mies 
Ellen M. Cronin, to the Custodian, 
Mr. Mark B. Mulvey and to those 
in their departments, I wish to ex- 
press my heartfelt thanks for the 
manner in which they have per- 
formed the functions of their 
offices and for their cooperation 
rendered to the School Committee. 

Important duties have been as- 
signed to chese members of our 
official staff. The Superintendent 
as Chief Executive officer has had 
the general control of all scholastic 
functions which come under the 
Committee. Nominations for ap- 
pointment which are subject to our 
approval are made by him. All these 
appointments have been made from 
the top positions on carefully and 
honestly rated lists of candidates. 

Exceptions to this rated list are 
made m the case of directors of 
departments where a thorough 
check is made by the Superinten- 
dent to determine candidates best 
fitted by training and experience 
to handle not only the academic 
but also the administrative duties 
which are required of department 
directors. Only in the case of pro- 
motion to the position of Superin- 
tendent and Assistant Superinten- 
dent does the Committee act with- 
out the nomination of the Superin- 
tendent for appointment and pro- 
motion. 

On account of the recent public- 
ity which has been attached to one 
of these appointments, I wish t.) 
make clear that I have absolute 
faith in the fairness and the ability 
which the Superintendent has dem- 
onstrated in presenting candidates 
to us for appointment. The care- 
fulness of this method of selection 
IS best indicated by the manner in 
which those appointed have pc''- 
formed their duties. 

Our teaching and administrative 
staff is second to none. The edu- 
cation given to the children of Bos- 



98 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



ton is outstanding among public 
school systems of the country. 

Next, I wish to comment upon 
the office and duties of our Busi- 
ness Manager. Through this office 
is handled a tremendous amount of 
detail, payrolls, purchases, con- 
tracts, receiving, inspecting, stor- 
ing and delivering of supplies. Our 
Business Manager, Alexander M. 
Sullivan, has achieved an enviable 
record during his career for eJ- 
liciency in the conduct of his of- 
fice and for character above re- 
proach. 

Miss Cronin, our Secretary, and 
Mr Mulvey, our Custodian, take 
equal place among these others who 
have so well served the schools and 
the people of Boston. 

Reviewing as I do now, the qual- 
ities both of the workers and their 
work, I feel honored to have served 
with them. 

However, the start of a New 
Year requires more forward look- 
ing than backward. It calls upon 
us to prepare for those problems 
which are to face us in 1936. With- 
out doubt, we begin tonight a year 
which will be as strenuous as any 
the School Department or Commit- 
tee has had to meet. 

Ahead are problems of maintain- 
ing at least, improving where pos- 
sible, the educational standards of 
our schools. At no time can we 
forget that this department exists 
for the benefit of the children of 
school age, and that in educating 
them we mold the future of the 
people of Boston and even the fu- 
ture of the city. In our schools 
today are youngsters who will di- 
rect the destinies of the City, State 
and Federal Governments of to- 
morrow. 

I bring to the chair no revolu- 
tionary educational methods nor 
do I bring suggestions of startling 
revisions of our teaching system. 
Rather, I promise to my associates, 
and to the people of Boston, that 
no effort will be spared to uphold 
standards of our teaching and 
teaching staff. 

Nevertheless, a limitation must 
be kept before our minds at all 
times. We cannot allow this De- 
partment to become an overpower- 
ing financial burden upon the tax- 
payers of the City. Every dollar 
expanded must be carefully check- 
ed, and every function and depart- 
ment of the school system must 
be made to prove that its merit 
is equal to its cost. With this 
principle in mind, we must give 
added scrutiny to the make-up of 
our 1936 budget, realizing as we 
work that the present tax rate is 
distinctly burdensome upon those 
who must pay it. 

Problems of this sort demand 
and will receive careful attention 
and consideration. Research into 
present and future needs, careful 
analysis of budgets and expendi- 
tures, the realization that the good 
of the system supersedes any de- 
sires of individuals in or out of 
the service — these must be our 
standards. 

Knowledge of the problems which 
confront us is discouraging neither 
to the members of the School Com- 
mittee nor of the School Depart- 
ment. They present, rather, a 
challenge to our ability and to our 
sense of duty. None are insur- 
mountable. 



GRAND JURT INVESTIGATION 

The activities of the School Com- 
mittee and Department have been 
mucfa in the public eye during the 
last few weeks. A Grand Jury 
was called to investigate to deter- 
mine whether or not any irregulari- 
ties or violations had been com- 
mitted. 

The same Grand Jury completed 
its service last Saturday and was 
discharged from further investiga- 
tion, out did not complete its duty. 
It left behind it a statement which 
was grossly unfair to the members 
of the School Committee. It 
charged that irregularities existed 
within our school system and tliat 
inertia, looseness and possibly cor- 
ruption have been prevalent. It 
further recommended that some 
members of the School Committee 
as now constituted should be ousted. 

I have always understood that 
the purposes and duties of a Grand 
Jury are that of an investigating 
body, that is, to investigate any 
violations of the law and to return 
to the Court after such investiga- 
tions their findings, namely, a no 
bill or an indictment. Another 
purpose for which the Grand Jury 
was constituted was to protect the 
names of innocent men and women 
so that no unnecessary publicity be 
given to them resulting in irrepar- 
able and wrongful injurj' to their 
reputation. 

This Grand Jury went beyond 
the purposes for which it was con- 
stituted in issuing a veiled state- 
ment leaving a cloud behind them 
and a doubt in the minds of the 
public as to what members of the 
School Committee they had in mind 
when recommending an ouster. 
And although no member of the 
District Attorney's office was 
charged with any violations, this 
same Grand Jury went beyond its 
limit and was extremely generous 
in the use of its adjectives in the 
praise of the District Attorney's 
office in the conduct of its investi- 
gation. Why? The Grand Jury 
was ill advised especially in view 
of the fact that it admitted that 
nothing had come to light crimi- 
nally and that this was the only 
angle that the Grand Jury and the 
District Attorney's office could 
touch upon. 

Their attack was not only ill ad- 
vised but grossly unfair and un- 
justified. If the Grand Jury was 
in possession of any evidence of 
irregularities or violations of trust 
on the part of any member of the 
School Committee it was the duty 
of that Grand Jury to name the 
man. They did not do it. Their 
failure to name the man indicates 
either a lack of courage on their 
part or a lack of facts upon which 
to base a conclu.'sion. 

The public has received no evi- 
dence except a statement which 
was a conclusion which cenfiures 
and slurs the members of the Com- 
mittee. Let fairness and justice 
prevail. Let no man or body of 
men dare asperse the character of 
any public official unless he or it is 
in possession of testimony or evi- 
dence that warrants such actions. 

In conclusion I wish to state 
again my thanks to the members 
of the Committee for the honor 
which is mine. I welcome the ad- 
ditional responsibilities which the 
Chairmanship imposes and shall 



endeavor to so conduct myself as 
your Chairman a* to reflect credit 
upon the Boston School Depart- 
ment. 

ADOPTION OF RULES AND 
REGULATIONS 

The following two orders were 
offered: 

ORDERED, That the Rules of 
the School Committee and the 
Regulations of the Public Schools 
of last year which involve the ex- 
penditure of money, are hereby 
adopted for the present year until 
otherwise ordered. 

ORDERED. That the Rules of 
the School Committee and the 
Regulations of the Public Schools 
of last year which do not involve 
the expenditure of money, are 
hereby adopted for the present 
year until otherwise ordered. 

Mr. Smith: Before I vote on 
this question I would like a rul- 
ing from the Chair on Section 16 
of the Rules which reads as fol- 
lows: 

Sect. 16. 1. The sessions of the 
School Committee shall be open, 
but the School Committee may, at 
any time, by a four-f'fths vote, go 
into executive session. It shall 
however pass no votes in execu- 
tive session. 

I want a ruling from the Chair 
before I vote on accepting these 
rules. I will vote yes if the Cha'r 
rules that this section will be 
strictly enforced. 

Chairman: The Chair will strict- 
ly enforce every rule and regula- 
tion of the School Committee. 

Mr. Smith: And that the prac- 
tice of holding conferences before 
public meetings will be abolished? 

Chairman: If the members vote 
to have such a conference in ac- 
cordance with the rules, I shall 
rule it as possible. 

Mr Smith: In that case I am 
going to move that Section 16 De 
stricken out and that the follow- 
ing be inserted 'n plsife thereof: 

Sect. 16. 1. The sessions of the 
School Committee shall oe open it 
all times to the public and to the 
press, but the School Committee 
may at any time, by a four-fifths 
vote, go into executive session "•) 
discuss anything which might 
prove damaging to a persons char- 
acter, etc. It shall, however, pass 
no votes in executive session. 

Mr. Smith's motion was seconded 
ty Dr. Lyons. 

Dr. Lyons: I am in hearty accord 
with the gentleman's motion. On 
May 19, 1930 and on many occasions 
since, I offeree the following order 
with a brief statement: 

"The Boston School Committee 
took a great forward step in con- 
firming the confidence of the peo- 
ple in its devotion to their interests 
when it provided for a complete 
examination of its administration 
by establishing the Survey Commit- 
tee. Much good has come of it. It 
is to be hoped that we shall now 
continue the march of progress by 
the passing of the order which I 
am about to present, which will 
bring to the people's view in public 
meeting the complete manner in 
which the administration of their 
schools is carried on. 

"I therefore offer the following: 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



99 



"ORDERED. That the Rules are 
hereby amended as follows: 

"Sect. 16, par. 1. Strike out the 
paragraph and substitute in place 
thereof the following: 

"Sect. 16. 1. The meetings of 
the School Committee shall be open 
but the Committee may hold execu- 
tive session by a majority vote for 
the discussion of the fitness and 
qualifications of its members, offi- 
cers, and employees, and all mat- 
ters relating to character and 
morals, but no votes shall be taken 
in executive session. 

"As a Committee, speaking for 
the school system generally, we 
have gone through a hard period, a 
severe test— all sorts of investiga- 
tions from within and without— 
and there have been all sorts of 
public criticisms of the school sys- 
tem generally and of the School 
Committee particularly and neces- 
sarily, ati the responsibility for any- 
thing that happens to the school 
system is placed where it rightful- 
ly belongs— on the shoulders of fhe 
Committee. I feel that the people 
of Boston, the taxpayers, would 
like -ery much to have us show 
a continuation of effort and pre- 
sent in the future all matters per- 
taining to public business here in 
this -lall vhere the public Jv^iD be 
welcome, where they may get an 
insight to th^ wordings of this 
Committee. I think particularly 
that the feeling '••hich I had during 
the starting of the Survey Commit- 
tee, our investigating body, the 
feeling that we hadn't anything to 
hide and that we were perfectly 
willing to iron out any matters that 
we might find were not beneficial 
to the public interest: that if we 
discovered conditions of which we 
were lot aware and that needed 
correction, that It would be of ex- 
treme interest to the people to 
know about these things and en- 
able them 10 better estimate our 
value as public servants. I think 
if meetings are held m public it 
will expedite business instead of 
retarding it. It ie going to make 
this :;ommittee sit up and pay 
even greater attention to business. 
Incidentally I think it will give 
the ublic the privilege and the 
right to sit in here and hear all 
their public business discussed." 

Dr. Lyons, continuing: I am in 
hearty accord with Mr. Smith's 
motion and I want to point out 
that if the suggestions which 1 
made on many occasio during the 
past two years had been followed, 
we would not have had the diffi- 
culties in which we now find our- 
selves. 

Mr. Tobin: Before voting on 
Mr. Smith's order, I desire time to 
thoroughly study the records, so 
for that reason I move that Mr. 
Smith's order be laid over for a 
period of two weeks. I feel it 
would be a mistake for the Com- 
mittee to take hasty action on a 
nr.easure as important as the meas- 
ure presented by Mr. Smith tonight. 
On question from the Chair, Mr. 
Smith agreed to the proposal to 
lay the order over to the next 
public meeting. 

Dr. Lyons: I am g^ad Mr. Smith 
agrees to that. I do think we 
ought to cut the Crordian knot 
here and now and hold these meet- 
ings here in public, with the under- 
standing that anything that per- 



tains to the reputation of individ- 
uals, shall be discussed in execu- 
tive session. 

