(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Class of 1922"

o \ 



1 








Sis. ILji&^jj^ 



Cla0H look 
1322 





oC CjUjJc ■€ 



-tjcj£juJL- 



w 



^ $^^& r 




Ollaaa look 
1922 



^ 



It &?rwmu0 



Ik 



fublisbrn fag tbr (Elass of 1922 



^EH221 



Or 



A 







V*0 »-*^uJU<S—»*-»*_Av 



w 



^clnqfe ^ 



^ 



3n grateful mugmttuu of tuljat slje l)aH m*ant 
in all of UH during our four full rullcgr gears, 
Jlje Qllaafl of 1922 Inutuglu, oputratra ti|t0 buuk. 



!k 



m 



&r 



J% 



w 



^® sfc ^ 



QJahlp nf (Emttenla 



President Emeritus L. 


Clark Seelye 




Frontispiece 


Dedication ...... 






5 


Board of Trustees ..... 






8 


President William Allan Neilson 






10 


Administrative Officers 










11 


Faculty of Instruction 










12 


The Class . 










23 


Former Members 










109 


The Other Classes 










111 


Smith College Council 










118 


House of Representatives 










120 


Smith College Association for Christian Work 






122 


Student Advisors 












124 


Delegations 










\ 


125 


Freshman Year . 












127 


Sophomore Year 












133 


Junior Year 












135 


Senior Year 












143 


Verse 












157 


Publications 












167 


Organizations and Clubs 










173 


Musical Organizations 










211 


Athletics . 










217 


Wit, Humor and Mirtf 


\ 










231 



^ 



b 



=5g[ 



^ 



y& 



w 



^g f^ofe ^ 



^ 



®rUHt?PB 



Charles H. Allen, LL.D. . 
Ruth Bowles Baldwin, A.B. 
H. Clifford Gallagher 
Helen F. Greene, A.M. 
John A. Houston, M.D. 
Frederic Marshall Jones, A.B. 
Thomas W. Lamont, A.B. . 
Samuel W. McCall, LL.D. . 
George B. McCallum, A.B. 
Elizabeth Cutter Morrow, A.B. 
Paul J. Sachs, A.B. . 
George Stanley Stevenson, A.M. 
Helen Rand Thayer, A.B. . 
Marguerite Milton Wells, B.L. 



Lowell, Massachusetts 

Brooklyn, New York 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Northampton, Massachusetts 

Springfield, Massachusetts 

. New York, New York 

Winchester, Massachusetts 

Northampton, Massachusetts 

. Englewood, New Jersey 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Hartford, Connecticut 

Portsmouth, New Hampshire 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 



Ik 



^ mrn 



®r 



Jfo 




I FACULTY 




William Allan Neilson, Ph.D., LL.D. 



President 



A.M. University of Edinburgh 1891; A.M. Harvard 1896; Ph.D. 1898. Teacher in 
Scotland; in Toronto, Canada, 1893-1895. Associate Professor at Bryn Mawr 
1898-1900. Instructor at Harvard 1900-1904. Adjunct Professor of English 
1904-1905. Professor 1905-1906 at Columbia University. Professor of English 
at Harvard 1906-1917. Exchange Professor at the University of Paris 1914- 
1915. Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Polk 
Lore Society. Modern Language Association of America. Scottish Text So- 
ciety. English Association. President of the New England Association of 
Teachers of English 1911-1912. Scottish History Society of North America 
1911-1912. President of Smith College since 1917. 



w 



^g f^gfe ^ 



^ 



Abmmtsirattb? UDfftrrra 





Ada Louise Comstock, A.M., 
LlTT.D., Dean 



Florence Gilman. M.D. 
College Physician 





Susan Rose Benedict, Ph.D. 

Dean of Class of 1922 



Amy Louise Barbour, Ph.D. 
Dean of Class of 1923 





George Bliss McCallum, 
A.B. 

Treasurer 




Mary Belle McElwain, 

Ph.D. 

Dean of Class of 1924 



Picture omitted by request. 



ck 



Mary Merrow Cook, B.S. 
Dean of Class of 1925 



Gifford Clark, A.M. 
Registrar 



^msE& 



s£ 



11 



w 




\@ [^a1 ©/ 

3Farultg of Jlnatrurtum 



Dwight W. 1 ryon : Studied art in 
Paris under J. de Chevreuse, C. Daubigny 
and A. Guillemerdt, and at l'Ecole des 
Beaux Arts. Member of the National In- 
stitution of Arts and Letters of the Amer- 
ican Water Color Society. 



^ 



<3 



Dwight W. Tryon, N.A. 
Professor of Art 




Alfred Vance Churchill, 

A.M. 

Professor of Art 




Harriet W. Bigelow, Ph.D. 
Professor of Astronomy 



Alfred Vance Churchill: A.M. Ober- 
lin College 1898. Student Koniglische 
Hochschule, Berlin, University of Leipsig 
and Academie Julien, Pans 1887-1890. 
Director of Art Department Iowa College 
1891-1893. Instructor at St. Louis Sec- 
ondary and Normal Schools 1893-1897. 
Professor of Fine Arts Teachers College 
1897-1904. Student at University of Paris 
1904-1906. 



Harriet W. Bigelow: A.B. Smith 1896. 
Ph.D. at University of Michigan. 



Irving Francis Wood: A.B. Hamihon 
College 1885. Instructor at Jaffa College, 
Ceylon, 1885-1889. B.D. Yale 1892, 
Ph.D. University of Chicago 1903, D.D. 
Hamilton 1915. Professor in Biblical Lit- 
erature and Ethics, University of Chicago 
1893. 



Robert Seneca Smith: A.B. Yale 1903. 
A.M. 1905, B.D. Yale School of Relig- 
ion 1906. Assistant pastor at the First 
Congregational Church at Montclair, New 
Jersey, 1906-1911. Pastor at the First 
Congregational Church at Poughkeepsie, 
N. Y., 1911-1917. Smith College since 
1917. 



William Francis Ganong: A.B. Uni- 
versity of New Brunswick 1884, A.M. 
1886 Harvard. A. B. 1889, Ph.D. Uni- 
versity of Munich !894, Ph.D. (adeun- 
dum) University of New Brunswick 1898. 
Assistant Instructor of Botany at Harvard 
1887-1893, Professor of Botany and Di- 
rector of the Botanical Gardens at Smith 
1893. 




Irving Francis Wood, 

Ph.D., D.D. 
Prof, of Biblical Literature 




Robert Seneca Smith, 

A.M., B.D. 
Prof, of Biblical Literature 




William Francis Ganong, 

Ph.D. 

Professor of Botany 



^Si 



^ 



Ja 



12 



w 



tSSEHJD^ 



^ 




H. Edwards Wells, Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 




F. Stuart Chapin, Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics 
and Sociology 




Elizabeth Deering Hanscom, 

Ph.D. 

Professor of English 



H. Edward Wells: B.S. Middlebury 
1894. A.M. 1895. Ph.D. University of 
Leipsig 1894. Assistant in Chemistry Mid- 
dlebury College 1894-1895. Associated 
with Professor W. O. Alevater, Wesleyan 
University, in Food Investigation 1898- 
1901. Assistant Professor in Chemistry 
Alleshany College 1902-1903. Professor 
of Chemistry 1903-1907. Professor of 
Chemistry Washington and Jefferson Col- 
lege 1907-1910. Captain of Chemical 
Service, U. S. A. 1918-1919. Instructor 
in Chemistry at Harvard 1919-1920. 



F. Stuart Chapin: B.S. Columbia 1909. 
A.M. 1910. Ph.D. 1911. Instructor of 
Economics at Wellesley 1911-1912. In- 
structor of Economics and Sociology 1912- 
1914. Assistant Professor 1915-1917. 
Director of the Hampshire Branch of the 
Massachusetts Society for the Prevention 
of Cruelty to Children. Secretary of the 
Hampshire County Chapter of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross. Member of the American 
Sociology Society, American Association 
for Labor Legislation. 



Elizabeth Deering Hanscom: A.B. Bos- 
ton University. Ph.D. Yale. Smith since 
1894. 



Herbert Vaughan Abbott: A.B. Am- 
herst 1885. Assistant Instructor in Eng- 
lish at Harvard 1894-1898. Instructor in 
the Horace Mann School and Teachers 
College, Columbia University 1898-1904. 
Adjunct Professor of English Teachers 
College 1904-1905. Smith since 1905. 



Richard Ashley Rice: A.B. Williams 
1899. A.M. Harvard 1913. 1899-1909 
engaged in teaching at the Lawrenceville 
School, in graduate study and teaching at 
Harvard, in teaching at the United States 
Naval Academy and in study in England 
and the University of Paris. 1909-1916 
Assistant and Associate Professor in Eng- 
lish at the Indiana University. Smith 
1916. 

Albert Schinz: A.B. at the University 
of Neuchatel 1888. A.M. 1889 at the 
University of Berlin. 1892-1893, 1894 
Ph.D. at Tubingen, University of Paris 
1894-1896. Instructor in Philosophy at 
Neuchatel 18%- 1897. Instructor in 
French at the University of Minnesota 
1898. Bryn Mawr 1899-1913. Smith 
since 1913. 




Herbert Vaughan Abbott, 

A.B. 

Professor of English 




Richard Ashley Rice, A.M. 
Professor of English 




Albert Schinz, Ph.D. 
Professor of French 



h 



35 nrosra ;& 



A 



13 



w 



^M2&r 



^ 




Louise Delpit, Licenciee 
es Lettres 

Professor of French 




William John Miller, Ph.D. 
Professor of Geology 




Ernst Heinrich Mensel, 

Ph.D., Litt.D. 

Professor of German 



Louise Delpit: Brevet Simple, Brevet 
Superior, Licenciee es Lettres, Paris. Pro- 
fessor in the College de Valence 1896- 
1898. Teacher in the Brearly School, 
New York, 1900-1904. Teacher in the 
Baldwin School Bryn Mawr 1904-1908. 
Smith since 1908. 



William John Miller: B.C. College of 
the Pacific 1900. M.S. 1902. Graduate 
Student in Geology Stanford University 
1900-1901. Instructor in Geology and 
Chemistry at the College of the Pacific 
1901-1903. Fellow in Johns Hopkins 
University 1904. Ph.D. 1905. Professor 
in Geology Hamilton College 1905-1914. 
Connected with the Maryland Survey 
1904-1905. Connected with the U. S. 
Geological Survey Summer 1905-1906. 
Member of the Staff of the New York 
Geological Survey since 1906. Smith since 
1914. 



Ernst Heinrich Mensel: A.B. Carthage 
College, Illinois 1887. Graduate student 
at the University of Michigan. Ph.D. 
1896. Professor in Carthage College 
1887-1892. Instructor in German in the 
University of Michigan 1892-1898. As- 
sistant Professor 1898-1901. 



Carl F. A. Lange: A.B. at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan 1894. Assistant in 
German at Harvard 1898-1899. A.M. 
Harvard 1899. Student at the University 
of Michigan 1899-1900. Instructor at the 
University of Michigan 1900-1905. Ph.D. 
University of Michigan 1903. 



Everett Kimball: A.B. Amherst 1896. 
Ph.D. Harvard 1896-1898. Instructor ir. 
History at the Englewood School for Boys 
1896-1898. Instructor in the Worcester 
High School 1898-1901. Graduate Stu- 
dent at Harvard 1901-1904. Assistant in 
Harvard and Radcliffe 1902-1903. In- 
structor at Wellesley 1903-1904. 




Carl F. A. Lange, Ph.D. 
Professor of German 




Everett Kimball, Ph.D. 
Professor of Government 




Julia Harwood Caverno. Smith A.B., 
A.M. Smith since 1895. 



Julia Harwood Caverno, 

A.M. 

Professor of Creek 



Ik 



VZ lMTTi V, 



14 



J& 



w 



^§ \\^m f 



^ 




Sidney N. Deane. Ph.D. 
Professor of Creelf 




John Spencer Bassett, Ph.D. 
LL.D. 

Professor of History 




Sidney Bradshaw Fay, 

Ph.D. 
Professor of History 



Sidney N. Deane: A.B. Yale 1902. 
Graduate Student at Yale 1902-1904. 
1904-1905 Student in School at Athens. 
1905-1906 Graduate Student at Yale. 
1909-1912 in the Classical Department of 
the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. 



John Spencer Bassett: A.B. Trinity 
College, North Carolina 1888. Ph.D. 
Johns Hopkins 1894. Professor in His- 
tory at Trinity College, North Carolina 
1898-1906. Lecturer at Yale 1897-1908, 
at New York University 1909. Officer in 
the American Historical Association. 



Sidney Bradshaw Fay: A. B. Harvard 
1896. Ph.D. 1900. 1898 at the Univer- 
sity of Paris, 1899 at the University of 
Berlin. T eaching Fellow at Harvard 
University 1900-1902. Assistant Professor 
of History at Dartmouth 1902-1910. Pro- 
fessor 1910-1914. Member of the Amer- 
ican Historical Association. 



Annie Heloise Abel: A.B. at the Uni- 
versity of Kansas 1898. Manuscript 
Reader in History and Political Science 
at Cornell University 1900-1901. Bulkley 
Fellow in History at Yale 1903-1905. 
Ph.D. 1905. Instructor of History at 
Wells College 1905-1906. Instructor of 
History at Goucher College, Baltimore 
1906-1908. Associate Professor 1908- 
1914. Professor at Head of the Depart- 
ment of American History 1914-1915. 
Historian of the Indian Office 1913. 



John C. Hildt: A.B. Johns Hopkins 
1903. University Scholar at Johns Hop- 
kins 1903-1904. Johns Hopkins 1906, 
Ph.D. 



William Dodge Gray: A.B. University 
of Kansas 1900. Principal of the Public 
Schools in Sprinsdale, Arkansas, 1900- 

1902. Graduate Student at Cornell 1902- 

1903. A.M. Cornell 1903. Instructor of 
Roman History at the Peekskill Military 
Academy 1903-1904. Fellow at Cornell 
University and Assistant Instructor 1905- 
1907. Ph.D. Cornell 1907. 




Annie Heloise Abel, Ph.D. 
Professor of History 




John C. Hildt, Ph.D. 
Professor of Historv 




William Dodge Gray, Ph.D. 
Professor of History 



ik 



=*§e 



Or 



15 



A 



V Jf 



^® sfc ^ 



^ 




Joel Ernest Goldthwait, 

B.S., M.D., F.A.C.S., 

D.S.M., C.M.G. 



Joel Ernest Goldthwait: B.S. Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College 1885. M.D. 
Harvard Medical School 1890. Assist- 
ant Surgeon in The Children's Hospital, 
Boston 1900-1902. Chief of the Ortho- 
pedic Clinic at the Carney Hospital, Bos- 
ton 1898-1907. In the Orthopedic De- 
partment at the Massachusetts General 
Hospital 1904-1908. Consulting Ortho- 
pedic Surgeon to several hospitals in and 
about Boston. President of the American 
Orthopedic Association 1900. Fellow at 
the American College of Surgeons 1913. 
D.S.M. 1919. C.M.G. Commander of 
the Order of St. Michael and St. George 
1918. 




Eleanor Philbrook Cushing, 

A.M. 
Professor of Mathematics 




J. Everett Brady, Ph.D. 

Professor of Latin 




Florence Alden Gragg, 

Ph.D. 

Professor of Latin 



J. Everett Brady: A.B. at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina 1881. Post Grad- 
uate at the University of Leipsig, Gottin- 
gen, Paris, Athens and Heidelberg 1882- 
1888. Ph.D. in Sanscrit Classics and 
Ancient History at Heidelberg 1888. 



Florence Aldsn Gragg: A.B. Radcliffe 
1899. A.M. 1906. Ph.D. 1908. Teacher 
at Vassar 1908-1909. 



Eleanor Philbrook Cushing: A.B. 
Smith 1879. A.M. 1882. 



Harriet Redfield Cobb: Smith A.B., 

A.M. 1891. 



Henry Dike Sleeper: A.B. Harvard 
1887. Hartford Theological Seminary 
1891. Student of Music at Worcester, 
Hartford, Chicago, Philadelphia and Lon- 
don. Ordained as Congregational minis- 
ter 1891. Instructor in Music at Beloit 
College, Wisconsin 1891-1894. Professor 
of Music Georgetown College, Kentucky 
1894-1895. Instructor of Music at Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin 1895-1898. Organ- 
ist at First Congregalional Church, Madi- 
son 1895-1898, Union Church, Worcester, 
Mass., 1899-1902, Fourth Congregational 
Church, Hartford, 1902-1904. Fellow of 
American Guild of Organists. 




Harriet Redfield Cobb, 
A.M. 

Professor of Mathematics 




Henry Dike Sleeper, 

F.A.G.O. 

Professor of Music 



Ik 



^0H221© 



1G 



73 



w 



^® f^5] @r 



^ 




Robert E. S. Olmsted, A.B. 
Professor of Music 




Rebecca Wilder Holmes 
Professor of Music 




Rcbert E. S. Olmsted: A.B. Amherst 
1893. Student at the College of Music, 
New York City. Teacher of Music in 
New York and Hartford 1896-1907. 
Teacher in the Broad Street Conserva- 
tory, Philadelphia 1901-1902. Director 
of Church Choirs. 



Arthur Ware Locke: A.B. Harvard 
1905. A. M. 1915. 1907-1909 Travel- 
ing Fellow of Harvard. Graduate Student 
in Piano and Composition in Berlin 1909. 
Instructor of Music in Brown University 
1910-191 1. Professor of Music at Wash- 
burn College, Topeka, Kansas, 1911-1914. 
Assistant Professor of Piano and Theory 
at the University of Wisconsin 1914-1915. 
Has done research in Music History at 
Harvard. 



Roy Dickinson Welch: Artist's Diploma 
in Music at the University School of Music 
at Ann Aibor 1907. A.B. University of 
Michigan 1909. Instructor in the Piano 
Department University School of Music 
Ann Arbor 1907-1910. Student of Josef 
Lhevinne, Berlin 1910-1912. Instructor of 
History, Analysis of Music and Compo- 
sition in the University School Music at 
Ann Arbor 1912-1914. 



Harry Norman Gardiner: A.B. Am- 
herst 1878. A.M. 1885. Union Theo- 
logical Seminary 1882. Leipsig Univer- 
sity in 1884. Heide.berg 1884. Teachers 
Academy, Green Falls, New York 1878- 
1879. Instructor of Psychology 1891- 
1892. Smith since 1884. 



Arthur Ware Locke, A.M. 
Professor of Music 



Anna Alice Cutler: A.B. Smith. Ph.D. 
Yale in 1896. Instructor in the Depart- 
ment of Philosophy at Rockford College, 
Illinois 1892-1893. Instructor in Logic 
1895; in English 1897-1899; in Philoso- 
phy 1899-1902. Assistant Professor 1905. 




Roy Dickinson Welch, A.B. 
Professor of Music 




Harry Norman Gardiner, 

A.M. 

Professor of Philosophy 




Anna Alice Cutler, Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology 



EVi 



^g |HIM^l 



&r 



A 



V JJ 




David Camp Rogers, Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology 




Frank Allan Waterman, 

Ph.D. 

Professor of Physics 



^S ftMZte r 



David Camp Rogers: A.B. Princeton 
1899. Hartford Theological Seminary 
1899-1901. A.M. Harvard 1902. Ph.D. 
1903. Assistant in Philosophy at Har- 
vard 1902-1903. Assistant and Instruc- 
tor in Social Ethics 1903-1909. Assistant 
in Applied Psychology 1908-1909 at Har- 
vard. Assistant Professor of Psychology 
at the University of Kansas 1904-1914. 



Frank Allan Waterman: A.B. Prince- 
ton 1888. Ph.D. Princeton 1896. In- 
structor of Physics 1891-1892. Profes- 
sor 1892-1893, at Purdue University, La- 
fayette, Indiana. Instructor in Physics at 
Princeton 1893-1897. Fellow of the A. 
A. A. S. Member American Physics 
Society. Societe Francaise de Physique. 



Caroline Brown Bourland: A.B. Smith 
1893. Ph.D. Bryn Mawr 1902. Student 
at the Sorbonne and College de France 
1897-1898. Fellow in Romance Lan- 
guages Bryn Mawr 1898-1899. Gradu- 
ate Student and Fellow in 1899-1900. 
Holder of the Mary E. Garrett European 
Fellowship and Sludent in Romance Lan- 
guages in Madrid, Spain 1900-1901. 



Harris Hawthorne Wilder: A.B. Am- 
herst 1886. Ph.D. University of Frei- 
burg. Baden 1891. Member of the 
American Society of Naturalists, Ameri- 
can Society of Zoology, Boston Society 
of Natural History. Fellow of the Amer- 
ican Academy of Arts and Sciences. 



^ 




Caroline Brown Bourland, 

Ph.D. 

Professor of Spanish 




Harris Hawlhorne Wilde 

Ph.D. 

Professor of Zoology 



William Allan Neilson, Ph.D., LL.D. 
Ruth Goulding Wood, Ph.D. 
Amv Louise Barbour, Ph.D. 
Mary Belle McElwain, Ph.D. 
Susan Rose Benedict, Ph.D. 
Esther Lowenthal, Ph.D. 
Laura Adella Bliss, A.M.. A.C.M. 
Ellen Parmelee Cook, A.M. . 
Julia Warner Snow, Ph.D. . 
Emma Bates, Mus.B. . 
Elizabeth Spaulding Mason, A.B. 
Louisa Sewall Cheever, A.M. 

Mary Breese Fuller, A.M. . 
Frances Grace Smith. Ph.D. 
Josef Wiehr, Ph.D. 
Margaret Bradshaw, Ph. I). . 

Aida Agnes Heine, A.M. 

Marv Louise Foster, Ph.D. . 

Inez' Whipple Wilder, A.M. . 

Wilson Townsend Moog\ Mus.B., F.A 

Harvey Gates Townsend, Ph.D. . 



G.O. 



. Professor of English 

. Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of Greek 

Professor of Latin 

Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of Economics and Sociology 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Botany 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of English Language and 

Literature 

. Associate Professor of History 

. Associate Professor of Botany 

. Associate Professor of German 

Associate Professor of English Language and 

Literature 

. Associate Professor of Geology 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

. Associate Professor of Zoology 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Education 



^ 



&r 



A 



IS 



w 



vJ) f[M3te ^ 



^ 



Mary Delia Lewis, A.M. 
Osmond T. Robert, B. es L. 
Margaret Rooke 



Associate Professo 



f English Language and 
Literature 

Associate Professor of French Language and 

Literature 
Associate Professor of Italian Language and 

Literature 

. Associate Professor of Physics 

. Associate Professor of Zoology 

\ssociate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Art 

Associate Professor of Latin 

Associate Professor of Philosophy and Psychology 

Associate Professor of English Language and 

Tjit ('i"i \ iii't 1 
Robert Withington, Ph.D., O. A. Chevalier de l'Ordre de la Couronne (Beige) 

Associate Professor of English Language and Literature 
Associate Professor of English Language and 



Arthur Taber Jones. Ph.D. . 
Howard Mason Parshley, Sc l> 
Jessie Yereance ('ami, Ph.D. 
Beulah Strong 
P. Warren Wright, Ph.D. . 
ICdna Aston Shea rer, 1 'h. I i. . 
Paul Robert Lieder, l»h. 1 >. . 



Howard Rollin Tatch, Ph.D. 

Chase Going Woodhouse, A.M. . 
Clara Willoughby Davidson, A.M. 
Stanley Alden, A. it. 

Walter Squire, A.M. 
Mary Lilias Richardson, A.M. 
I. aura Sophronia Clark, A.M. 
Milcn [sabelle Williams 
Sarah Hook Hamilton . 
Susan Miller Rambo. Ph.D. . 
Mary Merrow Cook, B.S. 

Ilchn Ashhurst Choate, Ph.D. 
Myra Melissa Sampson, A.M. 
Blanche Goode .... 

Laura Hatch, Ph.D. 
Samuel A. Eliot, Jr., A.B. 



Katharine Shepherd Woodward, A.B. 

Esther Ellen Dale .... 
Rose Frances Egan, A.M. . 

Grace Hazard Conkling', B.L. 

Clarence Kennedy, A.M. 

liny Richard Denslow, B.S., A.M. 

Elizabeth M. Whitmore, A.M. 

I'M ward James Woodhouse, LL.B. 

Alice Cleasnn .... 

Julius Drachsler A.M. . 
Emily Ledyard Shields, Ph.D. 
Eleanor Shipley Duckett. Ph.S. . 
Elizabeth Andros Foster, Ph.D. . 
Elizabeth Avery, Ph.D. . 

Elizabeth Faith Genung, M.S. A. . 

James Huntlev Sinclair, Ph.D. . 

Clifford H. Riedell .... 

Florence Farnham Olmsted . 

Mary Ella "Williams 

Anna Adele Chenot, A.M. 

Margaret Lewis Bailey, Ph.D. . 

Emmett Reid Dunn, Ph.D. . 

Louise E. W. Adams, Ph.D. . 

Dan T. Gorokhoff .... 

Catherine Elizabeth Koch, A.M.. M.L 

Madeleine Barthelemy, Certificate d' Aptitude . 

Charles Albert Case 

James Leavitt Stoddard, A.B., M.D 

Albeit Pages, Licencie es Lettres 

Margaret Brackenbury Crook. A.B, 

Lizbeth R. Laughton. A.B. . 

Cesar Bar.ia, Doctor en Derecho 

Florence McArdle, A.M. 

Sidney R. Packard. Ph.D. . 
Thames Ross Williamson. A.M. 
Robert Merrill Dewey, B.S. . 

A. Mortimer Erskine. Ph.D. . 
Amy K. McMaster, A.M. 
Hannah Louisa Billings. A.M. 
Lucy Lord Barrangon, A.M. . 
Abbie Mabel O'Keefe, M.D. . 



Literature 

Associate Professor of Economics and Sociology 

Associate Professor of Biblical Literature 

Associate Professor of English Language and 

Literature 
. Associate Professor Music 
Assistant Professor of Latin 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
. Assistant Professor of French 
Assistant Professor of Music 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Assistant Professor of French and Dean of the 

Class of 1925 

. Assistant Professor of Botanv 

. Assistant Professor of Zoology 

. Assistant Professor Music 

. Assistant Professor of Geologv 

Assistant Professor of English Language and 

Literature and of Spoken English 

Assistant Professor of English Language and 

Literature 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of English Language and 

Literature 
Assistant Professor of English Language and 

Literature 

. Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of Art 

. Assistant Professor of Government 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology 

Assistant Professor of Latin 

Assistant Professor of Latin 

• Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Assistant Professor of English and of Spoken 

English 

. Assistant Professor of Botany 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Psychology 

. Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of French 

Assistant Professor of German and English 

. Assistant Professor of Zoology 

Assistant Professor of Latin 

. Assistant Professor of Choral Music 

. Assistant Professor of Botany 

Assistant Professor of French 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

. Assistant Professor of French 

Assistant Professor of Biblical Literature 

Assistant Professor of Spoken English 

. Assistant Professor of Spanish 

. Assistant Professor of Hygiene and Physical 

Education 

. Assistant Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology 

Ass ; stant Professor of English Language and 

Literature and of Spoken English 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology 

Instructor in Physics 

Instructor in History of Art 

. Instructor in Hygiene 



rk 



^ 



& 



A 



19 



Vr 



^D fBfe ^ 



^ 



A.B. 



Gladys Amelia Anslow, A.M. 

Amanda Lee Norris 

Susan Raymond, A.B. 

Eunice Elizabeth Chace, A.M. 

Helen Joy Sleeper'. A.M. 

Louise Smith, A.M. 

C. Pauline Burt, A.M. . 

Constance Kilham Greene . 

Elizabeth Frances Rogers, I'h.I) 

Eleanor Ferguson Rambo, Ph.D. . 

Louise Bourgoin, Licenciee es Lettre 

K. Frances Scott, Ph.B., M.D. 

Edith Hamilton. A.M. . 

Ella Lauchner Smith, A.M. . 

Mildred Hurnette Porter, A.M 

Vera Marie Gushee, M.S. 

Helen McGregor Noyes, A.B. 

Mina Stein Kirstein. A.B. 

Abba Wlllard Bowen, 

Myrtle V. Jordan, A.B 

Harriette Dilla, Ph.D., LL.B. 

Lucile Marsh, A.D. 

Helen Bocher. A.B. 

Lilian Mary Lane, Ph.D. 

Mary J. Garber, A.M. . 

Rebecca Haight .... 

Margaret Pauline Roesel, A.M. . 

Germaine Ferio, Licenciee es Lettres 

Anacleta Candida Vezzetti . 

Anna Hobbet, A.B. .... 

Sara Bache-Wig. M.S. . 

Dorothy Louise Merchant, A.M. . 

Helene Cattanes Licenciee es Lettre 

Mira Bigelow Wilson, A.B., B.D. . 

Marine Dinan, Licenciee es Lettres 

Eleanor Hall Ayres, A.M. 

Alice Margaret Holden, A.M. 

Mag-delaine Pellet, A.B. 

Margaret M. Sherwood, Ph.D. 

Ruth Doggett Kennedy, A.B. 

Dorothy Sears Ainsworth, A.B. . 

<\bby Snow Belden, A.B. 

Ruth "Wendell Cooper, A.B. . 

Willard Thorp, A.M. . 

Harriet MeWilliams Parsons, Ph.D 

Edith Harrison Morrill, A.M. 

Margaret Gale Scott, A.M. . 

Cora Beale Key, A.M. . 

Margaret Cameron. A.M. 

Constance McLaughlin Green, A.B. 

Florence N. Schott, M.S. 

Prank Edward Dow 

Evelyn Harwood Scholi, A.B. 

Esther Purrington, A.B. 

Sadie Rae Myers, A.B. . 

Bernice Nelke .... 

Helen Pittman, A.B. 

Anna Polowetzki .... 

Elizabeth Kimball, A.M. 

Hazel M. Leach .... 

Marguerite McKee, A.B. 

Olive Morrill, A.B 

Frances Holden, A.B. . 
Ethel Cook Eliot .... 
Sylvia Spencer Welch . 
William James Short . 



