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Full text of "The clubwoman"

Official Or&ivoP 
Que) CafifoVnicO? 
Federation oF Womenlr 
Club 



s. 



November, 1913 



lotel Alexandria 



5th and Spring 




AFTER-THEATRE SUPPER 



IN THE 



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FAMOUS FOR ITS UNIQUE ENVIRONMENT 
PROMPT AND EXCELLENT SERVICE 
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PROPRIETOR 



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BY TRAINED CORSETIERES C0RSEr5H0P B 



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At the very instant you press your 



Homephone 



button the bell rings at the Police Station — the Fire Depart- 
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SPECIAL CLUB RATE 

The editors of the Clubwoman desire to announce that 
a special subscription rate of 50 cents annually is effective 
where five or more subscriptions are sent in together. 
Single subscriptions and clubs of less than five are $1.00 
for each name as heretofore. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 

Los Angeles, California 

Enclosed is One T)ollar for which send me the magazine for one 
year, beginning with the issue. 

Name 

Street No City 

Member Club. State 



ARTISTIC NOVELTIES 



IN 



CHRISTMAS AND WEDDING GIFTS 

and SMALL WARES 

QVAINT, ODD AND VNVSVAL OBJETS D'ART 
IN GLASS, SILVER, BRASS, BRIC-A-BRAC AND PICTVRES 




LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

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727 W. SEVENTH ST. [NEAR FLOWER] 



FINE FVRNITVRE 
OF SPECIAL DESIGN AND SVPERIOR WORKMANSHIP 

ALSO 

RARE IMPORTED 
WALL PAPERS, CARPETINGS; FABRICS AND LACES 
IN GREAT VARIETY 



The Clubwoman 



Official organ of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 



Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 

Subscription Price, One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH, Editor and Publisher. 
MRS. O. C. VOGEL, Federation Editor. 

Matter for Miss Smith and Mrs. Vogcl must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 



CONTENTS 



Frontispiece Miss Lillian D. Clark 

Editorial : 

The Country Life Department 7 

The Club Woman's Ritual 8 

Let L T s Have Peace 8 

California Federation : 

President's Letter 9 

New Federated Clubs 10 

Country Life of California; Lillian D. Clark 11 

World Peace — A Club Woman's Viewpoint ; Mrs. A. H. Griswold 13 

San Francisco District Convention 15 

President's Report 17 

Parliamentary Usage 16 

Dedication Address at Trinidad Head 21 

The Message of the Cross; Mrs. D. A. Francis 22 

"A Voice, Not an Echo" ; Mrs. Emily Hoppin '. 23 

District News : 

Alameda 25 

Los Angeles .". 26 

Southern 27 

To Our Contributors 28 

Books on Sex Education 29 

A Handsome Year Book 32 




MISS LILLIAN D. CLARK 



State Chairman of Country Life 



TKe Clubwoman 



Vol. V 



November, 1913 



No. 1 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Commu- 
nications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P.O.Box 1066, by the 
twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 



It is a favorite bromide of the intro- 
spective humorist that there are but 
seven jokes and that there never have 
been any but these seven jokes — that 
the great number of quasi-quips which 
serve to fill the columns of the funny 
and near-funny periodicals are mere 
changes rung upon some one of this 
original septette. No two humorists 
agree on the same seven but it is 
worthy of remark that three lists sub- 
mitted in a recent controversy on the 
subject all declare that one of the 
seven has to do with the tribulations 
of a novice in the country. 

If this is true it is a pity — for there 
is every indication that within another 
decade we will have only six jokes. 
There are few phases of our poly- 
angled progress more significant than 
our steadily-increasing reversion to 
type in the matter of the return to the 
soil. The first college of agriculture 
was regarded as itself a pretty good 
sort of joke by soft and horny-palmed 
alike. "Farming out of books," the 
scientific rotation of crops, soil-analy- 
sis and its concomitant chemistry- of 
fertilizers, the use of the Babcock 
tester in dairies, the use of double- 
entry in figuring profit and loss on the 
corn crop — all these were sneered at 
as visionary frills until the old-fash- 
ioned farmer who planted his potatoes 
in the dark of the moon lost not only 
the potatoes but the patch itself on a 
mortgage to the bespectacled young 
man who farmed with a test-tube, a 
telephone and a ticker. 

The introduction of the exact sci- 
ences into the mother of all industries 
— the once-despised farming — is a 
measure of self-protection for human- 



kind whose importance is to read in 
the fact that it has already drawn to 
itself some of the best brains of a 
generation. But to the long-sighted 
student of the great, slow-moving tides 
of human advancement there is a more 
significant fact than that — the palpable 
determination on the part of women 
that their share in the new movement 
shall keep pace with that of those who 
actually till the earth and reap its 
fruits. The Greek divinity of agricul- 
ture was not a man but a woman. 

The farmer's wife has always been 
rather a pathetic figure in literature — 
if not in real life, then the saga of the 
soil have written a lie. The words 
conjure up a work-worn figure toiling 
from early till late with the meager re- 
ward of a roof above, of food to eat 
and a "Sunday" gown of rusty black — 
a sort of silent, hopeless household 
peon, little-considered as a factor es- 
sential to the rural picture. She 
worked as her mother and as her 
grandmother before her worked, with 
the same methods, the same utensils, 
the same unintelligence. To her the 
scientific labor-saving of modern 
household economics meant as little 
as did to her husband the chemical 
symbols on a bit of paper which said 
that his time-honored ways of handling 
his soil spelled loss in the past and dis- 
aster in the future. Economical, con- 
scientious and industrious as she was, 
she was wasteful and extravagant 
when measured by the standards of 
household science. Her passing and 
his mark a new milestone on the road* 
to absolute efficiency of effort and it 
is well that they should be simultane- 
ous. 



8 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



Since the inauguration in the Cali- 
fornia Federation of Women's Clubs of 
the Department of Country Life there 
has arisen in more than one club a 
question as to exactly what this de- 
partment stands for. There are few 
possible interpretations of the words 
which do not contain part of the 
answer. But it is also true that it is 
very possible to view this new depart- 
ment of work in a superficial way and 
without an actual realization of the 
broad intent of those who conceived 
it and those into whose hands it has 
been given to direct. It is therefore a 
source of gratification that we are able 
to present in this issue of The Club- 
woman the first official message to 
the federated clubs on the subject from 
the pen of the state chairman of the 
Department of Country Life — Miss 
Lillian D. Clark, of Berkeley. 



given to every one of us the ability to 
lend a helping hand or bestow a touch 
of human sympathy to that condition 
of society which needs re-creating by 
better influences and pleasanter sur- 
roundings." 



The Club Woman's Ritual 

As a concise summary of the pur- 
poses of the woman's club, as far as 
they concern the welfare of the indi- 
vidual, the community and the state, 
it would be difficult to improve upon 
that given to the convention of the San 
Francisco District in the address of 
Mrs. Bradford Woolbridge. 

"What are our problems?" she said. 
"How to improve the conditions of the 
average home, school and street; how 
to stop the spread of diseases ; how to 
regulate woman and child labor ; how 
to make public unjust and unfair deal- 
ings ; how to help the downtrodden and 
oppressed ; how to prevent the spread 
of the social evil ; how to protect our 
youth from that now existing ; how to 
follow the public funds from the hand 
that puts them in the treasury to the 
place of expenditure ; how to make 
your vote count in the fight for civic 
betterment ; how to know our national, 
state and local governments and con- 
stitutions and understand our quest- 
ions of politics and finance. 

"We cannot all of us be renowned 
in the same way as he who creates a 
blue rose, or makes the useless desert 
cactus a rich and luscious food or 
brings forth a rare new plant, but it is 



Let Us Have Peace 

To the thinker skeptically inclined 
toward the belief that we shall ulti- 
mately see universal disarmament 
there is food for contemplation in the 
article contributed to this issue of The 
Clubwoman on the subject of peace by 
the state chairman of that newly-cre- 
ated department of the state federa- 
tion, Mrs. A. H. Griswold. It is par- 
ticularly timely when, as these words 
are written. United States battleships 
are gathering outside the port of Vera 
Cruz and troops of cavalry are massing 
under the Stars and Stripes on the bor- 
der of Mexico. 

It is not that anyone, least of all the 
clear-visioned prophet of a day when 
war will be a barbaric memory, would 
advocate the mistaken and invertebrate 
policy of peace-at-any-price. Univer- 
sal peace, when it comes, will be the 
fruit of a new cycle of evolution — one 
that will involve no single state or 
nation but the entire civilized world. 
It will be the product of education di- 
rected, not against the present genera- 
tion with its immense cash investment 
in the machinery of war, but toward 
the yet plastic youth, amenable to in- 
struction, in whom the atavistic ten- 
dencies that hark back to the age of 
stone may be not erased or emascu- 
lated, but guided and controlled. 

It is to be remembered that any pro- 
cess of evolution, such as this, must 
combat the inertia of a score of cen- 
turies of ingrained instinct. A dozen 
out of the score of leading thinkers in 
the country, asked recently by a 
humorous weekly if "war will be abol- 
ished in a hundred years," replied in 
the negative. It may not be abolished 
in a hundred years, nor in two hundred, 
but it will be abolished — if we, who 
wish it. beHn now to educate the gen- 
erations unborn. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 9 

California Federation §f Women's Clubs 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Mrs. James W. Orr, 2420 Gough street, San Francisco. 
Vice-President — -Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. 

Vice-President-at-large — Mrs. Calvin Hartwell,411 Summit avenue, Pasadena. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. Edward D. Knight, 238 San Jose avenue, San Francisco. 
Corresponding Secretary — Miss Jessica Lee Briggs, 1942a Hyde street, San Francisco. 
Treasurer — Mrs. H. E. DeNyse, P. 0. Box No. 695, Riverside. 

Auditors — Mrs. S. L. Wiley, Fresno, R. R. 9. Mrs. Fisher R. Clarke, 321 West Flora street, 
Stockton. 
General Federation State Secretary — Mrs. Russell J. Waters, 900 West Adams street, Los An- 
geles. 

District Presidents 

Northern — Mrs. A. F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery street, Oroville. 

San Francisco — Mrs. Percy S. King, >.apa. 

Alameda — Mrs. William E." Colby, 2901 Channing Way, Berkeley. 

San Joaquin — Mrs. Harry Bates, Modesto. 

Los Angeles — Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 2614 North Griffin avenue, Los Angeles. 

Southern — Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 702 Ivy street, San Diego. 

Chairmen of Departments 
Art — Mrs. Miguel Estudillo, 335 Fourteenth street, Riverside. 
Civics — Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge. Roseville. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. E. S. Karns, Channing Lane, Palo Alto. 
Club Extension — Mrs. H. V. Rudy, Box 1318, Fresno, Cal. 
Conservation — 

Forestry — Mrs. Foster Elliott, 111 South Hidalgo avenue, Alhambra. 

Waterways — Mrs. E. G. Greene, 611 Waverly street. Palo Alto. 
Country Life — Miss Lillian D. Clark, 1534 Arch street, Berkeley. 
Education — Mrs. May L. Cheney, 2241 College avenue, Berkeley. 
Endowment Fund — Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 3454 Twenty-first street, San Francisco. 
Federation Emblem — Mrs. Mary H. Gridley, 101 Brand Boulevard, Glendale. 
Health — Mrs. L. P. Crane, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 
History and Landmarks — Mrs. William Fairchild, Box 72, Placerville. 
Home Economics — Miss Edna Rich, Santa Barbara. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. C. F. Edson, 950 West Twenty-first street, Los Angeles. 
Legislation — Mrs. J. T. Harbaugh, 2706 N street, Sacramento. 
Literature — Mrs. George F. Reinhardt, 2434 Durant avenue, Berkeley. 
Music — Mrs. G. H. Hutton, 927 Second street, Santa Monica. 
Necrology — Miss Lucy Hatch, The Palms, Fresno. 
Parliamentary Practice — Mrs. Annie Little Barry, Berkeley. 
Peace — Mrs. A. H. Griswold, Box 53, El Centre 

Philanthropy — Mrs. William Baurhyte. 1033 West Edgeware Road, Los Angeles. 
Press — Mrs. O. C. Vogel, P. O. Box 106'3, Los Angeles. 
Program — Kxecutive Committee. 

Reciprocity and Information — Mrs. Cora E. Jones, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 
Redistricting Committee — Mrs. Henry E. DeNyse, Riverside. 
State University Club House Loan — Mrs. S. L. Piatt, 1720 J street, Fresno. 

PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

It is a pleasure to give the good me in the October days to be the guest 

news in the opening paragraph that of the Contemporary Club of Redlands 

Mrs. Orlando C. Vogel of Los Angeles and the Shakespeare Club of Pasadena, 

has accepted the position of Press These clubs are so beautifully housed 

Chairman and Federation Editor for and so capably officered that they can- 

The Clubwoman. This chairmanship not fail to be an essential element of 

has been vacant since the resignation civic and social advance. While I 

of Mrs. Ella Westland. A recent trip thoroughly appreciate the cost of a 

to the southern part of the btate per- clubhouse to those who initiate and 

mitted me to call on Mrs. Westland. carry the burden of the building. I also 

Her manv friends will be glad to hear see that the standing and usefulness of 

of her rapid convalescence. a club is materially augmented in the 

The privilege of my office enabled estimation of the community when it 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



can work from an established center. 

The latest and most interesting 
event in the Alameda district is the 
completion of the Twentieth Century 
Club house, a beautiful, two-story con- 
crete building. The opening reception 
was splendid evidence of the cordial 
good wishes of all neighboring club- 
dom. 

A late letter from Mrs. Pennybacker 
compliments the year book, and more 
than that, expresses approval of the 
leaflet of Practical Suggestions. Mrs. 
Pennybacker says : 

"Imitation is the sincerest flattery. 
I shall recommend this leaflet to the 
Texas Federation." 

At this writing it is not possible to 
give the result of the final meeting, 
which is called for November 10th in 
San Francisco to adopt constitution 
and by-laws, elect officers and per- 
manently establish the Woman's Leg- 
islative Council of California. 

The fifty-three charter organizations 



whose names appear in the official call 
sent out by Mrs. George E. Swan, the 
past State chairman of Legislation, are 
sufficient guarantee of the immense 
influence and efficiency the Council 
will exert "for that which is best and 
most vital," at future sessions of the 
California Legislature. 

A recent interview with the pub- 
lisher of The Clubwoman brought out 
the interesting news of sixty new sub- 
scriptions accompanied by letters of 
warm appreciation for the magazine. 
If every reader would constitute her- 
self a committee on subscriptions, we 
should finally reach a fair proportion 
of our club women, with the printed 
word, which is of such value to all of 
our State chairmen of departments. 

To find the answer to the question, 
"What does the Federation do for us?" 
take The Clubwoman. 

Cordially yours, 
MRS. JAMES W. ORR. 



NEW FEDERATED CLUBS 



The following clubs have been ad- 
mitted to the State Federation since 
the publication of the Year Book. 
Northern District. 

Woman's Club 
members) ; Pres. 
ner, Thermalito ; Cor. Sec. 
Sharpe, Thermalito. 

Woman's Improvement Club 
son, (100 members) ; Pres. Mrs 
Wright 



of Thermalito, (16 
Miss Pauline War- 
Miss Alice 

Tack- 

E. B. 

Amelia J. 



Jackson ; Cor. Sec. 
Schaclet, Jackson. 
San Francisco District. 

The Muricata Club, Pacific Grove, 
(10 members) ; Pres. Miss Laura Dun- 
can, 222 Sixth street, Pacific Grove; 
Cor. Sec. Mrs. Annie L. Ellis, 133 For- 
est Avenue, Pacific Grove. 

Wednesday Club of Suisun, Suisun, 
(68 members) ; Pres. Mrs. Henry Bird, 
Suisun; Cor. Sec. Mrs. F. A. Bartlett, 
Suisun. 

Larkspur Women's Improvement 
Club, Larkspur, (106 members) ; Pres. 
Mrs. Jas. A. Gardiner, Larkspur; Cor. 
Sec. Miss Belle C. Brown, Larkspur. 



Sequoia Club of Music, Eureka, (40 
members) ; Pres. Mrs. Geo. H. Kel- 
logg, Box 174, 1005 "J" Street, Eureka; 
Cor. Sec. Miss A. Davis, 401 Porter 
Street, Eureka. 
Alameda District. 

Albany W o m e n's Improvement 
Club, Albany, (20 members) ; Pres. 
Mrs. L. T. Druedas, Carmel and 
Brighton, Albany; Cor. Sec. Miss Til- 
lie Paul, 840 Evelyn Avenue, Albany. 

Women's Improvement Club of Pin- 
ole, Pinole, (22 members) ; Pres. Mrs. 
Lucia Robison, Pinole; Cor. Sec. Mrs. 
Teresa Clark, Pinole. 
San Joaquin District. 

Woman's Club of Stratford, Strat- 
ford, (31 members) ; Pres. Mrs. C. H. 
Newton, Stratford ; Cor. Sec. Mrs. D. 
C. Jones, Stratford. 
Southern District. 

The San Diego Society of Arts and 
Crafts, San Diego, (10 members) ; 
Pres. Mrs. Ida M. Masters, Box 446 

(Continued on Page 17) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



11 



COUNTRY LIFE IN CALIFORNIA 



By Lillian D. Clark 

State Chairman Country Life 



The trend of progress in educational 
lines is expressing itself more and 
more through co-operation between life 
in the country and life in the centers 
of population. 

That twenty universities of the East 
and Middle West have established and 
are continuing to expand and strength- 
en an Extension Service through which 
people living in towns, country dis- 
tricts, and even in remote corners of 
unsettled districts can pursue courses 
of study on numerous subjects, gives 
evidence of mutual interdependence in 
creating the expression in all phases 
of a deeper and a richer life. That our 
own University of California should 
follow in this great work, going afar tc 
field and mountain side, should prompt 
a hearty response in co-operation from 
every club woman in the State. 

The College of Agriculture has been 
long in the field in Extension Service 
teaching a better agriculture, not_ ex- 
tensively, because the funds provided 
would not permit, but persistently, 
through Farmers' Institutes and corre- 
spondence courses. 

The reception accorded the work in 
its beginning was not flattering. Like 
the first traveler through an unex- 
plored country, who "blazes" the trees 
and clears the path, the Extension De- 
partment of the College of Agricul- 
ture has prepared the field by break- 
ing down distrust and doubt and win- 
ning the confidence of the "children of 
the soil." 

The growth of this work since its in- 
cipiency in 1892 proves its worth and 
justifies its enlargement. There are 
six forms of Extension service. 

First : — Farmers' Institutes. During 
the last fiscal year of the University 
one hundred and sixty institutes were 
held in thirty-seven of the fifty-eight 
counties, with a total attendance of al- 
most fortv thousand. 



Second : — Lectures. At Special In- 
stitutes ; at Farmers' Clubs, at Normal 
Schools, High Schools and other 
schools, lectures were delivered — - the 
attendance aggregating 21,000. 

Third: — Letters of Inquiry. During 
the last fiscal year fifty thousand such, 
letters were answered. 

Fourth : — Personal Visitation. A 
local problem cannot be analyzed ex- 
cept by personal examination. Two 
hundred visits were made to examine 
local conditions. 

Fifth : — Experiment Farms. At pres- 
ent Experiment Farms are being main- 
tained at Meloland, Imperial Valley, at 
Riverside — at Whittier, using the land 
of the School of Industry in addition 
to that owned by the University at 
Santa Monica, where special study was 
made of the Eucalyptus. The farm at 
Tulare has been merged into the Kear- 
ney Farm at Fresno, which is used for 
experimental purposes. Such farms 
have been maintained at Ceres, lone, 
Paso Robles, Chico, Kings River Can- 
yon, (forestry) until the problems re- 
lating to those sections were solved. 

Sixth. The demonstration train of 
ten cars, seven cars of exhibits with 
lecturers in attendance, visited the 
greater part of the State. This form of 
service was carried on for four years — ■ 
the attendance the last year reaching 
the number of 102,000. 

During the past year another form 
of service was offered. This was hold- 
ing separate meetings for the ladies at 
which subjects in which they were par- 
ticularly interested were discussed. 
The attendance justified the offer, and 
the requests for more work to be given 
especially later for the woman on the 
farm received favorable consideration. 
The first thought was clubs for 
women only, studying the solution of 
household problems — practical Home 
Economics. In some districts women 
had taken the initiatory steps towards 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



organization. At this point it was de- 
cided to enlarge the scope of the work, 
take up both Agriculture and Home 
Economics with the club membership, 
including both men and women. Also, 
to offer to clubs already organized the 
benefit of the study of these two great 
subjects under the supervision of the 
College of Agriculture. This invita- 
tion has been most readily accepted by 
numbers of clubs, unions and organiz- 
ations in several counties of the State. 
The most enthusiastic advocates of 
this new movement in Extension Serv- 
ice are the people living on the edges 
of agricultural development where in- 
tensive farming is being practiced to 
some degree and the farmer and his 
wife has come to realize their need of 
knowledge and are willing to accept 
the instruction of scientists and admit 
that it is practical. In this work two 
meetings or study hours are held each 
month. The ladies meet in the after- 
noon for their study and two weeks 
from that day the evening meeting is 
held for all the members. In one set- 
tlement where no suitable building ex- 
isted and the schoolhouse was not in a 
convenient part of the district an aban- 
doned house has been renovated for 
use. Lacking even this, the meetings 
are held in the different homes. Young 
men and women are especially urged 
to take up this study in the hope that 
in some at least, latent ambition will 
be stirred sufficiently to impel them to 
seek further educational work. The 
object of these Study Clubs is to give 
practical knowledge of the latest scien- 
tific method of procedure for the man 
and woman both out of doors and in- 
doors ; to give practice in the writing 
and reading and discussion of papers ; 
affording as well a social uplift and 
enlarged outlook on life. 

Now that we have glanced at the 
past and looked over the field as it now 
lies where shall the work begin for the 
Department of Country Life? There 
is no more important home than the 
country home no more important per- 
son measured in influence than the 
country woman. 



So far her companion has received 
the major portion of instruction. The 
man has come to know his need and 
has asked for help — has the woman? 
Does she know her needs? 

Since the announcement that the 
College of Agriculture would give cor- 
respondence courses in agriculture and 
the establishment of the Extension De- 
partment of which Dr. I. A. Howerth 
is director nearly 5000 letters have 
been received asking for work on fifty 
or more subjects. Among these appli- 
cations two persons have asked for 
work on sanitation, and one club has 
asked for Household Management 
Does this not point the way? Can we 
not this year start groups of women 
studying and putting into use some 
knowledge of sanitation? 

A study of and campaign against the 
house fly would be practical. A study 
of not pure water so much as getting 
safe water into the house, and waste 
water out of the house. 

Sanitary preparation of foods. 

Sanitary care of milk. 

Study waste of household processes 
and how to stop them. 

Study sanitation and efficiency 
through conveniences. 

The house should be maintained as 
a unit of health for the extension oi 
human power. 

The world still wants its housekeep- 
ing done. but. like its agriculture, it 
must be more scientific than in the 
past. Let us arise and meet this de- 
mand. 



IN APPRECIATION 

To the many friends of Mrs. B. F. 
Walton, of Yuba City, it will be a 
pleasure to know that, in token of ap- 
preciation of her many years of un- 
selfish effort in behalf of the Federa- 
tion and of the Northern District, her 
name has been placed upon the honor 
roll of the Sarah Platt-Decker Endow- 
ment Fund. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



WORLD PEACE-A CLUB WOMAN'S VIEWPOINT 

By Mrs. A. H. Griswold 

State Chairman of Peace 



The question of international peace 
is one which concerns every man, 
woman and child on the face of the 
globe. It means, progression, conser- 
vation, philanthropy, humanity, in 
their deepest, broadest, highest and 
most vital sense. 

The history of the peace movement 
is one of wide scope and intense inter- 
est. The two-fold object to "diffuse 
light respecting the evils of war and the 
best means of effecting its abolition" 
has been the aim of the modern move- 
ment ever since its inception. 

Since John Jay was burned in effigy 
in Boston for putting an arbitration 
clause into our treaty with England in 
1794. there have been more than six 
hundred international disputes settled 
by arbitration or by special commis- 
sions, and it is a notable fact that no 
nation has ever repudiated its pledge, 
once given, and gone to war. The 
peace pact has been signed by no less 
than forty-six nations. 

That there is still much for the cause 
of peace to accomplish is evident from 
the fact that parallel with the peace 
movement has grown the most colossal 
system of militarism that the world has 
ever known. But with the advance- 
ment of the age, the closer study of 
economic conditions, the tendency to 
conserve life and energy and prevent 
waste, the very completeness of our 
system for carrying on wars is becom- 
ing intolerable and must soon suffer 
resction. 

Then there is the question of tax- 
ation. Do you know that the world is 
spending something like $8,000,000 
every day in the year in maintenance 
of its army and navy, in other words, 
in preparation of war? 

Armaments now cost Europe, every 
year, more than enough to pay for dig- 
ging six Panama Canals, almost 
enough to buy out the whole merchant 
marine in the world. Into whose hands 



does this golden stream flow? Five 
million dollars every twenty-four hours 
goes to pay the interest of money 
lenders and those who finance the 
operation. Possibly $1,000,000 a day 
goes in pay to officers and privates. 
The rest passes into the hands of arm}' 
and navy contractors, builders of war 
ships, manufacturers of armor plate, 
weapons, ammunition, supplies, etc. 
And not satisfied with our present 
"war strength" we must needs add to 
it from year to year. The United 
States not content with being third in 
wealth of armament is about to add 
three new battleships, and a propor- 
tionate number of submarines and tor- 
pedo boat destroyers at a cost of $148.- 
000.000 which will then rank us ahead 
of Germany and second to Great Brit- 
ain. 

If we could do away with this con- 
tinual strife, between nations, for su- 
premacy in "war strength," it would be 
a great stride forward in the peace 
movement. England will not conform 
to the measure endorsed by the United 
States and Germany that private prop- 
erty, at sea, in time of war shall be 
immune, though she does agree that 
private nroperty on land shall be pro-* 
tected. Hence, Germany in self de- 
fense, increases her navy, England, not 
to be outdone, (though she is burdened 
with strikes and widespread discon- 
tent, vast numbers not knowing where 
they are to get their dinner from day 
to day, and with a people in sore need 
of the technical education which has 
so enriched Germany), has added sixty 
millions more to the annual expendi- 
ture of her navy in the past four years. 

With international peace, the relief 
of humanity from necessary burdens 
of expense and of paralyzing fear that 
we may be called upon to give up our 
loved ones to the terrible ravages of 
war, will be eliminated. And of no 
less importance, with the reign of rea- 



14 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



son, good will and constructive co- 
operation, the opportunities for educa- 
tion may be augmented from two to 
four fold, without any increase in the 
burden of taxation. 

It is estimated that nine-tenths of 
our social evils and personal perver- 
sions which lead to crime are the direct 
result of idleness. Every boy and girl 
born into the world is entitled to that 
education which will fit him or her for 
a life of useful happiness, and if a 
large share of the money now needed 
to maintain our army and navy could 
be diverted to give vocational training, 
this world of ours would fast approach 
the millennium. 

What can you and I do to help in 
the advancement of the cause? Since 
it is an undisputed fact that the chil- 
dren are the chief asset of the nation, 
in that the boys and girls of today are 
the men and women of tomorrow, let 
us begin our education of peace with 
them. Permit them to have their 
drums and trumpets, music and march- 
ing, and all that is harmless about mili- 
tary display, but never allow them to 
play at killing. As Lucia Ames Mead 
so tersely puts it— "As well give chil- 
dren coffins and let them play 'hanging' 
as to permit the ghastly business of 
shooting human beings to be associ- 
ated with sport and pleasure." 

The principles endorsed by the Boy 
Scout movement, while affording him 
a great amount of wholesome pleasure, 
brings out the best there is in the boy 
and will make of him a citizen of the 
highest type. 

Work for a sane Fourth of July, sub- 
stituting pageants for sham battles and 
other dangerous sports. 

Create a sentiment that will lead to 
new text books of United States his- 
tory, laying more emphasis on the in- 
dustrial and artistic advancement of 
the age and less on the horrible details 
of war. Oppose the movement to puf 
rifle practice into our schools. No na- 
tion should be taxed to teach its boys 
the "art of killing." 

Encourage the writing of peace es- 
says by our school children and the 



educators in our schools and pulpits to 
make proper observance of "Peace 
Day" — May 18th — the anniversary of 
the opening of the Hague Conference. 

Censor our moving picture shows by 
discouraging the exhibit of pictures 
that show the grewsome details of bat- 
tle. 

See that our Congressmen join the 
peace movement in its theory of arbi- 
tration and stand against an increase 
of the navy. 

Read the peace literature provided 
by the various organizations support- 
ing the cause, also the books endorsed 
by the General Federation and your 
District Chairmen. You will find the 
study interesting and inspiring and 
well worth while. 

On October tenth with the opening 
of the Panama Canal was accomplished 
the greatest engineering feat of mod- 
ern days. The commercial, political 
and religious world will be changed as 
a result of this splendid achievement, 
and the possibilities of a "world broth- 
erhood" are greater than ever before. 
Let us as women of purpose realizing 
what our Federation of Women's 
Clubs is to us, work for the Federation 
of the Civilized World through the 
promotion of international and univer- 
sal oeace. 



A GOOD EXAMPLE 

A Civic Betterment .Committee has 
been formed in the Southern District 
with the following sub-committees: 

Anti-Fly Campaign — Mrs. A. J. Law- 
ton, Chairman, 1104 French street, 
Santa Ana. 

Bill-boards — Mrs. F. C. Martin, 
Chairman. Box 137, Beaumont. 

Parks. Parkings and Flower Shows 
—Mrs. R. B. Vaile, Chairman. El Cen- 
tro. 

Junior Civic Leaeue — Mrs. E. L. 
Ouinn, District Chairman, East New- 
port. 

Any club in the Southern District 
may obtain information on these sub- 
jects by writing: to the chairmen of the 
sub-committees. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



15 



SAN FRANCISCO DISTRICT CONVENTION 



Three hundred women from twenty - 
five cities and towns of the San Fran- 
cisco District, C. F. W. C, gathered 
at the Odd Fellows Hall of Santa Rosa 
on the morning of October 29 and 
made some Federation history that will 
be an inspiration to them and to their 
sister districts for the year to come. 
They departed three days later with an 
entirelv new coros of executive heads 
but with the plans, ambitions and 
ideals which are the real guiding im- 
pulses only the more definite and em- 
phatic. 

The dominant note of the district's 
twelfth annual convention, if a gather- 
ing of such diversified interest can be 
said to have such a characteristic, seem- 
ed to be the desire of those in attend- 
ance to lay a stress upon the ever-wid- 
ening scope of influence wielded by wo- 
men's clubs, though hardly at the ex- 
pense of those interests which have 
long played a prominent part in their 
activities. That desire was nowhere 
made more manifest than by the intro- 
duction of a resolution calling for a 
legislative revision of the time-honored 
and antiquated method of municipal 
bond-voting — a method which in the 
past has proved a prolific source of 
trouble in California civic government. 
The kernel of this resolution is that the 
qualified electorate in a bond election 
shall be restricted to property-owners 
in the district affected. Another ex- 
ample worthy of remark was the con- 
vention's indorsement — at the request 
of Mayor Rolph, of San Francisco — of 
a resolution looking toward the con- 
summation of the Hetch-Hetchy water 

Of largest single interest, naturally, 
was the election of officers for the dis- 
trict. The ballots were taken on the 
last dav of the convention. No oppo- 
sition develooed to the ticket bv which 
Mrs. Percy S. King of Napa, succeeds 
Mrs. Percy L. Shuman as president; 
Mrs. James S. Sweet, of Santa Rosa, 
succeeds Mrs. King as vice-president; 
Miss Janet MacClay, Napa, becomes 



corresponding secretary; Mrs. E. F. 
Croset, San Francisco, recording sec- 
retary; Mrs. Henry Daingerfield, Pa- 
cific Grove, treasurer; and Mrs. Alice 
C. Dixon, Santa Cruz, auditor. Com- 
mittee chairmen are: Mrs. A. P. 
Black, resolutions; Mrs. F. F. Bost- 
wick, nominating; Mrs. J. H. Andrea- 
son, credentials. The outgoing and in- 
coming presidents, Mrs. Shuman and 
Mrs. King, were elected district dele- 
gates to the Biennial at Chicago in 
1914, with Mrs. Sweet and Mrs. Emily 
S. Karns, Palo Alto, as alternates. 

Redistricting of the federation came 
in for the usual attention on the open- 
ing day — and with the usual result. It 
quickly developed the fact that the 
clubs in general oppose the plan. The 
discussion was led by Mrs. Olive Bor- 
rette, a member of the redistricting 
committee, and the principal speaker 
against the project was Miss Jennie 
Partridge. An alternative plan by 
which several vice-presidents be elect- 
ed to give representation to more sec- 
tions was suggested. 

The Open Forum was a feature of 
much interest to those in attendance 
and some valuable ideas were devel- 
oped by the discussions. Support of 
home industries was given a decided 
impetus by the impromptu forensic 
efforts led by Mrs. W. D. Wilkins. 
Capital punishment discussion brought 
out but one voice against its abolition 
and "The High Cost of Living," led by 
Dr. Caroline Coffin, president of the 
Housewives' League and Miss Mary 
B. Vail, chairman of Home Economics, 
evoked much intelligent interest. 

Reports from the outgoing officers 
showed the district to be in a condition 
of prosperity and healthy growth. 
During the presentation of that of Mrs. 
Shuman, printed elsewhere, the chair 
was occupied by the State president, 
Mrs. James W. Orr, who graced the 
gatherings with her kindly presence 
and approval 

Worthy of special mention were the 



16 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



reports of Miss Jennie Partridge, dis- 
trict chairman of civics, who outlined 
what has been accomplished in the dis- 
trict — a gratifying amount — in the di- 
rection of civic clean-up and the care 
of children and juveniles in general, oi 
Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge, State 
chairman of civics, who presented a 
comprehensive yet succinct outline not 
so much of what has been done as what 
remains to be done, and of Mrs. W. B. 
Grimes and Mrs. Emily S. Karns, res- 
pectively district and State chairmen 
of civil service reform. 

A special plea for an art section in 
every club was made by Mrs. Rose V. 
S. Berry, district chairman of art, for 
creative work in literature by Mrs. 
George F. Reinhardt, State chairman 
of literature — this report was read in 
Airs. Reinhardt's absence by Airs. G. 
E. Colby — and for purity in music by 
Mrs. John G. Jury, chairman of that 
district department. The features of 
greatest interest in the report of Mrs. 
Carrie A. Burlingame, chairman of his- 
tory and landmarks, centered in the 
exploits of the women of Humboldt 
county in erecting the cross on Trini- 
dad Head, described elsewhere in this 
issue of The Clubwoman, and those of 
the Santa Clara Woman's Club in rais- 
ing $1000 to buy an adobe building 120 
years old and under order of destruc- 
tion by the Santa Clara authorities. 

A plain talk on the modern methods 
of preventing disease was the valuable 
contribution of Dr. Mariana Bertola on 
the subject, "The Necessity of Physical 
Examination in All Periods of Life." 
Corollary to this was the address of 
Mrs. Henry Hicks on ''The Excep- 
tional Child," dealing with the proper 
manner of caring for and educating 
children either above or below the 
average. 

Fire protection supplied the theme 
of a practical talk by F. E. Olmsted, 
forester of the Tamalpais Fire Associ- 
ation, supplemented by the report of 
the forestry chairman. Miss Nell H. 
Cole. Waterways were discussed by 
Mrs. E. G. Greene, who suggested the 
organization of a board composed of 



a hundred women to study needed leg- 
islation along these lines. Mrs. Nor- 
man Martin, district press chairman, 
spoke for the press and Mrs. C. E. 
Chambers on the subject of peace. The 
necrology report was presented by 
Mrs. George Luttrell and that of Mrs. 
George Murray, on club extension, was 
read in her absence by Airs. A. J. Mon- 
roe. 

The principal address on the pro- 
gram was that of Dr. Luella Clay Car- 
son, president of Alills College, on "A 
Force in American Literature." The 
speaker gave an interesting resume of 
the evolution of American letters from 
English stock and followed its devel- 
opment through the nineteenth century 
to the beginning of the twentieth, with 
critical consideration for many authors. 
Perhaps her most significant words 
were these: 

"We have outgrown many vagaries 
of transcendentalism, but its noble 
principles illustrated by Emerson has 
permeated American life and American 
literature, and in speaking of Emerson, 
we speak of the controlling influence 
if not the creator of modern American 
thought. 

"It seems prophetic in this day when 
women everywhere are awakening to 
their own powers and looking for heav- 
enly visions — that in that early day in 
America a woman helped to bring the 
fuller day. Alargaret Fuller saw vis- 
ions of an American literature reflect- 
ing the knowledge, heart and vision of 
a woman." 

Another interesting address was that 
of Mrs. Agnes Rav on "Vocational 
Training for the Exceptional Child." 
She spoke especially for co-operation 
between the parent and the teacher for 
the solution of their joint problems and 
urged that the federation exert its tre- 
mendous influence in that direction. 

Among the resolutions presented by 
the chairman of that committee. Airs. 
A. A. Fowler, and warmly indorsed by 
the convention should be mentioned 
that accepting, so far as concerns the 
San Francisco District, the invitation 

(Continued on Page 32) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



17 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT SAN FRANCISCO DISTRICT 
CONVENTION, C. F. W. C. 



Practical service, in prospect and 
retrospect, supplied the text of the re- 
port of the president of the San Fran- 
cisco district, Mrs. Percy L. Shuman, 
read at the Santa Rosa convention. 
"Speakinp- for the District Board," she 
said, "I believe I can truly say we have 
kept our faces toward the sunlight. It 
has involved courage, self-sacrifice, 
nervous strain and mental activity, but 
the retrospective is that we are today a 
larger and stronger representative dis- 
trict of the California Federation of 
Women's Clubs. 

"The word 'Attention' should be 
more forcibly impressed upon each one 
of us. We should halt and adjust our- 
selves to the consideration of fewer 
subjects. Hold to them, digest them 
carefully and thoroughly understand 
one thing at a time." 

Mrs. Shuman continued with a plea 
for a closer attention to the detail work 
of the district and drew attention to 
the new portable bulletin boards dis- 
played at the convention with the idea 
of incorporating them into the equip- 
ment of clubs at large. The president 
presented a brief review of the prog- 
ress of the district during the past year 
and commended the club units for their 
intelligent interest in all affairs made 
part of the district work in general. 
Special attention was directed to the 
matter of municipal exhibits and to the 
part which the clubs played in the San 
Francisco land show. 

She reported that nine new clubs 
have joined the district during the year 
and tliat three new club houses have 
been dedicated at Pacific Grove. Red- 
wood Citv and Burlingame. The 
members of the Board received Mrs. 
Shuman's warmest expressions of es- 
teem — without them she declared such 
notable progress would have been "im- 
possible. In conclusion she said : 

"We are advancing: and preaching 
regulative and prohibitive measures, 
because we are going deeper into the 
conditions of our surroundings, but in 



all of these deliberations let us seek 
our own self-government. Let us dis- 
arm criticism by being moderate and 
sane and live in the sweet and sublime 
confidence that the world must grow 
better with a well-balanced, progress- 
ive activity. 

"Recognition is a great joy! When 
we go forth from this twelfth annual 
convention may we depart giving the 
real value of the work that has been 
faithfully performed and reported here. 
May we feel we have been in the midst 
of peerless souls and that we have 
found each one's eyes filled with stars 
of hope, beauty and truth, love and 
courage. To our successors, and I 
speak in behalf of my associates, we 
will welcome you ! In the new duties 
you are to assume we wish you to feel 
that it will always be our pleasure to 
assist you, for we are co-workers in 
the great stream of life's activities for 
the uplift of mankind." 

NEW FEDERATED CLUBS 

(Continued from Page 10) 
Coronado ; Cor. Sec. Mrs. M. Estelle 
Williams, The Curtiss Apartments, 
San Diego. 

"As You Like It" Club, San Diego, 
( 14 members) ; Pres. Miss Eleanor 
Partridge. 4514 Campus Avenue, San 
Diego; Cor. Sec. Mrs. B. B. Mac- 
Macken, 2125 Monroe Avenue, San 
Diego. 

Women's Civic Center, San Diego, 
(71 members); Pres. Mrs. Marian 
Pound, 4598 Edgeware, Kensington 
Park ; Cor. Sec. Mrs. Elsie Brem, 4040 
Grape Street, San Diego. 
Los Angeles District. 

Los Angeles Audubon Society, Los 
Angeles. (45 members) : Pres. Mrs. 
Edwin H. Husher. 434 West Twen- 
tieth Street. Los Angeles. 

Echo Park Mother's Club. (70 mem- 
bers) ; Pres. Dr. Maud Wilde. 1437 
Calumet Avenue, Los Angeles ; Cor. 
Sec. Mrs. Clyde Church, ^1874 Echo 
Park Avenue. Los Angeles. 



18 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



PARLIAMENTARY USAGE 

By Mrs. Annie Little Barry 

State Chairman of Parliamentary Practice 



QUESTIONS 

"How shall a club proceed to change 
its constitution and by-laws?" Answer 
— The constitution and by-laws should 
make provision for such change. The 
general rule is that previous notice in 
writing must be given of any change 
to be submitted. A two-thirds vote is 
required to pass any change. 

"Can an executive committee rescind 
a vote of the club?" Answer — The 
vote of the club is higher authority 
than that of the executive board. Plans 
and recommendations are brought by 
the executive board to the club to be 
acted uoon, but most executive boards 
are given the power to act in case of 
emergencies. 

"Are women who are not club mem- 
bers allowed to attend conventions?" 
Answer — Yes but delegates only are 
allowed to introduce motions, and to 
vote. The best seats are reserved for 
the delegates. 

"May the president discuss ques- 
tions?" Answer — Not from the chair; 
if she wishes to discuss the question, 
she must ask someone else to preside — 
the vice-president, if present — and dis- 
cuss the matter from the floor. 

"Must the chairman of a committee 
give the report?" Answer — It is her 
duty to do this ; but if she has a voice 
that cannot be heard, or is detained 
from the meeting or there is any other 
good cause why it would be better for 
another member of the committee to 
give the report, this may be done. The 
chairman mig-ht give her reason to the 
committee ?nd sav that, if there is no 

objection. Mrs. B will give the 

reoort. Committees rise, they do not 
adjourn. 

TO LAY ON THE TABLE 
LESSON III. 

This motion mav be made at any 
time during the debate of a question. 
The form is "I move to lay the ques- 



tion on the table," or "I move that the 
question be laid on the table" or "I 
move that the question lie on the 
table." 

The motion "to lay on the table" is 
undebatable ; it requires a majority 
vote; it cannot be amended; and it dis- 
poses of the question under considera- 
tion. 

Example 

Mrs. Wren — Madam President, 1 
move that our club invite Dr. C. F. 
Aked to lecture for us. 

Mrs. Larkspur — I second the mo- 
tion. 

Mrs. Comet — I move to amend the 
motion by adding the topic of his lec- 
ture to be "Man's Opportunity." 

Mrs. Estes — I second the amend- 
ment. 

President states the amendment and 
invites discussion. Several ladies dis- 
cuss the amendment. 

Mrs. Rinehart — I move to lay the 
amendment on the table till next meet- 
ing. 

President — You cannot make a mo- 
tion of that kind. That motion should 
take the form of a definite postpone- 
ment. 

Mrs. Rinehart- 
move to lay the 
table. 

Mrs. Greene — I second the motion. 

(It is well in the ordinary clubs for 
the president to give some of the rules 
governing this motion so that there 
may be no misunderstanding.) 

President — A motion to lay the 
amendment on the table is before you. 
This is an undebatable motion and re- 
quires a majority vote. If this motion 
is carried, it carries with it the main 
motion, which is, "that this club invite 
Dr. C. F. Aked to lecture for us." 

Mrs. Thrush — I second the motion. 

Mrs. Robbins — I move to lay the 
motion on the table. 



-Madam President, I 
amendment on the 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



19 



General Federation 

BOARD OF DIEECTOES 

President — Mrs. Percy V. Pennybaeker, 2606 Whitis avenue, Austin, Texas. 

First Vice-President — Mrs. L. L. Blankenburg, 214 West Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Second Vice-President — Mrs. Samuel B. Sneath, 211 Monroe street, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Eecording Secretary — Mrs. Harry L. Keefe, "Walthill, Nebraska. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Eugene Eeilley, 508 Park avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Treasurer — Mrs. John Threadgill, 922 North Robinson street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Auditor — Mrs. C. H. McMahon, 32 Caithness Apartments, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Directors — Mrs. William E. Andrews, 1225 Fairmont street, N. W., Washington, D. C; Mrs. 
A. L. Christie, 219 South Washington street, Butte, Montana; Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, 
Irvington, Indianapolis, Indiana; Mrs. Francis D. Everett, Highland Park, Hlinois; Mrs. 
William P. Harper, 651 Kinnear place, Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Creighton Mathewes. 315 
Bermuda street, New Orleans, Louisiana; Mrs. Frank White, Valley City, North Dakota; 
Mrs. William B. Williams, Lapeer, Michigan. 

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS 

Art — Mrs. Melville F. Johnston, 103 North Tenth street, Eichmond, Ind. 

Civics — Miss Zona Gale, Portage, la. 

Civil Service Eeform — Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, The Gladstone, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conservation — Mrs. Emmons Crocker, 48 Mechanic street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Education — Mrs. 0. Shepard Barnum, 312 South Fifth street, Alhambra, Cal. 

Household Economics — Miss Helen Louise Johnson, 234 Paddock street, Watertown, N. Y. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. A. E. Chantler, Tacoma Daily News, Tacoma, Wash. 

Legislation — Mrs. Horace T. Towner, Corning, la. 

Literature — Mrs. Frances Squire Potter, 4581 Oakenwald avenue, Kenwood, Chicago, 111. 

Music — Mrs. Lawrence Maxwell, Edgecliffe Eoad, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O. 

Public Health — Mrs. S. S. Crockett, 710 Belmont avenue, Nashville, Tenn. 

Press Committee — Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, Chairman, Indianapolis, Ind.. 



President puts the motion to lay on 
the table. 

Mrs. Rinehart — Madam President, 
at our Loyal Hill Club the other eve- 
ning. Mr. Jones, the president, told us 
that the motion "to lay on the table" 
required a two-thirds vote. 

President — This club is governed by 
Robert's Rules of Order which clearly 
state that the motion "to lay on the 
table" requires only a majority vote. 

Mrs. Greene — Madam President, you 
say that this motion, if carried, takes 
with it the original motion. At our 
last meeting, a motion was made to 
amend the minutes, then some one 
moved to lay the amendment on the 
table and it was carried. Yet, at that 
time, you stated that this action did 
not carry the minutes with it. 

President — A motion "to lay on the 
table" carries with it all pertaining to 



it, with these exceptions : — An amend- 
ment to the minutes, an appeal from 
the decision of the chair, the previous 
question and a motion to reconsider. 
Are you ready for the question, which 
is "to lay on the table the amendment 
to the motion that Dr. C. F. Aked 
be invited to lecture for this club ; the' 
amendment being 'on Man's Opportun- 
ity." All in favor of this motion to 
lay the amendment on the table say 
Aye. All opposed, No. 

If this motion carries, the whole 
question is disposed of. If it loses, the 
original motion stands before the club 
just as it did before the motion "to lay 
on the table" was made, and should 
be taken up in the following order: 
First, the amendment with discussion 
and vote; then the original motion, 
(amended or unamended, as the case 
may be) with discussion and vote. 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



DEDICATION ADDRESS AT TRINIDAD HEAD 

By Mrs. George D. Murray 

(On September 9 the club women of 
Humboldt County presented to the 
supervisors of that county a granite 
cross which they had reared on Trini- 
dad Head to replace that, worn away 
by time, which marked the landing 
place of the first Spanish settlers in the 
north. The cross stands twelve feet 
high and cost $250, which sum was 
raised for the purpose by a committee 
of which Mrs. Murray was chairman. 
.—Ed. 

We stand today upon historic 
ground. Here the first known land- 
mark was placed in our country. The 
landmarks of this state are becoming 
objects of interest to our people; they 
are helping to unfold its pages of his- 
tory. 

I consider it an honored privilege to 
take part in the dedication of this beau- 
tiful cross, erected to replace one past 
and gone, many, many years. In this 
connection it behooves us to consider 
again briefly the history of the move- 
ment that brings us together today. 

Before the "Westward March of 
Nations," long before our sturdy pio- 
neers came hither, the cross was plant- 
ed 'neath these western skies at a time 
when the Indians lived in luxury and 
ease. With joy we can see them hail- 
ine those Spanish navigators who 
drifted into this harbor one June day 
in 1775. Haceta and Bodega accom- 
nanied bv Father Campa anchored on 
June 9 of that year in this bay. They 
took formal possession, including the 
elevation of the Spanish standard and 
cross, followed by mass and a military 
salute and gave the port its present 
name. Trinidad, the day being the feast 
dav of the Holy Trinity. The Indians 
called it Shoran. After a week spent 
in reolacing a broken mast, obtaining 
wood and water and bartering with the 
Indians, the navigators turned their 
eves to the Northward and not acrain 
Hll Aoril. 1793, was Trinidad visited: 
this time by Vancouver. He reported 
having no difficulty in finding the 




The Trinidad Cross, Erected by the Women of 
Humboldt County 

wooden cross hewn from a pine tree 
that the Spanish had placed on the 
rugged headland in 1775. It was in a 
state of decay but he was able to co n » 
the inscription. 

Now another cross looks down upon 
the same ocean, out upon practicallv 
the same landscape, but a different 
people. 

The cross, a blessed and holy sign 
of hope, a sacred symbol, came down 
to us with the creation of man. I re- 
call that beautiful legend: "Osiris by 
the cross gave life eternal to the spirits 
of the just." Thor smote the head of 
the mighty serpent and restored to life 
those who had been slain ; beneath it 
the South American mothers lay their 
babes to keep them from harm, the 
ancient inhabitants of Italy lay down 



22 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



beside it for protection. By every peo- 
ple, in every age from the dawn of his- 
tory to the present hour it has been 
held in the same veneration and gen- 
erally associated with water, mountain 
or headland like the one upon which 
we now stand, so wonderful in outlook 
that the view cannot help but refresh 
and inspire. 

The dedication of this cross today 
marks an important event in the his- 
tory of Humbodlt county. We are 
striving to encourage and advance in- 
terest in our local history and the pre- 
servation of its landmarks. By so 
doing we will eventually secure a com- 
plete history of the county. By the 



study of local history we teach patriot- 
ism and devotion to home thereby lay- 
ing the foundation for permanent pros- 
perity. 

May all who look up to this, our 
first landmark, be strengthened in all 
that is good and kept faithful to the 
principles it stands for. 

The replacement of this cross per- 
mits the Federated Club Women of 
Humbodlt county to take the lead in 
symbolizing the regard felt for oui 
earliest history that is enshrouded in 
memories of the distant past. 

To the Honorable Board of Super- 
visors, I now give it into your keeping. 



THE MESSAGE OF THE CROSS 

READ AT THE DEDICATION CEREMONIES 
ON TRINIDAD HEAD BY 
MRS. D. A. FRANCIS 



Oh Cross of Trinidad! 

As you rise anew today, 
Fair, unmarred- and beautiful 

In your strength of granite gray, 
What is the message you bring to us 

From the days that are long gone by, 
When another cross, perhaps less fair, 

Stood clear against the sunlit sky — 
Stood in its pride, as you today, 

Close by the western sea, 
Lovingly placed by strangers' hands 

Hope's harbinger to be? 

Oh Cross of Trinidad ! 

Stand firm, stand firm for aye, 
Bearing this message to everyone, 

Each in his different way; 
To every soul a cross is given. 

Decreed by the Master's will; 
And it matters greatly to you and to 
me 
If we bear it well or ill, 
And strengthen or lessen the faith of 
man- 
In a world where faith is all. 
Oh Cross of Trinidad ! 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



"A VOICE, NOT AN ECHO" 

By Mrs. Emily Hoppin, 

Vice President C. F. W. C. 



Professor Brice, in his critique on 
the United States and the American 
commonwealth, says ours is a govern- 
ment, not of the people, but of public 
opinion. 

Women are moulding public opinion 
in a wonderful way. Every state fed- 
eration, and the general federation, is 
bringing to public notice the needs of 
the schools, the working women, the 
children, and the many ideas of civic 
improvement, and they speak with no 
uncertain voice ; but unfortunately a 
large number of us find it more con- 
venient to be an echo, not of the voice 
of the best, but the voice of the 
fashionable world, for fear of what 
"they" may say. 

We are somewhat afraid to wear 
a last year's gown, though it is per- 
fectly good, because "they" have new 
ones. We hesitate over hats, and 
functions, and opinions, for fear "they" 
will not be like our friends' hats and 
functions and opinions. 

Few of us realize our slavery to 
"they say," and "they do." 

There are between twenty and thirty 
thousand club women iri"'the state of 
California, and there is no reason why 
we should ever be an "echo" in regard 
to any question. Let us be the voice, 
and hope others will be the echo. 

"It takes great strength to train 
To modern service our ancestral brain, 
To lift the weight of the unnumbered 

years 
Of dead men's habits, methods, and 

ideas." 

The social evil is receiving nation- 
wide attention, and commissions with- 
out number are investigating the 
causes. 

As one reason for the prevalence of 
undesirable conditions, let me suggest 
one that has certainly some influence, — 
namelv, the dress of school girls, which 
has reached a point where if the club 



women have any influence, their voice 
should be heard. 

At the last convention of the North- 
ern district, a beautiful, well-bred club 
woman overtook me, on the street one 
day, and as we walked along, the con- 
versation drifted to the schools. 

She was from a neighboring town, 
and told me she had a daughter in the 
high school, but had sent her to a high 
school in a smaller town, because the 
young people's minds were so filled 
with clothes that there was no room 
for study. 

"My husband has a good income," 
this lady said, 'but I cannot keep Lot- 
tie dressed like the others, and would 
not if I could ; but it was making her 
dissatisfied and unhappy, so I sent her 
to a school where the aim of the school 
is good scholarship, and not clothes." 

The clothes of our school girls are 
not only too expensive, but are made in 
an ultra fashionable way that is not 
only too conspicuous, but immodest. 

Not long ago, a girl of about six- 
teen was walking on the street in front 
of me. She is the daughter of a fine 
family, and is a girl of exceptional 
ability and character. She wore on her 
feet very thin hose and pumps. Her 
short dress was of voile made with 
very short sleeves and low neck that 
showed her beautiful neck and arms, 
and a glimpse of the perfect contour of 
her bosom. Her face had a touch of 
rouge, and more than a touch of pow- 
der, and — all this was on the street. 
As we passed, I heard one young man 
say to another, as he gave him a wink : 
"She is sure fixed up some peach." 

No thought of immodesty entered 
the girl's mind; she was only one of a 
hundred others dressed the same way; 
she would have been hurt at the 
thought of immodesty; it was simply a 
case of "they," both with her and with 
her mother. 

Cannot club women be a "voice" in 
(Continued on Page 32) 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



25 



DISTRICT NEWS 



NORTHERN 
Mrs. B. F. Walton, Press Chairman. 

The Northern District Executive 
Board held its second meeting at the 
Tuesday Club House, Sacramento, on 
October 11. the president, Mrs. A. F. 
Jones, in the chair. Among the note- 
worthy reports by chairmen of depart- 
ments was that setting forth the Uni- 
versity Extension work undertaken by 
the Colusa Club. 

Reciprocity Day at Wheatland was 
observed by club women from Oro- 
ville, Chico, Rocklin, Sacramento and 
Marysville. Mrs. Walter Longbotham 
was authoried to offer a prize cup for 
the best musical program rendered by 
any club in the Northern District dur- 
ing the present year, and to award it 
as the permanent property of any club 
winning it for three consecutive years. 
While on the subject of prizes it may 
be mentioned that the Bogue Wednes- 
day Club offers a federation pin to 
each of the ten best attendants on club 
programs during the year. 

Mrs. C. L. Donohoe, of Willows, 
chairman of forestry, has prepared a 
number of excellent outlines for the 
study of forestry in the public schools. 
Every school in the Northern District 
has been supplied with copies for the 
respective grades in an effort to inter- 
est teachers in this work. Space per- 
mitting these outlines will be repro- 
duced wholly or in part in The Club- 
woman. 

Mrs. E. B. Stanwood spoke before 
the Bogue Wednesday Club at its first 
meeting. October 8, giving an interest- 
ing resume of the work of the last 
Legislature as it affects women. The 
Women's Improvement Club of Rose- 
ville. which, though small by compari- 
son with some, is one of the most ac- 
tive clubs in the state, has begun its 
year's work with a rush. As hereto- 
fore the music section will play a 
prominent part in the programs. It 
has organized a choral society and will 
offer musical half-hours every Sunday 
afternoon. Noteworthy also is the am- 



bitious program of the large art sec- 
tion. 

The Tuesday Club of Sacramento 
gives as the first of its year's work 
two lectures by Prof. Baumgardt, the 
attendance upon which augurs well 
for the future activities of the club. 

The press chairman of the district, 
Mrs. B. F. Walton, will spend the 
winter in Sacramento. 



ALAMEDA 

Mrs. L. G. Leonard, Press Chairman 
Alameda district has received a cor- 
dial invitation from the Hill and Val- 
ley Club of Hayward to make that city 
the meeting place for the next conven- 
tion to be held in February, 1914. The 
invitation has been accepted, and the 
convention committee is already at 
work upon the program. 

One of the notable events of the 
month and of the year was the open- 
ing, on October 21st, of the splendid 
new $20,000 home of the Twentieth 
Century Club of Berkeley. More than 
800 guests were present from San 
Francisco, Oakland, Alameda, Berke- 
ley and other cities and were welcomed 
bv the club's president, Mrs. Wallace 
Pond and her receiving line, compris- 
ing the founders of the club, the past 
presidents, officers of the home asso- 
ciation and a large reception commit- 
tee. Among those receiving were : 
Mrs. H. N. Baldwin. Mrs. Annie Little 
Barry, Mrs. H. W. Tavlor, Mrs. L. V. 
Sweesv. Mrs. Tulia R. Foster, Mrs. W. 
A. Caldwell. Mrs. T. H. Wood. Mrs. 
Rosemarv D. Lloyd. Mrs. Ernest L. 
Paee. Mrs. Stephen T. Eiffer. Mrs. F. 
T. Solinsky. Mrs. G. S. Whitlev. Mrs. 
W. H. Brown, Mrs. Frederick Crowell, 
Mrs. Paul O. Tietzen. The tea host- 
esses for the dav were : Mrs. R. A. 
Barry and Mrs. Lillian Hudson. 

Upstairs the decorations were in 
gold and white, palms and greenery 
setting off the front of the stage. Be- 
low a large center table was adorned 
with a bowl of red dahlias, on which 
were placed the dainties served the 



26 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



guests during the course of the after- 
noon. Mrs. Pond received, in an im- 
ported gown of gray satin charmeuse, 
with chiffon tunic embroidered in crys- 
tals and pearls. All were beautifully 
gowned and the assemblage was one 
of the largest that has ever been held 
in the bay region. 

Walnut Creek Improvement Club is 
engaged in municipal house-cleaning, 
a campaign for civic neatness having 
been inaugurated. The first step was 
the purchase, with its own funds, of a 
number of garbage cans which, it is 
hoped, will do away with the litter 
previously seen upon the streets. An- 
other laudable enterprise is the forma- 
tion of a Junior Civic League, the ob- 
ject being to train the boys and girls of 
the community in good citizenship. 

Another club active in social service 
is the New Century of Oakland. A 
new venture, under the direction of 
Mrs. John Newton Porter, chairman oi 
the social center department, is a series 
of supervised Saturday evening dances, 
to be given to the young people of the 
neighborhood at the clubhouse. Mrs. 



Harry Lewis, one of the oldest mem- 
bers of the club, has taken up her resi- 
dence there and will act as house 
mother to the young people who attend 
the various classes and social affairs. 

LOS ANGELES 
Mrs. O. C. Vogel, Press Chairman 

That women's clubs are indeed a 
mighty factor for good in the affairs 
of the world today is of course not to 
be questioned. But how far reaching 
their influence really is, and the work 
that earnest club women aspire to ac- 
complish, and are accomplishing is a 
constant revelation. 

The first fall meeting of the execu- 
tive board of the Los Angeles District 
in the Highland Park Ebell Club on 
September 23rd, demonstrated the 
truth of the foregoing to a remarkable 
degree. Almost every member of the 
board was present, eager and enthu- 
siastic to begin the work that lies be- 
fore them. 

Almost every field of endeavor is 
represented in the work of the federa- 



oM. Roiskin 

TAILOR FOR 

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MAKER OF HIGH GRADE LADIES SUITS 



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Los Angeles 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



27 



tion. Affairs of the nation, state, city 
and home, come within its scope. Of 
national import is the newly-formed 
Peace Committee of which Mrs. J. B 
Nichols is chairman, for the spread- 
ing of the doctrine of peace ; for arbi- 
tration and the elimination of war and 
its attendant horrors. 

The state will undoubtedly be bene- 
fited by the Committees on Legislation 
under the chairmanship of Mrs. Mor- 
gan Jones, and Political Science, whose 
very capable chairman is Mrs. Harry 
J. Slater of Santa Monica. "The great- 
est work I hope to accomplish is im- 
pressing upon the women who can 
vote and do not do so, the fact that ex- 
ercising their right of franchise is not 
only a privilege, the value of which 
cannot be overestimated, but a duty 
as well," said Mrs. Slater in speaking 
of her work. 

Mrs. Christopher Gordon the ener- 
getic chairman of the Civic Commit- 
tee, intends that Los Angeles shall be 
an inspiration to other cities in forcing 
the owners of vacant lots hitherto 
overgrown with weeds and the dump- 
ing ground of sundry rubbish, to at 
least keep them clean, and it is ulti- 
mately hoped that they may be trans- 
formed into beauty spots by the grow- 
ing of California poppies and other 
flowers that require no care. 

Education, art, literature, music, 
philanthropy, touch closely upon the 
affairs of the home and the women 
who have these committees in charge 
in outlining their plans, have devoted 
much time and thought as to the man- 
ner in which they can carry on their 
work in the most practical and helpful 
manner. 

Following the executive board meet- 
ing, luncheon was served by the mem- 
bers of the Highland Park Ebell Club, 
in the spacious dining room of their 
new and attractive club house. Im- 
promptu speeches were enjoyed and a 
delightful hour spent before the work 
of the afternoon was taken up, when 
the President's Council met, Mrs. 
Mushet again presiding. About a hun- 
dred and fifty were present and the 



afternoon was all too short for the in- 
terchange of ideas, the outlining of 
plans and the reading of reports. 

Suburbanites cheerfully missed cars 
that would get them home in time for 
dinner, and others forgot traffic con- 
gestion at rush hours and remained to 
hear and benefit by the last speakers. 

Nearly all of the clubs in the Fed- 
eration are now actively engaged in 
work again and a splendid era of 
achievement and success is bound to 
result. 



SOUTHERN 

Mrs. Helen M. Deimling 

Press Chairman 

As the result of an enthusiastic re- 
port read at the last meeting of the 
Southern District Executive Board by 
Mrs. W. G. Conley, district chairman 
of peace, it was voted that the district 
take a membership in the American 
Peace Society. The reports of the 
other chairmen of departments, Mrs 
R. B. Vaile on Home Economics, Mrs. 
S. E. DeBracken on Waters, Mrs. 
Homer Lash on Forests, Mrs. George 
Butler on Club Extension — with two 
clubs asking admittance — Mrs. J. B. 
Fleishman on Reciprocity, and others 
were hardly less effective. The ques- 
tion of the establishment of maternity 
homes through the joint efforts of the 
county authorities and the women's 
clubs is receiving much attention from 
the district board and its units. 

Ebell Society of Anaheim held its 
annual reception to the teachers of that 
city on October 4. The president, Mrs. 
Ida Tipton, made the address of wel- 
come in behalf of the club, which was 
responded to by Prof. Houch, principal 
of the Union High School. The aim 
of both is to cement a closer relation- 
ship between the women's clubs and 
the schools to the service of their com- 
mon purposes. This same idea has 
been adopted by the Ebell of Santa 
Ana by making the teachers associate 



28 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



members of the club. The thirteen 
sections of the latter club are now well 
launched on their year's work. 

The Fortnightly Club of Oceanside 
has resumed charge of the flower show 
which was so successfully managed by 
them last year. Prizes are offered for 
the best arrangement and collections 
of different flowers. The Pacific Beach 
Reading Club found a unique way tc 
add to its exchequer through a "cafe- 
teria supper," followed by a social and 
dance. The first meeting of the cluli 
was made unusual by an address by 
Mrs. Byford Leonard, of La Jolla, one 
of the first sanitary inspectors in Chi- 
cago and the first woman policewoman 
in the United States. 

The Woman's Improvement Club of 
Blythe is planning to build a club 
house which is also to be a public li- 
brary room and a social meeting place 
for the young people. An interesting 
and helpful program has been arranged 
for the year. A member of the Escon- 
dido Woman's Club is now secretary 
of the school board of that place and 
in other ways the civic influence of 
the organization is made to be felt. 

Inadvertently the name of the south- 
ern district historian was omitted in 
the state Year Book. Mrs. L. F. Dar- 
ling. 222 East Arlington avenue. Riv- 
erside, the first president of the dis- 
trict, was unanimously named for the 
office at the convention held at Corona 
last Januarv. She is now compiling 
an outline history of the district, which 
will be orinted in pamphlet form and 
distributed at the convention. 

The Woman's Club of Fullerton pre- 
sents an unusually strong program for 
the coming year. At each meeting a 
three-minute talk on "Civics" in gen- 
eral is given, followed by a paner on 
some particular phase of the question. 
A eenerpl discussion serves then as a 
clearing house of ideas on the subject. 

The Woman's Club of La Jolla have 
plans completed for a new clubhouse 
soon to be erected on one of the best 
sites in that beautiful place. 

The press chairman requests that 
club notes intended for publication 



reach her not later than the twentieth 
of the month in order that they may be 
assembled and forwarded bv the first. 



TO OUR CONTRIBUTORS 

The exigencies of magazine publica- 
tion make it necessary to again direct 
the attention of those to whom we are 
indebted for valuable contributions to 
The Clubwoman to certain limitations 
as to time in which such matter shall 
be submitted. Under present circum- 
stances it is impracticable, except un- 
der the most urgent necessity, to pub- 
lish in the issue of any given month 
matter received later than the first of 
that month. Even this leaves but little 
time for the necessary processes of 
editing, linotyping, proof-reading, as- 
sembling, printing, binding and mail- 
ing, so where it is possible to do so 
we request that contributions be sent 
in time to reach us by the fifteenth day 
of the month preceding. This, natur- 
ally, cannot apply in the case of dis- 
trict news nor in that of reports of 
gatherings held during the latter part 
of the month. 