Mr. Smith: In the meantime I 
shall attend no conferences of the 
School Committee until the meet- 
ing two weeks from now. 

The Chairman stated that at the 
next public meeting the proposed 
amendment to the Rules presented 
by Mr. Smith will be taken up. 

Mr. Tobin: I will state my posi- 
tion on the question now. It may 
not even be popular with the pub- 
lic, but at the same time I am 
elected a member of this School 
Committee to perform my duties 
and assignments as I see them. In 
every legislative body it is neces- 
sary to submit every proposition 
that comes before it to a sub-com- 
mittee in order that when the 
legislative body comes into session, 
it shall have something concrete 
on which to act, with definite rec- 
ommendations from the sub-com- 
mittee. This School Committee, due 
to the fact that it is comprised of 
only five members, must study its 
own problems as a Committee of 
the Whole before they are brought 
into the open. I am willing to be 
convinced in the event that I am 
wrong, but I do not think the 
members of this Committee should 
act on any proposition of this 
character without proper con- 
sideration. 

Dr. Lyons: I agree heartily with 
some of the things the Chairman 
has said about the statement of 
the Grand Jury. I also will have 
to say this, in justice to them, that 
I think the thing that pleased me in 
the Jury statement was the fact 
that the only cure for our ills is 
open public meetings, and it is 
the only thing that has not been 
taken advantage of and which 
should have been done -ears ago. 

Mr. Tobin: I would like for the 
benefit of the prcs and for the 
public who are present to state that 
the Committee never takes a vote 
in conference. It merely discusses 
the problem, studies it in detail 
find comes before the public 
with a concrete proposition. Every 
rule, law, and regulation that calls 
for presenting any order in public 
is lived up tc and all business of 
the Committee eventually comes to 
the open ■public meeting. 

Dr. Mackey: I am heartily in ac- 
cord with that motion and have 
been for the past four years, but 
as Mr. Tobin has just said, I feel 
that strict confidence should be 
given to any personal matters, and 
we all realize that personal mat- 
ter^ come before the Committee in 
relation to the employes as well as 
the pupils. As a member of this 
Committee I never want to have 
anyone's name slandered, either em- 
ploye or a pupil in the school. 

Chairman: Is it understood that 
the proposed amendment lies over? 

It was so agreed. 

Dr. Lyons: I just want to bring 
to the attention of the two previous 
speakers that incorporated in Mr. 
Smith's motion is complete and 
full protection for any matters that 
might need private session, as was 
incorporated in my order in 1930, 
and now specifically takes care of 
cases where personality or charac- 
ter might be involved. We have 
to admit here that there is never 
lengthy discussion here in public 



meeting, for example: we sit in 

conference on all financial matters. 
They are not discussed at length 
here. We come down here and 
vote. That is the way i* has been 
with me for six years. 

Mr. Smith: Mr. Chairman, I 
move that Section 18 which has to 
do with the order of business be 
re-arranged and amended to read 
as follows: 

Sect. 18. 1. The order of busi- 
ness at meetings of the School 
Committee shall be as follows, un- 
less the School Committee shall 
direct otherwise: 

(a.) Approval of minutes of pre- 
ceding meetings, as published and 
distributed under Sect. 17. 

(b.) Communications from the 
Mayor, City Council and other city 
departments. 

(c.) Communications from the 
Superintendent, Board of Superin- 
tendents or other officers of the 
School Committee. 

(d.) Reports of committees, 
(e.) Unfinished business of the 
preceding meeting. 

(f.) Motions, orders, resolutions, 
communications, petitions, new 
business, etc. 

Dr. Lyons: May I ask what you 
are trying to attain in that mo- 
tion? 

Mr. Smith: I am trying to amend 
Sectio.i 18. As it stands now, the 
first thing we take up is unfin- 
ished business. By all the laws of 
Roberts or any authority that 1 
have done business under, unfin- 
ished business should be the next 
to the Icist item before new busi- 
ness. For instance, on unfinished 
business you might have letters 
from the Mayor or the City Council, 
— this is under unfinished business. 
Under these rules you take up un- 
finished business before communi- 
cations. 

Dr. Lyons- May I say here that 
under the established procedure, 
unfinished business has been taken 
up toward the close of the meeting. 
Chairman: The only unfinished 
business taken up first at the 
meetings is the appointments to 
the teaching and administrative 
staff which have been laid over 
at a previous public meeting. 

Mr. Smith: Suppose you haven't 
any appointments? 

Dr. Lyons: To my knowledge we 
never touch the unfinished busi- 
ness memorandum until the end of 
the meeting. So ae the Chairn>an 
has stated what you might term 
unfinished business at the begin- 
ning of the meeting is appointments 
of a previous meeting which have 
been laid over under the rulee and 
should be acted upon. I would 
amend the motion to the extent 
that if the rules indicate that un- 
finished business in general comes 
first, the order of business make 
clear what our procedure actually 
has been. 

Mr. Tobin: I move that this order 
presented by Mr. Smith be laid over 
for a period of two weeks in order 
that I may have an opportunity to 
study the changes involved. 
The order was laid over. 

Mr. Tobin: If I am not out ">f 
order. I would like to speak on 
the question of open public meet- 
ings once again. I think that the 
public can appreciate that it is 



I 00 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



most difficult for a body to take 
up a question such as Mr. Smith 
has proposed here tonight and give 
to it the proper consideration that 
the measure justifies. I know that 
when I was Chairman of the School 
Committee, this Committee some- 
times met in conference as many 
as four nights a week and the con- 
ferences lasted ^ometmies three .)i 
four hours. That will give to the 
public a small idea of the tremen 
dous amount of printed matter 
that would be necessary in order 
to make puDl'c all phases of these 
questions which must be discussed 
before we can come to a concln 
sion Therefore I trust and hopp 
that the Committee is going to giv- 
serious though*; to this question of 
having open public meetings on 
eery question that comes before 
it with the exception of those items 
which deal with the personal ele- 
ment. 

Chairman: Do I understand, Mi. 
Smith, that you vote in favor of 
the present Rules and Regulations, 
subject to your right to amend 
Sections 16 and 18? 

Mr Smith: Yes. 

The Chairman declared the two 
orders — order adopting the rules 
and regulations which involve th? 
expenditure of money, and order 
adopting the rules and regulations 
which do not involve the expendi- 
ture of money— passed, Mr. Smith 
reserving his rights on the ques- 
tion. 



ELECTION OF TREASURER 

The Committee proceeded to the 
election of a Treasurer of the Cor- 
poration. 

The Secretary was directed to 
call the roll and the members as 
their names were called respective- 
ly voted as follows: 

For HENRY J. SMITH— Dr. 
Mackey, Messrs. Sullivan and 
Tobin— 3. 

For MAURICE J. TOBIN— Mr. 
Smith— 1. 

NOT VOTING — Dr. Lyons— 1. 

The Chair declared Mr. Henry J. 
Sm.ith duly elected Treasurer of the 
Corporation. 

Mr. Smith- I wish to thank the 
members of the School Committee 
for this manifestation of confidence. 



COMMITTEE ON NAMING OF 
SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

Chairman: The Committee as a 
Whole will ac. as the Committee 
on Naming of School Buildings 
during 1936. 

Dr. Lyons: I compliment you on 
that decision. I think it is a 
very good plan. 



APPROVAL OF APPOINTMENTS 
The Chairman stated the ques- 
tion was on approving the appoint- 
ments of a director and teachers, 
as reported by the Superintendent 
and laid over at the meeting of 
Dec. 16, 1935. 

In this connection, Mr. Smith 
made the following statement: 

I shall not vote on any motions 
or appointments that have been 
laid over from the preceding Com- 
mittee. I was not a member of 
that Committee and consequently 



do not feel qualified to pass judg- 
ment tonight on such motions or 
appointments. 

The appointment of James A. 
Ecker as Director of Music was ap- 
proved by the following vote: 

YEAS — Messrs. Lyons, Mackey, 
Sullivan, and Tobin — 4. 

NOT VOTING— Mr. Smith— 1. 

The remaining appointments were 
approved. 

DEATHS 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following - named 
teacher: 

Bigelow District — Alice E. Thorn- 
ton, assistant, elementary, Dec. 25, 
1935. 

Placed on file. 

Tne Superintendent reported the 
death of the following - named 
master emeritus: 

Robert Gould Shaw District — 
Francis A. Morse master emeritus, 
Dec. 25, 1935. 

Placed on file. 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named 
teacher who had been retired on 
pension; 

Norcross District — Bertha L. Ar- 
nold. Nov. 18, 1935. 

Placed on file. 

The Superintendent reported the 
death« of the following-named 
teachers who had been retired on 
pension under the provisions of the 
Boston Retirement System: 

Girls Latin School — Edward H. 
Atherton, Aug. 8. 1935. 

Joseph H. Barnes Intermediate 
District — Mary L. Sweeney, Oct. 17, 
1934. 

Julia Ward Howe District — Mary 
E. Deane. Jan. 25, 1935. 

Placed on file. 



RETIREMENTS ON PENSION 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 6. 1936. reporting that 
in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 11 of Chapter 521 of the 
Acts of 1922 and th. order passen 
Feb. 6. 1933 (see p. 19). he has made 
application for "^he retirement of 
Edward J. Carroll. Master, Lewis 
Intermediate District, because of 
ordinary disability. 

Placed on file 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 6. 1936, reporting the 
retirement from active service on 
account of ordinary disability of 
Edward J Carroll. Master. Lewis 
Intermediate District, a member of 
the Boston Retirement System, to 
take effect Nov. 30. 1935. as certi- 
fied by the Boston Retirement 
Board under date of Dec. 2, 1935. 

Placed on file. 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 6, 1936. reporting the 
retirement from active service of 
Lillian Tishler, assistant, elemen- 
tary. Franklin District, a member 
of the Boston Retirement System, 
to take effect Dec. 31. 1935. as cer- 



tified by the Boston Retirement 
Board under date of Dec. 31. 1935. 
Placed on file. 

The Superintendent offered the 
following: 

ORDERED, That the following- 
named teachers are hereby re- 
tired on pension in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 589 
of the Acts of 1908. as amende.; 
by Chapter 617 of the Acts of 19i;j, 
Chapter 569 of the Acts of 1912, 
and Chapter 304 of the Special 
Acts of 1915, the date of retire- 
ment and rate of pencion to be as 
hereinafter specified: 

Edward Everett District — Flor 
ence A. Goodfellow, master's as- 
sistant, Dec. 31, 1935, $600. 

James J. Chittick District— Nel- 
lie M. Howes, master's assistant, 
Dec. 31, 1935, $600. 

Passed unanimously. 



APPOINTMENTS 

The following appointments by 
the Superintendent, certified by 
him as being in accordance with 
the rules and regulations to take 
effect on the dates stated, were 
presented: 

(FROM THE ELIGIBLE LIST) 

(To fill vacancy caused by increase 
in numbers) 

William Barton Rogers Inter- 
mediate District — Myrtle E. Starkie, 
assistant, intermediate, Feb. 3, 
1936. 

Laid over. 

(To fill vacancy caused by 
promotion) 
Clarence R. Edwards Intermedi- 
ate District — Pearl Starbird, assist- 
ant, intermediate, Feb. 3, 1936. 
Laid over. 

(To fill vacancies caused by 
resignations) 

John Winthrop District — Frances 
A. Keefe, assistant, intermediate, 
Feb. 3, 1936. 

Mary E. Curley Intermediate Dis- 
trict—Angela M. Cannata, assist- 
ant, intermediate, Feb. 3, 1936. 

Laid over. 

LIST OF TEACHERS APPROVED FOR 
TEMPORARY SERVICE 

The Superintendent submitted, 
under the provisions of section 265 
paragraph 2 of the regulations, the 
following additions to the list of 
teachers approved by him from 
which assignments may be mad-J 
for temporary service: 

Day High Schools— Edwina M. 
Barry, Elizabeth A. Beahan, Cath- 
erine F. Brady, Dorothy M. Mutch, 
Marie J. Scanlin, Mary A. Thomp 
son. 

Day Intermediate Schools — John 
J. Casey, Sallie E. Lanagan, Ger- 
trude R. McCarron, John R. 
O'Brien, Samuel Reznick, Hyman 
Sobell. A Patricia Trayers. 