] nstructo 



li 



. Instructor in Physics 
Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 
Instructor in Astronomy 

. Instructor in Zoology 

Instructor in Music 

. Instructor in Zoology 

Instructor in Chemistry 

• in Hygiene and Physical Education 

. Instructor in History 

Instructor in Greek and Latin 

Instructor in French 

. Instructor in Hygiene 

Instructor in English 

structor in Economics and Sociology 

. Instructor in Physics 

Instructor in Astronomy 

. Instructor in English 

. Instructor in English 

Instructor in French 

Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 

Instructor in Economics and Sociology 

Instructor in Spoken English 

Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 

. Instructor in English 

Instructor in Spoken English 

Instructor in Music 

. Instructor in History 

Instructor in French 

Instructor in Italian 

. Instructor in Geology 

Instructor in Botany 

. Instructor in Geology 

Instructor in French 

Instructor in Biblical Literature 

Instructor in French 

Instructor in French 

. Instructor in Government 

Instructor in French 

Instructor in French 

tor in Economics and Sociology 

Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 

Instructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 

Instructor in Spoken English 

Instructor in Spoken English 

Instructor in Astronomy 

. Instructor in English 

. Instructor in History 

in Philosophy and Psychology 

Instructor in French 

. Instructor in English 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Assistant in Music 

Assistant in Astronomy 

Assistant in Geology 

. Assistant in Philosophy and Psychology 

Assistant in Hygiene and Physical Education 

Assistant and Curator in Zoology 

Reader in Art 

Museum Assistant in Art 

Curator in Art 

Reader in History 

Demonstrator in Chemistry 

Demonstrator in Philosophy and Psychology 

. Reader in English 

. Reader in Music 

. Lecturer in Music 



Instruc 



Instructo 



tk 



m 



\yr 



A 



20 




The • Class 



w 



^® frSte ^ 



^ 




Hannah Silberman Abraham 
644 Morris Street 
Albany, N. Y. 



M. Cornelia Ahl 

130 Hawley Street 

Binghamton, New York 





Katherine Grier Adam 
5219 Granada Street 
Los Angeles, California 



Janice Katherine Aldridge 

Lyncroft 

New Rochelle, New York 





L^ 



Marjorie Bradford Adams 
91 Gansevoort Street 
Little Falls, New York 



Elizabeth Alexander 

204 College Avenue 

Beaver, Pennsylvania 




^ 



^r 



A 



A 



24 



w 



^gf^^r 



^ 




Mildred Isabel Alfred 
546 First Street 

Brooklyn, New York 



Ann Axtell 

119 North 32nd Avenue 

Omaha, Nebraska 





Pauline Ames 

North Easton, Massachusetts 



Doris Palmer Babson 
Riverside, Illinois 





Jane Bogert Arms 
Lowell, Massachusetts 



Eleanor Bachman 
Jenkintown, Pennsylvania 




tk 



^fTOS^I 



& 



A 



w 



^[ili]^ 



^ 




Esther Colette Baehr 
2049 East 96th Street 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Alice Mildred Ball 

28 Forest Street 

Whitinsville, Massachusetts 





Beatrice Bacc 

840 Riverdale Street 

West Springfield, Massachusetts 



Annette Jenks Bardwell 

3321 Second Avenue 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 





Mayme Holden Bahin 
516 South Union Street 
Natchez, Massachusetts 



Hilda Barnes 
519 East Tenth Avenue 
Tarentum, Pennsylvania 




tk 



^gBKZa 



w 



Ja 



26 



w 



^SOl ^r 



^ 




Ruth Houghton Barnes 
28 Coyle Street 
Portland, Maine 



Madeleine Elizabeth Baxter 

356 South Main Street 

Woonsocket, Rhode Island 





Elizabeth Wendell Barry 
Milton Point 
Rye, New York 



Dorothy Alice Bedworth 

Round Hill 

Springfield, Massachusetts 





Dorothy Bartruff 
473 Evergreen Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 



Ruth Bemis 

Old Orchard Road 

Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 




tk 



^s. vmm n 



A 



27 



w 



^ fiiinte ^ 



^ 




Doris Benedict 

124 Highland Avenue 

Waterbury, Connecticut 



Marguerite Berc 

1 56 Grant Avenue 

Jersey City, New Jersey 





Kathryn Stuart Bennett 
319 Stuart Avenue 
Kalamazoo, Michigan 



^^^ 



Margaret Bergan 

75 Harrison Avenue 

Northampton, Massachusetts 





Dorothy Benson 

108 Woodlawn Road, Roland Park 

Baltimore, Maryland 



^ 



=*§ 



Harriet Bergtold 
1 1 59 Race Street 
Denver, Colorado 




®r 



Jk 



2S 



w 



^g f^Ol (g^ 



^ 




Esther Ann Berryman 
303 Lincoln Avenue 
Charleroi, Pennsylvania 



Marion Louise Billings 
Canton, Massachusetts 





Ruth Beveridce 

1801 North Pennsylvania Street 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



Elizabeth Seelye Bixler 
Exeter, New Hampshire 





Joanna Woolverton Beyer 
Alexandria, Pennsylvania 



Louise Blaisdell 

South Road 

Portsmouth, New Hampshire 




!k 



^g flimi] 



&r 



2!) 



A 



w 




^Esa] (g^ 



Gertrude Louise Blatchford 
19 Lincoln Street 
Framingham, Massachusetts 



^ 



Beth Bohning 

2226 Hemphill Street 

Fort Worth, Texas 





Eunice Blauvelt 
Port Byron, New York 



Dorothy Curtis Bourne 

2 Kensington Avenue 

Bradford, Massachusetts 





Ethel Theresa Boas 

10 West 88th Street 

New York City, New York 



Priscilla Alden Boyce 

233 North Chestnut Street 

Lansing, Michigan 




k 



^IMZH^ 



A 



30 



w 



^g f^ofe ^ 



^ 




Constance Boyer 
38 Fletcher Street 
Winchester, Massachusetts 



Mary Elizabeth Bridcers 

1306 Hillsboro Street 

Raleigh, North Carolina 





Clara Louise Bozovsky 
539 Washington Avenue 
Dunkirk, New York 



Eleanor Louise Brinsmade 

c/o 450 Riverside Drive 

New York City, New York 





Ernestine Elizabeth Bradford 
10 West 16th Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Elizabeth H. Brooke 

"Howe House" 

Framingham, Massachusetts 




L^ 



^g jlffiZll 



Or 



31 



^2 



w 



^ $^^& r 



^ 




Frona Marguerite Brooks 
1105 West California Avenue 
Uibana, Illinois 



Lois Eleanor Brown 
Lewiston, New York 





Leona Anna Brophel 
Leicester, New York 



Dorothy Lee Bryan 
2508 Sixth Avenue 
Fort Worth, Texas 





Katherine Mary Brosnahan 
24 Pine Street 
Bellows Falls, Vermont 



Dorris Louise Bryant 

I 788 Beacon Street 

Brookline, Massachusetts 




L^ 



^BUZH^ 



A 



w 



^g ft^te ^ 



^ 




Miriam Buncher 
14 Greenwood Lane 
Waltham, Massachusetts 



Beatrice Marie Byram 

220 Ridgewood Avenue 

Glen Ridge, New Jersey 





Zillah Marion Burke 

130 Longwood Avenue 
Brookline, Massachusetts 



Elizabeth Kannally Byrne 
859 Watertown Avenue 
Waterbury, Connecticut 





Charlotte Josephine Butler 
10 Addison Street 
Arlington, Massachusetts 



Laura White Cabot 
Woodstock, Vermont 




!k 



^ \WTE ^? 



^5 



33 



w 



^g fLM3] (5^ 



^ 




Elizabeth MacDonald Cairns 

19 Park Lane 

Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 



Helen Brownell Carroll 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 





+%> 


T* ^ 


/ 


** 




Vera Iydelle Call 
79 High Street 
Meriden, Connecticut 



Alice Baldwin Chapman 

446 Park Place 

Bridgeport, Connecticut 








Sarah Staples Campbell 
Cherryfield, Maine 



k 



Dorothy Jane Chapple 
206 Clark Avenue 
Billings, Montana 



^ 



& 



M v ! 




^ 



34 



i 



w 



^g fta ^ 



^ 




Dorothy Edwards Chase 
177 Redington Street 
Swampscott, Massachusetts 



Anna Margaret Claney 

717 Junior Terrace 

Chicago, Illinois 





Eleanor Child 

12 Lexington Avenue 

Greenwich, Connecticut 



Carita Louise Clark 

16 Occum Ridge 

Hanover, New Hampshire 





Eleanor Carroll Chilton 
Charleston, West Virginia 



Catherine Mitchell Clark 

321 Fourth Avenue 

St. Cloud, Minnesota 




L^ 



^ mrzw ? 



Ja 



V JJ 



^sa] ^ 



^ 




Dorothy Florence Clark 
7003 Euclid Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Sarah Mason Clarke 

128 Henry Street 

Brooklyn, New York 





Eleanor Gaither Clark 
1110 Michigan Avenue 
Evanston, Illinois 



Florence Laura Cohen 

1114 Union Street 

Schenectady, New York 





Evelyn Osborn Clarke 
140 Procter Boulevard 
Utica, New York 



Martha Cole 

63 Manchester Street 

Nashua, New Hampshire 




!k 



®[ffl221® 



&r 



36 



^ 



a 



w 



^^E^ 



^ 




Helen Virginia Conklin 
210 East Sixth Street 
Hutchinson. Kansas 



Mary Carter Coolidge 
R. F. D. 39 

Barre, Massachusetts 





Isabel Conklin 
139 Broadmead, 
Princeton, New Jersey 



Ruth Anne. Cooper 

2409 Grandview Avenue 

Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, Ohio 





Margaret Coogan 
32 Plainfield Street 
Hartford, Connecticut 



Hilda Juanita Couch 

46 South Broadway 

Nyack-on-Hudson, New York 




L^ 



& rosra 3£ 



A 



w 



^M^&r 



^ 




Adelaide Jackson Cozzens 

Locust Valley 

Long Island, New York 



Phyllis H. Creasey 

80 Prospect Street 

East Orange, New Jersey 





Elizabeth Crain 
Camp Gaillard 
Panama Canal Zone 



Marion Crozier 

945 East 53d Street 

Chicago, Illinois 





Marjorie Lyle Crandall 
283 Fellsway East 
Maiden, Massachusetts 



Dorothy Crydenwise 
Richfield Springs, New York 




^ 



^, vmm v, 



3S 



Jk 



w 



^g f^o] g^ 



^ 




Margaret Anne Cullinan 

Shadyside 

Houston, Texas 



Janet Danforth 

56 Lexington Avenue 

Buffalo, New York 





Helen Cunningham 
71 Hodge Avenue 
Buffalo, New York 



Lucile M. Darton 
379 Temple Street 
Haven, Connecticut 





Mary Elizabeth Daily 
Warren, Massachusetts 



Flora Mildred Davidson 
Bethany, Connecticut 




!k 



& nroana 3^ 



A 



39 



w 



^gglMiffe^ 



^ 




Martha Davidson 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



Florence Ruth Denison 

1502 Wilder Avenue 

Honolulu, T. H. 





Annette Davis 

81 1 North Ninth Street 

St. Joseph, Missouri 



Mary Dickson 

521 Grand Avenue 

Dayton, Ohio 





Helen Stiles DeGroat 
61 Railroad Street 
Cortland, New York 



Gertrude Priscilla Dimick 

25 Elmgrove Avenue 

Providence, Rhode Island 




!k 



^eiD^ 



40 



A 



w 



^^01 ^7= 



^ 




Ruth Dimick 

25 Elmgrove Avenue 

Providence, Rhode Island 



Edith De Lamater Donnell 

Northport, Long Island 

New York 





Gladys Dingledine 
821 Main Street 
Harrisonburg, Virginia 



Elizabeth Donnell 

Northport, Long Island 

New York 





Jane Dinsmore 

Baker Place, East Walnut Hills 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



Charlotte Dorian 

329 Washington Street 

Middletown, Connecticut 




LY 



^gfTO^I 



^ 



41 



A 



w 



^ssSte r 



^ 




HULDAH SoUTHWICK DORON 
133 Essex Street 
Bangor, Maine 



Dorothy H. Dreyfus 

230 West 107th Street 

New York City, New York 





Marion Downey 
Box 989 

Waterbury, Connecticut 



Nell Clarice Driggs 
Ogden, Utah 




rk 




Berenice Edna Dreyfus 
418 Central Park West 
New York City, New York 



Faith Dudgeon 

28 Fort Street 

Fairhaven, Massachusetts 




\3 



@EfflZ2I© 



^r 



A 



42 



w 



^gj fL^fe ^ 



^ 




Flora Edythe Durrell 
Stratton, Maine 



Ruth Eckhart 
Auburn, Indiana 





Edelweiss Waldron Dyer 
19 Chester Street 
Allston, Massachusetts 



Elinor Eltinge 
The Davenport Hotel 
Spokane, Washington 





Barbara Eaton 
15 Trinity Street 
Claremont, New Hampshire 



Marguerite R. Ely 
Hamburg, Connecticut 




^ 



^§,mzB^ 



43 



J& 



w 



^g fla ^ 



^ 




Lily Hortense Emerson 
319 Abercorn Street 
Savannah, Georgia 



Gladys Jane Fee 
1500 President Street 
Brooklyn, New York 





Eleanor M. Evans 

3445 North Pennsylvania Street 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



Gertrude L. Ferguson 

202 Market Street 

Amsterdam, New York 





Ellen L. Ewing 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 



Ruth Dakin Ferguson 

23 Linden Place 

New Rochelle, New York 




^ 



^g[ 



& 



44 



A 



V 



w 



^ fta ^ 



^ 




Katherine Marie Fischer 
Port Chester, New York 



Doris Flather 

8 Berkley Street 
Nashua, New Hampshire 





Myrtle Adele Fish 
420 Chestnut Street 
Roselle Park, New Jersey 



Margaret Angelina Ford 

255 Peeples Street 

Atlanta, Georgia 





Caroline Warren Fisher 
260 Franklin Street 
Newton, Massachusetts 



Dorothy Foresman 

515 Essex Road 

Kenilworth, Illinois 




uk 



^ 



■i& 



45 



A 



w 



Ag fi^nol ©^ 



^ 




Emily Foresman 
5 I 5 Essex Road 
Kenilworth, Illinois 



Elinor French 

14 Argyle Street 

Rochester, New York 





Margaret Miller Franks 
225 Maple Avenue, Rockville Center 
Long Island, New York 



Elizabeth Prescott French 

222 Belmont Street 

Fall River, Massachusetts 





Zena Colaer Friedman 
10 Hawthorn Street 
Stamford, Connecticut 



Helen Wentworth French 

20 School Street 

Andover, Massachusetts 




k 



^en2^^ 



46 



A 



a 



w 



^^g ftioafe ^ 



^ 




Edith Copland Fuller 
109 Barnard Avenue 
Watertown, Massachusetts 



Grace Marie Gafford 
Wymore, Nebraska 





Helen Elizabeth Fyke 
237 South Poplar Street 
Centralia, Illinois 



Louise Marie Garbe 

98 Hamilton Avenue 

New Brighton, New York 





Margaret Louise Gabel 

250 West 91st Street 

New York City, New York 



Frances E. Gates 

"Woodstock" 

South Belhngham, Washington 




^ 



^BHZSI^ 



47 



A 



w 



A ^QO) ^ 



^ 




Esther Pratt Gaylord 
76 Rogers Street 
Branford, Connecticut 



Hanna Gichner 

3220 Highland Avenue 

Cleveland Park 

District of Columbia 



' •■ 





Katherine Fuller Gaylord 
143 Holabird Avenue 
Winsted, Connecticut 



Virginia Manson Giles 
Weston, Massachusetts 





Elsye Geisenbercer 
900 Main Street 
Natchez, Mississippi 



Dorothy Katherine Gleason 

200 Prospect Street 

Northampton, Massachusetts 




L^ 



^L 



^ 



J& 



48 



w 



A@ s?te ^ 



^ 




Elizabeth Goldbeck 

Sag Harbor 

Long Island, New York 



Marie Goudy 

48 North Walnut Street 

East Orange, New Jersey 





Rosalie Gordon 

2405 West End Avenue 

Nashville, Tennessee 



Charlotte Day Gower 

841 South Greenwood Avenue 

Kankakee, Illinois 





Sophie Reiter Gordon 
Brookfield, Pennsylvania 



Helen Grant 
Faribault, Minnesota 




ik 



^ fTO^l ^ 



A 



49 



w 



^ f^oj g^ 



^ 




Evelyn Gray 

658 Longfellow Avenue 

Detroit, Michigan 



Catherine Virginia Grigsby 

22 Orange Road 

Montclair, New Jersey 





Ruth Green 

526 West I 13th Street 

New York City, New York 



Rosanna Augusta Grout 

107 Day Street 

Fitchburg, Massachusetts 







Elizabeth Hord Greer 
1443 North Meridian Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Ruth Guggenheim 

315 Beach Avenue 

Rochester, New York 




L^ 



g Mreng t& 



-\2, 



50 



^ 



w 



@ f™te ^ 




Frances Carlton Guild 
15 West Walnut Avenue 
Merchantsville, New Jersey 



^ 



Ardelia Ripley Hall 

181 Edwards Street 

New Haven, Connecticut 





Adelaide Lormore Guion 
159 Oakleigh Road 
Newton, Massachusetts 



Dorothy Hall 

43 Upland Road 

Quincy, Massachusetts 





Margaret Hackett 
Bolton, Massachusetts 



Helen Hall 

4600 Maryland Avenue 

St. Louis, Missouri 




b 



^g[TO221^ 



^ 



51 



V JJ 



^g ftg g^ 



^ 




Frances Helen Haven Harmon 
313 Ten Eyck Street 
Watertown, New York 



Isabel Westcott Harper 

36 Mercer Street 

Princeton, New Jersey 





Gertrude Harney 
57 Breed Street 
Lynn, Massachusetts 



Gladys Harriman 
North Wilmington, Massachusetts 





Helen Harper 

35 South Professor Street 

Oberhn, Ohio 



Ruth Harrington 

51 Brattle Street 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 




!k 



^iTOsra^ 



J& 



52 



w 



"?§ %M2fe 7r 



^ 




Alice Trowbridge Harris 
9 Doden Lane 
Flushing, New York 



Doris van Cott Harrison 
Haworth, New Jersey 



'Sfr^*^ 





Edith Bedell Harris 

20 North Mountain Avenue 

Montclair, New Jersey 



Mary Hale Harts 

2123 Bancroft Street 

Washington, D. C. 





ik 



Barbara Wyndham Harrison 
Whitestone, New York 



Beatrice Botsford Harvey 

2100 Calumet Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 




\§ Mwm &, 



&r 



y& 



53 



w 



^M$&f 



^ 




Helen Eleonore Harvey 
New Prague, Minnesota 



Katherine Kezia Hasson 

200 Hunter Avenue 

Kansas City, Missouri 





Jane Harwood 
Kansas City, Missouri 



Virginia Hatfield 

400 Wallace Place 

Covington, Kentucky 





!k 



Frances Knowles Haskell 
Ardsley Park 
Ardsley-on-Hudson, New York 



Frances Atkinson Hause 

22nd Street and Bellevue Road 

Harnsburg, Pennsylvania 




^ IWTB ^? 



v/2 



54 



w 



^g f^afe r 



^ 




Helen Marion Hauser 
186 Franklin Street 
Bloomfield, New Jersey 



Sophie Henker 

1395 Alta Vista Street 

Dubuque, Iowa 





Grace Lillian Havey 
43 Mendum Street 
Roslindale, Massachusetts 



Dorothea Lucia Higbie 
1300 Hyde Park 
Chicago, Illinois 





Margaret Hays 
25 Darwin Street 
Rochester, New York 



Marion Strong Hillhouse 
Willimantic, Connecticut 




Ik 



^GH221^ 



55 



A 






w 



^^& r 



^ 




Elizabeth Morse Hilliard 
Northboro, Massachusetts 



Marcarette Hines 

305 West Main Street 

Carbondale, Illinois 





Marion Himmelsbach 
382 Elmwood Avenue 
Buffalo, New York 



Margaret Randolph Hitchcock 
The Fall Field 
Proffit, Virginia 





Winifred Charlotte Hine 
Fishers Island, New York 



Arline Beryl Hoeson 

1 06 Lmsley Avenue 

Meriden, Connecticut 











p*5 2i 

& "9. 





^ 



^EH221 



Or 



J& 



a 



56 



w 



A@ f^Ofe ^ 



^ 




Julia Porter Hodcdon 

1000 Hill Street 
Hannibal, Missouri 



Winifred Louise Hope 

135 Monroe Street 

Ridgewood, New Jersey 





Dorothy Hogan 
2320 Sheridan Circle 
Washington, D. C. 



Constance Hopkins 
Barnstable, Massachusetts 





Janette Lincoln Holmes 
301 Summit Avenue 
Wayne, Pennsylvania 



Margaret Elizabeth Hopkins 

9314 Mile Avenue 

Cleveland, Ohio 




k 



^gS1221 



&r 



$ 



57 



w 



=5® 



l@r 



^ 




Katherine Houghton 
I 1 Manchester Road 
Brookhne, Massachusetts 



Elizabeth Portia Hubbard 

107 High Street 

Middletown, Connecticut 





Katherine Eleanor Howland 
Conway, Massachusetts 



Margaret McCalmont Humphrey 

140 Carmel Street 

Kalamazoo, Michigan 





Eleanor Patricia Hoyt 
15 Seminary Street 
Auburn, New York 



Grace Genan Humrich 

507 Walnut Street 

Roselle Park, New Jersey 




D 



^ IMTE ^ 



^ 



58 



w 



i§S@!r 



^ 




Marion Frances Hunt 
58 Kellogg Street 
Waterbury, Connecticut 



Mae Edith Incalls 
Windham, Vermont 





Mary Frances Hunt 
804 Con ley Avenue 
Columbia, Missouri 



Esther Irving 

77 Westford Avenue 
Springfield, Massachusetts 




k 




Marie Baltz Hutchincs 
305 Llandrillo Road 
Cynwyd, Pennsylvania 



Ruth Elizabeth Irwin 
Cataumet, Massachusetts 






^. mTE 



^ 



Jk 



59 






w 



=ggs li5Eite jr 



^ 




Elizabeth C. Ives 

15 Park Row 

New York City, New York 



Alice Child Jenckes 

46 Fruit Street 

Worcester, Massachusetts 





Harriet Jacobus 

Great Neck 

Long Island, New Yc 



Dorothy A. Jenks 

c/o Col. J. C. Jenks, U. S. Inf. 

The War Dept., Washington, D. C. 





Erika Caroline Jauch 
24 Montmorenci Street 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



Josephine Jenks 

1200 Marshall Building 

Cleveland, Ohio 




Ik 



ygfros^i^ 



•sy 



y& 



60 



w 



^g f^fe ^ 



^ 




Dorothy Bucknam Johnson 
24 Sidlaw Road 
Brookline, Massachusetts 



Frances Johnson 

Hinckley Road 

Milton, Massachusetts 





Dorothy Lucretia Johnson 
Manassas, Virginia 



Ruth Kerr Johnson 

Greenville Road 
Dallas, Texas 





Florence Ruth Johnson 
West Hartford, Connecticut 



Anne H. Johnston 

10 Rue de l'Elysee 

Paris, France 




k 



^Rroanaft f 



A 



61 



w 



^ fL^) @p 



^ 




Helen Elizabeth Johnston 
494 Jefferson Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 



Margaret Murray Jones 

201 East 37th Street 

Kansas City, Missouri 





Esther Bradford Jones 
9100 Dexter Boulevard 
Detroit, Michigan 



Charlotte Ruth Joshel 
Geneva, Illinois 





Lucy Van Dusen Jones 
New Hartford, Connecticut 



Mary Proal Judson 
Deep River, Connecticut 




E^ 



=*£[ 



& 



62 



A 



w 



^§ 5m3& r 



^ 




Ruth Edith Katsh 
41 St. Nicholas Terrace 
New York City, New York 



Helen Tracy Kellogg 
54 West Fifth Street 
Oswego, New York 





Edna Frances Kaufmann 

19 West 87th Street 

New York City, New York 



Frances Watrous Kelsey 
Branford, Connecticut 





Edna Mae Keeler 

1116 Neilson Avenue 

Far Rockaway, New York 



Margaret Kemp 

108 Mt. Vernon Street 

West Roxbury, Massachusetts 




ik 



=*g[ 



w 



63 



A 



w 



=vg)GIII]@7= 



^ 




Rachel Pamelia Keniston 
Plymouth, New Hampshire 



Hazel King 

101 Western Avenue 

Gloucester, Massachusetts 





Margie Atwood Kennedy 
36 Pleasant Street 
Dorchester, Massachusetts 



Madelyn Rose Kingsbury 

29 Pearl Street 

Holyoke, Massachusetts 





Mary M. Kerrigan 
8 Harbor Street 
Clinton, Massachusetts 



Louise Kingsley 

47 North Street 

Binghamton, New York 




k 



^ rmm v? 



A 



64 



w 



^g fta g^ 



^ 




Constance Kline 
2589 Euclid Boulevard 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Julia West Kreis 

211 East Franklin Street 

Wheaton, Illinois 





Catherine Knowles 
314 Washington Street 
Monroe, Michigan 



Kathryn Kryder 

36 Highland Avenue 

Akron, Ohio 





Margaret Gilmore Kreglow 
Palmerton, Pennsylvania 



Dorothy Helen Kudlich 

119 West 57th Street 

New York City, New York 




Ik 



^g ro^i 



Of 



Jk 



65 



■ 



w 



"i $m3® r 



^ 




R. Lucille Kyte 

186 West Lawrence Street 

Albany, New York 



Marion Elizabeth Lakin 

1575 Virginia Street 

Charleston, West Virginia 





Katherine Crandell Lacey 
Sixteenth Infantry 
Camp Dix, New Jersey 



Anna-May Lande 

315 Madison Avenue 

Elmira, New York 





Freda Helen Ladd 
20 Franklin Street 
Barre, Vermont 



Ellen Mary Lane 

27 Edgewood Street 

Hartford, Connecticut 




^ 



^s. wwm -t^ 



A 



66 



w 



^g fBte ^ 



^ 




Ilda Lancdon 

316 South 51st Street 
Omaha, Nebraska 



Edna Camp Lawrence 

421 West Price Street 

Germantown, Pennsylvania 





Naomi Laucheimer 

Far Rockaway 

Long Island, New York 



Helen Lawton 
Tiverton, Rhode Island 





Evelyn Grace Lawley 
55 Chestnut Street 
Florence, Massachusetts 



Marion Constance Leary 
Turners Falls, Massachusetts 




Ik 



^t 



"&> 



A 



67 






V JJ 



^g fEnate r 



^ 




Lois Thelma Ledbetter 

Oaklawn 

Michigan City, Indiana 



Helen Schuyler Leeminc 

94 Eighth Avenue 

Brooklyn, New York 





Barbara Lee 
31 Abbot Street 
Beverly, Massachusetts 



Mildred Edith Leeper 
Glenfield, Pennsylvania 





Elma Lee 
Box 643 
Detroit, Michigan 



Madeline Leonard 

Wetmore Avenue 

Winsted, Connecticut 




^ 



^[ 



^ 



68 



& 



w 




^g fL^te ^ 



Florence Henrietta Leopold 

48 East 80th Street 

New York City, New York 



^ 



Emma A. Lincoln 

1 13 Hancock Street 

Brooklyn, New York 





Marjory Sylvia Lewis 
Marion, Connecticut 



Julia Armour Lincoln 

49 Garden Street 

Hartford, Connecticut 





Louise Lieber 
3502 Central Avenue 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Elizabeth Lipse~i 

312 Park Road 

LaGrange, Illinoi: 




L^ 



^ rpmq 



^r 



Jfa 



69 



w 



^g f^afe ^ 



^ 







Anne Niven McLean Lockhead 
1202 North Pennsylvania Street 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Mary Dorothy Long 

1 1 Mawhinney Street 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 





Ella Loeb 

5112 Westminster Place 

St. Louis, Missouri 



Mildred Hartwell Lovejoy 

1 02 Lenox Street 

West Newton, Massachusetts 





Evelyn Loetscher 
230 Alpine Street 
Dubuque, Iowa 



Camilla Marcia Low 

575 Ridgewood Road 

Maplewood, New Jersey 




ck 



^QffiZ^S? 



70 



A 



w 



^g f^ofe ^ 



^ 




Rae Gloss Lowenthal 
630 Linden Avenue 
Newport, Kentucky 



Nancy R. McCullough 

Bellevue Park 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 





Barbara Lufkin 
Concord, Massachusetts 



Barbara McKay 

2311 Grandview Avenue 

Cincinnati, Ohio 





Kathryn Isobel Lyman 
Hilo Hawaii T. H. 



Dorothy Walker MacDonald 

1858 Carroll Street 

Brooklyn, New York 




^= 



=*g[ 



*& 



A 



w 



^m3&t 



^ 




Jean MacDonald 
547 West Sixth Street 
Erie, Pennsylvania 



Nellie O. MacLachlan 

7150 Penn Avenue 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 





Marcia Almeda MacDonald 
West Milford, New Jersey 



Margaret Churchill MacLean 

211 Main Street 

Cohoes, New York 





Charlotte MacDougall 
Naval Observatory 
Washington, D. C. 



Jean Matilda MacTarnaghan 
Nunda, New York 




^ 



^ 



& 



72 



A 



w 



^ $^& r 



^ 




Katherine Leeds Macomber 

23 Prince Street 

West Newton, Massachusetts 



Marian Howe Mann 
West Medway, Massachusetts 





Helen Marie Main 
Wayne, Nebraska 



Elizabeth C. Marmon 

1119 North Delaware Street 

Indianapolis, Indiana 





Margaret West Mann 
1 1 7 Green Bay Road 
Lake Forest, Illinois 



Harriet Hall Marsh 

400 West 153rd Street 

New York City, New York 




ik 



^ \WTT\ & 



Jh 



w 



^g fj^51 @? 



