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Digitized by tiie Internet Arcliive 

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INDEX TO THE CITY RECORD, 

JANUARY 2, I93T — DECEMBER 31, 193T. 



Page 
A. 

Airport business growing (passenger) 951 

Assessing Department: 

Notice of removal of Timothy W. Murphy, 87 

Report on revaluations 64 

Changes in personnel 139 

Assessments, revision of... 92, 121, 122, 123, 187 
496, .547, 620, 767, 972 
1066, 1139, 1240, 1274, 1416 
Auditing Department; 

New procedure for conducting city's 

business inaugurated 139 

Auditor Charles J. Fox, announces prepa- 
ration of new regulations for city's 

business 947 

Welcomes delegates to conference of 

municipal finance officers 1135 

Asks heads of departments to end lump 

sum agreements with contractors 1195 

B. 

Beaches (Boston): 

Commissioner Long refutes charges of lax 

conditions 927 

Boston's care of needy citizens discussed by 

Director 1409 

Boston's citizens contribute to Mid-West 

flood sufferers 107 

Budget Department, methods brought 

up-to-date 140 

Building activities for first six months 

shown 826 



Clean-up campaign proclamation 661 

Columbus Day Address, Henry A. Sasserno. 1229-- 
Community Fund campaign, city employees 

contribute 893 

Conference on parking meters, JMayor's 

Office 1273 

Constables names proposed 652 

Cows feed on Boston Common again 1340 

Construction work, orders for 63, 90, 91, 616 

647, 673, 731, 866, 1057, 1065, 1198 
1257, 1267, 1274, 1312, 13.55, 1404, 1466 

Claims allowed 477, 577, 770, 840 

932, 11.38, 1416 
CONTK.A.CTS Awarded: 
Assessing Department: 

for typewriting assessed polls 513 

for typewriting motor excise Usts 549 

for typewriting real estate tax lists 612 

Building Department: 

To take down buildings . . . ..58, 140, 206, 1023 
1041, 1199, 1376, 1388, 1413 
Fire Department: 

for dredging of berth for Engine 31 ... . 549 
for provision for insurance on boilers . . . 1067 
Hospital Department: 

for the extermination of vermin 86 

for installation of fire alarm system 897 

for renting of auto trucks 1097,1098 

for overhauling of swimming pools 1338 

for recharging fire extinguishers 206 

for furnishing X-ray apparatus, etc .... 549 
Institutions Department: 

for installation of sprinkler sj'stem 230 

for repairs to refrigerator boxes 581 

for repairs to Steamer "Stephen J. 

O'Meara" 765 

for testing and repairing of cables 1024 

for repairing piling at Long Island 

Wharf 1137 

for rental of automobiles 1429 

Library Department: 

for the construction of catalogue cases, 717 
for painting work at libraries and 

branches 1178 

for the transportation of books. ^ 1448 

Park Department: 

for erecting steel frame work at Colum- 
bus Park Bath House 612 

for furnishing pavement in the Fens. . . . 834 
for furnishing iron casings at Marine 

Park 925 

for the rental of auto trucks, etc 925 

for repairs to the Boston and Albany 

railroad bridge 1376 

Penal Institutions Department: 

for repairs to the Steamer "Michael J. 

Perkins" 1237 

Public Buildings Department: 

for alterations to Police Stations 3 

and 10 642 

for furnishing hand towels 707 

for alterations to Station 9 1152 

Public Welfare Department: 

for doing laundry work for Wayfarer's 

Lodge 206 

for doing laundry work (general) 183 

for hauling wood 86 

for moving welfare families ; 113 

Public Works Department: 
Bridge Service: 

for redecking draw span and painting 

Chelsea Bridge South 244 

for repaving Beacon Street Bridge . . . 1025 



Contracts Awarded: Page 

Public Works Department: 
Ferry Service: 

for repairing of Ferryboat "Daniel A. 

MacCormack" 612 

for repairing Ferryboat "Charles C. 

Donoghue" 1137 

Paving Service: 

paving of streets where no guarantee 

by contract exists 1338, 1376 

laying pavement in Ward 19 1275 

laying bituminous pavement 1041 

laying pavement in Old Harbor 

Village streets 1338 

laying sheet asphalt pavement. . . .787, 1237 
relaying granite blocks pavement .... 834 
resurfacing Dartmouth street, etc .... 858 

paving Falmouth street, etc 991 

Sanitary Service: 

for collecting of garbage 5 

for placing weighing and vending 

machines 113 

Sewer Service: 

erecting sewer at new Pumping 

Station 244 

blasting for sewer in Mt. Hope road, 

etc . . ._ 479 

for sewerage works in West Roxbury . 643 
for sewerage works in City Proper .... 642 
for sewerage works in West Roxbury, 

669, 696 

repairing pumps at Calf Pasture 834 

blasting for sewerage works. West 

Roxbury -926 

for cleaning No. 2 well. Calf Pasture 

Pumping Station 1041 

for new tar and gravel roof. South 

End sewer service yard 1041 

for building sewer chamber and 

regulator 1067 

for sewerage works in South Boston. . 1179 
for sewerage works in Hyde Park .... 1237 
for sewerage works in West Roxbury . 1237 

for sewerage works in Brighton 1237 

for repairing screens, etc., and gate 

valves at Pumping Station 1237 

for sewerage works in Hyde Park .... 1261 
for sewerage works in Drake street. 

East Boston 1338 

for sewerage works in Neponset 

River road 1338 

repairing piling at disposal plant 1338 

for cleaning surface drains 1413 

for cleaning catch-basins. South 

Boston. 717, 1310 

for installing new pump at Pumping 

Station 1261 

for sewerage works in Brighton 1261 

for sewerage works in West Roxbury . 1261 
for sewerage works in Dorchester. . . . 1261 
for sewerage works in Hyde Park .... 1261 
for sewerage works in South Boston . . 1261 
Water Service: 

for installing service pipes 612 

for installing service pipes, etc., in 

Dorchester . 642 

for instalhng water pipes in Brighton 

and West Roxbury 643 

for installing service pipes, etc., in 
South Boston and Charlestown .... 643 

for relaying water pipes 1025 

for relaying water pipes 1041 

for renting gasoline-driven pumps. . . . 1023 
for renting dump trucks, etc . . . .1023, 1024 
for erecting safety island Eliot square, 1199 
for repairing piling of disposal sta- 
tion 1388 

School Buildings Department: 

for making changes in heating system.. . 1261 
for furnishing furniture to the schools. . . 5 

for sheet metal equipment 21 

for delivery of pupils' furniture 58, 113 

for furnishing work benches to the 

schools 113 

for furnishing battery material 163 

for furnishing and delivering maple 

flooring 163 

for furnishing standard lock sets ..;.... 164 

for furnishing birch flooring 244 

for alterations to the Lawrence School . . 244 

for furnishing various sized trucks 479 

for furnishing and setting up furniture. . .581 
for furnishing blue prints for the year. . . 581 

for furnishing chain link fence, etc 642 

for alterations, etc., to the Roxbury 

Memorial High School 807 

for erecting office room in the High 

School of Commerce 834 

for new class rooms in the Brighton 

High School 858 

for alteration in the Robert Treat Paine 

School 875 

for new cooking room, etc., in the 

Tappan School 897 

for moving and repairing, etc., metal 

lockers Brighton High School 928 

for completing rooms in the Charles 
Sumner School 928 



Contracts Aw.irded: ' Page 

School Buildings Department: 
for doing plumbing work in the Farra- 

gut School 991 

for furni.shing automatic control pumps, 991 
for furnishing w-ork benches and sheet 

metal equipment 991 

for doing alterations in the Anne 

Hutchinson School 991 

for a new masters' toilet in Girls' High 

School 991 

for repairing and retubing boilers 1041 

for painting work at the various schools, 1041 

for doing masonry work 1041 

for providing insurance on boilers in 

schools 1067, 1112 

for furnishing gymnasium equipment. . . 1137 
for making changes in heating system of 

certain schools 1261 

School Committee: 

for furnishing oxygen, etc., to the 

various schools 59 

for furnishing writing paper to the 

public schools 140 

for furnishing bread and rolls to the 

public schools 140 

for furnishing paper towels to the 

schools 140 

for furnishing paper, blank books, etc., 549 

for cleansing football equipment 556 

for furnishing physical education sup- 
plies 556 

for furnishing toilet paper to the schools, 556 
for furnishing milk to the pubUc schools, 556 
for furnishing lumber to the several 

schools 717 

for'furnishing baseball uniforms 582 

for furnishing drawing supplies 766 

for furnishing art and manual training 

supplies 766 

for furnishing laboratory suppUes 787 

for furnishing coal for the public schools, 898 
for furnishing Har\-ard note book covers, 898 
for furnishing semi-bituminous coal. /. . 898 
for rebinding books for the public 

schools 899 

for furnishing fuel oil to the schools . . . . ■ 899 
for furnishing groceries to the schools. . . 1026 
for furnishing inter-folded paper towels . 1178 
for furnishing shop supplies and equip- 
ment 1 237 

for furnishing upright pianos 1338 

for cleaning baseball equipment 1352 

for furnishing candy to the schools 1389 

for furnishing musical instruments and 

stands 1413 

Supply Department: 

for furnishing dining room furniture. ... 36 

for furnishing dump trucks 5 

for furnishing snow plow blades 6 

for furnishing pick-up Ford cars 6 

for furnishing rock salt to the Public 

Works Department 6 

for furnishing metal showers 6 

for furnishing ethyl alcohol 59 

for furnishing door frames for clubhouse, 59 

for furnishing soft coal cinders 113 

for furnishing metal poUsh 113 

for furnishing fruits and vegetables to 

the various city departments 114, 614 

736, 836, 953, 1067 
1153, 1282, 138S 
for furnishing ha^-, grain and straw to 

the various citv departments 141, 206 

557, 737, 836, 969, 1068, 1153, 1378 
for furnishing meat« to the various city 

departments 115, 513, 646, 737 

970, 1026, 1069, 1179, 1283 
for furnishing butter, eggs, etc., to the 

various city departments 479, 614, 737 

837, 970, 1068. 1153, 1261, 1376, 1448 

for furnishing pig lead 114 

for furnishing lighting fixtures for the 

clubhouse 116 

for furnishing waste, etc., as required. . . 140 

for furnishing paper drinking cups 141 

for furnishing ice cream mix 141 

for furnishing crushed stone as required, 141 
for furnishing ether to the various 

department* 142 

for furnishing white lead, etc 142 

for furnishing soap, etc 142 

for furnishing sewer brick 164 

for furnishing Portland cement 164 

for furnishing sulphuric acid, etc 164 

for furnishing towelling to Park De- 
partment 164 

for furnishing suits to Long Island 

Hospital 164 

for furnishing earth fill to Park De- 
partment 164 

for mill work, etc., for the new Golf 

Club House 165 

for furnishing iron castings to the 

P. W. D 206 

for furnishing bituminous patching mi.'c- 

ture, P. W. D 206 

for furnishing non-asphaltic road oil.. 206 
for furnishing paper towels 206 



CITY RECORD INDEX. 



CoNTR.\CTS Awarded: Page 

Supply Department; 

for furnishing surgical needles, etc 221 

for furnishing cloth to various city 

departments 221 

for furnishing screened bank gravel 229 

for furnishing gases, etc., to the city 

departments 229 

for furnishing chain link fence to the 

Park Department 230 

for furnishing flashlight equipment 230 

for furnishing rubble stone 232 

for furnishing asphaltic road oil 244 

for furnishing Studebaker sedan to Fire 

Department 244 

for furnishing road asphalt 244 

for furnishing metal culverts to the 

Park Department 244 

for furnishing plumbing supplies to the 

Park Department 244 

for furnishing flour to various city 

departments 265 

for furnishing X-ray material 265 

for furnishing coffee to the various city 

departments 514 

for furnishing grass seed to the Park 

Department 514 

for furnishing motor oils 515 

for furnishing coils of copper 480 

for furnishing surgical supplies, etc 557 

for furnishing drugs to the various 

departments 557 

for furnishing fuel samplings and test- 
ings 557 

for furnishing ethyl alcohol 582 

for furnishing loam to the Park Depart- 
ment 612 

for furnishing soda to the Park Depart- 
ment 612 

for furnishing milk, cream, etc.. to the 

city departments 613 

for furnishing drugs, mercurochrome 

crystals 614 

for furnishing steel road forms to Park 

Department 615 

for furnishing loam to the Park Depart- 
ment 615 

for furnishing chain link fence to Park 

Department 616 

for furnishing strip cork. Park De- 
partment 616 

for furnishing canned goods to various 

departments 643 

for furnishing supplies to the Airport . . . 762 
for furnishing pre-mix concrete, 

P. W. D 673 

for furnishing commercial kerosene 696 

for furnishing dental apparatus, Citv 

Hospital 697 

for furnishing coal to various depart- 
ments 697 

for furnishing auto tires 698 

for furnishing iron casting, P. \V. D . . . . 699 

for furnishing concrete, P. W. D 700 

for furnishing strip cork to Park De- 
partment 700 

for furnishing tennis court clay. Park 

Department .700 

for furnishing cast-iron pipe 700 

for furnishing rail steel to Park De- 
partment 700 

for furnishing traffic paint 701 

for furnishing laundry equipment to 

Long Island Hospital 717 

for furnishing creosoted wood duct to 

Airport 736 

for furnishing soft coal cinders to -Air- 
port 739 

for furnishing paper napkins 739 

for furnishing loam to the playgrounds.. 766 

for furnishing fiour to departments 787 

for fumiahing iron castings 788 

for furni.shing coke to Deer and I>ong 

Islands 807 

for furnishing tea to various depart- 
ments 807 

for furnishing steel to the Airport 808 

for furnishing surgical dressings 834 

fo.- furnishing ethyl alcohol 8.58 

for furnishing kitchen supplies 8.59 

for furnishing gasoline 859 

for furnishing locker room equipment. . . 860 

for furnishing ice to fountains 875 

for furnishing automobile batteries 900 

for furnishing strip cork to Park De- 
partment 901 

for furnishing galvanized metal cut-outs. 

Park Department 901 

for furnishing steel dowel bars to Park 

Department 926 

for furnishing hospital equipment 953 

for furnishing pre-mix concrete 971 

for fiu-nishing food conveyors, City 

Hospital 992 

for furnishing sidewalk brick to Paving 

Department 1026 

for furnishing read.v-mix concrete, 

P. W. D 1026 

for furnishing bituminous concrete, 

P. W. D 1041 

for furnishing hard and soft wood. 

Welfare Department 1069 

for furnishing lead covered cable. 

Fire Department 1070 

for furnishing Ford trucks 1099 

for furnishing water pipes 1099 

for furnishing jumbo cloth 1099 

for furnishing miscellaneous supplies, 

Surgical Building U12 



Contracts Awarded: Page 

Supply Department : 

for furnishing earth fill to Park De- 
partment 1 154 

for furnishing uniform overcoats. Fire 

Department 1 180 

for furnishing galvanized metal cul- " 

vert, Airport 1 180 

for furnishing traffic paint 1180 

for furnishing heavy oils, etc 1199 

for furnishing range oil to Welfare and 

Soldiers' Relief Departments 1201 

for furnishing coal to Welfare and 

Relief Departments 1203 

for furnishing water meter parts, 

P. W. D 1206 

for furnishing water meters 1238 

for furnishing water pipes and castings. . 1238 
for furnishing C-castings, Water Service, 1261 

for furnishing bituminous concrete 1261 

for furnishing pre-mi.x concrete 1261 

for furnishing bituminous concrete, 

Park Department 1262 

for furnishing spreads to City Hospital, 1283 
for furnishing tires and tubes, various 

departments 1284 

for furnishing trucks and trailers to 

City Hospital 1284 

for furnishing sewer bricks 1284 

for furnishing loam and fill 1284 

for furnishing dr.v goods findings 1284 

for furnishing hospital furniture 1310 

for furnishing X-ray material to City 

Hospital '. 1310 

for furnishing milk and cream, etc 1310 

for furnishing desk phone system, City 

Hospital 1312 

for furnishing denatured alcohol 1338 

for furnishing concrete mix 1338 

for furnishing turke.vs to institutions. . . 1376 
for furnishing soft coal cinders to Air- 
port 1378 

for furnishing edgestones to Park De- 
partment 1388 

for furnishing heated concrete mix 1390 

for furnishing loam to Park Depart- 
ment. . 1413 

for furnishing contractors' tools, Park 

Department 1249 

for furnishing capstones. Park Depart- 
ment 1249 

for furnishing Christmas turkeys 1449 

Transit Department: 

for renting of automobiles 876 

for readj'-mix concrete, Commonwealth 

Underpass 926 

for furnishing lumber, Commonwealth 

Underpass 992 

for furnishing steel beams. Common- 
wealth Underpass 992 

for furnishing reinforcing rods. Com- 
monwealth Underpass 992 

for furnishing structural steel for 

Huntington Avenue Subwa.v 1099 

for furnishing steel for Huntington 

.\ venue Subway 1155 

for furnishing steel pipes, Huntington 

Avenue Subway 1155 

for furnishing gasoline crawler crane.. . . 1238 
for furnishing oil and gasoline, Hunt- 
ington Avenue Subway 1262 

for furnishing paving material. Com- 
monwealth .Avenue Underpass 1312 

for furnishing air compressor, Htinting- 

ton Avenue Subway 1312 

for furnishing ready-mix concrete, etc.. . . 1338 

for furnishing waterproofing pitch 1.378 

for furnishing dump trucks 1099 

Treasury Department: 

Temporary loans for city bonds 1099 

Contracts .A.warded WiTHOtrr .Advertising: 
22. 53. 88. 143, 144. 180, 207. 247. 248, 515 
616. 617, 701. 731, 739, 788, 808, 837, 876 
877, 1041, 1115, 11.38, 1181, 1391, 1239 
1262. 1286. 13.52. 1390, 1.391, 1414, 1449 
Contracts, -Additions to: 

Public Buildings 800, 1030, 1138 

1339, 1379, 1430 

Public Welfare 165 

School Buildings 165, 185, 739, 766, 772 

788, 1235, 1262, 1274 
Contracts -Amended: 

School Buildings 36, 140, 476, 649, 743 

769, 971, 1019, 1026, 1057, 1118 
11.55, 1222, 1235, 1286, 1442 



Electio-n Department: 

not involved in police listing 1254 

F. 

Fire Department: 

changes in personnel 110, 163, 182, 668, 765 

875, 896, 9.50, 1022, 1067, 1096 
1236, 1260, 1375, 1388, 1412, 1428 

H. 

Health Department: 

changes in personnel 110, 163, 218, 611 

Hospital Department: 

changes in personnel 5, 57, 163, 182, 218 

242, 243, 478, 511, .580, 611, 642, 668, 8.57 
875. 897, 924, 9.50, 991, 1022, 1040, 1067 
1097, 1112, 11.36, 1152, 1178, 1197, 1236 
1260, 1273, 1310, 1351, 1375, 1.388, 1412 
1428 
* new surgical building ready 1094 



I. 



Page 



Institutions _ Dep.vrtment : 

changes in personnel. . . .111, 163, 183, 218 243 
479, 511, 580, 642, 668, 696, 802, 857, 897 
925, 950, 991, 1040, 1067, 1112, 1137, 1152 
1178, 1198, 1236, 1260, 1273, 1310, 1337 
1352, 1.375, 1388, 1428, 1448 
resignation of Dr. Washburn announced.. . 87 
Independence Da.v, Prof. Louis J. A. 

Mercier, orator • , . . 869 



Land Takings: 

in Brighton District 160, 583, 771, 941 

in Charlestown 89, 119, 770. 1441 

. in City Proper.. H89.' 1380 

in Dorchester 84, 153, 154, 218 

480, 677, 795, 851, 928, 941, 1181, 1207 
1239, 1265, 1342, 13.53, 13.56, 1404 1415 
1417,1441,1452 

in East Boston 941 

in Hyde Park .481, 509, 730, 768, 771 

866, 1156, 1158, 1217 

in Roxbury 790, 1190, 1394 

in South Boston 1189, 1195, 1198, 1207 

1215, 1221, 1222, 1223 

in West Roxbury 91, 161, 771, 941, 839 

880, 901, 1080, 1099, 1147, 1254 
L.*.w Department: 

activities add revenue to city 159 

Long Island Medical Director replies to 

Council charges 507 

M. 

Market Department: 

changes in personnel 57 

Mayor, Activities, Etc.: 

announces tax rate for 1937 798 

announces budget increases for Police and 

Fire Departments 136 

approves construction of Commonwealth 

-Avenue Underpass 689 

argues against importation of -Argentine 

Beef 1240 

booms "-Aviation Week" in Boston 496 

battles for Boston as Transatlantic air- 
mail port 640, 674 

approves Huntington -Avenue Subway 

Extension 566 

Chinese children received on visit 166 

discusses proposed new building laws for 

Boston 541 

bars Welfare mural as depressing 263 

directs Employment Bureau to plan for 

jobs for citizens 1 

consults legal advice on Council's rights to 

appoint to office •. 63 

discusses -Airport's advantage as Trans- 
atlantic airmail terminal 945 

favors legislation on action on Dedham and 
Hyde Park Gas and Electric Com- 
pany 673 

invites President Roosevelt to Boston for 

Evacuation Day celebration 63 ' 

issues orders for holiday care of Institution 

inmates for Thanksgiving 1373 

joins with Port -Authority to keep New 

England railroads independent 1110 

joins in state- wide safety campaign 1217 

makes public action on Superior Court 

furniture contract .544. .547 

not to resign office of Mayor 174 

organizes committee for aid of flood 

sufferers 112 

pays tribute to Joseph St. Couer, lawyer. . 144 

praises Senator Lodge 144' 

presents legislative program to General 

Court 81 

presents annual budget to Council 13 

proclaims observation of "Cancer Week" . 480 
sulDmits new loan order for addition to 

Taft School. 639 

submits supplementary budget 575 

suggests names for South Boston streets . . 903 
signs School Committee Budget with 

statement 693 

secures praise for his administration 693 

receives reply of Institutions Commis- 
sioner to Council charges 496 

repUes to Research Bureau charges 481 

submits a revised budget to Council 263 

tries to trace family on appeal 951 

vetoes Council's actions on salaries 59 

vetoes petition of Hart Bus Lines, Incor- 
porated 1425 

M.iYOR, -Addresses by: 

annual address to Council 14 

discusses S25 tax limit over radio 106 

refutes conclusions of Municipal Research 

Bureau 135 

warns Council by radio on passage of 

sewer loan order 157 

rephes to Councillor Dowd on sewer loan 

order 177, 180 

urges passage of appropriation order 179 

pleads over radio for greater port develop- 
ment 213 

discusses W. P. A. and future of unem- 

plojment 573 

tells of Boston's importance as a fishing 

port 637 

St. Patrick's Day dinner address. Chari- 
table Irish Society 261 ^ 

Boston still needs Federal aid for welfare 

relief .506 

denies prediction of Research Bureau that 

tax rate »vill be S42 202 



CITY RECORD INDEX. 



Matob, Addressbs by : Page 

on the future of Boston as an Airport 473 

decries attempt at spelling reform (Spell- 
ing Bee) 666 

calls for right of free speech in Common 

address (May Day) 675 - 

protests proposed partition of Palestine. . . 979 
charges honor and reputation assailed by 

Finance Commission 1017 

delivers address at laying of Court Hoase 

cornerstone 1 174 

Mayor, Statements by: 

explains attitude of Boston on surplus 

milk ' 1194 

denies truth of charges concerning White 

Fund 543 

charges bias by Finance Commission on 

White Fund 578 

statement before Finance Commission on 

White Fund 977 

asks public to withhold judgment 1019 

thanks public for support of President's 

Ball 543 

Boston not in fear of water pollution 1027 

tells of replacing Boston Massacre marker, 1038 
comments on report of Farnum to Finance 

Commission 1134 

replies to Farnum on Finance Commission, 1177 
renews plan for checking registration 

frauds 1257 

city not obligated in Hyde Park Gas 

case 1417 

clarifies situation relative to visit to 

Washington on housing plans 1417 

pleased over appointment of Boston man 

as Ambassador 1442 

N. ■ 
New recreation study recommends cen- 
tralized authority 878 

New golf course ready for opening 782 

O. 

Overseers Public Welfare Department: 

changes in personnel 5, 57, 139, 205 

183, 219, 265, 1413 



Overtime Allowed: Page 

Hospital Department 243, 479, 802 

Printing Department 57, 111, 1023 

Public Works Department: 

Sanitary Service Ill, 479 

Ferry Service 243, 991 

Sewer Service 669 

Central Office 1413 

P. 

Park Department: 

ends busy winter of activities 714 

George Wright Golf Course completed. . . . 1061 
Penal Institutions Department: 

changes in personnel -57, 111, 139, 219, 479, 

512. 857, 1097, 1236, 1273, 1413 
Port Authority: 

changes in personnel 110, 611 

Printing Department: 

changes in personnel 183 

Public Buildings: 

changes in personnel 512 

Public Works Department: 

changes in personnel 21, 57, 111, 163, 243 

.581, 951, 1022, 1429 
changes in personnel (Traffic Tunnel), 

206, 669, 857 
officials make reply to Finance Commis- 
sion on split contracts 53 

R. 

Registry Department: 

changes in personnel 1198 

Reports rendered from departments: 

on removal of Elevated structure on 
Atlantic avenue: 

special commission meeting 1217 

of Credit Union on condition at annual 

meeting 1385 

of Helen Cleaves, Director of Manual Arts 

on Convention 674 

of Bertha A. Connor, Director of Pen- 
manship on Convention 801 



Reports rendered from departments: Page 

of James A. Ecker on Music Educators' 

Conference 827 

of Ella L. Bresnehen, Director of Educa- 
tion and Measurements, on Confer- 
ence 1.S96 

of Edward J. Rowse, on Convention of 

Commercial Teachers' Association. . . . 271 
of Susan .1. Ginn, Director of Vocational 

Guidance on Convention 272 

Retirement system has increased assets 921 

Report of Supervisor of Music on Conven- 
tion 1391 

S. 
Salary increases (general), all depart- 
ments 787, 802, 831 

Soldiers' Relief Department: 

commissioner discusses over radio, the 
relations and duties of department to 

citizens 799 

School Buildings Department: 

changes in personnel 856 

Supply Depart.ment: 

changes in personnel 243 

State reimburses city for Welfare expenses . . - .59 
Street Laying~0ut Department: 

changes in personnel 1413 

School children awarded Gardiner Wilson 

"Clean-up" prizes 1063 

Sureties make settlement in Dolan ease 1269 



Tax foreclosed property, what to do with it, 
discussed by Superintendent of Pub- 
lic Buildings 583 

Thoroughfare plan discussed by Frank H. 

Malley 1231 

W. 

Welfare aid discussed by Director P. J. 
Moynihan of the Public Welfare 
Department 237 

White Fund Trustees make annual report . . . 1305 



CITY OF BOSTON PRIN'nNQ DBPARTMBNT 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affaiks. 
Vol. 2y. Saturday, January 2, 19B7. No. 1 

BOSTON'S MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU, UNDER DIRECTION OF MAYOR 
MANSFIELD, PLANNING TO PLACE MANY MORE IDLE CITIZENS IN GAINFUL 
PURSUITS WITH PRIVATE INDUSTRY THAN IN PAST YEAR — WORK OF 
1936 MADE NOTABLE WITH JOBS FOUND FOR HUNDREDS BY HEAD OF 
BUREAU AND HIS STAFF — CONSTANT CONTACTS MADE WITH BUSINESS 
HAS SHOWN EFFECTIVE RESULTS WITH LESSENING OF CITY'S RELIEF 
BURDEN — BUREAU ABLE TO SUPPLY WORKERS FOR ALL LINES OF 
INDUSTRY. 

Under the direction of Mayor Mansfield, the City of Boston's Municipal Employment Bureau, with Samuel 
W. Warren in charge, is making varied plans for and looking forward to placing many more thousands of the city's 
idle to work in 1937 than was the case in 1936, even though this year was one of the most successful in that direc- 
tion that the Bureau has known in years. While the exact figures are not yet available, according to Director 
Warren, many hundreds who, at the beginning of 1936, were out of work and either on the Welfare or the Soldiers' 
Relief rolls have been placed in remunerative and gainful occupations. This has been a vast blessing both to the 
city and the citizens who have through this agency obtained work. The work done by the Employment Bureau 
has had no Httle part in reducing the figures on the welfare roll from that of 28,061 in December of 1935 to 23,987 
as 1936 draws to a close. 

The Bureau has made known to employers seeking competent and rehable workers, whether office, factory, 
hotel, restaurant, skilled and unskilled labor, the City of Boston Employment Bureau located at 25 Church street, 
conducted by Mayor Mansfield under the direction of Samuel W. Warren, and invites them to try the Bureau's 
service. 

Mayor Especially Anxious. 

This service is free to both employer and employee. Each apphcant is personal!}^ inter\'iewed by well- 
trained and experienced employment counselors, who after long years of study in the labor field are enabled to 
make a proper selection best suited to the employer. 

The Bureau was established sixteen years ago and seeks primarily to reach Boston employers and help them 
absorb some of the needy and deserving applicants. 

His Honor the Mayor has always been exceptionally anxious to secure steady employment for these needy 
men and women so that they will not become welfare recipients, because many of them are the heads of large families 
endeavoring to be placed on jobs to support theh dependents. A great number of these men have weathered the 
depression and remained off the welfare rolls, accepting work of any kind and for any length of time in order to keep 
their famihes from want. 

Listed with the Bureau have been men and women capable of fiUing any kind of positions, from the laborer's 
job to the professional positions where college graduates are essential. Among appHcations are graduates from 
Harvard, Boston University, Technology, Tufts and other colleges. 

In order that the functions and possibilities of the Bureau might be the better understood form letters have 
been drafted and mailed to employers. These letters read: 

Dear Sir, — When the present Mayor of Boston appointed me Director of the [Municipal Employ- 
ment Bureau he stressed the necessity of placing as many of the unemployed to work as quickly as 
possible. This office is being conducted with that thought foremost in our minds, and we wish to 
impress upon you the fact that this service is free to the employer and to all citizens of Boston. 

I am writing you at this time in hopes that you may have positions open in your organization 
that I might fill. In our files and applying here dailj^ arc a class of workers most efficient in every way 
and worthy of your consideration. These include skilled mechanics, office help, factory, salesmen 
and saleswomen, hotel and restaurant help, and all unskilled labor. 

May I place my twenty-five years of experience as an Emploj'mont Counselor at j'our service? I 
am making this personal appeal at this time, trying to relieve the unemplojancnt situation which is 
most critical at present. 

Thanking you for any orders that you may place with me and hoping to be of service to you, I am, 

"\''cry trulj^ yours. 

Director of Employment. 
(Continued on page S.) 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 2 




'•O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 
queen. 
From thy hills looking down on the ship= 

teeming plain of the ocean, 
iMay thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene. 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotion!" 
From Boston Centenial Poem by 

Nathan Haskel Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly in Boston by the Board of 
Trustees of the Statistics DepartmeTit of 
the City of Boston, under the direoti'on of 
the Mayor, in accordance with legislative act 
and city ordinance. 



FORREST P. HULL. Editor. Room 73, City 
* Hall. 

Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Auent, Room 73, 
City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



S2.00 per year 
10 Cents 



IN ADVANCE 



STREET AGENCIES 

Old South News-stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising 

A rate of $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, Citj- Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Mondaj% 
January 4, 1937, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursdaj- of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highwaj-s, the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or aale of merchandise in 



public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasoline, oil 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic waj's for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Traffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or aj^y streets, ways, high- 
waj's, roads and parkwaj'^s under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To the Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the femes, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To the Health Dep.\rtment, Room 
1107, Cit3' Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Bo.\rd of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Fi-anklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue. Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 
charges made for such service. Applica- 



tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to munioipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To THE School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Dep.^rtment of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Statistics Department, Room 
76, Citj^ Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To THE Wire Diwsion of the Fire 
Dep.artment, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY 

For the week ending Dec. 26, 1936. 

Population as of July, 1936, Massa- 
chusetts State Census, 817,713; popula- 
tion estimated, July, 1936, United States 
Census Bureau, 801,880; number of 
deaths (stillbirths excluded) : Residents, 
194; nonresidents, 43; total, 237. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 15.37; nonresidents deducted, 
12.58. 



REPORT. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 

Last week, 15.37; corresponding week 
last year, 15.37. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc. : Under 
one year, 14; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 7; sixtv vears and over, 139. 
Total deaths: Male, 124; female, 113; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 142; 
deaths of colored, 4. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DE.A.THS.* 



Diseases. 



Anterior Poliomyelitis 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis Lethargica 

Ipfluenza 

Measles 

Meningitis Epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet Fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) (childhood type T. B.) 

Tuberculosis (other forms) 

Typhoid Fever 

Whooping Cough 



Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Dec. 26, 1936. 



Cases. Deaths. 



_ 


1 


— 


I 


3 





— 


35 


11 


50 


— 


67 


13 


19 





2 


1 


2 


— 


3 


I 


3 



Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Dec. 28, 1935. 



Cases. Deaths. 



I 
I 
18 
2 
6 



' Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 2 



CITY RECORD 



OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE WEEK ENDING DECEMBER 26, 1936. 





Dependent 
Aid. 


Mothers' 
Aid. 


Old Age 
Assistance. 


Administkatiye. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 


T^nmhpr of aotive oases last 


14,990 

568 

*239 

15,319 

22,140 


1,604 

7 

8 

1,603 

1,581 


7,393 






23,987 
783 


week. 
Number of cases added . ... 


*208 

7,601 
4,340 






Number of cases discontinued 






247 


Number of active cases this 






24,523 


week. 
Same week last year 






28,061 









Financial. 



Expended during week 

Last week 

Same week last year 

Appropriations 

Expended to date 

Expended to date last year. . . . 

Collections from Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, 
outside cities and towns and 
refunds. I n[ 



$102,505 59 


99,980 


64 


145,946 


71 


6,590,665 


00 


6,586,436 


88 


8,028,688 


39 


1,058,685 54 



$24,043 71 


24,181 62 


23,950 00 


1,337,390 00 


1,274,759 10 


1,218,476 98 


619,119 83 



$2,217 77 


102,018 98 


27,167 05 


§1,771,167 01 


1,753,194 83 


1,383,021 05 


902,257 93 



$16,158 99 


16,157 85 


21,098 32 


t740,028 03 


718,056 11 


743,963 98 





t$188,376 70 
143,893 54 
170,269 53 



$144,926 06 

242,339 09 

218,162 08 

10,627,626 74 

10,476,340 46 

11,544,419 93 

2,580,063 30 



* Includes 46 transfers from Dependent Aid to Old Age Assistance. f Includes Federal Grant of §571,167.01. 

t Includes Federal Grant of 119,038.83. § Includes Federal Grant of $62,390.00. 

II Collections on account of Boston City Hospital, 144,576.40. II Miscellaneous collections, §4,484.01. 



REPORT OF BOSTON'S MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

(Continued from page 1.) 

Dear Sir, — This Bureau is an expression of the desire of the Municipal Government to furnish 
guidance to unemployed citizens of Boston and to supply employers with well-qualified workers. 
The present economic stress has, of course, produced a great number of unemployed men and women 
of skill and experience in all grades and types. 

Our files are well filled with the names and qualifications of those needing work who can well serve 
you when you offer them the opportunity. When you turn to us to fill your needs for skilled and 
unskilled help you have our assurance that the qualifications of the applicant sent j'ou will have been 
carefully weighed against your stated requirements. 

The Director of the Bureau offers you the benefit of his twenty-five years expcrit-uce in (he fitting 
of workers to employers' needs. He wishes to especially emphasize the heightened value of service^, 
under the present conditions, rendered by employers who arc able to find additional openiiigs for 
qualified persons now unplaced. 

This Bureau will appreciate greatly any opportunity of serving you. 

Very truly j'ours. 

Director of Employment. 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 2 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by ad\'ert.ise- 
nient in the City Record for the follow- 
ing depavtnients. The attention of con- 
tractor and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weeklj-. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and dehvering various parts of pupils' 
furniture to the Department of School 
Buildings storehouse. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to §1,000. 
Blank forms for proposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Department of School 
Buildings, 20 Norman street, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied l^by certified check in 
the sum of S500, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bills close Monday, January 11, at 2 p. m. 

Supply Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
fill to the Park Department. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied bj- certified check in 
the sum of S200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 11, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for fui'nishing 
cinders to the Boston Airport, Park 
Department. Sui'ety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
S200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 11, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
pig lead for the Water Service, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 
per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, Citj' Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of .S200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Btf/.s close Monday, January 11, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
white and red lead to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
C|uired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals niaj' be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, 13oston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the .sum of 
.S200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 11, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
mill work and inside finish to the Park 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals maj' be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, lioston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
•SlOO, to be filed at the same office. 



Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 12, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for fui'nishing 
paper drinking cups to the various city 
departments. Surety' bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals rhay be obtained at the 
office of the Supplv Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 12, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
lead pipe to the Water Service, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 12, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
toilet paper to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of .1300, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 12, at 12 ?«. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
sewer brick to the various city depart- 
ments. Siu'ety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sura of S200, 
to be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, Janaury 13, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
sewer pipe to the Sewer Service, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 
per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of .S300, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 13, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
Ice Cream Mix to the City Hospital. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .'SlOO, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bills close Thursday, JoMuary 14, at 
12 m. 



Advertises for proposals for fui-nishing 
Portland cement to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of -1300, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January I4, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for fiu-nishing 
cloth to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January I4, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for fm'nishing 
ether to the various city departments. 
Sui-ety bond wiU be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed mth the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 15, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
X-ray materials to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the siim of 
•1300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 15, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical dressings to the various city 
departments. Sm-ety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied bj^ certified check in the 
sum of S200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor: 

Bids close Tuesday, January 19, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical and hypodermic needles to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sura equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of SlOO, to be tiled at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 20, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for fm'nishing 
metal polish to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 



Jan. 2 



CITY RECORD 



the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Briston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$50, to be filed at the same office. DupU- 
cate bid, without check, to be filed with 
the City Auditor. 

Bills close Thursday, January 21, at 
12 m. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes iu the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, December 31 : 

HospiT.AL Department. 

The following persons were employed 
at the Boston City Hospital for the week 
ending Thursday, December 17: 

Temporary. — ^Margaret 0. Sullivan, 
ward helper, S15 a week; Irene Butt, 
Alice Cosgrove, Irene Griffin, Gladys 
Goulet, Mae Kozelsky, Alice McCarthy, 
Rita McGrafch, Dorothy Monahan, Jen- 
nie Politakis, Mildred Pratt, Alice Trav- 
erse, Helen Barlow, Margaret Bowen, 
Ivatherine Bullman, Francis Burdick, 
Julia Jarvis, Leonie Kirby, Ina Nulty, 
Samuel Odiorne, Agnes Wall, Mildred 
Wilkins, Frederick Farley,' special nurses, 
§4.50 a day. 

The following changes have occurred: 

John Fitzgerald, baker's assistant at 
$17.50 to §24 a week; Kathiyn Welch, 
floor nurse at §1,560 to §1,680 a year; 
Mary Carter, table girl at S15 to 
chambermaid at Slo a week; Joseph 
Crowley, center orderly at South Depart- 
ment, SIO, to Main Department as trans- 
fer porter at S16.50 a week. 

The following persons were employed 
at the Boston City Hospital for the week 
ending Thursday, December 24: 

Temporary. — ^Margaret Smith, floor 
nurse, §1,200 a year; Warren Fallon, 
house porter, $16.50 a week; William 
Goode, Max London, orderlies, $16.50 a 
week; Josephine Boisvert, Doris Broad- 
bridge, Evelyn Burns, Rita Hurley, Isa- 
bel Jaeghers, Julia Jarvis, Josephine 
Kass, Ellen Leonard, Anne McDonnell, 
Catherine Moore, Isabel O'Brien, Elea- 
nor O'Donnell, Mary Proal, Jermie Wal- 
ekwich, Anne Wright, special nurses, 
.S4.50 a day. 

South Department. 
Edward Larkins, center orderly, .$10 a 
week. 

The following changes have occurred; 

Anna Morang, floor nurse at $1,560 to 
$1,680 a year; Reginald Dunn, porter at 
$17.50 to kitchenmau at $21 a week; 
Joseph Williams, temporarj' house porter 
at, ,$16.50 to temporary elevatorman at 
$16 a week. 

H0.SPITAL Department (Sanatorium 
Division). 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division for 
the week ending Thursday, Dccomber 
24: 

Thomas McDonald, Anthony Leone, 
John Hu.ssey, chorcnuon, $17.50 a week; 
Nona Casey, housekeeper (first assist- 
ant), $900 a year; Virginia Berkwitii, 
maid, $12 a week; Mavy (ioodman, ward- 
mai(l (substitute), $lo".;30 a week; Dan- 
iel Fair, Richard Crijips, choromen (pa- 
tients), .$240 a year; Henry Larson, male 
niu-se (patient) (temporary), .$480 a 
year; Raymond Bradbury, Joseph Rus- 
sell, Lillian Perkins, maids (patients) 
(temporary), $240 a year. 



The following pei'sons have ceased to 
be employed : 

Nona Casey, seamstress, $12 a week; 
W. H. Geddi.s, choreman (patient), §240 
a year. 

Overseers of the Public Welfare. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons as aid and 
settlement agents, for a period of one 
month from December 30, at §1,000 a 
year : 

Harold Aronson, Frances A. Bousard, 
Charles Brack, Maiy Breen, Doris L. 
Burke, Helen J. Clancy, Eleanor M. 
Crosby, Marie F. Curran, Helen M. 
Dooley, Echia M. Driscoll, Mary R. 
Feeney, Joseph I. Feldman, Agatha Fran- 
cis, Angeline M. Giorgione, Katherine 
F. Gordon, AHan A. Grant, William S. 
Gu.ghee, Alice D. Hart, Delia Hatton, 
Mary R. Hurley, Annie E. Immick, Es- 
ther N. Jackson, Coleman Joyce, Kath- 
erine I. Joyce, William L. Kelley, Mar- 
garet Kiley, Katherine G. Krohn, David 

E. Leahy, James E. Luuny, Thomas 
Ryan, Helen F. Linehan, Joseph P. Leon- 
ard, Betty Miller, John Minton, John A. 
Molineaux, Henry G. Mullowney, John 

F. Mungovan, Joseph W. Murphy, Doro- 
thy E. Macdonald, Mary L. Macdonald, 
Marion E. McAuley, Edmimd J. Mc- 
Carthy, Stephen J. McMahon, Kathryn 
E. McGrath, Lillian McPeake, Elenore, 
J. Nowell, John C. Piggott, John E. 
Power's, Joseph Reardon, Grace L. 
Rogers, Edward B. Ryan, Mary R. 
Smith, Sam Steiman, Josephine Sulli- 
van, Walter Sullivan, Mary E. Sullivan, 
Lillian Taylor, Katherine P. Toomey, 
Agnes G. Towle, Mildred A. Walker, 
Margaret Warren, L. Lorimer WiUiams, 
Edward Davidson, Margaret O'Reilly. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of William E. McGerigle as statis- 
tician, for a period of three months from 
December 30, at $35 a week. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporary employ- 
ment of the following persons as social 
workers, for a period of one month from 
December 30, at §1,000 a year: 

Phoebe Cannon, Kathleen Conley, 
Margaret Connoi-s, Mary F. Kenney, 
John H. McNulty, Mary E. Norton, 
Helen F. O'Connell, Howard Pierce, 
Virginia M. Prout, Mary E. Robertson, 
Eva R. Sacco, Peter Siragusa. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary provisional employ- 
ment of the following pei'sons as sta- 
tistical clerks, for a period of one month 
from December 31, at §18 a week: 

Mershed Assafif, Sadie Barr, Mary E. 
Bouche, John J. Carey, Frances Collon, 
Catherine J. Crawford, Herbert L. Crim- 
lisk, Marion Devine, Henry Fine, Wil- 
liam F. Flaherty, Margaret Hackett, 
Mildred Harrington, Muriel L. Jordan, 
Antonio Longarini, Marguerite J. Limu}', 
Rosemary Mahoney, William L. Meade, 
Katherine Moriarlj', M. Florence Mul- 
doon, Vera Miuray, Georgiana Mm-phy, 
Thomas J. Murphy, Mildred Noonan, 
Arthur J. McGrath, Anno McGillivra\-, 
Anna G. O'Hare, Catherine Perraull, 
Marv Sclvitella, Gladys Shepard, Marv 
T. Townscnd, Rita A.' Tuohy. 

Approval has been gi\en for the con- 
tinued pro\isional temporary employ- 
ment of the following jtersons as assist- 
ants to social workers, for a period of 
one mouth from December 30, at $1,000 
a year: 

Daniel I. Crouin, James F. Dunn, 



Domenic Esposito, Frederick Hadge, 
Frances G. Kelley, Edward V. Lahey, 
Janes D. Mullin, Francis X. Morrissey, 
Charles A. Saya, -Mary R. Shea, Lillian 
R. Zilg. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary employment of the fol- 
lowing persons as social workers, for a 
period of one month from December 30, 
at 81,000 a year: 

James D. Canan, Thomas L. Daly, 
William L. Danforth, Francis X. Dardis. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart^ 
ment heads, has been approved bj' the 
Mayor. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Upon December 30 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with contractors as 
indicated for furnishing furniture and 
equipment to the South Boston High 
School addition: 

To Chandler & Farquhar Company, 
Incorporated, Item 16, No. 2, 1 Power 
squaring shears, §1,570; Item 17, No. 6, 

1 portable sander, $67.50; Item 18, No. 4, 

2 bench lathes, .$220; Item 18, No. 5, 5 
lathe accessories, $105.50. Total, $1,963. 

To Joseph Beal & Co., Item 18, No. 1, 
4 lathes, $2,040; Item 18, No. 2, 3 jaw 
Universal chucks, $142. Total, $2,182. 

Bids, opened September 21, were as 
follows: 

Item 16, No. 2, 1 Power Squaring Shears. 
— Herrick & Co., $1,500, not according 
to specifications; Chandler & Farquhar 
Company, Incorporated, §1,570; Joseph 
Beal & Co., $1,600. 

Item 17, No. 6, 1 Portable Sander. — 
Chandler & Farquhar Company, Incor- 
porated, light duty, §43.20; heavy duty, 
$67.50, accepted by Department of School 
Buildings; super dutj% $76.50. 

Item IS, No. 4, 2 Bench Lathes. — 
Chandler & Farquhar Company, Incor- 
porated, §220. 

Item IS, No. 0, Lathe Accessories. — 
Chandler & Farquhar Company, Incor- 
porated, $105.50. 

Item IS, No. 1, 4 Lathes. — Joseph Beal 
& Co., $2,040; Chandler & Farquhar 
Company, Incorporated, §2,076, their 
No. 386B; §2,220, their Improved Neu' 
Series. 

Public Works Depart.mext (Sanitary 
Service). 

Upon December 29 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with Mariiuicci 
Brothers & Co. for collecting and removing 
garbage and refuse in the Dorchester dis- 
trict at the rate of $16,950 :i nwnfh. 
Work is to be completed December 31, 
1937. 

The bid of the low biilder is rejected as 
this concern is unable to comply with con- 
ditions of page 2 of the proposal relative 
to the furnishing of a bond. The socoiul 
bidder has had the contract in this district 
previously, has rendered satisfactory serv- 
ice anil as the prrce is fair feel it is for the 
best interest of the city to awaril this con- 
tract to Marinucci Brothers i\: Co. 

The following bids were received 
December 8: 

Dooley Brothers, Incorporated, §12, .500 
a n\onth; Marinucci Brothers A: Co., 
$16,950 a month; ,ioseph P. McCabe, 
Incorporated, §17,200 a month; Coleman 
Brothers Corporation, §18,000 a n\onth. 

Supply Dep.wtment. 
Upon Deccmlier 24 the .Mayor approved 
a contract with the .\utocar JnUos iNc 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 2 



Service Company for furnishing one 
1937 5-yard dump truck for the Sewer 
Division. 

A copj' of the bids received was sent to 
the Public Works Department for exam- 
ination and recommendation. 

As the White IMotor Company and the 
jNIack Motor Truck Company did not 
state the model numbers on which they 
were quoting, the Public Works Depart- 
ment was unable to determine the value 
of their bid. 

The Public Works Department finds 
that the onlj' two bids submitted that do 
meet all the specifications are the Charles 
N. Wood Companj-'s bid on a Walter 
Model FNQS, at a net total price of 
84,880.70, and the bid of the Autocar 
Sales & Service Company, Incorporated, 
on an Autocar Model DF, at a net total 
price of 84,800. 

Therefore, as the bid of the Autocar 
Sales & Service Company, Incorporated, 
is the lowest bid that meets the speci- 
fications, and the Public Works Depart- 
ment believes it would give the citj' the 
best value for its monej-, permission has 
been given to award the contract to this 
companj^ at a net total price of S4,800. 

Requisition No. 0649, Sewer Division, 
* Garage, 624 -Albany Street. 

1 1937 5-Yard Dump Truck, as Per 
Specifications. — Mack Motor Truck Com- 
panv, .S4,785; Charles N. Wood Company, 
85,232.90, Walter Model FNQS; The 
White Motor Company, 84,867.47; Lin- 
scott Sales & Service Company, 84,529.50, 
Reo Model 4H5S; Four Wheel Drive 
Auto Company, 85,956.80, FWD Model 
HH6; dehverv, thirty-five daj's; Fred- 
erick U; Wells', 83,977, Hug Model 42TS; 
Autocar Sales & Service Company, In- 
corporated, 84,968.08, Autocar 'Model 
DF; R. W. Linscott, 83,732.74, Stewart 
jNIodel 58X; International Harvester Com- 
pany, 83,586.62, International Model 
C-60 156 W. B.; Alax Stonberg, doing 
business as Stonberg Motors, 83,244, 
Dodge. 

Excise Tax. — Mack Motor Truck Com- 
pany, 870; Charles N. Wood Company, 
882.90; The White Motor Company, 
892.69; Linscott Sales & Service Company, 
862.63; Four Wheel Drive Auto Com- 
pany, 8116.80; Frederick U. Wells, 
863.71; Autocar Sales & Service Company, 
Incorporated, 868.08; R. W. Linscott, 
857.74; International Harvester Com- 
pany, 849.15; Max Stonberg, doing busi- 
ness as Stonberg Motors, 830. 

Amount of Truck Less Excise Tax. — 
Mack Motor Truck Company, 84,715; 
Charles N. Wood Company, 85,150; The 
White Motor Company, 84,774.78; Lin- 
scott Sales & Service Company, 84,466.87; 
Foiu- Wheel Drive Auto Company, 
85,840; Frederick L'. Wells, 83,913.29; 
Autocar Sales & Service Company, In- 
corporated, .84,900; R. W. Linscott, 
83,675; International Harvester Com- 
pany, 83,537.47; Max Stonberg, doing 
business as Stonberg Motors, 83,214. 

Less Allowance on SE-4,5 1928 Sterling 
Truck. — Mack Motor Truck Company, 
850; Charles J^J■. Wood Company, S220; 
The \Miite Motor Companj-, 84.50; 
Linscott Sales & Service Companv, .8200; 
Four Wheel Drive Auto Company, 8500; 
Frederick U. Wells, 875; Autocar Sales & 
Service Company, Incorporated, 8100; 
R. W. Linscott, 8100; International 
Harvester Company, 8125; Max Ston- 
berg, doing business as Stonberg Motois, 
S485. 

Amount of Truck Less Excise Tax and 
Turn-In. — Mack Motor Tiuck Company, 
84,665; Charles N. Wood Companv, 
•84,930; The White Motor Company^ 
84,324.78; Linscott Sales & Service Com- 



pany, 84,266.87; Four Wheel Drive Auto 
Companj', 85,340; Frederick U. Wells, 
83,838.29; Autocar Sales & Service Com- 
pany, Incorporated, 84,800; R. W. Lin- 
scott, 83,575; International Harvester 
Company, 83,412.47; Max Stonberg, ^do- 
ing business as Stonberg Motors, 82,729. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — Charles N. 
Wood Company, 1 per cent, .849.30; 
Four Wheel Drive Auto Company, 2 per 
cent, 8106.80; Frederick U. Wells, 2 per 
cent, 876.76; R. W. Linscott, 2 per cent, 
871.50. 

Net Price of Truck Less Excise Tax, 
Turn-In and Cash Discount, Ten Days. — 
Mack Motor Truck Company, 84,665; 
Charles N. Wood Company, 84,880.70; 
The White Motor Company, 84,324.78; 
Linscott Sales & Service Company, 
84,266.87; Four Wheel Drive Auto Com- 
pany, 85,233.20; 85,343.20, optional motor, 
6-cylinder, 4 by 4 |-358 CU-110 H. P.; 
Frederick U. Wells, 83,761.53; 83,499.59, 
Clark B805 gear; Autocar Sales & Service 
Company, Incorporated, 84,800; R. W. 
Linscott, 83,503.50; International Har- 
vester Company, 83,412.47; Max Ston- 
berg, doing business as Stonberg Motors, 
82,729. 

Upon December 28 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Charles J. McCarty 
Company, Incorporated, for furnishing 
twenty reversible blade snowplows for 
the Paving Division, Public Works De- 
partment. A copy of the bids received 
were submitted to the Public Works 
Department for examination and recom- 
mendation. 

The Public Works Department finds 
that the snowplows quoted on by the 
three lowest bidders are altogether too 
light for their purposes, and cannot be 
accepted, and that the Walsh-Holyoke 
snowplow to be fui-nished by the ne.xt 
lowest bidder, Charles J. McCarty Com- 
pany, Incorporated, is the lowest priced 
plow of the bids received which is abso- 
lutel}^ suitable for their pm'poses. 

The Public Works Department piu'- 
chased fifteen Walsh-Holyoke sno\\'plows 
two years ago, and they have proven 
very satisfactory, with no repairs or 
breakdowns to date. 

The money to pui'chase these snow- 
plows has been appropriated in the 1936 
budget. The Walsh-Holyoke plows can 
be fm-nished to the city in two days after 
the award of the contract. 

Bids, opened December 18, were as 
follows : 

20 Reversible Blade Snoivploivs, Mould 
Board Approxirnately 10 Feet Long and 
27 Inches High with Trip Plow, Flare 
Plates About 15 Inches High Above Mould 
Board, Hydraulic Lifts, Swivel Casters, 
Push Frames and Axle Attachment Com- 
plete to Assemble on Truck, Each. — Clark- 
Wilcox Company, 8355; total, 87,100; 
Good Roads Machinery Corporation, A, 
8259; total, 85,180; Model 110; B, 8319; 
total, 86,380; Model 120; Charles J. Mc- 
Carty Companv, Incorporated, .$294.50; 
total, 85,890; Files & O'Keefe Company, 
8341; total, 86,820; The Heil Company, 
8342; total, 86,840; Monarch Manufac- 
turing Company, 8490; total, 89,800; 
New England Roads Machinery Com- 
pany, Model R-37H, 8350, with under- 
frames; total, 87,200; Model R-37H, 
8320, no underframes; total, 86,400; 
Model R-34H, 8350, with underframes, 
total, 87,000; Model R-34H, 8310, no 
underframes; total, 86,200; Model R-34L, 
•8270, with underframes; total, 85,400; 
Model R-34L, 8245, no underframes; 
total, 84,900; P. I. Perkins Company, 
8260,- full length flare plates, total, 
85,200; 8255, half length flare plates; 



total, 85,100; price does not include 
installation. 

Cash Discount, Ten Da)/s.^Clark-Wil- 
cox Company, 5 per cent; Good Roads 
Machinery Corporation, 2 per cent! 
Charles J. JMcCarty Company, Incorpo- 
rated, 2 per cent; Files & O'Keefe Com- 
pany, 2 per cent; The Heil Company, 2 
per cent; Monarch Manufacturing Com- 
pany, 1 per cent; New England Roads 
Machinery Company, 2 per cent; P. I. 
Perkins Company, 2 per cent. 

Name of Plow and Remarks. — Clark- 
Wilcox Company, Model R7-10 Ross; 
Good Roads Machinery Corporation, 
Good Roads Champion; Charles J. Mc- 
Carty Company, Incorporated, Walsh- 
Holvoke; Files & O'Keefe Company, 
Wassau, Model 100 RBH; The Heil 
Company, Heil; Monarch Manufacturing 
Companj', delivery, one week, plow and 
carry; New England Roads Machinery 
Company, New England; P. I. Perkins 
Company, Anderson. 

Upon December 29 the Mayor approved 
a contract with Bowers Motor Sales for 
fm-nishing three Standard Commercial 
Pick-Up Ford cars for the Fire Depart- 
ment, at a net total price of §1,440.90. 

Bids, opened December 24, were as 
follows: 

3 Standard Commercial Pick-Up Ford 
Cars with Closed Cabs, New 1937 Type, 
Fully Equipped with 85 Horse Power 
Motors, Each. — Hayward Motors, Incor- 
porated, 8544.50; total, 81,633.50; Rear- 
don & Woodward, Incorporated, 8589.43; 
total, 81,768.29; Coombs & McBeath, 
Incorporated, 8555.62; total, 81,666.86; 
Bowers Motor Sales, 8573; total, 81,719; 
Brown Automobile Companj', $578.67; 
total, 81,736.01. 

Excise Tax. — HayiV'ard Motors, In- 
corporated, 810.95 each; total, 832.85; 
Reardon & Woodward, Incorporated, 
88.73 each; total, 826.19; Coombs & 
McBeath, Incorporated, $11.13 each; 
total, 833.39; Bowers Motor Sales, 
87.85 each; total, 823.55; Brown Auto- 
mobile Company, $7.85 each; total, 
823.55. 

Amount of Fords Less Excise Tax. — 
Hayward Motors, Incorporated, $1,- 
600.65; Reardon & Woodward, Incor- 
porated, $1,742.10; Coombs & McBeath, 
Incorporated, 81,633.47; Bowers Motor 
Sales, 81,695.45; Brown Automobile 
Company, 81,712.46. 

Less Allowance on Maintenance Divi- 
sion Ford Service No. 44I 1929. — Hayward 
Motors, Incorporated, $35; Reardon & 
Woodward, Incorporated, $45; Coombs 
& McBeath, Incorporated, $47; Bowers 
Motor Sales, $76; Brown Automobile 
Company, 850. 

Less Allowance on Maintenance Divi- 
sion Ford Service No. 446 1930. — Haj'- 
ward Motors, Incorporated, $45; Rear- 
don & Woodward, Incorporated, $55; 
Coombs & McBeath, Incorporated, 872; 
Bowers Motor Sales, $100; Brown Auto- 
mobile Company, $75. 

Less Allowance on Division No. 2 Salt 
Car No. 422 i.92.5.— Hayward Motors, 
Incorporated, $15; Reardon & Wood- 
ward, Incorporated, .$25; Coombs & 
McBeath, Incorporated, $37; Bowers 
Motor Sales, 865; Brown Automobile 
Company, $25. 

Total Allowance. — Hajrft'ard Motors, 
Incorporated, 895; Reardon & Wood- 
ward, Incorporated, 8125; Coombs & 
McBeath, Incorporated, $156; Bowers 
Motor Sales, 8240; Brown Automobile 
Company, $150. 

Amount of Fords Less Excise Tax and 
Turn-Ins. — Hayward Motors, Incorpo- 
rated, 81,505.65; Reardon & Woodward, 



Jan. 2 



CITY RECORD 



Incorporated, 11,617.10; Coombs & Mc- 
Beath, Incorporated, 11,477.47; Bowers 
Motor Sales, $1,455.45; Brown Auto- 
mobile Company, $1,562.46. 

Cash Discount, Ten Daijs. — Hayward 
Motors, Incorporated, $7.53; Reardon & 
Woodward, Incorpoi'ated, one half of 
1 per cent, $8.08; Coombs & McBeath, 
Incorporated, one half of 1 per cent, 
$7.39; Bowers Motor Sales, 1 per cent, 
.114.55; Brown Automobile Company, 
1 per cent, $15.62. 

Net Prices of Fords Less Excise Tax, 
Turn-Ins and Cash Discount. — Hayward 
Motors, Incorporated, $1,498.12; Rear- 
don & Woodward, Incorporated, $1,- 
609.02; Coombs & McBeath, Incorpo- 
rated, $1,470.08; Bowers Motor Sales, 
$1,440.90; Brown Automobile Company, 
$1,546.84. 

Upon December 29 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the American Flour Com- 
pany, Incorporated, for furnishing approx- 
imately 4,000 bags coarse fine rock salt 
for the Fire Department and the Water 
Division, Public Works Department. 
The appro.ximate amount of the contract 
was $3,700. Bids, opened December 24, 
were as follows : 

Approximatehj 4,000 Bags Coarse Fine 
Rock Salt, Per 140-Pound Bar/.— Eastern 
Salt Company, 97.3 cents; American 
Flour Company, Incorporated, 92.5 cents; 
Atlantic Salt Company, 97.3 cents, 99.12 
sodium chloride. 

Additional Charge Per Bag for Deliveries 
South of Massachusetts Avenue. — Eastern 
Salt Company, 5 cents; American Flour 
Company, Incorporated, no extra charge; 
Atlantic Salt Company, 5 cents. 

Total. — Eastern Salt Company, 
$3,940.80; American Flour Company, 
Incorporated, $3,700; Atlantic Salt Com- 
pany, $3,940.80. 

Cash Discount, Ten Do?/s.— Eastern Salt 
Company, 1 per cent, genuine Retsof 
crushed mineral salt, C. C. grade, sodium 
chloride 98 per cent or better; American 
Flour Company, Incorporated, 1 per cent; 
Atlantic Salt Company, 1 per cent. 

3,024 bags delivered north of Massa- 
chusetts avenue; 976 bags delivered south 
of Massachusetts avenue. 

Upon December 29 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with the Bowers Motor 
Sales for furnishing one New Improved 
Fordson tractor for the Sumner Traffic 
Tunnel, Public Works Department. 

Bids, opened December 24, were as 
follows: 

1 New Improved Fordsou Tractor, 
Equipped inlh Tracks on Full Crawler.'^, 
Delivered in Boston,.— Sandberg Equip- 
ment Company, $1,335.95, International 
T-20 Trac Tractor with snow and ice 
grouser track shoes; 2 per cent, ten days; 
extras, if required, as follows: $2.65, 
Bosch no battery type electric ligTits; 
$171.83, one-man cab with sliding doors; 
$2,089, Trackson Model, G. H. McCor- 
mick Deering full crawler tractor with 
snow ice grouser shoes; 2 per cent, ten 
days; P. 1. Perkins Company, $1,500, 
Caterpillar "22"; extras, if wanted, as 
follows: $350, Anderson snowplow; $865, 
La Plant snowplow; $135, full inclosed 
cab; $80, electric lights, no battery typo; 
$75, canopy top with curtains; Fisk- 
Aldcn Company, $1,585; 1 per cent, ten 
days; Bowers Motor Sales, $1,585; 1 per 
cent, ten days. 

W. P. A. Supply Dep.vrtment. 
Upon December 29 the Mayor ap- 
proved a contract with the Construction 
Supply Company for furnishing metal 
shower, toilet aiul dressing room com- 



partments for the club house at the 
George Wright Golf Course, West street, 
Hyde Park, W. P. A. Project 6388. 

Only two bids were received, the Con- 
struction Supply Company of 6 Park 
street, Boston, Mass., and Shcehan & 
O'Brien Company, according to specifica- 
tions contained in the proposal. 

The Sheehan, O'Brien Company bid on 
a substitute material which, in the 
opinion of the Superintendent of Con- 
struction and the architect at the Golf 
Course, is not what is wanted, and, after 
careful investigation, they believe that the 
material as specified fulfills the require- 
ments both in quality and appearance. 

Bids, opened December 15, were as 
follows : 

Metal, Shower Toilet and Dressing Room 
Compartments. — The Construction Supply 
Company, lot $1,550; Sheehan O'Brien 
Company, lot $1,600; alternate, Fiat 
Metal Company, $1,450. 

Total. — The Construction Supply Com- 
pany, $1,550; Sheehan O'Brien Company, 
$1,600; alternate. Fiat Metal Company, 
$1,450. 

Cash Discount. — The Construction Sup- 
ply Company, none; Sheehan O'Brien 
Company, $32; alternate. Fiat Metal 
Company, $29. 

Net Total. — The Construction Supply 
Company, $1,550; Sheehan O'Brien Com- 
pany, $1,568; alternate, Fiat Metal 
Company, $1,421. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That as urgent^'- required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, for a trial period of sixty (60) 
days, the following mle is effective De- 
cember 28, 1936: 

Parking of vehicles is prohibited in the 
following street: 

Robinwood Avenue, West Roxbury. 
North side, from Centre street to a 
point four hundred fifty (450) feet 
east of Centre street, twenty-four 
hours. 
Inner side, circular portion of sti-eet, 
twenty-four hours. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of building 
operations in connection with the con- 
struction of the new court house, esti- 
mated to be one (1) week, vehicles are 
excluded from the following srtireets, ef- 
fective December 18, 1936: 
Allston Street, Downtown Boston. 
From Bulfinch street to Somei-set 
street. 
Somerset Street, Downtown Boston. 
From Ashburton place to Howard 
street. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safely and con- 
venience, the following rule is effective 
from 4.30 p. ni. to 11.30 p. m. on De- 
cember 24, 1936, and on December 31, 
1930: 

The following street is one-w:iy in the 
direction indicated: 

HuckinghamVStreet, Downtown Boston. 
From Columbus avenue to Dart- 
mouth street. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safely and con- 
venience, for a trial period of sixty (60) 
(lavs, the. Revised Traffic Rules and R.0- 
gulalions of the City of Boston, as 
adopted by the Boston Traffic Conunis- 
sion on October 31, 1935, and on Novem- 



ber 6, 1935, are amended as follows, ef- 
fective January 6, 1937: 

Section 8, Part 2, is amended by add- 
ing the following: 

Adams Street, Dorche'ster. 

West side, from Dickens street to 
Dorchester avenue, 7 a. m. to 
6 p. m. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of constmc- 
tion of the Liberty Mutual Insurance 
Company Building, estimated to be 
eleven (11) months, parking of vehicles 
is prohibited in the following street, ef- 
fective December 30, 1936: 

St. James Avenue, Downtown Boston. 
South side, from Arlington street to 
Berkeley street. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

CLERICAL SERVICE. 

For State and Cities and Towns Out- 
side OF Boston and Vicinity, M.arch 
6, 1937. 
Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, FfJbruary 20, 1937, at 12 noon. 

For Boston and Vicinity, March 20, 
1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, March 6, 1937, at 12 noon. 

WARNING! If all applicants cannot 
be accommodated on the above dates, 
they will be notified to appear on subse- 
quent Saturdays. Applicants should note 
the exact date given on their notification 
sheets. 

File your applications EARLY! In 
cases of ties, names will be placed on the 
eligible list in accordance with the date 
of filing application. 

The usual entrance salary for clerks 
for state service is $900 a year. 

Persons qualifying in the examination 
may have their names 'placed on the 
state list as well as on the list for the citj' 
or town in which they reside. 

Applicants must be not less than six- 
teen years of age at the time of filing 
application. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 2; spelling, 2; arithmetic (in- 
cluding problems), 2; following written 
directions, 2; filing, 1; word knowledge, 
1; total, 10. 

Pusjiug Reqifii-ements: Appliojints 
must obtain a mark of at least 65 per 
cent in spelling, at least 50 per ci>nt in 
each of the other subjects ami at least 
70 per cent in general average in order 
to become eligible. 



Second-Class Engineer, Newton School 
Department. Febritary 6, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
ilay, January 23, 1937, at 12 noon. 

This examination is open to resiilents 
of I ho state. 

The salary is S34 a week. 

The i-xaniination will consist of a state- 
nunit of training and exin^rience and the 
posst^wion of a second-class engineer's 
license. 

Passing Requirements: .\t least 70 per 
cent in experience in order to become 
eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
l>h\'sical examination. 

The ilate gi\eu abo\e is not the actual 
examination date but the d:\ie on which, 
as nearly as possible, Die ph\-sical exan>- 
iuatioii will bo given. 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 2 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED DECEMBER 24 TO DECEMBER 30. 



December 24. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Picola Montenigro 344-348 Hanover street .... 3 

.\. W. Perry, Incorporated . . 94 Beach street 3 

City of Boston, Lessee 42 Long Island Building 1 

John J. Mahoney 1293 Washington street 3 

Colonial Real Estate Trust.. 136 Massachusetts avenue. . 4 



Alterations, stores and tene- S400 

ments. 

.■iterations, stores and offices, 200 

Fire escapes 950 

Alterations, storage 500 

Alterations, theatre and 850 

stores. 



December 26. 



None. 



Dece.mber 28. 



Harriet M. Kendall el al . . . . 

B. Goldman 

Rev. John Kalapothakis. . . . 
Roman Catholic Archbishop 

of Baston. 
Merchants Cooperative 

Bank. 

City of Boston 

City of Boston 

City of Boston 

F. K. Hardy 

G. E. Martin 

A. Zulo 

A. Sandesky 

Francis Lovery el al 

John .Scotfi 

Minot, Williams and Bangs, 
Merchants Cooperative 

Bank. 
Merchants Cooperative 

Bank. 
E. M. Morris 



382 Commonwealth avenue. 
49 and 51 Cullender street. . 

29 Middlesex street 

75 Union Park street 



5 Alterations, tenements . 

14 .^Iterations, dwelling. . . 

5 .^Iterations, church. . . . 

8 .Second-class rectory. . . 

266 Spring street 20 .^Iterations, dwelling. . . 

1 Hayden place 

2 Hayden place 

3 Hayden place 

8 Cre.ston park 

77 Pearl street 

8 .A.lbert street 

105 Chelsea street 

869 Dorchester avenue. 
682 Saratoga street .... 

112 State street 

77 DLx street 



Rear of 77 Di.x street. 
5 School street 



6 Take-down, dwelling 

6 Take-down, dwelling 

6 Take-down, dwelling 

14 Take-down, garage 

2 Alterations, dwelling 

10 Alterations, dwelling 

1 Sign ■. 

7 Sign 

1 Alterations, dwelling 

3 Alterations, stores and offices, 
16 -Alterations, dwelling 

16 .Alterations, stable 



2 .Alterations, dwelling. 



December 29. 



A. Gerish 

Silent Glow Oil Burner Co . . . 

A. J. Lavoie 

Pine Lodge Development Co., 
Pine Lodge Development Co., 

T. J. McGreevy 

T. J. McGree\->' 

Joseph H. Bradley 

Buck Printing Company. . . . 
-Armenian Holy Cross 
Church. 

Soeony Oil Company 

Carl Weitz 



15 Grant street 

60 Cambridge street . . 
1497 Centre street. . . . 
1 1 Pine Lodge road. . . 
23 Pine Lodge road. . . 

93 Martin street 

141 La Grange street. 

10 Naneia street 

145 Ipswich street 

399 Shawmut avenue . 



-Alterations, 

Sign 

Third-class 
Third-class 
Third-class 
Third-class 
Third-class 
Third-class 
-Alterations, 
-Alterations 



dwelling. 



dwelling. . 
dwelling. . 
dwelling. . 
garage. . . 
dwelling. . 
garage . . . 

storage. . 

church . . 



474 Chelsea street . 
105 Stuart .street. . 



F. R. Gunn 

K. M. McCarthy 

K. M. McCarthy 

C. Hamilton 

Christian Science Church . . . 

C. W. Whittier 

Charles Street Garage, In- 
corporated. 

R. R. -Alexander 

M. Coyne 

Mission Hill Pharmacy 

Rosenthal Brothers 

.Alex Spa 

Tom's Spa 

R. C. Baroni 

-A. .A. Lanning 

Pleasant Drug Company 

National Spa. 

Hevi and Goggin 

Washington .Spa 



419 Huntington avenue. . . 

35 Rochester street 

37 Rochester street 

16 Dennis street 

276 Massachusetts avenue. 



616 -Atlantic avenue. . 
139 Cummings street. 



1 -Alterations, 

5 -Alterations, 

hng. 

18 -Alterations, 

3 Take-down, 

3 Take-down, 
8 Alterations, 

4 -Alterations, 

ments. 
3 -Alterations, 
18 Take-down, 



tank house 

store and dwel- 

dwelling 

dwelling 

dwelling 

dwelling 

stores and tene- 



mercantile. 
garage .... 



68 Eutaw street 

85 Bunker Hill street. . . 
1461 Tremont street . . . . 
130 Humboldt avenue. . 

219 Dudley street 

97 Humboldt avenue 

211 Belgrade avenue. . . . 

109 Green street 

4541 Washington street. 
126 Dorchester street . . . 
241 Dorchester street . . . 
.569 Washington street. . 



1 Alterations, dwelling. 

2 Sign 

10 Sign 

12 Sign 

8 Sign 

12 Sign 

20 Sign 

19 Sign - 

18 Sign 

7 Sign 

7 Sign 

22 Sign 



Dece.mber 30. 



Anna .Anderson 

New England Trast Com- 
pany, Trustees. 

Gerson and Horrigan, Incor- 
porated. 

Boston Laundry and Supply 
Company. 

M. -Miller 

Margery P. Dalton 

J. Walker Estate 

C'haniberlain Company 

C'ity of Boston 

Mary J. Donnelly 

-American I4rii|uet Company, 

City of Boston 

A. DelSaptista 

Cliarle.s Jennings 

John Uoes.sle 

State Realty Trust 

Margaret Hartigan 

Mary Fiimcrty 

G. .Sarno 

Warren Institution for .Sav- 
ings. 

Baston Sausage Company.. . K' 1'' 



133 Pembroke street. . . . 
84 and 86 Fulton street. 



4 Alterations, lodging. ... 

3 -Alterations, mercantile. 

18 Alterations, gas station. 

8 Alterations, laundry . . . 



869 Cummings Highway . . 

40-48 East Canton street . 

4 .Abbott street 14 Alterations, dwelling 

346 Beacon street 5 .Alterations, dwelling 

120 I5oylston street 5 Alterations, store and offices, 

26 Blackstone street 3 Alterations, sales and storage, 

128 Babson street 18 Alterations, fire station 

1.359 Columbus avenue 11 Alterations, lumber storage. . 

602 Chelsea street 2 Take-down, manufacturing . . 

11 Elm street 2 Alterations, fire station 

16 Madison street 18 Alterations, dwelling 

28 Wrentham street 16 Alterations, dwelling 

47 Centre street 11 Alterations, dwelling 

89 Gainsborough street 4 Alterations, tenements 

201 West Third street 6 Alterations, dwe ling 

63 P street 6 Alterations, dwelling 

14 .Arnold street 9 .Alterations, dwelling. ........ 

.37 Glenway .street 14 -Alterations, dwelling 

t one street 3 Alterations, sales and storage, 



None 

.S280 

2,000 

124,200 

1.500 

600 
600 
600 
50 
280 
200 
200 
250 
190 
400 
700 

197 

175 



$1,000 

400 

4.000 

5,000 

5,000 

300 

5,000 

125 

500 

1,000 

1,000 
200 

125 
100 
100 
780 
350 

300 
25 

240 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



S75 
6,500 

1,000 

10,000 

650 

50 

200 

4,500 

9,000 

175 

13,000 

8,500 

700 

175 

300 

400 

260 

150 

200 

900 

300 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

Dext.al Hygienist, Department of FtiB- 
Lic He.alth, Janu.\ry 23, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
daj', January 9, 1937, at 12 noon. 

The entrance salaiy is $1,440 a year. 

Duties: Under direction to make in- 
spections of the mouth and teeth. To 
note the need for dental treatment. To 
assist in community demonstrations in 
dental hygiene. To perform health edu- 
cation in dental hygiene. To perform 
related work as required. 

Entrance Requirement: Applicants 
must be registered dental hygienists un- 
der the State Board of Dental Examiners. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 4; per- 
sonality and fitnes.s, as determined bj- 
an oral interview, 3; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in each subject of the examination 
in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
ph.ysical examination. 

Bio-Chemist, Department of Mental 
Diseases, J.anuary 23, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, Januaiy 9, 1937, at 12 noon. 

The entrance salary is SI, 800 a year. 

Duties: To carry on researches relat- 
ing to metabolism and chemistry of min- 
erals, especially of micro-incineration. 
To direct work done on pathology of 
nervous system ; fixation; imbedding; cut- 
ting and staining. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 2; to- 
tal, 5. 

Passing Requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in each subject of the examination 
in order to become eligible. 

Phy.sical fitness to be determined bj- 
physical examination. 

Assistant Chemist, Department of 

Ment.al Di.sease.s, Janu.ary 23, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 9, 1937, at 12 noon. 

The entrance salary is $1,800 a j'ear 
and maintenance. 

Duties: Under general supervision to 
perform re.sponsible technical work in 
chemical analyses and researdh. To per- 
form related work as required. 

Entrance Requirement: Applicants 
must have a minimum of one j^ear of 
practical experience in anal3'sis of chem- 
ical constituents of brains. To include 
determination of inorganic salts, protid 
and non-protid nitrogenous compounds 
and various lipoidal substances found in 
brain substance. Must be able to cany 
out analyses of lipoidal constituent of 
blood and other body fluids, analyses of 
chemical constituents of the various re- 
gions of normal and schizophrenic bmins, 
and to undertake such general biochemi- 
cal investigations as may be assigned 
to him. Must be able to correlate re- 
sults of work and prepare them for pub- 
lication. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
ex]>erience, 3; practical cjuestions, 2; to- 
tal, 5. 

Passing Requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in each subject of the examination 
in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 



Jan. 2 



CITY RECORD 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED DECEMBER 24 TO DECEMBER 30. 

December 24. 



Plumber. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



A. J. Granara 01 Henshaw street 22 

W. H. Pickering 16 North Harvard street ... 22 

Harry Goldberg 397 Shawmat avenue 9 

Samuel Cohen 658 East Fifth street 6 

A. M. Smith 6 and 8 Mt. Washington ave., 6 

Hyman Lappin 859J East Broadway 6 

George S. Trethewey 39 Chilton road 20 

GeorgelS.'.Trethewey 5 Doncaster street 18 

William Duston 536 Commonwealth avenue. 5 



December 26. 



William M. Collins. 

D. B. Karger 

James A. Donnelly. 
Barnet Shillman . . . 
W. L. Donohoe. . . . 



15 Hathawav street 3 

403 Beacon street 5 

4 Rosedale street 17 

355 Washington street. .... 17 

27 Hajmarket square 3 



December 28. 



John J. Downey . 
John J. O'Toole. 
Emilio Pascucci. 
John J. Vogel . . . 



15 and 17 Lansdowne street, .5 

873 East Second street 6 

91 Putnam street 1 

254 Congress street 3 



December 29. 



George Lambie 

William F. McDonough. 

P. S. Monahan 

Thomas C. Kelly 

Samuel Cohen 

John A. Toland 

Saul Tack 

Harry Kingsberg 

Arthur F. Sullivan 

Lewis Beaumont 

Lewis Beaumont 

J. T. Hagen 

W. L. Ambrose 

B. F. Donohoe 

John J. Downey 

Samuel Litman 



18 Medfield street 21 

83 Tremont street 22 

405 Market street 22 

1667 Blue Hill avenue 18 

30 Neponset avenue 18 

16 Centre avenue IS 

64 Tacoma street 18 

35 and 37 Greenwich street, 15 

79-85 Exeter street 4 

55 Appleton street 5 

72 Appleton street 5 

304 Neponset avenue 16 

159 M street 6 

4A Hudson street 3 

435 Stuart street 4 

4 Copeland place 12 



December 30. 



Barney Levine 

C. C. Best 

Nathan Sable 

W. S. Emerson Company . 

D. J. RuU 

George Tack 

Owen W. Semple 

R. J. Spencer 

I. W. Crozier 

William T. O'Brien 

Louis Trehub 

.\braham Yorks 

David B. Karger 

R. J. McDonough 



67 Joy street 3 

55 Mildred avenue 18 

28 Sever street 2 

18 Wiget street 3 

716 East Sixth street 6 

63 Stuart street 3 

1 5 Hemenwa.v street 4 

184 BoN^lston street 5 

12 Hulbert street 9 

45 Franklin street 3 

81 Wilmington avenue 17 

12 Wilcock street 14 

1262 Blue Hill avenue 14 

338-348 Talbot avenue 17 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 10. 

A trial board consisting of Captains 
Killen, Connolly and Wall, having hoard 
by reference a complaint made by 
Thomas F. Gleavy, captain, Division 
17, against James P. Wclcl\, i^atrolman. 
Division 17, for alleged violation of the 
Rules and Regulations of the Police De- 
partment, charging him with conduct un- 
becoming an officer, has reported to the 
commissioner a finding of guilty. 

The commissioner accepts the finding 
and the recommendation of the Trial 
Board and hereby orders that the said 
Patrolman James P. Welch be suspended 
for a period of fifteen days, effective as 
of December 6, 1936, and that, at the 
expiration of the said jieriod of suspen- 
.sion the said Patrolman James P. Welch 
perform two hundred eighty houi-s of 
inmishment dulv. 

Civil Service Rule 23, Section 3, re- 
quires approval of the Civil Sendee Com- 
mission before reinstatement. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



New fixtures SI 5 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 600 

New fixtures 65 

New fixtures 85 

New fixtures 30 

New fixtures 195 

New fixtures 225 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures SSOO 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures 810 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 78 

New fixtures $285 

New fixtures 136 

New fixtures 75 " 

New fi.xtures 50 

New fixtures §60 

New fixtures 75 

New fixtures 50 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures 160 

New fixtures 600 

New fixtures 450 

New fixtures 188 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures SO 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 25 

New fixtures 160 

New fixtures 54 

New fixtures 29,000 

New fixtures 1,000 

New fixtures §150 

New fixtures 1,400 

New fixtures '400 

New fixtures S5 

New fixtures 300 

New fixtures 130 

New fixtures §0 

New fixtures 65 

New fi.xtures isO 

New fixtures 350 

New fi.xtures 500 

New fixtures 275 

New fixtures 40 

New fixtures 150 



" Rule 23. 
"Section 3. With the consent of the 
Oommiasioncr upon good cause shown, 
an appointing officer may reinstate in 
the same position in the same class and 
grade any person who has been separatee! 
from the service; provided, however, 
that the Commissioner shall not allow 
reinstatement of a person discharged for 
cause." 

The Superintendent of Police will jiro- 
mulgate this order. 

Joseph F. Timii.tv, 
Police Com missioiicr. 



Gciicml Order No. 11. 

The commissioner extends to all mem- 
l)er,s of the dejiartment and Hieir families 
his most cordial wishes for a very pleas- 
ant Christmas and a Happy New Year. 

The commissioner desires to commend 
the members of the department for their 
conlinuetl elficiencv and success in solv- 



ing many serious criminal cases during 
the past j^ear. 

The commis-sioner is especially happy 
to compliment the department on its re- 
cent outstanding achievement in the 
seizure of large quantities of narcotic 
dmgs and the arrests of alleged ring- 
leaders in the illicit and pernicious drug 
traffic. 

The fine spirit of cooperation and 
loyalty that has been shown to the com- 
missioner is deeply appreciated and he 
assures all members of the department 
that he will be ever mindful of their 
welfare. 

Officers will be permitted to enjoy the 
Christmas holiday at home in so far as 
it can be done without impairing the 
efficiency of the department. 

Division commanders will divide their 
day personnel in half so that day officer; 
Avill be able to take their morning or 
afternoon off on Christmas Daj', Friday, 
December 25. 

Tlie Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Joseph F. Timilty, 
Police Commissioner. 



General Order No. 12. 
A trial board, consisting of Captains 
Killen, Connolly and Wall, having heard 
by reference a complaint against Patrol- 
man George M. Tiemey of the Bureau 
of Operations, charging him with ab- 
sence from dutj', has reported to the 
commissioner a finding of guilty as 
charged. In accordance w^th which it 
is hereby ordered that the said Patrol- 
man George M. Tierney perform 210 
hours of punishment duty. 

The Superintendent of Police will pro- 
mulgate this order. 

Joseph F. Timilty, 
Police Commissioner. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voivd, That ;is urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, for a trial period of thirty (30) 
days, the Revised Traffic Rules and Reg- 
ulations of the City of Boston, as 
adopted by the Boston Traffic Commis- 
sion on October 31, 1935, and on Novem- 
ber 6, 1935, are amended as follows, ef- 
fective Jamiaiy 4, 1937: 

Section S, Part 2, is amende<l by atld- 
ing the folowing: 
Church Street, Downtown Boston. 
Both sides, from Columbus axenue to 
Stuart street, twenty-four hours. 
E;ist side, from Stuart street to Tre- 
mont street, twenty-foin- hours. 
Columbus Avenue, Downtown Boston. 
Southeast side, from Church street to 
Eliot street, twenty-four houi-s. 
Section 24, Part 1, is amended by add- 
ing the following: 
Broadwa.v, Do\TOto\\i\ Boston. 

From Stuart street to Park square. 
Church Street, Downtown Boston. 
From Columbus avenue to Tremont 
street. 
Columbus Avenue, Downtown Boston. 
From Park square to Arlington street. 
Kliot Street, Downtown Boston. 

From Stuart street to Columbus 
avenue. 
Stuart Street. Downtown Baston. 
From Arlington street to Warrenton 
street. 



10 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 2 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1937. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Wednesday, January 6. 
Lowell, Thursday, January 7. 
Boston, Wednesday, February 3. 
Worcester, Thursday, February 4. 
Boston, Wednesday, March 3. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 4. 
Fall River, Friday, March 5. 
Boston, Wednesday, April 7. 
Springfield, Thursday, April 8. 
Boston, Wednesday, May 5. 
Worcester, Thursday, May 6. 
Boston, Wednesday, June 16. 
Boston, Wednesday, September 15. 
Worce.ster, Thursday, September 16. 
Springfield. Thursday, October 14. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 15. 
Boston, Wednesday, November 3. 
Lowell, Thursday, November 4. 
Boston, Wednesday, December 8. 
New Bedford, Friday, December 10. 
New Bedford, Saturday, December 11. 

Rules for Examinations. 

All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent in 
the installation of wires, conduits, ap- 
paratus, fixtures and other appliances for 
carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
years' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for carrying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a master or journeyman certifi- 
cate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be re- 
quired to obtain at lea.st 70 per cent 
in order to obtain a certificate. 

Apnlicants who fail to obtain the re- 
(Uiired 70 per cent will not be entitled 
to re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent or who fail on 
the practical demonstration, will not be 
re-examined for a period of six months. 

Any person found refen-ing to notes or 
l)ook.s, or mi-sbehaving during an exam- 
ination, will be debarred from that exam- 
ination. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
cerlificates when and where examination 
will bo held and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day. 

Stephen C. Garrity, 
James G. Reardon, 
Thomas H. Green, 
Albert Frank, 
Walter J. Kenefick, 
!^lalr. Examiners of Electricians. 

For application blanks or other in- 
formation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 303, 14 Beacon street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

Chief Sanitary Officer and Milk In- 
spector, Newton Health Depart- 
ment, February 6, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 23, 1937, at 12 noon. 

This examination is open to residents 
of the state. 

The minimum salary is $2,400 a year; 
the maximum, $3,000 a year. 

Duties: To supervise the activities of 
the laboratory technician and sanitary 
inspector. To perform milk inspection 
work. To do standard plate counts on 
water, and determination of butter fat 
and total solids. To prepare statistical 
charts and tables. 

Applicants should be familiar with 
state and local regulations regarding 
milk, — its production and marketing. 
They should also be familiar with the 
general laws governing Board of Health 
procedure in relation to abatement of 
nuisances, general sanitary inspection 
and of diseases dangerous to the public 
health. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must be not less than twenty-five years 
of age at the time of filing applications. - 
A certificate of date of birth must be 
filed with the application UNLESS one 
has been filed with a previous applica- 
tion. 

Applicants must have at least two 
years' practical experience in the field 
of public health sanitation. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 4; per- 
sonality and fitness, as determined by 
an oral interview, 3; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in each subject in order to become 
eligible. 

Physical fitne.ss to be determined by 
pli3^.sical examination. 



POPULATION OF COUNTIES, 1930. 

(1) Middlesex (11 cities and 43 
towns), 934,924 or 156,572 over 1920; 
(2) Suffolk (3 cities and 1 town), 879,- 
536 or 44,014 over 1920; (3) Essex (8 
cities and 26 towns), 498,040 or 15,884 
over 1920; (4) Worcester (4 cities and 
57 towns), 491,242 or 36,107 over 1920; 
(5) Bristol (4 cities and 16 towns), 364,- 
590 or 5,585 over 1920; (6) Hampden (4 
cities and 19 towns), 335,496 or 35,191 
over 1920; (7) Norfolk (1 city and 27 
towns), 299,426 or 80,345 over 1920; (8) 
Plymouth (1 city and 26 towns), 162,311 
or 5,343 over 1920; (9) Berkshire (2 
cities and 30 towns), 120,700 or 7,667 over 
1920; (10) Hampshire (1 city and 22 
towns), 72,801 or 3,202 over 1920; (11) 
Franklin (26 towns), 49,612 or 251 over 
1920; (12) Barnstable (15 towns), 32,- 
305 or 5,635 over 1920; (13) Dukes (7 
towns), 4,953 or 581 over 1920; (14) Nan- 
tucket (1 town), 3,678 or 881 over 1920. 
Total for the 14 counties (39 cities and 
316 towns), 4,249,614 or 397,258 (t. e., 
10.3 per cent) over 1920. Of said total, 
2,940,335 (i. e., 69.19 per cent) were in 
the cities and 1,309,279 (i. e., 30.81 per 
cent) in the towns. The four counties, 
Suffolk, Middlesex, Essex and Bristol, 
contain 63.00 per cent of the State's in- 
habitants. 

If the municipalities having a popula- 
tion of 5,000 or over are properly called 
urban, then the percentage of urban 
population in the entire State reaches 
Jhe notable figure of 90.71, while the rural 
"shows but 9.29 per cent. 



BOSTON AS A TOWN. 

The 1936 issue of the "Municipid 
Index" contains a detailed study of the 
revenue bond acts in the thirty-three 
states whicli have enabling acts, and 
reports of all forty-eight states, showing 
what advantage has been taken of these 
acts by cities to finance the construction, 
operation and maintenance of sewerage 
systems and sewage treatment plants 
by service charges. 

The table shows the status of revenue 
bond acts and other enabling acts in 
the different states, the dates when the 
acts became effective, and whether or 
not cities have taken advantage of the 
opportunity offered for financing bonds 
by service charges. In the case of states 
with no enabling acts, the table shows 
whether cities are charging sewer rentals 
under some other authority. 



PITTSBURGH'S TRAFFIC SAFETY 
RECORD. 

Pittsburgh has been adjudged the saf- 
est city in the United States in 1932, and 
the second safest in 1933 and 1934 among 
cities with populations over 500,000. 
Registrations in the city increased 4.4 
per cent, gasoline consumption 7.7 per 
cent. In 1935, despite a 2.4 per cent de- 
crease in traffic volume, adult fatalities 
increased 30 per cent, total fatalities 24 
per cent, as compared with 1934. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals fob' Surgical Dressings. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing surgical dressings, 
as required, to the various city departments. 
The bidder must use the form of proposal to be 
obtained at the office of the Superintendent of 
Supphes, Room 801, City Hall Annex, and the 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
ciuarter the total estimated amount of the bid 
with a surety company authorized to do business 
in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful perform- 
ance of the contract. There will be a charge 
of twenty cents (SO. 20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bid, with a certified check for 
$200, payable to and to become the property of 
the City of Boston if the proposal is not carried 
out, must be left at the office of the Superintendent 
of Supplies, before 12 m., Tuesday, January 19, 
1937, at which time and place they will be publicly 
opened and read. A duplicate bid, without 
ciieck, must be left at the office of the City Auditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to accept or 
reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best in- 
terests of the city. All contracts made subject 
to appropriations to meet payments thereunder. 
D. Frank Doberty, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals i'Or Furnishing Cloth. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing to the various city 
departments, cloth, as per specifications to be ob- 
tained at the office of the Superintendent of Sup- 
plies, Room 801, City Hall Annex. There will 
be a charge of twenty cents (SO. 20) for each blank 
proposal taken out. The bidder must leave his 
proposal with a certified check for $200, payable 
to and to become the property of the City of 
Boston if the proposal is not carried out, at the 
above office. A duplicate bid, without check, 
must be left at the office of the City Auditor prior 
to the time named for opening bids. The bids 
will be publicly opened and read Thursday, 
January 14, 1937, at 12 m., at Room 801, City Hall 
Annex. Tlie successful bidder must furnish a 
bond for one ciuarter of the total estimated amount 
of the contract with a surety company authorized 
to do business in Massachusetts as surety for the 
faithful performance of the contract. The Super- 
intendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to award 
the contract as he deems for the best interests of 
the city. All contracts made subject to appro- 
priations to meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty. 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



Jan. 2 



CITY RECORD 



1 1 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Paper Drinking Cups. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites pnoposials for furnishing paiper 
drinkiing cups, as required, 'to the V(airiiOus 
city d'epai-ltmiants. The bidder musit use the 
form of pi-titposal to !be obtained at the ofRoe of 
the Superintendent of Suppliels, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, and the successful bidder 
must furnish a bond for one quarter the total 
estimated amouint of the bid with a surety 
oonip.any authorized to do business in Massa- 
chusetts as surety for the faithful performance 
of the conitract. There will he a charge of 
Uoenty cents (.$0.20) for eaeh blank proposal 
taken out. The bid, 'with a certified check for 
$200, payaible to and to become the property 
of the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out, must be left at the office of the 
Superiinteindent of Supplies, before 12 m., Tues- 
day, January 12, 1937, at which time and 
place they iwiUl be publicly opened and retad. 
A duplicate bid, without check, must be left 
at the office of the City Auditor prior to the 
time niamed ffloa- opdning: bids. The Superin- 
tend€int reserves the right to accept or reject 
any oa- all bids, or any part of a bid, and to- 
a,wlard the coinltract als he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made sub- 
ject to approipriatJofns to meet payments there- 
under. 

D. Fbank Doherty, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Pig Lead. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton inviites proposals for furnishing pig lead, 
as required to the Public Works Department, 
Water Service. The bidder must use the form 
of proposal to be obtained at thie office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 80:1, City 
Hall Annex, and the successful bidder must 
furnish a bOnd for one quarter the toital esti- 
mated amoiuinlt of the bid 'with a surety com- 
pany authorized to do business in Massachu- 
setts as surety for the faithful performance of 
the contract. There will be a charge of twenty 
cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal taken 
out.' The bid, rwilth a ceAified check for $200, 
payable to and to become the property of the 
City O'f Boislton if the proposal is not carried 
ouit, must be left at rth-,- office of the Superim- 
tendient tof SupplieB before 12 m., Monday, 
January 11, il937, at which time and place 
they will he publicly opened and read. A 
duplicate bid, without check, must be left at 
the office of the City Auditor prior to the time 
named for opening bids. The Suporiintiecndent 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or 
all bid's, or any part of a bid, and to award 
the conitract as he deems for the best iinlterests 
of the city. All contracts mn^ade subject to 
apipropriatioms to meet paymen^ts thereunder. 
D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CiITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Toilet Paper. 
The Supply Departmemt of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for fumiishing toSlet 
paper Ito the varioois city departments. The 
bidder must use the form of proposal to be 
obtained at the office of the Superiintendent 
of Suipplies, '801 Oity Hall Annex, and the 
sucoessful bidder must f urn'is'h a bond for one 
qulairter the toital estimated 'amount of the 
bid with a surety company authorized t)o do 
business 'in Massachusetts as surety for the 
flalithful performance of the contract. There 
will he a charge of •twenty cents ($0.20) for 
each blank proposai taken out. The b'id, 
with a certified checlc for $300, payable to and 
to become the pi-operty of the City of Boston 
i'f the prop'osal is molt carried out, must be 
left at the office of 'the Superintendent of Sup- 
pties. before 12 m., Tuesday, January 12, 1937, 
ait which time and place they wlill be iiuWicly 
opened and read. A duplicate 'bid, without 
check, mtust be lert A the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
blitis. The 'Superint'anden't reserves the right 
to acept or reject any or all bids, or any part 
of a bid, and to aiward Ithe contract as ho 
deems for the 'best interests of the city. All 
contracts inade subject to appropn-iations to 
meet paymenlbs (thereunder. 



(Jan. 2.) 



D. Frank Doherty. 
Su2>crintcndcnt of Supplies. 



OITY OF BOSTON. 



DEPARTIMjENT OF iSOHOOL BUILDINGS. 



To Furniture Contractors and 
Woodworkers. 

The Superimt'endenit of Oonstruc'tion of the 
Dep'artment of School Buildings of the City 
of Boston invites sealed prop'osaJls for furnish- 
iing aind delivering vairi'ous piarts of pupils' 
furniture ito the Department of School Build- 
ings storehouse, 26 Norman street, Boston, 
of the kind and quality as P'er specifications 
'and samples oin exhibition a!t the Depiartment 
of School [Buildings 'Storehouse. 26 Norman 
street, Bos'ton, and sivimg bond of a surety 
company, satisfactory to the Superinitendemt 
of Constructiom therefor, in the sum of $1,000. 
Only proposals 'obtaiined at the office of the 
Supeirinteindeint of Constru'ction, 26 Norman 
Kitredt, Boston, Mass., signed by the bidder and 
left be'fore 2 o'clock p. m. of Monday, January 
11, 11937, ^t said office, with a certified check 
for $500, payable to the lOity if the proposal 
is not carried out, will then and there be 
pu'blicly opened and read. The proposal shall 
be miade in dup'licate, the 'one with the check 
to be aubmlitted ais indicated above, the other 
to be dfeposlited with the City Auditor, City 
Hall, previous to the time n'amed for open- 
ing propos'als. The rate per hour of the ■wages 
to be paid mechanics, teamsters, chauffeurs 
and laborers 'in the work to be perform'ed under 
the contract shall mot be less- than the rate 
of wages in the ischedule 'd'stermiined by the 
Commissioner of Labor and Industries of the 
ComimoiniWealth, a copy of a-vhich s'chedule is 
ainnexed to the form of contract referred to 
herein. CO pies of said sohedlules imay be 
obtaiined. Without cost, upon application there- 
for at) the office of the Saiperintendent of Con- 
structiion. The Superintendeint Of Ocins'truc- 
tion 'reserves the right to reject any or all 
proposails. A deposiit of a certified check in 
the sum of i$2i5- 'will be required in order to 
'procure a complete set of specificatio'nS, said 
sum to be refunded if specifications 'are re- 
turned prior to moon of January 2i5, 1937. 
Mutiliation of the specifications will be deemed 
sufficient cause ftor the forfeiture of the said 
d'eposit. 

Wm. W. Drummey, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Construction. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Surgical and 
Hypodermic Needles. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing surgical and 
hypodermic needles, as required, to the various 
city departments. The bidder must use the form 
of proposal to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, and the successful bidder must furnish a 
bond for one quarter the total estimated amount 
of the bid with a surety company authorized to do 
business in iVIassachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract. There will be a 
charge of twenljj cents (SO. 20) for each blank pro- 
posal taken out. The bid, with a certified check 
for .$100, payable to and to become the property 
of the City of Boston, if the proposal is not carried 
out, must be left at the office of the Superintendent 
of Supplies, before 12 m., on Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 20, 1937, at which time and place they will 
be publicly opened and read. A duplicate bid, 
without check, must be left at the office of the 
City Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The Superintendent reserves the right to 
accept or reject any or all bids, or any part of a 
bid, and to award the contract as he deems for the 
b&st interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 2.) SttperinlendenI of Siipitties. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



AssEsaoEs' Notice to Taxpayer.s. 
City Hall Annex, 
Boston, January 1, 1937. 
liftnrns must br made on or before January SO, 
in.iT, instead of Fibruaru 16 as in last licar. 

Particular attention is called to the .\8SC9sors' 
notice posted upon City Hall and various other 
places throughout the city relative to making 
returns on personal property subject to taxation. 
Edward T. Kelly, 
Timothy W. Murphy, 
John P. O'Heakn. 

.Issfssors of Boston. 
(Jan. 2-9-16-23-30.) 



W. P. A. 
CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Fill. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furn,ishing the Park 
Department, fill, as per specifications to be 
obtained at the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Anmex. There tvill be a charge of 
twenty cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The 'bidder must leave his pro- 
posal and a certified cheek for $200, payable to 
aind to 'become the property of the City of 
Btositon if the proposal is not carried out, at 
the office of the Supply Department. A dupH- 
ca'te bid, withouit check, must be left at the 
office of the City Auditor prior to the time 
named for opening bids. The bids wUl be 
publicly Opened and read on Monday, January 
11, 1937, at 12 m., at Room SOI, City Hall 
Annex. The successful bidder must fui-nish a 
bond for one quarter the total estimated amount 
of the contriact with a surety company au- 
thorized to do bu'Siness in Massachusetts, as 
surety for the faithful performance of the 
contract. The Superintende'nt reserves the 
right to accept or reject any or all bids, 
or any part of a bid, and to award the con- 
tract as he deems for the best interestts of the 
city. All contracts made subject to appro- 
priations to meet payments thereunder. 
D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jam. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for White and Red Lead. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing white 
and red lead, as required, to the various city 
dep'artments. The bidder must use the form 
of proposal to be obtained at the office of the 
Superiintendent of Supplies, Room SOI, City 
Hall Annex, and the successful bidder must 
furniish 'a 'bond for one quarter the total es- 
'timated amount of the bid with a surety com- 
pany authorized itJo do business in Massachu- 
setts as surcity for the faithful performance 
of the contract. There will he a charge of 
twenty cents ($0,20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bid, with a certified check 
for $200, payable to and to 'become the property 
of the 'City of 'Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out, must -be left at the office of 
the Superintendent of Supplies before 12 m., 
Monday, January '11, 1937, at which time 
and place they will be publicly opened and 
read. A duplicate bid, without check, must be 
left at the office of the City Auditor prior to 
the time 'named for opening bi<l3. The Super- 
intendent reserves the right to accept or re- 
ject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and 
to award the contract as he deems for the 
basit interests of the city. All comtracts made 
subject to 'appropriations to meet payments 
thereuinder. 

D. Frank Doherty. 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Pohtl.\nd Cement. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites propos;ils for furnishing to the various city 
departments. Portland cement, as per specifica- 
tions, to be delivered in such quantities as re<iuired. 
'The bidder must use the form of propos;il to be 
obtained at the ollico of the Superintendent of 
Supplies. Room 801, City Hall .\nne.x, and the 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter of the total estiniatcd amount of the bid 
with a surety company authoriicd to do business 
in IVIassachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract. Thtrc icill be a ct\arg« 
of forty cents (&0.J,0) for eaeh set of proposals taken 
out. Bids, with a certified check for $300. p!»y- 
able to and to become the property of the City of 
Boston if the proposjd is not carried out, must be 
left at the ofiioe of the Supcrintondent of SuppUe?. 
Room 801, City Hall .\unox, before 12 m., Thurs- 
day, January 14, 1937, at which time and place 
they will be" publicly opened and read. .-V du(jU- 
cato bid, without check, must be left at the olhcc 
of the City .\uditor prior to the time named for 
opening bids. The Superintcndcut of Supplies 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or all 
bids, or any part of a bid. and to award the con- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of the city. 
All contracts made subject to appropriations to 
meet payments thereunder. 

D. B^vNK DoHEnrr, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supptiti. 



12 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 2 



CITY OF B03T0X. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Ftrnishing Ether. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
in\ntes proposals for furnishing to the various 
city departments, ether as per specifications to 
be obtained at the office of the Superintendent 
of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall Annex. There 
u-ill be a charge of tu-enty cents (SO. 20) for each 
blank proposal taken out. The bidder must leave 
his proposal with a certified check for S200, pay- 
able to and to become the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, at 
the above office. A dupUcate bid, mthout check, 
must be left at the office of the City Auditor, 
prior to the time named for opening bids. The 
bids will be publicly opened and read Friday, 
January 15, 1937, at 12 m., at Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. The successful bidder must furnish 
a bond for one quarter of the total estimated 
amount of the contract -n-ith a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts as 
surety for the faithful performance of the con- 
tract. The Superintendent reserves the right to 
accept or reject any or all bids, or any part of a 
bid, and to award the contract as he deems for 
the best interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Ice Cre.^m Mix. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing Ice Cream Mix 
to the Boston City Hospital. The bidder must 
use the form of proposal to be obtained at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
SOI, City Hall Annex, and the successful bidder 
must furnish a bond for one quarter the total 
estimated amount of the bid with a surety com- 
pany authorized to do business in Massachusetts 
as surety for the faithful performance of the con- 
tract. There leill be a charge of tieenty cents {30.20) 
for each blank proposal taken out. The bid, with a 
certified check for -SlOO, payable to and to become 
the property of the City of Boston if the proposal 
is not carried out, must be left at the office of 
the Superintendent of Supplies, before 12 m., 
Thursday, January 14, 1937, at which time and 
place they will be publicly opened and read. A 
duplicate bid, without check, must be left at the 
office of the City Auditor prior to the time named 
for opening bids. The Superintendent reserves 
the right to accept or reject any or all bids, or anj' 
part of a bid, and to award the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. .\11 con- 
tracts made subject to appropriations to meet 
payments thereunder. 

