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Full text of "The Cleveland hounds as a trencher-fed pack"

JOHNA.SEAVERNS 



A'etjster Family Un^^.r; of •./eterinary Medicine 
^"'^"Tnp" '^ Medicine at 



THE 



CLEVELAND HOUNDS 



I'IMNTKI) II Y 

SPdTTISWdiUM''. AND f"., XKW-STlMvKT SgL'AUK 

LONDON 










TOM ANDREW 



THE 



CLEVELAND HOUNDS 



AS 



A TI^ENCHEK-FED PACK 



A, E. PEASE 



LONDON 
LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO. 

1887 



All riy/ils teserveil 



INTEODUCTION. 



Fox-hunting in Cleveland has until late years been carried on 
without the elaborate organisation that is usually found to be 
necessary for conducting the affairs of a Hunt, and therefore 
ancient official records which would have been so valuable 
to any one desiring to publish the history of this Pack are 
entirely wanting. Had they existed, it is not likely that I 
should have considered it worth while to put th6 following pages 
into print ; for my desire has been to rescue fi'om oblivion 
before it is too late much that would otherwise be lost. 

In placing this volume before the reader I apologise for the 
imperfections of the work, which result as well from the incom- 
pleteness of the material as the fallibility of the writer. I offer 
no apology to the Cleveland sportsman for putting this book 
in his hands, as I am confident that he will find in it a few facts 
of interest and some entertainment. If the stranger to our 
country and our ways should by any chance take it up, I should 
wish him to know at the outset that this is simpl}^ a collection of 
fragments by a lover of the chase, and not ' a work ' by a literary 
author, and he will find it readable or not just in proportion to 
the amount of enthusiasm he may possess for the sport aud the 



VI INTRODUCTION. 

curiosity he may have to discover how a rough country in 
Yorkshire was hunted in the days of old. 

To me it has been a pleasant task collecting and perusing 
the letters and other MSS. from which this book is compiled, 
and I have followed the hounds with many a good sportsman of 
another day over the country I know so well. I have hunted 
with many packs of hounds, but have always come back to 
Cleveland more than ever satisfied that no country can give a 
greater variety of sport than ours. One day you find yourself 
flying over a perfect open country, alongside seventeen couple 
of houuds, racing as if tied to the strong fox which has just 
broken from Seamer Whin, and has his straight neck pointed 
lor Roseberry Topping or some other refuge amongst the 
Cleveland Hills — hills at the outset just discernible through the 
haze, but which grow clearer as you race over each field and 
throw fence after fence behind you, wondering all the time 
whether you will have to breast them, or whether 'the beauties' 
will roll him over ere he gains their base. The next day 
listening to the music of twenty-seven couple working out 
the line up the echoing ravines of Kilton, and later startled by 
a soul-stirring 'View holloa' and ' Gone away ! ' that tells you 
that you will have to sit down and ' ride ' to cross the enclosures 
that lie between the coverts and the moors, if you wish to be 
abreast of the merry pack as they flash on to the heather that 
lies in limitless expanse in the distance before you. The de- 
lights of a moor run are known to few. For my own part, it 
seems to me the enjoyment of hunting depends not so much on 
the country as the natural charm of pursuit, the delight of watch- 
ing hounds, the pleasure of motion, and the sense of power that 
a good horse under you imparts. I know nothing that requires 



I^'TRODUCTIo^^ vn 

more decision aud determination than to live with the bhick, 
white, and tan as they fly with heads up and sterns down over 
the wild hills and vales of our purple moors. There is an 
ecstasy in seeing the apparently limitless extent of the rolling- 
moorlands laid out before you, and never is the glorious un- 
certainty of the chase felt more keenly than when, attempting to 
live up to the motto of * Be with them I will,' you race on the 
sound ground, struggle through the boggy places, and take 
your chance as to holes and rocks and walls. Another day 
may find you in the country that lies spread out like a chess- 
board below Eston Banks and Wilton Woods, where if you 
find a fox in the whin covei-ts near the sea, and he goes 
straight and leaves a holding scent, you will want a good 
horse to take you safely over those big fences, and may count 
yourself luck}^ if you get through twenty-five minutes without 
finding out the depth of one of the numerous aud formidable 
' stells ' that intersect the country ; or it may be that you spend 
the greater part of the day in the beautiful woodlands of Wilton, 
Upleatham, and Guisborough Banks ; but wherever it is, to me 
there is some special charm about every portion of the Cleveland 
country. 

I would take this opportunity of recording the obligations I 
am under for much contained in the following pages to the late, 
and much lamented, Mr. Henry Turner Newcomen, of Kirk- 
leatham, who was Master of the Cleveland Hounds for some 
3'ears ; the late Mr. Thomas Petch, of Liverton, one of the finest 
specimens of an old Yorkshire sportsman aud yeoman which 
you could have found in the land ; !Mr. Geoi'ge Andrew of White 
House, Saltburn, brother to Tom Andrew the hero of Cleveland 
ibx-hunters : and to Mr. Thomas Parriusfton. who for nianv vears 



viii INTRODUCTION. 

was secretary to the Cleveland Hunt. The last two have been 
especially kind in placing all sorts of interesting documents and 
private journals at my service. 

At some future time I shall liope to continue the history here 
begun through the masterships of Squire Wharton, of Rkelton 
Castle; of Mr. Henry Turner Newcomen, of Kirkleatham Hall ; 
and of Mr. John Proud, of Yearby, under whose management 
the hounds have been hunted since Tom Andrew's death, and 
who have more than maintained the traditions and the character 
of the sport in Cleveland. 

ALFRED E. PEASE. 



PiNCHINTHORPE HOUSE, GriSimiJOUdH. YORKSHIRK 

1 S8fi, 



MAP OF THE 

CLEVELAND HUNT 




CONTENTS. 



PART PAGR 

I. RECORDS AND TRADITIONS PREVIOUS TO 1800 . . .1 



II. THE MASTERSHIP OF JOHN ANDREW, SENIOR (ISir-lS.-io) . 21 

HI. THE MASTERSHIP OF JOHN ANDREW, JUNIOR (18.3:j-18o.5) . 55 

IV. THE MASTERSHIP OF THO:\IAS PRESSICK ANDREW (IS.55-1870) 157 

Appendix I. FOXES KILLED DURING THE SEASONS 1835-1870 . 191 

Appendix II. KENNEL BOOKS, 1845-1855 19:^ 

Appendix III. NO.MENCLATURE OF HOUNDS 208 

Appendix IV, THE BOOK OF THE RULES AND .ACCOUNTS OF 

THE CLEVELAND FRIENDLY SOCIETY 229 

ADDENDA 255 



ILLUSTEATIONS. 

Tom Andrew ........ Frcndis^piere 

Map of Cleveland ....... Tofaeo ]>. viii 

Kao-simile of the Original Rules of the Roxby 
AND Cleveland Hunt (1817), with Signatures 
of Original Subscribers (Two Pages) . . „ I'l 

Fac-simile of the Signatures in the Book of 
the ilules and accounts of the cleveland 
Friendly Society (Three Pages) ... ., •J.'.'A 



PART I. 

RECORDS AND TRADITIONS PREVIOUS TO 1800 



PART I. 

RECORDS AND TRADITIONS PREVIOUS TO 1800. 

It is a somewhat difficult task to discover any particulars of the 
origin or formation of a pack of hounds when no records have 
been kept, when the country hunted has lain for generations 
out of the beaten track of the sporting world. But this much is 
certain, that hunting of some sort was in vogue in the Cleveland 
district at the commencement of last century, for while I write 
there lies beside me on the table an old but handsomely bound 
volume, entitled ' The Book of the Rules and Accounts of the 
Cleveland Friendly Society, begun November the thirteenth in 
the year 1722.' This society was started from the reasons stated 
on the first page : ' Whereas the happiness of all Countrys does 
chiefly consist in a Correspondence and friendship of one Neigh- 
bour with another, and nothing contributing so much towards 
it as the frequent conversing of the Gentlemen together, who 
may thereby quash all Idle Stories that are too often spread 
about the Country to the Disuniting of some Families and the 
great prejudice of others. And we having our forefathers in 
this Neighbourhood as a pattern, who did formerly Live in the 
most Intimate and Amicable manner, open friendly, and oblio-- 
ing to each other, and being desirous to imitate so good an 
Example, and Conceiving Visits at our private Houses not so 
frequent as desirable besides being unavoidably subject to some- 
thing of Ceremony they cannot be so conducible to that good end 

B 2 



4 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

as a free meeting at some publick-House would be under proper 
Regulations to prevent disorders, Have therefore mutually agreed 
to meet AVeekl y on Tuesdays at some publick-House, as shall be 
agreed on from Time to Time And to conform our Selves to the 
following Rules,' the first of which rules provides ' That no person 
be admitted to be a Member of the Society but such as shall 
first publickly lay his Right Hand upon a Hunting Horn and 
declare himself no Enemy to Cocking, Smocking, Fox-hunting, 
and Harriers And shall endeavour to discover all poachers, 
and shall promise to the utmost of his power to promote the 
Interest of the Society, and shall Subscribe his Name owning his 
Consent to the Underwritten Rules, Clergymen to be Excused 
of the word Smocking and laying their hand on the Hunting 
Horn.' Here we see a reference to fox-hunting that demon- 
strates clearly that it was a pursuit dear to the hearts of the 
families of Cleveland at this date, though certainly fox-hunting 
is not mentioned, according to the author's notions, in the proper 
order of precedence. There is only one other rule (the eighth) 
that refers to hunting : ' That the Dinner be set upon the Table 
on all Seasonable Hunting Days at 2 o'Clock, and on those 
that are not so at half an hour after Twelve.' ^ 

I believe that in the old leases of the property at Roxby 
owned by the Turton family there was always a clause inserted 
obliging the tenant to keep a fox-hound and to hunt him till 
May Day, in order to destroy the moor foxes during that time 
of year when they were likely to commit depredations among 
the lambs on the moors. It was also customary on this and 
other estates to provide each tenant that hunted, kept a hound, 
or walked a puppy with a red coat every year — a custom which 
could not fail to encourage the sport, and one that might be 
imitated nowadays with great advantage. 

' For the information of the curious the whole of the rules relating'to this 
societ}' and regulating the drinking customs of it have been ;_added '^in the 
Appendix, together with the names of the first signatories and further interest- 
ing and amusing particulars. 



MR. turner's hounds, 1 775. 5 

Beyoud these there is little documentary evidence relating 
to fox-hunting in Cleveland. There are two poems relating to 
the chase in Cleveland which may interest the reader, which 
not only exhibit the fact that fox-hunting was indulged in at 
the time they were wi-itten, but that they had reached that 
advanced stage when the hunt could boast some sporting bards. 
The earliest of these songs is 

'THE HURWORTH FOX CHASE.' 1 

A Ballad occasioned by a most remarkable Fox Chase with 
Mb. Turnee's Hounds, on the 1st day of December, 1775. 

Attend ! jolly sportsmen, I'll sing you a song, 
Which cannot fail pleasing the old and the young, 
I'll sing of a famous old fox and his wiles, 
And lead you a dance of at least fifty miles ; 
I'll tell you a tale of such men and such hounds, 
With what courage they bound o'er all sorts of grounds : 
How dogs vie Avith dogs, and how men with men strive ; 
Old Draper may rue that he was not alive. 

At Hurworth fam'd village, as soon as 'twas light, 

We feasted our eyes with a ravishing .'^iglit ; 

Each sportsman had pleasure, and health in his face, 

And horses and hounds were all ripe for the chase. 

But first the Commander-in-Chief I should name 

The lord of Kirkleatham of right honest fame, 

A friend to good men, but profess'dly a foe 

To villains of four legs as well as of two. 

We had not tried long, before Rafter gave mouth 

Esteem'd by the pack, as the standard of truth ; 

They quickly fly to him, and instant declare 

That Rafter was I'ight ! for a fox had been there. 

' In this remarkable run Mr. Turner rode three horses ; he got his second 
horse from ^Mr. Jennett at Ormesby. There is no evidence that they killed 
their fox. Tide Note I. Addenda, p. 255. 

Peter Beckford, in his Thoughts on TTunting, gives us an illustration of 
fox-hunters regaling — the dining-room at Kirkleatham Hall, with portraits of 
those who were out on this memorable occasion. Mr. Turner is at the head of 
the table, and Wilkinson in his cap is one of the most prominent portraits. 
Tiic original picture was by Luke Clennell. 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

And, trust me ! he proved a notorious blade. 

His name was 'old Cesar,' and plunder his trade. 

His namesake in all the great battles he won, 

Spilled less blood by gallons than this rogue had done. 

TJnlien'lling at Eryholme he first tried a round, 

In which he might run about four miles of ground, 

Then back to the earths, but the stopper took care 

To baulk him from making his quarters good there ; 

Disdaining such treatment, he flourished his brush, 

And seemed to say ' sportsmen I care not a rush,' 

I'll give you such proofs of my stoutness and speed 

That Nimrod himself would have honovired the breed. 

By Smeaton, and Hornby, he next took his way, 

Resolved to make this a remarkable day. 

Then wheel'd to the left for the banks of the Tees, 

But there he could meet neither safety nor ease, 

Now finding with what sort of hounds he'd to deal, 

And that his pursuers were true men of steel. 

He push'd to gain shelter in Craythorne wood. 

The hounds at his brush all eager for blood. 

The field all alive, now we smoaked him along. 

So joyous the music, each note was a song. 

All round us was melody, spirit and joy ; 

And strong emulation enliven'd each eye. 

Next passing by Marten and Ormesby Hall, 

He seemed to say ' little I value you all ' ; 

For many a stout horse v.'as now dropping his speed ; 

And to see them tail oflfwas diverting indeed. 

Now found to be thought no contemptible fox. 

He dared us to follow vip qiountains and locks : 

But th' ascent was so steep and so painfully won, 

That few gained the Hall ' before he was gone ; 

To Kirkleatham jiark he next points his career, 

Hard pressed by the owner to spend his life there, 

Assuring him he and his guests would not fail 

All possible honour to render his tail ; 

But Turner being now left alone on the field. 

And finding old Cesar unwilling to yield, 

At Kilton thought proper to finish the strife 

So call'd ofi" the dogs to give Cesar his life, 

' Eston HaU. 



CLEVELAND FOX HOUNDS, 1785. 7 

But Blue Bell and Bonny-lass would have a meal 

Whose hearts are of oak, and whose loins are of steel, 

So follow'd him up to his friends of the Mill, 

Where triumphant they seized him and feasted their fill. 

Then just like attraction twixt needle and pole, 

All center'd that evening in Kirkleatham Hall, 

Where the bottle of red, and the foxhunting bowl, 

Not only refreshed but exalted the soul, 

Then, may the kind host long continue to grace 

His country, his mansion, and also the chace, 

And long as old time shall be measured by clocks, 

May a Turner for ever prevail o'er a Fox.' 

Now this ballad concerns Mr. Turner s hounds, and lie finds 
this ' no contemptible fox ' at Hurworth. I believe that Mr. Turner 
hunted the low-lying portions of Cleveland, the neighbourhood 
of Kirkleatham, and as far west as Hurworth. Packs were not 
advertised in those days, and were designated sometimes by their 
owner's name and sometimes by the name of the country they 
hunted. There is little doubt that it was the same pack as Mr. 
Turner's hounds that so distinguished themselves on the day 
commemorated in the following verses; here, however, the hounds 
are called the ' Cleveland Fox Hounds.' 

A NEW FOX-HUNTING SONG. 
composed by w. s. hendrick and j. burtell. 

The Chace rux by the Cleveland Fox Hounds on Saturday the 
29th day of January, 1785. 

Ye hardy sons of Chace give ear, 

All listen to my Song ; 
'Tis of a Hunt performed this Year, 
That will be talk'd of long. 
When a hunting we do go, oho, oho, oho. 
And a hunting we will go, oho, oho, oho, 
And a hunting we will go, oho, oho, oho, 
With the Huntsman Tally ho. 

' Mr. Chas. Turner and Lord John Cavendish represented York City from 
1768-74-80, Mr. Geo. Lane Fox, a Tory, having formerly been one of the 
members. 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

On Weanj Bank ye know the same, 

Unkennell'd was the Fox • 
Who led us, and our Hounds of Fame, 

O'er Mountains, Moors and Rocks. 
When a Hunting we do go, &c. 

'Twas Craytkorn first swift Reynard made. 

To Limton then did fly ; 
Full speed pursu'd each hearty blade, 

And join'd in jovial cry. 

With the Huntsman Tally ho. 

To Worsal next he took his flight, 

Escape us he wou'd fain ; 
To Picton next with all his might, 

To CraytJiorn back again, 

With the Huntsman Tally ho. 

To Weary Bank then takes his course, 

Thro' Fanny Bell's gill flies ; 
In Seymour Car strains all his force, 

His utmost vigour tries, 

With the Huntsman Tally ho. 

To T anion, NuntJiorp, next he flies. 
O'er Langhrough Rig goes he ; 

He scours like Light'ning o'er the meads. 
More swift Fox could not be, 

Nor with a Huntsman better matched, &c. 

To Newton, then to Roseherry, 

To Hutton Locherass gill ; 
To Lownsdale, o'er Court Moor go we, 

From thence to Kildale Mill, 

With the Huntsman Tally ho, &c. 

By this our Zeal was not subdu'd, 

All crosses were in vain ; 
To Kildale Reynard we pursu'd, 

To Lovmsdale back again, 

With the Huntsman Tally ho, itc. 



FOX-HUNTING SONG, 1 785. 9 

By Percy Cross and Sleddale too, 

And nily Riy full fast, 
As Fox could run to ShjlderskeiVy 

And Lockicood Beck he past, 

With the Huntsman Tally ho, ifec. 

By Freehrourfh Hill he takes his way. 

By Danhy Lodge also ; 
With ardour we pursue our prey, 

As swift as Hounds could go. 

With the Himtsman Tally ho, kc. 

By Coal Pits and o'er Stonecjate Moor, 

To Scaling Reynard ran ; 
Was such a Fox e'er seen before ? 

His equal shew who can ! 

When a Hunting we do go, (fee. 

To Barnhy now by Ugthorp Mill, 

And Micklehy likewise; 
To Ellerhy, to Uinderwell, 

Still stubborn "Reynard flies. 

With the Huntsman Tally ho, kc. 

The Huntsman now with other three,^ 

And Reynard you'll suppose ; 
Ten couple of Hounds of high degree, 

One field now did inclose, 

With the Huntsman Tally ho, ko.. 

But now our Chace draws near an end. 

No longer we'll intrude ; 
For on the Cliff", rejoice my Friend, 

Swift Reynard there we view'd, 

With the Huntsman Tally ho, etc. 

Sure such a Chace must wonder raise, 

And had I time to sing, 
The Huntsman's deeds who merits praise, 

Would make the valleys ring, 

When a Hunting we did go, kc. 

' Thomas Cole, Huntsman; Eev. George Davison j ChristoiDher Rowntree, 
junr. ; William Stockdale. 



10 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Come sportsmen all your Glasses fill, 

And let the toast go round ; 
May each Foxhunter flourish still, 

In Health and Sti-ength abound, 

When a Hunting we did go, (to.' 

I give a less polished ballad descriptive of tliis run : — 

CLEVELAND STAUNCH PACK. 

You True Sons of Nimrod lend a ear to my Song, 
While I sing of a Chase above sixty miles long, 
With a Cleveland Staunch Pack and a set of such men 
As will seldom, if ever, be met with again. 

Chorus — Holla ! ark, ark away ! tallio, ark away ! 
And a follow was there — tallio, ark away ! 

On the 29tli of January, as Alura woke the day, 
All prepared in the field to join, hark, hai-k away ! 
First in Rudby far bank in vain we did try, 
Then to Crathorne strong Cover so eagerly did try. 
Holla ! ark, ark away, kc. 

Our hounds when thrown off did maloudislely sing; 
Sweet Echo makes woods, dales, and valleys to ring. 
The noise, close in cover, soon alarmed Rennard's ear. 
For he heard that his persures was drawing too near. 
Holla ! ark, ark away, ttc. 

When Eennard got up he ' my Lads ' seemed to say, 
* I will warrant you have met with your match here to-day ; 
Your hounds' threatening notes, and ye sportsmen so stout, 
Will find me such a game one as will scorn to give out.' 
Holla I ark, ark away, kc. 

Now a circle of ten miles he the country tripped o'er. 
Resolved to see his old Lodgings once more ; 
From thence did he pass into Fanny Bell Gill, 
For his hardy persuers seemed to care not a pin. 
Holla I ark, ark away, &c. 

Through Seymour ward Cars and over Nunthorp deep stell. 
Then ascended the top of Great Roseberry Hill — 

' Vide Addenda, p. 256. 



'CLEVKLAND STAUNCH PACK.' II 

A place of known safety — he scorned for to stay, 
So he chose the wild moore for to show them fair play. 
Holla ! ark, ark away, etc. 

Some one of our Chiefs got up Roseberry Hill ; 
Sir William took water in Niinthorp deep stell; 
Sir John, with some more of the Nimrod's true race, 
Was resolved to follow and see this fine chace. 
Holla ! ark, ark away, &c. 

Through Lowsdale, over Court Moor, and past Kildale Mill, 
The Huntsman began for to use all his skill ; 
Finding horses and hounds of their speed quite forsaken, 
And afraid this sly Creature would not be o'ertaken. 
Holla ! ark, ark away, &c. 

Then struggling for Honner, and had cause to maintain, 
In persuit of this fox, so speedy and brave. 
Past West House and Thunderbush he lead with pleasure ; 
Then he jodged along to Scaling Dam all at his own leisure. 
Holla ! ark, ark away, &c. 

Over hills, dales, and moors each strove for to follow 
The hounds cheerful notes, and the huntsmen did hollo; 
Till arriving with difficulty at Ellerby town, 
Some walked, some stood still, some were forst to lay down. 
Holla ! ark, ark away, &c. 

Sly Rennard, now finding himself free from danger. 
Would see more of the country, being a stranger ; 
Then looking around him a mile or two more, 
Came to Hinderwell Clifis and Runswick's wild shore. 
Holla ! ark, ark away, &c. 

The Rocks, for his safety, they found him a place, 
So triumphant we finished a six-hours chace. 
When he was bid a good night by three lads of best blood, 
And the rest stopt here and there and got home as they could. 
Holla I ark, ark away, &c. 

Here we see again that they find their fox beyond what are 
now considered the confines of the Cleveland Hunt, but this 
may be easily explained. In those days Masters of Hounds 



12 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

were not limited in tlie North to any exact boundary in hunt- 
ing, but it became customary not to encroach on the hunting 
grounds of those who were in the habit of drawing the country ; 
and in Yorkshire at this early date, although the Earl of 
Darlington hunted the country pretty much where he liked, Mr. 
Turner's, alias 'The Cleveland,' Hounds would find a large tract 
of country, now divided between the Hurworth and Cleveland, 
in which he could hunt without any interference from others. 
Then the higher grounds of Cleveland, the Cleveland Hills, and 
the country south and east of Guisbrough, were hunted by the 
trencher-fed packs in farmers' hands ; the Roxby Hounds 
hunting the country between Guisbrough and Whitby; the 
Bilsdale hunting Bilsdale and the southern range of the Cleve- 
land Hills with their intersecting valleys ; while the Farndale 
luinted in Farndale and Rosedale, and the Sinnington in the 
Helmsley district. 

The Roxby Hounds are then the ones with which we have 
to deal chiefly, as forming the foundation of the present pack ; 
for in 1817, fox-hunting being at low ebb, the hunting gentry 
and farmers met together and discussed how Cleveland should 
be properly hunted, and they christened the Roxby Hounds 
the ' Roxby and Cleveland Hounds ' ; but of this important epoch 
in the history of the hunt more anon. 

The ' Roxby Hounds,' prior to 1817, hunted fox and hare on 
alternate days ; and hounds always knew, so it is said, which 
they had to hunt, for being thrown into covert meant fox, rang- 
ing the fallows meant hare ; besides, they always cheered the 
hounds by naming the quarry, and there are a few old men still 
hunting with the Cleveland Hounds who remember old Tommy 
Page, long after hare-hunting had been discontinued, crying 
out as hounds were drawing, ' Dancer, a fox ! ' ' Slylad, a fox ! ' 
I believe this practice of hunting hares with fox-hounds, and of 
hunting fox with harriers, was common enough (^vide p. 4, ' de- 
clare himself no enemy to fox-hunting and harriers '), although 



THE ROXBY HOUNDS. I3 

neither Slylacl nor Dancer, nor any other lionnd in the pack, 
dreamt of finding anything but fox when drawing coverts. In 
1817 there -were three Dancers in the pack when all the owners 
were out : ' Page's Dancer,' ' Booth's Dancer,' ' White's Dancer.' 

A rule of the old Roxby was never to allow dark hounds in the 
pack. The consequence was that they were all very light hounds; 
some almost white, others marked with blue grey, light grizzle, 
and faint yellow-tan. The reason for this Avill be appreciated 
by Cleveland men, viz. the great difficulty of seeing dark hounds 
at a distance on the moors, and the gi-eater ease with which a 
light-coloured pack could be seen ; for the reader must recollect 
that the idea of following these hounds on anything but foot was 
comparatively a modern innovation. 

Mr. Thomas Fetch, now (1881) living, a veteran sportsman 
of more than eighty years, testifies to the fact that his grand- 
father, who died at the beginning of the century, hunted with the 
Roxby Hounds. He says : ' They did riot often hunt further 
west than Guisbrough Banks, though occasionally they did visit 
and draw Eston Banks.' Those who followed the old Roxby 
Hounds followed, as a rule, on foot, a practice that existed as 
long as the fox was hunted only on the hills. Those who rode 
rode their farm horses — a fact that may appear somewhat 
ridiculous to those who do not know this country and its famous 
breed of Cleveland bays, a breed as distinct as the thoroughbred, 
and combining bone, strength, activity, and free action in such a 
manner as to have made them world-famous for coaching horses, 
the fav^ourite stamp of agricultural horse to those who have 
tried them, and which produce, when crossed with blood, the 
finest weight-carrying hunters in England. The hounds were 
' gathered ' in a similar manner to the way in which the 
Farndale and Bilsdale Hounds are to this day. 

Any one who would see last-century fox-hunting at the pre- 
sent day, and how the rough countries of Yorkshire were hunted 
generations ago, cannot do better than have a day with these old 



14 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

trencher-fed packs, for the Farndale and Bilsdale countries have 
not felt those changes that time has wrought in other parts. 

There is a liill end at Roxby Avhere the hounds were called 
up in olden times by the huntsman blowing a horn at daybreak, 
and to this place the hounds quickly drew, whether they heard 
the horn or not, so well they knew the trysting-place, as soon 
as they were ' loused out ' from each farmhouse around. The 
names of these men have long since passed from the memory of 
man, with a few exceptions. The first names I have been able 
to find are those of ' Bush Billy ' and ' Binny Booth,' ' who, during 
the latter half of last century, acted as huntsmen together to the 
pack, and were no doubt kings in that humble fox-hunting con- 
fraternity. On the Roxby estates each tenant keeping a hound 
was found one scarlet coat per annum. 

At the very beginning of this century we find the following : 
John Peart, John Beardshaw, Isaac Moon, Henry Clarke, John 
Hart, John Hall, and ' Auld Tommy Page.' These last three 
were extraordinary men on foot, and hunted during the latter 
part of last century. 

I have heard from the lips of an old hunting yeoman farmer 
the following account of a remarkable run the hounds had about 
1800. ' They used to tell a tale,' said he, ' of a fox found in the 
neighbourhood of Kilton which they hunted, all the field being 
on foot, and John Hart was there, who was the keenest man 
a-foot in those days. They followed this fox by Saltburn Gill 
and Eston Banks, and then right away to Yarm, where the 
hounds had killed him some four hours before they got up ; they 
got the hounds together and walked back to Guisbro' by road, and 
so to " Auld Peart's" there, at the "Mermaid," where they spent 
the night.' ' Ye know the men were plain, hard-working men or 
farmers,' continued mv informant, ' who when thev hunted gave 

' A relative or son of this sportsiuan, Jno. I>ootli, a'ter hunting the Roxby 
al the beginning- of the century, went as huntsman to Mr. Hills, of Thornton, 
wljo liunted what is now Captain Johnstone's country. 



THE ROXBY MOUNDS. I 5 

up tlie day to it^ and often made a good night of it, and thought 
nout aboot lying a-bed all next day.' 

The two who distinguished themselves in this extraordinary 
run were John Hai-t and John Hall : a run which must have 
covered something like twenty-five miles, with seventeen miles 
walk back to Guisbro' from Yarm on the top of it, Auld Tommy 
Page is a character one would like to have been able to learn more 
about ; all, however, that is to be learnt of him is that he was a 
great man on foot, and that ' he came to get a horse in later years.' 

There was little money going and very few gentry residing 
in this out-of-the-way district, and a horse that could come under 
the description of a hunter was jirobably unknown ; but, as I 
said before, those who rode at all rode their farm horse, pillion 
horse, or market horse, which was invariably, almost, the Cleve- 
land bay. 

Where the hounds that formed the Roxby pack came from 
I have endeavoured but failed to discover, but in all probability 
they were originally harriers, hunting hare and pursuing a fox 
when occasion arose, and afterwards crossed and improved by 
admixture with the fox-hounds that George Villiers, Duke of 
Buckingham, who died at Kirby Moorside, 1686, brought into 
banishment with him and hunted in the neighbourhood of 
Helmsley. From these hounds the Bilsdale Hounds derive their 
origin, and probably the Farndale. 

No doubt they begged hounds from their landlords and 
neighbouring packs. The stamp of the old Roxby Hounds was 
very much the same as the Bilsdale — strong in bone, long on 
the leg, light-gutted, long-headed, sharp-nosed, and with coarse 
sterns ; in colour they were light, a valuable quality in hounds 
on these moors, where a dark pack would soon be lost to view 
among the heather. I have no doubt that they had a loud cry, 
as the modern Bilsdale have, for packs that are not under severe 
discipline and whose riot goes unchecked are distinguished for 
their ready tongues. At the present day I have heard six couple 



l6 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

of Bilsclale Hounds give such cry that it would drown the voices 
of fifteen couple of any kennel-kept pack. On the slightest 
evidence of sport, with the poorest scent, on the stalest drag, 
these hounds throw their tongues, and this is no doubt owing to 
the fact that the sportsmen a-foot, clambering along the steep 
sides of the hills, have seldom the opportunity to administer 
correction for riot, and such hounds speak freely and soon be- 
come noisy. Even now the Bilsdale Hounds hunt themselves ; 
they go off full cry to covert, and for a moment or two after they 
are in they continue to speak, and all the huntsman has to do 
is but wait till they have found and then cheer and encourage 
them. 

There live still a few traditions of the hunting customs of 
our forefathers in Cleveland ; among these one, that the meets 
for the week were given out in many parishes in the church by 
the parson. This custom still obtained in Bilsdale in the authors 
time, but has Mien into disuse of late years. The parson of the 
parish had certain duties towards the hunt to observe ; he was 
bound, I presume, by custom merely and not by any old Act, to 
give five shillings for every fox head brought him, killed by the 
hounds within his parish. With this five shillings the successful 
sportsmen retired to the nearest inn, mixed a bowl of punch, 
often plunging Reynard's head into the middle, and drank to 
fox-hunting, often not wisely but too well. 

The real history of those old times is, I fear, almost a sealed 
book to us, yet with these few bare facts laid before the reader 
the author hopes that he may be able to picture in his mind's 
eye the fox-hunting of Cleveland in the last century. 

In 1817 we find Cleveland, to the west, little hunted, Ralph 
Lambton hunting the country before hunted by Mr. Turner with 
South Durham. This state of things did not recommend itself 
to the old followers of the Cleveland Hounds, now dispersed and 
amalgamated with R, Lanibton's, and they met to take council 
with their brother sportsmen at Loftus on June 5th, 1817, and 



THE ROXBY AND CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 1/ 

see if sometliing could not be cloue to improve this melancholy 
state of things. At the Angel Inn, at Loftus, on a summer's 
afternoon, 1817, we may picture John Andrew, senior, Isaac 
Scarth, Henry Clarke, Henry Vansittart, Esquire, Thomas Cha- 
loner, Esquire, and the other signatories to the rules then 
drawn up, sitting with their tumblers of punch, making a treaty 
by which the residents in the West of Cleveland were to sup- 
port the Roxby Hunt, and the Eoxby Hounds were to hunt for 
the future the country to the west of Guisbrough as far as a 
line between Busby, on the foot of the Cleveland Hills, and 
Linthorpe on the Tees. The title of the pack to be ' The Roxby 
and Cleveland Hounds.' 

In another chapter, with better materials than we have 
hitherto had for our assistance, I shall trace the history and 
sport of these hounds. 



PART II. 

THE MASTERSHIP OF JOHN ANDREW, SENIOR 

1817-1835 



c 2 



PART II. 

THE MASTERSHIP OF JOHN ANDREW, SENIOR. 
1817-1835. 

In 1817 we saw that tlie supporters of the chase gathered 
together on June 5th at the Angel Inn, Lofthouse. The result 
of their deliberations is seen on next page. 

A careful perusal of these rules will convince the reader of 
the wisdom of those who drew np the code. They are simple 
and businesslike, and well suited for a sporting fraternity who 
had hunted with perfect freedom and with little discipline a 
trencher-fed pack. Rule I. makes provision for dining twice in 
the year. This was most necessary, and was regarded in those 
days as an indispensable function in every club and society. On 
these days all the choice sporting spirits of Cleveland met to- 
gether in a manner that conduced to sociability and friendship, 
and also in a way which could not but stimulate their ardour 
and encourage them in the pursuit of that object they all had in 
view — the prosperity of fox-hunting. Rule II. provided for the 
annual appointment of the president, and installed John Andrew 
as president for the year. Their wisdom and foresight is evi- 
denced by the sequel ; they appointed a man who was the 
making of the hunt, and who championed the cause in such a 
manner that for more than half a century the hunt was content 
to leave the management of the pack and country entirely in 
the hands of the Andrew family. The country was hunted by 
the Andrevv's for three successive generations. Rule VI. placed 
a check on betting, these old-time sportsmen recognising that 



ANGEL INN, LOFTUS 

June 5th, 1817. 



RULES and REGULATIONS 



EN'TEREP IXTO BY THE SUBSCRIBERS OF THE 



i\Ojil)K ^ ClclJrtautr Snuit 



First. XhAT the Members of the Hunt shall meet and dine Twice in 
each Year, at the Commencement and Conclusion of the Hunting 
Season, at such Times and Place as the President shall appoint, 
giving each Member a Week's Notice. 

Second. That a President be appointed at the Meeting held at the 
Conclusion of the Season, and that Mr. Andrew be appointed 
President for the present Year. 

TiiiED. That the President have the complete Management of the 
Hounds ; and fix the Days, Hour, and Place of Hunting. 

FoTTRTH. That in the absence of the President, the Members present, 
elect a Manager of the Hunt for that Daj'. 

Fifth. It is expected that every Member present in the Field, use his 
utmost Endeavours to keep the Pack steady, and otherwise assist 
the Manager in the Direction of the Hunt. 

Sixth. That any Member betting a Wager, either in the Field or at 
any Meeting, shall forfeit 2s. 6rf., to be applied to the general 
Purposes of the Fund. 

Seventh. That at the meeting held at the Commencement of the Season, 
any Gentleman proposed by Members of the Hunt shall be ad- 
mitted by Ballot, and that at the last Meeting the President's 
Accounts be audited and .settled. 

Eighth. That any Member not attending the fixerl Annual Meetings, 
such Member to forfeit 5s. — one half to be paid towards the 
Dinner Bill, and the other half to go to the Fund. 

Ninth. That at each of the Annual Meetings the President shall call a 
Bill, two Hours after drawing the Cloth. 

Tenth. That no Person be entitled to the Brush, who is not in the Field 
at the Commencement of the Chase. 

Eleventh. That the Sum of .£1. \\s. &d. be paid hy each Member at the 
Meeting held at t he Commencement of each Year. 



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JOHN ANDREW, SENIOR. 23 

sport is hindered and its good name sullied by contamination 
with gambling. Rule TX., whilst allowing a fair time for the 
pleasures of the table, took care that these social gatherings did 
not degenerate into orgies, and provided that the diners should 
rise at an hour in the evening when they were still in good 
temper, and before they could reach the quarrelsome stage, and 
before their enthusiasm would subside. Rule X. provided that 
none should have the brush but he who had earned it by being 
present from find to finish. The brush is still, and it is to be 
hoped always will be, the trophy carried off by the ' first in ' 
with the Cleveland Hounds. Rule XI. — The subscription is 
fixed at a reasonable amount, though it is higher than at the 
present day. 

And now, I am sure, all who are interested in the early his- 
tory of the Hunt will wish to know something of those who 
signed their names to these rules, and to whom we owe the 
formation of the Hunt, Here are a few brief outlines. 

John Andrew, first President and first Master of the Roxby 
and Cleveland Hounds, rightly heads the list. Born in Scotland, 
of an old and respectable Scotch family bearing the name of the 
patron saint of that country, he came in early life to Cleveland 
and settled there. As far as I can gather, the family were 
natives of Kincardine, and lived at Bridge of Leppie, near 
Bervie, on the coast. There is little to be discovered of their 
history, but the following entry, unearthed out of an old pocket- 
book for the year 1790, of John Andrew, is interesting : — 

* Directions /or My Father : 
To Mr. Jas. Andrew, att Bridge of Leppie by Bervie, N. Britain. 

for my brother Joseph : 
To Mr. Joseph Andrew, Surgeon's Mate of His Majesty's Fri- 
gate the Rose, att Spithead or Elsewhere. 

for my brother in Law Wm. Boss : 
To Mr. Wm. Ross, att Cheapelfeild, Vintner, Montrose, N. 
Britain.' 



-24 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Immediately following these notes is the following pfescrip!- 
tion, which may prove useful to some agriculturist : — - 

' 6d. worth of Best Castile Soap, ^ lb., 
^ lb. of Gunpowder, 
2d. worth of Spirits Turpentine, 
A Quart of Ale, 
for the Red water.' 

He seems to have kept up his connection with his old home, 
for in this year we find an item in ' A State of J. Andrews 
Affairs, May 12tli,' 'A House att Beme in Scotland cost 100?.' 
John Andrew was born in 1761 ; he had not settled many 
years at Saltburn before he married Ann Harrison, Saltburn 
was then but a fishing hamlet and colony of smugglers on 
-the seashore, and not the large and fashionable watering-place 
it has since developed into. On the top of the cliffs, with a 
wooded ravine running inland, stood then, and still stands, the 
home of the Andrew family, a farmhouse known as the White 
House. Up this secluded ravine many a string of pack-horses 
wended their way with the contraband goods, which found a 
ready market at Guisbrough, Stokesley, and in all the country-^ 
side, this illicit trade being encouraged both by the gentry and 
clergy, as well as by the farmers. At the head of this smug- 
gling fraternity was Mr. King, a brewer at Kirkleatham, and 
Mr. John Andrew, and many a good cargo was run ashore at 
Saltbmm and stored in the White House, and in the clay holes 
of Hob Hill, in the ravine beyond the house. The most cele- 
brated craft in the trade was the ' Morgan Rattler,' an extra- 
ordinary fast cutter, which eluded for years the coastguard, and 
was a terror to the Preventive men. You may now see in the 
last stall of the stables at the White House a large flagstone, 
which, when removed, discloses the entrance to a spacious cellar. 
In this stall John Andrew had always a celebrated mare who 
would kick like mad when any but her master approached 
that stall. Upstairs in the house is a room which had a 



, ORIGINAL SUBSCRIBERS. 25 

secret hiding-place, where, in case of a search, the men might 
hide or lie in ambuscade. Later on we shall see how John 
Andrew's trade interfered with one or two seasons' sport in 
Cleveland. 

In the beck at the bottom of the ravine were otters, that 
provided sport during the summer months, with a few couples 
of the old hounds. Badgers were also plentiful in the woods, 
especially at Kilton, and hunting them with an old hound or 
two helped to put away the weary months that elapse between 
the last day of one season and the first day of the next. 

During the Napoleonic wars John Andx'ew, like many 
others of his fellow-countrymen, considered it his duty to place 
himself in readiness to serve his country. We find the follow- 
ing commissions which he held, signed by the Duke of 
Leeds : — 

L October 24, 1801, to be Ensign in the corps of Cleveland 
Volunteer Infantry, Thomas NajDper, Esq., being Captain of that 
company. 

2. June 29, 1807, to be Lieutenant in the corjss of Cleve- 
land Volunteer Infantry. 

3. September 24, 1808, to be Lieutenant in the 3rd Regi- 
ment of local Militia of North Riding. 

4. May 16, 1809, to be Captain in the same regiment. 

On March 27, 1813, he entered his sou, John Andrew, 
junior, as an ensign in the same Militia regiment. 

Of John Andrew more anon. The second name on the list is 

2. Isaac Scarth, who was a hunting man, and father of the 
present Isaac Scarth of Stanghow. 

3. Henry Clarice was a solicitor at Guisbrough. Was not a 
hunting man, though a staunch supporter of the Hunt. His 
son was Vicar of Guisbrough for many years, and his grandson, 
J. W. Clarke, is one of the most energetic supporters of the Hunt 
at the present day. 



26 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

4. John Irvine. — Another solicitor at Guisbrough. Also not 
a hunting man. 

5. William Coates. 

G. Mathew Gattenhy, a keen hunting farmer who lived at 
Huuley Farm, Brotton ; who ' kept a good horse,' but afterwards 
' turned back in the world ' ; ' but he was a man in those days.' 
Such is all I can learn of poor Mathew Gattenby. 

A good story is told of how poor Mathew Gattenby, after a 
hunt dinner, went to bed in Hazel Grove, and, finding it very 
hot, took off all his clothes, and was found sleeping peacefully 
with nothing on. His hound was always named ' Safety,' or, as 
he called it, ' Saf-e-ty.' 

7. Michael Mackereth, a hard-riding doctor of Guisbrough, 
which town has alwaj'S possessed that most indispensable 
appendage to every hunt. We shall find his name cropping up 
hereafter. 

8. Consitt Bnjclen lived at Lazenby, and was a very keen 
hunting man. I inquired of old Mr. Thomas Fetch of this 
sportsman, and he says : ' The first thing I remember of him was 
the first day I was out hunting. I was riding an old mare that 
had been my grandfather's, for, look ye, my father cared nout 
about hunting. Well, I remember them turning down a fox at 
Megara Fark, and we ran him fast by Stanghow and Kilton 
and Handale. I can remember every field we crossed, though a 
good bit more than fifty years agone, better than any since. 
And just when they got to Handale one hound was just killing 
the fo.v, and Consitt Dryden threw himself off his horse to get 
the brush, when the fox got away and so did the horse, and 
Consitt Dryden was left wi'out brush or horse. However, they 
killed him, and some one else got the brush. When he came 
across Kilton I recollect very well seeing a man they called Will 
Hutton fall with his horse into a very deep hole, where they 
could not get out, though neither on 'em were lamed. I recol- 
lect his cursing and swearing what he wad do for them if they 



ORIGINAL SUBSCRIBERS. 2/ 

wad get him oot, what he wad do if he nobbut could get oot, 
and what he wad do if they didn't get him oot, boot they left 
him cursing there.' 

Consitt Dryden had a very celebrated horse, which he rode 
hard for twelve seasons, out of a Cleveland mare, another 
evidence of the value of that breed. This horse's portrait 
was painted by Dolby, but where it is now I do not know. 
C. Dryden is mentioned in 'Nimrod's Northern Tour,' as 
it appeared in the ' Sporting Magazine.' The day ' Nimrod ' 
was out with the Hurworth he rode this horse. They 
found in Wilkinson's Wliin, and ' Nimrod ' in his report said, 
'A Mr. Dryden asked for the brush; Wilkinson, with his 
usual politeness, however, gave it to me.' Dryden, knowing 
this to be make up, told ' Nimrod ' he was a ' damned liar,' 
and this passage was omitted when his ' Northern Tour ' was 
published. 

Richard Scarth, brother to Isaac Scarth of Stanghow, lived 
at North Cote Farm, near Guisbrough, and was an ardent 
sportsman. 

Thomas King, a brewer at Kirkleatham, but not much of 
a hunting man. One of the best supporters, and married old 
J. Andrew's daughter. Mr. Proud of Yearby, lately Master of 
the Cleveland, married a daughter of Mr. King's. 

James Andrew was brother to young John and son of John 
Andrew, senior, a keen man to hounds. 

Michard Otley, the sub-agent at Skelton Castle ; he did not 
hunt. 

Joltn Beardshaw, a farmer living at Marske. His son William 
was a more ardent sportsman than his father. 

Isaac Moon, a miller at Dale House ; his son was a promi- 
nent follower of the hounds. 

Joseph Newton lived at Wood House ; his son John was a 
very good man with hounds. 

John Andrew — ' Young John.' Of him more anon. 



28 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

John Barr. 

Leonard Ilarlcer. — Lenny Harker and John Beardsliaw of 
Marsk were neiglibours and brother Gportsmen. 

Henry Vansittart, Esq., of Kirkleatham Hall. This gentle- 
man's name is so well known that few remarks from me with 
regard to him are necessary. He was the best friend the Hunt 
ever had, supporting the hounds with his counsel, purse, and 
presence. He made a famous name on the turf, racing almost 
entirely at Newmarket. 

His hunters were the envy and admiration of Yorkshire, as 
were his teams of spanking blood bays, which he always drove 
four-in-hand. His groom, ' Tom Sherwood,' was known as the 
best in England. In appearance he was a remarkably handsome, 
tall man ; in the saddle he had a beautiful seat and perfect 
hands, while he was an excellent coachman. His daughter, 
heiress of the Kirkleatham estates, married Mr. Newcomen, whose 
son was the late Mr. Henry Turner Newcomen, Master of the 
Cleveland Hounds. Miss Vansittart (now Mrs. Newcomen) 
bred at Kirkleatham the Fl^dng Dutchman, after her father's 
death. 

Thomas Fishhurn \ 

rm -n T . [I cauuot tell anything of. 

Thomas Uolnnson ) -^ ° 

John Peart was a hard old sportsman, and was also land- 
lord of the Mermaid Inn at Guisbrough, an ancient hostelry 
where the friends of the chase were often entertained by the 
host, 

Alexander Pidman, better known as Alec, was a Guisbrough 
farrier. A comic character, but a good sportsman. He was 
fond of practical jokes, and used to seize the opportunity of 
an annual supper-party which he gave to play them off on 
his fox-hunting friends. On one occasion he had the mince 
pies made with horseshoe nails. In order that he might be 
easily found by his patrons and customers in the crowd on 
market days, he used to daub himself with amignura, a foul 



ORIGINAL SUBSCRIBERS. 29 

stinking- stuff, by which means he might be scented from a great 
distance. 

John Puhnan, a relative of the last named. 

Thomas Stevenson was a farmer at Marsk, one of the most 
prominent in J. Andrew's field, and when in 1827 John Andrew 
went to York Castle for smuggling, Thomas Stevenson hunted 
the hounds. 

Thomas JVJiite was landlord of the Lobster Inn at Coatham, 
and married old John Andrew's daughter. The ' Lobster ' was for 
many years a favourite meet, and even yet retains its character 
for hospitality to the sons of Nimrod, due, I have no doubt, to 
this ancient alliance with the Andrew blood. 

Henrij Chaloner, born 1791, the sixth son of Wm. Chaloner, 
of Guisbrough.^ 

The last name on the list is Attorney Stevenson, of Guis- 
brough, always fond of the sport. 

After all these introductory preliminaries we will see what 
sort of sport these fellows had. The only records of the doings 
of the Hunt are such as with a good deal of trouble have 
been deciphered off some old loose damaged sheets. As the 
documentary evidence of the sport under John Andrew's mas- 
tership is therefore little, what there is I shall give in ex~ 
tense. Although I have no continuous diary to extract from, I 
give the following items from John Andrew's accounts, which 
are certainly eloquent if few, and give us a good idea of the 
internal economy of the Hunt, an insight into their habits, 
some illustrations of their difficulties, and a history of the im- 
provement and consolidation of the pack by exhibiting from 
what kennels they obtained their hounds. In 1817 we find 
hounds fetched from the Rosedale farmers, i.e. the Farndale 
hounds; in 1818 ten hounds from Lambton and some from 

' Henry Chaloner was one of "William Chaloner's fifteen children by one 
wife. William Chaloner was succeeded by his third sou, Eobert Chaloner, who 
married a daughter of Lord Dundas. 



30 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

York ; iu 1819 hounds from Lambton again ; in 1820 from the 
Bilsdale ; in 1821 from York; in 1822 more from York, and 
also from Lambton. In fact the Cleveland hounds seem for a 
great number of years to have had the Lambton draft, and 
where could thev go for better blood ? Hounds that have 
always been praised in prose, and more than once in song. 

Reprinted from the old ' Sporting Magazine^ April^ 1828. 

* Descend, ye chaste Nine ; strike the chord you love best, 
I've a theme that will put your high notes to the test ; 
I've a chase to describe, that assuredly will 

Rouse the dead from their graves, with Huzza ! for Fox-hill, 
Ballanamona ora, 
The hounds of Ralph Lambton for me ! 

* We shall ever remember that glorious day 
When to Long Newton village we rattled away ; 
Every hound seem'd that morning, by instinct, to know 
That the Long Newton ' country would give us a go. 

Ballanamona ora, &c. 

* Burn Wood was drawn blank, but we cared not a rap, 

(Though we all thought it smelt h h strong of a trap), 

For we knew that a rallying point ^ we could make, 
Where a thoroughbred son of old Casar would break. 

Ballanamona, &c. 

* Scarce the hounds were in covert, when off reynard stole, 
How high beat each heart ! how transported each soul ! 
Every hound in his place, and, to give them their due. 
Over Newbiggin bottoms hke pigeons they flew. 

Ballanamona, &c. 

' By Sadberge and Stainton he now bent his way, 
For Elstob ^ afforded no shelter this day : 

' The southern district of tlie Sedgefield country. 
- Fox-hill, a celebrated fox-covert. 
' A fox -covert burnt down. 



THE HOUNDS OF RALPH LAMBTON. 3 1 

Little Stainton then gained, but he durst not look back, 
So close at his brush laid this brilliant pack. 
Ballanamona, &c. 

* Next pointing for Whitton, by Hillington Mill, 
One or two boasted clippers were fain to stand still ; 
But remember, my boys, with a Long Newton fox 
It don't do to lark vhen they're up to the hocks. 

Ballanamona, ttc. 

' O'er the famed Seaton hills with what vigour he flew, 
Determined to prove himself thorough true blue ; 
Sterns down ! bristles up ! 'twould have done your hearts good 
To have seen this staunch pack running frantic ybr blood. 
Ballanamona, &c. 

* By Thorp, Thewls, and Grindon we rattled like smoke, 
And the hounds gaining on him at every stroke, 

He, disdaining Thorp Wood should his destiny mark, 
Dropp'd his brush, and died vermin in Wynyard Park. 
Ballanamona, &c. 

' Fill ! fill ! ye brave fellows, that rode in the run 1 
May the pack add new laurels to those they have won ! 
At my toast how each bosom with ecstacy bounds, 
Long life to Ralph Lambton ! success to his hounds ! 

Ballanamona ora. 

The hounds of Ralph Lambton for me ! * * 

Tlie celebrated Lambton strain was mixed with the York, 
and with the wilder and harder blood of the Bilsdale, Farndale, 
and Siuningtou. 

Here are the items from the accounts : — 



' Written and sung the same day by George Sutton. In this run Bill 
Heely killed his horse Teetotum, and had to walk from Thorpe to Tolesby, 
The fox was killed on the ornamental bridge at Wynyard. Amongst those 
out were John Parrington, Dale Trotter, ' Billy Williamson,' and Thos. Waldy. 



52 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

1817-1818. 
Received by subscriptions . . . j€57 15 6 

Of which Henry Vansittart gave £10 10s., and Robert Challoner 

£5 55. 

The following items appear on the side of expenditure : — - 

Hounds fetched from Rosedale . . . £0 3 
For laying drain iu Apple Orchard . . 2 

N.B. — It was then and is still a favourite plan in Cleveland 
to encourage foxes by means of artificial earths ; they are made 
with 10-inch, 12-inch, or larger draining tiles, on a dry sheltered 
site, generally in the shape of a horseshoe or V, thus providing 
two entrances or exits. The kennel is built round, drained, and 
a large flagstone placed as a roof. 

Figs. 3 and 4 are modern improvements on the above, 3 
showing how an inner recess is made, in which there is just 
room for a fox to turn to come out or face a foe, with a tile 
leading up to it, which, whilst big enough to allow a fox to pass, 
is too small to admit an ordinary terrier, or, in case a dog 
should attempt to pass up, he would be at a hopeless disadvan- 
tage. Fig. 4 is of a single drain with a head of loose sand (a), 
in which a fox will bury himself should a terrier by any chance 
get in. 

£ s. d. 

John Shepherd, balance of salaiy . . .310 

,, ,, a pair of boots . . . .0150 

John Shepherd must have been the whip, with probably a modest 
salary and extras in the way of top boots, though from the price 
they could scarcely be made by Bartley. 

John Pulman, for laying a drain . . .020 



ARTIFICIAL EARTHS, 



33 




Fr». f. 




Fm. i. 



34 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 





HUNT ACCOUNTS, l8r8-l82I. 35 

Although the subscriptions in all amounted to only 
57/. Ids. 6d. John Andrew carries over to the next season 



Balance in hand 



£1 13 9 



1818-1819. 

Subscriptions amount to 

The following are amongst the items of expenditure : — 
'S dogs from Lambton 
1 dog from Sedgefield 
T. Atkinson, for laying a drain 
A man laying Lord Dundas's drain 
A man laying Miley's draia 
By Waller, for a sheep 
Carriage of 6 dogs from Lambton 
Drain in Howden Gill 
Taxes for 10 dogs at 14s. . 
By Rabbit Tommy, for bringing dogs from York 5 

Not very high pay for poor Rabbit Tommy in those days of no 
railways ! 



£ s. 


d. 


89 


3 


liture : 


— 


9 





3 


6 


2 


G 


2 


G 


2 


G 


(» U 


') 


12 


2 


2 


G 


7 






1819-1820. 

Subscriptions amount to . 

Items of expenditure : — 

June 19 — Mr. Lambton's huntsman . 
Laying drains • . . . . 
Taxes for hounds 



92 16 5 



5 5 () 
10 

7 7 4 



1820-1821. 



Subscriptions amount to , 
By casli for a fox to Acklam 



83 6 9 
10 



d2 



36 . THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS, 

N.B. — Foxes seem to have been as scarce then as now in that 
country ! 

£ s. d. 
Jack?on Hodding, for drain . . . .0126 

By Bilsdale dog" 5 

Lord Dundas's drain . . . . .026 



1821-1822. 
Subscriptions amount to . 

Oct. 5. — Jno. Richardson, 5 dogs from York, 

wages 6s., expenses 21s. 
Oct. 8. — Jno. Richardson bringing Governor 
Nov. 27. „ „ 6 dogs from York 

1822. 
Jan. 1 — Wm. Boothment (Bulman), 2 hounds 

from York . . ... 
Dalton's sons, laying drains .... 
Apple Robins' allowance ..... 

Query. — What became of Rabbit Tommy ? And what hap- 
pened that Jno. Richardson and William Boothment were not 
given this job, and that Apple Robins got it ? 

April.— Jno. Johnson's expenses bringing 4 

hounds from Lambton . . . . . 13 1 

By taxes for hounds . . . . . .774 



1822-1823. 

Subscriptions amount to . . . . . 86 18 6 

Items from expenditure : — 

By R. Wilkinson, for Volant . . . .083 

„ Jno. Richardson, for Bide . . . .026 

„ „ „ for C'oroner and Baronet .050 

„ Taxes for foxhounds . . . . .8164 



i5 


11 





1 


13 








3 





1 


8 








13 








5 








4 


6 



£ 


6', 


d. 


71 





3 


1 


5 





1 


8 






HUNT ACCOUNTS, 1823-I826. 37 



1823-1824. 

Subscriptions amount to . 
Items from expenditure : — 

By John Carr, for 1 ewe and 2 lambs 
,, Jack Richardson's headstone 

Note. — John Richardson will bring no more hounds along the 
York road into Cleveland. His memory is cared for by the Hunt, 
and they pay him this last tribute of respect. 

