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Full text of "Class of 1925"

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LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



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SablF of Qlmttents 



Dedication 

Board of Trustees 

The Faculty 

The Class 

Freshman Year . 

Sophomore Year . 

Junior Year . 

Senior Year 

Commencement Week 

Other Classes 

Organizations 

Dramatics 

Publications 

Music 

Societies and Clubs 

Athletics 

Verse 

Nonsense 

Advertisements . 



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Ruth Bowles Baldwin, A.B New York City 

Anne McClallan Chapin, A.B. . . Springfield, Massachusetts 
Ada Louise Comstock, A.M., Litt.D., LL.D., L.H.D. 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 
Henry Emerson Fosdick, A.M., D.D. . . New York City 

John A. Houston, M.D. . . . Northampton, Massachusetts 
Frederic Marshall Jones, A.B., S.B. Springfield, Massachusetts 
Thomas William Lamont, A.B. . 



George Bliss McCallum, A.B. 
Elizabeth Cutter Morrow, A.B. 
John E. Oldham, A.M. 
Paul J. Sachs, A.B. 
George S. Stevenson, A.M. . 
Marguerite Milton Wells, B.L. 



New York City 

Northampton, Massachusetts 

Englewood, New Jersey 

. Boston, Massachusetts 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 

. Hartford, Connecticut 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 



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PRESIDENT NEILSON 



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Abmtmatrattbe ©ffirera 





FRANCES FENTON BERNARD, LAURA W. L. SCALES. B.L. 
Ph.D. Warden 

Deun 



FLORENCE MEREDITH, 

B.S., M.D. 

College Physician 






JEAN CLARK CAHOON, A.M. 
//. aistrar 



..i ORG! P U MSB HYDE. 
AH.. LI. n. 

Cont roll, r 



GEORGE BLISS M( CA1 I UM, 

A B. 

7'/ < (/*u/« / 



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MARY MERROW COOK, B.S. 
Dean of the Class of 1925 




SUZAN ROSE BENEDICT, Ph.D. 
Dean of the Class of 1926 




MIRA BIGELOW WILSON, 

A.B., B.D. 

Dean of the Class of 192? 




SARA HINCKS, A.M. 
Dean of the Class of 192S 



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Jffarultu nf 3natrurttmt 




J. Everett Brady, Ph.D. 
Professor of Latin Language and 

Litrrut ill r 



William Francis Ganong, Ph.D. 
Professor of Botany 





Harris Hawthorne Wilder, Ph.D. 
Professor of Zoology 



Frank Allan Waterman, Ph.D. 
Professor of Physics 





Irving Francis Wood, 

Ph.D.. D.I). 

Professor of Biblical Literaturt 



Ernst Henrich Mensel, 

i'h.D.. I.itt.D. 

Profi MOT "' Qi r ituin ir LanQUBQi I tiini 

l.it> Hi' lit I * 




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Julia Harwood Carverno, A.M. 

Professor of Greek Language and 
Literature 



Alfred Vance Churchill, A.M. 

Professor of Art 





Elizabeth Deering Hanscom, 
Ph.D. 

Professor of English 



John Spencer Bassett, 
Ph.D., LL.D. 

Professor of History 





Anna Alice Cutler, Ph.D. 

Professor of Philosophii 



Robert E. S. Olmsted, A.B. 

Professor of Music 




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Harriet W. Bigelow, Ph.D. 

Professor of Astronomy 



Herbert Vaughan Abbott, A.B. 

Professor of English 





Caroline Brown Bourland, Ph.D. 
Professor of Spanish Language ond 

Lit* rat ure 



Everett Kimball, Ph.D. 
Professor of Government 





Albert Schinz, Ph.D., O.A. 
/■; ofeseor of French Language and 
Literatun 



Carl F. A. Lange, Ph.D. 

/ ..,,, ,,i (,« i ma >>>< Language i 

and Literatures 




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Louise Delpit, 

Concours Certificat Lettres, O.A. 

Professor of French Language and 
Literature 



Sidney Norton Deane, Ph.D. 

Professor of Greek Language and 
Literature 





David Camp Rogers, Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology 



Harriet Redfield Cobb, A.M. 

Professor of Mathematics 





Sidney Bradshaw Fay, Ph.D. 

Professor of History 



Joel Ernest Goldthwait, B.S., 
M.D., F.A.C.S., D.S.M., C.M.G. 

Professor of Hygiene and Physical 
Education 




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Richard Ashley Rice, A.M. 

Professor of English 



John C. Hildt, Ph.D. 

Professor of History 





Florence Alden Gragg, Ph.D. 
Professor of Latin Language and 
Literature 



Rebecca Wilder Holmes 

I' ro lessor of Music 





Robert Seneca Smith, A.M., B.I). 
Professor of BibUeal IAU rature 



Amy Louise Barbour, Ph.D. 
Prof s$90i of On * k Langvagi " "./ 

/ U( i >l! HI i 




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Mary Belle McElwain, Ph.D. 

Professor of Latin Language and 
Literature 



Suzan Rose Benedict, Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics 





William Dodge Gray, Ph.D. 

Professor of History 



Arthur Ware Locke, A.M. 
Professor of Music 





H. Edward Wells, Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 



Roy Dickinson Welch, A.B. 

Professor of Music 




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Osmond T. Robert, B. es L. 
Professor of French Language and 

Li(< nil U if 



Wilson Townsend Moog, 

Mus.B., F.A.G.O. 

Professor of Music 





Frank H. Hankins, Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics ami 

Sociology 



Harvey Gates Townsend, Ph.D. 
Prof* ssot of Education 





William Orton, M.A., M.Sc. 

/ rofeaaoi oj Economics <""/ 
Sociology 



Edna Astor Shearer, Ph.D. 

Pro/i soot <»' J'fi Uosoph >i 




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Florence Meredith, B.S., M.D. 

Professor of Hygiene and Physical 
Education 



Meyric R. Rogers, M.Arch. 

Professor of Art 





Agnes Low Rogers, Ph.D. 

Professor of Education and 
Psychology 



Samuel Ralph Harlow, A.M. 

Professor of Biblical Literature 





Harry Elmer Barnes, Ph.D. 

Professor of Economics and 
Sociology 



Howard Rollin Patch, 
Ph.D., Litt.D. 

Professor of English 




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Dickinson Miller, Ph.D., Sc.D., D.D. 
Professor of Philosophy 



Henry M. Tyler, D.D. . 
Eleanor Philbrook dishing, A.M. 
Mary Augusta Jordan, A.M., I..H.D 
Harry Norman Gardiner, A.M. . 



Ruth Goulding Wood, Ph.D. 
Esther Lowenthal, Ph.D. . 
Inez Whipple Wilder, A.M. 
Ellen Parmelee Cook, A.M. 
Julia Warner Snow. Ph.D. 
Elizabeth Spaulding Mason, A.M. 
Louisa Sewall Cheever. A.M. 
Frances Grace Smith, Ph.D. 
Josef Wiehr, Ph.D. . 
Margaret Bradshaw, Ph.D. 
Aida Agnes Heine, A.M. 
Mary Louise Foster, Ph.D. 
Mary Delia Lewis, A.M. 

Margaret Rooke, M.A.. Oxon. 
Arthur Taber Jones. Ph.D. 
Howard Madison Parsbley. Sc.D. 
Jessie Yereance ('ami, Ph.D. 
F. Warren Wright, Ph.D. . 
Paul Robert Lied... Ph.D. . 
Robert Withington, Ph.D., O.A. 
Chase Going Woodhouse, A.M. . 
Clara Willoughby Davidson, A.M. 
Stanley Aldcn. A.M. . 
Susan Miller Kamho, Ph.D. 
Grace Hazard Conkling, H.L. 

Edward James W Ihouse, l.L.lf. 

Elizabeth Avery, Ph.D. 

Emily Ledyard Shields, Ph.D. 

Eleanor Shipley Duckett, Ph.D.. D.I 

Margaret Brackenbury Crook, is. A. 

Abbie Mabel O'Keefe, M.D. 

Vincent Guilloton, Agreg£ de L'Universit 

Werner Josten .... 

Richard Donovan, Mum. it., F.A.G.O 

II. den Uabelle Williams. O.A. . 



Professor Emeritus of Greek Language and Literature 
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics 

. Professor Emeritus of English 
Professor of Philosophy 



Associate Professoi 

Associate Professor 



Professor of Mathematics 
Professor of Economics arid Sociology 

Professor- of /.o.'loev 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Botany 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor <>f English Language and Literature 

Associate Professor of Botany 

Associate Professor of German Language and Literature 

Associate Professor of English Language and Literature 

. Associate Professor of I. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 
English Language and Literature 

Italian Language and Literature 

Associate Professor of Physics 

Associate Professor of ZoSlogy 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor- of Latin Language and Literature 
Associate Professor- of English Language and Literature 
Associate Professor of English Language and Literature 

Associate Professor- of Economics and Sociology 

Associate Professor of Biblical Literature 

Associate Professor of English Language and Literature 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

te Professor of English Language and Literature 

. Associate Professor of Government 

Associate Professor of Spoken English 

A ociate Professor of Latin Language and Literature 

Associate Professor- of Latin Language and Literature 

Associate Professor of Biblical Literature 

Associate Professor of Hygiene 

Associate Professor of French Language and Literature 
Associate Prof* ISOI 

Associate Professor ol 
Associate Professor of French Language and Literature 



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Mary Merrow Cook, B.S. ..... Associate Professor of French Language and Literature 

Helen Ashurst Choate, Ph.D Associate Professor of Botany 

Myra Melissa Sampson, A.M Associate Professor of Zoology 

Katharine Shepherd Woodward, A.B. . . Associate Professor of English Language and Literature 

Sidney R. Packard, Ph.D Associate Professor of History 

Esther Cloudman Dunn, Ph.D. . . . Associate Professor of English Language and Literature 

Aline de Villele. Agregee es Lettres . . Associate Professor of French Language and Literature 

Mary Lillias Richardson, A.M. .... Assistant Professor of Latin Language and Literature 

Laura Sophronia Clark, A.M Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Sarah Hook Hamilton ........... Assistant Professor of Music 

Samuel A. Eliot. Jr., A.B. ..... Assistant Professor of English and Spoken English 

Rose Frances Egan, A.M. ..... Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature 

Clarence Kennedy, Ph.D. ........... Assistant Professor of Art 

Roy Richard Denslow, A.M. ......... Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Elizabeth Andros Foster, Ph.D. . . . Assistant Professor of Spanish Language and Literature 

Elizabeth Faith Genung, M.S. A. ......... Assistant Professor of Botany 

Clifford H. Riedell ............ Assistant Professor of Art 

Florence Farnham Olmsted .......... Assistant Professor of Music 

Anna Adele Chenot, A.M. ..... Assistant Professor of French Language and Literature 

Margaret Lewis Bailey, Ph.D. ...... Assistant Professor of English and of German 

Emmett Reid Dunn, Ph.D. .......... Assistant Professor of Zoology 

Ivan T. Gorokhoff .......... Assistant Professor of Choral Music 

Catherine Elizabeth Koch, A.M., M.L.D. ........ Assistant Professor of Botany 

Lizbeth R. Laughton, A.B. ........ Assistant Professor of Spoken English 

K. Frances Scott, Ph.D., M.D. ............ Assistant Physician 

Cesar Barja, Doctor en Derecho . . . Assistant Professor of Spanish Language and Literature 

Florence McArdle, A.M. ..... Assistant Professor of Hygiene and Physical Education 

Robert Merrill Dewey, B.S. ........ Assistant Professor of Spoken English 

Margaret Louise Farrand, A.B. .......... Director of Press Board 

Abba Willard Bowen, A.B. .... Assistant Professor of French Language and Literature 

Lucile Marsh, A.B. .......... Assistant Professor of Spoken English 

Lilian Mary Lane, Ph.B. ..... Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature 

Mary J. Garber, A.M. ......... Assistant Professor of Spoken English 

Alice Margaret Holden, Ph.D. ......... Assistant Professor of Government 

Elliott M Grant. Ph.D. ..... Assistant Professor of French Language and Literature 

Paul Hansell ........... Assistant Professor of Spoken English 

Sarah Hincks, A.M. ...... Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature 

Margaret Wooster, Ph.D. .......... Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Helene Cattanes, Docteur d'Universite . . Assistant Professor of French Language and Literature 
Mira Bigelow Wilson, A.B., B.D. ...... Assistant Professor of Biblical Literature 

Elsa P.utler Grove, A.M. ....... Assistant Professor of Economics and Sociology 



Marcus L. Hansen, Ph.D. 

Anne B. G. Hart. A.M. 

Frances E. Cheney 

L. Mary Moench. A. P.., M.D. 

Naomi Bevard 

Abbie Loveland Tuller, Ph.D. 

Antony Constans, A.B., LL.B. 

John Woods Duke 

Solon Robinson 



Assistant Professor 



Licencie es Let. Assistant Professor 



. Assistant Professor of History 

of English Language and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Education 

Assistant Physician 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Education 

of French Language and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Music 



Hannah Louisa Billings, A.M. .......... Assistant Professor of Physics 

Gladys Amelia Anslow. Ph.D. .......... Assistant Professor of Physics 

Louise Bourgoin, Licenciee es Lettres . . Assistant Professor of French Language and Literature 
Mina Stein Kirstein, A.M. ..... Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature 

Margaret Gale Scott, A.M. ........... Assistant Professor of History 

Priscilla Fairfield, Ph.D. .......... Assistant Professor of Astronomy 

Leah C. Thomas ...... Assistant Professor of Hygiene and Physical Education 

Homer Guy Bishop, Ph.D. ......... Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Julius Seelye Bixler, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biblical Literature 

Vera Lee Brown, Ph.D Assistant Professor of History 

Yvonne Imbault-Huart, Agregation Premiere Partie, O.A. 

Assistant Professor of French Language and Literature 

Oliver Waterman Larkin, A.M Assistant Professor of Art 

Howard Augustus Meyerhoff, A.M Assistant Professor of Geology 

Marie Milliette Assistant Professor of Music 

Katherine Pardee, A.B., M.D. ............ Assistant Physician 

Postley Sinclair ............. Assistant Professor of Music 



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Lucy Lord Barrangon, A.M 

Vera Marie Cushce, M.S. 
Anacleta Candida Vezzetti 
Sara Bache-Wiig, M.S. 
Dorothy Louise Merchant, . 
Abby Snow Belden, A.H. 
Ruth Wendell Cooper, A.H 
Kdith Harrison Morrill, A 
Newton Arvin, A.M. 
Frances Hotkin, A.M. . 
Eleanor Clifton, A.li. . 
Clayton M. Hall, Ph.D. 
Margaret Kincaid Bishop. 
Frances C. Mclnnes, A.li. 
Adela M. Pond, A.li. . 
(Catherine Wendell Townse 
Dorcas Brigham, A.H. 
E. Frances Stilwell, A.M. 
babel F. Smith. Ph.D. 
Madelein Guilloton, Liccnc 
Marian Rubins, A.M. . 
Harriet Howe, A.li. 
Vera A. Sickels, U.S. . 
Mary Evelyn Clark, M.A. 
Elizabeth Virginia Nagy, 
Marion Downey, A.li. . 
Leona C. (label. A.li. . 
Dora Neill Raymond, I'h.L 
Helen J. I'eirce, A.B. 
Margaret H. Peoples, A.M. 
Isabel Westeott Harper, A.l 
Helen Frances Small, A.H. 
Helen E. Howarth, A.li. 
Harriet F Clover . 
Ruth M. Agnew, M.A. . 
Eileen li. Hughes, B.A. 
Arnold Richard Janser 
Louise Kingsley, A.H. . 
Lois T. S locum, A.H. . 

Heat rice Newhall, A.H., li.! 

Edith Burnett, U.S. 

Constance Pauline Hurt, A. 
Ralph de Someri Child*. A 

.lane (). Dorscy, A.M. . 

Pierre de L. Dupont, I',, eg 
Bess M. Eversull, Ph.D. 
Natalie M. Gilford, M.Ed. 
Ruth M. Home. M.A. . 
Vera Koehrlng, A.M. . 
Marine Leland, A.H. 

II:. /.el Marie l.,,sh. Ph.D. 

Ruth E Spence, A.H. . 

Ruth H. Willian, A.li. 
Rosie Nelson, A.li. 
Doris Sllbert, A.H. 
Dorothy A Hunt. A.H. 
Marie H. Bralnerd, A.B 
Virginia White Jamei \ I 
Elizabeth Kimball, A.M. 
Elizabeth Bhand Allison, a 
Gertrude Leary 
Ethel Louise Lyman 

Dor,, thy Wolff DoUgblS, A.I 
Marian li. King 

Rebt eca I .e\ i'i 
Francis Powell 
George Dahl Ph.D. 



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Instructor in the History of Art 

Instructor in Astronomy 

Instructor in Italian Language and Literature 

. Instructor in Botany 

Instructor in Geology 

nstructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 

Instructor in Spoken English 

nstructor in English Language and Literature 

nstructor in English Language and Literature 

Instructor in Psychology 

nstructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 

nstructor in Latin Language and Literature 

Instructor in Psychology 

nstructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 

Instructor in Geology 

nstructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 

Instructor in Botany 

. Instructor in Zoology 

. Instructor in Geology 

nstructor in French Language and Literature 

Instructor in Economics and Sociology 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Instructor in Spoken English 

Instructor in Philosophy 

Instructor in Philosophy 

Instructor in Physics 

Instructor in History 

Instructor in History 

itructor in Spanish Language and Literature 

Instructor in French 

. Instructor in Zoology 

. Instructor in Zoology 

Instructor in Astronomy 

nstructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 

nstructor in English Language and Literature 

nstructor in English Language and Literature 

Instructor in Music 

Instructor in Geology 

Instructor in Astronomy 
nstructor in Spanish Language and Literature 

nstructor in Hygiene and Physical Education 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Instructor in Spoken I 

Instructor in Spoken English 
nstructor in French Language and Literature 

Instructor in Mathematics 

nstructor in Greek Language anil Literature 

Instructor in Economics and Sociology 

. Instructor in Zoology 

nstructor in French language and Literature 

Instructor in Astronomy 

Instructor in Psychology 

Instructor in Music 

Assistant in (,. 

Assistant in Music 
Assistant in / 
Assistant in Psychology 
\ i ':.nt in Bducat 1011 
Museum Assistant 

Curator il \ 

Secretary to the Department ol 
Librarian in tin Department ol 

Reader ill Economics and BOCiolog) 

Secretarial Assistant In Psycholog) 

. Secretarial Assistant In Psycholog) 

Lecturer in Spoken English 

\ | ii |na Profeasoi of Biblical Literature 



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Suzanne D. Ackerman 

1010 Grand Avenue 
Asbury Park. N. J. 



Priscilla H. Alden 

11 Newbury Street 
Brockton, Mass. 





Agnes Hope Adams 

5 Cross Street 
Medford, Mass. 



S. Elizabeth Allen 

3 Clifton Avenue 
Salem. Mass. 





Dorothy Albeck 

76 Warrington Place 
East Orange. N. J. 



Dorothy S. Allott 

215 East 62nd Street 
New York City 




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Jane G. Anawalt 

1201 North Topeka Avenue 
Wichita, Kansas 



Impi Arvo 

93 Pine Street 
Gardner, Mass. 





Hilda H. Anderson 

1513 Druid Hill Avenue 
Baltimore, Md. 



Eugenia V. Asmann 

17 Alameda Apts. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 





Marcaret Arnstein 

Dobbi Ferry, N. Y. 



Katherine L. Atwater 

10 Oakwood Itvantu 

i |.p. i htontclair, N. J. 




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Adelaide Avery 

1150 Northampton Road 
Holyoke, Mass. 



Carol L. Baker 

970 Elm Street 
New Haven, Conn. 





Phyllis Bagg 

840 Riverdale 

West Springfield, Mass. 



Helen U. Baker 

Greenwich, New York 





Ruth W. Bagley 

Westport, Conn. 



Jane H. Baker 

97 Maple Place 
Dedham, Mass. 




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Vera A. Baker 

Oneonta, N. Y. 



Elizabeth R. Barrett 

Dutch Riclk-.- Road 

Beaver, Pa. 





Lucy Barnard 

Rochelle Park 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 



Mary S. Barry 
1G40 Chicago Avenue 

Evanston, III 





Margaret Barnes 
818 Cherry Street 
Saginaw, Mich. 



M MtiK Louise Barstow 

■jiit Ba] sir. . i 
Springfield, Mi 




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Alice Batchelder 

11 Massachusetts Avenue 
Worcester, Mass. 



Elizabeth C. Beadle 

1312 Park Avenue 
Baltimore, Md. 





Christine E. Baumann 

279 Linden Street 
Winnetka, III. 



Caroline D. Bear 

Wilmington, N. C. 





Geraldine B. Beach 

1577 Wyoming Avenue 
Wilkes Barre, Pa. 



Caroline C. Bedell 

435 Wyckoff Avenue 
Ithaca, N. Y. 




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Rebecca Almeda Beeman 

Chittenanco, N. Y. 



Susan Silliman Bennett 

76 Evcrit Street 
New Haven, Conn. 





Helen May Benedict 

149 Fifth Avenue 
Roselle, N. J. 



Jeanette Ruth Berman 

574 Elm Street 
New Haven. Conn. 





Alice Bennett 
147 Willow Btreel 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



\1 \m Hi Kin m \n 
801 Lincoln Awenua 

Chftl lii'ul. I':i. 




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Grace Hirsch Bickart 

6 Hobson Street 
Stamford, Conn. 



Eunice Putnam Blake 

c/o A. W. Putnam 

18 Tremont Street 

Boston, Mass. 





Catherine C. Bissell 

629 South Main Street 
Geneva, N. Y. 



Bettina Blodgett 

57 Walnut Street 
Framingham, Mass. 





Catherine Blake 

"Olde Fieldstone" 
Weston, Mass. 



Virginia Hahn Blunt 

240 Ashmont Street 
Boston, Mass. 




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Frances Bolton 

61 Division Street 
New Haven, Conn. 



Doris Ruberta Booth 

63 Stratfield Road 
Bridgeport, Conn. 





Marion Bond 

Hraintree, Mass. 



Helen Booth 

188 Gibbs Street 
Newton Center, Mass. 





Marjokie Helen Boomer 

15 Hewlett Street 
Waterbury, Conn. 



FRANCE8E Rai BOI HFKl.n 

Swrrl ltri.il I 

Harvard, 




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Clarice Gertrude Bowers 

130 Euclid Avenue 
Waterbury, Conn. 



Margaret Stewart Bradley 

850 Lincoln Way E. 
Mishawaka, Ind. 





Caroline Ava Boyer 

84 Elm Street 
Waterville, Me. 



Kathf.rine Cunneen Brady 

547 Highland Avenue 
Fall River, Mass. 





Lois Marjorie Boynton 

Pine Orchard, Conn. 



Leila Dyckman Brady 

29 Fielding Court 
South Orange, N. J. 




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Lucy Eleanor Briggs 

Riverdale-on- Hudson 



New York City 



Margaret Wood Brinton 

414 South Carlisle Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 





Lydia Brigham 

7X Bowdoil) Street 

Springfield, Mass. 



Elizabeth H. Brodex 

820 Suffolk Street 

Baltimore, Mil. 





Dorothy Morse Brimicombe 

1840E Lake Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Makv Elizabeth Brower 

887 Baal Main Btreel 
Uloomaburg, Pa 




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Anne Kruesi Brown 

3 Glenwood Boulevard 
Schenectady, N. Y. 



Katherine Brownell 

618 West 187th Street 
New York City 





Elizabeth Chapman Brown 

76 Florida Street 
Springfield, Mass. 



Isobel Ramsey Buckley 

112 Montague Street 
Brooklyn. N. Y. 





Priscilla Scott Brown 

56 Beaver Road 
Sew'ckley, Pa. 



Mildred Buffington 

1908 Humboldt Avenue S. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 




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a 



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LT 




Ruth Bugbee 

31 Oak Grove Avenue 
Springfield, Mass. 



Anne Edith Burgess 

286 Suffolk Street 
Holyoke. 





Katherine Anna Bulkley 

530 Skokie Road 
Glencoe, III. 



Ida Jarvis Burgess 

2300 Wetherbee Street 
Fort Worth, T< 





Eleanor Harriet Burckhardt 

130 Kinsey Avenue 

Mt. Auburn, Cincinnati, oliii> 



Doris Gene> d \i Bi sua 

117 Summer Street 
Barre, \ I 




n 



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39 



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Margaret Elizabeth Burn ham 

Falmouth Foreside 
Portland, Me. 



Catherine Seymour Calhoun 

50 Forest Street 
Hartford, Conn. 





Elsie McColm Butler 

242 State Street 
Flushing-, L. I. 



Margaret Glynn Callahan 

4816 Kenwood Avenue 
Chicago, 111. 





Mabel Cahoon 

612 North Kentucky Avenue 
Roswell, N. M. 



Josephine Florence Cannon 

2235 Harcourt Drive 
Cleveland, Ohio 




n 



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40 



n 



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n 



LT 




Eleanor Folsom Carr 

Swan Road 
Winchester, Mass. 



Betty Charls 

232 19th Street N. W. 
Canton, Ohio 





Margery Cary 

Richfield Springs, N. Y. 



Edna Marie Charlton 

28 Sagamore Road 

lironxvillc, N. Y. 





Sarah Evelyn Chandler 

ro Sooih Park Boulevard 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Josephine Chovey 

Madison. N. J, 




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Barbara Ellen Churchill 

247 Adams Street 
Milton, Mass. 



Katiierine Ellen Clarkson 

237 Lexington Avenue 
Passaic, N. J. 





Eunice Ellen Clapp 

755 Whitney Avenue 
New Haven, Conn. 



Betty Louise Coates 

Center Street 
Fairfield, Conn. 





