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Full text of "Class of 1921"




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1921 




EAKER. JONES 
HAUSAUER, INC. 



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OIlaHH Honk 

1921 



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Publtati^ hu, % (SUubb of 1921 





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With garnered fruitage which these jour years yield- 
{A golden harvest left to mellow with the sun) 
Our argosies are filled; the prow is turned, 
We end a course that's all too swiftly run. 

And in those dim and far-off years we'll count 
The gold, and watch it as it slips like rain 
Through lingering hands; remembering finger-tips 
Will strive to hold the glistening coin in vain. 

But from that treasured store of memories 
One will be bright while others gather dust; 
A comradeship, a fellowship — to keep 
Our days and dreams more worthy of his trust. 

Ruth O'Haxlon 



$atmarh 



For the dear days of work and play together, 
For comradeship, the love of friend for friend, 
Our love and thanks in turn. 
But most of all for the glad faith you gave us, 
Perennial joy of your eternal youth, 
The will to try new ways, the strength for trying. 
Bid us Godspeed then, for those ways are calling. 
Bid us Godspeed, that in the years to come 
Whatever thing we win of truth or beauty, 
Whatever fruitage of our toil or dreams, 
We shall return, remembering you always, 
Remembering that faith you gave, and say, 
'All these your own through the old love we bear." 

Marion Ellet 






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Sable nf (ttotttrnts 



President Emeritus L 


Clark Seelye 






Frontispiece 


Dedication to William Allan Neilson 




s 


Foreword ...... 




6 


Campus Views 










7 


Board of Trustees 










10 


Dean Cook 










12 


Administrative Officers 










13 


Faculty of Instruction 










14 


The Class 










23 


Former Members 












98 


The Other Classes 












101 


Organizations 












109 


Publications 












123 


Clubs and Societies 












129 


Musical Organization; 












161 


Dramatics 












167 


Athletics 












171 


Freshman Year . 












189 


Sophomore Year 












193 


Junior Year 












199 


Senior Year 












207 


Verse 












221 


Jokes and Cartoons 












233 


Calendar 












239 


Acknowledgments 












241 


Advertisements 












243 






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William Allan Neilson, Ph.D., LL.D., President 

Arthur L. Gillett, D.D. 

Charles H. Allen, LL.D. 

Samuel W. McCall, LL.D. 

H. Clifford Gallagher 

Thomas William Lamont, A.B. 

Ruth Bowles Baldwin, A.B. . 

Rt. Rev. Thomas F. Davies, D.D. 

George Bliss McCallum, A.B. 

Marguerite Milton Wells, B.L. 

Frederic Marshall Jones, A.B., S.B 

Ellen Emerson Davenport, A.M. 

Helen French Greene, A.M. . 

Elizabeth Cutter Morrow, A.B. 



10 



Northampton 

Hartford, Conn. 

Lowell 

Winchester 

Boston 

New York City 

New York City 

Springfield 

Northampton 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Springfield 

Boston 

Boston 

Englewood, N. J. 








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The Faculty 



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Mary AIerrow Cook, B.S. 
Dean of the Class of IQ2I 



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Aimuttifitratto (Sffirrrs 




William Allan Neilson 
Ph.D.. LL.D. 

President 




Mary Eastman, A.B. 

Registrar 




Ada L. Comstock 

A.M.. Litt.D. 

Dean 



Georc;e B. McCali.um 
A.B. 

Treasurer 





Florence Gii.max 
College Physician 



Susan Rose Benedict, Ph.D. 
Dean of the Class of 1922 





f Amy L. Barbour. Ph.D. 
Dean of the Class of iqji 



Mary B. McElwain, Ph.D. 
Dean of the Class of 1924. 



fAbsent for the first semester 



13 









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iflarulig of Jnstrurttnn 




Eleanor P. Cushing, A.M. 

Professor of Mathematics 




DwiGHT W. TRYON, N.A. 

Professor of Art 





Mary A. Jordan, L.H.D. 

Processor of English 




J. Everett Brady, Ph.D. 
Professor of Latin 





Harry N. Gardiner, A.M. 
Professor of Philosophy 




Harris H. Wilder, Ph.D. 

Professor of Zoology 




Irving F. Wood, Ph.D., D.D. William F. Ganong, Ph.D. Frank A. Waterman. Ph.D. 
Professor of Biblical Literature Professor of Botany Professor of Physics 

[141 









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'.rnst H. Mexsel, Ph.D. 
Professor of German 



Henry D. Sleeper, F.A.G.O. 

Professor ot Music 



Julia H. Caverno, A.M. 

Professor of Greek 






Elizabeth D. Haxscom, Ph.D. 

Professor of English 



Anna A. Cutler, Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophy 



Alfred V. Churchill, A.M. 
Professor of Art 





John S. Bassett, Ph.D., LL.D. ^Robert E. S. Olmsted, A.M. Harriet W. Bigelow, Ph.D. 

Professor of History Professor of Focal Music Professor of 'Astronomy 



JAbsent for the second semester 



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Caroline B. Bourland,Ph.D. 

Professor of Spanish 



Albert Schinz, Ph.D. 
Professor of French 



Herbert V. Abbott, A.B. 

Professor of English 





Everett Kimball, Ph.D. 

Professor of History 



Carl F. A. Lange, Ph.D. 

Professor of German 




William J. Miller, Ph.D. David C. Rogers, Ph.D. 

Professor of Geology Professor of Psychology 



16 



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Louise Delpit 

Professor of French 




Sidney B. Fay, Ph.D. 
Professor of History 



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Sidney X. Dean. Ph.D. 
Professor ol Greek 



*Harriet R. Cobb, A.M. 
Professor of Mathematics 



Annie H. Abel. Ph.D. 

pTSli '■■■or ci IIi:tor\ 



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Joel E. Goldthwait 
B.S., M.D., F.A.C.S. 
Professor ot Hygiene 



Richard A. Rice 
A.M. 

Protessot ot English 



IFlorence A. Gragg 
Ph.D. 

Professor ot Latin 



□ 




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Robert S. Smith, A.M., B.D. 
Professor of Biblical Literature 



John C. Hildt, Ph.D. 

Professor ot History 



Rebecca W. Holmes 

Professor of Music 



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*Absent for the year 
fAbsent for the first semester 



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F. Stuart Chapin, Ph.D. William Dodge Gray, Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics and Professor of History 

Sociology 



H. Edward Wells, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 



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Ruth G. Wood, Ph.D. 

Amy L. Barbour, Ph.D. . 

Mary B. McElwain, Ph.D. 

Laura Adella Bliss, A.M., A. CM. 

Ellen Parmelee Cook, A.M. 

Julia Warner Snow, Ph.D. 

•Emma Bates, B.M. 

Elizabeth Spaulding Mason, A.B. 

Louisa Sewall Cheever, A.M. 

Mary Breeze Fuller, A.M. 

Frances Grace Smith, Ph.D. 

Josef Wiehr, Ph.D. 

Margaret Bradshaw, Ph.D. 

JAida Agnes Heine, A.M. 

Susan Rose Benedict, Ph.D. . 

*Mary Louise Foster, Ph.D. 

Inez Whipple Wilder, A.M. 

Arthur Ware Locke, A.M. 

Mary Murray Hopkins, Ph.D. 

Wilson Townsend Moog, Mus.B., F.Aj 

Harvey Gates Townsend, Ph.D. 

Mary Delia Lewis, A.M. 

Roy Dickinson Welch, A.B. 

*Esther Lowenthal, Ph.D. 

Osmond T. Robert, B. es L. . 

Margaret Rooke 

Arthur Taber Jones, Ph.D. 

Howard Madison Parshley, Sc.D. 

Jessie Yereance Cann, Ph.D. 

Beulah Strong 

F. Warren Wright, Ph.D. 

Edna Aston Shearer, Ph.D. 

Paul Robert Lieder, Ph.D. 

Robert Withington, Ph.D., O.A., C 

de la Couronne (Belge) 
Howard Rollin Patch, Ph.D. 
Elizabeth Richards, A.B. 
Chase Going Woodhouse, A.M. 
Anna Elizabeth Miller, A.M. 
Mary Lilias Richardson, A.M. 
Laura Sophronia Clark, A.M. 
Helen Isabelle Williams 
Sarah Hook Hamilton 
Susan Miller Rambo, Ph.D. 
Mary Merrow Cook, B.S. 
Helen Ashhurst Choate, Ph.D. 
*Myra Melissa Sampson, A.M. 
Blanche Goode 
Laura Hatch, Ph.D. 
Samuel A. Eliot, Jr., A.B. 
Katharine Shepherd Woodward, A.B. 
tEsTHER Ellen Dale 
Rose Frances Egan, A.M. 
Grace Hazard Conkling, B.L. 
*Clarence Kennedy, A.M. 
Roy Richard Denslow, B.S., A.M. 
Elizabeth M. Whitmore, A.M. 
Clara Willoughby Davidson, A.M. 
Edward James Woodhouse, LL.B. 
Elizabeth Valentine Louden, A.B. 
Alice Gleason 



As 



Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of Greek 

Professor of Latin 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Botany 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of English 

Associate Professor of 'History 

Associate Professor of Botany 

Associate Professor of German 

Associate Professor of English 

Associate Professor of Geology 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Zoology 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Astronomy 

0. Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Education 

Associate Professor of English 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Economics and Sociology 

Associate Professor of French 

Associate Professor of Italian 

Associate Professor of Physics 

Associate Professor of Zoology 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Art 

Associate Professor of Latin 

Associate Professor of Education 

Associate Professor of English 

hevalier de l'Ordre 

Associate Professor of English 

Associate Professor of English 

Associate Professor of Hygiene 

e Professor of Economics and Sociology 

Assistant Professor of German 

Assistant Professor of Latin 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of French 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of French 

Assistant Professor of Botany 

Assistant Professor of Zoology 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Geology 

Assistant Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of English 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

. Assistant Professor of Art 

ssistant Professor of Biblical Literature 

Assistant Professor of Government 

Assistant Professor of Spoken English 

Assistant Professor of Music 



□ 






i 



*Absent for the year 
tAbsent for the first semester 



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19 



1 









Julius Drachsi.er, A.M. 

Emily Ledyard Shields, Ph.D. 

Eleanor Shipley Duckett, Ph.D. 

Elizabeth Andros Foster, Ph.D. 

Elizabeth Avery, Ph.D. 

Elizabeth Faith Genung, M.S. A. 

Ida Barney, Ph.D. . 

James Huntley Sinclair, Ph.D. 

Clifford H. Riedell 

Rebecca Scandrett, A.B. 

Belle Julie Soudant 

Dorothy Brown, A.M. 

{Florence Farnum Olmsted 

Mary Ella Williams 

Hannah Louisa Billings, A.B. 

Anna Adele Chenot, A.M. 

Margaret Lewis Bailey, Ph.D. 

Lucy Lord Barrangon, A.M. . 

Abbie Mabel O'Keefe, M.D. 

Katharine Frazier, A.B. 

*Emmett Reid Dunn, A.M. 

Gladys Amelia Anslow, A.M. 

Caroline A. Yale, LL.D. 

Amanda Lee Norris 

Susan Raymond, A.B. 

Louise E. W. Adams, Ph.D. 

Marguerite Rivaud, Certificat d'Aptitude 

Ivan T. Gorokhoff 

Roger Huntington Sessions, A.B., Mus.B. 

Eunice Elizabeth Chace, A.B. 

Helen Joy Sleeper, A.M. 

Louise Smith, A.M. 

Ruth S. Finch, A.M. 

Florence Didiez David, A.M. 

C. Pauline Burt, A.M. . 

Constance Kilham Greene 

Elizabeth Frances Rogers, Ph.D. 

Catharine Elizabeth Koch, A.M., M.L.D. 

*Eleanor Ferguson Rambo, Ph.D. . 

Louise Bourgoin, Licenciee es Lettres 



Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology 
Assistant Professor of Latin 
Assistant Professor of Latin 
Assistant Professor of Spanish 
Assistant Professor of English and Spoken English 
Assistant Professor of Botany 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Psychology 
Assistant Professor of Art 
Assistant Professor of Spoken English 
Assistant Professor of Music 
Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology 
Instructor in Music 
Instructor in Music 
Instructor in Physics 
Instructor in French 
Instructor in German and English 
Instructor in History of Art 
Instructor in Hygiene- 
Instructor in Music 
Instructor in Zoology 
Instructor in Physics 
Instructor in Spoken English 
Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 
Instructor in Astronomy 
Instructor in Latin 
Instructor in French 
Instructor in Choral Music 
Instructor in Music 
Instructor in Zoology 
. Instructor in Music 
Instructor in Zoology 
Instructor in Chemistry 
Instructor in French 
Instructor in Chemistry 
Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 
Instructor in History 
Instructor in Botany 
Instructor in Greek 
Instructor in French 



Germaine Lucie Pierron, Licenciee es Lettres 

Madeleine Barthelemy, Certificat d'Aptitude 

K. Frances Scott, Ph.B., M.D. 

Edith Hamilton, A.M. 

Ella Lauchner Smith, A.M. 

Ethel M. Staley, A.B. . 

Verna M. Vining 

Mildred Burnette Porter, A.M. 

Vera Marie Gushee, M.S. 

Louise Lane Williams, A.B., M.S. . 

Helen McGregor Xoyes, A.B. 

Harriet Cutler Waterman, A.M. . 

Mina Stein Kirstein, A.B. 

Abba Willard Bowen, A.B. 

E. Claire Comstock, Ph.D. 

Milagros De Alda, Maestra Superior Nacional 

Laura Keziah Pettingell, A.M. 



Instructor in French 

Instructor in French 

Instructor in Hygiene 

Instructor in English 

Instructor in Economics and Sociology 

Instructor in French 

Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 

Instructor in Physics 

Instructor in Astronomy 

Instructor in Zoology 

Instructor in English 

Instructor in Zoology r 

Instructor in English 

Instructor in French 

Instructor in Philosophy and Psychology 

Instructor in Spanish 

Instructor in Greek and Latin 



Myrtle V. Jordan, A.B. 
Josephine Cuneo, A.M. 
Harriette Dilla, Ph.D., LL.B. 



Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 
Instructor in Spanish 
Instructor in Economics and Sociology 



*Absent for the year 

{Absent for the second semester 

[201 



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Li i- ii.e Marsh 

Sarah White Davis, A.M. 

Helen Bocher, A.B. 

Lilian Mary Lane, Ph.B. 

Mary J. Garber, A.M. 

Lois Oliphant Gibbons, Ph.D. 

Doris Xeal .... 

Rebecca Haight 

Margaret Pauline Roesel, A.M. 

Germaine Ferjo, Certificat d'Aptitude 

Charles Albert Case 

Axacleta Candida Vezzetti 

Anna Hobbet, A.B. 

Leland B. Hall, A.M. 

Frank Edward Dow 

Sarah Bache-W'iig, M.S. . 

Agnes Matilda Zurbrick, B.Ped.U 

Dorothy Louise Merchant, AIL 

Francisca King, A.B. 

Ruth Hammond VVillian. A.B. 

Evelyn Harvvood Scholl, A.B. 

Margaret Lucinda Mensel, A.B. 

Anna Polowetzki 

Priscilla E. Wood, A.B. 

Thelma Ruth Putnam, B.S. 

Edith Priscilla Butler, A.B. 

Lucy Agnes McHale, A.B. 

Elizabeth Kimball, A.M. 

Esther Purrington, A.B. 

Hazel M. Leach 

Marguerite McKee, A.B. 

William James Short 

Alexander Graham Bell, Ph.D., M.D. 

James Leavitt Stoddard, A.B., M.D. 



nstructor m 



nstructor in 



DlPLOME 



L.D. 



Instructor in Spoken English 
[nstructor in History 
Hygiene and Physical Education 
Instructor in English 
Instructor in Spoken English 
Instructor in I li>i< n \ 
Hygiene and Physical Education 
Instructor in Music- 
Instructor in History- 
Instructor in French 
Instructor in Music 
Instructor in Italian 
Instructor in Geology- 
Instructor in Music 
Assistant in Music 
Vssistant in Botany- 
Assistant in Hygiene 
Assistant in Geology 
Assistant in Zoology 
Assistant in Music 
Assistant in Astronomy 
Reader in History- 
Reader in Art 
Demonstrator in Chemistry 
Demonstrator in Chemistry 
Curator in Zoology 
Demonstrator in Philosophy and Psychology 
Museum Assistant in Art 
Demonstrator in Geology 
Curator in Art 
Reader in History- 
Lecturer in Music 
Lecturer in Spoken English 
Lecturer in Chemistry 



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Alice [Catherine Abbott 
17 Second Street 
Newport, \ ermont 



Nan Randolph Albert 

1702 Cleveland Avenue, N. W. 

Canton, Ohio 





Mildred Adams 
12 Ruskin Street 
West Roxbury, Massachusetts 



Elizabeth Albright 

730 Ferry Street 
Buffalo, New York 




Ella Adelson 
386 Vine Street 
Hartford, Connecticut 



Catherine Merrill Allyn 

1825 Northampton Street 

Holyoke, Massachusetts 



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Barbara Seaman Anderson 

— * » 1 W \i.\t r Street 
Peekskill, New York 



Helen Van Zile Anthony 

i'.i Crescent Avenue 

Jersey City, New Jersey 








Pearl Anderson 
Ludlow Center 
m issachusetts 



ISADORE APTED 

">0 College Avenue, N. E. 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 




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Alice Anthony 
2t> Pitman Street 
Providence, Rhode [sland 



Eleanor Armstrong 

2.520 Stratford Road 

Cleveland, Ohio 




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Cecile Arpin 

Wisconsin Rapids 
Wisconsin 



Katharine Cooley Baker 

Porter Apartments 

Lansing, Michigan 








Mary Baeyerts 

Whittier 

California 



Marguerite Baker 

32 South Walnut Street 

morgantown, west virginia 




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Helen Arthur Bailey 
1217 Overton Park Avenue 
Memphis, Tennessee 



Margaret Lewis Bardwell 

3321 Second Avenue, South 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 








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Helen Adolphine Barker 
130 Edgehton Street 
Rochester, New Yohk 



Marion Bayer 
373 Jefferson Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 




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Dorothy Pickering Bartlett 
6 Glen Street 
Dorchester, Massachusetts 



Edith Hill Bayles 

308 McGregor Avenue 

Cincinnati, Ohio 





Lois Barton 
North Ludbury 

Massachusetts 



Margaret Henrietta Becker 

5132 Hyde Park Boulevard 

Chicago, Illinois 







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Helen Prances Begley 
:i."> Carlton Stkeet 

HoI.VOKF., M 18SACHUBETTS 



Edith Thomas Betts 

l!(i:5 Adams Street 

W 1 I.M INGTON , Dei.a W a r E 










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Bertha Bei.i. 

HlLLSBORO 

Ohio 



Alida Bigelow 

415 Laurel Avenue 

.St. Paul, Minnesota 





Muriel Elinore Berry 
44 Belmont Avenue 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



Lynda Elizabeth Billings 

Little Falls, 
New York 







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Dorothea Mildred Blackmore 

EjDGEWOOD 

Pittsburgh, I'knxsyi.vani \ 



Rl I II BoLEMAN 

(>."> Munroe Street 

ROXBURl . M \s- ICHUSETT8 



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Helen Elizabeth Bloomer 

2-17 Charles Aventte 
Grand K \imi>~. Michigan 



Marion Frances Booth 

3223 North Forty-fifth Street 

Omaha. Nebraska 








Sybil Marie Boland 
51 Chambers Street 
New Vhhk, New York 



Helen Ide Borne.man 

4<>4."> Penn Street, Fraxkford 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 







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May Florence Bossi 

(i Elmwood Avenue 

North Adams, Massachusetts 



Erna Louise Brand 

1446 South Wabash Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 








Elizabeth Boutelle 
35 College Avenue 
Waterville, Maine 



Katherine Edith Brand 

Ocean Park 

Maine 




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Alison Bowie 

475 Eleventh Street 

Brooklyn, New York 



Hortense Braunstein 

coatesville 

Pennsylvania 




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Esther Lucille Brayton 
348 Jefferson Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 



Florence Rebecca Bricham 

Hi i»c.\ 

Massachusetts 




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Pauline Breustedt 

2728 Washington Street 
Waco, Texas 



Mary Bextley Brinkerhoff 
35 Bartley Avenue 

Mansfield. ( >m<> 







Lucy Catharine Brew 

220 West Anderson Street 
Hackensack, New Jersey 



Ruth Wilder Brooks 

3 Church Street 

Concord, New Hampshire 



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31 



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Alavene Fassett Brown 

2025 South Static Street 
Syracuse, New York 



Mary Buchanan 
1426 Chicago Avenue 

evaxston, 1 1. 1. incus 








Florence Brown 
209 Frederick Street 
Rhinelandf.r, Wisconsin 



Clarinda Darling Buck 

5609 Kenwood Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 




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Katharine Brown 
307 Union Street 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



Elizabeth Johnston Buckley 

Ravine Place 

Highland Park, Illinois 







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Elsie Carolyn Bullard 
735 Bakky Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



Helen Granville Butler 

35 Seminole Avenue 

Forest Hills, Long Island 





Harriet Wilson Burgess 

Til' >M ASTON 

Maine 



Mary Buttimer 

Lincoln Street 

Hingham, Massachusetts 



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Dorothy Burr 

814 North Prairie Street 
Bloomington, Illinois 



Dorothy Worthington Butts 

55 West 90th Street 

New York, New York 




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Adele Byrne 
1348 Main Stbeet 
Dubuque, Iowa 



Mildred Jane Campbell 

160 Franklin Avenue 

Brookville, Pennsylvania 







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Kathryn Margaret Caine 
1945 East 93rd Street 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Rebecca Cantarow 

73 Windsor Avenue 

Hartford, Connecticut 




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Myra Elizabeth Cameron- 
Hotel Utah 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



Frances Elise Carrier 

54 Woodlahn Avenue 

Buffalo, New York 




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Ariel Candace Carstens 
523 Washington Street 
Bkooki.ine, Massachusetts 



Dorothy Ida Cerf 

48 Lloyd Road 

Montclair, New Jersey 




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Grace Eno Carver 

SlMSBURY 

Connecticut 



Catharine Chadbourn 
Columbus 
Wisconsin 




□ 




Olive Fortner Catterall 
25 South Second Street 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



Doris Hill Chadyvick 
Marion- 
Massachusetts 







35 



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Mary Hathaway Chamberlain 

( 'uncord 

M ISSA.CHUSETTS 



Ruth Chovey 

21 Woodlawn Road 
Maplewood, New Jersey 





Carolyx Ely Chapman 
416 Park Place 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 



Natalie Chandler Christy 

Duncan Falls 

Ohic 



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Florence Grant Chester 

415 West 115th Street 
New York, New York 



Elizabeth Brewer Clapp 

49 Temple Street 

West Newton, Massachusetts 



36 







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Anne Elizabeth Clark 
Park Avenue 
Princeton. Illinois 



Zelda Wallace Clevenger 

1644 Talbott Avenue 
Indianapolis, Indiana 








Clara Louise Clark 

North Amherst 
Massachusetts 



Helen Katharine Close 
Hani oi k 

Michigan 




X 



□ 




Mary Holbrook Clark 

Mt. Pleasant 

Amherst, Massachusetts 



Adelaide Xerissa Clouting 

Sea Isle City 

New Jersey 




a 



1 



DDE 



37 



i 



1=1 




Margaret Vinnette Cobb 
Ridge View Farm 
Willoughby, Ohio 



Rowena Balliet Conn* 

501 South Washington Street 

Van Wert, Ohio 








Anne Cutter Coburn 

Weston 

M lssachusetts 



Ethel Jane Converse 

1 Whalley Avenue 

New Haven, Connecticut 








James Anne Collyer 

S29 Greene Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 



Alice Rice Cook 

14 Summer Street 

Bridgewater, Massachusetts 







i 



38 



:ec 



1 







Annabel Cooley 

C LRBONDALE 
PENNS1 I.Y 1NIA 



Helen Marguerite Croll 

43 East Burtom Place 

CHICAGO, Illinois 








Dorothy Eminger Cotterman 
451 Linden Avenue 
Mi \misuurg, Ohio 



Marguerite Currier 
20 East Street 
Barhe, Vermont 











Margaret Emily Cotton 
9400 Euclid Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Huldah Eleanor Curtis; 

Marenoi 

Illinois 




a 



Si 



IBG 



DEE 



39 



1 



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E 




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— 



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I 



Elizabeth Scofield Dafter 

sraa Hotel 
Evanston. Illi: 



Rachel Chase De: 
lO - 

De rado 





Winifred Howell Davies 
Watektown 

.-IN 



Ruth Elizabeth Dewsbury 

32 North Avenue 
Norwalk. Conn 




Dorothy Davis 

21 HiLLCRE^T Road 
Glen Ridge. New .T; 



Elsie Virginia Dey 
- lle Avenue 
Newark. New ' - 







C3 



DEE 



DEDC 







Mary Lewis Dickinson 

Charleston 

West Virginia 



Dorothy Acnes Dobner 
870 Osceola Avenue 
St. Paul, Minnesota 





Mary Elizabeth Dietrich 
Bellevue Park 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