1824-1825. 
Items of expenditure : — 

Subsci'iptions amount to . . . . . 68 4 3 

March. — Jno. Johnson, carriage of 2 dogs from 

Lambton . . . . . . .046 

May 31. — Ml. Johnson, for a sheep . . . 18 

1825-1826. 
Subscriptions amount to . . . . . 70 12 5 

Items of expenditure : — 

For 2 ewes in lamb . . . . . .300 

For 3 moor sheep . . . . . .10 

To Pretty, for digging for Truelass . . .050 

,, Mr. Lambton's man ' . . , . .076 

' Among Jno. Andrew's correspondence I find the following : — 

'May IB, 1825. 
' Sir, — I write to inform you tbat R. T. Lambton, Esq., has to dispose of at 
present about 18 or 19 couple of veiy fine young and old hounds, which, I 
think, would suit you well. Should you be in want of a few couple, I could 
send them with Harrison. Waiting your answei", 

' 1 remain, yuur obedient servant, 

' J. WiNTEB. 

' Lumloy Park.' 
J. Winter was Mr. Lambton's huntsman. 



i s. 


d 


9 1 


i) 


9 9 





7 





iO 





1 10 






38 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



182G-1827. 

Subscriptions amount to . 

Items of expenditure : — 

To J. Winter, for 4g couple of hounds 
,, Seaton, for a moor sheep 
„ T. Skeen „ „ . . 

„ Wm. Weatherill, a mugg sheep . 



1827-1828. 

The accoimt-book is now headed ' Mr. Vansittart's Hounds,' 
and liis subscription is put down as 30^. ; hitherto his subscrip- 
tion has been 10?. \0s. per annum. The reason for all this is 
that John Andrew has at last been caught by the excisemen, 
having been captured in running a cargo at Hornsea ; he was 
fined an enormous sum, and being unable to pay went to York 
C-istle. He had had one lucky escape some time previously, 
when running a cargo at Black Hall. He escaped at Hartlepool, 
being pursued by the Preventive men ; he found a boat at the 
Teesmouth, jumped in and rowed as hai-d as he could across, 
and made the best of his way to Coatham, where he went at 
once to the coastguard and asked the time. He was arrested 
next day, and when brought up called this coastguard as a 
witness that he was at Coatham so near the time alleged that 
he proved liis alibi. Now, however, he had to undergo a long 
term of imprisonment, during which time Mr. Vansittart took 
care of the finance of the Hunt and Tliomas Stevenson hunted 
the hounds. Beyond the additional subscription I do not find 
that Mr. Vansittart interfered in any way with the customs of 
the trouchcr-fed pack. 



HUNT ACCOUNTS, 1S2S-183O. 



39 



The following are the principal subscribers 



Henry Vansittart, E; 
George Peters . 
Sir Wm. Foulis 
Consett Dryden 
Jno. Andrews, senior 
Jno. Andrews, junior 
E. Turton 
Isaac Scarth 
Jno. Beardshaw 
Thos. King 
Jno. Peirson 
J. W. Parrington 
Thos. Stevenson 
Sundry subscriptions 

Total for 1827-28 



£ 


s. 


d 


30 








20 








5 


5 





10 








2 


2 





2 


2 





5 








2 


2 





2 


2 





2 


2 





2 


2 





1 


11 


6 


1 


11 


6 


5 


4 






£91 4 



1828-1829. 

'MR. VANSI'ITART's HOUNDS. 

Total subscriptions paid only amount to 27/. 6s. 6f?., but 
George Peters, Isaac Scarth, and Consett Dryden do not pay 
their promises, which amount to 32/. The 27/. ^s. ^d. is all 
spent, and John Andrew has not received one penny of his 50Z. 
salary. The Hunt arrange to make over to him the subscrip- 
tions due to the Hunt, and he manages to gather up 50/. ' all 

but 11. 8s. m: 



1829-1830. 

'the CLEVELAND HUNT.' 

Change of title does not bring in much more money, 
however, as the total amount of subscriptions is 64/. \s 
34/. 8s. 6c/. goes in expenses, leaving John Andrew only 
29/. 12s. U. of his 50/. salary. 



£ s. 


</. 


10 





7 






40 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Items of expenditure : — 

By casli for a fox ..... 
For strayed liounds ..... 
„ hounds from J. Booth . . . .060 

1830-1831. 

Subscriptions amount to only . . . . 24 19 
Total expenditure for the season . . .14 9 

There is this year due to John Andrew on acconut of his 
salary unpaid 30/. 10.^. Mr. Vansittart comes forward at last 
and pays him. Among the items of expenditure are : — 

Thos. Johnson, hounds from Stokesley. . .030 

Jno. Wood, a sheep ..... 
Martin Smith, ditto . . 

1831-1832. 

Subscriptions amount to . 

Expenditure to ..... 

Items of expenditure : — 

Richard Morsfan to Lambton 



1832-1833. 

Subscriptions amount to . 

Expenditure ...... 

Thos. Fetch first appears on the list as a subscriber of 21. 

Items of expenditure ; — 

INIorgan to Sedge6eld 6 

7 

1833-1834. 
Subscriptions amount to . . . . . 69 16 

Last season Mr. Vansittart subscribed 21/. and does so 
again this year, but at the end of the season Young John again 
wants 6/. ?>s. of his salary. 






5 








12 





59 


6 





61 


9 








7 








7 





5.5 


14 





65 


2 






£ 


s. 


d. 


68 


16 





62 


19 


10 





4 


6 


5 


12 





72 


1 


2 


66 





8 



THE JOURNAL OF JOHN ANDREW, SENIOR. 41 

1834-1835. 

Subscriptions amount to . 

Expenditure ...... 

Cash for 2 hounds from Pickering (Sinnington) 
Collecting hounds ..... 

1835-1836. 

Subscriptions amount to . 

Expenditure to ..... 

New subscribers this season : — 
Col. Hildyard,! 10^. ; R. O. Gascoigne,^ 10^. ; Hon. Thos. Dundas, U. 

Items of expenditure : — 

For strayed hounds and taking to quarters .15 6 

,, collecting hounds 56 times . . . .5120 

„ laying drains . . . . . .040 

lu this year, 1835, on Nov. 14, John Andrew died, so that 
we will close the account-books, and see what sort of sport was 
provided by these keen sportsmen with their scanty funds. As 
I said before, the only year in which I can find any documentary 
evidence is the season 1819-20 — a season which will at all 
events give some idea of the doings of this primitive Hunt. 
Here is the journal verbatim : — 

CLEVELAND HUNT. 

From Monday, Nov. \, 1819, to March 13, 1820. 

Monday^ Nov. 1. — Tried Easington and Eoxby Woods and 

Handale Gyll, all blank, and found in White Cliffe ; run by 

Stanghow to Panaby's Whin, when the hounds pressed him hard 

in cover, when he broke and went over the Rock Hole, when 

' Col. Hildyard lived at Stokesley Manor House, and kept a crack pack of 
harriers, which showed great sport ; he was a most hospitable man, and was 
known to keep a good cellar; throughout his life he had 1,100 dozens of wine 
always in the house. 

2 Gascoigne was the tenant at Long Hull, Guisbrough, the seat of the 
Chaloners, and while he resided there he hunted often with the Cleveland. 



42 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

tlie hounds viewed him by Richard Hill's Jocks Row into 
Ouisbro' Rock Hole, and in the whin above Sweeper overtook 
him, and just as the body of the hounds came up to Sweeper 
a fresh fox went out of the whin away west along Guisbro' 
Banks and all the hounds after Him, except three who di'ove 
him out of the whin and viewed him into the Rock Hole, where 
they killed him. \_Him is one fox, and him is another. Him is 
the fresh fox, him is the original fox. — Ed.'] Thos, Page and 
Wm. Booth, coming up behind and was standing on the Guisbro' 
Road, saw the hounds kill liim, a bitch fox. We ran the other 
Fox to Guisbro' rubbish Heaps and Back, when we called off. 
Some Hounds that was left in Kilton Woods brought other two 
Foxes to Roaka Banks. 

Friday, Nov. 5. — Tried Nov^a Scotia, the Warren, Symy 
Gyll Sheep Pastures, Guisbro' Rock Hole, all Blank, and found 
in Panaby's Whin ; run along to Forty Pence, where he headed 
back and went by Guisbro' Allum Works, along the Banks to 
the rubbish heaps, where he was layd ; he then went back to 
Panaby's Whin and run several rounds there and in Waterfall, 
When the Dogs w^as going to kill him in the whin a fresh Fox 
broke cover, and the hounds went after him by Guisbro' Rock 
Hole, Waterfall, Forty Pence, Adamson's farm by the Lodge 
and Skelton Castle, Upleatham, Hazelgrove, Hob Hill, where he 
got into a Rock, and most of the company left. We afterwards 
drove him out and run him up to Mount Shandy, and down by 
Marske Mill, Saltburn, the Hay, when it grew dark, and, a 
heavy shower coming, we called off, having fifteen couples. . . . 
Hard day, and not good scent. 

Mondaij, Nov. 8. — Tried Court Green, Eston Whin, Blank ; 
found in Mr. Jackson's Old Plantation, and run to the Large 
AVhin, where we run him about half an hour, and then broke 
and went by the Old Plantation, Eston Nab, to Court Green, 
where we run him about twenty minutes, and then back to 
Eston Whin, where he run some time, and then to Court Green, 



THE JOURNAL OF JOHN ANDREW, SENIOR. 43 

where we run him about half an hour like a rabbit Hunt, and 
several people got off their horses to Brush Him, as the hounds 
were all round him, and after that could run him no further ; 
and, a severe storm coming on, we could not tell whether he was 
killed or no. 

Friday, Nov. 12. — Tried Saltburn Gyll, Blank ; then turned 
down a Bag fox in Wm. Sayers' ground, who run very little 
and was killed. Then found a Fox immediately, when we put 
the hounds into Betty Appleton's wood, who run by Skelton 
Castle, Forty Pence, Waterfall, Tockets Lyth, Upleatham, Wil- 
ton Wood, Upleatham, Tockets Dump, Dunsdale, Wilton Wood, 
by George Paterson's, Medcalf 's, and Erington's, up to Uplea- 
tham North Banks, Marsk Quarry, back along the Banks by the 
Pole, and run round in the Fir Rig ; then by Tockets, Skelton 
Filers, a round in Forty Pence, when they run into Her at the 
High corner of Forty Pence. A very Large Bitch Fox. A hard 
day from elevon o'clock to half after three. Nth. Hary Brit- 
tain the brush. 

Monday, Nov. 15. — Found a Fox in Upleatham North Banks ; 
run by the Pole, New Buildings, Tockets Dump, Skelton EUers. 
Forty Pence, Waterfall, to a Drain near Mr. Chaloner's Fishpond. 
After being in about half an hour Gamester drove through the 
Drain, which is about a quarter of a mile long ; he then run by 
Mr. Yeoman's, Waterfall, Skelton Castle, to the rocks in Hob 
Hill, where he had taken shelter, and we could not drive him 
out, and it was very wet. The hounds chased remarkably well. 

Friday, Nov. 19. — Found in Kilton Wood by the Earth at 

half after nine o'clock, and run two rounds in Cover ; he then 

went by Wm. Farndale's, Wm. Stephenson's, Nova Scotia, Jno. 

Appleton's, Skelton Quarry, where he turned, and we were at 

default for some time ; he then went by Stephen Emmerson's, 

Robinson insigs,^ by my Barns, and he was Taliod in crossing 

' Insigs. This word occurs frequently. What it means I cannot discover ; 
probably it is J. Andrew's way of spelling ' ings.' An ing is a low-lying meadow 
or pasture. 



44 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

the lane below Lawrence IMills' house ; then by Wm. Child's 
Newks direct over Warsitt to the cliff in Welford"s farm ; then 
by Jas. Taylor's to the Road below Brotton ; then across Richard 
Childs' ground, by Mr. Chapman's to T. Toas Bank ; then up 
Kilton Wood to Mr. Carlen's Farm, when he had come up to the 
Lane, and we were at default for some time ; he then slipt back 
into the wood, and went by Owson Nab, by Fetch's to Loftus, 
then by Rt. Taylor's to Robson's Mill, and up the wood a 
very slow pace untill he passd Bennison's, when they began to 
run brisker up Moorsholm side ; then crossed -up to Stanghow 
by the Moor side ; then across the Moor to the Warren, across 
the Carrs, over Rocka Bank, down W. Adamson's ground, over 
the High Fark, thro' Forty Fence, Waterfall, up to a rabbit 
earth in Panaby's Whin, where we dug her out, and, being a 
Bitch Fox, we preserved her. A severe day, as I believe we ran 
only one Fox untill half after three (six hours' run). The Dogs 
worked well. 

Friday, Dec. S. — Tried Danby Crag, Friop (Fry up), and 
Glaizdale, and Dragd several Foxes, one into Danby Crag and 
one into Glaizdale Crag, which we bolted, and he took another 
Hole in Glaizdale Head, and we left them digging him out close 
to him. We had a long, unseasonable day, being a Frost at 
night, and going off; left Home at six in the morning, and got 
home about nine at night, after being Twice Bogd. 

Monday, Dec. 6. — Tried Forty Pence, W^aterfall, Guisbi^o' 
Banks, Sym}" Gyll, and Sheep Pastures, Blank, and found in 
Hob Hill ; run by Mr. Angely's, Wm. Farndale's, and back to 
Mr. Wilson's mill ; then up by the Castle to Mr. Otley's, along 
the lane to Mr. Farndale's ; then up by the Nursery, through 
the High Park, Forty Pence, Waterfall, Mr. Napper's, over 
Tocket Lyth to Guisbro'; then down below Wm. Maleham's and 
back to the Pinfold, where they ran into Him. C. Dryden's boy 
the Brush. A very sharp burst for about half an Hour ; he was 
viewed several times in tlie first two miles. A Dog Fox. 



THE JOURNAL OF JOHN ANDREW, SENIOR. 45 

Wednesday, Dec. 8. — Turned down a remarkably pretty gray 
Dog Fox, that we ran to ground at Glaizdale, a bit cut off his 
near ear, at Scaling Dam, and run him pretty smartly by 
Giri'ick-the-Moor to Wm. Moody's, and then slowly past Moors- 
holm, where we lost him, being a very unseasonable day, a very 
hard frost and snow-showers, and blowing very hard. N.B.- — A. 
large field. 

Moiida;/, Dec. 20. — Fresh weather. Tried Kilton Wood, 
Saltburn Gyll, Hob Hill, blank, and in trying round Upleatham 
covers a fox had slipt back and had been gone some time before 
we knew, and two or three Dogs run him by T. Coulson's mill to 
Skelton Park, where we lost him. A very bad scent. 

N.B. — In the last week of December the Roxby people 
Traced a Fox in the Snow into Hinderwell Cliffs, and run him 
from there into Roxby Woods, and after a short run killed him 
with three Hounds. 

Fridcii/, Jan. 28, 1820. — Fresh weather (after nearly six 
weeks' frost). Tried Huntcliff, Cattersty, Saltburn Gyll, Hob 
Hill, and Hazelgrove, all Blank. 

Monday. Jan. 31. — Turned a bag Fox down on Tocket Lyth ; 
run by Harland Corney's, E,d. Outred's, Tocket Dump, Soap- 
well, Marsk Quarry, Pittel's Camp Field, Saltburn, and Lime Kiln, 
into the Sea, where we run up to Him and killed Him, and gave 
Mr. Thompson, Brother to Mr. Yansittart, the Brush. X.B. — A 
bad Scent and a pottering Hunt. 

Thursday, Feb. 3. — Sir Wm. Fowlis turned down a bag Fox 
at Mr. Horritt's (? Porritt's), near Stokesley, and after a sharp 
Burst of forty minuets (except the first ]\Iile, which was all 
wheat Fields), and killd him near Little A}-ton. As soon as the 
Horses and Hounds had got their Winds we went and tried 
Cliverick Wood, where a Fox had stole away with the noise with 
killing the bag Fox, which we ran slowly through Newton Wood 
on the north side of Roseberry, up Howden Gyll, and on to the 
Moor, when they began to chace by Hanging Stone, James 



46 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Foster's Spite House, Gregory Rowland's, through Mr, Jackson's 
Plantation to Ormesby Bank Top, when he headed back through 
the Plantations to Upsall Mill, over the Moor, by Eston 
Beackon and down Lazenby Bank, crossed the Stockton Road, 
past Tlios. Dixon's, Jos. Dryden's, Farmer Hale's, down Thos, 
Hymer's Marsh to Middleburgh, up the slem in the Tees 
side about a mile, where he took the River, and would either 
sweam over or be Drowned. N.B. — He was not more than three 
hundred yards before the Hounds where he took the River. A 
fine cliace, with hardly a check ; a very large Field, the horses all 
bett except my Mare and my Boy's, and Thos. Stephenson's, who 
distinguished himself very much in leaping all the Stells from 
Cargofleet to IMiddlesbrugh ; ' not a Horse vdthin half a mile 
except the above-mentioned Three. 

[A very capital run, and one interesting f,o those knowing 
Cleveland at the present day. The scene of ihe last part of the 
run is now covered with furnaces, foundries, and houses. Mid- 
dlesboro' then was four houses, and a total jiopulation of twenty- 
five souls ; now it is an enormous town, a parliamentary borough 
of about 100,000 souls.] 

Monday^ Feb. 7. — Turned down a bag Fox before Grinkel Hall, 
and run through Easington and Roxby Woods, Roxby Town, 
to a Drain close to Mr. Dods's. Boulby dug her out and turned 
her down upon Easington Moor, and took the same round into 
the same Drain. Dug her out again, and intends to turn her 
down on Friday, the 18th, atSkelton. The Hounds run smartly 
the second time. 

Friday, Feh. 11. — -Tried Pulman's Marshes, Fields, the 

Park, Osburn Rush, and dragd a Fox from Upsall Whin to Mr. 

Jackson's Plantation. When there he was taliod going for 

Eston Nab. We ran him very badly about the Banks for an 

Hour before us, and bad scent. We then went to Court Green, 

' Middleburgh, Middlesbrugh, arc the same place, the modern Middles- 
borough. Middleburg is the ancient way of spelling it ; Middlesbrugh (pro- 
nounced Middlesbruff) the vulgar mode of calling it. 



THE JOURNAL OF JOHN ANDREW, SENIOR. 47 

where we found two or three Foxes. One went by Wilton 
Wood, Eston Nab, Jackson's Plantations, where he headed back 
by the Plantations, Upsill Mill, Chaloner's Park, Tocket Dump, 
Skelton Park, Skelton Green, Howson Flatt, and lost him at the 
east end of Skelton at half-past four o'clock. A very Threshing 
day for the Horses, and not good scent. 

Monday, Feb. 14. — Found in Upleatham North Bank, and 
run to the Beacon and back ; then to the Beacon again ; then 
down to a Drain in Field of Lord Dundas' New Farm above 
Medcalf. We bolted her, and run by the Plantation below the 
New Farm buildings ; then up through the North Bank, and 
back by the Beacon to the Summer House, when she turned 
along the middle of the Fir Pig, where the Hounds run into view 
and killed her. Jno. Andrew, j'unior, the Brush. N.B. — The 
Hounds viewed her frequently after Bolting. 

Fridaif, Feb. 18. — Very Frosty. Turned down the Bitch Fox- 
that we ran into Mr. Dods's Drain at Boulby, in Jas. Gowland's 
Field, back lane, Skelton, a little before one o'clock, and run her 
by W. Wilkinson's, Jno. Appleton's farm, Howson Flatt, past 
Wm. Thompson's Green, Forty Pence, the Filers, Upleatham, 
Skelton Castle, Lord Dundas' orchard, Marsk Quarry, to the 
Drain we bolted the Fox from on Monday, when we bolted Her 
and killed her immediately, as she could not run. We had a 
very good run of one Hour. Jas. Andrew the Brush. 

Monday, Feb. 21. — Tried and found a fox in Kilton Wood. 
Run a ring in the wood, and then broke at the Lodge by Jno. 
Keld's, and lost near John Kig's. A severe storm of sleet with 
wind. Tried Wild Grove and Saltburn Gyll, but did not find. 

Saturday, Feb. 26. — Tried Hob Hill, blank, and found near 
the Summer House at Upleatham. Run around the Hill as if 
they viewed ; then broke, and went by J. Abel son's, Harland 
Corney's, Harry Harrison's, Eston Nab, Ormesby Bank Top, 
i\Iarton Gyll, near to Newham, where he headed back by Marton 
Gyll, Jackson's Plantations to Upsall, where he headed back by 



■48 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Jackson's Plantations on the Fields below Eston Bank, tlirough 
the Riish and over the Hill near to Wm. Laing's Barn ; then 
back by Eston Nab, down to the Fields above Eston, through tlie 
Rush, Court Green, down through Wilton Wood, Lazenby, and 
killd him about three Fields below Lazenby. An old dog Fox. 
Jas. Andrew, junior, the Brush. A very hard chace of about 
three and a-half Hours. The horses all bett ; but my mare Tired 
having got a bellyful of water, not intending to go out. [Of 
course, John, she would not have been tired except for this 
bellyful of water !] 

Monday, Feb. 28. — Drag'd two Foxes from Skelton Warren 
into Symy Gyll, where they were Taliod. The Hounds divided ; 
got most of them together, run by Sheep Pastures, Guisbro' 
Banks, Roseberry, Easby Wood, Borrow Green, to Ingleby Barn, 
along the Banks to Whainstone (Wainstones), where he Earthed. 
A long Chase, but slow, being a very hard Frost. Sir Wm. 
Foulis joined us and had us all down to his House (Ingleby 
Manor), and Treated us and our Horses with great Hospitality, so 
that we came home full of life and Ingleby Wine. 

Monday, March 13. — [Stopped by frost for a fortnight.] 
Fresh weather. Found in Saltburn Gyll ; run by Stephen 
Emmerson's Clarybalds (?), where he was headed in my insigs, 
then down through Robinson's insigs, and up to Rt. Carlisle's 
Field, where he had crossed, and run up to Skelton Castle, where 
we lost him. A bad scent, and he being often headed, he had 
o-ot a long way before the Hounds, and the}^ ran him badly. 
Then tried Upleatham, Blank, and in going into Hazel Grove 
the Hounds threw up their Heads and rund down by the Sea 
Banks as if they viewed (which annoyed several of our sportsmen, 
who had but just gone into ]\Ir. Beard's house to get a smack). 
[There was an inn in the country with this rhyme on the sign- 
board of ' Fox and Hounds ' : — 

The hounds in cry, the fox in view, 
Come tak a glass, and then pui'suo ' — 



THE JOURNAL OF JOHN ANDREW, SENIOR. 49 

an exhortation to drink at a most improper time, and likely to 
cause tlie same annoyance to those who listen to it as those 
sportsmen suffered who partook of Beard's hospitality.] He 
then turned by Marsk, R. Lincoln's, and Errington's, when the 
Hounds divided, as I expect there had been two Foxes. Some 
went down to the Sea Banks, and we got them off and run with the 
other by Paterson's Bank, Tockett Dump, Thos. Bigg's, Water- 
fall, the Ellers, Forty Pence, to Cum Bank,' where we lost Him. 

Fridai/, March 17. — Tried Green of Burton (Green a Boton), 
and found in going into Sir Wm. Foulis' Park, and run him a 
round by Burton Head and the West Wood, and back to where 
we found him, and changed to a bad scent. Some of Jno. 
Rickaby's Dogs having joined [the Bilsdale — Rickaby was blaster 
then], they run badly after, and Jollyboy and Trimbush killed 
a sheep. AVe then called off" and Turned a Bag Fox down at 
Brouton (Broughton) Bridge, and run he thirty minutes and killd 
her in a garth on the east side of Bi'outon Town. Conset Drvden 
got the brush, and gave it to Miss Foulis, who had rode hard 
and was up at the death. N.B. — A large Field, but bad scent. 

Monday, March 20. — Found a Brace of Foxes below Kilton 
Castle. Run up near to Kate Ridden,^ headed back by the 
Castle up near to Liverton, then by Handell Gyll to Loftus 
High Fields, where we lost him. We then came back and 
dragd the other Fox to Hunt Cliff, where we had passed Him 
and he had slipt off behind us, but was seen, and we run him 
thro' Cattersty, by Jas. Farndale's, thro' Kilton Wood, by Jno. 
Carr"s, up near to Liverton, and over to Handell Gyll, where 
we lost him. A bad scenting day. 

Friday, March 24. — Tried all round Middlesbrugh, blank. 
[If they drew Middlesboro' to-day they would do the same. 
They might find a few stuffed ones.] Turned down a bag Fox 

' Cum Bank, Combe Bank - Conm Bank. Coiims in the Cleveland dialect 
signify hollow-lying recesses in the hills and moors— cf. Welsh cwm and Houtli 
Country comhe. 

" Kate Ridding. A riddinr/ in Cleveland is a clearing. 

E 



50 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

there, when the Horsemen rode the Hounds off the scent, and we 
had Past him after running about three Miles, but mett with the 
scent again by Mr. Rudd's Plantations (at Tolesby), and run 
him by the blew Bell (Acklam Blue Bell Inn) up to Viewly 
Hill, where the Hounds killd him. Thos. Stephenson the 
Brush we run an Hour and Forty Minutes snow and sleet 
all the time. Then tried Mr. Jackson's Plantations, blank. 
Found in Eston Bank, and run by Court Green, back by 
Hambleton Hills, Marton, Newhani, Nunthorp, Upsall, Eston 
Nab, Wilton Wood, and lost him in Lazenby Bank. 

.... A spring frost un. . . . we turnd a bitch Fox. . . . 
Kirkleatham, and she had about twenty-five minutes' run, when 
she went direct west about a mile, and then down to the Teas, 
then south to Andr. Smith's, when the hounds broke away 
with a Hare as far as Mr. Good's, when we got them off and went 
back to Meggitt Lane. We were haloed away to John Scarth's, 
where she had been seen about three-quarters of an hour before. 
(In leaping out of Meggitt Lane my mare slipt into a deep ditch, 
and had nearly gone back over upon me, but I was not much 
worse. It was bad riding, as the frost was not quite out of the 
ground.) We then dragd her up to Wilton Wood, Court 
Green, where we Taliod her in the Quarry, and she got to ground 
someway thereabout. The scent carried over ploughing .... 
from Guisbro' All am (allum) AVorks to H. . . . , where he slipt 
off, and a part of the hounds took the Heelway, the other run 
by Highcliff, Belman Bank, Mr. Yeoman's to Tocket Lyth, where 
we lost him ; and in going to Waterfall Gyll we heard he 
had gone there, and we dragd him into Panabys W^hin, where 
we unkenneled another Fox, and run him by Forty Pence to the 
bottom of Waterfall Gyll, by Mr. Napper's to Springwood, where 
we lost him. The Hounds could not run at all, it was so bad 
Bcent. 

ThumdaAj, March 30. — Tried Brotton, Saltburn Gyll, Hunt- 
cliff, Cattcrsty, Blank. Then dragd a fox thro' Kilton Wood, 



DEATH OF JOHN ANDREW, SENIOR. 51 

Kate Ridding, up the ]\[oor to Broth Hows,' where the hounds 
began to chase sheep, and could not make him oiF, and left him 
short about the Causey Way end, going to Castletown, where ]\Ir. 
Harker put him up afterwards. Then tried Forty Pence, Blank. 

Monday, April 3. — Tried about Skelton Warren and on the 
Moor to the Causay Way,^ but no drag. The Hounds ran sheep ; 
flogd some. Found in Symy Gyll. went by ^Nlr. Howgarth's to 
Bellman Banks, by High Cliff, Hanging Stone, over Roseberry, 
to Easby Wood, where we lost, being uncommon Hot. We went 
to Green of Burton; then tried Mr. Livesey's Plantations, blank ; 
Court Moor, Aji;on Alum Works, Guisbro' Banks, and Forty 
Pence, all Blank. 

Fridaij, April 7. — Tried Newton Woods, Howden Gyll, 
Blank. Then Turned a fox down near .... by the stell side, 
only run a few fields and was killed. Rd. Scarth the brush, 
then tried Guisbro' Banks, and found in Symy Gyll. Run 
by Holdforth's, Guisbro' Banks, Waterfall, Forty Pence, to 
Boosbeck Lane, and back to Guisbro' Banks, where he was 
lost. A bad scent and large Field. 

And now, having given the full account in John Andrew's 
own words of a season's sport with the old Roxby and Cleveland 
Hounds, we must say good-bye to him. Perhaps they wei'e, 
owing to foxes being ill-preserved in those days, too fond of the 
barbarous substitute for the real thing, viz. a bag fox. Perhaps 
their hunting ground was somewhat limited when compared with 
modern countries ; and perhaps the hounds do not seem to have 
been , under the discipline and control which characterises 
modem packs. But we must allow that John Andrew, on his 
old mare that he thought so much of, did show some extra- 
ordinary sport with this trencher-fed pack. In 1835, just as 

' How or Houe in this district is the name given to the barrows and 
tumuli which are numerous on the moors. 

- Quakers Causey. Causeys are narrow paved tracks, of great antiquitj- 
often, leading across the moors for packhorscs, or bj- the side of roads for 
foot passengers. 

K 2 



52 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

another season had come round, it was known that John 
Andrew would never again mount his old mare, in his red coat, 
nor cheer on his hounds. On November 14 he died; and the 
hills and valleys of Cleveland heard no more the sound of his 
cheery voice nor echoed with the clear note of his horn. A large 
following of those who had followed him in life followed him to 
Skelton Churchyard, where he was laid to rest.^ 

' Atkinson, in his History of Cleveland (pp. 262, 26.3), says : 'Lastly, a noble 
pack of iiouuds, not surpassed by any in England, are kept at Saltburn, .... 
and kill more foxes than any of the crack packs in the country.' He mentions 
John Andrew, junior, saying : ' He was a sound agriculturist, a strong-minded 
straight-forward character, and stanch veteran sportsman of the olden time.' 



PART III. 

THE MASTERSHIP OF JOHN ANDREW, JUNIOR 

1835-1855 



MASTERSHIP OF JOHN ANDREW, JUNIOR. 55 



PART III. 

THE MASTERSHIP OF JOHN ANDREW, JUNIOR. 

1835-1855. 

When old John Andrew died in November 1835, his sou John, 
who was born at Saltburn in 179-i, would be just in his forty- 
first year, and had during the last few seasons a very large share 
in the management of the affairs of the Hunt, and had hunted the 
hounds during the last five years of his father's life. He continued 
to act as huntsman till December 11, 1837. He had married very 
young and had a considerable family of promising young sports- 
men, one of whom eventually did more than any of the family 
to perpetuate the name of the Andrews. I allude to Tom 
Andrew, who first acted as huntsman in 1837. 

For accounts of the doings of the pack during the next decade 
I am indebted to Mr. Thomas Parrington, of Ravenswyke, Kirby 
Moorside, who kindly placed his journals at my disposal. This 
sportsman, whose name is now known throughout the kingdom 
as one of the first authorities on horses and hounds, who has 
hunted hounds, and for several years was Master of the Sinnington, 
began his hunting career in Cleveland, and although now residing 
outside the district, is often seen in the Cleveland field, judging 
at Horse and Foxhound Puppy Shows, and revisiting the haunts 
of his youth. For a number of seasons he was secretary to the 
Hunt, and sometimes contributed to the local press under the 
7ioni deplume of 'Harkaway.' 



56 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Season 1835-1836. 

The total of subscriptions this season amounted to 72^. l.s-. 2d., 
and the expenses incurred were 661. Os. 8d. We find three 
new subscribers coming down handsomely, viz. Col. Hildyard, 
Wl. ; R. 0. Gascoigne, 10^. ; and Hon. Thos. Duudas, 5^.' 

I give two or three of the best days' sport. They began 
hunting Monday, October 13. 

TJiursday, Decemher 17. — Advertised for Coathani but met 
at Marton, where JNIr. Vansittart had sent his fox ; ^ turned 
down in Middlesbro' Lane, went right away towards Mr. 
Calvert's at a tremendous pace, where Jollyboy had the lead 
of Hounds and R. Watson, Esq., the lead of the Tits. In this 
manner they continued to Key Lane, where the fox headed 
back ; here Vanguard took the lead of hounds and Major Healy 
the lead of horses, close followed by Rev. Mr. Newton, R. Watson, 
Esq., all the others being completely beaten off. The fox took a 
slant direction for jNliddlesbro', but was taken in a field of Mr. 
Harrison's. The following were in at the death : R. Watson, 
Major Healy, Rev. Mr. Newton, — Waring, Esq., T. Parrington. 
. . . R. Watson got the brush. A treinendous fast run. Went 
away to Ormesby Gill and found, ran up to Mr. Jackson's Whinn, 
across the Moor to Court Green, down through Lazenby Whin 

' Subscribers this season : Hon. T. Dundas, R. C. Gascoigne, Esq., — Gas- 
coigne, Esq., Wm. Danby, Esq., Jno. rierson, Jno. Parrington, Sir Wm. Foulis, 
C. K. Rowe, Es(j., Joseph, I. W., Thomas, and L. H. Parrington, Robt. Hymers, 
C. Dryden, Esq., Lt.-Col. Hildyard, T. Hustler, E.sq., R. Watson, Esq., J. Healy, 
E.sq., Rev. Wm. Gooch, W. Garbutt, Jnr., Jno. Newton, — Waring, Esq., Major 
liealy, T. Waldy, Estj., Geo. King, Wm. Beardshaw, Ed. Turton, Esq., 
— Newcomcn, Esq. 

^ To explain this we must refer back to December 10, when they found in 
Harrison's Whin and ran to ground at Lazenby, and ' some men foupd two 
foxes in the hole, one of which was sent to Mr. Vansit tart's, and the other to 
John's.' 

' N.l').— Tlie fox which was to have been sent to John's escaped with about 
a yard of chain at his neck.' 



SEASON 1S35-1836. 57 

into the Country to Joseph Garbutt's, and lost. A beautiful 
clay's sport. 

I am soiTy to say the best day's sport this season appears to 
have been with bag foxes, though I take this opportunity of 
assuring my readers that it was only occasionally they indulged 
in this vice. 

Thursday, Marcli 21. — Advertised for Upsall ; met at Blue 
Bell at eleven o'clock. Turned down the fox that was got at 
Forty Pence [last day they were out he is described in the 
account of that day as ' a tremendous large old fox '] in one of 
William Baxter's fields. Away he went at a slashing pace, past 
Piper Barn, through our farm, past Calverts, across Key Lane, 
past Peter Featherstone's, across the lower end of ]\Iartin Smith's 
farm, and killed in Mr. Jackson's second field below the lane. It 
could not be called a hunt hardly, but it was an out and out 
steeplechase, considering the severity of the pace and the severe 
country. In the field were seen — Grey, Esq. (Stockton), — Faber, 
Esq., Wm. Hustler, Esq., I. Walton, Esq., &c. &c., and T. Par- 
riugton. Jollyboy ' took the lead, but Ganger ^ beat him in grand 
style towards the latter end of the chase. John Andrew dashed 
off with the lead of the horses. There were two separate lines 
taken, the majority of horses being in the higher line. Tom Bean, 
who rode his brown horse, took a line of his own, happened to 
be lucky, and at our farm was about a field-breadth ahead, at 
which place the two lines fell together ; the pace was here beyond 
all description, and the tailbuj was desperate. At the last few 
fences Tom Bean was hard pressed, but won his race finally and 
got the brush ; Pev. Mr. Newton was second. Never such a 

\ 

' Jollyboy by York and Anisty, Judgement out of Cleveland Eoseberry. 

Koseberry was by Cleveland Valiant out of Old Eoseberry. 

Valiant by Cleveland Booth's Dancer out of Mr. Hill's Victory. 

Old Eoseberry by Cleveland Page's Farmer out of Cornelius Clark's bitch 
by Booth's Dancer; he was a light gray and white hound. 

^ Ganger, a gray and white hound, pure Cleveland, and generally known as 
' Tommy Pages lapdog.' 



58 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

severe burst was known with the Cleveland, and the Lambton 
gents declared they never saw such a run, and were much 
pleased with the running of the hounds. 

Thursday, March 31 — Met at Court Green ; did not find there. 
Found in Tommy Clark's Barn Whin ; ran in cover a long time ; 
broke away across the top of Court Green, away to Lazenby 
Whin, through it and away along the bottom of the bank, came 
out at the Nab, and away along the wall to Mr. J acksou's Plant- 
ings, away round by Upsall Whin, came out beside the Mill, and 
away to Osborn Rush across Greenwood's Farm and to Harrison's 
Whin ; away to Clark's Barn W hin again, and to Court Green ; 
through it, and away to the Greyhound Course, when the hounds 
had a sudden check and never could run him afterwards. This 
was a run of all runs, and considered the best performance this 
Season. 

The last day of the season was April 1 1 . They only killed 
ten foxes, according to Mr. Parrington's journal. The following 
paragraph winds up his diar}^ for the season : — 

' The Sport of the Cleveland this Season has been considered 
good, considering how unlucky they were in having bad scents. 
They have done their work in good style, and have had several 
liaUlers without a Kill. I only wish that the next Season may 
be equal to the Past. IMease God we may all live and enjoy it, 
sincerely hoping they may be successful in their endeavours 
another Season ; to which every Loyal Sportsman will say Amen.' 

Whether this pious and earnest desire was fulfilled I cannot 
discover, for all record of the season 1836-37 has vanished. The 
next season of which we have full particulars is that of 1837-38. 



' IIARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1 837. 59 



Season 1836-1837. 

£ s. d. 

Expenses 70 6 4 

Subscriptions . . . . . . . 73 5 6 

Among the items of expenditure for this season is ' wire, 2fe-.,' 
which was for wiring hounds' feet in summer time when they 
were at quarters — a barbarous but effective plan which still finds 
favour with the Bilsdale. 

Owing to a prosecution by the Society for P.C.A. for this 
practice, the Bilsdale have abandoned it. Whilst no humane 
man could approve this method, the cruelty of it has been 
grossly exaggerated, and it may even be presumed that hounds 
themselves would prefer this plan of keeping them at home to 
close confinement. The abolition of this custom prevents many 
farmers from keeping hounds, as it was their only means of 
maintaining hounds in health by giving them their liberty, and 
yet, by crippling them, prevented their hunting and straying. 

Season 1837-1838. 
Commencing Monday, October 23, and ending April 12. 





£ s. d. 


Total of subscriptions amounted to . 


. 85 7 2 


Expenses ...... 


.72 1 8 



Among the items of expenditure is Ql. 18.^, for collecting 
hounds forty-six times. 

Od. 30. — They ran a fox to ground and dug him out and 
four other foxes in the same hole. 

Friday, Nov. 3. — They seem to have had a good run ; the 
latter part of it is worth recording : ' Away he went across the 
Moor to Sir John Lowther's Plantations ; ran north down the west 



6o THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

boundary close past Lazenby, and direct down to the water side 
and into tlie slem. The fox was traced right into the water. What 
came of him remains a mystery ; however, the Run was a capital 
one, and a very severe one. Many horses gave up, and some 

were lamed Out of a numerous field only three saw the 

" wash up," viz. Mr. G. Peirson, Mr. Duudas, Mr. Danby, and 
John Andrew.' 

From Nov. 30 to Dec. 11 they did not hunt 'on account 

of the severe illness of Mr. John Andrew, the huntsman 

His complaint is inflammation of the Bowells, but it is the earnest 
prayer of the members of the Cleveland Hunt that he will 
recover, and that he may still be allowed to meet his brother 
Sportsmen with the gallant pack, by whom he is so much 
respected and beloved.' 

On Dec. 11 John Andrew's eldest son Tom came out as 
Huntsman. 

Tliursdaij, Dec. 21. — Famous Hun. Met at Lackenby Whin, 
in which there was no fox. Went to Kirkleatham Whin, where 
a gallant Fox went away before the hounds were scarcely in 
Covert, right away up the west side of Meggit Lane to Mr. Hett's 
at a slashing pace, crossed the road about half-way between 
Kirkleatham and Wilton, across the fields to Wilton Wood, 
when the Steeplechase (as it was so like one) had a singular 
appearance ; Thos. Parrington leading so many gallant Horses, 
his brother John coming next, then Mr. Danby and Col. Hild- 
yard ; these were the only ones near the Hounds. Some had 
stopped in the lane ; some, more eager, were forcing their already 
tired Horses onward, though so far behind ; and some, better 
mounted, who had got a bad start, were taking the advantage 
of every turn made by the leading nags to gain their lost 
ground . . . The fox went right through Wilton Wood and 
up to Court Green, the pace still very severe over the hill end, 
where all the horses had fallen in the rear save Col. Hildyard, 
John Parrington, T. Parrington, Jno. Newton, Mr. Danby, and 



' HARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1838. 61 

Geo. Peirson Away they went, if possible, faster than 

before, as if Guisbro' Park was his destination ; however, he skirted 
the east end of the Park, then turned rather to the right across 
Howl Beck to Guisbro' Town End, where they had a moment's 
check, and where Thos. Parrington was first got up to after 
leaving Court Green ; crossed Chapelbeck again close to Guisbro', 
and straight away to Highcliffe ; crossed to the right .... ran 
west along the covert above Hutton Loav Cross to Bousdale, 
where the Fos again broached the open country, right away back 
to Mr. Newton's, where he took the lane, and which he kept 
with little intermission along behind Guisbro', nearly to Tocketts 
Lythe. Of course the Hounds could not run at all in the lane, 
and the tedious business of tracing occupied so much time that 
when again he took the fields the Hounds could not run ; several 
of the ' tail ' had now gathered up, and all were fresh, except 
Col. Hildyard, who, having had quantum suff., left at Hutton Low 
Cross. Two or three couple of Hounds changed Foxes in High- 
cliffe, and as these Hounds were running very hard, it was deter- 
mined to join them with the body of Hounds and those Horses 
that were able, but some found it convenient as well as necessary 
that they should GO HOME. The Hounds were soon got together ; 
they ran a considerable way on the Spring Wood into a few 
whins, where there was some splendid covert hunting. The 
Fox, finding it could not live there, broke away back along the 
Wood at a rattler to Hutton Low Cross, right away towards the 
Hanging Stone, and into a drain in a wheat field not far from 
Pinchingthorpe, the Hounds close at back of him. It was now 
quite darh, so there was no chance of his being got out that 
night. This is the only run worth riding to this Season, bamng 
the one from Skelton Park, and those are the only two days 
that the Cleveland Country held a scent ; this plainly shows that 
Hounds cannot malce sport but when there is scent. If the 
Olevelands he lucky to have a good scent day, they can do their 
work as ivell and go as fast as any Hounds, and there are some 



62 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Cleveland Sportsmen who, when on their cracks, may well say, 
' Lamhtonians and Iliirworthians, come along ! ' 

Thursday^ Jan. 4. — Advertised for Upsall ; met at Acklam Bine 
Bell, to which place Mr, Vansittart had sent a bag fox. Turned 
down close to the west side of Clough's house near Acklam, and 
at five minutes' law the Hounds were laid on the scent. Away 
they went, running South towards Stainton Road ; the Fox then 
took a westerly line up wind to Stainsby, from thence towards 
Thorn aby, to which place some of the Horsemen — to wit, Messrs. 
Jos. Parrington and Frank Goates — skirted from the line, and 
the Fox taking a turn down to Mandale left them in the skirters' 
proper place ! After passing the Mill he crossed Stockton Road 
at the top of Fleet Bridge bank. The Hounds were going a 
tremendous pace. After crossing the ' Bottoms ' he took an 
easterly course up Willy Carr's farm, crossed the Newport Lane 
and right away nearly to Linthorpe, went close past Geo. 
Thompson's, crossed the Middlesbrough Lane, and straight 
away to the Beck, wli. the Hounds crossed 2 Fields above the 
Middlesbro' road Bridge, which proved a teaser to many. 
Mr. Geo. Peirson first charged it with success, and the Rev. J. 
Newton, Mr. Danby, and Mr. Healy were equally successful, but 
many who had yet stuck to the Hounds — viz. H. Waring, T. 
Parrington, and Pullein — found their way over the Bridge ; the 
rest found their way over another Bridge. The Fox still con- 
tinued his straight course close past White House to the Key 
lane, the hounds still continuing to go like pigeons. They 
now ran towards the ClifFe ; some awkward Stells were here to 
be got over. Mr. Geo. Peirson, who had up to this time ridden 
to the Hounds like a Sportsman, failed in his attempt to clear 
one, and had some difficulty in getting his IMare out, which 
spoilt him for the rest of the run. After going within a field 
or so of the Cliffe the Fox went straight away to Joseph Garbutt's, 
and then continued his easterly course. Mr. Newton and 
Tommy Bean now cut out the work, and tlie rest of tlio horses 



' ITARKAWAY's ' JOURNAL, 183S. 63 

were very much tailed crossing Jos. Garb utt's farm. The Hounds 
had their first check at Clay Lane, which the Hounds dashed 
over, but sly Reynard ran down the lane a field's length, and 
then took the fields. This gave the leaders a sob and the second- 
raters time to get up, and it was the first time Mr. Jos. Parring- 
ton saw the Hounds after leaving Thornaby. After a couple of 
minutes' delay the line was hit off by Roseberry, and away went 
the gallant pack, faster if possible, skirting Lackenby Whin ; 
they ran down to the Cliff and along the top to the West 
boundary of Coatham Marsh, finding it vain to attempt the 
darling earth the Fox never entered the Marsh, but continued 
the fields to behind West Coatham, when, after some beautiful 
viewing, he resigned himself to Symmetry and Company. INIr. 
Joseph Parrington, by dint of speed and good luck, got the 
Brush ; Tommy Bean came second, and then the rest. Mr. 
Danby and Tommy Bean both enjoyed tremendous falls just at 
the finish. The run, including one check, is estimated at IG 
miles, and was done in one hour and tiventij minides, over a 
severe country ; the Hounds ran and behaved like beauties, and 
could not be excelled by auy. Frank Coates was richly satisfied, 
and everybody was delighted. Everyone is decidedly of opinion 
that this run exceeds by far any run last season, both as for 
speed and good running. The lead as to the Hounds was prin- 
cipally kept by Symmetry ' and Tumult.'^ Jollyboy,^ Challenger,^ 
and Magic '^ ran equally well. 

The storm prevented hunting from Monday, Jan. 15, to 
Monday, March 12, though they were hunted often during this 
time on foot, having several capital runs and killing one fox. 

' Symmetry was a hound thej^ obtained from Mr. Petre's ; black and white. 

^ Tumult, a gray and white bound, second season, by Sir T. Sj'kes' Merri- 
man out of the Sinnington Termagant. 

^ Jollyboy, light gray and white hound, by the York Judgment out of the 
Cleveland Old Roseberry ; entered 1834. 

* Challenger, gray and white, Cleveland bred and by Castor. 

* Magic, yellow and white, Cleveland bred ; entered in 1836. 



64 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

On March 1 2 Mr. John Andrew came out for the first time after 
his severe illness ; ' he was warmly greeted, and the true-hearted 
group of Cleveland Foxhunters who surrounded him were all 
anxious to welcome him once more among them.' 

On Thursday, March 22, they had a splendid gallop from 
Acklam to Craythorne, twelve miles as they ran, and said to be 
done in forty minutes. This fox was a bagman, 

Monday, March 26. — Met at Court Green. After some 
sport found a fresh Fox in Mr. Jackson's Whin ; went through 
20 Acre Plantation. In running towards Ormesby they met 
with Col. Hildyard's Harriers, which were then running a bag fox ; 
after some trouble and loss of time got the Foxhounds on their 
own scent and ran prettily to Marton Gill ; during a check 
here a hare got up, and away went 2 or 3 couple of Harriers 
which had joined the Hounds, and of course they all broke away ; 
this spoiled the run. In going back to Upsall to try, met with 
the Colonel and his Pack, which had run their fox into Mr. 
Garnett's tanyard, but (hirst not kill him, so the men caught 
him alive. By Col. Hildyard's desire they joined packs, and had 
the fox turned down, which after a short run the Cleveland 
finished off", beating the little dogs in style, although both packs 
ran particularly well. 

On Monday, April 2, when they met at Hutton Low Cross, 
a curious misfortune happened during the day which is worth 
recording : ' The hounds found a bitch fox which had cubs o?i 
f]ie (jrovjid ; the cubs (five) were of course killed.' The old vixen 
escaped. 

They finished the season on April 12. 

Appended is a summary of this season (see pp. GG and 07). 

It is plainly shown by this summary that the whole number 
of days the hounds ought to have hunted during the season was 
fifty, from which, if nineteen be deducted for disappointments, 
&c., only thirt3'-one days remain that the hounds were taken o 
cover. Durinfj which tliirtv-one davs thev killed twentv-thrce 



EAR-MARKING HOUNDS— SEASON 1838-1839. 65 

foxes, nearly a fox for each day, and also only seven days out of 
these thirty-one days were high scenting ones, whilst twelve out 
of the same number had no scent at all ; enough to prove the 
general unfavourable season for foxhunting. Then 

May the Clevelands still flourish on, 

And nhow all others the way, 
Wear proudly the laurels they've won, 

Is th' desire and wish of Harkaway. 



66 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



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Cold and wet 

A very hard frost 
Fine day 
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2 *J . >■ d 2d. 



SUMMARY, 1837-1838. 



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THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 





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70 the cleveland hounds. 

Season 1838-1839. 

Commencing Monday, October 29, and ending Thursday, 
April 11. 

£ 8. d. 

Total amount subscribed . . , . 93 13 6 

M j> expended . . . . 83 8 10 

The new subscribers this season are — 

David Fetch, £\ ; Mr. Rudd, £\ ; and R. Garbutt, £2. 

Among the items of expenditure we find — 

Collecting hounds forty-nine times . . . 7 7 

Laying down drains . . . . . 5 

For a fox 10 

For Northumberland hounds * . . . 18 

The season began very badly, and they only killed two foxes 
before their hunt dinner on November 16; this poor start was 
chiefly due to the bad state of the weather and absence of scent. 
November 16, just mentioned, being the first day's sport worth 
recording, shall be given. 

A lieport of the Proceedings at Cleveland Hunt Anniversary 
Dinner, held at Mrs. Soivrays Hotel, Redcar, on Friday, 
November 16, 1838. 

President, Edward Pullan, Esq. ; Vice, John Peirson, Esq. 
Also present : Messrs. Bailey, John Hett, G. King, Geo. 
Peirson, John Parrington, L. Parrington, D. Petch, Thos. 
Petch, R. Hymers, T. Bird, John Black, Robt. Chilton, Jos. 
Parrington, Carrick, Thos. Parrington, John Andrew, Rd. Garbutt, 
Scott, Wm. Garbutt, Thompson, Andrew Smith, Henry Thomas, 
John Newton, Jos. Newton, Wm. Beardshaw. The dinner was 
served at three o'clock. On the cloth being drawn the Chairman 

' Bachelor and Rockwood, bred by Sir Mathew White Ridley, and prcseuled 
to the Hunt. 



ANNUAL HUNT DINNER, 1838. 71 

rose and said : Mr. Vice and Gentlemen, I give you ' The Queen,' 
a toast which I hope you will drink in a Bumper. 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, the next Toast I shall propose 
to you is the health of the Queen Dowager and the rest of the 
Koyal Family. 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, I call upon you to charge your 
glasses to the brim to do justice to the toast I am about to 
propose to you. It is the health of a Gentleman who is at the 
bead of the Cleveland Hunt, and who is well known among you ; 
it is Henry Vansittart, Esq. (loud cheers), and I beg with 
his health we may drink success to those Hounds which have 
earned lavirels for themselves (cheers). It is unnecessary for 
me to remind you of the many glorious runs we have had with 
them, but there was one day last season I will call 3'our atten- 
tion to, when the ' hrohen-legged fox ' was turned down ' 
(loud cheers), and that was a run which, even by those who 
made the ungentlemanly remark, will never be forgot (cheers). 
Without further remark, I propose to you the Health of Henry 
Vansittart, Esq., and success to the Cleveland Foxhounds 
(loud cheers). This Toast was drunk with three times three 
and one cheer more. 

The Vice-Chairman : Mr. President and Gentlemen, I beg 
to propose to you the health of a nobleman who is a true sup- 
porter of the Cleveland Hounds, and that is Lord Dundas 
(cheers). Drunk with three times three cheers. 

The Vice-Chairman : Mr. President tmd Gentlemen, I have 
the pleasure of proposing to you the health of another Gentle- 
man and kind friend to us — Colonel Hildyard — and success to his 
Harriers (loud cheers). Three times three and one cheer more. 

The Chairman : Mr. Vice-President and Gentlemen, in 
rising to propose the next Toast I certainly feel some diffidence, 
as I am sure I shall fall far short of expressing our kind obliga- 

' 1 7 A' Jan. 1, 18:58. 



^2 The CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

tions to that Gentleman whose health I am about to propose 
(cheers), and although last season he was nearly run to ground, 
I am thankful he was spared (hear), and he is now, I am glad 
to see, as well as ever, as wishful to show us sport and to super- 
intend the Cleveland Hounds, and I trust he may long continue 
to do so (loud cheers). Gentlemen, I give you the health of 
Mr. John Andrew, our worthy and respected Huntsman (ti'e- 
mendous cheering). Drunk with three times three and one 
cheer more. 

Mr. John Andrew returned thanks. 

Mr. Bird proposed the health of E. Pullan, Esq., the Chair- 
man. Drunk with three times three cheers. 

Mr. Pullan returned thanks. 

Mr. Black proposed ' Lady Turner and Miss Vansittart.' 
These healths were drunk with three times three cheers. 

Mr. George Peirson then sang ' To Bachelors' Hall we 
good fellows invite ' in beautiful style, and was loudly cheered. 

Mr. Bailey : Gentlemen, after the very excellent song we 
have just heard we cannot do less than drink Mr. Peirson's 
good health and song (cheers). 

Mr. George Peirson returned thanks. 

Mr. John Parrington : Gentlemen, there is one Toast I besr 
to propose to you; it is the health of a Sportsman who is now 
laid on the shelf, as it were, but who still retains an ardent wish 
for the prosperity of all hunting. Gentlemen, I give you the 
health of Ralph Lambton. Drunk with cheers. 

Mr. Thos. Parrington then sang his new song, the ' Lament 
of the Horses,' amidst loud cheers and laughter. 

The Vice-Chairman : Gentlemen, I think we cannot do less 
than drink Mr. Thos. Parrington's good health and his song, 
which I have just heard is of his own composing (cheers). 

Mr. T. Parrington : Mr. President and Gentlemen, I beg 
to thank you most kindly for the unexjiected honour you have 
done me ; perhaps I may be allowed to propose a Toast before I 



ANNUAL HUNT DINNER, I838. 73 

sit down. I think it is only a duty towards our neighbours that 
we should drink success to the Hurworth Hounds. I believe 
that a great many people run away with the idea that we and 
the Hurworth Hunt are absolute Enemies. I am glad, however, 
that such is not the case, and I don't see why it should ; it is all 
the same cause, and I have no doubt that if one flourish it will 
tend to the other's good rather than injury. 

Mr. Scott returned thanks. He said he had hunted with 
the Hurworth once or twice, and he was glad to see that the 
Hounds and Horses were of the best description and like doing 
work. 

The Chairman : Gentlemen, I must trouble you once again. 
I have to propose to you the health of a Gentleman who is 
perhaps the oldest supporter we have, and as I noticed last 
year three chips of the old Block were present, I am glad to say 
that four of his sons are present here to-day ; it is the health of 
Mr. Parrington, senior. Drunk with three times three. 

Mr. John Parrington returned thanks, and proposed success 
to the Wynyard and Durham Hounds. 

Mr, Bird then sang ' Come, landlord, fill the flowing bowl.' 
Many other toasts followed, including the healths of Mr. Black, 
Mr, Bird, Mr. Bailey, Mr, John Peirson, Earl of Zetland, &c., 
and many excellent songs were sung, including the following : 
By Mr. G. Peirson, ' Jack Robinson,' ' A Southerly Wind and a 
Cloudy Sky,' ' Rory O'More,' ' 'Twas Merry in the Hall ' ; by 
Mr. W. Garbutt, ' At Hurworth, famed village, before it was 
light '; by Mr. Thos. Parrington, ' Steam Pills,' ' Newcastle Fair,' 
&c. The party broke up at eleven o'clock, after spending one 
of the most agreeable evenings imaginable, and everyone seemed 
particularly delighted with the kind and liberal manner in which 
the whole splendid and sumptuous entertainment was conducted 
by Mrs, Sowray, the hostess. Upwards of thirty pounds was 
subscribed in the room for the Hunt this season, and some new 
members were added to the list. 



74 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

The «port this season was only moderate. On November 26 
they had a smart run from Howden Gill to Upsall coverts, and 
killed. 'Wm. Terry, on a thoroughbred of Mr. Vansittart's, 
got the brush. There was some good work for the Horsemen, 
and a few select ones rode true and hard.' 