Gladys Clark 

4 Morgan Terrace 
New Bedford, Mass. 



Carolyn A. S. Cochran 

234 Loma Drive 
Los Angeles, Cal. 




n 



a 



42 



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D 



LT 




Cornelia Rogerson Cochrane 

88 Green Street 
Hudson, N. Y. 



Margaret Gerry Cook 

157 North Broad Street 
Trenton, N. J. 





Katherine Morgan Cogswell 

30 Davis Avenue 
Rockville, Conn. 



Mary Adah Coolidge 

2339 Delamere Drive 
Cleveland, Ohio 





Katherine Alice Connell 
29 Charlotte Street 
Dorchester, Mass. 



Esther Jeanbtte Coon 

Harwood Farms 
Kast Rochester, N. Y. 




n 



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Hi 



n~ 



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Alice Virginia Cooper 

150 East 93rd Street 
New York City 



Virginia Deighton Cosby 

8 Madison Street 



Westfield, Mass. 





Frances Alden Copeland 

205 Elm Street 
Northampton, Mass. 



Cheryl Aileen Crawford 

10G Hamilton Avenue 
Akron, Ohio 





Frances Lena Copp 

128 Trenton Street 
Pawtucket, R. I. 



Mary Elizabeth Crawford 

2105 Abington Road 
Cleveland, Ohio 




n 



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44 



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31 



LT 



n 



[J 




Helen Curtis 

16 Thornton Park 
Winthroji. Mass. 



Constance MacLeod Davidge 

1G3 Chapin Strict 
Iiiru»hamton, N. Y. 





Aire Osborne Curwen 

Villa Nova, Pa. 



Anna Elizabeth Davis 

Hotel Slu-lt in 
49th Street and Lexington Avenue 

New Y'ork City 





Anna Elizabeth Dai.i im.i r 
7 Linnaean Street 
Cambridge, Mass. 



Cornelia Harsi n Dean 



16 Beach tvenue 
Larchi '. N X 




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Margaret Dewey 

500 Groveland Avenue 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



Marian Donahue 

1852 Rosalind Avenue 
Cleveland, Ohio 





Elisabeth Carver Dilts 

12 Fairfield Street 
Montclair, N. J. 



Frances Sue Dorris 

c/o Ruth Fitzsimons 

1125 Maple Avenue 

Evanston, 111. 





Miriam Priscilla Dionne 

114 Palm Street 
Nashua, N. H. 



Anna Margaret Doyle 

193 Highland Street 
Worcester, Mass. 




n 



ol 



46 



n 



u 



u 



LT 




Florence Drake 

618 West 24th Street 
Kearney, Neb. 



Rose Marie Dyson 

33 Wheeler Street 
Winsted, Conn. 





Lillian Amelia Duberg 

Collinsville, Conn. 



Margaret Alexander Elliott 

Woodland Road 
Pittsburg, Pa. 





Dorothy Woodwobth Dunning 

East Park Avenue 
Vineland, N. J. 



Faith Newbrook Ki v 

874 Elmwood Avenue 

Buffalo. N. Y. 




n 



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17 



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1 1 ■ i ... ■..„■'...■ 



Helen Virginia Emery 

3 Stetson Street 
Lexington, Mass. 



Barbara Estabrook 

37 Beechcroft Road 
Newton. Mass. 





Justine Bulkley Entz 

14 Manhattan Avenue 
New Rochelle. N. Y. 



Elizabeth McBurney Eulass 

301 Silver Street 
Lebanon, Ohio 





Beatrice Esler 

795 East 8th Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Pauline Seavey Fairbanks 

5 Ohio Street 
Bangor, Me. 




n 



o. 



48 



n 



lt 



"D 



— i 




Hanna Faterson 



Elizabeth Fitzgerald 

5216 5th Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 





Louise Featherstone 

2106 Nebraska Street 
Sioux City, la. 



Elizabeth Alberta Flanagan 

249 West 11th Street 
New York City 





Merl Eugenia Fisk 

282 Dwisrhl Streel 
New Haven, Conn, 



Virginia FOLSOM 

11187 Elm 

Manchester, N. H. 




n 



Q 



19 



n 



ID 



CJ 



n 



n 




Margaret Ellsworth Foote 

Hotel Cairo 
Washington, D. C. 



Frances Stratton French 

Concord, Mass. 





Helen Alese Forbes 

76 Soldiers Place 



Buffalo, N. Y. 



Eleanor Hayes Fuller 

12 St. Paul Street 
Cambridge, Mass. 





Mary Foss 

220 Newbury Street 
Boston, Mass. 



Lavinia Minerva Fyke 

237 South Poplar Street 
Centralia, 111. 




n 



□_ 



50 



13 



CF 



n 



n 




Edith Goldsborough Gaff 

Moylan 

Delaware Co., Pa. 



Clarace Eaton Galt 

63 Vandevanter Place 
St. Louis, Mo. 





Sylvia Howard Gaines 

Clark Road 
Lynnfield, Mass. 



Alice Hartley Garlichs 

101 South 17th Street 
St. Joseph, Mo. 





Beatrice Gordon Gale 

5646 Kimbark Avenue 
ChicagOi 111. 



Helen Margaret Geiger 

608 North .1 sn-.-.-i 

i acoma, Wash. 




n 



n. 



.-.l 



13 



CT 



U 



LT 




Mary Foster Gerould 

36 Occom Ridge 
Hanover, N. H. 



Eleanor Gilchrist 

254 Broad Street 
Sewickley, Pa. 





Grace Gibson 

Cazenovia, N. Y. 



Dorothy Gile 

Hanover, N. H. 





Elizabeth Liscomb Gifford 

112 North Broadway 
Tarrytown, N. Y. 



Ethel Lillian Gillis 

61 Pelham Road 
Rochester, N. Y. 




n 



□. 



52 



"□ 



D 



D 



D~ 




Frieda Merrill Goodenough 

Ledyard, Conn. 



Elizabeth Kimball Gould 

18 Norwood Street 
Winchester, Mass. 





Dorothy Brooks Gordon 

IX Greendale Avenue 
Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 



Barbara Grant 

131 Lockwood Avenue 
New RocheUe. N. Y. 





Ruth Gordon 

2 Woodville Street 
Boston (19). Mass. 



Eleanor Moi'lton Grant 
■) Brmttla Road 
Syracuse, N. Y. 




n 



ol 






n 



lt 



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Kathleen Hall Grant 

816 South Main Street 
Geneva, N. Y. 



Marian Bernice Guild 

5218 Oak Street 
Kansas City, Mo. 





Janet Esperance Greenburgh 

718 West 178th Street 
New York City 



Marian Lois Hagler 

Lakota, N. D. 





Elizabeth Reeve Greenwood 

239 Cumberland Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Sarah Crockett Hague 

416 Commonwealth Avenue 
Boston, Mass. 




n 



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54 



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Eleanor Hall 

53 Highland Avenue 
Haverhill, Mass. 



Beulah Minerva Hanson 

219 Elm Street 
Northampton, Mass. 





Mary Elizabeth Hamilton 

1321 North Meridian Street 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



Doris Burnap Harmon 

Suffield, Conn. 





Ruth Avis Hamilton 
29 Wellington Streel 

Athol, M;jss. 



Martha Harper 

889 Liberty street 

Memlville. Pi 




_□ 



a 



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D 



IT 




Lucelia Clark Harrington 

Collinsville, Conn. 



Elizabeth K. Hartman 

132 28th Street 
Newport News, Va. 





Virginia Hart 

388 Hart Street 
New Britain, Conn. 



Helen Hartzell 

667 Downing Street 
Denver, Colo. 





Virginia Vennard Hart 

291 North River Road 
Manchester, N. H. 



Doris Lenfest Hassell 

Houlton, Me. 




n 



□_ 



56 



n 



US 



LT 



n 



IT 




Mayme Starr Hastings 

Tahlequah. Okla. 



Hilda Apthorpe Heath 

249 Chestnut Hill Avenue 
Brighton, Mass. 





Elizabeth Bartles Hawke 

111 Main Street 
Flemington, N. J. 



Mezella Margaret Heath 

108 PrOBpecl Street 

Warren. Pa. 





i: \ima Aubert Heap 
r>7ii WiBBahickon Avenue 
Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Marjorie Rosalie Hedw u i 

1907 Knox Avenue 

Minneapolis, Minn 




_□ 



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B7 



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n 



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Helen May Heffernan 

23 Maple Street 
Bristol, Conn. 



Frances E. Higginbotham 

5002 Swiss Avenue 
Dallas, Texas 





Ruth Hene 

2 Pinehurst Avenue 
New York City 



Elizabeth Newman Hildreth 

Southampton, N. Y. 





Cecelia Lisner Herstein 

3807 Park Heights Avenue 
Baltimore, Md. 



Doris Hill 

1139 Sheridan Road 
Evanston, 111. 




n 



□_ 



58 



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CT 



D 



[J 




Julia Potter Himmilsbach 

3X2 Elmwood Avenue 
Huffalo, N. Y. 



Helen Marshall Hitchcock 

41 Woodrow Street, West 
Hartford, Conn. 





Ruth Hirschman 

318 2nd Avenue 
Salt Lake City, Utah 



Gladys Margaret Holmes 

3 Stewart Avenue 
Sioux City. la. 





Constance Willyne Hirschy 

269 South Kirst Avenue 
K.-is! Duluth. Minn. 



Abbey Fuller Hooker 

Avon Road 
Schenectady, N. Y. 




n 



ol 






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TD 



LT 




Martha Hooker 

359 Pleasant Street 
Belmont, Mass. 



Kathryn Hourihan 

430 Lovell Street 
Worcester, Mass. 





Katherine Hough 

1331 Liberty Street 
Franklin, Pa. 



Martha Parsons Houser 

199 Marlborough Street 
Boston, Mass. 





Constance Houghton 

Arlington, Mass. 



Louise Hortense Hovde 

1917 Arlington Avenue 
Des Moines, la. 




n 



EL 



60 



u 



IT 



m 



LT 




Margaret Arabella Howard 

62 West Street 
Northampton, Mass. 



Eustis Hill Hundley 



645 Westover Road 
Kansas City, Mo. 





Hilda Lyman Hulbert 

202 Monument Street 
Groton, Conn. 



Virginia Hunt 

502 West Prairie Avenue 
Decatur, III. 





Katherine T. Humphries 

217 West Lafayette Avenue 
Baltimore, M<l. 



Josephini ii izbl Hurst 

506 Second Avenue 
Anbury Park, N. J 




n 



ol 



81 



13 



CT 



D 



LT 




JUDELLE MACGREGOR HUSTON 
Oaks-Cloister, Lehman Lane 
Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Kathryn James 

114 The Fenway 
Boston, Mass. 





Mary Bird Huston 

418 Hamilton Street 
Evanston, 111. 



Dorothy Vaughan Jealous 

18 Dean Road 
Brookline, Mass. 





Gertrude Anne Illing 

47 Cleveland Terrace 
East Orange, N. J. 



Caroline Schuyler Jenkins 

112 Waverley Place 
Schenectady, N. Y. 




n 



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62 



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Martha Haraden Jennings 

6012 Greene Street 
Germantown, Philadelphia, Pa. 



Helen Treadway Johnson 

Wellesley Street 
Weston, Mass. 





Helen Fairfield Jillson 

19 Montague Street 
Turners F'alls, Mass. 



Kathryn May Johnson 

122 Washington Street 
Maiden, Masi. 





Sara Elizabeth Jobson 
42 Forest Road 
Ridgewood, N. J. 



Catherine BUSHNELL Jones 

:iii Ledges Road 

Newton Center, Mass. 




n 



ol 



63 



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CT 



U 



IT 




Mary Joslin 

14 Wildwood Street 
Winchester, Mass. 




Babette Suzanne Kafka 

231 Canner Street 
New Haven, Conn. 



k 




| 






Elizabeth Judkins 

2576 Wellington Road 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Vieno Mary Kajander 

121 Depot Street 
Fitchburg, Mass. 





Alice Colby Judson 

1108 East 53rd Street 
Chicago, 111. 



Ruth Kayton 

De Renne Apartments 
Savannah, Ga. 




n 



□_ 



64 



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1< 



LT 



U 



CJ 




Miriam Estella Keck 

417 South Ridgeland Avenue 
Oak Park, 111. 



Marion Frances Kenney 

337 Laurel Street 
Hartford, Conn. 





Elizabeth Keith 

6421 Kentucky Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Edna Frederica Kiesewetter 

117-19 9th Avenue, 
College Point, L. I., N. Y. 





Elizabeth Dorsey Kennedy 

2945 Fairmont Boulevard 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Let a Kirk 

Garnett, Kan. 




n 



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Georgianna Kline 

2589 Euclid Boulevard 
Cleveland. Ohio 



Anne Heilig Kohler 

Catasauqua, Pa. 





Arline Emma Knight 

65 Washington Street 
Hudson, Mass. 



Elizabeth May Kreider 

Hill Farms 
Annville, Pa. 





Grania O'Malley Knott 

16 East 78th Street 
New York City 



Ruth Eleanor Krick 

1406 Nineteenth Avenue 
Altoona, Pa. 




n 



a 



66 



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cr 




Harriet Kuhn 

506 Prospect Place 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



Doris Adeline Latimer 

33 Farmington Avenue 
Waterbury, Conn. 





Elizabeth Barnum Lane 

27 Edgewood Street 
Hartford, Conn. 



Edna Lillian Laurin 

169 Park View Avenue 
Lowell, Mass. 





Harriet Page Lane 

22 ArlinKton Street 
Cambridge, Mass. 



Ej i INOR l'.i ii I. \w i HER 

rj;i> Loetul sii..t 

DubuqiUi la. 




n 



Q. 



67 



TJ 



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"D 



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Marion Brady Leonard 

382 Winthrop Avenue 
New Haven, Conn. 



Dorothy Elaine Libaire 

400 West 151st Street 
New York City 





Anne Barbey Lewis 

112 East 73rd Street 
New York City 



Terice Janet Liebeskind 

10 West 84th Street 



New York City 



iA 




Isabel Jenkins Lewis 

c/o Clifford Lewis, Harts Hill 
Whiteboro, N. Y. 



Ruth Annette Lilly 

2123 West 20th Street 
Los Angeles, Cal. 




n 



Q 



68 



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lt 



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w 




Helen Burnham Lincoln 

124 Hillyer Street 
East Orange. N. J. 



Jessie Bross Lloyd 

455 Birch Street 
Winnetka, III. 





Margaret Stair Linley 

Azusa, Cal. 



Elinor Gerstley Loeb 

ir.io Oxford Street 

Philadelphia, I'a. 





Sally Linley 










Azusa. Cal. 










Elizabeth 


Bennett 


L 


ORING 




168 


Beacon 


Str.-rt 






Boat 


oil 


M 




n 



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69 



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LT 



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Helen Loomis Low 

Maplewood, N. J. 



Eleanor L yd all 

280 Main Street 
Manchester, Conn. 





Lillian Launcey Lowenthal 

350 Hearne Avenue 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



Carolyn Isabelle Lyle 

Palmetto Hotel 
Detroit, Mich. 





Eleanor Van Dusen Lucas 

4028 Walnut Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Harriet Martha McAvoy 

Phoenixville, Pa. 



lW 



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a 



70 



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lt 



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Ruth Elaine McBarron 

634 West End Avenue 
-N't W York City 



Elizabeth W. McClellan 

1 Orchard Street 
Andover, Mass. 





VIRGINIA LUCRETIA McCALMONT 
1504 Liberty Street 
Franklin, Pa. 



Genevieve McEldowney 

Bretton Hall 
New York City 





Merle Frances McCarthy 
88 Church Street 

North Adams, Muss. 



i.ci ise McGregor 

r. echmonl Park 

N.-w RocheUe, NY. 




n 



[a 



71 



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CT 



U 



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Bernice Marilla McIlhenny 

Wayne and Johnson Streets 
Germantown, Pa. 



Dorothy McKinnon 

25 Broad Street 
New York City 





Ruth Elizabeth McKeown 

23 Faxton Street 
Utica, N. Y. 



Ellen Francelia Macomber 

47 Lafayette Street 
St. Johnsbury, Vt. 





Mildred McKinley 

1117 Princeton Avenue 
Thornburg, Pa. 



Grace Miriam Magee 

Cairo, 111. 




n 



Q. 



72 



n 



n< 



LT 



T3 



CJ 




riELEN MAGUIRE 
17 Stratford Road 
Melrose, Mass. 



Louise Marion 

Shippan Point 
Stamford, Conn. 





Mary Elizabeth Mangan 

31 Bridge Street 
Northampton, Mass. 



Mary-Eleanor Marsh 

St. Paul's School 
Garden City, L. I., N. Y. 





Josephine Margaret Mannion 

111 Walker Street 
Concord, N. H. 



Anne FROTHINGHAM Mason 

:(1 Grace Court 

Brooklyn, N. V. 




n 



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Q 



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Eleanor Mason 

629 Sheridan Road 
Waukegan, 111. 



Frances Blanchard Means 

44 Forest Street 
Hartford, Conn. 





Esther Reed Mason 

Pawlet. Vt. 



Carolyn Melchers 

Owosso, Mich. 





Betty May 

373 Washington Street 
Boston Mass. 



Perchik Melik 

407 Marlborough Street 
Boston. Mass. 




n 



a 



74 



n 



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LT 




Florence Virginia Meling 

North Shore Hotel 
Evanston, III. 



Dorothy Canning Miller 
47 South Fullerton Avenue 

Montclair, N. J. 





Elisabeth Wightman Mellon 

401 North Negley Avenue 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Helen Sterling Moor 

2270 Glenwood Avenue 
Toledo. Ohio 





Doris Exilda Merriam 

121 River Streel 

lilackinton, Mass. 



iiki.en Frances Mob in 

ii, 82nd Avenue, N. 
Seattle, W 




n 



ol 






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CT 



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Florence Eloise Morford 

316-A Munroe Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Virginia Scott Mueller 

2344 Roxboro Road 
Cleveland, Ohio 





Elisabeth Reeve Morrow 

Englewood. N. J. 



Helen Jeannette Munz 

5 Rockwell Terrace 
Norwich, Conn. 





Annette Becket Morse 

11 Oxford Apartments 
Houston, Texas 



Dorothy Murfitt 

Milton Street 
Readville, Mass. 







n 



EL 



76 



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a 



n 



LT 




Agnes Murray 

58 Thorn Street 
Sewickley, Pa. 



Serena Olmstead Nii.es 

8 Abbott Street 
Nashua, N. H. 





Ruth Murray 

1718 LoRan Avenue 
Minneapolis. Minn. 



Ruth Edwards Norton 

507 Ashland Avenue 
Buffalo. N. Y. 





Nora Catherine Nelson 

llio South nth Street 
Si. Joseph, Mo. 



Dorothy O'Bru n 

1012 Seminole Avenue 

Detroit, Mi. ii 




n 



ol 



77 



n 



CT 



D 



cr 




Mary Elizabeth O'Donnell 

103 Crescent Street 
Northampton, Mass. 



Mary Octavia Orlady 

Jamestown, N. D. 





Lillian E 


MMA 


O'Leary 


4331 Drexel 


Boulevard 


Chicago, III. 




Esther Page 

22 Everett Avenue 
Winchester, Mass. 





Dorothy Ordway 

371 Main Street 
Winchester, Mass. 



Pauline Stevens Page 

7212 Thomas Boulevard 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 




n 



a 



78 



~u 



m 



LT 



"D 



d 




Alice Helen Paine 

81 Carroll Street 
New liedford. Mass. 



Elizabeth Parkhurst 

Tlfi 21st Street. A 
Moline, III. 





Margaret Elizabeth Pantzer 

2025 North 6th Street 
Sheboygan, Wis. 



Marjorie Ethel Parsons 

488 Madison Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 





Louva Brockway Parker 
Centerbrook, Conn. 



Dorothy Comfort PARTRIDGE 

l l^'i Ashland Avenue 

St. Paul. Minn. 




n 



nl 



T9 



n 



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Helen Andrew Patch 

31 Eastern Point Road 
Gloucester, Mass. 



Elizabeth Watt Paul 

31 Garfield Avenue 
Carbondale, Pa. 





Lucille May Patten 

225 Upham Street 
Melrose. Mass. 



Marjorie Cynthia Peabody 

71 Charles Street 
Fitehburg, Mass. 





Elizabeth Ann Patterson 

2915 Washington Boulevard 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



Vivian Stearns Peeling 

Bourne, Mass. 




n 



a 



80 



n 



Si 



CJ 



n 



— i 

u 




Rebecca Weaver Petrikin 

1137 New Street 



Bethlehem, Pa. 




Dorothy Pickard 

214 Greenwood Boulevard 
Evanston, 111. 





Katherine Mary Phealan 

110 Maple Street 
Athol. Mass. 



Elizabeth Rogers Poole 

South Shore Country Club 
Chicago, III. 





Cbcile Octavia Phillips 

L8 East :)7th Street 
New York City 



Eleanor Frances Pote 
80 Spruce Streel 
Portland, M> 




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Olive Elizabeth Potter 

Forestville, Conn. 




Irene Anna Rachdorf 

307 Ashland Street 
North Adams, Mass. 





Evelyn Priscilla Preis 

225 West 86th Street 
New York City 



Mary Elizabeth Ramsey 

Atchison, Kan. 





Barbara Bulkeley Priest 

Littleton, Mass. 



Marjorie Rankin 

34 Carruth Street 
Dorchester, Mass. 




n 



Q 



82 






n 



13 



D 



D 




Cornelia Ethel Ranney 

3016 Chadburne Road 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Marguerite Mary Rebboli 

7 Glendale Street 
Worcester, Mass. 





Marion Morrell Rauers 

201 East 37th Street 
Savannah, Ga. 



Mary Elizabeth Reiber 

351 North Main Street 
Butler, Pa. 





Agnes Reagan 

Schenectady, N. Y. 



Hi i.f.n Paine Reinh i 

•j^n Fairgreen Avenue 
youngatown, ohm 




n 



ol 






n 



Hi 



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Frances Resnik 

131 Oakland Street 
Springfield, Mass. 



Helen Rice 

834 West 7th Street 
Plainfield, N. J. 





Mary Quarters Rhodes 

6101 Jackson Street 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Madeleine Winsor Rice 



621 Summer Street 
Manchester, N. H. 





Elizabeth Griffiths Rice 

P2 Gates Avenue 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Muriel Rich 

17 Harley Street 
Boston (24), Mass. 




_□ 



Q 



84 



"□ 



CT 



"D 



CJ 




Elsie Goodrich Riley 

22 Jewett Street 
Northampton, Mass. 



Margaret Robinson 

713 Centre Street 
Bethlehem. Pa. 







Elizabeth Anne Robinson 

c/o Detroit Golf Club, 
Detroit, Mich. 



Virginia Robinson 

818 Riverside Avenue 
Evansville. I ml. 





Elinor Blake Robinson 
18 Forest Avenue 
Cranford, N. J. 



Ellen .Josephine ROGERS 

lMh Naval District 

Balboa. Canal Zone 




n 



ol 






"□ 



a 



D 



LT 




Marie Agnes Rolland 

2305 Genesee Street 
Utica, N. Y. 



Marie Rose 

272 West 90th Street 
New York City 





May Gillespie Rommel 

4601 North Broad Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Gladys Herrick Ross 

Parmley Apartments 
Summit, N. J. 





Catherine Ann Rose 

2471 West 41st Street 
Cleveland, Ohio 



Mary James Rossen 

132 Lorraine Avenue 
Upper Montclair, N. J. 




n 



Q 






86 



"□ 



CT 



D 



LT 




Muriel Barbara Rothschild 

15 East 72nd Street 
New York City 



Eleanor de Forest Rust 

417 West 120th Street 
New York City 





Zella Ruth Ruslander 

41 St. James Place 
Buffalo, N. Y. 



r I 



Alice Welsh Sailer 

1718 Spruce Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 





Nell Ford Russell 

Hotel Willard, 252 West 70th Street 
New York City 



Sylvia Agnes scakamki.i.i 

21ii Ifontrosa Avenue 
Rutherford, N. .). 







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Georgiana Bishop Schaub 

748 West North Street 
Decatur, 111. 



Margaret Grey Scott 

144 Greenwood Boulevard 
Evanston, 111. 





Marie-Louise Schmauk 

275 East 15th Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Emilie Sears 

Webster, Mass. 





Jeannette Barbara Scott 

54 Fanshaw Avenue 
Yonkers, N. Y. 



Katherine Sears 

15 Circuit Road 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 




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Mary Ferguson Sebring 

11k West Linn Street 
Bellefonte, Pa. 



Lenore Seymour 

121 Virginia Avenue 
St. Paul, Minn. 





Ruth Seinfel 

1535 President Street 
Brooklyn. Mass. 



Wilma L. Shannon 

234 Canterbury Road 
Rochester. N. Y. 





Josephine Setze 

••The HUl" 
Augusta, Ga. 



Olive Gertrude Sharret 

50 I l.tt (i.-l.l Place 

Richmond, N. Y. 




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Katherine Edwards Sheldon 

18 West Walton Place 
Chicago, 111. 



Helene Marie Shincel 

327 East Main Street 
Waterbury, Conn. 





Ethel May Sherman 

152 Spruce Street 
Turlington. Vt. 



Jane Howe Shoemaker 

Route 9 

Bridgeton, N. J. 





Catherine Bevans Shimer 

7 Linden Place 
Warwick, N. Y. 



Edith Showers 

122 East 4th Street 
Corning, N. Y. 




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Sophie Shulman 

91 Warrenton Avenue 
Hartford, Conn. 



Lillian Rosalind Silver 

132 Mansfield Street 
Hartford, Conn. 





Lucille Shyev 

450 Audubon Avenue 
New York City 



Mary Carter Sloan 

5545 PershinK Avenue 
St. Louis, Mo. 





Erna Pauline Sik.veks 

us Long Hill Street 
Springfield, Mass. 



