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Full text of "The City of Stockton and the County of San Joaquin, State of California: A Field for Factories ..."

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Sa]vi Joaquin County. 

2:^^^&^^i'^^w^ 1897 




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COMMERCIAL ASSOCIATION OF STOCKTON 

OZ-F/CEA^S A\n /WARD OF DIRECTORS. 



\\ A. HUKLL, Pi-FMi.tM. 

C. M. JACKSON, Vici>PkF>ii»FM, 



\V. \V. WESTHAV, Trfv^^ikir. 



ORRIX S. HENDERSON, Sk khakv 



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BIRDS-EYE VIEW OF THE CITY OF STOCKTON, LOOKING EAST, 



To Capitalists, Investors and Manufacturers: 

Your earnest and careful attention is respectfully solicited to what follows herein : 

The Stockton Commercial Association is an organization, duly incorporated, comprised of prom- 
inent bankers, merchants and manufacturers, residing and doing business in the City of Stockton. 

The Association has but one object, viz., the commercial advancement of Stockton, the general 
•upbuilding of San Joaquin County, and the promotion of its commerce. 

To that end it has striven energetically and successfully, in bringing Stockton to a marked degree 
of prominence not only as a manufacturing city but also as a great railroad center, and establishing it 
as the distributing point for all the vast mining and agricultural districts lying to the eastward and south- 
ward. 

The purpose of this publication is to bring to your careful notice the City of Stockton and the 
County of San Joaquin as a field rich and prolific in golden opportunities for the profitable invest- 
ment of capital. 

In the pages following are, first, facts — plain facts — that to the intelligent mind need no embel- 
lishment nor flowery descriptions to impress their significance and importance upon the reader ; and, 
secondly, views, photographed true to life, showing a few — only a few — of the buildings, mills, factories, 
industries, waterways, etc., that abound in and immediately around the City of Stockton and in the 
County of San Joaquin. 

Situated as is Stockton, in the most fertile part of the San Joaquin Valley, with its unequalled 
transportation facilities — facilities not enjoyed by any other city in California — for import and export by 
rail or water, it is possessed of many important and advantageous features of which enterprising men 
have already, and should in the near future, avail themselves. 

The result is, a large number of factories, mills, shops and other establishments, the trade of which 
is not confined to this particular locality but. extends throughout the entire State, and, in fact, the whole 
world. 

No other location in the West offers greater inducements to capitalists as an inland manufactur- 
ing center. 




STOCKTON HARBOR LOOKING TOWARD THE HEAD OF THE CHANNEL. ri,*. hr r ra. 



There is an open field here for a hundred new industries ; and the aim and hope of the Association 
is to foster and encourage their establishment and success. 

Almost any manufacturing plant or industry that might be established here can be insured permanent 
success. Having a command on raw materials of nearly every kind and nature, an unlimited scope 
for markets, and all the surroundings that redound to prosperity, their establishment here cannot meet 
with failure. 

Note particularly what is stated in the following pages under the heading of " Opportunities." 

The Association earnestly requests and solicits correspondence, and stands ready to answer any 
questions, or to give any information sought. Confidential inquiries will be treated as such. 

The officers of the Association will be more than delighted to wait upon any persons coming here to 
investigate this territory, and to render every assistance possible in the way of securing desirable building 
sites, accommodations and facilities. 

Kindly heed this suggestion: If any capitalists have it in mind to invest their means in new 
industries, or if manufacturers having plants in other places (Eastern or foreign) desire to establish branches 
for their factories, the Association earnestly invites them to visit this vicinity and see and investigate 
for themselves. To such will be extended every assistance in promoting and perfecting their plans. 

Awaiting the pleasure of those interested, we are respectfully yours, 



STOCKTON COMMERCIAL ASSOCIATION. 



Stockton, Cal., January 1, 1897. 




MAIN STREET LOOKING EAST FROM HUNTER STREET. p\^.ht j. pa^iur Sf^ 



The City of Stockton. 