Monday, Jan. 28. — Met at Liverton. Turned down the Fox 
that was run to ground this day week. Had a smart run and 
lost ; found again, had a most brilliant run. Those that saw it 
say that it was the Masterpiece of the Season so far — so severe 
that Tom Page, that father of the Cleveland Hunt, killed his 
horse. Only two horses were up at the finish, and those were 
Mr. R. White's and the Whipper-in's. Both foxes were run to 
ground. 

Monday, Feb. 25. — Met at Guisbro' Park. They first of all 
had a good run and killed a fox. Mr. John Parrington got the 
brush. I must here remark that this (a dog) was most curiously 
marked, being a regular brown and white, such a circumstance 
as was never before remembered. From March 7 to 14 pre- 
vented hunting ' by a very severe storm and heavy fall of 
snow.' 

Monday, March 18. — Met at Ormesby. Met with a Fox in 
Mr. Kay's Farm, near Cargo Fleet. Went away out at a rattler 
by way of Mr. Calvert's to Tolesby Hall, across the Gill, and 
killed in Mr. Hopper's farm, after one of the quickest and 
prettiest runs ever witnessed. Mr. John Newton got the Brush. 
Found a second Fox in Sir Wm. Penny man's Plantations ; away 
across Ormesby Bank to Mr. Jackson's ' Old Wood,' turned 
left down into the fields above Eston, back again acci'oss Nor- 
manby Hall pleasure Grounds to Ormesby, and away to Marton. 
Here the Fox was headed, and Reynard made a little ground, 
turning to the left, by way of Marton Gill, to Ormesby Bank 
again, across the Hill, past Morton Carr to Langborough, from 
thence to Cliffrig Wood. Nothing daunted, Reynard made the 
best of his wav to Easbv ; here the hounds were close at his 



' HARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1839. 75 

heels, but ' there is many a slip,' &c., for the Fox took a ring in 
the country back to Ayton, into a Tan Yard, alth ough the hounds 
were nearly in view they lost, and it was nearly a quarter of an 
hour before the line was hit ojff again, when it appeared that 
Reynard had crossed the Village Green without a Tally-ho. The 
Hounds ran him back a slowish pace to Upsal, when they were 
called off. This was a day's sport worthy of better praise than 
I can bestow upon it. I am sorry to say that, in consequence 
of the unfavourable morning, very few Sportsmen witnessed the 
splendid performances of the ' trim little Pack.' 

Thursday, March 21. — Met at Acklam Blue Bell. Turned 
down a Fox west of Stockton Road ; had three or four rings of 
quick running ; Reynard then got his head ' out,' and went at 
a rattler to Hilton, through the ' Scriddles,' across the Leven, 
when the Hounds and the Hurworth Hounds all got on the same 
scent, and no little astonished were the Hurworthians to see 
the Cleveland work the cold scent when the former could not 
run a yard. However startling this fact, many gentlemen of 
both hunts can prove it. A very pretty run ; some trouble in 
getting the Hounds divided ; did not try any more. 

The following is a summary of this season. 



76 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



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SUMMARY, 1838 -1839. 



17 



Fine and clear 
Hard frost 

Clear and mild 

Damp 
Mild 

Very wet 

Very dry 


Richard Garbutt 

John Parrington 
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l^ John Andrew / 
J. W. Parrington 

John Newton . 
Thos. Bean 

Jos. Parrington 


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moderate 

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THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



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Vanity . 
Jollity . 
Juniper 


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Monitor 

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Bachelor 


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THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Season 1839-1840. 

Tlie total amount of subscriptions and payments this year, 
according to the account book, was 99^. 155. 8d. ; while the ex- 
penditure was 90^. 18s. 8c^. 

But I propose to give this year's balance sheet (see next 
page) as a sample of the yearly accounts, and also exhibiting 
the sources of revenue, and how it is contributed. 

I might say here, what I have omitted to mention before, 
that the hounds were marked like sheep before going to quarters, 
and the marks registered, so that the uninitiated could always 
tell how the hound was bred, as well as whose he was, thus : — 



No. 


Sire 


Dam 


Dogs 


Bitches 


Mark3 


1 
2 
3 
4 


Roman . 
Finder . 


Factious . 
Merrylass . 
Princess . 
Sally . 


2 
1 

1 


1 
1 


One Clip Ri^ht Ear 
Two Clips Rio-ht Ear 
Three Clips Right Ear 
Four Clips Riglit Ear 



There is nothing worthy of particular note this season till 
after the Hunt Dinner, The dinner went off with usual success 
and happy harmony, consequent on a lengthy toast list and 
plenty of songs. 

Dec. 26. — Met at Guisbro' Park. Found two Foxes ; the 

Hounds divided ; at last they got settled to one Pox, had several 

rounds in the Cover, went away to Osbornes Rush, turned left, 

down across the low Country to Pinchinthorpe, away to Cliffrig 

Wood, lost for some time. At last Reynard was unkennelled 

again in view ; went away to Ayton Old Alum Works, back to 

Howden Gill. Here the Hounds unfortunately changed Foxes, 

after which they had no sport. Some parts of this run were 

pretty, though not fast. A very hard frost ; not much scent. 

It being St. Stephen's Day ' about 600 Footmen, were out this day 

' This saint's day is still observed in the same good fashion as of old. St. 
Stephen's Day gave a traditionary right to hunt any quarry over any ground 
up to the last century. 



82 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



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• HARKAW ay's ' JOURNAL, 1839-1840. 83 

Jan. 6. — Met at Kilton. Found in KiltonWood ; had much 
excellent running in cover, broke away, and at a quick pace 
they went to Aisdale Gate, across to Wiley Cat, away to High- 
cliffe, from thence to Lownsdale, forward to Kildale, over by 
Capt. Cook's Monument, and killed at Ayton Old Alum Works, 
after one of the quickest runs ever known in Cleveland. The 
Horsemen gave up the pursuit at HighclifFe, and none saw the 
beginning and ending. This was a wonderful day's sport. Con- 
sidering the distance, country, and pace, it is really astonishing. 
The fact is that no Hounds hut the Cleveland could have done it. 
Of course this splendid day afforded much pleasure to Tommy 
Page, and he will, no doubt, tell of it many a day hence. Don't 
know who was out. 

TJmrsday, Jan. 23. — Met at Acklam Lane end. Turned 
down one of the Coatham Marsh Foxes close by (7 minutes' 
law). Ran west round Acklam Village, turned to the left, 
crossed in front of Mr. Hustler's to Piper Pasture, ran north, 
down the Beck to below Mr. Dobson's, then in a direct line 
to Middlesbro' Grange, to Middlesbro' town ran into the Fox 
in Pottery Yard. Mr. R. Garbutt got the Brush. A Bitch 
Fox. This novel sight caused no little amusement to the 
Middlesbroonians. All this run, computed at 4^ miles, 
was done in 19 minutes. Only three horses stood it out — 
Messrs. T. Dobson's, R. Garbutt's, and W. Beardshaw's. 
Numerous were the falls and the dirty whites to be noticed, to 
wit, Joseph Harrison, ' Harkaway ' (Thos, Parrington), — Cator. 
Esq. ; but only the first of this trio was hurt. Turned down a 
second Fox at Middlesbro' Grange. After various turns and 
twines among the numerous footmen Reynard got a clear course 
made the best of his way to Cargo Fleet, nearly in a direct line 
across that deep and severe country to Lackenby Whin, then 
away to Kirkleatham, up, to, and through the Park and Wilton 
Wood, away to Court Green, through the Wood, across Green- 
woods Valley to Guisbro' Park. Here, it is supposed, the 



84 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

hounds changed Foxes. However, never stopped, but at a rattling 
pace away to Highcliffe, turned sharp back to Guisbro', 
viewed the Fox, into a Garden at Belmangate; however, 
escaped through Mr. Hart's Garden. Viewed the Fox again into 
the Churchyard ; had some good skurrying. At last Eeynard 
again broke view, and made the best of his way to Tockett's Tile 
sheds, from thence to Dunsdale, away, as if going to Upleatham; 
but at Blue Bams the Hounds were called off, after one of the 
longest, quickest, and severest runs ever witnessed. Only five 
horses were up at the finish, viz. Mr. E. Watson's, S. Langdale, 
Jr., R. Garbutt, T. Parrington, and the Huntsman. The two 
former were a good deal the best, and there is little doubt but 
that Mr. R. Watson's horse did the most work and was the best 
out. It was the old white-legged horse. A great many horses 
tired early, but the bulk stopped at Guisbro' Park. The falls were 
again numerous, but no one any worse. The hounds worked 
well. Tumult and Jollyboy particularly distinguished themselves. 
Thursday, April 9. — Met at Court Green (the last Fixture). 
In crossing the Moor to Eston Nab old Jollyboy hit on the line 
of a Fox that had evidently stole recently away. Aw^ay went 
the pack down Eston Bank to Lackenby Village, when the pace 
was quickened considerably. Away they went to Lackenby 
Whin, close to the Iliver side ; then turned right across Coatham 
Marsh to the Village, crossed the lane. Here a considerable 
check. It was the general opinion that sly Reynard had run 
along the road. However, the hounds were cast forward. At 
last a halloo was heard near Mr. Vansittart's Cover. Away they 
went, and Hounds were soon at work again. The Fox crossed 
the severe country and back to Eston Nab, away west, through 
Mr. Jackson's Pleasure Grounds, to Ormesby, turned left, crossed 
Hambledon Hills to Marten Gill, made a turn for Morden 
Carr,^ away to Newton Village, and into Newton Wood ; skirted 
the south of Rosebcrry, crossed Howden Gill, Ayton Old Alum 

' Morton Cans. 



SEASON 1840-1841. 85 

Works, Coxlioe,' &c., and several of the gallant hounds killed 
in a quarry of Mrs. Smith's near Cook's Monument. No horse- 
men were up. A footman saw the run from Howden Gill to 
the finish, and he got the Brush. He says the hounds were so 
tired that after they overhauled Master Reynard they were un- 
able for some time to kill him. The nearest point the last of 
the huntsmen reached was Newton Wood, some way about six 
miles ^ from the finish. The distance Hounds ran upon compu- 
tation amounts to near forty miles.' This almost incredible run 
borders close upon the famous one to Saltergate Bar. Of 
course the pace was slow at times, as is the case in all great 
distance chases. This may be considered a finish of the first 
order. Nothing could exceed the day's sport or the fineness of 
the weather. Many Members were out to-day. Out : C. E. 
Faber, C. Dryden, J. Parrington, jun., J. Peirson, Jos. Parring- 
ton, J. Newton, T. Parrington, H. Thomas, W. Garbutt, 
R. Garbutt, G. Can-ick, C. H. Rowe, Esq. 

Season 1840-1841. 

The total receipts from all sources this season amount to 

90?, 155. (including 10/. from the Earl of Zetland) ; whilst the 

expenditure amounts to 881. 17s., among the items of which 

are : — £ s. d. 

Collecting hounds fifty-seven times . . 9 19 
Laying down drains . . . . .0180 
For 'Verment'! 17 

' Cockshot. 2 j^Qt gQ much as six miles. 

^ N.B. — Forty miles is altogether too generous a computation for this 
distance. Judging from the description of run, and by careful measurement 
on an ordnance map, I make the run measure as follows: — 5| miles from 
Eston Moor to check at Coatham Lane ; 4^ back to the bottom of Est on Nab ; 
3, Eston to Ormesby ; 4, Ormesby to Newton Wood ; 3 to 4, Newton Wood to 
Howden Gill, a ring round Cockshot and Capt. Cook's monument; total, 21 
miles. This is allowing for a fair amount of turning and twisting; but it 
cannot be made into a more than twenty-five miles' run. It is, however, a most 
remarkable one. There is recorded a run, in the Duke of Beaufort's countr}^ 
where the hounds ran some extraordinary distance, and were found quite 
' done ' lying around their fox, which was panting unhurt in their midst. 



86 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

' The usual time of meet is ten o'clock.' 

The hounds were out five days previous to the * regular ' 
start, which took place on Monday, October 26. The next 
hunting day they had a real clipper. 

Monday, Nov. 9. — Hutton Low Cross. Having been hand- 
somely entertained to a public Breakfast at Mr. Reade's, found 
a Fox in Highcliff, ran him several times round and round the 
Coverts, once a ring into the country to near Guisbro', then 
turned back. "Worked on this way till 3 o'doclc. Had some 
of the most beautiful hunting ever seen, and the music sur- 
passed everything. The Fox was seen frequently, and, as the 
scent was good, he in vain tried to baffle his pursuers ; and about 
the time I mention he was obliged to seek refuge elsewhere. 
Away he went across the Moor to Easby Woods, then pointed 
for Kildale, crossed the vale, and into Baisdale to Baisdale 
Abbey, where the gallant pack ran into their Fox, after one of 
the most severe runs ever known. The Hounds could not run 
less than 50 miles this day, and very often the pace was good. 
Only 3 sportsmen endured to the end, viz. Tommy Page, 
G. Reade, Esq., and the Huntsman. Out : G. Peirson, T. 
Parrington, J. Newton, John Parrington, Jos. Parrington, 
&c., &c. 

Thursday, Nov. 19, — Osborne's Rush. Found in Mr. Jack- 
son's North Upsal Whin Cover ; broke at the Top, doubled back 
into cover, away round the Hill to the South Whin, down the 
Hill, across the Guisbro' Road, across Mr. Jackson's Carrs, past 
Morden (Morton) Car, over Langbaurgh Rig, close past Ayton, 
away to Easby, straight across the country to Ingleby Manor, 
into Sir W. Foulis' Park, doubled back, and went into a drain 
near Ingleby Village. Such a beautiful run needs no em- 
bellishment ; and I am sorry to say that the line of Country 
crossed included the formidable ' Nunthorp Stell,' • where we were 

' This stcll is jumpable durinj? most of its course. I have jumped it 
myself, and seen it jumped, at many ditlerent pilaces between Upsal and the 



' HARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1840-1841. 87 

all detained some time ; three or four were in for a bath, and 
although one or two Horses were in they were extricated without 
much damage. I have no doubt that if the hounds had been 
well ridden to they would have killed their fox before he had 
got so far, but the pace was so ten-ific there was no time allowed 
to halt. Did not get the Fox out. Out : Messrs. G. Peirsou, 
J. Newton, J, Peirson, R. Garbutt, W. Beardshaw, Eeade, Jos. 
& T. Parrington, W. Hart, T. Page, &c., &c. 

Thursday, Nov. 2G. — Lythe Village. Found a Fox near the 
place of meet, had a smart run of nearly an hour, and killed 
near Kettleness Alum Works. A Goldsboro Sportsman got the 
brush. A fine old Bitch Fox. Never found another Fox. About 
400 foot, besides innumerable Horse. 

Thursday, Dec. 31 . — Acklam Blue Bell, Had a Bag Fox, the 
first this Season, which had been recently caught at Court Green 
Quarry. Turned him down at Ayresliolme Village. Ten minutes' 
law. Away they went past Linthorpe in a direct line, cross- 
ing Middlesbro' New Road to White House, then pointed for 
Cargo Fleet, continued the easterly course to Coverdale's house, 
turned suddenly for the hills, past Jos. Garbutt's, up to Lackenby 
Village, crossed the Redcar Road, went direct to Eston Nab, and 
earthed under some loose stones, the hounds close at him. 
Time, 40 minutes to a pop ; distance 8 miles. Allowed him a 
little breathing time, then took the Hounds off, an^ bolted the 
Fox. Away he went for his native Earth at Court Green Quarry, 
which he just gained ; about a mile and a half in 8 minutes. 
It was a most mismanaged trick not to stop the earths at Court 
Green. The Fox certainly desei^ed his life, but the Hounds 
deserved blood. The run was one of the first rate; and altho' 
a field of upwards 100 mounted Sportsmen started for the 
race, only 3 were up ivith the Hounds at the finish, viz. Mr. 
Winn (a gentleman staying with Col. Hildyard), Messrs. John 

back of Newton ; though there are some unjumpable places uear the 
Langbaurgh aud Nunthorp ends of it 



88 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

& TIi03. Parrington, The following were in tlie front ranks afc 
the bottom of the Hill : Rev. J. F. Newton, John, Jos. & Thos. 
Parrington, John & Geo. Peirson, — Winn, Esq., and perhaps 
another or two well up. Then followed the tail, which reached 
from the Starting Post to the Winning Chair, and it was curious 
to see from the Hill the Stragglers all over the line of Country 
crossed. The pace, as Col. Hildyard remarked, vms shameful. 
Many excellent falls were encountered, and many an one got 
a good ducking in the numerous Stells. No one hurt. Found 
a second Fox in Mr. Jackson's Covers ; ran several rounds in the 
Cover ; at last broke away thro' Twenty Acre Plantation, away 
for Langbaurgh Quarry, turned to the right, direct away to Mr. 
Ley's Plantations at Tunstal, and went to Ground just before 
the Hounds. Only four horses endured to the finish. As fast 
a run as the first. The Hounds really ran better than Ever 
Known. ... In short, there was about 50 horsemen who 
could go, and as many more tag rag an' Bobtail. 

Jan. 28. — Staithes was the fixture, but hard frost stopped 
them. The next meet was the annual one at Mrs. Sowray's 
Hotel, Redcar, at four o'clock. The account given is similar to 
the ones already recorded, and they had a most pleasant evening. 
' The Toast and Song passed round with the Glass in quick 
succession .... after which all retired early and steadily to bed, 
highly delighted with the hilarity of the meeting, and in the 
sure hope of a good day's Sport to-morrow.' 

Jan. 29. — Redcar. They did have a wonderfully good 
hard day, the account given is a very lengthy one, which is 
here summarised : Found on the sea banks between Marsk and 
Redcar ; ran to the hills and back towards Marsk, and thither 
across that flat and deep country as if the devil kicked them, 
then to Hazelgrove, when he went out to sea and was killed 
amongst the breakers.* The run was very fast, twenty minutes. 
Second Fox found in Harrison's Whin ; had a couple of beautiful 
' I have several times seen the fox take tlie sea. — A. E. P. 



• HARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 184O-184I. 89 

rounds by Mordale Bog, Guisbro' Park, Court Green, and 
Clarke's Barn "Whin, and then across the moor for Eston ; here 
a long check from Jos. Parrington overriding the hounds ; ran 
slowly through Jackson's plantation, when after two hours ring- 
ing round Upsal, they killed their Fox. Only a footman in at 
the death. A dog Fox. ' Such an instance of stoutness of 
hounds seldom occurs.' 

Monday, Feb. 1. — Staithes. Had a splendid run ; the fox 
towards the end of the chase got into a wood on a Hill side, 
of large trees and no underwood ; he dodged the hounds some 
time by running up and down the hill, squatting behind a tree 
until his pursuers had passed him ; as soon as he saw this he 
slipped back and so escaped death for some time ; at length old 
Jollyboy ' slunk behind all the pack, as soon as he saw they 
were off the scent ; ' Jolly ' stood still and looked sharply round 
him, Reynard jumped up close under his nose, and the old dog 
ran into him and killed him. Such an instance of the sagacity 
of an old hound is worth notice. Mr. John Andrew, who was 
on the opposite side of the valley, saw it all. 

Thursday, Ap-il 1. — Marton Village, 7 a.m. Before I 
commit this day's sport to paper it is my painful duty to record 
the death of our Fox that was to have afforded us sport to-day, 
viz. the Fox got from Mr. Jackson's Flues on Thursday last. 
It appears when the Fox was first discovered in the flues it was 
•determined to ask Mr. Jackson's leave for him to be taken out, 
but Mr. J. being from Home, Mr. Dryden, who was present, said 
he would undertake to give leave. The Fox was then got out 
without any material damage to the wall, and taken to Middles- 
bro' Grange. On Saturday Mr. Jackson went to Mr. Dryden 
in an immense rage, and insisted on having the Fox, and 
altho' Mr. Dryden told Mr. J. he was responsible for all 
damages, still Mr. J. persisted, and eventually Mr. Dryden and 
one of Mr. J.'s men went for him, and John Pai-rington being 

' Vide No. 5 in List of Hounds, page 78. 



90 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

from home they brought Mm away. It afterwards appears that 
Mr. J. murdered the Poor Fox by Strangulation, one of his sons 
and a man assisting in the liorrid operation} Such a proceeding 
cannot be too much deprecated, and ought to meet no counte- 
nance from any human Bemg, from the Peer to the Peasant. 
And, moreover, it was exercising a power which neither Mr. 
Jackson nor a gentleman of a much higher station in society had 
a right to impose on anyone. The account of the day's sport 
which follows is not particularly worthy of note. 
The result of sport this season is thus : — 

Hunted ...... 32 days 

Disappointed (i.e. weather, frost, &c.) 8 „ 

Blank 7 „ 

Killed 31 Foxes ! ! ! ! 

therefore, 
Success to the Cleveland Hounds. 

1810-1841. 

The last list of hounds was in the season 1838-39 (p. 78). 
The hounds that have been drafted since then we find to be 
Nos. 1, 2, 4, G, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, IG, 17, 18, 22, 23, 26, 30, 33, 
,34, 3G, 37, 39, 40, 43, 49, 50, 54, 57, 59, and 60 ; while the 
new entries for the seasons 1839-40 and 1840-41 are given on 
next page. The pack was in 1838-39 thirty couples strong ; 
now its total strength is twenty-two couples of running hounds. 

' N.B. — It is only fair here to say that this family have always been the most 
Btaunch preservers of foxes ; that their coverts have always been, and still 
are, 'certain finds.' And if we put ourselves in Mr. Jackson's place for a 
moment we can understand his annoyance at having his garden-wall broken 
into to hay/ one of his foxes, when he knew that the Hunt owed much to his 
support in the matter of preserving foxes. I do not seek to excuse the vulpi- 
cide, but to point out that there were some extenuating circumstances, and 
that the crime has been expiated subsequently, and his descendants are proving 
themselves true sportsmen. 



ENTRIES, 1839-184I — SEASON 184I-1842. 



91 



No. 


Entered 


Name 


Sire 


Dam 


Remarks 


30 


1839 


Bluecap 


— 


— 


Bred by Mr. Wilkin- 
son, of the Hur- 
worth Hunt 


31 


— 


Glasgow . 


~ 




Presented by Jno. 
Healey, Esq., to the 
Hunt 


82 


1840 


Ganger 


Trojan 


Melody 


Also dam of Cottager 
(No. 38, p. 80) 


33 


1841 


Commodore 


Challenger 
(No. 3, p. 78) 


Jollity 
(No.44,p.80) 


— 


3-1 


1841 


Cleveland . 


Ditto. 


Ditto. 


— 


35 


1840 


Kegent 


Ditto . 


Bashful 
(No. 2, p. 78) 


By Bluecap, out of 
Mr. Hill's Timely; 
Bluecap, by Sir 
Mark Sykes' Boaster, 
bred at Sinnington 


36 


1840 


Racket 


Ditto . 


Ditto. 


Ditto 


37 


1840 


Tuner 


Cardigan 
(No. 4, p. 78) 


Countess 


Bred by Mr. Hill 


38 


1841 


Tom Boy . 


Challenger 


Tumult 


Also dam of JoUity 








(No. 3, p. 78) 


(No. 17, p. 79) 


(No. 44, p. 80) 


39 


1841 


Coimtess . 


•Ditto . 


Jollity 
(No. 44, p. 80) 




40 


1841 


Si)lendour . 


Ditto. 


Symmetry 
(No. 15, p. 79) 





41 


1840 


Bluecap 


— 


— 


Bred at Ugthorp 


42 


1841 


Wellington 


Bluster 
(No.o7,p.80) 


WilUng 
(No. 21, p. 79) 




43 


1841 


Clinker 


Challenger 
(No. 3, p": 78) 


Trim Lass . 




44 


1840 


Bluecap 


— 


— 


From Ugthorp 



Season 1841-1842. 

The total receipts this year are . 
The total expenditure is . . . 



£ s. d. 
97 10 
95 12 4 



The following additional subscribers' names appear : 









£ 


s. 


d 


A. Newcomin, Esq. . 

Leo. Pavrington, in addition 


to 


John, 


5 








Thomas, and Joseph 
Dr. Richardson . 
Couts . . . . . 
Mr. Loy . . . 




• 


2 
2 
2 
2 


2 

2 











92 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Also the following items of expenditure : — 

£ s. d. 
For Northumberland Hounds . . .0120 

For Verment and Riot . . . .5170 

The first meet of the season is at Kirkleatham, Saturday, 
October 9, when they had a nice day's sport, killing at Marske. 

Thursday, Oct. 28. — Marton. Had a Bagman Turned down 
in Mr. Parrington's farm, being a young bitch fox, and not 
knowing the rules of the game, they ran into her in three fields. 
Mr. Rd. Garbutt the Brush. Found a Second Fox in Marton Gill ; 
ran for Morden Carr ; skirted the plantations and pointed for 
Upsill, where the Hounds killed their fox just as he entered the 
Covers. Mr. Fletcher, of the Wynyard and Durham Hunt, got 
the Brush. Time, 17 minutes ; pace truly awful, in fact, reaZ 
St. Leger. An old Dog Fox, Found a third fox in Upsill 
Covers ; ran numerous ins and outs about the hill ; at last got 
our fox into the open at Upsill Mill, raced him over Pinchin- 
thorpe, crossed Bell End to Hanging Stone ; away over Hutton 
Low Cross to Highcliffe, over the top, pointed over the Moor for 
Lounsdale ; too hard pressed ; doubled back into Highcliffe 
Wood ; ran along the Wood to the Guisbro' Old Alum Works, 
when it was Whoo-Wlioop. Thomas Parring-ton got the Brush; 
the other riders up were Messrs. Jno. Parrington, Fletcher, 
Huntsman, and a young man from Stockton. . . . 

They had some splendid sport during November. On the 
4th, after killing a fox from Saltburn Gill at Waterfall, they 
found at Guisbro' Spa, and ran to Guisbro' across the open and 
back to cover, then to Aisdale Gate j thence to Stanghow, and 
away to Moorsholm, and ran into Reynard at Lockwood Beck. 
Lord Zetland being out, who expressed himself delighted with 
the sport. Again, on the 8th the hounds ran clean away from 
the field, running from Guisbro' Spa to Kilton and back to 
Moorsholm, killing their fox. 

Thursday, Nov. IL — Pinchiuthorpe. Had a bag Fox; 



' HARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1841-1842. 93 

slipped him down near the village ; took a ring to Newton 
through the Church Yard and village; pointed for Cliff Rig, 
could not gain it ; after two or three ineffectual attempts of our 
Fox to evade the Hounds, he was chased into a machine shade, 
in view, when they had him. Mr. Thos. Dobson got the Brush. 
A young Bitch Fox. Some good fencing and quick work. Just at 
the moment the hounds were discussing their fox a halloo was 
heard at Roseberry ; called away to it ; laid on the Hounds ; ran 
to Howden Gill, over the top on to the Moor, away to Hanging 
Stone, from thence to Hutton Low Cross, over the Top of High 
Cliffe ; turned smartly back towards Hutton and into Kemple}', 
when Eeynard found shelter in the Rock ; got him out after 
some trouble ; popped him off at Wood House ; pointed for Howl 
Beck, then turned for Guisbro' ; dashed into the Town, the Hounds 
in view ; headed back up Scarfe's Yard ; again took the main 
Street through the middle of the Houses, and into Fountain's 
Garth ; viewed him up the Garth, and ran into him in the adjoining 
close. Young Barugh, of Seamer, got the Brush. A fine old Dog 
Fox. An excellent day's Sport, with a Singular Termination. 
The inhabitants of Guisbro' were much amazed by the Foxhunt. 
Several children were ridden over, but none seriously hurt ; this 
was also an amusing day for falls ; some beautiful somersets were 
performed. I am happy, however, to say that no imitator of Mr. 
Ducrow received any injury. 

Mojiday, Nov. 29. — Ellerby. Found a Fox in that neigh- 
bourhood ; ran to Hinderwell through the Cliff, across Hinder- 
well fields to Overdale ; then on to Hormes Griff down to the 
Sea, and on the Rocks, where he was compelled to die in the 
jaws of Challenger and company. A remarkable pretty run. 
Out 150 Horsemen and 500 Foot, such as the Country could 
afford. 

Thursday, Jan. 6. — Tockets Tile Sheds. Found a brace of 
foxes in Court Green ; got the Hounds on one and ran him 
down to Wilton Wood away to Dunsdale, across Mr. Pearson's 



94 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

farm to Tocketts ; away to Forty Pence ; crossed to Eock 
Hole, up Simey Gill, and on to Guisbro' Moor ; pointed for 
Commondale ; turned to tlie right and into Kildale ; across past 
Mr. Turton's, and on Battersby Banks to Ingleby, and into the 
park ; turned up the Hill and on to the Moor ; away to Bais- 
dale, where nine couples of Hounds pulled down their game above 
the Abbey. The length of the run cannot be estimated at less 
than 20 miles, and the country crossed was the most awful in the 
Cleveland Hunt. The pace throughout was good, and at times 
quick. Tom Andrews and Josh. Harrison were the last that 
saw the hounds, and they compounded on Ingleby Moor ; a part 
of the field reached Ingleby, but the Majority stopped at Simey 
Gill. This run will long be remembered in Cleveland as a 
remarkable instance of stoutness of Hounds and determination 
to have blood. It is supposed the Hounds changed Foxes in 
Forty Pence ; one Fos never could have endured the Chase. 

From this date, January 6, till February 7 they were stopped 
by frost and snow every day but one. 

On Monday, April 18, at six o'clock in the morning, they 
meet for the last time. They had a good run and killed. ' Mr. 
John Andrew, our excellent Master, got his Brush, and thus 
ended the Season 1841-42, and certainly the most propitious sea- 
son ever known in the Cleveland Country.' That the season 
deserved this high character given it is evidenced by the facts 
when summed up : Hounds went to covert forty -six days, and 
killed twenty and a half brace of Foxes, ran eleven foxes to 
ground, and only lost fifteen ; they had two Blank days. There 
was an excellent scent on twenty-one days, and there are 
twelve runs recorded as capital, famous, supei'b, and magnificent. 

Mr. King, of Kirkleatham, having lost his wager, or rather 
his forfeit of a Dinner and Wine to the Members of the Club, in 
consequence of his having promised that whenever the Cleveland 
Foxhounds Killed 40 Foxes in one season he would treat the 
Members of the Hunt as above, the Dinner came off on the 19th 



MR. king's dinner TO THE HUNT, 1 842. 95 

of May, a report of which follows ; and with that generous spirit 
for which Mr. King is remarkable, he extended his invitations to 
the subscribers of one guinea to the funds of the Club. As the 
account that follows is very similar to the ones given already, I 
shall choose a few extracts only which are particularly enter- 
taining. 

The dinner was given at ]Mrs. Sowray's Hotel at three o'clock 
in the afternoon, and there assembled round the table Mr, King, 
Mr. Mathew King, Rev. J. Newsam, Messrs. C. Dryden, Jos. 
Newton, J. W. Parrington, C. Bailey, T. Bird, J. Parrington, 
J no. Peirson, Geo. Peirson, Geo. Reade, Jno. Andrew, Jos. 
]\arrington, Rd. Garbutt, Geo. Carrick, Jos. Harrison, W. 
Weatherill, L, H. Parrington, J. T. Trevor, Thos. Andrew, 
Jno. Newton, Thos. Weatherill, W. Hart, W. Simpson, and Thos. 
Parrington. Mr. John Parrington in the chair. After some 
preliminary toasts, the Chairman gave the toast of ' The gentle- 
man on my right ' (Mr. King) . In course of his speech he said : 
' And although I never sav/ him follow hounds, yet I know 
he is one of our best friends (cheers), and an ardent lover of 
the chase ' (loud cheers). Mr. Thomas Parrington then sang 
the following song for the occasion : — 

(Air. — The Old English Gentleman?) 

I'll sing you a song in which you must join, let's make the "Welkin 

ring, 
In praise and honor to the Toast loud plaudits let us sing, 
As a mark of the very high respect we entertain for Mr. King, 
Who's treated us handsomely this day with the best of everything. 

A fine old Cleveland Sportsman, one of the Olden School. 

'Tis he who opens wide his house when we chance to run that road, 
And gives us the best his cellar and his larder can afford ; 
Or if Kirkleatham is the ' meet,' why then you're all aware 
There's Breakfast for all who choose to go and a sumptuous bill of fare 
He's a, &c. 

'Tis he who from his earliest day he entered Cleveland bounds 
Delighted in the sounding Horn and cheering Cry of Hounds ; 



g6 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

And throughout his whole career has been an Honour to the Chace, 
And as a staunch friend to Foxhunting is always in hia place. 
He's a, &c. 

He's a man of Honour, by all allowed, acts up to what he says, 
And never once did we know him to shirk in all our days ; 
But boldly speaks and boldly does, a credit to liis name. 
And ne'er did he a promise make but he fulfilled the same. 
He's a, &c. 

Then let us arise and drink his health in sincerity and truth, 
And may Every blessing be his lot unto his latest breath ; 
And may he and his excellent Partner live yet many years to come, 
And may the sun of happiness ne'er set upon the home 

Of this fine old Cleveland Sportsman, one of the Olden School. 

This song was well received, and the two last verses loudly 
cheered. Mr. King's health was then drunk with three times 
three, and several cheers more. 

Mr. King returned thanks, after which Mr. Newsam (the 
parson) said : I do really think that we should not on this 
occasion separate man and wife. Allow me, therefore, to give 
you the health of Mrs. King. The toast was drunk in a 
Bumper with three times three. 

Mr. King, in returning thanks, said : I can only say that 
she is as sincerely attached to the Chace as anyone ; and cer- 
tainly she ought to be so, for you all are aware that she is the 
daughter of a first-rate Sportsman and sister to your present 
Huntsman (loud cheers). 

Among the songs sprinkled on the Toast List were the fol- 
lowing : Mr. J. Weatherill gave ' The Glasses Sparkle on the 
Board ' ; Mr. Geo. Peirson, ' Bachelors' Hall,' ' 'Twas very weel 
know^n to the folk of our town ' (Mr. Weatherill) ; the Vice- 
Chairman (Mr. Jno. Peirson), ' In Wine, Mighty Wine ' ; Mr. 
Thos. Parrington, ' Brandy and Salt.' 

Mr. Reade, in proposing Mr. Andrew's health, said : Gen- 
tlemen, I am about to propose to you the health of a gentleman 



MR. KING'S DINNER TO THE HUNT, 1 842. 97 

to whom we all are peculiarly indebted, not only for the more 
than average sport shown in this season, but also for the 
trouble and pain he is at in managing and training the Cleve- 
land Hounds (loud cheers), and to him the whole credit is 
due in bringing the Cleveland Foxhounds to that perfection 
which, altlio' I have hunted with Several packs of Hounds, I 
never saw equalled. He is always anxious to afford us the 
best sport he can, and often have we heard him shouting, ' Get 
on ! Get on ! Stick to them ! ' (loud laughter). ' They are 
going to kill him directly ! ' (cheers). But his merit as Hunts- 
man is not all, for as an Agriculturalist, a Husband, a Father, 
and a real good fellow he cannot be surpassed (loud cheers). 
Then ! let us drink the health of Mr. Jno. Andrew in a Bumper 
with three times three (loud cheers). 

The storm of cheering having at length subsided, Mr. Jno. 
Andrew said : Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen, for the compliment 
you have paid me I beg to return you many thanks, and my kind 
acknowledgments are due to Mr. Reade for the flattering manner 
in which he proposed my health (cheers). Mr. Reade told you 
about my shouting ' Get on ! ' but I can tell you tliat if I have 
my Health so well as I have of late, the cry next season will be, 
'Which way has Jno. Andrew and his Hounds gone?' (loud 
cheers and laughter). 

After many more toasts had gone round Mr. C. Dryden's 
health was drunk, and in returning thanks that gentleman 
announced that should the Cleveland Foxhounds succeed in 
killing twenty Brace of Foxes next Season he would give a dinner 
and wine to the Members as Mr. King had done that day. This 
announcement was received with the most deafening cheers. The 
Chairman then gave the health of Mrs. Sowray, the hostess, and 
immediately after the party broke up and partook of coffee in 
another room, and the glass and the pipe wound up the Sports 
of the evening. 

' Such a joyous meeting as the one just described happens 

H 



98 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

but rarely in the course of this life, and altho' the decanters 
did their work unusually quick, the most uninterrupted good 
feeling kept pace with them, and the whole field was well up at 
the Finish.' 

Season 1842-1843. 

I have been unable to find any account of receipts and ex- 
penditure for this and the following seasons ; but we may take 
it for granted that the amount subscribed for many years to 
come never reached more than 1001., and for some years the 
funds were very low. Indeed, so bad was the state of the 
finances that any less determined sportsmen than Yorkshiremen 
would have given up the task of hunting the country as perfectly 
hopeless. As an illustration of how cheaply good sport may be 
provided, at the present time (1885) the whole Bilsdale Hunt 
Subsci'iption does not reach 261., whilst 23?, is the largest sum 
that has been expended or subscribed in any one year, and yet 
the hounds are out two days a week all through the season. 
This season (1884-85) this ancient pack have been in rather low 
water, Robert Dowson's (the whipper-in) ' auld mear ' having died 
of old age, being something near half the age of Robert, who is 
near his eightieth year. Last year Robert got through his top 
boots, after many years of good service. A few years ago, Nicholas 
Spink (the Master and Huntsman) and Robert had one good 
red coat and one old purj^lish and blackish red coat between 
them.^ The agreement between them was that they should ' tak 
toorn and toorn aboot ' with the coats. It was nothing to them 
that Nicholas was a canny size and Robert ' nobbut a little yan.' 
So Nicholas came out the first day in the good coat, and Robert 
in the old coat. The second day Robert came out in the good 
one ; but Nicholas could not bide the idea of Robert being in 
a crood red coat while he was in a pui-ple old sack, and he came 

' I undevstnnrl the new coat to have been originally presented to Robert. 



'HARKAWAY'S' JOURNAL, 1842-1843. 99 

out in his work-a-day things. And so, throughout the season, 
Nicholas wore one day a good coat, and the next day rode in plain 
clothes, and kept his bargain with Robert. This season Nicholas 
told me, whilst he and I were sitting over a fireside in Baysdale 
before throwing off, that 'soom yan had gien him a red cooat, 
baot, ye knaw, he had tak'n off all t' bootons, and he could mak 
nout on't till he had soom.' Then, pointing to some very grand 
buttons on the old pink he had on: ' Yer see these bootons; Lady 
de Lisle gav me them. They're nobbut livry bootons, but they 
de well eneaf.' The day following I got some fine old sets of 
livery buttons from my tailors and sent them to Nicholas, who 
would be able to keep himself and Robert in buttons for the 
rest of their ' boorn daj's.' But to return to the season 1842-3. 

They began hunting on Monday, September 26, meeting at 
Cattersty, and killing a brace of foxes early in the mornino-. 
For cub hunting no place could equal Cattersty. Mining 
operations have now destroyed it as a covert,' but it is easy even 
now for a stranger to picture what splendid sport and music might 
be seen in those ravines and cliff sides, whilst standing above on 
a quiet dewy morning, with the North Sea rolling in 500 feet 
below, and Hunt Cliff rising to the north and Boulby to the 
south. 

Tlmmday^ Oct. 27. — Met at Wilton Lane End. Found under 
Eston Nab. Ran to ground at Court Green. Went to a Halloo 
in Sir Jno. Lowther's plantations, ran slowly to Mr. Jackson's 
Uppsal Covers, had some tedious cover hunting; at last got our 
Fox away accross Eston Moor, back to Sir J. Lowther's planta- 
tions, turned back to Eston Nab on the Bank to near Mr. 
Jackson's Covers, was headed and ran back to the Nab asrain ; 
then to Wilton Wood, down to the Castle, up the hill again to 

' 1885-86. This covert, although much injured by proximity to mines and 
furnaces, afforded some first-rate sport this season. Two litters of cubs in the 
two last years have been safely reared tliere, which speaks well for the honesty 
and sporting instincts of the colony of miners who surround the place. 

h2 



lOO THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

a small plantation of Sir John's, ran in Cover, some time viewed 
our Fox several times. Finding no friends there he broke away, 
ran exactly the same line again down to Wilton Castle; had him 
in view, a Whoo-Whoop expected every minute, but not so. Rey- 
nard succeeded in breaking view, and setting his head for theHilla, 
went straight to Mr. Dry den's Whin Bank, then turned back and 
on the foot of the hill westward to Eston Nab, up to the rock, 
back again, down the Hill, over above Lackenby and Lazenby to 
Wilton Wood, then turned and retraced his Steps once more to 
Eston Nab rock. Finding no shelter there, he resolved on one 
more desperate attempt. Running down the hill, he crossed the 
Eston Road, and went Straight to Lackenby Whin ; then turned 
to the left, past Mr. Jos. Garbutt's House, and on to below 
Normanby, where a friend saved him ; it was the darl; and we 
lost the Fox in spite of all we could do. Of all the runs 
for length of time — nearly 5| hours ; and severe country 
crossed — I never saw its equal ! We never had a yard of very 
fast running, but it was throughout a icorhing run ; and being 
so much up and down those steep and rugged hills we were all 
— horses, dogs, men, and Fox — worn out. The Hounds, consider- 
ing the scent of the Fox they had to deal with, ran well ; and so 
exhausted were they at the finish that they all laid down at the 
fences, and it was only a few that could make a run at all the 
last two or three fields. The Fox was undoubtedly beat, and 
had the run been straight he could not have lived. What 
shall I say of the Horses ? Out of a large field only the fol- 
lowing rode to the Hounds : Messrs. J. Harrison, T. Andrew, R. 
Garbutt, and T. Parrington. Of this lot the whole compounded 
except the first named ; and T. Andrew and the last named 
ran some distance on foot, leaving their distressed nags behind 
them. . . . 

Thursday, Nov. 3. — They had a good run from Guisbro' 
Park, killing their fox at Easby Village. Mr. A. Newcomen is 
mentioned ns going well. 



* HARKAWAV'S ' JOURNAL, 1 842- 1 843. roi 

Thursday, Nov. 24. — After a smart run iu the morning they 
found a fox at Upsal, and ran to Kirkleatham, and thence by 
Redcar and Marske to Upleatham, and killed. ' Only two horses 
out of a Great field saw the run throughout, viz. L. Pamngton's 
and Mr. Reed's. All the others were thrown out, but luckily 
got up at the finish. A fine old dog fox. The scent was not 
good. Although, as I before said, only two men rode hard and 
true, yet Mr. Richd. Garbutt, who never saw a moiety of the 
run, was permitted to cut off the Brush and carry it away. Such 
conduct as this is highly dishonourable, if not Shameful. It will 
be observed that so far, in this journal, I have only noticed one 
Brush. The fact is that I have been so frequently disgusted 
at the conduct of so many who follow the Cleveland Hounds, in 
their eagerness to obtain the Brush, that I shall not notice who 
carries off the trophy for the present Season, as I am satisfied 
that it rarely happens that the best performer gets the Brush ; 
and I should Earnestly recommend to the Managers of the 
Cleveland Foxhounds that they do at once leave off the exceed- 
ingly bad plan of giving Brushes. Let the Huntsman, as iu 
all other Hunts, take the Brush and dispose of it as he thinks 
proper.' ' 

Momhi)/, Dec. o. — Met at Huntcliffe. Found, and had a 
sharp run close upon our fox, when he crept over the cliff, and 
was followed by two Hounds (Madcap and Blagdon Driver), and, 
falling over, were Killed on the Spot. The Fox was killed after a 
good run at Saltburn. This was an unfortunate day, our fastest 
and handsomest bitch and our best cover hound being killed. 

' There is something to be said for 'Harkaway's ' view, but a good deal 
more, in the Author's opinion, in favour of the Cleveland practice, which is 
still continued, viz. that the ' first in ' has a right to the brush, and the ' second 
in ' to the mask. Any difference of opinion as to claims is promptly settled 
by the Master or Huntsman. It is surely better that all should have an equal 
opportunity of obtaining the prize, and that the man who eanis it, whether 
peer or footman, should receive it, rather than that these trophies should 
become the perquisite (or ' stealing,' as the Americans call it) of the Hunts- 
man, to be disposed of to the highest bidder or most enerous 'tipper.' 



I02 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Sucli a circumstance has not happened for some years in the 
Cleveland Country. 

Thursday, Dec. 29. — They seem to have had a very smart 
run from Howden Gill, and killed at Kemplah Wood. ' The 
huntsman was the only one that could live the pace, and con- 
sequently he had it all to himself at the last. Three or four 
couples of Hounds divided off on to a fresh Fox in the run, and 
they killed their Fox also in Commondale, quite alone in their 
glory. . . . Out: E. Turton, E. Turton, junior, J. Bell, M.P., 
G. Petres, Esq., Misses Turton and Petres (the latter young lady 
had a bad fall), E. Garbutt, Reade, &c., &c,, &c.' 

Tuesday^ Jan. 24. — They had a good run from Tunstal, near 
Nunthorpe, and killed near Eston, in thirty-five minutes ; dis- 
tance about seven miles. 'A faster run could not be. The 
Hounds raced all the way, and were exceedingly difficult to live 
with. Several of the field went well ; and Messrs. Newcomen, 
T, Parrington, and T. Andrew were well with hounds at the finish. 
The first named rode his chesnut mare, the second his grey 
horse (his first performance since his purchase, and got the 
Brush), the third his Bay Mare by Perion. There was some 
severe fencing and a rattling fall or two. I must not omit 
mentioning how excellently Mr. Jno. Andrew rode from the 
Start to Normanby, when a majority of the field, and nearly all 
lighter weights than himself, compounded. Mr. W. Beardshaw 
also went extremely well, and, along with Messrs. Turton and 
R. Garbutt, was in a tolerable position at the Whoo-AVhoop. . . . ' 

Some men doubt snow ever holding a scent. For their 
instruction I give — 

Thursday, March 2. — Met at Dunsdale Bridge. A regular 
Snowy morning, and the Ground well covered. Nevertheless, 
the Hounds came and found in Yearby Plantations. Had a 
splendid run, and killed at Lockwood Beck. The scent was 
breast high, and no hounds could go faster. Very bad riding, 
and onlv two or three horses out. 



•haricaway's' journal, 1842-1843. 103 

Mondai/, March 13. — Met at Howlsyke at 10. Had some 
good 8port and 2 pretty runs, the last a good one. Killed 
both our Foxes. The Danby Hounds joined us this day, but 
they could not go the pace.' Merryboy ran out from the whole 
pack and killed the last Fox clean away from the ruck. The 
Danbyites exceedingly astonished. 

Thursday, March 16. — Met at Acklam Blue Bell. On going 
to cover this morning, on the road near Mr. Bewicke's Gill, 
the Hounds suddenly broke away frill cry in the direction of 
Middlesbro'. The cause was evident to all, as the Smell of 
Aniseed was discovered by Everyone, and a train was the dodge. 
The Huntsman and Whip rode off to stop the Hounds, but they 
could do no such thing until they got to the end of the Hue 
at LacJienhi/ Village, a distance of 6 or 7 miles. The man 
who ran with the train just got into a cottage in time, dead beat, 
secured the door. The Hounds were close at him, and on coming 
to the cottage were irreconcileable, and several of them were on 
the ix)of. Those who caught a casual glimpse of the run say 
they never saw hounds go so fast in their lives. 

The Author of this joke was Mr. Dryden, and altho' it 
spoiled our day's Sport, having jaded the Hounds, and moreover 
being a Great nuisance to the large field to wait so long, yet we 
must laugh at it as other People do, as Mr, Dryden, above all 
other men, was the one to take such a liberty with the hunt. 

The sport that followed on this day was pretty fair, but not 
worth recording here.- 

March 21. — Met at Barnby, near Whitby, at 9 o'clock. To 
attempt to describe this day's Sport would be presumptuous, 
as we had 3 pacA-s out, and not less than 200 horse and 600 
foot. After indulging in sundry tankards of ale at Barnby, 
a move was made about 1 o'clock, a gi-eat majority of the 

' Note, 1885. — The hounds that are now kept by the farmers in the Danby 
dales are Harriers. Probably then, the Cleveland not often hunting that part 
of the country, they hunted anything, in the old style. 



104 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

vSportsmen sporting short 'pipes. A Fox was then started and 
killed, then more ' yal and baccy,' then another fox was turned 
down, and after a real good run was also killed, Tom Andrew 
beating all the multitude and getting the Brush. A visit was 
now paid to Staithes, and more baccy still was the order of the 
day. Mr. John Andrew and some others of the field absolutely 
addressed the Mob from the Public House Window. Indeed, it 
is stated that John and Mr. Womald were positively returned for 
the borough. Another fox was now uncarted and killed in the dark 
after a good run, Thomas Andrew again getting the Brush. The 
whole hunt this day from end to end was one of the grandest 
displays ever seen in this part of the Country. 

Monday, March 27. — Met at Stanghow at 9. Found in 
the neighbourhood and had a good run, and went to ground in 
Kilton Wood. After an immense deal of labour the Fox was got 
out about 12 o'clock at night. A good scent and some good run- 
ning; a numerous field out. 

Thursday, April G. — Met at Roseberry. Had a magnificent 
find in Howden Gill, the Hounds getting away close at their Fox, 
and away they went to Easby Wood, to near Kildale, turned 
down to Burrow Greens, thro' it away to Capt. Cook's Monu- 
ment, passed it on the right, and to Kildale through the Mill 
Wood, turned over into Lounsdale, then back to Ay ton Old 
Alum Works, away to Howden Gill, across it and to Rose- 
berry, where, being hard pressed and having had a splendid spin 
of 1 hour and 5 minutes, he took Shelter in a creek of tlie 
Rock on the very Summit of that far-famed hill. On a terrier 
being introduced Reynard immediately bolted over the top ; 
away at his brush were the bloodthirsty pack. He first pointed 
for Howden Gill ; finding that he could not gain it, he wheeled 
to the right for Newton Wood ; this would not do, so as a last 
desperate effort he again ran up the hill for the Rock, and within 
about a couple of yards of his old place of Shelter he died. I 
never in all my experience as a Foxhunter saw so grand a finish. 



' HARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1842-1843. 105 

and never a better run, and should I hunt in Cleveland all my daja 
it is a thousand to one I ever see a Fox run into on the top of 
Roseberry again, I have preserved his head in commemoration 
of the event. A splendid dog fox. The Brush was given to Miss 
Faber. Out: F. H. Faber, Esq., and daughter, B. Ord, Esq., 
Rev. J. Newton, E. Turton, Esq., Jr., Messrs. R. Garbutt, 
Simpson, Parrington, &c., &c. 

Tuesday, Ajyril 11. — Met at Kildale at 9 o'clock, private.' 
Found in Easby Wood a leash of Foxes. Settled to one. crossed 
the Country to Ingleby , into the Park, accross the Valley, and over 
the hill into Bilsdale, Away nearly to Chop Gate, headed back 
accross the Moor to Wainstones and went to ground. A capital 
run, altho' the Country Crossed was very rough and awkward. 
Trotted away back to Ayton, had some refreshment, then found 
another Fox near Pinchinthorpe. Ran accross the flat for Nun- 
thorpe ; turned back to Langbargh plantations ; recrossed the 
Stell, and pointed for Loys' plantations, running to the Stokesley 
Road, and then heading round, leaving Nunthorpe on the left ; 
run for home, but was run into near Nunthorpe Hill, after as 
good a 20 minutes as ever was ridden to. Had the Fox run 
straight instead of ringing about but a small part of the field 
would have seen the kill. An old Dog Fox. Several falls got 
to-day, and one or two had a cold bath in the famed Nunthorpe 
Stell (and seemed, from the length of time they blubbered 
about in it, to enjoy it). . . , This being the day after Mr. 
Uryden's dinner only a small muster of the Cleveland fancy 
were out. The rest were busily altho' not ]}leasantly engaged 
at home. 

The season was brought to a close with a hot sunny day's 
hunting at Kildale ; the hounds said to have run eighteen miles 
and killed in Baysdale. This was on April 17. 

' Not advertised. 



i06 the cleveland hounds. 

Mr. Dryden's Dinner. 

Consett Dryden, Esq., in fulfilment of his promise made at 
Mr. King's dinner last year, gave a dinner and wine to all the 
subscribers to the Cleveland Hunt Club at Mrs. Sowray's 
Hotel, Kedcar, on Monday, April 18, 1843, a report of which 
follows : — 

C. Dryden, Esq., in the Chair ; Jno. Peirson, Esq., in the 

Vice-Chair. Present, &c The Cloth was drawn about 5 

o'clock. After the usual loyal toasts, the healths of Henry Vansit- 
tart, Esq., Col. Hildyard, Arthur Newcomen, Esq., Lord Zetland, 
Lady Turner, and Mrs. Newcomen, and the Chairman. 

The Chairman, in response, said : Gentlemen, it would afford 
me much pleasure if I could express to you in the language I 
could wish how much I feel the compliment you have paid me. 
Mr. King, who has so humorously proposed my health, knows my 
good,"! and my ills, and by him I am willing to be judged (cheers). 
I am proud that my name has been introduced to you by one of 
the oldest supporters of the Cleveland Hunt, and still prouder 
am I to meet you on this occasion. I beg to thank you most 
sincerely for the honour you have done me, and beg to drink all 
your very good healths, and may you all live for ever and a day 
longer if you like (loud and continued cheering). 

The Chairman said : Gentlemen, I feel the greatest plea- 
sure in proposing to you the next toast, the health of my 
worthy friend John Andrew (loud cheers). I remember his 
worthy sire, with whom I began my early hunting career, and 
I am perfectly satisfied that his son, our present huntsman, is 
ever anxious, as he was, to show us sport on all occasions. 
Gentlemen, let us drink in a Bumper Long Life to John Andrew 
and success to the Cleveland Hounds. This Toast was drunk 
with 3 times 3, or rather 19 times 19. A song was then sung 
by J. Parrington, describing a run with the Cleveland Hounds 
on the 24th Jany. from Nunthorpe. 



MR. DRYDEN'S dinner, 1 843. I07 

Mr. John Andrew said : Mr. Chairman and Gentlemen, As 
you have been so kind to drink my health in the manner you 
have done, I cannot but feel greatly obliged to you, and I 
return you many thanks. I was quite astonished that we did 
as well this Season as the last, as I feared a Scarcity of Foxes. 
We have had some excellent Sport, and in 6 days running 
we killed 12 foxes (loud applause). It is well known that the 
Hurworth Hounds hunted this Country several weeks and 
never killed a Fox, and I can tell you that next Season we shall 
have such a Team of Hounds as cannot be equalled anywhere 
(loud cheers), and, moreover, I trust we shaU have plenty of 
Foxes (loud cheers). I do assure you we are not at the top 
of the tree yet, and I have no doubt but I shall have the plea- 
sure of meeting you here next year, as I am confident we shall 
win Mr. Peirson's dinner too.^ This fine old specimen of a real 
Foxhunter sat down amidst deafening Cheers from all parts of 
the room. 

The Healths of a young Sportsman, Mr. T. Parrington, and 
Mr. King, the Ladies of Cleveland, Mr. Rd. Garbutt, The Non- 
Subscribers, Messrs. E. Turton, G. Marwood, J. B. Rudd, H. H. 
Powe, and other Subscribers, ' Divinity, Law, and Physic,' were 
duly honoured. The Toast and Song succeeded each other in 
rapid succession for Sometime longer, and several excellent 
Speeches were delivered and some capital Songs sung. A discus- 
sion on the subject of hunting bagged Foxes was at one part of 
the Evening likely to have arisen, but the Chairman remarked 
that the meeting was not convened for the purpose of having 
an}" opinions from Members which would lead to a lengthened 
argument and thereby mar the pleasures of the party. The 
Subject consequently dropped. The party kept together in 
perfect enjoyment until a late hour — rather too late, considering 

' Mr. John Peirson forfeits a dinner next year should the Cleveland kill 
20 Brace, and Mr. Keade has also declared on the same Conditions for the 
Year after. 



108 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

that Kildale was the ' meet ' in the morning at 9 o'clock. 
Altho' there was a great abundance of moisture at Redcar this 
afternoon, still it has been remembered to have been ivetter, and 
only one or two of the party were Completely Soaked through ; 
nevertheless, there was not one of the Company but had Evidently 
experienced the effects of the Shower, less or more. 

The Summary for the Season is that the Hounds liunted 51 
days, killed 20 brace, run to ground 21 foxes, lost 10^ brace, 
and had G blank days. The blank days were at Upleatham, 
Cattersty, Skelton Park, Stanghow, Ilutton Low Cross, and 
Handale. 



Season 1843-1844. 