\i ..I si a llu \nm;iit Smith 

\... ili Downing Street 

Piqua, Ohio 




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Charlotte Rutherford Smith 

Palisado Avenue 
Windsor, Conn. 



Helen Hungerford Smith 

75 Brunswick Street 
Rochester, N. Y. 





Clara Nye Smith 

56 Fairmont Avenue 
Newton, Mass. 



Lois Katherine Smith 

17 Myrtle Avenue 
Troy, N. Y. 





Dorothy Brewster Smith 

710 Bluff Street 
Glencoe, 111. 



Shirley Smith 

216 Avenue A 
Bayonne. N. J. 




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Margaret Sparhawk 

335 South Union Street 
Burlington, Vt. 



Dorothea Isabelle Spieth 

3390 Ingleside Road 
Cleveland, Ohio 





Helen Gertrude Sparks 
1216 Elizabeth Boulevard 
Fori Worth, Texas 



Muriel Stevenson 

434 Lafayette Street 

New York City 





Catherine Louise Spkm i r 

606 Franklin Avenue 
Ridgewood, N. J. 



Alice Lbnor \ S toweli 

Elmira, N 1 




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Jeannette Strodthoff 

309 South Oxford Avenue 
Los Angeles, Cat. 



Margaret Stxjrges 

476 West 143rd Street 
New York City 





Beatrice Gertrude Stuart 

551 West 157th Street 
New York City 



Dorothy Lancaster Tait 

Northvale, N. J. 





Eleanor Dow Stubbs 

510 Center Street 
Newton, Mass. 



Eunice Pauline Tait 

6 Maplewood Terrace 
Springfield, Mass. 




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Kathryn Taylor 

520 Hamilton Road 
South Orange, N. J. 



Virginia Boyer Thieme 

816 West Berry Street 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 





Rose Ida Teitz 

11 Powell Avenue 
Newport, R. I. 



Kathleen Tildsley 

Spuyten Duyvil 
New York City 





Nancy Mepora Templeton 
•171 Willow Street 
Waterbury, Conn. 



Joskphine Hancock Tompkins 

- i" 28th Street, N.W. 

Washington, l>. C. 




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Elizabeth Towle 

151 Salisbury Road 
Brookline, Mass. 



Edith Mary Trussell 

Newtonville, Mass. 





Ruth Estelle Townsend 

1464 Cohassett Avenue 
Lakewood, Ohio 



Marion Chatterley Turner 

600 East 19th Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 





Irene Abigail Trafford 

15 Belleclair Avenue 
Longmeadow, Mass. 



Gwendolyn Underhill 

45 Monadnock Road 
Chestnut Hill, Mass. 




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Natalie V. Van Ulm 

L26 Clark Road 
Hrookline. Mass. 



Elizabeth Crandall Wales 

162 Cedar Street 
Emilewood, N. J. 





Carolyn Van der Veer 

North Branch, N. J. 



Dorothea Eunice Walker 

138 Willow Street 
Walerbury, Coon. 





Louise Torrey Van Voast 

mi Hank in Avenue 
Schenectady, N. V. 



M \i;\ Louise W u i ici 

809 North Elnwood Avenue 
Oak Park, III 




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Anna Teresa Walsh 

70 Hubbard Street 
Middletown, Conn. 



Jeanette D. B. Walton 

Ventnor, N. J. 





Isabella Woods Walsh 

12 Valentine Street 
West Newton, Mass. 



Elizabeth M. Wanamaker 

172 Mason Street 
Greenwich, Conn. 





Constance Clara Walter 

405 Palace Avenue 
Santa Fe. N. M. 



Elizabeth Walcott Ward 

127 Centre Street 

Milton, Mass. 




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Katherine Julia Warren 

Hotel Georgian Terrace 
Atlanta, Ga. 



Frances Lord West 

43 South St. Albans Street 
St. Paul, Minn. 





Elizabeth Watson 

(i">l 14th Avenue 
Paterson, N. J. 



Katherine Westbrook 

1145 Dean Street 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 





Elizabeth Georgia Webb 

600 North Euclid Avenue 
Oak Park, III. 



Dorothy Elizabeth Westfall 

rlubbard'a Lane 

Wheeling. W. Va. 




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Charlotte Amelia Wetherell 

216 Eighth Street 
Providence, R. I. 



Anne Harriet Whyte 

218 North James Street 
Rome, N. Y. 





Eunice Wheeler 

12 Chestnut Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Janet Elizabeth Wilcox 

24 Summit Avenue 
North Adams, Mass. 





Katherine Dey Whitney 

48 Forest Street 
Hartford, Conn. 



Clara Knyphen Williams 

3 Cherry Heights 
Lyons, N. Y. 




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Elizabkth T. Williams 

SB Fair Oaks Park 
Needham. Mass. 



Mildred Foshay Williams 

7 Clinton Avenue 
Maplewood, N. J. 





Elizabeth Torrey Williams 

Barre, Mass. 



Virginia Neeb Williams 

East Aurora, N. Y. 





Lucy Half. Williams 
:iii Norfolk Road 
Chestnut Hill. Mass. 



Frances Charloi i e Wn son 

Buena Vista Road 
Santa F<-, N. M. 




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Carrie Ernestine Wiltse 

808 James Street 
Syracuse, N. Y. 



Muriel Wise 

1950 Commenwealth Avenue 
Brighton, Mass. 





Dorothy Chaffee Winslow 

59 Hebron Street 
Hartford, Conn. 



Isabel Wisner 

Beaver Road 
Sewickley, Pa. 





Jean Gregg Wise 

215 Sargent Avenue 
Joplin, Mo. 



Lettie Robinson Witherspoon 

1355 Third Street 
Louisville, Ky. 




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Nancy Woehnert 

132 Park Street 
liuffalo, N. Y. 



Bernice Helen Wright 

634 Campbell Avenue 
Long Branch, N. J. 





Dorothy Whiting Woodruff 

Orange, Conn. 



Mary Boardman Wright 

IITj Midland Avenue 
St. Davids. Pa. 





Linda Woodworth 

26 Norfolk Road 
Arlington. Mass. 



Rosalind Wright 
237 East Delaware Place 

Chicago, 111 




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Hazel Sara Writer 

7 Geneva Street 
Worcester, Mass. 



Helen Phillips Wulbern 

49 South Battery 
Charleston, S. C. 




3n jlfemnrtam 

iSutl| Suttball 



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ifarmer MtmbnB 



Madeleine Abbott 
Ruth Adams 
Helen Spencer Allen 
Marian Mead Allen 
Elizabeth Converse Anable 
Frances McNeil Angier 
Charlotte Ashworth 
Virginia Babbitt 
Marion Ellen Ball 
Lucy Bartlett 
Ruth Bates 

Florieda Burton Batson 
Priscilla Alden Beach 
Helen Frances Bennett 
Josephine Marie Benz 
Gertrude Kemper Best 
Gladys Jane Bidwell 
Josephine Bigger 
Henrietta Bingham 
Elizabeth Blaisdell 
Elizabeth Marie Boeckeler 
Mary Townsend Bradley 
Mary Teresa Brega 
Gratia Constance Britcher 
Madeline Louise Broderick 
Eula Elizabeth Brown 
Dorothy Taylor Bruce 
Emily Thecla Brumder 
Miriam Lois Burdett 
Lucy Lloyd Burkam 
Dorothy Duffield Burnham 
Margaret Burr 
Kathryn Butters 
Ray Beatrice Calvert 
Helen Myrtle Carpenter 
Helen Ethelynd Chandler 
Frances Eloise Chapman 
Catherine Elizabeth Chipman 
Geraldine Clark 
Virginia Murray Cobb 
Lois Bigelow Cochran 
Helen Crosby 
Eugenie Crosby 
Marie Isabel Crosier 
Dorothy Bailey Crouse 
Dorothy Susan Cullen 
Marie Constance Curran 
Gertrude Cuscaden 
Dorothy Damon 
Isabel Olive Davenport 
Darthea Davis 
Margaret Day 
Mary Deal 
Laura Dean 

Nancy Hume Derr 
Mary Frances Dickson 

Roxane Hedwig DisseJ 
Martha Alice Dorman 
Dorothy Edna Dreyfus 

Doris Martha Dudley 



Doris Dunning 
Mary Willis Dyer 
Helen Bigelow Emery 
Winifred Glidden Evans 
Bern ice Lewis Faunce 
Florence Elizabeth Forth 
Dorothy Jane Frank 
Dorothy Alberta Fuller 
Mary Virginia Gable 
Mary Louise Gasser 
Helen Thornton Geer 
Evelyn Louise Gildersleeve 
Elizabeth Irene Goody 
Dorothy Gray 
Ruth Margaret Griffin 
Helvie Elina Haahti 
Helen Hahn 
Katharine Hall 
Virginia Wright Hall 
Margaret Sidford Hamp 
Hester Hanson 
Jeannette Bell Harris 
Frances Montana Harvey 
Grace Hazeltine 
Eleanor Hedges 
Sarah Josephine Hellen 
Helen Frances Henry 
Lucy Fitzhugh Hoblitzelle 
Margaret Hoffman 
Elizabeth Louise Hoiles 
Sabra Wyman Hood 
Marcelle Dewitt Hull 
Grace Hurewitz 
Lucille Malvina Israel 
Evelyn Pearl Johnson 
Florrella Beatie Johnson 
Henrietta Johnson 
Katherine Barbara Johnson 
Eleanor Reed Kambour 
Gertrude Kendig 
Juliet Kind 

Elinor Stannard Knothe 
Anne Lockwood Lackey 
Elizabeth Lane 
Margaret Louise Laney 
Dorothea Edith Lazear 
Katharine Ege Lee 
Lucille Levy 
Rachel Lothrop 
Naomi Lucretia Loucks 
Mary-Eleanor MacBurney 
Mildred McDonald 
Dorothy Knowlton Mclntyre 
(Catharine Gilman MacKenty 

Margaret Tennant McMillan 

lla/.el Alexandria MacPhail 
Evelyn Florence Maffitt 
Marie Caroline Major 
Giovanna Mancini 
Charlotte Eleanor Mason 



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Hilda Clara Max 

Frances Elizabeth Mead 

Frances Jeanetta Milburn 

Paulina Clara Miller 

Elisabeth Frederica Millett 

Harriett Whitney Mirick 

Margaret Elizabeth Mitchell 

Gertrude Montgomery 

Martha Hamilton Montgomery 

Frances Gladys Morton 

Katherine Mott 

Isabel Bedell Munroe 

Caroline Newman 

Virginia Fearn Newman 

Lillian Jeannette Niman 

Althea Noble 

Lucia Potter Nowell 

Alma Elizabeth O'Brien 

Helen Bruce Page 

Emma Conant Payson 

Mayzie-Wills Penn 

Gladys Russell Peters 

Eleanor Poppenhusen 

Helen Malcolm Pratt 

Laura Gardner Provost 

Evelyn Bird Queen 

Sarah Katherine Ramsey 

Helen Elizabeth Redding 

Annabel Reid 

Marcelline Reyburn 

Mary Reynolds 

Edah Esther Rhodes 

Mary Belle Risley 

Mary Ritchie 

Jeanne Marget Robeson 

Frank Elizabeth Robinson 

Amy Stuart Roe 

Alma Xcelsiore Rosen 

Augusta Rosenthal 

Helen Jean Ross 

Verna Mary Ross 

Lillian Carolyn Rulnick 



Elizabeth Tyson Russell 
Helen Burseley Sargent 
Irene Louise Schmidt 
Katrina Roosevelt Schuyler 
Florence Selman 
Hester Tinslow Shelden 
Emma Louise Shepherd 
{Caroline Elizabeth Simon 
Eleanor Randolph Smith 
Ethel Florence Smith 
Julia Edmonds Smith 
Maizie Bewley Smith 
Virginia Bland Sohlberg 
Sara Jane Spahr 
Miriam Lenore Spectorsky 
Ada Mildred Spencer 
Margaret Mansfield Sprout 
Constance Eleanor Stanley 
• Marjorie Edna Stenson 
Josephine Dorothy Stewart 
Sarah Helen Streeter 
Elizabeth Grace Strong- 
Emily MacKenzie Sturges 
Katheryn Talbot 
Ruth Edwards Tester 
Alice Elizabeth Thompson 
Constance Thompson 
Janet Isobel Thomson 
Katherine Van Wagenen Trowbridge 
Helen Agnes Tullock 
Marian Aline Van Vleck 
Mary Eloise Vilas 
Anne Townsend Walden 
Harriet Pittman Walker 
Marion Wallace 
Sidonia Wallis 
Margaret Munson Ward 
Helen Amy Waterhouse 
Jessie Bennett Williams 
Maidee Sara Williams 
Edith Louisa Wilson 
Frances Wood 



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HELEN SARGENT 



ELIZABETH WEBB 



Officers 

Class President 
* Helen Sargent 
Elizabeth Webb 

Vice-President 
Elizabeth Webb 

Secretary 
Jean Wise 

Treasurer- 
Elizabeth Ward 

Song Leader 
Lavinia Fyke 

Assistant Song Leader 
Ruth Tester 



Chairmen of Committees 

Ring and Pin 
Elizabeth Russell 

Motto 
Judelle Huston 

Rally Day 

Decorations 
Isabella Walsh 

Ribbons 
Martha Houser 

Class Color 
Yellow 

Class Animal 
Caterpillar 



: Resigned 



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(Class ijtBtflry— iftrrBljman |[ear 

Modesty is one of the numerous virtues of 1925, but not even it can prevent 
us from admitting that we were distinguished from the beginning. In a material 
way, we were the largest class that had ever entered by examination. And in a 
spiritual way, we were, if not the freshest freshmen in the history of the college, 
at least remarkable for our pep. As for adapting ourselves, we really did it 
beautifully, after the initial sinking feeling at the sight of our roommate and the 
house. From the morning of that first crowded chapel, with the President's kind 
and twinkling welcome, we knew that we should like college. Of course, there 
were ordeals still ahead of us. The doctor's office stabbed us, by way of welcome, 
and a certain new instructor, whose dignity was only exceeded by his youth, took 
brutish delight in telling us that our native tongue was unintelligible to the culti- 
vated English-speaking world. At Frolic we almost ruined a perfectly good pair 
of shoes getting on an intimate footing with some two thousand girls we had 
never met before and should not know when we met again. But we were thrilled 
at the number of "celebs" who had scribbled their nicknames on our cards; and 
when the annual Glee Club song told us our only fault was not making enough 
mistakes, we felt that life was "positively too wonderful." 

In the meantime, education threaded its precarious way with us, beset on 
every side by bats, teas, movies, plays, and freshman parties. Entertained rather 
than disciplined, we took our turn at entertaining the upperclassmen when the 
whole five hundred and ninety-nine (with few exceptions) made fools of our- 
selves at song trials. 

Our first official action was the election of class officers, at a large and heated 
meeting in December. We hailed our off-campus president, as freshmen should: 
with unity, coherence, and emphasis, — even the Weekly speaks of "cheers now 
and then during the evening." 

Long papers came on, yet life seemed to us good, on the whole. Upperclass- 
men groaned about classes in Gill, — but what did we care? The jaunt from gym 
and back to Seelye simply developed our quadriceps femoris for hockey and bas- 
ketball, in which we took a vital interest. They also found the new cut rule diffi- 
cult. But we knew that we had eighteen cuts a semester, (or was it nine? 
perhaps twenty-seven) and that the authorities expected us to take three week- 
ends. So we did as we were expected and should even have exceeded their expec- 
tations if we had been properly encouraged. But what worried the upperclassmen 
most of all was the ten o'clock rule. And it did seem wrong that we should have 
to hide our lights, under a bushel or any other contraption. A mass meeting in 
December resulted in the discarding of the old rule that John had tried for thirty 
years to enforce, in favor of unlimited study, — (no games allowed, except soli- 
taire, and possibly chess with one's roommate). 

Having given ourselves this Christmas present, we were all in the mood for 
the season and welcomed the glistening snow and the dark blue afternoons, upon 
which the yellow lights of the shot) windows shone out so merrily, We loved the 
grinds, the full joyous vespers, and the serenading, especially our glimpse of 
President Seelye; and were surprised to find ourselves so moved by a Christmas 
denatured, with no Christmas Day, and no family. Our eagerness for the real 
thing grew to the bursting point, until in an ecstatic Frenzy we threw our belong- 
ings into a trunk and went HOME. 



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After vacation it was altogether different: a cold and stern necessity hung 
in the air, making us wish that we had listened sooner to the President's advice. 
Life was one darned book after another, — and sometimes sixty darned people 
after one book. Sophomore Carnival broke the monotony, but even that could not 
hide the approaching doom. We saw the handwriting on the wall — "I hereby 
pledge my word . . . " — knew that it was too late for mortal aid : the Judgment 
had come. And yet we had not been idle all semester : we had learned many 
things that they did not ask us for on the examinations, such as how to chant, 
the price of desks, when to send flowers, how often to clean saddle-strap shoes, 
the nature of the grotto, and of the Plaza balcony, the true value of a nickel, 
and the ulterior meanings of "rose-bud," "chrysanthemum" and "the Grecian 
Urn." All useless, alas, in the hour of trial! 

But not even mid-years can last forever, and soon we were celebrating the 
birth of Washington, in a way which would probably have surprised him not a 
little. The stunts were overpoweringly clever, especially the Spoken English 
take-off and the library operetta, in which beautiful music was fearfully and 
wonderfully joined to the immortal words, "Someone sneaked it out and never 
signed the card." Inspired by such genius, we became original and gave the 
first and only all-freshman party in recent college history, — festivities which 
included Betty Boomer's orchestra and clogging by Nancy Templeton. Mean- 
while, perceiving that we were still allowed to live after what we had done at 
mid-years, we went in for a perfect orgy of trying out, and were ready to begin 
on Alpha and Phi Kappa when vacation set in. After vacation, luckily, we were 
absorbed by our first real dance, "fussing Glee Club" in the old way, with the per- 
formance of Pinafore in the evening. Later, we had the excitement of "running" 
for our sister class at their much more important party, — but that is ahead of 
the story. The most startling feature of the spring was a mysterious booklet, 
which came out of nowhere to cast the first stone at our innocent freshman 
acceptance of college. Cassandra awed us by her audacity. 

We were not, however, likewise awed at the athletic ability of the upper- 
classmen, and proceeded to beat all our betters in hockey. How we had grown 
in importance, from the lost prep school seniors who had come to Smith in 

the fall! We were almost sophomores, capable 
of giving bats and teas, and of putting our 
friends to bed when it was good for them. We 
had our side of the rectangle at step-sings, and 
delighted every one with "Standing in the need 
of prayer." And only we could enjoy the sen- 
iors' singing with true aesthetic detachment. 

The weather was beautiful all spring, but 
the last weeks were hot, with honors for keep- 
ing them so divided between the sun and the 
faculty. Finally it was over, and the fun was 
just beginning, when the authorities sent us 
home. In this they acted ill-advisedly, for it is 
said Hamp would not be consoled, and the 
heavens wept for seven days and seven nights 
after we left. 

Jessie Bross Lloyd. 

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VIRGINIA McCALMONT 



Officers 

President 
Virginia McCalmont 

Vice-President 
Martha Houser 

Secretary 
Mary Wallace 

Treasurer 
Dorothy Dunning 

Song Leader 
Lavinia Fyke 

Assistant Song Leader 
Marjorie Boomer 



Chairmen of Committees 

Sophmore Carnival 

General Chairman, Mary Sloan 

Invitations, Ruth McBarron 

Music, Marjorie Boomer 

Entertainment, Martha Houser 

Refreshments, Lavinia Fyke 

Decorations, Elizabeth Webb 

Rally Day 

Stunt, Florence Meling 

Decorations, Frances Wilson 

Ribbons, Mary Reynolds * 

Frances French 

1923 Commencement 

Decorations, Frances Wilson 

Rose Committee, Margaret Hamp 

Push Committee, Miriam Keck 




MARTHA HOUSER 



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(ttlaas MtBtnnj— Suipljomore $ ?ar 

We were carefree young things in 1922, not yet broken by the seminars of 
senior year, nor hysterical over husband-hunting. Whatever criticisms were 
levelled at us we blithely waved aside with the excuse that, after all, we were 
passing through a trying transition period. That silenced our bitterest enemies. 
For in the spring the flapper had gone clean out of fashion, leaving us but a 
brief summer to acquire a necessary hauteur and charm. We must let down out- 
skirts and lower our voices and draw back our hair in the demure chignon of 
our grandmothers and fasten at least three buckles of our galoshes as an out- 
ward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace. After a losing struggle, 
cavalier abandon had surrendered to maiden prudence. 

No one knows why we did not yield whole-heartedly to femininity predi- 
cated by obscurity. Perhaps fate had already marked us for fame, a fame 
achieved at our Sophomore Carnival. Such a night as that was, dismal rain 
that poured in rivers down our necks, shivering ushers, sodden skaters, reluc- 
tant guests. Came a crunching and an ominous hush — the ice was cracking. 
What a scoop for Press Board: SMITH SOPHOMORES SUBMERGED- 
SELF-POSSESSED PUPILS PERISH IN PARADISE POND. But, trained in 
the ways of honesty, they reported the more prosaic news that the ice held and 
the carnival continued. 

The accident of weather had brought us before the public eye, but our own 
ability furthered our meteoric career. The President's praise, "good sports." 
went to our heads like wine. And, in a mad moment of ambition we conceived 
the idea of a stunt that brought down the house on Rally Day, It was Orphans 
of the Storm, set to a haunting air that pursued us through our college life. 
Gilbert and Sullivan would have claimed with pride, inspired bits of the libretto, 
which began with the condensed characterization of the Orphans: 

"One is blind and both are 

dumb; 
Their father is a drunken bum." 
None will forget the moment 
when one of the Orphans 
reached for high E and missed, 
hut Weekly Board shook its col- 
lective head wisely and par- 
doned it with a quotation: "Ah, 
hut a man's reach must exceed 
his grasp, or what's a heaven 
for?" When we are alumna' at 

a reunion, we will shout with 
laughter as we recall the guillo- 
tine and the coach and four and 
the flapping hats of the Or- 
phans. 





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Close on that triumph came athletic victories to prove us a versatile class. 
As I remember it, long rows of silver cups shone on the 1925 trophy shelves as 
testimony to our prowess. But our successes may have been more in anticipation 
than in realization. Those of us with a taste for more ornamental sports took to 
roller-skating. We felt we made a really pretty picture coasting past the Library, 
our pleated skirts flying and ribbons in our "hair. 

Since we were to be proved morons in the next months it was gratifying to 
know ourselves beautiful morons, — that was all that mattered. We had never 
posed as scholars; it would have been quite useless. But we did consider our- 
selves a quick and clever class. But no, the Intelligence tests exposed us as im- 
beciles, at least in the eyes of the Administration, for it was a sophomore who 
insisted that Charlie Chaplin write the Cid, and that Lima was the capitol of 
Bean. Of course, that answer was written tongue in cheek, but the faculty shook 
their heads over our appalling lack of information and the varied answers to the 
question, "How many cubic inches are there in a box three inches long, by two 
inches deep, by four inches wide?" — a relatively simple arithmetical problem, as 
even we admitted. But intelligence tests are faulty things at best, and besides 
that we were quite sure we were all suffering from headaches on that particular 
day and so did badly by ourselves. 

All year the seniors said of us, "They're riding for a fall," and their predic- 
tion came true only a month before college closed. The upperclassmen rejoiced 
that they could point their fingers in derision and damn us with the adjective 
"sophomoric." For at sings was discovered our inability to carry a tune. It was 
a congenital weakness and incurable. Whatever voices we boasted of were 
trained to travel the lonely solo path. We grew rather maudlin about the whole 
matter of sings. What was the sense in writing a clever song only to make a 
laughing stock of ourselves by our rendering of it? 

And so we ended our second year, not without the usual frenzy over exam- 
inations. At last we could burn our gym suits and shoes, if we felt in so extrava- 
gant a mood. A chosen few stayed for Push Committee, and in the bustle and con- 
fusion of commencement, first realized what a leisurely life they had been leading 
all sophomore year. Little did they suspect how we would be harried by worries 
and responsibilities our Junior Year. 

Genevieve McEldowney. 




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MARTHA HOUSER 



FRANCES WILSON 



Officers 



President . 
Vice-President 
Secretary . 
Treasurer . 
Song Leader 
Assistant Song Leader 



Martha Houser 
Frances Wilson 
Martha Hooker 

Eleanor Lucas 
Lavinia Fyke 

Barbara Grant 



Chairmen of Committees 
Community Chest, Ruth McBarron 

Rally Day 
Shoiv, Virginia McCalmont Decollations, Elinor Robinson 

Junior Frolic 

General Chairman, Lavinia Fyke Refreshments, Caroline Jenkins 
Stunts, Elizabeth Robinson Police, Marjorie Boomer 

Invitations, Pauline Page Costumes and Staging, Jessie Lloyd 



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(Elaaa Ijtatnrg— iltmtnr ffcar 

Junior year is undoubtedly the best year, as the Freshman Bible 
and literature of that nature assured us it would be. One is indeed an 
upperclassman then; the seniors and juniors who overawed us when 
we were freshmen and sophomores have gone their several ways, and 
we can relax at last. Academically also, junior year is a great relief. 
By that time we have rid ourselves of freshman conditions and sopho- 
more requirements ; no longer need we contemplate the dreary reaches 
of geologic time ; while the gymnasium has lost for us its gloomy sig- 
nificance and has become merely a place in which to have a Prom. 