Day Elementarj- Schools — Marine 
H. Crowley, Eileen M. McCarthy. 

Special Classes — Dorothy H. 
Clarke 

Department of Household Sci- 
ence and Arts — Ruth L. Hennessey, 
Evelyn N. Kelley, Loretta B. Mac- 
Donald, teachers of sewing. 

Department of Physical Educa- 
tion — Joseph J. Hughes. 

Approved. 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



101 



TEACHING ASSISTANTS 

Day Intermediate Schools — Ethel 
Bickoff. 

Day Elementary Schools — Kath- 
ryr. F. Doherty, Edith E. Drew, 
Margaret M. Fitzgerald, Elizabeth 
I. Garvin, Dorothy Gouzoule, Mar- 
cella J. Laundrie. 

Approved. 

TKMPORARY SCHOOL NURSE 

Department of School Hygiene — 
Joanna McQuaid, temporary school 
nurse, Dec. 17, 1935. 

Approved. 

EVENING SCHOOLS 

Term 1935-36 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 6, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has appointed 
the following-named clerical as- 
sistants for the evening school term 
1935-1936, to take effect Jan. 6, 1936: 

Brighton Evening Commercial 
High School — Marie M. Burke. 

Central Evening High School — 
Mary E. Croke. 

Dorchester Evening Commercial 
High School— Catherine A. Gildea. 

East Boston Evening Commercial 
High School — Germaine M. Guay. 

Girls' Evening Commercial High 
School— Ruth F. Farrell. 

Roxbury Evening Commercial 
High School— Dorothy E. Brooks. 

South Boston Evening Commer- 
cial High School— Mary A. Walsh. 

West Roxbury Evening Commer- 
cial High School— Josephine F. 
Hugties. 

Bigelow Evening School — Bertha 
A. ^rzon. 

Edward Everett Evening School 
— Mary G. Shaughnessy. 

Franklin Evening School— Will- 
lam J. Gorman. 

Joseph H. Barnes Evening School 
—Margaret L. Dwyer. 

Lewis Evening School— Eleanor 
L. Broughal. 

Michelangelo Evening School- 
Helen F. Datow. 

Phillips Brooks Evening School 
—Ethyl T. Malloy. 

Washington Evening School- 
Sarah A. Neagle. 

Boston Trade School (Evening 
Classes)— Mary P. McGillicuddy; 
Helen ^. Cooney, (temporary). 

Approved. 

TEACHER COACHES 

Term 1935-36 
(To take effect Oct. 1, 1935) 

Public Latin School— Charles S. 
FitzGerald. 

Brighton High School— Thomas 
A. Scanlon. 

Charlestown High School— Robert 
W. Ford. 

Dorchester High School for Boys 
—William J. Pendergast. 

English High School— William H. 
Ohrenberger. 

High School of Commerce— Wil- 
liam F. Fleming. 

Hyde Park High School— Edward 
F. Sherlock. 

Jamaica Plain High School- 
James L. Duffy. 

Mechanic Arts High School- 
James H. Holland. 

Roxbury Memorial High School 
(Boys)— Thomas Campbell. 



South Boston High School — 
Stephen V. White. 

Boston Trade School — Henry J. 
Tilton. 

Approved. 

Coach 
(To take effect Oct. 1, 1935) 
East Boston High School— Fred- 
erick L. O'Brien. 
Approved. 



TRANSFERS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 6, 1936, reporting that 
eubject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has made 
the following transfers of teachers: 

Anna V. Doyle, assistant, kinder- 
garten, William Lloyd Garrison 
District, to the ^ame position m 
the William E. Endicott District. 
Jan. 2. 1936. 

Irma E. Loewenstein, assistant, 
kindergarten, one session. Edmund 
P. Tileson District, to the position 
of assistant, kindergarten, two ses- 
sions, William E. Endicott District, 
Jan. 3. 1936. 

Approved. 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE 

On the report of the Superintend- 
ent, leave of absence was granted 
each of the following-named teach- 
ers for the periods specified 

Boston Trade School— Leo J. Mc- 
Carthy, senior instructor. Dec. 2, 
1935, one day, court summons. 

Longfellow District— Mary A. Mc- 
Carthy, masters assistant, Dec. i), 
1935, one-half day, court summon:. 

Ulysses S. Grant District— Max- 
ine H. Cohen, assistant, kindergar- 
ten, two sessions, Dec. 5, 1935, one- 
half day, court summons. 

Department of Music— Esther G. 
O'Connor, assistant, Dec. 4, 1935, 
one-half day, court summons. 

On the report of the Superin- 
tendent, leave of absence under a 
suspension of the regulations was 
granted each of the following- 
named teachers for the period spe- 
cified: 

Girls' Latin School— Ida A. Co- 
hen assistant, Dec. 2, 1935 to Mar. 
13. 1936, without pay. 

Bennett District— Edith D. Rod- 
gers, assistant, elementary, Nov. 7. 
1935 to Jan. 31, 1936, without pay. 

Clarence R. Edwards Intermedi- 
at..- District— Louise C. Leary. as- 
sistant, intermediate, Dec. 2, 1935 
to Feb. 12, 1936. without pay. 

Theodore Lyman District— Thom- 
as F. Luby, sub-master, Dec. 2. 
1935 to Feb. 28, 1936, without pay. 



ASSIGNMENT 
A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 6, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
Mary D. McCusker, assistant, ele- 
mentary. John A. Andrew District, 
to Speech Improvement Classes, 
without change of rank or salary, 
to take effect Jan. 8, 1936, and to 
continue during the school year 
ending Aug. 31, 1936. unless earlier 
terminated by the Superintendent 
with the approval of the School 
Committee. 



Placed on file and the assign- 
ment approved, to take effect on 
the date stated. 



DESIGNATION 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 6, 1936, reporting that 
he has made the following desig- 
nation of a teacher to serve in the 
position indicated until such time 
as it shall be filled otherwise in 
accordance with the rules and reg- 
ulations, but not beyond Aug. 31. 
1936: 

Dearborn District — Evelyn R. 
Hurwitch, assistant, kindergarten, 
as acting first assistant, kinder- 
garten (vice Abigail Linnehan, ab- 
sent on leave), Oct. 14, 1935. 

Placed on file. 



TERMINATION OF SERVICE IN 
AFTERNOON KINDERGARTENS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 6, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has termin- 
ated the service of the following- 
named teachers in the afternoon 
sessions of the kindergartens in- 
dicated, to take e<>fect on the dates 
statea: 

Henry L. Pierce District — Kath- 
leen C. Daly, a.ssistant, kindergar- 
ten, Dec. 31. 1935. 

Ulysses S. Grant District — Max- 
ine H. Cohen, Jennie M. Penta, as- 
sistants, kindergarten, Dec. 9, 1935. 

Placed on file and the termina- 
tion of service approved. 



TEACHER OF PHYSICALLY 
HANDICAPPED CHILDREN 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 6, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
Kathryn S. Harvey, temporary 
teacher, for home instruction of 
physically handicapped children, to 
take effect January 7, 1936. 

Approved. 

HONORARY TITLE OF 
DIRECTOR EMERITUS 

The Superintendent offered the 
following: 

ORDERED, That the rank of 
Director Emeritus is hereby confer- 
red upon John A. O'Shea, said title 
being in consideration of his years 
of faithful and efficient service in 
the Boston public schools. 

Passed unanimously. 

Chairman: The School Committee 
owes a great deal of gratitude to 
Mr. O'Shea for the loyal service 
which he has rendered to this 
School Department. He was ever 
a faithful and trusted employe 
and did much to bring forward the 
Music Department of the Boston 
public schools. 



TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That during the cur- 
rent financial year the Superin- 
tendent is hereby authorized to 



102 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



employ 3uch temporary and emer- 
gency secretaries, clerical assist- 
ants and librarians in the schools 
as he may deem advisable. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED. That during the cur- 
rent financial year the Secretary 
is hereby authorized to employ 
such temporary assistance in tht" 
offices of the Superintendent- 
Secretary, and at such compensa- 
tion as she may deem advisable. 



PETITION FOR ADDITIONAL 
LEGISLATION 

On motion, it was 

ORDLRED, That the Chairman 
is hereby authorized for and m 
behalf of this Committee, to peti- 
tion the General Court for legisla- 
tion to provide for increased ap- 
propriating power. 



TRANSFER OF APPRO- 
PRIATION 

The Superintendent submitted a 
communication addressed to him 
by the Superintendent of Con- 
struction, Mr. William W. Drum- 
mey, under date of January 2, rec- 
ommending that the Committee ap- 
prove a transfer in the sum of 
$9000 from the appropriation for 
the Joseph H. Barnes Intermediate 
District, East Boston (construction 
of nine-classroom addition to East 
Boston High School— Item 7. 1934) 
to the appropriation for the lew 
Lucy Stone School. John Marsr.all 
District. Air. Drummey asked '.nat 
this request be substituted for ais 
previous request for a transfer 
in the sum of ?6.500 for the same 
purpose. 

Approved for transmission to the 
Board of Commissioners of School 
Buildings in accordance with the 
provisions of Section 7 of Chapter 
351 of the Acts of 1929 



PROMOTION OF EMPLOYE IN 
SUPPLY ROOM 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Jan. 6, 1936. recommending 
with the approval of the Division 
of Civil Service, the promotion of 
John L. Bowen to the rank of 
Storekeeper, at a salary of thirty- 
six dollars (S36) per week, to take 
effect Jan. 10. 1936. 

Placed on file. 

ORDERED, That the rank of 
John L. Bowen, Laborer, is hereby 
changed to Storekeeper, and his 
salary fixed at thirty-six dollars 
($36) per week, to take effect Jan. 
10, 1936. 

EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS, 
APPROVAL OF SUMMARIZED 
REQUISITION or CITY 
AUDITORS, AND OTHER 
ITEMS 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Jan. 6, 1936, recommending 
the passage of the accompanying 
eleven orders, as follows: 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for semi-bituminous coal between 
the School Committee and the 



Brighton Coal Company under date 
of May 18, 1935, and providing for 
the delivery of semi-bituminous 
coal from June 16, 1935 to Decem- 
ber 31. 1935. is hereby continued to 
June 15. 1936, as ..rovided for in 
Section 1 of the contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for semi-bituminous coal between 
the School Committee and the 
Massachusetts Wharf Coal Com- 
pany under date of May 14, 1935, 
and providing for the delivery of 
semi-bituminous coal from June 16, 
1935, to December 31, 1935, is hereby 
continued to June 15, 1936, as pro- 
vided for in Section 1 of the con- 
tract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for semi-bituminous coal between 
the School Committee and the 
Metropolitan Coal Company under 
date of May 14, 1935, and provid- 
ing for the delivery of semi-bitu- 
minous coal from June 16, 1935, to 
December 31, 1935. is hereby con- 
tinued to June 15 1936, as pro- 
vided for in Section 1 of the con- 
tract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for semi-bituminous coal between 
the School Committee and E. S. 
Morse and Company under date of 
May 9, 1935, and providing for the 
delivery of semi-bituminous coal 
from June 16, 1935, to December 
31. 1935. is hereby continued to 
June 15. 1936, as provided for m 
Section 1 of the contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for semi-bituminous coal between 
the School Committee and the 
Standard Coal Company under date 
of May 13, 1935, and providing for 
the delivery of semi-bitumious coal 
from June 16, 1935, to December 31, 

1935, is hereby continued to June 
15, 1936 as provided for in Sec- 
tion 1 of the contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for anthracite coal between the 
School Committee and the Stand- 
ard Coal Company, under date of 
May IS. 1935, and providing for the 
delivery of anthracite coal from 
June 16, 1935 to December 31, 1935, 
is hereby continued to June 15, 

1936, as provided for in Section 1 of 
the contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for nut and slack coal between the 
School Committee and the White 
Fuel Corporation, under date of 
November 6. 1935. and providing 
for the deliverj' of nut and slack 
coal from June 16, 1935 to Decem- 
ber 31. 1935. is hereby continued to 
June 15, 1936, as provided for in 
Section 1 of the contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for heavy fuel oil between the 
School Committee and Arthur H. 
Ballard. Incorporated, under date 
of May 15. 1935, and providing for 
the delivery of oil from June 16, 
1935 to December 31, 1935. is here- 
by continued to June 15, 1936, as 
provided for in Section 1 of the 
contract 

ORDERED. That the contract 
for heavy fuel oil between the 
School Committee and the Petro- 
leum Heat and Power Company, 
under date of May 15. 1935, and 
providing for the delivery of oil 
from June 16, 1935. to December 31, 
1935, is hereby continued to June 
15. 1936, as provided for in Section 
1 of the contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract for 
medium fuel oil between the School 



Committee and Arthur H. Ballard, 
Incorporated under date of May 
15, 1935 and providing for the de- 
livery of oil from June 16, 1935 to 
December 31, 1935, is hereby con- 
tinued to June 15, 1936, as pro- 
vided for in Section 1 of the con- 
tract. 