They commenced operations on Oct. 1 2 at Cattersty ; tliey 
did not find there, but found in the Woolpits, and killed an old 
dog fox. All the early part of the Season they had to Struggle 
against persistent bad Scent ; they never had a fair Scent at all 
till Nov. 27 ; the next day on which they had a Scent was Dec. 4, 
but they had no Sport. On Dec. 11 they had an hour and 10 
minutes with a bob tail fox and killed, but it appears to have 
been a ringing run on Eston and Wilton Banks for the most 
part. On Dec. 21 they had a very Smart run from Miller's Gill 
to Cattersty and back, killing at Hob Hill. The huntsman on 
his little mare was the only one well up to the hounds at the Kill. 

Tuesday, Dec. 26. — Liverton. Had some capital running ; ran 
one fox into the Cliffe, did not kill ; pretty good scent. Out : All 
the Neighbourhood, being St. Stephen's Day. 

Monday, Jan. 8. — Met at Hutton Locrass.' Found in 
Guisbro' Banks ; ran backwards and forwards some time ; broke 



' This place is spelt usually Hutton Lowcross or Lockrys ; the latter is the 
old-fashioned, but not of course original, spelling. The name of the township is 
taken from the old low cross which still (1885) stands by the roadside in the 
lane from Hutton to Guisbro'. 



' IIARKAiVAY'S ' JOURNAL, I 843- I 844. 109 

across the Moor for Commondale, turned smartly back ; then 
across Hutton Gills to Bousdale Wood, round Bell End to 
rinchinthorpe Wood, thro' it and down past Mr, Simpson's 
to Robt. Leng's house, where the hounds run into their fox in 
brilliant Style, having run the line two hours without a check. 
Remarkable old Dog Fox. Messrs. Newcomen, R. Garbutt, 
and the Huntsman went well, the last named of this trio 
being first up. The Squire of Skelton also rode true and hard. 




HUTTON LOWCROSS. 



... I was with Mr. Russell's hounds ' to-day and saw a 
splendid forty-two minutes, from Lea Close over a magnificent 
Country. 

Mondaij, Jan. 22. — Met at Roseberry. Found in Howden Gill, 
ran smartly down the cover, round by Cliffrigg, back to Howden 
Gill again ; ran another round, and then away to Pinchinthorpe 
Covers, through them down to Pinchinthorpe in view, and killed 
near Mr. Thomas's House after a splendid little run. A Bitch 
fox. Trotted away back and put the Hounds into Newton Wood ; 
found immediately below Roseberry, rattled away to Cliffrigg, 

' Durham Hunt. 



no THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

broke towards Ayton in close view, could not live, so doubled 
back across the fields above Newton to Pinchinthorpe, away over 
the hill to Bousdale Wood, through it and Hutton Locrass Covers, 
away to High clifife along the Guisbro' Banks to Cass Rock, then 
broke at the top over the Sheep Pastures to Simey Gill. Across it 
away to Aisdale Gate over the Moor to near Stanghow, turned 
to Lock wood Beck, and away to Kilton AVood, past Kilton Castle, 
right forward to near Lofthouse, turned back by Whitecliffe and 
ran to ground at Kilton Mill ; soon unearthed and bagged for 
another day. For the distance gone over during this run, the 
roughness of the country crossed, and the pace from start to the 
finish, it certainly out does anything which has been seen in 
Cleveland for many years. It is generally thought that the 
Hounds never changed foxes, and the way in which they ran 
their fox from first to last was magnificent to behold. Out of a 
numerous field at Roseberry but few saw the finish, and many 
had to Cry ' hold, enough ' some time before the Whoo-Whoo- 
Whoop was heard. I may mention that the following did their 
best to get to the Hounds, viz. Messrs. J. T. Wharton, G. Peirson, 
R. Garbutt, W. Garbutt, J. Andrew, R. White, and the Hunts- 
man. Mr. Rd. Garbutt's Nag stopped about Kilton Castle, Mr. 
Robt. White's compounded in Kilton Wood, and Mr. Geo. Peir- 
son's gave in about Lofthouse. It is lucky, however, that none 
of the horses were fatally overdone. And those Gentlemen who 
were fortunate enough to see all the run may well tell with 
Satisfaction that they were eye witnesses to one of the Stoutest 
and best runs Ever shown by the Cleveland Foxhounds. In 
addition to those already named, the following were out : Messrs. 
W. Simpson, W. A. Loy, — Jackson, W. Wardale, &c., &c., &c. 

I am happy to believe that there is a fairer tone amongst 
sportsmen of the present day than we find was the case with our 
rougher predecessors. Certainly it would be difficult to imagine 
anyone at the present day doing so mean a thing as to dig out 



' HARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1 843- 1 844. Ill 

this gallant Roseberry fox and put him in a bag for another clay, 
and still less probable to find anyone who would care to record 
this deed ; but we cannot in fairness to a past generation judge 
them by the standard of our own day. Bagged foxes were not an 
unusual thing, and no doubt they tried to obtain as good an 
article for the bag as they could. I record the following day's 
sport hoping to comfort the reader and lessen the indignation 
he has felt after the last recorded day. 

Thursday, Feb. 1, — Skelton Castle, the Seat of John T. 
Wharton, Esq., who handsomely opened his house to all comers 
this morning and had provided for the lovers of the Chace in 
Cleveland a magnificent Breakfast and a hearty Welcome, ' like a 
fine old English Gentleman, one of the olden time.' 

Altho' the morning was like anything rather than hunting, 
being a stinging hard frost with snow showers, yet twelve good 
men and true assembled at the Castle, and we sat down to break- 
fast at ^ past ten : ha%'ing had a sufficient quantity of the good 
things so liberally provided by the Squire, not forgetting a 
couple of Glasses (at least) to each of excellent cold Punch, 
we unbagged the Fox caught this day fortnight (Jan. 18th, 
dug out at Waterfall) in front of the Castle, and ran him prettily 
to near Stanghow, then hunted slowly back to Skelton, and down 
to Hob Hill and lost. Went to Saltburn House, the residence 
of our worthy Master, had some gin and water, &c., and then un- 
bagged the Roseberry Fox close by the Kennels. On laying the 
Hounds on they ran like distraction, the scent Evidently having 
improved. After two or three turns in the Wood the fox 
broke away across the beck, and away to Hazle Grove, and 
here we evidently changed foxes ; away back to Saltburn, to 
the Gill, away over Brotton Warsitt to Cattersty and to Skin- 
ingrove ; here it was given up and the hounds taken home, 
but one Hound (Sportsman) had got away with the fox, and 
after running him other three miles killed him alone, near 



112 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Loftliouse. Had all the Hounds got away with him, what a 
splendid termination it would have made to as good a run as 
ever was ridden to ! Altho' the Ground ^s^as very hard yet many 
of the field rode hard, and no accident occurred. Our Master 
blamed some of us, and particularly me, for overriding the 
Hounds with the first Fox. If I was to blame I beg to apologise, 
as it was all the cold Punch, which verified the old adage that a 
spur in the head is worth two in the Heel. Out : Messrs. J. T. 
and Geo. Wharton, J. and Geo. Peirson, John and T. Parrington, 
T. Bird, Geo. Carrick, D. Peters, John Andrew and Tom, 
W. Pearson, Richard Garbutt, Geo. Holt, &c., &c. 

This day I have thought worthy of giving, as recording the 
escape of two grand foxes which should never have been submitted 
to such indignities. 

Thursday, March 14. — Mefc at Goldsbro'. Turned down 
three dog foxes caught during the snow ; had some pretty run- 
ning, and killed them all. An immense number of people out on 
all kinds of animals. Richd. Garbutt was there, and asserts 
that one fellow rode a Cov, and that another eat iiart of a Fox 
along with the Hounds ! ! ! 

Monday, March 18. — Met at Osborne's Rush. In spite of 
the snow being a foot thick on the Ground the Hounds met, but 
did not find till they got to Lazenby Bank, and had a pretty 
run to Court Green, then to Kirkleatham Park, away close past 
Mr. Vansittart's and Geo. Carrick's, turned up Green Grass Gill 
and lost. The Fox to-day crossed the Lawn close under the 
windows of Kirkleatham Hall, and the Hounds followed in full 
cry, and at the same moment Mrs. Newcomen was safely 
brought to bed of- a son and heir, and 1 trust at some future day 
a staunch friend to foxhunting.' 

' Sir Charles Turner, of Kirkleatham, married the Hon. Teresa Newcomen 
(daughter of Sir W. Gleadowe and Viscountess Newcomen) ; he died without 



' HARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1 843- 1 844. i i 3 

An entertaining incident occurred on April 1, when tlie 
hounds met at Guisbro' Park. After a good run and a kill near 
Lazenby, tlie following event, somewhat appropriate to the day, 
is chronicled : ' Fifty minutes without ever being fairly off our 
fox and under a blazing Sun, so it may be supposed there was 
much distress among dogs, horses, and men. Had some Ale and 
Cheese and Bread at Lazenby, and then turned our heads for 
Lackenby Whin, and it was in journeying thither that a most 
ludicrous scene occurred. Mr. Thomas Tudor Trevor and ]\Ir. 
Richard Garbutt in riding along quarrelled about some trifliug 
matter, and after some ' sharp exchange ' with their tongues 
(during which Mr. Garbutt used the foulest and most unbecom- 
ing language), Mr. Trevor caught his adversary a stinging blow 
across the face with his double thong, and altho' Mr. G. 
displayed such a superior talent during the early part of the 
conflict, yet to the astonishment of all he never attempted to 
resent Mr. Trevor's blow ; and so the affair ended, much to the 
credit of the Man of Law ^ while his adversary proved himself to 
be a Man of Strav:. 

' I do now hope (this matter being Settled) that such an 
exhibition will not again occur in our hunting field, and I would 
recommend that some other more fitting place be selected for 
adjusting such differences, as it must ineWtably lead to ultimate 
disgrace and shame if such illjudged brawls break out anion o- 
us when we are, or at least ought to be, in the pursuit of a verv 
different object.' 

issue, the estates going to Lady Turner, who married again, Hemy Vansittart 
Esq., who died 18-18 ; they had issue, Artlmr Xewcomen, who died 1848, and 
Teresa, who married her cousin, Arthur Hemy Turner Newcomen, born 1844 
died 1884. 

The wish expressed here was amply realised, for Arthur Henry Turner 
Xewcomen, who was born under tliese good auspices, throughout bis life was 
a kind, genial, and popular gentleman, a thorough sportsman, and was Master 
of the Cleveland Hounds for many, years, doing much to improve the pack, 
and showing splendid sport. He died, deeply regretted, in the spring of 
1884. 



114 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Mondaij, April 8. — Met at Cattersty at G o'clock a.m. Had 
a severe scurry with a dog Fox ; ran liim till all was blue, but 
could not get hold of him, 

Monclai/, April 15. — Met at Hutton Lowcross at 9 o'clock. 
The last appointment this Season, and was for this cause to 
many a great disappointment, for it was understood that we 
were all to breakfast with Mr. Beade to-day, but in consequence 
of the death of a niece of that Gentleman the breakfast was 
postponed sine die. Tried Guisbro' Banks and Simey Gill, 
blank. Had a splendid find in Waterfall Gill ; broke away for 
Upleatham up Tocketts Gill ; away round by Mr. Peirson's Gill 
to Dunsdale Bridge, across the Grej^hound Course to Guisbro' 
Low Park ; away to Clarke's Barn Whin, through it to Har- 
rison's Whin ; turned back and through Greenwood's Whin ; 
away to Guisbro' Park ; down past North Cote ; right away to 
Tocketts Bridge ; up past Mr. Hart's Farm House, over Tocketts 
Lythe, and on to Waterfall drains, which were stopped ; 
then tried the Breed earth, stopped also ; obliged to take 
shelter in an open earth close by ; endeavoured to dig the Fox 
out for several hours, but could not get him ; he well deserved 
his life. Yet the Hounds well deserved, their Fox, for I never saw 
anything better than this run from end to end. The pace from 
the start to Harrison's Whin was excellent, and altho' it was 
somewhat slower from this point to the finish, yet the running 
of the Hounds was beautiful to look upon. Being the last day of 
course all rode hard and true, and all that could have been further 
desired was a jolly Whoo Whoop to finish the Season. After the 
run was over we found ourselves close to the residence of Mr. 
(ireo. Peirson, Junr., who kindly invited us all to partake of ' the 
best his cellar and larder could afford.' I must say we did great 
justice to the good things set before us, nye, to n man ; but it 
was the last day, and we were sorry to part ; and the pace the 
Hounds went this morning was only equalled with the pace the 
decanters went over our worthv host's mahoo-anv. Out : 



' HARKAWAV'S ' JOURNAL, 1844-184^;. 115 

A. Newcomen, Esq., on his Irish Horse ; Mr. J. Peirson on his 
Grey Wizzard ; Mr. Geo. Peirson on his Grey Mare ; Mr. Trevor 
on his brown Mare ; Mr. Simpson on his Chesnut Mare ; Mr. 
Richard Garbutt on his ' Seven Yards ' ; Rev. Jas. Newsani on 
Mr. R. Garbutt's ' Lucy Long ' ; Mr. Jos. Parrington on his 
Chesnut Mare ; Mr. W. Garbutt on his Volney horse ; Mr. 
Joseph Harrison on his Grey Pony; Mr. R, Scarth on his Grey 
Mare ; Mr. Jas. Dobbin on his bay Mare ; Mr. Jno. Andrew on 
his bay Mare ; Mr. Thos. Andrew on his Fanny ; Mr. W. Hart 
on his brown Perion Horse ; Mr. Tommy Page on his black 
liorse ; and last, though he never is last, the Writer hereof on 
his horse ' Charley Bates.' 

The following is a Summary of the Season, which shows that 
the Members of the Hunt did not earn their dinner : - Hunted 
46 days ; foxes killed, 26 (13 brace) ; foxes run to ground, 12 ; 
blank days, 1 ; stopped hunting 7 days. 

They hunted 12 Bag Foxes, a good number of which saved 
their Brushes. 

Season 1844-1845. 

Commenced hunting October 7 at Hazlegrove, killing 1^ 
Brace of Cubs. The first really fine day's Sport was on 
October 17. when they ran a fox from Saltburn (xill, and 
lost him at Ayton Alum Works. November 17 they met at 
Newby, and had a good forty minutes, and killed near Rudby, 
but not fast. 

Thursdat/, Dec. 5. — Met at Acklam Blue Bell. Tried in 
vain till we got to Marton Gill ; here Reynard jumped up 
close before the Hounds and broke away for Ormesby Hall, where 
he attempted for some time to dodge his pursuers, but it was no 
go ; at last he was obliged to missle, going over the Great Pas- 
ture, across the Stockton Road, past Mr. Calvert's ; away to 
Davison's Tile Yard ; crossed the Middlesbro" Road, away to 

I 2 



Il6 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Linthorpe Village, on to JMarsh House ; across the Middlesbro' 
Railway, and across the Tees at the high end of the New 
Cut. The Hounds being close at their Fox three of them crossed, 
R. Garbutt and the Huntsman then got a boat and took the rest 
of the Hounds over; ran the Fox up to Portrack Village, but 
could not run him further. This was a splendid run and very- 
fast ; beautiful country. Messrs. R. Garbutt, Newcomen, Mew- 
burn, Swann, Jordison, J. and T. Andrew rode hard and true. 
Out: Esquires Newcomen, McBean, J. T, and Geo. Wharton, 
Messi-s. J. Newton, W. Simpson, J. Parrington, J. Mev?^burn 
(on Clementina), R. Garbutt, Trotter, &c., &c. 

On the day after this run it was discovered that a fellow 
who pretended to be a Duck Shooter, shot the Fox as soon as he 
crossed the embankment on the Durham side of the Tees, when 
the Hounds were within three hundred yards of him. The fellow 
immediately took the Fox up and carried him into one of the 
Cottages at Portrack, and this accounts for the Hounds running 
up to the Houses. Mr. R. Garbutt has since recovered the Fox, 
and has him at Stockton getting stuffed. 

On Thursday, December 19, they met at Marsk. and found a 
fox in Hazlegrove ; they ran to Guisbro' Banks and killed, but 
continued on a fresh fox, which they ran to ground on the top of 
Roseberry. On this day the following week they had a smart 
run from Aj'ton to Upsal with a bagman. The Secretary was 
with the Kurworth on the Tuesday, and mentions that he had 
' one of the best runs I ever saw ; found in Beverley Wood ; ran 
one hour and thirty minutes over a magnificent country, and 
killed near Ro Anton. ]\Iy horse carried me at the tail of the 
Hounds the whole of the run. Mr. Wilkinson presented me 
with the Brush.' 

Thiirsddij, Jan. 2, 1845. — Met at Upleatham. Found in 
a small Clump of Plantation in front of Upleatham Hall; broke 
away for Skelton ]^]llers, away past Skelton Mill to Mount 
Shandv, where the Hounds divided. One half and the orio-inal 



' HARKA way's ' JOURNAL, I 844- 1 845. 11/ 

Fox going away to Saltburn Gill, across it, and took a ring towards 
Brottou ; back again, recrossed the Gill ; away back to ^farsk 
Mill ; down the beck through John Andrew's Wood, through 
Saltburn Village ; away past the Boatmen's Houses to HuntclifFe, 
and after some splendid viewing the Fox, rather than be killed 
by the Hounds, jumped over the Cliff! ' Old Donegal touched 
him at the moment he sprung off, and how the Hound saved 
himself I know not. I immediately galloped to Saltburn and 
on the Sands under the Cliflf, and picked up the Fox, quite 
dead. I never saw a finer specimen of a Fox in my life ; he 
was a dog fox about 3 years old, and weighed 14^1bs. ]\fr. 
Chas. Newcomen begged the Fox, and had him sent to 
London to be preserved. We had about 5 Couples of Hounds, 
and Thos. Andrew, Mr. Wharton, ^Ir. C. Newcomen, Mr. W. 
Dixon, myself and one or two more in this division. (The 
others killed their Fox at Court Green.) 

Monday^ Jan. 6. — Met at Skelton Castle. There in the 
good old English Style was breakfast for all, and a more 
magnificent set out I never beheld. About 20 of us sat 
down, and after doing ample justice to the good things set 
before us, we were conducted into an adjoining room, where we 
partook of various sorts of jumping powder. Time being 
called, we mounted our steeds and the first event worth}' of 
notice which befell us afterwards was the sudden disappearance 
of Mr. Trevor and his Horse into a hole underneath the carriage 
drive to the Castle, which it appears had been caused by the 
run of water from the Fish ponds. Fortunately for ^Mr. Trevor 
assistance was at hand, and he and his nag were speedily 
rescued from a premature grave. We then proceeded to try 
for a Fox ; Hob Hill and Hazlegrove Blank. Had a magnifi- 
cent find in Saltburn Gill ; broke away towards Skelton ; turned 
away past Merry Lockwood's, and right away to Liverton 

' About 300 feet. 



Il8 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Wood, where lie found shelter in a rock, after one of the fastest 
runs ever seen in Cleveland. The two Newcomens and Hd. 
Garbutt got well away with Hounds and stuck to them. . . . 

The Hounds were stopped hunting by frost and snow from 
January 30 to February 17, and after this the Sport was only 
moderate. They finished the Season on Thursday, April 17, at 
Hutton Low Cross ; they had a good breakfast at Mr. Reade's, 
but it being a hot sunny day no sport followed. 

The following is a summary of the Season : — Hunted 40 
days; killed 25 foxes (12i brace) ; ran to ground 10; had 
3 blank days ; stopped hunting 14 days. 

The following is the Secretary's report for the season 
1844-45 :— 

The Season 1844-5 was perhaps for hunting one of the very 
worst ever known ; under such circumstances the Cleveland 
Hounds could not be expected to shew much sport. Neverthe- 
less we had some good sport, but the Clippers were few and far 
between. I trust next year will be more favourable, for I never 
recollect so fine a kennel of Hounds in Cleveland since I knew 
anything about Hunting matters ; all the old slow Hounds have 
been drafted, and the pack is now composed of young, steady, 
even, and speedi/ Hounds. 

I cannot but regret that some dissatisfaction seems to be 
evinced by certain parties as regards the management of the 
Hounds, and I feel very sorry that in consequence of these par- 
ties being extremely hasty with our Huntsman, Tom Andrew, 
in laying serious charges against him of wilfid neglect and 
stupidity, of which I sincerely believe him to be innocent — I 
say, in consequence of this Mr. John Andrew has more than once 
threatened to give up the management of the Hounds. Should he 
do so, I ask where the person is to be found to fill his place ? We 
ought all to remember that John Andrew has been for years the 
main support of the Cleveland Foxhounds, and that he has at 



' HARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1 844- 1 845. II9 

very serious expeuce and personal inconvenience upheld and kept 
together the pack, and to him all the lovers of Foxhunting in 
Cleveland are peculiarly indebted for having brought the Hounds 
to that state of perfection in which they are now to be found. I 
am satisfied that John Andrew, from his great experience, is 
better calculated to manage the affairs of the Hunt than any 
other man I know of, and so far I am equally satisfied his sou 
Tom is anxious to do every that is right to the best of his 
abilities, and moreover he is particularly good tempered and 
civil in the field. 

I should hope that we may have uo more of this unpleasant- 
ness, and I would humbly recommend that when any member of 
the Hunt discovers a fault in the Huntsman that he had better 
at once tell him of it in proper language, and not get out of 
temper and give vent to expressions totally unbecoming to any 
gentleman. 

I shall now conclude my notice of this Season by wishing 
success to the Cleveland Hounds next Season, and health and 
happiness to every member of the Cleveland Hunt Club. 

Thos. Pakrington. 

3Iarton, June 24, 1845. 

The following is the List of Hounds with pedigrees and par- 
ticulars for 1815 : — 



120 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



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• IIARKA way's ' JOURNAL, 1845-1846. I23 



Season 1845-1846. 

This was a remarkably good season, and foxes seem to have 
been plentiful in every quarter. The first day which I shall 
record is 

Thursday, Nov. 13. — Met at Newby. In setting out to 
range some fields near Newby I saw a fox crossing a Stubble 
close by. We lost no time in bringing the hounds to the 
scent, nor did Reynard lose any time in making his Exit, run- 
ning West for Hilton ; turned round to the North making for 
Thornton, which he nearly reached, but being hard pressed 
headed round, and was run into in most brilliant style near 
Stainton Grange. One of the fastest bursts I ever saw, and 
over a beautiful Country, but very strong. A Cub fox, and 
I never saw a Gamer animal before hounds. Time, 17 minutes. 
Trotted back to Newby ; tried some Stubbles, no go. Went 
to near Seamer ; found again in some whinny fields, our fox 
going away close before the Hounds, another at the same time 
being viewed away in another direction. The hunted fox 
ran for vStokesley, crossed the Tame, a poser, and crossed the 
Garths near the town, then turned westward, and was run into 
close to Tame Bridge. A Quaker who joined us during the 
run jumped into the Tame up to his knees to get the Brush, 
but unfortunately for him Rd. Garbutt was there before him. 
Nevertheless, a game trick of Old Broadbrim. 

Monday, Bee. 15. — Met at Cattersty. An excellent break- 
fast provided by Mr. Maynard, but I am sorry to say that only 
one or two partook of it. Tried Cattersty, no fox ; Saltburn 
Gill, blank ; in fact, never found a fox ; the day was so windy 
nothing could be heard. A Fox went out of some whins near 
Cattersty after the Hounds had left, and went to the Cliff and 
fell over, and was killed on the spot. An unfortunate day's 
sport. 



124 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

On January 8 a fox went over the Cliff under Brotton War- 
sitt, after a good run of 55 minutes. 

Thursday, Jan. 29. — Met at Upleatliam. Found imme- 
diately near IMarsk Quarry, broke Northward ; turned left for 
the New Buildings farm, which he left on the right, and then 
pointed for Tockett's Dump over the earths ; away past Uplea- 
tham Hall and down to Hollin Hedge, and from thence direct 
to Skelton Castle at a terrific pace ; through Skelton and Forty- 
pence, and to Guisbro' Alum Works ; here he turned, recrossed 
the road into Waterfall, tried the drain near Mr. Harrison's, 
then ran a ring towards Tockett's Lythe and back ; then away 
past Tockett's Mill to the Earths again ; again disappointed, he 
determined on new ground, and went direct to Kirkleatham 
Park, through it, and ran a ring below, returning by Wilton 
Castle up the Hill, right along over the Moor to Eston Nab ; here 
two Foxes were on foot, but fortunately the run fox was tallyho'd 
near Lackenby Village dead beat ; the Hounds were soon at him, 
and forced him to take shelter in a Shoemaker's Shop in the vil- 
lage, but Old Regent was not to be denied, and they killed this 
gallant Fox in the presence of the Cobler and about 4 of the field, 
after one of the severest runs ever known in Cleveland. . . . 

Monday, Feb. 16. — They met at Hutton Low Cross, when 
they had a very long day and a good run to ground near Tockett's 
Mill, ' from which he was dislodged at Eleven o'clock at night, 
and supped off by Old Regent and his gallant comrades. I 
believe Mr. Geo. Maughan and T. Andrew were the only two 
who endured to the finish. I never saw the scent better than 
it was to-day ; they could drive it a field off the line. ..." 

Thursday, Feb. 19.— Met at Marton. Tried Tolesby and 
Mr, Bewick's Gill, blank ; in drawing down by the beck below 
Mr. Bewick's a Brace of Foxes jumped up in a rough stubble, 
and one of them in the middle of the Hounds ; however, by good 
generalship he got clear off and ran thro' Mr. Bewick's Gill, 
past Mr. Hopper's and Gunuergate, then over Davison's drains 



' HARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1 845- 1 846. 1 25 

and direct for Nunthorp Village, passing it close on his right, 
and then almost as the crow flies to Roseberry, where, in the 
rocks on the top he found refuge from his determined pursuers. 
Time, 40 minutes exactly ; distance between 8 and 9 miles ; 
pace exceedingly good, but not so severe as Monday. The 
Country crossed was the best in Cleveland, and abounded with 
every variety of fence, some of which were raspers. On my 
arrival at the top of the hill (for I had the honour and glory of 
being first at the finish) I soon saw that we could easily bolt the 
Fox when assistance arrived. I then took a survey of the line 
we came, and it was exceedingly amusing to see the Stragglers 
following on for miles back. In a short time we bolted the Fox 
in view of the Hounds, and away they went down the hill, the 
prettiest sight I ever beheld, and they did not pull him down 
till they reached the level below, close to the Village of Newton ; 
he proved to be a remarkable fine dog Fox. A great part of the 
field now went home, but, it being the day before om* ball and 
having some Strangers out, another run was determined on. 
Found in Upsall Whin, went direct to Osborn's Rush, then to 
Guisbro' Park, round by Harrison's Whin, and accross the moor 
to Eston Banks, when the fox was headed ; up to this time 
the run was excellent, and the Hounds were evidently drawing- 
on their Fox ; however, so much time was lost at the check that 
they could do no more good, altho' they hunted him down to 
Wilton Wood, where they called off. Out : A. and C. New- 
comen, G. Maw, J. W. Coates, C. Dryden, Esq., and Messrs. J. 
Parrington, T. H. Dobson, R. Garbutt, R. White, J. Harrison^ 
M. J. Pearson, W. Pearson (Barwick), Rev. J. Newton, Jos, 
Parrington, Wm. Parrington, Wilson, W. Dixon, C. Jordison^ 
Tom Harrison, Huntsman of Durham County Hounds, Self, &c. 
Monday, March 23. — Met at Hazle Grove. Found in Hazl& 
Grove, ran a ring round by Marsk Church, then away to- 
Upleatham, through the Covers, and direct away to Skelton Park, 
over the hill, through Rock Hole and Guisbro' Spa, right on the 



126 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Guisbro' Banks to Higlicliffe, then over the Moor pointing for 
Comraondale ; the Horses up to this time had had the greatest 
difficulty to keep up with the Hounds, and here all chances of 
riding further was gone, for the Snow laid still very deep on the 
Moors. Thos. Andrew and Mr. George Newcomen then took to 
their heels, and succeeded in finding the hounds near Commondale, 
where they had killed their fox and eat him too, except his Brush 
and head and a foot. This was one of the most brilliant runs 
of the Season ; the scent was good, but more particularly so where 
any Snow remained. The Fox killed this day was the well known 
three clawed dog fox which has been about Hazle Grove these 
3 or 4 years. Out : Chas. and Geo. Newcomen, Esqs., Messrs. 
W. Beardshaw, and J. and T. Andrew. 

Thursday, March 26. — Met at Wilton Lane End. Tried 
Lackenby Whin, blank ; found in Mr. Vansittart's cover, got well 
away, pointing for Eedcar, headed short back up to Geo. Smith's 
close behind Mr. Vansittart's Dog Kennells, and went to Ground 
in a drain under the Entrance Gate into Kirkleatham Stable Yard. 
He very soon bolted and crossed in front of the Hall over the 
Pigeon Cote field, and away to Yearby Wood ; here, I fancy, we 
changed Foxes (there were certainly two lines) ; however, without 
any stop we rattled away to the Greyhound Course and direct to 
Guisbro' Park, where our Fox got to ground in the breed earth 
after a very fast run. Almost immediately a halloo was heard 
on the Hill ; away we went, and laid on the Hounds, but the Fox 
had been gone too far, and we lost him in Harrison's Whin. Just 
as we were thinking of going home a fresh fox was seen to slip out 
of Greenwood's Whin ; the Hounds were quickly on the line, and 
away they went in good earnest for (xuisbro' Low Park, then to 
the Great Park, through it, took a ring in the country pointing 
for Koseberry, wheeled round to Upsal Mill, round the foot of 
Upsal South Whin, then up the Bank end and down the South 
Bank, and right along the foot of the Hill to below Eston Nab ; 
here our Fox turned to the left and faced the open, leaving 



' HARKA WAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1 845- 1 846. 1 27 

Eston \'illage close ou his left ; he then pointed for the planta- 
tions at the low end of Mr. Jackson's Estate, then crossed over 
just above Cargo Fleet, leaving White House close on his right ; 
he went dii-ect to the Long Plantations in Halliday's Farm near 
Middlesbro' New Eoad, and there he relinquished his life to the 
gallant Cleveland Hounds, and his Brush to John Andrew. Some 
of our field had gone home before we found this extraordinary 
fox, and out of the number that remained only five rode hard 
and true, viz. Messrs, A. and C. Newcomen, T. T. Trevor, 
Thos. Andrew, and myself, and of this lot only two saw the 
finish, viz. Mr. Trevor and J. Andrew. Mr. Newcomen was 
the first to cry out ' hold, enough,' near Cargo Fleet ; I then 
followed suit in White House lane, and Mr. Newcomen got to 
Mr. Calvert's vi'th great difficulty, and the two who struggled 
on to the end were regularly ' done.' John Andrew was there 
at the start, but skirted successfully till we reached Cargo Fleet 
lane ; he then took up the running, and galloped and cheered on 
his hounds with all the ardour of Youth. Messrs. Watson Dixon, 
W. Peirson and T. Dobson also, by galloping on the Hills and 
in the Lanes, saw the finish. In all my experience as a fox- 
hunter I never saw such a severe day for horses, hounds, and 
men as this. We had, in fact, had a hard day before we 
started the last fox, and how ever our horses endured the pace 
and severity of the country in this chace of 1 hour and 50 
minutes I cannot imagine. I only know that I never got 
nearly to the bottom of my horse before, and Mr. C. Newcomen 
rode a horse I fancied could beat the world. On enquiry I find 
that all the Nags recovered from the effects of this day in a 
remarkable manner ; in fact, I rode my horse again on Monday 
at Nunthorpe, and never found him better. . . . 

They finished the season on April 16 with a brilliant hour 
and forty minutes and a kill. ' Only two or three saw the 
finish of this Glorious Season, and I must not omit to say that 
Mr. Geo. Maughan was one, on a Gray not three years old. We 



128 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

terminated this memorable day by drinking Success to our next 
Season in a glass of Brandy and Water at tlie Cock Inn,' Guisbro', 
and then we parted, but in hopes to Meet Again.' 

I have taken out a summary of this Season ; — The hounds 
hunted 45 days; killed 16 brace of foxes; ran 14 foxes to 
ground ; had one blank day, and were stopped one day. 

[Vide A2}pendix /or 'List of Hounds. ''\ 



Season 184G-1847. 

There seems to have been a good show of the necessary 
animal during this season, though they were oftentimes bad to 
follow, as scent varied very much, and on the whole was bad. I 
find no sport particularly worthy of record early on, but give 
the following day to begin with, containing an incident. 

Tltursday, Oct. 1. — Met at Hazle Grove. Four foxes in 
Hazle Grove. Unfortunately got to work with the old one ; 
rattled him in cover some time, then broke at the West end and 
went at a rattling pace to Upleatham ; turned back over the 
hill to Hob Hill, then over to Hazle Grove ; gave him another 
turn in cover, broke again at the East end, away over to Marsk 
Mill, up Hob Hill as far as Mount Shandy ,2 and here he tried 
hard to baffle his pursuers; but finding it a vain attempt, he 
ran down the Wood, crossed below the Kennels, and passed 
Saltburn Mill and the Boathouses, and away to the Cliff as 
fast as he could rattle ; went down what is called ' the New 
Way to the Bottom,' run along the foot of the Cliff to the Point 

' The Cock Inn, pulled downi a few years ago, was the oldest hostelry in the 
town, and stood where the local branch of the National Provincial Bank now 
stands. The sign of ' The Cock ' was the crest of the Scotch royal house of 
Bruce or de Brus. The family of de Brus were the Lords of Skelton. &;c., and 
Bobert de Brus was buried in Guisbro' Priory, which he founded in 1129. 

2 ]\Iount Shandy. Called so from the fact that Sterne, who was a frequent 
visitor at Skelton Castle, wrote Tristram Sliaiuhj in the woods about this 
hill. 



' IIARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1846-1847. I29 

and lost. The fox either drowned or gone up the rock. Brig-lit 
sunny day; ground as hard as Pavement; hounds ran very well. 
Out, &c. . . . 

Thursdaii, Nov. 12. — Met at Upleatham Bridge. Had a 
splendid find at Tockett's Mill plantation, and broke for Tockett's 
Dump ; headed back as far as Upleatham Road, then back 
again past the Mill, and away to Tockett's Dump Earths, 
then up to the Fir Rig, where another Fox jumped up, which 
5 hounds and all the field, except Rd. Garbutt and mj'self, 
followed, and they ran him to ground into Upleatham drain. The 
old fox ran back to Tockett's Mill, and nearly the same track 
over again to the Earths at Tockett's Dump, and then away at 
a rattling pace to the Poll and right along the cover as far as 
Marsk Quarry ; turned short back at the low side of the covert, 
and ran into some minor earths about midway between the 
Poll and Marsk Quarry. At the same moment a holloa was 
heard near New Buildings ; away we went to it, and ran the 
line accross Grew Grass Gill, where a fresh Fox jumped up, to 
Yearby Bank and lost ; we then trotted away back to Uplea- 
tham, where Jno. Andrew had just got 2 Foxes out of the 
drain. We turned one down by Mr. Black's Farm House, and 
ran him West to near Mr. Geo. Carrick's, where they, or rather 
Mr. George Peirson, killed him after 15 minutes very pretty 
running. The Fox could have gone much further had not the 
gentleman named above ridden along the lane and got before 
the Fox and turned him back to the Hounds, a most unsports- 
manlike proceeding. Turned the Second Fox down by Mr. 
King's, after partaking ' the best his Cellar and larder could 
afford ' ; the Fox immediately crossed the lane into Mr. Vansit- 
tart's plantation, and crossed the fields below the Hall and 
Coatham Lane and Meggitt Lane, close by Mr. Hett's, and into 
the Wilton Lane ; ran along it some distance towards Wilton, 
then went up to Wilton Wood, through it away to Court Green 
and through it ; then on to Harrison's Whin : tried in vain to 

K 



130 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

dodge the liounds in covert ; then took the open Moor, pointing- 
to Eston Nab, but being dead beat he dribbled back to a small 
plantation at the foot of Moddal ' Bog, where he died after having 
shown an excellent run of 50 minutes, and most of it very good 
pace. Such a twister at the end of so hard a day, as may be 
expected, gave every satisfaction to man, horse, and hound, and 
at the finish I could not perceive a nag, except one that joined 
us at Wilton, that had not had enough. I am happy to say that 
Mr. Wharton on his bay mare carried home hotlt the brushes ; 
he was very lucky, but nevertheless he rode in a most credit- 
able manner. 

After having been stopped from Thursday, Dec. 10th, to 
Monday, Dec. 28th, on account of snow, which fell on the 
11th, 12th, and loth, about 20 inches deep, on 

Munda.y, Bee. 28, they advertised for Kilton Mill ; the hounds 
were taken out by the huntsman on foot, and had some good 
sport, running 2 foxes to ground and killing one. 

Tlmrsdaij^ Bee. 31. — Advertised for Upleatham. The Hounds 
were taken this day to the Cliff ; found a Fox in Hunt Cliff ; 
he was a long time before he could be prevailed upon to stir, 
at last he went down and ran to Saltburn point, where he 
could go no further for the tide, and he was lost in the same way 
as the one on the 1st of October. 

Thursday, Jan. 28. — Met at Sunny Cross. Turned down 
a bagman close by, and ran into him in a couple of fields. Tried 
Mr. Bewicke's Gill, blank. Turned down the Hazle Grove Fox 
ill White House Lane ; ran him Eastward straight accross to 
Normanby Old Hall, where it was Whoo Whoop 13 minutes 
very pretty. Found in the Upsal Covers ; our fox setting his 
head west ran thro' 20 Acre Bank, over Ormesby Bank, away 
accross Mai-ton Gill, and on nearly to Davison's Drains ; here 

' This word appears in the various IMSS. as Model, ]\Ioddal, Mortel, Mordel, 
ice. I bcliuvo the correct name is Mordale (from moor-dale), pronounced 
Mordlo. 



' IIARKAWAY'S ' JOURNAL, 1846-1847. 131 

he turned to the left and ran a run, leaving Nunthorpe on the 
right, accross Morton Carrs and direct back to Upsall, and 
went to ground in the North Bank close before the Hounds. 
We soon dug to him, it being a very small earth, and the 
Hounds were allowed to take him out, but there being two Foxes 
in they killed them both ; this was cowardly work, but the foxes 
about Upsal are too numerous. This last run was exceedingly 
pretty and very fast. Out. . . . 

In the notice of the next day's hunting it is related how 
they ran to ground at Little Ayton, but owing to ' poor old Crab 
having died of his wounds received in the earths on Thursday, 
Jan. 28,' they could not bolt him. 

Monday, Feb. 1. — Met at Moorsholm. Killed a Bagman 
in twenty minutes, very good ; then found a second Fox near 
Moorsholm, ran right away to Eoxby Wood, turned back to 
Moorsholm, then away to Birkbrow forward to Guisbro', close 
past the Church Yard, and away to Guisbro' Park, thro' it and on 
to the Upsal Covers, where the Huntsman, who was the only one 
near, called off the Hounds after one of the severest chases on 
record ; it is thought they changed foxes near Guisbro' ; the Fox 
was seen several times during the run and was an uncommon large 
one, and a man at Roxby declares that he took off tiro yards 
Every Stride in his Gallop as he measured it on the snow ; there is 
no doubt about his being an extraordinary Fox, and a right 'un 
to breed from. A nasty cold day, and a good deal of Snow on 
the Ground ; very few out. 

On Thursday, Feb. 4, after a fair good run from Uplea- 
thara, they ran from Saltburn Gill ' away to Hunt Cliff, where, 
being hard pressed, he went over, and was killed at the bottom ; 
had a glorious " break up " at Tom Johnson's by way of a finish ; 
a remarkably large Dog Fox.' 

Monday , March 8. — Met at Kilton Mill. Found several Foxes, 
but had no Sport worthy of notice. On Tuesday, Mar. 2nd, I met 
the Hurworth Hds. at Hornbv. We had a "-reat field but a bad 



132 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

day's sport, and finished off by running a Hare very fast for a 
couple of miles, and as near killed as possible. 

Thursday, A])ril 15. — Met at Hunt Cliff 9 o'clock ; not 
advertised. Our Last Bay ; breakfasted with Mr. John Andrew 
and then tried the Cliff; found a young bitch Fox, which, in 
attempting to go out, went over and was killed ; found a second 
Fox, a fine old Dog, in Cattersty ; ran a ring to Kilton Wood, then 
back to Cattersty, 30 minutes ; very good. He then took to 
the Cliff, which he would not leave, and after some pretty Sport 
he went down and was run into at the bottom and broken up in 
Grand style in front of Jno. Johnson's at Saltburn, where we 
afterwards had some refreshments. Tried Saltburn Gill, Hob 
Hill, Upleatham, and Hazle Grove, all blank ; and so we finished 
the season of 1846-7. Out : Messrs. Jno. Peirson, T. Bird, 
G. Peirson, Jno. Parrington, J. Pearson, R. Garbutt, G, Maughan, 
E. King, T. Page, W. Barugh, Self, J. Andrew, Thos., Geo, &c. 

Summary of the Season : — Hounds hunted 46 days ; killed 
17 brace of foxes ; ran 13 foxes to ground ; were stopped hunting 
13 days, and had no blank days. 

\yide Appendix for ^ List of Hounds.'^ 

Having come to the end of ' Harkaway's ' journal, this will 
be a convenient place to give the new rules issued by the Hunt 
after its reorganisation in 1845. 



CLEVELAND HUNT: LIST OF OFFICERS AND NEW RULES. 1 33 

CLEVELAND HUNT CLUB. 
ESTABLISHED JUNE 5, 1817. RE-ESTABLISHED SEPTEMBER 9, 1845. 



LIST OF OFFICERS 

For the Year cndimf Septemher, 1846. 

President — Henry Vansittart, Esq. 

MANAGING COMMITTEE. 

John Thomas Wharton, Esq., Chairinan. 

Mr. Joseph Parrington 
Mr. Richard Garbutt 
Mr. John Andrew 



Arthur Newcomen, Esq 
Mr. John Peirson 
Mr. H. W, Thomas 



Master of the Hunt, Mr. John Andrew 
Secretary y Mr. Thomas Parrington 



RULES OF THE CLUB. 

1 . That the Cleveland Hunt Club shall consist of a President, a 
Committee of Management, a Master, a Secretaiy, and Members. 

2. That the Piesident shall be elected at the Genei-al Annual 
Meetings, and shall hold oiEce untU another is appointed. 

3. That the Committee shall consist of a Chairman, to be elected 
for the time being, and six members of the Hunt, to be elected 
annually. The Chairman shall have the power of calling a Meeting 
of the Committee at any time, the Secretary giving the Members not 
less than two days notice thereof. The Master of the Hunt and the 
Secretary shall be ex officio Members of the Committee. 

4. That the Master of the Hunt shall be elected for the time 
being. He shall have the direction of the Hunt — must act up to 
any resolutions of the Managing Committee — shall superintend the 
hounds in the kennel and in the field —and shall fix the days, time, 
and places of Hunting. 

5. That the Secretary shall be elected for the time being. He 
shall enter into a book minutes of the proceedings of the Managing 
Comjnittee — he shall keep a regular account of all monies received 
and paid on account of the Club, and conduct the Correspondence 



134 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

thereof — and shall e'-^ery year prepare a general financial statement, 
and lay the same before the Club at their General Annual Meetings. 

6. That the Committee shall meet from time to time to transact 
the business of the Club, and shall have the power to supply any 
vacancies that may occur in the Officers of the Club. 

7. That every Annual Subscriber of the sum of two guineas and 
upwards to the funds of the Cleveland Hunt Club shall be considered 
a Member thereof, and shall have the power to vote at the Meetings 
and be eligible to serve on the Committee. 

8. That all Subscriptions shall become due on the first day of 
October in each year, and shall be paid in advance. 

9. That a General Annual Meeting of the Subscribers to the 
Cleveland Hunt Club shall be held at some convenient place, ap- 
pointed by the Committee, in the month of September in each year. 
The officers for the ensuing year shall be then elected, the Secretary's 
accounts avidited, and new Members proposed and elected. 

10. That a Special General Meeting of the Subscribers may be 
called at any time by the Committee, of which seven days' notice 
shall be given to each Subscriber by the Secretary. 

11. That any of the foregoing Rules may be altered or amended, or 
any new Rules introduced, at any General Meeting of the Subscribers. 



For iuformation with regard to the sport of the pack I can 
no longer give the graphic extracts from Mr. Parrington's 
journals, but although the reader may miss the descriptive 
talents of our friend Harkaway, I shall be able, through the 
kindness of the Andrew family, and especially that of Mr. George 
Andrew, of Saltbuvn, to furnish accounts of the most interesting 
days, the latter having placed in my hands his brother Tom 
Andrew's hunting diaries, which he kept complete up to the 
time of his death. I shall give extracts from these diaries 
exactly as they are written in the original MSS,, as to alter 
and to correct them would be to destroy their character and 
originality. Tom Andrew's writing is good and legible, and if 
his orthography is not up to the modern standard, it was above 
th(> average of his time. 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1847-184S. 1 35 



CLEVELAND HUNT. 

Ak Account of Foxes kild in 1847 and 1848. 

Beguu to Hunt October llth, 1847. 

Oct. 11, M. — Met at Cattorsty ; found and kild a dog fox. 
J. Cutlwortli got the Brushes. Futman found a Seckond fox, 
2, in Cattorsty ; kild at Humorsty ; a dog fox. 

[iVo/e. — The number following each fox killed is the num- 
ber of foxes which that fox raises the score of the season to.] 

Nov. 1, M. (7).' — Met at Hutton Lowcross ; found under 
Eighcliff. Run to ground at Kildale, digd out 4 foxes, kild a 
dog and a bitch. T. Pearson got one Brush ; G. Mauglin got 
the Bitch to Stuf. 5. 

Nov. 4. — Hunt Dinner at Guisbro'. 

Dec. 6, M. (1 7). — Met at Guisbro' Spa ; found in Skelton 
Park ; a gud run to ground at Boulby Alamworks. 

Dec. 23, Th. (22).— Met at Osbon Rush. Found in Mortel 
bog ; a gud run, and kild at Coatham Marsh ; a dog fox. 
J. Harrison Brush. 14. 

Jan. 24, M. (31). — Met at Wapley Newin (New Inn) ; Snow. 
Set Down a dog fox ; a gud run, kild ; Wm. Fetch Brush. 
Seckond found in Roxby Wood ; a gud run, kild above Liverton ; 
a Dog fox. John Bouth Brush. 

Ja7i. 25, (32). — Seckond Day ; found in Yackrig ; a gud run 
to Ornesgi-iff ; kild a Dog fox. T. P. Andrew, Brush. 

Feb. 10, Th. (37).— Met at Roxby ; set down a Dog fox, kild 
him under Boulby Cliff; a Fisherman got the Brush. 22. 

Feb. 21, M. (40). — Met at Hutton Low Cross ; a gud run, and 
kild at Stanghow ; a Dog fox. Thomas Petch,^ Brush. 25. 

March 23, Th. (49).— Met at Tanton Bridge. Set Down a 

' These numbers in brackets indicate how manj' clays tliey have hunted in 
that particular season. 

2 Died Feb. 1885, aged 80. 



136 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Bitch fox at Seamor Whin Cover, and had a gud run one hour 
and two minutes ; kikl at Guisbro'. Richard Scarth Brush. 30. 
Ap'il 17, M. (56) (last day). — Met at Roxby; found in 
Hinderwell Cliff, and kild at Runswick Bay ; a Dog fox, 38. T. 
Codling Brush. Seckond found in Kilton Wood ; a gud run, and 
Cald of the Hounds very Late at night in Kilton Wood. 

The number of Dog foxes kild . . . . .27 
The number of Bitch foxes kild . . . . .11 

Total number kild . . . .38 

The number of Days out Hunting . . . .56 

[Vide Aj)2)endix /or 'List of Ilotmds.^^ 

Season 1848-1849. 

Commenced Hunting October 12th, 1818. 

Oct. 12, Th. (1).— Met at Cattorsty ; found a Old fox, and had 
a gud run to Andel Abey (Handale Abbey) and Lost. Seckond 
found in Cattorsty and kild a Bitch fox. John Proud Brush. 
Gave it to Mr. Charlges Newcumen. Black Horse. 1. 

Oct. 20, Th. (5).— Met at Skelton Castle. Found in Skelton 
Bark ; a first rate run, and either lost or kild, not known, in 
Wliarterfall . Seckond found in Upleatham banks ; a gud run 
to Jackdo Scar, and whent to Ground. We had 'a splendid 
Breckfast at Skelton Castle. Sixteen got. Black Horse. 

Nov. 13, M. (10). — Met at Hazelgrove. Found and Run to 
the Cliff. Seckond found in Upleatham and run to the Cliff, 
and Fellover and was kild ; a dog fox (7). Mr. Charlges New- 
cumen Brush. Bay mare. 

Nov. 20, M. (12). — Met at Kilton ; found under Owson Nab, 
run up the wood and Lost. Verry whiudy day, fit to Blow one 
of Horse Back. Bay mare. 

Nov. 30, Tli. (15). — Met at Kirkleatham ; found inBengman 
Galery field, and had very long run and lost at Kirkleatham. I 
Road in Mr. Newcomen Black Horse Togery^ 



' EXTRAORDINARY RUN WITH THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS.' 1 37 

Dec. 7, Th. (17). — Met at Osborns Rush ; found under Estou 
Nab at one o'clock, and had very long run to Carlton, and kild 
in Medd Scarth Fam; a dog fox with a verry white head (11). 
T. P. Andrew Brush ; gave the Brush and head to Mr. George 
Newcumen. Run him three hours ; only 5 in at the Deth. 
Grey mare. 

The following is our old friend Harkaway's account of this 
run at length : — 

EXTRAORDINARY RUN WITH THE CLEVELAND 
FOXHOUNDS. 

This trim little pack, much to the credit of the small knot 
of Gentry, farmers, and others who compose the Cleveland Hunt 
Club, has been showing Capital Sport this Season, and have had 
clipping runs almost every day. On Thursday week they had 
such a run as will be long remembered in Cleveland. On that 
day the fixture was Osborn's Rush. The morning was by no 
micans promising for sport, and the rain which came pouring 
down served to make the Country dirtier and deeper, although 
up to the hocks. The timid and fine weather Sportsmen stayed 
at home, consequently we had a small field, and having a long 
draw before we found some who had ventured to the ' meet ' cut 
it, but would no doubt regret having done so afterwards. At 
one o'clock the watery god dried up his tears, and as we were 
drawing Eston Nab Whin we shook out our feathers and in- 
dulged in the hope that we might yet have a run, and that we 
had a run the sequel will show. The hounds had not been five 
minutes in cover when Reynard was pronounced at home, and 
instantly he broke away to Sir J. Lowther's Plantations. The 
hounds got away on capital terms with their Fox, and raced 
him away to Court Green through the cover, and straight away 
to Guisbro' Park ; here he never dwelt a moment, but broke 
away to the South extremity right across the vale of Guisbro' 
up the hill to Bell End, and forward as hard as they could pepper 



138 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

to Howden Gill. Up to this point the pace was terrific and the 
country most trying, and the select few who saw the beauties 
top the wall at Howden Gill hoped it was near a finish, and it 
was the unanimous verdict that ' the fox could not live much 
longer ' ; but greatly did we undervalue the gameness of the 
' Varment,' for even here, a cover almost impenetrable for hounds 
and full of earths, wherein he might have taken shelter and 
bid defiance to the inroads of the spade and pickaxe, even here 
he stayd not a moment. Again he faced the open, and skirted 
Ayton Old Alum Works, through Cockshot plantations, and away 
pointing for Kildale ; the fox here made a curious turn to the 
left, and went over the hill close past Capt. Cook's Monument, 
and ran a ring on Goat Moor and back through Cockshot 
Plantations away to Easby Wood ; disdaining to avail himself of 
the many places of safety which the hills would have afforded 
him, our gallant fox again took the open country, relying on 
his own stoutness to shake off his bloodthii'sty pursuers. Crash 
went the hounds through Easby Wood, every hound threw his 
tongue, and the chorus was truly grand ; at this point some 
of our field thought the hounds changed foxes, and thought it 
madness to follow further — perhaps the thought was convenient, 
as their nags might have already had a bellyful. Leaving the 
Village of Easby on the left, our fox pointed for the hills on the 
west of Ingleby, and then turned to the right, and, running 
almost due west, leaving Broughton, Kirby, and Busby on his 
left and Stokesley on his right, he struggled on to Carlton, where 
in a small plantation he was pulled down by his undeniable 
pursuers to the unspeakable delight of the remnant of the field 
that saw the last of it. The deep country after leaving Easby 
Wood told heavily on the horses ; the field grew ' small by 
degrees and beautifully less,' and only 5 got to the finish, viz. 
Tom Andrew, Geo. Newcomen, Esq., R.N., and Messrs. Watson 
Dixon, T. H. Dobson, and Tommy Bean. The last ceremonies 
having been performed to the death, and many a hearty ' who 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1 848- 1 849. 139 

whoop ' given untill the old hills of Cleveland resounded the 
echo, the party set their hesftls homeward, and on reaching 
Stokesby had abundant refreshment for themselves and their 
jaded horses at the hostelry of that thoroughbred Sportsman 
Tommy Bean. It is most remarkable but nevertheless true 
that throughout this extraordinary run over about thirty miles 
of difficult country and during 3 hours and 5 minutes the 
hounds were never once off the Scent. The pace was never slow, 
and how one fox, for they never changed, endured through the 
run is almost incredible. The fox, one that had ' braved the 
battle and the breeze ' for many a season, was almost white with 
age, a game and gallant fellow. 

Thomas Parrixgton. 

Dec. 14. — [A poor day's sport. The following may interest 
those who came to know this boy as a Master of the Cleveland 
Hounds : — ] ' Kild at the front of Kirkleatham Hall. Marster 
Henery Newcumen Brush.' 

JDec. 17. — Mr. Newcumen died, Aged 34 years. 

Jan. 15, M. (25). — Met at Hutton Lowcross ; found in 
Hutton Gill, and had a run round by Forty Pence, and back to 
High Cliff, and whent to Ground. Seckond found in Hutton 
Gill, and run Stright to Lambor to Ground in two a Drane, 
bolted him out, and run back to the hinging stone, and lost. 
Bay Horse. 

They finished a good season on April 5. 

1848-1849. 

Number of Dogs foxes kild . . . . .16 
Number of Bitches foxes kild .... 9 

Toatel Number kild 25 

Thomas Pressick Andrew got 8 Brushes. 

Blank days ....).... 5 

Number of davs hunting . . , . .25 



140 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Robert King was married to Miss Bird April 2, 1849. 



Road Black horse .... 


. 24 


Road Cliper horse .... 


. 10 


Road Greay mare .... 


. 4 


Road Bay mare ..... 


. 4 


Road Sweethart ..... 


. 4 


Road Wharton Greay horse 


. 1 




47 



Season 1849-1850. 

Commenced hunting Octobor 11, 1849. 

Met at Catorsty, and run in cover one hour and a half, and 
kild a dog fox. James Husband got the Brush, and gave it to 
William Chapman. 1. 

Oct. 29, M. (6).— Met at Claphow ; found in Busky Dale, 
and had some Cover Hunting, where we chopt a Bitch fox. 
T. Parrington got the Brush, and gave it to Mr. Cooper. Seckond 
fox Found in Skelton Park, and had a good run, and (killed) 
in Bisky Dale a Dog fox. T. P. Andrew got the Brush, and 
gave it to Mr. Maughn. 6. 

Nov. 22, Th. (13).— Met at Coatham Village. Found in Kirk- 
leatham Wincover, and had a good run, and kild in the Dickcoy 
pond ; a dog fox. Rich. Garbutt got the Brush. Seckond 
Found in Lackenby Whin Cover, and kild on Coatham Sands ; 
a Bitch fox, a very Old one. A dispute a Bout the Brush ; gave 
it to Thomas Parrington. 10. 

Nov. 26, M. (14). — Met at Roseberry. Found in Clirrick 
(Cliffrig), and Had a good Run round by Loys Planting, Tanton, 
Stokesley, Kerby, Browton, and Lost at Drumenby. 

Dec. 6, T/i. (17). — Met at Hutton Low Cross, and Found in 
Cempley (Kemplah), and Run round By Hannang Stone (Hang- 
ing), Bowsdale, Pinching Thorp, Upsall, Eston Banks, Coat- 
green, Upleatham, and whent to Ground. 

Dec. 20, Th. (21).— Met at Middlesbro'. Set down a fox 
near Mr. Garbutt's, and had a good Run to near Crathone, and 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1 849- 1 8 50. 



141 



Lost. Mr. Dixon gave a Breckfast At Mr. Alack Halles at 
IMiddlesbro' ; 18 got Brecfast. 