Ida Louise Dohme 

Roland Park 

Baltimore, Maryland 



□ 




c 

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3 


JL 


Lois Dissette 
Route H, Box 16 






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Indianapolis, Indiana 


JP^E 










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X^ 


Jean Donald 

4114 Pasadena Apartments 

Detroit, Michigan 








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Myrtle Louise Doppman 

12o North M \i-le Street 
Florence, Massachusetts 



Elsie Virginia Duberg 

Box 451 

Collinsvii.i.e, Connecticut 








Florence Dowden 

Sandwich 
Massachusetts 



Ruth Austin Duncan 

Lyons 

Iowa 




X 



□ 

a 




Virginia Dovvnes 
315 Woodside Avenue 
Narberth, Pennsylvania 



Miriam Frances Dunn 

Spruceland Avenue 

Springfield, Massachusetts 







1 



42 



DEC 



i 




]BE 



1 







Isabel Durfee 

,~>4 President Avenue 

Providence, Rhode Island 



Ellen Douglas Everett 
Columbia 

Tennessee 




□ 



w 

1 ■ 

1 "*■ 


I* 



Hilda Haines Edmester 
fl Ethelbert Avenue 
Ridgewood, New Jersey 



Ernestine Fay 

578 East 21st Street 
Brooklyn, New York 








Marion Ellet 

710 Broadway 

Kansas City, Missouri 



Mary Norwood Fishburn 

Charlottesville 

Virginia 




a 



1 



hem 



DBI 



43 



I 







Bridget Eloise Fitzgerald 
:i'.i Elm Street 

HoLYOKE, Massachusetts 



Dorothy Foi.m m 

370 Hanover Street 

Manchester, New Hampshire 







X 




Agnes Catherine Fitzgibbon 
7 Washington Street 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts 



Julia Franchi 

Great Notch 

New Jersey 








Frances Gardiner Flint 
7 Brimmer Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Janet Adeline Fraser 

Perrysville Avenue 

Ben Avon, Pennsylvania 





a 



44 



DEC 



JQI 



5 






□ 




Helen Elizabeth Frazier 
9:il4 Talbot Avenue 
Clkv eland, Ohio 



Marie F'.linore Gibbons 

394 Main Street 

Clinton, Massachusetts 







X 




Florence Nancy Gary 

2029 Grand Avenue 
Pueblo, Colorado 



Madelaixe Gile 

Hanover 

New Hampshire 








Sophie Marion Gerson 
211 South Perry Street 
Montgomery. Alabama 



Ruth Caroline Gillespie 

255 Campbell Avenue 

West Haven, Connecticut 







1 



DEM 



DEE 



45 



A 







Mildreth Anne Godfrey 

71 Quincet Street 

North Adams, Massachusetts 



Carolyn Marion Goodwin 
425 Windsor Boulevard 

Los Angeles, California 







X 




Margaret Rand Goldthwait 
1 Charles River Square 
Joston, Massachusetts 



Margaret Sylvester Gould 

1206 Boylston Street 
Newton Upper Falls, Massachusetts 




□ 




Dorothy Augusta Goodenough 

18 Hawthorne Road 
Milton, Massachusetts 



Sara Katherine Graham 

518 South Front Street 

Wheeling, West Virginia 







46 



:be 



DEE 



I 







Dorothy Eulalia Graves 
2-i Academy Street 
Presque Isle, Maine 



Ruth Green 

Brewer 

Maine 




□ 




Elizabeth Waterman Graves 

4 Mercer Street 

New London, Connecticut 



Helen Arthur Greene 

4") Chestnut Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 








Helen Green 

2190 Ambleside Drive 

Cleveland, Ohio 



Constance Eulalia Grigg 

27 Orange Street 

Woburn, Massachusetts 







m 



47 



DBG 



DEDG 



]t 



a 




Helen Benjamin Gutman 

142 West S7th Street 
Neh Vdhk, New York 



Margaret Elizabeth Haas 

1223 Hamilton Street 

Allentown, Pennsylvania 








Elinor Gutmann 
Browning Hotel 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 



Adelia Cobb Hallock 

10 Livingston Park 

Rochester, New York 








Freda Ernestine Haas 
1141 Sodth 33rd Street 

Omaha, Nebraska 



Judith Venable Hanna 

3718 Gillham Road 

Kansas City, Missouri 




a 
□ 



I 



48 



IEIC 



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fill 








Margaret Hunt Hannuj* 

l:iii Warren Street 

Newton Center, Massachusetts 



Ethel Jacoway IIari 

1011 Wolfe STREET 
Little Rock, Arkansas 








Rachel Harlan 
805 Walnut Street 
Mt. Vernon. Indiana 



Katherine Hauch 

515 Grove Street 

Johnstown, Pennsylvania 








Katharine Sevvall Harriman 
25 Windsor Street 
Haverhill. Massachusetts 



Alice Heebner 

315 South 41st Street 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 




1=1 


a 



B 



49 



DBG 



DEDE 



I 










Emma Powell Heindle 
012 West 20th Street 
Wilmington, Delaware 



Elena Maria Hepblrn 

Freehold 

New Jersey 




CD 

□ 




Frances Virginia Helmick 
616 Fairmont Avenue 
Fairmont, West Virginia 



Dorothy Johnston Hickman 

904 State Street 
Lafayette, Indiana 





Ruth Hensle 

91 Fletcher Avenue 

Mt. Vernon, New York 



Gladys Lilian Hill 

773 Central Street 

Lowell, Massachusetts 







i 



50 



DBG 



DQE 








X 



a 



Margaret Pope Hincklek 
199 Bay State Road 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Mabelle Melba Hobbs 

Amherst 

Massachusetts 





Bargara Fletcher Hines 

Ludlow 
Vermont 



Ada Laura Hockenberger 
Union Hill 
New York 




Carolyn Sloane Hinman 
107 Harrison Street 
East Orange, New Jersey 



Lois Elizabeth Hodges 

191 Center Street 

West Haven, Connecticut 











51 



1BG 



1 



CD 
a 



X 



□ 

a 




52 



Frances Holden 
323 Riverside Dbive 

New York. New York 



Helen Margaret Hook, way 

709 Irvinc A\ i.\i i. 

Syracuse, New York 





Katharine Morris Holmes 
1365 IOast 4sth Street 
Chicago, Illinois 



Berg Hooper 

54 Coolidge Street 
Brookline, Massachusetts 




Mary Holyoke 
Marlborough 
m vssachusetts 



Eunice Hope Hi a i.\ 

MoNTCLAIR 

New Jersey 



1=1 

□ 




X 




□ 

a 



I Ell 



DBI 



i 







Edith Howe 

( IXTAHA 

Nebraska 



Edna Hunkemeier 

1 Gibson Court 
South Norwalk, Connecticut 




[D 



X 




Harriet Alice Howe 
171 Ontario Street 
Providence, Rhode Island 



Louise Hunt 

11 Hale Avenue 

White Plains, New Jersey 




CD 
□ 




Julia Howell 

46 Johnson Avenue 

Newark, New Jersey 



Eunice Roberta Hunton 

372 Grand Avenue 

Brooklyn, New York 




□ 

a 



1 



3BE 



53 



DQE 



I 







Ruth Hutchinson 
10 Sparhawk Street 
Brighton, Massachusetts 



Elisabeth Rogers Jackson 

97 Oak Street 
blnghamton, new york 








Alice Elizabeth Jackson 
611 South Kline Street 
Aberdeen, South Dakota 



Edith Josephine Jacobs 

Dudley 

Massachusetts 




X 







Constance Jackson 

Wadesboro 

North Carolina 



Beatrice Linder James 

111 Salisbury Road 

Brookline, Massachusetts 




E 



ffl 



154 



)Bl 



I 



a 
□ 




CD 






Katrina Jameson 

2231 Q Stkeet 

Washington, District ok Cdi.imhu 



Gertrude Elizabeth Jenckes 

28 Prospect Street 

Shkhhrooke, Province of Quebec 





Dorothy Mathilde Janssen 

Kings Point Road 

Great Xeck, Long Island 



Virginia Amanda Job 

5007 Dorchester Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 





Alice Jaretzki 

121 East 73rd Street 

New York, New York 



Evalyn Davis Johnson 

122 Washington Street 
Malden. Massachusetts 



a 

□ 




□ 



55 



DBG 



I 






£*** 






M*** 




. 


yfi? . 


A 


i 



India Givens Johnson 

Mexico 

Missouri 



□ 



56 



Helen Josephy 

607 3rd Street 
Marietta, Ohio 





Alice Jones 

80 Humphrey Street 
Swampscott. Massachusetts 



Aigule Kalfaian 

Brighton 

Massachusetts 





Catharine Gaddis Joralmon 
1 West 81st Street 
New York, New York 



1=1 



Alfhild Helga Regina Kalijarvi 

12 Barthel Avenue 

Gardner, Massachusetts 







I Ell 







On\ e Rose Keegan 

SI Elm Street 

w inst Ed, Connecticut 



Catharine Elizabeth Kempl 

East Bhalntree 

Massachusetts 








Caroline Keller 
•55 Huntington Street 
New Haven, Connecticut 



IT 


^k*- 


M 




Elizabeth Kendall 








PlTTSFORD 








Vermont 













Mary Rachel Kelly 

910 North Lawrence Street 

Wichita. Kansas 



Christine Loretta Kennedy 

93 Edwards Street 

Hartford, Connecticut 







II 



:bg 



DLZ1G 



57] 



I 







Edith Yirdex Ketcham 
Chestnut Hill 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



Martha Amalia Kirsten 

311 West Street 

West Hoboken, New Jersey 







X 




Grace King 

Elm Street 

North Attleboro, Massachusetts 



Helen Combs Kittredge 

1 1 Concord Street 

Nashua, New Hampshire 








Mildred Abigail King 
810 Darby Road 
Llanerch, Pennsylvania 



Sallie Edith Kline 
315 West 98th Street 
New York, New York 




□ 



m 



58 



:be 



1 



i 




a 

□ 




Margaret Henrietta Klueppel 

1 West 04th Street 
New York, New York 



Ella Mae Knott 

44 Ward Avenue 
Easthampton, Massachusetts 







X 




Dorothy Carolyn Knapp 
50 Brookside Drive 
Greenwich, Connecticut 



Charlotte Knowles 

48 Warren Street 

Taunton, Massachusetts 








Mary Conant Kneeland 

92 Hollis Avenue 
Braintree, Massachusetts 



Emma Jane Kreider 

500 South 5th Street 

Springfield, Illinois 




a 


a 



i 



59 



IBG 



DQE 







X 






60 



Mildred Kress 
338 Tioga Street 
Johnstown, Pennsym \m^ 



Ellen Churchill Laird 

Wii.I.IAMSPORT 

Pennsylvania 




CD 




Charlotte Kathryx Kunzig 
2003 West Tioga Street 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



Marion Eulalie LaMontagne 

56 Summer Street 

Northam pton, Ma ssach usetts 





Gertrude Ernestine Kush 
153 South 121st Street 
Kockaway Park, Long Island 



Carlota Hart Lane 
Peekskill 
New York 








1EJG 



)BE 



I 



CD 




Catherine Laycock 

ii inover 

New Hampshire 



Louise Leonard 
R. F. D. No. 2, Box 29 

Dancok, Maine 








Margaret Dodd Leach 
Scotland Road 

South Orange, New Jersey 



Frances Hubbard Ley 

2.59 Long Hill 

Springfield, Massachusetts 




□ 
a 




Vivion Mercer Lenon 
2()i)o West Kith Street 
Little Rock, Arkansas 



Charlotte Eliza Lindley 

1920 Stevens Avence 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 







1 



DEE 



DEC 



61 



□ 







I 



J ] 162 



Louise Loewenstein 
1534 Ellis Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



Mildred Babette Loi i.r 

130 Roger Williams Avenue 

HIGHLAND Park, Illinois 





Hazel Annie Longden 

21 Hinckley Street 
Northampton, Massachusetts 



Doris Towle Lovell 

257 Otis .Street 

West Newton, Massachusetts 





Eleanor Loth 

22!) West 97th Street 

New York, New York 






Florence Mary Lowe 

Centerville 

Rhode Island 



r% 






DEI 



DQ 




a 
□ 
a 




Erna Frances Lowman 
668 Jholson Avenue 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



Olive Evelyn Lyman 

1521 West 27th STREET 
Minneapolis, Minnesoi \ 








Camilla Loyall 
1736 Stockton Street 
San Francisco, California 



Ruth Eleanor Lyman 

1521 West 27th Street 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 




□ 
en 




Alice Lucille Lull 
Stratford Arms Hotel 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



Mildred McCaddin 
628 West 114th Street 
New York, New York 




a 



i 



IEJG 



63 



e 







Emily Edgar McComb 

Sdffield 

Connecticut 



Helen McLane 

2115 Humboldt Avenue. SotjTB 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 




1=1 



X 




Ruth McCoy 
3421 Dodge Street 

Omaha. Nebraska 



Louise Longstreth McLaren 

2138 Madison Road 

Cincinnati, ( >hio 




X 







Edith Antoinette McEwen 
299 Belleville Avenue 
Newark, New Jersey 



Marguerite Rebecca MacLean 

333 North 59th Avenue, West 

Duluth, Minnesota 




□ 



Hi 



64 



IBG 



DBE 



CD 

□ 




.Marion Magee 

41 Clement Avenue 

West koxnuiiv, Mvssvcm stns 



Dorothy Parker Maxwell 

AlSTlNBURG 

Ohio 




a 

□ 

CD 



X 




Mary Elizabeth Magennis 

70 Atlas .Street 
Akron, Ohio 



Frances Elizabeth Marble 

1 Clement Street 

Worcester, Massachusetts 




CD 

□ 
CD 




Madeleine Manley 
935 Grand Avenue 
Toledo, Ohio 



Virginia Wadleigh Markel 

708 Omaha National Bank Building 

Omaha, Nebraska 




CD 

□ 

CD 



DBG 



EDC 



65] 



I 







Dorothy Marsh 
17i ii i (Ith Street 
Des Moines, Iowa 



Katharine Elizabeth Mathews 

131 Chestnut Street 
Rutherford, New Jersey 




□ 




Esther Marsh 
Xew Milford 
Connecticut 



Nevart Matossian 

.",12 Clinton Avenue 

West Hoboken, New Jersey 








Lorna Doone Mason 
308 Hill Street 
Sewickley, Pennsylvania 



Helen Grannis Matthews 

The Uplands 

Brockport, New York 




□ 



m 



66 



DBG 



DEDE 



f 



1 



DBE 



a 

□ 



X 






s 



DBG 




Paulink Anderson Mead 
West Acton 
m vss ichtj8ett8 



Gladys Miller 
100 Gaskill Avenue 

Jeanxette, Pennsylvania 




Ottilie Bernita Meiner 
430 Roger Avenue 
Inwood, Long Island 



Louise Michelle Miron 

465 Madison Avenue 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 




Catherine Marie Miller 
991 Ferguson Avenue 
Dayton, Ohio 



Anna Elizabeth Mitchell 

Lenox 

Massachusetts 



m 




[D 




X 




1=1 



67' 



DEDE 



i 



a 




13 



68 



Lucy Moore 

579 Western Avende 

Albany, New York 



Georgiana Morrison 

La Porte 
Indiana 





Laura Morgan 

Malverne 
Long Island 



Julia Russel Morse 

Galveston-Houston Interurban 

Houston, Texas 




Margaret Ella Morison 
1226 Mt. Curve Avenue 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 



Miriam Merigold Morse 

455 West 5th Street 

Winona, Minnesota 



C3 




X 







DQC 



I 




□ 




Frances Ethel Moschcowitz 
925 Madison Avende 
New York, New Vokk 



Mary Virginia Musk 

15 Ridge Road 

Lawrence, Massachusetts 








Marjorie Moulton 

75 Park Street 

West Roxbury, Massachusetts 



Eleanor Ada Nagle 

653 East 6th Street 

Erie, Pennsylvania 








Harriet Josephine Murdock 
Murdock Avenue 
Meriden, Connecticut 



Lola Frances Needles 

Elkins Park 

Pennsylvania 







69 



E^Jj- 



DQI 



I 



□ 

a 



X 







Caroline Newman Kewburger 
Hi) Moffet Avenue 
.Iuf'i.in, Missouri 



Anna Beatrice O'Connor 

696 Bridge Street 

Northampton, Massachusetts 





1 



70 



Florence Augusta Newell 
1315 Lemon Street 
Riverside, California 



Ruth Adelle O'Hanlon 

802 South Maine Street 

Geneva, New York 





Harriet Ellen O'Brien 
180 4th Street 
Troy, New York 



Faye Olds 

35 Church Street 

Ware, Massachusetts 







Q 
a 



BE 



□ 




Eleanor Frances Ormes 

Colorado SPRINGS 
Colorado 



Cassaxdana Page 

034 South Maine Street 

Athens, Pennsylvania 




a 
□ 




Elsie Brewer Orrell 

Glendale 

Phode Island 



Elinor Palmer 

25 West Street 

Portland, Maine 




□ 




Ruth Osteyee 

51 Euclid Avenue 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts 



Georgiana Paine Palmer 
215 North 4th Street 
Stillwater, Minnesota 








i 



1EJG 



DQE 



71 



I 



□ 







72 



Elsa Pantzer 

717 N. D. Woodruff 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Marguerite Alva Parkin 

2077 Riverdale Street 

Chicopee, Massachusetts 





Muriel Stearns Park 
Bethel 

Maine 



Cecil Lorene Patrey 

Milwaukee 
Wisconsin 




Alexandrine Parker 
839 South Quincet Street 
Green Bay, Wisconsin 



Greta Nelle Payne 

1430 Lee Street 

Charleston, West Virginia 



en 





□ 
a 



DBG 




a 




Esther Foster Pearson 

281 Glen Street 

Glens Falls, New York 



Pauline Phelps 

610 RrNNYMEDE ROAD 

Dayton, Ohio 




□ 







Helen Jeannette Peirce 

320 Cottage Street 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 



Helen Evelyn Pillsbury 

16 Pennacook Street 

Manchester, New Hampshire 








Ellen Chase Perkins 

460 Walnut Street 
Brookline, Massachusetts 



Helen Sinclair Pittman 

Elizabethtown 

New York 








73 



]BI 



DQE 



1 







Marie Dennis Poland 
445 Mt. Prospect Avenue 
Newark, New Jersey 



Marjory Webb Porritt 

689 Asylum Avenue 

Hartford, Connecticut 




1=1 




Adela Morse Pond 
29 South Main Street 
Rutland, Vermont 



Catherine Hale Pratt 

2048 Nuuanu Avenue 

Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands 




I 







Priscilla May Poore 

Ross 

California 



Isabel Virginia Prescott 

Lake Forest Park 

Seattle, Washington 




a 

Q 

□ 






7i 



IEjC 



i 







Mildred Jamieson Qua 
15 Butler Place 

Northampton, Massachusetts 



Margaret Raymond 

1231 Park Avenue 

Hoboken, New Jersey 







X 




Dorothy Quinby 

Brookline 
Massachusetts 



Kelle Elizabeth Rea 

710 Elm Street 

Copfeyville, Kansas 








Helen McGregor Rawson 

Bloomington 

Illinois 



Emily Judson Reed 

332 North 1st Street 

Yakima. Washington 







s 



IEJE 



75 



m 







Mary Reinhardt 
1825 South Boulevard 
Dallas, Texas 



Carolyn Reynolds 

3203 4th Avenue 

North Billings, Montana 




□ 



X 




Eleanor Relyea 

1736 I Street, Northwest 

Washington, District of Columbia 



Constance Richards 

22 Notre Dame Street 

Glens Falls, New York 








Marie Eyster Rewalt 
235 Chestnut Street 
Roselle, New Jersey 



Florence Roney Richardson 
924 Hickman Road 
Augusta, Georgia 




□ 



I 



76 



DQI 



I 



3BE 



IBE 



JT5 



HI 







Althea Lillian Rickert 
:i'M South Plum Street 

II \\ \\ \, Illinois 



Elizabeth Barnet Rintels 

923 Beacon Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 








Oneita Rike 

14S Central Avenue 
Dayton, Ohio 



Dorothy Deborah Roberts 
Dover 

New Hampshire 








Mary Elizabeth Rimer 

Clarion 

Pennsylvania 



Margaret Clark Roberts 

731 7th Street 

Buffalo, New York 







i 



77 



:be 



E\ 



□ 




Ethel Jean Robertson 

115 Grace Street 

. khsky City, New Jersey 



Esther Ropes 

18 Felt Street 

Salem, Massachusetts 







X 




Henrietta Robinson 
528 South Sth Street 
Springfield, Illinois 



Helen Louise Rosebrough 

1035 North Jefferson Street 

Huntington, Indiana 








Genevieve Robison 

255 Orange Grove Avenue 

Burbank, California 



Rosa Rosenthal 

Cloverdale Apartments 
Baltimore, Maryland 




□ 



4 : 



78 



DBG 



ED GDI 



i 




a 




Athalie Lizette Rowe 
Deforest Court 
Summit, New Jersey 



Marion Emma Louise Sailer 

628 Wyoming Avenue 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 




a 



X 




Grace Marion Rowe 

471 Prospect Avenue 
Buffalo. New York 



Catherine Sammis 

264 Barclay Street 

Flushing, Long Island 








Florence Miriam Russell 

301 Main Street 

Concord Junction, Massachusetts 



Selma Josephine Sampliner 

Grand Junction 

Colorado 







s 



DBG 



DEDE 



79 



iH 







Roberta Saunders 
224 Broad Stheet 
Newark, New .Jersey 



Elsa Josephine Schmidt 

3106 North Meridian Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 








Dorothy Helen Sawyer 
64 Milk Street 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts 



Dorothy Schuyler 
121 State Street 
Portland, Maine 








Helen Schaab 

740 North Main Street 

Auburn, Indiana 



Josephine Margaret Scully 

649 Irving Park Boulevard 

Chicago, Illinois 




a 




m 



[80 



1EG 



m 



1 



3HE 



1 







Mary Hathaway Sears 
Blooming Grove 

Nk» York 



Hannah Taylor Shipley 

1 Dexter Place 

East Walnut Hills 

Cincinnati, Ohio 




□ 




Gertrude Sehm 

744 Massachusetts Avenue 
Peoria, Illinois 



Mary Gardiner Howard Short 
Worcester 



Massachusetts 




X 



□ 

a 




Marion Shedd 
Bexley 
Columbus, Ohio 



Grete Siemens 

721 Stowell Avenue 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 







£ 



81 



IB! 



lEJI 







Adele Lyzette Siemons 

1981 Morris Avenue 
New York, New York 



Emilia Bltt7. Sitterly 

Drew Forest 

Madison, New Jersey 








Priscilla Warren Silver 

Llewellyn Park 

West Orange, New Jersey 



Elizabeth Brand Siveter 

123 Dethridge Street 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 








Susan Geraldine Silver 

Llewellyn Park 

West Orange, New Jersey 



Lois Tripp Slocum 

18 Sherman Street 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 







^1 [82 



IEJG 



DBE 



I 







Annette Armine Smith 

AT Curtis Street 

West Somehvii.i.e, Massachusetts 



Helena Huntington Smith 

Mohristown School 

Morbistown, New Jersey 




in 



X 




Barbara Smith 
5 College Street 
Amherst, Massachusetts 



Josephine Bicknell Smith 

91 Osgood Street 

North Axdoyer, Massachusetts 




a 




Emma Hetherington Smith 
1116 Weston Avenue 
Norfolk, Virginia 



Marion Frances Smith 

Caxajoharie 

New York 







I 



3 EH 



1QI 



83 



1 








Marjorie Blackstone Smithwick 
50 Percy Road 
Lexington, Massachusetts 



Harriet Louise Snyder 

479 Grand Avenue 

Dayton, Ohio 








Lois Knauff Snow 

Lakewood 

Ohio 



Eleanor Caroline Soleliac 
Hotel Traylor 

Allentown, Pennsylvania 








Olive Louise Snow 

Mahwah 

New Jersey 



Elizabeth Fry Somerville 

425 South Perry' Street 

Montgomery, Alabama 




□ 
a 



84 



DEC 



DQE 



i 




□ 

a 




Jean Gurney Spahr 

313 East 17th Street 
New York, New York 



Hazel Sprague 

214 Highland Street 

Milton, Massachusetts 




CD 




Dorothy Spalding 
501 Argyle Road 
Brooklyn, New York 



Marjorie Spring 

Olney 

Illinois 




X 







Virginia Speare 

61 Montvale Road 

Newton Center, Massachusetts 



Sarah Starkweather 

36 Forest Street 

Hartford, Connecticut 




a 






DBG 



85 



1C3E 







Dorothy Doris Stearns 

KS97 East 115th Street 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Katherine Stieglitz 

57 West 58th Street 

New York, New York 








Elizabeth Camp Stevens 

Deep River 

Connecticut 



Gertrude Louise Stone 

56 Macopin Avenue 

Upper Montclair, New Jersey 








Catherine Hall Stickney 

170 Engle Street 
Englewood, New Jersey 



Mary Elizabeth Stout 

67 Sparks Street 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 




□ 

E 

en 



1EG 



I 



□ 

a 







I 



Christine Straub 

Latham Park, Oak Lane 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



Margaret Sugarman 

3111 West 41st Street 

Cleveland, Ohio 





Gertrude Elizabeth Strickler 
Columbiana, Ohio 



Constance Elinor Sundh 

1 Devens Road 
Worcester, Massachusetts 




Sophie Wolcott Stuart 
<>44 Ferry Street 
Lafayette, Indiana 



Florence Josephine Taylor 

73 East Division Street 

Chicago, Illinois 



□ 

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Helen Terry 
914 Astor Street 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



Miriam Mack Thompson 

121 School Street 

Lowell, Massachusetts 




□ 



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Dorothy Don Carlos Thompson 

2681 Broadway 

New York, New York 



Ruth Malona Thompson 

Gambier 
Ohio 









Lelia Elizabeth Thomfson 
45 Elm Street 
Northampton, Massachusetts 



Janet Thornton 

Gerinq 
Nebk \>ka 




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Marjorie Tietig 

Vista Place, East Walnut Hills 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