D. Fb.\nk Doherty, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



W. P. A. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Mill Work 
AND Inside Finish. 
The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites rproposals for furnishing to the 
Park Department, mill work and inside finish, 
as per specifications to be obtained at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Booth 801, 
City Hall Annex. There will he a charge of 
twenty cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bidder must leave his proposal 
with a certified check for §100, payable to and 
to become the property of the City of Bos- 
ton if the proposal is not carried out, at 
the above office. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids will be publicly opened and 
read on Tuesday, January 12, 1937, at 12 m., 
at Room 801, City Hall Annex. The successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
the total estimated amount of the contract with 
a surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract. The Superintendent 
reserv-es the right to accept or reject any or 
all bids, or any part of a bid, and to award 
the contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the city. All contracts made subject to 
appropriations to meet payments thereunder. 
D. Frank Doherty, 
(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 
SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Metal Polish. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing to the various 
city departments, metal polish, as per specifica- 
tions to be obtained at the office of the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall Annex. 
There leill be a charge of twenty cents (SO. 20) for 
each blank proposal taken out. The bidder must 
leave his proposal with a certified check for S50, 
payable to and to become the property of the 
City of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the above office. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids will be publicly opened and 
read Thursday. January 21, 1937, at 12 m., at 
Room 801, City Hall Annex. The successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter of 
the total estimated amount of the contract with 
a surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract. The Superintendent 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or all 
bids, or any part of a bid, and to award the eon- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of the city. 
.411 contracts made subject to appropriations 
to meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Setsver Pipe. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing the Sewer 
Division, sewer pipe, to be delivered as required. 
The bidder must use the form of proposal 
to be obtained at the office of the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, and the successful bidder must furnish 
a bond for one quarter the itobal estimated 
amounit of the contract with a surety company 
authorized to do business in [Masachusetts as 
surety for the faithful performance of the 
contract. There will be a charge of tvjenUj 
cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal taken 
out. Bids, with a certified check for $300 
payable to and to become the propei^ty of 
the City of Boston if the proposal is n'olt car- 
ried out at the above office, must be left at 
the office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City HaJl Annex, before 12 m., Wednesday, 
January 13, 1937, at which time and place 
they will be publicly opened and read. A 
duplicate bid, without check, must be left 
at the office of the City Auditor prior to the 
time named for opening bids. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



W. P. A. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Cinders. 
The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton iinvit^ proposals for furnishing the 
Boston Airport, Park Department, Cinders, 
as per speeificaltions to be obtained at the 
Supply Department, Room 801, Clitty Hall 
Anmex. There will he a charge of twenty 
cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal taken 
out. The bidder must leave his proposal and 
a certified check for $200, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston 
if the propffeal is not carried out, at the 
office of the Supply Department. A duplicate 
bid, without check, must be left at the office 
of the City Auditor prior to the time named 
for opening bids. The bids will be publicly 
opened and read on Monday, January 11, 1937, 
at 12 m., at Room 801, City Hall Annex. 
The successful bidder must furnish a bond 
for one quarter the total estimated amount 
of the contract with a surety company author- 
ized to do business in Massachuset.ts, aa 
surety for the faithful performance of the 
oontraot. The Superinltendetnt ireserves 'the 
right to accept or reject any or all bids, or 
any part of a bid, and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 
All contracts made subject to approptilations 
to meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 
(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Lead Pipe. 

The Supfply Department of the City of Boston 
inviteis proposals for furnishing to the Public 
Works Department, Water Division, lead pipe, 
as per speci'fica.tions, to be delivered In such 
quiamtities as required. The bidder must use 
the ftorm of proposal to be obtained at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, and the successful bid- 
der imust furnish a bond for one quarter of 
the total estimated amount of the bid with 
a surety company authorized to do business 
in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract. There wUl he 
a charge of twenty cents ($0.20) for each 
blank proposal taken out. Bids, with a certi- 
fied check for $200, payable to and to become 
the property of the City of Boston if the pro- 
posal is not carried out, must be left at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, before 12 m., Tuesday, 
January 12, 1937, at which time and place 
they \vi\\ be publicly opened and read. A dupli- 
cate bid, without check, must be left at the 
office of the City Auditor prior to the time 
named for opening bids. The Superintendent 
of Supplies reserves the right to accept or 
reject any Or all proposals, or any part of a 
proposal, and to aw^ard the contract as he 
deems for the best interests of the city. All 
contracts made subject to appropriations to 
meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Server Brick. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing to the 
various city departments, se^wer brick, to be 
delivered as required. The bidder must use 
the form of proposal to be obtained at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall Anne.x, and the successful 
bidder must furnish a bond for one quarter 
the total estimated amount of the contract 
with a surety company authorized to do busi- 
ness in Massachusetts as surety for the faith- 
ful perfocrmance of the contract. There ivill 
be a charge of one dollar ($1) per set for 
each set of proposals taken out. Bids, with a 
certified check for $200, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston if 
the proposal is not carried out, at the above 
office, must be left at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, be- 
foa-e 12 m.; Wednesday, January 13, 1937, at 
which time and place they wUl be publicly 
opened and read. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The Superintendent reserves the right 
to accept or reject any or all bids, or any 
part of a bid, and to award the contract aa 
he deems for the best interests of the city. 
All contracts made subject to appropriations 
to meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing X-Rat Materials. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing to the various 
city departments. X-ray materials, as per specifica- 
tions to be obtained at the office of the Superin- 
tendent of Supphes, Room 801, City Hall Annex. 
There will be a charge of twenty cents (SO. 20) for 
each blank proposal taken out. The bidder must 
leave his proposal with a certified check for S300, 
payable to and to become the property of the 
City of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the above office. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City Auditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. The 
bids will be pubUcly opened and read Friday, 
January 15, 1937, at 12 m., at Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. The successful bidder must furnish 
a bond for one quarter of the total estimated 
amount of the contract with a surety company 
authorized to do business in Massachusetts aa 
surety for the faithful performance of the contract. 
The Superintendent reserves the right to accept 
or reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and 
to award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made subject 
to appropriations to meet payments thereunder. 
D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 2.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON PRINTING DEPABTMBNT 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol. 29. SATtJRr)A.Y, Janxjary 9, 1987. No. 2 

MAYOR MANSFIELD DELIVERS ANNUAL ADDRESS BEFORE MEMBERS OF 
CITY COUNCIL AND DEPARTMENT HEADS — REVIEWS PROBLEMS CON= 
FRONTING HIM IN MANAGEMENT OF CITY'S AFFAIRS AND HOW THEY 
HAVE BEEN SOLVED AND OUTLINES PLANS FOR COMING YEAR — 
FINANCIAL CREDIT OF CITY BETTERED DESPITE WELFARE DEMANDS 
AND OTHER BURDENS — COMPARES BOSTON'S TAX PROBLEMS WITH 
THOSE OF OTHER CITIES AND TOWNS IN STATE AND OUTLINES PLANS 
FOR ECONOMIES HOPED TO BE EFFECTED WITH COOPERATION FOR ALL. 



The following is the annual message of Mayor Frederick W. Mansfield to the Honorable 
the City Council, delivered January 4, at the first meeting of the year : 

The City Council of Boston has assembled today for the purpose of organizing for the 
year 1937. In accordance with custom, I wish to summarize briefly certain of the accomplish- 
ments of the year which has gone and to indicate certain of my plans for the present year. 

The Financial Condition of the City. 

No more important problem has confronted the city during the last three 3'ears of my 
administration than that of maintaining the stability of the city's credit. This task has been 
no easy one. While a Mayor may, by injudicious administration, vastly impair the citj^'s 
credit, there are so many city obligations beyond a Mayor's control that protection and improve- 
ment of credit by a Mayor are fraught with difficulties. Payment of State tax and Metropolitan 
assessments and a large part of the Boston Elevated deficit and pension accumulation require- 
ments are obligations which the Mayor cannot avoid. Nor can he eliminate debt service on 
debts already incurred. School costs, court costs and police costs are subject only to a very 
limited control by him. Without cooperation, therefore, from state, school and county officials, 
possibilities of curtailment are indeed restricted if not impossible. 

Furthermore, the complexities of our modern civilization impose tremendous burdens on 
municipal government which are aggravated in times of financial stress. The poor and needy 
must be properly cared for; persons and property must be protected; the public health must 
be preserved; traffic problems must be met. There is a point beyond which attempted economy 
is false and costly. 

I have heretofore frequently pointed out, and I now reiterate, that the financial diffi- 
culties which the city has had have been due in large part to continued heavy demands for inil^lic 
welfare coupled with a decrease in real estate values and a decrease in normal income. This 
condition is true generally throughout the Commonwealth, as is indicated by heavy borrowings 
and high tax rates of other municii^alities. In 1936 six towns in the Commonwealth had a tax 
rate of $50 a thousand or over; fifty-nine cities and towns, a tax rate of between $40 and $50; 
seventy-nine cities and towns a tax rate of between $35 and $40; and one hundred eighteen 
cities and towns a tax rate of between $30 and $35. 

The tax rate of Bostoa during the last three j^ears could have been materinlly reduced 
and our borrowings eliminated but this could only have been accomplished by a drastic curtail- 
ment of essential services and by a wholesale discharge of cmjiloyees. In the end, thousands 
M^ould have suffered immeasurably, property values would ha\e been impaired and (he cit>'s 
development and progress retarded for years. 

I was unwilling to take this course. Instead, the city has continued to gi\e ade(|uate 
assistance to the needy and to maintain essential services. I did succecnl, ho\ve\-er, in reducing 
appropriations for city maintenance ])urposes in 1936 almost two million dollars below similar 
a'ppropriations in 1935 and reduced our borrowings for welfare jnn-poses from $10,000,000 to 
$6,000,000,— a decrease of $4,000,000. As a result, the net debt of. Boston is now lower in" 
approximately $2,300,000 than it was on January 1, 1934, and approximately $1,000,000 lower 
than on January 1, 1936. That this record has been achieved despite substantial borrowinu;s 
for P. W. A. and public welfare, is a source of considerable satisfaction. The net debt of the 
city as of the close of 1936 is the lowest since 1932. {Continued on intgc te.) 



14 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 




"O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 

queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship= 

teeming plain of the ocean, 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene, 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotion!" 
From Boston Centenial Ptoem by 

Nathan Haskel Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Putilished weiekly in Boston by the Board of 
Trustees of the Statistics Department of 
the Oity of Boston, undler the directiioTi of 
the Mayor, in accordance -with legislative act 
and city ordinance. 



FORREST P. HULL, Editor, Room 73, City 
, Hall. 

Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Assocuite Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 
City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



$2.00 per year 
10 Cents 



IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES 
Old South News-'Sta.nd, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising 
A trate tif $2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
coipy must Ibe in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publica±iOin dn the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statiistics Department, 
Pu>om 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
January 4, 1937, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 

MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failm-e 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Bo.UiD OF StREET COMMIS- 
SIONERS, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways, the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 



public streets; the maldng of specific re- 
pairs in public streets; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasoline, oil 
and other inflammable substances or ex-, 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street raiilway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, mai-quises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Traffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any Streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To THE Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To the Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue. Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the -city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 
charges made for such service. Applica- 



tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and gymnasiums maintained by the oity, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fail-view and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To the School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Department op School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the constiuction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Statistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To the Wire Division of the Firb 
Department, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To the Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY 

For the week ending Jan. 2, 1937. 

Population as of July, 1936, Massa- 
chusetts State Census, 817,713; popula- 
tion estimated, July, 1937, United States 
Census Bureau, 805,192; number of 
deaths (stillbirths excluded): Residents, 
211; nonresidents, 48; total, 259. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 16.73; nonresidents deducted, 
13.63. 



REPORT. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 

Last week, 15.37; corresponding week 
last year, 17.51. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc. : Under 
one year, 24; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 2; sixtv years and over, 143. 
Total deaths: Male, 126; female, 133; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 156; 
deaths of colored, 9. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 



Anterior Poliomyelitis 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis Lethargica 

Influenza 

Measles 

Meningitis Epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet Fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) (childhood type T. B.) 

Tuberculosis (other forms) 

Typhoid Fever 

Wiiooping Cough 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 2, 1937. 



Cases. Deaths. 



G 

I 

43 

44 

15 

6 

3 

149 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Weelc 

Ended 

Jan. 4, 1936. 



Cases. Deaths. 



23 
16 
3 



* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



15 



OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON". 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 2, 1937. 





Dependent 
Aid. 


Mothers' 
Aid. 


Old Age 

Assistance. 


Administrative. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 


Number of active cases last 


15,319 

434 

*603 

15,150 

22,427 


1,603 

5 

7 

1,601 

1,589 


7,601 

*183 

13 

7,771 
4,364 






24,523 
622 


week. 
Number of cases added 






Number of cases discontinued . . 






623 


Number of active cases this 






24,522 


week. 
Same week last year 






28,380 











Financial. 



Expended during week . 

Last week 

Same week last year. . . 



Collections from Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, 
outside cities and towns and 
refunds. §11 



t$101,735 02 
102,505 59 
149,111 87 

1,164,127 48 



$24,081 


03 


24,043 


71 


24,017 


00 


619,675 


75 



t$106,765 


42 


2,217 77 


27,226 


20 


971,796 


33 



$16,361 24 
16,158 99 
13,923 22 



5,942 71 

144,926 06 

214,278 29 

2,755,599 56 



' Includes 64 transfers from Dependent Aid to Old Age Assistance, f Includes $10,836.84 advance payment for Jan. 1 and Jan. 2. 
t Includes $106,263.38 advance payment for Jan. 1. § Collections on account of Boston City Hospital, §45,672.82. 

II Miscellaneous collections, $6,433.29. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER, DECEMBER, 1936. 

CENTRAL OFFICE. - 



December, 1936. 
December, 1935. 
November 1936. 



Dependent Aid. 

$552,249 33 

750,527 82 

450,410 13 



Comparison of Administrative Expenditures. 

December, 1936 $18,970 45 

December, 1935 19,012 57 

November, 193G 10,452 98 

TEMPORARY HOME. 
Comparison of Expenditures. 

December, 1936 $951 03 

December, 1935 888 07 

November, 1936 981 14 



Mothers' Aid. 

$129,960 32 
126,482 11 
103,052 81 



Old Age Assi.stance. 
$208,016 43 
120,784 25 
187,547 58 



Total. 
$890,226 OS 
997,794 18 
741,010 52 



Comparison of Salaries Paid. 

December, 1936 SS1,40S OS 

December, 1935 73,395 64 

November, 1936 63,305 25 

WAYFARERS' LODGE. 
Comparison of Expenditures. 

December, 1936 Sl,054 96 

December, 1935 1,126 51 

November, 1930 1,058 OS 



1 6 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



ADDRESS OF MAYOR MANSFIELD. 

{Continued from page 13.) 

While city maintenance appropriations and bor- 
rowings have been decreased in 1936, tax collections 
have shown a decided improvement. Approximately 
73 per cent of the 1936 tax levy was collected before 
the close of the fiscal year. This is the highest record 
of collections in recent years and is approximately 
2^ per cent in excess of the percentage collected in 
1935. 

Dm-ing 1936 the city issued ^35,000,000 in tax 
anticipation loans. This represents a reduction of 
.S9, 500, 000 from the total of such loans issued in 1935. 
This reduction may be viewed with considerable 
satisfaction, since it indicates a sharp decrease in the 
amount of temporary financing engaged in by the 
city. 

Since 1928 a staff of auditors and accountants from 
the Division of Accounts at the State House have been 
engaged in the installation of a system of accounts in 
the financial departments of the city. In my inaugural 
message, I pointed out the necessity of a prompt 
completion of this work. In 1936 their work was 
completed, and today the system is being operated by 
the regular personnel of the Auditing, Collecting and 
'Treasury Departments. The system is based on the 
uniform system of accounts prescribed for municipali- 
ties in Massachusetts. Thus, after a period of nine 
years the accounts of the city have been established 
in accordance with modern principles of accounting 
practise. Under the new system it is possible at all 
times to determine accurately the assets and liabilities 
of the city, and so to secure a true picture of the city's 
financial condition at any given date. The City 
Auditor is now publishing in his monthly exhibit, 
balance sheets reflecting the assets and liabilities of 
the various accounts at the close of the current month. 
Boston is the only large city in the countrj^ which 
prepares for public inspection a monthly balance 
sheet. 

By legislative action, which I strongly urged, the 
policy of controlling the ordinary maintenance ex- 
penses of the city departments by the medium of a tax 
limit estabUshed by the Legislature was abandoned. 
This means that, after a half century of legislative 
control, Boston has been granted the authority to 
determine, without state interference, its budget and 
appropriation poUcies. Wliile it is too early to evalu- 
ate the full extent of the benefits which should come 
to the city from this legislation, it is evident that the 
delay in the submission of the budget to the City 
Council, which has been so marked in the last decade 
of the city's financial experience, should no longer 
occur, since, as the necessity for legislative authoriza- 
tion of a limit has been removed, it should now be 
possible to submit the budget to the City Council at 
an early date and enable the city to operate under 
adequate budget control almost from the commence- 
ment of the year. 

In conjunction with the removal of the tax hmit, 
the Legislature saw fit to place the city under the 
debt provisions of chapter 44 of the General Laws. 
Under these provisions the purposes for which the 
city may issue debt and the term for which each issue 
may be made are specifically enumerated. In ad- 
dition, before any loan may be authorized, the city 
is required to appropriate within the tax levy an 
amount equal to 10 cents on each $1,000 of the assessed 
valuation of the city for the preceding year. Under 
this latter provision, before the city may authorize 
borrowings in 1937 it will be necessary to provide for 



each authorization $162,026.50 within the tax levy. 
The effect of this provision will be to establish a partial 
"pay-as-you-go" policy on subsequent borrowings by 
the city, as well as to limit the projects to be financed 
through the medium of loans to work of a substantial 
nature. Over a period of years this particular legis- 
lation should result in a reduction in borrowings and 
in the net debt of the city. 

I am unable at this time to advise you as to the 
amount of the budget which I will recommend to 
you this year. We are still working to keep appro- 
priations at as low an amount as is consistent with 
the public interest. Every effort will be made to 
decrease the amount of the budget below the amount 
of the appropriations of 1936. 

It is also my purpose to reduce further the net 
debt of the city. While some borrowing will be 
necessary because of the continued heavy load of 
welfare relief, this borrowing and all other borrow- 
ing will be kept to a minimum in order that the city 
may ultimately ehminate its debt and be placed on a 
pay-as-you-go basis. A long term plan of debt 
reduction is bound to result in automatic tax rate 
relief. 

PUBLIC HEALTH. 

The extensive and important work of the city in 
the prevention of disease and the preservation of the 
public health is unknown to many. 

The untiring efforts of the Health Department 
speedily controlled a meningitis outbreak early in 
1936 and the methods of control then employed by 
that department have since been adopted in many 
cities and towns throughout the United States. 

The city now maintains twenty-nine infant and 
pre-school clinics to which mothers may bring their 
children for routine medical supervision and immun- 
ology. Sixty thousand or more visits were made 
during 1936 by mothers of infants and pre-school 
children to the chnics established by the city. 

It has been possible during the past year to increase 
the scope of the work of assisting children in the 
parochial schools of Boston. There are now children 
in about forty-five parochial schools constantly being 
supervised by the medical inspectors of the Health 
Department. This supervision consists of daily visits, 
physical examinations, immunization against diph- 
theria, control of communicable diseases and the 
correction of defects when found. It is estimated, 
that during the course of the past school year some 
75,000 inspections have been made and about 20,000 
physical examinations. 

During the New England flood of March, 1936, 
which affected the entire milk shed the facilities of 
producers and dealers in milk and of transportation 
agencies were marshaled under the direction of the 
milk inspection service of the Health Department with 
the result that there was no significant shortage of milk 
and no material change in the quaUty of the milk 
delivered in Boston during this period. 

The Food Division of the Health Department has 
labored with vigor and success during 1936. Much 
of the store inspection is necessarily routine, but there 
have been instances where particularly meritorious 
results have been achieved. Inspectors of this divi- 
sion were on the alert during the flood, and food in 
that area affected by the disaster was seized and con- 
demned. Arrangements were made with local boards 
of health in the flooded areas and before shipments 
were allowed to come into Boston, the Food Division 
was notified and when shipments were received in 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



17 



Boston, an inspector was on hand and such foodstuffs 
as were beyond salvage were received and condemned- 

TEMPORARY RELIEF FOR THE 
UNEMPLOYED. 

During the year 1936, the Federal Government, 
through the Works Progress Administration, expended 
approximately $24,000,000 on work projects for the 
needy unemployed in Boston and an avarage of 
approximately 24,000 persons have been afforded 
employment on such projects throughout the year. 

I have consistently maintained, both here and in 
Washington, that Federal assistance is essential to 
meet the unemployment problem and that work relief 
is socially far preferable to the dole. Every effort 
has been made to secure a fair share of Federal assist- 
ance for the needy of this city and attempts to cut, 
unwarrantedly, amounts allocated for rehef have been 
vigorously resisted and successfully prevented. 

The work done on these projects has been, in the 
main, of substantial benefit to the city. Highways 
have been constructed, parks and playgrounds im- 
proved, sewer and water hnes built and public build- 
ings renovated and repaired. The accomplishments 
may properly be a source of pride to the thousands 
employed on these projects. 

I shall continue through the present year my efforts 
to secure for residents of Boston their fair share of 
Federal funds for unemployment relief and to see 
that those funds are devoted to worth-while uses. 

HOSPITALS. 

Boston City Hospital. 

The new City Hospital Surgical Building, con- 
structed with Federal aid as a P. W. A. Project, has 
been completed and in a short time will be equipped 
and ready for occupancy. 

It is a building of ten stories and will have accom- 
modations for 300 beds. The operating rooms have 
been planned with a view to high efficiency. Each 
operating room has its own anaesthesia room, four 
bedrooms for patients, and, for the first time, oxygen 
piped to the room from a central tank in the base- 
ment. There will also be pressure and vacuum pipes 
available to assist the doctors in operations. Visitors, 
especially students, may view operations from a gallery 
which is entirely separated from the operating room 
by a glass shield set in a balcony above the room. 
When this building is opened Boston will have a city 
hospital service comparable with the best in the world. 

Long Island. 

The number of beds in the Long Island Hospital 
has been increased during the year 1936 and great 
improvements made for the comfort of the inmates 
and patients and in diminishing the dangers of con- 
tagion. 

Occupational therapy has been developed and 
inmates have been encouraged to engage in work of 
interest and utility to themselves. With the assist- 
ance of W. P. A. forces, buildings have been repaired 
and the chapel considerably improved. A corridor 
has been constructed to the chapel so that inmates may 
attend services in cohl antl stormy weatlier and yet 
remain under cover. 

PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS. 

Parks and playgrounds perform a most important 
function in the maintenance of tlio health and well- 



being of the community. The availability of W. P. A. 
funds has enabled the city to make many improve- 
ments in its parks and playgrounds during the past 
year with relatively small cost to the city. 

The improvements made are too numerous to 
describe in detail but a few illustrative examples may 
be mentioned : 

Marine Park in South Boston has been further 
developed so that it may be utihzed more fully, espe- 
cially in the summer months, and extensive parking 
areas have been constructed along the roadway to 
Castle Island to make this park more useful to the 
citizens of Boston. 

Concrete walks around the stadium and in other 
portions of the park have been built at Columbus 
Park, South Boston. Tennis coui-ts have been con- 
structed and a retaining wall has been built along the 
beach front to complete that part of the park and make 
the beach more attractive. 

Rough areas in the West Roxbury Parkway were 
cleaned of underbrush and loamed and seeded. The 
low areas were filled in, surfaced and seeded. A drain- 
age system was installed, culverts built, and rustic 
bridges and fences were erected along the line of the 
bridle paths which were reconstructed and put in 
first-class condition. This development has made a 
decided improvement in this section of the citv. 

Concrete walks have been constructed in the Back 
Bay Fens where dirt walks formerly existed and 
numerous replacements have been made of wooden 
seats and fences. 

Rough unfinished areas in Franklin Park have been 
graded and put in better condition, and an herb 
garden has been constructed near the Rose Garden. 
Walks have been regraded and surfaced; drainage and 
irrigation systems have been installed. 

A new bathing beach has been constructed along 
the portion of the basin at Charlesbank. Sand was 
spread along portions of this beach about 400 feet in 
length, so as to provide bathing facihties for the in- 
habitants of this congested section. It is contem- 
plated that this beach will be extended, under a W. P. A. 
project, during the coming year. 

Many improvements have been made to the World 
War Memorial Park in the East Boston district. 
Additional tennis courts have been constructed with 
the necessary fence inclosures. The beach and its 
entrances have been improved, as also the drainage 
system, walks and soccer field. 

Extensive replacements have been made to the piers 
and bath house at the North End Park and improve- 
ments have been made to the beach and its entrances. 

The George AVright Golf Course, located in Hyde 
Park and West Roxbury, has reached its final stage of 
preparation and is in such condition that it can be 
opened for plaj' during the present year. This golf 
course should be one of the best courses in Massa- 
chusetts and should be self-supporting. Its construc- 
tion has changed a rough wild tract of land, useless 
for building purposes, into one of use and beauty and 
should evenluallj' prove a boon to the surrounding 
neighborhood. 

Tlie new Wood .V venue Playground in Hyde Park is 
under construction; the Alsen Playground in Dor- 
chester is being leveled; the .Mmont Street Play- 
ground in Mattapan has been filled and siu-faced ami 
rustic paths, walls and fences have been built. .\ new 
baseball diamond has been constructed in the Chestnut 
Hill Playground, additional drainage and irrigation 
facilities provided there and the ground regr.aded. 
Tennis courts have been built in the .lelYerson JMav- 



18 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



ground in Roxbury and new courts at Franklin Field 
in Dorchester. 

Tliis is but a portion of the work of the year of the 
Park Department during 1936. In addition, it has, 
among other things, in cooperation with the Works 
Progress Administration, wiitten the most successful 
page in the history of City of Boston recreational 
activities, when its sports program attracted during 
1936 more than 4,500,000 spectators in games and 
exhibitions participated in by more than 1,500,000 
boys and girls. 

AIRPORT. 

The airport transport traffic at the Boston Airport 
has increased 250 per cent in the last four years. 
Approximately 5 per cent of all passengers carried by 
air on regularly scheduled airlines in the United States 
arrive or depart from the Boston Airport. Many 
extensions and improvements have been made during 
the past year. The flying field has been enlarged, 
drained, filled, surfaced and rolled. A building has 
been erected for the control of the floodlight system 
and the modernization of the fighting system at the 
airport is practically completed. 

During the past year the War Department leased 
to the city for airport purposes, for a term of fifty 
ye'ars. Governor's Island. This has added seventy- 
two acres to the city's present Airmart facilities. 
With the acquisition of this island, Boston is in a 
position to compete on favorable terms with the 
leading cities of the country as a port of entry for 
transatlantic air service. Plans for the development 
of the island have been made and it is expected that 
with Federal assistance substantial progress will be 
made during the coming year. 

PUBLIC WORKS. 

The city is now engaged in the completion of its 
present Federal Public Works program. During the 
course of the present year, work on three school build- 
ings, on the Chelsea Street Bridge over Chelsea Creek 
and on the Faneuil Hall Market should be completed. 
Except for the erection of a new City Hall, urgently 
needed because of the condition of the present struc- 
ture, it is my present purpose to be most conservative 
in the incurring of further debt during 1937 for new 
P. W. A. projects. 

Due to the heavy travel on our public streets, 
considerable reconstruction is annually necessary. 
During 1936 the city reconstructed 271 streets, and 
constructed 19 new streets. This work was made 
possible in part by the availability of W. P. A. labor. 
In addition, the city, thi'ough the PubHc Works 
Department, has laid 20,000 feet of new pipe and 
replaced 30,000 feet of old and smaller sized mains 
with new and larger sized. The Milton Street, 
Meridian Street and AUston Bridges were repaired 
and improved and new sewers were laid in various 
streets throughout the city. 

New five-year contracts with the Boston Con- 
solidated Gas Company for street lighting entered 
into in 1936 will effect a saving for the city in its 
lighting costs of $25,000 a year. 

PUBLIC WELFARE. 

The decentralization of the Welfare Department 
begun in June of 1934 was completed during the 
past year. This was accomplished at a minimum 
cost to the city as city property has been used for 
the new local units in all places except Dorchester 
and East Boston. In those districts the two new 



welfare buildings recently erected, under the auspices 
of P. W. A., will be used. 

The effect of decentralization will be to enable 
the Welfare Department to function more efficiently 
and to avoid the hardship heretofore borne by needy 
recipients of going from all sections of the city to the 
central office at Hawkins street. 

Welfare disbursements for dependent aid have been 
substantially less during the year 1936 than during 
1935. This is an encouraging sign and reflects im- 
proved economic conditions, W. P. A. assistance and 
careful investigation by the Welfare Department. 
Indications are that, unless there is a decrease in 
W. P. A. assistance during the present year, the city's 
burden, though still great, will be somewhat lightened. 

Every effort is being and will be made to enable 
recipients of dependent aid to secure private employ- 
ment. In a large percentage of cases, dependent 
aid recipients are untrained. The almost complete 
breakdown of the apprenticeship system during the 
depression calls for the training of these persons, 
if they are ever again to be gainfully employed. With 
the cooperation of the School Department it is hoped 
that this can be accomplished. 

THE PORT OF BOSTON. 

Port progress in 1936 was distinctly encouraging. 
The year showed an expansion of deep-water services, 
passenger and freight, and an increase in the number 
of passengers using the Port representing a patronage 
from all parts of the United States and Canada. 
Particularly significant is the fact that we have a 
growing percentage of passengers to and from the 
middle and far west, so that Boston, the second 
port of the United States, is becoming more and 
more a national father than a New England port 
of embarkation and debarkation. 

As to freight, a substantial gain in imports and 
exports took place for 1935 over 1934, and the first 
eight months of 1936, compared with the corre- 
sponding period in 1935, showed a further steady 
increase. Considering the many handicaps with which 
Boston is confronted in endeavoring to build up its 
import-export business, the current situation is 
encouraging. 

Domestic waterborne business has held its own, 
despite the serious marine strikes on the west coast. 
Intercoastal cargoes, of course, have fallen off, but 
those from the Gulf have increased. A few years 
ago, Boston had no services to such ports as Tampa, 
Mobile, New Orleans and Houston. Now we have 
four, and so heavy have been the cargo offerings 
that larger and faster vessels are being added to this 
trade route. For these improved conditions, the 
Boston Port Authority deserves great credit. 

There remains, of course, the prime necessity of 
correcting the rail rate and terminal situation favoring 
New York and handicapping Boston. Other adverse 
rate situations under scrutiny are important but none 
as important as this. I propose to continue my 
efforts for its correction. To aid in this accomphsh- 
ment, more active rail support by the New England 
carriers themselves is being sought, in the hope that 
by voluntary action on the carriers' part, we can 
have certain rate discriminations removed without 
the necessity of bringing formal proceedings before 
the Interstate Commerce Commission. Pennsylvania 
control of the New Haven and Boston and Maine, 
the two largest New England carriers, makes this 
phase of our program far from easy, and gives weight 
to the view that Pennsylvania control must be ended 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



19 



if the Port of Boston is to expand its cargo trade 
beyond New England boundaries. 

REORGANIZATION OF DEPARTMENTS. 

I have, on several occasions in the past, submitted 
a plan for the reorganization of certain departments 
of the city. This plan has not met with your approval. 
There are, as I have frequently pointed out, forty-six 
separate departments in the city government and 
one hundred thirty-five department heads. Many 
of these departments perform similiar functons and 
yet, because of the multiplicity of departments, many 
improvements in one department are unknown to 
others and much of the benefit of the experiences of 
one department is lost to other departments perform- 
ing similar functions. This system is antiquated and 
inadequate. 

Inasmuch as you have appointed a committee to 
consider further the matter of reorganization, I assume 
that you concur with me that reorganization is a 
necessity and that our disagreement is on its form and 
extent. 

In order that time may not be lost in accomplish- 
ing so important a functional necessity, I propose to 
appoint a committee to work with your committee 
toward the early formulation of a plan of reorganiza- 
tion on which we may both be able to agree. Heads 
of departments will have ample representation on that 
committee. 

THE $25 TAX LIMITATION PROPOSAL. 

During the 1937 session of the Legislature both 
branches in joint session will be required to give con- 
sideration to an initiative petition providing for an 
amendment to the Constitution of the Commonwealth, 
under which no municipality could declare in any 
year a tax rate in excess of $25 per $1,000. While 
the earliest date at which the proposed amendment 
could become effective is January of 1941, it is im- 
portant to consider the effect which this proposal, 
if adopted, would have on Boston and other Massachu- 
setts municipalities. Taking into consideration the 
fact that Boston this year borrowed $6,000,000 for 
maintenance purposes a $25 tax limit would mean a 
loss in revenue to the city of approximately $27,000,000, 
an amount equivalent to one third of the total main- 
tenance and operating requirements of the city for 
1936. Included in this latter total, however, are 
certain fixed charges such as debt requirements, 
State tax and Metropolitan district assessments, 
pension requirements and relief disbursements over 
which the Mayor has virtually no control, and which 
therefore would be beyond the scope of any reduction 
program. Admitting that these fixed charges must 
be met, it is evident that a $25 tax limit would neces- 
sitate a 57 per cent reduction in the ordinary main- 
tenance program of the city. From the experience 
of other states where tax limitation has been adopted 
it is clear that Boston's problem under a $25 tax limit 
could only be solved by suspending or sharply cur- 
tailing vital public services such as those of the Police 
and Fire Departments and of the schools. 

This has been almost the universal result in other 
States in which drastic tax-limitations have been 
put in effect. Thus the New York Times of March 
15, 1936, reports with reference to the effect of the 
Ohio tax-limitation in Columbus: 

"Only 151 of the regular force of 338 fire- 
men have been retained to protect this city 



of 298,000 from fires. Eleven of the nine- 
teen fire stations have been boarded up. 

The police force has been cut from 318 to 
156 men. Half the squad, of police cruiser 
cars are parked in the municipal garage. No 
men are available to operate them. 

Other city services — garbage collection, 
street cleaning, park upkeep, street repair — 
have been curtailed severely." 

and the Illinois Tax Commission reported that: 

"In Cleveland one effect of the Ohio tax 
limitation amendment was to produce a bond 
default of $1,287,345 in February, 1934. This 
was followed by payless pay days and doles 
for city employees during the months of March 
and April. The Federal Pubhc Works Authority 
withdrew all P. W. A. funds alloted to Cleveland, 
and during the month of March the city itself 
was forced to abandon its portion of the water 
main extension program, leaving piles of dirt 
and pipe along the streets. In its financial plight 
the -city of Cleveland 'fired' more than 700 
employees, closed city bath houses save for two 
days a week, turned off every other street fight, 
cut the cleaning of city property to every other 
day, instituted garbage collections weekly instead 
of twice a week, asked householders to place their 
rubbish at the street curb if they wanted it 
collected at all, wiped out all appropriations for 
city beaches and playgrounds this summer, gave 
the municipal boys' and girls' correction farms 
three months to operate, shut the dog pound and 
closed off four bridges over the Cuyahoga river to 
save bridge tenders' fees." 

Similar reports come from West Virginia, Michigan, 
Washington and other states wherein attempts have 
been made to establish an arbitrary tax limit. Since 
real estate is the chief beneficiary of municipal services, 
its owners would be the chief sufferers from any policy 
which admittedly would result in wide-spread curtail- 
ment or interruption of these same services. Tax 
rate reduction, while essential and desirable, must be 
secured without the disruption of local government. 
There is no doubt that real estate should not bear its 
present share of the cost of municipal government. 
The solution cannot lie, however, in hasty legislation 
which ignores completely the effect of its enactment on 
municipal services and municipal finance. No attempt 
should be made to limit drastically niunicipal revenue 
without making adequate provision for other sources 
of revenue to meet the costs of necessary municipal 
services in modern communities. 

TRAFFIC. 

The increased use of the highways of Boston has 
created an acute traffic problem. This problem is not 
peculiar to Boston. It exists in almost all larjic 
cities. It must, however, be faced. Extreme traffic 
congestion not only causes inconvenience but thrcaten.s 
substantial losses to business and real estate in the 
city. 

The problem cannot eifcctively be solved by tem- 
porary devices. A thorough and long range plan 
nuist be deterniineil upon and atlliored to and this plan 
nuist be consistent, witli the city's financial ability to 
execute it. 

The City Planning Board has given nuich time and 



20 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



attention to the matter. I shall, in the near future, 
estabhsh an Advisory Committee representing leading 
civic organizations in the city and composed of men of 
broad experience and sound judgment to cooperate 
wiih the City Planning Board in devising such a long 
range plan. 

CONCLUSION. 

During the last three years we have maintained 
and improved the credit of the city. This has been 
done by guarding against waste and extravagance 
and by curtailment of expenditures. It has also been 



accomplished without wholesale discharges and with- 
out the curtailment of essential services. 

We have, moreover, a record of achievement in the 
rendering of pubhc service. The needy have been 
cared for, useful work found for the unemployed, the 
city's hospitals, parks, playgrounds, streets and 
municipal services have been improved. 

We must not swerve from the course in which we 
are moving. Further curtailment of expenses is 
essential. Further rehabilitation of credit coupled 
with continued service to the people of Boston must 
be our aim. 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Depaktment of School Botldings. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering various parts of pupils' 
furniture to the Department of School 
Buildings storehouse. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to SI, 000. 
Blank forms for proposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Department of School 
Buildings, 26 Norman street, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $500, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 11, at 2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for fiu-nishing 
and delivering standard lock sets and 
parts. Surety bond ^^'ill be rer(uired 
in a sum equivalent to the full amount 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Department of School Buildings., 
26 Norman street, Boston. Bids, ac- 
companied by certified check in the sum 
of iSSOO, to "be filed at the same office. 
Duphcate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the Citj' Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 10, at 
2 p. m. 

School Committee. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
pencils, pens, penholders, chalk, ink and 
other items for the public schools. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to not less than 50 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Business 
Manager, School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of llOO, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 19, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
paper, blank books and envelopes for the 
public schools. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to not less 
than 50 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may bo ob- 
tained at the office of the lousiness Mana- 
ger, School Committee, 15 J^eacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of SlOO, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, Janv/xry 20, at 
12 m. 

Supply Dep.\rtment. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
fill to the Park Department. Surety 



bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be obtained 
at the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of -1200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 11, ai 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
cinders to the Boston Airport, Park 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
§200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 11, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
pig lead for the Water Service, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 
per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of .$200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duphcate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 11, ai 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for fm'nishing 
white and red lead to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 11, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
mill work and inside finish to the Park 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$100, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 12, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
paper drinking cups to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 



office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 
Bids close Tuesday, January 12, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furni.shing 
lead pipe to the Water Service, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 12, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
toilet paper to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Aimex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $300, to 
be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 12, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
sewer brick to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $200, 
to be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 13, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
sewer pipe to the Sewer Service, Public 
Works Department. Surety bond will 
be required in a sum equivalent to 25 
per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of .$300. to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 13, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
Ice Cream Mix to the City Hospital. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank form.s for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



2 1 



Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of iSlOO, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 
Bids close Thursday, January I4, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
Portland cement to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $300, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January I4, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
cloth to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of .1200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January I4, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
ether to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 15, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
X-ray materials to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$300, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 15, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
waste and wiping cloths to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Ann(-x, ]5oston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to b(; filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January IS, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical dressings to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum eciuivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract iirice. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without cheek, to be liletl 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 19, at 12 m. 



Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
meats to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall An- 
nex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $300, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 1.9, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical and hypodermic needles to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of .$100, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 20, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
fruits and vegetables to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $300, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 20, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
metal polish to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$50, to be filed at the same office. Dupli- 
cate bid, without check, to be filed with 
the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 21, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
hay, grain and straw to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
re(|uired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
C(;nt of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
olTice of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursilay, January 21, at 

12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
butter, eggs, etc., to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
(juired in a sum ecjuivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
odico of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall ,\nnex, Boston. Bids, 
aceom|)anied by ccMtified eiieck in the 
sum of .$300, to be filed at the Siimc 
oflice. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 21, at 
12 m. 



Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
.surgical suppfies to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract' price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $300, to be filed at the same 
oflSce. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 21, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
drugs to the various city departments. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall An- 
nex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of $300, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
sulfuric acid and sodium bicarbonate 
to the various city departments. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply De- 
partment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
cheek in the sum of .$100, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 25, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
soap powder and soap chips to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $100, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bills close Monday, January 25, at 12 m. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
plo3'ecs have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, December 31: 

Public Works Dep.\rtment. 
Permission has been gi\en to designate 
Joshua Atwood, Division Engineer of 
the Highway Division, as Deputy Com- 
missioner of Public Works from January 
2 to March 31, both dates included. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of departs 
ment heads, has been approved by the- 
Mayor. 

DlOfAUTMENT OF SlllOOL BlULDINCiS. 

Upon January (i the Mayor approved 
a contract with Chandler v*i: Farquhur 
Company, Incorporated, for sheet motai 
shoi) equipment at the South Boston 
High School addition, in the amount of 
$2,02(1.1)0. Bids, opened December 15, 
were as follows: 

Chandler A- Farquhar Company, Incor- 
porated, .'?2,92ti.90; I.ynd Farquhar Com- 
pany, no bid; Steilfast <.<: Houlston, no 



22 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



bid; Chase Parker & Co., Incorporated, 
no bid; Butts & Ordwaj' Compan}^ no 
bid; Barker, Stockwcll Company, no bid; 
Herrick Compauj', no bid. 

WITHOUT ADVERTISING. 

Upon varying dates as indicated tlic 
Mayor approved contracts with several 
concerns and contractors for supplies, 
labor, etc. Communications from the 
heads of departments concerned are as 
follows : 

Assessing Department. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — The Board of Assessors 
desires permission to make a contract 
with Healey's Office Service (Rose F. 
Healey, proprietor), without advertising, 
to write cards from the 1936 real estate 
tax list showing the total valuation of 
each separate owner of real estate in each 
ward in the city. 

This type of work has not been done 
for the year 1935 or 1936 by this depart- 
ment due to lack of time principally, 
because of the necessity for the depart- 
jnent office staff to prepare the tax sale 
descriptions for unpaid real estate pre- 
paratory to sale, which in recent years 
was done by the Collecting Department. 

The board endeavors by the use of the 
services of Healey's Office Service to make 
it possible for such real estate tax list 
cards to be in form for reference. 

There are approximately 83,000 cards 
to write and the board has agreed to a 
flat price of one cent (Ic.) per card, 
regardless of the number of items of 
information required to l)e placed thereon, 
which in some cases requires the writing 
of entirely new cards from the list, and 
in otiiers the filling in only of current 
valuation and reference. 

The total cost of the contract is stipu- 
lated not to exceed $850, the work to be 
done within the offices of the department 
and no records of the department to be 
removed therefrom. 

The work will not be completed during 
1936, but so much of it as is completed 
in 1936 is intended to be paid from avail- 
able funds in the current budget. The 
portion of the work done in 1937 is to be 
charged to 1937 appropriations, and 
subject thereto. 

The Board of Assessors respectfully re- 
quests your approval of this contract. 

Respectfully yours. 

Board of Assessors, 
by Edward T. Kelly. 

Public Works Department (Paving 
Service). 

Boston, December 2(), 1936. 
To the Maijor of Boston. 

I respectfuUy request permission to re- 
new for the period of one year from 
January 1, 1937, th<; lease with Annie V. 
Loonie for property on Gibson street, 
Dorchcstc)', occupied by this department 
as a Paving Service district yard. The 
rental will be at the rate now being paid, 
namely, §1,800 per year, in addition to 
which the city reimburses the owner for 
the taxes paid. 

This property is used as the yard which 
covers a large area of the Dorchester 
district, and its continued use is neces- 
sary for carrj'ing on our activities. 

RespectfuUy youi's, 

C. J. Caraten, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



Public Works Department (Sanitary 
Service). 
Boston, December 26, 1936. 
To the Mayor of Boston. 

The Sanitary Division has been using a 
Ford truck with a special body for paper 
collection to travel all over Boston daily 
and collect papers disposed of in catch-all 
boxes at street corners, said truck fur- 
nished by M. H. Loonie at a cost of $1.50 
per hour or $12 per eight-hour day. It is 
very desirable that the Ford truck 
equipped with this special body be con- 
tinued in use. 

I respectfully request permission to 
dispense with advertising and enter into a 
contract with M. H. Loonie for the use of a 
special Ford truck at a price of $1.50 per 
hour equal to $12 per day and at the rate 
of $360 per month for a period of one 
year, total expenditure being $4,320. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 



Boston, December 28, 1936. 
To the Mayor of Boston. 

Your approval is respectfully requested 
to the award of a contract for storing, 
deodorizing, disinfecting and washing 
garbage trucks for the Sanitary Division 
to the Modern Sanitary Truck W^ashing 
Company, 222 Quincy street, Dorchester, 
the only bidder, at an estimated cost of 
$6,300. 

The price paid for Item 1 (a) is to 
cover the months of May to September, 
inclusive, and the price bid for Item 1 (b) 
is to cover January 1 to April 30, and 
from October "1 to December 31, 1937. 

All work to be done under this contract 
is to be completed December 31, 1937. 

The proposal of the Modern Sanitary 
Truck Washing Company was received 
December 28, 1936, after advertisement 
in City Record December 19, 1936, and 
publicly opened and read. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Supply Department. 

Boston, December 23, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — I respectfully re- 
quest your permission to the award of 
a contract, without public advertising, to 
the Dictaphone Sales Corporation, Bos- 
ton, Mass., for the purchase of the follow- 
ing dictaphone machines and equipment: 

Three dictaphone dictating machines, 
desk model; seven dictaphone dictating 
machines, complete; fourteen dictaphone 
transcribing machines; four dictaphone 
shaving units. 

These machines, representing a total 
value of $5,108, are now installed in 
various divisions of the Public Welfare 
Department under a rental purchase 
arrangement, the sum of $3,015 having 
been paid to date as rental therefor. 

I am of the opinion that the best in- 
terests of the city will be served by pur- 
chasing these machines outright at this 
time for the sum of $2,093, which amount, 
I understand, is available in the 1936 
budget allowance. 

Respectfully yours, 

_ D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintetulent of Supplies. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

Dental Hygienist, Dep.\rtment of P'ub- 
lic Health, January 23, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, Januaiy 9, 1937, at 12 noon. 

The entrance salary is $1,440 a year. 

Duties: Under direction to make in- 
spections of the mouth and teeth. To 
note the need for dental treatment. To 
assist in community demonstrations in 
dental hygiene. To perfonn health edu- 
cation in dental hj'giene. To perform 
related work as required. 

Entrance Requirement : Applicants 
must be registered dental hj'gienists un- 
der the State Board of Dental Examiners. 

Subjecte and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 4; per- 
sonality and fitness, as determined by 
an oral interview, 3; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in each subject of the examination 
in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
phj'sical examination. 

Bio^Chemist, Department of Mental 
Diseases, January 23, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
daj', January 9, 1937, at 12 noon. 

The entrance salary is $1,800 a year. 

Duties: To carry on researches relat- 
ing to metabolism and chemistry of min- 
erails, especially of micro-incineration. 
To direct work done on pathology of 
nervous system ; fixation ; imbedding ; cut- 
ting and staining. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 2; to- 
tal, 5. 

Passing Requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in each subject of the examination 
in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

Assistant Chemist^ Department of 

Mental Diseases, January 23, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, Januai-y 9, 1937, at 12 noon. 

The entrance salary is $1,800 a year 
and maintenance. 

Duties: Under general supervision to 
perform responsible technical work in 
chemical analyses and research. To per- 
form related work as required. 

Entrance Requirement: Applicants 
must have a minimum of one year of 
practical experience in analysis of chem- 
ical constituents of brains. To include 
determination of inorganic salts, protid 
and non-protid nitrogenous compounds 
and various lipoidal substances found in 
brain substance. Must be able to carry 
out analyses of lipoidal constituent of 
blood and other body fluids, analyses of 
chemical constituents of the various re- 
gions of normal and schizophrenic brains, 
and to undertake such general biochemi- 
cal investigations as may be assigned 
to him. Must be able to correlate re- 
sults of work and prepare them for pub- 
lication. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 2; to- 
tal, 5. 

Passing Requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in each subject of the examination 
in order to become eligible. 

Physical fitness to be detennined by 
physical examination. 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



23 



BUILDINGS RAZED. 

The Ma\-or has iappro\'ed the request 
of the Buiklinfj Commissioner to raze the 
following structures as fire menaces or 
nuisances; 

To vacate the ell of the building at 
1255 and 1257 Washington street, rear, 
Ward 3, as the said ell is in an unsafe 
and dangerous condition. 

The building at 22 Rochester street, 
Ward 3, is a serious fire menace being 
open to trespass. The owTier, Irene 
Zimmerman of 10 Donald road, Dor- 
chester, has been notified of the unsafe 
condition of the building, but nothing 
has been done to remove the cause for 
complaint. 

The building at 22 Chambers street, 
rear,. Ward 3, is in a dilapidated condi- 
tion, windows and doors missing, sills 
rotted, front steps gone, clapboards and 
casings falling off, part of roof caved^ in, 
building in a very dangerous condition. 
The owner, William A. Hickey of Wilton, 
New Hampshire, has been notified of the 
imsafe condition of the building, but 
nothing has been done to remove the 
cause for complaint. 



RETIREMENT BOARD REPORT. 

Boston, December 31, 1936. 

To (he Auditor. 

At meetings of the Boston Retirement 
Board, held on December 15, December 
22 and IDecember 30, the retirement from 
active service of the following-named 
members of the retirement system was 
approved, to become effective at the 
close of business December 31, 1936: 

. Health Depaetment. 

Arthur W. Clark, daii-y inspector, 
salary at time of retirement $2,300 a 
j-ear. 

Susan M. Courtney, nurse, salary at 
time of retirement $1,800 a year. 

Hospital Department. 
Nora Breen, cleaner, salary at time of 
retirement $1,014 a year. 

Institutions Department. 
Edward L. Aheam, investigator, salary 
at time of retirement $2,100 a year. 

Park Department. 

Daniel J. Byrne, secretary and chief 
clerk, salary at time of retirement $4,000 
a year. 

Thomas F. Dolan, gardener, salary at 
time of i-etirement $1,716 a year. 

Public Works Department. 

Christopher J. Carven, commissioner, 
salaiy at time of retirement $9,000 a year. 

James 'Fitzgerald, teamster, salary at 
time of retirement Sl,560 a year. 

Patrick J. Jacobs, carpenter, salaiy at 
time of retirement 81,872 a year. 

Christopher Konney, gateman, salaiy 
at time of retirement $2,152 a year. 

John S. Plunkctt, laborer, salary at 
time of retirement $1,560 a year. 

Edward White, laborer, salaiy at time 
of retirement $1,560 a year. 

School Department. 
Ernest T. Cushman, junior master, 
sa'larj^ at time of retirement $3,888 a year. 

Si'FFOLK County. 
AVilliam F. Dono^'an, clerk, salary at 
time of retirement ,$6,500 a year. 
Attest: 

Wilfred J. Doyle, Chairman. 



LAND-TAKING IN WEST 
ROXBURY. 

The Mayor has aipproved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of 'land for a public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Pond place, West Rox- 
bury district, as a highway, from Pond 
street northerly, with the name of Corny 
Crescent or some other distinctive name, 
bounded and described as follows: 

A highway named Corny Crescent is 
hereby laid out, from Pond street to 
Rockwood street, and ordered con- 
structed; the cost thereof to be charged 
to Federal Funds. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or stractures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement 
for street purposes is hereby taken, is 
bounded and described as follows: 

Southerly by Pond street, thirty and 
7-100 feet; westerly 'by the westerly line 
of said Corny Crescent as hereby laid 
out, two hundred seventy-two and 90-100 
feet; northerly by the northerly line 
of said Corny Crescent as hereby, laid 
out, two hundred and ninety -seven feet ; 
easterly by Rockwood street, twenty-five 
and 11-100 feet; again southerly by the 
southerly line of said Conry Crescent as 
hereby laid out, two hundred sixty- 
four and 92-100 feet, and easterly by the 
easterly 'line of said Conry Crescent as 
hereby laid out, two hundred fortv-six 
and 10-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines 
that no person sustains damages in his 
estate by the making of the public im- 
provement consisting of the laying out 
and construction of Conry Crescent 
(formerly Pond place), West Roxbury 
district, as a highway, from Pond street 
to Rockwood street, under the order of 
the Board of December 23, 1936, and 
awards no damages therefor. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during the period of bridge 
repairs by the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad, estimated to be 
one (1) month, vehicles are excluded 
from the following street, effective Janu- 
ary 5, 1937 : 

West Street, Hyde Park. 

From Austin street to Hj'de Park 
avenue. 



Voted; That as urgently required by 
considerations of jniblic safety and con- 
■\'enience, during the period of water 
main construction, estimated to bo sixty 
(60) daj's, the following rules arc effec- 
tive December 31, 1936: 

Parking of vehicles is prohibited in 
Ihe following streets: 
Hull Street, Downtown Boston. 
Both sides, from Commercial street 
to Snow Hill street. 
Norlh Hudson Street, DoAvntown Bos- 
ton. 

Both sides, from Hull street to Snow 
Hill street. 
The following street is one way in the 
(lir(M'lioii indicated : 

Hull Street, Downtown Boston. 
From Commercial street to Snow 
Hill street. 



AMENDED DAMAGES. 

The Mayor has approved the follow- 
ing vote of the Board of Street Com- 
missioners : 

Voted, That the order of the Street 
Commissioners and Mayor of December 
6, 1933, as amended, determining diima^cs 
caused by the making of the public im- 
pro\'ement consisting of the laying out 
of Edgewater Drive (Mattakeeset street), 
be, and the same hereby is, amended, 
by atlding to said order the amount 
$115 as an award to Mary Haydostian, 
and that the amount $115 be, and the 
same herebj' is, awarded to Maiy Hay- 
dostian for the damages so sustained. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

CLERICAL SERVICE. 

For State and Cities and Towns Out- 
side OF Boston and Vicinity, M^vrch 
6, 1937. 
Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 20, 1937, at 12 noon. 

For Boston and Vicinity, M^vrch 20, 
1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, March \ 1937, at 12 noon. 

WARNING! If all applicants cannot 
be accommodated on the above dates, 
they will be notified to appear on subse- 
quent Saturdays. Applicants should note 
the exact date given on their notification 
sheets. 

File your applications EARLY! In 
cases of ties, names will be placed on the 
eligible list in accordance with the date 
of filing application. 

The usual entrance salary for clerks 
for state service is .§900 a j'ear. 

Persons qualifying in the examination 
may have their names placed on the 
state list as well as on the list for the city 
or town in which they reside. 

Applicants must be not less than six- 
teen yeai-s of age at the time of filing 
application. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 2; spelling, 2; arithmetic (in- 
cluding problems), 2; following written 
directions, 2; filing, 1; word knowledge,' 
1; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements: Applicants 
must obtain a mark of at least 65 per 
cent in spelling, at least 50 per cent in 
each of the other subjects and at least 
70 per cent in general a\erage in order 
to become eligible. 



Second-Class Engineer, Newton Sciukii. 
Dep.xrtment, February 6, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
(.lay. January 23, 1937, at 12 noon. 

'J'his examination is open to icsideuts 
of the state. 

The salary is $34 a week. 

The examination will consist of a state- 
ment of training and cxix-ricncc and tiie 
po.ssession of a second-class engineer's 
license. 

Passing Requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in experience ia oi'der to become 
eligible. 

Physical fitness to be detemuncd by 
l)hysical examination. 

The date gi\"cn above is not the actual 
examination date but the date on which, 
as nearly as possible, the phj-sical exam- 
ination will be given. 



24 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS. 

Department of School Buildings. 

The Hoj^t Company have been granted 
an extension of the contract for furnishing 
and installing panic bolts in various 
schools tlu'oughout the city for the years 
1935-36 to include the year 1937. The 
prices on the contract to remain the 
same for the year 1937. The total 
amount of the contract not to exceed 
$3,500. The Hoyt Company have in- 
stalled these panic bolts in a satisfactory 
manner and it is the desire of the depart- 
ment to keep these panic bolts uniform 
in quality and workmanship throughout 
the city. It is intended to complete as 
far as possible the following school districts 
this year: Jamaica Plain, Roslindale, 
Hyde Park, West Roxbury and Brighton. 

Public Works Department. 

Coleman Brothers Corporation have 
been granted an extension of the time of 
completion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in snow area No. 1, from 
December 31, 1936, to May 1, 1937. 
This extension is requested in order that 
the contractor may be available for snow 
and ice removal during the balance of the 
winter. 

, The Standard Contracting Company 
has been granted an extension of the 
time of completion of the contract for 
removing snow and ice in snow area 
No. 4, from December 31, 1936, to May 
1, 1937. This extension is requested in 
order that the contractor may be avail- 
able for snow and ice removal during the 
balance of the winter. 

John J. Callahan has been granted an 
extension of the time of completion of the 
contract for removing snow and ice in 
snow area No. 2, from December 31, 
1936, to May 1, 1937. This extension 
is requested in order that the contractor 
may be available for snow and ice removal 
during the balance of the winter. 

Edward M. Matz, Incorporated, has 
been granted an extension of the time of 
completion of the contract for removing 
snow and ice in snow area No. 3, from 
December 31, 1936, to May 1, 1937. 
This extension is requested in order that 
the contractor may be available for snow 
and ice removal during the balance of the 
winter. 

John F. Shea Company, Incorporated, 
has been granted an extension of the time 
of completion of the contract for repair- 
ing, altering and painting the Allston 
Bridge from. December 30, 1936, to Marcli 
30, 1937. This extension is requested on 
account of inclement weather and delay 
in procuring the necessary blast plates. 

Supply Department. 
The Mayor has approved the request 
of the Supply Department for the exten- 
sion of contracts as follows; 

Boston, December 28, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Bofitrm. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
IMay 19, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with the Massachusetts 
Gas and Electric Light Supply Company 
relative to the purchase of flashlight equip- 
ment for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to 
any date not later than February 1, 
1937." ■^ 



I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant 
to the above-quoted option, upon the 
same terms and conditions as are stated 
in said contract, such quantities of 
flashlight equipment referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1936, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 28, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — ^Under date of 
April 14, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with H. R. Squibb & 
Sons relative to the purchase of ether 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supphes, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to 
any date not later than February 1, 
1937." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant 
to the above-quoted option, upon the 
same terms and conditions as are stated 
in said contract, such quantities of ether 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 
Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 26, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 19, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with The Good Drug Com- 
pany, Incorporated, relative to the pui- 
chase of drugs for delivery to the various 
city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of drugs referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and. including December 31, 1936, for 
the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 26, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 10, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Edwin J. Marsh 
Estate relative to the purchase of drugs 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"JThe City of Boston may, with the 



approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of drugs referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1936^ for 
the extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. ~ 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 26, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with G. Giovino 
& Co. relative to the purchase of gro- 
ceries for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to 
any date not later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request yom- approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on be- 
half of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1937. 
Respectfully youi's, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 4, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Globe 
Grocery Company relative to the pur- 
chase of groceries for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on be- 
half of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1937. 
Respectfully ,yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 10, 1936, the City of Bosston entered 
into a contract with Eagle Oil and Supply 
Company, relative to the purchase of 
metal polish for delivery to the various 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



25 



city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The C'ty of Boston may, with the ap- 
proval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, ex- 
tend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of metal polish 
referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to February 1, 
1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 10, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Eastern Clay Goods 
Company relative to the purchase of 
sewer pipe for delivery to the sewer divi- 
sion. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of sewer pipe 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 
Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 10, 1930, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with National 
Boston Lead Company, relative to the 
purchase of lead pipe for delivery to the 
Water Division. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of lead pipe 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including Doconibcr 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 
Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Bo.'<ton. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 10, 1936, the City of Boston entered 



into a contract with E. R. Squibb & Sons, 
relative to the purchase of drugs for 
delivery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of drugs 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
July 11, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Brighton Coal Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of semi- 
bituminous coal for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1937, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
semi-bituminous coal as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936. This privilege is extended 
to April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of semi-bitumin- 
ous coal referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
April 30, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 19, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Brighton Coal Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of semi- 
bituminous coal for delivery to the Penal 
Institutions Department, Deer Island. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1937, at its option, 
])urcliase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
semi-bituminous coal as may not have 
been ordered uj) to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936. This privilege is extended 
to April 30, 1937." 

I i-espectfuUy request your ajiproval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such (luantities of scnii- 



bituminous coal referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
April 30, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 19, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Metropolitan Coal 
Company relative to the purchase of 
semi-bituminous coal for delivery to the 
fire and police boats. Included in the 
contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1937, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
semi-bituminous coal as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936. This privilege is extended 
to April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of semi-bitumin- 
ous coal referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to April 
30, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayer of Boston. 
Dear Mr. M.^yor, — Under date of 
July 9, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Fore River Coal 
Company relative to the purchase of 
semi-bituminous coal for delivery to the 
Long Island Hospital, Institutions De- 
partment. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

" It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, , 
beginning January 1, 1937, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and con- 
ditions as aforesaid, such quantities of 
said semi-bituminous coal as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936. This privilege is 
extended to April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of semi-bitumin- 
ous coal referreil to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the cxtoudod . 
period permitteil thorebv, to wit, to 
April 30, 1937. 

Respectfully youi-s. 

D. Frank Dohertv. 
Supcrinlaidcnt of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
llox. Frederick W, Mansfield, 
.\fayor of Boston. 
Dear Mh. Mayor, — Under the date of 
May 25, 1936, the Citv of Boston entercil 
into a contract witli Tidewater Coal 
Company relative to the purchase of 



26 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



semi-bituminous coal for delivery to the 
South Ferry. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

';It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1937, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
semi-bituminous coal as may not have 
been ordered up to and including De- 
cember 31, 1936. This privilege is ex- 
tended to April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of semi-bitu- 
minous coal referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the e.xtended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to April 
30, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
* Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 2, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Fort Hill 
Paper Company relative to the purchase 
of paper drinking cups for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of paper drinking 
cups referred to therein, as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to Februaiy 1, 
1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.^nk Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. AIansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
July 11, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract N\ith Tidewater Coal Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of anthra- 
cite coal for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

" It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayoi', may, 
beginning January 1, 1937, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
anthracite coal as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936. This privilege is extended to 
April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of anthracite 
coal referred to therein, as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 



ber 31, 1936, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to April 30, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — ^Under date of 
October 5, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Edward C. 
Perry relative to the purchase of coffee 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supphes, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than April 5, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of coffee referred 
to therein, as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1936, 
for the extended period permitted therebv, 
to wit, to April 5, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
July 6, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Sparrow Chisholm 
Company relative to the purchase of 
cloth for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause; 

"The Cit}' of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant 
to the above-quoted option, upon the 
same terms and conditions as are stated 
in said contract, such quantities of cloth 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1936, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to February 1, 
1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
February 29, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Portland 
Stoneware Company relative to the pur- 
chase of sewer bricks for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the .same 



terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of sewer 
bricks referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of May 
1, 1936, the City of Boston entered into a 
contract with Trimount Bituminous Pro- 
ducts Company relative to the purchase of 
asphaltic cement for delivery to the Pubhc 
Works Department. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor hy the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on be- 
half of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of asphaltic 
cement referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1,1937. 

RespectfuOy yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

De.\r Mr. May'OR, — Under date of 
November 9, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Suffolk 
Grocery Company relative to the purchase 
of groceries for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract is 
the following clause; 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, e.xtend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request yom- approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of groceries referred 
to therein, as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1936, 
for the extended period permitted thereby 
to wit, to March 31, 1937. 

Respectfully yom-s, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.-umsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

De.'Ui Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 31, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Reid, Mur- 
dock & Co., relative to the purchase of 
groceries for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, ex- 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



27 



tend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Dohehty, 

Supei'intendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 4, 1926, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Libby, 
McNeill & Libby relative to the pur-- 
chase of groceries for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. FR.A.NK DoHERTY, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 19, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Kenmore Hospital 
Supply Company relative to the purchase 
of drugs for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor bj' the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, ex- 
tend the end of the term hereof to anj- date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of lioston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of drugs re- 
ferred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Miiyor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 19, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into' a contract with Berry & Withington, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
drugs for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 



"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Maj^or, by written notice 
■ given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, ex- 
tend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of drags re- 
ferred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.ank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon Frederick W. M.ansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 11, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Lederle Laboratories, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
di'ugs for delivery to the various cit}^ 
departments. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor iDy the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to anj'' date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request youi- approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of drugs 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yom-s, 

D. Frank DohHrty, 
Superinlendeiit of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.'VNsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 11, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Lederle Laboratories, 
Incorporated, relative to the pui'chase of 
drugs for delivery to the various cit}' 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The Cit.y ot Boston maj', with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

1 respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purcha.se on behalf 
of the City of Bo.ston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of drugs referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1936, 
for the extended period permitted tlierebv, 
to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully youi-s, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Supenntendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
De.\r Mr. Mayor, — ITnder date of 
April 14, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Portlaiul 



Stoneware Company relative to the pur- 
chase of Portland cement for delivery to 
the various city departments. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of Portland 
cement referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted therebj^, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

B0.STON, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\n.sfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Deau Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 10, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Norris Drug Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of drugs 
for delivery to the various citj' depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following claase: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, ex- 
tend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfullj' request youi- approval to 
exercise the option to puichase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of drugs referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1936, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully j'ours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 19, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with John Wyeth «fc 
Brothers, Incorporated, relative to the 
puichase of drugs for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your appro\-al to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the .<ame 
terms anil eonilitions lus arc stated in said 
contract, such quantities of lirugs re- 
ferred to therein as may not have been 
orilered up to and including Deceinlior 
31, 1936, for the extended [nniod \nT- 
mitted tlierebv, to wit, to February 1, 
1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. FitvNK Doherty, 
SuiKrintciidcnt of Sup/tlivs. 



28 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mayor of Bo.<ton. 

Dear Mr. M.\yor, — Under date of 
July 6, 1936, the City of Bo.ston entered 
into a contract with Bartlett, Coppinger & 
Maloon Company, relative to the pur- 
chase of cloth for delivery to the various 
city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The City ot Boston may, with the 
approval of "the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of cloth re- 
ferred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Dohertv, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
'Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. M.ayor, — Under date of 
March 2, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Massachu- 
setts Envelope Company relative to the 
purchase of paper drinking cups for 
delivery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause ; 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of paper 
drinking cups referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted therebv to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 16, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Union 
Water Motor Company relative to the 
purchase of water meters for deHvery 
to the Water Division of the Public 
Works Department. Included in the 
contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of tiin Mayor, l:)y writt(-n 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than January 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of water 
metei-s referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 



December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
January 31, 1937. 

Re.spectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
.July 6, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Jennings Linen Com- 
pany, Incorporated, relative to the pur- 
chase of cloth for delivery to the various 
city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of cloth referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1936, for 
the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 26, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with E. F. Mahady Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of drugs for 
delivery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of drugs referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1936, for 
the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. M.iyor, — Under date of 
November 17, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with George D. 
Emerson Company relative to the pur- 
chase of groceries for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause; 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Sup- 
erintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purcha.se on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pm-suant to the 



above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 2, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Raymond E. Henchey 
relative to the purchase of pig lead for 
delivery to the Water Division. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, ex- 
tend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of pig lead 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

De.\r Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 13, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Sanford Pharmacy, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
di'ugs for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of drugs 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully youi's, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 17, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with American 
Flour Company relative to the purchase 
of groceries for delivery to the various 
city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than March 31, 1937." 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



29 



I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 25, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Webster- 
Thomas Company relative to the pur- 
chase of groceries for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayoi', by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of groceries 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 23, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Metropolitan Dental 
Supply Company relative to the purchase 
of surgical supplies for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Bo.ston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical 
supplies referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 193(), for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Stiperinlendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 11, 1936, tiic City of Boston entered 
into a contract with V]. V. Mahady Com- 
pany relative to tiio {)urciiase of surgical 
supplies for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 



"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant 
to the above-quoted option, upon the 
same terms and conditions as are stated 
in said contract, such quantities of sur- 
gical supplies referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and includ- 
ing December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 26, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Crowley & Gardner 
relative to the purchase of surgical sup- 
plies for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant 
to the above-quoted option, upon the 
same terms and conditions as are stated 
in said contract, such quantities of sur- 
gical supplies referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and includ- 
ing December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

B0.ST0N, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 25, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with S. H. Ansell & Son, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
surgical supplies for delivery to the various 
city departments. Indluded in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
appi'oval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the (Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of lioston, [)ursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such ([uantities of surgical 
supplies referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to ami including 
December 31, 1931), for the extended 
l)eriotl pern\ittetl thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Douerty, 
Superinlvndcnl 0/ Supplies. 



Bo.ston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 26, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Howe & French, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
surgical supplies for delivery to the vari- 
ous city departments. Included in the 
contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical sup- 
plies referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to February 1, 
1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

p. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 10, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with E. K. JNIedical Gas 
Laboratories, Incorporated, relative to 
the purchase of gases (industrial and 
medicinal) for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request j'our approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of gases (indus- 
trial and medicinal) referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1936, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to, 
wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.vnk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 11, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with The Liiuic Air Prod- 
ucts Companj' relative to the purchase of 
gases (industrial and medicinal) for de- 
livery to the various city departments. 
Incluileil in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of -Boston may, with the 
ap|)roval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at. its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than February I, 1937." 

I respectfully' request your approval to 
exercise the optioiv to purchase on behalf 
of the City o( Boston, jiursuant to tiio 
above-quoted option, upon the s;inic 
terms and conditions as are stated in s;iid 
contract, such quantities of gases (.iniius- 
trial anil medicinal) referred to therein 



30 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



as may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1936, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 3, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Thomas W. Reed 
Company relative to the purchase of 
surgical supplies for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of surgical 
supplies referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
Februaiy 1, 1937. 

Respectfully youi-s, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 26, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Evei-ett Fuel 
Company relative to the purchase of hard 
and soft wood for delivery to the Over- 
seers of- Public Welfai-e Department. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by wi'itten notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the tei-m heieof to any date 
not later than September 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such (juantities of hard and soft 
wood refei-red to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to September 
1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor,— Under date of 
April 18, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with P. H. Graham & Sons 
Company, Incorporated, relative to the 
purchase of waste and wiping cloths for 
delivery to the varioas city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Baston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor JDy the Superin- 



tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of waste and wiping 
cloths referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to February 1, 
1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 7, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Heath Oil 
Company relative to the purchase of 
range oil for delivery to the Public Welfare 
Department and Soldiers' Relief Depart- 
ment, Hyde Park, West Roxbury, Roslin- 
dale and Jamaica Plain districts. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of range oil referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1936, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to April 30, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 19, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Donahue & 
Riordan relative to the purchase of 
uniform overcoats for delivery to the 
Fire Department. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause; 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any 
date not later than October 15, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of uniform 
overcoats referred to therein as may 
not have been oidered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
October 15, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 10, 1936, the City of Boston 



entered into a contract with Stone & 
Forsyth Comj)any relative to the pur- 
chase of toilet paper for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of toilet 
paper referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 19, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Thomas E. Hogan, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
tires and tubes for delivery to the various 
city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, Ijy written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of tires and tubes 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 6, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Merchants Tire Com- 
pany relative to the purchase of solid tires 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of solid tires 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for tiie extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superinterident of Supplies. 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



31 



Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
July 16, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Charles W. Broad- 
bent Company relative to the purchase 
of surgical and hypodermic needles for 
delivery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical and 
hypodermic needles referred to therein, 
as may not have been ordeied up to and 
including December 31, 1936, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doiierty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 13, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a conti'act with Surgeons and 
Physicians' Supply Company, relative to 
the purchase of surgical and hypodermic 
needles for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contiactor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, ex- 
tend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exei'cisc the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical and 
hypodermic needles referred to therein as 
may not have been oi'dered up to and in- 
cluding Deceml)er 31, 1936, for tiie ex- 
tended i)criod permitted tliereby, to wit, 
to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Dohehty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 17, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Shawniut 
Dairy, Incoijiorated, relative to the 
purcliase of milk, cream, etc., for delivery 
to the various city departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Sujjplies, at its option, ex- 
tend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than Ai)ril 15, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exerci.se the oj^tioii to purchase on beluiif 
of the City of Boston, i)uisu!Uit to tlie 



above-quoted option, upon the .same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of milk, cream, 
etc., referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to April 15, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 28, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Socony- 
Vacuum Oil Company, Incorporated, 
relative to the purchase of fuel oil for 
delivery to the fireboat and Institutions 
Department boat. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than September 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
e-xercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of fuel oil re- 
ferred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to September 30, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1930. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 24, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Tide Water Oil 
Company relative to the purchase of 
engine, machine and cylinder oil for 
delivery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supi)lies, at its o])tion, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

■ I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
aix)ve-qu()ted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities ()f engine, 
machine and cylinder oil referred ti) 
therein as may not have l)een ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1936, 
for the ext(!nded period permitted there- 
by, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superinlendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear" Mr. Mayor, — lender date of 
April IS, 193(), the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Colonial Beacon 
Oil Company, lncori)()ratetl, relative to 
t-l\e purchase of engine, macliine and 
cylinder oil for delivery to tlie various 



city departments. Included in the con- 
tract is the following clau.se: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
appioval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Supeiintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of engine, 
machine and cylinder oil referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1936, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Sujiplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Man.sfield, 
Mayor of Boston . 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 2, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Whiting Milk Com- 
panies relative to the purchase of ice 
cream mix for delivery to the Boston 
City Hospital and Long Island Hospital. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor b}' the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of ice cream 
mix, referred to thennn as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended perioil 
permitted thereby, to wit, to February 1, 
1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. < 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston . 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 3, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Socony-\'aeuum Oil 
Company, Incorporated, relative to the 
purchase of kerosene for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supi^lies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than May 11, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on beiiall 
of the City of Boston, i>ui-suant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are statoil in said 
contract, such quantities of kerosene 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordei(Hl up to and including December 31. 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to May 11, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Supfriutiiidtiil of Supplies, 



32 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED DECEMBER 31, 1936, TO JANUARY 6, 1937. 

December 31. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



American Builders, Incor- 
porated. 

Portia Law School 

Stephen G. Allen et at, 
Trustees. 

Miss E. Killilen 

239 Commonwealth .A.venue. 
Incorporated. 

Paula Barshack 

Paula Barshack 

.\nna Ingham 



89 Tacoma street. 

45 Mt. Vernon street 

144 Huntington avenue .... 

35 Wenonah street 

239 Commonwealth avenue, 

654-668 Shawmut avenue, 
30 Arnold street 

208 Quincy street 



18 Third-class dwelling $4,000 

5 Alterations, school 6,000 

4 Alterations, stores and dwell- 2,000 

ing. 

12 Alterations, dwelling 300 

5 Alterations, dwelling 500 

9 Take-down, shop 200 

9 Take-down, store and dwell- 100 
ing. 

13 Alterations, dwelling 100 



J.\NUAEY 2. 



S. Clifford Speed 247 Beacon street 5 

Federal Street Building 24 Federal street 3 

Trust. 
Massachusetts General Hos- 56 Fruit street 3 

pital. 
New England Provision 27 and 29 Fulton street. ... 3 

Company. 
Beacon Beef Company 33 Fulton street 3 

Chamber of Commerce, In- 74-98 Federal street 3 

corporated. 
INIassachusetts Society for 476 Parker street 4 

Prevention of Cruelty to 

Children. 

John .\. Hope, Incorporated, 9-17 Poplar street 20 

Dorchester Co-operative 20 West Cottage street. ... 13 

Bank. 
tVilliam Filene's Sons Com- 406 Washington street 3 

pany. 



Alterations, dwelling $1,800 

Alterations, offices 3,000 

Alterations, shops 8,823 

.^Iterations, light manufac- 4,850 

turing. 

Alterations, light manufac- 29,900 

turing. 

Alterations, stores and offices, 200 

First-class home 80,000 

.-^Iterations, stores and offices, 3,000 

Alterations, dwelling 600 

.^Iterations, store 300 



J.lNn.AJRT 4. 



John Magazzu 

Flax Realty Company 

Flax Realty Company 

Joseph DeLaarentis 

Warren Chambers Trust . . . . 

Jennie Simberg 

Acme Corporation 

Lipson Oil Company 

Acme Corporation 

Boston Automobile Body Co., 

M. Lamsome 

T. Jeremiah 

John Christo 

Deha O'Brien 

Harold Horvitz et al 

.A-rmour Realty Company . . . 

Home Owners Loan Corpo- 
ration. 

Luigi Capponi 

Dennis Donovan 

L. Olson 

Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank. 

Charlestown Five Cents Sav- 
ings Bank. 

Frank Moore 

J. Hamilburg 



292 Western avenue 22 

24 Doone avenue 18 

7 Glenhill road 18 

33 North .Anderson street. . . 3 
415-421 Boylston street. ... 5 

1509 Blue Hill avenue 18 

267 Tremont street 5 

160 Cummings street 8 

283 Tremont street 5 

812 .Albany street 8 

34 South Margin street 3 

239 Bunker Hill street 2 

265 West Newton street. ... 4 

58 Blue Hill avenue 8 

125 Harvard avenue 21 

78 Warren street 2 

25 Worcester street 9 

16 Rossniore road 11 

93 Sydney street 13 

35 Edson street 17 

2 Copeland place 12 

4 Copeland place 12 

114 Boylston street 5 

117 Stuart street 5 



Alterations, repair shop 


$500 




4,000 


Third-class dwelling 


4,000 


.Alterations, dweUing 


1,400 


Alterations, stores and offices. 


3,000 


Alterations, garage 


200 


Special, shelter 


100 


Special, garage 


100 


Special, shelter. 


100 


Alterations, garage 


350 


Alterations, dwelling 


250 


Alterations, dweUing and 


200 


store. 




Alterations, tenements and 


110 


stores. 




Alterations, dwelUng 


250 


Sign 


250 


Alterations, dwelling 


180 


Alterations, dweUing 


200 


.Alterations, dwelling 


600 


Alterations, dwelling 


490 


.Alterations, dwelling 


100 


Alterations, dwelhng 


300 


Alterations, dwelling 


300 


.Alterations, offices 


300 


Sign 


150 



J.\NU.\RY 5. 



Massachusetts Machine Shops, 817 .Albany street 

Incorporated. 
Hotel Statler 60 Providence street 


. 8 

. 5 
1 


Nora Maher 324 K street . 


7 


Union Savings Bank 130 Broad street 


3 


.A Shapiro 15 Tyler street 

City of Boston Rear 77 Boylston street . . . 

Owen Phifield 22 Everett avenue 


3 
. 19 
. 13 


St. John's Seminary 37 Lake street 


. 22 


H. M. Winslow 456 Boylston street 

American Photo Publishing 353 Newbury street 

Company. 
Alice Dowling 524 Columbus avenue 


5 
5 

4 



J.\NU.\RY 6. 



Federal Street Building Trust, 

Frank Losardo 

Frank Losardo 

Doctor Ladd 

E. H. Withers 

City of Boston 

Mrs. John McGaffigan 

Socony Vacuum Oil Co 

Edwin Clare 

Patrick Collins 

New England Trust Co 

J. F. O 'Keefe 

David Sears Real Estate Trust, 

Michael Herrity 

.Alfred Powell 



24 Federal street 3 

17 Mercer street 18 

21 Mercer street 18 

270 Clarendon street 5 

69 Clare avenue 18 



29 Merchants ro%v. 

8 Cooper street 

2-6 Westland avenue.. . . 

32 Cottage street 

25 Chappie street 

19 Province street 

586 East Seventh street. 
128 Washington street.. . 

9 .Areola street 



3 
3 

4 
2 
2 
3 
6 
3 
10 
286 Perham street 20 



-Alterations, manufacturing... $500 

Alterations, hotel 800 

Alterations, dwelling 300 

Alterations, dwelhng 600 

Fire escapes 600 

Take-down, dwelhng 100 

Take-down, stable 25 

.Alterations, dwelhng 300 

Elevator 3,470 

Alterations, elevator 150 

.Alterations, elevator 40 

Alterations, dweUing 100 

.Alterations, offices $1,000 

Second-class garage 250 

Second-class garage 250 

Fire escapes 200 

Alterations, dwelhng 325 

Alterations, market 465 

Alterations, dweUing 350 

Special, office 1,800 

Take-down, dwelling 50 

Alterations, dweUing 100 

Alterations, restaurant 200 

Alterations, dwelling 246 

Alterations, offices 100 

Alterations, dwelling 700 

Alterations, dweUing 400 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 66, 1936. 

I. J.AMES J. DOOLAN. 

It is with deep regret that the Fire 
Commissioner announces the death, on 
December 27, 1936, of Ladderman James 
J. Doolan of Ladder Company 29. 
Ladderman Doolan was appointed to the 
department April 15, 1908. 

The funeral was held from his late 
residence, 63 Selden street, Dorchester, 
at 8.45 a. m. December 30, followed by 
services at St. Matthew's Church, Stanton 
street, Dorchester, at 9 a. m. 

The Chief of Department made the 
customary detail to act as funeral escort 
and the members of Ladder Company 29 
were excused from duty in order to 
attend the services. 



II. 



Fire Al.arm Box — Tempor.ary 

Location. 



A new fire alarm box No. 12-3215 will 
shortly be installed at Old Harbor Village . 
It will be connected into Circuit No. 49 
and the assignments wUl be the same as 
for Box 3215. Company commanders 
wUl print or tj'^pewrite this location on 
the assignment card for Box 3215 in a 
neat and legible manner. 

III. Inventory. 

Form No. 1, Inventory Form, is being 
issued to the department today. These 
forms are to be filled out as of January 1, 
1937, and returned to the office of the 
Fire Commissioner on or before Friday, 
January 29, 1937. 

In houses where more than one com- 
pany is located the senior officer in 
command of the houses will include in 
his inventory all articles which are used 
in common by the various companies 
in the stations. He will note on last 
page of the inventory the fact that his 
inventory includes the house equipment. 



IV. 



Instruction Cards for 
Assignment Boxes. 



A new set of instruction cards for 
assignment boxes wiU shortly be issued 
to the department. The old instruction 
cards now in assignment boxes will be 
returned to Headquarters on or after 
January 8, 1937, and not later than 
January 14, 1937. 

V. Boston Automatic Fire Alarm 
Company. 

The following signal numbers are to be 
added to the running cards of the Boston 
Automatic Fire Alarm Company in this 
department : 

Signal 167, Building 11 and 13 Avon 
street. 

Signal 371, Building 501 Washington 
street, 4th, 5th and 6th floors. 

Signal 372, Building 503 and 505 Wash- 
ingtron street, 1st floor and basement. 

Signal 373, Building 507 and 509 Wash- 
ington street, 1st, 2d and 3d floors. 

Signal 374, Building 1 and 3 West 
street, basement and 1st floor. 

Apparatus to respond to all foregoing 
signals Engine 7, Ladder 17, District 
Chief 5. Nearest box 1461. 

New pages for the Boston Automatic 
Alarm Book, Nos. 7 and 15, dated 
December 22, 1936, are being issued to 
the department today. Old pages, Nos. 
7 and 15, dated June 15, 1934, and 
August 11, 1930, respectively, are to be 
returned to Headquarters in the envel- 
opes provided on or before Tuesday, 
January 5, 1937. 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



33 



VI. American District Telegraph 
Company. 

Notice has been received from the 
A. D. T. Company that the following 
signal numbers of that company have 
been discontinued: 

Page 1, Signal 15, Goodspeed's Book 
Shop. 

Page 17, Signal 474, R. & S. Machine 
Company. 

Page 21, Signal 581, Unite'd Liquors, 
Limited. 

VII. New Streets. 

Notice has been received from the 
Board of Street Commissioners that the 
following new streets are to be made in 
Old -Harbor Village, the New Federal 
Housing Project: 

Mohawk street, from Old Colony ave- 
nue to Hyde Street. 

Wakefield street, from Old Colony 
avenue, to Mohawk street. 

Needham street, from Mohawk street 
to Wakefield street 

Ralston street, from Boston street ex- 
tended across Dorchester avenue to 
Albert street. 

VIII. Commendations. 

Ladderman Carl E. Johnson of Ladder 
Company 18 is hereby commended for 
extinguishing a fire at 170 Summer street 
on December 24, 1936, while on a meal 
period. 

Ladderman Walter A. Gavin of Ladder 
Company 23 is hereby commended for 
holding a fire in check until the arrival 
of apparatus at Box 2573, December 27, 
1936, while off duty. 

By order of Fire Commissioner 
Edward F. McLaughlin. 

Samuel J. Pope, 
Chief of Department. 



General Order No. 1, 1937. 

Regulations for Response and Cover 
INQ on Alarms of Fire. 

The following regulations for response 
and covering on alarms of fire are hereby 
ordered to take effect at 8 a. m., January 8, 
1937. 

All previous orders inconsistent here- 
with are hereby rescinded. 

Changes or additions to these cards 
shall be made by the company commander, 
or by a member designated by him, only 
on orders from Headquarters. The name 
of the company commander changing, or 
authorizing the change, the number of 
the order and the date of same shall be 
entered in the company journal. 

As previously required, first alarm 
cards are to be conveniently and con- 
spicuously displayed on the wall of the 
main floor, or on the cover of the patrol 
desk under glass. 

Regulations Concerning Fire Alarms and 
Signals. 

The alarms will be designated as the 
First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth. 

A.ssignments on the first lines, for 
first alarms. 

Assignments on the second lines, for 
second alarms. 

A.ssignments on the tiiird lines, for 
third alarms. 

Assignments on the fourth lines, for 
fourth alarms. 

Assignments on the fifth lines, for 
fifth alarms. 

Alarm Signals. 
First Alarnr: Three rounds of the box 
number struck on tappers and two rounds 
on gongs. 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED DECEMBER 31, 1936, TO JANUARY 6, 1937. 



December .31. 



Plumbeb. 



Ward. 



Natute. 



EsUmated 
Cost. 



John A. Martensen 180 Commonwealth avenue. .5 

K. W. McManua 629 Washington street 17 

Samuel Shulman 96 Stockton street 17 

S. J. Connolly 10 Hudson street .3 

Bart Dorsey 323 Washington street 22 

John Matto Bartlett place 3 

L. S. Larrey 7 Pine Lodge road 20 



January 2. 




1291 Commonwealth ave... . 21 


New fixtures 


.... S7.5 


Otto R. Schultes 


. . 16 Sewall street 10 


100 








Janu.ary 4. 



John J. Daniels. . , 
J. Harry Kurhan. . 
Hyman Weiss. ... 
Thomas C. Kelly. 



57 Sunnyside street 18 

113.5 Washington street .... 3 

32 Hillsboro road 14 

44 Peter Parley road 11 



January .5. 



Richard CoughUn . . 

John J. Vogel 

D. B. Karger 

Arthur H. Linton . . 
P. H. McCormack . 



24 Millmont street 9 

83 Circuit street 12 

162 Humboldt avenue 12 

9 Winthrop street 2 

85 Bunker Hill street 2 



January 6. 



Young and Hird . . . . 

L. E. Boyden 

John S. Monahan. . . 
Joseph Newman . . . . 

James A. Erwin 

A. Smith & Co 

John J. Vogel 

Harold E. Kenney. . 
Rocco Sammartano. . 
James A. Dickerson . 

Frank B. Connor 

William Duston 



2257 Dorchester avenue. ... 17 

283 Hyde Park avenue 19 

22 Saunders street 21 

10 Thacher street 3 

24 Nonquit street 13 

179 Longwood avenue 4 

27 Wellsmere road 20 



65 Deaconess road. 
56 F street 

269 Brookline avenue . 
72 Linden Park street. 

270 Bowen street 



New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fiixtures. 
New fixtures. 

New fixtures . 
New fixtures. 

New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 

New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 

New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fi.xtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 



SlOO 
100 
1.50 
350 
100 
100 
550 



$125 

1.50 

600 

50 



.S400 

350 

125 

70 

75 



$225 
300 
125 
240 
298 

50 
350 
125 
310 

50 
500 

65 



Private Fire Alarm Box Numbers: 
A prehminary signal of one blow, imme- 
diately followed by 2, 3 or 4 blows, etc., 
denoting the particular location, pause, 
then the box number. A duplicate num- 
ber of the nearest street box will gener- 
ally be used for the private box. 

Example : 
12-2351. 

Teachers College and Girls' Latin School. 
13-2351 



Martin School, Huntington avenue and 

Worthington street. 

The entire signal will be struck tlirec 
rounds on tappers and two rounds on 
gongs. 

Multiple alarms and "All Out" signals 
will be struck without the private desig- 
nating signal. 

Example: Second alarm. Box 12-2351. 



Example : 
Box 22-22 



"All Out' 
2351. - - 



signal for either 



Multiple Alarms: The term multiple 
alarm means two or more alarms from the 
same box. 

On all Multiple Alarms following the 
first alarm, a preliminary signal will he 
struck once, followed by one round of the 
box number on tappers and gongs. 

Second Alarm: Preliminary signal, two 
blows followed by the box number. 

Third Alarm: Preliminary signal, three 
blows followed by the box number. 

Fourth Alarm: Preliminary signal, four 
blows followed by the box number. 
I Fifth Alarm: Preliminary signal, five 
blows followed by the box number. 



In the event of a fire of such magnitude 
as to make it desirable to give a Third, 
Fourth or Fifth alarm immediately after 
the First, intervening alarms maj' be 
omitted, and the department will be 
governed by the same rules, relative to 
their response, as if the alarms had been 
given in numerical order. 

Special Signals: For islands in Boston 
Harbor and for dispatching aid to cities 
or towns adjacent to Boston, a prelimi- 
nary signal of thirteen consecutive blows, 
followed by the special signal denoting 
the island, city or town, struck two rounds 
on tappers and two rounds on gongs. 

A. D. T. Alarms: Preliminary signal 
of three blows struck three times followed 
by box number, struck two rounds on 
tappers. 

Automatic Alarms: Preliminary signal 
of two blows struck three times followinl 
by the number indicating the building 
location, followed by the floor number, if 
any, struck two rouiuls on tappers. 

Note. — I^ight blows indicates fii-st 
floor or basement, two blows the second 
floor, etc. 

"All Out" Signal: The preliminary 
signal of 22-22 foUowed l\v one round i>f 
the box luimber will be struck on tappei-s. 
It will be ordered only by the oHioer com- 
manding at a Hie. The receipt of tiiis 
signal signifies that the commnies en- 
gaged at the fire have been iviieved and 
are prepared to answer their own assign- 
ments. 

••.Ml Out" Signal for A. D. T. Alarms: 
Preliminary signal of 22-22, followed i)y 
3-3 3 and the box number struck one 
round on tappi>i-s. 

'•AH Out" Signal for Automatic .Alarms: 



34 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



Preliminary signal 22-22, followed by 
2-2-2 and then the box number struck 
one round on tappers. 

Note. — When an A. D. T. or automatic 
alarm is followed by an alarm from the 
nearest box, the "all out signal" will be 
struck for the box alarm only. 

"All Out" Signal for Special Signals: 
The preliminary signal 22-22, followed by 
thirteen consecutive blows and special 
signal struck one round on tappers. 

Signal for Reduced Assignments: In 
Effect — Six blows struck two rounds on 
gongs. Schedule Terminated — Seven 
blows struck two rounds on gongs. (See 
cards "H" and "I.") 

Drill School Signal: Two blows struck 
three times, thus, 2-2-2 on gongs denotes 
No Drill School, and when received at 
7.55 a. m. indicates no morning session, 
and at 12.30 p. m. no afternoon session. 
This signal will be sti'uck on order from 
the commanding officer of the department. 

Fire College Signal: Two blows struck 
three times, 2-2-2, on gongs at 7.30 a. m. 
denotes no session of Fire College. 

Public School Signal: One blow struck 
three times, thus, 1-1-1 on gongs, and 
thi'ee blasts of fireboats' whistles; when 
received at 7.45 a. m. indicates no session 
of the public schools for the day. When 
received at 12.45 p. m. indicates no after- 
*noon session. 

Marine Call for Fireboats: Three long 
and two short whistle blasts, to be given 
by any boat, and continued until answered 
by fireboat. 

Railroad Signal for Fire: One long and 
three short whistle blasts repeated several 
times. 

Special Signal for Telephones: Four 
blows struck three times, thus, 4-4^ on 
tappers. On receipt of this signal, com- 
pany commanders will proceed immedi- 
ately to call the Fire Alarm Office on 
department telephone. If unable to get 
Fire Alarm through the department tele- 
phone, they will then call from the 
nearest telephone to station. 

Response and Covering Regulations. 

The operator in charge of Fire Alarm 
Office will lie responsible on all alarms for 
the proper response and covering . of 
apparatus not specifically assigned by the 
assignment cards. 

Companies shall respond or cover on 
all alarms only when specifically assigned 
to do so by the assignment cards, other- 
wise they will remain in their stations 
until ordered to move by the Fire Alarm 
Office with the following exceptions. 

When first alarms are received from 
two boxes and all the engine companix^s 
assigned to respond to the second box 
have already responded to the first box, 
the response for engine companies to the 
second box shall be by those companies 
in the second alarm assignment of the 
second box under whose number there is 
an inverted pyramid. This i-ule shall 
apply also in exactly the same way to 
ladder and water tower companies. 
Under this condition, there shall be no 
covering except as ordered from the Fire 
Alarm Office. 

When first alarms are received from 
two boxes and the chief officers assigned 
to respond to the second box have already 
responded to the first box; the response for 
chief officers shall be as under a second 
alarm from the second box, except on 
boxes where one chief is assigned on the 
first alarm, then, only the district chief 
assigned on tlie second alarm of the 
second box shall respond. There shall 
be no covering of chi(;f officers except as 
ordered from the Fire Alarm Office. 

A company covering the station of 
another company will follow the assign- 



ment cards of that company, except for 
multiple alarms from the box under 
which it is covering, in that case it shall 
follow the assignment card for that box. 

Where a double engine company, or a 
double ladder company, is located and 
one of the companies leaves quarters on 
any alarm, the remaining company, in 
addition to its own assignments, shall 
assume the assignments of the absent 
company with the following exceptions, 
unless otherwise ordered: 

a. Shall not respond when one of the 
companies has responded to a still, auto- 
matic or A. D. T. alarm, which is fol- 
lowed by a box alarm in the immediate 
vicinity of the still, automatic or A. D. T. 
alarm. 

h. Shall not respond when first alarms 
are received from two boxes and all the 
engine or ladder companies assigned to 
respond to the second box have already 
responded to the first box. 

c. Shall not respond to the multiple 
alarm assignments of the absent company. 

A company covering in such station, 
in addition to assuming the assignments 
of the company it covers, shall assume 
the still, automatic, A. D. T. and first 
alarm assignments of the other company 
regularly quartered at such station, unless 
that company is covered. 

When a ladder company is covering at 
the quarters of Engine Company 46, the 
ladder company shall assume only the 
first alarm assignments of Ladder Com- 
pany 27, except as otherwise ordered by 
the Fire Alarm Office. This regulation 
shall be posted conspicuously at the patrol 
desk in the quarters of Engine Company 
46. 

In cases where companies have not 
returned to their stations from an alarm 
of fire, and another box is received to 
which they arc assigned, such companies 
shall not respond to the second box. The 
following exception is made to this rule: 
Upon receipt of an alarm from a second 
box in District 1, the Fire Alarm Office 
shall immediately dispatch apparatus, 
and then notify the officer in command 
at the first box, who upon receiving 
notification shall immediately dispatch 
any apparatus not engaged and shall at 
once notify the Fire Alarm Office of the 
action taken. 

If, after receiving the last alarm for 
which there are assignments, more com- 
panies are needed at the fire, the com- 
manding officer at the fire will order them 
through the Fire Alarm Office. 

The house patrol shall count accu- 
rately every alarm received and write the 
box number on the slate. 

If the company responds, he shall 
sound the house gong on receipt of the 
first round on the tapper. He shall then 
write the box number on the slate and 
announce the box number and location 
(or the house to be covered) loudly and 
clearly, which announcement shall be 
then i-epeated to the driver by the com- 
pany commander. 

Note. — It is here assumed that the 
first round has been counted correctly, 
and such is the I'equircment. In case of 
doubt, however, the patrol shall count 
the second round, or even the third, 
before proceeding as above; but when he 
does so, he must report the fact to his 
company commander, who shall forward 
a report of same on Form 5. 

In case the company is assigned to 
respond to the fire on the next following 
alarm, the engine on the apparatus shall 
be started and kept in operation long 
enough to ascertain that it is in good 
working order, except between the hours 
oi 10 p. m. and 7 a. m. 



On receipt of a first alarm to which the 
company does not respond, the house 
patrol shall ascertain immediately the 
location of the box and whether or not 
the company is due to respond on any 
subsequent alarm from that box. 

On receipt of any alarm to which the 
company does not respond, the house 
patrol shall cut out the gong, taking care, 
however, to allow it to remain out only 
while the alarm is being struck. The 
gong in all stations will be allowed to 
strike at least one alarm daily to serve 
as a test. 

The house patrol sliall notify promptly 
the company commtBider of any failure 
of tapper or gong to strike correctly. 

Upon arrival at a fire, deputy and dis- 
ti-ict chiefs and company commanders 
shah report at once to the officer in 
command. 

Upon arrival at covering quarters, and 
upon return to their own quarters, they 
shall report to the Fire Alarm Office by 
telephone before housing the apparatus. 

The return to quarters fi-om multiple, 
or two or more first alarm fii-es shall be 
made in reverse order to the movement 
toward the fire, unless changed by order 
of the officer in command at the" fire or 
by the Fire Alarm Office. 

On receipt of still alarms at least one 
engine company and one ladder company 
shall respond. 

When opei-ating under the conditions 
of these regulations, the telephone lines 
must be kept clear in order to facilitate 
the work of the Fire Alarm Office. 

Definitions. 

A star alongside of box number and 
alongside of company number indicates 
that such company shall re.spond to such 
box on first alarm. 

A dagger alongside of box number 
indicates that the fireboat shall not 
respond to such box. 

Abbreviations. 
E — Engine Co. L— Ladder Co. R — 
Rescue Co. Div. — Division. 

Reduced Assignments for June 17 and 
July 4. 

The following special regulations will 
be effective during the Bunker Hill and 
Independence Day periods: 

From 9 p. m., June 16, to midnight, 
June 17, and between the same hours 
on July 3 and 4 (to be read "June 17 
and 18, and July 4 and 5," when these 
holidays are celebrated on June 18 or 
July 5), in Districts 1, 2, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 
12, 13, 14 and 15, the first two engine 
companies and the first ladder company 
on the assignment card will respond to 
box alarms, except where boxes are lo- 
cated on private property, in which case 
the full complement provided on the 
assignment cards shall respond. Reduced 
assignments shall be made for schoolhouse 
boxes. 

Attention is called to the third para- 
graph on card "D." This rule must be 
observed. If a second box is received and 
there is an engine company in quarters on 
the first alarm assignment that company 
only shall automatically respond, This 
applies also to ladder companies. 

No reduction in assignments shall be 
made for rescue, tower and fireboat 
companies. 

In Districts 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 
15, instead of having two district chiefs 
respond to the same box, only the district 
chief in the district where box is located 
shall respond. 

In Districts 1, 2, 8, 9 and 12, the acting 
district chief shall be quartered at district 
headquarters; provided with an auto- 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



35 



mobile and a telegrapher assigned as a 
driver. The district chief shall respond 
to the first alarm in his district and the 
acting district chief to the next alarm, 
thus alternating and dividing the duty. 

District chiefs shall cause to be carried 
on ladder trucks in all districts where re- 
duced assignments are effective, four 
lengths of hose, a play pipe, coffee pot 
chuck and hydrant wrenches. 

Engine Companies 13 and 14 will be 
divided into two units, each of which will 
function as separate companies. The 
second unit in each company will respond 
to alarms only as directed by the Fire 
Alarm Office. 

Companies returning from fires must 
pay special attention to extinguishing 
bonfires and other small fires found en 
route, reporting same to the Fire Alarm 
Office upon return to quarters. 

Due to the reduced assignments brought 
about by conditions existing during this 
period, officers and members on companies 
responding must promptly notify the Fire 
Alarm Office on arrival if there is the 
slightest doubt as to the necessity for 
additional apparatus. This must be 
done by key. 

Officers in charge of fires, if the fire is 
inconsequential, must return all unneces- 
sary apparatus to quarters at once in order 
that it may be placed in service. 

Telegraphers will not telegraph location 
of fires or other matters of minor impor- 
tance that can be postponed without detri- 
ment to any interest concerned; but such 
matters should be telephoned, if feasible. 
The object is to keep the lines open for 
important business and free from needless 
interference in view of the increased 
number of alarms. 

Reduced Assignment During Dry Periods. 

The following reduced assignments will 
be in effect during extreme dry periods, 
whenever the special signal on card "C" 
has been struck. 

In District 1 upon receipt of an alarm 
from any box above 6225 and in Districts 
11, 12, 13, 14 and 15, upon receipt of an 
alarm from any box, the first two engine 
companies antl the first ladder company 
on the assignment cards will respond, 
excepting boxes that arc located on private 
property and all boxes auxiliarized to 
schoolhouse systems, in which case the full 
complement provided for on assignment 
cards shall respond. 

In the affected districts only the district 
cliief in the district where the box is 
located shall respond. 

Ordinarily these reduced assignments 
are in effect from 8 a. m. to 8 p. m. 
During these periods the signal will be 
struck at 8 a. m. daily. If, however, 
conditions arc such that it is deemed 
advisable to keep normal assignments in 
effect the signal will be omitted at that 
time but may be struck later in the day. 
The signal terminating the schedule will 
be struck ordinarily at 8 p. m., but if 
conditions warrant it will be struck 
previous to that time. 

Officers and members of companies 
responding to alarms under these con- 
ditions must promptly order additional 
apparatus if in their judgment such is 
ncedetl. Tliis must be done by kej'. 

Officers in charge of fires during tiiis 
period, if the fire is inconsequential, must 
return all unnecessary apparatus to 
quarters at once. 

Instructions to the Fire Alarm Office as 
to Response and Covering. 
A full complement of apparatus shall 
be sent to eacli box except under extraor- 
dinai'y conditions. 



At all times upon the receipt of a still 
alarm of fire in a hospital or a home for 
aged people, the operator in charge of the 
Fire Alarm Office shall send the still 
alarm assignment of apparatus, and im- 
mediately transmit the nearest box. 

On receipt of a still alarm between the 
hours of 11 p. m. and 7 a. m., the operator 
in charge of the Fire Alarm Office shall 
send the still alarm assignment of ap- 
paratus, and then transmit the nearest 
box. Also, at all times, after an automatic 
or A. D. T. alarm htis been struck, the 
nearest box shall be transmitted. This 
rule may be modified by the operator in 
charge under extraordinary conditions. 
Exceptions to this rule shall be made for 
grass fires and automobile fires in streets. 

The Fire Alarm Office shall at once 
notify the district chief when companies 
in his district are ordered to leave their 
stations. 

The fire alarm operatoi' who receives the 
report of the return to quarters of a 
deputy chief, district chief or company 
commander, shall at once notify him of 
the alarms then in or any other important 
event happening during his absence. 

Emergency Code Signal. 

In the absence of telegraphers,- the 
following system of emergency code 
signals will be in effect in this department. 

If a second alarm is desired, give a series 
of about twelve (12) quick taps on the 
Morse key; pause, then tap two distinct 
blows, wait for O. K. signal, then pull 
the hook. 

Example: (Pause) 

— wait for 0. K. signal ( — ), 

then pull the hook. 

For a third, fourth or fifth alarm, 
twelve (12) quick taps as above, then the 
number of distinct blows increased to cor- 
respond with the character of the alarm 
desired. 

After each signal has been transmitted 
and before the box is pulled, the fire alarm 

operator will tap 2-3 ( — ) meaning 

O.K. 

For an "All Out" signal, give a series 
of about twelve (12) quick taps, pause, 
tap 22-22, pause, then tap the box number 
and wait for O. K. signal. 

Example: "All Out" Box 1234 

(Pause) — — -- -- 

(Pause) - — wait for 

0. K. signal (- ). 

If the fire alarm operator desires to 
have signal repeated, he will tap 12-12 
( ), meaning "Repeat." 

When the fire alarm operator wants 
man at box to use a telephone^, he will tap 
4-4^ ( ). 

Keys to the doors of fire alarm boxes 
shall be carried by officers of the depart- 
ment at all times. 

Keys to the doors of fire alarm boxes 
shall be carried safely and conveniently 
on each piece of apparatus. 

Caution. 

Do not use Morse key if sounder in 
box is working. 

Be sure and lock tiie doors before 
leaving the box. 

Signal for Comi)any I'nits. 

For the purpose of dispatching com- 
pany units to a particular 1)<)X, the fol- 
lowing signals will be struck two rounds 
on tappers only. 

For engine companies, four (4) blows 
twice ( ). 