As noted elsewhere in this issue, 
Mrs. Orlando C. Vogel, press chairman 
of the Los Angeles District, has kindly 
consented to assume the duties of Fed- 
eration editor of The Clubwoman. 
Mrs. Vogel's experience in work of this 
character and her knowledge and in- 
terest in matters of import to the Fed- 
eration make her success a foregone 
conclusion. 

To avoid a further multiplicity of 
addresses, we request that matter in- 
tended for publication in the magazine 
or for the attention of Miss Smith be 
addressed as follows: The Club- 
woman, P. O. Box 1066, Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



29 



BOOKS ON SEX EDUCATION 



The following annotated lists of 
books on sex education for all classes 
of people have been prepared by Miss 
Rctta Parrott, of the Sacramento City 
Library and chairman of Industrial 
and Social Conditions for the North- 
ern District. They have been approved 
by the Northern District Board and 
by Mrs. Charles Farwell Edson, state 
chairman of Industrial and Social Con- 
ditions. Lack of space makes it impos- 
sible to print the entire bibliography 
in one issue of The Clubwoman. The 
remainder will follow in a subsequent 
number. 

METHODS OF TEACHING LIFE 
PROCESSES TO CHILDREN 

Hyatt, Edward — A Word to the 
Wise. 1913. State Printing Office, 
Sacramento. Free. This two-page leaf- 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

Harp Soloist of the Royal Academy 
of Music, London. 

Blaochard Hall. Ex. 62. Residence 1 972 Eitrella 
Phone»24558We.l4586. 



let is addressed to the parents and 
school teachers of California, and will 
be sent upon application to Mr. Hyatt, 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
State Capitol, Sacramento. 

Lowry, Edith B. — False Modesty 
That Protects Vice by Ignorance. 1913. 
Forbes & Co., Chicago. 50c, postage 
4c. This little book is dedicated to the 
next generation. It should be especi- 
ally helpful to parents and teachers, 
and might be used profitably in wo- 
men's clubs. 

Lyttleton, E. — Training of the 
Young in Laws of Sex. 1912. Long- 
mans, Green & Co., New York. $1.00, 
postage 5c. A dignified argument by 
a head master of Eton College in favor 
of sex education of the young by their 
parents. 

Morley, Margaret Warner — A Few 



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30 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



Familiar Flowers ; how to love them 
at home or in school. 1897. Ginn & 
Co., Chicago. 60c, postage 9c. This 
book makes a study especially of the 
morning-glory, the jewelweed, the nas- 
turtium, the geranium and the hya- 
cinth. It is addressed to teachers and 
is intended to be illustrative of the 
method of teaching life processes to 
children. 

Morley, Margaret Warner — T h e 
Honey-Makers. 1899. A. C. McClurg 
& Co., Chicago. $1.50, postage 10c. It 
would be difficult to conceive a more 
delightful introduction for teachers to 
the study of natural history than "The 
Honey-Makers." The second part of 
the book is devoted to the literature 
and history of the bee. 

Morley, Margaret Warner — The Re- 
newal of Life ; how and when to tell 
the story to the young. s 1906. A. C. 
McClurg & Co., Chicago. $1.25, post- 



age 10c. A little book addressed to 
mothers and adapted for use in wo- 
men's clubs. It contains a bibliogra- 
phy of books helpful in studying plant, 
animal and human life. 

Society of Sanitary and Moral Pro- 
phylaxis — Instruction in the Physiol- 
ogy and Hygiene of Sex, for Teachers ; 
a memorial to public school teachers of 
biologic branches, of domestic science 
and of physical training. 1913. Society 
of Sanitary and Moral Prophylaxis, 
New York. 10c, postage 2c. This 
pamphlet tells of ways to get special 
training for teaching the laws of sex; 
as, work in a biologic laboratory ; at- 
tendance upon lectures by biologists, 
sanitarians and physicians in turn ; or 
attendance at a first class normal insti- 
tution. It emphasizes these two rules: 
"Teach no evil," "Teach in time to pre- 
serve physical and moral well-being." 

Zenner, Philip — Education in Sexual 



gy'Mfifc 




224 SO BROADWAY 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Its the EXCELLENCE of the DAINTIES 
served combined with refined surroundings 
that makes the PIG and WHISTLE the favor- 
ite LUNCHEON place of PARTICULAR 
PEOPLE. 

And CANDIES "the taste you never forgot" 



^l/Lafame 






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THE CLUBWOMAN 



31 



Physiology and Hygiene. 1912. Stew- 
art & Kidd Co., Cincinnati. S1.00, post- 
age 6c. This book records the experi- 
ment of a woman and a man physician 
in giving talks to classes of school 
girls and boys respectively. Several 
illustrative talks are given. A special 
teacher is recommended rather than 
that the subject be left in the hands oi 
the general teacher. It is admitted 
that the parent is the ideal teacher. 

Morlev. Margaret Warner — The Bee 
People. '1900. A. C. McClurg Co., Chi- 
cago. $1.25, postage 9c. This book 
was published in the same year and 
based on the same material as ''The 
Honey-Makers," but it is adapted to 
children from about ten to fourteen 
years of age. The heroine is Miss Apis 
Mellifica, and interesting stories are 
told about her and her relatives. 

Morley, Margaret Warner — Flow- 
ers and Their Friends. 1898. Ginn & 
Co., Chicago. 50c, postage 8c. The 
same flowers are discussed in mis book 
as in "A Few Familiar Flowers," that 
from the teacher's point of view, and 
this from the child's. This contains a 
fifteen page glossary of words for the 
help of the child. 

Morley. Margaret Warner — Seed- 
Babies. 1896. Ginn & Co., Chicago. 
30c. postage 4c. A charming book for 
young children which tells how Jack 
came to "know beans" and some other 
things. 

BOOKS ON SEX HYGIENE FOR 
GIRLS AND WOMEN 

Galbraith. Anna M. — Four Epochs 
of Woman's Life : a study in hvgiene. 
1911. W. B. Saunders Co., Philadel- 
phia. SI. 50, postage 10c. A book full 
of good practical advice which has a 
word for the old as well as the young, 



for the matron as well as for maiden. 

Latimer, Caroline W r ormeley — Girl 
and Woman; a book for mothers and 
daughters. 1910. Appleton & Co., Chi- 
cago. $1.50, postage 10c. An excellent 
work which contains chapters on phy- 
sical, mental and moral disturbances of 
young women, and gives good advice 
in regard to personal hygiene. 

Lowry, Edith B. — Confidences; talks 
with a young girl concerning herself. 
1913. Forbes & Co., Chicago. 50c, post- 
age 3c. This little volume was written 
"with the desire to aid mothers to give 
necessary instruction to their daugh- 
ters." 

Morley, Margaret Warner — A Song 
of Life. 1902. A. C. McClurg & Co., 
Chicago. $1.25, postage 8c. This poeti- 
cally written and daintily illustrated 
book used to be classed with children's 
books, but is now especially recom- 
mended for young men and women. 

Mosher, Eliza M. — Health and Hap- 
piness; a message to girls. 1912. Funk 
& Wagnalls Co., New York. $1.00, 
postage 10c. In a series of letters to 
girls, Dr. Mosher gives them useful 
information concerning the physiology 
and hygiene of their bodies. This book 
is spoken of by the American Vigilance 
Committee as the best found for the 
general use of girls. 

Saleeby, C. W. — Woman and Wo- 
manhood; a search for principles. 1911. 
Mitchell Kennerley, New York. $2.50, 
postage 13c. This discussion is digni- 
fied and upon a high plane. It is good 
for any woman and some chapters will 
be especially helpful to young women. 
One chapter deals with the choice of 
terms for use in public speaking. It 
has strong chapters in favor of liquor 
and woman suffrage reforms. 








ENTIRE BUILDING 



443-445-447 South Broadway, Los Angeles 



Outfitters 
for 

Vvomen ana 
dm/aren 



32 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



San Francisco District Convention, 
C. F. W. C. 

t, Continued from page 16 ) 

of the Woman's Board of the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition to hold the State 
convention of 1915 in San Francisco 
and those extending the thanks of the 
convention to their hosts and hostesses 
for the many courtesies extended. A 
special vote of thanks was given 
Luther Burbank for his contributions. 

Invitations for the next convention 
were received from Eureka and from 
Pacific Grove. This question will be 
decided by the Executive Board. 

The social side of the convention de- 
veloped on Thursday. It began with 
an auto ride in the afternoon, provided 
by the Chamber of Commerce and the 
citizens of Santa Rosa. Afterward tea 
was served at the Saturday Afternoon 
Club house and in the evening a musi- 
cal and literary program of unusual 
merit was given in the same place. 
The principal number was a burlesque 
of Shakespearean characters by Mrs. 
R. L. Thompson as Juliet, Mrs. John 
Hood as Lady Macbeth, Miss Martha 
Hahmann as Portia and Mrs. O. L. 
Houts as Ophelia. 

One of the most interesting events 
of the convention program was not 
supplied by club women at all but by 
the school children of Santa Rosa. Fol- 
lowing the Wednesday program pupils 
of the different public schools gave an 
unusually creditable exhibition of folk 
dancing on the grounds of the Odd 
Fellows' Hall. This was under the 
supervision of Mrs. Minnie C. Mills, 
chairman of the program committee, 
with music by the High School boys' 
orchestra. 



"A VOICE, NOT AN ECHO." 

{Continued from Page 23) 

reeard to the dress of our school girls? 
The girls of well-to-do parents set 
the style for poorer girls, who may not 
have the shelter they have, and the 
desire to have clothes like the others, 
may set their feet on the path where 
the descent is so easy. 



Is there not a cure? Surely dress is 
not nearly so important as safe-guard- 
ing the girls and boys. 

Women are crying out about the 
looseness of morals. The dress of 
young gihls is no safeguard against it, 
but is rather an invitation for improper 
advances. 

Is it not possible for us to be a 
"voice"' against the prevailing style of 
dress among young girls? 



A HANDSOME YEAR BOOK 

Tastefully and heavily bound in gray 
and gold, the Year Book of the Long 
Beach Ebell Club, just received by The 
Clubwoman, is a model of its kind both 
in content and workmanship. Perhaps 
the most striking thing about it, next 
to the admirable conciseness with 
which it presents its message, is the 
profusion of apt quotations from the 
poets and philosophers of all times 
scattered everywhere throughout the 
text, tiny black-face bits of spice to the 
most prosaic entry. It contains a ros- 
ter of officers, directors, committees, 
department heads and members, the 
general program for the year and those 
of each of the fourteen departments, 
reports and the constitution, by-laws 
and articles of incorporation, assem- 
bled and typed in a manner to give 
pleasure to the lover of artistic book- 
making. 

The Long Beach Ebell was organ- 
ized in 1896, federated two years later 
and incorporated in 1908. From a 
charter membership of seventeen it has 
grown in that number of vears to one 
of three hundred and twelve. 



Two brothers once lived down this way, 

And one was Do and one was Say. 

If streets were dirty, taxes high. 

Or schools too crowded. Say would cry, 

"Lord what a town!" But brother Do 

Would set to work to make things new. 

And while Do worked. Say would cry: 
"He does it wrong! I know that I 
Could do it right." So all the day 
Was heard the clack of brother Say. 
But this one fact from none was hid: 
Say always talked, Do alwaj's did. 

Frederic Almy. 




— Ike liome^oP 
H-ari Schaffrver 
©Marx 4 oocl 
(q v ar ar\Ls ee)d 
C i oiKeJ 



The Clubwoman 



Official organ of tJu California Federation of Women's Clubs 



Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 

Subscription Price, One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH, Editor and Publisher. 
MRS. O. C. VOGEL, Federation Editor. 

Matter for Miss Smith and Mrs. Vogel must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 



CONTENTS 

Frantispiece Mrs. Miguel Estudillo 

Editorial : 

The Christmas Spirit , 7 

Thieves of the Yuletide 7 

As to Hetch-Hetchy 8 

The Legislative Council 9 

California Federation : 

President's Letter 9 

An Incentive to Art Study; Mrs. Miguel Estudillo 11 

A Needed Holiday Offering; Mrs. E. G. Denniston 13 

Christmas in the Clubs 14 

The Southern District Convention 15 

Mrs. Orlando C. Vogel 18 

General Federation : 

Biennial Notes 19 

The Past Presidents' Fund 20 

Colonial American Literature; Mrs. G. F. Reinhardt 21 

Parliamentary Usage ; Mrs. Annie Little Barry 23 

District News : 

Los Angeles : 25 

Southern : .-. 25 

Alameda 25 

San Joaquin 26 

San Francisco 27 

Northern 27 

Books on Sex Education i 28 

Executive Board Meeting 32 




MRS. MIGUEL ESTUDILLO 

State Chairman of Art 



TKe Clubwoman 



Vol. V 



December, 1913 



No. 2 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Commu- 
nications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P.O.Box 1066, by the 
twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 



What a beautiful thing it would be 
if Christmas could indeed become 
Merry Christmas for everyone! But 
its joyousness for some sharpens the 
contrast for others less fortunate. 
Club women, with their broadened 
outlook and knowledge of conditions, 
do much to make happier and merrier 
the holiday season for countless num- 
bers in the Christmas trees loaded with 
gifts to gladden the hearts of the little 
ones whose faith in Santa Claus would 
otherwise be shattered, and the bas- 
kets packed with good things to eat 
that carry cheer and courage to deso- 
late homes. 

But the Christmas spirit, the spirit 
of giving, of making others happy, 
does it prevail to quite the extent that 
it might? 

Is it not like the Christmas holly 
and the poinsettia that is at its best 
at the holiday season and then withers 
and blooms no more for another year? 

Why not make the Christmas spirit 
permanent, a fixture in every-day life, 
not confined to the giving of toys and 
baskets, not confined at all, for the 
opportunities are limitless. At home, 
at the club, on the street or in the 
stores a kindly word, a pleasant smile 
may carry much farther than we real- 
ize. There is need for more patience, 
sympathy, a greater democracy and 
less criticism. It is the little things in 
life that count the most and cost the 
least to give. 

So let the Christinas spirit flourish 
throughout the New Year and only be 
at its best at Christmas time. 



mas season in which club women 
could interest themselves with no little 
profit to their communities, particular- 
ly those which, in large measure 
through the influence of such women, 
have beautified their highways and 
their empty places with trees and 
shrubs. This is the wholesale theft, 
characteristic of this season, of Christ- 
mas trees and greens from the road- 
sides and the natural parks. Persons 
ordinarily law-abiding appear not to 
scruple to maim great evergreens or to 
cut down bodily any tree of appropri- 
ate size for their holiday purposes. 
The annual loss in real money from 
this source is about five thousand dol- 
lars in Los Angeles county alone. It 
is time to call a halt. The county and 
federal authorities have taken the mat- 
ter up with fines and threats of fines, 
but it is education against this sort 
of vandalism that is really needed. 



Thieves of the Yuletide. 

There is another side to the Christ- 



As to Hetch-Hetchy. 

From present appearances it is more 
than likely that, by the time this com- 
ment reaches the reader's eye, the 
United States Senate will have taken 
definite action upon the proposal to 
impound waters in the Hetch-Hetchy 
Valley for the municipal uses of San 
Francisco. This action will definitely 
settle the fate of this project and will 
end, in one way or the other, a contro- 
versy in which the club women of Cali- 
fornia and the country have taken an 
active part. 

Naturally, the strongest proponents 
of the Raker bill are those interested 
in the welfare of San Francisco. The 
club women of the Bay City have 
fought long and earnestly for it, declar- 



8 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



ing that those who fear the despoiling 
and commercialization of the Yosemite 
Valley exaggerate the circumstances 
which it is proposed to create. The 
ugly reservoir, as the opponents of the 
plan term it, they say will be instead 
a beautiful artificial lake, enhancing 
rather than diminishing the beauty of 
the great natural park. 

On the other hand, the General Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs has gone on 
record as actively opposing the Hetch- 
Hetchy project. The convention of 
the Southern District, C. F. W. C, 
passed a resolution against it. So did 
the Los Angeles district board. So 
did the San Joaquin district board, 
basing its action on the danger to their 
irrigation system. A more or less 
careful canvass of the country is 
claimed to show that two-thirds of the 
newspapers who have taken sides op- 
pose the plan. Senator Works is 
against it; so is Gifford Pinchot. The 
House of Representatives, the board of 
army engineers, the Secretaries of War, 
Agriculture and the Interior and other 
government officials have favored it. 
What is the answer? 

No one, San Franciscan or not, pre- 
tends to urge the project at the real 
and actual expense of Yosemite Na- 
tional Park. It seems to be only a 
question as to what extent the park 
will be affected by the damming of 
Hetch-Hetchy. Indubitably this will 
take water from the San Joaquin. It 
will be the introduction into a hitherto 
untouched beauty spot of a mighty en- 
gineering work, of questionable es- 
thetic value. Indubitably it means 
much to the city of San Francisco. 



The Legislative Council. 

Few events of the club year of 1913- 
14 have been or will be of as great sig- 
nificance to the future of club endeavor 
as the permanent organization in San 
Francisco November 10 of the Wom- 
en's Legislative Council of California. 
The immediate purpose of the council 
is to secure concerted effort of the en- 
tire personnel of the Federation in the 
preparation for and enactment of need- 



ed legislation in California. With the 
best intentions possible, it is not to be 
denied that in the past there has been 
much lost motion and wasted effort in 
legislative work, both of the education- 
al and the direct sort. 

Large credit for the organization of 
the council, tentatively formed imme- 
diately after the enfranchisement of 
California women, is due to Mrs. 
George E. Swan, then state chairman 
of legislation. Mrs. Swan sent out 
calls for district organization and meet- 
ings were held for the purpose in the 
principal cities of each division of the 
Federation. A temporary organization 
was effected, with Mrs. Swan as chair- 
man. Through voluntary contribu- 
tions headquarters were established at 
Sacramento during the session of the 
Legislature and the council became im- 
mediately effective. How effective it 
was is now a matter of history, upon 
which the club women may with jus- 
tice congratulate themselves. 

At the San Francisco meeting fifty- 
three clubs were represented as char- 
ter members. All women's organiza- 
tions interested in legislation are eli- 
gible to membership and the responses 
already received from all parts of the 
state indicate that the organization 
will swiftly become a formidable one 
in the interests of beneficent legisla- 
tion. 

By virtue of her office as state chair- 
man of legislation, Mrs. J. L. Har- 
baugh, of 2706 H street, Sacramento, 
was unanimously chosen president of 
the Council. Mrs. Seward A. Simons, 
of South Pasadena, a powerful figure 
in the politics and club work of the 
south, is vice-president; Mrs. Emily 
Hoppin, of Yolo, vice-president of the 
State Federation, is secretary; Mrs. H. 
N. Herrick, Sacramento, corresponding 
secretary; Mrs. George E. Swan, Up- 
land, auditor. The directors are Mrs. 
Mary Kinney, Venice; Mrs. O. P. 
Clark, Los Angeles ; Miss Julia George, 
San Francisco; Mrs. Robert Potter 
Hill, Eldridge; Mrs. A. P. Black, San 
Francisco, and Mrs. Robert J. Burdette, 
Pasadena. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 9 

California Federation if Women's Clubs 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Mrs. James W. Orr, 2420 Gough street, San Francisco. 

Vice-President — Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. 

Vice-President-at-large — Mrs. Calvin Hartwell,411 Summit avenue, Pasadena. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Edward D. Knight, 238 San Jose avenue, San Francisco. 

Corresponding Secretary — Miss Jessica Lee Briggs, 1942a Hyde street, San Francisco. 

Treasurer — Mrs. H. E. DeNyse, P. O. Box No. 695, Biverside. 

Auditors — Mrs. S. L. Wiley, Fresno, B. E. 9. Mrs. Fisher B. Clarke, 321 West Flora street, 

Stockton. 
General Federation State Secretary — Mrs. BusBell J. Waters, 900 West Adams street, Los An- 
geles. 

District Presidents 
Northern — Mrs. A. F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery street, Oroville. 
San Francisco — Mrs. Percy L. Shuman, San Mateo. 
Alameda — Mrs. William E. Colby, 2901 Channing Way, Berkeley. 
San Joaquin — Mrs. Harry Bates, Modesto. 

Los Angeles — Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 2614 North Griffin avenue, Los Angeles. 
Southern — Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 702 Ivy street, San Diego. 

Chairmen of Departments 

Art — Mrs. Miguel Estudillo, 335 Fourteenth street, Biverside. 

Civics— Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge, Boseville. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. E. S. Karns, Channing Lane, Palo Alto. 

Club Extension — Mrs. H. V. Eudy, Box 1318, Fresno, Cal. 

Conservation- 
Forestry — Mrs. Foster Elliott, 111 South Hidalgo avenue, Alhambra. 
Waterways — Mrs. E. G. Greene, 611 Waverly street, Palo Alto. 

Country Life — Miss Lillian D. Clark, 1534 Arch street, Berkeley. 

Education — Mrs. May L. Cheney, 2241 College avenue, Berkeley. 

Endowment Fund — Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 3454 Twenty-first street, San Franeiseo. 

Federation Emblem — Mrs. Mary H. Gridley, 101 Brand Boulevard, Glendale. 

Health — Mrs. L. P. Crane, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 

History and Landmarks — Mrs. William Fairchild, Box 72, Placerville. 

Home Economics — Miss Edna Eich, Santa Barbara. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. C. F. Edson, 950 West Twenty-first street, Los Angeles. 

Legislation — Mrs. J. T. Harbaugh, 2706 N street, Sacramento. 

Literature — Mrs. George F. Bernhardt, 2434 Durant avenue, Berkeley. 

Music — Mrs. G. H. Hutton, 927 Second street, Santa Monica. 

Necrology — Miss Lucy Hatch, The Palms, Fresno. 

Parliamentary Practice — Mrs. Annie Little Barry, Berkeley. 

Peace — Mrs. A. H. Griswold, Box 53, El Centre 

Philanthropy — Mrs. William Baurhyte, 1033 West Edgeware Boad, Los Angeles. 

Press— Mrs. O. C. Vogel, P. O. Box 106 S, Los Angeles. 

Program — Executive Committee. 

Reciprocity and Information — Mrs. Cora E. Jones, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 

Redistricting Committee — Mrs. Henry E. DeNyse, Biverside. 

State University Club House Loan — Mrs. S. L. Piatt, 1720 J street, FTesno. 

PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

In the first paragraph I desire to ac- fine a year book as I have seen, and the 

knowledge the receipt of the year books work covers a greater number of sub- 

of many clubs, the perusal of which jects than in many other states, 

has given me a treasured insight into On the last dav of October I was the 

their special activities. In exchange guest of the Philomathean club of 

for our own state year book sent out Stockton. Mrs. A. E. Pryor, the presi- 

in the early fall by the state secretary, dent, presides over a beautifully ap- 

I have received year books from many pointed new club house, and over a 

other state federations. Permit me to large membership. Mrs. Fisher Clarke, 

boast in just one sentence ! By com- the state auditor, who was my hostess 

parison, the C. F. W. C. sends out as and who made the arrangements for 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



the day, stipulated that my talk should 
be on the all-inclusive subject of fed- 
eration. 

The early November days took me 
south in company with Miss Briggs, 
the state corresponding secretary. The 
Santa Barbara Woman's Club, Mrs. H. 
J. Finger, president, entertained us 
beautifully at a luncheon at the Arling- 
ton, to meet her executive board before 
the hour at the club house. The offi- 
cers of the other city and country clubs 
were invited to the afternoon program 
and I was assured that they were an- 
ticipating with pleasure the Los An- 
geles district convention, which will be 
be housed in the Potter Hotel. 

The day at Long Beach with the 
Ebell Club was really a miniature con- 
vention. Mrs. D. M. Cate, the presi- 
dent, arranged her program to cover 
the relation of the club to the district, 
state and general federations. As 
house guests of Mrs. Frank Howe, 
Miss Briggs and I were surprised with 
a beautiful dinner party on the evening 
of our late arrival. Our appreciation 
must be briefly expressed. Mrs. Howe 
is an enviable hostess. 

The Southern District convention, so 
comfortably housed in the U. S. Grant 
Hotel in San Diego, was our objective 
point on the southern trip. It is not 
my purpose to report, but to express 
my keen interest in the proceedings. 
The hour with the club presidents and 
the reports of the district chairman of 
departments held my close attention ; 
as it is only in this intimate way that 
one can tell just how the federation 
work takes hold. 

As an interested observer, the truth 
must be told — the topic of greatest in- 
terest was Civics. Mrs. Palmer 
thoughtfully laid stress upon the new 
subjects. Vocational Education was 
splendidly presented. 

On the homeward trip we were 
guests at the Friday Morning Club of 



Los Angeles at the invitation of the 
president, Mrs. R. J. Waters. It was 
our good fortune to hear Mrs. Lillian 
Burkhart Goldsmith. Somewhat tired 
from protracted concentration on fed- 
eration topics, we were in a mood to 
thoroughly enjoy Mrs. Goldsmith's 
forcible and exquisite handling of her 
theme. Mrs. Goldsmith has many gifts 
and is the fortunate possessor of the 
power to lift the jaded mind, to stimu- 
late a tired indifference into active par- 
ticipation with the seething world of 
new and redemptive thought. 

My next detail was a day with the 
New Century Club of Oakland, Mrs. 
Robert Watt, president. After a lunch- 
eon of post-Thanksgiving dainties the 
many speakers expressed their views 
of the profits of federation. 

The Napa club women were the spe- 
cial guests of honor. Mrs. Bonette, in 
the course of her remarks, commended 
The Clubwoman and said Mrs. Barry's 
parliamentary page was worth the cost 
of the magazine. 

On December 6th the San Jose Wo- 
man's club will entertain the state 
president. 

The Local Biennial Board of Chicago 
has sent out its first circular on "Ho- 
tels," which will be found elsewhere in 
The Clubwoman. We shall endeavor 
to have "Biennial Notes" in each suc- 
ceeding issue of the magazine, that we 
may keep the California women in- 
formed of all necessary details of rates, 
of program and of entertainment. 

I must also call attention to the com- 
munication from the Past Presidents' 
Committee, G. F. W. C, viz., Mrs. 
Henrotin, Mrs. Moon and Mrs. Denni- 
son. Any club is at liberty to make 
recommendations to this committee. 

With greetings for the Christmas- 
tide and good wishes for the New Year, 
Cordially yours, 
MRS. JAMES W. ORR. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



11 



AN INCENTIVE TO ART STUDY 

By Mrs. Miguel Estudillo 

State Chairman of Art 



A great opportunity is coming to us 
all in the Panama-Pacific art exhibit. 
A thorough preparation in the clubs for 
the enjoyment and understanding of 
this exhibit will be of the greatest ad- 
vantage. The entire development of 
American art from its small beginnings 
in colonial times up to the present will 
be illustrated by original works, and 
to be ready for this special study will 
be given to our own American artists 
during the next two years. When 
this purpose is fulfilled, the California 
woman will be, Mr. Trask says, the 
most intelligent upon the face of the 
earth. 

Mr. John E. W. Trask, chief of the 
art department of the Panama-Pacific 
Exposition, intends that this exhibit 
will be as great and lasting an influ- 
ence for art in the West as the World's 
Fair at Chicago was to the East and 
Middle West. One of the committee 
on the selection of paintings for the 
art exhibit for this exposition is Mrs. 
Melville F. Johnston, art chairman of 
the General Federation. Mr. Trask 
stated to this committee that the effort 
of the department will be toward a gen- 
eral covering of the field of paintings 
in the last two or three centuries and 
the exhibit will contain a loan collec- 
tion of foreign paintings owned by 
Americans, a loan collection showing 
the logical development of American 
painting, and a collection of works by 
contemporaneous artists, produced 
since the St. Louis Fair. He says that 
the results cannot fail to be the creat- 
ing of an enormous demand for mod- 
ern paintings in the Far West, where 
the people temperamentally and finan- 
cially are ready for this development. 
This will be a favorable time for the 
purchase of paintings and statues, as 
the exhibit will be a careful selection 
from the best of present-day work by 
a jury of exacting artists. Paintings 
or statues may be selected before the 



exhibit is open to the public if pur- 
chase is guaranteed. 

Mrs. J. B. Hughes of the Northern 
District has sent out to her clubs sug- 
gestions and an outline of American 
art which, it appears, would be very 
helpful to remote clubs wishing to 
study the subject but without much 
material accessible for use. She sug- 
gests : 

First — That clubs plan, if possible, to 
devote one program each month to the 
study of art. 

Second — That clubs co-operate with 
the public schools in art study and the 
furthering of practical development in 
art lines. 

Third — That clubs work for the se- 
curing of one good copy of one good 
picture in every school in their com- 
munity. 

Fourth — That clubs work for the 
stimulation of art study through ex- 
hibits and lantern slides and through 
the introducing of art postal cards 
through the local dealers. 

Fifth — That clubs avail themselves of 
the opportunity to enjoy the splendid 
collection of reproductions of the mas- 
terpieces of the European galleries 
which can be secured from the State 
Library by paying the expressage. The 
cost is nominal, as the express com- 
panies have made special rates. 

Sixth — That clubs make every possi- 
ble effort to be placed on the circuit 
which will entitle them to enjoy the 
collection of some two hundred repro- 
ductions so generously loaned by the 
California Club of San Francisco. Clubs 
are permitted to keep the collection one 
month, entire cost ten dollars. The 
educational value of such an exhibit is 
inestimable. Not only should club 
members be privileged to enjoy it, but 
the entire community, especially the 
school children. 

To help clubs along the line of 
American art study, Mrs. Hughes has 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



prepared the following outline, select- 
ing only a few of the most noted art- 
ists in each line of work : 
Formative and Transitional Period. 

Group I — Portrait, miniature and 
historical painters: Benjamin West, 
John Copley, Gilbert Stuart, John 
Trumbull, Washington Allston. 

II — Older men who had greatest in- 
fluence upon modern American art: 
William Morris Hunt, George Innes, 
Homer D. Martin. 

Ill — Portrait and figure painters: 
Edwin A. Abbey, John W. Alexander, 
Cecilia Beaux, William Chase, Kenvon 
Cox, John La Farge (1835-1910, our 
greatest colorist), John S. Sargent, 
(probably strongest portrait painter of 
our present time), Abbot H. Thaver, 
Elihu Vedder, J. A. McNeil Whistler, 
1834-1903. 

IV — Landscape painters : Childe 
Hassam, William Keith (California 
artist), John Twachtman. 

V — Marine painters : Winslow Ho- 
mer (1836-1910, strongest and most 
original). 

VI — Animal painters : Anna Klump- 
ke (California artist, protege of Rosa 
Bonheur). 

VII — Mural painters : Edwin A. Ab- 
bey, John W. Alexander. Edwin H. 
Blashfield, Kenyon Cox', William Mor- 
ris Hunt, John La Farge, John Sar- 
gent, Elihu Vedder. 

Villi — Illustrators: Edwin A. Ab- 
bey, Howard Chandler Christy, Harri- 
son Fisher, Elizabeth Shippen Green, 
Charles Dana Gibson, Frederic Rem- 
ington, F. Hopkinson Smith, Jessie 
Wilcox Smith, Ernest Seton Thomp- 
son. 

IX— Etchers: J. McNeil Whistler, 
Joseph Pennel, Charles Piatt. 
Books on American Art, State Library. 

Armory, M. B.: "Domestic and Art- 
istic Life of J. S. Copley." 

Baxter, S. : "Legend of the Holy 
Grail," as set forth in the prize of the 
Boston Public Library, painted by Ed- 
win Abbey. 

Coffin, C. H. : "American Masters in 
Painting," "Story of American Paint- 
ing." 

Cortossez, R. : "John La Farge — 



Memoir and Study." 

Hartman, S. : "History of American 
Art." 

Isham, S. : "History of American 
Painting." 

King, P. : "American Mural Paint- 
ing." 

McSpadden : "Famous Painters of 
America." 

Rummel, J. : "Aims and Ideals of 
Representative Painters." 

Weir, J. F. : "John Trumbull." 

Wood, M. : "Sargent" (masterpiece 
in color). 

Van Dyke, John Q. : "A History of 
American Painting." 

The State Library also has several 
books on Whistler. It is planning to 
send out good reproductions of Amer- 
ican art. 

There may be made a general classi- 
fication of the subject, dividing it into 
three characteristic periods, Colonial, 
showing English influence ; Provincial, 
the Hudson River and Rocky Moun- 
tain school, a native growth of land- 
scape painting; Cosmopolitan, show- 
ing French influence, the Barbizons, 
impressionism and open-air methods, 
also examples of Independence, the 
painters of the present day. 

The General Federation Magazine 
announces the purchase of two sets of 
slides, which are ready for circulation 
among clubs. One set illustrates the 
"Development of American Painting" 
and the other "Present-Day Amer- 
ican Painting." Lectures are to be 
prepared on these subjects to send 
out with the slides. These sets were 
ready for renting to clubs on October 
15th and can be obtained for a charge 
of $2.50 and expressage from last place 
of exhibition; $1.50 will be charged for 
a slide broken in handling. For dates 
for the slides address Mrs. Howard T. 
Willson, Virden, 111. 

The district conventions are plan- 
ning exhibits of local work. When 
there is real talent striving in our own 
communities, here is where apprecia- 
tion should begin. We want to know 
the work of the artist who paints our 
own hills and desert and bits of coast 
and our own people. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



A NEEDED HOLIDAY OFFERING 

By Mrs. E. G. Denniston 

State Chairman of the Endowment Fund Commiteee 



The clubs are now actively engaged 
in the various forms of work to be con- 
sidered this year, and as chairman of 
the Endowment Fund for our own 
state I wish to present to every wom- 
an, club woman or not, the claims of 
this work upon the conscience. If the 
General Federation is to increase in 
efficiency, the Endowment Fund must 
be completed. As the work expands 
and the opportunities for service in- 
crease, the necessity of this fund be- 
comes more and more apparent, as a 
lew instances quoted will demonstrate. 

The dues of the General Federation 
have been kept very low, that the or- 
ganization might be a democratic one, 
no one barred by lack of wealth. The 
result is that the income is onlv be- 
tween $8,000 and $9,000, of which one- 
fourth must be spent for printing, one- 
fourth for the bureau of information, 
one-fourth for the expenses of Biennial 
and Council, leaving only about $2,000 
to pay all other expenses. How much, 
think you, can be allowed for the ex- 
penses of the ten departments of work, 
with their chairmen and members scat- 
tered throughout our territory? 

Only $200 could be allowed for the 
whole Department of Conservation, 
giving to the chairman and division 
chairmen but $50 each, and this to ex- 
tend over two years. I quote from a 
letter received: "$341.70 for printing 
and postage alone were expended in 
one year, while $25 was allowed by 
the General Federation." This means 
that $316.70 were paid by the members 
of the department from their own 
pockets. The chairman paid all of her 
traveling expenses herself. 

Another chairman writes : "For 
printing, typewriting, postage, etc., 
there has been spent for the depart- 
ment through the office of the chair- 
man, $418.26, of which $83.50 (less than 
one-fifth) was paid by the General Fed- 
eration treasurer." 



Again : "I feel sure that if only the 
work of the General Federation de- 
partments could be clearly shown to 
the State Federations there would be 
no further need for urging contribu- 
tions to the Endowment Fund." 

Another chairman writes that $241.- 
43 had been expended in furthering the 
work of the department for which no 
bills would be rendered. 

Quoting again: "The contributors of 
the Endowment Fund really hold the 
keys to the work of the Federation, sec- 
ond only to the love of the race in the 
hearts of the women." 

Do these extracts from letters give 
answer to the questions so often asked : 
"Do we need an endowment?" and 
"For what would it be used?" 

Is it right or dignified for us as club 
women to allow those who are doing 
the work to not only give of their 
strength, time and brains, but also to 
furnish the money for expenses? There 
is a moral 'obligation resting upon ev- 
ery woman in the Federation because 
the resolution to raise this $100,000 to 
form an endowment fund was adopted 
by the body in convention assembled 
at Cincinnati, in 1910. It is not for us 
to say they adopted the resolution ; we, 
each and every one, are members of this 
great Federation and stand for its pol- 
icy. 

We know, in a measure, what is be- 
ing accomplished by the Federation in. 
arousing public interest to the neces- 
sity for many reforms, and of what has 
already been accomplished, and we 
must support the efforts being made. 
Do we value the Federation to the ex- 
tent of twenty-five cents per capita? 
Is there any club woman who cannot 
pav this small amount, once and for 
all? 

Ten of the states have already paid 
the full apportionment, and three have 
paid more than the apportionment. 
{Continued on Page 32) 



14 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



CHRISTMAS IN THE CLUBS 



The holiday season is always one of 
activity for the women's clubs, and 
there are but few which do not inject 
into their programs more or less of the 
Christmas spirit in subject and sub- 
stance. This is perhaps more true in 
and about Los Angeles than in any 
previous year, for the reason that tne 
motive of helpfulness to others be- 
comes continually more marked. 

The annual Christmas party of the 
Los Angeles Ebell will be given on 
December 27 for the poor children of 
the city. An enormous Christmas tree 
is in process of preparation and literal- 
ly hundreds of pretty dolls — all 
blondes, by the way — are being dressed 
by the members for the occasion. Not 
that the boys will be neglected — tin 
soldiers, toys, play guns, Indian suits 
and scores of other things will be pro- 
vided for the edification of Young 
America. A supper will follow, and 
every child will have fruit and candy 
to carry home. The preceding after- 
noon will be devoted to the Christmas 
part}' for the children of members. 
They are to bring the gifts for their 
poorer sisters and brothers a,nd will en- 
joy a rendition of the play, "Christmas 
Eve at Mother Hubbard's," by the chil- 
dren of the Egan School. 

On December 3 the Badger Club 
gave a large and successful Christmas 
bazaar at the Ebell club house for the 
benefit of its philanthropic fund. Mrs. 
Elizabeth Baker Bohan, Mrs. Morgan 
Jones, Mrs. C. J. Williams, Mrs. Har- 
rison Ward, Miss Florence Bohan, 
Mrs. H. M. Mitchell and Mrs. Howard 
Bahn presided over the different 
booths. Many useful and pretty arti- 
cles were sold and a comfortable sum 
realized for the poor. 

During holiday week an enormous 
outdoor Christmas tree will be erected 
in the Plaza by the Los Angeles Wom- 
an's Million Club and every afternoon 
and evening from Christmas Eve to 
New Year's toys and good things will 
be given away to the children of the 
poor and useful articles to their elders. 



In the evenings there will be musical 
programs supplied by the different 
church choirs of the city, notably the 
great aggregation of 200 voices of Tem- 
ple Baptist Church, that of the First 
Methodist with 250 voices and of St. 
John's and Christ Episcopal. The 
Woman's Symphony Orchestra and the 
People's Orchestra have volunteered 
their services, and many grand opera 
singers who are expected in the city 
during the week will be asked to sing. 
Credit for the plan belongs to Mrs. W. 
C. Tyler. Mrs. M. H. Pehr is chair- 
man of the committee on arrangements. 
Several benefits have been given and 
are planned to raise the necessary 
money. 

The Woman's Improvement Associ- 
ation of South Pasadena gave a two- 
day Christmas bazaar at its new club 
house on Fremont avenue during the 
latter part of November. Mrs. Leo 
Longley, a past president, was in 
charge. Features of the program were 
folk-dancing by school children, an op- 
eretta by girls of the high school, a din- 
ner dance, a Japanese tea garden and 
a great variety of booths where all 
manner of good things to eat and to 
use were for sale. 

The Jewish Women's Consumptive 
Relief Association gave a large musi- 
cale at the Friday Morning Club house 
on December 12th for the benefit of its 
philanthropic work. The Florence 
Crittenton Home, in which a large 
number of local club women are inter- 
ested, held its annual Christmas ba- 
zaar on November 21, combining it 
with the annual reception. O. T. John- 
son has recently given the home $50,- 
000 for a new building. 

Among the many Christmas pro- 
grams arranged for clubs themselves 
may be mentioned two Christmas plays 
to be given on the evening of Decem- 
ber 12th by the members of the Echo 
Park Mothers' Club, just admitted to 
the federation, and the lecture-program 
"The Christmas Story in Art," enjoyed 
by the Los Angeles Ebell on Decem- 
ber 8. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



15 



THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT CONVENTION 



The evolution of the woman's club, 
once a neighborhood organization 
formed for the more or less desultory 
study of art, music and literature, now 
a keen, alert, powerful factor in the 
governmental life of the community, 
the city, the state and the country, 
has perhaps been seldom better ex- 
emplified than by the seven hundred 
club women in attendance at the 
twelfth annual convention of the 
Southern District, held at the U. S. 
Grant Hotel, San Diego, November 
18, 19 and 20. 

From the address of the state presi- 
dent, Mrs. James W. Orr, on the open- 
ing day of the convention, the gather- 
ing took its keynote. "Every club 
woman should be a business woman," 
said Mrs. Orr, "as well as making a 
business of being a club woman. It is 
vital that she should know and under- 
stand the important questions of the 
day affecting the welfare of society ; 
that she should possess the sympathy 
essential to that understanding and 
the prophetic vision that enables her 
to work wisely for this and future gen- 
erations." 

By way of practical illustration of 
what is possible when the modern prin- 
ciples of business are applied to the 
ends and aims of the woman's club, 
Mrs. Orr presented a brief and concise 
review of what the club woman has 
accomplished for herself and for 
others in California, both before and 
after her enfranchisement. For a con- 
tinuation and a broadening of this 
work she made an effective plea. 

Something of the recognition which 
is now accorded women's clubs as part 
and parcel of great movements was 
reflected in the opening addresses be- 
fore the convention. Mayor Charles 
F. O'Neall, of San Diego, welcomed 
the delegates on behalf of the city and 
paid a graceful tribute to the work 
which they were there to do. William 
Tomkins, secretary of the San Diego 
Chamber of Commerce, spoke for that 
body, and Duncan MacKinnon, super- 



intendent of schools, for the Order of 
Panama. Judge W. A. Sloane spoke 
on the Panama-California Exposition, 
its scope and purposes, and asked the 
co-operation of women's clubs in mak- 
ing it a gigantic success. Mrs. Carl S. 
Owen, president of the county federa- 
tion, the hostess organization, made a 
pretty speech of welcome, to which 
Mrs. W. E. Ellis, of Riverside, re- 
sponded on behalf of the delegates. At 
the close of the morning session a 
handsome, hand-carved gavel of lemon 
wood was presented to the chair. 

Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, the retir- 
ing district president, to whose execu- 
tive ability as a leader is due the great 
bulk of the gratifying progress shown 
by the annual reports of the district of- 
ficers, presided over the convention, 
Dr. Mary E. Ritter, of La Jolla, acting 
as parliamentarian. About one hun- 
dred and twenty-five accredited dele- 
gates from the five southern counties 
were in attendance, the rest of the big 
audience representing' nearly every 
city of importance below Tehachapi's 
top. 

The usual opposition to redistricting, 
even as applying to the Southern Dis- 
trict, promptly developed. The sub- 
ject was presented by Mrs. Henry E. 
DeNyse, of Riverside. The plan, which 
was vigorously opposed by delegates 
from all the counties affected, provides 
for the formation of a new district com- 
posed of clubs in Orange, Riverside 
and San Bernardino counties, leaving 
only San Diego and Imperial counties 
in the Southern District. The advan- 
tage of compactness seemed to weigh 
little against the disfavor with which 
a severing of long-knit ties was re- 
garded, and it was made plain that the 
Southern District will vote nearly as a 
unit against redistricting when the 
subject comes up for settlement at Riv- 
erside next spring. 

At the election, held on the last day 
of the convention, Mrs. A. J. Lawton, 
of Santa Ana, was elected president 
to succeed Mrs. Palmer; Mrs. S. M. 



16 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



Johnson, of Redlands, vice-president ; 
Mrs. G. W. Sherwood, Fullerton, cor- 
responding secretary ; Mrs. Anna Best, 
Brawley, recording secretary; Mrs. F. 
J. Miller, Corona, treasurer; Mrs. Geo. 
Butler, San Diego, auditor. On the 
state committees the following were 
named: Nominating, Mrs. N. P. J. But- 
ton, Riverside ; credentials, Miss Ger- 
trude V. Reid, Cucamonga ; resolu- 
tions, Mrs. C. S. Alverson, San Diego. 
The delegates to the Riverside conven- 
tion will be Mrs. Carl Owen and either 
Dr. Mary Ritter or Mrs. Henry De- 
Nyse. 

A resolution was introduced by Mrs. 
S. M. Johnson and enthusiastically 
passed indorsing Mrs. Palmer, the re- 
tiring president of the district, as a 
candidate for the state presidency at 
the forthcoming election at Riverside. 
Mrs. Palmer has held many important 
offices in the San Diego County Fed- 
eration, the Southern District Federa- 
tion and the state organization, and 
her candidacy will be a formidable one. 
Her successor as president of the dis- 
trict, Mrs. Lawton, is a past president 
of the Art Study Club and the Wom- 
an's Civic Club and is now president 
of the Santa Ana Ebell. 

Directly in line with Mrs. Orr's ad- 
dress and notable even among the 
many able discussions which featured 
the convention's program was that of 
Mrs. William Baurhyte, of Los An- 
geles, state chairman of philanthropy. 
Mrs. Baurhyte's address was at once 
a stirring appeal for the amelioration 
of the conditions of the poor and a 
scathing arraignment of conditions as 
they are now permitted to exist by 
California city governments. She called 
upon her audience, which frequently 
interrupted her with spontaneous out- 
bursts of enthusiastic applause, to 
force the political spoils-seekers to ade- 
quately care for the charges which mis- 
fortune has made theirs. Her greatest 
emphasis was laid upon the proper care 
of maternity cases among the poor, 
which she declared to be the most seri- 
ous problem now confronting the wom- 
en of America. 



"Don't let any politician scare you 
from going to your own county hos- 
pital," she said, "to see for yourselves 
how your maternity wards are con- 
ducted. You have a vote and you have 
'a right to go there. If women are po- 
litically ambitious, I believe it would 
be a much greater thing for them to 
control the hospital conditions of the 
country than to be governor or presi- 
dent." 

Mrs. Baurhyte drew a concrete les- 
son from what has been accomplished 
by club women in Los Angeles, where 
a little maternity hospital "was started 
a number of years ago and in which 
three hundred mothers were given ade- 
quate care the first year. She urged 
her hearers to begin a searching in- 
vestigation into hospital conditions and 
to make the end of their inquiry the 
establishment of enough hospitals to 
decently meet the need. 

One of the valuable addresses of the 
program was given by Miss Long- 
necker, of the San Diego State Normal 
School, on a subject which lies close 
to the heart of the federated club wom- 
an — that of vocational education. In 
emphasizing its need she startled her 
hearers somewhat with the declaration 
that the present elementary school is 
mediaeval in its limitations as regards 
the practical preparation of children 
for their life work. Manual arts of a 
wide variety, she said, should be taught 
to children as low as in the fourth and 
fifth grades, in order that, by the time 
they reach the eighth, where too many 
educations halt, they will have at least 
some idea of what they want to do and 
how to do it. 

"Two million children are added to 
the ranks of industrial workers every 
year," she said. "Half of these have 
never progressed in their education 
beyond the fifth grade. In London 
two-thirds of the children who go to 
work are not driven- to it by family 
poverty but because of dissatisfaction 
with the schools. 

"They should have just as respected 
a place in the school as the text-book. 
If we spent more money on the work 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



17 



of our elementary schools we should 
have to spend less on caring for our 
criminals : for it is the unpreparedness 
with which we handicap our boys and 
girls when we send them' out into the 
world that makes them drunkards and 
criminals." 

Prof. Edward L. Hardy of the same 
institution, made a telling address, es- 
tablishing the relation of cause and ef- 
fect between "Education and Interna- 
tional Peace." He declared that uni- 
versal peace will come as the result of 
education of men into the art of ruling 
themselves as well as the things of na- 
ture and urged his hearers to work for 
the consummation of that end. Prof. 
Hardy paid a high tribute to Col. 
Goethals, of Panama Canal fame, char- 
acterizing him as one of the great 
leaders in the army of peace. The 
same subject, though in a different 
way no less effective, was dealt with 
by Mrs. W. G. Conley, of El Centro, 
district chairman of peace, whose re- 
marks were followed by a general dis- 
cussion. 

The evening session of the first day 
was devoted to music, art and litera- 
ture. Mrs. J. R. Caldwell, district 
chairman of music, gave an interesting 
outline of what has been accomplished 
and what is planned. Miss Marion H. 
Harris, chairman of art, spoke on the 
importance of art in the club woman's 
''curriculum" and Mrs. L. E. Dadmun, 
chairman of literature, told briefly and 
interestingly of the work in her depart- 
ment. 

An interesting feature in connection 
with the talk on art was the art exhibit 
in a room adjoining the convention 
hall, where the representative arts and 
crafts of the five counties were on dis- 
play. A fifty-piece collection of hand- 
painted china, the work of Miss Xell 
Horton, was among the exhibits ad- 
mired. 

Worthy of special mention on Wed- 
nesday's programme were the ad- 
dresses of Mrs. Johnson, of Redlands, 
who spoke in place of ex-Senator M. L. 
Ward, and who made a plea for the 
better education of club women in 



civics and industrial conditions ; Mrs. 
E. L. Quinn and Mrs. Lena Squier, dis- 
trict chairmen of those departments, 
whose work has obviously done much 
to answer Mrs. Johnson's plea ; Mrs. 
Eliza G. Praul, on civil service reform ; 
Mrs. George Barr, on philanthropy, 
and Mrs. Russell J. Waters, president 
of the Friday Morning Club of Los 
Angeles, on federation topics. 

Reports by the various officers of 
the district federation were heard and 
the roll called of the constituent clubs, 
with two-minute responses by the pres- 
idents. Mrs. Homer Lash, chairman 
of forests conservation, spoke briefly 
on that subject, Mrs. J. C. King on the 
state university club house loan fund, 
Mrs. George Butler on club extension, 
and Mrs. Josephine B. Fleishman on 
the bureau of reciprocity and informa- 
tion. 

A telegram was read from the Gen- 
eral Federation president and the 
chairman of legislation, Mrs. Percy V. 
Pennybacker and Mrs. Homer W. 
Towner, asking" the women of Califor- 
nia to oppose the Hetch-Hetchy water 
project for San Francisco. 

Mrs. Lillian Harris Coffin, head of 
the delegation from San Francisco, la- 
bored valiantly to turn the tide in favor 
of Hetch-Hetchy, but her efforts were 
unsuccessful. The convention adopted 
a resolution of protest against the 
project. 

The principal social event of the 
three-day stay in San Diego was the 
annual reception of the district, held in 
the ballroom of the hotel Wednesday 
evening. About three hundred splen- 
didly-gowned women were present and 
not to exceed a dozen men, among 
them Mayor O'Neall. The evening was 
opened by a musical programme pre- 
sented under the direction of Mrs. J. R. 
Caldwell, chairman of the music com- 
mittee, skillfully arranged and credit- 
able to the last note. The principal 
numbers were an aria from La Tra- 
viata by Mrs. Lillian Stibolt-Hanssen 
and solos by Lysle Rothwell McKen- 
ney, basso ; Miss Blanche Lyons, so- 
prano, and Mrs. Fannie Naumann- 
Rosenfeld, violin. 



18 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




MRS. ORLANDO C. VOGEL 

Federation Editor of The Clubwoman 



Photo by Matzene 



THE CLUBWOMAN 19 

General Federation 

BOARD OF DIEECTOES 

President — Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker, 2606 Whitis avenue, Austin, Texas. 

First Vice-President — Mrs. L. L. Blankenburg, 214 West Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Second Vice-President — Mrs. Samuel B. Sneath, 211 Monroe street, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Eecording Secretary — Mrs. Harry L. Keefe, Walthill, Nebraska. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Eugene Eeilley, 508 Park avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Treasurer — Mrs. John Threadgill, 922 North Eobinson street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Auditor — Mrs. C. H. McMahon, 32 Caithness Apartments, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Directors — Mrs. William E. Andrews, 1225 Fairmont street, N. W., Washington, D. C; Mrs. 
A. L. Christie, 219 South Washington street, Butte, Montana; Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, 
Irvington, Indianapolis, Indiana; Mrs. Francis D. Everett, Highland Park, Illinois; Mrs. 
William P. Harper, 651 Kinnear place, Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Creighton Mathewes. 315 
Bermuda street, New Orleans, Louisiana; Mrs. Frank White, Valley City, North Dakota; 
Mrs. William B. Williams, Lapeer, Michigan. 

CHAIEMEN OF DEPARTMENTS 

Art — Mrs. Melville F. Johnston, 103 North Tenth street, Richmond, Ind. 

Civics — Miss Zona Gale, Portage, la. 

Civil Service Eeform — Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, The Gladstone, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conservation — Mrs. Emmons Crocker, 48 Mechanic street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Education — Mrs. O. Shepard Barnum, 312 South Fifth street, Alhambra, Cal. 

Household Economics — Miss Helen Louise Johnson, 234 Paddock street, Watertown, N. Y. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. A. E. Chantler, Tacoma Daily News, Tacoma, Wash. 

Legislation — Mrs. Horace T. Towner, Corning, la. 

Literature — Mrs. Frances Squire Potter, 4581 Oakenwald avenue, Kenwood, Chicago, 111. 

Music — Mrs. Lawrence Maxwell, Edgecliffe Road, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O. 

Public Health — Mrs. S. S. Crockett, 710 Belmont avenue, Nashville, Tenn. 

Press Committee — Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, Chairman, Indianapolis, Ind.. 



BIENNIAL NOTES 

The following communication of im- located in the downtown district of 

portance to all California club women Chicago. 

planning to attend the Chicago con- l n order to increase the advantages 

vention of the General Federation next f locating state delegations together, 

June, is the first of a series which The arrangements will be made whereby 

Clubwoman will print under the head- state headquarters will be provided, 

ing of "Biennial Notes." This is sent f ree of charge, in the hotel to which a 

out by Miss Florence Beckett, La o-iven delegation has been assigned. 



The California delegation has been 



Grange, 111., chairman of the hotels 

committee for the local biennial board, , 

and is addressed to the California State assigned to the La Salle hotel. 

President : Will you confer the favor of com- 

The Local Biennial Board, having in municating with all of the federated 
preparation the entertainment of its clubs in your state asking that the 
guests during the convention of the G. names of delegates, alternates and vis- 
F. W. C. from June 9 to 19, 1914, de- itors be forwarded to you without de- 
sires, so far as possible, to place dele- lay, that you, in turn, may inform the 
gates and alternates, as well as accom- hotels committee at the earliest possi- 
panying visitors, together, according ble moment of the number of people, 
to the states from which they come. with their choice of rooms, to be pro- 

The Local Board has decided that, at vided for, from your state? In making 

the Convention of 1914 there shall be application for reservations, please di- 

no hotel designated as "official head- vide your application in the following 

quarters." manner: Number of rooms, without 

All of the hotels, listed by the Hotels bath, wanted ; number of rooms, with 
Committee in a bulletin to be shortly bath, wanted ; number of rooms ad- 
issued, are equally desirable, and are joining, wanted; number of suites, con- 



20 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



sisting of parlor, bedroom and bath, 
wanted ; total number of rooms 
wanted. The prices of rooms will be 
listed in the bulletin. You are asked 
to be reasonably sure of occupying the 
number of rooms you reserve. You 



are likewise requested to send to the 
chairman of the hotels committee, be- 
tween April 15 and May 15, 1914, the 
names of the members of your dele- 
gation, stating in each case whether 
delegate, alternate or visitor. 



THE PAST PRESIDENTS' FUND, G. F. W. C. 

By Mrs. Minnie Starr Grainger. 



(The following, which is designated 
by its spokesman as the most impor- 
tant announcement ever made to the 
women of America, is a part of the 
address made by Mrs. Grainger before 
the Illinois State Federation at Evans- 
ton on November 11. It is a prelimi- 
nary announcement only — the details 
will be made known later. It may be 
added that the three trustees of the 
fund — Mrs. Henrotin, Mrs. Denison 
and Mrs. Moore — have asked Mrs. Orr 
as a first step to send a brief personal 
statement of the two or three most 
important present-day evils which the 
G. F. W. C. would abolish — if it had 
the money. — Ed.) 

The women's clubs in local bodies 
are the greatest power for good in ten 
thousand communities. The State Fed- 
eration concentrates that power in 
each state. The General Federation 
of Women's Clubs is the supreme body 
where the views of all local clubs and 
all State Federation should be focused, 
and where the will of over a million 
devoted women, the greatest influence 
for progress the world has ever known, 
should be put into practical operation. 

Such a powerful body of the brains 
and hearts of the nation — representing 
collectively one-third of the best 
homes — could influence every legisla- 
ture in the land in the making of good 
laws and in the repeal of the bad laws 
— it could reach out a helping hand to 
the child oppressed by labor, it could 
help to bring the breath of pure air and 
sunshine to the dark corners of crowd- 
ed cities, it could make pure food an 
actuality instead of a hope; the social 
evil could be curbed and white slavery 
abolished ; it could make the dreams 



of millions come true if it had the 
money to do it. 

But it has not the money. 

In the twenty-five years of its ex- 
istence the General Federation has had 
the equivalent of about one-quarter of 
a cent per annum from its directly and 
indirectly affiliated members. Think 
of it, one-quarter of a cent ! 

Now, here is the great news I have 
to present to you : 

Our three honored past presidents of 
the General Federation of Women's 
Clubs — Mrs. Ellen Henrotin, of Chi- 
cago; Mrs. Dimies T. S. Denison, of 
New York, and Mrs. Philip N. Moore, 
of St. Louis, realizing through years 
of heart-breaking effort this trying 
need and wishing to celebrate the 
twenty-fifth anniversary of our Feder- 
ation movement in a practical manner, 
have evolved a plan whereby every de- 
partment of work can be thoroughly 
financed for two years, so that the 
great power of the women's clubs can 
be thoroughly demonstrated. 

They have decided upon this as the 
best means of celebrating our silver 
jubilee. 

They propose between now and the 
next biennial to be held in Chicago in 
June, 1914, to raise a quarter of a mil- 
lion dollars and present it at the meet- 
ing, unhampered by any condition ex- 
cept that it is not to be added to the 
Endowment Fund — but is to be used 
at once to finance the various depart- 
ments of work. 

And they propose to raise this 
money without asking you as an indi- 
vidual to put your hands in your purse 
for a single cent. They will not apply 
( Continued on Page 32) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



COLONIAL AMERICAN LITERATURE 

By Mrs. George F. Reinhardt, 

State Chairman Literature 



It is good for a traveller, however 
delightful his journeys, to come home ; 
it is good for a reader, however widely 
he may browse in various literatures, 
to taste simple home fare. There must 
be some California club, moved by 
patriotism, or by a desire to under- 
stand the animating spirit of American 
literature, who would find a year spent 
in studying the literature of this coun- 
try illuminating and interesting. With- 
out doubt there are periods in Ameri- 
can history that shine with greater 
artistic splendor than the lean years 
that characterized the early Colonial 
days, but certainly there is no better 
way to get at the significance of things 
American and to determine the ideas 
that animated the settlers and have 
molded this nation, than by approach- 
ing our modern literature through our 
earliest writings. 

Colonized at the time when Shakes- 
peare was at the height of his fame 
in England, and the Mermaid tavern 
echoed to the sallies of wits that suc- 
ceeding centuries have failed to dull, 
this country was cut off by an uncabled 
ocean from the civilization of the par- 
ent land and came face to face with 
the harsh struggle for existence in a 
wilderness. The writings of this early 
time reflect the stern religious faith 
that held men to their tasks, the Yan- 
kee shrewdness that developed in the 
north, the pastoral quiet of the south, 
the absence of poetic and dramatic ex- 
pression, and finally they culminate in 
the practical genius of Benjamin 
Franklin. 

The following outline affords suffi- 
cient work 'for a monthly program 
throughout a club year, or if one sub- 
ject is treated extensively rather than 
two being treated more or less briefly, 
double that number of programs can 
be built upon it. 
1. John Smith and his histories: 

(a) 1608. A True Relation of such 
Occurrences and Accidents of 



note as hath happened in Vir- 
ginia. 
(b) 1624. The General History of 
Virginia, New England, and 
the Summer Isles. 

2. The Journalists : 

(a) William Bradford, 1590-1657. 

(b) Samuel Sewall, 1652-1730. 

(c) Sarah Knight, 1666-1727. 

(d) William Byrd, 1674-1744. 

3. The Ministers : 

(a) Cotton Mather, 1663-1728. 
Read either his Essays to Do 
Good, or his Ecclesiastical His- 
tory of New England. 

(b) Jonathan Edwards, 1703-1758. 
Read Jonathan Edwards in 
Pages from an Old Volume of 
Life by O. W. Holmes. 

4. The Writers of Verse: 

(a) Anne Bradstreet, 1612-1672. 
Read The Tenth Muse or Anne 
Bradstreet and Her Time, by 
Campbell, 1891. 

(b) Michael Wigglesworth, 1631- 
1715. Read the Day of Doom. 

(c) The Bay Psalm Book and its 
writers. 

5. Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790) : 

(a) Poor Richard's Almanac. 

(b) Franklin's Autobiography, 

6. Orators of the Revolution : 

(a) Samuel Adams, 1722-1803. 

(b) James Otis, 1725-1783. 

(c) Josiah Quincy, 1744-1775. 

(d) Patrick Henry, 1736-1799. 
General Authorities : 

C. F. Richardson : American Litera- 
ture, Putnam, 1887. 

M. C. Tyler: History of American 
Literature During Colonial Times, Put- 
nam, 1878: History of the Revolution, 
Putnam, 1897. 

Wendell : Literary History of Amer- 
ica, Scribner's Sons, 1901. 

E. C. Stedman and E. M. Hutchin- 
son : Library of American Literature, 
11 volumes, Webster & Co., 1887-1890. 

E. C. Stedman : American Anthol- 
ogy, Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 1900. 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



PARLIAMENTARY USAGE 

By Mrs. Annie Little Barry 

State Chairman of Parliamentary Practice 



QUESTIONS: 

If a president resigns and the vice- 
president cannot act, who should call 
the meeting to order? 

Answer — The recording secretary. 

In the above case how should vacan- 
cies be filled? 

Answer — Your by-laws should pro- 
vide for such an emergency. Ordinar- 
ily the executive board has power to 
fill vacancies. 

Can a presiding officer keep from 
discussion any question of which she 
is not in favor? 

Answer— Most decidedly, no. A pre- 
siding officer must always protect the 
minority as well as the majority. Her 
personal opinion is not to be urged 
upon her constituents. If a question 
to be discussed is contrary to the con- 
stitution the president may rule it out 
of order, giving her reason for so doing. 



INTRODUCING A SPEAKER. 

LESSON IV. 

How often we listen to introductions 
that place both the speaker and the pre- 
siding officer in a ridiculous position. 

The ideal introduction is brief. Re- 
member that the audience wishes to 
hear the speaker, not the introduction. 
Do not tell of the virtues, accomplish- 
ments and wisdom of the speaker, thus 
embarrassing even the boldest. Do 
not give your own opinion of the sub- 
ject or air your own knowledge. The 
subject is not yours. Say things you 
believe yourself, then some one else 
may believe them. Introduce a stran- 
ger. Present one who is well known. 

I once heard no less a personage 
than the mayor of a big city introduce 
a speaker of world-wide fame (a man 
whom everyone was anxious to hear) 
with a speech that was typewritten 
and twenty minutes in length. 

One's own taste is the best guide. 
but we present two very simple illus- 
trations for introduction. 

It is my privilege to introduce to 



} r ou today an artist who always de- 
lights her hearers. We promise her an 
appreciative audience. Mme. Sara 
Nightingale will give the program of 
the afternoon. Ladies, Mme. Nightin- 
gale. 

We are greatly honored in having 
with us today the president of the state 
university of California. As Califor- 
nians we are very proud of our state 
university, and greatly appreciate the 
head of this great institution, one who 
is honored both at home and abroad. 
The president of the university of Cali- 
fornia needs no introduction. I pre- 
sent to you Dr. Benjamin Ide Wheeler. 

Always mention the name of the 
speaker last, after you have made your 
remarks. It seems less personal. Be 
sure you get the name correctly. If 
the speaker prefers to be known as 
Mrs. John Skinner, Mrs. John Edward 
Skinner or Mrs. Susan Lowe Skinner. 

The best way to determine the name 
is to ask the person who owns it. It 
is well to ask if there is anything else 
the speaker wishes said. This is pub- 
lic courtesy. Of course, this is done 
before the meeting begins. 

At the close of the program, in a few 
very simple words, thank the speaker 
in the name of the club. A vote of 
thanks is awkward at best, do not ask 
for it. 

MAJORITY RULE. 

A principle which all club women 
should learn is that the majority rules. 
This is an American principle. We 
are not obliged to change our opinion, 
but surely we should respect the opin- 
ions of others. Women must learn to 
be good losers, and often, very often, 
it is not a matter of life and death even 
when our most cherished plan is de- 
feated. 

We may be disappointed, surprised 
and annoyed that not every club wom- 
an thinks just as we do, but remem- 
ber — 

The majority rules. 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



25 



DISTRICT NEWS 



LOS ANGELES. 

The Executive Board of the Los 
Angeles District C. F. W. C. was 
entertained by the Monday Afternoon 
Club of Covina on November 24th. 
The board meeting was followed by 
luncheon and in the afternoon a pro- 
gram of original stories and poems 
touching upon the Thanksgiving sea- 
son, was enjoyed. 

The most important event of the 
board meeting was the passing of reso- 
lutions condemning the Hetch-Hetchy 
project. A copy of these resolutions 
to be sent to Senator Works. 

Mrs. Slater, Mrs. Gallantyne and 
Mrs. Nicholas report a growing inter- 
est among the clubs, especially upon 
the subjects of political science and 
civil service reform. Mrs. Gallantyne 
has also persuaded the library board to 
secure books which she has suggested 
on the subject of civil service reform. 

South Pasadena women have real- 
ized their hopes and the pretty club 
house which they labored so long and 
so loyally for is furnished and in use. 
The Woman's Club of San Pedro is 
also meeting beneath its own roof, 
December 2nd, marking the formal 
opening of the new clubhouse. The 
corner stone of the Santa Monica Bay 
Woman's Club house will be laid with 
appropriate ceremonies on January 1st. 

SOUTHERN. 

The programs of the Southern Dis- 
trict show much hard work, brilliant 
achievement and a most earnest desire 
for progress along all lines, literature, 
civics, history and philanthropy. 

Fullerton Woman's Club has a live 
year ahead 1 of it with such subjects 
as vocation training, laws affecting 
women and children and a discussion 
of municipal ownership. In connec- 
tion with the club work the club is a 
power in civic life — urging the aban- 
donment of open ditches within city 
limits, opening a rest room for women 
and undertaking the censorship of 
moving picture shows. 