Frances Sessions Treadway 

17839 Lake Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio 




1=1 




Rose Sarafina Tomasi 
320 North Main Street 
Barre, Vermont 



Charlotte Reineck Truitt 
36 Saxon Road 

Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 




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Margaret Clifford Travis 
Hillside Avenue 
Tenafly, New Jersey 



Edith Martha Tyler 

24 Dakota Street 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 







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Margaret Vance 

Gheensburg 
Pennsylvania 



Madelaine Margaret Waddell 

Squirrel 
Idaho 





Lucia Lorraine Vennum 

Watseka 
Illinois 



Mary Esther Wagner 
Sound Beach 

Connecticut 




Mignon Wright Vroom 

HS7 Richmond Avenue 
Port Richmond, New York 



Katharine Virginia Walker 

260 Convent Avenue 
New York, New York 




□ 
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Mary Loretto Walsh 
71) Hubbard Street 
Middletown, Connecticut 



Elizabeth W'aterbi ry 

159 Philadelphia Street 

Saratoga Springs, New York 







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Elizabeth Hexdy Wanzer 

111 South Maple Avexuf 
Oik Park, Illinois 



Ella Louise W aterbury 

Oriskany 

New York 




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Marjorie Ward 
57 C'huhch Street 
Arum.. Massachusetts 



Helen Lucile Watts 

296 Main Street 
Northampton, Massachusetts 




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Frances Margaret Weadock 
440 South Weadock Avenue 
Saginaw, Michigan 



Helen Brooks Weiser 

226 Pine Street 

Holyoke, Massachusetts 




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Dorothy Weed 

2519 Sedgewick Avenue 

Bronx, New York 



Louisa Griswold Wells 

Warehouse Point 

Connecticut 








Phyllis Stuart Wegener 
1050 Hollywood Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



Virginia Wenner 

3250 Euclid Avenue 

Cleveland, Ohio 




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Hazel Austina Wentworth 

L'lli Bl.OOMINGDALE AVENUE 

Wayne, Pennsylvania 



Winifred Gardiner Whiton 

71 Williams Street 

New London, Connecticut 








Meldon Ludy White 
2101 Linnwood Boulevard 
Kansas City, Missouri 



Blanche Florence Wiener 

708 Diagonal Avenue 

Akron, Ohio 




X 







Helen Christine Whitney 

Marysville 

Ohio 



Jane Wilder 
807 St. Clair Street 
St. Paul, Minnesota 




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Sadie Wilens 

114 Windsor Avenue 

Hartford, Connecticut 



Hazel Maude Winans 

132 Chestnut Avenue 

Waterbury, Connecticut 




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Esther Adele Williams 
5059 Raymond Avenue 
St. Louis, Missouri 



Barbara Winchester 

1411 Blue Hill Avenue 

Mattapan, Massachusetts 




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Jean Elise Willis 
1360 Mistletoe Avenue 
Fort Worth, Texas 



Helen Melissa Wingate 

43 Granite Street 

Nashua, New Hampshire 




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Marjorie Scot Winslow 
202S Hampden Court 
Chicago, Illinois 



Carlotta Frances Wolverton 

106 East Gamlin Street 

Mt. Vernon, Ohio 




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Lenore Wolf 
Washington Hotel 
St. Louis, Missouri 



Elizabeth Hill Wood 

7.55 Main Street 

Waltham, Massachusetts 








Florence Edna Wolfe 
48 Warrington Place 
East Orange, New Jersey 



Ruth Hill Wood 
Crescent Road 

Concord, Massachusetts 







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Wynna Wright 

22 Circuit Avenue 

Newton Highlands, Massachusetts 



Elizabeth Hamlin Young 

2212 R Street, Northwest 

Washington, District of Columbia 




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Cora VVyman 
129 Lake Street 
Arlington, Massachusetts 



Jennette Lawrence Young 
Norfolk 
Virginia 




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Catharine Elizabeth Young 
655 West Market Street, 
Akron, Ohio 



Mary Platt Younglove 

320 Skinker Road 
St. Louis, Missouri 







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Adrian, Cornelia Margaret 
Allen, Rosamond 
Almy, Dorothy Winthrop 
Andrews, Helen Frances 
Axelrod, Sophia 
Balch, Dorothy Henrietta 
Barnett, Mary MacDonald 
Blake, Blanche Sarah 
Blanchard, Christine Harriet 
Bond, Elizabeth Chapman 
Bradley, Elizabeth Eury 
Brown, Charlotte Belden 
Brown, Mary Finley 
Burrell, Louise 
Butterfield, Mary Elizabeth 
Campbell, Carina 
Cathey, Noreen 
Clark, Cornelia Knight 
Clark, Mary Elizabeth 
Clemson, Elizabeth 
Clymer, Helen Kendal 
Cole, Mildred Farnham 
Coleman, Polly Margaret 
Collins, Cordelia Isabel 
Colt, Katharine Mary 
Cone, Margaret 
Conklin, Frances Eugenia 
Conley, Grace Markell 
Connery, Ruth Marie 
Conroy, Mary Elizabeth 
Cook, Marion Marva 
Cumming, Ruth Elizabeth 
Dahlman, Dorothy 
Dann, Dorothy 
Davis, Ruth Ellsworth 
Dean, Kathryn Zoe 
Dennis, Theodora 
Dexter, Zoe Mary 
Duffy, Eunice Marion 
Dunn, Florence Montgomery 



Durbin, Gretchen 
Dwyer, Margaret Cecilia 
Eads, Adeline Barnes 
Eichberg, Myra May 
Elkan, Carolyn Karpe 
Elliott, Margaret Mills 
Ellison, Elizabeth Garrett 
Ely, Marguerite Richmond 
Espy, Elsie Mary 
Falconer, Helen Margaret 
Fellows, Josephine Severance 
Fitch, Eleanor SchleY 
Fletcher, Pauline 
Fogg, Eleanore Virginia 
Foster, Marcella Hathaway 
Fox, Gladys Hulda 
Friedmann, Helen 
Friend, Caroline 
Fritsche, Dorothy Barbara 
Fuller, Mary Snyder 
Galvin, Julie Elizabeth 
Gassenheimer, Nettie Edith 

GlLLINGHAM, SADIE NoRBURY 

Goldin, Fannie 

Gorman, Dorothy Catherine 

Grim, Dorothy Nene 

Harris, Anna 

H^skins, Inez Clara 

Hastings, Elizabeth 

Hatheway, Elizabeth 

Hayes, Charlotte Lucille 

Hecht, Beatrice Sara 

Hewel, Elsie Lilien 

Hollingshead, Martha Mary 

Holmes, Constance Alison 

Holton, Flora Caroline 

Hough, Helen Bowers 

Hower, Isabel 

Hoyt, Mrs. Louise Warren Powe 

Hoxie, Dorothy Ellen 



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Huang, Kwe Pau 
Ingersoll, Helen 
Jacobson, Kathrine 
Janes, Dorothy Augusta 
Jewett, Dorothy Rosevear 
Johnson, Hilda Marie 
Jones, Elsie 
Kaufman, Pearl 
Keene, Marion Octavia 
Reiser, Ruth Love 
Rellog, Claudia Elizabeth 
Rellog, Helen Tracy 
Rent, Margaret 
Ridder, Mildred Virginia 
Rimball, Jean Elizabeth 
Lambert, Elizabeth Gorman 
Laylin, Ruth Hathaway 
Leisy, Helena Marie 
Less, Edith Ethel 
Lester, Lora Elderkin 
Lethiecq, Avis Somes 
Levis, Lydia Theresa 
Linthicum, Louise Wilson 
Livingston, Clara Elizabeth 
Logan, Mary Elizabeth 
Long, Helen Marshall 
Loomes, Grace Adele 
Lyon, Dorothy Moore 
McClelland, Ruth 
McHugh, Dorothy Leete 
McHugh, Miriam Fulton 
McLain, Ratharine 
McLane, Helen Bernice 
McLaughlin, Esther Lois 
McMillan, Roxie Corder 
Magennis, Helen Ruth 
Mahin, Marion 
May, Viola Stacy 
Meserve, Constance Lambert 
Metcalf, Therese Eleanor 
Michael, Rathryn 
Moore, Dorothy 
Moore, Helen Marita 



Moore, Marcella Colin 
Munroe, Ruth Schermerhorn 
Munsell, Juliet Dows 
Munson, Ratherine 
Munson, Mary Elizabeth 
Neiman, Janice Alberta 
Noyes, Adele Charlotte 
O'Shea, Mary Elizabeth 
Oswins, Albertine Martha 
Owen, Jessie Virginia 
Park, Gratia Buell 
Patterson, Mary Smith 
Patterson, Jane 
Pease, Eleanor Frances 
Peebles, Mary Beatrice 
Peebles, Susanna 
Pennewell, Margaret Anne 
Pew, Julia Caroline 
Phillips, Ethel Brinton 
Pierce, Adelaide Lyman 
Poland, Margaret Evangeline 
Prichard, Louise Gilman 
Proctor, Dorothy Bradstreet 
Ranney, Ratherine Huse 
Reed, Marion Flora 
Reed, Nancy Wesselhoeft 
Richards, Josephine Helena 
Rolph, Dorothy Ashton 
Rosenfield, Josephine Helen 
Ross, Barbara Elizabeth 
Roux, Yvonne Albertine 
Royse, Edith Hull 
Sadowsky, Betty Helene 
Sands, Esther Shepard 
Sawyer, Ruth 
Scholl, Ione Elizabeth 
schwartzburg, mlldred louise 
Searby, Alice Elizabeth 
Shepard, Agnes Isabel 
Shoop, Miriam Frances 
Silbert, Doris 
Smith, Priscilla Mary 
Spengler, Beatrice Alden 



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Starke, Vera Ruth 
Steadman, Norma 
Stimson, Mildred 
Stokes, Leonora Lucille 
Stone, Antoinette Creighton 
Stone, Elizabeth Parsons 
Stone, Iva Harpster 
Stoughton, Blanche Pauline 
Stover, Eleanor Runyon 
Strange, Lavinia 
Sullivan, Helen Irene 
Sullivan, Mildred Anna 
Sykes, Elizabeth Blanche 
Taylor, Dorothy Miriam 
Taylor, Rosemary Flower 
Teats, Dorothy Louise 
Tener, Annie Frances 
Thompson, Martha Louise 
Tolar, Sara Virginia 



Totten, Helen 
Tracy, Elaine 

Treichler, Virginia Marguerite 
Trope, Florence Ursula 
Truell, Marguerite Irene 
Van Doren, Esther Margaret 
Wade, Edith Lorna 
Walther, Gertrude Lynn- 
Watson, Helen Adelia 
Webb, Catherine McCord 
Wheeler, Dorothy Grace 
Williams, Marguerite Carol 
Wilson, Alice Low 
Wilson, Laura DaShiell 
Withington, Mildred Susan 
Woodruff, Harriette Borraine 
Wormser, Beatrice Elizabeth 
Worstall, Frances Jenks 
Wright, Helen Simmons 



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®n 1922 



We've played with you for three gay years- 
We hate to leave you, Twenty-two — 
We love your smiles, we love your songs, 
We love the merry things you do. 

You shoot the chutes with careless ease, 
To watch your stunts gives us a thrill 
When down the esophagus you slide 
In combinations fit to kill. 

And when on Floating Courts of Love 
Your mal de mer you firmly quell, 
We love the spirits you have raised — 
(You know your Patchwork very well!) 

You've played with us for three gay years 
We hate to leave you, Twenty-two — 
And if you urge us, we'll come back 
Next year — sometime — to play with you. 






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1923 

You had a hard time to get in 

Poor little '23— 

Mental tests and everythin' 

That was the decree. 

We got in most anyhow, 

But no one would know it now — 

That is plain to see. 

First you thought of rings and pins, 

But without a frown, 

They went the way of other sins — 

Voted down! 

Fresh fields opened to your view — 

You'd accomplish something new — 

Change the modern gown! 

But we are worried, '23, 

This is what we fear — 

That in uniforms you'll be 

When we come back next year. 

Unless sport clothes should meet our eyes, 

Short bobbed hair and narrow ties, 

We won't know we're here. 






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1924 

What will you be in a year or three 

We find it a puzzle to tell, 
But nevertheless we are willing to guess 

That you will be doing it well. 

Your freshman tricks we have tried to fix 
For we long to reform our age, 

But you smile on us and our frantic fuss — 
You are both calm and sage. 

We think with fear of the coming year 
But everyone knows you'll pass; 

So why bother to cram for a final exam — 
Come play with the Senior class. 



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QJomtril 

Anne Clark 
President 



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Anne Clark 



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(Eaunril itonbprB 

SENIOR YEAR 
Anne Clark Alice Jones 

Mary Holyoke Catharine Joralmon 

Wolcott Stuart 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Anne Clark Anne Coburn 

Alice Jones 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Helen Kittredge Frances Tener 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
Margaret Goldthwait 






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Mouae of 

OFFICERS 

Margaret Goldthwait 

President 

Eleanor Relyea 

Vice-President 



Margaret Goldthwait 



Mnnbns 

JUNIOR YEAR 



Nan Albert 
Margaret Bardwell 
Mary Baeyertz 
Clarinda Buck 
Helen Butler 
Margaret Cotton 
Isabel Durfee 
Edith Jacobs 
Olive Keegan 
Gertrude Kush 
Vivion Lenon 



Charlotte Lindley 
Alice Lull 
Virginia Markel 
Marjorie Moulton 
Florence Newell 
Helen Peirce 
Barbara Smith 
Catherine Stickney 
Dorothy Thompson 
Madelaine Waddell 
Katharine Walker 



Carlotta Wolverton 



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Katharine Brand 
Mary Brinkerhoff 
Katharine Brown 
Elizabeth Boutelle 
Dorothy Butts 
Catharine Chadbourn 
Louise Clark 
Anne Coburn 
Dorothy Davis 
Mary Elizabeth Dietrich 
Mildreth Godfrey 
Margaret Goldthwait 
Margaret Gould 
Frances Holden 
Beatrice James 
India Johnson 
Katharine Kempl 
Louise Leonard 
Doris Lovell 
Florence Lowe 

Jeannette 



Edith McEwen 
Katharine Mathews 
Muriel Park 
Ellen Perkins 
Helen Pittman 
Catharine Pratt 
Emily Reed 
Eleanor Relyea 
Adele Siemons 
Annetta Smith 
Emma Smith 
Christine Straub 
Margaret Sugarman 
Edith Tyler 
Mary Walsh 
Elizabeth Wanzer 
Virginia Wenner 
Esther Williams 
Wynna Wright 
Cora Wyman 
Young 




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Mary Holyoke 



Mary Holyoke 
Hazel VVinans 



Helen Watts 
Nan Albert . 
Helen Gutman 



SENIOR OFFICERS 



Preside fit 
Vice-President 



JUNIOR OFFICERS 

Treasurer 

Chairman of Extension Committee 
Chairman of Peoples Institute 



SOPHOMORE OFFICERS 



Alida Bigelow 



Secretary 



Student Volunteers 
Dorothy Butts Aigule Kalfaian 

Constance Grigg Dorothy Manwell 

Adelia Hallock Nevart Matossian 

Constance Jackson Helen Watts 




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Chairmen of Departments and Committees 
Missionary Department ..... . Helen Watts 



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Religious Service 

Consumer's League 

Publicity . 

Community Service Association 

Social Committee 

Leader of Student Volunteers 



Wolcott Stuart 

Dorothy Sawyer 

Charlotte Lindley 

Camilla Loyall 

Marjorie Winslow 

Constance Grigg 



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Alice Abbott 
Nan Albert 
Alice Anthony 
Helen Anthony 
isadore apted 
Cecile Arpin 
Mary Baeyertz 
Helen Barker 
Marion Bayer 
Edith Bayles 
Alida Bigelow 
Lynda Billings 
Helen Bloomer 
Sybil Boland 
Ruth Boleman 
Elizabeth Boutelle 
Katharine Brand 
Ruth Brooks 
Helen Butler 
Mary Buttimer 
Dorothy Butts 
Catheryn Caine 
Rebecca Cantarow 
Catharine Chadbourn 
Mary Chamberlain 
Carolyn Chapman 
Elizabeth Clapp 
Anne Clark 
Margaret Cobb 
Anne Coburn 
Annabel Cooley 
Helen Croll 
Winifred Davies 
Rachel Denison 
Ruth Dewsbury 
Mary Elizabeth Dietrich 
Lois Dissette 
Dorothy Dobner 
Jean Donald 
Florence Dowden 
Elsie Duberg 
Marguerite Ely 
Ellen Everett 
Frances Flint 
Dorothy Folsom 
Helen Frazier 
Sophie Gerson 
Ruth Gillespie 
Margaret Goldthwait 

[1161 



Margaret Gould 
Sara Graham 
Helen Green 
Helen A. Greene 
Constance Grigg 
Helen Gutman 
Barbara Hines 
Frances Holden 
Mary Holyoke 
Harriet Howe 
Ruth Hutchinson 
Constance Jackson 
Beatrice James 
Alice Jones 
Helen Josephy 
Alfhild Kalijarvi 
Caroline Keller 
Helen Kellogg 
Edith Ketcham 
Mildred King 
Martha Kirsten 
Helen Kittredge 
Vivion Lenon 
Charlotte Lindley 
Louise Loewensteix 

MlLDRED LOUER 

Doris Lovell 
Florence Lowe 
Camilla Loyai.l 
Alice Lull 
Mildred McCaddin 
Louise McLaren 
Frances Marble 
Nevart Matossian 
Catherine Miller 
Margaret Morison 
Georgiana Morrison 
Julia Morse 
Frances Moschcowitz 
Florence Newell 
Eleanor Ormes 
Ruth Osteyee 
Cassandana Page 
Elinor Palmer 
Alexandrine Parker 
Alva Parkin 
Esther Pearson 
Helen Pierce 
Ethel Phillips 
Helen Pittman 



Adela Pond 
Catharine Pratt 
Margaret Raymond 
Emily Reed 
Eleanor Relyea 
Esther Ropes 
Catherine Sammis 
Roberta Saunders 
Dorothy - Sawyer 
Helen Schaab 
Dorothy Schuyler 
M^ry Sears 
Marion Shedd 
Adele Siemons 
Priscilla Silver 
Emilia Sitterly 
Lois Slocum 
Helena Smith 
Marion Smith 
Jean Spahr 
Dorothy Stearns 
Elizabeth Stevens 
Catherine Stickney 
Wolcott Stuart 
Frances Tener 
Dorothy Thompson 
Charlotte Truitt 
Edith Tyler 
Margaret Vance 
Lucia Vennum 
Katharine Walker 
Mary Walsh 
Elizabeth Wanzer 
Marjorie Ward 
Ella Waterbury 
Helen Watts 
Polly Weaver 
Dorothy Weed 
Phyllis Wegener 
Louisa Wells 
Winifred Whiton 
Jean Willis 
Hazel Winans 
Florence Wolfe 
Elizabeth Wood 
Wynna Wright 
Elizabeth Young 
Jeannette Young 
Mary Younglove 



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Helen Anthony 
Helen Barker 
Alida Bigelow 
Lynda Billings 
May Bossi 
Mary Buttimer 
Mary Chamberlain 
Caroline Chapman 
Mary Elizabeth Dietrich 
Jean Donald 
Helen Frazier 
Dorothy Graves 
Helen A. Greene 



Constance Grigg 
Mary Holyoke 
India Johnson 
Edith Ketcham 
Martha Kirsten 
Helen Kittredge 
Charlotte Lindley 
Camilla Loyall 
Helen Pittman 
Eleanor Relyea 
Roberta Saunders 
Dorothy Sawyer 



Marion Shedd 
Mary Short 
Helena Smith 
Jean Spahr 
Dorothy Stearns 
Catherine Stickney 
Wolcott Stuart 
Margaret Sugarman 
Katharine Walker 
Helen Watts 
Marjorie Winslow 
Ruth Wood 
Wynna Wright 



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Margaret Hannum 
Adelia Hallock 
Constance Jackson 



AlGULE KaLFAIAN 

Nevart Matossian 



Marjorie Porritt 
Dorothy Schuyler 
Helen Watts 



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Dorothy Stearns 



SENIOR OFFICERS 



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Vice-President 
Representatives 
Basketball, Florence Newell Crew, Dorothy Schuyler 

Baseball, Frances Holden Cricket, Ruth Wood 

Hockey, Catharine Joralmon Archery, Helen Peirce 

Tennis, Charlotte Lindley Volley Ball, Margaret Gould 



JUNIOR OFFICERS 



Dorothy Stearns 
Dorothy Dobner 
Caroline Keller 
Mary Holyoke 






Presidetit 

Manager of Club House 

Manager of Boat House 

Junior Referee 



Representatives 
Hockey, Jean Spahr 
Crew, Dorothy Schuyler 
Tennis, Charlotte Lindley 
Cricket, Marjorie Morison 
Volley Ball, Margaret Gould 

SOPHOMORE OFFICERS 



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Frances Tener* 
Katharine Walker J 
Dorothy Stearns 



Secretary 
Treasurer 



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Katharine Walker 



Director 
Katharine Walker 

Chairman of Scenery 
Lynda Billings 

Head of Student Coaches 
Jean Spahr 

Business Manager 
Helen Green 

Dramaturgy 
Edith Bayles 






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Editor-in-Ch ief 
Edith Bayles 

Business Manager 
Dorothy Stearns 



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Dorothy Schuyler 

Freda Haas 



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Clarinda Buck 
Dorothy Butts 



Editors 



Marion Ellet 
Florence Wolfe 



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SENIOR YEAR 



Helena Smith 
Constance Jackson 
Helen Kittredge 
Dorothy Goodenough 



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News Editor 

Managing Editor 

Business Manager 



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Assistant Editors 

Constance Jackson Helena Smith 

Alice Jones* Jean Spahr 

Eleanor Relyea Wolcott Stuart 

Assistant Business Managers 

Caroline Keller Helen Kittredge 

Charlotte Lindley 



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Alice Jones Charlotte Lindley 

Caroline Keller Eleanor Relyea 

Jean Spahr 



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Margaret Cobb 



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News Editor 






Edith Bayles* 
Lynda Billings* 
Harriet Burgess 
Margaret Cobb 
Ellen Everett 
Mary Fishburne* 
Helen Gutman* 
India Johnson* 
Helen Josephy 



Edith Ketcham 
Eleanor Relyea 
Elizabeth Rintels 
Selma Sampliner 
Mary Sears 
Mary Short 
Lelia Thompson* 
Katharine Walker* 
Lenore Wolfe 






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Edith Bayles 
Lynda Billings 
Katharine Brown 
Anne Coburn 



Helen Gutman 
Mary Short 
Dorothy Thompson 
Katharine Walker 







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Editor-in-Ch ief 
Eleanor Relyea 

Assistant Editor 
Helen Butler 

Business Manager 
Carolyn Chapman 

Assistant Business Managers 

Frances Holden 

India Johnson 

Literary Editor 
Ellen Everett 

Art Editor 
Wynna Wright 

Photograph Editor 
Eleanor Nagle 

Assistant Photograph Editor 
Helen Greene 

Jokes and Cartoons Editor 
Mary Lewis Dickinson 



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Harriet Burgess Emilia Sitterly 

Jean Spahr 






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SENIOR YEAR 

Mildred Adams 
Catherine Allyn 
Pearl Anderson 
Clarinda Buck 
Elise Carrier 
Adelaide Clouting 
Anne Coburn 
Helen Croll 
Ruth Dewsbury 
Myrtle Doppmann 
Elsie Duberg 
Frances Flint 
Ruth Gillespie 
Margaret Goldthwait 
Helen Gutman 
Constance Jackson 
Alfhild Kalijarvi 
Edith Ketcham 
Vivion Lenon 



Louise Leonard 
Charlotte Lindley 
Florence Lowe 
Camilla Loyall 
Edith McEwen 
Elinor Palmer 
Marie Poland 
Esther Ropes 
Rosa Rosenthal 
Annetta Smith 
Helena Smith 
Wolcott Stuart 
Lelia Thompson 
Madelaine Waddell 
Elizabeth Wanzer 
Ella Waterbury 
Dorothy Weed 
Hazel Wentworth 
Carlotta Wolverton 






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Charlotte Lindley 
Dorothy Stearns 
Florence Wolfe . 
Lynda Billings 



Ruth Dewsbury 
Rachel Denison 
Dorothy Butts 
Lynda Billings 

Nan Albert 
Marguerite Baker 
Edith Bayles 
Lynda Billings 
Clarinda Buck 
Helen Butler 
Dorothy Butts 
Rebecca Cantarow 
Rachel Denison 



OFFICERS 

First Semester 

President 

Senior Executive 

Editor 

Chairman of Entertainment Committee 

Second Semester 

Presidefit 

Senior Executive 

Editor 

Chairman of Entertainment Committee 



Ruth Dewsbury 
Ellen Everett 
Marion Ellet 
Helen Gutman 
Edna Hunkemeier 
Constance Jackson 
Alice Jones 
Helen Josephy 



Charlotte Lindley 
Ruth O'Hanlon 
Eleanor Relyea 
Mary Short 
Dorothy Stearns 
Katharine Walker 
Dorothy Weed 
Louisa Wells 
Florence Wolfe 







133 



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OFFICERS 

First Semester 



Margaret Hannum 
Rosa Rosenthal 
Elizabeth Rintels 



Mary Holyoke 
Pauline Breustedt 
Carlotta Wolvertot 



Ruth Brooks 
Anne Clark 
Anne Coburn 
Jean Donald 
Florence Dowden 
Margaret Goldthwait 
Margaret Hannum 
Mary Holyoke 



President 

Senior Executive 

Editor 



Second Semester 



President 

Senior Executive 

<! . . . . . Editor 

Edith Jacobs Athalie Rowe 

Beatrice James Helena Smith 

Catharine Joralmon Jean Spahr 

Helen Kittredge Wolcott Stuart 

Frances Moschcowitz Edith Tyler 

Elinor Palmer Marjorie Winslow 

Elizabeth Rintels Carlotta Wolverton 

Rosa Rosenthal Wynna Wright 



[135 



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c.-p. 







