(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The clan Gillean"

^m 






m 



m 



r/T 



<?/•• 




• -V 



* 











m 






H 



■ Vt I 



■ 

■ 



M 

^^r 



H 



! 



r 




THE CLAN GILLEAN. 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 



http://www.archive.org/details/clangilleanOOsinc 




Oolonel Sir F1TZROY DONALD MACLEAN, Ba: 






THE 



CLAN GILLEAN 



hy mh 

REV, v II u i.i. w SINCLAIR 



GlhnrlottetolDti 

II AS/ \KH AND MOORS 

1899 



THE LIBRARY 

BRIGHAM YOUNG UN 
PHOVO, UTAH 



PREFACE. 



I h.wi: to thank Colonel Sir Fitzroy Donald Maclean, 
Baronet, C. B., Chief o\~ the Clan Gillean, for copies o\ a 
large number o\ useful documents ; Mr. H. A. C. Maclean, 

London, for copies o\' valuable papers in the Coll Charter 

Chest ; and Mr. C. R. Morison, Aintuim, Mr. C. A. McVean, 

KUfinichen, Mr. John Johnson, Coll, Mr. James M;ulean, 

Greenock, ami others, for collecting and sending me genea- 
logical facts. I have also to thank a number of ladies and 
gentlemen for information about the families to which they 
themselves belong. I am under special obligations to 
Professor Magnus Maclean, Glasgow, and Mr. Peter Mac- 
lean, Secretary of the Maclean Association, for sending- me 
such extracts as I needed from works to which 1 had no 
access in this country. It is only fair to state that of all the 
help I received the most valuable was from them. I am 
greatly indebted to Mr. John Maclean, Convener of the 
Finance Committee of the Maclean Association, for labouring 
faithfully to obtain information for me, and especially for his 
efforts to get the subscriptions needed to have the book pub- 
lished. I feel very much obliged to Mr. John K. Mackenzie, 



vi. Preface. 

foreman in the establishment in which the printing- was done, 
for his valuable assistance in correcting- the proofs, and also 
for his efforts to get the work printed in a satisfactory 
manner. 

It may be taken for granted that in a book of this kind — 
a book which deals with a large number of traditions, dates, 
and names of persons and places — there must be several 
errors. For corrections of real mistakes and for new facts 
sent to me, I shall feel very thankful. 

A. Maclean Sinclair. 

Belfast, P. E. Island, 

September 5th, 1899. 



CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. page 

Introduction 

CHAPTER II. 

(Drigin of the Clan (SUUait 2 9 

CHAPTER III. 
%ht Jjirst <£ight (Ehufe. 

I. Gillean of the Battle- Axe .... 40 

II. Malise 4 1 

III. Malcolm 4 2 

IV. John Dubh 44 

V. Lachlan Lubanach 44 

VI. Hector Roy of the Battles ... 53 

VII. Lachlan Bronnach 55 

VIII. Lachlan Og 5 8 

CHAPTER IV. 

Rector ©bhar anb ^achlan Cattanach. 

IX. Hector Odhar 59 

X. Lachlan Cattanach 6l 



Contents. 

CHAPTER V. 

$frtor .fftor anb |)«tor ©9. 



XI. Hector Mor 



90 



XII. Hector Og 106 

CHAPTER VI. 

XIII. Sir Lachlan Mor ...... 108 

CHAPTER VII. 
Tudor (Og anb Sector iftor. 

XIV. Hector Og 159 

XV. Hector Mor 177 

CHAPTER VIII. 

£»tr iL'achlan anb 4*)is ^one. 
XVI. Sir Lachlan, First Baronet . . .178 

XVII. Sir Hector Roy, Second Baronet . . 191 

XVIII. Sir Allan, Third Baronet .... 196 

CHAPTER IX. 

<§ir Jlohn fttU) $tf Elector. 
XIX. Sir John, Fourth Baronet .... 202 
XX. Sir Hector, Fifth Baronet . . 236 

CHAPTER X. 

(•Viualogn of the jRadntRi of £lnart. 247 

CHAPTER XI. 

The ittadcans tltb Jttadainre of £ochbuir. 

The Macleans of Lochbuie ..... 254 

The Maclaines of Lochblie .... 266 

BRANCHES. 

The Macleans of Scallasdale .... 272 

The Macleans of Uisken .... 273 

The Maclaines of Scallasdale .... 274 



Contents. 



IX. 



CHAPTER XII. 
The pesanb.tnte of TTerlach ittac Rector. 
The Macleans of Urchart .... 

BRANCHES, 
i. The Macleans of Kingerloch ... 
The Macleans of Rochester 
Captain John Maclean 

2. The Macleans of Dochgarroch . 

The Macleans of Culbokie . 
The Macleans of Kaffraria 
The Macleans of Pitmain 
The Macleans of Lochgorm 

3, The Macleans of Knock .... 



276 

279 
284 
285 
286 

2 95 
297 
298 
300 

303 



CHAPTER XIII. 
The £)eeccnb;mts of Jlomtlb of Jlrogour. 
The Macleans of Ardgour 



BRANCHES. 

1. The Macleans of Boreray 

(1) Terlach Mac Neil Ban 

The Macleans of Scour 

The Macleans of Princeton . 

The Macleans of Kilmoluaig - 

(2) The Macleans of Heisker 

(3) The Macleans of Balliphetrish 

2. The Macleans of Treshnish 

The First Macleans of Blaaich 
The Macleans of Achnadale 
The Macleans of Hynish 

The Macleans of Glenbard . 

3. The Macleans of Inverscadale 

4. The Later Macleans of Blaaich . 

Major-General Francis Maclean 



305 

3i5 
320 
320 
322 
3 2 3 
325 
327 
330 
335 
336 
337 
339 
34i 
343 
343 



Contexts. 



CHAPTER XIV. 
TThc prsccnbants of JUtl of 3Cchir 
The Macleans op Lbhib .... 
The Macleans of Lang-amull 
BRANCHES. 
i. The Maci bans 01 I 

(i) Lachlao Odhar of Airdchraoishnish 
The Macleans of Monachuich 
Lachlao Baa o( Bunesaao 

(2) Bwen of Ormsaig 

The Macleaoj of Killean . 
The Macleane of Ajrdfinaig 

(3) John Odhar .... 
I. Tin: Maui \\s 01 Sin \ \ 

The Macleans of Laggan, [slay 



346 

547 

349 
349 
35 a 

352 
354 
355 
358 
360 

360 
3*3 



CHAPTER XV. 

Ulu PeSttttBBtttt of iohn O^arbh of (To 

1 hi M u 1 1 ura 01 C01 1 . . 

BRAN< MB8. 

1. Tiik M u 

Ni 11. Mob ANP N'i 11. t\. 

a. Thb Maclbans 01 Cbossapol 
Rev. Donald Maclean 
The Last Macleani of Giurdal 

3. TBB MaCLBAMB Ol ACBNASAUL . 

Lachlan Maclean .... 
ROTV Maclean .... 

4. The First MaclbAN9 OP Grishipol 

5. The Macleans OP Mick 

Hugh Mac Hector .... 
Lachlao Mac Hector 

The Macleans ot Haremere Hall 



5*4 

389 
390 
395 

39 6 
400 
401 
402 
404 
409 
409 
410 



Contents. 



XI. 



Vht Bescenoanb of John Gferbh of %o\\.— (continued) 

The Macleans of Drimnacross . . . 4 11 

The Macleans of Germany . . • -4*3 

Dr. Neil Maclean, of Connecticut . . 4H 

Allan Maclean, of Connecticut . . . 4 X 5 

The Macleans of Totaranald . . . 418 

The Macleans of Gallanach . . . • 4 ! 9 

CHAPTER XVI. 
She /Vtadc.in* of lOiglu anb jfatfcent. 



The Macleans of Gigha 

John Diurach .... 
The Macleans of Morvern . 
1. Allan Mac Ian Duy 

(1) The Macleans of Kinlochaline 

(2) Terlach Mac Allan 

The Macleans of Drimnin 
The Macleans of Calgary 
The Macleans of Grulin . 
The Macleans of Killunaig . 
Hector of Torranbeg 
The Macleans of Pennycross 
The Macleans of Pennygoun 
Donald Mac Terlach 
Hector Mac Terlach 
Ewen Mac Terlach 
2. John Garbh Mac Ian Duy 
x. Charles Mac Iain Duy 



424 

• 43 2 
433 

• 434 
435 

• 43 6 
437 

• 443 
444 

• 446 
447 

. 448 
45° 

• 452 
453 

• 454 
454 

• 455 



CHAPTER XVII. 
Zhc 4&acU*n0 of Horloisk, <Sujebcn. z\ib $rokts. 

The Macleans of Torloisk 457 

. 463 



The Macleans of Sweden 
The Macleans of Brolas 



465 



xii. Contents. 

<£hc £aet JtfeC Chiefs of the (Clan (Oillcan. rAG « 

XXI. Sir Allan of Brolas, Sixth Baronet . . 468 

XXII. Sir Hector Maclean, Seventh Baronet . 470 

XXIII. Sir FitzroyJ. G. Maclean, Eighth Baronet . 471 

XXIV. Sir L'liarks Fitzroy Maelean, Ninth Baronet 471 

XXV. Sir Fitzroy Donald Maelean, Tenth Baronet . 472 

CHAPTER Will. 

Bniraaa .families 477 

CHAPTER xix. 
IThr ghtrfalffa of thr Clan Cnllcan 

Genera] Pacti w. i 1 h Regard to the Chiefahip of Clans 493 
The Claimi of the ICadainea ol Lochbuic to the Chiefahip 

o( the Clan Ciillean ...... 49S 

Proofs of the Chiefahip of the Ifacleana of Duarl . 505 



AoDmoiia, Rvhumcbs, and Carocnoiia . . > i; > 



Lis] 01 Si BS( RIBKRS 



5«5 




MACLEAN 




MACLEAN (hunting) 



THE CLAN G/LLEAN. 



CHAPTER I. 
Introduction. 

I. The Kings of Scotland from 1058 
to 1603. 
Malcolm III. ascended the Scottish throne in 
1058 a.d. He was known as Gillecalum a chinn 
mhoir, or Malcolm of the big head. He married, 
first, Ingebiorg, widow of Thorfinn, Karl of Caith- 
ness and Orkney, by whom he had two sons, 
Duncan and Donald. He married, secondly, 
Margaret, daughter of Edward, son of Edmund 
Ironside, and had by her eight children, Edward, 
Ethelred, Edmund, Edgar, Alexander, David, 
Matilda, and another daughter. He was killed at 
Alnwick in 1093. Matilda was married in 1 100 to 
Henry I., King of England. Malcolm Kenmore 
was succeeded by his brother, Donald Ban, who, 
according to the Scottish law of succession, was 
the lawful heir. Duncan, the eldest son of Mal- 
colm, procured from the King of England a large 
number of Anglo-Norman soldiers and deposed 



2 The Clan Gillean. 

Donald Ban. Duncan was murdered after a reign 
of fifteen months, and Donald Ban restored. In 
1097, Edgar, the sixth son of Malcolm Kenmore, 
obtained help from the King of England, and de- 
posed Donald Ban a second time. He deprived 
him of his eyesight, and threw him into prison. 
King Edgar removed the court from Scone to 
Edinburgh. lie looked upon Scotland as his own 
property, and willed the kingdom to his brothers, 
Alexander and David. .Alex. uuler became Kingof 
Scotland in 1 107. lie was known .is Alexander 
the Fierce. 1 le crushed an insurrection of the men 
of the Meams and Moray, in 1 1 16. lie was suc- 
ceeded by his brother David, Earl of Cumbria, in 
1 124. David, known as David I., had a son 

named Henry, who had three sons, Malcolm the 

Maiden, William the Lion, and David, Earl of 

I luntingdon. 

According to the tribal system of government the 

land belonged to the people who resided on it and 

used it for the purpose of making a living for them- 
selves and their children. According to the feudal 
system the land belonged io the king, not by a 
fiction of law, but in reality. As the king was the 
Owner of the land he had a right to divide it among" 
his subjects as he pleased, and also a right to nom- 
inate his successor, and will the kingdom to him. 
This system was clearly in its nature a self-per- 
petuating despotism. The only limitation to the 
power given by it was the inability of the ruler to 
carry out his wishes in all cases. 



The Kings of Scotland. 3 

According to the tribal system every tribe pos- 
sessed a district of its own, the land being the 
property of the tribe as a whole. Every freeman 
had a right to a certain portion of arable land, 
whilst the pasture lands were held in common. 
The freemen consisted of the chief, the kinsmen of 
the chief, and those who were simply freemen. 
The serfs had no legal claim to a share of the land. 
The chief or head of the tribe was not a landlord. 
He had a right, like other freemen, to some of the 
land, but only to so much of it as he really needed 
as a means of supporting himself and his family. 
He had of course certain rights as the head ruler 
of the tribe, but the right to take possession of his 
neighbour's lands was not one of them. Accord- 
ing to the feudal system the land belonged, not to 
the tribe, but to the person who had received it from 
the king, whether that person was the chief of the 
tribe or some Anglo-Norman adventurer. So far 
as the right to land was concerned the members of 
the tribe were, from a legal point of view, no better 
off than the serfs of the tribal system. The real 
difference between the tribal and the feudal systems 
was that the former took the family for its starting 
point, while the latter took the king for its starting 
point. The tribal system made regulations to suit 
a number of independent families living in the same 
district ; the feudal system made regulations to suit 
the king, and to suit him as owner of the land and 
lord of the people. 

The mode of introducing the feudal system into 



4 The Clan Gillean. 

a district was by no means of a complicated nature. 
The king gave the chief of the tribe, or some of 
his own favourites, a charter or deed of all the lands 
in the district, on condition of rendering to him, as 
owner of the lands, good, faithful, and gratuitous 
services. The people were now under a landlord, 
and a landlord who could depend upon the king to 
maintain him in his position. So long as the 
landlord flattered and pleased the king he was safe. 
If, however, he should be so unfortunate as to dis- 
please him by an act of disobedience, either in civil 
or religious matters, ho might be deprived of his 
lands, and perhaps of his head. 

The sons of Malcolm Kenmore were all thor- 
oughly feudalistic in their conceptions of the mode 
of government and the ownership of land. It 
was as a feudal king that Kdgar divided Scotland 
between his two brothers. But as Alexander's 
subjects were almost wholly Kelts, he was not in 
a position to extend feudalism, except on a small 
scale. David was in a better position, and was 
able to act with a firmer hand. He had a host of 
Anglo-Norman warriors under his control, and 
could always depend upon them to fight for the 
sake of getting an estate or an heiress. He planted 
quite a number of them as independent landlords 
among the old Keltic inhabitants. King Edgar 
introduced feudalism into Scotland ; King David 
established it on a firm basis. The latter crushed 
out the Keltic spirit of personal independence — the 
same spirit as that of the ancient Greeks — to as 



The Kings of Scotland. 5 

great an extent as he possibly could. He was 
not a bad man ; he simply believed that he had a 
right to do as he liked with his own — with the 
hills and glens of Scotland as his property, and 
with the people as his servants. 

Malcolm the Maiden succeeded his grandfather, 
David I., as King of Scotland in 1 1 53. William 
the Lion succeeded Malcolm in 1165. Alexander 
II., only son of William the Lion succeeded his 
father in 12 14. Alexander III., only son o^ 
Alexander II., was killed at Kinghorn by a fall 
from his horse in March, 1286. Margaret, grand- 
daughter of Alexander, died in September, 1290. 
The legitimate descendants of William the Lion 
were now extinct. John Baliol, who, according 
to the feudal system, was the lawful heir to the 
throne, was crowned King of Scotland, as a vassal 
of Edward I. of England, in November, 1292. In 

1296 Edward compelled Baliol to surrender his 
crown and kingdom to him, and reduced the 
whole of Scotland to subjection. In the spring of 

1297 William Wallace, the great uncrowned king 
of Scots, raised the standard of freedom, attacked 
the English oppressors, and drove them, bag and 
baggage, beyond the Tweed. He could overcome 
the English, but he could not overcome the cu- 
pidity, vanity, folly, and treachery of his own 
countrymen. He was betrayed and delivered to 
Edward by Sir John Stewart, son of Walter Bal- 
lach Stewart, son of the High Steward of Scotland. 
He was put to death in London, with the most 



6 The Clan Gillean. 

shocking barbarity and cruelty, on the 23rd of 
August, 1305. Robert Bruce was crowned King 
of Scots at Scone on March 25th, 1306. He de- 
feated the English at Bannockburn on Monday, 
June 24th, 1 3 14, and by this magnificent victory 
restored his country to its former state of inde- 
pendence. He died on June 7th, 1329, in the 
fifty-fifth year o( his age and twenty-third o( his 
reign. Of all the Scottish monarchs he was by far 
the greatest. David Bruce, known as David II., 
was only five years of age when his father died. 
He was crowned at Scone in November, 1331. 

Edward, son of John Baliol, was King of Scotland, 
off and on } from 1332 until 1338. David Bruce 
took the reins o\ government into his own hands 
in 1342. He was a prisoner in England from 1346 
until 1357. He died childless in 1370. 

Walter, I [igh Steward o\ Scotland in the time of 
David I., was the ancestor oi the Stewarts. He 
was succeeded by his son Allan, who was succeeded 
by his son Walter. Walter, the third High 
Steward, had two sons, Alexander and Walter 
Ballach. Alexander succeeded his father as High 
Steward. Walter Ballach obtained possession o( 
the earldom o\ Menteith. He had two sons, both 
of whom changed their name to Menteith. John, 
his second son, was the Judas who sold Wallace to 
the English. Alexander, the fourth High Steward, 
married Jane, daughter of James, son of Angus, 
son of Somerled of Argyll. He had two sons by 
her, James and John. James was succeeded as 



The Kings of Scotland. 7 

High Steward by his son Walter. Walter, the sixth 
High Steward, was one of the principal commanders 
at the battle of Bannockburn. He married 
Marjory, daughter of Robert Bruce, by whom he 
had one son, Robert. Robert, the seventh High 
Steward, was born in 131 5. He had ten natural 
children — four sons and six daughters — by Eliza- 
beth Moore. He married her in 1349, but had no 
issue by her after their marriage. He married in 
1355, Euphemia, daughter of William, Earl of 
Ross, by whom he had two sons, David and 
Walter. He became King of Scotland, as Robert 
II., in 1370. He died in 1390. John, his eldest 
son, was born about 1335. John succeeded his 
father as King, but changed his name to Robert. 
He is consequently known in history as Robert 
III. Walter, second son of Robert II., died with- 
out issue in 1360. Robert, the third son, was 
created Duke of Albany in 139S. Alexander, the 
fourth son, became Earl of Buchan in 1371, and 
afterwards Earl of Ross. He was known as the 
Wolf of Badcnoch. He died in 1394. He left 
four natural sons. Alexander, the eldest of his 
sons, became Earl of Mar in 1404. Alexander 
died in August, 1435. He left two natural chil- 
dren, Thomas and Janet. David, fifth son of 
Robert II., and his first son by Euphemia Ross, 
became Earl of Strathearn in 1371. Euphemia, 
his only child, was married to Sir Patrick Graham, 
who in her right became Earl of Strathearn. 
Walter, sixth son of Robert II., was created Earl of 



8 The Clan Gillean. 

Atholl in 1403. He had two sons, Robert and 
Allan. The latter was for a short time Earl of 
Caithness. Robert III. died in 1406. James I., 
his son and successor, was murdered at Perth in 
February, 1437. James I. was the ablest and best 
of the Stewarts. James II. was killed at Rox- 
burgh, by the accidental bursting' of a cannon, in 
August, 1460. James III. was slain at Sauchie- 
Dlirn in June, 14HS. James IV. fell at the battle 
of Flodden on September 9th, 1513. James V. 
died in December, 1542, and was succeeded by his 
only child, Mary Queen of Scots. Queen Mary 
was deposed in July, 1567, and beheaded in Eng- 
land in February, 1587. James VI., Queen 
Mary's son, was born in Edinburgh in June, 1566, 
and crowned at Stirling in July, 1567. He was 

educated by the celebrated George Buchanan, and 
made rapid progress in learning. He began to 
govern the kingdom in 1578. He became King of 
England and Ireland in 1603. He was now King 
of all the Britons. He died in March, 1625. 

II. Tin: Mac doug alls or Lorn. 
In 1 140, Somerled, Lord of Arregaithel, or 

Argyll, married Ragnhildis, daughter of Clave the 
Red, the Norwegian sub-king of Man, and had by 
her three sons, Dugald, Reginald, and Angus. 
He was either assassinated or slain in battle at 
Renfrew on the Clyde in 1 164. Dugald, his eldest 
son by Ragnhildis, was the progenitor of the 
Macdougalls of Lorn. Dugald possessed the 



The Macrories. 9 

whole of Lorn — which extended from Loch Leven 
to the Point of Asknish — the districts of Morvern 
and Ardnamurchan, and the islands of Lismore, 
Kerrera, Seil, Luing, Shuna, Scarba, Jura, Mull, 
lona, Ulva, and Tiree. He was succeeded by his 
son, Duncan, who was chief of the Macdougalls in 
1244. Duncan had three sons, Ewen, Alexander, 
and Malcolm. Ewen held the castle of Cairn- 
burgh and other strongholds for Haco, King of 
Norway, in 1249. He refused to support Haco 
in 1263. He was succeeded by his brother 
Alexander, who was the most powerful of all the 
Macdougall chiefs. Alexander fought against 
Robert Bruce, and was deprived of all his posses- 
sions. John Bacach, his son and successor, 
received a charter of the district of Lorn from 
David II. John Bacach, had four sons, John, 
Somerled, Allan, and Alexander Og. John suc- 
ceeded his father. He was the sixth and last 
Macdougall of Lorn. He had two daughters, 
who inherited his estate, and found husbands 
among the Stewarts. Allan, his brother, succeed- 
ed him as chief of the Clan Dugall. 

III. The Macrories of Uist and 
Garmoran. 

-Reginald, or Ranald, second son of Somerled 
and Ragnhildis, had two sons, Donald and Rory. 
Donald was the progenitor of the Clan Donald ; 
Rory was the progenitor of the Clan Rory. 

Rory, second son of Reginald, succeeded his 



io The Clan Gillean. 

father in North Kin tyre and other lands. He was 
a noted pirate. He fought under King Haco at 
the battle of Largs in 1263. He received from 
Alexander III. the islands of Rum, Bigg, Barra, 
and Uist, in 1266. He was succeeded by his son 
Dugald, who was succeeded by his brother Allan. 

Allan obtained possession of Garmoran, as the 
districts of Moydart, Arisaig, Morar, and Knov- 
d.irt, were called. He left three natural sons, 

Roderick, Lachlan, and Dugald, and a legitimate 

daughter named Christina. Roderick succeeded 

his father as chief of the Clan Rory. He joined 

Bruce in 1307, and followed him faithfully until 

the independence of Scotland was seemed on the 
field <>f Bannockburn. Bruce, in reward of his 
services, bestowed upon him the district of Lorn, 

and also some lands in Lochaber. 1 le was married, 
and had two children, Ranald and Amie. Ranald 

was known as Raonall Fionn. He was murdered 
in [346 by William, Earl of Ross. I lis possessions 
became the property of his sister Amie. The 

Maerories were inns landless. 

IV. The Lords op the Isles. 

Donald, son of Reginald, son of Somerled, was 
the progenitor and first chief o( the Clan Donald. 

He held the lands of South Kintyre and [slay. 
He was succeeded by his son Angus Mor, who 

was suceeeded by his son Alexander, who was 
succeeded by his brother, Angus Og. Angus Og 
was a faithful adherent of Robert Bruee, who 



The Lords of the Isles. ii 

bestowed upon him the islands of Tiree, Coll, 
Mull, and Jura, and the districts of Morvern, 
Ardnamurchan, Duror, Glencoe, and Lochaber. 
Bruce gave the Macdonald lands in Kintyre to 
Robert, son and heir of the High Steward, and 
placed the Castle of Tarbert in charge of a royal 
garrison. Angus Og was succeeded by his son 
John. John was the fifth chief of the Clan Donald. 
He married, about 1337, Amy, daughter of Allan 
Macrory of Garmoran. On the death of Ranald 
of Garmoran, Amy succeeded to his estates. The 
chief of the Clan Donald was now in possession of 
an extensive estate, and styled himself, as he had a 
perfect right to do, Lord oi' the Isles. About 
the year 1358 he discarded his wife, Amy Macrory, 
who was in every respect an excellent woman, and 
married Margaret, daughter o( Robert, High 
Steward of Scotland. By his first wife, the amiable 
but ill-treated Amy Macrory, he had four children, 
John, Ranald, Godfrey, and Mary. By his second 
wife, Margaret Stewart, he had three sons, Donald, 
John Mor Tanaistear, and Alexander. He died 
at Ardtornish in 1386. John, his eldest son, had 
a son named Angus, who died without issue. 
Reginald was the progenitor of the Clan Ranald. 
Godfrey settled in North Uist. Donald succeeded 
his father as chief of the Clan Donald. John Mor 
Tanaistear was the progenitor of the Macdonalds 
of Islay and the Glens. Alexander, known as 
Alasdair Carrach, was the progenitor of the 
Macdonalds of Keppoch. 



12 The Clan Gillean. 

Donald, sixth chief of the Clan Donald, and 
second Lord of the Isles, was educated at Oxford. 
He married Margaret, daughter of Sir Walter 
Lesley, and in her right claimed the earldom of 
Ross. Robert, Puke o\ Albany, who was regent 
of Scotland, wanted the earldom for his own son, 
and with grOSS injustice refused to give it to 
Donald. In June, 141 i, Donald raised his follow- 
ers and sailed with a large licet from Ardtornish 
to Strome, where he landed. He defeated Angus 
Dubh Mackay and Mackenzie o\ Kintail at 
Dingwall, and afterwards took possession o( 

Inverness. He left Inverness with an army of 

10,000 men and marched towards Aberdeen. He 

encountered the Earl of Mar at 1 larlaw on the 26th 

of July. Instead o\ renewing the battle the next 
day and utterly crushing his opponents, he began 
to retrace his steps. 1 lis fight at 1 larlaw was thus 

of no immediate benefit to him. He died about 
the year 142^. He was succeeded by his son, 
Alexander. 

Alexander, seventh chief o( the Clan Donald, 
and third Lord of the Isles, was seized by James I. 
at Inverness in 1427, and carried off a prisoner to 
Perth. He was released shortly afterwards. In 
1429 he raised an army o\ 10,000 men, and 
attempted to obtain possession of the earldom of 
Ross. James I. collected a strong force and 
marched against him. The Camerons and the 
Mackintoshes deserted the Lord of the Isles and 
joined the King. James entered Lochaber about 



The Lords of the Isles. 13 

the beginning of 1430 and inflicted a severe defeat 
upon Alexander and his followers. Shortly after- 
wards the Lord of the Isles went to Edinburgh and 
threw himself upon the mercy of the King-. His 
life was spared, but he was confined in Tantallon 
Castle. The King- planted a royal garrison at 
Inverlochy, and placed Alexander Stewart, Earl of 
Mar, and Allan Stewart, Earl of Caithness, in 
charge of it. In 1431 Donald Ballach, son of 
John Mor Tanaistear, sailed with a large fleet to 
Lochaber, and disembarked at Inverskipnish, two 
miles from Inverlochy. The Earls of Mar and 
Caithness attacked the invaders, but suffered a 
crushing- defeat. The former was slain ; the latter 
succeeded in making - his escape. Immediately 
after this battle Donald Ballach plundered and 
laid waste the lands of the Camerons and the 
Mackintoshes, who had been supporting the King 
against the Lord of the Isles. James led an army 
to Dunstaffnage Castle, with the avowed intention 
of pursuing and punishing his rebellious subjects. 
The chiefs and chieftains of the Isles deemed it 
prudent to go to meet him and throw themselves 
on his mercy. Donald Ballach fled to Ireland. 
Alexander of the Isles was set at liberty in October, 
143 1. Shortly after the death of James I., which 
took place in February, 1437, the Lord of the Isles 
received the much-coveted earldom of Ross. He 
was at the same time appointed Justiciar of the 
whole of Scotland north of the Forth. He drove 
the chief of the Camerons out of Lochaber, and 



14 The Clan Gillean. 

gave a charter of their lands to John Garbh Maclean 
of Coll. Alexander had a natural son, named 
Gillespick or Celestine, by a daughter o\ Macphie 

in Lochaber. He had another natural son, named 
Hugh or Austin, by a daughter oi Patrick Roy 
Obeolan. He married, about 14^0, Elizabeth, 

daughter o\ Alexander Setou, Lord Gordon and 
Huntly, and had one son by her, John, his 
successor. He died in May, 1449. 
John, eighth chief of the Clan Donald, fourth 

Lord o\ the Isles, and second Earl o\ Ross, was 
born about the year [43I. In 1402 James, ninth 

Earl ot Douglas, the Earl o\ Ross, and Donald 

Ballach entered into a treaty with Edward I V. o( 
England for the conquest and division o\ Scot- 
land. This treaty was kept a profound secret until 
1475. As soon as it came to light ^teps were 
taken to visit the Marl o\ Ross with the punishment 

which he so richly deserved. In December, 1475, 

the government of Scotland declared him a traitor, 

condemned him to death, and deprived him of all his 

possessions. In June, 1476, he went to Edinburgh, 
confessed his faults, and cast himself upon the royal 
mercy. The King pardoned him for his rebellious 
conduct, and also treated him in a very liberal 
manner. His possessions were all restored him, 
except the earldom o\ Ross and the lands of 
Kintyreand Knapdale. Angus Og and John, his 
natural sons, were at the same time acknowledged 
as his legal successors. He was still Lord of the 
Isles, and should have been profoundly thankful 
that he had escaped so well. 



The Lords of the Isles. 15 

Shortly after the settlement of 1476, Angus Og, 
heir apparent of the Lord of the Isles, quarrelled 
with his father. This quarrel terminated in a war. 
About the year 14S4 Angus Og defeated his father 
at the battle of Bloody Bay and inflicted a heavy 
loss on him. Angus was a hot-tempered and 
imprudent man, but brave, energetic, and generous. 
1 le was undoubtedly a very able commander. He 
was murdered at Inverness by a treacherous Irish 
harper, in 1400. In 1491 Alexander Macdonald 
of Lochalsh, apparently with the consent of his 
uncle, the Lord of the Isles, made an attempt to 
wrest the earldom of Ross from the government. 

He was utterly ignorant of the art of war, and 
apparently too full of conceit to take advice from 
any of the old warriors who served under him. 
He was attacked at Park, near the river Conan, 
by Kenneth Mackenzie of Kintail, a very able 
commander, and completely defeated. In 1493 
Alexander of the Isles was deprived by the govern- 
ment of all his estates and titles. He died in a 
lodging-house at Dundee in 1498. His funeral 
expenses were paid by the government. From the 
battle of Harlaw in 141 1 to the battle of Park in 
1 49 1 the earldom of Ross was only a curse to the 
Lords of the Isles. It would have been better for 
them if they had never claimed it. They were 
brave and generous men ; but they were too fond 
of land and power for their own good. 

Alexander of the Isles had three children, Angus 
Og, John, and Margaret. John died without 



16 The Clan Gillean. 

issue. Angus Og married, about 1478, Mary, 
daughter of Colin Campbell, first Earl of Argyll, 
and had by her one son, Donald Dubh, who, on 
the death of his grandfather in 1498, became chief 
of the Clan Donald. 

V. The Macdonai.ps of [slay and 
tin: Glens. 

John Mor Tanaistear, fifth son of the first Lord 
of the Isles, received from his father 120 marklands 
in Kintyre and bo marklands in [slay, in all about 
5,400 acres. He resided at Dun-Naomhaig or 

Dunniveg in [slay. He married, in 1399, Marjory 
Bisset, and obtained the Glens of Antrim with her 
as a dowry. He was murdered by a man named 
James Campbell, in 142b. He was succeeded by 
his son, the warlike Donald Ballach, who died 
about 1480. Donald Ballach was succeeded by 
his son John Mor, who was succeeded by his son, 
John Cathanach. John Cathanach was on very 
bad terms with John Macdonald of Ardnamurchan, 
with whom he had a dispute regarding the lands 
oi Sunart 1 [e seized the royal castle of Dunaverty 
in 1498, and put its defenders to death. James IV. 
commissioned Archibald, second Earl of Argyll, 
to bring him to account for his rebellious act. 
Argyll found a willing assistant in John of Ardna- 
murchan. The latter treacherously seized John 
Cathanach and two of his sons at Finlaggan Castle 
in Islay, and sent them to Edinburgh, where they 
were executed. John Cathanach was succeeded 



The Macdonalds of Islay. 17 

by his son Alexander, who was known as Alasdair 
Mac Iain Chathanaich. Alexander married Cath- 
erine, daughter of John of Ardnamurchan, his 
father's enemy and captor. He had by his wife 
nine children, James, Angus, Coll, Alexander Og, 
Donald Gorm, Sorley Buie, Mary, Meve, and 
another daughter. James succeeded his father. 
Coll was the ancestor of the famous Alasdair Mac 
Cholla, the supporter of Montrose. Sorley Buie 
obtained possession of the Glens of Antrim in 
1586, and had a son named Randal, who was 
created Earl oi~ Antrim in 1620. 

James, sixth Macdonald of Islay and the Glens, 
was educated in Edinburgh. He possessed an 
extensive estate. It embraced 91 marklands and 
1064 shilling lands in Islay ; the lands of Kintyre, 
north and south, consisting- of 294 marklands and 
53 shilling lands ; the lands of Ardnamurchan and 
Sunart ; 184 shilling lands in Jura; certain lands 
in Arran, Gigha, Colonsay, and Uist ; and the 
Glens of Antrim. In 1565 he crossed over to 
Ireland to assist his brothers against Shane O'Neill. 
He was defeated, wounded, and taken prisoner at 
the battle of Glentaise on the 2nd of May. He 
was imprisoned in Castle Corcke near Strathbane, 
where he died in the course of two months. He 
was married to Agnes, daughter of Colin, sixth 
Earl of Argyll. He left six sons, Archibald, 
Angus, Coll, Ranald, Donald Gorm, and Alex- 
ander. Archibald died shortly after his father, and 
was succeeded by his brother, Angus. In 1596 



1 8 The Clan Gilleax. 

Angus sold the island of Gigha to Sir John 
Campbell of Calder for 3,000 marks. He married 
a daughter of Hector Og Maclean of Duart, by 
whom he had three children, James, Angus Og, 
and Margaret. James, Angus's son, was the 
ninth and last Macdonald of I slay. 

VI. The Macdonalds of Slbat. 

Hugh or Austin, first Macdonald of Sleat, was 
a son of Alexander, third Lord of the Isles. He 
was known as I'isdean Ban, or fair-haired Hugh. 
I le made a plundering expedition to Orkney, along 
with William Macleod of Dunvegan, in the year 
1460. On his way back he remained for some 
time in Caithness. I [e received a charter of Sleat, 
Bcnbecula, and other lands, in 1469. He had 
three natural sons. He had Donald Gallaeh by 
a daughter of the chief of the Gunns, Donald 
Herraeh by a daughter of Macleod of Dunvegan, 
and Gilleasbuig Dubh by some other woman. 
He married Finvola, daughter of John Macdonald 
of Ardnamurchan, and had by her a son named 
John. His wife was living in 1469. He died in 
1498. John, second of Sleat, died without issue in 
1502. Donald Gallaeh, third of Sleat, was born 
about 1461. He had one son, Donald Gruamach. 
Donald Herraeh, his brother, had two sons, Ranald 
and Angus Fionn. Gilleasbuig Dubh murdered 
his two brothers, Donald Gallaeh and Donald 
Herraeh, in 1506, and took possession of all the 
lands which had belonged to his father. Donald 



The Macdonalds of Sleat. 19 

Gruamach and Ranald, son of Donald Herrach, 
slew the murderer of their fathers, about the year 
1 5 14. Donald Gruamach became laird of Sleat. 
Ranald distinguished himself as a warrior in Ire- 
land. Owing to a severe wound he was under the 
necessity of returning to Scotland. He was 
accompanied to Skye by Dr. Maclean, a native of 
Mull. Ranald settled at Griminish. Donald 
Gruamach, fourth of Sleat, was succeeded by his 
son Donald Gorm, who was succeeded by his son 
Donald, sixth of Sleat. Domhnall Mac Dhomh- 
naill Ghuirm married Mary, daughter of Hector 
Mor Maclean of Duart, by whom he had three sons, 
Donald Gorm Mor, Gilleasbuig Cleireach, and 
Alexander. Donald Gorm Mor succeeded his 
father in 15S5, and died without issue in 1616. 
Gilleasbuig Cleireach, or Archibald the Clerk, 
married Margaret, daughter of Angus Macdonald 
of Islay, and granddaughter of Hector Mor of 
Duart. He had three children by her, Donald 
Gorm Og y Hugh, and Sheela. Hugh, who was 
known as Uisdean Mac Ghilleasbuig Chleirich, 
was a man of enormous physical strength, but 
extremely treacherous and selfish. He was a great 
curse both to the Macdonalds and the Macleans. 
Sheela, Gilleasbuig Cleireach's daughter, was 
married to John Macleod of Minginish and Water- 
nish, by whom she had Tormod, John Dubh and 
others. John Dubh was a worse man than even 
his uncle Hugh. Donald Gorm Og, eighth of 
Sleat, was created a baronet on July 14th, 1625. 
He died in 1643. 



20 The Clan Gilleax. 

VII. The Macdonalds of Lochalsh. 

Celestine, natural son of Alexander, third Lord 
of the Isles, was the first Macdonald of Lochalsh. 
He possessed, in addition to Lochalsh, the districts 
of Lochcarron and Lochbroom. He married, 
about 1462, Finvola, daughter of Lachlan Bron- 
nach of Duart, by whom he had Alexander, and 
two or three daughters. Alexander, second of 
Lochalsh, married a daughter of Lord Lovat. He 
was assassinated at Orinsay in 1497 by John 
Macdonald of Ardnamurchan. He left three sons 
and two daughters. Margaret, the elder daughter, 
was married to Alexander Macdonald, fourth of 
Glengarry. Janet, the second daughter, was 
married to Dingwall of Kildun. Donald Gallda, 
eldest son of Alexander, was the third Macdonald 
of Lochalsh. He died in 1 5 19, either at Cairn- 
burgh or in the island of Tiree. He was the last 
of the family of Lochalsh in the male line. His 
estates were divided between his two sisters. 
Dingwall of Kildun sold his half to Mackenzie 
of Kin tail. The Macdonalds of Glengarry and 
the Mackenzies were now neighbours. 

VIII. The Macdonalds of Glengarry. 

Alexander, sixth of Glengarry, married Mar- 
garet, daughter of Sir Alexander Macdonald of 
Lochalsh, and great-granddaughter of Lachlan 
Bronnach of Duart. He had by her an only son, 
Angus. Angus, seventh of Glengarry, married a 



The Macleods of Dunvegan. 21 

daughter of Hector Mor Maclean of Duart, and 
hacTby her one son, Donald. Donald, eighth of 
Glengarry, married Margaret, daughter of Allan 
Macdonald of Moydart, by whom he had Angus 
Og, Alexander, Donald of Scotus, and others. 
Angus Og was killed in a feud with the Mackenzies 
in T002. Alexander, known as Alasdair Dearg, 
married Jane, daughter of Allan Cameron of 
Lochiel, by whom he had Angus. Donald of 
Glengarry died in 1645, and was succeeded by his 
grandson, Angus. Angus, ninth of Glengarry, 
was raised to the peerage, in 1660, by the title of 
Lord Macdonell and Arros. He died, without 
issue, in 1682. 

IX. The Macleods of Dunvegan. 
Leod, the progenitor of the Macleods, had two 
sons, Tormod, who succeeded him in Dunvegan, 
and Torquil, who succeeded him in Lewis. Tormod 
had two sons, Malcolm and Murdoch. Malcolm 
was succeeded by his son John, and John by his 
son William, who was known as Uilleam Cleireach. 
William married a daughter of Murdoch, second 
Maclean of Lochbuie, by whom he had John Borb, 
his successor. John Borb was succeeded by his 
son William Dubh, who married a daughter of 
John Maclean, third of Lochbuie, and was succeed- 
ed by his son Alexander. Alexander, known as 
Alasdair Crotach, was succeeded by his son William, 
who was succeeded by his brother Donald, who 
was succeeded by his brother Tormod. Tormod 



22 The Clan Gili.han. 

obtained possession of his father's estate in 15S0. 
He married Marion, daughter o\ Heetor Mor o( 
Dnart, by whom he had William, Rory Mor, 
Alexander, and three daughters, William, twelfth 
pf 1 tunvegan, was succeeded in 1590 by his brother 
Rory Mor, who was knighted ill 1613, Sir Rory 
married Isabel, daughter o\ Donald Maedonald, 

eighth o\ Glengarry, by whom he had John Mor, 
Sir Roderick ot Tajisker, Sir Norman o\ Bemera, 

William o\ 1 lamer, 1 >onald of Grishornish, Mar- 
garet) Mary, Janet, and Plorence. John Mor 
succeeded his father in h>j<>. He married Sibella, 
daughter o\ Kenneth, fii i Mackenzie o\ 

Kintail, and had by her seven children, Roderiek, 
fohn Breac, Mary, M . Julian, Sibella, and 

Margaret. Roderick succeeded his father in 1649. 

John Breae succeeded Roderiek in [664. M 
was married, as his second wife, tO Sir James 
Maedonald, ninth o\ Sleat, and had one son, John 

of Backney. Marion was the mother of Ailein 

Muideartach, Allan o\ Moydart, who fell at 
Sheriffmuir in 1715. Julian was the mother of Sir 
John Maclean o\ Puart ; Sibella was the mother 

o( Simon Fraser, Lord Lovat, who wa led 

in 1747. 

X. Tm CAMBRONS 01 LoeniEL. 

The histpry o\ the Lamerons of Lochiel begins 
with Donald Dubh, who fought at the battle of 
Harlaw in 141 1. He was the son of Allan, son of 
Paul, son of Patrick, son of Martin, son of Paul, 



The Camkrons of Lochiel. 23 

son of Millony, son of Gillcroth, who is mentioned 
in 1222, and was then living** He had two sons, 
Ewen and Allan. Ewen succeeded him as chief. 
Allan was captain of the Clan Cameron in 1472. 
Ewen^ son of Allan, married a daughter of Celestine 
of Lochalsh, and a granddaughter of Lachlarl 
Bronnach of Duart He had by her Donald, his 
successor. He received from Alexander of Loch- 
alsh, in 1492, a charter of the thirty marklands 
of Lochiel, the lands of Kilmallie, and others. 
Donald, son of Ewen, married, in 1520, Agnes, 
daughter of Sir James Grant of Freuchy, by whom 
he had Ewen Beag, who died about 1553. Ewen 
Beag was succeeded by his brother Donald, who 
married a daughter of Hector Mor of Duart, but 
died without issue. Donald was succeeded by his 
nephew, Allan, son of John Dubh. Allan was 
brought up under the care and protection of Lachlan 
Mor of Duart, and took an active part in avenging 
the death of tin? latter. He married a daughter of 
Stewart of Appin, by whom he had John, Donald 
and Jane. John married, in 1626, Margaret, 
daughter of Robert Campbell of Glenfalloch, by 
whom he had Ewen Dubh — the famous Sir Ewen 
of Lochiel. Donald was the ancestor of the 
Camerons of Glendessary. Jane was the mother 
of Lord Macdonell and Arros. Allan of Lochiel 
died about 1647, and was succeeded by his grand- 
son, Ewen Dubh. Sir Ewen of Lochiel married, 
first, a daughter of Sir Donald Macdonald, eighth 
of Sleat, but had no issue by her. He married, 



24 The Clan Gillean. 

secondly, Isabel, eldest daughter of Sir Lachlan 
Maclean of Duart, by whom he had three sons and 
four daughters. He married, thirdly, a daughter 
of Colonel David Barclay of Urie, by whom he 
had one son and seven daughters. He died in 
February, 17 19. 

XI. The Mackenzies of Kintail. 

Colin, Cailein Cam, eleventh Mackenzie of 
Kintail, succeeded his father, Coinneach na Cuirce 
or Kenneth of the dirk, in 1568. He married 
Barbara, daughter of John Grant of Freuchy by 
his wife, Marjory, daughter of John Stewart, third 
Earl of Atholl. He had by his wife eight children, 
Kenneth, Roderick, Alexander, Colin, Murdoch, 
and three daughters. He died in 1594. Kenneth, 
his eldest son, succeeded him in Kintail. Kenneth 
was created Lord Mackenzie of Kintail in 1609. 
He was succeeded in 161 1 by his son Colin Roy, 
Cailein Ruadh, who was created Earl of Seaforth 
in 1623. Roderick, second son of Cailein Cam, 
was a man of ability and determination. He was 
for some time tutor of Kintail. He obtained the 
lands of Coigeach and Assynt by his wife. He 
was knighted in 1609. He died in 1628. He was 
succeeded by his son John, who was succeeded by 
his son George, who was created Earl of Cromarty 
in 1703. Cailein Og's eldest daughter was married 
to Simon, eighth Lord Lovat. His second 
daughter was married to Hector Og Maclean of 
Duart, by whom she had Hector Mor and Sir 



The Campbells of Argyll. 25 

Lachlan. His third daughter was married to Sir 
Donald Macdonald of Sleat, Domhnall Gorm Og, 
by whom she had Sir James, ninth of Sleat, 
Donald of Castletown, and others. 

XII. The Campbells of Argyll. 

" Dubgall Cambel," or Dugald Campbell, was 
the progenitor of the Campbells and thus their first 
chief. He flourished about the year 1225. He 
was the son of Gillespick, son of Malcolm, son of 
Duibhne. It is impossible to trace him farther 
back. Neil, son of Colin Mor, son of Gillespick, 
son of Dugald, was the fourth chief. He was a 
loyal supporter of Robert Bruce. He was married 
twice. By his first wife he had Colin, his successor. 
By his second wife, Marjory, sister of Robert 
Bruce, he had at least one son. Duncan, Donn- 
achadh an Aigh, son of Colin, son of Gillespick 
Mor, son of Colin, son of Neil, was the eighth chief. 
He married Margaret, daughter of Robert Stewart, 
Duke of Albany, and granddaughter of King 
Robert II. He had two sons by her, Gillespick 
Roy, Gilleasbuig Ruadh, and Colin of Glenurchy. 
He was created Lord Campbell in 1445. He was 
a member of the Privy Council, Justice-General of 
Scotland, and Lieutenant of Argyll. Gillespick 
Roy, his heir, married Elizabeth, daughter of Lord 
Sommerville, by whom he had Colin and other 
children. Gillespick Roy died before his father. 
Lord Campbell died in 1453, and was succeeded 
by his grandson Colin, a boy of fifteen or sixteen 



26 The Clan Gillean. 

years of age. Colin was created Earl of Argyll in 
1457. He married shortly afterwards Margaret, 
daughter and co-heiress of John Stewart, Lord 
Lorn, by whom he had two sons and seven 
daughters. He was for a long time Chancellor of 
Scotland. He was succeeded by his son Archibald 
in 14CXV Archibald, second Earl of Argyll, 
married Elizabeth, daughter of John Stewart, Earl 
o\ Lennox, by whom he had ten children, Colin, 
Archibald of Skipnish, John, Donald, Margaret, 
Isabel, Mar}-, Jane, Ann, and Elizabeth. He was 
slain at Flodden in 1513. Colin, his eldest son, 
succeeded him. John married, in 15 10, Muriel, 
daughter and heiress of Sir John Calder, and 
obtained p n of her father's estate. He is 

known in history as Sir John Campbell of Calder. 
Colin, third Earl of Argyll, married Janet, 
daughter of Alexander Gordon, or really Seton, 
third Earl of Hun try, son of George, second Earl 
of Hun try, by his wife, Annabella, daughter of 
King Janus 1. Colin had by his wife four children, 
Archibald, John Gorm of Lochnell, Alexander, 
and Margaret. He died in 1542. Archibald, 
fourth Karl of Argyll, embraced the Protestant 
religion, and was an active supporter of it. He 
married, first, Helen, daughter of James Hamilton, 
Karl of Arran, by whom he had Archibald, his 
successor. He married, secondly, Mary, daughter 
of William Graham, Earl of Menteith, by w horn he 
had Colin of Buchan, Margaret, and Janet. He 
married, thirdly, Catherine, daughter of Hector 



The Campbells of Argyll. 27 

Mor Maclean of Duart. He died in 1558. His 
widow held the lands of Craignish in life-rent. 
Margaret, his elder daughter, was married to James 
Stewart, Lord Down, by whom she had James, 
" the bonny Earl of Moray." Janet was married to 
Hector Og Maclean of Duart, by whom she had 
the celebrated Lachlan Mor. Archibald, fifth Earl 
of Argyll, died in 1575, and was succeeded by his 
brother, Colin of Buchan. Colin, sixth Earl of 
Argyll, had two sons, Archibald and Colin of 
Lundy. He died in 1584. Archibald, seventh 
Earl of Argyll, fought against the Roman Catholic 
earls, Huntly and Errol, at Glenlivet in 1594. He 
pursued and slaughtered the Macgregors without 
mercy in 1603. He persuaded their chief, Alex- 
ander Macgregor of Glenstrae, to surrender to him, 
by promising him that he would send him to 
England, whither he desired to go to plead with 
King James for pardon. Instead of carrying out 
his promise in an honest way, he sent Macgregor 
across the Tweed, and then took him back to 
Scotland, and conveyed him to Edinburgh to be 
put to death. Alexander of Glenstrae was executed 
on January 12th, 1604. Archibald of Argyll mar- 
ried, first, Ann, daughter of William Douglas, 
Earl of Morton, by whom he had Archibald, his 
successor. He married, secondly, Ann, daughter 
of Sir William Cornwallis of Brome. Through 
the influence of his second wife, he became a Roman 
Catholic. In 161S he left Scotland, and entered 
the service of Philip II., King of Spain. He tried 



28 The Clan Gillean. 

now to atone for his opposition to the Roman 
Catholic earls in 1594 by fighting, under the Duke 
of Alva, against the Protestants of Holland and 
killing as many of them as he could. He died in 
London in 163N. 

Archibald, eighth Earl of Argyll, was born in 
1698. He was known as Gilleasbuig Gruamach, 
or morose Archibald. I Ee became practically chief 
of the Campbells when his father left Scotland in 
161 8. He received the family estates shortly after- 
wards. He succeeded his father as Marl in 1638, 
and was created Marquis of Argyll in 1641. He 
married Margaret, daughter of William Douglas, 
seventh Marl of Morton, by whom he had two sons, 
Archibald, his successor, and Neil of Ardmaddy. 
He was beheaded with the maiden at the Cross of 
Edinburgh on May 27th, 1661. Archibald, ninth 
Earl of Argyll, married Mary, daughter of James 
Stewart, Earl of Murray, by whom he had Archi- 
bald, his successor, John Campbell of Mamore, and 
others. He was executed in Edinburgh on June 
30th, 16S5. Archibald, tenth Karl of Argyll, came 
to Britain with the Prince of Orange in [688, and 
received all the titles and possessions which had 
belonged to his father. He was created Duke of 
Argyll and Marquis of Lorn on July 23rd, 1701. 
The Campbells were now at the height of their 
power. He died in 1703, and was succeeded by 
his son John, Iain Ruadh, a man of ability and 
kindness of heart. 



CHAPTER II. 
(Origin of the (Elan (Si I lean. 

The Book of Ballymote, the Book of Leccan, 
the Skene Manuscript, and MacFirbis's Book of 
Genealogies are the oldest works that deal with 
the origin of the Highland Clans. The first was 
compiled in 13(83 a.d., the second in 1416, the third 
in 1467, and the fourth between 1650 and 1666. 
The Skene MS., or as Skene himself calls it, the 
MS. of 1467, was written in Scotland ; the others 
were written in Ireland ; but they all agree in 
deriving the Highland Clans from the kings and 
kinglets of Ireland. The Macleans are traced 
back, first, to Lorn Mac Ere, and next through a 
long line of royal ancestors to the great Milesius. 
The other clans are honoured in the same way. 

According to the early historians of Ireland, 
Eber and Eremon, the sons of Milesius, began to 
reign over Erin as joint-kings in the year 1699 b.c. 
Angus Tuirmeach, who was lineally descended 
from Eremon, became high-king of Ireland in the 
year 384 b.c. He was an excellent king, and 



30 The Clan Gillean. 

reigned during the long period of sixty years. He 
died quietly in his bed at Tara. Two of his sons, 
Enna Aighneach and Fiachaidh Fearmara, were 
very eminent men. Enna was the ancestor of 
Conn Ceudchathach and the Macdonalds. Fiach- 
aidh was the ancestor of the kings of Scotland, the 
Macleans, Macgregors, and other clans. As the 
word tuirmeach means having many children, we 
may take for granted that the good King Angus 
had a very large family. As he was a heathen, 
and a powerful king, it is possible that he did not 
deem it necessary to limit himself to one wife. 
Eidersgeol, a descendant of Angus, became high- 
king of Ireland in the year 130 B.C. He reigned 
five years. Conaire M6r, son of Eidersgeol, be- 
came high-king in 109 B.C. He had a prosperous 
reign of thirty years. Conaire, son of Mogh- 
Lamha, and a descendant of Conaire Mor, married 
a daughter of Conn Ceudchathach, and succeeded 
his father-in-law as high-king of Ireland in 158A.D. 
He had by his wife three sons, Carbri Riada, 
Carbri Baschaoin, and Carbri Musg. Eochaidh 
Muinreamhair, or Eochy of the fat neck, was de- 
scended from Carbri Riada. He was King of 
Dalriada in Ulster, and had two sons, Ere and 
Eolchu. Ere, who succeeded his father, as King 
of Dalriada, had three sons, Fergus, Lorn, and 
Angus. About 497 a.d. the sons of Ere settled 
in Argyll, and founded the kingdom of Dalriada. 
In 844 a. d., Kenneth Mac Alpin, King of the 
Dalriadan Scots, succeeded in placing himself 



Origin of the Clan. 31 

upon the Pictish throne. By uniting the Picts 
and Scots under his authority he laid the founda- 
tion of the kingdom of Alban, or Scotland. 

As the Gaelic words paipear, peann, litir, leugh, 
and sgriobh, or paper, pen, letter, read, and write, 
are all of Latin origin, we may safely conclude 
that the Gaidels learned the art of reading and 
writing from the Romans. But the Romans did 
not settle in South Britain until the year 43 a.d. 
Patrick settled in Ireland about 425 a.d., and died 
about 469. There may have been some men in 
Ireland, before the time of Patrick, who could 
read and write, but they must have been extremely 
few. It is quite certain that the pious and zealous 
Patrick did not trouble his head with genealogies 
and histories. It is equally certain that the first 
converts to the Christian religion had nothing to 
do with these branches of knowledge. They had 
more important matters to attend to. It may be 
regarded as fairly certain, then, that there was not 
a single historical or genealogical work of Irish 
origin in existence prior to 450 a.d. As this is 
our belief, we attach very little importance to the 
history of pagan Ireland. It is certain that it 
contains elements of truth ; but it is equally certain 
that it is to a very large extent a mass of fictions. 
So far as the genealogies are concerned, they are 
utterly untrustworthy. There may have been a 
man in Ireland who was known as Angus Tuirm- 
each of Tara, but to suppose that the Macleans, 
Macdonalds, or any other clan, could be traced 



32 The Clan Gillean. 

back to him step by step, would be sheer halluci- 
nation. 

The pedigrees of the Highland Clans as given by 
the Irish genealogists and the writer of the Skene 
MS. are fairly correct to the year 1 150, or the time 
of Malcolm Kenmore. From that date back to 
the year S44 they are trustworthy only to a very 
small extent. Rack o\ S44 a.d. they are utterly 
worthless for historical purposes. We know the 
names of the kings who flourished in Alban between 
the days of the sons o\ Ere and the time of Kenneth 
Mac Alpin ; but with the names of the chiefs and 
chieftains who quarrelled >md fought and fell dur- 
ing that period we are almost wholly unacquainted. 

According to the genealogy oi the Macleans as 
given in the MS. o\ 1467, Old Dugald of Scone 
was the son o( Fcarchar Abhraruaidh. Old Dugald 
must have been born about the year 1030. Fear- 
char Abhraruaidh was a young man, and probably 
fighting under his brother Fearchar Fada, in 678. 
How, then, could Old Dugald have been his son? 
The plain fact is that the writer ot the MS. of 1467 
knew nothing whatever about the ancestors of Old 
Dugald of Scone. Yet he was a good scholar, 
and as intimately acquainted with the genealogy of 
the Macleans as he was with that o( any other clan. 
He would no doubt have given it correctly as far 
back as the time of the sons of Ere if he had the 
materials required. But the materials he had not. 
The presumption, then, is that they were not in 
existence. 



Origin of the Clan. 33 

It is held by some writers that the Macleans are 
of Norman origin. Gillean, it is affirmed, was a 
son of John Fitz-Thomas, chief of the Geraldines in 
Ireland, who was descended from a certain Otho 
that came over to England with William the 
Conqueror. We are also told that Gillean had 
a brother named Colin, that Colin had a son 
named Kenneth, and that Kenneth was the pro- 
genitor of the Mackenzies. The writer of the 
Ardgour MS. accepts the foregoing views in full. 
These are his words : — 4t Upon the whole the 
account of the Macleans being brothers to the 
Mackenzies from their first settlement in Scotland, 
together with their descent from the Fitzgeralds, 
is founded on undeniable facts and the unexception- 
able testimonies of the best historians and public 
records, together with a constant tradition to the 
same purpose amongst the two clans." 

The theory which maintains that the Macleans 
and the Mackenzies are of Norman descent is of 
comparatively recent origin. The earliest trace of 
it on record is to be found in a manuscript history 
of the Mackenzies, written by George, first Earl of 
Cromarty, in 1669. It has no foundation upon 
which to rest. It is based entirely on a forged 
charter and an ancient fragment of history, which 
was said to exist, but which no one has ever seen. 
Besides, it is contrary to well-known facts. It is 
simply the invention of those Highland genealo- 
gists who believed that it was more honourable to 
be descended from some Danish pirate, Norman 

3 



34 The Clan Gillean. 

knight, or Irish kingling, than from an honest 
farmer, hunter, or shepherd in their own glens. 
It stands upon a level with the absurd notion that 
the Gaidels of Scotland and Ireland are descended 
from Gathelus and his wife, Scota, daughter of 
Pharaoh, King of Egypt. Kenneth, the progenitor 
of the Mackenzies, was not the son either of Colin 
Fitzgerald or of any other Colin. He was the son 
of Angus, son of Gilchrist, son of Kenneth, son 
of Gilleain Og, son of Gilleain na h-Airde, or 
Gillean of the Aird. While the Macleans and the 
Mackenzies were invariably good friends, we have 
no ground for supposing that their progenitors 
were related. Gillean of the battle-axe lived in 
Argyleshire, while Gillean of the Aird lived in 
Ross-shire. 

About the year 1 160, Malcolm IV., King of 
Scotland, removed some of the inhabitants of the 
province of Moray from their old homes, and 
planted strangers from the Lowlands in their 
place. Skene, in his <4 Highlanders of Scotland," 
started the theory that among the men who were 
removed by King Malcolm were the Macleans. 
He considered it "not unlikely that Glenurchart 
was their original settlement," and regarded the 
district of Lorn as their oldest seat in Argyleshire 
— the place to which they had been removed by 
King Malcolm. "The Highlanders of Scotland " 
is a valuable work. At the same time it is the 
production of a young man, and contains a 
number of erroneous statements. In reading it, 



Origin of the Clax. 35 

however, we should do justice to its distinguished 
author. We have no right to make extracts from 
it and call them Skene's views, when we find that 
the statements in these extracts are not in accord- 
ance with statements in Skene's last work, " Keltic 
Scotland, a History of Ancient Alban." In his 
"Keltic Scotland,'' Skene traces the Macleans 
back to Scone, not to the province of Moray. In 
justice to Skene we should also bear in mind that 
when he wrote "The Highlanders of Scotland," 
he knew nothing whatever about the genealogy of 
the Macleans as it is given in the MS. of 1467. 
In his " Keltic Scotland " he speaks of that gene- 
alogy in the following terms: — "This genealogy 
is given with so much minuteness up to a certain 
Sean Dubh-gall Sgoinne, or Old Dugald of Scone, 
and the ecclesiastical character of the upper links 
are so obvious, that it is difficult to avoid regard- 
ing it as so far trustworthy." 

In a work published a few years ago we are told 
that it is in the highest degree probable that the 
Macleans and Mackenzies are of Pictish origin. 
It is possible that such is the case with regard to 
the Mackenzies; and, if it be the case, and if they 
feel disposed to glory in the flesh, they have at 
least as much reason to glory in their Pictish blood 
as others can have to glory in their Dalriadan 
blood. So far as the Macleans are concerned, we 
have no hesitation in affirming that there is not a 
particle of evidence in existence to indicate in the 
faintest manner that they are of Pictish descent. 



36 The Clan Gillean. 

The Macleans are undoubtedly of Keltic origin. 
It is impossible, however, to determine with any- 
thing" like certainty, whether their forefathers were 
Scots, Picts, or Britons. At the same time, it is 
slightly probable that they were Scots. As Ken- 
neth MacAlpin and his successors on the throne of 
Alban were Scots, it may be reasonably assumed 
that, by the year 1 100, the majority of the leading 
men in Scone were of the same stock. 

About the year n 25, Constantine, Earl of Fife, 
Dugald, the son of Mocche, and Maoldomhnach, 
the son of Machedach, wore appointed arbiters by 
David I. in settling a dispute regarding the bound- 
aries of the lands o( Kirkness and Lochore in Fife. 
Constantine is described as a great judge, or 
mormaor, in Scotland ; Dugald, as an old, just, 
and venerable man ; and Maoldomhnach, as a 
good and discreet judge. They were all prominent 
and well-known men. It is probable that Maol- 
domhnach was mormaor of Lennox, and the 
father of Muredach, father of Ailin Mor, who was 
Earl of Lennox in 1 193. Mocche probably stands 
for Mac-che or Mac-he. If it stands for the latter, 
the letters he can only be a part of some such 
name as Heth or Hedath. 

The old, just, and venerable Dugald, who acted 
as arbiter for King David I., was born probably 
about the year 1050. Now Old Dugald of Scone, 
the ancestor of the Macleans, must have been born 
about that very time, and was undoubtedly, like 
Dugald the arbiter, a prominent and well-known 



Origin of the Clan. 37 

man. All things considered, it may be regarded 
as a fact that the two old Dugalds were one and 
the same person. With this Dugald, then, the 
authentic history of the Macleans begins ; it is 
impossible to trace them farther back. It may, 
however, be some comfort for them to know, that 
so far as authentic pedigrees are concerned, the 
Campbells, Macdonalds, Mackenzies, Macleods, 
and Camerons, are no better off than they are 
themselves. 

It may be stated that the Rev. John Beaton, 
the last seannachie of the Macleans of Duart, 
agrees with the Skene MS. in deriving the Mac- 
leans from Old Dugald of Scone, Ere, and Angus 
Tuirmeach of Tara. His list of their ancestors 
has been preserved in the Ardgour MS. 

The following were the ancestors of the pro- 
genitor of the Macleans : — 

I. Dugald of Scone had a son named Raince 
or Raing. 

II. Raing had three sons, Cucatha, Cusithe, 
and Cuduilig. Cucatha means dog of battle. 
Cusithe apparently means dog of attack. Duilig 
seems to be the genitive case of Duileach or 
Duilleach. If it be, Cuduilig means dog of leaves, 
or hunting dog. According to the Irish genealo- 
gists, Cucatha was the ancestor of the Clan Con- 
chatha in the district of Lennox ;. Cusithe, of the 
Clan Consithe in Fife; and Cuduilig, or Cuduilligh, 
of the Macleans in Mull and its islands. 

III. Cuduilligh was lay abbot of Lismore in 



3& The Clan Gillean. 

Argyleshire. His descendants were all known for 
some time as Claim Duilligh, or the Clan Dullie. 
The Rankins, or Claim Mhic Rain&r — children 
of the son of Raing — are descended from Cu- 
duilligh, and were known for a long time as the 
Clan Dullie. They dropped that name and called 
themselves Claim Mhic Raing, or Rankins. They 
were hereditary pipers to the Macleans of Duart, 
and were highly distinguished for their profes- 
sional skill. 

IV. Neil, son of Cuduilligh or Cu dullie, had a 
son named Maolsuthain. 

V. Maolsuthain had a son named Macrath. 

VI. Macrath had a son named Gilleoin or Gill- 
eain. Gilleoin was the progenitor of the 
Macleans. 

According to John Maclean of Inverscadle, the 
name Gilleain is derived from gille leathann, and 
means the broad-shouldered youth. According to 
Lachlan Maclean, the Coll scholar and writer, it is 
derived from gille leoghainn, and means the boy 
or son of a lion. Both of these derivations are 
utterly erroneous ; they are in direct opposition to 
phonetic and historic facts. The real meaning of 
gille leoghainn is servant or attendant of a lion. 
But Lachlan, who knew the history of the Macleans 
well, was anxious to make out that they were sons 
of lions, not only in bravery, but even in name. 

The Gaelic word gille means a boy, a youth, a 
servant. The name John is of Hebrew origin, and 
signifies one graciously given by Jehovah. There 



Origin of the Clan. 39 

are three different forms of it in Gaelic, Eoin, 
Scathan, and Iain. Gille Eoin or Gille Sheathain 
means servant of John, or a person dedicated to 
serve the Apostle John and enjoy his protection. 
Gille Eoin is the oldest form of the name Gillean. 
It was in course of time contracted into Gill' 
Eoin, or Gilleoin. Gille Sheathain was changed, 
first, to Gill' Sheathain, and then to Gilleathain. 
Gilleoin is the most classical form of the name. 
But this form of it is never used at the present day 
except in poetic compositions, and even in works 
of this kind only rarely. As th is silent in Gaelic 
in the middle of words, Gilleathain is frequently 
written Gilleain, or just as it is pronounced. 

Gill-eath-ain or Gill-e-ain is a word of three 
syllables. As ath is silent in eath, eat/i really 
stands for*?, and is pronounced like the long sound 
of<?in met. In its Anglicized form Gill-e-ain is 
contracted into two syllables, and becomes Gil-lean, 
the accent being on the last syllable. 

The Gaelic word mac means son. The Gaelic 
word clann means children, and becomes clan in 
English. Thus, then, Mac Gilleain, or Maclean, 
means son of Gillean ; and Clann Ghilleain, or 
Clan Gillean, children of Gillean. The expression 
Clan Maclean should not be used ; its real meaning 
is children of the son of Gillean. But the Mac- 
leans are not the children of the son of Gillean ; 
they are the children of Gillean himself. Maclean, 
Maclaine, and Maclain are all pronounced in the 
same way. 



CHAPTER III. 

<iEhc -first (Bight Chiefs. 

I. GlLLEAIN NA TUAIGHE. 

Gilleain, or Gilleoin, was the progenitor of the 
Macleans, and thus their first chief. He was the 
son of Macrath, son of Maolsuthain, son of Neil, 
son of Cudullie, son of Raing, son of Old Dugald 
of Scone. He lived in Argyleshire, and must 
have been born about the year 1210. He was a 
prominent man and a distinguished warrior. He 
was known as Gilleain na Tuaighe, or Gillean of 
the battle-axe, a weapon which he no doubt 
wielded with dexterity and power. He had three 
sons, Bristi, Gillebride and Maoliosa. 

Tradition relates that while Gilleain was, on a 
certain occasion, hunting on Beinn Talaidh in 
Mull, he was suddenly enveloped in a fog and lost 
his way. He wandered about during two or three 
days, and at last, utterly exhausted by hunger and 
fatigue, stuck his battle-axe in the ground, near 
a cranberry bush, and lay down beside it. His 



Malise. 41 

companions discovered him in this perilous posi- 
tion, apparently dead, and succeeded in restoring 
him to consciousness and safety. As to this tra- 
dition we strongly suspect that there is no truth 
in it. The probability is that it is only of recent 
origin. There is no reference to it in the Ardoour 
MS., and certainly not in any earlier work. 

II. Maoliosa. 

Maoliosa, or Malise, had a son named Maol- 
calum, or Malcolm. It is probable that he had also 
a son named Maolmoire, or Malmory. Maol and 
gille, as the first part of a name, mean servant. 
Thus Maoliosa and Gilliosa, or Gillise, are the same 
name, and mean servant of Jesus. Maolcalum, or 
Gillecalum, means servant of Columba. Maol- 
moire, or Gillemoire, means servant of Mary. 

Among the men who rendered homage to Edward 
I. of England in 1296 was " Gillemoire Mackilyn," 
apparently Gillemoire Mac Gille-Eoin, or Gilmory 
Maclean. He belonged to the county of Perth, 
and was a man of some standing. As the county 
of Perth included the district of Lorn, it is probable 
that Gilmory lived in that district. He may, then, 
have been a son of Malise. 

It is necessary to bear in mind that the genealo- 
gists do not profess to give the names of the chiefs 
of a clan. They simply start with the last chief 
known to them and trace him back through a 
long line of ancestors. Thus, though Gillemoire 
Mackilyn should have been chief of the Clan 



42 The Clan Gillean. 

Gillean, if he died without issue, or if his sons died 
without issue, he would not appear in the genealogy 
of the Macleans. 

Tradition affirms that Malise, or Gillise, fought 
under Alexander III. at the battle of Largs in 
1263. It also asserts that he held some lands in 
Kin tyre. 

III. Gillecalim. 

Gillecalum, or Malcolm, son of Malise, married 
a daughter of the Lord of Carrick, and had three 
sons by her, Donald, Neil, and John Dubh. In 
1296 "Malcolm McCulian en 1' isle de Kintyr," 
or Malcolm MacCulian in the Isle of Kintyre, 
rendered homage to Edward I. That Malcolm 
Maclean and Malcolm MacCulian were one and the 
same person may be regarded as a fact. For this 
belief there are several good reasons. Malcolm 
Maclean was known as Malcolm Mac Gille-Eoin ; 
but Mac Gill-e-Foin would, in the hands of a 
Frenchified English scribe, become readily trans- 
formed into Mac Cul-i-an. Malcolm Maclean 
must have been born about the year 1270, and 
Malcolm MacCulian was a prominent man in 
1296. According to a tradition related by Hugh 
Macdonald, of Sleat, the Macleans came to 
Mull from Carrick. But Carrick, or the southern 
district of Ayrshire, was opposite Kintyre. Mal- 
colm MacCulian had lands in Kintyre, which 
in his day was classed as one of the Western 
Islands. As Malcolm Maclean was married to a 



Malcolm. 43 

daughter of the Lord of Carrick, his wife may 
have had at least a life interest in some lands in 
that district. By regarding the two Malcolms as 
the same person, we find a substantial foundation 
for Hugh Macdonald's traditional statement. In 
1325 Malcolm Maclean's three sons were appar- 
ently living in or near Kintyre. In that year 
Robert Bruce paid a visit to some of the Western 
Islands. Donald Maclean, Malcolm's eldest son, 
sent a ship in the King's service around the Mull 
— evidently the Mull of Kintyre — to West Tarbert. 
Neil and John, Donald's brothers, sent some of 
their men to watch the ship, while it remained at 
Tarbert. 

Tradition states that Malcolm Maclean fought 
under Robert Bruce at the battle of Bannockburn 
in 1314, and that Bruce granted him some of the 
lands which had belonged to the Macdougalls of 
Lorn. It is highly probable that this tradition is 
true. It is clear that Bruce and Malcolm's sons 
were on very friendly terms in 1325. Then, at 
that time or shortly afterwards, the King ap- 
pointed Neil, Malcolm's second son, constable of 
the castle of "Scraburgh," which is in all proba- 
bility a misreading for Karnaburgh or Cairnburgh. 
In 1329 Neil received ten pounds in part payment 
for keeping the castle. If the Macleans had not 
supported Bruce in his hour of need — if they had 
not fought for him at Bannockburn — it is not 
likely that one of them would have been placed in 
charge of a royal garrison, as " Scraburgh," what- 
ever place he meant, must have been. 



44 The Clan Gillean. 

IV. Iain Dubh. 

John, son of Malcolm, was known as Iain Dubh, 
or Black John. According- to the MacFirbis 
MS. Malcolm had three sons, Donlad, Neil, and 
John. That work tells us, first, that Donald had 
two sons and, next, that Neil had two sons. Then 
it makes the following statement : " Eoin diu da 
mhac maithe lets, i. *., Lochloinn agus Each- 
dhonn," or John "diu" had two good sons, i. e. t 
Lachlan and Hector. Diu seems to be a mis- 
reading for dub or dubh, black. 

V. LACHAINN Ll'BANACH. 

Lachlan, son of John Dubh, was known as 
Lachainn Lhbanach, or Lachlan the Crafty. He 
was a man of ability, determination, and courage. 

Hugh Macdonald, of Sleat, wrote a history of 
the Clan Donald in 16S0. His work is full of 
traditions and very interesting, but by no means 
trustworthy. He gives the following account of the 
settlement of the Macleans in the Isle of Mull : — 

"John Macdougall of Lorn, commonly called 
John Bacach, went off to harry Carrick in Gallo- 
way, the property of Robert Bruce, afterwards 
King Robert. Whilst there he met with one 
Gillean, son of Gillies, son of John, son of Gillies 
Mor, who went with him to Lorn in quest of better 
fortune. Macdougall gave him a spot of land, 
called Bealachuain, in the Isle of Sael. He had 
three sons : Hector, the eldest, of whom descended 



Lachlan Lubanach. 45 

the family of Lochbuie; Lachlan, of whom de- 
scended the family of Duart; and John, a natural 
son, of whom descended others of the name 
Maclean. Whilst Angus Og of the Isles was at 
Ardtornish in the time of Lent, Macdoug-all of 
Lorn sent Hector and Lachlan, the sons of Gillean, 
as ambassadors to him. After landing they had 
some conference with him about the Isle of Mull. 
He refused to grant their request ; but desired 
Mackinnon, who was master of his household, to 
use them kindly and give them their dinner. 
Mackinnon caused bread and gruthim to be set 
before them. The gruthim, which consists of 
butter and curds mixed together, was so brittle that 
it was not easy for them to take it up with their 
long knives. Macdonald came along whilst they 
were eating, and, seeing their condition, ordered 
Mackinnon to give them some other sort of food. 
Mackinnon replied that if they could not eat their 
food as it was, they should put on the nibs of hens, 
with which they might gather it up more easily. 
This reproachful answer touched the sons of Gillean 
to the quick. On the same day Macdonald left 
Ardtornish in a small boat to go to Aros in Mull 
to solemnize the festival of Easter. He gave 
instructions to Mackinnon to follow him with his 
large galley, and to take certain men with him. 
When Mackinnon went to the shore, the sons of 
Gillean, resolving to be avenged, called him aside, 
and stabbed him to the heart. They manned the 
galley with their own followers, pursued Mac- 



46 The Clan Gillean. 

donald, made him their prisoner, and took him 
with them to Dunstaffnag-e. They remained with- 
out the castle. When Macdougall, who was at 
dinner when they arrived, heard of what had taken 
place, he said that he was very glad to have 
Macdonald as his prisoner, but that the sons of 
Gillean were very bold, and that he would through 
time bridle their forwardness and insolence. One 
of Macdougall's sons, a young boy who had been 
fostered by Gillean, went to meet the sons of 
Gillean, and told them what his father had said 
about them. They were now greatly perplexed, 
but soon made up their mind. They went to 
Macdonald and told him that if he would forgive 
their crime in slaying Mackinnon and do them 
good, they would deliver him from his present 
danger, and inasmuch as he had greater power than 
their former master, they would join him and go 
along with him. He promised to accede to their 
wishes. They took him at his word, brought him 
back to his own galley, and went to the Isle of 
Mull. Macdougall saw neither him nor them. 
Macdonald gave fourscore marklands to Hector, 
the oldest brother, and to Lachlan, the youngest, 
the chamberlainship of his house. Angus Og had 
a daughter who was married to Maclean by her own 
inclination of yielding." 

The Ardgour MS. gives the traditional history 
of Lachlan Lubanach and Hector Reaganach as 
it existed among the Macleans of Mull when that 
work was written. It is as follows: — " Lachlan 



Lachlan Lubanach. 47 

Lubanach and Hector Reaganach, the sons of John 
Dubh, are said to have gone to the house of Mac- 
dougall of Lorn. They were kindly received by 
him and obtained much of his favour, but had the 
misfortune of awakening the jealousy of his former 
favourites, who formed the design of taking away 
their lives. The young men, being warned in 
time, gave their enemies the slip, and went to the 
house of Macdonald of the Isles. Here also 
their good behaviour procured them favour, but, 
as in the former case, they soon came to be hated 
by the previous favourites. The first that vented 
his ill-will against them was the laird of Mac- 
kinnon, who spoke harshly to them upon their 
return from hunting, at which they had been along 
with Macdonald. They resolved to take venge- 
ance upon their insulter whenever an opportunity 
should offer. In the course of a short time Mac- 
donald left Aros to go to the mainland, and 
Mackinnon, who had orders to follow him, was 
slain by the offended brothers as he was going on 
board of his galley. Having despatched their 
enemy, they followed Macdonald, boarded his 
galley, and made a prisoner of him. They carried 
him to the island of Garbh Eileach, or Garvellach, 
and there received from him the most satisfactory 
promises. From Garvellach they took him to 
Iona, where he solemnly vowed on certain black 
stones, which were deemed sacred, to grant them 
all their requests and to live in perpetual friend- 
ship with them. He gave them charters of lands 



48 The Clan Gillean. 

in Mull. He gave his daughter to Lachlan in 
marriage, made him his lieutenant-general, and 
assigned to the Macleans the privilege of being 
on the right wing of the army in battle."' 

According to Seannachie's History of the Mac- 
leans, Lachlan Lubanach demanded of the Lord 
of the Isles, fust o( all, full forgiveness for slaying 
Mackinnon and carrying himself off as a prisoner ; 
secondly, the hand of his daughter in marriage ; 

thirdly, that he would use his influence with Mac- 

leod to obtain one of his daughters as a wife for 
Hector; and fourthly, that he would give, as a 
dowry to his own daughter, Enisker with its 

islands. His fifth and last request was that the 
Lord of the Isles would confer upon him the 
next post o\ honor to himself both in peace 
and war. 

All the traditions about Lachlan Lubanach and 
1 lector Reagan. ich agree in affirming that they 

slew Mackinnon, carried off the Lord o\ the Isles 
as a prisoner, and compelled him to grant them 
certain lands in Mull. These assertions may all 
be regarded as facts. It is evident that the Sleat 
historian had only a vet)- imperfect acquaintance 
with the genealogy of the early Macleans. 
Lachlan and Hector were not the sons of Gil- 
lean ; they were the sons of John Dubh, great- 
grandson of Gillean. It was not Angus Og that 
was taken captive by the two Macleans, but his 
son, John, first Lord of the Isles. Hugh Mac- 
donald is correct in stating that Macdonald's 



LAC H LAN LlJBANACH. 49 

daughter was married to Maclean, or the chief of 
the clan ; but he is mistaken in calling her husband 
Hector. It is a historic fact that she was married 
to Lachlan Lubanach. The stories about the 
brittle gruthim and Enisker with its islands are 
clearly poetic embellishments and nothing more. 
There is no ground for concluding that Lachlan 
compelled the Lord of the Isles, when the latter 
had the honour of sitting on the black stones, to 
give him his daughter in marriage. It will be 
noticed that Hugh Macdonald states that Lachlan's 
wife was married to him "by her own inclination 
of yielding," or because she really wanted him. 
Hector Reaganach was not married to a daughter 
of Macleod of Lewis. It was lands, not wives, 
that Lachlan and Hector wanted. Probably they 
took it for granted that a good-looking man, 
with a charter either of Duart or Lochbuie in his 
pocket, could get a suitable wife any time without 
much difficulty. Both of them may, indeed, have 
been married men when they seized the Lord of 
the Isles. It is not at all certain that the daugh- 
ter of the Lord of the Isles was Lachlan 
Lubanach's first wife. We know that John Dubh 
was a grown-up and active man in 1325. It is 
possible, then, that his sons, Lachlan and Hector, 
were both born before the year 1330. They may, 
indeed, have been born before 1325. 

Shortly after the death of Robert Bruce in 1329, 
John Bacach received a charter of the lands of 
Lorn, Duror, Glencoe, Mull, Jura, Tiree, and Coll ; 



50 The Clan Gillean. 

all of which had been in possession of his father. 
In 1343 these lands, with the exception of the 
district of Lorn, were granted to John, Lord of 
the Isles. In 1354, John Bacach and John of the 
Isles entered into an agreement by which the 

former was to surrender tO the latter the islands of 
Mull and Jura, and the castles of Cairnburgh and 
[leburgh. John of Lorn was to place Lachlan 
Mac Alexander, [var Mae Lullt, and John Mae 
Molmari, as hostages in the hands of the Lord of 
the Isles until the lands and castles referred to 

should be actually delivered to him ; while the 

Lord of the Isles was never under any eireum- 

stances to bestow the constabulary of the castle 
of Cairnburgh upon any of the Clan Fingon, or 
the Mackinnons. Thus, the points in dispute 

between the Macdonalds and the Macdougallfl 

were settled in 1354- We are inclined to think, 

then, that it was in that year or shortly afterwards 
that the capture of the Lord of the Isles took 
place. 

It cannot be proved that the Macleans had lands 
in Mull before the time of Laehlan Lubanach and 
1 lector Reaganach ; at the same time it is tolerably 
certain that such must have been the case. There 
is a tradition among all the Macleans that Gilleain 
na Tuaighe held lands in Mull. As Neil Maclean 
was constable of Scraburgh, probably Cairnburgh, 
it is likely that he heid some lands near Cairnburgh. 
Hugh Macdonald tells us that Lachlan Lubanach 
and Hector Reaganach had some conference with 



Lachlan Lubanach. 51 

the Lord of the Isles about the island of Mull. 
The supposition that they went to Ardtornish as 
ambassadors for Macdougall of Lorn is out of the 
question ; they went simply on business of their 
own. What they wanted was evidently a title to 
some lands in Mull, which they regarded as their 
own, and which they must have held under Mac- 
dougall of Lorn. When they found that talking 
and pleading were of no use, they resolved to take 
heroic steps for gaining their ends. They found, 
in a short time, a fitting opportunity for carrying 
their purposes into effect. They slew Mackinnon, 
whom they evidently regarded as their enemy, 
seized the Lord of the Isles, and carried him off to 
seethe wonders of Iona. In the "Genealogical 
Account of the Family of Mackinnon " we find the 
following statements : — " Mackinnon of Strath- 
ordill was master of the household to John, Lord 
of the Isles. Being jealous of the rising influence 
of Lachlan and Hector Macgillean, he formed the 
project of assassinating them ; but, being made 
aware of his intention, they anticipated him, and 
murdered him at his own castle of Kilmorie ; the 
spot is still pointed out." Mackinnon could not 
dread the rising influence of the Macleans unless 
they had lands in Mull. He had lands there 
himself, and what he dreaded was that the Mac- 
leans would take some of them from him. The 
probability is that he had already suffered at 
their hands. Macdougall of Lorn detested the 
Mackinnons. He may, then, have allowed the 



52 The Clan Gillean. 

Macleans to deal with them as they pleased. It 
is extremely difficult to believe that the Macleans 
would rise at one bound to the influential position 
which they occupied in Mull in 1366. The only 
rational way of accounting for their influence then 
is the supposition that they had boon in Mull for 
some time, and that they had gradually increased 
in strength. Rome did not spring up in a day ; 
neither did the Macleans. 

Lachlan Liibanach married, in 1366, Mary, 
daughter of the fust Lord of the Isles by his wife, 

Amy Macrory. As he was related to her within 

the prohibited degrees, it was necessary for him 
to obtain a dispensation from the Pope, Urban V. 
lie was chamberlain of the household to the Lord 
of the Isles, an of\]ec which became hereditary in 
his family. He received three different charters 
from Donald, second Lord of the Isles. The first 
is a charter of the custody and constableship of the 
castle of Duart, Torosay, Brolas, and other lands 
in Mull ; half of the constableship of the castle of 
Dunconnel in Scarba ; half of the constableship of 
the castle of Dunkerd, together with the islands of 
Garvellach ; certain lands in Luing and Scarba ; 
the upper half of Jura ; lands in Morvorn ; and 
other lands. The second is a charter of the con- 
stableship and custody of the castles of Cairnburgh 
and Ileburgh, together with the small castles of 
Fladda and Lunga; Treshnish, Calgary, and other 
lands in Mull ; and the office of Fragramanach 
and Armanach in the island of Iona. The third 



Hector Roy. 



53 



is a charter of the bailiery of all the lands of Tiree ; 
certain lands in that island ; and the office of 
steward of the house to the Lord of the Isles. 
These three charters were granted at Ardtornish 
on July 1 2th, 1390. They were confirmed by 
King James I. They were confirmed again by 
King James IV., at Glasgow, on July 13th, 1495. 
Lachlan Liibanach died about 1405. He was 
succeeded in Duart by his son, Hector Roy. 

VI. Eachann Ruadh nan Cath. 

Hector, sixth chief of the Macleans, was born 
probably about the year 1367. He was known as 
Eachann Ruadh nan Cath, or Hector Roy of the 
battles. He was a distinguished warrior, and was 
one of the best swordsmen of his day. He was 
chamberlain of the household to his uncle, Donald, 
second Lord of the Isles. According to a poem 
composed by Hector Bacach Maclean in 1651, 
Hector Roy made an expedition to Ireland, 
captured a fleet, and entered the town of Dublin 
as a conqueror. To what extent these statements 
are true, it is impossible to determine. It is likely, 
however, that there was some foundation for them. 
According to a tradition recorded by Seannachie in 
his history of the Macleans, a celebrated Nor- 
wegian came to Mull and challenged the Lord of 
Duart to a duel with swords. Hector Roy met 
him at Salen, defeated, and slew him. The 
Norwegian was buried near the spot on which he 
fell. A cairn of stones beside the sea-shore is 
supposed to mark his grave. 



54 The Clan Gillean. 

The famous battle of Harlavv was fought on the 
24th of July, 141 1. Donald, second Lord of the 
Isles, had about 10,000 followers. His army was 
drawn up in the cuneiform order of battle. The 
men were on foot and were armed with swords, 
daggers, battle-axes, bows and arrows, and wooden 
shields. Donald himself commanded the main 
body, which consisted of Macdonalds, the Mac- 
kinnons, the Macleods of Harris, the Macleods of 
Lewis, and others. Hector Roy of Duart com- 
manded the right wing, and Malcolm Beag 
Mackintosh the left. John Mor Tanaistear had 
charge of the reserve, which was made up of 
Macdonalds, Mackenzies, and Camerons. The 
Earl of Mar had only a small army in comparison 
with Donald's. But the most of his men were 
trained warriors, and were on horseback. They 
were armed with long spears, maces, swords, and 
battle-axes, and were protected by coats of mail. 
The right wing was led by Sir James Scrymgeour, 
Constable of Dundee, and the left wing by Sir 
Alexander Ogilvy, Sheriff of Angus. Mar him- 
self commanded the main body. The men on 
each side were equally brave, and equally determ- 
ined to stand and fight. Scrymgeour defeated 
the left wing of the Highland army, while Hector 
Roy defeated the left wing of the Lowland army. 
Mar at the head of his mail-clad knights pene- 
trated Macdonald's centre, but was unable to rout 
the dense mass before him. The battle raged 
for a long time, and terminated only when the 



Lachlan Bronnach. 55 

darkness of night closed around the combatants. 
During the heat of the fight, Hector Roy of 
Duart and Sir Alexander Irving of Drum met 
face to face. They were both skilled swordsmen, 
and were well matched in every respect. They 
attacked each other with determination, and 
fought on until both fell mortally wounded. Of 
the Highlanders 900 lay dead upon the field of 
Harlaw. The most prominent of these, besides the 
brave Hector Roy, were Patrick Obeolan, Lachlan 
Macmillan, two or three gentlemen of the Clan 
Monroe, two gentlemen of the Clan Cameron, 
and a son of Macquarrie of Ulva. Of the fol- 
lowers of the Earl of Mar over 500 were slain ; 
among whom were Sir Alexander Ogilvy, Sir 
James Scrymgeour, Sir Thomas Murray, Sir 
Robert Maul, Sir William Abernethy, Sir Alex- 
ander Straiton, Sir Robert Davidson, James 
Lovel, Alexander Stirling, Lesley of Balquhain, 
and the valiant Sir Alexander Irving. The Earl 
of Mar was severely wounded. Hector Roy's 
body was carried home from the field of Harlaw 
by the Macinneses and Morisons, and buried in 
Iona. It is said that during several years the 
Macleans of Duart and the Irvings of Drum were 
in the habit of exchano-ino - swords on the anni- 
versary of the battle of Harlaw. 

VII. Lachainn Bronnach. 

Lachlan, son and successor of Hector Roy, was 
known as Lachainn Bronnach, or Big-bellied 



56 The Clan Gillean. 

Lachlan. He was probably about eighteen years 
of aee at the time of his father's death. He was an 
intelligent, prudent, and able man. He managed 
his affairs wisely and extended the influence and 
power of his family very much. He was with 
Alexander of the Isles in Lochaber when the latter 
was attacked and defeated by James I. in 1429. 
He was taken prisoner and confined along with 
the Lord of the Isles in Tantallon castle. He was 
not set at liberty until October, 143 1. He was 
consequently unable to take part in the battle of 
Inverlochy. 

Lachlan Bronnach had a son, named Donald, 
by a daughter of Maceachern of Kingerloch. He 
married, first, a daughter of John Borb Macleod of 
Dunvegan, and had two sons by her, Neil and John 
Garbh. He married, secondly, Janet, daughter of 
Alexander Stewart, Earl of Mar, and had one son 
by her, Lachlan Og, who, in accordance with the 
terms of the marriage contract between his father 
and mother, succeeded his father in Duart. As it 
is generally supposed that Mar's daughter was 
Lachlan Bronnach's first wife, it is necessary to 
produce some of the facts which show that such 
was not the case. 

In February, 1443, we find as witnesses to a 
charter, Lachlan, Lord of Duart, and John, his 
son, Lord of Coll ; in August, 1449, Lachlan, 
Lord of Duart, and John, his son, Lord of Coll ; 
in April, 1463, Lachlan, Lord of Duart, Lachlan, 
his son and heir, and Ewen, son of Donald of 



Lachlan Bronnach. 57 

Ardgour; in April, 1467, Lachlan, Lord of Duart, 
and Lachlan Og, Master of Duart ; in November, 
1467, Lachlan, Lord of Duart, Lachlan Og, 
chamberlain of the household to the Lord of the 
Isles, and Ewen, son of Donald of Ardgour ; in 
June, 1469, Lachlan, Lord of Duart, Lachlan Og, 
Master of Duart, and John of Coll, Lachlan's 
son ; and in 1472, Lachlan Og, Master of Duart, 
and Ewen of Ardgour. As John Garbh witnessed 
one charter in 1443 and another in 1449, and as 
Lachlan Og witnessed a charter for the first time 
only in 1463, it is clear that John Garbh must 
have been a good deal older than Lachlan Og. 

According to the Exchequer Rolls, the half of 
Bonnach and Bonnachare was, in 1458, granted for 
life to Janet Stewart, wife of Lachlan Maclean. 
As Janet Stewart was the Earl of Mar's daughter, 
and as she was Lachlan Bronnach's wife in 1458, 
it is beyond all dispute that she was Lachlan's 
second wife, and that consequently Lachlan Og, 
his son by her, was the youngest of his sons. 

Lachlan Bronnach acted with wisdom, both for 
himself and his family, in appointing Lachlan Og 
heir to Duart and the chiefship of the Clan. By 
this act he secured the friendship of the Earl of 
Mar and of the King as well ; both of whom in 
all probability used their influence to obtain for 
him the lands of Coll, and others. It is probable 
that Lachlan's marriage with Mar's daughter took 
place about the end of 1431. He died some time 
after 1472. He was Lord of Duart over sixty 
years. 8 



58 The Clan Gillean. 

VIII. Lachainn Og. 

Lachlan Og was born about the year 1432. 
He was chamberlain o( the household to the Lord 
oi' the Isles in 1407. He succeeded his father 
some time after 1472. He was Lord of Duarfl at 
least as early as 1478. 1 [e married a daughter of 
Gillespick Roy Campbell, son and heir o( Duncan, 
first Lord Campbell. He seems to haw been a 
peaceable and good man. 



CHAPTER IV. 
Doctor (Dbhar anb gachlan ttttfcmach. 

IX. Each ann Odhar. 

Hfxtor Odhar, or Hector the Swarthy, com- 
manded the Macleans at the long and sanguinary 
sea-fight of Bloody Bay, in Mull, which was 
fought about the year 1484. As Maclean of 
Ardgour was sailing up through the sound of 
Mull, he noticed Angus Og's fleet, which had just 
rounded the point of Ardnamurchan. Ardgour 
at once displayed his colours, and thus showed that 
he was ready for the contest. Angus Og con- 
cluded that the defiant galley in front of him was 
that of Hector Odhar and steered directly towards 
it. Hector Odhar, seeing his kinsman in danger, 
hastened to his relief. He was accompanied by 
the Macleods of Harris, and the Macneils of 
Barra. In the course of a few minutes the en- 
gagement became general. The result of the fight 
was that the supporters of the Lord of the Isles 
were defeated. Hector Odhar and Macleod of 



60 The Clan Gillean. 

Harris were taken prisoners. The son and heir 
of Torquil Macleod of Lewis who commanded 

the Macleods of that island was wounded by 
two arrows, and died a few days after the battle. 

Macneil of Barra fled towards Coll, and succeeded 
in making 1 his escape, though pursued by three 
galleys. 

John, the last Lord of the Isles, was deprived o{ 
his estates in May, 1404. The Macleans were 

now, in the eyes of the law, landless; but they 
did not remain in that position very long. They 

tendered their submission to James IV., and 

received charters from him of all the lands which 

they had formerly held under the Lords of the 
Isles. They were now an independent elan ; but 

their independence was really of no use to them. 

In [496, Hector Odhar, John Mae Ian of 
Ardnamurehan, Allan Mae Rorv of Moydart, 
Ewen Mae Allan of Loehiel, and Donald Mae 
Angus of KeppOCh, appeared before the Lords of 

Council in Edinburgh and bound themselves to the 

Karl of Argyll, in behalf of the King, under a 
penalty of five hundred pounds each, to refrain 
from injuring or molesting one another. The 
Council had a good Object in view; but to what 

extent they succeeded in attaining it we have no 
means of learning. It was certainly a difficult 
matter to keep the men with whom they had to deal 
in thorough order. Probably, it would require a 
good tyrant to manage them properly. We know 
that there was a bitter feud between Hector Odhar 



Lachlan Cattanach. 61 

and Allan Mac Rory, but we can give no particu- 
lars respecting it. It may be taken for granted, 
however, that the one did as much injury to the 
tenants of the other as he possibly could. 

Hector Odhar had a natural son named Lachlan, 
who was brought up among the Clan Chattan, and 
who in consequence of that fact was known as 
Lachainn Catanach,or Lachlan of the Clan Chattan 
country. According to tradition Lachlan's mother 
was a daughter of the chief of the Mackintoshes. 
On the 8th of October, 1496, Lachlan was legiti- 
mated. On the same day his father resigned the 
whole of his estates to him. Lachlan was now 
legally Lord of Duart. 

X. Lachainn Catanach. 

In the summer of 1498, King James renewed 
his visits to the Western Highlands. On this 
occasion he held court at his new castle of Kil- 
kerran in South Kintyre. Alexander Macleod of 
Dun vegan, known as Alasdair Crotach, Torquil 
Macleod of Lewis, and other land-owners, paid 
homage to him as their sovereign. He remained 
a long time at Kilkerran, and resolved, apparently 
before he left, to abandon his conciliatory policy 
towards the Islanders. At any rate, shortly after 
his return to Edinburgh he revoked all the charters 
which he had granted to those who had been 
vassals of the Lord of the Isles. Whoever the 
instigators of this harsh and unwise policy may 
have been, the men who reaped the greatest benefits 



62 The Clan Gillean. 

from it were Archibald, second Earl of Argyll, 
Alexander, son and heir of the Earl of Huntly, 
John Mac Ian of Ardnamurchan, and Duncan 
Stewart of Appin. James returned to the West 
Highlands in April, 1499, and held court at 
Tarbert Castle. He gave Archibald, Earl of 
Argyll, a commission of lieutenancy over the 
lordship of the Isles, and appointed him keeper 
o\ the eastle of Tarbert and bailie of the lands of 
Knapdale. He also empowered him to let on 
lease for three years the whole of the lordship of 
the Isles, except Kintyre and I slay. He gave 
lands to Alexander, son and heir of the Earl of 
Huntly, in Loehaber, and lands to Mac Ian of 
Ardnamurchan in [slay. Upon Duncan Stewart 
of Appin he bestowed the districts of Duror and 
Glencoe. These tyrannical proceedings alarmed 
the Islanders, and led them to rebel against the 
Government. In 1501 the Macdonalds of Glencoe 
delivered Donald Dubh, son and heir of Angus 
Og y from Ineheonnell, where he was kept a prisoner 
by his uncle, Archibald of Argyll. Donald fled 
to Lewis, and was taken under the protection of 
Torquil Macleod, who was married to Catherine, 
daughter of the first Earl of Argyll and sister of 
Donald's mother. Lachlan Cattanach of Duart, 
Ewen Mac Allan of Lochiel, John Maclean of 
Lochbuie, Gilleonan Macneil of Barra, Dunslaff 
Macquarrie of Ulva, Donald Mac Ranald Ban of 
Largie, and others, joined Torquil of Lewis in 
proclaiming Donald Dubh Lord of the Isles. It 



Lachlan Cattanach. 63 

seems, however, that the confederates committed 
no acts of hostility against the Government until 

1503. At the end of that year they invaded 
Badenoch, plundered the country, and laid it waste 
with fire and sword. They had two reasons for 
beginning- the war in that district; the first was that 
it belonged to the Earl of Huntly, and the second, 
that the Clan Chattan of Badenoch were assisting 
Huntly in his attempt to bring the inhabitants of 
Lochaber under subjection. 