The programs of the San Diego Club 



in their thoroughness of preparation 
and consistent performance would do 
well as models for many clubs which 
are not so fortunately placed. 

The Woman's Club of Hemet is not 
only studying California history but 
making it. They are improving the 
library grounds and to secure the 
necessary funds gave a town carnival. 

La Mira Woman's. Club has had two 
events of unusual interest and impor- 
tance. The La Mira public library was 
opened October 13 under the auspices 
of the Woman's Club and is lionized 
in the club house. It is to be operated 
in conjunction fwith the San Diego 
free library. An irrigation congress 
well attended by both men and women 
was held at the club house, and the 
following evening a lecture was given 
by Oscar H. Reinholt, a civil and min- 
ing engineer. His subject, "The De- 
velopment and Conservation of Water 
Supplies," was illustrated by charts, 
specimens and lantern sliles. 

That the Woman's Ten Thousand 
Club has high aims is shown by the 
ambitious programs laid out by each 
of the five sections and that they are 
determined to have the money to carry 
out their plans is shown by the ener- 
getic way they are working. 

A meeting of the federated clubs of 
Brawley, Calexico, Imperial, El Centro 
and Holtville, met at Ej Centro 
November 1 to make plans and get 
acquainted.. Mrs. Peck, of Calexico, 
the president, received enthusiastic re- 
ports from Mrs. Garren, chairman of 
the County Fair Committee ; Mrs. 
Huddleson, on history and landmarks ; 
Mrs. Packard on civics and sociology; 
Mrs. Apple, on education ; Mrs. Vail 
on home economics, and others. The 
Holtville Club, represented by Mrs. 
Frances, extended an invitation to the 
federation to hold its February con- 
vention there. 

ALAMEDA 

On November 7th the District Board 
held a large and enthusiastic meeting 
at Ebell Club house, Oakland, having 
as guests many of the club presidents 



26 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



of the district and several state chair- 
men. A number of interesting- topics 
were considered, one being the work 
with the girls at the county jail, which 
is carried on under the department of 
industrial and social conditions, Mrs. 
G. E. Colby, chairman. 

Convention dates are February 18th, 
19th and 20th. The District Board, 
as well as the hostess club, The Hill 
and Valley of Hayward, extends a cor- 
dial invitation to all club women to 
attend. 

The Richmond Club of Richmond 
has begun work on a new club house. 

The New Century Club of Oakland 
gave a luncheon November 28th at 
which Mrs. W. E. Colby, district pres- 
ident, and a number of state and dis- 
trict chairmen were entertained. 
After the luncheon many of the neigh- 
borhood mothers, among whom the 
club is working, came in to enjoy the 
program with the other guests. 

SAN JOAQUIN. 

Two additions have been made to 
the San Joaquin District Board, one 
of Mrs. L. A. Ferris of Modesto, as 
press chairman, named' in place of Mrs. 



Edwards, resigned, and Mrs. George 
Taylor, Fresno, as chairman of civil 
service reform. A gratifying interest 
in the work of all departments is 
reported from the district units. 

According to present plans the dis- 
trict convention will be held at Han- 
ford the first Thursday, Friday and 
Saturday in March, on the invitation 
of that city. 

As a direct result of the recent visit 
of Mrs. S. L. Wiley, past president of 
the district, to the clubs in the vicinity 
of Medford, Ore., a complete federation 
of those organizations in southern Ore- 
gon will be formed, comprising prac- 
tically all the clubs in Jackson and 
Josephine counties. Mrs. Wiley ad- 
dressed many individual organizations 
during her stay in the North and was 
also the principal speaker at a general 
"boost meeting,'* at which she detailed 
the work and methods employed by 
the California federation and the San 
Joaquin District in particular. Of her 
work the Medford 1 Sun says : 

"Mrs. Wiley has given club work a 
new impetus in the valley and with 
her experience and success in the work 



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is qualified to materially assist the 
local officers. It is expected that a 
movement by the women to have 
shade and fruit trees planted along the 
Pacific highway, improve the unsightly 
vacant lots and unkempt road strips 
by planting California poppies and 
other wild flowers indigenous to this 
section will soon be definitely formu- 
lated. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Through an inadvertence the name 
of the new president of the San Fran- 
cisco District, Mrs. Percy S. King, of 
Napa, was given in the last issue of 
The Clubwoman as the present acting 
head of the district. It should be 
stated here that the new officers, in 
this and other districts, will not take 
office until after the Riverside conven- 
tion of the state federation. 

The district board met on November 
15 at the Stewart Hotel with a gratify- 
ingly large attendance of district chair- 
men, all of whom reported excellent 
progress in their departments. It was 
announced at this meeting that there 
will be a joint gathering of the out- 
going and incoming boards next 
month, at which time the invitations 
for the next convention, at Pacific 
Grove or Eureka, will be passed upon. 

NORTHERN. 

The current executive board meeting 
of the Northern District was held at 
Marysville, Mrs. A. F. Jones, presi- 
dent, in the chair. Those present were 
Mrs. A. M. Seymour, Mrs. Emily Hop- 
pin, Mrs. V. S. Woolley, eleven depart- 
ment chairmen, several club presi- 
dents and many invited guests. Feat- 



ures of the program were Mrs. Jones' 
account of the San Francisco District 
Convention and five-minute talks by 
the district chairmen present, each on 
her particular department. Miss Pau- 
line Warner, president of the Ther- 
malito Civic Club, spoke on "Art 
in Children's Books," illustrating with 
examples. 

Mrs. George W. McCoy, state chair- 
man of transportation, spoke on the 
outlook for the Biennial Convention at 
Chicago, from which city she has just 
returned. Mrs. Hoppin spoke on the 
Endowment Fund, and Miss Lillian 
Janes on "The Girl Problem of To- 
day." Two able art talks were given 
by Mrs. J. B. Hughes, district chair- 
man of art, and Mrs. E. B. Stanwood. 
A reception and tea followed at the 
home of Mrs. W. C. Swain. 

Mrs. Jones, district president, was 
the guest on November 4 of the 
Woman's Club of Live Oak, an organi- 
zation which is especially interested in 
civic improvement She spoke to them 
of "Federation." Mrs. Jones also wel- 
comed into the federation on Novem- 
ber 13 the new Thermalito Civic Club. 

On November 22 a reciprocity meet- 
ing was held at Auburn, featuring art, 
literature, history and landmarks. Ten 
members of the Executive Board were 
present and an excellent program 
rendered. 

Mrs. Hughes, district chairman of 
art. has charge of the art conference 
given December 10 in the Crocker Gal- 
lery, Sacramento. Mrs. R. S. Holway, 
the guest of honor, is to speak on 
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28 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



BOOKS ON SEX EDUCATION 



FOR BOYS AND MEN. 

(Continued from November issue.) 

Cocks, Orrin G. — The Social Evil and 
Methods of Treatment. Designed 
for use as a basis and outline for dis- 
cussion in groups of laymen, such 
as men's clubs in churches. 1912. Y. 
M. C. A. Associated Press, New 
York. 25c. Postage 4c. This small 
book of 68 pages contains seven 
studies with lists of questions for dis- 
cussion and references to numerous 
books and magazine articles. 

Hall, Winfield Scott— The Biology, 
Physiology and Sociology of Repro- 
duction ; also Sexual Hygiene with 
Reference to the Male. 14th ed., 1913. 
(Binder's title, Reproduction and 
Sexual Hygiene.) Wynnewood Pub- 
lishing Co., Chicago. $1.00, postage 
6c. This little book is especially 
good for young men from seventeen 
to twenty-five years of age. 

Hall, Winfield Scott — From Youth into 
Manhood. 1912. Y. M. C. A. As- 
sociation Press, New York. 50c, 
postage 5c. This book may be put 
into the hands of boys from eleven to 
fifteen years of age. 

Hall, Winfield Scott— Instead of "Wild 
Oats ;" a little book for the youth of 
eighteen and over. 1912. Fleming 
H. Revell Co., Chicago. 25c, post- 
age 2c. Besides giving warning on 
the danger of sowing wild oats, this 
booklet offers good advice in regard 
to continence, diet, exercise and bath- 
ing. 

Hall, Winfield Scott— Life's Begin- 
nings ; for boys of ten to fourteen. 
1912. Y. M. C. A. Association Press, 
New York. 25c, postage 4c. This 
is a very good little book which 
might be of service also to boys over 
fourteen. 

Society of Sanitary and Moral Prophy- 
laxis — Health and Hygiene of Sex. 
For college students. (By Prince A. 
Morrow.) 1911. Society of Sanitary 
and Moral Prophylaxis, New York. 
10c, postage 2c. This pamphlet is 
strongly recommended by Felix Ad- 



ler, G. Stanley Hall and other edu- 
cators for the use of college youths 
and even high school boys. It ex- 
poses some pernicious fallacies and 
counsels self-control. 

Society of Sanitary and Moral Prophy- 
laxis — The Young Man's Problem 
(by Prince A. Morrow). 1912. So- 
ciety of Sanitary and Moral Prophy- 
laxis, New York. 10c, postage 2c. 
Thirteen factors in the problem of 
the young man are taken into ac- 
count in this pamphlet. They resolve 
themselves into the answer, self-con- 
trol. The problem is considered to 
be psychological as well as physio- 
logical, and several pages are devoted 
to the best means of instruction. The 
personality of the teacher is said to 
count for much. 

Willson, Robert N. — The American 
Boy and the Social Evil ; from a phy- 
sician's standpoint. 1905. John C. 
Winston Co., Philadelphia. $1.00, 
postage 6c. This book contains four 
impassioned addresses : "The Nobil- 
ity of Boyhood," "Clean Living," 
"The Social Evil in America," and 
"The Relation of the Citizen to the 
Social Evil." Coming as they do 
from a university physician and med- 
ical instructor, they show thorough 
knowledge of conditions as well as 
svmpathy with the boy nature. 

Willson, Robert N.— The Nobility of 
Boyhood. 1910. John C. Winston 
Co., Philadelphia. 50c, postage 4c. 
The two lectures, "The Nobility of 
Boyhood ; the boy's part in life's 
problem," and "Clean Living; a prob- 
lem of school and college days," have 
in this little volume been separated 
from the larger work, "The Ameri- 
can Boy," which contains besides 
two lectures for older readers. This 
is an excellent book to put into the 
hands of young men. 

BOOKS ON EUGENICS. 

Burbank, Luther — The Training of the 
Human Plant. 1907. Century Co., 
New York. 60c, postage 4c. This 
little book traces the analogy be- 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



29 



tween the development of plant and 
human life, and calls attention to the 
opportunity for the production of 
"the finest race the world has ever 
known out of the vast mingling of 
races brought here by immigration." 

Ellis, Havelock — The Task of Social 
Hygiene. 1913. Houghton, Mifflin 
Co., Chicago. $2.50, postage 12c. 
The English author of this book as- 
signs as "the task of social hygiene" 
the settlement of such questions as 
the changing status of woman, a fall- 
ing birth rate, eugenics and love, re- 
ligion and the child, the problem of 
(teaching) sexual hygiene, immoral- 
ity and the law, the war against war, 
and individualism and socialism. 

Foerster, F. W. — Marriage and the Sex 
Problem. 1913. Frederick A. Stokes 
Co., New York. $1.35, postage 10c. 
The author was raised in an atmos- 
phere not distinctly religious and yet 
he grew to appreciate the value of 
the Christian ideal in matters of sex, 
especially for the education of the 
young. The book has been criticized 
for its "catholocizing" tendency, 
though its author is not a Catholic. 

Geddes, Patrick, and Thomson, J. Ar- 
thur — The Evolution of Sex. 1911. 
Scribner's Sons. New York. $1.50, 



postage 10c. A scientific work which 
takes into account the theories of 
Darwin, Wallace, Romanes and 
others. 

Leighton, Gerald — Embryology: The 
Beginnings of Life. 1912. Dodge 
Publishing Co., New York. 20c, 
postage 3c. A little book intended 
as an introduction to the serious 
study of embryology. No attempt is 
made to simplify the language, 
though the construction is clear and 
the text is illustrated with diagrams 
and tables. 

Morrow, Prince A. — Social Diseases 
and Marriage ; social prophylaxis. 
1904. Lea & Febiger, Philadelphia. 
$3.00, postage 16c. While not writ- 
ten in an extremely technical man- 
ner, this book addresses itself princi- 
pally to physicians, showing their re- 
sponsibilities and duties in regard to 
social diseases, and suggesting rules 
for their guidance in the various sit- 
uations they encounter. 

Saleeby, Caleb Williams — Parenthood 
and Race Culture ; an outline of Eu- 
genics. 1909. Moffat, Yard & Co., 
New York. $2.50, postage 15c. This 
book on eugenics insists that the ef- 
fect upon the race be kept in view in 
studying the problems of parenthood. 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



It is more important to make possi- 
ble the health of future generations 
than to cure the diseases of the pres- 
ent, if one could be separated from 
the other. The author quotes from 
and refers freely to Galton. 
Thomson, J. Arthur, and Geddes, Pat- 
rick—Problems of Sex. 1912. (New 
tracts for the times.) Moffat, Yard 
& Co., New York. 50c, postage 4c. 
The authors of this little book have 
collaborated in larger works on the 
same general theme. This is full of 
compressed and ripened wisdom, and 
sets a sane but high ideal of the prob- 
lems of sex-education, self-control 
and family life. 

ON THE SOCIAL EVIL. 

Addams, Jane — A New Conscience and 
an Ancient Evil. 1912. Macmillan 
Co., New York. $1.00, postage 7c. 
An enlightened and hopeful treat- 



ment of the subject of white slavery 
such as would be expected from Miss 
Addams, with her sympathy for the 
young of both sexes who have been 
caught in the wheels of this system, 
the product alike of our industrial 
and social conditions. It should be 
read by every woman. 

Chicago Vice Commission — The Social 
Evil in Chicago : a study of existing 
conditions, with recommendations. 
1911. American Vigilance Associa- 
tion, New York. 50c, postage 12c. 
This much-quoted report contains, 
among other things, chapters on the 
social evil and the saloon ; the social 
evil and the police ; sources of sup- 
ply ; child protection and education ; 
rescue and reform, and the social evil 
and its medical aspects. 

Janney, O. Edward — The White Slave 
Traffic in America. 1911. American 
Vigilance Association, New York. 



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SOc, postage 6c. A most useful little 
book. It contains a chapter on the 
slavery of Chinese women on the Pa- 
cific coast; also an appendix com- 
posed of treaties and laws in force 
and model law proposed for the sup- 
pression of white slaver}'. 

Minneapolis Vice Commission — Report 
to His Honor, James C. Haynes, 
Mayor. 1911. Byron & Willard, 
Minneapolis. 35c, postage 5c. This 
report is against segregation and em- 
phasizes the enforcement of the laws. 
It gives suggestions in regard to res- 
cue and reform of the women, and in 
the appendix makes some excellent 
recommendations on the subject of 
education. 

Roe. Clifford G. — Panderers and Their 
White Slaves. 1910. Fleming H. 
Revell Co., Chicago. 50c, postage 9c. 
Experiences of an attorney in fight- 
ing the white slave traffic in Chicago. 



Plain narratives are given of cases 
brought before the courts and of ef- 
forts to bring knowledge of condi- 
tions to the public through the Y. M. 
C. A., ministerial associations, etc. 
Also an account of the passage of the 
Illinois law against pandering. 
Seligman, Edwin R. A., Editor — The 
Social Evil, with Special Reference 
to Conditions Existing in the City of 
New York; a report prepared in 1902 
under the direction of the Committee 
of Fifteen. 1912. Medical Publish- 
ing Co. $1.75, postage 14c. This 
book gives quite an extended history 
of prostitution and attempts at regie- 
mentation, notably in Paris and Ber- 
lin. Dr. Seligman has added to this 
second edition of the report a history 
of the movement from 1902 to 1912, 
and also a very full bibliography of 
the social evil exclusive of technical 
medical literature. 




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THE CLUBWOMAN 



EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETING, 
C. F. W. C. 

The executive board of the State 
Federation met at the California Club 
House, San Francisco, November 8, 
Mrs. Orr presiding. The other mem- 
bers present were Mesdames Fisher 
Clarke, Shuman, Colby, Bates, Wood- 
bridge, Denniston, Crane, Harbaugh, 
Reinhardt, Cora E. Jones and Misses 
Clark and Briggs. 

The treasurer's report, accepted, 
showed a balance of $208.18. Applica- 
tions were received and approved for 
membership in the federation of the 
following clubs, in addition to those 
printed in the last issue of The Club- 
woman : San Diego County Nurses' As- 
sociation, San Diego, Mrs. E. H. 
Thompson, president; The Ramblers. 
San Bernardino, Mrs. N. L. Mitchell" 
president. 

The substance of Mrs. Orr's report 
has appeared hitherto. Mrs. Shuman 
spoke on the San Francisco District 
convention and Mrs. Jones on the 
marked progress of art and literature 
in the Northern District. Mrs. Colby 
reported the membership of the Ala- 
meda District in the American Peace 
Society and spoke of gratifying success 
in the lines of civics, health and indus- 
trial and social conditions. Mrs. Bates 
reported the resignation of Mrs. Ed- 
wards as press chairman of the San 
Joaquin District and the appointment 
of Mrs. L. A. Farris in her place ; that 
Hanford had extended an invitation to 
hold the district convention there the 
first Thursday, Friday and Saturday in 
March. A valuable suggestion from 
Mrs. Reinhardt was that a simple bib- 
liography of literature be prepared and 
placed in the hands of city librarians 
for the use of club women. Mrs. Gris- 
wold,. state chairman of peace, wrote 
to suggest that all district chairmen 
take out memberships in the American 
Peace Society. Mrs. Woodbridge re- 
ported a growing interest in the subject 
of civics and recommended "The Wom- 
an Citizen's Library." published by the 
Civic Society of Chicago, 175 State 
street, for the use of civics students. 



Brief reports, uniformly of progress, 
were presented by Mrs. Crane, Miss 
Clark, Mrs. Karns, Mrs. Jones and Mrs. 
Hutton, respectively, state chairmen of 
health, country life, civil service, reci- 
procity, and information and music. 

A NEEDED HOLIDAY OFFERING 

{Continued from Page 13) 
When will California complete the 
amount allotted to her? Certainly be- 
fore the Biennial at Chicago next June, 
and we trust before many months have 
passed ; but it all depends on the indi- 
vidual interest, and the question comes 
to each one of us, "Am I to prevent 
the fulfillment of our obligation, or are 
you?" 

I feel certain that this subject only 
needs to be brought to the notice of 
the members of our State Federation. 
If by any chance the president of your 
club does not think of the matter, let 
the members suggest it to her, and let 
our aim be California soon to stand in 
the column of those states having met 
their full obligation to this fund. 



THE PAST PRESIDENT'S FUND, 

{Continued from Page 13) 
to your local club for one dollar, and 
they do not ask our State body for any- 
thing but co-operation in carrying out 
certain principles to which we are al- 
ready pledged. ' This sounds almost 
too good to be true, but I ask your 
earnest consideration of their plans 
when they are presented to you in your 
local club on your return home. 

These devoted women have given 
many years of their lives to our work. 
They have had all the honors we could 
bestow upon them. We have nothing 
more to offer them. Their work, there- 
fore, is unselfish. 

When you return home and the plan 
of the Past Presidents' Committee is 
presented to your home club, secure 
for it earnest consideration and give it 
your individual and enthusiastic sup- 
port. If you will do this we can, in 
June, 1914, give to the world the great- 
est evidence of the power of women 
and the women's clubs of America. 



The Clubwoman 



Official organ of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 



Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 

Subscription Price, One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH, Editor and Publisher. 
MRS. O. C. VOGEL, Federation Editor. 

Matter for Miss Smith and Mrs. Vogel must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 



CONTENTS 

Frontispiece Mrs. J. L. Harbaugh 

Editorial : 

The Red Light Referendum ; Mrs. Emily Hoppin 7 

Originality Gone Mad 8 

California Federation: 

President's Letter 9 

A Lofty Target 10 

Our Legislative Program; Mrs. J. L. Harbaugh , 11 

Home Rule in Taxation 12 

Practical Observations on Legislation; Mrs. Henry Kilgariff : J.3 

"After the Panama, Our Rivers," Mrs. E. G. Greene 14 

Fifth National Conservation Congress ; Mrs. Foster Elliott 17 

Notes on Water Conservation 158 

General Federation : 

Biennial Notes _ 19 

Call for Los Angeles District Convention 21 

Call for Alameda District Convention : _ 23 

The Personal Income Tax ; Mrs. L. C. Hunter 25 

Contemporary Dramatists ; Mrs. G. F. Reinhardt 26 

Interstate Literary Contest 27 

The Woman's Legislative Council 28 

District News : 

San Joaquin 28 

Northern 29 

Los Angeles 31 

Southern 32 




MRS. JAMES L. HARBAUGH 

State Chairman of Legislation 



TKe Clubwoman 



Vol. V 



January, 1914 



No. 3 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Commu- 
nications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P.O.Box 1066,bythe 
twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 



The following, from the pen of Mrs. 
Emily Hoppin, vice-president of the 
California Federation of Women's 
Clubs, may be considered the editorial 
expression of the entire federation 
upon a question so important as to 
command the most careful considera- 
tion of every citizen, man or woman, 
interested in the future welfare of Cali- 
fornia : 

During the 1911 session of the Cali- 
fornia legislature, the Red-light and 
Abatement Law was sponsored by the 
California Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union ; but was defeated. 

The bill was again introduced in the 
1913 legislature; this time endorsed, 
not only by its original sponsors but 
by the California Federation of Wom- 
en's Clubs, Civic Leagues, Churches, 
Young Men's and Young Women's 
Christian Associations and various 
other organizations. The women's 
vote and the effective work done in 
Sacramento brought victory for the 
bill and it became a law. 

This law is now before the voters 
for ratification under the referendum. 
The petitions for the referendum were 
circulated in saloons and among the 
flotsam of society. Thousands of 
forged names have been found on 
them : yet the law. that has the sup- 
port of the best of our citizens, has to 
be ratified at the polls in 1914. 

Every saloon, every dive, every 
house of prostitution stands against the 
law. It remains with the best men 
and women of the state to see that the 
law remains on our statute books. 

This is no new law. There have 
always been laws against prostitution ; 
but they have not been enforced, for 
only district or city attorneys could 



bring action, unless a citizen received 
personal damage. Under the new law, 
any citizen of the state, residing in the 
county, may in his own name maintain 
an action to prevent a building being 
used for purposes of prostitution. 

This law will close the house of 
prostitution in a residence district as 
well as the houses in a segregated 
district. It makes the owner of the 
property responsible for the respecta- 
bility of the house, and thus strikes a 
blow at the immense profits made by 
the landlord of these houses. Hitherto 
all legislation has been made against 
the unfortunate women ; under the new 
law, the owner of the disreputable 
house has to be responsible for his law- 
breaking. 

The opponents of the law make two 
arguments against it. One is that vice 
will be scattered throueh the cities. 
Yice now is scattered, and the citizen 
who knows it is in his neighborhood 
has no redress except through the city 
or district attorney ; under the new law 
he can remove the nuisance. 

The second argument is "black- 
mail" ; but anyone who brings action 
must first show that the nuisance 
exists. This must be done in open 
court, and if the court finds the action 
has been brought without reasonable 
grounds, all costs are taxed to the citi- 
zen bringing the complaint, and he is 
also liable for damages. In Iowa, 
where the law has been in force for 
some years and where its provisions 
make it easier for the citizen to bring 
action than does the California stat- 
ute, not a single case of blackmail 
has been known. 

Some have thought that possibly 
good women would not be safe. Ex- 



8 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



perience of cities where prostitution 
cannot be openly practiced, shows that 
women are safer there than where 
prostitution is allowed. But even were 
it not so, there is enough real manhood 
in California to make it certain that 
attempts to wrong good women would 
meet with a justice so severe and so 
swift that there would not be many 
repetitions of the offense. 

The law ought to have the help every 
woman in California can give it, not 
only by her personal vote but by an 
effort to secure votes. There is not a 
home in the state that may not be af- 
fected either directly or indirectly, for 
this social evil with its attendant phy- 
sical diseases threatens the life of the 
race. 

Originality Gone Mad. 

It was Sidney Lanier, if we remem- 
ber correctly, who complained that he 
was seriously hampered in the develop- 
ment of even his somewhat misan- 
thropic philosophy by the fact that 
"platitudes have monopolized the sum 
of human wisdom — we are all plagiar- 
ists nowadays." 

It may or may not be chiefly due to 
the undoubted fact that most of the 
wise generalities have already been 
said that the modern tendency in the 
pulpit, on the rostrum and in the den 
of the litterateur seems to be in the di- 
rection of a strained and frantic effort 
toward originality, even at the obvious 
expense of truth. Every professional 
promulgator of modern philosophy ap- 
pears to consider it incumbent upon 
him to produce something new, start- 
ling, attention-arresting. Where noth- 
ing better offers he accomplishes this 
end by deliberately and with malice 
aforethought reversing some one of 
our time-tried beliefs, bolstering up his 
frequently fallacious premise with cun- 
ningly-worded sophistries. 

For the most part no harm is done, 
nor is it to be maintained that there 
are not those among our platitudes 
which are the better for an inquisitorial 
picking to pieces. But when three suc- 
cessive lecturers, each modestly ad- 
mitting himself to be an authority upon 



things pedagogical, stand up before 
five thousand teachers — and by the 
medium of the press reach twenty 
times five thousand more — and solemn- 
ly preach vicious absurdities for no ap- 
parent reason except to be saying 
something "different," it would seem 
to be high time for common sense to 
come to the rescue of a wandering 
mind. 

At the annual meeting of the Cali- 
fornia Teachers' Association, held in 
Los Angeles in December, the head of 
the department of education of a great 
Middle West university warmly advo- 
cated the use of slang by common- 
school teachers in their class-rooms 
because, forsooth, the pedagogue there- 
by establishes a common level between 
himself and the pupil. The Addisonian 
example with which this authority on 
education illuminated his point was : 
"Sit down — your trolley's off!" In such 
wise he said 'the teacher should ad- 
dress a pupil who is trying to bluff his 
way through a recitation,' rather than 
with the customary 'teachery' remark." 
If every teacher who heard this amaz- 
ing advice puts it into practice the re- 
sults will be painful even for that 
learned expositor of modern pedagoy 
to contemplate. 

Another lecturer before the same 
body struck the same false note and 
for apparently the same purpose with 
a plea for the introduction of blood- 
and-thunder literature into the schools 
on the ground that such "lively food" 
is what the immature and atavistic 
mind craves and that therefore — note 
the admirable closeness of this reason- 
ing — that is what should be supplied. 

By way of rounding out this trinity 
of foolishness a third lecturer demol- 
ished at one fell swoop the greater part 
of the foundation of corrective educa- 
tion with the surprising dictum : 
"Never say 'don't' to a child." His 
idea is that by some process of labor- 
ious circumlocution it is always pos- 
sible and practicable to bring the child 
to the same mental-viewpoint as his 
instructor, wherefrom he will perceive 
with equal clearness that the matches 
he is eating will kill him. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 9 

California Federation §f Women's Clubs 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Mrs. James W. Orr, 2420 Gough street, San Francisco. 
Vice-President — Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. 

Vice-President-at-large — Mrs. Calvin Hartwell,411 Summit avenue, Pasadena. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. Edward D. Knight, 238 San Jose avenue, San Francisco. 
Corresponding Secretary — Miss Jessica Lee Briggs, 1942a Hyde street, San Francisco. 
Treasurer — Mrs. H. E. DeNyse, P. 0. Box No. 695, Riverside. 

Auditors— Mrs. S. L. Wiley, Fresno, R. B. 9. Mrs. F isher B. Clarke, 321 West Flora street, 
Stockton. 

General Federation State Secretary — Mrs. Bussell J. Waters, 900 West Adams street, Los An- 
geles. 

District Presidents 
Northern — Mrs. A. F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery street, Oroville. 
San Francisco — Mrs. Percy L. Shuman, San Mateo. 
Alameda, — Mrs. William E. Colby, 2901 Channing Way, Berkeley. 
San Joaquin — Mrs. Harry Bates, Modesto. 

Los Angeles — Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 2614 North Griffin avenue, Los Angeles. 
Southern — Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 702 Ivy street, San Diego. 

Chairmen of Departments 

Art — Mrs. Miguel Estudillo, 335 Fourteenth street, Biverside. 
Civics — Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge, Roseville. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. E. S. Karns, Channing Lane, Palo Alto. 
Club Extension — Mrs. H. V. Eudy, Box 1318, Fresno, Cal. 
Conservation — 

Forestry — Mrs. Foster Elliott, 111 South Hidalgo avenue, Alhambra. 

Waterways — Mrs. E. G. Greene, 611 Waverly street, Palo Alto. 
Country Life — Miss Lillian D. Clark, 1534 Arch street, Berkeley. 
Education — Mrs. May L. Cheney, 2241 College avenue, Berkeley. 
Endowment Fund — Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 3454 Twenty-first street, San Francisco. 
Federation Emblem — Mrs. Mary H. Gridley, 101 Brand Boulevard, Glendale. 
Health — Mrs. L. P. Crane, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 
History and Landmarks — Mrs. William Fairchild, Box 72, Placerville. 
Home Economics — Miss Edna Eich, Santa Barbara. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. C. F. Edson, 950 West Twenty-first street, Los Angeles. 
Legislation — Mrs. J. T. Harbaugh, 2706 N street, Sacramento. 
Literature — Mrs. George F. Bernhardt, 2434 Durant avenue, Berkeley. 
Music — Mrs. G. H. Hutton, 927 Second street, Santa Monica. 
Necrology — Miss Lucy Hatch, The Palms, Fresno. 
Parliamentary Practice — Mrs. Annie Little Barry, Berkeley. 
Peace — Mrs. A. H. Griswold, Box 53, El Centre 

Philanthropy — Mrs. William Baurhyte, 1033 West Edgeware Boad, Los Angeles. 
Press — Mrs. O. C. Vogel, P. O. Box 1066, Los Angeles. 
Program — Executive Committee. 

Reciprocity and Information — Mrs. Cora E. Jones, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 
Redistricting Committee — Mrs. Henry E. DeNyse, Biverside. 
State University Club House Loan — Mrs. S. L. Piatt, 1720 J street, Fresno. 

PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

The month of December was notable The C. F. W. C. is invited to parti- 

for art conferences, and exhibitions in cipate in the Internal Waterways Con- 

the Alameda, San Francisco and North- gress, called by the Commonwealth 

ern Districts. The California Club held Club to meet in San Francisco, Jan. 

a very fine exhibition of the new school 10-17. Mrs. E. G. Greene, the state 

in painting and at the close purchased chairman of waterways, will head the 

one of the pictures. The Sketch Club delegation of sixteen which will include 

has been very ambitious, with several all of the district chairmen, 

exhibitions and receptions, and the Art The San Joaquin District has 

Institute housed the exhibit of the Cal- changed the date of its annual meet- 

ifornia artists sent up from Los An- ing to February 10, 11, 12 at Hanford. 

geles. This will be followed by the conven- 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



tion of the Alameda District at Hay- 
ward. 

1913 was a memorable year in our 
club life in many respects, notably so 
for the appointment by the Governor 
of California of women on State Boards 
and Commissions. In many instances 
these were club women, which was es- 
pecially gratifying. The list is as fol- 
lows : The State Board of Education, 
two ; State Training School for Girls, 
three ; the Industrial Welfare Commis- 
sion, two ; Country Life, one ; the Im- 
migration and Housing Commission, 
one ; State Board of Charities and Cor- 
rections, two, and State Labor Bureau, 
one. The State Board of Education 
has recently appointed a woman State 
Superintendent of Elementary Instruc- 
tion. These are some of the fruits of 
political equailty. 

It is incumbent upon us to take im- 
mediate consideration of the balance 
due from California in the Endowment 
Fund. From my knowledge there 
must be $2000 still to raise. We want 
to send our new president and the dele- 
gates from California to Chicago in 
June, 1914, with this obligation cleared. 
Memorial services will be held for Mrs. 
Sarah S. Platt-Decker at this Biennial. 
As the fund bears her name in per- 
petuity, emphasis will be laid upon the 
unpaid subscriptions. California 

should be in the roll of honor. To do 
this each district chairman of endow- 
ments is asked to write to the clubs in 
her district. The District Presidents 
must give this matter place and promi- 
nence at their annual meetings, also at 
their President's Councils. This com- 
mittee should "rise" with honor at the 
Riverside Convention. 

My attention has been called to the 
fact that some sixteen clubs have with- 
drawn from membership in the General 
Federation. Also, that many subscrip- 
tions to the General Federation Maga- 
zine have not been renewed. This is a 
Biennial year and our club women will 
want to attend the Chicago meeting. 
The importance of keeping informed 
upon the general news and progress 
of the club movement should be real- 
ized by every club president, so I rec- 



ommend that each club subscribe for 
the General Federation Magazine. It 
will broaden the outlook and stimulate 
social and civic experiments. 

The Executive Committee will s.oon 
begin the work of preparation for the 
State Convention, April 29-May 2. 
If there be any amendments to the 
constitution and by-laws to be sub- 
mitted they must be sent in to the 
State Corresponding Secretary. The 
general plan of the program of the 
Fresno meeting will be followed ; if 
possible, more time will be given te 
discussion. The entertainment offered 
by the hostess city — Riverside — will 
soon be given publicity. 

With all good wishes for the New 
Year and with cordial welcome to the 
new clubs, I am 

Sincerely yours, 

MRS. JAMES W. ORR. 



A LOFTY TARGET 

There are not many clubs in Cali- 
fornia, of whatever size, for whose 
members there is not material for seri- 
ous consideration in the Year Book 
just issued of the Women's Improve- 
ment Club, of Roseville. To those who 
have come in contact with the work of 
this club at district and state conven- 
tions it is not at first easy to believe 
that it has only sixty-five members. 
Much credit for the high character of 
its achievements is due to the fact that 
Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge has been 
its president since 1910. only in the 
past year giving place to Mrs. W. R. L. 
Jenks. More is traceable to the fact 
that Mrs. Woodbridge seems to have 
been able to inspire her members with 
the federation ideal to a degree seldom 
encountered. The club claims the 
merited distinction of being the only 
one in the state which has completely 
exemplified federation work. It has a 
chairman of every department of work 
and during the past year has given one 
day to each one of all the different de- 
partments — not in a merely perfunc- 
tory manner and for the sake of having 
done so, but with an equal enthusiasm 
and interest for all. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



11 



OUR LEGISLATIVE PROGRAM 

By Mrs. James L. Harbaugh 

State Chairman of Legislation 



With one exception every one of the 
eighteen measures endorsed by the C 
F. W. C. were passed by the last Leg- 
islature, all but two were signed by 
the Governor. Besides these there 
were twenty-five additional amend- 
ments and new laws passed in the in- 
terest of women and children, also 
resolutions on Juvenile Court inquiry, 
training orphans and national equal 
suffrage. 

Now we have some weapons. The 
battle is but half won if we do not do 
our duty in enforcing these laws or 
having them enforced. 

We hope to make enforcement of 
laws one of the main features this 
year. We should interest our women 
in state and municipal laws for the 
protection of the home, both from a 
moral and economic standpoint. We 
have laws pertaining to the "property 
rights of women," "guardianship," 
"minimum wage," "eight-hour law," 
"nurses' registration," "teachers' pen- 
sion," "schools as civic centers," moth- 
ers' compensation," "orphan children's 
education," "state training school for 
girls," proper care in hospitals, ma- 
ternity and psycopathic homes (too 
few of these), fathers must now sup- 
port their illegitimate children, etc. 
We have no law requiring medical ex- 
amination before issuing a marriage 
certificate. We should have this law. 

From an economic standpoint the 
weights and measures law is an im- 
portant one, as well as those pertaining 
to food, meat and milk inspection and 
destruction of foodstuffs. Your Clubs 
should have these statutes. Study them, 
take them with you to the proper offi- 
cials and see that they are enforced. 
We have some health and sanitation 
laws, a state law to "regulate the build- 
ing and occupancy of tenement 
houses," but most of our towns and 
cities need more comprehesive muni- 
cipal laws covering our own needs in 
regard to lodging houses and homes 



for the very poor. Many sickening ex- 
poses have been made lately of exist- 
ing conditions. Are your public offi- 
cers doing all the law requires? 

Your State Chairman has had sent 
to the State Reciprocity Bureau and 
to the District Chairman a copy of "Ex- 
isting Laws of Interest to Women and 
Children," 1912, and an outline of 
measures passed in 1913. Any further 
information can be obtained by writ- 
ing the State Legislative Library, 
State Capitol, or to your State Chair- 
man. 

While we are getting our breath be- 
fore entering into any new legislation, 
we must prepare ourselves and the pub- 
lic as much as possible for 1914 respon- 
sibilities. Four important measures 
that passed the last Legislature and 
were signed by the Governor have been 
held up by referendum petitions and 
will be voted on in November, 1914 — 
the "Red Light Abatement," the "Blue 
Sky," "Water Conservation" and "Non- 
Sale of Game" acts. Four important 
state bond issues — "State Fair Bonds" 
(which involves our Permanent Wo- 
man's Building.) "Capitol Extension," 
"State Harbor" and "San Francisco 
Public Building" bonds will come be- 
fore the people. Literature on these 
measures and information on the 
amendments we are to vote on at the 
same election will reach you later. 

WOMEN UNDER THE LAW 
Questionerre 

1. What are the duties of a hus- 
band under our state laws? What are 
the duties of a wife? Has a wife any 
direct claim to any part of her hus- 
band's income? Can she have any- 
thing to say how it shall be invested 
or expended? Can she expect any- 
thing more than support? Shall she 
have a right to money of her own? 
What can she do if he fails to support 
her according to his means? 

2. Can he buy or sell property with- 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



out her signature? Can he borrow 
money or give a note without her sig- 
nature? Can he sign away his salary 
or wages without her consent? If he 
refuses to support her or their family, 
what can she do about it? How far 
does the law compel him to support his 
family? 

3. If a man deserts his family and 
leaves them destitute or without means 
of support in this state, is it, in the 
eyes of the law, a felony or a misde- 
meanor, or nothing but disorderly con- 
duct? How far and in what way can 
he be punished? If he is crippled or an 
invalid, what does your law say about 
the wife's working to suoport the fam- 
ily? How far does the law consider 
that a woman who stays at home and 
looks after her house and her children 
is doing her share toward the main- 
tenance of a family? 

4. If she fails to attend to her home 
and family duties, has her husband 
any legal cause for complaint? Just 
how far does the state consider a wife 
equal partner with her husband in 
property, in home management, in her 
children? What has your state done 
about providing pensions or allow- 
ances for widows with dependent chil- 
dren and without other means of sup- 
port? 

5. What states have laws allowing 
widow's pensions? What states are 
agitating that subject now? How do 
the laws, variously called "widows' 
pensions," "mothers' compensation 
acts," "home maintenance laws," "sub- 
sidies for widowed mothers," etc., 
work out in Illinois, Missouri, Califor- 
nia, Colorado, Ohio and other states 
where they are being tried? 

6. How far is the wife an equal 
guardian of children with the father? 
In case of desertion, which parent can 
claim the earnings of minor children? 
In case of the education or property 
rights of minor children does the 
mother have equal voice with the 
father? Exactly how far is the author- 
ity of the mother recognized by the 
courts in your state? 

7. If the father is immoral and has 



a decidedly bad influence over chil- 
dren, what can the mother do? If the 
case is reversed and the mother is bad, 
what can the father do? How far are 
father and mother equal guardians. 

8. What are the property rights of 
a wife in this state? Can she manage 
her own property or business? Can she 
claim her own earnings? Can she con- 
trol her own property? Can she sell 
or lease property, or he either, without 
the signature of the other? 

9. What are your homestead laws? 
What are your dower rights? What 
states have "community laws?" How 
far can either will away property from 
the other? If the husband dies with- 
out a will, how is the estate settled? 
What are the wife's rights in this mat- 
ter? If the wife dies without a will, 
what are her husband's rights? If 
there are no children, how far do the 
rights of inheritance go? 

(The above questions are nearly all 
answered in the Civil Code and 'the 
Code of Civil Procedure of the State of 
California, and the amendments there- 
to. These codes can be found in the 
library of almost any lawyer or Justice 
of the Peace.) 



HOME RULE IN TAXATION 

At the recent California Fruit Grow- 
ers' Convention at San Jose, the Home 
Rule in Taxation Constitutional 
Amendment was unanimously endors- 
ed by the convention. 

This organization is the oldest and 
most influential organization of fruit 
growers in California. It is called to- 
gether annually by the State Board of 
bership many thousands of fruit grow- 
Horticulture and numbers in its mem- 
ers. Its endorsement will materially 
assist the movement for the adoption 
of the amendment, which comes up at 
the election in November, 1914. 

The action of the fruit growers 
shows a remarkable change in senti- 
ment in reference to this subject, and 
is an indication of the educational work 
now being done to prove the advan- 
tage to fruit growers of the state of 
this amendment. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



PRACTICAL OBSERVATIONS ON LEGISLATION 

By Mrs. Henry Kilgariff 

Chairman of Legislation, Northern District 



It has been said that nearly all legis- 
lation especially needed for women 
has been placed upon the statutes of 
California. This is a debatable ques- 
tion. But we should look upon all 
laws with a desire to see wherein they 
will benefit the whole people and not 
merely with a wish to help our sex or 
class of voters. 

One fear has always been present in 
the minds of the statesmen of our 
country and students of the old world 
and that is that we might become a 
nation wherein classes become power- 
ful, warred against each other and 
seek legislation solely for the class and 
not for the whole people. 

We are only beginners in the voting 
system and should strive zealously to 
avoid errors. of the past and particu- 
larly guard against the great evil of 
arranging ourselves irvto a distinct 
class intent upon securing results for 
our class alone. 

Neither should we rush wildly to 
change old laws nor to make new ones 
without due consideration ; rather 
should we lend our aid and support to 
the enforcement of laws we already 
have. 

Laws regarding pure foods, civil 
service reform, conservation, health 
certificate before marriage, forestry, 
public health and sanitation, and others 
that might be named are all strongly 
advocated as meritorious measures ; 
but one and all, they affect all classes, 
both sexes and the entire community 
alike. They are not solely for the up- 
lift or betterment of the condition of 
women, but rather for the enhancing of 
the welfare of the entire population of 
California, hence while we should favor 
them and labor to secure their enact- 
ment we should do so as citizens, 
worthy of that high distinction, and 
not as women. 

The one law which I consider of 
interest to women as women is the 
amending of Section 172 of the Civil 
Code. This section deals with the dis- 



position of community property of 
married persons and as it reads at 
present does not protect the wife. It 
should be amended so as to provide 
that no real estate could be transferred 
without the signature of the wife. 
This seems so eminently fair that I 
feel sure it will receive the approval of 
the next Legislature if it is properly 
presented. 

We should also make an effort to 
amend the law so that women may 
serve on juries in all courts of the 
state. At present some judges permit 
this; others do not. The attorney- 
general, whose opinion is entitled to 
some weight, rules that women can not 
legally act as jurors until the law has 
been changed to include them. When 
this time comes it will be a crucial test 
for our sex as many men, while favor- 
ing equal suffrage, are afraid to trust 
women as jurors, regarding them as 
too sympathetic, too easily swayed by 
oratory, good looks, or deportment to 
properly adjudicate upon rights of 
property or human life. It should be 
our endeavor to have the right to act 
as jurors made plain to and for us and 
then to show by our conduct in the 
jury box that these fears are un- 
founded. 

Women have been made political 
equals with men in California by the 
votes of men alone. It is incumbent, 
therefore, upon our sex to prove to 
the world that this generous action was 
not a mistake. We should study care- 
fully the election laws and familiarize 
ourselves with the metnoa of using the 
elective franchise. Prospective legis- 
lation should be carefully analyzed, 
discussed and either favored or op- 
posed as its merits or demerits war- 
rant with regard solely to the one ques- 
tion, "Will it help the State"? Women, 
of course, should always favor morality 
and temperance and should cast our 
votes for candidates and measures that 
will secure those essentials to good 
government. 



14 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




"AFTER THE PANAMA OUR RIVERS" 

By Mrs. E. G. Greene 

State Chairman Department of Waters 

The stupendous achievement of 
changing the turbulent river Chag- 
res into the beautiful Gatun lake 
during the development of the 
Panama Canal fully demonstrates the 
possibilities of flood control of the 
Mississippi and other "irresolute" 
rivers which during the time of floods 
become raging torrents destroying 
many human lives and millions of dol- 
lars worth of property. In addition to 
the testimony relating to the Ohio 
flood, the estimates of the recent de- 
structive flood in Texas show that 40,- 
000 square miles were laid waste, be- 
tween two and three hundred persons 
killed, one hundred million dollars in 
property lost. 

In response to the demand of the 
nation for protection from and preven- 
tion of floods, Hon. Frances G. New- 
lands introduced into the Senate in 
1911 a bill known as the "River Regu- 
lation Bill." It is a bill to create a 
Board of River Regulation and to pro- 
vide a fund for the regulation of navi- 
gable rivers in aid of interstate com- 
merce, to provide for flood prevention, 
and for the protection of watersheds 
from erosion. It contemplates estab- 
lishing a system of storage reservoirs. 

This bill has been urgently presented 
through the press, endorsed by a large 
number of associations, and sustained 
by surveys and investigations cover- 
ing a period of years. It has also been 
incorporated into the platform of three 
political parties. The Democratic 
party "holds that the control of the 
Mississippi river is a national problem 
and favors cooperation of the United 
States and the respective states in 
plans for the comprehensive treatment 
of waterways." The Republican party 
"favors a liberal and systematic policy 
for the improvement of our rivers and 
harbors." The Progressive party "de- 
mands that our rivers shall be opened 
for traffic as an indispensable part of 
a great nation-wide system of trans- 



MRS. E. G. GREENE 

portation in which the Panama Canal 
will be the connecting link." 

In a convention held in New Orleans 
May 15, 1913, the Newlands Bill as 
amended was heartily endorsed; its 
speedy enactment by Congress was 
urged, in order that the development 
of the Mississippi Valley be no longer 
retarded by the flood menace. The 
amendments to the bill include recon- 
struction of levees. 

This bill calls for a unified, compre- 
hensive system. It proposes to unite 
all the hydrographic activities of the 
government into one harmonious plan. 

Under this system a Waterway 
Commission is created and a Board of 
River Regulation. The President of 
the United States is to be chairman of 
the Commission, and the Secretary of 
War, the Secretary of the Interior, the 
Secretary of Agriculture, and the chair- 
man of the Board of River Regulation 
are to be members of this commission. 

The Board of River Regulation con- 
sists of the chairman, who is a member 
of the Commission, the heads of im- 
portant allied Federal bureaus, and the 
Corps of United States Engineers. The 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



15 



bill carries an appropriation of $60,000 
annually, for ten years. 

The speech of the Hon. Henry F. 
Ashurst of Arizona, before the Senate, 
September 15, 1913, is a very compre- 
hensive analysis of the Newlands Bill, 
both pro and con ; it also embodies ex- 
cerpts and analysis of the report of the 
Commission of Corporations and 
Transportation by Water in the Uni- 
ted States, and it contains other ma- 
terial of much value to the student of 
the Newlands Bill. 

Mrs. Emmons Crocker of Massachu- 
setts, Chairman of the Conservation 
Department of the General Federation 
of Women's Clubs, advises a campaign 
of education on the Newlands Bill in 
the several states. Mrs. Crocker 
writes : "We hope you all will do what 
you can to educate the people in your 
state to the merits and value of this 
bill and. when you receive a call from 
the General Federation Chairman to 
bring vour forces to bear on it at a cer- 
tain stage of its progress in its journey 
through the legislative bodies, you will 
be prepared to act promptly and force- 
fully to further its passage. 

In response to a request to the Dis- 
trict Chairmen, C. F. W. C, their views 
on "Why California Women Should 
Be Interested in the Newlands Bill," 
Mrs. J. L. Craig, Alameda District 
Chairman, writes : "Since the extent of 
the Newlands Bill is nation-wide, it 
may seem that California has no more 
reason to be interested than any other 
state, yet she really has. Of the $600,- 
000.000 to be expended under this act, 
one-twelfth is to be used in California. 
We have extensive valleys, to be sure, 
but we have less than two per cent of 
the entire population, so you can read- 
ily see why we should feel personally 
interested. We have the dread of 
floods during the wet season, and the 
fear of failures during the dry season, 
but these conditions are neutralized in 
the perfect system of conservation out- 
lined in the Newlands Bill." 

Miss Adaline Gray, San Francisco 
District Chairman, heartily endorses 
the work for the Newlands Bill and 
will be ready to cooperate with the 



General Federation Chairman, and to 
interest the District Clubs as far as 
possible, upon her return from the 
East. 

Mrs. W. S. Kendall, Northern Dis- 
trict Chairman, writes: 

"The improvement of the water con- 
ditions of the northern district is one 
of the most vital problems confronting 
the people of Northern California, at 
the present time, and is one which 
cannot be overestimated. Upon the 
proper conservation of her natural re- 
sources depends, not only the prosper- 
ity, but the very life of the nation. 

"The Newlands Bill offers perhaps 
the best means for securing the needed 
improvements. It provides for both 
Federal and State annual appropria- 
tions for ten years of not less than 
$5,000,000 from each for Sacramento 
and San Joaquin valleys and also ap- 
propriations from property owners." 

Nothing will give greater impetus 
to the development of the general 
water problems of California than the 
discussion and final passage of the 
Newlands Bill. In many parts of the 
state enterprises well started are ad- 
justing their plans to meet the provis- 
ions of the bill, thus greatly enlarging 
the scope of the work. This is especi- 
ally true in the San Joaquin District, 
where extensive irrigation plans are 
developing. There are several organ- 
ized bodies considering the water prob- 
lems of this district, among them the 
San Joaquin Water Problems Associa- 
tion, which proposes to deal with the 
work of irrigation, drainage, reclama- 
tion, and the conservation of the water 
supply of the entire valley. The Tur- 
lock and Modesto Irrigation Districts 
have demonstrated the value of storage 
water. George H. Maxwell, executive 
director of several associations dealing 
with water problems, says: "Statistics 
show that 2,500,000 acres in the Sac- 
ramento Valley and 7,360,000 acres in 
the San Joaquin Valley are capable of 
irrigation, and there is water enough 
flowing into the sea to cover the acre- 
age in the upper Sacramento Valley 
to the depth of 11 J^ acre feet, and in 
the San Joaquin to 20 inches ; while 



16 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



there is but a small percentage under 
irrigation." Mr. Maxwell speaks of 
the frightful waste of water in Cali- 
fornia, both in the Sacramento and the 
San Joaquin valleys. He says, "a sys- 
tem that will impound and distribute 
this great water fall will solve the flood 
problem, meet the demands of irriga- 
tion and transform the valleys into an 
empire of wealth and population." 

Another very profound water prob- 
lem in California is that of water pow- 
er. The particular problem of water 
rights comes under the jurisdiction of 
the State Water Commissoin, whose 
rulings are based upon legislation and 
the findings of the courts. To the un- 
initiated the laws governing water 
power seem simple of interpretation, 
but to one skilled in the mysteries of 
past use they are not so simple and in- 
volve a vast amount of patient investi- 
gation, deliberation, and a wise judi- 
cial application. The awakening of 
California to the value of its waters 
opens up a new field for investigation 
and study. The indifferent or unin- 
terested citizen is surprised to learn 
of the great work which has been and 
still is being carried on. 

The large cities of the state are hast- 
ening to secure the best and most ade- 
quate water supply. The story of the 
beginnings of the Los Angeles cam- 
paign for its domestic water supply is 
most interesting. San Francisco's 
struggle to secure the best possible 
domestic water supply is a well-known 
current event of nation-wide interest. 
The report of the Citizens Committee, 
appointed by the Chamber of Com- 
merce of Sacramento to investigate all 
sources of water supply, was rendered 
to the Chamber of Commerce Tune 28, 
1913. The water supply in the past 
has been the Sacramento river ; and 
the committee recommended its con- 
tinued use as a source of supply, and 
that the water be subjected to the 
method of purification outlined in the 
report of the sub-committee on Sacra- 
mento River Water. 

Sacramento leads all other California 



cities, as far as heard from, in the ap- 
pointment of four women upon its Citi- 
zens Committee for the investigation 
of its domestic water supply. At the 
recent Waterways Conference held in 
Oakland, under the Civic Center, wo- 
men presided over the program, pre- 
pared the resolutions, and arranged for 
the conference. 

Mrs. Harriet W. Strong of Los An- 
geles in her able paper upon "Source 
Conservation," prepared for the Water- 
ways Conference at the State Federa- 
tion meeting at Fresno, presented a 
brief analysis of the Newlands Bill, 
saying: "What is all this to us? All 
citizens, voters and tax payers, have 
duties to perform along the following 
lines ; to become acquainted with ex- 
isting customs and laws regulating 
water — storm water and underground, 
both surface and artesian ; to learn 
what is good in the present system and 
laws, also the weak points ; but most 
important, to learn future needs and 
requirements, especially new laws." 
Closing she says : "I beg you support 
legislative measures to improve the 
present conditions. This handling of 
flood water is the greatest necessity to- 
day. Support the measures intelli- 
gently, and when you vote — vote 
right." 

Senator Newlands, in his plea for the 
bill, urged it at once as a business 
measure and as one that would lead 
the people into easier, happier, and 
fuller enjoyment of the bounties of nat- 
ure. His call was for men of vision, 
for men whose perspective could 
sweep far beyond the half billion dol- 
lars the government is asked to spend 
for irrigation, flood protection and nav- 
igation. He asked that man should fix 
his mind not on piles of profit counted 
in shimmering gold, but on the desert 
that would be made to blossom as the 
rose, on the river running free and 
clear in the interests of peaceful com- 
merce, on the mountain water storage 
lakes from which the thirsty valleys 
could drink deep and long for their 
nourishment. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



17 



FIFTH NATIONAL CONSERVATION CONGRESS 

By Mrs. Foster Elliott 

State Chairman of Forestry 

Conservation thing lately about the 



The Fifth National 
Congress was held in Washington, D. 
C, November 18-19-20. The forestry 
section of the congress held many 
meetings apart from the main meet- 
ings, where committee reports were 
given. These reports included the fol- 
lowing subjects: publicity, federal for- 
est policy, state forest policy, forest 
taxation, forest fires, lumbering, forest 
utilization, forest investigation. Chief 
Forester Graves was the chairman and 
the audience was composed of practical 
foresters from all over the country. 

A few words just here anent forest 
fires, for that has been the slogan of 
this department for some time. No 
phase of forest work has been so act- 
ively taken up or made such marked 
progress as that of forest fire preven- 
tion during the past ten years. Forest 
fires in the United States have caused 
an average annual loss of seventy hu- 
man lives and $25,000,000 of merchant- 
able timber. This is a conservative 
estimate. The so called "light burn- 
ing" theory advocated by certain tim- 
ber owners in California and adjoin- 
ing states is especially to be con- 
demned. It is not only impractical 
from a financial standpoint, but it 
causes destruction of young timber and 
makes for carelessness with fire on the 
part of the public. 

The Coneress proper met at the New 
Willard Hotel with delegates present 
from all parts of the United States. 
Alaska, and Canada, about 1,000 in all. 
Secretary Houston emphasized in his 
opening address that the government 
has a vast problem in promoting the 
efficiency of the average farmer — th? 
farm products must be standardized. 
He also spoke particularly of the need 
of rural education. 

President Pack introduced former 
Secretary of Agriculture Wilson, who 
spoke for the conservation of soils. 
The forests are being cared for but the 
soils are not. We have heard some- 



high price of 
food. The soils would produce more 
if they were conserved," he said. 

At the noon hour the State delega- 
tions met. We of California numbered 
sixteen, including Mrs. Lovell White, 
Mrs. Raker, and many from the North. 
We made Francis Cuttle, of Riverside, 
our chairman and elected members to 
the various committees where we were 
entitled to representation. All wore 
yellow ribbon badges with "Califor- 
nia" in large black letters on them. 

In the afternoon Senator Hoke 
Smith of Georgia, spoke on "Soil Fer- 
tility." An account of Canada's prog- 
ress in the conservation movement was 
given by James White, representing 
the Canadian Commission of Conser- 
vation, and a report from the commit- 
tee on food by Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, 
its chairman. 

It had been evident some time be- 
fore the opening of the Congress that 
a sharp fight was expected on Federal 
policies by those delegates who con- 
tend that the government is usurping 
the rights of the states to regulate 
their own power possessions. 

The powerful committee on water- 
power, composed of experts along 
these lines, brought in three reports, 
unanimous — majority and minority. 
The first named was bitterly opposed 
by the state's rights representatives. 

The second day opened with an ad- 
dress by Secretary Lane. He urged 
government ownership of railways in 
Alaska and predicted wonderful devel- 
opment there. Instead of giving land 
grants in Alaska to railroad companies 
to build railroads, the government 
ought to build the railroads and we as 
the government, should take the land 
grants ourselves," he said. Senator 
Burton, of Ohio, gave an able address 
regarding water power development 
control, as did Senator Newlands of 
Nevada. 

Walter Fisher, former Secretary of 



18 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



the Interior was in the chair on the 
second day, when was finally staged 
the bitter fight between states rights 
and Federal control of water power 
in the future. The issue was clearly 
defined and the steam roller was used 
most effectively. By many the charge 
was made that the Congress was pack- 
ed with p-overnment officials and ex- 
government employees. Finally by a 
vote of 434 to 154 in favor of Federal 
control this stormy session came to a 
close. 

A banquet for the foresters was held 
in the evening and Mrs. Emmons 
Crocker, Conservation chairman. G. F. 



W. C. gave an interesting talk telling 
of the many things club women can 
do for that cause. 

The forestry section took up its 
work before the Congress on the third 
day and a number of fine papers were 
given. Chief Forester Graves told of 
Federal forest work; E. A. Sterling" of 
Pennsylvania of private forest work; 
E. T. Allen of the Western Forestry 
and Conservation Association, Oregon, 
spoke for the spread of "Public Know- 
ledge of Forest Economics," and others 
more or less prominent also contrib- 
uted. 

(Continued on Page 32) 



NOTES ON WATER CONSERVATION 



At the call of Mrs. E. G. Greene, 
state chairman of waters, that depart- 
ment will hold a state water confer- 
ence at the California Clubhouse, San 
Francisco, the latter part of March. 
The special subject for consideration 
will be the Water Commission Bill 
(A. 642), which will be referred to 
popular vote in November, 1914. A 
number of able speakers will present 
the subject, among them Dr. George 
C. Pardee. 

Under the auspices of the Common- 
wealth Club of San Francisco a "State 
Congress for Waterways" will be held 
at the Palace Hotel, San Francisco, 
January 15-17. Its particular end will 
be to urge means of getting water 
transportation from the interior to tide- 
water. Every county, city and irriga- 
tion district in California, the members 
of the Legislature and the California 
Congressional delegation and many ex- 
perts on water questions have been in- 
vited to attend. The Newlands bil' 
will receive special attention. Gover- 
nor Johnson will make the opening ad- 
dress. 

Enthusiastic endorsement was given 
to the Newlands bill h^ the San Toa- 
quin County Teachers' Institute at its 
November meeting at Stockton. Cop- 
ies of the resolution, which recites the 
special benefits to accrue from the 
measure to the San Joaquin and Sac- 
ramento valleys, have been sent to 
President Wilson, to congressional rep- 



resentatives and to every county school 
superintendent in the state. 

At the request of Mrs. A. S. Taylor, 
of Coalinga, the slides and notes pre- 
pared by Mrs. Greene for use in lec- 
tures on water conservation have been 
sent to that city and will be used in 
the public schools. Mrs. Greene is in 
receipt of a letter from James B. Dav- 
idson, superintendent of the Marin 
County schools, warmly endorsing the 
idea of introducing the subject as a 
regular part of the school curriculum. 
In the interests of the later project the 
state chairman had sent a circular let- 
ter to school officials all over the state 
urging this and as well the establish- 
ment of a "Conservation Day" for 
general observance in the schools. The 
use of Overton Price's "Boy's Book 
on Conservation" and John H. Mat- 
hews' "Conservation of Waters" in the 
schools is suggested ; also that a mem- 
ber of each high school graduating 
class write an essay on the value of 
the Newlands bill. A second circular 
has been sent to all the public libra- 
ries asking particularly that these 
books be placed on their shelves, as 
well as the excellent bibliography con- 
tained in Mrs. Greene's bulletin on 
the Waterways Committe, a copy of 
which has been sent to every feder- 
ated club in the state. The liberal use 
of this bulletin is especially urged upon 
every club woman interested in water 
conservation. It may be secured by 
writins: Mrs. Greene. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



19 



General Federation 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President — Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker, 2606 Whitis avenue, Austin, Texas. 

First Vice-President — Mrs. L. L. Blankenburg, 214 West Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Second Vice-President — Mrs. Samuel B. Sneath, 211 Monroe street, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Harry L. Keefe, Walthill, Nebraska. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Eugene Reilley, 508 Park avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Treasurer — Mrs. John Threadgill, 922 North Robinson street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Auditor — Mrs. C. H. McMahon, 32 Caithness Apartments, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Directors — Mrs. William E. Andrews, 1225 Fairmont street, N. W., Washington, D. C; Mrs. 
A. L. Christie, 219 South Washington street, Butte, Montana; Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, 
Irvington, Indianapolis, Indiana; Mrs. Francis D. Everett, Highland Park, Illinois; Mrs. 
William P. Harper, 651 Kinnear place, Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Creighton Mathewes. 315 
Bermuda street, New Orleans, Louisiana; Mrs. Frank White, Valley City, North Dakota; 
Mrs. William B. Williams, Lapeer, Michigan. 

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS 

Art — Mrs. Melville F. Johnston, 103 North Tenth street, Richmond, Ind. 

Civics — Miss Zona Gale, Portage, la. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, The Gladstone, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conservation — Mrs. Emmons Crocker, 48 Mechanic street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Education — Mrs. O. Shepard Barnum, 312 South Fifth street, Alhambra, Cal. 

Household Economics — Miss Helen Louise Johnson, 234 Paddock street, Watertown, N. Y. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. A. E. Chantler, Tacoma Daily News, Tacoma, Wash. 

Legislation — Mrs. Horace T. Towner, Corning, la. 

Literature — Mrs. Frances Squire Potter, 4581 Oakenwald avenue, Kenwood, Chicago, 111. 

Music — Mrs. Lawrence Maxwell, Edgecliffe Road, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O. 

Public Health — Mrs. S. S. Crockett, 710 Belmont avenue, Nashville, Tenn. 

Press Committee — Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, Chairman, IndianapoliB, Ind.. 



BIENNIAL NOTES 



"The hum of industry" is heard in 
the meetings of the Chicago biennial 
board, of. which Mrs. George Bass is 
chairman. The women composing this 
board are at work in earnest, planning 
for what it is hoped will be the greatest 
biennial convention of the General Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs. The ap- 
pointment of chairman of the different 
committees, all of Chicago except 
where otherwise specified, has been 
completed and is as follows: 

Art — Mrs. Howard T. Wilson, Vir- 
den, 111. 

Badges— Mrs. E. S. Graf, 1522 Chase 
Ave., Rogers Park. 

Bureau of Information — Mrs. Rich- 
ard Phillips, 5503 Cornell Ave. 

Credentials — Miss Grace Temple, 
1360 E. 58th street. 

Decorations — Mrs. 
Hinsdale. 111. 

Distribution of 
Sallie Gaynor. 

Emergency — Dr. Van Hoosen, 4845 
Calumet Ave. 

Excursions — Mrs. Willis O. Nance, 
5213 Kenwood Ave. 



Albert True, 
Literature — Miss 



Furnishings — Mrs. Charles Corn- 
stock, 4908 Kimbark Ave. 

Halls State Headquarters — Mrs. Ed- 
ward Portman, 4945 Kenmore Ave. 

Hotels — Miss Florence Beckett, La 
Grange, 111. 

House — Mrs. Ira A. Newman, 5476 
East End Ave. 

Local Board Ticket— Mrs. W. H. 
Knap, 4246 Grand Boulevard. 

Local Press— Miss Ima Clarke, 2908 
Washington Boulevard. 

Local Program — Miss Ella J. Abeel, 
4907 Vincennes Ave. 

Local Transportation and Baggage- 
Mrs. Albert Hester, 832 Junior Ter- 
race. 

Music — Mrs. George B. Carpenter, 
1018 N. State St. 

Platform Communications — Mrs. 
Earle W. Spencer, Highland Park, 111. 

Printing — Mrs. Edward L. Murfey, 
4454 Sidney Ave. 

Publication — Mrs. Andrew P. Coon, 
2103 S. Sawyer Ave. 

Registration — Mrs. Charles Salmon. 
6826 Perry Ave. 

The hotels committee is composed 



20 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



of two hundred members, with a chair- 
man and six vice chairmen. These vice 
chairmen will be at the hotels from 
8:30 a. m. until 8 p. m., ready to do 
everything possible for the comfort of 
federation delegates and guests. There 
will be compiled a complete list (card 
system) of all delegates, alternates 
and out-of-town visitors to the con- 
vention, with their hotels and room 
numbers. A duplicate of this list will 
be in the hands of a vice-chairman in 
each hotel for the covenience of all 
visitors. 

The six hotels which will be used by 
the convention are the Auditorium, 
Blackstone, Congress, LaSalle, Palmer 
and Sherman. The first three are on 
the lake front ; the other three are 
within the loop district. Trains on the 
loop will convey passengers to the 
Auditorium Theatre, where the. con- 
vention is to be held, and arrangements 
for busses and taxicabs have been 
made whereby the delegates may ride 
to and from the convention at a rate of 
twenty-five cents per passenger. Plans 
are being considered for meals and of 
this report will be made at length 
later. The rates at hotels are $1.50 per 
day and up. Each room in the Hotel 
Sherman has a bath. All of these 
hotels are thoroughly modern in equip- 
ment and first-class service may be ex- 
pected. In each instance the hotel 
management is heartily cooperating 
with the hotels, committee to give to 
convention delegates the service de- 
sired. It is desired that everyone who 
expects to attend the convention will 
make their reservations through the 
hotels committee, whose word and 
wish will carry much more weight 
with the hotels' management than a 
letter from a stranger. Every possible 
effort will be made to give each one 
exactly the accommodations she de- 
sires. Compliance with this request 
will greatly facilitate many lines of 
work in the convention. 

The local program committee, of 
which Miss Ella J. Abeel, 4907 Vin- 
cennes Ave., is chairman, is perfecting 



plans which will give to the conven- 
tion a rare treat along several lines. 
It is expected that the Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra will give an opening 
concert on Tuesday evening, June 9, 
1914. Miss Jane Addams, famous 
throughout the world as the promoter 
of Hull House and its splendid social 
settlement work, will address the con- 
vention at its Wednesday evening ses- 
sion and Thursday evening will be de- 
voted to a reception at the Art Insti- 
tute. These are but a few of the feat- 
ures which the local program commit- 
tee offers and there will be almost lim- 
itless social affairs in charge of other 
committees, accounts of which, to- 
gether with the plans of the excursions, 
hospitality, music _and other commit- 
tees, will be printed in the Clubwoman. 