From Dec. 31 to Jan. 17tb they were stopped on account of 
frost and snow. On Jan. 16 Mr. Henery Thomas Gave a Dinner 
at Mr. Henery Watson('s) of Guisbro ; 13 Got Dinner. 

Jan. 17. — Had a hunt on foot at Hunt Cliff, and Kild a Dog 
fox. Mr. Gilping Brush. Duiring the Storm had three by 
days at Roxby and Nevor found. 

March 14, Th. (37). — Met at Nunthorpe. Found in a field 
near Stanley House, and had a good run to Stokesley to a 
Drane, and Bolted her, and Lost Close to Stoksley. Seckond 
fox found in Seamor Whin Cover, and had Clipping run of One 
hour and Thirty minets, and Kild on Snalesworth Moor (Sniles- 
worth). Mr. Whin got the Brush. A dog fox. 

Ajpril 5, F. (43). — Met at Ormesby. Set down a fox above 
William Loffchouse house, and had a good runn, and whent to 
ground at Eston Nab. Seckond fox : set her down at Quacers 
Planing above Mr. Dixon, and had Capatle runn too Saltburn 
Gill, and kild her. Mr. Dixon got the Brush. 23. 

April 11, Th. (45), — Met at Kilton, and Never found untill 
we got to Obhill, and run to a Drane at Upleatham, Bolted him 
out and run to another Drane Near Upleatham Fowl (Pole), and 
Bolted him out, and Lost Near the Chirch. 

They finished the Season on April 16th. 



1849-1850 



Number of Days Hunting 
Number of Days not out 
Number of Blank Days 
Number of Days advertised 

Number of Dog foxes kild 
Number of Bitch foxes kild 



46 
8 
4 

54 

16 
7 



Toatel Number of Foxes kild 23 



[ Vide Ajypendix for * List of Hounds.'] 



142 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Season 1850-1851. 

Comenced Hunting Oct. 17, 1850. 

Oct. 24<, Th. (3). — Met at Marton, and found in Mr. Bewick 
Plantasion, and had a very fast run to Hilton, wlieir wee Lost. 
Seckond fox found behind Acklam Hall, and whitch he gave ous 
a good ruwn to near Stockton, wheir he whent into a Drane 
under the Railway Belonging to Marshall Fowler. 

Jan. 20, M. (28).— Met at Claphow. Found on Mr. Hutchin- 
son Moor, and had a very fast to ground in Wharterfall. 
Seckond fox Found on Stanghow Moor, and had a very fast run 
to Between Redcar and Marske, and Lost. 

Feb. 3, M. (32).— Met at Coatham Village ; found in Kirk- 
leatham Whin Cover, and had a good run to Yerby Wood, and 
their he whent to ground. Started to digg and got two foxes 
out. Set the Bitch of in frunt of Kirkleatham Hall, and Cipt 
(kept) the Dog for Stanley House. Seckond fox found in 
Lackenby Whin Cover, and had a very good run to Obliill Wood 
(Hobhill) ; their we Lost. Very whet Day. 

Feb. 13, Th. (35). — Ingleby Greenhow Gamekeepers New 
Cottage. Drew Oggots Wood and all round Greenaboton head, 
all Kildale Covers, and never found untill wee got to Howdon 
Gill, and had a good run untill it was Dark. Wee hard after 
that the hounds run him into a Drane at Bowsdale. 

Feb. 20, Th. (37).— Met at Lofthouse, and fund in Kilton 
Woods, and had a good run to Dauby and Lost. Doctor 
Yeoman gave a Breckfast ; 45 Got Breckfast. 

March 24, ill. (46).— Met at Marske. Drew Kirkleatham 
Whin Cover, Lackenby Whin Cover, Blank, and Found in 
Normenby Whin Cover, and had a Run of 55 minets and 
whent to ground at Stainton Quarry. 

March 27, Th. (47). — Met at Newton. Drew Lambor Quary, 
Mr. (Hilyard's) Cover, Seamor Whin Cover, Newham Cover, 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1 85 I- 1 852. 1 43 

Marton Gill, and Fund in Ormesby Gill, and had a Run 1 hour 
and 30 minuts to Ground at Thornton Fields. 

ylj)ri7 10, Th. (51). — Met at Cattersty ; found in Kilton 
Wood, and run to Ground in Cock Shots. Seckond run, found in 
Kilton Wood and run to Hunt Cliff. Third fox found in Salt- 
burn Gill, and had a very good run and Lost near Ghearick 
(Gerrick). The Fourth Fox : Met with him Crossing the Lane at 
the fi'unt of the house when wee where Close to home ; Laid the 
hounds on nearly in view and had a very good run to Liverton 
Mill Boache, wheir he whent to ground. This was a vary long- 
day. [Yes, indeed, a ' vanj ' long one.] 

Finished the Season on Easter Monday, April 21. 

1850-1851. 

Number of Days Hunting . . . .52 
Number of Blank Days .... 4 

Number of Dog Foxes . . . .1.5 

Number of Bitch Foxes .... 3 

Toatel Number of Foxes Kild 18 

[Vide Api^endix for ^ List 0/ Ilounds.^^ 

Season 1851-1852. 

Comenced Hunting Oct. 2, 1851. 

Nov. 10, M. (12). — Met at Hutton Low Cross ; found in Hutton 
(tHI, run to Ground in Guisbro' Park ; after a litel Dighen Bolted 
him out, run to Ground again in Whilton Wood. Comenced 
Dighen again ; after a great Dell of Dig in Bolted him out 
a gaine. Quite Dark, and run to a Drane in Yearby Bank. This 
was a very long day. Mr. Reed gave a Breckfast ; onley 6 
got Breckfast. 

Dec. 4, Th. (16). — Met at Goldsbrough. Found in Omes- 
grove. Run to Mulgrove Woods and Lost. Second fox : Found 
again in Omesgrove, and had a great dele of running and Kild 
a Dogfox ; a Futman got the Brush, and Mr. Siggs gave 2s. for 



144 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

it. Third : Set down a fox at Runswick, and had a very sharp 
run — 35 minits ; kild near Ellearby ; a Bitch fox. A Futman 
got the Brush. 

Bee. 2G, Th. (22).— Met at Roxby. Drew Roxby Woods, 
Blank, and then Set down a fox on Boroby Moor, and he maid a 
bad run. Kikl near Thomas Paige's House; a Bitch fox, 
Thomas Paige's Gran Doter got the Brush. 

Bee. 29, M. (23).— Met at Kilton Mill ; never found untill 
whe got to Goat Scar, and rur^ down the wood and wbent to 
Hunt Cliffe. Came Out, and the Hounds got a Yew hat him 
and run round by Cattersty Back to the Cliff. I Roade 
Thirsk and he Fell with me, and Broke my Coller Bone. This 
Ended the Day's Sport. 

On Jan. 15 he enters in his diary, ' I whas Out a gane for the 
first time after my Axeedent, But Could not Hunt the Houns.' 

Jan. 22, Th. (30).— Met at Nunthorpe. Drew Mr. Hillards 
Planting, Semmor Whincover, Blank ; found in Newham Whin- 
cover, and had a good run and Lost the Leading hounds on Eston 
Moor ; the hounds run the fox to Upleatham, and their he whas 
Coat by the shebards Dog and Baged and Sent to Saltbum. 

Feh. 16, M. (37).— Met at Hutton Low Cross; found in 
Sime Gill and had a Good run ; kild Below Moorsholm ; a Dog 
fox, Thomas Petch got the Brush — a Bitch Fox. Second 
found in Stanghow Moor and run to a Drane Near Novey, and 
had a very Good run, 1 hour, and kild Near Stanghow. 
Whatson Dixon got the Brush. The Drane whitch wee run to, 
a fresh fox Bolted out, and the old fox Left in the Drane, and 
two hounds. Brilliant and Rewby, whitch theay Remained in the 
Drane untill Friday. When I whent and dug them out, Brilliant 
was just a Live, Rewby and the fox whas dead. I took Rewby 
and Berrid her in a graas Field at Claphow, and whitch theair is 
a Stone put in the meniery of her. The fox I sent to Guisbro' 
to get stufb for Thomas Yeoman, of Whitby. Two Dog foxes 
and one Bitch. 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1852-1853. 1 45 

Fek 26, Th. (40).— Met at Dunsdale Bridge ; found on Eston 
Moor, and had a very Nice Run to near Emlington Blue Bell 
and Lost. . . . 

March 25, Th. (48). — Met at Ooatliam. Found in Kirklea- 
tham Whin, and run to a Drane in Yearby Bank. Bolted hini 
Out, and run to ground in Lazenby Bank. Seckond found in 
Normenby Whin Cover, and had a very good run, 2 hours and 
5 minits ; kild at Mark Hall, near Brotton ; a Bitch fox. Gave 
the Brush to Mr. Elwon. 

They finished the Season on April 15. 

Number of Foxes kild in 1851 and 1852 :— 

Dog foxes . . . .25 
Bitch foxes . . . .14 

39" 

Number of days a Hhunting, 54. 

[Vide Appendix /or ' List of Hounds.'] 

Season 1852-1853. 

Comensed Hunting Septr. 30, 1852. 

Nov. 22, 31. (16).— Met at Claphow; found near Skelton 
Wharron and had a very gud Run to a Craggs near Baysdale. 
Time, 1 hr. 30 minutes. A fox found dead near Lumpsy 
whitch was kild by the hounds. 

Dec. 16, Th. (23). — Met at Newby; found in Seamor Whin 
Cover, and had 2 hours and 12 minets and kild at Upleatham ; 
a Bitch fox. Thomas Parrington got the Brush, the hounds 
Devied at Mr. Jackson Planting and run to a Drane near Osbon 
Rush. Bolted him out and Kild him. Mr. Hopkins got the 
Brush ; a Bitch fox. 

Dec. 27, M. (26).— Met at Lofthouse. Set down a fox in 
the High Fields and Lost near Hisington (Easington). A very 
Whindy day ; it was a greet ardship to Sit on horse back. 

Jan. 6, Th. (29).— Met at Guisbro Park. Found Below Eston 

L 



146 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Heiron Wooks (Iron Works) and Lost at Coat Green ; a very 
whiudy day with Rain. 

Jan. 10, A[. (30). — Met at Clapkow. Found in Skelton Park, 
and run too Grund in Wharterfall. Found again Near Rockley 
House, and run too Grund at Cass Rock, and Turned the Tarriers 
in and tried to bolt him. We Could not get One of the dogs 
out untill Wednesday ; we then got the Dog and a Bitch fox. 

Feb. 14 (41). — Advertised for Guisbro' Spaw, but could not 
get for Snow. Whent to Kilton Wood on fut with the hounds ; 
found in the wood, and had a gud run to Ground near Mill 
Boak (Beck) ; fund again Goat Scar, and run to Ground in 
Skelton Warron. Bolted him out and Kild near Maggar Park. 
William Mills got the Brush ; a bitch fox. 

Mr. Scarth of Carlton gives a more detailed account of this 
same run in a letter I received from him, and which I give at 
length. 

To Mr. A. E. Pease, M.P. 

Carlton Grove, Northallerton, Jan. 28, 1886. 

I should have been very glad to have given you any account of 
the past of the Cleveland Hunt that would have been any service to 
you, but I kept no regular journal of the seasons' hunting, only some 
memorandums of any good runs when I was there myself, and many 
of tliem have been either destroyed, lost, or mislaid. The few I have 
found are dated 1868, '69, and '70, and are merely where found, what 
way we ran, where killed, and what length of time the run was; some 
are one hour and thirty minutes, and more than one was fou^r hours 
and tliirty minutes, which I should be glad to copy and send you, but 
I expect you may have already got the account from Tom Andrew's 
hunt book of the very same runs. 

There was one rather remarkable day's hunting that I remember 
in old John Andrew's time ; that account I have lost, and am not 
quite certain of the exact date (but which I think I could ascertain) ; 
I think it would be about the 14th of February, 1853 or 1854. The 
meet was at Kilton Bank, in a snowstorm, which started in January 
and continued until past the middle of March. Old John, Tom, and 
the piesent Geo. Andrew rode to the east end of Brotton, and could 
get no further on liorsebick for the snowdrifts ; old John took the 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1 85 3- 1 854. I47 

horses home and Tom and George went on foot. We found a fox at 
Ness Hagg, ran up the wood to Liverton and back across the wood to 
Moorshlom, across Stanghow Wood to Sfcanghow Moor, where the 
fox took the top of a wall, which was level on both sides with snow. 
He kept on the wall top for 700 yards, where some hounds ran him 
the whole distance upon the wall top ; then across Lady Hewley's 
moor down into the quarry in Skelton Warren, where we got him out 
and killed close by. Tom Andrew followed on foot from Liverton 
Wood, across by Stanghow village, where he called to get some 
refreshments, and came up before we killed ; a Skelton man (Dick 
Morgan) carried Tom down the warren on his back. The only horses 
or horsemen were Watson Dixon, Greo. Andrew, and John Booth, 
who were mounted upon old Thomas Fetch's draught horses, besides 
myself. I was riding a Kisrock horse, and rode him all day. We 
horsemen had to keep to the lane from Liverton Mill, through 
JNEoorshlom village, round by Lockwood beck, and on to Stanghow 
town end, up the moor road, turned down Boosbeck road until we 
came to the warren gate. The other three horsemen left before we 
got the fox out, it getting nearly dark. The footmen beat me for 
the brush upon the snowdrifts below the quarry. Time of the run 
to the hole, one hour fifty minutes. Many of the snowdrifts we 
came at in the lanes were five feet deep. 

From Wm. Scaeth. 

From Feb. 14 to March 10 they were stopped altogether 
by the snow. No more days worthy of particular notice occur 
this season, which they finished on April 29. 

Number of Foxes kild in 18o2-1853 :— 

Dog Foxes . 21 

Bitch Foxes 20 

Totel number . . .41 

Days Hunting . . . . .55 

[ Vide Ajjjjendix for * List of Hounds.'^ 

Season 1853-1854. 
Commenced Hunting Oct. 17, 1853. 

Nov. 7, M. (7). — Met at Roseberry. Drew Neuton wood, 
Liverick (Cliff Rigg), Howden Gill. Blank ; found in Aton 

L 2 



148 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Hallam Works, and had gud run 1 hour. Lost at Mount House ; 
the fox got into a hous Becide a Calfe, whitch he Torned out after. 

On Bee. 1, Th. (14), occurs the first mention, I believe, of 
John Proud (subsequent Master of the Cleveland) : ' John Prood 
got the Brush and gave it unto Misses Maynard.' 

Dec. 1 9, M. (19). — Met at Skelton Park ; found in new cover, 
and had a very gud run unto Battersby banks, and Lost ; it 
whas a hard frost. 

They were prevented from hunting from Dec. 2G to Jan. 19 
by frost and snow. 

Feb. 2, Th. (26). — Met at Nunthorpe Village; found in Seamer 
Whin, and Kild the old bitch fox in the Cover. Seckond found 
in Mr. Raw Gill, and had 25 minets to a Drane near Hilton ; 
bolted him out, and had 1 Hour and 7 minets ; Kild at Stocks- 
ley ; a Dog fox, Robert Brunton got the brush. 

Feb. G, M. (27).— Met at Captain Cooks Monument ; found in 
Naunehow, and had a very good run to Ground in Bolton 
Head (Green a Boton Head) ; the Tarriers whorried one fox in 
the hole and left a Nother a Live. 

Hunt Ball at Mrs. Sowery, Feb. 8, 1854. 

Feb. 9, Th. (28). — Met at Redcar; found on the Sea Banks, 
and had a good run — time, 35 minuts — and kild near the bias 
founises (blast furnaces — probably at Eston) ; a Bitch fox. John 
Prood got the Brush. Seckond found in John Whilson Bank, 
and had a good run ; time, 1 hour and 30 minuts. Lost at 
Battersby. This was a very long day After The Ball. 

March 9, Th. (3G).— Met at Guisbro Park ; found in Mr. 
Jackson Planting, and had some slow hunting on the hills with 
a Bitch fox that a Peard to bee heavy in Cobs. We got the 
hounds of her. 

March 20, M. (39).— Met at Kilton Mill. Drew Kilton 
Woods, Stanghow Moor, and Rokley Banks ; found in Rock 
Oale (Hole) and run to Ground at Hite Cliff (High Cliff) ; it 
whas tliought to be a Bitch fox Heavy in Cubes. 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1854-1855. 



149 



Ajyril 2, M. (43).— Met at Kilton Mill. Found in Goat Scar 
and had a very good run to ground above Lockwood Beck, and 
we Started to dig and got a dog and Bitch fox ; the Bitch 
apeard to be in Cub. She whas Set at liberty, and the dog whas 
Set down Before the Hounds and kild near Maggar Park. John 
Mewbron got the Brush ; a dog fox. This being the Last day we 
had a very Large Field of Horses. Every one was pleased with 
the day Sport Excepting Thomas Parrington and Lenard Par- 
rington. Thomas said before all the Gentlemen that it being 
last time he should Hunt with the Cleveland Hounds, and 
withdraw his Subscription from the Hunt and Whas is ands on 
them for ever. And for Lenard he yoused a very bad tong, and 
Said he should never hunt againe with ous, and more over he 
said it would be the Last time he should Ever whant a Blount. 
He Road Leuzy (a mare of T. Andrew's). 

Number of dog foxes and Bitch foxes kild 1853 and 1854 : — 

12 

• -J 
Toatel Number 19 

Days Hunting ...... 

Elank Days 

[Vide Appendix /or 'List of iloutids.'] 



Number of dog foxes 
Number of Bitch foxes 



43 
5 



Season 1854-1855. 

Commenced Hunting Oct. 16, 1854. 

The sport this season was to begin with only moderate, and 
the first account of a day which will find a place is one evidently 
copied from a newspaper by Tom Andrew into his diary : — 

A Day with the Cleveland Hounds. 

On Thursday, the 7th inst. (December), the fixture for this 
pack was Skelton Park, half-past ten, and true to the appointed 
time Tom Andrew, the huntsman, might be seen coming in his 
favourite dog-trot pace over the Bridge House Bank top, look 



I50 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

ing down to the right or left as the eye of an especial favourite 
in the pack caught his glance, and no doubt thinking to himself, 
' Which of you will lead to-day, my darlings ? ' When we find — 
it now being five minutes past half-past ten — the hounds were 
uncoupled.' Skelton Park Whinn, Forty Pence, Rock Hole, 
and Whiley Cat Gill were drawn blank ; Woodhill Gill was 
next tried, and ail the field were on the point of turning away 
from the small fir plantation, thinking it too was blank, when Tom 
gave such a rattling view halloo that it seemed to astonish old 
Sly-boots himself, who was evidently thunderstruck, not having 
power to leave the cover, for he popped into a whin bush and 
there he stayed. Most of the pack overshot him, and were 
feathering about outside the cover, but Smoker was not to be 
done in that way, for on looking into the said bush in passing 
he espied my nabs, and had him by the cuff of the neck in less 
than no time. The field at this mishap seemed quite discon- 
certed, but, after the dismembering ' who-whooping and tear 
him up, good fellows,' part of the business was over, Aisdale 
Gate Whin whas next tried, and along the bank to Skelton 
Warren, where Danger soon told us that another Sty-boots was 
on foot. Sticking to the line he pointed it out to us, past Mutton 
Scalp and over Stanghow Moor, we had eventually the pleasure 
of hearing a well-known voice, Mr. John Peirson's, of Thornton 
Fields, cry, 'Tally ho! Gone away! Hark to Merryboy !' from the 
far side of Busky Dell Whin, which we were then fast approach- 
ing. Tom was presently across the dale with the rest of the 
pack at his heels. After passing Wilkinson's Orchard and the 
high part of Priestcroft Farm, he crossed by Bousebeck to Rocca 
Banks ; the hounds now getting on to good terms with him and 
the pace increasing, he made the best of his way over Airy Hill 
and through Skelton I'ark Whin to the earths in Forty Pence 

' At the present day, with the Bilsdale, should the ' draw ' be some distance 
from the meet, the hounds, or rather some of them, arc taken on to cover-side 
in couples. 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1854-1855. 151 

Wood ; but the Stopper had taken care to baulk him from 
making his quarters good there. He then sunk the hill, point- 
ing for Waterfall Gill, but, the wind blowing too strong in his 
teeth, he changed his mind and skirted the hill on the low side 
of Forty Pence. It was here that Tom, quite man as he is, 
could not refrain from cheering the gallant pack as they topped 
the walls and hedges with his ' Hie over, my little darlings ! ' 
They were now evidently gaining ground on Master Sly, who, 
after passing through Rock Hole Whin, was viewd in the 
bottoms near midway between George Story's well-known 
public-house ' and Maggray Park (Megara), where, after crossing 
the Guisbro' and Whitby Road, he tried for shelter in Wiley Cat 
Gill, but the eager hounds dashed boldly on, plainly telling him 
that no gill or earth could save him At the top of Wiley, 
where the Gill divides, there was a slight check, but Sportsman, 
after feathering about for a second or two, sprung on to the 
foot-bridge in Simey Gill, and said as plain as ever hound could 
say, ' Here he's gone.' His comrades soon joined him, and after 
running to the head of the Gill, where Slyboots had been headed 
by a sheep dog, he turned direct to the left over Tinkinhow 
Intakes, but being again headed by the horsemen who came on 
the south side of Wiley, he took the open moor. 

Disdaining such treatment, he flourished bis brush, 
And seemed to say, ' Sportsmen, I fear not a rush ; 
I'll give you such proof of my stoutness and speed, 
That Nimrod himself might have honoured the breed.' 

Leaving North Ings to the right, he now crossed by Thunder 
Bush and Skelderskew farms to Commondale, when after passing 
the mill he climbed the dark brow of the mighty Kempswithen. 
It was the climbing of the brow that told many of the would-be 
going ones that they must stop, as their steeds were exhausted. 
From this point the field gradually diminished, becoming small 
by degrees and very select. After crossing the Kildale road he 
' Fox and Hounds Inn, Slape Wath. 



152 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

went tlirough Sleathorn Plantations and over Crown Moor to 
Westerclale, where he eventually evaded his pursuers by taking 
the small enclosures behind the village, which were crowded 
with sheep, and afterwards the blue shale rocks where no scent 
could lay. 

He that's found and runs away 
May live to run another day ; 
But he that's in the cover slain 
Will never live to run again. 

We cannot conclude without naming the parties who were 
up at the finish, viz. Mr. Tom Andrew, the huntsman ; Mr. 
Robert Brunton, IMarton ; Messrs. T. and W. Fetches, Liverton ; 
Mr. John Wallis, West Coatham ; and Mr. John Harrison, 
Redcar. It is but justice to add that a portion of the field was 
thrown out when the fox left Simey Gill for Tinkinhow, and 
as the pace was anything but slow from that point, they had 
no chance of making up their lost ground. The time was 2 
hours and 20 minutes. 

Jan. 15, 71/. (27). — Met at Dunsdale Bridge ; found in Yearby 
Wood a Lame fox Whitch had been Cort in Rabbet Trap and 
kild him ; gave Marster Newcomins Brush ; a dog fox. Second 
found in Mr. Jackson Planting, and had a very good run down 
to Normenby Whin Cover and back to the Planting, and kild a 
dog fox, and gave the Brush to Mart. Charlge Newcomins. A 
very fine day. 

Very severe weather set in at the end of January, and the 
hounds were not out in the ordinary way from January 25 till 
March 5, but under date of Feb. 15, W. (30), is the following 
entry : ' Whent to Thos. Dewel over night with the Hounds to 
hunt at Mulgrove Woods in the Snow. First day Drew Barnby 
Dales, Cat Beck ; found in Omes Cliff and run to a Drane, and 
got him Out and kild at Goldsbrough ; a Bitch fox. Malt 
Hutichson got the Brush. Second Day : found near Lythe Castle 
and had a run hup the woods and down a gaine ; Lost. A Bad 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1854-1855. 1 53 

Sent ; the Snow wlias two Light. I staid with Mr. Siggs the 
Second Night, and Thos. Dewel a Long with me. 

Ajyril 12, Th. (42).— Met at Osborns Rush ; drew Mr. Jack- 
son Plantings, Eston Bank, Court Green, Grayhound Corse, 
Mr. Pearson Gill, and then to Mr. Pearson and got some Ale 
and Cheese and Bread, and then to Tockets dump, Skelton 
Ellers, and found in the New Planting and had a very Short run ; 
kild a Bitch fox whitch Lenard Parrington Set away to bread 
from. After the fox was kild he came up and demanded 
1/. 2s. 6d. for the Kiling of is fox. 

The last day of the season was April 17, at Ingleby Village ; 
a very hot day and a very bad scent. 

43 



Days Hunting 
Blank Days . 
Dog Foxes kild 
Bitch foxes do. 
Foxes Bun to Ground 



^ij Total kild, 18. 
14 

T. P. ANDREW. 



April 20, 1855. 

[Vide Ajjpendix /or 'List 0/ Hounds.'] 



PART IV. 

THE MASTERSHIP OF THOMAS PRESSICK ANDREW 

1855-1870 



PART IV. 

the mastership of thomas pressick andrew. 

Season 1855-1856. 

Started to Hunt Oct. 22, 1855. 

Oct. 29. — Not Out on account of my Farther being so veiy 
Powly. 

Nov. 1.— Not Out. 

N(yv. 5.— Not Out. 

Nov. 8.— Not Out. 

The above entries, for tliose who know the reason of them, 
are eloquent if brief. John Andrew, who had so long lived 
amongst the true-hearted sportsmen of Cleveland, and had won 
their affection and admiration, as well as the esteem of all who 
were acquainted with him, was passing avvay, and no doubt all 
hearts were aching at the thought that they would never more 
see John Andrew seated in the saddle, grasp that friendly 
hand, nor hear his voice come over the moors or echo among 
the dales as he galloped with the streaming black, white, and 
tan. 

John Andrew died November 2, at the age of sixty-one, and 
he was buried in Skelton Churchyard. He left behind him six 
children, viz. Thos. Pressick, Ann, John, James, George, and 
Mary Andrew. 

The following newspaper cutting is the only notice of his 
father's death that Tom gives : — 



158 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



The Cleveland Hounds. 

' Mr. Editor, — It has occasionally fallen to my lot to be the 
chronicler in your pages of capital runs with these hounds ; 
but it has now become my painful duty to inform the sporting 
world by the same means of the death of our esteemed Master, 
Mr. John Andrew, who for nearly forty years has been Hunts- 
man and Master of the Cleveland Hounds, carrying them on 
with a limited subscription and showing very good sport on the 
most economical plan. The sporting community of the beau- 
tiful valley of Cleveland is fully sensible of the great loss it 
has sustained, and its main consolation is a knowledge that the 
scarlet mantle has fallen upon the shoulders of a worthy son of 
their lamented Master. — Yours, &c., 

ROSEBERRY TOPPING. 

Cleveland, Nov. 6, 1855. 

From the time of his father's death Tom Andrew acted as 
Master as well as Huntsman, and he was soon after confirmed 
in the dignity by the formal resolution of the Hunt Club. It 
may be worth while mentioning here that up to 1853 the 
arrangement as to the amount for which the hounds were 
' managed ' and the country hunted was quite indefinite, his 
subscription being ' as much as he could get,' which sum, I 
believe, never amounted to 200Z. a year. In 1853, however, 
John Andrew stipulated for 200 guineas per annum, the Club 
undertaking to pay poultry damages and keepers' gratuities. 
In 185G Tom Andrew agreed for 2G0/. per annum, but out of 
tliis he paid poultry and keepers' expenses, and provided a 
Whipper-in, the Club paying for his clothes. 

Nov. 19, M. (5). — Met at Marton. Drew Mr. Bewick's 
Planting, Mrs. Raw's Gill, Blank ; found in Neuham Cover, and 
had a good run across the Country to Browton Mill and Lost in 
the Mill Race. We thouo-lit the fox was dround in the Race as 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARV, 1855-1856. 1 59 

the hounds Could not Run him any father than the Race. A 
Cloudy day. I road Mulgrove. 

Nov. 29, Th. (8). — Met at Kirkleatham ; found in Kirkleatham 
Whin Cover and had a very good run. The Line of Country 
West Coatham, Lackenby Whin, Whilton Woods, Eston Banks, 
down to Lackenby, a Cross the Country to Ormesby, Ormesby 
Bank Top, Marton Gill, Mr. Dixon Farm, Nunthorpe, Morton 
Cars, Pinchingthorp, Spoat House, and Lost near to Guisbro ; 
time, 4 hours 20 minets. A Very large field of Horses out ; a 
Great many Tired Horses ; a fine day. I Road Mulgrove. Mr. 
Thomas Parrington joind ous for the first time since 1853.^ 

The following entry is very interesting, as recording the 
final incorporation of the old Roxby Hunt with the Cleveland. 
I imagine that hitherto, although the owners of hounds at 
Roxby hunted their hounds with the Cleveland, they did not 
regard the hounds as the property of the Club, but each as 
belonging exclusively to the owner. Henceforth the hounds all 
belong to the Club, the members of which for the most part 
provide quarters for the hounds. 

Dec. 10, M. (10). — Met at Lythe. Set down a fox and had a 
very good roun with him to ground in Mulgrove Woods ; time, 20 
minets ; a very Stormey day with Snow. I Road Mulgrove. I 
Whent to Wilf^ Welfords on Sunday Night with the Hounds, 
Roxhi/. Thomas Page gave up is Clame of Roxby Hounds to 
T. P. Andrew In p~easance of John Welford, Will'"' Welford, 
Ralph Welford, and James Cudhorth, of Neidon Mulgrove.^ 

Dec. 17, M. (11).— Met at Grinkel Park; found in Roxby 
Wood and had a slow Hunting run ; Lost near Eisington. 
Seckond : Drew White Cliff and hup Kilton Woods to Stang- 
how and never found ; a bad senting Day With light frost, and 

' Vide p. 145. 

- I was unaware, till reading this entry, that there was any distinction 
between the hounds quartered at Roxby and elsewhere at so late a date. 



l60 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

it Came Rain on it, witch made it Click hup. Cald at Stang- 
how and got some think to eat. I Road Ginnie. 

Jan. 10, Th. (16).— Met at Ormesby Bank Top ; found in Mr. 
Jackson Planting and had a good run. Took a ring in the 
Planting and then Broke by Orsbons Rush, Guisbro' Park, 
Gi'ayhound Corse, Dunsdale Bridge, Whilton Woods, Eston 
Bank, and whent to ground in Mr. Jackson Planting. We 
started to dig ; one fox Bolted, one taken out, and one left in 
the ole. Set the one we took out down, and had a good run 
through the Plantings by Ormesby Bank Top, Ormesby Village, 
Normanby, Eston Banks, and we Lost the Hounds; it was 
Dark. T. Harrison and T. P. Andrew Whent on to Eston 
Moor and got the hounds Cald up and then whent Home. Mr. 
W. Dixon Lost is Coat Lap ; John Proud Lost is hat. A Cold 
Day with a Light frost and Snow. I Road Mulgrove. 

Out hunting most men have had the ugly possibility of 
jumping into a plough occasionally before them. In the 
account of Feb. 7, Th. (20), the following note is made : ' Mr. 
Terry Stuck Mr. Newcomen Horse with a Plough of Peater 
Wallis and kild the horse.' 

Feb. 18, M. (23).— Met at Guisbro' Park. Drew the Park, 
Harrison Whin, Mr. Lowders Plantings ; found in Eston Bank, 
and had a good run to Ground in Mr. Jackson Plantings. 
Second found in Mr. Jackson Planting and run by Ormesby 
House, Mr. Dixon, Morton Gill, Ormesby, Normenby Whin 
Cover, Fleet Lane, Middlesbro Lane, and Lost in Mr. Bolkeo farm. 
I Road Mulgrove; a fine Day. Henery Whilson got is Helbw 
Nock out with a fole from is horse. Docter Morris pit it in ; 
Henery Watson got a foale in the same field. 

March 6, Th. (28).— Met at Coatham Village; Drew Kirk- 
leatham Whin Cover, Blank ; found in Lackenby Cover, and had a 
very sharp run to Coatham Marsh to Ground ; time, 25 minets. 
Second found in Mr. Jackson Plantings and Lost at Ormesby 
Gardens; a fine day. I Road Mulgrove. Andrew Smith gave a 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1 8$ 5- 1 856. 161 

Brekefast to is friends, and John Harrison gave a Brekefast to 
is friends. 

Maixh 27, Th. (34). — Met at Hatton Low Cross ; found in 
Cleiverick ; ran by Newton Wood, Eoasebury, Bousdale, Pinch- 
ingtliorp, and tlien too Brek Kill (brick-kiln ?) at Morton Cars. 
Bolted him out ; run by Mr. Garbuts and into the Cill a gane, 
and run to a Cundith (conduit). Bolted him Out a gane and run 
into Cundith near Nunthorpe. Bolted him out a gane and run 
him two Fields, and kild him ; a Dog fox. John Proud got the 
Brush. I Road Mulgrove ; a very Dry Day. Ralph Robinson 
gave a Breckfast at Hutton Low Cross. 

April 3, Til. (36).— Met at Ingleby Village (they had a blank 
day). . . . ' I whent with the Hounds the Night before, and Mr. 
Dixon, John Wilkinson, Robt. Brunton, Mr. Thos. Cleasby, and 
John Wallis met me their, and we spent a very pleasant night. 

April 7 was their last day for the Season. 
Days Hunting . . .37 



Blank Days . 
Dog Foxes kild 
Bitch do. do. 
Foxes Run to Ground 



4 

^ I Total kild, 10. 

18 

T. P. Andrew. 



April 20, 1856. 



Before the commencement of the next season the Secre- 
tary, Mr. Watson Dixon, addressed the following circular letter, 
accompanied by a List of Officers and Rules of the Hunt Club, 
to every member : — 

Pursuant to a Resolution passed at a Meeting of the Subscribers to the 
Cleveland Huxt Club, held at Guisbro', on the 28th June, 1856, I for- 
ward you a List of the Officers with a Copy of the Rules of the Club, and 
beg most respectfully to intimate that oiu* Funds are inadequate to meet the 
increased Expenditure consequent on providing a Whipper in to the Hunt, 
it being the determination of those in management to use their utmost en- 
deavours to Hunt the Country to the satisfaction of all Parties, provided 
they meet with that support from the Nobility, Gentry, and others con- 
nected with Cleveland, to warrant their carrying out their present in- 
tentions. 

M 



l62 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Your Idnd assistance towards promoting' a continuance of this noble and 
manly Sport, which may he enjoyed by all classes, from the Peer to the 
Peasant, who are residents in, or may visit, this now wealthy and beautiful 
vale, 

Will greatly oblige 

Your humble Servant, 

Watson Dixoit, 

Seordiary, 
Marton, near Middlesbro', July, 185G. 



CLEVELAND HUNT CLUB. 

LIST OF OFFICERS ELECTED JUNE 28, 1856. 
President — Capt. Chaloner, RN. 

MANAGING COMMITTEE. 
John Thomas Wharton Esq., Chairman 



Mr. Isaac Wilson 
Mr. T. T. Trevor 



Mr. John Pierson 
Mr. Thomas Fetch 



Master of the Hunt, Mr. Thomas Pressick Andrew 
Treasurer, Mr. Robert King 
Secretary, Mr. Watson Dixon 

EULES OF THE CLUB. 

1. That the Cleveland Hunt Club shall consist of a President, a 
Committee of Management, a Master", a Treasurer, Secretary, and 
Members. 

2. That the President shall be elected at the General Annual 
Meetings, and shall hold office until another is appointed. 

3. That the Committee shall consist of a Chairman, to be elected 
for the time being, and four Members of the Hunt, to be elected 
annually. The Chairman shall have the power of calling a Meeting 
of the Committee at any time, the Secretary giving the Members not 
less than two days' Notice thereof. The Master of the Hunt and the 
Secretary to be ex officio Members of the Commitee. 

4. That the Master of the Hunt shall be elected for the time 
being. He shall have the direction of the Hunt, must act up to any 
resolutions of the Managing Committee, sliall superintend the Hounds 
in the Kennel and in the (ield, and shall fix the days, time, and place 
of Hunting. 



RULES OF THE CLEVELAND HUNT CLUB, 1856. 163 

5. That the Secretary shall be elected for the time being. He 
shall enter into a Book minutes of the 2:)roccecling.s of the Club, 
conduct the correspondence thereof, and shall in connection with 
the Treasurer (who shall also be elected for the time being) keep 
a regular account of all Monies received and paid ou account of the 
Club, and shall every year prepare a general financial statement to 
lay before the Club at their General Annual Meetings. 

G. That the Committee shall meet from time to time to transact 
the business of the Club, and shall have the power to supply any 
vacancies that may occur in the officers of the Club. 

7. That every annual Subscriber of the sum of one guinea and 
upwards to the funds of the Cleveland Hunt Club shall be considered 
a Member thereof, and shall have the power to vote at the Meetin"-s, 
and be eligible to serve on the Committee. 

8. That all subscriptions shall become due on the first day of 
October in each year, and shall be paid in advance either to the 
Secretary or Treasurer of the Club. 

9. That a General Annual Meeting of the Members of the Cleve- 
land Hunt Club shall be held at some convenient place, appointed by 
the Committee, in the month of September in each year. The Ofiicers 
for the ensuing year shall be then elected, the Accounts audited, and 
any new Members introduced. 

10. That a Special General Meeting of the Members may be called 
at any time by the Committee, of which seven days' notice shall be 
given to each Member by the Secretary. 

11. That any Subscriber wishing to withdraw his subscription 
from the Club shall signify his intention to the Secretary, by letter, 
on or before the fii'st day of September in each year. 

12. That no one shall interfere with the management of the 
Hounds in the field, unless requested to do so by the Master of tlie 
Hunt. 

1 3. That any of the foregoing Rules may be altered or amended, 
or any new Rules introduced at any General Meeting of the Members. 



Season 1856-1857. 

Commenced Hunting Oct. 23, 1856. 

As usual Cattersty was the draw on the opening day, and 
Mr. MajTiard, as was is wont, hospitably entertained the hunt 
to breakfast. 

M 2 



164 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

They had very fair sport the first few months of the season, 
but were often stopped by frost and snow, even in November, 

Jan. 12, If. (17). — Met at Hazelgrove. Drew Hazelgrove, 
Hob Hill Wood, and up to Skelton Ellers, blank ; found in Salt- 
burn Gill ; run by the Hagg, Stephen Emmerson, Millom, 
Lumpsey, Mr. Hall, Cattersty, Hunt Cliff, back to Cattersty, 
Mr. Hall, Kilton, Kilton Castle, White Cliff, Lofthouse, Handle 
Warron, Snipe House, down Roxby Woods to Bolby, and kild 
under the Cliff; a Dog fox. T. P. Andrew got the Brush ; gave 
it to Mr. Dixon, a fine day, but the ground very heavy. I 
Road Sally. 

Teh. 19, Th. (25). — Met at Liverton ; found in Goat Scar ; run 
by hup to Moorsholm Mell by Swindles, Moorsholm low moor, 
Gerrick Wood, Liverton Mill, Ness Hagg, Buck Rush, Lock- 
wood Whin, Lumpsey Whin, Saltburn Gill, Hunt Cliff, Cat- 
tersty, Kilton Castle, White Cliff, Handle Gill, and Lost near 
Handle. This was a verry good run. Mr. Dixon Tired is 
Mare, and a great many more was dun hup. I Road Ranglear ; a 
fine day. I and Mr. Harrison wlient to Liverton the night before 
with the Hounds. 

March 2, M. (28).— Met at Ingleby Village ; found in the Park 
wood and had a good run to ground in Bilsdale at the Scears. 
Second found in Battersby Banks ; run to ground at Nanny- 
how. A fine Day and Lound.' I Road Sally. 

March 5, Th. (29). — They had some fair sport. The second 
fox ' found in the Cliff, and he kild himself.' 

March 12, Th. (31).— Met at Goldsbrough. Drew Omes Cliff, 
Blank ; found in Mulgrove AYood and Lost near Ugthorpo. 
Drew Baruby Dales after, Blank ; from their to Runsick, and 

* For the information of non-Cleveland readers I might explain this word, 
'which is very expressive. ' Lound ' means a still calmness, and is used in this 
sense here ; it is also found to express shelter. ' T'hoos ligs iv a lown' spot ' (the 
house lies in a sheltered place) ; cf. also the name Loundsdale, pronounced 
usually Lownsdale. 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, I857-1858. 1 65 

had sum gin, and from their to Mr. Willm. Welford, of 
Neuton, and had a good set to with gin and Tobaco. I Road 
Rangelar. A fine day, but bad Sent. 

March 16. — . . . ' Robert Brunton, of Marton, Broke is Horse 
neck near to Kilton. . . .' 

They finished the season on April 12. 



Days Hunting 


. 40 


Blank Days . 


. 5 


Foxes run to ground 


. 22 


Do. Lost 


. 16 


Dog foxes kild 
Bitch foxes kild 


• ^j Total kild, 11. 




T. P. Andrew 


April 20, 1857. 





Season 1857-1858. 

Commenced Hunting Sept. 28, 1857. 

The opening day was Ingleby Village. 

Oct. 29, Th. (10). — Met at Seamer ; found in Seamer Cover, 
and had a run of 25 minets stright to Mr. Wilson Drane at 
Nunthorpe. Bolted him out, and had a good run of 25 minutes 
and kild on Roseberry, and kild a Dog fox. Robt. Brunton got 
the brush. Mr. Vaughn got the head. We had a good fild 
of horses. Mr. Brunton Came out in Scarlet for the first time. 
I Road Sally. 

Nov. 19. — A fox was killed at Cattersty thus : 'The Hounds 
vewed the fox over Cliff and was kild. a Bitch fox.' 

Dec. 7, M. (20). — Tom Andrew has copied in, I suppose, a 
newspaper account for a record of this day's sport, as the reader 
will notice it is not written quite in his style, and is more 
difiuse : — 

^Extraordinary Bun with the Cleveland Hounds. 

On Monday the meet was at Skelton Park, and the day will 
long be remembered by those who were fortunate enough to be 



l66 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

out on that occasion. After ranging for about a quarter of an 
hour, as gallant a fox as ever broke cover was roused from his 
lair, and the hounds getting well together, at once settled down 
to their work and gave evidence to the initiated that they were 
in for a ' burster,' and such in fact it proved to be. Away for 
Waterfall Gill he went, going down it until nearly reaching 
8kelton Ellers, then taking the open over Tockett's Lythe, and 
passing north of Guisbrough for the Greyhound Course Wood, 
where a slight check was experienced ; the pace so far very 
severe. The hounds, hitting the line again, rattled away to 
Moddle Gill, where the fox was headed. He then bore away to 
Poplar, thence to Barnaby, down near to the Stockton Road, 
where, turning to the right by the Upsal Iron Mines, he went 
away to Normanby, to within a short distance of Normanby 
Hall ; here he took a line bearing south-west past Hambleton 
Hills, and over Morton Carrs, where another check occurred ; 
but ' Tell-tale ' disclosed the secret that he had crossed the 
ploughing, and again the merry pack pressed hotly on. Now 
began the ' panic ' ; the pace had been good, and the distance 
already traversed very considerable, and as several stells must 
now be got over the aspect of affairs became serious ; however, 
man thought he was in for an uncommon thing, and he reso- 
lutely tried to get to the end. The fox, too, was now pointing 
over by Newton for Roseberry, up whose steep side they must 
go or give up the chase. Crossing the Stokesley Road, thence 
through Cliverick Wood, away over by Eryholme, Howden Gill, 
and over to Cockshots, He left Cook's monument to the right 
through Nannyhow. In Kildale the hounds had been going a 
telling speed, and many a jaded steed had ere this cried 
' enough ! ' Now this noble fox went through Lownsdale and 
over the Guisbro' and Kildale Road, through Codhill Slack, 
and then over Sleddale, on to the Guisbro' Moor, and then 
turned to the right down the Moor to Sleddale Bridge, by 
West House, and over Kemp Swithen Moor, then turning to 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1 8 58- 1 859. 1 67 

tlie left for Commondale, and crossed Commondale. He was 
pulled down on the Whitby Road after a run lasting about three 
hours and extending over thirty miles. Those who saw the 
finish were Messrs. Mewburn, Andrew the Master, Harrison, 
Wallis, and W. Fetch. The occurrences of this day were no 
inapt illustrations of what is now taking place in another sphere 
Men of means and respectability, from the pressure of circum- 
stances, found themselves suddenly compelled to ' shut up ' ; 
others, whose position appeared comfortable, as the run pro- 
gressed were forced to stop ; and, in fact, all save five, who strug- 
gled through their difficulties, were obliged to compound. The 
unfortunates have the sympathy of all who know them, and it 
is hoped, when their affairs have been properly investigated by 
Messrs. Cupis and Co., they will eventually be enabled to ' go 
on ' again. A Dog fox. Mr, Mewburn got Brush. I Road 
Polly ; changed with Isaac (the Whip) Howden Gill and took 
Jinny, a fine Day, but "\'\Tiindy. 

They had capital sport through the rest of the season, and 
some good old-fashioned Cleveland runs, but nothing of special 
interest occurs for recording. They fiuished the season on 
April 8. 



Days Hunting 
Blank Days . 
Foxes run to Ground 
Do. Lost 
Dog foxes Kild 
Bitch do. do. 



49 
2 

24 
20 

^JTotalkikl, 18. 

T. P. Andkew. 



April 20, 1858. 



Season 1858-1859. 



Commenced Hunting Sept. 30, 1858. 

Oct. 14, Th. (5). — Met at Danby Lodge; found in Danby 
Crag, and run rings round for 1 hour and then got in to the 
Crag. Seckond : set down a fox at the Lodge, and had a nice 



1 68 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

run on the moor ; kild a Dog fox. Pall Skimins got the Brush. 
I Kode Polly. Mr. Peaters Jack got a foall. 

Oct. 28, Th. (9). — Met at Seamer ; found in the Cover and Lost 
near Sunnycross. Drew Newham Cover, Blank ; found in Mr. 
Jackson Planting, and had a run of 2 hours and kild at Captin 
Cook Monument ; a Dog fox. T. P. Andrew Clamed the Brush ; 
gave it to Mr. Dixon. Mr. T. Parrington got through is mare, 
and could not get to the finish. I Rode Polly ; a Dull Day. 

Nov. 4, Th. (11). — Met at Lythe; found in the Goods (sic), 
and Lost at Overdale. Second found in Homescliff", and run to 
Ground at the same place. I left some men to get him out. I 
rode Polly ; a dull Day. Mr. Dixon Pd. 4s. for ale. 

Jan. 6, Th. (27).— Met at Skelton. Drew HoLhill Wood, 
Saltburn Gill, Cattersty, Hunt Clif Blank. I Rode Polly, a 
fine day ; a good field of Horsemen out. Mr. Willm. Wharton 
was maried to Miss Blunt on that day. A Dinner given at Skel- 
ton and a Ball at Castle. All whent of well. 

The following day they had a good run, and ' kild a Bitch 
fox. Knagas Rigg got the Brush and gave it to T. P. Andrew, 
and it was sent to Mrs. Wm. Wharton ; she was stoping at 
Skelton Castle.' 

Jan. 31, M. (34).— Met at Grinkel Park; found in Roxby 
Birks one in a Hole. Trid the other part of the wood and did not 
find. Whent to Bolt him out ; in the meen time the Hounds kild 
a fox in the beck, and eat him. Mattw. Codlend got a part of is 
Brush, the other Bolted out, run by Reus mill, Grinkel Park, 
Snipe House, Park House, and down the wood and to a Drane 
near Bush Bille • House, and Could not Bolt him. a Cold day 
and frosty. I Rode Strocutter. 

On Feb. 14, M. (38), T. P. Andrew says he was very unwell, 
and the next hunting day he finishes his account : ' I Rode 
Polly ; a fine Day. I was very unwell ; Mr. Dixon Hunted the 
hounds ; ' but he seems to have been soon all right again ; but 

' Bush Billy was one of the fathers of the Roxby Hunt. 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1859-1860. 1 69 

on March 15 he writes, ' I got cold (hunting at Goldsbrough) ; 
I had the scarlet fever, and was not able to Hunt the Hounds 
this Season. Mr. Dixon, of Marton, Hunted them the Season 
out, which was verry kind of him.' 

March 14, M. (46). — Met at Court Green. . . . George 
Andrew (his brother) hunted the Hounds, and with this excep- 
tion Mr. Dixon was huntsman till the last day of the season, 
which was 

April 8, F. (52). — Met at Danby End; found in Danby 
Crag, lost in Fryup. Second found in Fryup and lost in Glas- 
dale. Mr. Dixon Hunted the Hounds. Rode Polly. Gaylass 
Dropt down dead near home Last Day. 

Act. of the season — foxes kild, run to ground, and lost : — 
Diiys Hunting . . .52 
Blank Days . . . .13 
Foxes run to Ground . ,18 
Do. Lost . . . .18 
Dqw foxes kild . . , 15 1 m *. 1 i -i i on 
Bitch do. do g|Totalkdd,20. 

One found kild by the Hunds in Kirkleatham Cover and one at 
Roxby. 

T. P. Andrew. 

April 20, 1859. 

Season 1859-1860. 

Commenced Hunting Sept. 29, 1859. 

Oct. 17, M. (6).— Met at Kirkleatham. Drew the Washaway 
Planting, the Whin Cover, Lackenby Cover, Blank ; found in 
Court Green, run by Guisbro' Park, Hutton Low Cross, first 
check took place ; up to this it was very fast, by Haning Stone, 
Iloseburry, Newton Wood, Little Aton, Cook's Monument, 
Kildale, Lonsdale, Court Moor ; Lost near Gribdale Gate. I Rode 
Tomboy, a dul day ; it was a good day's Sport. 

Oct. 21, F. (7).— Met at Kilton Mill; found in White Cliff, 
and had a good run of 4 hours and a half up and down Kilton 
and Liverton Woods, it came on a snow storm, and the Ground 



170 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS, 

was 4 inches thick in Less than 2 Hours, the Hounds never run 
better ; they were never of the fox untill Lost. I Eode Tomboy 
and Mr. John Peirson Rode Jesse. I crossed the wood 16 times 
on Tomboy. 

[Those who know this steep deep ravine can appreciate the 
stuff Tomboy was made of.] 

Nov. 17, Th. (15).— Met at Acklam Blue Bell; found in 
Seamer Cover, and had a good run 2 hours and 20 minuts ; kild 
at Kirkleaverton ; a Dog fox. R. Brunton the Brush, the 
Hounds run the fox Through Yarm. a fine day ; I Rode Jessie. 

Dec. 1, Th. (19).— Met at Hinderwell. Turned Down a Dog 
fox that was got out of a Drane at Newton Mulgi'ove, which 
gave a run of 5 Jiours to ground at the top of Roseherry ; the Run 
was put in the YorTi Herald as a good one. I Rode Jessie ; a 
Cold Day with Showrs of Snow. (Vide Addenda.) 

Dec. 8, Th. (21). — Met at Marton ; found in Newham Cover. 
Run by Marton, Ormesby Gill, Jackson Plantings, Eston Lite 
house, Court Green, Upleatham, Marske, Redcar, West Coatham, 
and kild in the Tees ; a Dog fox. John Proud the Brush, a fine 
day. I Rode Jessie. 

On the 12th of the same month they had a clinker from 
Wilton Wood and lost at Ayton, after which they were stopped 
by frost and snow till Jan. 2. 

Jan. 10, Til. (25).— Met atGoldsbro'. Drew Ormesclifif Blank. 
Set Down a fox at Goldsbro' ; had a good run of 50 minuetes to 
Bolby Cliff", and he went over. I rode Tomboy ; a fine day with 
a slite frost, found next morning kild. 

Jan. 13, Fr. (2G). — Met at Coatham. Mr. John Ikleygavea 
Breckfast. Set down a fox at John Wallis ; run by Lazenby Cover 
and on to the Slem. We then stopt the Hounds. The fox run 
down to the Tees along the Wharter side, where some men shot 
at him, and he then swam over on to some Slag, and was Cote 
by some men that was driving piles in the river. We then went 
and got a Bote, and got him and gave him to the Hounds ; a Dog 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1860-1861. 171 

fox. Mr. Wharton got into a sad passion a bout the affair [as 
well he might ! — Ed.^ Drew Nomenby Cover, Jackson Low 
Plantings, Blank ; got on to a Drag on Ormesby Bank and run 
down to Ormesby Gill hellway. I Rode Jessie ; a fine day. 

March 29, Th. (42).— Met at Ingleby ; found in the Park. . . 
On Battersby Bank to gi'ound ; put in a Tarrier of Mr. Dixon, 
and it Brought out a young Cube and then whent Back to the 
Park, and some of the Hounds had run to a flat stone ; we 
started to dig, got out 3 Rabits. . . . 

The last day was April 19. 

Act. of the foxes kild, run to ground, and Lost : — 



Days out Hunting . 


. 48 


Blank Days . 


. 3 


Foxes run to ground 


22 


Do. Lost 


. 16 


Dog foxes kild 
Bitch do. do. 


• -^^j Total kild, 14. 




T. P. Ajn'drew 


April 28, 1860. 





Season 18G0-18G1. 

Commenced Hunting Oct. 29, 1 860. 

Dec. G, Th. (12). — Met at Nunthorpe Station .... found 
in 24 Acers Bank ; run by Eston Bank, Mr. Jackson Plantings 
Upsill Mill to ground in the soth bank (South Bank) ; it was a 
very fast run, dug him out and kild him. V. dial nor got the 
Brush ; Dog fox. "We had some good sport at the diging with the 
Miners ; we gave them 10s. worth of ale and Rum. I rode Jesse. 
Cold dul day. 

From Dec. 17 to Jan. 21 they were entirely stopped by frost 
and snow ; on the last-named date they had a moderate day's 
sport, after which ' Mr. Rigg gave the Hunters spice cake and 
Tea and a good glass of grog after.' 

Feb. 18, M. (22).— Met at Hazelgrove ; found in Hobhill 



172 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Wood at Dundas ^ side ; run by Wallis ^ Farm, Rift House, Rigg 
Wood, Robinson ' Ings, Hagg bottom, Millom, Wlietfoors (Wet 
Firs 2), Clapliow, Bousbeck, Skelton Warron, Maggra park, Ary- 
hill, Skelton Park, Upleatbam Banks, Saltburn, Hazelgrove, near 
Marsk Sea Banks, Back by Hazelgrove, Hobliill, Upleatham, 
Soapewell, the Hall, Tokets dump, SoapeWell, Upleatham, round 
by Skelton Park, and Lost near the Filers ; a fine day and good 
sent ; all the Horses was done up. I Rode Jesse. 3^ Hours the Run. 

They had several good days in wild districts similar to 
the above, the accounts of which, being very little more than 
strings of names, I forbear to mention. 

Act. of foxes kild, run to Ground, and Lost for the season : — 



Days Out Hunting . 
Blank Days . 
Foxes run to Ground 


. 37 

. 8 
. 15 


Foxes found . 


. 50 


Do. Lost 


. 15 


Dog foxes kild 
Bitch do. do. 


• ^j Total kild, 12. 

T. P. Andrew. 


April 15, 1861. 





Season 1861-1862. 

Commenced Hunting Oct. 3, 1861. 

Od. 17, Th. (5).— Met at Skelton Park. Drew Forty pence, 
Roker banks. Blank ; found in Fanny Bank. Run down to 
Hobhill and back to Fanny Bank, Upleatham, Skelton Mill, and 
down to Skelton Crow Wood to ground. A fine day ; the young 
Esqr. of Skelton Castle came out for the first time. I Rode Bobbe. 

[The ' young Esqr.' of Skelton Park is now (1886) Master of 
the Cleveland Hounds — Mr. W. H. A. Wharton.] 

Jan. 16, Th. (28).— Met at Carlton. Drew Mr. Marwood 
Covers and Suttons, Blank ; found at Snolerdale Crgg and had 

• I may remind the reader that the possessive case is never marked with 
the usual ' s ' by the vsriter of these journals. 
' Originally Wet Furrows. 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, I 86 1- 1 862. 1 73 

a verry good Run round Scugdale, Holehill, and Lost near 
Busby Hall. A cold day, and verry Wliindy. I rode Bobbe. 
this was the first time that the Hounds Met at Carlton.^ 

Jan. 27, M. (30). — Met at Gribdale Gate; found under the 
flat stone in Nanyhow and had a verry good run of Two hours, 
and dead Beet ; got under a stone on Nanyhow. Mrs. Ordon 
sent her Complements to the field and begd that they meght 
leive him for a nother days sport, whitch was obayed. 