The class of 1925 had other more specific reasons for enjoying 
its junior year. We were sweepingly successful at athletics, winning 
basketball game upon basketball game, and archery contest upon 
tennis tournament ; so that an unprecedented number of S sweaters 
were awarded, and cups and medals inundated us. To prove that we 
are a thoroughly well-balanced class, we produced not only quantities 
of athletes, but also eight Junior Phi Beta Kappas. And that scanty 
and highly selected group, "the Dean's List," is largely incorporated 
from our number. 

Before going home for spring vacation, we elected our Council 
President and Head of Judicial Board, as well as several Council mem- 
bers and the Editor of Monthly. It is curious how one's respect for 
these dignified offices diminishes as they are filled by one's friends. 
On returning from spring vacation we had the Junior Prom, to a 
running accompaniment of the old joke about "the thirteenth man I 

asked to Prom has just 
gone back on me," which 
was as usual applicable. 
Then we had a Frolic and 
distinguished ourselves by 
nost barbaric treatment of 
the uninvited sophomores 
w h o W e r e unfortunate 
enough to break in. As a 
result the class of 1926 
petitioned not to be obliged 



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to have a Frolic ; at least, that is our version of the current tale that 
it was forbidden to them by the authorities. 

Throughout the spring, if you could call it that, we courageously 
had Step Sings, which were well attended, in spite of cyclone and 
blizzard and driving rain. We passed our final examinations with 
the ease acquired by practice, and the more popular members of our 
class received Senior Pins. 

The next few days left us with a confused impression of a great 
many fathers and mothers, and our senior friends in caps and gowns 
looking unfamiliar and somewhat dazed. We took the steps from 
them to a very dolorous chant, but the solemnity of the occasion was 
soon relaxed by the stunts that followed. 

Finally, in large garden hats and summer dresses, we carried the 
ivy-chain; there was mud undei'foot and fog overhead and we felt 
rather foolish to be so arrayed in weather which demanded rubbers 
and raincoats. 

Sfl 5(! 3p If! Sp 

We hope it won't rain on our Ivy Day. 

Eleanor Gilchrist. 







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"Banttij IFair" 



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Cover Design Jordan, Emerson, Cushing 

Advertisements . . Northrop, Gillett, Albright, Baldwin, Tenney 

What the Well Dressed Man Will Wear, 

Tyler, Morris, Lawrence, 26 Green 

Art ...... Dickinson, Hubbard, Washburn 



Theatre 

Hall of Fame 

Caricatures 

Back Cover Design 



Belmont Avenue 

Talbot, Capen, Faunce 

Chapin, Dewey, Hatfield, Wallace 

Haven, Sessions. Elm Street 





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*''-'*-♦'' '- 

•*• '"•■»•" V,- 

1 ■<•- ' 

ate*" 




i* JCS3 

• •• »#- 




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^™y>> 



Mahpra 



HELEN LOW 
Head Usher 



Suzanne Ackerman 
Priscilla Alden 
Sarah Elizabeth Allen 
Margaret Arnstein 
Impi Arvo 
Katherine Atwater 
Phyllis Bagg 
Ruth Bagley 
Carol Baker 
Margaret Barnes 
Elizabeth Barrett 
Mary Barry 
Caroline Bedell 
Catherine Blake 
Virginia Blunt 
Frances Bolton 
Marion Bond 
Doris Booth 
Helen Booth 
Francese Bothfeld 
Caroline Boyer 
Leila Brady 
Elizabeth Brodel 
Elizabeth Brown 
Priscilla Brown 
Katharine Brownell 
Ida Burgess 
Dorothy Burnham 
Margaret Burnham 
Catharine Calhoun 
Josephine Cannon 
Margery Cary 
Josephine Chovey 
Barbara Churchill 
Eunice Clapp 
Gladys Clark 
Katherine Clarkson 
Jeanette Coon 
Frances Copeland 
Virginia Cosby 
Cheryl Crawford 
Mary Crawford 
Helen Curtis 
Alice Curwen 
Anna Dallinger 

Constance Dayidgc 
Anna Davis 

Cornelia Dean 
Miriam Dlonne 

Marian Donahue 

Anna Doyle 
Florence Drake 

Dorothy Dreyfus 



Lillian Duberg 
Dorothy Dunning 
Rose Dyson 
Justine Entz 
Elizabeth Eulass 
Pauline Fairbanks 
Hanna Faterson 
Merl Fisk 

Elizabeth Fitzgerald 
E. Alberta Flanagan 
Virginia Folsom 
Margaret Foote 
Frances French 
Eleanor Fuller 
Edith Gaff 
Beatrice Gale 
Clarace Gait 
Alice Garlichs 
Helen Geiger 
Mary Gerould 
Grace Gibson 

Eleanor Gilchrist 
Dorothy Gile 
Frieda Goodenough 
Dorothy Gordon 
Elizabeth Gould 
Eleanor Grant 
Kathleen II. Grant 
Janei Greenburgh 

Eleanor Hall 
I'eulah Hanson 

Doris Harmon 
Elizabeth Hartman 

Doris Hassell 
Marjorie Hedwall 

Helen Heffernan 
Ruth Hene 
Elizabeth Hildreth 
Julia Himmelsbach 

Helen HitchcOCl 

Martha Hooker 

Constance Houghton 
Martha HoiIBer 

Louise Horde 

Margaret Howard 
Hilda Hull.. > I 

Eustis Hundlej 

Josephine Hurst 
Mary Huston 
Kathjyri James 

Helen JUlaon 

Helen Johnson 
Catherine Jom 



Mary Joslin 
Elizabeth Judkins 
Alice Judson 
Vieno Kajander 
Miriam Keck 
Elizabeth Keith 
Edna Kiesewetter 
Leta Kirk 
Anne Kohler 
R. Eleanor Kriek 
Elizabeth Lane 
Edna Laurin 
Marian Leonard 
Dorothy Libaire 
Helen Lincoln 
Margaret Linley 
Jessie Lloyd 
Helen Low 
Eleanor Lucas 
Carolyn Lyle 
Martha McAvoy 
Louise McGregor 
Ruth E. McKeown 
Grace Magee 
Mary Mangan 
Josephine Blannion 
Louise Marion 
Mary-Eleanor Marsh 
Esther Mason 

Prances Means 
Carolyn Melchers 

Perchik Melik 

Dorothy Miller 
Helen Moor 
Eloise Morford 
Elisabeth Morrow 
Virginia Mueller 
Isabel Munroe 
Nora Nelson 
Mary O'Donnell 
Dorothy Ordway 
Esther Page 
Pauline I'age 

Alice Paine 
Elisabeth Parkhursl 

Helen Patch 

Rebecca Petrlkin 
Dorothy Plckard 
Eleanor Pote 

Olive Potter 
Irene Kachdorf 
Marjorie Rankin 
Prances Raanik 



Elisabeth Rice 
Elsie Riley 
Elinor Robinson 
Elizabeth Robinson 
Margaret Robinson 
Marie Rolland 
Nell Russell 
Eleanor Rust 
Alice Sailor 
Georgiana Schaub 
Louise Schmauk 
Katharine Sears 
Marv Sebring 
Ruth Seinfel 
Josephine Setze 
Wilma Shannon 
Catherine Shimer 
Helene Shincel 
Lucille Shyev 
Etna Sievers 
Mary Sloan 
Augusta Smith 
Dorothy Smith 
Shirley Smith 
Catherine Spencer 

Beatrice Stuart 
Eleanor Stubbs 
Margaret Sturges 
Eunice Tail 

Kathleen Tildaley 

Josephine Tompkins 
Elizabeth Towle 
Ruth Townsend 
Irene TrnlTord 
Natalie Van Ulm 

Elizabeth Wales 
Dorothea Walker 

Elizabeth Wanamaker 

Elizabeth Ward 
Planet's West 
Charlotte Wethcrcll 

Eunice Wheeler 

Janet WilCOX 
Clara Williams 
Elisabeth T. Williams 
Mildred Williams 
Prances Wilson 

Dorothy Winslow 

Wiener 
Let tie Witherspoon 

Woebu.lt 

Linda Woodworth 

Boardman Wright 



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General Chairman 
Refreshments Chairman 
Head Usher 



. Elizabeth Poole 

Katherine Bulkley 

Grania Knott 



Floor Committee 
Chairman, Frances Wilson 
Mabel Cahoon Kathleen Grant 

Constance Davidge Genevieve McEldowney 

Invitations Committee 
Chairman, Barbara Churchill 
Anne Brown Virginia Mueller 

Emma Heap Elizabeth Wales 

Eleanor Lucas Elizabeth Ward 

Theater Committee 
Chairman, Ruth McBarron 
Isobel Buckley Grania Knott 

Music Committee 
Chairman, Elizabeth Webb 
Marjorie Boomer Cornelia Dean 

Chaperone Committee 
Chairman, Beatrice Gale 

Irene Trafford 



Carol Baker 



Leta Kirk 



Tea Dance Committee 
Chairman, Barbara Grant 
Pauline Page 

Program Committee 
Chairman, Josephine Cannon 



Gladys Ross 



Catherine Jones 



Elizabeth Ann Patterson 




ELIZABETH POOLE 
Chairman 



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Officers 

President 
Martha Hooker 

Vice-President 
Martha McAvoy 

Secretary 
Anne Brown 

Treasurer 
Josephine Cannon 

Song Leader 
Lavinia Fyke 

Assistant Song Leader 
Marjorie Boomer 



MARTHA HOOKER 



Chairman of Committees 

Rally Day 

Ribbons, Josephine Cannon Rally in Gymnasium, 

Decorations, Justine Entz Dorothy Pickard 

Show, Nancy Templeton Basketball Game, Marjorie Boomer 
Senior Pins 
Chairman, Louise Hovde 
Dorothy Allott Natalie Van Ulm 

Mary Orlady 
Fiftieth Anniversary Birthday 
Gift 

Chairman of Undergraduate 

Committee 

Frances Wilson 

Chairman of Senior Committee, 

Elizabeth Webb 

Nancy Templeton Dorothy Miller 

Virginia Thieme Elisabeth Morrow 

Executive Finance Committee 

Chairman, Josephine Cannon 

Louise Hovde Margaret Arnstein 

Elinor Robinson Martha Hooker martha mcavoy 




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On September 23, 1924, the seniors bustled 
officiously into John M. Greene, advisees in 
hand, and sat down authoritatively in the front 
row seats. As a matter of fact, however, they 
felt unnaturally unauthoritative. College had 
grown beyond their recognition during the sum- 
mer: the new gymnasium and music hall had 
been completed, the names of various old build- 
ings had been changed, the new dean sat in- 
stalled upon the platform. The naive question- 
ing of their advisees made them a bit uneasy. 
Their sharpened intuition enabled them to 
answer the question, "Is Mrs. Bernard nice?" in 
the superlative, but as to the dimensions of the 
new gym . . . Fortunately three years' experience 
with inexplicable quiz questions had taught them 
not to be abashed; they lowered the carrying 
quality of their Spoken English voices and re- 
plied: "You mustn't talk at chapel." To be 

spared future embarrassment they investigated the matter at their earliest oppor- 
tunity, and their naivete and delight at the embodiment of their three-year-long 
hopes made the occasion one of great pathos. A tear coursing down each fur- 
rowed cheek (of those of them, that is, who had not been incapacitated by their 
arduous struggle for existence) plunged into the brine. 

In a few weeks after the opening of college, they dropped their cares and 
responsibilities for Mountain Day, and most of them managed to present the 
semblance of youthful alacrity. Some of them seized the belated occasion to walk 
the range at last; a few of the class, however, were in a state of such pitiable 
lassitude that they dared only ride around and around the environs in a street car. 

On October 12, the college suffered a severe loss in the death of President 
Seelye. The class of 1925, which had known him for three years, had come to 
regard him as the moral and spiritual guardian of the college, and they felt a 
new sobering responsibility in maintaining the high standards which he had 
taught. 

Before fall was over, preparations began to be made for the departure of 
the seniors. The Grecourt gates were dedicated, and 1925 was told that these 
gates should symbolize their exodus from their college and their spectacular 
entrance into the world, with their overpowering accumulation of charm and intel- 
ligence. At election time they showed their knowledge of politics and govern- 
ment and their qualifications for the vote by helping to make the Northampton 
campaign a fittingly brilliant one; they mounted soap-boxes, betted heavily, 
waved torches and cheered. And to signalize its new and mature role, the college 
was allowed to stay out until eleven o'clock to wait for the election returns! 

Suddenly the world was startled by the appea ranee of two phenomena which 
indicated the extreme Significance of the year L924-1925, One was the plague 
which was introduced into the college by two members of the senior class. The 



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notoriety was gratifying, — but what if Smith, and especially its senior repre- 
sentatives, should be wiped out? The entire college realized its importance to hu- 
manity, and rushed en masse to the town doctors for vaccination; and numerous 
veterans were able to go to Cambridge and assure Harvard and Dartmouth that 
they were still able to illuminate society. The second omen was the eclipse of the 
sun. Agog with scientific zeal, the college rose at dawn, donned costumes, correct 
scientifically though not aesthetically, braved the cold and travelled to Connecti- 
cut, where the officially astronomical members made careful records of the dura- 
tion length, shadow bands and the appearance of the corona. One fact only was 
omitted from the archives, — the cause of the eclipse, — and this shall now be duly 
registered : by processes of induction and deduction, by mathematical calculations 
and by translations of Chinese astrology, it has been discovered that it heralded 
the graduation of the class of 1925. 

On Rally Day the class broke its collective chrysalis and made its debut. For 
three years it had been the college caterpillar, and crawled its tortuous way in 
the realms of knowledge ploddingly, unassumingly, but voraciously withal; now 
it had acquired knowledge to the bursting point, — it had become a butterfly! 
Henceforth it should do nothing but flit from pleasure to pleasure. In such a 
frivolous spirit, the seniors entered into the Junior Promenade and quite outdid 
their rivals. During the spring term they discovered manifold pleasures: they 
rode, motored or walked in the country, they ate heartily, they frequented Para- 
dise, and they accepted the merited adulation of the underclassmen with modesty. 

Commencement came at last; they had a feeling of compunction about leaving 
Northampton and tried to flunk their finals, — but it was no use, — they had become 
too clever. And since they had been chosen to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary 
they might as well comply graciously. So they made the occasion a highly suc- 
cessful one: they were witty in the Ivy oration, dramatic in the play, attentive at 
Baccalaureate, pathetic and dignified at commencement, and charming all the 
time. No wonder their parents swelled with pride, the alumnae with reminis- 
cences, and the rest of the callege with awe. They felt a trifle sad themselves, but 
they looked forward to the warm reception which the world was undoubtedly pre- 
pared to extend to such a prodigious class. 

Helen Treadway Johnson. 




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{fantamuti* (Enmmtttre 

General Chairman 
Cheryl Crawford 

General Executive 
Margaret Arnstein 

Composer 
Dorothy Smith 

Chairman of Scenery 
Isabella Walsh 

(flammrcmtwnt flag Gtammittw 

General Chairman 
Cheryl Crawford 

Dramaturgy 
Grania Knott 

Business Manager 
Margaret Barnes 

Chairman of Lighting 
Kathleen Tildsley 

Chairman of Costuming 
Emma Heap 

Chairman of Publicity 
Justine Entz 

Chairman of Properties 
Elsie Butler 

Chairman of Staging 
Frances Wilson 



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"f ultwrntBB, Idjnlitrr nf QDrrau 



Prince 



. Jeannette Strodthoff 



Members of the Cast 

Virginia V. Hart Eleanor Loeb 

Louise Hovde Florence Meling 

Kustis Hundley Georgiana Schaub 



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Saturday, June Thirteenth 



Ivy Exercises on the Campus 

Ivy Exercises in John M. Greene Hall 

Society Reunions . 

Closing Concert 

College Sing . 

Dramatics 

Glee Club Concert 

"Circling Years of Smith" 



10.00 A. M. 
11.00 A. M. 

4.00 p. m. 

3.15 p. m. 

6.30 P. M. 

7.15 P. M. 

8.30 P. M. 

9.30 P. M 



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Sunday, June Fourteenth 

Baccalaureate Exercises in Sage Hall, 11 a. m. 

Address by President Neilson 

Reception Given by President and Mrs. Neilson, 3 p. m. 

Organ Vespers in John M. Greene Hall, 5 p. m. 

Smith College Symphony Orchestra, 8.15 p. m. 

Organ Music, 9.30 p. m. 



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commencement! 



Monday, June Fifteenth 

John M. Greene Hall 10.30 a. m. 

Address by Ada Louise Comstock 



Fiftieth Anniversary Party 



Class Supper in Alumnae Gymnasium 



. 2.30 P. M. 
. 6.00 P. M. 



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MONDAY, JUNE FIFTEENTH 
Alumnae Gymnasium, 6 p. m. 

Toastmistres8 

Mary Sloan 



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Juy Say ^ong 

April rain cast silver shadows 

Like a web across the grass, 
By a pool the young white birches 

Saw their slimness in a glass. 
What have we to do with shadows? 

Shadows pass. 

May flung clouds of apple blossoms 

Down in every hollow glade, 
Violet, primrose, pale arbutus 

Through the woods and meadows strayed ; 
And we turned to watch the pageant. 

Blossoms fade. 

Now the year is at its high tide, 

Longer here we may not stay, 
All the wide, white roads are calling, 

Calling, calling us away; 
Broken are the bonds that held us 

Yesterday. 

Grow then, sturdy little ivy, 

In the warm earth spread apace, 

Token to the ones that follow 

That we looked on learning's face 

And have touched the hem of beauty, 
In this place. 

Words by Frances Dorris 



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QlnmrntttFr on (Hoxnnmxttmmt ExmtsrB 



Ivy Day Committee 

Elisabeth Morrow, Chairman 
Frances French Alice Judson 

Frances Higginbotham Marjorie Rankin 

Catharine Jones Elizabeth Robinson 

Ivy Song Committee 

Margaret Linley, Chairman 
Frances Dorris Sally Linley 

Mary Gerould Elizabeth Robinson 

Harriet Lane Dorothy Smith 



Commencement Printing 
*Elinor Robinson | 



Doris Booth 



Chairman 



Helen Booth 
Katherine Cogswell 
Eloise Morford 



Barbara Priest 
Mildred Williams 
Lettie Witherspoon 



Ruth Mc Barron 



Commencement Orator 

Frances Wilson, Chairman 

Elisabeth Morrow 



Class Supper Committee 

Beatrice Gale, Chairman 
Marjorie Boomer Helen Low 

Martha Houser Eloise Morford 

Leta Kirk Lettie Witherspoon 

Committee on Order of Marching 

Dorothy Allott, Chairman 
Carol Baker Martha Hooker 

Constance Hirschy Helen Low 



Elizabeth Allen 
Eunice Clapp 

Dorothy (iilc 
Julia II immelsbarh 



Cap and Gown Committee 

Margaret Arnstein, Chairman 

Virginia Hunt 
Elizabeth Lane 

Pauline Page 



Edith Showers 
Josephine Tompkins 



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THE 

OTHER 
CLASSES 



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00 1926 



We met you when you entered here, 

And, ages older by a year, 

We led you round collegiate land 

With stern and sophomoric hand. 

We felt a solemn urge to pass 

Our wealth of wisdom to your class. 

Next year we came to realize 

You had indeed grown very wise ; 

Your subtle ways and strength of arm 

Caused us delight and some alarm. 

And now we will prognosticate 

That when you come to graduate 

You'll find it very hard to do. 

Our last words are, that we do, too. 




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So 192? 

Searching all our fouryears through, 
Last advice we pass to you ; 
That each of you herself comport 
Both as a student and a sport. 

Bluff your teachers to a man, 
Learn your lessons when you can, 
And fill the Monthly with good stuff 
So Class Book Board will have enough. 

Don't neglect the joys of gym, 
Don't forget to learn to swim, 
Play all games and win them too 
Make the Odds all proud of you. 

Thus, dear sisters, goes our verse, 
Keen, incisive, vigorous, terse, 
Unspoiled by that laborious study 
Which makes the intellect grow muddy. 




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Before we even knew you, '28, 
Exams and horoscopes pronounced you great. 
We pictured you with glasses on your nose, 
Eschewing men and moving picture shows. 
But it has been our very glad surprise 
To find that you are young as well as wise, 
And handle cuts and week-ends in a way 
That proves to us you must know how to play ; 
And what is more — these bursts of girlish joy 
Come quite unmixed with Registrar's Alloy ; 
For still in all your work you scintillate. 
Our love and admiration, '28! 







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MARY WALLACE 
President of Council 



MARY SLOAN 
Chairman of Judicial Hoard 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Helen Sargent Elizabeth Webb 

- SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Virginia McCalmont Elizabeth Ward 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Martha Houser Miriam Keck 

Mary Wallace 

SENIOR YEAR 

Lavinia Fyke Dorothy O'Brien 

Martha Hooker Mary Sloan 

Genevieve McEldowney Nancy Templet mi 
Mary Wallace 



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DOROTHY O'BRIEN 
President of the House 



Senior Year 



Elizabeth Barrett 
Mary Berryman 
Eleanor Briggs 
Edna Charlton 
Josephine Chovey 
Betty Coates 
Virginia Cosby 
Anna Dallinger 
Cornelia Dean 
Margaret Foote 
Helen Geiger 
Mary Gerould 



HOUSE PRESIDENTS 

Dorothy Gile 
Virginia Hart 
Katherine Humphries 
Kathryn James 
Leta Kirk 
Vieno Kajander 
Margaret Linley 
Esther Mason 
Virginia Mueller 
Agnes Murray 
Esther Page 
Barbara Priest 



Elizabeth Robinson 
Alice Sailor 
Louise Schmauk 
Sylvia Scaramelli 
Jeannette Scott 
Ruth Seinfel 
Erna Sievers 
Eunice Tait 
Josephine Tompkins 
Elizabeth T. Williams 
Mildred Williams 



Phyllis Bagg 
Elizabeth Brodel 
Josephine Cannon 
Virginia Folsom 
Barbara Grant 



REPRESENTATIVES 

Kathryn Hourihan 
Elizabeth Judkins 
Louise McGregor 
Merle McCarthy 
Dorothy Smith 



Elizabeth Wanamaker 
Frances Wilson 
Isobel Wisner 
Dorothy Winslow 



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Frances Bothfeld 
Margaret Bradley 
Anne Brown 
Katherine Clarkson 



Eunice Blake 
Doris Booth 
Elsie Butler- 
Mabel Cahoon 
Josephine Cannon 
Eunice Clapp 
Margaret Dewey 
Pauline Fairbanks 
Margaret Hamp 



Anna Davis 
Rose Dyson 
Margaret Hamp 



Josephine Benz 
Elizabeth Blaisdell 
Marjorie Boomer 
Mary Brower 
Josephine Cannon 
Marion Dionne 



Junior Year 
house presidents 

Cheryl Crawford 
Margaret Foote 
Freida Goodenough 
Vieno Kajander 

REPRESENTATIVES 

Julia Himmelsbach 
Martha Houser 
Helen Jillson 
Elizabeth Judkins 
Leta Kirk 
Elizabeth Lane 
Helen Low 
Frances Means 
Serena Niles 

Sophomore Year 

house presidents 

Katherine Johnson 
Irene Rachdorff 
Marjorie Rankin 

REPRESENTATIVES 

Frances Harvey 
Julia Himmelsbach 
Virginia Hunt 
Elizabeth Judkins 
Martha Jennings 
Genevieve McEldowney 



Ruth Lilly 
Ruth Seinfel 
Mary Sloan 
Elizabeth Webb 



Dorothy O'Brien 
Eleanor Poppenhusen 
Irene Rachdorff 
Marjorie Rankin 
Margaret Scott 
Louise Van Voast 
Elizabeth Wales 
Constance Walter 
Helen Wulbern 



Dorothea Walker 
Janet Wilcox 
Letty Witherspoon 



Elizabeth Parkhurst 
Nell Russell 
Margaret Robinson 
Louise Schmauk 
Mary Wallace 
Eunice Wheeler 




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Aasnnattnn fnr 
Christian Unrk 



LAVINIA FYKE 



Lavinia Fyke 
Virginia Mueller 



. President 
Vice-President 



Frances Wilson 
*Frances Harvey 
Katherine Bulkley 
Lavinia Fyke . 
Elizabeth Webb 
Josephine Cannon 



(Eatrittet iKrmbprs 



Junior Year 



. Treasurer 

. Social Service 

. Social Service 

Head of Representatives 

Social Activities 

Discussions 



Elisabeth Morrow 



Sophomore Year 



. Secretary 



* Left College 



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». <tt. A. (C. M. (Babbitt 



Chairmen of Departments and Committees 



Dorothy Gordon 
Eloise Morford 
Virginia Thieme 
Helen Low 
Dorothy Dunning 
*Pauline Page . 