Mrs. George W. McCoy, past presi- 
dent of the Northern District, C. F. 
W. C and state chairman of trans- 
portation to the Biennial has just re- 
turned from a visit to Chicago. She 
reports that the club women of Chi- 
cago and of Illinois are making ex- 
tensive preparations for the entertain- 
ment of those who are to be their 
guests in June. 

The headquarters of California club 
women will be Hotel LaSalle. This 
is a delightful hotel and the hotel home 
of Mrs. Bass. The railroad rates to 
Chicago will be about the same as for 
1913 ; that is $72.50 to Chicago and re- 
turn, with a good time limit and choice 
of routes returning. The Pullman 
rates will be about $14.00. Hotel rates 
are very reasonable. The official route 
will probably be given in the February 
issue of the Clubwoman. It is the de- 
sire of the chairman to have a splendid 
representation from California. Seven- 
ty-five tickets - will secure a special 
train, not car, probably a train de luxe. 
A very cordial invitation is sent to club 
women of California. Illinois sent 134 
to us, can we not do as well? Think 
the matter over and send your name 
to the state chairman, and she will plan 
accordingly. Mrs. McCoy's address 
is 2410 K St., Sacramento. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



CALL FOR THE THIRTEENTH ANNUAL CONVEN- 
TION, LOS ANGELES DISTRICT C F. W. C. 



The thirteenth annual convention of 
Los Angeles district will be held in 
Santa Barbara March fourth, fifth and 
sixth by invitation ; most graciously 
extended, of the federated clubs of 
Santa Barbara. 

The sessions will be held in the Pot- 
ter Hotel, and are open to all club 
women. 

Clubs are urged to elect early a full 
delegation of their women, who will 
carry back to their clubs the message 
of the convention. 

Each club shall be entitled to repre- 
sentation by the president and one del- 
egate. Clubs numbering one hundred 
members, the president and two dele- 
gates, and one additional delegate for 
every additional hundred members. 

The secretary of each club shall send 
the names of delegates and alternates 
elected by the club, to the correspond- 
ing secretary of the district, Mrs. G. 
O. Brewer, 658 So. Chicaeo St., Los 
Angeles, one week before annual meet- 
ing. 

The Hotel Potter quotes rates as 
follows : $3.50 for one or $6.00 for two 
persons per day; $4.50 for one, or $8.00 
for two persons per day, with bath. 
The above special rates are American 
plan, by the day, and the management 
asks that reservation be made earlv for 
convention is held at the height of the 
tourist season. To insure reservation 
write six weeks in advance, if possible. 
Other hotels recommended are: The 
Gregson and Upham, family hotels, 
$3.00 per dav each. Rooms in good lo- 
calities. $1.00 to $2.00 per dav. 

Address Chairman. Mrs. N. R. Han- 
cock, 114 W. Micheltorena St.. Santa 
Barbara. 

Credential cards must be presented 
in person, duly signed bv president and 
secretary of club, to the Credential 
Committee, which will be in session at 
the Potter Hotel Tuesday evening, and 
Wednesday morning before opening of 
the convention; Miss Edith Hodgkins, 
Chairman. 



Resolutions must be presented in 
writing, signed by the delegate of at 
least one federated club and placed in 
the hands of Credential Committee ; 
Chairman, Mrs. Frank A. Stephens, 
1831 Laurel St., So. Pasadena. The 
delegates from clubs, failing to pay 
their annual dues of 5c per capita can- 
not be seated at the convention. 

The convention will open Wednes- 
day morning at ten with President's 
Council and Department Conferences 
in session simultaneously. The morn- 
ings will be given over to business and 
the afternoon sessions to conferences. 

The Local Board, Mrs. H. J. Finger, 
President, has made plans for reception 
at Potter Hotel, Wednesday evening, 
preceded by concert. The Thursday 
afternoon session will be held in State 
Normal School. Miss Edna Rich, 
President, followed by a reception and 
light refreshments ; also there will be a 
display of civic center work at Neigh- 
borhood House. Friday P. M. auto 
ride by courtesy of Santa Barbara 
women. 

By order of Executive Committee. 
MRS. W. C. MUSHET, 

President. 



FOREWORD 

Surely every Club in Los Angeles 
District is eagerly anticipating the San- 
ta Barbara Convention and I am quite 
positive that delegates from more than 
one hundred clubs will convene with 
mind and spirit bent upon not receiving 
only, but giving. 

A program commensurate with 
the importance and requirements of 
Los Angeles District is being carefully 
worked out along most practical, most 
progressive lines lacking not the Pres— 
dents council nor the delegates con- 
ference. 

The committee have literally encom- 
passed the continent, in search of 
helpful speakers to supplement the de- 
partment reports ; as well as to inspire 
our Clubs to continued and even larger 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



effort, by giving them the benefit of 
the most advanced thought of the day. 

Especial interest will be added to the 
Convention by the co-operation of the 
Music Clubs of the district. There 
will be an exhibit of published and 
written music, also a concert given en- 
tirely by federated women. 

Art lovers will be interested to know 
that the art exhibit will be representa- 
tive of the very best California artists. 

The Manual Arts and State Normal 
School promises an unusual exhibit for 
home makers, in connection with the 
entertainment of the Convention. Ten- 
tative plans are forming for an exhibit 
of original literary work in manuscript 
or printed forms, in short story, nov- 
ellette, verse or one-act plays. 

For the builders of club houses, 
views, plans and special features of 
some of the many club houses built 
and owned by the women will be on 
exhibition. The housing of the con- 



vention under one roof will greatly fa- 
cilitate social intercourse, and we urge 
our club women to neglect not this 
opportunity to become acquainted or 
better acquainted with their fellow 
workers. For the personal touch can 
never be overestimated. 

Come to convention with full 
strength. 

Come with increased enthusiasm. 

Come and receive a new vision. 

Come with a will to deepen and 
strengthen the federation spirit and 
power. For what other organization 
can offer such widespread help, what 
other force exists, loving pure culture, 
yet lovine more pure humanity ; em- 
bracing all parties and all creeds in the 
practical program of social betterment, 
at work in hundreds of communities, 
and with apparently unlimited possi- 
bilities of growth. 

MRS. W. C. MUSHET, 



CALL FOR ALAMEDA DISTRICT CONVENTION 

By Mrs. W. E. Colby, President 



The thirteenth annual convention of 
Alameda District, C. F. W. C, will be 
held in Hayward, February, 18, 19, 20, 
and will be called to order at 1 :30 
o'clock of the first day. A splendid 
program is being arranged, time be- 
ing given for general discussion from 
the floor, in the hope that all will avail 
themselves of this opportunity for an 
exchange of ideas. The new depart- 
ments of Peace, Country Life and Lit- 
erature will be given special promin- 
ence. Both state and district chairmen 
will tell of work done, and explain their 
plans for the future. 

Our hostess, the Hill and Valley 
Club of Hayward, has given us a cord- 
ial invitation, and will welcome us in 
a spirit of true hospitality. Let us 
meet them more than half-way ! 

A convention possesses great possi- 
bilities. It is a clearing-house, where 
we learn what has been done ; finding 
out in this way where we can improve, 



or showing others where our way has 
been the better. It gives an opportun- 
ity for personal acquaintance with state 
and district officers, with chairmen of 
departments, with club officers and 
with earnest club women, which means 
so much to us all. From this personal 
contact comes sometimes our greatest 
inspiration. Last but not least, it 
gives us that strengh which comes 
from organization and co-operation. 
We are all working for a common end, 
the uplift of humanity. To learn that 
others are working with us is a great 
help. 

BUT — the individual convention is 
just as successful, is just as great an 
inspiration, as the individual member 
makes it. It is our — your — responsibil- 
ity. Let every club in the district have 
its full representation. Let every club 
woman who can attend each session, 
resolve to add her mite of interest or 
help to the general good. 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



25 



THE PERSONAL INCOME TAX 



By Mrs. L. 

Unless one has recently read the 
Constitution of the United States one 
may ask: Why was it necessary to 
change the Constitution in order to 
ley this tax? Congress has always had 
the right to impose any tax — but it 
must be by apportionment. In 1789 the 
Supreme Court got around this by de- 
ciding that an income tax was not a 
direct tax and therefore need not be 
apportioned among the states accord- 
ing to population. During the Civil 
war such a tax was actually levied, 
even on incomes derived from state 
bonds and state salaries. In 1859, 
however, the Supreme Court reserved 
itself and decided that it is a direct tax 
and therefore constitutional. 

The expenditures of the government 
are increasing so rapidly that the ad- 
dition of an income tax is an act of 
social justice. Wealth must more and 
more pay the bills as wealth more and 
more receives comfort and protection. 
Advocates commend it as the fairest 
of all taxes. Opponents denounce it 
as an attack on thrift and success. It 
has had to fight the great influence of 
wealth throughout the Nation and it 
has been victorious. 

All citizens, whether residing- at 
home or abroad, and all resident aliens, 
are taxable upon their entire net in- 
come, minus the exemptions provided 
for. Also — all non-resident aliens hav- 
ing an income derived from business or 
profession in the United States. This 
normal tax of 1 per cent per annum 
will be collected from the person him- 
self, or from his employer, trustee, 
agent, etc. This latter method is called 
collection at the source. 

Every citizen of lawful age, with an 
income of $3000 or over per year, is re- 
quired to make a return for the calen- 
dar year — setting forth his gross in- 
come from all sources, and deducting 
the expenses and other items author- 
ized by this law. Guardians, trustees, 
etc., shall make such returns for the 
person they represent. 

Any person liable under the normal 
tax only, that is with an income of any- 



C. Hunter 

where from $3000 to $20,000, need not 
make return on any income derived 
from dividends or interest of joint 
stock companies, corporations, etc., 
which are taxable upon their net in- 
comes, and if such person has no other 
source of income, he need not make 
returns. 

Any person whose taxes are collect- 
ed at the source, need make no return, 
unless he has other income. 

Partnerships need make no return, 
as that will be done in the individual 
capacity of the partners. 

The income of a taxable person must 
include gains and compensation re- 
ceived for any services whatsoever; 
professions, vocations, business or 
trade, etc., and income derived from 
any source whatever, except as other- 
wise noted. 

The value of property acquired by 
gift, descent, bequest, etc., is not to be 
returned as income, but any income 
derived from the same must be re- 
turned. 

The "specific exemption," so often 
mentioned, is the $3000 allowed every 
taxable person. If the person making 
the return is married, the exemption is 
$4000. There was much discussion as 
to whether a further deduction should 
be made for children, but it was not in- 
corporated in the law. 

There are many other deductions 
made to fit individual cases, such as 
the necessary expenses paid to carry on 
a business and interest paid within the 
year on indebtedness. Also all muni- 
cipal, county or state taxes paid within 
the year — losses sustained by fire, 
storms, or shipwreck, not covered by 
insurance, and many others. The law 
provides a further tax of 1 per cent 
on incomes between $20,000 and $50.- 
000; two per cent additional on in- 
comes between $50,000 and $75,000; 
three per cent additional between $75,- 
000 and $100,000; four per cent addi- 
tional between $100,000 and $250,000; 
and five per cent additional between 
$250,000 and $500,000. 



26 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



CONTEMPORARY DRAMATISTS 

By Mrs. George F. Reinhardt 

State Chairman of Literature 



Whether a club is interested in the 
study of drama from the point of the 
theatre-goer, the amateur playwright, 
or the literary student of the drama, it 
should have some knowledge of the. 
Drama League of America, whose 
headquarters are at 736 Marquette 
Building, Chicago, while a flourishing 
center exists for interested Californians 
in San Francisco. Organized as re- 
cently as April, 1910, the League has 
over 50,000 members. Its purpose is 
"to crowd out vicious plays by attend- 
ing and commending good plays and 
building up audiences for them through 
study classes, reading circles, and lec- 
tures ; to aid in the restoration of the 
drama to its honorable place as the 
most intimate, most comprehensive, 
most democratic medium for the self- 
expression of the people." The Drama 
League has departments for teachers, 
for students, for amateur players, for 
lectures, etc. Each of these depart- 
ments publishes information obtainable 
by any of the League's members and 
of real value to them. For individual 
members the annual dues entitling one 
to the many privileges of membership 
are but one dollar ; the annual dues of 
an association are two dollars. Clubs 
studying the drama would do well to 
join this association. 

Shakespeare once for all defined the 
function of the drama as that of "hold- 
ing the mirror up to nature." but even 
in his day the theatre was less un- 
feignedly true to the life about it, than 
is the theatre today. Fidelity to the 
problems and perplexities of modern 
life, consideration economic, political, 



religious, artistic, social, these things 
mark the plays of every European na- 
tion, as well as the plays of our own. 
So long is the list of contemporary 
English dramatists that a program of 
any pretense to completeness has no 
time for consideration of American and 
of Irish writers in the same field. How- 
ever, a club may prefer turning from 
the list below to our countrymen or 
to the Celtic school, and if so any play 
of Zangwill, Mackaye, Sheldon, 
Moody, and Augustus Thomas, or of 
Synge, Yeats and Lady Gregory will 
make a fruitful subject for compara- 
tive study. 

To the club taking up the subject of 
contemporary English drama three or 
four books of general dramatic interest 
should be available, as well as the in- 
dividual plays to be discussed. Such 
books are : A Study of the Drama, by 
Brander Matthews ; The Theory of the 
Theatre, by Clayton Hamilton ; Dram- 
atists of Today, by E. E. Hale, Jr.; 
English Stage of Today, by Mario 
Borso. 

Program 

1. Arthur Pinero — Mid-Channel, or 

Trelawney of the Wells. 

2. Henry A. Jones — The Liars, or the 

Hypocrites. 

3. Bernard Shaw — Major Barbara, or 

You Never Can Tell, Widower's 
Houses, or Mrs. Warren's Pro- 
fession. 

Doctors' Dilemma, or Getting 
Married. 

4. Granville Barker — Voysey Inherit- 

ance, or Waste. 
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THE CLUBWOMAN 



27 



John Galsworthy — Silver Box, or 

Strife. 

Justice. 

The Pigeon. 

The Eldest Son. 
Stanley Houghton — Hindle Wakes. 



7. John Masefield — The Tragedy of 

Nan. 

8. Charles Rann Kennedy — The Serv- 

ant in the House. 
The Necessary Evil. 



Interstate Literary Contest, G. F. W. C. 

In order to encourage and recognize 
literary merit among the clubwomen 
of America the General Federation has 
adopted a plan suggested by Mrs. 
Bashinsky, of Alabama, for an inter- 
state literary contest to be held this 
spring and to which any member of a 
federated club is eligible. The contest 
will be conducted under the general 
direction of Mrs. Frances Squire Pot- 
ter, chairman of Literature and Library 
Extension, G. F. W. C, whose ad- 
dress is 4581 Oakenwald avenue, Chi- 
cago. 

No restriction is made as to subject 
or length but every paper must be 
original and must be signed only with 
the name of the author's state. Each 
federated club is asked to submit 
through its literature or reciprocity 
committee the paper which it regards 
as its best to the state chairman of lit- 
erature. Of these not more than two 
shall be selected and submitted to Mrs. 
Potter. From the papers thus submit- 
ted by the different state chairmen of 
literature Mrs. Potter's committee will 
select twelve and submit them to a 
committee of three, to be chosen by 
the literature committee and the presi- 
dent, G. F. W. C. This committee will 
select the best and second-best papers 



not later than April 1 and will an- 
nounce the result to the state chairmen, 
who will notify the authors. All the 
papers reaching the General Federa- 
tion committee will become the prop- 
erty of the Bureau of Information, G. 
F. W. C, and will be subject to call 
for publication by the General Feder- 
ation organ and the different state or- 
gans. The titles and names of authors 
of all such papers will be printed in all 
the official organs. 

The plan is one whereby the very 
best literary efforts of America's club 
women will be expeditiously secured 
for publication broadcast in the various 
club magazines and should prove of 
incalculable benefit to clubs able to 
profit by such examples. While no 
actual prize is offered, the distinction 
of having produced the best club paper 
ever written is a crown of glory to 
mention in the same breath with the 
laurel wreath of an Olympian victor. 
Mrs. Reinhardt, our state chairman of 
literature, is very anxious that Califor- 
nia shall realize her due in this contest 
and The Clubwoman would second 
this desire by urging every club to 
make its selection immediately and 
with great care and to send the result 
to Mrs. Reinhardt without delay. 




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28 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



THE WOMAN'S LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL 

By Mrs. James L. Harbaugh, President 



At a meeting held in San Francisco 
November 10, the Woman's Legis- 
lative Council of California adopted a 
constitution and elected their officers 
for two years. These were given in 
the December Clubwoman. This or- 
ganization can be made the most effici- 
ent power in the State for the passage 
of good laws, but it must have the 
concentrated power of the women's 
organizations back of it. The officers 
hope that when the membership card 
and a copy of the constitution reach 
the different societies and clubs that 
they will be signed and speedily re- 
turned. 

The purpose of the council is to pre- 
vent duplication of work and expense 
and to try to decide wisely what legis- 
lation the women of the State desire 
to ask for. All bills must be properly 
prepared before presentation to the 
council. The constitution provides 
"That not more than five measures will 
be endorsed by the council in one 
year." The affiliated societies will no 
doubt have bills of special importance 
to themselves upon which they will 



work independently, but there will be 
other measures of vital importance 
upon which through the council they 
can unite for vigorous campaign work. 
This was the original plan and what 
we hope to carry forward next year. 

All bills will be carefully considered 
by the executive board of the council 
and recommendations made to the 
council which, unless by special call, 
will not meet before October. Quar- 
terly meetings of the executive Board 
of the council will be held begining in 
January. Other meetings of the board 
may be called when necessary. 

We do not want to make the mistake 
that Colorado women have, by classing 
women with children. We are con- 
vinced that laws should refer to 
classes regardless of sex so far as pos- 
sible. Citizenship should have the 
same standard for both sexes — this is 
the only way to secure equal rights. 

Harmonious action, enthusiasm and 
good sense should make our movement 
a wonderful power for good in our 
great state. 



DISTRICT NEWS 



SAN JOAQUIN 
Mrs. Leslie A. Ferris, Press Chairman 

The San Joaquin District executive 
board held its December meeting at 
Modesto, December 13th, the president, 
Mrs. H. A. Bates, in the chair. Splen- 
did reports were read from the various 
clubs and chairmen of the district. 

The most important business trans- 
acted was the fixing of the dates of 
the San Joaquin district convention, 
which is to be held at Hanford, Feb- 
ruary 10, 11 and 12. A good program 
is in preparation and the president 
urges each club to have its full dele- 
gation in attendance. 

The January Executive Board meet- 
ing is to be one of particular import- 
ance. Details of the program for the 



convention are to be completed and 
the session is to be a part of an all day 
meeting which is planned for Modesto, 
January 5, at Masonic Hall. The ex- 
ecutive board will meet at 10 a. m. that 
its business may be transacted by noon 
when a luncheon is to be served, under 
the direction of the Modesto Woman's 
Improvement Club. The club members 
will be hostesses on. that date, at a 
Reciprocity Day when they will enter- 
tain a number of neighbor clubs, in 
the cause of furtherment of woman's 
clubs' interests and the work they as- 
pire to accomplish. 

The Modesto Woman's Improve- 
ment Club was interestingly reported 
by the president, Mrs. Edgar H. An- 
near. The club gave its annual recep- 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



29 



tion to the teachers of the public 
schools early in the fall. Mrs. Edna 
Evans of San Francisco held a week's 
Domestic Science class in October. A 
notable achievement of the club which 
is just reaching its consummation is 
the planting and caring for sixty acres 
of parks which now grace the city of 
Modesto. There are five parks which 
have been located in various districts 
of the city, the entire expense of plant- 
ing and maintenance having been borne 
by the Improvement Club. They are 
now valued at $160,000 and will be 
turned over to the city February 1st. 
A committee on supervised recreation 
is accomplishing good work. The Art 
and Literary departments of the club 
are holding weekly meetings that prove 
very interesting and are well attended. 

The Fresno Wednesday Club reports 
weekly meetings devoted to study of 
the Modern Drama. This club has re- 
cently observed its twenty-fifth birth- 
day anniversary, holding the distinc- 
tion of being the oldest club in the dis- 
trict. 

The Woman's Club of Bakersfiela 
plans its programs to include every 
member of the club. Their program 
always begins with current events an' 1 
music. They study civics in regard to 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

Harp Soloist of the Royal Academy 
of Music, London. 

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Phone »24558West 4586. 



the betterment of local conditions. Mrs. 
U. P. Miller and Mrs. Charles F. Ed- 
son have appeared before the club in 
very instructive lectures. 

Other clubs sending reports were - . 
Madison Club, Sylvan Club, Walnut 
Improvement Club, Exeter Club, Gus- 
tine Woman's Improvement Club, 
Clovis Woman's Club, Dinuba Club. 
Selma Woman's Club, Coalinga Wo- 
man's Club. 

District chairmen reported as fol- 
lows: Legislation, Mrs. Thomas Grif- 
fin, Modesto ; Home Economics, Mrs 
G. O. Warlow, Fresno ; Country Life, 
Mrs. E. A. Mowry, Sylvan; Health, 
Dr. Mary Butin, Madera; Art, Mrs. H. 
Hart, Modesto; Waterways, Mrs. E. C. 
Dozier. Modesto : Literature, Mrs. C. 
H. Griswold, Modesto. 



NORTHERN 
By Mrs. B. F. Walton, Press Chairman 

The Executive Board of the North- 
ern District was in session December 
10th in Sacramento. Mrs. A. F. Jones, 
the president, was in the chair. 

Reports from the various chairmen 
of departments showed much excellent 
work accomplished, notably that of 
Philanthropy, which told of success in 



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inducing the board of supervisors of 
Sacramento County to appropriate 
$100 per month for maternity service 
in a local hospital, which provides for 
four cases per month or an average of 
two weeks for each case. This is in 
lieu of the institution of a maternity 
cottage which the department has by 
no means given up the hope of obtain- 
ing later. 

The work along the line of Industrial 
and Social Conditions was shown to be 
greatly hampered by lack of funds. 
Miss Parrott stated that much valuable 
information could be utilized through 
the county libraries, but they are not 
as yet largely established in this dis- 
trict. Discussion ensued as to how to 
secure the co-operation of club women 
to have these libraries more generally 
instituted. It was stated that a speak- 
er would be sent to any club, free of 
charge, that made application to the 



State Library, to give information as 
to the benefits to be derived by a com- 
munity from such library. 

Reciprocity days were announced for 
Roseville, Jan. 2nd., Rocklin Jan. 21st., 
and Colusa, time not fixed. 



The Northern District Art Confer- 
ence which was held in Sacramento on 
December 10, was certainly a suc- 
cess, if numbers and enthusiasm stand 
for anything. Every art club in the 
district sent from one to five delegates, 
and representatives were present from 
Auburn, Colusa, Grass Valley, Rose- 
ville, Rocklin, Marysville, Chico and 
Oroville. Each chairman gave a brief 
and inspiring report of work being 
done in her particular community. 

At the afternoon meeting Mrs. R. S. 
Holway read a splendid paper on "Be- 
ginnings of Art in California." Every 
one listened with greatest interest to 



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LOS ANGELES. CAL. 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



31 



the efforts of men of our own State 
along art lines, and California has just 
cause to be proud of her artists. 

Miss Mary Patten, of the Kingsley 
Art Club of Sacramento, followed with 
her talk on "The Making of a Canvas," 
helping each one to enjoy the splendid 
exhibit of some sixteen canvases by 
men of national reputation. Miss Pat- 
ten's viewpoint was most interesting. 
and she artistically illuminated each 
picture in turn. Too much cannot be 
said of this exhibit. It is by all odds 
the finest single group of pictures ever 
presented to the public in California, 
and is the property of the National 
Federation. 



LOS ANGELES 
Mrs. O. C. Vogel, Press Chairman 
The Los Angeles District held its 
last board meeting on December 23rd 
at the Wednesday Morning Club house 
and. despite the fact of its being so near 
Christmas, the attendance was most 
gratifying. 

Plans for the convention at Santa 
Barbara March 3 to 6 were discussed 
at length. Mrs. John J. Abramson, 
chairman of the program committee 
being anxious that the board cooperate 
with her in planning a program of 
greatest general interest. 



It was unanimously decided to re- 
tain the round-table conferences, as 
one of the most helpful features of a 
convention. 

As chairman of the music commit- 
tee of the District and a former pres- 
ident of the Harmonia Club. Mrs. 
Abramson is sure to provide the con- 
vention with a program of rare musi- 
cal excellence. 

A nominating committee was chosen 
to fill the offices of president and cor- 
responding secretary and others that 
may occur. Mrs. Mushet and Mrs. 
Brewer having served two years. 

The names proposed to act upon 
this committee include Mrs. William 
Baurhyte of Los Angeles, Mrs. Carl- 
ton Seavers of Pomona, Mrs. Mosier 
of Santa Maria, Mrs. Elsie Andrews of 
Carpinteria and Mrs. Mumford of 
South Pasadena. 

Mrs. Jane Beatty led a discussion in 
regard to the new free Municipal Em- 
ployment Bureau, asking that the in- 
fluence of the board be used to segre- 
gate the men's bureau from the wom- 
en's, locating: the latter in a better sec- 
tion of the city and under the direction 
of a woman. A resolution to this ef- 
fect was carried and will be presented 
to the proper authorities. 

Mrs. D. D. Cate, president of the 




The Raymond 

Pasadena, California 

Open from Dec. 18 
to April 30- 



AMERICAN PLAN 



GOLF COURSE IN ITS OWN GROUNDS- 
A PARK OF EIGHTY ACRES 



WALTER RAYMOND, Proprietor 



32 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



Long Beach Ebeil Club met with the 
board for the first time in her new 
position as chairman of waterways. 
Mrs. Cate plans a vigorous campaign 
for the better education of the people 
as to the importance of the extension 
and conservation of our waterways. 

A conference of club presidents of 
the district is announced for the next 
board meeting, when final plans for 
the convention will be perfected. 



SOUTHERN 

Mrs. Helene M. Deimling, Press 
Chairman 

In addition to the resolutions spoken 
of in the last issue of The Clubwoman 
as among those passed by the South- 
ern District convention at San Diego — 
notably that indorsing Mrs. Lillian 
Pray Palmer as a candidate for the 
state presidency and that against the 
Hetch-Hetchy project — should be 
mentioned that vigorously protesting 
against the erection of billboards on 
the highways. Another important 
resolution pledges the members to 
endeavor to secure the exhibits 
of California artists for the Panama- 
California Exposition in 1915; another 
is to so amend the redistricting plan 
as to leave the Southern District in- 
tact. Others provided for the expres- 
sion of affection and sympathy for Mrs. 
Ella Westland, past president of the 
district and thanks to the members of 
hostesses at the convention, for the 
great success of the latter. 

An unusual Christmas program was 
that given by the San Gorgonio Club, 
of Beaumont. Two of the local min- 
isters invited in to discuss respectively 
the literary and religious phases of the 
subject: "Ideals of the Brotherhood of 
Man." The principal points brought 
out by the discusssion turned about 
the apparent failure of socialism and 
philosophy alike to realize a real 
brotherhood. A phase of the same sub- 
ject was taken up by K. R. Smoot un- 
der the subject "The Commission Form 
of Government." Christmas music was 
given by members of the Club. 



FIFTH NATIONAL CONSERVA- 
TION CONGRESS 

( Continued from Page 18) 

Miss Mabel Boardman of the Ameri- 
can Red Cross spoke of conservation 
in the lumber camp, presenting a plea 
for first aid to the injured in these 
camps. 

Mrs. Pennybacker brought a greet- 
ing from the General Federation. She 
spoke briefly and to the point of the 
work of the organization, declaring 
that woman's work is in the home but 
is not confined by its four walls. She 
was bright and witty as she always is. 

The following officers were elected 
for the ensuing year: Charles Lathrop 
Pack, Lakewood, N. J., president ; Mrs. 
Emmons Crocker, Fitchburg, Mass., 
vice-president ; N. C. McLeod, Wash- 
ington, D. C, recording secretary; Dr. 
Henry S. Drinker, South Bethlehem, 
Pa., treasurer; Thomas F. Shipp, In- 
dianapolis, corresponding secretary. 

Mr. Pinchot moved as an amendment 
to the resolution committee report a 
declaration of principles on waterway 
control similar to the ideas in the min- 
ority report signed by himself, Henry 
L. Stimson, former Secretary of War, 
and Joseph N. Teal, of Oregon. After 
a battle which lasted for several hours 
Mr. Pinchot was upheld and monopol- 
istic control of water power was de- 
nounced. 

This fight over water power control 
has been made prominent in this re- 
port because it was the main issue. 
These especially concerned were offi- 
cials in four departments of the gov- 
ernment : Interior, Agriculture, War 
and Commerce. The decisions made 
at that time will largely influence Con- 
gress when these questions are being 
settled in that body during the coming 
session. 

Especially impressive in the great 
convention was the large attendance, 
the earnestness of the delegates, the 
number of women present — especially 
young women — the clear insight all 
had in the questions discussed, and, 
above all, the determination to accept 
no compromise. 



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FedQra(ior\of V^meni* 
C 1 u b s. 



FEBRUARY 




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PROPRIETOR 



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Deposits of $ 1 .00 or more 

LOS ANGELES TRUST & SAVINGS BANK 

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SPECIAL CLUB RATE 

The editors of the Clubwoman desire to announce that 
a special subscription rate of 50 cents annually is effective 
where five or more subscriptions are sent in together. 
Single subscriptions and clubs of less than five are $1.00 
for each name as heretofore. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 

Los Angeles, California 

Enclosed is One T)ollar for which send me the magazine for one 

year, beginning with the.... issue 

1 

Name 

Street No City 

Member Club. State 



SUNSET 
LIMITED 



Mardi Gras Celebration 



TRAVEL TALK 

THE SCHEDULE— 

Leaves Los Angeles 8:15 a. m. daily. 
Arrives New Orleans 8:S0 p. m., the 
second day. 

TWO NIGHTS TO NEW OR- 
LEANS 

Connections made with fast train on 
the Illinois Central — 

Close connections with "New York- 
New Orleans Limited" — 

FOUR NIGHTS TO NEW YORK 
NO EXTRA FARE 

No Transcontinental Route of greater 
interest or diversity — Through 
Southern California, Arizona and 
New Mexico — skirting the Mexican 
border — Through Southern Texas 
and Louisiana to Quaint, Historic 
New Orleans. 

The train is the very latest equipment 
with every convenience — Roadbed 
rock-ballasted and oiled — Oil burn- 
ing locomotives — Protected by auto- 
matic block signals. 

Southern Pacific Steamers leave New 
Orleans Wednesdays and Saturdays 
for New York. Fares the same as 
all rail and include berth and meals 
on ship. 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC SERVICE 
IS THE STANDARD 

Southern Pacific 

The Exposition Line 1915 

LOS ANGELES OFFICES 

212 West Seventh St. 



Phones: Home 10171; Sunset M. 8322 
New Orleans, Feb. 19-24 Station, Fifth and Central Ave. 



The Clubwoman 



Official organ of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 



Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 

Subscription Price, One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH. Editor and Publisher. 
MRS. O. C. VOGEL, Federation Editor. 

Matter for Miss Smith and Mrs. Vogel must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 



CONTENTS 

Frontispiece , Miss Ednah Rich 

Editorial : 

A Trust of Women .'. 7 

What Is a Living Wage? _ 8 

A Practical Educator 8 

California Federation : 

President's Letter _ 9 

The Advantages of Economic Training, Ednah A. Rich 11 

Cutting Out the Middleman 12 

Remedies for the Problem ; Mrs. C. C. Adams 14 

The Government and the Cost of Living 15 

Northern District Convention Call 17 

The Literature of the Bible ; Mrs. G. F. Reinhardt 18 

General Federation : 

Biennial Notes 19 

New Federated Clubs 20 

Parliamentary Usage; Mrs. Annie L. Barry 21 

District News : 

Los Angeles 23 

Alameda 25 

San Francisco 25 

Food and Industrial Exposition 26 

Executive Board Meeting 28 

One Woman's Success 29 




MISS EDNAH RICH. 



State Chairman of Home Economics, C. F. W. C, Member of Advisory Board of Home Economics, G. F. W. C. 



TKe Clubwoman 



Vol. V 



February, 1914 



No. 4 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Commu- 
nications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P.O.Box 1066, by the 
twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 



It is with no intention of merely 
thrashing out old straw and repeating 
truisms better and earlier said by abler 
phrase-coiners that The Clubwoman 
devotes a considerable portion of its 
available space in this issue to a con- 
sideration of what has been tritely 
termed the high cost of living. It is 
rather with a view to directing atten- 
tion to the means which lie at the hand 
of organized women to strike at the 
root of a grave problem and to con- 
tribute their not inconsiderable quota 
to the solution of a question of such 
moment as to seriously engage the at- 
tention of economists the world over. 

Whatever its ramifications — and they 
are so extensive as to touch upon every 
phase of humanity's endless chain of 
supply and demand — the problem is 
one which begins and ends in the 
household. In other words it is essen- 
tially a woman's problem. It may be 
taken to be axiomatic that in its ulti- 
mate analysis every endeavor has for 
its end some form of feeding, clothing, 
sheltering, caring for and training the 
human body. No one of these is un- 
reduceable to terms that are them- 
selves the alphabet of home economics. 

It is perhaps here that is to seek the 
best answers to reactionary minds that 
object to what they have somewhat un- 
felicitously denominated the emanci- 
pation of the woman from the home. 
No legislative, executive or judicial 
weapon ever placed in an intelligent 
woman's hands works otherwise than 
for the direct betterment of that locus 
of the social unit. It is scarcely fair 
to expect her to deal with a problem 
itself constantly evolving from her or- 
iginal heritage of the ages with any but 
the most modern equipment. That the 



tools may not have always been wisely 
used is an indictment, not of the funda- 
mental premise, but of human nature 
only. ' 

No error could be greater than the 
assumption that, enormously vital as is 
the sphere of home economics proper 
in the question of living cost, it is the 
only one women should consider in 
casting about for means to combat the 
encroaching enemy. It is only that 
that is the most direct — its connection 
is most plainly to be seen. To take an 
example, the development of civic sci- 
ence, through its relation to wages, 
housing conditons, the elimination of 
municipal waste and municipal graft — 
to be promptly reflected in lower taxes 
— is of equal importance in dealing 
with a question strictly limited to the 
sordid expense of subsisting from day 
to day. The connection of conserva- 
tion of our natural resources is equally 
obvious when expressed in terms of 
water, transportation, fuel, building 
material and power. Philanthropy, to 
carry the argument a step farther, is 
only another expression for an effort 
to equalize the burden of living cost. 
One may go down the list of depart- 
mental endeavors in the club woman's 
category and find not one that is not 
amenable to similar translation. If 
those which deal with art, music and 
literature are called into question it is 
only necessary to point out that as long 
as civilization remains civilization they 
are as much an essential part of living 
as are food and clothing. 

Putting aside for the moment the de- 
tailed mechanics of handling the prob- 
lem of living cost — the increase of earn- 
ing and purchasing power and the de- 
crease of waste — the question becomes 



8 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



one of co-operation and efficiency. 
Those are the watchwords of the great- 
est business combination ever formed 
■ — a corporation sometimes referred to 
as the most soulless of all the trusts, a 
grasping octopus whose grip is steeled 
by those characteristics alone. Very 
well, let us take a leaf from that proven 
book and form a trust of women's 
effort, a combination in restraint of 
lost motion, a beneficient octopus 
whose tentacles shall bring, rather than 
carry away, the things that lift our lives 
above the famished reach of the wolf 
pawing at the door. 



What Is a Living Wage? 

An interesting comparison between 
the estimates of employers and em- 
ployed of what constitutes a minimum 
living wage is supplied by the Wash- 
ington Industrial Welfare Commis- 
sion, now engaged in an investigation 
of the subject. The commissioners de- 
parted from the ordinary somewhat su- 
perficial procedure in such cases by 
causing three inquiries to be made — 
one by themselves, one by the em- 
ployers of girl workers and the third 
by the girls themselves. The first is 
not yet available. The second places 
the minimum wage at $10.29 for a fixed 
list of items previously agreed upon as 
essential. The third totals $12.11 for 
the same list — a difference of $1.82. 
The $12.11, it should be mentioned, is 
the average of the estimates of all the 
different classes of workers. Laundry 
girls, for example, set their minimum 
at $10.44 a week, while telephone girls 
put it highest — $13.65. Factory em- 
ployees estimated their necessary ex- 
penses at $12.01 a week, store clerks at 
$12.08, office girls at $12.27 and wait- 
resses at $13.07. 

The difference between the estimates 
of the girls and their employers was 
chiefly due to a considerable variation 
in opinion as to how little a girl ca.jj 
dress on. For example the employees 
put their minimum expenditure for 
hose at $4.73 a year. The employers' 
estimate was $3.24. The employees put 
$15.77 a year opposite the millinery 



item, while the wage-payers said by 
inference that $10.94 a year is enough 
for any working girl to pay for her 
hats. The girls wrote $5.69 for corsets 
— the employers $3.88. It is hardly 
necesary to point out that the estimates 
of the girls in this division are prob- 
ably considerably nearer the facts than 
those of the men. Where each side 
started with approximately the same 
fund of information the estimates were 
quite close together. Food, for ex- 
ample, was estimated by the girls at 
$202.91 a year. The employers' figures 
were $191.61. 



A Practical Educator 

California is proud of her women. 
She has shown it by granting them 
suffrage, and in the bestowal of other 
privileges not enjoyed by the women 
of other states. And it may also be 
said that California women are in- 
tensely proud of their state, and those 
to whom distinction has come invari- 
ably manage in some way to convey 
the impression that their being Cali- 
fornians had much to do with it. 

Miss Ednah Anne Rich, a native 
daughter of Santa Barbara, is a young 
woman whose attainments in the edu- 
cational world have won for her re- 
nown, and her future will be watched 
with interest. As president of the 
State Normal School of Manual Arts 
and Home Economics, Miss Rich oc- 
cupies a unique position. She is the 
only woman president of a State Nor- 
mal School, and president of the only 
Normal School with a name. Mjss 
Rich chose it and herself prepared the 
bill that had to be passed by the Cali- 
fornia Legislature, giving it to the 
Santa Barbara Normal School. 

To her untiring efforts are also due 
the beautiful new school buildings, 
valued at more than $150,000, and 
which she designed. 

Miss Rich is also an acknowledged 
authority on the subject of household 
economics and is State Chairman of 
this department in the Federation. 
Elsewhere in this issue is an article 
by her. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 9 

California Federation gf Women's Clubs 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Mrs. James W. Orr, 2420 Gough street, San Francisco. 
Vice-President — Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. 

Vice-President-at-large — Mrs. Calvin Hartwel],411 Summit avenue, Pasadena. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. Edward D. Knight, 238 San Jose avenue, San Francisco. 
Corresponding Secretary — Miss Jessica Lee Briggs, 1942a Hyde street, San Francisco. 
Treasurer — Mrs. H. E. DeNyse, P. 0. Box No. 695, Riverside. 

Auditors — Mrs. S. L. Wiley, Fresno, R. R. 9. Mrs. F isher R. Clarke, 321 West Flora street, 
Stockton. 
General Federation State Secretary — Mrs. Russell J. Waters, 900 West Adams street, Los An 
geles. 

District Presidents 
Northern — Mrs. A. F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery street, Oroville. 
San Francisco — Mrs. Percy L. Shuman, San Mateo. 
Alameda — Mrs. William E. Colby, 2901 Channing Way, Berkeley. 
San Joaquin — Mrs. Harry Bates, Modesto. 

Los Angeles — Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 2614 North Griffin avenue, Los Angeles. 
Southern — Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 702 Ivy street, San Diego. 

Chairmen of Departments 
Art — Mrs. Miguel Estudillo, 335 Fourteenth street, Riverside. 
Civics — Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge, Roseville. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. E. S. Karns, Channing Lane, Palo Alto. 
Club Extension— Mrs. H. V. Rudy, Box 1318, Fresno, Cal. 
Conservation — 

Forestry — Mrs. Foster Elliott, 111 South Hidalgo avenue, Alhambra. 

Waterways — Mrs. E. G. Greene, 611 Waverly street, Palo Alto. 
Country Life — Miss Lillian D. Clark, 1534 Arch street, Berkeley. 
Education — Mrs. May L. Cheney, 2241 College avenue, Berkeley. 
Endowment Fund — Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 3454 Twenty-first street, San Francisco. 
Federation Emblem — Mrs. Mary H. Gridley, 101 Brand Boulevard, Glendale. ] 

Health — Mrs. L. P. Crane, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. ? 

History and Landmarks — Mrs. William Fairchild, Box 72, Placerville. 
Home Economics — Miss Edna Rich, Santa Barbara. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. C. F. Edson, 950 West Twenty-first street, Los Angeles. 
Legislation — Mrs. J. T. Harbaugh, 2706 N street, Sacramento. 
Literature — Mrs. George F. Reinhardt, 2434 Durant avenue, Berkeley. 
Music — Mrs. G. H. Hutton, 927 Second street, Santa Monica. 
Necrology — Miss Lucy Hatch, The Palms, Fresno. 
Parliamentary Practice — Mrs. Annie Little Barry, Berkeley. 
Peace — Mrs. A. H. Griswold, Box 53, El Centro. 

Philanthropy — Mrs. William Baurhyte, 1033 West Edgeware Road, Los Angeles. 
Press — Mrs. O. C. Vogel, P. O. Box 1066, Los Angeles. 
Program — Executive Committee. 

Reciprocity and Information — Mrs. Cora E. Jones, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 
Redistricting Committee — Mrs. Henry E. DeNyse, Riverside. 
State University Club House Loan — Mrs. S. L. Piatt, 1720 J street, Fresno. 

PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

Each month brings some new duty State Chairman of Waters for the C. F. 

or new development. The month of W. C, is the second vice-president of 

January was notable for the part the the organization. The recognition 

clubwomen took in the adventure of the given to the "new citizen" was most 

Internal Waterways Congress called by cordial. 

the Commonwealth Club of California The Federation was represented by 

to meet in San Francisco, for the fifteen delegates. Many women not in 

avowed purpose of forming a perman- the delegate body attended the meet- 

ent organization. 'tigs, seemingly as much interested as 

This was effected, and is now known their husbands, in the all-important 

as The Inland Waterways Association subjects of waters, which includes flood 

of California. Mrs. E. G. Greene, the control, storage for domestic use, for 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



power and for irrigation ; also the trans- 
portation problem. 

At the first meeting of the executive 
committee, Mrs. Greene presiding, 
plans were formulated to prosecute the 
work in vigorous style. The member- 
ship is open to individuals and to or- 
ganizations. It is my hope that the 
C. F. W. C. will find it possible to be- 
come a subscribing member. 

The California Social Hygiene Soci- 
ety has asked the co-operation of the 
C. F. W. C. in their campaign of educa- 
tion on this most inclusive and import- 
ant subject. 

An admirable series of leaflets is pub- 
lished by this association, and the state 
chairmen may find them available by 
writing to 329 Phelan Building, San 
Francisco. All women who are alive 
to the saving grace of knowledge, and 
who desire to be helped to a sane, sim- 
ple and scientific statement of the facts 
that relate to the functions of the body 
and suggestions of how these may be 
presented to their own children — or 
those under their charge — will be great- 
ly interested in these publications. The 
society offers also to send speakers 
upon request. The officers' names ap- 
pear upon the printed matter, and they 
are all well-known Californians. 

The Woman's Legislative Council of 
California have sent out their constitu- 
tion and by-laws with membership 
cards to all previous participants in the 
conferences. It is to be hoped that a 
prompt response, signified by the re- 
turn of the signed membership cards, 
will show the cordial support of all of 
the organizations of women within the 
confines of the state. The membership 
is open to state and local societies. The 
object is to secure concerted action on 
legislative measures. 

At the January board meeting ten 
clubs were admitted to membership. 
This makes twenty-seven new clubs so 
far ; and a total of 369 in the state. As 
I write, another application is at hand. 

I have recently made a study of the 



year books of other state federations 
with a view of ascertaining the man- 
ner and method of districting. There is 
no uniformity, each state has been gov- 
erned by its own necessities; but of a 
total of twenty-five states, fifteen were 
districted, ten states had no district 
divisions, three states had only city 
federations, and but one state, Kansas, 
reports a county federation, beside its 
eight districts. Illinois has twenty-five 
Congressional districts. Some states 
dignify the office with the title of dis- 
trict president, most of them use the 
term vice-president, and a few district 
chairmen ; some of the year books give 
the reports of districts, while others do 
not. 

From a critical survey with a view to 
making a recommendation, I am con- 
firmed in my belief that the plan and 
the method prevailing in California is 
the most systematic and comprehens- 
ive. We give the chief district officer 
the title of president of her district, 
and vice-president of the state. Her 
executive board is a replica in detail of 
the state board, including chairmen of 
all departments. 

Working in unison, under these dis- 
trict divisions, all parts of the state 
are brought into personal relations with 
the official body of the federation, with 
its spirit, its purpose, and the fine and 
free opportunity for fellowship in ser- 
vice. 

The month of February offers two 
district conventions. The dates for the 
immediate future, as now arranged, are 
as follows : 

February 10 — Hanford. 

February 14 — Corona Club, San 
Francisco. 

February 18 — Hayward. 

February 23 — San Leandro. 

February 28 — Santa Cruz. 

March 2 — Los Angeles. 

March A — Santa Barbara. 

Cordially yours, 
MRS. JAMES W. ORR. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



11 



THE ADVANTAGES OF ECONOMIC TRAINING 



By Ednah A. Rich 

State Chairman of Home Economics 



"There is work that is work, and 
work that is play, and in one of these 
lies happiness," quotes the young wo- 
man of today who has had the joy of 
studying home economics at her club, 
in her home or at school. The same 
young woman knows that household 
occupations are a pleasure when there 
is a system, a plan and a purpose un- 
derlying the ''work that is play." She 
realizes that the study of food values 
induces an appreciation of the wisdom 
of the mothers of today, and the grand- 
mothers of fifty years, and more, ago, 
and a very wholesome respect for their 
ingenuity in overcoming the difficulties 
which beset their path to the haven 
found by the woman who has mastered 
the question of finance in the house. 

Today the profession of home-mak- 
ing demands not only careful study of 
ways and means, but the scientific ap- 
plication of the principles of right liv- 
ing and the art of the enjoyment of life 
abundantly. 

Chemistry, biology, and bacteriology 
all contribute to the unfolding of the 
rational plan of living of today, and the 
trend of a girl's education is toward the 
preparation for the responsibilities of 
her vocation — home-making. Of course 
some of the women workers of the 
world do not have the good fortune to 
have a husband to provide the home- 
setting, but the true clubwoman, 
whether the prefix to her name be 
"Miss" or "Mrs.," knows the signifi- 
cance of home economics, and its con- 
tribution to the welfare of the com- 
munity. 

National and State Federations are 
pledged to the cause of bringing in- 
terest and enlightenment to the woman 
of today, that she may share the honor 
of bringing understanding to the better 
race of people being developed. The 
economics of spending; the establish- 
ing of standards of weights and meas- 
ures ; the pure food laws, and various 
protective measures have absorbed the 



mature clubwoman's interest for so 
long that the new clubs may safely 
turn to their elder sisters for guidance. 
Philanthropv, civics, health and de- 
velopment and all sociological study de- 
mands from home economics a prac- 
tical contribution and your State Chair- 
man is trying through club activities 
to meet the obligations of the depart- 
ment. Training for efficiency is the 
most effective means of meeting the 
recognized conditions which contribute 
to the "high cost of living," and the 
"cost of high living." 

California's educational system pro- 
vides a very practical solution of some 
of the problems which will confront the 
next generation. This state is train- 
ing in its Special State Normal School 
of Manual Arts and Home Economics, 
teachers to go into the schools and 
give to the young people the ideals and 
standards of home-making. Beginning 
with the children in the grades, and 
continuing throughout the course, the 
girl of today can appreciate her moth- 
er's attitude toward the more serious 
aspect of life and early learns to co- 
operate in the home. The National 
Federation of Women's Clubs through 
its chairman, Miss Helen Louise John- 
son, an expert in her subject, is bring- 
ing within the reach of every club the 
knowledge of the value of concerted 
effort in the promotion of this phase 
of woman's work. The American 
Home Economics Association Journal, 
the United States Government Bulle- 
tins, the College of Agriculture mono- 
graphs, and the literature gradually 
coming into market on all special sub- 
jects from "house decoration," to "pa- 
per-bag cookery," all tend to increase 
interest in every-day tasks which oc- 
cupy woman's time preparing her to, 

"Waste no time in weeping 
There is work to do ; 
Higher duties waiting 
For the strong and true." 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



CUTTING OUT THE MIDDLEMAN 



The report of the Department of 
Agriculture for the year just closed is, 
as a whole favorable, despite the gen- 
eral impression to the effect that 1913 
was one of disaster to the farmer. Ten 
billion dollars' worth of products and 
half as much in cash income is the 
story as it reads in its fewest words to 
the country's six million farmers. On 
its face the record seems of itself a 
sufficient promise of lower prices to the 
consumer. It is this connection, how- 
ever, that the compilers of the report 
lay their finger on the greatest eco- 
nomic fault in the country's system of 
balancing supply and demand. 

"However desirable production may 
appear to be from the consumer's 
standpoint," reads this kernel, "it does 
not follow that such increased produc- 
tion would result in any increase in the 
cash income per farm or per capita of 
farm population, or that prices paid by* 
consumers would be any lower. Had 
the total production of 1913 equalled or 
exceeded the 1912 production, it seems 
probable that the cash income per 
farm would not have been greater and 
might mave been less than in 1912 ; but 
it is extremely doubtful if the cost to 
the consumer would have been any less, 
because retail prices are promptly 
raised on a prospect of under-produc- 
tion but are very slow to decline if 
there is over-production. 

"The high prices paid by consumers, 
ranging from five to nearly five hun- 
dred per cent in some cases more than 
the farmer receives, indicate that there 
is plenty of room for lowering the cost 
of farm products to consumers and at 
the same time largely increasing the 
cash income per farm without increas- 
ing farm production. 

"This condition is undoubtedly a 
marketing condition which will have 
to be adjusted by better organizations 
of farmers and improved methods of 
marketing." 

Passing over the question of whether 
this rather naive suggestion is not hint- 



ing at a combination in restraint of 
trade and consequently, amenable to 
the provisions of the Sherman act, t^je 
point promptly raises itself: Who gets 
the money? Farm products sold in 
bulk pass through at least two hands 
and usually three before reaching the 
consumer. At each transfer a handling 
cost is encountered which increases 
directly as the extent to which the con- 
signment is subdivided. If there is 
railway transportation to be added the 
number of handlers may be considered 
to be four instead of three. It is not 
unheard of for the handling item alone 
to add from fifty to seventy-five per 
cent to the cost of bulky produce. This 
is by virtue of its too-frequent change 
of hands — its obvious solution is a re- 
duction in the number of fingers in the 
pie. Again, there is no fixed rule for 
the figuring of profits to each handler; 
it is ten per cent for one article and a 
hundred in another, not to mention the 
frequent instances in which an absence 
of produce exchanges and systematiza- 
tion makes it possible for one jobber to 
grossly over-charge the retailer and 
through him the consumer. Federal 
legislation enforced through the me- 
dium of the interstate commerce com- 
mission has done something to modify 
this evil in the gross, as well as to lay 
a restraining hand on long-haul charges 
for transportation, yet in individual 
communities it flourishes untouched by 
needed state enactments. 

To the roll-top desk theorist the 
answer seems absurdly simple. Let us 
decrease the number of handlers of 
these products and thereby cut out 
from the progressive chain one or two 
or three profits as well as that many 
additions to handling cost. Let the 
producer deal directly with the con- 
sumer and thej' will divide between 
themselves the profits heretofore scat- 
tered in half a dozen gaping pockets all 
along the line. So has run the ancient 
shibboleth from the days of Joseph of 
Egypt to the days of Joseph Leiter of 
Chicago. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



The most recent and most familiar 
experiment along this line has been the 
establishment in a number of cities of 
free curb markets. Here, under muni- 
cipal auspices and control, farmers are 
invited to bring and sell their produce 
directly to the housewives who desire 
to buy. Taking it by and large the 
curb markets have been remarkably 
successful within a necessarily some- 
what limited scope. Yet, to the end of 
exact justice to all sides of the question, 
it is due to say that in more than one 
instance the disgusted remark of one 
civic economist has been justified. 
"Some women," he said, "would rather 
pay double the price and have it handed 
in at their kitchen doors than to walk 
across the street and cut the bills in 
two. Some farmers — and they are not 
a few — would rather sell their truck by 
the wagon-load to a jobber at half the 
retail price than spend a day selling 
piece-meal. Do people really want to 
cut their cost of living, anyway?" 
'Which is scarcely fair, except in so far 
as the problematical extent to which 
one buyer or seller is able to influence 
others by his bad example. 

On the subject of curb markets it 
seems worth while to mention the ex- 
ample set by children of the Los An- 
geles schools who are now selling the 
produce of their school gardens at 
these public institutions and devoting 
the proceeds to the purchase of flags, 
patriotic pictures and playground ap- 
paratus. This has been made neces- 
sary by reason of the extremely limited 
funds at the disposal of the Board of 
Education and is not an inconsiderable 
item of relief to them. 

The other side of the middleman 
story was voiced at the annual meeting 
of the Southern California Retail Gro- 
cers' Association, held in Los Angeles 
in January. By them unwise purchas- 
ing is blamed for a large share of the 
lamented cost of living. 

"One of the causes is the credit sys- 
tem." said Secretary N. P. Olsen. "If 
grocers could s:et cash for all thev sell 



they would be able to charge less. 
Someone, of course, has to pay the bills 
of those who fail to meet their obliga- 
tions. 

"The grocers do not like to sell on 
credit. They extend the courtesy to 
please their customers. There are 
about twelve hundred retail grocers in 
Los Angeles and the business carried 
on their books aggregates thousands 
of dollars. 

"Again, home products can obviously 
be sold at lower prices than the same 
article made elsewhere and shipped 
here. The high cost of living would 
be further decreased if buyers would 
ask for home products instead of so 
frequently insisting on goods made out 
of town." 

The retail grocers are exemplifying 
their undoubtedly partly-justified point 
of view with a pure food and industrial 
exposition in the old postoffice building 
at Seventh and Grand, Los Angeles. 
This is to last two weeks from Febru- 
ary 9. 

From Calgary. Alberta, Can., comes 
news of an organized campaign of 
women against the high prices of food- 
stuffs and the methods which they em- 
ploy, though savoring somewhat of 
borrowing from Peter to pay Paul, are 
at least worthy of consideration. They 
began by the creation of public opinion 
against the license tax imposed by the 
city upon hucksters, butchers, grocers 
and vegetable dealers and succeeded in 
securing a reduction to the uniform 
rate of $1 a year. Then, by a process 
of insistent urging, they got the pro- 
ducers and consumers together in joint 
session and organized a new system of 
direct marketing, the cost of which is 
divided equally between the benefici- 
aries instead of being laid upon the 
city. Visitors from Canada declare 
that a general reduction of prices of 
about one-fourth has followed. In the 
case of meats it has been even greater. 
In this connection it may be mentioned 
that the women of Calgary possess the 
franchise and exercise it with enthusi- 
asm and discrimination. 



14 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



SOME REMEDIES FOR THE PROBLEM 

By Mrs. C. C. Adams 

Chairman Home Economics, Lss Angeles District 



The "High Cost of Living" has 
probably come to stay, at least for a 
time, and as it has been built up largely 
by increased wages, shorter hours, 
more comforts for the working man, 
better prices for the farmer, and many 
other legitimate causes, we will adjust 
ourselves to it, accepting it as one of 
the penalties of increased growth and 
longer "want" columns. 

The real bugaboo is not the "High 
Cost of Living," but the "Cost of High- 
Living." Can we get a mental view of 
this monster? It stands on a ground- 
work of false training for our real busi- 
ness in life, and stalks about among all 
classes of women on two legs; one a 
lack of knowledge and the other care- 
lessness or inexcusable selfishness. For 
these two wobbly legs we pay the tre- 
mendous price of broken homes, and 
certainly they lead by a beaten path to 
the divorce court. The most frequent 
cause of indigestion is haphazard living 
and unfriendly food combinations. For 
this we pay the doctor or the greater 
penalty of inefficiency and incapacity. 
, Having seen at close range the thing 
which is destroying peace, causing di- 
vorces and delaying marriage among 
the thoughtful, how can we overcome 
it? 

There is only one effectual way. All 
womanly women, whether they feel 
that they are to blame for conditions 
or not, must join hands, walk fearlessly 
up to this ugly spectre and knock it 
down. How? By throwing out from 
under it the legs of lack of knowledge 
and carelessness. I have spoken of this 
chimera as "it." I might say "her" and 
be grammatically correct, but would 
it be quite fair. Men have brought 
much sorrow into the world, but wo- 
men have borne them and have always 
had the great privilege of starting them 
safely by wise physical means before 
the world at large got them, and men 
have without a question given their 



lives into our keeping. So just here 
between the pages of the Clubwoman 
may we not confess that women are 
entirely responsible for this particular 
evil. There is no remedy except the 
reconstruction of ideals regarding the 
home, a better preparation for our won- 
derful opportunities as mothers of the 
race. Back to the Soil! is the Govern- 
ment's new call. Back to the Home ! 
should be the vigorous cry issued not 
to a few so-called "homey" women, but 
heard and heeded by everyone worthy 
the name. Not by giving up dearly 
bought freedom from intolerable in- 
equality, not to become "perfect house- 
keepers," not the patient (or other- 
wise) victim of a family's selfish 
thoughtlessness, too weary to learn 
that self-sacrifice is rarely necessary. 
Back to the home spirit, whether it be 
sheltered in the tent, palace or apart- 
ment. Home to remain, leaving the 
world's work awhile until by careful 
study of universal problems, indi- 
vidualized, we become the trained en- 
gineer of our own engine, and of those 
dependent upon us for a safe life jour- 
ney. In this interesting study help is 
everywhere cheap and abundant, yet 
only applied effort and a large share of 
that rare sense we call "common," will 
accomplish the result. 

In combining food materials, no mat- 
ter what their original price may be 
so that with the minimum amount of 
energy, time or money, we can receive 
their maximum amount of value, we 
have reduced their cost to an intelligent 
basis. In full weight and measure we 
have saved the difference between 
profit and loss. In refusing to pay the 
unreasonable price for package goods, 
we could save from 10 to 50 per cent. 

With a head of applied knowledge, 
we can if we wish, turn a happy face 
to the world's activities, and no man 
living will regret that he was born of 
woman. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



15 



THE GOVERNMENT AND THE COST OF LIVING 



Not the least of the considerations 
which made Woodrow Wilson Presi- 
dent of the United States was his 
pledge to effect legislation which he, as 
an authority on economics, believed 
would produce marked and visible di- 
minution in the weekly grocery and 
household bills of John Smith and John 
Robinson, plain folks. If it is to<p early 
to look to him for the fulfillment of 
those desirable results it is not too 
early to inquire into the outlook. 

In all fairness it must be remembered 
that conditions have been highly un- 
favorable for an unprejudiced test. The 
mere fact that the test was to be made 
caused money to tighten spasmodically 
everywhere. While it is unquestion- 
ably only a temporary condition, it is 
a fact that prices are higher than they 
would have been if no effort had been 
made by Federal legislation to lower 
them. 

Wilson's critics have made much of 
the apparent failure to reduce the cost 
of every-day necessities of the Under- 
wood tariff. As a matter of fact few 
persons who have made a careful study 
of that involved subject believed that 
it would have any such immediate ef- 
fect. Sugar has dropped notably, wool- 
en goods in the rough are slightly 
cheaper to the consumer and that is 
about as far as it has gone. The effect 
of the liberal shipping of Australian 
meat to this coast has been more than 
offset by the collapse of the cattle in- 
dustry in northern Mexico, due to the 
ravages of war. The best opinion 
available on the subject is to the effect 
that the tariff will lower prices by its 
indirect and necessarily gradual recast- 
ing of great industries in general, 
through the establishment of a new 
standard of values, necessarily smaller 
all along the line. That this re-adjust- 
ment will be accompanied by wage- 
reduction is possible and even prob- 
able. 

Passing over the temporary strin- 
gency of the money market as a partial 
result of the timidity engendered by the 



Glass-Owen currency act, that piece of 
Democratic legislation may be expect- 
ed to produce some real results, sens- 
ible by the people at large. An elastic 
currency, made elastic by large and 
permanent Federal reserves in all parts 
of the country and the rendering elig- 
ible as collateral for loans of commer- 
cial paper, means lower rates of interest 
and a general extension of credit. 
Money movements ordinarily take 
place in advance of anticipated condi- 
tions, for which reason it is not surpris- 
ing to note that the larger Chicago 
banks have cut their six per cent call 
loans to five and a half, with eastern 
competitors making occasional loans of 
considerable size as low as four and a 
half. This easement of the financial 
situation was instantly reflected abroad 
and the Bank of England has cut its 
minimum rate of discount to four per 
cent, with prospects of still further re- 
duction. The German Reichstag Bank 
followed with a half-per cent cut, and 
practically all the larger European in- 
stitutions did the same. At the same 
time the bond market has improved to 
a point where a $51,000,000 issue at 
four and a half per cent by the state of 
New York was over-subscribed by 
$10,000,000 in two hours. 

The President's message to Con- 
gress, though properly described as 
primarily an anti-trust document, is in 
line with a general administrative pol- 
icy promulgated as for the benefit of 
the people and their pocketbooks. Not- 
able recommendations in which this 
connection is direct and obvious are 
those providing for the creation of a 
commission to act as a clearing house 
for public and capital, so as to do jus- 
tice to both sides, monetary redress 
for persons injured by combinations in 
restraint of trade — this is a direct blow 
at high prices — and co-operation be- 
tween the government and those who 
seek its aid in the regulation of mon- 
opolies on the necessities of life. 

The message has been followed im- 
mediately by the publication of the 



16 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



contents of four measures drafted un- 
der Wilson's direction and having for 
their purpose the making of his recom- 
mendations at once effective. These 
are proposed laws prohibiting commun- 
ity or interlocking directorates among 
corporations, an enlargement of the 
Sherman act to include semi-monopo- 
lies which have hitherto been able to 
dodge its provisions, a trade-relations 
measure aimed at price discriminations, 
discounts, rebates and territorial re- 
strictions, and government regulation 
of railroad securities. 

A contribution of considerable im- 
portance to the collection of Federal 
war-maps against the high cost of liv- 
ing are the recommendations contained 
in the first annual report of Secretary 
Houston, of the Department of Agri- 
culture — the department more vitally 
interested in the subject than any other. 

Of great interest to club women, in 
connection with the department of 
country life, is the secretary's canvass 
of the country seeking the opinions of 
farmers' wives. To gain information to 
enable the department better to serve 
rural women those of 55,000 selected 
farms, representing every county in the 
country, have been addressed in let- 
ters of inquiry. It is proposed to fol- 
low this with a requisition upon Con- 
gress for means to prosecute a general 
investigation of rural life. 

The answers so far received to Secre- 
tary Houston's letters indicate that the 
women of the country at large would 
be glad of Federal aid in all phases of 
home management, particularly as to 
ways of securing running water, labor- 
saving arrangements and better sani- 
tary conditions. The overwork of 
women and children and the difficulty 
of securing domestic help are men- 
tioned by a number of writers. 

Good roads, rather than rural credits, 
the secretary believes, will be of chief 
benefit to the farmer. He is of the 
opinion that improper marketing is at 
the bottom of high prices- — the im- 
proper marketing being in a great num- 



ber of cases directly traceable to the 
uncertain condition of country high- 
ways. He recommends that the gov- 
ernment shall help in the matter, co- 
operating with the states as the lowest 
units through a Federal highway com- 
missioner. His plan provides for main- 
tenance as well as construction, asks 
that preference be given to roads used 
by marketers and would apportion 
money appropriated for the purpose on 
the basis of such factors as total popu- 
lation, farm population, area, taxable 
valuation and mileage. 

In the way of financial aid to the 
farmer, the report says that there ap- 
pears to be no immediate need for ex- 
traordinary legislation looking toward 
the extension of a credit system more 
advantageous to farmers than to others. 
It intimates, however, that at present 
the farmer is not able to secure money 
on the same collateral at as low a rate 
as do other members of society and 
suggests that steps be taken to place 
him on an equal footing. 

Plans for redistricting the country 
for the enforcement of the pure fooa 
law are announced, as is also the inten- 
tion of the department to amend the 
law to improve the food supply, pro- 
tect the public health and promote uni- 
formity in food legislation. Inciden- 
tally, the free distribution of seeds by 
Congressmen is designated as a time- 
worn practice that should be discon- 
tinued in favor of scientific and con- 
structive work by the department in 
that direction. 

A full recognition of the difficulties 
in the way are contained in the words: 
"Even though the problem of how the 
farmer can best sell his produce and 
can improve the conditions under 
which he can secure the necessary capi- 
tal were solved, there would still re- 
main vital things to be accomplished 
before rural life can be made fully ef- 
ficient, profitable, healthful, pleasurable 
and attractive, and before a larger dis- 
position to remain on the farm de- 
velops." 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



17 



CALL FOR NORTHERN DISTRICT CONVENTION 

By Mrs. A. F. Jones, President 

The twelfth annual convention of 
the Northern District will be held in 
Woodland, March 31, April 1st and 2nd 
inclusive. There will be a joint coun- 
cil of presidents and delegates Tuesday 
morning, March 31st, promptly at 10 
o'clock, for the discussion of the fol- 
lowing interesting topics : 

(1) Are our present district boun- 
daries satisfactory? 

(2) Value of Reciprocity Days, 
President Days and County Federa- 
tion Conventions. 

(3) How is a club benefited by 
sending representatives to District, 
State and General Federation Conven- 
tions? 

(4) Why every club woman should 
interest herself, and assist if possible, 
in the work of preparation for the Pan- 
ama-Pacific International Exposition. 

Other topics will be presented if 
time permits. 

The convention will -be called to or- 
der promptly at 1 :45 Tuesday after- 
noon. State officers and speakers of 
note will address the meetings on the 
topics of the day. Each district chair- 
man will add something of value to the 
program Speakers will be limited as 
to time, as there are many subjects to 
be covered. 

The Credential Committee will be 
in session at 8:30 Tuesday morning. 

All resolutions must be presented 
through the resolution committee — 
Mrs. A. M. Seymour, 1605 H St., Sac- 
ramento. 

The hostess clubs, together with the 
Board of Trade, the City Trustees and 
the Chamber of Commerce, are giving 
their best thought and effort towards 
our entertainment, and are planning 
many new and entertaining features. 