^ 




Elisabeth Marshall 
42 Lake Avenue 
Melrose, Massachusetts 



Mildred Arlene Mason 
281 Barrington Street 
Rochester, New York 





Catherine Caroline Marx 
541 Evanswood Place 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



Jane Kirkman Massie 

Hotel Albion, 900 Cathedral Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 





Guida Harvey Marx 

Vista Terrace, East Walnut Hills 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



Marjorie Maxwell 

I 12 Elmer Avenue 

Schenectady, New York 




^ 



\3 



^IWT^i 



^J; 



74 



A 



w 



A@ fM5te jr 



^ 




Sylvia Roslyn Meltzer 

1352 Fairfield Avenue 
Bridgeport, Connecticut 



Eleanor Miller 
Sandy Spring, Maryland 





Katherine Merrill 
362 Hope Street 
Providence, Rhode Island 



Elvira Miller 

209 Hearne Avenue 

Cincinnati, Ohio 





Carolyn Hicks Metcalf 
Winthrop, Massachusetts 



Katherine McClure Miller 

420 Wisconsin Avenue 

Oak Park, Illinois 




^ 



^g lnnEna 



W 



75 



Jk 



w 



^g f^^ g^ 



^ 




Katherine Marie Miller 
2306 Hoagland Avenue 
Fori Wayne, Indiana 



Mary Beekman Mills 
Calumet, Michigan 





Louise Viola Miller 
Tower Ridge 
Hastmgs-on-Hudson, New York 



Helen Marita Moore 

309 Fifth Street 

Lorain, Ohio 





k 



Margaret McClure Miller 
325 C S. W. Street 
Ardmore, Oklahoma 



Marjorie Morrison 
Iron River, Michigan 




^ wmrn ^} 



Jk 



76 



w 



^M^fr 



^ 




Esther Louise Moss 
160 Pine Street 
Lockport, New York 



Ruth Moss Murray 

155 South Lake Avenue 

Albany, New York 





Margaret Estelle Moulton 
180 State Street 
Portland, Maine 



Elizabeth Uriel Neilon 

53 Henry Street 

Fitchburg, Massachusetts 





Catherine Gabrielle Murray 
100 Waldemar Avenue 
Winthrop, Massachusetts 



Evelyn Eleanor Nelson 
Granville, New York 




L^ 



^s. wmm n 



77 



A 



w 



& 



=v@ |csa| ©r 




Ruth-Alice Norman 

630 Park Avenue 

New York Cily, New York 



Edith Powers O'Neill 

64 South Allen Street 

Albany, New York 




Dorothea Elizabeth Nourse 
7 Marston Way 
Worcester, Massachusetts 



Helen Cecilia O'Reilly 

57 Washington Avenue 

New Rochelle, New York 




Ruth Amelia Ockerman 
99 Oak Street 
Binehamton, New York 



Mabelle Blanche Orleman 

101 Chevy Chase Drive 

Chevy Chase, D. C. 



^mrzv? 



^ 






A 



78 



w 



^g f^ofe ^ 



^ 




Anna Rhoda Orme 
Wayne, Pennsylvania 



Janice Harinc Ozias 
Quakertown, Pennsylvania 





WlLLA ORR 

1026 South Jefferson Avenue 

Saginaw, Michigan 



Lucille Page 

56 Laurel Streel 

Melrose, Massachuselts 





Virginia Woodhull Otto 
Sayville, New York 



Mary Elizabeth Parks 
Hurricane Mills, Tennessee 




L^ 



*s magna 3? 



79 



JA 



w 



^g fS) @r 



^ 




Elizabeth Patek 

435 Kenwood Boulevard 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin 



Dorothy Howard Peirce 

1037 Old Orchard 

Dayton, Ohio 





Mary Patterson 
1115 New Pear Street 
Vineland, New Jersey 



Margaret Gilmore Pendleton 

344 West 72nd Street 

New York City, New \ ork 





Katherine Peek 

846 Main Street 

East Aurora, New Yc 



Anna Margaret Pennypacker 
255 King's Highway East 
Haddonfield, New Jersey 




k 



^ 



Or 



SO 



£ 



w 



A@ f^fc ^ 



^ 




Olga Eaton Perkins 
77 Fairfield Street 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



Ethel Brinton Phillips 
Pomeroy, Pennsylvania 





Joyce Petterson 
Princeton, Minnesota 



Virginia Bellaurie Place 
Caledonia, New York 





Eleanor Burrell Phillips 
Peterborough, New Hampshire 



Mary Gladys Platner 

23 Grand Street 
Oneonta, New York 




!k 



^01122 



Or 



SI 



A 



w 



^g tsfe ^ 



^ 




Mary Barr Polk 
3700 Grand Avenue 
Des Moines, Iowa 



Achsa Louise Powell 

1018 37th Avenue N. 

Seattle, Washington 





Anne Pollitt 

137 West Ninth Street 

Erie, Pennsylvania 



Grace Elizabeth Preble 

240 Fifth Avenue 

New York City, New York 





Lillian Hall Potter 
Portland, Connecticut 



Dorothy Prescott 

340 School Street 

Webster, Massachusetts 




tk 



^IMTZV? 



82 



d 



w 



^g f^ote ^ 



^ 




Katherine Dahlcreu Prickett 
Valley Falls, New York 



Violet Constance Ramsey 

90 Undercliff Road 

Montclair, New Jersey 





Mildred Purdy 
2217 Newkirk Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 



Katherine Huse Ranney 

85 Payson Avenue 

Rockland, Massachusetts 





Jane Quinby 
Hotel Gotham 
New York City, New York 



Eleanor Rau 

Central Avenue 

Lawrence, Long Island, New York 




L^ 



^BH2H^ 



A 



w 



^§ X^nw 



^ 




Margaret Elizabeth Rawley 
Brazil, Indiana 



Virginia Reed 

812 West Drive, Woodruff Place 

Indianapolis, Indiana 





Hope Rawson 
78 Medway Street 
Providence, Rhode Island 



Mathilde Rehm 

2201 Burnet Avenue 

Cincinnati, Ohio 





Emily Reed 

35 Riverview Road 

Brighton, Massachusetts 



Judith Howard Relf 

512 Holly Avenue 

St. Paul, Minnesota 




rk 



^M22© 



84 



A 



a 



w 



^g f^ate ^ 



^ 




Phyllis Rice 

418 North Tenth Street 

Nebraska City, Nebraska 



Ruth Hannah Richards 

515 First Avenue East 

Hutchinson, Kansas 





Irma Jeanette Rich 
43 Donaldson Avenue 
Rutherford, New Jersey 



Alice Mildred Richardson 

109 Bedford Street 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 





ik 



Gerda Cornell Richards 

374 June Street 

Fall River, Massachusetts 



Irene Fletcher Richardson 

19 Van Dien Avenue 

Ridgewood, New Jersey 



I 




^ 



®r 



A 



85 



w 



^g f^^l ^p 



^ 




Beth Steler Ripley 
926 Lafayette Street 
Denver, Colorado 



Ruth Jeannette Robeson 

18 Portsmouth Ten ace 

Rochester, New York 





Sara Dean Roberts 
1918 N Street 
Washington, D. C. 



Alice Robinson 

470 West 144th Street 

New York City, New York 





Ik 



Louise Robertson 

1710 Dupont Avenue South 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 



Marion Louise Robinson 

1470 Beacon Street 

Brookline, Massachusetts 




^EffiZZl 



&r 



jZ 



86 



w 



^§ %M3& r 



^ 




Anceline Martha Rogers 

50 Lathrop Street 

West Springfield, Massachusetts 



Margaret Julia Romer 

27 West 11th Street 

New York City, New York 





Grace Luene Rogers 
742 Fourth Avenue 
Troy, New York 



Aimee Rosenbercer 

450 Riverside Drive 

New York City, New York 





Olivia Mae Rocers 
357 Main Street 
Gloucester, Massachusetts 



MATHILDE Ruce 

79 South Prospect Street 

Millers Falls, Massachusetts 




^ 



^ fTOS^l ^ 



A 



87 



w 



"? 3m3& r 



^ 




Anna Marie Ryan 
Thorold, Ontario, Canada 



Dorothea Helen Sanjiyan 
Springfield, Massachusetts 





Katherine Anna Ryan 
664 Chestnut Street 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



Vivian Savacool 

161 River Road 

Manchester, New Hampshire 





Katherine Hamlin Sanford 
34 Willow Street 
Waterbury, Connecticut 



Ruth Evelyn Scheibler 

327 Alexander Street 

Greensburg, Pennsylvania 




!k 



^ wmrn v, 



s& 



w 



^g l^ofe ; 



^r 



^ 




Paula Jeanette Schlegel 

729 Western Avenue 
Davenport, Iowa 



IONE E. ScHOLL 

Grandview Terrace 

Tenafly, New Jersey 





Margaret Schneider 
Bartow, Florida 



Gertrude Marion Schwartz 

14 Westbourne Parkway 

Hartford, Connecticut 





Caroline Eleanor Schofield 
193 Hazel Avenue 
Highland Park, Illinois 



Eleanor Virginia Scofield 
Morenci, Michigan 




ck 



^GUZ^ 



89 



Jk 



w 



^g f^Ol @A 



^ 




Abigail Farwell Scott 
974 Pleasant Street 
Worcester, Massachusetts 



Alice Darrow Shaw 

7 Webster Street 

Middleboro, Massachusetts 





Elizabeth McConway Scoville 
83 Third Avenue 
Northampton, Massachusetts 



Blanche Burckhardt Shaw 

1306 Park Avenue 

Indianapolis, Indiana 





Estelle Ann Scroggie 

45 Tremont Street 

New London, Connecticut 



Gladys Mary Shea 

247 Central Street 

Manchester, New Hampshire 




Ik 



^ ITOCT ^ 



&r 



90 



J\ 



w 



^ fta ^ 



^ 




Anna Toole Sheedy 
3 Forestdale Road 
Worcester, Massachusetts 



Louise Charlotte Silber 
Highland Park, Illinois 





Ellen Elizabeth Sheehan 
22 Fulton Street 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts 



Celia Helen Silberman 

668 Madison Avenue 

Albany, New York 





Lenore Danbrook Shimer 
427 Avenue C 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 



Helena Nettie Silberstein 

2328 East Third Street 

Duluth, Minnesota 




L^ 



^ rom^ 



a 



91 



w 



^g ftMal ^ 



^ 




Elsie Juel Silver 
421 Albany Avenue 
Hartford, Connecticut 



Catherine Smith 

3616 Holmes Street 

Kansas City, Missouri 





Louise Margaret Skinner 
60 Harrison Avenue 
Northampton, Massachusetts 



Elizabeth F. Smith 

1520 Market Avenue North 

Canton, Ohio 





Muriel Slawson 

7 Lyon Place 

White Plains, New York 



Harriet Maria Smith 

31 Pleasant Street 

Leicester, Massachusetts 




k 



jSH nnreng 



§*= 



A 



92 



w 



^g fciiclfe ^ 



^ 




Helen Amy Smith 
52 Church Street 
White Plains, New York 



Mary Katherine Smith 
Rushford, Minnesota 





Helen Atkinson Smith 
1116 Westover Avenue 
Norfolk, Virginia 



Nathalie Smith 

Howland Court 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 





Helen Dana Smith 

South Side 

Charleston, West Virginia 



Pearl Lucile Smith 
Granby, Massachusetts 




!k 



^wmm^ j, 



Jk 



w 



^g f^^ ^p 



^ 




Alice Davenport Snyder 
107 West Main Street 
Norwalk, Ohio 



Marion Parker Stacey 

1312 Church Street 

Evanston, Illinois 








Maxine Fullmer Spengler 
2019 East First Street 
Duluth, Minnesota 



Bernadette Stack 

1 5 Cottage Place 

Utica, New York 





Isabel Skillman Stabler 
3017 Cambridge Place 
Washington, D. C. 



Mary Elizabeth Stanton 

1 5 Thomas Street 

Springfield, Massachusetts 




k 



=*®[ 



& 



94 



d 



w 



^ feUife ^ 



^ 




Dorothy Jean Staples 
43 Longfellow Terrace 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



Eleanor Muncer Steele 

426 Main Street 

Herkimer, New York 





Helen Stearns 
417 Eagle Street 
Dunkirk, New York 



Regine Johanna Steinberger 

105 Congress Street 

Bradford, Pennsylvania 





Elizabeth S. Stedman 
1503 Greenleaf Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



Helen Vail Stenger 

757 Franklin Street 

Denver, Colorado 




k 



D 



^§ \mimw 



A 



V Jf 



^g f^aj g^ 



^ 




Thalia Stetson 

134 South Main Street 

Middleboro, Massachusetts 



E. Frances Stilwell 

700 North McKean Street 

Butler, Pennsylvania 





Carolyn Mathilda Stewart 
2 Kay Street 
Newport, Rhode Island 



Sadye Natalie Stone 

390 Belmont Street 

Brockton, Massachusetts 





Ethelinda Stewart 
Webster, Massachusetts 



Marabeth Storrs 

360 Farmington Avenue 

Hartford, Connecticut 







k 



^ 



& 



96 



A 



w 



^ fLM21 (5^ 



^ 




Margaret Storrs 
315 Whitney Avenue 
New Haven, Connecticut 



Mabel Thelma Studebaker 

426 East Tenth Street 

Erie, Pennsylvania 





Claire Strauss 

5317 University Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 



Helen Irene Sullivan 

3520 Holmes Street 

Kansas City, Missouri 





Elizabeth Stuckslager 
Lisbon, Iowa 



Mary Tehan Sullivan 

16 Washington Street 

Westneld, Massachusetts 




!k 



i§JBIffiZ2g* 



^r 



Ja 



97 



w 



^no^ 



^ 




Marian Adele Swayze 

73 Forest Street 
Stamford, Connecticut 



Janice Louise Taggart 

42 North Prospect Street 

Burlington, Vermont 





Virginia Louise Swift 
14 Clyfton Street 
Plymouth, Massachusetts 



Louise Taggart 

142 Chambers Street 

Newburgh, New York 





Dorothy Grace Swisher 
443 Hudson Avenue 
Newark, Ohio 



Miriam Taggart 
Newbury, Vermont 




Ik 



^enm© 



A 



98 



w 



Tsg jilEil gjr 



^ 




Dorothy Merrill Taylor 

Hackettstown, New Jersey 



Eugenie Terek 
Washington Depot, Connecticut 





Helen Campbell Taylor 
Lake Forest, Illinois 



Olivia Billings Terrell 

Riverhead 

Long Island, New York 





Julie Bulkley Taylor 
455 West Seventh Street 
Plainfield, New Jersey 



Eva Sofie Thompson 
149 Williamson Avenue 
Bloomfield, New Jersey 




E^ 



^[ffi22] 



®r 



Ja 



99 



¥ 




^S JtM^& r 



Marian Lowell Thorndike 

Riverdale-on-Hudson 

New York 



Elizabeth Howard Tillinchast 
Hope Valley, Rhode Island 



^ 





Sara Eleanore Thorp 
326 Maple Avenue 
Edgewood, Pennsylvania 



Margaret Frances Toan 

865 West Exchange Street 

Akron, Ohio 





Margaret Tjldsley 
Spuyten Duyvil, New York 



Marian Louise Townsend 

1464 Cohassett Avenue 

Lakewood, Ohio 




^ 



^BUS^ 



100 



A 



w 



^m^& r 



^ 




Susan Francis Tracy 
444 Greenleaf Avenue 
Glencoe, Illinois 



Margaret Northcote Tucker 
Skaneateles, New York 





Darthea Hebard Trickev 
16 Pilgrim Road 
Waban, Massachusetts 



Bessie Tulloch 

423 Elizabeth Street 

Odgensburg, New York 





Anna McCobb Trott 
982 High Street 
Bath, Maine 



Elizabeth M. Tuttle 

222 College Street 

Middletown, Connecticut 




k 



D> 



^QHZ2I^ 



101 



Ja 



w 



^g ft^fe ^ 



^ 



^ 




Charlotte Alice Twichell 
Mapleton, North Dakota 



Lois May Velde 

702 South Fourth Street 

Pekin, Illinois 





Frances Isabel Upham 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire 



Helen Wakefield 

2328 First Avenue 

Spokane, Washington 





Ik 



Frances Sacket deValin 
Cape Vincent, New York 



Jeanette Hale Wales 

1236 North Pennsylvania Street 

Indianapolis, Indiana 




^ wmm v? 



A 



Krj 



w 



^g f^^ g^ 



^ 




Anne Louise Walsh 
300 Roseville Avenue 
Newark, New Jersey 



Virginia Ward 

232 Morris Avenue 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 





Beatrice L. Walton 

78 Elm Avenue 
Flushing, New York 



Elisabeth Violet Wark 
450 East 16th Street 
Brooklyn, New York 





k 



Margaret Henshaw Ward 
127 Centre Street 
Milton, Massachusetts 



Marian Watkins 

209 Chestnut Street 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 




^ IMTB & 



Ja 



1 1 13 



w 



^g fsfc ^ 



^ 




Polly Dillingham Weaver 
520 16th Avenue 
Spokane, Washington 



Una Vircinia Whitehurst 

58 Woodland Avenue 

Summit, New Jersey 





Marion Ethel White 
North Stonington, Connecticut 



Jean Whiting 
373 Parkside Avenue 
Brooklyn, New York 





Helen Margaret Whitehill 
Spink Arms Apartments 
Indianapolis, Indiana 



Gertrude Rees Whitmore 

240 Prospect Avenue 

Mount Vernon, New York 




Lk 



^s roara 3* 



J& 



104 



w 



^g fLa ^ 



^ 




Marion Helen Whittemore 
24 Crescent Street 
Newport, New Hampshire 



Dorothy Grace Williams 

171 Mullin Street 

Watertown, New York 





Florence Caroline Wilder 
R. F. D. Box 70 

Sterling Junction, Massachusetts 



Jessie Macdonald Wilson 

64 Brattle Road 

Princeton, New Jersey 





Myrna Wilderson 
Latonia, Ohio 



June Wilson 

1044 Whittle Avenue 

Olney, Illinois 




tk 



^QH221^ 



105 



£a 



- 



w 



^ 



^g f^afe ^ 




Laura Elizabeth Wilson 

9 North 16th Street 

East Orange, New Jersey 



Greta Wood 

Webster Avenue 

Bangor, Maine 




Katharine Winchester 
Fairfield, Connecticut 



Aileen Woodman 
8 Trafalgar Place, Montreal 
Province of Quebec, Canada 




Gertrude Windisch 
210 Glenmary Avenue 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



Elizabeth Allen Woodson 
Georgetown, Kentucky 



=*g[ 



^ 



^ 









A 



Kit; 






w 



^ flg ^ 



^ 




Clarice Runyan Younc 
343 Fairmounl Avenue 
Jersey City, New Jersey 



Myra J. Zeiser 

82 Carey Avenue 

Wiikes-Barre, Pennsylvania 





Miriam Noble Zabriskie 
Maplewood, New Jersey 



Esther Ziskind 

75 Gales Street 

Lowell, Massachusetts 





^ 



Constance Louise Zonne 
910 Mount Curve 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 



^0HZ21 



W 



A 



: 



w 



^ $^3& r 



^ 



3wx\\\n iKnnberfl 



Aaron, Bernice Constance 
Acer, Charlotte Peck 
Acuff, Elizabeth Cooper 
Admas, Emily Marion 
Adams, Rachel Townsend 
Allen, Beatrice Sterling 
Allen, Ruth Emily 
Anderson, Marjone Mohala 
Annett, Ruth Raymond 
Armstrong, Adelaide Williams 
Atkinson, Helen Faris 
Babbitt, Lelia Phinette 
Backus, Georgia Alden 
Bame, Pauline Millerton 
Barchus, Iona 
Barker, Maud Frances 
Barrett, Virginia Bernice 
Bartlett, Hilda Elizabeth 
Bartlett, Natalie 
Bassett, Margaret Byrd 
Begg, Margaret Louise 
Beiderbecke, Gretchen Seiffert 
Bellows, Marjone Harlow 
Benjamin, Alice Julie 
Benninghoff, Mary Leola 
Benson, Caroline Ruth 
Blodgett, Ruth Emily 
Bower, Ada Louise 
Bradish, Rachel Hall 
Breed, Mary Paulding 
Brenner, Lucille Claire 
Breuer, Camilla 
Brooks, Dorothy Eleanor 
Brown, Margaret Kinghorn 
Bryson, Grace Louise 
Burgess, Viola Elizabeth 
Burner, Florence Anderson 
Buttolph, Dorothy Meriam 
Cady, Florence Louise 
Canfield, Catherine Flavia 
Carlile, Dorothea 
Carlson, Marguerite Eleanore 
Carroll, Jean Mcintosh 



Cary, Catharine Jennie 
Center, Dorothy Louise 
Chaffee, Edith 
Chalmers, Ruth Stirling 
Chapman, Dorothy 
Child, Janet Humphreyville 
Clark, Caroline Bayard 
Clark, Thalia 
Clifford, Nora Margaret 
Cohn, Marjorie Betty 
Coleman, Harriet Loomis 
Collier, Helen Adam 
Collins, Margaret Ruth 
Coon, Marion Reba 
Cooper, Harriet Frances 
Corwin, Madeleine 
Cottrell, Gundneda 
Culley, Charlotte 
Davis, Florens Raymer 
Denison, Emma Frances 
Dent, Elizabeth Haralson 
Dinwidde, Emily Bledsoe 
Dodge, Winifred Marianne 
Dorsey, Margaret Banks 
Driver, Margaret Elsie 
Ducey, Elizabeth Carney 
Dulley, Dorothy Wood 
Duffield, Susan Cornelia 
Duncan, Elizabeth Allen 
Ehrlich, Dorothy Olive 
Faries, Marie Louise Weightman 
Faucett, Rachel Fuller 
Fenn, Margaretta Elizabeth 
Ferguson, Dorothy Montague 
Fisher, Constance Graeme 
Fitz-Hugh, Virginia 
Foster, Ellen Frances 
Foster, Virginia 
Fowler, Adda Florence 
Foxon, Fern Iola 
France, Helen Holford 
Frye, Zola Lorena 
Geiger, Jeanne 



Glasgow, Helen Jean 
Goldberg, Carolyn Jesse 
Goltman, Hannah Louise 
Goodall, Eleanor Josephine 
Goodhue, Elizabe:h 
Goodwin, Evelyn Addie 
Gorton, Margaret 
Greer, Esther Belle 
Griswold, Emily Kimball 
Guettel, Stella Helen 
Guntzer, Germaine Agatha 
Hager, Madeleine 
Hall, Marjorie 
Hamblin, Marion Laurette 
Hamilton, Christabel Giles 
Hanan, Ethel 
Hanan, Virginia 
Hanson, Edna M. 
Harmon, Helen 
Harrison, Elizabeth 
Haskins, Polly Burr 
Hay, Dorothy 

Henricksen, Mildred Kathryn 
Hillyer, Marion 
Hirshkeimer, Dora Janice 
Hiss, Mildred Cushin 
Hitchcock, Deborah Victoria 
Hixson, Marie Elizabeth 
Holmes, Elizabeth Blodgett 
Hoyt, Maud Adelaide 
Hunt, Marion Juliet 
Jeffrey, Eloise Selling 
Johnesse, Adaline Emily 
Johnson, Maybelle Maude 
Jordan, Irene Crosby 
Kahn, Marjorie Ruth 
Kapff, Eleanore Antoinette 
Kellogg, Irene 
Kondolf, Louise Huntington 
Lamont, Wilhelmina Helena 
Landman, Bessie 
Langley, Marcia 
Lauter, Elfreda Elizabeth 



^ 



D 



^g 



I^F 



111!) 



Jk 



w 



^§ ftM!3& f 



^ 



Leckie, Jeanette Katherme 

Leiter, Hazel Belle 

Lewis, Ruth Anne 

Llewellyn, Elizabeth Mary 

Lockhart, Roberta Louise 

Lohman, Anna Elsa 

Lovell, Ruth 

Lyon, Katharine Louise 

McArdle, Marion Evelyn 

McCarthy, Rita Louise 

McFadden, Athena Roberta 

McLeary, Elthea 

McNair, Elizabeth 

Mabry, Hope 

Maher, Marjone Louise 

Maley, Jocelyn 

Malnek, Janet 

Matthews, Eleanor Patricia 

Merrill, Charlotte Snow 

Metcalfe, Louise Learned 

Meyer, Catherine Marie 

Miller, Margaret Elizabeth 

Miller, Martha Grace 

Minnock, Mary Dorothea 

Mitchell, Alice Catharine 

Mitchell, Frances 

Mitchell, Margaret MacKenzie 

Molloy, Anne Shirley 

Montgomery, Grace Elizabeth 

Morris, Virginia Thacher 

Mosely, Helen Norton 

Moses, Margaret 

Moss, Hedwig 

Mulliken, Katherme Freeman 

Munce, Lucy Mary 

Mvers, Isabel Grace 

Naftel, Lucy Price 



Neely, Helen 

Northam, Neola Elizabeth 

Nourse, Evelyn 

Oberman, Maud Elizabeth 

O'Leary, Helen Owen 

Olson, Eleanor Helen 

Olwin, Virginia Ruth 

Paine, Virginia 

Parker, Helen Wilson 

Parks, Eleanor Chapin 

Patterson, Marjorie Geraldine 

Patton, Adele Cults 

Pegram, Jean Forsythe 

Perkins, Annette 

Pittenger, Minerva Caroline 

Pudrith, Adele Louise 

Pye, Helen Elizabeth 

Randle, Dorothy Davies 

Ranney, Judith 

Rehm, Wilhelmine Anna 

Reid, Ruth 

Rice, Katherine Field 

Rihbany, Marguerite Rose 

Ringwalt, Elizabeth Hetherton 

Roberts, Dorothy Allen 

Roberts, Margaret Clark 

Robertson, Eva Ruth 

Schachner, Rosalie Claire 

Scheuer, Alice Clare 

Schloss, Ruth 

Schurman, Catherine Forrest 

Seaver, Elizabeth 

Seelye, Rebecca 

Seidman, Lynette 

Sheffield, Katharine Ray 

Shoemaker, Mary Harriett 

Sipe, Helen Catharine 



Smith, Bodiene 
Smith, Eleanor Pinney 
Smith, Gladys Louise 
Smith, Stella Marguerite 
Snow, Ina Mabel 
Spencer, Rowena Mumford 
Steer, Dariel Frances 
Stimson, Christine 
Stowell, Marion Hubbard 
Taber, Marie 
Taff, Imelda Agnes 
Thoman, Candace 
Thompson, Helen Louise 
Thompson, Jane Estelle 
Tredway, Mary Leslie 
Wadsworth, Dorothy 
Wakefield, Florence Mabel 
Walters, Harriette 
Ward, Esther Marian 
Wardwell, Regina 
Warren, Peace Eldridge 
Webb, Elizabeth Hope 
Webb, Louise Graham 
Weekes, Estelle 
Weil, Janice 

White, Frances Elizabeth 
Weiting, Kathryn Boshart 
Williams. Mildred Ruth 
Willis, Altana Barnum 
Wilson, Sarah Irma 
Winter, Pauline 
Winton, Margaret Ayrault 
Wolfenden, Lorna Maire 
Wolverton, Harriet Crosby 
Woods, Frances Elizabeth 
Zuraw, Anna Harriet 



^ 



& 



^[ 



W 



IK) 



A 





iffl 




m 




w 



^§ S^^& f 



^ 



®a 1923 



22's thought itself near perfection 
In every collegiate direction. 
We felt college never 
Could be quite so clever 
When our class should sever 
Connection. 

But we leave without any temerity 
In view of this absolute verity: 
We leave an alarming- 
Ly able and charming 
And wholly disarming 
Posterity. 

To describe 23's fascination 

Would be quite a year's occupation. 

Your wholly superior 

Ex — and — interior 

Preclude deterior- 

Ation. 




^9, vm^\ n 



JL 



112 



w 



^g f^ofe ^ 



^ 




^ 



^. ymm v, 



J& 



113 



^ 



^i|[|]]@7= 



^ 



©0 1924 



To all the world we will wager that few have seen 
Such a remarkable sister as you have been. 
It's hard to pick out what in you we most adored, 
But in the first place, you see, we both boast a Ward. 

They are what kept us from being iniquitous. 
You've been dramatic, athletic, ubiquitous ; 
One of the greatest of pleasures you've "brung" to us 
Was when you spurned '21 and then sung to us! 

Your "sensible faces" have been most inspiring; 
Your patience at taking advice was untiring. 
All in all, '24, you're what we long to be — 
So we subscribe ourselves 

Yours to eternity. 



k 




^s rosra & 



A 



114 



w 



^j^& r 



^ 




k 



^ 



& 



A 



115 



w 



^§ ftM2fe rf 



^ 



So 1925 



Four years have slipped away, 
It seems the other day 
That we were Freshmen too, 
And looking much like you. 

One's breathless at the thought 
Of knowledge we've been taught — 
It gives one's heart a turn 
At things you'll have to learn. 

When you reach Senior year 
There'll be more Freshmen here — 
Love them, you can't contrive, 
As we've loved you — Twenty-five. 




D^ 



^s \vmm^ 



& 



116 



w 



^MS&r 



^ 




^ 



i§,m2K& 



117 



A 



w 



^g fEgife ^ 



^ 




g>mttlj QlnUrge 
(Eounrtl 

Eleanor Miller 
President 



Eleanor Miller 



(Eounctl ifflmbrrH 



Eleanor Miller 
Eleanor Hoyt 



SENIOR YEAR 



Frona Brooks 



Jeannette Wales 
Alice Jenckes 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Harriet Wolverton (Resigned) Margaret Ward 

Virginia Conklin Isabel Conklin 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Eleanor Miller Eleanor Hoyt 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
Charlotte MacDougall 



rk 



=*§ 



®r 



IV.) 