King James put forth the most active efforts to 
break up the confederacy and crush the rebellion. 
He commanded Torquil Macleod of Lewis, in 
1452, to deliver up Donald Dubhtohim. Torquil 
refused, and was declared a rebel. His lands were 
at the same time confiscated. In 1503, or early in 

1504, Lachlan Cattanach of Duart and Ewen 
Mac Allan of Loch i el were declared traitors, and 
deprived of their estates, so far as the law of the 
land could deprive them of them. Immediately 
afterwards the Government sent letters to Torquil 
Macleod of Lewis, Mac Ian of Ardnamurchan, Mac- 
lean of Lochbuie, Macleod of Harris, Ranald Mac 
Allan of Moydart, Macneil of Barra, Mackinnon 
of Strath, and Macquarrie of Ulva, offering, if 
they should assist in bringing Lachlan Cattanach 
and Ewen of Lochiel to justice, to give them half 
the estates of these chiefs. As the mean and 
mischievous offer thus made had no effect, the 
Government resolved to send two armies to the 
Western Highlands in the spring of 1504. The 



64 The Clan Gillean. 

one was led by the Earl of Huntly, the Earl of 
J Lovat ; and the other by the 
Earl Marshall and the Earl of Argyll. A few- 
months afterwards the Earl of Arran was also sent 
with a militar .gainst the Islanders. At 

the same time a fleet, commanded by Sir Andrew 
. and Robert Bar- to the 

: Mull, with the result that the strong fortress 
of Cairnburgh was captured. In the spring of 1505 
the Earl ot Huntly invaded Ross-shire and made 
himself master oi the castles of Strome and Ellan- 
donan. At the same time King James led an 
army in person into Argyleshin 
fleet under the command of John Barton to the 
islands. The pre the King, and of the 

at his command, had the desired effect. 
Lachlan Cattanach ^ve up the contest and 

cast himself upon the mercy of his sovereign. As 
the Macneils of Barra and the Macquarr. 
Ulva had :he banner of Maclean of Duart 

since the forfeiture of the last Lord of the Isles, the 
submission of Lachlan Cattanach included also 
that of 'acquarrie. John Maclean 

or" Lochbuie, Macdonald of Largie, and Ewen 
Mac Allan ot Lochiel followed the example set by 
the Lord of Duart, and likewise surrendered to the 
King. Donald Dubh's first rebellion was now 
over. Torquil of Lewis refused to surrender him 
to the Government, but handed him over to Lach- 
lan Cattanach, who delivered him to the King. 
Donald was again placed in confinement. 



Lachlan C ach. 65 

On May 21st, 1505, Lachlan Cattanach re. 
a full remission for his past misdeeds. On January 
23rd, 1506, he was commanded not to intromit 
with the kirk rents pertaining to the Bishop of 
the Isles. He was also instructed to help the 
Bishop in gathering his rents. On January 2nd, 
1508, he received permission to sell the lands 

-equhoul, Auchadalyn, and others, in the lord- 
ship of Badenoch, to Alexander, Eari of Huntly. 
At the same time Ranald Mac Allan of Moydart, 
John Maclean or" Lochbuie, and himself m 
ordered not to molest Agnes Maclean, prioress of 
Iona, or the convent in that island. On the 

April, 1 5 10. Duncan Stewart, df Arpin, ob- 
tained a charter of appraising over the lands and 
castle of Duart for 4,500 marks, due to him by 
Lachlan Cattanach, the latter having power to 
em his property within seven years. In April, 
1 5 10. Lachlan received a letter of safe conduct 
himself, his kinsmen, and servants, while vis:, 
the King at Stirling, the letter to be of force during 
forty days. It is probable that Lachlan Cattanach 
was forced to part with his lands in Badenoch to 
pay the Earl of Huntly for the injuries which he 
had inflicted upon the Earl's tenants in 1502. It 
is also probable, indeed almost certain, that he 
plundered some of Duncan Stewart's lands about 
the same time, and that he was obliged to pay 
Duncan for his depredations. It is evident that 
Lachlan had no conscientious scruples about 
putting some of the Bishop's rents into his own 



66 The Clan Gillean. 

pockets, or seizing the lands which belonged to the 
monastery of Iona. He was not the only man, 
however, who was guilty of covetousness in action 
in these respects. 

In 1 513, James IV. resolved to invade England. 
He crossed the border on the 22nd of August at 
the head of the largest army that any Scottish 
king had ever yet commanded. He captured Nor- 
ham Castle and the fortresses of Wark, Etal, and 
Ford in a short time. Instead, however, of prose- 
cuting the war with vigour, he remained at Ford 
Castle for quite a long time, either to keep com- 
pany with Lady Heron, whose husband was a 
prisoner in his hands, or else to serve the flesh and 
the Devil. This attractive woman was thoroughly 
true to her country, and faithfully communicated 
full information with respect to the purposes and 
movements o( her royal slave to his enemies. In 
consequence of his delay at Ford Castle, James had 
only about 30,000 followers when he pitched his 
camp on Flodden Hill on the 6th of September. 
He was a thoroughly trained fighter and a brave 
man ; but his stubbornness, vanity, absurd notions 
of chivalry, and lack of skill as a general, utterly 
unfitted him for the position of commander-in- 
chief of an army. When Lord Patrick Lindsay, 
a warrior of experience and sense, advised that the 
King should retire from the army for the safety of 
his person, James replied in a rage that when he 
would return to Scotland he would hang Lindsay 
over his own gate. When the aged Earl of 



Lachlan Cattanach. 67 

Angus, Archibald Bell-the-Cat, warned him against 
making a rash attack upon the English, he scorn- 
fully and brutally replied, "Angus, if you are 
afraid you may go home." 

The Earl of Surrey, afterwards first Duke of 
Norfolk, hastened with an army of 31,000 men to 
meet King James. On the 9th of September he 
crossed the river Till and took up a position be- 
tween the Scots and their country. James could 
easily have attacked him while crossing the river, 
but did nothing of the kind. When he saw that 
the English had crossed it, he could have remained 
in the strong position which he occupied, at least 
for a few days. Instead of doing this, however, 
he descended to the level plain to meet his foe. 
The right wing of the Scottish army consisted of 
Campbells, Macleans, Mackenzies, Macdonalds, 
and other clans, and was commanded by Archibald 
Campbell, second Earl of Argyll, and Matthew 
Stewart, second Earl of Lennox. The centre was 
commanded by the King in person, and the left 
wing by the Earls of Huntly and Home. The left 
wing of the English army was led by Sir Edward 
Stanley ; the centre, by Surrey in person ; and the 
right wing, by Sir Edmund Howard and Lord 
Thomas Howard, Surrey's sons. The Earl of 
Bothwell had charge of the Scottish reserve, and 
Lord Dacre of the English reserve. Huntly and 
Home defeated Edmund Howard ; while Thomas 
Howard, assisted by Lord Dacre and his cavalry, 
defeated Crawford and Montrose. King James, 



68 The Clan Gillean. 

who had the best armed of the Scottish troops 
under his command, was driving back the Earl of 
Surrey, and throwing his squadrons into confusion. 
At this juncture Thomas Howard and Lord Dacre 
attacked his flank, but were kept in check by the 
Earl of Bothwell and the Scottish reserve. Stan- 
ley routed the division under Argyll and Lennox 
with great slaughter. He was now at liberty to 
make an attack upon the rear of the Scottish 
army. This attack decided the fate of the day, 
and also of King James and the brave men who 
fought around him ; the Scots were defeated and 
driven back to their own country. 

King James and about 10,000 of his followers 
were slain at Flodden ; the English lost about 
7,000. Among the prominent men who fell with 
James were the Earls of Crawford, Montrose, 
Lennox, Argyll, Bothwell, Caithness, Rothes, and 
Cassilis ; Hector Odhar, chief of the Clan Gillean ; 
Sir Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy ; Sir William 
Gordon of Gight ; George and William Douglas, 
sons of the Earl of Angus ; Sir John Sommerville 
of Cambusnethan ; and Andrew Stewart, Bishop 
of Caithness. It is said that two hundred gentle- 
men of the name of Douglas lay dead upon the field 
of battle, and that of the followers of the Earl of 
Caithness only one man ever returned home. It is 
affirmed by some writers that the Earl of Huntly 
fled from the field after the first charge, and that 
Lord Home and his followers began to collect all 



Lachlan Cattanach. 69 

the plunder they could find. Whether these 
charges be true or false, Huntly and Home re- 
turned to Scotland. 

Hector Odhar was a born fighter, an experienced 
commander, and a highly popular chief. He 
seems, however, to have been rather too fond of 
disturbance and war. At all events, he was known 
as Eachann Odhar nan Imreasan, or Hector Odhar 
of the strifes. He was about fifty-eight years of 
age at the time of his death. 

A few weeks after the battle of Flodden, Lach- 
lan Cattanach — who was now chief of the Clan 
Gillean — Malcolm Macleod of Lewis, Alexander 
Macleod of Harris, Alexander Macdonald of Islay, 
John Maclean of Lochbuie, Wiland Chisholm of 
Comar, and Alexander Macdonald of Glengarry 
proclaimed Sir Donald of Lochalsh Lord of the 
Isles, and raised the standard of rebellion against 
the Government. As Lachlan Cattanach was 
followed, not only by the occupants of his own 
estates, but also by the Macleans of Ardgour, the 
Macneils of Barra, the Mackinnons, and the Mac- 
quarries, he was by far the most powerful of Sir 
Donald's supporters. He was also ably assisted 
by his paternal uncle, Donald, who was a warrior 
of the same stamp as the brave Hector Odhar. 
In November, 15 13, Sir Donald of Lochalsh, 
or Domhnall Gallda, opened the campaign by 
invading Glenurchart. He was accompanied by 
his own immediate followers, the Chisholms of 
Strathglass, and the Macdonalds of Glengarry. 



70 The Clan Gillean. 

He seized the castle of Urchart and plundered all 
the lands near it. About the same time Lachlan 
Cattanach and Alexander Macleod of Dunvegan 
besieged and captured the royal garrisons of Cairn- 
burgh and Dunskaich. 

On the breaking out of the rebellion, Colin, 
third Earl of Argyll, was ordered to proceed 
against Lachlan Cattanach and those who sup- 
ported him, while Mackenzie of Kin tail and 
Munro of Foulis were instructed to preserve order 
and peace in Western Ross. At the same time 
Ewen Mac Allan of Lochiel and William Mac- 
kintosh, captain of the Clan Chattan, were 
guardians of Lochaber. Early in 15 15 John Mac 
Ian of Ardnamurchan was commissioned to treat 
with the less violent of the rebels, and to promise 
them forgiveness for their crimes on condition of 
obeying the Government for the future and 
making restitution to those whose lands had been 
plundered by them. The rebellion now speedily 
collapsed. On the 23rd of August, we find a 
respite granted to Sir Donald of Lochalsh to 
enable him to go to Edinburgh and return in 
safety. While in Edinburgh he was reconciled to 
John, Duke of Albany, Regent of the kingdom, 
and pardoned for his rebellious acts. On the 6th 
of September, 1 5 1 5, Albany granted a respite to 
Lachlan Cattanach and Macleod of Dunvegan for 
all their treasonable deeds, the respite to continue 
in force until the first day of January. On the 6th 
of January, 15 16, Lachlan and Macleod, together 



Lachlan Cattanach. 71 

with their kinsmen and friends to the number 
of one hundred persons, received a respite which 
was to last until the 1 5th day of March. They had 
permission to visit Edinburgh or any other place 
in the kingdom on lawful business, within that 
period. On the 30th of March, Sir Donald of 
Lochalsh came under obligation to the Lords of 
Council to make redress for all the slaughter and 
depredations committed by himself or Lachlan 
Maclean of Duart, and their kinsmen, friends, 
and assistants, against John Mac Ian of Ardna- 
murchan and his people. It is thus evident that the 
Macleans had taken part in plundering expeditions 
to Ardnamurchan, and that they had been insti- 
gated to do so by Sir Donald. They had no 
quarrel of their own with John Mac Ian. 

About the beginning of the year 15 17 the Knight 
of Lochalsh was again in open rebellion against 
the Government. He succeeded in persuading 
Lachlan Cattanach, Malcolm Macleod of Lewis, 
Alexander Macleod of Harris, John of Lochbuie, 
and Alexander Macdonald of Islay that he had 
been appointed lieutenant of the Isles by the 
Duke of Albany. Having procured the support 
of these restless leaders, he invaded Ardnamurchan 
at the head of a large body of men and took 
possession of the castle of Mingarry. The Gov- 
ernment sent him a peremptory order to withdraw 
from that district at once and deliver up the castle 
to its rightful owner. Instead of complying with 
this order, he razed the castle to the ground and 



72 The Clan Gillean. 

ravaged the whole country with fire and sword. 
The Macleans and the Macleods of Harris had by 
this time found out that Sir Donald had deceived 
them. They also clearly saw that he was playing 
the part of a madman, and that he was leading 
himself and his followers to utter ruin. The result 
was that they withdrew from all connection with 
him, and joined the Earl of Argyll in opposing 
him. Lachlan Cattanach and Macleod of Harris 
resolved to apprehend him ; but as he had dis- 
covered their purpose, lie succeeded in making his 
escape. They captured his two brothers, however, 
and sent them as prisoners to Edinburgh. 

The Earl of Argyll, Lachlan of Duart, John of 
Lochbuie, and Macleod of Harris sent petitions 
to the Regentand Lords of" Council with reference 
to the rebellion, and making certain requests for 
themselves. These petitions were considered and 
acted upon in March, 151 7. The Earl of Argyll 
was appointed lieutenant of the Isles and the 
adjacent mainland, except the Isles of Bute and 
Arran and those parts of Lochaher which belonged 
to Huntly, Mackintosh, or Lochiel. He was at 
the same time empowered to promise remission for 
their offences, and the restitution of their lands, to 
all who should submit to him, except Sir Donald of 
Lochalsh and the Macdonalds who had supported 
him. He was also commissioned to pursue the 
rebels with fire and sword. On the 8th of March 
Lachlan of Duart received a tack for eleven 
years of all the lands which had formerly belonged 



Lachlan Cattanach. 73 

to him in Mull and Morvern. On the ioth, he 
was empowered to raise and gather all the tenants 
who had obeyed him in the time of the late King, 
for the weal of the kingdom and his own just 
quarrels, but not for the purpose of fighting against 
the King, the Regent, or the Earl of Argyll, the 
King's lieutenant. On the 12th, Laehlan, Donald 
Maclean, his uncle, Gilleonan Macneil of Barra, 
Neil Mackinnon of Mishnish, Lachlan Mac Ewen 
of Ardgour, and their kinsmen and servants, re- 
ceived a full remission for all the illegal acts 
committed by them before that date. On the 14th 
Lachlan received a gift of the rents of the lands of 
Tiree, and was appointed collector of the King's 
dues south of Ardnamurchan, except from the lands 
which belonged to John Mac Ian of Ardnamurchan. 
Macleod of Dunvegan and Maclean of Lochbuie 
were pardoned and allowed to retain possession of 
their estates. 

In his petition to the Lords of Council, Lachlan 
Cattanach expressed a desire to have the two 
brothers of Sir Donald of Lochalsh executed for 
their crimes. It is impossible to believe for a single 
moment that Lachlan really wished to have these 
young men punished ; he could have no ill-will 
against them, and he could gain nothing by their 
death. It may be taken for granted, then, that it 
was owing to the influence of the Earl of Argyll, 
or some other person who was anxious to see the 
power of the Macdonalds utterly destroyed, that 
the horrible request to have Sir Donald's brothers 



74 The Clan Gillean. 

put to death appeared in Lachlan's petition. 
When the request was considered by the Lords of 
Council, Huntly, Lennox, Drummond, Ogilvy, 
Balwearie, and Ker voted in favour o\ leaving the 
fate of Sir Donald's brothers to the decision of 
the Regent ; while Argyll, Cassilis, Erskine, 
Borthwick, Avondale, Lees, Kincavil, and Otter- 
burn voted in favour oi~ having them dealt with 
according to their demerits. The desire o\ the 
majority was carried into effect, and the young 

nun accordingly put to death. When we con- 
sider the way in which the Earl oi~ Argyll, and 
Cassilis and Lrskine, who were married to his 
sisters, voted, wt eau scarcely have any doubt 
respecting the authorship of that part o( Lachlan 
Cattanach's petition which asked for the execution 
o\ Lochalsh's brothers. 

While Lachlan o\ Puart was in Edinburgh in 

March, 1317, he promised under oath in presence 

o\~ the Lords o( Council that he would he true to 
the King, to the Regent, and the realm ; that he 
would cause the holy kirk to be answered and 
obeyed within his bounds; that he would assist, 
supply, and help the Earl of Argyll, lieutenant of 
the Isles, in governing and maintaining good rule 
in the islands and districts over which he had 
charge ; and, finally, that as far as it was possible 
for him to do so, he would keep peace and ad- 
minister justice among the King's lieges. We have 
reason to believe that he acted in accordance with 
these promises. 



Lachlan Cattanach. 75 

In 1523 Lachlan Cattanach, having obtained a 
letter of safe conduct from the Government, paid 
a visit to Edinburgh. While asleep in his bed at 
night, Sir John Campbell of Calder and a number 
of his followers entered his room and assassinated 
him. He was about forty-eight years of age. 

TRADITIONAL HISTORY OF LACHLAN CATTANACH. 

The first tradition respecting Lachlan Cattanach 
has reference to his early life. Seannachie tells us 
that while he was still quite young, and living 
among his mother's people, he acted in such a 
wicked and cruel manner on two different occasions 
that he narrowly escaped being put to death by 
persons whom he had grossly injured. — It is certain 
that Seannachie did not find this story in any old 
manuscript or any old work of any kind. There 
is no ground whatever for believing it to be true. 
We suspect that it is not true— that it is simply a 
late invention. 

The second tradition with regard to Lachlan 
Cattanach refers to his election to the chiefship of 
the clan. This tradition also makes its appearance 
in print for the first time in Seannachie's work. 
That writer informs us that when Lachlan came 
to Mull the leading men among the Macleans held 
a council to consider what to do with him. Some 
were in favour of excluding him from the succession 
to the chiefship, on the ground of his depravity 
and wicked conduct. The majority, however, 
entertaining strong hopes that time would improve 



76 The Clan Gillean. 

his disposition and render his conduct somewhat 
tolerable, voted in his favour. Consequently, he 
was acknowledged as heir and successor to his 
father. — This tradition is no doubt founded upon 
facts. Seannachie, however, does not give the 
facts. But we have no reason to charge him with 
suppressing them ; it is tolerably certain that he 
did not know them. 

That there were men among the Macleans — and 
probably a large number — who wished to exclude 
Lachlan from the chiefship o( the clan may be 
regarded as a fact. It was inn his wickedness, 

however, but his being a natural son, that consti- 
tuted the ground o\ their opposition to him. In 
1496 his father procured an act o\ legitimation for 
him, and immediately afterwards gave Over the 
estates to him. His Opponents were now under 
the necessity o\ accepting the situation in which 
they were placed and making the best oi it. The 
fact that, in spite o\ his illegitimacy, the majority 
of the Macleans were willing to accept him as 
their chief, clearly shows that Lachlan could not 
have been such a notoriously wicked wretch as is 
generally supposed. 

The third tradition with regard to Lachlan 
Cattanach is well known to everyone. It refers 
to his treatment of his wife, Elizabeth Campbell. 
The oldest version of it is in a Campbell 
manuscript written in 1779. According to this 
manuscript, Lachlan placed his wife on a bare rock 
in the sea in the full expectation that she would be 



Lachlan Cattanach. 77 

overwhelmed and drowned by the incoming- tide. 
A person who happened to be passing by in a boat 
heard her cries, delivered her from her perilous 
position, and conveyed her to her friends. As 
soon as the men who had placed her on the rock 
returned to Duart Castle, they kindled a large fire 
on the middle of the hall floor, and formed them- 
selves into a circle around it. Then they seized 
John, second son of Colin, third Earl of Argyll, 
stripped him naked, and placed him between them- 
selves and the fire. He was only three or four 
years of age, and had been living with his aunt, 
Lachlan Cattanach's wife. His cruel tormentors 
kept rubbing his skin with a hot roasted apple, 
and compelled him to run around between them- 
selves and the fire. His nurse rushed into the 
hall, between the legs of Macgillivray of Glen- 
cannir, snatched up the boy, and ran to the shore 
with him, where she accidentally found a boat, in 
which she was carried to a place of safety. Owing 
to the treatment which little John Campbell had 
received at the hands of the ferocious Macleans, 
there were blue marks on his body ever afterwards. 
In consequence of this fact he was called Iain 
Gorm, or Blue John. He was the progenitor of 
the Campbells of Lochnell. Macgillivray was 
more humane than the Macleans, and consequently 
parted his legs for the express purpose of allowing 
the nurse to have access to the child. When Sir 
John Calder heard of the barbarous manner in 
which his sister and nephew had been treated, he 



78 The Clan Gillean. 

resolved to slay Lachlan Cattanach as soon as he 
should have an opportunity of doing so. Some 
time afterwards he met Lachlan in Edinburgh and 
thrust his sword, scabbard and all, through his 
body. 

It" the men who placed Duart's wife on the rock 
acted, on their return, towards a child of three or 
four years of age in the manner described in the 
Campbell manuscript of 1779, it is quite clear that 
they must have .irunk as any men who could 

keep on their feet before a tire, or anywhere else, 
could possibly be. We do not wonder that the 
nurse found an opening in the circle. The wonder 
is that there was only one gap in it, and that the 
little Campbell boy was the only p >rched 

by the fire. The Macdonalds of Sleat had three 
chieftains in whose names the word gorm ap; 
Donald Gorm, Donald Gorm Mor, and Donald 
Gorm Ogr, Were these chieftains also men who 
had been tattooed by apple juice ? The general 
belief is that they were handsome blue-eyed men. 
Is it not possible, then, that John Gorm of Loch- 
nell was likewise a handsome man, and that he had 
blue eyes? The Campbells were not Iberians. It 
is probable that Lachlan Cattanach was as good a 
swordsman as Campbell of Calder. Is it reason- 
able, then, to believe that Calder did not think it 
worth while to unsheathe his sword to attack 
Lachlan ? Among the State Papers of England 
there is a letter which was written to Henry VIII. 
by a number of Highland chiefs and chieftains 



Lachlan Cattanach. 79 

in 1545. In that letter the following sentence 
occurs: — "The Lord Maclean's father was cruelly 
murdered under trust in his bed in the town of 
Edinburgh by Sir John Campbell of Calder, brother 
to the Earl of Argyll." According to this state- 
ment — which is undoubtedly true — Calder was not 
quite so chivalrous and valiant a hero as the writer 
of the manuscript o( 1779 would have us believe. 
According to the Pennycross MS., Lachlan 
Cattanach's wife tried to persuade her husband to 
make over the Duart estates to her brother, John 
of Calder. When she found that he would not 
take her advice, she attempted to poison him. 
Lachlan, then, placed her on the rock, which has 
been ever since known as the Lady's Rock, to 
suffer for her wickedness and murderous intentions. 
According to another Maclean version of the s: 
Argyll's daughter was in love with another man, 
and was unwilling to marry Lachlan Cattan:.ch. 
At last, however, urged on by the hope that she 
could exert an influence over him which would be 
favourable to the interests of her father's family, 
she consented to become his wife. She would not, 
however, part with her lover. She had him dis- 
guised as a monk and passed him off as her 
confessor. When Lachlan found out who his 
wife's confessor reallv was, he was ereatlv enraged, 
and upbraided his wife for her infidelity. This 
was the beginning oi their quarrel. Another 
thing which turned him against his wife was the 
fact that she was constantly plotting against him. 



80 The Clan Gillean. 

and trying- to get his estates alienated from the 
Macleans and made over to her own people. 
There was also a third source of trouble. While 
Lachlan's wife would be on some occasions very 
pleasant, she would be on other occasions ex- 
ceedingly sulky and refuse to sleep with him. 
Lachlan's foster-brothers were deeply grieved on 
account o( his domestic infelicity, and resolved to 
put an end to it. So, on a certain day, Lachlan 
being away from home, they took his wife out to 
the Lady's Rock, and left her there to repent of 
her sins and die. — There is no ground for think- 
ing that Lachlan's wife tried to poison her hus- 
band. The story about the lover disguised as a 
monk is evidently a myth. 

Seannachie informs us that Lachlan Cattanach 
fell desperately in love with a daughter of Maclean 
of Treshnish, and that in order to be able to marry 
her he resolved to get rid of his wife, whom he 
disliked and treated with brutal cruelty. On a 
certain day he was in excellent humour, and showed 
every possible attention to his wife. In the evening 
he asked her to go with him on an excursion on 
the water near the castle. His galley was manned 
by a few persons to whom he had communicated 
his nefarious purpose. He placed his wife on a 
rock which has been ever since known as the Lady's 
Rock, and left her there to perish. As soon as 
he returned, one of those who had been with him 
reported the state of matters to some of Lachlan's 
best friends. These men immediately despatched 



Lachlan Cattanach. 8 i 

a boat to the Lady's Rock, took the doomed woman 
on board, and went with her to Lorn. Lachlan, 
not knowing that his wife had been rescued, pre- 
tended that she had died suddenly. He filled an 
empty coffin with something or other, and went to 
Inverary to have it buried there. The Campbells 
met him at Glenara, and professed to be as deeply 
grieved over the sudden death of his wife as him- 
self. When the funeral party arrived at Inverary, 
Lachlan was invited by the Earl of Argyll to go 
in to the castle with him to partake of some 
refreshment. When he entered the dining-hall he 
found his wife sitting at the head of the table, and 
ready to entertain him. 

Lachlan Cattanach was by no means a fool ; he 
was a man of both ability and sense. It is pretty 
certain, then, that if he intended to drown his wife 
he would not accompany her to the rock. As he 
would not wish to be blamed for her death he would 
stay at home and leave others to put her out of the 
way. The supposition that he went to Inverary 
with a bodyless coffin is outrageously absurd. 
What would he have done if the Campbells had 
desired to see the remains? But even if his wife 
were dead and her body in a coffin, why should 
he take the coffin to Inverary? The Macleans 
buried their dead in Iona. If, then, there was a 
mock funeral, there was a mock burial, and it must 
have taken place in Mull. Seannachie's story 
about the funeral procession to Inverary is beyond 
all doubt absolutely false. He had no foundation 



82 The Clan Gillean. 

for it except the poetic fancies of Joanna Baillie 
and Thomas Campbell. There is no reference to 
it in the Campbell manuscript of 1779. 

According to " The House of Argyll and the 
Collateral Branches of the Clan Campbell " — a 
work published in 187 1 — Lachlan Cattanach's wife 
was delivered from her perilous position by her 
foster-father, Dugald Campbell of Corranmore, 
who happened to be on his way to pay her a visit. 
John F. Campbell of Islay tells us that Lachlan's 
wife was taken off the rock by her second brother, 
Archibald of Skipnish. He also states that after 
the death of Lachlan she was married to Archibald 
Campbell of Achinbreck, and had a son named 
John by him. 

While the traditions about Lachlan Cattanach 
and his wife contain several absurd and false state- 
ments, they may be true with regard to the main 
fact. At any rate they all agree in asserting that 
Lachlan's wife was actually placed on the Lady's 
Rock. 

Colin, first Earl of Argyll, was married about 
the year 1457, or according to John F. Campbell 
of Islay, about 1460. He had a large family. 
Archibald, his son and successor, may not have 
been his eldest child. It is probable, however, 
that Archibald was married about 1485. He had 
four sons and six daughters. Elizabeth, the 
youngest of his daughters, may have been born in 
1497 ; it is certain that she was not born much 
earlier. Lachlan Cattanach got into serious diffi- 



Lachlan Cattanach. 83 

culties, early in 1517, by joining Sir Donald of 
Lochalsh, or Domhnall Gallda, in his mad projects. 
He stood in great need of Argyll's assistance, to 
interfere with the Government in his behalf. But 
Argyll needed Lachlan's assistance. If he could 
get the Macleans to support him, or at least to 
remain neutral, it would be much easier for him to 
crush the Macdonalds and get possession of their 
lands. That Argyll and Lachlan Cattanach were 
on very friendly terms in March, 15 17, is certain. 
If, then, Lachlan happened to be in need of a wife 
at that time, it would be only natural and proper 
that Argyll should give him his sister in marriage. 
She might help to keep her husband on the right 
track, and might also have a son who would in 
course of time become Lord of Duart. In view, 
then, of the friendly terms on which Argyll and 
Lachlan Cattanach stood towards each other in 
March, 1517, we are strongly of opinion that the 
marriage contract between Lachlan and Argyll's 
sister must have been drawn up about that time. 
But "The House of Argyll and the Collateral 
Branches of the Clan Campbell " puts the date of 
the marriage beyond all doubt ; it plainly tells us 
as a historic fact that it took place in 1517. 

The evidence brought forward to prove that 
Lachlan Cattanach placed his wife on the Lady's 
Rock to drown her, requires full and careful con- 
sideration. 

We are told, in the first place, that Lachlan was 
a monster of iniquity, and that he would therefore 



84 The Clan Gillean. 

murder his wife or any one else to serve his own 
ends. How do we know that he was a monster of 
iniquity ? It is true that Seannachie in his history 
of the Macleans states that Lachlan was " a 
worthless chief," that his violence of temper and 
neglected education led to acts of M the most savage 
cruelty," and that "he did not even possess the 
negative quality of being a brave tyrant." Where 
did Seannachie get his information? It is certain 
that he did not find it in old manuscripts or in 
official documents. All known facts go to show 
that Lachlan Cattanach was just as good a man as 
the other chiefs of his day, that he was of a cool 
temper, that he was kind to his followers, and that 
he was a warlike and brave man. It is true that 
he could not sign his name ; it does not follow, 
however, that his education had been neglected. 
He had certainly the knowledge and training 
deemed necessary for his position. Seannachie 
had no ground whatever for his charges against 
him. That he had heard some bad stories about 
him, we admit. He had no right, however, to 
convert these stories into historic facts, and publish 
them as such. So far as known, Lachlan Cattanach 
never murdered any one. It is utterly unreason- 
able, then, to believe, without clear proof, that he 
had murderous intentions towards his wife. 

We are told, in the second place, that Lachlan 
Cattanach had very strong motives for purposing 
to murder his wife. It is said that he disliked her 
and wanted to get rid of her ; that he had no 



Lachlan Cattanach. 85 

children, and that, like Napoleon, he was anxious 
to have an heir ; and that he was passionately 
in love with Treshnish's daughter and desired to 
marry her. 

It is quite possible that Lachlan Cattanach dis- 
liked his wife, that he could not honestly pray for 
long life and prosperity to her, and that he could 
wish to see her in the grave. It does not follow, 
however, that feelings of this kind would lead him 
to place her on the Lady's Rock to be drowned. 
The body might float ashore and his crime be 
discovered. If it should be found out that he had 
murdered his wife, the best men among his own 
followers would turn against him, while the Earl 
of Argyll would become his bitterest enemy. It 
may be safely affirmed that mere dislike to his wife 
could never tempt Lachlan to murder her. The 
supposition that Lachlan Cattanach was extremely 
anxious to have an heir, is preposterous in the ex- 
treme. When he married Elizabeth Campbell in 
15 17, he had two sons who were nearly grown-up 
men, Hector Mor and Ailein nan Sop. The story 
about his falling violently in love with Treshnish's 
daughter, after his marriage with Elizabeth Camp- 
bell, is entirely false. It is admitted both by the 
Macleans and the Campbells — even by Seannachie 
himself — that Treshnish's daughter was the mother 
of Hector Mor and Ailein nan Sop. She was 
thus Lachlan's first wife. 

We are told, in the third place, that there is a 
tradition in Argyleshire to the effect that Lachlan 



86 The Clan Gillean. 

Cattanach placed his wife on the Lady's Rock in 
the full expectation that she would be drowned, 
that the tradition is old, and that consequently it 
must be true. — It is by no means certain that the 
tradition which represents Lachlan Cattanach as 
trying to drown his wife, is old. Probably the 
earliest work in which it is recorded is the Campbell 
manuscript of 1779. The writer of that work gives 
no authority for his narrative except "common 
report." If the common report in 1779 were that 
Lachlan Cattanach had actually drowned his wife 
at the Lady's Rock about 15 19, it would probably 
be true. But that was not the report It was 
admitted that Lachlan's wife was not drowned ; 
what was affirmed was that Lachlan wanted to 
drown her. Thus, the report in circulation had 
reference, not to an actual occurrence, but to the 
purposes of a man's heart. We cannot always 
trust common report with regard to actual events ; 
how, then, can we trust it with regard to thoughts 
and intentions ? 

It is possible that the Macleans placed Elizabeth 
Campbell on the Lady's Rock. But they may 
have placed her there simply to drive her out of 
Mull. They could have no motives for drowning 
her ; but they might have motives — and very strong 
motives from their point of view — for sending her 
back to Inverary. It is quite likely that there was 
a good deal of dissatisfaction with their chief 
among them. They would blame him for his acts 
of rebellion and for bringing himself into a position 



Lachlan Cattanach. 87 

in which it was necessary for him to support the 
Campbells against the Macdonalds. They would 
very probably look upon him as a tool in the hands 
of Argyll. They would also be dissatisfied with 
his wife, and might look upon her as a source of 
danger to their clan. It is strongly probable that 
when Lachlan married her he came under obliga- 
tion, if he should have a son by her, to make her 
son his heir, and thus disinherit Hector Mor. The 
Macleans would naturally wish that she would 
never have a son. All things considered, they may 
have sent her to the Lady's Rock, and thence to 
Lorn, just to get rid of her. If they had really 
intended to drown her, they would no doubt have 
carried their purpose into effect. 

While it is possible that the Macleans sent 
Lachlan Cattanach's wife out of Mull, the proba- 
bility is that she left of her own accord. Love 
had nothing to do with uniting Lachlan and 
Elizabeth Campbell in marriage. It was the 
political craft of the Earl of Argyll that brought 
them together as man and wife. Consequently, 
it is not necessary to assume that Lachlan was a 
brute, or that his wife was a dabbler in poison, to 
account for their separation. It is probable that 
they were not happy together and that they could 
not be very anxious to remain together. Lachlan's 
wife, then, may have desired to be rid of Lachlan 
just as much as Lachlan desired to be rid of her. It 
is certain that she must have felt exceedingly un- 
comfortable in Duart. She may even have heard 



88 The Clan Gillean. 

whispers of ugly threats against her life. She 
was in no danger from Lachlan Cattanach, but she 
may have been in danger from others. According 
to "The House of Argyll and the Collateral 
Branches of the Clan Campbell," she was taken 
away from the Lady's Rock by her foster-father, 
Dugald Campbell. According to Campbell of 
I slay, she was taken off the rock by her brother, 
Archibald of Skipnish. According to the Camp- 
bell manuscript o( 1779, the nurse of John Gorm 
Campbell fled from Duart with her charge on the 
same night on which her mistress was placed on 
the Lady's Rock. If, then, Lachlan Cattanach's 
wife was carried away from the Lady's Rock, 
either by her foster-father or her brother, is it not 
probable that her deliverer had come to the rock 
for the very purpose of taking her away ? Again, 
if John Gorm's nurse found a boat at the shore, 
at the very moment in which she needed a boat, 
is it not likely that the boat was actually waiting 
for her where she found it ? The story which 
states that she broke through a circle of ferocious 
Macleans, snatched up John Gorm, ran off to the 
shore with him, and immediately found a boat by 
accident, is absurd. The traditions with regard to 
Lachlan and his wife clearly teach two things ; 
first, that his wife had some friends in Mull who 
conveyed her to the Lady's Rock ; and, secondly, 
that she was met there by her foster-father and her 
brother and taken to Lorn. In 1523 Sir John 
Campbell of Calder slew Lachlan Cattanach, and 



Lachlan Cattanach. 89 

thus set his sister at liberty to get a second 
husband. 

Dean Munro, who travelled through the Western 
Islands in 1549, gives a very minute account of 
the islands and rocks of that region ; but makes 
no reference to Sgeir na Baintighearna, or the 
Lady's Rock. If he had heard that the chief of 
the Macleans had tried to drown his wife on it, it 
is exceedingly probable that he would have stated 
that there was such a rock, and that he would, also, 
have mentioned the circumstance from which it 
derived its name. 

We have now examined all the facts and tra- 
ditions which have any bearing upon the charge 
of murderous intentions made against Lachlan 
Cattanach. Judging by the evidence before us, 
the only conclusion at which it is possible for us 
to arrive with respect to him is, Not guilty. 



CHAPTER V. 
Sector ittor an) Rector Og. 

XI. Eachann Mor. 

Hector Mor was born about the year 1497. He 
was on terms of close friendship with Alexander 
Macdonald of Islay and the Glens, Alasdair Mac 
Iain Chathanaich, and married his eldest daughter, 
probably about 1520. He became Lord of Duart 
in 1523. He hated the Campbells for murdering 
his father, and for other wrong acts of their 
aggressive policy ; and was ready to attack them 
whenever a favourable opportunity should offer. 
He could always count upon the assistance of the 
Macdonalds of Islay, and indeed upon that of all 
the Macdonalds of the South Isles. He would have 
invaded the lands of the Campbells immediately 
after his father's death, but was prevented from 
doing so by the interference of the Government. 

In May, 1520, Alexander of Islay obtained from 
John Campbell of Calder a grant for a term of 
five years of forty-five marklands in Islay, and the 



Hector Mor. 91 

whole of Jura and Colonsay. On the 25th of 
December, 1524, we find a remission granted to 
Calder for having- laid waste the lands of Colonsay. 
The acts for which the remission was granted were 
no doubt committed either in the autumn of 1523 
or the spring of 1524. Thus, the Campbells began 
to attack the Macleans and the Macdonalds of 
Islay about the same time. They first slew Lach- 
lan Cattanach, and then plundered Colonsay. The 
friendship which existed between the Macleans 
and the Macdonalds was evidently a source of 
annoyance to them. They may also have been 
anxious to provoke a fresh rebellion. In June, 
1527, the Government granted a letter to " Hector 
Maclean of Duart, son and heir of the late Lachlan 
Maclean of Duart, charging the Sheriff of Inver- 
ness to command Colin, Earl of Argyll, Sir John 
Campbell of Calder, and their accomplices, to make 
no hosting convocation of the lieges, or invasion 
upon the said Hector Maclean of Duart, his kin, 
and friends." This letter clearly proves that, at 
the time in which it was issued, the Campbells 
were threatening to attack the Macleans. It is, 
indeed, probable that they had already committed 
some acts of hostility against them. 

When James IV. fell at Flodden in 1513, his 
son James was only two years of age. Archibald 
Douglas, sixth Earl of Angus, was practically 
Regent of the kingdom from November, 1524, 
to July, 1528, at which date James V. took the 
reins of government into his own hands. When 



92 The Clan Gillean. 

Angus held the supreme power he made grants of 
crown lands to several persons in the lordship of 
the Isles, his object evidently being to attach these 
persons to his own cause, and thus increase the 
number of his adherents. In November, 1528, 
the King and Lords of Council declared the 
grants made by Angus to be null and void, and 
decreed that for the future no grants of lands 
should be made in the Isles and adjacent mainland 
except by the advice ot the Lords of Council and 
Colin, Karl of Argyll, the King's lieutenant. 
The cancellation of the grants made by Angus, 
and the power placed in the hands o( Argyll with 
regard to future grants, caused great dissatisfaction 
among the Macleans, Macdonalds, and Other clans. 
Some of them were deprived o\ lands to which 
they had a just claim, while they were all more 
than ever at the mercy of Argyll. 

In the spring of 1527, Alexander Macdonald of 
I slay, Hector Mor of Duart, and Macdonald of 
Largie ravaged Roseneath, Craignish, and other 
lands belonging to the Campbells, and slew several 
of the inhabitants. The Campbells, under the 
command of Archibald, son and heir of the Earl 
of Argyll, retaliated upon the Macleans at once, 
and laid waste a part of Mull, the Maclean lands 
in Morvern, and the island of Tiree. They also 
put a number of persons to the sword. In the 
month of August, Argyll sent an urgent appeal 
to the Government, through his brother Calder, 
asking for a strong force to enable him to subdue 



Hector Mor. 93 

the Macleans, Macdonalds, and other rebellious 
clans. Instead of the army which he wanted, the 
Government sent him two cannons and three 
barrels of gunpowder. At the same time they 
sent a herald, named Robert Hart, to Alexander of 
Islay, with directions to summon him to lay down 
his arms, and ask him to bring his grievances 
before the King in person. Alexander refused to 
comply with these requests, and thus unwisely put 
himself and his associates in the position of being 
rebels, not only against Argyll, but against the 
King as well. At the very time in which the 
Macleans and Macdonalds of Islay were in re- 
bellion in the South Isles, the Macleods of Harris 
and the Macdonalds of Sleat were causing trouble 
in the North. Thus, the whole of the Isles were 
in a state of commotion. In the spring of 1530 
King James began to make extensive preparations 
for an expedition against the Islanders. Alarmed 
by these preparations, nine of their principal lead- 
ers sent to the King in the month of May, by the 
hands of Hector of Duart, an offer of full submis- 
sion to his authority. The King at once granted 
to them letters of protection against Argyll and 
all other opponents, so that they might have an 
opportunity of appearing before him and return- 
ing to their homes in safety. The men who had 
offered to tender their submission to the King 
were, Hector Maclean of Duart ; John Maclean of 
Lochbuie ; John Muidartach, captain of the Clan- 
ranald ; Alexander Mac Ian of Ardnamurchan ; 



94 The Clan Gillean. 

Alexander Macleod of Harris ; John Abrach Mac- 
lean of Coll ; John Macleod of Lewis ; and Donald 
Gruamach of Sleat. In the spring of 1531, 
Alexander of Islay also sent an offer of sub- 
mission to the King. In the month of June, 
Hector Mor and himself appeared before the King 
in Stirling, and "in the most humble manner 
offered their service " to him. Alexander was 
pardoned on the 7th of June, and ordered to set at 
liberty all the men belonging to the Earl of Argyll 
that he held as prisoners. On the following day — 
the 8th of June, 1531 — Hector Mor and his asso- 
ciates received a remission for treasonably burning 
the houses of Roseneath, Lennox, Craignish, and 
others. The other land proprietors who had 
violated the laws of the land followed the example 
of Alexander of Islay and Hector Mor, and were 
dealt with in the same lenient manner. The 
Western Islands were now once more in a state of 
peace. Colin, third Earl of Argyll, died in 1530, 
and was succeeded by his son Archibald. We 
find that on the 17th of March, 1532, the Govern- 
ment granted to Archibald, Earl of Argyll, and 
eighty-two others, remission for the depredations 
committed by them in Mull, Morvern, and Tiree, 
on condition that the Earl should give satisfaction 
to " Donald Ballo Mac Auchin, Donald Crum 
Mac Cownane, and Farquhar Mac Sevir." 

About 1533 Hector Mor captured an English 
ship, and for his services received from King James 
a remission of the rents and duties of the island of 



Hector Mor. 95 

Tiree. Shortly afterwards the Clanranald com- 
plained to the Lords of Council of the aggressive 
acts of Hector Mor and his two brothers, Ailein 
nan Sop and Patrick. Hector was compelled to 
give securities for proper behaviour on his own 
part towards the Clanranald, and to become security 
himself for his brothers. On the 9th of January, 
1540, Hector Mor appeared before the King at 
Linlithgow and resigned all his lands in favour of 
his son and heir, Hector Og, reserving of course a 
life interest for himself. The lands thus placed in 
the King's hands were erected into the barony of 
Duart, and, according to the terms of resignation, 
conveyed by charter to Hector Og. On the nth 
of February, Hector Mor received a respite for all 
past crimes, the respite to continue in force for 
nineteen years. In November, 1542, he received a 
charter of the lands of Kilmichael and Kilmore in 
Islay. The lands were granted in life rent to him- 
self and in fee and heritage to his heir. Hector Og. 
In May, 1540, James V. sailed with a fleet of 
twelve large ships from Leith to the Orkney 
Islands, and thence along the western coast of 
Scotland to the Clyde. He landed in several places 
in the islands and on the adjacent mainland. He 
apprehended Donald Mackay of Strathnaver and 
carried him along with him. He received volun- 
tary visits from Rory Macleod of Lewis, Alexander 
Macleod of Harris, John Muidartach, Alexander 
Macdonald of Glengarry, John Mackenzie of Kin- 
tail, Hector Mor of Duart, and James Macdonald 



96 The Clan Gillean. 

of Islay. These imperious rulers were also under 
the necessity of accepting - a free passage from 
him and accompanying him on his voyage. He 
set some of them at liberty without much delay, 
but brought others to Edinburgh and kept them 
there as long as he lived. King James died in 
1542, and was succeeded by his infant daughter, 
Mary Queen of Scots. Early in 1543 Donald 
Dubh was allowed to escape from Edinburgh 
Castle, where he had been confined during the last 
thirty-seven years, and was once more at liberty to 
assert his claim to the lordship of the Isles and 
the earldom of Ross. Shortly after Donald 
Dubh's escape from Edinburgh, the Earl of Arran, 
Regent of the kingdom, liberated the turbulent 
chiefs and chieftains who had been placed in con- 
finement by James V. in 1540. Donald Dubh was 
now ready for action. He styled himself Lord of 
the Isles and Earl of Ross, and resolved to expel 
Argyll and Huntly from the lands which had be- 
longed to his grandfather, John, fourth Lord of the 
Isles. He was joined by the Macleans, Macneils, 
Mackinnons, and Macquarries, by the Macleods 
of Harris and Lewis, and by all the Macdonalds 
except James of Islay. At the head of 1800 
warriors he invaded Argyll's territories, slew quite 
a number of persons, and carried off an immense 
quantity of plunder. 

When Donald Dubh raised the standard of re- 
bellion the whole of Scotland was in a state of 
turmoil. The Protestants and Roman Catholics 



Hector Mor. 97 

were quarrelling over religious matters, while 
Henry VIII. of England was threatening to in- 
vade the country with an army and reduce it to 
subjection. The Earl of Lennox, disappointed in 
his expectations of obtaining the regency, went 
to England, and sold himself to King Henry. 
According to the terms of agreement between 
them he was to assist Henry in conquering Scot- 
land, while Henry was to appoint him Regent 
under himself. In May, 1544, an English army 
of 10,000 men, under the Earl of Hertford, landed 
at Leith and burnt the city of Edinburgh. At 
the same time Lord Evers entered Scotland at 
Berwick with 4,000 horse, and advanced to join 
Hertford, plundering the country as he marched 
along, and reducing castles, abbeys, villages, 
and farmhouses to utter ruin. In the following 
August the Earl of Lennox led an expedition 
from Bristol to the Clyde. He plundered the 
island of Arran, and reduced the village of Dunoon 
to ashes. He also made devastating excursions to 
Kintyre, Kyle, Carrick, Cunningham, and Gallo- 
way. His wrath was especially directed against 
the Earls of Arran, Argyll, and Glencairn. While 
engaged in this expedition, he entered into com- 
munication with Donald Dubh, the new Lord of 
the Isles. 

On the 23rd of July, 1545, Donald Dubh and 
his leading supporters held a meeting on the island 
of Ellancarne, or Eigg. They agreed unanimous- 
ly to recognize the Earl of Lennox -as Regent 



98 The Clan Gillean. 

of Scotland, and to send two commissioners to 
England to enter into a treaty, through the Earl 
of Lennox, with King- Henry VIII. The per- 
sons selected to go to England were Rory Mac 
Alister, dean of Morvern, and " Mr. Patrick 
Maclean, brother-german of Lord Maclean and 
justice-clerk of the South Isles." The men who 
elected them and signed their commission were, 
" Donald, Lord of the Isles and Earl of Ross ; 
Hector Maclean, Lord of Duart ; John Mac 
Alister, captain of Clanranald ; Rory Macleod of 
Lewis; Alexander Macleod of Dunvegan ; Mur- 
doch Maclean of Lochbuie ; Angus Macdonald, 
brother-german to James Macdonald ; Allan Mac- 
lean of Torloisk, brother-german to Lord Maclean ; 
Archibald Macdonald, captain of Clan Uisdein ; 
Alexander Mac Ian of Ardnamurchan ; John Mac- 
lean of Coll ; Gilliganan Macneil of Barra ; Ewen 
Mackinnon of Strathordill ; John Macquarrie of 
Ulva ; John Maclean of Ardgour; Alexander Mac 
Ranald of Glengarry ; Angus Mac Ranald of 
Knoydart ; and Donald Maclean of Kingerloch." 
Among all those influential men there was not one 
who could sign his name. Patrick Colquhoun, 
brother of Colquhoun of Luss, Walter Macfarlane 
of Ardlish, Archibald Macgillivray, vicar of Kill- 
ane, and Mr. John Carswell, afterwards Bishop of 
the Isles, were present as witnesses. Colquhoun 
and Macfarlane were agents of the Earl of Len- 
nox. Rory Mac Alister was a brother of John 
Muideartach. Allan Maclean of Torloisk was the 



Hector Mor. 99 

well-known Ailein nan Sop. Angus Macdonald 
was a brother of James Macdonald of Islay. 

Donald Dubh and his supporters had 8,000 
armed men at their command. They left 4,000 at 
home to protect their lands against Argyll and 
Huntly, and crossed over to Ireland with a fleet of 
180 galleys and 4,000 men. They held a meeting 
in the chapter house of the monastery of Greyfriars 
at Knockfergus on the 5th of August, and drew 
up articles, addressed to the King of England, 
stating their grievances, desires, and purposes. 
The commissioners from the Islanders, Rory Mac 
Alister and Patrick Maclean, appeared before 
Henry VIII. in the manor of Oatlands on the 
4th of September, and were received with great 
cordiality. The agreement arrived at was sub- 
stantially as follows : — The Lord of the Isles and 
his adherents were to serve the King of England 
truly and faithfully. They were not to come to 
any agreement with Huntly or Argyll, which 
should be prejudicial to the interests of the King 
of England. They were to place 8,000 men at the 
disposal of the Earl of Lennox, while he should 
remain in the country of the Earl of Argyll, and 
6,000 when he should be in any other part of 
Scotland. Henry was to give the Lord of the Isles 
an annual pension of 2,000 crowns, and to include 
himself and his adherents in any treaty that he 
should make with the Earl of Arran, Regent of 
Scotland. He was also to send the Earl of Lennox 
and the Earl of Ormond and Ossary with a num- 



ioo The Clan Gillean. 

ber of men to invade the Campbell districts of 
Argyleshire, and to march then to Stirling, burn- 
ing, harrying, and spoiling. Lastly, he was to pay 
3,000 of the Islesmen for the period of two months 
the same sum per day which he was accustomed to 
give to his own men. Immediately after the con- 
clusion o( the treaty the commissioners returned to 
Knockfergus. In the despatches from the Irish 
Privy Council to Henry VIII. we find the troops 
that accompanied Donald Dubh to Knockfergus 
described in the following terms: — "Three thou- 
sand oi them arc very tall men ; clothed, for the 
most part, in habergeons o( mail, and armed with 
long swords and long bows, but with few guns. 
The other thousand are tall mariners that rowed in 
the galleys." 

Some time after the arrival of the commis- 
sioners, Donald Dubh and his adherents returned 
to Scotland, where his army became dispersed. 
This result was brought about by two things. In 
the first place, the Karl of Lennox remained in 
England too long. He should have made the 
greatest possible haste to join the Islesmen. In 
the second place, the manner in which a sum of 
money, sent by the King of England, was dis- 
tributed among Donald Dubh's adherents, caused 
a good deal of grumbling. The money was 
entrusted to Hector Mor of Duart. While some 
were satisfied with the amount given to them, 
others complained that they did not receive enough. 

Lennox and Ormond sailed from Dublin on the 
17th of November with a large fleet and an army 



Hector Mor. ioi 

of 2,000 men, but did not attempt to invade the 
lands of the Campbells. They returned to Ireland 
without accomplishing anything. Shortly after- 
wards Donald Dubh died of fever at Drogheda. 
He was a brave but unfortunate man. 

When Donald Dubh was dying he commended 
his only child, a natural son, to the protection of 
the King of England. He also nominated James 
Macdonald of I slay as his successor in the lordship 
of the Isles. 

In a letter written by James of Islay on the 
10th of February, 1546, we find him ready to 
accept the position of Lord of the Isles. The 
Macdonalds, Camerons, and Ailein nan Sop were 
willing to support him ; but Hector Mor of Duart, 
Maclean of Lochbuie, Maclean of Coll, Maclean 
of Ardgour, Maclean of Kingerloch, Macneil 
of Barra, Mackinnon, Macquarrie, Macleod of 
Harris, and Macleod of Lewis refused to proceed 
any further in the vain attempt to re-establish the 
lordship of the Isles. The followers of Donald 
Dubh were never punished for their treasonable 
conduct. They were all apparently on good terms 
with the Earl of Arran, Regent of the kingdom, 
by the end of the year 1546. 

Hector Mor made extensive additions to the 
castle of Duart, and at the same time made it 
much stronger than it had been. The work was 
completed probably about the year 1547. 

According to the Pennycross MS., when Hector 
Mor was repairing his castle, the Earl of Argyll 



102 The Clan Gillean. 

threatened to invade Mull, and ordered all his 
vassals to meet him on a certain day at Clachan 
Saol. Campbell of Duntroon told him that he had 
no galley, but Argyll would take no excuse. The 
day before the invaders were to leave, Duntroon 
went to Duart and asked Hector Mor to loan him 
one of his galleys for a few days. Hector asked 
him where he was going with it. He replied that 
he was going to assist Argyll to invade Mull the 
next day. Hector at onee gave him one of his 
best galleys, and requested him to tell Argyll that 
if he should come to Duart in peace he would be 
glad to see him, but that if he should come for war 
he would be prepared to give him an opportunity 
of fighting. On the next morning Duntroon went 
to Clachan Saol, where Argyll and his vassals were 
assembled. Argyll asked him where he had been. 
He told him that as a matter of necessity he had 
to go to Mull to borrow a galley from Hector Mor, 
and that when he was asked what he was going to 
do with it he told the whole truth. He also de- 
livered Hector Mor's message. Then he advised 
Argyll to go to Mull in peace, to ask Hector Mor 
to give him his daughter in marriage, and to try 
to have a match made between Hector Mor's son 
and his own daughter. Argyll was highly de- 
lighted with Duntroon's advice, and acted at once 
in accordance with it. 

Whether Duntroon had anything to do with 
bringing about a marriage between the Earl of 
Argyll and Hector Mor's daughter or not, it is a 



Hector Mor. 103 

fact that they were married. It is also a fact that 
Hector Og and Argyll's daughter were married. 
But the two marriages did not take place at the 
same time. According to " The House of Argyll 
and the Collateral Branches of the Clan Camp- 
bell," the Earl of Argyll granted a charter of the 
estate of Craignish, in life rent, in favour of Cath- 
erine Maclean, on the 23rd of January, 1546. 
This charter determines the date of the marriage 
of Argyll with Hector Mor's daughter. Argyll 
died in 1553. On the 26th of January, 1557, 
Hector Og, with his father's consent, bestowed 
upon Janet Campbell, daughter of Archibald, Earl 
of Argyll, " Dunnowlycht, Rannochquhen," and 
other lands in Knapdale and Lochaber. Thus, 
Hector Og's marriage took place in 1557. 

In February, 1549, Hector Mor received a char- 
ter of the lands of Ardgour. Shortly afterwards 
he received a gift of the patronage of the kirks of 
Kilcomar and Kilmarrow in Islay, in the diocese 
of the Isles, and also of the kirks of Kilcolm- 
kill, and " Kilsynnye," in the diocese of Argyll. 
In June, 1553, he received a charter of the lands 
of Ulva, Laganvalsagary, and others in the shire 
of Tarbert. The charter of 1549 made Hector 
feudal lord of Maclean of Ardgour ; while the 
charter of 1553 put him in the same position to- 
wards Macquarrie of Ulva. 

Hector Mor tried to persuade Hector Maclean 
of Coll to acknowledge him as his feudal superior, 
and to follow him in all his wars and expeditions. 



104 The Clan Gillean. 

Finding that persuasion had no effect on the laird 
of Coll, he sent, in August, 1561, an armed force 
under the command oi his two sons, Hector Og 
and John Dubh, to plunder the lands o( Acha- 
lennan and Primnin. The laird o\ Coll was in 
Edinburgh at the time. 1 lector Mor's sons car- 
ried off all the horses, eattle, sheep, goats, and 

provision they could find the whole amounting in 

value to 4,000 marks. They also took possession 
of the lands they plundered, and kept possession of 
them for nearly three years and a half. In Janu- 
ary, 1565, Hector Roy, younger of Coll, appeared 
before the I Vive Council for his father, and 1 lector 
Mor for himself. Hector Mor was compelled to 
restore the lands o\ Achalennan and Drimnin to 
their lawful owner. He was also commanded not 
to oppress or molest Hector o\ Coll in any way. 

The amount to be paid by him for the depredations 

which he had committed was left to the decision 
and judgment o\ Archibald, Earl of Argyll. 

In July, 1539, Ailein nan Sop received from the 
Government a gift of the non-entry mails o\ Gigha 
and certain lands in Kintyre and [slay. In 1552, 
Hector, his son and successor, received a gift of 
the same lands. In 1554, Xeil Macneill, who had 
unquestionably a better right to Gigha than Hector 
Mac Allan, sold his claim to James Macdonald of 
Islay. Hector Mac Allan, who was in possession 
of Gigha, refused to part with it. His uncle, Hector 
Mor, took his part. The result was that Hector 
Mor and James of Islay became enemies. Shortly 



Hector Mor. 105 

afterwards they quarrelled about the Rhinns of 
Islay. The Macleans were in actual possession of 
the lands, but James of Islay had received a claim 
to them from the Crown. From hard feelings and 
angry words Hector Mor and James came to acts 
of hostility and war. In 1562 the Macdonalds of 
Islay, assisted by the Macdonalds of Sleat, invaded 
Mull, Tiree, and Coll, plundering and slaying; 
and we may feel quite sure that the Macleans paid 
them back in a similar manner. On December 
14th, 1563, we find a letter from Hector Mor read 
before the Privy Council, in which he claimed the 
Rhinns of Islay as his by right, but stated that he 
was "unable to travel to Edinburgh by reason of 
infirmity to prove his right." James of Islay 
appeared with witnesses to prove his claim to the 
Rhinns. It is just possible that Hector Mor was 
not quite so unwell as he pretended to be. At any 
rate some members of the Council were of the 
opinion that his infirmity was only feigned. In 
1564, the Privy Council determined the points in 
dispute in favour of James of Islay, but Hector 
Mor refused to accept its decision. The conse- 
quence was that James and himself continued their 
plundering raids into each other's lands. About 
the beginning of 1565 they were both summoned 
before the Privy Council and bound down, under 
a penalty of ;£ 10,000 each, to abstain from their 
barbarous warfare. James died a few months after- 
wards. In 1566 Hector Mor ravaged the island 
of Gis-ha with fire and sword. In April, 1567, 



io6 The Clan Gillean. 

Queen Mary commissioned the Earl of Argyll to 
proceed against him, and compel him to obey the 
laws of the country. It may be taken for granted 
that he made some compensation for his ravages 
in Gigha, and thus settled matters amicably with 
the Queen's lieutenant. 

Hector Mor died in 1568. He was a prominent 
man, and well fitted for taking his own part in the 
time in which he lived. He had strong intellectual 
powers, but he was arbitrary and stubborn, and 
could do exceedingly harsh things. His treatment 
of the family of Coll was utterly inexcusable. He 
was a shrewd manager, and amassed a good deal 
of wealth. He lived in princely style, and was, 
like all the Highland chiefs, given to hospitality. 

XII. Eachann Og. 

Hector Og married, in 1557, Janet, only daugh- 
ter of Archibald, fourth Earl of Argyll, by his 
wife, Mary, daughter of William Graham, six- 
teenth Earl of Menteith. He took an active part 
along with John Dubh, his brother, in the plunder- 
ings, quarrels, and wars of his father. He was 
not, however, of a warlike disposition. After his 
father's death in 1568 he led a life of ease and 
pleasure, and in a short time squandered all the 
money that had been left him. According to a 
song composed by Malcolm Macleod, third of 
Raarsay, the most bountiful hand seen by the 
Gaidels of Scotland in his day was that of Hector 
Og. By his folly and extravagance Hector Og 



Hector Og. 107 

actually plung-ed his estate into debt. He died 
some time after May 14th, 1573. He was suc- 
ceeded by his famous son, Lachlan Mor. 



CHAPTER VI. 

XIII. Lachainn Mor Dhubhairt. 

Lachlan Mor of Duart, only son of Hector Og 
and Janet Campbell, was born about the end of 
the year 1557. He spent a few years in the Low- 
lands, and received a good education. He was 
brought up a Presbyterian, both by his mother 
and those who had charge of him when going to 
school. He was knighted by King James. 

John Dubh of Morvern was the next heir to 
Lachlan Mor, and was entitled to the position of 
loader of the Macleans during the minority of 
the latter. Hector of Torloisk, or Hector the son 
of Ailein nan Sop, was the next heir to John 
Dubh. Hector was like his father an able and 
active man. He was also an ambitious man, and 
anxious to get the management of the Duart estate 
into his own hands. John Dubh, however, stood 
in his way. In May, 1573, John Dubh was seized 
without any legal authority by Archibald, fifth 
Earl of Argyll, and imprisoned in Inchconnell 



Lachlan Mor. 109 

Castle in Lochow. Argyll was instigated to take 
this step by Hector Mac Allan, or Hector of Tor- 
loisk. It is certain, however, that Argyll was just 
as anxious as Hector himself to prevent John 
Dubh from being leader of the Clan Gillean. 
In 1574, or thereabouts, Hector married Janet 
Campbell, Hector Og's widow, and succeeded in 
obtaining the leadership of the clan. Archibald 
of Argyll died in September, 1575, and was 
succeeded by his brother Colin, a rapacious and 
quarrelsome man, and a bitter enemy to the 
Macleans. 

About the beginning of 1576, Lachlan Mor re- 
turned from the Lowlands to take charge of his 
estates. Some time afterwards, probably about 
the end of the year, John Dubh was, by order of 
the Privy Council, released from his confinement. 
In March, 1577, Colin, sixth Earl of Argyll, tried 
to persuade John Dubh, by promising him great 
rewards, to murder Lachlan Mor, his own sister's 
son. John Dubh made known to Lachlan that 
the Earl of Argyll was plotting against his life. 
Lachlan also became acquainted with facts which 
led him to believe that Hector Mac Allan was 
associated with Argyll in planning his destruction. 
On May 23rd, 1577, he seized Hector and his son, 
Allan Og y and carried them off to Duart Castle, 
where he imprisoned them and put them in irons. 
In the summer of 1577, Argyll induced Angus 
Macdonald of Islay to besiege the castle of Loch- 
gorm in Islay, which belonged to Lachlan Mor, 



no The Clan Gillean. 

and ravage the lands around it. Angus led 1200 
men to attack the castle, and was assisted by Argyll 
with a force of 250 men. Lachlan Mor, however, 
remained in possession of Lochgorm. 

While the Macleans were engaged in defending 
Lochgorm Castle, Argyll sent two hundred of his 
followers, under the command of Dugald Camp- 
bell of Inveraw, to plunder the Macleans of Luing. 
In vera w carried out his instructions with fidelity 
and energy. He took away all the cows, horses, 
and sheep that he could find, and despoiled the 
women and children of their clothing. About 
the same time Campbell of Lochgoilhead, at the 
special command of the Earl of Argyll, seized 
Lachlan Mors servant, while on his way to the 
Low lands, and imprisoned him. The Earl in fact 
made it impossible for Lachlan Mor's followers to 
travel through Argyll, to trade with the Lowlands. 
He was in the habit of arresting them and keeping 
them in prison until ransomed by their friends. 
He was evidently an admirer of the ways and 
doings of the pirates of Algiers. In November, 
1577, Lachlan Mor, John Smollet, Ewen of Ard- 
gour, and "John Dubh Mac Charles Mac Eachann" 
seized Adam Mackay, with the intention of send- 
ing him a prisoner to Dumbarton. He was taken 
from them by John Og Maclean and his accom- 
plices, servants to Colin, Earl of Argyll. Shortly 
afterwards, George Smollet, captain of the Isle of 
Luing, was seized and imprisoned by Argyll. 

Alexander Cunningham, fifth Earl of Glencairn, 



Lachlan Mor. hi 

was among- the first of the Scottish noblemen who 
favoured the Reformation. He became a member 
of Queen Mary's Privy Council in 1560, and was 
a very influential man in his time. He died in 
1574. His daughter, Jane, was married to Archi- 
bald, fifth Earl of Argyll. William, his son and 
successor, had two sons and six daughters. 
Lachlan Mor entered into a contract of marriage 
with Margaret, the second of Glencairn's daugh- 
ters, on the 30th of December, 1577. They were 
married shortly afterwards. 

About the beginning of the year 1578, Lachlan 
Mor lodged a complaint with the Privy Council 
against the doings of Argyll in Luing and other 
places. In the following December the Council 
ordered Argyll to return answers to the complaints 
made against him. Shortly afterwards Lachlan 
Mor made preparations to enter the country of the 
Campbells and exact satisfaction by fire and sword 
for the injuries done to his followers. Argyll, 
dreading the consequences of an invasion, hastened 
to come to terms. Two arbitrators were appointed 
to determine the value of the property carried away 
from Luing. Argyll paid the sum agreed upon, 
and thus saved his warlike opponent the trouble of 
collecting it among the Campbells. 

In January, 1578, John Dubh of Morvern in- 
vaded the Island of Gigha with a strong force, 
plundered it, burnt and destroyed the houses, and 
slew nine men and two women. He carried off 
with him 500 cows, 300 horses, 2,000 sheep and 



ii2 The Clan Gillean. 

goats, and all the valuable ar: ?e found. 

minally under 
Lachlan M Still it is probable that for 

all the acts done by Lachlan Mor during the first 
few years of his chiefship, John Dubh's sh. 
the responsibility was greater than Lachlan's. He 
wasp- :he leader of the clan. In February, 

ve find the Government charging Lachlan 
Duart, Lachlan Dubh Mackinnon of 
Strathordill, and others, not to attack or pursue 
Donald Mac Aog Gleng;. 

In April, 157S, Lachlan Mor seized Donald 
Maclean, son of John Diurach, son of Hector Mac 
Allan, and imprisoned him in the castle of Cairn- 
burgh. On the 20th of April he invaded Coll, 
seized the cas. .acachadh, and garrisoned 

it whft D followers. He kept possession of 

the estates of Coll for some time. Rory Beg Mac- 
lean acted as his deputy and collected the rents for 
him. Shortly after he had made himself master of 
Coll, he sent Hector Mac Allan and Allan Og, 
on, to that island. Hector was beheaded 
there by his order, and Allan Og placed in con- 
finement. 

The feud between the Macleans and the Mac- 
donalds, with regard to the Rhinns of I slay, was 
renewed by the attack of the latter on the castle of 
Lochgorm in 1577. The one clan was in the habit 
of making plundering expeditions into the iands of 
- C seqnendy the losses and sufferings 
endured by the tenants of both clans were 



Lachlax Mor- 113 

great. In January, 1579, ir men t resolved 

to put a stop to the mischievous work that was 
going on. They enjoined Lachlan M or and James 
of I slay to sign an agreement, within a certain 
number 01 days, forgiving one another for the past, 
and promising obedience to the laws of the land for 
the future. They also made known to them in the 
plainest terms that if they would not comply with 
the orders given them, they would be proceeded 
against for treason. The result of the firm action 
of the Government was to bring the barbarous 
guerilla warfare of the Macleans and the 
donalds to an end. Shortly afterwards Ang^us of 
Islay married Lachlan Mors s:s:er. There was 
now some gTound for hoping that the Macleans 
and the Macdonalds would for the future act with 
wisdom and fight side by side against their common 
enemies as in the days 

On April 30th. 1579, the Privy Council issued 

s of denunciation and warning against L .. - 

Ian Mor for his unjust treatment of the Macleans 

.1, for keeping Allan Og and Donald 
of John Diurach, in confinement, and for the 

?mmitted by John Dubh in the I 
of Gigha. Shortly afterwards he restored the 
estates of Coll to their lawful am aer, released his 
prisoners, and probably made some compensation 
to A^nes Campbell, who had through her husband, 
James Macdonald of Islay, a life interest in Gigha. 
In 157S some of Lachlan Mors followers plun- 
dered the lands of M Shane O Dochtrie of Glach." 



ii4 The Clan Gillean. 

On the ioth of August, 1579, Colin, sixth Earl of 
Argyll, was appointed Lord High Chancellor of 
Scotland. On the 27th day of the same month he 
compelled Lachlan to give pledges for standing 
his trial at a future date for the losses sustained by 
O' Dochtrie. In May, 1580, Lachlan was under 
the necessity of surrendering to the High Chan- 
cellor lands of the yearly value of 200 marks, to 
compensate for the injuries done to O' Dochtrie. 
We do not know what became of these lands. It 
is possible that Lachlan paid the amount due to 
O' Dochtrie and got his lands back. The proba- 
bility, however, is that the Earl of Argyll retained 
possession of them. Lachlan Mor seems to have 
spent a few weeks in Ulster in 1584. 

In the summer of 1585 Donald Gorm Mor of 
Sleat, left the Isle of Skye, accompanied by a large 
retinue, with the intention of paying a visit to 
Angus Macdonald of [slay. Owing to a severe 
storm which had sprung up, he was forced to seek 
shelter in the northern part of Jura, which part of 
the island belonged to Maclean of Duart. Hugh, 
son of Archibald the Clerk, and another Mac- 
donald, a descendant of Donald Herrach, were 
driven by the same storm to Jura. During the 
night these two men collected a large number 
of the cattle which belonged to the Macleans who 
lived near the place in which Donald Gorm Mor 
had cast anchor, and carried them off in their 
galleys. Their sole object in taking away the 
cattle was to get Donald Gorm Mor into trouble. 



Lachlan Mor. 115 

They knew that the Macleans would believe that 
the theft was committed by Donald Gorm Mor, 
and they hoped that they would attack him and 
put him to death. The men whose cattle had been 
stolen went at once to Lachlan Mor to lay their 
complaint before him. As no one in Jura had seen 
the men who had taken away the cattle, Lachlan 
Mor believed the story told him, and immediately 
prepared to take vengeance upon the supposed 
plunderers. He sailed to Jura with a number of 
men and made a sudden attack upon Donald Gorm 
Mor, who was utterly ignorant of what had taken 
place. He slew sixty of the Macdonalds, but the 
rest of them, Donald Gorm Mor included, suc- 
ceeded in making their escape. Lachlan Mor's 
conduct was utterly inexcusable. Even if Donald 
Gorm Mor and his men had carried off the cattle, 
the punishment inflicted upon them was monstrous. 
Of course it may be said that Lachlan Mor acted 
in accordance with the custom of the age in which 
he lived. That may be true enough ; but the fact 
that it is customary to do wrong does not justify a 
man in disregarding the moral law. The place at 
which the Macdonalds were slain was known as 
Innis a Chnoic Bhric, Innis Knock Breck, or the 
grazing field of the speckled hill. 

Donald Gorm Mor hastened back to Skye, 
burning with anger, and fully resolved to take 
vengeance upon the Macleans. He despatched 
messengers to the chieftains of the various branches 
of the Clan Donald, calling upon them to assist 



n6 The Clan Gillean. 

him in attacking - his assailants. The conduct of 
Lachlan Mor in slaying a number of innocent 
men created feeling's of indignation and vengeance 
among all the Macdonalds. The league formed 
against him was so powerful that he found himself 
in great difficulties. The Macdonalds were com- 
mitting acts of depredation on his lands in various 
quarters, and threatening to invade Mull with all 
their forces. They had found out that the cattle 
had been actually stolen, and stolen by two Mac- 
donalds, still they felt so indignant over the 
slaughter o\ their clansmen at Knock Breck that 
they were unwilling to come to terms with their 
antagonist. In the month of September King 
James wrote Macleod of Dunvegan, requesting 
him to assist the Macleans against the Macdonalds. 
We may be sure that he urged the Macdonalds 
at the same time to desist from their hostilities. 
Owing to the action of the King, the Macdonalds 
felt disposed to settle their disputes with the Mac- 
leans in a proper manner. Even if they should 
be able to defeat both the Macleans and the 
Macleods of Harris, they could not possibly defeat 
the forces at the Kings command. 

In the spring of 1586 Angus Macdonald of 
I slay went to Skye to consult Donald Gorm Mor 
with regard to a settlement with Lachlan Mor. 
On his way back he called at Duart Castle to try 
to persuade Lachlan to come to an amicable settle- 
ment with his opponent. On the day after his 
arrival, the Lord of Duart seized both Angus and 



Lachlan Mor. 117 

his attendants, and threw them into prison, where 
he kept them until Angus consented to renounce 
his claim to the Rhinns of Islay. Angus was 
also under the necessity of giving James, his son, 
and Ranald, his brother, as hostages to Lachlan 
until the latter should be put in possession of the 
lands promised to him. The harsh treatment 
received by Angus at the hands of Lachlan Mor 
put an end to his peaceful intentions. He went 
back to Islay a bitter enemy to the Lord of Duart. 
In July, 1586, Lachlan Mor went to Islay to 
receive possession of the disputed lands of the 
Rhinns, and took up his quarters at the fort of 
Lochgorm, where he remained three days. He 
received repeated invitations from Angus of Islay 
to pay him a visit at Mullintrea. He yielded at 
last, and went to spend a night with him. He was 
accompanied, according to one account, by seventy 
of his followers, but according to another account 
by eighty-six. He was received in the most 
friendly manner, and entertained in grand style. 
During the evening Angus's wife saw reasons for 
thinking that her brother was likely to be attacked, 
but could find no opportunity of making her sus- 
picions known to him. She ventured, however, to 
make the simple remark, "Tha 'n oidhche stoirmeil 
's bu choir do gach buachaille sij.il a bhith aige 
air a threud," the night is stormy, and every shep- 
herd should have an eye on his flock. Lachlan 
understood the hint. He refused to comply with 
Angus's request to remain in the castle all night, 



n8 The Clan Gillean. 

and went to sleep in one of the buildings in which 
his followers were lodged. He took his nephew with 
him, James, the son and heir of Angus, who was 
still a hostage in his hands. At midnight Angus 
of I slay, at the head of nearly 400 armed followers, 
went to the door of the building in which Lachlan 
was sleeping, and asked him to get up and have a 
drink with him. Lachlan was on his feet in an 
instant, and, with little James in his left hand as a 
shield and his sword in his right hand, went to 
the door. While Lachlan saw that it was impos- 
sible for him to escape, Angus saw that if a fight 
took place his son would be certainly slain. Angus 
now solemnly promised that if the Macleans 
would give up his son to him, and surrender as 
prisoners, their lives would be spared. Lachlan 
Mor accepted the terms offered and delivered up his 
sword. All those who were with him, except two, 
followed his example. One of these was John Dubh 
of Morvern, the commander of the expedition to 
.Gigha ; the other was Macdonald Herrach, the 
man who, along with Hugh, son of Gillespick the 
Clerk, had occasioned the slaughter of the Mac- 
donalds at Knock Breck. As these men knew that 
they would receive no mercy they refused to give 
up their arms. They stood in the door of the 
building in which they lodged and defied their 
opponents to capture them. The Macdonalds, 
knowing their prowess and determination, and 
unable to subdue them by the sword, set fire to 
the building which they occupied. Both of them 



Lachlan Mor. 119 

perished in the flames. The prisoners were tied 
together two by two and placed in confinement. 

The day after the black night of Mullintrea a 
report was circulated in I slay to the effect that 
Ranald Mac James, who was a hostage in Duart, 
had been executed. On hearing this absurd story 
Angus ordered his brother Coll to lead out the 
prisoners in couples and put them to death. The 
work of butchery was carried on for several days, 
perhaps for several weeks. At last there was none 
left except Lachlan Mor. It is said that on the 
day on which the ferocious Angus intended to 
decapitate the Lord of Duart, he fell from his horse 
and received an injury which rendered him unable 
to go out to the place of execution. Owing to 
this accident, he spared the life of his enemy until 
he should be able to mount his horse and ride out 
to see him put to death. This story may or may 
not be true. It is likely, however, that it is not 
true. We suspect that Angus spared Lachlan 
Mor's life simply to exchange him for his own 
brother, Ranald. 

A work recently published conveys the idea that 
all the prisoners put to death by Angus of Islay 
were slain on the same day. This statement is 
wholly unwarranted. The history of " The Feuds 
and Conflicts of the Clans" was written in the time 
of James VI., and published in 1764. In that work 
we are told that "as soon as the report came to 
Angus's ears that his brother Ranald had been 
slain, he revenged himself fully upon the prisoners; 



120 The Clan Gillean. 

for Maclean's followers were by couples beheaded 
the days following, by Coll, the brother of Angus.'' 
The Ardgour MS. tells us that Angus "hated 
two of the prisoners more than any of the rest and 
caused the barn to be set on fire over them, and 
that next morning, contrary to the terms of capitu- 
lation, he caused two more of them to be put to 
death and continued doing so daily until only 
Lachlan Mor and his uncle, John Dubh, remained 
alive." It is certainly difficult to believe that 
Angus of Islay spent several days in butchering his 
prisoners ; but the foregoing evidence — especially 
that of the history written in the time of James VI. 
— clearly proves that such was the case. 

Lachlan Mor's conduct towards Angus of Islay 
was ungenerous and unjust, but Angus's con- 
duct towards Lachlan Mor was utterly atrocious. 
Angus went of his own accord to Duart, but 
Lachlan was invited and coaxed to visit Mullintrea. 
Lachlan acted in a cruel manner towards Angus, 
but Angus added treachery to cruelty in dealing 
with Lachlan. Lachlan did not injure any of 
Angus's followers, but Angus put to death all the 
men who accompanied Lachlan. Even if his 
brother had been murdered in Duart, the murder 
of one man could be no excuse for murdering 
seventy, or eighty-six, men whose lives he had 
promised to spare. But it is not at all likely that 
he believed the story regarding the execution 
of his brother. If he believed it, he must have 
also believed that the execution took place by 



Lac h lan Mor. 121 

Lachlan Mor's orders. Why then should he have 
spared Lachlan, and slain his followers? The proba- 
bility is that the main reason which influenced 
Angus to murder his prisoners was the desire to 
weaken his opponents by cutting off their leading 
men. 

The author of the report respecting the execution 
of Ranald Mac James was Allan Og Maclean, son 
of Hector Mac Allan. Allan Og hated Lachlan 
Mor, and was ready to invent and circulate any 
story that would give Angus of Islay a plausible 
excuse for putting him to death. But he was 
under the influence of other motives besides hatred. 
If he could get Lachlan out of the way, he him- 
self might become leader of the clan during the 
minority of Lachlan's son and heir. 

Shortly after the imprisonment of Lachlan Mor, 
the Macleans succeeded in capturing Ranald, son 
of Coll, third son of Alexander of Islay. They 
had now Angus Macdonald's brother and his first 
cousin in their hands. As soon as King James 
had heard of Lachlan Mor's danger, he took active 
steps to procure his release. Colin, sixth Earl of 
Argyll, died in 1584. As Archibald, his son and 
successor, was under age, the government of the 
earldom was in the hands of guardians. These 
guardians were instructed by King James, to act as 
peacemakers between the Macleans and the Mac- 
donalds, and to procure his freedom for Lachlan 
Mor. The Campbells performed the duties entrust- 
ed to them with fidelity and success. According to 



122 The Clan Gillean. 

the settlement arrived at, Lachlan Mor renounced 
his claim to the Rhinns of Islay in favour 
of Ang-us Macdonald, and promised to leave 
him in undisturbed possession of these lands. He 
also agreed to release Ranald Mac James and 
Ranald Mac Coll as soon as he should arrive in 
Duart. The Campbell peacemakers, who repre- 
sented the King, promised Angus a full pardon for 
all the crimes committed by him. They also placed 
in his hands eight hostages, of whom he was to re- 
tain possession until the remission promised should 
be actually granted to him. These hostag'es were, 
IKetor Maclean, Lachlan Mor's eldest son ; Alex- 
ander, brother of William Macleod of Dunvegan; 
Lachlan and Neil, sons of Lachlan Mackinnon of 
Strathordill ; John and Murdoch, sons of Rory 
Macneil of Barra ; Allan, son of Ewen Maclean 
of Ardgour; and Donald, son of Hector Maclean, 
constable of Cairnburgh. Lachlan Mor was now 
liberated. As soon as he arrived in Mull, he gave 
their freedom to Ranald Mac James and Ranald 
Mac Coll. 

The Ardgour MS. tells us that Angus of Islay 
murdered all his prisoners except Lachlan Mor 
and John Dubh. When the former was set at 
liberty, the latter was kept in prison as a hostage 
until Ranald Mac James and Ranald Mac Coll 
should arrive in Islay. A few days after Lachlan 
had been released, Macdonald of Ardnamurchan 
came to Islay and assured Angus that his brother 
Ranald had been put to death. Angus then 



Lachlan Mor. 123 

caused John Dubh to be executed. — There is no 
truth in this story. The eight hostages placed by 
the representatives of the King in Angus's hands 
would be a sufficient guarantee to him that the 
prisoners in Duart Castle would be liberated. 
According to "The Feuds and Conflicts of the 
Clans," the man who was burnt to death with 
Macdonald Herrach "was a very near kinsman to 
Maclean, and the eldest of his surname, renowned 
both for counsel and manhood." According to 
Seannachie's history, he was a Maclean from Mor- 
vern. As John Dubh was Lachlan Mor's uncle, 
as he was well advanced in years, as he was the 
most influential counsellor among the Macleans, 
as he was an experienced warrior, and as he was 
bailie of Morvern, it is beyond all doubt that he 
was the man who perished with Macdonald 
Herrach. It is clear, then, that Macdonald of 
Ardnamurchan was not responsible for his death. 
Lachlan Mor paid a visit to King James in 
Edinburgh in the spring of 1587. His object was 
undoubtedly to urge the King to secure the release 
and safety of the hostages who were in the hands 
of Angus of Islay. It is evident that he received 
a very favourable reception. At a meeting of the 
Privy Council held at Holyrood House on the 
16th of April, we find the King stating that he had 
remitted the great crimes of Angus Macdonald of 
Islay, that he had delivered eight hostages into 
his hands to procure the liberation of Lachlan 
Maclean of Duart, that it was unreasonable that 



124 The Clan Gillean. 

the hostages should always remain in their state 
of bondage, and that he himself intended to take 
immediate steps to settle in an equitable manner the 
controversies between Angus of Islay and Lachlan 
of Duart. He then orders that Angus Mac- 
donald, Ranald Macdonald of Smerby, John Mac 
Ian of Ardnamurchan, Archibald Macdonald, son 
of Angus I leach, Neil Mackay, officer of the 
Rhinns of Islay, Hector Mac Alister of Largie, 
Mac Alister, tutor of Largie, John Dubh Mac 
Ranald, and John Mor Mac Ian be commanded 
to deliver the eight hostages in their hands to 
Archibald, Earl of Argyll, or to any of his tutors, 
in order to be conveyed to His Majesty and kept by 
him until all the matters in dispute shall be settled. 
On the 20th of the same month, King James wrote 
a letter to the Earl of Huntly, requesting him to 
use all diligence to keep Donald Gorm Mor, Mac- 
leod of Lewis, Macleod of Harris, the captain of 
the Clanranald, and all others within the bounds 
of his lieutenancy, from taking part in the disputes 
between Lachlan Mor and Angus of Islay, as he 
himself intended to take special pains to settle 
these disputes as soon as possible. 

On the 30th of May, 1587, we find Donald Gorm 
Mor of Sleat and Angus of Islay entering into 
an alliance, offensive and defensive, with Lachlan 
Mackintosh, captain of the Clan Chattan, against 
all persons, except the King and the Earl of Argyll. 
The Macdonalds were evidently preparing for a 
renewal of the war with Lachlan Mor, while 



Lachlan Mor. 125 

Mackintosh was seeking to strengthen himself 
against the Earl of Huntly. Angus of Islay re- 
fused to give up the hostages in his hands, and thus 
placed himself in direct opposition to the King, 
the result being that he was outlawed. His asso- 
ciates were outlawed at the same time. 

In the summer of 1587, Lachlan Mor renewed the 
war against the Macdonalds. He invaded Islay, 
laid the greater part of it waste, and put to death 
a large number of persons ; he slew every Mac- 
donald, capable of bearing arms, that fell into 
his hands. At the time of this invasion Angus 
Macdonald was in Ireland attending to his affairs 
in that country. He returned as speedily as pos- 
sible, vowing vengeance upon his fierce opponent. 
Donald Gorm Mor and himself collected their 
vassals and friends, and at the head of a large 
force invaded the island of Tiree. As Lachlan 
Mor was utterly unprepared to attack them, he 
ordered his tenants in Mull to leave the sea-coast 
and valleys and to seek shelter, with their cattle 
and horses, in the mountains. The invaders sailed 
from Tiree to Loch-nan-Gall in Mull, and landed 
at Derryguaig, near Knock, at the foot of Ben 
Mor. The Macleans occupied a strong position 
at Lecklee, back of Gernadu. The Macdonalds 
pushed forward their outposts as far as Sron-na- 
Cranalaich, which was about three miles from 
Lecklee. They could advance no further without 
going through a narrow pass, which was guarded 
by a body of Macleans in command of John 



126 The Clan Gillean. 

Maclean of Inverscadle, one of the ablest warriors 
of his day. Contrary to his instructions, the fiery 
Inverscadle left his post and attacked the Mac- 
donalds who were at Sron-na-Cranalaich. He 
was of course defeated. He himself returned, but 
the most of his followers were slain. On the 
morning of the next day the Macdonalds came to 
the conclusion that it would be sheer madness to 
attempt to march through the mountain passes to 
attack their foes. Consequently, they resolved to 
go away and plunder some unprotected districts. 
As they were making their way back to their gal- 
leys the Macleans suddenly attacked them and 
inflicted some loss on them. 

During their expedition the Macdonalds laid 
waste the whole of Tiree, the Isle of Iona, and 
parts of Mull. They put to death all the Macleans 
whom they could find, and killed all the cattle, 
sheep, and goats which they could not carry away 
with them. Their whole aim was to exterminate 
the Macleans. But the latter were not idle. They 
invaded Kintyre and ravaged a large portion of 
that district with fire and sword. Angus Mac- 
donald was now compelled to hasten back to 
protect his tenants. 

In the sanguinary and destructive war which 
raged between Lachlan Mor and Angus of Islay, 
Lachlan was supported by the whole of the Mac- 
leans, the Macquarries, the Macneils of Barra, 
and the Mackinnons, and also by the Macleods of 
Harris ; while Angus was supported by the whole 



Lachlan Mor. 127 

of the Macdonalds, the Mac Alisters of Loup, 
the Macphies of Colonsay, and the Macneills of 
Gigha, and likewise by the Macleods of Lewis. 
So far as the Macleods were concerned, it is not 
likely that they took an active part in the war. 
The one branch would require to watch the other. 
John Mac Ian of Ardnamurchan became a suitor 
for the hand of Lachlan Mor's mother in marriage, 
some time after the death of her second husband, 
Hector Mac Allan of Torloisk. Lachlan was 
originally strongly opposed to the match. Early 
in 1588 he gave Mac Ian to understand that he was 
anxious to enjoy his friendship for the future, and 
was willing to give him his mother in marriage. 
His aim, evidently, was to detach Mac Ian from 
the party headed by Angus of Islay and Donald 
Gorm Mor. The marriage took place at the 
bride's residence, Torloisk House, on the 12th of 
April. The evening was spent pleasantly in feast- 
ing and drinking. After the newly married couple 
had been put to bed the most of the Macdonalds 
retired to a barn to sleep. A few of them, how- 
ever — probably the more prominent of them — 
remained in the house and continued drinking 
with Lachlan Mor and some of his principal men. 
During the conversation which took place, one of 
the Macdonalds boasted that Mac Ian had married 
Lachlan's mother for her wealth, and not from 
any love he had for her. He was also indiscreet 
enough to state that Mac Ian would still continue 
to support Angus of Islay and Donald Gorm Mor. 



128 The Clan Gillean. 

A Maclean who was sitting beside him called out, 
44 Drunken men always tell the truth," and stabbed 
him to the heart with his dagger. The Macleans 
immediately rushed upon the Macdonalds. They 
slew, first, the men who were drinking with them, 
and, next, those who were sleeping in the barn — 
in all over eighteen persons. Their next object of 
attack was Mac Ian himself. They broke into his 
room, and would have despatched him on the spot, 
if the cries and tears o\ his wife had not softened 
their hearts. They did not allow him, however, to 
remain in his room. He was dragged away and 
thrown into the dungeon. Two o\ his followers, 
who had escaped the general massacre, were im- 
prisoned along with him. These were, Allister 
Mac Ian and Angus Mac Ian. The latter was 
Mac Ian's page. Some of the foregoing details 
may not be strictly accurate. There are two things, 
however, which can be depended upon as facts ; first, 
that when the marriage took place, the Macleans 
had no intention o( murdering the Macdonalds ; 
secondly, that the real cause of the massacre was 
the discovery by the Macleans on the night of the 
marriage that Mac Ian would not support them 
against Angus of Islay and Donald Gorm Mor. 
The Lord of Duart was a politician. When he 
found that he could not get the Mac Ians to fight 
for him, he concluded in a moment of anger that 
the best thing he could do was to disqualify them 
from fighting against him. David Mac Gill of 
Nesbit, King's Advocate, wrote to the Privy 



Lachlan Mor. 129 

Council complaining of Lachlan Mors conduct 
and asking that steps be taken to secure the release 
of Mac Ian and his two companions. Lachlan 
was summoned to appear before the Council, but 
refused to obey. The consequence was that on the 
18th of June he was denounced a rebel. 

In the autumn of 1588, the Florida, one of the 
largest ships that belonged to the Spanish Ar- 
mada, was compelled by a storm to seek shelter 
in the harbour of Tobermory. Lachlan Mor 
supplied the captain with provisions, and received 
in return the use of 100 Spanish soldiers for 
a few weeks. With this force and some of his 
own followers he left Mull in the month of Octo- 
ber on an expedition against the Macdonalds of 
Ardnamurchan and Moydart. He plundered the 
islands of Canna, Rum, Eigg, and Muck, and 
destroyed the houses by fire. According to David 
Mac Gill of Nesbit, the King's Advocate, he 
slaughtered in the " most barbarous, shameful, and 
cruel manner, all the men, women, and children." 
He laid siege to the castle of Mingarry in Ardna- 
murchan during three days, but was unable to take 
it. He laid waste with fire and sword all the lands 
in the vicinity of it, and then returned to Mull. 
When Lachlan was away on this expedition, or 
soon afterwards, Angus of I slay, having procured 
the assistance of 100 English soldiers, ravaged 
with fire and sword some lands which belonged to 
the Macleans. 

Shortly after the return of the Macleans and the 



130 The Clan Gillean. 

Spaniards from their ferocious work, the Florida 
exploded in Tobermory Bay, the result being - that 
all the men who were on board perished, except 
three or four. According to the records of the 
Privy Council the ship was blown up at the 
instigation of Lachlan Mor. Martin in his " De- 
scription of the Western Islands,'' a work written 
about [695, states that it was destroyed by one 
Smollet, a native of Dumbarton. The Ardgour 
MS. assures us that the destruction of the Florida 
was purely a matter of accident. Seannachie gives 
a minute account of it. He tells us that Don 
Fareija, the captain of the ship, intended to go 
away without paying the people of Mull for the 
supplies which he had received from them ; that 
Lachlan Mor sent Donald Glas, son of John Dubh 
of Morvern, to demand a settlement ; that the 
captain kept Donald on board and intended to 
carry him off to Spain ; and that Donald, exas- 
perated by the dishonesty and treachery of the 
Spaniards, took vengeance upon them by setting 
fire to the powder magazine. According to a well- 
known legend the author of the destruction of the 
big Spanish ship, an long mhor Spainteach, was 
the Doideag Mhuileach, a celebrated Mull witch 
who invariably exerted her influence in behalf of 
the Macleans of Duart. Upon the whole we are 
inclined to think that Martin's statement is correct, 
and that the Smollet to whom he refers was either 
George Smollet, captain of the island of Luing, 
or else John Smollet, who was evidently George's 



Lachlan Mor. 131 

brother. It is certainly possible that Lachlan 
Mor was not in a state of total ignorance regard- 
ing Smollet's intentions. It is also possible that 
Donald Glas was one of Smollet's assistants. 

The treaty of peace effected by the King and 
the guardians of the young Earl of Argyll between 
the Macleans and the Macdonalds was concluded 
in the autumn of 1586. The Government, as we 
have seen, placed at that time eight hostages in 
the hands of the Macdonalds as a guarantee of 
remission for their crimes, and also as a pledge 
of abstinence from hostilities on the part of the 
Macleans. On the 30th of May, 1587, Angus of 
Islay and his associates were denounced rebels for 
refusing to deliver up the hostages in their hands 
to the Earl of Argyll, and, through him, to the 
King. Shortly afterwards Lachlan Mor renewed 
the war and swooped down upon Islay with fire 
and sword. On the 18th of June, 1588, he was 
declared a rebel for his treatment of John Mac Ian 
of Ardnamurchan. On the 3rd of January, 1589, he 
was again declared a rebel for his cruel expedition 
to Canna, Rum, Eigg, Muck, and Ardnamurchan. 
The war between himself and the Macdonalds had 
now raged during the long period of two years and 
three months. The King and his Council, how- 
ever, had done nothing to crush it. Indeed, it 
looks as if they did not care very much whether the 
belligerent clans should extirpate each other or not. 
They knew that the more they would fight the 
weaker they would become. They knew also that 



132 The Clan Gillean. 

as a result of their weakness their lands could by- 
and-by be easily gobbled up. To some of the 
rulers of the country the destructive feud between 
the foolish and sanguinary belligerents must have 
been an exceedingly enjoyable sight. 

About the beginning of the year 1589, the Mac- 
leans and the Macdonalds began to come to their 
senses, and to see that their raids, battles and 
butcheries, while injurious to both, were of no 
advantage to either. In their glimmerings of 
sanity they resolved to sheathe the sword and live 
at peace. The eight hostages who had been in 
the hands of the Macdonalds since the autumn of 
1586, were now set at liberty. John Mac Ian and 
the other prisoners in the hands of the Macleans 
were also allowed to return to their homes. 

In March, 1589, remissions were granted by the 
Government to Lachlan Mor, James of Islay, and 
Donald Grorm Mor, for all the crimes committed 
by them during their late feud. A few months 
afterwards they were induced to pay a visit to 
Edinburgh, ostensibly to communicate their views 
to the King and Council with regard to the best 
means of preserving order and peace in the High- 
lands, but really to be dealt with as criminals. 
Contrary to all ideas of justice and fair dealing, 
they were at once arrested and thrown into prison. 
About the beginning of 1591 they were brought 
to trial for the crimes already pardoned by the 
Privy Council. They made no attempt to defend 
their actions ; they simply cast themselves on the 



Lachlan Mor. 133 

King's mercy. They were fined to the amount of 
,£20,000 Scots each. Donald Gorm Mor was fined 
at the same time, the sum to be paid by him being 
.£4,000 Scots. 