Tuesday evening- will be devoted to a 
reception and musicale in honor of 
state officers and delegates. All day 
sessions are open to the public. 

Each club shall be entitled to repre- 
sentation by its president or her ap- 
pointee, and one delegate or her alter- 




MRS. A. F. JONES 
President Northern District 

nate. Clubs having a membership of 
fifty or more shall be entitled to one 
additional delegate for every fifty mem- 
bers or fraction thereof (exceeding one- 
half). 

Credential cards must be presented 
in person to the Credentials Commit- 
tee on Tuesday morning. 

No delegate shall represent more 
than one club. 

Voting by proxy shall not be per- 
mitted. 

The secretary of each club shall send 
the names of the delegates and their 
alternates to the Corresponding Secre- 
tary, Mrs. R. G. Stapleton, 903 Bird 
Street, Oroville, Cal. 

The annual dues of five cents per 
capita must be paid by all federated 
clubs before the opening of the con- 

(Continued on Page 32) 



18 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



THE LITERATURE OF THE BIBLE 

By Mrs. George F. Reinhardt 

State Chairman of Literature 



One may study the Bible for a vari- 
ety of reasons — from religious motives, 
for reasons of history or sociology, or 
because the English Bible is "the great- 
est prose work in any language." 
Without doubt the Bible has had the 
widest and profoundest influence of 
all books. Translated into e^ery ton- 
gue, studied from every viewpoint, it 
has inspired the noblest art, literature, 
and music that the western world has 
produced. 

Yet the Bible suffers perpetually 
from piece-meal reading, and until the 
average student recognizes this, he will 
never know a tithe of its greatness. 
When he begins to read according to 
logical divisions, complete books in- 
stead of isolated verses, he will begin 
to appreciate the beauty of form in 
Biblical literature, and the variety of 
its content, "legend and annal, war 
song and psalm, State-roll and biogra- 
phy, the mighty voices of prophets, 
the parables of Evangelists, stories of 
mission journeys, of perils by the sea 
and among the heathen, philosophic 
arguments, and apocalyptic visions." 

From the familiar words of the Au- 
thorized or King James version one 
must turn to the Revised Version, if he 
would have the original continuous 
narratives, the original distinction be- 
tween prose and poetry, and the most 
scholarly rendering of difficult and dis- 
puted texts. The best book for this 
purpose is, 

1. The Modern Readers Bible— R. 
G. Moulton, pub. by Macmillan, 1912 

The best text-book to use as a guide 
is, 

2. The Bible as Literature — Moul- 
ton, Peters, Bruce, etc., pub. by T. Y. 
Crowell, 1896. 

A study club would do well to make 
this text book the basis of a year's 
work, studying it chapter by chapter, 



and doing the Biblical reading upon 
which each chapter is based in the Re- 
vised Version, comparing from time to 
time with the older version. The au- 
thors are each specialists in their own 
particular field. For a club which has 
frequent meetings each chapter might 
be used as the point of departure for 
detailed study occupying weeks or 
months on such limited subjects as 
The Drama of Job, The Lyrical Poe- 
try of the Psalms, The Love Song of 
the Bible, or The Influence of the Bible 
on English Writers. 

The following list of reference books 
should be in the town library: 

3. Dictionary of the Bible, 5 vols., 
pub. by Scribners, 1905. 

4. Dictionary of the Gospel, 2 vols., 
pub. by Scribners, 1906. 

5. Introduction to the Literature of 
the Old Testament — S. R. Driver, pub. 
by Scribners, 1906. 

6. Introduction to the Literature of 
the New Testament — James Moffatt, 
pub. by Scribners, 1911. 

7. New Appreciation of the Bible — 
W. C. Selleck, University of Chicago, 
1907. 

8. Sociological Study of the Bible — 
Louis Walls, University of Chicago, 
1913. 

9. Book of Books — Lonsdale Ragg, 
D.D. pub. by Edward Arnold, 1910. 

10. The Psalms — A. F. Kirkpatrick, 
Cambridge, 1910. 

11. The Song of Songs — Earnest 
Renan, (trans, by William M. Thom- 
son), London, 1895. 

12. History of the English Bible — ■ 
John Brown, Cambridge, 1911. 

For any study club or literature sec- 
tion, no more profitable or delightful 
program could be arranged than one 
based on the inspiring and ennobling 
subject of Biblical literature. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



19 



General Federation 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President — Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker, 2606 Whitis avenue, Austin, Texas. 

First Vice-President — Mrs. L. L. Blankenburg, 214 West Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Second Vice-President — Mrs. Samuel B. Sneath, 211 Monroe street, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Harry L. Keef e, Walthill, Nebraska. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Eugene Reilley, 508 Park avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Treasurer — Mrs. John Threadgill, 922 North Robinson street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Auditor — Mrs. C. H. McMahon, 32 Caithness Apartments, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Directors — Mrs. William E. Andrews, 1225 Fairmont street, N. W., Washington, D. C; Mrs. 
A. L. Christie, 219 South Washington street, Butte, Montana; Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, 
Irvington, Indianapolis, Indiana; Mrs. Francis D. Everett, Highland Park, Hlinois; Mrs. 
William P. Harper, 651 Kinnear place, Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Creighton Mathewes. 315 
Bermuda street, New Orleans, Louisiana; Mrs. Frank White, Valley City, North Dakota; 
Mrs. William B. Williams, Lapeer, Michigan. 

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS 

Art — Mrs. Melville F. Johnston, 103 North Tenth street, Richmond, Ind. 

Civics — Miss Zona Gale, Portage, la. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, The Gladstone, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conservation — Mrs. Emmons Crocker, 48 Mechanic street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Education — Mrs. O. Shepard Barnum, 312 South Fifth street, Alhambra, Cal. 

Household Economics — Miss Helen Louise Johnson, 234 Paddock street, Watertown, N. Y. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. A. E. Chantler, Tacoma Daily News, Tacoma, Wash. 

Legislation — Mrs. Horace T. Towner, Corning, la. 

Literature — Mrs. Fiances Squire Potter, 4581 Oakenwald avenue, Kenwood, Chicago, HI. 

Music — Mrs. Lawrence Maxwell, Edgecliffe Road, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O. 

Public Health — Mrs. S. S. Crockett, 710 Belmont avenue, Nashville, Tenn. 

Press Committee — Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, Chairman, Indianapolis, Ind.. 



BIENNIAL NOTES 



Following is an outline of the pro- 
gram of the Biennial Convention, G. F. 
W. C, to be held in Chicago, June 9-16. 

Symphony concert, opening evening 
(Tuesday). 

Wednesday evening, President's 
Council. 

Conferences in the afternoon and 
every afternoon to follow. All confer- 
ences to begin at the same hour, so 
the delegates will have to choose which 
to attend. 

Thursday — entire day given to re- 
ports. 

Friday — Education, with Ella Flagg 
Young as the principal speaker. 

Civil service. 

Legislation. 

Friday evening, address by Jane 
Addams ; Miss Harriet Boswell on Pol- 
itical Science. 

Saturday — Art, Literature, Music ; 
address by Frances Squire Potter. 

Sunday afternoon, second concert, 
to be followed by memorial services for 
Mrs. Decker. 



Monday— Report of nominating 
committee. 

Home Economics. 

Public Health. 

Monday evening, State Presidents' 
evening. 

Tuesday, Election of Officers. 

Industrial and Social conditions. 

Civics. 

Conservation. 

Wednesday — Announcement of elec- 
tion, resolutions, etc. 

Wednesday evening, President's eve- 
ning. 

The Auditorium Theatre, seating 
four thousand, has been selected for 
the general meetings, while the second 
floor of the Auditorium Hotel (all in 
the same building) will be used for the 
Credentials Committee, the local Bur- 
eau of Information, Ticket and Trans- 
portation Committee, the Advisory 
Biennial Committee, and the State Fed- 
eration Advisory Committee. There 
will also be rest rooms in the Auditor- 
ium. Beside this various halls are be- 



20 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



ing secured for other than the general 
meetings — such as the conference of 
the departments, the state meetings 
and committee meetings. 

The conservation department, of 
which Mrs. Emmons Crocker, of Fitch- 
burg, Mass., is chairman, promises an 
address by Gifford Pinchot. In the af- 
ternoon there will be a conference led 
by Mrs. Crocker and she has invited 
each state president to speak for two 
minutes upon some special point of 
conservation work or upon the needs 
of her state along that line. The sub- 
ject of civil service reform will be 
handled by Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, of 
Philadelphia, who is national chairman 
of that department and who will con- 
duct the afternoon conference, which 
will have as its general topic, "How 
best to increase the interest in efficient 
local government." Several members 
of the General Federation Civil Service 
Reform Department will speak briefly 
to this subject and the discussion will 
be general. The Music Department, of 
which Mrs. Maxwell of Ohio is chair- 
man, will have in charge the music to 



be rendered in connection with the 
memorial services to Mrs. Sarah Piatt 
Decker. On President's Night the dif- 
ferent state presidents are asked to 
speak on their state's greatest need. 

There will be but seven actual work- 
ing days of the convention, leaving op- 
portunity for the sociological pilgrim- 
age planned by the Excursions Com- 
mittee and directed by one of the prom- 
inent social settlement workers of Chi- 
cago. This will be of interest and 
worth to every club woman who has 
made a study of any of the questions 
which are dealt with in the social cen- 
ter work. 

Rates at the Hotel La Salle, where 
the California delegation will be 
housed, are quoted in a letter to Mrs. 
George W. McCoy as from two to 
eight dollars per day for one person 
and three to eight dollars per day for 
rooms to be occupied by two persons 
each. It is probable that one entire 
floor of the hotel will be set aside for 
the use of the Californians, this based 
upon an estimated delegation of one 
hundred. 



NEW FEDERATED CLUBS 



The following clubs have been ad- 
mitted to the California Federation of 
Women's Clubs since the publication 
of the last list: 

Woman's Club of Camino, Camino, 
(30 members) ; President Mrs. Mary 
Potter Dart, Camino. 

Woman's Civic Improvement Club, 
Marysville, (65 members) ; President 
Mrs. J. E. Ebert, Marysville. 

Panathenea Club, Fort Bragg. (18 
members) ; President Mrs. Sam Shaf- 
sky. Fort Bragg. 

Woman's Improvement Club of Wil- 
litts, (30 members) ; President Mrs. 
Sarah E. Livermore, 73 Oak St., Wil- 
litts. 

The Book Club, Hollister, (16 mem- 
bers) ; President Mrs. Kate Cochran, 
Hollister. 

Athena Club, San Anselmo, (10 



members) ; President Mrs. C. S. Ly- 
monds, San Anselmo. 

Business Woman's Club, Santa Bar- 
bara, (40 members) ; President Ida L. 
Blaine, 228 Anacapa St., Santa Bar- 
bara. 

The Music Study Club, Alhambra, 
(13 members) ; President Octavia Hud- 
son, 212 So. Hidalgo Ave., Alhambra. 

Pico Heights Book Club, Los An- 
eeles, (15 members) ; President Mrs. 
Margaret A. Sharpe, 1540 Berendo St., 
Los Angeles. 

Glenavon Friendly Club, Riverside, 
(18 members) ; President Mrs. E. Hall, 
R. F. D. No. 1, West Riverside. 

University Heights Mothers Club, 
San Diego (25 members) ; President 
Mrs. Alfred S. Anderson, 3706 Kansas 
St., San Diego. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



PARLIAMENTARY USAGE 

By Mrs. Annie Little Barry, 

State Chairman of Parliamentary Practice 



Questions 

How are resolutions adopted? 

Someone moves to adopt; this may 
be done by the chairman of the Reso- 
lution Committee, if a number of reso- 
lutions are reported. Very often a 
motion is introduced in the form of a 
resolution, which should be in writing. 
The form is : "I move the adoption of 
this resolution," (reads resolution). 
Remarks, amendments and other modi- 
fications are in order. A resolution 
may be referred to a committee; this 
motion has high rank and is often made 
as a wise way of disposing of a resolu- 
tion that may cause unprofitable de- 
bate, or take more careful consideration 
than is possible to give it at a meeting 
where it has been proposed. 

A resolution to be in force must be 
adopted. 

In case a committee fails to report 
on a resolution, it is, to use a familiar 
term, "killed in committee." Any mem- 
ber interested in it may call for the 
report. But if no time, is stated, reso- 
lutions are often never heard of after 
they go to committee. 

May minutes be amended after they 
have been accepted? 

Yes ; by motion. 

What vote does it take to susoend 
the rules? 

A two-thirds vote ; constitutions and 
by-laws may not be suspended. 

Please give form of committee re- 
port. 

Your committee to which was re- 
ferred (give subject matter) desires to 

submit the following report 

Respectfully submitted, 
Signed by committee, or majority. 

Should a president sign the min- 
utes? 

Yes. the president and recording sec- 
retary. 

May a chairman refuse to put a mo- 
tion? 

She mav, but unless the motion is 



out of order or she can give some good 
reason why the motion should not be 
put, she has no right to do so. A presi- 
dent should never refuse to put a mo- 
tion simply because she is not in sym- 
pathy with the object of the motion. 

When a motion to adjourn is before 
the house, may any other motion be 
made? 

Yes, to fix the time of adjournment. 



THE LORENZA CLUB, 1814 



The Lorenza Club was organized in 
the year 1814 as a Literary Society. 
The ladies brought their fancy work 
and the program was, as a rule, one 
number of music indifferently rendered 
and one paper laboriously written. 
After a time this grew monotonous. 
One day a woman who was looked 
upon with awe made a suggestion 
"that this society consult with the town 
trustees in regard to having a park." 
This suggestion was talked over, it was 
talked up and talked down, discussed 
with their husbands, and after six, 
months the president was requested to 
ask her husband to inquire of the trus- 
tees if there could not toe a park. This 
was in 1885. 

In the Year 1914 

The president of the Lorenza Club : 
Is there any new business? 

Mrs. O'Callagan : Madam President. 

President: Mrs. O'Callagan. 

Mrs. O'Callagan : I move that a 
committee of five be appointed to con- 
sult with the town trustees in regard 
to the purchase of the Naylor tract, to 
be improved for a park. 

Mrs. Soberansas : Madam President, 
I second the motion. 

President states motion ; much dis- 
cussion follows ; motion carries. 

President: How shall this commit- 
tee be obtained? 

Mrs. Grav: Madam President. I 



Your Mirror will tell you 
more about "Style" 





in a minute- 



'THAN you could learn from rt 

whole book on the subject. 
There' s always something new to be learned 
about "Style" and there's just one really satis- 
factory way of acquiring this knowledge — visit 
1 ' The Style Shop ' ' , try on some of the new 
gowns, and — 

Let the Mirror tell you! 



Hke JlepTfork 




You may change at will 

your entire appearance through 
your choice of really smart apparel 

It's all a matter of "Style" 

A ND never was there wider latitude for 
•^ the exercise af charming individuality 
than at the present time among our myriads 
of exclusive and artististic creations, from 
the trim little gown for morning shopping 
to the extremely elaborate evening costume. 

High Class Suits 

From $14.75 up 

Dresses and Gowns 

From $12.50 up 

Daintiest Blouses 

From $2.50 up 

Artistic Millinery 

At tempting reductions 

Gloves and Veils 

Latest styles and shades 
"The Style Shop" 





THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



move that the president appoint the 
committee. 

Mrs. Shell: I second the motion 
Motion carries. 

President names committee, and in- 
structs the chairman to report at next 
meeting. Time consumed forty-five 
minutes. 

In the Year 2000 

President : Is there any new busi- 
ness? 

Mrs. Churchill : Madam President. 
President: Mrs. Churchill. 



Mrs. Churchill : I move that a letter 
of appreciation be sent the City Coun- 
cil for the supervision they have given 
our twenty-five beautiful parks, and 
that the Park Commissioners be com- 
mended for their excellent taste in the 
improvements they have made, and 
their economical management of these 
parks. 

Miss Blake: I second the motion. 

President states motion. Motion 
carried. 

President instructs corresponding 
secretary to write the letter. 



DISTRICT NEWS 



LOS ANGELES 
Mrs. O. C. Vogel, Press Chairman. 

The Los Angeles District Board 
meeting at the Angelus Hotel on Jan- 
uary 27th was a large and enthusiastic 
one, Mrs. W. C. Mushet, president of 
the board presided, and Mrs. L. B. 
Hogue, of Ventura, the treasurer, was 
also present. 

The Mother's Pension Bill was dis- 
cussed at length, and Airs. Cable, chair- 
man of Legislation, explained many 
points in regard to same that had not 
been correctly understood. She also 
urged that the women of the board 
give their support to the measure. 

Mrs. J. B. Nichols, chairman of the 
new Peace Committee, had a most 
gratifying report, indicating that a con- 
siderable interest was being manifested 
in the subject. Several clubs have 
agreed to appoint Peace Committees 
next year. 

Mrs. Samuel Epler, the very efficient 
chairman of Literature, also a new de- 
partment, is another who is kept busy 
with a large correspondence with vari- 
ous clubs in the district regarding 
courses of study. Mrs. Epler is an in- 
teresting speaker and she has also been 
asked to address several clubs. 

Mrs. Christopher Gordon, chairman 
of Civics and Mrs. Harry J. Slater, 
chairman of Political Science visited 
the Pomona Ebell Club, and spoke be- 



fore the members ; and Airs. Gordon 
also addressed the Woman's Club of 
Montebello. 

The Cosmos Club is having some ex- 
cellent programs this winter, and the 
membership is steadily growing. Mrs. 
Willoughby Rodman's talk on "The 
Work of the Drama League in Amer- 
ica," was the feature of a recent pro- 
gram, and was followed by several 
readings by Miss Gertrude Workman 
of the Los Angeles Players' Club. 

On January 28th the Wednesday 
Morning Club celebrated its 16th birth- 
day by a luncheon attended by over 200 
members and friends. An immense 
birthday cake with 16 blazing caudles 
decorated the table at which was seat- 
ed Mrs. J. E. Brown, president of the 
club, and the speakers. 

The Glendale Tuesday Afternoon 
Club is planning a series of evening en- 
tertainments to raise funds for the new 
club house. 

The club women of Santa Barbara 
seem quite determined to overwhelm 
the visiting delegates to the thirteenth 
annual convention of the Los Angeles 
District when they meet there on 
March 3, 4 and 5. Elaborate plans for 
their entertainment and comfort have 
been formulated, according to Mrs. J. 
J. Abramson, chairman of the program 
committee, who has just returned from 
Santa Barbara. 



Larger Volume 

Lower Prices 

Finer Quality 

This is the Detroit Electric policy for 1914— to make more cars and, therefore, 
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cars for lower prices than have ever been asked before, to take only a small profit 
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ELECTRIC 



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California Electric Garage Company 

Largest Dealers in ELECTRIC VEHICLES EXCLUSIVELY on the Coast 

SERVICE STATIONS 
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THE CLUBWOMAN 



25 



The Hotel Potter has co-operated 
with the club women to a generous de- 
gree, placing at their disposal the ball- 
room for the convention and several 
smaller rooms for round tables and 
committee meetings. 

Mrs. Abramson's reputation in musi- 
cal circles is so well established that 
she was able to arrange an unusually 
fine musical program, aside from other 
features. 



ALAMEDA 
Mrs. L. G. Leonard, Press Chairman. 

The Supervisors of Alameda County 
have granted the request of the club 
women for seven bells to complete the 
marking of El Camino Real and it is 
expected that they will be placed be- 
fore the convention, which is to be 
held at Hayward, February 18th to 
20th. One of these bells will be lopated 
near Mission San Jose, one near Warm 
Springs, and the others will mark the 
intersection of main roads with this 
one over which the early fathers trav- 
eled in coming to Oakland. The com- 
mittee who had this work in charge 
were Mrs. Thomas Huoley of Berkeley, 
Dr. Minora Kibbe of Oakland, Mrs. A. 
N. Aitken. President of the Alta Mira 
Club. San Leandro and Mrs. W. R. 
Peters, also of San Leandro and form- 
erly District Chairman of History and 
Landmarks. 

Mrs. W. E. Colby, District President, 
was entertained on February 10th by 
Mrs. Charles Graham and the Wom- 
an's Improvement Club of Pleasanton. 
Mrs. F. F. Allen. President of the Hill 
and Valley Club of Hayward and the 
District Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. 
L. G. Leonard of Oakland were also 
guests. An invitation to the entire 
Woman's Improvement Club of Liv- 
ermore to meet with the Pleasanton 
Club had been extended and many 
availed themselves of the opportunity 
to visit a sister club and become ac- 
quainted with the District President. 

Among the good things on the Feb- 
ruary program for the Oakland Ebell 
Society is an "Interpretative Reading" 



of Maeterlinck's "Mary Magdalene" by 
Mrs. Oscar Maillard Bennett. 

The Women's Improvement Club oi 
Tracy is the latest addition to the dis- 
trict roll call. 

The chief interest at present in Ala- 
meda district is the convention. Ad- 
dresses are to be given by Prof. Kreh- 
bill of Stanford University on "Peace" ; 
Mr. George Haushalter, an eminent 
Eastern artist on "Art" ; Mrs. C. A. 
Whitney on "The Travelers' Aid": 
Mrs. Emily Hoppin, state vice presi- 
dent on "Country Life" ; Mr. Hender- 
son, on "University Extension" ; and 
Mrs. George Reinhardt on "California 
Literature." Mr. Coeurt Du Bois, chief 
forester, will lecture on "Forest Fires" 
with the air of stereopticon views. 

Beside Mrs. Reinhardt, a number of 
state chairmen will be present and talk 
on their various departments: Mrs. 
Emily Karns on Civil Service Reform ; 
Mrs. E. G. Greene, Conservation ; Mrs. 
Bradford Woodbridge, Political Sience; 
Mrs. Charles Farwell Edson, Indus- 
trial and Social Conditions ; Mrs. Cora 
Jones, Reciprocity ; Mrs. L. P. Crane, 
Health ; Miss Lillian D. Clark, Coun- 
try Life; Mrs. May L. Cheney, Edu- 
cation. A fifteen minute parliamentary 
drill will be presided over by Mrs. 
Annie Little Barry. 

In the way of entertainment, a ban- 
quet, reception and an automobile ride 
will be features. 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Mrs. Norman H. Martin, Press Chair- 
man. 

The following greeting is sent to 
the members of the San Francisco Dis- 
trict by its president, Mrs. Percy L. 
Shuman : 

"We enter the New Year with con- 
tinued activity. The president desires, 
on behalf of the district officers, to 
compliment the chairmen for their sus- 
tained interest and to express our deep 
appreciation of their past and present 
co-operation. 

"While great progress is manifest, 
the thought which is uppermost in my 



26 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



mind as a New Year's invocation to all 
clubs is : to work with unity of pur- 
pose, as that alone will bring a new 
year of perfect results." 

Mrs. Rose V. S. Berry, district chair- 
man of Art, held in December an all- 
day conference, in conjunction with 
the Alameda District Art chairman, at 
the California Club house. The con- 
ference was well attended and new 
light was thrown upon many art sub- 
jects by clever speakers in the open 
forum. This was followed by lunch- 
eon at the Hotel Stewart, introducing 
a unique feature of entertainment con- 
sisting of original verses written by 
Mrs. Berry on the backs of photo- 
graphs of celebrated paintings. These 
were presented to the guests by Mrs. 
Berry and were read by each in turn in 
response to an appropriate toast. 

Miss Partridge, the chairman of Civ- 
ics, held a conference January 31, at 
the Hotel Bristol of which good speak- 
ers and a rousing: round table discus- 
sion at luncheon supplied the features. 

In general the clubs are lending 
splendid support to all Federation sub- 
jects and Mrs. Shuman feels that the 
district is to be congratulated upon so 
much interest and good work. 



SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA FOOD- 
FRUIT AND INDUSTRIAL 
EXPOSITION 



Monday, February 9th, the big Food, 
Industrial and Home Products Exposi- 
tion which has been in course of pre- 
paration for some months opened in 
the old Post Office Building at Seventh 
and Grand Avenue, under the auspices 
of the Southern California Retail Gro- 
cers' Association, and the Manufactur- 
ers' Home League. 

The plan was originated and is di- 
rected by Mr. Anthonv A. Tremp, a 
member of the Portland Ad Club. 

Various Woman's Clubs in the city 
are taking active interest. The first 
day's attendance reached over 800Q 
Cooking lectures of every description, 
and domestic science instruction is giv- 
en in the principle exhibits. Every 
manufacturer of note in the state of 
California is represented, including a 
few national food manufacturers, such 
as Thos. J. Lipton. The exposition 
will run for two weeks. One of the 
features is the daily concerts by the 
California Ladies' Poppe Orchestra. 



Pho 



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Daily Supply 



Operated by the Dairymen of Tulare and Fresno Counties. Challenge Butter is made, 
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■The Butter that Keeps" LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Hemstitching, Pleating and Cloth-Covered Buttons 
ELITE BUTTON CO. 

604 Title Guarantee Building, S. E. Corner Fifth and Broadway 

Phone F-1255 



Demand Davis' Perfection Home- Made Loaf 

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For estimates phone "Contract Dept." 10228-Main 8080 

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Manufacturers and Contractors 

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A confection of most pleasing taste 
From the cactus of the desert waste. 

The supreme daintiness of Cactus Chocolates 
has won them the approval of the most 
discriminating persons. 
Cactus Candy differs from most confections 
in that it does not tire the taste. 

If your dealer cannot supply you 
call Homephone 20427 

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Artistic Ladies' Hairdressing, Marcel Wavers, Toupees. Wigs 
Hair Nets and Fine Perfumes 

843 S. Broadway, Majestic Theatre Bldg. Los Angeles, Cal. 



28 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETING 



ONE WOMAN'S SUCCESS 



The following members of the State 
Executive Board met at the California 
Club House, San Francisco, January 
17: Mrs. James W. Orr, presiding, 
Mmes. Hoppin, Knight, Jones, Shu- 
man, Colby, Bates, Woodbridge, Karns, 
Denniston, Edson, Reinhardt, Barry, 
Knight and Misses Bridge and Clark. 
Among the business reports of interest 
received was that of the corresponding 
secretary recording the application of 
ten new clubs for admission to the fed- 
eration. These were approved. The 
names appear elsewhere in this issue. 

The treasurer's report shows a bal- 
ance on hand, January 1, of $653.91. 

Mrs. Emily Hoppin presented a re- 
port on a meeting of the Red Light In- 
junction and Abatement Campaign 
Committee and Mrs. Orr followed it 
with a request from that body for an 
investigation of forgeries fourid on the 
referendum petition. This was referred 
to the San Francisco district. 

Mrs. Griswold, chairman of peace, 
sent a report in which was quoted a 
letter from Mrs. Anna Duryea, of the 
World's Peace Foundation, highly 
commending the work in California. A 
motion by Mrs._Hoppin was carried to 
the effect that the C. F. W. C. send a 
letter to each California senator asking 
endorsement for a bill to provide for a 
peace statue at the Atlantic entrance to 
the Panama Canal. 

Mrs. Harbaugh sent a report in 
which she urged all club women to be 
thinking over the legislation which 
they would see enacted at the next ses- 
sion of the legislature in order that 
they may be prepared to work intelli- 
gently for it. On motion by Mrs. 
Woodbridge the program of education 
of the California Social Hygiene So- 
ciety was endorsed. 

A wide variety of reports from board 
members, presented either in person or 
by letters, completed the program. 
These reports were uniformly encour- 
aging in content and told of excellent 
work being accomplished. 



Dr. Margaret E. Schallenberger, the 
new state commissioner of elementary 
schools, is of distinguished family, 
scholarly attainments, and extensive 
and successful experience in the educa- 
tional system of California. 

It is interesting to know that she 
was not a candidate for the position; 
the office sought the woman. The au- 
thorities consulted in California agreed 
in recommending Miss Schallenberger 
as the best equipped woman in the 
state for the position ; from the East 
came similar recommendations from 
Mr. Winship, Dr. E. C. Moore and 
Mrs. Ella Flagg Young. 

Dr. Schallenberger was born on the 
ranch which is still her home, three 
miles from San Jose. For some years 
she has assisted in its management; 
she has made it a financial success 
when others near by have failed. This 
item has significance in view of the fact 
that many school men — frequently city 



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Made in Los Angeles 



GREETINGS TO THE 

MILLION CLUB: 

I have used Cero — a substitute for coffee 
manufactured in Los Angeles — and find it 
refreshing, wholesome and nourishing. I am glad 
to recommend it to our members. 

MRS. JAMES WESTPHELING 

Sec'y Million Club 

Red and Yellow Package 



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One dozen Oranges or Grape Fruit by 
Prepaid Express $1.00; two dozen $1.50 
Prompt reply to all inquiries. 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

Harp Soloist of the Royal Academy 
of Music, London. 

BUrhaid Hall. Ex. 82. Rejidsnce 1 972 Ettrella 
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MILLINERY 

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LOS ANGELES. CAL, 



See 

Our 

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at 

Broadway 

Store 



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Caterers and Confectioners 



341 SOUTH SPRING 
321 SOUTH SPRUNG 



For 

Weddings 

Parties 

Receptions 

and 

Club Affairs 



551 SOUTH BROADWAY— NEAR SIXTH 



30 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



school men — have claimed that only a 
man could handle the work of this 
commissionership successfully because 
a great majority of the schools needing 
help were rural schools. 

Her education extends from that af- 
forded by an ungraded country school 
to that of the graduate department of 
Cornell University. At fourteen she en- 
tered the San Jose Normal School ; up- 
on graduation she taught in the rural 
schools and afterward in the city 
school department of San Jose. Her 
work in the training of teachers soon 
began, when she was called to the San 
Jose Normal School as critic teacher or 
supervisor of the primary department; 
five years later she was made principal 
of the training school. 

After one year, Dr. David Starr Jor- 
dan offered her a position in Stanford 
University as instructor in the Depart- 
ment of Education, giving her an op- 
portunity at the same time to pursue 
studies there leading to the degree of 



Bachelor of Arts. Here in addition to 
the work as instructor, she helped in 
organizing and conducting an experi- 
mental school in connection with the 
Department of Education. 

- From Stanford Miss Schallenberger 
went to Cornell, where, after three 
years of graduate work, principally in 
the departments of experimental psy- 
chology, histology, ethics, and philos- 
ophy, she received the degree of Doc- 
tor of Philosophy. She was elected a 
member of the honor society of Sigmi 
Chi. (She has also from Stanford 
membership in the honor society of Phi 
Beta Kappa). She was given a fellow- 
ship at Cornell, and for two summers 
was instructor in psychology in the 
summer school. At the close of the 
second year, Miss Schallenberger was 
asked to take a position as teacher in 
the San Francisco Normal School and 
remained there a year as principal of 
the Training School. 

After receiving her doctor's degree, 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



31 



she was offered the position of princi- 
pal of the training school of the San 
Jose Normal — the oldest normal school 
in the State. For ten years she has 
held this position. There are many 
hundreds of teachers throughout the 
State who were trained under her su- 
pervision and await with confidence her 
success in the important work of com- 
missioner of elementary schools — the 
first state educational office in Califor- 
nia to be held by a woman. The wo- 
men teachers generally are interested 
and enthusiastic — and they comprise 
about six-sevenths of the teaching: force 
of California. 

During the last ten years Dr. Schall- 
enberger has worked extensively in 
teachers' institutes and summer 
schools, in trstee's meetings and moth- 
ers clubs. She has taught in the sum- 
mer schools held in connection with 
the normal schools of San Diego and 



San Jose, and with the University o» 
California. She has written upon edu- 
cational subjects and made addresses 
at state and national conventions, both 
in California and in the East. When 
the National Education Association 
met last in California, the president, 
Mrs. Ella Flagg Youner. selected Dr. 
Schallenberger to represent the school 
women of the Coast in a prominent 
place on the general program. She has 
long been a member of the National 
Council of Education, active and hon- 
orary. 

The salary of $4,000 is probably the 
largest as yet commanded in this state 
by a woman in the teaching profession. 
As a matter of fact, however, it was 
the last thing that Dr. Schallenberger 
considered or even knew in connection 
with the new work. Her obvious and 
convincing interest, is in the education- 
al opportunity afforded. 



COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

KAHN-BECK 



BUNGALOW WALL PAPER 

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Its the EXCELLENCE of the DAINTIES 
served combined with refined surroundings 
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PEOPLE. 

And CANDIES "the taste you never forgot" 



32 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



CALL FOR THE NORTHERN DIS- 
TRICT CONVENTION, 
C. F. W. C. 

(Continued from Page 17) 
vention. Clubs failing to pay dues 
will not have representation, and their 
delegates will not be seated in con- 
vention. 

A local board of management, com- 
posed of Mrs. J. T. Royals, Mrs. H. D. 
Lawhead, Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Mrs. H. 
E. Coil and Mrs. M. W. Ward, are 
making arrangements for the comfort 
of officers, delegates and visiting club 
women. Officers and delegates will be 
entertained at Woodland homes. Vis- 
iting club women will be given special 
rates at hotels, and a room will be re- 
served for them upon application. In 
order to secure rooms, officers, dele- 
gates and visiting club women should 
notify Miss Jennie Dick, Woodland, at 
least a week before the convention, if 
possible. 

Special rates of transportation over 
the Southern Pacific and Northern 
Electric are being arranged for Qn the 
certificate plan. Be sure to obtain cer- 
tificate when purchasing ticket. 



IN OUR SISTER STATE 

At the annual convention of the Ari- 
zona Federation of Women's _ Clubs, 
held at Nogales, January 20-23, the 
following officers were elected for the 
ensuing year: 

President, Mrs. Henry D. Ross, 
Phoenix ; first vice-president, Mrs. H. 



M. Claggett, Nogales; second vice- 
president, Mrs. Albert Robinson, Tuc- 
son ; recording secretary, Mrs. Ed- 
ward Flannigan, Bisbee; corresponding 
secretary, Miss Lucy Ellis, Phoenix; 
treasurer, Mrs. Pearson, Glendale; aud- 
itor, Mrs. Calisher, Douglas; State sec- 
retary for the General Federation of 
Woman's Clubs, Dr. Agnes McKee 
Wallace, Ft. Grant. 

Next year's convention will be at 
Phoenix. 



THE SINCEREST FLATTERY 

Under date of December 4, Mrs. M. 
T. Coleman, president of the South 
Carolina Federation of Women's Clubs, 
wrote Mrs. Orr in warm praise of the 
"Leaflet of Practical Suggestions" is- 
sued by the C. F. W. C. She said that 
the idea is so splendid that she had had 
immediately printed a similar leaflet for 
her own federation, admitting difficulty 
in avoiding absolute plagiarism." Mrs. 
Orr is in receipt of a copy of this leaflet 
and remarks in passing that "the South 
Carolina 'Leaflet' resembles its sister 
in all respects !" 



The Official Board of the National 
American Woman Suffrage Associa- 
tion chose the following women to be 
members of the Congressional Com- 
mittee for the coming year: Miss Lucy 
Burns, Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, 
Miss Alice Paul, Mrs. Desha Breckin- 
ridge, Mrs. Medill McCormick and 
Mrs. Charles Beard. 



Stetson's Pork and Beans 



PINK BEANS 
LIMA BEANS 



WHITE BEANS 
KIDNEY BEANS 



One of California's 
Best Food Products 



Appetizing Nourishing 



Satisfying 



The Clubwoman 



Official organ of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 



Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 

Subscription Price, One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH, Editor and Publisher. 
MRS. O. C. VOGEL, Federation Editor. 

Matter for Miss Smith and Mrs. Vogel must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 



CONTENTS 



Frontispiece _ Mrs. George H. Hutton 

Editorial : 

Easter and the "New Thought" 7 

The State Convention 8 

New Federated Clubs 8 

California Federation: 

President's Letter 9 

Popular Music; Mrs. George H. Hutton 11 

Alameda District Convention 14 

San Joaquin District Convention 15 

General Federation: 

Biennial Notes 17 

Parliamentary Usage 21 

District News : 

Southern 26 

Northern 28 

San Francisco 28 

San Joaquin 31 




MRS. GEORGE H. HUTTON 

State Chairman of Music 



TKe Clubwoman 



Vol. V 



March, 1914 



No. 5 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Commu- 
nications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P.O.Box 1066,bythe 
twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 



It is a curious sort of paradox in the 
annals of Christian nations that, in the 
observance of their great religious fes- 
tivals, outward pomp and circumstance 
has increased, to all appearances, at 
the direct expense of inward sincerity 
and conviction. More money was 
spent by the churches of America in 
the celebration of last Easter than ever 
before. The same is unquestionably 
true of individual outlays for travel, 
amusement and the wardrobe additions 
looked upon as inseparable adjuncts to 
the festival. Further, if indications al- 
ready obvious are realized, this year 
will see the record again eclipsed. 

One need be neither Puritan nor 
blue stocking to perceive that the holi- 
day spirit has taken for its own the 
Easter of years gone by. The occasion 
seems to be now less a matter of mir- 
acle than of millinery ; more of rich- 
ness than reverence; of chimes and 
lilies than of fasting and prayer. 

As fashionable as an Easter hat is 
the modern fad among religionists to 
attempt the revamping of the faith of 
the fathers. The growth of "new 
thought" in the universities is evidence 
of their failure to make sturdy creed 
bend to the narrow groove marked out 
by a test tube and a microscope. The 
rise of Unitarianism and kindred faiths 
all branded with the question mark of 
the agnostic bears witness to the deter- 
mination of the new "thinker" to hoe 
his own intellectual row without her- 
editary assistance, even though he kill 
everythine of value and leave nothing 
but the weeds. 

But when John D. Rockefeller's for- 
mer almoner and the president-emeri- 
tus of Harvard University arose from 



their respective places on opposite 
sides of the continent and declared in 
turn that the doctrine of the immacu- 
late conception is a fallacy and that the 
miracles of the Bible are essentially on 
a level with Hans Christian Anderson, 
they voiced the intellectual unrest of 
comparatively few. The storm of pro- 
test that followed was the most encour- 
aging note yet sounded for those to 
whom the time-tried faith is good 
enough. 

The odd thing about the entire dis- 
cussion is that there seems to be noth- 
ing to justify it. So far from being 
"advanced theories," those promulgat- 
ed by Dr. Aked and Dr. Eliot are in 
reality literally retrogressive. All that 
they have said has been said many 
times before. 

One wonders in perusing if it is be- 
cause Voltaire, Tom Paine and Col. 
Ingersoll are unrepresented on Dr. 
Eliot's famous "five feet of books" that 
he has been at such pains to essentially 
duplicate their several objections to a 
literal acceptance of the allegorical 
teachings of the Bible. Montaigne 
long ago disposed, to his own satis- 
faction at least, of the serpent in the 
garden; Weissman preceded Dr. Eliot 
by at least fifty years in his plea for a 
more general term in referring to the 
Deity ; Jean Jacques Rousseau begged 
in certainly more picturesque lan- 
guage for a modification of the church's 
dogma. 

There is little profit, even as an in- 
tellectual exercise, in the discussion of 
religion ; there is none at all in re- 
hashing the agnosticism outworn by 
nineteen hundred years. 



8 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



The State Convention 

Riverside club women are busy with 
their plans for the entertainment of the 
annual state convention which meets 
in Riverside April 28 to May 2nd. 

The sessions of the convention will 
be held in the new Congregational 
church just across the street from the 
Mission Inn, and is in the heart of the 
"Civic Center." This church has thir- 
ty-eight rooms that can be used for 
committee meetings. Its large audi- 
torium has a seating capacity of over 
one thousand. It is well lighted and 
its acoustic properties are unsurpassed. 
The ventilation is good, the air being 
changed every twelve minutes, thus 
making it an ideal place for a large 
gathering. 

The hotel accommodations are ample 
and no woman need stay at home for 
fear that she will not have comfortable 
quarters. Besides the Mission Inn, 
which can accommodate at least 600 
guests, there are two other first-class 
hotels, only a few blocks from the au- 
ditorium where the convention is to be 
held, that can each care for 200 guests. 
These hotels have recently been remod- 
eled and fitted up with all modern con- 



veniences. There are also several large 
apartment houses where club women 
can find good rooms at reasonable 
rates. Indeed if the need demanded it 
there is not a club woman in Riverside 
that would not gladly open her home 
to guests. The Southern District will 
leave nothing undone that would add to 
the success of the convention. River- 
side is planning to give the club women 
of the state a real Southern California 
welcome. 

It would be well, however, for dele- 
gates to engage their rooms as early 
as possible. All communications in 
regard to hotels and trains should be 
addressed to Mrs. H. A. Atwood, 904 
Eleventh street, Riverside. 

Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer of San 
Diego, president of the Southern Dis- 
trict, is chairman of the hostess com- 
mittee, and Mrs. J. H. Holland, of Riv- 
erside, is chairman of the local body 
and has the preparations for the enter- 
tainment of visitors well under way. 

All inquiries, except about trains and 
hotel accomodations, should be ad- 
dressed to the secretary, Mrs. J. H. D. 
Cox, 292 East Seventh street, River- 
side. 



NEW FEDERATED CLUBS 



The following new clubs have been 
admitted to the state federation since 
the publication of the last list: 

Berkeley Club, Berkeley, (20 mem- 
bers), President, Mrs. Millie H. Olds, 
2021 Carlton St. 

Chico Art Club, Chico, (30 mem- 
bers) ; Pres., Mrs. O. W. March, 632 
5th St., Chico. 

San Gabriel Woman's Club, (40 
members) ; Pres., Mrs. F. M. Fowler, 
"Ardea," R. F. D. No. 1, San Gabriel. 

Somis Thursday Club, (35 mem- 
bers) ; Pres., Mrs. W. E. Goodyear, R. 
F. D., Somis. 

Fruitvale Woman's Club, (23 mem- 
bers) ; Pres., Mrs. Alice Sorrells, 2453 
Wilbur St., Fruitvale. 

Saticoy Music Study Club. (21 mem- 
bers) ; Pres., Miss Edna S. Clark, Ven- 
tura, R. D. No. 2. 



Woman's Improvement Club, Tracy, 
(48 members) ; Pres., Mrs. Geo. A. 
Wood, Tracy. 

Women's Auxiliary of the University 
of Southern California, (100 members) ; 
Pres., Mrs. H. W. Brodbeck, 212 N. 
Soto St., Los Angeles. 

Tuesdav Club of Merced, (30 mem- 
bers) ; Pres., Mrs. M. D. Wood, 807 
19th St., Merced. 

Tuesday Afternoon Club of Garden 
Grove, (20 members) ; Pres., Mrs. J. A. 
Arkley, Garden Grove. 

Woman's Improvement Club of 
Pittsburg, Contra Costa Co., (70 mem- 
bers) ; Pres., Mrs. W. H. Barnes, Pitts- 
burg. 

Women's Protective Club, Upper- 
lake, Lake Co., (67 members) ; Pres., 
Mrs. Evangeline Polk, Upperlake. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 9 

California Federation §f Women's Clubs 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Mrs. James W. Orr, 2420 Gough street, San Francisco. 
Vice-President — Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. 

Vice-President-at-large — Mrs. Calvin Hartwell,411 Summit avenue, Pasadena. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. Edward D. Knight, 238 San Jose avenue, San Francisco. 
Corresponding Secretary — Miss Jessica Lee Briggs, 1942a Hyde street, San Francisco. 
Treasurer — Mrs. H. E. DeNyse, P. O. Box No. 695, Riverside. 

Auditors — Mrs. S. L. Wiley, Fresno, R. R. 9. Mrs. F isher R. Clarke, 321 West Flora street, 
Stockton. 
General Federation State Secretary — Mrs. Russell J. Waters, 900 West Adams street, Los An 
geles. 

District Presidents 

Northern — Mrs. A. F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery street, Oroville. 

San Francisco — Mrs. Percy L. Shuman, San Mateo. 

Alameda — Mrs. William E. Colby, 2901 Channing Way, Berkeley. 

San Joaquin — Mrs. Harry Bates, Modesto. 

Los Angeles — Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 2614 North Griffin avenue, Los Angeles. 

Southern — Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 702 Ivy street, San Diego. 

Chairmen of Departments 

Art — Mrs. Miguel Estudillo, 335 Fourteenth street, Riverside. 
Civics — Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge, Roseville. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. E. S. Karns, Channing Lane, Palo Alto. 
Club Extension — Mrs. H. V. Rudy, Box 1318, Fresno, Cal. 
Conservation — 

Forestry — Mrs. Foster Elliott, 111 South Hidalgo avenue, Alhambra. 

Waterways — Mrs. E. G. Greene, 611 Waverly street, Palo Alto. 
Country Life — Miss Lillian D. Clark, 1534 Arch street, Berkeley. 
Education — Mrs. May L. Cheney, 2241 College avenue, Berkeley. 
Endowment Fund — Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 3454 Twenty-first street, San Francisco. 
Federation Emblem — Mrs. Mary H. Gridley, 101 Brand Boulevard, Glendale. 
Health — Mrs. L. P. Crane, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 
History and Landmarks — Mrs. William Fairehild, Box 72, Placerville. 
Home Economics — Miss Edna Rich, Santa Barbara. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. C. F. Edson, 950 West Twenty-first street, Los Angeles. 
Legislation — Mrs. J. T. Harbaugh, 2706 N street, Sacramento. 
Literature — Mrs. George F. Reinhardt, 2434 Durant avenue, Berkeley. 
Music — Mrs. G. H. Hutton, 927 Second street, Santa Monica. 
Necrology — Miss Lucy Hatch, The Palms, Fresno. 
Parliamentary Practice — Mrs. Annie Little Barry, Berkeley. 
Peace — Mrs. A. H. Griswold, Box 53, El Centro. 

Philanthropy — Mrs. William Baurhyte, 1033 West Edgeware Road, Los Angeles. 
Press — Mrs. O. C. Vogel, P. O. Box 1066, Los Angeles. 
Program — Executive Committee. 

Reciprocity and Information — Mrs. Cora E. Jones, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 
Redistricting Committee — Mrs. Henry E. DeNyse, Riverside. 
State University Club House Loan — Mrs. S. L. Piatt, 1720 J street, Fresno. 

PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

February has been a strenuous trict conventions, was apparent at the 
month in federation circles, and for recent San Joaquin Valley meeting, 
the president, a continuous pilgrim- The Hanford Woman's Clubhouse was 
age. It is among the pleasant surprises admirably adapted to all the needs, 
that are frequent in my experience to even to the complimentary luncheon 
note each month the steady increase tendered to the convention by the three 
in membership. Eleven new clubs ad- Kings County clubs, 
mitted at the last executive meeting, The reports which impressed me 
whose names will appear elsewhere in most, of a total of general excellence, 
The Clubwoman, bring the total close were the reports of the district chair- 
to 380. men of education and endowment ; and 

The splendid spirit shown at all dis- for terseness and brevity, the report of 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



the Coalinga club. Mrs. H. A. Bates 
was re-elected, itself a compliment to 
her administration. Miss Ednah Rich 
and Mrs. C. F. Edson were received 
with great enthusiasm ; delegates clus- 
tered about them like bees to press 
their questions. It helps a lot to have 
state chairmen visit the district meet- 
ings; they confirm the work and 
strengthen and encourage the district 
chairmen. 

I was the house guest of Mrs. Dixon 
L. Philips, who not only cared for me 
but at every luncheon and dinner en- 
tertained speakers and officers. Just 
here is an opportunity to pay tardy 
tribute to the sub-debutante club wom- 
an, Mrs. Philips' daughters relieved 
their^ mother of all household cares 
during the convention ; they planned, 
prepared and served all meals for the 
many guests and attended the conven- 
tion as well. 

At the Alameda district meeting Mrs. 
Colby presented a brilliant program 
and held her speakers to the time limit 
with a smiling firmness. As I am in- 
dulging in possibly unwarranted per- 
sonalities in this letter, I might as well 
transgress further and say that Mrs. 
Emily Hoppin and Mrs. George Rein- 
hardt were, by popular consent, the 
most interesting speakers of the con- 
vention. Mrs. Hoppin's topic was 
"Country Life" and a request was made 
that the address be given to The Club- 
woman for publication. Other state 
chairmen who addressed the conven- 
tion were Mrs. Cora E. Jones, Mrs. 
Denniston, Mrs. Woodbridge, Mrs. 
Greene, Mrs. Edson and Mrs. Cheney. 
Although the rain persisted it did not 
affect the attendance. Mrs. Colby was 
re-elected to serve Alameda district 
another year. 

Mrs. E. W. Burr entertained Mrs. 
Colby, Miss Briggs and myself and, not 
content with giving us all the com- 
forts of home, made us guests of honor 
at a beautiful dinner party where gen- 
tlemen were included, an innovation to 
be commended. 

The February executive board meet- 
ing was largely concerned with the 



annual state meeting. The plans of 
the local board were presented and ac- 
cepted. The official "call" and creden- 
tial cards will go out to all clubs in 
March. Mrs. George Probasco of Bur- 
lingame is chairman of credentials ; 
Miss Calvin Hartwell, state vice-presi- 
dent, chairman of resolutions ; Mrs. R. 
J. Waters, chairman of nominations. 
All resolutions must have the indorse- 
ment of the club presenting; resolu- 
tions may be sent to Mrs. Hartwell at 
any time. Districts will please advise 
their member of nominating commit- 
tee as to the desired representation on 
state board. 

The local committee of arrange- 
ments at Riverside have provided a 
room for club exhibits. Exhibits must 
be brought or sent at expense of the 
clubs. Miss Sylvia Anderson of Riv- 
erside will be at your service. 

Mrs. Annie Little Barry will give a 
half hour parliamentary drill each 
morning, preceding the opening of the 
convention. Morning meetings are 
business sessions. Afternoon and ev- 
ening meetings will be given to the 
state chairmen of departments to pre- 
sent their subjects, and they will de- 
termine the program. Tuesday even- 
ing, April 28, will be formal opening 
of the convention, with a summary of 
the state work by the president, and 
the district presidents. Wednesday 
evening a reception will be tendered 
the convention by the local board. 
Thursday evening the state chairman 
of education will present speakers in 
Vocational Training. Immigration and 
Country Life. Friday evening the 
chairmen of Art. Music and Literature 
will unite in giving what promises to 
be a most entertaining program. The 
convention will close Saturday at 
noon with the introduction of new of- 
ficers. The president will preside at 
morning and evening meetings the 
vice-presidents at afternoon meetings. 
The conference on the first morning 
will consider the following subjects: 
"Efficiency in Service," "Cooperation," 
"Traders Aid," Amendments to By- 
(Continued on Page 19) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



11 



POPULAR MUSIC 

By Mrs. George H. Hutton 

State Chairman of Music 



Theodore Thomas said "Popular 
music is, after all, only familiar music." 
Theodore Thomas spent his life "popu- 
larizing" good music, and doubtless we 
are more indebted to him than to any 
other of the well-known orchestral 
leaders of the United States because 
he was a pioneer, and pioneers in any 
line of endeavor are not always appre- 
ciated until their propaganda is well 
established. 

Many orchestral leaders and concert 
artists all over the country are trying 
in novel and original ways as well as 
on conventional lines to interest peo- 
ple in the best music. For years spe- 
cial "Young People's Concerts" have 
been given in New York with great 
success. This year Walter Damrosch, 
the conductor of the New York Sym- 
phony Orchestra, is, in giving his con- 
certs, calling special attention to the 
use and tone-color of the different in- 
struments. At one concert the 
"strings" will be featured, at another 
the "woodwinds," at another the 
"brasses," even the instruments of per- 
cussion receiving consideration. Not 
only are these concerts interesting and 
instructive aside from the merit of the 
compositions offered, to the audience, 
but it is a stimulant to the orchestra, 
certain of the more obscure members 
are brought forward. Perhaps the 
oboe player is the center of interest, or 
the bassoon demands (for once) the 
serious attention of the audience, while 
the "strings" retire figuratively speak- 
ing, into the background. The wood- 
wind section is likely to materially im- 
prove, the players having a new in- 
centive toward efficiency by having the 
public mind thus drawn to them. 

Orchestral leaders and concert artists 
have found that a special program with 
a name attached, that is, a "Purpose 
Program," will draw a much larger 
crowd of interested listeners than a 
program equally good, but with noth- 



ing featured. A "Wagner Memorial" 
program recently given in Los Angeles 
was a good illustration of this. There 
was an immense crowd of enthusiastic 
people, many from out of town, though 
the heavens were literally "falling" 
with rain and a goodly number did not 
have the faintest idea how they were 
going to get home. (I was one from 
out of town, so I speak advisedly). A 
"Verdi Centenary" or a "Mozart Festi- 
val" will create the greatest enthusiasm 
and an "All Puccini" program recently 
drew a record breaking attendance at a 
Sunday night concert at the Metropoli- 
tan Opera house in New York. 

At least two charming singers have 
attracted much attention by giving cos- 
tume recitals, Maggie Teyte and 
Yvonne de Treville. A most novel 
program of eighteenth century songs 
was recently given in Boston by Miss 
Teyte, who not only wore the costumes 
of the period but was accompanied by 
ancient instruments, consisting of the 
harpsichord, hautbois d'amour, viola da 
gamba and viola d'amore. Though 
Miss Teyte is a delightful artist and 
well worthy of patronage, doubtless 
many people were drawn to a recogni- 
tion of her art and an appreciation of 
her songs by her novel idea. 

Indian songs in "costume" and with 
"setting" have become quite familiar, 
and have no doubt impressed the 
beauty of "From the land of Sky-blue 
Water" on many a listener, as well as 
augmented the fame of Charles Wake- 
field Cadman. 

Pianists also are giving their pro- 
grams more individuality than has been 
the case in years past. An all-Chopin 
recital was found to be as potent a 
magnet in its way, as an all-Wagner 
program, at a recent concert given by 
Josef Hofman at Carnegie Hall, there 
being present one of the largest audi- 
ences of the season. 

Harold Bauer is keenly on the alert 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



for opportunities of winning distinc- 
tion and proving his musical acumen 
by planning a whole program of dance 
music, nor is he catering to popular 
taste by debasing his art or losing his 
dignity by thus doing, no, he is simply 
choosing the psychological moment in 
which to call the attention of music 
lovers to the fact that since the six- 
teenth century the dance form has ever 
been a grateful one for composers and 
by this medium our great musicians 
have given to the world some of their 
most inspired ideas. Bach, Beethoven, 
Schuman, Chopin, Debussy and Ravel 
are illustrious names that will appear 
on Mr. Bauer's "dance" program and 
his audiences will as surely have a 
"feast of reason and flow of soul," and 
perhaps more enjoyment than if they 
listened to sonatas. Ernest Newman 
very aptly says in his "Evolution of the 
Dance" in Musical America, "There 
may possibly come a time when 
Brahm's Symphonies will mean no 
more to mankind than the Bible So- 
natas of Kuhnau, but it is impossible to 
imagine a time when his waltzes have 
ceased to charm. Can it be that in the 
course of the ages the greater musical 
forms are doomed to perish one by one, 
like the larger fauna, and that it is the 
smaller forms, the song and the dance 
that will inherit the earth?" 

One would be justified in thinking so 
if it is true as a well known authority 
states, that "The sonata forms were 
originally grounded upon a technical 
rather than an emotional premise, the 
divisions being evolved to cater to the 
pianist, the fast movements to display 
his dexterity, and the slow ones his 
command of expression and of a more 
sustained style." 

However this may be, I would urge 
club women to follow the suggestion of 
this famous pianist, and study dance 
music, since the dance is the order of 
the day. Only let us not limit our- 
selves to a consideration of the tango 
of Argentine which may leave us with 
stiffened muscles and a headache, but 
become familiar with the tarentella of 
Italy, the fandango of Spain, the czar- 



das of Hungary, the mazurka and pol- 
onaise of Poland, the highland fling of 
Scotland and the Irish jig. This folk- 
dance music to be our foundation, utili- 
tarian dance music. Then let us study 
dance music as an idealized art-form, 
culminating in the dances of Chopin, 
Liszt, Brahms and Grieg. Let us popu- 
larize the world's best dance music. 

In women's clubs where the educa- 
tional side of a musical program is em- 
phasized as it would not be, and per- 
haps should not be, at a public concert, 
thq advantage of the "purpose pro- 
gram" is becoming more and more evi- 
dent. It is hardly possible to think of 
"purpose programs" in connection with 
women's clubs without paying grateful 
tribute to one of Southern California's 
most talented and best loved contraltos, 
Estelle Heartt-Dreyfus, whose offer- 
ings are always of such a lofty charac- 
ter that both mind and heart are "min- 
istered unto;" surely the highest "pur- 
pose" of music is well understood and 
applied by this artist. 

With the assured annual visits of the 
Chicago Grand Opera Company, lec- 
ture-recitals are becoming more and 
more in demand, the literary part of 
the program being especially interest- 
ing to many. 

The splendid work and interesting 
up to date programs of the San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles orchestras are 
most stimulating to a love and appreci- 
ation of orchestral music, one need no 
longer go to New York to hear Strauss 
and Debussy, or the Ninth Syphonv of 
Beethoven which will be the ambitious 
climax of the first season of symphony 
concerts under the new director, Adolf 
Tandler, in Los Angeles. 

Professional musicians now, are hav- 
ing support, co-operation and assist- 
ance that Theodore Thomas and his 
associates did not always have, and 
that is, the tremendous amount of work 
in music done by women's clubs. 
Every year music is beinc considered 
more seriously, programs are being 
more intelligently planned, with some 
object in view. Few clnh<; now have 
"just some music," a vocal or instru- 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



mental solo, no one knowing or seem- 
ingly caring what the selection is, or 
who wrote it (though no doubt many 
have wondered why). 

There are, in California, at least 
eighty music clubs and music sections 
belonging to the California Federation 
of Women's Clubs, and many others, 
independent or belonging to the Na- 
tional Federation of Musical Clubs. 
This means that all these people are 
not simply listening to musical pro- 
grams, but studying musical history, 
theory and aesthetics. Besides this 
serious and systematic study of music, 
practically all women's clubs offer a 
musical program once a month or once 
in two months, many have music at 
every meeting, (the music having some 
relation to the program) which means 
that approximately 28,000 women in 
California alone are listening to good 
musical programs Perhaps some of 
these women have never thought of at- 
tending a symphony concert or a grand 
opera, or even a song recital, but they 
are developing a musical intelligence, 
an appreciation by having music an 
important part of their club life and 
they will make up the concert and 
grand opera audiences of tomorrow. 

Under our educational system the 
fault has always seemed to be too much 
theory and too little practice, and the 
effort of late years has been to make 
studies more practical, to introduce 
manual training, gardening, cooking, 
sewing and millinery in order to fit 
students for their vocation in life, but 
it seems to me that in regard to the 
study of music, just the opposite is 
true, it has been all practice and no 
theory. A teacher in order to gain 
pupils has only needed to play some 
instrument brilliantly, and education in 
music has meant the applied science, 
learning to play. Many students have 
spent years practicing and have in 
some cases become accomplished "per- 
formers" (not musicians) without 
knowing anything whatever of theory, 
music history or form, the lives and 
ideals of our greatest composers have 
been a sealed book, they have not 



known the difference between the clas- 
sical school and the romantic, between 
"absolute" music and program music. 

Many have studied voice culture, not 
knowing whether Lieder was a product 
of Germany or Michigan, have not 
known the difference between an oper- 
atic aria and a lied, a ballad and an 
artsong. I have known some students 
"training" for grand opera who have 
included no musical literature what- 
ever in their "studies." To practice 
the piano without hearing the best 
pianoforte music, is to drudge along 
without inspiration or any end in view. 
No wonder so many children hate to 
practice, the immediate result is not 
reward enough. Without the musical 
intelligence being developed, five finger 
exercises and scales will result in noth- 
ing but mediocrity and disappointment. 
The public schools are realizing the 
value of musical theory and history for 
all students and "appreciation" is be- 
coming a familiar word. It is in this 
line that women's clubs are doing their 
great work in the development of music 
in America. We are all studying "ap- 
preciation." The editor of "Musical 
America" says that the women's clubs 
are the great vital force, the most po- 
tent factor in the development of music 
in the United States. If that is true 
now, we are surely working along the 
right lines. 

To study music history, to have 
monthly musical programs in general 
clubs, to devote at least one program 
each year to American composers, (let 
"American Composers" day become a 
feature in our club life, securing the 
best talent available for interpretation) 
to foster creative ability in our own 
state by devoting one day each year to 
local composers, to use the same dis- 
crimination and intelligence in choos- 
ing music for our children to hear that 
we do in choosing books for them to 
read, and their associates who mav be- 
come friends, if we work earnestly and 
sincerely ever toward higher ideals, — 
in ten years, who will dare call us a 
"ragtime" nation? 



14 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



ALAMEDA DISTRICT CONVENTION 

By Mrs. L. G. Leonard 

District Press Chairman 



Alameda District, C. F. W. C, closed 
its three days annual convention at 
Hayward, February 20th, a convention 
which was, according to the local press, 
the best ever held in the district. 

More than one hundred delegates 
and alternates were in attendance and, 
in addition, about twice that number of 
visiting club women. Their interest 
never flagged and their enthusiasm was 
not dampened, even though the skies 
were sodden and the streets like rivers, 
Aside from the enthusiasm, the gather- 
ing was chiefly remarkable for its spirit 
of harmony and good fellowship, which 
survived all the work of the conven- 
tion, the election of officers and the dis- 
cussion of resolutions. To the efforts 
of the hostess club the credit in great 
measure belongs, for the members of 
the Hill and Valley Club of Hayward 
provided everything in their power to 
make their visitors comfortable and 
happy, from the profuse and beautiful 
floral decorations to automobiles for 
getting about town in the rain. 

The program was an excellent one 
and was carried out almost to the let- 
ter. Mrs. W. E. Colby presided in 
graceful, kindly but practical style, 
assisted by Mrs. Annie Little Barry as 
parliamentarian. The sessions began 
and ended promptly, addresses, 
speeches and reports were given on 
schedule time, evidencing good busi- 
ness management throughout. 

Among the guests of the convention 
who contributed to its success were 
Mrs. J. W. Orr, state president ; Mrs. 
Emily Hoppin, state vice-president; 
Mrs. A. F. Jones, president of the 
Northern District; Mrs. E. D. Knight 
and Miss Jessica Lee Briggs, state re- 
cording and state corresponding secre- 
tary, respectively; and Mrs. May L. 
Cheney, Mrs. G. F. Reinhardt, Mrs. E. 
G. Greene, Mrs. L. P. Crane, Miss Lil- 
lian D. Clark, Mrs. Emily S. Karns, 
Mrs. Charles Farwell Edson, Mrs. Cora 
E. Jones and Mrs. Annie Little Barry, 



all state chairmen of departments. 

Miss Jennie Partridge, of the Re-dis- 
tricting committee, gave a report and 
Mrs. E. G. Denniston make a plea for 
the Sarah Piatt Decker Endowment 
Fund. 

The paper on "Country Life" by 
Mrs. Emily Hoppin was one of the 
most generally liked numbers on the 
program, her most pertinent sugges- 
tion being that Uncle Sam aid the 
"Back to the Soil" movement by loan- 
ing money to farmers directly at three 
per cent, instead of to the bankers at 
two per cent, who in turn loan to the 
farmers at eight. Mrs. G. F. Rein- 
hardt's address, "A Half Century of 
California Literature," was a treat, the 
reception of which was a voucher for 
the popularity of the department of lit- 
erature. 

A virile address on "Some Immigra- 
tion Problems," by Mr. Carleton Par- 
ker, secretary of the Immigration Com- 
mission, brought out the point that so- 
ciety is responsible for every class 
within it and suggested plans by means 
of which the women of the state may 
aid the commission. A lecture bv Mr. 
Coert Du Bois, district forester, on 
"Forest Fires," illustrated by moving 
pictures, was particularly interesting 
and valuable. 

A banquet, given the first evening, 
was the chief social function of the con- 
vention and a very delightful affair, 
two hundred beautifully gowned wo- 
men sitting down in a bower of palm 
branches and fruit blossoms, at tables 
lavishlv decorated with jonquils, vio- 
lets and smilax. Greetings were ex- 
tended by Mrs. F. F. Allen, president 
of the hostess club, and by Mrs. E. D. 
Knight and Miss Jessica Briggs of San 
Francisco. 

During the convention, the work un- 
dertaken and carried out by the various 
departments was described by the dis- 
trict chairmen, while the presidents of 
the clubs told what their clubs had 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



15 



done for the Federation, or described 
their club houses and the means used 
to secure them. An increased interest 
in civics was shown, giving evidences 
that since their enfranchisement club 
women are awake, not only to their 
power, but to their duty. 

The convention declared itself to be 
opposed to the present plan of re-dis- 
tricting, but indorsed resolutions for 
holding the state convention and the 
meeting of the General Council in San 
Francisco in 1915, for co-operating with 
the Panama-Pacific Exposition Com- 
mittee in making the exposition a suc- 
cess and for measures having to do 
with forest conservation. 



The following officers were elected: 
President, Mrs. W. E. Colby, of Ber- 
keley, incumbent; vice-president, Mrs. 
Kate Smith, of Richmond, incumbent; 
recording secretary, Mrs. Henry Ros- 
enthal of Alameda ; corresponding sec- 
retary, Mrs. L. G. Leonard, of Oakland, 
incumbent ; treasurer, Mrs. Fisher 
Clark, of Stockton ; auditors, Mrs. J. N. 
Frank, of San Leandro, incumbent; 
and Mrs. J. Montgomery, of Lodi. 

An invitation to hold the next con- 
vention at Lodi was extended by Mrs. 
John Montgomery, president of the 
Woman's Improvement Club of that 
city, and accepted. 



SAN JOAQUIN DISTRICT CONVENTION 



By Mrs. Leslie A. Ferris, 

District Press Chairman 



Probably the most successful and 
enthusiastic session yet held of the San 
Joaquin District Federation occurred 
at Hanford Tuesday, Wednesday and 
Thursday, February 10, 11 and 12. The 
sessions were held in the beautiful bun- 
galow clubhouse, the home of the Han- 
ford Woman's Club. Not a little of the 
"at home" and free fellowship spirit so 
strongly felt among the guests was due 
to the charming welcome and hospital- 
ity of the hostess club president, Mrs. 
George Weishar, and her assistants. 