For ladder companies, five (5) blows 
twice ( ). 

For rescue companies, six (G) blows 
twice ( ). 

For tower companies, seven (7) blows 
twice ( ). 



The company number and box number 
to follow the apparatus designating signal 
in each case. 

Example: Call for Engine Company 10 
to respond to Box 1612: ( ) 

Example: Call for Ladder Company 20 
to respond to Box 3127: ( 

r-:v' -'-/.." ::,---—> 

Signal for Apparatus Out of Service. 

The following signals are adopted to 
report apparatus out of servicck or break- 
ing down responding to or returning 
from an alarm of fire, when telephone 
service is not available and a telegrapher 
is not present. 

Out of service signal, 8 blows: 



Engine company signal, 4 blows tapped 
twice 

Ladder company signal, 5 blows tapped 
twice 

Rescue company signal, 6 blows tapped 
twice 

Tower company signal, 7 blows tapped 
twice 

0. K. signal 2-3 - 

Repeat signal 1-2 1-2 - — - — 

The officer in command shall have sent 
from the nearest fire alarm box the fol- 
lowing signal: A series of about twelve 
(12) quick taps on box telegraph key, 
then pause, followed by eight blows given 
slowly and distinctly, to denote apparatus 
out of service, then followed by signal 
denoting type of apparatus, the company 
number and the box number. 

Example: Engine 10 out of service 

near Box 1532: ( ) 

Pause ( ) Pause ( 

) Pause (- ) 

Pause (- — ). 

Example: Ladder 11 out of service 

near Box 5191 : ( ) 

Pause ( ) Pause ( 

) Pause ( ) 

Pause ( -) 

The Fire Alarm Office will answer by 
giving the O. K. signal, if the message is 
understood, or the Repeat signal, if it is 
not understood. 

Upon receipt of the message, the Fire 
Alarm Office shall dispatch another com- 
panj' to the fire, if such action is neces- 
sary, and shall notify the Motor Squad 
of the disabled apparatus. 

Pumping Stations and Operations. 

High Pressure Station No. 1, Edison 
property, 165 Kneeland street. 

High Pressure Station No. 2, Edison 
property, 514-510 Atlantic avenue. 

Station No. 1 is equipped witli two 
Worthington pumps of 4,500-g"allon capa- 
city, each directly connected to a 750 
horse power Westinghouse steam turliine. 

Station No. 2 is equippinl with two 
Worthington pumps of 4,500-gallon capa- 
city, each directlj" connected to a Westing- 
house motor 75t) horse power, 220 volt.-^. 
Current is supplied from the Edison 
system. 

In order to give each station it.s pri>- 
portionate part of work, tlie higi> pressure 
zone is divided into two divisions, ".V" 
and "B." 

I'pon irceipt of an alarm from Di\ision 
.\ a immp will be started in Station No. 1 
and the pre.-^sure increased to 150 pounds. 

If a second innni> is needed, No. 2 
pump in the same station will be used. 
If a third or fourth pump is needed, the 
engineer of Station No. 1 will order 
Station No. 2 to start a pump. This 
regulation shall apply in rovei-se order to 
the pumping stations upon receipt of an 
alarm from Division B. 



36 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



The engineer in charge of station 
where the first pump is started will be 
responsible for the pressure. 

If there is a fire in Division A and a 
pump in Station No. 1 is operating, and 
an alarm is received from Division B no 
more pumps on the system wUl be started 
until needed to maintain the pressure. 
This regulation shall apply in like manner 
when a pump at Station No. 2 is operating 
and an alarm is received from Division A. 

No change in pump pressure shall be 
made except as ordered by the officer in 
command at the fire. 

Engineer in charge of high pressure 
station shall notify the Fire Alarm Office 
by telephone of anj' sudden decrease in 
pressure. 

In the event of more than one fire in 
the high pressure zone, at the same time, 
and an increase in pressure is ordered at 
either fire, the commanding officers at 
such other fires shall be notified by the 
Fire Alarm Office of such increase, prior 
to transmitting the signal to the high 
pressure station. 

The following code signals shall be 
used relating to water pressure: 

Increase pressure — — — 

Decrease pressure 

, Stop pumps — 

100 pounds 



125 pounds - 
150 pounds - 

175 pounds - 
200 pounds 



225 pounds 
250 pounds 

275 pounds 

300 pounds 



Example: Increase pressm-e to 175 

pounds. — — — 

Decrease pressure to 125 

pounds. — 



The Fire Alarm Office shall transmit 
the "Stop Pumps" signal to the pumping 
station when the "AH Out" signal is 
struck, or upon receipt of the "Stop 
Pumps" signal from officer in command 
at fire, unless there is another box in 
from the high pressure zone. 

Between the Fire Alarm Office and the 
pumping stations or between stations, 
code .signals only will be transmitted. 
The engineer receiving signal will repeat 
it for confirmation. The following code 
signals shall be used: 
Station No. 1. — 

Station No. 2. 

Start No. 1 pump — 

Start No. 2 pump — — 

Stop one pump 

Stop both pumps — 

Signals without station code number 
transmitted by fire alarm operator will be 
answered by the engineer of the first 
station to start. 

The engineer, at the end of each signal 
which he may transmit, or which, after 
receiving repeats, will give the code 
number of his station. 

If the fire alarm operator desires to 
.signal either station in particular, he will 
first give the station code number before 
transmitting the code signal. 

In the event of the high pressure sys- 
tem being out of service, the following 
signal will be struck on tappers : 8 blows 
struck twice thus, 



Upon receipt of the signal 8-8, engine 
companies responding to alarms in the 
high pressure zone will proceed to con- 
nect engines to low service hydrants in 
the same manner as previous to the 
installation of the high pressure system. 

When the high pressure system is 
restored to service the following 
signal wiU be struck on tappers: 
9 blows struck twice, thus, 

Should a water main in the high pressure 
system break during a fire in the high 
pressure zone, the officer in command at 
fire shall be notified immediately. Upon 
receipt of such information, the officer in 
command at fire shall at once proceed 
to take the water supply from the high 
or low service, or both if available. He 
shall order the high pressure pumps 
stopped as soon as practicable, notifying 
the Fire Alarm Office of the water main 
break. The Fire Alarm Office shall, in 
addition to transmitting the "Stop 
Pumps" signal, inform the engineers at 
the high pressure stations of such water 
main break. Said engineers shall then 
shut down the sources of supply to the 
high pressure system. The Fire Alarm 
Office shall notify the department by 
striding the signal indicating the high 
pressure system out of service. 

The Water Division, Public Works 
Department, shall be immediately noti- 
fied of the water main break by the Fire 
Alarm Office. 

By order of Fire Commissioner 
Edward F. McL.a.ughlin. 

S.\MUEL J. Pope, 
Chief of Department. 



CONTRACTS AMENDED, 

Dep.\etment of School Buildings. 

Massachusetts Welding Company has 
been allowed to amend the contract for 
furnishing and installing furniture and 
equipment in the addition to the English 
High School, by striking out the word and 
figures "August 15, 1936," on page 16, 
Article 2, and substituting therefor the 
word and figures "January 1, 1937," so 
that said Article 2 on page 16 shall read: 
"The Contractor shall promptly start the 
work to be done under this contract and 
shall complete the furnishing and install- 
ing of furniture and /or equipment at the 
times defined in the specifications, on 
January 1, 1937, and shall be liable in 
damages for any failure to do so, all as 
defined in the General Conditions and the 
specifications." 

Duparquet, Huot & Moneuse Company 
has been allowed to amend the contract 
for furnishing and installing furniture and 
equipment in the addition to the English 
High School, by striking out the word and 
figures "August 15, 1936," on page 16, 
Article 2, and substituting therefor the 
word and figures "January 1, 1937," so 
that .said Article 2 on page 16 shall read: 
"The Contractor shall promptly start the 
work to be done under this contract and 
shall complete the furnishing and install- 
ing of furniture and/or equipment at the 
times defined in the specifications, on 
January 1, 1937, and shall be liable in 
damages for any failure to do so, all as 
defined in the General Conditions and the 
specifications." 

Supply Department. 

Morris Gordon & Sons, Incorporated, 
have been allowed to amend the contract 
for furnishing dining hall furnishings to 
the Boston City Hcspital. 

The .specifications in this contract pro- 
vided, among other things, for the fur. 



nishing of morocco finished table tops 
with a triple metal edge strand and also 
provided for table tops of one piece 
material. The contractor furnished 
morocco finished table tops with a single 
metal edge strand instead of a triple metal 
edge strand. This was done in accord- 
ance with Doctor Manary's desires. The 
contractor also furnished table tops with 
two pieces of veneer jointed together in 
place of tops of one piece. Some ques- 
tion has arisen as to whether or not there 
has been compliance with the specifica- 
tions under these facts. 

The amendment transmitted herewith 
was prepared by the Law Department to 
remove doubt as to compliance with 
specifications. This amendment also pro- 
vides for a guarantee by the contractor 
that the two piece table tops will not 
separate and, in addition, provides that 
if so requested by the Superintendent of 
the Boston City Ho.spital, the contractor 
will move the table tops to certain other 
positions in the rooms in which they are 
installed. 



NOTICE OF ROOSEVELT BALL. 

Boston, January 8, 1937. 
To All Department Heads. 

The Birthday Ball for the President 
will be held in the Boston Garden on 
Friday, January 29. As Mayor of the 
City of Boston and General Chairman of 
the Committee I ask for the earnest co- 
operation of the employees of all depart- 
ments to the end that this affair wiU meet 
with the same success enjoyed in 1935 
and 1936. The great success of the balls 
in these two years was due in great meas- 
ure to the splendid purchase of tickets by 
city employees. 

Mr. Joseph A. Maynard, Collector of 
the Port of Boston, has accepted my in- 
vitation to serve as chairman of the 
committee and he reports that the pro- 
gram of this year will surpass that of all 
other years. It is expected that over 
20,000 persons will be in attendance. A 
famous orchestra and a well known band 
have been obtained and those attending 
will enjoy the finest music heard in 
Boston in years. Military drills, per- 
sonal appearances of famous men and 
women of the stage as well as carefully 
selected entertainment will be among the 
other features of the evening. 

A 1937 Ford sedan will be awarded the 
holder of a lucky ticket. Several other 
prizes surpassing in quality and quantity 
the fine gifts of last year have been ob- 
tained. An announcement of these prizes 
will be made through the press within the 
next few days. 

Members of the committee have set the 
price at $1 a ticket. This enables our 
fellow citizens to contribute to this most 
worthy cause and at the same time re- 
ceive the greatest value for their money 
in the way of entertainment and enjoy- 
ment that has ever been offered in this 
city. 

I urge the city employees to show by 
their attendance and the purchase of 
tickets that they are interested in this 
most worthy cause and that they are 
willing to give their cooperation to the 
end that we in Boston may assist in com- 
batting the dread disease of infantile 
paralysis and rehabilitating its victims. 

Arthur J. O'Keefe, assistant secretary, 
is in charge of the sale of tickets to city 
employees. Please make all returns to 
him at the Mayor's office. 

Yours truly, 

Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



37 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 

(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1&37. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Wednesday, January 6. 

Lowell, Thursday, January 7. 
Boston, Wednesday, February 3. 
Worcester, Thursday, February 4. 
Boston, Wednesday, March 3. 
Fall River, Thursday, iSlarch 4. 
Fall River, Friday, March 5. 
Boston, Wednesday, April 7. 
Springfield, Thursday, April 8. 
Boston, Wednesday, May 5. 
Worcester, Thursday, May 6. 
Boston, Wednesday, June 16. 
Boston, Wednesday, September 15. 
Worcester, Thursday, September 16. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 14. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 15. 
Boston, Wednesday, November 3. 
Lowell, Thursday, November 4. 
Boston, Wednesday, December 8. 
New Bedford, Fridaj', December 10. 
New Bedford, Saturday, December 11. 

Rules for Examinations. 

All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent in 
the installation of wires, conduits, ap- 
paratus, fixtures and other appliances for 
carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
years' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for canying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a master or .journe3'^man certifi- 
cate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be re- 
quired to obtain at least 70 per cent 
in order to obtain a certificate. 

.^nnjicants who fail to obtain the re- 
nuired 70 per cent will not be entitled 
to re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and tho.se who re- 
ceive loss than 50 per cent or who fail on 
the practical demonstration, will not be 
re-examined for a period of six months. 

Any person found referring to notes or 
books, or misbehaving during an exam- 
ination, will be debarred from that exam- 
ination. 

Notice will bo sent to applicants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held and only tho.se so notified 
will be examined on I hat day. 

Stephen C. G.\rrity, 
James G. Reardon, 
TiroivrAS H. Green, 
Albert Frank, 
Walter J. Kenefick, 
Stale Examiners oj Eleetriciavs. 

For application blanks or other in- 
formation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 303, 14 Beacon street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

Chief Sanitary Officer and Milk In- 
spector, Newton Health Depart- 
ment, Febru..\ry 6, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 23, 1937, at 12 noon. 

This examination is open to residents 
of the state. 

The minimum salary is $2,400 a year; 
the maximum, .§3,000 a year. 

Duties: To supervise the activities of 
the laboratory technician and sanitary 
inspector. To perform milk inspection 
work. To do standard plate counts on 
water, and determination of butter fat 
and total solids. To prepare statistical 
charts and tables. 

Applicants should be familiar with 
state and local regulations regarding 
milk, — its production and marketing. 
The}- should also be familiar with the 
general laws governing Board of Health 
procedure in relation to abatement of 
nuisances, general sanitary inspection 
and of diseases dangerous to the public 
health. 

Entrance Requirements : Applicants 
must be not less than twenty-five years 
of age at the time of filing applications. 
A certificate of date of birth must be 
filed with the application UNLESS one 
has been filed with a previous applica- 
tion. 

Applicants must have at least two 
years' practical experience in the field 
of public health sanitation. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 4; per- 
sonality and fitness, as determined by 
an oral interview, 3; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in each subject in order to become 
eligible. 

Physical fitness to be detennined by 
ph}-sical examination. 



THE NOISE NUISANCE. 

That city officials are serious about 
eliminating noise is noted from studies 
of new anti-noise ordinances enacted by 
a growing number of municipalities listed 
in the "United States Municipal News," 
bulletin of the American Municipal Asso- 
ciation and the United States Conference 
of Mayors. Among the more important 
of these cities are Philadelphia, Gkiry, 
Ind., Louisville, New York and Boston. 



THE MUNICIPAL WATER-WORKS TREND. 

In 1800 there was but one municipally- 
owned water-works plant in the United 
States. Now there are 7,853 municipally- 
owned installations, or 72.8 per cent of 
the entire number. In the United States 
there are ninety-four cities of over 
100,000 papulation. All but eleven of 
these o\\'n their water works. Municipal 
plants serve 96.1 per cent of the popula- 
tion of the ninety-four cities, while 
private plants serve only 3.9 per cent. 



50,000,000 WATER-SUPPLY PROJECT IN 
CALIFORNIA. 

The city of San Jose has entered into 
contract with the Water Properties Com- 
pany, Ltd., of San Francisco, to provide 
the city wat«r from the head waters of 
the American river in the vicinity of 
fjake Tahoo. The agreement is for thirty 
years, during which time the municipal- 
ity will acquire title to the loo;d distribu- 
tion system and receive a proportionate 
share of the production and transmission 
sy^ems. 



36.400 MOTOR DEATHS IN 1935. 

According to the findings of the Na- 
tional Safety Council motor traffic deaths 
in 1935 totaled 36,400, compared with 
1934's record of 36,000. 

The only decrease was among school 
children up to fifteen years of age. 
Motor vehicle accidents to children have 
increased much less than those of adults 
since 1922, when safety education began 
on a national scale. October, Novem- 
ber and December were the reddest 
months. Two-thirds of the accidents 
were in places under 10,000 population; 
more than 40 per cent of the victims 
pedestrians. 

Thirteen states decreased traffic deaths 
7 per cent or more: Delaware, Illinois, 
Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, 
Montana, North Dakota, Oregon, Rhode 
Island, Utah, Vermont, Wyoming and 
Washington. 

From its foundation imtil 1755, or a 
period of 125 years, Boston was not only 
the most outstanding but the most 
populous town in the American colonies. 
In 1760, Philadelphia's population wai 
ahead, viz., 18,756, Boston's then being 
15,631 and New York's about 14,000. 
In the last year of town government, 
viz., 1821, Boston's population was about 
45,000 and its public debt $100,000, all 
incuiTed for new county buildings. 

The history of Boston as a town dur- 
ing a period of nearly two centuries 
surpasses in civic interest that of Boston 
as a city because of the untiring zeal 
and successful efforts of its townsmen to 
realize more of tnj*i demociacy than had 
ever been attained before. Their obliga- 
tions were held as sacred as their liber« 
ties. 



PROFITABLE MUNICIPAL MARKETS. 

Municipal markets, "white elephants" 
in many cities, can be made self-sup- 
porting and even profitable, accord- 
ing to recent reports on two of them. 
The Department of Public Markets of 
New York City reports that within the 
administration of its present Mayor, 
Fiorello LaGuardia, the city's markets 
have changed from inefficient and ex- 
pensive undertakings into profitable in- 
vestments. The Benton Harbor, Mich., 
municipal fi-uit and vegetable market is 
described as doing a three-million-dollar 
annual business by its City Manager in 
the Febmary issue of "Public Manage- 
ment." 



MAYORS' COMiMITTEE ON FEDERAL 
LEGISLATION. 

As President of the United States 
Conference of Mayors, Mayor F. H. 
LaGuardia of New York has appointed 
the Mayors of fourteen cities as an 
advisory board on Federal legislation 
affecting municipalities. The list com- 
prises : 

Watktna Overton, Alemphis, Tenn., . 
Chairman; Harold H. Burton, Cleveland, 
Ohio; Joseph K. Carson, Jr., Portland, 
Ore.; R. E. L. Clancy, Tampa, Fla.; 
Frank Couzcns, Detroit, Mich.; Harry 
D. Durst, Springfield, Mo.; Meyer C. 
Ellensteiu, Newark, N. J.; Thom.is 
Gamble, Savannah, Ga.; Oscar F. Hol- 
corabe, Houston, Texas; Hilary E. 
ITowso, Nashville, Tenn.; James R. Law, 
Madison, Wis.: J. Fred Manning, Lvnn, 
Mass.; Roy N. Towl, Omaha. Neb.; 
George J. Zimmerraann, Buffalo, N. Y. — 
American City Magazine. 



38 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Monday, December 28, 1936. 
Regular meeting of the City Council in the 
Counci] Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m.. Presi- 
dent FITZGERALD in the chair. Absent, Coun. 
Peter A. Murray. 

MOTION TO ADJOURN. 

Coun. GLEASON moved that the Council 
adjourn for two weeks ; lost. 



GRANTS FOR SCHOOL CONSTRUCTION. 

The following was received : 
City of Boston, 

Office of the Mayor, December 28, 1936. 
To the Honorable the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — On November 25, 1935, your 
Honorable Body passed orders accepting the 
offers of the United States of America to 
aid by way of grant in financing the con- 
struction of the following school buildings : 

1. School in Roxbury district (P. W. A. 
Docket No. Mass. 1088). 

2. School in John Marshall District, Dor- 
chester (P. W. A. Docket No. Mass. 1089). 

3. School in Phillips Brooks District, Dor- 
chester (P. W. A. Docket No. Mass. 1090). 

I am advised that the Law Department 
and Emergency Finance Boaxd of the Com- 
monwealth construe such an offer to aid _ in 
financing the construction of a school build- 
ing to include aid in financing the necessary 
equipment therefor. The Federal authorities, 
however, are of the opinion that it is advis- 
able that such an offer should provide fotr 
aid in financing the equipment by express 
language and have therefore submitted super- 
seding offers in each of the above cases. By 
the terms of these superseding offers, the 
United States of America offers to aid in 
financing the construction of said school build- 
ings, including the necessary equipment 
therefor. 

The superseding offer which has been suo- 
mitted in connection vrith the construction of 
a school building in Roxbury district 
(P. W. A. Docket No. Mass. 1088-R) pro- 
vides by its terms for a reduction in the maxi- 
mum amount of the grant from $323,100, as 
appearimg in the original offer, to $307,260. 1 
have been advised, however, that since the 
present estimated cost of construction of 
said school building, including necessary 
equipment therefor, will be substantially less 
than the amount originally estimated, said 
amount of $307,260 is the maximum grant 
based upon the present maximum estimated 
cost. The United States of America has, 
therefore, reduced the maximum grant In 
order to release all available sums for other 
projects. 

I am transmitting herewith to your Honor- 
able Body the following: 

1. Superseding offer by the United States 
of America relative to school in Roxbury 
district (P. W. A. Docket No. Mass. 1088-R). 

2. Superseding offer by the United States of 
America relative to school in John Marshall 
District, Dorchester (P. W. A. Docket No. 
xMass. 1089-R). 

3. Superseding offer by the United States 
of America relative to school in Phillips 
Brooks District. Dorchester (P. W. A. 
Docket No. Mass. 1090-R). 

4. Three copies of rules and regulations, 
P. W. A. Form No. 179; and 

5. Three forms of order of acceptance of 
said superseding offers. 

I recommend prompt consideration and 
passage by your Honorable Body of the ac- 
companying orders. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Ordered. That the superseding offer of the 
United States of America to the City of 
Boston to aid by way of grant in financing 
the construction of a school building in 
Roxbury district, including necessary equip- 
ment therefor, a copy of which superseding 
offer reads as follows : 

"Federal Emergency Administration of 
Public Works. 

Washington, D. C, 
Dated: November 27, 1936. 
Docket No. Mass. 1088-R. 
City of Boston, Boston, Suffolk County, 
Massachusetts. 
1. Subject to the rules and regulations 
(P. W. A. Form No. 179, July 22, 1935, as 
amended to date) which are made a part 
hereof, the United States of America hereby 
offers to aid in financing the construction of 
a school building in Roxbury district, includ- 
ing necessary equipment therefor (herein 



called the "Project") by making a grant to 
the City of Boston in the amount of 45 per 
cent of the cost of the project upon com- 
pletion, as determined by the Federal Emer- 
gency Administrator of Public Works, but 
not to exceed, in any event, the sum of 
$307,260. 

2. Upon the acceptance of this offer by 
the City of Boston, the contract created by 
the acceptance of the offer dated October 7, 
1935, made by the United States of America 
to the City of Boston to aid in financing the 
project shall be cancelled. The cancellation 
of such contract shall not impair or vitiate 
any act performed or proceedings taken 
thereunder prior to such cancellation. Such 
acts or proceedings may be continued under 
the contract created by the acceptance of this 
offer. 

United States op America, 
Federal Emergency Administrator of Public 
Works, 
by Horatio B. Hackett, 
Assistant Administrator." 
be, and the same is hereby in all respects, 
accepted : amd further 

Ordered. That said City of Boston agrees 
to abide by all the rules and regulations re- 
lating to such grant, a copy of which rules 
and regulations ai'e annexed to the govern- 
ment's offer and made a part hereof. 

Ordered, That the superseding offer of the 
United States of America to the City of Bos- 
ton to aid by way of grant in financing the 
construction of a school building in the 
John Marshall District, Dorchester, including 
necessary equipment therefor, a copy of which 
superseding offer reads as follows : 

"Federal Emergency Administration of 

Public Works. 

Washington, D. C, 

Dated: December 7, 1936, 
Docket No. Mass. 1089-R. 
City of Boston, Boston, Suffolk County, 
Massachusetts. 

1. Subject to the rules and regulations 
(P. W. A. Form No. 179, July 22, 1935, as 
amended to date) which are made a part 
hereof, the United States of America hereby 
offers to aid in finamciiig the constniction 
of a scLool building in the John Marshall 
District, Dorchester, including necessary equip- 
ment therefor (herein called the "Project") 
by making a grant to the City of Boston 
iTi the amount of 45 per cent of the cost of 
the project upon completion, as determined 
by the Federal Emergency Administrato(r of 
Public Works, but not to exceed, in any event, 
the sum of $76,815. 

2. Upon the acceptance of this offer by tVie 
City of Boston, the contract created by the 
acceptance of the offer dated October 16, 1935, 
made by the United States of America to 
the City of Boston to aid in financing the 
project shall be cancelled. The cancellation 
of such contract shall not impair or vitiate 
any act performed or proceedings taken there- 
under prior to such cancellation. Such acts 
or proceedings may be continued under the 
contract created by the acceptance of this 
offer. 

United States of America. 
Federal Emergency Administrator of Public 
Works. 
by Horatio B. Hackett, 

Assistant Admiiiistrator." 
be, and the same is hereby in all respects, ac- 
cepted ; and further 

Ordered, That said City of Boston agrees 
to abidte by all the rules and regulations re- 
lating to such grant, a copy of which rules 
and regulations are ajnnexed to the Govern- 
ment's offer and made a part hereof. 

Ordered, That the superseding offer of the 
United States of America to the City of Bos- 
ton to aid by ■way of grant in financing the 
construction of a school building in Phillips 
Brooks District, Dorchester, including necessary 
equipment therefor, a copy of which super- 
seding offer reads as follows : 

"Federal Emergency Administi-ation of 

Public Works. 

Washington, D. C, 

Dated: December 3, 1936, 
Docket No. Mass. 1090-R. 
City of Boston, Boston, Suffolk County, 
Massachusetts. 
1. Subject to the rules and regulations 
(P. W. A. Form No. 179, July 22, 1935, as 
amended to date) which are made a part 
hereof, the United States of America hereby 
offers to aid in finamcing the construction 
of a school building in Phillips Brooks 
District, Dorchester, including necessary equip- 
ment therefor (herein called the "Project") 
by making a grant to the City of Boston 
in the amount of 45 per cent of the cost of 
the project upon completion, as determined 



by the Federal Emergency Administrator of 
Public Works, but not to exceed, in any event, 
the sum of $352,800. 

2. Upon the acceptance of this offer by the 
City of Boston, the contract created by the 
acceptance of the offer dated October 9, 1935, 
made by the United States of America to 
the City of Boston to aid financing the 
project shall be cancelled. The cancellation 
of such contract shall not impair or vitiate 
any act performed or proceedings taken there- 
under prior to such cancellation. Such acts 
or proceedings may be continued under the 
contract created by the acceptance of this 
offer. 

United States op America. 
Federal Emergency Administrator of Public 
Works, 
by Horatio B. Hackettt, 

Assistant Administrator." 
be, and the same is hereby in all respects, ac- 
cepted ; and further 

Ordered, That said City of Boston agrees 
to abide by all the rules and regulations re- 
lating to such grant, a copy of which rales 
and regulations are annexed to the Govern- 
ment's offer and made a part hereof. 

Referred to the Executive Committee. 



COLLECTION OF UNPAID WATER RATES. 
The fallowing was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 28, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith a com- 
munication from the Commissioner of Public 
Works relative to your order of November 
23, 1936, concerning methods of coBectine 
unpaid water rates. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Public Works Department, 

December 21, 1936. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary, Mayor's Office. 

Dear Sir, — ^I beg leave to acknowledge re- 
ceipt of your note of November 25, with 
attached City Council order dated November 
23, and reading as follows : 

"Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to inform the City Council what diffi- 
culties are involved in the collection of un- 
paid water rates by the lien method, so called, 
provided by sections 42A and 42F, inclusive, 
of chapter 40 of the General Laws, as amended 
by chapter 197 of the Acts of 1932, and what 
changes, if any, in his opinion, are required 
to make the said method more valuable for 
such collection," 

and to state that the so-called Lien Act was 
accepted by the City of Boston in an order 
passed by the City Council September 11, 
1923, approved by the Mayor September 12, 
1923, and recorded with Suffolk County Reg- 
istry of Deeds September 12, 1923 (Book 
4486, page 630). 

Since this acceptance there have been sev- 
eral amendments to the act, the last amend- 
ment being chapter 42, Acts of 1936. Sec- 
tion 1 of this act provides that the lien 
filed on water biUs not paid within sixty days 
after due date "shall a.ttach only for water 
supplied within a period of one year next 
prior to the filing of statement in the Reg- 
istry of Deeds." Section 2 provides that the 
lien as filed "shall contain the name of the 
owner of record of such real estate as on 
January 1 of the year in which the lieii is 
filed." 

There have been two major faults in this 
act. One fault, namely, the owner of record, 
etc., has been now remedied in section 2 
of this act. The other major fault is that 
the time from the arising of the lien and 
the expiration of the period in which the lien 
is obliged to be filed, namely, one year, as 
per section 1, is too short for effective collec- 
tion and necessitates drastic action be taken 
against the taxpayer. There is a question as 
whether or not too short a period is helpful 
to either the city or the taxpayer. The more 
serious danger is that a tax bUl including a 
water lien may be defeated by an error in 
effecting the lien for the water bill; that is, 
a sale made for a large tax account may be 
deifeated because of an error affecting a com- 
paratively small water bill, thus destroying 
or losing the tax sale. 

Respectfully yours, 

C. J. Carven, 
Coimnissioner of Public Works. 

Placed on file. 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



39 



ASSIGNING OF CLERKS TO SNOW DUTY. 
The followins was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 28, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith a com- 
munication from the Commissioner of Public 
Works relative to your order of September 
28, concerning the assigning of regularly em- 
ployed city clerks to snow duty and snow 
dumps during the winter months. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfieli>, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Public Works Department, 

December 21, 193B. 
Mr. Joseph F. Mellyn, 

Secretary, Mayor's Office. 

Dear Sir, — ^Reporting on the letter of Coun- 
cilor George A. Murray referring to an order 
introduced in the City Council asking that the 
Public Works Commissioner, through his 
Honor the Mayor, discontinue the practice 
this year which was initiated last year, for 
the first time, whereby clerks of the office 
force of the city were compelled to leave 
heated offices to work on snow at the dump- 
ing places, I wish to state that in the re- 
organization of the method of handling the 
removal of snow by contract, the number of 
districts were re<iuced from fourteen to four 
and each of the four districts were placed 
under the control of the Division Engineer 
of the Paving, Sewer, Bridge and Ferry, and 
Water Divisions. Also, in place of the con- 
tractor working from ten to fourteen hours 
daily, the contractor removing the snow last 
year worked in two shifts daily or approx- 
imately tweuty hours per day. It is impos- 
sible for the employees to stand a twenty- 
hour day, and in order to lessen the hours 
spent by the engineers, inspectors and checkers 
it was advisable to work said force in 
ten-hour shifts. 

In all the divisions except the Water Divi- 
sion there were and are engineers and in- 
spectors sufficient in number to properly 
handle the contract. The Water Division, 
after calling upon the engineers and inspectors, 
detailed clerks to the number of seven or 
eight to help out. With the exception of two 
clerks in said Water Division who are en- 
gaged in outside activities after 5 p. m., 
the other clerks willingly reported and ex- 
pressed satisfaction in being able to break 
the daily office routine and get a breath of 
fresh air, together with the knowledge of 
the method of handling snow. 

In the coming winter any clerks, if used 
on snow work, will have the opportunity to 
either remain in the office working on snow 
removal data or going outside assisting in 
the work of check snow loading. No clerk 
will be asked to or directed to do any outside 
work unless he so wishes or so volunteers. 
Very truly yours, 
C. J. Carven, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Placed on file. 



OWNERS OF SOUTH BOSTON PROPERTY. 
The foUowing was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 28, 193G. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith a com- 
muinlication from the Corporation Cou/nsel 
relative to your order of December 7, 193C, 
concerning the record ownens of prem'ises at 
767 Bast Fourth .street, 42-48 A street and 
27 Silver street, all in South Boston. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Law Department, December 23, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Ma:nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Deair Mr. Mayor, — 'I have received a memo- 
randum from your office dated December 10, 
1936, with which was transmitted the follow- 
ing order of the City Council passed Decem- 
ber 7, 1936: 

"To advise the Oity Council the name and 
address of the owner of record of the premiises 
at 7G7 East Ftourth street, 42-48 A sti-eet and 
27 Silver street. South Bosfon, prior to the 
City of Boston obtaining Land Court title 
following proceedings for nonpayment of taxes 
aind to perfect city title." 

The owner of record of the premises num- 
bered 767 East Fourth street. South Boston, 
at the time of foreclosure by the city of its 
tax title on said property was Louise Con- 
stanitine. I am informed that her address 
>vas at said itime 396 West Bix>ad\vay, South 
Boston. 

The oiwner of record of the premises num- 
bered 42, 44, 46 and 48 A street. South Bos- 
ton, and of the pi^'emises numbered 27 Silver 



street. South Boston, at the time of fore- 
closure by the city of its tax titles on said 
properties was Hugh R. CoUins. 

I am informed thaJt Mr. Collins' address at 
said time wSs 396 'West Broadway, South 
Boston. 

Very truly yours, 

Henry E. Foley, 
Corporation Counsel. 
Placed on file. 



VETO OF BARTLETT STREET SIDEWALK. 
The following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 23, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Genttemen, — I return herewith disapproved 
and without my signature an order adopted 
by your Honoralble Body on December 7, 1936, 
for the nvaking of a sidewalk with granite 
edgestotnes along both sides of Bartlett street 
in Ward 2. 

1 am informed 'by the Cominissioner of 
Public Works that there are no funds avail- 
ible at the present time for this construction. 
Undeir the circumstances I am constrained to 
veto the order. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 
Placed on file. 



1937 BUDGET. 
The following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 17, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith a com- 
munication from the Budget Commissioner 
relative to your order of December 7, 1936, 
concerning the time at which it is expected 
the 1937 budget will be presented to the City 
Council for action. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Budget Departmtent, December 15, 1936. 
To : HonoraJble Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 
Subject : City Council order, December 7, 
1936.. — To inform the City Council as to 
when the Mayor expects to present budget 
for 1937 to the City Council for action. 
Memorandum. 
As a result of legislation enacted during 
the current year disposing of the question of 
tax limit for the City of Boston, it will be 
possible to submit a budget, fully segregated, 
to the City iCouncil for the coming year in 
accordance with the provisions of section 3 
of the City Charter, ?. c, within thirty days 
after the beginning of the fiscal year (Jan- 
uary 1, 1937). 

Respectfully submitted. 

Francis J. Murray, 

Budget Commissioner. 
Placed on file. 



BUILDING AT CORNER OF BUNKER HILL 
AND BALDWIN STREETS. 
The following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 23, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — 'I transmit herewith a com- 
munication from the Building Commissioner 
i-elative to your order of December 15, 1936, 
concerning an inspection of the vacant build- 
ing at the corner of Bunker Hill street and 
Baldwin street. 

Bebpectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 

Building Department, December 21 , 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — In answer to your communica- 
tion of December 18, inclosing an order of 
the City Council dated December 15, "that 
the Building Commissioner and the Fire Com- 
missioner be instructed by his Honor the Mayor 
to make an inspection of the vacant building 
at the corner of Bunker Hill street and Bald- 
win street, and report back to the City Coun- 
cil, within one week, the condition of this 
building," please be advised as follows : 

The condition of this building has been 
known to this department since October 15, 
1935, when a notice of its unsafe condition 
was served on Ethel Hurley of 74 Jefterson 
avenue, Chelsea, by n deputy sheriff. Nothinit 
having l)ecn done to secure the unsafe condi- 
tion of this building a further notice wiis sent 
to the owner and it was my intention to 
refer this matter to the Law Department for 



prosecution when we were informed that the 
premises had been taken by the City of Boa- 
ton for nonpayment of taxes. 

On April 23, 1936, an inspector of this de- 
partment conferred with Mr. Roswell G. Hall, 
Superintendent of Public Buildings, relative 
to this matter, and he reported that the mat- 
ter had been referred to one of the employees 
of that department. 

In August of 1936 Mr. Hall requested a 
report from this department relative to the 
condition of the building. The district in- 
spector reported that it was a brick buUding 
with a wooden ell, formerly occupied by three 
families but now vacant ; that while the win- 
dows were broken they had been boarded up 
on the first floor ; that the structural condi- 
tion of the building was good ; that it was 
not beyond repair and he would not recom- 
mend the demolition of the building. 

On examination December 21, 1936, the 
district inspector makes a similar report, 
namely, that the windows and doors on the 
first floor are boarded up ; glass in upper 
windows broken, building is in fair structural 
condition. 

Respectfully yours, 
• Edward W. Roemer, 

Building Commissioner. 

Placed on file. 



SALE OF CITY-OWNED TAX-TITLE 
PROPERTY. 
The following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 21, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — ^I transmit herewith a commu- 
nication from the Superintendent of Public 
Buildings relative to your order of December 
7, 1936, concerning a request to supply cer- 
tain information incident to any further re- 
quests for leave to sell all parcels of city- 
owned tax-title property. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Public Buildings Department, 

December 21, 1936. 
John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary, Mayor's Office. 
Dear Sir, — Referring to the attached order 
of the City Council regarding city-owned tax- 
title property, I ■will be glad when submitting 
offers in the future to furnish the details as 
enumerated on the said order. 
Respectfully yours, 

Roswell G. Hall, 
Superintendent of Public Buildings. 
Placed on file. 



TRANSFER FROM PARKMAN FUND 

INCOME. 
The following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 21, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen. — I am in receipt of the attached 
communication from the Board of Park Com- 
missioners requesting the transfer of the sum 
of $2,103.31 from the income of the George 
F. Parkman Fund to the Maintenance and 
Improvement of the Common and Parks in 
Existence on January 12, 1S87. 

I submit herewith an appropriation order 
and respectfully recommend its immediate 
passage by your Honorable Body. 
Respectfully, 
Freperick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Park Department, December 21, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Sir, — By vote of the Board of Park 
Commissioners you are respectfully asked to 
request the City Council to transfer from 
the income of the George F. Parkmnn Fund 
the sum of ?2103.31. which is the final biifcmcc 
now available, to be expended under the di- 
rection of the Board of Park Commissioners, 
as follows : 

Common and Parks in E.xistence on January 
12, 1887, Maintenance and Improvement 

of $2,103.31. 

When making up the budget estimates for 
the year 1936, a sum equal to the total yearly 
income of the George F. Parkman Fund w.'is 
deducted from Item A-1, Permanent Em- 
ployees, with the understanding that tins 
deduction was to be replaced by the total 
yearly income of said Parkman Fund for 1936. 
to be transferred aa it accrued from time to 
time during the year to the regular mainte- 
nance appropriation of the Park Department. 
Respectfully yours. 
William P. Lono, ChsiniMui. 



40 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



Ordered, That ■ the sum of $2,103.31 be, 
and hereby is, appropriated from the income 
of the George F. Parkman Fund, to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the Park Com- 
missioners, for the Maintenance and Improve- 
ment of the Common and Parks in Existence 
on January 12, 18S7, as follows : 
Common and Parks in Existence on Jan- 
uary 12. 1887, Maintenance and Improve- 
ment of $2,103.31 

Referred to Executive Committee. 



FISKE WHARF PURCHASE. 
Tlie following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayoi-, December 18, 1'936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — ^In further reference to the 
Fiske Wharf matter about which your Hon- 
orable Body desired more information, I beg to 
transmit herewith a letter from the Boston 
Port Authority. This letter is in reply to the 
report of the Finance Commission to your 
Honorable Body on the same subject. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Boston Port Authomty, 

1600 Custom Hous.e, 

Bottom, Mass., 

December 10, 1936. 
Hon. Fredei-ick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

In re Fiske Wharf. 
Dear Mayor Mansfield, — Inclosed with a 
notice from yoiir office o-n November 23, 1S36, 
which asked for a reply to the Finance Com- 
mission's letter to the City Council about 
Fiske Wharf, their letter being dated Novem- 
ber 14, 1936, was a copy of the letter in 
question. This letter I have reviewed amd, 
as requested, am sending you my comments. 
I find in it no convincing argument against 
the purchase of the property by the city. 

Im order to providie a background and for 
your convenience, I caU your attention to the 
following letters and memoramda, copies of 
which are inclosed. 

Our letter to you dated July 25, 193'5. 
Captain Lord's mem^orandum to me, dated 
July 26, 1935. (Since this memoiramdtim wate 
submitted the New Haven has demolished the 
superstructure on Fiske Wharf.) 

Our letter to Mr. Charles J. Fox, City 
Auditor, dated October 1, 1935. 

Captain Lord's memorandum 'Vo me, dated 
October 30, 1935. (The tracing referred to 
was left either with you or with OWr. Fox.) 

Im paragraph 2, page 1, of the Finance 
Commibsiion's letter of N<)vember 14, the 
defeat of the order to acquire the property 
in question is recommended. My comment 13 
that the small expenditure involved cannot be 
described as "unnecessary burden on the heavy 
load the taxpayers now carry," that is, unless 
.sooind and coinstructive steps to build up the 
Port are to be construed as such an "unneces- 
sa-ry burden." In favoring the investmemt we do 
nut anticipate any immediate use for the 
pr'operty, nor amy immediate large expemdituT-es 
on the property. iSome fencimg would be 
necessary, as outlined in one of the memo- 
randa referre<I to above, and some of the 
dilapidated piling might have to be removed. 
Surely the investment and the immedifate 
expanse called for is a small burden for the 
city to carry in the protection of a very valu- 
able piece of waterfront property from possi- 
ble encroachment by mon-marine enterpiritee, 
and for a very much needed step in the direc- 
tion of getting our waterfront in an ultimate 
position to handle the growing needs of the 
Port. What seems not to be clearly under- 
stood is that the Port is nc^t standing still, 
but is constantly gaining in business. The 
time will come, and it is almost here, as a 
matter of fact, when existing facilities will 
not be adequate. If we want to hold up our 
end with ports with which we are competing, 
- all of which, without exception, regard their 
waterfronts as oine of the prime assets of their 
communities, it is inconceivable that we cam 
neglect any reasonable opiportunity for con- 
structive development, present or potential, 
which will permit us to keep abreast of the 
times and these other poi-ts. A defeaJtist at- 
titude, and an unwillingness to spend a few 
dollars when returns to the community of im- 
portant values are ultimately going to be had, 
is not the attitude and spirit by which this 
city has been brought to its present eminence. 
The Port has not kept pace with the rest 
of the city, and until comparatively recemt 
years, following a period of disastrous apathy, 
there has been little interest taken in it and 
apparently no one to take am interest im it. 
The city has paid the penalty for this neglect 
in countless ways, as, for example, the 
diversion of commerce an<3 the ^s'tablishmemt 



of rates and terminal practices favoring other 
ports but denied Boston. One reason why 
these things have happened is because the 
impression has been very deifinite that Bos- 
tk>n's own government and own citizens either 
cared very little what happened to the Port, 
or were unable or unwilling to make an 
attempt to better conditions. 

On page 2, test paragraph, the Finamce 
Commission says: "If the city buys, it will 
simply relieve the railroad ownership of 
carrying a 'white elephant,' so called — of pay- 
ing taxes on am assessed valuation of $120,000 
for something it has mo use for and cannot 
sell." It is ti-ue that the New Haven for 
many years has not miade use of this property, 
but it is not the case that it has been miable 
to sell it. As a matter of fact, comparatively 
recently a private purchaser was in the market 
for the property, and had negotiations not 
been going- on with the city for its acquisition, 
the property would presumably have been 
sold and the city would have lost an opportun- 
ity to acquire it at the price now offered. The 
paragraph also comitainB the observation that 
the solid area of the parcel is only one-fifth 
of the whole area. This statement is of no 
impopbamice, from the point of view of desir- 
ability of acquiring the space occupied by 
Fiske Wharf. It is the location the city should 
have, whether the property is solid land or 
whether a large part of it ite on piles. 

The Finance Commissiom's letter contains 
no answer to the argument (pages 1 and 2) 
"that the purchase by the city would keep 
the property out of ownership that might turn 
it into non-waterfront purposes, i. e., the 
establishment of manufadturing pjamte or 
other industries ■which would have no use for 
its waterfront possibilities." This is a main 
argument for the acquisition of the property. 
On pages 3 and 4, the letter refers to the 
large number of unused or little used parce-ls 
of land owned by the city. With such uniised 
parcels here and there about the city, the 
problem of Port development cam in no way 
be associated. 

fRefei-emce is made in the report (page 3) 
to certain waterfront properties im the vicinity 
of Fiske Wharf owned by the city, viz., 
"Atkims Whiarf" and "another dock south of 
it (i. e., Fiske Wharf) (insert ours), the 
old Ferry Dock, by a few hundred yards." 
The Jattar is lateo referred to as "the North 
Ferry slip" and the report states "Some 
waterfront experts regard the North Ferry 
slip as one of the most valuable dock properties 
om the waterfromt." 

Here are the facts om the several properties 
under reference and others. The City of 
Bofetom now owns or has under nin^ty-mine-year 
lease three parcels of land im this section of 
Atlantic avenue. The first runs from the 
old Boston and Worcester Street Railway 
piroperty to the present Fiske Wharf property. 
This parcel includes the North Paving Wharf, 
referred to in the Finance Commission's report 
as Atkins Wharf, the firelboat berth and North 
End Park. The city also owns the North 
Ferry slip and has under minety-nine-year 
lease the Soiith Ferry slip. These properties 
are outlined im red on the 'accompanying trac- 
ing of certain Atlantic avenue properties. 

The !so-c;UIed Atkins Wharf is the North 
Paving Wharf, which is adjacent to the fire- 
boat berth. This whai^f is very narrow, being 
only fifty-seven feet wide, and is used by the 
Fire Department for the parking of cars and 
overhauling of equipment. Due to its narrow 
width, and complete lack of facilities, it is 
of nto use to anyone but the Fire Deplartmemt. 
The Finance iCommibsion gives the existing 
valuation as $275,000, a figure which must 
apply, for the most part, to the fire station 
and the building previously used as Police 
Sbatio,n 8. 

Fiske Wharf has been assessed for vai^ilous 
amounts in recent years. Since the $120,000 
valuation, referred to im the report, the dilapi- 
dated buildings have been torn. down. From 
the report it would be assumed that the New 
Haven was unable to sell this property to 
amyonie. The contrary, as already pointed out, 
is the case. 

There are several pieces of property between 
Fiske Wharf and the North Ferry slip, a fact 
nc>t made cleiar in, the letter (page 3, para- 
graph 1). iFirst is that of the Lowney 
Chocolate Company, a privately -owned ware- 
house. Secomd ils the old Wilrunlsimimet Ferry 
slip, also privately owned. At one time, the 
city was conSiderimg its purchase to locate 
Police Station 8, then the Harbor Division. 
At the present time the property is used by 
no one. Adjacent to the Winmisimme't Ferry 
slip on the south is Constitution Wharf, owned 
by the Quincy IMarket Corporation, and used 
as a waterfromt warehouse. Next om the 
south is Battery Wharf, also owned by the 
Quincy Market Cbrporation and used as a 
distributing warehouse. Then comes the Notth 
Ferry slip. This is a comparatively small piece 



of property, the solid fill area on which is 
much less than at Fiske Wharf. This is due 
to the fact that the city has constructed a 
street over most of the property. The limited 
berthing space available makes the North 
Ferry slip absolutely useless for waterborne 
commerce. To say, as the report does, and 
assuming Fiske Wharf were put im shape for 
use, "the city would mot then have as good a 
location even for the purpose of which the 
Mayor wrote, as it now owms dm the North 
Ferry slip" is not borne out by the facts. 

Next in order come Lincoln and Union 
Wharves, privately owned, and then the South 
Ferry slip, leased by the city for ninety-nine 
years, fully utilized by the Ferry and the In- 
stitutions Department, and of no commercial 
value. 

In brief, the properties above referred to 
on Atlantic avenue as owned or leased by the 
city are not of the slightest use for com- 
mercial purposes, as far as the Port is con- 
cerned. 

On page 4, first full paragraph, the Finance 
Commission refers to "a comprehensive plan" 
and "proper legislative authority" in connec- 
tion with the reclamation of the waterfront, 
going on to say "No more wharf property 
should be acquired while the city owns the 
North Ferry slip and is allowing it to be- 
come a menace to the harbor and a public 
waste." My comment is that while waiting 
for a "comprehensive plan" to be developed 
and made operative, waterfront property de- 
sired by the city in connection with such a 
plan, is and would be at the mercy of land 
speculatoiis and of those wlio may purchase 
for nonmarine occupancy. No such attitude 
on the part of the city will protect its water- 
front. Rather, the city should acquire de- 
sirable waterfront property as opportunity 
occurs at reasonable prices in anticipation of 
future needs. 

If this is not the place to dwell at length on 
the Port and its pixiblems, attention at least 
should be called to moneys already expended 
and to be expended by other ports less favored 
geographically than Boston, but determined 
at all reasonable costs to make the most of 
their opportunities. I know of no other major 
port in this or any other country that would 
permit of continuance a (situation by which a 
large pier property in the heart of a city 
offered to that city for a quarter of its as- 
sessed valuation is refused. The sum involved 
is small. The will to go ahead is what is 
needed, and what I sincerely hope will be 
evidenced. 

Very truly yours, 
Boston Port Authority, 
Richard Parkhurst, 

Vice-Chairman. 

July 25, 1935. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mayor Mansfield, — One of the situa- 
tions in the Port which, as time goes on, 
should be susceptible of correctiom is the 
condition wbich we have on the water Bide 
of Atlantic avenue. Many of the piers there 
are relics of the old sailing days, and many 
of the structures aside from the piers are 
occupied for various purposes having nothing 
to do with marine use. Were the situation 
to be reversed, in other words, were the At- 
lantic avenue waterfront to be supplied with 
modern and commodious piers, there is no 
question but that the coastwise business of the 
Port, which, as you know, makes up about 
eigthty per cent of our total tonnage, would 
be handled more expeditiously and economi- 
cally. To reclaim the Atlantic avenue water- 
front at this time is, of course, quite out of 
the question. However, I have long felt that 
we should be bearing in mind the possibility 
and the desirability of making a start om this 
work if and when an opening presented itself. 

To the extent that the city itself can, from 
time to time, acquire parcels of property in 
this area, to that extent on the one hand can 
we keep undesirable construction or occupancy 
(and by undesirable I mean connected in no 
way with harbor activities) out of this zome, 
and on the other by such city ownership can 
we at a later date have a great deal more 
to say than we can now as to how we ulti- 
mately want this waterfront to be developed. 
For several years I have been keeping an eye 
out for such property as may be offered for 
sale in this area, but either mo large parcels 
have been offered or if they have the price 
has been way out of sight. At the present 
moment, however, I find that the New Haven 
Railroad, vvrhich owns Fiske Wharf, adjacent 
to North End Park, is rather inclined to get 
rid of that piece of property at a figure which 
may make it possible for the city to acquire 
it. Not long ago, we directed to the atten- 
tion of the New Haven the fact that this 
wharf was the worst looking piece of property 
on the entire waterfront and requested their 
attention to the matter of putting it in bettei? 
condition. Upon examination of the pier they 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



41 



found that it was so far gone that they would 
like to try to dispose of it and get it off 
their bands. They asked me if the city would 
be interested, and I &aid it would all depend 
upon what the property could be purchased for, 
because naturally the wharf itself is no good 
at all, and the only point in making the 
purchase would be to gain control of the 
land for such uses as the future might dic- 
tate. The New Haven has already bad an 
offer of $25,000, I believe, but I shall develop 
this. I may say that in 1932 the new Haven 
approached us on this same matter, which 
then came to a head for a different reason, and 
wanted a price of $150,000 for this' property. 

The above is a very brief resume of this 
proposition. I think that the city should 
eventually control the water side of Atlantic 
avenue. We may have a chance here to start 
in a small way. As you undouihtedly know, 
the city of New York lost control of prac- 
tically all the Hudson Rjiver w'aiterfront as 
long ago as 1800, and in 1870 began a pro- 
gram to buy it back. Tlhey have, of course, 
spent huge sums to do this, but it is now 
practically accomplished. Whatever money 
Boston might want to spend to get control of 
the Atlantic avenue waterfront would be very 
small in comparison with the New York ex- 
penditure and, as I have said before, this is 
not the time to go into the matter in a large 
way. However, to enaWe the city to get a 
foothold, I am wondering if you would agree 
with me that could we gat the Fiske Wharf 
property for the sum of $25,000, we should, 
in the interests of the future of the Port, and 
on account of the faot that the figure is really 
a very low one, proceed to acquire the parcel 
in question. 

I should like very much to talk this matter 
over with you ipersonally, if you are interested, 
and in the meanitime, I am going to suggest 
to Mr. Russell, of the New Haven, that be- 
fore he makes any final move to dispose of 
the property, he communicate further with us. 
Very truly yours, 

Richard Parkhurst, 

Vice Chairman. 



July 26, 1935. 
Memorandum for Mr. 'Parkhurst. 
Subject: Fiske Wharf Proper'ty. 

In compliiance with your memonandum of 
July 25, I visited the premises at Fiske Wharf 
and wish to submit the following report relative 
to conditions. 

The Fiske Wharf property consists of two 
piers, one, Fiske Wharf, adjacent to the North 
End Pairk l>a/th house property, and Harris 
Wharf, rwhich is between Fiske Wharf and the 
old IChelsea Ferry slip. Fiske Wharf is of 
pile construction with solid fill out to the 
present fire iwall, which i!s aip proximately one 
third of the distance from the street to the 
end of the pier. In examinSng this pier at 
low wHater, at a distance of about three 
quairters of the length of the pier and under 
the pier, the bottom -may be seen showing that 
while the entire pier is not all solid fill, the 
water shoaled to such an extenit that there 
would not be moi'e than eight or nine feet of 
water around the present piles. The flooring 
to this pier is in very poor condition, and on 
tbe north side 'Where there is a driveway ex- 
tending the entire length of the pier, the 
floior is unsafe for any one to walk on. This 
driveway is approximately thirty feet in width. 
In the balance of the pier a false floor has been 
built two feet higher than the original floor. 
This raised floor or platfoi-m dfe in good condi- 
tion . 

There are no sprinklers on the pier and no 
lights. The side walls are in very poor 
condition, sagging in many places and ab- 
solutely entirely open to the weather. The 
roof leaks considerably, but is compairatively 
solid. 

There are two street approaches to these 
piers from CoimmerciaJ street, having a width 
of about thirty-five feet. There are no fences 
protecting the piers from vandalism and there 
is no solid ground, other than what is under 
the piers, that would go with the property. 
Fiske Wharf is four hundred and thirty feet 
in length. In order to berth a vessel at Fiske 
Wharf on either siide, a certain amount of 
dredgijjng would be necessary, as the enitire 
area has shoaled. While charts show twenty 
feet alongside these piers, I doubt very much 
if there is eighteen feet and at the head 
I doubt if there would be more than eight 
feet of watei'. 

Fiske Wharf has the following dimensions : 
4'30 feet long, 135 feet wide, with a anie-story 
shed covering approximately 64,000 square 
feet. 

Harris Wharf is 280 feet in length, 50 feet 
wide, with a she<l one story high and cover- 
ing am area of 24.000 square feet. It has 
approximately TO per cent of floor apace over 
a solid fill foundation. This solid fill runs 
under the center of this piier, the aprons, and 



for a short distance inside of the aproma, 
being on pile donstrfuotion . The floor of 
Harris Wharf is the same height above mean 
low water as the driveway on Fiiske Wharf, 
so that at times of extreme high water this 
wharf is likely to be wet. The false floor 
on Fiske Wbairf keeps that area dry under 
these conditions. The side walls and roof of 
Harris Wharf are in the same condition as 
those of Fiske Wharf. 

These two wharves would be ideal for the 
handling of coastwise traffic, if rebuilt, by 
having* new side walls, roof and flooring in- 
stalled. While there is no direct rail con- 
nection to the Union Freight, one could be 
hiad very easily. Also, coastwise traffic for 
local coneumption is bandied in the most part 
by trucks. Ample faeilities are at hand for 
the handling of trucks on these two piens, as 
they may be approached from three different 
sti^ets. 

George P. Lord. 

*Also much new piling. 



October 1, 1935. 
Mr. Charles J. Fox, 
City Auditor. 
Deiar Mr. Fox, — ^In the matter of the Fiske 
Wharf property, in order that you may have 
a background of the situation. I inclose the 
following : 

1. Copy of a leltter which we sent the 
Mayor on July 25, l'9'a5. 

2. ICopy of a memorandum submitted to me 
by Captain Lord, our Marine Supervisor, on 
July 26. tt93i5. 

This piece of property is adjacent to North 
End Park and might be susceptible of develop- 
ment iin relation to the latiter. I hope, how- 
ever, that this will not be the case, and that 
this area would be set aside by the city for 
such future commercdal development as the 
requirements of the Port may diotatie. 

Fiske 'Wharf itself is in very bad condition. 
Some of the piling may be dn fair shape, but 
probably if the city were to acquire the 
property it would be advisoible to remove not 
only the upper rworlcs but also the piling. 
The place is one of the iworst fire hazards on 
the waterfront, and for that reason alone the 
city would do well to demolish it. 

As the com>merce of the Port expands, which 
it is bound to do after we get the aiate and 
terminal situation straightened out, the Fiske 
Wharf property should be a valuable asset to 
the city. It is close to the deep water channel, 
and while, of course, some dredging would 
have to take place between the channel and 
the pier itself, this would naturally be under- 
taken if and when new piers were constructed 
at that location. 

I hope very much that arangements wiil be 
made for the city to purchase the property, 
demolish the existing structui^es and have it 
availalblei for future needs. 

In the event that this letter and inclosures 
do not cover the situation for your purposes, 
I shall be glad to send you supplementia-ry 
information in such other form as you may 
request. 

Yours very truly, 

Richard Parkhurst, 

Vice Chairman. 



October 30, 1935. 
Memorandum -for Mr. Parkhuirst. 
Fiske Wharf Property. 

I have measured the length of fence re- 
quired to properly pr<>tect this property after 
buildings and deck of the piers have been re- 
moved. The total length 'would be 415 feet 
of fencing. If the deck of Harris WTiarf, 
the southern pier, is not removed, an additional 
40 feet would be required to keep people, and 
IKXirticularly youngsters, from getting over onto 
this property and possibly injuring themselves. 
The attached drawing is a tracing made of 
tho property from the atlas in the assessore" 
ofru<- :sCt City Hall. This property abuts the 
North End Park Bath House, and the fence 
would be run from that building stiiaight through 
to the southeastern corner of Harris Wharf, 
thence along the property line, a distance of 
38 feet to the brick wall which is iNirt ot 
Harris Whajrf. This brick wall probjibly could 
be retlained at least for half of its height, 
thereby saving appro.xiniately 100 feet of 
fencing which woukl otherwise be required. 

If the deck or planking ot Harris Wharf is 
removed, no further fencing would bo re- 
quire<l. If. however, it is left an additional 
10 feet of fenoinc would be necessary to run 
from the brick wall to beyond low water. 
Respectfully yours, 

GhX)KGH P. LoitP. 
(Capt. George P. I.or.l.) 

Plnce<l on file. 



1937 POLICE LISTING. 
The following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 18, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — ^I transmit herewith a com- 
munication from the Police Commissioner 
relative to your order of December 7, 1936, 
concerning the 1937 police listing. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Police Department, December 17, 1936. 
Mr. John F. Gilmore, Jr., 

Assistant Secretary, Mayor's Office. 

Dear Sir, — ^Replying to your communication 
dated December 14, 1936, with which you 
sent to this office copy of City Council order 
dated December 7, 1936, which reads : 

"Ordered, That the Police Commissioner he 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, in- 
cident to the 1937 police listing, to consider 
the advisalbility of using only day men on 
police listing work, utilizing the services of 
officers in the Traffic Division, and such di- 
visions as Division 2, for work in other sec- 
tions, and to issue an order to the captains 
dn the various divisions that no report on 
police listing be made sooner than twenty 
days from January first,". 

I am in receipt of a" report from Edward W. 
Fallon, Superintendent of Police, stating that 
he is of the opinion that no benefit will be 
obtained by adopting the City Council order, 
and he recommends that the present policy of 
the department in respect to police listing be 
maintained. 

The suggestion that the services of officers 
in the Traffic Division and such divisions 
as Division 2 be utilized for work in other 
sections is not feasible as the officers of the 
Traffic Division and Division 2 perform a 
most important duty in the business section 
of this city in the protection of large business 
establishments, and the guidance and safety 
of pedestrian and vehicular traffic in the most 
congested section of the city. 

Having in mind the duties performed by 
officers assigned to automobile patrol, special 
duty, court attendance, school crossings, and 
one day off in eigiht that is allowed officers, 
it would not be practicable to adopt this 
change at this time, especially in view of 
the fact that there is a shortage now of 310 
patrolmen in the department. 
Very truly yours, 

Joseph F. Timilty, 
Police Commissioner. 

Placed on file. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 
The following petitions were received and 
referred to the committees named, viz. : 

Claims. 

William H. Bennett, to be reimbursed for 
execution issued against him. 

Bernard J. Casey, to be reimbursed for 
e.xecution issued against him. 

Fred Perkins, for compensation for damage 
to truck by city track. 

A. Puopolo, for compensation for damage 
to property at 18 Cooper street, caused by 
burs'ting fire hose. 

Joseph S. Snyder, for reimbursement for 
execution issued against him. 

Angelo Steriti, for compensation for dam- 
age to truck and personal injuries caused by 
an alleged defect on Charlestown Bridge. 

Anthony Steriti, for compensation for in- 
juries caused by an alleged defect in Charles- 
town Bridge. 

Betsey Welansky. for compensation for dam- 
age to property at 35 Cunningham street, 
caused by blockage of sewer. 

Executive. 
Petition of Viola K. Breiding, for children 
under fifteen years of age to appear at Cur- 
rent Events Hal!, December 23. 



REMOVAL OP JAMES J. EGAN. 

Notice was received from tho Mayor ot 
removal of James J. Egan ti-om position as 
member of the Board of Commissioners vi 
School Buildings, inclosing copy of letter <!ent 
him December 21, 193G.' 

Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENTS BY THE MAYOR. 

Notices were received ot the foHowing ap- 
pointments by tho Mayor, viz. : 

Leo J. Dunn, 11 Primrose street, Roslin- 
dale, to bo moml>er of tho Board of Commis- 
sioners of Schtxil BuildiiiKs tor term endini: 
December 1, I93S. to fill vacancy caused hv 
removal of James J. Eg.in. 

Edward M. Richardson. 11 Gerald .■strtvt. 
Brighton, as Public Works Commissioner, in 
place of Christopher J. Carvon. retired. U» 
take effect January 1. 1937. 

Severally placed on fUo. 



42 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



APPOINTMENT OF FRANCIS R. BANGS. 

Notice was received from Richard J. Lane 
and Leo J. Dunn, members of the Board of 
Commissioners of School Buildings of City 
of Boston, of appointment of Francis R. Bangs 
of Boston as member of Board of Commas- 
sioners of School Buildings in accordance with 
provisions of chapter 351 of Acts of 1929, 
for the term of three years from December 
1, 1936. 

Placed on file. 



APPROVAL OF CONSTABLE'S BOND. 

The constable's bond of John J. Murphy 
having been duly approved by the City Treas- 
urer, was received and approved. 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

Coun. KERRIGAN, for the Committee on 
Soldiers' OElelief, submitted report recommeed- 
ing passage of order for payment of aid to 
soldiers and sailors and their families in the 
City of Boston for month of December. 

Report accepted ; said order passed under 
suspension of the rule. 



RECESS. 

The Council voted at 2.23 p. m., on motion 
of Coun. GLBASON, to take a recess for ten 
minutes. The Council reassembled and were 
called to order by President FITZGERALD 
at 2.53 p. m. 



ELECTION OF CLERK OF COMMITTEES. 

Coun. M'ELLEN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the City Cotincil proceed to 
the election of a Clerk of Committees of the 
Boston City Council. 

Coun. MELLBN^Mr. President, when the 
office of Clerk of Committees was vacated by 
the untimely and unfortunate death of the 
estimable man who had held it for so many 
years, I was greatly shocked and deeply 
chagrined to have the Mayor of Boston seek 
to usurp the powers of members of the City 
Council by attempting to place a member of 
his office force in that position. It occurred to 
me that the Mayor never asks us for our advice 
when he has a vacancy to fill, and that when 
we go to the [Mayor's office on a legitimate 
errand we receive a modicum of courtesy and 
are shown very little respect or esteem. I 
hold no 'brief for the Mayor of Boston. I 
think he goes entirely outside of his province 
when he attempts to dictate to the members 
of the body in a matter that is entirely within 
our province. For that reason I am against 
anything that the Mayor wants in this par- 
ticular matter. 

Ooun. WILSON — ^Mr. President, this position 
was left vacant through the unfortunate death 
of the man who served so well and so ably 
for seventeen years in a position of some 
importance for which he was so admirably 
and natura-Hy fitted ; although very fraoildy, in 
my opinion, except in the case of the man 
who has occupied that position for the past 
seventeen years, the salary of $5,500 means a 
gross overpayment for the services rendered. 
As a member of the City Council for some 
years — and I think many of my fellow members 
will agree with me — I will be frank enough 
to admit that the criticism, made by the Com- 
mittee on Rules this last year, as you will 
well remember, Mr. President, were well war- 
ranted by the existing facts. I personally be- 
lieve that this might well be an excellent time 
to revamp both the duties and the respective 
salaries of the eight attaches of the Clerk of 
Committee's office and the City Messenger's 
office. I think at the start of the new yaar, 
with the few important vacancies that have 
occurred, it might be an excellent time for 
the City Council to clean its own house and, 
as I say, revamp completely the duties of the 
eight attaches of the Clerk of Committee's 
and City Messenger's offices and also the sal- 
aries for the various positions. For that rea- 
son, I would like to see this entire matter 
go over until the New Year, and I would so 
move. 

Coun. Wilson's motion to postpone action 
upon the whole matter until the body meets 
in January was declared carried. Coun. DOWD 
doubted the vote and asked for the yeas and 
nays. 

"The motion to postpone was lost, yeas 8, 
nays 12 : 

Yeas — Coun. Finley, John I. Fitzgerald, 
Gleoson, Roberts, Rosenberg, SelviteUa, Shat- 
tuck, WiLson-^8. 

Nays — Coun. Agnew, Brackman, Doherty, 
Dowd, Peter J. Fitzgerald, Gallagher, Kerrigan, 
Kilroy, McGrath, Mellen, George A. Murray, 
Tobin— 12. 

President FITZGERALD— The motion is 
lost, and the question now comes on the pas- 
sage of the order. 



The order vras declared passed and the clerk 
started to call the roll. 

C-oun. ROSENBERG — ^Mr. President, I move 
that the matter be referred to the Executive 
Commilttee. 

Coun. DOWD — Mr. President, I rise to a 
point of torder, that the City Clerk has ali-eady 
proceeded to rpoU the members, and we are 
now proceeding to the election of a Clerk of 
Committees. 

Coun. Rosenberg's motion was lost. 

The vote on Clerk of Committees wals as 
follows : 

For Robert E. Green — Coun. Agnew, Dohei-ty, 
Dowd, Peter J. Fitzgerald, Gallagher, Kerri- 
gan, Kflroy, McGrath, Mellen, George A. 
Murray, Tobin — -11. 

For John F. Gilmore — Coun. Brackman, 
Finley, John I. Fitzgerald, Gleason, Roberts, 
Rosenberg, iSelvitella — 7. 

FV)r William J. J. O'NeU — Coun. Shattuck, 
Wilson— 2. 

President FITZGERALD — ^Eleven votes have 
been cast for Robert E. Green, seven for John 
F. Gilmore, and two for WUliam J. J. O'Nei], 
and Robert E. Green is elected Clerk of Com- 
mitted by this Council. 



ELECTION OF SECOND ASSISTANT CITY 
MESSENGER. 
Coun. MURRAY offered the following: 
Ordred, That the City Council proceed to 
the election of a Second Assistant City Mes- 
senger. 

On motion of Cbun. MURRAY the order 
was referred to Executive Committee. 



RECESS. 

On motion of Coun. GALLAGHER the 
Council voted at 3 p. m. to take a recess subject 
to the caU of the Chair. The membei-s re- 
assembled in the Council Chamber and were 
called to order by President FITZGERALD 
at 3.43 p. m. 



SALARIES OF COUNCIL ATTACHES. 

Coun. GALLAGHER offered the following: 
An Ordinance Concerning Salaries of Officers 

Connected with the City Council. 
Be it ordained by the City Council of Boston, 
as follows : 

Section 1. Section five of chapter three of 
the Revised Ordinances of 1925, as most re- 
cently amended by chapter four of the ordin- 
ances of 1935, is hereby further aimended by 
striking out the words "twenty-seven hundred 
and fifty dollai-s" in the salary of the second 
assistant city messenger and inserting in place 
thereof the words "twenty^two hundred and 
fifty dollars," and in the salaries of the two 
stenographer-clerks connected with the City 
Council by striking out the words "two thou- 
sand dollars" and inserting in place thereof 
the words "twenty-two hundred and fifty 
doBars." 

Section 2. This ordinance shall take effect 
begiinning With Decemlber 29, 1936. 

Passed under suspension of the rules. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS. 

Coun. GALLAGHER, for the Executive 
Committee, submitted the following : 

1. Report on message of Mayor and order 
(referred today) appropriating sum of 
$2,103.31 from Pai-kman Fund income — that 
same ought to pass. 

Report accepted ; said order passed, yeas 
21, nays 0. 

2. Report on petition of Viola K. Breiding 
(referred today) for children under fifteen 
years of age to appear at Current Events 
Hall December 23 — that leave be granted on 
usual conditions. 

Report accepted ; leave granted usual con- 
ditions. 

3. Report on payment of annuities to 
widows of policemen or firemen, as follows : 

The Executive Committee respectfully re- 
ports that under the Statutes of 1933, chapter 
340, an annuity cannot be paid to the widow 
of a policeman or fireman unless the Medical 
Board certifies that the death of such police- 
man or fireman was the direct result of "in 
injury received in the performance of his duty. 

On the following listed petitions the Medical 
Board, having certified that in each case the 
death was not the direct result of such an 
injury, the Executive Committee finds that 
even if favorable action were taken by th^ 
City Council such action would be ineffective 
under the statute, and accordingly reports that 
no further action is necessary, viz. : 

Mary A. Bailey, referred May 27, 1935. 

Mary Mahan, referred May 27, 1935. 

Jennie E. Reagan, referred June 13, 1935. 

Mehitable M. Patterson, referred August 12, 
1935. 



Marie L. A. Murphy, referred September 30, 
1935. 

Margaret M. Farley, referred September 30, 
1935. 

Mary McNamara, referred April 27, 1936. 

Jennie ^. Cahoon, referred May 25, 1936. 

Frances E. Dolan, referred June 8, 1936. 

Margaret H. GiUis, referred August 3, 1936. 

Mary V. Hunt, referred September 1, 1936. 

Mary F. Hartigan, referred October 5, 1936. 

Mary A. Barron, referred October 6, 193G. 

The report was accepted, and the Council 
voted that no further action be taken on the 
above listed petitions. 

4. Report on order (referred today) that 
Council elect Second Assistant City Messenger 
■ — that same ought to pass. 

Report accepted ; said order passed. 

President FITZGERALD— The clerk will call 
the roll. 

The clerk called the roll on the question of 
election of Second Assistant City Messenger, 
with the following result: 

For Dennis H. Shillue — Coun. Ag-new, Brack- 
man, Doherty, Dowd, Finley, John I. Fitz- 
gerald, Peter J. Fitzgerald, Gallagher, Glea- 
son, Kerrigan, Kilroy, McGrath, Mellen, George 
A. Murray, Norton, Roberts, Rosenberg, Sel- 
vitella, Tobin, Wilson— 20. 

And Dennis H. Shillue was declared elected 
Second Assistant City Messenger. 



PEDESTRIAN SIGNAL LIGHTS, WARD 14. 

Coun. ROSENBERG offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Traffic Commissioner be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to 
rearrange the lighting system at the inter- 
section of Blue Hm avenue and Seaver street. 
Ward 14, so as to provide pedestrian signal 
lights for the protection and safety of those 
persons who have occasion to cross this dan- 
gerous intersection. 

Coun. ROSENBERG — ^Mr. President, I wish 
to make just a few remarks about this order. 
At the corner of Seaver street and Blue Hill 
avenue we do not have traffic lighting that 
operates in three ways. The lights simply 
turn red and green, there being no pedestrian 
lights. I believe there is no section of Boston 
where there is a busier thorougihfare. In 
order to cross the street people somtimes have 
to wait ten or fifteen minutes, and when they 
do so their lives are frequently in jeouardv. 
Only last week an old gentleman of eighty 
was killed at that intersection, and accidents 
frequently occur there. The Traffic Depart- 
ment claims that the providing of pedestrian 
street lights is going to stop continuity of 
traffic. I believe that the engineers of the 
Traffic Department can work out some plan 
by which pedestrians will be enabled to cross 
more safely. I believe it is more important 
to take care of pedestrians than it is to have 
in mind merely the free flow of traffic. I 
trust, therefore, that this matter wlil be taken 
up by the Mayor and the Traffic Commis- 
sioner and that some plan will be worked out 
whereby the lives of people crossing at that 
point will not be placed in jeopardy. 

Coun. TOBIN — ^Mr. President, I am very 
happy to see that the councilor from the wa''d 
adjoining mine has taken this matter up. On 
November 16 I introduced an order asking, 
through his Honor the Mayor, that the Park 
Commissioner, the Public Works Commissioner 
and the Chairman of the Traffic Commission 
conduct a survey of trucks using (Columbia 
road, Dorchester, from Geneva avenue to 
Uphams Comer, a matter affecting both 
Wards 14 amd 15. Some years ago we had 
a system whereby truck traffic was conducted 
on one side of the highway and the regular 
vehicular traffic on the other. That has since 
been changed, with the result that the whole 
surface of Columbia road, from Franklin Park 
to Uphams Corner is being used by trucks 
at all houra of the day and night, in spite of 
the fact that other broad highways have been 
laid out for the benefit of trucks. We have 
had continual complaints from people living 
along the line, property owners of the district, 
who are losing money in connection with their 
property by reason of the existing situation. 
I hope that the matter will be looked into in 
accordance with the order introduced on 
November il6, and that the entire district will 
be protected. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



WARD 14 MUNICIPAL BUILDING. 

Coun. ROSENBERG offered the following: 
Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor be re- 
quested to include as an appropriation in the 
1937 budget, or as a W. P. A. project, the 
erection of a municipal building centrally lo- 
cated in Ward 14. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



Adjourned at 3.54 p. m., on motion of Coun. 
AGNEW, to meet on Monday, January 4, 1937, 
at 2 p. m. 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



43 



PROCEEDINGS OF SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 

Dec. 14, 1936 
A deferred regular meeting of the 
School Committee of the City of 
Boston was held In the Adminis- 
tration Building, 15 Beacon Street, 
at 6.47 o'clock P. M.. the Chairman 
presiding. 

Present: Messrs. Lyons,. Mac- 
key, Smith, Sullivan and Tobin. 



AMENDMENT AND APPROVAL 
OF MINUTES 

On motion, the minutes of pre- 
vious meetings were amended as 
follows: 

Oct. 30, 1936, on page 187, to pro- 
vide that the appointment from the 
eligible list of Eleanor J. Vogel, as 
assistant, Jeremiah E. Burke High 
School for Girls, to take effect Nov. 
16, 1936, shall read to take effect 
•'Nov. 17, 1936." 

Nov. 16, 1936, on page 200, to pro- 
vide that the appointment from the 
eligible list of May L. Faunce, as 
assistant, intermediate, WilHam E. 
Russell District, to take effect Dec. 
7, 1936, shall read to take effect 
"Jan. 4, 3937." 

Nov. 16, 1936, on page 202, to pro- 
vide that the leave of absence 
granted Walter J. Bonetsky, shop 
instructor. Department of Manual 
Arts, for Nov. 9, 1936, one-half day, 
court summons, shall read "Nov. 
9, 1936, one day, court summons." 

Nov. 30, 1936, on page 211, to pro- 
vide that the reinstatement of Dr. 
Gaetano Praino as permanent 
school physician. Department of 
School Hygiene, to take effect Dec. 
2, 1936, shall read to take effect 
"Dec. 3, 1936." 

The reading of the minutes of the 
previous meeting was omitted, the 
Oommittee approving them as 
printed as amended. 



APPROVAL OF APPOINTMENTS 

The Chairman stated the ques- 
tion was on approving the appoint- 
ments of teachers, as reported by 
the Superintendent and laid over 
at the previous meeting. 

The appointments were approved. 



APPROVAL OF STATE-AIDED 
COURSE 

A communication was received 
from the Director, Division of Vo- 
cational Education, Massachusetts 
Department of Education, under 
date of Nov. 30, 1936, reporting that 
the re-establishment of a course in 
welding for plumbers in the weld- 
ing department of the Boston 
Trade School, has been approved 
In accordance with plans set forth 
and submitted in memoranda on 
file in that office. If these plans 
are carried out as submitted, the 
work of the department will be 
given approval and the City of Bos- 
ton recommended for reimburse- 
ment under the provisions of Chap- 
ter 74 of the General '.laws, to take 
effect Nov. 18, 1936. The reim- 
bursemenit Is to be in full for the 
salaries of instructors under the 
special provisions of Section 22 — 
(1) for salaries of teachers giving 
types of training selected by the 
Commissioner as especially need- 



ing stimulus — and the regular 
amount of 50 per cent for other net 
maintenance as provided for in 
Section 9 of Chapter 74 of the Gen- 
eral Laws. 

Placed on file. 



ACCEPTANCE OF NEW SCHOOL 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent of Con- 
struction, Department of School 
Buildings, under date of Dec. 2, 
1936, reporting that he has accepted 
finally, as of Dec. 2, 1936, the ad- 
dition to the English High School. 

Placed on file. 



DEATH 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named 
teacher who had been retired on 
pension under the Boston Retire- 
ment System: 

Eliot District — Annie L. Lynch, 
Nov. 27, 1936. 

Placed on file. 

RESIGNATION 

The following resignation, report- 
ed by the Superintendent to take 
effect on the date stated, was pre- 
sented: 

Donald McKay Intermediate Dis- 
trict — Anne B. Movitz, assistant, in- 
termediate, Nov. 30, 1936. 

Accepted. 

WITHDRAWAL OF APPOINT- 
MENTS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 14, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee and at the re- 
quest of the teacher concerned, he 
nas withdrawn the following ap- 
pointment from the eligible list, 
as reported at the meeting of Nov. 
16, 1936 (see p. 200): 

Jamaica Plain High School — 
Oswald Tippo, junior master, Dec. 
7, 1936. 

Placed on file and the with- 
drawal approved. 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 14, 1936, reporting 
that subject to the approval of the 
School Committee and at the re- 
quest of the teacher concerned, he 
has withdrawn the following ap- 
pointment to a two-seseion kinder- 
garten, as reported at the meeting 
of Nov. 30, 1936: 

William Lloyd Garrison District 
—Sara Rosen, assistant, kinder- 
garten, two sessions (from assist- 
ant, kindergarten, one session), 
Dec. 1, 1936. 

Placed on file and the with- 
drawal approved. 

RETIREMENTS ON PENSION 

A communication was receivea 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 14, 1936, reporting 
that in accordance witii the pro- 
visions of Section 9 of Chapter 521 
of the Acts of 1922 and the order 
passed Feb. 6, 1933 (see p. 19), he 
has made application for the re- 
tirement of Lester S. Hart, master, 
Dorchester High School for Boys, 
because of ordinary disability. 

Placed on file. 

A communication wae received 
from the Superintendent, under 



date of Dec. 14, 1936, reporting the 
retirement from active service on 
account of ordinary disability of 
Lester S. Hart, Maeter, Dorchester 
High School for, Boys, a member 
of the Boston Retirement System, 
to take effect Nov. 30, 1936, as cer- 
tified by the Boston Retirement 
Board under date of Nov. 30, 1936. 
Placed on file. 

The Superintendent offered the 
following: 

ORDERED, Tliat the following- 
named teacher is hereby retired on 
pension in accordance with the pro- 
visions of Chapter 589 of the Acts 
of 1908, ae amended by Chapter 617 
of the Acts of 1910, Chapter 569 of 
the Acts of 1912, and Chapter 304 
of the Special Acts of 1915, the 
date of retirement and rate of pen- 
sion to be as hereinafter specified: 

Girls' Latin School— Ellen B. 
Esau, assistant, Dec. 31, 1936, $600. 

Passed unanimously. 

APPOINTMENTS 

The following appointments by 
the Superintendent, certified by 
him as being in accordance with 
the rules and regulations to take 
effect on the dates stated, were pre- 
sented: 



(FROM THE ELIGIBLE LIST) 

(To fill vacancies caused by in- 
crease in numbers) 

Dorchester High School for Girls 
— Adelaide T. Keiran, industrial in- 
structor (from tieaoher of sewing, 
intermediate. Department of 
Household Science and Arts), Jan. 
4, 1937. 

Roslindale High School — Kath- 
leen A. Deery, assistant, Dec. 16, 
1936. 

Theodore Roosevelt Intermediate 
District — Maud A. Dooley, assistant, 
elementary, Dec. 16, 1936. 

Department of Household Science 
and Arts — Teresa H. Kelly, teacher 
of cookery, intermediate, Jan. 4, 
1937; Catherine T. Roughan, teach- 
er of cookery, iintermediate, Jan. 4, 
1937. 

Jamaica Plain High School — Ed- 
ward W. Palmer, junior master, 
Jan. 4, 1937. 

(To fill vacancies caused by 
resignation or retirements on 
pension) 

East Boston High School — ^Anna 

F. Conley, assistant (from assistant, 
intermediate, vWllUam Howard 
Taft Intermediate District), Jan. 
4, 1937. 

Beethoven District — Doris B. 
Kapstein, assistant, elementary, 
Dec. 16, 1936. 

Donald McKay Intermediate Dis- 
trict — Emma H. Kinsela. assistant, 
intermediate, Dec. 16, 1936. 

Emerson District — Sylvia Green, 
assistant, kindergarten, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Julia Ward Howe District — 
Margaret F. Barletto, assistant, 
elementary. Dec. 16. 1936. 

Mary Hcmenway District^Edna 

G. Quinn, assistant, elementary, 
Dec. 16. 1936. 

Shcrwin District— Helen G. Con- 
lev, assistant, elementaiy, Dec. 16, 
1936. 

Department of Household Science 
and Arts — Helen C. Hennessey, 
teacher of sewing, clementarv, Jan. 
4, 1937. 



44 



CITY RE COR 



Jan. 9 



(To fill vacancies caused by 
promotions) 

Charles Sumner District — Alice J. 
Brooks, assistant, elementary, Dec. 
16, 1936. 

Mary E. Curley Intermediate 
District — Theresa R. Aicardi, as- 
sistant, intermediate, Dec. 16, 1936. 

Mather District — Elizabeth B. 
Chadbourne, assistant, kindei-gar- 
ten, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Robert Gould Shaw District — 
Alberta Coghlan, assistant, inter- 
mediate, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Sherwin District — Mary L. Dev- 
lin, assistant, kindergarten, Jan. 4, 
1937. 

Department of Household 

Science and Arts — L. Winifred 
Hutchings, teacher of sewing, ele- 
mentary, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Of the foregoing appointments, 
those scheduled to take effect Dec. 
16, 1936, were approved under a 
suspension of the regulations. 

The remaining appointments 
were laid over. 



(BY PROMOTION) 

Brighton High School— Barbara 
Y. Wilson, assistant (from indus- 
^trial instructor), Jan. 4, 1937. 
Laid over. 

(MODEL SCHOOL) 

(To fill vacancy caused by resigna- 
tion) 
Martin District (Model School) 
Kathleen M. Brooks, assistant, 
elementary (trom assistant ele- 
mentary, Charles Sumner District), 
Jan. 4, 1937. 
Laid over. 

(SPEECH IMPROVEMENT CLASSES) 

Speech Improvement Classes — 
Mary D. McCusker, assistant (from 
assistant, elementary, John A. An- 
drew District), Jan. 8, 1937; A. 
Isabelle Timmins, assistant (from 
assistant, elementary, Washington 
Alilston District), Jan. 4, 1937. 

Laid over. 

(DISCIPLINARY DAY SCHOOL) 

(To fill vacancy caused by in- 
crease in numbers.) 

Disciplinary Day School — Grace M. 
Curry, assistant (from assistant, 
elementary, Emerson District), Jan. 
4, 1937. 

Laid over. 

(TEACHER OP SEWING, INTERMEDI- 
ATE, FROM TEACHER OF SEWING, 
ELEMENTARY) 

Department of Household Science 
and Arts — Maude I. Grant, teacher 
of sewing, intermediaite (from 
teacher of sewing, elementary), 
Dec. 1, 1936. 

The regulations were suspended 
and the appointment approved. 

(TWO-SESSION KINDERGARTENS) 

Hancock District — Jenny Penta, 
assistant, kindergarten, two ses- 
sions (from assistant, kindergarten, 
one session), Dec. 15, 1936. 

The regulations were suspended 
and the appointment approved. 

William Lloyd Garrison District — 
Sarah M. Delehanty, assistant, kin- 
dergarten, two sessions (from as- 
sistant, kindergarten, one session, 
Emerson District), Jan. 4, 1937. 

Laid over. 



LIST OF TEACHERS APPROVED FOR 
TEMPORARY SERVICE 

The Superintendent submitted 
under the provisions of section 265 
paragraph 2 of the regulations the 
following additions to the list of 
teachers approved by him from 
which assignments may be made 
for temporary service: 

Day High Schools — Dorothea C. 
Ambrose, Mary A. McDonald, Ju- 
dith Ravit, Mildred A. Rice, Reu- 
ben Rosen. 

Day Intermediate School s— 
Marie H. Campbell, Kathleen A. 
Deery, Vdctor B. Glunts, Helen E. 
Hartford, M. Louise Holland, Alice 
M. Hurley, Frances M. Maloney, 
Edward McCrensky, Catherine A. 
Twomey. 

Day Elementary Schools — Sara 

F. Goldberg. 

Kindergartens — Gerardine A. 
Euckley. 

Special Classes — Anne L. Kenny, 
Agatha E. Guilford. 

Continuation and South End 
Intermediate Schools — Audrey G. 
Carr, Josephine E. Messina, Mary 
K. Riley. 

Horace Mann School — Gertrude 
A. Morrissey, Mildred A. Rice. 

Lip Reading Classes — Frances 
R. (iurry, Margaret M. Benson. 

Speech Improvement Classes — 
Ruth L. Goldman. 

Trade School for Girls— Mary E. 
Sullivan. 

Department of Physical Educa- 
tion — Charles K. Donohoe, Frank 

G. Pratt. 

Department of Household Science 
and Arts — Margaret A. White, 
teacher of sewing. 

Approved. 

Teaching Assistants 
Kindergarten — Mary E. Muldoon. 
Day Intermediate Schools — -Lil- 
lian E. Keesler. 
Approved. 

TEMPORARY TEACHERS 

Mechanic Arts High School — 
Vincent P. Connors, instructor, 
mechanic arts, Dec. 3, 1936. 

Roxbury Memorial High School 
(Boys) — Francis L. O'Keeffe, co- 
operative instructor, Dec. 1, 1936. 

Boston Trade School — William F. 
Butler, shop instructor, Nov. 10, 
1936; George P. Horigan, shop in- 
structor, Dec. 7, 1936. 

Department of Manual Arts — 
Richard E. Dow, shop instructor, 
Nov. 16, 1936; Frank J. Graham, 
shop instructor, Nov. 30, 1936. 

Approved. 

EVENING SCHOOLS 

Term 1936-37 

Central Evening High School — 
Joseph C. D'Amato, assistant, Dec. 
7, 1936. 

Joseph H. Barnes Evening School 
— Josephine E. Campana, assist- 
ant, Nov. 30, 1936. 

Lewis Evening School — Margaret 
A. Mclnerney, assistant, Nov. 30, 
1936; Pearl I. Tucker, assistant, 
Nov. 30, 1936 (one evening). 

Michelangelo Evening School — 
Paul J. Sullivan, assistant, Nov. 30 
and Dec. 1, 1936 (two evenings). 

Patrick P. Gavin Evening School 
— Isabelle M. Harvey, assistant, 
Dec. 1, 1936. 

Phillips Brooks Evening School 
—Margaret H. Sullivan, assistant, 
Nov. 30 to Dec. 10, 1936 (six eve- 
nings). 
^ Approved. 



SPECIAL ASSISTANTS ■ 

Day School for Immigrants — 
Ruth L. Goldman, special assistant, 
Nov. 16, 1936; Pauline Ehrlich, 
special assistant, Nov. 30, 1936. 

Approved. 



TRANSFERS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 14, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has made the 
following transfers of teachers: 

Mary E. Curry, assistant, ele- 
mentary. Harvard District, to the 
same position in the Agassiz Dis- 
trict, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Ethel M. McGonagle, assistant, 
elementary, Ulysses S. Grant Dis- 
trict, to the same position in the 
Hyde District, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Ethel M. Partridge, assistant, ele- 
mentary, Warren District, to the 
same position in Robert Gould 
Shaw District, Jan. 4. 1937. 

John F. Roche, master, head of 
department, Charlestown High 
School, to the same position in the 
Roslindale High School, Jan. 4, 
1937. 

Mary G. Strachan, assistant, ele- 
mentary. Wells District, to the same 
position in the Bennett District, 
Jan. ■ 4, 1937. 

Approved. 



LEAVE OF ABSENCE 

On th-2 recommendation of the 
Superintendent, leave of absence 
was granted as follows: 

Norcro:5S District — Helen G. 
Brooks, assistant elementai-y, Nov. 
25, 1936, one day, court summons. 



DESIGNATIONS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 14, 1936, reporting that 
he has made the following desig- 
nations of teachers to serve in the 
positions indicated until such time 
as they shall be filled otherwise 
m accordance with the rules and 
regulations, but not beyond Aug. 
31, 1937 

Bennott District — Margaret C. 
Smith, assistant, elementary, as 
acting master's Eissistant (vice 
Katherine F. Wood, absent on 
leave), Nov. 17, 1936. 

Donald McKay Intermediate Dis- 
trict — Anna M. Killion, assistant, 
intermediate, as acting master's as- 
sistant, Nov. 19, 1936. 

Placed on file. 



ASSIGNMENTS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 14, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
Gustav F. Virchow, cooperative in- 
structor, Brighton High School, to 
assist in placement work, one-half 
time, without change of rank or 
salary, to take effect Sept. 1, 1936, 
and to continue for the school year 
ending Aug. 31, 1937, unless earlier 
terminated by the Superintendent 
with the approval of the School 
Committee. 

Placed on file and the assignment 
approved, to take effect on the date 
stated. 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



45 



A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec 14, 1936. reporting tliat 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
Frank P. Rich, cooperative instruc- 
tor, Roxbury Memorial High School 
(Boys), to assist in productive work, 
without change of rank or salary, 
to take effect Sept. 1, 1936, and 
to continue for the school year 
ending Aug. 31, 1937, unless earlier 
terminated by the Superintendent 
with the approval of the School 
Committee. 

Placed on file and the assign- 
ment approved, to take effect on 
the date stated. 

On motion of the Superintendent, 
it was 

ORDERED, That the assign- 
ment, without change of rank or 
salary, of Rudolph N. Marginot, 
trade instructor, Continuation 
School, is hereby authorized for 
such portion of the current school 
year as may, in the discretion of 
the Superintendent, be necessary 
in organizing, in cooperation with 
the State Department of Educa- 
tion, apprentice classes to be con- 
ducted during the current school 
year, the cost of a substitute to be 
covered by Federal funds admin- 
istered by the Commissioner of Ed- 
uoaiiion and allctted by special dis- 
tribution to «hie City of Boston, and 
reimbursement made by the State 
Department of Education to the 
City of Boston for all oth'er ex- 
penses in the amount of fifty per 
cent (50%). 

HOME INSTRUCTION OF PHY- 
SICALLY HANDICAPPED 
CHILDREN 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 14, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
Catherine V. McGinty, tempo- 
rary teacher, for home instruction 
of physically handicapped children, 
to take effect Dec. 7, 1936. 

Approved. 

ANNUAL STATISTICS 

Th« Superintendent presented the 
Annual Statistics for the Boston 
Public Schools for the school year 
1935-1936, being School Document 
No. 9, 1936. 

Placed on file. 

APPOINTMENTS TO NUTRITION 
CLASSES 

A communication was received 
from the Secretary, under date of 
Dec. 14, 1936, reporting that the 
Division of Civil Service has certi- 
fied the following-named persons 
to fill two vacancies as nutrition 
class attendant, and two vacancies 
as assistant nutrition class at- 
tendant: 

Nutrition Class Attendant 

Helena G. Griffin, Mary A. Con- 
ley, Emma F. Faulstich, Helen V. 
Morley. 
Assistant Nutrition Class Attendant 

Margaret M. Knightly, Margaret 
F. Freitas, Mary H. Sullivan, Han- 
nah M. Dunn. 

Placed on file. 

The Superintendent reported that 
in accordance with the foregoing 



certifications, he has made tihe fol- 
lowing appointments, subject to the 
approval of the School Committee: 

Department of School Hygiene^ 
Helena G. Griffin, nutrition class 
attendant (from assistant nutri- 
tion class attendant), Dec. 21, 1936; 
Mai-y A. Conley, nutrition class at- 
tendant (from assistant nutrition 
class attendant), Dec. 17, 1936; Mar- 
garet M. Knightly, Margaret E. 
Freitas, assistant nutrition class at- 
tendants, Dec. 17, 1936. 

The appointments were approved, 
to take effect on the dates stated. 



APPOINTMENT OF ASSISTANT 
IN OFFICES OF SUPERINTEN- 
DENT-SECRETARY 

A communication was received 
from the Secretary, under date of 
Dec. 14, 1936, reporting that subject 
to the approval of the School Com- 
mittee and with the approval of 
the Commissioner of Civil Service 
and the Commissioner of Labor and 
Industries, Commonwealth of Mas- 
sachusetts, she has appointed 
Helen R. Sheehan as assistant. 
Group D, in the offices of the Su- 
perintendent-Secretary, by transfer 
from the Department of Labor and 
Industries, to take effect Dec. 16. 
1936. 

Placed on file and the appoint- 
ment approved, to take effect O'n the 
date stated. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the salary of 
Helen R. Sheehan, assistant. Group 
D, in the offices of the Superin- 
tendent-Secretary, is hereby estab- 
lished at the rate of twenty dollars 
($20) per week, to take effect Dec. 
16, 1936. 

CHANGE IN RANK 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Dec. 14, 1936. recommending 
that the rank of George F. Noonan. 
assistant in the office of the Busi- 
ness Manager, be changed to that 
of pay roll clerk, to take effect 
Dec. 18, 1936, and that he be 
granted an increase in compensa- 
tion of two dollars ($2) per week. 

Placed on file. 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the rank of 
George F. Noonan, assistant, Group 
D, is hereby changed to pay roll 
clerk. Group D, to take effect Dec. 
18 1936, and that his salary be es- 
tablished at the rate of twenty-six 
dollars ($26) per week, to take ef- 
fect Dec. 18, 1936. 



APPOINTMENT OF JUNIOR 
MESSENGER 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Dec. 14, 1936, recommending 
that Peter A. Gavrilles, who stands 
second on the Civil Service list, be 
appointed as junior messenger. 
Group E, in the office of the Busi- 
ness Manager, at a salary of sixteen 
($16) per week, to take effect 
Dec. 18, 1936. 

Placed on file. 

On motion, it was 
ORDERED, That the salary of 
Peter A. Gavrilles, Junior Messen- 



ger, Group E, in the office of the 
Business Manager, is hereby estab- 
lished at the rate of sixteen dol- 
lars ($16) per week, to take effect 
Dec. 18, 1936, ar}d to continue un- 
til otherwise ordered. 



ADVISORY COMMITTEES 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 14, 1936, submitting the 
following appointments and re- 
appointments to Advisory Commit- 
tees for term ending Aug. 31, 1939: 

AGRICULTURE 

James P. Estey, Market Gar- 
dener, 961 Dedham street, Newton. 

Joseph L. Griffin, Milk Dealer, 30 
Carolina avenue, Jamaica Plain. 

ART EDUCATION 

Miss Frances G. Curtis, 28 Mt. 
Vernon street, Boston. 

George C. Greener, Director, 
North Bennet Street Industrial 
School, 39 North Bennet street, 
Boston. 

Professor Arthur Pope, Member 
of Advisory Committee of Fogg Art 
Museum, Harvard University, Cam- 
bridge. 

BOSTON TRADE SCHOOL 

George Barry, Manager, Green- 
law Motor Parts Co., 1178 Tremont 
street, Boston. 

Clarence Bruns, Superintendent, 
A. H. Davenport Co., 26 Otis street, 
Cambridge. 

Walter Butterworth, Radio Ins- 
pector, Federal Radio Commission, 
Division of Field Operations, Cus- 
tom House, Boston. 

Ernest P. Ciausmeyer, Outside 
Sales Manager, Arnold Roberts 
Co., 180 Congress street, Boston. 

Waiter H. Eldridge, Sales En- 
gineer, Hol;zer Cabot Electric Co., 
125 Amory street, Jamaica Plain. 

Henry J. Fandel, Proprietor, 
Fandel Press, Inc., 59 McBride 
street, Jamaica Plain. 

Edward J. Farrell, Mason and 
Builder, 473 Tremont street, Bos- 
ton. 

William G. Kiefer. President, E. 
Van Noorden Co., 100 Magazine 
street, Roxbury. 

John F. Murphy, Plumbing In- 
spec'.or. Building Department, City 
Hall, Boston. 

Herbert L. Pierce. Foreman, 
Drafting Department, B. F. Stiute- 
vant Co., Hyde Park. 

Henry J. Tayne, Chairman. Ap- 
prentice Committee, Boston Cen- 
tral Labor Union, 17S M street. 
South Boston. 

BOSTON TR.VDE SCHOOL, EVENING 
CLASSES 

Patrick J. Cooney. Custom Taiior, 
1560 Tremont. street, Boston. 

COOPERATIVE COURSES IN RETAIL 
SELLING 

Daniel J. Bloomfield. Manager. 
Retail Trade Board, Chamber of 
Commerce, 80 Federal street, Bos- 
ton. 

Oscar T. Smith. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Merchandising. College of 
Business Administration. Boston 
University, 525 Boylston street, Bos- 
ton. 



46 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



COOPERATIVE INDUSTRIAL COURSE, 
BRIGHTON HIGH SCHOOL, 

Rollan A. Green, District Man- 
ager, New England, Graham Motor 
Cars, 1040 Commonwealth avenue, 
Brookline. 

John C. Harvey, Proprietor, J. 
C. Harvey Co., 971 Commonwealth 
avenue, Boston. 

COOPERATIVE INDUSTRIAL COURSE, 
CHARLESTOWN HIGH SCHOOL 

J. Walter Mullen, Clerk, Boston 
Elevated Railway Co., Claim De- 
partment, 31 St. James avenue, 
Boston. 

COOPERATIVE INDUSTRIAL COURSE, 
DORCHESTER HIGH SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

William I. Brown, President and 
General Manager, Davenport-Brown 
Co., 285 Washington street, Somer- 
ville. 

J. Wadsworth White, President 
and Production Manager, Norwood, 
White Co., Inc., 29 Wilton street, 
Hyde Park. 

COOPERATIVE INDUSTRIAL COURSE, 
EAST BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL 

John Peterson, Sr., Machine Shop 
Foreman, Gibby Foundry Co., 96 
Condor street, East Boston. 
' Neil C. Raymond, Superintend- 
ent, A. S. Campbell Co., 161 Pres- 
cott street. East Boston. 

COOPERATIVE INDUSTRIAL COURSE, 
HYDE PARK HIGH SCHOOL 

Rudolph K. Anderson, Superin- 
tendent, Oliver Ditson Building, 
Tremont street, Boston. 

COOPERATIVE INDUSTRIAL COURSE, 
ROXBURY MEMORIAL HIGH SCHOOL 
(BOYS) 

Joseph p. Donovan, Donovan and 
Sullivan Co., Photo Engravers, 235 
Congress street, Boston. 

Philip J. McAteer, Superinten- 
dent, New England Electrotype 
Co., 470 Atlantic avenue, Boston. 

COOPERATIVE INDUSTRIAL COURSE, 
SOUTH BOSTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Matthew T. Cavanaugh, Cav- 
anaugh and Earl'ey, Inc., 39 Oarle- 
ton street, Cambridge. 

EXTENDED USE OF THE PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS 

Laurence Curtis, 464 Beacon 
street, Boston. 

HOUSEHOLD ARTS IN HIGH SCHOOLS 

Mrs. Rosalind Davis, 603 Boyl- 
ston street, Boston. 

Miss Villa T. West, 16 Woodward 
Park street, Dorchester. 

MILITARY DRILL 

General John J. Sullivan, 20 
Chauncy street, Boston. 

SCHOOL HYGIENE 

Murray P. Horwood, Ph.D., De- 
partment of Biology and Public 
Health, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Frederic T. Lord, M. D., Presi- 
dent, Massachusetts Tuberculosis 
League, Inc., 305 Beacon street, 
Boston. 

Robert B. Osgood, M. D., Har- 
vard Medical School. 

Edwin H. Place. M. D., Boston 
City Hospital. 

SPECIAL CLASSES 

Judge John F. Perkins, Boston 
Juvenile Court, Court House, Bos- 
ton. 



Mrs. Eva Whiting White, Presi- 
dent, Women's Educational and 
Industrial Union, 264 Boylston 
street, Boston. 

STATE-AIDED CLASSES, CONTINUA- 
TION SCHOOL 

Waldo H. Rice, President, Sam- 
uel Ward Manufacturing Co., 29 
Melcher street. South Boston. 

Robert J. Watt, Secretary-Treas- 
urer, American Federation of La- 
bor, 11 Beacon street, Boston. 

STATE-AIDED CLASSES, EVENING 
SCHOOLS 

Paul Oifriino, 540 Gallivan boule- 
vard, Dorohester. 

Michael H. Corcoran, 31 Beach 
street, Boston. 

TRADE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

Michael H. Corcoran, 31 Beach 
street, Boston. 

Miss Edith M. Howes, 16 Appleby 
road, Welleeley. 

Mrs. Katherine A. Montgomery, 
178 Commonwealth avenue, Boston. 

Mrs. John Van Vaerenewyck, 6 
Boylston place, Boston. 

VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE 

Michael H. Corcoran, 31 Beach 
street, Boston. 

The appointments and reappoint- 
ments were approved. 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EX- 
PENDITURES TO DEC. 1, 1936 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Nov. 30, 1936, submitting a 
statement showing the appropria- 
tions, the expenditures, and the 
balances for maintenance of the 
public schools for the first eleven 
drafts of the current financial year, 
the expenditures for the first 
eleven drafts of the financial year 
1935, and the increases and de- 
creases in the several items. 

Placed on file. 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE TO 
CUSTODIANS 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Dec. 14, 1936, recom- 
mending that the following-named 
custodians be granted leave of ab- 
sence on one-half net compensa- 
tion for the periods specified be- 
cause of personal illness: 

Edward J. Powers, custodian, An- 
drew Jackson School-house, Dec. 5 
to 10, 1936, inclusive. 

Thomas H. Walsh, custodian, Far- 
ragut School-house, Nov. 27 to Dec. 
5, 1936, inclusive. 

James J. Smith, custodian, George 
T. Angell School-house, Dec. 1, 1936, 
to Jan. 31, 1937, inclusive. 

John Murphy, Jr., custodian, Dor- 
chester High School for Girls, Dec. 
4 to 31, 1936, inclusive. 

Placed on fil^ and leaves of ab- 
sence on one-half net compensation 
granted for the periods specified. 



TRANSFERS OF CUSTODIANS 

A communication was received 
from the Schoolhouse Custodian, 
under date of Dec. 14, 1936, recom- 
mending that the following-named 
custodians, who stand at the head 
of their respective lists, be trans- 
ferred as indicated, to take effect 
on the dates stated: 



John F. Mahoney from the George 
Putnam to the Eliot Sohool-house, 
Dec. 13, 1936. 

Charles C. Fitzgerald from the 
David A. Ellis to the Julia Ward 
Howe School-house and Portable 
No. 102, Dec. 20. 1936. 

Placed on file and the transfers 
approved, to take effect on the 
dates stated. 



REPORT ON AUDIT OF BOOKS 
AND ACCOUNTS 

A communication was received 
from Charles E. Di Pesa and Com- 
pany, under date of Nov. 25, 1936, 
submitting report on audit of the 
books Hid accounts of the princi- 
pals. Continuation School, Boston 
Trade School, Trade School for 
Girls, and High School of Practi- 
cal Arts, and of the co-ordinators 
in the Brighton High School, Dor- 
chester ilJgh School for Boys, Hyde 
Park High School, Roxbury Me- 
morial High School (Boys), and 
South Boston High School; for the 
period ending Sept. 30, 1936. 

Placed on file. 



CLOSING OF ADMINISTRATION 
BUILDING 

The following was offered: 
ORDERED, That the admini- 
strative offices and the supply 
room of the School Committee are 
hereby closed on Saturday, Dec. 
26, 1936, and Saturday, Jan. 2, 1937. 
The rules were suspended and 
the order passed. 

The Committee adjourned. 
Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN. 
Secretary. 

Dec. 21, 1936 
A regular meeting of the School 
Committee of the City of Boston 
was held in the Administration 
Building, 15 Beacon Street, at 7:12 
o'clock P. M., the Chairman presid- 
ing. 