On the 24th of December, 1589, we find Lachlan 
Mor giving to Neil Campbell, Bishop of Argyll, 
and the heirs male of his body, a charter of the 
lands of Tarbert in the Isle of Jura. On March 
23rd, 1 59 1, we find him entering into a bond of 
friendship with Duncan Campbell of Glenorchy 
and Sir James Campbell of Ardkinglass, who were 
acting in behalf of the young Earl of Argyll. 
As James, Earl of Glencairn, and Neil Campbell, 
Bishop of Argyll, were witnesses to this bond, it is 
very likely that they had something to do with 
getting it made. It is evident that Lachlan Mor's 
object in giving a piece of land to the Bishop of 
Argyll, and in entering into a bond of friendship 
with Glenorchy and Ardkinglass, was to procure, 
or rather to purchase, the favour and support of the 
Campbells. He was in a difficulty and needed 
their help. In the summer of 1591 John Campbell 
of Ardkinglass, son and successor of Sir James, be- 
came security for Lachlan Mor for the fine imposed 
on him ; while Sir John Campbell, third of Calder, 
became security for Angus of Islay and Donald 
Gorm Mor. Lachlan Mor promised to give, within 
a certain date after his release, three hostages to 
the King. The hostages to be given by him were, 
Hector Og, his son and heir ; John, eldest son of 
the captain of Cairnburgh, and Malcolm, eldest 



134 The Clan Gillean. 

son of the captain of Aros. Angus of Islay and 
Donald Gorm Mor were under the necessity of 
giving hostages before being set at liberty. The 
island rulers were now allowed to return to their 
homes. 

Shortly before his release from confinement 
Lachlan Mor offered, through Bowes, the English 
ambassador, his services to Queen Elizabeth. He 
expressed his readiness to cross over to Ireland 
and assist in putting down all rebellions against 
her authority in that country. Elizabeth was glad 
to have his goodwill, but probably unwilling to 
expend the money which would be required. 

Lachlan Mor, Angus of [slay, and Donald 
Gorm Mor failed in carrying out their promises, 
especially in paying the King's rents. At the meet- 
ing of Parliament in June, 1592, it was resolved 
to 4t punish and repress all the treasonable and 
barbarous rebels o\ the Highlands and islands." 
Lachlan Mor, Angus of [slay, and Donald Gorm 
Mor were commanded to appear before the Privy 
Council on the 14th day of July to fulfil the con- 
ditions which had been imposed upon them, and 
to give sufficient security for the payment of the 
Crown rents. In the event of non-compliance, 
the King could declare their lives, lands, and goods 
forfeited. On March 16th, 1593, the following 
persons were relaxed from the horn and received 
to the King's peace : Lachlan Mor of Duart ; 
Maclean of Lochbuie ; Maclean of Coll ; Mac- 
leod, tutor of Harris ; Lachlan Mackinnon of 



Lachlan Mor. 135 

Strathordill ; Hector Macquarrie of Ulva; Charles 
Maclean, tutor of Ardgour ; John Og Mac Ian of 
Ardnamurchan ; Allan Maclean, bailie of Morvern ; 
John Maclean, bailie of Ross ; Neil Mac Gille- 
calum, captain of Aros ; Hector Maclean, captain 
of Cairnburgh ; and Macneil of Barra. 

In June, 1594, the Earls of Huntly, Errol, and 
Angus were forfeited for conspiring with Philip 
of Spain to re-establish Roman Catholicism in 
Scotland. Lachlan Mor and Angus of Islay were 
forfeited at the same time for not carrying out the 
promises made by them in 1 591. Shortly after- 
wards, Archibald, seventh Earl of Argyll, who was 
only in the nineteenth year of his age, was 
commissioned to reduce the three Roman Catholic 
earls to submission. He raised an army of 4,000 
or 5,000 men, and marched into Badenoch, where 
he arrived on the 27th of September, and was 
joined by the Mackintoshes and Grants. He 
tried to capture Ruthven Castle, which was de- 
fended by the Macphersons, but failed. He led his 
army from Badenoch to Glenlivet, and was attacked 
there by the Earls of Huntly and Errol on Thurs- 
day, the 3rd day of October. 

At the battle of Glenlivet the Earl of Argyll 
had about 7,000 men. The Macleans were at the 
extreme right and the Mackintoshes next to them. 
The centre was commanded by Duncan Campbell 
of Auchinbreck. The left wing consisted of the 
Grants, Macgregors, and others. The rear was 
commanded by Argyll himself. The Earls of 



136 The Clan Gillean. 

Huntlv and Errol had only about 1500 men, but 
most oi these were horsemen. They had three field 
pieces, which were under the direction ot Captain 
Andrew Gray. Grant of Gartanbeg, in accordance 
with a promise given to the Earl of Huntlv, fled 
at the very commencement oi the fight. The 
Campbells or" Lochnell, who were enemies to the 
Earl ot Argyll, seem to have followed his example. 
The artillery struck terror into the ranks oi those 
oi the Campbells who remained with their chief. 
The Camerons, under Allan Mac Ian Duibh, 
attacked their old foes, the Mackintoshes, and 
routed them. The Earl oi Argyll fought bravely ; 
but being deserted by his followers he was com- 
pelled to flee with them. Lachlan Mor displayed 
the highest skill as a commander. He held his 
ground and inflicted upon Huntlv and Errol nearly 
all the losses which they suffered. He was the 
last man to quit the field. He led his followers 
away in good order. He lost only a few men in 
the battle, and none in the retreat. 

About the beginning oi July, 1595, Donald 
Gorm Mor and other Macdonald leaders crossed 
over to Ireland to assist Hugh Roy O* Neil, Earl 
of Tyrone, and Hugh Roy O" Donnell, who were 
at that time in rebellion against Oueen Elizabeth. 
About the middle of July another party ot Mac- 
donalds, numbering 900 men, left the Highlands 
for the same purpose. On the evening of the day 
on which they left, they landed on the small island 
of Calve in Tobermory Bay. Through the night 



Lachlan Mor. 137 

Lachlan Mor, at the head of 300 mc .; their 

galleys and boats and then captured themselves. 
Among the prisoners taken by him were, the 
captain of Clanranald and three of his uncles, the 
laird of Knoydart, Mac Ian of Ardnamurchan, a 
brother of Donald Gorm Mor, and a number of 
other prominent men. All the leading men taken 
were placed in confinement. The common soldiers 
were conveyed to Ardnamurchan, and set at liberty*. 
Queen Elizabeth was so well pleased with the Lord 
of Duart for capturing the Macdonalds that she 
sent him a present of 1,000 crowns, and also 
promised him a pension. 

Young Mac Ian of Ardnamurchan was mur- 
dered at Kintra, about the year 1596, by his uncle, 
Angus Mor Macdonald. The murderer was the 
next heir and expected to obtain the esta: - 
himself. He was a man of great size and strength, 
and also of great ferocity. He lived at Ath-na-h- 
Eilde, near Strontian. Allan Cameron of Lochiel, 
to whose daughter young Mac Ian was engaged 
to be married, invaded Ardnamurchan to punish 
the assassin. Angus Mor. aware of his danger, 
placed himself under the protection of Lachlan of 
Duart. A conflict took place between the invaders 
and the Clan Ian at Leachd-nan-Saighead, or the 
ledge of the arrows, in Morvern. Angus Mor 
raised his helmet to cool his brow. A Cameron 
who had been watching for a chance, immediately 
sent an arrow into his skull. When the Clan 
Ian saw that their leader was slain thev became 



138 The Clan Gillean. 

discouraged and fled. Immediately afterwards 
Lachlan Mor arrived in Morvern to support and 
protect them. The victorious Camerons were now 
under the necessity of desisting- from pursuing the 
Mac Ians, and of returning to Lochaber. The 
chieftain of the Mac Ians was buried in the 
churchyard of Keill in Morvern. According to 
tradition, the archer who slew Angus Mor was 
known as Iain Dubh Beag Innse-righ. 

Hector Maclean of Coll died about the end of 
the year 1593. Lachlan, his son and successor, 
was at that time only about eighteen years of age. 
Shortly after Hector's death, Lachlan of Duart 
seized the castle of Breaeaehadh and took posses- 
sion of all the Coll estates. He appointed Rory 
Beg Maclean as his deputy to collect the rents in 
Coll. When Lachlan of Coll reached his majority 
he complained to the Privy Council against the 
oppressive conduct of Lachlan Mor and petitioned 
for redress. The Council considered his complaint 
and petition on November nth, 1596. Lachlan 
Mor and himself were both present. The Council 
ordered Lachlan Mor to deliver up the castle of 
Breaeaehadh to Sir William Stewart of Houston, 
the King's lieutenant of the Isles and Highlands, 
to surrender the Coll estates to their lawful owner, 
and to allow the owner and his tenants to possess 
and use these estates without molestation from 
him. The Council also decreed that in case Lach- 
lan Mor should fail to carry out their orders he 
should pay as a penalty the sum of 10,000 marks. 



Lachlan Mor. 139 

Lachlan of Coll obtained possession of his estates, 
and was allowed to hold them in peace. We pre- 
sume that Lachlan Mor's object in seizing the 
estates of Coll was not to keep them for himself, 
but to compel Lachlan of Coll to hold them of 
him, and thus acknowledge him as his feudal 
superior. 

In May, 1596, King James issued a proclama- 
tion declaring his intention of leading an expedition 
in person against the Islanders. Lachlan Mor 
and Donald Gorm Mor immediately repaired to 
Edinburgh, gave in their submission to the King, 
settled with the Exchequer, and agreed to augment 
their rents. They were at once received into 
favour and had their estates restored to them. 
The Earl of Argyll and Kenneth Mackenzie of 
Kintail became securities for Lachlan Mor's obed- 
ience, in the sum of 30,000 marks. Rory Macleod 
of Harris and Donald Mac Angus of Glengarry 
obtained remissions shortly afterwards. The Mac- 
leods of Lewis also tendered their submission. 
Angus Macdonald of Islay still refused to yield to 
the King. The King showed his displeasure with 
him by granting Lachlan Mor a lease of the Rhinns 
of Islay. At last, in the month of October, 
Angus sent in his submission by James, his son 
and heir. In January, 1597, he went to Edinburgh 
to see the King. He was asked to find security 
for the arrears of his crown rents, to remove all 
his followers from Kintyre, and the Rhinns of 
Islay, and to deliver the castle of Dunnyveg to 



140 The Clan Gillean. 

the Government. It was agreed that if he should 
carry out these conditions, all the lands which he 
had held in Islay should be restored to him, except 
the Rhinns. He returned to Islay, but took no 
steps to comply with the obligations imposed 
upon him. 

Towards the end of the year 1597 Lachlan Mor 
and Angus of Islay came to some sort of settle- 
ment and agreed to proceed together to Ireland to 
fight in behalf of Queen Elizabeth against the Earl 
of Tyrone. They were to take with them between 
2,000 and 3,000 men. They did not, however, 
carry out their purpose. It is evident, then, that 
Elizabeth did not give them the encouragement 
expected by them. The conditions on which 
Lachlan Mor and Angus of Islay became recon- 
ciled, we do not know. It may be taken for 
granted, however, that one of the terms was that 
Lachlan should be left in undisturbed possession 
of the Rhinns. 

In October, 1596, Angus of Islay made over his 
estates to his son James, reserving for himself only 
a life interest. But Angus had no legal claim to 
the estates at that time ; they belonged to the 
King ; consequently the deed given to James was 
absolutely worthless. In 1597 James received the 
honour of knighthood from the King. Shortly 
afterwards he resolved to deprive his father of all 
influence and to take the management of the estates 
entirely into his own hands. An opportunity for 
carrying out his purpose with respect to his 



Lachlan Mor. 141 

father soon presented itself. Gorrie Macalister, the 
young laird of Loup, slew his tutor, and also in- 
tended to slay his two sons. The young men fled 
to Askamull, the residence of Angus of Islay, and 
enjoyed the protection of the latter. In January, 
1598, James Mac Angus, accompanied by the laird 
of Loup, his own brother Angus Og, and two or 
three armed followers, went to Askamull in the 
dead of night to arrest the Macalisters. When 
the men whose lives he sought refused to come out 
of the house to be executed, he placed a number 
of trees around it and set fire to it. He evidently 
expected that his father and mother would be burnt 
to death. They managed, however, to get out of 
the burning building in time to save their lives. 
He immediately arrested his father, and sent him 
to Smerby in Kintyre, where he kept him in irons 
for several months. He had now full charge of 
the estates. He acted, however, in such a violent 
manner that it became necessary in the month of 
June to issue a proclamation for a royal expedition 
to Kintyre. 

In the spring of 1598, Sir James Macdonald 
determined to deprive Lachlan Mor of the Rhinns 
of Islay, and thus to make himself master of all 
the lands which had belonged to his father. As 
Lachlan Mor had received the Rhinns from the 
King he refused to part with them. Both parties 
prepared for war. The end of their disagreement 
was that Lachlan Mor was slain at Gruinnart in 
Islay on the 5th of August, 1598. 



142 The Clan Gillean. 

Tytler in his history of Scotland gives the follow- 
ine account of Lachlan Mors death :— " Lachlan 
Maclean of Duart was treacherously slain in Islay 
by his nephew, Sir James Macdonald, who per- 
suaded him to visit the island ; alleging, as a 
pretext, his desire to make an amicable settlement 
of their differences. So little did the brave Lord 
of Duart suspect any foul play, that he came to 
the meeting without armour, in a silk dress, and 
with only a rapier at his side. Along with him 
were his second son, and the best of his kin, in 
their holiday garb, and with little other arms 
than their hunting-knives and boar spears; but, 
although set upon by an ambush of nearly 
700 men, they made a desperate defence. Mac- 
lean, a man of herculean strength, slew three 
of the Macdonalds at the first onset. When he 
saw that there was no hope, he commanded his 
son, who fought beside him, to fly, and live to 
avenge him ; but the chief himself, and a little knot 
of his clansmen, stood shoulder to shoulder, and 
were not cut down till after fifty of their assailants 
had fallen. The death of this great chief was 
little resented by the King, for James had long 
been jealous of his dealings with Elizabeth." — 
Tytler founds his statements on the contents of a 
letter written to Sir Robert Cecil, on the 10th of 
August, 1598, by Nicholson, the English envoy 
at the Scottish court. They are thus in all proba- 
bility substantially correct. 

According to the Ardgour MS., Lachlan Mor 



Lachlan Mor. 143 

and Sir James Macdonald agreed to meet at Gruin- 
nart on the 5th of August, 1598, to adjust in a 
friendly manner all the matters in dispute between 
them. Accordingly Lachlan Mor went to Islay on 
the day appointed, with Hector Og his eldest son, 
and his whole clan. He landed on Nave Island, 
where he left Hector Og and the most of his fol- 
lowers. He took sixty men with him to Gruinnart. 
He sent his proposals to Sir James, who sent a 
few gentlemen of his clan back with answers. Sir 
James learned from his scouts that Lachlan Mor 
had only a few men with him, and that the men 
whom he had left on Nave Island could not, owing 
to the ebb of the tide, leave the place in which they 
were. Sir James immediately attacked his uncle 
with the Islay men, the Kintyre men not having 
yet arrived. Lachlan Mor made a desperate re- 
sistance, and forced the Macdonalds to retire 
several times. At last the Kintyre men came up. 
Sir James now attacked the Macleans with his 
whole force and overpowered them. Lachlan 
Mor was shot in the belly through his target. His 
followers were all cut down, except a few who 
succeeded in making their escape by flight. — The 
Ardgour MS. undoubtedly gives the story current 
in Mull in 1762. Lachlan Mor's " whole clan," 
or followers, would number about 600 men. 

According to Seannachie's history of the Mac- 
leans, Lachlan Mor sailed to Islay at the head of 
600 men. He left 340 men on Nave Island and 
took 250 with him to Gruinnart. He was accom- 



144 The Clan Gillean. 

panied by Lachlan Og, his second son. Sir James 
Macdonald had 1500 men with him, nearly all of 
whom were hidden behind the hills. When Lach- 
lan Mor saw that he was in danger he took up a 
strong position on a hill, from which he drove 
away some Macdonalds who had occupied it. Sir 
James attacked him with 800 men, but was driven 
back. Shortly after the fight had begun Lachlan 
Og was wounded. His father immediately sent 
him off in charge of ten or twelve men to Nave 
Island. In his second attack upon his uncle, Sir 
James had 900 men under him. Lachlan Mor 
moved down the hill to meet his nephew. When 
he was almost within striking distance of him he 
called out to him, A Sheumais, a Sheumaisa mhic 
mo pheathar, fag mo rathad, James, James, son 
of my sister, get out of my way. These words had 
scarcely been uttered when a shot from one of Sir 
James's followers brought the hero of Glenlivet to 
the ground. The Macleans, enraged by the fall 
of their chief, fought on with uncontrollable fury. 
Sir James was at last under the necessity of calling 
up his reserve. The Macleans were now over- 
powered and all slain except seven or eight. — 
This account of the fight at Gruinnart cannot 
be depended upon. It is not in accordance with 
the traditions of the Macleans. Neither is it 
in accordance with any of the old histories which 
refer to Lachlan Mor's death. It is probably 
correct in stating that Lachlan left Mull with 
600 men. It is certain, however, that James 



Lachlan Mor. 145 

Macdonald had not 1500 men with him. Nichol- 
son's letter, which fixes the number of the 
Macdonalds at 700, evidently contains the truth. 
It is absurd to suppose that an experienced warrior 
like Lachlan Mor would leave an advantageous 
position to attack 900 men with 250 men. It is 
equally absurd to think that Sir James Macdonald 
would have found it necessary to call up his reserve 
to crush a handful of leaderless Macleans. 

According to " The History of the Feuds and 
Conflicts of the Clans " — a work written in the 
time of James VI. — Sir Lachlan Maclean claimed 
the whole of Islay. He assembled all his forces, 
and invaded that island to take possession of it. 
Sir James Macdonald likewise assembled his forces 
and went to Islay to prevent his uncle from carry- 
ing out his intentions. Certain persons who were 
interested in both of them tried to effect a recon- 
ciliation between them. Sir James agreed to let 
his uncle have the half of the island during his 
lifetime, providing he would consent to hold the 
land of him as his feudal superior. Moreover, he 
offered to submit the controversy to the arbitration 
of the King. Sir Lachlan refused to come to 
any settlement with his nephew unless the latter 
"would resign to him the title and possession of 
the whole island." The consequence was that 
both prepared for battle. Sir James Macdonald 
was far inferior, in the number of men, to his uncle, 
but some of those who were with him had been 
trained in the wars in Ireland and were better 



146 The Clan Gillean. 

disciplined than the Macleans. At the beginning 
of the battle Sir James caused his vanguard to 
pretend to retreat, in order to get possession of the 
top of a hill which was near them, and also to get 
the sun to their back. In the end he defeated the 
Macleans. Sir Lachlan and eighty of his leading 
men, together with 200 common soldiers, were 
slain. Lachlan Og and those who survived with 
him were chased to their boats. Sir James was 
dangerously wounded by an arrow, and was left 
during the greater part of the night on the field 
along with the slain. Thirty of the Macdonalds 
were killed and sixty wounded. 

It is quite clear that the foregoing account of 
the origin of the fight at Gruinnart and the fight 
itself is entirely erroneous. Lachlan Mor obtained 
a right to the Rhinns of Islay in 1596. It is 
likely, then, that he had possession of that district 
before August, 159S. It is unreasonable to sup- 
pose that he claimed the whole of Islay. On 
what ground could he claim that part of it which 
was still in the hands of the King? As James 
Macdonald had no legal claim either to the whole 
or a part of Islay, it was impossible for him to 
resign to Lachlan Mor " the title and possession 
of the whole island." How could he give to an- 
other that which did not belong to himself? The 
assertion that Sir James was willing to leave the 
matters in dispute to the King's decision is entirely 
groundless; it cannot be true. What was the King 
to decide ? Was it whether Sir James had a right 






Lachlan Mor. 147 

to the whole of I slay or not? The decree of for- 
feiture pronounced against Angus Macdonald in 
June, 1594, had already settled that point. Was 
the King to decide whether Lachlan Mor should 
hold the Rhinns of I slay of James Macdonald as 
his feudal superior or not ? Surely the fact that 
the King, who was the actual owner of those lands, 
had leased them to Lachlan Mor was as clear and 
full a decision with regard to this matter as could 
be given. How could Lachlan Mor be the vassal 
of a man who had no lands for himself? It is 
likely that so far as courage and strength were 
concerned the Macleans were equal, man for man, 
to the Macdonalds ; it is also likely that the war- 
riors of Glenlivet were just as well disciplined as 
the men who had been fighting in Ireland, and it 
is certain that Lachlan Mor was an abler strategist 
than James Macdonald. It is extremely difficult, 
then, to believe that the victorious Macdonalds 
were far inferior in numbers to the defeated Mac- 
leans. The assertion that James Macdonald was 
severely wounded is unquestionably incorrect. 
The truth is that " The History of the Feuds and 
Conflicts of the Clans" mixes together two different 
events. It deals with the fight at Gruinnart and 
the battle of Benvigory as if they were one and 
the same conflict. It makes no reference at all to 
the latter ; it is a well-known fact, however, that 
there was such a battle. 

Our own conclusion respecting the things which 
took place at Gruinnart, is that Lachlan Mor and 



The Clan Gillean. 

James Macdonald met thereto settle their disputes 
in a friendly manner, that when Sir James found 
out that the men on Xave Island could not get off, 
he resolved to attack Lachlan Ifor at once, that 
Lachlan Og was sent away to Xave Island either 
for safety or for assistance, and that Sir James 
;Jonald fell upon the Macleans with a strong 
e and slaughtered them. There are strong 
reasons for this view. In the first place, it is 
impossible to accept the statements of Seannachie's 
his: " The History of the Feu in- 

flicts of the Clans " as facts. In the second place, 
N jholson's letter and the Ardgour MS. support 
our view. In the third place, the * of the 

Privy Council informs us that one of the crimes 
eh Sir James Macdonald was committed to 
prison in 1604 was "the treasonable murder of 
Sir Lachlan Maclean of Duart, his uncle, com- 
mitted under trust and credit." In the fourth 
place, one of the crimes for which Sir James 
received a remission in 1620 was " the slaughter 
of Maclean." 

Lachlan Mor was a man of uncommon strength 
and activity, and an excellent swordsman. He 
possessed a strong and vigorous intellect, and 
thoroughly understood the art of governing those 
over whom he ruled. His military genius was of 
a high order. As a commander he had no equal 
in the Highlands in his day. He was of an im- 
perious disposition and determined, at all hazards, 
to have his own way. His weak point was his 



Lachlan Mor. 149 

readiness to believe his enemies. He acted fool- 
ishly when he went to Mullintrea, and he acted 
still more foolishly when he went to Gruinnart 
with only sixty men. He was forty-one years of 
age at the time of his death. He was buried at 
Kilchoman in Islay. His grave is on the outside 
of the church, and near the south wall. He was 
slain on August 5th, 1598. 

TRADITIONS ABOUT LACHLAN H 

Seannachie relates the following story concern- 
ing Lachlan Mors courtship and marriage : — In 
the beginning of December, 1577, Lachlan Mor 
paid a visit to the Scottish court. King James 
was exceedingly anxious that he should marry 
Dorothea Stewart, eldest daughter of John, fifth 
Earl of Atholl. All the parties concerned fell 
in with the King's plan. The consequence was 
that a contract of marriage between Lachlan and 
Dorothea Stewart was drawn up and signed. The 
marriage was to take place in the course of a few 
weeks. While Lachlan was on his way bacr 
make ready for the coming event he calk 
the Earl of Cunningham and staid a few days. 
He fell in love with Margaret, one of the Earl's 
daughters, proposed to her, and was accepted. 
When King James heard of his marriage he was 
much displeased with him for his fickleness and 
dishonourable conduct. 

There can be no truth in this story. It is 
probable that when Lachlan Mor was a boy he 



150 The Clan Gillean. 

spent a good part of his time with his maternal 
uncle, the Earl of Argyll. But Argyll's wife was 
Margaret Cunningham's aunt. It may be taken 
for granted, then, that Lachlan was acquainted 
with the fascinating Margaret long before Decem- 
ber, 1577. James VI. was only eleven years old in 
1577 and could scarcely at that early age have been 
an accomplished match-maker. John Stewart, 
fifth Earl of Atholl, was not born before the year 
1550. Consequently, it is exceedingly improbable 
that he had a daughter who was old enough in 
1577 to be married to Lachlan Mor or any one 
else, except a heathen Chinee. 

According to a tradition recorded in the Ardgour 
MS., the Macdonalds held a council of war on 
the morning of the day on which they intended 
to attack the Macleans at Lecklee. They noticed 
that Maclean of Boreray, a vassal of Macdonald 
of Sleat, looked extremely sad. " It cannot be a 
pleasant business for you," said Donald Gorm 
Mor to him, " to go with us to-day to slay your 
chief and his followers ; you may therefore remain 
in the rear." " I am much obliged to you for 
your offer," replied Boreray, "but I cannot accept 
it ; it is not unwillingness to fight against my own 
clan that makes me so sad ; it is something else." 
" What is the cause of your trouble, then ?" asked 
Macdonald. After a good deal of urging, Boreray 
told him that about the middle of the night, just as 
he had fallen asleep, he heard a man uttering in a 
melancholy voice the following words : — 



Lachlan Mor. i 5 i 

A Lic-li sin, O Lic-li, 

'S ann ort-s' a bheirear an dith. 

Clann-Ghilleain bheir iad buaidh 

Air an t-sluagh a thig air tir. 

'Ghearna dhubh, 's i Ghearna dhubh ! 

'S ann uimp' a dhoirtear an fhuil, 

Marbhar an Ridire Ruadh 

Mu'n deid lann an truaill an diugh. 

These lines may be rendered into English as 
follows : — 

O Lecklee, thou dread Lecklee, 
Great the carnage thou shalt see. 
The Macleans shall win the day ; 
The invaders slain shall be. 
Gerna Dubh, thou hill of woe, 
Tides of blood shall round thee flow, 
Ere the gleaming swords shall rest 
The Red Knight shall be laid low. 

Donald Gorm Mor believed that Boreray had 
actually heard the prophetic words which he re- 
hearsed, and became alarmed for his own safety 
and that of the men who were with him 1 he 
consequence was that the invaders hastened back 
to their boats as fast as they could. 

Donald Gorm Mor, who is undoubtedly the 
person meant by the Red Knight, was neither a 
baronet nor a knight. Donald Gorm Og y who 
succeeded him, was created a baronet in 1625. It 
is certain, then, that the poetic version of Boreray s 



152 The Clan Gillean. 

dream was not composed prior to that date. It is 
possible that Boreray was at Lecklee, and that he 
was something of a poet. It is utterly improbable, 
however, that he would have tried to fool a sensible 
man like Donald Gorm Mor by telling him that he 
had been taught two verses of poetry in a dream. 
The Macdonalds left Lecklee simply because they 
knew that it would be certain death for them to 
attack the Macleans in the strong position occupied 
by them. At all events, it was not Boreray's dream 
that caused them to go away. 

According to the Ardgour MS. the Macdonalds 
prepared to invade Mull a second time. They 
appointed the small island of Bakka, am Bac, at 
the south end of Kerrera, as their place of rendez- 
vous, their object being to attack Lachlan Mor in 
Duart Castle. Lachlan, aware of their intentions, 
collected a large force of Macleans, Macneils, Mac- 
quarries, and Mackinnons. He had also Maclean 
of Boreray with him. He left Duart at the head 
of his followers and sailed towards Bakka. The 
Macdonalds were drawn up on the shore prepared 
to receive their opponents. The Macleans sent 
several volleys of arrows among them and com- 
pelled them to retreat from the shore. Lachlan 
Mor immediately landed his forces, and advanced 
to the attack. He defeated the Macdonalds and 
forced them to seek safety in their galleys, which 
lay on the other side of the island. Macneil of 
Barra and Maclean of Boreray had command of 
the archers, and displayed signal valour in the 



Lachlan Mor. 153 

battle. After their defeat at Bakka the Macdonalds 
made no further attempt to invade Mull and beard 
the lion in his den. 

We are inclined to think that there was no such 
contest as the battle of Bakka, and that the affair 
really referred to is the capture of the Macdonalds 
on Calve Island in July, 1595. It is not at all 
likely that Maclean of Boreray fought against 
Macdonald of Sleat. The probability is that in 
the war between the Macdonalds and the Macleans 
he was allowed to remain neutral. 

In 1873, J. F. Campbell of Islay published the 
following story, as a short sample of popular local 
history : — There was a quarrel between Maclean of 
Duart and his brother. The latter was under the 
necessity of seeking refuge in Ireland, where he 
remained three years. Duart sent word to his 
brother, asking him to return and promising to 
forgive his past offences. The exile returned, but 
was immediately seized and condemned to death. 
Duart ordered Neil Mor Maclean to cut off the 
doomed man's head. He was told that unless 
he would do so his own head would be cut off. 
Through fear Neil Mor beheaded Maclean's 
brother. The sword became fast in the block. 
In order to draw it back Neil put his foot against 
the head. Maclean became enraged and said to 
him, Although I ordered the blow I will not suffer 
the insult. He commanded that Neil should be 
put to death. Neil fled and escaped. He suc- 
ceeded in keeping out of the hands of Maclean 



154 The Clan Gillean. 

and his followers for three years. Maclean sent 
for a powerful man named Allan Macdonald and 
persuaded him to go in search of Neil to arrest or 
slay him. Allan took fifteen men with him and 
went to Drimnacross, where Neil resided. When 
they entered Neil's house they asked his wife if her 
husband was at home. She went to the other end 
of the house, where she had Neil concealed, and 
took out a large bar of iron. She broke a piece 
of the bar off with her hands and gave it to the 
ploughman, saying, When your master went to 
the forge he told me to send you after him with a 
piece of iron ; take this with you and tell him that 
there are men in the house who want to see him. 
Don't tell him that, said Allan Macdonald ; we have 
no business of any importance with him. Allan and 
his men immediately left the house. When they 
were out of hearing, Allan said to those with him, 
We should be thankful to the Almighty that Neil's 
wife did not know the business we were on ; had 
she known it, she would have killed us all with 
that iron bar. Some time afterwards Maclean sent 
word to Neil Mor that he wanted him to come to 
see him so that they would make peace. Neil went 
to see Maclean. They settled their disputes and 
parted on good terms. On returning Neil said to 
his wife, Thank God I can sleep in my own bed 
to-night, a thing that I have not done for three 
years. His wife advised him to sleep in his hiding- 
place that night also, but he did not heed her. 
Through the night a body of men, sent by Mac- 



Lachlan Mor. 155 

lean, came to the house. They broke in the door; 
but Neil escaped and fled towards Bealach Ruadh. 
At Clachan Dubh he was met by a band of Mac- 
lean's men. A fight took place and Neil was left 
half dead on the ground. When his assailants 
were some distance on the way home, one of them, 
Dugald Roy Mac Alpin, said, I should not wonder 
if Neil Mor would come alive yet. The whole 
band immediately returned. They found Neil on 
his knees and the palms of his hands. They 
attacked him again and tore him apart into such 
small bits that it was in a bed-rug he was taken 
home. 

Ridiculous as the foregoing story is, we have 
reason to think that there are some persons who 
regard it as genuine history. They heard it from 
their fathers, and they believe that their fathers had 
it word for word as it existed originally. They 
make no allowance for the changes which a story 
undergoes in being handed down from one genera- 
tion to another. 

The Maclean referred to is Lachlan Mor. He 
had no brother, but he had a step-father, Hector 
Mac Allan, and a step-father who was plotting 
against his life and deserved to be put to death. 
Hector Mac Allan was not in Ireland at all, but 
Lachlan Mor was in the Lowlands about three 
years. Thus Hector Mac Allan and himself were 
parted during the period stated. Hector Mac 
Allan was beheaded in Coll in 1578 ; but Lachlan 
Mor was not present at the' execution ; neither was 



156 The Clan Gillean. 

Neil Mor. Lachlan Mor took possession of Coll 
in 1593, and compelled his opponent, Neil Mor, to 
flee for his life. He gave up Coll to its owner in 
November, 1596. Thus Neil Mor was in danger 
from Lachlan for three years. He was slain 
evidently about the end of 1596 or the beginning 
of 1597. The part of the story which states that 
Lachlan Mor had patched up a false peace with 
Neil Mor is a pure fiction. It can easily be shown 
that Lachlan committed some high-handed and 
wrong acts ; it cannot be shown, however, that 
treachery had a resting-place in his nature ; it had 
not. 

We are told in "The Feuds and Conflicts of 
the Clans" that Lachlan Mor consulted a witch 
before leaving for Gruinnart. She gave him two 
advices. The first was, not to land on Islay on a 
Thursday ; and the second, not to drink of the 
water of a certain spring near Gruinnart. He 
was driven to Islay by a tempest on Thursday, 
and drank of the water of the forbidden spring 
before he knew that he was in the wrong place. 
According to Dr. Norman Macleod's Cuairtear 
nan Gleann, the Macleans, before starting on an 
expedition, were in the habit of walking sunwise 
three times around a small island in Loch Speilbh. 
Lachlan Mor ridiculed this practice and walked 
three times around the island in the opposite 
direction. The superstitious men among his 
followers were greatly discouraged by this act. 

It may be regarded as pretty certain that such 



Lachlan Mor. 157 

an intelligent man and skilful strategist as Lachlan 
Mor never consulted a witch with regard to the 
steps to be taken for winning a battle. Then, it 
is probably equally certain that he did not go to 
the trouble of walking around the island in any 
direction whatever. We may be sure that he 
would do nothing to dampen the ardour of his 
followers. 

Tradition tells us that the man who slew Lach- 
lan Mor was known as Dubhsith and that he was 
a native of Jura. He was short in stature, but a 
good marksman. William Livingstone, the dis- 
tinguished Islay poet, describes him as a dwarf 
hatched by the devil in the hollow in Jura,— 
" troich a ghuir an diabhal 'san lag an Diura." 
Dubhsith offered his services to Lachlan Mor on 
the morning of the fight at Gruinnart. Lachlan 
gruffly told him that he would not disgrace his 
followers by having such a contemptible-looking 
creature as he was among them. Dubhsith went 
immediately to James Macdonald and asked per- 
mission to fight under him. James spoke kindly 
to him, and told him that he should be very glad 
to have him with him. According to one account 
Dubhsith had a gun and was on the look-out all 
day for an opportunity to kill Lachlan Mor. As 
Lachlan was climbing a hill he bent, and thus 
caused an opening in the joints of his defensive 
armour. Dubhsith took immediate aim and fired 
at him. According to another account, it was a 
bow and arrow that Dubhsith had. As Lachlan 



158 The Clan Gillean. 

Mor raised his arm he exposed a part of his side. 
Dubhsith instantly launched an arrow into his 
side just below the arm. 

There is not the slightest ground for believing 
that Dubhsith had proffered his services to Lach- 
lan Mor on the morning of the fight. He was 
undoubtedly with James Macdonald when the 
Macleans arrived at Gruinnart. William Living- 
stone agrees with the Ardgour MS. in affirming 
that Lachlan Mor was shot in the belly. 



CHAPTER VII. 
Sector <% anb Sector #lor. 

XIV. Eachann Og. 

Hector Og was brought up and educated with 
Colin Cam Mackenzie of Kintail. He received a 
royal charter, in March, 1588, of the island of Iona 
and certain lands in Mull, Tiree, and Islay ; all of 
which had formerly belonged to the abbot of 
Iona. He was about twenty years of age when 
he became Lord of Duart. He felt it to be his 
first duty to punish the Macdonalds of Islay for 
the murder of his father. He was assisted in 
carrying out his purpose by Rory Mor Macleod 
of Harris, and especially by Allan Cameron of 
Lochiel. Maclean of Lochbuie supported Sir James 
Macdonald. Hector Og and his assistants invaded 
Islay with a large force. They encountered the 
Macdonalds and their associates at Benvigory, 
and inflicted a severe defeat upon them. Sir James 
was dangerously wounded by an arrow, and 



160 The Clan Gillean. 

Lochbuie taken prisoner by Allan of Lochiel. 
Immediately after their victory the confederates 
ravaged the greater part of I slay with fire and 
sword. The wars between the Macleans of Duart 
and the Macdonalds of I slay were now over. 
Benvigory was their last battle. In 1602 Hector 
Og was summoned to appear before the Privy 
Council to render obedience to the King, to give 
security to pay the King's mails and duties, and 
to answer " touching the slaughters, herships, and 
depredations committed by him upon the King's 
own tenants in the Isles of Oronsay and Colon- 
say." As he refused to appear he was declared a 
rebel and put to the horn. The people of Oronsay 
and Colonsay were active supporters of Sir James 
Macdonald. That, no doubt, was Hector Og's 
reason for attacking them. 

In the autumn of 1602, Kenneth, first Lord 
Mackenzie of Kintail, obtained a commission of fire 
and sword against the Macdonalds of Glengarry. 
As the latter were assisted by the Macdonalds of 
Moydart and Ardnamurchan, he paid a visit to 
Mull for the purpose of procuring the help of 
Hector Og, who had married his sister. Hector 
Og, at his request, invaded Ardnamurchan and 
ravaged that district. These acts brought Hector 
into trouble with the Earl of Argyll, who was the 
legal owner of Ardnamurchan. As, however, 
Lord Kintail, who had a right to punish both the 
Macdonalds of Glengarry and their supporters, 
offered to hold himself responsible for Hector Og's 



Hector Og. i6x 

doings, Argyll did not press his complaint against 
the latter. 

On the 20th of September, 1603, Argyll obtained 
letters from the King charging Angus Macdonald 
of Islay and Hector Og of Duart to give up the 
castles of Dunnyveg and Duart to him. In case 
they should refuse to comply with this request, 
they were to be held as traitors and to be deprived of 
their estates. The authority thus given to Argyll 
proved of no use to him. But the fact that he 
went to the trouble of procuring it shows the hos- 
tile feelings which he entertained towards both the 
Macdonalds and the Macleans. 

On September 4th, 1604, James Cunningham, 
Earl of Glencairn, came under obligation to David 
Murray, Lord Scone, Comptroller of Scotland, to 
deliver Duart Castle to the King whenever required 
to do so, and to see the following payments made 
to the Comptroller, as part of the crown rents due 
by Hector Og : at Martinmas, 1604, 2,500 marks ; 
in August, 1605, 5,000 marks ; and at Martinmas, 
ID 05, ,£5,000. Hector Og was now relaxed from 
the horn. 

In 1603, Angus Macdonald of Islay received 
information that his son and heir was meditating 
another plot against him. He arrested Sir James 
at once, and delivered him to Campbell of Auchin- 
breck, who handed him over to the Earl of Argyll. 
In 1604 tne Privy Council confined him as a 
prisoner in the royal castle of Blackness. He 
tried twice to escape, but did not succeed. In 1607 



1 62 The Clan Gillean. 

Argyll obtained from King James a charter of all 
those lands in Kintyre and Jura, which had been 
forfeited by Angus Macdonald of Islay. One of 
the conditions on which the lands were given him 
was that he would not let any of them to persons 
of the name of Macdonald or Maclean without 
the King's consent. These lands are still in pos- 
session of the Campbells. 

In 1608, Andrew Stewart, Lord Ochiltree, was 
appointed by the King and Privy Council lieuten- 
ant over the Isles. Andrew Knox, Bishop of the 
Isles, Sir James Hay of Kingask, and others were 
appointed a council to assist him. He made an 
expedition to the Western Isles in the month of 
August. He had a small fleet and army under 
his command. The first place he visited was Islay. 
Angus Macdonald handed over to him the castle 
of Dunnyveg and the fort of Lochgorm. He 
placed a garrison of twenty-four men in the former, 
and razed the latter to the ground. He left Islay 
on the 14th of August and, after a very stormy 
passage, landed at Duart on the 15th. Hector 
Og surrendered Duart Castle to him without hesi- 
tation. He took possession of it on the 17th, but 
gave it back to its owner in the course of a few 
days. From Duart he went to Aros, where he 
held a court. Among the Islesmen who attended 
were the following : — Angus Macdonald of Islay ; 
Donald Gorm Mor Macdonald of Sleat ; Donald 
Mac Allan, captain of the Clanranald ; Rory Mor 
Macleod of Dunvegan ; Hector Og of Duart ; 



Hector Og. 163 

Lachlan Maclean of Ardnacross, Hector Og's 
brother ; Allan, son of Charles Maclean, tutor of 
Ardgour ; and Neil Mac Ilduy and Neil Mac Rory, 
two of Hector Og's principal vassals, both un- 
doubtedly Macleans. Angus Macdonald of Islay 
readily agreed to all the conditions imposed on 
him, and was allowed to return home. As the 
other landlords were not quite so pliable, Lord 
Ochiltree, by the advice of the tricky Bishop 
Knox, resolved to kidnap them. He invited them 
to go with him on board the King's ship, called 
the Moon, to hear a sermon from the Bishop. All 
of them accepted the invitation except Rory Mor 
of Dunvegan. When the sermon was over, Lord 
Ochiltree prevailed upon the Islesmen to dine with 
him. As soon as the dinner was finished he told 
them that they would have to accompany him to 
Edinburgh, and immediately weighed anchor and 
sailed off with them. He arrived in Edinburgh 
about the beginning of October. Some of the 
captives were confined in Dumbarton, some in 
Blackness, and some in Stirling. King James 
was greatly delighted with the success of the expe- 
dition. He could now compel the Macleans and 
Macdonalds to obey his laws and pay him the rents 
which he demanded of them. Besides, he had a 
bishop after his own heart. Hector Og, Lachlan, 
his brother, Allan, son of the tutor of Ardgour, 
Neil Mac Ilduy, and Neil Mac Rory seem to have 
been all imprisoned in Dumbarton. On February 
24th, 1609, Hector Og appeared in Edinburgh 



{64 The Clan Gillean^ 

before the commissioners of the Isles and offered to 
be answerable for all the inhabitants of Tiree and 
Morvern, the inhabitants of his part of Mull, and 
the inhabitants of the lands which belonged to him 
in Islay, Coll r Jura r Kintyre, Scalpa, and Lochaber- 
He offered at the same time to give as pledges of his 
obedience such of his sons or brothers as the 
commissioners should name. As these offers were 
rejected, Hector was sent back to Dumbarton Castle. 
His brother, Lachlan Og, was sent back along- with 
him. Allan Maclean, Neil Mac Ilduy, and Neil 
Mac Rory were confined in the Tolbooth in Edin- 
burgh. On May 12th, 1609, Angus Macdonald of 
Islay was imprisoned in the castle of Blackness. 
In the summer of 1609 Bishop Knox was sent 
by King James as commissioner to the Western 
Islands to make such arrangements with the chiefs 
and chieftains as would tend to support the cause 
of law and order, and advance the civilization and 
welfare of the people. The Bishop, accompanied 
by Angus of Islay and Hector Og of Duart, 
arrived in Iona about the middle of July. At the 
meeting held by him the following prominent 
persons were present : — Angus of Islay ; Hector 
Og of Duart ; Donald Gorm Mor of Sleat ; Rory 
Mor Macleod of Dunvegan ; Donald Mac Allan 
of Moydart ; Lachlan Maclean of Coll ; Lachlan 
Mackinnon of Strathordill ; Hector Maclean of 
Lochbuie ; Lachlan Og Maclean ; Allan Maclean, 
brother of Hector Og and Lachlan Og ; Gillespick 
Macquarrie of Ulva ; and Donald Macphie from 



Hector Og. 165 

Colonsay. All these men professed their adher- 
ence to the Episcopalian Church and acknowledged 
King* James as "supreme judge under the eternal 
God in all causes, and above all persons, both 
spiritual and temporal." They also bound them- 
selves in the most solemn manner to act in 
accordance with the following regulations or 
statutes : — 1. That the ministers planted or to be 
planted in the parishes of the Isles should be 
reverently obeyed, that their stipends should be 
dutifully paid, that ruinous churches should be re- 
paired with reasonable diligence, that the Sabbaths 
should be solemnly kept, and that the marriages 
contracted for certain years should be considered 
illegal and those entering into such marriages 
punished as fornicators. 2. That inns should be 
established at convenient places for the convenience 
of travellers and the benefit of the people, who 
were put to inconvenience and trouble in enter- 
taining travellers. 3. That no idle persons or 
masterless vagabonds should be allowed to reside 
within the Isles. 4. That all persons, who were 
not natives of the Isles, and who should be found 
sorning, or living upon the inhabitants, should 
be punished as thieves and oppressors. 5. That 
while men of wealth might import wines and other 
liquors for their own use, and while any person 
could brew as much whiskey as he required in 
his own family, no merchant should be allowed to 
keep wines or any other liquors for sale. Liquor 
found with a merchant could be seized and de- 



1 66 The Clan Gillean. 

stroyed ; while a person buying liquor from a 
merchant could be fined forty pounds for the first 
offence, one hundred pounds for the second, and be 
deprived of all he possessed for the third. 6. That 
every gentleman or yeoman within the Isles, 
worth in goods sixty cows, should send his eldest 
son to school in the Lowlands and keep him there 
until he should learn to speak, read, and write 
English. If he had only female children, he was 
to send his eldest daughter. 7. That no firearms 
should be used. 8. That wandering bards should 
be punished. 

These regulations were upon the whole well 
observed and had a beneficial effect. Bishop Knox 
took Angus of Islay and Hector Og back with 
him to Edinburgh. They were both released 
shortly afterwards. James, Earl of Glencairn, and 
Kenneth Mackenzie of Kintail became securities 
for Hector Og. They were bound under a penalty 
of jC 30,000 for his appearance before the Council 
whenever required. 

On the 28th of June, 1610, Hector Og of Duart, 
Angus Macdonald of Islay, Donald Gorm Mor of 
Sleat, Rory Mor Macleod of Dunvegan, Donald 
Mac Allan of Moydart, Lachlan Mackinnon of 
Strathordill, and Allan Cameron of Lochiel ap- 
peared before the Privy Council in Edinburgh. 
They bound themselves by a solemn promise to 
assist the King's lieutenant, justices, and com- 
missioners in securing obedience to the laws of 
the land ; to live at peace with one another ; and 



Hector Og. 167 

to bring such disputes as might spring up 
among them before the courts of law and justice. 
This agreement, if carried out, would put an end 
to their ferocious feuds. About a month afterwards 
the Bishop of the Isles was appointed for life 
steward and justice of all the West and North 
Isles of Scotland, except the Orkney and Shetland 
Islands. He was at the same time appointed 
constable of the castle of Dunnyveg in I slay. In 
1613 we find Hector Og of Duart, Donald Gorm 
Mor of Sleat, Rory Mor of Dunvegan, and Don- 
ald Mac Allan of Moydart referred to as persons 
who had settled with the Exchequer. In the same 
year, Sir James Campbell of Lawers tried to 
obtain from King James a charter of the Maclean 
lands in Morvern. The King was willing to grant 
these lands to him. He was to receive them, how- 
ever, on condition that in case the Macleans should 
rise up in rebellion, the Earl of Argyll and himself 
were to reduce them to subjection at their own 
charge, or else give the lands back to the King. 
For some reason or other Sir James did not receive 
the lands which he was so anxious to obtain. 
Probably the Earl of Argyll was not disposed to 
give him the assistance which he would in all like- 
lihood require to gain possession of them. 

In December, 1613, Allan Cameron of Lochiel 
was proclaimed a rebel. The Government gave a 
commission of fire and sword against him to the 
Marquis of Huntly and his eldest son, the 
Earl of Enzie, both of whom were acting very 



1 68 The Clan Gilleax. 

unjustly towards the Camerons. The Gordons 
tried to capture Lochiel, but did not succeed. In 
the spring of 1614, the Privy Council summoned 
Hector Og of Duart, Sir Rory Mor Macleod of 
Dunvegan, Mackinnon, Maclean of Coll, and 
Maclean of Lochbuie "for the reset of Allan 
Cameron of Lochiel and for remaining from the 
army of the Earl of Enzie." On the 8th of July 
we find the summons continued in force until the 
10th of next July. As the word "reset" means har- 
bouring an outlaw, it is evident that Lochiel had 
to flee from Lochaber. The Government called 
upon the Macleans, Macleods, and Mackinnons to 
support the Gordons against the Camerons. Of 
course they did not comply with this cruel order; 
and it is very much to their credit that they did not. 
Angus Macdonald of Islay died about the year 
161 2. Shortly after his death, Sir Ranald Mac- 
donald, afterwards Earl of Antrim, obtained a lease 
of the lands of Islay and held them about two 
years. In the spring of 1614, Ranald Og } an 
illegitimate son of Angus of Islay, seized the castle 
of Dunnyveg, which was in charge of the Bishop 
of the Isles. Angus Og, a legitimate son of 
Angus, besieged the castle, captured it, and com- 
pelled his brother Ranald Og to flee for safety. 
He placed Coll Macdonald, Colla Ciotach, in 
charge of it, and professed his readiness to restore 
it to the Bishop. Through the influence of the 
Earl of Argyll, Angus Og was led to keep posses- 
sion of the castle, and thus to put himself and his 



Hector Og. 169 

clan in the position of being in rebellion against 
the Government. Sir John Campbell, fourth of 
Calder, offered a very high feu-duty, or perpetual 
rent, for I slay, and agreed to accept a commission 
against Angus Og and his followers. On the 21st 
of November the King granted him a charter of 
the whole island. He landed in Islay with a 
strong force on the 6th of January, 1615, and 
captured Dunnyveg on the 3rd of February. The 
Campbells had now possession of all the lands 
which had at one time belonged to Angus Mac- 
donald of Islay. 

In May, 161 5, Sir James Macdonald escaped 
from prison. He went directly to Lochaber, and 
thence through Moror and Knoydart to the Isle 
of Skye. He sailed from Eigg at the head of 
about 350 men, and landed in Colonsay about the 
1 8th of June. He went from Colonsay to Islay, 
and made himself master of the castle of Dunny- 
veg about the 24th of the month. The Earl of 
Argyll was sent against him by the Government 
with a strong force in September. As he was 
unable to resist Argyll, he fled to Ireland, whence 
he made his escape to Spain. In 1626, King 
James recalled him from Spain, pardoned him for 
all his past offences, and gave him a pension of 
1000 marks sterling a year. He died shortly 
afterwards. 

The Ardgour MS. informs us that a few hours 
after the battle of Glenlivet in 1594, Lachlan Mor 
of Duart offered the Earl of Argyll, if he would 



170 The Clan Gillean. 

give him 500 men, to attack the Earl of Huntly 
with his own followers and these men, and to 
bring that nobleman, dead or alive, to him. The 
offer was rejected, but Huntly heard that it had 
been made, and was greatly annoyed. He had no 
opportunity to take vengeance upon the author 
of it. Hector Og, however, was not allowed to 
escape. At a convention of estates which was to 
be held at Stirling all the Highland landlords were 
to appear. Hector Og arrived on the morning of 
the day appointed for the meeting. He met 
Huntly on the street, and told him that he should 
like to change his clothes before going to the con- 
vention if he would have time. The latter gave 
him to understand that there was no special reason 
for hastening to the convention. As soon as 
Huntly had parted with Hector Og he went to the 
convention and caused Hector's name to be imme- 
diately called in connection with the estate of 
Garbhdhabhach in Lochaber. As Hector was 
not present to answer his name he was instantly 
deprived of that estate. Shortly afterwards the 
King granted it to Huntly's son George, Lord 
Gordon. 

There may be some truth in the foregoing story. 
It is probable, however, that the real cause of the 
animosity of the Gordons against Hector Og was 
the sympathy of the Macleans with the Camerons 
in 1614. We know that the Macleans possessed 
Inverlochy and other lands in Lochaber, and that 
they were deprived of them by the Gordons about 



Hector Og. 17 l 

the year 161 5. That the Lochaber lands were 
taken from them by some very unfair means, is 
pretty certain. In June, 1616, Hector Og, Allan 
of Ardtornish, Allan's sons, and others attacked 
the castle of Inverlochy, cut down its gates with 
axes, took possession of it, and drove away its 
defenders. On the nth of the following July the 
Privy Council ordered the Macleans to deliver up 
the castle of Inverlochy to George, Lord Gordon, 
its legal owner. The Macleans, of course, were 
under the necessity of complying. Lord Gordon 
became Marquis of Huntly in 1636. He was a 
Jacobite, but through spite and jealousy refused 
to co-operate with the great Montrose. He was 
beheaded in Edinburgh in March, 1649. 

On July 1 2th, 1616, Hector Og appeared before 
the Privy Council and consented that a tack of his 
lands should be given for five years to James, Earl 
of Glencairn. On the 26th of July he named upon 
oath the following persons as his chief vassals: 
Lachlan Og, Allan, Gillean, and Charles, his broth- 
ers; Allan Mac Iain Duibh; Hector, son of Lachlan 
Og ; John Garbh Maclean ; Lachlan Mac Donald 
Mac Neil; Hector, son of Allan Mac Iain Duibh; 
Neil Macllduy; and Donald Mac Rory, captain of 
Duart. In the same month Hector Og, Sir Rory 
Mor Macleod, Donald Mac Allan of Moydart, 
Hector Maclean of Lochbuie, Lachlan Maclean of 
Coll, Sir Lachlan Mackinnon of Strathordill, and 
Lachlan Og Maclean appeared before the Privy 
Council, and bound themselves to act in accord- 



172 The Clan Gillean. 

ance with the following obligations : — 1. That 
they should keep good order among their vassals 
and appear before the Privy Council annually on 
the 10th of July. 2. That they should bring with 
them to the Council annually a certain number of 
their principal kinsmen. Duart was to bring four, 
Macleod three, Clanranald two, and Lochbuie, Coll, 
Mackinnon, and Lachlan Og one each. 3. That 
they were to maintain in their households only a 
certain number of gentlemen. Duart was allowed 
to maintain eight, Macleod and Clanranald six, 
and the others three each. 4. That they were 
to expel from their lands all sorners and idlers. 
5. That thc\' were not to carry pistols, except when 
employed in the King's service, and that none but 
themselves and their household gentlemen were to 
wear swords or daggers. 6. That they were to 
reside in certain places allotted to them. Hector 
Og was to reside at Duart, Sir Rory Mor Macleod 
at Dunvegan, Clanranald at Ellantirim, Lochbuie 
at Moy, Coll at Breacachadh, Mackinnon at Kil- 
morie, and Lachlan Og Maclean at Ardnacross. 
7. That they were to let lands to tenants at a 
certain fixed rent, in lieu of all exactions. 8. That 
none of them should keep more than one birlinn 
or galley. 9. That they should send those of 
their children who were over nine years of age 
to school in the Lowlands to be instructed in 
speaking, reading, and writing the English lang- 
uage. 10. That they were to use in their houses 
annually only a certain quantity of wine. Hector 



Hector Og. 173 

Og and Rory Mor were limited to four tuns each, 
Clanranald to three tuns, and the others to one 
tun, or about 252 gallons, each. 

Donald Gorm Mor was prevented by sickness 
from appearing before the Council, but came under 
the same obligations as the other Islanders in 
September. He was to exhibit three of his kins- 
men to the Council annually, to have six household 
gentlemen, and to reside in Duntulm. He was 
allowed to use three tuns of wine yearly. 

On July 28th, 1616, Hector Og and his brother 
Lachlan were committed to ward in the castle of 
Edinburgh for not giving the securities required of 
them by the Privy Council. On the 2nd of Sep- 
tember, Hector Og was permitted to leave the 
castle and reside with his father-in-law, Archibald 
Acheson of Gosford, who lived in Edinburgh. 
Acheson came under obligation to present Hector 
before the Privy Council whenever he should be 
required to do so. Lachlan, Hector Og's brother, 
was not liberated until the following year. 

On April 3rd, 161 7, the Privy Council gave to 
Sir Rory Mackenzie of Coigeach a commission of 
justiciary and general rule over the lands which 
belonged to Hector Maclean of Duart and enfeoffed 
him in these lands instead of Hector Og. On the 
30th of April the Privy Council empowered Wil- 
liam Cunningham to apprehend Hector Og for a 
debt of ,£1020 and to seize his house. The debt 
was originally only 850 marks, which Hector Og 
had borrowed from Alexander Cunningham of 



174 The Clan Gillean. 

Craigends. Through interest at " ten per cent." 
this small sum gradually swelled up to the amount 
mentioned. Shortly after William Cunningham 
had been empowered to arrest Hector Og, William 
Stewart, son of William Stewart, constable of 
Dumbarton Castle, sued Sir Rory Mackenzie of 
Coigeach, possessor of the lands of Hector Mac- 
lean of Duart, for the repayment of 1,000 marks, 
with expenses, for money advanced by his father 
to Hector during the imprisonment of the latter 
in Dumbarton Castle. 

On June nth, 1618, Sir Rory Mackenzie of 
Coigeach made the following complaint to the 
Privy Council: — Out of his tender respect and 
regard for Hector Maclean of Duart and the 
standing of his house, he took upon him the bur- 
den of a great number of his debts, for which he 
was sorely distressed within the burgh of Edin- 
burgh, and through which lie was likely to lose 
his whole estate. He was put in possession of 
Hector's estates, and finds that he is answerable in 
law for the whole of Hector's men, tenants, and 
servants. It is necessary that in the matter of 
preserving order and peace he should be properly 
supported by Allan Maclean of Carnnacallych, 
Gillean Maclean of Coull, Hector Maclean, son 
of Lachlan Maclean of Ardnacross, Donald Mac- 
gillivray of Pennyghael, John Garbh Maclean of 
Bunessan, Allan Mac Ewen in Ormasay, and Neil 
Mac Donald Vic Iain Uidhir in Ballinahard. 
These men had refused either to support him or 



Hector Og. 175 

to find caution for their own good behaviour, and 
he asks that the Council compel them to do both. 
The Council denounced the persons named as 
rebels. Of course as Sir Rory Mackenzie had 
possession of the Duart estates, the rents were 
uplifted by him. On the 27th of July, 1620, 
Hector Macneill of Taynish complained to the 
Privy Council that he had been employed by the 
friends of the House of Argyll, who were acting 
for the young Lord Lorn, to plant the Isle of Jura 
with good tenants and to see them suitably settled ; 
that he was interrupted in that work by Charles 
Maclean, brother of Hector Maclean of Duart, 
who came to the island with a number of mastiff 
dogs, chased away the cattle, and assaulted and 
terrified the new tenants ; and that the said Charles 
Maclean had threatened to return with a large 
force. Hector Og and Charles, his brother, were 
both proclaimed rebels. It is evident that Mac- 
neill of Taynish was expelling the Macleans from 
Jura and introducing Campbells in their place. On 
February 22nd, 162 1, Lachlan Maclean of Ardna- 
cross petitioned the Privy Council, asking that his 
yearly appearance before the Privy Council in 
Edinburgh be dispensed with, inasmuch as he was 
only a poor tenant. He states that he was a minor 
at the time of his father's death, that his father 
made no provision for him, and that his brother, 
Hector Og, had so carelessly and slothfully gov- 
erned and husbanded his estate that he could never 
provide for him or even for himself. About 1620, 



176 The Clan Gillean. 

Sir John Macdougall began to impose a toll upon 
the cattle landed by the people of Mull in Lorn. 
On March 28th, 1622, Sir Rory Mackenzie of 
Colo-each complained to the Privy Council of Sir 
John's conduct. In his complaint he states that 
he had become responsible for the whole of Hector 
Og's debts and also for the payment of the crown 
rents due by Hector, which rents amounted to the 
sum of 2,500 marks yearly. Sir John's unjust 
interference with his tenants was making it difficult 
for him to pay the crown rents. Sir John and his 
officers were proclaimed rebels. 

The history of the Macleans in the time of 
Hector Og is very unpleasant reading. It is the 
history of a declining power. It is probable that 
owing to the sanguinary wars in which Lachlan 
Mor was engaged he left some debt on the estate. 
It is also probable that in procuring assistance and 
fitting out an expedition to take vengeance on the 
slayers of his father, Hector Og was under a good 
deal of expense. Then, it is well known that the 
crown rents imposed by King James upon the Lord 
of Duart and other Islesmen were unreasonably 
heavy, so heavy indeed that it was scarcely possible 
to pay them. The truth is that James was always 
in need of money, and frequently committed very 
unjust acts to increase his income. He was not 
naturally cruel, but he hated the Islanders, and 
was ready to deprive them both of their lands and 
their lives. They had too much of the spirit of 
independence in them to suit his tyrannical notions 



Hector Mor. 177 

of the rights of kings ; especially of the rights of 
such a wise king as he deemed himself to be. In 
1607 he was ready to grant a commission to the 
Marquis of Huntly to extirpate them ; and the 
Marquis was equally ready to take the work in 
hand for a proper reward. But while Hector Og 
laboured under some disadvantages from the begin- 
ning of his chiefship, it is plainly evident that he 
was utterly unfit for the position which he occupied. 
He was, like David Bruce and Richard Cromwell, 
the weak son of a great father. He lacked sagacity 
and energy, and could neither manage his own 
affairs nor those of his clan. He was exceedingly 
careless, and probably extravagant; at any rate he 
was continually getting into debt. He died about 
the beginning of 1623. 

XV. Eachann Mor. 
We find Hector Mor described as " Hector 
Maclean now of Duart " on September 12th, 1623. 
He was a quiet and good-natured man. He 
possessed none of the fiery qualities of his grand- 
father, Sir Lachlan Mor. His brother Lachlan 
and himself took possession of the island of Iona 
some time after 1626. It is pretty certain, however, 
that Lachlan was far more responsible for this act 
than he was. The Ardgour MS. tells us that he 
was " a good man, but somewhat inactive." He 
died apparently about the year 1630. He was 
succeeded by his brother Lachlan. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

£ir ^Lachlan anb 3fcjt5 Sons. 

XVI. Sir Lachainn. 

We find Lachlan, second son of Hector Og, 
described on September 12th, 1623, as "Lachlan 
Maclean now of Morvern." On that day Hector, 
his brother, and himself became sureties for the 
annual appearance of Sir Rory Mor Macleod of 
Dun vegan before the Privy Council during* the 
next three years. He received a charter of the 
barony of Duart on July 24th, 1631. He was 
created a baronet by Charles I. on the 3rd of the 
following September. In both the charter and the 
patent of baronetcy he is described as Lachlan 
Maclean of Morvern. The title conferred upon 
him was not limited to heirs male of his body ; it 
was to descend " to his heirs male whatsoever." 

There must have been a good deal of debt on the 
Duart estates when Sir Lachlan obtained possession 
of them. At any rate he was under the necessity 
of borrowing money in 1634. For the payment 



Sir Lachlan. 179 

of the amount borrowed by him, Lord Lorn, after- 
wards Marquis of Argyll, became security for 
him. At the same time Sir Lachlan accepted 
Lord Lorn as his feudal superior in the lands of 
Brolas. 

During a vacancy in the see of the Isles, Hector 
Mor of Duart took possession of the island of 
Icolmkill, or Iona. Bishop Xeil Campbell de- 
manded the island of him, but met with a refusal. 
The Bishop then sent a complaint against Sir 
Lachlan to the King. On March 10th, 1636, 
Charles I. instructed the Lords of the Exchequer 
to assign to the Bishop for the purpose of repairing 
the cathedral of Iona the sum of ^400 sterling 
out of the feu-duties payable to the crown by Sir 
Lachlan. On the 14th of the same month Charles 
wrote to Sir Lachlan, ordering him to restore to 
the Bishop " the absolute possession of the island 
of Icolmkill without further hearing or delay. '" 
Sir Lachlan had no right to the island of Iona ; at 
the same time it is well known that he was not 
the only prominent man who was guilty of seizing 
church lands. It is said that John Campbell, 
Bishop of the Isles from 1572 to 1605 "dilapidated 
the benefice in favour of his relations." Surely a 
Maclean laird might follow the example of a 
Campbell bishop. 

In 164 1 the Marquis of Argyll used his influence 
to persuade Sir Lachlan of Duart to join the 
political party to which he belonged himself. Sir 
Lachlan received a letter from the King in that 



180 The Clan Gillean. 

year. Argyll was exceedingly anxious to know 
the contents of the letter, but received no satisfac- 
tion from the Lord of Duart. When he found that 
he could not persuade Sir Lachlan by arguments 
to join him in his plans, he resolved to compel him 
to join him, or else to ruin him. He immediately 
purchased a right to some old crown rents due by 
Sir Lachlan, and also a right to some feu-duties 
claimed by the Bishop of the Isles for the island 
of Icolmkill. He obtained each of these claims 
for a comparatively small sum. By means of the 
crown rents, the Bishop's feu-duties, the amount 
for which he was security, and several smaller 
items, he succeeded in patching up an account 
against Sir Lachlan for .£30,000. For the whole 
of this claim — the sum for which he was security 
included — he paid in all only about £10,000. He 
was thus making a clear gain of £20,000 by the 
disreputable business in which he was engaged. 
Sir Lachlan went to Inverary to try to come to a 
settlement with Argyll. The latter immediately 
arrested him and imprisoned him in the castle of 
Carrick, where he kept him for over a year. At 
last, in order to procure his liberty, Sir Lachlan 
gave him his bond for £"16,000, and signed an 
account for ,£14,000. Sir Lachlan thus came 
under obligation to pay to Argyll the £30,000 
which the latter claimed. Argyll had now both 
Sir Lachlan and his estates to a large extent at 
his mercy. The imprisonment of Sir Lachlan in 
Carrick Castle is the subject of one of John Lom's 



Sir Lachlan. 181 

poems. The honest bard praises the chief of 
the Clan Gillean, hurls his fiercest anathemas 
against the race of Diarmid, and calls upon the 
Macleods of Harris, the Macdonalds of Sleat, the 
Macdonalds of Glengarry, and the Camerons of 
Lochiel to invade Argyll's lands, to plunder and 
lay them waste, and to plunge their red daggers 
into the bodies of the Campbells. On March 2nd, 
1643, Sir Lachlan resigned his lands in favour of 
his son, Hector, reserving to himself a life interest. 

On the 1 st of February, 1644, James Graham, 
Earl of Montrose, received a commission from 
Charles I. as Lieutenant-General of His Majesty's 
forces in the kingdom of Scotland. On the 6th of 
the following May he was raised to the rank of 
Marquis. He left Carlisle on the 18th of August 
to make his way to the Highlands, and after four 
days of hard riding reached Tilliebelton House in 
Perthshire, the residence of his cousin, Patrick 
Dubh Graham of Inchbrakie. He was accom- 
panied only by two persons, Sir William Rollock 
and Colonel Sibbald. He remained at Tilliebelton 
for some time, waiting for the arrival of a body of 
men that the Marquis of Antrim had promised to 
send to Scotland, to support King Charles in his 
war with the English Parliament and Scottish 
Covenanters. 

Alexander Macdonald, Alasdair Mac Cholla, 
sailed from Ireland for Scotland on the 27th of 
June, 1644. He had 1,500 men under him. He 
landed in Morvern on the 5th of July. He cap- 



1 82 The Clan Gillean. 

tured and garrisoned the castle of Kinlochaline. 
Shortly afterwards he laid siege to Mingarry Castle 
and made himself master of it in the course of a 
few days. Having garrisoned it, he marched to 
Kyle-rhea, as he was anxious to see Sir James 
Macdonald. From Kyle-rhea he led his forces over 
the mountains of Cuaich and thence to Glengarry, 
where he was joined only by a very few persons. 
From Glengarry he marched to Badenoch, where 
Ewen Og Macpherson, the son of Andrew, the 
son of Ewen, joined him with 300 men. He went 
from Badenoch to Blair Atholl, and was joined on 
the way by the Farquharsons of Braemar, under 
Donald Og^ son of Donald, the son of Finlay. 

Montrose came to Blair Atholl a day or two 
after the arrival of Alexander Macdonald. He 
was dressed in the Highland garb, and on foot. 
He had neither troops nor money ; he had nothing 
whatever but the King's commission and his own 
military genius. He took immediate charge of the 
small army which he found awaiting him, and 
displayed the royal standard, which he placed on 
Blair Castle. On the next day he was joined by 
800 Atholl men, consisting chiefly of Stewarts and 
the Clan Duncan, or Robertsons of Struan. He 
had now about 2,500 men under him. He left 
Blair Atholl as soon as possible and marched 
towards Perth. He attacked the Menzies, who 
had assailed his rear guard, destroyed their ripe 
cornfields, and set fire to a number of houses. He 
crossed the river Tay on the 31st of August. He 



Sir Lachlan. 183 

defeated Lord Elcho at Tippermuir on Sunday, the 
1 st of September. On the day following-, the city of 
Perth surrendered to him. He defeated Lord 
Burleigh at Aberdeen on the 12th of September. 
The Earl of Argyll attacked him with a large 
force at Fyvie on the 29th of October, but was 
compelled to retire. Montrose left Fyvie on the 
31st of October and marched through Strathbogie 
into Badenoch, where he was joined by John 
Muideartach and others. He led his army across 
the mountains to Atholl, and was joined there by 
the Atholl men, some of the Macdonalds of Knoy- 
dart and Glengarry, some of the Camerons, the 
Stewarts of Appin, the Macdonalds of Keppoch, 
and the Macdonalds of Glencoe. He left Blair 
Atholl about the middle of December, to invade 
the Campbell territories. He marched through 
Breadalbane to the head of Loch Tay, burning 
the houses, slaughtering the cattle, and killing the 
able-bodied men who fell into his hands. He was 
now joined by the Macgregors and Macnabs. At 
the head of Loch Tay he placed a division of his 
army in charge of John Muideartach with instruc- 
tions to lay waste the northern part of Glenorchy 
and the northern and western parts of Lorn. He 
gave him, in addition to his own followers, the 
Macdonalds of Glengarry and Knoydart, and the 
Macdonalds of Keppoch. Montrose marched 
through Glen Dochart and the valley of the river 
Lochy to Loch Awe, and thence through Glen 
Aray. Argyll knew nothing about his movements 



184 The Clan Gillean. 

until he was within three miles of Inverary. As 
soon, however, as he had heard that Montrose was 
so near him, he fled from his castle, entered a 
fishing boat, and sailed off to the Lowlands, both 
for safety and assistance. Montrose proceeded to 
Kilmartin near Loch Crinan. There he met John 
Muideartach with a drove of 1,000 of the fattest 
cows that he was able to pick up in the districts 
traversed by him. He now divided his army into 
brigades. He sent Alister Mac Coll and his 
followers in one direction, and John Muideartach 
and those who had been with him, in another 
direction. He kept the Atholl men and others with 
himself. We are told that Glenorchy, Inveraw, 
Auchinbreck and other places in Kin tyre were 
plundered, and that 895 of Argyll's followers 
were slain. The fact is that the invaders went 
everywhere among the Campbells plundering, 
burning, and slaughtering. About the 26th of 
January, Montrose called in his predatory bands, 
and marched by way of Connel Ferry to Inver- 
lochy, and thence to Kill-Cummin, now Fort 
Augustus, where he halted on the 29th. At 
Inverlochy he was joined by Sir Lachlan Mac- 
lean of Duart, who had come with about twenty 
men to meet him. At Glengarry he was joined 
by Angus Macdonald, son and heir of Don- 
ald Macdonald of Glengarry. On the 31st a 
messenger came to him from Allan Cameron of 
Lochiel stating that Argyll had entered Loch- 
aber plundering, burning, and laying waste the 



Sir Lachlan. 185 

country. It is probable that John Lom, the poet, 
arrived from Keppoch about the same time, and 
that there were thus two messengers. Montrose 
resolved to attack Argyll at once. He led his 
army along the river Tarf, over Lairc Thuirard, 
through Glenroy, over the mountains into Glen- 
nevis, where he arrived on the evening of Saturday, 
the 1 st day of February. Argyll left his army as 
soon as Montrose arrived, and sought safety on his 
galley. He appointed Sir Duncan Campbell of 
Auchinbreck to the chief command. At dawn on 
Sunday morning both parties began to prepare for 
battle. Sir Duncan Campbell placed a regiment 
of Lowland infantry with two field-pieces on the 
right ; the Campbells in the centre ; and a Low- 
land regiment with two field-pieces on the left. 
He planted about forty or fifty musketeers in 
Inverlochy Castle. His reserve occupied a rising 
ground, and had a field-piece. Montrose also drew 
up his men in four divisions. The left wing con- 
sisted of a regiment of Antrim men under Colonel 
Magnus O' Cahan or O' Kean ; the centre was 
composed of the Macdonalds of Glengarry, the 
Macleans, the Clanranald, the Macdonalds of Glen- 
coe, the Macdonalds of Keppoch, the Camerons, the 
Stewarts of Appin, and the Robertsons, Stewarts 
and other Atholl men ; the right wing consisted of 
an Antrim regiment under Alister Mac Coll. An 
Antrim regiment under Colonel Sir James Mac- 
donald formed the reserve. The Antrim men were 
all musketeers. The battle was begun shortly after 



1 86 The Clan Gillean. 

sunrise. George Stewart, son of Alexander Stew- 
art, laird of Urrard, charged from Montrose's line 
without orders, and was the means of hastening a 
general engagement. Colonel O'Cahan attacked 
the Lowlanders on Auchinbreck's right wing and 
defeated them. Montrose's centre and right wing 
now pressed forward and routed those opposed to 
them. The battle was over in a few minutes. 
The Lowland regiments fired only once; they were 
assailed by the claymores before they had time to 
reload. The pursuit continued for a long distance. 
Argyll lost fourteen barons of his own clan and 
1,500 common soldiers. Montrose lost only eight 
men, Lord Ogilvie, Captain Brain, and six pri- 
vates. Sir Duncan Campbell of Auchinbreck, who 
was a very brave man, was slain after the battle 
by Alister Mac Coll. 

Montrose defeated General Urry at Auldearn 
on May 9th, 1645. He defeated General Baillie 
at Alford on July 2nd. A few weeks afterwards he 
was joined by 700 Macleans, under the command 
of Donald of Brolas. 

Shortly after the Macleans had left Mull to join 
Montrose, the Campbells invaded their possessions 
and pillaged and destroyed as they marched along. 
As there were only women and children and a few 
old men to meet them, they were free from fear 
and took time, like Joel's locusts, to make every- 
thing "clean bare." The land was as the Garden 
of Eden before them, and behind them a desolate 
wilderness. 



Sir Lachlan. 187 

As Montrose was leading his army down the 
vale of the Devon to the wood of Tullibody, the 
Macleans laid waste the lands of Muckart and 
Dollar, which belonged to the Marquis of Argyll. 
They also reduced Castle Campbell to ashes. 
They committed these acts to pay back Argyll for 
wrongs which they had suffered at his hands. A 
few days afterwards Argyll burnt the house of 
Menstrie, which belonged to the Earl of Stirling, 
and the house of Aithrie, which belonged to 
Montrose's uncle, Sir John Graham of Braco. 

The battle of Kilsyth was fought on August 
15th, 1645. Montrose had 5,000 infantry and 500 
horse ; General Baillie had 7,000 infantry and 800 
horse. Montrose planted his troops at Auchin- 
cleugh, about two miles east of Kilsyth. There 
were a few cottages and gardens in front of 
him. Within the cottages and behind the walls 
he placed 100 of his best marksmen. A regiment 
of cavalry, acting of its own accord, attacked 
these marksmen, but was driven back with con- 
siderable loss. The Macleans, the Clanranald, 
and the Macgregors occupied the nearest position 
to the marksmen who were in the houses and en- 
closures. Without waiting for orders they rushed 
forward to attack Baillie's army. They were met 
by 2,000 foot, divided into three regiments, and 
flanked by three troops of horse and ohq of lancers, 
and were in danger of being surrounded and cut 
off. Lord Aboyne with a few horse made a sudden 
charge upon one of the infantry regiments and 



1 88 The Clan Gillean. 

broke right through it. James Ogilvie, Earl of 
Airlie, then in the seventieth year of his age, charged 
the horse with a strong body of cavalry and threw 
them into confusion. Montrose now made a gen- 
eral attack. In a very short time the Covenanters 
were routed and dispersed in every direction. Of 
Baillie's foot-soldiers, only about 300 escaped. 
Montrose lost only a few men. The Marquis of 
Argyll and other noblemen accompanied Baillie to 
the battlefield. Argyll saved himself by the fleet- 
ness of his horse. He fled to South Oueensferry, 
where he found a vessel which carried him off to 
Berwick. 

On the 3rd of September, Montrose was ap- 
pointed Lieutenant-General, and Captain-General 
of Scotland. On the same day he conferred the 
honour of knighthood on Alister Mac Coll, who 
immediately afterwards departed with most of his 
followers to Kintyre. The Macleans, Macdonalds, 
and other clans left Montrose at the same time. 

As Sir Alister Mac Coll and Sir Lachlan Mac- 
lean were passing through Lorn with their men, 
they defeated 700 of Argyll's followers at Mamore. 
They had only about 200 men with them, as the 
main body of their followers had been delayed by 
the way. 

Montrose was surprised and defeated by David 
Leslie at Philiphaugh on September 13th, 1645. 
King Charles was defeated at Chester on the 24th 
of September. The King gave himself up to the 
Scottish army on May 5th, 1646. On the 19th of 



Sir Lachlan. 189 

May he sent a letter to Montrose, ordering him to 
disband his forces and retire to France. The Scots 
surrendered King Charles to the English Parlia- 
ment on January 28th, 1647. On January 30th, 
1649, he was executed in front of Whitehall. He 
was an arbitrary and untrustworthy man. 

General David Leslie arrived at Inverary on 
May 2 1 st, 1647, with a strong force, to expel Sir 
Alister Mac Coll, who had been in possession of 
Kintyre since the end of September, 1645. He 
attacked the latter on the 25th, and easily defeated 
his small army. He then besieged Dunaverty, 
which was defended by 300 men, partly Irishmen, 
and partly Macdougalls and other Highlanders. 
After losing about forty men, the besieged surren- 
dered. With the exception of one or two, they 
were all put to death. Leslie went from Kintyre 
to Islay, and laid siege to Dunnyveg, which was 
defended by Colla Ciotach Macdonald with 200 
men. Coll, who was in his seventy-seventh year, 
went out of the garrison to have a talk with 
Campbell of Dunstaffnage, and was treacherously 
captured. The garrison surrendered on condition 
of having their lives spared. Colla Ciotach was 
hanged by the Campbells at Dunstaffnage. Sir 
Alister, his son, made his escape to Ireland. From 
Islay, Leslie went to Jura and thence to Mull. Sir 
Lachlan Maclean surrendered the castles of Duart 
and Aros to him, and along with the castles 
fourteen Irishmen who were with him. He also 
gave Leslie his son, Hector Roy, as a pledge of 



190 The Clan Gillean. 

his fidelity. The Irishmen were all, except per- 
haps one, put to death by Leslie. 

Sir James Turner, a major-general who served 
under Leslie, blames Sir Lachlan Maclean for 
delivering the Irishmen to Leslie. He tells us 
that " Maclean saved his lands with the loss of his 
reputation." The simple truth is that Sir Lachlan 
was utterly unable to protect either himself or the 
Irishmen. Sir Donald Campbell of Ardnamurchan 
and other Campbells were exceedingly anxious to 
have an opportunity of slaying the inhabitants of 
Mull. Turner tells us "that with all imaginable 
violence Sir Donald pressed that the whole Clan 
Maclean should be put to the edge of the sword." 
Leslie had 5,000 men in Mull. He could easily 
capture Duart and Aros in a few days. If he had 
been compelled to take these castles by storm, he 
would have put all the defenders to the sword. 
Besides, the Campbells would have laid Mull 
waste and butchered the defenceless inhabitants 
while the siege was going on. 

We are told by the Maclean historians that 
Argyll seized Sir Lachlan's heir at Dumbarton, 
where he was going to school ; that he took him 
with him to Mull ; and that he threatened to put 
him to death, unless Sir Lachlan would surrender 
his castle to Leslie. There is evidently no truth 
in this story. Hector Roy was probably about 
twenty years of age in 1647. Argyll was greedy 
and crafty, but he was not a murderer. Then, the 
likelihood is that he really desired that Sir Lachlan 



Sir Hector Roy. 191 

would refuse to surrender to Leslie. The more the 
latter should oppose the Government, the greater 
the probability that he would lose his lands. We 
suspect that the seizure of Hector Roy took place 
at the time of Sir Lachlan's imprisonment in 
Carrick Castle. 

It is said that Marion, Sir Lachlan's youngest 
daughter, placed a horse at the disposal of an Irish 
officer and thus enabled the latter to escape to a 
boat, by which, like the Marquis of Argyll on 
three different occasions, he was carried to a place 
of safety. It is probable that this story is true. 

Through the influence of Argyll, the Govern- 
ment planted a garrison in the castle of Duart 
and kept possession of it. In 164S Sir Lachlan 
besieged the castle of Cairnburgh, but did not 
succeed in getting possession of it. He died 
shortly afterwards. He was buried in Icolmkill. 
He left two sons, Hector Roy and Allan. He 
was an honourable man and an excellent chief. 

XVII. Eachann Ruadh Inbhircheiteinn. 
Sir Hector Roy, popularly known as Hector 
Roy of Inverkeithing, was a man of good ability 
and great energy, and possessed to a large extent 
the warlike qualities of his great-grandfather, 
Lachlan Mor. About the year 1648 he complained 
to the Marquis of Argyll of the depredations com- 
mitted by his followers in Ardnamurchan and Lorn 
upon the Macleans of Morvern and Mull. As 
Argyll paid no attention to his complaints, he 



192 The Clan Gillean. 

entered Ardnamurchan, seized two of the principal 
offenders, and hanged them. He compelled the 
other plunderers to make full restitution for all the 
cattle which they had carried off. He then entered 
Lorn and dealt in a similar manner with some of 
the cattle-lifters of that district. When Argyll 
remonstrated with him, he told him that unless he 
would control his thieves himself he would control 
them for him. About the same time some of the 
Camerons who lived in Morvern made a plunder- 
ing expedition into Kingerloch, slew the laird of 
that district, and wounded his son. Sir Hector 
tried to bring them to justice, but as they fled he 
was not able to arrest them. The only punish- 
ment he could inflict upon them was to kill three 
or four hundred o( their cattle. 

During the period of the civil war, or from 1642 
to 1649, the estate of Duart paid none of the 
public dues. As the Macleans were fighting for 
their king and country, they assumed that they 
had a perfect right to these dues to meet the 
heavy expenses incurred by them. Indeed, after 
the invasion of their lands by Argyll and General 
Leslie in 1647, they were utterly unable to pay 
anything. Argyll, taking advantage of their diffi- 
culties, bought up all the public debts on their 
estate. He purchased also the private debts for 
which Sir Hector was responsible. By means of 
these purchases, and the ,£30,000 promised him in 
1642, together with all the interest that he could 
possibly charge, he made up an account against 



Sir Hector Roy. 193 

Sir Hector, in 1650, for £70,000. In that year 
Sir Hector paid him .£10,000, and gave him his 
bond for the remaining £60,000. 

On the execution of his father on February 8th, 
1649, Charles II. assumed the title of King. He 
left France for Scotland in June, 1650, and landed 
at the mouth of the Spey on the 23d of the month. 
He professed to be a Presbyterian and signed the 
Covenant. He was crowned at Scone on January 
1st, 1 65 1. Cromwell had no idea of permitting 
Charles to rule in Scotland. He marched against 
him, and defeated the Scots under David Leslie 
at Dunbar on September 3d, 1650. In June, 1651, 
Cromwell led his army against the Scots, who 
occupied a strong position in front of Stirling. 
Shortly after the middle of July he sent a division 
of his army, under General Lambert, across the 
Forth at Oueensferry, to intercept the supplies of 
the Scottish army. Holburn of Menstrie was 
sent by the Scots to oppose Lambert. The two 
forces met at Inverkeithing on Sunday, July 20th. 
Lambert had about 4,000 men under him, 2,000 
of whom were probably cavalry. Holburn had 
about 3,500 men under him. His force consisted 
of 1,000 horse under his own immediate command, 
200 horse and 800 Lowland infantry under Sir John 
Brown of Fordel, 800 infantry under Sir Hector 
Roy Maclean of Duart, and 700 infantry under Sir 
George Buchanan, chief of his clan. Holburn, 
who was both a traitor and a coward, fled with his 
cavalry ere the battle had scarcely begun. The 



194 The Clan Gillean. 

left wing - , which was commanded by Sir John 
Brown, was, after a brave resistance, overwhelmed 
by numbers and forced to retreat, leaving their 
commander a prisoner, and mortally wounded. 
The Macleans and the Buchanans were suffering 
dreadfully from Lambert's artillery. They moved 
up the hill against their enemies as rapidly as they 
could. They were in a short time encircled by 
the English, the result being that they were nearly 
all cut to pieces. 

During the battle, one of the Macleans, seeing 
his young chief in danger, sprang in between him 
and his foes, but was soon cut down. Immediately 
another Maclean, calling out, Fear eile airson 
Eachainn, Another for Hector, assumed the same 
post of danger, and was likewise slain. Another 
and another followed, with the same self-sacrificing 
cry and the same result, until eight brave clansmen 
had unselfishly and gloriously yielded up their 
lives, trying to shield their heroic chief. 

In spite of the treachery of Holburn, the battle 
of Inverkeithing lasted during four long hours. 
Hector Roy fell, towards the close of the fight, from 
a musket-ball which pierced his breast. He was 
covered with wounds. Of the famous 800 whom 
he led to the field, 700 at least were Macleans. 
The remainder consisted of the Macquarries and 
scattered members of other clans. Of the 800 
only about thirty-five returned to their homes. 
Sir John Brown was taken prisoner, but died a 
few days after the battle. Sir George Buchanan 



Sir Hector Roy. 195 

was also taken prisoner. He died towards the 
end of the year. There were about 2,000 Scots- 
men killed at Inverkeithing. 

Among- the killed of the Maclean regiment at 
the battle of Inverkeithing were the following : — 
Sir Hector Roy Maclean of Duart, Colonel; Ewen 
and Lachlan Cattanach, sons of Lachlan Og 
Maclean of Torloisk ; Donald and John Og, sons 
of Allan Maclean of Ardgour ; Archibald, son of 
Maclean of Boreray ; Ewen Maclean of Tresh- 
nish ; Charles, son of Maclean of Inverscadale; 
Murdoch, Allan, Lachlan, Ewen, and John, sons 
of Lachlan Odhar Maclean of Ardchraoishnish ; 
Ewen, son of John Garbh Maclean of Coll ; Ewen, 
son of the first Maclean of Muck ; and Allan, son 
of Macquarrie of Ulva. Among the men wounded 
were : — Donald Maclean of Brolas, Lieutenant- 
Colonel ; John Maclean of Kinlochaline ; John 
Diurach Maclean of the Morvern family ; John 
Maclean of Totaranald ; and Neil Maclean of 
Drimnacross. 

The foregoing list is very defective ; but it is the 
fullest that we can give. Sir Hector Roy was an 
accomplished chief, a born fighter, and a valiant 
man. His fiery nature, however, unfitted him for 
being a successful commander. His conduct in 
continuing the unequal fight at Inverkeithing so 
long, when he might have retreated or surrendered, 
was utterly unreasonable. It was useless to his 
king, and injurious to his clan. His own life and 
the lives of his loyal followers were too valuable 



196 The Clan Gillean. 

to have them thrown away in trying to accomplish 
an impossibility. While, then, we admire Sir 
Hector's bravery and determination, we deplore 
his recklessness and folly. He was probably about 
twenty-five years of age at the time of his death. 
He was succeeded by his brother, Allan. 

XVIII. Sir Ailein. 

Sir Allan Maclean of Duart was born about the 
year 1641. He was thus only ten years of age 
when he succeeded his brother, Hector Roy. His 
uncle, Donald Maclean of Brolas, was appointed 
tutor to him. 

Shortly after the battle of Inverkeithing, Charles 
I. led his army to England. Cromwell followed 
after him, and defeated him at Worcester on Sep- 
tember 3d, 165 1. Of the Scots, 3,000 men were 
slain, and 10,000 taken prisoners. Those of the 
prisoners who recovered from their wounds were 
shipped off to the plantations, or colonies, in 
America, and sold into slavery. The Macleods of 
Harris, who had always been friendly to the Mac- 
leans, suffered severely at Worcester. Of the 700 
men who formed their regiment only a few lived to 
return to their native Isles. 

When Cromwell went in pursuit of Charles, he 
left General Monk behind him with a force of 
5,000 horse and foot to complete the subjugation 
of Scotland. Monk accomplished the work en- 
trusted to him without any difficulty. In July, 
1653, some of the followers of King Charles met 



Sir Allan. 197 

at Lochaber and organized a rebellion against the 
authority of Oliver Cromwell. Among those 
who joined this foolish project were : — William 
Cunningham, ninth Earl of Glencairn, the Mar- 
quis of Montrose, the Earl of Seaforth, the Earl 
of Selkirk, Lord Lorn, Lord Balcarres, Lord 
Forrester, Lord Kenmore, Glengarry, Lochiel, 
Donald Maclean of Brolas, Robertson of Struan, 
the tutor of Macgregor, Farquharson of Inverey, 
the chief of the Macnaughtons, Sir Arthur Forbes, 
and Graham of Duchray. The Earl of Glencairn 
was appointed to the chief command. The rebels 
lay in a wood about three miles from Ruthven 
Castle during the 12th, 13th, and 14th of August. 
On the night of the last of these days they received 
information with regard to the victories of Crom- 
well's fleet over the Dutch. This information led 
them to disperse immediately. Glencairn went to 
Lochaber. Lord Lorn and Donald of Brolas 
started together with their followers and travelled 
homewards over the hills. Lord Lorn joined 
Glencairn towards the end of the year with 1,000 
men, but deserted him on January 1st, 1654. In 
the month of March, Glencairn was superseded by 
Major -General Middleton. The defeat of the 
latter at Lochgarry by Colonel Morgan, on July 
26th, 1654, brought the insurrection to an end. 

The Marquis of Argyll pretended to be very 
much opposed to the conduct of his son and heir, 
Lord Lorn, in joining Glencairn. It is pretty 
certain, however, that Lorn was not really acting 



198 The Clan Gillean. 

against his father's will. When the insurrection 
began the Marquis could not foresee what turn 
political events might take. He deemed it, there- 
fore, good policy to have his heir fighting for 
Charles while he himself was supporting Cromwell. 
If Glencairn should be defeated, the Marquis would 
not be disturbed in his estates. If Glencairn won, 
the estates would be safe with Lord Lorn. 

On September 3d, 1653, Colonel Cobbet entered 
Mull and took possession of Duart Castle for 
Cromwell. The Marquis of Argyll arrived a few 
days afterwards, and by his advice and assistance 
the heritors of the Duart estate were compelled 
to promise that they would live peaceably, obey 
the authority of Parliament, and pay sess like the 
rest of the shire of Argyll. They were also forced 
to promise that the}' would not pay any rent to 
the tutor of Duart, who was in rebellion against 
Cromwell. At the request of the Marquis, Cobbet 
planted an English garrison in Duart. The steps 
thus taken prevented Donald of Brolas, the leader 
of the Macleans at the time, from giving any 
assistance to Glencairn. 

After the retirement of Richard Cromwell in 
May, 1659, the Marquis of Argyll felt at liberty 
to renew his attacks on the Macleans. Of the 
£60,000 for which Sir Hector gave his bond in 
1 65 1, the guardians of Sir Allan paid £22,000 be- 
tween 1652 and 1659. In 1659 Argyll obtained a 
decreet of adjudication in the sum of ,£85,000 
against the Duart estate. After the restoration of 



Sir Allan. 



igg 



Charles II. in May, 1660, Donald Maclean of 
Brolas, tutor of Sir Allan, sent a complaint to the 
Scottish Parliament against the doings of Argyll, 
and clearly proved that no credit had been given 
by him for a large portion of the sums which had 
been paid him. The King's Advocate, by the 
authority of the Parliament, stopped the execution 
of the decreet against the Macleans. The forfeit- 
ure and execution of Argyll in May, 1661, allowed 
them to live in peace for a few years. 

Sir Allan attained his majority in 1661, and was 
legally recognized as Lord of Duart in January, 
1662. 

In the year 1662 some Maclean women who 
lived in Strathglass were accused of the crime of 
witchcraft. An application was made to the Privy 
Council for a commission to try them and put 
them to death. The application was granted 
at Edinburgh on June 26th, 1662, and the follow- 
ing persons appointed commissioners: — Alexander 
Chisholm of Comar; Colin Chisholm, his brother; 
and John, Valentine, and Thomas Chisholm, his 
cousins. John Mac Rory Maclean went to Mull 
to see Sir Allan, the chief of the Clan Gillean, 
and to ask his protection against the Chisholms 
and their commission. Sir Allan immediately 
petitioned the Privy Council in behalf of the women 
whose lives were in danger. In his petition he 
states that the Macleans had been kindly tenants 
in Strathglass for two or three hundred years, 
and that Alexander Chisholm of Comar, laird of 



200 The Clan Gillean. 

Strathglass, had conceived an inveterate hatred 
against them and was anxious to remove them 
from their lands and possessions. Sir Allan's 
petition was considered on July 3d, 1662. The 
result was that the commission to the Chisholms 
was cancelled, and that the Strathglass witches 
were neither put to death nor banished. 

On August 26th, 1662, Archibald, ninth Earl of 
Argyll, the Lord Lorn of Glencairn's rebellion, 
was with gross injustice condemned by the Scottish 
Parliament to be put to death and to forfeit all his 
estates. The crime for which he was tried was 
that of leasing-making, or creating dissension be- 
tween the King and his subjects. As the time for 
carrying out the sentence against him was left to 
the judgment of the King, Charles II., he was 
allowed to lie in prison in Edinburgh. He was 
released on June 4th, 1663, restored to the honours 
and estates of his grandfather, and appointed a 
Privy Councillor and one of the Commissioners of 
the Treasury. He went immediately to work with 
hereditary zeal and diligence and bought up all 
the debts which he could find against the Duart 
estate. He was now in a position to press his 
claim against Sir Allan. In 1669 this claim was 
.£85,000. Argyll had at the same time a debt of 
.£20,000 Scots against Clanranald. 

On June 25th, 1664, the Earl of Argyll wrote a 
letter to Lauderdale, from which it appears that 
100,000 marks Scots would, at that time, have 
nearly satisfied all his claims on his neighbours. 



Sir Allan. 201 

As there are only thirteen shillings and sixpence 
of Scottish money in a mark Scots, 100,000 marks 
are equal only to ,£66,000 Scots. On November 
1 ith, 1665, Argyll claimed from Maclean of Duart 
alone £"121,000 Scots, or nearly double the amount 
which he claimed from all his neighbours in June, 
1664. It is thus evident that the Lords of Argyll 
thoroughly understood the art of investing money 
to the best advantage. Whether they were honest 
or not, is another question. 

In 1672, or thereabouts, Sir Allan Maclean 
crossed over to Ireland and went thence to London, 
to complain to the King with regard to the manner 
in which Argyll was acting towards him. The 
King ordered Lauderdale, the Secretary of State 
for Scotland, who happened to be in London at 
the time, to see justice done to him. Lauderdale, 
who was a tyrannical and unscrupulous man, and 
a friend of Argyll, made no attempt to render 
justice to Sir Allan. Instead of trying to see jus- 
tice done to him, he used all his powerful influence 
against him. The consequence was that Argyll 
obtained full control of Duart, Morvern, Tiree, 
and the other lands which belonged to Sir Allan's 
estate. He had power to uplift the rents and to 
keep them all, except a small allowance which 
was to be given to Sir Allan for maintenance. To 
this settlement the Lord of Duart was a consent- 
ing party. 

Sir Allan Maclean of Duart died early in 1674. 
He was in the thirty-fourth year of his age. He 
was succeeded by his only son, John. 26 



CHAPTER IX. 

Sir John ant) §ix Sector. 

XIX. Sir Iain. 

Sir John Maclean was only four years of age at 
the time of his father's death. Laehlan Maclean 
of Brolas and Laehlan Maclean of Toiioisk were 
appointed tutors to him. 

Immediately after the death of Sir Allan, in 
1674, Archibald, ninth Earl of Argyll, procured 
letters of ejection against the Macleans of Duart, 
on the ground that they had refused to give him 
possession of the castle of Duart. He then 
charged them with treasonable gatherings, keeping 
garrisoned houses, and making unlawful leagues 
among themselves ; and cited them to appear be- 
fore him, as justiciary of the Isles, at his court in 
Inverary. As they were wise enough to keep 
away from Inverary, Argyll complained of them 
as rebels to the Privy Council, and obtained a 
commission of fire and sword against them. He 
got 500 men from the Government, and with these 



Sir John. 203 

men and 1800 of his own followers he invaded 
Mull in the month of September. As the Macleans 
were not in a position to fight against both Argyll 
and the King, they removed to the mountains, 
taking the most of their cattle with them. The 
invaders landed in three different places, and com- 
mitted numerous acts of cruelty. Lord Neil 
Campbell of Ardmaddy, Argyll's uncle, took great 
delight in going about from place to place and 
houghing all the cattle that he could find. Some 
of the Campbells entered the house of Maclean of 
Ardnacross, stripped Sir John naked, and took 
all his clothes away. According to the Ardgour 
MS. they attempted to murder him. On the 8th 
of September, 1674, the ' Macleans, acting under 
compulsion, promised to pay the rents of Duart, 
Morvern, and Tiree to Argyll's agents until the 
sum claimed by the latter should be paid in full. 
At the same time Argyll, by the authority of the 
Privy Council, granted them a remission for all 
their past offences. The oppressive coveter of his 
neighbours' lands now returned to Inverary a 
happy man. Of course he left a garrison in Duart 
Castle. 