ORDERED. That the contract 
for light fuel oil between the School 
Committee and the Pennsylvania 
Oil Company, under date of May 
31, 1935, and providing for the de- 
livery of oil from June 16, 1935, to 
December 31, 1935, is hereby con- 
tinued to June 15, 1936, as provided 
for in Section 1 of the contract. 

Dr. Lyons: May I ask the total 
amount involved? 

There being no amount mentioned 
in the order, the Business Manager 
explained that it is the custom at 
this time each year to extend these 
fuel contracts to cover the heat- 
ing season, so as to carry over until 
new proposals are advertised and 
awards determined. Th-> authority 
for extension is provided in ;he 
contracts through a special clause. 

Dr. Lyons: May I ask the Busi- 
ness Manager what is the total 
amount involved? 

Business Manager: To cover the 
rest of the heating season, probab- 
ly S150.000. 

Dr. Lyons: You haven't that 
there in figures? 

Business Manager: No. These 
orders provide for the extension 
of the contracts from one financial 
year to another. The figure of 
$150,000 is an estimate for the bal- 
ance of the heating season. The 
contracts have to be made for the 
current year and the usual pro- 
cedure is to allow these contracts 
to run for the entire fuel year. In 
other words, when these contracts 
carry through December 31. it is 
the custom to extend them to the 
termination of the fuel year which 
will be in the spring. 

Dr. Lyons: Yes, but how much 
money is involved in these orders 
that we are asked now to pass? 

Business Manager: In order to 
answer correctly, I would have to 
know now how "^uch coal and fue' 
oil we will use between January 
1 and April 15- I don't know that 
now exactly. 

Chairman: Will the Business 
Manager return a report to the 
Committee at his early con- 
venience? 

Business Manager: Yes, gladly, 
but even then it will have to be 
my best estimate. 

Dr. Lyons: That is all that I 
want. 

Mr. Tobin: One point I want to 
bring out; namely, that this pro- 
cedure is not at all unusual. It is 
customary to ha'-e these bids run 
for the entire fuel year, from fall 
to spring. Under the law it is im- 
possible to approve any contract to 
go beyond the end of any finan- 
cial year, so any bids put in in the 
fall or summer of the year carry 
through to the end of the fuel 
year by agreement of the School 
Committee to renew the contracts 
for the remainder of said year. 

Dr. Lyons: My purpose in bring- 
ing up the quest' ->n was to open it 
up for public discussion and let 
the people know what we are do- 
ing. 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



103 



The communication was placed 
on file and the eleven orders 
passed. 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, un- 
der date of Jan. 6. 1936, recom- 
mending the passage of the accom- 
panying six orders: 

ORDERED, That the School 
Committee hereby acknowledges 
the valuable assistance rendered 
by the Sealer of Weights and Meas- 
ures in checking the weights of 
coal delivered by contractors in 
the several school buildings dur- 
ing the past year. 

ORDERED, That the School 
Committee hereby requests the 
Sealer of Weights and Measures to 
check the weights of coal to be de- 
livered to the several school build- 
ings during the current year. 

ORDERED, That the Business 
Manager is hereby authorized to 
employ such temporary assistance 
in his office and at the Supply 
Room, at such compensation as he 
may deem advisable, during the 
current financial year. 

ORDERED, That during the fi- 
nancial year 1936 any member of 
the School Committee is hereb:' 
authorized to accept, enter into 
and execute on behalf of the 
School Committee, contracts for 
equipment, supplies and other 
items, which contracts have been 
prepared and approved by the 
Business Manager. 

ORDERED, That during the fi- 
nancial year 1936 any member of 
the School Committee is hereby 
authorized to approve summarized 
requisitions and special drafts on 
th€ City Auditor prepared by ' e 
Business Manager and which 
cover all pay rolls, vouchers and 
other documents calling for the 
expenditure of money, each of 
which has been previously ap- 
proved in writing by the Businese 
Manager as provided for in the 
statutes. 

ORDERED, That under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 231 of the Acts 
of 1932, J. George Herlihy, Assist- 
ant Business Manager, shall act as 
Business Manager, during the cur- 
rent financial year, only during the 
time that the Business Manager is 
absent or otherwise unable to act, 
and shall, during such time, exercise 
all the powers and perform all the 
duties of said Business Manager. 

The communication was placed 
on file and the six orders passed. 



DEATH OF CUSTODIAN 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Jan. 6, 1936, reporting 
the death on Dec. 31, 1935, of Wil- 
liam G. Ryberg, custodian, B. F. 
Tweed School-house, and recom- 
mending th-t all money due him 
be paid to his widow, Mary T. Ry- 
berg. 

Placed on file. 



On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the salary due 
William G. Ryberg, late custodian 
of the B. F. Tweed Schoolhouse, 
be paid to his widow, Mary T. 
Ryberg. 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE TO 
CUSTODIANS 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Jan. 6, 1936, recom- 
mending that the leave of absence 
granted Vincent Gilligan, custodian, 
Mozart School-house, be extended 
for the further period Jan. 1 to 
Feb. 29, 1936, inclusive, on one- 
half net compensation, because of 
personal illness. 

Placed on file and leave of ab- 
sence on one-half net compensation 
granted for the further period. 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Jan. 6, 1936, recom- 
mending that leave of absence on 
one-half net compensation be 
granted the following-named cus- 
todians for the period specified be- 
cause of personal illness: 

John P. Barton, William Cullen 
Bryant Schoolhouse, Dec. 19,' 1935. 

Emil W. Meyer, Theodore Roose- 
velt Schoolhouse, Jan. 3 to Feb. 6, 
1936, inclusive. 

Placed on file and leave of ab- 
sence on one-half net compensation 
granted for the periods specified. 



TRANSFERS OF CUSTODIANS 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Jan. 6, 1936, recom- 
mending that the following-named 
custodians, who stand at the bead 
of their respective lists, be appoint- 
ed as indicated, to take effect on 
the dates si>ecified: 

Paul E. Butler, from the George 
Bancroft to the Lucretia Crocker 
SchooKiouse, Jan. 12, 1936. 

John A. Callanan, from the 
Choate Burnham to the Atherton 
Schoolhouse and Portables Nos. 24, 
178, and 201, Jan. 12, 1936. 

Adolph Casper, from the Aaron 
Davis to the Choate Burnham 
Schoolhouse, Jan. 12, 1936. 

Walter S. Harvey, from the Ellen 
H. Richards to the John Greenleaf 
Whittier Schoolhouse, Jan. 12, 1936. 

Hilary Johnson, from the Wood- 
row Wilson Schoolhouse to the Dor- 
chester High School for Boys and 
Portables Nos. 2, 129, 149, and 203, 
Jan. 12, 1936. 

Edward A King, from the Frank- 
lin to the Thomas N. Hart School- 
house, Jan. 12, 1936. 

Richard G. McCarthy, from the 
William H. Kent to the Ellen H. 
Richards Schoolhouse, Jan. 12. 1936. 

Carl I. Priest, from the Hugh 
O'Brien and Ralph Waldo Emerson 
Schoolhouses, to the Woodrow tVil- 
son Schoolhouse, Jan. 12, 1936. 

James S. Reardon, from the 
William Bradford to the Franklin 
School-house. Jan. 12, 1936. 

John J. Timmins, from the Bige- 
low to the Phillips Brooks School- 
houee, Jan. 5, 1936. 

Francis J. Wachenheim, from 
the '.i-herton to the Hillside 
School-house. Jan. 12, 1936. 

Placed on file and the transfers 
approved, to take effect on the 
dates stated. 



STATEMENT OF NEWLY- 
ELECTED MEMBER 

Mr. Smith: I appreciate the fact 
that, being the new member on 
this Committee, the ordinary pro- 
cedure for me to follow would be 



to remain silent for the first few 
months of my term and become 
acquainted by experience with the 
many duties of a School Committee 
man. However, these are extraor- 
dinary times, and I feel that I 
should make a statement at this 
my first meeting. 

Fundamentally, the most impor- 
tant duty of a School Committee 
is to provide for excellence in the 
instruction to be given the pupils. 
In order to protect these pupils, I 
intend therefore to take means to 
determine, to the best of my abil- 
ity, the qualifications of education, 
honesty and integrity of the vari- 
ous candidates for appointment or 
advancement in the school system 
before I vote to confirm such ap- 
pointments or advancements, dur- 
ing the next four years. 

I wish further to state to the 
thousands of my friends and sup- 
porters who voted for me in the 
last election, and to the citizens of 
Boston, that no act of mine ae their 
School Committee man for the next 
four years will cause them any 
embarrassment, nor one moment of 
regret. 

UNFINISHED BUSINESS 

The six orders laid over at the 
meeting of Dec. 16, 1935 (see pp. 
178-179) makine c.iar.ffes in the 
Authorized List of Text Books, 
were taken up and passed, Mr. 
Smith not voting. 

The order laid over at the meet- 
ing of Dec. 16, 1935 (see p. 179) 
dropping from the Authorized List 
of Text Books "A History of Amer- 
ican Progress." was taken up and 
passed, Mr. Smith not voting. 

The order laid over at the meet- 
ing of Dec. 16, 1935 (see p. 180) 
amending the course of study in 
English by dropping from the list 
of books for "Prose Narrative for 
Class Study and Rapid Reading" 
in Grade IX. "Captains Coura- 
geous," was taken up and passed, 
Mr. Smith not voting. 

The order laid over at the meet- 
ing of Dec. 16, 1935 (see p. 181), 
naming the Patrick F. Gavin 
School in the Shurtleff District, 
was taken up and passed, Mr. 
Smith not voting. 

The Committee adjourned. 
Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN, 
Secretary. 



MEN FOR SNOW REMOVAL. 

Upon January 23 the Mayor approved 
the request of the Public Works Depart- 
ment for hiring men as follows: 
To the Mayor of Boston. 

The snowstorm which came over the 
week-end has necessitated the employ- 
ment of emergencymen to supplement the 
work of the city employees in clearing 
streets. It has been necessary to hire 
4,000 men in the Highway and Sanitary 
Divisions and I respectfully request your 
approval for the employment of these 
men for a period of ten days from January 
20, 1936, with wages at the rate of $5 
per day. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



104 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE, CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE 
WEEK ENDING JANUARY 18, 1936. 





Dependent 
.\id. 


Motliers' 
Aid. 


Old Age 
Assistance. 


Administrative. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 


Number of active cases 


22,351 

550 

84.3 

♦22,058 

25,110 


1.586 

C 

1 

1.591 

1,456 


4,366 

56 

18 

4,404 

3,890 






28,303 


last week. 
Nunil*er of cases added. 






612 








862 


turned. 
Number of active cases 






28,053 


this week. 
Same week last year. . . . 






30,456 









Financial. 



Expended during week, 

Last week 

Same week last year . . . 

Appropriations 

Expended to date 

Unexpended balances. . . 



Collections on account 
of Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, out- 
side cities and towns 
and refunds.t 



$146,655 48 
148,703 49 
179,697 50 



372,977 07 



15,648 66 



$24,177 00 
24,051 00 
21,900 00 



48,341 00 



1,427 54 



$27,349 89 
27,200 12 
24,692 00 



73,529 



915 33 



$12,803 73 
12,873 62 
13.243 20 



29,372 49 



$210,986 10 
212,828 23 
239,521 70 



524,220 45 



17,991 53 



* 1,.375 E. R. A. Bupplementaries. 

t Collections on account of Boston City Hospital, $16,793.23. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 3. 