Present. Messrs. Lyons, Mackey, 
Smith, Sullivan, and Tobin. 

APPROVAL OF MINUTES 

The reading of the minutes of 
the previous meeting was omitted, 
the Committee approving them as 
printed. 

APPROVAL OF APPOINTMENTS 

The Chairman stated the ques- 
tion was on approving the appoint- 
ments of teachers as reported by 
the Superintendent and laid over 
at the previous meeting. 

The appointments were approved. 

DEATHS 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named 
teacher: 

Boston Trade School — Charles F. 
L'Hommedieu, trade instructor, Dec. 
15, 1936. 

Placed on file 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named teach- 
er who had been retired on pen- 
sion: 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



47 



Warren District— Ellen A. Pratt, 
Dec. 10, 1936. 
Placed on file. 



RETIREMENT ON PENSION 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 21, 1936, reporting the 
retirement from active service of 
the following-named member of 
the Boston Retirement System, to 
take effect Dec. 31. 1936, as certi- 
fied by the Boston Retirement 
Board under date of Dec. 15, 1936: 

Mechanic Arts High School- 
Ernest T. Cushman, master, Dec. 
31, 1936 

Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENTS 

The following appointments, cer- 
tified by the Superintendent as be- 
ing in accordance with the rules 
and regulations to take effect on 
the date stated, were presented: 

(FROM THE ELIGIBLE LIST) 

(To fill vacancy caused by increase 

in numbers) 

Roslindale High School — Marie 

E. Malaguerra, assistant, Jan. 4, 

1937. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointment approved. 

(To fill vacancies caused by resig- 
nations) 

Chapman District — Dorothea A. 
Burns, E. Marion McGreal, assist- 
ants, elementary, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Julia Ward Howe District — M. 
Loretta Dillon, Alice M. Wells, as- 
sistants, elementary, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Theodore Roosevelt Intermediate 
District — Edwin F. Trueman, as- 
sistant, intermediate, Jan. 4, 1937. 

William Lloyd Garrison District 
— Doris A. Loehr, assistant, elemen- 
tary, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Department of Manual Arte — 
Francis P. Assmus, assistant, man- 
ual training, elementary, Jan. 4, 
1937. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointments approved. 



TEMPORARY TEACHERS 

Department of Manual Arts — 
iljouis L. DeGiacomo, assistant, 
manual training, elementary, Dec. 
16, 1936; Daniel V. Lovett, shop in- 
structor, Dec. 7, 1936; James Woods, 
shop instructor, Dec. 7, 1936; James 
Woods, assistant, manual training, 
elementary, Dec. 8, 1936; Francis L. 
O'Keeffe, assistant, manual train- 
ing, intermediate, Dec. 14, 1936. 

Approved. 



DEPARTMENT OF EXTENDED 

USE OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Term 1936-1937 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 21, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approvlal of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
the following-named persons to 
serve in the Department of the Ex- 
tended Use of the Public Schools, 
for the term 1936-1937: 

Leaders — John F. Donelan, Helen 
E. Freeman, Tomasina G. Santora, 
Idella Thompson, Alice F. Turner, 
Mildred B. Villa, Dec. 21, 1936. 



General Helpers — James H. Crow- 
ley, David Wyman, Dec. 21, 1936. 

Helpers — Nonie C. Ahern, Peter 
A. Hoban, Nora Kelly, Dec. 21, 
1936. 

Approved. 

TRANSFERS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 21, 1936, reporting that 
subject to approval of the School 
Committee, he has made the follow- 
ing transfers of teachers: 

Helen L. Barron, assistant, ele- 
mentary, Samuel Adams District. 
to the same position in the Emei-- 
son District, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Monica P. Sullivan, assistant, 
elementary, Charles Sumner Dis- 
trict, to the same position in the 
Washington Allston District, Jan. 
4, 1937. 

Elizabeth P. Wright, assistant, 
special class, Wells District, to the 
same position in the Phillips 
Brooks District, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Approved. 

DESIGNATIONS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 21, 1936, reporting that 
he has made the following designa- 
tions of teachers to serve in the 
positions indicated until such time 
as they shall be filled otherwise in 
accordance with the rules and 
regulations but not beyond Aug. 
31, 1937: 

Bennett District — Mildred 
Rourke, assistant, kindergarten, as 
acting first assistant, kindergarten 
(vice Mathilde Hackebarth. absent 
on leave), Nov. 30, 1936. 

Chapman District — Florence C. 
Cunningham, assistant, elementary, 
as acting master's assistant, Nov. 

30, 1936. 

Phillips Brooks District — Linnea 
V. Bamberg, assistant, intermedi- 
ate, as acting master's assistant, 
Nov. 30, 1936. 

Robert Gould Shaw District- 
Doris B. Melling, assistant, kinder- 
garten, as acting first assistant, 
kindergarten, Nov. 23, 1936. 

Placed on file. 

ASSIGNMENTS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 21, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has ter- 
minated the assignment of Arvid J. 
Wahlstrom, shop foreman. Depart- 
ment of Manual Arts, to the Ros- 
lindale High School, one-third time, 
said termination to take effect Dec. 

31. 1936. 

Placed on file and the termina- 
tion approved. 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 21, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
Edwin C. Anderson, shop instruc- 
toi'. Department of Manual Arts, 
to the Roslindale High School, 
without change of rank or salary, 
to take effect Jan. 4, 1937, and to 
continue during the school year 
ending August 31, 1937, unless 
earlier terminated by the Super- 
intendent with the approval of the 
School Committee. 



Placed on file and the assign- 
ment approved, to take effect on 
th« date stated. 



SUBSTITUTE 'TEACHER COACH 

On motion of the Superintendent, 
it was 

ORDERED, That the employ- 
ment of Joseph M. Sullivan as 
substitute teacher coach in the 
Dorchester High School for Boys 
is hereby authorized for two days, 
November 25 and 26, 1936, compen- 
sation for such services to be at 
the rate of six dollars ($6) per day. 



COURSES OF STUDY IN ENG- 
LISH 

On motion of the Superintendent, 
it was 

ORDERED, That the accom- 
panying Course of Study in English 
for Grades VII, VIII, and IX is 
hereby adopted, and that five 
thousand (5,000) copies be printed 
as a school document. 

On motion of the Superintendent, 
it was 

ORDERED, That the accom- 
panying Course of Study in Eng- 
lish for Grades X, XI, and XII is 
hereby adopted, and that five thou- 
sand (5,000) copies be printed as a 
school document. 



LEAVE OF ABSENCE TO 
CUSTODIAN 

A communication was received 
from the Assistant iSchoolhouse 
Custodian, under date of Dec. 21, 
1936, recommending that Corneli- 
us P. Walsh, custodian, Wyman 
School-house, be granted leave of 
absence without pay for the period 
Nov. 22 to Dec. 31, 1936, because of 
personal business. 

Placed on file and leave of ab- 
sence without pay granted for the 
period specified. 



OCCUPANCY OF F STREET 
SCHOOL 

Dr. Mackey: Mr. Chairman, on, 
behalf of the people of my district 
I request that a public meeting be 
given to the residents in relation 
to the changing over of the school 
at F and Seventh Streets, in rela- 
tion to the Gavin District. 

May I ask, in behalf of the people 
of my district, that, through the 
Chairman, a date be set for a pub- 
lic meeting 

Chairman: In accordance with 
our established policy, which has 
been in effect since I have been a 
member of the Board, public hear- 
ings have not been granted. I. 
therefore, disallow such a meeting 
or hearing unless an order to do so 
is passed by this Board in a vote 
changing its general policy. 

Dr. Lyons: I am in hearty sym- 
pathy with the purpose of the Doc- 
tor's order, the purpose of the meet- 
ing, and the appearance before this 
Committee of those who have 
shown an interest in the children 
from (hat di&trict. On the other 
hand, before granting the hearing 
I would rather discues the matter 
as it was discussed this evening 
and follow out our agreed pro- 
cedure, which was that it would 



48 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



be taken up at the next meeting in 
a week's time, with the feeling that 
the vote that was passed by the 
Committee to abandon that build- 
ing or do certain redistricting, 
would be suspended in the mean- 
time. Before voting on the ques- 
tion of a public meeting I would 
like to make certain whether it 
would be necessary. I felt that 
with the procedure which was out- 
lined by the Chairman as to a visit 
and examination of the conditions 
there, by the Chairman and the 
other members in the interim, noth- 
ing would be gained by a public 
meeting at this time. 

In regard to the procedure; I do 
not think that it would be bene- 
ficial to change the procedure, and 
with that feeling, I would have to 
vote against a public meeting. 

Chairman Sullivan: As the sit- 
uation stands, there is no need or 
a vote on it. The Chair has pre- 
cedents from this Committee in 
other years, disallowing such a 
public hearing. Unless a vote is 
passed by the Committee to allow 
such public hearing the ruling will 
stand. 

Dr. Lyons: I have a deep and 
abiding interest in the situation 
which we would discuss in the event 
of a public hearing. But I don't 
like the idea of getting off on the 
wrong foot and getting people ad- 
vocating something in the heat o: 
a public hearing. I think every one 
of us would be as willing as the 
doctor to provide a public hearing 
for those who placed us in office 
here, but I still feel we should not 
be stampeded. 

Dr. Mackey: Am I led to be- 
lieve that a district of 70,000 people, 
with a school population close to 
20,000 children, are not eligible for 
a public meeting, when we can 
have ordinary employees come in 
here on the naming of schools and 
so forth? Am I led to believe 
that this Board here is preventing 
the people of South Boston from 
a public meeting, when they are 
justified in so doing for the health 
and safety and benefit of the 
children of my district? Am I led 
to believe that the members of 
this Board are preventing the peo- 
ple of South Boston from a public 
hearing? Am I led to believe when 
everyone else can come in here 
from the lowest and most menial 
condition and they can have a pub- 
lic meeting in relation to an audi- 
torium, that the members of this 
Board are preventing the people of 
my district from having a public 
meeting? 

May I say, for the benefit of the 
record, that I now make a motion 
that the respective organizations 
and the people in my district shall 
have a public meeting. And I want 
to go on record that I want the 
people- of my district to have a 
public hearing, and I want to vote 
on it. 

Chairman Sullivan: You have 
made your motion and further dis- 
cussion is out of order. 

I would like -irst to address my- 
self a little bit to your talk. I 
think. Doctor, you are deliberately 
confusing the issue. You yourself, 
as Chairman of this Board, refused 
public meetings in conjunction 
with orders which you had been 
given by this Committee. 

It has never been the policy of 
this Committee to prevent any 
group from appearing before us in 



our conferences, and that is where 
all such meetings have been held. 
It has been our policy not to have 
public hearings pi-esided over by 
this Board in such a meeting as 
this. On the other hand, you do 
not want to confuse it with our 
policy, which you know. Secondly, 
I do not feel that anybody who has 
come in here appearing before our 
board in conference should be da- 
scribed as "low and menial," re- 
gardless of what their tasks mignt 
have been and regardless of what 
they brought before us. 

I am always ready, and willing, 
and eager to hear the problems of 
the people of South Boston, whom 
I represent as well as you. You 
are confusing public meetings 
which we can in no way control 
with the right to appear before this 
Board in its own public meeting. 

Dr. Mackey: My remarks are in 
no way related to you as Chairman 
of this Board. I am merely follow- 
ing the requests of the various or- 
ganizations of my district, which 
include the South Boston Citizens, 
the South Boston Council of the 
Knights of Columbus, Pere Mar- 
quette Council, St. Augustine's 
Court of the Order of Foresters, as 
well as St. Peter's and Paul's, and 
I am following their request that 
they have a public meeting in rela- 
tion to this project or this condi- 
tion. I am following the advice of 
the people of my district and I do 
not think I am out of order. 

Chairman Sullivan: The motion 
is made by Dr. Mackey that a pub- 
lic meeting be held here. I have 
heard no second to that motion. Is 
the motion seconded? 

Dr. Lyons: Mr. Chairman, may 
I ask a question? I have a very 
personal interest in this entire mat- 
ter. In fact, I took it upon myself 
to carry it on at the last meeting, 
at which the Doctor was not pres- 
ent. I have talked it over with 
many, and I have not received a re- 
quest Or a petition from groups or 
individuals of any sort. I want my 
position in the matter made per- 
fectly clear. 

Unless a change is brought about 
such a procedure is already cov- 
ered by our Board, and such a pro- 
cedure as you suggest was acted 
upon in the same manner by Dr. 
Mackey when he was Chairman. I 
do not see the necessity for any 
hearing on this until we have con- 
cluded and disposed of the caise 
one way or the other. 

Mr. Tobin: I think the entire 
discussion is needless. If my mem- 
ory serves me correctly, it was 
agreed that the Chairman and any 
other members who desired might 
go over to South Boston and look 
the situation over, and the matter 
would then be taken up by the 
School Committee. In other words, 
I do not feel that it is necessary to 
come down here and call for a pub- 
lic hearing when the question is 
still in abeyance and the Chairman 
told the members of the Commit- 
tee that he was going o\er to look 
the situation over before the next 
public meeting. I do not think a 
public hearing is necessary. 

Chairman Sullivan: Since the 
resolution is not seconded, discus- 
sion is out of order. 

The Committee adjourned. 

Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN, 

Secretary. 



MASSACilUSB'i IS UAV COLONY. 

The first chartered colony in New 
Liiiglaiid, cliarler grauLed by Cbarles I 
on Marcii 4, 162'J. About a year before, 
a patent had been granted to six promi- 
nent ineu of Dorchester, west of England, 
among wiioin was Capt. John Endicott. 
lie sailed in Juue, 1G28, with a party of 
(ifty or sixty persons, arriving in Septem- 
ber ami settling at Nauuikeag, afterward 
named Salem, lu the spring of 1629, 
the Bay Company fitted out three ships 
conveying about four hundied persons 
and arriving at Salem in June. Endicott 
sent a small party to elTect a settlement 
on the Bay in Mishawum, afterward 
named by the settlers Charlestown, the 
first town in New England to assume tlie 
town polity, I'lyinoutli and Salem being 
governed by a governor and council. 
Endicott was appointed in London as the 
first resident governor on April 30, 1629. 
The R'lassacliusetts Bay Company was 
reorganized in London on October 20, 
1C29, when John Winthrop was chosen 
as governor. Ue arrived at Salem on 
June 12, 1030, soon proceeded to Charles- 
town with a large following and finding 
that place unsuitable, finally settled in 
Boston. Winthrop served thirteen yeare 
as governor in four different periods end- 
ing in 1649 and Endicott fifteen yeara 
at various times ending in 1665. Other 
governors were Thomas Dudley, Richard 
Uellingham, John Haynes, Henry Vane, 
John Leverett and Simon Bradstreet, 
the latter serving twelve years until 1692 
when the Bay Colony and the Plymouth 
Colony were merged, becoming the 
Royal Province of Massachusetts Bay, 
which existed eighty-two years to 1774, 
the goveruois being appointed by the 
King. 

The name, iVIassachusetts, is Indian 
and sigtiilies "near the big hills." 



POPULATION OF CITIES OF OVER 300,000, 
1930. 

New York, 6,930,446, an increase of 
1,310,398 or 23.3 per cent over 1920, di- 
vided thus: Brooklyn Borough, 2,560,- 
401; Manhattan, 1,867,312; Bronx, 1,265,- 
258; Queens, 1,079,129; Richmond, 158.- 
346. Other cities, with increase over 
1920: Chicago, 3,376,438 (increase 674,- 
733 or 25.0 percent) ; Philadelphia, 1,950,- 
961 (increase 127,182 or 7.0 per cent); 
Detroit, 1,568,662 (inc. 574,984 or 57.9 per 
cent) ; Los Angeles, 1,238,048 (inc. 661,375 
or 114.7 per cent) ;; Cleveland, 900,429 (inc. 
103,588 or 13.0 per cent) ; St. Louis, 821,960 
(inc. 49,063 or 6.3 per cent) ; Baltimore, 
804,874 (inc. 71,048 or 9.7 per cent) ; Bos- 
ton, 781,188 (inc. 33,128 or 4.4 per cent); 
Pittsburgh, 669,817 (inc. 81,474 or 13.8 
per cent) ; San Francisco, 634,394 (inc. 
127,718 or 25.2 per cent); Milwaukee, 
578,249 (inc. 121,102 or 26.5 per cent); 
Buffalo, 573,076 (inc. 66,301 or 13.1 per 
.cent); Washington, 486,869 (inc. 49,298 or 
11.3 per cent); Minneapolis, 464,356 (inc. 
83,774 or 22.0 per cent); New Orleans, 
458,762 (inc. 71,543 or 18.5 per cent); 
Cincinnati, 451,160 (inc. 49,913 or 12.4 
per cent); Newark, 442,337 (inc. 27,813 
or 6.7 per cent) ; Kansas City, Mo., 399,- 
746 (inc. 75,336 or 23.2 per cent) ; Seattle, 
365,583 (inc. 50,271 or 15.9 per cent); 
Indianapolis, 364,161 (inc. 49,967 or 15.9 
per cent) ; Rochester, N. Y., 328,132 
(inc. 32,382 or 10.9 per cent) ; Jersey City, 
316,715 (inc. 18,612 or 6.2 per cent); 
Louisville, 307,745 (inc. 72,854 or 31.0 
ler cent) ; Portland, Oregon, 301,815 (inc. 
43,527 or 16.9 per cent). 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



49 



GROSS FUNDED DEBT, JANUARY 31, 1936. 



City Debt. 



County Debt. 



Water Debt. 



Rapid Tran.sit 
Debt. 



Traffic Tunnel 
Debt. 



Total 



December 31, 1935. 
January 31, 1936. . . 



585,822,800 00 
85,822,800 00 



$1,477,666 61 
1,477,666 61 



.51,012,000 00 
1,012,000 00 



$57,789,700 00 
57,789,700 00 



819,300,000 00 
19,300,000 00 



$165,402,166 61 
165,402,166 61 



NET FUNDED DEBT, JANUARY 31, 1936. 





City Debt. 


County Debt. 


Water Debt. 


Rapid Transit 
Debt. 


Traffic Tunnel 
Debt. 


Total. 


December 31, 1935 


$69,781,513 60 
69,662,235 18 


$624,416 25 
620,326 69 


$1,012,000 00 
1,012,000 00 


$43,917,320 34 
43,831,922 71 


$19,166,223 00 
19,166,223 00 


$134,501,473 19 


January 31, 1936 


134,292,707 58 








$119,278 42 


$4,089 56 




$85,397 63 




$208,765 61 











PUBLIC WORKS ADMINISTRATION GRANT PAYMENTS. 



Date of Payment. 



Sept. 16, 
Dec. 1, 

Oct. 3, 

Nov. 20, 

Oct. 30, 

Nov. 8, 

Nov. 14, 
Jan. 31, 

Nov. 23, 



1935 
1935 

1935 
1935 

1935 

1935 

1935 
1936 

1935 



Object. 



Replacement of the Brookline Avenue Water Main, from tlie 
Brookline Line to Beacon Street 

Nortliern Avenue Bridge, Reconstruction and Repair 

Water Main Construction 

Reconstruction of Streets 

Hospital Department, New_ Buildings and Alterations and 
Equipment 

Construction, Reconstruction and Replacement of Sewers, and 
the Covering of Open Water Courses 

Total 



Amount. 



$53,170 07 

59,278 00 

98,318 23 
147,000 00 

223,197 27 

141,281 04 



$722,244 61 



POPULATION OF BOSTON, BY DISTRICTS. 



District. 



Boston Proper. 
East Boston. . . 
South Boston. . 

Roxbury 

Dorchester. . . . 
West Roxbury. 

Brighton 

Charlestown. . . 
Hyde Park, . . . 



All Boston. 



U.S. 

Census 

1920. 



181,193 
63,051 
63,815 
126,525 
156,006 
63,067 
42,102 
34,272 
18,029 



748,060 



State 

Census 

1925. 



172,101 

■ 66,534 

64,803 

129,883 

167,015 

73,621 

47,900 

37,918 

19,845 



779,620 



U. S. 

Census 

1930. 



State 

Census 

1935. 



151,818 
61,454 
58,039 
122,i509 
187,103 
88,327 
.56,362 
31,663 
23,913 



781,188 



152,003 
64,305 
56,610 
131,192 
197,257 
94,442 
66,995 
29,610 
25,299 



817,713 



CITY AND COUNTY FUNDED DEBT, JANUARY 31, 1936. 

Total Funded Debt, City and County * $105,402,166 01 

Funded debts outside the debt limit (debts exempted from the operation of the law limiting 
municipal indebtedness) : 

City debt $38,131,300 00 

Water debt 288,000 00 

Traffic Tunnel debt 16,000,000 00 

Traffic Tunnel debt. Series B 3,000,000 00 

Traffic Tunnel debt, Series C 300,000 00 

County debt 962.666 61 

Rapid Transit debt 57,789,700 00 



Funded debt within the debt limit 

Offsets to funded debt: 

Sinking Funds 

Less Sinking Funds for debt outside the debt limit: 

Cilv Sinking Funds S10,.345,912 62 

County Sinking Fund 857,339 92 

Rapid Transit Sinking Funds 13,9.57,777 29 

Traffic Tunnel 97,711 00 

Traffic Tunnel, Series B 36,066 00 



116,471,666 61 
$48,930,500 00 



Premium on loans. 

Less on loans outside debt limit . 



$8,231 34 
6,075 70 



$31,064,768 50 



25.294,806 S3 
$5,769,961 67 

3.155 64 



5,772,117 31 



Offsets to funded debt within the debt limit 

Net indebtedness within the debt limit $4 3,158,382 69 

* Includes $62,066.61 issued by the Commonwc.iUh ui\der chapter 534 of the .'Vets of 1906. 



HISTORICAL DATA ABOUT WARDS. 

The term "ward" first appears in a 
fire-protection order, approved by the 
Town on August 29, 1679, dividing the 
Town into 4 quarters with 2 wards each. 
The 8 wards had previously been mil- 
itary districts. 

On August 11, 1713, the Selectmen 
"agreed upon a distribution of the Town 
into distinct Wards or Precincts." 

On February 1, 1715, it was "voted to 
malce a new division of the Town into 
eight distinct Wards." 

On March 9, 1735, it was voted to 
divide the Town into 12 wards to facili- 
tate the work of the Overseers of the 
Poor. 

On March 13, 1822, the Selectmen di- 
vided the Town into 12 wards on the 
basis of the U. S. Census of 1820. 

By an ordinance which took effect on 
the second Monday of December, 1838, 
there was a revision of the wards. 

On April 29, 1850, the City Council 
accepted Chap. 167 of the Acts of 1850, 
which altered the wards on the basis of 
legal voters rather than on the number 
of inhabitants. 

By ordinance taking effect on Novem- 
ber 15, 1865 new ward lines were es- 
tablished. 

In the annexation period, 1865-1875, 
the number of wards was increased from 
twelve to twenty-one. 

By Chap. 243, Acts 1875, the City 
Council was ordered to cause a new di- 
vision of the City into twenty-four wards 
in the year 1875 in such manner as to 
include an equal number of votera in 
each ward. This division was made, tak- 
ing effect on December 13, 1875. On 
May 27, 1876, the City Council, in ac- 
cordance with Chap. 242, Acts of 1876, 
divided one of the wards in two, making 
a total of 25 wards for the City. 

By ordinance passed April 20. 1895, 
under authority of Chap. 437, Acts of 
ISSS, and Section 96 of Chap. 417, Acta 
of 1893, ward lines were est^ibiished on 
the basis of tiie number of voters reg- 
istered at the City election of 189-1, 
there still being -25 wards. 

The annexation of Hyde Park, elTectivo 
Januarj' 1, 1912, made an additional 
ward. 

By enactment of December 2S, 1914, 
under authority of Chap. 630, Acts of 
1914, the City Council redividcd the 
City into 26 wards. 

The latest redivision. est.nblished De- 
cember 30, 1924, under autliorify of 
Chap. 410, Acts of 1924, consists of 22 
wards. 



50 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 9 



OWNED AND RENTED HOMES IN 
UNITED STATES, NEW ENGLAND AND 

MASSACHUSETTS, 1930— ALSO BOSTON. 

Total homes in United States, 29,904,- 
663, of which 14,002,074 or 46.8 per cent 
were owned, 15,319,817 or 51.2 per cent 
were rented, and 582,772 were of un- 
known tenure. Native white families, 
20,968,803; foreign-bom white families 
(the head of the family being a foreign- 
bom white person), 5,736,491; Negro 
families, 2,803,756; other races, 395,613. 

The native white families owned 10,- 
255,682 homes and rented 10,314,500 
homes; the foreign-born white families 
o>vned 2,968,707 homes and rented 2,690,- 
30O homes; the Negro families owned 669,- 
645 homes and rented 2,050,217 homes; 
the other races owned 108,040 homes and 
rented 264,800 homes. 

Total homes in New England, 1,981,- 
499, of which 915,441 or 46.2 per cent 
were owned, 1,042,521 or 52.6 per cent 
were rented, and 23,537 were of un- 
known tenure. Native white families, 
1,203,304; foreign-bom white families, 
753,231; Negro families, 22,864; other 
races, 2,100. 

Total homes in Massachusetts, 1,021,- 
160, of which 439,238 or 43.0 per cent 
w6re owned, 569,645 or 55.8 per cent 
were rented, and 12,277 were of unknown 
tenure. Native white families, 579,751 
(306,978 or 30.06 per cent were native 
white of native parentage and 272,773 or 
26.71 per cent were native white of 
foreign or mixed parentage) ; foreign- 
born white families, 427,385 or 41.85 per 
cent; Negro families, 12,637 or 1.24 per 
cent; other races, 1,387 or 0.14 per cent. 

Total homes in Boston, 179,200, of 
which 45,986 or 25.66 per cent were 
o\vned, 130,140 or 72.62 per cent were 
rented and 3,074 were of tenure unknown. 
Divided by color and nativity of head of 
owner-families, 7,741 were native white 
of native parentage; 11,137 were native 
white of foreign or mixed parentage; 
26,366 were foreign-bom white; 726 were 
Negro and 16 were of other races. 

Of the renter-families, 27,267 were na- 
tive white of native parentage; 36,428 
were native white of foreign or mixed 
parentage; 61,505 were foreign-born 
white ; 4,431 were Negro, and 509 were of 
other races. 



POPULATION OP UNITED STATES, NEW 
ENGLAND AND MASSACHUSETTS. 

Continental United States (t. e., 48 
states and the District of Columbia) in 
1930, 122,775,046; outlying possessions, 
14,233,389; total, 137,008,435; New Eng- 
land, 8,166,341; Massachusetts, 4,249,614 
or 52.04 per cent of New England and 
ranking eighth in the Union. In density 
of population Massachusetts ranlts sec- 
ond, i. e., 528 per square mile of land, 
Rhode Island ranking first, with 644 per 
square mile of land. 

Population of the other New England 
States in 1930, ranking from the highest 
total: Connecticut, 1,606,903; Maine, 
797,423; Rhode Island, 687,497; New 
Hampshire, 465,293; Vermont, 359,611. 
Density for New England, 132 per sq. 
m.; for U. S. (48 states and the District 
of Columbia) 41 per sq. m. 

The population of the United States 
increased 16.1 per cent since 1920; that 
of New England 10.3 per cent and that 
of Massachusetts 10.3 per cent. 



A NEW POSITIVE WATER-METER 
TESTER. 

The large majority of waterworks, 
particularly the ^mailer ones, seldom 
have accurate or positive means of test- 
ing their meters. Often when a meter 
is repaired, the man making the repairs 
simply blows through the meter to see if 
it nins, when it is again put into sei-vice 
with the assumption that it is accurate. 
Sometimes meters are hooked up in se- 
ries with a new meter and water is run 
through to see if the readings check. 
This is better than the lung-power 
method, but still is far from accurate or 
dependable, in that the test meter may 
be in error by 2 per cent or even more. 
Several states have regulations govem- 
ing water utilities, both municipal and 
private, and require a positive method 
of testing water meters in every meter 
shop. — American City Magazine. 



POPULATION OP NEW ENGLAND, 1930. 

Total population, 8,166,341 (4,024,657 
males and 4,141,684 females) ; total white, 
8,065,113 (3,972,465 males and 4,092,648 
females) ; total native white, 6,230,803 
(3,067,723 males and 3,163,080 females); 
native white of native parentage, 3,167,- 
082 (1,572,885 males and 1,594,197 fe- 
males) ; native white of foreign or mixed 
parentage, 3,063,721 (1,494,838 males and 
1,568,883 females) ; foreign-bom white 
1,834,310 (904,742 males and 929,568 fe- 
males) ; Negro, 94,086 (46,963 males and 
47,123 females); Indian, 2,466 (1,273 
males and 1,193 females) ; Chinese, 3,794 
(3,233 males and 561 females) ; Japanese, 
352 (277 males and 75 females) ; Mexican, 
107 (69 males and 38 females) ; all other 
races, 423 (377 males and 46 females). 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE CITY 
OF BOSTON. 



Administration Building, 15 Beacon Street, 
Office of the Business Manager. 



WATER-SUPPLY DEVELOPMENT IN THE 
UNITED STATES. 

In 1652 Boston introduced the firat 
American public water supply. The first 
mechanical pumps were used in 1761 at 
Bethlehem, Pa., where Hans Christiansen, 
an American pioneer water-supply en- 
gineer, made his pumps work "after 
severe struggles." In 1850 there were 
only 100 water plants in the United 
States, and as late as 1875 only 243. In 
1933 there were more than 11,000 public 
water supplies, some serving more than 
one community. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 
SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Butter, Eggs, Etc. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing to the various 
city departments, butter, eggs, etc., as per specifi- 
cations to be obtained at the office of the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall Annex. 
There will he n charffc of twenty cents (SO. SO) for 
each blank proposal taken out. The bidder must 
leave his proposal with a certified check for .$300, 
payable to and to become the property of the 
City of Boston, if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the above oflBce. .\ duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City Auditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. The 
iSids will be publicly opened and read Th\irsday, 
.January 21, 19.37, at 12 m., at Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. The successful bidder must furnish 
a bond for one quarter the total estimated amount 
of the contract with a surety company authorized 
to do business in Massachusetts as surety for 
the faitlif\il performance of the contract. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to accept or 
reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made sub,iect 
to appropriations to meet payments thereunder. 
D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 9.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



Proposals for Furnishing Pencils, Pens, 
Penholders, Chalk, Ink and Other Items 
for the Boston Public Schools. 

The School Committee of the City of Boston 
invites bids for furnishing and delivering at the 
Supply Room of the School Committee, 440 
Brookline avenue, Boston, pencils, pens, pen- 
holders, chalk, ink and other items as per schedule. 
Proposal forms are obtainable at the office of the 
Business Manager of the School Committee, 15 
Beacon street, tenth floor. Envelopes containing 
proposals must be sealed and plainly marked 
"Proposal for Furnishing Pencils, Pens, Pen- 
holders, Chalk, Ink and Other Items." The bid 
must be in duplicate. One copy signed by the 
bidder and accompanied by a certified check for 
$100, payable to the City of Boston, must be left 
at the office of the Business Manager on or before 
12 o'clock m. on Tuesday, .lanuary 19, 1937. 
Copies filed with the Business Manager will be 
publicly opened and read at 12 o'clock m. of the 
oay stated. The other copy, also signed by the 
bidder, must be filed with the City Auditor, City 
Hall, Boston, Mass., previous to the time named 
for the opening of the bids. The School Com- 
mittee reserves the right to reject any or all bids, 
and to accept such bid or part of bid as may be 
deemed best for the interests of the city. The 
successful bidder will be required to furnish a bond 
for not less than 50 per cent of the amount of the 
contract. 

Alexander M. Sullivan, 
Business Manager of the School Committee. 

(Jan. 9.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Sulfuric Acid and Sodium 
Bicarbonate. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston^ 
invites proposals for furnishing Sulfuric Acid and 
Sodium Bicarbonate as required, to the various 
city departments, The bidder must use the form 
of proposal to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City Hall 
Annex, and the successful bidder must furnish a 
Ijoud for one quarter the total estimated amount 
of the bid with a surety company authorized to do 
business in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract There will, he a charge 
of twenty cents {$0.'20) for each hlank proposal 
taken out. The bid, with a certified check for 
$100, payable to and to become the property of 
the City of Boston if the proposal is not carried 
out, must be left at the office of the Superintendent 
of Supplies, before 12 m., Monday, January 25, 
1937, at which time and place they will be pubhcly 
opened and read. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City Auditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to accept or 
reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award tlie contract as he deems for the best in- 
terests of the city. All contracts made subject 
to appropriations to meet payments thereunder. 
D. Frank Doheety, 

(Jan. 9.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Soap, Soap Powder 
and Soap Chips to the Various City 
Departments. 
Proposals on blanks obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, 801 City Hall Annex, for 
furnishing soap, soap powder and soap chips to 
the various city departments, signed by the bidder 
and left before 12 o'clock noon on Monday, 
.lanuary 25, 1937, at the office of the Supply De- 
partment, with a certified check for $100, payable 
to and to become the property of the city if the 
proposal is not carried out, will then and there 
be publicly opened and read. There will be a 
charge of twenty cents (SO.ZO) for each blank pro- 
posal taken out. A duplicate proposal, without 
check, must be deposited with the City Auditor 
previous to the time named for opening bids. The 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the total estimated amount of the con- 
tract with a surety company authorized to do 
business in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract. The Superintendent 
reserves the right to accept or reject any or all 
bids, or any part of a bid, and to award the con- 
tract as he deems for the best interests of the city. 
All contracts made subject to appropriations to 
meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 
(Jan. 9. ) Superintendent of Supplies. 



Jan. 9 



CITY RECORD 



51 



CITY OF BOSTON 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT 



Proposals for Furnishing Drugs. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boe- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing drugs as 
required, to the various city departments. The 
bidder must use the form of proposal to be ob- 
tained at the office of the Superintendent of 
Supphes, Room 801, City Hall Annex, and the 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the total estimated amount of the bid 
with a surety company authorised to do 
business in Massachusetts as surety for the faithful 
performance of the contract. There will be a 
charge of thirty-five cents (SO. 35) for each hlanl' 
proposed taken out. The bid, with a certified check 
for $300 payable to and to become the property 
of the City of Boston if the proposal is not carried 
out, must be left at the office of the Superin- 
tendent of Supphes, before 12 m,, Friday, .Janu- 
ary 22, 1937, at which time and place they will be 
publicly opened and read. A duplicate bid, 
without check, must be left at the office of the 
City Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The Superintendent reserves the right to 
accept or reject any or all bids, or any part of a 
bid, and to award the contract as he deems for the 
best interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank Dohebty, 

(Jan. 9.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OE- BOSTON, 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Hay, Grain and Straw. 

Sealed proposals will be received at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, until 12 m., Thursday, 
January 21, 1937, at which time and place they 
will be publicly opened and read, for furnish- 
ing hay, grain and straw to the various city 
departments. There will he a charge of twenty 
cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal taken out. 
The bidder must include the cost of delivery. 
The bidders are requested to bid on United States 
No. 1 timothy hay. The grade of hay must comply 
with the federal hay grades, and No. 2 white oats to 
test no less than thirty-four nor more than thirty- 
eight pounds to bushel graded under federal 
standards. The hay and oats must be weighed 
by sworn weighers and on the scales designated 
by the Superintendent of Supplies. All articles 
covered by this contract shall be the growth 
production of the United States. The bidder 
must use the form of proposal to be obtained 
at Room 801, City Hall Annex. Proposals 
must be accompanied b> a certified check for 
$200. A duplicate bid, without check, must 
be left at the office of the City Auditor prior 
to the time named for opening bids. The 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for one 
quarter the total estimated amount of the 
bid with a surety company authorized to do 
business in Massachusetts as surety for the 
faithful performance of the contract. The 
Superintendent reserves the right to accept or 
reject any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and 
to award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made subject 
to appropriations to meet payments thereunder. 
No reservations or stipulations submitted by the 
various bidders will be considered by the Super- 
intendent. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 9.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Proposals for Furnishing ME.vr». 
The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing to the various 
city departments, mciits, as per specifications 
to be i>i)l:iincil at (lie iilTice of the Superintendent 
of Supplies, Hcioiii 8(11, City Hall Annex. The 
bidder must leave his proposal with a certified 
check for $300, payable to and to become the 
property of the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out, at the above office. There uiiU be a 
charge of twenty-five cents ($0.26) for each hianh 
proposal taken out. A duplicate bid. without 
check, must be left at the office of the City Auditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. The 
bids will be publicly opened and read Tuesday, 
January 19, 1937, at 12 m.. at Room 801, City Hall 
Annex. The successful bidder must furnish a 
bond for one quarter of the total estimated amount 
of the contract with a surety company authorized 
to do business in Massachusetts as surety for the 
faithful perfornuvnce of the contract. The Super- 
intendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to award 
the contract as he deems for the best interests of 
the city. All contracts nuide subject to appro- 
priations to meet payments thereunder. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



(Jan. 9.) 



D. Frank Doiiertv, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Proposals fok Furnishing Fruits and 

VBGEH'A.BLBS. 

The Siupply Depairtment of tihe City of Bos- 
ton ii'nvliites proposals for furnisihring to the 
various city dtepartmenlts, fruits amd vegetables, 
las per sipecificati'ons !bo be obtained at the 
'Office of the iSupenimtendent of Suppld'ets, RoO'in 
801, Cdty Hall Aninex. There will be a charge 
of thirty cents ($0.30) for each blank jwo- 
poaal taken out. The bidder must leave his 
proposal iwiith a certified check for ,$300, pay- 
able to aind 'to become 'the proiperty of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
at the alDOve office. A duipMca;te bid, without 
check, must lie left at the office of the City 
Auditor, prior to the time najmied for open- 
ing bids. The bids ^11 be P'ubM<^ly opened 
and read on Wed'nesday, January 20, 1937, at 
12 m., at Room 801, City Hall Aminex. The 
successful bidder must furnish a bond for oine 
quarter the toltal estim'ated amount dZ the 
contract with a surety company authorized 
to do busiiiness iin Massachusetts as surety for 
the faiithful performance of the coinltract. The 
S^peniintendent reserves the right to accept or 
reject 'any or ail bids, or any part of a bid, 
and to award the contract as he deems for 
the bast interests of the city. All cO!n.tra<;ts 
made subject to appropriations to meet pay- 
ments thereunder. 

D. Frank Dohbrty, 

(Jan. 9.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOiSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPAETMENT. 



Proposals for Surgical Supplies. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton linvites proposals for funnishimg surgicaJ 
supplies, as required, to the various city de- 
partments. The bidder must use the form of 
proposal to be obtlalined at 'the office of the 
Superintendenlt of iSupplies, 'Roiom 80(1, Oity 
Hall Annex, amd the successful bidder mnist 
funnlish a (bond for one quarter the total es.ti- 
maited 'amouinit of the bid with a surety com- 
painy authorized to do husiness in Massachu- 
setts as surety for the faithful performamce 
of the contract. There will be a charge 
of twenty-five cents (.$0.25) for each blank pro- 
posal taken out. The bid, with a certified 
check for $300, payable to and to become the 
property of the iCity Of Bottom if the proposal 
is mot carried out, must be left at the office 
of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, before 12 m., Thursday, Jamu- 
ary 21, 1937, at which time and place they will 
be publicly opened and read. A diuplicate 
bid, without check, must be left at the office 
of the Clity Auditor prior to the time named 
for openling Ibfids. The Superintendent reserves 
the righlt to acceipt or reject amy or aJl bids, 
or any part of a bid, and to award the contract 
as he deems for the hest interests of the city. 
All contracts made sulbjeot !to appropiriations 
to meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 9.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Puoposals for Furnlshing Waste and 
Wiping Cloths. 

The Supply Department of the City of Boston 
invites proposals for furnishing to the various 
(ity departments waste and wiping cloths as per 
specifications to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex. The bidder must leave his proposal 
with a certified check for $200, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston if the 
proposal is not carried out, at the above office. 
There will he a charge of tiventy cents (SO. 20) /or each 
blank proposal taken out. A duplicate bid, without 
check, must be left at the office of the City .Vuditor 
prior to the time named for opening bids. The 
bids will be publicly opened and read Monday', 
.January IS, 1937, at 12 ni., at Room SOI, City 
Hall .\nnox. The successful bidder must furnish 
a bond for one quarter of the total estinuvted 
aniount of the contract with a suret.x' company 
authorized to do business in Massiichusctts as 
surety for the faithful performance of the con- 
tract. The Superintendent reserves the right to 
accept or reject any or all bids, or any part of a 
bid and to award the contract us he deems for the 
best interests of the city. All contracts made 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank DonERTY, 

(Jan. 9.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



Notice to iHardwarb Contractors. 

Sealed proposals will, be received by the 
Superintendent of Con'struotian at the office 
of the Department of iSchoiol Buildings, 26 
Norm'an street, Boston, Mass., ointil 2 o'clock 
p. m., ."Standard time, of Tuesday, January 19, 
1937, and at thait time will be publicly opened 
and read, for furnishing and delivering to the 
Department Storehouse, 26 Norman street, 
Boston, as many standard flock sets and parts 
for exterior and interior 'doors of schoolhou-ses 
in the City of Boston as may be reciuired dur- 
ing the year of '1937. The proposal submitted 
to the iSuperimtendent of Construction shall 
not be separated from the book of specifications. 
The duplicate copy of the proposal form ishail 
be 'removed from the book of specifications 
amd after copying the original proposal exactly 
thereon, shall be sealed in an envelope and 
delivered to the Auditor of the Oity of Bos- 
ton at the ICity (Hall, School street, Boston, 
■before the time for the opening of the 
proposals. All bids niiust be accompanied by a 
certified check on a bank located in this 
Federal 'Reserve District in the sum of 
($500) five hundred dollars. The certifie<I 
check s'haJl be inclosed in the sealed proposal 
delivered to the ISuperirttendemlt of Construc- 
tion. The right is reserved to reject any or 
all iprOposals or to accept the proposal deemed 
best for the Oity of Boston. AU certSfied 
checks will 'be reitaiined until the corktract has 
been signed and approved by the Mayor of 
the lOity of Bositon. A bond of an approved 
surety cO(mpa,ny shall be giiven by 'the con- 
tractor in the full amount of the contract 
price. Speci'ficartlions may he obtained at the 
office of the SuperintendenJt of Ccmstruction, 
Department of School Buildings, 26 Norman 
street, Bbston-, Mass. A deposit of a certi- 
fied check for $25, payable to the City of Bo6- 
toin, will be required for each specification, 
said sum 'to be ^ef^lnded if specifications are 
returned not later than seven days after the 
openling Of proposals. 

Wm. W. Drummby, 
Superittfendent of Construction, 
Department of School BuHdinys. 

(Jan. 9.) 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE 
CITY OF BOSTON. 



Administration Building, 15 Beacon Street, 
Office of the Business Manager. 

Proposals for Furnishing Paper, Bl.^nk Books 
and Envelopes for the Boston Public 
Schools. 

The School Committee of the City of Boston 
invites bids for furnishing and delivering at the 
Supply Room of the School Committee. 440 
Brookline avenue, I3oston, paper, blank books 
and envelopes as per schediile. Proposal forms 
are obtainable at the office of the Business Manager 
of the School Committee, tenth floor, lo Beacon 
street. Envelopes containing proposals must be 
sealed and plainly marked "Proposal for Paper, 
Blank Books and Envelopes." The bid must be 
in duplicate. One copy signed by the bidder and 
accompanied by a certifietl check for $100, payable 
to the City of Boston, must be left at the ofiice 
of the Business Manager on or before 12 o'clock 
m. on Wednesday, January 20. 1937. Copies 
filed with the Business Manager will be publicly 
opened and read at 12 o'clock n\. of the day stated. 
The other copy, also signed by the bidder, must 
be filed with the City Auditor, City Hall, Boston, 
Mass., previous to the time named for the opening 
of the bids. The School Committee reser\'es the 
right to reject any or all bids, and to accept such 
bid or part of bid as may be deemed best for the 
interests of the city. The successful bidder will 
bo required to furnish a bond for not less than oO 
per cent of the amount of the contract. 

.\lexander M. SULLrVAN, 
liusiness Afanagcr of the School Commillic. 

(Jan. 9.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



.VssEssoRs' Notice to Taxpayers. 
City Hall .\nnex. 
Boston, January 1, 1937. 
Returns must he made on or before January SI, 
tOS7, instead of February lo as in ta.it year. 

Particular attention is called to the .\»jic!B'or?i' 
notice posted upon City Hall and various other 
places throughout the city relative to milking 
returns on personal property subject to taxation. 
Edward T. Kelly, 
Timothy W. MoRrnr, 
John P. O'Hearn, 

.Isftssors of Boston. 
(Jan. 2-9-lt)-23-30.) 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY. 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

Room 27, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 1100. 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 
Joseph F. Mellyn, Secretary. 
William C. S. Hhaley, Assistant Secretary. 
Cyril G. Cummings, Assistant Secretary. 
John F. Gilmore, Jr., Assistant Secretary. 
Bernard J. Dunn, Assistant Secretary. 
Thomas E. Cimeno, Assistant Secretary. 
Arthur J. O'Kebfe, Assistant Secretary. 
Mary L. Thompson, Assistant Secretary. 
John F. Gilmore, Assistant Secretary and 

Chief Clerk. 
Herbert L. McNary, Chief Licensing Division. 
Joseph Mikolajewski, Assistant. 
M.ARTIN J. Conroy, Messenger. 
CITY COUNCIL. 

Ward 1. Henry Selvitella, 80 Orient avenue. 

Ward 2. James J. Mellen, 18 Tremont st. 

Ward 3. John I. Fitzgerald, 7 Allen st. 

Ward 4. George W. Rol^erts, 20 Hemenway 
street. 

Ward 5. Henry L. Shattuck, 15 River st. 

Ward 6. George A. Murray, 223 West 
Second street. 

Ward 7. John E. Kerrigan, 213 West Eighth 
street. 

Ward S. John F. Dowd, 22 Greenville st. 

Ward 9. Richard D. Gleason, 15 Ruggles st. 

Ward 10. John J. Doherty, 67J Wyman st. 

Ward 11. James J. Kilroy, 1301 Columbus ave. 

Ward 12. David M. Brackman, 89 Waumbeck 
street. 

Ward 13. Peter J. Fitzgerald, 39 Belfort st. 

Ward 14. Sidney Rosenberg, 576 Blue Hill ave. 

Ward 15. Martin H. Tc^bin, 70 Westville st. 

Ward '16. John J. McGrath, 2 Glenrose road. 

Ward 17. Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr., 57 
Codman Hill avenue 

Ward '18. Clement A. Norton, 34 Myopia rd. 

Ward 19. Peter A. Murray, 7 St. John st. 

Ward 20. James F. Finley, 231 Cornell st. 

Ward 21. James E. Agnew, 92 Wallingford rd. 

Ward 22. Edward M. Gallagher, 21 Oak 
Square avenue. 

Clerk op Committees. 
John E. Baldwin, Room 56, City Hall. Tel. 

Lafayette 5100. 

City Messenger. 
Edward J. Lbary, Room 55, City Hall. Tel. 

Lafayette 9100. 

ART DEPARTMENT. 
Office, Faneuil Hall. 
Arthur A. Shurcliff, Secretary. 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Edward T. Kelly, Chairman. 
Timothy W. Murphy, Secretary. 
John P. O'Hearn. Principal Assessor. 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 
Room 20, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5'100. 
Charles J. Fox, City Auditor. 
Daniel J. Falvey, Deputy City Auditor. 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOL 

BUILDINGS. 
Richard J. Lane, Chairman ; Francis R. 

Bangs ; Leo J. Dunn. 

Department of School Buildings. 
Office, 28 Norman street. Tel. Capitol 5750. 
William W. Drummey, Superintendent of Con- 
struction. 

BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT. 

Frederick H. Fay, Chairman. 30 City Hall. 
Elisabeth M. Hbrlihy, Secretary. Te;l. 
Lafayette 5100. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 
134 North street. Tel. Oapitol 2125. 
William P. Hickby, Commissioner. 

BUDGET DEPARTMENT. 
47 City Hal!. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Francis J. Murray, Commissioner. 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 901 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100 
Edward W. Roemer, Building Commissioner. 
John H. Glover, Acting Clerk of Department. 

Board op Examiners. 
Office, 907 City Hall AnTiex, Tel. Lafayrtte 

5100. 
J. Fred McNeil, Chairman. 
Mary C. Dowd, Secretary. 

Board op Appeal. 
Office, City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Jambs A. McElaney, Jr., Secretary. 

CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 
Room 31, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle. City Clerk. 
John B. Hynes, AsmMant City Clerk. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD. 
Room 30, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 
, Secretary. 



I 



I CITY RECORD. 

Office, 73 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Forrest P. Hull, Editor. 
Joshua H. Jones, Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent. Room 73, 
City Hall. 

COLLECTING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 200 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
John F. Doherty, City Collector. 
William T. Gartland, Assistant City Collector. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 111 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
David B. Shaw, Chairman. 
Daniel H. Rose, Commissioner. 
Frederic E. Dowling, Commissioner. 
Francis B. McKinney, Commissioiier. 

FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Office, 24 School street. Tel. Lafayette 1622. 
E. Mark Sullivan, Chairman. 
Robert E. Cunnipf, Secretary. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
Headquarters, Bristol street, South End. Tel. 

Kenmore 1100. 
Wire Division, 103 City Hall Annex. Tel. 

Lafayette 5100. 
Edward F. McLaughlin, Commissioner. 

, Executive Secretary. 

Samuel J. Pope, Chief of Department. 
Peter F. Dolan, Superintendent of Wire 

Division. 

THE FRANKLIN FOUNDATION. 
Office, Franklin Union, Appleton and Berkeley 

streets. Tel.. Hancock 6590. 
Henry B. Sawyer, President. 
W. B. Russell, Director. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 1107 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
William B. Keeler. M. D., Commissioner. 
Joseph A. Cahalan, Secretary. 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 
City Hospital, 818 Harrison ave., Tel. Ken. 8600. 
Relief Hospital, Haymarket Sq. Tel. Cap. 0753. 
Relief Hospital, East Boston. Tel. E. B. 3600. 
West Department, West Roxbury. 
Sanatorium Division, 249 River st., Mattapan. 

Tel. Blue Hills 7900. 
Joseph P. Manning, President. 
Jambs W. Manary, M. D., Superintendent. 

INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 808-811 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Frederic A. Washburn, M. D., Commissioner. 
Elizabeth G. Nelson, Chief Clerk. 
Child Welfare Division. 
800 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Registration Division. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Long Island, Hospital Division. 
Long Island, Boston Hanbor. Tel. President 

1371. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 
Room 1003, Lawyers Building, 11 Beacon 

street. Tel. Lafayette 6200. 
Henry E. Foley, Corporation Couiisel. 
Margaret G. O'Neill, Secretary. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Library Building, Copley square. Tel. 

Kenmore 1500. 
Louis E. Kirstbin, President of Trustees. 
Milton E. Lord, Director. 

LICENSING BOARD. 

Office, 1 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 2470. 
David T. Montague, Chairman. 
Louis Epplb, Secretary. 

MARKET DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Quincy Market. Tel. Capitol 5382. 
Frank J. Kibrnan, Suijerintendcnt. 

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

Men and Women, 25 Church street. Tel. 

Liberty 8607. 
Sa.muel W. Warren, Director. 

OVERSEERS OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

Office, Charity Building, 43 Hawkins street. 

Tel. Capital 8320. 
Temporary Home, Chardon street. Tel. Laf. 

2337. 
Wayfarers' Lodge, 30 Hawkins street. Tel. 

Lafayette 3'198. 
James A. McMurry, Chairman. 
John C. L. Dowling, Executive Director. 

PARK DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 
William P. Long, Chairman. 
Daniel J. Byrne, Secretary. 

Park, Public Grounds. Bath and Music 

Divisions. 

Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 

Cemetery Division. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 



city op boston pbintinq department 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 805 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
John J. Douglass, Commissioner. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters, 154 Berkeley street. Tel. Ken- 
more 6700. 
Joseph F. Timilty, Commissioner. 
Andrew J. Gorey, Secretary. 
Edward W. Fallon, Superintendent. 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 174 North street. Tel. Lafayette 6363. 
William J. Casey, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1005 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. BIOO. 
Roswbll G. Hall, Superintendent. 
Thomas A. Callahan, Chief Clerk. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

E. M. Richardson, Commissioner. Office 509 

City Hall Annex. Tel Lafayette 5100. 
John J. Connelly, Secretary and Chief Clerk. 
Room 509, City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Bridge and Ferry Division. 
Thomas H. Sexton, Division Engineer. Office, 
602 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Highway Division. 
Joshua Atwood, Division Engineer. Office, 
501 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Sanitary Division. 
Adolph j. Post, Division Engineer. Office, 
501 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Sewer Division. 
George W. Dakin, Division Engineer. Office, 
701 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Water Division. 
Daniel M. Sullivan, Division Engineer. Office. 
'607 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. &100. 
Water Income Division. 
James A. MoMurry, Division Engineer. Office, 
604 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 

REGISTRY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1008 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Hilda H. Quirk, Registrar. 

RETIREMENT BOARD. 

Room 65, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, Chairman. 
3. Gex)RGB Hbrlihy, Secretary. 
William D. Kenny, Executive Officer. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Office, 15 Beacon street. Tel. Captol 5500. 

Frederick R. Sullivan, Chairman. 

Ellen M. Cronin, Secretary. 

Patrick T. Campbell, Superintendent of 

Schools. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, Business Manager. 

SINKING FUNDS DEPARTMENT. 

Room 20, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Eliot V/adsworth, Chairman. 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 60 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Charles H. Carey, Commissioner. 

STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 76 City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Walter A. Murray, Acting Chairman 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Secretary. 

STREET LAYING-OUT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 401 City Hall Annex. 

Commissioners: Owen A. Gallagher, Chair- 
man; Walter A. Murray; Thomas A. Fitz- 
gerald; Cornelius A. Reardon, Secretary. 

SUFFOLK, COUNTY OF. 

Offices, Court House, Pemberton square. Tel. 

Capitol 0351. 
William J. Foley, District Attorney. Tel. 

Capitol 9500. 
John A. Keliher, Sheriff. Tel. Capitol 2451. 
W. T. A. Fitzgerald, Register of Deeds. Tel. 

Capitol 0519. 
Arthur W. Sullivan, Register of Probate. 

Tel. Capitol 9110. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 801 City HaU Annex. T.el. Laf. 5100. 
D. Frank Doherty, Superintendent. 

TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1 Beacon st, 7th floor. Tel. Capitol 5860. 
Thomas F. Sullivan, Chairman. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 
Room 21, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
John H. Dorsey, Treasurer. 
Arthur F. Swan, Assistant Treasurer. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 105 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
James A. Sweeney, Sealer. 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol. '2y. Saturi^ay, .January Iti, 1937. No, 3 

PUBLIC WORKS OFFICIALS REPLY TO FINANCE COMMISSION CHARGES 
RELATIVE TO SPLIT CONTRACTS — TELL MAYOR MANSFIELD, IN REPLY 
TO REQUESTS FOR EXPLANATIONS AND REFUTATION OF ALLEQA= 
TIONS, THAT WORK COMMENTED ON WAS LARGELY OF EMERGENCY 
NATURE, DEMANDING IMMEDIATE ATTENTION, AND NOT OF A CLASS 
OR NATURE SUCH AS WOULD WARRANT ASSUMPTIONS AND ALLEGA= 
TIONS MADE IN ACCUSATIONS — BOTH C. J. CARVEN, RETIRED, AND 
GEORGE W. DAKIN EXPLAIN LEGAL RIGHTS AND COURSES PURSUED. 

"°" The following is a copy of letter from Christopher J. Carven to Mayor Mansfield relative to "split 
contract" allegations from Finance Commission. This was accompanied by a letter from George W. Dakin, 
Division Engineer: 

7 Lakeville Road, Jamaica Plain, 

January 8, 1937. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, Maijor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I respectfully beg leave to submit the following comments on report of the Finance Commis- 
sion, dated January 5, 1937, referring to so-called "spUt contracts" in the Sewer Service during the year 1936. 

As to the larger percentage of work given to Mr. M. H. Loonie, said Loonie has been a sewer contractor 
for many years, is as well equipped for doing this work as any contractor in Boston, has always given personal 
attention to the work, was and is prepared to respond to any call, day or night, week day or Sunday. In other 
words, he is available at any time, under any circumstances, and for the above reason the Sewer Division engineers 
have concurred with the undersigned in considering Mr. Loonie's availability and capability in the work given 
him by the Public Works Department. 

The statement that the Division Engineer of the Sewer Service (Mr. Dakin) was instructed by the under- 
signed to arrange the ordering of the work in such a manner as to avoid the necessity of advertising for bids is not 
correct, neither is the statement correct that Mr. Dakin was instructed to give all such work to a particular bidder, 
and the sewer records will show to the contrary. 

During the past year no protests were made to or received by the undersigned, as stated in the report, nor 
was any authority asked for by the Sewer Division to group the work and advertise it. 

Concerning the statement that the work involved was determined on information not obtained from the 
Sewer Service, beg leave to state that outside of some catch-basin construction demanded by the W. P. A. street 
building and called to the attention of the undersigned by the Chief Engineer of the Paving Division (Mr. JMorrissey) 
in charge of the W. P. A. street activities, and forwarded to the Sewer Division for action, knowledge of all other 
work ordered and done was obtained directly from the Sewer Service and from no other source. 

Finally, the work in the Sewer Division complained of in the Finance Commission report was largely of 
an emergency nature, demanding immediate attention, to free sewer stoppages and overcome and prevent flooding 
of buildings, street areas, etc. 

In some cases noted, it was found that after an original order for construction of a catch-basin, etc., was 
issued, and the work completed, it was necessary to give an additional order to the same contractor to completely 
remedy the complaints which the original order was supposed to complete. 

Very truly yours, 

C. J. Carven. 

The letter from George W. Dakin, Division Engineer, Sewer Division, Public Works Department, to Mayor 
Mansfield reads as follows: 

Boston, January 8, 1937. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — In reference to a report of the Boston Finance Commission, dated January 5, 1937, 
relative to so-called "split contracts," I wish to report as follows: 

About three months ago I was summoned before the Finance Commission and appeared before that com- 
mission accompanied by Joseph Brcnnan, Esq., Assistant Corporation Counsel, who came at my request. 

I obtained from Mr. Brennan an opinion as to my legal rights and obligations antl governed myself 
accordingly. 

In my testimony before the Finance Commission I did not testify that I was ordered by the Commissioner 
of Public Works to arrange the work in such a manner as to avoid the necessity of advertising for bids. At no time 
did I testify that I was ordered to give all unadvertised work to a particular contractor, M. II. I^oonie, as otlicr 
contracts of a similar nature were given to other contractors. 

Furthermore, I did not testify that I gave out this work after repeated protests to the Commissioner of 
Public Works. Nothing of the kind ever occurred. Neither did I state in my testimony that a large percentage 
of this work should have been done under advertised contracts, and that only a small percentage of it was of an 
emergency nature. 

It is my opinion that all the sewerage works in question were of an ctnergenoy nature, in the sense that all 
sewerage works are of an emergency nature, but som(> work is more urgent than other work. 

I am handicapped in making this report in not having a transcript of my testimony before me at this time, 
as it is voluminous, and suggest that Mr. Brennan be requested to substantiate me in these regards. 

George W. Dakin, Division Engineer. 



54 



C ITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 




"0 Boston, fair City enthroned lilce a radiant 

queen. 
From thy hills looking down on the ship- 
teeming plain of the ocean. 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene. 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unseinsh devotion!" 
From BostxMi Centenial Poem by 

Nathan Haskel Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly in Boston by the Board of 
Trustees of the Statistics Department of 
the Gity of Boston, undter the directiton of 
the Mayor, in accordance with legislative act 
and city ordinance. 



F&BREST P. HULL, Editor, Room 73, City 

Hall. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



$2.00 per year 
10 Cents 



IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES 
Old South News-'Stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising 
A rate of $2 per i-nch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
.January 18, 1937, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p, m. 

MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
officials directly in charge. The failure 
of such ofiicial to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways, the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 
for the storage or sale of merchandise in 



public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasoline, oil 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Traffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To THE Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To THE Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue. Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 
charges made for such service. Applica- 



tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To THE School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Department of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To THE Bo.IRD OF EXAMINERS, Room 

1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To THE Statistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To THE Wire Division of the Fire 
Department, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To THE Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY 

For the week ending .Jan. 9, 1937. 

Population as of July, 1936, Massa- 
chusetts State Census, 817,713; popula- 
tion estimated, July, 1937, United States 
Census Bm-eau, 805,192; number of 
deaths (stillbirths excluded): Residents, 
211; nonresidents, 48; total, 259. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 16.60; nonresidents deducted, 
13.75. 



REPORT. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 

Last week, 16.73; corresponding week 
last year, 18.48. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc. : Under 
one year, 19; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 5; sixty years and over, 134. 
Total deaths: Male, 132; female, 126; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 162; 
deaths of colored, 7. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 



Anterior Poliomyelitis 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis Lethargica 

Influenza 

Measles 

Meningitis Epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet Fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) (childhood type T. B.) 

Tuberculosis (other forms) 

Typhoid Fever 

Whooping Cough 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 9, 1937. 



Cases. Deaths. 



5 
2 
66 
71 
24 
15 
4 

199 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 11, 1936. 



Cases. Deaths. 



43 

100 
86 
22 



27 
1 



* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 16 



CITY RECORD 



55 



OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 9, 1937. 





Dependent 
Aid. 


Mothers' 
Aid. 


Old Age 
Assistance. 


Administeative. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 


Number of active cases last 


15,150 

506 

*193 

15,463 

22,427 


1,601 

6 

12 

1,595 
1,589 


7,771 
*325 

8,096 
4,364 






24,522 
837 


week. 
Number of cases added 






Number of cases discontinued . . 






205 


Number of active cases this 






25,154 


week. 
Same week last year 






28,380 









Financial. 



Expended during week . 

Last week 

Same week last year. . . 

Appropriations 

Expended to date 



Collections from Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, 
outside cities and towns and 
refunds, ft 



$103,899 74 
101,735 02 
149,111 87 



103,940 42 
19,169 62 



131,467 74 


24,081 03 


24,017 00 


31,467 74 


330 00 



$9,922 06 

106,765 42 

27,226 20 



116,185 44 



$16,130 00 
16,361 24 
13,923 22 



16,130 00 



$161,419 54 
248,942 71 
214,278 29 



267,723 60 
19,499 62 



* Includes 68 transfers from Dependent Aid to Old Age Assistance, f Collections on account of Boston City Hospital, $7,805.20. 

t Miscellaneous collections, $37.36. 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
find delivering standard lock sets and 
parts. Surety bond will be n^iuired 
in a sum equivalent to the full amount 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Department of School Buildings, 
26 Norman street, Boston. Bids, ac- 
companied by certified check in the sum 
of $.500, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, Jauuarij 19, al 
2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for rooting 
work, etc., on the J. W. Howe School. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the; full an\ount of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
]50sals may be obtained at th(> office of the 
Department of School Buildings, 20 Nor- 



man street, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $500, 
to be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bid close Monday, January 25, at 
2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furni-shing 
battery material for departmental use. 
Sun^ty bond will be recjuircd in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for propo.sals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Department of School Buildings, 26 Nor- 
man street, Boston, Mass. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$500, to" be filed at the same office. 
Dui)lieate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, February 1, at 

2 p. m. 

Puiuac WouKs DKrAHTiMKNT (l'\'rry 
Service). 

Advertises for proposals for placing 
weighing and vending machines in the 
headhouses of the ['"'ei'ry Service. Surety 
bond will be re(|uired in a sum equivalent 
to a sum satisfactory to the Public Works 
Commissioner. Blank forms for pro- 



posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Public Works Department, Room 508, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$100, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
witli the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, January 22, al 12 m. 

School Committee. 
Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
pencils, pens, penholders, chalk, ink and 
other items for the public schools. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to not le-^is than 50 per cent of the contract 

Erice. Blank forms for propo.-^als may 
e obtained at the office of the Business 
Manager, School Conunittee, 15 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of .?UX), to bo 
filed at the same office. Duplicate l^id, 
without check, to be (iled with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 19, al 12 nt. 

.\dvertises for proposals for furnishing 
paper, blank books and envelopes for the 
public schools. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to not li\^ 
than 50 per cent of the contract price. 
IMank forms for proposals may bo ob- 



56 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 



tained at the office of the Business Mana- 
ger, School Committee, 15 Beacon street, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of SlOO, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 20, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for rebinding 
books of the public schools. Surety bond 
wUl be required in a sum equivalent to 
not Jess than 50 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals maj^ 
be obtained at the office of the Business 
Manager, School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of SlOO, to be 
filed at the same office. Duphcate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 26, at 
12 m. 

Supply Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
waste and wiping cloths to the various 
cit3' departments. Suretj' bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
qfiace of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of 8200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 18, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical dressings to the various city 
departments. Surety bond wiU be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
oflSce of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of 8200, to be filed at the same office. 
Duphcate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 19, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
meats to the various city departments. 
Siuety bond wiH be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall An- 
nex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of 8300, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, January 19, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical and hypodermic needles to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of -SlOO, to be filed at the same 
ofiice. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 20, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
fruits and vegetables to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Aimex, Boston, Bids, 



accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of 8300, to be filed at the same 
office. Duphcate bid, without check, 
to be filed \\ith the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 20, at 

12 771. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
metal polish to the various city depart- 
ments. Surety bond will be required in 
a sum equivalent to 25 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of 
the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
850, to be filed at the same office. Dupli- 
cate bid, without check, to be filed with 
the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 21, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
hay, grain and straw to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of 8200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duphcate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 21, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
butter, eggs, etc., to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hah Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of S3 00, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be fUed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 21, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
surgical supphes to the various city 
departments. Surety bond wiU be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of 8300, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 21, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
drugs to the various city departments. 
Surety bond v^^\il be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall An- 
nex, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of 8300, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bidts close Friday, January 22, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
sulfuric acid and sodium bicarbonate 
to the various city departments. Surety 
bond wfil be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply De- 
partment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of 8100, to be filed at 



the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 
Bids close Monday, January 25, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
soap powder and soap chips to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of 8100, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 25, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
industrial and medicinal gases to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sunt of 8200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duphcate bid, without check, to 
be fUed with the City Auditor. 

Bids dose Wednesday, January 27, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
bank gravel and sand to the various city 
departments. Surety bond wiU be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
smn of 8200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 28, at 
12 VI. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
flashhght equipment to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City HaU Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of SlOO, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids dose Friday, January 29, at 12 m. 



PROSPECTS BRIGHT FOR NEW 
CITY HALL. 

On Januarj-- 11 the foUowing statement 
was issued from the office of the Mayor 
relative to the New City Hall. 

The prospects look very bright for a 
new City HaU. The President said that 
if a large part of the cost could be devoted 
to taking labor off the welfare rolls, he 
would be glad to help. The President 
asked us to figure how much skilled and 
how much unskilled labor could be em- 
ployed and taken off the welfare rolls and 
that he would give us that amoimt plus 
10 per cent or 15 per cent toward the 
project. Henry Foley was present and 
also Congressman McCormack. When 
we return to Boston, we are going to get 
those figures and present them to the 
President. The Mayor feels that any 
difference between that figure and the 
grant of 81,125,000 that we expected to 
get can be made up by additional borrow- 
ings by the city. 



Jan. 16 



CITY RECORD 



57 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation af the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thursday, January 14: 

Hospital Department. 

The following persons were employed 
at the Boston City Hospital for the week 
ending Thursday, December 31, 1936: 

Temporary. — 'Phillip Fay, supervisor, 
S32 a week; Samuel Odiorne, male nurse, 
S32 a week; Charles Toye, supervisor, 
$32 a week; Frances Burdick, Helen 
Clark, Dorothy Donovan, Louise Fal- 
lon, Eleanor Kilburn, Josephine Kass, 
Mary Korona, Rita McGrath, Eliza- 
beth Mitchell, Louise Murphy, Eleanor 
O'Donnell, Harry Plenty, Mary Pi-oal, 
Kathryn Silva, special nurses, S4.50 a 
day. 

South Department. 

Mae Barden, special nurse, S4.50 a day. 

Haymarket Square Relief Station. 

Katherine Bachman, cleaner, $15 a 
week; James Norton, porter, tending 
furnace, S33 a week. 

The foUowing changes have occurred: 

Ruth A. Church, out-patient registrar 
at SI, 750 to recording librarian at §2,000 
a year; Daniel J. Sullivan, steamfitter's 
helper at §30 to boiler room helper at 
S35.50 a week. 

■Montlily nurses, increases, October 1 : 
Regina Lamb, Mary Appleman, Ruth 
Chamberlain, $16 to $16.67; Anna Bald- 
win, Margaret Christown, Grace Savidge, 
S11.67 to $16.67; Mary Higgins, Maiy 
Leahy, Mildred Leonard, Dorothy Mul- 
Jin, Mary P. McCarthy, Mary A. Mc- 
Carthy, Hariett Rouleau, Vivian Turner, 
$10 to $12.50; Eva Beauparlant, Helen 
Coughlin, Claire Creely, Irene Duchesne, 
Eleanor Stowell, Alice Eckartt, Dorothy 
Gibbons, ©orothy LeBlanc, Ruth Leslie, 
Anna McNamara, Ruth Vass, Thelma 
Meister, Gladys 'Mical, Phyllis Moser, 
Shirley Sweet, Christine Mylott, Mar- 
garet Netto, Amelia Piekas, Nina Pot- 
ter, Mary Robertson, 'Anastasia Ru- 
denko, Mary- Sheehy, $10.50 to $12.50; 
Nellie Ei'ban, $12.50 to $16.67; Ruth L 
Anderson, $10 to $12.50. 

Steva Belansus, S12.50 to §16.67, South 
Department; Margaret Forsyth, §10, 
South Department; Hester Bull, Rita 
Qillahan, no pay. South Department. 

The following persons were employed 
at the Boston City Hospital for the 
week ending Thursday, January 7: 

Temporary. — Dr. Augustine Eddy, 
resident surgeon, §1,000 a year; John 
Carroll, transfer porter, $16.50 a week; 
William Goode, Albert Babel, orderlies, 
S16.50 a week; Samuel Odiorne, male 
nurse, §32 a week; Jacqueline Burke, 
Mary Begely, Anne Carroll, Ella Cleary, 
Marie Guerrio, Marion Hampshire, Fran- 
ces Harris, Ellen Leonard, Joan Mari- 
bito, Lsabel O'Brien, Mabel Ormsberg, 
Anna Ward, Vera Aldrieh, Frances Bur- 
dick, Louise Burns, Christine Byrne, 
Priscilla Chase, Catherine Cimninghain, 
Margaret Deeley, Anna Ferraira, Aldona 
Grublin, Isabel Jeghers, Julia Jarvis, 
Rita McGrath, Rose Pcletier, Edalia 
Ruscinsky, Douglass Spencer, Tina Ven- 
eham, Mildred Wilkins, Josephine Kass, 
Frances Sullivan, Katherine Bullman, 
Marie Carlson, Louise Fallon, Grace 
Krauss, Jemima Mahan, Olga Ollen, El- 
eanor Sexton, Mary Turner, Rose 
^^'alker, special nurses, $4.50 a day. 

The following changes have occurred: 



Harold Beckwith, tranter porter at 
§16.50 to housecleaner at $21 a week; 
Dorothy Kelley, Veronica McNamara, 
floor nurses at $1,560 to §1,680 a year; 
Dr. Robert M. Nye, assistant pathologist 
at §4,000 to §1,000 a year; Domonic 
Fredestafano, name changed to Fred- 
erick Stefano, per order of Probate 
Court. 

Hospital DeIpartment (Sanatorium 
Division). 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division of 
the Boston City Hospital for the week 
ending Thursday, December 31, 1936: 

Frances Kernell, nurse (temporary), 
§1,020 a year; Angela Roberts, ward 
maid (temporary), $10.50 a week; Henry 
Larsen, Richard Cripps, male nurses (pa- 
tients) (temporary), $480 a year; Joseph 
Chamrin, Joseph Russell, Edward Hulen, 
maids (patients) (temporary), §240 a 
year; Ann Hodgdon, relief telephone op- 
erator (temporary), §3 a day; Thomas 
Thompson, night supei'visor (tempo- 
rary), $4 a day; Louise Sachs, nurse, 
$1,020 a year; Alice Travers, Agnes Wall, 
nurses (temporary), $1,020 a year. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed : 

Gladys L'Esperance, nurse, $1,020 a 
year; Leo Levins, M. D., interne, $1,200 
a year; Joseph DiGiovanni, choreman 
(patient) (temporary), §240 a year; 
Penelope MacEachern, clerk (tempo- 
raiy), $18 a week. 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division of 
the Boston City Hospital for the week 
ending Thursday, January 7: 

Samuel C. Cohen, M. D., Max D. 
Stein, M. D., internes, $1,200 a year; 
Peter Walsh, male nurse, $480 a j^ear; 
Harold Chapman, watchman (tempo- 
raiy), $25 a week; Henry Larson, male 
nurse (patient) (temporaiy), $480 a 
year; Joseph Russell, maid (patient) 
(temporary), §240 a year; William 
Powei-s, relief supervisor (temporary), 
$4 a day; Anna Hodgdon, rehef tele- 
phone operator (temporarjO, §3 a day; 
Francis A. Day, choreman, from $14 to 
$17.50 a week. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed: 

Maurice McElligot, M. D., interne, 
§1,200 a year; Peter Walsh, male nurse 
(patient), $480 a year. 

Market Department. 
Approval has been given for the per- 
manent appointment of Edward J. Mc- 
Cormack as Deputy Superintendent of 
Markets at §3,000 a year, effective Janu- 
ary 8. 

OvER.SEERS OF THE PuBLIC WeLF.\UE. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporary employment of the 
following persons as stenographers, for 
a period of one month from January 15, 
at $900 a year: 

Cecelia F. Batchelder, Marie J. 
Bertach, Frances G. Clarke, Lillian I. 
Coulton, Mabel R. Crowley, Inna Y. 
Drcaycr, Edna M. Durgin, Mary F. Got- 
sell. Mary N. Kenned v. Zeldji Lezar, 
Francos J. MontoUo. "Mary T. Mc- 
Donough, Marv B. McGowau, Maiy 
O'Keefe. Elizabeth M. O'Leary, Mar- 
guerite Roonev, Alice Ru.sso, Helen T. 
Shea, Margaret Sullivan, Esther G. Ta- 
ranto, Rose G. Waters. 

Appro\al has been given for tlio con- 
tinued temporary employment of the 



following persons as clerks, for a period 
of one month from January 15, at §900 
a year: 

Philip Barber, Samuel G. Berger, Mary 
M. Cauley, John N. Chagaris, Thomas 
J. Connaughton, Marj' F. Cronin, Ru.s- 
sell E. CuUivan, Helen A. Curley, Mary 
E. Dillon, Anna M. Doyle, Charles H. 
Drew, Jr., Helen T. Fadden, Christopher 
J. Fay, Thomas F. Flanagan, Mary 0. 
Greene, Anne Halligan, Frederick T. 
Hurle3', Thomas F. Keeley, Mary P. 
Kellej', Stanislavia Kiwacyznska, Mar- 
garet E. Leahy, Edward F. Murphy, John 
J. McDonald, Bernard McGovern, 
Thomas W. Quigley, Michael J. Rizzo, 
Arthur Sawyer, John T. Scanlon, Lazard 
T. Seiff, William Miller, Helen T. Sever- 
ance, Helen G. Skapinsky, Jacob Speigel, 
George W. Stuart, Edward L. Sullivan, 
Agnes V. Sweeney, Mary Tatro, Alfred 
C. Troy, Ruth H. Walker. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued temporai-y emplojTnent of the 
following persons as clerk-tj-pists, for a 
period of one month, at $900 a year: 

Alice Banard, Edna E. Condon, David 
Goldfine, Thelma Goldkrand, Celia Gove- 
nor, Mary R. Grafton, Goldie Kai-p, Mu- 
riel L. Ki-aft, Marj- F. Langdon, Myra 
H. McCarthy, Mary A. O'Hare, Honora 
M. O'Neil, Alice W. Short, Katherine 
P. Travers, Julia Wood. 

Approval has been given for the con- 
tinued provisional temporaiy employ- 
ment of Edward B. Steele as real estate 
consultant, for a period of three months 
from January 6, at $1,500 a year. 

Penal Institutions Department. 
The foUowing appointments have been 
made: 

House of Correction. 
Joseph A. Sullivan, officer, §1,600 a 
year and maintenance, vacancy. 

Steamer "Michael J. Perkins:' 
Patrick J. Doherty, whai-finger, $40 a 

week, temporary, 
John J, Darragh, watchman-fireman, 

§5.50 a day, temporarj-. 

Public Works Dep.artment. 

Approval has been given to grant a 
leave of absence, without paj-, to the 
following emploj'ces of the department, 
who have been elected to serve as Rep- 
rentatives to the General Court for 
1937, for a period beginning Jauuaiy S 
and terminating upon the .prorogation of 
the General Court: 

Thomas E. Bariy, working foreman, 
§2,200 a year, Sewer Division; Francis 
W. Irwin, clerk, §2,200 a year, Water 
Division; Thomas J. Hannou, clerk and 
street numbering inspector, §2,100 a year. 
Highway Division. 

Overtime Allowed. 

The heads of the various departments 
whose employees have received payment 
for overtime state in connection there- 
with that if any laborer has been allowed 
to work more than eight hours per day 
it has been only in case of emergency 
under the law: 

Printing Department. 

For the week ending Thui-sday, Janu- 
ary 7: 

Frank Nicholson, compositor, j hour, 
81.15; John J. Dillon, compositor, i hour. 
SI .OS; William Ryan, press feeder, 1 
hour, $1.36; William Donohue. cylinder 
pressman, J hour, SI. 11; Joseph Colby, 
press feeder, i hour. §0.%; Richard 



58 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 



Morrison, cj-Iinder pressman, 1 hour, 
SI. 57; Jeremiah Connelly, cutter, | hour, 
SI. 10; Michael O'Oallaghan, sheet stock- 
man, U houi-s, S2.21 ; David O'Neil, cut- 
ter, i hour, SI. 10. Total, SI 1.63. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, maiterials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Building Department. 

Upon January 7 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the New York Building 
Wrecking Company to take down the 
building at 22 Chambers street, rear, 
Ward 3, for the sum of $109 and instructed 
them to proceed with the work. The 
following bids were received: 

New York BuUding Wrecking Com- 
pany, §109; City BuUding Wrecking Com- 
pany, $248; Hub Building Wrecking 
Company, Incorporated, $249; American 
Building Wrecking Company, $254; 
Central BuUding Wrecking Company, 
$255; New England Building Wreckmg 
Company, $275. 

- Department of School Buildings. 

Upon January 13 the Mayor approved 
a contract with low bidders on items indi- 
cated for furnishing and delivering parts 
of pupUs' furniture to the department 
storehouse, as ordered during the year 
1937. 

All proposals for finished items were 
rejected due to the fact that with a force 
of W. P. A. furniture finishers operating 
in this department, the best interests of 
the city are served by employing this 
group in the finishing of these furnitm'e 
parts. 

Contracts have been awarded to the 
low bidder on each item of unfinished 
materials as foUows: 

To John F. Hynes, Incorporated, 
Item No. 1000, 13|-inch by 23-inch desk 
hds, 75 cents each; Item No. 1000-A, 
135-inch by 24-inch desk lids, 78 cents 
each; Item No. 1000-B, 15-inch by 26-inch 
desk lids, 83 cents each; Item No. 1000-C, 
17-inch by 26-inch desk lids, 88 cents 
each; pencil rack molding, 5 cents a foot; 
Item No. 1002-D, 19-inch by 25-inch desk 
boxes, $2.85 each. 

To McCarthy Brothers, Item No. 1001, 
Sj-inch by 23-inch desk rails, 27 cents 
each; Item No. 1001-A, 4|-inch by 24-inch 
desk rails, 29 cents each; Item No. 1001-B, 
55-inch bv 26-inch desk rails, 29 cents 
each; Item No. 1001-C, 3i-inch by 26-inch 
desk raUs, 28 cents each. 

To Kenney Brothers, Incorporated, 
Item No. 1002, 13-inch by 21-inch desk 
boxes, $1.31 each; Item No. 1002- A, 
15-inch by 26-inch desk boxes, $1.53 each; 
Item No. 1002-B, 16-inch by 23-inch 
desk boxes, .$2.31 each; Item No. 1002-C, 
18-inch by 24-inch desk boxes, $2.64 
each; Item No. 1003, No. 1 large spindle 
back chair seats, $1.40 each; Item No. 
1003-A, No. 2 medium spindle back chair 
seats, $1.32 each; Item No. 1003-B, No. 3 
small spindle back chair seats, $1.21 each. 

In one instance, namely, Item No. 
1000-A, John F. Hynes, Incorporated, 
and McCarthy Brothers,, were in a tie 
at 78 cents each. As John F. Hynes, In- 
corporated, was the low bidder on the 
three other types of lids, the award on 
this one item was also made to that 
concern. 

Bids, were as follows: 

Item No. 1000, Thirteen and One-Half- 
Inch by Twenty-Three-Inch Desk Ldds. — 



John F. Hynes, Incorporated, unfinished, 
75 cents each, finished in school brown, 
90 cents each; McCarthy Brothers, un- 
finished, 77 cents each; finished in school 
brown, 87 cents each; Kenney Brothers, 
Incorporated, unfinished, 79 cents each; 
finished in school brown, 90 cents each; 
R. J. Connolly, Incorporated, unfin- 
ished, 96 cents each; finished in school 
brown, $1.11 each; M. S. Kelliher Com- 
pany, unfinished, $1 each; finished in 
school brown, $1.20 each. 

Item No. 1000-A, Thirteen and 0?ie- 
Half-Inch by Twenty-Fovr-Irich Desk Lids. 
— John F. Hynes, Incorporated, unfin- 
ished, 78 cents each; finished in school 
brown, 93 cents each; McCarthy Brothers, 
unfinished, 78 cents each; finished in 
school browTi, 88 cents each; Kenney 
Brothers, Incorporated, unfinished, 80 
cents each; finished in school brown, 91 
cents each; R. J. ConnoUy, Incor- 
porated, unfinished, 96 cents each; fin- 
ished in school brbwn, $1.11 each; M. S. 
Kelhher Company, imfinished, $1.15 
each; finished in school brown, $1.30 
each. 

Item No. 1000-B, Fifteen-Inch by 
Twenty-Six-hich Desk Lids. — John F. 
Hynes, Incorporated, unfinished, 83 cents 
each; finished in school brown, 98 cents 
each; McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 
88 cents each; finished in school brown, 
98 cents each; Kenney Brothers, Incor- 
porated, unfinished, 91 cents each; fin- 
ished in school brown, $1.02 each; R. J. 
Connolly, Incorporated, unfinished, $1.03 
each; finished in school brown, $1.18 
each; M. S. Kelliher Company, unfin- 
ished, $1.35 each; finished in school 
browTi, $1.50 each. 

Item No. 1000-C, Seventeen-Inch by 
Twenty-Six-Inch Desk Lids. — John F. 
Hynes, Incorporated, unfinished, 88 cents 
each; finished in school brown, $1.03 
each; McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 
98 cents each; finished in school brown, 
$1.10 each; Kemiey Brothers, Incor- 
porated, unfinished, $1.02 each; finished 
in school brown, $1.15 each; R. J. Con- 
noUy, Incorporated, unfinished, $1.09 
each; finished in school brown, $1.24 
each; M. S. KeUiher Company, unfinished, 
$1.45 each; finished in school brown, 
$1.60 each. 

Item No. 1001, Three and One-Half- 
Inch by Twenty-Three-Inch Desk Rails. — 
McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 27 cents 
each; finished in school brown, 34 cents 
each; Kenney Brothers, Incorporated, 
unfinished, 28 cents each; finished in 
school brown, 35 cents each; R. J. Con- 
nolly, Incorporated, unfinished, 36 cents 
each; finished in school brown, 42 cents 
each; John F. Hynes, Incorporated, 
unfinished, 30 cents each; finished in 
school brown, 37 cents each; M. S. 
KeUiher Company, unfinished, 45 cents 
each; finished in school brown, 55 cents 
each. 

Item No. 1001-A, Four and One-Half- 
Inch by Twenty-Four-Inch Desk Rails. — 
McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 29 cents 
each; finished in school brown, 36 cents 
each; Kenney Brothers, Incorporated, 
unfinished, 30 cents each; finished in 
school browTi, 38 cents each; R. J. Con- 
noUy, Incorporated, unfinished, 42 cents 
each; finished in school brown, 48 cents 
each; John F. H3Ties, Incorporated, un- 
finished, 36 cents each; finished in 
school brown, 46 cents each; M. S. 
Kelliher Company, unfinished, 55 cents 
each; finished in school brown, 65 cents 
each. 

Item No. 1001-B, Five and One-Half- 
Inch by Twenty-Six-Inch Desk Rails. — 
McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 29 cents 



each; finished in school brown, 36 cents 
each; Kenney Brothers, Incorporated, 
unfinished, 32 cents each; finished in 
school brown, 40 cents each; R. J. Con- 
noUy, Incorporated, unfinished, 51 cents 
each; finished in school brown, 57 cents 
each; John F. Hynes, Incorporated, 
unfinished, 40 cents each; finished in 
school brown, 50 cents each; M. S. Kel- 
liher Company, unfinished, 65 cents each; 
finished in school brown, 70 cents each. 

Item No. 1001--C, Three and One-Half- 
Inch by Twenty-Six-Inch Desk Rails. — 
McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 28 cents 
each; finished in school brown, 35 cents 
each; Kenney Brothers, Incorporated, 
unfinished, 30 cents each; finished in school 
brown, 38 cents each; R. J. Connolly, 
Incorporated, unfinished, 38 cents each; 
finished in school brown, 44 cents each; 
John F. Hynes, Incorporated, unfinished, 
30 cents each; finished in school brown, 40 
cents each; M. S. Kelliher Company, 
unfinished, 75 cents each; finished in 
school brown, 85 cents each. 

Item No. 1001-C, Pencil Rack Mold- 
ing. — John F. Hynes, Incorporated, 5 
cents a foot; R. J. Connolly, Incorporated, 
6 cents a foot; McCarthy Brothers, 8 
cents a foot; M. S. Kelliher Company, 
8 cents a foot; Kenney Brothers, Incor- . 
porated, 10 cents a foot. 

Item No. 1002, 13-Inch by 21-Inch 
Desk Boxes. — Kenney Brothers, Incor- 
porated, unfinished, $1.31 each; finished 
in school brown, $1.51 each; McCarthy 
Brothers, unfinished, $1.78 each; finished 
in school brown, $2.16 each; R. J. Con- 
nolly, Incorporated, no bid; John F. 
Hynes, Incorporated, unfinished, $1.65 
each; finished in school brown, $1.95 each; 
M. S. Kelliher Company, unfinished, 
$1.95 each; finished in school brown, $2.20 
each. 

Item No. 1002- A, 15-Inch by 26-Inch 
Desk Boxes. — Kenney Brothers, Incor- 
porated, unfinished, $1.53 each; fiinished 
in school brown, $1.73 each; McCarthy 
Brothers, unfinished, $1.86 each; finished 
in school brown, $2.30 each; R. J. Con- 
nolly, Incorporated, no bid; John F. 
Hynes, Incorporated, unfinished, 12.75 
each; finished in school brown, $3.05 each; 
M. S. KeUiher Company, unfinished, $2.40 
each; finished in school brown, $2.80 

Item No. 1002-B, 16-Inch by 23-Inch 
Desk Boxes. — Kenney Brothers, Incor- 
porated, unfinished, $2.31 each; finished 
in school brown, $2.56 each; McCarthy 
Brothers, unfinished, $3.37 each; finished 
in school brown, $3.88 each; R. J. Con- 
nolly, Incorporated, no bid; John F. 
Hynes, Incorporated, unfinished, $2.75 
each; finished in school brown, $3.05 each; 
M. S. KeUiher Company, unfinished, 
$2.75 each; finished in school brown, $3.10 
each. 

Item No. 1002-C, 18-Inch by 24-Inch 
Desk Boxes. — Kenney Brothers, Incor- 
porated, unfinished, .$2.64 each; finished 
in school brown, $2.89 each; McCarthy 
Brothers, unfinished, $3.70 each; finished 
in school brown, .$4.23 each; R. J. Con- 
nolly, Incorporated, no bid; John F. 
Hynes, Incorporated, unfinished, $2.85 
each; finished in school brown, $3.15 each; 
M. S. Kelliher Company, unfinished, $3 
each; finished in school brown, $3.40 
each. 

Ite7n No. 1002-D, 19-Inch by 25-Inch 
Desk Boxes. — Kenney Brothers, Incor- 
porated, unfinished, $3.02 each; finished 
in school brown, $3.27 each; McCarthy 
Brothers, unfinished, S3. 91 each; finished 
in school browTi, $4.48 each; R. J. Con- 
noUy, Incorporated, no bid; John F. 
Hynes, Incorporated, unfinished, $2.85 
each; finished in school brown, $3.15 each; 



Jan. 16 



CITY RECORD 



59 



M. S. Kelliher Company, unfinished, $3.10 
each; finished in school brown, .|3.50 each. 

Hem No. 1003, No. 1 Large Spindle 
Back Chair Seats. — Kenney Brothers, 
Incorporated, unfinished, $1.40 each; 
finished in school brown, .11.60 each; 
McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, $1.50 
each; finished in school brown, .11.81 each; 
R. J. Connolly, Incorporated, no bid; 
John F. Hynes, Incorporated^ no bid; 
M. S. Kelliher Company, unfinished, 
$1.45 each; finished in school brown, $1.60 
each. 

Item No. 1003- A, No. 2 Medium 
Spindle Back Chair Seals. — Kenney 
Brothers, Incorporated, unfinished, $1.32 
each; finished in school brown, $1.52 
each; McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 
$1.41 each; finished in school brown, 
$1.66 each; R. J. Connolly, Incorporated, 
no bid; John F. Hynes, Incorporated, 
no bid; M. S. Kelliher Company, un- 
finished, $1.65 each; finished in school 
brown, $1.80 each. 

Item No. 1003-B, No. 3 Small 
Spindle Back Chair Seats. — Kenney 
Brothers, Incorporated, unfinished, $1.21 
each; finished in school brown, $1.41 
each; McCarthy Brothers, unfinished, 
$1.29 each; finished in school brown, 
$1.60 each; R. J. Connolly, Incorporated, 
no bid; John F. Hynes, Incorporated, 
no bid; M. S. Kelliher Company, un- 
finished, $1.65 each; finished in school 
brown, $1.80 each. 

School Committee. 

The School Committee has approved 
proposals for furnishing oxygen, acetylene 
and calcium carbide for Boston public 
schools. Bids, opened Wednesday, De- 
cember 9, w ere received from the follow- 
ing concerns: 

Linde Air Products Company, National 
Carbide Corporation, New England Gas 
Products, Incorporated. 

Awards were made to the lowest 
bidders in accordance with specifications 
and contracts executed as follows : 

Linde Air Products Company, for 
furnishing acetylene, $288; National Car- 
bide Corporation, for furnishing calcium 
carbide, $564; New England Gas Prod- 
ucts, Incorporated, for furnishing oxy- 
gen, $1,000. 

Supply Department. 

Upon January 13 the Mayor approved 
permission to award a contract to bidders 
as indicated for furnishing 95 per cent 
ethyl alcohol for the various city depart- 
ments. The two bids received were 
identical. 

The approximate totals of awards 
were as follows: 

The American Distilling Company of 
New England, $1,215; Commerciaf Sol- 
vents Corporation, $1,215. Total, $2,430. 

Bids, opened December 14, were as 
"follows: 

Prices E.rcliisine of All Ta-ves. 

Appro.vimateli/ 500 Drums !)■') Per Cent 
Elhijl Akohol, 100 Proof, 5.'^ Gallons to 
Drum, 27,000 Gallons, Per Gallon.— The 
American Distilling Company of New 
England, 36 cents, 1 to 18 drums; 33 cents, 
m drums; total, .$9,720; Commercial 
Solvents Corporation, 36 cents, 1 to 18 
drums; 33 cents, 19 drums or over; total, 
$9,720. 

Remarks. — The American Distilling 
Company of New England, |)rices good 
until March 31, 1937, only; Conunercial 
Solvents Corporation, prices good until 
March 31, 1937, only. 

Upon January 13 tiu' Mayor ap- 
proved jjernussion to award a contract to 



bidders as indicated for furnishing tea for 
the various city departments from Janu- 
ary 1, 1937, to June 30, 1937. 

Samples of the Formosa Oolong and 
Ceylon Pekoe tea to be furnished by the 
lowest bidder, together with Supply 
Department samples supplied to bidders 
to be matched, were submitted to William 
T. Abbott & Co., 55 Long Wharf, Boston, 
tea experts, for testing. 

William T. Abbott & Co. has informed 
the department that the lowest bidder's 
sample on Forjnosa Oolong tea matches 
the Supply Department sample, but that 
the lowest bidder's sample on Ceylon 
Pekoe tea does not match the Supply 
Department sample. The sample of 
Ceylon Pekoe tea .submitted by the 
second lowest bidder was thereafter sent 
to William T. Abbott & Co., to be tested, 
and in a report they state that this sample 
does match the Supply Department 
sample. 

On the basis of the above tests, per- 
mission has been given' to make the 
awards, as follows: 

Edward C. Peri-y, the lowest bidder, 
approximately 1,080 pounds Formosa 
Oolong tea, at a price of 17.5 cents a 
pound, $189; J. L. McCormick & Co., 
the second lowest bidder, approximately 
8,350 pounds Ceylon Pekoe tea, at a price 
of 29.65 cents a pound, $2,475.78. 

Bids, opened December 17, were as 
follows : 

Appro.timaie Amounts on All Items. 

Formosa Oolong Tea, 1,080 Pounds in 
Bulk, Original Packages, Per Pouml. — 
Martin L. Hall Company, 19.5 cents; 
total, $210.60; DwinnelllWright Com- 
pany, 23.5 cents; total, $253.80; Edward 
C. Perry, 17.5 cents*; total, $189; Berry, 
Dodge Company, 19.43 cents; total, 
$209.84; Webster-Thomas Company, 24.2 
cents; total, $261.36. 

Ceylon Pekoe Tea, 8,350 Pounds in 
Original Packages, Garden Pack and 
Garden Marks to be Used, Per Pound. — 
Martin L. Hall Company, 31 cents; total, 
$2,588.50; J. L. McCormick & Co., 
29.65 cents*; total, $2,475.78; Edward C. 
Perry, 27.5 cents, total, $2,296.25; Berry, 
Dodge Company, 30.87 cents, total, 
$2,577.65; Webster-Thomas Companv, 
31.4 cents, total, $2,621.90. 

Cash Discount, Ten. Days. — Martin L. 
Hall Company, 3 per cent, Formosa; 
net, Ceylon; J. L. JXIcCormick & Co., 2 
per cent; Edward C. Perry, 2 per cent; 
Webster-Thomas Company, 1 per cent. 

* Contract awarded. 

W. P. A. Supply Depaktment. 

Upon January 12 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Brockway-Smith- 
Haigh-Lovell Company for door frames 
for tlu^ club house at the George Wright 
Golf Course, Park Department. A num- 
ber of firms were invited to bid and only 
one bid was received, that from Brockway- 
Sinith-Haigh-Lovell Companv. Their 
Iirice was $1,425. 

Bid, opened December 22, was as 
I'ollows: 

Exterior Doors and Frames, Interior 
Doors, Metal Doors and Frames, Glass 
and. Glazing of the Doors. — Brockway- 
Smith-IIaigii-Lovell Company, t<ital, 
$1,425; cash discount, 2 per cent; net 
total, $1,396.50. 



STATE REIMBURSES CITY FOR 
WELFARE EXPENDITURES. 

On December 24 the city received from 
the ollice of tiie State Treasurer eleven 



checks totaling $1,065,699.59, represent- 
ing amounts due the city from the Com- 
monwealth in reimbursement for Public 
Welfare expenditures.^ The detail of the 
checks is as follows: 



Dependent Aid . . 

Mothers' Aid.... 

Federal Grant — 

Mothers' Aid... 



$564,760 07 
438,548 62 

62,390 00 

$1,065,699 59 



In addition, notice wa.s received that a 
check for .$31,547.79 had been Issued to 
the Suffolk County Courthouse Com- 
mission, this check representing the first 
contribution by the Commonwealth to- 
ward its share of the cost of the construc- 
tion of the new courthou.se. This check 
will be turned over immediately by the 
commission to the City Treasoi'er who 
is acting as fiscal agent for the commission. 



MAYOR VETOES COUNCIL ACTION 
ON SALARIES. 

On January 13 the following letter to 
the City Council wa~s made public by the 
Mayor: 

Boston, January 13, 1937. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I return herewith dis- 
approved and without my signature the 
proposed ordinance adopted bj- your 
Honorable Body on December 28, 1936, 
purporting to reduce the salarj' of the 
second assistant citv messenger from 
$2,750 yearly to $2,250 and to increase 
the salaries of two stenographer-clerks 
from $2,000 to $2,250. 

In view of the fact that a legal question 
has arisen as to the right of j'our Honorable 
Body to appoint or elect a City Messenger, 
the solution of which may also involve 
the right to appoint or elect a second 
assistant city messenger, I am constrained 
to veto the ordinance. 

If the comt shall determine that your 
Honorable Body was within its rights in 
this matter a similar proposed ordinance 
may be presented to me again and I 
will be glad to consider it. 

Respectfully, 

Frederick W. Mansfield, .Mayor. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order No. 13. 

A trial board consisting of Captains 
Glea\y. Connolly and Wall, having heard 
liy reference a complaint against Patrol- 
man William F. Hurlej- of Division 13. 
charging him with neglect of duty, has 
reported to the commissioner a finding 
of gnilf>- as charged, in aceordanco with 
which it is hereby ordered that the slid 
Patrolman William F. Hurley perform 
thirty houi-s of punishment duty. 

The Superinlendent of Police will pro- 
uiulgutc this order. 

JoiSEPH F. TlMILTV. 

Police Caiiinussioncr. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

]'oletl. Tiiat as urgently requiix-d by 
considerations of public s;i.fcty and con- 
\enience, for a trial period of sixty (60) 
(lavs, the following rule is effoctive Jan- 
uary 11, 1937: 

Parking of vehicles is prohibilod in the 
following street : 
Alford Street. Chariest own. 

East side, from Dexter street to a 
point one hundred fifty tloO) foct 
south of Dexter street, twenty-four 
houi-s. 



60 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

School CoMivnTXEE. 
The School Committee has approved proposals for funiishing large incandescent electric lamps for Boston public schools, 
opened JNIondaj', November 23. Bids were received from the following concerns: 

American Electric Supply Company, Arvedon Electric Supply Company, Cutter Wood & Sanderson Company, Eagle Electric 
Supply Companj', Graybar Electric Companj^ Incorporated, Hardy Company, Loman Electric Supply Company, Marshall & Co., 
Massachusetts Gas and Electric Light Supply Companj^, New England Electric Supply Company, Ralph Pill Electric Supply Company, 
■\^'etmorc Savage Division of Westinghouse Electric Supply Company, James Wilkinson & Co. 

Contract was awarded to Marshall & Co., under date of December 30, 1936. Tabulation is as follows: 
TABULATION OF BIDS FOR FURNISHING LARGE INCANDESCENT ELECTRIC LAMPS FOR BOSTON PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 



Name of Biddek. 



Brand of Lamp. 



American Electric Supply Company * 

An'edon Electric Supply Company i 

Cutter Wood & Sanderson Company = 

'Eagle Electric Supply Company 

Graybar Electric Company, Incorporated ' 

Hardy Company (The) 

Loman Electric Supply Company t 

Marshall & Co.' 

Massachusetts Gas and Electric Light Supply Company ' 

New England Electric Supply Company ^ 

Ralph Pill Electric Supply Company t 

Wetmore Savage Division Westinghouse Electric Supply Company ^ 
James Wilkinson & Co. § 



Champion 

General Electric Mazda 

Hygrade 

Hygrade 

General Electric 

Champion 

Champion 

Champion 

Westinghouse 

Champion 

Hygrade 

Hygrade 

Westinghouse 

Hygrade 



Discount. 



Standard 
Packages. 



Broken 
Packages. 



38% 

31% 

37% 

37% 

31% 

38% 

38% 

38% 

31% 
38% 

38% 

37% 

31% 

37% 



38% 
21% 

37% 

21% 

38% 

38% 

38% 

21% 
38% 

38% 

21% 
37% 



Discount for C.iSH. 



10 Days. 



2% 

2% 

2% 

2% proximo. 

2% 

2% 

2% 

2% 

2% 
2% 

2% 

2% 
2% 



30 Days. 



Net. 
Net. 

Net. 
Net. 
Net. 
Net. 
Net. 

2% 

2% 

Net. 



List Prices Per L.^mp. 



Size and Type. 



10-watt, 

l5-\vatt, 

25-watt, 

40-watt, 

50-watt, 

60-watt, 

75-\vatt, 

lOO-watt, 

150-ivatt, 

2C0-\vatt, 

300-watt, 

500-v.att, 

750-watl, 

1,000- watt, 



List 

Price of 

Each Lamp. 



S. H Clear. . . , 
A. 17 1. F.... 

A. 19 L F 

A. 19 L F.... 
A. 21 LF.... 

21 L F 

A. 21 L F. ... 
A. 23LF.... 
P. S. 25 Clear 
P. S. 30 Clear 
P. S. 35 Clear 
P. S. 40 Clear 
P. S. 52 Clear 
P.[S. 52 Clear 



SO 15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
20 
20 
25 
45 
75 
1 40 

3 75 

4 00 



Remarks. 



(See Notes.) 



Notes. 

* Quoting as per list price on catalogue; no 
catalogue inclosed. 

t No trade name on auditor's copy. 

1 150-watt, P. S. 25 Clear changed to 150-watt, 
A. 25 Clear; no price quoted on 50-watt, A. 21 I. F. 

§ 150-watt, P. S. 25 changed to A. 25 Clear. 

1 No schedule inclosed in auditor's copy. If 
purchases are combined with other city depart- 
ments, discount is 34 per cent in standard pack- 
ages and 24 per cent in broken packages. 

- Quoting 65 cents each on 150-watt P.S. 25 Clear; 
90 cents each on 200-watt P. S. 30 Clear; $1.35 
each on 300-watt P. S. 35 Clear; $2.30 each on 
500-watt P. S. 40 Clear. 

2 Discount is contingent upon entire award being 
made. In event purchases do not equal $5,00() 
reserve right to render undercharge invoice to the 
extent of 2 per cent; should the purchase equal 
$10,000 2 per cent will be rebated on net purchases. 

■■ If total requirements of large lamps are com- 
bined and awarded (or awarded to another West- 
inghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company) 
to the amount of $20,000 net, quote discount on 
standard packages 34 per cent, broken packages 
24 per cent. 

* 150 P. S. 25 Clear (.A-25). On auditor's copy 
Item A 21 I. F. 75-watt 15 cents. Discount 
depends on $5,000 net. If purchases fall below, 
undercharge billing will be rendered; if they amount 
to more than .55,000 net, discount will be" adjusted 
to a higher discount: if requirements amount to 
$20,000 net, standard packages, 34 per cent dis- 
count, broken packages, 24 per cent discount. 

5 Lowest bidder taking discount of 2 per cent 
in thirty days into consideration on School Com- 
mittee end. 

' Lowest bidder on entire requirements for 
schools and other city departments. 



Jan. 1G 



CITY RECORD 



61 



NUMBER AND ESTIMATED COST OF NEW BUILDINGS AND ALTERATIONS, ADDITIONS, ETC., FOR WHICH 
APPLICATIONS HAVE BEEN FILED FOR THE MONTH ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1936. 



Character. 



Apartment 

AND 

Tenement 
Houses. 



ss 

H 



Apartment 

AND 

Tenement 

HOCSES 

and Stores. 



Churches. 



Dwellings. 






Dwellings 
Jand Stores. 



em 
a 
•■SO 



Garages. 



SS 



First Class . . . 
Second Class . 
Third Class . . 
Special Class . 



Total New Work . 
Alterations, etc 



Grand Totals . 



$124,200 
93,500 



S2.70O 
1,575 
1,.300 



521,025 



$21,025 



$18,950 



$1,500 



20 
216 



$217,700 
137,211 



$6,515 



$5,575 
11,210 



$18,950 



$1,500 



236 



$354,911 



$6,515 



23 



$16,785 



Character. 



Hotels. 



as 



Hospitals. 



Lodging 
Houses. 



as 



Merc.vntile 
Buildings. 



as 



Manu- 
facturing 
Buildings. 



Office 
Buildings. 



SOT 
o 
■•30 



e 6 

••go 



First Class. . . 
Second Class. 
Third Class . . 
Special Class . 



$44,000 



$80,000 



$17,000 
6.500 
1,900 



$12,500 



$1,500,000 



Total New Work . 
Alterations, etc 



Grand Totals. 