Religious Servict s 

Deputations 

Social Service 

Silver Bay Leader 

Missions and Student Volunteers 

Publicity 



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1922 
Anne Brown 
Frances Harvey 
Margaret Robinson 
Marie-Louise Schmauk 

1923 
Christine Baumann 
Caroline Bedell 
Katherine Bulkley 




Margery Cary 
Dorothy Dunning 
Lavinia Fyke 
Miriam Keck 
Helen Low 
Esther Mason 
Elinor Robinson 
Wilma Shannon 
Elizabeth Wales 
Mary Wallace 
Elizabeth Ward 
Elizabeth T. Williams 

1924 
Margaret Arnstein 
Leila Brady 
Dorothy Burnham 
Josephine Cannon 
Anna Dallinger 
Frances French 
Lavinia Fyke 
Dorothy Gordon 
Elizabeth Gould 



Kathleen Grant 
Julia Himmelsbach 
Martha Hooker 
Catharine Jones 
Alice Judson 
Elizabeth Keith 
Elizabeth Lane 
Jessie Lloyd 
Helen Low 
Helen Moor 
Eloise Morford 
Virginia Mueller 
Pauline Page 
Nell Russell 
Mary Sebring 
Josephine Tompkins 
Mary Wallace 
Elizabeth Webb 
Mildred Williams 
Katherine Whitney 
Lettie Witherspoon 



iht&tauapolts iplegatra 



HELEN LOW 



Katherine Bulkley 
Josephine Cannon 
Lois Cochran 
Dorothy Dunning 



Helvi Haati 
Martha Hooker 
Georgiana Schaub 
Louise Schmauk 



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imams, 1924-1925 






Suzanne Ackerman 


Dorothy Dunning 


Babette Kafka 


Eleanor Pote 






Hope Adams 


Rose Dyson 


Vieno Kajander 


Olive Potter 






Dorothy A'beck 


Justine Entz 


Ruth Kayton 


Barbara Priest 






S. Elizabeth Allen 


Elizabeth Eulass 


Miriam Keck 


Irene Racbdorf 






Margaret Arnstein 


Winifred Evans 


Elizabeth Keith 


Ethel Ranney 






Impi Arvo 


Pauline Fairbanl* 


s Edna Kiesewetter 


Mary Rhodes 






Katharine Atwater 


Hanna Faterson 


Arline Knight 


Elisabeth Rice 






Carol Baker 


Merl Fisk 


Grania Knott 


Helen Rice 






Jane Baker 


Elizabeth Fitzgerald Anne Kohler 


Elinor Robinson 






Lucy Barnard 


Alberta Flanagan Eleanor Krick 


Elizabeth Robinson 






Margaret Barnes 


Mary Foss 


Elizabeth Lane 


Margaret Robinson 






Elizabeth Barrett 


Frances French 


Harriet Lane 


Ellen Rogers 






Mary Barry 


Lavinia Fyke 


Isabel Lewis 


Mary Rossen 






Marie Barstow 


Edith Gaff 


Terice Liebeskind 


Nell Ford Russell 






Caroline Bear 


Clarace Gait 


Margaret Linley 


Eleanor Rust 






Caroline Bedell 


Alice Garlichs 


Sally Linley 


Alice Sailor 






Rebecca Beeman 


Helen Geiger 


Jessie Lloyd 


Sylvia Sca>-amelli 






Catherine Blake 


Mary Gerould 


Elinor Loeb 


Georgiana Schaub 






Eunice Blake 


Frieda Goodenou 


gh Elizabeth Loring 


Mary Sebring 






Virginia Blunt 


Dorothy Gordon 


Helen Low 


Ruth Seinfel 






Frances Bolton 


Kathleen Grant 


Eleanor Lucas 


Wilma Shannon 






Marjorie Boomer 


Marian Hagler 


Carolyn Lyle 


Ethel Sherman 






Francese Bothfeld 


Eleanor Hall 


Ruth McBarron 


Helene Shincel 






Caroline Boyer 


Beulah Hanson 


Virginia McCalmont 


Augusta Smith 






Lois Boynton 


Virginia Hart 


Louise McGregor 


Dorothy Smith 






Margaret Bradley 


Elizabeth Hartm; 


in Bernice Mcllhenny 


Lois Smith 






Mary Bradley 


Helen Hartzell 


Ruth McKeown 


Shirley Smith 






Elizabeth ISrodel 


Doris Hassell 


Grace Magee 


Beatrice Stuart 






Anne Brown 


Emma Heap 


Josephine Mannion 


Margaret Sturges 






Katherine Brownell 


Ruth Hene 


Louise Marion 


Dorothy Tait 






Katherine Bulkley 


Cecelia Herstein 


Mary-Eleanor Marsh 


Eunice Tait 






Eleanor Burckhardt 


Elizabeth Hildreth Esther Mason 


Virginia Thieme 






Ida Burgess 


Doris Hill 


Frances Means 


Kathleen Tildsley 






Elsie Butler 


Helen Hitchcock 


Carolyn Melchers 


Josephine Tompkins 






Mabel Cahoon 


Maltha Hooker 


Dorothy Miller 


Elizabeth Towle 






Catharine Calhoun 


Constance Houghton Helen Moot 


Irene Trafford 






Josephine Cannon 


Martha Houser 


Virginia Mueller 


Marion Turner 






Helen Carpenter 


Hilda Hulbert 


Helen Munz 


Natalie Van Ulm 






Barbara Churchill 


Katherine Humphries Nora Nelson 


Dorothea Walker 






Eunice Clapp 


Eustis Hundley 


Dorothy O'Brien 


Mary Wallace 






Gladys Clark 


Virginia Hunt 


Dorothy Ordway 


Elizabeth Ward 






Betty Coates 


Judelle MaeG. Huston Esther Page 


Elizabeth Webb 






Lois Cochran 


Kathryn James 


Pauline Page 


Charlotte Wetherell 






Frances Copp 


Dorothy Jealous 


Alice Paine 


Eunice Wheeler 






Mary Crawford 


Caroline Jenkins 


Margaret Pantzer 


Clara Williams 






Alice Curwen 


Martha Jennings 


Louva Parker 


Lucy H. Williams 






Anna Dallinger 


Helen Jillson 


Elizabeth Parkhurst 


Mildred Williams 






Constance Davidge 


Helen Johnson 


Helen Patch 


Frances Wilson 






Cornelia Dean 


Kathryn Johnsor 


Elizabeth Patterson 


Ernestine Wiltse 






Miriam Dionne 


Catharine Jones 


Marjorie Peabody 


Dorothy Winslow 






Marian Donahue 


Mary Joslin 


Katharine Phealan 


Jean Wise 






Martha Dorman 


Elizabeth Judkins Dorothy Pickard 


Lettie Witherspoon 






Lillian Duberg 


Alice Judson 


Eleanor Poppenhusen 


Mary Wright 




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Debating (Enunril 



Martha McAvoy 
Sylvia Scaramelli 
Frances Wilson . 
Catherine Jones 
Kathleen Tildsley 



Margaret Arnstein 
Martha McAvoy 
Josephine Cannon 



. President 

. Secretary-Treasurer 

Chairman of Intercollegiate Debatt 

. Chairman of Social Committee 
Chairman of Publicity 



Junior Year 

. Secretary-Treasun r 
. Chairman of Social Committee 

Chairman of Publicity 



n 



Odd-Even Debate, 1923 
Margaret Arnstein, Alternate Betty Coates, Speaki r 
Caroline Bedell, Speaker Helen Johnson, Alternate 

Katherine Bulkley, Speaker Sylvia Scaramelli, Alternate 

Williams-Smitii Debate, 1924 

Martha McAvoy, Speaker Sylvia Scaramelli, Speaker 

Frances Wilson, Coach 

Amherst-Smith Debate, 1924 
Bernice Mcllhenny, Speaker Frances Wilson, Coach 

Intercollegiate Debate, 1924 
Catherine Jones, Coach 

Intercollegiate Debate. 1925 
Martha McAvoy, Cm, eh 

Dartmouth-Smith Debate, 1925 
Eunice Blake, Speaker Catherine Jones, Coach 

Sylvia Scaramelli, Coach 



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Sramatira Aaaflnatton (ftnmtril 





Senior Year 




Cheryl Crawford 


. 


Producing Director 


Margaret Barnes 


Chairmen of Committees 


Business Manager 


Margaret Linley 


. 


Staging 


Emma Heap 


. 


. Costumes 


Grania Knott 


. 


Dramaturgy 


Kathleen Tildsley 




Lighting 


Justine Entz 




Publicity 


Elsie Butler 


Junior Year 


. Properties 


Anna Dallinger . 


. 


. Secretary 


Frances Wilson . 


...... 


Head of Publicity 



n 



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Sramattrfi 



The class of 1925 has proved itself beyond question a patron of 
the arts, if only in its devotion to the drama. Not content to trust 
our reputation for histrionic merit, as have other classes, to a gifted 
but jaded few, we have rallied in numbers to assist in the fashioning 
of our dramatic history. Names have shown with meteoric brilliance 
from time to time, only to drop into oblivion ; as if, content with hav- 
ing given their share of talent to our stage, their owners had chosen 
other less temperamental paths. Class presidents, athletes, Phi 
Betes have trodden our boards under obscurer names, wherein they 
have not only shown their versatility, but given us the spectacle of a 
practical application of the arts as a preparation for life. But, in 
addition to this loyal support from other fields, we can claim as many 
and as brilliant extra-curricular professionals in the drama as in any 
of our other pre-eminent interests. 

When the spring of our freshman year gave us an opportunity to 
develop our latent talents, we early showed ourselves eager for the- 
atrical fame. In the first production of the spring, the success of The 
Dragon rested largely on members of our class. The names of Anna 
Dallinger and Elinor Loeb, since familiar to campus theatregoers, 
appeared in the cast. Virginia McCalmont, besides presaging our 
brilliant future in her excellent performance, gave still another illus- 
tration of the native strength of the class backbone in her determina- 
tion to go through with the part, though she was borne to the infirm- 
ary from the stage door at the close of the play ! Our first mark in 
the history of producing was here set faintly in the persons of Fran- 
ces Bolton and Jessie Lloyd, who served on committees, obscurely of 
course, — but still an achievement for freshmen. 

The size of the cast for // / Were King gave twenty-nine more 
freshmen an intimate connection with the smell of grease paint and 
the nervous thrill of apprehension that precedes the entrance of a 
mob. It is significant that the names of Blake, Crawford. Tester, 
Foss, Wanamaker and Rannev thus early appeared on college play 
bills. 

But it was in the following year that our distinct acting person- 
alities began to emerge from the mobs of our dramatic infancy. The 
first production of the fall gave prominence to Kathleen Tildsley and 
Ruth Tester in a charmingly performed scene from the Romancers. 
On the same evening, Lucy Barnard, Grania Knott and Adelaide 
Avery made their successful debuts as characters in Masefield's 
Locked Chest. 

Large casts have for four years favored the ambition of our 
class. Several more of us skipped and sighed and sang ourselves 
before the footlights in the Workshop production of Scorpio. And 
we felt that we were growing up indeed, when Grania Knott, a mere 
sophomore, held the stage alone with a member of the Faculty in 
Li mo Hen us. 



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Having created a reputation of a sort, we found it impossible to 
let pass an opportunity for presuming on it. So we duly appeared, a 
trifle perfunctorily it must be admitted, in The Scarecrow. But we 
were merely reserving our forces for the successes of the spring. Our 
parts in the Chinese Lantern showed a growing maturity and confi- 
dence which found a sustained level in the acting of Cheryl Crawford, 
as the hero of one of the most popularly received plays the Association 
has ever produced, The Marriage of Convenience. It was during this 
spring that Gloria Mundi, of psychopathic fame, proved Grania 
Knott's versatility, — among other things. 

Up to this moment of our dramatic career our role had been one 
of pleasant dependence. No one had expected too much of us. If we 
achieved distinction, we were greeted with the lollypops of a delight- 
ed applause and were patted on the heads for being good girls. If we 
attained something less than mediocrity, it was put down to the score 
of our inexperience. But from the start of our junior year, we were 
expected to stand or fall on our own merits. We had, until now, ap- 
peared for the sake of appearing. The first plays of the small pro- 
duction found Anna Dallinger, Grania Knott and Cheryl Crawford 
assuming this harsh responsibility as the respective coaches of Deir- 
dre, The Knave of Hearts, and Beauty and the Jacobin. Our novitiate 
over, and the task before us of fashioning a dramatic tradition for 
others, less experienced than ourselves, we found mere personal 
achievement losing its importance in the larger scope of artistic excel- 
lence. 

We were proud of our share in the brave experiment of Jeanne 
D'Arc, as we showed by recklessly swelling the numbers of its un- 
wieldy cast. Foremost among its elements of success, was the acting 
of Grania Knott as D'Alencon in which she showed her appreciation 
of the high level of the theme by a subtle commingling of reality and 
idealism as at once lover and champion of an idea. 

We were trained to an ideal and innured to probable disappoint- 
ment, when, in the spring of our junior year, we received from 1924 
the sole responsibility for the dramatic excellence of the college. Not 
quite sure of our ground, we tested our footing in the first set of 
plays which included a successful attempt at sophistication with 
Grania Knott as the leading lady, in Molnar's A Matter of Husbands; 
and a venture upon the more difficult ground of Kemp's Boccaccio's 
Untold Tale, which was sincere if not quite convincing. 

In Shakuntalah we tried our first independent experiment. In 
an attempt to transcend the narrower type of drama which merely 
offers a vehicle for the good acting of individuals, we tried to make 
this an expression of a more comprehensive art, in which the action 
of the characters should be only in proportion to a pattern of theme, 
sound and color, so that the completed production should form an 
aesthetic unity. To this end we departed from the tradition of a pro- 
fessionally set stage, for the spring production, to the precincts of the 
President's garden, which afforded an appropriate setting for the 
rich and fantastic grouping of the play. Barbara Grant, as King 
Dushyanta, moved powerfully as a romantic and colorful center 
through its exotic scenes. Dorothy Pickard, Eunice Blake, and Doro- 



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thy Libaire gave it harmony in their confident and mature interpreta- 
tion of the character parts of Mudhavya, Father Kanva, and Gau- 
tami. 

In the fall of our senior year we paused and took breath. The 
first set of plays belonged primarily to the juniors. But we showed 
a continued interest in our dramatic career, even though it was draw- 
ing to a close. Cheryl Crawford played the title role in Sudermann's 
Teja, and Florence Melling startled and delighted us by proving her- 
self as capable in the part of the Bagdad merchant Ali, in Hudson's 
Pearl of Dawn, as in the delicate and sophisticated feminine parts 
we had come to consider primarily hers. 

The class has justified its long and universal interest in the 
drama in its most recent production, The Faithful, by John Masefield. 
In this, the ideal for which ShakuntalaJi served as an apprenticeship, 
was realized as a successful actuality. The rhythm of the play pro- 
gressed with an ever-accelerating intensity, unbroken by uncrafts- 
manlike slips in acting or stage management. Eunice Blake, Cheryl 
Crawford, and Grania Knott reached the height of their dramatic 
interpretation in the parts of Lords Kira, Kurano, and Asano, in 
which the excellence of their acting was so genuine that it merged in 
the general harmony of the whole. 

It is hoped that, departing from this basis of achievement as a 
standard, we shall show the results of our long and intensive training 
in a brilliant production in June. 

It is particularly to Cheryl Crawford, as competent and far- 
visioning director of the Dramatic Association, that we owe our deter- 
mination to accomplish something of artistic integrity in the face of 
occasional failure and frequent distrust, born of the fact that experi- 
ment of this sort is still in an early stage of development. It is to 
her, too, that we owe the success of ambitious performances under 
limited conditions. Only with her dauntless confidence and deter- 
mination could plays of the scope of ShakuntalaJi and The Faithful 
have been made convincing in the domestic and over-familiar settings 
of campus and the Students' Building stage. 



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Hilda Hulbert 
Clara Williams 



Editorial Staff 

Editor-in-Chief 

Lucy Barnard 

Literary Editors 

Frances Dorris 
Sally Linley 
Eleanor Gilchrist 



Business Board 

Business Manager 

Margaret Barnes 
Assistant Business Managers 

Katharine Brownell 
Marian Hagler 

Junior Year 
Literary Editors 

Hilda Hulbert 
Clara Williams 
Assistant Business Managers 
Katharine Brownell Anne Brown 

Margaret Barnes 



Anne Brown 
Carol Baker 



Lucy Barnard 



Anne Brown 



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Sophomore Year 
Assistant Business Managers 

Katharine Brownell 
Marian Hagler 



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Ruth Seinfel 
Elizabeth Keith . 
Wilma Shannon 
Dorothy Winslow 
Impi Arvo . 
Clarace Gait 
Elizabeth Barrett 
Frances Bolton 
Helen Hitchcock 
Eunice Blake 
Ellen Rogers 



Elizabeth Keith 



l^kly Snari 



. Editor-in-Chief 

Associate Editor 

News Editor 

Managing Editor 

Business Manager 

Circulation Manager 

Assistant News Editors 

. Art Critic 

Dramatic Critic 

Music Critic 



Junior Year 

Assistant News Editors 
Wilma Shannon 



Ruth Seinfel 



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Assistavit Managing Editors 
•Christine Baumann Mabel Cahoon *Lettie Witherspoon 

*Mildred Buffington *Emma Heap Dorothy Winslow 

Assistant Business Managers Art Critic 

Margaret Arnstein * Phyllis Bagg 

Caroline Boyer Elizabeth Brodel 

*Frances Harvey Music Critic 

Lucille Shyev Sally Linley 

Sophomore Year 

Assistant Neivs Editors Assistant Managing Editors 

Caroline Bedell Mildred Buffington 

Jessie Lloyd Mary Wallace 

Music Critic 

Harriet Lane 

• Resigned 



0: 



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Miriam Keck 
Georgiana Schaub 
Isobel Wisner 

*Lucy Barnard 
Mary Barry 

*Caroline Bedell 
Katharine Brownell 
Elsie Butler 
Betty Coates 
Pauline Fairbanks 

*Louise Hovde 
Caroline Jenkins 



. President 

News Editor 
Senior Executive 



Members 



Miriam Keck 

* Harriet Lane 

*Jessie Lloyd 

*Ruth McBarron 
Georgiana Schaub 
Katherine Sheldon 

*Mary Wallace 
Charlotte Wetherell 
Katherine Whitney 



Isobel Wisner 



* Resigned 



n 



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Dorothy Dunning J ^^ 

Eleanor Gilchrist ^ ' 

Business Manager 

Business Board 



Isobel Buckley . 
Wilma Shannon 



Catherine Spencer / 
Isabella Walsh \ 



Lucy Barnard 
Dorothy Dunning 
Eleanor Gilchrist 
Margaret Hamp 



Art Editors 



Members 

Jessie Lloyd 
Genevieve McEldowney 
Catherine Spencer 
Nancy Templeton 
Isabella Walsh 



* Resigned 



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Wilma Shannon 
Margaret Linley 
Isobel Buckley . 
Margaret Arnstein 
Catherine Spencer 
Frances French . 
Kathleen Tildsley 
Elizabeth Lane . 
Isabel Lewis 
Alice Judson 
Nancy Templeton 



. Editor-in-Chief 

Assistant Editor 

Business Manager 

Assistant Business Manager 

Art Editor 

Clubs and Lists Editor 

Board Pictures Editor 

. Senior Pictures 

Literary Editor 

Snap-Shot Editor 

Nonsense Editor 



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Priscilla Alden 
Caroline Bedell 
Alice Judson 



Jessie Lloyd 
Louise McGregor 
Eunice Wheeler 
Linda Woodworth 



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Elizabeth Robinson 
Harriet Lane 



Members 



Priscilla Alden 

Marie Barstow 

Lucy Briggs 

Elizabeth Brown 
**Eula Brown 

Katherine Bulkley 

Josephine Cannon 

Eunice Clapp 

Katherine Clarkson 
*Dorothy Dunning 

Sylvia Gaines 

Mary Gerould 

Barbara Grant 
**Virginia Hall 
**Margaret Hamp 

Beulah Hanson 

Emma Heap 

Julia Himmelsbach 

Constance Houghton 

Virginia Hunt 
*Martha Jennings 

Sara Jobson 

Leta Kirk 

Elizabeth Lane 



** Lefl College 

* Hi'sik'ni'il 



Leader 

. Secretary 



Harriet Lane 
* Marion Leonard 
Margaret Linley 
Helen Low 
*Virginia McCalmont 
Louise McGregor 
Carolyn Melchers 

**Helen Redding 

**Mary Reynolds 

**Mary Risley 

Elizabeth Robinson 
Ellen Rogers 

** Helen Sargent 
Shirley Smith 
Dorothea Spieth 

**Mildred Spencer 
Lillian Silver 
*Nancv Templeton 

**Ruth*Tester 
Dorothea Walker 
Charlotte Wetherell 
Eunice Wheeler 
Lucy Williams. 
Mildred Williams 






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Marjorie Boomer 



iManbnlm (Elub 



Members 



Priscilla Alden 
Virginia Blunt 
Marjorie Boomer 
Caroline Cochran 
Constance Houghton 



Leader 



*Louise Hovde 

Sara Jobson 

Edna Laurin 

Helen Patch 
* Nancy Templeton 



Resigned 



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I'hyllis Bagg 
Elizabeth Barrett 
Mary Harry 
Susan Ik'nnett 
Catherine Blake 
Marion Bond 
Marjorie Hoiimfr 
Doris liooth 
Helen Booth 
Clarice Iiowers 
Carolyn lioyer 

{Catherine Brady 
Lucy Briggs 
Margaret Brinton 

Elizabeth Brown 
{Catherine Bulk Icy 
Eleanor Burkhardl 
Elsie Butler 
Josephine Cannon 
Eunice Clapp 
[Catherine Clarkson 
Caroline Cockran 
Katherlne Cogswell 
Margaret Cook 

Frances Copp 
Alice Cm-wen 

Anna Dallinger 
Constance Davidge 

Cornelia llean 



Prances Dorris 

Rose Dyson 
Faith Ely 
Elizabeth Eulass 
Frances French 
Lavinia Fyke 
Mary Gerould 
Dorothy Gile 
Dorothy Gordon 
Elizabeth Gould 
Barbara Grant 
Kathleen Grant 
Beulah Hanson 
Martha Harper 
Emma Heap 
Prances Higginbotham 
Julia Hininielsliaeb 
Helen Hitchcock 
Maltha Hooker 

Constance Houghton 
Louise Hovde 
Hilda Hulbert 

Josephine Bui i 
Kathryn James 

C iMi. i i II.' Jones 

Elisabeth Keith 
Edna Kiesewettor 
I. eta Kirk 
\ t li ii<- Knight 



Grania Knott 
Anne Kohler 
Elizabeth Dane 

Harriet Lane 
Edna Laurin 
Marion Leonard 
Helen Lincoln 
Margaret Linley 
Sally Linley 
Helen Low 
Ruth McKeown 
Ellen Macomber 
Helen Maguire 

Josephine Maiiiiion 

Florence Moling 
Helen Moor 
Elisabeth Morrow 
Virginia Mueller 
Pauline Page 
Alice Paine 
Margaret Pantzer 
Marjorie Parsons 
Vivian Peeling 
Elizabeth Poole 
olive Potter 
Barbara Priest 
Mai i Rhodes 

Elsie Riley 

Elinor Robinson 



Elizabeth Robinson 
Ellen Rogers 
Mary Rossen 
Eleanor Rust 
Sylvia Scaramelli 
Marie-Louise Schmauk 
Mary Sebrinc 
Wilma Shannon 
Heli ne Shincel 
M.ny Sloan 
Dorothea Spieth 
Heal lice Stuart 
Josephine Tompkins 
Carolyn Van der Veer 
Dorothea Walker 
Elizabeth Ward 
Elizabeth Webb 
Prances West 
Charlotte Wetherell 

Kun ice Wheeler 
Lucy Williams 
Mildred Williams 
Virginia Williams 
Prances Wilson 
isobel Wiener 

Lettie Witherspoon 
Dorothy WoodrutT 
Mary Wrinht 



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Caroline Bedell 
Merl Fisk 
Mary Gerould 
Elizabeth Keith 



Junior Year 



Terice Liebeskind 
Grace Magee 
Ruth Seinfel 
Josephine Tompkins 



Senior Year 



Agnes Hope Adams 

Margaret Arnstein 

Phyllis Bagg 

Carol Louise Baker 

Marie Louise Barstow 

Elizabeth Huntington Brodel 

Katherine Brownell 

Isobel Ramsay Buckley 

Anna Elizabeth Dallinger 

Dorothy Woodworth Dunning 

Ruth Avis Hamilton 

Doris Hill 

Catharine Bushnell Jones 

Miriam Estella Keck 

Leta Kirk 

Elizabeth Barnum Lane 

Harriet Page Lane 

Margaret Stair Linley 

Jessie Bross Lloyd 



Harriet Martha McAvoy 
Ruth Elaine McBarron 
Elizabeth Walcott McClellan 
Bernice Marilla Mcllhenny 
Mary Elizabeth Mangan 
Carolyn Melchers 
Louva Brockway Parker 
Rebecca Weaver Petrikin 
Dene Anna Rachdorf 
Mary Elizabeth Ramsey 
Marie Agnes Rolland 
Margaret Grey Scott 
Catherine Bevans Shinier 
Erna Pauline Sievers 
Mary Carter Sloan 
Catherine Louise Spencer 
Dorothy Lancaster Tait 
Marion Chatterly Turner 
Charlotte Amelia Wetherell 



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President, First Semester 
Entertainment Committee 



Caroline Bedell 
Anna Dallinger 



Priscilla Alden 
Adelaide Avery 
Caroline Bedell 
Anna Dallinger 
Frances Dorris 
Mary Gerould 
Eleanor Gilchrist 
Hilda Hulbert 
Caroline Jenkins 
Miriam Keck 
Harriet Lane 
Margaret Linley 
Jessie Lloyd 



Members 



Ruth McBarron 
Florence Meling 
Elisabeth Morrow 
Dorothy Pickard 
Ethel Ranney 
Elizabeth Robinson 
*Alma Rosen 
* Helen Sargent 
Ruth Seinfel 
Dorothy B. Smith 
Catherine Spencer 
Jeannette Strodthoff 
Nancy Templeton 
Isabella Walsh 



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President, First Semester 
Senior Executive 
Editor 



Lucy Barnard 
Eunice Blake 
*Eula Brown 
Elsie Butler 
Cheryl Crawford 
Mary Foss 
Grania Knott 
Dorothy Libaire 
Sally Linley 
Virginia McCalmont 
Genevieve McEldowney 
Louise McGregor 
Dorothy Miller 



Genevieve McEldowney 

. Virginia McCalmont 

. Clara Williams 



Members 



Cecile Phillips 
Elinor Robinson 
Virginia Robinson 
Wilma Shannon 
Mary Sloan 
Margaret Sturges 
*Ruth Tester 
Kathleen Tildsley 
Elizabeth Wanamaker 
Eunice Wheeler 
Clara Williams 
Frances Wilson 
Linda Woodwortb 



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"□ 



CT 



n 



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Members 



Margaret Arnstein 
Mary Barry 
Alice Bennett 
Eunice Blake 
Isobel Buckley 
Katherine Bulkley 
Ida Burgess 
Mabel Cahoon 
Margaret Callahan 
Josephine Cannon 
Barbara Churchill 
Mary E. Crawford 
Constance Davidge 
Cornelia Dean 
Pauline Fairbanks 
Mary Foss 
Frances French 
Clarace Gait 
Elizabeth Gould 
Julia Himmelsbach 
Martha Hooker 
Virginia Hunt 
Josephine Hurst 
Judelle Huston 
Dorothy Jealous 



Caroline Jenkins 
Catharine Jones 
Mary Joslin 
Alice Judson 
Vieno Kajander 
Anne Kohler 
Helen Low 
Martha McAvoy 
Ruth McBarron 
Bernice Mcllhenny 
Elizabeth Mellon 
Virginia Mueller 
Esther Page 
Elizabeth Poole 
Mary Ramsey 
Alice Sailor 
Sylvia Scaramelli 
Wilma Shannon 
Kathleen Tildsley 
Josephine Tompkins 
Elizabeth Towle 
Marjorie Rankin 
Elizabeth Wanamaker 
Mildred Williams 
Lettie Witherspoon 



Linda Woodworth 



n 



D. 