I. Retirement. 

The following retirement, effective at 
8 a. m., Wednesday, January 15, 1936, is 
published for the information of the 
department : 

Foreman of plumbers, John J. Riley, 
Maintenance Division. 

Mr. Riley was appointed to the depart- 
ment on November 3, 1888. He was 
promoted to apparatus operator, June 10, 
1927, and to foreman of plumbers, June 
24, 1932. He leaves the department with 
the best wishes of his associates. 

II. Promotion. 

The following promotion, which took 
effect January 10, 1936, is hereby an- 
nounced for the information of the de- 
partment : 

Hoseman John J. Martin of Engine 
Company 44 to third engineer. 

III. New Assignment Card. 
As announced in General Order No. 
55, series of 1935, a new assignment card 
dated January 14, 1936, for Box 3765, 
Milton avenue and Highland street, is 
being issued to the department today. 
Company commanders will return the 
old card for this box to headquarters on 
or before Saturday. January 18, 1936. 
The companj' number is to be marked 
on the back of these cards. 



IV. 



Fire Alarm Box Resmoved from 

Service. 



Fire Alarm Box 12-1632, located in the 
Grand Opera House, Washington street, 
has been removed from service. 

V. Boston Automatic Fire .\larm 

Company. 
Permission has been granted the Bos- 
ton Automatic Fire Alarm Company to 



reinstate on their running cards the fol- 
lowing signal number: 

Signal No. 85— Building, 101 and 103 
High street. Apparatus to respond: En- 
gine 25, Ladder 8, District 3. Nearest 
city box is 1421. 

A new page 2, dated December 26, 
1935, for the Boston Automatic Fire 
Alarm Book, is being issued to the de- 
partment today. This card will take 
the place of old page 2, dated October 
21, 1935. Company commanders will re- 
turn the old card in the envelope pro- 
vided to Fire Department Headquarters, 
on or before Saturday, January 18, 1936. 

The following Boston Automatic Fire 
Alarm Signals have been discontinued 
as of January 6, 1936: 

Signal 1286— Building, 7 and 8 Bos- 
worth street. 

Signal 1287— Building, 33 and 35 Pro- 
vince street, basement. 

VI. Akron Vapor Nozzles. 

Akron vapor nozzles to be used in ex- 
tingui.shing oil and gasoline fires have 
been assigned to the following companies 
and are now available for service: 

Large Size Nozzles: One No. 1035 
to Engme 9; two No. 1035 to Engine 31; 
two No. 1035 to Engine 44; two No' 
1035 to Engine 47. 

Small Size Nozzles: One No. 1020 to 
Engine 1; one No. 1020 to Engine 8- 
one No. 1020 to Engine 9; one No. 1020 
to Engme 17; one No. 1020 to Engine 
33; one No. 1020 to Engine 37; one No. 
1020 to Engine 41; one No. 1020 to 
Engme 48; one No. 1020 to Engine 50. 

Capt. John J. Crehan, drill master, 
will visit each company which is equipped 
with these nozzles and instruct the offi- 
cers and members in the proper opera- 
tion of the nozzles. 

VII. Booster Tanks. 
The attention of the department is 
called to General Order No. 84 issued 



under date of October 17, 1929, concern- 
ing Booster Tanks on apparatus, with 
particular notice being given to cold 
weather precautions. The order read 
in part as follows: 

"Cold Weather Precautions. 

"During freezing weather, apparatus 
equipped with Booster Tanks will, upon 
arrival at fire, empty water from pump, 
tank and line by opening pump 
drain, tank valve marked T and line 
drain marked L. D., if this unit is not 
called on for operation or if they are 
to be kept at fire for any length of time. 
Also in the event of extreme long 
response where there is danger of freez- 
ing on road, drains should be opened on 
leaving quarters and tanks can be re- 
filled on return. 

"Company commanders will be held 
strictly accountable for the carrying out 
of the foregoing rules and instructions." 

VIII. Commend.^tions. 

On behalf of the members of the de- 
partment, the Fire Commissioner grate- 
fully acknowledges the receipt of $100 
from Mrs. Alice E. Sias, 115 Bay State 
road, Boston, as a donation to the Bos- 
ton Fireman's Relief Association. 

Hoseman Louis Cohen of the Fire Pre- 
vention Division is hereby commended 
for extinguishing a fire in an automobile, 
at Box 3572, on December 26, 1935, 
while off duty. 

Ladderman Henry F. McDonald of 
Ladder Company 31 is hereby com- 
mended for responding to and working 
with Engine Company 5 of this depart- 
ment at a fire in Chelsea on December 
27, 1935, while off duty. 

Hoseman Everett J. Hassell of Engine 
Company 48 is hereby commended for 
responding to and working at fire. Box 
3736, December 31, 1935, while off duty. 
Ladderman Charles F. McCarthy of 
Ladder Company 9 and Hoseman Ed- 
ward B. Nolan of Engine Company 36 
are hereby commended for extricating 
and removing Hoseman John J. Murphy 
who was severely injured at fire, two 
alarms, Box 4145, January 1, 1936, when 
a metal ceiling and timbers fell upon 
him, pinning him to the floor. Ladder- 
man McCarthy and Hoseman Nolan per- 
formed commendable work under danger- 
ous conditions. 

Apparatus Operator George Brady of 
Engine Company 50 is hereby com- 
mended for responding to and working 
at fire, second alarm, Box 4145, January 
1, 1936, while off duty. 

Lieut. John C. J. Merrill of Ladder 
Company 28 is hereby commended for 
extinguishing an awning fire before the 
arrival of apparatus, at Box 3364, 
Januai-y 4, 1936, while off duty. 

Ladderman Walter Weston of Ladder 
Company 19 is hereby commended for 
extinguishing an awning fire at 669 Tre- 
mont street, January 8, 1936, while off 
dut}-. His prompt action prevented the 
necessity of sounding an alarm. 

Deputy Chief John J. Kenney of Di- 
vision 1 is hereby commended for assist- 
ing in operations at fire. Box 2376, 
January 8, 1936, while off duty. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edw.ard 
F. McLaughlin. 

Thomas H. Downey, 
Acting Chief of Department. 

General Order No. 4. 
I. President's Birthday B.u.l. 
Members of the department are un- 
doubtedly well informed concerning the 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



105 



monster ball to be held at Boston Garden 
on Thursday evening, January 30th, 
President Roosevelt's Birthday, for the 
purpose of raising funds to combat the 
scourge of infantile paralysis. Through 
the press and radio the program for the 
evening of the ball has been explained 
and outlined. Large committees of 
public-spirited men and women are de- 
voting their time and effort to make 
this ball a financial success so that a 
substantial sum may be raised for the 
purpose of giving medical attention and 
care to those who have the misfortune 
to be stricken with this dreadful disease. 

Throughout the Nation similar balls 
are being conducted on the same 
evening with the same object, and it 
can be said that nowhere will there be 
so elaborate a program of an evening's 
entertainment as will be presented in 
Boston for those who go to Boston 
Garden on Thursday evening, January 
30th, 1936. Two of the finest orchestras 
in Boston will provide music for dancing. 
Leading stars of the stage and screen 
will be present and participate in the 
entertainment program. His Honor the 
Mayor is deeply and earnestly interested 
in the success of this event. He will 
attend the ball in company with many 
distinguished guests, including represent- 
atives of foreign countries. The com- 
mittee in charge of the ball has given 
assurance that this ball will be one of 
the most colorful and interesting events 
ever held in the City of Boston. 

In order that all who desire to attend 
the ball, as well as to aid in the worthy 
cause for which the affair is sponsored, 
all tickets have been popularly priced 
at only one dollar. This year the money 
will go to agencies for the study and 
care of this disease. Seventy per cent, 
seventy cents of every dollar will be ex- 
pended here in our own community for 
the treatment of this particular disease 
and the other thirty per cent will go to 
a National Board for research work and 
study, to prevent and stamp out this 
terrible malady. Everj' one knows the 
physical handicaps that follow in the 
wake of infantile paralysis and we are 
all familiar with the heroic and coura- 
geous fight President Roosevelt has 
waged since he became afflicted with 
this sickness. He, like many others, 
knows the agony and suffering that ac- 
companies those who are stricken, but 
out of his affliction was borne a positive 
and determined purpose to devote his 
efforts to help his fellow sufferers. The 
disease is not only a children's sickness 
but strikes adults as well, and our 
sympathy should go out to all and any 
one who is attacked. 

As already stated his Honor Mayor 
Mansfield has given his hearty endorse- 
ment and support of this affair and has 
assured the committee that the city 
employees would not be found wanting 
in response to this appeal. In order that 
members of the department may give 
their assistance to this cause, tickets 
have been placed in the hands of every 
district chief and division head today 
and he will immediately interview every 
member of his command as to his wishes 
in purchasing a ticket. All returns must 
be made to the Fire Commissioner on 
or before Wednesday, January 29. Mem- 
bers purchasing tickets will fill out the 
stub on the ticket, give it to the district 
chief or division head, who will see that 
the stubs are returned to the Fire Com- 
missioner's office not later than Wednes- 



day, January 29, in order that the pur- 
chaser may participate in the drawing 
to be held on the evening of the ball. 
A new automobile, a fur coat, an electric 
washing machine and a frigidaire are 
among the prizes that have already 
been donated. 

It is hoped that members of the de- 
partment will support this most worthy 
endeavor. The time for helping is short, 
only a few days. Members are urged to 
show an enthusiastic interest in this 
project and to arouse similar interest 
among their friends. A large sale of 
tickets by and through members of the 
department is earnestly desired. Addi- 
tional tickets can be obtained at De- 
partment Headquarters. 

Disease, like death, is no respecter of 
time or persons. By aiding in this cause 
you are helping yourself, your family, 
your neighbor, perhaps your own child. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edward 

F. McL.AUGHLIN. 

Thomas H. Downey, 
Acting Chicj of Deparlmenl. 



STREETS FOR COASTING. 

The Mayor has approved the follow- 
ing vote of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners of the City of Boston: 

Voted, That until other\vise ordered 
by this Board, coasting be allowed dur- 
ing the winter seasons, not later than 
10 o'clock p. m., under the regulations 
herein set forth and under such restric- 
tions that the Police Department may 
deem proper to impose, in the following- 
named streets: 

Police Division 1. 

Allen, Brighton, Norman, Poplar, Park- 
man, North Anderson streets; Chambers 
street, from Poplar street to Spring street. 

Police Division 6. 

Silver street, between Dorchester and 
F streets, also from F street to E street ; 
F street, between West Third and West 
First streets; East Third street, between 
N and P streets; East Fifth street, be- 
tween I and K streets; East Seventh 
street, between G and H streets; H 
street, between Emerson and East First 
streets. 

Police Division 7. 

Sumner street to Jeffries street; Cot^ 
tage street to Marginal street; Brooks 
street, between Lexington and Saratoga 
streets; Putnam street, between Lexing- 
ton and Saratoga streets; Breed street 
to Ashley street; Homer street to Moore 
street; Byron street to Coleridge street. 

Police Division 9. 
Laurel, Belden, Fountain, Marshfield, 
Dewey, Hazelwood, Wyoming, Fairland, 
Dunreath, Hulbert, Holborn, Robin 
Hood, Rochdale, Moreland streets; Whit- 
ing street, between Wan-en and Winthrop 
streets; Devon street, easterly from Blue 
Hill avenue; Julian street, easterly from 
Rand street; Randall street, between 
Albany and Fellows streets; Schuyler 
street, between Maple street and Blue 
Hill avenue; Bainbridge street, between 
Paulding and Dale streets. 

Police Division 10. 
Haskins, Hillside, Norfolk, Minden 
streets; Chestnut avenue; Lambert 
avenue, between Logan and Bartlett 
streets; Highland street, between Fort 
avenue and Cedar street; Thornton 
street, between No. 38 and Oakland 
street. 



Police Division 11. 
Bailey, Dix, Denny, Richfield, Sumner 
streets; Wrentham street, from Bruce to 
Florida street ; Alpha road ; Vinson street, 
between Park and Marlowe streets; 
Ocean street, between Welles avenue and 
Ashmont street; Park street, between 
Washington and Waldeck streets; Green- 
brier street, between Park and Bloom- 
field streets; iButtonwood street, between 
Grafton street and Crescent avenue; 
Templeton street, easterly from Dor- 
chester avenue to Florida street; Ken- 
wood street, easterly from Washington 
street; Longfellow street; Hillsdale 
street, from Richview street northwest- 
erly to land of the City of Boston; Med- 
way street, from Huntoon street to Ven- 
tura street. 