In 1634, Sir Lachlan of Duart became a vassal 
of Lord Lorn for the lands of Brolas. Imme- 
diately after obtaining possession of Duart, in 
September, 1674, the Earl of Argyll tried to 
compel Lachlan of Brolas, tutor of Sir John, 
to accept a new charter of these lands. As 
the charter was binding the grantee to renounce 



204 The Clan Gillean. 

allegiance to his own chief and to follow Argyll in 
all things, Brolas refused to have anything to do 
with it. Argyll now trumped up some charges 
against him, and took steps to prosecute him and 
obtain a commission o\ fire and sword against 
him. The Macleans, seeing that concessions were 
of no avail, and that their existence as an inde- 
pendent clan was in danger, resolved to withhold 
the rents from Argyll, and to resist his fresh attacks 
with the sword. The Macleans of Kinlochaline 
and the Macleans of Ardgour joined Hrolas at 
once. The Macleans of Torloisk, Lochhuie, and 

Kingerloch promised to support him. The Mac- 
donellsof Glengarry, the Macdonalds of Keppoch, 

and the Camerons, also assured him of their 
assistance. In April, 1075, the Macleans sent 
fiery crosses through Mull, Morvcrn, and other 
places, and assembled, to the number of 400 men, 
in arms. It is evident that they expected to be 
attacked by the Campbells. On the 20th of the 
same month the)- appeared in a warlike posture on 
the lands of Knockmartin. Shortly afterwards, 
100 of them gathered together at Gaderly and 
Glenforsay. 

In a letter, dated at Coll, May 2d, 1675, Lachlan 
Maclean writes the Earl of Argyll that all the 
Macleans aimed at his life and had sent to Tiree 
to apprehend him. By information from the laird 
of Coll, he escaped and found refuge in Coil's 
castle. He had lost most of his means. In a 
second letter to Argyll, dated at Coll, April 20th, 



Sir John. 205 

1676, he states that he had been bailie of Tiree 
until 1675, that John Maclean of Kinlochaline 
forced him to leave that island, that he had a wife 
and children, and that his losses amounted to 
.£3,090 Scots. He asks Argyll to send him relief, 
or compensation for his losses. We do not know 
who Lachlan was. It is evident, however, that 
the Macleans regarded him as a traitor to his clan. 
John of Kinlochaline was probably the most ex- 
perienced warrior among- the Macleans in 1675. 
He was one of the heroes of Inverkeithing. It 
seems that when he scared Lachlan Maclean out 
of Tiree, he seized a number of horses and swine, 
and also some corn. Probably the swine and corn 
would be of more use to him than Argyll's bailie. 
In May, 1675, Argyll cited a number of the Mac- 
leans to appear at court in Inverary before John 
Campbell, Sheriff depute, to answer for crimes and 
treasonable acts of various kinds. Some of the 
charges referred to matters which took place prior 
to September 8th, 1674. The others referred to 
the doings of the Macleans in April. The princi- 
pal persons cited to appear at Inverary were : — 
Lachlan Maclean of Brolas ; Hector, his brother ; 
John Maclean of Ardgour ; Ewen Maclean, fiar of 
Ardgour ; Allan Maclean of Inverscadale ; John 
Maclean of Kinlochaline; and Hector, son of Kin- 
lochaline. Of course the Macleans were not foolish 
enough to go to Inverary. Consequently they were 
dealt with as fugitives from justice, and rebels. 
But they were not rebels against the King ; they 



206 The Clan Gillean. 

were rebels simply against the petty kinglet of 
Inverary. About the first of September, 1675, 
Argyll received from the Privy Council a commis- 
sion oi fire and sword against the Macleans of 
Duart, Kinlochaline, and Ardgour. He also 
obtained a body of soldiers to assist him. About the 
1 2th oi September, the Macleans, the MacdoneHi 
of Glengarry, the Macdonalds oi Keppoch, and 
the Camerons, in fourteen boats and to the number 
of 300 men, attacked a frigate belonging to Argyll, 

near the castle oi' Ardnamurchan ; but were beaten 
off. The frigate was coming from Leith and was 
laden with provision for Argyll's army. Shortly 
after this event Argyll sailed, for Mull with a force 
of 2,200 men. Hut this formidable force never 
reached its place oi destination. A dreadful storm, 
which raged lov two days, drove back the ships 
and disabled some oi them. The superstition of 

the times ascribed the storm to the influence of 

the witch known as an Poideag Mhuileach, or 
the Mull Doideag. It seems that this famous 
witch had promised the Macleans that so long as 
she lived Argyll should not enter Mull. It is just 
possible that when Argyll found that the Mac- 
donalds and Camerons were assembling to help 
the Macleans he had no particular desire to go to 
Mull. He may perhaps have begun to think 
about the fate of the Campbells at Inverlochy. 

When the Campbells were preparing to invade 
Mull in September, 1675, the Macleans sent Sir 
John, who was only six years of age, to Cairn- 



Sir John. 207 

burgh for safety. In the course of a few months 
he was taken back to Ardnacross, where we find 
him in 1676. It was felt, however, that his life 
was not safe there from his deadly foes. Conse- 
quently he was sent in 1677 to Brahan Castle. 
Lachlan, eldest son of Allan Maclean of Grulin, 
accompanied him to his new home. Both of them 
remained with the Earl of Seaforth until they were 
old enough to go to college. 

On October 18th, 1675, Hector Maclean of 
Lochbuie, and the brothers of Kingerloch, with 
sixty men in three birlinns, invaded the islands of 
Garvellach and plundered them. Shortly after- 
wards, Lachlan of Brolas, Hector of Lochbuie, 
Major David Ramsay, and others, raided the 
island of Kerrera, which was occupied by William 
Campbell, and carried off everything of value 
they could find. John Mac Charles Maclean, with 
sixty men, broke into the house of John Mac- 
lachlan of Kilbride and plundered it. They also 
carried away fifty-two cows, sixteen stirks, four 
horses, and twelve sheep. But the Campbells 
were not idle ; they were plundering the Macleans. 
Argyll went to Edinburgh and tried to obtain 
additional assistance from the Privy Council. As 
he did not meet with the encouragement which he 
expected, he started for London about the end of 
the year 1675, to lay his complaints before the 
King. He felt confident that through Lauder- 
dale's influence he would be successful in obtaining 
everything that he wanted. Lachlan of Brolas 



2o8 The Clan Gillean. 

and Lachlan of Torloisk, accompanied by Lord 
Macdonell, and probably by Sir Ewen of Lochiel, 
followed him to London. In February, 1676, the 
King remitted the matter in dispute to three lords 
of the Privy Council of Scotland for adjudication. 
Argyll lodged his complaints against the Macleans 
with the Council. Lachlan of Brolas and Lachlan 
of Torloisk gave in their answers to these com- 
plaints. The Macleans had now strong hopes 
that the disputed points would be finally settled. 
But Argyll, who did not desire a settlement, con- 
tinued to have the decision put off for several 
years. We have seen that in 1665 Argyll's claim 
against the Duart estate was ,£121,000. In 1676 
he claimed ,£200,000. Perhaps he was an un- 
scrupulous usurer ; perhaps he was a manufacturer 
of bogus accounts ; he was certainly either the 
one or the other. 

On February 24th, 1677, some of the Campbells 
who were garrisoning Duart Castle captured a 
boat loaded with Irish victuals, six miles from 
Duart, and brought it with them to the castle; but 
before they could unload it, the Macleans, under 
Archibald Maclean, uncle of Ardgour, and the 
laird of Kingerloch's brother, seized it, carried it 
away, and kept possession of it. On May 23d, 
1677, we find Campbell of I nverawe writing Argyll 
that frequent meetings had lately taken place be- 
tween the Macleans and the Macdonalds, that the 
former expected a vessel with guns from Lord 
Macdonell, that a trench had been constructed 



Sir John. 209 

near Tobermory to hinder vessels from entering 
the Sound of Mull, and that Brolas and Lochiel 
were to meet in Morvern on the following day. 
Shortly afterwards, Brolas and Lochiel raided 
Migharie, Carwallan, and other lands belonging 
to Alexander Campbell of Lochnell, and carried off 
650 lambs, 650 sheep, 161 horses, 500 goats, 230 
bolls of corn, and twenty-four bolls of barley. 
About the same time the Macleans and Camerons 
took away from Ardnamurchan sixty-six sheep, 
twelve horses, and fifty goats. 

Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel seems to have 
withdrawn all active support from the Macleans in 
1678. According to the Ardgour MS. and other 
works he had solemnly promised to stand by them 
in their troubles. Argyll, however, succeeded in 
securing his non-interference by forgiving him a 
debt of 40,000 marks, which he had against him. 
Hence the saying came into existence, Chaill 
Eoghan a Dhia, ach chaill an t-Iarla chuid airgid, 
Ewen lost his God, but the Earl lost his money. 
Whatever may have been the nature of the trans- 
action which took place between Argyll and Sir 
Ewen, it is certain that the latter never worked 
against the Macleans. He was always friendly to 
them. The probability is that he did all he could 
for them. 

About the beginning of 1679, Argyll obtained a 
commission from the Privy Council to disarm and 
bring to obedience Lord Macdonell, Archibald 
Macdonald of Keppoch, Lachlan Maclean of 



2io The Clan Gillean. 

Torloisk, Lachlan Maclean of Brolas, John Mac- 
lean of Ardgour, and other persons who were 
suspected of popery or known to be rebels. The 
Macleans were Presbyterians, and Lord Macdonell 
probably an Episcopalian. Archibald of Keppoch 
was of course a Roman Catholic. But all the 
men named were rebels against Argyll, and 
consequently irreligious criminals in his eyes. 
On April 24th, he issued a command to them to 
deliver up to the Sheriff depute all the arms and 
ammunition in their possession. On May 24th, 
Donald Macdonald of Inveroy, Archibald Mac- 
lean, brother of Ardgour, John Maclean, brother 
of Torloisk, and Donald Gow Maclean of Sheba 
in Mull, acting according to Lord Macdonell's 
instructions, invaded the lands of Colin Campbell 
of Inveresrigane, and carried off sixteen horses, 
a hundred and six cows, and valuables of various 
kinds. About the beginning of June, the Macdon- 
aldsand Macleans invaded and plundered denshire, 
Brae Lochfine, and other Campbell lands. 

On July 2d, 1679, Argyll invaded the Isle of 
Coll, and compelled Donald Maclean of Coll to 
surrender the castle of Breacachadh to him. Ac- 
cording to the articles of capitulation, Donald and 
those who were with him agreed to deliver up all 
their arms and ammunition, to become obedient 
subjects and abstain from the committal of crimes, 
not to hinder the execution of the law, not to raise 
any forces, not to hold any convocations, and not 
to purchase arms without authority from Argyll. 



Sir John. 21 1 

On the 30th of the same month, Lachlan Maclean, 
son of the laird of Ardgour, surrendered to Argyll 
the castle of Kinlochaline on condition of being 
discharged from all criminal process. On the nth 
of August, an agreement was entered into between 
Argyll and the Macleans, by which Lachlan Mac- 
lean of Brolas, John Maclean of Ardgour, John 
Maclean of Kinlochaline, Ewen Maclean, fiar of 
Ardgour, Hector Maclean, fiar of Kinlochaline, 
Allan Maclean of Inverscadale, and others, con- 
sented to dismiss all the prisoners taken by them. 
Argyll promised in return to drop all criminal pro- 
cesses against these men. At the same time, Lord 
Neil Campbell of Ardmaddy, Sir Ewen Cameron of 
Lochiel, and three others, received a commission 
empowering them to proceed against the Macleans 
with fire and sword should they make any further 
invasions of Argyll's lands. Argyll had now the 
castles of Breacachadh and Kinlochaline in his 
possession. He had also recovered those of his fol- 
lowers who had been prisoners in the hands of his 
enemies. He thus felt at greater liberty than ever to 
persecute and harass the Macleans. In November, 
1679, Argyll, acting with shameless treachery, 
caused the Privy Council to grant a commission to 
John Campbell of Glenorchy, Lord Lorn, Lord 
Neil Campbell, Sir Hugh Campbell of Caddell, 
Sir Duncan Campbell of Auchinbreck, Sir James 
Campbell of Lawers, Colin Campbell of Ard- 
kinglass, and others, to pursue and apprehend or 
slay Lachlan Maclean of Brolas and the other 



212 The Clan Gillean. 

Macleans who had refused to appear at court in 
Inverary on June 3d, 1675. On November 6th 
he obtained for himself a commission of fire and 
sword against John Maclean of Ardgour and 
Lachlan Maclean of Torloisk. Ardgour' s crime 
consisted in taking violent possession of Ard- 
namurchan and Sunart, and plundering all the 
Macleans who had submitted to Argyll. With 
regard to Torloisk, the Earl states that he was 
11 peaceable in 1674, but joined with Brolas in 
1675 and became as disorderly as the rest of the 
Macleans." John Campbell of Glenorchy held 
unjustly the title of Earl of Caithness from 1677 
to 1681. Consequently, he is described in the 
commission granted against Lachlan of Brolas 
and his associates, as Earl of Caithness. He was 
created Earl of Breadalbane in 1681, rejoiced over 
the massacre of Glencoe in 1692, and died in 17 16. 

The way in which Argyll fulfilled his written 
promises to the Macleans clearly shows what he 
was. He did not prosecute them for their plun- 
dering excursions into his lands, but he caused the 
Privy Council to grant their bitterest enemies a 
commission to hound them to death. He did not 
insert his own name in the commission, but he 
inserted his son's name in it, Glenorchy's name, 
and the names of a number of other persons who 
would act as his tools in carrying out his selfish 
and destructive purposes. 

About the beginning of 1680, Lachlan Maclean 
of Brolas and Lachlan Maclean of Torloisk 



Sir John. 213 

brought the matters in dispute between Argyll 
and themselves to the notice of King Charles a 
second time. The subject was considered by the 
Privy Council about the beginning of July. The 
Macleans strongly pled in favour of having Mull 
and the castle of Duart restored to them. Lauder- 
dale used his utmost influence to have the matter 
" settled in the most advantageous method for 
Argyll." Both the King and the Duke of York 
yielded to him. The conclusion was that Argyll 
should have the whole of the Duart estates, and 
that .£300 a year should be paid to Sir John out of 
Argyll's feu-duties. On July 10th, 1680, Charles 
II. wrote from Windsor Castle to the Privy Council 
of Scotland, proposing to purchase so much of 
Tiree as would make to "the laird of Maclean" 
^500 a year. On October 1st, 1681, Alexander 
Stewart, Earl of Moray and Secretary of State for 
Scotland, replied that the Council thought it not 
advisable to purchase a part of Tiree for the laird 
of Maclean. On October 19th, 1681, the King 
authorized the Scottish Council to draw yearly on 
Argyll ^"300 for the laird of Maclean, or Sir John. 
We may state that the Earl of Moray was a 
brother of Argyll's wife. He succeeded Lauder- 
dale as Secretary of State in November, 1689. 

Argyll had now possession of Duart, Morvern, 
and Tiree. He had no notion, however, of leaving 
the Macleans alone. In November, 1680, or 
thereabouts, he complained to the Privy Council, 
in Edinburgh, against them for garrisoning the 



214 The Clan Gillean. 

rock and fortress of Cairn burgh and other illegal 
acts. The Council cited the men complained of, 
to appear before them to answer for their conduct. 
As they did not appear on the day appointed, they 
were denounced as rebels, and put to the horn. 
On the 22d of December, Argyll received a com- 
mission in which the Macleans were commanded to 
deliver to himself or any one having his order, the 
rock and fortress of Cairnburgh within fourteen 
days. The commission was executed on January 
7th, 1681. The men who held Cairnburgh, and who 
were proclaimed rebels for holding it, were:— Lach- 
lan Maclean of Brolas ; Hector Og, his brother ; 
John Maclean of Ardgour ; Allan Maclean of 
[nverscadale ; John Maclean of Kinlochaline ; 
Lachlan Maclean of Torloisk ; Donald Maclean of 
Kingerloch ; Hector and John Macquarrie, uncles 
to Macquarrie of UK a ; Ewen Maclean, son of 
Kinlochaline; Charles Maclean of Ardnacross; 
Lachlan Mae Charles in M Ornish; Allan Mac 
Charles in Mishnish ; Donald Mac Charles in 
Ai os ; Hector and Ewen Mac Charles ; Hector 
■ inA Alexander Maclean, brothers of Kingerloch ; 
Ewen Maclean of Carnae, and Hector, his son ; 
Allan Maclean of Killintyn ; and Ewen Maclean, 
late bailie of Tiree. Cairnburgh was either given 
up to Argyll or abandoned. 

James, Duke of York, arrived in Scotland as 
Lord High Commissioner in November, 1679. 
He resided in the palace of Holyrood and lived in 
regal splendour. For some time he exerted himself 



Sir John. 215 

to the utmost to conciliate the affections of all the 
influential men who came in contact with him. 
He interested himself especially in the Highland 
chiefs, and sought to adjust their difficulties, and 
remove their feuds. He returned to London in 
the course of three months, but remained there 
only a short time. Immediately after his return 
he began to show a spirit of intolerance, and a 
determination to have his own way both in civil 
and ecclesiastical matters. He hated the Cove- 
nanters and persecuted them with bitter cruelty. 
As the Earl of Argyll, who was an out-and-out 
Presbyterian, was opposed to his actions and 
purposes, he caused him to be arrested and thrown 
into prison. On December 12th, 1681, Argyll 
was tried for high treason and leasing-making, and 
pronounced guilty. Of treason he was certainly 
innocent, of leasing-making, or creating dissension 
between the King and his subjects, he was also 
innocent. As he expected to be condemned and 
executed, he fled from Edinburgh on December 
20th. He was assisted in making his escape by 
his step-daughter, Sophia Lindsay, and also by 
Captain Campbell of Lochnell. He went from 
Edinburgh to London and thence to Holland. 
Immediately after his flight, sentence of attainder 
was pronounced against him. His titles, estates, 
and life were forfeited, and a large reward offered for 
his head. The whole of the proceedings against 
Argyll were utterly discreditable to the Duke of 
York and his followers. They were neither 



216 The Clan Gillean. 

initiated nor carried on for the well-being of the 
state. However, if a man does wrong he may 
expect to suffer. Argyll dealt unjustly with the 
Macleans, and the Duke of York dealt unjustly 
with himself. 

It is probable that after the forfeiture of Argyll 
the management of the Duart estates was left 
practically in the hands of Lachlan Maclean of 
Brolas and Lachlan Maclean of Torloisk. The 
Macleans would now be obedient subjects and pay 
the sums due the Government punctually. 

Charles II. died on February 6, 1685, and was 
succeeded by his brother, James, Duke of York. 
The Duke of Monmouth, an illegitimate son of 
Charles II., and the Earl of Argyll were both 
exiles in Holland. They resolved to invade Britain 
and attempt to overthrow the despotic government 
of James. Monmouth landed at Lynne, in Dorset- 
shire, on June nth, 1685. He was defeated at 
the battle of Sedgemoor on July 6th, captured on 
the 8th, and executed on Tower Hill on the nth. 
Argyll landed at Campbellton, in Kintyre, about 
the 1 2th of May, 1685. He soon found himself 
at the head of 2,000 men, but he was unable to do 
anything. He was a commander only in name ; 
he had to be guided in his movements by Sir John 
Cochrane, Sir Patrick Hume, and others who had 
come with him from Holland. With the consent 
of his advisers, he led his small army to Lennox, 
with the intention of marching to the Lowlands 
to call the Covenanters to arms. On arriving at 



Sir John. 217 

Kilpatrick, Argyll's followers, finding themselves 
in danger of being attacked and cut to pieces, 
dispersed and began to make their way back to 
their respective homes. Argyll and Major Ful- 
larton crossed the Clyde and journeyed through 
Renfrewshire as far as Inchinnan. At this place a 
man named Riddel, and four others, seized Argyll 
and carried him off as a prisoner to Renfrew. He 
was immediately conveyed to Edinburgh. He 
was executed by the maiden on June 30th ; not, 
however, for his rebellion, but for the treason for 
which he had been unjustly condemned in Decem- 
ber, 1 68 1. Argyll seems to have been greatly 
benefited by his misfortunes ; he died like a brave 
man and a Christian. 

The forces which had been raised to resist and 
attack the Earl of Argyll were placed under the 
command of the Marquis of Atholl. They were 
much more numerous than the followers of Argyll. 
Among them were the Camerons, the Macleans, 
and the Macdonalds. They were disbanded on 
the 2 1 st of June. While Atholl's army was 
encamped at Aird Rannoch, Lochiel's men, mis- 
taking in the night-time for Argyll's followers, a 
reconnoitering party sent out by Atholl, fired upon 
it and killed four or five men. Atholl resolved 
to place Lochiel under arrest. Lochiel withdrew 
his men to some distance from the main body of 
the army, and was joined by the Macleans, who 
promised to stand by him. As there was a 
possibility that the Macdonalds would follow the 



218 The Clan Gillean. 

example of the Macleans, Atholl wisely concluded 
to leave Sir Ewen alone. Some time afterwards, 
however, he was mean enough to try to arrest him 
for the mistake committed by his men. 

After the escape of the Earl of Argyll to Hol- 
land in 1 68 1, the Marquis of Atholl was appointed 
Lord-Lieutenant of the county of Argyle. He 
held his court at Inverary, where he had 600 men 
under the command of Stewart of Ballechan, when 
Argyll returned in 1685. After the execution of 
Argyll, he allowed the lands of the Campbells to 
be plundered by his own retainers and others. 
Among those who took part in the work of spoli- 
ation were Struan Murray, Stewart of Ballechan, 
the Duke of Gordon's men, the Mackays of 
Strathnaver, the Stewarts of Appin, the Mac- 
kenzies of Lochalsh, the Macalisters of Tarbert, 
the Macphies of Islay, the Camerons of Lochaber, 
the Macdonalds of Keppoch, the Macdonalds of 
Glencoe, and the Macleans of Lochbuie, Torloisk, 
Brolas, Coll, and Ardgour. Lachlan Maclean of 
Torloisk besieged, captured, and destroyed the 
castle of Carnassary. 

Lachlan Maclean of Brolas died in 1686, and 
Lachlan Maclean of Torloisk in 1687. On the 
death of the latter, Sir John Maclean took the 
management of the Duart estates into his own 
hands. He appointed John Macleod of Mishnish, 
Archibald Maclean of Ardtun, Lachlan Maclean 
of Calgary, and Allan Maclean, agents or factors 
for him. He visited London in 1688, and thence 
crossed over to France. 



Sir John. 219 

William I., Prince of Orange Nassau, and 
stadtholder of Holland, married Mary, daughter 
of Charles I., King of Britain, and had by her 
a son, who was also named William. William II. 
was born in 1650. On the 4th of November, 
1677, he married Mary, eldest daughter of the 
Duke of York, afterwards James II. of England. 
In June, 1688, he received a letter from seven of 
the leading men in Britain, urging him to accept 
the rulership of the kingdom. On November 5th, 
he landed at Torbay in England, expelled his 
father-in-law from the throne, and compelled him 
to seek refuge in France. On February 13th, 1689, 
William and Mary were proclaimed King and 
Queen of England and Ireland. On the nth of 
April, they were proclaimed King and Queen of 
Scotland. 

Sir John Graham of Claverhouse was a man of 
energy and courage, a strong Episcopalian, and a 
zealous supporter of King James. He was an 
experienced warrior and possessed a good share of 
military skill. He persecuted the Covenanters 
with ardour and ferocity in 1679, and thus com- 
mended himself to King James. He was promoted 
to the rank of Major-General in 1688, and on the 
1 2th of November in the same year, was created 
Viscount of Dundee. King James appointed him 
Commander-in-Chief of his forces in Scotland. 
Dundee went to the Highlands and succeeded in 
raising a small army. 

King James sailed from Brest in France on the 



220 The Clan Gillean. 

7th of March, 1689, and landed at Kinsale in 
Ireland on the nth. Among- those who accom- 
panied him were Sir John Maclean of Duart and 
Sir Alexander Maclean of Otter. On the 21st of 
March, King James commissioned Sir John to act 
as colonel of the Maclean regiment, and Hector 
Maclean of Lochbuie to act as lieutenant-colonel. 
On receiving his commission Sir John crossed over 
from Ireland to Mull. The Macleans welcomed 
their chief with great joy. They were all ready 
to fight under him, nominally against King Wil- 
liam, but really against their hereditary foe, the 
Earl of Argyll. As hatred of tyranny led the 
Covenanters to join King William, so hatred of 
tyranny led the Macleans to join King James. 

Early in May, Sir John Maclean sent Hector 
Maclean of Lochbuie with 300 men to join Dundee. 
As the Macleans were marching through Badenoch 
they were suddenly attacked by five troops of 
horse. They defeated their assailants, and slew 
the commander and several of those who were with 
him. A few of themselves were also killed. They 
joined Dundee on the day after their encounter 
with the troops. The place at which the skirmish 
took place was called Knockbreck. It was the 
first fight in Scotland in behalf of King James. 

The Jacobite clans assembled in Lochaber on 
the 1 8th of May, but dispersed shortly afterwards. 
They met again in Lochaber in July, for the purpose 
of making an expedition into Atholl to save Blair 
Castle from falling into General Mackay's hands. 



Sir John. 221 

Their place of meeting was the lower end of Loch 
Lochy. They pitched their camp there on Satur- 
day, July 2 1 st, and left on Tuesday morning, July 
24th. They marched through Glenroy, over the 
Drummond Hills— which lie between the upper 
vale of the Spey and Loch Laggan — and across 
the Hills of Drumuachter. They arrived in Blair 
Atholl on Saturday morning, July 27th. On the 
evening of that day the battle of Killiecrankie, or 
Rin Rory, was fought. 

General Mackay advanced from Dunkeld with 
3,000 foot and two troops of horse. He led his men 
through the Pass of Killiecrankie and arranged 
them on a narrow field beside the Garry. Dundee 
had about 2,500 men. He drew them up in battle 
array on an eminence which was only about a 
musket-shot from the Williamites. His men were 
arranged in the following order from right to left : 
the Macleans ; 300 Irishmen under Colonel Can- 
non ; the Macdonalds of Moydart; the Macdonells 
of Glengarry and the Grants of Glenmoriston ; a 
small squadron of cavalry under Sir William 
Wallace ; the Camerons under Sir Ewen of Loch- 
iel ; a battalion under Sir Alexander Maclean of 
Otter; and the Macdonalds of Sleat, Keppoch, and 
Glencoe. The battle began about half an hour 
before sunset. The Highlanders, while moving 
down the hill, received three successive volleys 
from Mackay's line. When they got near their 
enemies they fired at them, and then fell upon them 
with their swords. The battle lasted only a few 



222 The Clan Gillean. 

minutes. The Highlanders gained a magnificent 
victory. Still it was a dear victory to them ; 
about 800 of them were slain. Besides, they lost 
their commander, the only man who could keep 
them together and lead them to another victory. 
Of Mackay's men 2,000 were either killed or taken 
prisoners. 

On the fall of Dundee, Colonel Cannon, who 
was next to him in rank, assumed the command 
of the army. He was utterly unfit for his new 
position. He attacked the Cameronians at Dun- 
keld on Wednesday, the 21st of August; but, after 
a stubborn fight of over four hours, was defeated 
with the loss of 300 men. The Highlanders 
retired from Dunkeld to Blair Atholl, and on the 
24th of the month dispersed to their respective 
homes. Colonel Cannon and his Irishmen went 
to Mull with Sir John Maclean. According to 
the Ardgour MS., Sir George Rooke, one of King 
William's admirals, attacked the castle of Duart in 
1689, but was unable to capture it. 

King James appointed Major-General Buchan 
Commander-in-Chief of all his forces in Scotland. 
Colonel Cannon was next in command to him. 
Buchan arrived in Scotland in April, 1690. Only 
about 1200 men rallied to his standard. Of these, 
200 were Macleans, commanded by Captain Allan 
Maclean, a near relative of Sir John, and Captain 
John Maclean, a brother of Sir Alexander Mac- 
lean of Otter. Sir Thomas Livingstone, at the 
head of a strong force of cavalry and some infantry, 



Sir John. 223 

surprised General Buchan at Cromdale on the 
morning of May 1st, 1690, and easily defeated 
him. Four hundred of the Highlanders were 
either killed or taken prisoners. Buchan was an 
old soldier and a commander of some skill. On 
July 1 st, 1690, James was defeated at the battle of 
the Boyne. King William was now full master 
of England, Scotland, and Ireland. 

On the execution of the ninth Earl of Argyll in 
1685, Archibald, his son and heir, fled to Holland. 
He returned with the Prince of Orange in 1688, 
and was allowed to take possession of all the titles 
and estates which had belonged to his father. He 
invaded Mull with a strong force about the begin- 
ning of October, 1690. According to one account 
he had 2,500 men ; according to another account, 
he had only 1,600 foot and sixty horse. Sir John 
Maclean, accompanied by a few armed followers, 
took refuge in Cairnburgh. He seems to have left 
the castle of Duart in charge of Captain James 
Maclean, son of Archibald Maclean of Ardtun. 
The most of the Macleans surrendered their arms 
to Argyll, and took the oath of allegiance to King 
William. On October 22d, 1690, Argyll wrote the 
tutor of Torloisk, asking him to inform the lairds 
of Ardgour, Lochbuie, and Kinlochaline, and 
others of the name of Maclean, that unless they 
would immediately deliver up their arms under 
oath, and surrender their forts, he would not receive 
them under protection. About the same time he 
instructed John Campbell, bailie of Jura and 



224 The Clan Gillean. 

governor of Aros, to fortify the old castle of Aros, 
and to seize the persons and goods of all in Mull, 
Coll, and Tiree, who continued in rebellion. He 
also instructed Colin Campbell of Braeglen to take 
possession of the castle of Moy. 

In the spring of 1691, the Scottish Jacobites 
received a formal permission from the exiled King 
James to enter into negotiations with the Govern- 
ment for surrendering to it. Having obtained 
this permission, they applied to the Government, 
and obtained a cessation of hostilities until Octo- 
ber 1st. On the 27th of August the Government 
issued a proclamation, promising an indemnity to 
all who had been in arms and who should take the 
oath of allegiance to the Government before Janu- 
ary 1st, 1692. On March 31st, 1691, Sir John 
surrendered Cairnburgh and Duart Castles to the 
Government. On April 26th, he received an order 
from John, Earl of Tweeddale, Chancellor of Scot- 
land, permitting himself and his two servants to 
travel from the place of his residence to any place 
in England or Flanders, to throw himself upon the 
King's mercy. He proceeded to London and was 
graciously received by William, who desired him 
to accompany him to his next campaign on the 
continent, and promised to do the best he could 
for him on his return. Sir John went back to 
Edinburgh to put matters in order before leaving 
for the continent. While in Edinburgh, John- 
stone, the Secretary of State of Scotland, treated 
him very unkindly, and threatened to throw him 



Sir John. 225 

into prison. He hastened back to London, but 
found that the King had gone over to the contin- 
ent. He followed the King with the intention of 
joining him. When he landed on the continent 
he heard that King William had lost the battle of 
Steinkirk, which was fought on August 3d, 1692. 
He was also led to believe that there would be a 
counter-revolution in Britain in a very short time, 
and that King James would be restored. In his 
blind attachment to the Stewarts, he joined the 
exiled James at St. Germains instead of joining 
King William. This foolish step ruined his pros- 
pects. Had he followed King William he might 
possibly have recovered a part of his estate from 
the grasp of Argyll. 

King William died on March 8th, 1702, and 
was succeeded by Anne, second daughter of King 
James. Shortly after her accession to the throne 
an indemnity was granted to all who had followed 
her father to France. Sir John Maclean returned 
to London about the beginning of 1704. 

In September, 1703, Lord Lovat informed the 
Duke of Queensberry that the Duke of Atholl, 
the Duke of Hamilton, the Earl of Cromarty and 
others were engaged in a plot to dethrone Queen 
Anne and place her brother James, son and heir 
of James II., upon the. throne. Sir John Mac- 
lean was immediately arrested on suspicion of 
being concerned in the plot referred to ; but as 
there was no proof against him he was set at lib- 
erty in a short time. The probability is that there 



226 The Clan Gillean. 

was really no such plot. Lord Lovat was not 
incapable of inventing and spreading- a false story. 
Sir John received from Queen Anne a pension of 
^500 sterling a year, which he enjoyed during her 
reign. He resided in London, but visited the 
Highlands occasionally. 

It is proper to state that King William, after he 
had reduced the Highlands to obedience, allowed 
yearly pensions to the heads of the clans. The 
same plan was continued by the Government in 
Queen Anne's time. The sum allowed to each 
chief was about ^360 sterling. The total spent 
annually in pensions among the chiefs was between 
.£3,000 and ,£4,000. 

On May 1st, 1707, Scotland and England were 
united under one legislature. In March, 1708, 
James, son of King James II., made an abortive 
attempt to enter Scotland, with twelve battalions 
of French soldiers, to incite an insurrection in his 
favour. On August 1st, 17 14, Queen Anne died, 
and was succeeded by the Elector of Hanover, 
George I. of Britain. In January, 1 7 1 5, the 
Parliament was dissolved, and writs issued for an 
election. When the Parliament met on the 17th 
of March, the Whigs, who had been out of office 
during the latter part of Queen Anne's reign, had 
a large majority on their side. The consequence 
was that the Tory ministry was dismissed, and a 
Whig ministry installed in its place. Among those 
who were deprived of their offices and emoluments 
was John Erskine, Earl of Mar, an accomplished 
courtier, and an able speaker, but a selfish politician. 



Sir John. 227 

At the time of Queen Anne's death, Sir John 
Maclean was at Achnacarry in Lochaber. When 
the governor of Fort William received the news of 
her death, he kept the matter to himself, and sent a 
kind invitation to the chief of the Macleans, John 
Cameron of Lochiel, and other Jacobites to come 
and dine with him. Lachlan Maclean of Grulin 
happened to notice that the governor's residence 
was surrounded by soldiers. He spoke to Sir John 
in Gaelic and made known the state of matters to 
him. The governor tried to arrest both Sir John 
and Lochiel, but they got out of the house and 
succeeded in making their escape. 

In January, 17 15, the following chiefs and chief- 
tains signed a loyal address to King George : — Sir 
John Maclean, Macdonellof Glengarry, Mackenzie 
of Frazerdale, Cameron of Lochiel, Macleod of 
Contullich, Macdonald of Keppoch, Grant of Glen- 
moriston, Mackintosh of Mackintosh, Chisholm of 
Comar, Macpherson of Cluny, and Sir Donald 
Macdonald of Sleat. The address was written by 
Lord Grange, a brother of the Earl of Mar, but 
evidently composed by the latter. When Mar 
presented it to King George, he gruffly and fool- 
ishly refused to receive it. Mar at once departed 
for the Highlands to stir up a rebellion against the 
new Government. He had no further use for 
King George ; he wanted to see James, the son of 
King James, on the throne. 

On August 26th, the Jacobites held a meeting 
at Braemar to consider what steps to take. After 



228 The Clan Gillean. 

an eloquent speech from Mar, they agreed to 
return to their homes, raise their forces, and 
assemble at Aboyne on the 3d of September. 
They met on the day appointed. On the 6th of 
the month they unfurled the royal banner at 
Castletown, and proclaimed young James King, 
by the title of James VII. of Scotland, and James 
III. of England, Ireland, and their dependencies. 
During the night of September 8th, 100 of the 
Jacobite party tried to capture the castle of Edin- 
burgh. Through their folly in allowing a woman 
to know their intention, their attempt failed. The 
garrison was prepared to meet them. Four of 
them, Captain Maclean, Alexander Ramsay, 
George Boswell, and a man named Lesley, were 
taken prisoners. The rest succeeded in making 
their escape. 

The Earl of Mar acted as commander-in-chief 
of the Jacobites, and had his head-quarters at the 
city of Perth. He knew nothing at all about 
military matters, and lacked the ability to make a 
right use of the military skill of others. He was 
not only unfit to command an army, but utterly 
unfit to direct and control a large body of men in 
any capacity. He could intrigue, tell plausible 
stories, and make speeches ; but he could really 
do nothing else. 

About the 17th of September, 17 15, a body of 
Highlanders, consisting of Macleans, Macdonalds 
from Moydart, and Camerons, attacked Fort Wil- 
liam, and succeeded in taking two of the outworks 



Sir John. 229 

and making prisoners of the men who defended 
them, twenty-six in number. Owing to the want 
of cannon they were unable to capture the fort 
itself. In October Sir John Maclean raised 300 
men in Mull, Coll, Tiree, and Morvern, and was 
joined by young Ardgour with 100 men. On the 
13th of the month he passed, with these 400 men, 
at the current of Ardgour, seven miles from Fort 
William, and on the following day, passing Call- 
art, marched up through Glencoe to Glenorchy. 
The Macdonells of Glengarry, the Macdonalds of 
Moydart, the Campbells of Glenorchy, and others 
also assembled in Glenorchy. General Gordon, 
an experienced veteran, commanded them. He 
led them to Inverary, apparently to encourage 
those who were afraid of the power of Argyll, 
to rise up in arms. From Inverary he led his 
forces through Strathfillan towards Auchterarder. 
Among those who joined him were 400 of the 
Campbells of Breadalbane, under Glendaruel and 
Glenlyon. 

John Campbell, second Duke of Argyll, pos- 
sessed ability of a high order, and was a very 
excellent man. He distinguished himself highly 
as a general, statesman, and orator. Of all the 
Campbell chiefs he was the most renowned. He 
was born in 1678, and succeeded his father as 
Duke of Argyll in 1703. He took an active part 
in promoting the legislative union between Scotland 
and England, and was rewarded for his serv- 
ices, in 1704, by being created a peer of England 



230 The Clan Gillean. 

by the title of Earl of Greenwich. He fought 
under Marlborough, and was raised to the rank of 
lieutenant-general in 1709. He was appointed 
Commander-in-Chief of the royal forces in Scot- 
land in 1 7 1 5. He had his head-quarters at Stirling. 
On Thursday morning, November 10th, 17 15, 
Mar led his forces out of Perth with the intention 
of proceeding to Stirling. He encamped at Auch- 
terarder in the evening, but sent two squadrons of 
horse on to Dunblane. On Friday, the nth, he 
was joined by General Gordon with the Macleans, 
Macdonalds, and other clans. On Saturday, the 
1 2th, he led his army to Ardoch and thence to the 
bridge of Kinbuck. On the same day Argyll took 
possession of Dunblane. On the morning of Sun- 
day, the 13th, the two armies met at Sheriffmuir. 
Mar had 8,400 men under him. He arranged his 
followers in two lines. The first line was drawn 
up in the following order:— a squadron of horse 
on the extreme right under the Master of Sinclair, 
son of Sinclair of Hermandston in Haddington- 
shire ; two squadrons of horse, under the Marquis 
of Huntly; the Macdonalds of Moydart; the Mac- 
donells of Glengarry ; the Macdonalds of Sleat ; 
the Mackinnons ; the Macdonalds of Glencoe; 
the Campbells of Breadalbane; the Macleans; 
the Camerons ; the Stewarts of Appin ; the men 
of Strathdon and Glenlivet, under Gordon of 
Glenbucket; and the Perthshire squadron of horse. 
This line was commanded by General Gordon. 
The second line was made up of two squadrons 



Sir John. 231 

of horse, under the Earl Marischal ; the Mac- 
kenzies ; two battalions of Huntly's men ; the 
Earl of Panmure's followers ; the Marquis of 
Tullibardine's men ; Lord Drummond's men ; the 
Robertsons of Struan ; and the Angus squadron 
of horse, under the Earl of Strathmore. Mar's 
reserve consisted of 400 horse. The second line 
was commanded by General Hamilton and Mar 
himself. The Duke of Argyll had 2,300 foot and 
1,200 cavalry. Argyll's first line consisted of 
Evans's dragoons, the Scots Greys, a squadron 
of the Earl of Stair's dragoons, 1,800 foot, Gen- 
eral Carpenter's dragoons, Ker's dragoons, and 
a squadron of Stair's dragoons. The second 
line was composed of two battalions of foot, 
with a squadron of dragoons on each wing. 
The Duke himself commanded the right wing, 
General Wightman the centre, and General M it- 
ham the left wing. The battle began in the 
afternoon. It is said that Sir John Maclean 
addressed his clan as follows : — "Gentlemen, this 
is a day we have long wished to see. Yonder 
stands Maccallen Mor for King George ; here 
stands Maclean for King James. God bless Mac- 
lean and King James. Charge, gentlemen." 
The Macdonalds of Moydart, the Macdonells of 
Glengarry, the Macdonalds of Sleat, the Campbells 
of Breadalbane, and the Macleans acted with great 
bravery, and routed Argyll's left wing in eight 
minutes. The Earl Marischal and Lord Drum- 
mond pursued the fugitives towards Dunblane. 



232 The Clan Gillean. 

Argyll defeated Mar's right wing", but met with 
stout opposition from the Perthshire and Angus 
horse. The victorious Highlanders of the right 
wing marched across the field of battle and drew 
up on an eminence, called the Stony Hill of Kip- 
pendavie. The Master of Stair and the Marquis 
of Atholl, through dissatisfaction with the Earl of 
Mar, took no active part in the battle. The Mac- 
gregors and the Macphersons watched it from a 
safe distance, but did not strike a blow. The 
Macdonalds of Keppoch also kept out of the fight. 
Mar retired to Ardoch, and Argyll to Dunblane. 
Of Argyll's men 290 were killed, 187 wounded, 
and 133 taken prisoners. According to the account 
given by the Jacobites, they had only sixty men 
killed and a few wounded. It is probable, how- 
ever, that their losses in killed and wounded 
amounted at least to 400 men. Argyll took eighty- 
two prisoners with him to Stirling. Among the 
slain on the side of the Jacobites was the accom- 
plished Ailein Muideartach. John Lyon, third Earl 
of Strathmore, was also killed. Of the Macleans 
only six men fell — Captain Allan Maclean of 
the Morvern family and five privates. Donald 
Maclean of Brolas, who was Sir John's lieutenant- 
colonel, was wounded. 

On November 6th, Thomas Foster, a member 
of Parliament for the county of Northumberland, 
and the Earl of Derwentwater raised the standard 
of rebellion in England against King George. 
Mar, with great folly, sent a body of men under 



Sir John. 233 

Brigadier William Mackintosh of Borlum, to their 
assistance. The force under Borlum consisted 
of Mar's own regiment, the Mackintosh regiment, 
Lord Charles Murray's regiment, a part of the Earl 
of Strathmore's regiment, and others. Borlum 
arrived at Kelso on Saturday, October 22d. Here 
he found Alexander Gordon, fifth Viscount of 
Kenmure, and George Seton, fifth Earl of Win- 
toun, awaiting his arrival. The insurgents crossed 
the English border on November 1st, and marched 
to Brampton. Foster, who had been appointed 
by the Earl of Mar general of the Jacobite forces 
in England, now assumed the commandership, a 
position for which he did not possess a single 
qualification. He led his army to Preston, where 
he allowed it to be cooped up by his opponents. 
On Saturday, November 12th, General Wills 
attacked the Jacobites, but was repulsed. On the 
13th he was joined by General Carpenter. On 
Monday morning, November 14th, Foster and his 
followers were compelled to surrender at discretion. 
The men taken prisoners numbered in all 1,468. 
Of these 1,005 were Scotsmen, and 463 English- 
men. Of the former, 143 were either noblemen or 
gentlemen, and of the latter, seventy-five. 

On the 31st of January, 17 16, Mar left Perth, 
and led his army towards Montrose, where he 
arrived on February 3d. On the 4th, Prince 
James, the Earl of Mar, the Earl of Milfort, Lord 
Drummond, and others went on board a small 
French vessel, and sailed to Waldham in French 



234 The Clan Gillean. 

Flanders. Prince James had been in Scotland only 
since the 22d of December. When he arrived he 
was accompanied only by six men. 

General Gordon led the Jacobite army to Aber- 
deen, and there made known to them on the 
morning of February 6th that Prince James had 
set sail for France and that the insurrection was 
now at an end. With sad hearts they marched in 
the direction of Old Meldrum, and thence through 
Strathspey into Badenoch, where they quietly dis- 
persed in various directions. 

George I. treated the prisoners taken at Preston 
and other places, and indeed all the rebels whom 
he could find, with mean and savage vindictiveness. 
Major Nairne, Captain Philip Lockhart, Captain 
Shaftoe, and Ensign Nairne were tried before a 
court-martial and condemned for having deserted 
the King's army. They were shot on the 2d of 
December, 17 15. The Earl of Derwentwater and 
Viscount Kenmure, both excellent men, were exe- 
cuted at Tower Hill on February 24th, 17 16. Five 
prisoners were executed at Tyburn, and twenty- 
two in Lancashire. Seven hundred of the men 
taken at Preston, of whom the great majority were 
Highlanders, were by "the King's mercy" trans- 
ported and sold as slaves to West India merchants. 
The Earl of Nottingham, Lord Alysford, Lord 
Finch, and Lord Guernsey were deprived of their 
offices because they were inclined to be somewhat 
merciful towards the men who had been in rebellion. 
The Duke of Argyll, the very man who had 



Sir John. 235 

crushed the insurrection in Scotland, was punished. 
He was deprived of the command of the army in 
Scotland and General Carpenter appointed in his 
place. He committed no crime, but he was looked 
upon as being too humane towards his country- 
men, as being unwilling to butcher them and sell 
them into slavery. If George I. was not equal in 
ferocity to his grandson, the Duke of Cumberland, 
he was certainly not far behind. The Earl of 
Wintoun, Foster, Brigadier Mackintosh, and a 
number of other persons succeeded in making their 
escape from the prisons in which they had been 
confined. It is probable that the jail-keepers were 
not as thirsty for their blood as their tyrannical 
Hanoverian King. 

About forty persons were deprived of their 
estates for the rebellion of 17 15. The estates were 
placed in the hands of trustees and ordered to be 
sold for the benefit of the public. They were pur- 
chased by a mercantile company in London, known 
as the York Building Company. They were all 
disposed of by the company in course of time. 
Some of them were bought in by friends of the 
lawful heirs and conveyed to them. Many of 
them, however, became the property of persons 
who had no hereditary claim to them. 

Sir John Maclean caught cold on the night of 
his escape from Fort William, and never got over it. 
After the battle of Sheriffmuir he became unwell 
at Perth. He accompanied his men as far as 
Keith. Here he bade farewell to them, and retired 



236 The Clan Gillean. 

to Gordon Castle in the vicinity of Fochabers, 
Elginshire. He died there of consumption on 
March 12th, 17 16, in the forty-sixth year of his 
age. He was buried in the church of Raffin in 
Banffshire, in the burial-place of the Gordons of 
Buckie. He was the last of the powerful Lords 
of Duart. 

Although Sir John Maclean held possession of 
the estate of Duart for some time, he never owned 
it. He was only ten years of age when it became 
the property of the crown in 1681. After the 
revolution in 1688, it was handed over to the Earl 
of Argyll. Sir John was absolutely landless when 
his clan loyally followed him, first to Killiecrankie, 
and afterwards to Sheriffmuir. 

Sir John of Duart was a man of good ability, 
and was thoroughly honest and honourable in his 
ways. He was well educated, and spoke Gaelic, 
English, and French fluently. He was generous 
by nature, affable in his manners, brave and cool 
in battle, and fitted in every way to command the 
respect and love of his clan. He was probably 
the subject of more pathetic songs than any other 
Highland chief. 

XX. Sir Eachann. 

Sir Hector, only son of Sir John Maclean of 
Duart, was born at Calais in France on November 
6th, 1703. He was taken to Scotland in 1707 and 
placed under the care of Donald Maclean, laird of 
Coll. He remained in Coll during eleven years. 



Sir Hector. 237 

He succeeded his father as chief of the Clan Gillean 
in 1 7 16. He was sent to Edinburgh, to study at 
the university, in 1718. He made good progress 
in languages, philosophy, and mathematics. He 
went to France in 1721 to complete his education. 
One of the subjects to which he paid special atten- 
tion there was civil law. He returned to Scotland 
in 1726. He went back to France in 1728. He 
lived sometimes at Boulogne and at other times in 
Paris. He had really no home. 

Charles Stewart, son of Prince James, son of 
King James II., landed at Borodale in Moydart on 
July 25th, 1745. The Stewart standard was raised 
at Glenfinnan on the 19th of August. It was un- 
furled by William Murray, Marquis of Tullibardine, 
one of the men who had fought at Sheriffmuir in 
1715. Prince James was acknowledged as king, 
and Charles proclaimed regent of the kingdoms 
of Scotland, England, France, and Ireland, and the 
dominions thereunto belonging. Prince Charles 
and his followers arrived at Blair Atholl on the 
30th of August, and entered Perth on the 4th of 
September. He appointed Lord George Murray 
lieutenant-general of his forces. 

Prince Charles defeated Sir John Cope at the 
battle of Prestonpans, or Gledsmuir, on Saturday 
the 21st of September. He invaded England with 
4,500 men on the 8th of November, captured 
Carlisle on the 15th, entered Preston on the 26th 
and Manchester on the 28th, and arrived at Derby 
on the 4th of December. He was now within 



238 The Clan Gillean. 

127 miles of London, but had been joined only 
by 300 Englishmen. On the 6th of December he 
commenced a retreat towards Carlisle, and crossed 
the Esk back into Scotland on the 20th. He 
arrived in Glasgow on the 26th, and remained 
there a few days. On Thursday, the 17th of 
January, 1746, he defeated General Hawley at 
Falkirk. On Monday, the 14th of April, he 
pitched his camp on the flat moor of Drummossie, 
near Culloden, to await the approach of the Duke 
of Cumberland. 

Sir Hector Maclean arrived in Edinburgh about 
the first of June, 1745, with the intention of joining 
Prince Charles. He lodged with a man named 
Blair. This man, in the expectation of obtaining 
a good reward for his political zeal, made known 
to the Government that Sir Hector was staying 
with him. On the 5th of June, Sir Hector was 
arrested and placed in confinement in Edinburgh 
Castle. Two men who were with him, Lachlan 
Maclean and George Bleau of Castlehill, were 
seized and imprisoned at the same time. The 
three of them were sent up to London. 

John Campbell, son of John Campbell of 
Mamore, joined General Hawley with 1,000 men 
on the morning of the day on which the battle of 
Falkirk was fought. Shortly after his departure, 
Charles Maclean of Drimnin raised 500 Macleans 
and joined Prince Charles. The Maclachlans 
and themselves were formed into one regiment. 
Lachlan Maclachlan, chief of his clan, was 



Sir Hector. 239 

appointed colonel, and Charles of Drimnin, lieu- 
tenant-colonel. The Maclachlans numbered about 
300. 

A party of Campbells invaded Morvern while 
the fighting men of that district were absent with 
Prince Charles, and committed disgraceful acts of 
barbarity. They plundered all the houses along 
the coast occupied either by Macleans or Camerons, 
stripped the women and children of their clothes, 
killed all the horses that came in their way, and 
burnt the byres and all the cattle in them. 

Lord George Murray arrived at Drummossie 
Moor on Tuesday, the 15th of April. He objected 
at once to it as a place for encountering the Duke 
of Cumberland. He urged Prince Charles to leave 
it and pitch his camp on a hilly and boggy spot 
south of the water of Nairn. His reasons for 
proposing this course were : first, the necessity of 
fighting on a field in which Cumberland's cavalry 
could not act with advantage ; secondly, the 
desirableness of giving the Macphersons, the 
Macgregors, the Mackinnons, the Macdonalds of 
Barrisdale,and the followers of the Earl of Cromarty 
time to arrive ; and thirdly, the unfit condition of 
the men to engage, owing to their want of food. 
Prince Charles, instigated by his Irish and French 
officers, rejected Murray's advice. Murray then 
proposed a night march towards Nairn, where the 
Duke of Cumberland was encamped. The Prince 
hailed this proposal with great alacrity. But 
there were serious difficulties in the way. In the 



240 The Clan Gillean. 

first place, it was neccessary to march ten miles and 
arrive at Nairn at two o'clock in the morning. 
In the second place, through the carelessness of 
those who had charge of the commissariat depart- 
ment, there was only one biscuit for each man in 
the camp. Indeed, the large majority of those 
who were expected to march to Nairn had not 
tasted any food for the last day and a half. Mur- 
ray's intention was to surprise Cumberland's army 
before daylight. The plan of making a night 
march was resolved on about three o'clock in the 
afternoon. During the day a large number of 
half-starved men wandered off towards Inverness 
in search of food. The march to Nairn began at 
eight o'clock in the evening. Murray, at the head 
of the Atholl men, led the van, while the Duke of 
Perth had charge of the rear. The night was very 
dark, and the ground rough and hard to travel. 
The van arrived at Knockan Buie, or Yellow 
Knowe, two miles beyond Kilravock, about one 
o'clock in the morning. Lord Drummond and 
the Duke of Perth came to Murray and urged him 
to halt there for the rear. Their request was com- 
plied with. Murray had now marched ten miles, 
but he was still nearly four miles from Nairn. At 
two o'clock in the morning the rear was yet about 
a mile behind. As it was clearly impossible to get 
to Cumberland's camp in time to surprise it, he 
ordered a retreat. The Prince's army was back 
at Drummossie Moor about half-past five in the 
morning. The men were hungry, fatigued, sleepy, 



Sir Hector. 241 

and dissatisfied. Murray again proposed to cross 
the river Nairn, and occupy a suitable place for 
battle, but Charles paid no attention to him. The 
Prince was a handsome, brave, and amiable man ; 
but he was as stubborn as his grandfather, and 
just as full of absurd notions respecting the rights 
of kings. Murray was a loyal Jacobite, and as 
able a general as had ever led a Highland army, 
except Montrose ; but he was blunt and honest 
and unwilling to flatter. Consequently, he was 
disliked by the Prince and his Frenchified followers. 
On Wednesday, the 16th of April, 1746, about 
ten o'clock, the Jacobite forces were drawn up for 
battle on Drummossie, or Culloden Moor. The 
first line, reckoning from right to left, comprised the 
Atholl men, the Camerons, the Stewarts of Appin, 
the Frasers, the Mackintoshes and Macgillivrays, 
the Maclachlans and Macleans, the Farquharsons, 
John Roy Stewart's regiment, the Macdonalds of 
Moydart, the Macdonalds of Keppoch, and the 
Macdonells of Glengarry. Each wing was flanked 
by four field-pieces. There were also four field- 
pieces in the centre, between the Mackintoshes and 
Macgillivrays on the right and the Maclachlans 
and Macleans on the left. The second line con- 
sisted of Lord Lewis Gordon's regiment in column, 
Lord Ogilvie's, the Duke of Perth's, Lord John 
Drummond's French Royal Scots, the Irish Pic- 
quets, and Glenbucket's regiment in column. It 
was flanked on the right by Lord Elcho's horse 
guards and Fitzjames's horse, and on the left by 



242 The Clan Gillean. 

Lord Balmerino's horse guards. The reserve 
consisted of Strathallan's horse, Pitsligo's horse, 
and Lord Kilmarnock's foot guards, a body of 
cavalrymen who had no horses. There were only 
250 horse in all. Murray commanded on the right 
of the first line, Lord John Drummond in the 
centre, and the Duke of Perth on the left. The 
second line was under the command of General 
Stapleton. The whole army amounted only to 
about 5,000. The most of these had nothing to 
eat during the last two days, except one biscuit. 
Some of them were nodding with sleep while they 
stood in the ranks. The Macdonalds and Mac- 
donells were dissatisfied because they had not been 
placed on the right wing, and had made up their 
minds to take no part in the fight. 

The Duke of Cumberland had 8,100 foot and 
900 horse. His first line, reckoning from left to 
right, consisted of Barrel's regiment, Munro's, 
the Scots Fusiliers, Price's regiment, Cholmond- 
ley's regiment, the Scots Royals, and Pultney's 
regiment. It was flanked on the right by Ker's 
and Cobham's dragoons, and on the left by King- 
ston's dragoons. The second line consisted of 
Semple's regiment, Bligh's, Ligonier's, Fleming's, 
Howard's, and Bathereau's. Wolfe's regiment 
stood at right angles to the first and second lines, 
and at some distance away from them. Blakeney's 
dragoons formed the reserve. Each line was three 
deep. There were two pieces of cannon between 
every two regiments in the first line, three in the 



Sir Hector. 243 

centre of the second line, and three on the flank of 
Semple's regiment. The first line was commanded 
by the Earl of Albemarle, the second by General 
Huske, and the reserve by Brigadier Mordaunt. 
The Campbells of Argyleshire had charge of the 
baggage, and as it did not contain any heiresses 
or titles to land they acted with scrupulous honesty. 
The battle commenced about one o'clock, by a 
discharge of artillery. About the same time a 
shower of sleet from the north-east began to beat 
violently in the faces of the starving Highlanders. 
The Jacobites were cut down in large numbers by 
the cannon of the English, while their own artillery 
did little or no execution. About half-past one 
o'clock the Duke of Perth was ordered to advance 
with the left, but the Macdonalds and Macdonells 
refused to move. The Mackintoshes, who were 
near the centre of the first line, lost all patience 
and rushed forward to attack their foes. Murray 
immediately ordered a general charge and rode 
into the fight at the head of his men. In a few 
seconds the Atholl men, Camerons, Stewarts of 
Appin, Frasers, Mackintoshes and Macgillivrays, 
Maclachlans and Macleans, Farquharsons, and 
John Roy Stewart's men were all in motion. They 
were stormed at with musketry and grape-shot in 
front, and with a furious fire on their flank from 
Wolfe's regiment, but they pressed forward with- 
out flinching. They attacked the first line sword 
in hand and soon routed Barrel's regiment and 
Munro's. While advancing towards the second 



244 The Clan Gillean. 

line they were cut down so thickly that they were 
forced to turn back. In the course of a few 
moments the whole Jacobite army gave way. The 
battle of Culloden was now over. It lasted only 
about forty minutes. About 1,200 of the Jacobites 
lay on the field, some dead, many only wounded. 
The English army had fifty killed and 259 wounded. 

Lachlan Maclachlan, colonel of the united regi- 
ment of the Maclachlans and the Macleans, was 
killed by a cannon-ball at the beginning of the 
action. Charles Maclean of Drimnin, his lieu- 
tenant-colonel, then assumed the command, and 
led the regiment in the brilliant charge of the clans. 
As he was retreating, he missed his son Lachlan, 
and enquired of Allan, another of his sons, what 
had become of him. Allan, who was himself 
wounded, told him that he was afraid that Lachlan 
had been killed. His death shall not be unavenged, 
answered the grieved father, and immediately faced 
about. Allan began to beseech him not to go 
back. To the pleading Allan, his father said, 
Ailein, coma leat mise ; ma's toil leat do bheatha 
thoir an aithre dhuit fhein, Allan, never mind me ; 
if you value your life take care of yourself. The 
gallant but rash Charles went back, attacked two 
troopers, killed one, and wounded the other ; but 
was in the course of a few minutes cut down by 
fresh foes. Allan escaped from the field, and got 
back to Drimnin. 

The Duke of Cumberland murdered all the 
wounded men that he found on the field of Cul- 



Sir Hector. 245 

loden or in huts near it. He spent two days in 
collecting and butchering them. He went to Fort 
Augustus on the 23d of May, and made it his 
head-quarters. He sent the most brutal of his 
followers in detachments through the districts in 
which the Jacobites lived. These men plundered 
mansions and huts and then set fire to them. 
They shot down the men as if they had been savage 
wolves. They insulted, ravished, and abused the 
women, stripped them of their clothes and rings, 
and left themselves and their children to starve. 
They collected horses, cattle, sheep, and goats in 
thousands, drove them to Fort Augustus, sold 
them to Whig speculators from England and the 
Lowlands, and pocketed the proceeds as prize- 
money. In all his butcheries, robberies, burnings, 
and other atrocities, the Duke of Cumberland had 
zealous assistants in General Hawley, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Howard, Captain Caroline Scott, Major 
Lockhart, and other varnished savages. The Gov- 
ernment also acted in a very sanguinary manner 
towards the rebels. They caused a large number 
to be hanged by the neck for some time ; to be 
cut down while they were yet alive ; to have their 
bowels taken out and burnt before their faces ; to 
have their heads severed from their necks ; and to 
have their bodies divided into four quarters. 
Hundreds of Highlanders were transported to the 
West Indies and Carolina. 

Sir Hector Maclean was set at liberty as a 
French prisoner, in May, 1747. He left London 



246 The Clan Gillean. 

immediately and crossed over to France. He 
paid a visit to Rome in 1750. He had an attack 
of apoplexy in the month of July, but partly 
recovered from it. He had a second attack in 
November, and died shortly afterwards. He was 
buried in Rome. 

Sir Hector was low in stature, and lame in one 
leg ; but he was sturdy and active, and capable of 
bearing fatigue. His complexion was fair, his 
eyes large and piercing, and his manners and 
address polite and agreeable. He was a good 
Latin scholar, and spoke Gaelic, English, French, 
and Italian. He was well read and had a strong 
memory and clear judgment. The Ardgour MS. 
tells us that he was rather too generous. This 
statement is only a half-truth ; he was unfortu- 
nately a little too fond of strong drink. He was 
never married. 



CHAPTER X. 
dicntalogtj of the JRarientB of Suart. 

I. Gillean of the battle-axe had three sons, 
Bristi, Gillebride, and Malise. 

II. Malise had apparently two sons, Malcolm 
and Gilmory. 

III. Malcolm married Rioghnach, or Reena, 
daughter of the Lord of Carrick, and had by her 
three sons, Donald, Neil, and John Dubh. Don- 
ald had four children, Malise, John, Beathag, 
and Aithbric. Xeil had two sons, Diarmad and 
Malcolm. 

IV. John Dubh had two sons, Lachlan Lubanach 
and Hector Reaganach. The latter was the pro- 
genitor of the Macleans of Lochbuie. 

V. Lachlan Lubanach married Mary, daughter 
of John, first Lord of the Isles, and had by her 
seven children, John, Hector Roy, Lachlan, Neil, 
Somerled, Finvola, and Mary. 

VI. Hector Roy, Eaehann Ruadh nan Cath, 



248 The Clan Gillean. 

married a daughter of the Earl of Douglas, by 
whom he had Lachlan Bronnach. 

VII. Lachlan Bronnach had a natural son 
named Donald by a daughter of Maceachern of 
Kingerloch. Lachlan married, first, Finvola, 
daughter of John Borb Macleod of Harris, and 
had by her two sons, Neil and John Garbh. He 
married, secondly, Janet, daughter of Alexander 
Stewart, Earl of Mar, and had by her three 
children, Lachlan Og^ Finvola, and Ann. Donald 
was the progenitor of the Macleans of Ardgour. 
Neil was the progenitor of the Macleans of Lehir 
and Ross. Lachlan Og succeeded his father as 
chief of the clan. Finvola was married to Celestine 
of Lochalsh, by whom she had Alexander and two 
or three daughters, one of whom was married to 
Allan Cameron of Lochiel. Ann was married to 
Sir William Munro of Foulis. John Garbh was 
the progenitor of the Macleans of Coll. 

VIII. Lachlan Og married a daughter of Gilles- 
pick Roy Campbell, son and heir of Lord Duncan 
Campbell of Lochow, and had by her two sons, 
Hector Odhar and Donald. 

IX. Hector Odhar was slain by arrows at the 
battle of Flodden in 1513. He was succeeded in 
the chiefship by his son, Lachlan Cattanach. 

X. Lachlan Cattanach married, first, Marion, 
daughter of John Maclean of Treshnish, and 
secondly, Elizabeth, daughter of Archibald Camp- 
bell, second Earl of Argyll. He had at least two 
sons by his first wife, Hector Mor and Allan. 



The Macleans of Duart. 249 

He had a son named Patrick, but it is not certain 
who Patrick's mother was. According to a 
document of the year 1545, Patrick was a brother- 
german of Hector Mor, and was thus a son of 
Treshnish's daughter. According to the Ardgour 
MS., he was a natural son, his mother being a 
girl named Catherine Hay. As Patrick was not a 
Maclean name, we suspect that the Ardgour MS. 
is correct. Lachlan Cattanach was assassinated in 
Edinburgh by Sir John Campbell of Calder in the 
summer of 1523. Hector Mor succeeded his father 
in Duart. Allan — the famous Ailein nan Sop — 
was the progenitor of the Macleans of Gigha. 
Patrick was justiciar of the South Isles and bailie 
of Iona in 1545. He received from Queen Mary 
in August, 1547, a gift of the temporality of the 
bishopric of the Isles and the abbey of Iona, both 
of which he resigned in favour of the Rev. John 
Carsewell in 1567, on condition of receiving an 
annual pension. 

XI. Hector Mor married Mary, daughter of 
Alexander Macdonald of Islay and the Glens, and 
had by her two sons and seven daughters, Hector 
Og, John Dubh, Marion, Mary, Catherine the 
elder, Julia, Una, Janet, and Catherine the younger. 
1. Hector Og succeeded his father. 2. John Dubh 
was the progenitor of the Macleans of Morvern. 
3. Marion was married to Norman Macleod, elev- 
enth of Harris. 4. Mary was married to Donald 
Macdonald, sixth of Sleat. 5. Catherine the elder 
was a handsome, high-spirited, and accomplished 



250 The Clan Gillean. 

woman. She was married, first, to Archibald, 
fourth Earl of Argyll, and, secondly, to Calvagh 
O' Donnell. It is said that she was married, 
thirdly, to Shane O' Neill. She was married, 
lastly, to John Stewart of Appin. Her first hus- 
band died in 1553. Her second husband was killed 
in 1565. Shane O' Neill was slain in 1567. 
Catherine was with him at the time, but may not 
have been married to him. She was living in 1576, 
and was then the wife of John Stewart of Appin. 
She had no children. 6. Allan Macdonald of Moy- 
dart married the eldest daughter of Alasdair Crotach 
Macleod of Dunvegan, and had at least one son 
by her, Allan Og. According to the Book of 
Clanranald, Allan paid a visit to Duart, fell in 
love with one of Hector Mor's clever girls, and 
carried her off to Castle Tirim. He lived with 
her as his wife and had two children by her, John 
of Strome and another son, probably Angus. 
Alasdair Crotach's daughter, Allan's lawful wife, 
found a home with Macdonald of Keppoch. It is 
a fact that one of Hector Mor's daughters ran off 
with Allan of Moydart. It is evident that Julia 
was the girl who committed this act of folly and 
sin. At any rate she is the only one whose 
husband is not mentioned in the Ardgour MS. 
7. Una was married to Donald Cameron of Lochiel, 
but had no issue by him. 8. Janet was married 
to Angus Macdonald, seventh of Glengarry, by 
whom she had one son, Donald. 9. Catherine the 
younger was married to Archibald Campbell of 



The Macleans of Duart. 251 

Craignish, by whom she had two sons, Dugald 
and Tearlach Mor, or Big Charles. 

XII. Hector Og married Janet, daughter of 
Archibald Campbell, fourth Earl of Argyll, and 
had by her four children, Lachlan Mor, Mary, 
Janet, and Marion. Mary was married to Angus 
Macdonald of Islay, by whom she had three 
children, James, Angus Og, and Margaret. Janet 
was married, as his third wife, to Roderick 
Macleod, tenth of Lewis, and had two children, 
Torquil Dubh and Tormod, or Norman. Marion 
was married, first, to Hector Roy, sixth of Coll ; 
and, secondly, to Charles Maclean of Inverscadale. 

XIII. Lachlan Mor was born in 1557. He 
married Margaret, second daughter of William 
Cunningham, sixth Earl of Glencairn, and had 
by her six children, Hector Og, Lachlan Og, Allan, 
Gillean, Charles, and a daughter. He was slain 
at Gruinnart, on August 5th, 1598. 1. Hector Og 
succeeded his father. 2. Lachlan Og was the 
progenitor of the later Macleans of Torloisk. 

3. Allan lived at Carnnacaillich in Morvern. He 
married a daughter of Allan Maclean of Ardtor- 
nish, and had at least one child, a daughter, 
who was married to Allan Macquarrie of Ulva. 

4. Gillean is described in 1618 as Gillean Maclean 
of "Coull." He married a daughter of Allan of 
Ardtornish. 5. Charles seems to have lived in 
Mull. It is said that he married a daughter of 
Hector, eighth of Lochbuie. 6. Lachlan Mor's 
daughter was married to Hector Odhar, ninth of 
Lochbuie. 



252 The Clan Gillean. 

XIV. Hector Og married, first, Janet, second 
daughter of Colin Cam Mackenzie of Kintail, and 
had by her three children, Hector Mor, Lachlan, 
and Finvola. He married, secondly, Isabel, 
daughter of Archibald Acheson of Gosford, by 
whom he had two sons, Donald and John Dubh. 
Hector Mor succeeded his father. Lachlan suc- 
ceeded Hector Mor. Donald was the progenitor 
of the Macleans of Brolas. John Dubh was the 
progenitor of the Macleans of Sweden. Finvola 
was married to John Garbh of Coll. 

XV. Hector Mor married Margaret, eldest 
daughter of Sir Rory Mor Macleod of Dunvegan, 
but had no issue by her. 

XVI. Lachlan married Mary, second daughter 
of Sir Rory Mor Macleod, and had by her five 
children, Hector Roy, Allan, Isabel, Mary, and 
Marion. He was created a baronet in 163 1. He 
died in 1648. 1. Hector Roy succeeded his father. 
2. Allan succeeded Hector Roy. 3. Isabel was 
married to Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, and had 
seven children, John, Donald, Allan, Margaret, 
Ann, Catherine, and Janet. John succeeded his 
father as chief of the Clan Cameron. Donald died 
without issue. Allan died without male issue. 
Margaret was married to Alexander Drummond 
of Balhaldy ; Ann, to Allan Maclean of Ardgour; 
Catherine, to William, third son of Sir Donald 
Macdonald, tenth of Sleat ; and Janet, to John 
Grant, fourth of Glenmoriston. 4. Mary was 
married to Sir Lachlan Mor Mackinnon, by whom 



The Macleans of Duart 253 

she had one son, John Og. 5. Marion seems to 
have died young. 

XVII. Sir Hector Roy, second baronet, was 
killed at Inverkeithing, on July 20th, 165 1. 

XVI I I. Sir Allan, third baronet, married Sheela, 
or Julia, third daughter of John Mor Macleod of 
Dunvegan, and had one child by her, John, his 
successor. He died in 1674. 

XIX. Sir John, fourth baronet, married Mary, 
daughter of Sir ^Eneas Macpherson, by whom he 
had six children, Hector, Louisa, Isabel, Mary, 
Ann, and Beatrix. Hector succeeded his father 
in the chiefship. Ann was married to Hector 
Macquarrie of Ormaig, and had four children, 
John, Hector, Mary, and Margaret. Beatrix died 
at the age of fourteen, and is buried at Glendaruel. 
His wife predeceased Sir John. She was only 
thirty years of age at the time of her death. She 
is buried at Inchkenneth. Sir John died at Gordon 
Castle on March 12th, 17 16. 

XX. Sir Hector, fifth baronet, was the twentieth 
chief of the Clan Gillean. He was born at Calais 
in 1703 and died at Rome in 1750. He was suc- 
ceeded in the chiefship by Allan, fourth Maclean 
of Brolas. 



CHAPTER XI. 

The Macleans of Lochbuie. 

I. Hector Reaganach, son of John, was the 
first Maclean of Lochbuie. He was a venturesome 
and daring warrior, and was noted for his stern- 
ness and determination. He received the lands of 
Lochbuie from John, first Lord of the Isles. 
According to tradition these lands were held in 
possession by a chieftain named Macfadyen. As 
Macfayden, however, was not in a position to 
contend with Hector Reaganach and his friends, 
he considered it the part of wisdom to leave Mull 
and seek a home somewhere else. Hector Reag- 
anach was married twice. By his first wife he had 
at least one son, Terlach. By his second wife, 
Christina, daughter of Murdoch, son of Tormod 
Macleod of Harris, he had five sons, Murdoch 
Roy, Donald, Ewen, Thomas, and Malcolm. 
Terlach was the progenitor of the Macleans of 
Urchart. Murdoch Roy succeeded his father in 



The Macleans of Lochbuie. 255 

Lochbuie. The descendants of Terlach were known 
as Clann Thearlaich, or the children of Terlach, 
and the descendants of Murdoch as Sliochd Mhur- 
chaidh Ruaidh, or the offspring of Murdoch Roy. 

II. Murdoch Roy is said to have married a 
daughter of Roderick Macleod of Lewis. He had 
two sons, John and Terlach, and also a daughter, 
who became the wife of William Macleod of 
Harris. 

III. John, son of Murdoch Roy, received a 
charter of Banvy, Corpach, and other lands in 
Lochiel, and also of Duror and Glencoe, from 
John of the Isles, in October, 1461. 

IV. Hector, son of John, married Margaret 
Campbell, and had four children by her, John Og, 
Murdoch of Scallasdale, Margaret, and Christina. 
His wife was living in February, 1474. He wit- 
nessed a charter in 1478. 

Y. John Og received, in March, 1492, from John 
of the Isles and Alexander of Lochalsh, a charter 
of the office of bailiery of the south half of Tiree. 
In March, 1494, James IV. confirmed to him all 
his charters from the Lord of the Isles, and gave 
him some additional lands in Inverness-shire. In 
1499 Lachlan Cattanach, John of Coll, and him- 
self invaded Lochiel's lands, and carried off a large 
booty. He supported Donald Dubh in 1504. He 
quarrelled with Lachlan Cattanach in 1506, appar- 
ently about their conterminous lands in Morvern 
and Tiree. In 1507 the Government bound him 
M to keep the peace " towards Lachlan. In 1512 



256 The Clan Gillean. 

he attempted to enforce his claim to the lands of 
Lochiel, but failed. The feud between himself 
and Lachlan Cattanach was renewed about the 
same time, but did not last long. In March, 1517, 
he received remission for all his past offences. In 
June, 1522, he sold his claim to the lands of Lochiel 
and Duror, and to the office of bailiery of the 
south half of Tiree, to Sir John Campbell of 
Calder. In July, 1528, Calder transferred his title 
to the lands of Lochiel and Duror to his brother 
Colin, Earl of Argyll. It is probable that he 
transferred to his brother, at the same time, the 
office of bailiery of the south half of Tiree. In 
1526, Ailein nan Sop invaded Lochbuie's lands 
and slew a number of his followers, among them 
John, his son. In 1529 John Og joined the Mac- 
leans of Duart and the Macdonalds in ravaging 
Roseneath, Craignish, and other Campbell lands. 
John Og was born probably about the year 1470. 
He had two natural sons by the same woman, 
Murdoch Gearr and Charles. It is said that he 
married a daughter of Macdougall of Dunolly. 
He had two sons by his wife, John and Ewen. 
Murdoch Gearr and Charles were legitimated on 
September 13th, 1538. John left no issue. Ewen 
was known as Eoghan a chinn bhig, or Ewen of 
the little head. He was a distinguished warrior. 
He was married, and had an ill-tempered and 
penurious wife. He was killed in a fight with the 
Macleans of Duart some time before 1538. He 
was buried in Iona, where his tombstone is still 
pointed out. 



The Macleans of Lochbuie. 257 

According to the stories of superstition, Eoghan 
a chinn bhig is still going about in this world. 
He is always present when any of the Lochbuie 
family is in distress. He also very frequently 
attends the funerals of those who belong to that 
family. He wears his old cloak about him summer 
and winter, and always carries his trusty sword 
with him. He is still without his head. He 
rides a dun horse, the same horse on which he 
rode to Glen Cainnir, the place in which the battle 
in which he fell was fought. His horse has no 
equal in Arabia, or anywhere else. He travels 
over sea and land with equal facility. Ewen does 
not confine his wanderings to Scotland. He has 
been frequently in Ireland, Spain, and other coun- 
tries. We are told that the cause of his restlessness 
is that " he fell fasting, his cross and worthless 
wife having given him no breakfast on the morning 
on which he left home for Glen Cainnir." 

John Og died about the year 1539. His pos- 
sessions at the time of his death included the 
lands of Lochbuie, and lands in Tiree, Morvern, 
Jura, and Scarba. He was succeeded by his 
eldest son, Murdoch Gearr. 

VI. Murchadh Gearr, or Short Murdoch, was 
born about 1496. In January, 1538, he received 
from his father, Achalennan, Drimnin, and other 
lands in Morvern. On the death of his father, 
his uncle, Murdoch of Scallasdale, seized the estate 
and tried to keep possession of it. As Murdoch 
Gearr was only a legitimated son, Murdoch of 



258 The Clan Gillean. 

Scallasdale was supported by a strong party. 
Tradition gives the following account of their 
quarrel and their reconciliation: — When Murdoch 
of Scallasdale took possession of Lochbuie, Mur- 
doch Gearr was compelled to seek refuge in Ireland. 
Having collected a number of resolute men in 
Antrim, he returned to Mull. He landed near 
Moy Castle after dark. He immediately called to 
see his old nurse. She told him that she would 
let loose the cattle, and that when the men who 
were in the castle came out to drive them back, he 
could rush with his men to the gate and secure 
possession of it. Murdoch approved of her plan, 
but said that it might endanger the life of her 
husband, who was keeper of the gate. As to that, 
she replied, Leig an t-earball leis a chraicionn, 
let the tail go with the hide. The plan proposed 
by the nurse was acted upon, and Murdoch Gearr 
became master of the castle of Lochbuie. Shortly 
afterwards he defeated Murdoch of Scallasdale at 
the battle of Grulin. After his defeat the latter 
led his forces to the glen east of Benbuy. During 
the night Murdoch Gearr entered his uncle's camp, 
and left his dirk sticking in the ground at his head. 
Overcome by a feeling of gratitude to his nephew 
for sparing his life, Murdoch of Scallasdale re- 
turned home and caused no further trouble to 
Murdoch Gearr. The battle of Grulin must have 
been fought about the year 1540. It is said that 
the Stewarts of Appin assisted Murdoch of Scal- 
lasdale, while the Macleans of Ross assisted 
Murdoch Gearr. 



The Macleans of Lochbuie. 259 

In June, 1542, Murdoch Gearr received a charter 
of all the lands which had belonged to his father. 
He supported Donald Dubh in 1543, and signed 
the petition addressed to Henry VIII. of England 
in 1545. In January, 1576, we find him complain- 
ing to the Privy Council that John, his son and 
heir-apparent, had used him very uncourteously, 
although he was then an old, decrepit man of 
fourscore years. He also states that John had 
acted badly towards Allan Maclachlan and Ewen 
Maclean. John was denounced a rebel. In 1576, 
Murdoch Gearr was willing to become surety for 
the good behaviour of John Dubh of Morvern, 
but Argyll refused to accept him. In 1578 we find 
John, his son, suing him for having spulzied him, 
and cast him into irons. It is pretty evident that 
Murdoch Gearr and his heir were on exceedingly 
bad terms. Probably John thought that his father 
should have dropped off at the age of seventy. 

Murdoch Gearr married Ann, daughter of Sorley 
Buie Macdonald, and had five children by her, 
John Mor, Allan, Ewen, Lachlan, and Ann. He 
died in January, 1586. John Mor, his eldest son, 
succeeded him. Allan and Ewen are mentioned 
in 1579. Lachlan studied for the church. He was 
accused of trying to obtain the bishopric of the 
Isles and the abbacy of Iona for himself. He 
appeared before the Privy Council in May, 1567, 
denied the charges made against him, and re- 
nounced all claim to the bishopric and abbacy in 
favour of John Carsewell. It is probable that 



260 The Clan Gillean. 

Lachlan did not understand the art of keepings 
quiet and getting others to work for him as well 
as a man who seeks a better parish, or ecclesias- 
tical promotion of any kind, should understand it. 
He was alive in 1579. Ann, Murdoch Gearr's 
daughter, was married to John Macnaughton of 
Dundarave. 

VII. John Mor was one of the most expert 
swordsmen of his day. Tradition relates that a 
famous Italian swordsman visited Edinburgh, that 
he offered to fight any man in Scotland, and that 
John Mor accepted his challenge, defeated, and 
killed him. In June, 1581, John Mor, Hector, his 
son, and others attacked Peter Lymburner, burgess 
of Glasgow, while travelling in the Isle of Mull, 
robbed him of his pack of merchandise wares, 
which was worth 3,000 marks, and wounded 
him in several places. Lymburner lodged a com- 
plaint with the Privy Council. As John Mor 
and his accomplices did not appear before the 
Council, they were denounced rebels. In April, 
1586, John Roy Maclean, a member of the family 
of Lochbuie, paid a visit to John Mor, but was 
seized by the latter, thrown into prison, and put 
in irons. John Auchinross, acting as procurator 
for John Roy, brought the matter to the notice of 
the Privy Council. On March 20th, 1588, the 
Council ordered John Mor to set his captive at 
liberty within six hours after the receipt of their 
charge, under pain of rebellion. John Mor mar- 
ried a daughter of James Macdonald of Islay, by 



The Macleans of Lochbuie. 261 

whom he had apparently three sons, Hector, 
Murdoch, and John. He was succeeded by his 
eldest son, Hector. 

VIII. Hector was born about 1555. He was 
the first of the Lochbuie chieftains who embraced 
the Protestant religion. He fought, in behalf of 
the Macdonalds of Islay, against the Macleans of 
Duart at the battle of Benvigory in 1598. He 
was taken prisoner by Allan Cameron of Lochiel, 
carried off to Lochaber, and kept in chains for six 
months. He was served heir to his grandfather, 
Murdoch Gearr, in November, 1609. He sold, 
about the same time, his claim to the lands of 
Lochiel to Archibald, seventh Earl of Argyll, for 
the small sum of 400 marks. His chief object was 
no doubt to take vengeance on Allan of Lochiel 
for having imprisoned him. He married Mar- 
garet, daughter of Archibald Campbell, second of 
Lochnell, and had by her four sons, Hector Odhar, 
Charles, Ewen, and Allan. He died about 1614. 

IX. Hector Odhar received the lands of Loch- 
buie from his father in June, 161 2. He was served 
heir to his great-grandfather, Murdoch Gearr, in 
July, 1615. In March, 1621, he came under obli- 
gation to the Government "not to shoot deer." 
Charles and Ewen, his brothers, and Allan 
"Anenach" Maclean, his servant, came under a 
similar obligation. He married the only daughter 
of Lachlan Mor of Duart, and had at least four 
children by her, Murdoch Mor, Lachlan Mor, 
Margaret, and Janet. Margaret was married to 



262 The Clan Gillean. 

Donald Macquarrie of Ormaig. Janet was mar- 
ried, in 1625, to Campbell of Kilmelfort. Hector 
Odhar died about 1628. 

X. Murdoch Mor, son of Hector Odhar, received 
the estates from his father in July, 1625. In 
August, 163 1, he came under obligation to the 
Rev. Martin Macgillivray, minister of the kirks 
of Killean and Kilfinichen, to pay his own yearly 
tithes and to compel his vassals and tenants also 
to pay their tithes ; to make the inhabitants of the 
parishes referred to give due obedience to the dis- 
cipline of the kirk ; to cause them to repair to the 
kirks to hear the word of God and to participate 
in the holy sacraments ; and also to prevent them 
from convening in any chapel or any other place 
within the bounds of Killean and Kilfinichen to 
hear the word of God or participate in the holy 
sacraments. If the religion to be maintained by 
Murdoch Mor was not creideamh a bhata bhuidhe, 
or the religion of the yellow stick, it was certainly 
something which bore a very close resemblance to 
it. Murdoch Mor joined Montrose, along with 
the Macleans of Duart, in June, 1645, and fought 
at the battle of Kilsyth. He was with Alister 
Mac Coll from September, 1645, until April, 1646, 
plundering Knapdale and Cowall, and other lands 
occupied by the Campbells. He was deprived of 
his estates in 1649, but received them afterwards. 
He married Juliana, fifth daughter of Sir Robert 
Campbell of Glenorchy. He died about 1662, and 
was succeeded by his brother, Lachlan Mor. 



The Macleans of Lochbuie. 263 

XI. Lachlan Mor took an active part in 1675 
in supporting the Macleans of Duart against the 
rapacity of the Campbells of Argyll. He had a 
natural son named Allan. He married Margaret, 
daughter of Hector Maclean, second of Torloisk, 
and had four children by her, Murdoch Og, John, 
Hector, and Mary. Allan received from his father 
certain lands in life-rent. Murdoch Og married 
Anne, fourth daughter of Sir Hugh Campbell, sixth 
of Calder. He died without issue. John married 
Isabel, daughter of Macdougall of Dunolly, but 
had no issue. Hector succeeded his father. Mary 
was married to Ewen, ninth of Ardgour. Lachlan 
Mor died in 1701, and was interred in the burying- 
ground in Laggan. 

XII. Hector, son of Lachlan Mor, received a 
charter of the lands of Lochbuie in March, 1670. 
On the night of March 31st, 1671, he was at 
Inverary, along with Archibald Campbell, fifth of 
Lochnell, Colonel Menzies, Maclachlan of Inch- 
connel, and others. All present were drinking, 
and at last began quarrelling. Lochbuie and 
Inchconnel threatened to kill Colonel Menzies, but 
were prevented from attacking him by some of 
those present. During the squabble the light 
went out. Colonel Menzies' servant fired at 
Lochbuie through the window, but missed him 
and killed Lochnell. On March 21st, 1689, 
Lochbuie was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the 
Maclean regiment, Sir John Maclean of Duart 
being colonel. In June, 1689, he defeated a body 



264 The Clan Gillean. 

of cavalry, under Sir Thomas Livingston, at 
Knockbreck in Badenoch. He fought at the 
battle of Killiecrankie, which took place shortly 
afterwards. He was compelled to surrender the 
castle of Moy to the Earl of Argyll on October 
22d, 1690. Argyll placed Colin Campbell of 
Braeglen, with twenty-four men, in charge of the 
castle. 

Hector of Lochbuie married Margaret, second 
daughter of Colin Campbell, fifth of Lochnell, and 
had by her seven children, Murdoch, John, Allan, 
Lachlan, Margaret, Mary, and another daughter. 

1. Murdoch succeeded his father in Lochbuie. 

2. John received the lands of Pennygoun in life- 
rent from his father in 1705. 3. Allan received 
the lands of Garmony in life-rent in 1705. He 
married Julia, daughter of Lachlan Maclean of 
the Torloisk family, by whom he had John, Julia, 
and Finvola. John became laird of Lochbuie. 
Julia was married to James, son of Donald, third 
of Brolas ; and Finvola, to John, son of Hector 
Og t son of Donald, first of Brolas. 4. Lachlan 
received the lands of Knockroy in life-rent in 1705. 
He married Flora, daughter of Lachlan Mac- 
quarrie, fourteenth of Ulva, by his wife Catherine, 
daughter of John Garbh of Coll. Lachlan had 
by his wife a son named Murdoch, who in course 
of time became laird of Lochbuie. Hector of 
Lochbuie died some time after 1 7 1 7. 

XIII. Murdoch, thirteenth of Lochbuie, received 
the estate from his father in 1705. He married 



The Macleans of Lochbuie. 265 

Anne, fourth daughter of Sir Hugh Campbell, 
sixth of Calder, and had by her four daughters, 
the eldest of whom became the wife of Donald 
Campbell of Airds. He was succeeded by his 
brother, John of Pennygoun. 

XIV. John of Pennygoun married Isabel, 
daughter of Duncan Macdougall of Dunolly, by 
whom he had Lachlan and other children. He 
became laird of Lochbuie in 1727, and handed 
over the management of the estate to his son, 
Lachlan, in 1733. 

Isabel Macdougall was a kind-hearted and brave 
woman, and was highly esteemed. Some time 
after the death of her husband, she went to reside 
on the farm of Drimnantighean, which she held 
for life by right of dowry. She lived in a small 
thatched cottag-e, and had a very pretty garden in 
front of it. She had six tenants on her farm, four 
brothers of the name of Livingston, and two Mac- 
dougalls. Her total rent from them was eig-ht 
pounds per year, together with two pounds of 
tobacco. Her tenants treated her as if she were 
their mother, worked for her, and served her 
faithfully. She sued John, seventeenth of Loch- 
buie, in 1750, for certain moneys which she claimed 
from the estate. On one occasion she found 
Maclaine of Scallasdale and his men collecting 
kelp below her house. She seized a knife, waded 
out to the spot on which they were at work, cut 
the ropes used by them in gathering the kelp, and 
ordered them away. Scallasdale, influenced either 



266 The Clan Gillean. 

by his knowledge of law or the fear of being 
scalped, promptly obeyed, and •left the kelp alone. 
Isabel lived to a very great age, and spent the last 
years of her life at Dunolly. When she was dying 
she requested her friends to send for her tenants 
in Drimnantighean to carry her body to the grave. 
Her request was readily complied with by her 
attached tenants. 

XV. Lachlan of Lochbuie married a daughter 
of Macdougall of Dunolly, by whom he had two 
children, Hector and Mary. He died on Decem- 
ber 31st, 1744. Hector, his only son, succeeded him. 

XV I. Hector obtained possession of the estate 
in June, 1742. He took no part in the rising of 
1745. He died unmarried about 1759. He was 
succeeded by John, son of Allan of Garmony. 

About 1750 — the year in which Sir Hector Mac- 
lean died at Rome — the Macleans of Lochbuie 
began to distinguish themselves from the Macleans 
of Duart, and other descendants of Gilleain na 
Tuaighe, by writing their name Maclaine. 

XVII. John Maclaine, Iain Mac Ailein Mhic 
Eachainn, was served heir male special to Hector 
Maclean of Lochbuie in February, 1 751, and is 
described as "John McLean, son of Allan McLean 
of Garmony." He was served heir-general to his 
cousin, Lachlan Maclean of Lochbuie, in Novem- 
ber, 1751, and is described as "John McLean of 
Lochbuy." He was somewhat rough in his ways, 
proud of his dignity as laird ; but kind and very 
hospitable. 






The Macleans of Lochbuie. 267 

John of Lochbuie built a large and comfortable 
house near the old castle of Moy. It was forty 
feet long, twenty-eight feet wide within the walls, 
and eighteen" feet high on the side walls. It was 
begun in May, 1750, and finished in 1752. Loch- 
buie arrested, in 1758, Hector, son of Maclean of 
Killean, and Allan Maclean of Kilmory, for certain 
misdemeanours, and confined them as prisoners in 
his castle for two days. On being set at liberty 
they sued him for damages. The result was that 
he was fined 500 marks Scots, and compelled to 
P a y ;£i8o sterling for damages and expenses. It 
seems that the men whom he imprisoned actually 
deserved some punishment. He had no rio-ht. 
however, to take the law in his own hands. He 
received a visit from Dr. Johnson and Boswell in 
October, 1773. John of Lochbuie found the estate 
burdened with debts, and certainly did nothing to 
lessen them. It is indeed evident that through 
erecting new buildings, exposing himself to prose- 
cutions, and probably also through living beyond 
his means, he must have greatly increased them. 
He had a natural son named Gillean. He married 
Isabel, daughter of Donald Maclean, third of 
Brolas, and had three children by her, Archibald, 
Isabel, Catherine, and Margaret. Gillean was the 
progenitor of the Maclaines of Scallasdale. 

XVIII. Archibald, son of John of Lochbuie, 
received the estate from his father in 1775, or 
thereabouts. He was a hot-headed, proud, and 
stubborn man, and was in the habit of usino- his 



268 The Clan Gillean. 

tongue too freely. In 1776 he placed the estate 
under two trustees, and resolved to seek his fortune 
in America. The trustees appointed John Maclean 
of Grulin as factor under them. Archibald became 
a lieutenant in the old 84th, or Royal Highland 
Emigrant Regiment. In due time he was pro- 
moted to the rank of captain. About 1779 he 
quarrelled with his commander, Brigadier Allan 
Maclean of Torloisk, and brought several charges 
against him. Captain, or rather captain-lieutenant, 
Maclaine was tried by court-martial in Quebec, 
and suspended for six months. When the report 
of the trial was sent home to Britain, the sentence 
o( suspension was changed to that of dismissal. 
In 17S4 Captain Maclaine left Canada to lay his 
case personally before the King. He married 
Barbara Lowther in Boston, and took her with him. 
During the passage to the Old Country, he had 
a dispute with a fellow-passenger named Daniel 
Munro. Munro tried to avoid him, but Captain 
Maclaine kept up the quarrel day after day. At 
last he became so enraged against Munro that he 
started to his state-room for his sword, with the 
avowed intention of killing him. Munro hid 
behind the door, and ran his sword through young 
Lochbuie as the latter was passing by on his way 
back from his state-room. Munro was tried in 
Britain, but was acquitted. Captain Maclaine 
was killed on the 6th of August, 1784. His wife 
received about ^800 from the estate. As Archibald 
predeceased his father, he was not a chieftain ; he 



The Macleans of Lochbuie. 269 

was merely a laird. He left his estate to Murdoch 
Maclaine, son of Lachlan of Knockroy. John of 
Lochbuie died in 1785. 

XIX. Murdoch was born in 1730, and entered 
the army as an ensign in October, 1761. He 
went to America shortly after the breaking out of 
the Revolutionary War. He raised 100 men for the 
old 84th. He was appointed captain in that regi- 
ment in June, 1775. Shortly afterwards he was 
sent off with thirty recruits for the garrison at 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. The ship in which he 
sailed was attacked by an American privateer. 
He defeated his assailant, and inflicted on it a loss 
of eleven men killed and thirteen wounded. In 
i 778 he was sent from Halifax with dispatches to 
Sir William Howe. He was in South Carolina 
in 1782, with some companies of his regiment. 
He returned to Scotland in 1784. He was served 
heir to Captain Archibald Maclaine of Lochbuie 
in May, 1785. He sued the trustees of the Loch- 
buie estate in 1791, and compelled them to give 
an account of their management of its affairs. 
He built a new house for himself about the same 
time. He furnished 100 men for the Argyle 
Fencibles in 1793. He was appointed lieutenant- 
colonel of the Dumbarton Fencibles in 1794, and 
removed to the Argyle Fencibles in 1797. In the 
latter year those to whom he was indebted tried to 
get his estate sold, but did not succeed. The debt 
due by him at that time was ,£11,120. 

Murdoch of Lochbuie married, in 1786, Jane, 



270 The Clan Gillean. 

daughter of Sir John Campbell of Airds and 
Ardnamurchan, and had by her eleven children. 

1. Murdoch, the eldest son, succeeded his father. 

2. John was a lieutenant in the 73d Highlanders, 
and was killed in an engagement with the natives 
of Ceylon in 181 7. He was a very popular young 
man. 3. Jane was married to Captain Campbell. 
4. Flora was married, first, to Dr. Allan Maclean ; 
and, secondly, to Dr. Whitehead, of Ayr. 5. Mar- 
garet was married to Dugald Macdougall of 
Gallanach. 6. Phcebe was married to Colonel 
Donald Gregorson of Barrichboye. 7. Elizabeth 
was married to Donald Campbell of Achnacreig. 
8. Harriot was married to John Stewart of Fas- 
nacloich. 9. Catherine died unmarried. 10. Mary 
was married to John Gregorson of Ardtornish. 
11. Jane-Jervis was married to Mr. Scott, of 
Ettrick Bank, Selkirkshire. Murdoch of Lochbuie 
died at Moy in July, 1S04. He was a man of 
good qualities, and was highly respected. 

XX. Murdoch of Lochbuie was born in 1 791 . 
He was for a few years a lieutenant in the 42d 
Royal Highlanders, and was present in some of 
the battles in which that regiment was engaged 
during the Peninsular War. He retired from 
the army in 181 2. He married, in April, 1813, 
Christina, daughter of Donald Roy Maclean, of 
Kinloch,and had by her eleven children, Murdoch, 
Donald, John, Lillias, Jane, Allan, Elizabeth, 
Marion, Colquhoun, Alexander, and Margaret. 
He died in August, 1844. Murdoch, his eldest 



The Macleans of Lochbuie. 271 

son, was an officer in the 91st Foot, or Argyleshire 
Regiment. He succeeded his father as chieftain 
of the Macleans of Lochbuie, but not in the estate. 
He died unmarried in 1850, and was succeeded in 
the chieftainship by his brother Donald. Alex- 
ander, the youngest son, married Marion-Palmer 
Sands, by whom he had one son, Alexander. 
Elizabeth, the third daughter, was married to Dr. 
Mackenzie. 

XXI. Donald, twenty-first laird of Lochbuie, 
was born in 18 16. He went to Batavia in Java, 
entered into business as a merchant, and amassed 
quite a fortune. He purchased the estate of Loch- 
buie from those who held it for debt, and thus 
fortunately saved it from passing out of the hands 
of the descendants of Hector Reaganach. All 
the Macleans and Maclaines on earth have reason 
to be thankful for Donald's energy and prosperity, 
and his success in getting possession of the lands 
of his forefathers. May they remain in the hands 
of his descendants as long as Scotland must have 
lairds. Donald made a number of valuable im- 
provements on his estate, and was highly respected 
by his tenants. He was, like his ancestors before 
him from the time of Hector Odhar, a firm 
adherent of the Presbyterian Church. 

Donald o.{ Lochbuie married, in 1844, Emilie- 
Guillaumine, daughter of Charles-Antoine Vincent, 
and had by her four children, Murdoch-Gillian, 
Antoine, Emilie-Guillaumine, Rosa-Elizabeth, and 
Christina-Sarah. He died on October 12th, 1863. 



272 The Clan Gillean. 

He was succeeded by his elder son, Murdoch- 
Gillian. Emilie-Guillaumine, his eldest daughter, 
was married to Frederick Campbell. 