PUILQ/OPUICAL 
SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 



Frances Holden . 




President 


Hazel Wentworth 


MEMBERS 


Secretary 


Pearl Anderson 




Janice Ozias 


Zelda Clevenger 




Georgiana Palmer 


Rachel Denison 




Helen Pillsbury 


Marion Ellet 




Helen Rosebrough 


Dorothy Goodenough* 


Helena Smith 


Helen Gutman 




Jean Spahr* 


Alfhild Kalijarvi* 




Wynna Wright 


Helen Kittredge* 




Lelia Thompson 


Charlotte Lindley* 




Helen Watts 


Nevart Matossian 




Ella Waterbury* 



X 



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Hazel Wentworth 



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Anne Coburn 



Nan Albert 
Edith Bayles* 
Dorothy Cerf 
Ruth Chovey 
Axxe Coburn 
Eleanor Curtiss 
Sophie Gerson 



*Resigned 



1 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 

Helen Gutman 
Eunice Hunton 
Edith Ketcham 
Sallie Kline 
Camilla Loyall 
Julia Morse 
Ethel Phillips 

Intercollegiate Debate, iqiq 

Anne Coburn 
Intercollegiate Debate, 1920 

Anne Coburn 

Helen Gutman 

Edith Ketcham 

Jean Spahr 

Intercollegiate Debate, 1921 
Anne Coburn 
Sallie Kline 
Jean Spahr 
Charlotte Truitt 
Catharine Young 



ident 



Helen Pittman 
Dorothy Marsh 
Emilia Sitterly 
Jean Spahr 
Helen Watts* 
Florence Wolfe 
Catharine Young 



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Eleanor Curtiss . 
Nevart Matossian 



Margaret Cobb 
Dorothy Janssen . 



OFFICERS 

First Semester 

President 
Chairman of Program Committee 

Second Semester 

President 
Chairman of Program Committee 



X 






Barbara Anderson 
Alice Anthony 
Marguerite Baker 
Helen Barker 
Edith Bayles* 
Katharine Brown 
Ariel Carstens 
Doris Chadwick 
Margaret Cobb* 
Frances Conklin 
Eleanor Curtiss 
Florence Dowden 
Ruth Duncan 



''Resigned 



MEMBERS 

Frances Flint 
Sophie Gerson 
Sara Graham 
Dorothy Graves 
Helen A. Greene* 
Helen Gutman 
Adelia Hallock* 
Barbara Hines 
Dorothy Janssen 
Caroline Keller 
Sallie Kline 
Camilla Loyal 
Nevart Matossian* 
Julia Morse 



Ethel Phillips 
Helen Pillsbury 
Marjory Porritt* 
Emily Reed 
Elizabeth Rintels 
Athalie Rowe 
Mary Short 
Lelia Thompson 
Charlotte Truitt 
Katharine Walker 
Marjorie Ward 
Florence Wolfe* 
Elizabeth Wood 






i 



138 



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SOCIOLOGY CLV/b 



X 



India Johnson 
Dorothy Schuyler 



OFFICERS 



President 
Secretary 



MEMBERS 






Marguerite Baker* 
Marion Booth 
Mary Buttimer 
Catherine Chadbourx 
Mary Dietrich 
Helen Frazier 
Helen Hookway 
Vivion Lenon 
Camilla Loyall 
Lorna Doone Mason 
Helen Matthews 



Caroline Newburger 
Esther Pearson 
Ellen Perkins* 
Marjory Porritt 
Ethel Robertson 
Selma Sampliner 
Dorothy Schuyler 
Marion Shedd 
Sarah Starkweather 
Dorothy Stearns 
Wolcott Stuart 



Elizabeth Waterbury 



□ 



*Resigned 



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OFFICERS 




Louise Loewenstein 






President 


Athalie Rowe 






Senior Executive 


MEMBERS 




Elizabeth Boutelle 






Eleanor Loth 


Pauline Breustedt 






Doris Lovell 


Ruth Brooks 






Louise Loewenstein 


Frances Carrier 






Camilla Loyall 


Elizabeth Clapp 






Virginia Markel 


Anne Coburn* 






Esther Ropes 


Helen Croll 






Athalie Rowe 


Ruth Dewsbury* 






Josephine Scully 


Dorothy Goodenough 






Jean Spahr* 


Helen Greene 






Wolcott Stuart* 


Julia Howell 






Virginia Treichler* 


Katrina Jameson 






Rose Tomasi 


Alice Jaretsky 






Dorothy Weed 


Caroline Keller 






Winifred Whiton 


Marion LaMontagne 






Barbara Winchester 


Louise Leonard 






Helen Wingate 


Charlotte Lindley* 






Elizabeth Young 



X 



□ 



'Resigned 



140 



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Catherine Allyn 
Helen Peirce 



OFFICERS 



X 



Vice-President 
Secretary 



MEMBERS 






Alice Abbott 
Catherine Allyn 
Mary Buchanan* 
Elsie Bullard 
Grace Carver* 
Dorothy Cotterman 
Marie Gibbons 
Ruth Gillespie 
Evelyn Johnson 



Mary Kneeland 
Eleanor Loth 
Frances Marble 
Anna Mitchell 
Margaret Morison 
Helen Peirce 
Margaret Vance 
Louisa Wells* 
Barbara Winchester 






^Resigned 



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Pauline Breustedt 



President 



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MEMBERS 

Pauline Breustedt 
Edith Ketcham 
Rose Tomasi 






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GREEK CLUB 



OFFICERS 



Mildred Adams 
Ruth Boleman 



MEMBERS 

Mildred Adams 
Ruth Boleman 
Miriam Dunn 
Harriet Howe 
Georgiana Palmer 



a 

□ 

a 



President 
Secretary 






143] 



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OMENTAL SOCIETY 






Annabel Cooley 

AlGULE KALFAIAN . 

Mary Dietrich 



OFFICERS 



President 
Secretary 
Executive 



MEMBERS 



□ 



Harriet Burgess* 
Alice Cook 
Annabel Cooley 
Marguerite Currier 
Mary Dietrich 
Sophie Gerson 
Dorothy Graves* 
Constance Grigg 
Adelia Hallock 
Ruth Hensle 
Barbara Hines 



Helen Watts 



Helen Josephy* 
Aigule Kalfaian 
Edith Ketcham 
Martha Kirsten 
Eleanor Loth 
Dorothy Manwell 
Laura Morgan 
Alva Parkin* 
Helen Pillsbury 
Emily Reed 
Emilia Sitterly* 



□ 

a 



•■Resigned 






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BIOLOGICAL 
SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 



Catharine Pratt 



ident 



X 



MEMBERS 

Barbara Anderson 
Pearl Anderson 
Alice Anthony 
Helen Bloomer 
Sybil Boland 
Mary Elizabeth Dietrich 
Dorothy Goodenough 
Frances Holden 
Helen Hookway 
Berg Hooper 
Constance Jackson 
India Johnson 

Edith Tyler 



Alfhild Kalijarvi 
Elizabeth Kendall 
Mildred King 
Ottilie Meiner 
Catherine Miller 
Helen Pittman 
Marie Poland 
Marjorie Porritt 
Catharine Pratt 
Marion Sailer 
Catherine Sammis 
Margaret Travis 



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COLLOQUIWn 



OFFICERS 



Henrietta Robinson 
Florence Newell* 



Secretary 



Senior Executives 



Mildred Adams 



MEMBERS 



Mildred Adams 
Mary Baeyertz 
Adele Byrne* 
Margaret Ely* 
Bridget Fitzgerald 
Katherine Hauch 
Frances Helmick 
Lois Hodges 
Harriet Howe 
Constance Jackson 
Alfhild Kalijarvi 
Louise McLaren 
Catherine Miller 



Annetta Smith 



Laura Morgan 

Florence Newell 
Anna O'Connor 
Henrietta Robinson 
Annetta Smith 
Lois Snow 
Jean Spahr 
Katherine Stieglitz 
Margaret Travis 
Charlotte Truitt 
Madelaine Waddell 
Meldon White 
Sadie Wilens 







*Resigned 



DBG 



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Phy/ic/Clvb 



Alva Parkin 
Helen Barry 



Mildred Adams* 
Helen Barry 
Cecily Blackford 
Adele Byrne 
Grace Carver* 
Frances Flint 
Dorothy Graves* 
Helen Gutman 
Alfhild Kalijarvi 
Olive Lyman 



*Resigned 



S 



OFFICERS 



MEMBERS 



President 
Vice-President 



Ruth Lyman 
Alva Parkin 
Helen Pittman 
Catharine Pratt 
Annette Smith 
Jean Spahr* 
Dorothy Stearns 
Margaret Travis 
Ella Waterbury* 
Ha.zel Wentworth 






147 



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NaTUEMATIC/ 





OFFICERS 




Ruth Lyman 




President 


Mildred Adams 




Treasurer 


Cassandana Page 


MEMBERS 


Secretary 


Mildred Adams 




Dorothy Graves 


Helen Barry 




Olive Lyman 


Cecily Blackford 




Ruth Lyman 


Florence Brigham 




Cassandana Page 


Olive Catterall 




Alva Parkin 


Rowena Conn 




Miriam Russell 


Virginia Downs 




Lois Slocum 






148 



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Lois Slocum 



OFFICERS 



: 



President 






MEMBERS 

Helen Anthony 
Florence Brigham 
Helen Butler 
Kathryn Caine 
Helen Kittredge* 
Olive Lyman* 
Dorothy Manwell 
Cassandana Page 
Eleanor Relyea* 
Emilia Sitterly* 
Lois Slocum 






*Resigned 



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□ 



VOX CLU5 



OFFICERS 



Helen Watts 



MEMBERS 

Ella Adelson 
Muriel Berry 
Lynda Billings 
Dorothy Butts 
Anne Coburn 
Hilda Edmester 
Dorothy Graves 
Marion LaMontagne 
Ruth O'Hanlon 
Katharine Matthews 
Lola Needles* 
Dorothy Sawyer 
Louisa Wells 
Helen Watts 



President 



X 






"Resigned 



150 



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CLEF CLOEd 



X 



Florence Chester 



OFFICERS 



President 






MEMBERS 

Lynda Billings 
Florence Chester 
Ruth Dewsbury 
Edna Hunkemeier 
Beatrice James 
Elizabeth Stevens 
Christine Straub 
Edith Tyler 
Dorothy Weed 
Marjorie Winslow 






1 



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151 



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X 







5TUDIO CLUD 



OFFICERS 



Carolyn Reynolds 



MEMBERS 

Ruth Chovey 
Adelaide Clouting 
Helen Croll 
Margaret Goldthwait 
Dorothy Hickman 
Mary Hollingshead* 



President 



Ellen Laird 
Catherine Miller 
Carolyn Reynolds 
Olive Snow 
Lucille Stone 
Wynna Wright 



*Resigned 



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BLUE PENCIL 



X 



Catharine Young 
Ruth O'Hanlon 



OFFICERS 



X 



President 
Secretary and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



a 



Edith Bayles 
Clarinda Buck 
Dorothy Butts 
Carolyn Chapman 
Marion Ellet 
Eleanor Fogg* 
Helen Green 



Helen Josephy 
Edith McEwen 
Elizabeth Rintels 
Denise Rotival 
Mary Short 
Helena Smith 
Katharine Walker 



□ 




*Resigned 



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SPECTATOR 



Nan^Albert 



OFFICERS 



X 



President 



□ 
a 



MEMBERS 

Nan Albert 
Florence Dowden 
Frances Holden 
Mary Holyoke 
Alice Jones 
Caroline Keller 
Helen Kittredge 
Charlotte Lindley 
Marjory Porritt 
Mary Short 
Helena Smith 



□ 



I- 



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CURRENT EVENT/ 



OFFICERS 



Alida Bigelow 



President 



□ 



MEMBERS 

Alida Bigelow 
Elizabeth Boutelle 
Pauline Brelstedt 
Helen Butler 
Elizabeth Clapp 
Jean Donald 
Margaret Goldthuait 
Beatrice James 
Alice Lull 
Rosa Rosenthal 
Elizabeth Young 
Jeannette Young 



□ 



I 



[ 155] 



1EE 



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I 







□ 

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ONLOOKER/ 



X 



Margaret Hinckley 



OFFICERS 



President 



MEMBERS 

Ruth Brooks 
Florence Brown 
Carolyn Chapman 
Anne Clark 
Anne Coburn 
Margaret Hinckley 
Camilla Loyall 
Elinor Palmer 
Eleanor Relyea 
Dorothy Schuyler 
Jean Spahr 
Dorothy Stearns 
Wolcott Stuart 
Edith Tyler 



□ 



a 



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156 



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GRANDDAUGHTER 



X 



Jean Spahr 



OFFICERS 



ident 



□ 



MEMBERS 

Elizabeth Albright 
Alice Anthony 
Lois Barton 
Ruth Brooks 
Dorothy Davis 
Margaret Goldthwait 
Helen A. Greene 
Charlotte Lindley 
Georgiana Palmer 
Marion Shedd 
Mary Short 
Jean Spahr 
Helen Weiser 
Barbara Winchester 
Wynna Wright 






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THE QUADRANGLE TO BE BUILT ON ALLEN FIELD 




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Ruth Dewsbury 
Marjorie Winslow 
Rebecca Cantarow 
Rachel Denison 



Leader 

Assistant Leader 

Accompanist 

Business Manager 



□ 
a 



Margaret Bardwell 
Alida Bigelow 
Esther Brayton 
Ruth Brooks 
Florence Chester 
Mary Elizabeth Dietrich 
Jean Donald 
Margaret Hannum 
Edith Jacobs 
Katrina Jameson 
Carlotta Lane 



Vivion Lenon 
Alice Lull 
Pauline Mead 
Anna O'Connor. 
Catharine Pratt 
Henrietta Robinson 
Dorothy Sawyer 
Gertrude Sehm 
Annetta Smith 
Josephine Smith 
Marjorie Smithwick 
Hazel Sprague 



Sarah Starkweather 
Dorothy Stearns 
Marjorie Tietig 
Edith Tyler 
Mary Walsh 
Louisa Wells 
Dorothy Weed 
Marjorie Winslow 
Carlotta Wolverton 
Elizabeth Young 
Mary Younglove 





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Helen Bloomer 



President 






Alice Abbott 
Helen Barker 
Dorothy Bartlett 
Helen Begley 
Muriel Berry 
Helen Bloomer 
Ariel Carstens 
Elizabeth Jackson 
Charlotte Lindley 



Caroline Newburger 
Muriel Park 
Marion Sailer 
Dorothy Schuyler 
Christine Straub 
Dorothy Thompson 
Lelia Thompson 
Elizabeth Wanzer 
Sadie Wilens 



□ 

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Ruth Boleman 
Elizabeth Butterfield* 
Florence Chester 
Catharine Joralmon 
Mary Kneeland* 



Mary Patterson- 
Mildred Qua 
Genevieve Robison 
Dorothy Weed 
Helen Weiser 



□ 



X 









•"Resigned 






164 



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First Soprano Leaders 
Rachel Denison Edith Jacobs 

Second Soprano Leaders 
Dorothy Graves Annetta Smith 



X 



Pearl Anderson 
Helen Anthony 
Cecile Arpin 
Margaret Bardwell 
Edith Bayles 
Lynda Billings 
May Bossi 
Alison Bowie 
Erna Brand 
Esther Brayton 
Ruth Brooks 
Elsie Bullard 
Dorothy Butts 
Rebecca Cantarow 
Q] Florence Chester 

Ruth Chovey 
Anne Clark 
Louise Clark 
Anne Coburn 
Annabel Cooley 
Margaret Cotton 
Winifred Davies 
Rachel Denison 
Ruth Dewsbury 
Mary Elizabeth Dietrich 
Jean Donald 
Florence Dowden 
Frances Flint 
Florence Gary 



Margaret Goldthvvait 
Dorothy Graves 
Constance Grigg 
Freda Haas 
Margaret Hannum 
Elena Hepburn 
Lois Hodges 
Eunice Hovey 
Edith Howe 
Harriet Howe 
Julia Howell 
Edith Jacobs 
Beatrice James 
Katrina Jameson 
Alice Jones 
Mary Kelly 
Elizabeth Kendall 
Edith Ketcham 
Charlotte Kunzig 
Marion LaMontagne 
Carlotta Lane 
Vivion Lenon 
Louise Leonard 
Mildred McCadden 
Louise McLaren 
Pauline Mead 
Catherine Miller 
Frances Moschcowitz 
Alva Parkin 
Catharine Pratt 



Helen Rawson 
Henrietta Robinson 
Athalie Rowe 
Selma Sampliner 
Roberta Saunders 
Dorothy Sawyer 
Dorothy Schuyler 
Gertrude Sehm 
Adele Siemons 
Emilia Sitterly 
Annetta Smith 
Marion Smith 
Josephine Smith 
Marjorie Smithwick 
Sarah Starkweather 
Dorothy Stearns 
Dorothy Thompson 
Rose Tomasi 
Charlotte Truitt 
Edith Tyler 
Lucia Vennum 
Mary Walsh 
Helen Watts 
Dorothy Weed 
Louisa Wells 
Hazel Wentworth 
Wynna Wright 
Marjorie Winslow 
Elizabeth Young 






i 



165 




Drahatic^: 






X 



®lj? f ear in Sramattrs 



DRAMATICS has in the last few generations of the College 
history played a role of ever increasing importance and 
this year has not been an exception. This is seen not only 
in the regular productions by the Dramatics Association, but 
also in the Work Shop Plays which form a part of the academic 
curriculum, in the Rally Day Show, and in the numerous plays 
given by the various honorary and departmental clubs. 

The Dramatics Association, although but two years old, has 
already established beyond the shadow of a doubt a permanent 
place for itself among the other College organizations; for it has 
already been successful in its financial aspect, in its dramatic 
achievements, and in drawing a college-wide interest both to 
itself and to drama. Barrie's "What Every Woman Knows," 
coached by Jean Spahr, was the first and smaller production 
given by the Association in the fall, in which Helen Butler 
distinguished herself as the hero, John Shand, and Athalie Rowe 
did good work as David. "The Man of Destiny" by Shaw, 
given at the Academy of Music on December ist along with 
Fielding's "Tom Thumb the Great," was said by professionals 
to have been exceedingly well put on and according to the 
Weekly "Rosa Rosenthal, as the Man of Destiny himself, was 










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perhaps the most outstanding personality of 
the evening." Of "Tom Thumb," on the other 
hand, the Weekly missed the point altogether, 
when it said that the play was "well acted, well 
staged, well everything — except well chosen," 
for public opinion generally commended the 
Association in no mild terms for resurrecting the 
old satire from a sleep of nearly two centuries. 
The Boston Evening Transcript wrote that 
"the play scored a tremendous success. In- 
terest in and knowledge of the 'new stage- 
craft' has become widespread at Smith, and 
the production of 'Tom Thumb' was made in 
comical defiance of many of the principles 
and manners of Craig and his disciples. Thus, the throne room 
was a simple, 'discreet' set in purple and gold, well balanced and 
artistic — a set quite suitable for any throne room in any costume 
play treated with modern ideas; whereas Huncamunca's bed- 
chamber was 'draped' with green curtains within the purple 
side frame, making a solemn discord, and the street scenes took 
place before a flagrantly old-fashioned backdrop gaudily painted 
in perspective with much realistic detail and glaringly lighted in 
the worst nineteenth century manner. Not 
the dullest spectator could miss the implied 
contrast, or its comic value, as patent as the 
similar contrasts in the speeches of the play 
itself. Likewise the costumes were ludi- 
crously heterogeneous in an effort to make 
each character wear a characteristic and 
expressive dress. In color, unity was broadly 
preserved, but in cut and material and period 
the wildest variety prevailed; and here again 
many an onlooker caught the comic intent. 
The Queen was out of Hamlet; Lord Grizzle 
was a Tartar, Glumdalca a Valkyr, and Tom 
himself a vermilion imp in a little ballet skirt 





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and a plumed steel cap — in many other items the production 
fell no whit behind the play — nay, modernized it in its own 
spirit and helped the eighteenth century allusions." 

Four of the best Work Shop Plays, written, acted and coached 
by members of Mr. Eliot's courses in Dramatic Construction 
and Production, were presented in January. They were "The 
Outcasts of Poker Flat," a dramatization of Bret Harte's story 
by Dorothy Cerf ; "Gloriana," dramatized by Edith Bayles from 
the story of the same name by Kipling; "Pierre and Jean" 
dramatized from de Maupassant's novel by Katharine Walker; 
and "Rejuvenated" adapted from a short story by Clarinda 
Buck. "Pierre and Jean" was the best of the group. 

Although disappointed in not being able to give Lenore 
Wolfe's play, which was said to be unsuited for parental eyes, 
1921 sustained her dramatic reputation in her contributions to 
the Rally Day Show by means of the Senior Sextets written by 
Carolyn Chapman, and the production of Hilda Stannard's 
"Enter the Hero" in which the quality of the acting in some 
measure compensated for the unhappy choice of play occasioned 
by the press of time. And with the Dramatics Association putting 
on "The Ideal Husband" in March and "A Thousand Years 
Ago" in May we approach Commencement and "False Gods." 






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Awarded on Field Day, May 22, 1920, to 

Anne Clark Alice Jones 

Charlotte Lindley 

Qualifications for the S 

Academic standing equal to that required for a two point office. 

Continued work in the Gymnasium. 

Ability in at least two sports. 

Proper attitude toward sports and college life in general. 

Poise and self-control. 

Neatness of appearance at all times. 

Good posture. 



172 






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Game 
Baseball 

Cricket 

Archery 

Basketball 
Hockey 



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mM Sag 



May 22, 1920 



Points 

f 10 points for first place I 
I 4 points for second place J 

/ 10 points for first place 
| 6 points for second place 

6 points for first place 
5 points for second place 

10 points for first place 
4 points for second place 

10 points for first place 



FINAL WINNERS 
1921 



Si 



Players Winners 

1920-1921 



1921-1922 

1920-1921 

1921-1922 
1920-1921 



1921 o 



1921 

1920 

1921 
1921 







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1021 lM*mter*i of AU-g>mtttj laakrtball 5kam 



Anne Clark, 1920, 1921 
Helen Frazier, 1921 
Louise McLaren, 1920 



Florence Newell, 1920, 1921 
Roberta Saunders, 1920, 1921 
Louisa Wells, 1921 



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SENIOR BASKETBALL TEAM 
Captain, Roberta Saunders 



Forwards 
Anne Clark 
Louisa Wells 
Lenore Wolfe 



Centers 
Jean Donald 
Florence Brown 
Roberta Saunders 



Guards 
Helen Frazier 
Louise McLaren 
Florence Newell 



Forwards 
Marion Bayer 
Florence Dowden 
India Johnson 



SENIOR SUBSTITUTE BASKETBALL TEAM 

Captain, Elizabeth Clapp 

Centers Guards 

Carolyn Chapman Charlotte Lindley 

Elizabeth Clapp Catherine Stickney 

Helen A. Greene Marjorie Winslow 









174] 



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1 



Forzvards 
Anne Clark 
India Johnson 
Louisa Wells 



JUNIOR BASKETBALL TEAM 
Captain, Roberta Saunders 



Centers 
Florence Brown 
Jean Donald 
Roberta Saunders 



Guards 
Helen Frazier 
Louise McLaren 
Florence Newell 



a 



Forzvards 
Anne Clark 
Louisa Wells 
Lenore Wolfe 



SOPHOMORE BASKETBALL TEAM 
Captain, Roberta Saunders 



Centers 
Florence Brown 
Jean Donald 
Roberta Saunders 



Guards 
Eleanor Fitch 
Louise McLaren 
Florence Newell 



□ 

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X 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALL TEAM 
Captain, Elizabeth Clapp 



Forzvards 
Margaret Bardwell 
Marion Bayer 
Lenore Wolfe 



Centers 
Elizabeth Clapp 
Jean Donald 
Margaret Leach 



Guards 
Alida Bigelow 
Louise McLaren 
Jean Spahr 








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1921 iHrmhera of AU-^mttlj Borkn} (Jkam 



Dorothy Burr, 1919 
Carolyn Chapman, 1920 
Elizabeth Clapp, 1920 
Catherine Joralmon, 1920 



Edith Ketcham, 1920 
Charlotte Lindley, 1920 
Alice Lull, 1920 
Jean Spahr, 1919, 1920 



Florence Taylor 
Elizabeth Clapp 



Carolyn Chapman 



Edith Ketcham 



Hazel Winans, 1920 

SENIOR HOCKEY TEAM 
Captain, Carolyn Chapman 

Forzvards 
Helen Weiser 

Half Backs 
Catherine Joralmon 

Full Backs and Goals 
Ruth Brooks 



Hazel Winans 
Marjorie Winslow 



Charlotte Lindley 



Dorothy Burr 



A [176 



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Helen Kittredge 
India Johnson 