A 



w 



^§ RM^ f 



^ 




^ 



IfOUH? of 

SSeprpfientattbra 

WfCutrs 

Camilla Low 
President 

Laura Cabot 
Vice-President 

Catherine Smith 
Member of Judicial Board 



Camilla Low 



BmiBP of Steprpflentattupa 



Junior Year 



Jane Arms 
Doris Babson 
Esther Baehr 
Ruth Barnes 
Dorothy Bedworth 
Elizabeth Bixler 
Constance Boyer 
Camilla Breuer 
Vera Call 
Dorothy Chapman 
Virginia Conklin 
Margaret Cullinan 
Gladys Dingledine 
Charlotte Dorian 
Dorothy Dreyfuss 
Sarah Freedman 
Esther Gaylord 



Ruth Joshel 
Ruth Katsh 
Helen Leeming 
Camilla Low 
Elizabeth Lipsey 
Katherine Miller 
Marie Miller 
Janice Ozias 
Alice Robinson 
Pearl Smith 
Marion Stacey 
Julie Taylor 
Marion White 
Una Whitehurst 
Jessie Wilson 
Katherine Winchester 
Aileen Woodman 



Clarice Young 



^EH22^ 



A 



1 20 



w 



^g f^fe ^ 



^ 



Sjouhp af jBeptesetttaittipa 



Senior Year 



Jane Arms 
Doris Babson 
Dorothy Bartruff 
Dorothy Bedworth 
Louise Blaisdell 
Beatrice Byram 
Laura Cabot 
Dorothy Chase 
Mary Coolidge 
Phyllis Creasey 
Lucile Darton 
Mary Dixon 
Edith Donnell 
Huldah Doran 
Margaret Ford 
Elizabeth French 
Helen French 
Ruth Guggenheim 
Dorothy Hall 
Helen Harper 
Ruth Harrington 
Barbara Harrison 
Margaret Hinckley 
Janette Holmes 
Dorothy Jenks 
Ruth Johnson 



Esther Jones 
Margaret Kemp 
Katherine Lacey 
Evelyn Lawley 
Marion Leary 
Helen Leeming 
Emma Lincoln 
Mary Long 
Camilla Low 
Dorothy MacDonald 
Jean MacDonald 
Nellie MacLachlan 
Elizabeth Marmon 
Barbara McKay 
Ruth Murray 
Emily Reed 
Mathilde Rehm 
Katherine Sanford 
Catherine Smith 
Marion Swayze 
Julie Taylor 
Susan Tracey 
Bessie Tulloch 
Jean Whiting 
Marion Whittemore 
Katherine Winchester 



Elizabeth Woodson 



E^ 



^ vmm n 



A 



121 



A© fta ^ 



^ 




Aufinrtattmt fur 
OIlinBitatt Hlork 



Eleanor Hoyt 



Senior Officers 



Eleanor Hoyt . 
Thalia Stetson 



President 
Vice-President 



Junior Officers 



Camilla Low . 
Margaret Kreglow 
Eleanor Hoyt . 



Treasurer 

Chairman of Extension Department 

. Chairman of World Fellowship 



Sophomore Year 



Margaret Ward 



Secretary 



ik 



Student Volunteers 

Rhoda Orm Elizabeth Cairns 

Margaret Ward Evelyn Gray 

Eleanor Hoyt 



& mTB V7 



122 



A 



w 



^ig f^fe ^ 



^ 




S. C. A. C. W. Cabinet 



(H. A. (E. W. (Eabutrt 



CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS AND COMMITTEES 



Religious Service and Bible Study 

World Fellowship 

Social Committee 

Publicity .... 

Head Representative 

Community Service Association 

President of Student Volunteers 



Margaret Ward 
Alice Chapman 
Isabel Stabler 
Evelyn Gray 
Catherine Smith 
Miriam Buncher 
Elizabeth Cairns 



^ 



k 



^(HZ2I 



^ 



123 



J& 



w 



" ^MR &t 



^ 



g>tutottt Abtoera 



Hannah Abraham 
Marjorie Adams 
Cornelia Ahl 
Mildred Alfred 
Pauline Ames 
Jane Arms 
Mildred Ball 
Eleanor Bachman 
Esther Baehr 
Ruth Barnes 
Madeleine Baxter 
Dorothy Bedworth 
Doris Benedict 
Harriet Bergtold 
Joanna Beyer 
Elizabeth Bixler 
Beth Bohning 
Dorothy Bourne 
Priscilla Boyce 
Constance Boyer 
Ernestine Bradford 
Prona Brooks 
Katherine Brosnahan 
Lois Brown 
Dorris Bryant 
Miriam Buncher 
Charlotte Butler 
Beatrice Byram 
Laura Cabot 
Elizabeth Cairns 
Vera Call 
Alice Chapman 
Dorothy Chase 
Eleanor Child 
Carita Clark 
Evelyn Clarke 
Sarah M. Clarke 
Isabel Conklin 
Virginia Conklin 
Ruth Cooper 
Hilda Couch 
Adelaide Cozzens 
Marjorie Crandell 
Phyllis Creasey 
Dorothy Crydenwise 
Margaret Cullinan 
Helen Cunningham 
Flora Davidson 
Florence Denison 
Helen DeGroat 
Mary Dickson 
Priscilla Dimick 
Ruth Dimick 
Gladys Dingledine 
Jane Dinsmore 
Edith Donnell 
Elizabeth Donnell 
Charlotte Dorian 
Huldah Doron 
Marion Downey 
Faith Dudgeon 
Barbara Eaton 



Eleanor Evans 
Ruth Ferguson 
Caroline Fisher 
Doris Flather 
Margaret Ford 
Margaret Franks 
Elinor French 
Edith Fuller 
Helen Fyke 
Margaret Gabel 
Grace Gafford 
Esther Gaylord 
Katherine Gaylord 
Virginia Giles 
Dorothy Gleason 
Sophie Gordon 
Charlotte Gower 
Evelyn Gray 
Elizabeth Greer 
Ruth Guggenheim 
Frances Guild 
Ardelia Hall 
Helen Hall 
Frances Harmon 
Isabel Harper 
Barbara Harrison 
Doris Harrison 
Katharine Hasson 
Frances Hause 
Sophie Henker 
Marion Hillhouse 
Marion Himmelsbach 
Margarette Hines 
Margaret Hitchcock 
A. Beryl Hobson 
Dorothy Hogan 
Margaret Hopkins 
Katherine Howland 
Eleanor Hoyt 
Margaret Humphrey 
Marion Hunt 
Mary Frances Hunt 
Esther Irving 
Ruth Irwin 
Harriet Jacobus 
Erika Jauch 
Alice Jenckes 
Dorothy Jenks 
Josephine Jenks 
Frances Johnson 
Ruth K. Johnson 
Anne Johnston 
Esther Jones 
Margaret Jones 
Ruth Joshel 
Helen Kellogg 
Margaret Kemp 
Rachel Keniston 
Hazel King 
Louise Kingsley 
Catherine Knowles 
Margaret Kreglow 



Dorothy Kudlich 
Katherine Lacey 
Ilda Langdon 
Lois Ledbetter 
Helen Leeming 
Louise Lieber 
Elizabeth Lipsey 
Anne Lochhead 
Evelyn Loetscher 
Camilla Low 
Kathryn Lyman 
Nancy McCullough 
Athena McFadden 
Barbara McKay 
Dorothy Mac-Donald 
Marcia MacDonald 
Charlotte MacDougall 
Nellie MacLachlan 
Margaret MacLean 
Katherine Macomber 
Jean MacTarnaghan 
Harriet Marsh 
Mildred Mason 
Jane Massie 
Sylvia Meltzer 
Katherine Merrill 
Elvira Miller 
Eleanor Miller 
Katherine Miller 
Katherine McC. Miller 
Louise Miller 
Margaret Miller 
Marjorie Morrison 
Esther Moss 
Margaret E. Moulton 
Catherine Murray 
Elizabeth Neilon 
Evelyn Nelson 
Ruth Alice Norman 
Dorothea Nourse 
Helen O'Reilly 
Mabelle Orleman 
Rhode Orme 
Willa Orr 
Janice Ozias 
Elizabeth Patek 
Katherine Peek 
Margaret Pendleton 
Anna Pennypacker 
Eleanor Phillips 
Gladys Platner 
Achsa Powell 
Eleanor Rau 
Hope Rawson 
Emily Reed 
Virginia Reed 
Matilde Rehm 
Wilhelmine Rehm 
Irma Rich 
Gerda Richards 
Alice Richardson 
Sara Dean Roberts 



Ruth Robeson 
Alice Robinson 
G. Luene Rogers 
Olivia Rogers 
Anna Ryan 
Dorothea Sanjiyan 
Margaret Schneider 
Caroline Schofield 
Alice Shaw 
Ellen Sheehan 
Helena Silberstein 
Muriel Slawson 
Catherine Smith 
Harriet Smith 
Helen Amy Smith 
Pearl Smith 
Alice Snyder 
Maxine Spengler 
Marion Stacey 
Isabel Stabler 
Bernadette Stack 
Helen Stearns 
Eleanor Steele 
Dariel Steer 
Thalia Stetson 
Marabeth Storrs 
Margaret Storrs 
Claire Strauss 
Marian Swayze 
I meld a Taff 
Janice Taggart 
Louisa Taggart 
Julie Taylor 
Marian Thorndike 
Susan Tracy 
Dorothea Trickey 
Anna Trott 
Margaret Tucker 
Bessie Tulloch 
Frances Upham 
Frances deValin 
Jeanette Wales 
Beatrice Walton 
Margaret Ward 
Virginia Ward 
Marian Watkitis 
Pollv Weaver 
Helen Whitehill 
Una Whitehurst 
Jean Whiting 
Gertrude Whitmore 
Marion Whittemore 
Florence Wilder 
Katherine AVin Chester 
Jessie Wilson 
Gertrude Windisch 
Harriet Wolverton 
Greta Wood 
Aileen Woodman 
Elizabeth Woodson 
Clarice Young 
Miriam Zabriskie 



3ox §>tittont0 ^Entering uritlj Aduattrpfc §>tatt&tng 



Harriet Bergtold 
Constance Boyer 
Alice Chapman 
Dorothy Chase 
Carita Clark 
Isabel Conklin 
Elizabeth Crain 
Dorothy Crydenwise 



Helen DeGroat 
Marion Downey 
K. Marie Fischer 
Charlotte Gower 
Margaret Hackett 
Eleanor Hoyt 
Dorothy Jenks 
Ruth Katsh 



Margaret Kreglow 
Naomi Laucheimer 
Elizabeth Lipsey 
Esther Moss 
Rhode Orme 
Luene Rogers 
Isabel Stabler 
Margaret Ward 



rk 



^ \WTT\ Q? 



Ja 



vi\ 



w 



^s $m3& r 



^ 



^ 




Marjone Adams 
Elizabeth Alexander 
Harriet Bergtold 
Constance Boyer 
Elizabeth Brooke 
Frona Brooks 
Miriam Buncher 
Laura Cabot 
Alice Chapman 
Carita Clark 
Virginia Conklin 
Helen DeGroat 
Florence Denison 
Ruth Dimick 
Jane Dinsmore 



Elizabeth Cairns 
Evelyn Gray 
Jeanne Geiger 



&tlb?r Say BrlrgateH 



Edith Donnell 
Huldah Doron 
Eleanor Evans 
Katherine Gaylord 
Virginia Giles 
Edith Harris 
Polly Haskins 
Eleanor Hoyt 
Alice Jenckes 
Frances Johnson 
Anne Johnston 
Margaret Jones 
Margaret Kreglow 
Florence Leopold 
Camilla Low 
Charlotte MacDougall 



Harriet Marsh 
Eleanor Miller 
Katharine Marie Miller 
Esther Moss 
Rhoda Orme 
Anna Pennypacker 
Ruth Robeson 
Matilde Ruge 
Catherine Smith 
Isabel Stabler 
Margaret Storrs 
Thalia Stetson 
F ranees Upham 
Margaret Ward 
Marion Whittemore 



1? b Malm b Sfbgatra 



Eleanor Hoyt 
Camilla Low 



Janice Ozias 
Eleanor Steele 
Margaret Ward 



^BBEZZ 



&r 



A 





SHMAN YEA 




w 



^§ ftM2fe jj- 



^ 




ifosljman f par 



Charlotte MacDougall 



OFFICERS 



President Ch 


arlotte MacDougall 


Vice-President ...... 


Harriet Wolverton 


Treasurer ....... 


. Laura Cabot 


Secretary ....... 


Beatrice Harvey 


Song Leader ....... 


Constance Boyer 


Assistant Song Leader ..... 


. Jean Whiting 


CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 


' 




Ruth Beveridge 


Motto 


. Doris Flather 


Song 


Elizabeth Donnell 


RALLY DAY 




Decorations — Lois Brown Ribbons- 


-Marion Thorndike 


Class Color — Red Class Anima 


I — Lion 



^l 



l&r 



1-2* 



A 



w 



^g Sfc ^ 



^ 



^ 



J$l 








•<- ^jfcg 








\ ^MlB? 


6^? 
















HP^\, 










P 

r * 


^«M 


4b 


• 




. iJ8r 








■ % ^ ? 


■■pi,**-** 






IMB^^MM 


HH^^^H 



(ttlasfi ijtstnrij, iFrealjman fear 

In the beginning there 
was the Flu (without men- 
tion of which no history can 
hope to be complete) , and 
its sister, Quarantine. Shall 
we lightly forget the latter's 
reign under which our first 
impression-ful months were 
spent? Far be it from us, 
aside from the taboo on 
shopping (which was good 
for the purse), and on 
week-ends in the world at 
large (which was good for 
the health), to regret said 
quarantine which gave us 
the earliest weeks of our grand entry in which to get acquainted with our incarcerated 
fellow-flu-avoiders, rather than with our all-too-pressing books. And who would not 
consider farming — a remunerative and companionable pastime — preferable to a more 
normal life spent in the breathless pursuit of Hygiene II, Latin (or Greek) and other 
concomitants of Freshman life? Never having been to a Freshman Frolic, we shed 
no tears at its postponement, although when the ban was finally lifted we frolicked 
with the greater abandon. And the one-way traffic system which developed in 
Seelye and elsewhere to avoid Congestion, Confusion and Contagion, was a memory 
to cherish in the afterdays when subsequent normalcy brought the impassable jam on 
the stairs and in the noteroom. 

And then, as some one has put it, "War and quarantine were both really off" ; 
we became for a fleeting hour, the equals of all men, including the academically- 
gowned Faculty. She who had no white skirt borrowed one, and joined the cele- 
bration Parade, with a chilly thrill running Marathons up and down her spine, and 
a feeling that she was "E Pluribus Unam" in the general rejoicing. 

Before we had become really accustomed to the music of flapping galoshes, and 
to fur-coated figures of our friends, Christmas vacation descended upon us, and we 
upon our relatives. Again 
the flu spectrally appeared 
and prolonged our vacation 
five days beyond its sched- 
uled close. We returned 
— and upon our young and 
unsophisticated minds the 
burden of approaching 
Mid - Years weighed not 
wisely but too well. Most 
of us survived the ordeal, 
however, soothed by Organ 
Vespers and good skating. 




^ 



&r 



A 



120 



w 



=v® liIEi1 (ajr 



^ 



We had heard, vaguely, of an affair known as Sophomore Reception, whither, 
clad in full splendor of evening dress, the Sophomores and Freshmen repaired to 
shake hands with the Dean. But '2 1 , hostesses ever-resourceful and original, de- 
cided that the wilds of Paradise were more conducive to enjoyment than the mazes 
of the gym, and thereupon instituted the Ice Carnival, decreeing the boat-house as 
the place to meet the Deans and class presidents formally ; and, afterwards on the 
pond, the rest of the Sophomore and Freshman classes informally. Warmish weather 
produced puddles here and there upon the ice, and the ice creaked ominously ever 
and anon beneath so many feet — but amid the magic of food and the flash of skates 
all minor matters were lost sight of. 

Ensued a period of dullness, when the weather was as a rule unspeakable and 
dispositions in proportion. The tedium was pleasantly broken, however, by Rally 
Day. We were impressed by the multitude of white clothes and class ribbons no 
less than by the Faculty in full array — for, as aforementioned, we had seen the 
academic robes, but this was our first glimpse of Ourselves, all 777 of us, Smith's 
largest entering class, in massed numbers ! We sat through the morning program 
with one eye on the speaker and the other on the nearest exit, calculating our chances 
of being able to reach the gym, through all the swarm of girls and guests, in time to 
get a front-rank place for the rally. Once there, we sang, diffidently but with our 
wonted enthusiasm, our first class song. And in the afternoon ours was inordinate 
pride in being Evens, as we cheered the invincible and superior basketball of our 
valiant sister class. 

Then came Spring Vacation, in the midst of weeks of slush, and when, spring- 
clad ourselves, we returned to Hamp, an indefinable, inexplicable, but wholly 
delightful metamorphosis took place. It did not burst upon us full-fledged — it came 
shyly (as we had come shyly some months before!) and with faint green and blue 

mists and blushes. And its name was Spring. 
Then we knew what people had meant when 
they had said, "Oh, yes, this is all very nice 
— but wait till you see Spring in Hamp — it's 
different from and more beautiful than any- 
thing else in the world!" We had thought 
these were mere maundenngs — but now we 
knew, and we revelled in it and life became 
an acute pleasure. Step-sings we swarmed 
to and tried (with no success!) to outdo our 
loftily superior Sophomore friends. Most of 
us decided not to help 1919 into the wide, 
wide world — for that same world was call- 
ing us too. And with a hectic bound we left 
our last Final, and boarded the next train 
for Home, scarcely realizing that we had 
been away and grown-up ( !) for nine months. 
Forth we went, broadcast, with plans for 
next year buzzing in our heads, and a spring- 
time memory of college in our hearts. 

Harriet Bergtold 




Ik 



^ BM ^ 



130 



dk 




s 




\T 



^ liliiite jr 




^ 



^opljnmarp f par 

(Sfitrpra 

President, Eleanor Miller 
Vice-President, Jeanette Wales 
Secretary, Marion Himmelsbach 

Treasurer, Catherine Smith 

Song Leader, Elizabeth Bridgers 

Assistant Song Leader, Elizabeth Donnell 

Treasurer of Fund, Harriet Wolverton 



Eleanor Miller 



Chairmen of Committees 
sophomore ice carnival 
General Chairman, Laura Cabot 
Invitations, Margaret Gabel 
Music, Phyllis Creasey 
Entertainment, Charlotte MacDougall 
Decorations, Sara Dean Roberts 
Refreshments, Alice Jenckes 
Costumes, Pauline Ames 
Grind Bool(, Anne Johnston 

1920 Commencement 

Rose Committee, Charlotte MacDougall 
Push Committee, Katherine Murray 




!k 



^Buza^ 



^ 



132 



w 



^ 



(SUms piston}, g'npljnmnrp f ?ar 

As Freshmen we had been happy nobodies with innumerable upper classmen to show us how 
we ought to behave, and to patronize us generally. But now at last we were Sophomores and we 
could assume some of the dignity and wisdom that had seemed so unattainable the year before. 

Growing into a Sophomore is like going into your 'teens. In one great leap you jump from 
infancy into life. As we stepped off the train ready for our second year of college life we were 
full of the importance of this new exis:ence that had been thrust on us. Our suitcases were loaded 
down with the things that only experience and never a Freshman Bible can teach you to bring. We 
wanted to find our new sisters and give them lots of advice and be superior and kind to them in 
payment of old scores. We wanted to hug everyone we saw and tell them all what a wonderful 
place Smith was for fear they'd forgotten over the vacation. We were happy and independent as 
only Sophomores can be. 

It took us very few scrambling hours to get settled and to put on the sport clothes which were 
such an impressive sign of our sophistication. And off we went, chattering our way down Main 
Street in search of blotters and desk calendars and ferns (which experience had not taught us to 
leave alone). We shouted to each other bromidically that it was "great to be back." And indeed, 
it was! 

The next morning, Freshmen in hand, we trotted off to hear the welcome and the good advice 
of the President and found at chapel that we were to have the great joy of pointing out the 
Faculty on the platform to our young charges. This was a treat quite new to us and we made the 
most of it. President Neilson encouraged us in our good resolutions for the year by reminding us 
that we had no war to attract our attention outside of all-sufficient Northampton. This year was 
to be nothing but plain sailing and steady work (though we all privately sent up a little prayer that 
there be no quarantine to enforce it). Our ambitions were further fired by our honor roll which 
was read in chapel some weeks later. With such possi- 
bilities how could we fail to make ourselves the highest 
class in college? This, reckoning with the chosen brains 
of the Freshman class! 

However, we soon found there were more than good 
resolutions in the world. It took us a while to realize 
our liberty, but when we did grasp the situation there 
was not a trial sign posted that 1922 didn't put her 
name on. In 1920s Dramatic Association we found 
much opportunity for displaying our talents. The fall 
production called upon us for fairies, slaves, and duelling 
poets, while later in the spring we furnished a court with 
dazzling beauties and a black-browed villain. Then 
there were departmental clubs which urged us to join 
and those papers which we weren't already helping to 
edit soon discovered our value and offered us positions. 
So highly prized were we that the Monthly broke all 
precedent and put three of our number on the board. 

After the first great burst of energy stored up by a 
year of watching upper classmen play with the toys we 
wanted we calmed down a bit and looked beyond our 
own precious vigorous class. We took time to sing some 
Even songs at the Fall Field Day which was added for 
the first time to the business of autumn, and to pat our sister class on the back when she came 
off victorious. We hoped we would be athletes too when we grew up. 



^ 




^ fTO^l 



Of 



A 



133 



w 



^m!R & 



^S 



Then came Armistice Day. After the splendid swaying mass of enthusiasm that we had been 
a part of just a year before we were a bit afraid to face the crowded John M. Greene for fear it 
could not do justice to the occasion again. But gradually the war songs uncovered the emotion 
which had been hidden for a year under little things. And there were poems read to us in great 
quietness by the President. He chose all our favorites and read them as well as we had hoped to 
hear them. So we thanked him to ourselves and decided that perhaps there were other ways to 
celebrate than the one we chose last year. 

There was the Fund, of course, over and around everything. There were continual debates 
as to the economic possibilities of one nickel which Sue paid Jane for blacking her shoes and Jane 
paid back to Sue for a sandwich. Each claimed it as going towards her pledge and everyone be- 
came involved in the tangle. During Christmas vacation we tackled all our millionaire friends to 
extract a few stray pennies from their pockets. Our Christmas presents from the Dean — the four 
million dollar bags — we flaunted in everyone's faces. 

Our Ice Carnival was inducement enough to bring us back from this vacation filled not en- 
tirely with raising money. Here we played with our younger sisters (some of us clumsily enough) 
and showed them some of the joys that Alice would have had, had her Wonderland been Paradise. 
And in the end we gave ourselves to advertise the Fund and 
haunted the movies afterwards to find out how well we skated 
on a movie screen. 

Then mid-years followed, this year not such an unalloyed 
mass of dates and conjugations. Experience had taught us that 
a judicious mixture of breakfast parties and movies (alas, there 
was no longer the Municipal Theatre!) along with the other 
necessities of life was advisable. We tried to teach the Fresh- 
men that Livy was better for a little fresh air and that drivers 
of delivery wagons are surprisingly agreeable about hitches, but 
it was of no avail. "Live and learn," we sighed happily as we 
kicked our way through the snow and over the hill to the 
fruit farm. 

With exams safely behind us we turned all our attention to 
Rally Day. It was exciting enough the first time we saw it. 
We never suspected that anything half as exhilarating nor half 
as packed full of college existed. We had been proud to see 
ourselves enough a part of Smith to sit in white and red in the 
gallery of John M. Greene in the morning and to cheer outside 
the gym in the afternoon. But this year we were part of it all. 
We got tickets to everything and even contributed our share to 
the evening with a bewildering orchestra and a musical comedy 
from which "Nobody" soon became immortal. 

Winter was soon over and the snow began to melt and the 
ivy grew green over the brick. On the Libe the bunches of 
wistaria grew full and perfumed. The President's new house which had been such a' pleasant 
place for chatter and exploring was shut to the outsider and only a lucky few were given a last 
glimpse over it with Allan as a careful guide. We began thinking of "bats and sings," our ardor 
nothing dampened by ceaseless outpourings from heaven. But all too soon these also were things 
of the past and Commencement had come with its burden of Sophomore cares, — and Sophomore 
sorrows. For after all what class can ever take the place of those superior beings who first smiled 
at us across the gym floor at Frolic and told us they'd give us advice, but never bothered us with 
anything but friendship? 

We haunted the Academy to glimpse the happy painted faces of the cavaliers of Verona and 
on Saturday night we serenaded until we were hoarse and the curtain shut us away from the 
festive supper party on the stage. Then there was the marvel of illumination night with a full 
moon and the elm trees swinging soft bubbles of light. A close rival to this was Mr. McCallum's 
garden party. This was only for the lucky few (or were they unlucky?) who were graduating, but 
the rest of us could watch the lights from the far shore and hear Miss Dale's voice across the water. 
So while Commencement seemed a happy time we were glad it was not too near for us. The 
past gave us the pleasant memories of gaielies and soberness and beauties only recognized with the 
half-knowledge of adolescence. Next year we would be Juniors — "upper classmen." We would 
be happy, yes. But after all there was something in the first joyful realization of ourselves that 
we would not find again. Still, as long as we could not be Sophomores again, we were ready to 
try the next year to see what it would bring. ANNE H. JOHNSTON. 




rk 



m 



& 



A 



a 



134 




<J> 



^J 



NIOD YEA 




w 



^© n^fe ^ 



^ 



dhmtnr f far 





Harriet Wolverton 



Virginia Conklin 



Officers 

President — Harriet Wolverton* 

Virginia Conklin 
Vice-President — Eleanor Hoyt 
Secretary — Virginia Conklin* 
Treasurer — Katherine Murray 
Song Leader — Elizabeth Donnell 
Assistant Song Leader — Jean Whiting 
Chairman of Fund — Harriet Wolverton 

Chairmen of Committees 
rally day 
Decorations — Helen Carroll 

Ribbons — Miriam Zabriskie 

Stunt — Isabel Conklin 

JUNIOR FROLIC 
General Chairman — Charlotte MacDougall 
Stunk — Clarice Young 
Invitations — Margaret Jones 
Refreshments — Dorothy Benson 
Decorations — Edith Donnell 



* Resigned 




C^ 



^S 



W 



Jk 



136 



w 



^g fsfe ^ 



^ 



ilmrior (Olaflfi ijifitnry 



When Twenty-Two returned to pass 
The talked-of Junior year, 

She found herself the only really 
— Happy person here: 

The freshmen all were homesick ; 

The seniors all were blue 
From chorusing "The last, last time" 

With everything they'd do. 

The sophomores were too busy 
Being Taken In, and Trying, 

To perch upon their Reputations 
And attempt high flying . . . 

But Twenty-Two was running things 
And if she missed Surprise, 

At least she knew that she was very 
Charming, although wise. 

She found her young advisees 
And then got to the bottom 

Of what they needed, when, and how- 
And then, I think, forgot 'em. 



She took her midyears gracefully, 
And from their bended knees 

Her teachers gave her thanks with five 
Phi Beta Kappa keys. 

On Rally Day she stood beneath 

Her lion in the gym. 
And tried to roar (to Twenty-One) 

As best befitted him, 

But, overcome by sentiment, 
And love, and deep respect, 

She dropped her voice into the lilting 
Darky dialect. 

But in the afternoon, at eighty 

Minutes after one, 
She out-basketballed the haughty team 

Of Nineteen Twenty-One. 

And then her voice, from dulcet tones, 
Regained its self-possession, 

And screeched to celebrate the third 
Odd Jefeat in succession ! 




^ 



^[ffl221 



& 



A 



137 



w 



^g f^a] ©r 



^ 



And, later in the evening, 

When the crowds filled John M. Greene 
She danced, and sang, and acted out 

A tragic Hamlet Scene. 

She Frolic-ed all one evening. 

With ponderous dignity — 
(Remember, Twenty-Two's the largest 

Class you'll ever see!) 

And several lonely guests sat in 

The balcony — and five 
Or six, who weren't invited, were 

Allowed to leave alive . . . 

And what they saw was our ancestress, 

Good Sophia Smith, 
Inquiring of a medium 

What we were busy with. 



To which the medium responded 

In eleven (?) acts, 
And plainly showed Sophia all 

The "crude, unvarnished facts." 



And she, from off the balcony 
(Attached to fire ropes) 

Sang, with an angel chorus, 
Of her disappointed hopes. 

And of the loss of Womanly, 
To gain Dramatic Style . . . 

(The angels traced it back to 
S. A. Eliot's Greek profile!) 

Then Twenty-Two with lollypops 
Her Junior Frolic ended, 

And said that it was quite as nice 
As any she'd attended. 

One warmish evening, Twenty-Two 
With plainly-breaking hearts 

Relieved the Seniors of the Steps 
(In three harmonious parts.) 



And then when Spring its sparkling course 
Along the walks had run out, 

She packed her trunk and dressed in white, 
And ushered Twenty-One out. 

(At least, in all past Class Books 

This is what the Juniors do — 
And 'though I can't remember, I 

Suppose that we did, too.) 

Eleanor Carroll Chilton. 



1 &Ij$ 




\jf "^f T 


siji .1- 

1 k • 


■ •>l«--*-^Hg^{^' 





rk 



iSQESa® 



■va 



^ 



138 



V ), O g f^fe / W 



3luntor fJrDtmmane 

Jeanette Wales ..... General Chairman 

Laura Cabot ...... Head Usher 

Floor Committees 

Alice Jenckes, Chairman 

Virginia Conklin Catherine Smith 

Elizabeth Greer Helen Stenger 

Program Committee 

Dorothy Bryan, Chairman 

Annette Bardwell Helen Carroll 

Eleanor Phillips 

Music Committee 

Phyllis Creasey, Chairman 

Constance Boyer Katherine Gaylord 

Edith Donnell Katherine Peek 

Invitation Committee 

Una Whitehurst, Chairman 

Pauline Ames Margaret Jones 

Margaret Cullinan Caroline Schofield 

Frances deValin 

Refreshment Committee 

Dorothy Chase Margaret Gabel 

Marion Himmelsbach 

Theatre 
Frances Johnson, Chairman 

E ^ .y gl Mm,M^ ito^ ' 111 



^ mTB &? 