XXII. Murdoch-Gillian Maclaine, twenty-sec- 
ond laird of Lochbuie, is the present chieftain of 
the Maclaines of Lochbuie. He was born in 
Batavia on September 1st, 1845, and came to 
Scotland with his father in 1853. He entered the 
6th regiment of dragoon guards in 1864, and at- 
tained the rank of captain. He married, in June, 
1869, Catherine-Marianna, youngest daughter of 
Salis Schwabe, of Glengyrth, Anglesey, and has 
seven children by her, Kathlein-Emilie, Mabel- 
Julia, Edith-Jane, Kenneth-Douglas-Lorn, and 
Ranald-Gillian. He belongs to the Episcopalian 
Church. 

The Macleans ov Scallasdalb. 

Murdoch, son of Hector, fourth of Lochbuie, 
was the first Maclean of Scallasdale. He married 
a daughter of Stewart of Appin. In 1785 there 
were four brothers in Mull who were descended 
from him in the male line. Their names were, 
John, Lachlan, Malcolm, and Hugh. John went 
to Glasgow, started in the cotton business, and 
built up quite an industry ; but failed in the great 
financial crisis of 1825. Lachlan studied medicine, 
and settled in London. He married a Miss Goring. 
Hugh came to America, settled in Georgia, and 
became a successful planter. He had a daughter 
who became somewhat noted in the Civil War. 



The Macleans of Uisken. 273 

John, eldest son of the first of the four brothers, was 
born in Glasgow. He married Isabella Findlay, 
of Rothes, came to America, and settled in On- 
tario. William F. Maclean, eldest son of John, 
was born in Ancaster, Ontario, in 1854. He 
graduated at the University of Toronto in 1880, 
and in the same year established " The World," 
an independent Conservative journal, which is 
published in Toronto. He was elected to the 
House of Commons in May, 1892. 

The Macleans of Uisken. 

We find in 1656 Duncan Maclean, son of Pat- 
rick, son of John, described as servant to Murdoch 
Maclean of Lochbuie. This Duncan was in all 
probability the father of Angus Maclean of 
Assapol. Angus married Elizabeth, daughter of 
Duncan Campbell of Dunstaffnage, and had four 
children by her, Duncan, Marion, Catherine, and 
Mary. Duncan lived at Uisken in Mull. He 
married Mary, daughter of John Maclean of Gru- 
lin, by whom he had four sons, Alexander, John, 
Archibald, and Duncan. Duncan died in 1770. 
Alexander, the eldest of his sons, was lieutenant- 
colonel of the 3d West India regiment. According 
to his own account, he was of the race of the three 
Duncans and belonged to the family of Lochbuie. 
He left the sum of ,£20,000 for the support and 
education of boys of the name Maclean. John, 
second son of Duncan, was a captain in the army, 
and was killed in the Irish Rebellion. Archibald 



274 The Clan Gillean. 

was a lieutenant in the 56th regiment. He was 
married, and had John-Ralph and other children. 
Duncan was a lieutenant in the army. John- 
Ralph Maclean is the only representative of the 
Uisken family now living. 

The Maclaines of Scallasdale. 

Gillean, son of John, seventeenth of Lochbuie, 
studied law, but settled in Scallasdale as tacksman. 
He married, in 1 77 1 , Maria, eldest daughter of 
Lachlan Macquarrie of Ulva, and had by her 
five sons and five daughters. 1. Allan, the eldest 
son, succeeded his father in Scallasdale. He 
married Marjory, daughter of Angus Gregorson 
of Ardtornish, by whom he had two sons, Gillean 
and Angus. Gillean was a merchant in Java. 
Angus was minister of Ardnamurchan from 1827 
to 1841, and died at Ardrishaigin 1877. 2. Archi- 
bald will be noticed afterwards. 3. Murdoch was 
a captain in the 20th regiment, and was killed at 
the battle of Maida in 1806. He was a twin 
brother of Archibald. 4. John was a major in 
the 73d regiment, and was killed at Waterloo in 
1815. 5. Hector was a lieutenant-colonel in the 
army. He married Martha, only child of William 
Osborne, of Knyeton, in the county of Gloucester, 
and had by her one child, William-Osborne. 
Hector died in 1847. William-Osborne, Hector's 
son, married Anna, daughter of John Thorburn 
of Murtle, in Aberdeenshire, by whom he had two 
sons, Hector and John-Thorburn. Hector was a 



The Maclaines of Scallasdale. 275 

lieutenant in the Royal Horse Artillery. He was 
taken prisoner at the battle of Maiward, kept for 
a month in Ayoub Khan's camp, and murdered 
a few minutes before General Roberts entered 
Candahar, on September 1st, 1S80. John-Thor- 
burn inherited through his mother the property of 
Murtle. He died without issue in 1892. 6. Alicia, 
eldest daughter of Gillean of Scallasdale, was 
married to John Wood, Edinburgh. 7. Julianna 
was married to Thomas Ross, by whom she had 
Mary, authoress of " Banners are waving o'er 
Morvern's dark heath." 8. Flora died unmarried. 
9. Mary died unmarried. 10. Margaret-Ann was 
married to William Craig in Edinburgh. 

Archibald Maclaine, second son of Gillean of 
Scallasdale, was born on January 13th, 1777. He 
entered the army in early life, and was a captain 
in the 94th regiment in 18 10. In that year he 
greatly distinguished himself by his gallant defence 
of Fort Matagorda for fifty-five days, with only 
155 men, against 8,000 men under Marshal Soult. 
For his services on this occasion he was knip-hted, 
and promoted to the rank of major in the 87th 
regiment. He was for some time lieutenant-colonel 
of the 7th West India regiment. He married, in 
1823, Elizabeth Bridges. He died, without issue, 
in March, 1861. He was at the time of his death 
a lieutenant-general. 



CHAPTER XII. 
jcnbants of Tcrlach ittar Sector. 

I. The Macleans of L'rchart. 

I. Terlach Mac Hector, or Tearlach Mac 
Eachainn, was the progenitor ot the Macleans of 
Urchart, Kingerloch, Dochgarroch, and Knock. 
He was the eldest son of H .aganach, first 
Maclean of Lochbuie. It is said that he possessed 
Ardmeanach in Mull, Kilmalieu in I .. and 
Balmaccaan, or Baile-Mhic-Eachainn, and other 
lands in Glenurchart. He was constable of Urch- 
in 1394 to 141 1. Tradition affirms 

that the castle of Bona, Caisteal Spioradan, near 
the lower end ot Lochness, was built by him. He 
seems to have married either a daugh .rchar 

Mackintosh, chief oi the Mackintoshes, or of 
Ferchar Gumming ot Altyre, probably a daughter 
ot the former. He had a son named Ferchar. 

II. Ferchar Mac Terlach seems to have prede- 
ceased his father. He left two children, Terlach 
and a daughter. The daughter was married to 



Macleans of Urchart. :-- 

Rory Macneil of Barra, by whom she had Gilleo- 
nan, and other children. 

III. Terlach Mac Ferchar was a warlike and 
prominent man. He witnessed a charter in : 

of his youthful nephew, Gilleonan Macneil, in 
1427. He was a prisoner in Tantallon Castle in 
1 43 1. and had for companions the Lord of the 

Lachlan Bronnach of Duart, Torqui! 
neill, and " Duncan Persoun," apparently Duncan 
Macpherson. chief of the Macphersons, and son-in- 

: Ferchar Mackintosh. In 1439 Lachlan 
Bronnach, Terlach Mac Ferchar, and Hector Mac 
Terlach witnessed an obligation given bv Alexander 
of the Isles to Alexander Sutherland of Dunbeath. 
It is evident that Terlach I har was a de- 

voted follower of Lachlan Bronnach; and it is just 
possible that he derived some benefit in the w 
getting lands, from the marriage of the latter with 

daughter. He had three sons. Hector Buie, 
Lachlan, and Donald. Lachlan was killed at the 
battle of Park in 14S4. Donald had a daughter 
named Anna, who was prioress of Iona, and died 
in 1511. 

IV. Hector Buie was chamberlain of Urchart 
in June, 1440. He became coostabk Vrchart 
Castle in 1454, and enterta in, Lord of the 

s, there in 1466. 
In Hector Buie's time the Camerons and I 
nedie:- rf" L aber were in the habit of making 
raids into Glenmoriston and Glenurchart, and 
carrying off the cattle. But Hecror Buie was not 



278 The Clan Gillean. 

a man to be trifled with ; he entered Lochaber, 
plundered the country, and carried off Cameron of 
Glen-nevisandothersasprisoners. Lochiel pursued 
him with a strong force, and succeeded in capturing 
several of his followers, among whom were two 
of his sons. On arriving at Castle Bona, Lochiel 
demanded the release of the prisoners in Hector 
Buie's hands, and at the same time threatened, in 
case of refusal, to hang the prisoners in his own 
hands. The end was that each of them hanged 
all the prisoners that he had taken. According to 
the "Memoirs of Lochiel," Hector Buie refused 
to exchange prisoners, and killed all the captives 
in his hands. Provoked by Hector's savage con- 
duct, Lochiel retaliated by hanging in front of the 
castle, Hector's sons, and the other men whom he 
had captured. According to the " History of the 
Clan Terlach," Hector Buie — who had a much 
larger number of prisoners than his opponent — 
offered to make a fair exchange, but refused to 
comply in full with Lochiel's demands. Owing to 
this refusal the latter hanged Hector's two sons. 
Hector took immediate vengeance by putting all 
his prisoners to death. — It may be safely taken for 
granted that so far as moral qualities were con- 
cerned, Hector Buie and Lochiel stood on the 
same level ; they were both, no doubt, capable of 
committing very cruel deeds. Tradition assures 
us that ever after the hangings and murders caused 
by them, the castle of Bona was haunted by noisy 
and troublesome ghosts. It seems that it became 
a very unpleasant place to live in. 



The Macleans of Kingerloch. 279 

It is asserted that Hector Buie married, first, 
a daughter of Allan Mac Rory of Moydart ; 
secondly, Margaret, daughter of Malcolm Beg 
Mackintosh ; and, thirdly, a daughter of Hugh 
Fraser, Lord Lovat. It is also said that he had six 
sons, Allan Dubh, Neil, Ewen, Terlach, Ferchar, 
and Alexander. Three of his sons survived him, 
Ewen, Terlach, and Ferchar. Ewen became laird 
of Kingerloch. Terlach and Ferchar appear as 
witnesses in 1498. Terlach was rector of Killin- 
dyke in the diocese of Lismore in 1542. Ferchar 
was Bishop of the Isles in 1529. He resigned his 
bishopric in 1544. It is said that he was killed at 
the battle of Pinkie in 1547. According to the 
"History of the Clan Terlach," he left six children: 
Roderick, Dean of the Isles ; Donald, tacksman 
of Dochgarroch ; James, priest of Glenurchart ; 
Mary, prioress of Iona in 1548; and a daughter 
who was married to Rory Mor Mackenzie, first of 
Achilty. 

II. The Macleans of Kingerloch. 
1. Ewen, first Maclean of Kingerloch, must 
have been born between 1450 and 1455. He held 
possession of the Maclean lands in Urchart only 
for a few years. On July 1st, 1476, James III. 
deprived John, fourth Lord of the Isles, of the 
earldom of Ross, and placed the castle and lands 
of Urchart, and also the lands of Glenmoriston, 
in charge of George Gordon, second Earl of 
Huntly. Huntly appointed Hugh Rose of Kil- 



280 The Clan Gillean. 

ravock as his chamberlain, and also as constable 
of Urchart Castle. Ewen Maclean resolved to 
hold his lands by the sword, and was supported 
by the Clann Mhic Uidhein of Glenurchart, the 
Macdonalds of Glenmoriston, and Duncan Mack- 
intosh, captain of the Clan Chattan. In March, 
1479, Duncan Mackintosh and Hu^h Rose agreed 
to submit to arbitration all matters in dispute be- 
tween them. The arbitrators decided in favour of 
Rose, and decreed that he was entitled to possess 
in peace the lands which Ewen Maclean claimed. 
As Ewen had nothing to do with the appointment 
of the arbitrators he refused to be bound by their 
decision. Ik- was deserted by the chief of the 
Mackintoshes, but was still supported by the 
Clann Mhic Uidhein and the Macdonalds of 
Glenmoriston. He had also a good friend in 
Lachlan Badenoch, second son of Malcolm Beg 
Mackintosh. In June, 14S2, Hugh Rose was in 
so much trouble that he was glad to give up 
all connection with Urchart and Glenmoriston. 
Huntly appointed Sir Duncan Grant of Freuchie 
in his place. In 1509 Sir Duncan became pro- 
prietor both of Glenurchart and Glenmoriston. 
In the same year James IV. granted to Ewen 
Maclean a charter of Kilmalieu, Blaaich, and other 
lands. It is probable that the lands thus granted 
to him had belonged to his father. They were 
erected into the barony of Kingerloch in 1530. 

Ewen of Kingerloch was evidently a resolute 
and active man. He supported Donald Dubh in 



The Macleans of Kingerloch. 281 

1 5 13. He had apparently three sons, Hector, 
Allan Mor, and Ferchar. Allan Mor was put to 
death by Sir Duncan Grant in 1498. Ferchar 
was slain by one of Sir Duncan's followers about 
1 5 10. Ewen died some time after 1530. He was 
succeeded by Donald, who was probably his 
grandson, and a son of Hector. 

II. Donald was laird of Kingerloch in 1545. 
He married Jean, daughter of Lachlan Beg 
Mackintosh by his wife, Jean, daughter of Sir 
Alexander Gordon of Lochinvar. 

III. Hector, son of Donald, was laird of Kin- 
gerloch in 1609. 

IV. Donald, son of Hector, appears as heir- 
apparent of Kingerloch in 1609. 

V. Hector, son of Donald, joined Montrose 
in June, 1645. He fought at Kilsyth, and took 
part in plundering Knapdale, Cowall, and other 
Campbell lands. He was killed by the Camerons 
of Morvern about 1650. He was succeeded by 
his son, whose name was probably Lachlan. 

VI. The sixth Maclean of Kingerloch had three 
sons, Donald, Hector, and Alexander. He died 
about 1675, and was succeeded by his eldest son, 
Donald. Hector, his youngest son, was killed at 
Dunkeld in 1689. 

VII. Donald took an active part, in 1680, in 
supporting the Macleans of Duart against the 
Campbells. He had two sons, Lachlan and Allan. 
Lachlan succeeded his father. Allan married 
Una, daughter of John Maclean of Pennygoun. 
Donald died in May, 1726. 36 



282 The Clan Gillean. 

VIII. Lachlan of Kingerloch had three sons, 
Hugh, John, and Lachlan. Hugh succeeded his 
father. John entered the Black Watch as a 
lieutenant in 1739. He killed an officer named 
Mackenzie, in a duel, and had to leave the army. 
He was a captain in the Maclean battalion at the 
battle of Culloden, and fell bravely fighting for the 
hapless Stewarts. Lachlan settled at Rochester. 
Kingerloch died in 1756. 

IX. Hugh of Kingerloch was a very intelligent 
man, and was well versed in the genealogy of his 
clan. He married Mary Stewart, and had nine 
children by her. 1. Donald, the eldest son, suc- 
ceeded his father. 2. Murdoch was a captain in 
the 2d West India regiment, and was killed at St. 
Vincent. 3. Colin was a lieutenant in the 37th 
regiment, and was killed at the battle of Tournay 
in 1794. 4. James was a planter in Jamaica, and 
was killed in the war with the Caribs. 5. Hector 
succeeded Donald in Kingerloch. 6. Mary was 
married to the Rev. Donald Skinner, of Ardna- 
murchan, and had two sons : James, a doctor in 
Pictou, Nova Scotia ; and Hugh, who kept a 
light-house in Cape Breton. 7. Margaret was 
married to Hugh Cameron. 8. Jane was married 
to John MacCormick. 9. The youngest daughter 
was married to Hugh Dunoon in Pictou. Hugh 
of Kingerloch died in March, 1784. 

X. Donald of Kingerloch married Ann, daugh- 
ter of Hugh Maclean of Ardgour. He died 
without issue. 



The Macleans of Kingerloch. 283 

XI. Hector, eleventh and last Maclean of Kin- 
gerloch, was a lieutenant in the Dumbartonshire 
Fencible regiment. He was served heir to his 
brother Donald in March, 1801. He found the 
estate in debt, and sold it. He came to Pictou, 
Nova Scotia, about 1812. He opened a store, 
but failed in a short time. He married Harriet- 
Elizabeth, daughter of Captain John Fraser of the 
82d regiment, by whom he had four children. 
1. Murdoch, his elder son, succeeded him as chief- 
tain of the Macleans of Kingerloch. 2. Simon 
was a sea-captain. He married a Miss Noonan, 
and had by her three children, John, Fannie, and 
Christina. John died in prison in the Southern 
States at the time of the Civil War. Captain 
Simon Maclean died in Australia. 3. The elder 
daughter was married to George Mackay in Cape 
Breton. 4. The younger daughter was married 
to the Rev. Kenneth-John Mackenzie, of Pictou. 
Hector of Kingerloch died in Pictou town, and is 
buried in the old cemetery there. 

XII. Murdoch, elder son of Hector of Kinger- 
loch, was born in March, 1807. He was sheriff of 
the county of Guysborough, Nova Scotia, for a 
number of years. He married Elizabeth, daughter 
of the Hon. R. M. Cutler, and had by her eight 
children : Sophia, Elizabeth, Kenneth-John, 
Robert-Cutler, William-M urdoch, Charles-Shrieve, 
Norman, and Francis-George. He died in April, 
1865. William-Murdoch, his third son, is married, 
and has six sons. Norman is married, and has 
three sons. 



284 The Clan Gillean. 

XIII. Kenneth-John, eldest son of Sheriff Mac- 
lean, died unmarried in 1873. 

XIV. Robert-Cutler, second son of Sheriff Mac- 
lean, was born in 1846. He resides in Lynn, 
Massachusetts. He is married, and has three 
daughters. He is the present Mac-Mhic-Eachainn. 

The Macleans of Rochester. 

Lachlan, third son of Lachlan of Kingerloch, 
fought at Culloden in 1746. He escaped to 
Holland, but returned in 1747. He settled at 
Rochester, in Kent, England, and engaged in 
mercantile pursuits. He married a Miss Ferry in 
1757, and had eight children by her, Charles, John, 
Lachlan, William, Elizabeth, Jane, Ann, and Sarah. 
1. Charles died unmarried. 2. John was a navy 
agent. He was married, and had four children, 
John, Edward, Elizabeth, and Harriet. 3. Lachlan 
was an officer in the navy. He died in 1830, and left 
one daughter, Charlotte. 4. William was a surgeon 
in the Royal Marines. He was married and had 
two sons and three daughters. Lachlan, his 
eldest son, was a captain in the 6th regiment of 
Madras Native Infantry. William-Henry, the sec- 
ond son, was a clerk in the office of the Paymaster- 
General in London. He was married, and had 
four daughters. 5. Elizabeth, the eldest daughter, 
was married to William Maclean of Dochgarroch. 
Natural affection would have led Lachlan of 
Rochester to call his first son after his brother 
John. But Lachlan was a most loyal Jacobite, 



Captain John Maclean's Descendants. 285 

and therefore he called his first son after Prince 
Charles. 

The Descendants of Captain John Maclean. 

John Maclean belonged to the Kingerloch 
branch of the Macleans, and was born in 1753. 
He was captain of a vessel in the mercantile service 
of Anderson and Company, Edinburgh. He was 
presented by that firm, in 1794, with a large silver 
cup, for his gallantry in saving the vessel under 
his command from two French frigates which 
tried to capture it. He married, in 1795, Sibella, 
daughter of Alexander Maclean of Sollas, by 
whom he had eight children, Alexander-Anderson, 
Francis- Murray, Sibella, Johanna, Alexander, 
Susanna, John-Anderson, and Mary-Ann. He 
died in 1832. Alexander-Anderson, his eldest 
son, married, in 1837, Maria, daughter of Joseph 
Lightfoot, of Walworth, and had by her four 
sons, Henry, Joseph-John, Francis-William, and 
Septimus. Henry married, in 1864, Marion, 
daughter of James Abernethy, of Whiteness, by 
whom he had five children, Alexander, Harry- 
Abernethy, Francis -John, Edith -Marion, and 
Anne-Alice. Alexander was educated at Oxford. 
He resides in London, and is an artist by profes- 
sion. Francis-William, third son of Alexander- 
Anderson, studied law, and is now Chief Justice of 
Bengal. He was knighted a few years ago. He 
is married, and has one son, Montague. 



286 The Clan Gillean. 

III. The Macleans of Dochgarroch. 

I. Donald, son of Ferchar, son of Hector, son 
of Terlach, was the first Maclean of Dochgarroch. 
He settled there as tacksman in 1557. He received 
from the Bishop of the Isles a legal claim to the 
island of Raasay and a part of Troternish in Skye. 
As he was not able to obtain possession of these 
lands, his claim to them was of no use to him. He 
married, first, a daughter of the laird of Grant, and 
had by her four children, Alexander, John, Hector, 
and Elizabeth. He married, secondly, a Mackenzie 
woman, and had a son named Donald by her. 
Alexander succeeded his father in Dochgarroch. 
It is said that John was an officer under Gustavus 
Adolphus, and that he was killed at Altenburgh 
about the year 1632. Hector lived at Culcabok, 
and married, about 1621, Margaret, daughter of 
Paul Macpherson of Lonnie. Elizabeth was 
married to Walter Urquhart, sheriff of Cromarty. 
Donald of Dochgarroch died some time after 1606. 
According to the " History of the Clan Terlach," 
he was the second son of Bishop Ferchar, son of 
Hector Buie of Urchart. 

II. Alexander of Dochgarroch was a man of 
good business capacity, and was in very prosperous 
circumstances. It is said that he was at the battle 
of Glenlivet in 1594. In 1609 he entered into a 
bond of manrent with Mackintosh, captain of the 
Clan Chattan. He purchased the lands of Doch- 
garroch and Dochnalurg from the Earls of Enzie 



The Macleans of Dochgarroch. 287 

and Huntly, and obtained a feu charter of them 
in May, 1623. It is said that he was married 
three times: first, to a daughter of Maclean of 
Kingerloch; secondly, to Margaret Grant, daughter 
of Grant of Glenmoriston ; and, thirdly, to Anna- 
bella, daughter of Andrew Munro of Daan. He 
married his last wife in 1628. He had at least 
four sons and three daughters. 1. John, the eldest 
son, succeeded his father. 2. Charles settled in 
Culbokie. 3. David lived in Buntaite. He was a 
captain in Colonel Strachan's regiment, and was 
killed at Red Castle in a skirmish with some 
of Montrose's followers. He left a son named 
Hector, who had a son named Lachlan. Lachlan 
fought under Dundee at Killiecrankie in 1689. He 
settled some time afterwards at Broughty Ferry. 

4. James, the fourth son, was born about 1630. 
He was a medical doctor, and was at one time 
provost of Inverness. He married Alice, daugh- 
ter of Captain Kenneth Mackenzie, of Suddie. 

5. Agnes, the eldest daughter, was married in 
1614 to William Baillie, of the Dunain family. 

6. Marion was married to William Baillie of Doch- 
four. 7. Janet was married, first, in 1625, to 
James Cumming of Dalshangie ; and, secondly, 
to James Grant of Sheuglie. 

III. John of Dochgarroch was known as Iain 
Mac Alasdair. He was born probably about 1600. 
He married, in 1629, Agnes, daughter of Thomas 
Fraser of Struy. It is said that he fought under 
Montrose in 1645, and at Inverkeithing in 165 1. 



288 The Clan Gillean. 

He had by his wife six sons and three daughters, 
i. Alexander, the eldest son, succeeded his father. 
2. John lived in Leys in 1676. 3. Hector settled 
at Dochnalurg, and was killed at Killiecrankie. 
4. Donald was a merchant burgess of Inverness. 
He was married and had at least one son, John. 
He died probably in 1693. John, his son, was 
served heir to him in May, 1694. 5. With regard 
to David, the fifth son, we have nothing to state. 
6. Farquhar lived at Kinmylies, and was killed at 
Killiecrankie. 7. Elspet, the eldest daughter, was 
married, prior to 1657, to Angus Macqueen, in 
Inshes, Strathdearn. 8. Catherine was married, 
first, to Donald Munro of Culcabok ; and, sec- 
ondly, in 1669, to Duncan Macpherson in Daltochy 
of Ardclash. 9. Janet was married in 1665 to 
Malcolm, son of William Mackintosh of Holme. 
John Mac Alister died on October 8th, 1674. 

IV. Alexander of Dochgarroch married, in 
November, 1656, Agnes, daughter of Alexander 
Chisholm of Comar, by whom he had two sons, 
John Og and Allan. He made his will on Angust 
3d, 167 1. He left his estate to his eldest son, and 
nominated John of Leys, his own brother, tutor to 
his son. He died in the following September. It 
is said that Allan, his second son, settled in 
Sutherlandshire. 

V. John Og of Dochgarroch was only about 
fourteen years of age when his father died. He 
married, in 1682, Margaret, daughter of David 
Fowler, bailie of Inverness. He was an ardent 



The Macleans of Dochgarroch. 289 

Jacobite. He appointed his brother Allan factor 
of his estate in October, 1688. He fought with 
his followers under Dundee at the battle of 
Killiecrankie in 1689. His loyalty to the Stewarts 
and to his chief, Sir John Maclean of Duart, led 
him into serious difficulties. He was declared an 
outlaw, and was thus under the necessity of hiding 
himself wherever he could find shelter, until the 
general amnesty of 1693 was passed. In 1694 his 
brother Allan handed back the management of 
the estate to him. John Og died in 1707, in the 
fiftieth year of his age. He left by his wife six 
sons and three daughters. 1. John, his eldest son, 
Iain Mac Iain Oio\ succeeded him in Dochg-arroch. 
2. Alexander was a writer in Inverness. He was 
a greedy and dishonest man. He died at Borlum, 
leaving two sons, Robert and William. Robert 
was tacksman of Craigscorrie. He married a 
daughter of Fraser of Aigish, by whom he had 
Hugh and two daughters. Hugh married a 
daughter of the Rev. Malcolm Macnicol in Kil- 
tarlity, and had three sons, Malcolm, Robert, and 
Peter ; all of whom died unmarried. William, 
second son of Alexander, married a Miss Fraser, 
by whom he had two sons, Alexander and Hugh, 
and also three daughters. 3. David, third son of 
John Og, was a dyer by trade. He was a burgess 
of Inverness. He was married and had two sons, 
John, and Alexander of Lochgorm. John was 
married and left a son named Robert. Alexander 
of Lochgorm was the father of David Maclean, 



290 The Clan Gillean. 

of West Branch, East River, Pictou. 4. Donald, 
fourth son of John Og, settled in Argyleshire. 
He married a daughter of Campbell of Airds, by 
whom he had Lachlan and others. Lachlan 
married Jane, daughter of Maclean of Kingerloch, 
by whom he had six children, Donald, Murdoch, 
Allan, Hector, Charles, and a daughter. Donald 
settled in Jamaica. Murdoch was a surgeon in 
the Royal Navy. Allan was married, and left one 
son, Charles. Hector was a jeweler in London. 
He married a Miss Miller, of Bungay in Suffolk, 
and had by her five children, Hector, Thomas, 
Sarah, Anne, and Mary. Hector was a purser in 
the Royal Navy. Thomas was a print-seller in 
London. Charles, fifth son of Donald, died in 
the military service of the East India Company. 
5. With regard to Lachlan, fifth son of John Qg, 
we have no information. 6. Ferchar, or Farquhar, 
the seventh son, was a man of roving habits. It is 
not known what became of him. 7. Janet, eldest 
daughter of John Og^ was married in 1723 to 
William Mackintosh, son of Duncan, son of 
William of Borlum. She had one son, Alexander 
Mackintosh, a sea-captain. 8. Margaret was 
married in 1725 to William, son of John Grant of 
Corriemonie. 9. Annie was married to James Ross, 
a notary in Edinburgh, and had two children, 
Peter and Mary. 

VI. John of Dochgarroch, Iain Mac Iain Oig, 
was noted for his strength and chivalrous dispo- 
sition. Influenced by Sir John Maclean of Duart 



The Macleans of Dochgarroch. 291 

and Lord Lovat, he joined the Earl of Mar in the 
rising of 1715, and fought at the battle of Sheriff- 
muir. Before leaving home to join the Jacobite 
army, he appointed his brother Alexander factor 
of the estate. Shortly after his return from Sheriff- 
muir he found four Hessian soldiers plundering on 
his lands. He attacked them, and killed one of 
them with his sword. He remained in concealment 
for some time. At last he surrendered himself to 
the officers of the law in Inverness. He was put 
on trial for killing the Hessian soldier, but as there 
was no one mean enough to testify against him, 
he was acquitted for want of evidence. He had a 
good deal of trouble with his brother Alexander, 
who tried to keep the management of the estate in 
his own hands and get it for himself. 

John of Dochgarroch married, in 17 10, Chris- 
tina, daughter of Alexander Dallas of Contray, 
by whom he had three sons, John, Charles, and 
William. He died in 1748. John, the eldest son, 
died at a comparatively early age, and probably in 
Jamaica. Charles succeeded his father in Doch- 
garroch. William joined the Black Watch as an 
ensign in 1743. He married Mary, second daughter 
of Lachlan Mackintosh, son of William of Bor- 
lum. In his contract of marriage, which is dated 
November 6th, 1 751, he is described as the "second 
lawful son of the deceased John Maclean, late of 
Dochgarroch." He was killed at the storming of 
Guadaloupe in 1759. He left two sons, Lachlan 
and John. Lachlan died young. John served in 



292 The Clan Gillean. 

the old 84th, and settled in America. As William 
was the second lawful son of John of Dochgarroch 
in 1751, it is evident that John, his eldest brother, 
had died before that date. 

VII. Charles of Dochgarroch entered the Black 
Watch in 1743. He left the Episcopalian Church 
and became a Presbyterian. He had a lawsuit 
with the Duke of Gordon, by which he lost heavily. 
He married, in 1753, Marjory, second daughter of 
Angus Mackintosh of Drummond, by whom he 
had seven children, John, Phineas, Angus, Wil- 
liam, Janet, Marjory, and Barbara. He died in 
1778, in the sixty-first year of his age. 1. John, 
his eldest son, succeeded him in Dochgarroch. 
2. Phineas died young. 3. Angus was a captain 
in the military service of the East India Company. 
He became administrator of his brother's estate in 
1789. He died at Calicut in 1794. He was a very 
promising young man. 4. William succeeded his 
brother John in Dochgarroch. 5. Janet was born 
in 1756, and was married, in 1779, to Alexander 
Mackintosh, captain of a West India merchant 
ship. She had seven children, Charles, Phineas, 
William, Angus, Mary, Janet, and May. Angus 
made a good deal of money in Calcutta. He died 
at Forres without issue about the year 1856. May 
was married to Alexander Fraser, tacksman of 
Dochnalurg, by whom she had four children, 
Alexander, William, Charles, and Mary. Charles, 
her youngest son, is the accomplished and well- 
known antiquarian, Dr. Charles Fraser-Mackintosh 



The Macleans of Dochgarroch. 293 

of Drummond. 6. Marjory, second daughter of 
Charles of Dochgarroch, was married to Alexander 
Lee, a merchant in Inverness. 7. Barbara died 
in June, 1849, aged eighty-eight years. 

VIII. John of Dochgarroch was educated at 
the University of Aberdeen. He received an ap- 
pointment in the civil service in the island of 
Grenada in 1775. He had an attack of sunstroke 
in 1777, which affected his brain to such an extent 
that he became permanently insane. He returned 
to Scotland shortly afterwards. He died on 
October 7th, 1826. 

IX. William, ninth and last Maclean of Doch- 
garroch, entered the 73d Foot, or old Macleod 
Highlanders, as an ensign in 1779. He embarked 
for Madras in 17S0, along with others who had 
been drafted from the regiment. The ship which 
carried him was seized by a Spanish privateer and 
taken to Cadiz. The soldiers were well treated by 
the Spaniards, and in a short time exchanged as 
prisoners of war and sent to Gibraltar. William 
Maclean arrived in Madras in 1784. He returned 
to Britain in 1788, and in the same year married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Lachlan Maclean of 
Rochester. He was appointed captain in the 
Breadalbane Fencibles in 1790, and in 1794 captain 
in the 83d regiment of the line. On the death of 
his brother Angus in 1794, he became heir of 
Dochgarroch. In 1796 he retired from the army 
and took the management of the estate into his 
hands. In 1826 he succeeded his brother John as 
proprietor. 



294 The Clan Gillean. 

William of Dochgarroch was a careless and 
imprudent man, and got deeply into debt. In 
January, 1832, the estate was sold by the creditors, 
and purchased by Evan Baillie of Dochfour, who, 
it is said, had been looking upon it with a covetous 
eye for a long time. The price paid for it was 
,£10,000. Allan Maclean, William's son, had a 
lease on the mansion at the time of the sale. As 
soon as the lease expired, which was in 1839, 
William had to leave the house of his forefathers. 
He died at Clach-na-harry, in a house which be- 
longed to the canal engineer, on November 24th, 
1841. He was eighty years of age. He left 
three sons, Allan, Charles-Maxwell, and William. 
Allan succeeded him in the representation of the 
Dochgarroch family. Charles-Maxwell was born 
in 1791, and joined the 72d in 1807. He was 
appointed lieutenant-colonel of the 3d West India 
regiment in 1850. He retired from active service 
in 1852, and settled at Woodside, Fortrose. He 
married, in 1823, Sarah- Amelia, daughter of 
Samuel Marshall, by whom he had one child, 
Charlotte-Amelia. He wrote a history of the Clan 
Terlach, a useful but exceedingly inaccurate work. 
He was a gentlemanly and honourable man. He 
died in December, 1864, and was buried with his 
forefathers in the Old Greyfriars churchyard in 
Inverness. William, third son of William of 
Dochgarroch, was for some time a clerk in the 
Royal Dock Yard at Sheerness. He was after- 
wards connected with the Imperial Fire Office, 



The Macleans of Culbokie. 295 

Cornhill. He lived, during his later years, at 
Maize Hill, Greenwich Park. He married Eliza- 
beth, only daughter of Dr. Thomas Henderson, 
in the island of Dominica, and had by her three 
children, William-Thomas-Henderson, Allan, and 
Marion. He died in October, 1841. His eldest 
son was for some time a subaltern in the 78th 
Highlanders. 

X. Allan Maclean, eldest son of William of 
Dochgarroch, was born in 1790. He died unmar- 
ried, at the old house of Drummond, in 1876. He 
was succeeded as representative of the Macleans 
of Dochgarroch, by Allan, second son of his 
brother William. 

XI. Allan married, in 1871, Marion, daughter 
of the Rev. Edward Guilie, vicar of St. Luke's, 
Jersey, by whom he has two sons and one daughter, 
Allan-Mackintosh, Hector, and Jessie. He is a 
life member of the Maclean Association, and lives 
at Brighton, England. His sons are both minis- 
ters of the Church of England. 

The Macleans of Culbokie. 

Charles, second son of Alexander, second of 
Dochgarroch, settled in Culbokie. He married, in 
1625, a Miss Cumming, probably a daughter of 
dimming of Dalshangie, and received a marriage 
portion of 1,000 marks with her. He had a large 
family. One of his grandsons in the male line had 
two sons, Simon of Kinmylies, and Charles. The 
latter was a draper in Inverness. His shop is 



296 The Clan Gillean. 

referred to in one of Burt's Letters. He married 
Margaret Mackenzie. 

1. Simon, or Sween, portioner of Kinmylies, 
was a writer in Inverness. He married Janet 
Baillie, and had at least two children, John and a 
daughter. He died on March 20th, 1754. His 
daughter was married to a Campbell, by whom 
she had two children, Donald and a daughter. 
Donald died in the West Indies at the age of forty, 
and left an estate which was worth about ;£ 15,000. 

2. John was born in 1746. He married Mar- 
garet Patterson, by whom he had five children, 
Alexander, John, Donald, Finlay, and Jane. He 
lived in Inverness, and died in 1852, at the good 
old age of 106 years. He was known as the 
Centenarian. Alexander, his eldest son, was a 
sergeant in the army, and was wounded at 
Waterloo. Alexander settled in Limerick, and 
was married there. Finlay was a printer. He 
published his father's reminiscences, and also 
traditions related by him. He died in 1857. He 
was married and left a family. 

3. Donald, third son of the Centenarian, came to 
Newfoundland in 181 2, and to Cape Breton a year 
or two afterwards. He lived at Judique. He 
married Flora Macdonald, by whom he had five 
children, John, Donald, Allan, Mary, and Donald- 
Charles. He died in 1838. Allan lives in Halifax, 
Nova Scotia. 



The Macleans of Kaffraria. 297 

The Macleans of Kaffraria. 

According to the " History of the Clan Terlach," 
David Maclean of Buntait, third son of Alexander, 
second of Dochgarroch, had a son named Hector, 
who had a son named Lachlan, who settled at 
Broughty Ferry in 1690. It is possible, but by no 
means certain, that this Lachlan was the grand- 
father of Murdoch Maclean, of the Aird, Aird 
Mhic Shimi, near Inverness. 

Murdoch Maclean, of the Aird, was born prob- 
ably about 1725. He married a Miss Mackenzie, 
by whom he had a son named Roderick. Roderick 
settled in Strathspey, and married a Miss Macbean. 
He had three sons, Alexander, John, and William. 
William was born about 1785. He entered the 
army in the 27th, or Enniskillen regiment, in 1805. 
He was appointed lieutenant in 1806, captain in 
1820, and major in 1831. He married a Miss 
Grant, of Strathspey, by whom he had three 
children, John, Jessie, and Eliza. Jessie was 
married to Major Macpherson of the 27th regi- 
ment, and Eliza to Surgeon Mostyn of the same 
regiment. John, only son of Major William 
Maclean, was born at Enniskillen Castle on August 
23d, 1810. He entered the army in the 27th 
regiment when quite young, and rose to the rank 
of lieutenant-colonel. He was for some time 
lieutenant-governor of Kaffraria, and afterwards 
governor of the colony of Natal. He spent the 
latter part of his life at East London in Cape 



298 The Clan Gillean. 

Colony. He had five children, William-Alexander, 
Allan -Cromdale, John- Kenneth, Ranald, and 
Annie- Matilda. William- Alexander, known as 
Lexy Maclean, captured a famous freebooter, Klaas 
Lucas, single-handed, and carried him into Cape 
Town. Allan was noted for his deeds of daring 
in the field. John married Jessie Macglashen, by 
whom he has five children. Ranald was born in 
1 85 1. He married Elizabeth- Jane Arnold, and 
has eight children, John - Kenneth, Ranald -Mac- 
pherson, William- Alexander, Allan -Cromdale, 
Clifford-Arnold, Grace-Annie, Lillian-Maud, and 
Clara. He resides in East London, Cape Colony. 
He is a captain in the Kaffrarian volunteers. He 
has been through six campaigns. He holds the 
Albert Medal of the first class and the Humane 
Society's Bronze Medal. Annie, only daughter of 
Major Maclean, was married to Captain Wilson of 
the 95th regiment. 

According to Seannachie's History, Major 
William Maclean was the son of Roderick, son of 
Murdoch, and belonged to the Dochgarroch family. 
As this information was undoubtedly obtained from 
Major William himself, it may be regarded as 
correct. 

The Macleans of Pitmain and Westfield. 

John of Leys, second son of John Mac Alister 
of Dochgarroch, fought under Dundee at Killie- 
crankie in 1689. It is said that he settled shortly 
afterwards in Strathdearn. He left a son who had 



The Macleans of Pitmain. 299 

a son named John. John, grandson of John of 
Leys, was born in 1725. He got a wadset from 
the Duke of Gordon of the lands of Pitmain in 
Badenoch. He married, first, Isabel, daughter of 
James Fordyce, by whom he had Hugh, James, 
and Grace. He married, secondly, Isabel, daughter 
of Donald Macpherson of Kinlochlaggan, by 
whom he had one daughter. He married, thirdly, 
Margaret, daughter of John Macpherson of Inver- 
nahaven, by whom he had John, Alexander, and 
Isabel. He married, fourthly, a daughter of Lewis 
Macpherson of Dalraddie, and by her had Lewis, 
Alexander, Christina, Una, Margaret, and Eliza- 
beth. He died in 1808. James, second son of John 
of Pitmain, was minister of Urquhart in Moray- 
shire. He married, first, Elizabeth, daughter of 
George Todd, by whom he had John, George, 
and Hugh. He married, secondly, Elizabeth, 
daughter of William Todd, by whom he had one 
son, James. He died in 1840. John died at the 
age of twenty-four. George became governor of 
the Gold Coast, Africa, in 1829. He married 
Letitia E. Landon. He died in 1847. Hugh 
was a surgeon in the service of the East India 
Company. He purchased Westfield in Elgin. 
He married Isabel Gordon, by whom he had one 
son, John-Alexander, who succeeded him in West- 
field, and died without issue. James, fourth son 
of the Rev. George Maclean, was a captain in the 
Gold Coast corps. He married Barbara, daughter 
of Harry Munro, of Seafield, by whom he had four 



300 The Clan Gillean. 

children, Hugh, James, George-Alexander, and 
Elizabeth. He died in 1877. James, his second 
son, succeeded his cousin in Westfield. James died 
in 1888 and was succeeded by his brother, George- 
Alexander, now of Westfield. 

John, third son of John of Pitmain, entered the 
Royal Scots as an ensign on April 30th, 1794. 
On the following day he was promoted to a 
lieutenancy in the o,2d regiment, or Gordon High- 
landers. He fought a duel with Captain John 
Cameron of Fassiefern at Gibraltar in 1795. He 
became a captain in 1797. He was transferred to 
the 27th, or Enniskillen regiment, in 1804, and 
appointed major. He served in Holland, Egypt, 
and the Peninsula, and was wounded severely on 
four different occasions. He was created a K.C.B. 
in January, 181 5. He was married and had one 
son, Alexander, who died without issue. Sir John 
died at Pitmain in i860. He was at the time of his 
death a lieutenant-general. He left the greater part 
of his money to his nephew, Dr. Hugh Maclean 
of Westfield. 

The Macleans of Lochgorm. 

I. Alexander Maclean of Lochgorm was the 
second son of David, third son of John Og, fifth 
of Dochgarroch. He married a Miss Macbean of 
the Kinchyle family, by whom he had two sons, 
David and Donald. Donald entered the army, 
and fought at the battle of Waterloo, and shortly 
afterwards retired with a pension. He spent his 



The Macleans of Lochgorm. 301 

later years in Pictou, Nova Scotia. He was for 
some time crier of the court, and also held some 
other easy positions which suited an old pensioner. 
He died unmarried. 

II. David, elder son of Alexander of Loch- 
gorm, was for some time a sergeant in the old 73d, 
or Macleod Highlanders. He came to Pictou 
about 1784, and settled at the West Branch of the 
East River. He was a good scholar, and was 
quite a prominent man in the district in which he 
lived. He was a surveyor, a magistrate, and an 
elder in the Presbyterian Church. He married 
Isabel, daughter of Alexander Fraser, of Middle 
River, Pictou, and had ten children by her, Alex- 
ander, John, Donald, David, Catherine, William, 
Simon, Hugh, Margaret, and Marion. The sons 
were all big men. There was none of them under 
six feet in height. Donald was the tallest, being 
six feet eight inches in height. David himself 
was a big man. At any rate he was known as 
Daibhidh M6r Mac Gilleain, or Big David Mac- 
lean. 1. Alexander, eldest son of David Maclean, 
settled on a portion of his father's farm. He 
married Mary Macdonald, by whom he had 
Hannah, Mary-Ann, John, David-Hugh, and 
Peter. David -Hugh married Mary Gray, by 
whom he had John, Enon, Mary, and Ella. 
2. John, second son of David Maclean, settled on 
a part of his father's farm. He married Elizabeth 
Munro, by whom he had seven children, Isabella, 
Jessie, David, Henry, Alexander, Margaret, and 



302 The Clan Gillean. 

Thomas. Henry, John's second son, was engaged 
in business at Hopewell. He married Annie, 
daughter of John Gray, of Hopewell, and had by 
her six children, Jessie, Ella, Elizabeth, John- 
Brown, Alister, and Harry-Gray. Ella is married 
to the Rev. J. H. Hattie. John-Brown, now the 
Rev. J. B. Maclean, B.A.,B.D., studied at Dal- 
housie University, Halifax, at the Presbyterian 
College, Halifax, and afterwards for one term in 
Edinburgh. He is settled at Upper Stewiacke, 
Nova Scotia. It is scarcely necessary to add that 
he belongs to the Presbyterian Church. Alister, 
second son of Henry Maclean, is a machinist. 
Harry-Gray, the third son, is a pattern-maker 
with the Robb Engineering Company, of Amherst, 
Nova Scotia. 3. Donald, third son of David 
Maclean, married Barbara Mackay, by whom he 
had five children, Isabella, Catherine, Simon, 
Daniel, and David. 4. David, fourth son of David 
Maclean, married Nancy Fraser, but had no issue. 
5. William, the fifth son, married Marion Murray, 
by whom he had four sons, David, John, Alex- 
ander, and William. Simon and Hugh died 
unmarried. Margaret, his eldest daughter, was 
married to Alexander Maclean, of Maclennan's 
Brook, and had three sons and three daughters. 
Marion was married to Alexander Fraser, miller, 
near New Glasgow, and had five sons and five 
daughters. Catherine was married to John Mac- 
lean, Iain Ruadh, and had four sons and three 
daughters. 



The Macleans of Knock. 303 

IV. The Macleans of Knock. 

I. The Rev. Angus Maclean was rector of 
Morvern in 1626. He was the son of John, son 
of Angus, son of John, son of John, a priest, son 
of John, son of Charles Maclean of Glenurchart. 
He possessed Knock and Ulline in Morvern, 
Killean in Mull, and Scarinish in Tiree. He left 
two sons, John and Hector. He died in 1635. 
John, his elder son, seems to have died without 
issue. 

II. Hector, second son of Angus, was born in 
1605. He succeeded his father as minister of 
Morvern, and was appointed Bishop of Argyll in 
1680. He married Jean, daughter of the Rev. 
Thomas Boyd, son of Bishop Andrew Boyd. He 
had six children, Andrew, Angus, Alexander, 
John, Janet, and another daughter. Angus was 
minister of Kilfinan and Cowall. Alexander was 
a prominent member of his clan. In 1686 he 
received the lands of Otter from James II., who 
had deprived Alexander Campbell of them. He 
was knighted shortly afterwards, and is known in 
history as Sir Alexander Maclean of Otter. He 
was severely wounded at Killiecrankie. He was 
taken to Duart Castle, and kept there until he got 
well. He entered the French service and was 
appointed lieutenant-colonel. He died at Aix-la- 
Chapelle. John, fourth son of Bishop Hector, 
was a lieutenant in the Earl of Portmore's regiment 
of Foot. He was killed at Kaizerswerth, probably 
about 1702. 



304 The Clan Gillean. 

III. Andrew, eldest son of Bishop Hector, 
possessed the lands of Knock ; but owing to the 
depredations of the Camerons, was forced to sell 
them and remove to Mull. He was a captain in 
Dundee's army at Killiecrankie. He married 
Florence, daughter of Charles Maclean of Ardna- 
cross, and had by her one son, Angus. He was 
the author of several Gaelic songs. 

IV. Angus, son of Captain Andrew, was a major 
in the Spanish army. He married Grace, daughter 
of Colonel Gerald Fitzgerald, by whom he had 
three sons and a daughter. The sons were all in 
the Neapolitan service. Angus, the eldest of them, 
died in 1780. 



CHAPTER XIII. 
^hc Bcscenbants of $onalb of JUbgour. 

I. The Macleans of Ardgour. 

I. Donald, son of Lachlan Bronnach, Domhnall 
Mac Lachainn Bhronnaich, was the first Maclean 
of Ardgour. He was a bold, resolute, and active 
man. About 1432 he received the lands of Ard- 
gour from Alexander, third Lord of the Isles. It 
is said that the Lord of the Isles was at the time 
displeased with Macmaster, who had been in 
possession of these lands, but had no legal claim 
to them. Donald invaded Ardgour, attacked 
Macmaster, and slew himself and his sons. It is 
true that the Lord of the Isles and Lachlan 
Bronnach were very good friends, and had been 
companions for some time in Tantallon Castle. 
At the same time it is just possible that the 
influence of the Earl of Mar had something to do 
with getting Ardgour for Lachlan's son. 

Donald of Ardgour was married to a daughter 
of Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, son of Donald 



306 The Clan Gillean. 

Dubh, and had three sons, Ewen, Neil Ban, and 
John. He had also a natural son named Archi- 
bald. Ewen succeeded his father in Ardgour. 
Neil Ban was the progenitor of the Macleans of 
Boreray. Archibald's descendants were known as 
Clann Eoghain an Fhraoich, or the children of 
Ewen of the heather. 

II. Ewen of Ardgour was chamberlain of the 
house to John, fourth Lord of the Isles, in 1463. 
He was in possession of Ardgour at least from 
1479 to 1495. He married a daughter of Thomas 
Chisholm of Comar, by whom he had five sons, 
Lachlan, Terlach, Allan, John Roy, and Hector. 
Lachlan succeeded his father in Ardgour. Ter- 
lach had one son, John. Allan married a daughter 
of Mac a Ghlasraich in the Braes of Lochaber, and 
had a son named John, who had a son named 
Allan. John was captain of Cairnburgh Castle. 
Hector was the first Maclean of Blaaich. It is 
from Ewen that the chieftains of the Macleans 
of Ardgour derive their patronymic of Mac-Mhic- 
Eoghain. 

III. Lachlan of Ardgour was a young man of 
warlike character. He took an active part under 
Lachlan Cattanach of Duart, in 15 13, in seizing 
the royal castles of Cairnburgh and Dunscathaich. 
He supported Sir Donald Gallda of Lochalsh in 
15 1 7. He died without issue, and was succeeded 
by his nephew, Iain Mac Thearlaich, or John the 
son of Charles. 

IV. John Mac Terlach was under age when he 



The Macleans of Ardgour. 307 

succeeded to the estate. He supported Donald 
Dubh in 1545, and died about 1547. As he left 
no lawful heirs, his estate reverted to the crown. 
In March, 1549, the Government gave a charter 
of it — "the lands and barony of Ardgour" — to 
Hector Mor of Duart. Hector Mor conveyed it 
to Allan, son of John, son of Allan, third son of 
Ewen of Ardgour. 

V. Allan of Ardgour handfasted with a daughter 
of Macdonald of Ardnamurchan, and had two 
sons by her, John of Inverscadale, and Hector. 
He had a natural son who was known as Iain 
Gleannach, or John of the Glens. He married, 
first, a daughter of Ewen Cameron of Lochiel, 
Ewen Mac Allan, by whom he had one son, Ewen. 
He married, secondly, a daughter of Macdonald 
of Moydart, and had two sons by her, Charles 
and Lachlan. John of Inverscadale, Iain an 
Ionair, was distinguished for his strength, bravery 
and activity. He was one of Sir Lachlan Mor's 
grandest warriors. Ewen became laird of Ard- 
gour. Charles was the progenitor of the Macleans 
of Inverscadale. According to the Ardgour MS. 
the six sons of Allan were all men of great sub- 
stance, while the most of them had a numerous 
issue. 

VI. Ewen of Ardgour was known as Eoghan 
na h-Iteige, or Ewen of the feather, an appellation 
which indicated that he was quick and active in 
his movements or like a bird flying from place to 
place. He was laird of Ardgour in 1587. He 



308 The Clan Gillean. 

married a daughter of Stewart of Appin, by 
whom he had two sons, Allan and John. He was 
killed in his boat, by the Macdonalds of Keppoch, 
at Sgeir-thir-Muir, a rock near the seashore oppo- 
site the farm of Coire-chaorachain in Lochaber. 
The Keppoch men mistook him for Cameron of 
Lochiel, against whom they had a bitter grudge. 
He was slain probably about the year 1590. Allan, 
his elder son, became laird of Ardgour. John had 
a son named Allan. This Allan was the father of 
John Maclean, the famous Mull poet, who was 
known as Iain Mac Ailein Mhic Iain Mhic 
Eoghain. 

VII. Allan of Ardgour was a hostage in the 
hands of Angus Macdonald of Islay in 1587. He 
was only a young boy when his father was killed. 
His uncle Charles acted as tutor to him. Charles 
was a greedy and dishonest man, and succeeded 
by some crooked means in getting himself served 
heir male to the lands of Ardgour, in September, 
1593. When Allan came to be of age, Charles 
refused to give up the estate to him. His mother's 
people then advised Allan to apply to the Earl of 
Argyll for assistance. Argyll agreed to obtain 
possession of the estate for him, on condition of 
holding it of himself as superior instead of holding 
it of the Crown. Allan accepted Argyll's terms. 
Charles was seized by a stratagem, by Stewart of 
Appin, and imprisoned on Stalker's Island — Eilein 
an Stalcaire — where he was detained for some 
time. Through the influence of Hector Og of 



The Macleans of Ardgour. 309 

Duart, to whose aunt Charles was married, Allan 
agreed to give to Charles Inverscadale and certain 
other lands, on condition of his paying to him 
yearly the feu-duty which was to be given to 
Argyll. This duty consisted of twenty-five marks 
Scots, and a cuid oidhche, or night's entertainment. 
It was afterwards commuted to fifty marks Scots, 
or two pounds fifteen shillings and sixpence. 
Allan received Ardgour in November, 1618. He 
was served heir to John Mac Terlach Mac Ewen, 
son of the brother of his great-grandfather. He 
married Catherine, daughter of Allan Cameron of 
Lochiel, and had fourteen children by her : John 
Criibach, his successor; Hector; Allan; Charles, 
whose son John settled at Anderton near Glasgow; 
Donald, who was killed at Inverkeithing; Lachlan 
Mor ; Lachlan Og ; Ewen the elder ; Ewen the 
younger ; Archibald ; John Og ; Mary, who was 
married to Charles Maclean of Ardnacross; Marion, 
who was married to John Maclean of Totaranald ; 
and Christy. The Rev. John Maclean, D. D., 
minister of Gorbals, Glasgow, was the son of John 
Maclean, of Anderton. He married, in 1797, Ann 
Ballentine, and had by her John, James, John, 
Patrick, William, Robert, Alexander, Walter, 
Margaret, Euphemia, and Elizabeth. William 
was a merchant in Buenos Ayres. Robert was a 
merchant in Manchester. 

VIII. John Criibach, eighth Maclean of Ard- 
gour, was a daring and active man. He was an 
ardent lover of the chase, and was always ready 



310 The Clan Gillean. 

to draw the sword in support of his chief and 
king. He sprained his foot severely when he 
was quite young, and was ever afterwards lame. 
He was consequently known as Iain Criibach, or 
Lame John. He was in possession of Ardgour in 
1680. He received a crown charter of his lands 
from James II., on September 12th, 1688. He 
was married twice. By his first wife, a daughter 
of Campbell of Dunstaffnage, he had five sons : 
Ewen, Lachlan, Donald, Allan, and Archibald. 
By his second wife, Marion, daughter of Hector 
Maclean, second of Torloisk, and relict of Hector 
Roy of Coll, he had one son, John. He was 
ninety-two years of age at the time of his death. 
He was buried in Coll. Ewen, his eldest son, 
succeeded him in Ardgour. Lachlan was the 
progenitor of the later Macleans of Blaaich. 
Donald lived in Arighoulan. 

IX. Ewen of Ardgour married Mary, daughter 
of Lachlan Maclean, eleventh of Lochbuie, and had 
by her five sons, Allan, Donald, Charles, John, 
and Lachlan. Allan succeeded his father. Don- 
ald married Janet, daughter of Lachlan Maclean 
of Calgary, by whom he had three sons, Ewen, 
John, and Lachlan. Lachlan, the youngest of 
Ardgour's sons, was a lieutenant in the Spanish 
service. He was killed at Madrid in a duel with a 
man named Cockpen. 

X. Allan of Ardgour was born in 1668. He 
married Anne, second daughter of Sir Ewen 
Cameron of Lochiel, and had by her nine children : 



The Macleans of Ardgour. 311 

Donald, Ewen, John, Archibald, Allan, James, 
Isabel, Margaret, and Mary. He was a very ex- 
travagant man and utterly mismanaged his affairs. 
He made over his estate to Donald, his eldest son, 
but Donald was as foolish and reckless as himself. 
Between them they sank the estate so deeply in 
debt that they brought it to the brink of ruin. 
Ewen, the second son, died at sea on his way 
home from Virginia. Allan died in Georgia. 
James was a lieutenant in the Montgomery High- 
landers. He was killed at sea, in an engagement 
with a privateer, on June 1st, 1761. He was on 
the way to Minorca, and was in charge of a de- 
tachment of soldiers. Isabel was married to 
Donald of Brolas ; Margaret, to Angus of Kin- 
lochaline ; and Mary, to John, son of Charles of 
Inverscadale. 

XI. Donald of Ardgour predeceased his father, 
and was succeeded by Ewen, son of his brother 
John. John, third son of Allan of Ardgour, mar- 
ried Marjory, daughter of Allan Maclachlan of 
Corry, and had three children by her, Ewen, 
Hector, and Margaret. On the death of his 
brother Donald in 1 731, he became heir to the 
estate. He died in Mull in March, 1739, and was 
buried at Kilmore in Ouinish. 

After the death of Donald of Ardgour, Hector 
Maclean of Coll, Donald Maclean of Torloisk, 
the Rev. John Maclean of Kilninian, and the 
Rev. Archibald Maclean of Kilvicewen, took the 
management of the estate into their own hands, 



312 The Clan Gillean. 

and went to a good deal of trouble and expense 
in connection with it. They appointed Donald 
Cameron, of Strontian, factor under them. At the 
end of two or three years Donald pretended that 
he had some business to settle in Edinburgh. He 
went away, but never returned. It was believed, 
at the time, that he left Scotland. After his flight 
the management of the estate fell principally into 
the hands of John, third son of Allan of Ardgour. 
When John died, the Maclachlans of Corry tried to 
get control of the estate. Hector of Torloisk at 
once stepped in and prevented them from obtaining 
their object. Hector was a good Maclean, and a 
good lawyer, and knew what to do. He took 
charge of the estate and associated with him in the 
management of it the following persons : — Donald 
Campbell of Airds; John Campbell of Clahombie; 
James Maclean, sixth son of Allan of Ardgour ; 
Lachlan Maclean, a merchant in Glasgow ; and 
Dr. Hector Maclean of Grulin, who was then 
living in Glasgow. He placed Evven, the youthful 
heir of Ardgour, in charge of Lachlan Maclean, the 
Glasgow merchant. He managed the affairs of 
the estate successfully, and was apparently the 
means of preserving it from passing out of the 
hands of the descendants of Donald Mac Lachlan 
Bronnach. John Maclean's widow went to Glas- 
gow and resided there for a number of years. 
Lachlan Maclean acted in the kindest manner 
towards herself and her children. Hector, the 
second son, died young. Margaret also died at an 



The Macleans of Ardgour. 313 

early age. Allan of Ardgour died in November, 
1756, at the ripe old age of eighty-eight years. 

XII. Evven of Ardgour was born about 1736. 
He was brought up in Glasgow. He was served 
heir to his uncle Donald in July, 1744. He mar- 
ried, in 1763, Elizabeth, daughter of Alexander 
Houston of Gordon Hill, by whom he had two 
children, Alexander and Anne. He was for some 
time a captain in the first regiment of Argyle 
Fencibles, which was raised in 1758. He died in 
1768. He was succeeded by his son, Alexander. 
Anne, his daughter, was born in November, 1765, 
and died in Edinburgh in April, i860. Several 
of the Ardgour family lived to a very old age. 

XIII. Alexander, thirteenth of Ardgour, was 
born on April 16th, 1764. He entered the army 
as an ensign in 1780, and rose to the rank of 
major in the 8th regiment of Light Dragoons. 
He was appointed lieutenant-colonel in the third 
regiment of the local militia of Argyleshire in 181 1. 
Like his ancestor, John Criibach, he delighted in 
the chase. He was a magnificent horseman and 
was the most daring rider in the Caledonia Hunt. 
He married, in 1795, Margaret, daughter of John 
Hope, second Earl of Hopetoun, and had by her 
fourteen children. 1. Hugh, the eldest child, died 
in infancy. 2. John-Hugh was educated for the 
Scottish bar. He died at Rome in 1826. 3. Archi- 
bald was a captain in the navy. He died in 
Edinburgh in 1832. 4. Alexander became laird 
of Ardgour. 5. Henry-Dundas was senior major 



314 The Clan Gillean. 

of the 95th regiment. He became owner of Laz- 
enby Hall in Cumberland. He died without issue 
in 1863. 6. James-Charles was for some time 
barrack-master of Fort William, Bengal. He 
died at Calcutta in 1825. He was married and left 
two daughters. 7. Charles-Hope was educated 
at Balliol College, Oxford, and was called to the 
English bar in 1829. He took a deep and prac- 
tical interest in his clan. He bore the expense of 
publishing Seannachie's "Account of the Clan 
Maclean" in 1838. He was married and had two 
daughters. He died in 1839. 8. Thomas was for 
some time assistant adjutant-general at Nagpore. 
9. William was a commander in the Royal Navy. 
He married, in 1838, Elizabeth-Mary Charter, 
by whom he had three children, William-Gunston, 
Allan, and Frances-Margaret. 10. George was a 
colonel in the Royal Artillery. He married, in 1842, 
Amelia-Jane, daughter of Sir Colin Campbell, 
governor of Ceylon. 11. Robert died unmarried 
in 1835. 12. Peter was a colonel in the Royal 
Artillery. He married, in 1841, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Lieutenant-General Sir Henry Som- 
erset, by whom he had seven children, Allan- 
Henry, John-Hugh, Henry- Eardley, Charles- 
Hope-Adrian, Margaret-Ann, Louisa-Charlotte, 
and Elizabeth-Frances. Alexander of Ardgour 
died at Ardgour House on September 8th, 1855. 
He was buried at Cille-Mhaodain. 

XIV. Alexander of Ardgour was born in 1799. 
He entered the civil service of the East India 



The Macleans of Boreray. 315 

Company, and became collector of the Jaghire. 
He married, in 1833, Helen-Jane, eldest daughter 
of Major-General Sir John Dalrymple, by whom 
he had two sons, Alexander -Thomas and John- 
Dalrymple. Alexander -Thomas succeeded his 
father. John-Dalrymple lived at Lazenby Hall, 
Cumberland. 

XV. Alexander-Thomas was born in Madras in 
1835. He was educated at Harrow. He entered 
the civil service of the East India Company in 
Bengal in 1857, and rose to the position of judge 
of the high court of judicature at Fort William. 
He was married, in 1875, to Selina- Philippa, 
daughter of William S. Dicken, by whom he had 
four children, Alexander- John- Hew, Catherine- 
Helen-Dalrymple, Margaret, and Flora. He died 
a few years ago. He was succeeded by his only 
son. 

XVI. Alexander-John-Hew was born in 1880. 
He is the sixteenth Maclean of Ardgour. 

II. The Macleans of Boreray. 

I. Neil Ban, second son of Donald, first laird 
of Ardgour, was the progenitor of the Macleans of 
Boreray. According to tradition, Patrick Roy 
Obeolan, lay abbot of Applecross, had three 
children, Norman, Austin Mor, and a daughter. 
Alexander, third Lord of the Isles, took the 
daughter to live with him, and had by her a son 
named Austin or Hugh. This son was brought 
up in Donald of Ardgour's family. He received 



316 The Clan Gillean. 

the lands of Sleat and others from his father, and 
was the progenitor of the Macdonalds of Sleat. 
Neil Ban Maclean married a daughter of Norman 
Obeolan. His wife and Hugh of Sleat were thus 
first cousins. Hugh was very much attached to 
Neil Ban, the companion of his childhood, and 
gave him the lands of Boreray, Peinn Boreray, 
Claddach Carinish, Grimsay, Gearndu, Scotvein, 
Rhudu, Ardnastriiban, and Kallin. The con- 
ditions imposed were : first, that Neil Ban and 
his successors should furnish Macdonald of Sleat 
with a certain number of fighting men whenever 
required ; and, secondly, that each of the Macleans 
of Boreray, on taking up the succession, should 
deliver to his superior in the lands held by him 
fifteen cows and a bull. It is said that about the 
time of Sir Lachlan Mor of Duart, the Maclean 
who held Boreray refused to comply with the 
conditions, and was consequently deprived of his 
lands. They were leased, however, to his son, 
about 1612, at an annual rent of sixteen pounds 
three shillings and fourpence. The Macleans of 
Boreray were known as Sliochd Neill Bhain, or 
the offspring of Neil Ban. 

II. John, son of Neil Ban, was the second 
Maclean of Boreray. 

III. The name of the third Maclean of Boreray 
we do not know. 

IV. Alexander seems to have been the fourth 
Maclean of Boreray. 

V. Ailein na Tuaighe was probably the dream- 
ing Boreray of Sir Lachlan Mor's time. 



The Macleans of Boreray. 317 

VI. Donald of Boreray had three sons, Archi- 
bald, Neil Ban, and Lachlan. Archibald was 
killed at Inverkeithing. Lachlan lived at Vallay. 

VII. Neil Ban married Ann, daughter of 
Alexander Mackenzie of Kilcoy, and had twelve 
children by her, John, Donald, Charles, Archibald, 
Murdoch, Allan, Ewen, Hector, Alexander, and 
three daughters. John succeeded his father in 
Boreray. Charles settled in Tiree. Archibald 
was tacksman of Kirkibost. Ewen had a son 
named John, who was a captain in the army or 
navy, and died at the siege of Carthagena. Hector 
settled in Tiree. 

VIII. John was tacksman of Boreray when 
Martin visited the island in 1695. He married a 
daughter of Campbell of Strond, by whom he had 
four children, Archibald, John, Neil, and Ann. 
He died in 1723. 1. Archibald succeeded his 
father in Boreray. 2. Neil married a daughter 
of Lachlan Maclean of Vallay, and had three 
daughters by her. The eldest was married to 
Roderick, son of Macleod of Contullich. The 
second was married, as his second wife, to William 
Macdonald, tutor of Sleat. The third was mar- 
ried to Hugh Macdonald, the tutor's son. 3. John 
was minister of North Uist. He was married and 
left a son named John, who settled in Greenock. 
4. Ann was married to John Macdonald of Castle- 
ton in the Isle of Skye. 

IX. Archibald of Boreray was served heir to 
his father in 1723. He was married twice. By 



318 The Clan Gillean. 

his first wife, a daughter of Samuel Macdonald in 
Sleat, he had Neil Ban, John, and a daughter. By 
his second wife, a daughter of John Macdonald of 
Balkany, Bail'-a-Chanaich, he had Alexander, 
Hector, and John. He was a man of intelligence 
and good sense. He died in 1739. He was suc- 
ceeded by his eldest son, Neil Ban. Alexander 
was a tenant in North Uist and had a son named 
Archibald, who was in the year 1790 served heir 
male to his grandfather, Archibald Maclean of 
Boreray. 

X. Neil Ban married a daughter of William 
Macdonald, tutor of Sleat, and had seven children 
by her, Donald, John, Archibald, William, Allan, 
Marion, and Margaret. John was a captain in the 
army. 

XI. Donald of Boreray married a daughter of 
Campbell of Strond. He was in possession of the 
estate in 1760, but his father was still living. He 
was married to a daughter of Campbell of Strond. 
He was succeeded apparently by Archibald, son of 
Alexander, son of Archibald of Boreray. 

XII. Archibald of Boreray had two children, 
John, his successor, and Christina, who was married 
to Macneil of Pabbay and Kyles, and had a son 
named William. 

XIII. John of Boreray was born in 1758. He 
purchased the estate of Drimnin and went to live 
on it. He married, in 1797, Jessie, daughter of 
Donald Macleod of Bernera, and had eight chil- 
dren by her : Donald ; John, who died young ; 



The Macleans of Boreray. 319 

Archibald- Neil ; Roderick-Norman, who was an 
officer in the Bengal army and died in 1845 ; 
William-Campbell; Alexandrina, who was married 
to Major -General Duncan Macpherson of the 
Bengal army; Marion who died in 1892; Mar- 
garet, who was married to the Rev. Dr. John 
Maclean, minister of Morvern ; and Helen, who 
was married to Donald Macleod. He died on 
April 3d, 1 82 1, and was buried at Ard-a-Mhorain 
in North Uist. 

XIV. Donald of Boreray sold the lands of 
Drimnin a few years after his father's death. He 
sold his lease of Boreray, in 1865, to Sir John 
Campbell-Orde for ^3,000. The lease was for 
11 three lives and three nineteens." When Donald 
sold it there were twelve years of it to run. Donald 
died in North Devon, England, in 1874. He was 
married, but had no issue. 

XV. Archibald-Neil, third son of John of Bor- 
eray, was a major-general in the Bombay army. 
He died in 1875. 

XVI. William-Campbell, fifth son of John of 
Boreray, was born in 181 1. He was a military 
surgeon in India for a long time. He married, 
in 1845, Louisa, daughter of John Macpherson, 
factor in Skye, and had by her several sons and 
daughters. He was appointed professor of mili- 
tary medicine at Netley School in England in i860. 
He held the rank of surgeon-general, and was an 
LL.D., and a C. B. He printed for private cir- 
culation, in 1895, " Memoirs of a Long Life," a 
very interesting work. He died in 1898. 



320 The Clan Gillean. 

i. The Descendants of Terlach Mac 
Neil Ban. 

Charles, Tearlach Mac Xeill Bhain, third son of 
the second Neil Ban of Boreray, settled in Tiree, 
and was in very comfortable circumstances. He 
married Florence, daughter of Neil of Drimnacross, 
and had nine children by her, Neil, Archibald, 
Lachlan, Donald, John, Catherine, Ann, Isabel, 
and Mary. Neil married Florence, daughter of 
Donald Maclean of Arighoulan, by whom he had 
Alexander, Lachlan, and daughters. Alexander 
was in the arm}- and died in Holland. Lachlan 
was a captain in the military service of the East 
India Company. He settled at Craigebete in 
Mull. Lachlan, third son of Charles, was a cap- 
tain in Colonel Lamby's regiment in Holland. 
He married Maria Fatmangle, by whom he had a 
daughter named Plorentia. He died at the Brill 
in 1752. Catherine, eldest daughter of Charles, 
died unmarried. Ann was married to Hector 
Maclean ; Isabel, to the Rev. John Maclean ; and 
Mary, to John of Treshnish. 

The Macleans of Scour. 

Archibald, second son of Charles Mac Neil Ban, 
graduated at the University of Glasgow in 17 13, 
and became minister of Kilvicewen, or Kilfinichen, 
in Mull, in 1720. He was an amiable and excellent 
man. He married Susanna, daughter of Donald 
Campbell of Ardtun and Scamadale, by whom he 



The Macleans of Scour. 321 

had Charles, John, Neil, Florence, Margaret, Ann, 
and Barbara. Neil was for some time in the 
commissary department at Niagara. He was 
married, and left a daughter. Florence was married 
to Donald of Muck. Margaret was marriecf in 
1756 to the Rev. Neil Macleod of Kilfmichen, a 
brother of Donald Macleod of Swordale in Skye, 
and a nephew of the Rev. Norman Macleod of 
Morvern. She had four children, Alexander, 
Mary, Susanna, and Ann. Alexander studied for 
the ministry, settled in New York, and was the 
author of several works. Ann, third daughter of 
the Rev. Archibald Maclean, was married to Hugh 
Maclean of Langamull. Barbara was married to 
Hugh Maclean, a lawyer in Glasgow. 

Charles, eldest son of the Rev. Archibald Mac- 
lean, was a kind and pleasant man, and possessed 
of extraordinary strength. He was for some time 
in the army. He settled at Scour in Mull. He 
married Catherine, daughter of Lachlan Maclean, 
third of Muck, by whom he had three children, 
Archibald, Mary, and Isabel. Mary died un- 
married. Isabel was married on May 20th, 1801, 
to the Rev. Edmund Macqueen, minister of Barra. 

Archibald, second Maclean of Scour, was a 
mild and kind-hearted man. He was known as 
Gilleasbuig na Sgurra, or Archibald of Scour. 
He was for some time in the 71st regiment. He 
was appointed lieutenant -colonel in the 79th, or 
Cameron Highlanders, in 1801. He served in 
America, Holland, and Egypt. He was noted for 



322 The Clan Gillean. 

his great strength. He was an officer of the most 
undaunted courage. He retired from the army in 
1807. He died, unmarried, in 1817. 

The Macleans of Princeton. 

John, second son of the Rev. Archibald Maclean 
of Kilfinichen, was a doctor. He married, in April, 
1756, Agnes Lang, of Glasgow, by whom he had 
five children, all of whom died young, except John. 
He was appointed surgeon in Fraser's Highlanders 
in 1757. He was present at the capture of Louis- 
burg in 1758, and of Quebec in 1759. He is said 
to have been the third man who scaled the Heights 
of Abraham with General Wolfe. He returned to 
Scotland in 1762. 

John, son of Dr. John Maclean, was born in 
Glasgow in 1 7 7 1 , and graduated at the University 
there as physician and surgeon in 1791. He 
studied chemistry for some time in Edinburgh, 
and surgery in Paris. He went to the United 
States in 1795, and was appointed professor of 
chemistry and natural philosphy in Princeton. 
He married Phcebe, daughter of Dr. Absalom 
Bainbridge, and a sister of Commodore Bainbridge. 
He had six children, John, William-Bainbridge, 
George-Mackintosh, Archibald, Mary, and Agnes. 
He died in 1814. He was a man of good ability 
and high character. John, his eldest son, was 
born in 1800. John studied for the ministry, and 
became president of Princeton College in 1853. 
He resigned in 1886, and was succeeded by Dr. 



The Macleans of Kilmoluaig. 323 

McCosh. He was the author of several valuable 
review articles and of a history of Princeton Col- 
lege. He was a benevolent, honourable, and 
amiable man. He died, unmarried, in 1886. Two 
of his brothers, William and Archibald, also died 
unmarried. They were both lawyers. 

George-Mackintosh, third son of Professor John 
Maclean, studied medicine. He was for some 
time professor of chemistry and natural history in 
Hanover College, Indiana. He was married three 
times. By his first wife, Catherine 0. Smith, he 
had one son, John. By his third wife, Caroline 
M. Fitch, he had three daughters, Mary-Agnes, 
Louisa-Bragdon, and Caroline-Fitch. He died in 
1886. John, his only son, studied for the ministry. 
John died in 1870. He was married, and left a 
daughter named Phcebe. 

The Macleans of Kilmoluaig. 
I. Donald, fourth son of Charles Mac Neil Ban, 
was the only one of his father's sons that remained 
in Tiree. He was tacksman of Kilmoluaig. He 
married Isabel, daughter of John Campbell of the 
family of Dunstaffnage. He had six children, 
John, Charles, Archibald, Florence, Isabel, and 
Elizabeth. 1. John, his eldest son, was factor of 
the estate of Ardgour. John married Florence, 
daughter of John Maclean, son of Charles of 
Inverscadale, and had eight children, Charles, 
John, Donald, James, Hugh, Isabel, Ann, and 
Barbara. (1). Charles was a physician. He mar- 



324 The Clan Gillean. 

ried Mary, daughter of Dr. Hector Campbell, of 
London, by whom he had six children, Hector, 
Charles, Frederick, Emma, Mary, and Adelaide. 
(2). John was collector of customs in the island 
of St. Domingo. He died in London in 1837. 
(3). Donald was a merchant in London. He 
married Jane, daughter of George Brown, and 
had eight children ; John-George, Donald-James, 
William-Henry, Charles-Edward, Margaret-Ann, 
Jane, Anna, and Catherine. (4). James was a 
captain of dragoons in India. (5). Hugh was a 
merchant in New York. He died unmarried. 
(6). Isabel was married to John, son of Donald 
Maclean of Muck. (7). Ann was married to 
Lieutenant-General Skinner, and had six children, 
Thomas, John, James, Allan-Maclean, Anne, and 
Mary-Ann. 2. Charles, second son of Donald of 
Kilmoluaig, was a major in the 43d regiment. 
He died unmarried. 3. Archibald succeeded his 
father in Kilmoluaig. 4. Florence was married 
to Donald, son of Macdonald of Glencoe, and 
was the mother of Colonel Alexander Macdonald 
of the Royal Artillery. 5. Isabel was married to 
the Rev. John MacCubbin, minister in Galloway. 
6. Elizabeth died unmarried. 

II. Archibald, second of Kilmoluaig, married 
Catherine, daughter of Donald Campbell of 
Scamadale, and had five children ; Donald, Charles, 
John, Annabella, and Mary. Donald and Charles 
died in the West Indies. John succeeded his 
father in Kilmoluaig. 



The Macleans of Heisker. 325 

III. John, third of Kilmoluaig, married Mar- 
garet, daughter of the Rev. Archibald MacColl, 
minister of Tiree, by whom he had at least one 
son, Donald. 

IV. Donald, son of John of Kilmoluaig, went 
to New Zealand about 1840. He learned the Maori 
language, and could speak it as fluently as Gaelic. 
He was appointed local protector of the aborigines 
at Taraniki about 1844, anc * Native Administrator 
and Minister of Colonial Defence in 1869. He 
was created knight commander of the order of St. 
Michael and St. George in 1874. He married 
Susan - Douglas, daughter of Robert R. Strang, 
by whom he had one son, Robert-Douglas-Donald. 
He died in January, 1877. 

The Hon. Sir Donald Maclean possessed ad- 
ministrative talent of a high order. He pursued 
a policy of fair dealing and kindness towards the 
natives, and wielded an immense influence over 
them. To his ability and sagacity, New Zealand 
was indebted to a large extent for its peace and 
prosperity in the early period of its history. Sir 
Donald was greatly lamented by the Maori tribes. 
His death was to them the loss of a great chief 
and kind father. 

2. The Macleans of Heisker. 

Archibald, fourth son of the second Neil Ban of 
Boreray, was tacksman of Heisker and Kirkibost 
in North Uist. His son, Gilleasbuig Og, married, 
first, a daughter of Samuel Macdonald, and had 



326 The Clan Gillean. 

by her two sons, Archibald, a coppersmith in 
Glasgow, and John. He married, secondly, a 
daughter of Ranald Macdonald of Ballishear, by 
whom he had Lachlan and two daughters. John, 
his second son, Iain Mac Ghilleasbuig Oig, resided 
for some time at Mingary in Mull. He married 
Catherine, daughter of the Rev. John Maclean. 
It is said that he had five sons, Archibald, Neil, 
Donald, John, and James. He left Mingary, and 
went back to North Uist. Archibald was tacks- 
man of Heisker. He quarrelled with Macdonald 
of Vallay, and shortly afterwards emigrated to 
Canada. lie was succeeded in Heisker by his 
brother, Captain James Maclean of Penmore. 
Neil, second son of John, son of Gilleasbuig Og f 
was born at Mingary in 1759. He was for some 
time a lieutenant in the 84th regiment. He settled 
at St. Andrews in the county of Stormont, Ontario, 
shortly after June, 1782. He was appointed 
lieutenant-colonel of the Stormont militia in 1812. 
He fought at the battle of Chrysler's Farm. He 
became a member of the Legislative Council of 
Upper Canada in 181 5. He married, in 1784, a 
daughter of John Macdonald, of Leek, and had by 
her eight children, John, Archibald, Alexander, 
Catherine, James, Jessie, Isabel, and Ann. He 
died in 1832. John, his eldest son, was a sheriff. 
He was married and left three sons. Archibald 
was born in 1794, and began studying law in 1808. 
He joined the militia in 181 2. He was dangerously 
wounded at the battle of Oueenstown Heights and 



The Macleans of Balliphetrish. 327 

taken prisoner at the battle of Lundy's Lane. He 
was called to the bar in 181 5. He was elected 
to the Legislative Assembly in 1820, and was for 
some time speaker. He was appointed to the 
bench in 1837, and became chief justice of Upper 
Canada in 1862. He married Joan Macpherson, 
and had by her, John, Archibald, Thomas, Neil, 
Duncan, Isabel, Mary, and Elizabeth. He was 
an honourable and amiable man, and a good 
judge. He died in 1865. He was a Tory in 
politics and a thorough Presbyterian in religion. 
Alexander, third son of Neil Maclean, was married 
and left two sons, Neil and Alexander. 

3. The Macleans of Balliphetrish. 

I. Hector, eighth son of the second Neil Ban, 
settled at Balliphetrish in Tiree. He was appar- 
ently a merchant. He married Marion, daughter 
of John Macquarrie of Ulva. He had at least 
two sons, Neil and Ewen. Neil had a son named 
John. Ewen lived at Balliphetrish. The Ardgour 
MS. refers to him as " a worthy gentleman of the 
family of Boreray." He had two daughters : 
Catherine, who was married to Allan Maclean of 
Grishipol ; and Mary, who was married to Hector 
Maclean, son of John Diurach. 

John, son of Neil, son of Hector of Balliphe- 
trish, was born in Tiree in August, 1707. He 
was an ensign in the Black Watch. He left Scot- 
land on May 20th, 1757, and arrived in America 
on August 14th. He settled at Danbury, 



328 The Clan Gillean. 

Connecticut, and on October 12th, 1759, married 
Deborah, daughter of Samuel Adams, of Fairfield, 
Connecticut. He was a merchant, and prospered 
in his business. He joined the American army in 
the time of the Revolution, and acted as com- 
missary for four or five years. When the British 
were approaching - Danbury in 1777 he knew that 
his wife and children would be safe, but he was 
somewhat anxious about his whiskey. In order to 
preserve it, he put it in jars and hid the jars under 
his barn, and perhaps under the ground. The 
British burnt Danbury, but some of John Maclean's 
whiskey escaped. It seems that the jars were all 
destroyed except one. That lucky jar is still in 
existence ; but to what use it is now put we do not 
know. In 1 Soo lie was one o( the heaviest tax- 
payers, and one of the wealthiest men in Danbury. 
I le died on April 7th, 1805. 

John Maclean and Deborah Adams had nine 
children; Mary, Anne, Deborah, Alexander, Lilly, 
John, Lany, Sally, and Hugh, or Ewen. Anne, 
was married to John Dodd, by whom she had 
Sally, Eliza, James, Frederick, and John. Deb- 
orah was married to Zadoc Starr, by whom she 
had Hugh, Flora, Sally, Amos, George, Clarissa, 
Mary, and Angeline. Lilly was married to Wil- 
liam Chappell, by whom she had Julia, William- 
Ogden, Hannah, Mary, and Eliza. Lany was 
married to Samuel- Henley Philips, by whom she 
had William, Charles, Hannah- Amelia, and 
Thomas-Henley. Sally was married to Philo J. 



The Macleans of Balliphetrish. 329 

Calhoun, by whom she had Nancy, Mary-Jane, 
Philo C.| and Sarah. Hugh died at the age of 
nineteen. 

Alexander, eldest son of John Maclean, was 
born in 1768. He married Laura Warner, by 
whom he had five children, Alexander, Mary, 
Laura, Deborah, and Hugh. Alexander was 
married twice. He had six children by his first 
wife; George, Sarah, Catherine-Amanda, Emiline, 
Julia, and Mary-Ellen ; and two children by his 
second wife, William and John. Hugh, second 
son of Alexander, John's son, settled in Ohio. 
He was married and had nine children. Laura, 
daughter of Alexander, John's son, was married 
to John Hurlburt. Deborah was married to 
Cebra Lake. 

John, second son of John Maclean, was born in 
1773. He married, in 1797, Sally Chappell, by 
whom he had John-Adams and Sally. Sally was 
married to George Wade and had one son and three 
daughters. John- Adams was born in 1798. He 
was a medical doctor, and practised his profession 
at Norwalk, Connecticut, during sixty-three years. 
He married Elizabeth Jarvis, by whom he had 
one son, John-Wilson. He died in March, 1883. 
John-Wilson was like his father a doctor, and also 
lived at Norwalk. He served as a surgeon in the 
Northern army during the Civil War. He married 
Harriet Grumman, by whom he had two sons, 
Charles and Frederick. He died in April, 1897. 



330 The Clan Gillean. 

III. The Macleans of Treshnish. 

Ewen, second Maclean of Ardgour, had five 
sons ; Lachlan, Terlach, Allan, John, and Hector 
of Blaaich. Hector was the ancestor of the 
Macleans of Treshnish and the first Macleans of 
Blaaich. 

I. John, fourth son of Ewen, second of Ardgour, 
was the first Maclean of Treshnish. He was 
known as Iain Ruadh, or John Roy. He was 
appointed hereditary constable of the fortress of 
Cairnburgh. He acted for some time as tutor to 
John Mac Terlach, fourth of Ardgour. He had 
two children, Donald and Marion. Donald suc- 
ceeded his father in Treshnish. Marion was 
married to Lachlan Cattanach of Duart, and had 
at least two sons, Hector Mor and Ailein nan Sop. 

II. Donald of Treshnish died without issue, 
and was succeeded by his cousin-german, Donald 
Dubh, son of Hector of Blaaich. 

III. Donald Dubh was known as Domhnall 
Dubh a Chaisteil, or Black Donald of the Castle. 
He married, first, a daughter of Macmartin of 
Letterfinlay, by whom he had at least one son, 
Ewen. He married, secondly, a daughter of Clan- 
ranald, by whom he had at least three sons, Ewen 
Uaibhreach, John Odhar, and Lachlan Fionn. 
Besides the four sons mentioned he had also Lach- 
lan and Donald, and several daughters. Donald 
Dubh was a bold and rough sort of man, but 
remarkably faithful to his chief. Ewen, his eldest 



The Macleans of Treshnish. 331 

son, succeeded him in Treshnish and in the con- 
stableship of Cairnburg-h. Ewen Uaibhreach, or 
Ewen the Haughty, succeeded him in Blaaich. 
John Odhar held the lands of Achnadale in Loch- 
aber. He was also bailie for Maclean of Duart of 
the lands of Garbhdhabhach. Lachlan Fionn, or 
Lachlan the Fair, was the first Maclean of Hynish 
in Tiree. 

IV. Ewen of Treshnish was an active and 
prosperous man. He loved to distinguish himself 
and make a figure in the world. He married Ann 
Maclean of the family of Lethir, and had seven 
sons by her; Hector, Lachlan, Allan, John, Donald, 
Charles, and Archibald. He was buried in Icolm- 
kill. Hector, his eldest son, succeeded him 
in Treshnish. Lachlan was an intelligent and 
prudent man, and acted for some time as bailie for 
Lachlan Og Maclean of Torloisk. Allan was a 
prominent warrior. He was killed in a skirmish 
with the Macdonalds at Sron-na-Cranalaich, near 
Lecklee. He was buried in Icolmkill. 

V. Hector of Treshnish was an active man 
and a good manager. He was very well off. He 
is described in 1579 as Hector Mac Ewen Vic 
Donald Dow, captain of Cairnburgh. He ob- 
tained from Hector Og of Duart a charter of 
the lands of Treshnish, the half of the island of 
Gometra, and Gott, Vaal, and Hynish in Tiree. 
He married, first, Ann, daughter of Macquarrie of 
Ulva, and, secondly, Flora, daughter of Macneil of 
Barra. He had four sons; Donald, John, Neil, 



332 The Clan Gillean. 

and Charles. Donald was by the first wife. He 
was a hostage in the hands of Angus Macdonald 
of Islay in 1587. He died shortly afterwards. 
Hector was succeeded by his second son, John. 

VI. John of Treshnish married Margaret, 
daughter of Charles, son of Allan Og y son of 
Hector, son of Ailein nan Sop. He had a natural 
son, who was known as Iain a Ghanbhair. He had 
three sons by his wife ; Ewen, Lachlan, and John 
Og. He was succeeded by his son Ewen. 

VII. Ewen was a born warrior. Owing to a 
misunderstanding with his chief, he went to France 
about the year 1632. He spent ten years as a 
captain in the French service. He returned to 
Mull about 1642, and, having become reconciled 
to his chief, was sent to Ireland to command a 
company of Macleans in Sir Duncan Campbell's 
regiment. He returned to Scotland about twenty 
days before the battle of Inverlochy. He was 
present at that battle, and saved the life of an old 
companion, Campbell of Skipness, who was then 
fighting against him. Skipness was severely 
wounded. Ewen brought him to Cairnburgh, and 
thence went home with him to Skipness. He 
returned immediately to Montrose's army. He was 
a captain under his chief, Sir Lachlan of Duart. 
He was a great favourite with Montrose. While 
the latter, shortly after the battle of Alford, was 
marching towards Auchterader, he was annoyed 
by 300 horse sent in pursuit of him, under Sir 
Jcftn Urry. He ordered Ewen of Treshnish to 



The Macleans of Treshnish. 333 

select twenty good marksmen and check the 
cavalry. Ewen made his selection from the Mac- 
leans and the Camerons and placed his men behind 
rocks and bushes. They shot a number of their 
pursuers, and Urry deemed it prudent to retreat. 
Ewen was severely wounded at the battle of 
Inverkeithing, and died shortly afterwards. 

Ewen of Treshnish married Catherine, daughter 
of Allan Maclean of Achnasaul, and had three 
sons by her. He was succeeded by Hector, the 
eldest of his sons. 

VIII. Hector married Margaret, daughter of 
John Garbh, son of John Dubh of Morvern, and 
had one son by her, Ewen, his successor. He died 
in 1693. 

IX. Ewen of Treshnish had two natural sons, 
John and Lachlan. He married Margaret, daugh- 
ter of Neil Maclean of Drimnacross, and had by 
her two sons, Hector and John. 

John, the eldest son of Ewen, was born about 
the year 1680. He became minister of Kilninian 
and Kilmore in Mull in 1702. He was a man of 
high character and a faithful minister. He went 
regularly through his parish, catechising and in- 
structing his people. He married Isabel, daughter 
of Charles Mac Neil Ban, by whom he had four 
children ; Alexander, Ann, Mary, and Catherine. 
Alexander succeeded his father as minister of 
Kilninian. Ann was married, first, to John, son 
of Allan Maclean of Grishipol ; and, secondly, 
to Hugh, son of Hector Maclean of Kilmorie. 



334 The Clan Gillean. 

Mary was married to Alexander, son of Donald 
Maclean of Calgary. Catherine was married to 
John, son of Archibald Og Maclean of Heisker. 
The Rev. John Maclean was an excellent poet. 
He died on March 12th, 1756. He was buried 
with his father at Kilninian. Alexander, son of 
the Rev. John Maclean, was born in 1722. He 
was licensed to preach in 1745, and became min- 
ister of Kilninian and Kilmore in 1750. He 
married, in 1750, Christy, daughter of Donald 
Maclean of Torloisk, by whom he had John, 
Donald, Lachlan, and two daughters. John was 
a captain In the American War, and was drowned 
near Halifax. Lachlan was a major-general in 
the arm}'. He died in Halifax, Nova Scotia. 
Lachlan, second son of Ewen of Treshnish, mar- 
ried Jean, daughter of Donald Maclean of Calgary, 
by whom he had one son and several daughters. 
His only son was drowned while on his passage 
from Mull to Glasgow. Hector, third son of Ewen 
of Treshnish, was born in 1696. He became minis- 
ter of Coll in 1733. He received a visit from Dr. 
Johnson in 1773. He married Janet, daughter of 
Hector Maclean, tacksman of Knock in Coll, by 
whom he had three children; Allan, Florence, and 
Margaret. Allan was a lieutenant in the army, 
and was lost at sea on his passage from New York 
to Scotland. Florence was married to Captain 
Lachlan Maclean, of the Coll family, and Mar- 
garet, to Alexander Maclean of Mingary. The 
Rev. Hector Maclean died in April, 1775. John, 



The First Macleans of Blaaich. 335 

fourth son of Ewen of Treshnish, succeeded his 
father. 

X. John of Treshnish married Mary, daughter 
of Charles Mac Neil Ban, by whom he had Hugh, 
or Ewen, and several daughters. He was dispos- 
sessed of his estate by the managers of the Duke 
of Argyll, in 1738. 

Treshnish was in possession of the Macleans for 
nearly three hundred years. Ewen, fourth of 
Treshnish, obtained a charter of his lands from 
Lachlan Mor of Duart. The charter was renewed 
by Hector Og, Lachlan Mor's son, the witnesses 
being Roderick Macleod of Harris and Roderick 
Macneil of Barra. When Ewen, seventh of 
Treshnish, was in France, his brother Lachlan 
gave the charter to Sir Lachlan of Duart for safe 
keeping. It was lost along with other papers 
which were in Sir Lachlan's possession. Owing 
to this loss, it was an easy matter for the Duke 
of Argyll to make himself the legal owner of 
Treshnish. 

XI. Hugh, eleventh representative of the Mac- 
leans of Treshnish, was a lawyer by profession. 
He married Barbara, youngest daughter of the 
Rev. Archibald Maclean of Kilfinichen, and had 
by her five sons and two daughters. 

The First Macleans of Blaaich. 

I. Hector, fifth son of Ewen, second Maclean 
of Ardgour, was the first Maclean of Blaaich. 
He had three sons : Donald Dubh ; Ewen, first 



336 The Clan Gillean. 

Maclean of Cornaig in Tiree ; and Hector Odhar. 
According to the Ardgour MS. the descendants of 
Hector Odhar, Sliochd Eachainn Uidhir, were 
scattered over Mull and Tiree. 

II. Donald Dubh, second of Blaaich and third 
of Treshnish, had six sons ; Ewen of Treshnish, 
Ewen Uaibhreach of Blaaich, John Odhar of 
Achnadale, Lachlan Fionn of Hynish, Lachlan, 
and Donald. 

III. Ewen Uaibhreach was succeeded in Blaaich 
by his son, Hector. 

IV. Hector was succeeded by his son, Ewen. 

V. Ewen, son of Hector, was the next Maclean 
of Blaaich. 

VI. Hector, son of Ewen, was served heir to 
his father in 1615. 

The Macleans of Achnadale. 
John Odhar, third son of Donald Dubh of 
Treshnish, was the first Maclean of Achnadale. 
According to the Ardgour MS. the Macleans of 
11 Keppernack " belonged to the Achnadale family. 
The first Maclean of Kepparnach had three sons, 
Alexander, William, and Lachlan. Alexander 
was a major in the army. He was killed in Ger- 
many in the year 1762. He was the subject of 
a very beautiful elegy by Rob Donn Mackay, 
or Calder, the celebrated Sutherlandshire bard. 
William was a lieutenant in Colonel Montgomerie's 
Highland regiment. Lachlan was a merchant in 
Barbadoes. 



The Macleans of Hynish. 337 

The Macleans of Hynish. 

I. Lachlan Fionn, fourth son of Donald Dubh 
of Treshnish, was the first Maclean of Hynish 
in Tiree. He was a bold, active, and resolute 
man, and accumulated a good deal of wealth. He 
had nine sons, all of whom lived in Tiree. 

II. Ewen, son of Lachlan Fionn, had a son 
named John. 

III. John had a son named Donald. 

IV. Donald, who was known as Donald Og, 
had two sons, Lachlan and Allan. Allan was the 
father of Charles, father of Donald Roy. 

V. Lachlan, son of Donald Og, had a son 
named Charles. 

VI. Charles, son of Lachlan, had three children; 
Lachlan, John, and Mary. 

1. Lachlan had two sons, Charles and Archi- 
bald. Charles, the elder son of Lachlan Mac Ter- 
lach, had a son named Donald. Donald married 
Mary, daughter of Alexander Macfadyen, Alasdair 
Mac Neill Mhic Dhomhnaill Mhic Dhughaill, and 
had by her Charles and Archibald. Archibald, 
second son of Lachlan Mac Terlach, was known as 
Gilleasbuig Laidir, or Strong Archibald. He was 
a poet of fair ability. He married Flora Maclean, 
by whom he had John, Archibald, Alexander, 
James, and Hector. He died at Kilmoluaig. 

2. John, second son of Charles, lived at Hodh 
in Tiree. He was drowned near Mull at an 
early age. He was married and left one child, 



33% The Clan Gillean. 