Lynda Billings 

Catherine Sammis 



SENIOR SUBSTITUTE HOCKEY TEAM 

Captain, 

Fonvards 
Marjorie Morison Margaret Hannum 



Half Backs 
Jean Spahr 

Full Backs and Goal 
Virginia Speare 



Alice Lull 
Alice Jones 
Helen Pittman 



JUNIOR HOCKEY TEAM 

Captain, Carolyn Chapman 

Forwards 
Marjorie Winslow Helen Weiser Hazel Winans 

Elizabeth Clapp Alice Lull 

Half Backs 
Carolyn Chapman Catherine Joralmon Charlotte Lindley 

Full Backs and Goal 
Edith Ketcham Jean Spahr Alice Jones 

SOPHOMORE HOCKEY TEAM 

Captain, Carolyn Chapman 

Fonvards 
Elizabeth Clapp Hazel Winans 

Alice Lull 

Half Backs 
Carolyn Chapman Charlotte Lindley Alice Jones 

Full Backs and Goal 
Dorothy Burr Jean Spahr Dorothy Cerf 



FRESHMAN HOCKEY TEAM 

Captain, Carolyn Chapman 

Fonvards 
Helen Weiser 



Judith Hanna 
India Johnson 



Judith Hanna 
India Johnson 



Carolyn Chapman 
Dorothy Burr 



Half Backs 
Charlotte Lindley 

Full Backs and Goal 
Edith Ketcham 



Hazel Winans 
Alice Lull 



Mary Buttimer 
Ellen Perkins 



177] 






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1921 ifemfora nf AU-&mttlj laarball Gkam 



May Bossi, 1919 
Mary Buttimer, 1920 



Rosa Rosenthal, 1920 
Mary Holyoke, 1920 



SENIOR BASEBALL TEAM 
Captain, Rosa Rosenthal 

Margaret Bardwell Margaret Gould Rosa Rosenthal 

Mary Buttimer Frances Holden Sarah Starkweather 

Florence Dowden Mary Holyoke Frances Treadway 



Q 



SENIOR SUBSTITUTE BASEBALL TEAM 



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Dorothy Blackmore 
Anne Clark 
Louise Clark 



Jean Donald 
Edith Ketcham 
Louise McLaren 



Marion Magee 
Florence Newell 
Roberta Saunders 



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JUNIOR BASEBALL TEAM 

Captain, Rosa Rosenthal 



Margaret Bardwell Louise Clark 
Mary Buttimer Florence Dowden 

Dorothea Blackmore Mary Holyoke 



Dorothy Knapp 
Rosa Rosenthal 
Sarah Starkweather 



SOPHOMORE BASEBALL TEAM 

Captain, May Bossi 



Margaret Bardwell 
May Bossi 
Mary Buttimer 



Frances Holden 
Mary Holyoke 
Vivion Lenon 



Rosa Rosenthal 
Marjorie Tietig 
Frances Treadway 



FRESHMAN BASEBALL TEAM 

Captain, Barbara Smith 



May Bossi 
Anne Clark 
Eleanor Fitch 



Frances Holden 
Mary Holyoke 
Rosa Rosenthal 



Barbara Smith 
Sarah Starkweather 
Marjorie Tietig 




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1921 Urmhers of AU-^mitli (Brirkrl 3ram 

Margaret Ely, 1919, 1920 Margaret Morison, 1919, 1920 

Frances Flint, 1920 Ella Waterbury, 1920 

Ruth Wood, 1919, 1920 



SENIOR CRICKET TEAM 
Captain, Margaret Morison 



Helen Anthony 
Helen Barker 
Lynda Billings 
Elsie Duberg 



Frances Flint 
Constance Grigg 
Margaret Morison 



Margaret Raymond 
Grace Rowe 
Ella Waterbury 
Ruth Wood 



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181 



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Helen Anthony 
Lynda Billings 
Margaret Ely 
Frances Flint 



JUNIOR CRICKET TEAM 

Captain, Margaret Morison 

Constance Grigg 
Laura Morgan 
Margaret Morison 



Margaret Raymond 
Grace Rowe 
Ella Waterbury 
Ruth Wood 



SOPHOMORE CRICKET TEAM 



Mary Baeyertz 
Lynda Billings 
Margaret Ely 
Frances Flint 



Captain, Margaret Morison 

Constance Grigg 
Marjorie Morison 
Margaret Moulton 



Margaret Raymond 
Emily J. Reed 
Dorothy Sawyer 
Ruth Wood 



FRESHMAN CRICKET TEAM 
Captain, Margaret Morison 



Lynda Billings 
Katherine Brown 
Elise Carrier 
Frances Flint 



Constance Grigg 
Margaret Gould 
Margaret Morison 



Margaret Raymond 
Emily Reed 
Dorothy Sawyer 
Lelia Thompson 







t 






182 



DHG 
















SENIOR TENNIS TEAM 
Louise McLaren Frances Treadway 

SENIOR SUBSTITUTE TENNIS TEAM 

Charlotte Lindley Florence Newell 



SENIOR ARCHERY TEAM 
Captain, Helen Peirce 

Helen Peirce 
Charlotte Truitt 



Dorothy Graves 



Lois Slocum 



SENIOR SUBSTITUTE ARCHERY TEAM 

Louise Leonard Nevart Matossian Ruth Wood 

Emilia Sitterly 



183 



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I 




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□ 



SENIOR CREW 

Captain, Margaret Goldthwait 



Ruth Brooks (cox) Catherine Miller 

Margaret Goldthwait 



Frances Treadway 
Mary Younglove 



SENIOR SECOND CREW 

Frances Moschcowitz Ruth Dewsbury Alice Jones 

(cox) Edith Betts Catharine Joralmon 

SENIOR THIRD CREW 

Eleanor Relyea (cox) Dorothea Blackmore Ruth Wood 
Eleanor Nagle Alexandrine Parker 




184 



DEC 



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(gymnasium Exhibition 

1921 CAPTAIN 
Catharine Joralmon 



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WINNERS 



Flag 
Class Work 
1918— Class of 1918 
1919— Class of 1919 
1920— Class of 1920 
1921— Class of 1921 



Cup 
Class and Individual Work 
1918— Class of 1918 
1919— Class of 1921 
1920— Class of 1923 
1921— Class of 1921 






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II. 



III. 



Mmt lag 

May, 1920 

EVENTS 
Straight-away Rowing for Form 
Senior III and Junior III 
Senior II and Junior II 
Senior I and Junior I 

Rowing with Turn for Form 
Senior III and Junior III 
Senior II and Junior II 
Senior I and Junior I 

Speed Rowing 

Senior III and Junior III 
Senior II and Junior II 
Senior I and Junior I 



Totals 



FINAL WINNER 

1920 



186 



67.75 



□ 



X 



Senior 


Junior 


6.5 


6 


7.9 


8 


9.1 


8.6 


7.5 


7 


8.5 


8.5 


8.75 


9 




10 


10 




10 





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57.1 



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Introduction 

History, Liberty and Justice 

Ancient Period 

Noah's Ark 

Saul Listening to the Songs of 

David 
Abraham Starting for the 

Promised Land 
Cleopatra on the Nile 
Socrates Drinking the Cup 

of Hemlock 
Nero and the Gladiators 
Buddhism in the East 

Mediaeval Period 

Wedding of Venice to the Sea 
Alfred and the Cakes 
A Crusader 



Joan of Arc 
Columbus 

Pocahontas and Captain John 

Smith 
Captain Kidd 

Queen Elizabeth and Shakes- 
peare 

Modern Period 

French Revolutionists 
Napoleon 

Marquette and Joliet 
Washington Crossing the 

Delaware 
Betsy Ross 

Lee Surrendering to Grant 
Peary Discovering the North 

Pole 
A Tank 



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rRETH MAHTEAR 



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OFFICERS 

President, Margaret Goldthwait 
Vice-President, Dorothy Burr 
Secretary, Markell Conley 
Treasurer, Helen Kittredge ' 
Historian, Jean Spahr 
Sojig Leader, Jean Donald 
Assistant Leader, Anne Clark 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 

Ring and Pin, Dorothy Burr Motto, Dorothy Stearns 

Song, Jean Donald 

RALLY DAY 

Decoration, Eleanor Armstrong Animal, Jean Spahr 

Ribbons, Rosa Rosenthal 






BIG GAME 

Decorations, Dorothy Schuyler 
Mascot, Katharine Walker 



Class Color, Yellow Class Animal, Leviathan 

[1901 







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(ttlaas ijtatflrjj — iFrpfiljmatt f ear 



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T was indeed an eventful year for the 
College when the Class of 1921 
appeared upon the scene as Fresh- 
men. Not only did we number over six 
hundred and fifty — the largest class — but, 
if we are to believe all that we were told 
those first few days, we were also the most 
serious minded class, — a real war class. 
Our greatest contribution to the Col- 
lege was in the person of our leading 
spirit, President Neilson. On President Seelye's birthday (our first day at 
chapel), the new president was presented to us and 1921, though still new 
and strange, realized with peculiar pride and foresight that he was going to 
be our "Bonnie Scotch Laddie" and we liked him from the start. Those 
first few days were full of hurried calls from upper classmen asking for chapel 
dates, giving advice, and telling us that we were "just going to love it." A 
few of us doubted it at first as we sat in our uncurtained rooms, without 
even our trunks, surrounded by that mass of girls who expected us to do the 
impossible (remember their names). But we felt better about our great 
ignorance of people and of the college when we found that President Neilson 
also felt new and strange; so new, he said, that he too must listen, those Thurs- 
day afternoons at four, to what the faculty had to tell us of the customs and 
regulations. The whole class was in the same boat. 
Saturday came our first class meeting led by 
Alison Cook. It seemed impossible that we would 
ever get to know each other, but we did learn a little 
about the class and then we went up to the field and 
saw how Smith did things. Our biggest surprise, how- 
ever, was Freshman Frolic, where we were pushed and 
pulled about signing our names and meeting people 
seen neither before nor since. "Dear Miss Adviser" 
quite enchanted us as a song — only of course we never 
did such stupid things. 

And soon we were a part of the College. We made 
up the better part of the Junior-Freshman sings in 
numbers if not in singing; we played on the field; we 
expanded intellectually, and then we entertained the College at song trials in 
the usual Freshman manner. 

W ith December we were electing our class president. We deliberated 
long, consulting school records and listening to most interesting discourses on 
character brought out by the personal anecdote. Then after hours of voting 




191 



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we selected Margaret Goldthwait and serenaded her at Haven House. Just 
in the knick of time it was too, for that evening came Sophomore Reception, 
where after walking miles through lockers and showers, we shook hands 
with her and the Dean and 1920's two class presidents. Having thus estab- 
lished ourselves as a class we proceeded to show our spirit and gave up our 
class rings for the Red Cross. 

We then went home to tell our families all about college and show them 
that, though of course we were older and knew a lot more, still we did not 
mind seeing them for a while. Yes, it did seem all too soon that we had to 
return with midyears to cloud the future. Even then we almost didn't arrive 
for, thanks to the coal shortage and the blizzard, the trains ran only spas- 
modically. 

But all things must end and so did our trip and we rejoiced in the snow, 
which meant real tobogganing, and in the zero weather, which meant weeks 
of wonderful skating. We rejoiced even though the coal gave out and we as 
Freshmen had to arise and shut the windows in the chill 5:30 A. M. breezes. 
Were we not a war class? We were smiling through wheatless and meatless 
days — even heatless ones could not phase us. 

Gym stopped and so did basketball, so we had no preliminary game 
with 1920, but met them for the first time on the field of battle. Then our 
leviathan dropped down cheerily from the wall but our ball did not seem 
to drop into our basket so readily. That takes practice you know, and did we 
not show them that when 1921 had an equal chance she could lead? At 
Gym Drill the cup was ours for marching. 

Marching did not end, however, with Gym Drill. On April 19th in 
blue coats and yellow ribbons we formed the largest part of the College sec- 
tion in the Liberty Loan Parade. And of course we out-marched them all. 
In May, sports began and we understood why Spring term is the term 
of the year. We batted and step-sang, quite taking the College by storm in 
that quarter. Then, what with Float Day where we 
were most enthusiastic spectators and Field Day where 
we actually took part, we found ourselves at finals. 
And the next thing we knew we were "safe now in 
the Sophomore Class." 

Then of course we had to inaugurate President 
Neilson and perform for his benefit in Carmen Saecu- 
lare. We wanted to manifest our age and discretion 
by helping the Seniors graduate, but not being urged to 
remain, we departed to return to our position of honor 
as Sophomores next fall. 

Jean Gurney Spahr 



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yGfflofloRE YE AR 







OFFICERS 
President, Frances Tener 
Vice-President, Alice Jones 
Secretary, Jean Spahr 
Treasurer, Carolyn Chapman 
Historian, Mary Short 
Song Leader, Jean Donald 
Assistant Leader, May Bossi 
Treasurer of Mar Board, 

Anne Clark 



□ 



Frances Tener 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 

SOPHOMORE ICE CARNIVAL 

General Chairman, Alice Lull 
Invitation, Dorothy Stearns Decoration, Pauline Phelps 
Music, Alida Bigelow Refreshment, Elizabeth Boutelle 

Costume, Lynda Billings 



X 






1919 COMMENCEMENT 

Class Supper, Charlotte Lindley 
Push, Helen Green 







194 



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(Class Ijifiinrn — g>npljnmnre f?ar 

IT was hard for you to realize you were a Sophomore. To be sure you 
had stayed for the last sing Freshman year, and had carolled gleefully, 
"Safe now in the Sophomore Class"; but after all 1918 was still there 
then and it seemed as if they would always be the Seniors and you would 
always be the Freshmen. But when September came and your little friends 
of the Class of 1922 began to inquire timidly what were the right clothes to 
get and if Chemistry was easier than Physics you drew a long breath and 
saw to it that 1922 was impressed with your Sophomoreness and knowledge 
of things in general. Chaperoning '22 on the train for Hamp helped till '20 
came along and laughed at the idea of you having Freshmen under your 
wing. You hoped '22 hadn't noticed the snub and you pointed out Mt. 
Tom and Alt. Holyoke hastily. 

At the station you knew now what S. C. A. C. W. stood for and how to 
be the first to get a taxi. And as you whirled up Alain Street you realized 
that '21 was here to back up '19 in every way, to keep '22 to the straight and 
narrow path and to help her classmate President Nei!son through his second 
year. You began by escorting '22 to the Christian Association Tea where 
you tried to introduce her to people whose names you had forgotten, con- 
suming lemonade all the while and picking out Freshmen to take to the 
Frolic that wouldn't Frolic for a while. Then you forgot all about '22 in your 
rush to get a Bible class to the tune of "I want what I want when I want it" 
regardless of where your name came in the alphabet. 

But then you heard rumors. You must not forget the rumors, best 
beloved, for thick was the crop in Hamp that fall! Some people were sick; 

there wouldn't be any A. A. Tea; then you went to 
chapel and what to your wondering ears should be 
heard but no Frolic, no visiting at other houses and 
all on account of the Flu. Then Wednesday morn- 
ing another amazing announcement: recitations 
stopped. Play palled after two or three days and 
then you decided that you wanted to be a nurses' 
aid. What was the good of your taking that course 
in Home Nursing last year if you couldn't show your 
wonderful skill in the art of making a bed with a 
patient in it? 

But then the fiat was issued: 1921, because of 
her tender age could not nurse. You were disap- 
pointed but not crushed. To quote the Seniors: 

"You were not forlorn so 
You tried raising corn." 

Moreover, the farmers were pleased, and while you couldn't farm for the 
Fund (for it was way back in the days when there wasn't any Fund), still 
you could give the money for the Red Cross. 

Classes began again in two weeks and you learned to believe in signs, for 
Seelye Hall was plastered with them. You had to keep to the right and keep 
moving. The note room was absolutely closed, and what is Seelye Hall 
without a note room? In some houses you had to wear gas masks and there 




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was a daily health drill on Campus where you informed the house matron 
that you were feeling fairly normal. At length, however, you could do every- 
thing but go downstreet or leave town, two things you burned to do; but 
firmly resolving to keep your minds fixed on College affairs, you hospitably 
escorted '22 to the belated Frolic and made another resolve that Sophomore 
Reception would be less crowded. 

Then came some extremely interesting rumors. The war was over and 
you could go down street to celebrate. No, but honestly, the Dean had called 
out of the window that quarantine would be off tomorrow and to pass the 
word along! You were studying Sociology and you rejoiced at the oppor- 
tunity to study the emotions of the mob at first hand. But next week, as an 
excited Freshman telegraphed her father, "War and quarantine are both 
really off" and the College, as President Neilson put it, resembled a circus. 

\ou were taking Zoo and you had an annoying way of insisting that 
people smell your hands and you made the luncheon table hideous with 
your accounts of "pussy cats and traveling rats that would never more be 
seen," and then as your hearers waxed credulous, you told of dear little puppy 
dogs sacrificed in the interests of science. The geologists were quite put in 
the shade and could only respond by repeating Mr. Miller's jokes. 

Feeling bound to give '22 a good time in a freer atmosphere than the 
crowded gym, you rejoiced exceedingly when Helen Green suggested that 
there was surely room for all on Paradise, and at once started work on plans 
for the first Ice Carnival. 

During the Xmas vacation you had a pleasant surprise, for on account 
of the Flu your furlough was extended five days. Then back you came ready 
for the carnival, but to quote the Campus Cat again, "Whoever thought the 
ice so rough, would early grow warmhearted." For a time it seemed as if 
we might have to have the carnival without ice. But the kind Providence 
that watches over the affairs of 1921, froze the pond in some miraculous way 
so that it bore the weight of all the Freshmen and Sophomores without any 
difficulty. The Juniors made spiteful remarks from the bank but that didn't 
hinder the merriment any. 



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Then dark days came and you shut yourself up with a Bible cram, deter- 
mined to keep separate the personalities of Zechariah and Zephaniah. Some 
of you skated until the last moment and, fortunately, not in every case did 
"sin bring punishment." 

After Midyears the only bright spot on the horizon was Rally Day where 
you got valiantly behind "the wearers of the green" at the basketball game. 
It was '21's first appearance in the dramatic world that night at the show, 
and how you applauded your class's acting. 

Along in March came the debate. You rudely informed Mt. Holyoke 
that "there was only one college for you," but then you had just beaten the 
Freshmen in basketball so you had rather a swelled head anyway. 

You had always known that songs somehow just seemed to sing them- 
selves when Jean was leading you, but it was not until Spring Term that you 
fully realized what a lucky class you were. It was then you announced that 
you were "going to keep on singin' till you died" and judging from the Seniors' 
encores they seemed willing to have you keep it up for quite a while. You 
felt rather queer when 1919 asked you to come and play with her while she 
was "still here," — you didn't like to think of a time when she wouldn't be 
there "sucking lollypops." 

You were going to do your little best for '19 at Prom though it was hard, 
because about a Prom you were as green as the Freshmen. You got direc- 
tions, however, and the only thing the Seniors forgot to explain was how to 
carry an umbrella and two plates of ice cream at one and the same time. It 
wouldn't matter if you got wet, but that ice cream must arrive as dry as it 
was cold. You were warned to be tactful, too, and not to say "Hello, Jane, 
why, where is Fred? I thought you had invited him?" or "Dear me, Alice, 
did you get a man after all? I thought you had given up trying!" 

Next came the melancholy days when you were obliged to prove "dey is 
ways of passin' co'ses" if you wanted to sing "Safe Now in the Junior Class" 
with a clear conscience. And it did seem as if you had troubles enough with- 
out that awful heat. 

It was over at last, however, and you were pushing for 1919 and planning 
about the walk home from Class Supper. 

So let us leave you at the most thrilling moment of your Sophomore year, 
when you are resting your weary bones outside the gym, listening to the roll 
call inside and waiting for Her to get through Her class supper. 

Mary Short 










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JunioR Year 




a 




Junta f rar 

OFFICERS 

President, Anne Clark 

Vice-President, Alice Lull 

Secretary, Mary Holyoke 

Treasurer, Margaret Hannum 

Historian, Katharine Walker 

Song Leader, Jean Donald 

Assistant Leader, Frances Moschcowitz 






Anne Clark 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 

RALLY DAY 

Decoration, Margaret Gould Ribbon, Marion Shedd 

Stunt, Beatrice James 



□ 
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JUNIOR FROLIC 

General Chairman, Rosa Rosenthal 
Elizabeth Boutelle 
Eleanor Nagle 
Lynda Billings 
Helen Butler 



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(HlaBB ijiatnnj — Junior f ear 

HUMMING 1919's farewell advice, 1921 packed her trunk hoping she 
"wouldn't be too superior when she came back next Fall." The 
excitement ran high over the sister class that we had been promised 
"bye and bye". We tried to give them valuable advice on all subjects, 
impress them with a due sense of our dignity, and occasionally unbend to 
play with them. We were more impressed with our advisees, however, than 
they could possibly have been with us. In fact, some of us were so overcome 
with the responsibility thrust on our young shoulders, that the Freshmen 
thought us tongue-tied and tried their best to help us "mix" and give us a 
good time. However, at Freshman Frolic we found our tongues if not our 
alphabetically divided friends, and our volubility increased in direct propor- 
tion to the number of unknown faces. Never had we wished so hard that 
we had taken a memory course. We would sight a familiar face but by the 
time we had piloted our advisee to that part of the gym, we found that the 
girl's name had left no traces on our ne irones. One-sided introductions 
became our specialty (for we could still read the advisee's name pinned on 
her!) "Yes, I want you to meet my advisee, Susie Smith" you would mur- 
mur, and then make heroic efforts at conversation to cover up your failure 
to mention whom Susie was meeting, until the name was scrawled upon her 
card. The greatest shock to our pride came with the discovery that there 
were some who recognized us without being able to tag us. In that case 
you both gravely introduced the Freshmen. After all, it was most important 
for them to meet their own class, you reflected sagely. 

After starting '23 safely along the straight and narrow path, '21 turned 
her attention to helping '20 run the College. The one organization that we 
ran ourselves had a brand new extra Field Day in the Fall, so 1921 could exhibit 
her prowess to this younger sister. And 1923 was properly impressed, for in 
spite of the defeat in basketball, '21 won the day. And then when the sports 

on the Field were ended, we de- 
voted our energies to helping '20 
start a new DramaticAssociation. 
The night of the production at 
the Academy we decided that 
footlights had a lure in spite of 
grease-paint and grime. 

Since the Alumnae thought that 
we were worth #4,000,000 we de- 
cided to boost ourselves, and while 
the Sophomores shined shoes, we 
helped "Molly - Make - Believe" 










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and tried to remember that we should use our Junior brains. A great deal 
of the energy was devoted to speculating on what Anne could find to say to 
all the famous people on her frequent trips to the fund headquarters; yet 
under her guidance, 1921 went over the top with the largest subscription 
per capita of any of the classes. 

When Midyears were passed (and we had the College in good working 
order) we sought to cheer our declining years with a Frolic. The gloomy 
setting, lit by lurid rays suggestive of forest fires or Bolshevik tendencies, 
made a splendid background for the "striking scenes". Everyone from the 
"striking shopkeepers" to the faculty on a "walkout" felt that the one draw- 
back was the fact that this was our only party as a class. 

Rally Day we distinguished ourselves as usual. The Seniors formed 
merely a purple and white background for "our" ode. Even Mr. Vanderlip 
had the good taste to quote from it. During the game, however, '20 was far 
from remaining an effective setting for our deeds of valor. The score told a 
different tale. But our naturally cheerful nature clung to the fact that it 
was a good game and we failed to emphasize the score on the minds of the 
visitors. 1921's part of the '20-'21-'22 show that evening showed our growing 
appreciation of the problems of life (of the show at any rate) although the 
solution of the servant question in "Where But In America" might not be 
considered the last word in economics. 

Spring Term was rather bewildering. Not only were we thrust into 
"the seats of the mighty" to carry on '20's work under her watchful eye, but 
we were expected to exhibit social tendencies at the same time. Yet we 
found that it was no strain to be sociable at the "Mikado" and, in spite of 
our inward qualms, we had a Prom that was almost sunshiny! 

Some of the bloom wore off the blissful season of sings when Jean insti- 
tuted the custom of 7:45 practises and attendance slips, but we became so 
accustomed to practising on the Steps that we sang "Quit 'cha hangin' on to 
those steps" without a blush. 

Meanwhile exams were progressing "logically" 
to the Senior pins, which finally were actually ours. 
But it was not until we took the Steps in June 
that a sudden rush of feeling told us that we were 
Seniors, and we were conscious of a pang of regret 
as we sang, 

"Days have passed; golden days 
Ever brimming with joy." 

Katharine Walker 




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202 



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7 B L,C 



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□ 



The Strikers 

Mailmen . 

Grinds 

Fund Workers 

Shopkeepers 

Matrons . 