Police Division 13. 

Cornwall street; Chestnut avenue; 
Spring Park avenue, between Enfield 
street and Chestnut avenue; Tower 
street; Woodlawn street to Hyde Park 
avenue. 

Police Division 14. 

Newton, Union, Everett, Hobart, 
Saunders, Dustin, Ridgemont, Mansfield 
streets; Burton street, between Washing- 
ton street and Hunnewell avenue. 

Police Division 15. 
Perkins street; Carney street, between 
Bunker Hill and Medford streets; High 
street, between School and Sullivan 
streets; Bartlett street, between School 
and Sullivan streets. 

Police Division 17. 
Howitt road; Montclair avenue; Max- 
field, Newburn, Ridge, Wachusett street, 
from Patten street to Eldridge road; 
Aldrich street to Belgrade avenue; New- 
burg street to Belgrade avenue; Ains- 
worth street, between Centre and South 
streets; Bellevue street, between Robin 
and Martin streets; Kittredge street, be- 
tween Metropolitan avenue and Albano 
street; Metropolitan avenue, from Poplar 
street to Burley street; Park street, be- 
tween Martin and Oriole streets; Birch 
street, between Dudley avenue and Al- 
bano street; Avalon road, from Weld 
street towards the Newton boundary 
line; Chilton road, from Weld street 
towards the Newton boundary line. 

Police Division 18. 
West, Child, Regent, Sprague streets; 
Metropolitan avenue; Neponset avenue; 
Charles street to Roxana street. 

Police Division 19. 
Harvard street, between Deering road 
and Morton street ; Wales street, between 
Harvard and Nightingale streets; Fair- 
mount street, from Milton avenue to 
near Gallivan Boulevard ; Spencer street, 
between Athelwold and Park streets; 
Wilmington avenue, from Milton avenue 
to Gallivan Boulevard; Westmore road, 
from top of hill at about Gilmer street 
to Deering road; Pleasant Hill avenue. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of L Street 
Bridge repairs, estimated to be five (5) 
days, vehicles are excluded from the 
following street, effective January 20, 
1936: 
Summer Street, South Boston. 

From the northwesterly end of the 
L Street Bridge to the southeast- 
erly end of the L Street Bridge. 



06 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 25 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Monday, January 20, 1936. 
Regular meetinB of the City Council in the 
Council Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m.. Presi- 
dent FITZGKBALD presiding. Absent, Coun. 
Urackman, Gleason, Peter A. Murray, Norton 
and Wilson. 



APPOINTMENT BY THE MAYOR. 

Subject to confirmation by the Council, 
the Mayor submitted the following : 

Weigher of Goods : Gerrard Vaughin, 3 
Cufflin street, Brighton. 

Laid over a week under the law. 



VETO OF PAYMENT TO MOTHER OF 

DAVID McDonald. 

The following was received : 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 15, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I return herewith disapproved 
and without my signature the order adopted 
by your Honorable Body on January 6, 1936, 
favoring legislation for the payment of money 
to the mother of David McDonald. 

This matter has been before the City Council 
and the Mayor on several occasions and has 
never been approved. In 1932 the then Corpo- 
ration Counsel advised the Mayor that there 
was "neither legal nor moral liability upon 
the City to pay any money to the mother of 
David McDonald." It also appears that Har- 
rington, at the time of the killing of McDonald, 
was not occupied in the performance of 
police duty and was acting as a private citizen. 
Under these circumstances I am constrained 
to veto the order. 

Respectfully yours, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

The question came on placing the message 
on file. 

Coun. ROBERTS— Mr. President, I rise to 
a point of order, that the resolution of the 
City Council was merely a request for the 
enactment of certain legislation in behalf 
of the mother of David McDonald, and I don't 
see how that can be vetoed. That is my point. 

President FITZGERALD— Under joint rule 
7B of the Legislature, no resolution for such 
special legislation shall be entertained unless 
it is adopted by the City Council and approved 
by the Mayor. 

The message was placed on file. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

The following petitions were received and 
referred to the committees named, viz. : 

Claims. 

Robert O. Andrews, for compensation for 
damage to car by city wagon No. 113. 

Carmino A. Barra, for compensation for 
damage to property at 31 Waverly street, 
Brighton, by employees of Park Department. 

Nathan L. Ginsberg, for compensation for 
damage to car by city team. 

Stephen G. Grady, for compensation for 
damage to property at 2 Chestnut terrace, 
Jamaica Plain by ash truck. 

Jack Jaguel, for compensation for damage 
to car caused by an alleged defect in Wash- 
ington street. 

Cathem Mahony, for compensation for 
damage to car by paint, in Women's Con- 
venience Station, Roxbury. 

Delia A. Morrison, for compensation for 
injuries caused by an alleged defect in Hunt- 
ington avenue. 

Mrs. Tekla W. Ormsby, for compensation 
for damage to property at 3 Beethoven street, 
caused by city employees. 

Alexander Reina, for compensation for in- 
juries caused by an alleged defect in Tremont 
street. 

G. Thoresen, for refund on refuse tickets. 

Effie Tingos, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect at 20 Davison 
street. 

Trimount Manufacturing Company, for 
compensation for damage to property at 55-71 
Amory street, Roxbury, caused by break in 
water pipe. 

Raymond J. Trull, for compensation for 
injuries caused by an alleged defect at 114 
Hemenway street. 



APPOINTMENT OF ACTING HEALTH 
COMMISSIONER. 

Notice was received from the Mayor of the 
appointment of Dr. Frederic A. Washburn as 
Acting Health Commissioner in place of Dr. 
Francis X. Mahoney, deceased. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON MUNICIPAL 
LIGHTING. 

Coun. DOWD, for the Committee on Munic- 
ipal Lighting, submitted the following : 

Report on message of the Mayor (referred 
January 13) together with proposed contracts 
with the Boston Consolidated Gas Company 
for furnishing gas, and for equipment and 
lighting of gas street lamps, recommending 
passage of the accompanying order, viz. : 

Ordered, That in accordance with the pro- 
visions of section six of chapter 486 of the 
Acts of 1909, a public hearing be given by 
the City Council on Tuesday, February 4, 
1936, at two o'clock p. m., on the proposed 
contracts with the Boston Consolidated Gas 
Company for furnishing gas, and for the 
equipment and lighting of gas lamps ; and 
that the City Clerk be directed to give notice 
of said hearing by advertising the same in 
the daily newspapers and seven days before the 
date of said hearing in the City Record; the 
expense of said hearing and advertising to be 
charged to the appropriate items for City 
Council, Incidental Expenses. 

The report was accepted and said order 
passed. 



RECESS. 

President FITZGERALD declared a recess 
subject to the call of the Chair at 2.33 p. m. 
The members reassembled and were called to 
order by President FITZGERALD at 
2.39 p. m. 



CONFIRMATION OF EXECUTIVE 
APPOINTMENTS. 

President FITZGERALD called up, under 
unfinished business. No. 1 on the calendar, 
viz. : 

1. Action on appointments submitted by 
the Mayor January 13, 1936, of John Mahoney, 
to be a Weigher of Coal ; and Walter T. Cur- 
ran, John J. Heavey and William F. Heavey, 
to be Weighers of Goods. 

The question came on confirmation. Com- 
mittee, Coun. Finley and George A. Murray. 
Whole number of ballots 14, yes 13, no 1, and 
the appointments were confirmed. 



PAYMENTS TO BEREAVED FAMILIES. 

Coun. FITZGERALD offered the following: 

Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation 
whereby the City of Boston may be authorized 
to pay a sum of money to the father of Joseph 
Taylor, who was drowned while bathing in 
the Charles river, provided that such legisla- 
tion includes a referendum to the Mayor and 
City Council. 

Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation 
whereby the City of Boston may be authorized 
to pay a sum of money to the mother of John 
McGonagle, who died from injuries sustained 
by the falling of a wall at the Morton Street 
Playground, provided that such legislation 
includes a referendum to the Mayor and City 
Council. 

The resolves were passed under suspension 
of the rule. 



ADDITIONAL MEN ON SNOW REMOVAL. 

Coun. TOBIN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to immediately place 2,000 additional 
men at work on snow removal. 

Coun. TOBIN— Mr. President, this order 
provides for the appointment of 2,000 addi- 
tional men, to be paid by the city, for emer- 
gency work on snow removal. It is apparent 
at the present time that there are not enough 
men to take care of the situation and that 
more can be employed and paid by the city, 
especially in districts such as Dorchester, where 
they have no contracts. There has been con- 



siderable discussion with regard to the re- 
moval of snow to the effect that it can be 
taken care of by W. P. A. employees. The 
rules issued on the matter, however, provide 
as follows : 

1. Skilled workers may be used only to 
make up time. 

2. White-collar workers cannot be used. 

3. Trucks, paid out of Federal Funds, 
cannot be used. 

4. No supervisors or foremen, receivins pay 
beyond the Security Wage rates, may be em- 
ployed. 

5. No non-relief workers, or non-relief fore- 
man, may be used. 

6. Regrular W. P. A. hours will be worked. 
No overtime, no Sunday work. 

7. Worker's time to be charged to regular 
W. P. A. projects. 

8. Letter must be written by sponsor, re- 
questing permission, and giving number of 
men to be employed, and nature of emergency. 

9. In all cases, W. P. A. personnel must 
not be allowed to stand around. They mutt 
work. 

10. If workers are needed after Thursday, 
another request will have to be made to this 
office for permission to use them after that 
date. 

It is obvious that the use of W. P. A. 
employees is unfair both to the employees 
themselves and to the city. This is work 
that has to be done in a hurry. I advise you, 
therefore, Mr. President, to appoint a com- 
mittee and to see the Mayor, and to see if 
2,000 more men cannot be put on the work 
tonight. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



APPOINTMENT OF ADDITIONAL 
PATROLMEN. 

Coun. AGNEW offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Police Commissioner be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to 
appoint immediately two hundred patrolmen 
to fill existing vacancies in the Police Depart- 
ment and to insure the residents of Boston 
the protection to which they are entitled. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



COASTING AT ARNOLD ARBORETUM. 

Coun. FINLEY offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Park Commission be re- 
quested, through his Honor the Mayor, to allow 
coasting at the Arnold Arboretum. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



CONVENIENCE STATION, FOREIST HILLS. 

Coun. FINLEY for Coun. MURRAY and 
FINLEY offered the following: 

Ordered, That the trustees of the Boston 
Elevated Railway Company be requested, 
through his Honor the Mayor, to re-open the 
convenience station at the Forest Hills station 
immediately. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



TRAFFIC SIGNALS, WARD 7. 

Coun. KERRIGAN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Traffic Commission be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to 
install automatic traffic signals at the junction 
of Pond street and Columbia road. Ward 7. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

Coun KERRIGAN offered the following: 
Ordered, That under the provisions of 
chapter 115 of the General Laws, and acts 
in amendment thereof or in addition thereto, 
the amounts set forth in the list of allowances 
hereto annexed, for the month of January, 
1936, of aid to soldiers and sailors and their 
families residing in the City of Boston or 
having a settlement therein, be hereby ap- 
proved and paid until otherwise ordered, unless 
the person named shall previously become in- 
elegible to receive said aid. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



Jan. 25 



CITY RECORD 



107 



EUMINATION OF OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 
RECIPIENTS FROM POLL TAX LISTS. 

Coun. ROBERTS offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Board of Assessors be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to 
eliminate all recipients of old age assistance 
from the poll tax lists. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 

Coun. GALLAGHER— Mr. Chairman, I move 
that we adjourn. 

'Coun. TOBIN — Mr. President, before we 
adjourn I wonder if action could not be taken 
on the snow-removal order, having a com- 
mittee appointed to see his Honor the Mayor. 

President FITZGERALD— That will be taken 
care of. 

Coun. GALLAGHER'S motion was carried, 
and the Council adjourned at 2.45 p. m., to 
meet on Monday, January 27, 1936, at 2 p. m. 