Allan. Allan settled at Cnoc Mhic Dhughaill in 
Caolas, Tiree. He married Margaret, daughter 
of Neil Macfadyen, Niall Mac Dhomhnaill Mhic 
Dhughaill, and had by her, Donald, Charles, John, 
Neil, and Mary. i. Donald, Domhnall Ciibair, 
or Donald the Cooper, settled at Bailephuill in 
Tiree. He married Mary Macdonald, by whom 
he had Margaret, Mary, Marion, Catherine, Ann, 
Christy, Archibald, and John. Archibald died 
young. John succeeded his father in Bailephuill. 
He married Mary Sinclair, by whom he had Isabel, 
Mary, Catherine, Christy, Archibald, Dugald, 
and Donald. Margaret, the eldest of Domhnall 
Cubair's family, was married to Neil Brown. Mary 
was married to Donald Maceachern ; Catherine, 
to Colin Macmillan; and Christy, to John Macleod. 
Ann died unmarried. 2. Charles, second son of 
Allan, married Mary Lamont, by whom he had 
one son, Allan. He died in his boat at Tobermory 
about 181 1. Allan, his son, married Mary Cameron 
and had two sons and a daughter. 3. John, third 
son of Allan, came to America. 4. Neil, fourth 
son of Allan, succeeded his father at Caolas. He 
married Marion Macdonald, by whom he had nine 
children; Margaret, Ann, Neil Og, Charles, Isabel, 
Catherine, Flora, Mary, and James. He died about 
1847. Neil Og succeeded his father at Caolas. 
He married Flora Macfadyen, by whom he had 
five children; Christy, Neil, Mary-Ann, Alexander, 
and Marion. Charles, second son of Neil, married 
Ann Brown, by whom he had seven children; John, 



The Macleans of Glenbard. 339 

Christy, Marion, Johanna, Catherine, Neil, and 
Hector. James, third son of Neil, lives in Glas- 
gow, and is married. Margaret, eldest daughter of 
Neil, was married, in 1844, to Archibald Macdonald 
in Caolas. Ann was married to Lachlan Maclaine 
in Caolas. Neil Maclaine, vice-president of the 
Maclean Association, Glasgow, is her son. Isabel 
was married to Dugald Maclellan from Islay. 
Mary was married to Lachlan Maclean. 5. Mary, 
only daughter of Allan Maclean, was married to 
Roderick Macdonald in Caolas, and had by her 
eleven children; Allan, Lachlan, John, Alexander, 
Marion, Charles, Catherine, Margaret, Isabel, 
Duncan, and Lachlan. Roderick Macdonald died 
in 1883 at the advanced age of 103 years. He 
was a very kind and pleasant man. He visited 
Iona with us in August, 1869. 

The Macleans of Glenbard. 

John, third son of Allan Maclean — Ailein Mac 
Iain mhic Thearlaich mhic Lachain mhic Dhomh- 
naill Oig mhic Iain mhic Eoghain mhic Lachainn 
Fhinn— was born at Cnoc Mhic Dhughaill in 
Caolas, Tiree, on January 8th, 1787. He mar- 
ried in Glasgow, on July 19th, 1808, Isabel, 
daughter of Duncan Black in Lismore. He 
published his own poems, and some poems by 
other Gaelic bards, in 1818. He came to Nova 
Scotia in 1819, and settled at Bail'-a-Chnoic in 
Barney's River, Pictou County. He removed to 
Glenbard in Antigonish County in 1831. He 



34-0 The Clan Gillean. 

died on January 26th, 1848. He was known in 
Scotland as Bard Thighearna Chola, or the Laird 
of Coil's Poet, and in America as Am Bard Mac- 
Gilleain, or the Bard Maclean. His poems were 
published in Clarsach na Coille in 1881. His wife 
died in 1877. He had an intimate acquaintance 
with the poetry, legends, and history of the 
Macleans. 

John Maclean and Isabel Black had six children; 
Christy, Charles, Archibald, John, Allan, and Eliza- 
beth. Charles was born in Tiree in 1813. He 
succeeded his father in Glenbard, and died in 1880. 
He was never married. Archibald married Cath- 
erine Macphie, by whom he had three children; 
Isabel, Mary, and Christy-Ann. He was born in 
Tiree in 1815, and died on January 26th, 1899. 
He was with his father when the latter died. He 
died himself precisely fifty-one years afterwards. 
John, the poet's third son, was born at Bail'-a- 
Chnoic, or Balknock, in 1820. He married Mar- 
garet Robertson, by whom he had John, Alexander, 
Duncan, Isabel, Allan-Robert, Annie, Christy, and 
Charles-Sinclair. He succeeded his brother in 
Glenbard. He died on May 15th, 1897, and was 
succeeded in Glenbard by his second son, Alexander. 
Allan, the poet's fourth son, was born at Balknock 
in 1822. He married Rebecca Maclaughlan, 
by whom he had seven children ; Rebecca, John, 
William, Charles, Anthony, Jane, and Isabel. He 
died in 1871. Christy, the eldest of the poet's 
family, was born in Tiree on December 25th, 1809. 



The Macleans of Inverscadale. 341 

She was married, as his second wife, in 1839, to 
John Sinclair from Strath-Halladale in Suther- 
landshire, and had by him one child, Alexander- 
Maclean. She died on March 7th, 1887. Eliza- 
beth, the youngest of the poet's family, was born 
at Balknock in 1826. She lives in Glenbard. 

The Macleans of Inverscadale. 

The Macleans of Inverscadale are descended 
from Charles, third lawful son of Allan, fifth 
Maclean of Ardgour. 

I. Charles was tutor of Ardgour for some time. 
He is referred to as such in public documents in 
1592 and 1601. He succeeded, through the in- 
fluence of Hector Og of Duart, in procuring a 
hereditary right to the lands of Inverscadale, 
Arighoulan, Achaphubuill, and others. He married 
Marion, daughter of Hector Og of Duart, and 
relict of Hector Roy of Coll, and had two sons, 
Allan and Ewen. Allan succeeded his father in 
Inverscadale. Ewen, known as Ewen Dubh, 
obtained from his father a charter of Arighoulan 
and other lands. 

II. Allan of Inverscadale was succeeded by his 
son, Ewen. 

III. Ewen was succeeded by his son, Allan. 

IV. Allan had two sons, Charles and Allan. 
Charles succeeded his father. Allan settled in 
Killean in Mull. He married Margaret, daughter 
of Lachlan Og y seventh son of Allan, seventh of 
Ardgour ; and had two sons by her. Lachlan, the 



34 2 The Clan Gillean. 

elder of the two, lived in Dublin. He was captain 
of a ship, and was in comfortable circumstances. 
He was shipwrecked on the south-west coast of 
Ireland. He got ashore, with most of his men, in 
the long-boat ; but was murdered by the inhabit- 
ants, who carried off all the plunder which they 
could obtain. 

V. Charles of Inverscadale was known as 
Tearlach Og. By his first wife, a daughter of 
Donald Cameron of Glendessary, he had Allan, 
his successor. By his second wife, a daughter of 
Archibald Maclean of Ardtun, he had John and 
others. John was known as Iain Mac Thearlaich 
(Dig. He was a well-informed man and full of 
humour. He was the author of some excellent 
comic songs. He lived at Sorn in Mull. He 
married Mary, daughter of Allan, tenth of Ard- 
gour, by whom he had two children, John and 
Florence. The latter was married to John Maclean 
of Kilmoluaig. 

John, son of Iain Mac Thearlaich Oig, went to 
Jamaica in 1760 to obtain possession of an estate 
which had been left to him by the son of a paternal 
uncle. After his return he married Sibella, second 
daughter of Sir Allan Maclean of Brolas, and 
had two children by her, Allan and Mary-Ann. 
Allan was a captain in the 60th regiment, and 
died in the West Indies. Mary-Ann was married 
to Dr. Mackenzie Grieve. 

VI. Allan of Inverscadale married Marjory, 
daughter of Allan Mac Ian Diurach, of the 



The Later Macleans of Blaaich. 343 

family of Torloisk, and had issue by her. He 
sold the reversion of the lands of Inverscadale to 
the Camerons, from whom they were purchased by 
Alexander, thirteenth of Ardgour. 

The Later Macleans of Blaaich. 
The later Macleans of Blaaich are descended 
from Lachlan, second son of John Criibach of 
Ardgour. He seems to have been succeeded in 
Blaaich by his son, Allan. In March, 1758, we 
find William Maclean, lately a journeyman barber 
in Edinburgh, returned heir general to his grand- 
father, Allan Maclean of Blaaich. 

Major-General Francis Maclean. 
William Maclean, of the Ardgour family, was 
born in Mull, about 1660. He was an accomplished 
musician, and was appointed by James, Duke of 
York, master of the revels for Scotland. He had 
a son named William, who was a captain under the 
Duke of Marlborough. Captain William married 
a daughter of Sir Francis Kinloch, by whom he 
had two sons, Francis and James. The latter died 
in the West Indies in 1748. Francis entered the 
army, in the regiment in which his father served, 
at a very early age. He was a lieutenant in the 
Scottish brigade at the capture of Bergen-op-zoom 
in 1747. Allan, son of Maclean of Torloisk, was 
also a lieutenant in that brigade. Both were taken 
prisoners. When carried before General Lowen- 
dahl, that distinguished commander addressed 



344 The Clan Gillean. 

them as follows: — "Gentlemen, consider your- 
selves on parole. If all had conducted themselves 
as you and your brave corps have done, I should 
not now be master of Bergen-op-zoom." Francis 

was appointed senior captain in the 2d battalion 

of the Black Watch in July, 1758. He was a 

lieutenant -colonel in 1702, and was in that year 
sent tO Portugal tO assist the Portuguese in their 
war with Spain. He was governor of Almeida 
for several years, and afterwards commander of the 
troops in Bstramadura and Lisbon. He returned 
from Portugal in 177 s , and was immediately sent 

to Nova Scotia to take charge of the forces in that 
province. He landed in Halifax on the 14th of 
August 1 le w.ts accompanied by three regiments, 

one of them being the 74th, or Arg\ le 1 I ighlandcrs. 
In June, 177c), he went to Penobscot in Maine 
with 700 men, and began at once to erect a fort. 
Before he had Completed his defences, a New 

England Reel arrived from Boston, having on 

board 2,500 men, under the command o\ General 
Lovell. The New Englanders landed on the 
25th ot July and began to lay siege, to the newly 
erected fort. On the 13th o( August Sir George 

Collier Came to its relief with a fleet, attacked the 
besiegers, and destroyed their ships and transports. 
General Maclean received high praise for his 
gallant defence o( Penobscot. He strengthened 
the fort, and placed it in charge o( Lieutenant- 
Colonel Alexander Campbell of Menzie, with 600 
men of the Argyle Highlanders. He returned to 



Major-General Francis Maclean. 345 

Halifax on November 23d. He died on May 4th, 
1 78 1, and was buried on the morning of May 
9th in the vault of St. Paul's Church, Halifax. 
He was a major-general, and in the sixty-fourth 
year o( his age. 

According to the Ardgour MS., General Francis 
Maclean was descended from Hector Odhar, third 
son of Hector, the first of the earlier Macleans of 
Blaaich. According to Seannachie's History, the 
General's grandfather, William Maclean, master of 
the revels, was a grandson of Lachlan, progenitor 
of the later Macleans of Blaaich. 



CHAPTER XIV. 
^Ehc ^Descendants of ileil of Xchir. 

I. The Macleans of Lehir. 

I. Neil, second son of Lachlan Bronnach of 
Duart, was the progenitor of the Macleans of 
Lehir, Ross, and Shuna. He was born probably 
about the year 1418. He received from his father 
the sixty marklands of Lehir in fee simple, to 
compensate him for the loss of Duart and the 
chiefship. His place of residence was called Baile 
Neill, Balneil, or Neil's Town. His estate was 
known as Leithir Baile Neill, or Lehir of Balneil. 
In course of time the name Baile Neill was changed 
to Torloisg, or Torloisgte, in English, Torloisk. 
The name of the estate was then changed to 
Leithir Thorloisg, or Lehir of Torloisk. Neil of 
Lehir was succeeded by his son, Neil. 

II. Neil, second laird of Lehir, fought under 
Hector Odhar at the battle of Bloody Bay in 1484. 
Owing to the number of thumbs which he cut off 
as his opponents were trying to board his galley, 



The Macleans of Langamull. 347 

he was afterwards known as Niall nan Ordag, or 
Neil of the thumbs. He was succeeded by his 
son, John. 

III. John, third laird of Lehir, seems to have 
been known as John Dubh, and to have married a 
daughter of Malcolm Macneill of Gigha. He had 
apparently three sons, John Og, Malcolm, and 
Neil. 

IV. John Og was slain by Ailein nan Sop about 
the year 1540. Allan seized the estate and kept 
possession of it. It was never given back to the 
lawful heirs. 

The Macleans of Langamull. 

Neil Maclean, son of Malcolm, Niall Mac Gille- 
chaluim, was captain of Aros in 1592, and had a 
son named Malcolm. Hugh Maclean, Eoghan 
Mac Eachainn Mhic Eoghain Mhic Gillechaluim, 
was the representative of the Macleans of Lehir 
in 1762. Malcolm, his great-grandfather, was 
probably a grandson of Malcolm, son of the cap- 
tain of Aros. At the same time all that we really 
know about his pedigree is that he was the son 
of Hector, son of Ewen, son of Malcolm. He 
married a daughter of Captain Allan Maclean. 
Lieutenant Hugh Maclean, of the Dutch service, 
was tenant of Langamull in 1762. He married 
Ann, daughter of the Rev. Archibald Maclean, 
minister of Ross and Brolas. He had at least two 
children, Lachlan and Archibald, who died young. 
His wife died in 1772. He died himself about 



348 The Clan Gillean. 

1775. In what relationship he stood to Hugh 
Maclean, the representative of the Lehir family in 
1762, we do not know. 

John Maclean of Langamull was known as Iain 
Mac Eoghain. As his father's name was Hugh, 
and as he succeeded Lieutenant Hugh in Langa- 
mull, the probability is that he was the son and 
heir of the latter. He may, however, have been 
a son of Hugh, the son of Hector, son of Ewen, 
son of Malcolm. He was, at all events, the ac- 
knowledged representative of the Macleans of 
Lehir. He was an intelligent man, an elder in the 
Church of Scotland, an ardent Jacobite, an excel- 
lent swordsman, and a composer and singer of 
Gaelic songs. He married Mary, daughter of 
Donald, son of Eachann Mac Iain Diuraich, and 
had by her nine children ; Donald, Hugh, Alex- 
ander, Lachlan, Mary, Ann, Christy, Flora, and 
Margaret. Donald was a major in the Royal 
Scots. Donald married Catherine, daughter of 
Dr. Alexander Maclean of Pennycross. He died 
without issue in 1819. Hugh was a lieutenant 
in the 90th regiment, and died at Portsmouth. 
Alexander was a doctor, and died in India in 1821. 
Lachlan died young. Mary was married to Allan 
Maclean of Crossapol ; Ann, to John Maclean of 
Tirouran ; Christy, to Alexander Maclean of 
Kinnegharar ; Flora, to Peter Macarthur ; and 
Margaret, to Lieutenant Fraser. John of Langa- 
mull was drowned in February, 18 10. His wife 
died in December, 181 1. 



Lachlan Odhar of Airdchraoishnish. 349 

II. The Macleans of Ross. 

The Macleans of Ross were descended from Neil 
of Ross, and were known as Sliochd a Chlaidhibh 
Iarainn, or the race of the iron sword. They were 
remarkably brave and warlike. 

Neil of Ross was a great-grandson of Neil of 
Lehir, or Neil Mac Lachlan Bronnach, Niall Mac 
Lachainn Bhronnaich. He was probably the third 
son of John, third laird of Lehir. He settled in 
Ross some time after 1540. He had two sons, 
Donald and John Mor. Donald had at least 
three sons ; Lachlan Odhar of Airdchraoishnish, 
Ewen of Ormsaig, and John Odhar. 

1. Lachlan Odhar of Airdchraoishnish. 

Lachlan Odhar was a distinguished warrior. 
He fought at the battle of Glenlivet in 1594, and 
at the battle of Benvigory in 1598. We find 
him described in 1616, as Lachlan Mac Donald 
Vic Neil, Lachainn Mac Dhomhnaill mhic Neill. 
He lived at Airdchraoishnish in Mull. He was 
married and had a large family. It is said that 
five of his sons, Murdoch, Allan, Lachlan, Ewen, 
and John, were killed at Inverkeithing. 

Tradition tells us that Allan Mac Eachann and 
Lachlan Odhar performed the horrible rite known 
as Taghairm nan Cat, or the invocation of the cats. 
They collected a number of cats and took them 
with them to a barn at Pennygoun in Mull. They 
began their invocation at the middle of the night 



350 The Clan Gillean. 

between Friday and Saturday and continued it for 
four days, without tasting any food. Allan was 
the elder of the two, and acted as high priest. He 
stood at the door with a drawn sword, and gave 
the necessary directions. Lachlan's work consisted 
in putting a live cat on a spit, and roasting him to 
death before a huge peat fire. In the course of a 
day or two a black cat appeared and said to him, 
A Lachainn Uidhir mhic Dhomhnaill mhic Neill 
is olc an diol sin air cait, Lachlan Odhar, son of 
Donald, son of Neil, that is a bad treatment of 
cats. Allan at once shouted to Lachlan, Ge b' e 
chi no chluinneas tu cum an cat mu'n cuairt, 
whatever you see or hear keep the cat turning. 
As Lachlan took the advice given him, he had a 
large number of black cats before him in a short 
time. They joined their yells to those of the cat 
on the spit, and thus tried to frighten him and 
make him give up his work. They did not enter 
by the door, which was guarded by Allan. It is 
evident, then, that they were not real cats ; they 
were demons in the guise of cats. On the fourth 
day Cluas Mh6r, or Big Ear, made his appearance. 
He was a cat of enormous size, and was black like 
all the other cats that came in. There was now 
a cat at the foot of each of the rafters of the barn. 
Cluas Mhor threatened the performers with the 
severest punishment, but they paid no attention to 
him. Indeed they threatened to take hold of Cluas 
Mhor himself and put him on the spit. When 
Cluas Mhor saw their determination, he agreed 



Lachlan Odhar of Airdchraoishnish. 351 

to grant them their petitions. Allan asked for 
wealth ; Lachlan asked for wealth and progeny ; 
each of them received a promise of getting what 
he desired. It is said that the yells of the cat were 
at one time so terrific that they were heard distinctly 
in Morvern. 

The word taghairm is derived from to-ghairm, 
and means a calling to, or invocation. The Irish 
form of it, which is the oldest, is toghairm. It 
was really a sacrifice to the devil, in order to bring 
him before one in a visible form. The purpose for 
which he was wanted was to get certain worldly 
benefits from him. 

There is no ground for the supposition that 
Allan Mac Hector and Lachlan Odhar ever offered 
cats in sacrifice, or ever petitioned the evil one for 
blessings. It is certain that they never heard a cat 
talk. It is equally certain that they never saw 
demons in the shape of black cats. Allan Mac 
Eachann was evidently Allan Og, son of Hector, 
son of Ailein nan Sop. The Macleans in general 
looked upon him as an extremely wicked man, 
and were ready to believe any bad story about 
him. He seems to have lived among the Macleans 
of Lochbuie. We suspect that Lachlan Odhar 
and himself were not intimate friends. The prob- 
ability is that they were enemies. They were both 
men of undoubted courage, and were probably the 
most daring fighters among the Macleans in the 
year 1600. 



35 2 The Clan Gillean. 

The Macleans of Monachuich. 

Captain Allan Maclean of the 90th regiment 
was descended from Lachlan Odhar, and according 
to some persons, his actual representative. Captain 
Allan, resided at Monachuich, or the Cuckoo's 
Moor, which is half-way between Ardfinaig and 
the Sound of Iona. He seems to have been living 
in 1838. Donald Roy, who was either a brother 
or a son of Captain Allan, had two sons, Donald 
Ban and Hector. The latter entered the army as 
a private and became an officer. He died unmar- 
ried. Donald Ban settled in Glasgow and engaged 
in business as a tailor and clothier. He left a son 
who was also known as Donald Ban. This Don- 
ald Ban was a law clerk in Glasgow. He died at 
Partick about the year 1868. He was the last of 
the Monachuich family in the male line. 

Lachlan Ban of Bunessan. 

Lachlan Ban Maclean was a descendant of 
Lachainn Odhar. He lived at Bunessan in Mull, 
and was known as Lachainn Ban Bhuneasain, or 
Lachlan Ban of Bunessan. He kept the inn at 
Bunessan, and was at one time in very comfortable 
circumstances. He married Mary, daughter of 
Hector Maclean of Torren, by whom he had eight 
children ; John, Hector, Allan, Charles, Sibella, 
Mary, Catherine, and Isabel. John, his eldest son, 
was for some time a dry-salter in Glasgow. He 
left Glasgow and took charge of the inn which 



Lachlan Ban of Bunessan. 353 

had been kept by his father. He died unmarried 
about 1848. Hector, second son of Lachlan Ban, 
was a captain in the 93d regiment. He married 
Ann, third daughter of the Rev. Neil Macleod 
of Kilfinichen in Mull, and had by her three 
children; Margaret- Burnett, Lachlan- Allan, and 
Mary-Sibella. After retiring from the army, 
Captain Maclean took up his residence at Carsaig 
in Mull. He removed to Campbellton about 183 1. 
Margaret, his elder daughter, was married to 
George Grierson, teacher at Aberfeldy, and had 
six children. Mary-Sibella, his younger daughter, 
was born at Carsaig in November, 1821. She 
was married in August, 1851, to the Rev. Duncan 
B. Blair, D. D., minister of Barney's River and 
Blue Mountain in Pictou County, Nova Scotia, 
She had five children ; Ewen, Thomas, Margaret, 
Lachlan, and John. She died on the 6th of June, 
1882. She was a pious and friendly woman. Her 
husband died on June 4th, 1893. Dr. Blair was 
an excellent Gaelic scholar, and a good poet. 
Allan, third son of Lachlan Ban, was a lieutenant 
in the 91st regiment. Charles, the fourth son, 
was a surgeon in the army. He was for some 
time inspector -general of hospitals. He died in 
Ireland. He was married, but had no issue. 

Lachlan-Allan, son of Hector, son of Lachlan 
Ban Maclean of Bunessan, came to America in 
1842. He landed in New York, and went thence 
to Missouri. He fought in the United States 
army during the Mexican War. After the war he 



354 The Clan Gillean. 

settled at Lexington, Missouri, as a surveyor. He 
fought in the Confederate army in the war between 
the Northern and Southern States. He was a cap- 
tain under Major-General Sterling Price in July, 
1862, and a major from October of that year to 
March, 1864. He was afterwards for a few months 
a major under Brigadier-General T. F. Drayton. 
On December 23d, 1864, he was stabbed and 
killed in his office at Lexington, Missouri, by 
Lieutenant-Colonel R. C. Wood. 

Major Maclean married Eliza, daughter of 
Colonel Robert N. Smith, of Missouri, by whom 
he had one son, Nelson-Robert. Nelson was 
living in 1883 on a farm near Ellsworth in Kansas. 
He was married, and had one child, a daughter 
named Hope. 

2. EWEN OF ORMSAIG. 

Ewen, second son of Donald of Ross, had two 
sons, Allan and Hector. Allan is described in 
June, 1618, as " Allane McEwne in Ormesag." 
Allan had a grandson named Charles. Charles 
had a son named Donald. John, son of Donald, 
was known as Iain Mac Dhomhnaill mhic 
Thearlaich. He was born in 1724. He was a 
doctor, and lived in Brolas. He married Christina, 
daughter of Captain Allan Maclean, son of Lach- 
lan, second of Brolas. He had three children by 
his wife; Allan, Donald, and Marion. He died in 
March, 1808. His wife was born in 17 18, and 
also died in March, 1808. Dr. Maclean was 



The Macleans of Killean. 355 

eighty-four years of age and his wife ninety. 
They were buried at Kilpatrick in Brolas. Donald, 
their younger son, was a lieutenant in the Cameron 
Highlanders. He died without issue about 1799. 

Allan, elder son of Dr. Maclean, followed his 
father's profession. He was in 1800 lieutenant 
and surgeon in the 4th Fencible Infantry. He 
served for several years as surgeon in the Cameron 
Highlanders. On leaving the army he settled in 
Brolas. He was a very popular man. He is de- 
scribed in a well-known song as doctair ruadh 
nam blath shuilean, or the red-haired doctor of 
the warm eyes. He married, when well advanced 
in years, Flora, daughter of Murdoch Maclaine 
of Lochbuie, a girl of about seventeen years of 
age, and had a large family by her. He died in 
October, 1827. 

According to the inscription on the tombstone 
of Dr. John Maclean, he was "the eighth lineal 
descendant and the legal representative of Neil 
Maclean of Ross." It is apparently true enough 
that the doctor was the eighth lineal descendant of 
Neil of Ross. It does not follow, however, that 
he was the representative of the Macleans of Ross. 
He was simply the representative of Ewen, second 
son of Donald, son of Neil of Ross. 

The Macleans of Killean. 

Hector, second son of Ewen of Ormsaig, had a 
son named John, who had a son named Donald. 
Donald lived in Killean. He married Mary, 



356 The Clan Gillean. 

daughter of Charles Maclean, son of John Garbh 
of Bunessan, and had by her John and others. 
John, second of Killean, married Catherine, 
daughter of Hector Maclean of Kilmory, and had 
by her five sons ; Donald, Hector, Neil, John, and 
Lachlan. He was living in 1760. Donald, his 
eldest son, served as a volunteer in Majoribank's 
regiment, and died in Holland. Hector succeeded 
his father in Killean. Neil was a lieutenant in 
Lacell's regiment. John was an ensign in the old 
84th. Lachlan followed the sea. 

Hector of Killean was a lieutenant in the 
army. He married Janet, second daughter of 
Alexander Maclean of Shuna, by whom he had nine 
children ; Donald, Dugald, Neil, John, Catherine, 
Jessie, Jane, Eleanor, and Anne. Neil, the third 
son, was lieutenant of the Leda frigate, and was a 
brave and skilful officer. On Sunday night, July 
29th, 1804, he attempted, with the boats of the 
Leda, to cut out one of the French gunboats under 
Portel, near Boulogne. He got on board the 
gunboat with his men, killed the Frenchmen, 
about fifty in number, and took their vessel in 
tow. The tide having set in to the eastward, the 
Britons drifted down upon a brig full of soldiers. 
They boarded the brig in the face of a destructive 
fire, slew a number of the soldiers, but were finally 
overcome. When last seen, Lieutenant Maclean 
had his back against the mainmast of the brig. 
Though there were several bayonets in his body, 
he was cutting away with his sabre, and calling 



The Macleans of Killean. 357 

out "Victory," which was the rallying- word of 
his men. The captain of the forecastle killed 
upwards of seven Frenchmen before he fell. The 
men who boarded the brig were all slain, except 
fourteen, most of whom had been thrown over- 
board. A few weeks before he was killed at 
Boulogne the gallant Neil married Ann, daughter 
of Donald Maclean of Muck. He had no issue. 
John, fourth son of Hector of Killean, was an 
ensign in the 6th West India regiment, and was 
killed in action. 

Donald, eldest son of Hector of Killean, was a 
lieutenant in the 74th regiment, or Argyle High- 
landers. He came with his regiment to Halifax, 
Nova Scotia, in 1778, and was with it at Penobscot 
from 1779 to 1783, in which year the regiment was 
reduced. He retired on half pay. He received 
a grant of land from the Government in New 
Brunswick. He lost his house by fire and left 
New Brunswick. He spent several years in 
Danville, Vermont. He removed from the United 
States to Canada when the War of 18 12 broke out. 
He received a grant of 2,600 acres on the St. 
Francis River, Quebec, and settled on it. The 
place in which he lived is now known as Maclean's 
Ferry. He married Susan Haney, daughter of a 
sea-captain in Castine, Maine, and had by her 
nine children ; Catherine, Susan, Janet, Hector, 
Archibald, Eleanor, Betsey, Margaret, and John. 
He died in 1825. His wife was born in 1760. 
The Government granted her, in 1830, a pension of 



358 The Clan Gillean. 

forty pounds a year. She died on May 19th, 1868, 
at the great age of 108 years and five months. 
Hector, eldest son of Lieutenant Maclean, married 
Lucretia Elkins, by whom he had John, Hector, 
Susanna, Catherine, Helen-Lucretia, and Samuel. 
Helen-Lucretia was married to Colonel Kimball, 
and resides in Washington. Archibald, second son 
of Lieutenant Maclean, married Hannah Lyster, 
and had by her, Donald, Archibald, Margaret, 
John, Alexander, Margaret - Reef, Susanna, 
Benjamin, and Elizabeth. John, third son of 
Lieutenant Maclean, was born in 1804. He ran 
the Maclean Ferry on the St. Francis River about 
sixty years. He married Deborah Harris, by 
whom he had Donald- Neil, John-Sinclair, and 
several daughters. He died in 1883. Donald- 
Neil died at the age of twenty-five. John-Sinclair 
resides at Martinville, Quebec. Catherine, eldest 
daughter of Lieutenant Maclean, was married to 
John Whicher. Susanna was married to Colonel 
James Morrill ; Janet, to Ebenezer Morrill ; 
Eleanor, to William Minneall ; and Betsey, to 
Elisha Andrews. 

The Macleans of Ardfinaig. 

Dugald, second son of Hector of Killean, lived 
at Ardfinaig in Mull. He was for some time an 
officer in the Dumbarton Fencibles. He was after- 
wards captain in the Argyleshire regiment of 
Fencibles. He married Susanna, daughter of 
the Rev. Neil Macleod, minister of Kilfinichen 



The Macleans of Ardfinaig. 359 

and Kilvicewen, now Ross and Brolas, and had 
by her five children ; Janet, Margaret, Hector- 
Neil, Susanna, and Donald-William. He was 
drowned near Crinan, on June 29th, 1818, while 
returning from Glasgow. His eldest daughter, 
Janet, died young. Margaret and Hector died 
unmarried. Susanna was born in 1808. She 
was married in 1837 to the Rev. Donald McVean, 
Free Church minister of Iona, and had seven 
children ; Colin -Alexander, Annie -Catherine, 
Susan- Isabella, Mary- Helen, Dugald - Hector, 
Isabella-Merriman, and Archibald-Arthur. She 
died in 1883. 

Colin-Alexander McVean is a prominent and 
well-known man. He was born in Iona, and is a 
civil engineer by profession. He was for some 
time surveyor-in-chief of Japan. He returned to 
Scotland in 1886, and settled at Kilfinichen in 
Mull. He married Mary-Wood Cowan, of Edin- 
burgh, by whom he has four sons and five 
daughters. Donald, his eldest son, is a lieutenant 
in the 45th regiment. 

Donald-William, second son of Captain Dugald 
Maclean of Ardfinaig, was born in 1819. He emi- 
grated to Australia in 1839, and settled on a farm 
near the town of Inverell in New South Wales. 
He called his place of residence Killean. He 
married Catherine, youngest daughter of Finlay 
Macdonald, of Ellerston, New South Wales, and 
had by her seven children ; Hector-Neil, Dugald- 
John, Francis-John, William-Pender, Neil-Finlay, 



360 The Clan Gillean. 

Susan-Catherine, and Archibald-Alexander. He 
was an energetic man, managed his affairs with 
prudence, and made a comfortable home for himself 
and his family. He died in 1875. Hector succeeded 
his father on the Killean farm. Susan and Archi- 
bald live with him. Dugald married Elizabeth, 
daughter of R. F. Fremlin. Francis married 
Caroline, daughter of James Cheadle. William 
came to America in 1894. He is a journalist by 
profession, and resides in Brooklyn, New York. 
He married Mary, daughter of the Hon. Otis 
Johnson, of Nassau, Bahama Islands. Neil 
married Emily, daughter of Alexander Currie. 
Dugald, Francis, and Neil have each of them sons 
with the good old clan names. It is a pleasure to 
see these names preserved. The Lachlans, Hec- 
tors, Allans, and Neils should not be forgotten. 

3. John Odhar. 

John, third son of Donald of Ross, was known 
as Iain Odhar. Donald, eldest son of John, had 
a son named Neil, who lived at Ballinahard. Neil 
was, in 16 18, one of the principal followers of 
Hector Og of Duart. It is said that Donald and 
John Maclean, merchants in Blackburn, were de- 
scended from him. 

III. The Macleans of Shuna. 

According to the traditions of the Macleans of 
Shuna, as preserved in the Ardgour MS., they 
were descended from a younger son of Neil of 



The Macleans of Shuna. 361 

Ross. They also maintained that their ancestor 
was parson of Kilvicewen in Mull. On the 
assumption that their traditions respecting their 
origin are substantially correct, the Rev. Ewen 
Maclean must have been their ancestor. There 
was no other parson of Kilvicewen from whom 
they could have sprung. Ewen was not a son of 
Neil of Ross ; he may, however, have been his 
grandson. The probability is that he was the son 
of John Mor, son of Neil of Ross. He was minister 
of Coll in 162 1, of Killean in 1626, and of Kilvic- 
ewen at a later date. He married "Fionnaghal, 
nighean Ailein," Finvola the daughter of Allan, 
probably the daughter of Allan Mac Ian Duy. 
We find it stated in May, 1642, that "his widow 
intromited with the stipend, according to custom, 
for herself and children." 

I. Allan, first Maclean of Shuna, was born 
probably about the year 1625. If the Shuna tra- 
dition be correct, he must have been a son of Ewen 
Maclean, minister of Kilvicewen. On April 2d, 
1679, ne obtained from Lord Neil Campbell, a 
charter of the lands of Shuna in life-rent for him- 
self and in fee for Donald, his eldest son. The 
charter was confirmed by the Earl of Argyll. 
Allan had at least three children, Donald, Archi- 
bald, and Ann. He died about 1706. 

II. Donald, second Maclean of Shuna, had 
three sons. The eldest son, whose name was 
Archibald, died in 1698. The second son left a 
son named Alexander. The third son left a son 



362 The Clan Gillean. 

named John. Donald was succeeded by his grand- 
son, Alexander. 

III. Alexander, third of Shuna, was, in March, 
1 73 1, served heir to his uncle Archibald. He was 
served u heir male of taillie and provision special 
in a redeemable annual rent of sixty pounds Scots 
over Shuna." In October, 1740, he received a 
precept of Clare Constat in his favour as heir to 
Donald Maclean, his grandfather. He was suc- 
ceeded by John, son of the third son of Donald 
of Shuna. 

IV. In September, 1765, John, fourth of Shuna, 
received a precept of Clare Constat as heir to 
Alexander Maclean of Shuna, his cousin-german. 
John married a daughter of Campbell of Ardlarach, 
by whom he had five children; Alexander, Samuel, 
and three daughters. Alexander succeeded his 
father in Shuna. Samuel married his first cousin, 
Jane, fourth daughter of Dugald Campbell of 
Ardlarach, and had two sons by her, Dugald and 
James, both of whom died in Jamaica, and with- 
out issue. One of Shuna's daughters was married 
to a Macaulay who lived in Greenock. 

V. Alexander, fifth and last Maclean of Shuna, 
became laird of that island in March, 1787. He 
was the son of John, grandson of Donald, son of 
Allan, first of Shuna. He married the widow of 
Campbell of Sunderland, and had by her Mary-Ann 
and Janet. He was deeply in debt, and was 
under the necessity of placing his estate, on Decem- 
ber 5th, 1796, in the hands of Alexander Keay, 



The Macleans of Laggan. 363 

accountant in Edinburgh, as trustee for the 
creditors. In January, 1798, Major Alexander 
Macdonald of Lyndale took charge of it. Major 
Macdonald sold it in 1815 to James Yates, who 
in 1829 bequeathed it in trust to the provost and 
magistrates of Glasgow. 

Alexander of Shuna spent his later years in 
Edinburgh. He was a good-looking man, and full 
of wit and humour. Mary-Ann, his elder daughter, 
was married, first, to a Captain Shaw of jh - 
British Army, and, secondly, to an Edinburgh 
lawyer named Handyside. Captain Shaw was 
killed in a duel by Maclean of Kilmory. Tradition 
throws the blame for the whole trouble upon the 
latter. 

The Macleans of Laggan, Islay. 

Allan, first Maclean of Shuna, had two sons, 
Donald and Archibald. The descendants of 
Donald, second of Shuna, are now extinct in the 
male line. 

I. Archibald, second son of Allan of Shuna, 
settled in Islay. 

II. Donald, Archibald's son, married Elizabeth 
Macnab, by whom he had two sons, Archibald and 
Allan. One of Allan's sons went to the Crimea, 
and rose to a good position in the Russian service. 
Donald died in 171 1. 

III. Archibald, Donald's eldest son, was born 
in 1699, and died in 1750. He was married, and 
left a son named John. 



364 The Clan Gilleax. 

IV. John lived at Octofad in Islay. He was a 
capital scholar, and could converse freely in several 
languages. He had a powerful voice and could 
be heard on a calm day across Lochindaal. He 
married, first, Janet, daughter of Archibald Camp- 
bell o( Jura, by whom he had Lachlan and other 
children. He married, secondly, either a daughter 
or very near relative ot the Rev. John Murdoch, 
minister of Kilarrow and Kilmeny, and had by 

harles and Barbara. Charles was known as 
Tearlach Ghoirtein-taoid. 

V. Lachlan married Lucy, daughter of James 
Campbell of Balinaby, by whom he had Donald, 
James, Alexander- Colin, Jessie, and another 
daughter. Donald and James died unmarried. 
The second daughter was the mother of Thomas 
Pattison, the poet and translator, and of Mrs. 
Archibald Robertson. Lachlan, died at a com- 
paratively early age. 

VI. Alexander- Colin, or Colin as he was 
invariably called, was a captain in the merchant 
service and also a ship-owner. He amassed a 
good deal of wealth. He gave up going to sea 
when he was about thirty-six years o( age, and 
settled at Laggan in Islay. He received two 
medals from the Humane Society for rescuing 
shipwrecked crews on the Laggan Strand on two 
different occasions. He was the subject of a 
very pretty Gaelic song by John Maceachern, am 
Piobaire Cam, of Bowmore in Islay. The bard 
praises his fine looks, his gentlemanliness, and his 



The Macleans of Laggan. 365 

skill with the gun and rod. Probably, inasmuch 
as he was a sea-captain, he thought it unnecessary 
to say that he was a thorough steersman. Captain 
Maclean was evidently a popular man. He married 
Margaret, daughter of Xeil Macneill of Ardna- 
cross in Mull, by whom he had five children ; 
Lachlan, Xeil, Lucy-Campbell, Annabella-Gillies, 
and Flora -Ann. Lucy was married to Robert- 
Holmes Hunter, and Annabella to Robert Ballin- 
gal. Flora lives in Edinburgh. Captain Maclean 
died in 1861. 

VII. Lachlan, eldest son of Captain Alexander- 
Colin Maclean, was born on the 24th of August, 
1830. He spent a number of years in Java. He 
returned in 1870. On his return he rented Islav 
House in Islav, and resided there. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. Alexander Cam- 
eron of Kilchoman in Islav, and had bv her 
Alexander-Colin, Alexander, Xeil, Mary-:- 
Lucy -Campbell, and Elizabeth- X era. Lachlan 
died on August 9th, 1880. Mary is married to 
Percy Howard in London. 

VIII. Alexander-Colin, eldest son of Lachlan 
Maclean, is a captain in the Cameron Highlanders. 
He married Dora, daughter of the late Sir K 
Thomson, lieutenant-governor of Bengal, and has 
a son named Colin and two daughters. 

Xeil, second son of Captain Alexander- Colin 
Maclean of Laggan in Islav, was born on June 
9th, 1S36. He spent a number of years in Java 
with his brother Lachlan. He married, in 1871 



366 The Clan Gillean. 

Elizabeth, daughter of Alexander Macneill of Bor- 
lands, fifth son of Neil Macneill of Ardnacross, 
and had by her six sons and two daughters ; 
Colin, Alexander-Ellister, Lachlan, Godfrey, Neil- 
Gillean, Loudon- Macneill, Isabel-Agnes, and 
Elizabeth- Marjory. He purchased, about the 
year 1892, the property of Breda, near Alford in 
Aberdeenshire, and resides there. He is a thor- 
oughly loyal Maclean — just as loyal as the 
Macleans of Ross used to be in the fighting days 
of old. His eldest son, Colin, is a lieutenant in 
the Black Watch. 



CHAPTER XV. 
Ihe Bcscenoante of John Satbh of OIoIL 

I. The Macleans of Coll. 

I. John Garbh, third son of Lachlan Bronnach 
of Duart, was the first Maclean of Coll. He 
received a charter from Alexander, Lord of the 
Isles, of the twenty pound lands of Coll, the 
eighteen marklands of Ouinish in Mull, and the 
six marklands of the Isle of Rum. He received 
some time afterwards a charter from Alexander of 
the Isles of the twenty pound lands of Lochiel in 
Lochaber. Both charters were confirmed by 
James II. 

There is a tradition to the effect that Gilleonan 
Macneil of Barra claimed the island of Coll and 
tried to keep John Garbh from getting possession 
of it. The latter, having collected about fifty 
armed men, sailed from Mull and landed with his 
followers in Coll, at the place known as an Acarsaid 
Fhalaich. He marched in all haste to Grishipol, 
attacked Macneil, who had 120 men, and defeated 



368 The Clan Gillean. 

him. Macneil and all his followers were slain. 
According to tradition Macneil was more than a 
match for John Garbh with the battle-axe, and 
was killed by one of the followers of the latter, 
who was known as An Gille Riabhach, or the 
Speckled Youth. Immediately after the battle of 
Grishipol, John Garbh sailed to Barra and took 
possession of that island. He kept it for a few 
years and then gave it up to the lawful heir. 

John Garbh was a tall, powerful, and cour- 
ageous man ; possessed great shrewdness and 
determination ; and was well fitted for the rough 
times in which he lived. He married Isabel, 
daughter of Fraser of Lovat, and had John, 
Lachlan, and other children. He became laird of 
Coll shortly after 143 1. He was alive in 1469. 

II. John, Iain Mac Iain Ghairbh, lived at Cor- 
pach in Lochaber, and was in possession of the 
twenty pound lands of Lochiel. The Camerons 
attacked and slew him, and destroyed all his 
charters. His wife and children were protected 
by the Macgillonies and sent to Coll. He was 
succeeded by his son, John Abrach. 

The Macleans of Coll were so grateful to the 
Macgillonies for their kindness to the family of 
their slain chieftain that they caused the following 
inscription to be placed on a stone over the door 
of Breacachadh Castle :— " If any man of the Clan 
Gillonie shall appear before this castle, though he 
came at midnight with a man's head in his hand, 
he shall here find safety and protection against all 



The Macleans of Coll. 369 

but the King." In further token of their grati- 
tude the Macleans of Coll were, for over two 
hundred years, in the habit of educating the 
representative of the man who saved John Abrach. 
'III. John Abrach received from James V. on 
December 1st, 1528, a charter of the lands of 
Coll, Quinish, and Rum. He received also from 
the King on the same day a charter of the three 
marklands of Achalennan, the forty shilling lands of 
Drimnin, and the twenty pound lands of Lochiel. 
In the spring of 1539 he presented a petition to 
the Privy Council, in which he states that his 
predecessors had peaceably enjoyed the lands of 
Lochiel for forty years, that his father was slain 
while living on these lands, and that afterwards 
Ewen Mac Allan unjustly took possession of them. 
He prays for relief. The Council appointed a 
commission on all the matters referred to. What- 
ever the action of the commission may have been, 
Ewen Mac Allan retained possession of Lochiel. 
John Abrach had at least two sons, John and 
Hector. He had his lands conveyed to John, the 
elder of the two, in September, 1542. 

IV. John, fourth of Coll, Iain Mac Iain Abraich, 
joined Donald Dubh in the rebellion of 1545. 
He died without lawful issue about the beginning 
of 1558, and was succeeded by his brother, Hector. 

V. Hector, Eachann Mac Iain Abraich, received 
a good education, and was known as An Cleireach 
Beag, or the Little Clerk. He was a man of genuine 
piety, and a good poet. Some of his poems were 



370 The Clan Gillean. 

written in Gaelic, and some in Latin. Two of his 
Gaelic poems are still in existence, and are pub- 
lished in the Maclean Bards. Tradition relates 
that on a certain occasion, about the year 1537, he 
happened to make some uncomplimentary remarks 
with regard to Ailein nan Sop's conduct. Allan, 
deeply provoked by these remarks — which were 
no doubt just — sailed to Coll with his fleet, seized 
the pious but rash bard, and carried him off to 
Tarbert Castle. Hector, in order to appease his 
wrath, composed a song in praise of his captor. 
Allan was so well pleased with the song that he 
set his prisoner at liberty. He gave him, how- 
ever, a friendly warning to be more guarded about 
his tongue for the future. The song contains 
nothing but the truth. It simply describes Allan's 
good qualities — qualities which he undoubtedly 
possessed. 

Hector Mac Ian was married twice. By his 
first wife, Meve, daughter of Alexander Macdonald 
of Islay, he had at least one son and two daughters; 
Hector Roy, Margaret, and Janet. By his second 
wife, Finvola, daughter of Godfrey Mac Alister of 
Loup, he had two sons; Allan and John. Hector 
Roy, who was also known as Hector Og y suc- 
ceeded his father. Allan was the progenitor of 
the Macleans of Achnasaul. John was the pro- 
genitor of the Macleans of Grishipol. Hector 
Mac Ian resigned his lands in favour of Hector 
Roy in 1559. He was living in 1565. 

VI. Hector Roy received, on June 25th, 1559, 



The Macleans of Coll. 371 

a crown charter of the "twenty pound lands of 
Coll, the twelve pound lands of Ouinish, the four 
pound lands of Rum, and the four pound lands of 
Achalennan and Drimnin." He married Marion, 
daughter of Hector Og of Duart, by whom he had 
Lachlan, his successor. He died in 1593. 

VII. Lachlan of Coll was born about the year 
1582. He spent the first fourteen years of his 
life with Lachlan Mor Mackintosh, captain of the 
Clan Chattan, whose wife was a daughter of Ken- 
neth Mackenzie of Kintail. To Mackintosh and 
his family he formed a deep and lasting attachment. 
In July, 161 7, he received from James I. of Britain 
a charter of all the lands which had belonged to 
his father. In August, 161 7, he obtained from 
Andrew Knox, Bishop of the Isles, a charter of 
the three marklands of the Isle of Muck, on con- 
dition of paying to the Bishop and his successors 
in office sixteen bolls of barley per year. The 
charter granted by the Bishop was confirmed by 
King James in March, 1621. Lachlan had a good 
deal of trouble in connection with the Isle of 
Muck. Sir Donald Campbell of Ardnamurchan 
claimed it as a part of the estate of the Macdonalds 
of Ardnamurchan. Lachlan retained Muck, but 
was under the necessity of giving up Achalennan 
and Drimnin to Sir Donald. The Mac Ians were 
in possession of Muck, and endeavoured to keep 
possession. They annoyed Lachlan by their 
predatory acts. At last he arrested fourteen of 
their principal men and sent them as prisoners to 



372 The Clan Gillean. 

Inverary. Some of them were found guilty of 
gross crimes and put to death. Lachlan and Sir 
Rory Mor Macleod were very intimate friends. 
Two of Rory Mor's sons, Roderick of Talisker 
and Norman of Bernera, were brought up with 
him in their boyhood. It was through the media- 
tion of Angus Macdonald of I slay and himself 
that the bitter feud, which raged in 1601 between 
the Macdonalds of Sleat and the Macleods of 
Dun vegan, was brought to an end. 

Lachlan of Coll had a natural son named John. 
As John was brought up in the Lowlands he was 
known as Iain Galkla, or Lowland John. He 
received from his father the farm of Mingary in 
Mull, of which we find him in possession in 
November, 1627. Lachlan married Florence, 
daughter of Tormod Macleod of Dunvegan, and 
had six children by her ; John Garbh, Hector, 
Neil, Catherine, and Janet. John of Mingary 
was killed in his boat by the Mac Ians of Ardna- 
murchan, in revenge for the execution of their 
relatives at Inverary. His body was pierced by 
sixteen arrows. John Garbh succeeded his father 
in Coll. Hector was the progenitor of the 
Macleans of Muck. Neil was the progenitor of 
the Macleans of Drimnacross. Catherine was 
married, in 1627, to John Balbh, chief of the Clan 
Fingon, or Mackinnons. She had a life interest 
in a part of Sornmor, a part of Sornbeg, a part of 
Lepennie, and a part of Knockcarrach in Mull. 
She was the mother of Sir Lachlan Mor Mac- 



The Macleans of Coll. 373 

kinnon. Janet, the second daughter of Lachlan 
of Coll, was married to the Rev. Farquhar 
Fraser, minister of Tiree. Lachlan died about the 
beginning of 1642. He was a man of ability and 
prudence, and possessed a good deal of influence 
in his time. He was a Presbyterian. He was 
probably the last laird of Coll who could not sign 
his name. 

VIII. John Garbh of Coll was a man of 
intelligence and sound sense. He was also a 
religious man, and showed his faith by his works. 
He was temperate in all things, practised the virtues 
of benevolence and hospitality, and delighted in 
reading the Word of God. It is said that a certain 
man in Skye, who had a large debt against him, 
promised to forgive him the debt if he would spend 
a night drinking with him. He was urged by 
his friends to accept the offer, but refused. He 
was an excellent musician, and a skilful player on 
the harp. Two of his musical compositions, " An 
Caoineadh Rioghail " and "An Tom Murrain," 
are still known. Captain Witters, the English 
governor of Duart Castle in the time of Cromwell, 
paid him a visit, and in speaking of him afterwards 
said that he resembled King David very much, 
being a great reader of the Bible and a good 
player on the harp. It seems, however, that the 
resemblance went no farther ; John Garbh was 
not so fond of war as King David ; he was a man 
of peace. 

John Garbh married, first, Florence, third 



374 



The Clan Gillean. 



daughter of Sir Dugald Campbell of Auchinbreck 
by his wife, Mary, daughter of Sir Alexander 
Erskine of Gogar, son of John, fifth Earl of Mar ; 
and, secondly, Florence, daughter of Hector Og 
of Duart, son of Sir Lachlan Mor. By his first 
wife he had six children ; Hector Roy, John, Ewen, 
Florence, Janet, and Una. By his second wife he, 
had one child, Catherine. Hector Roy, his eldest 
son, succeeded him in Coll. John was the pro- 
genitor of the Macleans of Totaranald. Ewen, 
or Hugh, joined Montrose at Strathearn in 1646. 
He was killed at Inverkeithing in 165 1. He was 
a very brave man. Florence was married to Don- 
ald, first Maclean of Brolas. Janet was married 
to Alexander Macdonald of Achdir. Una was 
married, first, to John Maclean of Kinlochaline ; 
and, secondly, to Duncan Stewart of Ardshiel. 
Catherine was married to Lachlan Macquarrie of 
Ulva. 

IX. Hector Roy received, in 1642, a charter o\ 
Coll, Rum, Muck, and two-thirds of Ouinish. 
He was of a warlike nature. He fought at the 
battle of Inverlochy, in 1645, and probably at the 
battle of Inverkeithing, in 1651. He got deeply 
into debt, evidently through neglecting to pay his 
dues to the Government, and incurring expenses in 
arming his followers to fight for the Stewarts. 
On October 3d, 1655, it was found by a court held 
at Inverary, that George Campbell of Kinnochtrie 
had a claim of ,£5,380 Scots against him. On 
March 7th, 1656, Oliver Cromwell gave a charter of 



The Macleans of Coll. 375 

Hector Roy's lands to George Campbell, to com- 
pensate the latter for the amount due him. In 
July, 1675, Colin Campbell, son and heir of George 
Campbell, surrendered the lands which had been 
granted to his father by Cromwell, to Charles II., 
who gave a charter of them to Sir Norman 
Macleod of Bernera. Sir Norman conveyed them 
either to Hector Roy or his heir. 

Hector Roy married Marion, eldest daughter 
of Hector Maclean of Killean, afterwards second 
Maclean of Torloisk. The marriage contract 
was signed at Hogh in Tiree, on January 22d, 
1 64 1. The marriage took place shortly after- 
wards. Hector Roy had six children by his wife ; 
Lachlan, Donald, Margaret, Catherine, Janet, and 
Una. Lachlan, his eldest son, succeeded him in 
Coll. Donald succeeded Lachlan's son. Catherine 
was married, first, to Allan Stewart of Appin, by 
whom she had a son who became laird of Appin. 
She was married, secondly, to Hector Maclean of 
Muck. Janet was married to Hector Maclean, 
son of Charles of Ardnacross. Una was married 
to John Maclean of Achnasaul. Hector Roy died 
in 1676. John Garbh, his father, died a few years 
afterwards. 

X. Lachlan of Coll, Lachainn Mac Eachainn 
Ruaidh, raised a company of men on his estates 
for service in Holland, and was appointed captain 
in General Mackay's regiment. It is said that he 
acted with a good deal of severity in forcing the 
sons of his tenants to enter the army and go with 



376 The Clan Gillean. 

him to Holland. He returned to Scotland on 
leave of absence in the summer of 1687. He was 
drowned in the water of the Lochy in Lochaber in 
the month of August. He was at the time on his 
way back to join his regiment. He was married 
to Marion, daughter of John Dubh Macdonald 
of Moydart, and had three children by her; John 
Garbh, Florence, and Catherine. John Garbh 
succeeded him in Coll. Florence was married to 
John Macleodof Talisker. Catherine was married 
to Norman Macleod of Grishornish, by whom she 
had Donald, Alexander, and Margaret. Donald 
was minister of Diurinish in Skye. He was a 
man of culture, and a poet of good ability. 

XI. John Garbh of Coll was accidentally killed 
in Edinburgh while pursuing his studies. He 
was standing on the street looking at a riotous 
mob. A part\- of soldiers, acting under the direc- 
tion of Captain Wallace, threw a grenade from 
the Abbey Church among those who were causing 
the disturbance. A splinter from it struck the 
young laird of Coll and killed him instantly. He 
was only about eighteen years of age. He was 
succeeded by his uncle, Donald. 

XII. Donald, Domhnall Mac Eachainn 
Ruaidh, was born in 1656. He had charge of the 
Coll estates during the absence of his brother 
Lachlan in the army. On July 2d, 1679, we find 
him surrendering the castle of Breacachadh to 
Archibald, Earl of Argyll, on condition that 
neither himself nor any of those who were with 



The Macleans of Coll. 377 

him should be called to account for any of their 
past acts by the Privy Council. He became tutor 
of Coll in 1687, and laird of Coll a few years 
afterwards. He was a very popular man. 

Donald of Coll had two sons named Hector. 
It is admitted that the first Hector was the eldest 
of his sons. It is also generally admitted that 
he was born out of wedlock. Donald married, 
first, Isabel, daughter of Sir Roderick Macleod of 
Talisker ; and, secondly, Marion, daughter of Sir 
Norman Macleod of Bernera. By his first wife, 
and after his marriage with her, he had one son, 
Hector. By his second wife, he had five children ; 
Lachlan, John, Hugh, Neil, and Catherine. 
Hector, eldest son of Donald, settled in Mull. 
Hector, second son of Donald, succeeded his father 
in Coll. Lachlan married Catherine, daughter of 
Donald Maclean of Brolas. He had several 
children by her, all of whom died young. He 
survived his brother Hector. Hugh succeeded 
his brother Hector in Coll. Neil was a merchant 
in Virginia. Catherine was married to Dr. Hector 
Maclean of Grulin. Donald of Coll died in 
April, 1729. 

There is a tradition in Coll to the effect that 
Donald of Coll had Hector, his eldest son, by 
Isabel, daughter of Sir Roderick Macleod of 
Talisker. Some time after the birth of Hector he 
married Isabel, and had the second Hector by her. 
When Donald and his bride were leaving Talisker 
Sir Roderick told them that he would never see 

48 



378 The Clan Gillean. 

the inside of their roof. After his anger had cooled 
down he went to Coll to see his daughter. When 
Donald saw him coming he took a bunch of ripe 
barley and hung it to the roof of his house on the 
inside. After some conversation he asked his 
father-in-law if he had seen such barley as that 
anywhere. Sir Roderick looked up, and Donald 
at once exclaimed, — Chunnaic sibh an nis mullach 
an taighe ge b' oil leibh, you have now seen the 
roof of the house in spite of you. Of course this 
story may not be true. Some persons maintain 
that Donald of Coll was actually married three 
times ; that his first wife was a daughter of John 
Macleod of Dunvegan ; that he had Hector, his 
eldest son by her ; and that for some reason or 
other he denied that he had been married to her, 
and disinherited Hector. Others again simply 
affirm that Hector was a natural son. 

XIII. Hector of Coll, Eachann Mac Dhomhnaill 
Mhic Eachainn Ruaidh, was a tall, handsome, 
and dignified-looking man. He was richly en- 
dowed with good sense, and managed his affairs 
with prudence. He found the estate heavily 
burdened with debts, but succeeded in paying them 
all, and also in laying some money by. He built 
a fine residence near the old castle, and lived in a 
style becoming his circumstances. He used all 
his influence to keep his own followers and other 
members of his clan from joining Prince Charles 
in 1745. On July 3d, 1753, he received from 
George II. a charter of the lands of Coll, Quinish, 



The Macleans of Coll. 379 

and Muck. He married, first, in 17 15, Janet, 
fourth daughter of Alexander Campbell of Loch- 
nell by his wife, Margaret, daughter of Stewart 
of Appin. He married, secondly, Jean, daughter 
of Donald Campbell of Airds. He had five 
daughters by his first wife ; Isabel, Margaret, Mary, 
Una, and Sibella. Isabel was married in 1733 to 
Colin Campbell, eldest son of Colin Campbell of 
Baltimore. Margaret was married to Alexander 
Macdonald of Boisdale, and had two sons ; 
Donald and Hector. Mary was married in 1745 
to Captain John Macleod of Talisker. Una was 
married to Sir Allan Maclean of Brolas; and 
Sibella to Captain Allan Cameron of Glendessary. 
In his marriage contract with Lochnell's daughter, 
which was signed on September 14th, 17 15, 
Hector is described as Hector Maclean of Coll, 
younger, eldest lawful son of Donald. He dis- 
posed of his estates in favour of his brother Hugh 
and his heirs male. He died in 1754. He was 
the last laird of Coll who kept a harper. 

XIV. Hugh of Coll married Janet, daughter of 
Donald Macleod, third of Talisker, and had eight 
children by her; Donald, Alexander, Hector, 
Norman, Roderick, Allan, Hugh, and Marion. 
He was served heir of tailzie general to his brother 
Hector, in April, 1755. In February, 1756, he 
received from George II. a charter of the lands of 
Coll, Quinish, and Muck. He died on May 4th, 
1786. 1. Donald, his eldest son, was an intelligent, 
well-educated, and promising young man. He 



380 The Clan Gillean. 

was drowned in the Sound of Ulva on September 
25th, 1774. 2. Alexander succeeded his father in 
Coll. 3. Hector was born in 1756. He entered 
the military service of the East India Company as 
an ensign in 1775. He was appointed captain in 
1786, major in 1795, lieutenant-colonel in 1798, 
and major-general in 181 1. He was created a 
K. C. B. in 181 5. He was promoted to the rank 
of lieutenant-general in 1821. He spent the whole 
of his military life in India. He lived in London 
after retiring from active service. He died in 1849. 

4. Norman was a major in the 78th regiment. 
He died of yellow fever in the island of Grenada. 

5. Roderick was an officer in the army. He 
married Christina, daughter of Captain Allan 
Cameron of Glendessary, by whom he had one 
daughter, Marion. 6. Allan was a captain in the 
36th regiment. He married Jean, daughter of 
Captain Allan Cameron of Glendessary. 7. Hugh 
was a captain in the 60th regiment. 8. Marion 
was married in 1783 to Alexander, son and heir of 
Colin Macdonald of Boisdale, by whom she had 
Hugh and other children. 

XV. Alexander of Coll was born about the 
year 1754. He was known as Alasdair Ruadh, 
or Alexander Roy. He studied law for some time, 
with the intention of following it as a profession. 
On the sad death of his brother Donald in 1774 
he abandoned his legal studies. He was for some 
time a captain in the Argyle Fencible regiment, 
which was embodied in Glasgow in April, 1778. 



The Macleans of Coll. 381 

He was served heir to his father in May, 1790, 
and is described as Captain Alexander Maclean of 
Coll. He was appointed lieutenant-colonel in the 
Breadalbane Fencibles in 1794 or thereabouts. He 
seems to have gone to Ireland with the third 
battalion in 1795. 

When Alexander of Coll was in the Argyle 
Fencibles, John Macdonald, of Hogh in Tiree, 
neglected to perform some duty, which had been 
entrusted to him, at a bridge. For this act of 
neglect Major Hugh Montgomery ordered that he 
should be whipped. Coll was at that time only a 
captain. As Macdonald was in his company, and 
as he had been acquainted with him from his 
youth, he went twice to the major and humbly 
pleaded with him to forgive Macdonald ; but the 
major was inexorable. When the flogging was to 
begin Coll drew his sword and cut the cords with 
which the unfortunate soldier was tied to the 
whipping-post. Montgomery challenged Maclean 
to a duel with swords ; the challenge was at once 
accepted. As there was some fear among the 
soldiers that Maclean might be killed, they sent 
word to Montgomery that if he should happen to 
kill Maclean, he would be instantly shot. Coll 
appeared on the ground ; but Montgomery kept 
away. The duel was never fought. 

One of Coil's tenants, who came to the island 
of Cape Breton, was one day telling his neighbour 
about the clearness of head and knowledge of law 
which the old laird possessed. Surely, said his 



382 The Clan Gillean. 

neighbour, he did not know as much about law as 
Moses. Moses, was the reply, Moses never saw 
the day when he could split the law better than 
our own laird of Coll. 

Alexander of Coll married Catherine, eldest 
daughter of Captain Allan Cameron of Glendes- 
sary, by whom he had one son and six daughters ; 
Hugh, Janet, Sibella, Catherine, Maria, Marion, 
and Breadalbane. Hugh succeeded his father in 
Coll. Janet was married to the Honourable 
George Vere Hobart, second son of the Duke of 
Buckinghamshire. Both her husband and her- 
self died a few years after their marriage. They 
left one child, a daughter named Vere- Louise - 
Catherine, who became the wife of Donald Cameron 
of Lochiel, and was the mother of the present 
Cameron of Lochiel. Sibella, second daughter of 
Alexander of Coll, died unmarried. Catherine was 
married to Major Donald Macleod of Talisker, 
who emigrated to Australia about the year 182 1. 
She visited Britain in 1857, and died shortly after 
her return to Australia. She had a large family. 
Maria, fourth daughter of Alexander of Coll, was 
married to Alexander Hunter, Edinburgh. Marion 
and Breadalbane died unmarried. The latter was 
noted for her piety and charitable deeds. 

Alasdair Ruadh was of an independent spirit, 
and somewhat quick-tempered. He was manly, 
obliging, and benevolent, and treated his tenants 
with thorough kindness. He was a chieftain of 
great popularity. He was, in 1818, laird of Coll, 



The Macleans of Coll. 383 

Quinish, Rum, and Muck. He handed over his 
estates to Hugh, his eldest son, in 1828. He left 
Coll then and went to live in Quinish. He died 
on April 10th, 1835. 

XVI. Hugh, sixteenth and last Maclean of Coll, 
was born in 1782. He served for some time in the 
Guards, and became a lieutenant -colonel. He 
purchased Ben More in Mull, and built the castle 
of Drimfin near Tobermory. He got into debt, 
and had to part with his estates, which were sold 
in April, 1856. 

Hugh of Coll married, first, in 1814, Janet 
Dennistoun, by whom he had four daughters; 
Margaret, Catherine-Cameron, Elizabeth, and 
Isabella-Sibella. He married, secondly, in 1825, 
Jane Robertson, by whom he had six children ; 
Juliet, Alexander, John-Hector-Norman, William, 
Hugh, and Jane-Albane. William died in India 
in 1867. Hugh was a captain in the army, and 
died in 1867. Margaret was married to James 
Hamilton of Barnes ; Elizabeth, to Walter Griffith ; 
Juliet, to Ashe Windham ; and Jane-Albane, to 
George Dundas. Hugh of Coll lived in London 
during the latter part of his life. He died at 
Woodville in the house of his daughter Margaret 
in 1861. He was a kind-hearted man, and was 
well liked by his tenants. 

XVII. Alexander, eldest son of Hugh of Coll, 
succeeded his father as representative of the de- 
scendants of John Garbh. He was tall and athletic, 
modest, and full of kindness. He emigrated to 



384 The Clan Gillean. 

South Africa in 1849. He died at Umgeni, near 
Durban, on Sunday afternoon, July nth, 1875. 
He was in the forty-seventh year of his age. He 
was succeeded in the chieftainship of the Macleans 
of Coll by his brother, John-Hector-Norman. 

XVIII. John Hector Norman Maclean was 
born in 1829. He entered the army in India in 1846, 
and rose to the rank of major-general. He mar- 
ried a daughter of Robert Rae, by whom he had 
three daughters ; Emily-Agnes, Florence-Maude, 
and Isabel-Annie. On retiring from active service 
he returned from India, and took up his residence 
at Brighton in England. He died on the 29th of 
August, 1882. 

II. The Macleans of Arnabost. 

Lachlan Maclean was born at Grimsary in the 
Isle of Coll, and died at Arnabost. He was the 
son of John, son of Donald, son of Rory, son of 
Hector, son of Neil, son of Malcolm, son of 
Lachlan, son of John Garbh, first of Coll. He 
married Catherine, daughter of John Campbell, 
by whom he had a son named John. John lived 
at Arnabost. He married Finvola, daughter of 
Hector Maclean, Eachann Mac Iain Mhic Thear- 
laich, and had seven children by her ; Lachlan, 
Murdoch, John Og } Donald, Mary, Margaret, and 
Catherine. Murdoch was married, and had six 
sons ; Donald, Alexander, Lachlan, Hugh, John, 
and Neil. He died at Sordidale in 1867. John 
Og came to Canada in 1846, and settled at 



The Macleans of Arnabost. 385 

Melbourne above Montreal. He removed to the 
United States in 1869. He died at Wichita in 
Kansas, in 1892, and was eighty-eight years of 
age. He left a large family of sons and daughters. 
Donald, fourth son of Iain Mac Lachainn Mhic 
Iain, died unmarried. Mary, the eldest daughter, 
was married to Donald Macdonald, son of Ailein 
Muilleir, and was the mother of that worthy High- 
lander, the late D. T. Macdonald, of Red Jacket, 
Michigan. 

Lachlan, eldest son of Iain Mac Lachainn Mhic 
Iain, was born at Arnabost, Coll, on June 2d, 1798, 
and was educated in his native island. He went 
to Glasgow about 182 1 and engaged in the hosiery 
business. He was a scholarly and well-read man, 
and an admirable writer, both in Gaelic and Eng- 
lish. He wrote a number of excellent articles for 
the "Teachdaire Gaidhealach" and "Cuairtear nan 
Gleann." He published "Adhamh agus Eubh," 
or Adam and Eve, in 1837, and "The History of 
the Keltic Language" in 1840. He composed a 
few short poems. He took an intense interest in 
his mother tongue, and was known as Lachainn 
na Gaidhlig, or Lachlan of the Gaelic. He was 
frank and genial in his manner, sociable by nature, 
and an exceedingly pleasant companion. He 
married Agnes Ashmore, by whom he had a son 
named Norman, and four daughters. He died at 
his residence, 49 Oxford Street, Glasgow, on 
November 22d, 1848, in the fifty-first year of his 
age. He was buried in the southern Necropolis. 



386 The Clan Gillean. 

The Maclean Association erected a handsome 
monument to his memory in 1896. 

III. Neil Mor and Neil Og. 

I. Neil Mor Maclean was a grandson of John 
Abrach. It is generally supposed that he was a 
natural son of John, fourth of Coll. According 
to the Rev. Neil Maclean, minister of Tiree, he 
was a son of Hector, fifth of Coll. He was dis- 
tinguished for his strength, bravery, and manly 
character. He became military leader of the 
Macleans of Coll after the death of Hector Roy in 
1593. Lachlan Mor of Duart sent an armed force 
to take possession of Coll. Neil Mor marched in 
great haste to meet the invaders. On his way to 
the encounter he found that the flag had been 
forgotten. An old warrior, known as Domhnall 
Mugach, or Gloomy Donald, stepped forward, 
took off his bonnet, and pointing to his bald head 
exclaimed, This will do for a standard, and I 
promise that it will not go back a foot to-day. 
The two parties met at Struthan-nan-Ceann, or the 
streamlet of the heads ; the invaders were defeated 
with great slaughter. Shortly afterwards Lachlan 
Mor sent a much larger force to Coll. The result 
was that he made himself master of that island. 
Neil Mor had to flee for his life. He resided at 
Drimnacross, but left Drimnacross and went to 
live at Cill-bheag. Lachlan Mor's men were 
seeking for an opportunity to kill him during 
three years. At last twenty -four of them came 



Neil Mor and Neil Og. 387 

upon him by surprise in the middle of the night. 
He fled, but was overtaken at Clachan Dubh, 
and beaten to death in a most savage manner. 
The spot on which he was killed is still known as 
Dunan Neill, or Neil's Hillock. His real murderer 
was Dughall Ruadh Mac Ailpein, Dugald Roy 
Mac Alpin. He was slain in the latter part of 
1596 or the beginning of 1597. He was married, 
and left at least one son, Niall Og. 

Lachlan, seventh of Coll, seized four of the men 
who formed the party that killed Niall Mor. He 
came upon them as they were playing shinty at 
Traigh Chalgari, the shore of Calgary in Mull. 
He took them to Coll, kept them in confinement 
for some time, and then hung them on a gibbet 
on the top of Cnoc a Chrochaire, or the Hangman's 
Hill. In 1896, or thereabouts, four skeletons were 
found at the spot on which the hanging took place. 
Some suppose that they were the skeletons of 
Niall Mor's murderers. We suspect, however, 
that they must have been of more recent origin. 
At the same time we must confess that we know 
nothing about the nature of the soil on Cnoc a 
Chrochaire, or the time it would take skeletons to 
decay in it. It is possible that the men who were 
put to death by Lachlan of Coll deserved their 
fate. But it is also possible that if they had not 
gone in pursuit of Niall Mor their lives might 
have been terminated sooner than they were. We 
certainly think that if the villain who gave the 
finishing blow to Niall Mor was one of them, 



388 The Clan Gillean. 

Lachlan of Coll cannot be blamed for sending him 
to the gallows. 

II. Niall Og was only a young boy when his 
father was killed. Tradition states that imme- 
diately after his father's death he was taken to 
Coll, and carried thither in a creel by a Macquarrie. 
We must not deal with traditions as if they were 
acts of parliament. It would be folly to interpret 
them literally. They may be substantially true, 
yet at the same time contain a number of details 
which are purely ornamental. It may be taken 
for granted that Niall Og was taken to Coll shortly 
after his father's death. It is also likely enough 
that he was taken to Coll by a Macquarrie. We 
feel confident, however, that he must have been 
at least six or seven years of age, perhaps 
ten or eleven. We do not say that he was not 
carried in a creel ; he may have been. And cer- 
tainly, in a painting of the flight of Niall Og, we 
should rather see him in a big creel on Macquarrie's 
back than trotting along beside his protector. 

Apart from tradition, we consider it certain that 
Niall Og was brought to Coll shortly after the 
death of his father. We consider it also certain 
that on coming of age he received a farm from 
the laird of Coll. From what we know of the 
manly character of the Macleans of Coll, we 
cannot for a moment believe that they would treat 
with indifference or neglect the son and heir of 
the hero of Struthan nan Ceann. They might 
cut off the head of an enemy without just cause, 



The Macleans of Crossapol. 389 

but they would not forget the good deeds of a 
valiant friend. There was a Neil Maclean in 
Gallanach, Coll, in 161 7. He was a prominent 
man, and may possibly have been the same person 
as Niall Og. 

The Macleans of Crossapol. 

I. Neil Maclean was tacksman of Crossapol in 
1773. He was paying seven pounds a year of rent, 
and was in very comfortable circumstances. Neil 
was born probably about the year 1724. He 
married, about 1750, Julia Stewart, and had nine 
children by her ; Donald, Margaret, Allan, Neil, 
Janet, Catherine, Flora, Una, and Ann. It is said 
that his wife was a grand-daughter of Hector 
Roy of Coll. She was born about 1734, and died 
about 1815. Donald, Neil's eldest son, studied 
for the ministry. Allan succeeded his father in 
Crossapol. Neil died young. Margaret was 
married to Charles Maclean of Gallanach. Janet 
was married to Captain Allan Macdonald of 
Darracha. Catherine died unmarried. Flora was 
married to Alexander Maclean, of Airleod, Coll, 
and had a son named Norman. Una was married 
to Allan, son of Malcolm Maclean. Ann was 
married, in 1796, to Neil Campbell of Treshnish 
and Sunipol, by whom she had Colin, Neil, 
Donald, John, Alexander, Archibald, and five 
daughters. 

II. Allan Maclean of Crossapol was born in 
1760. He married Mary, eldest daughter of John 



39° The Clan Gillean. 

Maclean of Langamull, by whom he had eight 
children ; Neil, John, Donald, Catherine, Chris- 
tina, Jessie, Julia, and Mary. He died in August, 
1 832, and was buried in the graveyard at Crossapol. 
Neil, eldest son of Allan, succeeded his father in 
Crossapol. John was born in 1810. He was 
a wine -merchant in London. He married, in 
1 83 1, Anne, daughter of Alexander Maclean of 
Kinnegharar, by whom he had two daughters, 
Catherine-Mary, and Christina-Julia. Catherine 
was married to Dr. William Lovejoy, New York ; 
and Christina, to George Rose Innes, solicitor, 
London. John died in August, 1886. Donald 
was studying for the ministry. He died in March, 
1834, m tne twenty -second year of his age. 
Catherine, eldest daughter of Allan, was married 
to the Rev. Hugh Maclean, who went to America. 
She had ten sons. Christina was married to 
Hugh Maclean in Edinburgh. Janet was married 
to a Mr. Barron in Glasgow. Mary was married 
to the Rev. A. Fraser in Greenock. 

III. Neil was the last Maclean of Crossapol. 
He was born in 1805, and died on January 10th, 
1855. He was a thorough gentleman in every 
respect. He was never married. 

The Descendants of the Rev. Donald 
Maclean. 

I. Donald, eldest son of Neil Maclean of 
Crossapol, was born in 1752. He graduated at 
Aberdeen in 1773, and was licensed to preach in 



Rev. Donald Maclean's Descendants. 391 

1779. He acted for some time as chaplain to the 
Reay Fencibles. He became minister of Small 
Isles in 1787. He preached once a month in 
Rum, once a month in Muck, once a quarter in 
Canna, and the remainder of the time in Eigg, 
where he resided. He married, in 1777, Lillias, 
daughter of Alexander Maclean, of Gott, Tiree, 
and had five children by her; Margaret, Alexander, 
Neil, Hector, and Julia. He died in 1810. Neil, 
his second son, was born in 1784, and studied for 
the church. He became assistant minister of Coll 
in 1809, minister of Small Isles in 181 1, and min- 
ister of Tiree and Coll in 181 7. He married, in 
1814, Isabella, daughter of Major Alexander 
Macdonald of Vallay, by whom he had five 
children ; Donald, Harriet, Mary-Flora, Alexan- 
der, Lillias, and Isabel. Donald was a doctor, 
and died in Tiree. Alexander died in Australia. 
Lillias was married to William Mitchell, and Isabel 
to Alexander W. Cameron. The Rev. Neil Mac- 
lean died on August 26th, 1859. Hector, third 
son of the Rev. Donald Maclean, was minister of 
Lochalsh, and died in 1869. 

II. Alexander, eldest son of the Rev. Donald 
Maclean, was born in 1782. He studied medicine, 
and became surgeon to the 64th Foot in 18 13. He 
was present at the battle of Waterloo in 181 5. 
He returned to Britain in 1817, and married at 
Plymouth, Ann - Maria, daughter of Captain 
Williams, R. N. He died on board of a ship, near 
Plymouth, on March 5th, 1818. His body was 
taken ashore and buried in Plymouth. 



39 2 The Clan Gillean. 

III. Alexander, only child of Dr. Maclean, was 
born on May 8th, 1818, two months after the 
death of his father. He joined the 94th regiment 
in India, in 1839, and was for eight years adjutant 
in it. He became captain in 1852. He married 
in February, 1857, Olivia-Louisa-Elizabeth, only 
daughter of the Rev. Samuel E. Day, vicar of 
the parish of St. Philip's and St. Jacob's, Bristol. 
In 1859 he was appointed staff officer of pensioners 
in Omagh, Tyrone County, Ireland. He retired 
from the army with the rank of lieutenant-colonel 
in July, 1878. After his retirement he resided at 
Bristol, England. He had by his wife five children ; 
Alexander-William- Day, Mary-Olivia, Hector- 
Arthur- Coalson, Edith- Louisa -Maud, Louisa- 
Maud, and Henry- Donald- Neil. He died on 
November nth, 1892. Hector, his second son, 
was born in Omagh, Ireland, on November 9th, 
1861. He resides in London with his mother. 
He takes a deep interest in the history and gene- 
alogy of his clan, and is in every respect worthy 
of the good Maclean name which he bears. H. D. 
Neil was born at Clifton in June, 1872. He joined 
the King's Own Scottish Borderers at Mean Meer 
in India in April, 1893. He is a lieutenant, and 
was with his regiment in the Tirah expedition. 
Mary -Olivia was married, in 1884, to Captain 
William Holcombe Francis, of the 28th regiment. 
Edith died young. Louisa-Maud was married, in 
1894, to Dr. Francis Henry Hawkins, of Reading. 

IV. Alexander W. D. Maclean was born at 



Rev. Donald Maclean's Descendants. 393 

Bristol, on February 6th, 1858. He was educated 
at Clifton College, and prepared for the army at 
Sandhurst. He entered the 94th regiment, or 
Connaught Rangers, in 1878. He became a lieu- 
tenant in 1879, and was in the same year in the 
Zulu War. He was promoted to the rank of 
captain in 1883, and to that of major in 1893. 
He was for five years adjutant of the 3d battalion 
of his regiment at Castlebar in Ireland, and was 
highly esteemed by all classes. He married in 
July, 1889, Rose- Eaden- Abinger, daughter of 
Admiral William Fenwick. He is at the present 
time commandant at Kailana in India. 

The origin of the Macleans of Crossapol is a 
matter of uncertainty, and has consequently occa- 
sioned a good deal of controversy. Unfortunately 
the Ardgour MS. makes no reference to them. 
We are thus left, to a very large extent, at the 
mercy of family traditions. According to one 
tradition, Neil Maclean, tacksman of Crossapol in 
1773, was the son of Allan, son of Neil Og, son 
of the heroic Neil Mor. As Neil Mor was slain 
at least as early as the beginning of 1597, it is 
certain that the Neil of 1773 was not his great- 
grandson. According to another tradition, the 
Neil Maclean who was in Crossapol in 1773 was 
the son of Hector, son of Ewen, son of John 
Garbh, eighth of Coll. There are several diffi- 
culties in the way of accepting this view. There 
is no reference, either to the marriage or son of 
Ewen, John Garbh's son, in the Ardgour MS. He 



394 The Clan Gillean. 

may, however, have been married ; and whether 
he was married or not he may have left a son 
named Hector. As Ewen was killed at Inver- 
keithing in July, 165 1, Hector, his son, must have 
been born at least as early as the spring of 1652. 
Now it is tolerably certain that the Neil who was 
tacksman of Crossapol in 1773 was not born 
earlier than 1724. Thus, then, if he was the son 
of Hector, son of Ewen, son of John Garbh of 
Coll, Hector must have been seventy-two years of 
age when his son Neil was born. Such, of course, 
may have been the case ; but before believing that 
it was the case one would require some evidence. 
If the Neil of 1773 was really the son of Hector, 
we should expect to find one of his sons called 
Hector. As, however, the names of his children 
are all taken from the baptismal register, it may 
be assumed as a fact that he had no son named 
Hector. At the same time it is possible that his 
father's name was Hector. In support of the 
contention that the Neil of 1773 was the son of 
Hector, son of Ewen, son of John Garbh, we are 
told that there is a tradition in favour of it. The 
weak point about this argument is that there is 
another tradition which asserts that Neil was the 
son of Allan, son of Neil Og. 

In July, 1642, Hector Maclean of the Isle of 
Muck, John Maclean in Crossapol, and others, wit- 
nessed a charter granted by John Garbh, eighth of 
Coll. It is evident that John Maclean in Crossapol 
was a man of good standing among the Macleans 



The Last Macleans of Giurdal. 395 

of Coll. He was in all probability tacksman of 
Crossapol, and is the first Maclean with whom we 
meet there. It is at least possible that this John 
— whoever he may have been — was the progenitor 
of the Macleans of Crossapol. He may have had 
a son named Neil, and Neil may have had a son 
who was known as Neil Og. 

The Last Macleans of Giurdal. 

John Maclean was born in Grishipol, Coll. He 
settled in the Isle of Rum, and was tenant of the 
farm of Giurdal. He married Mary, daughter of 
Allan Maclean of Grishipol, and had by her six 
children ; Charles, Allan, Neil, Catherine, Ann, 
and Janet. Allan succeeded him in Giurdal. 

According to the late Hugh Maclean of Ruel 
Cottage near Dunoon, Neil Og of Crossapol had 
two sons, Allan and Charles, and three daughters. 
Allan succeeded him in Crossapol, and had two 
sons, Neil and Lachlan. Neil was tacksman of 
Crossapol in 1773. Lachlan had three sons; 
Allan, Lachlan, and Hugh. He had also several 
daughters, one of whom was married to John 
Mackinnon in Grimsary, Coll. Charles, second 
son of Neil Og y had a son named John. John, 
Iain Mac Thearlaich, held the farm of Kinloch 
Scrisort in Rum. He married Rachel, daughter 
of Hector Campbell in Rum, and had by her four 
children ; Allan, Charles, Margaret, and Flora. 
Allan succeeded his father in Kinloch Scrisort. 
Charles became tenant of Giurdal. He married 



396 The Clan Gillean. 

a sister of Allan Maclean of Giurdal, and had by 
her three sons, Allan, Hector, and Alexander, all 
of whom emigrated to Cape Breton in 1826. 
Flora, second daughter of Iain Mac Thearlaich, 
was the grandmother of Hugh Maclean of Ruel 
Cottage. 

Allan Maclean of Kinloch Scrisort, was factor 
of Rum and Muck. He married Margaret 
Macdonald, of the Isle of Eigg, and had by 
her five children ; John, Donald, James, Mary, 
and Isabel. John died unmarried. Donald 
studied for the ministry. He was ordained, and 
settled in the parish of Small Isles, in 1818. He 
married, in 1822, Isabella, daughter of Charles 
Maclean of Gallanach, Coll. He died on board of 
a steamer between Greenock and Glasgow on 
October 6th, 1839. He left five children ; Allan, 
Lachlan, Margaret, Breadalbane, and Maria. 
Allan remained in Scotland with his mother. 
Lachlan and the three girls went to Melbourne, 
Australia, about the year 1853. James, third son 
of Allan of Kinloch Scrisort, occupied the farm of 
Gallanach in Muck from 1826 to 1836. He married 
Mary, daughter of Eachann Ghiurdail, and had 
by her two sons, Hector and John. The whole 
family emigrated to Melbourne in 1838. 

IV. The Macleans of Achnasaul. 

I. Allan, second son of Hector, fifth of Coll, 
was the progenitor of the Macleans of Achnasaul. 
He married Anne, daughter of Macdonald of 



The Macleans of Achnasaul. 397 

Ardnamurchan, by whom he had three sons ; 
Hector, Ranald, and Donald. He was with Sir 
Lachlan Mor at Gruinnart in 1598. He accom- 
panied Lachlan Maclean of Coll to the Isle of 
Skye in 1601, when the latter was trying to effect 
a reconciliation between the Macleods and the 
Macdonalds. The descendants of Hector and 
Ranald settled in Ireland. 

II. Donald, youngest son of Allan of Achna- 
saul, lived for some time in the island of Gunna, 
near Coll. Owing to a disagreement between the 
laird of Coll and himself, he was compelled to 
leave Gunna. He went to Skye, and took up his 
abode in Troternish. He was married, and had a 
son named Archibald. 

III. Archibald married a daughter of Mackas- 
kill of Rudh'-an-dunain, and had two sons by 
her, Allan and Rory. In a fight with swords 
between Allan and one of the Macsweens of Skye, 
the latter was killed. Immediately afterwards 
Allan and his brother Roderick left Skye, and 
settled at Kilmory in the Isle of Rum. The 
descendants of the former were known as Sliochd 
Ailein Mhic Ghilleasbuig, and those of the latter 
as Sliochd Ruairidh Mhic Ghilleasbuig. 

IV. Allan, son of Archibald, had two sons, 
Donald and Lachlan. 

V. Donald, son of Allan, had four sons ; Allan, 
John, Angus, and Neil. 1. Allan settled in Coll, 
where he had charge of the laird's galley, birlinn 
Thighearna Chola. He died unmarried at Tota- 



398 The Clan Gillean. 

ranald. 2. John succeeded his father in Kilmory. 
3. Angus left* a son named Rory, who was known 
as Rory Mor, and was ground officer in Muck. 
John, only son of Rory Mor, settled in Coll. He 
married Ann Maclean, by whom he had four sons ; 
James, Hector, Neil, and John. James and Hector 
were drowned at Traigh Ghortain in Coll, about 
the year 1828. John and Neil died shortly after- 
wards. 4. Neil obtained a croft in Totaranald in 
Coll. He was married, and had a large family of 
sons and daughters. All the sons, except Donald, 
emigrated to Cape Breton. Donald remained in 
Totaranald. He had four sons. Two of them 
emigrated to Cape Breton ; and two, Donald and 
John, remained in Coll. Donald had two sons, 
Donald and Archibald. John was a carpenter, and 
was known as Iain Saor. He was married and 
had seven sons. 

VI. John, second son of Donald, had three 
sons ; Donald, Allan, and Archibald. Donald 
succeeded his father in Kilmory. Allan emigrated 
to Pictou, Nova Scotia. Archibald had two sons, 
Donald and John. 

VII. Donald, eldest son of John, had thirteen 
children ; John, Allan, Rory, Neil, Lachlan, Donald 
the elder, Hector, Donald the younger, Ewen, 
Mary, Catherine, Ann, and another daughter. 
Lachlan, Hector, and the two Donalds, died at an 
early age. Allan, the second son, lived at Kinloch 
in Rum. He had seven children ; Hector, Peter, 
Donald, Kenneth, and three daughters. Hector, 



The Macleans of Achnasaul. 399 

Peter, Donald, and two of the daughters, emi- 
grated to Upper Canada in 1852. Kenneth and 
the eldest daughter remained in Rum with their 
father. Kenneth was the last Maclean that lived 
in Rum. But he was not allowed to die there. 
He was removed to Perthshire. He died at Glen- 
lyon in 1896. He was about seventy-eight years 
of age. Rory, third son of Donald, lived in 
Rothesay. He had five children ; Neil, Donald, 
John, Allan, and Mary. Neil, fourth son of Donald, 
married Flora Macdonald, from Kilchoan, Ardna- 
murchan, and had three sons ; Lachlan, Donald, 
and James. Lachlan, eldest son of Neil, lived in 
Oban. He married Ann Maclean, by whom he 
had five children ; Donald, James, Archibald, 
and two daughters. Donald, second son of Neil, 
is tenant of the farm of Arileoid in Coll, for which 
he is paying a rent of ^125 a year. He married, 
in i860, Catherine, daughter of Donald MacColl 
in Lismore, and had by her eight children ; Neil, 
Donald, Flora, James, Archibald, Hector, Lachlan, 
and Alexander. James, third son of Neil, is a 
plumber by trade, and resides in Greenock. He 
is well versed in the history of the Macleans. He 
married, in 1869, Margaret Macbride from Arran, 
by whom he has seven children ; Flora, Mary, 
Kate, James, Alexander, Christy, and Margaret. 
Ewen, fifth son of Donald, was married and had 
two sons, Robert and Donald. 

VIII. John, eldest son of Donald, had two 
sons, Donald and John. Donald had three sons ; 



400 The Clan Gillean. 

Allan, Donald, and John. John, the younger son 
of John, son of Donald, came to Cape Breton 
in 1835. 

The Descendants of Lachlan Maclean. 

Lachlan Maclean, son of Allan, son of Archibald, 
son of Donald of Gunna, lived in Kilmory in the 
Isle of Rum, and was noted for his great strength. 
John, Lachlan's son, married a daughter of Donald 
Maclean, his uncle, and had by her John Mor and 
other children. John Mor was six feet four-and- 
one-half inches in height, and stout in proportion. 
He married, first, Marion, daughter of Murdoch 
Maclean, son of the Gobha Crubach, and had 
by her four sons ; John Og f Neil, Hector, and 
Murdoch Mor. He married, secondly, Christy, 
daughter of Neil Maclean, Niall Mac Thearlaich 
Mhic Iain Ghobha, and had by her six children ; 
Mary, Christy, Flora, Marion, Margaret, and 
Donald. John Mor died in Kilmory at the age of 
fifty-five. The whole of his family, except Mary 
and Donald, came to Cape Breton in 1826. Mary, 
Mairi Mhor, was married to Charles Maclean. 
She died in Muck in May, 1838. Donald seems 
to have died young. John Og, eldest son of John 
Mor, married a Miss Macquarrie, by whom he 
had John, Marion, and other children. John was 
born in Rum in 1813. He married Margaret 
Macarthur, by whom he had Hector, John, Mar- 
garet, Donald, Hugh, Mary, and Allan. He died 
in 1897. Hector, his eldest son, was born at Port 
Hastings, Cape Breton, in 1843. 



The Descendants of Rory Maclean. 401 

The Descendants of Rory Maclean. 

Rory, second son of Archibald, son of Donald 
of Gunna, lived at Kilmory in Rum. John, son 
of Rory, was a blacksmith by trade, and was 
known as Iain Gobha, and, also, as an Gobha 
Criibach. He was for some time in the army in 
Holland. He left two sons, Murdoch and Charles. 
Charles was in the army, and served for some 
time in America, under Sir Allan of Brolas. He 
had two sons, Neil and Donald, the latter of 
whom was reputed the swiftest man in Rum. 
Donald had a son named Angus, who had three 
sons, Donald, Gillespick Mor, and John. Donald, 
eldest son of Angus, left three daughters. Gilles- 
pick Mor was a cooper in Rothesay, and had five 
sons ; Angus, Neil, John, Donald, and Archibald. 
Donald was a lawyer in Greenock. John, third 
son of Angus, settled in Eigg, and had two sons, 
Archibald and Lachlan. 

Murdoch, elder son of John Gobha, had five 
sons, Rory, Lachlan, Neil, Hector, and Allan, all 
of whom came to Cape Breton, except Lachlan, 
who died in Rum. Lachlan left two sons, Donald 
and Allan. Both came to Cape Breton. 

Rory, eldest son of Murdoch, married Ann 
Macisaac, by whom he had William, Murdoch, 
John, Neil, Charles, Allan, and Donald. Rory 
and all his sons, except Murdoch, left Rum for 
America in 1810. They were a night at Oban, 
attended a dance, and afterwards took part in a 



402 The Clan Gillean. 

big fight with some militiamen who had unwisely 
provoked their wrath. Rory and his family spent 
two years in Prince Edward Island, and then 
removed to Broad Cove, Cape Breton. William 
was for some time in the army. He settled at 
Chimney Corner in Cape Breton. Murdoch was 
pressed into the navy, and served seven years in 
it. He came to Cape Breton some time after his 
father. He married Mary Macgregor, by whom 
he had three sons ; Rory, Gregor, and Charles. 
John married Margaret Macdougall, by whom he 
had Murdoch, Duncan, Charles, John, Catherine, 
Ann, Mary, and Margaret. Mary was married to 
that excellent Highlander, Alexander Campbell, 
ex-M. P. P., Strathlorne, Cape Breton. 

V. The First Macleans of Grishipol. 

I. John, third son of Hector, fifth of Coll, 
was the first Maclean of Grishipol. He married 
Finvola, a daughter of the laird of Mackinnon, by 
whom he had a son named John. 

II. John, second of Grishipol, married a 
daughter of Roderick Maclean, a merchant in 
Glasgow, and had by her four sons ; Lachlan, 
John, Hugh, and Charles. John, the second son, 
graduated at the University of Edinburgh, in July, 
1672, and became minister of Kilmorie in Kintyre 
in 1688. After the revolution he went to Ireland, 
and was for some time minister of Coleraine, and 
afterwards prebendary of Referchen. He was a 
man of extraordinary bodily strength. He was 



The First Macleans of Grishipol. 403 

married twice. By his first wife, a daughter 
of Lachlan Macneill of Lossit, he had several 
daughters. By his second wife, a daughter of 
James Cubbage, he had three sons ; John, Clot- 
worthy, and James. John was minister of Clocher. 
He married Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. Philip 
Matthews, by whom he had three sons ; Lachlan, 
James, and Henry. Lachlan was a doctor, and a 
very clever man. He was for some time agent of 
the Nabob of Arcot. He was lost on his passage 
home to Britain. Clotworthy, second son of the 
Rev. John Maclean, was a doctor. James, the 
third son, was minister in Rachray. Charles, 
fourth son of Roderick of Grishipol, was the 
ancestor of Lachlan Maclean of Kilmore in Mull, 
whose son, John, was a wine-merchant in Glasgow 
in 1838. 

III. Lachlan, third of Grishipol, Lachainn Mac 
Iain Mhic Iain, married Ann, daughter of Neil 
Maclean of Drimnacross, by whom he had four 
sons ; Roderick, John, Hector, and Allan. 

IV. Roderick, fourth of Grishipol, had a natural 
son named Neil. He married, first, Marion, 
daughter of John Macdonald of Moydart, and 
widow of Lachlan of Coll. He married, secondly, 
Marion, daughter of Donald Maclean of Ari- 
ghoulan, by whom he had two sons, Lachlan and 
John. Neil had a son named John, who went to 
Jamaica. John, Roderick's third son, died young 
and unmarried. 

V. Lachlan, son of Roderick of Grishipol, was 



404 The Clan Gillean. 

a captain in the military service of the East India 
Company. He married, first, a daughter of Hector 
Maclean, his uncle ; and, secondly, a daughter of 
Alexander Maclean of Sollas in Uist. He had 
two sons and several daughters. 

VI. The Macleans of Muck. 

I. Hector, second son of Lachlan, seventh of 
Coll, received the island of Muck from his father. 
He seems to have been educated for the ministry. 
He was a man of ability, and of noble appearance. 
He commanded under Sir Lachlan of Duart in 
Montrose's army, and distinguished himself very 
highly at the battle of Kilsyth. 

The Mac Ians of Ardnamurchan were bitter 
enemies to Hector of Muck, because his father 
had brought some of them to justice for their mis- 
deeds. They were also privately instigated by their 
enemy, Sir Donald Campbell of Ardnamurchan, 
to do all the harm they could to the Macleans of 
Coll, and thus bring themselves into trouble. 
Under the leadership of Mac Ian Gheir, a noto- 
rious thief and robber, a party of them landed at 
night in Muck, and began to drive away all the 
cattle they could find. Hector of Muck fired at 
them, but missed them. He was immediately 
surrounded and slain. 

Hector of Muck was married to Julian, daughter 
of Allan of Ardtornish, and according to the Ard- 
gour MS. had two sons by her, Hector and Hugh. 
It is certain that he had also a son named Lachlan. 
He was succeeded by Hector. 



The Macleans of Muck. 405 

II. Hector, second of Muck, married a daughter 
of Hector Roy, ninth of Coll, and had by her 
three children ; Hector, Lachlan, and Julian. 
Hector married Marion, daughter of Lachlan 
Maclean of Calgary ; but both died at an early 
age, and without issue. Lachlan succeeded his 
father in Muck. Julian was married to Alexander 
Maclachlan, bailie of Tiree. 

III. Lachlan of Muck was a captain under Sir 
John of Duart at Sheriffmuir in 17 15. He mar- 
ried Mary, daughter of James Macdonald, of 
Balfinlay, and had four children by her ; Hector, 
Donald, Catherine, and Mary. Hector succeeded 
his father. Donald succeeded Hector. Catherine 
was married to Charles Maclean of Scour ; and 
Mary, to Alexander Maclean of Sollas. 

IV. Hector, fourth of Muck, married Isabel, 
second daughter of Donald Macleod, third of 
Talisker, but died without issue. 

V. Donald, fifth Maclean of Muck, was a very 
popular man. He held the farm of Cornaig in Coll, 
and was known as Fear Chornaig. He married, 
first, Flora, daughter of the Rev. Archibald Mac- 
lean, minister of Ross, by whom he had one son, 
Lachlan. His wife died on May 1st, 1756. He 
married, secondly, Florence, daughter of John 
Maclean of Treshnish, by whom he had one son 
and three daughters ; John, Florence, Mary, and 
Ann. John, his second son, was a captain in the 
army. He married Isabel, daughter of John 
Maclean, eldest son of Donald of Kilmoluaig in 



406 The Clan Gillean. 

Tiree, and had four sons by her ; Donald, John, 
Alexander-Campbell, and James. Donald lived 
in Bermuda. He left one son and one daughter. 
John was a captain in the 43d regiment. He 
married a daughter of Grant of Red Castle, and 
had four sons. He lived for some time in New- 
South Wales. Alexander-Campbell was a mer- 
chant in China. James was killed in the Crimea. 
Ann, youngest daughter of Donald of Muck, 
was married to Lieutenant Neil Maclean of the 
Leda frigate. Donald of Muck died in Edinburgh 
on August 31st, 1790. He was buried at Killinaig 
in Coll. He was the subject of a good elegy 
by Archibald Maclean of Tiree, the well-known 
Gilleasbuig Laidir. 