Feb. 6, Th. (33).— Met at Sunny Cross. Set down the Kilton 
fox in Mr. Dixon Planting, and kild near Brass Castle. Time, 
15 minuts. Mr. R. Brunton the brush. Second found in 
Newham Cover, and had a good Run. Time, 1 hour and 55 
minutes. Kild at Castle Leavington. A. Tate the Brush. 2 
Dogs foxes ; a dull Day with showrs ; boath the Runs was put 
in the Papers. I rode Newport. 

In the following letter to the ' York Herald ' will be found 
an account of this day's sport : — 

Fox Hunting in the Vale of Cleveland. 
To THE Editors of the ' Yoek Heeald.' 

Gextlemex, — As I see most of our neighbours are sending 
you an account of their doings, I beg leave to forward for your 
insertion our last week's sport with the Cleveland as a specimen 
of what we are doing in this locality. 

The fixture for Monday, 3rd, was Kilton, and after trying 
up the wood to Goat Scar a fox was unkennelled and crossed the 
Wood over Bennison's farm to Porrit Hag, where he was un- 
fortunately headed back into the wood on the Liverton side, and 
after passing Walk Mill Fail, Ness Hagg and Beck Meetings, 
he saved his life by going to ground near Kilton Castle. Time, 
18 min. During this run another fox had been viewed on Mr. 

' Met at Carlton again on Feb. 1 3 — ' found on Shotadale Moor and run 
to Ground in the Wainstones ; ' and also on Ajjril 3—' found in a Planting 
above Carlton. . . .' 



174 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Robt. Fetch's farm ; tlie liouncls were taken to the place, but he 
was too far gone, for after dragging in his line about a mile it 
was given up as a bad job, and we went in search of No. 3, 
whom we found sojourning with his lover in Mr. Wm. 
Walker's farm, near to Skate Beck. Fortunately the hounds all 
got well away with the first fox that broke ; he took a north- 
western .... he eventually eluded his pursuers by taking 
refuge in the cliffs at Lofthouse Alum Works. Time, 40 minutes, 
over the most rugged country and without a check. Some of 
the gents would have it they saw master reynard in the cliff, and 
a man named Seymour volunteered to go to the place to dis- 
lodge him, which feat he was about to accomplish (to the terror 
of all who beheld him, he having nothing but a small pickaxe 
in his hand, with which he had to make steps for each foot on a 
cliff nearly as plumb as the side of a house), but unfortunately 
when nearing the object it turned out to be only a projecting 
stone, and thus ended our Monday's sport. Those parties whose 
road home lay past the hospitable mansion of A. L. Maynard, 
Esq., of Skimingrove Hall, were kindly invited to refresh their 

steeds and themselves Our Thursday's fixture was 

Sunny Cross. The morning Avas very unpropitious, which ac- 
counted for our field being smaller than usual, raining and 
sleeting heavily until about 10 o'clock, when the gloom that 
was on our master's countenance gradually brightened as the 
weather improved, and by half-past ten he Was at Sunny Cross 
looking anything but cross. Time being up, ovei'coats were now 
doffed and buckled to the saddle or left at the farmhouse. Our 
first fox was found in a small plantation near to Brass Castle, 
and after going a racing pace for about 15 minutes in a semi- 
circle, he gave up the ghost near to our place of meeting. We 
then trotted to Newham Whin, and the hounds were no sooner 
in cover than old Trusty told us reynard was at home, and that 
he was in the enjoyment of health and strength his deeds pro- 
claim, for after a turn in the Whin he popped into Mr. Emmer- 



EXTRACT FROM LETTER IN 'YORK HERALD,' 1862. 175 

son's plantation. The hounds rattling him from one side to the 
other he soon saw that he must either do or die, therefore 
gallantly broke at the south end of the plantation with such 
music ringing in his ears as would gladden the heart of aught 
but a fox ; none of your ' whiff whafF ' lap-dog notes, but a 
regular melee of all the sharps, flats, and naturals from A to Z. 
His first point appeared to be Blackmoor Plantations, but, wheel- 
ing to the left, he kept on the banks of Nunthorpe Stell, which 
he crossed near Mr. Hall's, of Roundhill, and attempted to cross 
the Guisbro' Lane between Pinchingthorpe and Newton, but 
being headed kept the latter village on his left, and made 
another attempt to reach Newton, but again failing he retraced 
his steps over Nunthorpe Stell, passing in front of the hall (the 
residence of that staunch friend of this noble science, Isaac Wilson, 
Esq.), crossed the Ayton road into Mr. Ellerby's farm, pointing 
for home, sweet home ; but thinking he might alarm his wife 
and family by calling in such an excited state, he turned away 
through Mr. Richardson's farm and over the lane near Marton 
Moor House in the direction of the Swang, close to which he 
was headed by a labourer, and after passing Mr. Suggitt's and 
crossing the j\Iarton Lane a little south of the village, he 
entered the Gunnergate Estate thro' the pleasure grounds in 
front of the mansion (the residence of John Vaughan, Esq.), 
and over the earths, which, thanks to the keepers, were all 
secured. He crossed the Gill to Newham Grange, here he once 
more turned his head homeward for Newham Whin, but beino- 
headed he turned west, passed Mr. Ettering's, Mr. Graham's, 
and down past Mr. Appleton's, of Hemlington Hall, over the 
Stainton Lane ; bearing to the left and crossing between Stainton 
Vale and Stainsby Wood, pointed for High Leven Windmill ; 
from thence he crossed the Yarm road and Hilton road into the 
Skriddles Plantation, over the grass bottom to the Leven, which 
he crossed. The hounds were now gaining on him at every 
stroke, and it was very evident this state of things could not 



176 ■ THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

last long. Climbing the bank on the opposite side of the Leven 
was a teaser, and in front of Mr. Robinson's, of Castle Leving- 
ton, this gallant fox had to succumb to his pursuers after 
running 1 hour and 55 minutes. Andrew Tate, the Whip, was 
first up on his favourite mare Sally. ^ Mr. Andrew (the Master) 
and several other gentlemen were also there at the finish, but it 
was an utter impossibility for any horse to have stuck to the 
' hounds that run true ' from the find to the who whoop ! . . . 
The Master and his hounds were now more than 20 miles 
from the kennels, and after jogging on to Marton with his old 
friend the Secretary and getting a little refreshment for hounds, 
horses, and men, he started for home at Saltburn-by-the-Sea, 
where I have no doubt his amiable wife^ would be ready to 
receive him with her blandest smile and be proud to hear him 
recount the day's sport. May he live to recount many such, and 
she be there to listen, is the sincere wish of a 

Red Rover. 

Feb. 20, Th. (36).—' Met at South Stockton.' They had a long 
dragging day, finishing by calling off" the hounds in Kildale "Wood. 

March 6. — Met at Gribdale Gate. Could not Hunt ; it was 
very misty on the hills ; we went down to Ay ton to meet the 
Bilsdale men with a fox, and did not come ; it was a very whet 
day. 

March 17, M. (41). — Met at Ayton. Set down a fox near 
Ayton that Spinks brought from Bilsdale ; run away through 
Broughton to the Hills and on to Coldworth moor ; Lost the 
Hounds ; it was verry misty. We Could not tell weather they 
kild or run to ground when we found them. I Rode Newport. 

March 21, F. (42).— Met at Marton. Drew Mr. Vaughn, 
Mr. Bewick's Plantings, blank. Set down a Dog fox in vSevers 

> Probably the only one he ever rode. 

2 Tom Andrew married twice: first, in 1841, Charlotte Sanger, of Guis- 
brough, and, second, in 185G, IMary Ellerby, of Brotton; he had only one 
child, who died in infancy. 



T. r. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1 862-1 863. 1 77 

Planting ; we had a nice Run of 25 minutes. Kild in Hilton 
Mill Dam. Bronton and Robinson Jumpt into the wharter for 
the Brush, and nearly got Dround ; the fox sunk to the Bottom, 
and could not be got out. Second found in Newham Cover, 
run round by Gunate ' and Mr. Dixon, then stopt the Hounds ; 
it was a Bitch fox. a fine day, but very cold. I rode Bobbe. 

The last day was April 10. 

Act. of foxes kild, run to Ground, for the Season 1862 : — 



No. days out Hunting 
Blank Days . 
Foxes Run to Ground 
Foxes kild, Dogs . 
Do. do. Bitches. 



■i7 

G 

25 



• ^fj 18, Total kild. 

T. P. Andrew 



April 12, 18Gi 



Season 1862-1863. 

Commenced Hunting Oct. 23, 1862. 

On Nov. 10, M. (6).— Met at Kukleatham. . . . Mr. New- 
comen gave the Hunters a Cup of Coffe in the yard in stead of 
Ale and Whine. A very Cold day, with showers of snow. 

Dec. 18, T/^. (15). — Met at Marton. Drew Mr. Bewick 

Planting and Newham Cover, Blank ; found near Newham Hall. 

Run through the Cover down the Gill past Mr. Brown's farm, 

Gunnate,' Marton, Tolsby Hall, Slip Inn ; kild near ^Mr. 

Hunter's farm ; dog fox. Marster John Beadshaw the Brush. I 

got into Mr. Ruds ^ Planting after the Hounds, and met Mr. 

Ruds, and he yoused some very bad language to mee. Mr. Elwon 

and Mr. Treavor found a gi*eat deal of folt a bout Peaple vous- 

ing their knives to cut up the fox. Second : Drew Ormesbv 

Gills, Mr. Jackson Plantings, Blank; found on Wilton Moor. 

Run by Court Green, Guisbro' Park, and then a cross tlie 

Country to Hutton Low cross, where we stopt the Hounds : it 

' Gunate, Gunnate = Gunnergate. 
- J. B. lludd, Esq., of Tolesby Hall. 



178 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

was Dark ; time, 1 liour and 35 minuts. I Rode Newport ; a 
dull day, with Rain. 

Jan. 8, Th. (21). — Met at Stanley House ; found in Blackmoor 
Planting. Run by Tanton, Handgrove, Kerby Station, across 
to near Busby, and then stright to Seamer to Ground ; time, 
55 minets. Drew Seamer Cover and Severs Planting, blank ; 
got on to a Drag. ... A fine day, with a slight frost. I Rode 
Newport. 

Feb. 5, Th. (29).— Met at Carlton ; found in Mr. Marwood 
Wood. Run to Carlton Banks, Reeves Planting, and Lost near 
Swanby^ Iron Works. Drew Broughton Banks, Blank, a fine 
day ; I Rode Newport. Whent to Mr. Marwood night before 
with the Hounds. 

On Feb. 16 they had a good run from Cook's Monument to 
Marton, and on the 19th they had 1 hour and 30 minutes from 
Severs plantation to Kirklevington, but on neither of these 
days did they kill their fox. 

March 5, Th. (36). — Met at Cross Keys ; found in Mr. Jack- 
son Planting. Run round the Planting, then Brok by 24 Acers 
Bank, Ormesby Gill, Marton Gill, Gunate, and to the Drane in 
Newham Cover ; this run was the fastest of the season ... I 
Rode Jeose ; a fine day, and verry Hot has a Midsomber day. 

March 19, Th. (40).— Met at Carlton; found in Carlton 
Banks, and had a Run on the Bank to Laithe Moor and back to 
Carlton ; kild in the Bank side ; Dog fox ; gave the Brush to 
Mr. Marwood son.^ Second : set down a fox that Mr. Kitchin ^ 
had, and had a good run. Kild at Hole Hill ; R. Brunton the 
Brush ; Bitch fox ; time, 30 minuts ; a fine day. I Rode 
Jesse, whent the Night before to ]\Ir. (Marwood's) Busby Hall. 

March 30, M. (43). — Met at Pinchinthorp station ; found at 
Bousdale. Run by Hutton Lowcross, Coddel, Howdon Gill, 

' Swainby. 

* G. F. Marwood, Esq., the present owner of the Busby property. 

3 This veteran sportsman is still the mainstay of the Bilsrlale Hunt. 



T. r. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1863-1S64. 1 79 

Ayton Allam Works, and Lost. Second found in Newton wood. 
Run by Lambro' Ridge, Ayton, Turned by Lalmbro' Ridge, 
Newton, Pincliinthorpe, Bousdale, Roseberry, Newton Wood, 
and to a Drane below the wood. Turned in Mr. Bradle 
(Bradley) Tarrier to Bolt the fox ; the wharter Dam Gav way, 
Drounded Both fox and Tarrier ; a Dog fox. A cold day. I 
Rode Dutch. 

The last day was April 9. 

Act. of foxes kild, Rin to Ground, season 18G2 and I860: — 



No. of days out Hunting 
Blank Days . 
Foxes Run to Ground 
Dog foxes kild 
Bitches do. do. 



45 

6 

30 
10 

5 

T. P. Andrew. 



'? I Total kild, 1.5. 



April 12, 18ti:i. 



Season 1863-186i. 

Commenced Hunting Oct. 1, 1863. 

A very curious entry occurs on Xor. 26, Th. (17), with 
regard to the second run of the day : ' Second found in Wilton 
Wood ; had a verry sharp Run to a Drane near New^bildingrs. 
Bolted him Out ; Run to Wilton Wood, Yearby Wood, and 
Lost on the Road in Yearby Bank ; the fox ivhent by KirMeatham, 
CoatJbam, and Run into the Sea near Reclcar, and v-an droioied.' 
The fox, according to this statement, ran three miles unpursued 
and then committed suicide ! 

Dec. 7, M. (20).— Met at Guisbro Spa; found in Whiley 
Gill. Run by Cass Rock, Guisbro' Spa, Com Bank, Forty pence. 
Back by Rock ole, Com Bank, Skelton Warron, Buskey Dale. 
Lost near Mr. Youngs, Claphow. Second found in Skelton 
Park, Aryhill, Skelton Green, Saltburn Gill, Brotton Barns, 
Lumpsey, Claphow, Stanghow moor, Skelton Warron, Boosbeck, 
Skelton Green, the Park, Forty pence ; it got Dark ; the 

N -2 



l8o THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Hounds ran round by Aisdale Gate, the warron, and was floged 
of by G. Codling and J. Proud. Crossing Railway it was quite 
Dark. I Rode Polly, and she was tired. 

The last day was April 9. 

Acct. of foxes kild. Run to Ground, 1863 and 1864 : — 



No. of days out Hunting 

Blank days 

Foxes Run to ground 

dog foxes kild 

Bitch do. kild 



.50 

4 
26 Lost 22. 

8 



I 11, Total kild. 
T. P. Andrew, 



April 12. 



Season 1861-1865. 

1864. Commenced Hunting Oct. 6. 

Oct. 13 (3). — Baysdale. Drew all Baysdale and a part 
Westerdale, Blank. 

Dec. 15 (20). — Stanley Houses. Drew Handgrove, Black 
Moor Plantings, Blank ; found in Newham, and had a good 
Run ; Lost near Hilton by over Riding the Hounds. Second 
found in Sivers Planting, and had a very fast Run ; Lost near 
Seamer by over Riding the Hounds. I Broke Jesse Leg ; she 
was obliged to be shot, a fine day and good scent. 

March 2 (32). — Newby ; found in Severes Planting and had a 
nice Run over to Hilton and Lost the fox by a fals Hollow From a 
Gentleman who oate to known better. Drew Seamer Cover, 
Newham Cover, Black Moor Plantings, Blank ; whet Cold day. 
March 20 (37). — Claphow ; found in Scarth Planting ; Run to 
Ground in Wiley Gill. Second found in Skelton Park, and had 
a good Run to ground at Hobhill in a get ole ; ' got the fox out, 
and the Tarrier dog Snap got kild. a Cold frosty day. 

March 13 (43). — Met at Kirby ; found in the Whin. Run to 

' A jcL hole. Jet mining was a considerable industry in Cleveland up 
till the lasl few vears. 



T. r. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1865-1 866. 181 

Mr. Marwoods and Lost. Second found in Broughton Bank 
and Lost near Kirby. Bad Sent and a fine day, 

Acct. of foxes kild, Eun to Ground, in 1864 and I860 : — 



"No. of Days out Hunting 
Blank Dayes . 
foxes Run to ground 


45 
5 

20 


Do. Lost 


24 


Dog foxes kild 
Bitch do. do. 


^j Total kild, 12. 


April 20, 1865. 


T. P. AymiE^^ 



Season 1865-1866. 

1865. Commenced Hunting Sept. 28. 

Nov. 2, Th. (11). — Baysdale ; found and had a good run ; kild 
a dog fox. Mr. T. Parrington the Brush, a fine day. 

Xor. 9, Th. (13). — Newby; found in Seamer Cover; had a 
nice Run to Hilton and back to tiie Cover, and Cald of the 
hounds; Kild in Cover. Second : Bolted one out of Mr. Wilson 
drane ' and had a good Run, one hour and 25 miuits ; kild a dog 
fox at Hutton Low Cross. Mr. Wilson the Brush. A fine day 
and good sent. 

Nov. 30, Th. (19). — Marton ; found in Newham Cover ; had a 
good Run into the Hurworth Hunt ; near Whest Rownton the fox 
was thought to be Drownd in the Wisk. Time, 1 hour and 35 
minuts. a dull day and the ground very whet, 25 miles from 
home. 

Dec. 26, M. (26). — Saltburn by the Sea. Set down a Bitch fox 
I got out of Marske Sea Banks ; had good Run to the Cliff, 
One hound fell over and was kild, Juniper. A whet misty day. 

Jan. 4, Th. (29). — Newton. R. Jackson gave a Wedding 
Breckfast : the hunters whent to the Charch with the weddino-ers 
in scarlet ; 7 in number. Drew Newton wood, Blank ; found in 

' Nunthorpe. 



l82 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Borrow Green ; had a sharp run. Lost near Howclon Gill. Second 
found in Whiley Gill, and had a nice Run to Ground at Eigh 
Cliff, a Whindy day with Rain. 

Feb. 8, Th. (39).— Cattersty ; found their. Run in Cattersty 
and Round to the Cliff, 45 minuts, into a Drane at the Railway. 
Bolted him out and kild a Old dog fox. Mrs. Newcomen the 
Brush. Second found Near LivertonMill ; had a sharp run, kild 
a dog fox. John Fetch the Brush. Third found in Moon Shandy, 
and that a good run ; time, 2 hours and 30 minuts. Lost at 
Dark in Skelton Church Yard. 

This was the Last day on Account of the Cattle Plauge ; it 
whas a fine one and good sent. 

Acct. of foxes kild, Run to Ground and Lost, 1865 and 
1866 :— 





No. of Days out Hunting 


. 39 




Blank Days . 


. 1 




Foxes Run to Ground 


. 20 




Do. Lost 


. 17 




Dog foxes kild 
Bitch do. do. 


• ^H Total kiM, 19. 

T. P. AymiKW 


Aju-i 


1 12, 1866. 





Season 1866-1867. 

1866. Connnenced Hunting Oct. 4. 

Nui-. 26. 31. (16). — Kirkleatham ; found in the Whin Cover, 
had a sharp Run, and Lost near Dunsdale. Second found in a 
stuble Field near Lazenby. Run by Lazenby Cover, West Coat- 
ham, Wilton Wood, Court Green, Guisbro Fark, Finchinthorp, 
Bousdale, Haning Stone, Hutton Mines. Changed foxes at High 
Cliff; one lot whent over the Moor, the other to Slape Warth. 
a fine day and good sent with the last fox. 

I think I must give the following day as being one of those 
days which happily become rarer— an East ('ountry bag fox 
day :— 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, I 86/- 1 868. 1 83 

Jan. 31, Th. (30). — Mickleby. Set down a Bitch fox, had a 
sharp run, kild at Ellerby ; time, 20 miuuts. ]\[r. Pattison the 
Brush. Second set down at How Hill, near Goldsbro', Bitch fox ; 
had a good run, kild at HolmsgrifF; young Page the Brush, time, 
1 hour, a fine day, good sent, a very large field out, 1 hundred 
Horses and 2 hundred futmen. 

The last day was April 18. They ran a fox after a good run 
to ground in ' Mr. Wharton Brick Kill ; the Sqer, (Squire) would 
not have him Bolted, a fine day.' 

Acct. of foxes kild, Run to Ground and Lost, days 
Hunting : — 



No. of Days Hunting 
foxes Run to Ground 
Do. Lost 
Dog foxes kild 
Bitch do. do. 



49 

20 
24 

^^ \ Total kild, 26. 
8/ 

T. P. AXDREW, 



April 26, 1867. 



Season 1867-1868. 

1867. Commenced Hunting Oct. 3. 

Oct. 10, Th. (3). — Baysdale ; found in Hoggard, had a good 
Run, Kild a dog fox. Mr. Dixon the Brush. Second found in the 
Grain and had a nice Run, Kild on the Moor; a Bitch fox. Mr. 
Parrington the Brush, a fine day. 

Oct. 28, ill. (8).— Skelton Castle ; found in Fanny Bank, had 
nice Run Roun by the Castle, Ellers, Forty pence, and to a drane 
in the Park. Second found in Park Winn. Run by Cumbank, 
Forty pence, Ellers, Skelton Lawns, Aryhill, Marleys Planting, 
Cumbank ; kild in Forty pence ; Dog fox. T. P. Andrew the Brush ; 
gave it to Mr. Dundas, Upleatham Hall, the Head to Mr. Barker, 
Guisbro Bank, a fine day and a large field, 200 Horses besides 
futmen. I was Presented with a Gold Watch and Tea Serves, &c. 

Nov. 14, Th. (13). — Newby; found in Seamer Cover and 



1 84 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

had good Kan by Newby, Stainton, Hilton, Cratliorne, Rudby, 
Carlton, Busby, Carlton and Brongliton Bank, and back to 
Mr. Scarth and Lost; time, o hours and 10 minets. a dull day 
and good sent. I had axident with whier, being in a fense in 
Mr. Penyman Farm at Thornton ; flesh Rent, the Shoulder. 

During the following three weeks Mr. Dixon hunted the 
hounds in consequence of this accident to the Master. 

Jan. 6, M. (27). — Rushpool Hall. Set down a fox near the 
Hall that came from Mr. Dixon ; had a good Run Round 
U pleatham Banks twice, and Lost near Skelton Castle ; a whet 
day. Mr. Bell gave a Breckfast. 

Jan. 9, Til. (38). — Marton ; found at Gunate Hall ; had a 
sharp Run to a Drane near Sunny Cross. Second found in Seamer 
Cover ; had 40 minets to a Drane near Tanton. Bolted out and 
kild near Nunthorp ; a Dog fox. Young Lord Delile the Brush, 
the other fox was got out. Set down at Mr. Vaughan Hall and 
had a nice Run ; kild at Mr. Hunters farm ; a Bitch fox. Mr. T. 
Vaughn the Brush, a fine day, good sent. 

Feb. 6, Th. (36). — Coatham ; found in Kirkleatham Cover. 
Run by Kirkleatham, Yearby Wood, Wilton Wood, Court Green, 
Guisbro Park, Dunsdale, Upleatham, and Lost in Skelton Ellers. 
Second found in Cumbank. Run to Forty pence to Ground. 
Third found in Hazelgrove ; and had a good Run to Ground in 
Hazelgrove ; dug him out and gave him to the Hounds at 1 2 
o'clock at nite. T. P. Andrew the Brush ; sent it to Mr. Hikley 
has he gave a Breckfast in the morning, a dog fox, and a fine day. 

They finished on April 2. 

Acct, of foxes kild, Run to ground, Lost, and days 
Huntinsr : — 



No. of days Hunting 
foxes Run to Ground 
Do. Lost 
Dog foxes kild 
Bitch foxes kild 



52 
23 
22 



^": ] Toatal kild, .39, 

T. P. Andrew. 



April \-l, 1868. 



T. r. ANDREW'S DIARY, I 868- 1 869, 1 85 



Season 1868-1869. 

1868. Comenced Hunting Sept. 17. 

86111. 17, Th. (1). — Cattersty; found plenty of Foxes and 
had some good sport ; kild 3 foxes, 2 dogs, and 1 bitch. Mr. 
Maynard 2 Brushes, Mr. R. Brunton the other, a fine day and 
good sent. 

Sept. 25, Th. (3).— Kirby Whin ; found in Mr. Emmerson 
Whin ; had a nice run to ground, and could not get him out. a 
fine day and nice sent. 

iSiov. 12, Th. (17). — Marton; found in Newham Cover and had 
a good [run] to Hilton Woods and back to Cold Peall Planting ; 

kild a dog fox ; gave the Brush to Mr. _^ 

Bolum. the hounds bit Crabbe in Killing the /( f- — rs_J»,C*~^^ 
fox, and he died after ; one of the best dogs ' f " -^ 

inEngeland. Second : met with some hounds 
that was left in Cover Runing near Mr. Dixon. We had a 
nother good run by Tanton, Stocksley, Broughton, Ayton, and 
Cald of at Blackmoor. a fine day ; good scent. 

Jan. 7, Th. (32). — Saltburn by the Sea; found in Saltburn 
Gill. Run to the Cliff, Cattersty, Kilton Wood, Liverton Woods, 
Kilton Mill, Craggs Farm, Lumpsey, Foggoa Farm, Hagg Farm, 
Saltburn Gill, and kild on the Cliff near Saltburn. Mr. Wilson son 
the Brush ;' a Bitch fox ; Seabright and Splender Rowld over the 
Cliff witb the fox, and Boath kild ; 2 of the Best Hounds, Splender 
is Buried in the Garden at White House. Seabright ^ was sent 
to be stufed for Mr. Wharton, a fine day ; good scent but bad luck. 

Feh. 8, M. (40).— Dale House. . . . Third found in Bamby 
Dales. Run to Kettelness, back to the Dales, by Bamby, Ug- 
thorp, Through all Mulgrove Woods, Sandsend, Overdale, and 
kild over the Cliff at Steelpoint ; a dog fox. T. P. Andrew the 

' K. T. Wilson, Esq. (of Nunthorpe). He galloped round to the bottom of 
the cliflE. 

* He can be seen in a "lass case at Skeltou Castle. 



1 86 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Brush. Time, 1 hour and 20 minutes. A dull day, with wind 
and Rain. 

Feb. 12, F. (41).— Marton; found in Mr. Rud's Gill. Run 
by Mr. Bewick's Plantings, Slip Hinn, Marton, Mr. Dixon, 
Newham Cover, Sunny Cross, Newby, into Seamer Cover. 
Changed foxes. Run to Hilton Wood, Middleton, Fanny Bell 
Gill, back to Hilton. Changed foxes. Run by Midelton, Fanny 
Bell Gill, Craythorne, Treunam Bar, Hutton, Rudby, and kild 
in Willm. Husband Orchar ; a Bitch fox. W. Harrison the 
Brush. Time, 4 hours and a half; the Hounds when farst. (jood 
scent. 2 Horses kild in the Run, and verj^ few up at the finesh. 

Sir Charles Slingsby Burried on the 11th, 

March 4, Th. (47). — Normanby. We did not Hunt at 
Normanby on acct, of Mr. Dry den deth. Met at Marton ; 
found in Wallis Gill. . . . Lost near Hutton Rudby. Time, 
3 hours. . . . 

March 11, Tli. (49). — Kilton ; found in Goat Scar. Run 
by Liverton Mill, Skate Beck, Girrick, Liverton, Porritt Hag. 
Run a ring in Kilton and Liverton Woods, and to Girrick, 
over the moor to Dale end, Danby Park, Commerdale White 
Cross, over the moor to Swindales, Moorsholm Mill, and to 
Ground in Goat Scar; dug out, got a dog and Bitch fox. 
Kild the dog and set the Bitch off. Thos. Petch the Brush, 
a good scent, a Cold Stormey day with Snow. 

The last day was 

Ai>ril 1, Th. (55). — Roseberry. Drew Newton Wood, How- 
don Gill, Lonsdale Planting, Blank ; found on Court Moor, 
and had a good Run by Easby Wood, Borrow Green, Mill 
Wood, Nanyhow, Cook Monument, Easby Wood; kild at Easby; 
a dog fox. John Petch the Brush. Second found at Hutton 
Low Cross. Run by High Cliff, Hutton Works, ^ Hanning 
Stone, and Lost at Bousdale. a fine day, but very dry. Midling 
scent. 

' The mines here were worked till ISOG. 



T. P. ANDREW'S DIARY, 1869-1870. 1 87 

Acct. of foxes kild, Eun to gTouncl, Lost, and days Hunting : — 

No. of days Hunting ,55 

foxes Lost . . . .26 One blank day. 

Do. run to Ground . . .20 

Bitches kild .... 5/ 



T. P. Andrew. 



April 20, 1869. 



Season 18G9-1870. 

18G9. Commenced Hunting Sept. 24, 

Sept. 24, F. (1). — Goldsbro' ; found in Homes Griff, and had 
some good Runing. Kild 2 foxes,. dog and Bitch; 2 futmen 
got the Brushes, a fine day, and very Hot. 

Oct. 14, Th. (6). — Baysdale ; found on Ogra Moor, and kild 
the fox in view ; a Bitch fox. T. Fetch the Brush. Second 
found in Kildale Side, and had some good Running. Kild a 
Bitch. Fetch got the Brush, and gave them boath to Mr. 
Parrington for Lord Boyon (Lord Boyne, the proprietor of 
Baysdale). a fine day. one kild on the moor by 3 Hounds, 
found after by the keeper. 

Nov. 15, 31. (15), — Hutton Low Cross ; drew Coddel Gill, 
Newton "Wood, Blank ; found in Howdon Gill, had a good 
Run of 35 minuts. Kild at Kildale Mill Bank ; a dog fox. 
W. Dixon the Brush ; gave it to INIr. Fease. Second found in 
Guisbro' Banks, and Run to Ground in the High Planting. A 
fine day ; good scent. 

On Dec. 23, Th. (24), they had a wonderfully good run from 
Newham by Nunthorpe, Tolesby, nearly to Middles bro, and then 
via Ormesby, Upsall, Eston Moor, and Court Green, to ground 
in Wilton Wood. ' Got him out, .... run by Lazenby up to 
Eston Banks, over the moor, and Brought him Back by the 
Lighthouse, and kild near Lakenby. Some Plough Boys picked 
him up just at Dark, and gave him to Mr. Dixon, and he 
followed the Hounds to Mr. Mewburn, and was Broke up in the 



I88 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Grass Field by Candle Light ; a dog fox, Mr. Mewburn the 
Brush ; Mr. Brunton the head, a dull day, but nice scent.' 

March 3, Th. (37). — Seamer ; found in Seamer Cover. Run 
by Newby, Seamer, Hilton, Leavin Banks, Barick Quary, and 
to Ground in the Holm opisit Mr. Fowler Hall. We got on to 
a nother at Leavon, and Run him Round by Barick and Thornaby 
Wood • Lost, a whet day. 

They concluded the season with a Blank Day on March 31, 
Th. (45), at Kilton. 

Acct. of foxes kild. Run to Ground, Lost, and days Hunting : — 



No. of days Hunting 
foxes Lost 
Do. Runt Ground . 
Do. Dogs kild 
Do. Bitches kild 



45 

12 Blank days, 6. 

16 

^^ \ Toatel kild, 28. 
8 J 

T. P. Andrew. 



April 20, 1870. 



Season 1870-1871. 



1870. Commenced Hunting Sept. 29. 

Sept. 29, Th. (1).— Goldsbro' ; found in Homes Cliff, and 
had some nice Running. Kild 2 foxes, a old Bitch and young 
dog. 2 Gentleman from Whitby got the Brushes, fine day. 

I must give you the last two days that poor Tom Andrew 
ever had with hounds. 

Nov. 3, Th. (11). — Newby; found in Seamer Cover. Run 
to Hilton, and Lost. Second found at Gunnate Hall, and had 
some nice Hunting. Run to ground near Mr. Rudd Hall, and 
he would not let us dig him out ; * the fox Avas Quite don ; the 
Hound(s) Viewed him in. A fine day. 

Nov. 7,3/. (12). — Kilton Bank Top. Found in Cattersty, had 
a nice Run in the Cover, and got to ground. Second found at 

' Mr. Hiuld is still as true to fair plaj'. He always has a litter of cubs near 
hiri house, but will never allow the earth lo be stoj>ped ! 



DEATH OF T. V. ANDREW, 1 870— CONCLUSION. J S9 

Howson Nab, and had a good (run) of o hours to Ground at 
Liverton Mill Boak (beck), a fine day, and good scent. 
Nov. 10 — Guisbro' Park ; not out for snow. 

This is his last entry, and here ends abruptly the carefully 
kept journal of the last Master of the trencher-fed Cleveland. 

Tom Andrew had a seizure in the hunting field from which 
he never rallied, and died on December 26, 1870, the day 
after Christmas Day, at the age of 54 ; and was buried in 
Skelton Churchyard, being followed to the grave by such a 
concourse of mourners as was never seen before or since in 
Cleveland. Andrew had sent in his resignation of the mastei-- 
ship in November 1870, for the end of the season (May 1871). 
After his death in December, Mr. John Thomas Wharton, of 
Skelton Castle, bought the hounds, and they were removed to 
Kirkleatham and hunted by Mr. Dixon up to April 1871. 
From this time the Cleveland ceased to be a trencher-fed pack. 
Mr. AVharton, having sold the hounds to the Club in May 1871 
for 105?., continued Master, the pack being kept at Skelton till 
May 1874. From this date up to May 1879 Mr. Henry Turner 
Newcomen, of Kirkleatham, was Master, having his kennels at 
Warrenby, near Coatham. Mr. Newcomen was succeeded in the 
mastership by Mr. John Proud, of Yearby, who continued to 
hunt the country till May 188G, when he resigned, and Mr. 
W. H. A. Wharton, of Skelton, gave up the Hurworth Hounds 
to undertake the mastership of the Cleveland. Under these 
successive Masters the Cleveland have shown excellent sport, 
greater than ever before in their history. But if since the 
hounds were brought into kennel the country has been better 
hunted and twice as many foxes killed each season as formerly, 
and if blank days and bag foxes are known no more, it is only 
fair to remember that during the fifty-four years the Andrews 
hunted the country, foxes were not preserved as they are now ; 
thev were without the ' sinews of war,' having a most meagre 



IpO THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

subscription and difficulties to contend with wliicli we can hardly 
realise— difficulties so great that nothing but the Yorkshireman's 
love of fox-hunting and his determination to have the sport 
could have overcome them. Those who can remember Tom 
Andrew, who have seen him handle his pack and who have 
heard him cheer his hounds, feel sure that never will they 
behold again such a master of his craft nor listen to such a 
huntsman's voice. Such is his local fame that had his name 
never appeared in print, I believe it would have lived for ever 
in Cleveland. If I have contributed only a few facts of interest 
relating to the early history of fox-hunting, and done anythiug 
to give a wider knowledge of a few real sportsmen of a bygone 
day, I shall feel satisfied with the unambitious task which I set 
myself, and which I here bring to a conclusion. 



APPENDIX I. 



Season 


Foxes killed 


Blank 
Days 


Days out 


Dogs 


Bitches 


Xot 
ascertained 


Total 


1835-6 

1836-7 

1837-8 

1838-9 

1839-40 

1840-41 

1841-2 

1842-3 

1843-4 

1844-5 

1845-6 

1846-7 


no 
10 

no 


record 
4 

record 


9 


10 

23 
16 

31 
41 
40 
26 
25 
32 
34 


no 

4 

1 

7 
2 
6 

1 
3 
1 



account 

31 
39 

32 
46 
51 
46 
40 
45 
46 




i 




278 






1847-8 

1848-9 

1849-50 

1850-1 

1851-2 

1852-3 

1853-4 

1854-5 

1855-6 

1856-7 

1857-8 

1858-9 

1859-60 

1860-1 

1861-2 

1862-3 

1863 4 

1864-5 

1865-6 

1866-7 

1867-8 

1868-9 

1869-70 


27 

16 

16 

15 

25 

21 

12 

11 

7 

9 

9 

15 

13 

4 

13 

10 

8 

7 

14 

18 

22 

29 

20 


11 
9 

7 
3 
14 
20 
7 
7 
3 
2 
9 
5 
1 
8 
5 
5 
3 
5 
5 
8 
17 
5 
8 








38 
25 
23 
18 
39 
41 
19 
18 
10 
11 
18 
20 
14 
12 
18 
15 
11 
12 
19 
26 
39 
34 
28 



5 
4 
4 


5 
8 
4 
5 
2 
13 
3 
8 
6 
6 
4 
5 
1 


1 
6 


56 
47 
46 
52 
54 
55 
43 
43 
37 
40 
49 
52 
48 
37 
? 

45 
50 
45 
39 
49 
52 
55 
45 




341 


167 




508 
278 
786 







192 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Thus out of 508 foxes killed in 12 years 341 were dogs and 167 
were vixens. This goes to prove an opinion I have long held, but which 
natural historians sometimes dispute, that there are more dog foxes 
than bitch foxes. In these days, when the terrier and spade are not 
so often called into requisition, the disproportion is still greater, but 
in those days they had no mei'cy on a fox going to ground unless it 
was a main earth and breeding time. It may be urged that the 
vixen lies more in earth than the dog, but this is not true of any time 
but the spring, and it will be found by any one giving attention to this 
subject that the disproportion is just the same during cub hunting. 
Besides, the vixen when found is, in my opinion, more easily killed and 
more frequently chopped than the dog. She does not go away so 
readily. Again, in these early days, when they found an earth that 
was used, they often, when sport was uncertain, dug out or bolted, and 
many of the bagged foxes were vixens, and then generally were killed. 

Three summers following, when there were too many litters of 
cubs at Hutton, some cubs were taken up, kept for some weeks, and 
sent to restock other parts of the country. Fifteen were caught one 
year, only two of which were vixens ; eleven the next year, only 
three of wliich were vixens; and seven the last year, two (or thiee 
— I am not quite sure) of which were vixens. 



KENNEL BOOK, 1 845. 



193 



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194 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



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KENNEL BOOK, 1 845. 



195 



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196 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 
SEPTEMBER 1846. 



No. 


Entered 


Names of 
Hounds 


Sires 


Dams 


Eemarks 


1 


1839 


Juniper 


. 





See former season 


2 


„ 


Jollity 


— 


— 






3 


„ 


Jolly boy . 


— 


— 






4 


„ 


Merryboy . 


— 


— 






5 


„ 


Monitor . 


— 


— 






6 


„ 


Bliiecap . 


— 


— 






7 


1840 


Regent 


— 


— 






8 


f> 


Racket 


— 


— 






9 




Trouncer . 


— 


— 






10 


1841 


Tomboy 


— 


— 






11 


» 


Clinker . 


— 


— 






12 


1842 


Triumph . 


— 


— 






13 


» 


Maiden 


— 


— 






14 




Manful 


— 


— 






15 


1843 


Splendour . 


— 


— 






16 


» 


Spanker , 


— 


— 






17 


„ 


Symmetry . 


— 


— 






18 


„ 


Farmer 


— 


— 






19 


1844 


Sebright . 


— 


— 






20 


J, 


Rawmarsh . 


— 


— ■ 






21 


jj 


Rotheram . 


— 


— 






22 


„ 


Sportsman 


— 


— 






23 


» 


Cleveland . 


— 


— 






24 




Bonny Lass 


— 


— 






25 


,, 


Rover 


— 


— 






26 


,, 


Truemaid . 


— 


— 






27 


,j 


Cotherstone 


— 


— 






28 


1845 


Lancaster . 


— 


— 






29 


,j 


Bashful . 


— 


— 






30 


» 


Trusty 


— 


— 






31 


„ 


Jndy . 


— 


— 






32 


„ 


Joyful 


— 


— 






33 


» 


Judgment . 


— 


— 






34 




Justice 


— 


— 






35 


1845 


Boxer 


— 


— 


From the Wyn- 
yard and Durham 


36 


j^ 


Norman . 


— 


— 


See former season 


37 


,, 


Statesman. 


Jollyboy (3) . 


Symmetry(17) 


— 


38 


„ 


Sweeper . 


5. 


» • 


— 


3i) 


,, 


Speedy 


» 


„ . 




40 


)) 


Smoker 


)» 


„ 




41 




Songstress 


» 


» 


— • 


42 


" 


Charlotte . 


Bro. to Blue- 
cap (6) 




Bred in Bilsdale 



PupriES, 1846. 



Jollity to Regent 
Symmetry to Regent 
Judy to Monitor 
Maiden to 



6 — all rearing. 

3 

4 



Saltburn, Sept. 7, 1846. 



THOMAS PARRINGTON. 



KENNEL BOOK, 1 847. 
SEPTEMBER 1847 



197 



No. 


Entered 


Kames 


Sires 


Dams 


Bemarks 


1 


1839 


Jollity 


See former years 


*Died Oct. 11, 1847. 


2 


„ 


Bluecap . 


1) 


After the first day's 
hunt he was as good 


3 
4 
5 


1840 


Regent* . 
Racket 
Clinker . 


n 


1841 


" 


a hound as any ever 
known in Cleveland 


6 


1842 


Triumph . 


„ 




7 


„ 


Maiden 


„ 




8 


,, 


Manful 


n 




9 


1843 


Splendour . 




f This hound was lost in 


10 


)> 


Spanker . 


>i 


April 1848,andinthe 


11 


„ 


Symmetry . 


„ 


Koveviher following 


12 


„ 


Farmer 


i» 


we discovered he 


13 


1844 


Sebright . 




was among Mr. 


14 


)» 


Rawmarsh. 


„ 


pack, called the 


15 




Rotheram . 


jj 


' Hounds.' 


16 


,, 


Cleveland . 


jj 


Of course, he was 


17 


„ 


Bonny Lass 


5» 


claimed, but 


18 


yj 


Rover 




declined giving him 


19 




Truemaid . 


J, 


up, declaring he 


20 


,, 


Cotherstoue 


Ij 


hred the hound him- 


21 


1845 


Lancasfer . 


>» 


self, and assuring us 


22 


,, 


Bashful . 


»» 


that if w^e could re- 


23 


„ 


Trusty 


>» 


cover the hound by 


24 


,, 


Judy . 


„ 


FALSE SWEARING in 


25 


J, 


Joyful 


„ 


a Court of Law, he 


26 


ji 


Joker 


„ 


would give him up, 


27 


J, 


Justice 


„ 


but not othemise ! 


28 


1846 


Boxer 


„ 


In the end, however. 


29 


,, 


Norman 


n 


Mr, proved as 


30 


J, 


Statesmanf 


„ 


great a Coward as 


31 


,^ 


Sweeper . 


>» 


he had proved him- 


32 


» 


Speedy 


,, 


self a Liar, and gave 


33 




Smoker 


„ 


up the hound nitli- 


34 


)» 


Songstress . 


,j 


ovtajJTOcess of Law, 


35 


1847 


Rachel 


Regent 


Jollity 


but with a very bad 


36 


)) 


Rarity 




„ 


grace, and it has 


37 


)) 


Ringwood . 




» 


since transpired that 


38 




Rifle . 




)> 


should he lay hands 


39 


)» 


Reveller - 




Symmetry 


on poor Statesman 


40 




Ruby 




„ 


again he has sworn 


41 


,j 


Manager . 


Tomboy . 


Maiden 


to 'Bm-k ' him. — 


42 


„ 


ISIendicant 


— 


,, 


September 1849. 


43 


,, 


Merryman . 


— 


J, 




44 


ft 


Crowner . 


— 


»> 


From Bilsdale 


45 




IMarplot 


Monitor . 


Judy 




46 


" 


Mountain . 


)> 


" 





Puppies, 1847. 
From Truemaid by Spanker : From Racket by Manful : 

Dog, Trouncer Dog, Rockwood. 

„ Trojan 

„ Tomboy From Bashful by Regent 

Bitch, Timely Dog, Bachelor 

Bitcn, Brilliant 



O 3 



198 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS 



SEPTEMBER 1848. 



Ko. 


Entered 


Karnes 


Sires 


Dams 


1 


1841 


Clinker 


See former years See former years 


2 


1842 


Triumph . 


„ 




3 


,j 


Maiden 


„ 




4 


II 


Manful 


„ 




5 




Splendour . 


„ 




6 


„ 


S3'mmetry . 


,, 




7 


1844 


Sebright . 


„ 




8 


II 


Eawmarsh . 


„ 




9 




Rotherham 


II 




10 


„ 


Bonny Lass 






11 


„ 


Rover 


„ 




12 


,, 


Cotherston 


B II 




13 


1845 


Lancaster 


„ 




14 


„ 


Bashful 


„ 




15 


„ 


Trusty 


„ 




16 


,, 


Judy . 


„ 




17 


„ 


Joj^ul 


„ 




18 


„ 


Joker 


„ 




19 


,1 


Justice 


,j 




20 


1846 


Norman 


II 




21 


„ 


Sweeper 


II 




22 


n 


Speedy 


>i 




23 


i> 


Smoker 


„ 




24 




Songstress 


II 




25 


1847 


Rachel 


„ 




26 


„ 


Rarity 


„ 




27 


II 


Eingwood 


>i 




28 




Rifle . 


II 


„ 


29 


„ 


Reveller 


» 




30 


„ 


Ruby. 






31 


„ 


Manager 


„ 




32 


II 


Mendicant 


„ 




33 




Merrj'man 


„ 


,, 


34 


„ 


Crowner 


„ 




35 


II 


Marplot 


„ 




36 


,, 


Mountain 


„ 


„ 


37 


1848 


Farmer 


, Spanker 


Truemaid 


38 


II 


Trouncer 


II ■ 


11 


39 


II 


Timely 


11 • • • • 


„ 


40 


„ 


Trojan 


11 • 


,, 


41 


,j 


Bachelor 


. Regent .... 


Bashful (14) 


42 


j^ 


Brilliant 


11 ... 


,, 


43 


" 


Fountain 


From Bilsdale | 


44 




Jonathan 


. Cleveland Spanker 


Durham County Jasmine 


45 


19 


Jester 


11 11 • • 


11 11 11 


46 




Julia . 


11 11 ■ • 


11 11 11 


47 


„ 


Jupiter 


11 11 • • 


11 „ 1. 


48 


^, 


Jessamine 


11 11 • • 


11 11 11 


49 


„ 


Actress 


. Durham County Lexicon 


Durham County Actress 


60 


„ 


Brevity 


. Sir R. Sutton's Roaster 


Sir R. Sutton's Madcap 


51 


1, 


Cumby 


Pedigree unknown | 


52 


1847 


Cottager 


Durham County Lexicon 


Durham County Constant 


53 


,, 


Cruiser 


11 11 11 


11 11 11 


54 


1848 


Workman 


Durham County Wildboy 


Fifeshire Dowager 


55 


II 


Nimrod 


11 


II II 



KENNEL BOOK, 1 849. 



199 



Puppies, September 1848. 



By Trmmph out of Bashful : 
Tomboy, dog- 
Farmer, „ 
Tidings, bitch 

By Sebright out of Jollity : 
Jollyboy, dog 
Jericho, „ 
Jollity, bitch 

Saltbum, Sept. 25, 1818. 



By Sebright out of Symmetry ; 
Sailor, dog 
Sultan, „ 
Sampson, dog 
Spanker „ 
Susan, bitch 
S^rsnet, „ 



Six couples. 

J. W. P. 



SEPTEMBEK 1849. 



No. 


Entereri 


Name 


Sire 


Dam 


1 


1842 


Maiden 


See former years 


See former years | 


2 


1843 


Symmetry . 










3 


1844 


Kotheram . 










4 


„ 


Boimy Lass 










5 


„ 


Kover 


f 




, 




6 


^j 


Cotherstone 






. 




7 


1845 


Lancaster , 










8 


„ 


Trusty 










9 




Judy . 










10 


„ 


Joyful 










11 


,, 


Joker 










12 


1816 


Norman . 










13 


„ 


Sweeper . 










14 


i> 


Speedy 










15 


„ 


Smoker 










16 


„ 


Songstress . 










17 


1847 


Ringwood . 










18 


„ 


Rifle . 










19 


J, 


Reveller . 










20 


„ 


Ruby. 










21 


,, 


Manager . 










22 


J, 


Crowner . 










23 


)» 


Mountain . 










24 


)) 


Marplot 








' 1 


25 


1848 


Farmer 










26 


j^ 


Trouncer . 








, ' 


27 


>> 


Timely 










28 


)) 


Trojan 










29 


» 


Brilliant . 










30 




Mountain . 










31 


ij 


Jonathan . 










32 




Jester 


' 








33 


If 


Julia . 










34 




Jupiter 










35 


,, 


Jessamine . 










36 




Actress 










37 


,. 


Brevity 











100 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 
SEPTEMBER 1 Wd—contiyiucd. 



Ko. 


Entered 


38 


1847 


39 


1848 


40 


„ 


41 


1846 


42 





43 


1849 


44 




45 




46 


ji 


47 


»> 


48 


1846 



Cruiser 
Workman 
Nimrod 
Woodman ' 

Carmelite ' 

Tanner 

Sampson 

Barnaby 

Sarsnet 

Sebright 

Statesman 



See former years 



Sir M. W. Ridley's Game- 
boy 
Durham County Lexicon 
Triumph 
Sebright 



Sec former years 



His Wildgoose 

Their Constance 

Bashful 

Symmetry 



Puppies, 1849. 
By Trusty out of Symmetry : By Trusty out of Bonny Lass : 

Dog, Tranby Dog, Bendigo 

„ Timothy „ Bachelor 

„ Traveller „ — 

Bitch, Barmaid 



September 25, 1849. 



THOMAS PARRINGTON. 



SEPTEMBER 1850. 



No. 


Entered 


Names 


Sires 


Dams 


1 


1843 


Symmetry 


See former entry 


See former entry 


2 


1844 


Cotherston 


e „ 




3 


1845 


Trusty 






4 


i> 


Joyful 






5 


»» 


Joker 






6 


1846 


Norman 






7 


i> 


Speedy 






8 




Smoker 






9 


>» 


Songstress 






10 


„ 


Statesman 






11 


1847 


Ringwood 






12 


J, 


Ritle . 






13 


9» 


Reveller 






14 


» 


Ruby 






15 


91 


Mountain 






16 




Marplot 






17 


1848 


Farmer 






18 


„ 


Trouncer 






19 


»> 


Timely 






20 


" 


Trouncer 







list. 



From Durham County Kennels. 
- For pedigree of Statesman and a history of Mr. 



-. see the 1847 



KENNEL LOOK, 1 85 I. 
SEPTE MBER 1 950— continued. 



201 



No. 


Entered 


Xame 


Sire 


Dam 


21 


1848 


Brilliant . 


See former entry 


See former entry 


22 


„ 


Mountain 


„ 




23 


„ 


Jonathan 


» 




24 


,j 


Julia . 


,j 




25 


„ 


Jupiter 


„ 




26 


„ 


Jessamine 


i> 




27 


„ 


Actress 






28 


,, 


Brevity 


„ 




21) 


1847 


Cruiser 


„ 




30 


1848 


Workman 


,, 




31 


1849 


Farmer 


„ 




32 


J, 


Sarsnet 


jj 




33 


„ 


Barnaby 


„ 




3i 


,, 


Sebright 


„ 




35 


,, 


Jericlao 


Sebright 


Jollity 


36 


„ 


Jollyboy 


„ ... 


„ 


37 


1850 


Wellington 


Dui'ham Co. Woodman 


Their 


38 




Woodman 


» 


— 


39 


" 


Brusher 


Duke of Rutland's Ber- 
tram 


His Rosebud 


40 


J, 


Kallywood 


Ld. Fitzwilliam's Furrier 


His Ransome 


41 





SeUnia 


. Ld.Yarborough'sBasilisk 


Mr. Muster's Susan 


42 


1850 


Boaster 


. Trusty .... 


Bonnylass 


43 


„ 


Bendigo 


i> • • • 


„ 


44 


,, 


Bachelor 


j» • 


„ 


45 


?» 


Barmaid 




,, 


4G 




Thunder 


» • 


Symmetry 


47 


» 


Countess 


From Bilsdale 



Puppies. 



By Brusher (39) out of Symmetry : 
l.-8portsman \ 
2.-Splendour 

3.-Spanker l-proposed names 
4. -Symmetry 
5.-Sinnington ) 

September 10, 1850. 



By Brusher (39) out of Sarsnet : 
l.-Bluecap \ 
2. -Brusher -, 

3.-BonnyLassri^^°P"'^'^^^°^^" 
4.-Bashful j 

THOMAS PARRINGTON. 



SEPTEMBER 1851. 



No. 


Entered 


Names 


Sires 


Dams 


1 


1844 


Cotherstone 


See former list 


See former list 


2 
3 
4 


1845 


Trusty 
Joyful 
Joker 








5 


1846 


Norman 








6 

7 


" 


Speedy 
Smoker 








9 


„ 


Songstress . 









202 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 







SEPTEMBER 18 


51 — continued. 




No. 


Entered 


Name 


Sire 


Dam 


10 


1846 


Statesman . 


See former list 


See former 


list 


11 


1847 


Rifle . 








12 


,, 


Reveller . 








13 


„ 


Ruby 








14 




Mountain . 








15 


>> 


Marplot 








16 


1848 


Farmer 








17 


jj 


Trouncer . 








18 


jj 


Timely 








19 


jj 


Trouncer . 








20 


,, 


Brilliant . 


,, 






21 


,, 


Mountain . 








22 


,, 


Julia 








23 


„ 


Jupiter 








24 


,j 


Jessamine , 








25 


„ 


Actress 




• 




26 


„ 


Brevity 








27 


1847 


Cruiser 








28 


1848 


Workman . 


,, 






2y 


1849 


Tanner 


^j 






30 




Sarsuet 


,, 






31 




Barnaby . 


,, 






32 




Sebright . 


,^ 






33 




Jericho 


,, 






34 




Jollyboy . 


,, 






35 


1850 


Boaster 


,j 






36 




Bendigo 


„ 






37 




Bachelor . 


^j 






38 




Barmaid . 


j^ 






39 




Thunder . 


,, 






41 




Pilot . 


From Durham County 




42 




Chorister . 


^j 




43 


— 


Gaylass 


„ 




44 


— 


Trueman . 


,, 




45 


— 


Tragedy . 


„ 




46 


1851 


Sportsman . 


Brusher 


Symmetry 




47 


„ 


Splendour . 








„ 




48 


„ 


Spanker . 








„ 




49 


,, 


Sinnington 








„ 




50 


„ 


Symmetry . 








„ 




51 


,, 


Brusher 








Sarsnet 




52 


" 


Bluster 








" 





Puppies, 1851. 

By Bilsdale Mountain out of Symmetry : By Trusty out of Songstress ; 

Melody, bitch Judgment, dog 

Merry boy, dog Jimmy, bitch 

Manful, "dog Jollyboy, dog 

Jovial, dog 
By Bilsdale ^Mountain out of Rifle : 
Ringwood, dog 
Sept 8 1851. THOMAS PARRINGTON, 



KENNEL BOOK, 1 85 2. 
SEPTEMBER 1852. 



203 



No. 
1 


Entered 


Karnes 


Sires 


Dams 


1844 


Cotherstone 


See former list 


See former list 


2 


1845 


Trusty 


„ 




3 


,, 


Joyful 


„ 




i 


1846 


Speedy 


„ 




5 


„ 


Songstress . 


■ )) 




6 


1847 


Rifle 


ij 




7 


J, 


Reveller . 


,, 




8 


„ 


Marplot 


„ 




9 


1848 


Trouncer . 


jj 




10 


,, 


Timely 


jj 




11 


„ 


Brilliant . 


ij 




12 


,, 


Julia . 


,, 


„ 


13 


,, 


Jessamine . 


„ 




14 


„ 


Brevity 


„ 




15 


1847 


Cruiser 






16 


1849 


Barnaby . 


„ 




17 




Sebright . 


,1 




18 


1850 


Boaster 


,, 




19 


J, 


Bendigo . 






20 


J, 


Bachelor . 






21 


jj 


Barmaid . 


,, 




22 




Chorister . 


From Durham County 


23 


5» 


Gaylass 


» 


24 


J, 


Trueman . 


II 


25 


„ 


Tragedy . 




26 


1851 


Sportsman . 


See former list 


See former list 


27 


„ 


Splendour . 


,, 


jj 


28 


„ 


Sinnington 


jj 


,, 


29 


,, 


Symmetry . 


J, 


„ 


30 


,, 


Brusher 


,, 


,, 


31 


,, 


Blaster 


,, 




32 


1847 


Solomon . 


Mr.Foljambe's Sampson 


His Jessamine 


33 


1848 


Conqueror . 


Cleveland Jollyboy 


Durham Co. Cheerful 


3i 


„ 


Jollyboy . 


„ Spanker 


„ Jessamine 


35 


1852 


Stentor . 


Mr. Foljambe's Stentor . 


His Sportive 


36 


,, 


Chider 


„ Chaser . 