Tuesday, the opening day of the con- 
vention, found a large number of dele- 
gates from the various district clubs in 
attendance. The morning program 
opened with an invocation by Rev. Ray 
O. Miller and an address of welcome by 
Mrs. George Weishar. Mrs. S. L. 
Wiley of Fresno made the response for 
the delegates in her characteristic, 
happy way. Mrs. Wiley, former dis- 
trict president, was an honored at- 
tendant at the entire session. 
Xo one fails to enjoy her sense 
of humor, her keen wit, and, perhaps 
most of all her fearlessness in doing 
what she considers right. When the 
subject of redisricting came up during 
the convention Mrs. Wiley won hearty 
applause by expressing herself as op- 



posed to the change of name to Fresno 
district. "Although I am from 
Fresno, I am strongly opposed to such 
a measure. We have no right to it," 
Mrs. James W. Orr gave the State 
President's greeting. Mrs. Orr was in 
attendance throughout the convention, 
giving helpful suggestions and 
straightening doubts, as is the manner 
of this great little gentlewoman who 
has so bravely and so understandingly 
presided over the State Federation as 
its president for the past two years. 
Perhaps the keynote of the convention 
was "the trained woman in every place 
of woman's work ; leaders chosen with 
care, who will direct by experience and 
a fully developed sense of responsibil- 
ity." This sentiment was most clearly 
sustained by Miss Ednah Rich, of the 
Santa Barbara Training School, and 
state chairman of Home Economics, in 
her address, "Vocational Education" 
and "Vocational Opportunities for 
Women and Young Peoole." Herself 
so well trained an example of her work, 
Miss Rich brought to the convention 
one of its strongest messages, straight 
from the heart of a simple, thoughtful 
woman. "Men. women and children 
may live without club houses, theaters, 
organizations of various popular kinds, 



16 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



but no one can live without a certain 
degree of domestic knowledge which 
makes home for mankind," said Miss 
Rich. "The conservation of child life 
is an absolute necessity for children. 
Schools send children out unprepared 
to meet the obligations of life. Voca- 
tional opportunities are open and al- 
ways will be open to people who can 
accept them. Give the boys and girls 
the proper vocational training and we 
shall have fewer probation officers, re- 
formatories, beggars and jails." 

The Tuesday evening session was 
largely attended. Mayor Charles H. 
Coe of Hanford made an address of 
welcome to the visitors in behalf of the 
city. A twenty-minute address, "The 
Scope of Federation." by Mrs. Orr, was 
a clear and ennobling conception of the 
scope of women's work. Thomas F. 
Griffin, of Modesto, followed with an 
address, "Woman and the State." The 
idea of woman's helpfulness to the 
state and of her right to a share in its 
government was developed and culmin- 
ated in the speaker's last sentence, "My 
friends, you ARE the state." A recep- 
tion to all visitors closed the evening. 
Wednesday was a day of interesting re- 
ports of the district clubs. Some of 
them were filled with worthy actions 
taken by club women ; some were re- 
plete with plans for new works of use- 
fulness ; all were enthusiastic in hope of 
advanced social conditions of every 
community to be brought about by the 
extension of woman's work. A lunch- 
eon was served at noon by the feder- 
ated clubs of Kings county in compli- 
ment to the guests. Artistically beau- 
tiful in all its appointments, the affair 
was worthy of remembrance both for 
the round of toasts enjoyed and for the 
intelligent womanhood seated at the 
handsomely decorated tables in the 
club house dining room. Mrs. T. B. 
Fox of Lemoore was the clever toast- 
mistress. The evening program con- 
sisted of an address upon the Panama- 
Pacific exposition by Mrs. Frederick 
Sanborn of San Francisco, president of 
the Woman's Board of the exposition 
and an address, "The Changing Order," 
by S. P. Elias, of Modesto. 



Thursday morning's session was de- 
voted to business matters principal of 
which was the election of officers. Mrs. 
H. A. Bates of Modesto was again hon- 
ored with the presidency of the feder- 
ation. Praise for Mrs. Bates' efficient 
presiding and of her general executive 
ability was heard on every side. The 
convention delegates classed her as an- 
other great little woman. The other 
officers were practically all retained, 
thus receiving a tribute of appreciation 
of duties well performed. 

Elbert M. Vail of Fresno spoke of 
"The Social Aspect of the Recreation 
Movement" and Miss Grassier of the 
Fresno Y. W. C. A. followed with a 
short address on the work of the asso- 
ciation and the Travelers' Aid. 

Mrs. S. L. Wiley and Mrs. H. A. 
Bates were elected delegates to the 
Chicago bi-ennial. The convention 
closed with an automobile drive to Le- 
moore, arranged by the Hanford Cham- 
ber of Commerce. Tea was served at 
the Lemoroe Woman's club house. 

The eighteenth annual convention 
will be held in Selma. 



To The Clubwoman, Mrs. A. F. 
Jones, president of the Northern Dis- 
trict, writes : 

"Greetings from the Northland — 
from its snow-capped mountains, its 
big rivers, its fertile valleys. 

"A great wave of civic betterment is 
sweeping over the district. Our con- 
servation chairman has wisely begun 
work in the schools. Art has flourished 
and as a result a district traveling art 
exhibit will carry the gospel of art to 
the most remote clubs. In fact we 
have achieved tangible results along all 
department lines. This is greatly due 
to the spirit of reciprocity that has 
spread through the district. At these 
meetings there has been a 'feast of rea- 
son and a flow of soul,' a personal con- 
tact and an exchange of ideas — links 
that strengthen our federation chain. 

"Come to our convention. Wood- 
land will be the hostess city. March 
31, April 1 and 2 the time. We have 
some surprises in store for you." 



THE CLUBWOMAN 17 

General Federation 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President — Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker, 2606 Whitis avenue, Austin, Texas. 

First Vice-President — Mrs. L. L. Blankenburg, 214 West Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Second Vice-President — Mrs. Samuel B. Sneath, 211 Monroe street, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Harry L. Keefe, Walthill, Nebraska. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Eugene Reilley, 508 Park avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Treasurer — Mrs. John Threadgill, 922 North Robinson street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Auditor — Mrs. C. H. McMahon, 32 Caithness Apartments, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Directors — Mrs. William E. Andrews, 1225 Fairmont street, N. W., Washington, D. C; Mrs. 
A. L. Christie, 219 South Washington street, Butte, Montana; Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, 
Irvington, Indianapolis, Indiana; Mrs. Francis D. Everett, Highland Park, Illinois; Mrs. 
William P. Harper, 651 Kinnear place, Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Creighton Mathewes. 315 
Bermuda street, New Orleans, Louisiana; Mrs. Frank White, Valley City, North Dakota; 
Mrs. William B. Williams, Lapeer, Michigan. 

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS 

Art — Mrs. Melville F. Johnston, 103 North Tenth street, Richmond, Ind. 

Civics — Miss Zona Gale, Portage, la. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, The Gladstone, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conservation — Mrs. Emmons Crocker, 48 Mechanic street, Fitchhurg, Mass. 

Education — Mrs. O. Shepard Barnum, 312 South Fifth street, Alhambra, Cal. 

Household Economics — Miss Helen Louise Johnson, 234 Paddock street, Watertown, N. Y. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. A. E. Chantler, Tacoma Daily News, Tacoma, Wash. 

Legislation — Mrs. Horace T. Towner, Corning, la. 

Literature — Mrs. Frances Squire Potter, 4581 Oakenwald avenue, Kenwood, Chicago, 111. 

Music — Mrs. Lawrence Maxwell, Edgecliffe Road, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, 0. 

Public Health — Mrs. S. S. Crockett, 710 Belmont avenue, Nashville, Tenn. 

Press Committee — Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, Chairman, Indianapolis, Ind.. 



BIENNIAL NOTES 

By Mrs. R. J. Waters 

General Federation Secretary 

It is said that "Blessinps brighten as Auditorium Theatre by elevated and 
they take their flight," and perhaps it surface car-lines. All of these hotels 
is due to a plan to make the General are examples of the capacious hostelry 
Federation Secretary cling to her of- of luxurious appointment and faultless 
fice with great persistency that she is cuisine for which Chicago is famed, 
given the pleasant duty of makinar res- Since the Local Biennial Board has 
ervations at the Chicago hotel for decided that, during the convention of 
prospective biennial delegates and vis- 1914, there shall be no hotel designated 
itors. Be that as it may, the duty has as "official headquarters" — the Audi- 
been assigned her and in accordance torium Theatre is the headquarters — it 
with the plan she is sending The Club- hopes, by a judicious placing together 
woman a part of the first official bul- of state delegations, to equalize the 
letin. Will every club intending to patronage of the hotels and to avoid 
send delegates, read the bulletin care- all crowding. 

fully, think decisively and act prompt- To add to the advantages of this 

ly? plan, arrangements have been made 

Official Bulletin No. 1 whereby state headquarters will be 

The hotels listed are all located in located, free of charge, in the hotel to 

the downtown district of Chicago, which a delegation is assigned. 

Three are in close proximity to the The club women of Illinois will spare 

Auditorium Theatre, Michigan avenue no efforts to contribute to the comfort 

and Congress street, where the meet- and well being of their guests and to 

ings of the convention will be held, maintain the reputation Chicago holds 

Three are within five minutes of the for unstinted hospitality. 




n 



New styles, which I've gathered from 
every fashion mart abroad, and which 
I've had duplicated in New York, and 
sent to me here. 

Prices on Gowns, Cloaks, Costumes 
and Suits — $25, $35, $50 or more. 

For lower prices I couldn't furnish you as 
good style as you'd desire. 



U l^^SMART SHOP 
408 South Broadway 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



19 



All of the hotels listed are conducted 
on the European plan only. 

La Salle Hotel, Madison and La 
Salle streets. 

Room without bath, one person in 
room, $2.00 per day. 

Room with bath, one person in room, 
$2.50 per day. 

Room without bath, two persons in 
room, $1.50 to $4.00 each person. 

Room with bath, two persons in 
room, $2.00 to $8.00 each person. 

Connecting rooms, with bath be- 
tween : 

Two persons, $5.00 per day. 

Three persons, $6.50 per day. 

Four persons, $7.50 per day. 

All rooms at $5.00 and $6.00 are the 
same price for one or two persons. 

The following delegations have been 
assigned to the La Salle Hotel: Cali- 
fornia, Illinois, Georgia, Kentucky, 
New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Ore- 
gon, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Vir- 
ginia, Wyoming. 

In order to systematize the work of 
the Hotels Committee, delegates, alter- 
nates, visiting club members and visit- 
ors are respectfully requested to send 
at an early date their specified applica- 
tions, for hotel reservations, to the 
General Federation Secretary of their 
state. She in turn will arranee for 
these reservations through the chair- 
man of the Hotels Committee. All 
other communications should be ad- 
dressed directly to 

MISS FLORENCE BECKETT, 
Chairman of Hotels Committee, 
Local Biennial Board G. F. W. C, 
La Grange, Illinois. 



THE ROUTE TO CHICAGO 



Mrs. George W. McCoy, California 
chairman of transportation for the bi- 
ennial announces the following tenta- 
tive schedule : 

Special train leaves Oakland June 6 



(date subject to change), to Ogden on 
the Southern Pacific, to Denver on the 
Denver & Rio Grande, to Omaha on 
the Union Pacific and thence to Chi- 
cago on the Northwestern. This will 
be the official train. A stopover of 
three hours at Salt Lake City for a visit 
to the Tabernacle is being arranged, 
also one at Colorado Springs where the 
Garden of the Gods will be the objec- 
tive point. 

All those intending to travel on this 
train are asked to take it at Oakland. 
The fare will be $72.50, Pullman fare 
$13. Further information will be pub- 
lished next month. 



ARE YOU A MEMBER? 



It is pleasing to note the growth in 
General Federation membership. Much 
of this attributable to the efforts of 
Mrs. Frank White, national chairman 
of membership, who has been untiring, 
her labors proving splendidly resultant. 
There is still time for other clubs to 
join the General Federation, but re- 
member that April 9th is the last day 
of grace on which you may reach Mrs. 
Frank White, Valley City, North Da- 
kota, telling her that you wish to join 
the national organization before the 
Biennial. 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

{Continued from Page 10) 

Laws. All officers and state chairmen 
of departments are advised to present 
a typewritten report, brief and concise, 
which must be left with the secretary. 

My dates for March are : March 7, 
Santa Maria; March 17, Berkeley; 
March 25, Jackson and Sutter Creek; 
March 30, Woodland. 

Cordially yours, 

MRS. JAMES W. ORR. 





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THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



PARLIAMENTARY USAGE 

By Mrs. Annie Little Barry 

State Chairman of Parliamentary Practice 



Questions 

Do you advise a club to appoint a 
parliamentarian ? 

Yes, if it has a member who is cap- 
able. 

What becomes of a minority report 
of a committee? 

If no action is taken it is of no value 
— the report of a committee is the ma- 
jority report. If someone moves to 
substitute the minority report for the 
majority and the motion is seconded, 
action is taken ; not otherwise. 

Conventions 

Nothing- helps a convention more to 
be successful than observance of par- 
liamentary usage. 

Delegates and alternates should re- 
port early to the credential commit- 



tee. This committee is obliged to work 
nearly all night, so do not, by your 
neglect make their work harder. An 
alternate does not vote except when her 
delegate is absent. Only delegates 
vote or introduce motions. By cour- 
tesy of the convention others than dele- 
gates are permitted to discuss ques- 
tions. 

AH business must be introduced by 
motion. If you wish to make a mo- 
tion, rise, address the chair and give 
your name. When recognized by the 
chair, make your motion as definite and 
concise as possible and speak in a clear 
tone, loud enough for all to hear. The 
one who makes the motion has the 
right to close the debate, if you wish to 
discuss a motion do not speak five or 
six times, but definitely and logically 




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It's all a matter of "Style" 

A ND never was there wider latitude for 
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THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



debate the question. As a rule do not 
speak more than twice to a question; 
if the rules of convention limit the time 
of debate keep well within the time. 

If you wish to ask questions, address 
the chair, wait to be recognized and ask 
your question of the presiding officer. 
She may, of course, ask anyone whom 
she wishes to answer. 

The maker of a motion has all the 
privileges in regard to her motion, 
amending, etc., except she mav not 
speak against her own motion. She 
may vote against her own motion. Re- 
member the negative vote will be asked 
for. It is not necessary to vote in the 
affirmative. Delegates should vote; 
they are not representative delegates if 
silent when a vote is called for. 

Delegates should promptly make 
routine motions, for example the adop- 
tion of reports, adjournment, etc., and 
should promptly second motions. It 
saves the time of conventions. 

A delegate wishing to leave the room 
should rise, address the chair and ask 
to be excused. She should not ask to 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



25 



be excused to take an automobile ride 
or for other pleasure. Delegates are 
expected to attend a convention for 
business. 

Some of the things we all know, but 
sometimes forget : Not to whisper ; not 
to tear paper; to be a good loser. 

Delegates wishing to offer resolu- 
tions should hand them to the resolu- 
tion committee at the beginning of the 
convention. 

Delegates should concentrate on the 
work of the convention and not permit 
their minds to wander. They should 
inform themselves in regard to amend- 
ments to the constitution and by-laws. 
The question of redistricting is to be 
voted on, being offered as an amend- 
ment. Ascertain how your club wishes 
you to vote on this question; you rep- 
resent your club, not yourself, at the 
convention. You must, of course, act 
according to your own convictions on 
questions which arise during the con- 
vention. 



Present your railway certificates to 
the secretary to be signed early in the 
convention ; do not wait till your train 
is ready to leave. 

Remember the majority rules. 

I wish to repeat my favorite defini- 
tion of parliamentary usage: Public 
courtesy. Remember parliamentary 
usage should facilitate business, not 
obstruct it. It should be your servant; 
not your master. 

The state president has arranged 
that time shall be given each morning 
before the opening of the convention 
for discussion of parliamentary usage. 



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Saturday 10 to 12 



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THE FRATERNAL BROTHERHOOD 

A Fraternal Beneficiary Society for MEN and WOMEN 

Provides protection for the home, making possible the education of the children. Insurance in this Society should interest all 

women. The Home Office is situated at 845 S. Figueroa St., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Acting Supreme President Supreme Secretary 

MRS. E. R. NEIDIG CHAS. W. DEMPSTER 



26 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



DISTRICT NEWS 



Southern 

Mrs. Helene M. Deimling 

Press Chairman 

So far as concerns the Imperial Val- 
ley section of the district the notable 
occasion of the month was the annual 
meeting of the Imperial County Feder- 
ation, held at El Centro on February 7. 
Mrs. J. E. Peck, of Calexico, the presi- 
dent, was in the chair. In her address 
she paid a high compliment to the su- 
pervisors and to the various civic or- 
ganizations of the county for the recog- 
nition accorded by them to the import- 
ance of the federation. 

Among the many excellent reports 
by department chairmen that of Mrs. 
Apple, chairman of education, was es- 
pecially gratifying. It told of large 
increases in the number of schools, 
high, intermediate and grade, within 
the jurisdiction of the federation, and 



of the incorporation into their curricula 
of many subjects classifying as voca- 
tional training. 

In the election of officers Mrs. J. R. 
Stevenson, of Imperial, was named as 
the new president; Mrs. R. L. Glasby, 
Calexico, vice-president; Mrs. Arthur 
Williams, Holtville, recording secre- 
tary; Mrs. J. F. Bezdecheck, Imperial, 
corresponding secretary; Mrs. T. H. 
Gebbe, Heber, treasurer; and Mrs. D. 
C. Huddleston, Brawley, auditor. 

Resolutions were passed enthusiasti- 
cally endorsing Mrs. Lillian Pray Pal- 
mer, president of the Southern District, 
for the state presidency and pledging 
the aid of the federation to secure her 
election at Riverside ; condemning ad- 
vertising on the public highways; urg- 
ing the fixing of regular "clean-up 
days" ; providing for the sanitary care 
of foodstuffs ; to amend the constitu- 



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The Homephone 

When you have a Homephone in your home you have two 
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You will find it a service indispensable. Costs little. Call Con- 
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28 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



tional provision for the election of of- 
ficers; asking the appointment of a 
good roads commission by the super- 
visors; endorsing the Newlands bill for 
a waterways commission. 
Northern 
Mrs. B. F. Walton, Press Chairman 

On account of stormy weather the 
January meeting of the executive board 
of the Northern District was deferred 
until "Reciprocity Day" of the Rocklin 
Woman's Improvement Club. 

Mrs. Kendall gave a very interesting 
account of the recent Inland Water- 
ways Congress, held in San Francisco, 
which resulted in the organiaztion of a 
permanent Inland Waterways Associ- 
ation, and in which the work of the 
California Federation of Women's 
Clubs was recognized by the election 
of Mrs. E. G. Greene as second vice- 
president. Mrs. Greene presided, in 
the absence of both president and vice- 
president, at the organization of the 
permanent body, in a very acceptable 
manner and was very highly compli- 
mented by the able men composing the 
executive committee. In the afternoon 
the visitors were the guests of the 
Rocklin club, which presented a very 
pleasing and instructive program. Ad- 
dresses were made by Mrs. Jones and 
others; several Irish ballads were sung 
by Mrs. Longbotham, with Mrs. G. H. 
Perry, of Sacramento as accompanist. 
Mrs. Kearns, probation officer at Rose- 
ville, gave a most interesting resume of 
her work in that position, showing how 
great is the need for the work of wo- 
men in this as well as other depart- 
ments where women are either men- 
tally, morally or physically concerned. 
SAN FRANCISCO 
Mrs. Norman H. Martin 
Press Chairman 

The San Francisco District executive 
board held an all-day session in the 
Hotel Stewart on Saturday, February 
7th, Mrs. Percy L. Shuman presiding. 
Addresses were made by Mrs. J. W. 
Orr, Mrs. Fred G. Sanborn, and Mrs. 
Denniston, chairman of the Sarah 
Piatt Decker Endowment Fund. 



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We make our promises good, even 
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If it does, please telephone us, and 
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30 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



At this meeting three invitations for 
the next district convention were thor- 
oughly discussed. The invitations 
were from Eureka, St. Helena and 
Pacific Grove. Each presented so 
much hospitality and interest that the 



decision was difficult, but finally, by a 
close ballot, Pacific Grove in Monterey 
County was decided upon. This con- 
vention will be the fourteenth, and will 
be held in October, 1914, with the fol- 
lowing newly elected officers in charge : 



FINE ARTS 



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March 30th to April 11th 

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to highest or any branch of study. Illustration, 
Commercial Art, Modeling, Painting, Drawing, in 
both day and night classes. Open all the year. 

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Send for Illustrated Catalog. 



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Home Phone E 1657 



Telephone Hollywood 1944 



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Entertainments of all kinds furnished for hotels, lodges, clubs and all social affairs 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



31 



Mrs. Percy S. King, president ; Mrs. 
J. S. Sweet, vice-president; Mrs. Cro- 
set, recording secretary; Miss McClay, 
corresponding secretary; Mrs. Dain- 
gerfield, treasurer; Mrs. Dixon, auditor. 

SAN JOAQUIN 
Mrs. Lesle A. Ferris, Press Chairman 

The clubs of this district received 
great stimulus for greater work at the 
district federation convention at Han- 
ford. 

The social event of the district was 
probably the Fresno Wednesday Club's 
celebration of its twenty-fifth anniver- 
sary. This club, the "Sorosis of the 
Valley," organized a quarter of a cen- 
tury ago in a Fresno much smaller than 
the beautiful city of Fresno today, has 
to its credit the founding of women's 
clubs in the San Joaquin Valley — a 
movement so far reaching in scope of 
intelligent usefulness as to be immeas- 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

Harp Soloist of the Royal Academy 
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Blanchord Hall. Ex. 82. Residence 1972 Eatiella 
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MILLINERY 

534 W. WASHINGTON STREET 
LOS ANGELES. CAL, 



urable in value. The Hotel Fresno fur- 
nished the charming setting for the 
brilliant social function to which nearly 
a thousand guests were bidden. Each 
of the ten counties of the valley were 
represented in the large gathering 
while Fresno club women formed the 
larger part of the assemblage. The 
Wednesday Club ladies were distin- 
guished by the wearing of corsage bou- 
quets of pansies. the club flower. 

The receiving line was headed by 
Mrs. H. W. Neely, the club president, 
and Mrs. J. A. Webster, who holds the 
distinction of being the only active 
member of the present list of members 
who was also one of the founders. 
Music was provided throughout the 
afternoon by an orchestra, the members 
of the Parlor Lecture Club Choral and 
Mrs. Louise Brehany, of San Fran- 
cisco. Refreshments were served in 
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The Clubwoman 



Official organ of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 



Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 
Subscription Price, One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH. Editor and Publisher. 
MRS. O. C. VOGEL, Federation Editor. 
Matter for Miss Smith and Mrs. I'ogel must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 
Entered at the Los Angeles postojffice as second-class matter 



CONTENTS 



Frontispiece _ Airs. James W. Orr 

Editorial : 

Redi stricting the Federation 7 

A Naval Holiday - 8 

The Change of the 'Watch 8 

California Federation : 

President's Letter 9 

The Heritage of California Historv; Mrs. William Fairchild 11 

Mrs. William Fairchild 12 

Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer _ 14 

Call for State Convention _ 1 5 

Mrs. Russell J. Waters .- 16 

Mrs. Calvin Hartwell _.._ _ 18 

The Convention's Social Side _ 19 

A Leader of Club Women ; Airs. C. S. Owen 19 

Mrs. Henry DeNyse 20 

For Art Sections _ 21 

Mrs. W. C. Mushet _ 22 

Los Angeles District Convention _ 23 

Mrs. A. H. Griswold 24 

Mrs. E. D. Knight 26 

New Federated Clubs _ 27 

Miss Jessica Lee Briggs 28 

The Club Woman as a Home Maker; Mrs. Charles K. Merrill _ 29 

Travelers' Aid Society; Mrs. L. P. Crane 30 

Power Bonds; Mrs. W. C. Mushet 31 

General Federation : 

Biennial Notes _ 33 

District News : 

Los Angeles _ 37 

San Francisco 41 

Southern .._ 42 

Frances Squire Potter; Mrs. James W. Orr 44 





;-^Hr^ 






Bx- *&IP3P| 






K ,4 _ sii , 

■dp f ^iJtSt. j( 








' 



MRS. JAMES W. ORR 
President of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 



TKe Clubwoman 



Vol. V 



April, 1914 



No. 6*2/ 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Commu- 
nications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P.O.Box 1066, by the 
twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 



There are man}' reasons why the 
forthcoming state convention should 
call out, to the last club woman, the 
full voting strength of the federation. 

To take the first point that presents 
itself: Unquestionably the one issue 
of paramount significance before the 
convention, not even second to the 
election of a new president, is the mat- 
ter of redistricting. Last year at 
Fresno a parliamentary technicality 
prevented this matter from coming to 
a focus and it was with a sigh of 
genuine relief that most of the dele- 
gates saw it laid over for a year. At 
Riverside, however, no such welcome 
or unwelcome obstacle will lie in the 
way. The question will come up for 
settlement one way or another. There 
is nothing to be gained by further pro- 
crastination. 

Delegates to the convention would 
do well to read carefully — before they 
leave for Riverside — the excellent sum- 
mary of the redistricting situation 
written by Mrs. Henry DeNyse, chair- 
man of that committee, for the 1913- 
1914 Year Book. It will be found on 
page 99 of that volume. Having studied 
this with open mind, let them turn to 
their file of The Clubwoman and, in 
the issue of July, 1913, read the article 
entitled "Making Over the State Fed- 
eration," by Mrs. Olive E. Borrette, 
member of the redistricting commit- 
tee. 

Let it be borne in mind by those 
whose sentiments are all against a 
severing of cherished district ties that 
the able women who compose the re- 
districting committee are not them- 
selves insensible to every argument 
which can be advanced from the stand- 
point of personal feeling. That, in the 



face of this, they should earnestly 
recommend the splitting of the present 
six districts and the formation from 
the pieces, as it were, of ten smaller 
districts is in itself a powerful argu- 
ment. 

The question of redistricting the 
California federation is one that has 
already passed the point where senti- 
mental considerations can be allowed 
to stand in the way of efficiency. It 
had passed it, as a matter of fact, two 
years ago. It is a significant fact that 
club women are at one, practically, on 
the advisability of smaller, more com- 
pact, more easily handled districts — 
so long as the question remains an ab- 
tract one and does not affect their 
own particular ties. Let, however, 
the knife touch their own district and 
threaten them with the loss of this or 
that club or group of clubs and it is 
singular with what unanimity the 
scheme is voted down. This has hap- 
pened so often in the district conven- 
tions this spring as to bode serious ill 
for the plan when it comes up at Riv- 
erside. 

It may be well to remember that the 
redistricting plan as outlined at pres- 
ent is not necessarily the plan which 
will be adopted — it is merely that 
which has seemed best to club women 
who have devoted long and patient 
study to the federation map. There is 
another crumb of comfort for those 
about to be bereaved in the well-taken 
point of Mrs. Borrette, to the effect 
that, in the nature of things, there will 
be no actual recasting of the districts 
until the expiration of the terms of 
the officers elected at the recent dis- 
trict conventions. 

Finally, if redistricting is necessary, 



8 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



let us do a thorough and workmanlike 
job of it and get it over. Let us not 
"cry-baby" at the last moment, nor 
beg off from a situation which time 
will only aggravate to a point where 
more serious surgery will become 
necessary. Let us remember that, 
whatever the importance to us of our 
club or our district, it is important 
only as a single stone in the strong, 
unbroken front of the federation 
structure. After all it is the federa- 
tion that counts — its welfare is the all- 
paramount consideration. 



A Naval Holiday 

It was a prophetic voice that cried 
at Santa Barbara. The sentiment it 
bore, crystallized by the action of the 
Los Angeles district convention into 
a resolution calling upon the President 
of the United States and upon Con- 
gress assembled to withhold for one 
year action on all bills looking toward 
additional appropriations for naval 
purposes, is perhaps the sentiment of 
a visionary, yet of such a visionary as 
creates the realities of a day not too 
far distant. 

The wish expressed by that resolu- 
tion will probably not be fulfilled, but 
the resolution is not the less significant 
nor effective because of that. It is 
one of the reeds that, light in itself, 
binds with many of its kind to make 
a great beam in the structure of a fu- 
ture civilization. It is a straw that 
shows which way the wind is blow- 
ing; and it is appropriate that it should 
be the expression of women of the 
state Which next year will see the 
greatest display of naval armament 
ever gathered together. 

Elsewhere in this issue appears a 
likeness of the chairman of the newly- 
created department of peace — Mrs. A. 
H. Griswold. In the November Club- 
woman Mrs. Griswold wrote into fed- 
eration literature for the first time the 
program of peace as it is viewed by 
that association of women. It is an ar- 
ticle that is worth re-reading, yet it 
is hardly as notable a contribution to 



the story of peace as are her letters 
to every senator and representative 
from California asking support for the 
naval holiday bill, for the bill provid- 
ing for a peace statute at the Atlantic 
gate of the Panama Canal and pro- 
testing against that which would place 
rifle practice in our schools. 



The Change of the Watch 

Before another issue of The Club- 
woman shall have been printed a new 
president will stand at the helm of 
the California Federation of Women's 
Clubs. That the choice of the River- 
side convention will be a wise one and 
that that post of heavy responsibility 
will be given into skilled and able 
hands, trained by experience and ex- 
ample for her exacting labors, is a 
foregone conclusion. It is no disloy- 
alty, however, to that yet unnamed 
woman that the termination of the 
two-year administration of Mrs. 
James W. Orr brings with it a keen 
sense of sorrow to every one of the 
twenty-five thousand club women that 
comprise that great organization. 

Of the executive work of Mrs. Orr 
as the head of the federation there is 
little need to speak. It is already 
written on the statute books of the 
commonwealth of California, in the 
archives of the state library, in the 
minutes of four hundred clubs, in the 
chronicles of the General Federation 
and the Year Book of our own. 

It is one thing, however, to wisely 
shape and direct the destinies of the 
federation and to keep that mighty 
machine moving smoothly toward a 
far-seen goal and quite another to 
crown that achievement with the lau- 
rel of sincere affection honestly earned 
and unstintedly given. Notable as 
have been the things Mrs. Orr has ac- 
complished, her greatest work. is no- 
where chronicled save in the hearts of 
women. The federation is much the 
gainer through the work of her brain, 
but its units are more the gainers 
through the impress of her gentle per- 
sonality. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 9 

California Federation §f Women's Clubs 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Mrs. James W. Orr, 2420 Gough street, San Francisco. 
Vice-President — Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. 

Vice-President-at-large — Mrs. Calvin Hartwell,411 Summit avenue, Pasadena. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. Edward D. Knight, 238 San Jose avenue, San Francisco. 
Corresponding Secretary — Miss Jessica Lee Briggs, 1942a Hyde street, San Francisco. 
Treasurer — Mrs. H. E. DeNyse, P. 0. Box No. 695, Riverside. 

Auditors— Mrs. S. L. Wiley, Fresno, R. R. 9. Mrs. F isher R. Clarke, 321 West Flora street, 
Stockton. 

General Federation State Secretary — Mrs. Russell J. Waters, 900 West Adams street, Los An 
geles. 

District Presidents 
Northern — Mrs. A. F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery street, Oroville. 
San Francisco — Mrs. Percy L. Shuman, San Mateo. 
Alameda — Mrs. William E. Colby, 2901 Channing Way, Berkeley. 
San Joaquin — Mrs. Harry Bates, Modesto. 

Los Angeles — Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 2614 North Griffin avenue, Los Angeles. 
Southern — Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 702 Ivy street, San Diego. 

Chairmen of Departments 
Art — Mrs. Miguel Estudillo, 335 Fourteenth street, Riverside. 
Civics — Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge, Roseville. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. E. S. Karns, Channing l.nne, Palo Alto. 
Club Extension — Mrs. H. V. Rudy, Box 1318, Fresno, Cal. 
Conservation — 

Forestry — Mrs. Foster Elliott, 111 South Hidalgo avenue, Alhambra. 

Waterways — Mrs. E. G. Greene, 611 "Waverly street, Palo Alto. 
Country Life — Miss Lillian D. Clark, 1534 Arch street, Berkeley. 
Education — Mrs. May L Cheney, 2241 College avenue, Berkeley. 
Endowment Fund — Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 3454 Twenty-first street, San Francisco. 
Federation Emblem — Mrs. Mary H. Gridley, 101 Brand Boulevard, Glendale. 
Health — Mrs. L. P. Crane, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 
History and Landmarks — Mrs. William Fairchild, Box 72, Placerville. 
Home Economics — Miss Edna Rich, Santa Barbara. 

Lidustrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. C. F. Edson, 950 West Twenty-first street, Los Angeles. 
Legislation — Mrs. J. T. Harbaugh, 2706 N street, Sacramento. 
Literature — Mrs. George F. Reinhardt, 2434 Durant avenue, Berkeley. 
Music — Mrs. G. H. Hutton, 927 Second street, Santa Monica. 
Necrology — Miss Lucy Hatch, The Palms, Fresno. 
Parliamentary Practice — Mrs. Annie Little Barry, Berkeley. 
Peace — Mrs. A. H. Griswold, Box 53, El Centre 

Philanthropy — Mrs. William Baurhyte, 1033 West Edgeware Road, Los Angeles. 
Press— Mrs. O. C. Vogel, P. O. Box 1066, Los Angeles. 
Program — Executive Committee. 

Reciprocity and Information — Mrs. Cora E. Jones, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 
Redistricting Committee — Mrs. Henry E. DeNyse, Riverside. 
State University Club House Loan — Mrs. S. L. Piatt, 1720 J street, Fresno. 

PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

In the first paragraph, if possible in department chairmen will corroborate 

black type, I would write in my ap- this statement, and concur in this sen- 

preciation of the privilege of an offi- timent. I have had complimentary 

cial state magazine. The Clubwoman copies of the club magazines of other 

has been an honor, a credit and a com- states, and have studied them with the 

fort to the official family. Xo one single desire to learn the best methods 

knows better than the president of this of content and make-up, with a view 

state federation what it means when to advising the publisher. I feel sure 

the way of putting into the hands of from my survey of state publications 

every club women the "continued that the California Clubwoman will 

story" of the federation, as it develops stand the test of comparison in mat- 

from month to month. I am sure the ter, in make-up and in style. If the 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



magazine could be somewhat enlarged, 
and if the club members would see that 
the circulation was increased, it would 
increase the efficiency and the scope 
of its usefulness. I cannot close my 
monthly "letters" without offering my 
sincere thanks and my best wishes for 
future success to the publisher and 
the Federation Editor. 

As I write, the north District Con- 
vention is in session at Woodland. 
This is the last of the series of six 
successful district meetings, and the 
last at which it is my privilege to 
represent the state. 

Other times, other presidents, but 
for this, the retiring president of 1912- 
1914, I must say that this office has 
given me a wonderful chance to see 
the club woman on her own ground, 
taking hold of all the vital questions, 
discussing them intelligently, with 
keen interest and outlook, making the 
federation "the club movement" a 
mighty force for righteousness. 

Recently the director of the G. F. 
W. C. who has California in charge 
asked me to answer the following 
question: 

"What definite things has the Cali- 
fornia Federation done in this Bi- 
ennial period?" 

And I answered as follows : 

1. Entertained the eleventh, or 
"San Francisco" Biennial. 

2. Printed and circulated a fore- 
word of "Practical Suggestions," com- 
piled by state chairmen of depart- 
ments. 

3. Published a monthly magazine, 
known as The Clubwoman. 

4. Introduced four new subjects in 
department work, viz : Peace, Country 
Life, Political Science, Literature. 

5. Inangurated the Budget System 
in the administration of federation 
funds. 

6. Fostered the spirit of co-opera- 
tion on matters of public policy; edu- 
cational, social and legislative and 
with movements whose social ideals 
are in accord. 

7. Advised the clubs of the oppor- 
tunitv for consecutive well-directed 



study, offered through the Extension 
Division of the University of Califor- 
nia. 

8. Co-operated in organizing the 
Woman's Legislative Council of Cali- 
fornia. 

9. Paid up 75 per cent of the En- 
dowment fund. 

10. Made a gain of over 25 per cent 
in membership. 

Yet we are not to be measured by a 
dry record of achievement ; we are al- 
ways in a process of becoming. The 
federation is flexible ; it is a state of 
consciousness attuned to the call of the 
day. There are nearly four hundrea 
clubs in the state, all imbued with a 
magnificent sincerity. 

We have endeavored to standardize 
club work that comes under depart- 
ment direction, for instance: the de- 
partment of Literature has presented 
a series of seven studies in literature. 
This series, with the bibliography and 
references, is as good next year or any 
year as it was this year. 

It is so with the lessons in parlia- 
mentary usage. They, too, are stand- 
ard in content. I have mentioned these 
two, as examples of the purposeful- 
ness of our plans. 

I repeat, nothing is finished; our 
arbitrary time divisions are simply for 
the purpose of "taking stock," of mak- 
ing an inventory of methods and re- 
sults. I would, however, emphasize 
the fresh field of the University Ex- 
tension Division. Here we can estab- 
lish the relation between the women of 
the state and the State University. 

A state president comes to feel al- 
most like a disembodied spirit, in the 
course of her term of office ; her trav- 
els enlarge her personal acquaintance 
and give her a curiously intimate sense 
of "belonging to," of feeling "at home" 
with any congregation of club women. 
Personal letters and the columns of 
The Clubwoman have been the wings 
for her words of counsel and appre- 
ciation ; her thoughts have known no 
limitations of distance or districts ; the 
state looks whole, a unit of industry, 
(Continued on Page 47) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



11 



THE HERITAGE OF CALIFORNIA HISTORY 



By Mrs. William Fairchild, 

State Chairman of History and Landmarks 

The department of California His- 
tory stands alone and far removed 
from the many other topics which are 
being constantly agitated, talked of 
and written about in The Clubwoman, 
periodicals and newspapers. To the 
majority of readers, there is little in 
dry history with its dates to chain the 
attention unless it is with the single 
and important exception of the remi- 
niscent light a subject throws on a 
past age, whose dusty tomes have be- 
come the property of the bibliophile 
rather than the book-lover. A taste 
for historical reading is a growth and 
often a very slow growth. 

Some of the patriotic and native 
lovers of California know its past — ■ 
delight in its record and take time to 
recite its glories; they do not place too 
high a valuation upon what we have 
for they know it to be a golden her- 
itage — one to be conserved from every 
point of view and one to be jealously 
and zealously guarded. To these there 
will always remain a reflected light 
revealing the charms of a western ter- 
ritory, profound in its spaciousness — 
fertile, rich, varied and picturesque be- 
yond description — its history full of 
unlimited fascination, leading the mind 
through labyrinthine courses over the 
rough seas of the buccaneer and navi- 
gator — over the parched, burning 
plains and precipitous mountains of 
the explorer, diversified by the peril- 
ous pilgrimages of the sandal-footed 
friars — the tramp of victorious bands 
— the events of discovery and the con- 
quest — the bringing to light of count- 
less treasures — the advent of the great 
change in social conditions and the 
witchery of the King of Gold unfold- 
ing his delusive enchantments of hope. 
The connecting link between east and 
west — our recognized resources and 
commercial interests, strengthened by 
personal and political ties — all awaken 
a keen interest and each of us should 
be eager to delve into the 



by-gone 



age to learn more of its activities and 
of the pioneers and founders of the 
state. 

What Californian would fail to be 
interested in our first pioneer, Junipero 
Serra, who braved tho perils of un- 
explored deserts and mountains — of 
Indians and wild beasts, blazing the 
trail for his followers, with none to 
guide save the spirit within? He suf- 
fered famine, drouth and sickness but 
never flinched from duty in the on- 
ward march of Fate. He was the 
father of the pioneers, the messenger 
of civilization and progress and the de- 
voted proclaimer of regeneration. 
Passing over the El Camino Real front 
San Diego to Sonoma we find the sug- 
gestive memorials of his handiwork — 
the Christianizing Missions — some ful- 
ly restored — others in lowly ruins 
where 
"The bat and owl repose 

Where once the people knelt them, 
And the high 'Te Deum' rose. - ' 
These were the homes of his prose- 
lytes, surrounded by an atmosphere of 
sacredness and nobility. Today, they 
stand as monuments to the forgotten 
padres and important links between 
pastoril times and the conquest of the 
State. 

Others came at an early period who 
did much to give importance find 
prosperity to California. The bones 
of hosts of them lie mouldering in the 
earth from Siskiyou to San Diego. 
Some of these were our noblest and 
best — honor and religion were two of 
their controlling incentives. They 
never deserted their standard and sac- 
rificed their lives freely, falling by the 
wayside. It is fitting that we add a 
wreath of immortelles to their mem- 
ory, lest, as the years come and go, 
their bones sink deeper and deeper be- 
neath the covering of age, on the 
mountain top and in the valley, en- 
tombed and unknown. 

Among them we may include many 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




MRS. WILLIAM FAIRCHILD 
State Chairman of History and Landmarks 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



of the forty-eight who figured so 
prominently in framing our first Con- 
stitution when the State was organ- 
ized; they placed the first mile-stones 
of our growth and development — help- 
ed to make our history and helped to 
mould it into one great, harmonious 
whole. The lives of all for the most 
part are yet unwritten. And so one 
might go on with reflections on this 
fascinating period at greater length 
than the limits of this article will per- 
mit, recalling the facts brought to 
mind by the long list of names (in 
their own hand writing) of the rep- 
resentative members of our first Con- 
stitution — the list being found on a 
manuscript in the archives of the hah 
of the California Pioneer Society. 

From the discovery of the State, 
relics were to be found, but CaL- 
fornians have failed to appreciate their 
value until within recent years. Any 
amount of these belonged to the native 
races. There were Indian implements, 
Mission books, used by the neophyte., 
Mission furniture, baptismal fonts, 
early newspapers, magazines, poems, 
pictures and histories — rare laces, 
clothes, baskets, etc., these should be 
collected by our own historical depart- 
ment, together with the few untold 
stories of the remaining pioneers. To 
the uninterested they may seem faded, 
and ghostly and echo with hollow 
mockery of the past. But, if we stop 
to think a moment, we cannot fail to 
realize they are the last frail link con- 
necting the yesterdays with today. To 
those who have our State's interests at 
heart, I would say, gather these few 
reminiscences from the pioneers you 
know, ere it be too late. They are 
nearing the summit and will soon look 
upon the darkness. This carries with 
it one of the saddest thoughts of con- 
servation, as we know only too well 
that it will not be long ere the very 
last one will stand upon the brink 
then pass beyond the Sunset Gate. 
Let each of us form a committee of 
one to gather and record these last 
stories, lest we sip the dregs of the 
Cup of Regret. 



For years scientists and relic hunters 
who knoA' and appreciate the value of 
oar treasures, have been making busi- 
ness trips to California and method- 
ically gathering all that could be 
found. Their value was enormous and 
we will never be able to replace them. 
The Smithsonian Institute sent repre- 
sentatives to search our caves, moun- 
tains and islands and have taken in- 
numerable relics of the aborigines ; 
the winds and rains had uncovered 
them and their harvest was rich. From 
foreign countries came ethnologists, 
who bought everything of consequence 
from local dealers and collectors. 
Tourists, who have the fad for col- 
lecting are constantly packing away 
valuables and the devastation has been 
tremendous. But this is not all. Eth- 
nologists realize how rich the Califor- 
nia field is for research — how apathetic 
Californians are to the value and loss 
of their treasures and that there is no 
law to prohibit their taking and buy- 
ing. Industrious workers represent- 
ing the Field Columbian Museum of 
Chicago, come yearly and comb the 
State, they have money to buy and 
permission to excavate mounds and 
burying grounds of the Indians. So 
thoroughly has their work been done, 
they have said: "Californians who 
study the history of their perishing 
Indian tribes will have to come to our 
Chicago' Museum to do it." No doubt 
these men are spurred on by worthy 
motives strengthened by the knowl- 
edge there is no legal opposition to 
prevent. "To the victor belong the 
spoils." 

Have we become too indifferent to 
care or realize the menace to our 
State? Knowing this, will it be wise 
to place the department of History and 
Landmarks under the head of Educa- 
tion? If we do, in time it will be 
lost sight of by all but an interested 
few. To do so would be a discredit 
to us as Native Daughters and mem- 
bers of a State organization. 

Living as we do in a hurrying, 
bustling, progressive age, character- 
( Continued on Page 32) 



14 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




MRS. LILLIAN PRAY PALMER 
Retiring President of the Southern District 



THE CLUBWOMAN 15 

CALL FOR THE THIRTEENTH ANNUAL CONVENTION, CALIFOR- 
NIA FEDERATION OF WOMEN'S CLUBS; RIVERSIDE 
APRIL 28-29-30, MAY 1-2 

The Thirteenth Annual convention of the California Federation of Women's 
Clubs will be held in Riverside, April twenty-eighth, twenty-ninth and thirtieth, 
and May first and second, by invitation of the Southern District, with Riverside 
as the hostess city. 

We urgently request all clubs to send full delegations. As the purpose of 
the Federation develops new strength and significance with each added year, 
and its influence becomes of greater import in our commonwealth, it is emi- 
nently desirable that full and free discussion of present and future plans and 
purposes be participated in by the entire voting strength of the Federation. 
In this way, only, can reports of delegates be of real value to their respective 
clubs. 

All meetings of the convention will be held in the Auditorium of the 
First Congregational Church, and are open to the public. Committee rooms 
will be found in the church building. 

REPRESENTATION. Each club shall be entitled to representation to 
the State Federation by the president, .or in her absence, a vice-president in 
order of rank, and one delegate; clubs consisting of one hundred members — 
the president and two delegates, and one additional delegate for every addi- 
tional hundred members. No delegate shall represent more than one club. 
The secretary of each club shall certify one week before the annual meeting 
the names of the delegates and alternates from the club to the Chairman of 
Credentials, Mrs. Geo. Probasco, Box 16, Burlingame, Cal. The delegates 
from clubs failing to pay their annual dues shall not be seated at the annual 
convention. 

CREDENTIAL COMMITTEE. The credential cards enclosed must be 
presented to the Credential Committee, which will be in session at the Con- 
gregational Church at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning. Mrs. Geo. Probasco, 
Chairman. 

RESOLUTIONS. All resolutions offered for the consideration of the 
Federation must be presented in writing with the endorsement of the delegates 
of at least one federated club. Resolutions must -be in the hands of the com- 
mittee not later than the second day of the convention. Mrs. Calvin Hartwell, 
411 Summit Ave., Pasadena, Chairman. 

HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS. Rooms without bath for two in room, 
from 75c to $2.00 per day each. Rooms with bath for two in room, $1.25 
to $2.50 per day each. Hotels, American and European plan. Grill room rates, 
reasonable. Reservations should be made early. Address, Chairman Hotels, 
Mrs. H. A. Atwood, 904 Eleventh Street, Riverside. 

The Local Board is to send out a bulletin containing full information regard- 
ing hotels, rates, etc. 

TRAIN RATES. The round trip, Southern Pacific or Santa Fe, will be 
one and one-third fare on the receipt-certificate plan. Tickets to be on sale, 
April 18th to May 2nd, inclusive, and honoring certificates for the return, 
April 29th to May 7th, inclusive. A one fare rate, viz., $14.00 for the round 
trip, applicable from San Francisco, will be accorded if a special train party 
of 125 or more can be arranged. 

PROGRAM. The convention will continue through five days and even- 
ings. All meetings are open to the public. Business meetings at morning 
sessions. Conferences during the afternoons. Topics of general interest will 



16 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




MRS. RUSSELL J. WATERS 
General Federation State Secretary 



THE CLUBWOMAN 17 

be presented at the evening sessions, preceded by a half-hour of music. A 
Joint Council of Presidents and Delegates will be held Wednesday morning 
at 11:00 o'clock. 

HOSPITALITY. The Local Board has arranged for a get-acquainted 
party at the Woman's Club House, Tuesday afternoon, April 28th. Wednes- 
day evening, a Reception will be tendered the convention at the Glenwood 
Mission Inn. Automobile trips, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday afternoons, 
4:30. Reception and Tea, Victoria Club, Friday afternoon, 4 o'clock. 
By order of the Executive Commitee. 

MRS. JAMES W. ORR, President. 

MRS. E. D. KNIGHT, Recording Secretary. 

MISS JESSICA LEE BRIGGS, Corresponding Secretary. 

AMENDMENTS 
Constitution 

Article IV, Section 1 — Officers. Insert after Chairman of Departments — 
"and Chairman of Standing Committees of Departments." 

Article V — Districts. To amend Section 1 to read: "To better facilitate 
the work of the Federated Clubs, the State shall be divided into ten (10) 
districts, viz.: Northern, Sonoma, San Francisco, Alameda, Monterey, San 
Joaquin Vallev, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Riverside, San Diego." (See 
page 99, Year Book 1913-14.) 

By-Laws 

Article II, Section 1 — Voting Membership of State Federation Meetings. 
Insert after Departments of W'ork, "Chairmen of Standing Committees." 

Article III, Section 4 — Duties of Officers. Section 4, add the following: 
"The outgoing Treasurer shall within thirty days after the close of the State 
Convention, turn over to the Treasurer all money, vouchers, books and papers 
of the State Federation, in her custody, together with a supplemental report, 
attested by the Auditor, covering all transactions from April 1st, to the close 
of the State Convention." 

Article V, Section 2 — Dues. Strike out the word "July," and insert the 
word "April." 



TOPICS FOR JOINT COUNCIL OF THE PRESIDENTS AND DELE- 
GATES 

1. Efficiency in Service. 3. Travelers' Aid. 

2. Co-operation. 4. Discussion of Amendments. 
Following are the chairmen of committees : 

Nominating: Mrs. Russell J. Waters, 900 West Adams street, Los Angeles. 

Credentials: Mrs. George Probasco, Box 16, Burlingame. 

Resolutions. Mrs. Calvin Hartwell, 411 Summit avenue, Pasadena. 

Rules and Regulations: Mrs. Ella Westland, Upland. 

Local Board : Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 702 Ivy street, San Diego. With 
her on this committee are Mrs. J. H. Holland, chairman, 963 West Tenth 
street, Riverside, and Mrs. J. D. H. Cox, corresponding secretary, 292 East Sev- 
enth street, Riverside. 

Hotels and Trains: Mrs. H. A. Atwood, Mrs. G. W. Dennis. 

Information: Mrs. J. H. D. Cox. 

Exhibits: Miss Sylvia Anderson. 

All officers and chairmen of departments will make brief reports during the 
morning sessions. No report must exceed ten minutes in length. All must be 
typewritten and must be afterward left with the recording secretary, Mrs. E. D. 
Knig-ht. 



18 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




MRS. CALVIN HARTWELL 
Vice President-at-Large C. F. W. C. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



19 



THE CONVENTION'S SOCIAL SIDE 

By Louise Harvey Clarke 



While the program for the State 
Convention of Federated Clubs is 
necessarily a full one yet there will be 
time given for auto trips and social af- 
fairs. Mrs. Orr is an ideal presiding 
officer, holding the convention down 
strictly to business so that no time is 
lost. Mrs. Orr believes in work but 
not in all-work-and-no-play, so she has 
graciously set apart certain hours each 
day for playtime. 

All meetings of the convention are 
open to the public but the social affairs 
and other entertainment are for officers 
and delegates to the convention, all 
federated club women, speakers and 
representatives of the press. 

On Tuesday afternoon, the first day 
of the convention, will be the get-ac- 
quainted reception at the Woman's 
Clubhouse, Eleventh and Main Streets. 
At 4 o'clock of the same day the visit- 
ing club women will be taken in auto- 
mobiles from the clubhouse to Sher- 
man Institute along Magnolia Drive. 
At the school they will be met by the 
Indian band and escorted to the 
grounds, where a flag drill will be 
given. Opportunity will then be giv- 
en the women to inspect the build- 
ings and see what the government is 
doing in the way of education, es- 
pecially vocational, to make good cit- 
izens and useful men and women of 
the Indian boys and girls. 

Wednesday has been left free for 
private luncheons and dinner parties 
of which there are already several 
planned. On Wednesday evening is 
the big formal reception at the Mis- 
sion Inn. Something special in the 
way of entertainment is provided for 
this evening but it will not be a set 
program. 

At the close of the afternoon session 
on Tuesday a May fete will be given 
in Fairmount Park where the dance 
around the Maypole and other folk 
dancing by the school children and the 
Campfire Girls will be enjoyed. 

Fridav afternoon at three is the tea 



party at the Victoria club. Here the 
visiting club women may chat over 
their tea cups and watch a most 
unique dramatic performance — a living 
moving picture show. 

A sunrise breakfast on Mt. Rubidoux 
has been talked of but the plans are 
not fully matured as yet. But there 
will be something there; that you may 
be sure of. 

On Saturday the delegates will be 
in the hands of the San Bernardino 
County Club women and will be at 
liberty to visit neighboring cities and 
pleasure resorts. It will be many 
years before the state convention 
comes to this locality again and dele- 
gates and visitors should make a point 
of seeing as much of the surrounding 
country in the vicinity of Riverside as 
possible. 



A LEADER OF CLUB WOMEN 
By Mrs. C. S. Owen 

There are few who are either able 
or willing to take the lead in any 
movement, few, who have the ability 
to be leaders, and fewer still are those 
who combine executive ability with 
that personal magnetism which draws 
and holds the loyalty of the masses, 
and without which great success is im- 
possible. 

Among men, those to stand at the 
head and direct the affairs are not so 
hard to find, for men have been trained 
in quick judgment and executive abil- 
ity for many generations, but among 
women it is rare indeed to find these 
traits combined with the unfailing 
tact, the ability to see into and beyond 
the surface of things, and the cour- 
age to stand for what is right and just, 
which are such essential qualities in 
the woman, who is to direct the activ- 
ities of other women. 

That Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer is 
one of the few possessed of these qual- 
ities is attested by her rapid rise to 
prominence in the club life of Southern 




MRS. HENRY DeNYSE 
State Federation Treasurer 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



California, the unfailing success of all 
which she has uncertaktn as well as 
the love and loyalty teL tor her by all 
those who know her and have worked 
with her. 

Mrs. Palmer began her active club 
life in San 'Diego and has been a mem- 
ber of several of the oldest and larg- 
est clubs in that city. For two years 
she was Recording Secretary of the 
San Diego County Federation of 
Women's Clubs and president of that 
organization from 1911 to 1913. Dur- 
ing her administration the County 
Federation grew by leaps and bounds 
and became one of the largest and best 
organized bodies of women in South- 
ern California. Airs. Palmer has 
served the Southern District of Cali- 
fornia Federation of Women's Clubs 
for two terms as Recording Secretary 
and Chairman of Club Extension, her 
good and faithful work in these offices 
making her known throughout the dis- 
trict. At tie eleventh annual conven- 
tion of the Southern District of Cali- 



fornia Federation Women's Clubs, she 
was unanimously elected president of 
her district and that she has done mosi 
efficient work as president was amply 
demonstrated during the recent con- 
vention held in San Diego. 

Hers is a spirit of willing service, 
an unselfish giving of herself and the 
best that is in her to the ideal of Fed- 
eration — a Federation which strives 
for the betterment of humanity 
through the power of united woman- 
hood. 

Knowing her ability, her devotion 
to the federation principles, her noble 
self-sacrifice, and believing that those 
qualities, which have made her so suc- 
cessful in her work in Southern Cali- 
fornia would but shine with an added 
brightness in a larger sphere, the 
Southern District, at its last annual 
convention, unanimously endorsed 
.Mrs. Palmer for state president of the 
California Federation of Women's 
Clubs for the cominsr vear. 



FOR ART SECTIONS 



The General Federation set of 
slides of contemporary American 
paintings will be shown at the state 
convention at Riverside and will re- 
main in California during May. All 
clubs wishing to use this set are re- 
quested to write without delay to the 
state chairman of Art, Mrs. Miguel 
Estudillo, 335 Fourteenth street, Riv- 
erside, for dates. Some of the artists 
represented are Adam Emory Al- 
bright. John W. Alexander, Cecilia 
Beaux, George DeForest Brush, Wil- 
liam Classe, Thomas W. Ewing, Childe 
Hassam, John S. Sargent and William 
Wendt. 

Please note carefully the following: 
Two sets of slides are now available 
for loan by the General Federation — 
that mentioned above, consisting of 
sixty lantern slides, and the collection 
of historical Ameiican paintings, for- 
ty-eight slides. Annotated catalogues 
and sketches of the artists represented 
accompany each set. Clubs using them 
pay the expressage from th^ last pla^e 



of exhibition and a fee of $2.50 addi- 
tional. Breakage is charged at the 
rate of $1.50 per slide. The colored 
slides are very perishable and must 
not be left in the lantern more than 
one minute. The slides must not be 
long exposed to daylight. When not 
in use keep them in their box. Warm 
the box and contents over a radiator 
or stove just before using. In cold 
or damp weather this is imperative to 
prevent their breaking in the lantern. 
The round white marker "0" is the 
thumb mark — where the operator's 
thumb should be when the slide is 
placed in the lantern carrier, so that 
the cover glass always comes next the 
light. The committee requests that 
schools be invited to view the exhi- 
bitions free of charge. 

S'ides must be packed and unpacked 
by the same club member. Check with 
the catalogue at both times. The fee 
o c P2.50 is to be sent at once to Mrs. 
Howard T. Wilson, Virden, 111., the 
(Continued on Page 45} 



22 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




MRS. W. C. MUSHET 
Retiring President of the Los Angeles District 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



LOS ANGELES DISTRICT CONVENTION 



Worthy in every respect of an or- 
ganization which in thirteen years — 
and really less — has risen from a dis- 
organized handful to a united and thor- 
oughly co-operative body numbering 
more than seventeen thousand mem- 
bers was the thirteenth annual con- 
vention of the Los Angeles District 
Federation, held at Santa Barbara 
March 4, 5 and 6. No individual nor 
group of individuals was responsible 
for its success ; it was rather the 
arithmetical summing of a series of 
factors which could produce but one 
result, unaffected by extraneous cir- 
cumstances. 

Of this, the largest district of the 
federation, seventy-four clubs were 
represented. Two hundred and three 
delegates and alternates were regis- 
tered and every one, or so it seemed, 
left her impress in some way upon the 
proceedings. The latter were but two 
and a half days in duration, so far as 
concerns actual convention business, 
and they were filled to the ultimate 
second not so much with individual 
work nor club work but federation 
work in its largest sense of all-em- 
bracing weal. 

Perhaps never has the growing 
activity of federation units, as such, 
made itself more manifest. The com- 
plaint has, with some justice, been 
made in the past that convention usage 
is in danger of falling into a rut 
whose sides are defined by the prece- 
dents of years gone by. The feeling 
appears to be on the increase that the 
larger responsibilities of the districts 
and of the federation as a whole shall 
be more equally divided over many 
more willing shoulders than those, 
however able, of a single small com- 
mittee. It was, for example, in no 
spirit of criticism of the painstaking 
and creditable work of the nominating 
committee nor of the their splendid 
ticket that the convention adopted a 
resolution asking the new president to 
name a committee to work out a dif- 
ferent and more democratic system of 



choosing federation heads. In the lan- 
guage of the resolution, this is to ''give 
the convention in general greater op- 
portunity and ambition to take part in 
the selection and nomination of their 
officers." 

That there is no dissatisfaction with 
the concrete results of the nominating 
committee's deliberations, however, is 
attested by the slate named and unani- 
mously elected. The new president of 
the district is Mrs. Herbert Cable, past 
chairman of legislation for the district 
and president of the Averill Study 
Club, of Los Angeles, a woman whose 
conspicuous ability in a constructive 
and executive way does much to recon- 
cile the loyal district clubs to the re- 
fusal of Mrs. W. C. Mushet to be a 
candidate to succeed herself. Mrs. 
Dallas Mason Cate, of Long Beach, is 
vice-president, Mrs. L. W. Harmon, of 
Montebello, recording secretary; Mrs. 
R. C. Shipman, Los Angeles (member 
of the Redondo Beach Club), cor- 
responding secretary; Mrs. L. B. 
Hogue, Ventura (incumbent), treas- 
urer; Mrs. H. J. Finger, Santa Bar- 
bara (incumbent), auditor. Mrs. 
Charles Robinson, of San Pedro, is the 
district's member of the nominating 
committee for the State Federation 
and Mrs. George Williamson for the 
credential committee. 

Always of interest as an index of 
the actual constructive work of a dis- 
trict's year is the list of resolutions 
presented, those which fail of passage 
as well as those indorsed. The con- 
vention at Santa Barbara declared in 
favor of a world-wide naval holiday of 
one year, of the amendment establish- 
ing the constitutionality of the mini- 
mum wage commission, of the Torrens 
land law, of an artists' censorship of 
public buildings, of a cleaner journal- 
istic school, of the boundary stone 
league, of a peace conference to be 
held in San Francisco next year, of 
protection for wild birds (opposing 
the proposed amendment of the Flint- 
Care}' bill), of the Palmer child labor 



24 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




MRS. A. H. GRISWOLD 
State Chairman of Peace 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



25 



bill and of thanks to the Santa Bar- 
bara club women and to Airs. Mushet. 

Among those reierred was a reso- 
lution introduced by Mrs. Dallas Ma- 
son Gate, chairman of waters, asking 
indorsement for the Newlands bill for 
the control of flood waters. Opposi- 
tion by Miss Lloy Galpin sent this to 
the state committee on waters. To 
the state legislative committee, on the 
vigorous protest of some educators 
present, went a resolution by the Tues- 
day Afternoon Club of Glendale re- 
moving the compulsory feature from 
manual training, music, art and domes- 
tic science in the schools. The cus- 
tomary protest against re-districting 
was ably opposed by Mrs. Russell J. 
Waters, general federation secretary, 
and was tabled on motion of Mrs. C. 
M. Gordon. 

It is out of the question, in the space 
available, to deal with any detailed 
adequacy with the many excellent 
papers presented before the conven- 
tion or with the thoughtful discussions 
which they evoked. One which made 
a deep impression upon all the dele- 
gates, whether directly associated with 
such an endeavor or not, was the ad- 
dress of Mrs. James F. Scherfee, presi- 
dent of the Outlook Club, of Los An- 
geles, whose subject was ''Prison Re- 
form." To those accustomed to muck- 
raking tirades upon prison conditions 
it was a pleasure to hear, from com- 
petent authority, of real reform which 
is being accomplished behind the gray 
stone walls of California state peniten- 
tiaries. 

"The tendency in prison reform 
work," said Mrs. Scherfee, "has been 
toward the reclamation of the criminal 
after his release. This is not suffi- 
cient. The great need is for con- 
structive, preventive work in the elim- 
ination of conditions that create crime. 
To this end there should be a reform 
in the administration of criminal law. 
There should be reform in the dis- 
ciplinarv measures in the prisons; oc- 
casional training should be introduced 
and the indeterminate sentence and 
parole svstem should be established. 



"Previous to Governor Johnson's ad- 
ministration most barbarous punish- 
ments were inflicted on prisoners for 
offenses of the most trivial nature. 
Such cruelties as existed in the dark 
ages were not more severe. Ail this 
is being changed in Folsom. A won- 
derful transformation is taking place 
in sanitary conditions. A ventilating 
system has been installed. Vocation- 
al training is being established. The 
men are being taught cabinet-making, 
carpentering, hardwood-finishing, tail- 
oring, mechanical drawing, road-build- 
ing and many other useful vocations, 
even including a course of study in 
law." 

Miss Mary Foy, of Los Angeles, one 
n ,r the well-known woman politicians 
of the country, aroused much en- 
thusiasm with a pithy address on "The 
Responsibility Inherent in the Fran- 
chise." Her golden text was indi- 
viduality. "Act on your own initia- 
tive," she cried. "Follow your own 
judgment. You may make mistakes, 
but if you watch the results of your 
decision and see whether you were 
right or wrong you will grow. It is 
only by such individual fulfillment of 
civic duties that the true democracy 
may be evolved." 

Judge Robert L. Hubbard gave the 
club women some meaty ideas on an 
important problem in his address on 
"The Land and the Market Basket," 
a plea for the abolition of the middle- 
man and for the direct handling of 
women's problems by women them- 
selves. The minimum wage law for 
women and children was the subject 
of an illuminating address • by Mrs. 
Charles Farwell Edson. Mrs. J. B. 
Nichols, in the course of a strong talk 
on peace, announced that twenty-seven 
clubs of the district have named peace 
chairmen. She advocated the placing 
of peace literature in the schools and 
the propagation of the peace spirit 
from the pulpit and the rostrum. She 
was followed by Mrs. C. C. Adams in 
a remarkably comprehensive address 
on home economics and home making 
in general, dealing; with the relation of 



2b 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




MRS. E. D. KNIGHT 
State Recording Secretary 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



27 



art, music, literature and civics to the 
social unit. Art was ably handled by 
Mrs. Theodore M. Walker and music 
by Mrs. J. J. Abramson, Mrs. Carrie 
Stone Freeman, Mrs. William How- 
ard, Miss Lucy E. Wolcott and Mrs. 
Eugene E. Davis. Civil service re- 
form, literature and social and indus- 
trial conditions were handled respect- 
ively by Mrs. C. M. Gordon, Mrs. W. 
S. Galentine and Mrs. Samuel Epler. 
It is worthy of mention in this con- 
nection that forty clubs have started 
sections for civil service reform in the 
last year and more than that have un- 
dertaken practical civic beautification 
in their communities. 

Notable among the three-minute 
talks of the president's council were 
those of Miss Edith Hodgkins on clubs 
for employed women and Mrs. W. L. 
Jones on children's rights. One of the 
more important departmental confer- 
ences was that on legislation, presided 
over by Mrs. Cable, at which it was 
urged that women work for such a 
change in the laws as to enable them 
to do jury duty. 

The principal event of a semi-social 
nature was the visit of the entire con- 
vention body to the State Normal 
School of Manual Arts and Home 
Economics, Miss Ednah Rich, presi- 
dent. The principal speaker of the 
afternoon was Miss Rich herself, who 



addressed four hundred women in the 
school cafeteria from a text drawn 
from the institution around her. Die- 
tetics, textiles and allied subjects were 
also considered. 

Of chief importance as an evening 
function was the reception tendered 
the delegates by Reina del Mar Par- 
lor of the Native Daughters. A de- 
lightful musicale was given under the 
direction of Mrs. William H. Jamison 
and an informal tea on the verandas 
of the Hotel Potter, where the conven- 
tion was held. Others who entertained 
were Stewart Edward White, the au- 
thor, and Mr. Dawson, a noted ornith- 
ologist. The musical programs, which 
added much to the spirit of the con- 
vention, were given under the leader- 
ship of Mrs. Abramson and Mrs. E. F. 
Herbert. 

For the excellent care and entertain- 
ment of the guests, even to the many 
automobile excursions provided about 
beautiful Santa Barbara, chief credit 
is due to Mrs. Henry J. Finger, presi- 
dent of the Santa Barbara Women's 
Club, the hostess organization, and to 
her able and indefatigable corps of as- 
sistants. 

The next convention of the district 
will be held at Long Beach, on the 
invitation of Mrs. Dallas Mason Cate, 
the new vice-president. 



NEW FEDERATED CLUBS 



The following new clubs have been 
admitted to the state federation since 
the publication of the last list: 

Northside Neighborhood Club, near 
Lodi, San Joaquin County (30 mem- 
bers) : President Mrs. Laura Wagner, 
Acampo, San Joaquin County. 

Hermosa Beach City Club (26 mem- 
bers) ; President Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, 
Hermosa Beach, 22nd and Strand. 

Long Beach Women's Civic Club 
(25 members) ; President Mrs. May 
Bartlett Moore, 456 West Seventh St. 
Cosmos Study Club, South Pasadena 



(11 members) ; President Mrs. Edna 
Price, 203 A St, Sierra Vista. 