Faculty 

Dramatic People 

Fussers 

Parents 



Dickinson, Hubbard, Washburn 
West Street, Arnold, Ahwaga 
Lawrence, Tyler, Green Street 
Left Side of Belmont Avenue 
Albright, Baldwin, Bedford 
Right Side of Belmont Avenue 
Clark, Dewey, Hatfield, Wallace 
Gillett, Northrop, Elm Street 
Chapin, Haven, Henshaw Avenue 






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(ttnmmttto fnr Junior Jlronmtato 

Jean Donald ..... General Chairman 

Alida Bigelow ...... Head Usher 

FLOOR COMMITTEE 

Chairman, Carlotta Wolverton 

5 Roberta Saunders Nan Albert H 

5 a 

Catharine Joralmon 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE 
Chairman, Pauline Phelps 
Marion Bayer Carolyn Chapman 

Hazel Winans 

MUSIC COMMITTEE 
Chairman, Edith Tyler 
Helen Bloomer Jean Willis 

Dorothy Dobner 

INVITATION COMMITTEE 

Chairman, Caroline Keller 

Anne Coburn Alice Jones 

a □ 

□ YVolcott Stuart 

a □ 

REFRESHMENT COMMITTEE 
Chairman, Frances Tener 

THEATRE 
Katharine Walker 



[204] 



iluninr Ha^rH 



a 

□ 



X 






Alice Abbott 
Mildred Adams 
Nan Albert 
Helen Anthony 
Mary Baeyertz 
Marguerite Baker 
Margaret Bardwell 
Dorothy Bartlett 
Marion Bayer 
Edith Bayles 
Alida Bigelow 
Lynda Billings 
Dorothea Blackmore 
Helen Bloomer 
Sybil Boland 
Ruth Boleman 
May Bossi 
Elizabeth Boutelle 
Alison Bowie 
Ruth Brooks 
Florence Brown 
Katharine Brown- 
Harriet Burgess 
Helen Butler 
Mary Butti.mer 
Dorothy Butts 
Kathryn Caine 
Rebecca Cantarow 
Grace Carver 
Dorothy Cerf 
Mary Chamberlin 
Carolyn Chapman- 
Florence Chester 
Elizabeth Clapp 
Anne Clark 
Clara Clark 
Cornelia Clark 
Zelda Clevenger 
Margaret Cobb 
Anne Coburn 
Annabel Cooley 
Margaret Cotton- 
Helen- Croll 
Winifred Dayies 
Rachel Denison 
Ruth Dewsbury- 
Mary Dickinson 
Mary Elizabeth Dietrich 
Dorothy Dobner 
Jean Donald 
Florence Dowden 
Elsie Duberg 
Marion Ellet 
Marguerite Ely 
Ellen Everett 
Mary Fishburne 
Frances Flint 
Helen Frazier 
Sophie Gerson 
Margaret Gould 
Dorothy Graves 



Margaret Goldthwait 
Dorothy Goodenough 
Helen Green 
Helen A. Greene 

( lONSTANCE GRIGG 
Helen Gutman 
Margaket Haas 
Judith Hanna 
Margaret Hannum 
Elizabeth Hasting 
Barbara Hines 
Frances Holden 
Mahy Holyoke 
Helen Hough 
Harriet Howe 
Julia Howell 
Constance Jackson- 
Elizabeth Jackson 
Edith Jacobs 
Beatrice James 
India Johnson- 
Alice Jones 
Catharine Joralmon 
Helen Joseph y 
Olive Keegan 
Caroline Keller 
Catharine Kempl 
Edith Ketcham 
Mildred Kidder 
Helen Kittredge 
Sallie Kline 
Mary Kneeland 
Charlotte Kunzig 
Ellen Laird 
Carlota Lane 
Margaret Leach 
Barbara Lee 
Yivion Lenon 
Charlotte Lindley 
Doris Lovell 
Eleanor Loth 
Florence Lowe 
Camilla Loyall 
Dohothy Lyon 
Edith McEwen 
Esther Marsh 
Katharine Mathews 

Xl.VART MaTOSSIAN 

Pauline Mead 
Catherine Miller 
Margaret Morison 
Frances Moschcowitz 
Marjorie Moulton 
Eleanor Nagle 
Lola Needles 
Florence Newell 
Ruth O'Hanlon 
Ruth Osteyee 
Muriel Park 
Alva Parkin 
Ellen Perkins 



i 



Pauline Phelps 
Helen Pittman 
Marjory Porritt 
Catharine Pratt 
Helen Rawson 
Margaret Raymond 
Emily Reed 
Eleanor Relyea 
Carolyn Reynolds 
Elisabeth Rintels 
Esther Ropes 
Rosa Rosenthal 
Catherine Sammis 
Roberta Saunders 
Dorothy Sawyer 
Dorothy Schuyler 
Mary Sears 
Gertrude Sehm 
Marion Shedd 
Mary Short 
Adele Siemons 
Priscilla Silver 
Emelia Sitterley- 
Annetta Smith 
Barbara Smith 
Helena Smith 
Marjorie Smithwick 
Harriet Snyder 
Sarah Starkweather 
Dorothy Stearns 
Catherine Stickney' 
Christine Straub 
Wolcott Stuart 
Frances Teneh 
Dorothy Thompson 
Lelia Thompson 
Marjorie Tietig 
Rose Tomasi 
Margaret Travis 
Frances Treadway 
Charlotte Truitt 
Edith Tyler 
Madelaine Waddell 
Katharine Walker 
Mary Walsh 
Elizabeth Wanzer 
Helen Watts 
Dorothy Weed 
Helen Weiser 
Louisa Wells 
Jean Willis 
Hazel Winans 
Marjorie Win-slow 
Florence Wolfe 
Ruth Wood 
Wynna Wright 
Cora Wyman 
Catharine Young 
Elizabeth Young 
Jeanette Young 
Mary Younglove 



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13 

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205 







/"EHIOR YEAR 








^entnr S?ar 



OFFICERS 

President, Alice Jones 

Vice-President, Elinor Palmer 

Secretary, Ruth Wood 

Treasurer, Charlotte Lindley 

Historian, Ruth O'Hanlon 

Song Leader, Jean Donald 

Assistant Leader, Margaret Bardwell 






Alice Jones 



X 



CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 

SENIOR PINS 

Chairman, Carlotta Wolverton 

Lois Dissette Sybil Boland 

Helen Bloomer 






Elsie Day 
Ethel Hart 



CAPS AND GOWNS 

Chairman, Helen Frazier 

Dorothy Graves 
Margaret Gould 



SENIOR BASKETBALL GAME 

Chairman of Decorations, Mary Chamberlain 
Ruth Thompson Helen Barker 







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(Eammittoa fnr (Eamm?nr?m?nt iExmiaca 



□ 



□ 



ORDER OF MARCHING 

Chairman, Carolyn Chapman 
PRINTING 

Chairman, Roberta Saunders 
Marion Booth Marion Shedd 

Catharine Chadbourn Dorothy Stearns 

Hazel Winans 

IVY SONG 

Chairman, Helen Josephy 
Florence Chester Edna Hunkemeier 

Marion Ellet Ruth O'Hanlon 

Elizabeth Rintels 

IVY DAY EXERCISES 

Chairman, Florence Wolfe 
Rachel Denison Marjorie Winslow 

Mary. Short Ruth Wood 

Catherine Young 

COMMENCEMENT ORATOR 

Chairman, Frances Holden 
Helen Gutman Anne Coburn 

CLASS SUPPER 

Chairman, Helen Green 
Katharine Brown Mary Holyoke 

Madelaine Gile Dorothy Sawyer 

Dorothy Spalding 



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209 



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X 






(EammtttwH fnr Senior iramatirs 



Jean Spahr 
Mary Chamberlain 
Helen Kittredce 
Caroline Keller 
Eleanor Nagle 



General Manager 

Assistant to the Manager 

Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 

Stage Manager 



SCENERY 
Chairman, Lynda Billings 
Lucille Stone Hazel Winans 

Catharine Young Ruth Wood 

COSTUME 

Chairman, Catherine Miller 
Ruth Chovey Carolyn Reynolds 

Helen Croll Marion Frances Smith 

Dorothy Davis Lenore Wolfe 

STAGE MANAGER'S ASSISTANTS 
Margaret Haas Eleanor Relyea 

MUSIC 
Chairman, Edith Tyler 



Ruth Boleman 
Florence Chester 
Beatrice James 



Edna Hunkemeier 
Elizabeth Stevens 
Marjorie Winslow 



PRELIMINARY CHAIRMAN 
Katharine Walker 



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The High Priest 








Gertrude Sehm 


Rheou 








Helen Watts 


Satni 








Louisa Wells 


Pakh 








Frances Flint 


Sokiti 








Marjorie Morison 


Bitiou, the dwarf 








. Wynna Wright 


Nourm 








Anne O'Connor 


The Steward 








Louise McLaren 


The Exorcist 








Georgiana Palmer 


Officer 








Margaret Goldthwait 


Mieris 








Helen Butler 


Yaouma 








Ruth O'Hanlon 


Kirjipa . 








Virginia Markel 


Zaya 








Florence Dowden 


Delethi 








Mary Elizabeth Dietrich 


Nagaou . 








Henrietta Robinson 


Hanon 








Anne Collyer 


Nahasi . 








Nevart Matossian 


Sitsinit . 








Janet Thornton 


Mouene . 








; Hazel Sprague 


Nazit 








Constance Jackson 


Mourner 








Margaret Cobb 



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IT was startling — that return in September as Seniors. We lacked much 
of the s avoir jaire which was to become ours later. We were still the 

same persons that we were when we had our final lacrymal Step-Sing 
and had watched '20 depart. For a brief space of time we thought we zvere 
the same, and then in a few weeks, through no effort of our own (we insist) 
we were made to realize that we were different. We had grown up, and we 
had done it as suddenly and as violently as Alice when she ate the cake 
marked "Eat me" in currants. Poor Alice, — how sincerely we can sympa- 
thize with her! Really we weren't grown up inside enough to be Seniors, and ^ 
when people were so inconsiderate as to point us out as such we felt as hope- 
lessly awkward and helpless as Alice when she said "Goodby" to her feet. 
When we found that we had really grown up we decided it wasn't so bad after 
all. The eternal ego! On the whole those little acts of attention, submis- 
sion, service, and (if we dare to say it) admiration, — flattered us. And so 
we turned for a while from the flapper-like characteristics of previous years 
to a state which might be called "The Earnestness of Being Important." Not 
only the underclassmen but even the United States Government honored our 
coming of age. They permitted us to vote. If we could not have wars or 
quarantines to make us feel a part of the world without, at least we could 
have the vote. 

The fall term in comparison with those three preceding years, was curi- 
ously quiet. In place of battles and plagues and armistices which had been 
contemporary with our autumnal manoeuvres before, there was nothing but a 
slight skirmish on the Connecticut. There were several ultimata and hostile 
relations ensued until January when the higher powers announced that all 
was well again. 

We had many relapses into our lost youth. It was rather fun to be 
dignified for a while but the novelty soon woreoff, so many of us bobbed our heads 
and wore demure round-necked blouses with astonishingly short skirts. In 
fact, this particular form of second childhood was taking such a violent form 
S that it became necessary for the Sophomores to bring us back to the narrow rn 

path by means of the dress reform. Of course, the mournful rites of "last 
times" began early. The last Christmas Vespers, the last Rally Day and 
even the last Midyears had that dismal finality about them which, to the 
more sentimental of us, brought melancholy sighs and sad shakings of the 
head. This naturally morbid tendency in human nature was unfortunately- 
given a more tangible cause on the 22d of February when defeat by two 
points increased our grief. 

Again we showed our juvenile tendencies. When someone suggested 
that the discreet black dignity of caps and gowns should be ours for more 
than thatonegreat day in June weviolently attacked the idea and overcame the 



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[213 



a 



more classically-inclined members of the class. Even the weather softened 
as the time of our departure approached. It had welcomed us Freshman 
Year as a lion, but it was dismissing us as a lamb. The new crew-house was 
very nice, but we wanted to skate! We were doomed to tepidity, to occa- 
sional days of uncertain ice which soon disappeared, and to slush! We even 
became more temperate in that popular and delightful pastime of eating 
between meals. It seemed that the Czecho-Slovakians needed more fudge 
cake and chocolate sauce. We were very glad to comply with Mr. Hoover's 
request and tried to appear English as we sipped tea and smiled over pieces 
of uninteresting and jam-less toast. 



214] 



□ 



o 



r-j-i yjl uin 11 ici ^s liii£, aiici j aiii-i^ss Luaoi. — 

And so Spring came. We discarded galoshes and acquired gingham 
dresses, colds and rubbers. We were far too busy to be bothered with a 
Senior Prom, so we let the Juniors have their fling alone. Step-Sings came 
and we felt more and more that we didn't want to "Quit 'cha hangin' onto 
th' steps." We had a curious "outside" feeling when we saw underclassmen 
signing up for various things in the note-room — periodical try-outs, and 
student-advisers. Some of us about this time began mad searches for 
Juniors to pin and for rooms for trusting parents. 

And then came June with a suddenness that overwhelmed us and a 
finality which made us at the same time sad, excited, eager, desperate and 
gay. We were really too busy to think. There was the fine frenzy and fetid 
fervor of Senior Dramatics. Strange persons appeared (resembling Cleo- 
patra's grandfather or Rameses II) with paint-bedaubed faces and curious 
costumes. One found oneself looking fearfully for alligators! There were 
parents to be managed, spotless white to press and keep white for Ivy Day, 
endless rehearsals and frantic farewells. 

At last Commencement came and we held in our hands the object of our 
four years' striving, — the pinnacle of our hopes and fears, our goal! But as 
we took our places in John M. Greene, really belonging there for the last time, 
our minds were not on such high and noble thoughts. We were looking 
anxiously out of the corners of our eyes for our parents' approving glances, 
wondering whether these queer flat things on our heads were as unbecoming E 

as they felt and could we actually be sufficiently grown up to have that 
impressive-looking A. B. after our names! 

Ruth O'Hanlon 



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ACCALAVREATE 



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SUNDAY, JUNE TWELFTH 

Baccalaureate Exercises in Assembly Hall, II A. M. 
Address by President Neilson 

Organ Vespers in John At. Greene Hall, 8 P. M. 
Organist, Wilson Townsend Moog 



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Ivy Dav 



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MONDAY, JUNE THIRTEENTH 






Ivy Exercises on the Campus 






10 A. M 


Ivy Exercises in John M. Greene Hall 






11 A. M 


Society Reunions .... 






2 P. M 


Closing Concert .... 






3 P. M 


Art Exhibition .... 






4-6 P. M 


College Sing ..... 






7 P. M 


President's Reception in the Library 






8-10 P. M 



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Jug ^ong 



Green beauty, grow for other Junes, 

And bring your emerald coolness there — 

To cool the heat of hazy noons 

And summer stillness of the air. 

Grow, delicate design of leaves, 

Spread clinging fingers to the stone; 

Fair, fragrant tracery that weaves 
A verdant pattern of its own. 

May your adventurous tendrils twine 

Green-gleaming upward toward the sun, 

Adding an intricate design 

Each spring to that most lovely one. 

Grow, ivy, over stone and wall, 

And so may our poor hearts aspire 
To cling more firmly, grow more tall 

Sun-ward, toward our most high desire. 

Ruth O'Hanlon 



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[217; 






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1BG 




COnnENCEHENT 



TUESDAY, JUNE FOURTEENTH 



John>l. Greene Hall 



10:30 A. M. 



Address by Roscoe Pound 



Alumnae Meeting .... 
Class Supper in Alumnae Gymnasium 



4:00-6:00 P. M. 
. 7:00 P.M. 



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CLASS SUPPER 



Toastmistress — Anne Elizabeth Clark 

"Ah, I was right. It was in truth torture that awaited me here." False Gods, Act 4. 

The Faculty — Beatrice Linder James 
History of the Middle Ages. 

"She no longer answered you, she questioned you no more." Act 2. 

The Past — Rosa Rosenthal 
Child Psychology. 

"He was then a young man pious and wise. On his travels he has lost some piety and gained 
some wisdom." Act. 4. 



1=1 






The Present — Ellen Douglas Everett 
Modern Drama. 

"I have a pain in my head." Act 3. 

"Nothing is left hut ruins, ruins one might laugh at." Act 3. 



□ 



The Future — Carolyn Sloane Hinman 
Mental Reconstruction. 

"/ would fain go, Master, but I looked upon the Nile a while ago; there was nothing in sight." 
Act 1. 



i 



Roll Call — Margaret Hunt Hannum 

"The name of the chosen will be cried from the doorway on high, caught up by those who hear 
it first, cried out to others — then shall the happy victim of the year stand Jorth alone, — 
and to her ear shall rise the shoutings of the multitude." Act 1. 



219 



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*Resigned 

[2201 



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SENIOR OFFICERS 

Chairman, Marjory Porritt 
* Treasurer, Anne Coburn 

iMITH, the first woman's college to equip and maintain a unit in France 
during the war. was also the first to establish a collegiate branch of the 
League of Women Voters. The idea has been so well received by the 
National and State organizations and byother colleges, that the Smith branch Q 

is now working out some suggestions for programs for other college leagues 
that are being planned. 

While the idea of starting such a branch originated with the student 
body it might never have come to fruition without the advice and help of 
Miss Marguerite Wells, an alumna and president of the Minnesota League, 
and of Dean Comstock and Professor Kimball. The two latter, with Professor 
Woodhouse, have formed a faculty advisory committee who have given inval- 
uable assistance in the way of time and counsel. 

Then, too, the League has been fortunate in the representatives which it 
has had as its spokesmen during the year. It was organized in December 
and had for the first meeting Mrs. Maud Wood Park, chairman of the National 
League. Dean Comstock and Professor Kimball were the speakers at the 
^ second meeting telling of the why and wherefore of a chapter at Smith. Miss 

Katherine Ludington, regional director of the League for New England, 
spoke during March on "What the League of Women Voters has to Offer 
College Students." At the last meeting of the year Mrs. Arthur G. Rotch, 
vice-president and chairman of the legislative committee of the Massachu- 
setts League, told about the legislative program, what has been done and 
what is still to be accomplished, and the chances for work with the various 
State Leagues in the months to come. 

Two delegates went from Smith to the State convention in Boston and 
one was present for part of the National convention held in Cleveland in 
April. During this first year the chief purpose was to become well established, 
and the program was therefore mainly informational. The character of the 
League in general, the reason for its establishment and its aims and functions 
□ were emphasized. 

It is a recognized fact among various organizations that their personnel 
is largely made up of older women, and it is hoped that a college branch of 
this type will help to bridge the gap and bring the girls more immediately 
and recently out of college into these organizations as active workers and 
leaders. Then, finally, it is the purpose of the Smith League to prepare its 
members to be as intelligent, well-informed and participating citizens of 
their home communities as they have been of their college community. 



H ^ Bl ee ^CSIj— ^ oe== I II 




VER^E 



□ 



(CfltnmFmorattott <§b? 

Above the fitful tumult of our days, 

Beyond man's crooked paths and earth-dimmed ways, 

The years grow pale and old, and flicker out — 

We hope and believe — we lose our faith — we doubt. 

Springs come and pass; new worlds are made; 

A star goes out, — and empires fade. 

The fabric of time on the Loom of Years 
Is dimmed and marred by human fears. 

Strife sweeps us on with restless, brawling waves, 

For Mars is seeking more than cross-marked graves. 
C3 The war has ceased, — but not the strife; 

^ Our peace was won, — but not our life. 

By troubled winds we're blown and blindly swayed, 

By yellow piles of gold our lives are weighed. 

We look at man but lose mankind — 

Looking at self, forget man's mind. 

The fabric of time on the Loom of Years 
Is dimmed and marred by human fears. 

With other hands whose centuries have brought 
Time-honored tales, by ancient heroes wrought 
In that heroic pageant of the world, 
Wherever freedom's blood-red flag unfurled, 
We have our place — a little dust is ours 
In history's path — a few immortal flowers. 

From infinite seas of time and star-marked space 
A spirit comes again to take its place, 
w Serene and kind, commanding even now, 

With whitened, deathless laurels on his brow, 
He lives again in the nation's heart, 
Once more he plays the father's part. 

He helped a faltering land and gave it strength 
To keep its steadfast purpose down the length 
Of distant years to come; he saw the truth 
And by its light he led our youth; 
He fought and ruled; he answered every call 
And was American first of all. 

With older, wiser nations of the earth, 
Who knew democracy before our birth, 
Wherever men have believed and fought and died, 
We walk with them as brothers, side by side. 

And when America shall make her claim 
rn To share, through honor of a great man's name rn 

□ The universal heritage of time, □ 

She'll proudly answer: "Washington is mine." 

The fabric of time on the Loom of Years 
Is dimmed and marred by human fears. 

Few things abide; joy stays an hour and goes; 
Youth and Art, — and even life must close. 
Springs come and pass; new worlds are made; 
A star goes out, — and empires fade. 

The years will keep — nor can time take away 
A great man's spirit, — that will stay 
With light and truth and silence, 
Eternity and God. 



222] 



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Ruth O'Hanlon 






a 



Northampton 

Little New England hills, 

How tenderly 

You gather in this bit of world 

To comfort me, 
Encircling all I love 
As I would do 

Were arms proportionate to heart. 
Small hills of blue, 

If, having grown to be 
More tall than you, 

I shall be forced to see 
The farther view, 

How shall I feel 
The solace of your rounded form 
against the sky, 

Unless I kneel? 

Dorothy Butts 



A ©ronbaoour'o £>onn far 
t^to Igtttn Utfr 

"A broken flower upon my breast 
Pale, 'neath the moon; 
Mother in Heaven, grant a rest 
For her soul soon. 

A little child that waits to sleep 

Yet fears the night, 
Mary, bend close, that you may keep 

My love from fright. 

She has no priest her soul to save, — 

Accept her prayer; 
The life is broken that you gave, — 

The soul is fair. 

Take Thou her hand when we must 
part 
And guide to thee, 
And I will give to her my heart 
For company. 

Clarinda Buck 



□ 



a 



Urn ©anolro 

Christmas Eve, 

And two red candles on the mantel-piece. 

The little candles that you used to light 

On this same evening, year after year. 

After you'd hung the shining mistletoe, 

And draped the holly in its crisp green wreaths. 

But oh, the bitterness that comes with change! 

And so, it's Christmas Eve again. 

Again the sharp sleet on the window pane, 

The driving snow, the shrilling prairie wind. 

Again the twilight shadows stealing in. 

Caress the books, the pictures on the wall, 

With the familiar touch of one who's home 

After long years of wandering. 

It's time to light the Christmas candles now, 

Dear little candles with the rosy flame 

To shine across the darkness and the snow 

And warm the frozen heart-break of dead years, 

And make those dead years live again. 

I've tried to light the candles, but I can't. 

You see, I understand now something of your pain, 

Your tragic hunger after loveliness. 

Something I know, too, of your old strange love 

For the red candles on the mantel-piece. 

Marion Ellet 



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The trees are all tossing their branches about 

And they're making a hurricane blow; 
They've plotted together to have stormy weather, 

They're angry 'bout something, I know. 
Just the twist of a leaf and the swing of a bough, 

And away goes a rollicking breeze — 
It's funny to me that the grown-ups can't see 

That the wind is all made by the trees! 

Helen Green 









Qlljr Hurfipn 



X 



Our love will never come home in some dear 
place 

Of rosy bricks and swinging gate. 
Nor dream before the flames that trace 
Rich graining in the old mahogany 

And light old silver plate. 

Forever we shall miss 

The little fan-shaped windows 
The ruffled curtains of cool, dotted swiss, 
The gleaming knocker on the heavy door, 

The holly-wreaths of winter and June's 
roses. 

Ah, June, is there more anguish in the arching 

Of crimson bloom above the walk, 
Than when I saw in the marching, 
Brilliant tulips in the border beds, or loved 
The lilacs and the glimpse of hollyhock? 



Oh, holly-wreaths, behind your shining covers 

Peering into the world beyond the glass, 
You may discover there someone who hovers 
Near enough to steal a look within, 
To long for your security, to pass! 

Forever we shall miss, 

We who are doomed to roam, 
The fan-shaped windows with their ruffled 

white. 
And yet, we wander through the streets at 
night 
Hushing our plaintive love that cries for 
home. 

Dorothy Butts 



X 






®o ®wo QHjtttm Utatolja look-lEnDa (§« iHg Steak 

Two dull-blue gods with grinning mouths. 

And dumb and vacant stare 
In oriental silence sit, 

A queer, fantastic pair. 

They make me dream of nightingales, 

Of peacocks blue and gold. 
Of lotus flowers and mystery 

The East has never told. 

And so I let my fancy drink 

The Eastern breath they bring, 
But wonder how a human heart 

Could worship such a thing! 

Ruth O'Hanlon 






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iShp Guiana of Hutntlia 

\In Icelandic mythology, the Hades — Tuenello 
— is surrounded by a river on which there are 
swans that sing.) 

The black river flows, in an eternal ring 
Around and around encircling Tuenello — 
And endlessly, the white swans sing. 

We are the swans, the swans of Tuenello, 
We alone are white, gleaming through the 

dark. 
Only we are singing in the rustling silence — 
Be still in your bitterness. Hark. 

We sing the song of each soul that passes. 
Come new-dead, to join an ever dead life, — 
Sing of tragedy, of quivering pathos. 
Of sorrow, and soul-wounding strife. 

We sing of souls in agony, come burning with 

their pain, 
Of lifeless souls and paralyzed, that never 

knew the light, 
Of little souls all tattered, and great souls 

dashed to bits, 
And souls that held aloof from the fight. 

We have chanted souls since the birth of 

time. 
The old, old soul songs that were in the 

beginning; 
The new songs are the old songs — the first 

and the last are one — 
We know of no new torture or sinning. 

We are the swans, the swans of Tuenello — 
Always we must sing as we swim through the 

dark. 
Listen to our songs — you souls in your silence 
Stop in your hopelessness. Hark. 

The black river flows ever in an eternal ring, 
Around and around, encircling Tuenello, 
And endlessly and endlessly the white swans 
sing. 

— Elizabeth Ristels 



Mary icltEabrth 

Oh, Mary Elizabeth Allen and I 

Used to play with our dolls, long ago. 

Either she'd be at my house or I'd be at her's, 

For we lived in the very same row. 

Her doll}- was china, with long golden hah 

And she called her "Virginia," for me. 

She had real eyelashes, and trunkfuls of 

clothes 
That had come all the way from "Paree". 
My doll had been mother's when she was a 

girl, 
So a lot of her hair had come out. 
And one foot was broken, but I tied it up 
With a bandage, and said she had gout. 
Every one of her dresses I made by myself, 
Except for the very hard part, 
And I christened her, "Mary Elizabeth," too 
For I loved her with all my heart. 
We played with each other from morning till 

night 
And were happy as happy could be, 
Until Mary Elizabeth went off to school — 
And then there was no one but me. 
I tried for a while to play dolls by myself 
But I found it wasn't much fun, 
For what was a lovely tea-party for two. 
Was simply hot water for one. 