$1,050 



$44,000 
10,023 



$80,000 
975 



$25,400 
96,450 



$12,.500 
8,400 



$1,500,000 
21,725 



$1,050 



$54,023 



$80,975 



69 



$121,850 



10 



$20,900 



22 



$1,521,725 



Character. 



Public 
Buildings. 



ss 
■go 



School 
Houses. 



•■so 



Stables. 



as 



Theaters. 



as 
■■go 
w 



Miscel- 
laneous. 



as 
•■go 



Totals. 






First Class . . . 
Second Class . 
Third Class . . 
Special Class. 



Total New 'Work . 
Alterations, etc 



Grand Totals. 



$25,500 



$25,500 



$6,970 



$197 



$6,970 



$197 



$£00 



$800 



$700 
1,200 



$1,900 
5.651 



57 
385 



$7,551 



442 



$1,624,000 

143,900 

102.275 

16,900 



$1,887,075 
374,ir>2 



$2,261,227 



62 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 



BUILDING PERiMITS ISSUED JANUARY 7 TO JANUARY 13. 

J-tNUABY 7. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Fred Westerlund 71 Florence street 

80 Marlborough Street Trust, 80 Marlborough street 

Robert T. Fowler 1724-1736 Centre street 

Checker Taxi Company 4 and 6 St. Botolph street . . 

Checker Taxi Company 8 and 10 St. Botolph .street. . 

City of Boston 9 Fenton street 

H. F. Winslow 137 Newbury street 

AVest Roxburv Co-operative 28 Brookford street 

Bank. 

J. Caponigro 1.5 and 17 Meridian street . . . 

.1. Caponigro 19 and 21 JNIeridian street. . 

Margaret E. Parker 32 Notre Dame street 

Cityd Boston 28 West Fifth street 

C. W. Woodbur\' 5 Washington court 

T. M. Smith Estate 38.5 Bunker Hill street 

Zoller Brothers 41.5—419 Rutherford avenue, 

Violet Gilson 100 Arlington street 

Louis Cataldo .51 Frescott street 

Kohler Company 139 Newbury street 

William A. Hickev Rear 22 Chambers street . . . 

M. Click 68 Sterling street 

George N. Jacobs 125 Beacon street 



19 Special garage S200 

5 Fire escapes 7 

20 Alterations, stores 600 

4 Alterations, garage 90 

4 Alterations, -garage 90 

15 Take-down, dwelling 800 

5 Alterations, offices 300 

13 Alterations, dwelling 100 

1 Take-down, dwelling and 100 
stores. 

1 Take-down, dwelhng and 100 

stores. 

11 Take-down, dwelling 30 

6 Take-down, dwelling 500 

16 Alterations, dwelling 255 

2 Alterations, dwelling 100 

2 Alterations, store 200 

18 Alterations, dwelling 350 

1 Alterations, dwelling 300 

5 Alterations, stores and offices, 400 

3 Take-down, dwelling 75 

9 Alterations, dwelling 100 

5 Alterations, dwelling 500 



J.\Nn.4KY 8. 



York Realty Company 

Merchants Co-operative 

Bank. 

Joseph G. Morley 

Joseph G. Morley 

Royal Curtain Company. . . . 

Suffolk Savings Bank 

Dartmouth Corporation 

Dartmouth Corporation 

S. Kerzner 

H. L. Shattuck tt al 

H. L. Shattuck et al 

Lumber Specialty and Ware- 
house Company. 

Meredith & Grew 

M. Driscoll 

City of Boston 

City of Boston 

City of Boston 

Minot, Williams & Bangs. . . . 



109 and 111 Beach street. 
4 Park place 



Park 



24 Peak Hill road.... 

58 Lasell street 

283 and 285 Hyde 
avenue. 

I Tremont street 

435 Stuart street 

435 Stuart street 

II Havelock street 

12-18 Matthews street. . . 
118 and 120 Federal street 
66 Cambridge street 



1126 Boylston street 

540 Newburv street 

69 and 69A Kendall street. . 

67 Kendall street 

8 North .Short street place.. 
371 and 373 Washington st,. 



3 Alterations, storage 84,000 

19 Alterations, dwelling 1,000 

20 Third-class garage 250 

20 Third-class dwelling 4,000 

19 Elevator 2,300 

3 Elevator 1,400 

5 Temporary hoist 200 

5 Temporary hoist 100 

14 Alterations, dwelling 700 

3 Alterations, mercantile 1,000 

3 Alterations, mercantile 3,000 

2 Alterations, storage 75 

4 Fire escapes 60 

5 Fire escapes 250 

9 Take-down, dwelling 700 

9 Take-down, dwelling 700 

2 Take-down, dwelling 400 

3 Alterations, mercantile 500 



.Janu.\ry 


9. 


None. 


January 


11. 



Sherwood Construction Co . . 

Martin S. Cosgrove 

Vedante Centre, Incorporated 

Warren Institution for Sav- 
ings. 

Mary Eriich 

Childs Dining Company 

Realty Holding Trust of 
Boston. 

Bradley Real Estate Trust. . 

John Maheras 

Home Owners' Loan Corpo- 
ration. 

John J. Curran 

Wrhardt Schatz 

Warren Institution for Sav- 
ings. 

Angelo Buccella 

John D. Knight 

I. Rosnoff 

Hyde Park Co-Operative 

Bank. 
Columbia Co-Operative Bank, 
Boston Safe Deposit and 

Trust Company. 

Louis August 

John Koffske 

J. Ross 

Roman Catholic Archbishop 

of Boston. 

M. C. Scipione 

Al. .Segal 

.Max's Market 

Gumsun Restaurant 

Union Savings Bank 

Elizabeth Martin 

Harry Chafatz 



3 Sherwood road 

Rear of 83 Park street 

420 Beacon street 

100 and 102 Brookline ave- 
nue. 

38 Cliff street 

258 Huntington avenue 

19 and 21 Poplar street 



147 Tremont street 

1226 Massachusetts avenue, 
66 -Alexander street 



134 and 136 Elmer road. . . 
4195 Washington street.. . . 
669 Bennington street 



82 West Eighth street.. 

31 Hancock street 

1016 and 1018 Blue 

avenue. 
131 Child street 



20 Third-class dwelling 

16 Third-class dairy 

5 Alterations, dwelling 

5 Alterations, mercantile 

12 Alterations, dwelling 

4 Alterations, restaurant 

20 Alterations, stores and offices, 

3 .^Iterations, stores and offices, 

7 -Alterations, dwelling 

13 .\lterations, dwelling 



16 -Alterations, dwelling 

20 -Alterations, stores.. . 

1 Take-down, garage. . 



Hill 



6 Alterations, dwelling. 
15 -Alterations, dwelling. 
14 -Alterations, stores. . . . 



18 -Alterations, dwelling 



42 and 44 Empire street. 
13 Edinboro' street 



326 Blue Hill avenue. . . 

56 Davison street 

722 Dudley street 

89 Northampton street . 



22 Fire repair, dwelling.. . . 
3 -Alterations, mercantile. 



27 Rossmore road 

43 Cambridge street.. . 
177 Cambridge street.. 

21 Hudson street 

216 Tremont street.. . . 

25 Glendale street 

138 Bennington street. 



14 Alterations, store and dwelhng 

18 .Alterations, dwelhng 

7 Sign, stores 

8 -Alterations, church 



11 Alterations, dwelling. . . 

3 Sign, store 

3 Sign, store 

3 Sign, restaurant 

•3 -Alterations, offices 

1-5 .Alterations, dwelling. . . 

1 .Alterations, dwelling. . . 



Januaky 12. 



Ellis Williams 40 Chi.sholm road 18 

James B. Rayfield 29 Belden street 7 

Wallace R. Marden 23-5 Beacon street 5 

.Antonio Culucci 36 Woodward avenue 8 



Third-class dwelhng . , 
.Alterations, dwelling. 
.Alterations, dwelhng. 
.Alterations, dwelling. 



So.OOO 

6,500 

100 

1,000 

900 

5,700 

900 

2, .500 
300 
400 

100 
750 
500 

.500 
800 
.500 



17.5 
250 

500 

200 

40 

100 

700 
20 
50 
200 
100 
200 
1.50 



S4,500 
300 

10,000 
900 



FIRE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order Mo. 2. 

I. New Box Circuit. 

A new box circuit has been made, con- 
taining the following boxes: 

Circuit No. 90: 1646 out of 86 circuit; 
12-1654 out of 86 circuit; 2132 out of 
62 circuit; 12-2211 out of 77 circuit; 
2217 out of 27 circuit; 2219 out of 88 cir- 
cuit; 2233 out of 88 circuit; 2332 out of 
26 circuit; 2337 out of 87 circuit; 2351 
out of 87 circuit; 12-2352 out of 87 cir- 
cuit; 3141 out of 9 circuit; 3144 out of 9 
circuit; 3231 out of 49 circuit; 3237 out 
of 69 circuit; 7212 out of 86 circuit; 
7233 out of 86 circuit. 

II. A. D. T. COMP.ANY. 

Notice has been received from the 
A. D. T. Company that the foUo\\-ing sig- 
nal number of that companj' has been 
discontinued: 

Page 5, signal No. 126, 127 Tremont 
street Building, G. N. Talbot. 

III. Commendations. 

For the information of the depart- 
ment the Fire Commissioner is pleased to 
acknowledge receipt of a check in the 
amount of -SlOO, which has been donated 
to the Relief Ftmd by Mrs. Alice E. Sias, 
115 Bay State road, Boston. 

Ladderman George D. R3-an of Ladder 
Company 8 is hereby commended for 
extinguishing a fii-e at 971 Dorchester 
avenue, December 31, 1936. Ladder- 
man Rj^an was returning to quarters from 
a meal period at the time. 

Lieut. Robert A. Nugent of Engine 
Company 44 is hereby commended for 
responding to and working at fire, Bo.x 
253, at 2.09 a. m., January 2, 1937, while 
off duty. 

The following members of the dcpart.- 
ment are hereby commended for rescue 
work performed by them during fire. Box 
1361, third alarm, 9.22 p. m., December 
18, 1936, at 37 Revere street, city. These 
men were instrumental in saving the 
hves of two persons who were trapped in 
the fifth floor of the building: 

Lieut. Andrew F. Larson, Hosemen 
Edward F. Bmke, Hugh W. Lynch, 
Clarence W. Snow, Harry W. Murphy, 
Rescue Company 3; Ladderman Armando 
Caggiano, Ladder Company 1 ; Ladder- 
man William A. Moore, Ladder Company 
24. 

Capt. WUliam J. Marshall of Engine 
Company 31 is highly commended for 
rescuing a man who had fallen into the 
water from North End Park pier, at 2.20 
p. m., January 4, 1937. Captain Marshall 
climbed down a spile, grasped the victim 
by the coat collar and held him above the 
water mitil assisted in getting him aboard 
the pohce boat by other members of 
Engine Company 31 and police officers 
on the boat. 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edward 
F. McLaughlin. 

Samuel J. Pope, 
Chief of Deparlment. 

The last General Orders, Series of 1936, 
was numbered 66. 



General Order No. 4- 

I. President's Birthday Ball. 

The following letter which was received 

from his Honor Mayor Frederick W. 

Mansfield is published herewith for the 

information of the department: 

January 8, 1937. 
Hon. Edward F. McLaughlin, 
Fire Commissioner. 
De.ar Commissioner, — In 1936 the 
sale of ~ tickets for the Roosevelt Ball to 



Jan. 16 



CITY RECORD 



63 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 7 TO JANUARY 13. 

January 12. — Continued. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Abraham Silverman 23 Ransom road 

Boston Wharf Company .... 274 A street 

John Concannon 340 Massachusetts avenue. 

A. L. .Skolnick 21 Bargess street 

W. H. Ballard, Agent 177 High street 

Chin Lung 83 Harrison avenue 

Chin Lung 86 Harrison avenue 

Leopold Morse Company. . . 137 Washington street. . . . 

Gertrude H. Nelligan 2 Melbourne street 



January 13, 



W. W. Robinson 

J. H. Curtis 

Joseph Chartoff 

P. M. Hamlen, Trustee 

John K. Howard 

George N. Jacobs 

Factory Mutual Building 
Association. 

City of Boston 

F. A. MacSheffrev 

Mrs. E. S. Walker 

Suffolk .Savings Bank 

A. Broude 

Henry C. Everett 

Ethel Levenson 



1224 Dorchester avenue. . . 

525 Centre street 

31 Neponset avenue 

96 Massachusetts avenue. . 

71 Summer street 

125 Beacon street: 

184 High street 



22 and 24 Leverett street. . 

258 West First street 

46 Centre street 

29-33 Endicott street 

26 Beverly street 

49 Commonwealth avenue. 
676 Dudley street 



Davis-Rose Company 22 Thayer street 

Alpha Lunch 64 Summer street . . . . 

City of Bo.ston 131 Cambridge street. 

City of Boston Rear 33 Kent street. . 

City of Boston Rear 35 Kent street . . 



21 ,\Iterations, dwelling .$200 

6 Take-down, storage 100 

4 .^Iterations, store and .studios, 250 

8 Alterations, dwelUng 495 

3 Alterations, stores 150 

3 Alterations, stores and dwell- 110 

ing. 

3 Alterations, stores and dwell- 100 

ing. 

3 Alterations, store 250 

16 .^Iterations, dwelling 400 

15 .^Iterations, laundry $300 

19 Second-class .service station. . 4,000 

18 Alterations, store 1,500 

5 .■^Iterations, auto show rooms, 150 
3 Alterations, stores and lofts. . 10,000 

5 ."^Iterations, dwelling 5.000 

3 Alterations, mercantile 300 

3 Alterations, storage 1,200 

6 Take-down, mercantile 100 

17 Alterations, dwelling 1,000 

3 Alterations, garage 225 

3 Alterations, elevator 400 

5 .Alterations, dwelling None. 

8 .Alterations, stores and tene- $900 

ments. 

3 Alterations, manufacturing. . . 325 

3 Alterations, restaurant and 500 

offices. 

3 Alterations, Library 900 

9 Take-down, dwelling 600 

9 Take-down, dwelling 600 



city employees was very succe.ssful. This 
was due in a great measure to the splendid 
record of your department, wiiich last 
year accounted for the sale of SI, 461 
worth of tickets. 

In 1936, also, you issued a general 
order to all members of your department 
concerning this ball and I am going to 
ask you to do likewise this year so that 
the 1937 Birthday Ball may be even 
greater than that of 1936. 

Yours truly, 
Fhederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

This year the President's Birthday 
Ball will be held on Friday evening, 
January 29, 1937, at the Boston Garden, 
the proceeds of which will be used to 
combat the scourge of infantile paralysis. 

The program for the evening of the 
ball will be explained and outlined through 
the press and radio. 

Throughout the nation similar balls 
are being conducted on the evening of 
January 29, with the same object in 
view. Two of the finest orchestras in 
Boston will provide music for dancing at 
the ball and leading stars of the stage 
and screen will be present and participate 
in the entertainment program. His Honor 
the Mayor is deeply and earnestly in- 
terested in the success of this event and 
he will attend the ball in company with 
many distinguished guests. 

In order that all who desire to attend 
the ball, as well as t(i aid in the worthy 
cause for which the alTair is sponsored, 
all tickets have been priced at only .SI. 
Seventy per cent, seventy cents of every 
dollar, will be expended here in our own 
community for th(^ treatment of this 
paiticular disease anil the rest will go to 
a National Board for research work and 
study to i)revent ;ui(l stamp out this 
terrible malady. 

As already statetl, his Honor, Mayor 
Frederick W. Mansfield, has given his 
hearty inilorsement and support to this 
alTair and has assurinl the committee that 
the city emi)loy(-es would respond gener- 
ously to this appeal. In order that 
members of this ik'partment maj' give 



their assistance to this cause, tickets have 
been placed in the hands of every district 
chief and division head today and he will 
immediately interview every member of 
his command as to his wishes in purchas- 
ing a ticket. All returns must be made 
to Miss Kelley at Headquarters in the 
forenoon of January 22, 23, 25 or 26, 
1937. All returns should be in by Janu- 
ary 26. Members purchasing tickets 
will fill out the stub on the ticket, give 
it to the district chief or division headj 
wlio will see that the stubs are returned 
to the Fire Commissioner's office not 
later than Tuesday, January 26, in order 
that the purchaser may participate in 
the drawing to be held on the evening of 
the ball. A new automobile and many 
other articles are among the prizes that 
have already been donated. 

It is hoped that members of the depart- 
ment will support this worthj' endeavor. 
The time for helping is short — only a few 
days. Members of the department arc 
urged to show an interest in this project 
and to arouse similar interest among their 
friends. A large sale of tickets by and 
through membeis of the department is 
earnestly desired. If additional tickets 
are desired, they may be obtained at 
Headquarters next week. 

II. FmE Al.\rm Box Changes. 

The following changes in fire alarm box 
designations are heieliy aimonnced: 

Box 2542, new designation, Cunnnins 
Highway and Sheldon street, auxiliary 
Washington Irving School. 

Box 12-334(1, new designation, Lucy 
Stone School, Ilegina road. 

Box 12-6187, new tlesignation, Kmer- 
son and Patiiek .1. Kennedy Schools, 
Prescott and Saratoga streets. 

New cards will be i.ssued for these boxes 
at a later date. In the meantime, com- 
pany commanders will make nece.'^.'iary 
corrections on pi-e.-^ent a.ssignment cai-ds. 

III. Commendation. 
Ladtlerman Edward F. Powei-s oi 
Ladder Company 15 is hereby commcndeil 



for volunteering and donating blood in 
transfusion to an eight-year old child at 
the Boston City Hospital on Thursday, 
January 7, 1937. ■ 

By order of Fire Commissioner Edward 

F. McL.\UGHLIN. 

Samuel J. Pope, 
Chief of Department. 



MAYOR CONSULTS LEGAL 

ADVICE ON CITY COUNCIL 
APPOINTIVE RIGHTS. 

Upon January 5 the following state- 
ment was issued from the office of the 
Mayor: 

By the provisions of the City Charter 
the City Council, with the approval of 
the Mayor, may create new departments. 
Therefore the City Council was within 
its rights and acted lawfully when, by 
Ordinances in 1929, it created two new 
departments, namely, the Department 
of the Clerk of Committees and the De- 
partment of the City Messenger. 

But having created the two new depart- 
ments it would seem that their power 
stopped there. The provisions in those 
ordinances reserving to the Citj' Council 
the authority to appoint the heads of 
those departments seems to me to be of 
doubtful validity in view of section 9 of 
the Charter which plainlj- states that all 
heads of departments are appointed by the 
Mayor and are removable by him without 
the necessity of obtaining the approval of 
the Cit.y Council. 

Therefore, if this is so, it seems to foUow 
that the purported election of the Clerk 
of Committees was void under the Charter 
and, since the Clerk of Committees is head 
of the Department of the Clerk of Com- 
mittees, that the power of appointment 
rests with the Mayor. 

I have referred this matter to the 
Corporation Counsel who is now consider- 
ing it. 



CONSTRUCTION WORK. 

The Mayor has approved the request 
of the Public Works Department for the 
following construction work: 

A sanitary sewer of 10-inch pipe, a 
surface drain of 10-inch, 12-inch, IS-inch 
and 21-inch pipe and seven catch-basins, 
W. P. A. Project 65-14-4953, in Hallowell' 
street, between 50 feet northeast of 
Cummins Highway and 903 feet north- 
easterlv, in the Dorchester district, at an 
estimated cost of .'§19,500. 

A surface drain of 12-inch pipe and two 
catch-basins, W. P. A. Project 65-14- 
4953, in Belton street, between (Jallivan 
Boulevard and 405 feet .southerly, in the 
Dorchester district, at an estimated cost 
of S8,000. 

A surface drain of 4-foot 3-inch con- 
crete and r2-incii pipe ami two catch- 
basins, W. P. .A. Project 65-14-495;}, 
in Frazer street, between 150 feet south- 
west of Wood avenue anil Reildy 
avenue and in private land, between 2.Ttt 
feet southwest of Wood avenue and 
9 feet northwesterly, in the Hyde Park 
district, at an estimated cost of Sl7.40t). 



MAYOR INVITES PRESIDENT TO 
BOSTON FOR ENACUATION 
DA^ PARADE. 

The Mayor invited President Koosevelt 
to participate in the 17th of March 
i'lvacuation Day Parade. The President 
wasn't sure if he could come to either the 
Charitable Irish dinner or the parade but 
if he could possibly conie ho would. 



64 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 



PLUMBINQ PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 7 TO JANUARY 13. 

January 7. 



Plumber. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



E. Rothenberg 25 Howard street 3 New fi.ttures. 

E. Rothenberg 60 ScoUay square 3 New fixtures. 

S. Cohen 19 Chelsea street 2 New fixtures. 

A. P. Russo 1254 Hyde Park avenue. ... 18 New fi.Kturcs. 

Louis Trehub 80 Wilmington avenue 17 New fixtures. 

D. B. Karger 47 Hewins street 14 New fixtures. 

William Duston 79 Call street 11 New fixtures. 

John J. Voge! 205 Bellevue street 20 New fixtures. 

Thomas E. Frazier 228 Bowen street 6 New fixtures. 

John J. Vogel 4195 Washington street. ... 20 New fixtures. 

Thomas E. Frazier 232 Bowen street 6 New fixtures. 

Israel Howitz 8 Griggs place 21 New fixtures. 

P. W. Donoghue 257 Washington street 3 New fixtures. 

Thomas L. Delaney 69 Summer street 3 New fixtures. 



January 8. 



William L. Donohoe 83 Harrison avenue 3 New fixtures. 

Ralph F. Norwood 240 Arborway 11 New fixtures. 

D. J. Kilday 3712 Washington street. ... H New fixtures. 

E. H. Marchant 40 Broad street 3 New fixtures. 



January 9. 



M. F. Kargir 438 Dudley street 8 New fixtures. . 

William Duston 137 Harold street 12 New fixtures. . 

Kenneth P. Palmer 40 Reyem circle 11 New fixtures. . 

Kenneth P. Palmer 44 Reyem circle 11 New fixtures. . 

Harry E. Kimball 579 Columbia road 13 New fixtures. . 

John M. Devlin 34 Cushman road 22 New fixtures. , 

A. L Russell 48 Dighton street 22 New fixtures. 

Horace E. Stevens 145 Ipswich street 5 New fixtures. 

G. J. Vallati 3 Vinson street 16 New fixtures. 

Charles Barnes 41 Bakersfield street 13 New fixtures . 

M. J. Neary. 680 Morton street 14 New fixtures. 

Frank M. Flynn 876 Cummins Highway. ... 18 New fixtures. 

Lewis Beaumont 175 Pilgrim road 4 New fixtures. 

George S. Patey 53 Stanwood street 14 New fixtures. 



January 11. 



Charles E. Bevelander 142 Berkeley street 4 New fixtures. 

Dorchester Plumbing Co. .. . 20 Crawford street 12 New fixtures. 

William G. Hogan 135 Hillside street 11 New fixtures. 

M. J. LiUis 355 Washington street 22 New fixtures. 

Max Hyman 501 Washington street 17 New fixtures. 



January 12. 



P. J. Holahan 

Barney Levine 

David E. Pike 

Oscar F. Metcalf 

Samuel Segal 

William R. Pitcher 

T. A. Matthews 

John J. Daniels 

James G. Gillespie 

WiUiam H. Mitchell & Sons 
Company. 

Thomas J. Walsh 

Charles Welmer 

T. J. ColUns 

Louis Ruvinovitch 

Thomas C. Kelly 

Benjamin M. Kahn 



32 North Grove street. 

78 Warren street 

68 High street 

56 Roland street 



3 
2 
2 
2 

81 Linden street 21 

67 Brooksdale road 22 

536 Washington street 17 

15 Gordon avenue 18 

180 Arborway 19 

184 High street 3 



470 Atlantic avenue. 
206 Lexington street. 
80 Arlington .street . . 

8 Ivanhoe street 

484 Boylston street. . 
120 Boylston .street. . 



New fixtures. . 
New fixtures. . 
New fixtures. . 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures . 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 

New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 
New fixtures. 



January 13. 



Samuel Barron 

.John D. Matto 

Ray Martin 

Ray Martin 

John J. O'Toole 

Charles E. Bevelander. . 

Nelson Walters 

Floyd I. Montgomery . . 

Frank B. Connors 

William F. McDonough. 
Joseph Locke 



636 and 638 Beacon street. 

230 Harvard avenue 

7 Gaylord street 

12 Assabet street 

65 Lon.sdale street 

254 Lincoln street 

70 Quincy street 

71 Warren street 

144 Addison street 

132 Worcester street 

33 North Anderson street. . 



6 New 

21 New 
17 New 
16 New 
16 New 

22 New 
12 New 
12 New 



New 
New 



3 New 



fixtures . 
fixtures, 
fixtures . 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures, 
fixtures. 
fixtures. 



Estimated 
Coat. 



$75 
100 
100 
250 
500 
125 
330 
200 
125 
325 
125 
85 
400 
200 



$20 

245 

200 

1,200 



S400 

175 

500 

500 

3,000 

50 
200 
400 
546 
600 

50 
300 

75 
550 



300 

250 

25 

70 



$350 
375 
150 
85 
20 
150 
200 
150 
400 
450 

1,321 
600 
400 
500 
75 
850 



$800 
100 
150 
450 
315 
250 
200 
70 

1,500 
300 
500 



ASSESSMENT VALUATIONS. 

The following is a copy of a letter 
received by the Mayor from the Assess- 
ing Department: 

Boston, January 12, 1937. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — The following statement 
of the assessed valuation of the City of 
Boston for each of the preceding three 
years is respectfully submitted, together 
with the abatements allowed thereon 
prior to the thirty-first day of December, 
1936, and the average of such valuations 
reduced by such abatements. 

This average has been determined in 
accordance with the provisions of General 
Laws (1932 Ter. Ed.), chapter 44, sec- 
tion 10. 



Year. 


Valuations. 


Abatements. 


1934* 

1935* 


$1,705,033,900 
1,672,072,170 
1,644,287,555 


$66,364,350 
48,284,230 


1936 * 


13,426,520 






Totals 


$5,021,393,625 
128,075,100 


$128,075,100 


Less abatements. . . 




Average valuations 
for three years, 
less abatements. . 


$4,893,318,525 
$1,631,106,175 





* Includes valuations and abatements of motor 
vehicles. 

Respectfully, 

Board of Assessors, 
by T. W. Murphy, Secretary. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

Chief Sanitary Officer and Milk In- 
spector, Newton Health Depart- 
ment, February 6, 1937. 
Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 23, 1937, at 12 noon. 

This examination is open to residents 
of the state. 

The minimum salary is $2,400 a year; 
the maximum, $3,000 a year. 

Duties: To supervise the activities of 
the laboratory technician and sanitary 
inspector. To perform milk inspection 
work. To do standard plate counts on 
water, and determination of butter fat 
and total solids. To prepare statistical 
charts and tables. 

Applicants should be familiar with 
state and local regulations regarding 
milk, — its production and marketing. 
They should also be familiar with the 
general laws governing Board of Health 
procedure in relation to abatement _ of 
nuisances, general sanitary inspection 
and of diseases dangerous to the public 
health. 

Entrance Requirements: Applicants 
must be not less than twenty-five years 
of age at the time of filing applications. 
A certificate of date of birth must be 
filed with the application UNLESS one 
has been filed with a previous applica- 
tion. 

Applicants must have at least two 
years' practical experience in the field 
of public health sanitation. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 3; practical questions, 4; per- 
sonality and fitness, as determined by 
an oral interview, 3; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in each subject in order to become 
eligible. 

Physical fitness to be deteiTOined by 
physical examination. 



Jan. 16 



CITY RECORD 



65 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1937. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Wednesday, February 3. 
Worcester, Thursday, February 4. 
Boston, Wednesday, March 3. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 4. 
Fall River, Friday, March 5. 
Boston, Wednesday, April 7. 
Springfield, Thursday, April 8. 
Boston, Wednesday, May 5. 
Worcester, Thursday, May 6. 
Boston, Wednesday, June 16. 
Boston, Wednesday, September 15. 
Worcester, Thursday, September 16. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 14. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 15. 
Boston, Wednesday, November 3. 
Lowell, Thursday, November 4. 
Boston, Wednesday, December 8. 
New Bedford, Friday, December 10. 
New Bedford, Saturday, December 11. 

Rules for Examinations. 

All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent in 
the installation of wires, conduits, ap- 
paratus, fixtures and other appliances for 
carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
years' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for carrying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a master or journeyman certifi- 
cate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be re- 
quired to obtain at least 70 per cent 
in order to obtain a certificate. 

Api)licants who fail to obtain the re- 
(Hiired 70 per cent will not be entitled 
to re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent or who fail on 
the practical demonstration, will not be 
re-examined for a period of six months. 

Any person found referring to notes or 
books, or misbehaving during an exam- 
ination, will be debarred from that exam- 
ination. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day. 

Stephen C. Garrity, 
James G. Reardon, 
Thomas H. Green, 
Albert Frank, 
Walter J. Kenefick, 
Stale ExaminerR oj Electricians. 

For application blanks or other in- 
formation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 303, 14 Beacon street, 
Boston, Mass. 



CITY AND COUNTY FUNDED DEBT, JANUARY 31, 1936. 

Gross funded debt December 31, 1935 $165,402,166 61 

Gross funded debt January 31, 1936 *S165 402 166 01 

Sinking Funds December 31 , 1935 S30,892',462 08 ' ' 

Receipts during 1936 192,568 32 

831,085,030 40 
Payments during 1936 20,261 90 

$31,064,768 50 
Premiums on loans: 

City 8.231 34 

Betterments, etc., collected during January 36,459 19 

Total redemption means January 31, 1936 31,109,459 03 

Net funded debt January 31, 1936 $134,292,707 58 

Gross Debt, Sinlving Funds, etc. Net Debt. 

City Debt t $85,822,800 00 $16,160,564 82 $69,662,235 18 

County Debt 1,477,666 61 857,339 92 620,326 69 

Water Debt §1,012,000 00 — 1012 000 00 

Traffic Tunnel Debt 16,000,000 00 97,71100 15 902 289 00 

Traffic Tunnel Debt, Series B 3,000,000 00 36,066 00 2,963 934 00 

Traffic Tunnel Debt, Series C 300,000 00 — 300,000' 00 

$107,612,466 61 317,151,681 74 890,460,784 87 
Rapid Transit Debt 57,789,700 00 13,957,777 29 43,831,922 71 

$165,402,166 61 $31,109,459 03 Sl.34,292,707 58 



* Includes 862,666.61 issued by the Coramonwealth under chapter 534 of the Acts of 1906. 

t Includes 33,965,000 Public Works Administration Projects, chapter 366, Acts of 1933 as amended 
by chapter 21, Acts of 1934. 

§ Includes 8724,000 Public Works Administration Projects, chapter 366, Acts of 1933, as amended by 
chapter 21, Acts of 1934. 



SAND, CINDERS AND SALT IN DULUTH. 

About 385 miles of sidewalk are sanded 
every year and about 250 miles of streets 
are snow-plowed and sanded. Ordi- 
narily, flat grades are not sanded, this 
work being confined to steep grades where 
dangerous ice conditions exist. During 
the past season the maintenance depart- 
ment used about 500 cubic yards of cin- 
ders, 500 cubic yards of sand, and 5 tons 
of calcium chloride on the streets. 

The use of salt, or sodium chloride, 
has been discontinued entirely, because 
of its injurious effect on concrete walks 
and pavements. The action of salt is 
not clearly understood, but it is much 
more active during cold weather than 
in summer, and is apparently due to the 
formation of crystals after penetrating 
the surface, the force of which disin- 
tegrates the concrete. Calcium chloride 
does not seem to be entirely free from 
this difficulty, but is much less active 
than sodium chloride. 



PUBLIC DEBT, JANUARY 1, 1933. 

Gross funded debt, January 1, 1933, 
$165,758,499.95 (including $119,999.95 is- 
sued by State for enlargement of Court 
House); sinking funds, $35,737,619.21; 
other redemption means, $3,078,263.28; 
net debt, $126,942,617.46 or $7,588,429.94 
more than on January 1, 1932. Of said 
debt (net) $79,310,520.63 or 62.48 per 
cent was City debt; $46,199,023.96 or 
36.39 per cent, Rapid Transit debt (rep- 
resenting 4i per cent investment) ; $994,- 
466.87 or 0.78 per cent. County debt; 
$438,000 or 0.35 per cent. Water debt. 

Debt paid in 1932 was $9,935,301 but 
there was an increase in total gross debt 
of $5,437,698.99. 

Net debt per capita, $160.62 (approx.) ; 
net debt, exclusive of Rapid Transit debt, 
$80,742,993.50 or $102.17 per capita (ap- 
prox.). 

Per capitas arc based on U. S. Census 
Bureau's estimated population on Janu- 
ary 1, 1933. 

Loans authorizeil but not issued (with- 
in debt limit), $1,898,000; same outside 
of debt limit, $2,080,000; total, $4,578,000. 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES, FISCAL 
POPULATION OF BOSTON, BY SEX, NA- 
TIVITY, ETC., 1930. 

Total population, 781,188 (383,454 
males and 397,734 females) ; ratio of 
males to females, 96.4 to 100 as against 
97.2 to 100 in 1920. Native white, 
529,400 (260,419 males and 268,981 fe- 
males) or 67.77 per cent; sex ratio, 96.8 
to 100. Of the 529,400 native whites, 
200,130, or 37.80 per cent, are of native 
parentage; 248,653, or 46.97 per cent, are 
of foreign parentage and 80,617, or 15.23 
per cent, are of mixed parentage (i. e., 
one half native). Foreign-born whites, 
229,356 (111,261 males and 118,095 fe- 
males) or 9,563 less than in 1920; sex 
ratio 94.2 to 100. The foreign-born 
whites are 29.36 per cent of total popula- 
tion. Negroes, 20,574 (10,223 males and 
10,351 females) or 2.63 per cent of popu- 
lation; sex ratio, 98.8 to 100. The Negro 
population has increased 4,224 since 1920 
and 4,993 since 1915. Other races, 1,858 
females); 55 to 64 years, 63,416 (30,671 
(1,551 males and 307 females), or 0.24 
per cent, comprise 1,595 Chinese, 69 Jap- 
anese, 43 Indian, 26 Me.xican and 125 
miscellaneous. Total foreign white 
ivhich is 61.19 per cent of all inhabitants, 
stock, 478,009 (viz., 229,356 plus 218,653) 
which is 61.19 per cent of all inhabitants. 



A SQUARK DEAL IN ASSESSA\ENTS TOR 
TAXATION. 

Many cities are finding it greittly to 
their advantage to have their tax valua- 
tions periodically overhauled. The first 
criterion of any assessment is equitj'. 
For every citizen who wants tJirough 
"pull" or however 'else to get olT oa,-iy, 
there are twenty, nay a hundred wlio 
want a fair and square deal for all. 

The appraisal of city real estate is .» 
liiglily techniciil affair. 

Few things arc more iin[iortant than 
the equalization of assessments. Par- 
ticularly in cities that are cramped by 
an inflexible debt or t;\x limit, an jjon- 
est, full value assessment may be a 
great boon. AYithout the slightest rai-se 
in the tax rate a substantiidly greater 
tax yield may bo had. 



66 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS. 

Supply Department. 
The Ma,yor lias approved the request 
of the Supply Department for the exten- 
sion of contracts as follows: 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 4, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with H. A. John- 
son Company relative to the purchase of 
groceries for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to anv date 
not later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of groceries re- 
ferred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
ISiereby, to wit, to March 31, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
SuTperintendent of Suppltcs. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 5, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Petroleum 
Heat and Power Company relative to the 
purchase of heavy fuel oil for delivery to 
the various city departments. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
beginning January 1, 1937, at its option, 
purchase and the C'ontractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same tei'ms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
heavy fuel oil as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936. This privilege is extended to 
September 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of heavy fuel 
oil I'eferred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to September 30, 
1937. 

RespeetfuU.y yf)urs, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Bo.sTON, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 7, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a conti-act with County Coal 
Company relative to the purchase of 
chestnut coal for delivery to the Public 
Welfare Department and Soldiers' Relief 
Department, Jamaica Plain, West Rox- 
buiy, Roslindale and Hyde Park districts. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 



the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than May 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of chestnut coal 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the iextended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to May 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston . 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 11, 1936 the City of Bo.ston entered 
into a contract with Thomas W. Reed 
Company relative to the purchase of 
surgical and hypodermic needles for de- 
livery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Bo.ston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical and 
hypodermic needles referred to therein as 
may not have been ordered up to and in- 
cluding December 31, 1936, for the ex- 
tended period permitted thereby, to wit, 
to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 30, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with The Boston 
Ice Company relative to the purchase of 
chestnut coal for delivery to the Public 
Welfare Department and Soldiers' Relief 
Department, Roxbury, Dorchester, South 
End and South Boston districts. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than May 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as ai'o stated in said 
contract, .such quantities of chestnut coal 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to May 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Su,p plies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston.. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
Match 13, 1936, the City of Boston 



entered into a contract with Picker 
X-Ray Corporation relative to the pur- 
chase of X-ray materials for delivery to 
the various city departments. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the ^ 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of X-ray 
materials referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 
D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 30, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with E. 8. Morse 
& Co., relative to the purchase of chestnut 
coal for delivery to the Public Welfare 
Department and Soldiers' Relief Depart- 
ment, Charlestown district. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than May 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of chestnut 
coal referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to May 1, 1937. 
Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Man.sfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 17, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Tide Water 
Oil Company relative to the purchase of 
automobile motor oil for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than April 15, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of auto- 
mobile motor oil (Pennsylvania base oil) 
referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to April 15, 
1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Jan. 16 



CITY RECORD 



67 



Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boaton. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
March 10, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with National 
Boston Lead Company relative to the 
purchase of white and red lead for delivery 
to the various city departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I I'espectfully request your approval to 
e.xercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of white 
and red lead referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and includ- 
ing December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 31, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with H. P. Hood 
& Sons, Incorporated, relative to the 
purchase of milk, cream, etc., for delivery 
to tbe various city departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any date 
not later than April 15, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of milk, 
cream, etc., referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and includ- 
ing December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
April 15, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 4, 1936, the City of Boston 
entei'ed into a contract with Herliliy 
Brothers, Incorporated, relative to the 
purchase of milk, cream, etc., for deliveiy 
to the various city departmcMits. In- 
cluded in the contract is tiie following 
clau.se : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to tile Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its ojition, extend 
the end of t(>rm hereof to an\' date not 
later than April 15, 1937." 

I respectfully reciuest your api)rov:il to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted ofition, upon the same tei-ms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, sueii (luantities of milk, cream, etc., 
refei'red to tiierein as mav not have been 



ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to April 15, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 23, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Burner Fuel and Ice 
Company relative to the purchase of ice 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than June 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of ice referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1936, for 
the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to June 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.ank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 25, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Maier 
Brothers, Incorporated, relative to the 
purchase of anti-skid chains for delivery to 
the various city departments. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date not 
later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of anti-skid chains 
referred to therein as may not have b(>en 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended jjeriod iiermitted 
thereby, to wit, to March 31, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Dohf.rty, 

Superintcndoit of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick VV. Mansfikld, 
Mayor of Boston . 

Dear Mr. Mayor,— Under date of 
December 16, 193f), the City of Boston 
entered into a conti'act with JiVnc^h SuiK'r 
Oil Company relative to tiie i)uroiias(> of 
range oil for delivery to tiie Public W'el- 
l'ar(» Deparlnient and Soldiei's' R(>lief 
Dei)artnieTit, Brighton district. Included 
in tlu> contract- is the following clause: 

"The C'ity of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the C\)ntractor i)v the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any ilate not 
later than April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully reciuest your approval to 
exercise the oi)tioii to purchase on belialf 



of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of range oil referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1936, 
for the extended period permitttid tluu-eby, 
to wit, to April 30, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 18, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Pennsylvania 
Oil Company relative to the purchase of 
range oil for delivery to the Public Wel- 
fare Department and Soldiers' Relief 
Department, Charlestown and South End 
districts. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
tlie end of the term hereof to anj' date not 
later than April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of range oil referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1936, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to April 30, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 193f). 
Hon. Frederick W.' Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston . 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 30, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Tidewater 
Coal Company relative to the purchase of 
range oil for deliveiy to the Public Wel- 
fare Department and Soldiers' Relief 
Department, North and West ImuI 
districts. Included in the contract is the 
following clau.se: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to anvdate 
not later than April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exei'cise the option to purchase on beiialf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-(iuote(l option, upon the same 
terms aiul conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such ((uantities of range oil 
referred to therein a,s may not have been 
ordered up to and including Decemiier 
31, 1936, for the extendeil |)erloii per- 
mitteil thereby, to wit, to April 30, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Dohf.rty, 

Siipcrinlcndtnl of Suiiplits. 

HosTON, Deeeniiier 29, 1936. 
Hon. I'^REDKHicK W. Mansfikld, 
.\[ayor of Boston. 
Dkar Mr. Mayor, Under date of 
Xoveniber 30, 1936, the City of Boston 
entereil Into a contract with Hanl(\v Oil 
Company, Incorporativl, relative to the 
purcha.se of range oil for delivery to the 
Pultllc Welfare Department and Soldiei-s' 



68 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 



Relief Department, Dorchester district. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The Citj- of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Maj'or, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to anv date not 
laterthan April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of range 
oil referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including De- 
cember 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to April 30, 
1937. 

Respectfullj' yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 18, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Congress 
Oil Companj- relative to the purchase of 
range oil for delivery to the Public "\^^el- 
fare Department and Soldiers' Relief 
Department, South Boston district. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with tlie 
approval of the Mayor, b3^ written 
notice given to the Contractor bj' the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of range oil 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1936, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to April 30, 1937. 
Respectfullj' youre, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Bo.'iton. 

Dear Mr. M.\yor, — Undei- date of 
December 7, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Everett 
Fuel Company, Incorporated, relative to 
the purchase of range oil for delivery to 
the Public Welfare Department and 
Soldiers' Relief Department, Roxbury 
di.strict. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

''The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Maj'or, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than April 30, 1937." 

I respectfully reque.st your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as arc stated in 
said contract, such quantities of range 
oil referred to therein as may not have 
been'^ordered up to and including De- 
cember 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to April 30, 
1937. 

Respectfully j'ours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 30, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Metropolitan 
Coal Company relative to the piu'chase 
of chestnut coal for deliveiy to the 
Public Welfare Department and Soldiers' 
Relief Department, Brighton district. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston ma3% with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than May 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant 
to the above-quoted option, upon the 
same terms and conditions as are stated 
in said contract, such quantities of 
chestnut coal referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to May 
1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 30, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with East Boston 
Coal Company relative to the purchase 
of chestnut coal for delivery to the 
Public Welfare Department and Soldiers' 
Relief Department, East Boston district. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause • 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, bj^ written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than May 1, 1937." 

I respectfullj' request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of chestnut 
coal referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to May 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
November 30, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Tidewater 
Coal Company relative to the purchase 
of chestnut coal for delivery to the Public 
Welfare Department and Soldiers' Relief 
Department, North End and W'est End 
districts. Included in the contract is 
the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Supei'in- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to anj' date 
not later than May 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
abo\ie-quoted option, upon the same 



terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of chestnut 
coal referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to Maj' 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 



Boston, December 29, 1936. 
. Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. M.\yor, — Under date of 
October 8, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with State Fuel 
Company relative to the purchase of 
medium and light fuel oil for delivery to 
the various city departments. Included 
in the contract is the following clause: 

"It is agreed that the City of Boston, 
with the approval of the Mayor, may, 
begimaing January 1, 1937, at its option, 
purchase and the Contractor agrees to 
deliver upon the same terms and condi- 
tions as aforesaid, such quantities of said 
medium and light fuel oil as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936. This privilege is extended 
to September 30, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same terms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of medium and 
light fuel oil referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
September 30, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. FitANK Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston,- December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 19, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Thomas W. Reed 
Company relative to the purchase of 
drugs for delivery to the various citj' 
departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of di'Ugs 
■referred to therein, as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1936, for the extended period per- 
mitted thereby, to wit, to February 1, 
1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.ank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

B0.STON, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 25, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Howe & French, 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
drugs for delivery to the various city 



Jan. 16 



CITY RECORD 



69 



departments. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayoi-, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any date 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of drugs 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May 19, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Parke Davis & Co. 
relative to the purchase of drugs for 
delivery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of drugs 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
May ,13, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Burroughs Wellcome 
& Co. relative to the purchase of drugs 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of the term hereof to any dat(> 
not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such (juantities of drugs 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1936, for the extended period pei'- 
mitted tliereby, to wit, to February 1, 
1937. 

Respectfully j'ours, 

D. FitANK Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 10, 1936, the City of Boston entered 



into a' contract with Arthur D. Little, 
Incorporated,^ relative to the purchase of 
fuel, sampling, testing and engineering 
service for delivery to the Supply Depart- 
ment. Included in the contract is the fol- 
lowing clause: 

"The City of Boston inay, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to any 
date not later than March 31, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of fuel, 
sampling, testing and engineering service 
referred to therein as may not have been 
ordered up to and including December 
31, 1936, for the extended period per- 
mitted tliereby, to wit, to March 31, 
1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936.' 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
December 16, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Shell Eastern 
Petroleum Products, Incorporated, rela- 
tive to the purchase of denatured alcohol 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of the term hereof to 
any date not later than April 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Bo.ston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of denatured 
alcohol referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
April 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Bo.ston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 24, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Cities Service Re* 
fining Conii)an}' relative to tlie purchase 
of engine, machine and cylindei' oil for 
delivery to the various city departments. 
Included in the contract is Ihe following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with tl>e 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Suiiplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-(iU(5ted option, upon the same 
terms and contlitions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of engine, 
machine and cylinder oil referred to 
therein as may not have been ordered up 
to and including December 31, 1936, for 



the extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frai<ik Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston . 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
.luly 17, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Pennsylvania Oil 
Company relative to the purchase of 
gasoline for delivery to the various city 
departments. Included in thecontract is 
the following clause: v, 

"The City of Boston may, ""with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than July 14, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase, on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of gasoline 
referred to therein as maj' not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31,* 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to July 14, 1937. 

Respectfully youi's, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.\nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 26, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Thomas W. 
Reed Company relative to the purchase 
of surgical dressings for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Maj^or, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the Citj' of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same t(>rms 
and conditions as are stated in said con- 
tract, such quantities of surgical dressings 
referred to therein as ma>' not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended jieiiod permitted 
theiel)y, to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully youi's, 

D. rR,vNK Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29. 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston . 

Deau Mr. Mayor, — -Under date of 
December 7, 193(), the City i>r Boston 
entereil into a contract with Ciill Brotliei-s 
relative to the pureliase of range oil for 
delivery to tlie Pui)lic Well'are Depart- 
ment anil Soldiei's' Relief Department, 
l']ast Boston district. Ineludeil in the 
contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Bi>ston may. with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given ti> the Contractor by tlie SujHMin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to anv date not 
later than April 30. 1937." 

I respectfully reijuest your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pui-suant to the 



70 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. l6 



above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of range oil 
referred to therein as maj' not have been 
ordered up to and including December 31, 
1936, for the extended period permitted 
thereby, to wit, to April 30, 1937. 

Respectfully .voui's, 

D. Fr.\nk Doherty, 
Siipenntendeni of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. MansfieilD, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 19, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with E. F. Mahady 
Company relative to the purchase of 
surgical dressings for deliver}' to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The Citj' of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to anj' date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
'terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical 
dressings referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted therebv, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfull}' j'ours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 24, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Stimpson & Co., 
Incorporated, relative to the purchase of 
surgical supplies for deliver}' to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Bo.ston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor bj' the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectful!}' request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical sup- 
plies referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted therebv, to wit, to February 1, 
1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
■ Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 19, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with McCampl)ell 
& Co. relative to the purchase of surgical 
dressings for dciiveiy to tlie various city 
departments. Included in the contract 
is tlie following clause: 

"Tlie City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to tlie Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 



the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above- quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical dress- 
ings referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to February 
1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. M.^nsfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 19, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Acme Cotton 
Products Company, Incorporated, rela- 
tive to the purchase of surgical dressings 
for delivery to the various city depart- 
ments. Included in the contract is the 
following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than Fel)ruary 1, 1937." . 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical dress- 
ings referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted therebv, to wit, to February 
1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty', 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
June 11, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Surgeons & Phy- 
sicians' Supply Compan}' relative to the 
purchase of surgical supplies for delivery 
to the various city departments. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause : 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are .stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical 
supplies referred to therein as may not 
have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 18, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with George L. Dodd 



relative to the purchase of surgical dress- 
ings for delivery to the various city 
departments. -Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Bo.ston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical dress- 
ings referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to February 
1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor cf Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 18, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with Sparrow-Chisholm 
Company relative to the purchase of 
surgical dressings for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Superin- 
tendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of surgical di'css- 
ings referred to therein as may not have 
been ordered up to and including Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, for the extended period 
permitted thereby, to wit, to Fel^ruary 
1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. May'or, — Under date of 
October 5, 1936, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with Savem Prod- 
ucts Company relative to the purchase of 
soap chips, soap, etc., for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Bo.ston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such quantities of soap 
chips, soap, etc., referred to therein as 
may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1936, for the 
extended period permitted thereby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 



Jan. 16 



CITY RECORD 



Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston . 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
October 19, 1930, the City of Boston 
entered into a contract with The Procter 
& Gamble Di.stributii)g Company relative 
to tlie purchase of soap for delivery to the 
various city departments. Included in 
the contract is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, w'ith the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
e.xercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of soap referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1936, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston.. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 18, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with 5jew England Sand 
and Gravel Companj' relative to the 
purchase of screened bank gravel and 
sand for delivery to the Public Works 
Department. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, a "ts option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of screened bank 
gravel and sand referred to therein as 
may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1936, for the 
extended period i)ermitted thereby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Sui)plics. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. 'Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 24, 1936, tiie City of Boston entered 
into a contract with .J. II. McNamara, 
Incorporated, relative to the iiurehase of 
screened bank gi'avel and santl for delivery 
to the Public Works Department. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The Ci(y of Boston may, with the 
approval of tlu' Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, exteiul 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your ujjproval to 
exercise tlu- o])tion to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, jiursuant to the 
above-quoted oiition, upon the san\e 
terms and conditions as are stated in 
said contract, such ((uantities of screened 
bank gravel and sand referred to therein 
as may not have been ordered up to and 



including December 31, 1936, for the 
extended period permitted theieby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
April 28, 1936, the City of Boston entered 
into a contract with George H. Noone 
Sand and Gravel Company relative to 
the purchase of screened bank gravel 
and sand for delivery to the Public Works 
Department. Included in the contract 
is the following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option, extend 
the end of term hereof to any date not 
later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfully request your approval 
to exercise the option to purchase on 
behalf of the City of Boston, pursuant 
to the above-quoted option, upon the 
same terms and conditions as are stated 
in said contract, such quantities of 
screened bank gravel and sand referred 
to therein as may not have been ordered 
up to and including December 31, 1936, 
for the extended period permitted thereby, 
to wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent cf Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of May 
1, 1936, the City of Boston entered into 
a contract with Somerset Bituminous 
Company relative to the purchase of 
45 per cent asphaltic road oil for delivery 
to the Public Works Department. In- 
cluded in the contract is the following 
clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
approval of the Mayor, by written 
notice given to the Contractor by the 
Superintendent of Supplies, at its option, 
extend the end of term hereof to any 
date not later than February 1, 1937." 

I respectfull.y request your ajiproval to 
exercise the option to purchase on behalf 
of the City of Boston, pursuant to the 
above-quoted option, ujxju the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of 45 per cent 
asphaltic road oil referred to therein as 
may not have been ordered up to and 
including December 31, 1936, for the 
extended period i)erniitted thereby, to 
wit, to February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 
Superintendent of Supplies. 

Boston, December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — Under date of 
Ai)ril 10, 1936, the City of Boston en- 
tered into a contract witii Boston Sand 
and Gravel Company, relative to the 
l)urchase of screened bank gravel and 
sand for delivery to the Public Works 
Department. Included in the contract 
is tlie following clause: 

"The City of Boston may, with the 
apjiroval of the Mayor, by written notice 
given to the Contractor by the Super- 
intendent of Supplies, at its option. 



extend th(- end of term hereof to any 
date not later than Februarj' 1, 1937." 

I respectfully r(;quest your approval to 
exercise the option to purcha.se on be- 
half of the City of Boston, pursuant to 
the above-quoted option, upon the same 
terms and conditions as are stated in said 
contract, such quantities of screened bank 
gravel and sand referred to therein as may 
not have been ordered up to and including 
December 31, 1936, for the extended 
period permitted thereby, to wit, to 
February 1, 1937. 

Respectfully yours, 

D. Frank Doherty, 

Superintendent of Supplies. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

Second-Class Engineer, Newton School 
Department, February 6, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, January 23, 1937, at 12 noon. 

This examination is open to residents 
of the state. 

The salary is S34 a week. 

The examination will consist of a state- 
ment of training and experience and the 
possession of a second-class engineer's 
license. 

Passing Requirements: At least 70 per 
cent in experience in order to become 
eligible. 

Physical fitness to be determined by 
physical examination. 

The date given above is not the actual 
examination date but the date on which, 
as nearly as possible, the physical exam- 
ination will be given. 



CLERICAL SERVICE. 

For State and Cities and Towns Out- 
side OF Boston and Vicinity, March 
6, 1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 20, 1937. at 12 noon. 

For Boston and Vicinity', March 20, 
1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, March 6, 1937, at 12 noon. 

WARNING! If all applicants cannot 
be accommodated on the above dates, 
they will be notified to appear on subse- 
quent Saturdays. Applictuits should note 
the exact date given on their notification 
sheets. 

File your applications EARLY! In 
cases of i:ics, names will be placed on the 
eligible list in accordance with the date 
of filing application. 

The usual entrance salary for dorks 
for state scrxice is .?900 a year. 

Persons qualifying in the e\-;unination 
may have their names jilaced on the 
state list as well as on the list for tiie city 
or town in which they reside. 

Applicants nuist be not less than six- 
teen ycai-s of age at- the time of filing 
applic^ition. 

SubjertvS and Weights: Training and 
experience, 2; spelling, 2; arithmetic Cnx- 
cluding problems), 2; following writlcu 
directions. 2; filim;, 1; word knowledge, 
1; total. 10. 

Passing Require.mi;nls: Applicants 
must obtain a mark of at least 65 per 
cent in spelling, at least 50 per cent in 
each of the other subjects and at least 
70 per cent in general average in order 
to become eligible. 



72 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Jamiary i, 1937. 
Fii-st meeUiiK of (he City Council for 1937 
in the City Coxindi Chamber, City Hall, a* 
•> p. m., Coun. GALL.AGHEIR, senio-r member, 
presiding, and all the members present except 
Coun. No'rtx>n. 



ELECTION OF PRESIDENT FOR 1937. 

Coun. KERRIGAN offered the following: 

Ordered, That the City Council now pro- 
ceed to the election of a PresMent for the 
niiiinicipal year 1937. 

The order was read a second time and the 
(lue^tion came on i'ts passage. 

Coun. GEORGE A. MURRAY— Mr. Presi- 
dent, this completes my first year as a mem- 
ber of this body. Last year, when I came 
here I thought quite seriously of the voite 1 
was to cast for president of the body. _ There 
was much agitation about it, and certaim city 
fathers saw fit to visit the homes of the coun- 
cjllars and there solicit their suffrage and 
support. This year the same thing is true. 
We now learn that the man upon whom has 
been bestowed this high honor of presSdtent 
of the body for two years is again a caindidate. 
I cannot understand for the life of me why 
he again thrusts himself upon ouir city in 
this -way. I cannot understand how he cam in 
good faith come in here and ask us for a 
third time to elect him president of this 
body. It must have some deep signific:ance. 
Why should the Mayor of this oity stoop so 
low in attempting to carry out his desires 
that certain councilors who do not vote his 
way are out of luck, so to speak ? Last week 
we voted on a certain attache of this body, and 
you who saw fit to vote for the man who was 
chosen, a man who has been associated with 
the body for some years, find that in so vot- 
ing you are cut off dowins'tadrs ; that if you 
want to get some recognition for some of 
your consieituents because of the fact that 
you did not vote in a certain way you were 
out of luck. I personally did n'ot see fit to 
vote for a certain main, and because I did 
not do so 1 find that that goes against me 
when I interest mys^f in behalf of a con- 
stituent. I have in nvind a constable who 
I.I2S held the position for eight or mime months, 
but, because of my vote, he sees fit to fire 
that man, and that no constable is to be ap- 
pointed for a member who does not vote as 
the Mayor desires. Is that the condition that 
we are coming to in this city? I «ay to you, 
gentlemen, let us dO what is right; let us 
call them as we see them, amd if we call 
them as we see them, and vote as we think 
is right, certainly the Mayor should not in- 
terfere. Why does the 'Mayor want this man 
to be president of this body? This mam has 
served the bo<ly as president for two terms, 
an unprecedented thing in the histoiT of our 
city, and is now a candidate foi a third term, 
with the support of the Mayor. Why do these 
things happen ? Why does this man want 
to sit here as president for a third term? 
Is it beoause he is more capable, able, more 
aggressive, and can best represent our city? 
Of course, that is mot so. Why, when the 
President of these United Staites came to our 
oity he received at the hands of this man the 
most deplorable greeting that was ever given 
to a Presidant. His conduct on that occasion 
was disgrpxreful. 

Chairman GALLAGHER— The councilor will 
kindly confine himself to the order. 

Coun. MURRAY — Is it because he has more 
ability? Why, he sat in this body for ten 
years and none of his colleagues saw fit to recog- 
nize him in any such way, but three years ago, 
for the first time the new members gave him 
his chance. They gave him his chance be- 
cause they felt that they should elevate him to 
this office becau.se he had mever had it before 
although he had served for ten years, and it was 
fdt that it was the Only fair and proper 
thing to do to give him the chance to serve. 
Since that time the situation has changed. 
The heads of various departments have put 
their heads together — everybody here knows 
who they are — amd they want him agaiin this 
year, and they are going to sacrifice fellows 
who are s-itting here complacently and letting 
it go on, felloivs who have been here for 
(several years, who have given faithful service 
to the city, and who .should be given a decent 
chance. Wouldn't it be a fine thing to give 
to others this opportunity? There is the 
colleague who leaves us to go to the Senate, who 
might well before this have been given an 
opportunity to serve as president of this body. 
There is the councilor from Ward 17, who 
has been here for a long time, and he should 
have a chamce. But no, this m'an wants it 
three times in a row, amd he asks us to eit 
here and like it. Of course, he will be re- 



elected. But it is am imdiobment Of the in- 
telligen'ce of each of us. It is an indictment 
of what we honestly and conscientiously try 
to do. Can you tell me how you are going 
back to your various wards amd explain your 
vote? How are you goling to go to them amd 
give an explanlation of why you voted for this 
man as preBident three times, when the people 
of Boston ask you why you did it? 

Coun. SHATTUCK— Mr. President, I do not 
agree with what the last speaker has said. 
I am very much in favor of the re-election of 
our present President. I have known him 
for a good many years, starting about fifteen 
years ago, when I entered the Legislature, 
and when for a number of years we sat to- 
gether on the Committee on Ways and Means. 
I think I know him very thoroughly. I have 
seen much of him in the last three years, 
sitting in this Council — during the first year, 
when another man was president, and during 
the last two years when he has been president. 
I have not been asked by anybody outside of 
this body to vote one way or the other. No 
pressure whatever has been brought to bear 
on me. I believe he has performed his duties 
well and satisfactorily, that he has had ex- 
perience in the position, and I believe in con- 
tinuing a man of experience who has done 
well and on whom I am sure we may all 
rely. Therefore, I shall vote for John I. Fitz- 
gerald as president of the Council, and hope 
he will be elected. 

Coun. DOWD — Mr. President, our choice of 
president as members of this body is purely 
a personal one, and is a matter in which I, 
and in that respect I know I am like the 
other members of the body, use my judgment. 
I am not going to disagree with any member 
of the Council im voting as he sees fit, as I 
intend to do. However, to clear up the rec- 
ord, I want to say most emphatically that no 
department head, and not even the Mayor has 
suggested to me how I shall vote in this 
election. So far as our President for the 
past two years is concerned, I wish to say 
that I shall always be proud of my vote for 
him, because I believe he has just as much 
ability as any man seeking the office, and 
more, because he has served for a number of 
years in the Boston City Council. I simply 
want to go on record as saying, speaking of 
the attitude we are told the Mayor may take 
against those who vote contrary to his wish, 
that I do not believe he will take any such 
action, regardless of the action we are told 
that he may have taken. So far as I am 
concerne<l, he can do what he desires. He 
is not controlling my vote or my voice here 
today nor has he done so during my term of 
office. I shaJl vote today as a personal matter, 
and not because the Mayor asks me to vote 
in a certain way, because I can say in jus- 
tice to the Mayor and to the heads of depart- 
ments that they have not requested me to vote 
for any individual. I am acting today with 
an open mind and looking merely to my own 
conscience. 

Coun. MELLEN — ^Mr. Chairman, two weeks 
ago I introduced an order which would pro- 
hibit any meml>er from holding the office of 
president of this body for two consecutive 
teHms. That order was referred, like all 
orders that it is wisihed to bury, to the po- 
litical graveyard, the Committee on Rules. 
The order was introduced without any per- 
sonal animosity or prejudice against any in- 
dividual, but because I believed in an ideal. 
That ideal is fair play and proper considera- 
tion for all the memlbers of this body who 
are here representimg their constituents. We 
have here today the councilor from Ward 3 
(Coun. John I. Fitzgerald), sitting on my 
right, a candidate for the office of president 
of the body for the third consecutive time, a 
condition unprecedented in the City of Bos- 
ton. He is a candidate not because of any 
exceptional standing among the members of 
the body, not because of exceptional ability, 
not because he stands head and shoulders 
above other members, but because of the hold 
upon this city of the most vicious machine 
that ever dominated BosJton, whose namifioa- 
tions have extended throughout the Common- 
wealth. He is dominated today by that archaic 

political monstrosity 

Chairman GALLAGHER — The councilor 
must confine himself to the order. 

Coun. MELLEN — ^He is dominated by. the 
chaii-man of the Election Commission. 

Chairman GALLAGHER— The Chairman 
must again remind the councilor to confine 
himself to the order. 

Coun. MELLEN — Mr. Chairman, the chair- 
man of the election Commission took a hand 
in this matter a year ago this time. He 
tried and succeeded in accomplishing the elec- 
tion of the president of the body. You know 
as well as I do that one year ago today David 
B. Shaw, the Election Commissioner, went to 
the members of this body soliciting their votes. 
He vm.s at my house at 1.30 o'clock in the 
morning on that errand, and today he is 
doing the same thing on behalf of the gentle- 
man who has been holding the office of presi- 



dent of this body and who now seeks it for 
a third time. Why should 'he hold the office? 
Is it because he is the member most qualified 
to sit there? No. He has been here only 
three times, and has taken the floor twice, 
once in regard to the Fiske Wharf taking and 
once in regard to the proposed swap of land 
between the New England Telephone Com- 
pany and the City of Boston. And so I say 
to every member of the body that dt canmot 
be claimed that he is to be placed in this 
position again because he is the one man in 
the body who is capable of sitting in the 
chair. To elect him to this posiition for a 
tliird time is certainly an indictment of the 
intelligence of our body, and I shall not vote 
to continue him in that office. 

Coun. TOBIN — ^Mr. Chairman, I think every- 
body here realizes that last year, as well as 
this year, the only candidates who have had 
a chance to be president of this body were the 
president, John I. Fitzgerald, and myself. Of 
course, I, like other members who may have 
served here, have had a natural ambition to 
be president of the body. Election to that 
position is something that we would all wel- 
come. During my service here I have never 
said an unkind word about any fellow member, 
but I know, we all realize, that the votes 
recorded here at times do not represent the 
feeling in our hearts. Problems arising in 
political life sometimes demand different ac- 
tion from what we would personally like to 
take. We all at times record certain votes in 
a way that we would not do if our own mere 
personal feelings were concerned. I know 
personally, as between Jolm I. Fitzgerald and 
myself as candidates for the pxesidency, some 
of the members here, as was the case last 
year, would personally prefer to vote for me. 
I realize from my experience in politics that 
it is all right to vote on principle, but that 
at times questions of political expediency render 
it difficult to do so. Therefore, knowing that 
many members here would wish to vote for 
me, but that they might be personally em- 
barrassed in doing so, I wish to say to them 
that I shall have no personal feeling so far 
as they are concerned if they do not do so. 
I realise that a vote for me today would be 
considered a vote against the present adminis- 
tration, and I know that those dependent upon 
us in our various wards, those who are looking 
to us for help in their present troubles, need 
to have as their representative one who has a 
friendly entree to the Mayor's office. I know 
that many of the councilors here have to have 
such an entree in order to satisfy their con- 
stituents. Accordingly, realizing that a vote 
for me might embarrass some of the members 
of the body, something that I would not wish 
to do, that it might prevent their obtaining 
patronage for the assistance of their con- 
stituency, and that the majority of the mem- 
bers here for one reason and another intend 
to vote for John I. Fitzgerald for president, 1 
withdraw as a candidate for the office, not 
wishing to embarrass those who as a matter 
of personal friendship desire to vote for me. 
I realize that I would get the votes of a 
number of the members of the body if they 
were to vote as they personally saw fit, but 
I wish to release them from any possible 
embarrassment. I shall myself vote for a 
man who has been in the City Council almost 
as long as any man, who has served three 
terms, and I shall cast my vote believing that 
every man here should be given an equal op- 
portunity. We have had some very famous 
men who have been members of this body 
and who have left this hall to take prominent 
places in public and private life, and I be- 
lieve in a matter of this kind that all should 
be given a chance. For that reason I shall 
vote for another man as president of the 
body and gladly release those who might 
otherwise vote for me, so that they may 
do as they see fit under the circumstances. 

The order was passed and the clerk called 
the roll on the question of election of a presi- 
dent of the body for the year 1937, with the 
following result : 

For John I. Fitzgerald — ^Coun. Agnew, 
Brackman, Doherty, Dowd, Finley, John I. 
Fitzgerald, Peter J. Fitzgerald, Gallagher, 
Gleason, Kerrigan, Kilroy, McGrath, Peter A. 
Murray, Roberts, Rosenberg, Selvitella, Shat- 
tuck, Wilson— 18. 

For George A. Murray — Coun. Mellen — 1. 

For James J. Mellen — Coun. George A. Mur- 
ray — ^1. 

For Clement A. Norton — ^Coun. Tobin— 1. 

Chairman GALLAGHER- John I. Fitz- 
gerald has eighteen votes, George A. Murray 
one vote, James J. Mellen one vote, Clement 
A. Nortom one vote, amd John I. Fitzgerald is 
elected President of the Council for the year 
1937. The Chair will now appoint Coun. 
Kerrigan and Shaittuck to escort the Presi- 
dent-elect to the chair. 

The committee performed the duty assigned, 
amid applause. 

President FITZGERALD in taking the chair 
said : 



Jan. ]G 



CITY R ECORD 



73 



Gentlemen, His Honor the Mayor is ready 
to make his annual address to the body, and 
the OhaJir will appoint Ooum. iRoberts and Gal- 
laghcr a committee to escort the Mayor to 
the chamber. 

The committee retired at 2.36 p. m., and 
returned at 2.39 p. m., escorting his Honor 
Mayor Frederick W. Mansfield and suite. 



THE MAYOR'S ADDRESS. 

Mayor Mansfield addressed the City Council 
as follows : 

The City 'Council of Boston has assembled 
today for the purpose of orKainiiing for the 
year 1937. Ln accordance with custom, I wish 
to summarize briefly certain of the accomplish- 
ments of the year which has gone and to in- 
dicate certain of my plans for the present 
year. 

The Financial Condition of the City. 
No more important problem has confronted 
the city duninsr the last three years of my 
administration than that of maintaining the 
staibility of the city's credit. This task has 
been mo easy one. While a Mayor may, by 
imjudicious administration, vastly impair the 
city's credit, there are so m^any city obliga- 
tiO'ns beyond a Mayor's control that proitection 
and improvement of credit 'by a Mayor are 
fTaught with difficulties. Payment of State tax 
amd Metropolitan assessments a.nd a large 
part of the Boston Elevated deficit and pension 
accumulation requirements are obligations which 
the Mayor cannot avoid. Nor can he eliminate 
debt service on debts already incurred. School 
cos'ts, court costs and police costs are subject 
only to a very limited control by him. With- 
out cooperation, therefore, from state, school 
and county officials, possibilities of curtailment 
aire indeed restricted if not impossible. 

Furthermore, the Complexities of our modern 
civilization impose tremendous burdens on 
municipal government which are aggravated 
in times of financial stress. The poor and 
needy must be properly cared for ; persons and 
property must be protected ; the public health 
must be preserved ; ti-affic problems must be 
met. There is a point 'beyond which attempted 
economy is false and costly. 

I have heretofore frequently pointed out, and 
I now reiterate, that the financial difficulties 
which the city has had have 'been due iin lanres 
part to continued heavy demands for public 
welfare coupled with a decrease in reial estate 
values and 'a decrease in normal i'ncome. This 
condition is true generally throughout the 
Commonwealth, as is indicated by heavy bor- 
rowings amd high tax rates of other munici- 
palities. I'n 1&36 six Itomns in the Common- 
wealth had a tax rate of $50 a thousand or 
over ; fif ty^nine cities and towns, a tax rate 
of bebweon $40 amd $50 ; seventJy-nine cities 
and towns a tax ralte of between $35 and $40 ; 
and one hundred eighteen cities and towns a 
tax ra'te of betweem $30 and $35. 

The tax Tate of Boston during the last three 
years could have been materially reduced and 
our borrowings eliminaited but this could only 
have 'been accomplished by a drastic curtail- 
ment of essential services and by a wholesale 
discharge of employees. In the end, thousands 
would have suffered immeasurably, property 
values would have "been impaired and the city's 
development and progress retarded for years. 

I was unwilling to take this course. Instead, 
the city has continued to give adequate assists 
ance to the needy and to maintain essential 
services. I did 8uccee<l, however, in reducing 
appropriabioms for city maintenance purposes 
in 1936 almost two million dollars below 
similar appropriations in 1935 and reduced 
OUT borrowings for welfare purposes from 
$10,000,000 to $6.000,000, — a decrease of $4,000- 
000. As a result, the net debt of Boston is 
now lower by approximately $2,300,000 than it 
was on Januai-y 1. 1934, and approximately 
$1,000,000 lower than on January 1, 1930. 
That this recor<l has been achieved despite 
substantial borrowings for P. W. A. and 
public welfare, is a source of considerable 
eatis'faotion. The net debt of the city as of 
the close of 1936 is the lowest since 1932. 

While city maintenaince appropriations and 
borrowings have been deci-easod in 1930. tax 
collections have shown a decidc<l improve- 
ment. Approximately 73 per cent of the 1936 
tax levy was collected before the close of the 
fisciil year. This is the highest record of 
coJlecbions in recent years and is approximately 
2i per cent in excess of the percentage 
collected in 1935. 

During 1936 the city issued $35,000,000 in 
tax anticipation loans. This represents a i-e- 
duction of $9,500,000 from the total of such 
loans issued in 1935. This reduction may be 
viewed with considerable satisfaction, since 
it indicates a sharp decrease in the amount of 
tempoary financing engaged in by the city. 

Since 1928 a stafit of aud'itora and accouint- 



anits from the Division of Accounts at the 
State House have been engaged in the installa- 
tion of a system of accounts in the financial 
departments of the city. In my inaugural 
message, I pointed out the necessity of a 
prompt completion of this work. In 1936 their 
work was completed, and today the system is 
being operated by the regular personnel of 
the Auditing, Collecting and Treasury Depart- 
ments. The system is based on the uniform 
system of accounts prescrihed for municipal- 
ities in Massachusetts. Thus, after a period 
of nine years the accounts of the city have 
been established in accordance with modern 
principles of accounting practise. Under the 
new system it is possible at all times to de- 
termine accurately the assets and liabilities of 
the city, and so to secure a true picture of 
the city's fi'nancial condition at any given date. 
The City Auditor is now publishing in his 
monthly exhibit, balance sheets reflecting the 
assets and liabfflities of the various accounts 
at the close Of the current month. Boston 
is the only large city in the counitry which 
prepares for public inspection a monthly 
balance sheet. 

By legislative action, which I strongly uged, 
the policy of controlling the ordinary mainte- 
nance expenses of the city departments by the 
medium of a tax limit established by the 
Legislature was abandoned. This means that, 
after a half century of legislative control, Bos- 
ton has been granted the authority to deter- 
mine, without state interference, o'lts budget 
and appropriation policies. While it is too 
early to evaluate the full extent of the benefits 
which should come to the city from this legis- 
lation, it is evident that the delay in' the 
submission of the budget to the Clity Council, 
which has been so marked lin the last decade 
of the city's financial experience, should no 
longer Occur, since, as the necessity for legis- 
lative authorization of a limit has been re- 
moved, it should now be possible to submit the 
budget to the City Council at an early date 
and enable the city to operate under adequate 
budget control almost from the commence- 
ment of the year. 

In conjunction with the removal of the tax 
limit, the Legislature saw fit to Fplace the 
city under the debt provisions of chapter 44 
of the General Laws. Under these provisions 
the purposes for which each issue may be made 
are specifically enumerated. In addition, be- 
fore any loan may be authorized, the city is 
required to appropriate within the tax levy 
an amounit equal to ten cents on each $1,000 
of the assessed valuabion of the city for the 
preceding year. Under this latter provission, 
before the city may authorize borrowings in 
1937 it will be necessary to provide for each 
authorizaition $162,026.50 within the tax levy. 
The effect of this provision will be to establish 
a partial "pay-as-you-go" policy on subse- 
quent bori-owings by the city, as well as to 
limit the projects to be fiinanced 'through the 
medium of loans to work of a substantial 
nature. Over a period of years this particular 
legislation s;houId result in a reduction in 
borrowings and in the net debt of the city. 

I am unable at this time to advise you as 
to the amount of the budget which I will 
recommend to you this year. We are still 
working to keep approprialbionS at as low 
an amount as is consistent with the public 
in'terest. Every effort %vSll 'be made to de- 
crease the amount of the budget below the 
amount of the appropriations of 1936. 

It is also my purpose to reduce fua'ther the 
net debt of the city. While some borrowing 
will be necessary because of the conti'uued 
heavy load of welfare relief, this borrowing 
nind all other borrowing will be kept to a 
miinimum in order that the city may ultimately 
eliminate its debt and be place<l on a pay-as- 
you-go basis. A long term plan of debt re- 
duction is bound to result in automatic tax 
rate relief. 

Public Health. 

The extensive and important work of the 
city in the prevention of disease and the 
preservation of the public health is unknown 
to many. 

The untiring efforts of the Health Depart- 
ment speedily controlled a meningitis out- 
brrtik early in 1936 and the methotls of control 
thcTi ompli)ye<l by that departmont have siince 
boon adopted in many cities and towns through- 
out the United States. 

The city now main/tnims twenty-nine infant 
nnd pre-Bchool clinics to which mothers may 
bring their children for n>ubine mc<lica] super- 
vision and immunology. Si.'cty thousand or 
more ■vis.its were made during 1936 by mothers 
oC infanta and pre-school children to the 
clinics cS'tablishc<l by the city. 

It has been piwsfble durinji the past 
year to increase the scope of the work 
of assisting children in the parochial 
schools of Boston. There nre now child- 
ren in about forty-five parocliial schools 



constantly being supervised by the medical in- 
spectors of the Health Department. Thi.4 
supervision consists of daily visits, physical 
examinations, immunization against diphtheria, 
control of communicable diseases and the cor- 
i-ection of defects when found. It is estimated 
that during the course of the past school year 
some 75.000 inspections have been made and 
about 20,000 physical examinations. 

During the New England flood of March, 
1936, which affected the entire milk shed, the 
facilities of producers and dealers in milk 
and of transportation agencies were marshaled 
under the direction of the milk inspection 
service of the Health Department with th(? 
result that there was no significant shortage 
of milk and no material change in the quality 
of the milk delivered in Boston during this 
period. 

The Food Division of the Health Depart- 
ment has labored with vigor and success dur- 
ing 1936. Much of the store inspection is 
necessarily routine, but there have been in- 
stances where particularly meritorious results 
have been achieved. Inspectors of this divi- 
sion were on the alert during the flood, and 
food in that area affected by the disaster was 
seized and condemned. .Arrangements were 
made with local boards of health in the flooded 
areas and before shipments were allowed to 
come into Boston, the Food Division was 
notified and when shipments were received in 
Boston, an inspector was on hand and such 
foodstuffs as were beyond salvage were seized 
and condemned. 

Temporary Relief for the Unemployed. 

During the year 1936 the Federal Govern- 
ment, through the Works Progress Admin- 
istration, expended approximately $24,000,000 
on work projects for the needy unemployed in 
Boston and an average of approximately 
24,000 persons have been afforded employment 
on such projects throughout the year. 

I have consistently maintained, both here 
and in Washington, that Federal assistance 
is essential to meet the unemployment prob- 
lem and that work relief is socially far pref- 
erable to the dole. Evei-y effort has been made 
to secure a fair share of Federal assistance 
for the needy of this city and attempts to 
cut unwarrantedly, amounts allocated for re- 
lief have been vigorously resisted and success- 
fully prevented. 

The work done on these projects has been, 
in the main, of substantial benefit to the city. 
Highways have been constructed, parks and 
playgrounds improved, sewer and water lines 
built and public buildings renovated and re- 
paired. The accomplishments may properly 
be a source of pride to the thousands cm- 
ployed on these projects. 

I shall continue through the present year 
my efforts to secure for residents of Boston 
their fair share of Federal funds for un- 
employment relief and to see that those funds 
are devoted to worth-while uses. 

Hospitals. 
Boston City Hospital. 

The new City Hospital Surgical Building, 
constructed with Federal aid as a P. W. A. 
Project, has been completed and in a short 
time will be equipped and ready for occu- 
pancy. 

It is a building of ten stories and will have 
accommodations for 300 beds. The operating 
rooms have been planned with a view to high 
efficiency. Each operating room has its own 
anaesthesia room, four bedrooms for patients, 
and, for the first time, oxygen piped to tlie 
room from a central tank in the basement. 
There wUl also be pressure and \racuum pipes 
available to assist the doctors in oi>eration< 
Visitors, especially students, may view opera- 
tions from a gallery which is entirelj' sepa- 
rated from the operating room by a ghu^s shield 
set in a balcony aliove the room. When this 
building is opened Boston will have a city 
hospital service comparable with the best in 
the world. 

Long Island. 

The number of beds in the Long Island 
aospital has been increased during the vcar 
1936 and great improvements made for the 
comfort of the inmates and patients nnd in 
diminishing the dangers of contagion. 

Occupational therapy has bi-cn <IevoK>'iH>l nnd 
inmates have been encouraged to engage in 
w-^u ,?^ interost and utility to themselves. 
With the assistance of W. P. A. forces, build- 
ings have been repaired and the chapel eon- 
sidcrabb- improveil. A corridor has been 
constructed to the chapel so that inmates 
may attend services in cold and stormv 
weather and yet remain under cover. 

Parks and PLAYOROirMis. 
Parks and playgrounds perform n most im- 
por ant function in the maintenance of the 
hojillh nnd woB-boinK of the communib-. The 
availability of W. P. A. funds has enabled 
inc city to make many improvements in its 



74 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 



parks and playgrounds during the past year 
with relatively small cost to the city. 

The improvements made are too numerous 
to describe in detail but a few illustrative 
examples may be mentioned: 

Marine Park in South Boston has been 
further developed so that it may be utilized 
more fully, especially in the summer months, 
and extensive parking areas have been con- 
structed along the roadway to Castle Island 
to make this park more useful to the citizens 
of Boston. 

Concrete walks around the stadium and 
in other portions of the park have been built 
at Columibus Bark, SoTJth Boston. Tennis 
courts have been constructed and a retaining 
wall has been built along the beach front to 
complete that part of the park amd make 
the beach more attractive. 

Rough areas in the West Roxbury Parkway 
were cleaned of underbrush and loamed and 
seeded. The low areas were filled in. surfaced 
and seeded. A drainage system was installed, 
culverts built, and rustic bridges and fences 
were erected along the line of the bridle 
paths which were reconstructed and put in 
first-class condition. This development has 
made a decided improvement in this section 
of the city. 

Concrete walks have been constructed in the 
Back Bay Fens where dirt walks formerly ex- 
isted and numerous replacements have been 
made of wooden seat-s and fences. 

Rough unfinished areas in Franklin Park 
have been graded and put in better condition, 
and an herb garden has been constructed near 
the Rose Garden. Walks have been regraded 
and surfaced ; drainage and irrigation systems 
have been installed. 

A new bathing beach has been constructed 
atong the portion of the basin at Charlesbank. 
Sand was spread along portions of this beach 
about 400 feet in length, so as to provide 
bathing facilities for the inhabitants of this 
congested section. It is contemplated that 
this beach will be extended, under a W. P. A. 
project, during the coming year. 

Many improvements have been made to the 
World War Memorial Park in the East Bos- 
ton district. Additional tennis courts have 
been constructed with the necessary fence in- 
closures. The beach and its entrances have 
been improved, as also the drainage system, 
walks and soccer field. 

Extensive replacements have been made to 
the piers and bath house at the North End 
Park and improvements have been made to 
the beach and its entrances. 

The George Wright Golf Course, located in 
Hyde Park and West Roxbury, has reached 
its final stage of preparation and is in such 
condition that it can be opened for play dur- 
ing the present year. This golf course should 
be one of the best courses in Massachusetts 
and should be self-supporting. Its construc- 
tion has changed a rough wild tract of land, 
useless for building purposes, into one of 
use and beauty and should eventually prove a 
boon to the surrounding neighborhood. 

The new Wood Avenue Playground in Hyde 
Park is under construction ; the Alsen Play- 
ground in Dorchester is being leveled ; the Al- 
mont Street Playground in Mattapan has been 
filled and surfaced and rustic paths, walls and 
fences have been built. A new baseball dia- 
mond has been constructed in the Chestnut 
Hill Playground, additional drainage and ir- 
rigation facilties provided there and the 
ground regraded. Tennis courts have been 
built in the Jefferson Playground in Roxbury 
and new courts at Franklin Field in Dor- 
chester. 

This is but a portion of the work of the 
year of the Park Department during 1936. 
In addition, it has, among other things, in 
cooperation %vith the Works Progress Admin- 
istration, written the most successful page 
in the history of City of Boston recreational 
activities, when its sports program attracted 
during 1936 more than 4,500,000 spectators in 
games and exhibitions participated in by more 
than 1,. 500, 000 boys and girls. 

Airport. 

The airport transport traffic at the Boston 
.■\irport has increased 250 per cent in the last 
four years. Approximately five per cent of all 
passengers carried by air on regularly sched- 
uled airlines in the United States arrive or 
depart from the Boston Airport. 

Many extensions and improvements have 
been made during the past year. The flying 
field has been enlarged, drained, filled, surfaced 
and rolle<l. A building has been erected for 
the control of the floodlight system and the 
modernization of the lighting system at the 
airport is practically completed. 

During the past year the War Department 
leased to the city for airport purposes, for a 
term of fifty years. Governor's Islajid. This 
has added 72 acres to the city's presemt Air- 
mart facilities. With the acquisition of this 
island, Boston is in a position to compete on 
favorable terms wth the leading cities of 



the country as a port of entry for transatlantic 
air service. Plans for the development of the 
island have been made and it is expected that 
with Fedei-al assistance substantial progress 
will be made during the coming year. 

Public Works. 

The city is now engaged in the completion of 
its present Federal Public Works program. 
During the course of the present year, work on 
three school buildings, on the CheOsea Street 
Bridge over Chelsea Creek and on the Faaieuil 
Hall Market should be completed. Except for 
the erection of ■ a new City Hall, urgently 
needed because of the condition of the present 
structure, it is my present purpose to be 
most conservative in the incurring of further 
defet during 1937 for new P. W. A. projects. 

Due to the hea\^ travel on our public streets, 
considerable reconstruction is annually meces- 
saiT. Dui-ing 1936 the city reconstructed 271 
streets, and constructed 19 new streets. This 
work was made possible in part by the avail- 
ability of W. P. A. labor. In addition, the 
cfty through the Public Works Department, 
has laid 20,000 feet of new pipe and replaced 
30,000 feet of old and smaller sized mains 
with new and larger sized. The Milton 
Street, Meridian Street and Allston Bridges 
were repaired and improved aind new sewers 
were laid in various streets throughout the 
city. 

New five-year conitracts with the Boston 
Consolidated Gas Company for sti'eet lighting 
entered into in 1936 will effect a saving for the 
city in its lighting costs of $25,000 a year. 

Public Welfare. 

The decentralizaJtion of the Welfare Depart- 
ment begun in June of 1934 was completed 
during the past year. This was accomplished 
at a minimum cost to the city as city property 
has been used for the new local units in all 
places except Dorchester and East Boston. In 
those districts the two new welfare buildings 
recently erected, under the auspices of W. P. A., 
will be used. 

The effect Of decentralization wiU be to 
enable the Welfare Department to function 
more efficiently and to avoid the hardship 
heretofore borne by needy recipients of going 
from all sections of the city to the central 
office at Hawkins street. 

Welfare disbui-sements for dependent aid have 
been suhs'tantially less during the year 1936 
than during 1935. This is an encoui-aging sign 
amd reflects improved economic conditions, 
W. P. A. assistance and careful investigation 
by the Welfare Department. Indications are 
that, unless there is a decrease in W. P. A. 
assistance during the present year, the city's 
burden, though still great, wiU be somewhat 
lightened. 

Every effort is being and will he made to 
enable recipients of dependemt aid to secure 
private employment. In a large percentage 
of cas&3, dependen't aid recipients are un- 
trained. The almost complete breakdown of 
the appreniticeshlip system during the depres- 
sion calls for the training of these persons, 
if they are ever again to be gainfully em- 
ployed. With the cooperation of the School 
Department it as hoped that this can be ac- 
complished. 

The Port op Boston. 

Port progress in 1936 was distinctly en- 
coui-aging. The year showed an expansion of 
deep-water services, pasesnger and freight, and 
an iincrease in the number of passengers using 
the Port representing a patronage from all 
parts of the United States and Canada. 
Particularly significant is the fact that we 
have a growing percentage Of passengers to 
and from the middle and far west, so that 
Boston, the second port of the United States, 
is becoming more and more a national rather 
thajn a New England port of embarkation and 
debarkation. 

As to freight, a substantial gain in imports 
and exports toiok place for 1935 over 1934, 
and the fti-st eight months of 1936, compared 
with the corr^ponding period in 1935, showed 
a further steady increase. Considering the 
many handicaps with which Boston ds con- 
fronted in endeavoring to build up its import- 
e.xport business, the current bituation is en- 
couraging. 

Domestic waterborne business has held its 
own, despite the serious marine strikes on 
the west coast. Intercoastal cargoes, of course, 
have fallen olf, but those from the Gulf have 
increased. A few years ago, Boston had no 
services to such ports as Tampa, Mobile, New 
Orleans and Houston. Now we have four, and 
so heavy have been the cargo offerings that 
larger and faster vessels are being added to 
this trade route. For these improved condi- 
tions the Boston Port Authority deserves great 
credit. 

There remains, of course, the prime necessity 
of correcting the rail rate and terminal situation 
favoring New York and handicapping Boston. 



Other adverse rate situations under scrutiny 
are important but none as important as this. 
I propose to continue my efforts for its cor- 
rection. To aid in this accomplisliment, more 
active rail support by the New England 
carriers themselves is being sought, in the 
hope that by voluntary action on the carriers" 
part, "we can have certain rate diiscriminations 
removed without the necessity of bringing 
formal proceedings before the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission. Pennsylvania control of 
the Ne\v Haven and Boston and Maine, the 
two largest New England caniiers, makes this 
phase of our program for from easy, and 
gives weight to the view that Pennsylvania 
control must be ended if the Port of Boston 
is to expand its cargo trade beyond New Eng- 
land boundaries. 

Reorganization of Departments. 

I have, on several occasions in the past, sub- 
mitted a plain for the reorganization of cea^in 
departments in the city government and one 
met with your approval. There are as I 
have frequently pointed out, forty-six separate 
departments in the city government and one 
hundred thirty-five department heads. Many 
of these departments perform similar fimctions 
and yet, because of the multiplicity of depart- 
men:ts, many improvements in one department 
are unknown to others and much of the benefit 
of the experiences of one department is lost 
to other depar'tments perfornijing similar func- 
tions. This system is antiquated and inade- 
quate. 

Inasmuch as you have appointed a com- 
mittee to consider fujither the matter of re- 
organization, I assume that you concur wth 
me that r*rganizaltion is a necessity and that 
our disagreement is on its form amd exteoit. 

In order that time may not he lost in ac- 
complishing so important a functional neces- 
sity, I propose to appoint a committee to work 
with your committee toward the early formula- 
tion of a plan of reorganization on which 
we may both be able to agree. Heads of de- 
partments "ivill have ample representation on 
that committee. 

The $2'5 Tax Limitation Proposal. 

During the 1937 session of the Legislature 
both branches in joint session mil be required 
to give consideration to an initiative petition 
providing for an amendment to the Constitu- 
tion of the Commonwealth, under which no 
municipality could declare in any year a tax 
rate in excess of $25 per $1,000. While the 
earliest date at which the proposed amend- 
ment could become effective is January of 1941, 
it U impoi-tant to consider the effect which 
this proposal, if adopted, would have on 
Boston and other Massachusetts mumdeipalities. 
Taking into consideration the fact that Boston 
in 1936 borrowed $6,000,000 for maintenance 
purposes a $25 tax limit would mean a loss 
in revenue to the city of appaioximately 
$27,000,000, an amount equivalent to one-third 
of the total naaiintenance and operating re- 
quirements of the city for 1936. Included in 
this latter total, however, are certain fixed 
charges such as debt requirements. State tax 
and Metropolitan district assessments, pension 
requii'ements and relief disbursements over 
which the Mayor has virtually no control, and 
which therefore would be beyond the scope 
of any reduction pi'ogram. Admitting that 
these fixed charges must be met, it is evident 
that a $25 tax limit would necessitate a 57 
per cent reduction in the ordinary maintenance 
program of the city. From the experience of 
other states where tax limitation has been 
adopted dt is clear that Boston's problem 
under a $25 tax limit could only be solved 
by suspending or sharply curtailing vital pub- 
lic services such as those of the Police and 
Fire Departments and of the schools. 

This has been almost the universal result 
in other states in which drastic tax limitations 
have been put in effect. Thus the New York 
Times of March 15, 1936, reports with refer- 
ence ito the effect of the Ohio tax limitation 
in Columbus : 

"Only 151 of the regular force of 338 fire- 
men have been retained to protect this city 
of 298,000 from fires. Eleven of the nineteen 
fire stations have been boarded up. 

"The police force has been cut from 318 
to 156 men. Half the squad of police cruiser 
cars are parked in the municipal garage. No 
men are available to operate them. 

"Other city seiwices — garbage collection, 
street cleaning, park upkeep, street repair — 
have been curtailed severely." 
and the Illinois Tax Commission reported that — 

"In Cleveland one effect of the Ohio tax 
limitation amendment was to produce a b^nd 
default of $1,287,345 in February. 1934. This 
was followed by payless pay days and doles 
for city employees during the months of March 
and April. The Federal Public Works Au- 
thority withdrew all P. W. A. funds allotted 
to Cleveland, and during the month of March 



Jan. 16 



CITY RECORD 



7S 



the city itself was forced to atandon its por- 
tion of the water main extension program, 
leaving piles of dirt and pipe along the 
streets. In its finaincial plight the city of 
Cleveland 'fired' more than 700 employees, 
closed city bath houses save for two days a 
week, turned off every other street light, cut 
the cleaning of city property to every other 
day, instituted garbage collections weekly in- 
stead of twiice a week, asked householders to 
place their rubbish at the street curb if they 
wanted it collected at all, wiped out all ap- 
propriations for city beaches and pJaygrounds 
this summer, gave the municipal boys* and 
girls' correction farms three months to op- 
erate, shut the dog pound and closed off four 
bridges over the Cuyahoga river to save bridge 
tenders' fees." 

Similar reports come from West Virginia, 
Michigan, Washington and other states wherein 
attempts have been made to establish an ar- 
bitrary tax limit. Since real estate is the 
chief beneficiary of municipal services, its 
owners would be the chief sufferers from any 
policy which admittedly would result in wide- 
spread curtailment or interruption of these 
same services. Tax rate reduction, while es- 
sential and desirable, must be secured without 
the disruption of local government. There is 
no doubt that real estate should not bear its 
present share of the cost of municipal govern- 
ment. The solution cannot lie, however, in 
hasty legislation which ignores completely the 
effect of its enactment on municipal services 
and municipal finance. No attempt should 
be made to limit drastically municipal revenue 
without maJcing adequate provisiion for other 
sources of i-evenue to meet the cos'tB of (neces- 
sary mjuniciip'ai services in modern communities. 

Traffic. 

The increased use of the highways of Bos- 
ton has created an acute itraffic problem. This 
problem is not peculiar to Boston. It exists 
in almost all large cities. It must, however, be 
faced. Extreme traffic congestion -not only 
causes inconvenience but threatens substantial 
losses to business and real estate in the city. 

The problem cannot effectively be solved by 
temporary devices. A thorough and long range 
plan must be determined upon and adhered to 
and this plan must be consistent with the 
city's financial ability to execute it. 

The City Planning Board has given much 
time and attention to the matter. I shall, 
in_ the near future, establish an Advisory Com- 
mittee representing leading civic organiza- 
tions in the city and composed of men of 
broad experience and so-.nd judgment to co- 
operate with the City Planning Board in 
devising such a long range plan. 

Conclusion. 

During the last three years we have main- 
tained and improved the credit of the city. 
This has been done by guarding against waste 
aind extnawagance and by curtailment of ex- 
penditures. It has also been accomplished 
without wholesale discharges and without the 
curtailment of essential services. 

We have, moreover, a record of ochievemenlt 
in the rendering of public service. The needy 
have been cared for, useful work found for 
the unemployed, the city's hospitals, parks, 
playgrounds, streets and municipal services 
have been improved. 

We must not swerve from the course in 
which we are moving. Further curtailment of 
expenses is essential. Further rehabilitation 
of credit coupled with continued service to 
the people of Boston must be our aim. 

The Mayor, at the close of his address, was 
greeted wiith applause, and the Mayor and 
suite retired from the chamber at 3.15 p. m. 

President FITZGERALD— At this time I 
wish to Ithank the members of the Council for 
the honor they have coinfarred upon me. I 
greatly appreciate the confidence they have 
placed in me. 



APPOINTMENTS BY THE MAYOR. 

Subject to confiirm'atiion by the Council, the 
Mayor submitted (the following appoiinltmenta, 
viz. : 

Weighers of Coal: Betty Bronsteiin, I'aT In- 
tervale sitreet, Roxbury ; Mildred Cohen, 6 
Glenway s'treet, Dorchester ; Lillian M. Dewar, 
30 Gomley iioad, Medford ; Mrs. Eunice N. 
Lamb, 77 Poirk Drive, Bo&ton ; John C. Koomas, 
19 'Suimmit avenue, Everett ; Cecil Monitague, 
86 Lexiirgtton street. East Boston ; Edward F. 
Gregory, 30 Wall street, Everett. 

Weigher of Goods: Arthur J. Walsh, 197 
Orchard street, Belmont. 

Severally laid Over a week under the law. 



TRAFFIC CONDITIONS, WEST ROXBURY. 
The following was received: 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 29, 1936. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith a communi- 
cation from the Traffic Commissioner relative 
to your order of December 7, 1936, comcern- 
ing the making of a survey of the ti'affic con- 
ditions at the in'tersectlion of La Grange and 
Vermont sitreets. West Roxbury. 
Respectfully, 
Frbdbmck W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Gity of Boston, 
Traffic Commission, December 28, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — ^I have the honor ito acknowledge 
receipt of Council order dated December 7, 
1936, which reads as follows : 

"Ordered, That the Traffic OommisBioner be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to 
make a survey Of the traffic conditions at 
the iinterseiition of La Grange aind Vennont 
streets. West Roxbury, with the view of 
eliminating the presenit hazardO'US traffic con- 
ditions." 

Our accident records show omiy one accident 
at this imteiTseotion through the past seven 
ye^ars. The intersection itself is wide open. 
Vehicles come ailong La Grange street fairly 
fast but there is plenty of opportunity for 
ajny one coming out of Vermont street to 
observe approaching oars in La Grange street 
for a considerable distance either way. 

lit is the opinion of our engineers that this 
is not a hazardous intersection. 

Respectfully subm.itted, 
William P. Hickey, Ctommissioner. 

Placed on file. 



SALE OF DEER ISLAND PIGS. 
The following was received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, December 31, 1936. 
To the Oity Council. 

Gentlemen, — I am in receipt of the inclosed 
communlicatiom from the Penal Institutions 
Commissioner requesting permission to sell 
100 pigs now located at the House of Correc- 
tion, Deer Island. These pigs weigh approxi- 
mately 6,000 pounds and in the opinion of 
the commissioneir it would be for the best 
interests Of the city Ito dispose of them at this 
time. 

As the pigs are mo longer required at Deer 
Island the comimlissioner's request has my 
approval and I respectfully recommend adop- 
tion of the accompanying order by your Honor- 
able Body. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

City of Boston, 
Penal Institutions Department, 

December 30, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
Deair Sir, — We have at 'the present time at 
the House of Correction, Deer Island, one 
hundred (100) pigs ready for market. These 
pigs will weigh approximately sixty (60) 
pounds each, a itotal of appixjximately 6,000 
pounds. 

At a ntarket price of from 7 cenlts to 8 
cents per pound, this sale should net approxi- 
nrately $400. In any opinion the sale of these 
pigs at the pTesemlt time would be for the 
best iintereisJts of the city and your approval 
of siale is hereby requested. 

Respectfully, 
John J. Douglass, Commissioner. 

Ordered, That the Penal Institutions Com- 
missioner be authorized to sell at public or 
priivate sale to the highest bidder the sxixplus 
stock of pigs at the House of Correction, 
Deer Island, amounlbing approximately to 
6,000 pounds. 

'Referred to Executive Committee when ap- 
pointed. 



LOANS IN ANTICIPATION OF TAXES. 

The following \vas received : 
City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 4, 1937. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with the estab- 
lished practice of introducing at the first 
meeting of the Council in each year an order 
authorizing the borrowing from time to time 
during the year of temporary loans in an- 
ticipation of ta.xcs, I submit herewith an order 
authorizing the City Treasurer to issue and 
sell during the current financial year tem- 
porary notes or certificates of indebtedness 
of the city to the amount of $40,000,000. This 



is the same amount as authorized by the City 
Council for the year 1936. 

I respectfully recommend the adoption of 
this order by your Honorable Body. 
Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 

Ordered, That to provide temporarily money 
to meet the appropriations for the financial 
year 1937, tlie City Treasurer issue and sell, 
at such time and in such amounts as he may 
deem best, notes or certificates of indebtedness 
of the City of Boston not exceeding $40,- 
000,000 in the total, in anticipation of the 
taxes of the current municipal year ; that all 
such notes or certificates of indebtedness be 
dated the day the money for the same is 
received, made payable with the interest there- 
on within one year of their date and bear 
interest from their date until the same are 
made payable at such rate as the City Auditor, 
the City Treasurer, and the Mayor may de- 
termine. 

Coun. DOWD — ^Mr. President, in view of 
the fact that that order has to have two read- 
ings, I now move a suspension of the rule and 
the passage of the order. 

The rule was suspended, and the order was 
given its first reading and passage, yeas 16, 
nays — Coun. Mellen — 1. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

The following petitions were received and 
referred to the committees named, viz. : 

Claims. 

Mrs. Edward Bruso, for compensation for 
collapse of water boiler at 140 Grove street. 
West Roxbury, caused by water being shut off. 

William L. Buckley, for compensation for 
injm-ies caused by an alleged defect in Mystic 
Bridge, Charlestown. 

Catherine J. Casey, for compensation for in- 
juries caused by an alleged defect in I street. 
South Boston. 

NeUie Daly, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect at Shawmut ave- 
nue and Union Park street. 

Joseph I. Epstein, for compensation for in- 
juries caused by an alleged defect at Common- 
wealth avenue, Allston. 

Edward Norton Flaherty, for compensation 
for loss of clothing at J. J. Sullivan Play- 
ground, during fire. 

Peter E. Flynn, for compensation for dam- 
age to car caused by ' an alleged defect at 
River and Washington streets. 

Ralph lies, for compensation for damage to 
car caused by an alleged defect in North 
Beacon street, Brighton. 

Thomas F. McDonough, for compensation for 
damage to car caused by an alleged defect in 
Peak Hill road. West Roxbury. 

Bessie McLaughlin, for compensation for in- 
juries caused by an alleged defect in Cam- 
bridge street. 

Francis J. McNeil, for compensation for 
damage to car caused by an alleged defect in 
Strandway. 

Catherine R. Murray, for compensation for 
injuries caused by an alleged defect at S16 
Washington street, Brighton. 

Thomas R. Oleson, for compensation for 
damage to car by city truck. 

Isadore L. Perils, for compensation for 
damage to car caused by an alleged defect at 
Cheney and Maple streets. 

Charles G. Shannon, to be reimbursed for 
execution issued against him on account of 
his acts as operator of car of Fire Department. 

Harriet J. Tipling, for compensation for in- 
juries caused by an alleged defect at Wash- 
ington and La Grange streets. 

WUliam C. Walsh, for compensation for 
injuries caused by an alleged defect in Wil- 
low street. West Roxbury. 

A. L. Wells, Inc., for refund on license for 
methyl and wood alcohol. 

Osia Yeramian, for compensation for dam- 
age to car by team of Public Works Depart- 
ment. 

Grace Gottwald, for compensation for dam- 
age to property at Cedar and Centre streets, 
caused by city car No. S272. 



REMOVAL OF J.\MES J. EGAN. 

Notice \\-a8 received from tlie Ma>-or of re- 
moval of Janus J. Etan iis nienibor of Board 
of Comjiiissionei-s of School Buildings. 

Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENT OF LEO J. DUNN. 

Notice was received from the Maj-or of ap- 
l>ointmont of Loo J. Dunn of H Primjveo 
street, RosJindaJe, to be member of Board of 
Commissioners ot School BuikUnps for term 



76 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 



ending December 1, 193S, to fill vacancy caused 
by removal of James J. Egan. 
Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENT OF FRANCIS R. BANGS. 

Notice was i-eceived from Board of Com- 
miiseioners of School Buildings of City of 
Beaton of appointment of Fi-ancis R. Bangs 
of Boston to be member of said Board in ac- 
eoi-dance with provisions of chapter 351 of 
Acts of 1929 for term of thi'ee years from 
December 1, 1936. 

Placed on file. 



APPOINTMENT OF PAUL M. FINAN. 

Notice was received from Board of Assessors 
of appointment of Paul M. Finam, 54 Elm 
street, Charlestown. to position of permtment 
first ass.istant assessor. 

Placed on file. 



APPROVAL BY EMERGENCY FINANCE 
BOARD OF TAX-TITLE RENEWAL LOANS. 

Notice was received from the Emergency 
Finance Board of vote approviiig tax title 
renewals of Oity of Bositon passed December 
29, 1936. 

Placed on file. 



FINANCE COMMISSION REPORT ON 
UNUSED LAND. 

The following was received : 
* City of Boston, 

The Finance Commission, January 4, 1937. 
To the Honorable the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I have been authoirized by the 
Finance Commission to send to you the inclosed 
copy of a report made to the Mayoj: relating 
to the laree am'ount of city-owned property 
for which there is EtUe if any public use. 

The commission believes that you should 
have this situation in mind when you take 
action on the order submitted by the Mayor 
authorizing the purchase of Fiske Wharf. 
Yours very truly, 
Robert E. Cunniff, Secreltary. 

December 23, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Honorable Sir, — It is apparenit from the 
statements which you gave to the newspapers 
in reply to two Finance Comniission repo*-ts 
regarding §1,500,000 worth of unused or little 
used city property that you have been mis- 
informed in many particulars in regard to the 
facts conta,ined in these reports. Because 
you have sent no reply to the Finance Commis- 
sion, the commission has had to rely on the 
meager accounts of your statements which 
appeared in the nevrepapers. 

The commission made the reports to you be- 
cause you hold the office of mayor. WbaJbever 
acljion is taken with i-egard to disposal oi 
city-owned real estate must toe begun by you 
or by a board of which you are the head. It 
is such a board that must arrange fo>r the 
sale of the school lands. The Finance Com- 
mission has been informed that this board 
has not had a meeting during the three years 
of your administration. The commission has 
also been informed that the Superintendent 
of Construction of the School Buildings Depart- 
ment, Mr. Drummey, has written to you three 
t.mts asking you to convene the boai'd. He is 
a member of that board by statute. He has 
stated to a representative of the Finance Com- 
mission that the cost of caring for unused 
school real esUte is eating into his mainte- 
nance appropriations. , , ■ 

The real estate expert designated by you 
to have charge of city real estate matters has 
informed a representative of the Finance Com- 
mission that the restrictions placed upon the 
sale of some school parcels by the bcliool 
Committee are unwarranted and prevent sale. 
The only action taken by the School Com- 
mittee in this matter was during the admin- 
istration of your predecessor. 