„ Milkmaid 


37 


J, 


Bertha 


„ Chaunter 


,, Barmaid 


38 


„ 


Blucher 


From Lord Harewood 


39 


,j 


Rattler 


From Mr. Milbank 


40 


,, 


Rockwood . 


Bilsdale Mountain 


Rifle 


41 


,, 


Judgment . 


Trusty .... 


Songstress 


42 


,, 


Jollyboy . 


,,.... 


,, 


43 


,, 


Jovial 


!)••■■ 


jj 


44 


" 


Merryboy . 


Bilsdale Moimtain 


Symmetry 



Puppies, 1852. 

Countess, bitch, by Cotherstone out of Symmetry 
dog, „ Marplot „ Sarsnet 



bitch, 
dog, 



Joyful 



204 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

out of Joyful 
Julia 
Brevity 



dog, by Marplot 

bitch, 

dog, 

clog, 

dog. 



, Barnaby 
Cotherstone 



THOMAS PARRINGTON. 









SEPTEMBER 27, 


1853. 




No. 


Entered 


Name 


Sires 


Dams 


1 


1845 


Joyful 


See former list 


See former list 


2 


1846 


Speedy 






3 


)? 


Songstress . 






i 


1847 


Eifle . 






6 


»J 


Reveller . 






6 


1848 


BriUiaut . 






7 


,j 


Julia 






8 


1, 


Jessamine . 






9 


>» 


Brevity 






10 


1849 


Barnaby . 






11 


,, 


Sebright . 






12 


1850 


Bendigo . 






13 


i> 


Bachelor . 






14 


»i 


Barmaid . 






15 


»i 


Gaylass 






16 


„ 


Trueman . 






17 


„ 


Tragedy . 






18 


1851 


Sportsman 






19 


,, 


Sinnington 






20 


„ 


Splendour . 






21 


„ 


Symmetry . 






22 


» 


Bluster 






23 


1852 


Chaser 


" 1 brothers 




24 


„ 


Chider 




25 


,1 


Rattler 






26 


,, 


Rockwood . 






27 


1, 


Judgment . 






28 


jj 


vial 






29 


„ 


Jollyboy . 






30 


,, 


IMerryboy . 






31 


„ 


Wildair . 


From Durham County 


32 


,1 


Labourer . 


»» 


33 


^j 


Aimwell . 


„ 


34 




Catchem . 


„ 


35 


1853 


Bluecap 


Barnaby 


Julia 


36 


j^ 


Brusher 


„ 






„ 


37 


,[ 


Mischief . 


Marplot 






Joyful 


38 


,, 


Marplot . 


„ 






„ 


39 




Mountain , 


„ 






„ 


40 




Miner 


^j 






Sarsnet 


41 




Cotherstone 


Cotherstone 






Brevity 


42 




Brevity 


„ 






„ 


43 


11 


Joylass 


From Durham County Hounds 1 



KENNEL BOOK, 1 854. 



205 





Puppies, 


1853. 




J. Wilkinson . 


. Danger, dog. 
Dancer, „ 


by Sebright 


out of Joyful 


— 


Denmark, „ 


!. 




J. Suggitt . . 
J. Troud . . 


. Bellman, „ 
. Blossom, bitch, 


„ Barnaby 


„ Brilliant 


W. Scarth . . 
W. Mills . . 
J. Parrington . 


. Bounty, „ 
. Joker, dog, 
. Jester „ 


„ Sebright 


„ Julia 


J. Garbatt . . 


. Justice, bitch, 


.. .. 




— 


Sweeper, dog, 
Smoker, „ 


„ Marplot 


„ Symmetry 


— 


Bellman, „ 


„ Sinnington 


„ Barmaid 


R. Garbutt . 


Barrister, „ 
, Buxom, bitch, 




„ „ 


B. Wood . . 


Beauty, „ 
Tuner, dog, 
. Tomboy, „ 


,',' Trusty 


„ Tragedy 



SEPTEMBER 26, 1854. 



No. 


Entered 


Kame 


Sire 


Dam 


1 


1845 


Joyful 


See former list 


See former list 


2 


1846 


Speedy 








3 


1847 


Rifle . 








4 


J, 


Reveller . 








5 


1848 


Brilliant . 








6 


„ 


Julia . 








7 


„ 


Jessamine . 








8 


„ 


Brevity 








9 


1849 


Barnaby . 








10 


1850 


Bendigo . 








11 


)> 


Bachelor . 








12 




Barmaid . 








13 


»» 


Gaylass 








14 


„ 


Trueman . 








15 


1851 


Sportsman 








16 


„ 


Sinnington 








17 


„ 


Splendour . 








18 


„ 


Bluster 








19 


1852 


Chider 








20 


„ 


Rattler . 








21 


jj 


Rockwood . 






'* 


22 


,1 


Judgment . 








23 


„ 


JoUyboy . 








24 


„ 


Merryboy . 








25 


1853 


Bluecap 








26 


„ 


Brasher 








27 


„ 


Mischief . 








28 


„ 


Marplot . 








29 


,, 


Mountain . 








30 


,, 


Cotherstone 








31 


,, 


Brevity 








32 


„ 


Joylass 









206 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



SEPTEMBER 185i—contimied. 



No. 


Entered 


Kame 


Sire 


Dam 


33 


1854 


Danger 


Sebright 


Joyful 


34 




Denmark . 


,1 




,, 


3.5 




Bellman . 


Barnaby 




Brilliant 


36 




Blossom . 


„ 




„ 


37 

38 




Bounty 
Jester 


Sebright 




. Julia 


39 




Justice 


,, 




„ 


40 
41 




Sweeper . 
Smoker 


Marplot 




Symmetry 


42 




Barrister . 


Sinnington 




Barmaid 


43 




Buxom 


,, 




„ 


44 
45 




Beauty 
Nimrod ' . 


" _ 




_ 


46 




Rally ' 


Bilsdale Mountai 


n . — 


47 




Restless ' . 


,, 


— 


4S 




Rally wood 2 


— 


— 



Puppies, 1854. 

W. Dixon . Spanker, dog, by Sportsman out of Joyful 

— . Statesman, 

R. — . Sailor, 

— Wilkinson . Boaster, 



Esq. '/ Bedford, 
T. Duell . . Sebright, 
J. Welford . Speedy, bitoh, 
M. Codhn . Juniper, dog. 



, Bachelor 

, Merryboy 
Sportsman 



Brilliant 

Speedy 

Jessamine 
WATSON DIXON. 



SEPTEMBER 22, 1855. 



No. 


Entered 


Name 


Sire 


Dam 


1 


1847 


Rifle . 


See former list 


See former list 


2 


1848 


Brilliant . 








3 


,, 


Julia . 








4 


^, 


Brevity 








5 


1850 


Bendigo . 








6 


II 


Bachelor . 








7 


,, 


Gaylass 








8 


1851 


Sportsman 








9 


ji 


Sinnington 








10 


„ 


Splendour . 








,11 


1852 


Chider 








12 


II 


Rattler 








13 


II 


Judgment . 








14 


1853 


Bluecap 









' From Squire Elwes, Aisleby Hall, near Wliitbj', 
^ From Mr. Chaloner. 



KENNEL BOOK, 1 855. 
SEPTEMBER ISoo—crmthined. 



207 



No. 


Entered 


Name 


Sire 


Dam 


15 


1853 


Brusher 


See former list 


See former list 


16 


,, 


^Mischief . 








17 


„ 


JIarplot . 








18 


,, 


Brevity 








19 


„ 


Joylass 








20 


1854 


Bellman . 








21 


,, 


Blossom . 








22 


„ 


Justice 








23 


„ 


Smoker 








24 


1^ 


Barrister . 








25 


^^ 


Nimrod 








26 


„ 


Rallywood 








27 


1855 


Statesman . 


Sportsman . 


Joyful 


28 


,, 


Boaster 


Bachelor 


Brilliant 


29 


„ 


Beaufort . 


„ ... 


„ 


30 


jj 


Juniper 


Sportsman . 


Jessamine 


31 


4yr old 


Spanker' . 


Durham Nimrod . 


Fifeshire Susan 


32 


„ 


Baroness' . 


Foljambe's Stentor 


Their Baroness 


33 


^^ 


Primate ' . 


York Profit . 


Comedy 


34 




WilfuP . 


York Sultan 


Braham Moor Wishful 


35 


" 


Wilderness 


I 


— 


36 




Rafter' 


Swimmer 


Ruby 


37 


„ 


Jovial ■» 


— 


— 


38 


)> 


Albion* 


— 


— 



W. Dixon 
J. Wilkinson 
R. Garbutt 
W. Dale's 
W. Scarth 
W. Welford 
Josh. Welford 
Thos. Duell 



Puppies, September 1855. 

. Ringwood, dog, by Rallywood out of Brilliant. 
. Rockwood, „ „ „ „ „ 

• Ruby, 

. Restless, „ „ „ „ 

. Jollyboy, „ „ Bachelor „ Julia 
. Jessamine, bitch, „ 



Joyful, 
Joker, 



T. Duell, Plumptree House Jasper, 
R. Verrel . . . Jes'er, 



dog, 



Joylass 



WATSON DIXON. 



' These three hounds are from Tom Harrison's Sedgefield. Corned)' was 
by Cleveland Jollyboy. 

^ These two hounds from Stwalwell, Thirsk, Foljambe's blood. 

* Ruby, by Cleveland Reveller (Jack Wharton). Scotch extraction. 

* These two hounds from Bill Dee, Billingham, 



APPENDIX III. 



NOMENCLATUEE OF HOUNDS. 

EXPLANATION. 

The following list of hounds' names has been compiled with the 
idea that it may be of some nse to masters of hounds and huntsmen. 
It is no easy task often for those who breed many hounds to find 
suitable names for all, especially as all those of one litter are usually 
yiven names, all of which begin with the same letter of the alphabet, 
(5._(/. Trouncer, Traveller, Trusty, Tattle, and Telltale. Peter Beck- 
ford tells us of a baronet of his acquaintance who was a literal 
observer of the above rule, who sent three young hounds of one litter 
to a friend, all their names beginning, as he said, with the letter G : 
Gowler, Govial and Galloper. Some masters prefer names of two 
syllables; others names of three, p.g. Artful, Active, &c,, Arrogant, 
Auditor, &c. 8ome have a liking for classical or historic names, such 
as Ajax, Almevic, &c, Peter Beckford considers it sacrilege to call 
hounds by such names as Titus and Trojan, has a decided contempt 
fur such names as Damon and Delia, and can see no reason for Tap- 
sters and Tipplers, just because some drunken sportsman in bygone 
days has used a denomination for his hound that was better suited 
for himself; he, however, allows Pipers and Fiddlers, on account of 
their music. I am very much of the same opinion as the huntsman 
of whom Peter tells us, who, on being asked what was the name of 
a certain hound, said it was Lyman. ' Lyman ! ' said the questioner. 
* Why, James, what does Ijyman mean % ' ' Lord, sir,' replied James, 
' ivhat iloes anything mean ? ' It is unimportant what a hound is 
called, so long as it is a name that fits the mouth well, carries a dis- 
tance, and is answered to. Of course it is preferable to give names 



APPENDIX III. 2C9 

indicative of some attribute of the sport of hounds in general, or of 
the leading characteristic of the individual dog or bitch. 

In the following table of names I have tried to class them accord- 
ing to their genders, but frequently the name is equally applicable to 
either dog or bitch. The names selected have been taken from various 
historical books on fox-hunting, Peter Beckford's list, and the names 
of hounds from the kennel lists of Lord Althorp, Lord Anson, Duke 
of Beaufort, The Berkeley, Brocklesby, Mr. Chadwick, Mr. Codring- 
ton, Sir John Cope, Delamere Forest, Mr. Farquharson, Lord Fitz- 
william, Mr. Foljambe, Duke of (Irafton, Sir Bellingham Gra- 
ham, Mr. Hanbury, Hatfield, Lord Lonsdale, Mr. Meynell, Sir 
Thomas Mostyn, Mr. Newman, Mr. Nicoll, Mr. Osbaldeston, Lord 
Petre, Pytcheley, Raby, Duke of Rutland, Sir Richard Sutton, Mar- 
quis of Tavistock, Mr. Villebois, The Union, Mr. Warde, Mr. Wick- 
sted, and other celebrated packs that flourished at the beginning of 
this century. To these have been added names of the present day 
having come within the experience of the compiler. I have avoided 
altogether coining new names — a thing which would be easy to do — 
and have also omitted many thousands of names that might be added 
from mythology, classical authors, history, biographical dictionaries. 
Some men have named their hounds from the Peerage, and thei'e is 
nothing to prevent any one naming their hounds from an atlas index, 
but I have carefully given only such names as from custom, tradition, 
and experience have come to be regarded as names proper for hounds. 
There will be found some names of places, some names of breeders 
and the like, but these have been put in only because they have come 
to be regarded as suitable by long use by successive generations of 
masters and huntsmen. 

Prefixed to the main general list of names are the following, 
classified : — 

L Those names indicating the music and speaking of hounds. 

2. Those inferring capacities for hunting, pursuing, punishing, 
and endurance. 

3. Those conveying some idea of character or attribute. 

4. Old-fashioned names, quaint, classic, and historic. 



210 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



NAMES REFERRING TO THE MUSIC AND SPEAKING OF HOUNDS. 



Dogs 


Bitches 


Dogs 


Bitches 


Auditor 


Audible 


Mutterer 


Music 


Barker 


Blarny 


Newsman 


Noisy 


Bluster 




Orator 




Boaster 




Pasan 


Prattle 


Boisterous 




Pealer 




Bragger 




Piper 




Brawler 




Prattler 




Carol 


Chauntress 


Prompter 




Caviller 


Cherriper 


Querulous 




Chanticleer 


Chorus 


Rattle 


Racket 


Chaunter 




Resonant 


Rhapsody 


Chider 




Rhymster 


Riot 


Chimer 




Rumbler 




Chirper 


~ 


Screacher 


Songstress 


Chorister 




Screamer 


Sweetlips 


Clamorous 




ScufHer 


Symphony 


Clangour 




Singwell 




Clarion 




Songster 




Clinker 




Sonorous 




Cryer 




Soundwell 






Dulcet 


Spokesman 






Dulcimer 


Squabbler 






Echo 


Squeaker 




Fiddler 




Tattler 


Tattle 


Fulminant 




Thunderer 


Tidings 


Garrulous 


Gossip 


Tuner 


Tremulus 


Growler 




Twanger 


Tuneable 


Grumbler 






TuneCul 




Harmony 


Voucher 


Vehemence 


Jargon 






Vehement 


Jingler 






Vocal 


Larnm 






Voluble 


Linguist 




Warbler 


Warble 


Merry call 


Madrigal 


W;irhoop 


AVhisper 


Minstrel 


Melody 


Wrangler 


Wrangle 


Musical 


Merriment 







NAMES OF HOUNDS. 



211 



IL 

NAMES INFERRING CAPACITIES FOR HUNTING, PUNISHING, AND 

ENDURANCE. 



Dogs 


Bitches 


Dogs 


Bitches 


Able 


Accurate 


Duster 




Adamant 


Active 


Eager 


Energy 


Aider 


Agile 


Earnest 


Enmity 


Aimwell 


Angry 


Effort 


Essay 


Ardent 




Envious 




Ardor 




Errant 




Baffler 


Busy 


Facer 


Fearless 


Banger 




Factious 


Fidget 


Barbarous 




Fatal 


Fireaway 


Bouncer 




Fearnought 


Forcible 


Boxer 




Fencer 


Furious 


Brilliant 




Finder 


Fury 


Brusher 




Flagrant 




Brutal 




Fleece'm 




Burster 




Fleecer 




]>ustler 




Flinger 




Carver 


Careful 


Flyer 




Caster 


Careless 


Foiler 




Cast well 


Carnage 


Foremost 




Catcher 


Caution 


Forward 




Challenger 


Cautious 


Gainer 


Gamesome 


Chaser 


Crafty 


Galloper 




Combat 


Credible 


Gameboy 




Combatant 


Credulous 


Glancer 




Conflict 


Curious 


Glider 




Conqueror 




Grapler 




Conquest 




Grasper 




Constant 




Grinder 




Contest 




Griper 




Clasper 




Harasser 


Harmless 


Clearer 




Hardiman 


Hasty 


Clencher 




Hardy 


Heedless 


Damper 


Dashaway 


Havoc 




Danger 


Dauntless 


Headstrong 




Dangerous 


Desperate 


Helper 




Darter 


Diligent 


Highflyer 




Dasher 


Doubtful 


Humbler 




Daunt er 


Doubtless 


Hurtful 




Dexterous 


Dreadful 


Impetus 


Impetuous 


Dreadnoughr 


Dreadless 


Jerker 


Industry 


Driver 




Jostler 





I' 2 



212 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Dogs 


Bitches 


Dog a 


BrrcHES 


Jumper 




Router 




Launcher , 


Lacerate 


Rover 




Lasher 


Lawless 


Ruffler 




Laster 


Lissome 


Rummager 




Leader 




Runaway 




Leveller 




Runner 




Lifter 




Rusher 




Lightfoot 




Sampson 


Scrupulous 


Lunger 




Sapient 


Shrewdness 


Lurker 




Scalper' 


Skilful 


Lusty 




Scamper 


Speedy 


Manager 


Jlischief 


Scourer 


Spiteful 


JLinful 




Scrambler 


Sportful 


Martial 




Scutfier 


Sportive 


Masker 




Searcher 


Sportly 


Meanwell 




Settler 


Stoutness 


Medler 




Shifter 


Strenuous 


Mcnacer 




Skirmish 




Mendall 




Spanker 




Mender 




Speedwell 




Militant 




Spoiler 




Mover 




Stinger 




Nettler 


Nimble 


Stormer 




Nimrod 




Strider 




Paramount 


Patience 


Striver 




Penetrant 


Prudence 


Strivewell 




Piercer 




Struggler 




Pillager 




Sturdy 




Pincher 




Subtile 




Potent 




Tackier 


Tentative 


Racer 


Rashly 


Teaser 


Terrible 


Piager 


Rashness 


Terror 




Rambler 


Resolute 


Thrasher 




Rampant 


Restless 


Threat en er 




Random 


Rummage 


Thiimper 




Ranger 


Ruthless 


Thwacker 




Rapper 




Thwarter 




Rasper 




Tickler 




Rattler 




Topmost 




Ravager 




Torment 




Ravenous 




Torturer 




Ravisher 




Tosser 




Reacher 




Trampler 




Render 




Trimmer 




Resolute 




Trouncer 




Rifler 




Trudger 




Rouser 




Trusty 





NAMES OF HOUNDS. 



21 



Dogs 


Bitches 


Dogs 


BrrciiEs 


Trywell 




Victor 


Vigilance 


Twig'em 




Vigilant 


Violent 


Twister 




Vigorous 




Tyrant 




Vigour 




Valiant 


Vanguard 


Warrior 


Warfare 


Valorous 


Vanquish 


Wilful 


Warlike 


Valour 


Vengeance 


Wisdom 


Watchful 


Vaulter 


Vengeful 


Worker 


Welldone 


Venture 


Venturesome 


Workman 


Willing 


Venturer 


Verity 


Wrangler 


Wily 


Venturous 


Victory 


Wrestler 


Wrathful 


Vexer 


Victrix 




Wreakful 



III. 

NAMES CONVEYING SOME IDEA OF CHARACTER OR ATTRIBUTE. 



Dogs 


BiTCUES 


Dogs 


BrrcHES 


Amorous 


Affable 


Fervent 


Famous 


Anxious 


Airy 


Flagrant 


Fanciful 


Ardent 


Angry 


Flippant 


Fearless 


Arrogant 






Festive 


Artful 






Fickle 


Barbarous 


Bashful 




Fiery 


Boisterous 


Beauteous 




Flighty 


Brazen 


Blissful 




Fretful 


Brutal 


Blithesome 




Friendly 




Bonny 




Frisky 


Choleric 


Candid 




Frolicsome 


Clamorous 


Capable 




Funny 


Constant 


Captious 




Fury 


Courteous 


Careful 


Gallant 


Gaily 


Critical 


Careless 


Giant 


Gamesome 


Crusty 


Carnal 


Glorious 


Giddy 




Cautious 


Guileful 


Gladish 




Cheerful 




Gladsome 




Comely 




Graceful 




Comical 




Graceless 




Crafty 




Gracious 




Cruel 




Grateful 


Dangerous 


Dainty 




Guilesome 


Dexteicus 


Delicate 




Guiltless 




Docile 


Hardy 


Handsome 




Doubtful 


Headstrong 


Happy 


Eager 


Elegant 


Hearty 


Harmless 


Envious 


Excellent 


Heedful 


Hasty 


Factious 


Faithful 


Helpful 


Heedless 



214 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



DvGti 


BiTCJUS 


DuGij 


Brrcifft's; 


Hopeful 


Helpless 




Roguish 


Hurtful 


Hideous 




Ruthless 


Jolly 


Jealous 


Sapient 


Saoguine 


Jovial 


Joyful 


Social 


Scrupulous 




Joyous 


Sonorous 


Shiny 


Laiidable 


Lavish 


Steady 


Shrewdness 


Laughable 


Lawless 


Sturdy 


Skilful 


Liberal 


Lecherous 


Subtile 


Slyboots 


Lusty 


Lenient 


Surly 


Specious 




Lightsome 




Speedy 




Likely 




Sportive 




Lissome 




Sportly 




Lively 




Sprightly 




Lofty 




Stately 




Lousy 




Strenuous 




Lovely 


Tragic 


Testy 




Lovesome 


Trusty 


Terrible 




Luckless 




Taudrey 




Luscious 




Tawney 


Manful 


Magical 




Thankful 


Martial 


Mindful 




Thoughtful 


Marvellous 


Modish 




Timely 


Mighty 






Tractable 


Musical 






Trivial 


Mutinous 






Troublesome 


Nervous 


Needful 




Tunable 


Noble 


Nimble 




Tuneful 


Noxious 


Noisy 


Valiant 


Vehement 




Notable 


Valid 


Vengeful 




Oddity 


Valorous 


Venomous 


T'aramount 


Painful 


Venturous 


Venturesome 


Perfect 


Passionate 


Vigilant 


Vicious 


Pertinant 


Patient 


Vigorous 


Violent 


Petulant 


Pensive 


Volant 


Viperous 


Playful 


Placid 




Virulent 


Politic 


Playful 




Vital 


Potent 


Playsome 




Vivid 


Profligate 


Pleasant 




Volatile 


I'rosperous 


Pliant 




Voluble 




Positive 


Wayward 


Wsiggish 




Precious 


Wilful 


Wanton 


(Querulous 




Woful 


Warlike 


Pianipant 


Kakish 


Worthy 


Waspish 


Jleprobate 


Kapid 




Wasteful 


llestive 


Kashly 




Watchful 


l{ural 


Ravish 




Waxy 


Uuslic 


Restless 




^\'himsev 



NAMES OF HOUNDS. 



215 



Bitches 

Willing 

Wily 

Wishful 

Witless 



BlTCUES 

Wonderful 

Worry- 
Wrathful 
Wreakful 



IV. 

OLD-FASHIONED AND CLASSIC NAMES. 



Dogs 


Bitches 


Dogs 


Bitches 


Abelard 


Abigail 


David 




Abjer 


Acme 


Demirep 




Abraham 


Achmet 


Dominic 




Adrian 


Amoret 


Donner 




Alaric 


Annabel 


Dorimont 




Almeric 


Aricie 


Druid 




Amadis 


Audrey 


Dryad 




Ambrose 




Dryden 




Amervel 




Edgar 




Andrian 




Egbert 




Ariel 




Erebus 




Atlas 




Falstaff 


Fatima 


Bajazet 


Bathsheba 


Fingal 


Favola 


Basilisk 


Blowzy 


Fugleman 


Februa 


Eergami 


Bosky 




Florival 


Bobadil 




Gabriel 


Gadbout 


Bolivar 




Gaffer 


Galliot 


Boreas 




Ganymede 


Gambia 


Bumpkin 




Gimcrack 


Ganza 


Caleb 


Celia 


Glaucus 


Goneril 


CaUiban 


Cora 


Gondolier 


Goosecap 


Capulet 


Cresida 


Gratian 


Gramerie 


Catchpole 




Greatridge 




Cerberus 




Gremio 




Charon 




Guliver 




Cicero 




Gulmore 




Claremont 




Guyman 




Claudius 




Hannibal 


Hoyden 


Clowder 




Harbinger 


Hyale 


Comet 




Harlequin 


Hydra 


Comus 




Hector 


Hymen 


Crispin 




Helicon 




Cromwell 




Hengist 




Dagon 


Dido 


Hercules 




Dredalus 


DeUa 


Herwin 




Damon 




Horsa 




Dardan 




Hotspur 





2l6 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Hudibras 

Jackimo 

Jaflier 

Jasper 

Jethroe 

Jowler 

Julxit 

Julian 

Junius 

Jupiter 

Juvenal 

Koran 

Lashwood 

Latimer 

Launcelot 

Lazarus 

Limner 

Linkboy 

Lionel 

Looby 

Lorimer 

Lucian 

Ijucius 

Lumpkin 

Luther 

Malcolm 

Manuel 

Marmion 

Marplot 

Maximus 

Mercury 

Merkin 

Methodist 

Michael 

Midas 

Minikin 

Mirabeau 

Mittimus 

Montresor 

Mortimer 

Myrmidon 

Nathan 

Nelson 

Nejjtune 

Nigel 



BncuKtf 

Imogen 

Jesse 

Jessamy 

Jezabel 

Judith 



Knick-knack 
Lady blush 
Lesbia 
Libra 
Luna 



Malaprop 

Marcia 

Mira 

Monica 

Mopsy 



Noblet 
Noody 
Noma 



Dogs 
Nimrod 
Nerval 
(Edipua 
Orpheus 
Palafox 
Pangloss 
Pasquin 
I'hoebns 
Pindar 
Plato 
Platoff 
Porester 
Priam 
Prospero 
Pagabell 
Passelas 
Regan 
Regulus 
Remus 
Romulus 
Ronion 
Rubens 
Sacripant 
Saladin 
Sampson 
Saraband 
Seabright 
Seneca 
Solyman 
Sycorax 
Talisman 
Tancred 
Tarquin 
Telamon 
Teucer 
Timon 
Trajan 
Trinculo 
Trulliber 
Troilus 
Varidal 
Vulcan 



Pallas 
Pamela 
Pamphilla 
Proserpine 



Rantipole 
Rumsey 



Selina 



Taffeta 

Tamerlane 

Termagant 

Thais 

Thetis 

Thisbe 

Tiffany 



Valentine 

Venus 

Vesta 

Wamba 

Whirligig 

Wowsky 



NAMES OF HOUNDS, 



217 



GENERAL NAMES OF HOUNDS. 



Dous 


Bitches 


Do as 


BrrcHEs 


Abelard 


Abbess 


Atlas 




Abjer 


Abigail 


Atom 




Able 


Accurate 


Auditor 




Abraham 


Achmet 


Awful 




Absolute 


Acme 


Baby 


Ballina 


Actor 


Aconite 


Bacchanal 


Baneful 


Adamant 


Active 


Bachelor 


Banquet 


Adjutant 


Actress 


Bachus 


Barbara 


Admiral 


Adeline 


Badsworth 


Barbary 


Adrian 


Affable 


Baffler 


Bashful 


Agent 


Agate 


Bajazet 


Battery 


Aider 


Agatha 


Banger 


Bauble 


Aimwell 


Agile 


Banker 


Beatrice 


Ajax 


Agnes 


Bannister 


Beauteous 


Albion 


Agony 


Bansted 


Beauty 


Alderman 


Airy 


Bantling 


Beldam 


Alaric 


Alpha 


Bapton 


Bellmaid 


Alfred 


Amathyst 


Barbarous 


Bertha 


Almeric 


Ani.azon 


Barber 


Betsy 


Amadis 


Amity 


Bargainer 


Bilberry 


Ambrose 


Amoret 


Barker 


Billingsgate 


Amervel 


Amy 


Barleycorn 


Billington 


Amorous 


Angry 


Barnaby 


Blameless 


Anchorite 


Anguish 


Baronet 


Blarny 


Ancram 


Animate 


Barrington 


Blissful 


Andrian 


Aniseed 


Barrister 


Blithesome 


Angler 


Anna 


Barterer 


Blossom 


Anson 


Annabel 


Basker 


Blowzy 


Anthony- 


Anodyne 


Basilisk 


Bluebell 


Antic 


Apathy 


Beaufort 


Bluemaid 


Anxious 


Ardent 


Bedford 


Bonfire 


Arbiter 


Aricie 


Bellman 


Bonny 


Archer 


Ariel 


Belzebub 


Bonnybell 


Ardor 


Armstead 


Bendigo 


Bonnylass 


Argus 


Arrogance 


Benedict 


Bonnyly 


Argyle 


Artifice 


Bender 


;6oozer 


Ariel 


Artless 


Benison 


Bosky 


An'ogant 


Attica 


Beresford 


Boundless 


Arsenic 


Audax 


Bergami 


Bounty 


Artful 


Audible 


Bertram 


Bramble 


Arthur 


Audrey 


Binchester 


Bravery 


Artist 




Bishopton 


Brevity 


Asbton 




Bittern 


Bridesmaid 



2l8 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Dogs 


BncHKs 


Dugs 


Bitches 


Bloomer 


Bridget 


Cannibal 


Capable 


Blucher 


Brilliant 


Capital 


Captious 


Bluecap 


Brimstone 


Captain 


Captive 


Blneman 


Busy 


Captor 


Careful 


Blunder 


Buxom 


Capulet 


Careless 


Blusher 




Cardigan 


Carnage 


Bluster 




Cardinal 


Carnal 


Blusterer 




Carmelite 


Caroline 


Boaster 




Carnival 


Casket 


Bobadil 




Carraway 


Caution 


Boisterous 




Carol 


Cautious 


Boldface 




Carver 


Celery 


Bolivar 




Caster 


Celia 


Bolsover 




Castor 


Chambermaid 


Bondsman 




Castwell 


Chaplet 


Bonnyface 




Catcher 


Charity 


Boreas 




Catchpole 


Charlotte 


Borrowby 




Cateract 


Charm 


Bosphorous 




Caviller 


Chauntress 


Botcham 




Censor 


Cheerful 


Bouncer 




Cerberus 


Cherriper 


Bowler 




Challenger 


Cherry 


Bowman 




Champion 


Chlora 


Boxer 




Chancellor 


Chorus 


Bragger 




Chandler 


Cicely 


Bravo 




Chanticleer 


Circe 


Brawler 




Chariot 


Clara 


Brazen 




Charmer 


Clarinet 


Brighton 




Charon 


Clio 


Brilliant 




Chaser 


Columbine 


Brixton 




Chaunter 


Colza 


Brocklesby 




Cheerly 


Comedy 


Broker 




Chesterfield 


Comely 


Bruiser 




Cheviot 


Comfort 


Brusher 




Chider 


Comical 


Brutal 




Chieftain 


Concord 


Bumper 




Chimer 


Concubine 


Bumpkin 




Chirper 


Confidence 


Burlington 




Choker 


Constance 


Burster 




Choleric 


Cora 


Bustard 




Chorister 


Coral 


Bustler 




Churlish 


Costive 


Butler 




Cicero 


Costly 


B^'ron 




Claimant 


Counterfeit 


Caitiff 


Cambric 


Clamorous 


Countess 


Caleb 


Canda 


Clangour 


Courtesy 


Calliban 


Candid 


Claremont 


Cowslip 



NAMES OF HOUNDS. 



219 



Dogs 


BiTCHrs 


Dogs 


Bitches 


Clarion 


Crafty 


Cromwell 




Clasher 


Cranberry 


Crowner 




Clasper 


Crazy 


Cruiser 




Claudius 


Credible 


Crusty 




Clearer 


Credulous 


Cryer 




Clencher 


Cressida 


Curfew 




Cleveland 


Croney 


Currier 




Client 


Crotchet 


Cypher 




Climbauk 


Cruel 


Cj'lJrian 




Clinker 


Crystal 


Dabster 


Dabble 


Clowdor 


Cumby 


Diedalus 


Dabchick 


Coaster 


Curious 


Dagon 


Daffodil 


Coaxer 


Curricle 


Damon 


Dainty 


Cobbet 




Damper 


Dairymaid 


Cobweb 




Dancer 


Dalliance 


Coiner 




Danger 


Damsel 


Collier 




Dangerous 


Daphne 


Combat 




Dandy 


Darling 


Combatant 




Dapper 


Dashaway 


Comet 




Dapster 


Dauntless 


Comforter 




Dardan 


Decent 


Commodore 




Darlington 


Delia 


Comrade 




Darter 


Delicate 


Comus 




Dasher 


Desperate 


Conflict 




Dashwood 


Destiny 


Conqueror 




Da\id 


Devilish 


Conquest 




Delamere 


Dextress 


Conrad 




Delegate 


Diadem 


Constant 




Delver 


Diamond 


Contest 




Demirep 


Dian 


Coroner 




Denmark 


Dido 


Corsican 




Derby 


Dilligent 


Cossack 




Despot 


Dilly 


Cotherstone 




Dexter 


Dimitj- 


Cottager 




Dinger 


Dimple 


Counsellor 




Diomed 


Discord 


Countrj'man 




Disputant 


Docile 


Com-teous 




Dolphin 


Document 


Courtier 




Dominic 


Dolly 


Courtly 




Doncaster 


Domina 


Coxcomb 




Donegal 


Domino 


Craftsman 




Donovan 


Donative 


Crasher 




Dorimont 


Dorcas 


Ci-imson 




Dormer 


Dorothy 


Crispin 




Doublet 


Doubtful 


Critic 




Downright 


Doubtless 


Critical 




Dragon 


Dowager 



220 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Dous 


Bitch E.S 


Docs 


BncHEs 


Dreadnought 


Doxy 


Fervent 


Fidget 


Driver 


Dozy 


Fiddler 


Fiery 


Dromo 


Dreadful 


Fielder 


Fireaway 


Drugger 


Dreadless 


Figaro 


Firequeen 


Druid 


Drewdrop 


Finder 


Firetail 


Drunkard 


Drollery 


Fingal 


Flexible 


Dryad 


Drowsy 


Firebrand 


Flighty 


Dryden 


Dulcet 


Fisherman 


Flora 


Duncan 


Dusky 


Flagrant 


Florentine 


Duplicate 


Dutchess 


Flambeau 


Florida 


Duster 




Flamer 


Florist 


Dustiefoot 




Flasher 


Florival 


Eager 


Easy 


Fleecer 


Flourish 


Earnest 


Ebony 


Fleece'm 


Flurry 


Edgar 


Echo 


Flinger 


Flyaway 


Editor 


Ecstasy 


Flippant 


Forcible 


Edmund 


Editha 


Flourisher 


Frailty 


Edwin 


Eleanor 


Flyer 


Frantick 


Effort 


Emblem 


Foamer 


Freckle 


Egbert 


Emerald 


Foiler 


Frenzy 


Eldon 


Emigrant 


Foreman 


Fretful 


Elegant 


Emily 


Foremost 


Friendly 


Eminent 


Empress 


Foresight 


Frisky 


Emperor 


Endless 


Forester 


Frolic 


Envious 


Energy 


Forward 


Frolicsome 


Envoy 


Enmity 


Frampton 


Frowzy 


Erebus 


Envy 


Freedom 


Funny 


Ernest 


Equity 


Freeman 


Funnylass 


Errant 


Ermine 


Friar 


Furious 


Euclid 


Essay 


Fuddler 


Fury 


Eustace 




Fugleman 




Excellent 




Fulgiu- 




Fabulist 


Faithful 


Fulminant 




Facer 


Fan-maid 


Furnace 




Factious 


Fairplay 


Furrier 




Factor 


Fairy 


Gabriel 


Gadbout 


Falconer 


Fallacy 


GadBy 


Gaiety 


Falstaff 


Famous 


Gaffer 


Gaily 


Fanatick 


Fanciful 


Gager 


Gainful 


Farmer 


Fashion 


Gainer 


Galley 


Fatal 


Fatima 


Gainsborough 


Galliot 


Fearnought 


Favola 


Gallant 


Gambia 


Felix 


Favourite 


Gallantry 


Gambol 


Felony 


Fearless 


Galliard 


Gamesome 


Fencer 


Februa 


Galloper 


Gamestress 


Ferdinand 


Festive 


Gam boy 


Ganza 


Ferryman 


Fickle 


Gamester 


Garland 



NAMES OF HOUNDS. 



22 I 



Doos 


Bitches 


Dona 


BlTCHISS 


Ganger 


Garnet 


Guyman 




Ganymede 


Garnish 


Hackwood 


Handmaid 


Garrulous 


Gaudy 


Handicap 


Handsome 


Gauby 


Gauntlet 


Hannibal 


Hannah 


Gager ( = Ganger) Gaylass 


Harasser 


Happy 


General 


Gertrude 


Harbinger 


Harlot 


Genial 


Ghastly 


Harborough 


Harmonj' 


Genius 


Giddy 


Harbottle 


Harnet 


Gentile 


Giglet 


Hardiman 


Harpy 


German 


Gipsv 


Hard wick 


Hasty 


Giant 


Gladish 


Hardy 


Hazardous 


Gilder 


Gladness 


Harlequin 


Hecuba 


Gim crack 


Gladsome 


Havoc 


Heedless 


Glancer 


Glory 


Hawthorn 


Hellen 


Glaucus 


Goldfinch 


Hazard 


Hellice 


Gleaner 


Golding 


Headstrong 


Helpless 


Glider 


Gonerail 


Hearty 


Hermia 


Gloster 


Goodie 


Hector 


Hermitage 


Glourious 


Goosecap 


Hedger 


Heroine 


Goblin 


Gossamer 


Heedful 


Hideous 


Gondolier 


Gossip 


Helicon 


Honesty 


Goodman 


Governess 


Helmet 


Hornet 


Governor 


Graceful 


Helper 


Hostess 


Gradus 


Graceless 


Helpful 


Hostile 


Grampus 


Gracious 


Hengist 


Hoyden 


Granby 


Gramerie 


Hercules 


Hurricane 


Grandison 


Grateful 


Heretic 


Hyacinth 


Grapler 


Gravity 


Hermit 


Hyale 


Grasper 


Grovely 


Hero 


Hydra 


Gratian 


Guilesorae 


Herwin 


Hymen 


Gratitude 


Guiltless 


Highflyer 




Greatridge 


Guilty 


Holiness 




Grecian 




Hopeful 




Gregory 




Horsa 




Gremio 




Hotspur 




Grinder 




Hudibras 




Griper 




Humbler 




Growler 




Hurtful 




Grumbler 




Hypocrite 




Guardian 




Impetus 


Ida 


Guardsman 






Industry 


Guider 






Innocence 


Guilder 






Imogen 


Guileful 






Italy 


Guiler 




Jackimo 


Janty 


Gulmore 




Jaffier 


Jealousy 


Guliver 




Jailor 


Jenny 



222 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Dogs 


BlTCUKS 


Dogs 


Bitches 


Jangler 


Jessamine 


Launcelot 


Lenient 


Jargon 


Jessamj' 


Launcher 


Lenity 


Jasper 


Jesse 


Lawyer 


Lesbia 


Javelin 


Jessica 


Layman 


Lethe 


Jericho 


Jewel 


Lazarus 


Levity 


Jerker 


Jewess 


Leader 


Liberty 


Jester 


Jezabel 


Ledger 


Libra 


Jethroe 


Jollity 


Ledston 


Lighting 


Jilter 


Joyful 


Legacy 


Lightsome 


Jingler 


Joyous 


Leinster 


Likely 


Jobson 


Judith 


Leveller 


Lily 


Jockey 


Judy 


Levi 


Lissome 


Joiner 


Juliet 


Lexicon 


Litigate 


Joker 


Junket 


Liberal 


Lively 


Jolly 




Libertine 


Lofty 


Jollyboy 




Lictor 


Lousy 


Jonathan 




Lifter 


Lovely 


Jostler 




Lightfoot 


Love some 


Jovial 




Limner ' 


ijucious 


Jowler 




Lincoln 


Luckless 


Jubal 




Linguist 


Luckylass 


Jubilee 




Linkbo}' 


Lucy 


Judgment 




Lionel 


Luna 


Juggler 




Listener 


Lunacy 


Julian 




Longitude 


Luxury 


J umper 




Lonsboro 




Juniper 




Lorimer 




Junius 




Lounger 




Jupiter 




Loversal 




Juryman 




Luby (Looby) 




Justice 




Lucian 




Juvenal 




Lucifer 




Koran 


Knick-knack 


Lucius 




Labrador 


Lacerate 


Ludlow 




Labourer 


Lady 


Lumpkin 




Lancaster 


Ladybird 


Lunatic 




Lancer 


Ladyblush 


Lunger 




Landmark 


Larceny 


Lurker 




Landsman 


Latitude 


Lusher 




Lapwing 


Laudable 


Lusty 




Larkspur 


Laundress 


Luther 




Larum 


Laura 


^ladcap 


Madam 


Lasher 


Lavender 


Magistrate 


Madcap 


Lashwood 


Lavish 


Majesty 


Madrigal 


Laster 


Lawless 


Malcom 


Maggoty 


Latimer 


Leclierons 


ISIalster 


^Magic 


J^aughablo 


\.vga.cy 


:\Ialton 


Magical 



NAMES OF HOUNDS. 



223 



Doos 


Bitches 


Doiis 


Bitches 


Manager 


Maiden 


Miraheau 




Manchester 


Malady 


Miracle 




Manful 


Malaprop 


iliscreant 




Maniac 


Malice 


Miser 




Mannel 


Marcia 


Mittimus 




Mariner 


Margery 


Momus 




Mark well 


Margaret 


Monarch 




Marmadnke 


Marigold 


Monitor 




Marmalade 


Mary 


Monster 




Marmion 


Matchless 


Montresor 




Marplot 


ISIatron 


Mortimer 




Marquis 


Mattersey 


Motley 




Mai-tial 


Mayday 


Mountain 




Marvellous 


Mayfly 


Mountebank 




Masker 


Maypole 


Mounter 




Matchem 


iledley 


Mousetrap 




Jlaxini 


:\Ielody 


Mover 




Maxims 


Memory 


Mungo 




Mean well 


Mercy 


Musical 




Medler 


Mermaid 


Mussulman 




Melrose 


Merriment 


Mutinous 




Menacer 


Merrylass 


Mutterer 




Mendall 


Miliner 


Myrmidon 




Mender 


Milkmaid 


Nabob 


Nameless 


]\Iendicant 


Mimic 


Nathan 


Nancy 


Mentor 


Mindful 


Nautilus 


Narrative 


Mercury 


Minion 


Nector 


Nectar 


Merkin 


Minuet 


Needwood 


Nectarine 


IMerlin 


Mira 


Nelson 


Needful 


Merryboy 


Mirabel 


Neptune 


Neetness 


Merrj'call 


Miriam 


Nervous 


Negative 


MerrjTuan 


Mischief 


Nestor 


Nelly 


Messmate 


Modesty 


Nettler 


Nettletop 


Methodist 


M isery 


Newman 


Nicety 


Meynell 


Misty 


Newsman 


Nightshade 


Michasl 


Modish 


Nigel 


Nimble 


Midas 


Monica 


Nimrod 


Niobe 


Middleton 


Monody 


Noble 


Noblet 


Midnight 


Moppet 


Nonsuch 


Noisy 


Mighty 


Mopsy 


Norman 


Nominal 


Militant 


Mufti 


Nerval 


Nonsuch 


Milton 


Music 


Notary 


Noody 


Minikin 


Myrtle 


Novel 


Norah 


Minister 




Noxious 


Noma 


Minor 






Notable 


Minstrel 






Notice 


Minus 






Notion 



224 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Bitches 
Novelty 
Novice 

Nullit}' 



OErlipns 


Oddity 


Orator 


Ornament 


Orpheus 




Ortelan 




Ottoman 




Outlaw 




Pasan 


Painful 


Pagan 


Palestine 


Pageant 


Pallas 


Painter 


Pamela 


Palafox 


Pamphilla 


Paleface 


Parafine 


Pander 


Parasol 


Pangloss 


Paradisa 


Parable 


Passion 


Paradox 


Pastime 


Paragon 


Patience 


Paramount 


Patty 


Parody 


Peeress 


Partner 


Pensive 


Partyman 


Petticoat 


Pasquin 


Phoenix 


Passionate 


Phrenetic 


Patient 


Phyllis 


Patron 


Phrensy 


Pealer 


Picture 


Pedlar 


Placid 


Pelican 


Playful 


Penetrant 


Playsome 


Perfect 


Plaything 


Perilous 


Pleasant 


Pertinent 


Pliant 


Petulant 


Policy 


Phoebus 


PoUy 


Piercer 


Poi cupine 


Pilgrim 


Positive 


Pillager 


Prattle 


Pilot 


Precious 


Pincher 


Pretty 


Pindar 


Prettylass 


Piper 


Previous 


Pirate 


Priestess 


Placeman 


Primrose 


Plaintiff 


Princess 


J'latu 


Probity 



Dogs 


Bitches 


Platoff 


Promise 


Playful 


Prophetess 


Pleader 


Proserpine 


Plodder 


Prudence 


Plunder 


Punty 


Politic 


Purity 


Pontiff 




Porrester 




Possum 




Posthumous 




Potent 




Prater 




Prattler 




Premier 




Prevalent 




President 




Presto 




Priam 




Primate 




Primer 




Principal 




Prior 




Prizer 




Proctor 




Prodigal 




Prodigy 




Profligate 




Prompter 




Prophet 




Prosper 




Prospero 




Prosperous 




Prossody 




Provost 




Prowler 




Pryer 




Pucelage 




Pugilist 




Querulous 




Quibbler 




Racer 


Rachel 


Radical 


Racket 


Raffler 


Raffle 


Rafter 


Rakish 


Ragabell 


Rally 


Rager 


Ramekin 


Ragland 


Rampish 


Rallywnod 


RnnfipoU 



NAMES OF HOUNDS. 



225 



Dogs 


BlTCHEa 


Dogs 


Bitches 


Rambler 


Rapid 


Risker 




Rampant 


Rapine 


Roadster 




Rampart 


Rapture 


Robinhood 




Ramper 


Rarity 


Rochester 




Rancour 


Rashly 


Rocket 




Random 


Rashness 


Rockwood 




Randy 


Rattle 


Rodderick 




Ranger 


Ravish 


Rodney 




Ransack 


Rectitude 


Roger 




Ransom 


Redcap 


RoUiston 




Rantaway 


Redrose 


Roman 




Ranter 


Relish 


Romper 




Rapper 


Reptile 


Romulus 




Rasper 


Restless 


Ronion 




Rasselas 


Rhapsody 


Roseberry 




Rattler 


Riddance 


Rotheram 




Ravager 


Riddle 


Rouser 




Ravenous 


Rifle 


Router 




Ravisher 


Ringdove 


Rover 




Raymond 


Ringlet 


Roj'al 




Readier 


Ringtail 


Royalist 




Reasoner 


Riot 


Roj'ster 




Rebel 


Rival 


Ruben 




Rector 


Rivulet 


Rubicon 




Redwing 


Roguish 


Rudesby 




Regan 


Rosalind 


Ruffian 




Regent 


Rosamond 


Ruffler 




Regicide 


Rosebud 


Rufus 




Reginald 


Rosemary 


Ruler 




Regulus 


Roundelay 


Rumbler 




Remnant 


Roundly 


Rummager 




Remus 


Ruby 


Rumour 




Render 


Rueful 


Runaway 




Reprobate 


Ruin 


Runner 




Resolute 


Rummage 


Rural 




Resonant 


Rumsy 


Rusher 




Restive 


Ruthless 


Rushlight 




Reveller 




Rustic 




Rhodope 




Sacripant 


Safety 


Rhymster 




Sailor 


Saffron 


Ribster 




Saladin 


Sally 


Richmond 




Salient 


Sanguine 


Rifleman 




Sampler 


Sappho 


Rifler 




Sampson 


Scandal 


Rigid 




Sanction 


Scandalous 


Rigour 




Sapient 


Science 


Ringwood 




Sapling 


Scrupulous 


Rioter 




Saraband 


Selina 
Q 



226 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Dogs 


BiTCUES 


Do(is 


Bitches 


Saracen 


Sempstress 


Special 




Satellite 


Shiny 


Specimen 




Saucebox 


Shrewdness 


Speedwell 




Saunter 


Skilful 


Spinner 




Scalper 


Sloven 


Splendour 




Scamper 


Slyboots 


Splenetic 




Schemer 


Songstress 


Spoiler 




Scourer 


Sophy 


Spokesman 




Scrambler 


Sorcerj' 


Sportsman 




Screamer 


Spangle 


Squabbler 




Screecher 


Specious 


Squeaker 




Scuffler 


Speedy 


Standard 




Seabrigbt 


Spinster 


Statesman 




Seaman 


Spiteful 


Steady 




Seapoy 


Spitfire 


Stickler 




Searcher 


Sportful 


Stinger 




Senator 


Sportive 


Stingier 




Seneca 


Sportly 


Stormer 




Sentinel 


Sprightly 


Stranger 




Settler 


Starlight 


Streamer 




Sharper 


Stateley 


Strider 




Shiner 


Stella 


Stripling 




Shifter 


Stoutness 


Striver 




Sifter 


Strenuous 


Strivewell 




Signal 


Strumpet 


Stroker 




Silver 


Sukey 


Stroller 




Simpleton 


Surety 


Struggler 




Sindbad • 


Susan 


Sturdy 




Singer 


Sweetlips 


Subtill 




Singwell 


Sybil 


Succour 




Skirmish 


Sylvia 


Sunderland 




Smicket 


Symmetry 


Suppler 




Smoker 


Symphony 


Surly 




Smuggler 


Syntax 


Swaggerer 




Snowball 




Sycorax 




Social 




Sylvan 




Soldier 




Syrius 




Solomon 




Tackier 


Taffeta 


Solyman 




Talisman 


Tamerlane 


Solon 




Tamer 


Tattle 


Somerset 




Tancred 


Tawdry 


Songster 




Tandem 


Tawney 


Sonorous 




Tangent 


Telltale 


Soundwell 




Tapster 


Tempest 


Sorcerer 




Tartar 


Tentative 


Sovereign 




Tarquin 


Termagant 


Spanker 




Tattler 


Terminate 


Sparkler 




Taunter 


Terrible 



NAMES OF HOUNDS. 



227 



Doss 


BlTCITES 


Teaser 


Testy 


Telamon 


Thais 


Terror 


Thankful 


Teucer 


Thetis 


Thrasher 


Thisbe 


Threatner 


Thoughtful 


Thumper 


Thoughtless 


Thunderer 


Tidings 


Thwacker 


Tiffany 


Thwarter 


Tigress 


Thwack um 


Timely 


Tickler 


Tinsel 


Titchfield 


Tiresome 


Timon 


Toilet 


Timour 


Toilsome 


Tinker 


Tractable 


Tidings 


Tragedy 


Tipsy 


Treachery 


Tomboy 


Tremulous 


Topmost 


Trespass 


Topper 


Trifle 


Torment 


Trinket 


Torrent 


Trivial 


Torturer 


Troublesome 


Tosser 


Truelass 


Touchstone 


Truemaid 


Towler 


Tunable 


Tracer 


Tuneful 


Traffick 




Tragic 




Trajan 




Trampler 




Transit 




Transport 




Traveller 




Trentham 




Trial 




Trier 




Trinculo 




Trimbush 




Trickster 




Triped 




Triumph 




Troilus 




Trojan 




Trollop 




Trophy 




Trouncer 





Dogs 
Truant 
Trueboy 
Truelove 
Trueman 
Trudger 
Trulliber 
Trusty 
Trywell 
Tudor 
Tuner 
Turbulent 
Turban 
Twanger 
Twig 'em 
Twister 
Tyrant 
Vagabond 
Vagrant 
Valentine 
Valiant 
Valid 
Valorous 
Valour 
Vanguard 
Vandal 
Varlet 
Vaulter 
Vaunter 
Venture 
Venturer 
Venturous 
Venison 
Verderer 
Vermin 
Vernon 
Veteran 
Vexer 
Viceroy 
Victor 
Vigilant 
Vigilance 
Vigorous 
Vigour 
Villager 
Vintager 
Viper 
Volant 
Votary 



Bitches 



Vanity 
Vanquish 
Varnish 
Vault ress 
Vehemence 
Vehement 
Vengeance 
Vengeful 
Venomous 
Venturesome 
Venus 
Verify 
Verity 
Vesta 
Vestal 
Vestris 
Vicious 
Victory 
Victoria 
Victris 
Vigilance 
Viliate 
Violent 
Violet 
Viperous 
Virgin 
Virulent 
Vital 
Vivid 
Vixen 
Vocal 
Volatile 
Q 2 



228 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



Dogs 


BiTCHISS 


Dogs 


Bitches 


Voucher 


Voluble 


Whirlwind 


Whisper 


Vulcan 


Volant 


Whizgig 


Wildernesa 


Wafter 


Wary 


Whynot 


Wildfire 


Waldemar 


Waggery 


Wildair 


Willing 


Walter 


Waggish 


Wildboy 


Wily 


Wanderer 


Wagtail 


Wildman 


Windymere 


Warbler 


Wanton 


Wilful 


Winnifred 


Warder 


Wamha 


Winder 


Winsome 


Warning^ 


Warble 


Wilfred 


Witchcraft 


Warrener 


Warfare 


Wisdom 


Witchery 


Warhoop 


Warlike 


Wiseton 


Wishful 


Warrior 


Waspish 


Woldsman 


Witless 


Waterloo 


Wasteful 


Woodman 


Wonderful 


Waverley 


Watchful 


Worker 


Woodbine 


Wayward 


Wa^y 


Workman 


Worry 


Warrenby 


Waxy 


Wonder 


Wowsky 


Waster 


Wayward 


Wormwood 


Wrangle 


Wearer 


Wedlock 


Worthy 


Wriggle 


Weathergage 


Welcome 


Wrangler 


Wrongful 


Wellbred 


Welldone 


Wrestler 




Wellington 


Whimsy 


Xenophon 




Wentworth 


Whiterose 


Xerxes 




Whipster 


Whirligig 


Zodiac 




Whisker 


Whinny 







APPENDIX IV. 



THE BOOK OF THE RULES AND ACCOUNTS OF THE 
CLEVELAND FRIENDLY SOCIETY. 

{Begun November the Thirteenth, in the Year 1722.) 

Whereas the happiness of all Countrys does chiefly consist in a 
Correspondence and friendship of one Neighbour with another, and 
nothing contributing so much towards it as the frequent conversing 
of the Gentlemen together, who may thei-eby quash all Idle Stories, 
that are too often spread about the Country, to the Disuniteing of 
some Families and the great prejudice of others. And we having our 
fore-fathers in this Neighbour-hood, as a pattern, who did formerly 
Live in the most intimate and Amicable manner, open, friendly and 
obliging to each other, and being desirous to imitate so good an 
Example, and Conceiving Visits at our private Houses, not so fre- 
quent, as desirable; besides being unavoidably subject to something 
of Ceremony they cannot be so Conducible to that good end, as a free 
Meeting at some publick-House would be under proper Regulations, 
to prevent disorders. Have therefore mutually agreed to meet Weekly 
on Tuesdays at some publick House, as shall be agreed on from Time 
to Time, And to conform our Selves to the following Rules : — 

First. That no person be Admitted to be a Member of the Society ; 
but such as shall first publickly lay his Right- Hand upon a Hunting- 
Horn, and declare himself no Enemy to Cocking, Smooking,' Fox- 
hunting and Harriers ; And shall endeavour to discover all poachers, 

' Clergymen to be excused of the word Smookiug, and laying their Hand 
on the Hunting-Horn. 



230 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

and shall promise to the utmost of his power to promote the Interest 
of the Society, and shall Subscribe his Name owning his Consent to 
the Undei-written. Rules. 

Secondly. That every Member of the Society shall in his Turn 
be Chair-man to the Same. 

Thirdly. That no New Member be Admitted ; but such as shall be 
Recommended to the Society by two old IMembers, who shall give an 
Account of the Person to be Introduc'd ; and he haveing first 
obtained a Majority of Votes of the Society shall thereupon be Con- 
ducted by the same two Members, to the Chairman where he shall 
publickly make the Declaration as a foresaid. 

Fourthly. That at a General Meeting of the whole Society, a 
Chaplain and Secretary be Appointed, which shall have their Charges 
defray'd for their Trouble. 

Fifthly. That no Article shall be added, but such as shall be made 
by a Majority of the whole Society, who Shall Severally Subscribe 
theii- Names to the Same ; And That any Member of the Society 
Reflecting at any Time upon, and refusing to Conform to any of the 
Articles which he shall Subscribe to, or Such as shall be made at any 
Time afterwards, by this Society; shall be expell'd the Same. 