Oh, Mary Elizabeth's grown up, to-day. 

And some people think I am, too. 

Yet we still love each other as much as we 

did 
When her golden haired dolly was new. 
But she has a golden haired baby, to-day. 
And she's named her "Virginia" for me; 
While the best I can do is to sit here and write 
Of my dolly, who once used to be. 

— Helen Green 



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October rains are grey and sad and still, 
A soft weeping for the end to come 
Of all the glowing times of riotous fall 
That sings and dances to her waiting tomb. 

The tears fall gently on the yellowing fields, 
On purple mists of asters on the hill, 
On proud red trees of glory — all sadly 
Weeping and weeping, soft and grev and 
still. 

II 

October nights are cold and crystal-clear, • 
Tanged with the sweet sharp scent of full- 
blown fall, 
Strewn on the ground, the dry leaves crisp 

and curl, 
High over head, the midnight sky's a whirl 
Of gem-cut stars that wink and flirt and call. 



Witchcraft's abroad, ghosts gay and debonair; 

White as the moon, still as the fast approach- 
ing snow, 

Flickering up and up, follow the heady- 
breeze, 

Dance with the dark shadows of the trees, 

The ghosts so swift and light, the shadows 
ponderous and slow. 

All night that white, white band^is merry 

mad. 
All night they revel 'neath the star-gemmed 

sky, 
No sound they make on curling leaves and 

crisp, 
Frolicking gay as any will o' the wisp, 
Till crack of dawn when, dancing still, they 

vanish like a sigh. 

— Elizabeth Rintels 



iCyrtr 



Oh, a golden moon is a lover's moon, 
Glowing warm through the languorous night; 

And a silver moon is a poet's moon, 

With dreams a-gleam in its clear, cold light; 

But the wan day-moon is my moon, 

(The wan day-moon, like a pale, high kite!) 

The wan day-moon is my moon, 

Is my moon, 

The wan day-moon is my delight. 

— Edith Hill Bayles 



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Alma Matn 



Words by Henrietta Sperry, igio 
Music by II. D. Sleeper 

To you, Oh, Alma Mater, 

Oh! Mother great and true. 
From all your loyal children 

Comes up the song anew. 
Where swings the red sun upward, 

Where sinks he down to rest, 
Arc hearts that backward turning 

Still find you first and best. 

Chorus: 

And gladly singing to you always 
Our loyal hearts with joy shall fill; 

Oh! fairest, fairest Alma Mater 
"i ou hold and claim us still. 

^ ou gave us dreams unnumbered, 

And life we had not known, 
And now, Oh! Alma Mater, 

We give you back your own. 
For memories, for friendships, 

That bless each passing dav, 
Our toil unsought we render, 

Our debt unasked we pay. 

Chorus: 



iFatr £>mtilj 



Fair Smith, our praise to thee we render, 

O dearest college halls, 
Bright hours that live in mem'ry tender 

Are winged within thy walls. ' 
O'er thy walls the elms are bowing, 

Alma Mater, 
Winds 'mid branches softly blowing, 
Ivy 'round thy towers growing, 
Alma Mater. 

Though time may prove the pleasure fleet- 
ing, 
No hour is spent in vain. 
True hearts behold the future meeting; 

Our friendships cannot wane. 
Of thy care forgetful never, 

Alma Mater, 
Bound by ties that nought can sever, 
Still to thee returning ever, 
Alma Mater. 

And while the hills with purple shadows 

Eternal vigil keep, 
Above the happy river meadows, 

In golden haze asleep, 
May thy children thee addressing, 

Alma Mater, 
Still with grateful praise unceasing, 
Speak in loyal hearts thy blessing, 
Alma Mater. 



CD 






(ttlaflfi §>0nga 

191B 



iFtrat g>trp-^>img 

Tune: "Drifting" 

Now from all we can gather 

The Freshmen are expected to deliver 

Some heart-rending selection 

Melodious, clever and new. 

This is to be directed in all due rev'rence, 

Seniors, to you, 
As we now are gathered at our step-sing 

debut — 

Chorus: 
'18, this is a sad scene 
When Freshmen so green try to express their 

hearts; 
We know the thoughts they should show. 
And yet we find no one with that art. 
Our wit is like our socks — nit — 
Affection won't fit into our rhyme. 
The fact is, we need some practice, 
You'll notice we will improve with time. 




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£mnato to Prmiifnt NpilHon 

Tune: "Bonnie Dundee" 

There's a bonnie Scotch laddie we lov'd from 

the start. 
And we pledge our allegiance, he's won a' 

our hearts. 
We will follow his leading beyond and away, 
For we lo'e him forever and ever and aye. 
Then come one and all, 
We'll raise such a cheer 
That it will ring far and wide many a year, 
And aftertimes wake an echo to say, 
Oh, they lo'ed him forever and ever and aye. 



ffiptriatljan 

Tune: "Hula Maid" 

Leviathan, you've got the cutest little 

wiggle, 
In your tail, your curly, twirly tail; 
Round your mouth you've got a knowing 

little giggle 
As you eye the Freshman team so spry — 
You know we love the Boojum like a 

brother 
We far from scorn 
The purple unicorn — 
We respect the old age of the lion so sage 
But give us our own Leviathan. 



1919 



Tune: "Come a Six, Come a Seven' 



Tune: "We Love a Fox-trot" 



There are ways of passing co'ses 

'Most everybody says 

And a co'se is something we's all gotta have 

For to get us our B. A.'s 

Now I ain't never been a working girl 

No — not on your life! 

But I'se a-praying for my marks just the 

same 
And a-hoping that they all comes right. 

Chorus: 
Come an A, come a B, come a B plus 
For that's the way it be — 
Go 'way E, go 'way D, go 'Way D plus 
I wouldn't mind a C. 
I've studied hard on Jordie's thirt 
And not at all on French — 
But come an A, come a B, come a B plus to 

me 
Or I'll be sittin' on the mourner's bench. 



When the sun goes under 
And the sky is grey 
And the sing's postponed 
In case of rain today. 
You think you won't prepare a song, 
And you spend eleven cents 
To join the movie throng — 
If you take this chance 
Then you can safely say 
"There ain't a-gonna be no rain to-day." 

We're gonna practice singing till we die — 
We're gonna practice singing till we die — 
You may go away and leave us here alone 
We're set on moaning like a saxaphone 
We're gonna sing our step-song well or die. 







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Tune: "I'm So Sympathetic'''' 

Two years ago we sang all our songs to 

eighteen, 
Then nineteen was the cause for our lungs 

inflating; 
Now love for twenty tongue-ties us when 

together — 
For conversation we'll talk about the 

weather. 

Chorus: 

When the snow is snowing, 

Postman slowly going 

Makes us miss our chapel news, 

Through procrastination 

We will lose salvation 

Waiting for our billet-doux 

But — when we have spring weather, 

We will swim together, 

Via campus into Paradise — 

We'll build an ark, 

Moor it on Mountain Park, 

When we have spring weather. 

Tune: "Quitcha' MakirC Eyes at the Men' 

Quit'cha, quit'cha, quit'cha hangin' onto the 

steps 
And a-takin' up all the room — 
Ain't-a, ain't-a, ain't-a bit-a lady-like 
Because you know you've got to give them 

up 
Sooner or later. 

Treat us with some due respect — 
It's a logical conclusion we'll be sittin' there 

next — 
We've got a covetous eye — 
We'd like to try 
To sing a-sittin' on the Senior steps. 



fc^3 ' ** 



Days have passed, golden days 
Ever brimming with joy; 
Youth is ours, wondrous youth, 
But will soon flee away — 
Here you formed friendships true, 
Bonds that never will break — 
Though life's pathway lies dim, 
And you may wander far, 
Always in your memory tender, 
Youth will come again, 
When your thoughts hither turn. 



But now, go forth for life's but a fleeting 

dream, 
Go forth and win what it holds; 
The gates of fame swing wide for you, 
Farewell, ah, farewell! 



To these steps, sacred now, 
Come we smiling through tears, 
Symbols whose precious past 
Herald on-coming years. 
We are proud, following you, 
We will plight you our faith; 
Glorious this our trust — 
May we keep it with honor. 
For you who have here nobly led, 
In life will lead the way, 
And the best will attain. 



So now, go forth for joy is awaiting you, 
Go forth and drink from its cup; 
And may it ever be full for you — 
Farewell, ah, farewell! 



Dusk has come, friendships' hour, 

Bringing mem'ries anew — 

Now this time we may claim 

For our last song to you. 

You will go, scattered far, 

Bearing courage and hope; 

Where the world needs your youth; 

Our love goes with you ever; 

And we, from these steps you have left, 

When Spring comes again 

Will go out to meet you — 

So now — go forth; the twilight is deepening 

here, 
Go forth, our hopes light your way; 
The world's white stars shine bright for you 
Farewell, ah, farewell! 






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Dtastpnan Jffrolir — GJnptral £>mtg 










Tune: "^ Fowwg il/««'.r Fancy" 
Long ago, in the days of old, 
All the men were brave and bold. 
Maids were modest, shy and sweet. 
With lily hands and dainty feet; 
'Neath the trees they'd sit all day — 
Life for them was merely play. 
Times have changed a lot since then- 
Why, when I was only ten, 
Mother had a great career 
Waiting for her daughter dear. 

Chorus: 
Up to Hamp I'd go, I'd be a freshman so 

demure 
They'd be glad to see me come, of that I'm 

very sure. 
The family would take me to College Hall 

gate, 
Where President Neilson and the faculty 

would wait. 
Then we'd go to see the Dean, I'd say "How 

do you do? 
Our arrival I announce; I knew 'twould 

interest you." 
I won't tell her of my cleverness or anything, 
She's sure to find it out at least by spring. 

So I had my plans worked out. 
Not the shadow of a doubt, 
In a month or two at most, 
Though I didn't like to boast, 
I would give a College tea — 
Show my popularity; 
'Twould be such a big affair, 
Quite a number would be there. 
The nicest Seniors I'd invite — 
I'd be starting College right. 

Chorus: 
Then one day a letter came from Memphis, 

Tennessee — 
Didn't know a soul down there who'd be apt 

to write to me, 
'Twas from my adviser who said that I'd get 
A black leather bible, but I haven't received 

it yet. 
Said there'd be some girls in Hamp to meet 

me at the train — 
Though I hope they won't come down if it 

should chance to rain 
Wonder how they'll recognize me in a crowd 

like that — 
For they won't know I'll wear a henna hat. 

Then the train to Hamp I took; 

Settled down to read a book. 

Wiser far than '23, 

Smith's Ferry had no charms for me. 

America's fair Paradise 

Really looked to me quite nice. 

On the platform trunks galore — 

Girls I counted by the score. 

I was glad it didn't rain. 

For thev'd come down to meet mv train. 



Chorus: 
Then I rushed right up to one and asked her 

hastily; 
(S. C. A. C. W. was her sorority.) 
"Has my roommate come yet? I'm new here, 

you know; 
1 ler name is Mary, I want to see her so." 
I was much astonished that a girl who looked 

so bright 
Didn't have the knowledge that would help 

me out that night. 
Not what you'd expect in College news 

variety 
From active ones in that society. 

All the people that I knew, 

Telling me what Smith girls do, 

Said it would be simply fine 

Riding on the Amherst line. 

But my Bible said you go 

To Smith and not to Amherst, so 

\V hen I want excitement now — 

More than just a family row — 

The campus rush is all I fear — 

In that you tear your clothes, I hear. 

Chorus: 
Then I went to chapel where I couldn't find 

a chair 
Recitals on the organ seem to come before 

the prayer. 
I waited and listened and learned a great deal, 
All about olives being the College meal. 
Registration afterwards was really much the 

worst — 
Made you write your name and age and 

address down at first 
Asked you to put your denomination if you 

can — 
Of course for that I wrote Republican. 

I have quite made up my mind 
Never to become a grind. 
There's so many things to do — 
Athletic clubs and tea rooms too. 
I will play most every night 
Do my studying by daylight. 
If I do not get it done 
By the time that chapel has begun 
Though I'd miss my chapel date, 
I'd slip into chapel late. 

Chorus: 
I'd be sure to get there at the very most by 

nine, 
When seniors in their long black gowns march 

in one at a time. 
I'd come in so softly and not make a sound — 
'Twould be so embarrassing if every one 

turned around. 
It would be because my work came first as I 

am sure you know. 
But there's someone here who thinks we 

should come early every day. 
Who is this President Neilson. anyway? 



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Freshmen, we fear that you're not quite 

deferential. 
We miss the respect that's our due — 
Please don't infringe upon our movie 

privilege — 
We'll censor them for you. 
But we're awfully glad you are here 
You've made it springtime all year; for — 

Chorus: 
We never knew we could have such a winter 
Weather always warm and nice. 
It was your sunny smile 
Beaming all the while, 
Melted all the snow and ice. 
And though it's great 
We're here to state 
That what we really want is just a chance to 

skate, 
So for a while, hide your lights under bushels, 
And see how winter sports entice. 

What's this we hear about our sister class, 
'23— 

It sounds most shocking to me. 

If you had followed in our modest footsteps, 

No dress reform you'd need. 

But as your sister class after all, 

I suppose we're to blame for your fall; but — 
Chorus: 

We never knew until your own admission 

To what depths you'd fallen down. 

We didn't realize till you advertised 

The merits of the Goldthwait gown. 

You seemed so neat, very sweet, 

We can't believe you'd do a thing so indis- 
creet, 

We never knew until your own admission 

To what depths you'd fallen down. 



Juniors, we feel that we're in such a position 

that 
We could give you some advice. 
We could say "Wait until you're as old as 

we are" 
Or something just as concise. 
But we're feeling sad and not gay — 
We hate to seem old and gray! Oh! 

Chorus: 
You'll never know till you get to be Seniors 
How you loved your Junior year. 
You'll have your Junior prom, 
Your man on vour arm, 
(You'll hope that he won't seem queer!) 
And pretty soon, this coming June, 
The ivy chain will twine you with its wet 

festoon, 
You'll never know till you get to be Seniors 
How you loved your Junior year. 
Four years ago, when we were as fresh as 

the freshmen are 
We had so much dignity — 
Now that we're old and wise and venerated 
Our downfall you can see; 
Instead of baldness from care 
We're going in for bobbed hair; but — 

Chorus: 
We always knew we would some day be 

famous, 
For honor comes where honor's due. 
And when we've gone away 
You will bless the day 
We left our great award to you. 
For in our class, for four years past 
Was one outstanding member you cannot 

surpass; 
They'll never know what it is to have a class- 
mate, 
Pres'dent Neilson, quite like you. 



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THE QUIET LITE OF THE COLLEGE STUDENT 

N CROSS SECTION 



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Anne Coburn 

"Oh, Bobbie, grab my suitcase," 
Cried Anne upon the run; 
But when at last she looked around. 
What was her horror when she found — 
'Twas "Bobby" Withington. 



Mary Holyoke may know how to pray. 
But in German her tongue runs away. 

\\ hen Herr Muser she passes, 

En route to her classes, 
She stops and says: "Oh, bon marche." 

H. G. (in Chaucer class): "Oh, Mr. Chaucer — " 
Mr. Patch (coyly): "Pray, call me Geoffrey!" 

Mr. Gray (proudly): "Now this is the oldest 
piece of potter}" around here except a few other 
old pieces." 






X 



A pair of wool stockings with purple clocks, 

A sweater of brilliant hue, 

A round white collar and narrow tie, 

A dark brown oxford shoe; 

A short plaid skirt and a big fur coat, 

Bobbed hair and a henna hat; 

I'm sure that no one could tell us apart 

If onlv I weren't so fat. 



Barbara Hines (talking to Dr. Withington 
through a screen door). 

Dr. Withington: "Be careful. Miss Hines, 
you'll strain your voice." 

President Neilson (after telling the story of 
St. Francis and the leper to little Frances): "And 
why do you suppose St. Francis kissed the leper?" 

Little Frances: "Because there weren't any 
ladies around, wasn't it, father?" 




^m 



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CR 



Edith Bayles 

"In winter snows, her thinnest clothes 
She wears — and when you ask her — 
"W ell, why on earth?" she coldly smiles: 
"Just tryouts for Alaska." 



Mrs. Strong (to Piso, the model): "Would 
you mind wearing that same suit again tomorrow. 
Miss Hinckley?" 

Professor Wood (on the subject of Mysti- 
cism): "When I lived in Ceylon they said a 
devil lived in the house even before I came." 

Mr. Gardiner (upsetting the pitcher of cream 
all over his hostess's tea table): "My, what an 
awkward pitcher." 






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When Anne was first elected 

To rule us long and well, 

She was afraid of Seniors — 

Or so I've heard her tell; 

But when one broke a rule brand new 

And came to see what Anne would do, 

She looked that Senior up and down, 

And then she cocked her eye 

And gave it to her good and strong 

Until she made her cry. 

And to this day Anne says she's proud 

To've made a Senior cry so loud. 




"I do more Weekly every day." 
A freshman overheard her say. 
And rapidly the rumor spread: 

"Poor Helena is sick in bed." 



Kay Walker, an overworked lass, 

In Dramatics is known to surpass, 

But she's often distressed 

By her letters addressed 

To the Smith College Dramatic Ass. 



Piso: "The Coliseum is a sad-looking old 
building. 

Gerry: "No wonder — it's built on tiers." 

M.: "What makes the Tower of Pisa lean?" 
D.: "Because it was built during a famine." 

Doctor (on official visit to Miss Jordan): 
"Hereafter, Miss Jordan, you will have to lead a 
quiet and orderly life." 

Q.: "Why is Mr. Wlthington like Max Wel- 
ton?" 

A.: "Because his braes are bonny." 

Mlle. Williams: "Mr. Trebla, I want to 
exchange this fruit please." 

Mr. Trebla: "But we can't exchange fruit." 

Mlle. Williams: "But you must. I don't 
like it." 

Mr. Trebla: "I can't." 

Mlle. Williams: (getting excited) "But you 
must, Mr. Trebla." 

Mr. Trebla (with finality): "Sorry, Miss Wil- 
liams." 

Mlle. Williams: "Miss Williams, indeed!! 
I am Mademoiselle Williams!" 

Mr. Trebla: "Oh, are you mad as hell? \\ ell, 
I'm mad as hell, too." 









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September 

28 Registration. 

29 Classes began. 

October 

2 First Senior Class Meeting. 
Freshman Frolic. 

5 First meeting of the S. C. A. C. W. 
Mary Holyoke, President, spoke. 

6 Field Day. 

8 Mass Meeting of the Student Gov- 
ernment Association. Anne 
Clark, Members of the S. C. A. 
C. W. Cabinet, College Sports 
Representatives, and the Director 
of the Dramatics Association, 
spoke. 

13 Mountain Day. 

20 Boston Symphony Orchestra Con- 
cert. 

23 Odd-Even Basket Ball Game. 

27 Freshman Song Trials. 

28 Cox vs. Harding Debate. 

30 Fall Field Day. 

November 

2 First Concert of the series in Cham- 
ber Music. 

5 Lecture by Professor Baldwin. 
Subject: English University Meth- 
ods. 

6 Gingling-Smith Basket Ball Game. 
8 Pavlowa. 

10 Dramatics Association Production 
in Students' Building. 
"What Every Woman Knows." 
Song Recital by Mr. Case and Miss 
Holmes. 
12 Lecture by Mr. Stark Young. 

Subject: Some Italian Impressions. 

16 Lecture by Gaston Riou. 
Subject: Pourquoi la pensee fran- 

gaise est-elle devenue religieuse? 

17 Concert by Povla Frijsh. 
19 Lecture by Dr. Sarton. 

Subject: The History of Science. 
23 Tercentenary Celebration of the 
Landing of the Pilgrims. Presi- 
dent Neilson, Professor Gardiner, 
and Professor Bassett spoke. 
25 Thanksgiving Day. Turkeys vs. 
Butchers Basket Ball Game. 
Miss Jeanette Rankin spoke for the 
Consumers League. 
27 Lecture by Baron Korff. 

Subject: Some Phases of the Pres- 
ent Russian Situation. 

29 Lecture by Mr. Charles W. Farn- 

ham. 
Subject: Roosevelt the Man. 



November 

30 Drive for the Fund. 

Lecture by Mr. Joseph Pennell. 
Subject: Whistler as I Knew Him. 

December 

1 Faculty Recital Commemorating 
the 150th Anniversary of Beet- 
hoven's Birth. 
Dramatics Association Plays given 

at the y\cademy of Music. 
"The Man of Destiny," "Tom 
Thumb the Great." 
3 Lecture Recital by Seumas Mac- 
Manus. 

8 Christmas Sale. 

Lecture by Mr. Normal Angell. 
Subject: The Great Illusion and the 
War. 

9 Lecture by Mrs. Maud W. Park. 
Subject: Training Smith Women 

for the Duties of Citizenship. 

10 Lecture by Dr. John Brewer. 
Subject: Teaching as a Vocation. 
Lecture by Professor Vida Scudder. 
Subject: Motivation In the Grail 

Romances. 

11 Vocational Conference. 

14 Reading of Christmas Poems by 

President Neilson at the Chris- 
tian Association Meeting. 
Student Recital. 

15 Concert by Fritz Kreisler. 

16 Open Meeting of the French Club. 

17 Lecture by Professor Copeland. 
Subject: Dickens' Best Book. 

18 Christmas Concert of the Smith 

College Musical Clubs. 

19 Christmas Vesper and Carol Serv- 

ice. 
21 Beginning of the Christmas Recess. 



January 1921 

7 Opening of College. 

8 Lecture by William Archer. 
Subject: Three British Playwrights: 

Shaw, Barry and Galsworthy. 
12 Concert by Maurice Dambois and 

Aurore La Croix. 
15 Joint Concert by the Harvard Glee 

Club and the Smith College 

Choruses. 

18 Student Recital. 

Concert of Chamber Music. 
Lecture by Gilbert K. Chesterton. 

19 Lecture by Mrs. Charlotte Kellogg. 
Subject: European Students' Relief. 
Concert by the Letz Quartet. 

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9 

10 

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February 

7 Meeting of the League of Women 

Voters. Miss Comstock and 
Professor Kimball spoke. 

8 Student Recital. 

Mass Meeting of the Students. Mrs. 
Trowbridge spoke. 

Concert by Royal Dadnum. 

Lecture on Teaching by Miss Sarah 
Dean. 

Lecture by M. Leonce Benedite. 

Subject: La Peinture Contempo- 
raine en France: L'lmpression- 
isme. 

Lecture by Chauncy Tinker. 

Subject: Mute Inglorious Miltons. 

Valentine Bridge Party in the Boat 
House. 

Week of Prayer Services — Reverend 
Maxwell Savage. 

Washington's Birthday. 

Commemoration Exercises. 

Invocation by President-Emeritus 
Seelye. 

Commemoration Ode by Eleanor 
Chilton. 

Oration by Professor John Erskine. 

Student Rally. Junior-Senior Bas- 
ketball Game. Juniors victor- 
ious. '21, '22, '23 show for the 
benefit of the Four Million Dollar 
Fund. 

Lecture by Abbe Dimnet. 

Subject: Coming Men in French 
Politics. 

Recital: Phaneian Harp Ensemble 
and Trio Eleu. 

Lecture by Professor Eric Home. 

Subject: Diarachy in British India, 
a Great Constitutional Experi- 
ment. 

Freshman-Sophomore Basket Ball 
Game. Freshmen victorious. 



24 



25 



26 






March 
2 
3 



9 

9 

11 



Concert by the Letz Quartet. 

Lecture by Dr. Alice Hamilton. 

Subject: Industrial Hygiene. 

Concert by the Smith College Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 

Lecture by Dr. Frankwood E. Wil- 
liams. 

Subject: Practical Applications of 
Mental Hygiene. 

Concert by Sergei Rachmaninoff. 

Fashion Show. 

Junior Frolic. 

Lecture by Robert Seneca Smith. 

Subject: The Life of Christ. 



March 



12 
16 



18 
19 

21 

23 



13 
15 
16 
17 
20 
27 



30 



May 



Professor Harrv N. 



Lecture by 
Holmes. 

Subject: Emulsions. 

Lecture by Felix Schelling. 

Subject: Seedpods of Shakes- 
pearean Criticism. 

Freshman - Sophomore Basketball 
Game. 1923 victorious. 

Dramatics Association Production 
in Students Building. 

"The Ideal Husband." 

Concert by the Letz Quartet. 

Lecture by Professor MacDougal. 

Annual Gymnastic Drill. 

Holyoke-Smith Debate. 

Lecture by Mr. S. K. Ratcliffe. 

Beginning of the Spring Recess. 



College Opened. 

Lecture by Mrs. Roys. 

Faculty Recital. 

Lecture by Mr. Hulbert. 

Plays for Dress Reform Movement. 

Shakespeare Week. 

Concert by the Boston Symphony. 

Dramatics Association Play given 

at the Academy of Music. 

"A Thousand Years Ago." 
Glee Club Production of "The 

Chimes of Normandy." 






X 



2 Lecture by Miss Bourland. 

4 Recital by Miss Goode. 
11 Oratorio. 
14 Field Day. 

18 Junior Promenade. 

19 Lecture by Dr. Richard Strong. 

24 Lecture by Dr. Dow. 

25 Float Day. 
Faculty Recital. 

26-June 7 Final Examinations. 
30 Memorial Day. 



June 



a 


a 



9-11 Senior Dramatics 

"False Gods." 

Baccalaureate Sermon. 

Ivy Day. Orator: Anne Coburn. 
Meeting of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion. 

Reception by the President and 
Faculty. 

Commencement Exercises. Ad- 
dress by Roscoe Pound, Alumnae 
Assembly. 

Class Supper. Chairman: Helen 
Green. 