TOCKTON has a population exceeding 21,000 inhabicants. 
It is at the head of tide-water navigation. 
It has hardly a- desirable vacant store or residence. 

It gives employment to over 2.000 men in its factories and on its railroads. 
It pays its workmen an average wage annually of $782.50. 
It pays more than $1,250,000 annually to its factory employees. 
^ It has four llour mills, with an aggregate capacity of i'.OCH) barrels daily. 

It has ever been known as the "manufacturing city of the Pacific." 
It yields an annual output exceeding $i:i.O(X),000. 
It supports five banks and three daily and five weekly newspapers. 

It has progressive and well-e<|uipped schools, its High School being constantly accredited to the 
universities. 

It will shortly be graced with a new CiovernmeiU LUid I'ost Office building, to cost $2C0,000. 
It is thr "g.itfway Iv the San loatpiin X'alley." the larg<st valley in the Slate, being 250 miles long 
by liO miles wide. 

It is the county seat of San Joaquin County. 

It is ihi: healthiest city in California, according to official mortuary reports. 

It h.is gas and electric light plants, and a well-equipped system of double-track electric street railways. 

It has unrivaled railroad and water transportation facilities; two steamship companies operate three 

steamers tiaily between Stockton and San I-"ranci.sco, and also smaller craft running up-river ; and four 

competitive railroad companies (three in operation and one in course of construction) do an immense 

freight and passenger tniffic here. 

It has many miles of bituminous-rock and bas:ilt paved streets, lined on either side by beautiful shade 
trees and concrete sidewalks. 




YO SEMITE BUILDING, SAN JOAQUIN STREET, STOCKTON, CAL. 



THE CITY OK STOCKTON. 

It maintains twenty or more religious organizations, and its church edifices are of the most moderru 
and picturesque style of architecture. 

It is composed of a class of citizens as moral, educated and refined as can be found in any other 
city in the United States. 

It has the finest theater in the interior of the State. 

It has commodious swimming baths, supplied with water from the £as wells, the fame of which 
extends throughout the State. 

It possesses a most beautiful public library, a marble building costing over $100,000 and containing 
more than 25,000 volumes. 

It has a perfect water system, supplied from artesian wells 

It has one of the best systems of sewerage in the world. 

It is the grain and flour center of California. 

It is the depot for the storage of the enormous grain products of the San Joaquin Valley, and it is the greatest 
wheat center on the Coast, the grain shipments by rail averaging daily 100 cars and by water 1,500 tons. 

Its manufactured products are: Flour, woolen fabrics, building materials, furniture, street and railroad cars, 
carriages, windmills, agricultural implements, vitrified pipe, pottery, wine, brandy, chicory, macaroni, soda water, 
medicinal preparations, mining machinery, leather, harness, and countless other articles of commerce. 

It has twenty or more natural gas wells, yielding daily from 25,000 to 100,000 cubic feet of gas, 
which is used for fuel, lighting, and manufacturing purposes, and they are a constant source of wealth. 

It draws tribute, great or small, from the varied commodities that annually move along the San Joaquin 
River, which include- 100,000 tons of grain, 100,000 tons of mill stuffs, 30,000,000 feet of lumber, 500,000 
packages of garden produce, 44,000 tons of coal, 50,000 tons of general merchandise, many thousand head 
of live stock, and many thousand tons of miscellaneous freight, averaging 2,5(KJ tons daily, the collation 
of which under respective heads is impossible. 

The assessed valuation of property in Stockton for 1890 is $12,016,439. 




BLOCK ON WEBER AVANUE, OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE, STOCKTON, CAL. 



The County of San Joaquin. 



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AX JOAQUIN COUNTY'S population exceeds 56,000. 

It has the finest Court House on the Pacific Coast, located in the City of Stockton, 
and built of California granite in 1890 at a cost of $306,000. 
k Aj¥^^ It has an average rainfall for twenty years of 13.71 inches per annum. 