The Finance Commission conclusion in its 
recent report was that the time is ripe for 
new action. The steadily increasing volume 
of city-owned parcels is appiallijng. It is 
necessary to begin at once, regardless of the 
result of previous weak efforts, to find op- 
portunity to reduce the city's load. The real 
estate situation is improving and there are 
persons available who are willing to invest 
in real estate. The Finance Commission's 
recommendation therefore is that you require 
the School Committee today to give all the 
facts in regard to every one of the twenty- 
eight parcels listed by the Finance Commis- 

The School Committee has no right under 
chapter 259 of the Acts of 1906 to impose any 



restriction on the sale of these parcels. That 
is a matter for the board of which you and 
the Superintendent of Schoolhouse Construc- 
tion are joint members with the School Com- 
mittee. None of the members of this board are 
real estate experts, but expert services are 
available through the expert designated by 
you to have charge of city real estate matters. 

In regard to the parcels listed in the name 
of the other departments of the city under 
your direct control, action must start with 
you, not with the City Coancil. The City 
Council can vote to authorize sales only on 
your recommendation. The charter allows the 
Council no administrative authority. 

The commission's recommendation is that 
you cause the list to be investigated ; that you 
obtain specific and sound reasons why the 
city should retain posession of each of the 
forty parcels in the list. If your depart- 
ment heads can give sound reasons for the 
retention of any of them, the Finance Com- 
mission does not insist on sale. The commis- 
sion does claim that the city authorities have 
been asleep on the matter and that the tax- 
payers need relief. 

The Finance Commission also recommends 
that you withdraw your order in the City 
Council providing a $25,000 appropriation for 
the purchase of defunct and dilapidated Fiske 
Wharf from the New York, New Haven & 
Hartford Railroad. Your plan to build^ there 
a dock for city steamers and for privately 
owned freighters, if carried out, will cost a 
million dollars and will deprive the owners 
of many of the wharves now in use of their 
only means of earning the money to pay their 
taxes. A better dock site for city steamers, 
the old North Ferry slip, now owned by the 
city, is falling into ruin. 

■The Finance Commission believes another 
city dock is unnecessary. The city has Fos- 
ter's Wharf under long lease which is ample 
for the city steamers. The city also has a 
dock 100 yards away from Fiske Wharf. Any 
money available for investment in docks should 
be spent on the old North Feri-y dock to 
preserve it until a purchaser can be found. 
There is not in prospect sufiicient use of it 
by the city to warrant retention of it longer. 
Respectfully submitted, 
The Finance Commission, 
by E. Mark Suilivan, Chairman. 

Placed on file. 



COMMITTEE ON FINANCE REPORT. 

Coun. DOWD, for the Committee on Finance 
of last year, submitted the following: 

1. Report on message of Mayor and order 
(referred November 23, 1936) appropriating 
$75,000 from special fund — Sales of City Prop- 
erty — for Police Department purchase of Har- 
bor patrol boats — that same ought to pass. 

The report was accepted and the question 
came on the passage of the order. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, are we 
going to hear anything about this matter? 

Coun. DOWD — ^Mr. President, I shall be glad 
to give my colleague the information he de- 
sires. As a matter of fact, I believe he sat 
in with the committee when both the old 
commissioner and the new commissioner 
advised us that unless the money was ap- 
propriated at once, it would be absolutely 
necessary to curtail the services of the harbor 
police. One of the most striking statements 
was that it has cost in the last two 
years $7,500 for repairs on the two boats 
that the department has now. There was 
no question on the part of the committee 
that the lieutenant who appeared was well 
qualified to state the situation. Even Coun- 
cilor Shattuck was so well satisfied that he 
agreed to vote for the appropriation. We 
were told that if the appropriation was not 
secured and the new boat obtained, it would 
be necessary to absolutely curtail the harbor 
service. One of the most striking things that 
appealed to me was, so tar as the Long Island 
situation is concerned, that on various oc- 
casions wlien other boats were not available 
in the case of patients dying and their relatives 
wishing to go down and see them, perhaps 
in the early morning, the police boat was the 
only boat available, that it had to be depended 
upon, for instance, to carry the medical staff 
or specialists to and from Long Island, re- 
gardless of the hour when transportation 
rnight be required. That is one of the prin- 
cipal reasons why I shall vote for the ap- 
propriation, which both the old and the new 
commissioners consider very necessary, and 
which they have greatly desired to have. 

The order was passed, yeas 15, nays — Coun. 
Mellen — 1. 



Coun. GALLAGHER in the chair. 



amendment thereof or in addition thereto, 
the amounts set forth lin the list of allo-wances 
hereto annexed, for the month of January, 
1937, of aid to soldiers and sailors and their 
families residing in the City of Boston or 
having a settlement thei-ein, be hereby approved 
and paid until otherwise ordered unless the 
person named shall previously become ineligible 
to receive said aid. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



SOLDIERS' RELIEF. 

Coun. KERRIGAN offered the following: 
Ordered, That under the provisions of 
chapter 115 of the General Laws, and acts in 



INFORMATION RE DEPARTMENTAL 
REORGANIZATION. 

Coun. GALLAGHER offered the following : 

Ordered, That the Mayor be, and hereby is, 
requested to require the following information 
of all city departmenit heads and to transmit 
such information by March 1'5, 1937, to the 
City Coumcil for use in lits study of depart- 
mental reorganization : 

Information up to January 1. 1937, similar 
to that required by the Mayor's Circular Letter 
No. 11 of June 22, 1934, relative to (1) In- 
ternal Departmental Organization, (2) Kind 
and Volume of Work, (3) Personnel, (4) 
City Property and (5) General. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



JURORS DRAWN. 

Jurors were drawn as follbws, under the 
law, Coun. PETER J. FITZGERALD presiding 
at the box in the absence of the Mayor, viz. : 

Seventy-three traverse jurors, Superior Crim- 
inal Court, to appear Febmary 1, 1937 : 

William H. Bennett, Ward 1 ; Henry Delorey, 
Ward 1 ; Arthur J. Hedrington, Ward 1 ; Jef- 
frey E. Landry, Ward 1 ; Albert F. Puzzo, 
Ward 1 ; William L. Richardson, Ward 1 : 
John T. Scannell, Ward 1 ; William J. 
Benner, Ward 2 ; John H. McCarthy, 
Ward 3; James E. O'Keeffe, Ward 3; 
George Armstrong, Ward 4 ; Jamas E. 
Henderson, Ward 4 ; Duncan MacFarlane, 
Ward 4 ; Chester E. Bonney, Ward 5 ; John 

E. Kennedy, Ward 5 ; William Davis, Ward 6 ; 
Thomas L. MacLean, Ward 6 ; Patrick M. 
Bresnahan, Ward 7 ; Patrick L. Connolly, Ward 
7 ; Charles D. Jones, Ward 9 ; William Kobs, 
Ward 10 ; William J. Langdon, Ward 10 ; 
Joseph McEneany, Ward 10 ; John J. McKeom, 
Ward 10; Thomas F. Reddish, Ward 10; Wil- 
liam H. Thompson, Ward 10 ; Norman E. 
Johnson, Ward 11 ; Philip M. Higgins, Ward 
12 ; William G. Lewis, Ward 12 ; Harold E. 
Barron, Ward 13 ; Alexander F. Hastie, Ward 
13 ; Edward Jennings, Ward 13 ; William 
Newman, Ward 13, Abraham Rosenberg, 
Ward 13 ; Daniel E. Cowan, Ward 14 ; Harry 
Esterman, Ward 14 ; Joseph F. Garrity, Ward 
14 ; Harold A. Moore, Ward 14 ; Walter C. 
Rice, Ward 14 ; Hyman Rosenberg, Ward 14 ; 
Thomas J. Sperling, Ward 14 ; Michael W. 
CoBtello, Ward 15 ; James F. Cunning, Ward 
15 ; Benjamin F. Draper, Ward 15 ; Albert 
Daniel Hughes, Ward 15 ; Alexander J. Smith, 
Ward 15 ; William Bauer, Jr., Ward 16 ; John 
P. O'Donnell, Ward 16 ; Bertram C. Arey, 
Ward 17; Daniel J. Casey, Ward 17; Frank 
J. DeSisto, Ward 17 ; Thomas Gillespie, Ward 17 ; 
Cecil Scudder. Ward 17 ; Lewis Buhlman, Ward 
18 : Victor Feinberg, Ward 18 ; Frederic S. HiU, 
Ward 18 ; Erfic O. A. Johnson, Ward 18 : Ed- 
ward J. Leonard, Ward 18 ; John F. Ryan, 
Ward 18 ; Thomas Coulter, Ward 19 ; David 
J. McCarthy, Ward 19 ; Joseph A. Mulkern, 
Ward 19 ; Roderique F. Soule, Ward 19 ; Walter 
W. Wentworth, Ward 19 ; Bernard F. Wucher, 
Ward 19 ; Johin P. Curley, Ward 20 ; Ernest 
C. Eaton, Ward 20 ; Irving Allman, Ward 21 ; 
Herman Brightman, Ward 21 ; Fred R. Elkins, 
Ward 21 ; Frederick Meyei-s, Ward 21 ; Thomas 

F. Clark, Ward 22 ; George J. FarreU, Ward 22. 

Seventy-one traverse jurors, Superior Civil 
Court, to appear February 1, 1937 : 

Dominic L. Bonugli, Ward 1 ; Charles Com- 
marata. Ward 1 ; Thomas M. Fahey, Ward 1 ; 
Theodore W. Maloney, Ward 1 ; Horatio J. 
Nelson, Ward 1 ; Edward Clafferty, Ward 2 ; 
Frank J. Ferry, Ward 2 ; Edwin C. Leighton, 
Ward 2 ; John Sullivan, Ward 2 ; Walter H. 
Lockman, Ward 3 ; John W. Barker, Ward 4 ; 
Edward Ingle, Ward 4 ; John V. Neary, Ward 
4 ; Harris :S. Shaw, Ward 4 ; George H. True, 
Ward 4 ; Sylvester Francis Murray, Ward 5 ; 
Edward White, Ward 5 ; Hugh Whitney, Ward 
5 ; WiUiam J. Fern, Ward 8 ; Joseph M. 
Brickley, Ward 10; James J. Brown, Ward 10; 
Frank A. Allen, Ward 11; Augustus DeCoste, 
Ward 11 ; Michael J. Leonard, Ward 11 : 
Charles F. Matthews, Ward 11 : Michael Murray, 
Ward 11 : John L. Pink, Ward 11 ; Percy 
Sharpe, Ward 11; Walter J. Smith, Ward 11; 
James B. Trefry, Ward 11 ; Thomas F. Har- 
rington, Ward 12 ; Thomas J. Mee, Ward 12 ; 
Francis M. Ott, Ward 12; Herbert M. Cady, 



Jan. 16 



CITY RECORD 



77 



Ward 13 ; Arbhuir C. England, Waxd 13 ; 
Herbert M. Waugh, Ward 13 ; James J. Curley, 
Ward il4 ; John J. McCarron, Ward 14 ; Stew- 
art P. Burke, Ward 15; Noirwood R. Hazen, 
Ward 15 ; Richard D. Landers, Ward 15 ; Finley 
B. Murdock, Ward 15 ; Thomas Russell, Ward 
15 ; Alfred E. Sutherland, Ward 15 ; Joseph L. 
Walker, Ward 15 : Joseph F. Whitford, Ward 
15 ; John J. (Murphy, Ward IG ; Edward L. 
Powers, Ward 16 ; Edward H. Bryant, Ward 
17; James F. Burke, Ward 17; Ray P. Ells, 
Ward 17 ; Ctornelius J. Flynn, Ward 17 ; 
Thomas K. Foster, Ward 17 ; Joiin Perry, 
Ward 17 ; Alexander J. Sutherland, Ward 17 ; 
Franklin L. MOIer, Ward 18; Winfield O. 
Tripp, Ward 18 ; Henry W. Gebhardt, Ward 
19; John J. Gorrrfey, Ward 19; John Humter, 
Ward 19 ; John Kast, Ward 19 ; Harold Lougee, 
Ward 19 ; Fiinlay J. iMiacKinnon, Ward 19 ; 
Samuel D. Knowlton, Ward 20 ; Daniel J. 
McDonlald, Ward 20; Patrick Waters, Ward 
20; William J. Hurd, Ward 21; William 
Shepherd, Ward 21 ; Frank J. Taylor, Ward 
21 ; Patrick W. Birogie, Ward 22 ; James 
Holian, Waird 22. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON CLAIMS. 

Cown. SELVITELLA, for the Committee on 
Claims of 1936, submitted the followimg report: 

1. The iCommittee on Claims respectfully 
submdt the fdlloiwing report showing ithe disposi- 
tion of claims dui^ine the mun'icapal year 1936 : 

Claims pending January 1, 1936 1,060 

Claims received during 19i36 618 

Claims approved during 1936 74 

Claims diisapproved during 1936 361 

Reimbursements (suits agalinst ciity em- 
ployees) 29 

Amount paiid out oto' reim- 
bursements $7,007.96 

Amount paid out on ap- 
proved claims 3,029.16 



Ttotal amount paid out ooi claims $10,037.12 

Claims pending December 31, 1936 1,214 

For the Committee, 
Henry Selvitella, Chairman. 
Report accepted. 

2. Report on petition of Charles A. O'Dowd 
(referred December 7, 1936) (to be reimbursed 
for amouint of judgment issued against him 
on account of his acts as operator of motor 
apparatus beloinging to Fire Department — 
recomtaending passage of accompanyimg order, 
viz. : 

Ordered, That the sum of six hundred 
twenty-two dollars amd eighty cen.ts ($622.80) 
be allowed iand paid to Charles A. O'Dowd 
in reimbursement for amount of judgment 
issued against him O'n ^account of his acts as 
operator of motor apparatus belonging to the 
Fire Departmenit, said sum to be charged to 
the Reserve Fund. 

The report was accepted and the order passed. 



TRANSFERS OF FUNDS SINCE 
DECEMBER 15, 1936. 

Couin. MELLEN offered the followiing : 

lOrdered, That the Auditi'ng Department 
furnish the Ciity iCouncil, wiithim one week 
from Ithe p^sage of this order, a complete 
list of all transfers of funds Which have been 
made between departments and within de- 
partmental items, since December 15, 1936. 

Coun. (MELLBN — Mir. President, I am in- 
terested in this order because I think it will 
he very interestiing amd somewhat enlightening 
to see the transfers that have gone through 
wilthout the approval of the City Council since 
December 15. 

The order was passe<l under suspension of 
the rule. 



PATRONAGE ACTIVITIES OF ELECTION 
COMMISSIONER. 

Coun. MiELLEN offered the following : 
Oi-dered, That the Finance Commission be 
requested to investigate the fimancial drain on 
the City of Boston because of the time spent 
and the attention given to patronage activities 
by the chairman of ithe Election Commission 
which time and attention should be devoted 
exclusively to his duties as chairman of the 
Election Commlission. 

Referre<l to the Executive Committee when 
appointed. 



REMOVAL OF CITY OONSTABLES. 

Coun. MELLEN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Boston City Council re- 
quest his Honor the Mayor to show cause for 
the removal of Thomas L. Gallagher and Ed- 
ward J. Potter, formerly city constables. 



Chairman GALLAGHER— The order will be 
referred to the Executive Committee when 
appointed. 

Coun. MELLEN — Mr. President, I have in- 
troduced this order with no hope of having the 
Mayor explain why he did this, although it 
is self-evident. Two young men upon whom 
depend two to eight people ai^iece for their 
living have been put on the street merely 
because, exercising my right as a member of 
the City Council, I voted as I saw fit. If 
that is the way he wants to attack me, let it 
stand in that way. 

Coun. WILSON— Mr. President, possibly I 
should mind my own business on this particu- 
lar subject, but I do wish to rise and point 
out the fact that various members of the 
Council during 1936 protested strongly against 
the appointment of seventy-odd so-called city 
constables, so appointed in order to get around 
civil service clerical rules. There were some- 
thing like twice as many of these appointees 
to patronage jobs put in by the present Mayor 
as by former Mayor Curley, and I cannot 
resist the comment that the firing of three 
or four dozen of these constables merely be- 
cause of the apparent failure of their patrons 
to vote just as the Mayor wished is certainly 
another certification of the correctness of the 
charges made when the seventy-one were ap- 
pointed. I certainly trust, in line with the 
Mayor's inauguration speech, if we can call 
it that, wherein he expresses his desire for 
economy where it can properly be effected, 
that there shall not be this year the appoint- 
ment of seventy or eighty constables in viola- 
tion of the true spirit of the civil service law. 

The order was referred to the Executive 
Committee when appointed. 



BOSTON RECIPIENTS OF CHARITY. 

Coun. MELLEN offered the following: 

Ordered, That Mayor Frederick W. Mans- 
field be requested by the City Council to shov7 
cause and give reason why he is aligned and 
unjustly prejudiced against the unfortunate 
recipients of charity in the City of Boston. 

Chairman GALLAGHER— The Chair will 
rule the order out of order. 

Coun. MELLEN— Mr. Chairman, I ask 
unamimous consent to make a statement. 

Chairman GALLAGHER— If there is no ob- 
jection, the gentleman may proceed. 

Coun. MELLEN^Mr. Chairman, a few 
weeks ago the officers of the Welfare League 
of Boston, previously known as the Welfare 
Recipients' League, asked me what had be- 
come of the orders I introduced in regard to 
their condition. One of the orders called for 
their being entitled to the maximum relief 
with four days instead of five days' work in 
the week. That order is still on the Mayor's 
desk. The other order asked that they should 
receive a $5 grocery order this past Christmas, 
and that order is also on the Mayor's desk. 
They have since sent me an open letter, which 
I will read for the purposes of incorporation 
in the record. (Coun. Mellen here read the 
letter referred to, which was subsequently 
excluded from the minutes.) 

Coun. AGNEW — Mr. President, inasmuch as 
the order introduced by the councilor was 
ruled out of order by the Chair, I move that 
this communication be not allowed to be 
printed in tlie records. 

Coun. JOHN I. FITZGERALD— Mr. Chair- 
man, I hope Councilor Agnevir's motion pre- 
vails. 

Chairman GALLAGHER — The order has 
been ruled out, and Councilor Agnew moves 
that the letter read a moment ago by Coun- 
cilor Mellen be expunged from the records. 

Coun. Agnew's motion was carried. 

Coun. JOHN I. FITZGERALD— Mr. Chair- 
man, I did not object to the remarks made 
by the councilor from Charlcstown, but I do 
want to say emphatically that any statement 
made by any committee or anybody to the 
effect that Mayor Mansfield was responsible 
for anything such as he is charged with here 
today is a deliberate falshood. I want to say 
in fairness to Mayor Mansfield that when ho 
went to Europe and left the affairs of his 
office in my hands ho made no reservation 
whatever. He left the city in the hands of 
the Acting Mayor to meet every situation that 
came up. No such statements were made 
and no such action as has been referred to 
here was taken. The matter was referred 
to the Public Welfare Board. The Mayor was 
entirely innocent and knew nothing more than 
I did about the whole affair. I think it is 
extremely unfair that any such statement 
should be made here, and that the Mayor 
should be held responsible. I know, too, that 
I never said anything of the kind. These 
men were asked, first, where they lived, if they 
wore citizens and who they were. I asked 
one of the parties why ho was on welfare, 
why he was not on W. P. A. He said he 
was not interested in W. P. A., that he 
wanted to bo employed under city welfare. 



He said he lived on Concord street, and I 
think, although I have forgotten all the cir- 
cumstances, that that was looked up and he 
could not be found. But the Mayor knew 
nothing about it, and I think it is extremely 
unfair that he should be attacked this way 
when he was far distant and knew nothing 
whatever about the matter, anyway. I cer- 
tainly think it is unfair and unjust. 

Coun. MELLEN — 'Mr. President, in answer 
to the last Sipeaker I would like to say just 
a word. 

Chaiirmam GALLAGHER — The councilor can 
speak with unanimoois consent. 

Couin. MELLEN — Mr. President, if whaJt the 
laist speaker has said is true I cannot see how 
he has any valid objection to incorporating 
the entire lettor that I have here from the 
Welfare Leauue in our record, so that it may 
be a matter of official record in case of future 
dispute. This letter says that "Acting Mayor 
Fitzgerald informed the representative of this 
League that 'this ruling was drafted at the 
imtetiigation of Mayor Frederick W. iMansfield 
with the express intention that the ruling 
should be put iinto effect by the Welfare au- 
thoirities while the Mayor was in Europe.' " I 
think, in all fairness to the Welfare League, 
that that statement, at least, should go into 
the records of the City Council. 



WEST ROXBURY ELEVATED SERVICE. 

Coun. FINLEY offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Trustees of the Boston 
Elevaibed Railway Company be requested, 
throiugh his Honor the Mayor, to extend the 
service iniow given on the Weld street. West 
iRoxbury, bus line so as to include Pomfret 
street, Corey street. Centre street, and Maple 
street to Weld street. 

Coun. FINLEY— Mr. President, the Boston 
Elevated is now rendering a very fine service 
to the residemts of the West Roxbury section 
by dnsitalling the bus line on Weld street. I 
Suggest, through this order, that the line be 
extended to cover the other streets I have re- 
ferred to — ^Pomfirelt street, Ciorey street. Centre 
street and Maple street to Weld street, because 
I believe such an extension of the service 
will be of material benefit to the merchants 
and the public in West Roxbury. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



CORRECTION OF LIEN ACT. 

Coun. WILSON offered the following: 

Ordered, That, in view of the advices of the 
Comm.issioner of Public Worlcs contained in 
the City Council Minutes of December 28, 
1936, the Corporation Counsel be requested, 
through his Honor the Mayor, to at once 
draft and file such form of proposed legisla- 
tion as shall correct the present lien act ac- 
cepted by the City Council on September 
11 192-3 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, of course it 
becomes periodically necessary for the City 
Collector to make drives for the collection 
of unipaid water bills, which, because of the 
shut-off provision, when utiMzed, throws all 
the resulting suffering from failure to pay 
the bills on the tenant and not on the owner 
of the property. During the past ten years or 
more members of the Ck>unoil, includinE my- 
self, have urge<l that the City Collector and 
the city authorities, instead of punishing the 
poor unfortunate .tenant by shutting off his 
water Ibeoause some smart landlord does not 
pay his wate'r bill year after year, get after 
the owner or the landlord. So in this order 
I rciiuest the Corporation Counsel, through 
the Mayor, to di-i;ift and file some such form of 
propose<l legisl.iltion iis shall correct the present 
lien act aix'epte<l by the City Council in 1923. 
The difficulties now arising in connection with 
the collection ot unpaid water rates under 
the lion act are sdt forth by CV>mmissioner 
Ciirven in a mcssace which appears on page 
403 of the City Council Minutes, and unless 
there is some change made in the provisions 
of the act as it now stands, the present 
s>-stem of dealing witli unpaid \«itor rates will 
go on for the next twelve months. 1 believe 
the true intent of the -aet should be carried 
out, as evidently is not now the case, and, 
with the new Legislature coming in, this 
seoms to l>e the opiH>rtune time to introtluco 
a bill which will clean up the lien statute 
and make it easy for the City of lUwton in 
other yejvrs to cnfoive the lien on the prv>perty 
if the wat«rr bills are not paid, so that no 
city ollWi.'ul may find it ntvcssary to shut off 
the water frvni the tenants. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 



1937 POLICE LISTING. 

Coun. WILSON offered tlie followinE: 
Ordertxl, That the Police Commissioner 



78 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 16 



be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, — on all requests from the Election 
Department for a check-up of police listings 
for the registration of voters, — to instruct 
all police officers personally to verify in each 
case the alleged residence as of January 1, 
1937, and to require the alleged resident to 
certify as to residence, over his own signature, 
in the presence of a police officer. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, in order that 
what I mean by that order be clear, I will 
state that it is a distinct disappointment to 
me to see the current police listing which 
starts this week being carried out apparently 
in about the same manner in which it has 
been carried out in past years. Those of us 
interested in a clean voting list of course 
feel that the place to start is with the police 
list, and we had hoped that this year the 
annual police listing might be made in a 
better and more efficient way. I appreciate 
the fact that we have had some recent changes 
in the high personnel of the Police Depart- 
ment, and that it would be quite natural for 
the department to proceed in the way in which 
it has proceeded in the past. It is not too 
late, however, to make an improvement in the 
police listing. We have seen in the news- 
papers the form of card which it is proposed 
to use this year for the purpose of the police 
listing at each dwelling, a card on which some- 
body into whose possession it comes will in 
his own handwriting write the names of the 
pesons whom he says slept there on the night 
of January 1, 1&37. I do hope that at least as 
one step in the right direction they vrW re- 
quire each person whose name is on the card 
picked up by the police officer to sign his 
own name, because I think the present sys- 
tem of allowing anybody to file a list of names 
gf those sleeping in the house on the night 
of January 1 is a farce, in proper govern- 
ment of the city, when it comes to allowing 
such haphazard registration for purposes of 
suffrage as against persons who reaUy live 
at certain places and who are really entitled 
to vote from those places. Therefore, I have 
suggested a check-up through the police list- 
ing for registration, instructing police officers 
personally to verify the alleged residence as 
of January 1 and requiring the alleged resident 
to certify his residence over his own signature, 
in the presence of the officer. Proper time is 
allowed, of course, under the law, to do this. 
The suggestion is not a reform measure. There 
is nothing novel or original about it. I have 
no pride of authorship. I understand that 
the system prevails in Chicago, bad as it is 
in more ways than one, — that the signatures 
of those who are police listed are recorded, 
and on the voting day, I am informed, the 
signature of each prospective voter is avail- 
able at the voting booth, to be duplicated 
by the voter before he casts his ballot. _ So 
apparently even a city of the type of Chicago 
takes this precaution. Now, the reason why 
I have introduced the order at this time is 
this. I understand that the police are now 
taking the police listing, as usual, and feel 
that it would be well for them to observe 
this additional proper precaution. They are 
not required to finish this thing right up in 
a few days. I hope the captains will notify 
them that under the statute, twenty days are 
allowed, that they do not have to try to make 
the record within three or four days, and that 
even an additional time is allowed, if neces- 
.sary. We can all appreciate the situation at 
present. In Division 9, for instance, where 
I am informed that there over 100,000 names 
listed, while an officer may try to make a 
good record and get his report in quickly to 
headquarters, it must be evident to the Po- 
lice Commissioner that it is not physically 
possible to list 100.000 names in three or four 
days. The Police Department should take the 
full twenty days allowed by the law and, if 
necessary, the additional ten days that are 
permitted under the law. Of course, I have 
in mind all the time the usual procedure 
whereby after the start of the year the old 
crew of floating voters in this city come into 
the Election Department to register, giving 
new addresses, and the Election Department 
.sends to the division station for an O. K. on 
the police listing. Therefore, it becomes im- 
portant that there should be some more ac- 
curate way of dealing with the matter. I re- 
alize that the new commissioner has been 
handicapped in starting on a matter like this 
right off, but I do urge that he see that the 
officei-s going around do get this additional 
check-up, so that when the Election Depart- 
ment wishes a verification as to the men or 
women on tlie list there may be more validity 
to the police list than there is at the present 
time. That v,rill be the case if the precautions 
urged in this particular order are taken. 

The order was passed under suspension of 
the rule. 

Adjourned at 4.03 p. m., on motion of Coun. 
DOWD, to meet on Monday, January 11, 1937, 
at 2 p. m. 



SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT CON- 
STRUCTION ON THE INCREASE. 

Owing to the economic conditions pre- 
vailing during the past year, there wae 
but a relatively small volume of sewage 
treatment plant construction. Within 
recent months, however, there has been 
a decided impetus to new construction 
of this type growing out of the 
Public Works Administration allotments. 
Nearly 700 cities have received allot- 
ments of funds from the P. W. A. for 
sewerage or sewage treatment, involving 
an aggregate expenditure of well over 
8200,000,000. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



To Roofing Contractors. 

The Superintendent of Construction of the 
Department of School Buildings of the City 
of Boston invites sealed proposals for a^oofing 
^ivork, etc., at the J. W. Howe School, Dale 
street, Roxbury, Mass., and giving bond bf a 
surety company satisfactory to the Superin- 
tend anit of Construction therefor in the full 
amount of the conitract price. Only proposals 
obtained sit the office of the Superinteindemt of 
Construction, 28 Norman street, Boston, Mass., 
siigned by the bidder and left before 2 p. m., 
Monday, January 25, 1937, at said office, with 
a certified check for $500, payable to the city 
if the proposal is not carried out, will then 
•and there be publicly opened and read. The 
proposal shall be made in duplicate, the one 
with the check to be submitted as indiciaited 
above, the other to be deposited iwith the City 
Auditor, Oity Hall, previous to the time named 
for lapeming proposals. The rate per hour 
of the wages to be paid mechanics, teams'ters, 
chauffeujs amd laborers in the work to be per- 
formed under the contract shall not h& less 
than the rate of 'vrsiges in the schedule deter- 
mined by the 'Ctoim mission er of Labor and In- 
dustries of the Commonwealth, a copy of which 
schedule is annexed to the form of contract 
referred to herein. Copies of said schedules 
may be obtained, "without cost, upon applica- 
tion therefor at the office of the iSuperintendent 
of Constructiom. The Superintendent of Con- 
struction reserves the right to reject any or 
all proposals. A deposit of a certified check 
in the sum of $25 will be required in order to 
procure a complete set of plans and specifica- 
tions. This deposit shall be returned to all but 
the successful bidder, providing that all plans 
and specifications are returned to this office 
prior to 12 o'clock noon bf Monday, February 
1, 1937, otherwise said deposit shall be for- 
feited. 

Wm. W. Drummey, 

(Jan. 16.) Superintendent of Constructioyi. 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE 
CITY OF BOSTON. 



Administration Building, 15 Beacon Street, 
Office of the Business Manager. 



Proposals "for Rebinding Books for the 
Boston Public Schools. 

The School Committee of the City of Bos- 
ton invites bids on rebinding approximately 
40,000 books. Proposal forms are obtainable 
at the office of the Business (Manager of the 
School Committee, tenth floor, 15 Beacon street. 
Envelopes contaiTuimg pr'oposals mjust be sealed 
and plainly marked "Proposal for Reblndimg 
Books." The bid must be in duplicate. One 
copy signed by the bidder and accompainiied by 
a certified check for $100, payable to the City 
of Bos'ton, must be left at the office oi the 
Business Manager on or before 12 o'clock m. 
on Tuesday, January 26, 1537. Copies filed 
with the Business Manager will be publicly 
opened and read at 12 o'clock m. of the day 
stated. The other coq^y, abo signed by the 
bidder, must be filed wiith the 'City Auditor, 
City Hall, Boston, Mass., previous ito the 
time named for the opening of the bidt. The 
School Committee reserves the right tb reject 
any or all bids and to accept such bid as may 
be deemed best for the interests of the city. 
The successful bidder will be required to 
furnish a bond for not less than 50 per cent 
of the estimated amount of the contract. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, 
Business Manager of the School Committee. 

(Jan. 16.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Flashlight Equipment. 
The Supply Department of the City of 
Boston invites proposals for furnishing flash- 
light equipment to the various city depart- 
ments. The bidder must use the form of pro- 
posals to be obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent of Supplies, Room 801, City 
Hall Annex, and the successful bidder must 
furnish a bond for one quarter the total esti- 
mated amount of the bid with a surety com- 
pany authorized to do business in Massachu- 
setts as surety for the faithful performance of 
the contract. There will be a charge of twenty 
cents ($0,20) for each blank proposal taken 
out. The bid, with a certified check for $100, 
payable to and to become the property of 
the City of Boston if the proposal is not 
carried out, must be left at the office of 
the Superintendent of Supplies, before 12 m., 
Friday, Jajnuary 29, 1937, at which time and 
place they will be publicly opened and read. 
A duplicate bid, without check, must be left 
at the office of the City Auditor prior to the 
time named for opening bids. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any lor all bids or any part of a bid, and to 
award the contract as he deems for the best 
interests of the city. All contracts made sub- 
ject to appropriaJtions to meet paymen'ts there- 
under. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 16.) Superintendent of Supplies. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 



Changes in Traffic Regulations. 
Voted, That the Revised Traffic Rules and 
Regulatibns of the 'Oity of Boston, as adopted 
by the Boston Traffic Commission on October 
31. 1935, and on November 6, 1935, are 
amended as follows, effective January 25, 1937: 
Section 8, Part 2, is amended by striking 
out the following : 

Brattle iStreet, Downtown Boston. 
South side, from Adams square to Scollay 
square, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Hyde Park Avenue, Hyde Park. 

Bast side, from Oak street to Winthrbp 
stredt, trwenty-four hours. 
River Street, Hyde Park. 

iSouth side, from Business street to Maple 
street, twenty-four hours. 
Tremont iStreet, Do^vntbw^n Boston. 
West side, from a point two hundred (200) 
feet north of Boylston street to Park 
street, live parking, 7 a. m. 'to 6 p. m. 
West side, ftom Park street to Scollay 
square, twenty^four hours. 
Section 8, Port 2, as amended by adding the 
following : 

Adams Street, Dorchester. 

West side, from Dickens sitreeit to Dor- 
chester avenue, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Alford iStreet, CharlesBown. 

East ^ide, from ©exter street to a point 
one hundred and fifty (150) feet south 
of Dexter street, twenty-four hours. 
Arch Street, Downtown Boston. 

East side, from Milk street to Bummer 
street, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Brattle Street, Downtown Boston. 

North side, from Adams square to Scollay 
square, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Devonshire Street, Downtown Boston. 

East side, from Adams square to State 
street, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Franklin Street, Downtown Boston. 

North side, from Washington streeit to 
Hawley street, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Hawley Street, DowTitown Boston. 

East side, from Milk street to Summer 
street, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Hyde Park Avenue, Hyde Park. 

East side, from Oak street to River street, 
twenty-four hours. 
River Street, Hyde Park. 

South side, fi-om Business street to Hyde 
Park avenue, twenty-four hours. 
Robimwood Avenue, West Roxbury. 

North side, from Centre street to a point 
four hundred and fifty (450) feet east 
of Centre street, twenty-four hours. 
Inner side, circular poi'tion of street, 
twenty-four hoxirs. 
Tremont Street, DoAvntown Boston. 

West side, from a point two hundred 
(200) feet north of Boylston street to 
opposiito Temple place, live parking, 7 
a. m. to 6 p. m. 
West side, from opposite Temple place 
to Scollay square, twenty-four hours. 
■Section 35 is amended by adding the follow- 
ing: 
Stuart Street. 

Into Tremont street, northerly. 
Into Trembnlt street, southerly. 

William P. Hickey, 
(Jan. 16-23.) Commissioner. 



Jan. 16 



CITY RECORD 



79 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



GEORGE ROBERT WHITE FUND. 

December 29, 1936. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 
My dear Mr. Mayor. — On October 3, 1936, 
the City of Boston as it is Trustee under the 
FV>urteenth Clause of the Will of George Robert 
White, entered in'to a contract with the Cod- 
main HiW Construction Oompany for water- 
proofiing of the basements in the premises 
numbered 190-192 aind 194-200 Boylston street, 
Boston, and the contract was approved and 
signed by four of the Trustees of the George 
Robert White Fund. 

After work was started i.n the above men- 
tioned premises unforeseen developemeuts ap- 
peared, suc-h as defective pile tops, defective 
underpin'ning, shoring and other incidental 
work that .necessitated the combraotor to no- 
tify the owners of the dangerous conditibn of 
the walls and foundations of the premises 
where the waterproofing work was being done. 
A conference was held at the prem.ises in 
question and was attended by Mr. Roswell 
G. iHall. Manager of the Real Estate of the 
Fund : Mr. George L. DriscoH, .Secretary in 
the office of the Fund and a representative 
of the CodmaTi HiU Construction Company, and 
the fbllowinu as a full description of the con- 
ditions they found to exist in the premises: 

The above mentioned buildings are carried 
on piles capped with granite, on which rest 
the brick walls of these buildings. Due to the 
lowering in the ground water leveil in this 
sectiton of Boston, the tops of the piles were 
left exposed to the air, bringing about great 
deterioration and dry rot. In some cases 
these piles were found to have no carrying 
value, which condition has caused the walls 
to settle and become badly cracked. In one 
particular case the orack in the brick wall 
extended from the basement to the top of the 
third story of the buildiTig. There are also 
several bad cracks throughout the building, and 
all rooms fronting on Boylston street are so af- 
fected and badly sagged, due to this condition, 
that they are more than | inch to a foot off 
level, which niakes it impossible to properly 
close the dtooi^ amd windows in the building. 

With conditions as outlined aJbove it was 
impossible to proceed with the waterproofing 
*vork until siboring tof the buildings, removing 
of defective pile tops and placing of new 
underpinninlg work are done, as the ccmtinued 
settlement of the buildings %vill crack the 
waterproofing concrete, rendering it useless. 

Owing to the conditions as outlined above 
it is my judgment that it will take approxi- 
mately five addiitional imonthis and an addi- 
tional expenditure not exceeding forty-five 
thousand dollars to make these buildings safe 
and to properly complete the shoring, under- 
pinning and other necessary and incidental 
work. 

In consideration of the foreg'oing, I (respect- 
fully request permission to amend the con'tract 
dated October 3, 1936, to take care of this 
additional work, in a sum not to exceed forty- 
five thousand dollars on a time and material 
basis, without the usual form of public adver- 
tiaing. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Approved ; 



RoswEa^L G. Hall, 
Manager of the Real Estate. 



Frbdeirick W. Mansfield. 

CkaJrman and Mayor. 

Charles J. Fox, 
John I. Fitzgerald, 
Bentley W. Warren, 
Eliot Wadsworth, 

Trustees of the George Robert White Fund. 

(Jam. 16.) 



CHANGE IN DATE FOR OPENING 
OF BIDS. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



Special Notice to Hardware Contractors. 
Contractors are hereby notified that the 
opening of sealed pttoposials for furmishdng and 
delivering standard lock sobs and parts for 
exterior and Imterior doors of .schoolhouses is 
hereby deferred and the day far opcming of 
bids is extended to 2 o'clock p. m. of Tuesday, 
January 26, 1937, land all of the terms and 
conditions contained in the notice of January 
9. 1937, shall apply to this notice. 

Wm. W. Drummby, 
Superintendent of Co-fU'ttru-ction 
Departmoit of School Buildings. 
(Jan. 16.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



DEPARTMENT OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 



To Electrical Supply Contractors. 

The Superintendent of Construction of the 
Department of iSchooI Buildings of the City 
of Boston invitels sealed p-roposals for furnish- 
ing and delivering baittery material and other 
electrical supplies for departmenital use, to 
the Depai'tment of School Buildings store- 
house, 26 Norman street, Boston, of the 
kind and quality as per specificationB and 
samples on exhibition aJt the Department 
of iSchooQ Buiildings storehouse, 26 Norman 
street, Boston, and giving bond of a surety 
company, satisfactory to the Super^intendemt 
of Construction therefor, in the sum of $1,000. 
Only proposals obtained at the office of the 
Superintetndent Of Construction, 26 Norman 
street, Boston, 'Mass., signed by the bidder and 
left before 2 o'clock p. m., of Monday, February 
1, 1937, at said office, wiith a certified check 
for $500, payable to the city if the proposal 
is not carried out, will then and there be 
publicly opened amd read. The proposal shall 
be made in duplicate, the one with the check 
to be submitted as indicated above, the Other 
to be deposited with the City Auditor, City 
Hall, previous to the time named for open- 
ing proposals. The rate per hour of the ivages 
to be paid meohanics, teamsters, chaAiflfeurs 
and laborers in the work to be performed under 
the contract shall not be less than the rate 
of wages in the schedTile determined by the 
iCommissioner of Labor and Industries of the 
Commonlwealth, a copy of which schedule is 
annexed to the form Of contract referred to 
ti'rei'n. Copies of said schedules may be 
obtained, without cost, upon application there- 
for at the office of the Superintendent of Con- 
str\iotiOn. The Superintendent of Construc- 
ti'on reserves the right to reject any or all 
pixjposals. A deposiit of a certified check in 
the sum of $2'5 will be required in order to 
procure a complete set of specifications, said 
sum to 'be refunded if specifications are re- 
turned prior to nOon of February 15, 1937. 
Mutilation of the specifications will be deemed 
sufficient cause for the forfeiture of the said 
deposit. 

Wm. W. Drummey, 

(Jan. 16.) Superintendent of Construction. 



OITY OF BOSTON. 



iSUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Industrial and Mbdioinal 
Gases. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furnishing dndiusitrial 
and medicinal gases to the vairious city de- 
partments. The bidder must use the form of 
pr'oposal to be Obtained at the office of the 
Superintendent Of ISupplies. Room SO'l, City 
Hall Annex, and the successful bidder must 
furnish a bond for one quarter the total es- 
timated amount Of the bid with a surety com- 
pany authorized to do business in Massachu- 
setts as siurety for the faithful performance 
of the contract. There will he a charge of 
twenty cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bid, wiith a certified check 
for $200, payable to and to become the prop- 
erty of the Oity of .Boston if the ipropoeal is 
not carriied out, must be left at the office of 
the Supenintondant of iSupplies, before 12 m., 
Wednesday, January 27, 1937, at which time 
and place ithey w'ill be publicly opened and 
read. A dujplicate bid, without check, must be 
left at the office of the City Auditor prior to 
the time named for opening bids. The Super- 
intedent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or any part of a bid, and to 
award the con'tract as he deems for the best 
interests Of the city. All contracts made sub- 
ject to apprt>priatioinB to meet payments there- 
under. 

D. Frank Dohbrty, 

(Jain. 16.) Superinten^lcnt of Supplies. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 



a83e880r8' notice to taxpayers. 
City Hall Annex, 
Boston, January 1, 1937. 
Returns must be made on or before January 3t, 
19S7, instead of February 15 as in last year. 

Piirticuliir attention is called to the •■Vssessors' 
notice posted upon City Hall and various other 
places throughout the city relative to niakinR 
returns on personal property subject to taxation. 
Edward T. Kelly, 
Timothy W. Mcrphy, 
John P. O'Hearn, 

.[ssessors of Boston. 
(Jan. 2-9-16-23-30.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing, Bank Gravel and 

Sand. 

The Supply Department of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for furniishinc bank 
gravel and sand to the various city depart- 
ments until December 31, 1937, deliveries to 
be made as required. The bidder must use 
the form of iptoposal to be obtained at the 
office of the Superintendent of Supplies, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, and the successful bid- 
der must furnish a 'bond for one quarter the 
total estimated amount of the contract with a 
surety company authorized to do business in 
Massachusetts as surety for the faithful per- 
formance of the contract. There wUl be a 
charge of twenty-five cents ($0.25) for each 
set of blank provosaUi taken out. Bids, -with 
a certified check for $200, payable to and to 
become the property of the City of Boston if 
the proposal is not carried out, must be left 
at the above office before Thursday, January 
28, 1937. at 12 m.. at which 'time and place 
they will be publicly opened and read. A 
duplicate bid, without check, must be left 
at the office of the City Auditor prior to the 
time named for opening bids. The Super- 
intendent of Supplies reserves the right to 
accept or reject any or all proposals, or any 
part of a proposal, and to award the contract 
as he deems for the best interests of the city. 
All contracts made subject to appropriations 
to meet payments thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 16.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES DEPARTMENT. 



Notice. 
In compliance with provisions of section 41, 
chapter 98, of the General La'ws of Massa- 
chusetts, as amended by chapter 32 of the Acts 
of 19213, I hereby give notice to all inhabitants 
or persons having usual places of business in 
Boston using weighing or measuring deNices 
for the purpose of buying or sdling goods, 
wares or merchandise, for public weighing or 
for hire or reward, to bring in such weighing 
and measuring devices to be tested, adjusted 
and sealed. I shall be at the office of Sealer 
of Weiglits and Measures every day during 
regular business 'hours to attend to this duty. 
Jambs A. Sweeney, 
Sealer of Weights ajid Measures. 

105 Oity Hall Annex, Boston. 
Office h'ou're, 9 to 5, except Saturdays, 9 to 12. 
(Jan. 16.) 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Weighing and Vending Ma- 
chines in Ferryhouses. 
The Commissioner of Public Works of the 
Oity of Boston, office 508 City Hall Annex, 
invites proposals frOm citizens of the United 
States and corporations or other legal associa- 
tions wherein the controlling inter^t to the 
e.xtent of at least over one half thereof is 
owned by a citizen or citizens of the United 
States for the pri\-ilege of p^lacing weighinK 
and vending machines in the headhouses of 
the Ferry Dtivision for a term of three years, 
beginning February ,1, 1937, and giving 
a bond approved by the Commissioner. All 
information relative to proposals which the 
bidder himself will furnish can be obtained 
at Room 508, City Hall Annex. The bidder 
will submit a piHice for each machine and 
the Tiiumber to be placed in each headhouse 
and leav« the same at Room 508, fifth floor. 
City Hall Annex, before 12 o'clock m. of 
Friday. January 22, 1937, with a certitied 
check for one hundred ('100) dollars paj'uble 
to and to bo the property of the city if the 
proposal after acceptance, is not carried out. 
The piMpoeals will at said hour and place be 
publicly opened and Tcad. The proposjils 
should bo inclosed in an envelope, sealed .-uid 
marker! "Proposals for Weighing amd Vendinif 
Machines." Proposals must be made in dupli- 
cate, the sealed duplicate, without cheoJv, to 
be deposited by the bidder with the City 
.Auditor proWous to the time named for open- 
ing the proposals. If the price bid appears 
to the CommissTV.>ncr to lie abnormally hish 
or low, it may lead to the rejection of the 
uropos.il containling such price. The under- 
signed reservcB the riurht to reject any or .ill 
proiHJsals or to accept any proiHisal should 
he deem it to be for the lH»t interest of the 
oity *} to do. 

E. M. Richardson, 
(Jan. 16.) CommiMioiKT of Public ^york3. 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY. 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

Room 27, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 1100. 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 
Joseph F. Mellyn, Secretary. 
William C. S. He.\i.ey, Assistant Secretary. 
Cykil G. Cummings, Assistant Secretary. 
John F. Gilmore, Jr., Assistant Secretary. 
Bernard J. Dunn, Assista7it Secretary. 
Thomas E. Gimeno, Assistant Secretary. 
Arthur J. O'Keefe, Assistant Secretary. 
Mary L. Thompson, Assistant Secretary. 
John F. Gilmore, Assistant Secretary and 

Chief Clerk. 
Herbert L. McNary, Chief Licensing Division. 
Joseph Mikolajewski, Assistant. 
Martin J. Conroy, Messenger. 
CITY COUNCIL. 

Ward 1. Henry Selvitella, 80 Orient avenue. 

Ward 2. James J. Mellen, 18 Tremont st. 

Ward 3. John I. Fitzgerald, 7 Allen St. 

Ward 4. George W. Roberts, 20 Hemenway 

Ward 5. Henry L. Shattuck, 15 River st. 
Ward 6. George A. Murray, 223 West 
Second street. 

Ward 7. John E. Kerrigan, 213 West Eighth 

Ward 8. John F. Dowd, 22 Greenville st. 
Ward 9. Richard D. Gleason, 15 Ruggles st. 
Ward 10. John J. Doherty, 67h Wyman st. 
Ward 11. James J. Kilroy, 1301 Columbus ave. 
Ward 12. David M. Brackman, 89 Waumbeck 

Ward 13. Peter J. Fitzgerald, 39 Belfort st. 
Ward 14. Sidney Rosenberg, 576 Blue Hill ave. 
Ward 15. Martin H. Tobin, 70 Westville st. 
Ward 16. John J. McGrath, 2 Glenrose road. 
Ward 17. Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr., 57 
»Codman Hill avenue 

Ward 18. Clement A. Norton, 34 Myopia rd. 
Ward 19. Peter A. Murray, 7 St. John st. 
Ward 20. James F. Finley, 231 Cornell st. 
Ward 21. James E. Aguew, 92 Wallingford rd. 
Ward 22. Edward M. Gallagher, 21 Oak 
Square avenue. 

Clerk of Committees. 
John E. Baldwin, Room 56, City Hall. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

City Messenger. 
Edward J. Leary, Room 55, City Hall. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

ART DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Faneuil Hall. 

Arthur A. Shurcliff, Secretary. 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Edward T. Kelly, Chairman. 
Timothy W. Murphy, Secretary. 
John P. O'Hearn, Principal Assessor. 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 
Room 20, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Charles J. Fox, City Auditor. 
Daniel J. Falvey, Deputy City Auditor. 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOL 

BUILDINGS. 
Richard J. Lane, Chairman; Francis R. 
Bangs ; Leo J. Dunn. 

Department of School Buildiijgs. 
Office, 28 Norman street. Tel. Capitol 5750. 
William W. Drummey, Superintendent of Con- 
struction. 
BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT. 
Frederick H. Fay, Chairman. 30 City Hall. 
Elisabeth M. Hhruhy, Secretary. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 
134 North street. Tel. Capitol 2125. 
William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 

BUDGET DEPARTMENT. 
47 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Francis J. Murray, Commissioner. 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 901 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100 
Edward W. Roemer, Building Commissioner. 
John H. Glover, Acting Clerk of Department. 

Board op Examiners. 
Office. 907 City Hall Annex, Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
J. Fred McNeil, Chairman. 
Mary C. Dowd, Secretary. 

Board op Appeal. 
Office, City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Jambs A. MoElaney, Jr., Secretary. 

CITY CLERK DEPARTMENT. 
Room 31, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, City Clerk. 
John B. Hynes. Assistant City Clerk. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD. 
Room 30, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Fredep.ic H. Fay, Chairman. 
, Secretary. 



CITY RECORD. 

Office, 73 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Forrest P. Hull, Editor. 
Joshua H. Jones, Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent. Room 73, 
City Hall. 

COLLECTING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 200 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
John F. Doherty, City Collector. 
William T. Gartland, Assistant City Collector. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 111 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
David B. SHA^y, Chairman. 
Daniel H. Rose, Commissioner. 
Frederic E. Dowling, Commissioner. 
FR.4.NCiS B. McKinney, Commissioner. 

FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Office, 24 School street. Tel. Lafayette 1622. 
E. Mark Sullivan, Chairmayi. 
Robert E. Cunniff, Secretary. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
Headquarters, Bristol street. South End. Tel. 

Kenmore 1100. 
Wire Division, 103 City Hall Annex. Tel. 

Lafayette 5100. 
Edward F. McLaughlin, Commissioner. 

— , Executive Secretary. 

Samuel J. Pope, Chief of Department. 
Peter F. Dolan, Superintendent of Wire 

Division. 

THE FRANKLIN FOUNDATION. 
Office, Franklin Union, Appleton and Berkeley 

streets. Tel.. Hancock 6590. 
Henry B. Sawyer, President. 
W. B. Russell, Director. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 1107 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
William B. Keeler, M. D., Commissioner. 
Joseph A. Cahalan, Secretary. 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 
City Hospital, 818 Harrison ave., Tel. Ken. 8600. 
Relief Hospital, Haymarket Sq. Tel. Cap. 0753. 
Relief Hospital, East Boston. Tel. E. B. 3600. 
West Department, West Roxbury. 
Sanatorium Division, 249 River st., Mattapan. 

Tel. Blue Hills 7900. 
Joseph P. Manning, President. 
James W. Manary, M. D., Superintendent. 

INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 808-811 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Frederic A. Washburn, M. D., Commissioner. 
Elizabeth G. Nelson, Chief Clerk. 
Child Welfare Division. 
800 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Registration Division. 
Office, Room 5, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Long Island, Hospital Division. 
Long Island, Boston Harbor. Tel. President 

1371. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 
Room 1003, Lawyers Building, 11 Beacon 

street. Tel. Lafayette 6200. 
Henry E. Foley, Corporation Cownsel. 
Margaret G. O'Neill, Secretary. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Library Building, Copley square. Tel. 

Kenmore 1500. 
Louis E. Kirstein, President of Trustees. 
Milton E. Lord, Director. 

LICENSING BOARD. 

Office, 1 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 2470. 
David T. Montague, Chairman. 
Louis Epple, Secretary. 

MARKET DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Quincy Market. Tel. Capitol 5382. 
Frank J. Kiernan, Superintendent. 

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

Men and Women, 25 Church street. Tel. 

Liberty 8607. 
Samuel W. Warren, Director. 

OVERSEERS OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

Office, Charity Building, 43 Hawkins street. 

Tel. Capitol 8320. 
Temporary Home, Chardon street. Tel. Laf. 

2337. 
Wayfarers' Lodge, 30 Hawkins street. Tel. 

Lafayette 3198. 
Jambs A. McMurry, Chairman. 
John C. L. Dowling, Executive Director. 

PARK DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 
WiLLLAM P. Long, Chairman. 
Daniel J. Byrne, Secretary. 

Park, Public Grounds, Bath and Music 

Divisions. 

Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 

Cemetery Division. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 805 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 6100. 
John J. Douglass, Commissioner. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters, 164 Berkeley street. Tel. Ken- 
more 6700. 
Joseph F. Timilty, Commissioner. 
Andrew J. Gorey, Secretary. 
Edward W. Fallon, Superintendent. 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 174 North street. Tel. Lafayette 6363. 
William J. Casey, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1005 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Roswell G. Hall, Superintendent. 
Thomas A. C-4LLAHAn, Chief Clerk. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

Edward M. Richardson, Commissioner. Office 
■ 509 City Hall Anmex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
John J. Connelly, Secretary and Chief Clerk. 
Room 509, City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 6100. 
Bridge and Ferry Division. 
Thomas H. Sexton, Division Engineer. Office, 
602 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Highway Division. 
Joshua Atwood, Division Engineer. Office, 
501 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 
Sanitary Division. 
Adoij"H J. Post, Division Engineer. Office, 
501 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Sewer Division. 
George W. Dakin, Division Engineer. Office, 
701 City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Water Division. 
Daniel M. Sullivan, Division Engineer. Office. 
607 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Water Income Division. 
James A. McMurry, Division Engineer. Office, 
604 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 

REGISTRY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1008 City HaH Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Hilda H. Quibk, Registrar. 

RETIREMENT BOARD. 

Room 65, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, Chairman. 
3. George Herlihy, Secretary. 
William D. Kenny, Executive Officer. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

Office, 15 Beacon street. Tel. Captol 6500. 

Frederick R. Slillivan, Chairman. 

Ellen M. Cronin, Secretary. 

Patrick T. Campbell, Superintendent of 

Schools. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, Business Manager. 

SINKING FUNDS DEPARTMENT. 

Room 20, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Euot Wadsworth, Chairman. 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 60 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 
Charles H. Carey, Commissioner. 

STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 76 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette BIOO. 
Walter A. Murray, Acting Chairman 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Secretary. 

STREET LAYING'OUT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 401 City Hall Annex. 

Commissioners: Owen A. Gallagher, Chair- 
man; Walter A. Murray; Thomas A. Fitz- 
gerald; Cornelius A. Rbardon, Secretary. 

SUFFOLK, COUNTY OF. 

Offices, Court House, Pemberton square. TeL 

Capitol 0351. 
William J. Foley, District Attorney. TeL 

Capitol 9600. 
John A. Keliher, Sheriff. Tel. Capitol 2451, 
W. T. A. Fitzgerald, Register of Deeds. Td. 

Capitol 0519. 
Arthur W. Suluvan, Register of Probate. 

Tel. Capitol 9110. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 801 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
D. Frank Doherty, Superintendent. 

TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1 Beacon st., 7th floor. Tel. Capitol 6860. 
Thomas F. Sullivan, Chairman. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Room 21, City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

John H. Dorsey, Treasurer. 

Arthur F. Swan, Assistant Treasurer. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 105 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 6100. 
James A. Sweeney, Sealer. 



CITY OP boston PEINTINO DBPAETUENT 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affairs. 
Vol. 2y. Saturday, Janxjary 23, 1987. No. 4 

MAYOR MANSFIELD, THROUGH THE CORPORATION COUNSEL, HAS PRE= 
SENTED A NUMBER OF PIECES OF LEGISLATION TO THE GENERAL 
COURT AFFECTING GOVERNMENT FOR THE CITY OF BOSTON — 
AMONG THEM ARE ACTS TO ABOLISH FINANCE COMMISSION, FOR 
ABOLITION OF BOARD OF TAX APPEALS, RE=REGISTRATION OF BOSTON 
VOTERS, TO STUDY COUNTY GOVERNMENT, TO FIX COUNTY BOUND= 
ARY LINES AND TO ESTABLISH TERRITORIAL LIMITS OF METRO- 
POLITAN BOSTON, AND A NUMBER OF OTHERS. 



The following is the Hst of and brief statement concerning legislation petitioned for by the Mayor of 
Boston for 1937. 

I. Public Works. 

A. Boston Elevated Huntington Avenue Extension. 

An Act to Enable the City of Boston to Secure the Benefits of Certain Acts and Joint Resolutions of 

THE Congress of the United States. 
Note. — Petition requests the amendment of existing state law so as to permit the city to engage in a W. P. A. 
project for the extension of the Boston Elevated Subway to Huntington avenue. 

B. Underpass. 

An Act to Provide for the Construction of an Underpass in Commonwealth Avenue At or Near its In- 
tersection with Massachusetts Avenue in the City of Boston. 
Note. — Petition seeks legislation to authorize the city to afford traffic relief at one of the busiest intersections 
in the city. 

C. Court House. 

An Act Authorizing Temporary Borrowing by the City of Boston in Anticipation of Certain Receipts 
FROM THE Commonwealth and from the Federal Government to Meet the Cost of Providing Certain 
Additional Accommodations and Facilities for the Courts and Other Officials in the County of 
Suffolk. 

Note. — Petition seeks legislation to simplify arrangements for financing the new court house by allowing the 

advance of money by the city to the Court House Commission in anticipation of the reimbursement of the city by 

the Commonwealth and Federal Government. 

D. White Fund. 

An Act Authorizing the City of Boston to Charge Admission Fees to Certain Lectures, Contests and 

Exhibitions. 
Note. — Petition seeks legislation to authorize the city to charge admission fees to exhibitions, contests and 
lectures which may take place in works, such as a planetarium, forum, youth center, and auditorium, which maj' be 
erected with the income of the George Robert White Fund. The aim is to assist the city in meeting the cost of the 
care and maintenance of such works. 

II. Airport. 

1. A Resolve Authorizing the Extension of Certain Leases to the City of Boston for Airplane and 

Seaplane Purposes. 
iVo^e.— Petition asks that the Department of Public Works of the Commonwealth, with the approval of the 
Governor and Council, be authorized to extejid for airport and .seaplane purposes the existing leases to the city 
of land in East Boston. An extension of these leases is desired for the proper development of the airport by the 
city. 

2. An Act Providing for an Extension of the Period Within Which the City of Boston May Borrow 

Money for Aiupout Purposes. 
Note. — ^In 1929 the Legislature authorized the city to borrow SI, 250,000 for airport improvements within 
a period of two years. Approxiinat(>ly §1,000, 000 of this amount was borrowed. Legislation is now sought 
authorizing the borrowing of the balance of said sum. This legislation will, if enacted, enable the city to improve 
further the airport properties in conjunction with the Works Progress Administration. 

{Conlinued on page S4.) 



82 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 23 




"O Boston, lair City enthroned like a radiant 

queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship- 

teeming plain of the ocean. 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene. 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotion!" 
From Boston Centenial Poem by 

Nathan Haskel Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly in Boston by the Board of 
Trustees of the Statistics Department of 
the City of Boston;, under the direction of 
the Mayor, in accordance with legislative act 
and city ordinance. 



FORREST P. HULL, Editor, Room 73, City 

Hall. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr., Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City Hall. 

Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription 
Single Copies 



;.00 per year 
10 Cent3 



IN ADVANCE 



STREET AGENCIES 

Old South News-Stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising 

A rate Of §2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 



Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Council Monday, 
January 25, 1937, at 2 p. m. 

A defeiTsd regidar meeting of the School 
Committee of the City of Boston wdl 
be held in the Administration Buildmg, 
15 Beacon street, on Monday, Janu- 
ary 25, 1937, at 6.30 o'clock p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment. Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held on the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 

MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
oflScials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows : 

To THE BOAHD OF StREET COMMIS- 
SIONERS, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways, the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 



for the storage or sale of merchandise in 

public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasoline, oil 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic ways for any permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Tr.u-fic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
ways, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
struction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and oiJal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water charges 
of the city. 

To THE Health Department, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fi^sh and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To THE Board of Paek Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue. Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 



charges made for such service. Applica- 
tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and gymnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fairview and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To THE School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To the Dep.\rtment of School Build- 
ings, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To the Board of Examiners, Room 
1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
struction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To the Statistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To THE Wire Division of the Fire 
Department, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To THE Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY 

For the week ending Jan. 16, 1937. 

Population as of July, 1936, Massa- 
chusetts State Census, 817,713; popula- 
tion estimated, July, 1937, United States 
Census Bureau, 805,192; number of 
deaths (stQlbirths excluded): Residents, 
243; nonresidents, 40; total, 283. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 18.28; nonresidents deducted, 
15.69. 



REPORT. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 

Last week, 16.66; corresponding week 
last year, 15.24. 

Deaths by age periods, sex, etc.: Under 
one year, 24; one year to four years, in- 
clusive, 3; sixtv years and over, 141. 
Total deaths: Male, 151; female, 132; 
deaths in hospitals and institutions, 181; 
deaths of colored, 10. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DEATHS.* 



Diseases. 



Anterior Poliomyelitis 

Diphtheria 

Encephalitis Lethargica 

Influenza 

Measles 

Meningitis Epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet Fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) (childhood type T. B.) 

Tuberculosis (other forms) 

Typhoid Fever 

Whooping Cough 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 16, 1937. 



Cases. Deaths. 



2 

46 

74 

19 

7 

3 

1 

208 



12 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 18, 1936. 



Cases. Deaths. 



66 
4 

68 
1C9 

25 
8 
3 
3 
7 



1 

21 



* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 23 



CITY RECORD 



83 



OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 16, 1937. 



• 


Dependent 
Aid. 


Mothers' 
Aid. 


Old Age 
Assistance. 


Administrative . 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 


Number of active cases last 


15,463 
450 
435 

15,478 

22,058 


1,595 

13 

9 

1,599 

1,591 


8,096 

211 

118 

8,189 

4,404 






25,154 


week. 
Number of cases added 






674 


Numbet of cases discontinued . . 






562 


Number of active cases this 






25,266 
28,053 


week. 
Same week last year . . . 















Financial. 



Expended during week 

Last week 


$103,236 96 
103,899 74 
146,655 48 


$24,142 15 
31,467 74 
24,177 00 


$113,128 13 

9,922 06 

27,349 89 


$16,135 84 
16,130 00 
12,803 73 




$256,643 08 
161,419 54 




Same week last year 




210,986 10 


Appropriations 






Expended to date 


217,973 54 
28,637 06 


55,609 89 
330 00 


229,313 57 


32,265 84 




535,162 84 


Collections from Common- 




28,967 06 


wealth of Massachusetts, 
outside cities and towns and 
refunds. *t 







* Collections on account of Boston City Hospital, $9,627.87. 



t Miscellaneous collections, S69.36. 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULINGS. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, for a trial period of sixty (60) 
days, the Revised Traffic Rules and Reg- 
ulations of the City of Boston, as 
adopted by the Boston Traffic Com- 
mission on October 31, 1935, and on 
November 6, 1935, -are amended as fol- 
lows, effective January 25, 1937. 

Section 8, Part 2, is amended by add- 
ing the following: 
High Street, Downtown Boston. 
Southeast side, from Broad street to 
Summer street, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 

Section 13, Part 1, is amended by strik- 
ing out the following: 
Charles Street. 
Both sides, from Boylston street (o 
Beacon street; vehicles shall be 
pbced with both right wheels to 
the curb or edge of the roadwaj'. 
The following new section is added: 

Section 13-A. Two-Hour P.vrking. 

Subject to sections 7, 8 and 16, and 
between the houi-s of 10 a. m. and 1 
a. m., vehicles may be parked for not 
more than two (2) hours in the follow- 



ing places and in the manner specified, 
proA'ided that between the hours of 1 
a. m. and 10 a. m., no driver shall 
stand a vehicle in any such place except 
that passenger vehicles may be placed 
for not more than five (5) minutes con- 
tinuouslj^ for the receiving or discharging 
of passengers and commercial vehicles 
may be placed for not more than twenty 
(20) minutes continuously for the load- 
ing or unloading of materials: 
Charles Street. 
Both sides, from Boylston street to 
Beacon street; vehicles shall be 
placed with both right wheels to 
the curb or edge of the roadway. 

Voted, That the Re\-ised Traffic Rules 
and Regulations of the City of Boston, 
as adopted bj' the Boston Traffic Com- 
mission on October 31, 1935, and on No- 
\'ember 6, 1935, are amended as follows, 
effective January 25, 1937 : 

Section 8, Part 2, is amended by strik- 
ing out the following: 

Brattle Street, Downtown Boston. 
South side, from Adams square to 
Scollay square, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Hyde Park Avenue, Hyde Park. 
East side, from Oak street to Win- 
throj) street, twenty-four hours. 



River Street, Hyde Park. 
South side, from Business street to 
Maple street, twentj'-four hoiu-s. 
Tremont Street, Downtown Boston. 
West side, from a point two hun- 
dred (200) feet north of Boylston 
street to Park street, live parking, 
7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
West side, from Park street to Scol- 
lay square, twenty-four hours. 

Section S, Part 2, is amended by add- 
ing the following: 
Adams Street, Dorchester. 
West side, from Dickens street to 
Dorchester a\enue, 7 a. m. to 
6 p. m. 
Alford Street, GJiarlestown. 
East side, from Dexter street to a 
point one hundred and fifty (150) 
feet south of Dextor street, twenty- 
foiu' hours. 
Arch Street, Downtown Boston. 
East side, from Milk street to Sum- 
mer street, 7. a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Brittle Str(N?t. Downtown Boston. 
North side, from .\dams square to 
Scollay square. 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
De\onshirc Street, Downtown Boston. 
East side, from Adams square to 
State street, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 



84 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 23 



Franklin Street, Downtown Boston. 
North side, from Washington street 
to Hawley street, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Hawley Street, Downtown Boston. 
East side, from Milk street to Sum- 
mer street, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Hyde Park Avenue, Hyde Park. 
East side, from Oak street to River 
street, twenty-four houre. 
River Street, Hyde Park. 
South side, from Business street to 
Hj-de Park avenue, twenty-^four 
hours. 
Robinwood Avenue, West Roxbury. 
North side, from Centre street to a 
point four hundred and fifty (450) 
feet east of Centre street, twenty- 
four hours. 
Inner side, circular portion of street, 
twenty-four hours. 
Tremont Street, Downtown Boston. 
West side, from a point two hun- 
dred (200) feet north of Boylston 
street to opposite Temple place, 
live parking, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
West side, from opposite Temple 
place to ScoUiay square, twenty- 
four hours. 

Section 35 is amended by adding the 
following : 
Stuart Street. 

Into Tremont street, northerly. 

Into Tremont street, southerly. 



LAND-TAKINQ IN DORCHESTER. 

The Mayor has approved the order of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for a public improve- 
ment, consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Greenhalge street, Dor- 
chester district, as a highway, from 
Columbia road to Roseclair stieet, 
bounded and described as follows: 

A highway named Greenhalge street is 
hereby laid out, from Columbia road to 
Roseclair street, and ordered constructed, 
the cost thereof to be charged to Federal 
Funds. 

Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereby taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Southerly by Columbia road, forty 
feet; westerly by the westerly line of 
said Greenhalge street as hereby laid out, 
two hundred and 5-100 feet; northerly 
by Roseclair street, forty feet; and 
easterly by the easterly line of said 
Greenhalge street as hereby laid out, 
two hundred and 5-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines that 
no person sustains damages in his estate 
by the making of the public improvement, 
consisting of the laying out and construc- 
tion of Greenhalge street, Dorchester 
district, as a highway, from Columbia 
road to Roseclair street, under the order 
of the Board of January 12, 1937, and 
awards no damages therefor. 



EXTRA WORK UNDER CON= 

TRACT. 

Quincy Dry Dock and Yacht Cor- 
poration have been directed to perform 
the following extra work under the con- 
tract for repairing hull, etc., of ferryboat 
"Ralph J. Palumbo." Items ordered, 
repair mooring bitt foundation, starboard 
side, Boston end, agreed price, .S40; furnish 
machine and fit one new L . P. piston ring, 
agreed price, S40. Estimated cost of 
extra work, agreed price, S80. 



LEGISLATION PETITIONED BY 
MAYOR MANSFIELD. 

(Continued from page 81.) 

III. Election. 

An Act Providing for the General 
Registration of Voters in Boston. 
Note. — Petition seeks legislation to 
require general registration of voters in 
Boston in 1937 and in every tenth year 
thereafter and to provide further as to 
the identification of persons registered. 

IV. Welfare. 

1. An Act Authorizing the City of 
Boston to Borrow on Accotjnt of 
Public Welfare, Soldiers' Bene- 
fits .wjD Federal Emergency L^n- 
employment Relief Projects. 

Note. — This petition seeks legislation 
extending the authority of the city to 
borrow for welfare pm-poses during 1937. 

2. An Act Relative to the Giving 
of Notice of Temporary Aid 
Rendered to Certain Persons 
and to the Reimbursement of 
Cities and Towns Therefor and 
Relative to the Settlement of 
Such Persons. 

Note. — Under the present law if relief 
is furnished to a person who is claimed 
to have a settlement in another munici- 
paUty and that other municipality does 
not deny settlement within a very limited 
time, it is barred from thereafter denying 
settlement for a period of two years. 
This works an unnecessary hardship on 
municipalities which have not had an 
opportunity to determine the fact of 
settlement. The legislation requested 
seeks to permit a later denial of settle- 
ment. 

3. An Act Relating to the Recovery 
of Charges for Support of Cer- 
tain Patients Admitted to the 
Pondville State Hospital. 

Note. — Petition seeks the enactment of 
legislation which will require the state 
to have recoui'se against a patient able 
to pay before recovery against a 
municipality. 

V. County. 
A. General. 

A Resolve Providing for the Study 
BY A Special Commission of the 
General Subject of County 
Government. 
j^ote, — Petition requests the estabhsh- 
ment of a special unpaid commission to 
study the entire system of county gov- 
ernment in the Commonwealth; to con- 
sider whether it would be in the public 
interest to transfer all or part of exist- 
ing functions now performed by counties 
to the Commonwealth or to municipal 
governments and what methods of ad- 
ministrative and financial control should 
be adopted to promote greater efficiency 
and economy in the performance of func- 
tions of county government. 

B. Special. 

An Act Providing for the Appoint^ 

MENT OF A Special Commission 

TO Study the Desirability of 

Re-establishing the Boundary 

Lines of the County of Suffolk 

by Detaching Therefrom the 

Territories of the Town of 

Winthrop and the Cities of 

Revere and Chelsea. 

. Note.— At the present time Suffolk 

County is comprised of the town of 



Winthrop and the cities of Chelsea and 
Revere and Boston. The City of Bos- 
ton now bears all Suffolk County expenses. 

VI. Metropolitan Boston. 

An Act Establishing the Territorial 
Limits of Metropolitan Boston. 
Note. — There are forty-three cities and 
towns surrounding and including Boston 
which are now known as the Metropolitan 
District. The simple pui'pose of this 
act is to change that designation from 
Metropolitan District to Metropolitan 
Boston. The territorial boundaries of 
each city and town would remain as 
they are now, the present names of the 
cities and towns would be retained, to- 
gether with their present forms of govern- 
ment, and local autonomy, and respon- 
sibilities and authority would in no way 
be interfered with. Legally, they would 
not be a part of the City of Boston, would 
not be liable for any of its debts, nor 
subject to its tax rate. In short, they 
would remain exactly as they are now 
without any change whatever excepting 
that the Metropolitan District as a whole 
would hereafter be called Metropolitan 
Boston. The effect would be to raise the 
Boston district to the third largest city 
of the country, would give Boston more 
weight in Washington, and would tend to 
attract to Boston foreign shipping which 
now seeks other ports because they are 
thought to be larger, and therefore, 
more important. 



VII. Public Health and Safety, 

1. An Act Relative to Violations of 
Reasonable Health Regulations 
Adopted by Boards of Health. 
Note. — Petition seeks the enactment of 
legislation which will enable boards of 
health more effectively to enforce reason- 
able health regulations adopted by them 
under the provisions of section 31 of chap- 
ter 111 of the General Laws, by providing 
a penalty for a violation of such health 
regulations in cases where no such penalty 
is now provided. 



2. An Act Relative to the Making 

and Enforcing of Rules or Orders 

IN Relation to Fire Prevention. 

Note. — This act seeks to increase the 

power of the Fire Commissioner to require 

changes in a building in the interest of fire 

prevention. 

VIII. Tax and Collection Matters. 

1. An Act Relative TO THE Allowance 
OF Discount on Taxes Before the 
Date on Which Interest Becomes 
Payable for the Non-Payment 
Thereof. 

Note. — Petition seeks legislation allow- 
ing cities and towns to give a discount for 
prepayment of taxes for the purpose of 
inducing early payments and thus lessen 
the amount of interest which cities and 
towns must pay on temporary loans. 

2. An Act to Facilitate the Collec- 
tion of Excise Taxes Assessed 
and Levied upon Motor Vehicles. 

Note. — Petition seeks legislation anala- 
gous to that enacted in Connecticut which 
would facilitate motor vehicle excise 
collections, by authorizing the suspension 
or revocation of the registration of a motor 
vehicle for the non-payment of excise tax 
assessed upon such motor vehicle. No 
additional tax is suggested. 



Jan. 23 



CITY RECORD 



85 



3. An Act Relative to Certain Un- 
paid Water Rates and Charges 
AND to the Establishment of 
Liens for Such Rates or Charges. 

Note. — Petition seeks legislation which 
would make water liens effective to secure 
charges for water supplied within a period 
of two years prior to the creation of the 
lien rather than within a period of one 
year, as at the present time. This change 
would facilitate collections of water 
charges. 

4. An Act to Facilitate the Dis- 
posal OF Land Acquired by Cities 
AND Towns Through the Fore- 
closure OF Tax Titles. 

Note. — Petition seeks to enable munic- 
ipalities to employ a more facile method 
of disposing of land acquired through 
tax title foreclosure. This legislation is 
sought because of the large amount of 
such land which municipalities have been 
forced to acquire in recent years and be- 
cause the present law is not adapted to 
meet adequately, from an administrative 
standpoint, this problem. 

5. An Act Relative to Demand 
Before Sale of Land for Non- 
Payment OF Taxes. 

Note. — This petition seeks to amend 
the law which permits demand by the 
collector upon occupants of real estate 
who are not the owners thereof. The 
legislation is needed because of certain 
changes last year with reference to assess- 
ment of taxes to occupants. 

IX. Miscellaneous. 

L An Act Relative to the Prepa- 
ration AND Verification of Lists 
of Officials and Employees of 
the City of Boston and County 
OF Suffolk. 
Note. — Petition seeks legislation re- 
moving the requirement of publishing 
every two years a copy of the list of offi- 
cials and employees of Boston and Suffolk 
County. The Legislature sometime ago 
did away with the requirement that such 
a list of state officials and employees be 
published. The requirement that such a 
list be published every two years involves 
a needless expense to the taxpayers of 
Boston, is shortly after publication out 
of date owing to the numerous changes 
which constantly take place and is capable 
of abuse by anyone who desires to harass 
persons whose names appear therein. 

2. An Act Permitting the Letting 
OF Bicycles on the Lord's D.\y. 
Note. — Petition seeks legislation which 

will permit the letting of bicycles on the 
Lord's Day. In view of the volume of 
bicycle riding at the present time there 
has been considerable agitation for the 
liberalizing of regulations in this respect. 

3. An Act Subjecting to Classifica- 
tion the Salaries of Probation 
Officers. 

Note. — Under the act authorizing the 
county classification plan, the classifica- 
tion of salaries of probation ofticcis was 
excluded. The legislation souglit would 
remove this exception and provide for 
the classification of probation officers with 
other officers and cmi)loyees of counties. 

4. An Act Relative to Certain Ex- 

penses OF THE Land Court. 
Note. — Under existing law the city is 
required to provide books, printed blank 
forms, etc., for the Land Court. The 
volume of business in the Land Court 
has been greatly increased by the fore- 



closure of tax titles by cities and towns 
and is likely to continue to increase. 
Moneys received by the court as fees are 
paid to the State Treasm'er. The Land 
Court is not a county court and its juris- 
diction is state -wide. This petition seeks 
legislation by which the expenses of the 
Land Court for the foregoing items will be 
borne by the Commonwealth. 

5. An Act Changing the Period of 
THE Operating Year in Connec- 
tion with the Operation and 
Maintenance of the Sumner Tun- 
nel in the City of Boston. 

Note. — Petition seeks legislation to 
make the operating year of the Sumner 
Tunnel coincide with the fiscal year of 
the city. 

6. An Act Relative to the Expira- 
tion OF Certain Licenses for 
Theatrical and Like Exhibitions 
IN THE City of Boston. 

Note. — Petition requests legislation to 
fix as the date for the expiration of cer- 
tain theater licenses hereafter to be 
issued, as of July 1 rather than August 1. 
Its purpose is to facilitate the adminis- 
tration of the license law. 

7. An Act Providing that the City 
OF Boston May' Use for General 
Purpose of the County of Suffolk 
a Certain Sum of Money' Now in 
its Custody. 

Note. — Petition seeks legislation author- 
izing the City of Boston, with the ap- 
proval of the Superior Court, to use for 
general purposes of the County of Suffolk 
a sum of money received from his prede- 
cessor in office by Francis A. Campbell 
upon the assumption by him of the office 
of Clerk of the Superior Court, which 
sum was upon order of the Superior 
Court by him paid to the City Collector, 
the same to be held subject to the further 
order of the Coui't. 

X. Buildings. 

An Act for Codification, Revision and 
Amendment of the Laws Relative 
TO THE Construction, Alteration 
and Maintenance of Buildings 
and Other Structures in the City 
OF Boston. 
Note. — Petition requests the codifica- 
tion, revision and amendment of the laws 
now regulating the erection, alteration, 
maintenance and equipment of buildings 
in Boston. The existing law has been 
amended by each successive Legislature 
and is today without any continuity of 
thought or order. The bill proposed is 
the result of the work of one hundred fifty 
men interested in the building industry, 
such as engineers, architects, building con- 
tractors, material men, insurance men 
and real estate men. These men have 
been divided into forty-six groups, each 
one having a particular part of the pro- 
posed building law. The reports from 
these forty-six groups have been referred 
to a so-called review committee, which 
has made recommendations and criti- 
cisms which have been considered by the 
committees and the final report of each 
of tliese connnittees has been reviewed 
by the executive committee with the result 
suhinitted. It is believed that (he enact- 
ment of this bill will give to Boston the 
most modern and efficient building law of 
any city in the United States. 

Note. — Representative Barry lias (iled 
bill relative to retirement of members, etc. 
(City Clerk Doyle). 

Note. — Representative Barry filed bill 
re police commi.ssioner. 



Supplementary List. — 1937 Legis- 
lation. 

An Act Abolishing the Finance Com- 
mission OF THE City of Boston and 
Making Certain Changes in the 
Charter of the City of Bo-ston 
Relative Thereto. 
Note. — The public service w'hich had 
been hoped would be accomplished through 
the establishment of the Finance Commis- 
sion has not only faded of realization, 
but the powers conferred upon the com- 
mission have been used for purpose,? 
contrary to the public interests. Hence 
the continued expenditure of the tax- 
payers' money to meet salary and other 
requisitions of the Finance Commission, 
approximating fifty thousand dollars a 
year, is no longer in the pubfic interest. 
The petition, therefore, seeks legislation 
to abolish this commission. 

An Act Amending an Act Establishing 
the Salaries of the Principal 
Assessors of the City' of Boston. 
Note. — In 1928 the Legislature passed 
an act establishing the annual salary of 
the chairman of the Board of Assessors of 
the City of Boston at S7,500 and of the 
two other members of the board at 
S5,000. Since the enactment of that 
legislation the work involved in the per- 
formance of the duties imposed upon the 
other two members of the board has 
greatly increased. The salary established 
in 1928 is not adequate compensation for 
the work they now perform and the 
petition seeks legislation establishing this 
annual salary of each of these two members 
at .16,000. 

An Act Abolishing the Board of Tax 
Appeals and Giving the Land 
Court Jurisdiction to Decide 
Certain Appeals, and Defining 

THE POWRES AND DuTIES OF SaID 

Court Relative to Such Appeals, 

AND Transferring to Said Court 

Certain Appeals Pending in Said 

Board of Tax Appeals. 

Note. — The petition seeks legislation 

providing for a judicial, in place of an 

administrative, determination of the issues 

involved in an appeal from the decisions 

of a board of assessors upon matters of 

assessment, made bj' them, and in certain 

other appeals. 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and othcre is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Advertises for proposals for roofing 
work, etc., on the J. W. Howe School. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of the' 
Department of School Buildings, 2(5 Nor- 
man street, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of -SoOO, 
to be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Hid dose Mondatj, January 25, at 
,.' p. m. 

.\dvertises for proposjUs for furnishing 
battery material for departmental use. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amoutit (^f the con- 



86 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 23 



tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the 
Department of School Buildings, 26 Nor- 
man street, Boston, JMass. Bids, accom- 
])anied by certified check in the sum of 
$500, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, February 1, at 
2 p. in. 

School Committee. 

Advertises for proposals for'"rebinding 
books of the public schools. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
not less than 50 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Business 
Manager, School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of |lOO, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, Jcmuary 26, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
toilet paper in rolls for the Boston public 
schools. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to 50 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of the 
Business Manager, School Committee, 
15 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$100, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, February 3, at 
12 m. 

Supply Department. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
sulfuric acid and sodium bicarbonate 
to the various city departments. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply De- 
partment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of 1100, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 25, at 12 in. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
soap powder and soap chips to the various 
city departments. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Bo.ston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $100, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Monday, January 25, at 12 ?«. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
industrial and medicinal gases to the 
various city departments. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. DupHcate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, January 27, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
bank gravel and sand to the varioas city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 



for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Thursday, January 28, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
flashlight equipment to the various city 
departments. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per 
cent of the contract price. Blank forms 
for proposals may be obtained at the 
office of the Supply Department, Room 
801, City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, 
accompanied by certified check in the 
sum of $100, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Friday, Janvnry 29, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
men's suits to the Long Island Hospital, 
Institutions Department. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of .$200, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, February 2, at 12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for fui-nishing 
toweling to the Park Department. Surety 
bond will be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of $200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, February 3, at 
12 m. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of departs 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Hospital Department. 

Upon January 16 the Mayor approved 
permission to award a contract to the 
Sanitaiy Maintenance Company, Incor- 
porated, for the extermination of all ver- 
min, excepting rats and mice, at Main 
Department, South Department, Hay- 
market Square and East Boston Relief 
Stations, Boston City Hospital. Bids 
opened at the Hospital on Tuesday, 
December 1, 1936, were as follows: 

Paramount Laboratories, Incorporated, 
$280 per month; Acme Exterminating 
Company, $198 per month; Sanitary 
Maintenance Company, Incorporated, 
$175 per month. 

Overseers of the Public Welfare. 

Upon January 16 the Mayor approved 
permission to award a contract to Walter 
Curley & Son for hauling wood from the 
Wayfarers' Lodge to various sections of 
the city. This contract will amount to 
approximately $1,460.95 for the year 
1937. Bids were as follows: 

Hauling Wood. — From Boston & Albany 

or New York, New Haven & Hartford 

Railroad or Boston & Maine Railroad to 

• city woodyard, 30 Hawkins street, Boston, 



Walter Curley & Son, 75 cents per cord; 
A. J. McCabe, 85 cents per cord; from 
city woodyard, 30 Hawkins street, to the 
City Proper as far as Massachusetts 
avenue. South Boston and Charlestown, 
Walter Curley & Son, 25 cents per cord 
foot; $1.50 per cord; A. J. McCabe, 40 
cents per cord foot; $2 per cord; from 
city woodyard, 30 Hawkins street, to 
Roxbury and East Boston, Walter Curley 
& Son, 25 cents per cord foot; $1.50 per 
cord; A. J. McCabe, 40 cents per cord 
foot; $2 per cord; from city woodyard, 
30 Hawkins street, to Dorchester to 
Harvard street, Talbot avenue and Ash- 
mont street; Jamaica Plain to Boylston 
street; Brighton to Harvard avenue, 
Walter Curley & Son, 25 cents per cord 
foot; $1.50 per cord; A. J. McCabe, 40 
cents per cord foot; $2 per cord; from 
city woodyard, 30 Hawkins street, to 
balance of Brighton, Dorchester, and 
Jamaica Plain, Walter Curley & Son, 
25 cents per cord foot; $1.50 per cord; 
A. J. McCabe, 40 cents per cord foot; 
$2 per cord; from city woodyard, 30 
Hawkins street, to Mattapan, Roslin- 
dale. West Roxbury, Hyde Park, Read- 
ville and Brookline, Walter Curley & Son, 
25 cents per cord foot; $1.50 per cord; 
A. J. McCabe, 40 cents per cord foot; 
12 per cord. 



ADDITION TO CONTRACTS. 

Department of School Buildings. 

The Rugo Construction Company, In- 
corporated, has been allowed the issuance 
of an order of change making an addi- 
tion in the sum of $1,195.10 to the con- 
tract for the erection and completion of 
the addition to the South Boston High 
School, Thomas Park, South Boston, 
Massachusetts. This amount is neces- 
sary in order to pay for removing the 
present wood dado in gymnasium and 
replace with new wood dado, base and 
cap molding which is to match the new 
sheathing which is to be installed in the 
addition to the gymnasium. The Super- 
intendent of Public Schools has requested 
this old dado be replaced with a new one 
so that the whole dado in the gymnasium 
will be uniform. 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS. 

Public Works Department. 

The Roxbury Concrete Construction 
Company, Incorporated, has been granted 
an extension of the time of the comple- 
tion of the contract for the building of 
sewerage works in Everett Street exten- 
sion, between Western avenue and Sol- 
diers Field road, Brighton, from October 
10, 1936, to October 22, 1936, a period of 
twelve days. This extension is occa- 
sioned by unforeseen obstacles encoun- 
tered during the prosecution of the work. 

The Quincy Dry Dock and Yacht Cor- 
poration have been granted an extension 
of the time of completion of the contract 
for repairing hull, etc., of ferryboat 
"Ralph J. Palumbo," from January 4, 
1937, to January 16, 1937. This exten- 
sion is requested on account of the delay 
in receiving Westinghouse generators. 

W. P. A. Supply Department. 
M. McGinnis Company have been 
granted an extension of the contract 
relative to the purchase of hard dry fill 
for delivery to the Park Department, 
Wood Avenue Playground, W. P. A. 
Project No. 2094, until March 1, 1937. 
This contract did not start until Decem- 
ber 16, 1936. There was not sufficient 
time to deliver the total amount of the 
material. 



Jan. 23 



CITY RECORD 



87 



Sheohan, O'Brien Company have been 
granted an extension of the contract 
relative to the purchase of plumbing 
supplies for delivery to the Park De- 
partment, George Wright Golf Course, 
W. P. A. Project No. 6388, until March 1, 
1937. Due to a delay in manufacturing 
and shipment of part of the materials, the 
contractor wa.s unable to make delivery 
before December 31, 1936. 



CONTRACTS AMENDED. 

Assessing Department. 
Healy's Office Service has been allowed 
to amend their contract as follows: 
"Tliis work is to be done Isetween the 
present date and February 15, 1937, and 
is to be charged to 1937 approprations 
and subject thereto." 

Institutions Department. 
The Bethlehem Ship Building Corpo- 
ration, Limited, has been allowed to 
amend the contract for repairs to the 
steamer "George A. Hibbard," as follows: 

1. That the time for the completion 
of the work provided for under said con- 
tract be, and hereby is, extended to and 
including January 5, 1937. 

2. That Item 19 of said contract be, 
and hereby is, stricken out. 

3. That the specifications under the 
paragraph entitled "Main Crank Shaft," 
appearing on page 5 of the specifications 
annexed to said contract, be stricken out 
and that the following specifications be 
substituted therefor : 

Main Crank Shaft. 
At the direction of the commissioner 
the crank shaft will be lifted sufficient to 
give proper clearances. Bearings and 
caps are to be trued and bearings to be 
fitted with fillers and laminated shims as 
directed. 

4. That Item 26 of said contract be 
amended by striking out the sum of $210 
appearing therein and substituting in 
place therefor $35. 

Public Buildings Department. 
Daniel Cunningham Construction Com- 
pany, Incorporated, has been allowed to 
amend the contract for repairs to Quincy 
Market, by changing the date of com- 
pletion to read February 1, 1937, instead 
of "one year from the date of the 
contract." 



NOTICE OF REMOVAL. 

Upon January 14 the following com- 
munication was made public from tiie 
Mayor's office: 

Wilfred J. Doyle, Citij Clerk. 

Dear Sir, — Pursuant to the power 
conferred upon me by section 14 of 
chapter 486 of the Acts of 1909 (and also 
(■hapt(-r 95 of the Special Acts of 1918 as 
amended by chapter 100 of tlie Acts of 
1928), I hereby remove Timothy W. 
Mui'phy from the office of principal 
assessor of the City of Boston for the 
good of the service and for the following 
specihc reasons: 

1. Failure to cooperate with and un- 
warranted personal hostility toward the 
other two members of the Boaid of 
assessors, to an extent which prevents 
the proper performance of the duties 
incuml)ent ui)on him as a member of said 
Board of Assessors. 

2. Conduct unbecoming a principal 
assessor in the office of the Board of 
Assessors and disruption of ttio iirojier 
functioning of said Board and tiie service 
of the subordinates of said Board by such 
conduct. 



3. Unwarranted public statements 
challenging the honesty and integrity of 
the other two members of the Board of 
Assessors, and other municipal officers of 
the City of Boston, and other public state- 
ments tending to bring the City of Boston 
and its officers into di.sreputc. 

4. Failure to perform the duties in- 
cumbent upon him as secretary of the 
Board of Assessors and as principal 
assessor of the City of Boston. 

Yours truly, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Maijor. 



ART COMMISSION OPPOSES RE= 
MOVAL OF LINCOLN STATUE. 

The following is a copy of letter received 
by his Honor the Mayor from chairman 
of Boston Art Commission: 

Boston, January 16, 1937. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — This is in reply to your 
letter of January 8 concerning the Lincoln 
statue in Park square. 

I have consulted with all the other mem- 
bers of the Art Commission, except Mr. 
Emerson who is not yet well enough to 
receive me. 

It was our unanimous opinion that the 
statue should be left where it now is unless 
traffic conditions necessitated removal. 

I have conferred with Mr. Hickey and 
Mr. Desmond of the Traffic Commission 
who tell me there is no need to remove the 
statue for reasons of traffic or to change 
the shape of the island on which it is now 
placed. 

The statue faces the north and has a 
fine background in the Motor Mart Build- 
ing which was awarded the Parker Medal 
of the City of Boston as an outstanding 
example of architecture. 

It has been the opinion of the Art Com- 
mission for many years, often reiterated, 
that "it would be impossible to assign a 
site for any monument in Copley square 
while the plans for remodeling the square 
remain in their present chaotic condition." 

Respectfully yours, 

Robert P. Bellows, 
Chairman, Boston Art Commission. 



RESIGNATION OF DOCTOR 
WASHBURN. 

Upon January 15 Mayor Mansfield 
issued the following statement: 

Dr. Frederic A. Washbui'n, Institutions 
Commissioner, having completed the job 
of reorganization in the Institutions 
Department and at the Long Island 
Hospital as requested to do, is being 
relieved of his duties and has tendered 
me his resignation to take elTect Febru- 
ary 1, 1937. I have appointed as his 
successor Dr. John W. Lane of 10 Pleasant 
street, Dorchester, and 1101 Beacon street. 

Doctor Lane was born in 1877, 
graduated from Harvard University in 
1902 and Harvard Medical in 1903." He 
is pi-esident of the statT of St. Margaret's 
Hospital in Dorchester and is one of tlie 
leading surgcotis in Massachusetts. Dur- 
ing i\w war lie was chief of the Surgical 
Service at the Base HospitJil in Camp 
Grant, Illinois; chief of the Surgical 
Service in the Evacuation Hospital in 
Royaumeix, France, and at Trier in (lor- 
manv. He was visiting surgeon at the 
Boston Citv Hospital from 1910 to 1914 
and at St. i':iizabetli's Hosi)ita! from 1914 
to 1916. He is a well-known jjractionecr, 
tiioroiighly familar with institutional and 
hospital administration. Although very 



basy, he consented to accept this appoint- 
ment and Boston is fortunate in obtaining 
the services of such a capable man. 



DOCTOR WASHBURN'S LETTER OF 
RESIGNATION. 

190 Bay State Road, Boston, 

January 15, 1937. 

Dear Mr. Mayor, — 1 hereby present 
to you my resignation of the oflSce of 
Commissioner of Institutions, City of 
Boston. If it is agreeable to you I should 
be glad to have the resignation take effect 
February 1, 1937. 

I have already given you my reasons 
verbally for this action on my part. 

May I express to you my appreciation 
of your constant support. I value your 
friendship highly and I have had a 
"bully" good time. 

Yours sincerely, 

Frederic A. Washburn, M. D. 



MAYOR'S REPLY TO DOCTOR 
WASHBURN. 

Dr. Frederic A. Washburn, 190 Bay 
State Road, Boston, Mass. 

Dear Dr. Washburn, — It is with 
extreme reluctance that I accept your 
resignation, to become effective at the 
close of business on January 31, 1937. 
But knowing your wish to be relieved of 
the heavy burdens which you have carried 
since you have been at the head of the 
Institutions Department, and keenly 
realizing that you have thoroughly per- 
formed the job that I asked you to do, 
namely, to reorganize the Institutions 
Department and, particularly, the Long 
Island Hospital division of it, I accept 
your resignation. 

In doing so I want you to know that 
the very thorough and admirable work 
that you have done is realized by me and 
every citizen of Boston who has come in 
contact even in the remotest way with 
the Institutions Department. The depart- 
ment itself, under your control, has 
attained a degree of efficiency never before 
known in the City of Boston, each division 
is working in harmony with every other 
division and the reforms instituted at 
Long Island have been excellent in every 
way. A spirit of harmony and content- 
ment pervades the whole Island not only 
among patients and inmates but also 
among the emploj'ees and the result of 
your patient labors are clearly evident on 
every hand. 

As Mayor of the City of Boston I thank 
you for your loyal and efficient service 
and assure you that it is appreciated not 
only by me but by all the citizens of 
Boston whom I have the honor to repre- 
sent. 

Youre truly, 

Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 



LAND-TAKING IN CHARLES- 
TOWN. 

The Mayor lias approved tiie order of 
the Board of Stivet Commissioners for 
tiie taking of land for a public improve- 
ment consisting of the laying out and 
construction of Bunker Hill court, Charlos- 
towii district, as a highway, southwesterly 
from Bunker Hill street, bounded and 
described as follows: 

A highway named Bunker Hill court 
is hereby laid out, from Bunker Hill 
street southwesterly for a distance of 
approximately one luindred and sixty 
feet and ordered constructed, the cost 
thereof to be charged to Federal Funds. 



88 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 23 



Said highway and the land, exclusive 
of trees or structures standing upon or 
affixed thereto, in which an easement for 
street purposes is hereb.y taken, is bounded 
and described as follows: 

Northeasterly by Bunker Hill street, 
fifteen feet; southeasterly bj' the south- 
easterlj' line of said Bimker Hill Court 
as hereb}^ laid out, one hundred sixty-one 
and 39-100 feet; southwesterly by the 
southwesterly line of said Bunker Hill 
court as hereby laid out, fifteen and 
16-100 feet; and northwesterly by the 
northwesterly line of said Bunker Hill 
Court as hereby laid out, one hundred 
sixty-thi-ee and 72-100 feet. 

Voted, That this Board determines 
that no person sustains damages in his 
estate by the making of the public im- 
provement, consisting of the laying out 
and construction of Bimker Hill court, 
Charlestown district, as a highway, 
from Bunlver Hill street southwesterly 
for a distance of approximately one 
hundred and sixty feet, under the order 
of the Board of "Januaiy 12, 1937, and 
awards no damages therefor. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED WITHOUT 
ADVERTISING. 

Upon January 22, 1937, the Mayor 
approved the following request of the 
Police Commissioner: 

Police Department. 

Boston, January 19, 1937. 
PiMic Works Project No. 8200, Boston 

Police Comnmnications System. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Re: Contract with the New England 
Telephone and Telegraph Company 
for certain necessary equipment re- 
quiring special construction and in- 
stallation. 
Dear Sir, — I am inclosing herewith 
four executed copies of the above-entitled 
agreement. 

This agreement provides for the in- 
stallation of equipment necessary for 
rendering the telephone and teletype 
service contemplated by the Police 
Communications System, and also pro- 
vides for the installation of certain special 
equipment necessary for proper super- 
vision and control of the radio system 
and for interconnection of the radio and 
telephone systems. It is inherent in the 
plan heretofore adopted for the Police 
Communications System that the equip- 
ment specified in this agreement be owned 
by and leased from the Telephone Com- 
pany, and that the charges for the installa- 
tion thereof (■S4,801.17) be paid from the 
existing appropriation available for said 
system. 

I have been advised by Messrs. Jackson 
and Moreland, engineers for the Police 
Department, that the services described 
above can be obtained only tlii'ough 
agreement with the Telephone Company, 
and that the most efficient equipment and 
economical terms available are those 
specified in this agreement. I therefore 
request that you approve the execution 
of this agi'eemcnt without advertisement. 
Yours respectfully, 

Joseph F. Timilty, 
Police Commissioner. 



CIRCULAR LETTER NO. 1. 

City of Boston, 
M.vyor's Office, January 6, 1937. 
To All Heads of Departments. 

Gentlemen, — The following informa- 
tion is requested with regard to your 
department: 



1. 



Internal Departmental 
Organization. 



Description of manner in which depart- 
mental duties are separated, between divi- 
sions or otherwise, and names of divisions, 
if any. 

2. Kind and Volume of Work. 

Please express this in sufficient detail 
to give an adequate description by divi- 
sions, or by other method of separating 
departmental duties. 

3. Personnel. 

By division or other internal separation. 
Give total number of permanent and of 
temporary employees as of June 1 for 
each of the past five years. If temporary 
personnel fluctuates greatly during the 
year, please tabulate by months for 1935 
and 1936. 

4. City Property. 

(Other than current supplies and office 
equipment and the like.) Give location 
and description of such city property held 
or maintained by the department on 
January 1, 1937. 

5. General. 

Brief history of the department under 
present charter. Brief history of more 
important departmental changes since 
1909, and any statutes relevant to the 
functions of your department not listed in 
the 1936 Municipal Register. 

Please forward detailed information 
in triplicate to this office at your earliest 
convenience. 

Very truly yours, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE AND CITY SERVICE.) 

CLERICAL SERVICE. 

For State and Cities and Towns Out- 
side OF Boston and Vicinity, March 
6, 1937. 
Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, February 20, 1937, at 12 noon. 

For Boston and Vicinity, M.-iRCH 20, 
1937. 

Last date for filing applications, Satur- 
day, March 6, 1937, at 12 noon. 

WARNING! If all applicants cannot 
be accommodated on the above dates, 
they will be notified to appear on subse- 
quent Saturdays. Applicants should note 
the exact date given on their notification 
sheets. 

File your applications EARLY! In 
cases of ties, names will be placed on the 
eligible list in accordance with the date 
of filing application. 

The usual entrance salary for clerks 
for state service is $900 a year. 

Persons qualifying in the examination 
may have their names placed on the 
state list as well as on the list for the city 
or town in which they reside. 

Applicants must be not less than six- 
teen years of age at the time of filing 
application. 

Subjects and Weights: Training and 
experience, 2; spelling, 2; arithmetic (in- 
cluding problems), 2; following written 
directions, 2; filing, 1; word knowledge, 
1; total, 10. 

Passing Requirements: Applicants 
must obtain a mark of at least 65 per 
cent in spelling, at least 50 per cent in 
each of the other subjects and at least 
70 per cent in general average in order 
to become eligible. 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1937. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Wednesday, February 3. 
Worcester, Thursday, February 4. 
Boston, Wednesday, March 3. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 4. 
Fall River, Friday, March 5. 
Boston, Wednesday, April 7. 
Springfield, Thursday, April 8. 
Boston, Wednesday, May 5. 
Worcester, Thursday, May 6. 
Boston, Wednesday, June 16. 
Boston, Wednesday, September 15. 
Worcester, Thursday, September 16. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 14. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 15. 
Boston, Wednesday, November 3. 
Lowell, Thursday, iSTovember 4. 
Boston, Wednesday, December 8. 
New Bedford, Friday, December 10. 
New Bedford, Saturday, December 11. 

Rules for Examinations. 

All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent in 
the installation of wires, conduits, ap- 
paratus, fixtures and other appliances for 
carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and have had at least two 
years' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for cari-ying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a master or journeyman certifi- 
cate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days_ previous to the date of 
such examination. 

Applicants for examination will be re- 
quired to obtain at least 70 per cent 
in order to obtain a certificate. 

Applicants who fail to obtain the re- 
quired 70 per cent will not be entitled 
to re-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent or who fail on 
the practical demonstration, will not be 
re-examined for a period of six months. 

Any person found referring to notes or 
books, or misbehaving during an exam- 
ination, will be debarred from that exam- 
ination. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
certificates when and where examination 
will be held and only those so notified 
will be examined on that day. 

Stephen C. Garrity, 
James G. Reardon, 
Thomas H. Green, 
Albert Frank, 
Walter J. Kenefick, 
State Examiners oj Electricians. 



For application blanks or other in- 
formation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 303, 14 Beacon street, 
Boston, Mass. 



Jan. 23 



CITY RECORD 



89 



NUMBER AND ESTIMATED COST OF NEW BUILDINGS AND ALTERATIONS, ADDITIONS, ETC., FOR WHICH 
APPLICATIONS HAVE BEEN FILED FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEAIBER 31, 1936. 



Character. 



Apartment 

AND 

Tenement 
Houses. 



Apartment 

AND 

Tenement 

Houses 

AND Stores. 



Banks. 



Churches. 



-*^ . 

SOT 
O 

•■go 



Dwellings. 



Dwellings 
AND Stores. 



Foundries 



■•30 



Garages. 



ss 

■•so 



First Class. .. 
Second Class . 
Third Class.. 
Special Class. 



$300,000 
12,000 



S6,850 



4 
188 



$148,700 
934,000 



$48,320 
45,675 
29,720 
11,095 



Total New Work . 
Alterations, etc 



4 
224 



$312,000 
257,002 



133 



$121,703 



$134,250 



36,850 
102,350 



192 
3,374 



$1,082,700 
1,695,327 



208 



$97,040 



$1,000 



222 
82 



$134,810 
325,365 



Grand Totals. 



228 $569,002 133 $121,703 6 $134,250 27 $109,200 3,566 $2,778,027 208 $97,040 1 $1,000 304 $460,175 



Character. 



Hotels. 



Hospitals. 



SS 
•■go 



Lodging 
Houses. 



S8 

■go 



LoDGrNQ 

Houses 
and Stores. 



Mercantile 
Buildings. 



Manu- 
f.acturing 
Buildings. 



SS 
■go 



Office 
Buildings. 



as 



First Class. . . 
Second Class. 
Third Class . . 
Special Class. 



Total New 'Work . 
Alterations, etc 



$374,000 



$280,000 



33 



$90,626 



$374,000 
106,448 



$280,000 
163,645 



$4,875 



62 

847 



$425,950 
44,450 
14,650 



$74,000 



16,000 



$485,050 
1,164,732 



8 
125 



$90,000 
290,275 



8 
175 



52,627,500 
29,700 



$2,657,200 
306,663 



Grand Totals. 



33 $90,626 34 $480,448 81 $443,645 6 



$4,875 909 $1,649,782 133 $380,275 183 $2,963,863 



Character. 



Public 
Buildings. 



Public 
Halls. 



Sin 
o 



School 
Houses. 



SS 
■go 



Stables. 



es 
■go 



Theaters. 



a to 
o 

■^" 



Miscel- 
laneous. 



Totals. 



H 



En 
o 

■go 



First Class.. . 
Second Class. 
Third Class . . 
Special Class. 



$60,918 



$100,000 



$30,000 



$68,500 

107,600 

21,950 

117,116 



30 
143 
34S 
105 



$3,498,320 

1,229.393 

1.042,120 

15S.S61 



Total New 'Work . 
Alterations, etc 



$60,918 
284,513 



$30,000 
11,301 



$100,000 
434,476 



17 



$16,157 



$13,250 



119 
202 



$315,166 
.259.411 



626 ' $5,928,694 
5.663 5,880,409 



Grand Totals. 