139 



w 



Marjorie Adams 
Janice Aldridge 
Elizabeth Alexander 
Mildred Alfred 
Pauline Ames 
Jane Arms 
Ann Axtell 
Doris Babson 
Esther Baehr 
Beatrice Bagg 
Mildred Ball 
Annette Bardwell 
Hilda Barnes 
Elizabeth Barry 
Dorothy Bedworth 
Ruth Bemis 
Doris Benedict 
Kathryn Bennett 
Dorothy Benson 
Harriet Bergtold 
Ruth Bsveridge 
Elizabeth Bixler 
Louise Blaisdell 
Beth Bohnmg 
Dorothy Bourne 
Constance Boyer 
Ernestine Bradford 
Elizabeth Bridgers 
Frona Brooks 
Lois Brown 
Miriam Buncher 
Zilla Burke 
Elizabeth Byrne 
Laura Cabot 
Elizabeth Cairns 
Helen Carroll 
Alice Chapman 
Dorothy Chase 
Eleanor Child 
Eleanor Chilton 
Anna Claney 
Carita Clark 
Catherine Clark 
Eleanor Clark 
Virginia Conklin 
Isabel Conklin 
Hilda Couch 
Adelaide Cozzens 
Elizabeth Crain 
Phyllis Creasey 
Dorothy Crydenwise 
Margaret Cullinan 
Helen Cunningham 
Janet Dan forth 
Lucile Darton 
Flora Davidson 
Helen DeGroat 
Florence Denison 
Mary Dickson 
Priscilla Dimick 
Ruth Dimick 



Junior laljfra 



^ 



Sk 



Jane Dinsmore 
Edith Donnell 
Elizabeth Donnell 
Charlotte Dorian 
Huldah Doron 
Berenice Dreyfus 
Faith Dudgeon 
Barbara Eaton 
Lily Emerson 
Eleanor Evans 
Ellen Ewing 
Ruth Ferguson 
Katherine Fischer 
Myrtle Fish 
Doris Flather 
Margaret Franks 
Edith Fuller 
Helen Fyke 
Margaret Gabel 
Esther Gaylord 
Katherine Gaylord 
Elsye Geisenberger 
Hanna Gichner 
Virginia Giles 
Charlotte Gower 
Elizabeth Greer 
Ardelia Hall 
Dorothy Hall 
Frances Harmon 
Gladys Harriman 
Edith Harris 
Jane Harwood 
Frances Haskell 
Virginia Hatfield 
Frances Hause 
Helen Hauser 
Dorothy Higbie 
Elizabeth Hilliard 
Marion Himmelsbach 
Marguerite Hines 
Janette Holmes 
Constance Hopkins 
Katherine Houghton 
Katherine Howland 
Eleanor Hoyt 
Elizabeth Hubbard 
Margaret Humphrey 
Mary Frances Hunt 
Marie Hutchings 
Esther Irving 
Ruth Irwin 
Alice Jenckes 
Dorothy Jenks 
Dorothy Johnson 
Frances Johnson 
Ruth Johnson 
Anne Johnston 
Margaret Jones 
Ruth Joshel 
Ruth Katsh 
Helen Kellogg 



Margaret Kemp 
Rachel Keniston 
Louise Kingsley 
Margaret Kreglow 
Julia Kreis 
Kathryn Kryder 
Ruth Kyte 
Naomi Laucheimer 
Helen Lawton 
Thelma Ledbetter 
Barbara Lee 
Helen Leeming 
Mildred Leeper 
Florence Leopold 
Louise Lieber 
Julia Lincoln 
Elizabeth Lipsey 
Mildred Lovejoy 
Evelyn Loetscher 
Camilla Low 
Kathryn Lyman 
Nancy McCullough 
Athena McFadden 
Barbara McKay 
Dorothy MacDonald 
Marcia MacDonald 
Charlotte MacDougall 
Nellie MacLachlan 
Jean MacTarnaghan 
Katherine Macomber 
Helen Main 
Elizabeth Marmon 
Harriet Marsh 
Mildred Mason 
Jane Massie 
Eleanor Miller 
Katherine Miller 
Marie Miller 
Marjorie Morrison 
Esther Moss 
Catherine Murray 
Ruth Alice Norman 
Helen O'Reilly 
Rhoda Orme 
Willa Orr 
Virginia Otto 
Janice Ozias 
Elizabeth Patek 
Katherine Peek 
Dorothy Peirce 
Margaret Pendleton 
Anna Pennypacker 
Eleanor Phillips 
Mary Platner 
Grace Preble 
Katherine Pnckett 
Mildred Purdy 
Jane Quinby 
Violet Ramsay 
Eleanor Rau 
Virginia Reed 



Mathilde Rehm 
Judith Relf 
Irma Rich 
Ruth Richards 
Alice Richardson 
Dean Roberts 
Louise Robertson 
Ruth Robeson 
Mathilde Ruge 
Katherine Sanford 
Dorothy Sanjiyan 
Margaret Schneider 
Caroline Schoneld 
Eleanor Sconeld 
Abigail Scott 
Anna Sheedy 
Louise Silber 
Helena Silberstein 
Catherine Smith 
Harriet Smith 
Helen Amy Smith 
Helen Atkinson Smith 
Helen Dana Smith 
Nathalie Smith 
Pearl Smith 
Maxine Spengler 
Isabel Stabler 
Marion Stacey 
Bernadette Stack 
Helen Stearns 
Helen Stenger 
Thalia Stetson 
Marabeth Storrs 
Margaret Storrs 
Claire Strauss 
Mary Sullivan 
Marian Swayze 
Dorothy Swisher 
Janice Taggart 
Louise Taggart 
Marian Thorndike 
Margaret Tildsley 
Elizabeth Tillinghast 
Louise Townsend 
Darthea Trickey 
Elizabeth Tulloch 
Frances Upham 
Frances deValin 
Jeanette Wales 
Beatrice Walton 
Margaret Ward 
Virginia Ward 
Polly Weaver 
Una Whitehurst 
Jean Whiting 
Marion A&hitlemore 
Katharine Winchester 
Greta Wood 
Clarice Young 
Miriam Zabriskie 
Constance Zonne 



^ 



& 



A 



141 




JlNIODfROUC 



1 . Prologue — Sophia Smith, Angels, and Spiritualistic Seance 

West Street and Arnold 

2. Chapel Any Morning 

Albright, Baldwin, Henshaw, 26 Bedford and Leuba Club 

3. The Death of Lord Jeff and the Modest College Girls 

Haven, Elm Street and Hatfield House 

4. Dr. Goldthwaite's Dress Reforms and Hat Parking at Beckmann's 

Washburn, Hubbard and Wallace 

5. Dramatics at Smith . . . Tyler, Morris, Lawrence and Dickinson 

6. Clubs in College ....... Belmont and Green 

7. A Busy Morning on Main Street . . Clark, Dewey, Chapin, Tucker 

8. Graduation . . Northrop, Gillett, 41 Elm Street and Tenney House 




w 



^g fB1 @r 



^ 




§>nttflr Wear 



Jeannette Wales 



©ffinra 

President, Jeannette Wales 
Vice-President, Margaret Ward 
Secretary, Caroline Schofield 
Treasurer, Greta Wood 
Historian, Clarice Young 
Song Leader, Elizabeth Donnell 
Assistant Song Leader, Jean Whiting 

Committees 

senior PINS 

Chairman, Ruth Katsh 

Huldah Doron Caroline Fisher 

Eleanor Evans Miriam Zabriskie 



CAPS AND GOWNS 

Chairman, Marian Swayze 

Marjorie Adams Jane Harwood 

Mayme Bahin Ethel Stewart 

Laura Wilson 

Rally Day Committees 

chairmen 

Decorations — Jane Quinby 
Ribbons — Marion Stacey 
Stunt — Jean Whiting 
Shorv — Dorothy MacDonald 




k 



^t 



l©r 



a 



144 



w 



^M^&r 



^ 



Qllaaa SjtBtnry, g^ntnr § mv 



\< > 


' , : 


,. 










nOf 






rgS&Vi 


SIH&CV.i 




* hs* . 




N SiTvi 


£**§t\\?m 








fi * 




















I 













'22 came back to Hamp for 
her fourth and last year, (why 
bring this up so early?) looking 
just as young as the youngest of 
'25. Girls seemed to her to be 
getting more and more frivolous 
all the time — no such sedate 
and impressive upperclassmen as 
there used to be; but at this 
point '22 suddenly realized that 
she constituted the college dig- 
nity, and surreptitiously pulled 
her tweed skirt lower, tilted her 
felt hat at a more conservative 
angle, slipped on her bone- 
rimmed glasses, and frowned at 
the hatless who wandered gaily 
below Beckmann's. 

She took the least awe-inspiring of her advisees to Frolic, and after the nerve-racking search 
for and capture of friends, acquaintances, and surprised strangers, she settled back and thoroughly 
enjoyed herself, feeling her duty well done. What did it matter if other escorts had filled two 
cards? She had obtained the signature of the Senior Class President, and the sense of achievement 
which comes to all autograph collectors was hers. 

After years of happy criticism, '22 suddenly discovered that she had nothing more to say. 
The worm had turned and the Faculty had given her a cut system. On principle she attended all 
the football games and cut all her classes before and after Mountain Day just to see how it would 
feel. Someone reminded her that these cuts counted double, and she realized with pain that the 
new and longed-for reform wasn't quite as free and simple as it had seemed at first. However, it 
marked a step forward in civilization, she reflected sagely. 

To the college soon came the exciting news that the beauty and brains of Smith in conjunction 
with the youth and valor of Dartmouth were to decide the fate of Soviet Russia. Upheld by this 
added dignity accorded her sex, '22 pledged her last $10.50 to the fund with pride, putting sternly 
from her, visions of the two Senior pins that had to be bought. Although the four million dollars 




!k 



^ mrB V? 



Jh 



a 



145 



r 



v Jr 



^ 



^S](^ 



for which she had toiled would not build a swimming pool in her college generation, or house her 
in that mysterious thing: — a quadrangle, at least she could be a mermaid in the Senior play which 
would immortalize Paradise, and could run, plaster-dusted over the creaky scaffolding of the new 
dormitories. Later she was much disappointed to learn that a fish tail would be too expensive, 
but soon consoled herself with the idea that she could be a beautiful statue in the "Winter's Tale." 

The full gravity of her position burst upon her when she listened, in growing discouragement, 
to the qualities needed for any career and realized that none of these were hers. She filled out 
the Appointment Bureau slip (or rather slips) witS laborious care, searching vainly in her memory 
for any possible information to write proudly after "Academic Honors" if employers did not 
appreciate her. As next (o the last resort there was always Father's Office; and as the last resort 
— well, you know what the song says about reunions and Prom men, and he had been writing 
ever since. 

After painstaking efforts to surprise Miss Benedict with a birthday party, an idea still fondly 
cherished long after the anniversary had passed, she decided to change it to a Christmas party, and, 
amid the holiday atmosphere and general gaiety, tried to impress the guest of honor with a small 
part of what she meant to her class. 

Having begun to fortify herself a year before, '22 simply would not let herself think of any 
activity or occasion as being her "last." Did not every speaker 1 say that college was simply a 
preparation for the wild, wild world? Nevertheless she fell with tooth and nail upon any of the 
poor unfortunates who mentioned that they would be glad to leave, and she wept a silent and 
private tear whenever she thought what she would be without college, and what college would be 
without her! When commencement really came she was too busy to think that she was being 
rapidly changed into that most remote creature, an alumna. Her only worries were whether she would 
secure those evasive rooms; and whether the family understood all the funny hits at the step 
sings. The question of attaching her mortar board to her bobbed hair was an added trouble and 
she was highly incensed when her facetious father suggested the infantile black chin elastic. She 
loved the impressive "President's Reception," yet some insurgent feeling tempted her to change 
her high-heeled slippers for her dear old muddy saddle shoes, rush after Georgia Coyle and 
shouting '76, and get the full joy and fatigue of the evening. 

Not until '22 started dismantling and realized that nothing could be left because the room 
was hers no longer, did she feel that she was really going, and that college days were over. 

CLARICE YOUNG, '22. 




^ MM ! B &7 



^ 



Jk 



1-IG 



VJ ; v® [BEq^ yvp 



(ttnmmtttwa fnr (Enmntnirrntent iExrrrtara 

Ivy Day Committee 

Charlotte Gower, Chairman 

Isabel Conklin Huldah Doron 

Marion Downey Eleanor Evans 

Margaret Kreglow Elisabeth Marshall 

Ivt Song Committee 

Harriet Bergtold, Chairman 

Adelaide Cozzens Alice Shaw 

Margaret Kreglow Blanche Shaw 

Clarice Young 

Commencement Orator 
Ruth Joshel, Chairman 
Carita Clark Mildred Williams 

Commencement Printing 

Margaret Jones, Chairman 

Doris Babson Helen Fyke 

Beth Bohning Ann Scroggie 

Ruth Dimick Darthea Trickey 

Class Supper Committee 

Margaret Gabel, Chairman 

Dorothy Chase Achsa L. Powell 

Virginia Giles Elizabeth Marmon 

Mary Dailey Louise Lieber 



C M* ■ igJ Mfl T .M^ to ;. U Q 



^Si\WTE\^7= ^ /a 



147 



r 



^s fllnafe /? 



^ 




Senior SramattrH QIommttt^H 



General Chairman . 
Business Manager . 
Assistant Business Manager 
Secretary 
Call Boys 



tk 



Laura W. Cabot 

Katharine Lyman 

. Carita Clark 

Elizabeth Lipsey 

Ruth Dimick, Dorothea Nourse 

Costumes 
Chairman, Gladys Harriman 
Elizabeth Greer Virginia Reed 

Frances Haskell Margaret Tucker 

Scenery 

Chairman, Dean Roberts 

Harriet Bergtold Margaret Franks 

Doris Flather Elizabeth Scoville 

Aileen Woodman 

Staging 

Chairman, Clarice Young 

Hilda Couch 

Music 

Chairman, Phyllis Creasy 

Constance Boyer Bernadette Stack 



^ 



Or 



JZ 



3 4.S 



w 



ik 



^g f^fe ^ 




"A Hintpr'a ©air" 



Leontes 

Camillo 

Antigonus 

Cleomenes 

Dion . 

polixenes 

Florizel 

Archidamus 

Mariner 

Old Shepherd 

Clown 

Autolycus . 

The Shepherd's 

A Gaoler . 

The Captain 

The Chief Judge 

A Lord 

Another Lord 

Hermione 

Perdita 

Paulina 

Emilia 

Mo psa 

Dorcas 

A Lady 



Servant 



^ 



Helen Amy Smith 
Eleanor Brinsmade 
Mildred Purdy 
. Louise Silber 
. Julia Lincoln 
Harriet Marsh 
Anne Johnston 
Helen Carroll 
Helen Dana Smith 
Isabel Conkhn 
Jane Dinsmore 
Zena C. Freedman 
Frances Upham 
Elizabeth Lipsey 
Ann Scroggie 
Dorothy Swisher 
Jean Whiting 
Eleanor Thor;-e 
Mary Dickson 
. Lois Brown 
Frances H. H. Harmcn 
Celia Silberman 
Katharine Peek 
Ruth Kerr Johnson 
Constance Boyer 



^ fTO^l ^ 



A 



140 





MM 



[NC 



M 




T 



■ 



w 



^g fBte ^ 



^ 




©ia'(^aDji2Kyl|P^i?Qh 



Sunday, June Eighteenth 

Baccalaureate Exercises in Assembly Hall, 11 a. m. 

Address by President Neilson 

Organ Vespers in John M. Greene Hall, 8 p. m. 

Organist, Mrs. Conniston 



ik 



=*g 



Of 



152 



A 



w 



k 



^g f^Ol (g^ 




iMft urn G&i,}'" 1 ''" ' '»''" "''" ..W* iiiii.K.DF 

Ivy Day 



Monday, June Nineteenth 

Ivy Exercises on the Campus . . . . . 1 a. m. 

Ivy Exercises in John M. Greene Hall . . . 1 1 a. m. 

Society Reunions . . . . . . . 2 p. m. 

Closing Concert . . . . . . 3 p. m. 

Art Exhibition 4-6 p. m. 

College Sing 7 p. m. 

President's Reception in the Library . . .8-10 p.m. 



^bbez© 



^ 



A 



\y.\ 



w 



^§ $^® r 



^ 



Jug ^rntg 



Our hopes have flamed like your autumn leaves 

When the skies have been clear and cold. 
Like you, we have weathered winters of doubt. 

Bereft of forgotten gold. 
Spring has brought to us courage each year, 

As your glossy leaves unfurled. 
Now the summer sun shines graciously — 

We stand at the door of the world. 

We would add to your wealth before we go, 

In remembrance of years now fled — - 
Then we turn to go out to the larger life, 

And, as we look ahead, 
We see ourselves a part of the world, 

A bit of the whole at last. 
So we add to the whole ourselves and our vine, 

In token of future and past. 



Elisabeth Marshall. 



ik 



m 



w 



s& 



ir>4 



w 



=v@ (ilS3| @r 



^ 




COMMENCEMENT 



Tuesday, June Twentieth 

John M. Greene Hall 10.30 a.m. 

Address by Samuel McLoid Crothers 



Alumnae Meeting .... 
Class Supper in Alumnae Gymnasium 



4.00-6.00 p. m. 
7.00 p.m. 



rk 



^gHE2 



&r 



1 55 



Jk 



w 



^g f^fc ^ 



^ 



Cs 




©a^^ 3 j^nm&L 



Toastmistress, Isabel Conklin 



The Faculty . 

The Past and Present 

The Future . 

Dramatics 

Roll Call 



. Barbara McKay 

Camilla Low 

Naomi Laucheimer 

Jean Whiting 

Margaret Cullinan 



s@BEE22® 



A 



156 




VEDSE 



w 



^flag^ 



^ 



Or poppies flaring in the wheat. 

I'll love you if you'll find the three 

Who make me I — and rule the child. 

And play philanderer to the girl, 

And love the woman silently; 

And if you'll seldom be discreet. 

And sometimes (watch my eyes!) be wild 

And tell me things you couldn't mean. 

And if, on every moon-crossed night, 

You'll lift the shades, and dim the light, 

And turn sardonically polite, 

And help me act a tragic scene 

Oh, if you act it very well 

I'll love you. 

Maybe. 

Who can tell? 

Eleanor Chilton. 



Stye ^riaaarH (Srinfor 

Scissor-r-rs to grind! Scissor-rs to grind! 
His bell jangles harshly; he shuffles along — 
His pack and his lathe are strapped on behind, 
And creak, as he wearily drags out his song — 

"Ombr-rellas to mend! Ombr-rellas to mend!" 
He snarls out the words with malevolent whine, 
He frightens the children ; they fly round the 

bend 
And hide in the tangle of clematis vine. 

His back, it is crooked; his step, it is slow; 
His eyes, in the shade of his hat's tattered brim. 
Are lit with a sullen fanatical glow, 
As he peers through the twilight so somber and 
dim. 



©fje %>\\tv& QHjapel 



The shadows of dusk creep out, stealthy and 

gray; 
A star glitters over the hill like a spark. 
The sound of his slow-ringing bell dies away 
Down the road, and he vanishes into the dark. 

Barbara McKay. 



Love hovered in the chapel of my heart, 

Unhonored spark — ■ 
Found dim devices not yet understood. 
And candlesticks of rude, unpolished wood 
Whose slim, pale tapers scorned his every art 

To bright the dark. 



At last one taper caught — a trembling glow 

That frailly seemed 
To warm the roof-beams of so chill a shrine, 
Or help those legends to divine — 
But since it flickered out new meanings grow 

I had not dreamed. 

Dorothy Benson. 



A 3Fattrii 



Ocean, Ocean, calling me, 
Savage voice, and strong. 
To what beauties will you lead 
If I go along? 

Tossing up your beckoning spray, 

Urging me to roam; 

If I go away with you. 

Will you bring me home? 

Charlotte Dorian. 



ck 



^gram© 



A 



Kill 



w 



^g f^O] @r 



^ 



Jlndtan ppps 



fpaterimy'H PromtHP 



When the night is dim and misty and the moon 
seems far away, 
And the coon's laugh echoes softly through the 
trees, 
From a distant shadowy glade, just before the 
break o' day. 
Comes a haunting smoky smell upon the 
breeze. 
There the shadows of the Red-Men come a-steal- 
ing one by one, 
And they build a phantom camp-fire in the 
night, 
Then they smoke their long-stemmed peace-pipes, 
and they dream of battles won 
Sitting silent in ;he fitful flickering light. 
And wherever they have gathered, from the 
phantom ashes cold 
There will grow some pallid pipe-shaped little 
flowers — 
And you'll know that there the Red-Men's 
ghosts have hovered as of old 
Round the ghostly fire in the dark and silent 
hours. 



The sky is low. 

Yesterday's flowery promise 

Is dead. 

There's sadness in the naked shivering 
trees 

Whose withered arms bear up the droop- 
ing sky. 

Yesterday promised 

Resurrection; hazy dawns; 

Cowbells in fragrant pastures; 

Warm mossy stones; and toadstools; 

Damp mud with pale green shoots; 

Swollen bubbling streamlets; and pools 

With innocent gaze; 

Lazy days; 

Green things; and breezes 

That know how to play — 

But Yesterday's promise is dead. 
It is smothered under the snow. 



^nmtpt 



Elisabeth Marshall. 



Entile 



Can you go away 

For a while? 

I can never say 

Whether your smile is sweeter 

When it's smiled — 

Or just remembered. 



Helen Harvey. 



The poignant scent of Fall rides on the wind — 
A gold and crimson sunset, when the day 
Will linger for a moment more, and say 

Again the beauty of noon, then leave behind 

In passing, an ache and yearning that can find 
Solace, for tomorrow will display 
A different face, as lovely in its way 

And yesterday has made the world less blind. 

The poignant scent of Fall! The glory of Spiing 
Is in its better-sweet — of youth, that vies 

Moment with moment — of tomorrow, that 
transcends. 
The sweetness of the grape is in the sting 

Of aged wine. Fall does not tell of ends. 
For only as the Phoenix-bird it dies. 

Ruth Alice Norman, 



!k 



^EH221 



^r 



](vl 



A 



w 



S>ongB 



^ 



Alma Mattt 

Words by Henrietta Sperry, 1910 
Music by H. D. Sleeper 

To you, O Alma Mater, 

Oh, Mother great and true. 
From all your loyal children 

Comes up the song anew. 
Where swings the red sun upward, 

Where sinks he down to rest. 
Are hearts that backward turning 

Still find you first and best. 



And gladly singing to you always 
Our loyal hearts with joy shall fill; 

Oh, fairest, fairest Alma Mater 
You hold and claim us still! 

You gave us dreams unnumbered 

And life we had not known. 
And now, oh Alma Mater, 

We give you back your own. 
For memories, for friendships 

That bless each passing day, 
Our toil unsought we render. 

Our debt unasked we pay. 




Ik 



iflatr §>mitl| 



Words by Regina ^Catherine Crandall, 1890 

Fair Smith, our praise to thee we render, 

O dearest college halls, 
Bright hours that live in mem'ry tender. 

Are wing'd within thy walls. 
O'er thy walks the elms are bowing. 

Alma Mater, 
Winds mid branches softly blowing. 
Ivy 'round thy towers growing, 
Alma Mater. 

Tho' time may prove the pleasure fleeting. 

No hour is spent in vain ; 
True hearts behold the future meeting. 

Our friendship cannot wane. 
Of thy care forgetful never, 

Alma Mater, 
Bound by ties that naught can sever. 
Still to thee returning ever, 
Alma Mater. 

And while the hills with purple shadows 

Eternal vigil keep 
Above the happy river meadows 

In golden haze asleep, 
May thy children thee addressing, 

Alma Mater, 
Still with grateful praise unceasing 
Speak with loyal hearts thy blessing, 
Alma Mater. 

Ii>mnato to JJreHttottt Wilson 

Tune: "Bonnie Dundee" 

There's a bonnie Scotch laddie we've lov'd from 

the start. 
And we pledge our allegiance, he's won all our 

hearts; 
We will follow his leading beyond and away, 
For we lo'ed him forever and ever and aye. 

Then come one and all. 

We'll raise such a cheer 

That it will ring far and wide many a year 
And aftertimes waken an echo to say, 
Oh, they lo'ed him forever and ever and aye. 

19X9 
ftutndrg 

Tune: "My Bonnie" 

My nightgowns have lost all their ribbons. 

My petticoats own not a string; 
And so dear old Smith College Laundry, 
Tonight 'tis to you that we sing. 
CHORUS 
Bring back, bring back, oh bring back 

my laundry to me, to me! 
Laundry, laundry, — oh, bring back my 
remnants to me! 



^ 



israzzi® 



=^ 



^7 



a 



162 



w 



^m!3& r 



^ 



You sure have made sieves of my stockings- 
My shirtwaists are hanging in tags; 

Before the spring season is over 
I'll come to the step sings in rags! 



UaskethaU £>mtg 

Tune: "Tim Rooney" 

Come sing to 1920, 

Her victories are plenty, 
She is the team the Evens all adore! 

With cheers, ye t reshmen, greet her 

Now Nineteen's come to meet her, 
We'll just watch the score! 

1920 
Angle Horma 

All the little angle worms that wiggled 
on the walk 



H 



ave all gone away! 
They're either in their holes 
Or stickin' to your soles 

All dried and gray! 
If they are in Heaven and St. Gregory 
wants 
To make his joke he'll vow 
That all the little angles that wiggled 
on the walk 
Are angels now! ! ! 

Skinnay 

Tune: "Sweetheart" 

Skinnay! Skinnay! Skinnay! Yoo-hoo! 
Come on over and play! 
What are you doing today? 
I feel so happy and gay — 

Yoo-hoo-hoo-hoo! ! 
We can't fuss like the Seniors, 
Sporting 'round with gardenias, 
But we'll hide in the grotto 
And this be our mottoo: 

Yoo-hoo, yoo-hoo, yoo-hoo! 

t^aue f mi fljeard % ICatpHt T8?wb 

Tune: "By Jingo" 

Have you heard the latest news? 
Guaranteed to cure those blues? 

Ta da, da da da ad da da, 

umpa, umpa, umpa, umpa. 
No, it's not that spring is near, 
But they say she's really here — 

Tra la, la la la la la la, 

Tweet tweet tweet tweet, tweet tweet 
tweet twee, 
How we've hated, the Lord only knows, 



^ 



Waiting for those wintry snows 

To disappear. 
But now that Spring is here 
We can have that long-postponed step-sing — 
Celebrate poor resurrected spring, 
You can sport that Easter hat 
Without fear and more than that, 
We'll throw in Paradise our old galoshes 
And those threadbare mackintoshes. 
And now at last you'll have your Prom — 
Tho' goodness knows where you will get 

him from — 
And you know there's a chance that at 

last there's be 
After all this sloppy, slushy weather, 

A Prom that's almost sunshiny! 



1921 
iijapaitteaa SUufb 

We're so happy — oh, so happy! 

Yes, everybody feels sumpin' in the air, 

Spring- fever's gwine ter git yuh 

If yuh don't have a care! 

Oh, de Springtime — our step-sing time! 

Now de Seniors are a-sittin' they got such an 

air, 
One might think that they'd always been there! 
Oh, hear them warbles! ! My how that Senior 

class can sing! 
Hm-hm — such warbles! ! We've never heard 

the like before this Spring, 
So we're all a-gwine ter come, rain or shine. 
And hear that warbling so divine, 
For we have waited three years for this spring, 
That's why we're oh, so happy, oh, so happy, 
Now the Seniors are a-sittin' they have got such 

an air 
One would think that they'd always been there! 



Uramlrga 

Tune: "Til-ivilloiv" 

On the steps of old Students' the Seniors all sat 
Wearing Bramleys, just Bramleys, just Bram- 
leys. 
They were all dressed alike, both the lean and 
the fat. 
In their Bramleys, their Bramleys, their Bram- 
leys. 
Oh, we are struck dumb, '21, by the spell 
Of the blue and the gray and the henna as well. 
And so all we can say is just, "My, ain't they 
swell, 
Them Bramleys, them Bramleys, them Bram- 
leys! " 



^g fnga 



w 



Jk 



163 



vjr 



^g Sfe ^ 



^ 



^ 



GJ00M? 1? iFag 



Seniors all think that they are quite bright, 

Because all their courses come in the night, 
Toodle de Fay, toodle de Patch, 
With a Kimball and Gardiner ump-ump — 
Bye and Bye 

We'll get ours bye and bye — 

'Cause we'll have a Seminar too, bye and 
bye! 

IGaat £>muj to 1921 

Aged Seniors, always I've respected your 

superiority, 
But somehow it seems that you've neglected 

to consider such as me — 
But now that Logic's through, and I'm a 

Senior, too. 
It's plain as plain can be 
There's nothing left for you to do except 

move over 
And make some room for me! ! 

1922's £>iep-§>img 

Samson and Delilah 
"My Heart at Thy Dear Voice" 

I. 
These steps, which daily use 
Have made common to thousands, 
Have tonight for us a meaning, 
Have tonight for us a meaning. 
Three years have slipped away, 
Years that we cannot stay, — 
Days that we have lived together, 
Days that we have lived together. 
Now must we let them pass 
With the closing day 
But the memories you leave us 
We forever will hold — 
Joyous memories untold. 
CHORUS. 

As we take these steps, our love bringing 

Once again of you we're singing 

And from these steps 

That you now leave us 

Long may our song 

Ring out and greet you 

Ring out — ring out — and greet you. 
II. 
As you have done before 
We now take this our trust 
As the gathering shadows deepen, 
As the gathering shadows deepen, 
And loud the echoes ring 
While now our song we sing, 
Bidding other echoes waken, 
Bidding other echoes waken. 
So may you hear the call 
Of another spring 
Just as next year from afar 
You will hear '22 
Singing ever of you. 



CHORUS. 
As we take these steps, echoes ringing 
Once again of you we're singing, 
Oh, once again 
Of you we're singing 
Whom we soon — 
Whom we soon must follow 
Farewell, farewell — we follow. 