VI. Lachlan, son of Donald Maclean of Muck, 
was for some time an officer in the 84th, or Royal 
Highland Emigrant regiment. He was appointed 
captain in the North Carolina Dragoons, and did 
good service under General Sir Henry Clinton, 
for which he received public thanks. He returned 
to Britain on half-pay in 1783, but re-entered the 
army in a short time. He was compelled by ill 
health to retire from active service, and to accept 
an official situation. He was for a short time 
lieutenant-colonel of the Breadalbane Fencibles. 
He lived in London during the latter part of his 
life. He held the rank of major in the army, and 
was deputy -lieutenant, or resident governor, of 
the Tower of London. He married Hannah- 
Barbara, daughter of Captain Cottnam, and had 



The Macleans of Muck. 407 

twelve children by her; Francis -John - Small, 
Donald, Charles, Lockhart, John, George, Hector, 
Elizabeth, Florianne, Mary-Gavinne, Henrietta, 
and Susan. He died in 1816 in the sixtieth year 
of his age. He is buried in London. Donald, his 
second son, was married, and had a son named 
Lachlan-Hector. Charles was married, and left 
one son, Lachlan. Lockhart was married, and left 
a son named Seymour. John was married, and 
left two sons, Henry-Grey and Lachlan. George 
died unmarried. Hector was first-lieutenant of 
the Crescent frigate, which was wrecked off the 
coast of Jutland. He lost his life while gallantly 
attempting to save the lives of those who had been 
wrecked along with him. Florianne was married 
to James Macleod of Raasay, with issue — John, 
James, Loudon, Francis, and Hannah- Elizabeth. 
John was the last Macleod of Raasay. Hannah- 
Elizabeth was married to Sir John Campbell of 
Ardnamurchan. Mary-Gavinne, third daughter 
of Lachlan, was the celebrated London beauty of 
1 8 16 and 181 7. She was married to Captain 
William C. Clarke. She lost her health in the 
trying climate of India. She returned to Britain 
in 1828, and died in 1833. Henrietta was married 
to Major Poore. 

VII. Francis John Small Maclean held an 
appointment in the ordnance department. He 
married Margaret, daughter of I. Hemp, of Heme 
Hill, Surrey, by whom he had one son, Archibald. 
He was killed in the island of Dominica, while 
assisting to suppress an insurrection of natives. 



408 The Clan Gillean. 

VIII. Archibald, eighth representative of the 
Macleans of Muck, entered the army as an ensign 
in the 68th Durham Light Infantry. He served 
in the army eight years ; and then found it nec- 
essary to retire owing to impaired eyesight. He 
married Sarah- Elizabeth- Frances, daughter of 
Colonel Raynes of the 17th Dragoons, and had 
eleven children by her; Francis- Etherington, 
Herbert- Arthur, Fanny- Maria, Cottnam-Walter, 
Hector- Archibald, Charles- James, Septimius- 
Maitland, Isabel, Marion, Moira, and William. 
He died about 1883. Herbert, his second son, 
settled in Australia. He was married, and left 
sons and daughters. Fanny lives in London. 
Cottnam settled in Queensland. He married Ida 
Richardson, by whom he had two sons. Hector 
settled in New Zealand. He is married, and has 
several children. Charles-James resides in Lon- 
don. Septimius died young. Isabel, Marion, 
and Moira are married. William lives in London. 
He is married, and has a son and daughter. 

IX. Francis Etherington Maclean is the present 
representative of the Macleans of Muck. He 
lives in Australia. He married Jessie Brown, 
and has several sons and daughters. If the Coll 
estates were still in possession of the descendants 
of John Garbh, Francis Etherington would be 
laird. He would have inherited the estates ac- 
cording to the charter granted to Hugh, fourteenth 
of Coll, in February, 1756. 



Lachlan Mac Hector's Descendants. 409 

The Descendants of Hugh Mac Hector. 

Hugh, second son of Hector, first of Muck, 
married a daughter of the laird of Coll, by whom 
he had three sons ; John, Hector, and Donald. 
John settled in Sandyneesher in Rum. He married 
Marion Macqueen, a sister of the Rev. Donald 
Macqueen, by whom he had a son named Hugh. 
Hugh married Flora, daughter of John Maclean, 
Iain Mac Thearlaich Mhic Neill Oig, and had six 
children by her ; John, Hector, Hugh, John Og, 
Flora, and Marion. John married Mary, daughter 
of John Macaulay, and grand-daughter of the 
Rev. Angus Macaulay, and had by her four sons 
and two daughters ; Hugh, John, Donald, Hector, 
Florence, and Marion. John left Rum about the 
year 1830. Hugh married Anne, daughter of 
John Cameron in Strathchur, Argyleshire, and 
had six children by her ; John, James, Donald, 
Hugh, Mary, and Anne. He lived near Dunoon, 
Scotland, and died a few months ago. 

The Descendants of Lachlan Mac Hector. 

Lachlan, son of Hector, first of Muck, had a 
son named John. John married a Miss Campbell, 
and had by her Lachlan and Alexander. Lachlan 
was drowned at the age of twenty-two. Alex- 
ander married Eunice Mackinnon, by whom he 
had six children, Lachlan, Donald, Malcolm, 
Christy, Mary, and Catherine, all of whom emi- 



410 The Clan Gillean. 

grated to Cape Breton in 1826, except Catherine. 
Lachlan, known as Lachainn Mac Alasdair, was 
born in 1763. He was ground officer in Rum for 
about thirty years. He married Mary Mackay, 
by whom he had Donald Ban and Marion. He 
came to Cape Breton in 1826, and settled in Strath- 
lorne. Donald Ban married Christy, daughter of 
John Mor Maclean, of Kilmory in Rum, and had 
twelve children by her; John, Lachlan, Alexander, 
Murdoch, Allan, Donald E., Hector, Neil, Marion, 
Isabella, and Christy. Donald E.is a loyal mem- 
ber of his clan. Donald Ban died in 1874, aged 
eighty years. 

The Macleans of Haremere Hall. 

Alexander-Campbell, third son of Captain John 
Maclean, son of Donald of Muck, was a merchant 
in China, where he succeeded in amassing a large 
amount of wealth. He purchased Haremere Hall 
in the county of Sussex, England, where he lived 
during the latter part of his life. He married, in 
1825, Mary Elizabeth Travers, of Fairfield, in 
Devonshire, England, and had six children by her; 
Henry-Travers, John-Lachlan, George- Francis, 
Alexander, Hector-Morgan, and Adelaide. His 
estate was sold after his death, and the proceeds 
divided among his surviving sons. 

1. Henry-Travers, eldest son of Maclean of 
Haremere Hall, was a captain in the Indian army 
of Bombay. He married Marion, daughter of 
Captain Donald Maclean, son of Lachlan of Muck. 



The Macleans of Drimnacross. 411 

He died in 1863. He had a posthumous son, 
Henry-Travers, who resides in New Zealand. 

2. John-Lachlan was a merchant in China. 
He married, in 1858, Mary, daughter of Henry 
Huttleston, of New Bedford, Massachusetts, by 
whom he had seven children ; Lachlan-Percival, 
Cameron - Tra vers, Edmund - Henry, Hector- 
George, Mary, Annie, and Lilian. 

3. George- Francis was a merchant in China. 
He married a daughter of J. W. Cole, by whom 
he had six children ; Margaret-Gavinne, Emilie- 
Fordyce, Alexander- Henry- Herbert, Rosalie- 
Abbe, Lowry-Cole, and Adelaide -Travers. He 
died in 1885. 

VII. The Macleans of Drimnacross. 

Neil, third son of Lachlan, seventh of Coll, 
lived on the farm of Drimnacross in Mull. He 
served under Sir Lachlan of Duart in the time of 
Montrose. He was at the battle of Inverkeithing 
in 1 65 1, and was severely wounded. He married 
Florence, daughter of Allan Macdonald of Morar, 
by whom he had two sons and six daughters ; 
Hector, Allan, Marion, Ann, a daughter whose 
name is not known, Florence, Margaret, and Janet. 
Marion was married to John Garbh, bailie of 
Ross. Ann was married to Lachlan Maclean of 
Grishipol. The third daughter was married to 
Hector Macquarrie of Ormaig. Florence was 
married to Charles Mac Neil Ban in Tiree. 
Margaret was married, first, to Donald Maclean 



412 The Clan Gillean. 

of Arighoulan ; and, secondly, to Ewen Maclean of 
Treshnish. Janet was married to Charles Maclean, 
of the Gallanach family. 

Hector, elder son of Neil of Drimnacross, 
occupied the farm of Torrestan in Coll. He 
married Florence, daughter of Lachlan Maclean 
of Calgary, by whom he had one son, Lachlan, 
his successor. Hector was a captain under Sir 
John of Duart at the battle of Killiecrankie in 
1689. He was killed at Dunkeld shortly after- 
wards. Lachlan, second of Torrestan, served 
for some time as a volunteer in General Murray's 
regiment in Holland. He married Margaret, 
daughter of the Rev. Alexander Macdonald, 
minister of Sunart, by whom he had a daughter 
named Marjory. Marjory was married, in 1736, 
to the Rev. Donald Macqueen, minister of Small 
Isles, and had two sons, Allan and Edmund. 
Allan became minister of North Uist in 1770, 
and died in 1801. Edmund became minister of 
Barra in 1774, and died in 181 2. 

Allan, second son of Neil of Drimnacross, 
occupied the farm of Grishipol in Coll. He married 
Catherine, daughter of Ewen Maclean of Balli- 
phetrish in Tiree, and had by her six children ; 
Lachlan, John, Neil, Allan, Florence, and Mary. 
Lachlan was a merchant in Glasgow, and took a 
deep interest in his clan. He left a daughter 
named Catherine, who was married to Daniel 
Burrell of Annat Hill. John succeeded his father 
in Grishipol. Neil was a doctor. Allan was in 



The Macleans of Germany. 413 

the army. Both of them emigrated to Connecticut. 
Florence was married to Donald Maclean, of 
Calgary. Mary was married to John Maclean of 
Giurdal in Rum. 

John, second of Grishipol, married Ann, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. John Maclean, of Kilninian in 
Mull, and by her had John and Archibald, and 
two daughters. John was a merchant in Norfolk, 
Virginia. He was married and had one child, a 
daughter. Archibald settled in Germany. 

The Macleans of Germany. 

Archibald, second son of John of Grishipol, 
was a merchant in Dantzic. He married Mary 
Symson, by whom he had four sons ; John, Lach- 
lan, Archibald, and Henry. John lived in Dantzic. 
His present representative, whose name is also 
John, is an officer in the German army. Lachlan 
visited Coll about the year 1800, and died in 1831. 
His descendants live at Rodstock. Archibald, son 
of Archibald, or Archibald II., had two sons, 
Archibald and Hugh. Archibald III. had two 
sons, Archibald and Lachlan. Archibald IV. was 
born in 1842. He was premier-lieutenant of the 
Life Guards in the Franco- Prussian War. He 
received the Iron Cross for distinguished services. 
His son, Archibald V., visited Coll in 1896. The 
German Macleans have evidently retained the 
fighting propensities of their clan. It is pleasant 
to find that they have not forgotten the old High- 
land names. 



414 The Clan Gillean. 

The Descendants of Dr. Neil Maclean. 

I. Dr. Neil Maclean, third son of Allan of 
Grishipol, emigrated to America in 1736, and 
settled at Wethersfield, Connecticut. He re- 
mained there about two years, and then removed 
to Hartford, where he had an extensive practice. 
He married, first, in 1737, Hannah Stillman, by 
whom he had Lachlan, Allan, John, and Neil. 
He married, secondly, in 1757, Hannah Knowles. 
He died in 1784. Allan, his second son, was a 
doctor by profession. He married Mary Sloan, 
by whom he had Catherine, Allan, Polly, Peggy, 
Elizabeth, and James. He died in 1829. Allan, 
his elder son, was a sea-captain, and resided at 
Savannah. John, third son of Dr. Neil, was a 
farmer, and lived at Windsor. He married Sarah 
Gardiner, by whom he had Dolly, John, James, 
Harry, Sally, and Betsey. Harry, his third son, 
lived at Bloomfield. He married Susanna Gillett, 
by whom he had Betsey, Henry, John, Daniel- 
Goodwin, Susanna, and Alexander- Dana. He 
died in 1844. Neil, fourth son of Dr. Neil, 
followed the sea. He was married, and left nine 
children. 

II. Lachlan, eldest son of Dr. Neil Maclean, 
settled in Windsor, Connecticut. He married Lucy 
Humphrey, by whom he had Hector, Charles, 
Mary-Ann, Archibald, William, James, and Lucy. 
He removed with his family from Windsor to 
Whitestown, New York. He died in 1813. 



The Descendants of Allan Maclean. 415 

Hector, his eldest son, was a sea-captain, and died 
in Lisbon, Portugal, on August 5th, 1800. By 
his wife, Dolly Bissell, he left two children, Esther 
and Henry. The former was married to Morris 
H. Tucker. Charles, second son of Lachlan, and 
Archibald, the third son, were married and left 
issue. William, the fourth son, was a printer by 
trade. He started the Whitestown Gazette in 
1779, and the Cherry Valley Gazette in 1818. He 
married, first, Sukey Williams, by whom he had 
Albert, Adelaide, and Thomas. He married, 
secondly, Loise Gillette, by whom he had Amasa, 
Loise, Charles, Susan, Eliza, and William. 
Albert, his eldest son, married Rebecca Wilson, 
and left issue. Thomas died unmarried. Amasa 
married Louisa Elliston, by whom he had Joseph, 
Annie, and Sarah. Charles, fourth son of William, 
succeeded his father as publisher of the Cherry 
Valley Gazette. He married Mary Judd,by whom 
he had William-Oliver, Elizabeth, Charles- Dana, 
and John-Judd. William, fifth son of William, 
was a printer by trade, and lived at Cooperstown. 
He married Phcebe Webb, by whom he had one 
son, William-Melville. 

The Descendants of Allan Maclean. 

I. Allan, fourth son of Allan Maclean of Grishi- 
pol, was born at Kilbride in Coll on August 1st, 
1715. He left Scotland on July 22d, 1740, and 
landed in Boston on the 17th of the following 
September. He opened a shop in Hartford shortly 



416 The Clan Gillean. 

afterwards. He married, in 1744, Mary, daughter 
of James Loomis, and had by her Mary, Alexander, 
Jabez, and Susanna. He was a lieutenant and 
commissary in the British army in 1760. He 
settled on a farm at Vernon about 1763. He died 
in 1786. 

II. Alexander, elder son o( Allan, lived in Ver- 
non. He married Johanna, daughter of Jonathan 
Smith, and had by her Hannah, Alexander, 
Francis, Allan, Mary, and Rosanna. He died in 
1806. Hannah, his eldest daughter, was married 
to Elijah Fitch Reed, M. D., and had six children. 

1. Alexander, eldest son of Alexander, was a 
farmer in Manchester, Connecticut. He married, 
first, Betsey Thrall, by whom he had Alexander, 
John, Betsey, Clarissa, Allan, Mary, and Charles. 
He had, by a second wife, a son named William. 
He was generally known as Deacon Maclean. He 
died in 1843. Alexander, his eldest son, married 
Mary Meakins, by whom he had Alexander, 
Edwin, George-Allan, and others. John, second 
son of Deacon Maclean, married, first, Sarah 
Bunce,by whom he had Caroline, Rosanna, Sarah, 
John-Dwight, Charlotte, and Maro. He married, 
secondly, Rhoda Woodford, and had by her one 
daughter, Almena. Allan, third son of Deacon 
Maclean, married Eliza Woodbridge, and had one 
son, Christopher. Charles, the fourth son, mar- 
ried Octa Strong, by whom he had William-Tyler, 
Jerusha, Octa, Charles-Noble, Emma, Clara, and 
George-Lincoln. William, fifth son of Deacon 



The Descendants of Allan Maclean. 417 

Maclean, married, first, Mary T. Palmer, by whom 
he had Mary, William, Alfred, Clarence, and 
Arthur. He married, secondly, Helen Christian, 
and had by her Charles, John, Minnie, Frank, 
Edwin, Rosanna, Ernest, and Kate. 

2. Francis, second son of Alexander, lived on 
the old homestead in Vernon, a farm of about 300 
acres. He was a farmer, surveyor, and manufact- 
urer. He was a member of the state legislature 
for several years. He was also lieutenant-colonel 
of a militia regiment. He married, first, Roxey 
Mackinney, by whom he had Otis, Lora, Francis, 
Mary, John, and Rosanna. He married, secondly, 
Sarah Barre Childs, with issue — Edward, Roxey, 
Sarah, Harriet, Maria, Mary, and John-Hall. He 
died in 1861. 

3. Allan, third son of Alexander, was born in 
1781. He studied for the ministry, and was 
settled over the Congregational Church at Sims- 
bury, Connecticut, in August, 1809. He married, 
first, Sarah Pratt, with issue — Allan- Neal, Loyd, 
Charles- Backus, Sarah -Olmstead, and Dudley- 
Bestor. He married, secondly, Nancy Morgan. 
He was a tall, erect, and dignified-looking man. 
He was totally blind during the last twelve years 
of his life, but continued to preach. He died in 
March, 1861. He was pastor of the same church 
during the long period of fifty-one years and seven 
months. 

Allan-Neal, eldest son of the Rev. Allan Mac- 
lean, married Emeline Barber, and by her had 



41 8 The Clan Gillean. 

Allan, Calvin-Barber, and Thomas-Neil. Loyd, 
second son of the Rev. Allan Maclean, died 
unmarried. Charles- Backus, the third son, was 
pastor of the Congregational Church at Collins- 
ville, Connecticut. He married Mary D.Williams. 
He died at Wethersfield in 1873. Dudley-Bestor, 
fourth son of the Rev. Allan Maclean, lived in 
Simsbury. He married, in 1846, Mary Payne, by 
whom he had five children; Hannah - Bishop, 
Charles- Allan, John - Bunyan, Sally -Pratt, and 
George - Payne. John - Bunyan studied for the 
ministry. George-Payne is a lawyer in Hartford. 
Sally -Pratt was married to Franklin Lynde 
Greene. She is the authoress of "Cape Cod 
Folks," and other novels. 

VIII. The Macleans of Totaranald. 

I. John, second son of John Garbh, eighth of 
Coll, was the first Maclean of Totaranald. He 
was known as Iain Ruadh, or John Roy. He 
served under Sir Lachlan of Duart in Montrose's 
army. He was at Inverkeithing in 165 1, and was 
severely wounded in the head. He was taken 
prisoner, and was kept in custody for a long time. 
He had a natural son named Ewen. He married 
Marion, daughter of Allan Maclean of Ardgour, 
and had by her Allan, Hector, Ann, Margaret, 
and Florence. Ewen was married and left issue. 
Allan succeeded his father in Totaranald. Hector 
had a son named Allan, who had a son named 
Hector, who had a son named Lachlan, who left a 



The Macleans of Gallanach. 419 

daughter who was married to Norman Maclean. 
It is highly probable that Lachainn Mac Mhic 
Iain, the poet, was a son of John of Totaranald. 

II. Allan of Totaranald married Catherine, 
daughter of Roderick Macleod of Hamer, by 
whom he had two sons, Hector and Allan. Allan 
was drowned ere he had attained the age of 
manhood. 

III. Hector, third of Totaranald, married 
Julian, daughter of Alexander Maclachlan, bailie 
of Tiree, by whom he had two sons, Allan and 
Roderick. Allan settled in Ireland, and may or 
may not have been married. Roderick settled in 
Ireland, and was married there. 

The Macleans of Gallanach. 

I. Hector, eldest son of Donald of Coll, was 
the progenitor of the Macleans of Gallanach. He 
lived in Mull. He was married and had two sons, 
Charles and Neil Ban. His descendants were 
known as Sliochd Eachainn Mhic Dhomhnaill, or 
the offspring of Hector the son of Donald. Neil 
Ban resided at Balliscate, near Tobermory. He 
had a son named Charles, who settled in Coll, and 
had a son named John. John, Iain Mac Thear- 
laich, occupied the farm of Trialan. He had two 
children, Hector and Isabel. He died in 1760. 
His daughter was married to Donald Campbell. 
Hector had five children ; John, Flora, Isabel, 
Ann, and Jane. He died in 1818. John, Iain 
Mac Eachainn Mhic Iain, had five sons ; Hector, 



420 



The Clan Gillean. 



Charles, John, Lachlan, and Alexander. He died 
in i860. Hector, his eldest son, was for a long- 
time a mason in Glasgow. He emigrated to 
Macomb, Illinois. Lachlan was a minister in 
Australia. 

II. Charles, son of Hector, son of Donald of 
Coll, married Janet, youngest daughter of Neil 
Maclean of Drimnacross, and had by her a son 
named Lachlan. Charles fought at the battle of 
Culloden in 1746. 

III. Lachlan, son of Charles, was born in 1730. 
In his younger days he engaged in business in the 
Lowlands, but returned to the Western Islands in 
the course of a few years, and settled at Gallanach 
in Coll. He married Susanna, daughter of John 
Maclean of Treshnish, by whom he had Charles 
and other children. He died in 1802. 

IV. Charles, son of Lachlan, was born in 1760. 
He received a good education, and was a clear- 
headed and shrewd man. He kept a shop in 
Glasgow for a short time. He removed from 
Glasgow to Arinangour in Coll, where he also 
kept a shop. He entered into the kelp business 
and made a small fortune by it. He rented the 
farm of Gallanach in Coll, and was at the same 
time appointed factor of Coll. He purchased 
shortly afterwards the farm of Ardow in Mull. 
He married Margaret, daughter of Neil Maclean 
of Crossapol, by whom he had Lachlan, Margaret, 
Isabel, Sibella, and others. Margaret was married 
to a Mackinnon in Derrichuaig ; Isabel, to the 



The Macleans of Gallanach. 421 

Rev. Donald Maclean, minister of Small Isles ; 
and Sibella, to John Campbell of Cornaig in Coll. 
Charles of Gallanach died in 1829, and was suc- 
ceeded by his only son, Lachlan. 

V. Lachlan of Gallanach was born on July 21st, 
1789. He studied medicine. On leaving the 
university, he became manager of the Lochalsh 
estate. He took a lease of Talisker in Skye in 
1817. He leased the whole island of Rum in 
1825, and went to live there in the following year. 
He has been severely blamed for the evictions 
which took place from that island. He lost heavily 
through an expensive lawsuit and otherwise, and 
was reduced to poor circumstances. He left Rum 
in 1839, and went to Australia. He returned in 
1843, and entered upon the practice of medicine 
at Tobermory. He married, in 1823, Isabella- 
Mary, daughter of Captain Donald Mackenzie of 
Hartfield, and had eleven children by her; Donald- 
Alexander, who went to Australia with his father, 
left Melbourne for the gold-diggings in 1846, and 
has never been heard of since ; Alexander, who 
was a surgeon in the service of the East India 
Company ; Charles-Smith ; John-Mackenzie, who 
was a surgeon-major in the army ; Lachlan- 
Roderick, who died young ; Loudon-Francis, who 
is a civil engineer in India ; Margaret, who was 
married to Colonel A. A. Macdonell, and whose 
son, Professor Arthur Macdonell of Oxford, is the 
author of an excellent Sanskrit-English dictionary ; 
Jane- Mary, who died unmarried ; Anne-Flora, 



422 The Clan Gillean. 

who was married to Colonel John Anderson of the 
Royal Engineers; Elizabeth, who was married to 
the Rev. John Sharpe ; and Sibella- Christina. 
Dr. Lachlan Maclean died in 1882, at the advanced 
age of ninety-three. His wife died at Oban in 1S84. 
She was an excellent woman. 

VI. Charles Smith Maclean, third son of Dr. 
Lachlan Maclean, was born in Rum on December 
15th, 1836. He entered the army as an ensign in 
1853. He saw a great deal of service in India, 
China, and Afghanistan. He was recommended 
for the Victoria Cross for his heroic conduct at 
Delhi on September 14th, 1857. He received two 
severe wounds at Agra on the 10th of October in 
the same year. In 1887 he was appointed agent 
to the Governor-General of India for Khurasan 
and Seistan, his residence being at Mashad. In 
1888 he succeeded in inducing Ayub Khan to 
surrender to him. In 1889 he was appointed 
British consul-general for Khurasan and Seistan. 
In 1890-91 he laid out the boundary between Persia 
and Afghanistan in the district of Hashtadan. 
He erected the last pillar on May 24th, 1891. He 
returned to Europe in 1892. When leaving Persia 
he was presented with a sword of honour by His 
Majesty the Shah Nunorodeen. He resides at 
Newstead, Shanklin, Isle of Wight. He is a 
major-general in the army, a Companion of the 
Bath, and a Companion of the Order of the Indian 
Empire. He speaks, reads, and writes Gaelic, 
and is in every respect a man of whom his clan 



The Macleans of Gallanach. 423 

may well feel proud. Gu ma fada beo e is ceo de 
'thaigh. 

General Maclean married, fn 1869, Margaret- 
Macqueen, daughter of Peter Bairnfather, of 
Dumbarrow, Forfarshire, by whom he had four 
sons and three daughters ; Hector- Lachlan- 
Stewart ; Isabel - Margaret - Sophia - Hastings ; 
Maria - Penelope - Crighton ; Donald - Charles- 
Hugh; Colin-Kenneth; Sheila-Loudon-Lindesay ; 
and Alister-FitzHugh. Hector was born in a 
tent on the hill of Shekh, Budin, India, on 
September 13th, 1870. He was educated at Fettes 
College, Edinburgh, and Sandhurst. He entered 
the army in 1889, and was appointed lieutenant 
in the Queen's Own Corps of Guides at Marsdan 
in 1891. He took part in the Chitral campaign 
of 1895. He was appointed adjutant of the 
cavalry of the Guides in 1896. He was killed at 
Nawa Kila in the Upper Swat Valley, on August 
17th, 1897. He was a brave soldier and a skilful 
officer. Donald, second son of General Maclean, 
entered the Royal Scots in 1895 and was appointed 
lieutenant in 1896. 



CHAPTER XVI. 

Wxt Macleans of 6igha anb irlorbcrn. 

The Macleans of Gigha. 

I. Allan, second son of Lachlan Cattanach of 
Duart, was a man of ability, courage, and intense 
energy. He got a strong fleet under his com- 
mand, and made plundering expeditions to Ireland, 
the Lowlands, and parts of the Highlands. He 
received the name of Ailein nan Sop, or Allan of 
the straws, from the fact that he was in the habit 
of setting wisps of burning straw to the buildings 
in the districts invaded by him, and reducing them 
to ashes. He was one of the most celebrated 
plunderers that the Scottish Islands ever produced. 
About 1525 he plundered the lands of Lochbuie, 
and slew John, son of Lochbuie, and other persons. 
In 1535 Hector Mor, his brother, became security 
for his good behaviour towards Macdonald of 
Moydart. He attacked the Macneills of Gigha, 
slew their chief, and took possession of their lands. 
On July 28th, 1539, he received a "gift of the non- 



The Macleans of Gigha. 425 

entry mails of Gigha, Comeravoch, Tarbert, and 
other lands, for all terms since the death of Malcolm 
Macneill, last possessor thereof, and until the entry 
of the rightful heir." Shortly afterwards he slew 
the laird of Lehir, seized his estate, and kept 
possession of it. He was an active supporter of 
Donald Dubh in 1545, and in 1546 offered to assist 
in making James Macdonald of Islay Lord of the 
Isles. The Earl of Argyll secured his non-inter- 
ference by giving him the lands of Cille-Charmaig 
in Knapdale. It is said that it was through Sir 
James of Islay that he received Tarbert Castle and 
Gigha. It was probably owing to the favours 
bestowed upon him by Sir James that he was so 
ready to fight for him. He was not an ungrateful 
man ; he would help those that would help him. 
He never interfered with his brother Hector or any 
of his followers. It is indeed probable that in 
his attacks upon the lairds of Lochbuie, Moydart, 
Coll, Gigha, and Lehir, he was encouraged by 
Hector. It seems that he was always friendly 
towards Murdoch Gearr, Lochbuie's natural son. 
Ailein nan Sop plundered the Route in Ireland 
once, and the district of "Corca" twice. He 
plundered the lands of the Colquhouns near Loch- 
lomond. On a certain October night he made 
a raid into the district about Rothesay in Bute. 
He was accompanied by Murdoch Gearr. The 
sheriff collected a number of men to attack him, 
but Allan defeated his assailants and carried off 
a large drove of cattle. A few years before his 

84 



426 The Clan Gillean. 

death he gave up his predatory expeditions. 
His restless followers were displeased with his 
peaceful ways. On a certain day a large number 
of them were present at dinner in his castle. One 
of them was picking a rib of beef on which there 
was very little meat. He turned to the person who 
was sitting beside him and said, What a change has 
come over this house, when the bones are so bare ! 
Allan heard the remark, and understood what was 
meant. Immediately after dinner he said to his 
men, Let every birlinn be ready for sea this even- 
ing, and we shall try to get a little meat for the 
winter. Allan, at the head of his fleet, left Tarbert, 
directed his course towards the Clyde, and sailed 
up that river as far as Erskine Ferry, near Renfrew. 
He landed there, collected a large number of 
cattle, and took them home with him. This was 
his greatest plundering expedition; it was also his 
last. It was known as Creach na h-Aisne, or the 
Foray of the rib. It derived its name, of course, 
from the rib which happened to be the innocent 
occasion of it. Allan died at peace with his church, 
on his bed in Tarbert Castle, in the year 1551, and 
was buried with his ancestors on the sacred Isle of 
Iona. He was probably about fifty-three years 
of age. 

If any person is disposed to wonder that Ailein 
nan Sop was not sent to the gallows, let him 
consider these facts : first, that Allan was an 
accomplished warrior, that he had a strong fleet 
at his command, and that he had a large number 



The Macleans of Gigha. 427 

of daring followers ; and, secondly, that he had 
friends in the Earl of Argyll, Sir James Macdonald 
of Islay, and his own brother, Hector Mor. It 
would have taken a pretty strong force to catch 
Allan and bring him to task for his depredations. 
It is not always an easy matter to " bell the cat." 

Among the traditions about Ailein nan Sop are 
the following : — 

1. Lachlan Cattanach was exceedingly anxious 
to have an heir, and, as his wife, Elizabeth 
Campbell, had no children, he resolved to get rid 
of her. He had her placed upon the Lady's 
Rock, in order that she might be drowned. He 
married, as his second wife, a daughter of Campbell 
of Auchinbreck. He was deeply disappointed 
when he saw that she was likely to have no 
children. In an unguarded moment his wife 
happened to say to him that he would never have 
children. This remark annoyed him very much. 
By-and-by it began to be rumoured among the 
women of Mull that Treshnish's daughter was with 
child by Lachlan Cattanach. When Lachlan's 
wife heard this rumour she called together all the 
witches in Mull, and hired them to prevent the 
birth of her husband's child. The witches exerted 
their power so effectually that the child expected 
was never likely to make its appearance. At last 
a long-headed man from the west of Mull went to 
see the head witch, who lived at the east side. 
When he called upon her, she enquired for the 
news of the district to which he belonged. He 



428 The Clan Gillean. 

told her that the principal topic of conversation 
on the other side of the island was that Treshnish's 
daughter had given birth to a son. The witch 
was greatly disappointed, and became so enraged 
that she reduced to pieces all the instruments and 
charms used by her, and threw them into the fire. 
At that moment Treshnish's daughter was on her 
way from Treshnish to Duart. She became 
unwell in Gleann Mhurchaidh, and was under the 
necessity of resting. Her servants took the straw 
coverings off the horses, and prepared a bed for 
her in the most suitable place they could find. In 
this bed she gave birth to her child, a healthy and 
handsome boy. Owing to the influence of the 
witches the child had been carried by her during 
the long period of eighteen months. As soon as 
he was born he took up a handful of straw. It 
was owing to this fact that he was called Ailein 
nan Sop, or Allan of the straws. After the death 
of his second wife, Ailein nan Sop married Tresh- 
nish's daughter, and had by her Hector Mor, his 
successor. 

2. When Ailein nan Sop was quite young, a 
daughter of Macneil of Barra paid a visit to his 
father's family at Cairnburgh. Allan fell in love 
with her, but received no encouragement from her 
that would lead him to think that she would con- 
sent to marry him. He seized her one day with 
the intention of committing an outrage. She 
succeeded in escaping from his hands, and fled 
towards the brink of a precipice. Allan pursued 



The Macleans of Gigha. 429 

her, but was attacked and pitched over the rock by 
a man who happened to see what was going on. 
Fortunately for himself he fell on a projecting 
shelf of the rock, and was thus saved from imme- 
diate destruction. The deliverer of his intended 
victim compelled him to give him a solemn promise 
that he would never molest the young lady again, 
and that he would not try to take vengeance upon 
himself for his treatment of him. Having given 
these promises, he was rescued from his perilous 
position. He left Cairnburgh immediately after- 
wards, joined a piratical ship, and in a short time 
obtained command of it. The place on which 
Allan fell when he was thrown from the precipice 
is still known as Uirigh Ailein nan Sop, or Allan 
nan Sop's Couch. 

3. Lachlan Cattanach had an illegitimate son by 
a beautiful young woman of his own clan. As 
the child happened to be born on a heap of straw, 
he came to be known as Ailein nan Sop, or Allan 
of the straws. Maclean of Lehir was captivated 
by the charms of Allan's mother, and married her. 
Allan, who was distinguished from other youths 
of his own age by his strength and comeliness, 
paid frequent visits to his mother. Her husband 
disliked the boy, and resolved to insult him in such 
a manner that he would never come back again. 
One morning Allan's mother saw her son coming 
up from the sea-shore towards the house. She 
immediately put a cake, which he might have for 
his breakfast, on the griddle. When the boy came 



430 The Clan Gillean. 

into the house his step-father snatched up the cake, 
gave it to Allan and closed his hands about it, 
saying, Here, Allan ! here is a cake which your 
mother has got ready for your breakfast. Allan's 
hands were severely burned. He left Lehir, went 
off to sea with pirates, and in the course of a few 
years became commander of a small fleet. Some 
time after the death of his mother, Allan — now 
laird of Gigha, Tarbert, and other places — resolved 
to pay a visit to Lehir. His step-father received 
him with great kindness, pretended to take a deep 
interest in his welfare, and strongly urged him to 
put Macquarrie of Ulva to death and take posses- 
sion of his lands. Allan sailed to Ulva next day 
and was entertained by Macquarrie in the most 
friendly manner. On the day after his arrival he 
told Macquarrie the object oi his visit, but stated 
that the hospitality he had received had removed 
all his bad intentions from his mind. Macquarrie 
at once replied that he felt confident such a wicked 
purpose never originated in his own mind, and 
that it must have been suggested to him by the 
laird of Lehir — the man who had treated his 
mother in such a cruel manner, and had burnt his 
own fingers with the griddle-cake. I have been 
always your friend, said Macquarrie, but the laird 
of Lehir has not, and his estate will suit you fully 
as well as mine. Allan went back to Lehir, put 
the laird to death, and took possession of his lands. 
To what extent the foregoing traditions are 
founded upon facts we are not able to determine. 



The Macleans of Gigha. 431 

We know, however, that they contain several 
statements which are entirely contrary to facts. 
Treshnish's daughter was Lachlan Cattanach's 
first wife. We have never seen it affirmed that 
Hector Mor was a natural son ; but Hector Mor 
and Allan had the same mother. We find Allan 
described in the Register of the Privy Seal, on 
August 3d, 1547, as "Allan McClane, brother- 
german of Hector McClane of Duart. " As 
Allan was thus a son of Lachlan Cattanach by 
Lachlan's wife, it is outrageously unreasonable 
to think that he was born on a heap of straw. 
It is not at all probable that Allan was of so brutal 
a nature as to attempt to commit rape. As Allan's 
mother was Lachlan Cattanach's first wife, there 
can be no ground for thinking that she was ever 
married to the laird of Lehir. It has never been 
asserted that Lachlan divorced her. As the 
Macquarries were faithful followers of Hector 
Mor of Duart, it is not at all likely that Allan 
would go to Ulva with the intention of slaying 
their chief. 

Ailein nan Sop, or Allan Maclean of Gigha, 
Tarbert, and Torloisk, left two natural sons, 
Hector and John, both of whom were legitimated 
on August 3d, 1547. He left also a natural 
daughter. Hector succeeded his father in his 
estates. John settled in Jura, and was known as 
Iain Diurach. 

II. Hector, eldest son of Ailein nan Sop, was 
known as Eachann Mac Ailein, or Hector Mac 



432 The Clan Gillean. 

Allan. He received a gift of the non-entry mails 
of Gigha and certain lands in Kintyre and Islay 
on January 30th, 1552. He married Janet Camp- 
bell, daughter of Archibald, fourth Earl of Argyll, 
widow of Lachlan Og of Duart, and mother of 
Lachlan Mor, but had no children by her. He 
tried to get the estate of Duart for himself, and, 
evidently, to do away with Lachlan Mor and John 
Dubh of Morvern. He was beheaded in Coll by 
Lachlan Mor's orders in 1578. He left a natural 
son, Ailein Og. 

III. Ailein Og y or Ailein Mac Eachainn, was 
legitimated on June 7th, 1573. He was thus in a 
position to succeed to his father's estate ; and also 
to Duart, if Lachlan Mor and John Dubh of 
Morvern could be destroyed. He was a bitter 
enemy to both. He was a brave and cunning 
man. He left a natural son named Charles. 

IV. Charles, son of Ailein Og, was legitimated 
on June 7th, 1573. He married Flora, daughter 
of Macneil of Barra, by whom he had at least 
one child, a daughter named Margaret. Hector, 
sixth of Treshnish, married his widow, as his 
second wife. John, seventh of Treshnish, married 
his daughter. 

John Diurach. 

John, second son of Ailein nan Sop, settled in 
Jura, and was the first Iain Diurach, or John of 
Jura. Two of his sons, John Og and Donald, 
were legitimated on June 7th, 1573. Donald was 



The Macleans of Morvern. 433 

seized by Lachlan Mor of Duart, and imprisoned 
in Cairnburgh Castle in April, 1578. He was set 
at liberty through the interference of the Privy 
Council, in April, 1579, or shortly afterwards. 

According to tradition, John Maclean, a native 
of Mull, fled to Jura on account of some unfriendly 
act committed against his chief. He was a strong, 
fierce, and lawless man, and had several sons who 
were in every way like himself. He hated taxes 
with a bitter hatred, and always refused to pay 
them. Iain Dubh Caimbeul, Black John Campbell, 
seized two of his horses for his taxes, and sold 
them in Inverarv. He compelled John Dubh, 
however, at the point of the sword, to swear to 
him that he would pay him the price of the horses. 
John Dubh kept his oath, and never tried again 
to make John Diurach pay taxes. 

The John Diurach who settled in Ballimartin 
was either John, son of Ailein nan Sop, or John 
Ogj eldest son of John, son of Ailein nan Sop. 
He was thus either a son or grandson o( the 
famous Allan. It is likely that he fled from Jura 
to Tiree in 157S. 

The Macleans of Morvern. 
John Dubh, second son of Hector Mor of 
Duart, Iain Dubh Mac Eachainn Mhoir, was a 
man of ability and good sense. He received from 
his brother, Hector Og of Duart, in May, 1573, a 
tack of certain lands in Morvern and Islay, and 
was at the same time appointed bailie of Morvern 



434 The Clan Gillean. 

and other places. He fell in love with his first 
cousin, Margaret, daughter of Hector, fifth of 
Coll, but seems to have been unable to get the 
dispensation required for a lawful marriage. He 
got over this difficulty by handfasting with her. 
He had at least one son by her, Donald Glas. 
He married, first, Mary, daughter of John Gorm 
Campbell of Lochnell, and relict of John Stewart 
of Appin. He had one son by her, Allan of 
Ardtornish. He married, secondly, Margaret, 
daughter of Archibald Campbell of Ardintenny, 
and had two sons by her, John Garbh and Charles. 
John Dubh was put to death by Angus Macdonald 
of Islay, in July, 1586. His descendants are 
popularly known as the Macleans of Morvern. 
Donald Glas, his eldest son, lost his life in the 
explosion of the Florida in 1588. 

I. The Descendants of Allan Mac Ian Duy. 

Allan, eldest son of John Dubh, was known as 
Ailein Mac Iain Duibh, or Allan Mac Ian Duy. 
He succeeded his father as bailie of Morvern, and 
is described as such in 1592. He lived at Ardtor- 
nish. He was at the battle of Glenlivet in 1594, 
and was saved from falling into the hands of the 
Gordons by the valiant Lachlan Odhar of Aird- 
chraoishnish. He took part in the battle of 
Benvigory in 1598. He was a man of ability and 
influence, and was well-off. He married Una, 
daughter of John Mac Ian of Ardnamurchan, and 
had by her ten children ; Hector of Kinlochaline, 



The Macleans of Kinlochaline. 435 

Charles of Ardnacross, Donald Glas, Mary the 
elder, Mary the younger, Margaret, Janet, Julia, 
Christina, and Finvola. Donald Glas died without 
issue. Mary the elder was married to Gillean, 
son of Lachlan Mor ; Mary the younger, to Allan, 
son of Lachlan Mor ; Margaret, to Macneil of 
Barra ; Janet, to Hector of Torloisk ; Julia, to 
Hector of Muck ; and Christina, to Maclean of 
Kingerloch. 

The Macleans of Kinlochaline. 

I. Hector, eldest son of Allan Mac Ian Duy, 
was the first Maclean of Kinlochaline, and the 
third chieftain of the Macleans of Morvern. He 
possessed those lands in Morvern of which his 
father and grandfather had been tacksmen and 
bailies. He also owned some lands in Mull and 
Tiree. He became laird of Kinlochaline some 
time after 1622. He commanded a company of 
men in Ireland in the rebellion of 1641. He mar- 
ried, first, Janet, daughter of Lachlan Og Maclean, 
first of Torloisk, and had two sons by her, John 
and Lachlan. He married, secondly, Margaret, 
daughter of Robert Campbell of Glenorchy, relict 
of John Cameron, and mother of the celebrated 
Sir Ewen Dubh of Lochiel. He had one son by 
his second wife. John, his eldest son, succeeded 
him in his possessions. 

II. John was severely wounded at the battle of 
Inverkeithing in 1651. He married, first, Mary, 
daughter of John Campbell of Lochnell, by whom 



436 The Clan Gillean. 

he had three children ; Hector, Allan, and Janet. 
He married, secondly, Una, daughter of John 
Garbh, eighth of Coll, but had no issue by her. 
Janet was married to John Cameron of Glen- 
dessary. 

III. Hector, son of John, married Janet, 
daughter of Hector Maclean, second of Torloisk, 
and had by her a son named Angus. 

IV. Angus served for some time as a volun- 
teer in General Murray's regiment in the Dutch 
service. He was a captain under Sir John of 
Duart at Sheriffmuir in 17 15. He married, first, 
Janet, daughter of John Cameron of Glendessary. 
He had several children by her, but they all died 
young. He married, secondly, Ann, daughter of 
Ranald Macdonald of Kinloch- Moydart. He 
died on May 8th, 1735. He was succeeded in his 
estate by Charles Maclean of Drimnin. 

The Macleans of Drimnin, Calgary, Grulin, 
and Other Places. 

Charles, second son of Allan Mac Ian Duy, 
was tacksman of Ardnacross in Mull. He was 
invariably spoken of as Tearlach Mac Ailein, or 
Terlach Mac Allan. He purchased the lands of 
Drimnin from the Earl of Argyll, and gave them 
to his eldest son. He married Mary, daughter of 
Allan of Ardgour, and had by her nine children ; 
Allan of Drimnin, Lachlan of Calgary, Allan of 
Grulin, Donald of Aros, Hector, Ewen, Ann, 
Finvola, and Mary. Ann was married to Alex- 
ander Macdonald of Kinloch-Moydart. Flora was 



The Macleans of Drimnin. 437 

married, first, to John Macquarrie of Laggan- 
Ulva, and, secondly, to Captain Andrew Maclean, 
the poet. Mary was married to Hugh Cameron. 
We meet with Terlach Mac Allan and all his sons, 
except Allan of Drimnin, in Cairnburgh Castle in 
December, 1680. 

1. The Macleans of Drimnin. 

I. Allan, eldest son of Terlach Mac Allan, or 
Charles Maclean of Ardnacross, was the first 
Maclean of Drimnin. He was an exceedingly 
handsome man. He married Mary, daughter 
of John Cameron of Callart, by whom he had 
three children ; John, Donald, and Margaret. 
Allan of Drimnin died at the age of twenty-nine. 
John, his eldest son, succeeded him. Donald, his 
second son, married Florence, daughter of Lachlan 
Maclean of Calgary, by whom he had Lachlan 
and several daughters. Lachlan went to Ireland 
and settled at Mullach-Glas, near Dundalk. He 
married and left issue. Margaret, only daughter 
of Allan of Drimnin, was married to Allan Mac- 
lean, of the Torloisk family. 

II. John, son of Allan, married Mary, daughter 
of John Criibach of Ardgour, by whom he had 
Allan and Charles. He died, like his father, at 
the age of twenty-nine. He was succeeded by 
Allan, his elder son. 

III. Allan died unmarried, and, like his father 
and grandfather, at the age of twenty-nine. He 
was succeeded by his brother Charles. 

IV. Charles served for some time in the navy. 



438 The Clan Gillean. 

He was short in stature, but strongly built. He 
was hot-tempered and apt to commit rash acts. 
He struck the laird of Macleod with his fist, on 
the street in Edinburgh. He took hold of a 
schoolmaster, who was charged with lying by a 
mean shoemaker, put him across his knees, and 
thrashed him with the shoemaker's strap. He 
was the subject of several pieces of semi-sarcastic 
poetry by John Mac Allan, the famous Muli bard. 
He was kind and manly, and brave to rashness. 
He had a natural son named Lachlan. He 
married Isabel, daughter of John Cameron of 
Erracht, by whom he had Allan, John, Donald, 
Lachlan, and two or three daughters. He was 
killed at Culloden in 1746. Lachlan, his eldest 
son, was a captain under him at Culloden, and was 
also slain there. Lachlan was married, and left a 
son named Allan. Allan, second son of Charles, 
succeeded his father in Drimnin. John, the third 
son, married Margaret, daughter of Donald Camp- 
bell of Scamadale, by whom he had three sons ; 
Donald, Charles, and Colin. He was lost in the 
Sound of Mull. Donald, his eldest son, was a 
doctor. It is said that he died in Nova Scotia, 
and left a numerous issue. It is also said that 
Charles died in Nova Scotia, that he was married, 
and left issue. Colin was a lieutenant in the army. 
He married Helen, daughter of Cameron of Callart, 
by whom he had one son and one daughter. He 
died in Jamaica. Donald, fourth son of Charles 
of Drimnin, was a surgeon in Colonel Mont- 



The Macleans of Drimnin. 439 

gomery's Highland regiment. He settled in New 
York. Lachlan, the fifth son, was a planter in 
Jamaica, and died there in 1764. Marjory, eldest 
daughter of Charles of Drimnin, was married to 
Donald Cameron of Erracht. The celebrated 
General Sir Allan Cameron of Erracht was her 
son. 

V. Allan, fifth of Drimnin and sixth of Kin- 
lochaline, was the eighth chieftain of the Macleans 
of Morvern. He was born in 1724. He was 
wounded in the battle of Culloden. He was 
served heir male special, in 1749, to John Maclean 
of Kinlochaline in Knock in Morvern, Killean in 
Mull, and Scarinish in Tiree. He married, first, 
Ann, daughter of Donald Maclean of Brolas, 
and had by her Charles, Una, and others. He 
married, secondly, Mary, daughter of Lachlan 
Maclean of Lochbuie, by whom he had Donald, 
John, Mary, Louisa, Catherine, and others. He 
was an excellent man, and was highly respected. 
He died in 1792. Charles, his eldest son, succeeded 
him. Donald succeeded Charles. John was a 
surgeon in the 79th Highlanders, and died at 
Martinique. Una was married to Ewen Cameron, 
of the family of Erracht. Mary was married to 
Dr. Hector Maclean, author of a small work on 
the plague. Louisa was married to a man named 
Wood. Catherine was married to Captain John 
Campbell, of the Royal Navy, and had seven 
children ; Elizabeth, Allan, Mary, Margaret, Jane, 
Lillias-Grant, and Donald. Captain Campbell died 



44o The Clan Gillean. 

in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. One of 
Allan of Drimnin's daughters was married to 
Captain Stewart, of the Royal Navy, and another 
to Ranald Macdonald of Glenturret, who was an 
officer in the 79th regiment. 

VI. Charles of Drimnin and Kinlochaline, 
married Maria, eldest daughter of Sir Allan Mac- 
lean of Brolas. He received a third of Sir Allan's 
estate by his wife, and seems to have purchased 
the shares which belonged to her two sisters. He 
was a careless, imprudent, and extravagant man, 
and got deeply into debt. The final result was 
that, in 1798, or thereabouts, his estates were sold 
to pay his creditors. 

VII. Donald, second son of Allan of Drimnin, 
was known as Domhnall Ruadh nan Drimnean, 
or Donald Roy of Drimnin. He was a writer to 
the signet in Edinburgh. He lived during the 
latter part of his life at Kinloch in Mull, and is 
generally referred to as Donald of Kinloch. He 
married Lillias, youngest daughter of Colquhoun 
Grant, a lawyer in Edinburgh, and had by her 
sixteen children ; Christina, Allan, Colquhoun, 
Mary, Lillias, Ann, Hector, Margaret, Isabella, 
John, Charles, Jane, Alexander, Archibald, An- 
drew, and Fitzroy-Jeffreys-Grafton. Allan was a 
lieutenant in the 79th Highlanders, and was 
severely wounded at the battle of Toulouse, on 
April 10th, 1814. He died in 1818. Colquhoun 
was an officer in the Royal Navy. He died on the 
west coast of Africa in 1822. Hector was killed 



The Macleans of Drimnin. 441 

while capturing a slave dhow in the West Indies, 
in 1818. John died unmarried. Alexander died 
in 1818. Archibald was a writer to the signet in 
Edinburgh. Fitzroy was also a lawyer. Chris- 
tina was married to Murdoch Maclean of Lochbuie; 
and Isabella, to Alexander Crawford. 

VIII. Charles, fifth son of Donald Roy of 
Kinloch, was born in Edinburgh in 1806. He 
lost his eyesight at the age of sixteen, from a 
virulent form of Egyptian ophthalmy. He was, 
at the time, attending a college in London and 
preparing for entering the army. Being now 
unfitted for a military life, he entered the University 
of Edinburgh and studied for the ministry. He 
passed all his examinations successfully, but the 
General Assembly of the Church of Scotland 
refused to sanction his being inducted into a 
pastoral charge. He came to Canada in 1836, 
and purchased a farm at Seymour, Ontario. He 
married, in 1837, Jane-Jessie, daughter of Captain 
Campbell of Kintra, and had by her ten children ; 
Lillias- Grant, Donald, Jane- Campbell, Colin- 
Campbell, Jane-Jarvis, William-Bruce, Sibella- 
Adelaide- Crawford, Archibald- Murdoch, Alex- 
ander-Campbell, and Charles. He was a man of 
high culture, and a good musician. He died at 
Kingston, Ontario, in 1872. Colin, his second 
son, was drowned at the age of fourteen. William 
died at the age of nineteen. Archibald is a doctor 
at Leadville, Colorado. He is married, and has a 
son and daughter. Alexander is a doctor at Salt 



442 The Clan Gillean. 

Lake City. He married Susan Maroner, by 
whom he has three children ; Ailene, Donald, 
and Kenneth. Charles is a doctor at Hancock, 
Michigan. He is married, and has four sons and 
three daughters. 

IX. Donald, eldest son of Charles Maclean, is 
a doctor in Detroit. He is married, and has two 
children, Donald and Annie. He is the present 
representative of John Dubh of Morvern. 

Dr. Andrew Maclean. 

Andrew, eighth son of Donald of Kinloch, 
was born in Edinburgh in 1812. He graduated 
as a medical doctor in 1832. He was appointed 
surgeon in the 64th Foot in 1833. He retired 
from the army as deputy inspector-general in 1S78. 
He is still living, and resides in Church House, 
Kew, Surrey. 

Dr. Maclean married, in 1838, Clara, daughter 
of Henry Holland Harrison, and had eleven 
children by her ; Harry-Aubrey de Vere, Donald- 
Grant, Fitzroy-Beresford, Allan-Bruce, Charles- 
Gordon, Archibald- Douglas, Clara- Rosa, Alice- 
Lillias, Edith-Kathleen, Louisa-Flora, and Minnie- 
Margaret. Donald died in the twenty-second year 
of his age. Fitzroy studied medicine, and was ap- 
pointed surgeon in the army in 1880. He is at the 
present date a surgeon -major. He married, in 
1889, Mary Norris, daughter of the Rev. J. Erskine, 
of Wycliffe Rectory, Yorkshire. Allan is in the 
consular service. Archibald entered the Royal 



The Macleans of Calgary. 443 

Artillery as second lieutenant in 1882, but resigned 
his commission in 1889. He is married, and has 
one son. Clara resides with her parents. Alice 
is married to Surgeon-General C. D. Madden, C.B. 
Edith is married to Colonel C. W. Fothergill. 
Louisa was married to General Sir Duncan A. 
Cameron. Minnie died in Morocco. 

Harry-Aubrey de Vere, eldest son of Deputy 
Surgeon-General Maclean, was born on June 15th, 
1848. He entered the British army in 1869. He 
resigned his commission in 1876, and accepted 
an appointment as M Instructor in Drill and Dis- 
cipline," in the army of the Sultan o( Morocco. 
He holds the rank of kaid or chief. He is a 
fearless and energetic man, and has had a number 
of thrilling experiences and narrow escapes. He is 
an excellent horseman and a good marksman, and 
is always ready to run risks in the Sultan's service. 
He is very popular among the Moors. 

Kaid Maclean has a Scottish piper, named John 
Macdonald Mortimer. With him six Moors are 
receiving instruction in playing, and are making 
good progress. All the pipes are decorated with 
ribbons of the Maclean tartan. 

Kaid Maclean was married in 1875, and has 
one son, Andrew de Vere, and three daughters. 
His son was born in 1882, and is preparing for 
the army. 

2. The Macleans of Calgary. 

1. Lachlan, second son of Terlach Mac Allan, 
was tacksman of Calgary. He married, first, 



444 The Clan Gillean. 

Florence, daughter of Farquhar Fraser, dean of 
the Isles, by whom he had Donald and Florence. 
He married, secondly, Anne, daughter of John 
Maclean of Totaranald, by whom he had Charles, 
Allan, Peter, and Marion. He was succeeded by 
his eldest son, Donald. Florence was married, 
first, to Hector Maclean of Torrestan, and, second- 
ly, to Donald, son of Allan Maclean of Drimnin. 

II. Donald of Calgary married, first, Susanna, 
daughter of Duncan Campbell of Inverawe, by 
whom he had Charles, Alexander, and Allan. 
His wife died in 1 7 1 5, aged thirty-one years. He 
married, secondly, Florence, daughter of Allan of 
Grishipol, with issue — Lachlan and Jean. Charles, 
his eldest son, died young. Alexander succeeded 
him in Calgary. Allan, his third son, was a lieu- 
tenant under Charles of Drimnin, and was killed 
at Culloden. 

III. Alexander of Calgary married Mary, 
daughter of the Rev. John Maclean of Kilninian, 
and had by her Charles, Duncan, and Donald. 
Charles went to Jamaica. Duncan died in the 
navy. Donald was also in the navy. He settled 
in some part of America. 

3. The Macleans of Grulin. 

I. Allan, third son of Charles of Ardnacross, 
was the first Maclean of Grulin. He married 
Una, daughter of Donald Macquarrie of Ulva, by 
whom he had Lachlan, Charles, John, Margaret, 
and Janet. He died about 1720. Lachlan, his 



The Macleans of Grulin. 445 

eldest son, succeeded him in Grulin. Charles lived 
in Killunaig, and John in Pennygoun. Margaret 
was married to Hector Maclean of Kilmory. 
Janet was married to John Dubh Campbell of 
Achaghuarain, by whom she had fourteen sons 
and three daughters, all of whom grew up. Mary, 
the eldest daughter, was married to Magnus 
Morison in Penmore; and Ellen, the second 
daughter, to Charles Macgregor in Ardmore. 

II. Lachlan of Grulin was born about the year 
1670. He received a good education, and was an 
intelligent, prudent, and highly-esteemed man. 
He was served heir to his father in March, 1721. 
He married, first, Janet, daughter of John Mac- 
leod, of Bernera, by whom he had Hector and 
Una. He married, secondly, Ann, daughter of 
John Campbell of Kirkton. He died about the 
year 1 75 1 . His daughter Una was married to 
Alexander Macgillivray of Pennyghael in Mull. 

III. Hector, only son of Lachlan of Grulin, 
was a doctor by profession. He spent a few years 
in Flanders and Holland, apparently as a surgeon 
in the army. After his return he settled in Glas- 
gow, and lived there for a number of years. He 
spent the latter part of his life at Erray, near 
Tobermory. He was a man of ability and liter- 
ary culture, and took a deep interest in the history 
and poetry of his clan. He collected a large 
number of very valuable Gaelic poems. He 
married Catherine, only daughter of Donald Mac- 
lean of Coll, by whom he had one daughter, 



446 The Clan Gillean. 

Mary. Dr. Johnson spent a night at his house, 
and pronounced Mary the most accomplished lady 
that he had found in the Highlands. Dr. Maclean 
died about 1784. Mary died in 1826. 

The Macleans of Killunaig. 

Charles of Killunaig was the second son of 
Allan of Grulin. He studied law, but never fol- 
lowed it as a profession. He married Marion, 
daughter of John Maclean of Tarbert, by whom 
he had ten children ; Allan, Hector, Donald, 
Allan Og, John, Alexander, Lachlan, Archibald, 
Isabel, and Anne. He died in the sixty-ninth year 
of his age. 1. Allan, his eldest son, was a lieu- 
tenant in the Dutch service. He married Isabel, 
daughter of Donald Campbell of Scamadale, 
by whom he had two sons, Charles and Allan. 
Charles was a lieutenant in the military service of 
the East India Company, and was killed in the 
war with Hyder Ali in 1754. Allan was a planter 
in Jamaica, and also died in 1754. 2. Hector 
resided at Torranbeg. 3. Donald lived at "the 
Queen's Ferry." He married Mary Mean, by 
whom he had James, John, Christopher, Mary, 
and Catherine. James was a merchant in Kings- 
ton, Jamaica. He married Mary-Ann, daughter 
of John Maclean in Kingston. John, second son 
of Donald, died unmarried. Christopher was 
married and had two sons. 4. Allan Og was a 
surgeon, and died at the age of twenty -four. 
5. John was a planter in Jamaica, and resided at 



Hector of Torranbeg. 447 

Kingston. He married Marion, daughter of 
Fortunatus Duvaris, by whom he had Charles, 
Thomas, Mary-Ann, and another daughter. The 
two sons died unmarried. Mary-Ann was married, 
first, to James Maclean, Donald's son ; and, sec- 
ondly, to Dr. Alexander Grant. 6. Alexander 
was the first Maclean of Pennycross. 7. Lachlan 
was a lieutenant in the Black Watch, and was 
killed at Havana in 1762. 8. Archibald was in 
partnership with his brother John in Jamaica. He 
died unmarried. 

Hector of Torranbeg. 

Hector, second son of Charles Maclean of 
Killunaig, lived at Torranbeg in Mull. He 
married Julia, daughter of Allan Maclean of 
Suic, of the Lochbuie family, and had by her 
eight children; Allan, John, Alexander, Archibald, 
Ann, Mary, Catherine, and Alice. Ann was 
married to Alexander Mackinnon of Derryguaig ; 
Mary, to Lachlan Ban Maclean of Bunessan ; 
Catherine, to Alexander Sinclair in Kintyre ; and 
Alice, to Archibald Maclean of Pennycross. 
Allan, eldest son of Hector of Torranbeg, was a 
merchant in Kingston, Jamaica. John was tacks- 
man of Grulin, and was served heir to his father 
in July, 1799. Alexander was lieutenant-colonel 
of the 2d West India regiment. Archibald was 
born in 1758. He was a captain in the New York 
volunteers. He was severely wounded at the 
battle of Eutaw Springs, September 8th, 1781. 



448 The Clan Gillean. 

He settled on the Nashwaak River in New Bruns- 
wick, Canada. He represented the county of 
York in the legislature for upwards of twenty 
years. He married, first, a Miss French, by whom 
he had Allan, Salome, and other daughters. He 
married, secondly, Susan Drummond, by whom 
he had Archibald and John. He died in 1829. 
Allan, his eldest son, was a lieutenant-colonel in 
the militia, and died in 1871. Salome, eldest 
daughter of Captain Archibald Maclean, was mar- 
ried to James S. Howard in Toronto. 

The Macleans of Pbnnycross. 

I. Alexander, sixth son of Charles Maclean of 
Killunaig, was a medical doctor. He lived in the 
Ross of Mull. He married, in 1 760, Una, daughter 
of Alexander Nfacgillivray of Pennyghael, and 
had by her two children, Archibald and Catherine. 
He purchased the lands of Pennycross about 1798. 
He died in 1800. Catherine, his daughter, was 
married to Donald Maclean, of the Royal Scots. 

II. Archibald, only son of Dr. Alexander 
Maclean, was born in 1761, and was served heir to 
his father in 1800. He was for some time major 
of the 3d regiment of the Argyleshire Fencibles. 
He was the writer of the Pennycross MS. He 
married Alice, daughter of Hector Maclean of 
Torranbeg, and had by her nine children ; Alex- 
ander, Allan-Thomas, Charles-James, Mary, John, 
Julia, Hector, Lachlan, and Archibald- Donald. 
Alexander succeeded him in Pennycross. Allan- 



The Macleans of Pexnycross. 449 

Thomas, his second son, was born in May, 1793. 
He entered the army as cornet in the 13th Light 
Dragoons in 1809. He served in this regiment 
throughout the Peninsular War, and also at Water- 
loo, where he commanded it. He spent thirty-two 
years in India without returning home. He was 
appointed major-general in 1854, and lieutenant- 
general in 1S61. He married, in 1843, Agnes 
Furlong, by whom he had three daughters; Agnes, 
Alice, and Margaret. The last named was married 
to Baron de Pollandt. Charles-James, third son 
of Archibald of Pennycross, entered the 79th 
Highlanders in 1813. He carried the colours at 
Ouatre Bras and Waterloo. He was subsequently 
a lieutenant in the 31st Foot. He died at Calcutta 
in May, 1837. John, fourth son of Archibald of 
Pennycross, was a lieutenant in the 2d West India 
regiment. He died at Nassau, New Providence, 
in 1822. Hector, the fifth son, was in a mercan- 
tile establishment in London, and died in 1834. 
Lachlan, the sixth son, was a lieutenant in the 
Ceylon Rifles. He died at Colombo in 1830. 
Archibald- Donald, the seventh son, was deputv 
commissary-general in Bermuda. 

III. Alexander, third of Pennycross, was born 
in 1 791, and succeeded his father in 1830. He 
met with losses, borrowed money, and got deeplv 
into debt. The fall in the price of kelp was to a 
large extent the cause of his difficulties. He mar- 
ried, in 1740, Charlotte-Brodie, daughter of John 
Maclean, of Elrick, and had by her two sons and 

37 



450 The Clan Gillean. 

three daughters ; Archibald-John, Allan-Thomas- 
Lockhart, Alice, Charlotte, and Mary. He died 
on March 8th, 1876. 

IV. Archibald-John, fourth and last Maclean of 
Pennycross, was born on March 6th, 1843. He 
was for some time engaged in mercantile pursuits. 
He was under the necessity of parting with his 
estate in 1888. He visited the United States and 
Canada in 1893, and spent a few days with us in 
Belfast. He is a good-hearted, cheerful, and pleas- 
ant man ; and is, so far as is known to us, the 
present representative of the Macleans of Grulin. 
He married, first, in 1868, Isabella Alexandrina 
Simon, by whom he had eight children ; Julian- 
Archibald, Charles-Alexander-Hugh, Isabel-Juliet, 
Norman-Henry, Allan-Fitzroy, Elsie-Una, Muriel, 
and Violet. His wife died in 1886. He married, 
secondly, in June, 1890, Clara-Isabel, daughter 
of W. H. Rudkin, of Woodside, Teignmouth. 
Charles A. H., his eldest son, is a lieutenant in 
the Sutherland Highlanders. 

The Macleans of Pennygoun. 

I. John, third son of Allan Maclean of Grulin, 
lived in Pennygoun. He married Isabel, daughter 
of Colin Campbell, of the family of Dunstaffnage, 
by whom he had five children ; Donald, Allan, 
Una, Janet, and Catherine. Donald succeeded 
his father in Pennygoun. Allan came to America, 
and was killed at Casco Bay by the falling in of 
the roof of a storehouse. Una was married to 



The Macleans of Pennygoun. 451 

Allan, son of Maclean of Kingerloch. Janet was 
married to Duncan Macarthur ; and Catherine, to 
Donald Macdonald. 

II. Donald, second Maclean of Pennygoun, 
married Ann, natural daughter of Lachlan Mac- 
lean of Lochbuie, by whom he had Lachlan, John, 
Hector, Donald, Alexander, Ann, Mary, and 
Margaret. John entered the navy, and died in the 
East Indies. Hector was killed at the storming 
of Seringapatam, probably in 1799. He was the 
second man to mount the breach. Donald was a 
doctor, and lived at Achitenny. Alexander lived 
for some time at Kinnegharar in Mull. He mar- 
ried Christina, third daughter of John Maclean of 
Langamull, and had issue by her. He emigrated 
with his family to the Red River Settlement, now 
Manitoba, and was killed there. Mary, second 
daughter of Donald of Pennygoun, was married to 
David Fraser. 

III. Lachlan, eldest son of Donald of Penny- 
goun, was a medical doctor. He lived for some 
time in the island of Jersey, and married there. 
He emigrated with his family to America, and 
settled near Nashville, in Tennessee. He left 
seven children ; John, Joshua, Gabriel, Charles- 
Durell, Susan, Mary-Ann, and Isabel. John was 
a merchant and Joshua a doctor. Charles was 
editor and publisher of the Nashville Gazette. 
Susan was married to William Banks Anthony. 



I _ The Clan Gillean. 

4. Donald, Foirt S i Terlach Mac Allan. 

Donald, fourth son of Terlach Mac Allan, lived 
at Aids. He married Catherine, second daughter 
of Donald Macquarrie of Ulva, by whom he had 
Alex. Charles, and others. Alexander, 

the eldest son, was born in 1690. He was a major 
in the Spanish service. He was put to death at 
Madrid in 1739. He left three sons and a daugh- 
ter. One of his sons was known as Don Andrew. 
The daughter, whose name was Zeiretta, was 
married to a Spanish nobleman of Arragon. 

Bg to one account. Major Maclean was 
put to death for killing the colonel of his regiment 
in a duel. According to another account, the 
colonel and a subaltern named Lynch quarrelled 
near a monaster) in Madrid, and began fighting 
with thei- Major Maclean happened to 

come along at the time, and struck down the 
swords of both. Lynch took a treacherous 
advantage of the colonel, thrust his sword through 
him, and ran away. A crowd gathered imme- 
diately to the scene of the fight, and finding the 
major standing beside the slain colonel, concluded 
that he had killed him in a duel. Some of the 
occupants of the monastery saw everything that 
had taken place, and testified to the major's inno- 
cence. He was condemned, however, and put to 
death. The King of Spain took his wife and 
children under his own protection. It is a matter 
of little or no consequence which of the two ver- 



Hector, Son of Terlach M - 

sions is the c ne. We can readily believe 

that a fiery Highlander of the year 1739 would 
fight a duel with a Spanish colonel or any other 
man. We can also believe that he might get into 
trouble, when his own blood was cool, by trying 
to prevent others from fighting. 

Angus, second son of Donald of Aros, married 
Ann, daughter of Allan Maclean, Ailein Mac Iain 
Diuraich, of the Torloisk family, and had one 
daughter by her. Charles, third son of Donald 
of Aros, married Jean Campbell, and had two 
children by her. Hector and Margaret. Hector 
mar ion, daughter of Donald Macquarrie 

of Ulva, and had a son named John, who settled 
in N k. Margaret was married to Alex- 

ander Macquarrie of Laggan in Ulva. 

_ of the daughters of Donald of Aros was 
married ibald Campbell, of the Lochnell 

family, by whom she had a numerous issue. The 
Rev. Archibald Mac Coll, who was born in 1746, 
and became minister of Tiree in 1780, was her 
grandson. 

5. Hicros, Fifth Son 07 Terlach Mac Al: 

Hector, fifth - F Charles Maclean of Ardna- 
->, married Janet, daughter eir- 

apparent of John Garbh, eighth of Coll, and had 
by her four children ; Lachlan, John, Donald, and 
Ifaiy. Lachlan died young. John was for s 
time a lieutenant in the navy. He was a dis- 
tinguished mathematician. He died unmarried at 



454 The Clan Gillean. 

Lynn in the county of Norfolk. Donald was 
married, but left no issue. Mary died unmarried. 

6. Ewen, Sixth Son of Terlach Mac Allan. 

Ewen, or Hugh, sixth son of Terlach Mac 
Allan, or Charles Maclean of Ardnacross, married 
Marion, daughter of Archibald Maclean of Ardtun, 
of the Ardgour family, and left issue. 

II. The Descendants of John Garbh Mac 
Ian Duy. 

John, third son of John Dubh of Morvern, was 
quite a prominent man in his day. We find him 
described as John Maclean, bailie of Ross, in 1592, 
as John Garbh Maclean in 161 6, and as John 
Garbh of Bunessan in 1618. It is thus evident 
that he was known as John Garbh, that he was 
bailie of Ross, and that he resided at Bunessan. 
He married, first, Janet, second daughter of Hector, 
fifth Maclean of Coll; and, secondly, Mary, second 
daughter of Lachlan Og of Torloisk. He had 
six children ; Charles, Hector, Donald, Margaret, 
Janet, and Catherine. Margaret was married to 
Hector Maclean of Treshnish ; Janet, to Malcolm 
Macphie of Colonsay ; and Catherine, to Ewen 
Maclean of Balliphetrish in Tiree. 

Charles, eldest son of John Garbh of Bunessan, 
married Marion, daughter of Neil Maclean of 
Drimnacross, by whom he had four children ; 
Allan, Hector, John, and Mary. Allan married 
Catherine Stewart, by whom he had three sons; 



Charles Mac Ian Duy. 455 

Hector, John, and Allan. Hector was killed in 
the Spanish service. John was killed in Flanders. 
Allan was killed at SherifTmuir in 17 15. He was 
a captain under Sir John of Duart. Hector, 
second son of John Garbh, lived in Assapol. He 
married Florence, daughter of Ewen Maclean of 
Treshnish, and had by her, John, Charles, Hugh, 
Janet, and Florence. John married Florence, 
daughter of Lachlan Maclean of Calgary, but had 
no issue. Charles married a daughter of Hector 
Macquarrie of Ormaig, by whom he had Lachlan, 
who was killed in Spain. According to the 
Ardgour MS., Hugh was married, but left no 
issue. Janet was married to Lachlan Maclean, of 
the Torloisk family, by whom she had a daughter 
named Julia, who became the wife of Allan Mac- 
lean of Garmony. Florence was married to John 
Macquarrie of Ulva. Lachlan, the last chief of 
Ulva's Isle, was her son. He was born in 17 15, 
entered the army in 1778, and died in 1818. 
Donald, third son of John Garbh of Bunessan, 
seems to have died without issue. 

III. The Descendants of Charles Mac 
Ian Duy. 

Charles, fourth son of John Dubh of Morvern, 
married Julia, daughter of Neil Macgillivray of 
Glencannir, and had by her Lachlan of Achacreig, 
John Diurach, and others. Lachlan of Achacreig 
had a son named Donald, who was a merchant in 
Glasgow. Donald married a daughter of Peter 



456 The Clan Gillean. 

Macadam in Glasgow, by whom he had a son 
named Peter. Peter was major-commandant of 
Colonel Lamby's regiment, in Holland. He died 
in London in 1752. John Diurach, second son of 
Charles Mac Ian Duy, commanded the forlorn 
hope at the battle of Inverkeithing in 1651, and 
was one of the few Macleans who escaped from 
the dreadful carnage which took place. He re- 
ceived a number of severe wounds. He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Charles Maclean of Hilis 
in Tiree, by whom he had Hector and other 
children. Hector, Eachann Mac Iain Diuraich, 
married Mary, daughter of Ewen Maclean of 
Balliphetrish in Tiree, and had three sons by 
her; Lachlan, John, and Donald. Lachlan served 
with distinction in the Scots Guards in Spain. 
He commanded a company of volunteers, under 
Brigadier Mackintosh, at Preston in 17 15. He 
was taken prisoner there, but was liberated shortly 
afterwards. John was a captain under Charles of 
Drimnin at the battle of Culloden in 1746. He 
was killed in the ferocious massacre of the Gaidels 
by the Anglo-Saxons the day after the battle. 
Donald married, first, Ann, daughter of Charles 
Maclean of Killunaig, by whom he had one 
daughter, Mary. He married, secondly, Mary, 
daughter of John Maclean of Killean, by whom 
he had Lachlan, Mary, and another daughter. 
Lachlan lost his life in Major Paulson's expedition 
from Jamaica to the Spanish Main. Mary was 
married to John Maclean of Langamull. 



CHAPTER XVII. 
W\t iHatltaiu of Torloisk, Stotbett, attfa firolae. 

The Macleans of Torloisk. 

I. Lachlan Og, second son of Lachlan Mor of 
Duart, was the progenitor of the Macleans of 
Torloisk. He was for a long time tenant of 
Ardnacross, and resided there. He received the 
lands of Torloisk from his brother, Hector Og of 
Duart. He married, first, Marion, daughter of 
Sir Duncan Campbell of Auchnambreck ; sec- 
ondly, Margaret, daughter of William Stewart, 
captain of Dumbarton ; and, thirdly, Marion, 
daughter of Donald Macdonald of Moydart. He 
had by his first wife, Hector and several daughters. 
He had no issue by his second wife. By his third 
wife he had six sons ; Lachlan Og, Ewen, Allan, 
Lachlan Cattanach, Neil, and John Diurach. He 
had also some daughters by her. He had six 
daughters in all ; Janet, Mary, Catherine, Julia, 
Isabel, and Christina. Hector, his eldest son, 
succeeded him in Torloisk. Lachlan Og, his 



458 The Clan Gillean. 

second son, died unmarried, but left a natural son 
named Donald. Ewen and Lachlan Cattanach 
were killed at Inverkeithing. Allan died in 
Harris. Neil married a daughter of Maclean of 
Lochbuie, by whom he had Lachlan and a daugh- 
ter. Lachlan, Neil's son, was a lieutenant in the 
British army, and died in London. John Diurach, 
seventh son of Lachlan Og of Torloisk, married 
Janet, daughter of John Crubach of Ardgour, and 
had by her Allan, and two or three daughters. 
Allan was married, and had two daughters : 
Marjory, who was married to Allan of Inver- 
scadale ; and Ann, who was married to Angus, 
son of Donald of Aros. Janet, eldest daughter 
of Lachlan Og, was married to Hector of Kin- 
lochaiine ; Mary, to John Garbh Mac Ian Duy ; 
Catherine, to John, son of Macneil of Barra ; 
Julia, to Allan Maclean, of the Lochbuie family ; 
Isabel, to the Rev. Martin Macgillivray of Penny- 
ghael; and Christina, to Donald Macquarrie of 
Ulva, by whom she had six children ; Allan of 
Ulva, Hector of Ormaig, Lachlan of Laggan, 
John of Ballighartan, Una, and Catherine. 

II. Hector of Torloisk adhered to the party led 
by Argyll from 1647. He was placed in charge 
of Cairnburgh, which he garrisoned with thirty 
men for eighteen months. Sir Lachlan of Duart 
besieged Cairnburgh in 1648, but was unable to 
capture it. Hector was pardoned by the Act of 
Indemnity in 1661, but had to pay a fine of ,£4,000. 
We find him one of the commissioners for Argyle- 



The Macleans of Torloisk. 459 

shire in 1667. He was married twice. By his 
first wife, Janet, daughter of Allan Mac Ian Duy, 
he had three daughters ; Margaret, Marion, and 
Mary. By his second wife, Catherine, daughter 
of John Campbell of Lochnell, he had five children ; 
Lachlan, Hector, John, Isabel, and Janet. Lach- 
lan succeeded his father. Hector was murdered, 
near his own house at Torloisk, by the Maclachlans 
of Fiairt in Lismore, a notorious set of robbers, 
who were carrying off his cattle. John was the 
first Maclean of Tarbert. He married Catherine, 
daughter of Donald Campbell of Comguish, by 
whom he had Donald, John, and Marion. Donald 
succeeded his father in Tarbert. John was mar- 
ried and had issue. Marion, second daughter of 
Hector of Torloisk was married, first, to Hector 
Roy of Coll ; and, secondly, to John Crubach of 
Ardgour. Mary, the third daughter, was married 
to Duncan Campbell of Saundaick, and had by her 
two sons, John and Alexander. John was bailie 
of Jura, and governor of Aros Castle in 1690. 
Alexander was the ancestor of the Campbells of 
Glendaruel. 

III. Lachlan of Torloisk was an able, high- 
spirited, and accomplished man. He gave valuable 
assistance to Donald of Brolas in managing the 
Duart estate during the minority of Sir John. 
He married Barbara, daughter of Sir Donald 
Macdonald, eighth of Sleat, by whom he had 
Hector, Alexander, and Janet. Hector, his elder 
son, died at the age of eighteen. Alexander 



460 The Clan Gillean. 

succeeded him in Torloisk. Janet was married to 
Archibald Campbell of Inverawe. 

IV. Alexander of Torloisk was born in 1686. 
He was a captain in the second battalion of the 
Scots Guards in Spain. He received a severe 
wound at the siege of Briguego in 1711, and died 
from its effects shortly afterwards. He was a very 
promising young man. He was succeeded in the 
estate by his cousin-german, Donald Maclean of 
Tarbert. 

V. Donald of Torloisk was noted for his kind- 
ness and refinement of manners. He was major 
of the Maclean regiment at Sheriffmuir in 17 15. 
He married Mary, daughter of Archibald Camp- 
bell of Sunderland, by whom he had Hector, 
Lachlan, Allan, Archibald, Mary, Ann, Alice, 
Christina, Betty, and Elizabeth. He died in 
August, 1748. Hector, his eldest son, succeeded 
him. Archibald, his fourth son, was a merchant 
in Laggan. He was a kind-hearted man, and 
was the author of several Gaelic songs. He died 
about 1800. He left a son named John, who had 
two sons, Lachlan and Archibald, both of whom 
died without issue. Ann, second daughter of 
Donald of Torloisk, was married to Donald Mac- 
lean of Raodel ; and Alice, to Lachlan Macquarrie 
of Ulva. Elizabeth was married, first, to Lachlan 
Maclean of Garmony ; and, secondly, to James 
Park of Jamaica. The Hon. Sir James Allan 
Park was her son. Allan, third son of Donald of 
Torloisk, was a lieutenant in the Dutch Brigade 



The Macleans of Torloisk. 461 

in 1 747. He was severely wounded at Ticonderoga 
in 1758. He raised the 84th, or Royal Highland 
Emigrant regiment, in 1775, and was appointed 
lieutenant-colonel-commandant of the first bat- 
talion. He defeated Generals Arnold and Mont- 
gomery at Quebec on December 31st, 1775, and 
successfully defended that city against Arnold 
until the spring, when the latter was compelled to 
raise the siege and retire from Canada. He was 
promoted to the rank of brigadier-general. He 
returned to Britain in 1784. He married Janet, 
daughter of Donald of Brolas. He died in Lon- 
don in March, 1797. He was a man of intense 
energy, and a skilful officer. He certainly deserves 
a monument at Quebec. 

VI. Hector of Torloisk studied law. We find 
him described in 1751 as a writer in Edinburgh. 
He died in Glasgow in May, 1765, and was suc- 
ceeded by his brother, Lachlan. 

VII. Lachlan followed the sea for a number of 
years. He was captain of the ship Mary, a 
merchantman which plied between London and 
Jamaica. He married Margaret, daughter of 
Richard Smith in Fifeshire, by whom he had one 
daughter, Marianne. He died in 1799, leaving 
the estate to his daughter. 

Major-General William Maclean Douglas Cleph- 
ane, of Carslogie, Fifeshire, married Marianne, 
daughter and heiress of Lachlan of Torloisk, and 
had by her three daughters; Margaret, Anna-Jane, 
and Wilmina-Marianne. He died in Grenada in 



462 The Clan Gillean. 

1803. Sir Walter Scott was appointed guardian 
of his children. Spencer Joshua Ahvyne, after- 
wards Marquis of Northampton, married Margaret 
in 181 5, and had by her Charles-Douglas, William, 
and four daughters. William succeeded his 
maternal grandmother in the estate of Torloisk. 
Anna-Jane, second daughter of General Clephane, 
died unmarried. Wilmina-Marianne was married, 
in 183 1, to Wilhelm, Baron de Normann, of the 
diplomatic service of Prussia, and had one son, 
Wilhelm-Fredric-Carl-Helmuth. Her son, who 
succeeded his father as Baron de Normann, was 
murdered by the Chinese in Pekin. 

The Descendants of Lachlan Og. 

I. Lachlan Og y second son of Lachlan Og of 
Torloisk, had a son named Donald. 

II. Donald married a daughter of the Rev. 
Martin Macgillivray of Pennyghael, and had 
three sons ; Allan, Lachlan, and John. John was 
a lieutenant in the Darien expedition. He died in 
Flanders. He left no issue. Lachlan married 
Janet, daughter of Hector Maclean, of Assapol, 
and had two sons, Hector and Donald, both of 
whom died in Ireland. 

III. Allan, eldest son of Donald Maclean, was 
a captain under Sir John of Duart at the battle of 
Killiecrankie in 1689 and at Sheriffmuir in 1715. 
He married Margaret, daughter of Allan Maclean, 
first of Drimnin, and had three children by her; 
Donald, John, and Florence. John died in 
Flanders. He left no issue. 



The Macleans of Sweden. 463 

IV. Donald, son of Captain Allan Maclean, 
lived in Raodel, and was regarded as one of the 
strongest men in Mull. He married Ann, daugh- 
ter of Donald Maclean, fifth of Torloisk, and 
had by her, George, Hector, and Marion. George 
died unmarried in the East Indies. Marion was 
married to Hugh Maclean of Airdchraoishnish, 
son of John Maclean of Ardfergnish, and had a 
daughter named Flora. Flora was born at Gribun 
in August, 1784. She was married to Archibald, 
son of John, son of Lachlan Maclean, of Kirkipool 
in Tiree. She died at Greenhill, Tiree, in August, 
1885, at the advanced age of 101 years. 

V. Hector, son of Donald Maclean of Raodel, 
was known as Eachann Ruadh. He lived first in 
Mingary, and afterwards at Ensay, or Easadh. 
He married Ann, daughter of Donald Campbell, 
bailie of Tiree, by whom he had a son named 
George. 

VI. George was for some time tenant of Hynish 
in Tiree, and was known as Deorsa Heinis. He 
was a very popular man. He married a daughter 
of Campbell of Barramholaich, by whom he had 
Sheela, Hector, Malcolm, George, Helen, and a 
son whose name we do not know. He died either 
in Australia or New Zealand. 

The Macleans of Sweden. 

I. John Dubh, fourth son of Hector Og of 
Duart, was for a short time an officer in the Brit- 
ish navy. He was afterwards engaged in the 



464 The Clan Gillean. 

diplomatic service of Charles I. He settled in 
Sweden about 1625, and changed his name to 
Mackeleer. He was admitted as a citizen and 
tradesman in Gottenburgh in 1639. He was a 
successful merchant, and became very wealthy. 
He was appointed a member of the town council of 
Gottenburgh in 1640. He was ennobled in 1649, 
and introduced at the Riddarhus, or house of 
knights, in 1652. He received a white flower as a 
coat of arms. He married, first, Lillias Hamilton, 
but had no children by her. He married, secondly, 
in 1629, Ann Gubbertz, daughter of a tradesman 
in Stockholm, and had nine children by her; 
Charles, Jacob, John, Gustaf, Peter, David, 
Maria, Catherine, and Eliza. He married, thirdly, 
Anna Thompson, but had no issue by her. He 
owned Gase wad holm in Holland, Hammaro in 
Hermland, and Hageby, Hokalla, and Rada in 
Westergothland. 

Charles, eldest son of John Maclean, was a 
captain in the French army. Jacob was a colonel 
in the British arm}-, and fought in behalf of 
Charles I. John was a judge. He married Ann 
Gordon, and had two sons, Gustaf and Charles, or 
Karl. Gustaf was born in 1641. He was, in 1676, 
colonel of Elfsborg's regiment. He married Sarah 
Carlberg. Peter was born in 1644. He was 
colonel in 1676, and afterwards commander at 
Stralsund. He married Sophia Van Plassen. 
David, the youngest of John Maclean's sons, laid 
aside the name Mackeleer and assumed his right 



The Macleans of Brolas. 465 

name. He was a major in 1675, and rose after- 
wards to a higher rank in the army. He was 
governor of the province of Elfsborg in 1693. 
He was created Baron Maclean in 1708. He was 
married, and had five sons; Rutger, Gustaf, John- 
Adolf, Jacob, and Ludwig. Rutger was born in 
1688. He was taken prisoner at Pultowa in 1709, 
and sent to Tobolsk. He rose to the rank of 
colonel. He died in 1748. John-Adolf was col- 
onel of the Swedish Life Guards. He was 
married, and left a large family. Jacob died in 
1 77 1 . Rutger of Swanholm and Gustaf of Strom, 
grandsons of Baron David Maclean, were intro- 
duced at the Riddarhus in 1784. Rutger was the 
fourth Baron Maclean of Sweden. He was living 
in 1798. 

Maria, the eldest daughter of John Maclean, 
was married to General David Duncan ; Catherine, 
to Colonel David Sinclair of Finnekumla ; and 
Eliza, to Major Cailenkerheilm. The descendants 
of John Dubh seem to be now extinct in the male 
line, at least in Sweden. 

The Macleans of Brolas. 

I. Donald, first Maclean of Brolas, Domhnall 
Mac Eachainn Oig, fought under Montrose in 
1646 and at Inverkeithing in 165 1. He was tutor 
to his nephew, Sir Allan of Duart, during the 
minority of the latter. He married Finvola, 
daughter of John Garbh, eighth of Coll, and had 
three sons by her ; Lachlan, Hector Mor, and 



466 The Clan Gillean. 

Hector Og, 1. Lachlan succeeded his father. 
2. Hector Mor died unmarried. 3. Hector Og 
married Janet, daughter of Macneil of Barra, by 
whom he had two sons, Donald and John. He 
was drowned while crossing the sea in a small 
open boat from Mull to Barra. Donald, his elder 
son, died young. John married Finvola, daughter 
of Allan Maclean of Garmony, by whom he had 
two sons, Donald and Hector. The latter was a 
merchant in Jamaica. He seems to have died 
without issue. Donald was, in 1760, a merchant 
in Glasgow. He was married twice. By his first 
wife, Mary, daughter of John Dickson, merchant, 
Glasgow, he had two children, Hector and Janet. 
By his second wife, Margaret, daughter of James 
Wall of Clonae in the county of Waterford, Ire- 
land, he had one son, Fitzroy- Jeffreys- Grafton. 
He died between 1770 and 1775. Janet, his 
daughter, was married to General Allan Maclean, 
of the Torloisk family. 

II. Lachlan, second Maclean of Brolas, was 
born in 1650. He was a man of good ability, 
sound sense, and unflinching fidelity to his chief 
and clan. He represented the county of Argyle 
in the Scottish Parliament during the commis- 
sionership of James, Duke of York, afterwards 
James II. He was tutor to Sir John of Duart, 
and managed the affairs of the estate in a most 
satisfactory manner. He married Isabel, daughter 
of Hector Maclean, second of Torloisk, and had 
by her two sons, Donald and Allan. Donald 



The Macleans of Brolas. 467 

succeeded his father. Allan was a captain in the 
army. He died at Stirling in 1722. He was not 
married, but left one or two natural children. 

III. Donald, third of Brolas, was born in 167 1. 
He was left fatherless at the age of sixteen. He 
had many difficulties to contend with, but by 
prudent management overcame them all. He was 
for some time a lieutenant in the British army, 
and was, on one occasion, badly wounded by a 
trooper's sabre. He was lieutenant-colonel under 
Sir John of Duart at the battle of Sheriffmuir, 
and received two severe wounds on the head. He 
had two natural sons, James and Gillean. He 
married Isabel, daughter of Allan, tenth Maclean 
of Ardgour ; and had by her four children ; Allan, 
Catherine, Isabel, and Ann. He died on April 
23d, 1725. James, his eldest son, married Julia, 
daughter of Allan Maclean of Garmony, and had 
at least one son, John. Gillean was a lieutenant 
in the army. He was in Guernsey in 1760. He 
was married and left issue. Allan succeeded his 
father as representative of the family o( Brolas. 
Catherine was married to Lachlan Maclean of 
Coll. Isabel was married to John Maclean of 
Lochbuie. Ann was married to Allan Maclean of 
Drimnin. 

John, son of James, son of Donald of Brolas, 
had five children ; Allan, Dugald, Donald, Ann, 
and Mary-Julia. Allan, eldest son of John, worked 
at mining in Ayrshire. He had one son, Allan 
Og, and nine daughters. Allan Og had four sons ; 



468 The Clan Gillean. 

Allan, Andrew, Alexander, and James. He came 
with his family to Pictou, Nova Scotia, and was 
engaged in coal mining. He removed to Penn- 
sylvania in 1842. James, his fourth son, was born 
in Scotland in 1829. He was a doctor, and settled 
at St. Louis in Missouri. He amassed a large 
fortune by selling a patent medicine. He was a 
member of the 47th Congress. He died in 1866. 
Dugald, second son of John, was married and left 
issue. Donald, the third son, settled in Glasgow. 
Ann was married to a Maclellan who lived at 
Bowmore in Islay. Mary Louisa was married, 
in 1822, to the Rev. John Sinclair, son of Peter 
Sinclair in Tiree. Mr. Sinclair came to Nova 
Scotia in 1838, and removed to Pennsylvania in 
1852. We have seen it asserted that he was the 
author of Seannachie's history of the Macleans. 
He had nothing to do with that work. 



The Xaot jfito Chiefs of the (Clan ©Mean. 

XXI. Sir Ailein Bhrolais. 

Sir Allan of Brolas, sixth baronet, was born 
about the year 17 10. He entered the army at an 
early age. He was for a short time a captain in 
the second battalion of Drumlanrig's regiment. 
When this battalion was disbanded in 1749, he 
returned to Mull. He was served heir male and 
of line to his grandfather, Lachlan Maclean of 
Brolas, in August, 1749. He married shortly 
afterwards, Una, daughter of Hector Maclean of 



Sir Ailein Bhrolais. 469 

Coll. He succeeded Sir Hector, Sir John's son, 
in the chiefship of the Clan Gillean and in the 
baronetcy, in 1750. In January, 1757, he was ap- 
pointed a captain in Montgomery's Highlanders. 
His company was raised by himself. It consisted 
of 100 men, all of whom it is said were natives of 
Mull. He sailed from Cork in Ireland in June, 
1758, and landed at Charlestown in South Carolina. 
He took part in Brigadier Forbes's expedition 
against Fortdu Ouesne, now Pittsburg, in Novem- 
ber of that year. He was with General Amherst 
in the expedition against Ticonderoga and Crown 
Point, in June, 1759. His wife died of a nervous 
fever on the 30th of May, 1760. He returned to 
Britain on leave of absence about the end of that 
year or early in 1761. He was appointed major 
in a regiment raised by Colonel Charles Fitzroy, 
afterwards Lord Southampton. He served in this 
regiment until the close of the Seven Years' War 
in 1763. As the regiment was then disbanded, Sir 
Allan returned to Mull. He was promoted to the 
rank of lieutenant-colonel some time afterwards. 
He leased the island of Inchkenneth, and went to 
live there. In October, 1773, he received a visit 
from Dr. Johnson and Boswell. 

It seems that the Campbells took possession of 
Brolas in 1689. They claimed it as a part of the 
Duart estate. About 1770 Sir Allan commenced 
a lawsuit with John, fifth Duke of Argyll, for the 
recovery of Brolas. The suit was a tedious and 
expensive one, but Sir Allan won in the end. 



47° The Clan Gillean. 

Argyll was compelled in 1783 to restore the lands 
in dispute to their lawful owner. It was a source 
of great joy to the Macleans to see Sir Allan in 
possession of even a very small part of the lands 
which had belonged to his forefathers. 

Sir Allan was a good-looking man, of a frank 
disposition and polished manners ; and, like High- 
land chiefs in general, liberal and hospitable. He 
died on December 10th, 1783, and is buried at 
Inchkenneth. He was the last chief of the Mac- 
leans who lived in the Highlands, and probably 
the last of their chiefs who could address them in 
the melodious language of the poetic and warlike 
Gaidels. He is the subject of several excellent 
Gaelic songs. He was evidently greatly beloved 
by his clan. He had three children ; Maria, 
Sibella, and Ann. Maria was married to Charles 
Maclean of Kinlochaline and Drimnin ; and 
Sibella, to John Maclean of Inverscadale. Ann 
died unmarried. 

XXII. Sir Hector Maclean. 

Hector, son of Donald, son of John, son of 
Hector Og, third son of Donald of Brolas, suc- 
ceeded Sir Allan in the chiefship. He was the 
seventh baronet of Morvern. He was for some 
time a lieutenant in the army, but spent the greater 
part of his life in retirement. Sir Hector died 
unmarried in 1818, and was succeeded by his 
brother, Fitzroy-Jeffreys-Grafton. As he did not 
live in Mull we have not given his name in Gaelic. 



Sir Charles Fitzroy Maclean. 471 

XXIII. Sir Fitzroy Jeffreys Grafton 
Maclean. 

Fitzroy Jeffreys Grafton Maclean entered the 
army as an ensign in 1787. He went out to the 
West Indies in 1788, and saw a good deal of active 
service there. He was promoted to the rank of 
captain in 1793. He married, in 1794, the daugh- 
ter and only child of Charles Kidd, and had by 
her two sons, Charles-Fitzroy and Donald. He 
received a medal for his gallant conduct at the 
capture of Guadaloupe in 1810, and was about the 
same time appointed major-general. He became 
a lieutenant-general in 1814. He returned to 
Britain in 1815, and spent the remainder of his 
days in London. He was raised to the rank of 
general in 1837. He died on July 5th, 1847. He 
was succeeded by his elder son, Charles-Fitzroy. 

Donald, second son of General Maclean, was 
born in 1800. He graduated at Oxford in 1823 
with the highest honours in classics. He was 
called to the bar at Lincoln's Inn in 1827, and 
in the same year married Harriet, daughter of 
General Frederick Maitland. He was elected in 
1834 to the House of Commons, for Oxford, and 
represented that constituency until 1847. He was 
a Conservative in politics, and a strong friend of 
the Carlists in Spain. He died at Rome in 1874. 

XXIV. Sir Charles Fitzroy Maclean. 

Charles-Fitzroy was born in the West Indies in 
1798. He was taken to Britain in 1806. He was 



472 The Clan Gillean. 

educated at Eton College and the Royal Military 
College, Sandhurst. He entered the Scots Guards 
in 1816. He commanded the 81st regiment for 
some time, and was afterwards colonel of the 13th 
Light Dragoons. He was for a few years military 
secretary at Gibraltar. He was a good draughts- 
man, and took great delight in yachtingand fishing. 
On retiring from his post at Gibraltar, he navigated 
his own vessel all over the Mediterranean as far as 
the Black Sea. He retired from military service 
in 1846. He was a true Highlander, and took a 
deep interest in the history of his clan. He was 
a tall, good-looking, and pleasant man, and was 
well liked. He married, in 1831, Emily-Eleanor, 
daughter of the Honourable and Reverend Jacob 
Marsham, D. D., Canon of Windsor, and had by 
her five children ; Fitzroy-Donald, Emily-Frances- 
Harriet, Louisa-Marianne, Fanny- Henrietta, and 
Georgina-Marcia. Sir Charles- Fitzroy died at 
West Cliffe House, Folkestone, on December 
27th, 1883. Fitzroy-Donald succeeded his father. 
Louisa was married in i860 to the Hon. R. P. 
Neville, second son of the Earl of Abergavenny. 
Fanny was married in 1855 to Admiral Sir 
A. W. A. Hood. Georgina was married in 1868 
to John A. Rolls, of The Hendre. 

XXV. Sir Fitzroy Donald Maclean. 

Fitzroy Donald Maclean was born on May 18th, 
1835. He entered the 13th Light Dragoons, now 
the 13th Hussars, as a cornet, in August, 1852. 