12 
13 



14 



m 



240 



IBG 



DHI 



Arknnwbftgmenta 






THE 1921 Class Book Board takes this opportunity to express its 
appreciation of the assistance given by Professor William Francis 
Ganong in his capacity of adviser to the Board. The Board also thanks 
the undergraduates for their support and especially the following contributors 
for their continued interest and active efforts in supplying material: 






LITERATURE 



X 



Edith Bayles 
Marion Booth 
Clarinda Buck 
Dorothy Butts 
Marion Ellet 
Helen Green 
Margaret Hinckley 
Katharine Holmes 



Helen Josephy 
Ruth O'Hanlon 
Georgiana Palmer 
Elizabeth Rintels 
Mary Sears 
Mary Short 
Wolcott Stuart 
Lenore Wolfe 



□ 



ART 
Carolyn Reynolds Catherine Miller 

BUSINESS 

Barbara Hines Helen Pittman 

Constance Richards 



SNAP SHOTS 



Margaret Haas 
Margaret Hinckley 
Josephine Hopkins 



Rosalind Hubbell 
India Johnson 
Elizabeth Marshall 






Catharine Murray 



1 



241 



DBG 



DGDG 



1 



INDEX 



Alberts, E 15 

Bailey, Banks and Biddle Co. 5 

Baker, Walter & Co., Ltd. 7 

Baker, Jones, Hausauer, Inc. 30 

Beckmann's 13 

Belanger, Miss 6 

Berry, James 12 

Bicknell, H. E 6 

Blum, Julius 5 

Boston Fruit Store ... 23 

Boyden's 4 

Brandle, Frank A 5 

Bridgman & Lyman .... 14 

Brigham & Co 8 

Buchholz, H. & Son ... 5 

Butler & Ullman ... 29 

Cahill, Julia B 6 

Charles, Inc. 17 

Central Grocery .... 29 

Champion Spark Plug Co. . 19 

Childs, Thomas S 20 

City Taxicab Co 18 

Cohn, Sarah 7 

College Blouse & Mending 

Shop 7 

College Shoe Shining Parlors, 

The 25 

College Taxi Co., The . 21 

Coburn & Graves .... 25 

Copeland's 20 

Copper Kettle, The ... 14 

Davis, Frank E 18 

Dewhurst, O. T 19 

Draper Hotel 5 

Electric Shoe Repair Co. . 9 

Elms Restaurant, The . 15 

First National Bank ... 14 

Fitts, C. N 15 

Fleming 16 

Foster Farrar Co. . . .17 

Gazette Printing Co. . . .12 

Green Dragon, The ... 8 

Hampshire Book Shop ... 17 

Hampshire County Trust Co. 14 



Harlow, Geo. F 13 

Hill Brothers 21 

Hotel Garage, The ... 16 

Howard, Chas. H 12 

Howes, Dorothy M. ... 23 

Jensen's 21 

Kimball & Cary Co. ... 22 

Lambie, J. E. & Co. ... 28 

La Montagne, A. J. ... 8 

La Montagne Boot Shop . 8 

Mandell Co., The .... 9 

Mary Marguerite, The . 24 

McCallum, A. & Co. . . 29 

Metcalf Printing Co. ... 16 

Niquette 25 

Northampton Electric Light- 
ing Co 23 

Northampton Institution for 

Savings 10 

Northampton Garage Co. . . 26 

NORTHFIELD HOTEL, The . 25 

Ono, T. & Co 28 

Paddock Tailoring Co. . . 9 

Park Company, Inc., The . . 26 

Pierce, J. Hugh 12 

Pinehurst Riding School . . 28 

Plaza Theater 9 

Plymouth Inn 19 

Raysel's 31 

Richards Co., R. J. ... 16 

Rose Tree Inn, The ... 24 

Schultz 20 

Sockut, Samuel 25 

Stahlberg, Eric 11 

Steiger Co., Albert ... 7 

Tiffany & Co 3 

Todd, T. H 24 

Toohey,A. A. . . . . . . 27 

Trebla 26 

Warren and Watt . . . . 15 

Welch, Wm. E 13 

Wiswell, H. A 13 

Wood, Arthur P 10 



Tiffany & Co. 

Jewelry Silverware Watches Clocks Stationery 



An Incomparable Stock 



Purchases maybe made by Mail 



Fifth Avenue & 37 -Street 
NewYork 



aaaaaaoaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaGaaaaaaaaaaacaaaaaaaaaaaaa 

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□ 




□ 



HONOR ROLL TABLETS, FRATERNITY EMBLEMS, RINGS, SEALS, CHARMS, PLAQUES, 
MEDALS, ETC., OF THE BETTER KIND. 

THE GIFT BOOK, Mailed upon request Illustrating and Pricing Graduation and other Gifts 



TELEPHONE, 954-W. 



JULIUS BLUM 



LADIES' TAILOR AND FURRIER 

259 MAIN STREET NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



H. Buchholz & Son 

Theatrical, Historical and 
Masquerade Costumiers 

Pageants and School Productions a Specialty 
Wigs, Beards, Make-ups, Etc. 

33 LYMAN ST. SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



Frank A. Brandle 

COLLEGE 
PHARMACY 

271 Main Street 271 

Agents for Huylers Candies 



GUESTS 

from 

48 STATES 
Praise the 

Draper Hotel 

□ 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

William M. Kimball, Prop. 



JULIA B.CAHILL 

WOMAN'S WEAR 

BLOUSES 

CORSETS 

BANDEAUX 

UNDERWEAR 

HOSIERY 



On the Library steps during Exams. 

A senior: "Well, I have my nine- 
teenth to-day." 

Awestruck freshman: "Goodness, 
How can she take so many sub- 
jects!" 



Go to 

Miss Belanger 
for 

Shampoos 
Marcelling 
Manicuring or 
Face Massage 

277 MAIN STREET 



A personal word from Bicknell 
- - - - to the Class of 1921 

We know you have enjoyed your four years at Smith. 

W T e know you have enjoyed Northampton and some of you will 
come back many times in the years to come. 

W 7 e hope that you will carry away a favorable impression of Bicknell's 
and the shoes and furnishings purchased from us. 

We shall be always glad to see or hear from you and will cheerfully 
send any of our merchandise on approval. 

Quality always high. Prices always reasonable. 



Harry E. Bicknell Northampton, U. S. A. 



THE COLLEGE 

Blouse and M ending Shop 
28 CENTER STREET 



The Shop where you find everything 
that's new and smart in blouses 

EXCLUSI V E 
Dressmaking, Mending, Repairing, Altering, 
French Dry Cleaning, Steaming and Pressing 



MISS 


SARAH COHN 




MEDIUM-PRICED 




MILLINERY 


70 


MAIN STREET 



Baker's 

Breakfast 

Cocoa 




Has a most delicious 
flavor. 

Is pureand healthful. 
The ideal food bever- 
age. 

Genuine has this 
trade-mark on every 
package. 

Booklet of 

Choice Recipes 

Sent free 



WALTER BAKER & CO., LTD. 

Established 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS. 



"Nous Avons Change Tout Cela" 



One doesn't have to journey to Paris, or even to New York to 
dress with originality nowadays. "Nous Avons Change Tout Cela". 
(We have changed all that.) 

One finds at this store not only the rare once-in-a- 
lifetime luxuries, but also a great collection of sensible, 
serviceable wearables. 

SMART — DIFFERENT — EXCLUSIVE 

Albert Steiger Company 

Springfield, Mass. 



A. J. LaMontagne 

Distinctive Decorator 
and Painter 

267 Main St. Northampton 

Telephone, 146-W 



LaMontagne Near 

BO U „ Post Office 

oo t oho p 

Style — Quality — at Prices that please 
It Pays to Pay Cash 

21 PLEASANT STREET 
NORTHAMPTON MASS. 




207 MAIN STREET 

A Gift Shop 
of Distinction 



D. H. Brigham & Company 

Spring-field :: •• :: :: Massachusetts 



An exclusive store for women, special- 
izing in wearing apparel that particu- 
larly appeals to young women. 



Electric 

Shoe Repair 

Co. 



15 Masonic St. 
Northampton, Mass. 



Paddock Tailoring Co. 

CLEANERS AND DYERS 

Northampton 



PLAZA 

THEATRE 

NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 



Pick O' The World 
PHOTOPLAYS 

From Famous Producers presenting 

America's Greatest Plays 

Program Changed Daily 
Except Mondays and Tuesdays 

FREDERICK P. BELMONT. Mgr. 



The Mandell Co. 

165 MAIN STREET 

Always the newest Shoes and Hosiery 

FEATURING 

Sport and Recreation Shoes 
High Quality — Prices Right 



THE MANDELL CO., The Draper Hotel Building 



TV/I ANY people prefer to 
leave their unused 
money in a Savings Bank 
where it will be drawing 
interest. 

If one who reads this belongs to 
that class, let this be an invita- 
tion to call at the Bank between 
the First Church and the Court 
House. You will find attractive 
quarters and accommodating 
service. 

Northampton Institution 
for Savings 

109 MAIN STREET 

Northampton, Mass. 




Gold Wrist IVatches 



Bracelet Watches have endeared themslves to all 
womankind. 

No lady now feels at ease without one. 

Correct time is necessary for everyone these days. 

Ask to see the Gruen Watches — they have a 
world-wide reputation for their time-keeping quali- 
ties and exclusiveness from the ordinary watches. 



ARTHUR P. WOOD 

THE JEWEL STORE 



197 MAIN ST. 



Tel. 1307-M Opp. City Hall 



10 






Eric Stahlberg 

McCLELLAN STUDIO 

FORTY-FOUR STATE STREET 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Official Photographer 

To 

Smith College 
Smith . . 1919 
Smith . . 1920 
Smith . . 1921 



11 



Wall Paper, Paints 

Picture Glass 

Etc. 



W e Paint 
Students ' Furn iture 

J. HUGH PIERCE 

186 Main St. 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Gazette Printing Co. 

14 Gothic Street 

Printing of All Kinds 



Chas. H. Howard 

Expert Developing 

Printing and 

Enlarging 

160 MAIN STREET 

Opposite The Draper 



WHEN IN NEED OF 
GOOD WATCH, CLOCK 
OR JEWELRY WORK 



JAMES BERRY 

JEWELER 

Draper Hotel Building : 161 MAIN ST. 
NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



OFFICIAL WATCH INSPECTOR 
FOR N. Y., N. H. & H. RAILROAD 



12 



WISWELL 

The Druggist 

□ 

82 MAIN STREET 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



A Good Place To 


Buy 




YOUR - 




Desks, 


Chairs and Tables 


G. F. HARLOW'S 






19 Center St. 





WILLIAM E. WELCH 
Travelers' Insurance Co. 




THIRD NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

Springfield, Massachusetts 



BECKMANN'S 



Candy Shop and 
Soda Fountain 



FINE CANDIES 
CHOCOLATES 



ICE CREAM 
NOVELTIES 



We Make a specialty of Mail Orders. "Grads" everywhere 
known this. Let us add you to our out-of-town customers. 

30 YEARS ON THE SAME CORNER 

247-249 Main Street, Northampton 



13 



The IV oman 

The woman is the 
Economist — Which 
is a word meaning, 
Original Housekeeper 

The Best Housekeeper 
uses a Check Book 
and has her account 
with the 

Hampshire County 
Trust Company 



The Copper Kettle 
TEA ROOM 

FORTY-FIVE STATE STREET 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

NORTHAMPTON' 
THE BANK ON THE CORNER 

We make every effort to render 

a faultless Personal Service 

May we serve you ? 

WM. G. BASSETT, President 

F. N. KNEELAND, Vice-President and Cashier 

ELBERT L. ARNOLD, Asst. Cashier 



BRIDGMAN & LYMAN 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Send us your mail orders for 

SMITH 

Class Books, Song- Books, Banners 
and Pennants, Stationery, Verse 

and anything else in the book and stationery line 



14 



W — & — w 

WARREN & WATT 

" Everything Electrical" 
179 Alain St., Northampton 
Telephone 126 



We solicit students' patronage. 
Credit extended, terms 30 days 

E. ALBERTS 

The Shoe Man 

The nearest shoe store to college 



Thirty Years' Experience 
Selling 

Students 9 Room 
Furnishings 

We 

Solicit your Business 
At 

137 MAIN STREET 
Northampton, Mass. 

C.N.FITTS 



44 



The Elms 



ii 



NORTHAMPTON'S 

Popular Restaurant 

Convenient for College Students and Guests 

Let us convince you that we serve 
Best Quality Food at Moderate Prices 



G. HARVEY BLISS 



Distinctive 
Jewelry 

Avoidance of the 

commonplace 

distinguishes 

our stock 

R. J. RICHARDS 

COMPANY 

Northampton's Finest 
Jewelry Shop 



]Y|OST Exclusive Models 
in Ladies' Pumps and 
Oxfords are found at 

Fleming's Shoe Shop 

211 Main Street 



Print alk 

We are doers of clever things 
in type, and our master touch 
confers distinction on your 
literature as well as on ourown. 

Metcalf Printing Co. 

8 CRAFTS AVENUE 



The Hotel Garage 

ENTRANCE, MAIN STREET, OPPOSITE CITY HALL 

FORD AGENCY 

Firestone and Linked States Tires 

Storage for ioo Cars 

OFFICIAL BATTERY SERVICE STATION 

Telephone 439-W 

Store and Sales Room, 24 Center St. 

Chase Motor Sales Company 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



The Winchester Store 

Invites the trade of College 
Girls and their friends. 
Winchester Sporting Goods, 
Flash Lights, Tennis Rackets 
and Balls. Golf Balls. 

FOSTER FARRAR CO. 

162 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



Send back for Books 

and 

Stationery 
The Hampshire Bookshop 

Northampton 




Ethel of the 
Sophomore Ice Carnival 



3ttr. 

IMPORTER 

FORMERLY OF FIFTH AVENUE 



EXCLUSIVE 
FEMININE GARMENTURE 



STEARNS BUILDING 

TWO EIGHTY-NINE BRIDGE ST. 
SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



17 



GIRLS! 



WHAT'S THAT TAXI NUMBER? 



IV hy it's 

96-W 

of Course 



City Taxicab Co. 



Draper Hotel Building 



Cars for all Occasions 



E. Sarazin, Prop. 



Services that we 

render Smith 

College Graduates 

wherever 

they may be 

□ □ 

Frank E. Davis 

Northampton, Mass. 

MANUFACTURING 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS IN THIS STORE 



Jewelry — We send it anywhere. Write us and 
we can quickly come to an understanding 
of what you need. Watch work of the 
highest grade. 

Jewelry Repairs — This includes new designs, 
remounting of jewels, cleaning, burnishing, 
and other work. Write to us. 

Engraving — Send in the article. We shall be 
glad to submit sketches of proposed designs. 

Optical Work — Let us measure your glasses 
and make a detailed record before you 
go, and then repairs or new work will be 
sent upon receipt of your letter or wire. 
If you break a lens send the pieces and 
frames, and repairs will go to you quickly. 



18 




hampion 



Manufactured by 

Champion Spark Plug Co. 
Toledo, Ohio 



Plymouth Inn 



The Hotel Approved 
by the Committee on 
Social Regulations 

Here Students may go 

and dine without a 

special chaperon 

Visit 

PLYMOUTH INN 
TEA ROOM 

All Home Cooking 



OUR SHOP IS CONVENIENT TO YOU 

We are centrally located; those 
little adjustments that your glasses 
occasionally need are only matters 
of a few minutes' work. 

We pride ourselves that our 
interest in you does not end with 
your original purchase. 

Prescription work, mail and 
telegraph orders are finished same 
day received. 




"See tor Yourself- 77ie , 
Are Scarcely NoticQable^^ 



OPTICIANS to your President's family and the majority of the Faculty, 
Heads of Houses and Students. Imitation and real Tortoise Shell our specialty. 

O. T. DEWHURST 

REGISTERED OPTOMETRISTS AND PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 
201 MAIN ST., opposite City Hall Tel. 184 W. 



19 



Thomas S. Childs 

INCORPORATED 

273-279 High St. Holyoke, Mass. 

Shoes and Hosiery 

of Quality and Fashion 

CORRECTLY FITTED 

The most extensive and varied 

assortments in Western 

Massachusetts 

Mail Orders Given ExpertAttention 



Roberta teach 


ing at the I 


nstitute: 


"What 


is the vortex, 


I key? 


>> 




I key: 


"Vat 


you 


pay 


at 


the 


movies, 


mam." 











Manicuring 
Facial Massage 



SCHULTZ 



Hair Dressing 
and Shampooing 



Copeland's Fancy Goods Shop 

FURNISHES A LARGE AND CHOICE 
ASSORTMENT OF 

High-class Wools, for Knitting and Crochet- 
ing. Also a complete line of Stamped Goods 
and Embroidery Materials of every descrip- 
tion. Class and Society Designs, a Spe- 
cialty. Art Novelties, Ribbons, Laces, Etc. 

COPELAND'S 

Mail Orders Receive Prompt and Careful Attention 

104 MAIN STREET :: NORTHAMPTON 



20 



QUALITY 



SERYICE 



We have any kind of a car 
for anywhere, at any time 

THE COLLEGE TAXI CO. 

WILLIAM G. MAHER 

Telephone 80 



EFFICIENCY 



RELIABILITY 




SPRINGFIELD 
MASS. 

315 MAIN ST. 

Makers and Retailers 

of 

Fine Candies 



HILL 

BROTHERS 

118 MAIN ST. 

Ye Olde Tyme Rugs 

\\ indow Draperies 

Couch Covers 

Burlap 

Cretonnes 

Floss 

Fingering Yarns 

Down Pillows 

Sport Coats 

Umbrellas 

RELIABLE MERCHANDISE 
AT REASONABLE PRICES 



21 



Established 1881 Incorporated 1896 

Kimball & Cary 

Company 



Hard and Soft 

COALS 

of best quality 



OFFICE: 
2 MAIN ST., NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



22 



You will never regret 
trading at the 

BOSTON 

FRUIT STORE 

M. GIUFFRE & CO. 

The Pioneer Fruit House 
of Northampton 

Tel. 370 

235 MAIN STREET 



DOROTHY M. 
HOWES 

Life Insurance 

Special plans for 

Smith College Students 

ENDOW YOUR COLLEGE 

MAKE SURE OF YOUR OWN 
FUTURE 

ESTABLISH A MONTHLY 
INCOME 

Always — At your Service — All Ways 

New England Mutual Life Ins. Co. 

of Boston, Mass. 
America'! Oldest Company, Incorporated in 1835 



573 Third National Bank Building 

Tel. River 3080 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



How many times have you wished to press a 
shirt waist, etc., for a party? 

Oh! for a Universal Electric Traveler's Iron 
with velvet bag, weight only 3 1 2 lbs. 

Or to add a couple more waves to that coiffeur? 

Oh! for a Universal Electric Curler. 

Now for the studying which takes many long 
hours. 

Oh! for an Electric Study Lamp. See them 
at Our Store. 



Northampton Electric Ltg\ Co. 



23 




YE ROSE TREE INN, NORTHAMPTON 



Commencement Week 
in our Drapery Section 



\\ 7"E want you to come 
* " and look around in 
this department at any 
time, but particularly dur- 
ing Commencement Week, 
the week we set aside for 
featuring Curtains, Drap- 
eries and other Merchan- 
dise of interest to Students 
furnishing rooms. 



Todd's Day Light Store 



The 

Mary Marguerite 

Tea Room and 

Food Shop 



LUNCHEONS AND 
SUPPERS SERVED 

Hours: 11:00 to 6:30 



TWENTY -ONE STATE STREET 



24 



]\T IQUETTE'S 

The College Drug Store 

NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



CAMERAS AND SUPPLIES 

Mail Us Your Films 



Agency for PAGE & SHAW CHOCOLATES 



COLLEGE 

Shoe Shining Parlors 

Shoe Repairing Hat Renovating 

PHILIP KARKANEDES 

233 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



JONTEE L 

Toilet Preparations 

Talcum, Face Powder, Rouge 

Cream, Odor 

EXCLUSIVE AGENTS 
FOR NORTHAMPTON 



Also Headquarters for 

"Those Big Peppermints" 

Coburn & Graves 

" The Rexall Store'''' 

Orders sent by mail anywhere 

Opposite Court House 
NORTHAMPTON 



SAMUEL SOCKUT 

Tailor and Furrier 



Telephone, 1685-M 



Ladies' Suits, Coats and Skirts 
Made to Order 



Steam and Dry Cleaning and Pressing 

Work called for and delivered 



GARMENTS REMODELED 

In Latest Ideas and Fashions 



10 Center Street Northampton, Mass. 

NEAR MAIN STREET 



' II • I : h;:i-i 



„ H»TJ!!!>;;"!'; 



The Northfield 

East Northfield, Mass. 

OPEN ALL THE YEAR 



A homelike house combining comfort, pleasing service, 
and attractive menus. On the Smith College ap- 
proved list and for many years a recreation center 
for .Smith College students and faculty 



Golf, Tennis, Croquet, Mountain Tramping, 

Motoring, Snowshoeing, Skiing, and 

Other Winter Sports in Season 



Thirty-four miles from Northampton over State 
Roads or the Boston & Maine Railroad 

AMBERT G. MOODY, Manager 



25 



Northampton 
Garage Co. 

Cadillac and Dodge Agents 
Telephones, 583-8240 Next to Post Office 

Cadillac Cars to Rent 
By Day or Hour 



STORAGE, REPAIRS 
AND ACCESSORIES 

65 PLEASANT STREET 

Northampton, Mass. 



Fine Chocolates 



Choice Bonbons 




TREBLA'S 

5wEET66Fl?UIT8 



NORTHAMPTON 



265 Main Street 



MAKERS — RETAILERS 



Crispy Candies Fancy Fruit Baskets 



Our New Art 
Room 

at 263 Main Street, adjoining 
our Optical Shop, is a place of 
rare interest and beauty — a 
treasure house of fine pictures, 
framed and unframed; art goods 
charmingly unique, together 
with a most noteworthy display 
of the "different" sort of greet- 
ing cards for all occasions. 

The Park Company, Inc. 

257 Main Street 
Northampton, Massachusetts 




26 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



©nnljnj'a 




Unusual Dress for 
IVomen and Misses 



Fashions for every occasion — 

of unusual distinctiveness and originality 

SUITS, MOTOR COATS, DAY FROCKS, GOWNS, 

SKIRTS, LINGERIE, CORSETS, HOSIERY 



T. ONO 
& COMPANY 



DEALERS IN 



JAPANESE AND 
CHINESE GOODS 



Telephone, 1253-W 



14 CENTER STREET 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




. 6- 

" Ride for Pleasure " 

Pinehurst Riding School 

45 GOTHIC ST. 

Riding Lessons given with the 
Best of School Horses 



W. H. LAW, Prop. Phone, 813-M 



J. E. LAMBIE & CO. 

92 MAIN STREET, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 
We Specialize in the Following Merchandise: 

Imported and Domestic Trimmings. Fancy Silks and 

Dress Goods. Ribbons and Laces. Veilings, 

Kid and Fabric Gloves, Hosiery. Silk and 

Fine Nainsook Undergarments. Curtains, 

Curtain Materials and Curtains 

made to order. Couch Covers, 

Cretonnes and Drapery 

Materials. Silk and 

Lingerie Blouses. 

AGENTS IN THIS CITY FOR BETTY WALES DRESSES 



28 



Whe$e Birthday 






Someone dear to you is a 
year older today 

BUTLER & ULLMAN 



Wjffjy 




You'd be surprised 

At 

The lowness of our prices 
Our large supply of stock 
Our courtesy to customers 

Try Us! 

THE 
CENTRAL GROCERY 



A. McCallum Company 

The Department Store That Makes College Furnishings a Specialty 



For years this store has stood for quality and service. 
Specializing in all the needed 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES— also Suits, 
Coats, Dresses, Blouses and Millinery 



A Cordial Invitation is Extended to You to Make Our Store Your Store 

A. McCALLUM and COMPANY 



29 















Beau tif ul forms 
and compositions 
are not made by 




^"\UR claim to your considera- 
\J tion lies in the fact that we 






chance, nor can 
they ever, in any 
material , be made 




have applied to our own business 
the thought contained in this 






at small expense. 

A composition 

for cheapness and 




quotation from one of the world's 
greatest thinkers and practical 






not for excellence 
of workmanship. 




workers. 






is the most fre- 




If there is anything attractive 






cause of the rapid 




beyond the ordinary, in the page 






decay and entire 
destruction of 
arts and manu- 




arrangement, cover decoration, 
presswork,and general harmony 






factures. 

— Ruskin 




which distinguish our work, be 
assured it has not been due to 
chance. 

We leave nothing to chance. 
Every line, page, volume, as it 
comes from our establishment, 
is the result of a carefully laid, 
conscientiously executed plan. 

The thought and the super- 
vision which our system provides 
is your guarantee of excellence. 

If you have anything to be 
printed, write us; if we under- 
take it, we will do it well. 

BEE 








psm 




Baker, Jones, Hausauer, Inc. 








B|P 




45-51 Carroll Street 
Buffalo, N. Y. 












| 















The "Class Book " is one of our Products. 



30 



The Academy Is Opposite Raysel's 

RAYSEL'S 

The Acme of College Footwear 

The complete exclusiveness of our line of Foot- 
wear demonstrates our genuine ability to meet 
every requirement of the 

College Girl 

Each style in our shop is absolutely of the latest 
design and altogether charming. 

For the Exclusive Girl 

Tailored Waists and Dresses, Sport Suits in 
Jersey and Camel's Hair, Polo Coats, Suede 
Jackets, Imported Beret. 

RAYSEL'S 

SPORT SHOP TAILORED SHOES 



31