III. 
Now '21 go forth, 
We would not strive to keep you, 
Though our hearts be sad at parting, 
Though our hearts be sad at parting, 
The gift of friendship true, 
The joy in knowing you 
In our faith we'll cherish always, 
In our faith we'll cherish always. 
So let us gladly sing, 
This our last song to you, 
And although we long to keep you 
Our great love to tell, — 
We must bid you farewell. 

CHORUS. 
As we take these steps, our love bringing 
Once again of you we're singing 
Oh, once again, of you we're singing 
Who all too soon — who all too soon, 

must leave us. 
Farewell, farewell, we follow. 



jFrraljman iFrolir-Snptral £>nng 

Tune: "Humming" 

One day I got a letter from my advisor, 
She sent a little book, sure to make me wiser, 

She said I was to be 

Her friend and advisee 
And that she'd answer my questions. 



CHORUS 
So I wrote her, "What color should I wear? 
How near is Amherst? How do you do your 

hair? 
Mother says shirtwaists don't become me 
But she is sure you'll like me in a middy. 
I want to live in an invitation house — 
Is Biolog a nice one? 
Can you tell me what's meant when a girl is 

'on tent'? 
I always thought camping was fun!" 

When I got off the train no porter seemed to be 

there, 
Some girls with badges white were all that I could 
see there. 
One took my bag away, 
But I held on till I could say, 
"Do you charge more than a quarter?" 



^S) IMT% -& 



d 



104 



w 



^MtM lf 



^ 



CHORUS 
Then she asked me just where I'd like to go; 
I said quickly, "Oh, tell me, do you know, 
Is President Neilson's house on our way? 
Can't I call now and get it all done today?" 
Freshman Bibles must be very scarce, 
She asked me if I'd lend her mine. 
And I said, T've no new — 
We thought Mother's would do — 
I hope it's the right college kind!" 

Soon I was asked to write all my life's short 

history ; 
What a teacher said to me will always be a 
mystery — ■ 
She said, "Your name is Rice — are you 
Any relative of Mr. Rice, too?" 
I said, "Why, yes, he's my father!" 

CHORUS 
I leaned over and asked a girl by me 
What denomination she though; that I could be; 
First I decided to put American, 
But it might be I should have written Freshman. 
^he was scornful and wore a Bramley dress — 
Made me feel far, far from bright — 
For she said, "You're all wrong, 
It's the Church you belong." 
So St. John's was all I could write. 

I went to chapel early to get a front seat. 
On the platform sat parents queer but sweet; 
They sat up straight and stared hard at me, 
While in black robes sang loudly the faculty. 
I went to class — 'twas far above my head — 
Teacher saw me puzzled and said, 

"This is Ethics in here." 

I exclaimed, "Oh, my dear! 
I thought it was Spanish instead." 

CHORUS 
'25, we're singing now to you, 
'25, we've seen what you can do. 
We like your looks, saddle-shoes, felt-hats gay, 
And if you'll let us, with you we want to play. 
But you've one fault that's very grave indeed — 
Freshmen should all make mistakes! 
'25 makes so few 
That 'twas all we could do 
To sing this short song on your breaks. 



eTi|F £>n«g for Sallg Sag 

Tune: "April Showers" 

'25, such conduct does astound us! 

In the days when we were mere Freshmen 

Every single night you could have found us 

Stretched between the sheets at stroke of ten! 

But '25 stays up half the night 

And never has to put out her light. 



We're not complaining — we wouldn't change 

The way you are, altho' the things you do 

Se^m just a little strange. 

There's no denying we're getting old, 

We're way behind times, so we've b^en told. 

But if you ever are a senior, with us you will 

agree, 
The freshmen aren't quite what they used ;o b;! 



Our sister-class we find in mystery shrouded, 
We can't see quite what she is about. 
When she's here she keeps our minds all 

clouded — 
Of Cassandra she could tell, no doubi. 
Oh, '24, we appreciate 
The fact that you are so up-to-date; 
We leave the siyles and the fads to you, 
For when it comes to wearing knxkers 
You outshine poor '22. 
There's no denying, we're getting old, 
We're way behind limes, so we are told; 
But if you ever are a senior, with us you will 

agree, 
The sophomores aren't quite what they used to be! 



'23, we find it hard expressing 

In this song a tone of deep respect. 

But we feel most humble when addressing 

Women of such massive intellect! 

Soon there won't be any front row lights 

Instead you will have gloating Oxfordites. 

They'll flock each morning off to the Libe 

And soon be buried deep within the stacks 

Such knowledge to imbibe. 

There's no denying we're getting old. 

We're way behind times, so we are told. 

But tho' we'll soon be old alumnae 

With us you will agree, 

The front-row lights aren't what they used to be! 



The time is coming soon when we'll be parted — 

No more Rally Days on which to sing! 

Tho' we know that we'll be broken-hearted 

In our day you'll grant we've had our fling. 

We entered college the largest class, 

Now we're a sadder but wiser mass. 

We've taught the college a thing or two; 

We raised four million dollars and we leave it 

all to you. 
There's no denying, we're getting old, 
We're way behind times, so we are told. 
But when next year we're old alumnae 
With us you will agree 
The seniors aren't quite what they used to be! 



tk 



=^1111 



®r 



^ 



L65 




PUBLICATI 




w 



^g f^fe ^ 



^ 




Editor-in-Chief 
Dorothy Benson 

Business Manager 
Virginia Hatfield 

Advertising Manager 
Marian Watkins 



Editors 



Julia Lincoln 

Adelaide Cozzens 



Margaret Tildsley 
Eleanor Chilton 



^ 



^QHZ21^ 



168 



A 



w 



^g fEHI ^ 



^ 




ffirrklij ffioarii 



Senior Year 



Margaret Storrs 

Willa Orr . 

Harriet Bergtold (Resigned) 

Hanna Gichner 

Helen Fyke . 

Janice Ozias . 

Ruth Alice Norman 



Editor-in-Chief 
. Nervs Editor 

Associate News Editor 

. Managing Editor 

. Business Manager 

Dramatic Critic 



Junior Year 
Assistant Nervs Editors 
Harriet Bergtold Barbara McKay 

Hanna Gichner Wilhelmina Rehm 

Miriam Taggart 

Assistant Managing Editors 

Helen Fyke Esther Gaylord 

Assistant Business Managers 

Janice Ozias Greta Wood 

Sophomore Year 

Assistant Managing Editors 

Marjorie Crandall Esther Gaylord 

Helen Fyke Harriet Wolverton 

Assistant Business Manager 

Barbara McKay 



Margaret Schneider 
Margaret Storrs 



^ 



^1111}^ 



Ja 



169 



w 



=v® fi5icite Jr 



^ 




Prraa Snard 



President 
Dorothy Cryderrwise Eleanor Rau* 

News Editor — Polly Weaver 



Ik 



*Helen Carroll 

Carita Clark 

Eleanor Clark 

Hilda Couch 
*Janet Danforth 
^Elizabeth Donnell 

Marie Fischer 
*Elsye Geisenberger 



Members 1922 



Katharine Howland 
Katharine Lacey 
Ruth Katsch 
Anna Pennypacker 
Blanche Shaw 
Louise Silber 
Isabel Stabler 
Claire Strauss 



^Margaret Schneider 



* Resigned. 



ss rragrai 3f 



Ja 



170 



w 



=v@ [iIEite jr 



^ 





H ^l 








* r * ^ ■ 




^R Hfl^. ifl 


» "* ' 


f^^j 




1 -* f*^ ' A 




^B j& jJ 


:-|PPP^- *T ^^B^H 



(Eampufi (Eat 



Laura Cabot 
Eleanor Chilton 
Elizabeth Donnell 



Anne Johnston 
Anna Pennypacker 
Margaret Tucker 



Sk 



^ pmrB V? 



171 



^ 



w 



^m^m - 



^ 




(Elaaa look Inarb 



Ediior-in-Chief 
Assistant Editor 
Business Manager . 
Assistant Business Manager 
Advertising Manager 
Art Editor . 
Assistant Art Editor 
Literary Editor 
Photograph Editor . 
Assistant Photograph Editor 
Jol(es and Cartoons Editor 
Boards and Clubs Editor . 
Senior Pictures Editor 



Barbara McKay 
Frances Harmon 
Helen DeGroat 
Mildred Leeper 
Jane Dinsmore 
Doris Flather 
Margaret Franks 
Harriet Bergtold 
Nancy McCullough 
. Helen Fyke 
Jean Whiting 
Abigail Scott 
Beatrice Walton 



ik 



^ 



& 



172 



A 



Z ,'2. 3 ;z 4/2.5* 
ole. £or 

CAC.V 

TFICER^ 

TOR 



A.A.MEI* 
Nominate 

Tor president 
^fecrelary A 




OF 





w 




^ fESS^ 



^ 




Laura Cabot 



S>mttlj (ttnlbge 
Atljlettr AaBflrtatfnn 

Senior Officers 
Laura Cabot, Vice-President 

Representatives 

Tennis — Alice Jenckes 

Hockey — Margaret Ward 

Crew — Helen Dana Smith 

Basketball — Caroline Schofield 

Cricket — Dorothy Chase 

Chairman of Outing Committee — Harriet Marsh 

Junior Officers 
Laura Cabot, President 

Representatives 
Club House Manager — Una Whitehurst 
Boat House Manager — Margaret Jones 

Sophomore Officers 
Margaret Jones, Secretary 
Alice Chapman, Treasurer 




h. 



=*§) 



&r 



J& 



174 




DRAMATICS 



ty 






^^Olllte^ 



^ 




Lois Brown 



>mttl) ffnllnjr Sramattr Aasoriatian 



Director 
Lois Brown 

Chairman of Scenery 
Margaret Franks 

Head of Student Coaches 
Jean Whiting 

Business Manager 
Eleanor Child 

Dramaturgy 
Marian Thorndike 



mmrE\ &, 



fa 



170 



w 



=vSg |[SS3| ©r 



^ 



®lj? Sramatir AHfioriatian rnxb 1922 

Some wise person was once heard to say that: "Personalities were either made 
or broken at college." Smith aims to do the former and the Dramatic Association 
is one of the most important organizations in helping to achieve this aim. In the 
Dramatic Association, "personalities" are brought out and trained, not only to the 
benefit of the individual but also to the pleasure and delight of the entire college. 
I 922 has been well represented in the Association for the past three years and has 
now a total number of one hundred and ten members. 

To trace our Dramatic career from the beginning, we must go back to the 
middle of February, 1920. Our careers were as yet not very clearly defined. We 
were, as the Seniors probably said, "Just Sophomores." We were as yet unini- 
tiated in the charm of the gay white lights of the student stage. Many of us, 
however, have a vague remembrance of the "Pity, fear, terror," reaction which we 
had when we first braved the three-minute trials. We felt that more depended 
upon those try-outs than we dared to confess. Moreover, from that very moment, 
when the daring members of '22 took courage in hand and stepped forth to test 
their fates with the judges, the class has done more than justice to itself in the 
dramatic line. 



ik 




^hhs^ 



^2 



it: 



w 



^ $^& r 



^ 



Workshop plays, Rally Day Shows, and joint productions with Amherst, all 
have aided in making the D. A. plays more finished and successful. 

The first few members of 1922 to be initiated to the above-mentioned white 
lights made their bow to the college along with the first bow of the Dramatic Asso- 
ciation. None of their parts were "majors," but Zena Freedman, Anne Johnston, 
Isabel Conklin, Dorothy Bedworth and Lois Brown felt highly flattered to be 
allowed to be seen, if only slightly heard. Some of them continued in the following 
spring production of "Monsieur Beaucaire," with reinforcements. Then in the Fall 
of 1921 unexpected talent burst forth in "What Every Woman Knows," in which 
Naomi Lauchheimer and Jane Dinsmore took their places in the front rank, followed 
in Fielding's "Tom Thumb, the Great," by Jean Whiting, Camilla Low, Helen 
Amy Smith and Helen Dana Smith. Eleanor Chilton as the heroine of Shaw's 
"The Man of Destiny" added new laurels to her previous accomplishments in 
Shavian roles in the Alpha and Phi Kappa open plays. In the spring, "The Ideal 
Husband" gave Barbara McKay her opportunity, in which she distinguished herself 
as the hero, ably directed by Anne Johnston. 

The aim of the Association is to express itself not in acting alone, but in all 
possible fields of dramatic art. As a result we have in '22 not only actors of note, 
but scene designers, costume designers and coaches. Anne Johnston, Mildred Purdy 
and Lois Brown have produced various plays of the Association. Mildred Purdy 
has taken charge of costuming the productions at the Academy of Music for the 



k 




lis 



A 



w 



^§ 5^& r 



^ 



past year with extraordinary artistic success, while Margaret Franks with the aid of 
Louise Kingsley has contributed to the increasing artistic progress of the productions 
by her beautifully designed and carefully executed sets. Her feeling for atmos- 
phere in the settings is unusually keen and her work has brought much flattering 
comment from the college. 

Early in the fall came the performance in Students' Building of two more 
plays. "The Pretty Sabine Women" was a satiric farce. In "Aria da Capo" Lois 
Brown again distinguished herself. 

The enthusiastic appreciation of the audience, faculty and students at the 
last D. A. production, a bill of three one-act plays — "Torches," from the Harvard 
47 Workshop; Shaw's "The Lady of Dark Sonnets" and Philip Moeller's 
"Helena's Husband," shows that under the direction of 1922 the D. A. has moved 
steadily forward and has taken more than ever before a vital role in college activities. 

A further interesting advance in dramatic activity has been made in the co- 
operation of the D. A. with the Amherst College "Masquers." Zena Freedman, 
Helen Carroll and Lois Brown have taken part in Amherst plays in the past two 
years and have compared creditably with the Amherst actors. The artistic char- 
acter of the plays chosen and the experience to be gained in acting with men under 
the extremely able coaching of Mr. Glass of the Amherst faculty has made this 
co-operation well worth while. 

Mr. Eliot's workshop has continued to draw heavily from all of the acting 
and producing material of 1922. This year so far there has been but one produc- 
tion, in which Florence Leopold's work as Falstaff in a scene from Henry IV 
coached by Jean Whiting, deserves especial mention. 

1922 on Rally Day won her reputation for cleverness and enthusiasm in 
Sophomore year with the famous musical comedy — "Book and Lyrics" by Eleanor 
Chilton and Anne Johnston ; music by Phyllis Creasy ; starring Jean Whiting and 
Elizabeth Lipsey. Last year appeared Eleanor Chilton's clever burlesque of the 
mediaeval romance with a large and proficient cast. 

There is, of course, much ahead of us in the dramatic world of college for the 
rest of the year from the Rally Day Show to "A Winter's Tale"; and we can only 
prophesy on the basis of past experience that '22 will continue to uphold her well- 
won reputation for dramatic talent. 



rk 



igf lizzi tej 



^ 



&r 



179 



fa 




CUIBSSSOCITKS 



v Jr 



^g) Sfe ^ 



^ 



\ 


1 * ' ^El.'^H BK'.'itn 


Tvrrf 



flljt leta iKappa 



Charlotte Gower 
Julia Kreis 



Junior Year 



Alice Richardson 



Margaret Kreglow 
Willa Orr 



^ 



Annette J. Bardwell 
Alice B. Chapman 
Carita L. Clark 
Helen V. Conklin 
Isabel Conklin 
Marjorie L. Crandall 
Mary E. Dailey 
Flora M. Davidson 
Jane Dinsmore 
Myrtle A. Fish 
Virginia M. Giles 
Evelyn Gray 
Isabel W. Harper 
Frances A. Hause 
Elizabeth M. Hilliard 



Senior Year 

Winifred L. Hope 
Katherine E. Howland 
Ruth E. Irwin 
Alice C. Jenckes 
Margaret Kemp 
Ilda Langdon 
Emma A. Lincoln 
Camilla M. Low 
Kathryn I. Lyman 
Nancy R. McCullough 
Jane K. Massie 
Eleanor Miller 
Janice H. Ozias 
Katharine Peek 
Margaret G. Pendleton 



^aaza 



Or 



Hope Rawson 
Gertrude M. Schwartz 
Anna T. Sheedy 
Helen D. Smith 
Helen Stearns 
Louise Taggart 
Miriam Taggart 
Helen C. Taylor 
Marian L. Thorndike 
Elizabeth H. Tillinghast 
Frances I. Upham 
Beatrice L. Walton 
Margaret H. Ward 
Jessie M. Wilson 
Clarice R. Young 



Ja 



1S1 



A 



w 



^S^^Jr 



^ 




Alplja 

Officers 



^ 



Laura Cabot 
Janice Taggart 
Barbara McKay . 

Thalia Stetson 
Huldah Doron 

Elizabeth Barry 
Lois Brown 
Laura Cabot 
Helen Carroll 
Adelaide Cozzens 
Eleanor Chilton 
Phyllis Creasey 
Margaret Cullinan 
Edith Donnell 
Elizabeth Donnell 
Huldah Doron 
Margaret Franks 



FIRST SEMESTER 



SECOND SEMESTER 



Members 



President 

. Senior Executive 

Editor 

President 
. Senior Executive 

Margaret Gabel 
Margaret Humphrey 
Anne Johnston 
Julia Lincoln 
Elizabeth Lipsey 
Barbara McKay 
Eleanor Miller 
Katherine Marie Miller 
Mildred Purdy 
Eleanor Rau 
Thalia Stetson 
Janice Taggart 



Margaret Tildsley 



^ IMZTI V? 



d 



183 



; 




% 



w 



^g f^te ^ 



^ 




f \\\ Kappa fat 



Isabel Conklin 
Jane Dinsmore 
Harriet Bergtold . 

Frona Brooks 
Helen Dana Smith 
Dorothy Crydenwise 

Frona Brooks 
Dorothy Benson 
Harriet Bergtold 
Isabel Conklin 
Dorothy Crydenwise 
Jane Dinsmore 
Zena C. Freedman 
Katherine Gaylord 
Eleanor Hoyt 
Julia Kreis 
Margaret Kreglow 
Naomi Lauchheimer 



Officers 



FIRST SEMESTER 



SECOND SEMESTER 



Members 



President 

. Senior Executive 

Editor 

President 

. Senior Executive 

Editor 

Camilla Low 
Charlotte MacDougall 
* Athena McFadden 
Mabelle Orleman 
Gladys Platner 
Alice Shaw 
Helen Dana Smith 
Helen A. Smith 
Margaret Storrs 
Mary Sullivan 
Jean Whiting 
Harriet Wolverton 



CI 



arice Young 



* Left College 



rk 



^[11221 



&? 



y& 



is. - , 



w 



^g ft^5K ?^ 



^ 



SDi^ 




PHILOSOPHICAL* CLUB 



Officers 



Janice Ozias 
Anna Pennypacker 



President 
Secretary 



Members 

Charlotte Gower Emma Lincoln 

Janice Ozias Anna Pennypacker 

Elizabeth Tillinghast 



Ik 



^dHH 



W 



1S6 



^ 



w 



A® f^fe /r 



^ 




^^e^m@^)mea 



^ 



Helen DeGroat 



^Margaret Bassett 
Dorothy Bedworth 
Laura Cabot 
Flora Davidson 
Helen DeGroat 
Mary Dickson 
Gladys Dingledine 
Marion Downey 
Eleanor Evans 



Officers 



Members 
Dorothy Jenks 

^Charlotte Gower 
Alice Jenckes 
Anne Johnston 
Ruth Joshel 

^Margaret Kreglow 
Rae Lowenthal 
Harriet Marsh 
Jane K. Massie 
Esther L. Moss 



President 



*Edith O'Neill 
Ethel Phillips 
Mathilde Rehm 

^Marguerite Rhibany 
Marian Swayze 
Margaret Tildsley 
Frances Upham 
Greta Wood 
Aileen Woodman 



Intercollegiate Debate, 1920 
Margaret Kreglow Dorothy Bedworth 

Frances Upham Marguerite Rhibany 

Intercollegiate Debate, 1921 
Frances Upham 

Smith-Dartmouth Debate, 1922 
Jane K. Massie Mary Dickson 

Frances Upham Esther L. Moss 



Mathilde 



Intercollegiate Debate, 1922 
Rehm Mary Dickson 



* Resigned 



^BUZH^ 



fa 



187 



w 



^§ $^^& r 



^ 



t 



r 




DFI 




POLITY* CLUB 



Officers 



Katherine Lacey 
Isabel Conklin 



First Semester President 
Second Semester President 



jane Arms 
Frona Brooks 
Elizabeth Crain 
Gladys Dingledine 
Lily Emerson 
Elinor French 
Hanna Gichner 



Members 

Catherine Grigsby 
Elizabeth Hilliard 
Frances Johnson 
Ruth Joshel 
Katherine Lacey 
Ella Loeb 



Hope Rawson 
Emily Reed 
Gertrude Schwartz 
Anna Sheedy 
Harriet Smith 
Anna Trott 



^ 



^H22I® 



a 



]88 



w 



^ig f^fe ^ 



^ 




&C\fiA-^/£\ZC\Ct (&2> * 



Officers 



Ruth Katsch 
Ruth Joshel 



President 
Vice-President 



Members 



Doris Bryant 
Vera Call 

Dorothy Crydenwise 
Ruth Dimick 
Eleanor Evans 
Myrtle Fish 
Ruth Guggenheim 
Virginia Hatfield 
Beryl Hobson 



Katherine Howland 
Ruth Joshel 
Ruth Katsh 
Edna Kaufman 
Helen O'Reilly 
Lillian H. Potter 
Emily Reed 
Virginia Reed 



!k 



^romm 



1S9 



A 



w 



^gftgg^ 



^ 




J^aJociefejrdncaise 



Mi 



Officers 
Slawson ....... President 



Members 



{Catherine Adam 
Constance Boyer 
Helen Carroll 
Marjone Crandall 
Marion Crozier 
Dorothy Crydenwise 
Lucile Darton 
Elinor Eltinge 
Ruth Ferguson 
Margaret Gabel 
Margaret Hackett 
Alice Jenckes 
Esther Jones 
Barbara Lee 



Charlotte MacDougall 
Dorothea Nourse 
Mabelle Orleman 
Margaret Pendleton 
Katherine Ranney 
Muriel Slawson 
Louise Silber 
Claire Strauss 
Louise Taggart 
Marian Thorndike 
Darthea Trickey 
Elizabeth Tuttle 
Una Whitehurst 
Clarice Young 



k 



^ IWTZ} &? 



190 



A 



w 



^g filnafe ^ 



^ 




Virginia Giles 
Marion Downey . 



Officers 



Vice-President 
Secretary 



Marion Downey 
Faith Dudgeon 
Virginia Giles 
Marjorie Crandall 
Katherine Brosnahan 



Members 



Grace Humrich 
Elizabeth Nielon 
Katherine Ryan 
Ellen Sheehan 



Ik 



& imMi &r 



191 



J& 



a 



w 



^g f^aj g^ 



^ 




ILrTQICOLOQE 



Officers 



M 



anon Thorndike 




• 


Vice-President 




M 


EMBERS 




Marion Billings 






Charlotte MacDougall 


Carita Clark 






Elvira Miller 


Ruth Green 






Gerda Richards 


Margaret Hopkins 






Eugenie Terek 


Ellen Lane 






Marian Thorndike 



k 



^ RIM^l t^ 



^7 



V.vl 



£ 



w 



=gg) liH€il @J 



^ 




lL^jlL j}*1jLm 







Officers 



Charlotte Gower 



President 



Charlotte Gower 
Margaret Hopkins 



Members 



Beatrice Walton 



Dorothy Jenks 
Willa Orr 



!k 



^imrav? 



193 



A 



w 



^g f^o] ^ 



^ 




ORJENTAbSoCIETY 



Officers 



Ruth Barnes 


President 


Members 




Ruth Barnes 


Zena C. Freedman 


Elizabeth Cairns 


Camilla Low 


Dorothy Crydenwise 


Jean MacTarnaghan 


Flora Davidson 


Janice Ozias 


Beatrice Walton 





D^ 



^ wmm v? 



104 



^ 



w 



T® [i5Eite jr 



^ 





ih®h®<^<StibhJ r °&K&SH$ 



Mathilde Rehm . 
Katharine Winchester 



Officers 



Members 



President 
Vice-President 



Hilda Barnes 
Margaret Bergan 
Priscilla Dimick 
Gladys Dingledine 
Ruth Ferguson 
Sophie Gordon 
Charlotte Gower 
Frances Guild 
Isabel Harper 
Mae Ingalls 
Helen Kellogg 
Louise Kingsley 
Mildred Leeper 
Katherme Macomber 
Nancy McCullough 

Associate 
Mildred Alfred 
Elizabeth Cairns 
Jane Dinsmore 



K. Marie Miller 
Eleanor Phillips 
Katherine Prickett 
Hope Rawson 
Mathilde Rehm 
Ruth Richards 
Alice Robinson 
Katherine Sanford 
Margaret Schneider 
Celia Silberman 
Frances Stillwell 
Margaret Toan 
Katharine Winchester 
Gertrude Windisch 
*Miriam Zabriskie 
Members 



Dorothy Sanjiyan 



Ruth Ockerman 
Anna Pennypacker 
Olivia Rogers 



* Resigned 



rk 



^ IMTB 



%r, 



Jfn 



a 



19£ 



w 



^ SmiM >r 



^ 




COLLOQUIUM 



He 



Officers 



President 



Members 



Alice Chapman 
Mary Dailey 
Virginia Giles 
Dorothy Gleason 
Helen Harper 
Barbara Harrison 
Frances Hause 
Julia Hodgdon 
Dorothy Hogan 
Winifred Hope 
Constance Hopkins 



Frances Kelsey 
Ilda Langdon 
Evelyn Lawley 
Nancy McCullough 
Caroline Schofield 
Mabel Studebaker 
Olivia Terrell 
Margaret Toan 
Jeanette Wales 
Dorothy Williams 
Jessie Wilson 



Marion White 



^ 



^ ITO^l ^ 



196 



A 



w 



^ $^& r 



^ 




Marguerite Hines 
Marion Downey . 



Officers 



President 
Vice-President 



Members 



Mildred Alfred 
Evelyn Clark 
Marion Downey 
Margarette Hines 
Julia Hodgdon 



Katherine Howland 
Ruth Irwin 
Katherine Peek 
Mabel Studebaker 
Olivia Terrell 



Elizabeth Tillinghast 



^ 



^fros^i 



Or 



197 



Jk 



w 



^g) fs^ 



^ 



B l6& 







Mathematics 





Officers 




Alice Richardson . 


. 


Vice-President 


Anne Lockhead . 




Secretary 


Carita Clark 


Members 


Treasurer 


Frona Brooks 




Margaret Kreglow 


Laura Cabot 




Anne Lockhead 


Canta Clark 




Kathryn Lyman 


Frances Guild 




Jean MacTarnaghan 


Frances Hause 




Willa Orr 


Ruth Irwin 




Alice Richardson 


Rachel Keniston 




Mary K. Smith 



!k 



^ [TOS^l ^ 



19S 



^2 



w 



Tjg figEil igar 



^ 




TELESCOPIUM 



Annette Bardwell 



Officers 



President 



Annette Bardwell 
Edith Harris 
Esther Jones 
Anne Lockhead 



* Resigned 



Members 



Jean MacTarnaghan 
*Jane Massie 
Louise Miller 
Dorothea Sanjiyan 



ik 



^g 



ig^= 



109 



A 



w 



=v@ lilicite jr 



^ 




Vox Club 



Helen Carroll 



Officers 



President 



Members 



Annette Bardwell 
Dorothy Bedworth 
Lois Brown 
Helen Carroll 
Florence Cohen 
Isabel Conklin 
Zena C. Freedman 



Elsye Geisenberger 
Elizabeth Ives 
Harriet Marsh 
Catherine Murray 
Eleanor Rau 
Luene Rogers 
Helen A. Smith 



Ik 



T§flm2& 



lit H t 



JZ 



w 



^M^&r 



^ 




Phyllis Creasey 
Bernadette Stack 



Clara Bozovsky 
Constance Boyer 
Phyllis Creasey 
Edith Donnell 



Officers 



Members 



. President 
Vice-President 



Huldah Doron 
Margaret Humphrey 
Bernadette Stack 



Associate Members 
Margaret Kreglow Thalia Stetson 



^ 



^agggp F 



2(M 



Sfo 



^ 



^© flinclfe ^ 



^ 




Studio Club 



Margaret Franks 



Officers 



President 



Members 



Elizabeth Bridgers 
Carita Clark 
Mary Dickson 
Doris Flather 
Margaret Franks 
Frances Guild 
Doris Harrison 



Gladys Harriman 
Harriet Jacobus 
Josephine Jenks 
Sara D. Roberts 
Katherine Sanford 
Elizabeth Scoville 
Dorothy Taylor 



Helen Taylor 



ik 



V2- 



& wmzi &, 



202 



A 



w 



^5m!& 



^ 







Q 



foG®& f9 Q®^ t tf 



Ele 



Chiltc 



Officers 



President 



Members 



Katherine Adam 
Dorothy Benson 
Eleanor Chilton 
Sarah Clarke 
Adelaide Cozzens 
Anne Johnston 



Julia Lincoln 
*Athena McFadden 
Barbara McKay 
Margaret Storrs 
Margaret Tildsley 
Clarice Young 



* Resigned 



ik 



^rros^i 



&r 



20.3 



Jfa 



w 



"^s ftM^& r 



^ 




SPECTATOR 



Officers 



Esther Gaylord ....... President 



Members 



Laura Cabot 
Esther Gaylord 
Anne Johnston 
Margaret Kreglow 
Camilla Low 



Barbara McKay 
Eleanor Miller 
Janice Ozias 
Sara Dean Roberts 
Margaret Ward 



^ 



^[ffiZ21© 



1204 



A 



w 



^safe ^ 



^ 




C\j%£/iT&v5(irs 



Jane Dinsmore 



Officers 



President 



Members 



Annette Bardwell 
Dorothy Bryan 
^Eleanor Chilton 
Jane Dinsmore 
Charlotte MacDougall 
Eleanor Phillips 



Helen D. Smith 
Frances de Valin 
Jeanette Wales 
Una Whitehurst 
Jean Whiting 
Harriet Wolverton 



" Y " Resigned 



^ 



D 



^ fTOS^l 



^ 



205 



A 



w 



^gf^fe^ 



^ 




" Onlookers ■ 



Officers 



Pauline Ames 




Members 


President 


Pauline Ames 






Margaret Jones 


Virginia Conklin 






Ruth Johnson 


Barbara Eaton 






Elizabeth Lipsey 


Doris Flather 






Mildred Mason 


Marion Himmelsbach 




Ruth Robeson 


Alice Jenckes 






Caroline Schofield 



^ 



&IWTB& 



^r 



& 



206 



w 



^§ fiM3® F 



^ 




(£ti®s>ci&&6sy<3$tf&&®£ 






Granddaughters 



Pauline Ames 
Elizabeth Bixler 
Frona Brooks 
Helen DeGroat 
Adelaide Guion 
Mary Harts 
Winifred L. Hope 
Elizabeth Hubbard 



Margaret Humphrey 
Charlotte MacDougall 
Elizabeth M. Scoville 
Margaret Tildsley 
Marian Thorndike 
Jeanette Wales 
Margaret Ward 
Katharine Winchester 



^ 



^eia^ 



207 



A 



w 



^g f^l ©^ 



^ 




k 



^M221^ 



A 



w 



^g fesnite ^ 



^ 




ik 



^BH221^ 



A 



209 







ZT7Q 



jd& 



musical 



yr 



^ f^ofe ^ 



^ 






Wthkh 



K*s 




($in Club 








Janice Taggart . 