182 



n 



a 



D 





Officers 



President . 
Vice-President . 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Members 



Margaret Barnes 
Katharine Brownell 
Jeanette Coon 
Helen Curtis 
Frances French 
Grace Gibson 
Martha Hooker 



Sylvia Scaramelli 

. Helen Low 

Dorothv Winslow 



Jessie Lloyd 
Helen Low 
Irene Rachdorf 
Sylvia Scaramelli 
Kathleen Tildsley 
Natalie Van Ulm 
Anne Whyte 



Dorothy Winslow 



n 



□. 



U 



is:: 



"□ 



u 



D 



LT 



MILWWEAL SOCIETY 




d-LS 



President . 
Vice-President 



*Caroline Bedell 

Susan Bennett 

Isobel Buckley 

Elsie Butler 

Catharine Calhoun 
**Catherine Chipman 
*Eunice Clapp 

Miriam Dionne 
**Martha Dorman 

Frances Dorris 

Justine Entz 

Hanna Faterson 

Lavinia Fyke 

Edith Gaff 
*Mary Gerould 

Ruth Hamilton 

Doris Hill 

Caroline Jenkins 



Officers 



Members 



Dorothy Pickard 
. * Irene Trafforcl 



*Miriam Keck 
**Juliet Kind 
Eleanor Krick 
Margaret Linley 

*Jessie Lloyd 

*Ruth McBarron 
Virginia McCalmont 
Elizabeth Parkhurst 
Cecile Phillips 
Dorothy Pickard 
Irene Rachdorf 
Ruth Seinfel 
Wilma Shannon 

*Dorothy Smith 
Muriel Stevenson 
Irene Trafford 
Mary Wallace 
Elizabeth Ward 
*Charlotte Wetherell 



* Resigned 
**Left College 



n 



a 



184 



n 



CT 



U 



IT 




President . 



Officer 



Dorothy Tait 



Members 



Miriam Dionne 
Louva Parker 
Dorothy Pickard 



Emilie Sears 
Dorothy Tait 
Janet Wilcox 



Nancy Woehnert 



n 



ol 



is:. 



*□ 



CT 



I] 



LT 




Officers 



President . 
Secretary (1923-1924) 



Louva Parker 
Dorothea Walker 



Members 

Katherine Connell Louva Parker 

Dorothea Walker 



n 



0. 



186 



"□ 



a 



n 






T)Cfi«jj#V 



o 



11 il 11 




President . 
Vice-President 



*Isobel Buckley 

*Alice Curwen 
Dorothy Dunning 
Ruth Hamilton 
Lucelia Harrington 
Katharine Hough 
**Florelle Johnson 

♦Elizabeth Keith 
Edna Kiesewetter 



Officers 



Members 



Lois Smith 
Elizabeth Lane 



Harriet Kuhn 
Elizabeth Lane 
Esther Mason 
Martha McAvoy 
Mary O'Donnell 
*Ruth Seinfel 
Lois Smith 
Marion Turner 
Charlotte Wetherell 



* Resigned 

••Left College 



n 



a 



1ST 



n 



a 



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j>cfvi«-t.e^ 



FMTAnriH 



1 MAI 






President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Officers 



Elizabeth Parkhurst 
. Mary Mangan 
. Elizabeth Lane 



Members 



Hope Adams 
Katherine Clarkson 
Margaret G. Cook 
*Dorothy Dunning 
Hanna Faterson 
Virginia Folsom 
Lucelia Harrington 
Katharine Hough 



Elizabeth Lane 
Doris Latimer 
* Martha McAvoy 
Mary Mangan 
Elizabeth Parkhurst 
Eleanor Rust 
Jeannette Strodthoff 
Kathryn Taylor 



* Resigned 



n 



a. 



188 



n 



u 



D 



n 




COLLO 



Officers 



President 
Secretary 



Martha McAvoy 
Josephine Mannion 



Josephine Bentz 
Eunice Clapp 
Dorothy Dunning 
Lavinia Fyke 
Janet Greenburgh 



Members 

** Dorothy Gray 
Edna Kiesewetter 
Arline Knight 
Josephine Mannion 
Esther Mason 
Martha McAvoy 



* Resinned 
••Left College 



n 



ol 



L89 



n 



a 



"D 



LT 




Officer 



President . 


• 


Hope Adams 




Members 


Hope Adams 




Doris Latimer 


Mary Berryman 




* Jessie Lloyd 


Cheryl Crawford 




Elinor Loeb 


Mary Gerould 




**Frances Milburne 


Eleanor Krick 




Margaret Pantzer 


Elizabeth Lane 




** Eleanor Poppenhusen 




Katherine 


Whitney 


* Resigned 




"Left College 







£3 



Q 



190 



"□ 



CT 



D 



LT 



BWtmmAl SMEW 




Officers 



President . 
Vice-President 



Alice Curwen 
Eunice Clapp 



Members 



Margaret Arnstein 
Caroline Bedell 
Rebecca Beeman 
Elizabeth Brodel 
Anne Brown 
Eunice Clapp 
Mary Elizabeth Crawford 
Alice Curwen 
Dorothy Dunning 
Kathleen Grant 
Janet Greenburgh 



Beulah Hanson 
Edna Kiesewetter 
Marion Leonard 
Nora Nelson 
Dorothy O'Brien 
Mary O'Donnell 
* Eleanor Poppenhusen 
Edith Showers 
Lois Smith 
Marion Turner 
Elizabeth Torrev Williams 



Lucy Williams 



n 



* Left ColU't'e 



ol 



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"□ 



u 



D 



d 




Officers 



President . 

Vice-President . 
Senior Executive 



Members 



Jane Baker 
Mary Barry 
Susan Bennett 
Caroline Boyer 
Lydia Brigham 
Barbara Churchill 
Gladys Clark 
Margaret Cook 
Alice Curwen 
Cornelia Dean 
* Dorothy Dreyfus 
Rose Dyson 
Merl Fisk 

Elizabeth Fitzgerald 
Alice Garlichs 
Emma Heap 



Josephine Tompkins 

Emma Heap 

. Gladys Clark 



Frances Higginbotham 
Caroline Jenkins 
Mary Joslin 
Vieno Kajander 
Elizabeth Keith 
Dorothy Libaire 
Grace Magee 
Ruth McBarron 
Bernice Mcllhenny 
Elizabeth Mellon 
Katherine Sears 
Ruth Seinfel 
Charlotte Smith 
Eleanor Stubbs 
Josephine Tompkins 
Charlotte Wetherell 



* Left College 



n 



□_ 

:zr 



192 



"D 



m 



D 



LT 




SPAMISH 
CW3 




Officers 



Active President 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Vera Baker 
Francese Bothfeld 
Katherine Cogswell 
Florence Drake 
Rose Dyson 



Members 



Lillian Lowenthal 
Francese Bothfeld 



Vieno Ka.jander 
Lillian Lowenthal 
Helen Maguire 
Doris Merriam 
Augusta Smith 



n 



ol 



L93 



"D 



CT 



U 



LT 




Officer 



President . 


Erna Sievers 




Members 


Elizabeth Erodel 


Genevieve McEldowney 


** Dorothy Burnham 


Elsie Riley 


** Isabel Davenport 


Marie Rose 


*Lillian Duberg 


**Lillian Rulnick 


Rose Dyson 


Erna Sievers 


Beulah Hanson 


Ruth Townsend 


Kathryn Johnson 


Edith Trussell 


Marian Leonard 


Charlotte Wetherell 




Muriel Wise 


** Left College 




* Resigned 





n 



Q 



194 



"D 



LT 



D 



D" 




President 



Officer 



Alice Garlichs 



Mary Barry 
Rebecca Beeman 
Alice Garlichs 
Doris Hassell 
Helen Heffernan 



Members 

Vieno Kajander 
**Mary Reynolds 
Sylvia Scaramelli 
Emilie Sears 
Augusta Smith 
Dorothea Walker 



*• Left College 



S3 



nl 



i ■ 



"D 



CT 



D 



[J 




President 
Treasurer 



Officers 



Georgiana Schaub 
Impi Arvo 



Members 



Impi Arvo 
Catherine Blake 
Marion Bond 
Clarice Bowers 
Anne Burgess 



Mary Coolidge 
Doris Lattimer 
Edna Laurin 
Eleanor Mason 
Georgiana Schaub 



n 



o. 



196 



n 



CT 



n 



D" 




MUM CLOB 



Officers 



President .... 
Vice-President . 
Secretary-Treasurer . 
Chairman of Entertainment 



. Irene Trafford 

. Susan Bennett 

Dorothea Spieth 

Mildred Buffington 



Mkmhkks 



Susan Bennett 
Katharine Browned 
Mildred Buffington 
Frances Dorris 
Hanna Faterson 
Elizabeth Gifford 



Elizabeth Gould 
Celia Herstein 
Eleanor Lydall 
Olive Sharrett 
Dorothea Spieth 
Kut h Townsend 



Abbv Trafford 



n 



ol 



197 



n 



lt 



"D 



CJ 



CLEF 





Officers 



President . ... 


• 


. Dorothy Smith 


Vice-President . 


. 


Eunice Wheeler 


Treasurer . . . . 


Members 


Ellen Rogers 


Caroline Bedell 




Margaret Pantzer 


Hilda Hulbert 




Ellen Rogers 


Sally Linley 




Dorothy Smith 


** Marie Major 




Dorothea Walker 


Louise McGregor 




Eunice Wheeler 


* Resigned 
**Left College 





n 



a 



198 



n 



a 



El 



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^ ^ ^ /~\ £Z^ /^> ^"^ ^ ^-N 



President . 
Vice-President 



Officers 



Dorothy Pickard 
Marian Leonard 





Members 


* Adelaide Avery 


Eleanor Lawther 


*Lucy Barnard 


Marian Leonard 


Eunice Blake 


Dorothy Libaire 


Cheryl Crawford 


Florence Meling 


Marian Hagler 


Dorothy Pickard 


Martha Hooker 


Margaret Sturges 


Kathryn James 


**Ruth Tester 


Crania Knott 


Rosalind Wright 


••Left College 




* Rcdiened 





n 



nl 



199 



n 



CJ 



D 



n 




)Tudio Clue 



President 
Treasurer 



Officers 



Margaret Sturges 
Justine Entz 



Phyllis Bagg 
Lydia Brigham 
Elizabeth Brodel 
**Eugenie Crosby 
Justine Entz 
Eleanor Fuller 
Helen Hitchcock 



Members 

Josephine Hurst 
** Helen Kendrick 
Dorothy Miller 
Eloise Morford 
Marguerite Rebboli 
Elinor Robinson 
Margaret Sturges 
Isabella Walsh 



**Left College 



n 



a 



200 



"□ 



CT 



n 



CT 




. m/////////////////MWWM///l//ff//IHIIIIIMUUilUIIIIIIIIIIIIIII,. ''//. '/, 

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ue Pencil 



President 
Secretary 



Officers 



. Frances Dorris 
Eleanor Gilchrist 



Members 



Phyllis Bagg 
Lucy Barnard 
Margaret Brinton 
Frances Dorris 
Eleanor Gilchrist 
Helen Hitchcock 
Hilda Hulberl 
**Anne Lackey 



Harriet Lane 
Margaret Linley 
Sally Linley 
Jessie Lloyd 
Genevieve McEldowney 
Cecile Phillips 
** Miriam Spectorsky 
W'ilma Shannon 



Clara Williams 



•» Left College 



n 



nl 



20] 



"D 



3 



CT 



n 



n 




President . 
Secretary . 
Senior Executive 



Officers 



Elizabeth Keith 

Nora Nelson 

Catharine Calhoun 



Members 

Frances Bolton 
Catharine Calhoun 
Eunice Clapp 
*Virginia Cosby 
Anna Dallinger 
Lillian Duberg 

* Dorothy Dunning 
Alberta Flanagan 

* Helen Forbes 
Eleanor Fuller 
Lavinia Fyke 
Grace Gibson 
Dorothy Gordon 
Martha Hooker 
Elizabeth Keith 

* Miriam Keck 

Carolyn Van der 



*Elizabeth Lane 
Helen Low 
Grace Magee 

Perchik Melik 
Nora Nelson 
Olive Potter 
**Lillian Rulnick 
Nell Russell 
Mary Sebring 
Helene Shincel 
Eleanor Stubbs 
Virginia Thieme 
Mary Wallace 
Elizabeth Webb 

*Jean Wise 
Lettie Witherspoon 
Veer 



*» Left College 
* Resigned 



n 



n 



202 



n 



a 



"D 



n 




GRAND-DAUGHTER 



Lucy Barnard 
Caroline Bedell 
Eunice Blake 
Bettina Blodgett 
Elizabeth Brodel 
Anne Brown 
Cornelia Cochrane 
Dorothy Dunning 
Clarace Gait 
Dorothy Gray 
Helen Hartzell 
Catharine Jones 
Harriet Lane 

Elizabeth Torrey 



Helen Lincoln 
Jessie Lloyd 
Louise Marion 
Elisabeth Morrow 
Dorothy Ordway 
Helen Patch 
Marjorie Rankin 
Mary Rossen 
Jane Shoemaker 
Margaret Sparhawk 
Kathleen Tildsley 
Elizabeth Ward 
Eunice Wheeler 
Williams 




n 



Q 



203 



n 



[j 



U 



w 




n 



CL 



204 



~U 



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D~ 




n 



ol 



205 



"□ 



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n 



Q 



206 




CL:3Pfc-WCfc-«.-~ 



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n 



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MARY SLOAN 



g>mith (Unll^p Atl^lriir Aaanriation 



Senior Officers 



Mary Sloan 



Vice-President 



Representatives 



Banket ball 
Virginia Hunt 

Hockey 

Virginia Thieme 

Crew 
Virginia Blunt 



Swimwiing 
*Lucy Barnard Eleanor Lucas 

Archery 

Catharine Jones 

Outing Club 
Anne Brown 



Junior Officers 



Mary Sloan 



/'/•< 8td( nt 



Representatives 



Baseball 
*Katherine Trowbridge 



Margaret Hamp 

Cricket 

Eleanor Rust 

Sophomore Officers 

"■Virginia McCalmont \ 
Mary Sloan \ 
Ruth McBarron 



Archery 
Edna Kieseweth r 

Boat-House Manager 

Lois Cochran 

( 'lub-House Managi r 
Dorothv Pickard 



'/'/( a sun r 

Seen tary 



n 



* Resinned 



d1 



209 



T2 



UJ 



TJ 



n 




1925 Hfontora of All -g>mttl) 
laskrtball ®ram 



Edith Gaff, 1925 
Virginia Hunt, 1925 
Georgianna Kline, 1924 
Anne Lewis, 1925 



Eleanor Lucas, 1925 
Bernice Mcllhenny, 1924, 1925 
Elizabeth Poole, 1924 
Nancy Templeton, 1924, 1925 



Senior Basketball Team 

Captain, Nancy Templeton 

Forwards Centers Guards 

Anne Lewis Virginia Hunt Katherine Bulkley 

Bernice Mcllhenny Eleanor Lucas Edith Gaff 

Elizabeth Poole Nancy Templeton Georgianna Kline 

Junior Team 

Captain, Nancy Templeton 

Centers 
Virginia Hunt 
Eleanor Lucas 
Nancy Templeton 
Elizabeth Ward 



Forwards 
Barbara Churchill 
Anne Lewis 
Bernice Mcllhenny 
Elizabeth Poole 



Guards 
Marjorie Boomer 
Katherine Bulkley 
Edith Gaff 
Georgianna Kline 



n 



□_ 



210 



n 



a 



~a 



cr 



Sophomore Team 
Captain, Nancy Templeton 



Forwards 
Anne Lewis 
Bernice Mcllhenny 
Elizabeth Poole 



Centers 
Eleanor Lucas 
Lenore Seymour 
Nancy Templeton 



Guards 
Edith Gaff 
Georgianna Kline 
Helen Sargent 



Forwards 
Florieda Batson 
Mary Dickson 
Emma Heap 



Freshman Team 
Captain, Nancy Templeton 
Centers 



Nancy Templeton 
Lenore Seymour 
Elizabeth Ward 



Guards 
Edith Gaff 
Georgianna Kline 
Marceline Reyburn 




n 



ol 



211 



n 



LJ 



U 



lt 




IQ25 Hkmbmi nf AU-§>mttlj Sjnrknj Ukam 

Barbara Churchill, 1924 Eleanor Lucas, 1924 

Martha Houser, 1922, 1923 Virginia McCalmont, 1922 

Virginia Hunt, 1923, 1924 Bernice Mcllhenny, 1923, 1924 

Eleanor Rust, 1923 

Senior Year 
Captain, Virginia Hunt 

Forwards 



Katherine Bulkley 
Virginia Hunt 



Barbara Churchill 



Martha Houser 



Alice Judson 
Bernice Mcllhenny 



Helen Patch 
Half-Backs 

Eleanor Rust 
Full-Backs 

Eleanor Lucas 



Elizabeth Poole 



Virginia Thieme 



n 



Q 



212 



"□ 



en ra 



lt 



Junior Year 

Captain, Virginia Hunt 

Forwards 

Katherine Bulkley Alice Judson 

Virginia Hunt Jessie Lloyd 

Bernice Mcllhenny 

Half -Backs 
Eleanor Lucas Elizabeth Poole 

Eleanor Rust 

Full-Backs 
Dorothy Dunning Martha Houser 

Virginia Thieme 

Sophomore Year 

Captain, Virginia McCalmont 
Forwards 
Babette Kafka Helen Patch 

Jessie Lloyd Virginia Thieme 

Elizabeth Ward 

Half -Backs 

Barbara Churchill Virginia McCalmont 

Catherine Spencer 

Full-Backs 
Dorothy Dunning Martha Houser 

Margaret McMillan 

Freshman Year 
Captain, Virginia McCalmont 

Forwards 

Katherine Hough Alice Judson 

Babette Kafka Ruth Norton 

Lucy Williams 

Half -Backs 

Barbara Churchill Virginia McCalmont 

Catherine Spencer 

Full-Backa 

Dorothy Dunning Martha Houser 

Margaret McMillan 

El [51 

t== :zr" 

218 



li 



T\ 



cr 



"D 



d 




1925 fMember nf AU-g>mitlj laarball Gfcam 



Jane Baker 
Catherine Blake 
Frances French 
Arline Knight 



Jane Baker, 1923, 1924 

Junior Team 
Captain, Jane Baker 

Mary Rossen 



Catherine Shinier 
Helene Shincel 
Eleanor Stubbs 



Katherine Talbot 



n 



Jane Baker 
Catherine Blake 
Virginia Blunt 
Gladys Clark 



Sophomore Year 
Captain, Jane Baker 

Catherine Shinier 



Helene Shincel 
Sarah Streeter 
Katherine Talbot 



Katherine Trowbridge 



am 



214 



u 



m 



en ra 



Freshman Year 

Captain, Margaret Hamp 

Jane Baker Margaret Hamp 

Catherine Blake Mary Ritchie 

Katherine Bulkley Catherine Shimer 

Elizabeth Fitzgei^ald Katherine Trowbridge 

Mary Wallace 



1925 iMnttbrr nf AU-S>mtih SrnntH ufeam 

*Eugenie Crosby 

First Team 
Eugenie Crosby Lois Smith 

Second Team 
Alice Bennett Elizabeth Greenwood 

Third Team 
Dorothy Dunning Margaret Elliott 



• l.lr Colleee 



[J 



ill lal 






n 



n 



u 



D~ 




n 



1925 ifemhrrs of AU-^mitlj (Ertrkrt Gkam 



Elizabeth Keith, 1923 
Elizabeth Lane, 1923 



Margaret Robinson, 1923 
Eleanor Rust, 1923 



Sophomore Year 
Captain, Eleanor Rust 



Elizabeth Brbdel 
Anna Dallinger 
Lillian Duberg 
Pauline Fairbanks 
Merl Fisk 



Elizabeth Keith 
Elizabeth B. Lane 
Eleanor Parkhurst 
Margaret Robinson 
Eleanor Rust 



Lucille Shyev 



Freshman Year 
Captain, Eleanor Rust 



Elizabeth Brodel 
Eula Brown 
Alice Curwen 
Merl Fisk 
Helen Hitchcock 



Elizabeth Keith 
Elizabeth B. Lane 
Margaret Linley 
Doris Merriam 
Margaret Robinson 



Eleanor Rust 



□_ 



216 



ID 



a 



u 



n 




\BZ5Mtn\btt of AU-g>mitlj Arrljpry ©ram 

Josephine Hurst, 1924 

Junior Year 

Captain, Catharine Jones 
Lois Boynton Catharine Jones 

Josephine Hurst Margaret Ward 

Sophomore Year 

Captain, Catharine Jones 
Elsie Butler Josephine Hurst 

Mary Crawford Catharine Jones 

Freshman Year 

Captain, Catharine Jones 
Elsie Butler Catharine Jones 

Mary Crawford Mary Sebring 



D 



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-M7 



"□ 



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1025 ifflrmbrr nf All-&tmth <£n>w 



Alice Curwen 



Carol Baker 
Beatrice Stuart 



Junior Yeae 

Captain, Virginia Blunt 

Cox, Virginia Blunt 

Anne Whyte 



Alice Curwen 



n 



Cox, Caroline Bedell 

Eloise Morford Frances Copeland 

Helen Curtis Helen Geiger 



Cox, Marian Donahue 



Eleanor Pote 
Hilda Anderson 



Eunice Clapp 
Dorothy Jealous 



Cox, Dorothy Winslow 

Esther Mason Elizabeth Lane 

Sylvia Scaramelli Mary Sloan 



Q 



218 



n 



Hi 



CJ 



"D 



D~ 




* Helen Sargent Virginia Thieme 

1025 ilembrra of AU-&mitl? Swrn* ®pam 



Katherine Atwater 
Virginia Blunt 



Frances Copeland 
Beatrice Stuart 



Senior Team 
Captain, Frances Copeland 
Jane Baker Frances Copeland 

Catherine Blake Frances Copp 

Virginia Blunt Mary Crawford 

Marjorie Boomer Janet Greenburgh 

Helen Booth Eloise Morford 

Beatrice Stuart 

Substitutes 

Katherine Atwater Elizabeth Parkhurst 

Irene Rachdorf 



n 



* Left College 



ol 






"□ 



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D 



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^ <^ <* 



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V, 



I I I I I I I I 




1925 ffitfe Okiarba 



Eunice Blake 
Virginia Blunt 



Helen Booth 
Babette Kafka 



Helene Shincel 



1925 g>hrimmtng ®pam 



Virginia Blunt 
Josephine Cannon 
Carolyn Cochran 
Dorothy Dunning 



Babette Kafka 
Eloise Morford 
Helen Rice 
Helen Wulbern 



n 



a 



220 



n 



13 



U 



LT 




iFlnat lag 

May 26, 1924 

Total Score 

1924—77.66 Points 
1925—71.7 Points 

•Patjeaut 

Down Through the Ages 



1. 


Rome 


9. 


America Columbus 


2, 


Egypt 


Id. 


Pocahontas and Captain .John 


•». 


Spain — Vasca de Gama 




Smith 


4. 


Italy 


1 1. 


The Pilgrims 


5. 


Switzerland The Story of 


12. 


The Boston T<a Party 




William Tell 


13. 


Washington Crossing the Delaware 


6. 


Germany —Martin Luther 


] I. 


The Westward Movement 


7. 


Kranee —The French Revolution 


15. 


The Whiskey Rebellion 


8. 


Napoleon 


16. 