Sir Fitzroy Donald Maclean. 473 

He was appointed lieutenant in 1854, captain in 
1856, major in 1861, and lieutenant-colonel-com- 
mandant in 187 1. He served in the same regiment 
— the 13th Hussars — over twenty-one years, and 
was with it wherever it was quartered or fighting. 
He was in Bulgaria and the Crimea in the war of 
1854 and 1855. He went out to Bulgaria in the 
sailing transport Culloden, which landed the troops 
on board of it at Varna, but was afterwards wrecked 
in the Black Sea, and captured with all its crew by 
the Russians. He was with his regiment at the 
landing of Eupatoria, at the cavalry affair of Bul- 
ganak, at the battle of the Alma, and at the siege 
of Sebastopol. He received the Crimean medal 
from the Queen's own hand, on May 18th, 1855. 
He received two clasps and the Turkish War medal 
about the same time. He was aide-de-camp to 
Field Marshal Lord Seaton in 1859, and to Gen- 
eral Sir George Brown in i860. He was selected 
in 1865 to report on the French cavalry manoeuvres 
at Chalons. While there he was frequently in 
conversation with the Emperor of the French. In 
1880 he was appointed to the command of the 
West Kent Queens Own Yeomanry Cavalry, and 
is now commander of the Kent Yeomanry Brigade. 
He became chief of the Clan Gillean in 1883. He 
received the decoration of the Order of the Bath 
in 1897. On the first of last March he was ap- 
pointed president of the League of Mercy for the 
Hythe division of the county of Kent. 

Sir Fitzroy has travelled extensively both in 



474 The Clan Gillean. 

Europe and America. He takes a deep and active 
interest in the history, traditions, and poetry of his 
clan, and also in the welfare of all his clansmen. 
He is a good linguist. We wish we could say 
that, like the Duke of Atholl, the Marquis of 
Tullibardine, and Sir Kenneth Mackenzie of Gair- 
loch, he speaks the language in which Fingal 
fought and Ossian sung. He married, in 1872, 
Constance-Marianne, daughter of George Holland 
Ackers, Esq., of Moreton Hall, Cheshire, and has 
by her five children ; Hector- Fitzroy, Charles- 
Lachlan, Fitzroy-Holland, George-Marsham, and 
Finovala-Marianne-Eleanor. Hector was born on 
February 17th, 1873. He is a lieutenant in the 
Scots Guards. Charles is a lieutenant in the 
Royal Navy. He took part in the Benin expedi- 
tion in 1897. Fitzroy died in 1881. At the present 
time Sir Fitzroy and his three sons, Hector, Charles, 
and John, are the only representatives in the legiti- 
mate male line of Domhnall Mac Eachainn Oig, 
the first Maclean of Brolas. May his sons live to 
a good old age, and his grandsons be numerous 
and prosperous. 

The Clan Maclean Association was instituted in 
Glasgow, Scotland, in 1892. It held its first 
annual gathering on the 28th of October in that 
year. There was a large number of Macleans 
present, probably a larger number than had been 
seen together since Charles of Drimnin led his 
heroic followers to Culloden. Addresses were 
delivered by Sir Fitzroy, who acted as chairman ; 



Sir Fitzroy Donald Maclean. 475 

bv that grand old man, Professor Blackie; and by 
the Rev. John Maclean, D. D., Glasgow. Annual 
meetings have been held regularly ever since. 
The Association has been of much service to the 
clan. It has helped to bring its scattered members 
together, to make them personally acquainted 
with each other, and to lead them to feel that they 
all belong to the same family. It has also helped 
to bring the Macleans to look upon themselves, 
not as a broken clan, but as a fully organized clan, 
and to take a real interest in the past history and 
present welfare of the clan, its branches, and its 
members. 

In 1S93 the Macleans of the United States and 
Canada, invited Sir Fitzroy, Lochbuie, Ardgour, 
Kingerloch, Pochgarroeh, and Pennycross, to visit 
the World's Fair, in Chicago, and requested the 
privilege of having them as their guests during 
their stay. On Monday, June 12th, Sir Fitzroy 
and Pennycross arrived in Chicago. On Thurs- 
dav, June 15th, they were entertained at a grand 
banquet. There were about ninety Macleans 
present, most of whom were accompanied by their 
wives. 

Sir Fitzroy is the twenty-fifth chief of the Clan 
Gillean, and the tenth Baronet of Morvern. He 
is the son of Charles, son of Fitzroy, son of Don- 
ald, son of John, son of Hector Og y son of Donald 
of Brolas, son ot Hector Og of Duart, son of 
Lachlan Mor of Duart, son of Hector Og of 
Duart, son of Hector Mor of Duart, son of Lach- 



476 The Clan Gillean. 

Ian Cattanach of Duart, son of Hector Odhar of 
Duart, son of Lachlan Og of Duart, son of Lachlan 
Bronnach of Duart, son of Hector Roy of Duart, 
son of Lachlan Liibanach of Duart, son of John 
Dubh, son of Malcolm, son of Malise, son of 
Gilleain na Tuaighe. He is thus the twenty-first 
in lineal descent from the founder of the clan of 
which he is the worthy and honoured Ceann- 
cinnidh. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 

Sntraccb families. 

There are several prominent Macleans referred 
to in history, of whose origin we know nothing. 
There are also at the present day hundreds of true 
Macleans in the world who cannot trace themselves 
back step by step to the parent stock, or even tell 
to what branch of the clan they belong. There 
are many in this position simply because they 
neglected to write down the genealogical facts 
which they could easily have collected fifty years 
ago. 

The Macleans of Cuidreach. — Dr. Maclean 
settled in Skye, as physician to the Macdonalds of 
Sleat, about the year 1525. He was a native of 
Mull, and had probably studied medicine under 
the Beatons of Pennycross. His descendants 
were physicians in Skye during the period of 270 
years. The last of them who lived in Skye, Dr. 
John Maclean, was born at Cuidreach in 1708. 
He was an excellent classical scholar. It is said 



478 The Clan Gillean. 

that he knew by heart Homer's Iliad and Virgil's 
^neid from beginning to end. He was celebrated 
as a physician all over the Western Isles. He 
held the farms of Uragag, and Shulista in 1733, 
and acted as chamberlain to Lord Macdonald. 
He died at Cuidreach on May 1st, 1793, and was 
buried at Kilmuir in Troternish. He was married, 
and had at least three sons ; James, John, and 
Malcolm. He had also a daughter named Mary. 
James died young. John, known as Seocan, was 
drowned on the coast of Uist. Malcolm was a 
captain in one of the Highland regiments, and 
served in America. He spent his latter days at 
Aird-Mhic-Ceblain in Skye. He was somewhat 
eccentric. Mary, Dr. John's daughter, was mar- 
ried to John Beaton, tenant of Achachorc in 
Troternish. 

It is said that Dr. Lachlan Maclean of Sudbury 
was a son of Dr. John Maclean, but this may not 
be a fact. Dr. Lachlan was at any rate a native 
of Skye. He was for some time physician to the 
Duke of Kent. He was elected member of par- 
liament for the borough of Arundel in 1768. He 
retired from politics in 177 1, and was knighted 
some time afterwards. He was the author of sev- 
eral works on medicine, copies of which are in the 
British museum. He married Mary, daughter and 
co-heiress of John Young, of The Priory, Suffolk, 
and had three sons, Allan, John, and Hippisley, 
and also two daughters. He died about 1840. 
Allan was physician to the Essex and Colchester 



Untraced Families. 479 

Hospital. John died in 1822. Hippisley was born 
in 1808. He was vicar of Caistor in Lincolnshire 
from 1844 to 1886. He died at St. Alban's in 
1895. Mary, second daughter of Sir Lachlan, 
was married to John Eaton, of Eaton Manor, 
Shrewsbury. 

The Macleans of Kilmory. — Hector Maclean 
of Kilmory married, about 1690, Margaret, daugh- 
ter of Allan Maclean of Grulin, and had at least 
two children, Hugh and Catherine. Hugh married 
Ann, daughter of the Rev. John Maclean of 
Kilninian, and widow of John, son of Allan of 
Grishipol. Hugh, son of Maclean of Kilmory, 
was a captain under Charles of Drimnin at Cul- 
loden. Allan of Kilmory died about the year 
1759. Murdoch, son of Allan, was served heir to 
his father in July, 1761. Murdoch Hector Mac- 
laine was appointed lieutenant-colonel of the 77th 
regiment in 1822. We find it stated that he was 
descended from the Macleans of Kilmory, and that 
he wrote a history of the Lochbuie family — the 
branch of the clan to which he beloneed. 

The Maclaines of Holland. — The Rev. Alex- 
ander Maclaine graduated at the University of 
Edinburgh in 1646, and was minister of Kilmaglas 
in 1655. He translated a number of the Psalms 
into Gaelic verse. According to Scott's Fasti 
Ecclesiae Scoticanae, he belonged to the Lochbuie 
branch of the clan. Archibald, son of Alexander, 
was licensed to preach in 1684, and in the follow- 
ing year became minister of Dunoon and Kilmun. 



480 The Clan Gillean. 

He accepted a call to Omagh in Ireland in 1699. 
He was married, and had four children ; Daniel, 
Alexander, Thomas, and a daughter. Daniel 
became minister of Kilbride, Argyleshire, in 1704. 
Alexander was minister of Antrim, and Thomas 
minister of Monaghan. The daughter was mar- 
ried to the Rev. Thomas Milling, minister of the 
Scots church at The Hague. The Rev. Thomas 
Maclaine married Elizabeth, daughter of James 
Milling, and sister of the Rev. Robert Milling. 
He had two sons by her, Archibald and James. 
He died in 1740. 

Archibald, son of the Rev. Thomas Maclaine, 
was born at Monaghan in 1722, and educated at 
the University of Glasgow. He went to Holland 
in 1746, and became assistant pastor to his mater- 
nal uncle, the Rev. Robert Milling. He acted for 
some time as preceptor to the Prince of Orange, 
afterwards King William I. He left The Hague 
in 1796, and settled at Bath in England. He 
translated Mosheim's History into English. He 
married Esther-Wilhelmina, daughter of the Rev. 
Charles Chaise, the French clergyman at The 
Hague, and had four children by her ; Charles- 
Anthony, Henry, William-Nicholas, and Henri- 
etta-Ann. He died in 1804. He was a man of 
deep piety and extensive learning. Henry, his 
second son, was a colonel in the Dutch army. 

Charles-Anthony, eldest son of the Rev. Archi- 
bald Maclaine, studied law, and was recorder of 
the court at Brabant. He married Catherine 



Untraced Families. 481 

Spanjaard, by whom he had William and Mary. 
William settled in England, and had four children ; 
Archibald, Charles, Catherine, and Mary. Archi- 
bald left a son named William, who resides in 
London. 

Mary, daughter of Charles Anthony Maclaine, 
was married in 181 2 to Pieter Pont, burgomaster 
of Modemblie, by whom she had three children ; 
Frans- Maclaine, Archibald-Maclaine, and Mary. 
Frans-Maclaine had two sons ; William-Maclaine 
and Archibald-Maclaine. Archibald-Maclaine, 
second son of Mary Maclean and Pieter Pont, 
was for some time a lieutenant in the Dutch navy. 
He married, in 1848, Johanna-Susanna-Cornelia- 
Maria Van Pabst Rutgers, and had by her Pieter- 
Maclaine, Willem-Maclaine, Archibald-Maclaine, 
and three daughters. Pieter resides at The Hague, 
and is a lawyer by profession. William is manager 
of a gold-mine at Totok in Celebes. Archibald is 
a lawyer, and resides in Batavia. 

The Macleans of Gometra. — John Maclean 
belonged to the Lochbuie family. He had a 
son named Hector, who had a son named John. 
John, Iain Mac Eachainn, lived in Lag, and was 
succeeded there by his son Hector, who was suc- 
ceeded by his son, Peter. Peter of Lag married 
Christy Lamont, by whom he had two sons, 
Hector and Duncan. Hector was for some time 
tenant of the farms of Achnasaul, Achnacreig, and 
Torosay. He removed to Kinnegharar in 1841. 
He married Flora, daughter of Donald Macarthur, 



482 The Clan Gilleax. 

tenant of Burg on the Torloisk estate, and had 
by her Donald, Peter, John, Margaret, Ann, 
Mary, and Flora. 1. Donald was born in 18 14. 
He purchased the island of Gometra in 1857. 
He died in 187 1. He was a very popular man. 
2. Peter succeeded his brother in Gometra. He 
died in May, 1S93. 3. John was tenant of Kinne- 
gharar and Burg. He was a successful cattle-dealer. 
He died on February 24th, 1S93. 4. Margaret, 
eldest daughter of Eachann Mac Phadruig, was 
married to Neil Morison of Aintuim, and was the 
mother of Coundullie Rankin Morison, the Mull 
antiquarian. 

John Maclean, Iain Mac Dhomhnaill Mhic 
Phadruig, married Flora Macleod, by whom he 
had Hector, John, Donald, and Neil. Hector 
married Catherine Macdonald, and had John, 
Roderick, and Peter. John is a merchant in 
Dervaig. Roderick is a merchant in Glasgow, 
and purchased the island of Gometra in 1893. 

Iain Mac Eachaixx. — John Maclaine, Iain Mac 
Eachainn Mhic Iain Mhic Dhomhnaill Ghlais, 
lived at Dervaig, and belonged to the Lochbuie 
branch of the clan. He was the author of several 
pieces of Gaelic poetry. He married Flora, only 
daughter of Donald Mor Macquarrie in Ulva. 
Donald, his son, married Jessie, daughter of Cap- 
tain John Cameron in Greenock, by whom he had 
six children ; John, Donald, Sarah, Lachlan, 
Archibald, and Flora. Lachlan, his third son, is 
minister of Arisaig. 



Untraced Families. 483 

Aoxghus Og. — Angus Og Maclean was born in 
Coll, and belonged to the Boreray branch of the 
Macleans of Ardgour. His father's name was 
Angus. His mother was a Macfadyen. He had 
a son named Lachlan, who had a son named 
Neil. Neil had three sons ; Lachlan, John, and 
Norman. Lachlan was a carpenter by trade, and 
was known as Lachainn Saor. He came to Nova 
Scotia, and settled in Keppoch, Antigonish County. 
He died in July, 1855, and left five sons ; Neil, 
Archibald, Norman, John, and Alexander. The 
Rev. Lachlan A. Maclean, of Louisburg, Cape 
Breton, is a son of Alexander. 

Donald, Alexander, and James Maclean.— 
Donald, Alexander, and James Maclean were 
brothers, and were born in North Uist. It is 
pretty certain that they belonged to the Boreray 
branch of the Ardgour family. Their parents 
were drowned while crossing from Uist to the 
mainland. Donald went to Jamaica, prospered in 
business, and sent for Alexander and James. He 
married Ann Susanna Rodon, by whom he had 
Lachlan, George-Rodon, and Ann. Alexander 
was born in 1767. He became proprietor of the 
Crawle River and Orange Hill estates in Jamaica. 
He returned to Scotland in 18 19, and settled in 
Liberton. He married, in the same year, Mary 
Baigrie, by whom he had Catherine-Ann, Alex- 
ander, Donald, and John M. He died in 1839. 
His youngest son, John M., is the well-known 
member of parliament for Cardiff. 



484 The Clan Gillean. 

Allan Maclean in Achnacreig. — Allan Mac- 
lean belonged to the Coll branch of the clan. He 
lived at Achnacreig, between Sorn and Dervaig, 
in Mull. Charles, his son, lived in the same 
place. Charles met Prince Charles when the latter 
arrived in Moydart in 1745. Having shaken 
hands with the Prince, he never afterwards gave 
his right hand to anyone. Allan, son of Charles, 
had a son named Hector. Hector lived at Cill- 
bheag, Kilveg, in or near Bellach Roy. Allan, 
son of Hector, lived at Cuinn, near Dervaig. 
Hector, son of Allan, resides at 5 Belgrave Street, 
Glasgow. 

The Macleans of Altanull. — Lachlan Mac- 
lean was born in Rum, and belonged to the Coll 
branch of the clan. He came to Nova Scotia in 
October, 1781, and settled at Allta-'n-aoil, or Lime 
Brook, in Pictou County. He married Ann Mac- 
quarrie, by whom he had four children ; David, 
Hector, Gormall, and Catherine. David married 
Margaret Mackenzie, by whom he had Lachlan, 
James, Duncan, Robert, and Alexander. Lachlan 
and Robert live at Lime Brook. James is minister 
of the Presbyterian Church at Great Village, Nova 
Scotia. Duncan was a doctor at Shubenacadie, 
Nova Scotia. He was skilful, kind, and self- 
sacrificing, and was highly esteemed. He made 
no money, but he did a great deal of good to his 
fellow-men. He died a year ago. Alexander 
lives in Pennsylvania. The Rev. James T. Mac- 
lean of Oakryn, Pennsylvania, is his son. 



Untraced Families. 485 

Eoghan Mac Lachainn Mhic Iain Bhain. — It 
is said that John Ban was a son of Terlach 
Mac Allan Mac Ian Duy. He settled in Tiree, 
and had a son named Lachlan, who had a son 
named Ewen. Ewen, Eoghan Mac Lachainn 
Mhic Iain Bhain, had two sons, Donald and 
Ewen. Donald had three sons; Lachlan, Charles, 
and John. 1. Lachlan had three sons ; John, 
Hugh, and Donald. 2. Charles had six sons ; 
John, Donald, Hugh, Hector, Alexander, and 
Dugald. Hugh, Hector, and Dugald came to 
Canada. Alexander lived at Ruaig, and had two 
sons, Donald and Hector. Hector is minister of 
Dalkeith, Scotland. 3. John was born in 1771. 
He was one of the tenants of Ruaig. He had 
three sons ; Malcolm, Lachlan, and Donald. He 
died in 1861. Malcolm succeeded him in Ruaig, 
and was succeeded there by his son Allan. Lach- 
lan was married, and had one daughter. Donald 
was born in 181 7. He was a merchant and manu- 
facturer in Glasgow. He had four sons ; John, 
Andrew -Bruce, Archibald, and Malcolm. John 
came to Canada. Andrew-Bruce is a manufacturer 
of electric light cables at Craigpark, Glasgow. 
Archibald is an India-rubber merchant in Leeds. 
Malcolm is a manufacturer of electrical articles in 
London. 

Tearlach Mac Lachainn Mhic Eachainn.- — 
Charles Maclean, Tearlach Mac Lachainn Mhic 
Eachainn, lived in Kilmoluaig. He married Ann 
Campbell, of Gortandonald, by whom he had Don- 



486 The Clan Gillean. 

aid, Archibald, Lachlan, and Catherine. Donald 
married Mary Graham, and had by her, Alexander, 
Ann, Mary, and Margaret. Archibald died unmar- 
ried. Catherine was married to Archibald Maclean. 

Lachlan, third son of Charles Maclean, occupied, 
during the latter part of his life, the farm of Grian- 
ail, or Greenhill, in Tiree. He married Catherine, 
daughter of Archibald Maclean, Gilleasbuig Mac 
Iain Mhic Lachainn, and had by her, Catherine, 
Archibald, Charles, Donald, Lachlan, Marion, 
and Donald-Archibald. Catherine, the eldest of 
his family, was married to John Macgavin, and 
Marion to Captain John Brodie. Archibald, eldest 
son of Lachlan Maclean, settled at Hawke's Bay, 
New Zealand. Charles, second son of Lachlan, 
is a farmer in Leicestershire, England. He mar- 
ried Jeanie Barr, and has six children ; Robert, 
Lachlan, Charles, Mary, Katie-Jane, and Thomas. 
Donald, third son of Lachlan, settled at Hawke's 
Bay. He married Margaret Macfarlane, by whom 
he had Catherine, Lachlan, Margaret, and Elspeth. 
Donald-Archibald, fifth son of Lachlan, settled at 
Hawke's Bay. He married Elizabeth Macfarlane, 
and has one daughter, Catherine. 

Lachlan, fourth son of Lachlan Maclean, was 
born at Crosh, Tiree, on May 28th, 1852. He 
left Tiree in April, 1868, to join the Glasgow office 
of the Leith, Hull, and Hamburg Steam Packet 
Company. He was transferred to Leith in 1871, 
and to London in 1874. He was appointed, in 
1878, chief agent in South Africa for the Castle 



Untraced Families. 487 

Mail Packets Company. He married, in August, 
1899, Margaret, daughter of John Cumming Craw- 
ford, of Edinburgh, and has one child, Sheila. 
He resides at Greenhill, Kenilworth, near Cape 
Town. He takes a thorough interest in his clan. 
The Macleans of Grand Lake. — Archibald 
Maclean was a lieutenant in the Royal Navy. He 
settled in New York, and married there, on June 
1 2th, 1780, Catherine Price. He came to St. John, 
New Brunswick, and received a grant of two lots 
of land in the city. He removed afterwards to 
Grand Lake, Queen's County, where he took up a 
large grant of land. John, his son, was born at 
Grand Lake in 1784. John was for a number of 
years judge of the court of common pleas. Lach- 
lan, John's son, was a merchant in the city of St. 
John ; but was obliged to retire from business on 
account of ill health. He died at Mill Stream, 
King's County, in 1875. Hugh-Havelock, son of 
Lachlan, was born in Fredericton, on March, 2 2d, 
1854. He was called to the bar in 1876, and is 
connected as solicitor or director with a number of 
wealthy companies. He takes a hereditary interest 
in military matters, and is lieutenant -colonel of 
the 62d St. John Fusiliers. He was lately in 
Britain as commandant of the Bisley Team from 
Canada. He is a good member of the great clan 
to which he belongs. 

Iain Ban Mac Ailein. — John Maclean, Iain Ban 
Mac Ailein, was one of the tenants of the farm of 
Achadh-a-Chairn on the north side of Loch-nan- 



488 The Clan Gillean. 

Ceall. He had three sons ; Allan, Charles, and 
Lachlan. Allan, the eldest son, was for about 
sixty years a teacher in Iona, in connection with 
the Society for Propagating Christian Knowledge 
in the Highlands and Islands. Besides teaching, 
he expounded the Scriptures to the people, and 
also kept a Sabbath school for the children. He 
was a useful man, and was highly respected. 
Lachainn na Gaidhlig describes him as abbot of 
Iona. Charles, second son of John Ban, was at 
one time a sergeant in the Breadalbane Fencibles. 
He was afterwards forester at Loch Sunart to the 
Duke of Argyll. He married Euphemia, daugh- 
ter of Donald Campbell, by whom he had Neil, 
Ellen, Mary, Jessie, and others. Neil was born 
in 1796. He was educated at Iona and in the 
University of Glasgow. He was licensed to 
preach in 1822, and became minister of Ulva in 
1826. He was translated to Halkirk in 1844. 
He married Clementina Clark, sister of Francis 
W. Clark of Ulva, and had six children; Charles, 
Neil, Francis, James A., Clementina, and Isabella. 
Charles was a minister, and died in Ceylon in 
1897. Neil was mate of the steamship Tenasserim. 
He died at sea in 1878, and was buried in Malta. 
Francis was in the service of the Caledonian 
Insurance Company, Edinburgh, and died in 1885. 
James A. Maclean, youngest son of the Rev. Neil 
Maclean, is a lawyer and bank agent in Forfar. 

General John Maclean. — John Maclean was 
born in Mull in 1756. He served in the Revolu- 



Untraced Families. 489 

tionary War under Washington, and was an officer 
of artillery in the War of 181 2. He was the first 
commissary-general of the state of New York. 
He died in New York on February 28th, 182 1. 
George W., son of General Maclean, graduated at 
the Military Academy at West Point in 1818. He 
had four sons ; Henry-Clay, Malcolm, Donald, 
and Walter. Malcolm was born in 1848. He is 
a practising physician and surgeon in New York. 
He married the only daughter of Dr. George W. 
Jewett, by whom he has three children ; Alfred, 
Donald, and Helen. Donald, third son of George 
W. Maclean, is a lawyer in New York. Walter 
is a lieutenant in the United States Navy. 

The Macleans of Dysart. — George Maclean 
resided in Dysart, Fifeshire, and was known as 
George Mac Allan. He was married, and had two 
sons, George and William. George was licensed 
to preach in 1797, and became minister of Fogo 
in Berwickshire in 1814. He was returned heir to 
his father, " George Mac Allan, or Maclean," in 
1818. He died in 1840. He was married and 
left issue. William, second son of George Mac 
Allan, was manager of the Dysart colliery. He 
married a daughter of John Brodie, by whom he 
had a son named George. George, son of Will- 
iam, was born at Dysart in 1795. He entered the 
commissariat department of the army in 1812. 
He was appointed commissary-general in 1849. 
He was knighted in 1854. He served in the 
Crimea from March, 1855, to the close of the war, 



490 The Clan Gillean. 

when he was created a K. C. B. He married, 
first, a French lady, by whom he had one son. 
He married, secondly, Sarah M. Lord, of Nassau 
in the Bahamas, and had by her three sons and 
three daughters. He died about 1862. 

Henry-John, eldest son of Sir George Maclean 
by his second wife, was born at Nassau in 1827, 
and entered the army in 1845. He served for nine 
sears in the nth North Devonshire regiment. 
He served for twenty-five years in the Rifle Brig- 
ade, and commanded one of its battalions. He 
was appointed, in 1878, to the head-quarter staff 
in Ireland. He was placed on the retired list, with 
the rank of major-general, in 1884. He was mar- 
ried twice, and had five sons and three daughters. 

The Macleans of Plantation. — George Mac- 
lean was enrolled a burgess and guild brother of 
Glasgow in 1739. William, eldest son of George, 
was enrolled in 1782. William, eldest son of 
William, was born in Glasgow in 1783. He pur- 
chased, about 1830, the mansion and lands of 
Plantation, west of Glasgow. He married Mary 
Brown, by whom he had William and other 
children. He died in 1867. William, second of 
Plantation, was born in 1805. He paid strict 
attention to his business, but found time to com- 
pose upwards of 2,000 sacred melodies. He 
married Alice, daughter of the Rev. Robert Muter, 
D. D., by whom he had eight children ; William, 
Jessie, Robert, Mary, Alice, W^ilhelmina, Jane, and 
Charles-James. Jessie was married to William 



Untraced Families. 491 

Galbraith, of St. Rollox. She has composed 
several songs, and also some pieces of music. 
Alice was married to John Paterson Paton ; Wil- 
helmina, to Henry Homan, a lawyer in Norway ; 
and Jane, to Sheriff Hall of Ayrshire. William, 
eldest son of William, succeeded his father in 
Plantation. He is senior partner of the firm of 
Maclean, Fyfe, and Maclean, writers, in Glasgow. 
Robert, the second son, is an advocate in Edin- 
burgh. Charles-James is, like his brother, a lawyer 
by profession. He is a partner in the firm of 
Maclean, Fife, and Maclean. He married Sara 
D. Holms, and has four children ; William, 
Archibald -Campbell- Holms, Helen -Alice, and 
Hope-Sara. 

Gilbert Maclean. — Gilbert Maclean emigrated 
from Scotland to Antrim in Ireland about 1770. 
He had a son named James, who had a son named 
Alexander. Alexander came to the United States 
about 1820, and engaged in the coal business. 
He settled on a large farm at Wilkes Barre, Penn- 
sylvania, in 1848. He had six sons ; James, 
Samuel-Swan, Leslie, George, William-Swan, and 
John. James continued the coal business, and 
died, quite a rich man, in 1863. Samuel-Swan 
was a lawyer, and represented the territory of 
Montana in Congress for two successive terms. 
Leslie went to California, thence to Australia, 
and died on his way back. George was receiver 
of public moneys for the district of Montana. 
William-Swan is a lawyer in the city of Wilkes 
Barre. John died in the Union army of camp fever. 



492 The Clan Gillean. 

Charles McClain was born in the north of 
Ireland in 17 12. He came to America in early 
life, and settled in New Jersey. He removed about 
1785 to Pennsylvania, and settled near Pittsburgh. 
He was for fifty years an elder in the Presbyterian 
Church. He died in 1807. D. G. McClain, of 
Denver, Colorado, is his great-grandson. The 
name Maclean was very commonly spelled McClain 
in 1700. 

The Rev. Andrew Maclean was born at Dal- 
reach of Moy in 182 1. He was descended from 
a Maclean who left Mull between 17 15 and 1745, 
and settled in Strathdearn. He came to Canada 
in 1857, and became minister of a congregation at 
Crieff, Ontario. He married Catherine Cameron. 
He died in April, 1873. Lieutenant-Colonel John 
Bayne Maclean is his son. Colonel Maclean is 
president and managing editor of the Maclean 
Publishing Company, of Montreal and Toronto. 
He was elected president of the Clan Maclean 
Association of America in 1896. Like all loyal 
Macleans, whether they be rich or poor, he takes 
a real interest in the history of his forefathers. 

Eoghan Mor Mac Thearlaich Mhic an Dotair 
was born in Coll, and served for some time in the 
Black Watch. Lachlan, his son, was born about 
1805, anc * came to Canada about 1822. He 
married Catherine Mackay, and settled at Lake 
Ainsley in Cape Breton. Captain Ewen Maclean 
in Charlottetown is his third son. 



CHAPTER XIX. 

%ht (Chicfship of the Clan €illcan. 

I. General Facts with Regard to the 
Chiefship of Clans. 

A clan includes, first, those who claim descent 
from a common ancestor, and use the name of that 
ancestor as their surname. It includes, secondly, 
all who have joined it by adopting its name as 
their own. There are thus in all clans, clansmen 
by descent and clansmen by adoption. At the 
present day, however, it is, as a general rule, 
impossible to distinguish the one class from the 
other. 

The man who stands at the head of a clan and 
represents the founder of it, is known in Gaelic as 
an ceann-cinnidh, the kenkinnie, or clan -head. 
The representative of a branch of a clan is known 
as an ceann-taighe, the kentie, or house-head. 
The word ceann-cinnidh is generally rendered into 
English by the term chief, and the word ceann- 
taighe by the term chieftain. In kentie, the 



494 



The Clan Gillean. 



Anglicized form of ceann-taighe, the accent is on 
the last syllable ; it is pronounced, not kenty, but 
ken-tie. 

The English word chief is used in two distinct 
senses in connection with clans. It is used, first, 
as the equivalent of the word kenkinnie ; and, 
secondly, in the sense of feudal superior, or land- 
lord. In the latter sense Campbell of Breadalbane 
was chief of the Macintyres of Glennoe ; in the 
former sense, he was not ; the Macintyres had a 
kenkinnie of their own. 

The kenkinnie was ruler, judge, and com- 
mander-in-chief of his clan. He protected the 
members of his clan in their rights, settled disputes 
between them, and punished evil-doers. He also 
led his followers to battle, and fought at their 
head. He had great influence, but he could not 
act as he pleased. He could neither make nor 
change laws without the consent of his people. 
He was of course largely under the control of his 
leading men. If he played the part of a tyrant, 
he would lose his head. It was thus absolutely 
necessary for him for his own safety and comfort 
to treat his followers in a kind and fatherly 
manner. 

The law of primogeniture, as it exists in Britain 
at the present day, belongs entirely to the feudal 
system. It was utterly unknown to the clan sys- 
tem. It simply declared that the land-chief should 
be succeeded in his estate by his eldest lawful son, 
if he had sons ; if not, by his daughters. Thus, 



The Chiefship of the Clan. 495 

it utterly ignored the existence of clans. It would 
be unreasonable, then, to regard it as a law fitted 
for regulating the succession to the headship of a 
clan. 

There were two things required to constitute a 
person eligible for the chiefship. It was necessary, 
first, that he should be descended in the male line 
from the founder of the clan ; and, secondly, that 
he should possess the intellectual and physical 
qualifications required for the performance of the 
duties required of him as chief. 

A natural son, legitimated by an act of parlia- 
ment, a letter of legitimation, or the marriage of 
his parents after his birth, was eligible for the 
chiefship of a clan as well as a son born in wed- 
lock. Robert II. was chief of the Stewarts ; 
Archibald the Grim, chief of the Douglases ; and 
John of Killin was chief of the Mackenzies. 
Dugald Stewart was chieftain of the Stewarts of 
Appin ; Aonghus na Feirte, chieftain of the Mac- 
donalds of Keppoch ; Donald Gallach, chieftain of 
the Macdonalds of Sleat ; and John Muideartach, 
chieftain of the Clanranald. 

There were three ways in which a person might 
become chief of his clan ; by the general law of 
succession, through designation to the chiefship 
by the last chief, or by election. According to the 
general law, the eldest legitimate son succeeded 
his father, if he had the requisite qualifications for 
the chiefship. His fitness would, no doubt, be 
judged in the most favourable manner possible by 



496 The Clan Gillean. 

those who were attached to his father. It was 
thus strongly probable that he would become 
chief. 

Sometimes the chief of a clan passed by his 
eldest son, for prudential reasons, and settled 
the succession upon a younger son. John, first 
Lord of the Isles, appointed Donald, his third 
son, his heir-apparent. John Glas, the first Earl 
of Breadalbane, had two legitimate sons, Duncan 
Mor and John. He gave the estate to John, who 
was chieftain of the Campbells of Breadalbane 
from 1 7 16 to 1752. Duncan Mor, who was equal 
to John in every respect, was married, and left two 
lawful sons, Patrick Mor and John. 

When a clan elected a kenkinnie, the rule in- 
variably followed by them was to select the best 
qualified person among the near relatives of the 
last chief. Of course they never selected a man 
who could not be traced back step by step in the 
male line to a former chief. As a general rule 
their choice fell upon a brother, uncle, or cousin of 
the last chief. A young and inexperienced person 
was never elected. 

A clan had a right to depose a chief and to 
elect a more suitable person to fill his place. 
About the year 1405, Ferchar, ninth chief of the 
Mackintoshes, was deposed, and a near relative, 
Malcolm Beg, raised to the position of ruler of 
the clan. Ferchar had sons, who became the 
founders of several families. Malcolm Beg died 
in 1457, and left four sons. He was the progenitor 



The Chiefship of the Clan. 497 

of all the Mackintosh chiefs known to history from 
the time of his death to the present day. John 
Alainn, chieftain of the Macdonalds of Keppoch, 
was deposed by his followers in 1505 or there- 
abouts, and his cousin-german, Donald Glas, 
chosen in his place. About 15 15 the Clanranald 
murdered their chieftain, Dugald Mac Ranald, and 
placed themselves under the command of his uncle, 
Alexander Mac Allan. John Muideartach, Alex- 
ander's son, became laird of Moydart, and, under 
the name of captain, actual chieftain of the Clan- 
ranald. Allan, son and heir of the deposed 
Dugald, had to be satisfied with being laird of 
Morar. 

In order to be chief of a clan it was always 
necessary that a person should be acknowledged as 
such by the majority of the clan. It was of no 
use for a man to call himself a chief unless he had 
followers enough to maintain him in that position. 
James, son of James II., called himself King of 
Britain, but in spite of his declarations the Georges 
remained kings. Theoretical claims are not of 
much value to a man unless he can obtain posses- 
sion of that which he claims. James Stewart had 
no doubt very good claims to the British throne, 
but unfortunately for him the hated Brunswicker 
had more followers than he had. Probably it 
would have been as wise for him if he had never 
said anything about his claims. 



498 The Clan Gillean. 

II. The Claims of the Maclaines of Lochbuie 

TO THE CHIEFSHIP OF THE CLAN GlLLEAN. 

The Macleans of Ross knew perfectly well that 
their ancestor, Neil of Lehir, was the eldest of 
Lachlan Bronnach's lawful sons. But they knew 
also that Lachlan Og was acknowledged by the 
clan as their chief, and that his son, Hector Odhar, 
his grandson, Lachlan Cattanach, and his great- 
grandson, Hector Mor,were likewise acknowledged 
as chiefs. Instead of grumbling and complaining 
because they were not themselves chiefs they 
followed those who were chiefs, and proved on the 
battle-field that as men they were their equals in 
every respect. If they could not afford to purchase 
such polished swords as the chiefs had, they could 
make swords for themselves and cut down as many 
enemies with them as the chiefs could cut down 
with theirs. They were grand warriors and most 
loyal clansmen. The Macleans of Coll always 
asserted that their valiant ancestor, John Garbh, 
was an older son than Lachlan Og of Duart, but 
they never on that ground or any other claimed 
the chiefship of the clan. They were intelligent 
and well-informed men, and knew that they were 
only chieftains. They would never pretend to be 
what they were not. 

The Macleans of Duart were in possession of 
the castle and lands of Duart, at least from 1366 
to 1689. The Macleans of Lochbuie never, during 
that long period, claimed to be chiefs of the clan. 



The Chiefship of the Clan. 499 

If they had on any occasion made such a claim, 
it is tolerably certain some old book, manuscript, 
or official document would contain a reference to 
it. They did not put forward their claim even for 
some time after Duart had ceased to be the prop- 
erty of Lachlan Liibanach's descendants. They 
waited until Sir Hector Maclean, Sir John's only 
son, died in Rome in 1750. Then they said to 
themselves, The Campbells have taken their lands 
from our brethren, and we will take the chiefship 
from them ; they are now too weak to defend 
themselves. 

John, seventeenth of Lochbuie, obtained posses- 
sion of the estate in 175 1. It is not certain that 
he laboured under the delusion that he was chief 
of the Macleans, but it is quite possible that he 
did. Captain Archibald Maclaine, his son, ad- 
dressed a memorial to the King, which commences 
thus: — "The subscriber is only son to a Maclaine 
of Lochbuie, a gentleman of as good family and 
connections as any in the Highlands of Scotland, 
and whose family has for the space of from eight 
to nine hundred years supported the character of 
what is called in that country a Highland chief, 
or the first man of his name." The memorial was 
written apparently about the year 1776. As the 
king had no special acquaintance with Highland 
history, it was probably safe enough to tell him 
him that there were Maclaine chiefs in the High- 
lands at least as early as the year 976, or about 
234 years before Gilleain na Tuaighe was born. 



500 The Clan Gillean. 

A mural tablet in Laggan, Mull, contains the 
words, " In memory of Murdoch Maclaine, Esq., 
of Lochbuie, chief of his name." Murdoch died in 
1844. The inscription was written some time 
after that date. The present Maclaine of Loch- 
buie became laird in 1863. He styles himself 
" Maclaine of Lochbuie, chief of the clan." 

It will be noticed that Captain Archibald Mac- 
laine, refers to his father, John Maclaine, merely 
as a chief, or the first man of his name. It will 
also be noticed that all that the writer of the 
inscription on the tablet claimed for Murdoch 
Maclaine was that he was chief of his name, or 
chief of the Maclaines. The present Maclaine of 
Lochbuie, according to his own statement, is much 
more than chief of his name ; he is chief of the 
clan. 

The Maclaines of Lochbuie maintain, in the 
first place, that Hector Reaganach of Lochbuie 
was older than Lachlan Lubanach of Duart. 
They support this contention by asserting that 
there has always been a tradition in the Lochbuie 
family to that effect. It is a well-known fact that 
traditions are not always as old as they are sup- 
posed to be. The Ardgour MS. contains the 
following statement: — " It is known beyond all 
controversy that a tradition was handed down 
from father to son, from the very first eras of 
their settlement in Mull to the present day, that 
Gillean, progenitor of the Macleans, and Colin 
Fitzgerald, ancestor of the Mackenzies of Kintail, 



The Chiefship of the Clan. 501 

were brothers, and sons of the Earl of Kildare in 
Ireland." The tradition referred to was merely a 
false story started into existence about the year 
1669. The tradition with regard to the seniority 
of Hector Reaganach, may also be a story of 
recent origin. If it could be shown that the 
second, third, fourth, fifth, or sixth Maclean of 
Lochbuie had held that Hector Reaganach was 
older than Lachlan Lubanach, it is not likely that 
anyone would be disposed to call in question the 
correctness of his assertion. But it is impossible 
to show anything of the kind. So far as known 
to us, the tradition with regard to the seniority of 
Hector Reaganach cannot be proved to be older 
than 1750. 

The Maclaines of Lochbuie maintain, in the 
second place, that inasmuch as Hector Reaganach 
was older than Lachlan Lubanach, the present 
Maclaine of Lochbuie is chief of the Clan Gillean. 
As the assertion that Hector Reaganach was older 
than Lachlan Lubanach cannot be shown to be a 
fact, it is utterly worthless as a ground of claim. 
Even if it were true, it would not follow that 
Hector Reaganach was chief of the Clan Gillean. 
According to the very tradition to which the Mac- 
laines of Lochbuie attach so much importance, he 
was not. That tradition tells us that Lachlan was 
a wily character, and that he cheated his brother 
Hector out of the chiefship. 

The validity of the claim of the Maclaines of 
Lochbuie to the chiefship of the Clan Gillean has 



502 The Clan Gillean. 

never been acknowledged by any Scottish writer. 
Hugh Macdonald, of Sleat, who wrote about the 
year 1680, makes the following statements : — 
44 Maclean fostered Donald Ballach, John Mor's 
eldest legitimate son. Finnon, the Green Abbot, 
a subtle and wicked counsellor, told John Mor 
that he had only a small portion of his father's 
estate, and that he should seize all the land south 
of the Point of Ardnamurchan. He brought over 
to his side the chief of the Macleans and Macleod 
of Harris." The person described as " Maclean" 
and "the chief of the Macleans," was Lachlan 
Bronnach of Duart. It is true that the Sleat 
historian asserts in one part of his work that 
Hector Reaganach was older than Lachlan Lub- 
anach. That opinion, however, never led him to 
think that the Macleans of Duart were not the 
chiefs of the Macleans. He knew perfectly well, 
whether they were descended from a younger son 
of John Dubh or not, that they stood at the head 
of the Clan Gillean. Douglas's Baronage was 
published in 1798. It contains the following 
statements with regard to the chiefship of the 
Macleans : — " It cannot be absolutely determined 
which of the two, Hector Reaganach and Lachlan 
Liibanach, was the elder brother, the precedency 
being claimed by both ; nor can it be discovered 
either from the private writs of their families or 
the public records. On the contrary, it appears 
that the whole clan, at different periods, have 
followed the heads of both families to the field and 



The Chiefship of the Clan. 503 

fought under their command." It is extremely 
absurd to assert that the precedency was claimed by 
both Hector Reaganach and Lachlan Lubanach. 
Surely they must have known which of them held 
the more prominent position under the Lord of 
the Isles. There is not the slightest reason to 
suppose that they ever disputed about anything. 
They were evidently very affectionate brothers. It 
will be noticed that, according to the Baronage, 
it could not absolutely be determined which of 
the two brothers, Hector Reaganach or Lachlan 
Lubanach, was the elder. If it could not be 
affirmed as a fact in 1798 that Hector Reaganach 
was older than Lachlan Lubanach, how can it be 
affirmed as a fact to-day? The assertion that it 
appears that the Clan Gillean followed the leader- 
ship of the Macleans of Duart on some occasions 
and the leadership of the Macleans of Lochbuie 
on other occasions, is utterly groundless ; it is 
actually false. There is nothing of the nature of 
evidence in existence to show that the Macleans 
of Duart ever followed, even for one day, the . 
leadership of the Macleans of Lochbuie. 

Gregory published his valuable history of the 
Western Islands and Highlands of Scotland in 
1836. He writes as follows about the chief- 
ship of the Macleans :— " Maclean of Duart has 
generally been considered as the chief of all the 
Macleans. The house of Lochbuie has always 
maintained that of the two brothers, Lachlan 
Lubanach and Hector Reaganach, the latter was 



504 The Clan Gilleax. 

the senior ; but this is a point on which there is no 
certain evidence." — For the assertion that the 
house of Lochbuie has always maintained that 
Hector Reaganach was older than Lachlan Luban- 
ach, there is not a particle of historic authority. 
Gregory could have no ground for it except the 
assertions of Murdoch of Lochbuie. 

Skene published his Highlanders of Scotland 
in 1837. He makes the following reference to the 
chiefship of the Macleans: — "John Dubh had two 
sons, Lachlan and Hector. The descendants of 
these brothers have disputed among themselves 
the honour of the chieftainship of the Clan Gil- 
lean ; but, although there are no data left from 
which to ascertain with any degree of certainty in 
which family the right lay, there seems little reason 
to doubt that the family of Duart was the princi- 
pal branch of the clan. Both families produce 
tradition in support of their claims ; but when we 
consider that upon the Lord of the Isles being 
compelled, when in the power of both the brothers, 
to give his daughter to one of them, Lachlan was 
selected, and that unvaried tradition asserts that 
his son commanded as lieutenant-general at the 
battle of Harlaw, it seems probable that Lachlan was 
the eldest brother, and consequently that the Mac- 
leans of Duart were chiefs of the Clan Gillean." 
The genealogy of the Macleans, which is given 
in the MS. of 1467, was not known to Gregory 
in 1836 or to Skene in 1837. It was not known 
to anyone until 1838. It was published by Skene 



The Chiefship of the Clan. 505 

in 1839. In the notes appended to it, that eminent 
historian makes the following - statements: — " This 
genealogy of the Macleans agrees pretty exactly 
with the old genealogy of the clan preserved by 
the Beatons, their hereditary seannachies. It will 
be observed that it commences with Lachlan, the 
progenitor of the Duart family, and this proves 
the seniority of this branch over that of Lochbuie." 
We do not agree with Skene in thinking that the 
fact that the MS. of 1467 begins with Lachlan 
Liibanach proves that Lachlan Liibanach was 
older than Hector Reaganach. What it really 
proves is that Lachlan Liibanach was chief of the 
Clan Gillean. 

III. Proofs of the Chiefship of the 
Macleans of Duart. 

As the Macleans of Duart and the Maclaines of 
Lochbuie trace themselves back to the same ances- 
tor and call themselves by his name, they constitute 
only one clan. They have always looked upon 
themselves as one clan, and have always been 
looked upon by others as one clan. 

The Macleans of Duart and the Maclaines of 
Lochbuie were feudally independent of one an- 
other. The former did not hold their lands of 
the latter ; neither did the latter hold their lands 
of the former. Maclean of Duart was feudal 
chief of all the tenants on the Duart estates, 
whether they were Macleans or not. In the same 
way Maclean of Lochbuie and all other Maclean 



506 The Clan Gillean. 

lairds who held crown charters, were feudal chiefs 
of the tenants on their respective estates. 

We wish it to be distinctly understood that we 
do not lay it down as an historic fact that Lachlan 
Liibanach was older than Hector Reaganach. So 
far as the chiefship of the Clan Gillean is con- 
cerned, it is a matter of perfect indifference which 
of the two brothers was the elder. It is only 
ignorance of the laws and history of the Scottish 
clans that would lead any person to affirm that if 
Hector Reaganach was older than Lachlan Lub- 
anach he must have been chief of the clan. The 
tradition to which the Maclaines of Lochbuie attach 
so much importance, does not assert that Hector 
Reaganach was chief of the Macleans. It tells us 
indeed that he was not — that his brother Lachlan 
cheated him out of the chiefship. 

Among the proofs of the chiefship of the Mac- 
leans of Duart, are the following : — 

i. The order in which the names of witnesses 
to charters is given, shows that the Macleans of 
Duart were first in rank among the Macleans. 

The witnesses to a charter granted by Alexander, 
third Lord of the Isles, in February, 1443-4, were, — 
Lachlan M'Gilleon, Lord of Dowart ; John Mac 
Murdoch McGilleon, Lord of Canlochbouye; John 
Mac Lachlan M' Gilleon, Lord of Coll ; Wiland 
Chisholm and others. The witnesses to a charter 
granted by" John, fourth Lord of the Isles, in 
August, 1449, were, — John Stewart, Lord of 
Lorn; Lachlan M'Gilleoin of Doward ; John 



The Chiefship of the Clan. 507 

Mac Murdoch M' Gilleoin of Fynschenys ; John 
Mac Lachlan M' Gilleoin; William, Thane of 
Cawdor, and others. The witnesses to a charter 
granted by John of the Isles in April, 1463, were, — 
Donald of the Isles, Lord of Dunnowage and of 
the Glynns ; Celestine oi' the Isles, of Lochalsh, 
and of Lochbryn ; Lachlan M' Gilleon, Lord of 
Dowart ; John Munro, Lord of Foulis ; Lachlan 
Og M' Gilleon, son and heir of Lachlan McGilleon 
of Doward ; Ranald Ban of the Isles and others. 
The witnesses to a charter granted by John of the 
Isles in April, 1467, were, — Donald of the Isles; 
Lachlan McGilleoin, Lord of Doward; Alexander 
Mac Ian, Lord of Ardnamurchan ; Lachlan Og 
McGilleoin, Master of Doward, and others. The 
witnesses to a charter granted by John, Lord of 
the Isles, in June, 1469, were, — Donald of the 
Isles; Celestine of Lochalsh; Lachlan M'Gilleoin, 
Lord of Doward; John M'Gilleoin of Lochboyg; 
Lachlan Og M' Gilleoin, Master of Doward ; 
William M' Loyd of Glenelg ; Roderick M'Leoid 
of Leoghas ; Alexander Mac Ian of Ardnamur- 
chan ; John Mac Lachlan M' Gilleoin of Coll ; 
and Thomas Monro, secretary to the Lord of the 
Isles and rector of Kilmanawik. The witnesses 
to a charter granted by John of the Isles in 
December, 1478, were, — Colin, Earl of Argyle ; 
Lachlan MakGilleoin of Doward ; Hector Mack- 
gilleoin of Loichbowe ; William Makloid of Glen- 
elg; Rory Makloide of Lewis; Alexander M'Cane 
of Ardnamercho; and Malcolm Makneile of Geya. 



508 The Clan Gillean. 

The charters granted by the Lords of the Isles 
clearly prove two things : first, that the Macleans 
of Duart held the first or highest place among the 
Macleans ; and, secondly, that the Macleans of 
Lochbuie were next in rank to them in the clan. 

2. The order in which the names of the leading 
Islanders appear in a commission written by them- 
selves in July, 1545, shows that Maclean of Duart 
was the most important man in his own clan. 
The names are given as follows: — Donald, Lord 
of the Isles and Earl of Ross ; Hector Maclane, 
Lord of Doward ; John Macallister, captain of 
Clanranald; Rory MacLeod of Lewis; Alexander 
MacLeod of Dunvegan ; Murdoch Maclane of 
Lochbuy ; Angus Maconill, brother of James 
Maconill ; Allan Maclane of Torloisk ; Archibald 
Maconill, captain of the Clan Huistein ; Alexan- 
der Mackane of Ardnamurchan ; John Maclain of 
Coll; Gilleonan MacNeill of Barray ; Mackiynnan 
of Strathordill ; John Macquarrie of Ulva ; John 
Maclane of Ardgour ; Alexander Rannoldson of 
Glengarrie ; Angus Ranaldson of Knoydart ; and 
Donald Maclane of Kingerloch. 

3. The order in which the names of the barons 
and gentlemen of the Isles are given in the record 
of the court which was held at Icolmkill by Bishop 
Knox in 1609, shows that Maclean of Duart was 
the leading man among the Macleans. The names 
are given as follows: — Angus Macdonald of Dun- 
nyveg; Hector Maclean of Dowart; Donald Gorm 
McDonald of Slait ; Rory McCloyd of Harris ; 



The Chiefship of the Clan. 509 

Donald Mac Allan Vic Ian of Ilanteram; Lachlan 
McCleane of Coll ; Lachlan McKynnoun of that 
ilk; Hector McCleane of Lochbowie; Lachlan 
and Allan McCleane, brothers-german to Hector 
McClane of Dowart ; Gillespie McQuirie of Ull- 
ova ; and Donald McFie in Collonsaye. 

4. There are certain statements in the Register 
of the Privy Council which imply that Maclean of 
Duart was the principal man in his clan. On July 
1 2th, 1616, it is stated that McClayne, McCleod 
of Harris, the captain of the Clanranald, McKyn- 
noun, Lachlan McClayne, brother to McClayne, 
and the lairds of Coll and Lochbuy compeared 
before the Council. It seems that Hector of 
Duart was known to the Privy Council as Maclean, 
and Sir Lachlan of Strathordill as Mackinnon ; 
but that Hector Maclean of Lochbuie was known 
to them merely as the laird of Lochbuie. It is 
pretty clear, then, that as there was only one 
" McKynnoun " in Scotland in 1616, so there was 
only one " McClayne." 

5. According to the Highland genealogists, the 
Macleans of Duart were chiefs of the Clan Gillean. 
The MS. of 1467 gives the pedigree of the Mac- 
leans as follows : — Lachlan, son of John, grandson 
of Malise, son of Gillean. There is no reference 
to Hector Reaganach. In the genealogical tables 
published in Skene's Keltic Scotland, the pedigree 
of the chiefs of the Macleans is given thus : — 
Lachlan, son of Hector, son of Lachlan, son of 
John Dubh. We are also told that John Dubh 



510 The Clan Gillean. 

had two sons, Lachlan and Hector. It is not said 
that he had two sons, Hector and Lachlan. The 
pedigree in the MS. of 1467 begins with Lachlan 
Lubanach. The pedigree in Skene's Keltic Scot- 
land begins with Lachlan IJronnach. Macvurieh 
gives the genealogy of the Macleans — not the 
Macleans of Duart, but the Macleans as a clan — 
in the Book oi~ Clanranald, and begins it with Sir 
John of Duart. 

6. The Highland bards must have known who 
the men were that were recognized as chiefs of 
clans. When we examine their productions we find 
that they speak of Maclean of Duart generally 
as Mac-Gilleain, or Maclean, sometimes as ceann- 
cinnidh Chloinn-Ghilleain, or the kenkinnie of the 
Macleans, and once or twice as ceannard Chloinn- 
Ghilleain, or the captain of the Macleans. They 
refer to Maclean of Lochbuie simply as Maclean 
of Lochbuie, as Murdoch of Moy, or as Lochbuie. 
It is thus evident that the old Highland bards 
believed that Maclean of Duart was the chief of 
the Macleans. It is equally evident that in the 
time of the old bards, Maclean of Duart was 
recognized throughout the whole Highlands as 
the chief of the Macleans. 

7. In all the battles in which the Macleans took 
part as a clan, they were led by the Lords of 
Duart. Hector Roy of Duart commanded them 
at Harlaw ; Hector Odhar of Duart commanded 
them at Bloody Bay and Hallidon Hill ; Lachlan 
Mor of Duart commanded them at Glenlivet ; Sir 



The Chiefship of the Clan. 511 

Lachlan of Duart commanded them in the battles 
in which they took part in the time of Montrose; 
Sir Hector Roy of Duart commanded them at 
Inverkeithing; and Sir John of Duart commanded 
them at Killiecrankie and Sheriffmuir. The Mac- 
leans as a clan were never in one single instance 
led into battle by a Maclean of Lochbuie. 

8. In a letter written by Charles II. to the Privy 
Council of Scotland on July 10th, 1680, he describes 
Sir John of Duart as " the laird of Maclean." 
Thus, according to King Charles, Sir John was 
chief of the Clan Gillean. 

9. According to the acts of the parliaments of 
Scotland, Sir John Maclean of Duart was laird 
of Maclean. On May 13th, 1685, King James 
1 1, of Britain, with the advice and consent of 
parliament, appointed certain persons to be com- 
missioners within the sheriffdom of Argyle, for 
ordering and uplifting the cess. Among those 
appointed were, — the Earl of Perth, the Marquis 
of Atholl, the Earl of Breadalbane, Campbell of 
Lochnell, the laird of Maclean, Lachlan Maclean 
of Brolas, Lachlan Maclean of Torloisk, Maclean 
of Ardgour, Maclean of Lochbuie, Macalister of 
Tarbert, Macdonald of Largie, the laird of La- 
mont, the laird of Macnaughton, Stewart of 
Appin, and John Campbell of Glendaruel. The 
laird of Brolas was convener. The person desig- 
nated laird of Maclean, was Sir John Maclean of 
Duart. The words, laird of Maclean, and the 
words, chief of the Macleans, mean the same 



512 The Clan Gillean. 

thing. Thus, then, according to King James 
and the Scottish parliament, Sir John of Duart 
was the lawful chief of the Macleans, and their 
only chief. 

10. According to the direct testimony of his- 
torians and other writers, the Macleans of Duart 
were the chiefs of the Clan Gillean. We have 
already seen that Hugh Macdonald, of Sleat, 
refers to Lachlan Bronnach as the chief of the 
Macleans. The author of Diurnal Occurrences 
in Scotland from 1652 to 1654, speaks of the 
Macleans as one of the greatest clans in Scotland, 
and states that it was their chief and divers of 
them who fought so stoutly at Inverkeithing. 
Thus, then, according to the testimony of a person 
who wrote in 1652, Hector Roy of Inverkeithing 
was chief of the Clan Gillean. Martin wrote his 
Description of the Western Isles of Scotland 
about 1695. In his account of Mull he makes 
the following statements : — "The castle of Duart 
was the seat of Sir John Maclean, head of the 
ancient family of the Macleans ; the castle of 
Moy is the seat of Maclean of Lochbuie." To 
say that Sir John was the head of the family of 
the Macleans is precisely the same thing as to say 
that he was chief of the Clan Gillean. Dr. 
Johnson, who visited Mull in 1773, speaks of Sir 
Allan Maclean of Brolas as " the chieftain of the 
great clan of Maclean," and of Maclean of Loch- 
buie as "a very powerful laird." Boswell, who 
accompanied Dr. Johnson in his travels, speaks 



The Chiefship of the Clan. 513 

of Sir Allan, in one place, as "the chief of his 
clan," and, in another place, as "the chief of the 
Macleans." 

Sir Fitzroy Donald Maclean is the lawful heir 
male of Sir Allan of Brolas, Sir Lachlan of Duart, 
Hector Og of Duart, and Lachlan Mor of Duart, 
the mightiest chiefs the Macleans ever had. He is 
acknowledged as their chief by the Macleans of 
Duart, Ardgour, Ross, Coll, Kingerloch, Doch- 
garroch, and Morvern, and by some of the best 
men among the Maclaines of Lochbuie. We take 
for granted that some who loyally follow him as 
their chief really believe that Hector Reaganach 
was older than Lachlan Lubanach. This belief, 
however, does not blind them to the historic fact 
that the Macleans of Duart were all along the 
head men or chiefs of the Macleans considered as 
one great clan. The truth is that, apart from the 
daring deeds performed by them under the leader- 
ship of the Lords of Duart, the Macleans have 
no historic position— no standing of any kind — as 
a portion of the Scottish nation from the battle of 
Harlaw in 141 1 to the battle of Sheriffmuir in 
1 7 15. Surely the men under whom they dis- 
tinguished themselves on one bloody field after 
another must have been their chiefs. If the lairds 
of Lochbuie were their chiefs, where were they 
when the Lords of Duart were leading the mem- 
bers of the clan, possibly to death, but certainly 
to fame as warriors ? 



ADDITIONS, REFERENCES, AND 
CORRECTIONS. 



Page 9. — For "Ewen, Alexander, and Malcolm" read Ewen, 
Alexander, and Lachlan; and for "his brother Alexander" read 
his son Alexander. — According to Mr. A. Brown's Memorials of 
Argyleshire, the Chartulary of Cupar makes Alexander the son 
of Duncan. As we took for granted that this was really the 
case, we stated that Ewen was succeeded by his brother Alex- 
ander. We have lately learned from an article by that excellent 
Keltic scholar, Mr. Alexander Macbain, of Inverness, that the 
Duncan referred to in the Chartulary of Cupar was Duncan of 
Lornie, near Perth, not Duncan of Lorn in Argyleshire. There 
is thus no ground whatever for the assertion that Ewen of Lorn 
was succeeded by his brother Alexander. It is possible that 
Alexander was Ewen's nephew, but the probability is that he 
was his son. — Transacliotis of the Gaelic Society of Inverness, 
vol. xxi., p. 202. 

Page 33. — The Ardgour MS. is a work of great value. It 
contains an account of the Macleans of Duart, Ardgour, Lehir 
and Ross, Coll, Morvern, Torloisk, and Brolas. It was written 
between 1762 and 1765. For our copy of it we are indebted to 
the kindness of the late Alexander Maclean, Esq., of Ardgour. 

Page 36. — Old Dugald of Scone is referred to in Skene's 
Keltic Scotland, vol. iii., pp. 62, 343, 361, and 480. 



516 The Clan Gillean. 

Page 44. — For " Donlad" read Donald, and for " Beala- 
chuain," Bailechuain. — The published portion of the history of 
the Clan Donald by the Sleat historian will be found in the 
Colleclanea de Rebus Albanicis, a rare but very useful work. 

Page 55. — Maoim Mor le Mac-Dhbmhnaill na h-Alba air 
Gallaibh Alba, agus Mac-Gille-eoin de mhuinntir Mhic-Dhomh- 
naill do mharbhadh e am frithghuin a mhaoim sin. — Great 
onset by Macdonald of Scotland on the Lowlanders of Scot- 
land, and Maclean of Macdonald's people was slain in the heat 
of that onset. — Annals of Loch Ce, vol. ii.,p. 137. 

Page 57. — For the lands granted to Janet Stewart, see The 
Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, vol. vi., pp. 467, 519, and 654, 
and also p. 142 of the preface. 

Page 61. — Apud Edinburgh, 3 Oct., 1496. Rex dedit le- 
gitimationem Lachlano Makgilleone, filio naturali Hectoris 
Macgilleone. Lachlan was thus legitimated on the 3d of 
October. On the 8th of the same month he received a charter 
of all the lands which had belonged to his father. 

Page 68. — Among those slain at Flodden were the Bishop 
of the Isles, the Earl of Argyll, and " Mack Clene." — Hairs 
Chronicle, p. 563. 

Page 75. — A.D., 1523. — Macgilleain, i.e., Lachainn Mor 
Mac Eachainn, do mharbhadh am foill leis an ridire Mac Mhic- 
Cailin am baile righ Alba in hoc anno. — Mac-Gillean, that is, 
Lachlan Mor, son of Hector, was killed in treachery by the 
knight, the son of Mac-Cailin, in the King of Albin's town in 
this year. — Annals 0/ Loch Ce, vol. ii., p. 243. 

It seems that Lachlan Cattanach was known in Ireland as 
Lachlan Mor. He was also known as Maclean. Hector Roy, 
who was killed at Harlaw in 141 1, was likewise known in 
Ireland as Maclean. 

Page. 95. — For " Tiree " in first line read Tiree, Morvern, 
and other lands. Hector Mor seems indeed to have received 
a remission for the rents of all his lands. — Exchequer Rolls, 
vol. xvi., p. 566. 



Additions and Corrections. 517 

Pace hi. — John Dubh of Morvern, — 
" Register of Privy Council. 

" Stirling Castle, 28th March, 1579. 

"Complaint of John, Bishop of the Isles, as follows: — 
Although he is lawful Bishop of the Isles, ' be his Hienes and 
the ordour ressavit in the reformit Kirk of Scotland,' and has 
been in possession of the bishopric, uplifting • the maillis and 
dewities of the samyn, be the space of diverse and sundrie 
yeiris, yet Johnne Dow McClayne, bailie of Morvarne, Murdo 
McClayne of Lochboy, Johnne McClayne, Allane McClayne, 
Ewin McClayne, and Master Lauchlane McClane, his sons, 
Gilleonane NcNeill of Barray, Rorie Oig, his son and heir, 
. . . . , his son, and Gilleonane, his brother, Lauchlane 
McClayne and Tarloch McClayne sons to Donald Murynauch 
McClayne, Hector McClayne, and Tarloch McClayne, sons to 
Donald Crowdirnauch McClayne. Donald McClayne, Lauch- 
lane Cam, his brother, Neill McAne VcNeill, Donald Barrach 
McAchin, Hectour McEwin VcDonald Dow, captain of Carn- 
bulk, Johnne Rogach, his brother, Donald Goddach, his brother, 
Lauchlane McAne Dow, . . . McNaell of Ballenyntyne, 
Gillecallum McLauchlane Fyn and his brother, Terloch Mc- 
Achin Row Our Roy McAchin, Fynnoun McKynnoun of 
Strathowardill, Lauchlane Oig, his son and apparent heir, Angus 
McConnell of Dunnaveg, Raunald, Donald Gorm, and Coll 
his brothers, Raunald McChoill, and Johnne McKane of the 
Randy, with their accomplices,' not onlie hes maid stop trubill, 
and impediment to the said Bischope.in uptaking of the maillis, 
fermes, teindis, proffettis, emolumentis, and dewiteis of the said 
bischoprik thir diverse yeiris bygane, and in a maner dispossest 
him thairfra, quhairthrow he gettis littill or na commoditie of 
the samyn, bot als hes stoppit, and still stoppis and makis 
impediment to him and his servandis to travell in the cuntrie 
for doing of thair lefull busines and executing of his office, 
swa that they, nor utheris our Soverane Lordis trew liegis, sic 
as merchandis, schipmers, and fischearis dar not resort to the 
saidis ylis for feir of thair lyvis and spuilyeing of thair guidis, 



518 The Clan Gillean. 

without his Hienes and the Lordis of Secreit Counsale provide 
sum remeid." 

This extract is valuable for its list of names. Professor 
Mackinnon, of Edinburgh, has kindly examined the original 
for us, and states that Ballenyntyne is clearly a mistake for 
Balemertyn, and that Our in Our Roy should perhaps be read 
Ewir or Ewin. Carnbulk stands for Carnaborg, or Cairnburg. 

Page 169. — For " Moror " read Morar. 

Page 185. — For " Glenroy, over " read Gicnroy, and over. 

Page 231. — For "General Carpenter's dragoons" read one 
squadron of Carpenter's dragoons. 

Page 244. — For "aithre" read aire. 

Page 248. — The sentence, "John Garbh was the progenitor 
of the Macleans of Coll," should have come in immediately 
after the words " Lehir and Ross." 

Page 254. — " Hector Reaganach was married twice. By 
his first wife he had at least one son." Instead of these 
positive assertions we should have written, Hector Reaganach 
seems to have been married twice, and by his first wife to have 
had at least one son, Terlach. 

According to the genealogical tables published in Skene's 
Keltic Scotland, Terlach was the third son of Hector Reag- 
anach. The statements of the tables are as follows: — "John 
had two good sons, Lachlan and Hector. Hector had these 
sons ; Murdoch, Donald, Charles, Ewen, Thomas and Malcolm. 
They were the sons of Christina, daughter of Macleod, namely, 
Murdoch, son of Tormod, son of Leod." 

Among the reasons for thinking that Hector Reaganach 
was married twice are the following : — 1. Tradition affirms that 
Terlach was the eldest son of Hector Reaganach. In a letter 
written on August 3d, 1780, by Hugh Maclean, laird of Kin- 
gerloch, to John Maclean of Grulin, we find this statement : — 
" From the tradition of your own family and others, it was 
currently affirmed that Charles, son to Hector, first of Loch- 
buie, was the oldest of several sons, but contented himself 
with the division of Ardmeanach, and left the rest to the other 



Additions and Corrections. 519 

brothers to divide as they thought proper." The Ardgour MS. 
assures us that this tradition is true. 2. Douglas's Baronage 
contains the views held by the Maclaines of Lochbuie respect- 
ing their own origin when that work was written, and one of 
the statements made in it is this : " Hector Reaganach is said 
to have married a daughter of the Lord of the Isles." It is 
absolutely certain that Hector Reaganach married Christina, 
daughter of Murdoch Macleod. If then he married a daughter 
of the Lord of the Isles, it must have been as his fust wife. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Charles M. Maclean tells us in his History 
of the Clan Tarlach that—" Tarlach, ancestor of the Clan 
Tarlach, was a son of Hector Reaganach by a daughter of the 
Lord of the Isles, and that Murdoch, progenitor of the Macleans 
of Lochbuie, was his son by a daughter of Macleod of Lewis." 
Of course Macleod of Lewis is a mistake for Murdoch Macleod, 
who was of the Harris family. 3. It is tolerably certain that 
John Og of Lochbuie was not born earlier than 1470. It is 
thus extremely probable that his great-grandfather, Murdoch of 
Lochbuie, was not born earlier than 1370. Now in a charter 
of the year 1427 we find as contemporaries, John Mac Murdoch 
Mac Hector and Terlach Mac Ferchar Mac Terlach Mac 
Hector, or John the grandson of Hector Reaganach and 
Terlach the great-grandson of Hector Reaganach. We also 
find that when the charter was granted, the daughter of Ferchar 
Mac Terlach Mac Hector was married, and had children. It is 
probable then that she was born as early as 1407. It is thus 
also probable that her grandfather, Terlach Mac Hector, was 
born as early as 1357— several years earlier than his brother 
Murdoch. 

The argument from tradition in favour of the seniority of 
Terlach, taken by itself, is not sufficiently strong to counter- 
balance the statement in Skene's tables, and certainly the 
assertions of Douglas's Baronage and the History of the Clan 
Tarlach do not add much weight to it. Taken, however, in 
connection with the third argument advanced, it possesses some 
evidential value. The third argument, or the apparent teach- 



520 The Clan Gillean. 

ings of historic facts, is really the one that leads us to think 
that Terlach of Urchart was actually older than Murdoch of 
Lochbuie. But whether he was or not, Murdoch was chieftain 
of the Macleans of Lochbuie. There can be no dispute about 
that point. 

Page 256. — " Apud Linlithgow, 13 Sept., 1538. Rex dedit 
literas legitimation is Murdaco Makgilleoune et Karolo Makgil- 
leoune bastardis, filiis naturalibus Johannis Makgilleoune de 
Lochboy, et eorum alteri." — Register of the Great Seal, vol. ii., 
P. 409. 

Page 262. — A. D. 1651. Murdoch Maclean of Lochbuie 
and Lachlan Maclean of Calchellie complained to the Estates 
of Parliament against John Mac Alister Roy, alias Campbell, 
bailie of Colonsay ; Neil Mac Alister Vic Phatrick, alias 
Campbell, of Torropafe in Islay ; Malcolm Mac Ian Roy in 
Corranbeg, Creignish ; Iver Ban Mac Iver of Ardlarich ; and 
others, because in 1647 they went with guns, swords, bows, 
dorlochs, culverins, pistols, and other weapons, under silence 
and cloud of night, to the lands of Glengaristil belonging to 
Murdoch Maclean of Lochbuie, and most cruelly and barbar- 
ously murdered John Mac Gilliecalum Vic Donald Duy, John 
Mac Terlach Vic Alister, Donald Mac Angus Vic Ian, Donald 
Mac Gilliecalum Vic Donald, John Mac Neill Duy, tenants 
and servants to said Murdoch Maclean of Lochbuie, all being 
quietly and peaceably at their own houses. The said murderers 
were declared to be fugitives and rebels, and ordained to be put 
to the horn and all their moveable goods to be escheated. — 
Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, vol. vii., p. 301. 

Page 272. — For "Glengyrth" read Glyngarth. 

Page 277. — For the obligation given by Alexander of the 
Isles, see Thanes of Cawdor, p. 15. 

Page 279. — For the first three sentences read, Heclor Buie 
had six sons : Ewen, Allan, and Ferchar ; Neil and Terlach; 
and Alexander. It is said that the mother of Ewen, Allan, 
and Ferchar was a daughter of Allan Mac Rory of Moydart. 
Mora, daughter of Malcolm Mackintosh, was the mother of 



Additions and Corrections. 521 

Neil and Terlach. Margaret, daughter of Hugh Fraser, Lord 
Lovat, was the mother of Alexander. Three of Heclor Bute's 
sons, Ewen, Ferchar, and Terlach, survived him. 

Page 280. — For " In the same year," &c, read, On January 
6th, 1 5 10, fames IV. gave to Ewen Maclean a charter of Kilmalieu, 
Blaaich, and other lands, all of which had been formerly held by him 
under the Lord of the Isles. It is certain that the lands thus granted 
to him had belonged to his father. — Reg. Mag. Sig., Lib. XV, No. Ji. 

Page 307. — Handfasting. In his History of the Macleans, 
Seannachie makes the following statements: — "John, fourth 
laird of Ardgour, had two sons by a daughter of Mac Ian of 
Ardnamurchan, whom he had taken upon the prospect of 
marriage if she pleased him. At the expiration of two years — 
the period of her noviciate — he sent her home to her father, 
but the children by her were reputed lawful children, because 
their mother was taken upon a prospect of marriage." 

The assertion that the children by Mac Ian's daughter were 
reputed lawful children is not true. John of Inverscadale, the 
elder of the two sons, was a man of ability and prominence ; 
but there was no attempt to make him chieftain of the Macleans 
of Ardgour. Had he been a lawful son he would certainly 
have been appointed chieftain. 

According to the lowest conception which can be formed of 
marriage as a divine institution, it is necessary that a man and 
woman should take each other as husband and wife until God 
shall separate them by death. In the handfasting ceremony a 
man merely stood up before witnesses, took a woman by the 
hand, and declared that he accepted her as his wife for a year 
and a day or perhaps a longer period. It is clear that there is 
nothing of the nature of marriage in this ceremony. It is 
equally clear that the children of handfasting persons were 
simply illegitimate. 

The Ardgour MS. contains the following statements : — 
" Allan, fourth laird of Ardgour, had two sons by a daughter 
of Mac Ian of Ardnamurchan, whom he had taken upon a 
prospect of marriage. After living with him for a year or two, 



522 The Clan Gillean. 

he sent her home to her friends, but the children were reputed 
as good as lawfully begotten, because their mother was taken 
upon a prospect of marriage." These statements are correct; 
but Seannachie in copying them changed their meaning. What 
the writer of the Ardgour MS. meant was, not that the children 
were reputed lawful children, but that they held as good a 
social position as lawful children, which was undoubtedly the 
case. There were really two classes of natural children ; those 
acknowledged by their fathers as their children, and those who 
were ignored by their fathers. A child acknowledged by his 
father as his, provided for and protected by him, was in a very 
different position from a child who had no father to care for 
him. It may be regarded as a fact that all the natural children 
referred to in this work were children who had been treated 
by their fathers as if they had been born in wedlock. We may 
state that in Seannachie's History a natural son is invariably 
described as " another son." 

Page 309. — For " Anderton " read Andcrston. 

Page 310. — Marion, daughter of John Crubach, was married 
to Lachlan Macquarrie of Ulva, by whom she had John, whose 
son Lachlan was born in 1715. 

Page 320. — The Rev. Archibald Maclean was born in 1679. 
He died on March 10th, 1755. 

Page 337. — For "Hodh" read Hogh. 

Page 342. — Extracts from letters by John Maclean, Inver- 
scadale — John, son of Ian Mac Thearlaich Oig. 

" St. Andrews, 20th March, 1797. 
" One of the chiefs of our clan married a daughter of 
Macdonald of the Isles, whose arms were blended with ours 
and used by the clan till lately. On searching the Heralds' 
Office, it was found that those I use were the proper ones ; 
namely, a mountain called Kernaburg — the stronghold of the 
clan in times of danger, and very difficult of access — in one 
quarter; a hand and cross crosslet in another; a galley or lymphad 
in the third ; and two hawk's or griffin's heads and a salmon in 



Additions and Corrections. 523 

the fourth, with a Lochaber axe between branches of laurel and 
cypress as a crest. The different families of the clan have 
little or no distinction. Excepting the family of Lochbuie, 
they all, since the above discovery, at least such as chose to 
be at the expense of new seals, have assumed them. The lairds 
of Lochbuie, indeed, have of late taken it into their heads to 
dispute the chiefship, and have chosen sea dogs or seals for 
their supporters, animals as awkward and clumsy as their pre- 
tensions, as the honour of the chiefship by universal consent 
was vested in the Duart branch from the earliest settlement of 
the clan in Scotland. 

" The motto was originally Vincere vel mori, but as some 
other clans had the same, Sir John or Sir Hector — I forget 
which — changed it to Altera merces, which is of pretty much 
the same import, alluding to the crest, cypress and laurel, 
emblems of death and victory. The full arms with support- 
ers have for motto, Virtus et durissima terit, alluding to the 
digestive power of the ostrich's stomach, said, whether true 
or false, to overcome the hardest substances, even iron. 

"At the battle of Largs in 1263, Gillean made such 
slaughter among the Danes with his battle-axe as drew the 
attention of the King and his generals. After the battle the 
King took great notice of him and gave him lands and 
armorial bearings, insisting he should have a Lochaber axe 
as his crest, to commemorate the noble use he made of it 
that day. 

u At the battle of Flodden in 15 13, where James IV. was 
killed, one of our chiefs and 500 of his clan fell fighting 
around that brave though rash prince. Sir Hector, one of 
the first warriors of the age, was killed at Inverkeithing with 
750 Macleans. Of 1000 fine fellows who followed their chief 
250 only got off, most of them wounded. In point of num- 
bers we have scarcely got the better of this yet." 

Page 364. — Lachlan Maclean and Lucy Campbell, his wife, 
had five children ; Donald, James, Alexander-Colin, Jessie, and 
Bethia. The second daughter, Bethia, was married to Peter 



524 The Clan Gillean. 

Pattison, by whom she had Thomas and Mary-Hamilton. 
Mary was married to Archibald Robertson. 

Page 366. — In the last circular anent this history it was 
stated that the Chief of the Clan had offered to take ten copies 
more, and Lieutenant-Colonel H. H. McLean five copies more, 
if necessary. It should have been stated that Mr. Maclean of 
Breda had also offered to take five copies more. 

Page 372. — For " Knockcarrach " read Kuockcorrach. 

Pages 384 and 395. — For "Grimsary" read Grimisary. 

Page 389. — For "Airleod" read Arilcod. 

Page 414, line 12. — For "Catherine," &c, read Cat /urine, 
Allan, Helena, Polly, &c. 

Page 416. — Dr. E. F. Reed and Hannah Maclean, his wife, 
had seven children ; Julia, Ebenezer-Fitch, Maro-Maclean, Mary- 
Eliza, Harriet-Smith, Julius- Alexander, and Rosanna. Julius 
married Caroline Blood, by whom he had Anna, Rosanna, 
and Mary. Anna was married to Henry M. Wilkinson. 

Page 443, line 8. — For "Deputy Surgeon-General" read 
Deputy Inspector-General. 

Page 468. — For "Mary-Louisa" read Mary-Julia. Sean- 
nachie's History was written by Neil Maclean. 

Page 468.— For "BHROLAIS" read BHROLAIS. 

Pali: 474, line 10. — For "and has by her five children," 
&c, read and had by her five children; Hector - Fit zroy, 
Charles-Lachlan, Fitzroy-Holland, John-Mar sham, and Fin- 
vola-Marianne-Elcanor. 

Page 484. line 29. — Alexander Maclean married Lydia Cath- 
erine Rice, by whom he had James T., Annie M., Armenia E., 
and Alice A. 

Page 487, line 2. — For " 1899" read i88g. 

Page 488, lines 22 and 28. — For "James A." read J. A. 

Page 503, line 10. — For "absolutely be determined" read 
be absolutely determined. 

Page 513, line 7. — For "chiefs" read chief. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



SCOTLAND. 

The Clan Maclean Association, Glasgow (20 copies) 

Prof. Magnus Maclean, D.S&, 51 Kersland Terrace, Glasgow 

John Maclean, 68 Mitchell Street, Glasgow 

Mrs. A. II. Maclean, 3 Kirklee Gardens, Glasgow 

Andrew Bruce Maclean, Craigpark, Denniston, Glasgow 

Petei Maclean, 5 Cecil Street, Ibrox, Glasgow 

Neil Maclaine, 2 Rutland Crescent, Glasgow 

Sir Andrew Maclean, Viewfield House, 1'artick, Glasgow 

John Maclean, 4 Buchanan Street, Partick, Glasgow 

John Maclean, 35 Thomwood Terrace, Partick, Glasgow 

Hugh Maclean, 32 Gardner Street, Partick, Glasgow 

Angus Maclean, 6 Lome Street, Glasgow 

James B. Maclean, 52 West Nile Street, Glasgow 

Lachlan Maclean, 56 Paterson Street, S.S., Glasgow 

Neil Maclean, 56 Paterson Street, S.S., Glasgow 

William Maclean, 345 St. Vincent Street, Glasgow 

William Maclean of Plantation, 1 15 St. Vincent Street, Glasgow 

Charles J. Maclean, 115 St. Vincent Street, Glasgow 

Walter Maclean, 2 Bothwell Circus, Glasgow 

Peter Maclean, 76 Elderslie Street, Glasgow 

William Maclean, 25 Wellington Street, Glasgow 

Hugh Maclean, 122 Union Street, Glasgow 

Hector Maclean, 84 Paisley Road West, Glasgow 

Hector Maclean, 5 Belgrave Street, Glasgow 

Alexander Maclean, 42 Blackburn Street, Glasgow 

R. Maclean, 69 Main Street, Anderston, Glasgow 

Roderick Maclean 58 Sandyford Street, Glasgow 

John Maclean, 23 Kensington Terrace, Ibrox, Glasgow (2 copies) 

Malcolm Maclean, 42 Vork Street, Glasgow 

Hugh Maclean, 14 Selborne Terrace, Woodlands Road, Glasgow 

Allan Maclaine, 1085 Pollokshaws Road, Glasgow 

Hugh Maclean, 74 Ardgowan Street, Glasgow 

Malcolm B. Maclean, 59 Cambridge Drive, Glasgow 

Rev. E. D. Fingland, 9 Fitzroy Place, Glasgow 

Neil C. Colquhoun, 64 Couper Street, Glasgow 



526 List of Subscribers. 

Mrs. Donald, 13 Gloucester Street, Glasgow 

Duncan Macfarlane, 7 May Terrace, Mount Florida, Glasgow 

The University Library, Glasgow 

The Faculty of Procurators' Library, Glasgow 

The Mitchell Library, Glasgow 

Neil Maclean of Breda, Alford, Aberdeenshire (10 copies) 

Rev. Lachlan Maclean Watt, M.A..B.D., Tariff, Aberdeenshire 

J. A. Maclean, Forfar, Forfarshire (3 copies] 

A. R. Maclean Murray, Grove House, Brechin, Forfarshire 

James A. Maclean, Linden Lodge, Strawberry Bank, Dundee 

Neil Maclean, 4 Windsor Terrace, Stranraer, Wigtownshire 

C. A. Maclean, Writer, Wigtown, Wigtownshire 

Rev. John Maclean, Minister of Grandtully, Aberfeldy, Perthshire 

Duncan Maclean, 4 Rose Terrace, Perth 

Rev. Daniel Maclean, Bellvue, Alloa, Clackmannanshire 

William Gordon Maclean, Lindenlee, Trinity Road, Edinburgh 

Robert Maclean, Advocate, 19 Queen Street, Edinburgh 

The Advocates' Library, Fdinburgh 

University Library, Fdinburgh 

Rev. A. G. Maclean, The Rectory, Selkirk 

Tames S. Maclean, Myrtle Cottage, Alexandria, Dumbartonshire 

Robert M. MacFarlane, 2 Stratlileven Place, Dumbartonshire 

R. Maclean, Merchant, Bridge of Weir, Renfrewshire 

A. Scott Maclean, M. I. M. F., 31 Bank Street, Greenock (2 copies) 

James Maclean, 7 Aldgowan Street, Greenock 

Donald Maclean, Rhives, Golspie, Sutherlandshire 

Duncan Maclean, 14 Strath, Gairloch, Ros.>-shire 

Marou Maclean, Commission Agent, Stornoway, Lewis 

John Maclean, Merchant, Point Street, Stornoway 

Charles Maclean, Milton, South List, Inverness-shire 

Rev. D. Maclean, Duirinish, Skye 

Rev. John Maclean, Bracadale, Skye 

Rev. D. Maclean, Tomatin, friTCmcil ihiro 

Ewen Maclean, 106 Church Street, Inverness 

William Mackay, Solicitor, [nrei 

Nigel Banks Mackenzie, Fort William, Lochaber 

Mrs. Maclean of Aldgonr, Ard^ >ur, Argyleshire 

Angin McLean, Contractor, Tobermory, Mull 

Peter Maclean, M. D., GlenvieW, Dervaig, Mull 

C. R. Morison, Aintuim, Dervaig, Mull 

C. A. McVean, Kilfinichen, Mull 

Archibald Maclean, Arileod, Coll 

John Lome Stewart of Coll, Coll 

Rev. Dugald Maclean, Hylipol, Tiree 

ENGLAND. 

The Chief of the Clan Gillean, 15 Hyde Park Terrace, London 

(10 copies) 
Hector Fitzroy Maclean, 15 Hyde Park Terrace, London (3 copies) 
R. M. Maclean, Royal Colonial Institute, London (3 copies) 
Malcolm Maclean, Elmdale, Palmer's Green, London (4 copies) 
Charles Maclean, M. D., 159 Cromwell Road, South Kensington, 

London 
C. Fraser-Mackintosh of Drummond, LL.D., F.S.A. Scot., 18 Pont 

Street, London, S.W. 



List of Subscribers. 527 

Major Alex. \V. D. Maclean, 50 Bessborough Street, London, S.W. 

Hector A. C. Maclean, 50 Bessborough Street, London, S.W. 

Lieut. H. D. Neil Maclean, 50 Bessborough Street, London, S.W. 

Mrs. O. L. E. Maclean, 50 Bessborough Street, London, S.W. 

Lord Alvvyne Complnn, M.P., 7 Balfour Place, London, W. 

Ewen J. Maclean, M.D.,51 Linden Gardens, Bayswater, London, W. 

I. (',. Maclean, 21 Cadogan Garden, London, S.W. 

David Maclean, 5 Kensington Court, London, W. (2 copies) 

Thomas Maclean, 7 1 Iaymarket, London, N. 

Miss Georgiana Flora Maclean, 13 Fopstone Road, Earle's Court, 

London, W. 
Miss Isabella S. Maclean, 60 Central Hill, Upper Norwood, London 
Miss 1 ■'. M. Maclean, 54 Belvedere Road, Norwood, London, S.E. 
Miss Lucy Maclean, 63 Fitzjohns Avenue, Hampstead, London. 
Miss Margaret Maclean, 63 Fitzjohns Avenue 
Miss Nora Maclean, 63 Fitzjohns Avenue 
Mrs. S. Percy Howard, 25 Sussex Gardens, London, W. 
Baroness De I'allandt, 36 Bryanston Street, London 
Lady Hood of Avalon, 19 Queen's Gate Place, London 
Rev. Arthur J. Maclean, Isthmean Club, Piccadilly, London 
James Maclean, M.U.,97 Fitzwilliam Street, Sheffield | 

William Maclean, Grandtully, West Hartlepool (2 copies) 
Miss Emily F. H. Maclean, West Clili'e House, Folkestone (2 copies) 
Capt. William Maclean, Superintendent Sailors' Home, Southampton 
Allan Maclean, M.D., Weymouth, Dorset 
Allan Maclean, 47 Hove Park, Hove, Brighton 
Rev. Allan M. Maclean, 47 Hove Park, Hove, Brighton 
Rev. Hector Maclean, 47 Hove Park, Hove, Brighton 
John Robert Maclean of Aston Hall, Shifnal, Shropshire (2 copies) 
George W. Maclean, 3 Jesmond Villas, Newcastle-on-Tyne 
Major-General C. S. Maclean, Shanklin, Isle of Wight 
James Maclean, Old Wittington, N. Chesterfield 
The Honourable Mrs. Nevill, Birling Manor, Maidstone 
Mrs. Francis, Woodhurst Shorne, near Gravesend 
The Marquis of Northampton, Castle Ashby, Northampton 
J.Campbell Maclean, M. I)., Swindon House, Swindon, Wilts 
Mrs. Hamilton-Dundas, Duddingstoun, Torquay 
T. B. Maclean, Gresham Rectory, Norwich 
Mrs. D. H. Maclean, Stobery, Wells, Somerset 
Lady Llangattock, The Hendre, Monmouth (2 copies) 
Donald Maclean, Albion Chambers, Cardiff 
John Mackay, C.E., Reay House, Hereford 

NORWAY, GERMANY, AND HOLLAND. 

W. M. Homan, Oscars Gade, Christiania 
Archibald Maclean, 25 Koninggraetzer Strasse, Berlin 
Dr. P. Maclaine Pont, Copes 72, The Hague 
Miss M. W. Maclaine Pont, Zetten, Gelderland 

ASIA, AFRICA, AND AUSTRALASIA. 

Lieut. A. H. Maclean, 93d Highlanders, Shahjahanpur, N.W.P., 

India 
Lieut. Charles A. H. Maclean, 93d Highlanders, Shahjahanpur, 

N.W.P., India 



5*8 



List of Subscribers. 



Surgeon-Major Fitzroy B. Maclean, Campbellpore, Punjaub 

W. Maclaine Pont, Totok, Manado, Dutch East India 

Kaid Maclean, C.M.G., Fez, Morocco 

Lachlan Maclean, Greenhill, Kenilworth, Cape Town (10 copies) 

Hon. R. D. Douglas Maclean, Napier, Hawke's Bay, New Zealand, 

(2 copies) 
P. S. Maclean, Barrister and Solicitor, Napier, New Zealand 
A. A. Maclean, Inverell, New South Wales 
John E. B. Maclean, Munbilla, Queensland 
Capt. Alex. McLean, Geelong Street, E. Brisbane, Queensland 

UNITED STATES. 

Malcolm Maclean, M.D., 29 East 126th Street, New York (2 copies) 
Donald Maclean, Counsellor-at-Law, 27 William Street, New York, 

(2 copies) 
George Hammond Maclean, 126 West 57th Street, New York (2 copies) 
Frank B. Maclean, 1829 Washington Avenue, New York 
Rev. J. L. Campbell, D.D.,20 East 120th Street, New York 
W. Bender Maclean, 476 Lexington Avenue, New York. 
Hon. J. R. Maclean, 1500 First Street, Washington, D.C. 
Mrs. Helen L. McL. Kimball, office of Comptroller of the Currency, 

Washington, D.C 
Mrs. George Mackintosh Maclean, 73 Alexander Street, Princeton, 

New Jersey 
Mrs. C. F. Kroeh, 328 Central Avenue, Orange, New Jersey 
Thomas Neil Maclean, M.D., Elizabeth, New Jersey 
Mrs. John A. Buckingham, Watertown, Connecticut (2 copies) 
Hon. George P. Maclean, Simsbury, Connecticut 
Mtn. Mary I). Maclean, Wethersheld, Connecticut 
Mrs. Theodore S. Ferry, Bethel, Connecticut 
John McLean, Danbory, Connecticut (2 copies) 

Mrs. Henry W. Wilkinson, 168 Bowen St., Providence, R.I. (2 copies) 
R. K. Maclean, Escanaba, Michigan (3 copies) 
Rev. J. T. Maclean, M.A., Oakryn, Penn. (4 copies) 
W. S. McLean, Wilkes Barre, Penn. (2 copies) 
David M. McLean, Chicago, III. 

Alexander Campbell Maclean, M.D., Salt Lake City, Utah 
1... 1>. Met lain, 1537 Washington Avenue, Denver, Colorado 
Robert A. McLean, M.D., 305 Kearney St., San Francisco, California 

CANADA. 

Alexander Campbell, Strathlorne, Cape Breton 

Donald E. Maclean, Strathlorne, Cape Breton 

A. G. McLean, Sydney, Cape Breton 

Rev. Lachlan A. Maclean, B.A., Louisburg, Cape Breton 

Allan Maclean, 28 Cornwallis Street, Halifax, N.S. 

A. II. Mackay, LL. D., Superintendent of Education, Halifax, N.S. 

A. K. Maclean, Barrister and Solicitor, Lunenburg, N.S. 

Mrs. Hector Maclean, Bridgetown, Annapolis, N.S. 

James A. Maclean, Q.C., Bridgewater, N.S. 

Rev. J. B. Maclean, Upper Stewiacke. N.S. (2 copies) 

Henry Gray Maclean, Amherst, N.S. 

Alister Maclean, Amherst, N.S. 

Rev. James Maclean, Great Village, N.S. 



List of Subscribers. 529 

Rev. A. Maclean, D.D., Hopewell, Pictou, N.S. 
Rev. Andrew Macgillivray, Dunmaglass, Antigonish, N.S. 
Alexander Maclean, Glenbard, Antigonish, N.S. 

Hon. D. Farquharson, Premier of Prince Edward Island, Charlotte- 
town, P.E.I. 
Hon. Tames R. Maclean, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
J. T. Davies, Hotel Davies, Charlottetown, P.E.I. (3 copies) 
Capt. Alexander Cameron, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
Capt. Ewen Maclean, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
Tonnoid Mac-Leoid, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
Malcolm Macleod, Q.C., Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
J. D. Macleod, Charlottetown. P.E.I. 
D. A. Mackinnon, M.L.A., Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
Mrs. John F. Whear, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
Rev. J. C. Maclean, St. George's, P.E.I. 
Rev. Malcolm Campbell, Strathalhyn, P.E.I. 
Lieut. -Col. H. II. McLean, St. fohn, N.B. (10 copies) 
Rev. D. Henderson, Chatham, N.B. 
Lieut. -Col. John Bayne Maclean, Montreal (7 copies) 
David McLean, City Hall, Montreal, Quebec 
Capt. Hugh C. Maclean, 20 Front Street, Toronto, Ontario 
W. F. Maclean, M.P., 610 Jarvis Street, Toronto, Ontario 
Allan Maclean Howard, 192 Carlton Street, Toronto, Ontario 
Malcolm Maclean, Postmaster, Walkerton, Ontario 



THE MACLEAN BARDS. 



"The Old Maclean Bards" was published in 1898. It 
is the first volume of '* The Maclean Bards," and contains the 
extant productions of all the Maclean poets who flourished 
between 1525 and 1775. It is sold at the low price of two 
shillings and sixpence, and is thus within the reach of the 
poorest persons who may desire to have a copy of it. To- 
wards defraying the expenses of publishing it, the following 
contributions were given : — 

Sir Andrew Maclean, Partick, Glasgow $ 5. 10 

The Clan Maclean Association, Glasgow 5.10 

Prof. Magnus Maclean, ( ilasgOW 5.00 

William Maclean, 1 15 St. Vincent Street, Glasgow 1. 82 

C J. Maclean, 1 15 St. Vincent Street, Glasgow 1. 82 

Walter Maclean, 2 Bothwell < ircu^, Glasgow 1.82 

James B. Maclean, 56 West Nile Street, Glasgow 1.22 

John Maclean, 6S Mitchell Street, Glasgow 1.22 

Robert M. MacFarlane, 2 Strathleven Place, Dumbartonshire . 2.43 

Thomas Maclean, B. L. Bank, Alexandria 1.22 

Neil Maclean of Breda, Aberdeenshire 25.00 

J. A. Maclean, Forfar 9.75 

James A. Maclean, Dundee 5. 10 

Rev. John Maclean, Aberfeldy, Perthshire 1. 22 

Neil Maclaine, Stranraer 1.22 

K. A. Maclean, Muir of Ord 1.22 

C. R. Morison, Aintuim, Mull 2.43 

The Chief of the Clan Gillean 25.00 

Miss E. F. H. Maclean, West Clifie House, Folkestone 7.31 

H. A. C. Maclean, 50 Bessborough Street, London 4.87 

William Maclean, West Hartlepool 3. 10 

Mrs. Hamilton-Dundas, Duddingstoun 2.55 

Edmund Eaton, Burwash, Sussex 1.34 

Lachlan Maclean, Kenilworth, Cape Town 10.21 



Prof. J. P. MacLean, Greenville, Ohio $ 5.00 

D. T. Macdonald, Red Jacket, Michigan 5.00 

Mrs. H. L. McL. Kimball, Washington, D.C 2.00 

Lieut. -Col. H. H. McLean, St. John, N.B 10.00 

Lieut. -Col. John Bayne Maclean, Montreal 5.00 

Rev. A. Maclean, D.D., Hopewell, N.S 5.00 

Hector Maclean, Bridgetown, N.S 5.00 

Rev. Roderick Maclean, Valleyfield, P.E.I 5.00 

tfa rfa t$fl 

"The Maclean Bards from 1775 to 1900," or Vol. II. 
of "The Maclean Bards," is ready for publication. It contains 
poems by all the Maclean poets and song-writers who have 
written in Gaelic during the last one hundred and twenty-five 
years. The following- sums have been received towards 
defraying- the cost of publishing it : — 

The Chief of the Clan (in. lean $14.60 

Neil Maclean of Breda, Aberdeenshire 14.60 

Major-General C. S. Maclean, Isle of Wight 4.87 

Hector Maclean, Bridgetown, N.S 5.00 

Rev. Andrew Macgillivray, I lunmaglass, N.S 5.00 

It would take an additional sum of about one hundred 
dollars to make the work what it ought to be. The printer 
should have the copy in his hands in December. The book 
would then appear early in 1900. 



Supplementary List of Subscribers. 



Chablbb Lacblab m a< i.i an, Lieut R.N., \5 Hyde Park Terrace, 
London. 

JOBB ftfABSBAB ICaGLBAB, Lieut R.A.. 1.". Ily.le Park Terrace, 
London. 

Alexanmkh Ma.i.kan, U.M.S. " Be Adelaide," Chatham. 

Andrew Bruck M iclban, Craigpark, Dennistoun, Glasgow (additional 

4 copies). 

George A. Maclban, Hythe Hill, Elgin ft copies). 

John Maclean, IS Paisley Road West, Glasgow. 

Ronalu John Maclean, US Springbara Road, Glasgow. 

ClEOR(iK W. M \< i.i w, :\ Jeamond Villas, Newoaatle-on-Tyne 

JOBS A. MACLEAN, Mariano Railway, Havana, Cnha. faddtHonal). 

D. G. Macdonald, Point Prison, P.E.I. 

James Paton, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 

H. TbAVBBS MACLEAN, Supreme Court Library, Auckland, New 

Zealand. 

Charles JAMBS Maclbab, 14 Winchester Road, South Hampstead, 
London, N.W. 

ANGUS Maclean, 1 Buchanan Street, Partick. 

A. G. Robertson, Lismore, New South Wales. 



3 1197 01056 9967 




Q 

■ 



&>«. ^sur!riii4&j 



^^^^^^M 






C 



I