. Business Manager 


Doris Babson 


Barbara Lee 


Elizabeth Barry 


Julia Lincoln 


Marguerite Berg 


Katherine Miller 


Elizabeth Brook 


Ruth Murray 


Miriam Buncher 


Rhoda Orme 


Carita Clark 


Margaret Pendleton 


Ruth Dimick 


Alice Robertson 


Myrtle Fish 


Mathilde Ruge 


Margaret Franks 


Ruth Scheibler 


Helen Fyke 


Harriet Smith 


Katherine Gaylord 


Mary Sullivan 


Beryl Hobson 


Katherine Winchester 


Margaret Humphrey 


Harriet Wolverton 


Lucille Kyte 


Clarice Young 


Margaret Kreglow 


Miriam Zabriskie 



^ 



^t 



1^5= 



A 



212 



w 



^g iB) ^ 



^ 





B * vl 




• 




BF i ' v 


■ J i 


I'*™ 


_M 1 


• ' ▼ 


m W' vfe 


xvfl 



fHanitaitn (Slab 



Helen Carroll 



Leader 



Elizabeth Barry 
Helen Carroll 
Margaret Ruth Collins 
Eleanor Clark 
Phyllis Creasey 
Lucile Darton 
Helen French 

Louise Taggart 



Edith Fuller 
Edith Harris 
Louise Kingsley 
Violet Ramsey 
Irma Rich 
Anna Sheedy 
Marabeth Storrs 



k 



^[ffiZSl 



&r 



d 



a 



w 



© ffiOcIfe ^ 



^ 





-A 


■T: /I r 




■ B>2H K* / s. 






r • jLr or m J*5S 


Bar *w^L ^Hf **^fc 




* 31 






j«"^W / 


^^B 

^^v ^^^ ^^^H 


V/ -^""i " 3?' 


l€fl 


LfJ 


■4 i 


i / y 




L / — ^1 







©rrif^ira 



Edith Donnell 
Helen Hauser 
Marion Himmelsbach 
Winifred Hine 
Mabelle Orleman 
Elizabeth Patek 
Joyce Petterson 
Emily Reed 
Alice Robinson 



Eleanor Scofield 
Alice Shaw 
Anna Sheedy 
Louise Silber 
Bernadette Stack 
Thalia Stetson 
Janice Taggart 
Frances Upham 
Katherine Winchester 



^ 



^g[ffi221 



*&) 



A 



214 



w 



^g f^ol ©? 



^ 




k 



(Etjair 



First Soprano Leaders 
Darthea Trickey {Catherine Miller 

Second Soprano Leaders 



Elizabeth Brooke 



Beatrice Bagg 
Mildred Ball 
Madeleine Baxter 
Marguerite Berg 
Harriet Bergtold 
Elizabeth Bixler 
Dorothy Bourne 
Elizabeth Brooke 
Frona Brooks 
Elizabeth Cairns 
Helen Carroll 
Adelaide Cozzens 
Eleanor Clark 
Flora Davidson 
Jane Dinsmore 
Huldah Doron 
Ruth Ferguson 
Myrtle Fish 
Helen French 
Edith Fuller 
Esther Gaylord 
Catherine Grigsby 



Ardelia Hall 
Dorothy Hall 
Frances Harmon 
Edith Harris 
Doris Harrison 
Elizabeth Hilliard 
Beryl Hobson 
Katharine Howland 
Eleanor Hoyt 
Dorothy B. Johnson 
Helen Johnston 
Rachel Kenniston 
Louise Kingsley 
Thelma Ledbetter 
Kathryn Lyman 
Barbara McKay 
Helen Main 
Katherine Miller 
Mabelle Orleman 
Virginia Otto 
Lucile Page 



Beatrice Bagg 

Grace E. Preble 
Katherine Prickett 
Irene Richardson 
Alice Richardson 
Dorothea Sanjiyan 
Elizabeth Scoville 
Louise Skinner 
Helen A. Smith 
Helen D. Smith 
Nathalie Smith 
Pearl Smith 
Thalia Stetson 
Janice Taggart 
Miriam Taggart 
Bessie Tulloch 
Una Whitehurst 
Jean Whiting 
Marion Whittemore 
Florence Wilder 
Katharine Winchester 
Gertrude Windisch 



@BH221^ 



■sr 



Ja 



2li 




ATHLETIC 5 



w 



=@ (^El gjr 



^ 




g> g>tomt?rB 



Eleanor Miller Elizabeth Lipsey 

Laura Cabot 



^BBSa^ 



^ 



w 



^^& r 



^ 



Basketball 



$wlb lag 

Saturday, May 2 1 , 1 92 1 

Points Won by 1 922 

First Teams 

5 Cricket . 



10 



Archery 
Baseball 



Second Teams 

6 Basketball 6 

3 Cricket 3 



Third Teams 



Hockey 2 



Te 



D^ 




^ITOga 



&r 



4% 



219 



w 



=v@ (^a1 ©r 



^ 




1922 Unttbrns of % AU-g>mitl? 
laakrtball ufcam 

Alice Chapman, 1921, 1922 Eleanor Miller, 1920, 1921, 1922 

Elizabeth Lipsey, 1921, 1922 Dorothy Peirce, 1922 

Mildred Mason, 1 922 Ruth Robeson, 1 922 

Caroline Schofield, 1921, 1922 



Forwards 
Dorothy Peirce 
Margaret Humphrey 
Caroline Schofield 



Senior Basketball Team 
Captain, Elizabeth Lipsey 
Centers 
Ruth Robeson 
Eleanor Miller 
Alice Chapman 



Guards 
Elizabeth Lipsey 
Mildred Mason 
Pauline Amos 



Senior Substitute Basketball Team 
Captain, Catherine Murray 
Forwards Centers 

Ruth Harrington Catherine Murray 

Annette Bardwell 
Dorothy Higbie 



Dean Roberts 
Elizabeth Brooke 



Guards 
Harriet Bergtold 
Frances deValin 
Eleanor Phillips 



Ik 



^QHZ21 



^ 



J?a 



220 



w 



^g f^gfe ^ 



^ 



Forwards 
Dorothy Peirce 
Margaret Humphrey 
Caroline Schofield 



Junior First Team 

Captain, Elizabeth Lipsey 

Centers 
Ruth Robeson 
Eleanor Miller 
Alice Chapman 



Guards 
Elizabeth Lipsey 
Frances deValin 
Elizabeth Hubbard 



Forwards 
Margaret Humphrey 
Dorothy Peirce 
Caroline Schofield 



Sophomore Basketball Team 

Captain, Mildred Mason 

Centers 
Ruth Robeson 
Eleanor Miller 
Alice Chapman 



Guards 
Elizabeth Lipsey 
Mildred Mason 
Frances deValin 



Forwards 
Eleanor Bachman 
Elizabeth Ringwalt 
Katherine Yeomans 



Freshman Basketball Team 

Captain, Susan Duffield 

Centers 
Eleanor Miller 
Alice Chapman 
Susan Duffield 



Guards 
Elizabeth Hubbard 
Mildred Mason 
Frances deValin 



rk 



^BUZSl^ 



221 



^ 



w 



^g f^ofe ^ 



^ 




Mt mbrra of AU-S'mttlj ijnrkeg ufcam 

Pauline Ames, 1920, 1921 Catherine Murray, 1920, 1921 

Junior Hockey Team 

Captain, Catherine Murray 

Forwards 

Catherine Murray 

Caroline Fisher 
Half Backs 



Una Whitehurst 
Pauline Ames 



Doris Flather 



Claire Strauss 



Marabeth Storrs 



Jeannette Wales 
Full Bac^s and Goal 



Margaret Ward 



Dean Roberts 



Anna Pennypacker 



Sophomore Hockey Team 

Captain, Catherine Murray 

Forwards 
Margaret Schneider Catherine Murray 



Pauline Ames 



Doris Flather 



Caroline Fisher 



^ 



^ 



Of 



A 



w 



^g SH ©r 



^ 



Half Backs 
Elizabeth Hubbard Hilda Couch 

Jeannette Wales 

Full Backs and Coal 
Charlotte MacDougall Dean Roberts 

Anna Pennypacker 

Freshman Hockey Team 
Captain, Margaret Ward 

Forwards 

Margaret Schneider Frances Johnson 

Pauline Ames Doris Flather 

Caroline Fisher 

Half Backs 

Ruth Guggenheim Hilda Couch 

Margaret Ward 

Full Backs and Goal 

Charlotte MacDougall Dean Roberts 

Anna Pennypacker 



!k 



^gjlTOS^ 



Or 



Jk 



w 



^M3® r 



^ 




1922 iMmtorH of AU-*rmif? lafirbaU 



Harriet Bergtold, 1920 
Dorothy Higbie, 1921 



Alice Jenckes, 1 92 1 
Una Whitehurst, 192 



Junior Baseball Team 
Captain, Dorothy Higbie 



Marjone Adams 
Beatrice Bagg 
Elizabeth Brooke 
Miriam Buncher 



Dorothy Higbie 
Alice Jenckes 
Harriet Marsh 
Dorothea Sanjiyan 



Beatrice Walton 



^ 



fc 



>@ 0BE2 ^ 



224 



d 



w 



^g fESEIfe ^ 



^ 



Sophomore Baseball Team 



Captain, Harriet Bergtold 



Harriet Bergtold 
Miriam Buncher 
Harriet Marsh 
Marjorie Morrison 



Wilhelmina Rehm 
Claire Strauss 
Beatrice Walton 
Una Whitehurst 



Margaret Winton 



Freshman Baseball Team 



Maude Barker 
Harriet Bergtold 
Alice Brack.ett 
Jane Dinsmore 



Captain, Maude Barker 

Dorothy Higbie 
Elizabeth Lipsey 
Marjorie Morrison 
Wilhelmina Rehm 
Margaret Winton 



rk 



^ mwE 



^r 



A 



w 



^§ %B & 



^ 




1922 iEnnbrrs nf AU-§>mtttj (Srtrkrt 



Dorothy Chase, 1920, 1921 
Ruth Katsh, 1921 



Marjorie Morrison, 1 92 1 
Mathilde Rehm, 1920, 1921 



Junior Cricket Team 



Captain, Dorothy Chase 



Frona Brooks 
Dorothy Chase 
Hilda Couch 
Marjorie Crandall 



Helen Hall 
Harriet Jacobus 
Ruth Katsh 
Marjorie Morrison 



Katherine Prickett 
Mathilde Rehm 
Pearl Smith 



tk 



^S nnrena gf 



226 



A 



A 



w 



Tjg liljEite jr 



^ 



Sophomore Cricket Team 



Captain, Dorothy Chase 



Frona Brooks 
Dorothy Chase 
Marjorie Crandall 
Helen Hall 



Harriet Jacobus 
Kathenne Prickett 
Mathilde Rehm 
Irma Rich 



Ellen Sheehan 
Pearl Smith 
Marion Watkins 

Freshman Cricket Team 
Captain, Dorothy Chase 



Frona Brooks 
Dorothy Bedworth 
Dorothy Chase 
Helen Hall 



Irma Rich 
Ellen Sheehan 
Marion Watkins 



Harriet Jacobus 
Ruth Katsh 
Ellen Lane 
Virginia Paine 



!k 



=35 nraara 3i= 



d 



w 



^JMM^ 



^ 




8>mttlj (Mleg? Sntntfl (Seams 

First Team 
Alice Chapman Alice Jenckes 

Second Team 
Dorothea Nourse Pauline Ames 

Third Team 
Marabeth Storrs Eleanor Bachman 



!k 



^asas 



22S 



^ 



a 






w 



^t^p^r 



^ 




1922 (UrtittB 



Junior Year 
Captain, Kathryn Lyman Cox, Anne Johnston 

Cox, Frona Brooks Edith Donnell Huldah Doron 

Helen Dana Smith Jane Quinby Margaret Hackett Achsa Powell 

Alice Jenckes 



Cox, L 



ox, Louise N-ingsley 



Kinesh 



Harriet Bergtold 






Esther Gaylord 






Eleanor Hoyt 






Katharine Macomber 




■*&. 


1922 Member of 






All-Smith Crew 






Jane Quinby 


El 


1 



!k 



^\MZB& 



A 



229 



w 



^g f^ol ^ 



^ 




^ 



POSSIBLE 
POINTS 
10 



(gymnasium iExljibtttfltt 

Saturday, March 18, 1922 
Won by 1922 



EVENT 
Marching 



Total for Cup (Won by 1922) 



?&\M2^& 



POINTS WON BY 

1922 
9.0 





Total for Banner (Won by 1922) 




26.25 


30 


(Carried from above) 




26.25 


20 


Somersault on Boom . 








18.02 


20 


Flank Vault on Horse 








15.15 


20 


Oblique Vault on Box 








18.30 


20 


Swing Jump with Two Ropes 








17.00 


20 


Stride Vault on Buck 








18.35 


20 


Serpentine Window Ladders 








19.00 


20 


Fence Vault on Boom 








19.20 


20 


Face Vault on Box . 








16.40 


20 


Rope Climbing with Transferrins 


' 






18.60 



186.27 



Ja 



230 




WIT, HUMOR 
AND MIRTH 



w 



^g frSte ^ 



^ 




Two students peering in campus house where 
there is evidnce of great excitement and social 
functioning: 

Peg to Jane — Who're all (hose strangers? 

Mrs. Bradshaw (emerging from doorway — 
Why that's a Faculty Reception, young lady, 
that's why they look so strange. 



OF '" 



If knock knees and bow legs wont keep a girl 
from wearing knickers, what chance has 
modesty? 



Probable editors of "Cassandra": 
"What ho?" said the vague Mrs. Brown. Dlxie M ,n er and Dixie Dutm 

"Do you know you're the talk of the town?" Linda Belanger and Peg Hinckley. 

"Why, what have I done, »j ohn " and H ;i da Conkling. 

My sweet honey bun?" £ddie Niquette and " Mrs . B " 

"Never mind," said the vague Mrs. Brown. Mr. Patch and the Foresmans. 

Does this sound like Vachel Lindsay to you? Abb ' C Belden and Minna - 

Herr Neilson-in-Law and Margie Ward. 



1st — Did you get any mail? 

2nd — No, my mother is visiting me now. 




k 



D> 



TOSS! 



4k 



w 



^g fBte ^ 



^ 




^ 



^HE2I 



®r 



2:::! 



A 



w 



=y® [^a1 ©r 



^ 




5AY IT WITH MUSIC 



Or 



>@ 0EE2 §? 



A 



234 



w 



^g f^E^ 



^ 




E>EFO^E 



J. C. gives an informal lecture 
to Zoo. '21 as she fills new Dunne 
fountain pen. The following was 
of peculiar interest to Mr. Dunn, 
then crossing the threshold. 

"This is the famous Dunn; it 
only drinks once a year, but when 
it does, oh baby!" 

Liz — How can I keep my toes 
from going to sleep? 

Lippy — Don't let them turn in. 

John puts Bee out of Music Hall 
for the ninth Sunday night in suc- 
cession. 

Bee (kittenishly) — Won't you bo 
sorry next year, John, when you 
won't have me to put out? 

John (philosophically) — Well — 
I've been through it before. 




AFTE£; 



Mr. Lieder (in English 311. at 10.30 A. M., 
after nine girls have left the class) — Perhaps it u 

would convenience the class more if I had a I U» /) v rv-~ — \ C* 1 

train caller here in the future. * " B fl UAt OrCiC>YStem 

At 10.39 A. M.: lo22. \QZ2 

All that period was decadent; in fact there 
was quite a movement on foot of child suicide. 

At 10.49 A. M.: 

Now I have just one minute left, and I'll give 
it to you in a second. 



1822 

Jff 





, 1... _orl 

AS we: imagine ouc"pc.or-A' 
MAN" APPEALS TO OUB FRIENDS 



Mr. Fay — What do you think of Czecho- 
slovakia? 

Student — It's hard to say. 

Mr. Withington (at Moliere celebration) — 
I'd rather bust the crown than crown the bust 
of Moliere. 

Modern Poetry. Scene: Northampton Station. 

Bell (dramatically) — See the box cars jerking 
by a mile long, the smoke like brick red dust, 
quadrangles of crimson sputter from the smoke 
stacks, whistles shrieking, bells shrieking — 

Dumbell — Ah, yes — it sounds so like a poem 
of Eric Stahlberg's! 



ik 



^ptos^i 



&r 



23i 



Ja 



w 



^i^Q r 



^ 




^ 



^2/ 



&\mzTi& 



i^r 



236 



A 



a 



w 



^§ X\^U^ r 



^ 



QIalpniiar. 1921-1922 



September 

27 Registration. 

28 Classes Began. 

October 

1 Freshman Frolic. 

4 First Meeting of the S. C. A. C. W. 
Eleanor Hoyt, 1922, President, spoke. 

7 Lecture by Sir William Mitchell- Ram- 

say. Subject, "Wanderings of an 
Archaeologist in Greek Lands." 

8 Walter Hampden played in: "The Ser- 

vant in the House," and "The Mer- 
chant of Venice." 

12 Mountain Day. 

15 Lecture by William Beebe. Subject: 
"The Life in the Jungle." 

19 1922 Show for the benefit of the Four 

Million Dollar Fund. 

20 First Meeting of the House of Represen- 

tatives. 

21 First Meeting of the Smith College 

Branch of the League of Women Vot- 
ers. 

24 Lecture by Helen Fraser. Subject: "Poli- 
tics and Personalities in Britain." 

26 Faculty Recital. Mr. Locke, Mr. Case, 
Mr. Moog, Miss Bliss, Miss Holmes, 
Miss Gleason, Miss Haight. 

28 Lecture by Agnes Repplier. Subject: 

"The Courageous Reader." 

29 Field Day. Morning and afternoon meet- 

ings of the New England Classical As- 
sociation. 

30 Discussion Meeting: "The Christian 

Measuring Stick." 

November 

2 First Concert of the Smith Colege Con- 
cert Course. New York Philharmonic 
Orchestra. 

4 Concert by John McCormack for the ben- 
efit of the Four Million Dollar Fund. 

6 Discussion meeting. Subject: "College 
Here and There." Speakers: Daisy 
Yen Tsung-Tsung Nyi, Vong-Kyih 
Nyi. 

9 Student Mass Meeting for discussion of 

Disarmament. Dramatics Association 
Production: "Aria da Capo," and "The 
Sabine Women." Faculty Recital: 
Arthur W. Locke, Pianist. 
10 Illustrated lecture in French. Speaker: 
M. Arnold van Gennep, Professeur 
d'Ethographie of Paris. Subject: "Les 
Costumes des Provinces de France." 



II Armistice Day Celebration. Speaker: 
President Meiklejohn of Amherst Col- 
lege. Armistice Day Celebration by 
the Northampton Post of the American 
Legion. 

13 Discussion meeting. Subject: "Fitting 
Ourselves into Politics." Speaker: 
Lucia Norton, 1923. 

15 First meeting of the training class for Girl 

Scout leaders. Instructor: Miss Kath- 
erine Dabney. 

16 First meeting of the Senior Class. Speak- 

er: Miss Helen Wright, Director of the 
Appointment Bureau. First Concert of 
the Smith College chamber music course. 
The Letz Quartet. Freshmen Song 
Trials. 
20 Discussion meeting. Speaker: Camilla 
Low, 1922. 

24 Thanksgiving Day. Basketball game. Yale 

versus Harvard (so-called). 

25 Lecture by Mr. Alfred Zimmern of Uni- 

versity College, Wales. Subject: "The 
Present European Situation." 
27 Discussion meeting. Subject: "Unpaid 
Debts." Speaker: Virginia Moore, 1924. 

29 Faculty Recital. Miss Rebecca Haisht, 

'cellist, assisted by Mr. Moos, Miss 
Flobray, Mrs. Olmsted, Miss Gleason. 

30 Christmas Sale. Dramatics Association: 

"Helena's Husband," "Torches," "The 
Dark Lady of the Sonnets." 



December 

1 Illustrated lecture by Miss Annie J. Can- 

non of Harvard College observatory. 
Subject: "Modern Excursions into An- 
cient Star Fields." 

2 Vocational Conference. 

4 Discussion meeting. Subject: "Is Social 
Service Worth While." Speaker: 
Jane Arms, 1922. 

6 Lecture by Miss Cicely C. Warner of 

the English Women's Hockey Team. 
Subject: "Hockey." 

7 Concert by Ossip Gabrilowitsch, pianist. 

9 Lecture by Mr. Henry Eichheim. Sub- 
ject: "The Comparative Development 
of Oriental and Occidental Music." 

Smith-Dartmouth Debate. Resolved: That 
the United States should recognize the 
present Soviet Government in Russia. 

Lecture by Don Ramon del Valle-Inclan. 
Subject: "Spanish Literature." 

Concert by the Letz Quartet assisted by 
Paul Kefer, 'cellist. 



10 

13 
14 



^ 



^. msm v, 



Ja 



w 



^g f^al ©r 



^ 



16 
17 



17 Conecrt by the Smith College Glee Club 
assisted by Mary Tanner Fairchild, vio- 
linist, and Wilson T. Moog, organist. 

20 Beginning of the Christmas Recess. 



January 1922 

6 Opening of College. 

1 I Faculty Recital. Miss Bates, Miss Ham- 
ilton, Mr. Olmsted. Lecture by John 
A. Lomax. Subject: "Cowboy Songs." 

Motion Pictures. Subject: "The Manu- 
facture of Sugar." 

Lecture by Sir Phillip Gibbs. 

Tercentenary Celebration of the birth of 
Moliere. I. "Malade Imaginaire," in 
French. II. Crowning of the bust of 
Moliere. Ode, by Grace Hazard 
Conkling, read by Eleanor Chilton. 
III. "The Cheats of Scapin." 

Joint Concert of the Harvard Glee Club 
and the Smith College Oratorio Chorus. 

Meeting of Student Volunteers. Speakers: 
Edith Leach, 1923, Eleanor Hoy t, 1922, 
Sarah Riggs, 1923. 

Concert by Louise Homer for the benefit 
of the Vassar Fund. 

Lecture by Professor Arthur Pope of 
Harvard University. Subject: "A Few 
Examples of Fine Pictorial Design." 

Sophomore Carnival. 

Examinations began. 



21 



24 



25 



27 



28 
30 



February 

4 Meeting of the Connecticut Valley section 
of the American Chemical Association. 
Speaker: Dr. W. T. Bovie of Harvard 
University. Subject: "The Chemical 
and Physical Organization of Proto- 
plasm." 

8 Concert by Pablo Casals. 

10 Beginning of the second semester. Lecture 
by Carl Sandburo. Lecture in English 
by M. Julien Champenoix. Subject: 
"The State of Franco- American Uni- 
versity Relations and a Short Summary 
of the Educational Movement in 
France." 

10 The Northampton Amateurs presented: 
"The Gentleman Dancing Master." 

1 I Recital of Dancing and Music by Miss 
Theresa Duncan and Mr. Richard Hans 
Barth. 

13 Beginning of the week of Prayer. Ser- 
vices conducted by Dr. William P. 
Merrill of Brick Presbyterian Church, 

N. Y. C. 

18 Mrs. Thomas G. Winter spoke on the 
Disarmament Conference. Song recital 
by Miss Edith Bennett. Conference of 
the Alumnae Council. 



20 Lecture by Miss Caroline Yale, Princi- 

pal of ;he Clark School. Subject: 
"Teaching the Deaf." 

21 Faculty Recital by Miss Williams. 

22 Washington's Birthday Commemoration 

Exercises. Commemoration Ode by 
Sarah Riggs, 1923; oration by Dwight 
Whitney Morrow, LL.B. Rally in the 
Gymnasium. Junior-Senior Basketball 
game. Seniors victorious. '22, '23, '24 
Show for the benefit of the Four Million 
Dollar Fund. 

24 Lecture by Professor John Livingston 

Lowes of Harvard University. Subject: 
"The Bird and the Daemon and Other 
Supernatural Matters"; a Chapter in 
the History of the "Ancient Mariner." 

25 Freshman-Sophomore Basketball game. 

Sophomores victorious. Motion piclures 
accompanied by a lecture by Miss Mad- 
eleine Z. Doty, 1900. Subject: "Japa- 
nese Life." 
27 Lecture by M. Bernard Fay. Subject: 
"The So-Called Anglo-Franco Con- 
flict." 



March 

1 Lecture by Professor Joseph Redlich of 

the University of Vienna. Subject: 
"Democracy and Republicanism in Cen- 
tral Europe. Dramatics Association 
Mass Meeting. Concert by the Smith 
College Symphony Orchestra, Miss 
Holmes, leader. 

2 Concert by the Hampton Institute Quartet. 

3 Lecture by M. Paul de Schweinitz. Lec- 

ture by Professor Joseph Redlich. 

8 The Church Conference. Junior Frolic. 

Concert by the Letz Quartet, assisted 
by Mr. Locke. 

9 Beginning of the exhibition of Spring- 

Flowering Bulbs at the Lyman Plant 
House. Lecture by M. Henri Chamard 
of the Sorbonne. Subject: "The Ter- 
centenary of La Fontaine." 

Address by M. Guillaume Fatio of the 
University of Geneva. Subject: "The 
University of Geneva Summer School 
for the Study of International Affairs." 
Lecture by Miss Rose Schneiderman, 
President of the Women's Trade Union 
League. Subject: "Trade Unionism, 
A Force in Democracy." Lecture by 
Professor Ashley H. Thorndike of Co- 
lumbia University. Subject: "Scholar- 
ship in the Victorian Era. 

Freshman-Sophomore Basketball game. 
1924 victorious. Dramatics Association 
Presentation : "The Dragon." 



10 



II 



k 



tS®M$$& 



23S 



r a 



w 



^® fl!sa) ^ 



^ 



13 Lecture by Mrs. Tracy B. Griswold. Sub- 

ject: "Daily Vacation Bible Schools, 
a Summer Program of Religious Edu- 
cation and Americanization. Lecture 
by Professor Christian Gauss of Prince- 
ton University. Subject: "Journalism" 

14 Informal Talk by Miss Tousley of the 

Charity Organizations Society of New 
York. Subject: "Social Work.' 

15 Dramatic Association Mass Meeting. 

Concert by the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra. Soloist, Miss Goode. 

16 Lecture by Dr. C. E. Winslow, Profes- 

son of Public Health, Yale School of 
Medicine. Subject: The International 
Red Cross at Work. 

Lecture, Miss Ada Fitts, Director of Spe- 
cial Classes, Boston Public Schools. 
Subject: Classes for Retarded Chil- 
dren. 
18 Annual Gymnasium Drill. Banner and 

Cup awarded to 1922. 

Barnard-Smith Debate. Resolved: That 
the United States Grant the Philippines 
Immediate Independence. 
20 Sonata Recital by Mrs. F. S. Coolidge, 
pianist, and Mr. Hugo Kortschak, 
violinist. 
22 Beginning of the Spring Recess. 

April 

6 College reopened. 

7 Concert by Jascha Heifetz, violinist. 

10 Lecture by Mr. S. K. Ratcliffe. Subject: 

The Crisis in India. 
I I Lecture by Vachel Lindsay. 

12 Lecture by Miss MacMaster. Subject: 

The Immediate Economic Causes of the 
Distress in Austria. 
Faculty Recital. Charles Albert Case, 
Tenor. 

13 Lecture in French by Professor Andre 

Morize of Harvard University. Sub- 
ject: Brillat-Savarin and the Culinary 
Art in France. 
Pavlowa. 

14 Recital of Folk Dances by the Misses 

Peronne and Constance Arntzenius. 

15 Illustrated lecture by Miss Bertha Hazard. 

Subject: The Oberammergau Passion 
Play. 



18 



19 



20 



24 
26 

28 



Sonata Recital by Mrs. F. S. Coolidge 
and Mr. William Willicke, 'Cellist. 

Lecture in Italian by Professor L. P. de 
Castelvechio of the University of Bir- 
mingham. Subject: Carducci and His 
Contempories. 

Lecture in Italian by Professor de Cas- 
telvechio. 

Concert by Arthur Middleton, baritone. 

Lecture in Italian by Professor de Cas- 
telvechio. 

Lecture in English by Professor de Cas- 
telvechio. Subject: Universities of 
Italy. 

Shakespeare Week Celebration began. 

Mass meeting of the Dramatics Associa- 
tion. 

Lecture by Professor Wilbur L. Cross of 



Yale 
Old 



University. 
rid New. 



Subject: Novels, 



29 Glee Club presented "H. M. S. Pinafore." 



May 

3 Dramatics Association presentation of: "If 

I Were King." 

4 Meeting of the League of Women Voters. 

Speaker: Wolcott Stuart, 1921. Sub- 
ject: The Pan-American Conference 
of Women at Baltimore. 
10 Concert by the Amherst Glee Club and 
Smith Oratorio Chorus. 