Finale 



n 



ol 



221 



"□ 



1< 



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"D 



n 




Game 
Archery 
Baseball 
Hockey 



3fel& Bag 

May 24, 1924 

Won by the Class of 1924 

Score Players 

119-110 1924-1925 

26-6 1925-1926 

2-1 1924-1925 



Winner 
1924 
1926 
1924 



Total Number of Points 

1924—26 
1925—18 
1926—16 



n 



ol 



222 



"□ 



CT 



D 



CJ 




n 



Hi 



•22:\ 



n 



% 



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n 



CJ 




n 



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224 



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JUNIOR STEP SONG 



WORDS BY 
HILDA HULBERT 



MUSIC BY 
DOROTHY SMITH 



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l.TradiTiona of oar Alma. MaTer OTanJ arte -I one* seTcnejOne in spirit are her childreh/TjSo 
£. jB»-it we wnoVe live J tocr«TKer here Mor* closely sti I) a»-e DoanJjA bond of comradeship rias. drawn 
3- I n« grana*ur of tradition blinds Our eyes wiTn danlincr liantj From you alone we da*-© To Take 1 ne 



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years may intervene; One The loyally, (he love. One The memVy dear, 

More firm out hearts arounj. On us toqethev fell the light", With us you sought the truth, 
torch that turns so Wright. In humbleness we take your plaoe Who Know and love you well, 



ifcyn J- T J J 


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The happiness of four brief years That pass so Quickly here We sadly let you go at la»t, We 
And you who leave us know The strength and weakness of our youth. 
Through you lnepasT has reached us now, As you bid usTarewell. 



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Commemoration Ode 

No longer now from quiet midnight sky 

Does flaming death flash down : 

No longer now from countryside and town 

Are marching thousands driven forth to die ; 

For we are done with war : the cannon cease ; 

Only the endless silence of the slain. 

And wasted lands and broken lives remain ; 

And through that silence is heard again 

The age-old cry for peace. 

Peace! And there is no peace, 

For out of greed and fear and hate 

What peace can come? The asking is too late. 

A war long growing in distrust and greed 

Yields its black fruit, and in a nation's need 

Is reaped a harvest desolate. 

We are afraid, as once we were afraid ; 

For though we send our alms across the sea, 

A careless dole for human misery. 

The hand of trust and friendliness is stayed ; 

And so we wait. 

Oh Washington, strong spirit and serene! 
How would it grieve your mighty soul to know 
The land you lived for changed and fallen so. 
To see the souls of men grown dull and mean. 
Give us your courage ! Give us eyes to see, 
And wills to do the right, unchecked by fear; 
Make us to hold the brotherhood of man more 

dear 
Than any nation's brief supremacy. 
Give us your courage, that we may not wait 
And reach our wakening too late. 
Roused by a signal dread ; 
When on our ears shall break once more the 

tread 
Of marching feet, 

And once again we mourn a million dead, 
And every country road and village street 
Runs red. 

Frances Downs. 



Realization 

You showed me first your wind-tossed hair. 
An elf had blown a red leaf there. 
Your golden mermaid's eyes were fair — 
So when I found your leaden soul, 
I did not care. 

RlTii Mi'Hahuon. 



Tribute 

I envy you 

that you should have 

a trust in me 

1 cannot fill ; 

the muted beauty 

of your thought 

is singing in me 

still. 

Cbcili Phillips. 



Dishes 

She washes them swiftly in a soap bubble spatter, 

Daintily the teacups, swimmingly the platter ; 

Numerically, glasses and the ordinary plates. 

In sixes and eights, sixes and eights ; 

A bit of wine flavor in a silver spoon. 

Some froth on the cake cutter curved like the 

moon ; 
And latterly the scorch on the agate pan 
With the peak of a witch and the stoop of a man. 
She twists it with a flourish, the tow-headed mop. 
And compresses her lips as she scoops up the 

slop. 

Cbcile Phillips. 



Litany 

Today, for certain reasons unavoidable, 

I must go down the wood-road that we walked 

Together in November of last year. 

I have a fear of traveling alone 

That perilous pathway through a burning world. 

May I pass safely onward through the blue 

Of smoky autumn clinging to the hills, 

And may I not be choked 

By bitter odor of the charring year. 

From blaze of bittersweet, from smouldering 

sumach flame 
Oh. Lord, deliver me! 

Sally Lin ley. 



Poem 

A moon, more like a feather than a moon. 

Was spilling silver in a careless way 

Upon a pine tree, where it stood blue-grey 

In shadows from the hill. A world so still 

The thought of you came like a rushing wind. 

Untying shadows that had lain half pinned 

To earth, and bruising through the evening air, 

Which lay as quiet as a grey-eyed pool. 

Wrapped in soft shadows, purple-tinged and cool. 

Almost I thought I had forgotten you ; 

I had supposed a feather moon was quite 

Enough. You came ; and everywhere the night 

Drew by, and framed a background for your face. 

Slip of a thing, you swayed beneath those trees 

Whose branches only stir for stoutest breeze, 

And I. who hold no faith in phantom ghost. 

Watched your slim lingers push aside the veil 

Of clinging memory, and saw you, frail 

As breath of summer wind, stand clearly there. 

Wing of a bird against the iiuivering leaf. 

Falls no more lightly than your glance, as brief 

As drifting flakes of winter's snow. 

You smiled 1 think and. stir of wind, were 

gone. 
While over sky a passing cloud was drawn. 
That dipped the world in sudden velvet dark. 

NOW, 1 have always fear lest I shall see 
A leather moon spill silver on a tree. 

C IROLINl ,H skins. 



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With Footlights Between 

Marionettes pulled by strings 

Are we. 

You who watch us, 

You foolish tense faces, 

Will it make your breath come fast 

To see a wooden Pyramus 

Call through the wall to a wooden Thisbe? 

Does the kiss on the carved lips of a puppet 

Mean more to you than life? 

Then why are you here ? 

You are cold and weary white 

With the passing of night 

That has torn a thousand fires from your eyes. 

You have conquered flesh, it's true, 

But your soul has conquered you, 

And tonight an actor lives, a poet dies. 

Fame you see heaped at your feet. 
And you hear the steady beat 
Of applause, unstinting audiences give. 
You are perfect, then, tonight, 
But are other goals in sight ? 

When an actor dies, what is there left to live ? 
Margaret Brinton. 



Night Piece 



First Grief 

Be not afraid, dear love, of this the night ; 

All nights have ending, every dawn is sure. 
Think not that with one snuffing of the light 

Day dies forever. Worlds and suns endure. 
Because your eyes can see no color where 

The dark has dimmed the garden into gray, 
Are roses duller, or the scarlet flare 

Of wind-blown poppies cooler than by day? 
The world is all unchanged and will again 

Gleam golden to the sun. Nor will these hours 
When darkness veils all color, and your pain 

Gathers the incandescence of white flowers, 
Be all ungrateful to remember when 
The night is gone and day relumed again. 
Dorothy Tait. 



Coquette 

Had you a satin cloak, all stiff 
With gold embroidery, and clasped 
Tight with golden link, you'd cry 
For royal ermine. 

— Had you pearls, 
Diamonds would be the only way 
To win your quick capriciousness. 
Oh, if you held the sun itself, 
Its heat would tire you, and you'd ask 
A cooler, safer toy, — the jmoon. 
I doubt if you could ever know 
Quite, why, when you demand my love, 
I offer only poetry. 

Margaret Brinton. 



What is stirring there, down beside the river, 
In the long still hours that come before the 
dawn ; 

Surely I saw the parted branches quiver, 
Surely, ere a twig is broken — follow on! 



Dew hangs still and heavy on the hedges. 
Dew lies cold and grey upon the grass ; 

Stop ! What path leads among those 
ledges ? 
Can these be footprints where we pass ? 



rocky 



Follow ! Follow ! For down beside the river 
He comes to drink, the goat god. Pan, before 
the night is gone ; 
Break through dripping hedges, in the forest 
deeper, 
Hasten, the dawn comes swiftly, follow on ! 

Swiftly pursue, but there is one still swifter, 
Here at the water's edge you must pause and 
wait ; 
Heard you a twig crack far across the river? 
Was that a mocking laugh, for mortals come 
too late ? 

Eerie and still stand the reeds across the river, 
Knee-deep in star gleams they wait till night 
is gone ; 
And no passing night wind wakes a single shiver, 
As they wait in the darkness where the river 
ripples on. 

Frances Dorris. 



Autumn 

Autumn is a stately woman, 

Tall, full-breasted, dark of hair : 
Low her voice, and sweet with wind-song, 

Red her lips and passing fair. 

Autumn goes bedecked so gaily, — 

Gleaming yellow is her gown ; 
Blood-red ruby, tawny topaz 

Glitter in her hair so brown. 

But her eyes are sad with brooding. 

Though bright smile her red lips part ; — 

Rippling laugh is but concealing 
Dread foreboding in her heart. 

Ruth Seinfel. 



Cinquain 



I know 

Where shadows steal, 

After the sun goes down. 

They creep in search of bygone days 

Once loved. 

Caroline Jenkins. 



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Triad 

Peace will come slowly on the folded wings of 

time, 
When memory sleeps. 
I saw old Thomas sitting in the sun, spreading his 

horny hands out like a dial 
To where the sunlight creeps; 
Feeling the hours as they pass on file; 
Muttering thickly, whimpering awhile ; 
Then nodding pertly with his crooked smile. 
Dreaming over the watch he keeps. 

Young Thomas has a touch of the sublime 

Strength in the sower, God-like when he reaps. 

They brought him home blinded from the war, 

His face afire with an inner light, 

His heart benumbed. A sickening sight 

To see him fumbling at tasks he loved before. 

Young Thomas' wife is a wild, painted creature. 

Light-hearted and laughing, whistling scraps of 
song. 

She scolds and teases, and jollys him along, 

Shrugs her shoulders when everything goes 
wrong. 

I came upon her, — starch-white, and sharp Ol fea- 
ture — 

The lamplight sputtered about her, she was star- 
ing 

Straight through the circle where the lamp was 
flaring, 

And the look in her eyes was hunted-wise, 
Tortured past all caring. 

But her lips were parted, and she was singing 
A gay old song like a thin coin ringing. 
She greeted me. strangely peaceful in her bearing 
And shook out the lettuces that she had been pre- 
paring. 

Ckcu.k Phillips. 



Fortune 

Peter will be handsome, extravagant and clever. 
Yet he swinged his chunky porridge bowl as 

clumsily as ever. 
Peter ; young imperious, haughty a bit, and 

proud ; 
Hut when he capsized on the stair he wept aloud. 
This isn't human frailty, or some star-throbbing 

jest, 
That Peter goes through childhood insulted, like 

the rest, 
Obliged to bow to door steps, to smirk and nod at 

sticks. 
To be polite to gaiter snakes and his own flying 

bricks? 
Oh, Peter, running, laughing with a dreamless 

wit, 

Dust, there between roar very toes; it gets the 

best of it. 

Cbcilb o. Phillips. 



The Princess Passes 

Hefore you rode across my path, I was very 

merry, 
Queen of the country side, brown as a berry ; 
I'd gossip with the neighbors to pass the time of 

day, 
And lie to my lover just to see what he'd say. 

Hut you rode across my path, fair and dazzling 

white, 
Fairest of princesses in the world's sight ; 
And what cared you to gossip who had the state 

to guide ? 
And you always spoke truth to the prince at your 

side. 

! after you rode out of sight, I tried to change 

my way ; 

1 never told a lie and I worked all day ; 

But the neighbors tried to make me come and sit. 
And my lover left me for a lass with more wit. 

Helen Johnson. 



Written in Sands 

Past midnight, — 

And the curving horn of the wind 
Tilts, as the forlorn light flares higher 
In a lantern held tight in the trembling, 
thinned hands 
Of a watchman alone on the night-drowned 
beach. 
Plow, master of the wind, blow ! 

Put rough lips to your strident horn again. 
Watch the man slow-circling 

Round and round on the sands. 
Heating with his hands at your shrill empti- 
ness. 
A last sound of the horn.— so! 

And his flickering, ill-smelling lamp is out. 
Hut you will let him lie then'. 
Half-buried in the in-coming tide. 

And with death's wet breath already stirring 
his hair I 



Near morning, — 

Ami the first warning lingers of the sun 

Reach down and stroke a naked-breasted 

beach. 
The tide is out. the sands smooth, 

— All but near where a giant boulder stands. 

Sentinel over this wide desolation. 

Hire, under its sheltering face. 
Are footprints, 

— Uncertain and worried like those of a hound 
in chase 

Put oir his scent , 
footprints leading to nowhere, following each 

other 
Round and round. 

otAHOAVJR Hkinton. 



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Horace, Book 1, 25 

You shun me like a little faun, 

(Chloe, stay!) 
Like the faun that trembling fears 
Every rustle that it hears, 

Startled, leaps away. 

For leaves, that flash and quiver, take 

Terror's part ; 
Small green lizards in the sun, 
Glitter as they dart and run, 

Rouse the timid heart. 

But I have not a tiger's way, 

Manner rough ; 
Do not seek your mother so, 
Chloe, follow where I go — 

You are old enough. 

Lucy Barnard. 



Afterward 

Now death has taken you, 
And to your quiet room 

I come to wonder that you lie so still ; 
There was much I had to say, 
But words are unavailing ; 

Even to the last I knew you would work your 
will. 

I had thought to watch with you. 
But the heavy silence grows 

Thick with thronging ghosts ; I cannot stay, 
Lest this quiet room should be 
On a sudden clamorous, 

I softly close the door and come away. 

Frances Dorris. 



Night Watch 



The wind is moving through the night 

Softly, restlessly, 

Stirring shadows where they hide by every hedge 

and tree ; 
The candle flame goes flickering, 
But you do not see. 
Yesterday I wept for you. 
But yesterday is past ; 
Now I sit and watch and know 
That soft and merciful and slow, 
Death will come at last. 
Death will come like waters 
Dark and cool and deep, 
Rising, slowly rising through your sleep. 
Do not move so restlessly. 
Do not struggle so ! 
Nothing more can hurt you now, 
You will never know 
When the healing waters rise, 
Cool and dark and slow. 
Sleep ! I would not have you waken — 
It is better so. 

Frances DoRRts. 



Whim 

That round-faced pool, so curiously still 

Tonight, has worn a restless look all day, 
And shadow fingers stretching from the hill 

Have drenched all color in a sodden grey. 
I passed this morning when a wisp of child 

Was poking one bare, stubby toe, beneath 
A wave, then shrieking in amazed and wild 

Surprise to feel the crisply sharpened teeth 
Of cold bite through the skin. I hurried by. 

For though each scream was even more a 
laugh, 
I had a silly whim perhaps one cry 

Might sound quite different from the rest. I 
half 
Turned back one time in make-believe concern, 

(It was just make-believe, you understand) 
But there was nothing over there to learn ; 

The child had gone, and pulsing wind had 
fanned 
The ripples into nervous rings. 

Tonight 

There is a deadness in that grey-faced pond ; 
Wind voices shriek from trees as if in fright. 

I wonder what it is they see beyond 
This heavy dark. I have been guided here 

Again by some strange fantasy, no doubt ; 
Fool to be tampering with an idle fear ; 

What black ! I wish the moon would venture 
out. 

Caroline Jekins. 



The Agnostic 



The tang of sweet geranium, 
The smell of charred wood on my thumb, 
A funny smirch like black on birch 
Across my cheek : 

David is red and soapy sleek. 
Mildred is starched, and ruffled and glum ; 
But I'm too dirty to go to church. 
(And anyhow I went last week). 

Cecile Phillips. 

The Difference 

Your thoughts 

Are stiff brown cat tails. 

Unyielding to the wind; 

And mine 

Are cool gray clouds, 

Caught in a pool. 

Turned upside down, 

And blown away. 

Caroline Jenkins. 



Etching 

All truly lovely things are black and white 
Words that sing on a printed page, 
Bare trees against a wintry hill, 
Your hair where it leaves your neck. 

Sally Linley. 



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Alma Mater 

Words by Henrietta Sperry. 10 
Music by H. D. Sleeper 

To you, O Alma Mater, 

O mother great and true, 
From all your loyal children 

Comes up the Bong anew. 
Where awinga the red sun upward. 

Where sinks he down to rest. 
Are hearts that backward turning 

Still And you Brat and beet. 

Chorus 

And gladly singing to you always 
Our loyal hearts with joy shall till ; 

O fairest, fairest Alma Mater, 
You hold and elaim us still. 



Cheer the Team as it comes on the floor. 
It's the team that will roll up the score ; 
The guards tret the ball every time 
And they pass it along the line. 
The centers then pass it with vim 
To the homes who will always put it in, 
• And the Odds will be true to the end. 
To the team of '25 and Captain Nancy. 



Tune : "Skinny-ma-rinky-dinky-doo." 
Here's to Nancy Templeton 
Captain of our team. 

Twenty-five ! 
Here's to all our players nine 
Cheer them all along the line. 

Twenty-live ! 
While you're running and you're passing and 

you're shooting on the floor. 
We will swing our feet above you, just to help 

you raise the score. 
So! Cheer with all the pep you know 
For the team that has the go. 
Twenty-five ! 



Rally Day Song, 1922 

Tune: "Leave Me With a Smili" 

Haughty, imposing, sedate and dignified. 

Learned, sage scholars, just full of undue pride ; 

That's what we thought you. 

Dear Seniors, yes for long. 

'Ere we came to college 

And found that we were wrong. 

Chorus 



For your poise, your pep 

And your famous rep. 

Seniors, we love you. 

.lust because you're peaches. 

You true friendship teach us. 

Seniors we love you. 

Always we'll admire 

You who us inspire 

With an ardor new. 

"l'is a great sensation 

Of deep adoration 

That we have for you. 



You gave us dreams unnumbered. 
And life we had not known, 

And now. Alma Mater, 

We give you back your own. 

For memories, for friendships. 

That bless each passing day 

Our toil unsought we render, 

Our debt unasked we pay. 



Though we have known you for much less than 
a year. 

We've liked Smith better- -well, just because you're 

here. 

Vnd when you leave us. we'll be so verj blue. 

No one can ever take the place of 1982. 

Choi m 



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Last Step Song, 1923 

Tune: "Where My Caravan Has Rested" 

For two years our hearts have rested 

In your keeping, '23. 

Thoughts are cherished there 

Of your spirit rare. 

Soon to be a guiding memory ; 

Smiling as we part, 

To shield a mournful heart, 

Farewell, sister class, farewell. 



You have been our inspiration, 

Your high standards can not fade. 

Nothing can efface 

The glory of your place, 

Told so feebly in our serenade. 

Smiling as we part 

To shield a mournful heart. 

Farewell, sister class, farewell. 



Tune: "Emetine" 

Oh, '23, please hear our plea, 

When you graduate don't stay away. 

Start all over in the freshman class. 

Oh, please! Just try. 

You'd never have to study, or crack a single book, 

If you repeated courses, or subjects that you took ; 

You'll find this dear old place will be even more 

like heaven. 
Oh, '23, come back as '27. 



Tune: "It Ain't Gonna Rain No More" 
Since we've been in college here 
We've praised each Senior class. 
But youth must have its fling, you know 
We've found true love at last. 

Oh, '25 is all upset, 

You say we are to blame. 

You say that we have no respect, 

But — we love you just the same. 

Oh, some may sing about a ring. 
But you don't have to weep, 
Before you all the men will fall — 
But look before you leap. 

Oh, there never were such seniors 

As 1924— 

Though you may think you're pretty good — 

We think you're even more. 

Oh, we won't weep for '24, 

But rather '28, 

Think what a lot they're going to miss 

Because they'll come too late. 

Oh, there never were such seniors 

As 1924. 

Of course you can see you're pretty good, 

You're the class we all adore. 



Tune: "Standin' in the Need of Prayer" 

We've begun our finals on this day, oh Lord, 

Standin' in the need of prayer. 

Oh, won't you make 'em different from our mid- 
years, Lord, 

This will be our only prayer. 

It's me — it's me — it's me, oh Lord, 

Standin' in the need of prayer, 

It's not my roommate, but it's me, oh Lord, 

Offerin' up you this here prayer. 

Tune: "That's Where My Money Goes" 
That's where my money goes, 
To buy collegiate clothes. 
We must have everything 
From sandals to hats of leghorn. 
When the exhibits come, 
Off to Plym Inn we run. 
Too bad — That's where my money 
It's sad — That's where my money 
Yes, Dad — That's where my money goes. 



Tune: "Ain't Nature Grand?" 
We love to see you sitting there. 
Ain't nature grand? 
We're standing up but we don't care. 
Don't we look grand? 
For we're doing something new. 
Looking Seniors down on you, 
But we can't forget who's who, 
You look so grand. 
We wonder if it took you long, 
To sing like that. 
We often wonder why it is 
We sharp or flat. 

Your songs are interspersed with wit, 
No wonder they make such a hit — 
With us it's just the opposite, 
Ain't Seniors Grand? 



Tune : Scale 
We cannot always keep a tune: 
We won't disgrace ourselves in June; 
In order that we may not fail 
We thought we'd practice on the scale. 
Do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, te, do — Do, te, la, sol, fa, 
mi, re, do. 



Tune : "Marcheta" 
Mosquito, mosquito, 
I still hear you buzzing 
Around me again and again ; 
I still feel the sting of 
Your last kiss upon me, 
Since then all my life has been pain, 
All life is madness with you here, mosquito, 
Each night finds me swatting at you. 
You're driving me crazy, 
I hate you, mosquito, 
I loathe you, mosquito, I do. 



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Tune: "When Frannie Donees With Me" 
We love dat Senior class — holy gee. 
Dere as svell as can be, 

Ve copies dere manners — ve copies dere style, 
Golly — ve copies dem all of de vhilc. 
Oh, de Seniors — de Seniors, 
Vat vill we do when dere gone? 
Inspirin' to look at, — dat's vat ve all mean, 
De trills dat ve've gotten in old John M. Greene 
Ven down in de front row dem Seniors ve've seen. 
Dat svell Senior class. 



Tune: "He Hugged and He Kissed Her in the 

Moonlight" 
She chewed it and she chewed it and the flavor 
It lasted all next day. 
I asked her if she'd park it as a favor, 
But she chewed it anyway ! 
Doggone that — chewing gum ! 



A fair young girl, once came to Smith, 

With figure quite petite-o. 

But soon she fell for Trebla's cakes and Mary 

Marguerite-o. 
And now, my friends, two years have passed, 
Same girl, but sad to say-o, 
She has grown stout ! 
Her hips stick out! 
And she is quite passe-o. 



The class of 1925 

Has crawled its way along. 
Through three long years of work and play 

And soon we will be gone. 
Our reputation steadily has grown, 

Though we have decreased in size. 
Anil very, very soon, we'll leave our old cocoon. 

And, then we'll all be butterflies. 



Tune: "Sunday School Is Over" 

Now our Prom is over, 
And we can play no more. 

We're sorry, we're sorry, 
But we can play no more. 

We've had our childish pleasures, 
We've had our girlish fun, 

But now they must stop, 
When finals have begun. 

Tune: "London Bridge In Falling Down' 

So put away your roller skates. 
Tennis balls, playing cards, 
Get your books and pencils 
And — we'll meet in the l.ibe. 

Hut-when our exams are over. 
Then we are going home. 

Hurrah I Hurrah ! For 

We are going home. 



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Oh, if you were a Freshman and driving a Ford, 

With no one to gossip about it ; 
Would you run to report of your own sweet ac- 
cord ? 

Well, maybe you would but we doubt it. 

Oh, if you were a Sophomore, and fussing at 
Prom, 
With never a Junior to scent it. 
Would you say, "do not come" when you tele- 
graphed Tom? 
Well, maybe you would but we doubt it. 

Oh, if you were a Senior, with an average of C, 

And no one to murmur about it. 
Would you give up Dramatics to try for a B? 

Well, maybe you would but we doubt it. 

Oh, if you were a Junior, who slept much too 
long. 
With no one to warn you about it. 
Would you miss out on breakfast to practice a 
song ? 
Well, maybe you would but we doubt it. 

Oh, next year if we're all on the Dean's list, en 
masse. 

With no one to worry about it, 
Will we firmly refuse to be absent from class I 

Well, maybe you would but we doubt it. 



Freshman Frolic, 1924 

Tunes: "Just Like a Gypsy" and "What'll I Do?" 

Patiently waiting we've struggled our three years 

through. 
Counting the moments until we ran play with 

you. 
Keeling that Freshmen all need advice 
Wandering, squandering 
Your time by Paradise. 
And — we thought that maybe on some of these 

autumn nights 
You'd be enthralled by the glittering Calvin lights. 
We even thought that we'd be good advisors to 

you, 
Helping you to see that in years to be 
Dreams would come true. 

BUT— 

What'll we do since your Intelligence has scared 

us blue, what'll We do? 
What'll we do with such a chosen few. t. 

to. what'll we do 7 
What'll we do with infant prodigiee, who don't 

Feel strange and new | 
What'll we do 7 foi there li nothing we ean d" foi 

you, what'll we dot 



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Tune: "Reuben, Reuben, I've Been Thinking" 
Green and fresh as early onions 
We do our work with might and vim. 
Yes, we are the striving Freshmen, 
Our motto is to Sink or Swim. 

With a pair of water wings 
And a life preserving suit, 
We will swim to be Sophomores 
Office of a good repute. 

When at last we are Sophomores, 
Oh, how confident we'll be. 
We'll throw away our water wings 
And dive into the Junior sea. 

Then we'll swim for Senior Island, 
The best island of them all. 
The dog paddle will be too slow then 
We will try the racing crawl. 

When at last we are Seniors, 
And our troubles past and dim. 
We will say to all green Freshmen 
You must either sink or swim. 



Tune: "One Little, Two Little, Three Little 
Injuns" 
One little, two little, three little telegrams 
Four little, five little, six little telegrams 
Seven little, eight little, nine little telegrams 
Her tenth prom man can't come ! ! ! 



Rally Day Song, 1925 

Tune: "Oh, Joseph" 

Every year on Rally Day 

The seniors their respects do pay 

To underclassmen who sit round and grin. 

Waiting with anticipation 

For the coming proclamation. 

Of either their merit or their sin. 

Freshmen long have trembled, 

Now since you're assembled, 

We will praise and also haze you — Ho ! 