Lakeport Women's Protective Club, 
Lakeport (14 members); President 
Mrs. Ida Dutcher, Lakeport. 

Fortuna Women's Civic Club, Hum- 
boldt County (33 members) ; President 
Mrs. L. C. Morgan, Fortuna. 

Exes and Ins, Riverside (40 mem- 
bers) ; President Mrs. L. F. Darling, 
222 E. Arlington Ave. 

The Presidents' Assembly, San 
Francisco (110 members); President 
Miss Christine Hart, 1804 Leaven- 
worth St., San Francisco. 



28 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




MISS JESSICA LEE BRIGGS 
State Corresponding Secretary 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



29 



THE CLUB WOMAN AS A HOME MAKER 

By Mrs. Charles K. Merrill 



There are few indictments of the 
club woman more frequent among- the 
superficial than that time-worn, tart 
and tattered complaint that the great- 
er her activity and usefulness as a club 
worker, the more her own particular 
household suffers. By a like token 
there is none less just. From a more 
or less extended acquaintance with 
many club women — without being, ex- 
cept in a desultory way, one myself — 
I am prepared to bear witness that 
those who have left their impress deep- 
est upon their communities through 



en, in the club room or in the nur- 
sery. Further, the club ideal has crys- 
tallized with years of development un- 
til it is literally true that a woman does 
not make a good, well-rounded club 
worker unless she is a good home- 
maker. The functions of the club and 
the home are mutual and retroactive 
but there is no question in the mind 
of the sincere and able club woman 
as to which are the more important, 
or which the means and which the 
end. 

At the Los Angeles district con- 




their work in women's clubs are the 
same women who have reared endur- 
ing monuments for themselves in the 
hearts of families over which they 
have graciously and ably presided as 
wives, mothers and home-makers. 

There is nothing strange about this 
fact. The qualities that make a woman 
are the same whether they are exerted 
in the convention hall or in the kitch- 



Couriesy California Furniture Co, 

vention at Santa Barbara the delegates 
heard that principle expressed in the 
concrete by a practical home-maker 
who is at the same time a club women 
who ability has made her district 
chairman of home economics — Mrs. C. 
C. Adams. She took up in turn the 
different phases of club work and 
showed their vital relation to the busi- 
(Continued on Page 48) 



30 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



TRAVELERS' AID SOCIETY OF CALIFORNIA 

By Mrs. L. P. Crane 

State Chairman of Health 



Travelers, irrespective of age, sex, 
race, creed or class may come to Cali- 
fornia for the Panama-Pacific Interna- 
tional Exposition and rest assured that 
they will be met when they arrive, 
that they will receive all information, 
and, when necessary, full guidance and 
protection. This is guaranteed by the 
recent formation of the Travelers' Aid 
Society of California, and by the as- 
surance of the Exposition Exploita- 
tion Department. The California 
Travelers' Aid Society has been fash- 
ioned in every fundamental respect 
after that of New York, with which 
the Western organization will official- 
ly co-operate. 

The California Society has been 
formed at the instance of the Woman's 
Board of the Panama-Pacific Interna- 
tional Exposition, which sent out a 
call to all churches, every prominent 
commercial body, and every railroad 
and steamship company in San Fran- 
cisco and cities about the bay. In all 
cases the response was immediate and 
the interest enthusiastic. Mr. Orin 
C. Baker, the General Secretary of the 
New York Travelers' Aid Society, who 
came to California on the invitation of 
the Woman's Board, assisted in the 
formation of the Western organiza- 
tion. 

Knowing that California would have 
its immigration problems with the 
opening of the Canal, the Woman's 
Board decided to effect a permanent 
organization rather than one for the 
temporary welfare work necessary 
during the Exposition year. From 
now, until after the Exposition, the 
Travelers' Aid Society will be an al- 
lied Exposition activity. President 
Moore endorses heartily the formation 
of the permanent organization. 

At the time of the Exposition the 
Information Bureaus will be handled 
jointly by the Travelers' Aid Society 
and the Exploitation Division of the 
Exposition. This will mean efficiency. 



The Exploitation Department of the 
Exposition will list and endorse hotels 
and restaurants that may be .relied 
upon not to increase rates and prices, 
and the Travelers' Aid Society will do 
everything else that will make for the 
comfort and general welfare of the 
traveler. This combination of big 
forces will mean peace of mind for 
every one who makes the pilgrimage 
to the 1915 Exposition. 

The Woman's Board, in the inter- 
est of the Exposition and the immigra- 
tion of the years to follow, is organiz- 
ing the women of every County in 
the State of California. That organi- 
zation will take up Travelers' Aid 
work in conjunction with the Woman's 
Board, meaning that a traveler may 
come from any part of the world and 
go to any county of this vast State, 
protected at all times by the agencies 
of the Travelers' Aid. It will mean 
that any mother, who cannot accom- 
pany her daughter, may trust her to 
travel alone to San Francisco or any 
part of California. It will mean that 
this girl will be met and protected 
upon her arrival, will be directed to 
a home where she may be safe and 
comfortable. 

The California Travelers' Aid So- 
ciety will unite with other societies 
having the same objects, to form the 
National Travelers' Aid Society, and 
to adopt a uniform badge, uniform 
plans and methods of work, stand- 
ardize records and reports, and finally 
to unite with similar organizations in 
other countries. The significance of 
the Travelers' Aid and the breadth of 
interest in the new organization is 
shown in the personnel of the direc- 
tors, the interests which they rep- 
resent are: Bishop Edward J. Hanna, 
Catholic Church ; Rabbi Martin A. 
Meyer, Jewish people : Bishop Edwin 
H. Hughes, Evangelical Churches; 
William H. Crocker, Crocker National 
Bank; Jesse W. Lilienthal. United 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



31 



Railroads of San Francisco ; James 
Horsburgh, Jr., Southern Pacific Rail- 
road; A. H. Payson, Santa Fe Railway 
Company; Charles M. Levey, Western 
Pacific Railroad; W. J. Dutton, Fire- 
men's Fund Insurance Company; M. 
H. Robbins, Jr., San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce; Archibald Kains, 
San Francisco Clearing House; R. B. 
Hale, P. P. I. E.; S. Veatch, Brother- 
hood of Railway Trainmen ; Robert 
Newton Lynch, San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce; Milton H. Esberg, 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce; 
Warren Olney, Jr., San Francisco Bar 
Association ; John P. Young, San 
Francisco Chronicle ; Charles S. Stan- 
ton, San Francisco Examiner; Carlton 
H. Parker, California Immigration 
Commission ; H. E. A. Railton, Pacific 
Mail Company ; O. D. Jacob}-, Oak- 
land Banking Interests; Mrs. Phoebe 
A. Hearst ; Mrs. George P. Thurston, 
Y. W. C. A. of San Francisco : Miss 



Grace Fisher, Oakland Y. W. C. A.; 
Rev. C. S. S. Dutton, Unitarian 
Church ; Rev. Eugene H. Benson, 
Episcopal Church; Miss Anna Nichol- 
son, Secretary State Board of Educa- 
tion; Mrs. Mary Prag, Principal Girls' 
High School; Mrs. Myer Friedman, 
Council of Jewish Women ; Alexander 
Russell, San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce; Mrs. H. E. Magee, Oak- 
land, Catholic Ladies' Aid Society; 
Mrs. Ernest S. Simpson, Woman's 
Board, P. P. I. E.; Mrs. L. P. Crane, 
Oakland; John F. Davis, Native Sons 
of the Golden West; Mrs. J. W. Stir- 
ling, Native Daughters of the Golden 
West; Miss Anna Beaver, San Fran- 
cisco Y. W. C. A. ; Mrs. William Geer 
Hitchcock, Catholic Women of San 
Francisco; Mrs. Frederick G. Sanborn, 
President of Woman's Board, P. P. 
I. E. ; Miss Grace Trumbull, Califor- 
nia Development Board. 



POWER BONDS: TO BE OR NOT TO BE 

By Mrs. W. C. Mushet 

Retiring President Los Angeles District 



"To be or not to be — that is the 
question." 

So many cunningly devised and 
specious arguments are adduced that 
it is imperative if we would exercise 
aright our power to vote, that we 
should investigate for ourselves. 

I thought I favored the power bond 
issue, but an investigation of the facts, 
at first astounded, then made me indig- 
nant, and now I know that they should 
be defeated and I have decided to state 
some of the facts. 

As you know there are three com- 
panies operating in this field, each 
with its own distributing system dis- 
figuring our streets, three investments 
upon which the law requires the people 
to pay a reasonable return through 
their rates, and now it is proposed that 
the people should provide five and a 
quarter million dollars for a fourth 
system. 

The object of the installation of a 



fourth distributing system is said to be 
to provide the people with electricity 
at cost. That this is a fabrication can 
be seen by the workings of the Muni- 
cipal Water Department. We trusted 
in vain that we should get water at 
cost, and now as an actual fact we pay 
2^ times the amount for water, that 
it costs. 

The power companies have offered 
to buy all the electricity that can be 
generated from the Aqueduct at a 
price to be fixed by the people through 
the Railroad Commission and to sell it 
to the public at a rate to be fixed by 
the people through the Board of Public 
Utilities, and also agree to retire from 
the Los Angeles field at the en<i of five 
years. 

What could be fairer? 

These companies have been induced 
to invest many millions of money be- 
longing to many thousands of small 
stockholders in good faith, and it is 



32 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



now proposed to drive them out of 
business. It does not need a prophet 
to tell that the small stockholder is the 
one who will suffer, and there are 
thousands of them among our citizens. 

In less than seven years the bonded 
debt of this city has jumped from $7,- 
000,000 to nearly $39,000,000 so that at 
the present we are required to pay 
taxes to the extent of $3.00 each year 
on every $100 of property. 

Do we realize the enormity of this, 
and what it is costing this city? We, 
through our taxes, are paying the sum 
of $9,534.26 per business day to liquify 
the debt, and ought we to assume a 
further amount? 

The voting of these bonds would 
mean an increased burden and would 
prevent the floating of other bond is- 
sues which are needed for storm drains, 
harbor completion, water distribution, 
etc. 

The proposed bond issue for distri- 
bution purposes is absolutely inade- 
quate and would have to be supple- 
mented by another issue. 

But the crowning objection I have 
to the issue is the manner of its pres- 
entation to the people. 



A year ago this same question was 
presented to the voters and they de- 
cided against the bonds. 

Now another bond election is to be 
held at a cost to the people of many 
thousands of dollars. The only excuse 
for a bond election is to ascertain the 
will of the people and yet the council 
has deliberately tied this question of a 
distribution system, to cost five and a 
quarter millions to that other question, 
of the issue of $1,250,000 bonds for the 
completion of the work already begun 
of generating electricity along the line 
of the aqueduct. 

We all wish to vote for the $1,250,- 
000.00 bonds for completion of work 
already begun, but I am sure when the 
facts are known few will care to vote 
$5,250,000 more to install a fourth dis- 
tributing system, yet the powers that 
be, have decreed that the two issues 
must rise or fall together, for in the 
bond election called for the express 
purpose of allowing us to express our 
wills the two questions are tied to- 
gether, so whether we will or not we 
must vote yes for both or no for both. 

There is no compulsion but we must 
— they force me to vote no. 



CALIFORNIA'S HISTORY 

Continued from Page 13) 

ized by nothing so much as a vague 
feeling of unrest, it is not strange 
that we should be unable to enter fully 
into the spirit of a generation as re- 
mote as that of a century or even a 
half-century ago. This is the distin- 
guishing feature of the present and 
voices the spirit of the times. The in- 
centive to rush — to live for today is 
paramount. But with it all, there is 
that one abiding subject of interest 
that cannot be separated from us or 
sentiment — our History and Land- 
marks. In the mad rush onward and 
upward, we, as loyal, patriotic citizens, 
must pause and reflect, "lest we for- 
get" and our State fall behind. Her 
reputation as well as our own is clear 



to us and so closely related we needs 
must feel anxious for conditions that 
may make or mar it. Our motives 
should be of deep concern for the in- 
terests with which we are connected, 
which we allege to serve and which 'it 
is our privilege to promote. To fail 
to keep this subject separated, above 
and before us would cast a shadow on 
our organization ; it is like the atmos- 
phere about us — it is for you and me 
and is always timely. Nothing could 
be more instructive, more interesting 
than the events which formed the mile- 
stones of our progress ; in no field is 
there more room for extended research 
— in none can be found a deeper re- 
ward for exerted labor. It is the core 
and back-bone of all California his- 
tories that have been or ever will be 
written. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



33 



General Federation 

BOAKD OF DIRECTORS 

President — Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker, 2606 Whitis avenue, Austin, Texas. 

First Vice-President — Mrs. L. L. Blankenburg, 214 West Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Second Vice-President — Mrs. Samuel B. Sneath, 211 Monroe street, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Harry L. Keefe, Walthill, Nebraska. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Eugene Reilley, 508 Park avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Treasurer — Mrs. John Threadgill, 922 North Robinson street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Auditor — Mrs. C. H. McMahon, 32 Caithness Apartments, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Directors — Mrs. William E. Andrews, 1225 Fairmont street, N. W., Washington, D. C; Mrs. 
A. L. Christie, 219 South Washington street, Butte, Montana; Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, 
Irvington, Indianapolis, Indiana; Mrs. Francis D. Everett, Highland Park, Illinois; Mrs. 
William P. Harper, 651 Kinnear place, Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Creighton Mathewes. 315 
Bermuda street, New Orleans, Louisiana; Mrs. Frank White, Valley City, North Dakota; 
Mrs. William B. Williams, Lapeer, Michigan. 

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS 

Art — Mrs. Melville F. Johnston, 103 North Tenth street, Richmond, Ind. 

Civics — Miss Zona Gale, Portage, la. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, The Gladstone, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conservation — Mrs. Emmons Crocker, 48 Mechanic street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Education — Mrs. 0. Shepard Barnum, 312 South Fifth street, Alhambra, Cal. 

Household Economics — Miss Helen Louise Johnson, 234 Paddock street, Watertown, N. Y. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. A. E. Chantler, Tacoma Daily News, Tacoma, Wash. 

Legislation — Mrs. Horace T. Towner, Corning, la. 

Literature — Mrs. Frances Squire Potter, 4581 Oakenwald avenue, Kenwood, Chicago, 111. 

Music — Mrs. Lawrence Maxwell, Edgecliffe Road, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O. 

Public Health — Mrs. S. S. Crockett, 710 Belmont avenue, Nashville, Tenn. 

Press Committee — Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, Chairman, Indianapolis, Ind.. 



BIENNIAL NOTES 



Mrs. Frederick Dow, state president 
of Illinois, is planning to keep open 
house during the Biennial Convention 
of the General Federation of Women's 
Clubs, June 2-19, at Hotel La Salle, 
that, as head of the hostess state, she 
may be of all possible assistance to the 
various delegations which have their 
headquarters at that hotel. On Satur- 
day, June 13, with the assistance of 
past state presidents, she will hold a 
reception from 2 to 4 o'clock for Illinois 
delegations and many distinguished 
club women from all parts of the coun- 
try. This will be one of the attractive 
social features of the convention. Other 
state presidents are also planning lor 
dinners and receptions. 

The Press Committee, of which Mrs. 
Grace Julian Clarke, of Indianapolis, is 
General Federation chairman, will hold 
a press luncheon, followed by a con- 
ference, at 12:30 Saturday, June 13, at 
one of the down town hotels. There 
will be short, crisp, pointed speeches 
by members active in press work 



throughout the country, with ad- 
dreses by a leading newspaper man 
and a leading newspaper woman of 
Chicago. This will be followed by a 
general discussion of publicity work. 
Some of the topics discussed will be 
"The Future of the Club Department 
in the Newspaper," "Why Is the Press 
Committee," and ''Holding Out In- 
ducements." 

After the seven working days of the 
convention there will be a sociological 
pilgrimage under the direction of Mrs. 
Willis O. Nance, of Chicago, chairman 
of the Excursions Committee. This 
will include an automobile trip over 
the park and boulevard system, with 
visits to Hull House, Fellowship 
House, Gadshill Settlement and nu- 
merous public playgrounds, where the 
school children of the city will furnish 
entertainment for the guests in 
pageant and otherwise. The tea will 
be served at various stopping places 
and each little group of women will 
be conducted by a member of the Ex- 




MME. WILBUR 
{with J. M. Hale Co. for 
twelve years) is now at 
535 South Broadway, 
where old and new cus- 
tomers will receive her 
personal attention. 



Hair Goods 
Specialists 

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required in this season's modish Coiffures. 

Switches, Pompadours, Braids, Tango Curls, Transforma- 
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Our Hair Dressing Parlors Are The 
Largest and Best Equipped in the City 



Ladies' Turkish Baths 

For tired, worn-out nerves, general lassitude, or for the 
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535 South Broadway 



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THE ONLY MORNING DAILY OF SOUTHERN CALI- 
FORNIA THAT DOES NOT CARRY UNDESIRABLE 
READING MATTER INTO THE HOME. EVERY EF- 
FORT OF THE TRIBUNE IS ALONG THE LINE OF 
PROGRESS AND THE FURTHERANCE OF PUBLIC 
WELFARE. 

NO MORBID NEWS MATTER, NO SUGGESTIVE IL- 
LUSTRATIONS, NO OFFENSIVE ADVERTISING WILL 
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liked. You will like the Tribune. Just phone us to start. 



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Home 60266 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



35 



cursions Committee, who will be ready 
to explain the different points of in- 
terest visited. There will also be ex- 
cursions to the stores and shops where 
arts, crafts and textile exhibits will 
be seen and the visits to the Art In- 
stitute will be under the directions of 
competent guides. 

The Local Biennial Board is never 
for a moment forgetting that it has 
made Comfort its slogan and there will 
be maintained in each hotel a room in 
which will be found a member of the 
Hotels Committee, the Bureau of In- 
formation, the Press, Reserves, Reg- 
istration and Local Board Ticket Com- 
mittees ready to answer all questions 
and do everything possible for the 
comfort and convenience of the 
guests. Arrangements have been 
made whereby state headquarters will 
be located free of charge in the hotel 
to which a delegation is assigned. 

Transportation Bulletin 

The following is the latest word re- 
garding the arrangements for reaching 
Chicago on the Biennial Special. Mrs. 
McCoy recommends that the delegates 
and visitors from Southern California 
join the train at Salt Lake, getting 
there via the Salt Lake Route. They 
can leave Los Angeles at 9 o'clock 
a. m. June 5, reaching Salt Lake at 
11:45 a. m. the next day. The special 
will arrive from Oakland at Salt Lake 
over the Southern Pacific at 2 p. m. 
June 6. There will be a stopover at 



Salt Lake, where the hospitality of 
the local club women will be enjoyed 
and another at Denver, where the 
Colorado delegation will join the train. 
All delegates desiring to go from Oak- 
land or Sacramento will please notify 
Mrs. George W. McCoy, 2410 K 
street, Sacramento. Those going via 
Salt Lake Route from the south notify 
Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 702 Ivy 
street, San Diego. 

The special train will leave Oak- 
land, June 5th, on arrival of 10 :20 
a. m. ferry from San Francisco. Leave 
Sacramento 1 :45 p. m., arrive Salt 
Lake City June 6 at 2:15 p. m. The 
delegates and visitors will be met and 
entertained for about three hours by 
the Salt Lake City and Utah club 
women. Invitations have been ex- 
tended to the state delegations of Ore- 
gon, Washington, Nevada, Utah, Col- 
orado and Nebraska to join us en 
route. Arrive Colorado Springs 5 :35 
p. m. June 7. Arrive Denver 8:15 
p. m. Arrive Omaha 4 p. m. June 8. 
Leave Omaha 6 p. m., arriving in Chi- 
cago June 9 at 7:45 a. m. 

It has been made necessary to start 
on June 5 instead of June 4 to secure 
the round trip summer rates which are 
as follows : $72.50 round trip, good for 
three months, with stopover privileges 
and choice of routes returning. Pull- 
man rates : Lower berth, $13.00 each 
way; upper berth, $10.40. 

For reservations and further par- 
ticulars, address Mrs. McCoy. 



Home 20380 



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R. C. GARLAND 

OILS AND GREASES VULCANIZING TIRES TUBES 

PRESTO RECHARGES 

BEST GASOLINE ASK FOR TEST 

South East Cor. Figueroa and Washington Sts. LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



The automatic telephone represents electricity's most modern 
application — in the field of telephonic communication. 

The Homephone I 

■ 

affords direct, instantaneous connection—a feature well worth 
remembering. Call Contract Dept. F 98. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



67 



DISTRICT NEWS 



Los Angeles 

Next to the Santa Barbara conven- 
tion and its trail of lesser annual gath- 
erings and elections, flower shows, past 
and coming, are the events of prom- 
inent interest in the Los Angeles dis- 
trict. Easily first in importance has 
been the festival of the Sierra Madre 
Woman's Club, held at the club house 
in the shadow of Mount Wilson for 
the three days beginning April 2. 

The Sierra Madre Flower Show is 
always a remarkable affair — a sort of 
progression in superlatives. This vear 
exceeded last by just about the same 
amount that last year exceeded the 
year before. It will continue in this 
wise, presumably, until there is noth- 
ing bigger to attain. 

The entire club house was turned 
over to the exhibits and was so filled 
with flowers and ferns that hardly an 
inch of woodwork was visible any- 



where. The great feature of the show 
this year was the wonderful collection 
of wild flowers — more than one hun- 
dred varieties shown in millions of 
blossoms. Little Gladys Walker won 
the girls' first prize for the largest col- 
lection of these and Kenneth Saunders 
the boys'. 

A utilitarian turn was lent the show 
by the admission as exhibits of fruit 
and vegetables, canned fruits, jellies 
and jams — with prizes. The commit- 
tee in charge of the affair consisted of 
Mrs. W. J. Lawless, chairman ; Mrs. 
W. H. Ingraham, J. N. Hawks, Mrs. 
Frank Wright, E. J. Webster. J. T. 
Mason and L. E. Steinberger. 

The Los Angeles Wednesday Morn- 
ing Club will give an elaborate floral 
fete and pageant on May 22 and 23. 
Each section of the club will take some 
particular part of the festivities in 
charge. There will be booths for the 




Oriental Rugs 



WE are offering now exceptional values in Oriental rugs. It will pay 
you, if interested in rugs, to look over our stock before purchasing 
or selecting your floor coverings. 

We have over 700 pieces of Oriental rugs now on sale and to 
select from. Remember — Our low rental and expense enables us to sell 
you rugs at low prices, and to meet any competition. 

We invite your critical inspection and will be pleased if you 
merely call and price our rugs, whether you buy or not. 

J. H. Minassian & Co. 

"The Exclusive Oriental Rug Store" 

802 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Hotel Cordova Building 



Your Mirror will tell you 
more about "Style" 




in a minute — 

'THAN you could learn from reading a 

whole book on the subject. 
There's always something new to be learned 
about " Sty le" and there' s just one really satis- 
factory way of acquiring this knowledge — visit 
"The Style Shop," try on some of the new 
gowns, and — 

Let the Mirror tell you! 





You may change at will 

your entire appearance through 
your choice of really smart apparel 

It's all a matter of "Style" 

A ND never was there wider latitude for 
"^ the exercise af charming individuality 
than at the present time among our myriads 
of exclusive and artististic creations, from 
the trim little gown for morning shopping 
to the extremely elaborate evening costume. 

High Class Suits 

From $14.75 up 

Dresses and Gowns 

From $12.50 up 

Daintiest Blouses 

From $2.50 up 

Artistic Millinery 

At tempting reductions 

Gloves and Veils 

Latest styles and shades 
"The Style Shop" 





THE CLUBWOMAN 



39 



sale of pretty and useful things, Span- 
ish dinners, with appropriate accom- 
paniments, and tea a l'Anglaise each 
afternoon. 

Among the first of the district clubs 
to nominate officers for the ensuing 
year is the Los Angeles Council of 
Jewish Women, of which Mrs. Isidore 
Myers has been the able head for the 
past two years. This branch of the 
national organization has named Mrs. 
Henry Klein to succeed Mrs. Myers, 
upon the refusal of the latter to con- 
sider a third term. Mrs. Jules Kauff- 
man was nominated for the post of 
first vice-president. 

The California Badger Club nomi- 
nates Mrs. Frank Waters and Mrs. 
A. C. Labrie to succeed themselves as 
president and first vice-president, re- 
spectively. Mrs. E. E. Xott, incumb- 
ent, and Mrs. Louis A. Gould were 
named as candidates for second vice- 
president. Mrs. James Ormsby and 
Mrs. Fagge for recording secretaary, 
Miss May McGovern for correspond- 
ing secretary and Mrs. M. E. Bartlett, 



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AND 

Slip on Models 

OF THE 

GOODWIN 
CORSETS 

Expert Fitter in 
attendance at 



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602 Title Guarantee BIdg. 

F 1961 Mine. A. Gale Butt, Mgr. Main 4234 





WHITAKER 

ELECTRIC 

LIGHT 

BATH 

CABINET 

Manufactured in 
LOS ANGELES 

Indorsed by all 

Up-to-Date Physicians 

Salesroom 

804 WEST EIGHTH STREET 

Phone F-7496 for Booklet 



40 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



A MODEST MASTER OF MILLIONS 



With the season at Pasadena drawing to a close The Hunting- 
ton, which during the past few months has been the center of the 
activities of the winter colony, is to soon pass into the hands of 
decorators and furnishers to prepare for the 1915 season. 

Opened in January as the most beautiful and the only fireproof 
winter resort hotel in the west, the resort sprang into instant promi- 
nence as the center of the fashionable Oak Knoll colony of mil- 
lionaires, and the announcement made during the past week that 
heavy expeditures will be made in additional improvements before 
the coming of the 1915 visitors marks the Huntington as the social 
center in the Southern California festivities of Exposition year. 

Back of the taking over of the Huntington by the traction mag- 
nate whose name it bears lies a story of one man's pride in South- 
ern California. 

Years ago before the building of the Pacific Electric and Los 
Angeles Railways H. E. Huntington and Professor Lowe of Pasa- 
dena were on Echo mountain. 

Huntington was just taking over the few scattered properties 
that he was to weld into the greatest electric system in the world 
and looking out over the San Gabriel Valley Huntington said, 
"Lowe, that's an empire down there, and all it needs is light, heat 
and transportation. That is what we must give to it." 

After the work of building was begun Huntington purchased 
the San Marino estate for his personal home, and it was to this 
place that after years of building and furnishing the greatest 
country home in the west Huntington brought his bride a few 
weeks ago. 

During the period in which Huntington purchased the San 
Marino estate he became interested in Oak Knoll and planned to 
make the bench above the San Gabriel mission the beauty spot 
of the west. 

His plans were carried out with one exception, for the builders 
of the Hotel Wentworth were unable to finish the work because 
of financial stringency. 

Huntington did not desire to enter the hotel business, but as 
the years went by and the hotel stood on the edge .of the mesa an 
unfinished ruin it blocked the plan of beautification of the Oak 
Knoll disrict. 

The final result was that a year or so ago he walked into the 
offices in Los Angeles, called a department head to him and said. 
"I have bought the Wentworth. Finish it and make it look like a 
Southern California hotel ought to look." 

There was no question of expense, and the Huntington of to- 
day, recognized as the social center of the Pasadena winter colony, 
speaks for itself. 

It may never be a great money maker, for the investment in 
the property is too great for that, but it always will be a drawing 
card for Southern California. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



41 



incumbent treasurer, were the other 
nominations. There are to be two new 
directors elected to succeed Mrs. C. 
H. Grant and Mrs. J. L. Wilder. The 
election will be held the first Wednes- 
day in May. 

San Francisco 

The San Francisco district has held 
three executive board meetings re- 
cently, each largely attended by de- 
partment chairmen. The year's work 
has been summed up and a splendid re- 
port is coming to the state convention 
at Riverside of the work of this dis- 
trict. A Down and Out Club of past 
officers and chairmen is formed to go 
on record at the next district conven- 
tion. The district year will close with 
a luncheon at the Palace Hotel on 
April 4 with all the clubs which are 
members represented by delegations. 
The officers and chairmen acting as 
hostesses are eager that the general 
invitation shall be as generally ac- 
cepted. 



Mrs. Percy Shuman and Mrs. Percy 
King, respectively the retiring and in- 
coming presidents of the district, were 
the guests of honor at a Reciprocity 
Day given by the clubs of St. Helena 
at that place on March 18. 

A panoramic view of Yosemite Na- 
tional Park, showing the characteris- 
tic features of the landscape, has just 
been issued by direction of Secretary 
Lane. This panorama shows in a strik- 
ing manner the gradual rise in the 
elevation of the country from the west- 
ern boundary of the park to the east- 
ern boundary along the crest of the 
Sierra Nevada, and the sudden drop to 
the level area of the Great Basin. 
Eight colors were used in the printing, 
the meadows and valleys being in light 
green, the streams and lakes in light 
blue, the cliffs and ridges in combina- 
tions of colors in order to give the 
hazy effect characteristic of the region, 
and the roads in light brown. The let- 
tering is printed in light brown, which 
is easily read on close inspection, but 




Women 's New Responsibility 

With the enfranchisement of the women of 
California comes a new responsibility — that of 
business cares. The officers of this strong 
Bank take pleasure in consulting with women, 
in an advisory capacity, about all matters per- 
taining to business. 

Particularly is this Ba?ik interested in 
being appointed Executor of Estates. 
The fees are fixed by law. Let us talk 
to von about it. 







ffl^S^ TRUST t) Olfc 



308-310 South Broadway 



> 



42 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



which merges into the basic colors 
when the sheet is held at some dis- 
tance. The panorama is surrounded 
by a gray border in order to make an 
effective background. This view, 
which may be purchased from the 
Superintendent of Documents, Govern- 
ment Printing Office, Washington, D. 
C, for 25 cents, measures 18| by 18 
inches, and is on the scale of 3 miles 
to the inch. It is based on accurate 
surveys and gives an excellent idea of 
the configuration of the surface as it 
would appear to a person moving over 
it in an aeroplane. 

Southern 

The Southern District, hostess to 
the forthcoming state convention, has 
centered its club activities of late 
largely in the direction of Riverside. 
It is an open secret that the women 
of this district expect — in more ways 
than one — to leave their impress upon 



the federation as a result of this gath- 
ering and nothing which will con- 
tribute to that end is being neglected. 
Mrs. Palmer herself has taken a large 
share of the task of preparation and 
the local board at Riverside. Else- 
where in this issue will be found de- 
tails for the guidance of visitors and 
delegates. 

One of the most active clubs in this, 
or for the matter of that, in any other 
district, is the San Bernardino Wom- 
an's Club, Mrs. R. F. Garner, presi- 
dent. In the last year its membership 
has risen from sixty-six to a hundred 
and seventy-six through the potent 
agency which its practical work in the 
community has been. The club has 
taken an active part in practically 
every movement for civic betterment 
in San Bernardino, and their success- 
ful accomplishment has been in large 
measure due to its influence. A ma- 
ternity home, the most recent ambition 



THE MOST COMPLETE CORSET 
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• 531 

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Main 


255 


SAM SEELIG 


Home 


10428 


Successor to Stockwell & Bradford Co. 
GROCERIES, FRESH MEATS AND POULTRY 
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 1307-9 S. FIGUEROA ST. 



Hemstitching, Pleating and Cloth-Covered Buttons 
ELITE BUTTON CO. 

604 Title Guarantee Building, S. E. Corner Fifth and Broadway 

Phone F-1255 




99 



The Store that sells the noted 

"Wooltex 

Suits - Coats - Skirts 

Endorsed by club and professional women in a 

thousand centers of fashion 

Sold in Los Angeles exclusively at Lane's 



Have you tasted 

California 

Cactus 

Candy? 



If not, you owe it to yourself to learn of the surpassing goodness of 

CALIFORNIA 

product— the candy hit of the age. Entirely different from 
other candies and just as good as it is different. Pure, wholesome, 
typically Western — a wonderful use found for a hitherto worth- 
less species of desert /"* Af^'T'F '/C 

THE CACTUS GARDEN is headquarters for California Cactus 
Candy, and the "cutest place in town" for light lunches, fountain 
service and all lines of pure, wholesome CAND Y 



CALIFORNIA CACTUS CANDY COMPANY 

Office: 2306 South Hoover Street LOS ANGELES Cactus Garden: 222 West Fourth Street 



VISIT THE SODA FOUNTAIN AT THE NINTH STREET 
PHARMACY, CORNER NINTH AND FIGUEROA STREETS. 
FULL LINE OF DRUGS, STATIONERY, TOILET AR- 
TICLES, ETC., AT CUT RATE PRICES. 

W. W. GROOM, Proprietor 



THE ROSE TREE TEA HOUSE 

Miss Ludovici 
167 North Orange Grove Avenue, Pasadena 

Lunch 12 to 2. Afternoon Tea 3 to 6. Table d'hote dinner at 6:30, to order. 
Sunday, Supper only 6 to S. Private Room for Luncheons, Bridge, Tea Parties. 
Phone Colorado 5523. Orange Grove Avenue cars pass the door. 



HomeF-6412 



Office Hours 10 to 4 
Saturday 10 to 12 



MRS. M. R. TEALE 

Formerly with Unique 

Lillian R. Premiere Beaute Requisites 

London Paris New York San Francisco 

314 Title Guarantee Bldg., 5th & Broadway- 
Entrance 220 W. 5th St. Los Angeles. Cal. 



Phones: Sunset West 213; Home 22970 
Exclusive Toilet Preparations 

Marinello Toilet Parlors 

Miss Helen Fries, Prop. 
532 AVest Washington St. Los Angeles 



^&t» 






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44 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



of the club, is in a fair way to realiza- 
tion. 

A notable change and forward step 
in the work of the San Diego Club has 
been accomplished through altering its 
by-laws to introduce the departmental 
feature into the club's work. Up to 
the present time seven departments 
have been established. Through a 
judicious dividing of the work these 
are made to cover the ground ordi- 



narily embraced by ten departments. 
Northern District Convention 

It is a source of regret to the editors 
of The Clubwoman that the notes re- 
garding the convention of the North- 
ern District, held at Woodland March 
31, April 1 and 2, failed to arrive in 
time for an account of the gathering 
to appear in this issue of the magazine. 
The article will appear in the May 
number. 



FRANCES SQUIRE POTTER-AN APPRECIATION 



By Mrs. James W. Orr 

In Frances Squire Potter we had an 
example of the trained, intelligent 
mind applied to the presentation and 
guidance of department work. 

The federation is quick to grasp the 
possibilities of definite and determined 
progress, in calling to its service the 
best minds in the country, and it is 
encouraging to see how cordially they 
meet the occasion of the varied de- 
mands and requirements. 

Mrs. Potter was one of those "whose 
ways be established," yet she felt that 



a warm place in our hearts, and that 
we have lost a friend and a lover. 

Mrs. Potter was chairman of Liter- 
ature and Library Extension for the 
General Federation. Our own depart- 
ment of Literature is modeled upon 
this and we felt the stimulus of her 
fine scholarship of her wise leader- 
ship. 



inner urge to find a larger audience. 
Her mind swept with wide wings over 
the possibilities of the feminist move- 
ment, and she naturally assumed lead- 
ership. In later years her pen and her 
voice were freely given to the cause of 
human freedom. 

We discovered Mrs. Potter, for our- 
selves, at the Boston Biennial, where 
she easily carried the honors as a 
speaker. When Mrs. Hume conferred 
with her executive board about invit- 
ing Mrs. Potter to attend the state 
meeting held at Hotel Del Monte, we 
enthusiastically supported her. Mrs. 
Potter included in that trip, a visit to 
several of the clubs in the state. 

Again we had Mrs. Potter at the 
San Francisco Biennial, and her ad- 
dresses while here, given with such 
masterly presentation of argument, 
with such utter conviction behind 
them, carried her audiences to the 
highest point of enjoyment. 

W r e feel then, in a very special 
sense, that Mrs. Potter had and has 



THEI WAY 




To the EAST 



Every day in the year, and particularly 

THE WAY 

TO THE 

CHICAGO 
CONVENTION 

General Federation of Women's Clubs, 

IN JUNE 

Excellent service. Two limited trains 
through without change in less than 
three days. 

Round Trip Fare ¥72.50 

On Sale June 1, 2, 3, 5, 6. 
Three Months Return Limit. 

Full particulars at 
601 So. Spring St., Los Angeles, 

and other offices of the 

SALT LAKE ROUTE 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



4o 



FOR ART SECTIONS 

{Continued from Page 21) 

member of the C. F. W. C. Art De- 
partment in charge of the traveling 
exhibits. 

Always ship by express, taking a 
receipt for the box but placing no 
valuation on it. Remove all former 
addresses and see that the box is in 
good condition. Repairs on the pack- 
ing case will be paid by the federa- 



tion. All other damage must be 
promptly reported and paid for. See 
that everything pertaining to the out- 
fit is in the box, address plainly and 
ship promptly. Notify by mail the 
club member to whom you ship by 
what express the box has started. 
Each club must promptly acknowledge 
receipt of the slides, using the postal 
furnished by the committee, or give 
notice of anv undue delav. 



STORE NO. 2 
Cor. Washington & Flowe 

Phones: Home 2414S 

Sunset West 100 



r Albert Cohn 

a ROCBR 



MAIN STORE 
215-219=221 S. Main St. 

Phones: Home 10664 

Sunset Main 853 



1007 S. Fisueroa 

Phone 556414 
GEO. J. JOHXSOX R. F. HAXSEX 

Upholsterer and Draper Furniture, Piano and Interior Finisher 

Maker of Special Upholstery New artistic colors on all woods 

For years operating the Upholstering and Finishing departments of the late 
Geo. B. Shriner Co., formerly Shriner-Allen Co. 





A IN VI L \J REFRIGERATOR l^ \J . 

KITCHEN SPECIALTIES 

803-805 SOUTH HILL STREET 

LOS ANGELES, U. S. A. 
E. J. FLEMING 

PRESIDENT AND MANAGER 



Home 23088 

LEIHY'S CHOCOLATES 

FOR QUALITY 

Quality is Remembered Long After 

Price is Forgotten 

Every Box Guaranteed 

Ask For Them at all Leading Stores 

BE A READY SPEAKER 

Adequate to the Emergency 
Charming, Convincing 

Private Lessons in Creative Thought, Logic, English 
Platform, Club or After-Dinner Speaking 

By appointment only. Write to 

RUBY ARCHER DOUD ^SelfI* 

PUEUR DE LIS 

CONFECTIONERY 

Pure home-made Candies, Ice Cream, Sodas, Light Lunches 
H. C. FRENCH, Manager 
538 West Washington Street 



Hotel 
Cordova 



for real comfort, all round excellence 
and refinement cannot be excelled. 
Our cafe is certainly equal to any in 
the city and at the moderate prices 
charged is in a class by itself. 

If you will stay with us once you 
will always come back. Corner 8th 
and Figueroa, Los Angeles. 

GEO. P. WELLS 

Manager 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

Harp Soloist of the Royal Academy 
of Music, London. 

Blanchard Hall. Ex. 82. Residence 1972 Eitrella 
Phones 24558West 4586. 



ENGRAVERS OF SOCIETY STATIONERY 



JAM 



WEBB COMPANY 



856 SOUTH HILL STREET 
A3539 BDWY. 7418 



"PRICES COMPARATIVE, QUALITY SUPERLATIVE" 



J. ALLAN HARVEY 

Late with "The French Gallery," London, England 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 

Special Exhibition of American Artists 
EGAN SCHOOL BUILDING, 1324 S. FIGUEROA ST., NEAR PICO, LOS ANGELES 



Hours: 9 a. m. to 6 p. m. Special Appointments Tuesday and Friday Evenings. 

Marinello System, Manicuring, Shampooing, Facial Massage, Scalp Treatments. 

Cordova Electrolosis, Chiropody and Steani Baths 

Ladies Exclusively 

S06 So. Figueroa St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Phones: Home A 2S94 Main 7544 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



47 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

{Continued from Page 10) 
interest, enthusiasm, good fellowship, 
mutual love and pride in the federa- 
tion. 

I have true love and affection for 
each officer and chairman of depart- 
ments who have served with me for 
either a part or all of the two years. 
They have shown such a clear concep- 
tion of their obligations, have so dil- 
igently prosecuted their work, have 
had such high ideals, such unquench- 
able enthusiasm, that the federation 
could not but grow in grace and 
strength. 

We have thought our way — not 
fought our way — through the months 



and years, to the end that we should 
achieve a high standard of attainment. 
We have imposed upon ourselves, as 
a line of conduct, the necessity to see 
the federation steadily, and see it 
whole. 

One of my remaining pleasures is to 
attend the "Installation Luncheon" of 
the Oakland Ebell and to install the 
officers for the coming year. 

I shall hope to see everybody at the 
thirteenth annual meeting in River- 
side, and I close my administration 
with the words of the old song: 
"Thou hast this heart of mine 
So closely bound to thine, 
No other can I love, save thee alone." 
MRS. JAMES W. ORR. 



Home 23732 



Broadway 6694 



Gockley Hardware Co. 

Paints GAS RANGES Glass 

Gas and Electric Appliances 
China and Glassware 

612-614 West Pico Street 

Bet. Flower and Figueroa 

Los Angeles, California 



Prompt Delivery Service 

Unexcelled Soda Fountain Service 
FRED VAN DAM 

DRUGGIST 

Washington and Figueroa Streets 
Home 25881 Eastman Agency West 3384 



PHONE 24357 



MILLINERY 

534 W. WASHINGTON STREET 
LOS ANGELES. CAL, 




— goes much farther in furnishing your home if you 
buy Reed Furniture. With Reed Furniture you furnish 
your home Attractively, Up-to-date and Inexpensively. 
Then, too. Reed Furniture is Comfortable and Clean. My 
Motto is: "Quality for Less." Combine good taste and 
good judgment. Let me help you in selecting. 



Walter H. Clark 

Quality for Less 

819 So. Hill St. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



%'^fctk 




224 SO. BROADWAY 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



It's the EXCELLENCE of the DAINTIES 
served combined with refined surroundings 
that makes the PIG and WHISTLE the favor- 
ite LUNCHEON place of PARTICULAR 
PEOPLE. 

And CANDIES "the taste you never forgot" 



48 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



THE CLUB WOMAN AS A HOME 
MAKER 

{Continued from Page 29) 

ness of making of a house a pleasant 
place to live. The choice of interior 
finishing and furnishing, of harmoni- 
ous color schemes, of good but inex- 
pensive pictures for the home lies, she 
said, within the province of art and 
art, as studied by the clubs, should 
embrace those' practical phases of it- 
self. Music — the music of laughter, of 
bright and happy voices, if not of in- 
struments — she added was indispen- 
sable. Literature — good books, well 
chosen for the needs of the individuals 
of particular families — is as much a 
part of the home as the kitchen sink. 
I once knew a club woman who said 
that if she ever attended a meeting of 
her club and failed to learn something 
or get an idea which could be put to 
practical good in her own home she 
would resign. She considered that that 
was what her club was for — to fit her 



better for the old-fashioned business 
of being a woman. Some of the young- 
er members of the club considered it 
a slightly-exaggerated ideal and hu- 
morously undertook to prove it. They 
tried a number of programs apparent- 
ly far removed from dustpans and din- 
ner-getting, but the member in ques- 
tion always got her ideas from them 
and even innocently complimented the 
conspirators. In despair they sent to 
a neighboring college and got an ex- 
tremely learned person to address the 
club in very obscure and abstruse 
fashion on the technique of Corot. The 
practical member listened carefully, 
obviously a bit puzzled but hopeful. 
At the end of the lecture her troubled 
face cleared. On her way home she 
stopped at a bookstore and bought a 
two-cent Copley print of a Corot land- 
scape and a piece of glass. Neatly 
mounted in passe-partout fashion it is 
now one of the really striking bits of 
decoration on the walls of her living- 
room. 



SPECIAL FURNITURE TO ORDER 



DECORATING 



THE ART FURNITURE COMPANY 



Great reduction in prices 
during April and May 



Antique and Art Furniture 



Phone 23813 



601-603 W. Washington St., cor. Figueroa 



Sf^TRADIUM 
SUU>riURSPRIN6$[ 

'It Sparkles and Foamslite Champagne*^ 

Bathe imLiquidSuhsmne 

Most RadioActiveGi native Mineral >%ter 
CURES RHEUMATISM, SCIATICA, 
COLDS, CATARRH, STOMACH, 
LIVER, KIDNEY, BLOOD POISON 
AND NERVOUS DISEASES, POOR 
CIRCULATION, FEMALE TROUBLES. 
PHYSICIAN IN CHARGE. WATER 
DELIVERED. SEND FOR BOOKLET. 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. MELROSE 
AVE. CARS DIRECT TO SPRINGS 




Offiaal On*nvgP 
flic) California^ 
Fedoraiionof Uv£>men!r 
C 1 u b j: 



May, 1914 



ARDEN DAIRY CERTIFIED 

(R0BB1NS* RANCHES) 

CERTIFIED MILK AND CREAM 

RED SEAL BUTTER 

LOS ANGELES EL MONTE. PASADENA. HOLLYWOOD. OCEAN PARK. VENICE 

SANTA MONICA. LONG BEACH HERMOSA BEACH 

SHIPMENTS TO ALL PARTS OF THE STATE 

GENERAL OFFICES: LOS ANGELES 



Sn 

Oar 

Banquet Rooms 

at 

Broadway 

Store 



LJ. Christopher Co. 

Caterers and Confectioners 



241 SOUTH SPRING 
321 SOUTH SPRING 

S31 SOUTH BROADWAY— NEAR SIXTH 



For 

Weddings 

Parties 

Receptions 

and 

Club Affairs 



Broadway 5313 



Exclusive Optical Office 



DR. D. M. SMALL 

OPTOMETRIST 



References by permission 
Brock & Company, Jewelers 
Montgomery Bros. Jewelers 



408 TITLE GUARANTEE BLDG. 
Cor. Fifth and Broadway 
LOS ANGELES 



Superior Service 






Since 1889 
Main Office and Plant 



THIS is THE "Economy Laundry" of Los Angeles — though 
our rates on some articles are a little higher than most 
laundries — because we do better work, because your goods 
are safe — and because there is less wear and tear on them under 
our expert and careful methods. 

We make our promises good, even in the matter of delivery 
— and we never promise what we cannot perform. 

Doesn't this very element of reliability appeal to you? 
If it does, please telephone us, and let us demonstrate how 
trustworthy we are. THE TR0Y LAUNDRY CO. 

14th and Main Streets Phones: Home 10531 Main 8497 



The Clubwoman 



Official organ of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 



Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 
Subscription Price, One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH, Editor and Publisher. 
MRS. O. C. VOGEL, Federation Editor. 
Matter for Miss Smith and Mrs. Vogel must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 
Entered at the Los Angeles postofftce as second-class matter 



CONTENTS 



Frontispiece Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer 

Editorial : 

To Our New Officers 7 

Clubwomen and War 7 

California Federation: 

President's Letter 8 

The State Convention 9 

Convention's Literary Program 10 

Convention Notes 12 

Retiring President's Report 13 

A Convention in Mission Style 15 

The Redlight Abatement Act ; Franklin Hichborn 16 

General Federation : 

Biennial Program 17 

A Parting Message 19 

Northern District Convention 21 

District News : 

Los Angeles 25 

San Francisco l 26 

Alameda 27 

Southern 30 




MRS. LILLIAN PRAY PALMER 
President of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 



TKe Clubwoman 



Vol. V 



May, 1914 



No. 6-6" 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Commu- 
nications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P.O.Box 1066, by the 
twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 



In so far as it may lie within its 
province to do so. The Clubwoman 
adds its voice to the pledge of wel- 
come and of fealty which the Califor- 
nia Federation of Women's Clubs ex- 
tends to its new chief and her staff. 
The nominating committee and the 
delegates at Riverside have chosen 
wisely and well. To those to whose 
hearts the ideals of federation lie close 
it means much to see them given into 
able and experienced hands to carry 
a little farther toward realization. 

Otir new executive board can hard- 
ly be called so, however. It members, 
although under new titles, are for the 
most part drafted from the old. Even 
the new faces on that bodv are those 
of familiar friends, of tried and trusted 
ability. There will be no hitch in the 
orderly procedure of federation work, 
no tedious interim of ''breaking in." 

Few more responsible tasks have 
been laid on the shoulders of enfran- 
chised women than those which Airs. 
Palmer and her colleagues will bear 
during the coming year. It will be 
the greatest year in California's his- 
tory. With our women in the fore- 
front of the feminist movement, the 
eyes of the world will literally be 
upon them — and when one speaks of 
a California woman one means a club 
woman. With our federation lies a 
great share of the responsibility for 
the showing which California will 
make before the world. 



Club Women and War 

As these words are written the 
breath of Mars blows hot in troubled 
Mexico. The hope of South Amer- 
ican mediation really succeeding in the 
restoration of peace, law and order 



in the distracted republic seems on 
the wane. Great battleships flying 
the Stars and Stripes flank her coasts 
with decks cleared for action. Unit- 
ed States troops are massed on her 
borders and in rifle pits at Vera Cruz, 
the men alert behind fixed bayonets. 

We need neither exaggerate nor 
minimize the situation. It is hardly 
a question of war with the Huerta 
government. A nation does not de- 
clare war upon an unrecognized gov- 
ernment. A grown man does not 
challenge to a duel at arms the gam- 
ins he finds at fisticuffs in the street, 
even though they bruise his shins and 
knock his hat into the mud. Neither 
does he allow them to continue 
to kick him nor to maul each other, 
if he or his suffer from the fray. The 
parallel is fairly exact and will con- 
tinue so, even to the strong hand that 
snatches apart the combatants and 
shakes them till their teeth rattle in 
their respective heads. Unstartled by 
the raucous cry of the jingo, the Unit- 
ed States is deliberately pursuing the 
one course which the failure of other 
earnestly-sought means to peace and 
order would leave to her — that of 
armed pacification. 

If we must use the sword, let us 
use it that peace may come swiftly — 
not in a spirit of conquest nor revenge 
but as the surgeon uses his lancet: 
that the gangrene may be cut away 
and health return. Let us protect our 
own. now and in the future. Let us 
oust the bloody-handed bandits and 
establish a protectorate over Mexico, 
if need be. until sanity returns to her. 
And then let us withdraw, as we with- 
drew from Cuba : as we will one day 
withdraw from the Philippines. 



8 THE CLUBWOMAN 

California Federation gf Women's Clubs 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 540 West Ivy street, San Diego. 

Vice-President — Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 2614 Njrth Griffin avenue, Los Angeles. 

Vice-President-at-Large — Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. 

Recording Secretary— Mrs. Henry DeNyse, P. O. Box 695, Riverside. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. George W. Butler, San Diego. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Edward D. Knight, 238 San Jose avenue, San Francisco. 

Auditors — Mrs. Fisher R. Clark, 321 West Flora street, Stockton; Mrs. Andrew W. Fran- 
cisco, 143 South Figueroa street, Los Angeles. 

General Federation State Secretary— Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 3454 Twenty-first street, 
San Francisco. 

District Presidents 

Northern — Mrs. A. F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery street, Oroville. 

San Francisco — Mrs. Percy S. King, Napa. 

Alameda— Mrs. William E. Colby, 2901 Channing Way, Berkeley. 

San Joaquin — Mrs. Harry Bates, Modesto. 

Los Angeles — Mrs. Herbert A. Cable, 1906 West Forty-second Place, Los Angeles. 

Southern — Mrs. A. J. Lawton, 1104 French street, Santa Ana. 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER 



To the California Federation of Wom- 
an's Clubs, most cordial greeting: 

We are facing the year, and "the 
year's at the spring." The year with 
its opportunities and its responsibil- 
ities, its trials and its testings, its de- 
mands and its compensation. It all 
lies close folded in the mystery of the 
future which time only shall unfold. 
We must, however, see the vision, and 
with prophetic eye anticipate the rev- 
elation, for it has been written "with- 
out the vision my people perish." 
Surely the vision is clear before our 
eyes and our hearts thrill in unison 
as we hear the call to larger service 
plain in the report of every depart- 
ment, the theme of every speaker in 
our great conventions. 

State endowment seems an object 
worthy of our great enthusiasm for 
it promises greater efficiency. With 
a state endowment fund our chairmen 
of departments will be equipped to do 
the work w T e now ask as confidently 
of them as the toilers of old were 
asked for bricks without straw. Our 
vision includes a close and intelligent 
co-operation between the departments 
of our Federation and State Commis- 
sions and other organizations that 
recognize a common cause. 

The perplexing question of re-dis- 



tricting has been left for solution with 
the executive board and it is hoped 
that some satisfactory plan may be 
found for re-districting, in some form, 
is a necessary and inevitable step. 
This and the reorganization of depart- 
ments will be given careful thought. 

Our first executive board meeting, 
held Saturday, May 2nd, at Glenwood 
Mission Inn, immediately after our 
election was a gratifying occasion to 
your president. Every member pres- 
ent manifested a desire to grasp the 
policies of the new administration and 
to give their loyal support thereto. 
Such spirit promises well for the fu- 
ture. 

Before another issue of this maga- 
zine is in your hands we shall be in 
the midst of the great Biennial. All 
plans for the comfort and pleasure of 
our California delegation en route are 
well made and we urge all club women 
to go if possible. 

The following starting points have 
been arranged Tor our greater con- 
venience. The president's car will 
leave San Dieg"o, June 5th at 2 a. m. 
All Southern delegates who desire 
reservations on this car will please 
promptly notify Mr. C. C. Jewett, 
Commercial Agent, Salt Lake Route, 
Union Building, Third and Broadway, 
(Continued on page 32) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



THE STATE CONVENTION, C. F. W. C. 



'Wrought in a single, well-knit fab- 
ric of achievement and with the suc- 
cessive steps of further progress 
clearly and definitely marked out be- 
fore, the thirteenth annual conven- 
tion of the California Federation of 
Women's Clubs was brought to a 
close at Riverside on May 2, follow- 
ing five days of work worthy of the 
accredited delegates of a body of wom- 
en now believed to exceed thirty thou- 
sand in number. 

With each succeeding year the state 
convention eliminates more and more 
of what properly may be termed glit- 
tering generality — fine phrases that 
mean little — and writes into its rec- 
ord more and more hard and concrete 
facts of real things accomplished and 
real things planned. Xot planned in 
a vague and sketchy way as some- 
thing that "ought to be done" but out- 
ned from the beginning as a general 
outlines a battle, with every step 
mapped out, every contingency pro- 
vided for, every task assigned and ev- 
ery available weapon in the hands of 
those best qualified to use it. 

Outside of the subjects provided by 
the convention that which supplied 
the widest field for earnest discussion 
was the resolution sponsored by the 
delegation from the Los Angeles Ebell 
by which matters of a strictly polit- 
ical complexion were barred from 
consideration. This move, intended 
to eliminate discordant partisanship 
in club work, will come before the 
next convention in an elaborated form 
as will, probably, a new form of elec- 
tion of officers. 

The Xewlands bill, the Torrens land 
law, the minimum wage amendment, 
the naval holiday bill, the state game 
law, state water commission bill, ex- 
tradition of truant fathers bill, red- 
•ood forest reserve and the plan pro- 
viding for the exchange of govern- 
ment timber lands for cut-over terri- 
tory privately owned were all in- 
dorsed. The convention also went on 
record as favoring a peace conference 



in San Francisco in 1915, the adop- 
tion of the Star-Spangled Banner as 
the national anthem, general reform 
in women's dress, a cleaner press, ex- 
tension of the kindergarten system to 
the state schools, refusal of bill-board 
lease extensions, the more general 
teaching of history and political sci- 
ence, State University extension and 
the establishment of an architects' 
commission for the inspection of pub- 
lic buildings. Among those referred 
to committees were amendments to 
the constitution providing for the af- 
filiation with the federation of organ- 
ized working women and a more dem- 
ocratic plan for the election of officers ; 
also a resolution asking the revision 
of the jury law to include women as 
well as men. Mrs. Rosamund Wright's 
resolution on the regulation of vivisec- 
tion was lost by a close vote. In- 
dorsement was given the plan to erect 
a peace statue at the entrance to the 
Panama Canal "and to the "Women's 
Independence Day" held by suffrag- 
ists on May 2. The amendment add- . 
ing the chairmen of standing depart- 
mental committees to the Executive 
Board was carried. 

Personal feeling triumphed over ad- 
mitted expediency and the redisrict- 
ing plan was defeated, after a long de- 
bate. Inyo county was shifted from 
the Northern to the Los Angeles Dis- 
trict — at its own request — but no oth- 
er change was made. An effort will 
be made to devise a new plan for the 
consideration of the next convention. 

If there were those who anticipated 
a repetition of the somewhat dramatic 
incident turning upon the nomination 
from the floor at Fresno last year of 
an opposition candidate for president 
to that presented by the nominating 
committee, they were disappointed. 
When the time came for the report of 
the nominating committee, Mrs. Rus- 
sel J. W r aters, its chairman, quietly 
rose and declared the choice of that 
body for president of the California 
Federation of Women's Clubs to be 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, of San 
Diego, retiring president of the 
Southern District. The nomination 
was received with an enthusiasm 
which means much for the support of 
the new president during her term of 
office. 

On the new executive board, as so 
far made up, there are but five new of- 
ficers, out of a possible fifteen. These 
are Mrs. George W. Butler, of San 
Diego, who succeeds Miss Jessica Lee 
Briggs in the exacting office of corre- 
sponding secretary, Mrs. Andrew W. 
Francisco, of Los Angeles, who re- 
places Mrs. S. L. Wiley as one of the 
auditors, and the three new district 
presidents — Mrs. Percy S. King for 
San Francisco, Mrs. Herbert A. Cable 
for Los Angeles and Mrs. A. J. Law- 
ton for the Southern District. 

Mrs. W. C. Mushet becomes Mrs. 
Palmer's vice-president, relinquishing 
her office as president of the Los An- 
geles District; Mrs. Emily Hop.pin, 
who has been vice-president, becomes 
vice-president at large, succeeding 
Mrs. Calvin Hartwell ; Mrs. Henry 
.DeNyse and Mrs. Edward D. Knight 
simply exchange places as treasurer 
and recording secretary, respectively; 



Mrs. E. G. Denniston, chairman of the 
Endowment Fund, becomes General 
Federation State Secretary, succeed- 
ing Mrs. Russell J. Waters. 

Much interest centered in the elec- 
tion of delegates to the Biennial next 
month. The list includes Mrs. Robert 
J. Burdette, Mrs. Ella Westland, Airs, 
reorge Butler, Mrs. Larkey and Miss 
Jessica Lee Briggs. 

At a conference of the members of 
the Woman's Legislation Council of 
California it was decided that a meet- 
ing to determine the next legislative 
program shall be held in Sacramento 
in October. A special committee, con- 
sisting of Mrs. W. E. Colby, Mrs. Se- 
ward Simons and Mrs. Anna Chase, 
will in the meantime pass upon all bills 
submitted — they must be in before 
September 1 — and from the list select 
five to be presented to the general 
body. 

The official reports read by the de- 
partment heads show the federation at 
large to be in perhaps the most flour- 
ishing condition in its history. Since 
last year nearly one hundred new 
clubs have been federated, with a total 
addition to its membership of close to 
5000 women. 



THE CONVENTION'S LITERARY PROGRAM 



Noteworthy among the many valu- 
able contributions to federation liter- 
ature made at Riverside was the ad- 
dress on "Sex Hygiene," by Rev. Ca- 
leb S. S. Dutton, pastor of the First 
Unitarian Church of San Francisco. 
Though the theme is an old one, he 
presented it in a hew way, calling vivid 
attention to the danger which lies in 
the path of our rising generation, 
growing up in ignorance of their own 
most vital characteristics. He force- 
fully condemned the policy of silence 
on the part of parents to their chil- 
dren. Teachers themselves are un- 
taught in the science of presenting the 
matter to their pupils, he said, and it 
therefore only complicates the prob- 
lem to introduce it in the schools. 



Spirited discussion from the floor 
followed, and the rules were suspend- 
ed while a resolution for the indorse- 
ment and support of the second an- 
nual conference of the Pacific Coast 
Federation for Sex Hygiene to be held 
in San Francisco June 29-July 1 was 
presented and unanimously passed. 

For timeliness and a just, unblinking 
treatment of facts, presented with their 
own remedy ably and logically worked 
out, no paper read before the conven- 
tion surpassed that of Mrs. Robert J. 
Burdette, first president of the Feder- 
ation, on "The New Patriotism." Mrs. 
Burdette defined the new patirotism 
as simply the old patriotism educated, 
civilized and grown up — not braver or 
more self-sacrificing but kinder and 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



11 



wiser. It is the doctrine not only of 
peace with honor, but peace with 
righteousness, she said. Internation- 
al peace tribunals and courts of arbi- 
tration she looked upon as stepping- 
stones to the education of a world- 
conscience to a point where there will 
e no need for arbitration. Not by 
revolution but by evolution, she said, 
will universal peace come. That it 
will come she believes certain, but 
only through knowledge, world-wide 
and organized, based upon a founda- 
tion at once spiritual, scientific and 
economic. 

The scope and purposes of the new 
department of Country Life was the 
subject of an interesting address by 
Miss Lillian D. Clark, state chairman 
of that department. She told of what 
the march of progress and invention 
has done for the farmer's wife, and 
spoke for a closer touch between the 
women of the city and the country, 
showing how it may be accomplished 
by the organization of women's clubs 
in the rural districts. 

Carleton H. Parker, secretary of the 
State Immigration and Housing Com- 
mission, spoke warmly in favor of leg- 
islation locking toward housing re- 
form. He laid stress upon the need 
of the growing child for the right kind 
of an environment, one which it cer- 
tainlv cannot get in the slum or the 
tenement. 

Next to Mrs. E. G. Greene's ad- 
dress, as chairman of the department 
of Waters, on "After the Panama Our 
Rivers," which has "been printed in 
The Clubwoman, the most important 
contributions to that subject w r ere the 
papers bv Mrs. D. M. Cate, of Long 
Beach, on the Newlands bill and by 
Mrs. W. S. Kendall on "The State 
Water Policy." The latter spoke for 
the development of power and trans- 
portation by our interstate waterways 
and for co-operation between these 
and the railways for a maximum of ef- 
ficiency. Mrs. Cate pointed out the 
tremendous significance to California 
of the Newlands bill and urged every 



club woman to do her utmost to see 
that men are sent to Congress who 
will work and vote for the bill. 

W. C. Hodge, of the forest service, 
and Airs. Foster Elliott, state chair- 
man of Forestry, spoke on what club 
women can do to promote the welfare 
of the woods, both dealing with the 
question from its practical side and 
showing how vital it is to our pros- 
perity that the forests shall be con- 
served. Mr. Hodge dwelt particularly 
upon the ravages of hunters upon the 
wild game, the remnants of which he 
said can be saved only if the timber 
is saved. 

In an able address on "Civics and 
Political Science," Mrs. Bradford 
Woodbridge, state chairman of that 
department, spoke warmly in defense 
of the showing which suffrage has 
made in this state, making plain that 
critics of the movement are unjust or 
misinformed. Other speakers in the 
same section, whose addresses proved 
her case, were Chester H. Rowell, of 
Fresno, who spoke on "Ideals of 
American Citizenship," and Airs. J. L. 
Harbaugh, state chairman of legisla- 
tion, whose subject was "The Legisla- 
tive Outlook." Airs. Harbaugh gave 
a general survey of legislative reforms 
yet to be accomplished and dealt par- 
ticularly of the great bond issues 
forthcoming at San Francisco and 
Sacramento. Mrs. Emily S. Karns. 
state chairman of Civil Service Re- 
form, pointed out some needed repar- 
ation in the classified code and Mrs. 
Y. A. Galentine, addressing the con- 
vention on "Prison Reform," made a 
powerful plea for less of the revenge- 
ful spirit of punishment in our peni- 
tentiaries and more really reformatory 
work. 

Airs. Aliguel Estudillo, state chair- 
man of Art, contributed one of the 
most interesting numbers on the pro- 
gram in her address on contemporary 
painters and painting. The talk was 
illustrated by the unusually excellent 
collection of slides lent bv the Gener- 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



al Federation and now on its tour of 
this state. 

Mrs. Charles Farwell Edson pre- 
sided over a conference on the mini- 
mum wage question, in her capacity 
as state chairman of Industrial and 
Social Conditions, at which the speak- 
ers were Judge W. I. Morrison and 
Mrs. Frances Noel, of Los Angeles,. 
Notable contributions to kindred sub- 
jects were the addresses of Prof. Ira 
B. Cross, of Stanford, on "The Human 



Cost of Industry'' and on "Two 
Phases of Philanthropy," by Mrs. O. 
P. Clark. 

In the department of Education 
some notable work in state and na- 
tional endeavor was told in the ab- 
sence of Mrs. May L. Cheney, state 
chairman, by Mrs. O. Shepard Barn- 

im, general chairman, Prof. Edwin 
Snyder, commissioner of vocational 
education and Mrs. Frank A. Gibson, 
state housing; commissioner. 



CONVENTION NOTES 



Notable among the unscheduled 
events at the Riverside convention was 
the presentation to Mrs. Orr of a hand- 
some necklace and pendant, the gift of 
the retiring board and others in token 
of their fealty and affection for the 
outgoing chief. The presentation was 
made by Mrs. E. G. Denniston and 
Mrs. Orr voiced her appreciation of the 
token in graceful words. 

Much enthusiasm was created by 
the report of Mrs. Denniston, as chair- 
man of the Sarah Platt-Decker Endow- 
ment Fund, that California will pay 
more than her apportionment of $6000 
at the Biennial in Chicago next month. 

San Francisco gets the next con- 
vention, as a matter of course. No 
other city ever put in a bid. The in- 
vitation was extended by Miss Jennie 
Partridge and the acceptance was 
unanimous. 

The annual banquet of the Down 
and Out Club, always a bright spot in 
convention programs, was held at the 
Glenwood Mission Inn Friday even- 
ing. Lender the leadership of its presi- 
dent, Mrs. Ella Westland, the club 
amply justified its reputation for brill- 
iant functions. 



The principal social event, the an- 
nual reception, was held at the Glen- 
wood, Wednesday evening, Mrs. J. M. 
Holland presiding. It was remarkable, 
incidentally, for the remarkably hand- 
some gowns worn by the delegates 
and visitors. Automobile rides with- 
out number were provided for the 
guests by their indefatigable hostesses, 
that to Mt. Rubidoux being especially 
noteworthy. Nearly all the delegates 
made the interesting trip to the Sher- 
man Institute. On Friday a beautiful 
Mav Day fiesta was given at the Wom- 
an's Clubhouse — vice the park — brill- 
iant with seasonal dances and tableaux. 
An elaborate musical program was 
piven in the evenine under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. George H. Hutton, state 
chairman of that department. 