32 



$345,431 



12 



$41,301 



46 



$534,476 



17 



$16,157 



$13,250 



321 



$574,577 



6,2S9 $11,809,103 



90 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 23 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 14 TO JANUARY 20. 



January 14. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Arthur Wallace 

Federal Street Building Trust, 

Joseph Seigel 

Slorris Berg 

M. E. Goldberg, Trustee 

William Hyman 

Walter J. Dennis 

Chauncy-Bedford A s s o - 
ciates. 

John A. Hope 

City of Boston 

Timothy Smith Company.. 

A. S. Caplan 

Paine and Webber Company, 

Warren Institutions for Sav- 
ings. 

Dr. H. W. Adams 

Nathan Neustadt 

.American Mutual Insurance 
Company. 



130 Tremont street 

24 Federal street 

185 Glenway street 

2224 Washington street. . . . 
113 Commonwealth avenue, 

143 Havre street 

412 Washington street 

31 Bedford street 

24 and 26 Har^'ard street. . . 

FaneuilHall 

2267 Washington street . 

237 Tremont street 

24 Federal street 

53 Charlotte street 

158 and 160 Magnolia street, 

132 Callender street 

142 Berkeley street 



3 .^Iterations, stores and offices, SI, 500 

3 Alterations, offices 2,000 

14 Alterations, dwelling 100 

8 Alterations, stores 1,000 

5 .^Iterations, dwelling 12.000 

1 Alterations, dwelling 300 

22 Alterations, dwelling 235 

3 Alterations, stores and offices, 300 

3 Take-down, dwelling 150 

3 Elevator 2,000 

9 Elevator 500 

5 Sign 200 

3 Alterations, offices 1 ,000 

14 Alterations, dwelling 5,000 

13 Alterations, dweUing 500 

14 Alterations, dwelling 200 

4 Alterations, offices 400 



January 15. 



Harvard College 

Lillian Blacklow 

Proctor Ellison 

Whitney Shoe Company . . . . 

L. & F. Brown 

L. & F. Brown 

fD Marlborough Street Trust, 
ladehne A. Scott 

I. Shapiro 



452 Boylston street 5 

31 Pasadena road 14 

18 South street 3 

183 Tremont street 3 

41 Stanhope street 4 

43 Stanhope street 4 

80 Marlborough street 5 

572 East Broadway 6 

35 Spring street 3 



Frank Coleman 190 Sycamore street . . . . 

Rowland Marine Products 325 Northern avenue. .. . 

Company. 
Allen Manufacturing Com- 1.344 Hyde Park avenue. 

pany. 
Merchants Co-operative 53 Lamartine street 

Bank. 
Mrs. H. K. Finn 38 Fairview street 



19 
6 

18 

10 

20 



Alterations, stores and offices, S20,000 

Alterations, dwelhng 700 

Alterations, mercantile 40 

.^.Iterations, stores and offices, 200 

Alterations, garage 1,000 

Alterations, garage 10,000 

Alterations, lodging None 

Alterations, dwelling 1,400 

Alterations, dwelling and 1,200 
store. 

Alterations, dweUing 1,000 

Special, manufacturing 4,850 

Third-class storage of lumber, 600 

Alterations, tenements 350 

.Alterations, dweUing 325 



January 16. 



Frank DeLuzio 10 Gustin street 7 Alterations, dweUing. 

Chelsea BuUding Wrecking 42 Monument square 2 Take-down, dwelling. 

Company. 

Antonio Collucci 36 Woodward avenue 8 Alterations, dweUing. 



Janu.iry 18. 



Joseph Neustadt 

Joseph E. Doherty 

Sadie Baniett 

Wiggin Terminals, Incorpo- 
rated. 

Wiggin Terminals, Incorpo- 
rated. 

Harvard CoUege 

David Channer (t al 

Carl Stohn, Incorporated... . 

Institution for Savings in 
Roxbury. 

Rand & Byam, Incorporated, 

Enterprise Co-operative 

Bank. 

Columbian National Life In- 
surance Company. 

Jennie Gordon 

John A. Hope, Incorporated. 
Boston Lying-in Hospital. . . 
F. Friedson Shoe Company.. 
Merchants Co-operative 

Bank. 



716 Shawmut avenue 9 

248 Purchase street 3 

650-654 Centre street 19 

68 Terminal street 2 

40 Terminal street 2 

47-67 Blaekstone street. ... 3 

551 Shawmut avenue 9 

96 Bradlee street IS 

330 Dartmouth street 5 

11 Charles street 2 

25 Meridian street 1 

22 Huntington avenue 4 

263 and 265 Main street. ... 2 

215 Humboldt avenue 12 

221 Longwood avenue 4 

614 Atlantic avenue 3 

20 and 22 Oakland street. . . 11 



January 19. 



E. C. Thatcher 

Air Reduction Company .... 

Jennie Berman 

DeBlois and Maddison 

National Cash Register Com- 
pany. 

Frank Losardo 

Carleto 

P. J. Driscoll 

H. Siegel 

J. Jenks 

Bernard Wolfe 

D. BuUock 

K. V. Sullivan 

A. K. Cohen et al 

A. K. Cohen et al 

Jordan Marsh Company .... 

E. J. Hickey 



19 Hudson street 

122 Mt. Vernon street 

74 Allen street 

10 and 12 Cit3' Hall avenue, 
537 Commonwealth avenue, 

21 Mercer street 

1233 Commonwealth avenue, 

646 Main street 

36 .ScoUay square 

237 Grove street 

254 Tremont street 

98 Nightingale street 

311 Norfolk avenue 

137 Washington street 

137 Washington street 

45 .Summer street 

234 Friend street 



S700 
200 



500 



Alterations, stores and dwell- SI 50 

ing. 

Alterations, stores and offices, 800 

Alterations, stores 8,000 

Alterations, storage 1,700 

Alterations, storage 1,700 

Alterations, storage and 2,000 

manufacturing. 

Alterations, store and dwell- 200 

ing. 

Alterations, manufacturing.. None 

Alterations, offices and dwell- 1,500 
ing. 

Take-down, factory 300 

Take-down, bank and offices, 250 

Alterations, store 250 

Alterations, store and dwell- 100 
ing. 

Alterations, garage 200 

Alterations, hospital 300 

Sign 100 

-Alterations, dweUing 150 



3 Alterations, restaurant SI, 000 

7 Alterations, manufacturing.. 1,200 

3 Alterations, tenements 95 

3 Alterations, stores and offices, 2,500 

5 Alterations, stores 3,900 

18 Third-class dweUing 4 000 

21 Sign 150 

2 Sign 100 

3 Sign 100 

20 Sign 100 

5 Sign 150 

14 Alterations, dwelhng 100 

7 Alterations, stable 1 00 

3 Sign 500 

3 Sign 500 

3 Sign 500 

3 Alterations, store lOO 



CONSTRUCTION WORK. 

The Mayor has approved the request 
of the Public Works Department for 
the following construction work: 

A surface drain of 2-foot 3-inch cir- 
cular concrete (W. P. A. Project 65-14- 
4953; Work Project 11907) in Cambridge 
street, between Dustin street and Wan-en 
street, in the Brighton district, at an 
estimated cost of 811,492. 

A surface drain of 15-inch pipe and 
one catch-basin (W. P. A. Project 65-14- 
4953) in Hyde Park avenue, between 
Milton street and Stanley street, in 
the Hyde F'ark district, at an estimated 
cost of $10,160. 

A surface drain of 12-inch pipe and 
two catch-basins (W. P. A. Project 65-14- 
4953) in Grayson street, between Galli- 
Vdii Boulevard and 502 feet southerly, in 
the Dorchester district, at an estimated 
cost of S9,000. 

A surface drain of 12-inch pipe and ton 
catch-basins (W. P. A. Project 65-14- 
4953) in Prescott street, between 460 
feet southwest of Stanley street and 835 
feet northeasterly, in the Hyde Park 
district, at an estimated cost of S10,740. 

A .surface drain of 12-incli pipe and 
two catch-basins (W.P. A. Project 65-14- 
4953) in Albion street, between Beacon 
street and Highland street, in the Hyde 
Park district, at an estimated cost of 
511,800. 

A sanitary sewer of 10-inoh pipe and a 
surface drain of 3-foot 6-ineh circular con- 
crete (W. P. A. Project 65-14-4953) in 
Elton street, between Auckland street 
and Dorchester avenue, in the Dorchester 
district, at an estimated cost of S17,500. 

A .surface drain of 15-inch and 18-inch 
pipe and three catch-basins (W. P. A. 
Project 65-14-4953) in WaiTen avenue, 
between Beacon street and Summit 
street, in the Hyde Park district, at an 
estimated cost of §24,000. 

A surface drain of 12-inch and 15-inch 
pipe and three catch-basins (W. P. A. 
Project 65-14-4953) in Wood avenue, be- 
tween Cummins Highway and Roanoke 
road, in the Dorchester and Hyde Park 
districts, at an estimated cost of S24,0O0. 

A surface drain of 12-inch pipe (W. P. A. 
Project 65-14-4953) in Stanley .street, 
between Prescott street and Hyde F'ark 
a\"enue, in the Hyde Park district, at an 
estimated cost of S4,500. 

Sanitary sewer of 10-inch and 15-inch 
pipe, a surface drain of 10-inch and 12- 
inch pipe and two catch-basins (W. P. A. 
Project 65-14-4953) in Humphrej's 
place, between Humphreys street and 
end of Humphrej's place, in the Dor- 
chester district, at an estimated cost of 
86,000. 

A sanitary sewer of 12-inch pipe, a 
surface drain of 12-inch and 15-inch pipe 
and one oatch-basin (W. P. A. Project 
65-14^953) in Grotto Glen road, between 
Day street and 244 feet westerly, in the 
Roxbuiy district, at an estimated cost of 
812,000. 

A surface drain of 12-inoh 15-inch and 
20-inch pipe and six catch-ibasins (W. P. A. 
Project 65-14^953) in Neponset ave- 
nue, between 350 feet northwest of Lo- 
ring street and 837 feet southeasterly, in 
the Hyde Park district, at an estimated 
cost of 815,000. 

A sanitary sewer of 12-inch pipe, a sur- 
face drain of 12-inch and 18-inch con- 
crete pipe and two catch-ibasins ( W. P. A. 
Project 65-14-4953) in Atherton street, 
between Amory street and Wasliington 
street, in the Roxbury district, at an 
estimated cost of 823,000. 



Jan. 23 



CITY RECORD 



91 



A surface drain of 3-foot 6-inch circu- 
lar concrete (W. P. A. Project 65-14- 
4953) in Auckland street, between Savin 
Hill avenue and Elton street, in the Dor- 
chester district, at an estimated cost of 
$17,500. 

A surface drain of 12-inch pipe and 
two catch-basins (W. P. A. Project 65-14- 
4953) in Nira -avenue, between Day street 
and 480 feet westerly, in the Roxbury 
district, at an estimated cost' of $9,700. 

A surface drain of 2-foot 3-inch and 
3-foot 3-inch circular concrete (W. P. A. 
Project 65-14-4953; Work Project No. 
11907) in Dustin street between North 
Beacon street and Cambridge street, in 
the Brighton district, at an estimated 
cost of $53,508. 

A sanitary sewer of 10-inch pipe and 
a -surface drain of 3-foot 1-inch by 3- 
foot, 3^foot by 2-foot 9-anch, 2-foot 
9-iuch by 2-foot 5-inch, and 2-foot 3-inch 
by 2-foot U-shaped concrete (W. P. A. 
Project 65-14-4953; Work Project Nor 
11907) in Washington street (north- 
west side), between Mosgrove avenue 
and South street, in the West Roxbury 
district, at an estimated cost of $42,000. 

A surface drain of 4Hfoot 9-inch cir- 
cular concrete (W. P. A. Project 65-14- 
4953; Work Project No. 11907) in Wil- 
lowdean avenue, at HolljTvood road, in 
the West Roxbuiy district, at an es- 
timated cost of $2,400. 

A surface drain of 10-inch and 12-inch 
pipe and four catch-basins (W. P. A. 
Project 65-14-4953; Work P'roject No. 
11907) in Glenburnie road, between Burn- 
side avenue and Cerdan avenue, in the 
West Roxbury district, at an estimated 
cost of $9,660. 

A siu'face drain of 10-inch, 12-inch, 
18-inch and 22-inch pipe and eleven 
catch-ibasins ( W. P. A, Project 65-14-4953 ; 
Work Project No. 11907) in Bourne 
street, between Oanterbury street and 
Southbourne road, in the West Roxbury 
district, at an estimated cost of $22,500. 

A sanitary sewer of 10-inch pipe and a 
surface drain of 2-foot 6-inch circular con- 
crete and 10-inch pipe (W. P. A. Project 
6.5-14-4953; Work Project No. 11907) in 
Catherine street, between Meyer street 
and Bourne street, in the West Roxbury 
district, at an estimated coat of .$22,500. 

A surface drain of 10-inch and 12- 
inch pipe and four catch-basins (W. P. A. 
Project 65-14-4953; Work Project No. 
11907) in Bollaire road, between Bum- 
side a\-cnue and Cerdan avenue, in the 
West Roxbua-y district, at an estimated 
cost of .$9,180. 

A surface drain of 12-inoh pipe ( W. P. A. 
Project 65-14-4953; Work Project No. 
11907) in Bovunside avenue, between- 
Weld street and Bellaire road, in the 
West Roxbury district, at an estimateil 
cost of .$6,160. 



LAND=TAKING IN WEST 
ROXBURY. 

The Mayor has ajjpi'ovctl tlie oi'der of 
the Board of Street Commissioners for 
the taking of land for sewerage works 
to be constructed as follows: 

The right antl easement is taken to lay 
and maintain sewerage works in the 
following descrihed lands, exclusive of 
any interest in trees, buildings or other 
structures standing thereon, reserving to 
tlu; owneis tliereof the right to use the 
lands for any purjiose except such as may 
injuic or obstruct said works, and except 
for placing or maintaining any structure 
on said lands not authorized in writing 
by the Mayor of said city; trees, buildings 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 14 TO JANUARY 20. 



.Janoary 20. 



Owner. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Natur^. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Carter's, Incorporated 

Mary A. Reycroft 

Enterprise Co-operative 

Bank, 

E. & F. King 

E. & F. King 

DeBlois and Maddison 

Massachusetts Hospital Life 

Insurance Company. 
Buck Printing Company. . . . 

Mrs. Gertrude Moore 

B. S. Sargent 

Peter Curse 

A. E, Waters 

E. J. Costello 



G9.3 Atlantic avenue 

32 Wintiirop street 

23 and 25 Meridian street . 



.399 Atlantic avenue 

407-413 Atlantic avenue. . . . 
130 and 132 Lincoln street, 
393 Marlborough street .... 

145 Ipswich street 

47 Fairmount street 

88 Mt. Vernon street 

898 Saratoga street 

51 Stanley street 

4195 Washington street. . , . 



3 Alterations, hotel $900 

2 Alterations, dwelling 800 

1 Alterations, bank and offices, 500 

3 Alterations, rnercantile 175 

3 Alterations, mercantile 175 

3 .Altera tions, mercantile 4,000 

5 Fire escapes 150 

5 Elevator 1,700 

17 Alterations, dweUing 2,000 

5 Alterations, dwelling 17,000 

1 Alterations, stable 350 

15 Alterations, dwelling 350 

20 Sign 250 



or other structures standing upon or 
affixed to the land in which an easement 
is hereby taken are to be removed there- 
from within sixty days following a notice 
of the city's intention to enter upon said 
taking for the purpose of constructing 
said sewerage works. Said lands are in 
that part of Boston formerly West Rox- 
bury and are bounded as follows : 

A parcel of land, owneis unknO^\Ti, 
being part of the private way known as 
Hollywood road, bounded: 

Southerly by easement taken by the 
City of Boston for sewerage purposes, 
July 29, 1932, fifteen feet; westerly by 
another part of Hollywood road, seven- 
teen feet; northerly by easement taken 
by the City of Boston for sewerage 
purposes, June 19, 1930, seven hundred 
eighty-three and 36-100 feet; northeast- 
erly by the same, nineteen and 80-100 
feet; southerly by another part of Holly- 
wood road, seven hundred eighty-five 
and 99-100 feet, and easterly by the 
same, eight feet, containing seventy-two 
hundred and fiftj^ square feet, more or 
less. 

A parcel of land, owners unknown, 
being parts of the private wa.ys known as 
Hollywood road and Willowdean avenue, 
bounded : 

Northerly by another part of Holly- 
wood road, forty-two and 57-100 feet; 
northeasterly by another part of Willow- 
dean avenue, twelve and 32-100 feet; 
southeasterly by easement taken by the 
City of Boston for sewerage purposes in 
Willowdean avenue, .June 19, 1930, 
sixteen and 16-100 feet, and southwest- 
erly by easement taken by the City of 
Boston for sewerage puri)oscs, June 19, 
1930, forty-nine and 81-100 feet; con- 
taining five hundred seventy-eight square 
feet, more or less. 

A parcel of land, owners unknown, 
being part of the private way known as 
Willowdean avenue, hounded: 

Northwesterly by easement taken by 
the City of Boston for sewerage purposes 
in Willowdean avenue, twelve and 55-100 
feet; northetusterly by anotlier part of 
Willowdean avenue, seventeen and 60-100 
feet; southeasterly by laud hereinafter 
tlescribed as taken from The Manage- 
ment Corporation, eight feet, and south- 
westerly l)y easement taken by the City 
of Boston for sewerage purpo.ses, June 
19, 1930, seventeen feet; containing one 
lunulred seventy-five square feet, more 
or less. 

A parcel of land, sujiiiosed to belong to 
The Management C'oriwration, bounded: 

Northwesterly by land liereinbeforo 
described as taken from ownei-s unknown, 
eight feet; northeasterly l)y other huul 
supposed to belong to 'I'lie Management 
C'orpovat ioii, one lunulred feel; south- 



easterly by land hereinafter described as 
taken from Hall, eight feet, and south- 
westerly by easement taken by the City 
of Boston for sewerage purposes, June 19, 
1930, one hundred feet, containing eight 
hundred square feet, more or less. 

A parcel of land, supposed to belong 
to Florence C. Hall, bounded: 

Noi'thwesterly by land hereinbefore 
described as taken from The Manage- 
ment Corporation, eight feet; northeast- 
erly by other land supposed to belong to 
said Hall, one hundred nine and 27-100 
feet; southeasterly by land hereinafter 
described as taken from owners unknown, 
Parkvale road, eight and 1-100 feet and 
southwesterly bj' easement taken by the 
City of Boston for sewerage pm-poses, 
June 19, 1930, one hundred eight and 
79-100 feet; containmg eight hundred 
seventy- two square feet, more or less. 

A parcel of land, owners unknown, 
being part of the private way known as 
Parkvale road, bounded: 

Northwesterly by land hereinbefore 
described as taken from Hall and by 
other land supposed to belong to said 
Hall, fifteen and 30-100 feet; north- 
easterly by "another part of said road, 
twelve and 49-100 feet; southeasterly by 
another part of Parkvale road, fourteen 
and 56-100 feet, and southwesterly by 
easement taken by the Citj' of Boston for 
sewerage purposes, June 19, 1930, fourteen 
and 5-100 feet, containing one hundred 
ninety-seven square feet, more or less. 

A parcel of land, owners unknown, 
being jwrt of the private way known as 
Parkvale road, bounded: 

Noi'thwesterly by another part of said 
road, eighteen and 41-100 feet; north- 
easterly by the same, seventeen and 
45-100 feet; southeasterly by Wi>st 
Roxbury Parkway, eighteen and 31-100 
feet, and southwesterly by the same, 
fifteen antl 50-100 feet, containing three 
hundred two square feet, more or less. 

The sewoi'ago works to be constructed 
are as follows: 650 linear feet of 10-ineh 
pipe sanitary sewer and 1,125 linear feet 
of 4-foot 9-inch circular concrete surface 
drain, in the above describotl premises, 
being part of the private way known as 
Hollywood road, between Cluireli street 
and ^\'illowdean avenue, part of tiie 
private way known as Willowdean avenue 
at tite easterly enil of Hollywood mad, 
privat(> land between Willowiiean avenue 
and Parkvale road, and part of the 
private way known as Parkvale road, 
between said private laiui and the West 
Roxbury Parkway. • 

No bettiMinents aiv to be assessed for 
the making of the aforesaid impnn-emeiit. 

\'i<Uil. Tliat this Board determines that 
the unilonnentioned estates sustain 



92 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 23 



damages bj' the taking of an easement 
for sewerage purposes in Holl}^^•ood road 
and in private land, West Roxbury dis- 
trict, under the order of the Board of 
January 8, 1937, in the amounts herein- 
after respectivelj^ set against them, and 
awards said amounts therefor. 

Owners unknown (Hollywood road) , 7,250 

square feet Nothing 

Owners unknown (HoUy^vood road and 

Willowdean avenue). 578 square feet. . Nothing 
Owners unknown (Willowdean avenue), 

175 square feet Nothing 

The Management Corporation, 800 square 

feet SI 

Florence C. Hall, 872 square feet 1 

Owners unknown (Parkvale road), 197 

square feet Nothing 

Owners unknown (Parkvale road), 302 

square feet Nothing 



OPPOSES REMOVAL OF STATUE 
FROM PARK SQUARE AREA. 

The following is a copj^ of a letter 
received by the Mayor from the Boston 
Traffic Commission on January 16: 

Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to 
acknowledge receipt of yom' communica- 
tion of January 8, 1937, together with 
copy of a letter from Mr. Wendell P. 
Thore, who suggests that the Lincoln 
statue be removed from Park square and 
set up in the grass plot in Copley square. 

In my opinion the removal of this 
statue, with the resultant opportunitj"- to 
perhaps change the shape of the island for 
the pui'pose of creating a small rotary 
traffic cucle, as suggested by youi- Honor, 
would not facilitate the movement of 
traffic in this area. 

The present system of one-way streets, 
which is on trial in the Park square dis- 
trict, appears to be functioning splendidly. 
Rotary traffic aromid the Emancipation 
statue island would be contrary to the 
existing concept. 

Respectfully yours, 

William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 



REVISION OF ASSESSMENTS. 

The Mayor has approved the following 
orders of the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners : 

In the matter of the application for 
revision of assessments levied on account 
of the construction of sewerage works, 
February 8, 1933, Edgemere road. West 
Roxbury, the Board of Street Com- 
missioners, acting mider the provisions 
of chapter 359 of the Acts of the year 
1896, and deeming it just and proper that 
such action should be taken on said 
apphcation, 

Ordered, That the amounts hereinafter 
specified, being the annual apportionment 
of said assessments for the year 1936, be, 
and the same are, hereby abated. 

Sophia C. Peterson, Lot 27, Plan 
1932-2, §8.52. 

Sophia C. Peterson, Lot 28, Plan 
1932-2, .S8.52. 

In the matter of the apphcation for 
revision of assessments levied on account 
of the construction of sewerage works 
July 27, 1934, Johnson street. West 
Roxbury; and March 16, 1931, for sewer- 
age works in Belnel road. West Roxbury, 
the Board of Street Commissioners, 
acting under the provisions of chapter 
359 of the Acts of the year 1896, and 
deeming it just and proper that such 
action should be taken on said apph- 
cations, 



PLUMBING PERMITS ISSUED JANUARY 14 TO JANUARY 20. 

January 14. 



Plumber. 



Location. 



Ward. 



Nature. 



Estimated 
Cost. 



Saul Tack 89 Taeoma street 18 

>S. Shulman 6 Wilmington avenue 17 

I. W. Crozier 19 Woodrow avenue 14 

Jacob Dubinsky 648 Main street 2 

D. M. Goldstein 40 Leverett street 3 

Samuel Morse . , .' 78 Revere street 5 

John J. Downey 137 Newbury street 5 

Domenic Naimo 634 Main street 2 

A. Kellem 1315 Commonwealth ave. . . 21 

D. H. Lane 22 Thwing street 11 

Nelson Walters 68 Quincy street 12 



George S. Trethewey 15 Searle road 

Samuel Adams 14 Morley street 9 

John J. Vogel 28 Brookford street 13 

William Wiseman 1484 Washington street. ... 8 

Abraham Kellem 10 HoUis street 3 

Samuel Morse 78-90 Broadway 5 

Thomas C. Kelly 20 Montclair avenue 20 

WilUam Cooper 4298 Washington street .... 18 

Samuel Adams 52 East Cottage street 8 

Louis Trehub 15 Grant street 



13 



New fixtures $475 

New fixtures 400 

New fixtures 125 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 25 

New fixtures 295 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures < 50 

New fixtures 175 

New fixtures 180 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 625 

New fixtures 300 

New fixtures 480 

New fixtures 250 

New fixtures 800 

New fixtures 150 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures 20 

New fixtures 600 

New fixtures 300 



January 15. 



P. F. Russo 131 Child street 18 

Max Hyman 326 A street 6 

Arthur F. SulUvan 79-85 Exeter street 4 

EmiUo Pascucci 293 Benningtcn street 1 

L. S. Larrey 23 Pine Lodge road 20 

Thomas J. Walsh 42 Long avenue 21 

Louis Kometsky 19 Antwerp street 22 

Emilio Pascucci 204 Marion street 1 

A. T. Hapenney 5203A Washington street. . . 20 

Samuel Adams 266 Spring street 20 



New fixtures $300 

New fixtures 50 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 100 

New fixtures 500 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures 200 

New fixtures 75 

New fixtures 110 

New fixtures 100 



Janu.aby 16. 



A. E. Scrivens .... 
John S. Pagington. 
George S. Patey . . 

S. G. Cort 

D. J. RuU 

H. E. Smith 

John Manning. . . . 
Abraham KeUem. . 
Emiho Puopolo. . . 
Harry O. Heath . . 
John J. Norris. . . . 
H. J. Ritterhaus . . 



20 Wachusett street 18 New 

II Gienwood place 18 New 

147 Stratford street 20 New 

1087 Morton street 17 New 

725 East Second street 6 New 

16 Hyde Park avenue 11 New 

109 West Brookline street . . 6 New 

17 Irving street 5 New 

5 Adams street 2 New 

5 Cordis street 2 New 

16 Moulton street 2 New 

33 Grove street 5 New 



fixtures S50 

fixtures 248 

fixtures 50 

fixtures 650 

fixtures 25 

fixtures 75 

fixtures 175 

fixtures 90 

fixtures 150 

fixtures 50 

fi-xtures 375 

fixtures 300 



January 18. 



E. N. Banks 452 Boylstou street 4 

Emilio Puopolo 256 Franklin street 3 

Emilio Puopolo 149 Endicott street 3 



New fixtures S2,300 

New fixtures 50 

New fixtures 250 



J.INU.ARY 19. 



Joseph Nessell 

Harry A. Bella ce 

James A. Dickerson. . . 

J. E. Stanley 

R. J. Cavanaugh 

Frank J. BeU 

C. E. Bevelander 

Louis Trehub 

Floyd I. Montgomery. 

Oswald E. Porst 

E. J. Farley 



125 Beacon street 5 New 

235 Beacon street 5 New 

420 Beacon street 5 New 

19 Hubbardston road 13 New 

676 Dudley street 8 New 

590 Washington street 22 New 

190 Cambridge street 22 New 

70 Wilmington avenue 17 New 

73 Warren street 12 New 

1605 Columbus avenue 11 New 

80 Smith street 10 New 



fixtures §5,500 

fixtures 2,000 

fixtures 30 

fixtures -^ 300 

fixtures 85 

fixtures 150 

fixtures 75 

fixtures 500 

fixtures 40 

fixtures 100 

fixtures 700 



January 20. 



Michael B. Bradone. 

Frank Jordan 

Frank Jordan 

Wilford H. Gray 

Frank L. Gustafson . 
Nathan Katz 



35 Cambridge street 3 

6 King street 16 

43 Templeton street 16 

168 River street 18 

30 Chesbrough road 20 

36 Woodward avenue 8 



New fixtures $75 

New fixtures 105 

New fixtures 115 

New fixtures 90 

New fixtures 500 

New fixtures 250 



Ordered, That the amounts herein speci- 
fied, being the annual apportionments of 
said assessments for the undermentioned 
years, be, and the same are, hereby 
abated. 

Anna M. Busch, Lot 8, Plan 1932-40, 
.lohnson street, 1936 apportionment, 
S23.10. 

John E. and Ellen O'Toole, Lot 49, 
Plan 1930-25, Belnel road, 1935 ap- 
portionment, S13.60. 

In the matter of the apphcation for 
revision of assessment levied on account 



of the construction of sewerage works, 
June 6, 1934, Washington street, West 
Roxbury, the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners, acting under the provisions of 
chapter 359 of the Acts of the year 1896, 
and deeming it just and proper that such 
action should be taken on said application. 

Ordered, That the amount hereinafter 
specified, being the annual apportionment 
of said assessment for the year 1935 be, 
and the same is, hereby abated. 

Abraham Corey, Lot 2, Plan 1932-38, 
S18.12. 



Jan. 23 



CITY RECORD 



93 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL. 

Monday, January 11, 1937. 
Regular meeting of the City Council in the 
Council Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m., President 
FITZGERALD in the chair. Absent, Coun. 
Gleason, Kilroy, Peter A. Murray and Shattuck. 



APPOINTMENTS BY THE MAYOR. 

Subject to confirmation by the Council the 
Mayor submitted the following appointments, viz.: 

Weighers of Coal: Zelma Stoler, 41 Wolcott 
street, Dorchester, Mass.; James L. Maher, 10 
Welton road, West Roxbury, Mass.; Walter John- 
son, 84 Redlands road, West Roxbury, Mass.; Roy 
Francis Forrest, 401 Meridian street. East Boston, 
Mass. 

Severally laid over a week under the law. 



TRAFFIC LIGHTS, BLUE HILL AVENUE 
AND SEAVER STREET. 
The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 8, 1937. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I transmit herewith a communica- 
tion from the Traffic Commissioner relative to 
your order of December 28, 1936, concerning the 
rearrangement of the lighting system at the inter- 
section of Blue Hill avenue and Seaver street, 
Ward 14. 

Respectfully, 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 



City of Boston, 
Traffic Commission, January 7, 1937. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honor to acknowledge re- 
ceipt of Council order dated December 28, 1936, 
which reads as follows: 

"Ordered, That the Traffic Commissioner be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to re- 
arrange the lighting system at the intersection of 
Blue Hill avenue and Seaver street, Ward 14, so 
as to provide pedestrian signal lights for the pro- 
tection and safety of those persons who have 
occasion to cross this dangerous intersection." 

This signal was placed in operation on February 
4, 1932. At the request of Councilor Ruby an 
exclusive pedestrian period was added to the 
operation of this signal on April 27, 1932. 

The resultant congestion was immediately ap- 
parent and was so serious that on May 11, 1932, 
the pedestrian period was deleted and a new 
mechanism installed, which provides three dis- 
tinct periods for vehicular traffic, thus separating 
the dangerous conflicting movements. 

It is the opinion of the engineers of this com- 
mission that the present method of operating the 
signal is the most satisfactory, and provides a 
greater degree of safety to pedestrians than an 
exclusive red and yellow indication, with its 
attendant congestion, would afford. 

Respectfully yours, 
William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 

Placed on file. 



LOAN FOR SEWERAGE WORKS.' 

The following was received: 

City of Boston, 
Office of the Mayor, January 8, 1937. 
To the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — I am in receipt of the attached 
communication from the Public Works Commis- 
sioner, in which he requests that a loan in the 
amount of $800,000 be authorized within the bor- 
rowing power of the city for 1937, for sewerage 
works. Of this amount, roughly $490,000 will be 
used in connection with W. P. A. projects involv- 
ing a contribution by the Federal Government for 
labor and materials in the amount of $1,660,000. 
and the balance of the proposed loan, roughly 
$310,000, will be used in the construction of pro- 
posed sewerage works in various sections of the 
city. The complete details of the entire program 
are to be found in the letter of the Public Works 
Commissioner. 

In accordance with the provisions of chapter 44 
of the General Laws, it is now necessary for the 
city, in connection with the authorization of any 
loan, to provide for an appropriation equivalent 
to 10 cents on the valuation of the city for the 
previous year. .'Vccordingly I submit herewith an 
appropriation order in the amount of $162,026.50. 

I respectfully recommend immediate considera- 
tion and adoption of the accompanying orders. 
Respectfully, 
Frbdekick W. Mansfield, i\Iayor. 



City of Boston, 
Public Works Department, 

January 8, 1937. 
To His Honor the Mayor. 

At the present time the unencumbered balance in 
the Sewerage Works appropriation available for the 
use of the Public Works Department is approxi- 
mately $23,000. 

Funds are necessary for the program of the 
department which must be carried on during the 



current year. I therefore respectfully recommend 
that a loan appropriation of $800,000 be made 
available under the provisions of chapter 426 of the 
Acts of 1897 as amended by chapter 204 of the Acts 
of 1908 and by chapter l78 of the Acts of 1930. All 
sewer construction in this city must be charged to 
the loan made available under these acts. 

The program for the year's work, as prepared by 
this department, is as follows: 



For the W. P. A. Program. 

A. To complete W. P. A. sewerage works now in progress 

B. New W. P. A. Project blanket (pending) 

C. Proposed W. P. A. sewerage works (highway list) 



Proposed Sewerage Works to be Constructed Entirely from City Funds. 

Calf Pasture and Union Park street pumping stations and Moon Island plant 

Iron and bronze castings, manhole and catch-basins in frames, grates, fittings, etc 

Proposed sewerage works in City Proper, Roxbury, Dorchester, Hyde Park, West 
Roxbury, Brighton 

Miscellaneous proposed sewerage works for petitions, relaying broken and stopped sewers, new 
catch-basins and catch-basin drains, new manholes, new tide gates, etc., in various districts 
of the city 



$8.5,000 00 
1.56,600 00 
248,000 00 

$489,600 00 



$38,-500 00 
30,000 00 

141,900 00 



100,000 00 
$800,000 00 



It will be noted that the cost to the city for 
sewerage works in connection with the W. P. A. 
program is estimated at $489,600. In connection 
with this work it is estimated that the Federal 
Government will spend from W. P. A. funds for 
labor relief and materials the sum of $1,659,431. 
Y^ours respectfully, 

E. M. Richardson, 
Commissioner of Public Works. 

Ordered, That under the provisions of section 
one of chapter one hundred and seventy-eight of 
the Acts of nineteen hundred and thirty and section 
five of chapter two hundred and twenty-four of the 
Acts of nineteen hundred and thirty-six the sum 
of six hundred thousand dollars ($600,000) be, and 
the same hereby is, appropriated, to be expended 
under the direction of the Commissioner of Public 
Works, for the construction of sewerage works, 
and that the City Treasurer may issue, from time 
to time, upon approval of the Mayor, bonds or 
certificates of indebtedness of the city to said 
amount. 

Ordered, That under the provisions of section 
five of chapter two hundred and twenty-four of the 
Acts of nineteen hundred and thirty-si.x the sum 
of one hundred sixty-two thousand, twenty-six 
dollars and fifty cents ($162,026.50) be, and the 
same is hereby, appropriated, to be expended under 
the direction of the Commissioner of Public Works, 
for the construction of sewerage works, said amount 
to be raised by taxation on the polls and estates 
in the City of Boston. 

Referred to the Committee on Finance. 



PETITIONS REFERRED. 

The following petitions were received and re- 
ferred to the committees named, viz.: 

Claims. 

Edward C. Day, for compensation for damage 
to car by city car. 

William F. J. Doherty, for cpmpensation for 
accident caused by an alleged defect at 898 Sara- 
toga street. 

Domenico Gentile, for compensation for damage 
to property at 53 Chelsea street, caused by de- 
fective water pipes. 

Harry Glickman, for refund on refuse tickets. 

Hattie V. Goodwin, to be paid for expenses in- 
curred in cleaning drain pipes at 39 Humphreys 
street, Dorchester. 

Frank Kaufman, for refund on refuse tickets. 

F. Milontaler, for compensation for injuries 
caused by an alleged defect in Blue Hill avenue 
and Georgia street. 

Rabinovitz Creamery, for refund on refuse 
tickets. 

Scacchetti & Siegel, for refund on building 
permit. 

William R. Spinnej', for compensation for 
damage to car by city car. 

John J. Ward, for compensation for damage to 
car by fire engine. 

Mrs. Charles D. Hurley, to bo reimbursed for 
damage to coat by catching same on city truck 
No. B59S. 

Thomas W. Reed Company, for refund on 
refuse tickets. 

Executive. 

Petition of Ruth M. McShano for children under 
fifteen years of age to appear at Municipal Build- 
ing, Soiith Boston, February 5. 



APPOINTMENT OF JOHN T. McMORROW. 

Notice was received of the appointment by 
the Mayor of John T. McMorrow of 25 .Vthclwold 
street, IJoston. as member of Hoard of Examiners 
for term ending .\pril 30, 193S. 

Placed on file. 



SEWER DEPARTMENT CONTRACTS. 

The following was received: 

Boston. January 11, 1937. 
To the Honorable the City Council. 

Gentlemen, — On December 7, 1936, your 
Honorable Body adopted the following order: 

"Ordered, That the Boston Finance Commission 
be requested to furnish the Council with informa- 
tion relative to the matter of the awarding of 
Sewer Department contracts under $1,000 during 
the past year." 

The Finance Commission incloses herewith a 
copy of a report made to the Mayor on the subject 
referred to, as its reply to your order. 
Yours very truly, 
Robert E. Cunniff, Secretary. 

City of Boston, 
Finance Commission, January 5, 1937. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 
Mayor of Boston. 

Honorable Sir, — On .April 7, 1936, the Finance 
Commission made public protest to you against 
further continuance of the policy of the adminis- 
trators of the Public Works Department to "split 
contracts." The commission pointed out that 
work costing many thousands of dollars had been 
given out to a small group of favored contractors 
without public advertisement for bids and without 
competition. 

The commission stated in its report in reference 
to the award of public works contracts under these 
circumstances "that it has become a public 
scandal." The denial of the commission's charges 
by the Public Works Department officials who 
were accused in the Finance Commission report 
v/as accepted by you and given publicity at the 
time. Now that you are making a change in the 
position of Public Works Commissioner, the 
Finance Commission believes it is opportune to 
bring to jour attention evidence that the practices 
complained of in April have continued to the 
present time. 

This evidence is the record of more than $100,000 
worth of work given out by the Sewer Service to 
one contractor. The figures have been taken from 
the official records of the auditor's office and 
checked with the records in the Sewer Service. 
Further evidence is the testimony given under 
oath before the Finance Commission by the head 
of the Sewer Service, Mr. George W. Dakin. 

This official has informed the Finance Commis- 
sion that he was instructed by his superior, the 
Public Works Commissioner, to arrange the ORlcr- 
ing of work in such a manner as to avoid the 
necessity of advertising for bids. Mr. Dakin 
further informed the Finance Commission that 
he was instructed to give all such work to a piirticu- 
lar bidder, M. H. Loonie. 

The charter requires public advertisement for 
bids when the contract is to amount to $1.1H)0 or 
over. The auditor's records .are proof that Mr. 
Dakin carried out his instructions, .\coording to 
his testimony before the Finance Commission, he 
did so under repeated protest to the Public Works 
Commissioner. 

Between January 1 and November 15. M. U. 
Loonie was given 1S7 separate orders for work l>\" 
the Sewer Service. Nnt one of IS7 was awardinl 
as the result of competition in bidding, public or 
otherwise. The sum of the amount alroad.v |i:iid 
on these orders and the amount still due totals 
$106,147.82. 

Examiitation of the instructions cont.iinoii in 
the orders revealed n deliberate effort to split up 
into several orders cjioh being under Sl.tXKI jobs 
that would often amount to several thou»;ind 
dollars each, if given out as the charter re^iuircs. 

In some cases work on one street, sometime.* at 
almost the sjime S|H>t, wivs split into two or more 
orders. Sometimes a half docen or ntoro ortlors 
were given out within twenty-four to seventy-two 
hours for work on the sj»me street or in one sector. 
Often this work had been long planned by the 
Sewer Service. Often, however, the work in\-\<lv<\l 
was determined, as far .n.s Mr. Dakin and the 



94 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 23 



Sewer Service knew, bj' the Public Works Com- 
missioner on information not obtained from the 
Sewer SerWce. 

In 40 of the 1S7 instances of separate orders 
given to the Loonie firm, the estimate of the cost 
of the work to be performed under each order 
was just below SI, 000. In the majority of these 
forty cases and in many instances where the 
estimate of the cost of the work described was of 
smaller amount, the actual work done on each 
was but a part of the whole job contemplated. 

1 he commission has prepared a list of cases as 
illustrations of the practices followed. In every 
ease, according to the head of the Sewer Service, 
the work paid for came under the classification of 
split contracts. The commission also discussed 
with Mr. Dakin the whole list of 187 Loonie cases. 
Mr. Dakin stated that a large percentage of the 
work should have been done under advertised 
contracts; that a very small per cent of it should 
necessarily have been done on unadvertised 
orders, as it was of an emergency nature; that 
he and his department are not responsible for 
doing this work under the present method, namely, 
splitting up the jobs so that the amount involved 
will be less than SI, 000; that frequently he has 
visited the commissioner in regard to this matter, 



but has never been able to get authority to group 
the work and advertise it. 

Mr. Dakin has in his possession individual 
orders signed by the commissioner instructing him 
to give to a mentioned contractor certain work. 
He said he has no alternative but to follow the 
orders of the commissioner. On certain occasions 
when he has received orders from the Public 
Works Commissioner to split work on the same 
locus, he said he has visited the office of the com- 
missioner to make protest, but on each occasion 
was instructed to follow the original orders. 

The commission offers as an addenda a number 
of cases as typical of the practices followed. 

The commission recommends that the new 
Public Works Commissioner be instructed by you 
to end the deliberate evasion of the charter re- 
quirements in regard to contract awards that has 
been practised in the Public Works Department 
during the past three years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. Mark Sulliv.vn, Chairman, 
.Philip .-i. Ch.apm.a.n, 
Robert Robinson, 

,J.\MES E. M.\GnIRE, 

.Joseph A. Scolponeti, 
. . , , The Finance Commission. 



Addenda. 
(Accompanj-ing report to the Mayor regarding policy of the Public Works Commissioner to .split contracts 
in such a way as to make it possible to award them without advertising.) 

Main and Salem Streets, Charlestown. 

On May 27 an order was issued for excavating a test pit at Main and Salem streets estimated to cost 
SlOO, the actual payment being .S93.10. 

The next day. May 28, an order was issued for building one catch-basin on Salem street, Charlestown, 
fit an estimated cost of S400. The actual cost was S268.29. 

On the next da^■, May 29, an order was issued for the rebuilding of the sewer at Main and Salem streets 
at an estimated cost of -58.50, the actual cost being S712.26. 

On June 2 another order was issued for the building of a manhole at Main and Salem streets estimated 
at .S145, the actual cost being S143..55. 

The department's estimate amounted to SI, 495 and the actual cost was .SI, 217. 20. 



Esti- 
mated 
Price. 



Actual 
Payment. 



May 


27 


May 


28 


-May 


29 


June 


2 






.338 


o 


342 





344 





348 



Main and Salem streets 

Salem street 

Main and Salem streets 
Main and Salem streets 



Test pit 

1 catch-basin. . 
Rebuild sewer. 
1 manhole. . . . 



SlOO 
400 
850 
145 



81,495 



S93 10 
268 29 
712 26 
143 55 



Sl,217 20 



Columbia Road and Hamilton Street, Dorchester. . ■ 

On August 29 an order was issued for building three catch-basins at Columbia road and Hamilton street 

at an estimated cost of S990 and an actual cost of S966.24. 

On September 11 another order was issued for the construction of two catch-basins at Columbia road 

and Hamilton street at an estimated cost of .$950 and an actual cost of S985.74. 
The department's estimate was SI, 940 and the actual cost 81,951.98. 



Esti- 
mated 
Price. 



Actual 
Payment. 



August 29 
September 11 



No. 841 
No. 671 



Columbia road and Hamilton street, 
Columbia road and Hamilton street. 



3 catch-basins. . 
2 catch-basins. . 



S990 
950 



81,940 



.S966 24 
985 74 



81,951 98 



O'Connell Road, Dorchester. 

On September 17 an order was issued for the construction of a manhole on Washington street at O'Connell 
road at an estimated cost of 8990 and an actual cost of S980.10. 

On the same day an order was issued for the construction of two catch-basins at O'Connell road and 
Valley road at an estimated cost of 8900 and an actual cost of 8669.19. 

On September 24 an order was issued for the construction of one manhole on O'Connell road near Wa.sh- 
ington street at an estimated cost of 8990 and an actual cost of .8980.10. 

The department's e.stimate amounted to .82,880 and the actual co.st was 82,629.39. 

It will be noted in this case that two orders were issued on the same day amounting to 81,800 in the 
aggregate. 



Esti- 
mated 
Price. 



Actual 
Payment. 



September 17 
September 17 
September 24 



No. 700 
No. 701 
No. 731 



Washington street and O'Connell road. . . 

O'Connell road and Valley road 

O'Connell road, near Washington street. . 



1 manhole 

2 catch-basins. 
1 manhole 



8990 
900 
990 



82,880 



8980 10 
669 19 
980 10 



82,629 39 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON INSPECTION 
OF PRISONS. 

Coun. DOHERTY, in the absence of Chairman 
Gleason, for the Committee on Inspection of 
Prisons of 1936, submitted the following: 

In accordance with the provisions of chapter 126 
of the General Laws, the Committee on Inspection 
of Prisons submits herewith its annual report. 

Suffolk County Jail. 

The committee made its customary semi- 
annual inspections of the Suffolk County Jail 
during the year. 

The usual conditions with reference to cleanli- 
ness and sanitation prevailed at this institution. 

The most necessary improvements recommended 
by the committee at this time are the repair of 
the back wall, which is in a dangerous condition, 
and the pro\'iding of a permanent entrance to 
replace the present temporary gate. 

House of Correction. 
The usual number of "vasits were made to the 
House of Correction by the committee and con- 
ditions were found to be very satisfactory in every 
respect. 

For the Committee, 

Richard D. Gleason, Chairman. 
The report was accepted. 



PLAYGROUND ON COMMERCIAL STREET. 

Coun. JOHN I. FITZGERALD offered the 
following: 

Ordered, That the Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, through his Honor the Mayor, be re- 
quested to make an exanination of the property 
on the southerly side of Commercial street near 
Hull street acquired by the city under tax title 
proceedings and report ai; to its availability for 
playground purposes. 

Passed under suspension, of the rule. 



REVOCATION OF CERTAIN INSURANCE 
COMPANY LICENSES. 

Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 

Resolved, That the Boston City Council favor 
the revocation of the licenses of each and every 
insurance company to operate under the laws of 
Massachusetts, if it is found in cases of the refusal 
of compulsory automobile insurance to automobile 
owners, were arbitrary and sufficient cause has 
not been offered to justify the refusal of this 
insurance. Such action to be taken after the 
examination of cases before the Board of Appeal. 

Coun. McGR.ATH — Mr. President, there seems 
to be a great deal of agitation among the insurance 
companies regarding the acceptance of compulsory 
automobile insurance. I find through a clipping 
from one of the Boston papers (The Boston 
Evening American of December 8, 1936) that 
automobile policies have been refusecl to 90,000 
car owners in the state. But I am not introducing 
this order today merely upon hearsay. I have 
this year refused to write any compulsory auto- 
mobile insurance. If you go into the offices of 
some of the companies who place such insurance, 
you will find that if the name of the applicant 
does not sound all right, the clerk in charge refuses 
the apphcation for insurance. I have definite 
proof, Mr. President, of the charge that I am now 
making against some of the insurance companies. 
Last year I went into the office of one of the large 
insurance companies in Boston with an application 
for renewal. The name of the gentleman who 
signed the application indicated that he was of 
Polish extraction, and the clerk in charge said, 
"Have you tried to place this pohcy anywhere 
else?" I said, "No. I thought I would come to 
you first, knowing that you want the business." 
"Well, if you don't mind, we are going to refuse 
this." I asked the clerk, "Is it because of the 
name of the appUcant'?" and he said, "Yes." 
I had a witness, Mr. President, and I said, " I think 
I will go down and see the Insurance Commis- 
sioner." He said, "Just a minute. Let me look 
at this again." I said, "No, you have made 
your decision. Mister." He asked if I would be 
kind enough to give him the application, which 
I refused to do. But it appears that there are 
90,000 such cases in the state, which, of course, 
means a great deal of inconvenience and embarrass- 
ment to the people of our state, in business and 
otherwise. A man may be in business, with a 
little route that requires the use of a truck, and 
he is told by these companies, " No, we don't 
want your business." He has a right of appeal, 
but that may take a month or six weeks. With 
90,000 cases to be heard, I cannot say how long 
it might take. So I think, if a company does not 
have sufficient cause to justify the refusal of such 
insurance, upon investigation, the license of such 
a company should be revoked. Therefore, I ask 
the members of the Council to go on record as in 
favor of revoking licenses under such conditions. 

(The newspaper article referred to by Coun. 
McGrath, taken from the Boston American of 
December 8, 1936, is as follows: 

90,000 in State Refused Auto Insurance. 
"Several large insurance companies have refused 
to issue automobile pohpies to 90,000 car owners 



Jan. 23 



CITY RECORD 



95 



because the motorists would not take out property 
damage coverage, Insurance Commissioner Francis 
J. DeCellcs revealed today. 

" Under the law the commissioner can order the 
companies to write compulsory auto policies. He 
did this last year and will probably have to do so 
again, he intimated. 

"According to Commissioner DeCelles, the 
situation occurs near the close of every year, 
when the large insurance agencies try to force 
property damage insurance on the car owners by 
embarrassing them with delay. 

"Hundreds of complaints have 'already been 
received this month by the commissioner. On 
the basis of these, he estimates the number of car 
owners being refused policies, under one subterfuge 
or another, will reach 90,000. 

"Car owners naturally e.vpect the companies 
that insured them one year to renew the policies 
the next year. After making their appUcations, 
they wait for their number plates, until near the 
end of the year, when they suddenly realize the 
company has failed them. 

"Only in rare cases, it was explained, do the 
companies make an outright refusal in writing, so 
that the car owner knows where he stands. 

"In some cases the agencies have held policies, 
complained to the registrar of motor vehicles that 
the insured failed to pay, and requested that his 
insurance be revoked, all because he declined to 
buy property damage, guest and extra-territorial 
coverage, as well as compulsory liability. 

"'Due to the seriousness of the situation this 
year, I am planning to call a conference of all 
insurance executives within a few days in order 
to see that unethical practices are stopped,' said 
Commissioner DeCelles.") 

The order was referred to the Committee on 
Rules. 



MORTGAGES OF HOME OWNERS LOAN 
CORPORATION. 

Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 

Resolved, That the members of the Boston City 
Council go on record as requesting the Massa- 
chusetts Congressmen to take whatever action 
necessary to forestall the possibility of foreclosures 
on homes covered by mortgage of the Home 
Owners Loan Corporation, where the mortgagor 
is paying interest on the mortgage, but is not in a 
position to make payments on the principal. 

Coun. McGRATH— Mr. President, this is a 
very important order. Knowing a little about 
the workings of the Home Owners Loan Corpora- 
tion, being somewhat familiar with the system. 
I have introduced the order so that we may take 
some steps to try to correct the present situation 
and afford relief to many people in Massachusetts 
and probably in the en', ire country. At the start 
of the Home Owners Loan Corporation it was 
necessary for the beneficiary to be in arrears in 
interest on the mortgage, in fact to be on the 
verge of foreclosure, before his application to the 
Home Owners Loan Corporation would be con- 
sidered. In the beginning, in order to relieve 
the burden on the home owner and to assist him, 
they waived principal payments. That, however, 
was only temporary, and the system now is that if 
the home owner is behind three to six months in 
making principal payments on a mortgage, under 
the[]bookkeeping system of the Home Owners Loan 
Corporation, he is in arrears for that amount of 
money; and if he is in arrears a thousand dollars 
on principal paj'ments orders have come, I don't 
know from where, to foreclose. Now, we know 
that we are not as j'et out of the depression, and 
that conditions are still bad, so that it is impossible 
for some of these home owners to make principal 
payments. Of course, if they are in a position 
to do so, very well, and I have made a stipulation 
to that effect. I think, however, that if these 
people are up on their interest payments at a time 
like this, Mr President and members of the Coun- 
cil, they are doing pretty well. There is, however, 
another situation that enters into the condition 
at which this order aims. The men in charge of 
the Home Owners Loan Corporation, who after 
all are only working under orders from some one 
higher up, insist that principal payments must be 
made even although the home owner wishes to 
use the money he has to pay his taxes. The orders 
are, "Pay your interest and principal here, and 
never mind the taxes." I know of a case in point 
where a lady with whom I came in contact owns 
and rents a three-family house. It is necessary 
for her to bring the rent of that house to the Home 
Owners Loan Corporation every month, so that 
she has nothing left to live on. In doing so she 
has exhausted her entire means. She has visited 
the Assessing Department and tried to get an 
abatement of the taxes, and the attendant asse.ssor 
in charge said, "Well, if the Home Owners Loan 
Corporation will waive principal pa.vments, madam, 
I will do what I can to assist j*ou, so that you 
may receive a little money from the income of 
this property, to live upon." I know that the 
Home Owners Loan Corporation was not set up 
with the idea of depriving people of a livelihood, or 
of a little income that they might need. So I am 
asking the Massachusetts Congressmen to take 
action in this matter and do what they can to 
relieve the home owners. 

The resolution was referred to the Committee 
on Rules. 



Addenda — Continued. 

Pope's Hill Street, Dorchester. 
On March 26 an order was issued for the construction of two catch-basins on Pope's Hill street, Dor- 
chester, at an estimated cost of S350 and an actual cost of S687.61 

On July 8 an order was issued for the construction of one catch-basin on Pope's Hill street at an esti- 
mated cost of S400 and an actual cost of .S444.51. 

The department's estimate amounted to S7.50 and the actual cost was -51,132.12. 











Esti- 
mated 
Price. 


Actual 
Pay- 
ment. 


March 26 


No. 150 
No. 458 


Pope's Hill street . .... 


2 catch-basins. . 
1 catch-basin... 


S3.50 
400 


•$687 61 


July 8 


Pope's Hill street 


444 51 










S750 


SI, 132 12 



Penryth Street, at Columbus Avenue, Roxbury. 

On September 22 an order was issued for the construction of two manholes on Columbus avenue, at 
Penryth street, at an estimated cost of S700 and an actual cost of S506.53. 

Three days later, on September 25, an order was issued for the construction of two catch-basins on 
Penryth street, near Columbus avenue, at an estimated cost of S900 and an actual cost of $712.30. 

The degartment's estimate amounted to .$1,600 and the actual cost was SI, 218. 83. 











Esti- 
mated 
Price. 


Actual 
Pay- 
ment. 


September 22 
September 25 


No. 723 
No. 736 


Columbus avenue, at Penryth street 

Penryth street, near Columbus avenue. . . . 


2 manholes .... 
2 catch ba.sins, 


$700 
900 


S506 53 
712 30 




SI, 600 


Sl,218 83 



Fremont Street, Dorchester. 

This street is being built and paved by the city at the present time and the necessary sewerage work 
is always performed before the paving work commences. 

On September 29 an order was issued for the construction of two catch-basins and one manhole on 
Fremont street, Dorchester, at an estimated cost of .39-50, and an actual cost of S764.53. 

An order was issued to the same contractor on October 8 for the construction of one catch-basin on 
Fremont street at an estimated cost of S500 and an actual cost of S672.ll. 

On October 22 another order was issued to a different contractor for the construction of one catch- 
basin on Fremont street, at Fremont place, at an estimated cost of .$400. 

By grouping the first two orders the department's estimate amounted to SI, 450 and the actual cost 
was si, 436. 64; by grouping the three orders the department's estimate would have been Sl,850 and the 
actual cost correspondingly incre.ised. 





Esti- 
mated 
Price. 


Actual 
Pay. 
ment. 


September 29 


No. 758 

No. 791 
No. 840 


Fremont street 


/2 catch-basins, \ 
11 manhole. ... J 

1 catch-basin. . . 
1 catch-basin.. . 


S950 

500 
400 


S764 .53 


October 8 




672 11 


October 22 


Fremont street 












SI, 850 


7 



Sycamore Street, West Roxbury. 

On August 7 an order was issued to J. F. O'Connell Company for constructing one catch-basin at Syca- 
more street at an estimated cost of $465, the actual cost being S223.74. 

Five days later, on August 12, an order was issued to the Roxbury Concrete Construction Company for 
constructing one catch-basin on Sycamore street at an estimated cost of S700 and an actual cost of $271. 26. 

Again, on November 4, an order was issued to Daniel Clifford for the construction of one catch-b;usiu on 
Sycamore street at an estimated cost of $.500. The actual cost was S219.78. 

The department's estimate amounted to $1,665 and the actual cost w:is only S714.78. 



Esti- 
mated 
Price. 



.\ctual 
Payment. 



August 7 

.\ugust 12 
November 4 



No. 564 
No. 583 
No. 876 



Sycamore street. 
Sycamore street. 
Sycamore street. 



1 catch-basin. . 
1 catch-basin. . 
1 catch-lxisin. . 



$465 
700 
500 



91,665 



$22,? 74 
271 26 
21U 7S 



9714 78 



West First Street, South Boston. 

On September 18 an order was Lssued for the cleaninR of the sewer at West Firsi sircei In-twoon D and 
E streets at an estimated cost of $850. The actual cost was $S;U.60. 

Six days later, September 24, an order was i.ssued for the clcaninn of thoscworin the same si root between 
E and F streets at an estimated cost of $8(X). The actual cost was $757.35. 

Eight da>'s later. October 2, another order was issued for cleaning of the sewer in the same street between 
F and East First streets at an estimated cost of $550. The actual cost wtus $534.60. 

On November 2 another order was issued e.xtending the same work at an ostinialed ca«t of S'OO and an 
actual cost of $690.52. 

The department's estimate amounted to $2,900 and the actual cost was $3,814.07. 



96 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 23 



Addenda — Concluded. 

There was another order issued on October 6 for the construction of a manhole on West First street at 
an estimated cost of $500. The actual payment was $202.04. 





Esti- 
mated 
Price. 


Actual 
Payment. 


September 18 
September 24 
October 2 

November 2 


No. 703 
No. 733 
No. 777 

No. 868 
No. 785 


Clean sewer West First street between D and E streets 

Clean sewer West First street between E and F streets 

Clean sewer West First street between F and East First 
streets. 

Clean sewer West First street between East First and Dor- 
chester streets. 


$850 
800 
550 

700 


$831 60 
757 35 
534 60 

690 52 


October 6 


$2,900 
500 


$2,814 07 
202 04 










$3,400 


$3,016 11 



East Second Street, South Boston. 
The same procedure was followed in the cleaning of the sewer in East Second street. 







■ • ■ 


Esti- 
mated 
Price. 


Actual 
Payment. 


November 16 
November 18 


No. 911 

No. 927 


Clean sewer East Second street from Dorchester street 125 
feet easterly. 

Clean sewer East Second street from 125 feet east of Dor- 
chester street to 30 feet west of H street. 

^ • ' •' ' \-. 


$410 
955 


$402 19 




$1,365 


$402 19 



Tolman Street, Dorchester. 

On January 18 an order was issued for the construction of one manhole on Tolman street at an estimated 
cost of $250 and an actual cost of $277.69. 

On March 17 another order was issued for the construction of a manhole on the same street at an 
estimated cost of $200. The actual cost was $233.14. 

On June 25 another order was issued for the construction of two catch-basins on Tolman street at an 
estimated cost of $700. The actual cost was $973.17. 

On Jul.v 6 another order calling for the construction of two catch-basins on the same street was issued 
at an estimated cost of $900. The actual cost was $940.50. 

By grouping these orders the estimate of the department would have been $2,050, while the actual 
cost amounted to $2,424.50. Or even the grouping of the two orders issued on June 25 and July 6 involved 
an expenditure of close to $2,000. Besides the above, orders for cleaning the sewer in Tolman street were 
issued on January 1, March 31 and April 1. By grouping of these three orders the department's estimate 
would have been $1,650. The actual payments made on them amounted to $1,596.36. 











Esti- 
mated 
Price. 


Actual 
Pay- 
ment. 




No. 43 
No. 135 

No. 416 
No. 451 




1 manhole 

1 manhole 

2 catch-basins. . 
2 catch-basins. . 


$250 
200 
700 
900 


$277 69 


March 17 


Tolman street 


233 14 


June 25 


Tolman street 


973 17 


July 6 


Tolman street 


940 50 










$2,050 


$2,424 50 


January 15 


No. 38 
No. 155 
No. 159 




$700 
300 

650 


$690 52 


March 31 


Clean sewer Tolman street 


289 57 


April 1 


Clean sewer Norwood street, between Tolm 
streets 


an and Conway 


616 27 










$1,650 


$1,596 36 



Placed on file. 



COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS. 

President FITZGERALD made the following 
committee appointments: 

Executive Committee: All members, Coun. 
Gallagher chairman. 

Appropriations: Coun. Agnew, Roberts, Selvi- 
tella. Peter J. Fitzgerald, Gallagher, Rosenberg, 
Kilroy. 

Claims: Coun. Selvitella, Agnew, Roberts, 
Brackman, Tobin. 

County Accounts: Coun. Roberts, Rosenberg, 
Wilson, Peter J. Fitzgerald, Tobin. 

Finance: Coun. Dowd, Peter J. Fitzgerald, 
Sbattuck, Kilroy, Kerrigan, Rosenberg, Agnew. 

Inspections of Prisons: Coun. Gleason, Doherty, 
Finley, McGrath, Peter A. Murray. 

Jitney Licenses: Coun. Peter A. Murray, 
Selvitella, Wilson, Dowd, Kerrigan. 

Legislative Matters: Coun. Shattuck, Peter J. 
Fitzgerald, Kilroy, John I. Fitzgerald, Gleason. 

Ordinances: Coun. Gallagher, Rosenberg, Finley, 
Selvitella;'-Peter J. Fitzgerald, Wilson, Shattuck. 

Parkman Fund: Coun. Gallagher, Doherty, 
George A. Murray, Peter A. Murray, Shattuck. 

Printing: Coun. Selvitella, Peter A. Murray, 
Finley, Rosenberg, Norton. 

Public Lands: Coun. Kerrigan, Kilroy, Agnew, 
Peter J. Fitzgerald, Wilson. 



Rules: Coun. Wilson, Kerrigan, Agnew, Galla- 
gher, Peter J. Fitzgerald. 

Soldiers' Relief: Coun. Kerrigan, Doherty> 
Mellen, Norton, Gleason. 

Special Committees. 

Constables: Coun. Agnew, Kerrigan, Roberts. 

Hospitals: Coun. Doherty, Finley, Agnew, 
Peter A. Murray, Kerrigan. 

Municipal Lighting: Coun. Dowd, Wilson, 
Gallagher, Rosenberg. Selvitella. 

Parks and Playgrounds: Coun. Finley, Kerrigan, 
Tobin, Rosenberg, Brackman. 

Public Safety: Coun. Agnew, Selvitella, George 
A. Murray, McGrath, Brackman, Mellen, 'Tobin. 

Unclaimed Baggage: Coun. Agnew, Roberts, 
Kerrigan. 

License Fees: Coun. Wilson, Roberts, McGrath, 
Selvitella, Brackman. 

Pubhc Welfare: Coun. Agnew, Roberts, Wilson, 
Finley, Peter A. Murray. 

Tax Title Property: Coun. Finley, Doherty, 
Wilson, Kerrigan, Shattuck. 

Special Committee on Consolidation of Depart- 
ments: Wilson, Dowd, Shattuck, Kerrigan, Peter 
J. Fitzgerald, Gallagher. 

Fire Insurance: Coun. McGrath, Kerrigan, 
Petet J. Fitzgerald. 



RENTAL OF FRENCH TELEPHONES. 
Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 
Ordered, That the Corporation Counsel of the 
City of Boston be requested to immediately peti- 
tion for the necessary legislation to provide for the 
return of all payments to subscribers of the Tele- 
phone Company that have been paid in connection 
with the renting of so-called French telephones by 
the Telephone Company. 

Coun. McGRATH— Mr. President, I would Uke 
to refer to the clipping that I have from a Wash- 
ington newspaper and to have the clipping incor- 
porated in our records. It is headed " French 
Phones. A. T. T. profits $24,000,000," and it goes 
on to show that the American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Company collected in one year $24,000,000 
from the use of French telephones. $24,000,000! 
I would like to say, on behalf of some of the em- 
ployees of the telephone company who have 
written me regarding my orders introduced into 
the City Council, that I have every respect for 
them. Anything I have said on the floor of the 
Council has been in their favor, and I am not 
opposed to the employees of the telephone com- 
pany. And I would like to go just a step further, 
Mr. President, I have the highest respect for the 
charitable work that they do every Christmas, 
the relief taken from the relief fund of the em- 
ployees of the telephone company. The good 
work that they do for the poor of Boston every 
year is so well known that it is not necessary for 
me to speak about it here. However, we have 
heard a great deal about class against class. For 
the past few years the employees of the telephone 
company — although the higher-ups have rather 
taken the credit for it — have entertained children 
in the Bowdoin Square building during the Christ- 
mas season. This year, however, contrary to the 
situation in other years, it was necessary for the 
employees to hire Mechanics Building, for the rea- 
son that the higher-ups in the telephone company 
had their maintenance department waxing the 
floors of the Bowdoin Square building so that they 
themselves could use it at that time, while the 
employees entertained the children at Mechanics 
Building. I say, if the higher-ups want to put 
class against class, that is all right; but I still 
want to say that I have every appreciation of 
the work that the employees are doing during the 
Christmas season. While on this subject I would 
also like to have incorporated in the record another 
clipping from the Boston Traveler of December 17, 
1936, with a Washington date line, headed "Phone 
Charges Held Too High; Federal Board Finds 
Exorbitant Prices paid for Equipment." 

(Following are the two clippings referred to by 
Coun. McGrath in his remarks: 
"French 'Phones. A. T. T. Profits $24,000,000. 

"Washington, December 18 (I.N.S.). Ihe 
engineering department of the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission today told the commission 
that the American Telephone and Telegraph Com- 
pany, and its subsidiaries, by means of excess 
monthly charge for the use of the so-called ' French ' 
type of telephone, has collected over $53,000,000 
from telephone subscribers on which the net profit 
has been $24,000,000. 

"This, the report said, represented 45 per cent 
profit on the gross revenue and an annual return 
of 25 per cent on the investment. 

"The report further showed that the largest 
net profit thus far accumulated was suflScient to 
defray all alleged future added expenses of ' French ' 
'phones until 1950, with a remaining profit of over 
$11,000,000, 'even assuming that all monthly 
excess charges for use of the instrument were 
completely ehminated as of January 1, 1937.' 

"'Of greater importance,' the report said, 'was 
the fact that A. T. & T. had developed and intro- 
duced the hand telephone set and telephone trans- 
mission improvement of such magnitude that 
additional savings in wire construction cost, 
amounting to over $85,000,000, were made avail- 
able to the Bell System as a result of a widespread 
use of the new instrument, in addition to the 
$11,000,000 net profit as previously shown. 

'"It was further alleged that the savings have 
not been fully revealed by the Bell System in its 
previous defense of the added charge before state 
regulatory commissions. 

'"The report concluded with a statement that 
a consideration of all relevant facts indicated that 
the introduction of the instrument into the Bell 
System "constituted ample cause for a reduction 
in telephone rates, rather than for the increase 
which has been obtained by the Bell System 
through application of this excess charge for the 
use of the hand telephone set.'"" 

From Boston Traveler December 17, 1936: 
"Phone Charges Held Too High. 
"Federal Board Finds Exorbitant Prices Paid for 
Equipment. 

"Washington, December 17 (U. P.). Bell Tele- 
phone System rates are based on exorbitant prices 
paid Western Electric Company for equipment, 
the Fecleral Communications Commission charged 
today at its inquiry into financial operation of the 
American Telephone & Telegraph Company. 

"The commission charged associated companies 
paid Western Electric, a subsidiary of the A. T. 
& T., which controls the Bell System, from 50 to 
550 per cent more for central office equipment 
than it would have cost if purchased from inde- 
pendent manufacturers. 



Jan. 23 



CITY RECORD 



97 



'"A large part of the $4,250,000,000 invest- 
ment in telephone property, and a portion of the 
$651,000,000 operating expenses of the Bell Sys- 
tem are represented by the purchase prices of 
telephone apparatus, equipment and material,' 
the commission said. 

"Long-distance telephone rate reductions total- 
ing $22,000,000 have been made since the com- 
mission iDCgan its investigation more than a year 
ago. The commission is seeking to show that 
still further reductions should be made.") 

There being no objections, the above cUppings 
were ordered included in the record, and the 
order was passed under suspension of the rule. 



TRAFFIC SIGNALS, WARDS 16 AND 17. 

Coun. WILSON and Coun. McGRATH offered 
the following: 

Ordered, That the Traffic Commissioner be re- 
quested, through his Honor the Mayor, to pro- 
vide suitable automatic traffic signals at the inter- 
section of Ashmont street and Dorchester avenue, 
on the dividing line of Wards 16 and 17. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 

Coun. WILSON — Mr. President, I offer that 
order because of the dangerous situation and the 
need for traffic signals at the intersection of As.h- 
mont street and Dorchester avenue, on the dividing 
line of Wards 16 and 17, a dangerous situation 
that is also reaUzed bj' my colleague from the ad- 
joining ward (Coun. McGrath). As the councilor 
from Ward 16, who is now having an intermission, 
also well knows, this is a particularly dangerous 
spot, at Peabody square, being at the center of a 
group of some six streets through which pour 
traffic to and from the South Shore, connecting up 
with Dorchester avenue, Washington street and 
Neponset. We have there a terminal of the Boston 
Elevated Railway, as well as of the Eastern Massa- 
chusetts, making altogether an extremely compli- 
cated traffic situation. While I would not urge 
signal traffic lights on each of the six entrances 
into this particular square, I do urge the advisabil- 
ity of his Honor the Mayor and the Traffic Com- 
missioner in their wisdom going at least as far as 
to install a light on the Ward 16 side of Dorchester 
avenue and on the Ward 17 side of Dorchester 
avenue, to control that traffic pouring into the 
Peabody square tunnel. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



ACCEPTANCE OF JACOB STREET. 
Coun. ROSENBERG offered the foUowing: 
Ordered, That the Board of Street Commis- 
sioners be requested, through his Honor the Mayor, 
to accept and lay out Jacob street. Ward 14, as a 
public highway. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



PAYMENT TO MOTHER OF 
MARY DURANT. 
Coun. KERRIGAN offered the foUowing: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby favors the enactment of legislation author- 
izing the city to pay a sum of money to the mother 
of Mary Durant, who lost her life at a South 
Boston bathing beach, provided that such legisla- 
tion includes a referendum to the Mayor and 
City Council. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



PAYMENT TO MARY MARGARET ItEANE. 

Coun. GALL.VGHER, for Coun. Peter A. 
Murray, offered the following: 

Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby favors the enactment of legislation author- 
izing the payment of a sum of money to Mary 
Margaret Keane for injuries received while a 
student nurse at the City Hospital, provided that 
said legislation includes a referendum to the Maj'or 
and City Council. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



ELECTRIC LIGHT ON HEATH STREET. 

Coun. DOHERTY offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Public Works Commissioner 

be requested, through liis Honor the Mayor, to 

install an electric light at the corner of South 

Huntington avenue and Heath street, Ward 10. 

Passed under the suspension of rule. 



PAYMENT OF AID TO SOLDIERS AND 
SAILORS. 

Coun. KERRIGAN, for the Committee on 
Soldiers' Relief, submitted a report recommending 
the passage of an order for payment of aid to 
soldiers and sailors and their families in the City 
of Boston for the month of January. 

Report accepted; said order passed. 



WARD 6 IMPROVEMENTS. 

Coun. GEORGE A. MURRAY offered the fol 
lowing; 

Ordered, That the Commissioner of the Public 
Works Department be requested, through his 
Honor the Mayor, to install an electric light in 
front of 227 Second street, between C and D 
streets, replacing the present gas lamp. 

Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the 
Mayor, to resurface with smooth paving, West 
Third street. Ward 6. 

Ordered, That the Commissioner of Public 
Works be requested, through his Honor the Mayor, 
to resurface with smooth paving C street. Ward 6. 

Severally passed under suspension of the rule. 



LOWER INTEREST RATES ON HOME 
MORTGAGES. 

Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 

Ordered, That the Corporation Counsel be 
requested, through his Honor the Mayor, to 
petition the Legislature for legislation to provide 
for lower interest rates on mortgages on homes. 

Coun. McGRATH— Mr. President, I introduce 
that order in conjunction with the order I have 
just introduced and spoken upon in regard to the 
Home Owners Loan Corporation. The banks are 
paying 2 and 3 per cent interest and charging 5-2- 
and 6 per cent interest on loans on mortgages. I 
think if they reduced the rate fo 4 per cent they 
would be getting a substantial investment on their 
money. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



FIRE INSURANCE RATES. 

Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 

Ordered, That the President of the City Council 
appoint a committee of members of the City 
Council to cooperate with the Governor in con- 
nection with Fire Insurance rates in Boston with 
the view of doing everything possible to bring 
about a reduction in the present insurance rates. 

Coun. McGRATH— Mr. President, I would like 
to say that on June 1 of last year I introduced 
this order, and I was pleased to see the present 
Governor dwell on the question of fire insurance 
rates in his inaugural message. I ask, therefore, 
in this order that the President appoint a com- 
mittee of the Council to cooperate with the 
Governor in this matter of fire insurance rates 
in Boston, looking to a reduction from the present 
rate, and I would like to have brought to the 
attention of the Governor our minutes of June 1, 
1936, dealing with this matter. They are very 
brief, and I would ask that they be incorporated 
in the records of this meeting. 

(The order and the remarks referred to, printed 
in the City Council Minutes of June 1, 1936, are 
as follows: 

Investigation of Fire Rates. 

Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 

Ordered, That the President of the City Council 
appoint a special committee of three members to 
investigate and study fire insurance rates in 
Boston and to confer with the Board of Fire 
Underwriters. 

Coun. McGRATH— Mr. President, in my 
experience in writing insurance in the Dorchester 
district for the past twelve years my loss ratio 
has been but S2.56, and in that period I have 
probably turned in to the insurance companies 
about .575,000. There was a lobby of the insurance 
companies last year in the matter of the workmen's 
compensation and liability insurance, which the 
state was thinking of handling under a separate 
department. Five different insurance men visited 
my office and asked me to do what I could to 
influence the Representatives and Senators from 
that district to vote against it. I asked the rep- 
resentatives of the companies what the reason 
was for the different insurance rates on streets 
adjacent to each other, and the only answer w;vs, 
"Congestion." I think, with the ratio of loss I 
have stated, and with the amount of money I have 
turned into the insurance companies, there should 
certainly be a dropping of a readjustment of the 
rates. For example, they have increased the 
liability rate on a three-family house from S2.5 to 
$42, with no explanation. That is the reason for 
the introduction by mo of this order, and I would 
like to have the President appoint suoli a couimitteo 
as is provided for in the order. 

Coun. ROSHNBERCi— Mr. President, I am 
interested in this order also, because, as a repre- 
sentative of the Dorchester district, I find that, 
for some reason or other, from an insurance point 
of view, the Dorchester district seems to be a 
blacklisted section. In other words, it seems to 
be set .aside as a dangerous district in the matter 
of insurance rates. 1 don't believe the losses in 
the Dorchester district are as great as they are in 
other .sections of the city, and I don't see why 
people living in that residential section of my 
district should bo barred or discriminated against, 
why the.\' should have to pay an exorbitant rate 
of insurance. I think, if you will look up the 
insurance rates, you will find that the people of 



Dorchester are paying two or three times as much 
as people in other sections of the city. I believe 
that an investigation of the rates in different 
sections will prove beneficial to Dorchester and 
will bring about a reduction in the insurance rates 
not only in Dorchester but probably in greater 
Boston.) ' 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



RECESS. 

A recess was ordered by President FITZ- 
GERALD at 2.48 p. m. The members re- 
assembled in the Council Chamber and were 
called to order by Coun. GALLAGHER at 3.35 
p. m. 



Coun. GALLAGHER in the chair. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE REPORTS. 

Coun. GALLAGHER, for the Executive Com- 
mittee, submitted the following reports: 

1. Petition of Ruth M. McShane for children 
under fifteen years of age to appear at JIunicipal 
Building, South Boston, February 5 — that leave 
be granted on usual conditions. 

Report accepted; leave granted on usual con- 
ditions. 

2. Report on message of Mayor and order 
(referred December 28, 1936) re amended grants 
for school buildings. Public Works Project — that 
same ought to pass. 

Report accepted; and the question came on the 
passage of the order. s 

Coun WILSON— Mr. President, I want my 
vote to be consistent in this matter. I voted in 
November, 1935, against the passage of the 
P. W. A. agreements, because I believed, as I still 
believe, as a matter of financial policy, that if 
the city is in poor financial condition it is in no 
condition to spend 45 per cent of a million dollars 
merely because the Federal Government is ad- 
vancing the other 55 per cent, or the other way 
around. For that reason I voted against the 
P. W. A. measures. The original propositions 
were that the city would pay 70 per cent, the 
Federal Government 30 per cent, but we found, 
when the original P. W. A. measures came through 
and when the thing was all boiled down and the 
amounts paid, that we received, instead of 30 
cents on the dollar, less than 20 cents. And so 
I fear that there may be the same result here, 
even if I were in favor of the financial policy 
involved, that if we were expecting the Federal 
Government to advance, say 45 per cent, we 
would find in the final outcome that we were 
getting 30 per cent or less. I am against the 
principle of these P. W. A. grants, as I gather that 
the Mayor is also, from his annual message. But, 
in view of the fact that the three school buildings 
have now been constructed, from mj- point of 
view I would rather see the Government con- 
tribute some portion of the equipment e.xpense of 
the building. For that reason, although I am 
against the projects as projects, I shall change 
my vote, with reference to the equipment. 

The orders were passed, yeas 15, nays 0. 



PAYMENT TO FATHER OF JOSEPH 
TAYLOR. 
Coun. FITZGERALD offered the following: 
Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation 
whereby the City of Boston may be authorized 
to pay a sum of money to the father of Joseph 
Taylor, who was drowned while bathing in the 
Charles River, provided that such legislation 
includes a referendum to the Mayor and City 
Council. 
Passed under suspension of the rule. 



PAYMENT TO MOTHER OF JOHN 
McGONAGLE. 

Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
hereby approves the enactment of legislation 
whereoy the City of Boston nuiy bo authorized 
to pay a sum of money to the mother of Jolm 
McGonagle, who died from injuries sustained by 
the falling of a wall at the .\forton Street Play- 
ground, provided that such legislation includes a 
referendum to the Mayor and City Council. 

Passed under suspensfon of the rule. 



RETROACTIVE P.VV.MENTS ON OLD .\GE 
PENSION. 
Coun. DOWD offered the following: 
Ordered. That his Honor tho Mayor rc<iuest the 
Pulilic Welfare Department to immediately start 
retroactive payments of money duo to thoso 
receiving the old age pension. 

Coun DOWD --.\tr. President, a few wctks 
ago I introduced an order nvi.iing tho i>oini that 
our :wclfare recipients of old ago pensions wore 
entitled to their pensions from the day thoy put 



98 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 23 



their application in and not from a time three or 
four months later when the department might 
get around to 0. K.'ing them. In my order I 
called the matter to the attention of the Mayor, 
who took it up with the Corporation Counsel, and 
the Corporation Counsel declared my point 
correct, that the recipients of old age pensions 
were entitled to those pensions from the tiine 
when they put in their application, we will say in 
September, and not from a time several nionths 
later, possibly December, when their application 
might be O. K.'d. In other words, they are 
entitled to that back pay. I have received, under 
date of January 7, this letter from Mr. Dowling, 
the Executive Director of the Overseers of Public 
Welfare: 

" Dear Councilor Dowd, — Answering your letter 
of January 6, 1937, I wish to assure you that the 
orders of "the Mayor are being carried out and 
retroactive payments will be made froin the date 
of application provided the person is eligible under 
the law for relief." 

The reason why I have introduced this order is 
that it would appear to me that the department 
has had sufficient time to straighten this matter 
out, but like anything else, they simply want to 
delay it as long a.s they possibly can. I have 
talked with the Welfare Department today, and 
they advise me that the strategy board were 
going to take the matter up. I don't know what 
they are going to take up, because the Mayor and 
the Law Department have definitely stated that 
retroactive payments should be made. I respect- 
fully ask, therefore, that this matter of retroactive 
payments to these poor old souls be taken care of 
immediately. 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



. " OVERPASS RAMPS, CHARLESTOWN. 
Coun. MELLEN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the trustees of the Boston 
Elevated Railway be requested, through his 
Honor the Mayor, to erect two overpass ramps, 
one on either side of the elevated structure at 
City square, Charlestown, in order that passengers 
may enter and leave the City square elevated 
station without the necessity of passing through 
the dense traffic. 

Passed under suspension of the rule. 



CONTRACT WITH M. H. LOONIE. 

Coun. MELLEN offered the following: 

Ordered, That his Honor the Mayor instruct 
the Public Works Commissioner not to dispense 
with advertising, and not to enter into a contract 
with M. H. Loonie for the use of a special Ford 
truck at a price of SI. 50 per hour equal to 812 per 
day and at the rate of S360 per month for a period 
of one year, total expenditure being S4.320. 

Coun". MELLEN — Mr. President, I see in the 
at!/ Rtcord of January 9 of this year that the 
Pubhc Works Commissioner, Mr. Carven, writes 
as follows to the Mayor of Boston: 

"The Sanitary Division has been using a Ford 
truck with a special body for paper collection to 
travel all over Boston daily and collect papers 
disposed of in catch-all boxes at street corners, 
said truck furnished by M. H. Loonie at a cost of 
SI. 50 per hour or S12 per eight-hour day. It is 
very desirable that the Ford truck equipped 
with this special body be continued in use. I 
respectfully request permission to dispense with 
advertising and enter into a contract with M. H. 
Loonie for the use of the special Ford truck at the 
price of SI. 50 per hour equal to S12 per day. 
and at the rate of S360 per month for a period of 
one year, total expenditure being $4,320." 

Mr. President, M. H. Loonie received S106,000 
from the Sewer Department alone in 1936. That 
does not take into account the various gift con- 
tracts he as a pet contractor has had in the last 
three years in connection with the telephone, gas 
and Edison companies. We all know that when a 
Ma.vor comes in he designates one or two con- 
tractors as pets to do certain work that has to be 
done in connection with telephone, gas and Edison 
companies in this city, on streets. It is safe to 
say that the amount of work so done in the last 
two years has run up to a miUion dollars, and now 
we have here this Ford truck hiring, which is 
purely a gift. I think it is a crying outrage and a 
travesty on municipal government to allow such 
payment to be made on a contract which is made 
without advertising, and I certainl.v trust that 
some remedial action will be taken as the result of 
this order. 

The order was referred to the Executive Com- 
mittee. 



NO CONSECUTIVE TERMS FOR COUNCIL 
PRESIDENTS. 
Coun. MELLEN offered the following: 
Ordered, That the rules of the City Council be 
amended to provide that no member of the City 
Council shall be elected President of any one body 
of the Council for two consecutive terms. 

The order was declared referred to the Com- 
mittee on Rules. 



Coun. MELLEN — Mr. President, a few weeks 
ago an identical order offered by myself was re- 
ferred to that political graveyard of all orders not 
desired by the Mayor. I have now introduced 
this order again, and it is referred to that same 
committee. I then spoke of the gentleman who 
then desired re-election as president of this body 
being continually absent from the bod>', and we 
find now, after his re-election as president, that he 
is again absent today. This order represents the 
democratic ideal of rotation in office and equality 
of opportunity for all. You, Mr. Chairman, are 
occupying the chair of the gentleman who was 
elected as president of the body at our last meeting 
and who should be presiding here today. Surely 
our present president can have no objection to the 
passage of this order at this time. Surely, after 
three terms in the chair he cannot ask for the 
fourth. With that in mind, I now introduce the 
same order that I introduced awhile ago. 

Chairman GALLAGHER— The order has been 
referred to the Committee on Rules, and I will say 
that our President is today Acting Mayor and that 
the duty of that office required him to leave our 
chamber before adjournment. 

Coun. MELLEN — Have we received notice of 
the absence of the regular Mayor? 

Chairman G.ALL.AGHER — No, sir, and it is not 
necessarj' that we should. 

The order stood referred to the Committee on 
Rules. 



BOSTON .AS CONVENTION CITY. 

Coun. McGRATH offered the following: 

Ordered. That his Honor the Mayor be requested 
to appoint a committee of city officials and public- 
spirited men and women in Boston, for the pur- 
pose of attracting to our city, conventions and 
other gatherings, to the end that Boston, the 
best all-around convention city on the Atlantic 
seaboard, be made a mecca for this most profitable 
source of revenue to our merchants and our 
citizens. 

Coun. McGR.\TH — Mr. President as a delegate 
to the Democratic National Convention at Phila- 
delphia I had the honor of having lunch with 
Mayor S. Davis Wilson of Philadelphia, who was 
born on Beacon Hill and afterwards moved to 
Philadelphia. I was very much impressed by 
what he said when I asked him how it happened 
that he could secure such a large convention, and 
during the course of the conversation I asked him 
if he would estimate approximately what such a 
convention would expend while in Philadelphia. 
He said the amount would run into millions of 
dollars, although, of course, he did not say just 
how much. However, afterwards he communi- 
cated with me and informed me that the Demo- 
cratic convention held in Philadelphia spent 
approximately SIO.000,000, as near as he could 
check it up. I read an article in the Boston Pout 
yesterday that I would like to have incorporated 
in our records. The headline says, "Boston 
Should Get S100,000,000" on conventions every 
year but that, even although an ideal convention 
city, we are getting only .?38,000,000 of business 
in that way. The article goes on to tell what 
should be done by the Chamber of Commerce, and 
gives the opinions of Glenwood J. Sherrard, 
president of the City of Boston Hotel Association, 
and others on this matter. I believe that if a 
little money was spent and some inducements were 
given to the associations and organizations hold- 
ing these conventions, it would be more than worth 
while to the business men of this city. I would 
like to have certain portions of the article included 
in our record. 

There being no objection, the following por- 
tions of the article in the Boston Post of January 10, 
1937, headed "Boston Should Get 3100,000,000," 
were ordered included in the minutes: 

" The New England background represents the 
principal lure here of the convention business and 
with that picture in the back of the convention 
prospect's mind there is the new technique of 
'getting business' which other cities have developed 
to a sharper and more competitive degree than 
Boston. The Boston Chamber of Commerce has 
an alert and active convention bureau and the 
Boston hotels have high salaried executives of 
their own whose sole job it is to bring the great 
conventions to Boston. The job they do in the 
way of pressure, persistence, literature,_ solici- 
tation, service, is, of itself an example of highly 
impressive organization and skill. 

"But there are one or two missing cogs in the 
wheel which make us all to blame. 

"It is a frightening thing that Boston is losing 
precisely 862,000,000 a year in convention busi- 
ness which the experts tell us may be had for the 
fighting. That means matching in Boston 
whatever it is other drab, hot, either dull and 
colorless cities or artificially gay and silly ones 
like Atlantic City, give the conventions that 
go there. The Boston business men we discussed 
this with were ashamed to mention just where 
it is that Boston fits, statistically, in the con- 
vention field. Because — and don't let it get out too 
far, — we're about fourteenth and we should be 
sixth, at worst, eighth. 

" Right now, for this month of January, Chicago 
is booked for seventy-seven conventions. There 
is a fortune wrapped up in that fact. And the 
shock of it, by way of contrast, is that Boston 
for the whole year of 1937, from the last January 1 



to December 31, is booked for a probable total 
of seventy-six conventions. That, considering 
our record, is really not bad. There won't be 
any other conventions floating in at the last 
moment because conventions are determined 
a year in advance and all the conventions for 
1937 are no^y already booked somewhere. So 
that we get in a year what Chicago gets in a 
single month. 

"The convention bureau of the Boston Chamber 
of Commerce, however, estimates conventions 
to Boston on a broader definition than that 
employed by the hotel men. Thus the Bureau 
finds — and has records to prove its point — that 
we had a total of at least two hundred conven- 
tions during 1936. But the Bureau's own defini- 
tion of a convention is that it consists of ' a 
group of people coming from outside of Metro- 
politan Boston, meeting in the city and remaining 
overnight in the hotels.' In the list furnished 
us by the Bureau, the lowest attendance given 
for any convention is fifty delegates and there 
are only a handful of these minimunr gatherings, 
most of them running up into the several hundreds 
and thousands. The hotel men, it ought to be 
added, shown the Bureau's list, scratched off a 
batch of listings as not falling into their less 
enthusiastic and far more conservative view of 
what a convention really is. 

"Glenwood J. Sherrard, president of the City 
of Boston Hotel Association, says the present 
set-up synchronizing the work of the hotel sales 
promotion departments with the Chamber's 
convention bureau is a major advance over less 
effectual previous methods. .A co-operative ma- 
chinery is now in process, he says, w^hich should 
go a long way towards bringing to Boston more 
of the conventions that the city should have 
out of the national assortment. The Bureau 
also anticipates a boost in Boston's convention 
business over previous years beginning in 1937, 
so that the outlook is far brighter than it ever 
has been. In addition, President Sherrard is 
extending the effort to get a convention fund 
for Boston and the purveyors, or wholesale food 
establishments, are being asked to contribute to 
this fund. According to Mr. Sherrard, the hotels 
get only 20 cents, or 19 cents, out of the usual 
convention dollar. The rest of it finds its way 
into the cash registers of the food supply houses, 
pay rolls, restaurants, retail stores, garages and 
gas stations, amusements and so on. 

"The energy and push with which other cities 
go after conventions is illustrated best by some- 
thing which happened right under this writer's 
eyes here in Boston when the American Bar 
Association was in town. Philadelphia wanted 
that convention for the succeeding year, 1937, 
and the negotiations for it had broken down. 
Mayor S. Davis Wilson of Philadelphia gathered 
an impressive entourage about him which in- 
cluded that city's Maurice Speiser, two or three 
other high appointees and the city solicitor. 
They boarded an overnight train and descended 
upon the Boston convention. They treated it 
like a competitive war and they were grim about 
it. 

"Philadelphia's Mayor was ready to get up and 
make a speech, offer concessions to boom his 
cause. They were prepared to launch the most 
distinguished jurists of Philadelphia on the com- 
mittee. Anything to bring the American Bar 
to Philadelphia. It happens that this technique 
failed because that is not just the method for 
persuading a group like the A. B. A. But that 
sort of strenuous endeavor while it failed at this 
point will succeed say six times out of ten and 
that makes it worthwhile. The Mayor of Phila- 
delphia told this writer that his city gathered in 
$10,000,000 on the Democratic national con- 
vention — that's right — 810,000,000 on one con- 
vention alone. That's something to consider 
when you remember that Boston never in its 
whole history has had either of the two great 
party conventions. 

"And it is especially interesting when you con- 
sider that Philadelphia took the Democratic 
national convention right out from under the nose 
of San Francisco when .Senator William Gibbs 
McAdoo of Cahfornia seemed actually to have 
the convention in the bag for his state. Boston 
wasn't even represented. There are several 
amusing myths about what some of the other 
communities have to offer conventions, but 
under analysis Boston has not only what all the 
other communities have, and then some even in 
the physical things, but it has what the other 
communities cannot even acquire — it drips with 
history, with background and with prestige. 
And the fact is that the better part of that missing 
862,000,000 is tied up in just that reputation — 
because it is Boston's background which grips 
the imagination of every man, woman and child 
educated enough to have read three chapters of 
American history. 

"If somebody says we're guessing when we say 
that we mention the Boston convention of the 
American Bar Association again. There's an 
interesting thing about that which helps us to 
kill half a dozen birds without any stone. Chicago 
gets all this enormous convention business be- 
cause Chicago is the nation's big city geographical 
center. Boston is off on the fringe of the Atlantic 
seaboard and is not so easily accessible from the 
whole country. But what happened? The in- 
formation we have is that the lawyers flocked to 
'inaccessible' Boston as they never flocked to 
the other cities in the country's interior. There 



Jan. 23 



CITY RECORD 



99 



were during the middle of the convention 4,917 
of them, and still more later on. Of these, mark 
the figure, there were 1,000 women, 200 children 
and then 250 Massachusetts women. 

"In other cities this convention never had as 
many women, hardly that many children — as 
we get the statistics. Now the American Bar 
is one of the most desirable of all the conventions. 
They're a solid, spending crowd. They come 
with dignity, stay with dignity, leave with dignity, 
and pay their bills. Well, what made these women 
and children — the wives and daughters — come to 
Boston, when the years before they remained at 
home and let papa go to the convention by him- 
self? The answer is that Boston provides every- 
thing from a codfish to a Rembrandt, and that 
tuclced away in every American's head is an 
imaginative stir about Boston." 

The order was passed under suspension of the 
rule. 



Adjourned, on motion of Coun. NORTON, at 
4 p. m., to meet on Monday, January 18, 1937, 
at 2 p. m. 



CORRECTION. 

In the meeting of December 15, W36, in the 
second column on page 399, debate on reorganiza- 
tion of city departments, in the speech of Coun. 
Peter J. Fitzgerald, the introductory words 
"Mr. President, one of the best statements I have 
heard upon this matter is that read by the member 
from Ward 17 (Coun. Wilson)," should read: 
"Mr. President, in ray experience in the Legisla- 
ture, and also in sitting as a member of this body 
for one year, I never heard an abler or finer state- 
ment than that we have heard from the member 
from Ward 17 (Coun. Wilson). "- 



FINANCINQ SEWAQE WORKS BY SPECIAL 
ASSESSMENT IN IOWA. 

The cost of constructing sewage dis- 
posal plants in a number of states, and 
in Iowa in particular, may b^ levied 
against the various lots, parts of lots or 
parcels of ground draining to or sus- 
ceptible to drainage to, the site of the 
disposal plant. Such assessments must be 
in proportion to the benefits to each prop- 
erty and must not, in any case', exceed 
one-fourth of the fair value of the property 
in question. These special assessments 
are payable in the same manner as other 
municipal improvement costs; that is, 
in ten annual equal installments, paid 
at the same time and place as the March 
1 installment of ordinary taxes in Iowa. 
Any property owner may pay off the 
unpaid portion of such tax at any time. 
Interest on the deferred paymsnt mus< 
not exceed 6 per cent. 



NO COST CONTROL FOR REFUSE 
DISPOSAL. 

American cities on the whole may be 
clean housekeepers, but they don't know 
how much it is costing them to be clean 
or whether th?y are spending too much. 
Only a few cities are able to report 
accurately the unit cost of removing 
garbage and other refuse and of cleaning 
streets, according to the Public Adminis- 
tration Service of Chicago, 111., which 
further reports that at least 90 per cent 
of the cities in this country have no cost 
control over this service. 



THE MUNICIPAL WATER-'WORKS TREND. 

In 1800 there was but one numicipally- 
owned water-works plant in the United 
States. Now there are 7,853 municipallj'- 
owned installations, or 72.8 per cent of 
the entire number. In the United Skutcs 
there arc ninety-four cities of over 
100,000 population. All but eleven of 
these owTi their water works. Municipal 
plants serve 96.1 per cent of the popula- 
tion of the ninoty^four cities, while 
private plants serve only 3.9 per cent. 



PROCEEDINGS OF SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 

Jan. 4, 1937. 

The meeting for organization of 
the School Committee of the City 
of Boston for the current munici- 
pal year was held in the Adminis- 
tration Building, 15 Beacon Street, 
at 6:05 o'clock P. M. 

Present: Messrs. Lyons, Mackey, 
Smith, Sullivan, and Tobin. 

The meeting was called to order 
by Dr. Joseph V. Lyons, the senior 
member. 

Dr. Lyons stated that under the 
provisions of Chapter 479 of the 
Acts of 1924 — An Act Providing for 
Biennial Elections in the City of 
Boston, etc. — the membership of 
the School Committee for the year 
1937 is the same as that for the 
year 1936; namely, Dr. Joseph V. 
Lyons, Dr. Charles E. Mackey, 
Mr. Henry J. Smith, Mr. Frederick 
R. Sullivan, and Mr. Maurice J. 
Tobin. 



ELECTION OF CHAIRMAN 

The Committee proceeded to the 
election of a Chairman, and the 
Secretary was directed to call the 
roll. 

The members, as their names 
were called, respectively voted as 
follows: 

For FREDERICK R. SULLI- 
VAN — Messrs. Lyons, Smith, Sulli- 
van and Tobin — 4. 

For JOSEPH V. LYONS— Dr. 
Mackey — 1. 

On motion of Dr. Mackey, the 
election of Mr. Sullivan as Chair- 
man of the School Committee was 
declared unanimous, and Mr. Sulli- 
van assumed the chair. 

Mr. Sullivan: I wish to express 
my thanks to the members of this 
Committee for the display of con- 
fidence which makes possible my 
re-election as Chairman of the 
Boston School Committee for the 
coming year. 

The responsibility of this high 
office is fully realized. I shall do 
my best at all times to conduct 
its affairs as you would have them 
conducted — honestly, fairly, and 
with the best interests of the 
School Department uppermost in 
my mind. 

I am deeply grateful to the mem- 
bers ot the School Department 
who have made not only this past 
year so pleasant but who have 
also helped me so much since I 
first became a member of the 
Board. 

We are indeed fortunate in hav- 
ing men and women of such high 
standards as our counsellors and 
assistants. Boston ever will be 
grateful to Superintendent Patrick 
T. Campbell, educator and ad- 
ministrator, for his outstanding ad- 
ministration, and to those who 
served with him. 

In the Business Manager — Mr. 
Alexander M. Sullivan — we have 
one whom I believe to be without 
superior in the conduct of school 
financial problems. To Miss Ellon 
M. Cronin, our Secretary; to Mr. 
Mark B. Mulvey, Schoolhouse Cue;- 
todian; to Mr. James J. Mahar, En- 
gineer; and to all those in the va- 



rious departments whom it is im- 
possible for me to name now, I 
express my sincere thanks for the 
splendid cooperation which they 
have shown always. 

This coopei-ation, reflected as it 
is throughout the department, had 
made possible a school aystem of 
which we may be justly proud. It 
has been tried time and again in 
the past and it has responded al- 
ways. 

It is natural that each new year 
should present new problems which 
differ in degree but not in their 
fundamental nature from those of 
the preceding year. 

Our first thoughts must be di- 
rected toward an immediate com- 
pletion of our budget for 1937. I 
propose to have preliminary esti- 
mates for the year placed before 
this body in the very near future 
and I am sure that all members 
will be ready to give them imme- 
diate attention. 

As far as may be consistent with 
the maintenance of satisfactory 
school standards and functions we 
must more than ever strive for 
economy. School costs have shown 
a tendency to rise despite efforts 
to keep them at a minimum. The 
efforts of previous committees may 
be appreciated when we consider 
that in 1931, the last year before 
cuts of increments or salaries, our 
total expenditures from the tax 
levy for general school purposes 
amounted to $15,617,577 and our 
estimated expense for 1936 amounts 
to approximately $15,830,000. This 
is exclusive of expenditures for 
lands and buildings and repairs. 

The increase has been controlled 
in the past. This may be under- 
stood from the fact that while in 
this period there was a decrease in 
total school population of approxi- 
mately 800 pupils, there was at the 
same time an increase of over 
3100 in our high school enrollment, 
where the cost is far in excess of 
that of the elementary school 
wherein the drop in numbers 
caused the decrease. 

Our school budget has. with the 
exception of the years when the 
cut was in effect, been continually 
increased by added salary incre- 
ments, approximating $220,000 A 
year in total. 

It will be seen that to keep the 
Increase of cost at so low a pro- 
portion during these years has re- 
quired curtailment of many ex- 
penditures by failure to fill" posi- 
tions of administrative nature 
once vacated, reduction of activi- 
ties and reduced purchasing of 
supplies and materials. 

In 1937 we must approach ou;- 
appropriations in an even more 
critical manner. The continuance 
of increases which may be expect- 
ed from yearly salary increments 
— salarj' increments in many cases 
extend over a period of fourteen 
years, from the lowest to the 
highest step, and many of our em- 
ployees have not reached their 
maximimis— will complicate our 
budget procedure in the years t.i 
come. I believe that wc should 
preserve our basic salary sched- 
ules as they are conducive to pood 
morale and efficiency in the de- 
partment, and make it po.ssiblo for 
us to sricct quality in our teach- 
ing staff. However, every school 
function and facility must bo ex- 
amined closely and made to prove 



I 00 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 23 



in the light of our present finan- 
cial outlook, that both its imme- 
diate and ultimate value will be 
equal to the burden it places upon 
the tax rate. 

I am sure that in our efforts to 
accomplish this we shall have the 
endorsement of the citizens of Bos- 
ton as well as the heartiest of co- 
operation from every member of 
the school staff. 

The maintenance of the high 
quality of education in the Boston 
Public Schools must continue to be 
a sacred trust to all those con- 
cerned. Measured by any yard- 
stick they stand out among the 
schools, public and private, in the 
country. 

As in other communities the 
years since 1900 have seen the 
School Department take over re- 
quired functions which might be 
considered as beyond the funda- 
mental needs of former ideas of 
education. The School Department 
has undertaken such duties because 
it has been the city department 
best situated to insure them proper 
performance. 

They include examination and 
care of health, nutrition for under- 
nourished children, playgrounds for 
their after school and summer 
hours, the prevention of accidents to 
school children, special instruction 
in the home for physically handi- 
capped children, post graduate 
work in specialized fields and 
trades, physical education, and mak- 
ing provision for the use of schools 
after hours by the people of the 
community. 

While these functions add to the 
general item of school mainte- 
nance, they are, I believe, of such 
a nature that they result in un- 
told benefit to the city. In the 
period of transition which caused 
the school department to assume 
these activities, the department has 
become of more value and of more 
service. However, in the future 
caution must be exercised to pre- 
vent any tendency toward dupli- 
cating activities which may also be 
furnished by other city depart- 
ments, or which might better be 
performed under other depart- 
ments. One of the dangers of 
such growth might be a failure to 
stop at the proper time. 

I should like to take this oppor- 
tunity to express to the members 
of the Committee and to all the 
members of the School Depart- 
ment my sincere wish that 1937 
will be a happy and prosperous 
one for them. 

RULES INVOLVING EXPENDI- 
TURE OF MONEY 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That the Rules of 
the School Committee and the res- 
ulations of the Public Schools of 
last year which involve the expen- 
diture of. money, are hereby adopt- 
ed for the present year until other- 
wise ordered. 

RULES NOT INVOLVING EX- 
PENDITURE OF MONEY 
On motion, it v/as 
ORDERED. That the Rules of 
the School Committee and the Reg- 
ulations of the Public Schools of 



last year, which do not involve the 
expenditure of money, are hereby 
adopted for the present year until 
otherwise ordered. 



ELECTION OF TREASURER 

The Committee proceeded to the 
election of a Treasurer of the Cor- 
poration. 

The Secretary was directed to 
call the roll, and the members as 
their names were called respective- 
ly voted as follows: 

For HENRY J. SMITH— Messrs. 
Mackey, Sullivan, and Tobin — 3. 

For CHARLES E. MACKEY— 
Dr. Lyons — 1. 

For MAURICE J. TOBIN— Mr. 
Smith— 1. 

The Chair declared Mr. Henry J. 
Smith duly elected Treasurer of 
the Corporation. 



APPROVAL OF STATE-AIDED 
CLASS 

A communication was received 
from the Division of Vocational 
Education, Department of Educa- 
tion, under date of Dec. 29, 1936, 
reporting that the establishment of 
a part-time trade preparatory 
course in Airplane Rigging in 
connection with the Airplane 
Service Department at the Boston 
Tradt School has been approved 
in accordance with plans set 
forth and submitted in memoranda 
on file in that office. If tl-e plans 
are carried out as submitted, the 
work will be given approval, and 
the City of Boston recommended 
for reimbursement from George- 
EHzey Funds, to take effect Dec. 2, 
1936. 

Placed on file. 



RESIGNATIONS 

The following resignations, re- 
ported by the Superintendent to 
take effect on the date stated, were 
presented: 

Boston Clerical School — Alma I. 
Dellamano, senior assistant, Dec. 
23, 1936. 

John Marshall District — Lois M. 
Oliver, assistant, special class, Dec. 
23, 1936. 

Mary E. Curley Intermediate 
District — Elizabeth A. Donahue, 
assistant, intermediate, Dec. 23, 
1936. 

Accepted. 

LIST OF TEACHERS APPROVED FOR 
TEMPORARY SERVICE 

The Superintendent submitted 
under the provsions of section 265 
paragraph 2 of the regulations the 
following additions to the list of 
teachers approved by him from 
which assignments may be made 
for temporary service: 

Day High Schools — Edith Camp- 
bell, Mary M. Devenny, Elizabeth 
H. Gilligan, Anne R. Kelley, Sarra 
Kilstein, Kathleen T. Larson, Mary 
K. Riley, Leo Tarutz, Constance 
G. Willson, Maurice Zeserson. 