NOTICE OF HEARING. 



City of Boston. 
Office of the City Clerk, January 22, 1936. 

In accordance with the provisions of sec- 
tion 6 of chapter 486 of the Acts of 1909, a 
public hearing will be given by the City 
Council in the City Council Chamber, City 
Hall, on Tuesday, February 4, 1936, at two 
o'clock p. m., on the proposed contracts with 
the Boston Consolidated Gas Company for 
furnishing gas for street lights, and for the 
equipment and lighting of gas lamps. 

By order of the City Council. 

(Jan. 25-Feb. 1.) W. J. Doyle, City Clerk. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 



Changes in Traffic Rbgui-ations. 

Voted, That the Revised Traffic Rules and 
Regulations, as adopted by the Boston Traf- 
fic Commission on October 31, 1935, and on 
November 6, 1935, are amended as follows, 
effective Jajiuary 27, 1936: 

Section 24, Part 1, is amended by adding 
the foltowing : 
Fos3 Street, Charlestown. 

From Chelsea street to Water street. 
Temple Street. 

From Derne street to Cambridge street. 
Section 41 is amended by adding the follow- 
ing: 
North Beacon Street, Brighton. 
At Parsons street. 

William P. Hickby, 
(Jan. 18-25.) Ctmmisaioner. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Flashlight E<iuipmbnt. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing flash- 
light equipment to the various city depart- 
ments. The bidder must use the form of pro- 
posals to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, and the successful bidder must 
furnish a bond for one quarter the total esti- 
mated amount of the bid with a surety com- 
pany authorized to do business in Massachu- 
setts as surety for the faithful performance of 
the contract. There will be a charge of 
twenty cents {$0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bid, with a certified check for 
$100, payable to and to become the property 
of the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out, must be left at the ofiRce of 
the Superintendent of Supplies, before 12 m., 
Tuesday, February 4, 1936, at which time and 
place they will be publicly opened and read. 
A duplicate bid, without check, must be left 
at the office of the City Auditor prior to the 
time named for opening bids. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank Dohbrty, 
(Jan. 25. ) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Remodeling Uniform Sack 
Coats, Boston Fire Department. 

The Fire Commissioner of the City of Bos- 
ton, hereinafter designated as Commissioner, 
60 Bristol street, invites proposals from citi- 
zens of the United States and corporations 
and other legal associations wherein the con- 
trolling interest to the extent of at least over 
one half is owned by a citizen or citizens of 
the United States, for doing the following 
stated work, the remodeling of the collars, 
necks and fronts of approximately 974 of the 
present stand-up front, privates sack coats of 
the Boston Fire Department, so that the col- 
lars will be of a turned-down roll-collar type, 
like sample to be seen at Maintenance Divi- 
sion, 70 Bristol street. The work to be done 
in accordance with specifications and sample, 
which may be obtained at Fire Headquarters, 
60 Bristol street. Proposals will be received 
at the office of the Fire Commissioner, 60 
Bristol street, where the same will be publicly 
opened and read at 12 o'clock noon, February 
5, 1936. Proposals must be in duplicate, 
sealed, and marked "Proposals for Uniform 
Alterations," one of which is to be deposited 
at the office of the Fire Commissioner, and 
contain a certified check, made payable to the 
City of Boston, for two hundred (200) dollars, 
said check to be forfeited if the bidder fails to 
carry out his proposal ; the other proposal is 
to be deposited at the office of the City Auditor 
previous to the time stated for the opening of 
the bids. The succesful bidder will be required 
to furnish a bond in the sum of 40 per cent 
of the estimated total amount of the contract 
price, of an approved surety company doing 
business in the State of Massachusetts. The 
contract is made subject to appropriation to 
meet payments thereunder. The Fire Com- 
missioner reserves the right to reject any or 
all bids or to award the contract as he deems 
best. 

Edward F. McLaughlin, 

(Jan. 25. ) Fire Commissioner. 



W. P. A. 
Project 65-14-6027-5659-1731. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Hard, 
Dry Fill. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing the 
B'lston Airport. Park Department, hard, dry 
fill, as per specifications to be obtained at the 
Supply Department, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex. There will be a charge of twenty 
cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bidder must leave his proposal 
and a certified check for $300 payable to and 
to become the property of the City of Boston 
if the proposal is not carried out, at the 
office of the Supply Department. A duplicate 
bid, without check, must be left at the office 
of the City Auditor prior to the time named 
for opening bids. The bids will be publicly 
opened and read on Friday, January 31, 1930, 
at 12 m., at Room 801, City Hall Annex. 
The successful bidder must furnish a bond 
for one quarter the total estimated amount 
of the contract with a surety company author- 
ized to do business in Massachusetts, as 
surety for the faithful performance of the 
contract. The Superintendent reserves the 
right to accept or reject any or all bids, or 
any part of a bid, and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 
All contracts made subject to appropriations 
to meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 25.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



To Taxpayers. 
Assbssors' Notice, City Hall Annex, 

Boston, January 1, 1936. 
Attention is called to the Assessors' Notice 
posted upon City Hall and various other 
places throughout the city, relative to mak- 
ing returns on personal property subject to 
taxation. Returns should be made not later 
than February 15. 

Edward T. Kelly, 
Timothy W. Murphy, 
Michael J. Brophy, 

Assessors of Boston. 
(Jan. 4-11-18-25— Feb. 1-8-15.) 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY 
OF BOSTON. 



Administration Building, 15 Beacon Street, 
Office of the Business Manager. 



Proposals for Furnishing Supplies and 
Equipment for Physical Education in 
Boston Public Schools. 
The School Committee of the City of Bos- 
ton invites bids for furnishing supplies amd 
equipment for physical education in Boston 
public schools. Proposal forms are obtainable 
at the office of the Business Manager of the 
School Committee, tenth floor, 15 Beacon 
street. Envelopes containing proposals must 
be sealed and plainly marked "Proposal for 
Furnishing Supplies and Equipment for Phys- 
ical Education." The bid must be in dupli- 
cate. One copy signed by the bidder and ac- 
companied by a certified check for $50 pay- 
able to the City of Boston must be left at the 
office of the Business Manager on or before 
12 o'clock m. on Thursday, February 6, 1936. 
Copies filed with the Business Manager will 
be publicly opened and read at 12 o'clock m. 
of the day stated. The other copy, also signed 
by the bidder, must be filed with the City 
Auditor, City Hall, Boston, Mass., previous 
to the time named for the opening of bids. 
The School Committee reserves the right to 
reject any or all bids, and to accept such bid 
or part of bid as may be deemed best for the 
interests of the city. The successful bidder will 
be required to furnish a bond for not less 
than 50 per cent of the amount of the contract. 

Alexander M. Sullivan. 
Business Manager of the School Committee. 
(Jan. 25.) 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing X-Ray Materials. 

The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various city departments, X-Ray materials, as 
per specifications to be obtained at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex. There will he a charge of 
twenty cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bidder must leave his pro- 
posal with a certified check for $300, pay- 
able to and to become the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the above office. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids will be publicly opened and 
read Thursday, Febi-uary 6, 1936, at 12 m., at 
Room 801, City Hall Annex. The successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter of 
the total estimated amount of the contract 
with a surety company authorized to do 
business in Masachusetts as surety for the 
faithful performance of the contract. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to accept 
or reject any or all bids, or any part of a 
bid, and to award the contract as he deems 
for the best interests of the city. All con- 
tracts made subject to appropriations to meet 
payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 25.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Engine, Machine and Cyl- 
inder Oils. 
The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing engine, 
machine and cylinder oils, as required, to the 
various city departments. The bidder must use 
the form of proposal to be obtained at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, and the successful bidder 
must furnish a bond for one quarter the total 
estimated amount of the bid with a surety 
company authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the contract. There will be a charge of 
twenty cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bid, with a certified check 
for $200, payable to and to become the prop- 
erty of the City of Boston if the proposal is 
not carried out, must be left at the office of 
the Superintendent of Supplies, before 12 m., 
Wednesday, February 5, 1936, at which time 
and place they will be publicly opened and 
read. A duplicate bid, without check, must 
be left at the office of the City Auditor prior 
to the time named for opening bids. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to accept or 
reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, 
and to award the contract as he deems for the 
best interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 
(Jan. 25. ) Superintendent of Supplies. 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY. 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

Room 27, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 1100. 
FRFnjEHicK W. MANsrifXD, Mayor. 
JosKl-M K. Mkllyn, Secretary. 
William C. S. Healby, Assistant Secretary. 
CvKlL C;. Cl'MMINCS, AnKiHlant Secretary- 
JOH.N F. GiLMORE, Jh., Asaistant Secretary. 
Bernard J. Dunn, Assistant Secretary. 
Thomas E. C'imkno, Assistant Secretary. 
Artiilr J. CKebje, Assistant Secretary. 
Mary L. Thcmpson, Assistant Secretary. 
John F. Gilmore, Chief Clerk (Acting). 
Herbert L. McNary, Chief Licensing Division. 
JoswH MlKOLAJEWSKI. Assistant. 
Martin J. Conroy, Messenger. 

CITY COUNCIL. 

Ward 1. Henry Selvitella, 80 Orient avenue. 

Ward 2. James J. Mellen, 18 Tremont 8t. 

Ward 3. John I. FitzRerald, 7 Allen st. 

Ward A. George W. Eoberts, 20 Hemenway 
street. 

Ward 5. Henry L. Shattuck, 15 River st. 

Ward B. George A. Murray, 223 West 
Second street. 

Ward 7. John E. Kerrigan, 213 West Eighth 

Ward 8. John F. Dowd, 22 Greenville st. 

Ward 9. Richard D. Gleason, 15 Ruggles st. 

Ward 10. John J. Doherty, 67* Wymaji st. 

Ward 11. James J. Kilroy, 1301 Columbus ave. 

Ward 12. David M. Brackman, 89 Waumbeck 
street. 

Ward 13. Peter J. Fitzgerald, 39 Belfort St. 

Ward 14. Sidney Rosenberg, 576 Blue Hill ave. 

"Ward 15. Martin H. Tobin, 70 Westville st. 

Ward 16. John J. McGrath, 2 Glenrose road. 

Ward 17. Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr., 57 
Codraan Hill avenue. 

Ward 18. Clement A. Norton, 34 Myopia rd. 

Ward 19. Peter A. Murray, 7 St. John st. 

Ward 20. James F. Finley, 231 Cornell st. 

Ward 21. James E. Agnew, 92 Wallingford rd. 

Ward 22. Edward M. Gallagher, 21 Oak 
Square avenue. 

Clerk op Committees. 
John E. Baldwin, Room 56, City Hall. Tel. 

L,afayette 5100. 

City Messenger. 
Edward J. Leary, Room 55, City Hall. Tel. 

Lafayette 6100. 

ART DEPARTMENT. 

OflBce, Faneuil HaU. 

Arthur A. Shurclipf, Secretary. 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Edward T. Kelly, Chairman. 
Timothy W. Murphy, Secretary. 
Michael J. Brophy, Principal Assessor. 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 

Room 20, City HaU, Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Charles J. Fox, City Auditor. 

Daniel J. Falvety, Deputy City Auditor. 

BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOL 
BUILDINGS. 

Richard J. Lane, Chairman; Francis R. 
Bancs; Jambs J. Egan. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Office, 11 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6750. 

William W. Drummey, Superintendent of Con- 
struction. 

BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT. 

Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 30 City Hall. 
, Secretary. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 

134 North street. Tel. Capitol 2125. 
William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 

BUDGET DEPARTMENT. 

47 City HaU. Td. Lafayette 6100. 
Francis J. Murray, Commissioner, 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 

Office. 901 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Edward W. Roemer, Building Commissioner. 
John H. Glover, Acting Clerk of Department. 

Board of Examiners. 
Office, 907 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 

6100. 
Thomas K. Reynolds, Chairman. 
Mary C. Dowd, Secretary. 

Board of Appeal. 
Office, City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Joseph A. Tomasello, Chairman. 
James A. McElaney, Jr., Secretary. 

CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 

Room 31, City HaU. Tel. L.afayette 5100. 

Wilfred J. Doyle. City Clerk. 

John B. Hynes, Assistant City Clerk. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD. 