17 Junior Promenade. 
20 Field Day. 

24 Float Day. 

25 Presentation of Plays by the Smith Col- 

lege Workship. 
30 Memorial Day. 

June 

2-13 Final Examinations. 
15-17 Senior Dramatics: "A Winter's Tale." 

18 Baccalaureate Sermon. 

19 Ivy Day. 

Meeting of the Alumnae Association. 
Reception by the President and the 
Faculty. 

20 Commencement Exercises. 
Alumnae Assembly. 
Class Supper. 



rk 



^ras 



Of 



A 



239 



w 



^0M$&r 



^ 



^ 



3n iUnttnriam 

Sorntljra Olarlylr 
Stella Wrtm (Surttel 
iFrancpa ijattsp 



^g firo^i 



^ 



A 



:40 



. 



The Board of the I 922 Class Book wishes to express its appreciation 
of the assistance of its advisor, Professor William Francis Ganong, and also 
wishes to thank the following for their active support and co-operation: 

Janet Bannard 
Ellen Ewing 
Lavinia Fyke 
Elsye Geisenberger 
Ruth Guggenheim 
Mildred Mason 
Eleanor Rau 
Nathalie Smith 




IF'D^OD^ 3 o 



INDEX 



Alberts, E 24 

Armchair, The 5 

Bailey, Banks & Biddle Co. ... 5 

Baker, Walter, & Co., Ltd. ... 27 

Beckmann's 29 

Belanger, Miss 7 

Belkin, Mitchell 15 

Berry, James 14 

Bicknell, H. E 23 

Bistany, S 18 

Blum, Julius 20 

Bon Marche, The 27 

Boston Fruit Store 32 

Boyden's 4 

Brandle, Frank A 23 

Bridgman & Lyman 31 

Brigham & Co 16 

Buchholz & Son 7 

Butler & Ullman 19 

Cahill, Julia B 24 

Central Grocery 9 

Charles, Inc 10 

Childs, Thomas S 32 

City Taxicab Co 30 

Clark Coal Co 16 

Coburn & Graves 18 

Coe Shop, David C 7 

College Blouse & Mending Shop . 1 3 

College Shoe Repair Shop ... 14 

College Shoe Shining Parlors . . 23 

College Taxi Co., The . . . . 21 

Copeland's 26 

Copper Kettle, The 17 

Dewhurst, O. T 25 

Draper Hotel 12 

Electric Shoe Repair Co. . . . 25 

Elms Restaurant, The .... 8 

Fitts, C. N 19 

Fleming's Shoe Shop 30 

Forbes & Wallace 31 

Foster-Farrar Co 32 

Gare, E J. & Son 27 

Gazette Printing Co 18 

Gleason Bros 24 

Goldman, H 27 

Green Dragon, The 14 

Hall, Charles, Inc 18 

Hampshire Bookshop 17 



Hampshire County Trust Co. . . 19 

Harlow, Geo. F 18 

Harngan Press 33 

Hill Brothers 21 

Hotel Garage, The 13 

Howard-Wesson Co 33 

Jensen's 21 

Kimball & Cary Co 22 

Kingsley 32 

Lambie, J. E. & Co 9 

LaMontagne, A. J 7 

LaMontagne Boot Shop . . . . 19 

Laythe Shoe Co., G. W. . . . 24 

Luce, George N 25 

Mary Marguerite, The .... 9 

Metcalf Printing & Publishing Co. . 29 

Mother's Cupboard 18 

McCallum, A. & Co 28 

Niquette's 14 

Northampton Electric Lighting Co. 1 

Northampton Garage Co. ... 32 

Northampton Hosiery Co. ... 24 

Northfield Hotel, The .... 6 

Ono, T. & Co 25 

Otis Elevator Co., The .... 11 

Paddock Tailoring Co 24 

Park Co., Inc., The 13 

Pierce, J. Hugh 12 

Pinehurst Riding School .... 26 

Plaza Theatre 8 

Plymouth Inn 6 

Private Estate Coffee Co. ... 28 

Raysel's 33 

Richard's Co., R. J 20 

Schultz 13 

Sockut, Samuel 17 

Stahlberg, Eric 18 

Steiger Co., Albert 5 

Sutherland, Miss R. L 17 

Sweetheart Tea House . . . . 19 

Taylor's Music House .... 8 

Tiffany & Co 3 

Todd, T. H 29 

Trebla 6 

Warren & Watt 29 

Welch, William E 20 

Wiswell, H. A 17 

Wood, Arthur P 30 











Tiffany & Co. 

Jewelry and Silverware 

Noted for Design 
Quality and Workmanship 

Mail Inquiries Given Prompt Attention 

Fifth Avenue &37- Street 
NewYork 







DnnnnnnaannnnnannDDnnnnDnnDnnnDDDDnacGannannnnDDDn 



I BOYDEN'S I 

D □ 

D D 

DDDDDDnnDannnnnnnnDnnnnannnnDnnnnnnDnnDnDDannDnnDa 



DnannnnnnannnnDnnnnnnnnnnnDannnnnnnnDDDDDnnnnnnDDa 




□ 
□ 
□ 

D 

a 

D 
D 

a 
a 
□ 
a 
a 

D 
D 

a 

D 
D 

a 

D 

a 

D 

□ 
a 
a 

D 
D 

a 
□ 

D 
□ 
□ 
D 
□ 
□ 

a 

D 
D 
D 
D 

a 

D 
D 

a 

D 



DODDDDDODnaoaaoaaaonaDDDQaoaQOoaDDDDaDDQaananDDDnQ 



□□□□□□□□QQQnaDnoannnoaanoaananDDDDGnnnoQGannQQDQon 

I BOYDEN'S I 

a a 

DDnnnnnDnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnDnnDDnnDDDDnnnnnnDnnDnnnnna 



rjjr* Silversmiths MJ 

Jr Stationers 



FRATERNITY r y hAN^&Dhhl ^ PLAQUES. 

EMBLEMS, illhl'^ JU U Pf. MEDALS. ETC. 

RINGS, SEALS, f2/M L ^ Jeweler. M< I ft OF THE 

CHARMS. Hr* Sflvcrsmiths MJ BETTER KIND 



PHILADELPHIA 

THE GIFT BOOK, Mailed upon request Illustrating and Pricing Graduation and other Gifts 

The ARMCHAIR 

Tea and Guest House 



CORNER CRESCENT AND ELM 
On the Approved List Service a la Carte Hours: 8 A. M. - 1 P. M. 



Our fashions are neither more nor less than what they appear to be — the 
best — and our prices are always the lowest at which such apparel can be sold. 

Distinction of design, merit of material, and the truth and originality that reside 
in Creative Art — these elements alone account for the prestige of our fashions. 

Character, dignity and good taste — most women ever seek these qualities in 
the clothes they choose. 

It is to such women that our apparel appeals quickly and convincingly. 

Albert ^Xna,n (ftnmpany 

SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



JUgmnutlj Jmt 

Northampton, Massachusetts 

HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS which are attractive 
and comfortable. Adjoining Smith College Campus. 
Rooms single or en suite, with or without private bath. 



N?to (ttnlomal ®ea Unnm 

JUST OPENED IN THE MAIN HOTEL 

Excellent well-planned meals in a dainty, artistic setting. 
Meals served from 7 a. m. to 10 p. m. Arrangements 
made for private parties. Open Sundays. 

John B. Hyatt, Manager. 




ttbe IHoctbfielD 

EAST NORTHFIELD, MASS. 
OPEN ALL THE YEAR 

A home-like house, combining comfort, pleasing 
service, and attractive menus. On the Smith Col- 
lege "approved list'' and for many years a resort 
for Smith faculty and students: 

Golf, Tennis, and Croquet on grounds. 

Tobogganing, Snowihoeing, Skiing and 

other WINTER SPORTS in season 

34 miles from Northampton on White Mountain 

Motor Route, or Boston and Maine R. R. 
Ambert G. Moody, E. Everett Martin, 

Manager. Asst. Manager. 



Fine Chocolates 



Choice Bonbons 



TREBLA'S 

Sweets 6 Fruits 



NORTHAMPTON 



265 Main Street 



MAKERS— RETAILERS 



Crispy Candies 



Fancy Fruit Baskets 



The 

David C. Coe 

Shop 
IMPORTERS 



VICUNA JACKETS NOVELTY SWEATERS 

SILK AND LISLE HOSE 

SPORT HOSE 

FOULARD HANDKERCHIEFS FOULARD TIES 

SCARVES 



THE COE BUILDING 

TWENTY -SIX VERNON STREET 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



GO TO 



Miss Belanger 

FOR 

Shampoos 
Marcelling 

Manicuring or 
Face Massage 

277 Main Street 



H. Buchholz & Son 

Theatrical, Historical and 
Masquerade Costumiers 



Pageants and School Productions a Specialty 
Wigs, Beards, Make-ups, Etc. 

33 LYMAN ST. SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



A. J. LaMontagne 

Distinctive Decorator 
and Painter 

267 Main St. Northampton 

Telephone, 146-W 



TAYLOR'S 
MUSIC HOUSE 

98 PLEASANT ST. 



We carry the largest 
stock of 

Victor Talking Machines and 
Records in the City 

Students' Victor Machines 
$25.00 - $35.00 - $50.00 

Ukuleles, Ukulele Banjos, 
Mandores 



TAYLOR'S MUSIC HOUSE 

98 PLEASANT STREET 



Plaza Theatre 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Pick o' the World Photoplays 
From Famous Producers 

presenting 
America's Greatest Plays 



Program Changed Daily except Mondays 
and Tuesdays 

FREDERICK P. BELMONT, Mgr. 



"Ike El 



■>«» 



ms 



NORTHAMPTON'S POPULAR RESTAURANT 



CONVENIENT FOR 
COLLEGE STUDENTS AND GUESTS 



Let us convince you that we serve Best Quality Food 
at Moderate Prices 



G. HARVEY BLISS 



J. E. LAMBIE & CO. 

92 MAIN STREET, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

We Specialize in the Following Merchandise: 

Imported and Domestic Trimmings. Fancy Silks and Dress Goods. 
Ribbons and Laces. Veilings, Kid and Fabric Gloves, Hosiery. 
Silk and Fine Nainsook Undergarments. Curtains, Cur- 
tain Materials and Curtains Made to Order. Couch 
Covers, Cretonnes and Drapery Materials. 
Silk and Lingerie Blouses. 

AGENTS IN THIS CITY FOR BETTY WALES DRESSES 



You d be surprised 



AT 



The lowness of our prices 
Our large supply of stock 
Our courtesy to customers 



TRY US! 



THE 

Central Grocery 



The 

Mary Marguerite 

Tea Room and 

Food Shop 



LUNCHEONS AND 
SUPPERS SERVED 

Hours: 1 1.00 to 6.30 



TWENTY-ONE STATE STREET 



^^^ 




Gowns Suits 
Coats Skirts Blouses 

M.T. WxTLGry of* DisK-acti on 

S i ~£&ct7"nS' M building 

J llio €igfxty JVine ridge S'treeir 
Sprin cffietcL 



How many times have you wished to press a shirt 
waist, etc., for a party? 

Oh! for a Universal Electric Traveler's Iron with 
velvet bag, weight only 3 1 /. lbs. 

Or to add a couple more waves to that coiffeur? 

Oh! for a Universal Electric Curler. 

Now for the studying which takes many long hours. 

Oh! for an Electric Study Lamp. See them at Our 
Store. 



NORTHAMPTON 
ELECTRIC LIGHTING CO. 



10 




COMPLIMENTS OF 



The Otis Elevator Company 




Guests Jrom 48 States 
Praise the 



^Draper Ifcotel 



NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

WILLIAM M. KIMBALL, PROP. 



WALL PAPER, PAINTS 

PICTURE CLASS 

ETC. 



We Paint 

Students' Furniture 



J. HUGH PIERCE 

186 Main Street 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




12 



Authorized 




Dealers 



Present Prices Lowest Ever 

F. O. B. NORTHAMPTON 



Sedan $708.99 

Coupelet 641.31 



Touring, Starter and Dem. Rims . 
Roadster, Starter and Dem. Rims 



$498.65 
468.46 



Why Not Benefit by These Prices? 



For Genuine Ford Parts, First Quality 
Tires and Accessories 

GO TO 

24 Center Street Telephone 470 



For Service and Repairs 

— TRY — 

HOTEL GARAGE 

Rear 203 Main St. Tel. 187 



CHASE MOTOR CO. 



Our New Art 
Room 

at 263 Main Street, adjoining 
our Optical Shop, is a place of 
rare interest and beauty — a 
treasure house of fine pictures, 
framed and unf ramed ; art goods 
charmingly unique, together with 
a most noteworthy display of the 
"different" sort of greeting cards 
for all occasions. 

The Park Company, Inc. 

257 Main Street 
Northampton, Massachusetts 



THE COLLEGE 

Blouse and Mending Shop 
28 CENTER STREET 



The Shop where you find everything 
that's new and smart in blouses 

EXCLUSIVE 
Dressmaking, Mending, Repairing, Altering, 
French Dry Cleaning, Steaming and Pressing 



Manicuring 
Facial Massage 



SCHULTZ 



Hair Dressing 
and Shampooing 



13 



Gifts That Last 



You will find that we have a complete line of gifts in jewelry 

for college girls. 

Our stock of Smith Seal Rings and Pins is complete 

BERRY'S 

Jewelers 



161 MAIN STREET 



Next to Western Union 



NORTHAMPTON 




207 MAIN STREET 

A Gift Shop 
of Distinction 



N IQUETTE'S 

The College Drug Store 
NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



CAMERAS AND SUPPLIES 
Mail Us Your Films 



Agency for PAGE & SHAW CHOCOLATES 



College 
Shoe Repair Shop 



Tony Rabskey, Prop. 



Goodyear System Repairing 
33 State Street Northampton, Mass. 



14 



Telephone 1 753 

Mitchell Belkin 

241 MAIN STREET, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

STUDIOS AT 

72 and 465 MAIN STREET, SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 

Official Photographer to Smith, 1922 
Amherst College Photographer to Olio, 1923 

imperial EatPH to ^Utornta 



We are experts in developing and printing your films. 
Free developing of films to students. 




15 



1 . If. 1 rtgljam & Gkmpatr? 

Springfield, Mass. 

Specializing in Smart Apparel 
and Furs for the College Girl 



Make Briglia ill's Your Meeting Plaee 
Whenever In Springfield 



William A. Clark Coal Co. 



Coal 



202 Main Street 



Telbphonbs] 1170 



16 



YOUR ACCOUNT IS ALWAYS 


GOOD 


AT 


The Hampshire 


Bookshop 


Send back for B o o l( s 





Antiques 



Copper Kettle 

45 State Street 



Samuel Sockut 

Tailor 
and Furrier 

Ladies' Suits, Coats and Skirts 
Made to Order 



Ladies' and Gents' Garments Remodeled to the 
Latest Designs and Fashions 



Steam and Dry Cleaning and Pressing 
Done al Reasonable Prices 



WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 



Telephone 1685-M 

Center Street Northampton, Mass. 

Near Main Street 




"HARPER" 

METHOD 

MISS R. L. SUTHERLAND 

78 Main St. Bement Bleb 

Scalp Treatment, Shampooing 

Manicuring, Facial Massage 

and Marcel 



W I S W E LL 


The Druggist 


82 MAIN STREET 


NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



17 



40 STATE STREET 



Tea-Room Service from 9 A. M. to 
7 P. M. on Week-Days 



Dinner and Supper on Sundays 



ERIC STAHLBERG 



McCLELLAN STUDIO 
*— * 

NORTHAMPTON MASSACHUSETTS 



©dental Sbop 

S. BISTANY 

Fancy Work Imported Goods 

Turkish Rugs 

** 

239 MAIN STREET 
Telephone I 1 72-W Northampton, Mass. 



A GOOD PLACE TO BUY 
YOUR 

Desks, Chairs and Tables 

G. F. HARLOW'S 
19 Center St. 



The Tea Room 
at Hall's 

Luncheon served from Twelve to Two 

Afternoon Tea from Three to Five 

Waffles and Syrup a specialty 

Cosy Corner especially in favor with 
college girls 

CHARLES HALL, Inc. 

The Hall Building 



CARA NOME and JONTEEL 

(ErramH, JFfarp Pmutora, 
Sains, iEtr. 



Liggett's Candies 



Coon's Ice Cream 



Coburn & Graves 

Opp. Court House The Rexall Store 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Ofertt? Printing (Eo. 



14 GOTHIC STREET 



PRINTING OF ALL KINDS 



^mitlj d>ra&H 



as well as 



may always feel free to write 
or wire flowers and expect the 
very best that we can give. 



lutbr & lUman 

Flowers 



The Woman 



THE WOMAN IS THE 
ECONOMIST — WHICH 
IS A WORD MEANING, 
ORIGINAL HOUSEKEEPER. 

THE BEST HOUSEKEEPER 
U S ES A CHECK BOOK 
AND HAS HER ACCOUNT 
WITH THE 

Hampshire County 
Trust Company 



LaMontagne Boot Shop 

Near the Post Office 

Style — Quality — at Prices thai please 
It Pays to Pay Cash 



21 PLEASANT STREET 
NORTHAMPTON - MASSACHUSETTS 



SHELBURNE FALLS, MASS. 

Sweetheart Specialties: 

Fried Chicken and Waffles. Waffles and Maple 

Syrup. Pure Maple Sugar Products 



Open until 8 o'clock every day 

May 24th to Oct. 26th 

ALICE BROWN MOHAWK TRAIL 



Thirty Years' Experience 
Selling 

Students' Room 
Furnishings 

We 

Solicit your Business 

At 

137 MAIN STREET 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

C. N. FITTS 



19 



Blum's Ready-to-Wear Shop 

ALWAYS SELECTED AS THE IDEAL SHOP 
FOR COLLECE GIRLS' APPAREL 

Our ready-to-wear is noted for 
its beauty of material and its 
certainty of long wear. 

At present we are specializing in TWEED 
DRESSES AND SUITS. We invite each col- 
lege student to inspect our fine Tweed material 
and make an early selection. A perfect fit guar- 
anteed in every case. 



JULIUS BLUM 

259 MAIN STREET 



Proprietor 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Distinctive 
Jewelry 

Avoidance of the commonplace 
distinguishes our stock 



R. J. RICHARDS 

COMPANY 

Northampton's Finest 
Jewelry Shop 



WILLIAM E. WELCH 

Travelers' Insurance Co. 




THIRD NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 
Springfield, Massachusetts 



20 



QUALITY 



SERVICE 



We have any kind of a car for anywhere, 
at any time 

THE COLLEGE TAXI CO. 

WILLIAM G. MAHER 
Telephone 80 



EFFICIENCY 



RELIABILITY 




315 Main Street 

Springfield, Mass. 

22 Pratt Street 
Hartford, Conn. 



Makers and Retailers 

of 

Fine Candies 



Hill Brothers 

118 MAIN STREET 



Ye Olde Tyme Rugs 

Window Draperies 
Couch Covers 
Burlap Cretonnes Floss 

Fingering Yarns 

Down Pillows Sport Coats 

Umbrellas 



RELIABLE MERCHANDISE 
AT REASONABLE PRICES 



Established 1 88 1 



Incorporated 1 896 



Kimball & Cary 

Company 



Hard and Soft 

COALS 

of best quality 



Office: 
2 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



22 



All through their College Course and for Many 

Years After the Smith College Girls 

Deal With Us 



They're wide awake, up-to-date and refined. They want the best, they know what 
it is, and they soon see that they can depend on us to supply it. And the result is their 
patronage while here, and mail orders from all over the world after they leaVe Alma 
Mater. We, like the college, stay with and serve them as the years pass. 

Footwear - Hosiery - Wool Goods - Novelties 



H. E. BICKNELL 



158 MAIN STREET 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



h 


. ** * i _» , V*^k 




i 




t 


J * 

i 







Philip Karkanedes 

233 Main Street Northampton, Mass. 

College Shoe Shine and Hat 
Cleaning Parlor 



Hats Dyed Shoes Dyed 

Postal Cards, Magazines 



Frank A. Brandle 

COLLEGE 
PHARMACY 

271 - Main Street - 271 

Agents for Hurler's Candies 



23 



G. W. Laythe Shoe 
Company 

Shoes and Hosiery of Distinction 
and Character 

DRAPER HOTEL BLOCK 
Tel. 571-M 



Pabinrk tailoring QI0. 

Cleaners - and - Dyers 

Suits Made to Order. All Kinds of 
Fancy Alterations 

14 Masonic St. Northampton, Mass. 

Just Around the Corner of Main St. 



— Telephones — 

7 Pearl St., 413-W R. R. Station, 153-W 

P. Gleason, 413-R 



Gleason Bros. 

P. P. GLEASON, PROP. 

Freight 
Forwarders 

LONG DISTANCE TRANSFER BY 
AUTO TRUCK 



Light and Heavy Trucking 

Contracting, Cement, Mortar, Sand 

Furniture and Piano Moving 



OFFICE: 7 PEARL STREET 
NORTHAMPTON MASSACHUSETTS 



PARADISE 
HOSIERY 



MADE IN 

THE PARADISE OF AMERICA 

Sillf, F U H Fashioned 



BY 

Northampton 
Hosiery Company 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



We are Headquarters for 


Everything in - - - 


(Eorrpct (Eolleg? ifaatuiear 


** 


E. ALBERTS 


241 MAIN STREET 


"The Shoe Store Nearest the Campus" 



Julia B. Cahill 



WOMAN'S WEAR 

Blouses - Corsets - Bandeaux 
Underwear - Hosiery 



24 



Compliments of 



To Ota© & Company 



DEALERS IN 



PAN! 1 ' S! 1 ' 



:iiira 



Telephone 1253-W 



14 CENTER STREET 



George N. Luce 



Ladies' 
Tailor 



111 MAIN STREET 

NORTHAMPTON MASSACHUSETTS 

Telephone Connection 



Electric 
Shoe Repair Co. 

15 MASONIC STREET 
NORTHAMPTON MASSACHUSETTS 



OUR SHOP IS CONVENIENT TO YOU 



We are centrally located ; those little 
adjustments that your glasses occa- 
sionally need are only matters of a 
few minutes' work. 

We pride ourselves that our interest 
in you does NOT end with your 
original purchase. 

Prescription work, mail and tele- 
graph orders are finished same day 
received. 




dee ror rourscit - /ney t /^ 
\re Scarcely Notlceabl<0^'\ 



OPTICIANS to your President's family and the majority of the Faculty, Heads 
of Houses and Students. Imitation and real Tortoise Shell our specialty. 



O. T. DEWHURST 

REGISTERED OPTOMETRISTS AND PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 
201 MAIN ST., opposite City Hall Tel. 1 84-W 



25 



Pinehurst Riding School 

W. H. LAW, Prop. 



^% 


Riding Lessons 


TlS\^ 


Given with the 


f if ■TiJ 


Best of 


*^^^F^ 


SCHOOL 


-*' ^yel? 


HORSES 


/r/ ^ --jJSs&k- 


Horses Boarded by Week or Month 


"Ride for Pleasure" 





45 and 47 GOTHIC STREET (Rear) 



Telephone 813-M 



Copeland's Fancy Goods Shop 

FURNISHES A LARGE AND CHOICE 
ASSORTMENT OF 

High-class Wools, for Knitting and Crochet- 
ing. Also a complete line of Stamped Goods 
and Embroidery Materials of every descrip- 
tion. Class and Society Designs, a Spe- 
cialty. Art Novelties, Ribbons, Laces, Etc. 

COPELAND'S 

Mail Orders Receive Prompt and Careful Attention 
04 MAIN STREET :: :: :: NORTHAMPTON 



26 



Eversharp Pencils 
LeBceuf Pens in Colors 



E. J. GARE <S SON 



112 MAIN STREET 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 




H. GOLDMAN 

Eaites* utaUnr 

ano 3\xxx\n 

Special Order on New Fur Coats 
Remodeling and Repairing 

Phone 868-m 217 MAIN STREET 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

Bon /Ifcarcbe 



27 



BAKER'S 

Sweet Chocolate 



..■jsidv-i 1 r. 



if BAKER'S *■ . 
CARACAS. SWEET 
CHOCOLATE !» 




^:" 



I'-^i -J 



Delicious 
Flavor 

Absolute 
Purity 

High 
Quality 



Sweet Chocolate is very sustaining, 
as it contains more nourishment 
than the same amount of beef. 

WALTER BAKER & CO. LTD. 

Established 1780 DORCHESTER, MASS. 




IHK HOI NOAKIES OK QUALITY 



/ 




Smttb College 

Private 
Estate Coffee Co. 

ESTABLISHED 1851 

21-23-25 Fulton St. NE"" * I tli I 




A. McCallum Company 

A Sppartntwt $>tan Uiljai IHakea (ftnllnjp iFitrmsljttujH a £>pprialttj 



For years this store has stood for quality and service 
Specializing in all the needed 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES also Suits, Coats, 
Dresses, Blouses and Millinery 

A (Earntal JnuitaUmt is iExlenorn to ^ou to JMakr ©ur §>totv f nur &tarp 

A. McCALLUM and COMPANY 



28 



JSeckmann's 



takes this opportunity to extend to every member of the graduating Senior 
class, a host of sincere congratulations ; we hope you will always remember 
the happy days spent at Smith ; we know you will always think of the 
happy hours you spent at Beckmann's. And no matter what course 
the future may have in store for you; no matter what clime or time, 
whether in some far-off land or in the uttermost parts of this good old 
U. S. A., remember, too, that BECKMANN'S will always be ready 
to extend to you the same service and attention that helped to make your 
days at Smith such happy ones. 



HIGH QUALITY 
RIGHT PRICES 
QUICK SERVICE 

— Three sound reasons why you 
should give us your PRINTING 

iErtralf Printing $c Publishing (En. 

line. - 



Printers of the Smith College Monthly 
Northampton, Mass. 



w— & — w 

WARREN & WATT 

"Everything Electrical" 

1 79 Main St., Northampton 

Telephone 1 26 



Todd's 



We want you to feel at home in our store at 
all times. We are always happy to welcome 
back the upperclassmen, who have been trad- 
ing here for several years; and, in like man- 
ner, we are pleased to have the new girls 
who have just entered college, feel that 
Todd's Store endeavors to have goods in 
stock which will appeal to every girlish 
whim. Attractive and novel goods at rea- 
sonable prices is our aim in business. 

Our Students' Furnishing Department will 
convince you that this is accomplished. Cre- 
tonne draperies, novelty pillows and couch 
covers made to order at all times. 

Prompt delivery service. — Free telephone 
for town calls. 



29 



Rare Conceptions of Modern 
Artistry 

To her who would find in a watch that perfect union of beauty and accuracy, 
we offer rare masterpieces of the modern watchmaker's art — 

Wristlets hand-chased in green and white and yellow gold ; wristlets brilliant 
with full-cut diamonds or charming in unadorned simplicity — 

All rich with that elegance which graces only the products of the highest artistry. 
In our wide selection of women's wristlets will be found the means of gratifying 
each feminine taste. 

Particularly attractive, we believe, is our distinctive showing of Gruen Wrist 
watches for women — made by the famous Gruen Guild of Watchmakers. 



ARTHUR P. WOOD 

The Jewel Store of Northampton - also - The Watch and Clock Hospital 
197 MAIN STREET Tel. 1307-M OPP. CITY HALL 



GIRLS ! 

WHAT'S THAT TAXI 
NUMBER? 

Why It's 

96-W 

of Course 



City Taxicab Co. 

DRAPER HOTEL BUILDING 
Cars for All Occasions E. Sarazin, Prop. 



Man to Grocery Clerk: — "Have you anything 
in the shape of bananas?" 

Clerk: — "Nothing except cucumbers." 



Most Exclusive Models in 
LADIES' PUMPS and OXFORDS 



ARE FOUND AT 



Dfomtng'B Bi\ot Bi}op 



211 MAIN STREET 



30 



jforbes & Wallace 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



A 



STORE that stands among the finest institu- 
tions in the community — a store with policies, 
ideals and initiative that place it on a standard 
with the most famous stores in the country 



BRIDGMAN & LYMAN 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Extend Greetings to the Class of 22, and thank 
them for their patronage 



SEND US YOUR MAIL ORDERS FOR 



V/l// TT^H Class Books, Song- Books, Banners 
and Pennants, Stationery, Verse 

Ana anything else in the Book ana Stationery Line 



31 



Thomas S. Childs 

INCORPORATED 

273-279 HIGH STREET 

HOLYOKE 



Smart Styles. 

Shoes and Hosiery 

of Quality and Fashion 

Moderately priced. 

Mail Orders carefully 
filled. 



1Ringsle\>'8 

Soda Fountain and Luncheonette 



Nothing like it in all New England 
for Beauty 



Convenience and Service Candies of Excellence 



— The Correct — 

Golf Clubs and Balls, Tennis Rackets, 
Balls and Nets at 

Foster-Farrar Co. 



162 Main Street 



Northampton, Mass. 



NORTHAMPTON 

GARAGE 

CO. 

Cadillac and Dodge Agents 
Telephones, 582-8240 Next to Post Office 

Cadillac Cars to Rent 
By Day or Hour 



STORAGE, REPAIRS 
AND ACCESSORIES 

65 PLEASANT STREET 
Northampton, Mass. 



You will never regret 
trading at the 

BOSTON 
Fruit Store 

M. GIUFFRE & CO. 



The Pioneer Fruit House 
of Northampton 



Telephone 370 
235 MAIN STREET 



32 



The Academy Is Opposite Raysels 

The Sport Shop 

of 



IRa^eele 



SHOWING 



Exclusive Creations 

—^ of 

New Things from the Old World, 



English Golf Sweaters English Hosiery 

Tweed Suits Sport Dresses 

Top Coats Tailored Waists 



IRa^sels 



33 



Howard-Wesson Co. 

WORCESTER, MASS. 




Engravers for the Class Book 



Harrigan 


Press 


WORCESTER, 


MASS. 


Printers of the Class Book 







34 



1°. 



7 -I 



8 -I 



9 ^ 



10 4 



11^