■jpS^^^pjj^y It has an area of 873.195 acres, of which 845,000 acres are adapted to the growth 

f^ t^^ of fruits; in other words, there is less waste land in San Joaquin County than in any 
other county in the State. 

Its lands, suitable for grain fruits, vines, nuts, or vegetables, vary in price from $20 to $100 per 
acre, according to location. 

It is the greatest wheat raising county in the State. 
It has hundreds of miles of excellent wagon roads. 

It is dotted with numerous towns and villages, all prosperous; and district schools and churches 
are everywhere. 

It has an irrigation system in the northern i)art of the county that will supply 00,(KK) acres of 
land ; and in the eastern part of the county, and extending into the adjoining- counties, as shown by 
one of the maps herein, is one of the most completer and (.'xtensiv,' irrigation systems in the world, 
capable of covering 20(),(MH) acres. 

The assessed valuation of propt^rty in San Joacjuin County lor 181J<; is $oo,7Sl,S:jl. 

It has the lowest tax rate of anv countv in the State. 

Tax rate for 1896: Outside of City of Stockton, $1 10; inside of City of Stockton, 90 cents. 











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BLOCK ON MAIN STREET OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE. STOCKTON. CAL. 



Transportation Facilities. 




; H E Southern Pacific Company's main line runs directly through Stockton, which is also the 
terminus of a number of its branch lines, viz., the Oakdale branch to Merced, the line to 
Valley Springs and the lone branch. This company has made Stockton one of its six 
"terminals" in this State, thus affording transcontinental shipments the advantage of through 
rates without the addition of "locals." The traffic handled by the Southern Pacific Company 
at Stockton and its various stations in San Joaquin County is enormous. 

The San p'rancisco and San Joaquin \'alley Railway, to operate between Stockton and 
Bakersfield, a distance of 235 miles, covering the entire length of the San Joaquin valley, is at present 
equipped and in operation between Stockton and p'resno, a distance of 122 miles. 

This line is an active competitor of the Southern Pacific Company, and since it commenced to 
handle traffic it has forced the last named company to reduce its rates from twenty-five to fifty per cent. 
Its through business to and from San Francisco is handled by the river steamers. 

The Alameda and San Joaquin Railroad Company operatc;s its line between Stockton and the Corral 
Hollow coal mines, located in Alameda County, thirty-five miles distant from Stockton. The same gentle- 
men owning this road also own the coal mines referred to, which have in sight over twenty millions of 
tons of a most excellent quality of coal, equally good for all purposes — domestic, steam, manufacturing, or 
otherwise. The entire output of these mines will be handled at Stockton, where enormous coal bunkers 
have been constructed, and from there distributed all over the State as a cheap fuel for all purposes. 

The Sierra Pacific Railway has now in course of construction its line from Stockton to Jackson, a 
central point on the famous Mother Lode. This line, about sixty miles long, when completed will 
give Stockton direct rail communication with the rich Southern mines, the business of which amounts to 
millions of dollars annually. 




UNION FLOUR MILLS, STOCKTON. CAL. 



TRANSPORTATION FACILITIES. 

The California Navigation and Improvement Company operates two steamers daily each way 
between Stockton and San Francisco, and also a fleet of fifteen barges and five tow boats; and during 
high water, when navigation is open up river, it also operates a number of smaller vessels to accommodate 
the traffic further up the San Joaquin River. This line, by reason of a traffic agreement, handles the 
through business routed via the Valley Road. 

The Union Transportation Company, a strong competitor of the California Navigation and Im- 
provement Company, also operates a line of steamers between Stockton and San Francisco. 

Competition is keen between these two steamer lines, and freight and passenger rates are extremely 
low. The steamers of both lines are large and commodious, comfortable and neat, have electric lights 
and other conveniences on board, and are liberally patronized. 

In San Joaquin County the number of miles of railroad tracks is greater than in any other county 
in the State. 

No other locality in California enjoys such splendid facilities and low rates as are afforded by the 
transportation lines mentioned. 