Sixthly. That a Majority of the Society shall have the power to 
Expell any Member, of Avhich Expulsion the Chairman shall give 
notice to the Person so Expell'd. 

Seventhly. That the Chairman for the Time being shall Declare 
all penalties, which shall be incurred by the Members of the Said 
Society and others, and give all Orders, And see that they be punc- 
tually Executed, And that all persons, that are not Members and 
be Addmitted into their Company, shall be Conformable to all the 
Orders and Rules of the same or be forthwith desired to withdraw 
by the Chairman. 

Eightly. That the Dinner be set upon the Table on all Season- 
able Hunting-Days at two a Clock, and on those, that are not so, at 
half an Hour after Twelve. 

Ninthly. That the Chairman shall immediately after Dinner, 
Colkct of every Gentleman Member of the Said Society, two Shillings, 



APPENDIX IV. 231 

and of every Freeholder one, and of every other Gentleman that is 
not a INIember two Shillings and Sixpence, and that then the Said 
Chairman call up the Mistress of the House and pay her for every 
Gentleman Member or not, one Shilling for their Dinner, and for 
every Fi-eeholder Sixpence. 

Tenthly. That if any other Liquors than such as the House 
affords be Drunk by any of the Members of the Society, The Mistress 
of the House be allow'd two pence for every Quart, that is Drunk ; 
And that the Person so drinking any such Liquor, as a fores'^ shall 
over and above their first Contribution pay their share for the Same. 

Eleventhly. That a Box be provided with three Locks, The Keys 
be kept by three Different persons (being Members of the Society) 
chosen by a Majority thereof for the keeping of Books of Account, 
and Money rais'd by the Society. 

Twelfthly. That every Gentleman member of the said Society, 
which shall be absent on any of the s^ Days of Meeting ; and shall 
not give notice thereof to the Chaii'man on the Tuesday before. 
Setting forth his going out of the Country, or a Reason to be allow'd 
of by a Majority then Met. Shall for every Such neglect forfeit one 
Shilling, and every Freeholder Sixpence to be pay'd to the Mistress 
of the House for their Dinner. 



Rules to he ohserved in Drinking. 

First. That a forfeit Glass be provided and Set upon the Table 
and kept there to be Drunk full by every person Member of the Said 
Society or others who shall by a Majority of the same be Yoted a 
Defaulter, and another Glass with a Seal to be fixt at such a certain 
height, as shall be agreed on for the Drinking of all private Healths 
upon every respective Club-day, to be Called for after the Cloth is 
taken from off the Table. 

Secondly. That whilst at Dinner every ones Health then present 
shall be Drunk by every Respective person before the Cloth be taken 
away in Some Strong Liquor or other on pain of Drinking for every 
such neglect Two forfeit Glasses. 

Thirdly. That no one be obliged to Drink Bumpers (other than 
forfeit Glasses) but to the four following Healths which are to be 



232 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

named Distinctly, and begun by the Chairman immediately after the 
Cloth be drawn. 

Yiz. 1. King George. 

2. The Church of England by the Law Establish'd. 

3. The Queen, Prince, Princess, and all the Royal Family. 

4. Prosperity to the Society, and to all the Neighbouring 

Cleveland Families. 

Fourthly. That the Chairman call vipon his right-hand man for 
his Toast, who shall name it aloud to the Company, who shall then 
severally Drink it round, filling the Glass to the vipper part of the 
Wax, learning the Health very punctvially, neither adding to nor 
Diminishing therefrom, except to the jiraise of the Health aforesaid, 
under penalty of Drinking, for every default one forfeit Glass.' 

Fifthly. That if any objection be made to any Toast which shall 
be offered, it shall be determined by a Majority of the Society. 

Sixthly. That every Gentleman (Member or not) who shall swear 
an Oath, shall for the first offence. Drink one forfeit Glass, for the 
Second pay a Groat, the third Sixpence, and every other Time Six- 
pence ; Eveiy Freeholder for the first Default shall Drink one forfeit 
Glass, for the Second two, the third three, the fourth, and every other 
Time four. 

Seventhly. That every person, who shall speak in any other Lan- 
guage than his Mothers Tongue, shall for every such time Drink a 
forfeit Glass ; and that every person, who shall Kiss or otherwise Dis- 
turb any of the Women Attending on the Society, shall for every 
such Time pay to the same WomtcU Sixpence. 

Eightly. That every one upon all Accusations, shall stand up and 
make the sarne to the Chaii-man after which the person so accused 
shall have the Liberty to stand up, and make his Defence, and then 
shall sit down and submitt to the Determination of the Society. 

Ninthly. That upon any Disputes which may happen, the persons 
so disputing shall Du^ect their Discourse to the Chairman, who shall 
suffer no more than one to speak at a Time, and Direct by holding 
out his Finger, who shall be heard, under penalty of forfeiting, for 
every such default Sixpence. 

' Clergj-men Excused of this Article who shall Lave the Liberty to Omit 
any part of the Health. 



appp:ndix IV. 



233 



Tenthly. That no Box and Dice be allowed But if any of the 
Members of the Society or others have a mind to play at Cards at any 
Time, they may be allow'd to play at a Table by themselves ; provided 
they do not play to the loosing of five Pounds at a Sitting, And that 
all Wagers made, or offered to be made by any Person or Persons 
shall be made Null or Void unless allow'd on by the Chairman with 
the Consent of a Majority of the Members there present. 

Lastly. Tliat all Doubts, Matters, or things arising in the said 
Society to be decided, shall be determined by a Majority of Votes of 
the s*^ Members which shall be given by holding up their Thumb, 
(for yeas) and down (for IS'oes) which they shall Continue to doe, till 
the Chaii'man has Counted them both and declared the Majority, and 
in Case the Votes are equal, the Chairman shall have the Casting 
Vote after which all Disputes shall end, and no one to have Liberty 
to Vote, but such as have subscribed, as a foresaid, and are Members 
of the Society. 

"VVe whose names are Subscribed, do hereby Acknowledg our 
Approbation, and promise our Conformity to all the Ai-ticles above 
Written. Witness our Hands this Diiy of 



Pennyman. 
Jas. Pennyman. 
Z. More. 

J. LOWTHEB. 
Jo. TUKNER. 

Wm. Lemax. 
Cha. Taxered. 
Cha. Eathurst. 

Dad.' DOWTHWAITE. 

Cha. Chalonbr. 
G. Vane. 
H. Fletcher. 
Tho. Davison. 
J A. Hustler. 
John Chaloner. 
Cho. Turner. 
Ed. Chaloner. 
W. Hustler. 

CODRINGTON JOHN PRISSICK. 

W. Warton. 
Matt. Consett. 
Jno. Jackson. 
\V. Hustler. 



Ra. Robinson. 
Wii. Turner. 
John Harrison. 
Nic. Swainston. 
Tho. Standish. 
R. Dent. 
James Wilson. 
GiLtiT. Waugh. 
Matt. Watt. 
Francis Forsteb. 
Jno. Wilson. 
Gilbert Lacy. 
WiLLJi. Chaloner. 
Jno. Morgan. 
Edwd. Nelson. 
Thos. Mubgateoyd. 
Sim. Butterwick. 
Wm. Jones. 
Francis Clarke. 
W. Hide. 
James Carr. 
Geo. Sfainthorp. 
Geo. Duck. 



234 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



W. Jackson. 
R. Graham. 
Watt Cinder. 
H. Cholmley. 
Tho. Davison, Jnr. 
Thos. Proddy, 
John Langstaff. 
Tho. Skotlowe. 
Jno. Ley' Witham. 
Ra. Ward. 

WlLLM. LONGBOTIIANG. 

Thos. Frankland 
Md. Wm. Turner. 
Jno. Cholmeley. 
Wm. Sutton. 
Z. H. More. 
Thos. Stuart More. 



Geo. Bulman. 

ACLOMB MiLBANKE. 

Tho. Ascough. 
James White. 
William Drason. 
Christop. Wayne. 
Tho. Lockhart. 
John Cholmley. 
Hugh Cholmley. 
Rich. Girmonsway. 
JoNA. Davison. 
Jno. Motley. 
Ja. Cooke, Jnr. 
Tho. Peirse. 
Jno. Hopkinson. 
Jno. Turner. 
John Hall, 






Z^^";', 

^^i^^' 













■:jw/?c/r 


















u/jl^' 



'^ 



fn^ ^"-^-"^^^^ , 














^/— 



.ri<s^\ 






M^'f^iM^ 



•/A, 







^ftUruJ 



l^^/2. 
























^-^ : u/i^t^ft/^ 















V V> 












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i'-i-^^A^ 











APl'KN'DIX IV 



:>:> 



THE ACCOUNTS OF THE CLEVELAND-FKIENDLY 
SOCIETY, 

Begun November the XIII. in the Year MDCCXXII. 



The Names of the Contributors and the Sums Contributed by the 
Members op the Cleveland-friendly Society. Towards a Capital 
Stock for the Uses of the Society. 



Cholmley Turner, Esqr. . 

■William Hustler, Esqr., Deceas'd 

Wharton Wharton, Esq. . 

Mr. William Turner 

Captain Consett 

Mr. Codrington Prissick 

Edward Challoner, Esqr., Deceas'd 

Sr. AVilliam Hustler, Deceased 

Ealph Robinson, Esqr. . 

Sr. James Pennyman, Bart. . 

James Pennyraan, Esq. . 

Nicholas Swainston, Esqr., Deceased 

Mr. Jno. Turner 

Charles Bathurst, Esqr. , 

Mr. David Dowi:hwaite, Deceas'd 

Mr. Charles Chaloner, Deceas'd 

Mr. Jolin Chaloner . 

George Vane, Esqr. 

Thomas Davison, Esqr. . 

Henry Fletcher, Esqr. . 

Robert Killinghall, Esq. 

Zachariah iMoor, Esqr., Deceased 

James Hustler, Esqr. 

William Chaloner, Esqr. 

Mr. Ralph Mars 

Mr. William Sutton 

Mr. James Cooke, Junr. 

Mr. Thomas Peirse 

Jno. Turner, Esqr. . 



£ s. (I. 
































236 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 



1722. 



Dehtur. 







£ s. d. 


Nov. 13 . 


To 3 Flasks of Wine Drank ys'' 


6 


„ 20 




To pd. Two flasks. Do. 
To Do. One Bottles of Do. . 










4 
2 6 


,, 21 




To Do. 2 bottles of Do. . 












5 


,, 27 




To Do. 2 flasks 














4 


,, ,, 




To Do. 1 Botle 
















2 6 


Deer. 4 




To Do. 1 Botle 
To Do. 2 flasks 
















2 6 
4 


Dec. 11 




To Do. 2 Flasks 
To Do. 1 Bottle 
















4 
2 6 


„ 18 




To Do. 1 Do. . 
















2 6 


1722/3 


To Do. 1 flask 
















2 


Jany. 15 


To Do. 1 Botle 
















2 6 


Feby. 18. 


3 flasks 
















6 


Mar. 5 




4 Do. . 
















8 


„ 12 




4 Do. . 
















8 


1723, Mai 


-7 . 


3 Do. . 
















6 


May 14 




3 Do. . 
















6 


June 11 




2 flasks of ^ 


Vine 














4 


July 9 




4 Do. . 
















8 


,, 23 




4 Do. . 
















8 


Augt. 19 




2 Do. . 

„ 1^ of Brand 


y 














4 


Oct. 1 




6 Do. . 
1 Do. . 
















11 
1 10 


„ 29 . 




5 Do. . 
















9 2 


Nov. 12 




2 Do. . 
„ 4 of Wine . 
„ 4 of Do. 
















2 
8 
6 8 


Deer. 10 . 




Used 3 B. Brandy . 




















Do. 4 of Wine 
















7 6 




£7 8 2 


1724. The Chairman. . . Debtor. ... To the Stock. 


May 12 . 


To Wine Bought of Mr. Consit, 1 Dozn 


£ s. d. 
10 


June 30 . 


To Do. bought of Cho. Turner, Esq., 1 Do. . 


1 


Oct. G . 


To Wine Acct 


£ s. d. 
12 12 


)> 


To Do. reed, for 9 flasks us'd this day . 






15 


>> 


To y" Ales Acct 






l") 2 


Nov. 17 . 


To Wine Acct. reed, for 3 flasks Usd y» Day. 
To 4 flasks Brandy in 10 Qts. Punch 






5 
10 


Decembr 1 


To Ale Acct. y« Day, W. T 

To wine Ace. Reed. 1 Dozn., all used y' day . 






8 






18 


Deer. 15 . 


for 6 Flasks of Wine Reed. And usd y day 






14 


Jany. 19 . 


To Six Flasks of wine used ye" 






14 


1724/5. The Chairman. . .Debtor. . . . To the Stock. 


Jan. 16 . . 1 To Wine Account 


£ s. d. 
13 13 


To Do. received y« day for 6 Bottles usd y' day . 


15 


March - 1 o the Wine Account, £12 195. ; Ale Account, Is. 6d. 


13 6 



APPENDIX IV. 



237 



1722. 



p. Cuntra Credit'. 



Nov. 13 . 
„ 20 . 
Fcby. IS. 
1723, May 7 
July 23 . 
Augst. 19 

Oct'.' 1 . 
Novr. 12 . 



Deer. 10 . 



1724. 



May 12 
„ 26 

June 9 
„ 30 

July 28 

Augt. '11 
Sept. 's 



Oct. 6 

Nov. 17 

Dcr. 1 
Dccembr 

Jan. 16 



15 



P. one Dozen of Wine bought of Mr. Consett 

P. one Dozen of Do. bought of Mr. Hustler 

P. Do. of Conseet . 

P. Do. „ ... 

P. 4 flasks of Cho. Turner, Esq. 

P. 4 Do 

P. 2 Do. of Brandy 

P. 1 Do. of Wine Captn. Consit 

P. 2 Do. Mr. Challinor . 

P. 2 Botles of Brandy of Do. . 

P. 2 Duz. Lemons of Mr. Hustler 

p'. 18 Bottles of Brandy of Captn. Consit 



£ g. (I. 
14 
1 10 



1 4 
1 4 





8 
8 



1 


2 





2 










2 







2 





1 


1 





£10 


5 






£13 13 
10 5 



Reed. Originall Stock . 
Disbursed for a Stock of Wine, &c. 

Rems' Debt In Cash to y« s" Stock 

Laid out of y" Original Stock for a Stock 1 ^^^ ^ q 

of Wine, &c., as above . . -J 
Expended at y° Sev" Daj^es of Meeting | £782 

as on y° other side . • • , • J z: — r^~\ 
Rems. Accountable to y" Wine and Brandy Stock in 1 

Liquor •' 



3 8 



2 16 10 



P. Cuntra Credit'. 



By 4 flasks of Wine, and 1 Do. of punch Drank 

By 2 tiasks of Wine 

By 4 fl. Do. i 1 of Brandy 

By 7 fl. Wine . 

By 1 fl. Do. . 

By 1 Do. to Mr. Hide 

By 4 Do. 

„ 1 Do. 

,. 1 Do. 



P. Cholmly Turner, Esq 
Wine 



,, Pd. himi for 1 Doz. flasks } 



p. Mr. Swains'tonb.Pd. him for Lemons k Sugar . 
To Mr. Watson for 1 Doz. wine, paid . 
To Mr. Watson 1 Doz. of Wine, pd. 



£ s. d. 


7 6 


3 4 


9 


11 8 


1 8 


1 8 


G 8 


1 8 


1 8 


10 


11 6 


1 8 


18 



To Mr. Watson for 1 Doz. of Wine, pd. 



238 



1725. 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 
The Chairman. I)'. 



Aprill 6 
)j )? 

22 
May 17 
June 8 

June 17 

Scjit. IG 



1726. 



To Cash received of Wm. Hustler, Esq. 

Remainder then Stock in hand 

Six Bottles of Wine 

And furnished 12 ditto more 

To Cash retd. for wine Bottles used this day 

To ditto of Mr. W. Turner for one Bottle 

To ditto on the Ale Account 

Stock of Wine remaining in hand, Nine Bottles 

To Cash reed, for five Bottles of Wine . 

To ditto — on the Ale Account .... 

Stock of Wine in hand, four Bottles 

To Cash reed, for four bottles of Wine drank this day 

To detto — on the Ale Account .... 

To Cash for three Bottles of Wine used this day . 

To ditto— upon Ale Account 

N. S. Suraa . 



To Cash Eecd. of Nicholas Swainton, Esqr. . 

Remained then stock in hand 

To Cash Eecd. for 9 Bottles of Wine used this day 

To Ditto on y" Ale Account 

To Ditto Reed, of Mr. Challoner for forfeit money 

To Do. Reed, of Sir William Hustler for Do. 

To Do. Reed, for 10 Flasks of Wine used this day 

To Do. „ for a Forfeit money of Wm. Turner, Esq. 



To Ballance of Wine Acct. as p. Contra 

To Do. of Ale 

To Cash reed, more upon j' Ale Acct. . 





£ 


s. 


d. 




13 





6 




1 


2 


6 






2 


6 






4 


10 






12 


6 






3 









10 









4 


8 






7 


6 






4 


2 




£16 


12 


2 




£ 


.f. 


d. 




13 


<) 







1 


2 


6 






G 









2 









1 









15 


G 


• 




1 







£15 


17 







£ 


s. 


d. 




13 


4 


4 




1 


14 


6 






11 


G 




£\o 


6 


4 



The Chairman. BeJf. 



Mar. 31 . 


• 

To Cash Brought Ford 

To Do. Reed, for 3 flasks of Arrack .... 
To Do,. Reed, for 1 flask of Wine 


£ s. d. 

13 11 4 

6 1 

6 S 




13 ly 


Aprl 14 . 


Cash Received of Jno. Turner, Esqr 

Remained then Stock in hand, 14 Fla. of an-ack, of 

Wine 2 FJa. 
Receiv'd of Edwd. Challoner, Esq., an arrear of 2 Fla. 

of arrack 


£ X. d. 
13 G 

4 



APPENDIX IV. 



239 



172: 



Per Contra. 



Creel' 



Aprill 6 . 



22 
M;Vy 17 . 
June 3 . 



June 17 



Jan. 20 . 



By Ca.sh paid Mr. Consett for a flask of Wine 

By ditto paid fur drinking 9 Bottles of Wine and a^ 

flask / 

By Cash paid Mr. Watson for a Dozen Bottles of Wine 

By ditto, for drinking five Bottles of Wine . 

By ditto paid for drinking four Bottles of Wine . 

By Cash paid Mr. Watson for a dozen Bottles of Wine 

By ditto paid for drinking three Bottles 

Ballance due & Contra ic carryd to new Account . 



N. S. 



Suma 



By Cash paid for Drinking a Bottle of Wine 
By Ditto pd y" maid and for Ale .... 
By Ditto pd. for 1 Dozn of Wine .... 
Balhince due v Contra & Carryd to Wine new Acct. 
Do. Carry'd to Ale Act 



By Cash pd. Mr. Bright for half an Ankr Arrach 9, "1 

19 flasks / 

By Ballance remaining on both Accts. in my hands 



Rems. In Stock y'' Ank Arrach 9, 19 flasks, and a flask 
of Wine from Mr. Ustler. 



£ s. (I. 
1 6 

1 8 

1 8 

10 

8 

1 10 

<; 




1.3 9 



£\& 12 2 



v.) 

1:5 4 

1 u G 



£15 17 

£ s. d. 

1 15 

13J1 4 

£15 6 4 



1726. 



Per Contra. 



Credr 



Mar. 31 . .P. Cash paid Mary Baxter for a Dinner she provided "I 

when none of y (Jentlemn came . . . / 

P. Do. paid for a Dozen of Glasses , . . . 

P. Do. paid for 2 Dozen of Lemns . . . . 

P. Do. pd. for sf^ of Loaf Sugar 

Ballance of Acct. Due in mv Hands . . . . 



£ s. (I. 

10 6 

4 

2 

2 

18 6 

13 fi 

13 19 



Aprl 14 . . Paid for 5 quarts of ale 

Do. To Pipes, Tobacco, & Servt. 
Do. For Drinking a quart of Pun & Wine 
Pd. Mr. Swainston an old debt for Leramons 
P. Mr. Swainston for Lemons for this day's use 



£ 8. d. 



240 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

1726. The Chairman. DeU. 



Aprl 14 . 



May 5 . 



May 26 . 



June 9 



June 30 . 



July 8 . 
„ 21 . 



29 



, 1 @ 1/6 



Receiv'd of Mr. Jackson an arrear of 2 Fl. of Wine 

Reed, for 3 Fla. of arrack 

Do. for 2 Fla. of Wine . 

Reed, on the ale account 

To a Surplus in Collection 

To an omission by mistake in the ale account 

To Cash receiv'd for 8 Ordn'. 

Remain'd then Stock in hand, 11 Flas. of arra 

Wine 
To Cash receiv'd for Ordinaries 
To ale account 
To Sugar and Lemons . 
To arrack 2 Flasks Expended 
To Wine, 1 Flask Expended . 
To a Surplus in Collection 
Stock in hand, 9 Fla. arrack, a fresh supply of 13 Fla 

of Wine 
Receiv'd for Ordinaries . 
Do. on the Ale acct. 
for 3 Flasks of arrack used . 
for i Flasks of W^ine used, 3 @ 2/ 
for Lemons and Sugar . 
Remain'd then Stock in hand, arrack, 5 Flasks ; wine, 

5 Flas. ; had a supply of 12 more of Wine 
Receiv'd for Ordua. ....... 

Do. on Ale acct 

Do. for 5 Fla. of W^ine used 

Do. for 1^ Fla. of Arrack used . . . . . 

Do. for ^ Doz. of Lemmons 

Stock in hand, Wine, 12 Fla. ; aiTack, Flas. 3^ 
Receiv'd for Ordna. ....... 

Do. on Ale acct 

Do. for a Flas. of arrack Drunk p. Mr. Jno. Turner 
Do. for 2| Flas. of arrack used this day 
Do. for 4 Flas. of Wine used this day .... 
Do. for 1 Doz. of Lemmons ...... 

Do. to a Surplus in Collection 

Reed, of Mr. W^harton, p. Mr. Jno. Turner for 2 Flas. "\ 

of Wine / 

Remain'd Stock in hand, Wine, 8 Fla. ; arrack, 1 Fla. 

Receiv'd for 14 Ord 

Do. on the Ale account ...... 

Do. for 7 Flas. of Wine, 1 of arrack, (a) 2s. p. Fla. 
Do. in a Surplus of Collection .... 



M. Consett, Debt in Cash 

Wm. Hustler, p]sqr , Debr. as pr. Mr. Jno. Turner's") 
acct. made up y" 20th of .June last, one Flask . / 
Edwd. Challoner 1 „ f Debtr. to one P'lask of Wine ) 
Nicho' Swainston J *^" \_ drunk at Baxter's 
Cash Paid of Mr. Consett .... 
Paid for 9 Bottles of JVine .... 



i 





4 







1 


8 




3 







9 







9 







6 







7 


a 




2 


10 




10 







10 







10 







^ 







1 


3 




12 


6 




12 


6 




2 







5 







8 







2 


9 







q 




4 







12 


6 




12 


6 




16 







5 


2 


24 


1 


1 


10 





3 


14 





10 


14 





10 


1 


2 


6 



172G. 



APPENDIX IV, 
P' Contra. Creel'. 



241 



for 



To Cash paid for 8 Ordinaries .... 

To Cash paid for 9 Ordinaries .... 

To Ale and attendance ...... 

Paid for drinking 4 quarts of Punch, 1 of Wine . 
Do. for Pipes and Tobacco ..... 

Paid for 8 Ordna. @ 1/-, 2 at 6<^ 

Do. for Ale, Pipes, Tobacco, and Servt. 

for Drinking 6 qu. of Punch, 4 of Wine @ 2d. 

Paid out of y"= ale acct. to make up a deficiency of "I 

Collection j 

The 12 Fla. of Wine, price unknown, tl' odd one 1/6, "1 

all unpaid for j 

Paid Mr. Jno. Turner for this Doz., and a Doz. men-"! 

tioned on y« other side, which we had on y 9th of '. 

June J 

Memo. : 

Mr. Chall & Mr. Swainston, Club-day, 26 May,"] 
Drank 4 Hasks of Wine, and are unpaid for, J. 
after Comp. gone ...... J 

That Mr. Wharton came one day w"" oneT „. 
Applegarth and drunk 2 Flas., and are ^^ ,> .'?*;^ 
unpaid for . . . . . J I'aid fo 

That one came & got a Flas of an'ack, Mr. "j Since 

Jno. Turner j Paid for 

Paid for Ordna 

Do. for \ Doz. of Lemons 

Do. for Ale 

Do. for Pipes, Tobacco, and attendance 

Do. for Drinking .5 flas. of Wine, 8 quart of Punch 

Do. for a Doz. of Wine more @ 2 - P. doz. . 

Paid for Ordna 

Do. To House, Pipes & Tobacco 

Do. to Ale 

Do. for Drinking 5 qu. of Punch and 4 of Wine . 
Do. for a Doz. of Lemmons ...... 

Paid for a loaf of Double refined Sugar, weight 81b., > 

®rM i 

Paid for 14 Ord., 11 @ 1/-, 3 @ 6rf 

Do. for Ale ......... 

Paid for to House, Pipes and Tobacco .... 

Do. for Drinking 7 qua. of Wine & 2 of Punch @ 2d. . 
Do. for 4 Lemons ........ 

Paid to Mr. Watson for a Doz. of wine .... 

Do. to Carriage for the same 



£ s. d. 

8 

9 
3 

10 

2 

9 

3 3 

1 



3 8 6 



10 





6 





1 


Ci 


1 


f) 


4 





12 


6 


1 


6 



1 6 

2 9 



S 



1 
1 


6 


1 10 

1 


;» 

li 


10 


3 







242 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

1726. The Chairman. Del/. 



Sepr. 29 . 
Oct. y» 20th 
Novr. 3 . 

„ 24 . 

Febv. 16 . 

1727 
June y" 14,1727 



for Ale .... 

Paid for 3 Bottles of Wine 

Paid for Wine 

Reed, for 3 flasks of Brandy 

Paid for Brandy & Lemons 

for Wine 

Paid for 2 Bottles of Wine 



Stock in hand. 



£ s. d. 
2 6 
7 
17 
3 
5 
2 
5 



16 16 6 



June 15, 1727 
„ 29 . 



Oct. 12, 1727 



Oct. 12 
Nov. 9 



Xbcr 7 

1728 
July 25 



To Cash Reed, of Mr. Chalouer . 
Stock in hand, 23 Bottles of port 

„ „ 2 Bottles of White Wine 

To Cash Reed, for Wine 

Deliver'd to Mr. Vane in Cash 
Stock of Wine in hand as above . 

Tot. Delivd. 



Reed, by Subscript. 21 Gs. 
by y* Ale Acct. 



To Stock in hand as on the other side . 
To Cash receiv'd of Cho. Turner, Esq. , 
To Cash for 2 bottles of Arrack at Stockton . 
To Cash Collected of the Compa. at Ormesby For — 
4 Bottles of Arrack . . . . £0 10 



one dous. French Wine . . . 1 10 

Two bottles of Port .... 03 

one dous Lemons .... 02 

Shugr 1 

To Ditto for the Ale Acct. ...... 

To Mr. Swainston for 2 botles Red port 

To Rodgr. the Land Lord for 2 hot. white do. 

Stock left att Ormesby, 2 Bottles Arrack, 1 dous 
Lemons, 19 Bottles of Red Port, k. Sbugr 

To Cash Collected att Stockton for 3 bottles of Arrack 
Stock att Stockton, 1 Bottle of arrack 

To Cash Collected att Stockton for 1 bottle of Arrack . 



To Subscription, 22 (iuineas 
To Ale Stock . 



£ s. d. 
16 10 10 



11 





21 8 
2 1 


10 

8 


£23 10 


6 


£ s. 

22 1 

1 9 


d. 

6 


£23 10 


6 



£ 

2 

21 



7 6 



2 6 



2.') 4 


4 


£ s. 

23 2 

1 9 


d. 


8 


£2\ 1! 


8 



APPENDIX IV. 
1726. Per Contra. CrecV. 



243 



Octr. 20 



Nov. 3 . 
„ 24 . 

MavSl, 1727 . 



Payd Wattson & Sutton for 2 Doz. of Wine 

for Carriage .... 

for Brandy &; Varjuir 

for Brandy .... 

Paid for a Key for y" Box 

Payd Charles Chaloner for 2 dozen of Wine , 



£ s. d 

3 

2 

2 6 

3 6 
6 

1 18 



1 727 I 

June 29 . . By Cash pd. iNIr. Challonor for 2 dozen of Wine 

Oct. 12 . .1 By \ Dou.sen of Arrack att Stockton . 



Novr. 9 



1728 
Aug. 8 



Bj' \ Douscn of Arrack Sent to Orm'sby 
I'y 2 Dousii of Lemons sent to Ditto 
By 1 Dousn of French Wine sent to Do. 
By 1 Double refine Sugr. Loaf Sent to Do. 



Bj' y* Ballance paid to Wm. Hustler, Esqr , by Mr. 
Vane 



By Stock on y other side. Delivered to Mr. Hustler at 
Ornesby, Augt. y" 8th — 

2 Bottles of Arrack, 1 dous Lemons .... 
1".» Bottles of Red Port and Shugr 

y^ above Caslis 



£ s. d. 
2 

15 



1.1 





4 





1 10 





ry 


9 



2 9 9 



22 


14 


7 


£25 


4 


4 


£ 


s. 


d. 


1 


7 
10 




I 


£1 
22 

£2V 


17 
14 

11 


1 
7 



R 2 



244 



1728. 



Sept. 12 



Sept 


26 . 


Oct. 


30 . 


Nov. 


14 . 


Dec. 


12 . 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 
The Chairman. Bel/. 



3 Bottles Arrack used 

2 Do. French wine 
1 Do. Port . 
1 Doz. of Lemons . 

3 Bottles Arrack . 

1 Doz. of Lemons . 

2 Bottles of French Wine 

5 Bottles of French Wine 

3 Ditto Methuine . 

6 Ditto of Arrack . 

4 Bottles of Arrack 

5 French Wine 
4 Bottles of Arrack 
3 Do. of French Wine 



1730. The Chairman. 



B' 



7th, 24 . 



8th month, 15. 



9th, 10 



24 



To Cash Collected of y" Gentlemen at Ormesby . 

To Do. for 6 Bottles of wine . . £0 18 

6 Do. „ „ . . l.*^ 

3 pints White wine . . 2 6 
To Cash collected of y gentlemen at Ormesby . 

To Do. for 5 Bottles of Fr. Wine . . .15 

1 Bottle White wine . . . 10^ 

To Cash, &c 

To Do. for 7 Bottles fr. Wine 

4 pints White Wine 



£\ 



1 
3 4 



Stock in hand, 4 Quarts of Eumm, Sugar & Tobacco 
To Cash collected of y" Gentlemen at Guisborough 
To Do. for 2 Bottles of fr. wine .... 
To Do. for U pint of Eumm .... 



Stock at Guisborough 
8 Glasses . 



£8 


15 


2 


£ 


s. 


d. 


1 





6 




2 


8 


1 


3 


2 



1728. 



Nov. 12 . 



Oct. 30 . 



Nov. U . 
Deer. 12 . 

Jan. 31 . 



1730. 



7th, 24 



APPENDIX IV. 
Per Contra. CrecV. 



245 



By A dous. arrack at Ormesby 
By I dous. french Wyne Do. 
Brought over, 19 Bottles of red Port 
By Mr. Dowthwaite, 2 Doz. of Arrack . 
one of French wine . . . • 

1 Doz. of Methuine .... 

2 Doz. & 9 Lemons of Mr. Turner . 
Carridge for Wine & Arrack to Stoxley 
Bone Fire . . . • • 

Lemons, 3 doz 

Lemons, 2 doz. . . . • • 
Deliver to Mr. Bathurst in Cash . 
Stock of Wine in hand, 19 Bottle of Port 
at Ormesby ....•• 
Stoxley, French Wine, 3 Bottles . 

Anack, 6 Bottles 

Bone-fire 

Two Bottles of French Wine, loose 
One Bottle of French Wine, used . 
after the Clubb had paid at Guisborough 
Methuine, 8 Bottles .... 

In money 



£0 19 
£0 16 



£ s. <1. 

1 15 

1 8 

3 K) 

1 12 I) 



It; « 

3 

2 6 
18 (■> 

6 

3 



21 10 2 

8 

7 

19 



18 
5 
2 
2 

10 



24 8 
3 


4 

4 


24 11 
1 


8 



£25 11 


8 



Ver Contra. 



C 



8th month, 15. 



9th month, 10. 



P. 6 Bottles fr. Wine . 

P. 6 Do • 

P. 4 pints of White wine 

P. 2 Galls. Rumm &; Bottles . 

P. 4 Bottles of Brandy . 

P. 1 pound Tobacco 

P. a Sugar Loaf, 4; 10^, 1^ Doz. Lcms. 2 

P. 8 Glasses & a Baskett 

P. Cash paid for Gentlemen's Dinners 

P. Do. for Ale ... . 

P. Do. for 12 Bottles of fr. wine drunk 

P. Do. to y« maid, 1/- ; Do. for Oysters, 1/- 

Do. for 9 quarts of Punch then clrunk 

P. 6 Bottles of fr. wine . 

P. 2 Bottles of white wine . 

f. Cash paiid for Gentlemen's Dinners 

P. Do. for Ale, 3/6 ; Do. for 4 quarts of punch, 8d. 

P. Do. 5 Bottles of Wine, lOd. ; Do. to y= maid, 1/ 

P. 6 Bottles of Wine 

P. 2 pints of White wine 

P. 1 Doz. Lemons .... 

P. Cash paid for Gentlemens Dinners 

P. Do. for Ale, &c. ... 



£ s. d. 

18 

15 

3 4 

16 9 

6 
2 

7 7i 

4 6 
10 

7 7 
2 
2 
1 6 

18 

1 8 

8 
4 2 
1 10 

18 

1 8 

2 

9 6 
6 6 

8 17 7* 



246 



1730. 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 
Tlie Chairman. B' 



June 3 . 
July 6 . 
July 27, 1731 . 

May y 4 th, 173: 



This book deliver'd to James Hustler, Esq., on 
Thursday, y^ 14th of January, 1730-31. 

Raced, of Charles Bathurst, Esq 

Remains in the Reckoning ...... 

Remains in the Reckoning . 



Delivered the Ballance of this account, beino- twenty- 
four pounds, eleven shiUings, and eight "pence, to 
Edward Chalouer, Esq. J. a. Hustler. 

Delivered y Ballance of this Account To James Penny- 
man, Esq., twenty-two Pound, eighteen shillino-s a. 
Twopence. Ed. Chaloner. ' 



1732. 



The Chan-man. 



D'- 



i\lay 4 
June 1 



July 4, 1732 



July 4, 1732 . 
Aug. 1 . 
Do. 22 . 



Ornesby, 7ber, 

10 . 
8ber 10 . 
9ber 4 . 



Do. 28 •. 



To Cash Receivd of Edward Chaloner, Esq. 
To Ditto on the old account ..." 
To Cash Receivd for Six Bottles of Wine 



Stock in hand at Ormesby, 1 doz. & i of wine at 
a bottle 



"■} 



Delivered the Ballance of this to Cholinley Turnor, 
Esqr., Twenty-two pounds, fourteen shillings, and 
five pence. John Chaloner. 



Reed, the Book of Mr. Jno. Chaloner at Stockton. 

The Club at Guisborough. 

At Kirkleatham, Reed, for 1 Bott. Port. 

To 10 Bott. of French Claret. . . ' ' 

To 5 Bott. of Brandy at 2/2^ ..*.". 

To Cash Reed, for Lemons & Sugar 

To 2 Bottles of French Claret . . . . 

The Club at Guisbrough. 

At Kirkleatham. 

To 1.5 Bottles of B'rench Wine, 2/6 

To 6 Bott. of Brandy . . , '. \ \ 

At Gisbrough 



£ s. d. 



24 2 
6 


8 


24 9 
2 


2 
6 



24 11 8 



£ s. 

22 18 

2 

12 


d. 

8 




23 12 
2 14 


8 
3 


20 18 

1 16 

22 14 


5 

5 



£ s. d. 



2 
15 

10 Hi 

13 6J 
5 



1 17 6 

13 0^ 



5 b 0\ 



1730. 



9th, 24 



Deer. 3 



1732. 



Angst. 22 



7ber, 19, ^1 
Orusby J 
8ber 10 . 

Obcr 4 . 
,. 28 . 



APPENDIX IV. 
rev Contra. 0'. 



247 



Receiv'd as on y"^ other side . 

P. 6 llottles fr. wine 

P. Cash for Gentms Dinners. 

P. A\q, punch, y maid, &c. . 



Balance 





£. s. d. 




7 3 8 


• 


1 13 11 


' 


18 




12 « 




11 6 




10 19 7 


ide . 


8 15 2 




£2 4 5 



Receiv'd as on y" other side 



]3v Ale .•••■■■'' 

By Bill pd. Jlr. Charles Chalonor, whom Mr. Bathurst \ 

was Chairman in 1729 J 

Keal. r Contents of this Acct., being one Pound, 

Thirteen Shillings & Four pence, fuU of all Acct. 

Chas. Chaloner. 



Per Contra. 



CrecV. 



May 4 . .By Cash paid to Mr. Robinson for | a Doz. Bottles of j 

Wine • ^_,. • ■ -• 

Junel . . By Cash pd. to Mr. Harley for 2 Doz. of ^\ me . 
By Ditto for Drinking Six Bottles of wine . 



At Kirkleatham. 

By Cash paid for 1 Doz. of French Claret 
By Cash pd. for 11 Bottles of Brandy . 
By Do. pd. for Lemons & Sugar . 
f By Cash paid for i Doz. of French Claret 
\ Paid overplus at y° Reckoning . 
The Club at Guisborough. 
Paid Overplus of y'' Reckoning 
At Kirkleatham. 

To Drinking 18 Quarts of Punch . 
To Cash paid for 1 Doz. of Fr. Wine . 
At Guisbrough. 
The Ale Account . . • 



1 13 



£ s. (I. 

10 

2 3 3 

1 

2 14 3 



£ K. d. 

1 10 

1 4 

12 G^- 

1.5 

1 6 



3 6 





3 





1 


10 



8 


6 





'Ik 



~4^ THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

1732. The Chairman. D\ 



Deer. 19 . 



January IG, 
17ii2 3. 

Jany.l6,1732/.3 



22 Feby. 
2y March 



ilay 17, 1733 . 



July 12 



To a Bott. of Fr. Wiiie . 

To Cash Reed, of Mr. Jno. Chaloner 

Reed. Stock in Hand, 18 Bott. at 2s. 



Delivered to Mr. Jno. Chaloner Twenty pounds, ten 
8hills., 1 penny Halfpenny, And 13 Bott. of port 
Wine And I Bott. of Fr. Wine. 

Received the Book of Cholmley Turner, Esq. 

The Club, then at Gisbrough, receivd overplus at the "I 
Reckoning upon the old account ■ ■ • J 

At Kirkleatham. 

The Club at Gisbrough. 



Delivered to Cliolmely Turner, Esqr., Twenty pounds,"! 
Seven Shillings and seven pence halfpenny, j 
And 2 Bottles of Red port, 3 pints of white wine, 
Sc one bottle of french wine. J. Chaloner. 

To 1 Bott. of Fr. Wine ... 

To 2 Pints of White Wine ...."' 



£ s. d. 

2 6 

20 18 5 

1 16 



28 2 11 
6 11 lOi 



2i 11 Oi 



20 10 1| 
1 6 



20 11 
4 



20 7 



2 6 
2 



£2 12 



The Chairman. 



B' 



1736-7 
Jan. 4 



27 Jany, 1736/7. 



Brought from y" other side 

Reed, for 2 Botts of Fr. Wine . . . . ' 

2 Botts. Rum at 2,?. 1 . , 

3 Botts. Brandy at 2s. / '° P"^^'^ . . . . 

Reed, of Tho' Jackson for 2 Botts. Port, 1 Bott. Wh."] 
Wine, Drunk p. Wm. Chalontr, Esq., and others at'' 
Wilton . .J 

Paid P. Contra Side . 

Deliver'd to John Chalonor, Esqr., in Cash, Eighteen^ 
pds., Twelve Shills. & Nine pence halfpennj^/ 
And 12 Botts. Red Port, 10 Botts. french wine, 3 
Botts. Brandy, & 2 Botts. Rum. 

Cho. Turner. 



£ s. d. 

20 12 \\ 

5 

10 



21 10 U 
2 17 4" 



18 12 



1732. 



APPENDIX IV. 
Per Contra Creel''. 



^49 



I \ £ s. d. 

\)rcv 10 . . ■ Upon y' Ale Acct i^ 8 

i Dott. Drunk by y= Landlady At her Wedding at \ j g ^ 

Ornsby / 



1733, 2y March The Club at GisbrouE;h. 

I'd. overplus at the Reckoning 



£6 11 10^ 



4 



P" Contra. 



Gred'. 



1735 
July 12 

1736 
Jany. 3 



Paid upon the Ale Account . 
To paid for 2 Galls, of Brandy 
To Do. 1 Galln of Pvumm 
Botts. & Corks for y' Brandy, &c. 
To pd. for 1 Doz. of Fr. Claret 



£ s. 

1 

16 

8 

1 

1 10 



17 



d. 

10 


6 


4 



250 



173G. 



THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 
The Chairman. D\ 



3 March . 
Club at Ay ton. 
30 June, 1737, ~) 
Club at |. 
Kirkleatham J 

1738, 6 April . 



Brought from the other side , 
Cash reed, for 3 Bottles of Brandy 

Cash rood, for 2 Bottles of french wine 



Reed, of Wm. Chalonor for his subscription . 
at the same time reed, of Mr. Ralph Ward, £1 1 0, "1 
& Mr. Sutcon £110 J 



To Cash reed, by Cholmley Turner, Esq., of Mr. Jno. 1 

Chalonor / 

To Cash Reed, for the Two Blank Tickets . 



Ballance paid to the Clubb 



s. d. 

12 9i 

6 

5 



19 


3 


9^ 


1 


1 





2 


2 





19 


3 


9| 


12 


18 





32 


1 


9i 


20 









12 1 y.v 



APPENDIX IV. 



251 



Per Contra. 



Cred' 



21 Octr., 1737. 
6 April . 



16, 



Kovemr. 
1738. 
Mays, 17-10 



21 Aug., 1710 



Aug. 21, 1740. 



Delivered to Mr. Turner .... 
John Chaloner. 

Deliv'd to Wm. Chaloner, Esq., in my hands 

& at the same time I delivd 

Chas. Bathurst. 



£ 


«. 


a 


19 


3 


n 


1 


1 





2 


2 






To Cash paid by Cholraley Turner, Esq., For Two \ 
Tickets in y" Bridge Lottery . . • • / 



20 



To Cash delivered to James Hustler, Esq., in my hands 

Wm. Chaloner. 

To Cash delivered to Mr. Wm. Sutton . £15 4 9i 
To 2 Guineas reed. Mr. Richard Hopkinson 2 2 
J. A. Hustler. £17 6 91 

To Cash delivered to Mathw. Consett, Esq. . 

Do. Received of John Turner, Esq 

W. S. Paid. 

I own then to have received of Mr. Wm. Sutton, my^ 
Predecessor, the sum of £18 7s. did (Viz.) 10 36s. ^ 
peices in PortugaU Gold, 7^. ^Id. in Silver m all J 



15 4 9^ 



17 


6 


H 


17 

1 


(? 
1 


H 



18 


7 


Ji 



18 7 9i 



252 , THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

Yarra, July 21, ITH". 
At a publick Meeting of The Teese-Water friendly Society at this 
place, It is unaminonsly agreed by a Majority of the Guinea Sub- 
scribers to y'^ said Society there present that Two Westminster 
Bridge Lottery Tickets be subscribed for, for y® Benefit of y^ said 
Subscribers, And that Cholmley Turner, Esq., be desired and Im- 
power'd to procure the said Two Tickets. And the said Cholmley 
Turner, Esq., is hereby Order'd and Impower'd to purchase Two 
Tickets Accordingly And to pay for the Same out of the Money 
Belonging to y^ said Subscribers. 

Witness our Hands The Day and year abovesaid. 

Tho. Davison. Prissick. 

Ed. Chaloneb. David Douthwaite. 

EOBT. KiLLINGHALLS. ChA. BATHURST. 

Wm. Turner. G, Vane. 

John Turner. J. A. Hustler. 

John Chaloner. 

Pursuant to a request made at Yarmm the 21st Day of July 
1737 (by a Majority of Guinea Subscribors of the Teas water Society 
then present) to Cholmley Turner, Esq., desiring him to procure two 
Bridge Lottery Ticketts for the benefitt of the Said Society, which 
accordingly have been done, and the two Ticketts are now in the Cus- 
tody of the said Cholmley Turner with the No. 41n031 and No. 
4m034, as by the said Ticketts may appear when desired by any of the 
Subscribors. 

Memorandm. Sept. the 19th, 1742. Then deliver'd to Cholmley 
Turner, Esq., 181. Is. 9k/. (Yiz.) 10 30*. pieces in Portugall money. 
Is. M. in Silver, and Z\d. in Copper, being in all 18/. 7s. 'd\d., and 
the Teas Water Societys Money, deliver'd to me by Mr, Sutton, on 
Augt. 21, 1740, as appears in the second preceding Page, I say paid 
by me M. Consett. 

The Receipt of the above Summ is acknowledg'd by 

Cho. Turner. 



Stockton, October the 20th, 1742. 
Whereas Publick Notice was given to the Members of the Tees 
water Society to meet this Day at Stockton in Order to Dispose of the 



APPENDIX IV. 



253 



sum of 18?. 7s. dU., beiDg money belonging to the survivors of the 
Society. Tis unanimously agreed, that the s<i sum shall be DeliverVl 
to Chomley Turner, Esq., in Order to Purchase a Lottery Tickett or 
Ticketts for the Benifitt of the Society, and in case the s^ sum should 
fall short of Pvu-chaceing such Number of Tickitts as Mr. Turner shall 
think Proper, not Exceeding Twenty Pound in the ^^^lole, We tlie 
Under Written do agree to make up the Defficency Over. 

For Sr. Jas. Pennyman, Mr. Hustler, Mr. Warton, my self, J^s. 
Penny man. 

Tho. Davison for myself, 

G. Vane. 

For Mr. R. Ward and myself, 

Rd. Robinson. 

For Wm. Chaloner, Esq., and myself, 
John Challoner, 

ROBT. KiLLINGHALL, 

Tho. Peibse. 
For Mr. John Turner and Self, 

"Wm. Turner. 

Procured for the use as above-mentioned Two Tickets, No. 6963 
and 6964. ^y_ Sutton. 



ACCOUNTS OF Money Laid Out upon the Ale Acct^ 



1723, Dec. 10 

1725 
June 3 . 



Defict 

Forfeitures for Non Apperance— 

Edwd. Challoner, Esq. . 

Matt. Consett, Esq. 



s. 


(I. 


1 





1 





1 






Defray'd. 



1722 

Nov. 27 



Dec. 4 . 
„ 11 . 
1722/3, Jan. 15 
Feby. 18. 



Remains in j' Reckoning 

Forfeits 

Remains in y" Reckening 

Remains in y= Reckening 

Do 

Do 





£ s. d. 




16 2 




4 




2 




4 




9 {> 




1 7 



254 



THE CLF.VELAND HOUNDS. 



Accounts op the Forfeit Money — continued. 



1722/3 




£ s. (1. 


Feby. 26 . 


Remains in y Reckening .... 


1 3 6 


Mar. 5 


Do 










1 6 <; 


„ 12 . 


Do. 
















16 


1723, Mar. 26 . 


Do. 
















1 4 


Apl. 2 . 


Do. 
















1 


May 7 . 


Do. 
















] 2 C. 


„ li . 


Do. 
















1 4 (i 


June 11 . 


Do. 
















1 3 6 


July . 


Do. 
















1 6 


,, 23 . 


Do. 
















1 1 6 


Aug. ]9 . 


Do. 
















1 1 6 


Sept. 3 . 


Do. 
















1 .o 


„ 17 . 


Do. 
















1 


Oct. 1 . 


Do. 
















1 9 6 


„ ir, . 


Do. 
















1 .5 6 


„ 29 . 


Do. 
















1 8 


Nov. 12 . 


Do. 
















1 3 


„ 26 . 


Do. 
















18 6 


Deer. 20 . 


Do. 
Do. 
Do. . 
















12 6 


1731, June 3 . 


4 




6 cS 



The Ale Kcgt.— continued. 



1724 

May 12 . 

„ 26 . 

June 9 . 

Aug. 11 . 

iSepr. 8 . 

Oct. 6 . 

Nov. 17 . 

Decembr. 1 
lOber 15. 

Jan. 16 . 
March 2 . 
Tber 30 . 

Oct 23 . 



Remains in v Ale Act. unexpended 

Do 

Do 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



Added to ^,' Ale Acct., 8,<(. lOr/. in all . 

Reed, for Ale 

Reed, for Ale 

Reed, for Ale 

Remains upon the Ale Account. "W. H. 
Rems. on y"' Ale Acct., Brought from y Wine) 

Acct ' y 

Reed. for Ale .... 



£ X. 


d. 


3 





2 





6 





7 





8 


2 


12 


2 


1 


2 


3 


6 


5 


4 


7 


T) 


1 


i; 


1 14 


6 


3 


6 



THE TEE.SE-WATER SOCIETY'S TWO TICKETS, No. 6963 & 6964. 
Received the March, 1744, of Cho. Turner, Esq., two Blank 
lottery Tickets for the Year 1743, Ko. 6963 & 6964, which I promis 
to Account for on Demand. 

John Cox. 

In tliis Tur.s i.s the Ballance of the Teese Water Society's money 
—8/. 17.s\ 9.'//. ^ 

Cho. Turner. 



ADDENDA. 



Note to Part I. p. 5.—' The Hurworth Fox Chace.' 

Poetic licence has been carried beyond its due limits in tliis case, 
for from the following extracts it is obvious that they did not kill. 
The other extracts may interest the reader as throwing some light on 
the character of Sir Charles Turner. 

Mr Charles Turner's hounds hunted at Areyholme, near Hurworth, in the 
county of Durham, and found the noted old fox Ca:sar, which made an extra- 
ordinary chase. *After a round of four miles, he led to Smeaton through 
Hornby and Appleton ; then back aga'n to Hornby, Worsetmoor, Piersbur-h, 
Limpton, Craythoni, :»Iiddleron, Hilton Seamer, Newby, Marton, Ormsby ; then 
upon Hambleton, through Kirkleatham Park, Upleatham, Skelton, and Kilton.+ 
Mr Turner tired three horses, and only three hounds were in pursuit, when 
he thought proper to call them off, it being near five in the evenmg. The 
chase was upwards of fifty miles.-Sjfartinrj Magazine. August 1793. Vol. n. 
folio 281. 

Extraordin-ary Foxchase, run in Yorkshire on thk 
1st of December 1775. 
The hounds of the late Sir Charles Turner, Bart., of Kirkleatham, hunted 
at Aureyholm Woods, near Haworth, and found the noted old fox Caesar, who 
made an extraordinary chase. After a round *....(«« above) .... and 
Kiltout Sir Charles Turner tired three horses; Robert Colhng, Esq., ot 
Haworth, was the last and only horseman, who called off the hounds, that 
started when they first found the fox : near 5 o'clock in the afternoon there 
were only three hounds in pursuit, one of which was bred in the Januarj- be- 
fore Sir Charles, after the chase, invited the Gentlemen present to his house 
at Kirkleatham, where they were most hospitably entertained ; the chase was 
upward of 50 rm\^^.- Snorting Magazine, December 1794. Vol. v. folio 142. 

The same Gentleman (Sir Charles Turner) made a match with the Earl of 
March, for 4,000 guineas a-side, to be performed on the fell near Richmond 

Yorkshire, in the year 1753. u u • i f^,. 

The conditions of the match was, that Sir .I'harles Turner should ride ten 

miles within the hour, in which he was to take thirty leaps-each leap to be 



256 THE CLEVELAND HOUNDS. 

one yard one quarter and seven inches high (4 ft. 4 in.). Sir Charles performed 
it upon a Galloway, to the astonishment of every person present, in 46 minutes 
and 59 seconds. — Sporting Magazine, December 1794, Vol. v. folio 142. 

The Pychely hunt assembled on Thursday, the 26th ult. . . . they had a 
desperate run of thirty-two miles on the Thursday preceding, and in the 
evening some desperate play. — Sir Charles Turner was lately elected a member 
of this sporting society. — 25?., the contents of the box belonging to the gentle- 
men of the Pychely hunt on breaking up for the season, given to the North- 
ampton General Infirmary. — Sporting Magazine, April 1795, Vol. vi. folio 53. 



Note to Part I. pp. 8-10. 
A New Fox Hunting Song descriptive of the Run of Jan. 29, IT.'^i^. 

' An old copy of this song has been sent me which gives a little 
more information with regard to this run. The song is headed ' A 
S(ing of a Chace with William Chaloner Esqr's Fox-Hounds Guisbro' 
in Cleveland, wrote by Burtill, Painter who was at the Chace on 
Saturday 29th of Jany. 1785. Supposed 63 miles run.' 

From this it is clear that ' the Cleveland Hounds ' was the title of 
Mr. William Chaloner's Pack. 

There is little variation in the song to that already given, except 
the last two lines of verse 1 .3, which run 

' Fox in the Cliff he's gone my Friend ! 
Swift Reynard there resides.' 

The following is written at the end of the song : ' Those gentlemen 
was in the last field when Pteynard got in the Rock by the Seaside 
near Staithes in Cleveland viz., 

Thos. Coal Huntsman. 
Mr. C. Rowntry Jun. 
Mr. Wm, Stocdale. 

The time of the run 7 o'clock in the morning tell four o'clock in 
the afternoon. 

Wrote in Pembrance of the worthy Wm, Chalone Esq. and 
Famely.' 



ADDEND.V, 257 

Note to Pakt IV. p. 17U. — Run of Deckmuer 1, 1859. 
Extraordinary Run ivith the Clevelatvi FoxJiounds. 

TO THE EDITORS OF THE 'YORK HERALD.' 

Gentlemen, — It has fallen to my lot on some former occasions to 
send you an account of the exploits of this merry pack ; but I hardly 
remember ever to have furniylied you with a report of so hard and 
well fought a day as we experienced on Thursday week. 

' Well fought,' I term it, because through five good hours, and 
over a space of above six-and-thirty miles, every legitimate effort was 
made by a resolute pack of hounds to ' pull down ' a*most gallant fox, 
who yet lives, T hope, not only to afford many a good day's sport to 
come, but to perpetuate as well the breed of as staunch a varmint as 
ever carried a brush. The meet was at Hinderwell, and about half- 
past eleven the game old fellow was on foot. His first point was for 
Newton Mulgrave, then through Oakridge Wood for Borrowby 
Quarry ; from there, leaning to the left for High Roxby, he went 
away by Scaling to Dan by Beacon, then to Sandy wath by Dale End, 
and across the Moor to White Cress, where there was a slight check, 
which was very acceptable to the panting steeds, the pace up to this 
time being very smart. Hitting him off again on the Wliitby road, 
which he kept for about two miles, the line was then to C'ommondale, 
from thence to Tidkinhow, Sleddale, Codhill, and over Highcliffe Nab. 
Now he went down to Hutton Low Cross, running near to Guisbro', 
where he took a turn, next pointing to the Belmont Iron Mines, and 
from there through Captain Chalioner's woods, over Highcliffe again 
and Codhill, for Kildaleand Howden Gill. Leaving this cover to the 
left, he next made for Little Roseberry, from there over High Rose- 
berry, through Newton Woods, and then taldng the low country and 
away to Pinchinthorpe. He once more faced the hills, and in the 
highest latitude in Cleveland, about five o'clock, amidst the pelting 
snow and bitter cold, with nought but ' darkness visible,' on the very 
summit of Roseberry Topping, he found in a cleft in the rock a secure 
and well-merited retreat. So ended a memorable day's sport. Well 
did the hounds deserve their fox, and richly does the ' noble fellow ' 
deserve to live. Out of a good field the folloNving got to the end, 
viz. : The Master (Air. Andrew), the Whip, Messrs. Wm. Fetch, 
John, Jos, Isaac, James and Joseph Welford, Barugh, Child, and 
Watson. — Yours, &c., 

c. H. a 

York Ilcrahl, ^lituidyy, Decciuber 10. 1859. 

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