Freshmen, oh Freshmen, don't look so beguiled, 

It's been six months since one of you has smiled, 

We really won't offend you, 

Indeed we will commend you. 

You treat us with due humbleness 

That can't be said for another class. 

A mask ball was given — it was quite a fete. 

But don't forget, though debs — you're '28. 

Just 'cause mid-years now are over 

Don't think college is just clover, 

Think it out before it is too late. 

Every year on Rally Day 

The seniors their respects do pay 

To their respective baby sister class. 



We had that same thrill in our youth, 

We were praised and flattered forsooth, 

But our privilege other years surpass. 

We sing approbation, 

After our migration. 

You will miss your praising sister — Ho ! 

Sophomores, oh Sophomores, you innocent things. 

You're old enough to leave our apron strings. 

To bring up such a big mob 

Was really quite a stiff job ; 

We hope that you appreciate 

The troubles that we've had of late. 

And then came your party, your carnival so cold. 

You must admit you were a trifle bold ; 

Thermometer said just zero, 

You made us feel like ten below, 

By transferring us to an Iceland floe. 

Every year on Rally Day 

The seniors their respects do pay 

To that prospective, substitutive horde. 

Who look on with expectation 

Waiting for our graduation 

So they'll be the dominating lord. 

Now we'll tell a secret. 

But please don't repeat it, 

You are worthy and deserving — Ho ! 

Juniors, oh Juniors, you're lucky 'tis true, 

Our eyes with jealousy we cast on you, 

The new gymnasium lures you, 

It certainly assures you 

That you will need no curtained roads 

Between your promenade abodes. 

And now may we ask you, since it's almost spring, 

To leave some songs for '25 to sing. 

You sign up for every one 

That's been in print since the year one, 

Do you wonder that we chose this thing? 

Every year on Rally Day 

After their respects they pay 

The seniors introspect their learned throng. 

After four years hibernation 

Gleaning bits of information 

On all things from classics to Mah Jongg ! 

Girlish timidation 

Forbids intimation 

Of our glory or our story — So ! 

Seniors, we're Seniors, for us all is wrong, 
We've had hard luck throughout our four years 

long ; 
At carnival it rained hard. 
And poured at junior promenade, 
And now we cannot even shine 
At our own graduating time. 
We stand here decrepit and worn out and gray, 
We're old and we must step out of your way — 
May 50 anniversaries 
Keep us fresh in your memories, 
This is the end. We have no more to say. 



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SPRING DANCE 
"Things are seldom what they seem." 

Compensations! (By 1925) 

Less hair* — more rings!** 

More dignity — less spring! 

Less future — more past! 

Home food — no hash! 

'25 goes out — Rally Day'll come in, 

A chance for some other class to win! 

The Rain Song 

We've had a little cloud burst To our Junior Promenade 

That's stayed with us always, It came without delay, 

Through four years of our best and worst It dribbled down into the sod 

It's crowned our biggest days. And made the ground like clay. 



Favored us at Mountain Day, 

Our carnival on ice 
Was tended by one cloud burst gay 

Which made it very nice. 



Now, oh little cloud burst, 
We are to graduate, 

Tell us all the very worst 
Before it is too late. 



Have you the least intention 

Of letting us all go 
Without your intervention, 

Oh! Would you treat us so? 



* See any barber 

** See left hand of half senior class. 



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An "If" for Younger Generations 

If you can learn to know your Skeat by heart, 

Your Patch and Neilson, Kittredge and your Root, 
Say them from first to last, from end to start, 

And Medieval history to boot; 
If you can see the vast iniquity 
Of all things up to date, and recognize 
How pusillanimous are you and me, 

Boethius — how very, very wise. 
If you can understand of final c's 

How vital — and know the whyfore, when, and why; 
Recite upon the source of all of these 

With hot scholastic fervor in your eye; 
If you can learn to scorn the bobbed of head, 

Their mannish mannerisms and their ways, 

And cultivate monastic airs instead, 

In imitation of ye goode olde dayes; 
If you can lay aside your point of view, 

The better to absorb what's said in class, 
There may in time be slender hope for you, 

You may conceivably expect to pass. 
But, ponder this — the essence of your power 

Lies not in knowing facts nor seeing light, 
But reproducing these within one hour; 

Before you learn your Chaucer learn to write! 



A la Small-Pox Scare 



"Arm or leg? Arm or leg? 
Which have you chosen? 
Not one leaves this town," they said, 
(Groans — from two thousand.) 



In went the fair brigade, 

Calm, noble, unafraid. 

One by one they were marred and made 

Safe, for Northampton! 



"Better forego a dance Proudly, each showed her scar, 

Than take the slightest chance! Whether 'twas near or far, 

Don't crowd! What's your rush?" they said Then from pleasures no longer barred 
To the two-thousandth! Out, limped two thousand! * 



Revelation 

I thought she was a genius, 

I thought she was a grind, 
I thought she did some research work, 

I thought she was that kind. 



I soon was disillusioned; 

My theory was absurd. 
She was a cross-word puzzle fiend 

A-looking for a word. 



•With apologies to the "twenty-three" omitted! 



Conflict 

"Wigglcy, wiggley little tooth. 
This dentistry is poor, forsooth! 
How I wish I were not hire! 
Hockey mars the best career! 
But rather than appear in doubt, 
Boldly— I will take it OUT I 

Significant Sayings 

For ten o'clock rule: "Mum is the 
word." 
"What a whale of a difference a blue 

card makes." 

Student's prayer after Browning 
exam: ".May my name be I'ippa." 



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Flip Verse 

(With apologies to Edna St. Vincent Millay) 

I knew my lesson Monday, 

Recited it to you; 
I did not know it Tuesday, 

So much is true. 

Why you come complaining, 
Is more than, I can see; 

I failed Tuesday — yes, 
But what is that to me? 



Safe up in the brilliant A's the ugly students be, 
But come and see my pretty scholar clinging to a D. 



The Calvin — it has lured me, 

I've left my work undone, 
But, ah, my grinds and oh, my profs, 

I've had a lot of fun. 



I cannot study in the Libe 

There's such a lot of noise; 
I cannot study in my room 

With walls festooned with boys; 
I cannot study on the roof — 

It has an awful slope — 
Or even in the kitchenette, 

It reeks of ivory soap; 
I solved the problem splendidly 

Quite early in the fall, 
I just enjoy existing here 

And don't study at all! 

Cross Word Puzzles 

She never cuts her classes, 
She never goes away, 

And yet she never passes, 
It really doesn't pay. 



Excelsior 

Or, If One Believed All One Heard. 

"Nobody loves a fat man." 
Does that apply to us? 

We weigh 195 pounds, 

Is it really much too much? 

No matter how hard we diet, 
We still are plump, 'tis true; 

How simply wonderful it must be 
To have a bone show through! 



I wish that girl in back of me, 
Who kicks her gay tattoo; 

Would only try to realize 
The seat's made of bamboo! 



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The Board is very grateful to the following members of the 
College, who, through their assistance and interest have aided mate- 
rially in bringing this book to its completion: 

Caroline Bedell 
Carolyn Cochran 
Justine Entz 
Frances Gait 
Sally Goodell 
Barbara Grant 
Marian Hagler 
Doris Harmon 
Josephine Hurst 
Caroline Jenkins 
Lucia Jordan 
Laura Kimball 
Dorothy Miller 
Elizabeth S. Parnell 
Marguerite Rebboli 
Elinor Robinson 
Mary Sebring 
Isabella Walsh 
Letty Witherspoon 

Border and cover designs by Josephine Hurst. 



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2 11 



INDEX 



Armchair, The 10 

Baker, Walter & Co., Ltd. ... 10 

Belanger, Celia M 16 

Bicknell, H. E 13 

Boston Fruit Store 23 

Boyden's 4 

Bridgeman & Lyman 15 

Brigham, D. H 14 

Brill Brothers 9 

Buchholtz, H. & Son 16 

Burgess, M. V 13 

Butler & Ullman 18 

Childs, Thomas 13 

Clapp & Clapp 19 

College Studio 24 

College Taxi Co 24 

Copeland's 14 

Cotrell & Leonard 17 

Davis, Frank E 19 

Dewhurst, 0. T 25 

Fleming's Shoe Shop 15 

Fleming, Thomas 11 

Forbes & Wallace 5 

Fox, G. & Co : 8 

Frank Bros 6 

Gazette Printing Co 18 

Green Dragon, The 6 

Hall, Charles, Inc 25 

Hampshire Bookshop, Inc. . . . 19 

Hampshire County Trust . . . . 16 

Hickson, Inc 21 

Hill Brothers 11 

Howard-Wesson Co 26 

Howe, A. M 16 

Jackson's 22 



Keever's Garage 16 

Kingsley's 5 

Kresge & Co 20 

Lambie, J. E. & Co 24 

Luce, George N 17 

McCallum's 17 

McCutcheon, James & Co. ... 6 

Manse, The 17 

Mary Marguerite, The 21 

Merriam Co., G. & C 11 

Metcalf Printing & Publishing Co. . 8 

Miller, 1 7 

Neylon & Dailey 11 

Northampton Buick, Inc 15 

Northampton Electric Lighting Co. 18 

Ono, T. & Co 20 

Paddock Tailoring Co 23 

Parson's Electric Shop 18 

Peacock Shop, The 8 

Pierce, J. H 18 

Plymouth Garage 10 

Plymouth Inn 22 

Eidge Shop 18 

Schultz 9 

Solby Montague 8 

Stahlberg, Eric 12 

Steiger, Albert & Co 11 

Tiffany & Co 3 

Todd 20 

Trebla 23 

Walsh, E. H 8 

Warren & Watt 20 

Wells, T. F 8 

Wild Rose Tea Room 20 



TlFFANY&Co. 

Jewelers Silversmiths Stationers 



An Incomparable Stock 



Mail Inquiries Given Prompt Attention 

Fifth Avenue & 37- Street 
NewYork 



The Home of Good Food 




Where you will be sure to meet your friends whether 
students or alumnae 



196 - 200 MAIN STREET 



NORTHAMPTON - MASSACHUSETTS 



Springfield 's 

Fashion 

Store 



It is the daily fashion study, fashion 
buying, fashion presentation of this 
store which gives it the fashion au- 
thority for which it is distinguished. 



FORBES & WALLACE 

SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



Kingsley's, Inc. 

THE ATTRACTIVE STORE 



The best of all places for college 
girls to (jet everything then desire 



Candies 
Ice Cream Luncheon 

Sodas 

Toilet Articles 

Imported Perfumes 




Established 1855 




Reg. U.S. Fbt. Off 



C ( 



The Greatest Treasure House 
of Linens in America" 

JAMES McCUTCHEON & COMPANY 

Fifth Avenue, Mew York 

PALM BEACH SOUTHAMPTON MAGNOLIA 



THE 

GREEN 

DRAGON 



227 MAIN STREET 



A Gift Shop 
of Distinction 



fifth Avenue Boot Shop 

Between 47 ifc and 48<h Streets. New York 




Footwear of quality invariably 
correct 



The Phantom 



Slipper Style 



When your imagination pictures the originality 
of Style . . . the charm of Beauty . . . the 
wear of Quality . . . then must memory flush 
. . . J. Milter Slippers! 



I. MILLER 

Beautiful Shoes 

NEW YORK BROOKLYN CHICAGO 



HIGH QUALITY 
RIGHT PRICES 
QUICK SERVICE 

— Three sound reasons why you 
should give us your PRINTING 

Metcalf Printing & Publishing Co. 

INC. - 

Printers of the Smith College Monthly 
NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Solby - Montague Co. 



SHOES - and - HOSIERY 



213 Main Street 
Northampton 



Mass. 



Fox Special 

Pure Silk Hose 




— Especially rein- 
forced at wearing, 
points. In all the 
newest and most 
favored shades. 

$1.95 
a pair 



d. 3fax $c (En. 

Mail orders carefully filled 



The 

Peacock Shop 



GOWNS - - HATS 

SWEATERS 
SCARES - NOVELTIES 



26 Bedford Terrace 
Northampton - Massachusetts 



We carry a Choice line of 

Imported and Domestic 
Groceries and Delicacies 

The Central Grocery 

J. F. WELLS, Prop. 

221 MAIN ST. NORTHAMPTON 



Dry Cleaning, Dyeing and 
Pressing 

FINE LAUNDERER 

E. H. Walsh 

23 GREEN AVENUE TEL. 1382-M 

Next to New Gym 




Scalp Treatment 

Shampooing 

"Marcel That Stays" 

Facials Manicuring 

Oil Permanent Waving 

Water Waving 



SHULTZ, Inc. 



223 MAIN STREET 



The Women's Shop 

Here we have assembled a complete array of sports 
wear for college girls. 

Every needed wearable for sports wear can be 
ordered by mail. Just state particulars. 



1619 BROADWAY NEW YORK 

Our Service to the Alumnae Customers 



TEA ROOM 



GRILLE 



Arm Chair 



Steak and Chicken Dinners 



Special Arrangements 
for Clubs and Parties 



Guest Rooms Available 



187 ELM STREET TEL. 1289-M 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 





Seniors ! 

Make your arrangements early 

for your car to be taken 

care of after your 

Spring Vacation 



Plymouth Garage 

PHONE 1440 

Masonic Street 
Northampton Mass. 



10 



Albert Steiger Company 

A Store of Specialty Shops 

Springfield, Mass. 

That note of individuality, that finesse, is so easily effected if 
you choose your apparel here. 

Everything is carefully selected for the college girl — from the 
smart but always favored sports apparel to the most charm- 
ing of evening gowns. 

Visit our Specialty Shops whenever you happen 
to be in Springfield. 



Compliments of 



Thomas F. Fleming 

12 Crafts Avenue 

SHOES - and - HOSIERY 



Whatever Your 
Question 




Be it the pronunciation 
of vitamin or marquisette^! 
or soviet, the spelling of ;i 
puzzling work the mean- 
ing of overhead, novocaine, 
etc., this "Supreme Authority" 
WEBSTER'S 
NEW INTERNATIONAL DICTIONARY 
contains an accurate, final answer. 107.000 
Words. 2700 Pages. 6000 Illustrations, Reg- 
ular and India Paper Editions. Write for speci- 
men pages, prices, etc. FREE Pocket Dtap U 
you name this paper. 
G. & C. Merriam Co., Springfield, Mass. 



HILL BROTHERS 

118 MAIN STREET 



YE OLD TYME RUGS 

WINDOW DRAPERIES COUCH COVERS 

BURLAP CRETONNES FLCSS 

FINGERING YARNS 

DOWN PILLOWS SPORT COATS 

UMBRELLAS 



Neylon - Dailey 

FRENCH DRY CLEANSER AND DYER 

FANCY DRY CLEANING A SPECIALTY 

HAND LAUNDRY 

Quick Service Our Mo. to 



18 Crafts Ave. 
Northampton 



Tel. 2172 
Massachusetts 



1 1 



ERIC STAHLBERG 

The Studio 
Northampton 




The Eclipse as seen from the Chemistry Building, January 24th, 1925, 
photographed by Eric Stahlberg. 



12 



White House Inn 

105 Elm Street 
Northampton Massachusetts 

Open All Year 
Guest House and Tea Room 
MRS. M. V. BURGESS 
Phone 22 1 



Sl(ill in Manufacture 






Correctness in Style 






Economy in Price 






Make our shoes worthy the 


atten 


tion of every 


Smith Student and 


graduate 


See them at our Northampton 


Shoppe, 


2 Green Street, Plymouth Inn, 




Northampton, Mass. 






CHILDS 


,1 


nc. 


273-379 High St. 


Hol : 


foke, Mass. 




"The Store Where You Get Your Gym Shoes" 



For Twenty-Five Years 

We have sold shoes to the girls of Smith College, while they were here 
and after they left Alma Mater. 

We send shoes all over the country 
to the girls •who left college years ago 
and those who left but last year. 

We send them ANYWHERE on approval, and we suited the girls 
so well while they were here that they KNOW what we can do, and 
keep in touch with us year after year. 

Shoes, Hosiery, Silk Scarfs, Wool Gloves and Mufflers. You'll always 
fine) the old prompt service at Bicknell's. 



H. E. BICKNELL, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



158 Main St., opposite Draper Hotel 



13 



D. H. Brigham & Company 



SPRINGFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS 



Specializing in Smart Apparel and 
Furs for the College Girl 



Make Brigham's Your Meeting Place 
Whenever in Springfield 




Copeland's 

Fancy Goods 

Shop 

FURNISHES A LARGE AND CHOICE 
ASSORTMENT OF 

High-class Wools for Knitting and 
Crocheting. Also a complete line 
of stamped Goods and Embroidery 
materials of every description. Class 
and Society Designs a Specialty. Art 
Novelties, Ribbons, Laces, etc. 

COPELAND'S 

Mail Orders Receive Prompt 

and Careful Attention 

227 Main St. Northampton 



"BUICK" 



When better automobiles are built, 
Buick will build them. 



Northampton Buick 

INCORPORATED 

Cor. Pearl and Pleasant Sts. 
Phone 456 Northampton 



Most Exclusive Models in 



Ladies' Pumps and Oxfords 



are found at 



Fleming's Shoe Shop 

189 Main Street 
Northampton Massachusetts 



BRIDGMAN k LYMAN 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Extend Greetings to the Class of '25 and Thank 
Them for Their Patronage 



Send Us Your Mail Orders for 



CLASS BOOKS, SONG BOOKS, BANNERS 
AND PENNANTS, STATIONERY, VERSE 



SMITH 

AND ANYTHING ELSE IN THE BOOK AND STATIONERY LINE 



15 




Are you saying 
this year 

Good-bye, Smith 

Farewell, Northampton- 



Then why not start now or any time 
in the years to come a Savings Account. 
Something to keep you in touch with Smith 
and Northampton. 



We wanted your account while at col- 
lege, we want your account while away. 

THE WHITE BANK 

Hampshire County Trust Co. 

Northampton, Massachusetts 



Celia M. Belanger 

HAIRDRESSER 

277 MAIN STREET - NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

PERMOIL WAVING SYSTEM 

Oil Treatment for Permanent Wave 



Specializing in Marcel Waving 

Telephone 688-W 



H. Buchholz & Son 

Theatrical, Historical and 
Masquerade Costumiers 



Pageant and School Productions a Specialty 
Wigs, Beards, Makeup, Etc. 



33 LYMAN ST. 



SURINGFIELD, MASS. 



FUN and FACTS 

CHARACTER described from your HAND- 
WRITING. My analysis will show whether or 
not you are 



affectionate 


selfish 


jealous 


impulsive 


conceited 


original 


conscientious 


stubborn 


cultured 



and give many other characteristics. Know 
your friends. Send letter in ink on plain paper, 
one dollar and stamp to 

A. M. HOWE, Graphologist 



22 MAPLE ST. 



GEORGETOWN, MASS. 



The Keevers Co. 



GARAGE - and - RADIO 



OPP. CITY HALL 



TEL. 1086-W 



Demonstration Every Evening 



16 



The Manse 

54 Prospect Street 
Northampton - Mass. 



Good Food 

Homelike Atmosphere 

Table d'Hote or a la Carte Service 

Rooms for Transient Guests 



George N. Luce 

LADIES' TAILOR 



277 MAIN ST. NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Telephone Connection 



Cotrell & Leonard 

Albany, N. Y. 



MAKERS OF COLLEGE 

GOWNS - HOODS - CAPS 



McCallum 

A Department Store That Makes College Furnishings a Specialty 

For years this store has stood for quality and service 
Specializing in all the needed 

COLLEGE SUPPLIES — also Suits, Coats, 
Dresses, Blouses and Millinery 

A Cordial Invitation is Extended to You to Make Our Store Your Store 



McCALLUM 



WALL PAPER - PAINTS 
PICTURE GLASS, ETC. 



J. Hugh Pierce 

186 MAIN ST. NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Ridge 


Shop 


WOMEN'S SPORTS 
WEAR 


Northampton, Mass- 



Smith College 

and 

Butler k Ullman 

They are institutions in 
old "Hamp." 

— You will always know just where to 
find them. 



WIRE US FOR FLOWERS 




FLOWERS 



DO YOUR STUDYING 
BY PROPER LIGHTING 

We Prescribe a Study Lamp with 
the Proper Sized Bulb. 

Let Us Fill Your Prescription 

Northampton Electric 
Lighting Co, 

189 MAIN STREET 



Appliances 



Radio 




ajpBjs 



*Hi>kiMim JVTrni 



/&/ MAIN STREET PHONE /JQ7W 

Northampton , Mass. 



Lamps 



Repairs 



Gazette Printing Co. 



14 Gothic Street 



PRINTING OF ALL KINDS 



18 




. . . THE PLACE . . . 

to gel your eats for bats and kitchenette 
breakfasts 

Chops - Steaks - Frankfurters - Crean 
Pickles - Olives - Cheese 

CLAPP & CLAPP 

147 MAIN STREET 



Your Account is Always 
Good at 

The Hampshire 
Bookshop 



Send bacl( for books 



Davis' Jewelry Store 

is known all over the world through Smith College Girls 

They find it a unique, beautiful and useful store while they 
are here, and the more they travel, the farther they go from 
Alma Mater, the more evidence they find that there are few 
stores of its kind. That's why our mail order business is so 
large among the graduates of the famous college. 



At home or dbroad- 



-let us serve uoi'. 



FRANK E. DAVIS 

Jeweler and Optician . Northampton, Mass. 

Over a quarter of a century's business 



iy 



Todd's Daylight Store 

INTERIOR DECORATION 



126 Main Street 

Reasonable Prices Delivery Service 



Wild Rose Tea Room 

417 MAIN STREET 

Woman's Shop Bldg. 
SERVICE 11.30 A. M. TO 5 P. M. 



71 SUMNER AVENUE 

SERVICE 11.30 A. M. TO 7.20 P. M. 

SPRINGFIELD 



Compliments of 

T. ONO & CO. 



Dealers in 



JAPANESE AND CHINESE 
GOODS 

192 MAIN ST. NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



w — & 



w 



WARREN & WATT 

"Everything Electrical" 

179 MAIN ST. NORTHAMPTON 

Telephone 126 



S. S. Kresge Co. 

5-10-25 Cent Store 



Cameo Records 



Party Favors 



Stationery 



20 



Around the Clock of Fashion's Day 

In our drawing-rooms the great assemblage of outer attire for the 
well-dressed woman goes around the clock of the daily activities. 

Here is the field coat for the morning walk ; the boulevard wrap 
for the afternoon and the evening mantle, like a pair of butterfly's 
wings, for the social hour. 

The demure little morning frock; the sleek silken afternoon dress 
and the velvet evening gown of deep luxuriousness, complete the 
day's program. 




667 - 669 BOYLSTON ST., BOSTON 

NEW YORK BUFFALO 



PARIS 



The Mary Marguerite 
Tea Room 



21 STATE STREET 



AND 



The Coffee House 



40 STATE STREET 



To ye Seniors and Sophomores, Jun- 
iors and Freshmen — let us serve you 
Luncheons and Teas and Dinners. 
When you've joined the Alumnae — 
let us mail you Fudge Cake and 
Brownies. 




WHEN IN TOWN 
— STOP IN — 

and be refreshed with a Dainty Luncheon 
or Afternoon Tea 



Folks Say We Have the 
Best Ice Cream in Town 



Jackson's 



281 High St. 
362 Main St. 



Holyoke 
Springfield 



HOME MADE CANDIES OUR SPECIALTY 




When you come back to Northampton 

stay at 

The Plymouth Inn 



31 WEST STREET 



TELEPHONE 420 



22 




Fine Chocolates Choice Bonbons 




Confection and Luncheon 
Shop 



Ice Cream and Ices 



Compliments of the 



Boston Fruit Store 



23 



J. E. LAMBIE & CO. 

92 MAIN STREET, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE FOLLOWING MERCHANDISE: 

Imported and Domestic Trimmings. Fancy Silks and Dress Goods. 
Ribbons and Laces. Veilings, Kid and Fabric Gloves, Hosiery. 
Silks and Fine Nainsook Undergarments. Curtains, Cur- 
tain Materials and Curtains Made to Order. Couch 
Covers, Cretonnes and Drapery Materials. 
Silk and Lingerie Blouses. 

AGENTS IN THIS CITY FOR BETTY WALES DRESSES 



WILLIAM G. MAHER E. M. MALONEY 

COLLEGE TAXI 
CO. 

PHONE 80 



Touring Cars - Sedans - Busses 



Best of Cars, Service 
and Drivers 



OFFICE — 188 MAIN ST. 
NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



NEXT TO BOYDEN'S 



COLLEGE STUDIO 

Modern Photographer 

Portrait designs to bring out your likeness. 

We use modern artificial lights as 

in modern picture studios. 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER 

1924 M. A. C. Shorthorn Magazine 
1924 Williston Log 1926 M. A. C. Index 



241 MAIN ST. NORTHAMPTON 

Telephone 1970 



24 



— Our Shop is convenient to You — 

We are centrally located; those little adjustments that your 
glasses occasionally need are only matters of a few minutes' 
work. 

We pride ourselves that our interest in you does NOT end 
with your original purchase- 

Prescription rvorl(, mail and telegraph orders are finished 
same day received. 

Opticians to your President's family and the majority of the Faculty, 

Heads of Houses and Students. Imitation and real 

Tortoise Shell our Specialty. 



O. T. DEWHURST 

REGISTERED OPTOMETRISTS AND PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 



201 MAIN ST., opposite City Hall 



Telephone 184-W 




Smith College students are partic- 
ularly invited to try the home-like 
luncheons served in our Tea Room 
on the third floor. The Hall store 
is also noted for its unusual dis- 
play of gifts for all occasions. 



CHARLES HALL 

INCORPORATED 

The Hall Building 



Springfield 



Massachusetts 



25