Other lines of railroad, steam and electric, are contemplated, and a profitable field is open to them. 




Bi[l1 ol Cal)l*n! 



opportunities. 




n'VPl^ is safe to say there is not another city of its size in the United States where such advant- 
ages exist for the location of profitable industries as in Stockton. With raw material of 
almost every kind at her very doors and at prices lower than at most places, with trans- 
portation facilities over competitive lines extending in all directions, with electric lines and 
hundreds of miles of excellent wagon roads, with land and building materials acccessible and 
cheap, with plenty of intelligent labor at command, with fuel of all kinds cheap and plentiful, and with 
many other liberal inducements to offer, it would seem that nothing more could be asked for by enter- 
prising capitalists and manufacturers. 

As to the kind of industries for which special opportunities exist here, the following is a list of 
those that come principally to mind. There are perhaps others, especially factories that manufacture 

specialties of various kinds: 

SMELTING WORKS. 

Upon the completion of the Sierra Pacific Railway, thousands of tons of ore of all kinds will be 
brought direct to Stockton; and were there a smelter located here, the bulk of that business would 
undoubtedly fall to it. Such an enterprise is urgently needed here. 

WOOLEN MILLS. 

The amount of tleece gathered in San Joaquin County and the adjoining counties each year is 
exceedingly large, and there is a wide scope for business for several industries of this kind. 

PACKING PLANTS. 

Sheep, cattle and hogs are raised hereabouts in such abundance that thousands of head are shipp(!d 

away annually. Packing could be carried on profitably here because stock could be purchased cheaper of 

the farmers than city packers pav. 

SHOE FACTORIES. 

This class of industry is entirely open here, there being no enterprises of the kind in this region; and 




STOCKTON'S FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



OPPORTr JNITIES. 

as tanneries of larjjc capacity are operated here, leather couki easily be obtained in generous quantities 

and at reasonable rates. 

SOAP FACTORIES. 

The abundance of raw material herd to supply factories of this kind is notable, and there is no 
reason why such industries should not flourish. 

PICKLING FACTORIES. 

In view of the abundance of all kinds of truck raised in San Joaquin County and the growth of 
interest in truck gardening, a factory of this kind on a large scale could command success. It would 
have materials readv at hand and the world for its market. 

CANNERIES. 

This class of industry is greatly needed here, to make profitable use of the vast quantities of 
fruits of all kinds that are grown in San Joaquin County. 

SUGAR REFINERIES. 

The quality of sugar beets raised in this county is most excellent, and the establishment of a refinery 
would encourage the growth of sugar beets in unlimited quantities. 

SASH, DOOR AND FURNITURE FACTORIES. 

None of the kind are as yet located here on a large scale, and there is a splendid field and opening 
for such enterprises. 

Brass and Iron Foundries, Flour Mills, Broom Factories, Carpet Mills. Implement and Wagon 
Factories, Cracker Factories, Starch Factories, Silk Mills, and the like, would find this a most advan- 
tageous place for locating. 

And all this not because there is at hand a demand for such articles of manufacture in this 
immediate locality, but because the markets throughout the entire State can be more easily reached 
from Stockton than from any other shipping point, and at a less cost for transportation. 




STOCKTON CHANNEL, SHOWING HEAD OF NAVIGATION. 



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InE UlMlllt «MI StN J<ltl)ll> RAIl.lNltD'S C(IM, Hl'MER. ON THE SDIIH SlUr (IF STOCkTUN CHANNEL, HITH THE TMESILE APPRnUtl. CAPACITY. J.SM TONS. 





HE\D WATERS OF THE STAMSLAl.S AND SAN JOAQtlN WATER COHPASV. 




TRESTLEWORK FLUME ON THE STANISLAUS AND SA:< JOADUIM CAMAL. 



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MAP OF THE SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY AND ITS ROADS, ALL TRIBUTARY TO THE CITY OF STOCKTON. 



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