Day Intermediate Schools — Ju- 
dith Ravit, Mary K. Riley. 

Day Elementary Schools — Alice 
M. Dunn. 

Kindergartens — Catherine B. 
Healy. 

Classes fo.- Conservation of Eye- 
sight — Sylvia Ginns, Anna T. Joyce. 



Horace Mann School — Margaret 
M. Benson. 

Continuation and South End Inter- 
mediate Schools — Allan J. Doherty. 

Department of Music— Theodore 
Romano. 

Approved. 



TEMPORARY TEACHERS 

Department of Manual Arts- 
Francis L. O'Keeffe, assistant, 
manual training, intermediate, Dec. 
14, 1936; Louis L. DeGiacomo, as- 
sistant, manual training, elemen- 
tary Dec. 16, 1936; Thomas W. 
Cunningham, assistant, manual 
training, intermediate, Dec. 22, 
1936; Habib C. Deratany, assistant, 
manual training, elementary, Dec. 
22, 1936. 

Approved. 



TRANSFERS 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 4, 1937, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has made 
ti;c following transfers of teachers: 

Dorothy F. Toomey, assistant, 
special class, Bennett District, to 
the same position in the John 
Marshall District, Jan. 11, 1937. 

Mary F. Watsc.i, assistant, kin- 
dergarten, Lowell District, to the 
same position in the Beethoven 
District, Jan. 11, 1937. 

Approved. 

DESIGNATION 

A communication was received 
frccn the Superintendent, under 
date of Jan. 4, 1937, reporting that 
he has made the following designa- 
tion of a teacher to serve in the 
position indicated until such time 
as it shall be filled otherwise in 
accordance with the rules and 
regulations but not beyond Aug. 31, 
1937: 

Phillips Brooks District — Helen 
J. Lyons, assistant, kindergarten, as 
acting first assistant, kindergarten 
(vice Agnes G. Ryan, absent on 
leave), Dec. 3, 1936. 

Placed on file. 



EMPLOYMENT OF ADDITIONAL 

SPECIAL ASSISTANT IN 

READING CENTER 

On motion of the Superintendent, 
it was 

ORDERED, That for the re- 
mainder of the current school year, 
the Superintendent is hereby au- 
thorized, in his discretion, to em- 
ploy an additional special assistant, 
making two in all, in the reading 
center of The Teachers College, 
compensation to be at the rate of 
five dollars ($5) per day of service. 



TEMPORARY ASSISTANCE 

On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That during the 
current financial year the Super- 
intendent is hereby authorized to 
employ such temporary and emer- 
gency secretaries, clerical assist- 
ants and librarians in the schools 
as he may deem advisable. 



Jan. 23 



CITY RECORD 



101 



On motion, it was 

ORDERED, That during the 
current financial year the Secre- 
tary is hereby authorized to em- 
ploy such temporary assistance in 
the offices of the Superintendent- 
Secretary, and at such compensa- 
tion as she may deem advisable. 



RESIGNATION 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Jan. 4, 1937, reporting the 
resignation of May B. Simmons, 
assistant in the office of the Busi- 
ness Manager, to take effect Dec. 
30, 1936. 

Placed on file and the resigna- 
tion accepted, to take effect on the 
date stated. 



EXTENSION OF CONTRACTS, 
APPROVAL OF SUMMARIZED 
REQUISITION ON CITY AUDI- 
TOR, AND OTHER ITEMS 

A communication was received 
from the Business Manager, under 
date of Jan, 4, 1937, recommend- 
ing the passage of the accompany- 
ing thirteen orders, as follows: 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for semi-bituminous coal between 
the School Committee and the 
White Fuel Corporation under date 
of May 13, 1936, and providing for 
the delivery of semi-bituminous 
coal from June 16, 1936 to Decem- 
ber 31, 1936, is hereby continued to 
June 15, 1937, as provided for in 
Section 1 of the contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for anthracite coal between the 
School Committee and the Tide- 
water Coal Company, under date of 
June 24, 1936, and providing for the 
delivery of anthracite coal from 
June 16, 1936 to December 31, 1936, 
is hereby continued to June 15, 1937, 
as provided for in Section 1 of the 
contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for nut and slack coal between the 
School Committee and the White 
Fuel Corporation, under date of 
May 13, 1936, and providing for the 
delivery of nut and slack coal from 
June 16, 1936 to December 31, 1936, 
is hereby continued to June 15, 1937, 
as provided for in Section 1 of the 
contract 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for heavy fuel oil between the 
School Committee and Arthur H. 
Ballard, Incorporated, under date 
of May 15, 1936, and providing for 
the delivery of oil from June 16, 
1936, to December 31, 1936, is here- 
by continued to June 15, 1937, as 
provided for in Section 1 of the 
contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for heavy fuel oil between the 
School Committee and the Petrole- 
um Heat and Power Company, 
under date of May 20, 1936, and 
providing for the delivery of oil 
from June 16, 1936, to December 
31, 1936, is hereby continued to 
June 15, 1937, as provided for in 
Section 1 of the contract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for medium fuel oil between the 
School Committee and Socony 
Vacuum Oil Company, under date 
of May 27, 1936, and providing for 



the delivery of oil from June 16, 
1936 to December 31, 1936, is hereby 
continued to June 15, 1937, as pro- 
vided for in Section 1 of the con- 
tract. 

ORDERED, That the contract 
for liglit fuel oil between the 
School Committee and the Han- 
ley Oil Company, under date of 
May 27, 1936, and providing for the 
delivery of oil from June 16, 1936 
to December 31, 1936, is hereby con- 
tinued to June 15, 1937, as provided 
for in Section 1 of the contract. 

ORDERED, That the School 
Committee hereby acknowledges 
the valuable assistance rendered 
by the Sealer of Weights and 
Measures in checking the weights 
of coal delivered by contractors in 
the several school buildings during 
the past year. 

ORDERED, That the School 
Committee hereby requests the 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
to check the weights of coal to be 
delivered to the several school 
buildings during the current year. 

ORDERED, That the Business 
Manager is hereby authorized to 
employ such temporary assistance 
in his office and at the Supply 
Room, at such compensation as he 
may deem advisable, during the 
current fiscal year. 

ORDERED, That during the 
fiscal year 1937 the Chairman of 
the School Committee is hereby 
authorized to accept, enter into 
and execute on behalf of the 
School Committee, contracts for 
equipment, supplies and other 
items, which contracts have been 
prepared by the Business Manager 
and approved by him as required 
under the provisions of Chapter 
140 of the Acts of 1926 as amended 
by Chapter 231 of the Acts of 1932 

ORDERED, That during the fis- 
cal year 1937 any member of the 
School Committee is hereby author- 
ized to approve summarized requisi- 
tions and special drafts on the City 
Auditor prepared by the Business 
Manager and which cover all pay 
rolls, vouchers and other docu- 
ments calling for the expenditure 
of money, each of which have been 
previously approved in writing by 
the Business Manager as provided 
for in the statutes. 

ORDERED, That under the pro- 
visions of Chapter 231 of the Acts 
of 1932, J. George Herlihy, Assistant 
Business Manager, shall act as 
Business Manager, during the cur- 
rent fiscal year, only during the 
time that the Business Manager is 
absent or otherwise unable to act 
and shall, during such time, exer- 
cise all the powers and perform 
all the duties of said Business 
Manager. 

The thirteen orders were passed 
collectively. 

COMMITTEE ON NAMING OF 
SCHOOL BUILDINGS 

Chairman; The Committee as a 
Whole will act as the Committee on 
Naming of School Buildings during 
1937. 

The Committee adjourned. 
Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN, 
Secretary. 



PROCEEDINGS OF CITY 
COUNCIL, 

Monday, January 18, 1937. 

Regular meeting of the City Council held 
in the Council Chamber, City Hall, at 2 p. m., 
Coun. GALLAGHER presiding, in the ab- 
sence of President Fitzgerald. Absent, Coun. 
John I. Fitzgerald and Shattuck. 

Chairman GALLAGHER — It is with sincere 
regret that the Chair announces the death 
of one of our colleagues. Councilor Richard 
D. Gleason. Because of that, no business 
will be transacted this afternoon except two 
matters that we must take up. due to their 
importance, namely, the $40,000,000 tempo- 
rary loan order and the ordinance changing 
the name of the division in the Health De- 
partment which would otherwise become ef- 
fective before our next meeting. The Chair 
will now call up No. 2 on the calendar, under 
unfinished business. 



TEMPORARY LOAN FOR 1937. 

No. 2 on the calendar, under unfinished 
business, is as follows : 

2. Ordered, That to provide temporarily 
money to meet the appropriations for the 
financial year 1937, the City Treasurer issue 
and sell, at such time and in such amounts 
as he may deem best, notes or certificates 
of indebtedness of the City of Boston not 
exceeding forty million dollars in the total, 
in anticipation of the taxes of the current 
municipal year ; that all such notes or certifi- 
cates of indebtedness be dated the day the 
money for the same is received, be made 
payable with the interest thereon within one 
year of their date, and bear interest from 
their date until the same are made payable 
at such rate as the City Auditor, the City 
Treasurer and the Mayor may determine. 

On January 4, 1937, the foregoing order 
was read once and passed, yeas 16, nays 1. 

The order was given its second and final 
reading and passage, yeas 18, nays 0. 



HOUSING AND SANITARY HEALTH 
DIVISION. 

Coun. WILSON, for the Committee on Or- 
dinances, submitted the following: 

Report on message of Mayor and ordinance 
(submitted November 23, 1936) amending 
ordinances concerning Health Department — 
that same oucrht to pass. 

Coun. WILSON— Mr. President, this or- 
dinance, very briefly, is to satisfy the Health 
Department, proposing a change in the name 
of one of the divisions so that, instead of 
being the "Sanitary" Division, thereby be- 
coming confused with the Sanitary Division 
of the Public Works Department, it may be 
more definitely and properly known as the 
"Housing and Sanitary Division." 

Report accepted ; ordinance passed. 



RESOLUTIONS ON COUNCLLOR 
GLEASON'S DEATH. 

Coun. DOWD submitted the following: 

Whereas, Almighty God, in His infinite 
wisdom, has taken from this life our friend 
and colleague, Richard D. Gleason : therefore 
be it 

Resolved, That the City Council of Boston, 
in meeting assembled, expresses its sincere 
sorrow that one so young and energetic should 
be taken so suddenly from its midst: and 
that the services he so cheerfully and willingly 
rendered as a member of the Massachusetts 
Legislature and Boston City Council have come 
to such an abrupt end ; and be it further 

Resolved, That the City Council of Boston 
offers its deep sympathy to the members of 
the family of Richard D. Gleason, whose friend- 
ship for his fellowman, whose intense desire 
to help those needing assistance and whoso 
generous and responsive heart and nature will 
always be held in fond romembrance. 

The resolutions were p.issed by a unanimous ■ 
rising vote. 



Adjourned at 2.2G p. m.. on motion ot Coun. 
FINLEY. as a further mark of rospcct to the 
memor>- of Coun. Gleason. 



UNITED STATES GROSS DEBT. 

November 30, 1932. toUil gross debt 
of the United States was S20,S06 ,013,836, 
of which $20,476,034,190 w.os interest- 
bearing. This is a reduction of $6,120.- 
667,458 from the peak of $26.596,70 1.6-JS 
on August 31, 1919. The gross debt on 
June 30, 1931. wsis $16.S0I,2S1.492. 



102 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 23 



PROCEEDINGS OF SCHOOL 
COMMITTEE. 

Dec. 30, 1936. 

A special meeting of the School 
Committee of the City of Boston 
was held in the Administration 
Building, 15 Beacon Street, at 2.55 
o'clock P. M., the Chairman pre- 
siding. 

Present: Messre. Lyons, Smith, 
Sullivan and Tobin. 



APPROVAL OF MINUTES 

The reading of the minutes of 
the previous meeting was omitted, 
the Committee approving them as 
printed. 



DEATHS 

The Superintendent reported the 
deaths of the following-named 
teachers: 

Joseph H. Barnes Intermediate 
District— Jenny W. Cronin, assist- 
ant, mtermediate, Dec. 21, 1936. 

Thomas Gardner District — M. 
Grace Seymour, assistant, ele- 
mentary, Dec. 25, 1936. 

Placed on file. 

The Superintendent reported the 
death of the following-named 
teacher who had been retired on 
pension: 

Prescott District — Delia A. V. 
Howes, Dec. 23, 1936. 

Placed on file. 



RESIGNATION 

The following resignation, re- 
ported by the Superintendent to 
take effect on the date stated, was 
presented: 

Quincy District— Mary T. G. 
Ward, assistant, elementary, Dec. 
23, 1936. 

Accepted. 

APPOINTMENTS 
The following appointments by 
the Superintendent, certified by 
him as being in accordance with 
the rules and regulations to take 
effect on the dates stated, were pre- 
sented: 

(FROM THE ELIGIBLE LIST) 

(To fill vacancy caused by death) 

Boston Trade School — Francis J. 

Harrigan, trade instructor (from 

shop foreman. Department of 

Manual Arts), Dec. 23, 1936. 

(To fill vacancy allowed in budget) 
Boston Trade School — William F. 
Sheehan, trade instructor (from 
shop foreman. Department of 
Manual Arts), Dec. 23, 1936. 

(To fill vacancy caused by re- 
tirement on pension.) 

Mechanic Arts High School — 
David E. Rosengard, junior mas- 
ter (from senior instructor, Boston 
Trade School), Jan. 11, 1937. 

The rules were suspended and 
the appointments approved. 



TRANSFER 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 



date of Dec. 30, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has made the 
following transfer of a teacher: 

Alice C. Haggerty, assistant, ele- 
mentary, Hugh O'Brien District, to 
the same position in the Quincy 
District, Jan. 4, 1937. 

Approved. 

ASSIGNMENT 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 30, 1936, reporting 
that subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he has assigned 
Francic P. Assmus, assistant, manu- 
al training, elemen.ary, Depart- 
ment of Manual Artb, to the Ros- 
lindale High School, without 
change of rank or salar; to take 
effect Jan. 4, 1937, and to continue 
for the school year ending Aug. 31, 
1937, unless earlier terminated toy 
the Superintendent with the ap- 
proval of the School Committee. 

Placed on file and the assign- 
ment approved, to take effect on 
the date stated. 

A communication was received 
from the Superintendent, under 
date of Dec. 30, 1936, reporting that 
subject to the approval of the 
School Committee, he ha.3 made the 
following assignment of a teacher 
to a class attended exclusively by 
boyr in a grade above the third in 
the district herein stated: 

Michelangelo Intermediate Dis- 
"■ricu — Eleanor F. Fallon, assistant, 
intermediate, Dec. 1, 1934. 

Placed On file and the ajsign- 
ment approved, to take effect on 
the date stated. 



LEAVES OF ABSENCE TO 
CUSTODIANS 

A communication was received 
from the Assistant Schoolhouse 
Custodian, under the date of Dec. 

30, 1936, recommending that the 
following custodians be granted 
leave of absence on one-half net 
compensation for the periods speci- 
fied because of personal illness: 

John Murphy, Jr., Dorchester 
High Schools for Girls, Jan. 1 to 

31, 1937, inclusive. 

Edward C. Sheehan, Ellis Men- 
dall School-house, Dec. 16 to iSs, 
1936, inclusive. 

Frederick J. Wright, Hawes Hall 
and Simonds School-house, Jan. 1 
to Feb. 27, 1937, inclusive. 

Placed on file and leaves of 
absence on one-half net compen- 
sation granted for the periods 
specified. 

A communication was received 
from the Assistant Schoolhouse 
Custodian, under date of Dec. 30, 
1936, recommending that the follow- 
ing custodians be granted leaves of 
absence without pay for the periods 
specified: 

William D. Fox, Wendell Phillips 
School-house, Nov. 25, 1936 (one-half 
day) to June 4, 1937, inclusive. 

Cornelius P. Walsh, Cora L. Ethe- 
ridge School-house, Nov. 22, 1936, to 
Jan. 31, 1937, inclusive. 

Placed on file and leaves of ab- 
sence witnout pay granted for the 
periods specified. 



TRANSFERS OF CUSTODIANS 

A communication was received 
from the Assistant Schoolhouse 
Custodian, under date of Dec. 30, 
1936, 'recommending that the follow- 
ing-named candidates, who stand at 
the head of their respecitve lists, be 
appointed as indicated, to take ef- 
fect Jan. 10, 1937: 

Arthur B. Callahan, from the 
Bowdoin to the John Winthrop 
School-house. 

Philip H. Kelly, from regular sub- 
stitute custodian to the Aaron 
Davis School-house. 

John J. Sullivan, from the Bene- 
dict Fenwick to the .-Jorcross 
Schuol-house. 

Placed on file and the transfers 
approved, to take effect on the date 
ytatecL 



APPOINTMENT OF CUSTODIAN 

A communication was received 
from the Assistant Schoolhouse 
Custodian, under date of Dec. 30, 
1936, reporting that he has con- 
sidered the candidates certified by 
th' Division of Civil Service as 
eligible for appointment as regular 
substitute custodian, and recom- 
mending that Walter J. Mayer, 
wh stands at the head of the list, 
be appointed as regular substitute 
custodian, to take effect Jan. 10, 
1937. 

Placed on file and the appoint- 
ment approved, to take effect on 
the date stated. 



UNFINISHED BUSINESS 

The order laid over at the meet- 
ing o;: June 1, 1936 (see p. 83) nam- 
ing the new intermediate school on 
Cummins Highway, Roslindale, the 
John F. Cummins School, was 
taken up. 

Question came on the passage of 
the order. The members, as their 
names were called, voted as fol- 
lows: 

Dr. Lyons — John F. Cummins 
School. 

Dr. Mackey — Absent. 

Chairman: At this afternoon's 
conference. Dr. Mackey expressed 
himself as in favor of naming the 
new intermediate t-chool in Roslin- 
dale the John F. Cummins School. 

Mr. Smith: Washington Irving 
School. 

At the conference on June 1, 
when the Committee decided to 
name this building the "John F. 
Cummins School," I argued for the 
retention of the name "Washing- 
ton Irving School." 

I am voting this way, first, be- 
cause I believe that the majority 
of the citizens of the Roslindale 
and West Roxbury district wish 
the name "Washington Irving" re- 
tained; second, this building does 
not represent a new district being 
formed. The Washington Irving 
Intermediate School was shifted 
from one building to another to 
make room for the new Roslindale 
High School. Therefore, in my 
opinion, the name "Washington Ir- 
ving" should be retained for :he 
new building; third, we have a 
sense of duty to the thousands of 
alumni who hold diplomas from 
the Washington Irving School to 
retain that name. 

I have the utmost respect and 
reverence for the late Father Cum- 
mins and I was very happy when 



Jan. 23 



CITY RECORD 



1 03 



the City of Boston honored his 
memory by naming the new hign- 
way after him a few years ago. 
If the new building represented a 
new district being created I would 
feel differently about it. 

However, I believe the rights and 
wishes of the majority of the 
citizens and the alumni should be 
respected. Consequently I am vot- 
ing to retain the name of ."Wash- 
ington Irving." 

Mr. Tobin: Washington Irving 
School. 

Chairman: Washington Irving 
School. 

The Chairman stated that th-e 
proposed order naming the new in- 
termediate school in Roslindale the 
John F. Cummins School failed of 
passage since, under the rules, four 
votes are required. The name 
"Washington Irving School" there- 
fore will stand. 



NAMING OF SCHOOL 
BUILDINGS 
Mr Smith offered the following: 
ORDERED, That in the naming 
of school buildings in the future 
the following procedure shall be 
adopted or adhered to: 

(a) Where a school building is 
demolished and another school con- 
structed in place thereof, the new 
building shall bear the name of the 
original structure. 

(b) Where changes take place in 
existmg buildings which necessitate 
the removal of the pupils to a new 
structure and the renaming of the 
building vacated by such pupils, the 
new building shall bear the name 
of the building in which the pupils 
were formerly housed. 

(c) Where new buildings are to 
be named and there are no such 
complications as described under 
(a) and (b) of this order, the 
wishes of all organizations of citi- 
zens in the district in which each 
school is to be located will be con- 
Mdered so that the School Com- 
mittee may have complete infor- 
mation as to the wishes of the 
majority of the citizens with re- 
spect to the naming of a new school 
building 

Dr. Lyons: I am going to ask 
that that motion be laid over until 
the full Board is present. I do not 
think it is fair to act or vote on a 
motion of this kind with any mem- 
be absent. I think we all should 
share the responsibility and I call 
for the entire membership of the 
Board before voting on a motion 
of this sort. On the other hand, 
while I make that request, I would 
not obstruct any action on the part 
of Mr. Smith. 

Chairman: I think it would be 
advisable to have the motion laid 
over. In the meantime I would 
ask the Secretary to furnish each 
member with a copy of the motion. 

The motion was laid over and a 
copy ordered sent to each member. 

On motion, all unfinished busi- 
ness was referred to the next Com- 
mittee. 

The Committee adjourned. 

Attest: 

ELLEN M. CRONIN, 
Secretary. 



CITY OP BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Furnishing Men's Suits. 

The Supply Depairitment of the City of Bos- 
ton inviites proposals for furnishing men's 
suits to the Lonz Island Hospital, Institu- 
tions Department, as per speoifioajtio'Tis con- 
tained dm proposals which may be obtained alt 
the office of the Supply DepartmeTit, Room 801, 
Oity Hall Araiex. There will be a charge of 
twenty cents ($0.20) for each blank proposal 
taken out. The bidder must leave his pro- 
posal with a ceritified check for $200, payable 
to and to ibecoime the property of the City 
of Boston if the proposal is not carried out, 
alt the labove Office. A duplicate bad. without 
check, must be left at the office of the Oity 
Auditor prior to the time named for opening 
bids. The bids wiU be publicly opened and 
read on Tuesday, February 2, 1937, at 12 m., 
alt Room 801, City Haill Aranex. The successful 
bidd'eir must furnish a bond for one quai'iter 
the total estimated amount of the contract 
with a surety company authorized to do busi- 
ness in Maisachiuseftts as siiirety for the faithful 
performance of the contract. The Superin- 
tendent reserves the right to accept or reject 
any or all bids, or amy part of a bid, and 
to award the contract as he deems for the 
best inlteires'ts of the city. All contracts miade 
subject to appropriations to meet payments 
thereunder. 

D. Frank Doherty, 

(Jan. 23.) Superintendent of Supplies. 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE OF THE 
OITY OF BOSTON. 



Administration Building, 15 Beacon Streeh', 
Office of the Business Manager. 



Proposal for Furnishing Toilet Paper in 
Rolls for Boston Public Schools. 

The School Committee of the City of Bos- 
ton invites bids for furnjishing toilet paper 
in roi'.ls for the Bcstfon public schools. Pro- 
posal forms are obtainable at the office of the 
Business Manager of the School Committee, 
15 Beacon stirect, tenith floor. Envelopes con- 
taining proposals must be sealed and plainly 
marked "Proposal for Toilet Paper in RoHs." 
The bid must be in duplicate. One copy 
signed by the bidder amd accompaniW by a 
certified check foir $100, payable to the City 
of Boston, must (be left at the office Of (the 
(Business Manager On or before 12 o'clock m. 
on Wednesdiay, February 3, 1937. Copies filed 
vTOth the Business Manager will be publicly 
opened and read at 12 o'clock m. of the day 
stated. The lother copy, also signed by the 
bidder, must he filed with the City Auditor, 
City Hall, Boston:, Mass., previous to the time 
named for the Opening of bids. The School 
Comimittee reserves the right to reject any or 
all bids, and to accept such bid as may be 
deemed best for Ibhe interests of the city. 
The successful bidder will be required to 
furnish a bond for not less than 50 per cent 
of the amount of the contract. 

Albxandeir M. Sullivan, 

Btisiness Manager of the School Committee. 

(Jan. 23.) 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 



Proposals for Toweling. 

The Supply Departmeint of the City of Bos- 
ton invites proposals for funniishing the Park 
Department, toweling, as per specifications 
to be obtiaiined at the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex. There ivUI be 
a charge of twenty cents (fO.:iO) for each 
proposal taken out. The (bidder must leave 
his proposal and a certifie<l check for $200, 
payable Ito and to ibecome the property of 
the Oity of B'ociton if the proposal is not 
carried out, alt tlie office of the Supply Deparit- 
menjt. A duplicate bid, without check, must 
be left at the office of the City Auditor prior 
bo the time named for openinsr bids. The 
bn<ls will be publicly oponcd and read on 
Wednesday, February 3, 1937, at 12 m.. at 
Room 801. City Ball Annex. The successful 
bidder musit furnish a bond for one quarter 
the tdt;.al estimated amount of the contract with 
(I surely company oAithorizcd to do bu-sinoss in 
Massachusetts as surety for the fojithful per- 
formance of the contract. The Superintend- 
ent reserves the right to laccopt or reject any 
or all bids, or any part ^f a bid, and to award 
the contract as he deems for the best interests 
of the city. All conbracts made subject to 
appTopriations to mecit payments thei-eunder. 
D. Frank Doherty. 

(JaYi.ZS.) Stiperintoidcnt of Supplies. 



CITY OF BOSTON. 



BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 



Chances in Traffic Regulations. 
Voted, That the Revised Traffic Rults and 
Regulations of the Oity of Boston, as adopted 
by the Boston Traffic Commission on October 
31. 1935, and on November 6, 1935, are 
amended as follows, effective January 25, 1937: 
Section 8, Part 2, is amended by striking 
out the following : 

Brattle Street, Downtown Boston. 
South side, from Adams square to Scollay 
square, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Hyde Park Avenue, Hyde Park. 

East side, from Oak street to Winthrop 
street, twenty -four hours. 
River Street, Hyde Park. 
iSouth side, from Business street to Maple 
street, twenty-four hours. 
Tremont Street, Downtown Boston. 
West side, from a point two hundred (200) 
feet north of iBoylston street to Park 
street, live parking, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
West side, from Park street to Scollay 
square, twenty-four hours. 
Section 8, Part 2, is amended by adding the 
following : 

Adams Street, Dorchester. 

West side, from Dickens Street to Dor- 
chester avenue, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Alford iStreet, Charlestown. 

East side, from Dexter street to a point 
one hundred and fifty (150) feet south 
of Dexter street, twenty-four hours. 
Arch Street, Downto\vn Boston. 

East side, from Milk street to Summer 
street, 7 a. m. to G p. m. 
Brattle Street, Downtown Boston. 

North side, from Adams square to Scollay 
square, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Devonshire Street, Downtown Boston. 

East side, from Adams square to State 
street, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Franklin Street, Downtown Boston. 

North side, from Washington streeft to 
Hawley street, 7 a. m. to S p. m. 
Hawley Street, Downtown Boston. 

East side, from Milk street to Summer 
street, 7 a. m. to 6 p. m. 
Hyde Park Avenue, Hyde Park. 

Bast side, from Oak street to River street, 
twenty-four hours. 
River Street, Hyde Park. 

South Slide, from Business street to Hyde 
Park avenue, twenty-four hours. 
Robinwood Avenue, West Roxbury. 

North side, from Centre street to a point 
four hundred and fifty (450) feet east 
of Centre street, twenty-four hours. 
Inner side, circular portion of street, 
twenty-four hours. 
Tremont Street, Downtown Boston. 

West side, from a point two hundred 
(200) feet north of Boylston street to 
opposite Temple place, live parking, 7 
a. m. to 6 p. m. 
West side, from opposite Temple place 
to Scollay square, twenty-four hours. 
Section 35 is amended by adding the follow- 
ing: 

Stuart Street. 

Into Tremont street, northerly. 
Into Tremont street, southerly. 

William P. Hickey, 
(Jan. 16-23.) Commissioner. 

CITY OF BOSTON. 



ASSESSING DEPARTiMENT. 



Assessors' Notice to T.vxp.wers. 

CiTV H.\ll .\nxex. 
Boston, January- ], 1937. 
Relurns must br Jiiade on or before January SI, 
10S7, instead of February to as in last year. 

Particular attention is called to the .Assessors' 

notice posted upon City Hall and various other 

places throughout the city relative to niakiiiK 

returns on personal property subject to taxation. 

EDw.\nD T. Kelly, 

Timothy W. Murpuy, 

,IoHN P. O'llvuiV 

(Jan. 2-9-16-23 :;o 



THE NOISE NUISANCE. 

That city officials are serious about 
eliminating noise is noted from studiea 
of new anti-noise ordinances enacted by 
a growing number of municipiilities listed 
in the "United States Municipal News," 
bulletin of the American Municipal Asso- 
ciation and the United StAt«s Conference 
of Mayors. Among the more important 
of these cities are Philadelphia. Garj*, 
Ind., Louisville, New York and Boston. 



OFFICIAL DIRECTORY. 



MAYOR'S OFFICE. 

Room 27, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 1100. 
Frederick W. Mansfield, Mayor. 
Joseph F. Mellyn, Secretary. 
William C. S. Hbaley, Assistant Secretary. 
Cyril G. Cummings, Assistant Secretary. 
John F. Gilmore, Jr., Assistant Secretary. 
Bernard J. Dunn, Assistant Secretary. 
Thomas E. Cimeno, Assistant Secretary. 
Arthur J. O'Keefe, Assistant Secretary. 
Mary L. Thompson, Assistant Secretary. 
John F. Gilmore, Assistant Secretary and 

Chief Clerk. 
Herbert L. McNaby, Chief Licensing Division. 
Joseph Mikolajewski, Assisfa7if. 
Martin J. Conroy, Messenger. 
CITY COUNCIL. 

Ward 1. Henry Selvitella, 80 Orient avenue. 

Ward 2. James J. Mellen, 18 Tremont st. 

Ward 3. John I. Fitzgerald, 7 Allen st. 

Ward 4. George W. Roberts, 20 Hemenway 
street. 

Ward 5. Henry L. Shattuck, 15 River st. 

Ward 6. George A. Murray, 223 West 
Second street. 

Ward 7. John E. Kerrigan, 213 West Eighth 
street. „ 

Ward 8. John F. Dowd, 22 Greenville st. 

Waa-d 9. . , „^ 

Ward 10. John J. Doherty, 671 Wyman st. 

Ward 11. James J. Kilroy, 1301 Columbus ave. 

Ward 12. David M. Brackman, 89 Waumbeck 
street. ... 

Ward 13. Peter J. Fitzgerald, 39 Belfort st. 

Ward 14. Sidney Rosenberg, 576 Blue Hill ave. 

Ward 15. Martin H. Tobin, 70 Westville st. 

Ward 16. John J. McGrath, 2 Glenrose road. 

Ward 17. Robert Gardiner Wilson, Jr., 57 
Codman Hill avenue . 

Ward 18. Clement A. Norton, 34 Myopia rd. 

Ward 19. Peter A. Murray, 7 St. John st. 

Ward 20. James F. Finley, 231 Cornell st. 

Ward 21. James E. Agnew, 92 Wallingford rd. 

Ward 22. Edward M. Gallagher, 21 Oak 
Square avenue. 

Clerk of Committees. 
Room 56, City HaU. Tel. 



Lafayette 5100. 

City Messenger. 
Edward J. Lbary, Room 55, City Hall. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

ART DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Faneuil Hall. 

Arthur A. Shurcx,iff, Secretary. 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Edward T. Kelly, Chairman. 
John C. L. Dowling. Stcretary. 
John P. O'Hearn, Principal Assessor. 

AUDITING DEPARTMENT. 
Room 20, City Hall. Teh Lafayette 5100. 
Charles J. Fox, City Auditor. 
Daniel J. Falvey, Deputy City Auditor. 
BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OF SCHOOL 

BUILDINGS. 
Richard J. Lane, Chairman; Francis R. 
Bangs ; Leo J. Dunn. 

Department of School Buildings. 
Office, 28 Norman street. Tel. Capitol 5750. 
William W. Drummey, Superintendent of Con- 
struction. 
BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTAtENT. 
Frederick H. Fay, Chairman. 30 City Hall. 
Elisabeth M. Herlihy, Secretary. Tel. 
Lafayette 5100. 

BOSTON TRAFFIC COMMISSION. 
134 North street. Tel. Capitol 2125. 
William P. Hickey, Commissioner. 

BUDGET DEPARTMENT. 
47 City Hall. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Francis J. Murray, Commissioner. 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 901 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100 
Edward W. Roemer, Building Commissioner. 
John H. Gloveb, Acting Clerk of Department. 

Board of Examiners. 
Office, 907 City Hall Annex, Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
J. Fred McNeil, Chairman. 
Mary C. Dowd, Secretary. 

Board op Appeal. 
Office. City Hall Annex. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 
James A. McElaney, Jr., Secretary. 

CITY CLERK DEPARTA'iENT. 
Room 31, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, City Clerk. 
John B. Hynes, Assistant City Clerk. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD. 
Room 30, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Frederic H. Fay, Chairman. 
■ , Secretary. 



CITY RECORD. 

Office, 73 City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Forrest P. Hull, Editor. 
Joshua H. Jones, Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent. Room 73, 
City Hall. 

COLLECTING DEPARTiMENT. 
Office, 200 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
John F. Doherty, City Collector. 
William T. Gartland, Assistant City Collector. 

ELECTION DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 111 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 

5100. 
David B. Shaw, Chairman. 
Daniel H. Rose. Commissioner. 
Frederic E. Dowling, Commissioner. 
Francis B. McKinney, Commissioner. 

FINANCE COMMISSION. 

Office, 24 School street. Tel. Lafayette 1622. 
E. Mark Sullivan, Chairman. 
Robert E. Cunniff, Secretary. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 
Headquarters, Bristol street. South End. Tel. 

Kenmore 1100. 
Wire Division, 103 City HaU Annex. Tel. 

Lafayette 5100. 
Edward F. McLaughlin, Commissioner. 

, Executive Secretary. 

Samuel J. Pope, Chief of Department. 
Peter F. Dolan, Superintendent of Wire 

Division. 

THE FRANKLIN FOUNDATION. 
Office, Franklin Union, Appleton and Berkeley 

streets. Tel.. Hancock 6590. 
Henry B. S.\wybr, President. 
W. B. Russell, Director. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 1107 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
William B. Keelek, M. D., Commissioner. 
Joseph A. Cahalan, Secretary. 

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT. 
City Hospital, 818 Harrison ave., Tel. Ken. 8600. 
Relief Hospital, Haymarket Sq. Tel. Cap. 0753. 
Relief Hospital, East Boston. Tel. E. B. 3600. 
West Department, West Roxbury. 
Sanatorium Division, 249 River St., Mattapan. 

Tel. Blue Hills 7900. 
Joseph P. Manning, President. 
James W. Manary, M. D., Superintendent. 

INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 808-811 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Frederic A. Washburn, M. D., Commissioner. 
Elizabeth G. Nelson, Chief Clerk. 
Child Welfare Division. 
800 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Registration Division. 
Office, Room 5, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 

Long Island, Hospital Division. 
Long Island, Boston Harbor. Tel. President 

1371. 

LAW DEPARTMENT. 
Room 1003, Lawyers Building, 11 Beacon 

street. Tel. Lafayette 6200. 
Henry E. Foley, Corporation Counsel. 
Margaret G. O'Neill, Secretary. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Library Building, Copley square. Tel. 

Kenmore 1500. 
Louis E. Kirstbin, President of Trustees. 
Milton E. Lord, Director. 

LICENSING BOARD. 

Office, 1 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 2470. 
David T. Montague, Chairman. 
Louis Epple, Secretary. 

MARKET DEPARTMENT. 

Office, Quincy Market. Tel. Capitol 5382. 
Frank J. Kiernan, Superintendent. 

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYMENT BUREAU. 

Men and Women, 25 Church street. Tel. 

Liberty 8607. 
Samuel W. Warren, Director. 

OVERSEERS OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 
Office, Charity Building, 43 Hawkins street. 

Tel. Capitol 8320. 
Temporary Home, Chardon street. Tel. Laf. 

2337. 
Wayfarers' Lodge, 30 Hawkins street. Tel. 

Lafayette 3198. 
James A. McMurry, Chairman. 
Patrick J. Moynihan, Executive Director. 

PARK DEPARTMENT. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 
William P. Long, Chairman. 
Daniel J. Byrne, Secretary. 

Park, Public Grounds, Bath and Music 

Divisions. 

Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 

Cemetery Division. 
Office, 33 Beacon street. Tel. Capitol 6940. 



PENAL INSTITUTIONS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 805 City Hall Annex. Tel. Laf. 6100. 
John J. Douglass, Commissioner. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Headquarters, 154 Berkeley street. Tel. Ken- 

more 6700. 
Joseph F. Timilty, Commissioner. 
Andrew J. Gorey, Secretary. 
Edward W. Fallon, Superintendent. 

PRINTING DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 174 North street. Tel. Lafayette 6363. 
William J. Casey, Superintendent. 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1005 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 6100. 
Ros^VELL G. Hall, Superintendent. 
Thomas A. Callahan, Chief Clerk. 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT. 

Edward M. Richardson, Commissimier. Office 

509 City Hall Anmex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
John J. Connelly, Secretary and Chief Clerk. 
Room 509, City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Bridge and Ferry Division. 
Thomas H. Sexton, Division Engineer. Office, 
602 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Highway Division. 
Joshua Atwood, Division Engineer. Office, 
501 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 
Sanitary Division. 
Adolph j. Post, Division Engineer. Office, 
501 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Sewer Division. 
George W. Dakin, Division Engineer. Office, 
701 City HaU Annex. Tel. Lafayette 5100. 
Water Division. 
Daniel M. Sullivan, Division Engineer. Office. 
607 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 6100. 
Water Income Division. 
James A. McMurry, Division Engineer. Office^ 
604 City HaU Annex. TeL Laf. 5100. 

REGISTRY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1008 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 5100. 
Hilda H. Quirk, Registrar. 

RETIREMENT BOARD. 

Room 65, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 
Wilfred J. Doyle, Chairman. 
J. George Herlihy, Secretary. 
William D. Kenny, Executive Officer. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 
Office, 15 Beacon street. Tel. Captol 5500. 
Frederick R. Sullivan, Chairman. 
Ellen M. Cronin, Secretary. 
Patrick T. Campbell, Superintendent of 

Schools. 
Alexander M. Sullivan, Business Manager. 

SINKING FUNDS DEPARTMENT. 

Room 20, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 
Eliot Wadsworth, Chairman. 

SOLDIERS' RELIEF DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 60 City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 
Charles H. Carey, Commissioner. 

STATISTICS DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 76 City HaU. Td. Lafayette 6100. 
Walter A. Murray, Acting Chairman 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Secretary. 

STREET LAYING=OUT DEPARTMENT, 

Office, 401 City HaU Annex. 

Commissioners: OwEN A. GALLAGHER, Chair- 
man; Walter A. Murray; Thomas A. Fin- 
gerald; Cornelius A. Reardon, Secretary. 

SUFFOLK, COUNTY OF. 

Offices, Court House, Pemberton square. TeL 

Capitol 0351. 
William J. Foley, District Attorney. Tel. 

Capitol 9500. 
John A. Keuher, Sheriff. Tel. Capitol 2451, 
W. T. A. Fitzgerald, Register of Deeds. Td. 

Capitol 0519. 
Arthur W. Sullivan, Register of Probate. 

Tel. Capitol 9110. 

SUPPLY DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 801 City HaU Annex. Tel. Laf. 6100. 
D. Frank Doherty, Superintendent. 

TRANSIT DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 1 Beacon st., 7th floor. Tel. Capitol 6860. 
Thomas F. Sullivan, Chairman. 

TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 

Room 21, City HaU. Tel. Lafayette 6100. 

John H. Dorsey, Treasurer. 

Arthur F. Swan, Assistant Treasurer. 

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
DEPARTMENT. 

Office, 105 City HaU Annex. TeL Laf. 5100. 
James A. Sweeney, Sealer. 



city op boston printing depabtmbnt 



CITY RECORD 

Official Chronicle of Boston Municipal Affaibs. 
Vol.. 29. Saturday, -Ianxjary yo, 19y7. No. 5 

MAYOR MANSFIELD DISCUSSES $25 TAX LIMIT ON REAL ESTATE AND ITS 
RELATION TO THE ENTIRE BURDEN OF MUNICIPAL GOVERNMENT — 
AGREES THAT SOMETHING SHOULD BE DONE TO RELIEVE REALTY 
OWNER, BUT POINTS OUT THAT PROPOSAL WOULD BRING DISASTER 
TO CITY AND NOT ACCOMPLISH DESIRED EFFECT — SHOWS DIFFICUL= 
TIES COLLECTORS OF TAXES FACE IN MATTER OF PERSONAL AND 
INTANGIBLE PROPERTY LEVIES. 



The following is the Mayor's radio address over Station WAAB, January 27, on the matter of §25 tax 
limit: 

Good Evening, Radio Friends. 

I can think of no subject more important for me to talk to you about tonight than that of the proposed S2o 
tax limit on real estate. This question was submitted on the ballot at the November Election to the voters in 
every Boston ward except 1, 6, 7, 8, 12 and 15. It was adopted by a decisive majority in every ward. 

It was also voted upon in thirty-five cities and towns in the Commonwealth. In every one of these cities 
and towns also there was a decisive vote in favor of the $25 tax hmitation. 

I can readily understand the reason for this action by the voters. I happen to be a taxpayer myself and I 
know what the burden is. I would like very much to have a $25 limit on my real estate tax if it could be done 
without injuring the city. 

More than that, I agree that the proportion of the tax burden borne by real estate is altogether too great. 
I agree further that something ought to be done to relieve the real estate owner and distribute the burden more 
equitably upon all property owners and not merely real estate owners. Under the law we are supposed to assess 
all taxable property equally, both real estate and personal. In theory that is what we do, and again in theorj' we 
are supposed to collect our full assessments upon personal property just as we do upon real estate. 

Burden on Realty Owner. 

But as a matter of actual fact and practical working of the law, the burden falls almost wholly upon the 
real estate owner. The proportion of revenue received from taxation according to the last figures supplied to me by 
the City Auditor shows that over 97 per cent of the entire revenue came from real estate and that less than 3 per 
cent came from personal property. I agree that this is altogether disproportionate. I know that there is a great 
deal of personal property in Boston that ought to be taxed that is not taxed. But there is a reason for this. And 
the reason is that the personal property cannot be come at to be assessed against a person owning jewelry and similar 
kinds of personal property. 

But the real estate owner — the man or woman who owns a Uttle house and a piece of ground — cannot hide 
that kind of property. The land is there and the house is there, and when the assessor comes around and looks at 
the house and land he assesses it. And just because the personal property owner conceals his holdings and thus 
avoids bearing his fair share of the tax burden the real estate owner must pay more than he ought to pay because 
he must make up the deficit caused by the default in payment of the personal property owner. And so I say, and 
readily admit, that the real estate owner is unduly and unfairly burdened and that his taxes are too high. I agree 
further that something ought to be done to relieve him. But just what that something ought to be is a matter of 
the most serious importance to the people of Boston, and, since the Legislature must pass upon the referendum 
submitted to them by the voters who favored a tax limit of $25, it is just as important for the citizens of every city 
and town in Massachusetts as it is to the citizens of Boston. 

But having freely admitted that the real estate tax is too high and ought to be reduced, I do not admit 
that the right way to reduce it is by an arbitrary limitation fixed at $25 by a Legislature. That is not the way 
to relieve the taxpayer of this burden, and if that measure should be adopted by the Legislature and should become 
law in Massachusetts, it would be, in my opinion, one of the most disastrous things that couUl possibly happen 
to the community. Let us see what it would mean. I shall deal in round figures only. 

Governmental Requirements. , 

Last year it required over $81,000,000 to conduct the affairs of the City of Boston. We received from the 
receipts of various departments, the Corporation Tax, Income Taxes, School receipts, Auto Excise Tax, Poll Tax, 
Race Track distribution and reimbursement for state-owned land, a little over $15,700,000. Subtracting this 
from the $81,000,000 that we needed, it was necessarv for us to raise by taxation $67,500,000. The 1930 tax rate 
of $38 produced $61,500,000. The remaining $6,000,000 was borrowed. If this $6,000,000 was not borrowed the 
tax rate would have been $3.60 higher becau,se last year every million dollars spent was equal to 50 cents on your 
tax bill. 

(Conlinuetl on page lOS.) 



1 06 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 30 




"O Boston, fair City enthroned like a radiant 
queen, 
From thy hills looking down on the ship- 
teeming plain of the ocean. 
May thy future be bright, thy skies beam 

with light all serene, 
Ensured by thy sons' and thy daughters' 
unselfish devotion!" 
From Boston Centenial Poem by 

Nathan Haskei, Dole. 



CITY RECORD. 



Published weekly in Boston by the Board of 
Trustees of the Statistics Department of 
the City of Boston, under the direction of 
the Mayor, in accordance with legislative act 
and city ordinance. 



FORREST P. HULL, Editor. Room 73, City 

Hall. 
Joshua H. Jones, Jr.. Associate Editor. 
Edward F. O'Dowd, Business Agent, Room 73, 

City Hall. 



Entered as second class matter at Boston Post 
Office. 



By Subscription S2.00 per year 

Single Copies 10 Cents 

IN ADVANCE 
STREET AGENCIES 
Old South News-Stand, Old South entrance 
to subway. 

Advertising 
A rate of S2 per inch of 12 lines (set 
solid) has been established for such adver- 
tisements as under the law must be printed 
in the City Record. Advertising and other 
copy must be in hand by Thursday of each 
week to insure its publication in the Satur- 
day issue. 

Copies for sale at the Statistics Department, 
Room 73, City Hall. 



MUNICIPAL CALENDAR. 

Meeting of the City Couucil Monday, 
Februarj- 1, 1937, at 2 p. m. 

Meetings of the Transit Department are 
held on Monday and Thursday of each 
week at 11 a. m. 

Board of Zoning Adjustment Public 
hearings and executive meetings are 
held oa the first Friday of each month, 
Room 30, City Hall, at 2 p. m. 



MUNICIPAL SERVICE. 

Complaints, inquiries or suggestions 
regarding the work of municipal depart- 
ments should be made in writing to the 
ofiBcials directly in charge. The failure 
of such official to make reply within a 
reasonable length of time should be 
brought to the attention of the Mayor. 
Communications should be directed as 
follows: 

To THE Bo.\nD OF Street Commis- 
sioners, Room 401, City Hall Annex, 
for information relative to the laying 
out, relocation, widening and the discon- 
tinuance of highways, the taking of real 
property for municipal purposes; the 
assessments of betterments for streets 
and sewers; the plotting of undeveloped 
area for streets and the opening of 
private ways; the granting of licenses 



for the storage or sale of merchandise in 

public streets; the making of specific re- 
pairs in public streets ; the naming of pub- 
lic streets; the planting and removal of 
trees in public ways; the issuing of 
licenses for the storage of gasoline, oil 
and other inflammable substances or ex- 
plosive compounds; the use of the pub- 
lic waj'S for an}' permanent or tem- 
porary obstruction or projection in, 
under or over the same, including the 
location of conduits, poles and posts for 
telephone, telegraph, street railway or 
illuminating purposes, signs, marquises, 
bay windows, coal holes and vaults. 

To THE Boston Traffic Commission, 
134 North street, for information 
relative to regulation of vehicular street 
traffic on all or any streets, ways, high- 
waj's, roads and parkways under the 
control of the City of Boston, the 
issuing of all permits in connection 
therewith. 

To THE Commissioner of Public 
Works, Room 511, City Hall Annex, for 
information as to the watering, cleaning, 
lighting and repairing of streets, the con- 
stiTiction and care of sewers and catch- 
basins, the operation of the ferries, the 
maintenance of bridges and drawbridges 
and the removal of ashes and offal. 

To Room 604, City Hall Annex, for 
information relative to the supplying or 
metering of water and the water chaises 
of the city. 

To THE Health Dep.artment, Room 
1107, City Hall Annex, for information 
relative to the inspection of milk, vine- 
gar, meat, fish and vegetables, the issu- 
ance of permits for stables, slaughter 
houses, etc., smoke nuisances, the exist- 
ence of contagious diseases, of public 
health nuisances. 

To THE Board of Park Commis- 
sioners, 33 Beacon street, for informa- 
tion as to the care of the Common, 
Public Garden, Franklin Park, Franklin 
Field, Commonwealth avenue. Back Bay 
Fens, Marine Park, the Airport, and the 
small parks and playgrounds in general 
throughout the city, and as to the ex- 
termination of gypsy moths and the 



charges made for such service. Applica- 
tion may be made to this department 
for information regarding the public bath 
and g3Tnnasiums maintained by the city, 
and with regard to municipal indoor 
concerts and band concerts, also infor- 
mation relative to Mt. Hope, Evergreen, 
Fair\aew and other public cemeteries 
owned by the City of Boston. 

To THE School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, for information relative to the 
operation of the schools of the city. 

To THE DeP.\RTMENT OF ScHOOL BUILD- 
INGS, 11 Beacon street, for information 
as to the construction and repair of 
school buildings. 

To THE Bo.\RD OF EXAMINERS, Room 

1001, City Hall Annex, for information 
regarding the licensing of persons having 
charge or control of the work of con- 
stmction, alteration, removal or tearing 
down buildings. 

To THE Statistics Department, Room 
76, City Hall, for historical, geographical, 
political and population facts about Bos- 
ton; the personnel and accomplishments 
of present and past municipal adminis- 
trations; and such similar information 
as may be found concerning other 
American municipalities in its Munic- 
ipal Officials' Reference Library. 

To THE Wire Division of the Fire 
Dep.artment, 60 Bristol street, for all in- 
formation relative to the erection of 
poles, building of conduits, the in- 
stallation of all overhead and under- 
ground construction and electrical ap- 
paratus, as well as for general informa- 
tion relative to the entire division. To 
Room 103, City Hall Annex, for permits 
for the installing of wires and electrical 
apparatus within buildings of the City 
of Boston, and for the payment of fees 
incident to the granting of the privileges 
above named, and which must be paid 
in advance. 

To THE Board of Zoning Adjustment, 
Room 30, City Hall, relative to changes 
in the boundary lines of zoning districts 
of the City of Boston as established by 
chapter 488 of the Acts of 1924, and 
amendments thereto. 



MORTALITY 

For the week ending Jan. 23, 1937. 

Population as of July, 1936, Massa- 
chusetts State Census, 817,713; popula- 
tion estimated, July, 1937, United States 
Census Bureau, 805,192; number of 
deaths (stillbirths excluded): Residents, 
223; nonresidents, 45; total, 268. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 
All deaths, 17.31; nonresidents deducted, 
14.40. 



REPORT. 

Death rate per 1,000 of population: 

Last week, 18.28; corresponding week 
last year, 16.02. 

Deaths b.v age periods, sex, etc. : Under 
one year, 21; one j^ear to four years, in- 
clusive, 10; sixty vears and over, 137. 
Total deaths: Male, 139; female, 129; 
deatlis in hospitals and institutions, 160; 
deaths of colored, 6. 



REPORTABLE DISEASES: CASES AND DEATHS.' 



DlSE.\SE3. 



Anterior Poliomyelitis 

Diphtheria. . ; 

Encephalitis Lethargica 

Influenza 

Measles 

Meningitis Epidemic 

Pneumonia (lobar) 

Scarlet Fever 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) 

Tuberculosis (pulmonary) (childhood type T. B.) 

Tuberculosis (other forms) 

Typhoid Fever 

Whooping Cough 



Cases and Deaths 
Reported Week 

Ended 
Jan. 23, 1937. 



Cases. Deaths. 



223 



Cases and Deaths 

Reported Week 

Ended 

Jan. 25, 1936. 



Cases. Deaths. 



73 

2 

66 

78 

25 

8 

2 



1 
18 

5 

2 

1 



* Residents and nonresidents included. 



Jan. 30 



CITY RECORD 



107 



BOSTON CITIZENS LED BY MAYOR MANSFIELD RESPOND TO DISTRESS CALLS 
FROM FLOOD=STRICKEN MID=WEST AREA — POLICEMEN AND RADIO 
EQUIPMENT, AS WELL AS SUPPLIES, RUSHED WEST BY AIRPLANE AND 
MOTOR AND TRAIN IN EFFORTS TO ALLEVIATE SUFFERING AND TO SAVE 
LIVES OF THOSE WHOSE LIVES, HOMES AND PROPERTY HAVE BEEN 
ENDANGERED — BOSTON JOINS HANDS WITH WHOLE NATION IN RESCUE 
AND AID WORK — ALL HELP DEEPLY APPRECIATED. 



Boston, with Mayor Mansfield directing the activities, has responded to the calls for aid from the flooded 
regions of the Middle West. \ Not only has the city and citizens responded with supplies and food as well as cloth- 
ing and money contributions through the Red Cross but also with men and fire and flood fighting apparatus. 

Mayor Mansfield has been in direct touch with the official at Louisville, Kentucky, and with other head- 
quarters as well as with the police and fire details that have been sent to aid the stricken regions. Immediately 
upon receipt of word that aid would be welcomed Mayor Mansfield made plans for giving relief. The following 
statements and communications indicate the steps by which aid was dispatched and the success being achieved 
by those who represent Boston in the stricken areas. 

Upon January 25 Mayor Mansfield, after consultation, issued "the following statement: 



Police Aid Ready. 

Lieutenant Waitt and Robert McGeouch 
of Police Headquarters have informed me 
that the Boston Police Department could 
put six two-way radio police cars m the 
field in the flood district at twenty-four 
hours' notice, and also a portable gener- 
ator capable of generating 1,200 watts, 
which will maintain three portable flood 
lights if plugged into an outlet in a build- 
ing or to a switchboard to light a building 
.such as a hospital. One of the radio 
cars could be established as a head- 
quarters to receive and send messages 
and the other five care could cruise in the 
stricken area. 

I have wired to Mayor Neville Miller of 
Louisville and have attempted to tele- 
phone to him, but have been informed 
that there will be a ten hours' delay in 
getting a message through. 

Li the meantime Police Commissioner 
Timilty is cooperating in every way and 
will liave the cars and crews in readiness 
to start wlien I get the word. There will 
be two men for each radio car and one 
man on the generator and one superior 
officer in charge of the detail, making 
fourteen men in all. 



The following is a copy of Mayor 
Mansfield's telegram to the Mayor of 
Louisville, Kentucky: 

Boston, January 25, 1937. 
Hon. Neville Miller, Mayor's Office, 
Loui.svillc, Kentucky. 
Boston can send you six two-way radio 
police cars and one portable generator 
capable of generating twelve hundred 
watts, which will maintain three portable 
flood lights if plugged into outlet in a 
l)uilding or to a switchboard to light a 
huikling such as a hospital. One two- 
way car can be establishotl as head- 
quarters and otiier five cruisers sending 
and receiving from headquarters car. 
Detail of two men each car, one man on 
generator and one superior officer in 
charge, total, fourteen men ready to start 
for Louisville tomorrow if needed, ^^'ire 
or telephone reply. 

Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Maijor of Boston, Mass. 



AfteJ conference on January 27 the 
following Boston policemen were sent to 
Louisville, Kentucky: 

First Detail. 

Lieut. Lawrence L. Waitt, Bureau of 
Operations. 

Patrolman Joseph Lundy, Division 1. 

Patrolman Frank L. O'Neill, Division 4. 

Patrolman John D. Gorman, Division 4. 

Patrolman Joseph C. Murphy, Divi- 
sion 9. 

Patrolman Daniel A. PhiUips, Divi- 
sion 16. 

Patrolman Eldred Adair, Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation. 

Patrolman Salvatore DiNatale, Bureau 
of Criminal Investigation. 

Patrolman Joseph D. McGillivray, 
Bureau of Criminal Investigation. 

Patrolman Robert C. McGeouch, 
Bureau of Operations. 

Patrolman John D. Ahern, Bureau of 
Operations. 

Patrolman Arthur V. Fraher, Bureau of 
Operations. 

Patrolman William E. Payne, Ballistic 
Unit. 

Patrohnan George F. Smith, Ballistic 
Unit. 

Patrolman John I. Callahan, Bureau of 
Criminal Investigation. 

Second Detail. 

Lieut. James J. Hinchey, Division 9. 

Sergt. Herbert T. Dwyer, Division 13. 

Patrolman Joseph B. Curley, Division 1. 

Patrolman Thomas F. Hickey, Divi- 
sion 4. 

Patrolman John J. Kearns, Division (>. 

Patrolman Jolui ,1. Welch, Division 7. 

Patrolman John J. Dunn, Division 11. 

Patrolman Samuel Williston, Division 9. 

Patrolman .Mbert B. Gilderslceve, Divi- 
sion 9. 

Patrolman Ti\oma,s N. Johns()i\, DiviT 
sion 10. 

Patrolman .loiui B. Sweeney, Division 
15. 

I'atrohnan James L. Mood, Division 15. 

Patrolman David T. Mortimer, Divi- 
sion 1(). 

Patrolman I'rauk J. Hughes, Division 
16. 

Patrolman Leo Kearns, Special Sci-vice 
Squad. 

Patrolman Minard Culkin, Division 9. 

Patrolman Clark D. Adair, Special 
Service Squad. 



Patrolman Joseph J. Hynes, Special 
Service Squad. 

Patrolman Robert 0. Mahar, Special 
Service Squad. 

Patrolman Daniel E. Donahue, Special 
Semce Squad. 

On January 27 the following telegram 
was received by Superintendent of Police 
from Lieutenant Waitt : 

Dated today at Cincinnati 
10.55 A. M. 
Leaving Lockland, Ohio, for Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, immediately. Arrive in 
about four hours. Conditions at Louis- 
ville extremely bad according to informa- 
tion. This railroad station crowded with 
refugees evacuating flood area. 
We will pi'oceed : 

Route 25 to Georgetown, Ky. 
Route 62 to Lawrenceburg, Ky. 
Route 35 to Alton, Ky. 
Route 151 to Grayseburg, Ky. 
Route 60 to Shelbwillc, Ky. 
Route 30 to LaGrange, Ky. 
Route 22 to LouisvUle, Ky. ' 

Will advise further on arrival. 



message from American 



Telephone 
Airways: 

Plane carrying Boston pciliee approach- 
ing Louisville at 12.45 p. m. 
at Louisville at 12.50 p. m. 



Will land 



I"'ollowing tliese ini>s.siiges Mayor Mans- 
field issued tlie following statement: 

Mayor Mansfield has just talked with 
Mayor Miller of Louisville, Kentucky, 
who is very grateful to Boston for the 
police relief sent to them. Boston police 
were the first to arrive on the scene, fol- 
lowed closely by Philadelphia. 

The speed with which this was acconi- 
piisiicd was due in large part to the 
adniirai)le manner in which the .American 
Air Lines cooperated with fiie city 
authorities. They .>ient a large cruising 
plane from Ciiicago to Boston to pick up 
the Boston contingent, and contributixl 
tiie use of the plane witlunit charge, 
although we were ready and willing to 
pay for it if that should be necessjiry. 
Tlie -Vmerican Air Lini^s have ais<i 
supplied planes from Pittv^burgh, Phila- 
delphia and other {)laccs without charge. 



108 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 30 



MAYOR'S RADIO ADDRESS. 

{Continued from page 105.) 

But a $25 tax rate would have pro- 
duced last year only .140,500,000. But, 
as I have already shown, we need S67,- 
500,000, and if $25 would produce only 
.$40,500,000, it is claimed that there 
would be a loss in revenue of $27,500,000. 
In other words, we would have $27,000,000 
less with which to run the city. 

Now, there are certain fixed charges 
that the city must pay and they cannot 
be reduced or scaled down. They are as 
follows : 

Debt Requirements (that 
means paying off old in- 
debtedness borrowed by 

the city in gone by years), $11,300,000 

Welfare Relief 10,000,000 

State Tax 2,500,000 

Boston? Retirement System, 1,800,000 
Boston' Elevated Deficit As- 
sessment 1,500,000 

Metropolitan District As- 
sessment . 1,400,000 

W. P. A. Projects 1,175,000 

Overlay 1,150,000 

County p]xpenses 1,150,000 

'Noncontributory Pensions, 160,000 

Sumner Tunnel Deficit 200,000 

This, roughly in round figures, comes to 
over $33,000,000. Taking this $33,000,- 
000 away from the $81,000,000 that we 
need to have to run the city with last 
year leaves only $48,000,000. And from 
$47,000,000 you must subtract the 
$27,000,000 lost by the reduction in the 
tax rate, so that you would have only 
$21,000,000 to run the city with after 
paying the fixed charges of $33,000,000 
that I have referred to. 

Now, .$27,000,000 reduction is 56 per 
cent of the $48,000,000 that we need, so 
that we would have to reduce all of our 
expenses 56 per cent. And do you know 
what that would mean? Let me tell you 
what it would mean. It would mean that 
every city activity would have to he re- 
duced by 56 per cent. It would mean 
that all city departments would be re- 
duced 56 per cent in the amount of money 
given to them to run their departments 
with. It would mean a wholesale dis- 
charge of hundreds, yes thousands, of city 
employees, or a cutting of their salaries to 
the bone. It would mean closing many of 
our fire houses because we would not have 
men enough to keep them open or operate 
our fire apparatus. It would mean closing 
dozens of our schools becau.se we could 
not afford to pay for teachers to teach in 
them. It would mean closing many of our 
police stations because wc would not have 
policemen enough to man them. It 
would mean curtailing the activities of our 
Health Department. It would mean that 
garbage would not be collected, that 
streets would not be cleaned, that our 
sewers would not be kept in repair. That 
probably every other street light, if not a 
larger proportion than that, would have to 
be extinguished. In short, it would 
mean that many things that the people 
insist upon having and must have would 
have to be abandoned. Do you want 
thi.s to happen in Boston? Do you want 
this to happen in other cities and towns 
in this Commonwealth? 

No Im.vginary Picture. 

And this picture that I am painting for 
you is not merely imagination. The.se 
things actually have happened in other 
states that adopted a real estate tax limit. 

Thus in Columbus, Ohio, one half of 
the fire force was discharged and eleven of 
the nineteen fire stations were boarded up. 



The police force was cut in halves and half 
of the police cruiser cars were parked in 
the garage because there were no men to 
operate them. Garbage collection, street 
cleaning, park upkeep and street repair 
were all curtailed severely. This was re- 
ported in the New York Times of March 
15, 1936. 

Taking another Oliio city comparable 
in size with Boston, namely, Cleveland, 
the first effect of tlie tax limitation was to 
produce a bond default of over $1,280,000 
in February, 1934. This was followed by 
payless pay days and doles for city em- 
ployees during March and April. P. W. A. 
authorities withdrew all P. W. A. 
funds allotted to Cleveland and in May the 
city itself was forced to abandon its water 
main extension program, leaving piles of 
dirt and pipe along the streets which in 
many places were nothing but open 
trenches. More that seven hundred city 
employees were discharged. City bath 
houses were opened only two days a week. 
Every other street light was turned off 
and the collection of garbage, street clean- 
ing, playgrounds and other similar activi- 
ties wei'c substantially curtailed. Four 
bridges over the Cuyahoga river had to 
be closed in order to save bridgetenders' 
pay. 

In Bluefield, in West Virginia, it was 
boasted that $25,000 was saved by the 
tax limitation but the immediate result 
was the raising of the insurance premiums 
on property in Bluefield over $100,000, 
so that the boasted saving of $25,000 was 
wiped out four times over in just that one 
item of increased insurance cost. 

But time will not permit me to go into 
the experience of every city and town m 
all of the states that have tried this 
experiment, but the story is the same in 
all of them — California, Indiana, Mich- 
igan, New Mexico, Ohio, Oklahoma, 
Washington and West Virginia. 

And the curious thing about the whole 
situation is that real estate and real 
estate owners would be the very first 
element in the community to suffer if this 
tax limitation bill were to be adopted. 
Because most of the municipal activities 
are for the benefit of real estate and real 
estate owners. Let them pause then be- 
fore they place such a drastic limitation 
upon real estate taxes that their own 
property will suffer and that they will 
find themselves much more out of pocket 
in the long run by the deterioration of 
their real estate, by their inability to 
rent the property and by the general loss 
to the community than they would ever 
save by the tax limitation itself. 

If this tax limitation goes through, one 
thing is absolutely imperative, and that 
is that the Legislature must find some 
substitute for the deficit that will surely 
exist. If we need a $38 tax rate and all 
we get is a $25 tax rate then the one- 
third reduction which, as I have shown 
above amounts to 57 per cent when you 
consider fixed charges that must be paid, 
must be made up in some other way. 
What way do you suggest? The real 
estate owners who are pressing this bill 
•are altogether vague and uncertain about 
this. But there have been only two sug- 
gestions — one is by sales tax and the 
other is by borrowing money. Do you 
want a tax sale? That has been unpoplar 
wherever it has been tried, and further- 
more with all the exemptions on neces- 
sities of life, the tax would not produce 
enough money to make up the deficit. 
The only other thing is borrowing — an 
undesirable method at best. As I have 
tgld you above, we borrowed $6,000,000 
last year — where could we borrow $27, 
000,000 on top of the ..$6,000,000 if we 



needed it? If we did succeed in borrow- 
ing, it would be at such a high rate that 
the interest would more than offset any 
possible saving in the tax rate, and re- 
member, that the interest and the prin- 
cipal have to be paid by these very same 
taxpayers who are now pressing for a $25 
tax limit. 

Let me urge all of you to interest your- 
selves in this suljject and write and speak 
to your representatives in the Legislature 
to the end that this most dangerous 
measure shall be defeated. 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

Bids have been asked by advertise- 
ment in the City Record for the follow- 
ing departments. The attention of con- 
tractors and others is especially called to 
the closing time of receipt of such pro- 
posals. This will be published weekly. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
battery material for departmental use. 
Sui'ety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the full amount of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the oflfice of the 
Department of School Buildings, 26 Nor- 
man street,' Boston, Mass. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$500, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Momkiij, February 1, at 
2 p. m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
and delivering maple flooring to the 
various schools. Surety bond will be 
required in a sum equivalent to the full 
amount of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Department of School 
Buildings, 26 Norman street Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of .$500, to be filed at the same 
office. Duplicate bid, without check, 
to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, February 9, at 
2 p. m. 

Public Works Department (Bridge 
Service). 

Advertises for proposals for redecking 
draw span and painting the Chelsea 
Bridge South over the Mystic river. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to the fuU amount of the con- 
tract price. Blank forms for proposals 
may be obtained at the office of the Pub- 
lic Works Department, Room 508, City 
Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accompanied 
by certified check in the sum of $1,000, 
to be filed at the same office. Duplicate 
bid, without check, to be filed with the 
City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, February 10, 
at 12 m. 

School Committee. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
toilet paper in rolls for the Boston public 
schools. Surety bond will be required 
in a sum equivalent to 50 per cent of the 
contract price. Blank forms for pro- 
posals may be obtained at the office of the 
Business Manager, School Committee, 
15 Beacon street, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
$100, to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, February 3, at 
12 m. 

{^Continued on page 110.) 



Jan. 30 



CITY RECORD 



109 



OVERSEERS OF THE PUBLIC WELFARE OF THE CITY OF BOSTON. 



STATISTICAL REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE WEEK ENDING JANUARY 23, 1937. 





Dependent 
Aid. 


Mothers' 
Aid. 


Old Age 
Assistance. 


Administrative. 




Statistical. 


Salaries. 


Other 
Expenses. 


Totals. 


Number of active cases last 


15,478 

460 

363 

15,575 

21,964 


1,599 
10 
15 

1,594 

1,589 


8,189 
200 






25,266 
670 


week. 
Number of cases added 






Number of cases discontinued . . 






378 


Number of active cases this 


8,389 
4,445 






25,558 
27,998 


week. 
Same week last year 













Financial. 



Expended during week 


*$105,542 95 
103,236 96 
145,612 04 


$24,016 12 
24,142 15 
24,130 00 


$2,390 90 
113,128 13 

27,652 28 


$16,120 50 
16,135 84 

12,848 26 




$148,070 47 


Last week 




256,643 08 
210,242 58 


Same week last year 




Appropriations 






Expended to date 


323,516 49 
30,468 82 


79,626 01 
1,274 41 


231,704 47 

203 78 


48,386 34 




683,233 31 
31,947 01 


Collections from Common- 




wealth of Massachusetts, 
outside cities and towns and 
refunds.ft 









* Includes $1,252.16 advanced payments to adjust Hancock street paj'-daj^s. 
t Collections^on'account of Boston City Hospital, $11,155.97. J Miscellaneous collections, SS8.90, 



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS. 
(STATE.) 

State Examiners of Electricians. 

Examinations, 1937. 
Examinations will be held at the fol- 
lowing points and on the following dates: 

Boston, Wednesday, February 3. 
Worcester, Thursday, February 4. 
Boston, Wednesday, March 3. 
Fall River, Thursday, March 4. 
Fall River, Friday, March 5. 
Boston, Wednesday, April 7. 
Springfield, Thursday, April 8. 
Boston, Wednesday, May 5. 
Worcester, Thursday, May 6. 
Boston, Wednesday, June 16. 
Boston, Wednesday, September 15. 
Worcester, Thursday, September IG. 
Springfield, Thursday, October 14. 
Pittsfield, Friday, October 15. 
Boston, Wednesday, November 3. 
Lowell, Thursday, November 4. 
Boston, Wednesday, December 8. 
New Bedford, Friday, December 10. 
Now Bedforfl, Saturday, December 11. 



Rules for Examinations. 
All examinations shall be given in 
English. 

Applicants for Class B or journeyman's 
certificate must be at least eighteen years 
of age and have had at least two years' 
practical experience or the equivalent in 
the installation of wires, conduits, ap- 
paratus, fixtures and other appliances for 
carrying or using electricity for light, 
heat or power purposes. 

Applicants for Class A or master's 
certificate must be at least twenty-one 
years of age and havp had at least two 
years' experience in the business of in- 
stalling wires, conduits, apparatus, fix- 
tures and other appliances for carrying 
or using electricity for light, heat or 
power purposes. 

Examinations shall consist of appli- 
cant's knowledge of the National Elec- 
trical Code and practical electrical work. 

All persons desiring to be examined, 
either for a master or journeyman' certifi- 
cate, shall have application on file at 
least ten days previous to the date of 
such examination. 



Applicants for examination will be re- 
quired to obtain at least 70 per cent 
in order to obtain a certificate. 

Apulicants who fail to obtain the re- 
duirod 70 per cent will not be entitk^d 
to rc-examination until a period of three 
months has elapsed, and those who re- 
ceive less than 50 per cent or who fail on 
the practical demonstration, will not be 
re-examined for a period of six months. 

Any person found referring to notes or 
books, or misbehaving during an exam- 
ination, will be debarred from that e^yara- 
ination. 

Notice will be sent to applicants for 
certificates when and whore examination 
will be lield and only those so notilled 
will bp examined on that day. 

Stephen C. G.^rritv, 
James G. Reardon. 
Thomas H. Green, 
.\i,bert Frank, 

W.M-TER J. KeNEFICK, 

Stale Examiners of Electricians. 

For application blanks or other in- 
formation apply to State Examiners of 
Electricians, Room 303. 14 Beacon street, 
Boston, Mass. 



1 10 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 30 



PROPOSALS ADVERTISED. 

iConlinutd from pagt, 108.) 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
supplies and equipment for physical edu- 
cation in the Boston public schools. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 50 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may be 
obtained at the office of the Business 
Manager, School Committee, 15 Beacon 
street, Boston. Bids, accompanied by 
certified check in the sum of §50, to be 
filed at the same office. Duplicate bid, 
without check, to be filed with the City 
Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, February 9, at 
12 m. 

Supply Depabtment. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
men's suits to the Long Island Hospital, 
Institutions Department. Surety bond 
will be required in a sum equivalent to 
25 per cent of the contract price. Blank 
forms for proposals may be obtained at 
the office of the Supply Department, 
Room 801, City Hall Annex, Boston. 
Bids, accompanied by certified check in 
the sum of S200, to be filed at the same 
'office. Duplicate bid, without check, to 
be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, February 2, at 12 7n. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
toweling to the Park Department. Surety 
bond wiU be required in a sum equivalent 
to 25 per cent of the contract price. 
Blank forms for proposals may be ob- 
tained at the office of the Supply Depart- 
ment, Room 801, City Hall Annex, 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the sum of S200, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Wednesday, February 3, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
chain link fence to the Park Department. 
Surety bond will be required in a sum 
equivalent to 25 per cent of the contract 
price. Blank forms for proposals may 
be obtained at the office of the Supply 
Department, Room 801, City Hall Annex. 
Boston. Bids, accompanied by certified 
check in the .sum of $300, to be filed at 
the same office. Duplicate bid, without 
check, to be filed with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesdatj, February 9, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for two-part 
cast-iron gate boxes for the Public Works 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
S200, tx) bo filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, February .9, at 
12 m. 

Advertises for proposals for furnishing 
cast-iron water pipe to the Public Works 
Department. Surety bond will be re- 
quired in a sum equivalent to 25 per cent 
of the contract price. Blank forms for 
proposals may be obtained at the office 
of the Supply Department, Room 801, 
City Hall Annex, Boston. Bids, accom- 
panied by certified check in the sum of 
S200. to be filed at the same office. 
Duplicate bid, without check, to be filed 
with the City Auditor. 

Bids close Tuesday, February 9, at 
12 m. 



DEPARTMENT CHANGES. 

The following changes in the number, 
rating and compensation of the city em- 
ployees have been made during the week 
ending Thin-sday, Januaiy 28 : 

Boston Port Authority. 
ApproN'al has been given to appoint 
Hugo Oberg as rate expert to the Board, 
at S4,500 a year. 

Fire Dep.irtment. 

Edward L. Barry, clerk in the Fire De- 
partment, has been promoted to the po- 
sition formerly held by Thomas W. 
O'Connell, with salaiy increased from 
SI ,800 to S2,000 a year. 

Eugene J. Sullivan, stenographer and 
clei-k, has been promoted to the position 
formerlj' held by William D. Slattery, 
with salary increased from $1,700 to 
§2,000 a year. 

Hosemau John J. Gleason of Engine 
Company 33 has been retired at $1,050 
a year, which is one half the annual com- 
pensaition he is now receiving. 

Lieut. Patrick Ryan of Engine Com- 
pany 42 has been retired, effective 8 
a. m., February 16, at $1,250 a year. 

Stenographer Thomas W. O'Connell 
of Headquartere has been promoted to 
chief clerk in the Fire Commissioner's 
office with an increase in salary from 
§2,000 to $2,500 a year, this is §300 less 
than the amount allowed in the budget 
for the position of chief clerk. The pro- 
motion is necessary to fill an existing 
vacancy and in order to conduct the 
clerical work of the Fire Department 
in an efficient marmier. 

Stenographer and clerk William D. 
Slattery of Headquarters has been pro- 
moted to executive secretary with am in- 
crease in salary from $2,000 to $3,000 a 
year, this is §600 less than the salai-y al- 
lowed in the budget for the position of 
executive secretaiy. The promotion is 
necessary to fill an existing vacancy and 
in order to conduot the clerical work 
of the Fire Department in an efficient 
manner. 

Health Department. 

In conformity with the change in ordi- 
nance recently approved by his Honor 
and the City Council, whereby the name 
of the Sanitary Division of this depart- 
ment will hereafter be known as the 
"Housing and Sanitation Division," ap- 
proval of change in designation of in- 
spectors and supervisng inspectors, as 
set fonth below, has been approved. 

George J. McElroy, from sanitary in- 
spector and clerk to inspector of housing 
and sanitation and chief clerk. 
■ George W. Comerford, from chief sani- 
tary inspector to chief inspector of hous- 
ing and sanitaton. 

Francis A. Dorrigan, from supervising 
sanitary inspector to supervisor of hous- 
ing and .sanitation. 

William F. Brogie, fiom supervising 
sanitary inspector to supervisor of hous- 
ing and sanitation. 

James 'A. Carr, from eupei-vising 
sanitai-y inspector to supemsor of hous- 
ing and sanitation. 

Franci.s L. Donovan, from supervising 
sanitary insi>ector to supervisor of hous- 
ing and sanitation. 

Michael T. HaiTington, from supervis- 
ing sanitary inspector to supervisor of 
housing and sanitation. 
_WilIiam F. Blood, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 



William F. Brown, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Edward A. Campana, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspectoi- of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Walter V. Campbell, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Patrick H. Cannon, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

John C. Clougherty, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

George A. Costanza, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Paul C. Disaiio, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Francis X. Dolan, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Joseph D. DriscoU, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Timothy J. Dwyer, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspectoi' of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Thomas A. English, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Frederick A. Fitzgerald ,from sanitary 
inspector to inspector of housing and 
sanitation. 

Bernard A. Flaherty, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Daniel J. iFlanagan, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspectoi' of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Wilfred J. Gaudreau, fi'om sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Robert J. Graham, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Frederick W. Harrington, from sanitary 
inspector to inspector of housing and 
sanitation. 

John J. Harrington, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspectoi' of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Martin F. Haverty, from sanitaiy in- 
spector t'O inspectoi' of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Joseph F. Jefferson, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspectoi' of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Albert J. Kehoe, from sanitary in- 
spector to insppctoQ' of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Frank A. Kelley, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspectoa' of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Adam Krauss, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspectoi' of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Frank J. MoFarland, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

David R. MacSwain, from sanitaiy in- 
spector to inspectott' of housing and .sani- 
tation. 

William G. Maloney, from sanitaiy in- 
spector to inspectoi' of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Ralph R. Martin, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspectoi' of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Thomas A. Mulligan, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

James M. Murphy, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 



Jan. 30 



CITY RECORD 



1 1 1 



Michael J. Murphy, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

James T. O'Hara, from sanitaiy in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

John T. O'Neil, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

James J. Pontuso, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

George A. Quirk, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

William 0. Quirk, from sanitary in- 
spector bo inspectoir of housing and sani- 
tation. 

John J. Reai'don, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

John T. Ryan, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

John T. Ryder, from sanitary in- 
spector bo inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Richard F. Sheehan, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

James F. Winston, from sanitary in- 
spector to inspector of housing and sani- 
tation. 

Hospital Department. 
The following persons were employed 
at the Boston City Hospital for the week 
ending Thursdaj', January 14: 

Main Department. 
Temporary. — -Phillip Fay, supervisor, 
S32 a week; Irma Butt, Julia Jan'is, 
Gladys McCarthy, Maiy Marmar, special 
nurses, $4.50 a day. 

East Boston Relief Station. 
Temporary. — Dr. Charles Boyajian, 

resident surgeon, S2,0O0 a year. 
The following changes have occurred: 
Mar}' Flaherty, clerk, name now Mary 

Olds; "Ellen McCarthy, Helen Bruzzo, 

head nurses at Sl,560 to Sl,680 a year; 

Madeline Desmond, floor nurse at SI ,560 

to SI ,680 a year. 

The following persons wei'e employed 
at the Bo.gton City Hospital during the 
week ending Thursday, January 21: 

Main Department. 
Temporary. — Dorothy Leonard, Isabel 
Jeghei-s, Rose Walker, Ilia Allen, Al- 
dona Grablin, Eleanor McCarthy, Flor- 
ence McMasters, Agnes Aherne, Pris- 
cilla Beckwith, Francis Burdick, Marie 
Carlson, Ruby Childs, Loretta Comtois, 
Elizabeth Connaughton, M'ary M. Grant, 
Dorothy Hainus, Frances Harris, Julia 
Jurvis, Mabel Ormsberg, Antoinette Pas- 
cucci, Genevie\e Ploski, Catherine V. 
Shea, Catherine Silva, Ann Summers, 
Helen Spillane, Dorothy Waters, Louise 
Burns, Carroll Briggs, Catherine Cun- 
ningham, Josephine Hayes, Veronica 
O'Suliivan, special nurses, $4.50 a day. 

South Department. 
Temporary. — Dorothy Leomird, floor 
nurse, Sl,200 a year; Mabel Saimders, 
special nur.se, $4.50 a day. 

Haymarket Square Relief Station. 
Temporary. — Margaret McPhee, Mar- 
garet Branco, cleaners, S15 a week; James 
Norton, porter tending furnace, S33 a 
week. 



Hospital Department (Sanatorium 
Division). 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division for 
the week ending Thursday, January 14: 

W^i'lliam Powers, Paul Curtis, night 
supervisors (temporary), S4 a day; Ed- 
ward Bonner, mvale nurse, S480 a year; 
James Kelley, Joseph DiGiovanni, chore- 
men (patients), §240 a year; Angelo 
Tammaro, maid (patient), S240 a year; 
Joseph Russell, maid (patient) (tempo- 
raiy), S240 a year; Henry Larson, male 
nurse (patient) (temporary), S480 a year; 
Marv Mulligan, maid, (temporary), 
$10.50 a week. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed : 

George Tracey, Edward Flaherty, male 
nurses (patients), S480 a year; Joseph 
Murphy, Daniel Fair, choremen (pa- 
tients), S240 a year; Michael Healey, 
maid (patient), SS40 a year. 

The following persons have been ap- 
pointed at the Sanatorium Division for 
the week ending Thursday, January 21 : 

Glach's Gaimt, Alice Greene, Mary 
Malloy, nurses (temporary), $1,020 a 
year; Margaret Robinson, laundress 
(temporary), $10.50 a week; Carmine 
Zarlengo, choreman, $14 a week; Miary 
Andrews, maid (temporary), $10.50 a 
week; Joseph Chamrin, Abe Shuman, 
choremen (patients), $240 a year; John 
Henebury, male nurse (patient), $480 a 
year; Henry Paul, maid (patient), $240 
a year; William Heffeman, Henry Lar- 
sen, male nurses (patients) (temporary), 
S4S0 a year; Jane Mahar, Joseph Rus- 
sell, maids (patients) (temporaty), $240 
a year; Anna Hodgdon, telephone op- 
erator (temporary), $3 a day; Paul 
Curtis, night supenisor (temporary), 
$4 a day; Edward McLaughhn, waiter, 
$14 a week. 

The following persons have ceased to 
be employed : 

Henry Williams, William Doherty, 
choremen (temporaiy), $17.50 a week; 
Bartholomew Conlon, Thomas O'Laugh- 
lin, choremen (patients), $240 a year; 
George Redfern, maid (patient), $240 a 
year. 

Institutions Department. 
The following changes have been made 
in the personnel for the week ending 
Thursday, January 21 : 

Long Island Hospital. 

Appointments: John J. Dillon, insti- 
tution employee, porter, $526 a year, 
temporary; Theresa S. Fraher, staff 
nurse, $960 a year, temporary; Daisy B. 
McKecn, staff nurse, $960 a year, tempo- 
rary; Marjorie A. Harrington, institu- 
tion employee, attendant, temporary, 
S6O0 a year, temporary; Helen F. Har- 
\'ey, in.stitution emploj'ee, housemaid, 
S500 a year, temporaiy. 

Resignations: Edward R. Carpenter, 
institution employee, watchman, $600 a 
year, voluntary; Mary C. Hibbard, in- 
.stitution employee, wardmaid, $526 a 
year, ^■oIuntary; Louis Ravreby, M. D., 
interne, $300 a year, voluntary; Cath- 
erine J. Donahue, institution emi>loyee, 
laimdross, $750 a year, voluntary. 

]'jni)ioyni(nvt Terminated: Irene C. 
Egan, stall" nurse, tempor.-iry, .$960 a year; 
Tlieresa S. Fraher, statT nurse, temporary, 
S960 a year; John J. Dillon, institution 
employee, porter, temporary, $526 a year. 

Transfers: MargariM V. Conley, insti- 
tution employee, wardmaid, $526 a year; 
from attendant at $000 a year; Anna E. 



Mayer, institution employee, attendant, 
temporary, $600 a. year from wardmaid 
at $526 a year; James J. McDevitt, in- 
stitution employee, hdper, pharmacy, 
$600 a year from porter at $526 a year; 
Joseph B. Fitzsimmons, institution em- 
ployee, porter, $526 a year from helper 
pharmacy at $600 a year. 

Course Completed: Margaret H. 
Whalen, student nurse, $600 a year. 

Overseers of the Public Welfare. 

The resignation of John C. L. Dowl- 
ing as secretary of the board and exec- 
utive director of the department, has 
been accepted, effective January 15. 

Patrick J. Moynihan has been elected 
as secretaiy of the board and executive 
director of the department at $6,000 a 
year, effective Januaiy 18. 

Penal Institutions Department. 
The following appointments have been 
made : 

Steamer "Michael J. Perkins." 
Thomas Bagley, watchman-fireman, 

$38.50 a week, temporary. 
John J. Darragh, watchman-fireman, 

$38.50 a week, temporary', time extended 

by Civil Service. 

Public Works Department (Sanitary 

Ser\'ice). 
The Boston Retirement Board has 
ordered the retirement of Frederick M. 
Williams, foreman at $2,500 a j^ear in 
the East Boston Sanitar;,^ District, ef- 
fective January 31. Appro\-al has been 
given for his continual employment from 
February 1 to February 27, inclusive, to 
clean up odds and ends of his work and 
also to instruct his successor in the work 
of his district at $2,500 a year. 

Overtime Allowed. 

The heads of the various departments 
-whose employees have received payment 
for overtime state in connection there- 
with that if any laborer has been allowed 
to work more than eight hours per day 
it has been only in case of emergency 
under the law: 

r 

Public Works Department {Sanitnnj 
Service). 

For the week ending Thui"sdav, Janu- 
ary 2S: 

George L. Gifford, John J. McDonald, 
teamster-chauffeurs. 1 day. S5.50 each ; 
Romeo F. Booth, teamster-chauffeur. 1 
day $5; Henry F. Collet t, Edward Davis, 
Joseph W. DcRocher. Patrick W. Sheehan, 
teamster-laborers, 1 day, $5 each ; George 
Golden, Patrick R. Manning, teamster- 
chauffeurs, 1 dav, S5.50 each; Alfred 
Buckley. Arthur D. Fitzpatrick. John F. 
Handren, John J. Hilicn. Jeremiah J. 
Keohane. John F. Muri^hy, Thomas 
Twome>', teamster-Jaborers, 1 day, $5. 
each; Walter G. Owens, laborer. 1 day. 
$5; J. J. Bellow. toainster-ciiautTeur, 1 
day. $5,50: William E. Learv, teamster- 
laborer, 1 day, S5. Total, .$97.50. 

This overtime is for sanding icy streets 
on Wednesda>', January 20. and is to be 
charged to Snow Removal appropriation. 

Ptiblic Works Department (Saiiilary-C 

Service). 
For the week ending Tiiur.-;day. Junu- 
arv 2S: 

L. Duftv, H. Pitts, laborers. 1 day. So 
each: J. Slioa. laborer, i day. .$2.50: \\_. 
Eastman, J. Lyueii, laborers. I day. $5 
each; H. Barry, ciiaulTeur. 1 day, S5.50; 



1 12 



CITY RECORD 



Jan. 30 



F. Kellej% R. KeUej% E. Noonan, M. 
Eyan, J. Martin, laborers, 1 day, So 
each; R. Jennings, H. Dohertj', N. 
Coakley, M. GiovaneMa, J. Harnett, H. 
Foley, chauffeurs, 1 da}', 85.50 each. To- 
tal, SS6. 

This overtime is for sanding icy streets 
on Wednesday, January 20, and is to be 
charged to the Snow Removal appropria- 
tion. 



CHANGES IN CONTRACTS. 

O^TERSEERS OF PuBLIC WELFARE. 

R. J. Connolly, Incorporated, has been 
directed to make the following changes, 
deductions and additions, to the con- 
tract on P. W. A. Project 1278: Provide 
4-inch terra cotta block insulation vmder 
boiler, add 813.49; install shelves and 
pipe hangers in locker room, install door, 
door frame and trim to provide electric, 
closet under stairs in lobby, add 877.01 ; 
substitute asphalt tile in place of linoleum, 
deduct 8121; replace top section of 
counter in aid room, add 880; install land 
tile drain and fill old catch-basin, add 
8169.16; omit partitions in waiting 
rooms, deduct S104.45; additions 8269.66; 
deductions, -8225.45; net addition, 864.21; 
Contract price 854,951; net addition, 
864.21; revised contract price, 855,015.21. 

R. J. Connolly, Incorporated, has been 
ordered to make the following change in 
the P. W. A. Project 1279: Deduct for 
the omission of the sump pump as origin- 
ally specified the sum of 834. Contract 
price, 854,951; previous changes, 864.21; 
contract as standing, 855,015.21; this 
change, deduct, 834; revised final con- 
tract price, 854,981.21. 

Public Buildings Department. 

Daniel Cunningham Construction Com- 
pan\'. Incorporated, has been ordered to 
make a change in the contract for repairs 
at Quincj- Market, as follows: 

P. W. A. A"o. 60-1-58, install new 
trackage beam scale in basement stalls 
1 and I5 to provide a scale in overhead 
meat rail sj-stem of a tj'pe that will 
operate without conflicting with new 
floor structural members, 8194.49. 

P. W. A. No. 61-1-59, install new 
electric operated clock in old casing of 
clock removed during alterations, equip- 
ping same with reflectors and electric 
lights, 884.87. 

P. W. A. No. 62-1-60, build new steel 
supports for brick arches supporting side- 
walk, 8 North Market street, 8108.35; re- 
move electric outlets, etc., plumbing vent, 
waste, hot and cold water supplies in 
basement space under sidewalk, 8 North 
Market .street, and relocate on side wall, 
847.15; rebuild present iron staire with 
reinforced concrete and reinstall in con- 
crete treads, present safety treads at 
entrance "C,"' fir.st floor, North Market 
street, 8150; apply heavy coat of hnseed 
oil dampproofing to concrete roof surface 
of canopy, South Market street, 8225; 
rebuild refrigerating partitions in base- 
ment at 6, 7 and 8 North Market street, 
S667.01; furnish and install three re- 
frigerators, doors complete, at 7 and 8 
Nortli Market street, including electrical 
work, 8340; cover floor area at refrigera- 
tors under sidewalk, 10 South Market 
street, with concrete, waterproofed and 
turned up on walls to form 4-inch ba.se, 
and finished with granolithic surface, 
8125; rebuild present iron stairs at 
entrance to basement, 12 South Market 
street, with reinforced concrete and new 
safety treads, with concrete pier and 
beam supporting stairs, under side- 
walks, 8160—81,822.51. 



P. W. A. No. 63-1-61, replace basement 
floors, third operation, in accordance with 
Item 6 unit prices: 889.63 square feet Ih- 
inch plank floor at 92 cents, 8818.46; 
582.45 square feet |-inch board floor at 
90 cents, .$524.21; 122.72 square feet 
concrete floor at 70 cents, $85.90 — 
81,428.57. 

P. W. A. No. 64-1-62, install permanent 
di'ip connections for refrigerators in stalls 
2-8, 10-16, 18-20, 22-24, 26, 38-40, 
50-60, 62-64 North Market street; 1-7, 
9-11, 13-15, 17-25, 27-31, 41-43, 45, 
47^9, 51-55, 61-63, 65-67 and 69-71 
South Market street; 66-72 North Market 
street, 81,194.84. 

P. W. A. No. 65-1-63, install grade 
beam resting on foundation wall, under 
sidewalk curb at basement stalls. Sections 
I, J, K and portion of H on South Market 
street, to support canopy columns in 
third operation as shown on drawings 
F-12 and F-12A, .83,535.80. 

Total addition, $8,261.08, and the 
amount of -88,261.08 will be added there- 
for, making the account as follows: Con- 
tract price, 8375,400; total additions, 
834,363.04; amount of contract, 

$409,763.04. 

Daniel Cunningham Construction Com- 
pany, Incorporated, has been ordered to 
make a change in the contract for repairs 
at Quincy Market, as foUows: 

P. W. A. No. 67-1-64, omit rebuilding 
of office in stalls 2-8. inclusive. North 
Market street, and repair surface of out- 
side wall where partitions were removed, 
no change in price. 

P. W. A. No. 69-1-66, omit the work 
of removing and reinstating of heating 
apparatus in section 1, together with 
masonry flue and ventilator, 8227. 

P. W. A. No. 70-1-67, erect sheathing 
partition forming egg room in basement, 
including painting one coat of black, 
8154.89; omit rebuilding of present iron 
stairs at entrance to basement, 12 South 
Market street, with reinforced concrete 
and new safety treads, with concrete 
pier and beam supporting stairs under 
sidewalks, $160. 

P. W. A. No. 67-1-64, remove material 
from the front of mezzanine stall, sections 
10-15, inclusive. North Market street, 
and replace with plain tile to correspond 
with material used for wall surfacing, no 
change in price. 

Net deduction, .$232.41, and the amount 
of 8232.41 will be deducted therefor, 
making the account as follows: Contract 
price, .8375,400; total additions, .$34,- 
363.04; total deductions, -$232.41; amount 
of contract, $409,530.63. 

Daniel Cunningham Consti-uction Com- 
pany, Incorporated, has been ordered to 
make a change in contract for repairs at 
Quincy Market as follows: 

P. W. A. No. 53-1-52, Remove 104 
square feet of exLsting refrigerator parti- 
tion at rear of Doe-Sullivan's basement 
a,nd install a new refrigerator partition of 
like dimensions complete with coOs at 
contract unit price of $1, 8104. 

P. W. A. No. 54-1-53, instaU rein- 
forced concrete grade beam, resting on 
foundation wall under sidewalk curb, at 
basement stalls between Sections E and 
middle of H, South Market street, to 
support canopy columns in second opera- 
tion, 82,537.17. 

P. W. A. No. 56-1-55, rearrange stalls, 
partitions, oflSces and refrigerators in 
temporary buildings, A and B, 8111.98. 

P. W. A. No. 57-1-56, replace basement 
■floors, first and second operations with 
new floors as follows: Remove old floors, 
install concrete slab and lay 2-inch plank 



floor in work space, 295 square feet at 
92 cents, $271.40; remove old floors, 
instaU concrete slab and lay |-inch wood 
floor in office space, 730 square feet at 
90 cents, $657; install finished concrete 
floor to replace old wood floors, 890 square 
feet at 70 cents, 8623—81,551.40. 

P. W. A. No. 58-1-57, provide suitable 
working equipment in Stalls 27-29-31 
for a tenant deprived of such in former 
location taken for pump room. The 
work consists of making repairs to the 
coils in the refrigerator; replacing gal- 
vanized-iron drip-pan and trough under 
coils and fitting with wood top, refrigerat- 
ing coils and connecting to brine system; 
installing lavatory in mezzanine office; 
running separate wastes and supplies and 
vent up through building; installing sand 
arrester floor drain under picklhig tanks 
and connecting with drainage system, 
and changing location of stairs to mez- 
zanine, $721.40. '. 

Total addition, $5,025.95, and the 
amount of $5,025.95 will be added there- 
for, making the account as follows: 
Contract price, 8375,400; total addi- 
tions, $26,101.96; amount of contract, 
$401,501.96. 



MAYOR ORGANIZES COMMITTEE 
ON FLOOD AREA AID. 

Upon January 27 the Mayor issued the 
following statement : 

In the event that it may be necessary 
to have a citizens committee to cooperate 
with the Red Cro.ss or any other agency 
that is seeking to relieve conditions in the 
flooded area, I have appointed to act as a 
nucleus in forming a large committee, the 
following: 

Chairman, F. A. O'Connell; Louis K. 
Liggett, AUan Forbes, Gen. E. L. Logan, 
Ehot Wadsworth. 

Mr. O'Connell readily accepted the 
chairmanship and is adding other names. 
He has notified me that he has added to 
the above five the names of James L. 
Richards, S. Bruce Black, Anthony J. 
Philpott. 

This committee wUl be added to by 
Chan-man O'Connell, will be organized 
by him and be ready to act in case their 
services will be needed. 



EXTRA WORK UNDER 
CONTRACT. 

M. DeSi-sto Company has been directed 
to perform the following extra work under 
the contract for building sewerage works 
in Washington street outlets in Archdale 
road, private land, and Toll Gate road 
and Whipple avenue and private land. 
West Roxbury. Items ordered: Remove 
and relay in new location about 90 feet 
of 6-inch water pipe, making connections, 
and all incidental work, at an agreed 
price of $2 per linear foot, in Archdale 
road, from Wasliington street 90 feet 
easterly. West Roxbury. Although this 
is in addition to the work contemplated 
in the original contract, it is incidental 
thereto. Estimated cost of extra work, 



TRAFFIC COMMISSION RULING. 

Voted, That as urgently required by 
considerations of public safety and con- 
venience, during ithe period of sewerage 
construction, estimated to be sixty (60) 
days, vehicles are excluded from the fol- 
lowing street, effective January 25, 1937: 
Dustin Street, Brighton. 
From North Beacon street to Say- 
brook street. 



Jan. 30 



CITY RECORD 



1 1 3 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

Permission to award contracts for 
work, materials and supplies, in accord- 
ance with recommendations of depart- 
ment heads, has been approved by the 
Mayor. 

Department of School Buildings. 

Upon January 25 the Mayor approved 
the following request of the Superin- 
tendent of Construction, Department of 
School Buildings: 

Boston, January 21, 1937. 
Hon. Frederick W. Mansfield, 

Mayor of Boston. 
Re: P. W. A. Project Docket No. Mass. 
1090R Furniture and Equipment, 
Phillips Brooks District School. 

Dear Sir, — Bids for furnishing and in- 
stalling furniture and equipment at the 
above .school were opened in the presence 
of P. W. A. inspector on August 11, 1936. 
Your Honor approved various items in- 
cluded in the above opening, among them 
an award to Albert Silva, 1433 Dorchester 
avenue, Boston, for Item 18, No. 1, ten 
cabinet ranges, in the amount of $627. 
Mr. Silva made an error in figuring this 
item and did not detect it until after your 
Ponor's approval of the award. I feel 
that the mistake made by Mr. Silva was 
an honest one and I have, therefore, 
allowed him to withdraw his bid on this 
item, and my procedure has the approval 
of the P. W. A. 

I therefore ask your Honor's approval 
of my award of the above-mentioned 
item to Mr. I. Shannahoffski, 69 Portland 
street, Boston, the next lowest bidder, 
according to specifications. Subject to 
your approval the award to Mr. Shan- 
nahoffski reads as follows: 

Item 18, No. 1, ten cabinet ranges, 
$875; one restaurant range, $450. Total, 
$1,325. 

Respectfully yours, 

Wm. W. Drtjmmey, 
Superintendent of Construction. 

Upon January 25 the Mayor approved 
a contract with John W. Duff & Sons, 
Incorporated, for furnishing sheet metal 
work benches, etc., at the Phillips Brooks 
District School, in the amount of $1,900. 
Bids on this equipment were opened Janu- 
ary 18, in the presence of P. W. A. in- 
spector, and were as follows: 

J. W. Duff & Sons, Incorporated, $1,900; 
P. J. Cantwell & Sons, $1,960; John F. 
Hynes, Incorporated, $2,002; M. S. Kelli- 
her & Co, $2,365; Walter Curley & Son, 
$2,420; R. J. Connelly, Incorporated, no 
bid; Albany Milling Company, no bid. 

Upon January 25 the Mayor approved 
a contract with P. J. Cantwell & Son for 
furnishing sheet metal work benches at the 
South Boston High School addition, in 
the amount of $1,900. Bids on this 
equipment were opened January 18, in 
the presence of P. W. A. inspector, and 
were as follows: 

P. J. Cantwell & Son, $1,900; M. S. 
Kelliher Company, $2,280; Walter Curloy 
& Son, $2,323; John F. Hvnes, Incor- 
porated, $2,520; J. W. DuiT & Sons, In- 
corporated, .$4,300. 

Overseers of the Public Welfare. 

On January 25 approval was given for 
permission to award a contract to A. J. 
McCabc for moving welfare families and 
for moving equipment and supplies for tlie 
department. The prices submitted were 
as follows: 

Moving household furnishings, per 
family, Walter Curley & Son, $0.50; 



A. J. McCabe, .$5; upright pianos, Walter 
Curley & Son, $3; A. J. McCabe, $5; 
square pianos, Walter Curley & Son, .$3; 
A. J. McCabe, .$5. 

Moving equipment and supplies, $1.50 
per hour. 

At the prices bid by A. J. McCabe, the 
cost of the contract will be approximately 
$1,150 as compared with $1,244 bid by 
Walter Curley & Son. 

The cost of this work for the year 1936 
was approximately $1,521. 

Public Works Department. 

Upon January 25 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Mills Automatic 
Merchandising Corporation for the privi- 
lege of placing weighing and vending 
machines in the ferry headhouses for a 
period of three years, for the sum of $510. 

East Boston, South Ferry, Boston side, 
two weighing machines, $50 each, $100; 
three vending machines, .$60 each, $180; 
East Boston, South Ferry, East Boston 
side, one weighing machine, .$50; three 
vending machines, $60 each, $180. Total, 
$510. 

Bid was publicly opened and read Janu- 
ary 22. 

Supply Department. 

Upon January 25 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the Cerulli Contract- 
ing Company, Incorporated, for ap- 
proximately 10,000 cubic yards of soft 
coal cinders, to be delivered, as required, 
during 1937, to the Airport, Park De- 
partment, W. P. A. 

The approximate amount of the con- 
tract was $8,500, less 1 per cent cash 
discount for payment in ten days. 

Bids, opened January 11, were as 
follows : 

10,000 Cubic Yards Soft Coal Cinders, 
Well-Bur7ied, Per Cubic Yard.~T>. B. 
Raymond, $1; total, $10,000; M. Dovle 
& Co., Incorporated, $1; total, $10,050; 
Vincent N. Bellizia Cinder Company, 
95 cents; total, $9,500; Cerulli Con- 
tracting Company, Incorporated, 85 cents; 
total, $8,500; Joseph P. McCabe, In- 
corporated, 93 cents; total, $9,300. 

Cash Discount. — D. B. Raymond, 2 per 
cent; Cerulli Contracting Company, In- 
corporated, 1 per cent. 

Net Total.— D. B. Raymond, $9,800; 
M. Doyle & Co., Incorporated, $10,000; 
Vincent N. Bellizia Cinder Company, 
$9,500; Cerulli Contracting Company, 
Incorporated, $8,415; Joseph P. McCabe, 
Incorporated, .$9,300. 

Each truckload must be a mixture of 
fine material and coarse particles, not over 
4 inches in diameter. Particles must be 
angular, no round or pebble-shaped slag, 
no house ashes, rubbish, soot or other 
foreign material. To be delivered by 
pneumatic-tired trucks and dumped as 
directed at tlie Boston Airport, delivery to 
commence on or about the immediate re- 
ceipt of order, and is to be made at the rate 
of at least four days a week, weather per- 
mitting, and at tiie option of the pur- 
chaser. No deliveries will be permitted 
before 8 a. m. or after 4 p. m. Trucks 
will be measured and checked for yardage 
on the job. Loads will be subject to 
deduction of yardage after dumping on 
account of any soot, coke or other non- 
acceptable material not apparent when 
the loads are checked at the gate. 

Upon January 25 the Mayor approved 
a contract with the l<!dison Chemical 
Company for furnishing metal polisli for 
the various city departments, as required, 
during 1937. The approximate amount 
of the contract was S5S2.63. Privilege 
of purchasing on same terms and condi- I 



tions extended to Febmary 1, 1938. 
Bids, opened January 21, were a.s follows: 

Approximate Amounts on All Items. 

34 Half-Gallon Cans, Per Can. — Edison 
Chemical Company, 20 cents*; Little- 
field Greene Corporation, 44 cents, 64 
fluid ounces; Heaney Manufacturing 
Company, 26 cents; Cleanser Compounds 
Compariy, 461 cents; Eagle Oil and 
Supply Company, 25 cents, bid irregular, 
no copy filed at auditor's office. 

1,217 One-Gallon Cans, Per Can. — 
Edison Chemical Company, 31 cents*; 
Littlcfield Greene Corporation, 73 cents, 
128 fluid ounces; Heaney Manufacturing 
Company, 42 cents; Cleanser Compounds 
Company, 60 cents; Eagle Oil and Supply 
Company, 34.5 cents, bid irregular, no 
copy filed at auditor's office. 

72 Half-Pint Cans, Per Can. — Edison 
Chemical Company, 5 cents*; Littlefield 
Greene Corporation, 7 cents, 8 fluid 
ounces; Heaney Manufacturmg Company 

8 cents; Cleanser Compounds Companj% 
8-3- cents; Eagle Oil and Supply Company, 
7 cents, bid irregular, no copy filed at 
auditor's office. 

2,462 One-Pint Cans, Per Can. — Edison 
Chemical Company, 8 cents*; Littlefield 
Greene Corporation, 12 cents, 16 fluid 
ounces; Heaney Manufacturing Company, 
11 cents; Cleanser Compound Compam% 
14 cents; Eagle Oil and Supply Company, 

9 cents, bid irregular, no copy filed at 
auditor's oflnce. 

Approximate Total. — Edison Chemical 
Company, $582.63; Littlefield Greene 
Corporation, $1,199.45; Heaney Manu- 
facturing Companj', $793.96; Cleanser 
Compounds Companj% $1,092.08; Eagle 
Oil and Supply Company, S652.48. 

Cash Discount, Ten Days. — Edison 
Chemical Company, net; Littlefield 
Greene Corporation, 2 per cent; Heaney 
Manufacturing Companj', 2 per cent; 
Cleanser Compounds Company, 5 per 
cent; Eagle Oil an