Boom 80, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 
Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 
EUSABETH M. Herlihy, Secretary. 



CITY RECORD. 

Office, 73 City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Frank H. Cushman. Editor. 
Joshua H. Jones, Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73. 
City HaU. 

COLLECTING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 200 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
John F. Doherty, Cily Collector. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 111 City Hall Annex. TeL Lafayette 

5100. 
David B. Shaw, Chairman. 
Daniel H. Rose, Commissioner. 
Frederic E. Dowling, Commissioner. 
Francis B. McKi.n.vey, Commissioner. 

FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Office, 24 School street. Tel. Lafayette 1622. 
E. Mark Sullivan, Chairman. 
Robert E. Cunniff, Secretary. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters, Bristol street. South End. Tel. 

Kenmore 1100. 
Wire Division, 103 City HaU Annex. Tel. 

Lafayette 5100. 
Edward F. McLaughlin, Commissioner. 

, Executive Secretary. 

Henry A. Fox, Chief of Department. 

Peter F. Dolan, Superintendent of Wire 

Division. 

THE FRANKLIN FOUNDATION. 

Office, Frajiklin Union, Appleton and Berkeley 

streets. Tel. Hancock 6590. 
Henry B. Sawyer, President. 
W. B. RussEXL, Director. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1107 City HaU Annex. TeL Laf. 6100. 
William B. Keeler, M. D., Commissioner. 
Joseph A. Cahalan, Secretary. 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 

City Hospital, 818 Harrison ave. Tel. Ken. 8600. 
Relief Hospital, Haymarket Sq. Tel. Cap. 0753. 
Relief Hospital, East Boston. Tel. E. B. 86. 
West Department, West Rox. Tel. Parkway 68. 
Sanatorium Division, 249 River St., Mattapan. 

Tel. Blue Hills 7900. 
Joseph P. Manning, President. 
James W. Manary, M. D., Superintendent. 

INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 808-811 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Frederic A. Washburn, M. D., Commissioner. 
Elizabeth G. Nelson, Chief Clerk. 
Child Welfare Division. 
800 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Registration Division. 
Office, Room 5, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Long Island, Hospital Division. 
Long Island, Boston Harbor. Tel. President 
1371. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 
Room 1003, Lawyers Building, 11 Beacon 

street. Tel. Lafayette 6200. 
Henry E. Foley, Corporation CounseL 
Margaret G. O'Neill, Secretary. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Library Building, Copley square. Tel. 

Kenmore 1500. 
Frank W. Buxton, President of Trustees. 
Milton E. Lord, Director. 

LICENSING BOARD. 

Office, 1 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 2470. 
David T. Montague, Chairman. 
Louis Epplb, Secretary. 

MARKET DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Quincy Market. Tel. Capitol 6382. 
Frank J. Kiernan, Superintendent. 

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

Men and Women, 25 Church street, Tel. 

Liberty 8607. 
Samuel W. Warren, Director. 

OVERSEERS OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

Office, Charity BuUding, 43 Hawkins street. 

Tel. Capitol 8320. 
Temporary Home, Chardon street. TeL Laf. 

2337. 
Wayfarers' Lodge, 30 Hawkins street. TeL 

Lafayette 3198. 
James A. McMurry, Chairman. 
John C. L. Dowling, Executive Director. 

PARK DEPARTMENT. 

Office. 33 Beacon street. TeL Capitol 6940. 
William P. Long, Chairman. 
Daniel J. Byrne, Secretary. 
Park, Public Grounds, Bath and Music 
Divisions. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. TeL Capitol 6940. 

Cemetery Division. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. TeL Capitol 6940. 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 805 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
John J. Douglass, Ccrmmissioner. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters, 154 Berkeley street. Tel. Ken- 
more 6700. 
Eugene M. McSweeney, Commissioner. 
Andrew J. Gobey, Secretary. 
Martin H. King, Superintendent. 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 174 North street. Tel. Lafayette 6368. 
William J. Casey, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1005 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
RoswELL G. Hall, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

C. J. Carven, Commissioner. Office, 609 City 

HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

John J. Connelly, Secretary and Chief Clerk. 

Room 509, City Hall Annex. TeL Laf. 6100. 

Bridge and Ferry Division. 

Thomas H. Sexton, Division Engineer. Office, 

602 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Highway Division. 

Joshua Atwood, Division Engineer. Office, 

501 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Sanitary Division. 

Adolph J. Post, Division Engineer. Office, 

501 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 

Sewer Division. 

George W. Dakin, Division Engineer. Office, 

701 City HaU Annex. TeL Lafayette 5100. 

Water Division. 

Daniel M. Sullivan, Division Engineer. Office, 

607 City HaU Annex. TeL Laf. 6100. 

Water Income Division. 

Jambs A. McMurry, Division Engineer. Office, 

604 City HaU Annex. TeL Laf. 5100. 

REGISTRY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1008 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Hilda H. Quirk, Registrar. 

RETIREMENT BOARD. 

Room 65, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, Chairman. 
J. George Herlihy, Secretary. 
William D. Kenny, Executive Officer. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Office, 15 Beacon street. TeL Capitol 5500. 

Frederick R. Sullivan, Chairman. 

Ellbn M. Cronin, Secretary. 

Patrick T. Campbell, Superintendent of 

Schools. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, Business Manager. 

SINKING FUNDS DEPARTMENT. 

Room 20, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Eliot Wadsworth, Chairman. 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 60 City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Charles H. Carby, Commissioner. 

STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 76 City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Walter A. Murray, Acting Chairman. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Secretary. 

STREET LAYING=OUT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 401 City HaU Annex. 

Commissioners, Owbn A. Gallagher, Chair- 
man; Walter A. Murray; Thomas A. Fitz- 
gerald ; Cornelius A. Reardon, Secretary. 

SUFFOLK, COUNTY OF. 

Offices, Court House, Pemberton square. Tel. 

Capitol 0351. 
William J. Foley, District Attorney. TeL 

Capitol 9500. 
John A. Keliher, Sheriff. Tel Capitol 2451. 
W. T. A. Fitzgerald, Register of Deeds. Tel. 

Capitol 0519. 
Arthur W. Sullivan, Register of Probate. 

TeL Capitol 9110. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 801 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 6100. 
D. Frank Doherty, Superintendent. 

TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1 Beacon st., 7th floor. TeL Capitol 5860. 
Thomas F. Sullivan, Chairman. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Room 21, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

John H. Dorsety, Treasurer. 

Arthur F. Swan, Assistant Treasurer. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 105 City HaU Annex. TeL Laf. 6100. 
James A. Sweeney, Sealer. 



city op boston printing department 



CITY RECORD 



Officxal Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 



Vol. 28. Saturday, Febrxjary 1, 1936. No. 5 

MAYOR MANSFIELD OPENS DRIVE FOR SALE OF TICKETS FOR PRESIDENT 
ROOSEVELT'S BIRTHDAY BALL — ADDRESS BEFORE CITIZENS' COMMIT= 
TEE, OF WHICH HE IS GENERAL CHAIRMAN, STARTS WORK WITH 
ENTHUSIASM THAT WARRANTS PREDICTION OF GREATER SUCCESS 
THAN FOR ANY PREVIOUS YEAR — EXPLAINS NEED FOR FUNDS TO 
BATTLE INFANTILE SCOURGE AND HOW SUM SECURED WILL BE 
DISTRIBUTED. 

The following is the radio speech of Mayor Frederick W. Mansfield over Station AVBZ on January 24: 
Mr. Maynard, Ladies and Gentlemen of the Radio Audience. 

As Mayor of the City of Boston and as General Chairman of the Birthday Ball for the President Committee, 
I am pleased tonight from Station WBZ to open, officially, the drive for the sale of tickets for this most worthy 
cause. 

As Mr. Maynard has informed you, — information which I feel should be repeated, — 70 per cent of the 
proceeds of the ball will be distributed locally to care for needy infantile cases. The local committee will retain 
that amount to be expended in this community. It will give the local authorities the opportunity to concentrate 
their moneys with those hospitals, doctors and societies that are putting forth every effort to combat this dreaded 
disease. 

The remaining 30 per cent will be turned over to the National Committee of the Birthday Ball for delivery 
to President Franklin D. Roosevelt to be presented by him to a national commission to widen research efforts to 
bring under control the disease itself. It might be well to mention here that the Harvard Infantile Paralysis Com- 
mission received $10,000 from this 30 per cent fund during the past year. 

Leaders from all walks of life have accepted the invitation to serve on the National Committee, and here 
locally I have received whole-hearted response from all who have been asked to serve. 

Collector of Port Joseph A. Maynard kindly consented to serve as chairman for the Birthday Ball to be 
held here in Boston and we feel that under his direction we will have even greater success than last year when the 
net proceeds were 812,315.41. 

A most excellent committee of one hundred and fifty ladies and gentlemen who are giving willingly of their 
time so that this most worthy cause might be a great success have been working earnestly for the past several weeks. 
To all members of this committee I extend my heartfelt thanks for their willing assistance and cooperation. To 
the Press and radio stations of this city I am deeply grateful, for without the valuable aid of these two agencies 
we could not hope for success. To all the musical units, military organizations, decorators, and to all others who 
are assisting I extend my sincere thanks. 

As for the ball itself. It will take place on the evening of Thursday, January 30, at the Boston Garden. 
It is expected that over 20,000 persons (the largest ever assembled at an affair of this kind) will be in attendance 
that evening. 

A famous orchestra and two well-known bands have indicated their willingness to take part and those 
attending will enjoy the finest music to be heard in Boston in years. Music will be but one feature of the evening, 
which, in addition to dancing, will include a military drill, personal appearances of famous men and women of stage 
and screen as well as carefully selected entertainment. Mr. Majmard has informed you of the prizes to be awarded 
to the holders of lucky tickets. These prizes alone should be reason enough to assure a banner attendance. 

It is the desire of our National Leader, President Roosevelt, that the tickets for these social events of January 
30 be priced at a low figure and accordingly the committee here in Boston have set the price of one dollar each per 
ticket. In this way a vast majority of our fellow citizens can contribute to this most worthy cause and at the same 
time receive the greatest value for their money in the way of entertainment and enjoyment that has ever been 
offered in this city. 

One of the real features of the evening will be a special message via radio by President Roosevelt at 11.30 p. m. 
to all those assembled in the Garden. It is expected that the President will speak to over 5,000,000 people at that 
time. 

I am informed by the National Committee that over five thousand balls and entertainments will be held 
throughout the country on the evening of January 30, and it is my hope that the gala affair to be held at the Boston 
Garden will be the most successful of all, from both a financial and attendance standpoint. 

I urge upon my fellow citizens to show by their attendance and the pvu-chase of tickets that they are interested 
in this most worthy cause and that they are willing to cooperate to the end that we of Boston may assist in combating 
one of the most dreaded diseases menacing our nation and thus help to rehabilitate the victims of infantile paralysis. 



I 10 



CITY RECORD 



Feb. 1 




"O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 
queen, 

From thy hills looking down on the ship- 
teeming plain ol the ocean. 

May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 
with light all serene, 

Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotionl" 

From Boston Centennial Poem by 

Nathan Haskell. Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly under legislative act by the 
City of Boston, Massachusetts. 



FRANK H. CUSHMAN, Editor, Koom 73, City 

HaU. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City HaU. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies . 



$2.00 Per Year 
10 cents 



IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES 
Old South News-Stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising. 
A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73. City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
Febniary 3, 1936, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 

MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
oflScials directly in charge. The failure 
of such ofiBcial to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways; the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 



public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasoline, oil 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Tr.^ffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of ail permits in connection 
therewith. 

To the Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and oflal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To the Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To THE Bo.'iRD OF PaRK COMMIS- 
SIONERS, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue. Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 
charges made for such service. Applica- 



tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bathg 
and gj'mnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To THE School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools in the city. 

To THE Department of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Ex.\miners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Statistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To THE Wire Division of the Fire 
Department, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To THE Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



For the week ending January 25, 1936: 
Population as of July, 1935, Massa- 
chusetts State Census, 817,713; popula- 
tion estimated July, 1935, United States 
Census Bureau, 801,880; number of 
deaths (stillbirths excluded): Residents, 
205; nonresidents, 42; total, 247. 

Death rate per 1,000 of pop