The Travelers' Aid Society furnished 
a topic of notable interest for the con- 
ference of the department of Public 
Health. Already organized in Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, it is to affil- 
iate with the New York society to 
form a national body for the orotec- 
tion of boys, girls and women obliged 
to travel without escorts. 



VACATION 



There is no more effective way of 
feeling young again than going camp- 
ing. The novelty of new and pictur- 
esque scenes, the stimulus of care-free 
and happy companions, the certainty 
of long, bright days and nights of well- 
earned repose — all contribute to our 
well-being in a wonderfully short time. 
Even two weeks of horse-back riding. 



fishing, climbing and dancing will re- 
tore the tired nerves and brighten the 
fagged brain to new and successful en- 
deavors — 

Everyone should take enough leis- 
ure each year to go to the mountains 
and make good the prophecy : "He 
who takes short vacations often will 
never need a long one." 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



RETIRING PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

By Mrs. James W. Orr 



In the two years in which we have 
worked together as an official family, 
the elected leaders of the Federation, 
we have determined some policies and 
established some precedents. 

We began two years ago with the 
entertainment of the Eleventh Bien- 
nial Convention, C. F. W. C, for the 
California Federation was the hostess 
for the occasion. The impetus given 
us through the work of preparation 
and in participation, emphasized the 
power that lies in our hands when we 
work with unity of purpose, desire and 
action. The encouraging increase of 
our numbers in this biennial period in- 
dicates the growing esteem in which 
the federation is held, and that we 
cannot set too high a value upon the 
associated group which controls our 
general policy and activities. 

The comparative ease with which 
the new department work has been 
accepted, part of which was intro- 
duced upon the advice of Mrs. Penny- 
backer, president of the General Fed- 
eration, shows that we see readily 
enough the necessity of keeping step 
w r ith the club movement and to be 
wide awake to the great civic 
questions with which the General 
Federation is concerned. 

The business of being a club woman 
means that we must be informed of 
what is new in the social or com- 
mon thought 'of the day, what the 
ideals are which lead or guide, what 
special activities are advised, what 
plans, methods, or purposes are in the 
lead during the current year. 

To keep this sense of direct alliance 
keen, requires some effort on the part 
of each club. It must keep the line 
clear and answer to the call of "cen- 
tral." The federation has as its chief 
aid the publicity of the printed page. 
The columns of the club magazines 
and of the daily press are supple- 
mented by the pen in the hands of 



able chairmen, by the distribution of 
printed circulars, by Reciprocity days, 
by district and state conventions. 

We are in effect, a public body, with 
representation in each community, 
town and city, in the state. Each 
unit, or club, has the power of im- 
mediate influence and action in its 
own community and if it works in 
accord with the departments in the 
C. F. W. C, it has the weight of the 
state organization behind it, and 
shares the wider field of service. 

"The spirit of the times" is a trite 
phrase, yet it is the only thing which 
determines our course of conduct. The 
test of efficiency lies in an intelligent 
grasp of opportunity, and in discern- 
ing the ripeness of occasion. The se- 
cret of any measure of our success is 
equal to our response to the call of 
this time spirit. 

Opportunities increased and respon- 
sibilities likewise when the hour 
struck of our political enfranchise- 
ment. Woman's work, club work, took 
on a new significance, and the ques- 
tion arose, will our clubs become po- 
litical centers? Will we lose sight of 
the ideals of the federation and for- 
get our obligations as a state to the 
national body, or as clubs to the state 
association? 

The answer is, that California clubs 
have undoubtedly enlarged their civic 
activities, have received more consid- 
eration from public officials, have made 
more definite demands upon legisla- 
tive bodies, and conserved more care- 
fully their collective power, because 
since it is so very evident that we 
can create and determine public opin- 
ion we must know definitely what 
we want to do with it. We have not 
disturbed the established procedure in 
our clubs, but there is a constant rise 
in the character of our programs. We 
seek and are sought by, in return, the 
best speakers on the latest and most 



14 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



vital subjects. We keep the open 
mind and the poise of judgment, so we 
do not fly off at a tangent. We re- 
solve with conviction, and sometimes 
with sublime indifference to conse- 
quences, and our club life is steadily 
enhancing in interest. 

The essential club woman has not 
changed, but the spirit of the times 
calls with insistent appeal to every 
human attribute. 

The federation, taking us as a state 
association, must take an intelligent 
interest in all public questions that 
concern the public good. We can be 
a most powerful social help because 
we have no political limitations, no 
party fences, nor programs, no political 
affiliations, nor campaigns to finance. 
We do not advocate the cause of spe- 
cial interests nor of candidates for 
office. Our program shows that we 
are concerned with questions of Pub- 
lic Health, with the Conservation of 
our Forests and our Waters, with the 
advance of education, with better so- 
cial and industrial conditions, with 
greater civic responsibility; in brief, 
with the world ideals of increasing the 
sum of human happiness. That these 
are political questions at bottom, and 
that we reach final results through the 
machinery of politics, in no way les- 
sens the woman's basic ideal of cit- 
izenship. 

Since the rise of the club movement, 
we have had two generations of col- 
lege women. They have had the 
education the earlier club women 
sought in their study clubs. These 
college women, Mrs. P. N. Moore, 
Mrs. Pennybacker, Mrs. Laura Drake 
Gill, Mrs. Frances Squire Potter, for 
instance, and in our own state, Mrs. 
May L. Cheney, Mrs. George F. 
.Reinhardt, Mrs. E. B. Stanwood, Mrs. 
W. E. Colby, and many others, are 
examples of college women who work 
effectively in association, and also en- 
joy the work for its wide and varied 
possibilities. It is gratifying to know 
that the federation attracts the best 
minds, the young and fresh minds, 
and especiallv those wise, practical 



and experienced women who have by 
persistent and devoted sacrifice raised 
the woman movement to a world 
power. 

We have come face to face in the 
last two years with the need of sym- 
pathetic and active co-operation or 
fellowship with associations whose so- 
cial ideals are in accord with ours. 
The federation is not static, it is dy- 
namic, and year by year we shall take 
hold of the things which press for 
consideration. 

The past year the University of 
California, through its new Extension 
Division, brought the resources and 
the service of the University to our 
club doors. We have come to see the 
necessity of standards, which we can- 
not have without knowledge. For in- 
stance, here is a list of vital questions 
for which the Bureau of Public Dis- 
cussion in the Extension Division has 
prepared bibliographies : 

Teachers' pensions; preferential vot- 
ing and transferable vote; minimum 
wage; eight hour working day; Pan- 
ama tolls; immigration; prohibition; 
Mexican intervention ; commission 
form of government. 

The State and County Libraries will 
supplement the Extension Division of 
the U. C. by obtaining as far as pos- 
sible books covering any specified sub- 
ject. 

The recent organization in California 
of an Internal Waterways Associa- 
tion gave us the opportunity of show- 
ing how deeply interested the women 
of the state are in the conservation 
and use of waters. Woman's interest 
in remedial legislation demonstrated 
the necessity of associate co-operation, 
that efforts should not be duplicated 
nor lost by factional fights or jeal- 
ousies. The result is the organiza- 
tion of the Women's Legislative Coun- 
cil of California. 

The Traveler's Aid work has re- 
cently been put under state control 
through an organization which has on 
its directorate men and women, Jew, 
Catholic and Protestant. The C. F. 
(Continued on page 32) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



IS 



A CONVENTION IN MISSION STYLE 



With the Mission City, and the 
great, picturesque pile of the Glen- 
wood Mission Inn as a background, 
few state conventions have been held 
in more beautiful settings than that 
just completed at Riverside. More of 
the success of such a gathering than 
is perhaps realized is dependent upon 



pitality of Riverside would be com- 
plete without acknowledgment of the 
club women's debt to the Glenwood 
Mission Inn, the historic hostelry 
which has sheltered so many of the 
nation's great. The magnificent hotel 
was filled to overflowing with visitors 
and delegates and that this, the most 




CARMEL TOWER, GLENWOOD MISSION INN 



the environment and entertainment of 
the delegates outside of their conven- 
tion hall, the comfort of their hotel 
accommodations, the restfulness of 
their surroundings in the hours of re- 
laxation and, by no means least, the 
menus laid before them three times 
daily. 

No recognition of the splendid hos- 



trying test of a caravansary, was han- 
dled smoothly and without the small- 
est complaint is the convention's best 
tribute to the intelligent interest and 
co-operation of the Miller manage- 
ment, the splendid facilities for social 
activities provided and the many 
pretty courtesies extended. 



16 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



THE REDLIGHT ABATEMENT ACT 

By Franklin Hichborn 
Read at the Riverside Convention 



The Redlight Abatement act, having 
duly passed the Legislature, would 
have gone into effect last August had 
it not been held up under the refer- 
endum. 

The referendum provision of the 
State Constitution provides that when 
a given percentage of electors petition 
that a law passed by the Legislature 
be submitted to the electors of the 
state for their approval or disapproval, 
it shall not become operative until the 
electors have had opportunity to pass 
upon it. If, at a large state-wide elec- 
tion, a majority vote for the measure, 
it becomes a law. If a majority vote 
against it, the measure is defeated. 

Petitions were presented to the Sec- 
retary of State, praying that the 
Abatement law be submitted to the 
electors for referendum decision. On 
their face, the petitions bore a suffi- 
cient number of genuine signatures to 
bring the act under referendum pro- 
visions. It developed, however, that 
the opponents of the bill to secure this 
result had resorted to wholesale forg- 
ery, entire pages of forged names ap- 
pearing on the petitions. Neverthe- 
less, the referendum provision became 
operative against the measure. 

Pending the decision of the voters 
of the State at the general election 
next November, therefore, the meas- 
ure has not gone into effect. 

If, at the November election more 
voters cast their ballots for the bill 
than against it, it will become oper- 
ative. If more electors vote against 
the bill than for it, it will have been 
defeated as though it had received an 
adverse vote of the Legislature. 

As the law now stands, and as it 
has been for many years, District At- 
torneys are authorized to proceed 
against houses of prostitution and as- 
signation as public nuisances. Every 
house of prostitution, therefore, de- 
pends upon the tolerance of the Dis- 



trict Attorney of the community in 
which it is situated for its existence. 
District Attorneys, for reasons not 
necessary to discuss here, have not 
been particularly active against such 
places. The Redlight Abatement act 
corrects the present weakness of the 
law which places monopoly of such 
prosecution in the hands of the Dis- 
trict Attorney, by authorizing any 
citizen to proceed against such places. 

The measure has arrayed against it 
those interests generally designated as 
tenderloin, and particularly those who 
are reaping enormous profits from the 
exploitation of the social evil. It is 
estimated that these exploiters, not in- 
frequently of strong financial and so- 
cial standing, reap profits of $3,000,- 
0C0 a year from the San Francisco in- 
vestments in vice exploitation. Three 
million dollars capitalized at six per 
cent represents $50,000,000. Such is 
the standing of the exploitation of 
prostitution in San Francisco alone. 

To prevent the measure going into 
effect, its opponents have already re- 
sorted to wholesale forgery and per- 
jury. Those who resort to forger}- 
and perjury will not hesitate at mis- 
representation. It is to be expected 
that the bill will be misrepresented. 
It has been misrepresented. By per- 
sistent circulation of false representa- 
tion regarding it, many, who are en- 
tirely misinformed of its provisions, 
have been led to believe that the 
measure will work wrong to property 
owners and injury to the state. 

Arrayed on the side of those sup- 
porting the bill are physicians who 
are intelligently combating the spread 
of the venereal plagues; students of 
social conditions who have made un- 
biased investigation of the social evil ; 
and the normal men and women who 
contend for the single standard of 
morality. 

{Continued on page 31) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



17 



General Federation 

BOARD OF DIEECTOES 

President — Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker, 2606 Whitis avenue, Austin, Texas. 

First Vice-President — Mrs. L. L. Blankenburg, 214 West Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Second Vice-President — Mrs. Samuel B. Sneath, 211 Monroe street, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Eecording Secretary — Mrs. Harry L. Keefe, Walthill, Nebraska. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Eugene Eeilley, 508 Park avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Treasurer — Mrs. John Threadgill, 922 North Eobinson street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Auditor — Mrs. C. H. McMahon, 32 Caithness Apartments, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Directors — Mrs. William E. Andrews, 1225 Fairmont street, N. W., Washington, D. C; Mrs. 
A. L. Christie, 219 South Washington street, Butte, Montana; Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, 
Irvington, Indianapolis, Indiana; Mrs. Francis D. Everett, Highland Park, Illinois; Mrs. 
William P. Harper, 651 Kinnear place, Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Creighton Mathewes. 315 
Bermuda street, New Orleans, Louisiana; Mrs. Frank White, Valley City, North Dakota; 
Mrs. William B. Williams, Lapeer, Michigan. 

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS 

Art — Mrs. Melville F. Johnston, 103 North Tenth street, Richmond, Ind. 

Civics — Miss Zona Gale, Portage, la. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, The Gladstone, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conservation — Mrs. Emmons Crocker, 48 Mechanic street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Education — Mrs. O. Shepard Barnum, 312 South Fifth street, Alhambra, Cal. 

Household Economics — Miss Helen Louise Johnson, 234 Paddock street, Watertown, N. Y. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. A. E. Chantler, Tacoma Daily News, Tacoma, Wash. 

Legislation — Mrs. Horace T. Towner, Corning, la. 

Literature — Mrs. Frances Squire Potter, 4581 Oakenwald avenue, Kenwood, Chicago, 111. 

Music — Mrs. Lawrence Maxwell, Edgecliffe Road, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O. 

Public Health — Mrs. S. S. Crockett, 710 Belmont avenue, Nashville, Tenn. 

Press Committee— Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, Chairman, Indianapolis, Ind.. 

BIENNIAL NOTES 



The wealth of interesting things to 
be presented at the Biennial Conven- 
tion of the General Federation of 
Women's Clubs in Chicago, June 9- 
19, indicates that no club woman 
should fail to attend. Between ten and 
fifteen thousand women are expected 
and hotel managers think the number 
will be greater, estimating by the 
reservations already made. Following 
the complimentary concert to be giv- 
en by the Chicago Symphony Orches- 
tra, on Tuesday evening, there will be 
a Council meeting on Wednesday 
morning. 

Wednesday afternoon will be left 
open for General Federation depart- 
ment chairmen to meet the members 
of their departments, and there will 
be open hours in which club women 
may find delight in visiting Chicago's 
great shopping center. Wednesday 
evening the convention will formally 
open with a program under the di- 
rection of the Local Biennial Board. 
On this occasion Miss Jane Addams 
will give one of the two addresses of 
welcome. Thursdav morning the work 



of the convention begins in earnest, 
with reports of the national officers. 
"Comfort" is the slogan of the Local 
Biennial Board and there will be an 
absence of that stress of work which 
sometimes makes a convention an 
onerous duty. This is due to the ar- 
rangement of the programs. Friday 
will be the first day given to a de- 
partment and will be in charge of Mrs. 
O. Shepard Barnum, of Alhambra, 
California, chairman of Education. Her 
report will cover the educational work 
done by clubs of the State Federations 
and by state committees of her de- 
partment, which is highly organized 
into four committees — Peace, Political 
Science, Social Hygiene and Voca- 
tional Education. Mrs. Ella Flagg 
Young, Principal of the Chicago 
schools, will make the leading ad- 
dress of the morning on Education in 
a Democracy. At the general educa- 
tion conference in the afternoon each 
chairman of the committees will pre- 
sent a strong speaker as an expert 
leader of discussion on vital questions 
relating to her branch of the depart- 



18 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



merit. The subject of Peace will be 
in charge of Mrs. Josiah Evans 
Cowles, of Los Angeles, for four years 
first vice-president of the General 
Federation. The Political Science 
portion of the conference will be con- 
ducted by Helen Varick Boswell, of 
New York, on the general subject 
Preparation for Citizenship. It was 
Miss Boswell who was sent to the 
Canal Zone by authorities of the 
United States Government to organ- 
ize women's clubs there as an element 
in socially constructive conditions. 
The vexed question of Social Hygiene 
and instruction concerning it in nor- 
mal schools will be handled by Presi- 
dent William B. Owen, of the Chicago 
Normal, chairman of the committee 
appointed by the president of the Na- 
tional Education Association to pre- 
pare plans and outlines for a suitable 
normal course in Social Hygiene. Mrs. 
Maggie W. Barry, of Sherman, Texas, 
will preside during that portion of the 
conference, followed by Mrs. C. P. 
Barnes, of Kansas City, Missouri, 
chairman of the committee on Voca- 
tional Training and Guidance. The 
chief speaker for her section will be 
Prof. Frank M. Leavitt, president of 
the National Vocational Guidance As- 
sociation. At a general session on the 
evening of Education Day there will 
be an address on Political Science and 
one on Peace. 

In the Conservation department the 
report of the national chairman, Mrs. 
Emmons Crocker, of Fitchburg, Mas- 
sachusetts, will be followed by an ad- 
dress on Conservation by Gifford Pin- 
chot. The afternoon session at 2 :30 
will be a conference under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. Crocker, when in ten- 
minute talks Mrs. Lovell White, of 
San Francisco, will speak on Fores- 
try; Mrs. A. L. Christie, of Butte, 
Montana, on Conservation in general ; 
Miss Myra L. Dock, of Fayetteville, 
Pennsylvania, on Tree Nursery Work; 
Mrs. May Riley Smith on Conserva- 
tion of Birds ; and Mrs. Lydia Adams 
Williams, of Washington, D. C, on 
the Forest Service. 



CALIFORNIA 
Los Angeles, Adams and Hoover Streets. 

Girls' Collegiate 
School 

"CASA DE ROSAS" 

Twenty-third year begins September 29th. 
Accredited at leading colleges. Music, art, 
gymnasium, domestic science. Beautiful 
buildings and fine equipment. Limited 
number of resident pupils. Advanced 
courses for high school graduates and reg- 
ular first year college work. 

Miss Parsons and Miss Dennen 

Principals. 

The Fisk Teachers' Agency 

Recommends teachers to public schools 
and private schools 



Also tutors and private teachers 



343 Douglas Bldg. Tel. A 4531; Bdwy 4060 

BE A READY SPEAKER 

Adequate to the Emergency 
Charming, Convincing 

Private Lessons in Creative Thought, Logic, English 
Platform, Club or After-Dinner Speaking 

By appointment only. Write to 

RUBY ARCHER DOUD <=«&££* 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



19 



A PARTING MESSAGE 
My Dear Clubwoman : 

May I, through your columns, ex- 
press my appreciation of the enter- 
tainment of the Thirteenth Annual 
Meeting C. F. M. C? The Riverside 
club women met every demand upon 
their resources with quick and loving 
response. I cannot thank all of the 
members of the Local Board person- 
ally — although I have written many 
notes of appreciation. I am deeply 
grateful. 

The Southern District is to be con- 
gratulated. Its hostess city and its 
efficient club women have endeared 
themselves to every officer, delegate 
and visitor. 

The atmosphere of the convention 
radiated friendship, fellowship and 
energy: no discordant note was 
sounded, no vain regrets prevail. 

We shall dwell long and pleasantly 
upon the memory of the beautiful 
Glenwood Mission Inn with its count- 
less art treasures, the spacious and 
comfortable church, with its dignified 
appointments, the noble Woman's 
Clubhouse, radiating hospitality and 
overflowing with flowers. 

For all kind words, for all tokens of 
love and appreciation, including the 
gift from the members of the retiring 
executive board : for the flowers sent 
to my rooms ; for all thoughtful pro- 
visions of the local board ; for the 
words of appreciation spoken by the 
pastor of the church ; for the gift of 
the photographs ; for the general treat- 
ment of the daily press, for all, and 
more than I can mention of courtesy 
and generous care, I wish to express 
mv sincere thanks ; words do not say 
half I feel. 

Cordially yours, 

MRS" TAMES W. ORR. 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

Harp Soloist of the Royal Academy 
of Music, London. 

Blanchard Hall. Ex. 82. IWJaiM 1 972 E^tidl. 
Phont. 24558W«t 4586. 



Marquis Ellis 

VOICE EXPERT 
Placer, Trainer and Coach 



Los Angeles Times: 

"Marquis Ellis is a thespic 
coach extraordinaire, and has 
brought many real discov- 
eries to the public notice." 



STUDIO 
Majestic Theatre Building 

THOUSAND PINES 

A CABIN RESORT IN THE 
SAN BERNARDINO MOUNTAINS 

A MILE HIGH 

THOUSAND PINES, the new vacation 
camp, is located in the San Bernardino 
Mountains, 75 miles from Los Angeles. It 
is easily accessible by auto over one of the 
very best and most picturesque mountain 
roads in California. 

Good trout fishing, dancing pavilion and 
club quarters, horses and burros for the 
mountain trails, fine dining room and gen- 
eral store, cozy housekeeping cabins, pure 
spring water in every cottage. 

C. W. Brashear, Proprietor 

Thos. W. Law, Gen. Manager 

Los Angeles Headquarters — 520 Van Nuys 
Building— Main 5630; A1052 

San Bernardino Headquarters, Thousand 
Pines Garage, 325 "F" Street. Home 181 — 
Pacific 170. 




Starr Service 
Means Piano 

Satisfaction 



Regardless of what your needs may be in connection with a Piano or 
Playerpiano we are in a position to serve you in the most advantageous 
manner. If you have no piano and wish to purchase a Grand, Upright or 
Playerpiano — if you have a piano and wish to exchange it for a modern 
Grand or Playerpiano — have your piano Tuned, Regulated, Repaired or 
Refinished by Factory Experts, we will take pleasure in furnishing esti- 
mates that will certainly interest you. 

Standard 65 and 88 note Playerpiano music rolls at 33 \-Z% discount. 
Buy your Piano or Playerpiano Direct from the Manufacturer. 



The Starr Piano Company 

Factory Distributing Warerooms 
628-630-632 South Hill Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 



SAN DIEGO 
1333 Fifth Street 



SAN BERNARDINO 
160 G Street 




Rin 



Lamp Kincon 

Gem of the San Gabriel Canyon 
Good Health, Good Fare and Good Cheer 

For all who visit our Camp. New Management 

Spacious dining-rooms, pavilion for danc- 
ing, good music, plunge 40x80 feet, hot tub 
and shower bath, fine spring water, an 
ideal spot to spend a vacation. Stage fare 
to camp $1.50; Horses $2.00. 
Dr. M. H. Dailey, Mgr. R. C. Pollard, Pres. 

Azusa, Cal. Los Angeles Office 621 Central Bldg 

Telephone 213 Tel. A3475 Bdwy. 2673 

Camp Bonita 

Beautifully located at the junction of the 
main San Gabriel River and Cattle Canyon 
Creek. Completely furnished cobblestone 
huts and tents. Splendid dining room. Fine 
dance pavilion. Tennis court, croquet 
grounds. Al fishing. 

City Office 740 South Hill Street 
Henry Willard, Manager 



RELAXATION -, FREEDOM 
RECREATION SPP <T COMFORT 
REJUVENATION ^^^ lv NOVELTY 



at Follows Camp 

Beautiful trails and hospitable entertain- 
ment.- Tents, bungalows, or rooms. De- 
licious food, fresh and nourishing. Horse- 
back riding, fishing. A complete and ideal 
modern camp. 

For your Vacation 
Try the Camping and Outing 

Cold Brook Camp 

First-class accommodations and amuse- 
ments. Every arangement for camping or 
boarding. 

Pacific Electric trains 6:30, 7:05, 8:00, 
8:55 A. M. Stage daily from Azusa. 

Social hall, tennis, croquet, boxball, 
horse-back riding. Large dining room; hot 
and cold tub and shower baths. 



*For above camps take P. E. car 7:30 or 8:30 A. M. from Los Angeles to Azusa. 
Daily stage to each camp leaving at 9:30 A. M. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



NORTHERN DISTRICT CONVENTION 

By Mrs. B. F. Walton 

Press Chairman 



The Northern District Convention 
was held in Woodland, Yolo County, 
March 31st. April 1st and 2nd, with a 
full attendance of officers, district 
chairmen, and a gratifyingly large at- 
tendance of delegates and club mem- 
bers. 

Mrs. J. W. Orr. state president : 
Miss Jessica Lee Briggs. correspond- 
ing secretary ; Mrs. Percy S. King, 
president-elect of San Francisco Dis- 
trict, and several chairmen of state de- 
partments were also in attendance. 

Reports showed great activity along 
all lines of work. Reciprocity Days 
have been one of the strong features 
in arousing interest. 

The prize of a silver loving-cup for 
the best musical program for the year 
was awarded to the Music Club of 



Yreka, Siskiyou County, and the fine 
picture given by Miss Etta Cornell of 
the Federation Emblem Committee, 
went to the Lois Club of Grass Val- 
ley, that club having bought the most 
''Federation Emblems" in proportion 
to its membership. 

The resolution to re-district the 
State as a whole was voted down. 
It was agreed to ask for a new State 
Department, that of Library, with a 
trained librarian in charge, that the 
state library ma} - more efficiently serve 
the needs of club women. 

A traveling art exhibit was recom- 
mended by the art chairman, and it 
was agreed to take steps to form such 
an exhibit. 

Officers were elected for the ensuing 
\'ear as follows: President, Mrs. A. J. 




Oriental Rugs 



WE are offering now exceptional values in Oriental rugs. It will pay 
you, if interested in rugs, to look over our stock before purchasing 
or selecting your floor coverings. 

We have over 700 pieces of Oriental rugs now on sale and to 
select from. Remember — Our low rental and expense enables us to sell 
you rugs at low prices, and to meet any competition. 

We invite your critical inspection and will be pleased if you 
merely call and price our rugs, whether you buy or not. 

J. H. Minassian & Co. 

"The Exclusioe Oriental Rug Store" 

802 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Hotel Cordova Building 



Your Mirror will tell you 
more about "Style" 




in a minute — 

'THAN yott could learn from reading a 

whole book on the subject. 
There's always something new to be learned 
about" Style" and there 's just one really satis- 
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"The Style S'wp," try on some of the new 
gowns, and — 

Let the Mirror tell you! 

7he Jle&t/ork 





You may change at will 

your entire appearance through 
your choice of really smart apparel 

It's all a matter of "Style" 

A ND never was there wider latitude for 
•^ the exercise af charming individuality 
than at the present time among our myriads 
of exclusive and artististic creations, from 
the trim little gown for morning shopping 
to the extremely elaborate evening costume. 

High Class Suits 

From $14.75 up 

Dresses and Gowns 

From $12.50 up 

Daintiest Blouses 

From $2.50 up 

Artistic Millinery 

At tempting reductions 



Gloves and Veils 

Latest styles and shades 




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"The Style Shop" 




THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



Jones, Orovilie ; Vice-president, Mrs. 
A. H. Seymour, Sacramento; Auditor, 
Mrs. V. S. Wooiley, Chico ; Corres- 
ponding Secretary, Mrs. H. O. Ham- 
ilton, Orovilie ; Recording Secretary, 
Mrs. Orrin Whipple, Sacramento; 
Treasurer, Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo; 
Member State Credential Committee, 
Mrs. W. . S. Kendall, Sacramento ; 
Member Nominating- Committee, Mrs. 
G. W. McCoy. Sacramento ; Member 
Resolutions Committee, Mrs. Bradford 
AYoodbridge, Roseville ; Delegates to 
Biennial Convention, Mrs. G. W. Mc- 
Coy, Sacramento, and Mrs. B. F. Wal- 
ton, Yuba City. The 1915 convention 
will meet in Sacramento. 

Much interest was inspired by the 
talk of Mrs. Charles Farwell Edson., 
state chairman of Industrial and So- 
cial Conditions, whose subject was 
"Women and Children Industry." She 
spoke of the minimum wage as one 
to be fixed at a point where the man 
of family can support his family with- 
out the necessity for any other mem- 
ber of it to go out as a bread-winner. 



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We Deliver Promptly 



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Deposits of $ 1 .00 or more 

LOS ANGELES TRUST & SAVINGS BANK 

SIXTH AND SPRING 



24 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



Mrs. L. P. Crane, chairman of the 
department of Health, gave the con- 
vention something to think about with 
a rather disquieting review of the mor- 
tality tables for children. Two and a 
half million children born in the United 
States, she declared, live less than one 
year. Out of the 154,000 born in 
1910 there were 15,000 who died with- 
in a week of birth and 38,000 within 
a month. From these figures Mrs. 
Crane pointed a powerful moral on 
the subject of clean milk and sanitary 
care. 

Mrs. A. Ml Seymour took as her 
text the big- idea that a clerk in a 
New York criminal court once had — 
the "Big Brother" movement. It is 
in a nutshell that every responsible 
adult shall take a real and personal 
interest in the welfare of some one 
other person less fortunately sit- 
uated. 

Theodore Bell, one of the conven- 
tion's principal speakers outside of 
the members themselves, made an 
able address on the subject of home 
industries. He laid stress upon the 
need of wise legislation to meet the 
changed conditions -to follow the 
opening of the canal and pleaded for 
wisdom and justice in building for the 
future of California's industries. 

Interesting speakers on the subject 
of education were Mrs. Lydia Law- 
head, of the hostess club, and Mrs. 
May Dexter-Henshall. Mrs. George 
W. Hamilton spoke on literature, Mrs. 
Powell, of Marysville, on Reciprocity, 
Mrs. C. L. Donahue of Forestry, 
Mrs. J. H. Shearer on Home Eco- 
nomics — to enumerate but a few of 
the many speakers on varied topics. 

The members of the Woodland 
clubs were most generous in hos- 
pitality and used every effort to help 
make the convention a notable suc- 
cess. The last half day session was 
held at the University Farm, at Davis 
where after a delicious luncheon, the 
Country Life conference was held, and 
an opportunity given to inspect the 
farm, which was the first for many of 
the visitors. 



CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK 

OF RIVERSIDE 

RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA 



CAPITAL 5150,000 SURPLUS $160,000 

First National Bank 

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United States Depositary 
Established 188S 

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While it is true of our business that the 
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an establishment that will in every way 
meet your approval as to service, comfort 
and reliability. 



G. ROUSE & CO. 

Riverside, Calif. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



25 



DISTRICT NEWS 



Los Angeles 

With their notable Arts and Crafts 
festival to raise funds for their new 
820,000 club house and the ground- 
breaking ceremonies for that same club 
house held within a few days of each 
other, the members of the Hollywood 
Woman's Club properly feel that the 
past months has been epochal in their 
history. The festival itself was a 
great success and a comfortable sum 
of money was realized from the sale 
of floor space to exhibits of interior 
decoration, household equipment and 
building materials. The club house 
is to rise on La Brea street near Hol- 
lywood boulevard and will follow the 
Spanish colonial type of architecture. 
Mrs. Cassius Smith, president of the 
club, turned the first spadeful of 
earth. 

Speaking of club houses, it may be 
mentioned that the Friday Morning 
Club has put an end to its period of 
uncertainty by definitely deciding to 
build a new home for itself. No de- 
tails have been arranged but the club 
house will be built. 

The women of the district, spurred 
on by a special message from Mrs. W. 
C. Mushet on the subject, took a no- 
table part in the clean-up week ob- 
served by Los Angeles and its suburbs 
from April 20th to 26th. Prominent 
figures in the seven-day battle against 
rubbish and germs were Mrs. C. M. 
Gordon, district chairman of civics; 
Dr. Elinor Seymour, chairman of 
health ; Mrs. J. H. Francis, of the Los 
Angeles Ebell ; Mrs. Horace E. Smith, 
Highland Park Ebell; Mrs. G. A. At- 
kinson and Mrs. E. Mumford, the lat- 
ter of the noteworthy Woman's Im- 
provement Association of South Pas- 
adena. 

Annual elections began in earnest 
during the past month. For the Col- 
lege Women's Club the following offi- 
cers have been chosen : 

Airs. Roger J. Sterrett, president, re- 
elected ; Miss Sybil Jones, first vice- 
president ; Airs. Frederick F. Pender- 
gast, second vice-president, re-elected : 



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26 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



Mrs. Charles Nelson, third vice-presi- 
dent, re-elected; Miss Edith Wilde, 
recording secretary ; Mrs. O. C. Mont- 
gomery, corresponding secretary, re- 
elected; Miss Ann Mumford, treasurer. 
The Los Angeles Travel Club 
names the following : 

' President, Mrs. Fred B. Kuck; vice- 
president, Mrs. J. H. Hebard; record- 
ing secretary, Mrs. C. M. Roberts; 
corresponding secretary, Mrs. Lam- 
bert E. Jenkins ; treasurer, Mrs. J. A. 
Zimmerman; directors, Mrs. I. W. 
Gieason, Mrs. J. P. Ellis. 

San Francisco 
By Mrs. Percy L. Shuman 

This report expresses to The Club- 
woman our full appreciation of cour- 
tesies extended to us throughout our 
two years' work just closed. We feel 
we have had a progressive and inter- 
esting two years. 



The closing function was a recep- 
tion and "Wireless Luncheon" held at 
the Palace Hotel in San Francisco 
Saturday, April 4th, in honor of the 
retiring and incoming San Francisco 
district officers. 

The decorations under the able 
committee, with Mrs. Rose V. S. Berry 
as chairman and also art chairman, 
were beautiful and unique, the wire- 
less station being worked out with 
bamboo poles, golden cords, flowers 
and flags. 

At different points about the room 
were placed substations, and these 
various stations were presided over by 
the chairman of each department ol 
the district as a table hostess. The 
main receiving "Federation Station" 
constituted the district officers, state 
officers and honored guests. At this 
table Mrs. Lewis E. Aubury, cor- 
responding secretary, to whom the 



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27 



original idea of the luncheon is due, 
acted as chief operator, controlling the 
crackling, flashing spark which an- 
nounced the receipt of messages to the 
chairman of the program, Mrs. Ella 
M. Sexton. Answers and replies flew 
thick and fast from officers and dis- 
trict chairmen. A message was sent 
each club president to reply in ten 
words to this question : "What is the 
best club effort of your administra- 
tion?" The verbal messages in re- 
ply as the wireless call was made 
showed a cleverness and a concise- 
ness in wording, that were gems of 
messages. 

Messages came from all the retiring 
and incoming officers : Mrs. James W. 
Orr, state president, all past district 
presidents and many others, Mrs. Sex- 
ton proved herself clever and witty for 
the occasion. The delicious menu 
was arranged for by Miss Partridge, 
the luncheon chairman. Our own 
California songs of Mr. Cator's com- 
position, were sung by the artist, 
Mme. Chapin-Woodward. The final 



an revoir wireless message was given 
regretfully and full of tender mem- 
ories by the president as she summed 
up the faithful services of her asso- 
ciates. 

Alameda 
By Mrs. L. G. Leonard, Press Chair- 
man 
An interesting April event was the 
District Board meeting and Presi- 
dent's Council, at which the chief 
speaker was Miss Ednah Rich of San- 
ta Barbara, State Chairman of Home 
Economics. After an informal talk, 
Miss Rich answered questions and 
made suggestions covering a wide 
range, from "How to save steps," to 
the more psychological query, "How 
not to worry." 'Miss Vrooman of San 
Francisco spoke on Vocational Train- 
ing, with special reference to a school 
recently established at 1810 Dievisadero 
street, San Francisco, where house- 
wives as well as their maids may re- 
ceive instruction. University Exten- 
sion was presented by Miss Cooley 
of the State University. 



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29 



An Art Conference under the direc- 
tion of San Francisco and Alameda 
Districts was held at Ebell Club 
House, Oakland, April 16th. An all- 
day meeting-, presided over by Mrs. 
R. S. Holway, art chairman of Ala- 
meda District, was greatly enjoyed by 
those in attendance. The morning 
was given over to a talk on Rodin by 
Miss Mabel Thayer Gray of Oakland, 
and one on Futurists and Cubists by 
Miss Anne Bremer of San Francisco, 
with discussion following, participated 
in by Mrs. Rose Berry, art chairman 
of San Francisco District and Mrs. 
Stadtmuller, also of San Francisco. 
In the afternoon Prof. Neuhaus of the 
University of California, spoke on 
Contemporary American Art and Miss 
Seymour of New York on Post Im- 
pressionism. Mrs. W. E. Colby, presi- 
dent of Alameda District, gave her 
approval of the conference idea and 
expressed the hope that it would be 
made use of by' other departments. 

Mrs. J. W. Orr, retiring state presi- 
dent, and Mrs. Colby were the guests 
of honor at the Installation Luncheon 
recently by Ebell Society, Oakland. 

Mrs. G." R. Reinhardt of Berkeley, 
state chairman of Literature, was a 
guest of the Alta Vista Club of Oak- 
land and of the Richmond Club of 
Richmond during the month of April, 
speaking to both clubs on "California 
Literature." 

The Richmond Club is soon to have 
a new club house and is achieving, in 
its erection, a greater feat than is 
usual in the construction of such build- 
ings, forit is evoking a most amazing 
spirit of friendliness and co-operation 
among the people of Richmond. The 
Cement Workers' Union sent a body 
of men to lay the foundation on Sun- 
day, April 19th, and each Sunday since 
has seen a group of union workers 
giving their services. It is expected 
that most of the material for- the 
building will be contributed by the 
business men of Richmond and that 
the entire construction will have been 
the generous gift of the unions, car- 
penters, plumbers, plasterers, etc. A 
club which can elicit such a response 



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30 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



must be a power for good in the com- 
munity. 

Southern 
By Helene N. Deimling, Press Chair- 
man 

A called meeting of the Executive 
Board and Presidents' Council of the 
Southern District was held March 31 
in Santa Ana. A noon luncheon was 
served at Taylor Bros. Banquet Par- 
lors at which Mrs. A. J. Lawton, 
president of the Santa Ana Ebell, and 
president-elect of the Southern Dis- 
trict, presided as hostess. Those pres- 
ent were Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 
President Southern District; Mirs. 
George Butler, chairman Club Exten- 
sion and acting corresponding secre- 
tary; Mrs. K. R. Smoot, Mrs. Henry 
De Nvse, Mrs. Florence P. Willetts, 
Mrs. F. C. Martin. Mrs. T. C. Jame- 
son, Mrs. S. L. Beiler. Mrs. C. F. 
Crose. Mrs. W. L. Grubb, Mrs. Ida L. 
Tipton, Mrs. E. L. Quinn, Mrs. F. M. 
Pyle, Mrs. G. W. Slierwood, Mrs. G. 
W. Kellogg, Mrs. J. D. Ashley, Mrs. 
E. F. Roberts, Mrs. W. L. Deimling. 

The business meeting was held in 
Armory Hall. Reports from presi- 
dents and chairmen were comprehen- 
sive and satisfactory, showing good, 
thorough work and steady growth 
along all .lines. 

The chairman of Club Extension re- 
ported nine new clubs federated dur- 
ing the year, and nine more ready to 
federate. 

The report on Club House Loan 
Fund was encouraging. More than 
one-half of the entire amount paid in 



has come from the Southern District. 

The committee on School for Moth- 
er Craft, of which Mrs. H. E. Vaile 
of El Centro is chairman is to have 
five members, one from each county. 
The following members were appoint- 
ed: Mrs. S. L. Beiler, San Bernardino 
County; Mrs. F. C. Martin, Riverside 
County; Miss Margaret Taylor, San 
Diego. The members from Orange 
County is to be selected by the Or- 
ange County Federation. 

The resolution to be presented at 
state convention asking that the de- 
partment of History and Landmarks 
be retained was unanimously en- 
dorsed. 

In April there was a called meeting 
of the Executive Board and Presi- 
dents' Council in El Centro. 

The Orange County Federation held 
its semi-annual meeting in the Pla- 
centia Club House, April 16. 

The Women's Ten Thousand Club, 
of El Centro, has elected the following 
officers to serve for the coming year: 
President, Mrs. W. S. Fawcett ; vice- 
president, Mrs. D. V. Noland ; secre- 
tary, Mrs. Winthrop Pier ; correspond- 
ing secretary, Mrs. Allen Nuffer; 
treasurer, Mrs. G. S. Helms. 

An enjoyable Reciprocity Day meet- 
ing and luncheon was held by the 
Current Events Club of Ontario, 
March 4. Nearly 150 guests enjoyed 
the hospitality of the hostess club. Un- 
usually good- reports were given and 
interesting discussions followed. 

Co-operation of club and home, es- 
thetic development and civic duty has 



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THE CLUBWOMAN 



31 



been successfully brought out in the 
wonderfully good years of program of 
the Perris Woman's Club. 

The activities of the Woman's Club 
of Riverside are so varied and each de- 
partment so efficient in its work that 
the reports of their meetings form an 
outline of great educational value. 
The Shakespeare Class has had the 
best of programs, while the many 
papers on Art, Music, Travel and His- 
tory which have been given before the 
club have been of great benefit not 
only to the club members but to the 
whole community. The Review and 
Current Events Class have studied 
deeply the questions of the day. The 
Home and Philanthropy Class on 
March 26 had Dr. H. J. Webber give 
a lecture before the club on "Eugen- 
ics." Each program has had good 
musical numbers and has been well at- 
tended. It is this energetic wide- 
awake life that makes the efficient 
club women. 

Fred Van Dam 

Washington and Figueroa Streets 

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THE REDLIGHT ABATEMENT 
ACT 

{Continued from Page 16) 

To meet the systematic campaign of 
misrepresentation which is being car- 
ried on against the measure, its sup- 
porters have organized to meet this 
misrepresentation and to present the 
bill to the electors on its merits. 

For purposes of effective work, the 
state has been divided into two dis- 
tricts. Southern and Northern Cali- 
fornia, respectively. Assemblyman 
Frank E. Woodley of Los Angeles is 
chairman of the Southern California 
committee. 

The Northern California committee 
has opened headquarters in the Monad- 
nock building, San Francisco. The 
committee consists of Assemblyman 
Bohnett of San Jose, author of the bill 
in the Assembly, chairman ; Senator 
Edwin E. Grant of San Francisco, 



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And CANDIES "the taste you never forgot" 



32 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



author of the bill in the Senate, and 
Miss Charlotte Anita Whitney of 
Oakland, vice chairman; J. E. White 
of San Francisco, secretary ; Rev. 
Charles N. Lathrop, rector of the 
Church of the Advent (Episcopal), 
San Francisco, treasurer; Franklin 
Hichborn of Santa Clara, correspond- 
ing secretary; Rev. Terrence Caraher, 
pastor of St. Francis' Roman Cath- 
olic Church, San Francisco ; Bishop 
Edwin Holt Hughes, San Francisco, 
Methodist Episcopal Church; Hon. C. 
C. Young, Berkeley, Speaker of the 
Assembly; Mrs. Sara J. Dorr, San 
Jose, President Women's Christian 
Temperance Union ; Charles H. Bent- 
ley, San Francisco ; Chester H. Row- 
ell. Fresno : Francis J. Heney, San 
Francisco; Mrs. J. W. Orr, San Fran- 
cisco. President Federation of Wom- 
en's Clubs; Walter Macarthur, San 
Francisco; Irving Martin, Stockton. 

Through newspaper publicity, lec- 
ture courses and general canvass, this 
committee is presenting the facts re- 
garding the measure in every com- 
munity north of Tehachapi. 

The bill will be voted upon at the 
general election in November next. 

Those who favor its enactment will 
vote ''yes." 

Those who oppose it will vote ''no." 

But before the elector may vote one 
way or the other, he or she must be 
registered. 

Therefore, the first step in support 
or opposition to this measure is to 
register. 

Those who are working for the rat- 
ification of this bill hold that if its 
provisions are understood, and the 
normal citizenry go to the polls and 
vote on the question, the majority in 
favor of the bill will be over 200,000. 



H. Adams, General Agent, Salt Lake 
Route, Los Angeles. The main sec- 
tion of our California special train will 
leave Oakland over the Southern Pa- 
cific, June 5th at 9 o'clock a. m. 
Reservations may be secured of Mrs. 
George W. McCoy, Sacramento, chair- 
man of Transportation for Chicago Bi- 
ennial. These sections will all meet 
in Salt Lake and proceed as the Cali- 
fornia Special to Chicago. 

Looking forward in happy anticipa- 
tion of a year of successful endeavor 
for a greater Federation I am, 
Yours sincerely, 

LILLIAN PRAY-PALMER. 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

{Continued from Page S) 

San Diego. Another special car will 
leave Los Angeles, June 5th at 9 
o'clock a. m. Those desiring reserva- 
tions please promptly notify Mr. F. 



MRS. ORR'S REPORT 

Continued from Page 14) 

W. C, through its state wide avenue 
of service, has here an opportunity for 
helpful co-operation. 

The federation is definitely com- 
mitted to work for the final success 
of the Red Light Abatement Act. 

The vital question of Social Hy- 
giene, the humanitarian question of 
the abolition of capital punishment, 
the very practical questions of Immi- 
gration, of Vocational Education — 
these and others of which you will 
hear during this convention constrain 
us to see that we must not shirk the 
discussion or consideration of these 
great and grave social problems. We 
must choose wisely wherein we shall 
walk, but have much faith. "A turn, 
and we stand in the heart of things." 

It has been my privilege for a brief 
moment to interpret the spirit and the 
meaning of the federation. If by any 
written or spoken word I have widened 
the horizon .of your thoughts or stim- 
ulated the mind's vision, or touched 
the imagination so you could see with 
me the relations of things, could be, 
even momentarily, absolved from the 
limits of the personal and glimpse 
the universal, then indeed you and I 
together know why we must keep in 
procession if we would march to the 
measure of progress. 



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Half Rates for Entire Summer 

THREE MONTHS, ONLY $15 

This Special Offer appears in "The Clubwoman" only 

Bookkeeping 1 

Stenography 1 

Telegraphy 

Southern Pacific Main Line Wires in Railroad Dept. School 
Founded by the S. P. R. R. Co., 1907. Splendid openings for young 
men interested in a railroad career. 

Stidger Shorthand, the World's Briefest and Most Easily Learned 
Shorthand System. Students take dictation in TEN DAYS. 
Seventh year with this remarkable method. 

Gregg Shorthand. This department is in charge of an expert. 
Over one hundred graduates last year. 

Commercial Dept. We employ only expert instructors. Our grad- 
uates make good. 

Normal Dept. For students of any age who need coaching in 
English, Writing, Spelling, Arithmetic, etc. When taken with com- 
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in High School with a year in college added. 




The Clubwoman 



Official organ of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 



Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 
Subscription Price. One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH, Editor and Publisher. 
MRS. HAINES REED, Federation Editor. 
Matter far Miss Smit/i and Mrs. Reed must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 
Entered at the Los Angeles postoffice as second-class matter 



CONTENTS 



Frontispiece '. . . Mrs. Josiah Evans Cowles 

Editorial : 

By the Federation Editor 7 

Our Bricks and Mortar 7 

California Federation : 

President's Letter 8 

Executive Board Meeting 9 

Mrs. George F. Reinhardt 10 

Half Century of California Literature; Mrs. G. F. Reinhardt 11 

University Extension ; Nadine Crump 13 

Mrs. E. G. Denniston 14 

Women at the Great Exposition 15 

General Federation : 

Where 'We Stand in General Federation IS 

A Blow at Freak Fashions ; Mary L. Wood 23 

A Tribute to Mrs. Pennybacker ; Pearl Wasson 24 

District News : 

Los Angeles 25 

A Problem for Club Women ; Mrs. L. B. Hertz 2S 

The California Poppy ; Mrs. Jean de Chauvenet 32 




MRS. JOSIAH EVANS COWLES 
An important figure on the Biennial program in connection with the subject of peace 



THe Clubwoman 



Vol. V 



June, 1914 



No. 7 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Commu- 
nications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P.O.Box 1066, by the 
twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 



When new people assume new offices 
they invariably plan to do new and 
great things. No matter how compe- 
tent and expert past officers have been, 
all newly elected incumbents plan to 
increase the efficiency of, and perform 
great miracles with, the offices. They 
are stimulated by responsibility; 
pushed forward by sincere, earnest am- 
bition — that greatest ploughshare of 
human Progress. 

Such is the outlook for the coming 
year in the California Federation of 
Women's Clubs. Every new year of 
work is a greater year. Every year 
means not only more work in quantity 
but in quality. Every year means 
greater methods to be employed ; 
greater aims to be sustained ; greater 
results to be anticipated. 

Officers and department chairmen of 
this year will do greater things than 
past officers and chairmen because 
greater tasks will arise for them to 
perform. This is no reflection on past 
officers. It is nothing more than evo- 
lution and progress. Greater efficiency 
comes from constant growing. Every 
year Federation officers must set their 
standards a notch ahead. When this 
year's officers catch up with their stan- 
dard, the next year's workers will al- 
ready have raised their ideals to con- 
form with the new growth. Year after 
year this has been done. Year after 
year this will continue. That is what 
makes the Federation the wonderfully 
efficient body it is known to be 
throughout the country. 

Like all the new officers of the Fed- 
eration, the Federation editor has big 
plans for her department, and a set of 
ideals to make The Clubwoman a 
greater magazine for a greater Federa- 
tion. The department will aim to keep 



in touch with the growth and evolution 
of the Federation as a whole, and to 
reflect in the magazine the big things 
the splendid corps of Federation offi- 
cers have already begun. The aims 
and ideals are to make The Clubwoman 
an interesting, sparkling, entertaining 
medium of Federation news. 

Such the magazine must be if it is to 
reflect truly and honestly the wonder- 
ful humanitarian, sociological and eco- 
nomic achievements being accom- 
plished by Federation women, most of 
whom are mental experts in their 
chosen work. Of such women the Fed- 
eration editor asks sympathetic co-op- 
eration ; from such women the maga- 
zine will gain its greatest and most 
valuable stimulation. 



Our Bricks and Mortar 

As important a message as any 
which it has been the privilege of The 
Clubwoman to convey is that in the 
present issue from the pen of Miss 
Xadine Crump, secretary of the Bureau 
of Public Discussion of the State Uni- 
versity. It is, as it were, the key to 
a gigantic arsenal where are stored in 
the handiest and most orderly fashion 
possible the weapons of all ages, 
cleaned, polished and ready for the in- 
stant and efficient use of the modern 
woman on any problem which she may 
desire to attack. 

To the busy woman's club desirous 
of accomplishing the most in the short- 
est time it points the short cut to the 
exact information indispensable, and 
without the addition of a vast mass of 
irrelevant and confusing facts. It is 
not the bricks and mortar out of which 
reforms are built, but it is that which is 
equally important — the precise direc- 
tions for using them. . 



8 THE CLUBWOMAN 

California Federation gf Women's Clubs 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 540 West Ivy street, San Diego. 

Vice-President — Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 2614 N)rth Griffin avenue, Los Angeles. 

Vice-President-at-Large — Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Henry DeNyse, P. O. Box 695, Riverside. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. George W. Butler, San Diego. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Edward D. Knight, 238 San Jose avenue, San Francisco. 

Auditors — Mrs. Fisher R. Clark, 321 West Flora street, Stockton; Mrs. Andrew W. Fran- 
cisco, 143 South Figueroa street, Los Angeles. 

General Federation State Secretary — Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 3454 Twenty-first street, 
San Francisco. 

District Presidents 

Northern — Mrs. A. F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery street, Oroville. 

San Francisco — Mrs. Percy S. King, Napa. 

Alameda — Mrs. William E. Colby, 2901 Channing Way, Berkeley. 

San Joaquin — Mrs. Harry Bates, Modesto. 

Los Angeles — Mrs. Herbert A. Cable, 1906 West Forty-second Place, Los Angeles. 

Southern — Mrs. A. J. Lawton, 1104 French street, Santa Ana. 

Chairmen of Departments 

Art — Not yet appointed. 

Bureau of Library Information and Eeciprocity — Mrs. Susan T. Smith, State Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Civics — Not yet appointed. 

Civil Service Eeform — Mrs. W. A. Galentine, Eedondo Beach. 

Club Extension — Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge, Eoseville. 

Committee on Eevision of By-Laws — Mrs. Calvin Hartwell, 411 Summit avenue, Pasadena, 
chairman. 

Conservation — 

Forestry — Mrs. Poster Elliott, 111 South Hidalgo avenue, Alhambra. 
Waterways — Mrs. E. G. Greene, 611 Waverly street, Palo Alto. 

Country Life — Miss Lillian D. Clark, 1534 Arch street, Berkeley. 

Education — Miss Gertrude Longeneeker, San Diego State Normal School. 

Endowment Fund — Not yet appointed. 

Federation Emblem — Not yet appointed. 

Health— Mrs. L. P. Crane, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 

History and Landmarks — Not yet appointed. 

Home Economics — Miss Ednah Rich, Santa Barbara. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. C. P. Edson, 950 West Twenty-first street, Los Angeles. 

Legislation — Mrs. -J. T. Harbaugh, 2706 N street, Sacramento. 

Literature — Mrs. George P. Eeinhardt, 2434 Durant avenue, Berkeley. 

Music — Not yet appointed. 

Necrology — Not yet appointed. 

Parliamentary Practice — Mrs. J. A. Osgood, Sierra Madre. 

Peace — Mrs. A. H. Griswold. Box 53, El Centre 

Philanthropy — Not yet appointed. 

Press and Federation Editor — Mrs. Haines W. Eeed, 1966 Carmen avenue, Los Angeles. 

State University Club House Loan Fund — Mrs. S. L. Piatt, 1720 J street, Fresno. 

PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

In beginning a year of important, results from a knowledge that the work 

progressive and definite work it is a of the federation is well begun, 

great satisfaction to feel that no time At our second meeting of the execu- 

has been wasted. That each day rec- tive board which was held Monday, 

ords some definite action. May 25, at Hotel Lankershim, Los An- 

The days since the Riverside Con- geles, plans, policies and reports were 

vention have been full days for your all given due consideration, and much 

president and her secretaries, but we routine business attended to. 

go on our way to Chicago with a cer- Thirteen members of our as yet uii- 

tain sense of relief and pleasure that completed official family and one guest, 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



our retiring General Federation State 
Secretary, were present. This, consid- 
ering these veiy busy pre-Biennial 
days, seemed a very good attendance. 
Three of our state chairmen availed 
themselves of the privilege granted by 
the board to appoint three commission- 
ers to assist in carrying on the ever- 
increasing work of their departments. 
They were Mrs. E. G. Greene, Waters, 
Mrs. Katherine Philips Edson, Social 
and Industrial Conditions, and Mrs. 
Foster Elliott, Forests. This is a step 
toward a wider co-operation, that we 
believe, will prove its value by greater 
efficiency in the service of our depart- 
ments. 

The Executive Committee will have 
the budget of expense estimated and 
ready by July 1st. It would be help- 
ful in making this budget if all State 
Department Chairmen would send an 
approximate estimate of the cost of 
their department for the coming year 
to Mrs. Henry E. DeNyse, Riverside. 

We are very appreciative of the value 



of The Club. Woman as a means of 
communication and to extend its field 
of service we ur,ge every club woman 
in California t(M do her part in main- 
taining it. In our new Press and Fed- 
eration Editor, Mrs. Haines W. Reed, 
we have secured the services of a press 
woman of experience and worth and 
who with the co-operation of our pub- 
lisher Mrs. E. M. Smith, will withoul 
doubt furnish an official organ of which 
we will be proud and worth many 
times the price of its subscription to 
every club woman of the State. 

We feel that a word of thanks is 
fitting at this time, for the many mes- 
sages of congratulation which have 
come by word, post and wire every day 
since our election to this office. Such 
messages with their burden of love and 
assurance of loyalty, have sent a gleam 
of light out over the path of future 
days which gives us faith and courage 
to walk therein. 

Yours sincerelv, 
LILLIAN PRAY-PALMER. 



EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETING 



The executive board of the Califor- 
nia Federation of Women's Clubs met 
in all-day session Monday, May 25, at 
Hotel Lankershim. Mrs. Lillian Pray- 
Palmer, the new president, presided 
over an interesting meeting in which 
newly elected officers and department 
chairmen gave their pledges for work 
during the coming club year. 

Those who attended the meeting 
were Mrs. W. C. Mushet, vice presi- 
dent ; Mrs. Henry DeNyse, recording 
secretary; Mrs. George W. Butler, 
corresponding secretary; Mrs. Andrew 
Francisco, auditor; Mrs. Herbert A. 
Cable, Los Angeles District president; 
Mrs. A. J. Lawton, Southern District 
president; Miss Gertrude Longeneck- 



er, chairman of education ; Mrs. Fos- 
ter Elliott, chairman of Forestry; Mrs. 
W. A. Galentine, chairman of Civil 
Service Reform ; Mrs. J. A. Osgood, 
parliamentarian ; and Mrs. Haines W. 
Reed, federation editor. 

The delegates who go to the Chicago 
Biennial with Mrs. Palmer to represent 
the California Federation are Miss Jes- 
sica Briggs, San Francisco; Mrs. Percy 
King, Napa ; Mrs. Percy Shuman, 
Berkeley; Mrs. Carl S. Owen, National 
City; Mrs. J. S. Caldwell, El Cajon; 
Mrs. S. L. Wiley, Fresno ; Mrs. Harry 
Bates, Modesto; Mrs. Ella Westland, 
Upland ; Mrs. Leo Longley, South 
Pasadena; Mrs. H. E. DeNyse, River- 
side ; Mrs. Helen Kidd and Mrs. C. S. 
Sarsrent of Alameda. 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




MRS. GEORGE F. REINHARDT 
State Chairman of Literature 

IN SINCEREST SYMPATHY 



There is none in the federation who 
will not grieve to learn of the sudden 
bereavement of the well-loved chair- 
man of Literature, Mrs. George F. 
Reinhardt, whose able articles have 
made her known everywhere in club 
circles of California and whose person- 
ality has endeared her to us all. Her 



husband, Dr. Reinhardt, died suddenly 
at their Berkeley home on June 7th, 
following an operation. He was pro- 
fessor of hygiene at the State Univer- 
sity, a member of the State Board of 
Medical Examiners and founder of the 
Self-Supporting College Infirmary sys- 
tem. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 11 

A HALF CENTURY OF CALIFORNIA LITERATURE 

By Mrs. George F. Reinhardt, 
State Chairman of Literature. 



"Art is enduring; life is brief," said 
the Greeks, and produced an art that 
has been the world's model for two 
thousand years. Art develops slowly, 
through long periods of growth, while 
the whole cycle of a man's life some- 
times covers less than half a century. 
Now, the history of this State of Cali- 
fornia has not yet reached the Hebraic 
allotment of three score years and ten, 
and yet its output in the various fields 
of art — musical, pictorial, literary — has 
been remarkable. As for literature, 
California has, as well as individual au- 
thors, literary colonies and clubs that 
are known the world over. We are re- 
minded of Bret Harte's description of 
Cambridge. He found the famous town 
so thickly populated with literary folk 
that he averred it was impossible to 
fire one's revolver from one's front 
porch without "bringing down a two- 
volumer." What had New England 
done in literature after fifty years of 
settlement? What has the Pacific 
Coast done in the same time? The 
comparison gives us something to think 
about. 

Of course, the West has always been 
a word to stir the spirit of adventure, 
and invoke the genius of mystery. We 
are used to thinking of the West as 
the goal of Empire, and other splendid 
things. Humanity has made its tour 
of discovery, like the sun, from East 
to West, and never in all history has 
"the panorama of the retreating hori- 
zon disclosed so quickly" literature in 
California. It ought to come as na- 
turally as speech, you say, when you 
realize what an elevating effect on the 
human mind must have been the rapid 
and amazing opening of the American 
continent. Certainly, never since the 
Greeks travelling from their primal 
home, topped the mountains that look 
down on the Mediterranean, has a peo- 



ple made a journey like that which took 
our forefathers from Plymouth Rock 
south to the bayous of Louisiana, West 
across mighty rivers like the Mississ- 
ippi, North to inland oceans like the 
Great Lakes, across the prairies of the 
vast Middle-West, up over mountain 
systems like the Rockies and Sierras, 
down into deserts like the Mohave, and 
out at last through paradisal valleys to 
the Golden Gate of the Pacific. Such 
a journey quickens the imagination of 
a people, sensitizes the mind, and 
plants deep within the creative im- 
pulse. 

First settlers are not in the large 
creators of art, for they must build 
roads, till the soil, and house their 
families, but among first settlers spring 
up individuals who express the thought 
and experience of the group, and be- 
come the artists. Catching the sig- 
nificant things in the life about them, 
they body them forth in permanent 
form. Of all the arts, literature is 
closest to life, it is the most spontane- 
ous, the least formal, the most compre- 
hensive, the least technical, and there- 
fore the most completely satisfying to 
all men ; literature makes history its 
handmaid and ethics its priestess. But 
we must keep our subject of California 
literature more specifically in mind. 

Of course, in a new country, the ear- 
liest writing tends to be descriptive. 
Externals appeal to the writer and 
make the subject of his work. The lit- 
erature of the mind and spirit flower 
only after many years of quiescent 
growth, not in the early days of a trans- 
planted people. So it is, that the mass 
of California literature belongs to the 
first sort, literature of journalism, of 
narrative, of description ; literature re- 
flecting the picturesque life of the new 
world in picturesque surroundings ; 
tragedy and comedy, humor and pa- 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



thos, in both prose and verse. The lit- 
erature of the spirit, or that which 
Shelly defines as the "breath and given 
spirit of all knowledge" has as yet, 
been ours in small measure — some day 
it will be ours in great measure. 

Considering the brevity of Califor- 
nia's history, the popularity of some 
of the authors here produced is amaz- 
ing. Mark Twain, Joaquin Miller, 
Jack London and Wallace Irvin one 
can list without pause. It is not highly 
critical to classify together men whose 
work is finished and men whose work 
is only partially done; those who are 
dead, and those who still live. But 
from this incomplete list, I can draw 
this conclusion : The popularity of 
California literature can be partially 
explained from certain of its character- 
istics, its unique picturesqueness, its 
democracy and its humor. 

Popularity of appeal in literature de- 
pends very largely on the first of these, 
as America has at least three times 
proved beyond question. Three au- 
thors who have been as widely read as 
any authors in the world during the 
last century, have been Americans who 
dealt with peculiarly striking and tem- 
porary phases of American civilization : 
Cooper and the Indian, Harriet Beech- 
er Stowe and the negro, Bret Harte 
and the gold-miner are known not 
only wherever English is read, but 
wherever occidental interests have 
transplanted themselves, whatever the 
soil. 

As for the element of humor, it is 
essentially a western characteristic — 
almost an American characteristic. 
From the days of Benjamin Franklin's 
"Autobiography," and "Poor Richard's 
Almanac," American humor has been 
an accepted phrase, standing for an ac- 
cepted fact. But particularly in the 
West, where the population has been 
a various collection of race-types, and 
a nursery of incongruities, where men 
of all professions and varying abilities 
have worked out their own physical 
and mental salvation under strange 
conditions. In the character-testing 



struggle of the days when men tramped 
across the plains behind ox-teams, 
fought the Indians, died of fever on 
the Chagres River or of thirst on the 
desert, graze on mountain passes, and 
starved at the mouth of gold mines, 
humor emerges as a saving grace. To 
laugh at hardship, to prevent a quar- 
rel, to hasten lagging time, or to as- 
suage a grief men coined anecdotes, 
unraveled a yarn, or built up a story. 
Truth in those days was stranger than 
fiction, and fun that was the cure-all 
for even' trouble, became a quality of 
the people themselves, and thereafter 
a quality of their literature. 

As for the element of democracy, 
that too is a reflection of the life which 
the literature portrays in our western 
land. The realization that men and 
women are human, that neither their 
descent, nor their manners, nor their 
garments are any help in the struggle 
for existence, these democratic facts 
come out again and again in western 
poetry and song. Primitive emotions 
and virtues, independent of civilization 
left behind ; character, apart from con- 
ventions and social customs ; human 
qualities, instinctive, spontaneous, 
persistent; these are the elements of 
democracy in our literature, with its 
optimism and tolerations and inevit- 
able humor. Try, if you will, any char- 
acter produced in our western writing 
and you will find the qualities of pic- 
turesqueness or humor or democracy, 
one or all three, belonging to him. The 
outlaw, the filibuster, the desperado, 
and the beautiful maiden that Joaquin 
Miller loves to portray; or Truthful 
James, the Heathen Chinese, Flynn of 
Virginia and Tennessee's Partner, all 
typical of Bret Harte. 

California writers (if we refrain from 
dividing them into prose writers and 
verse writers) may be divided into 
three classes : those who were sent here 
or came here in the early days to write 
of the new land ; those who were borne 
or bred here ; and those who are drawn 
to California because of the material 

{Continued on page 30) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



UNIVERSITY EXTENSION FOR WOMEN'S CLUBS 

By Nadine Crump 

Secretary of Bureau of Public Discussion 



Never have the women of California 
been in so much need of self-improve- 
ment as now, for never before have 
they been called upon to contribute 
so much to the social and civic life of 
the state. 

Such questions as immigration, labor, 
such problems as the public school or 
crime or the re-organization of the city 
government in which so many cities of 
California are now engaged are all mat- 
ters calling for enlightenment. 

With the ballot in hand the women 
of the State must bear their share of 
the responsibility in the settlement of 
those questions. Fortunately for them 
they have a better opportunity than 
ever before to prepare themselves to 
settle them correctly. 

The State University of California 
keeping pace with the Democratic 
movement of the day has established 
an extension division through which 
it is extending its usefulness to people 
in all parts of the State. Through its 
department of instruction opened July, 
1913, more than thirteen hundred peo- 
ple are receiving instruction by corre- 
spondence, besides over 900 more 
who have received instruction in 
classes. In addition, twenty-one 
lecture courses have been placed and 
several hundred communities have re- 
ceived information through the Bureau 
of Public Discussion and the Bureau of 
Municipal Reference. 

There are now 104 courses which 
can be taken by those not in attend- 
ance at the University. Some are 
purely cultural ; others are designed to 
meet the practical needs of life. Among 
the courses offered in the latter group 
are courses in domestic science, courses 
in business and courses in civics in- 
cluding some very vital questions of 
the day. 

If there is any criticism upon the 
work the women's clubs are doing today 
it is, they are undertaking- too much. 



Some programs show the attempt to 
study too many subjects in one year 
with the result that only confused im- 
pressions are received. Instead of a 
program of subjects, more or less un- 
related many clubs are finding it de- 
sirable to confine a year's study to few- 
er subjects, but give to each a more 
thorough consideration. In so doing 
they find the University can be of val- 
uable help to them in planning and di- 
resting their work. Those clubs with- 
in a radius of fifty miles from the Uni- 
versity will find it greatly to their ad- 
vantage to form themselves into a class 
to which the instructor can come. For 
a course of fifteen lessons there is a 
fee of $5.00 for each student, and where 1 
a class of fifteen can be formed the 
department can generally send an in- 
structor. For those who are too far 
away from the University to be reach- 
ed at this time by the class method, 
the following plan is being adopted : 
The club selects some definite course 
of study, and pays for as many regis- 
trations as it can afford, paying $5.00 
for each registration. It selects from 
its membership those who are most 
able to do the work. Those students 
are thus enabled to lead the club in the 
discussion of the topics in question. 
This plan offers an opportunity to 
do a little home missionary work. In 
almost all clubs will be found some 
who are desirous of completing a col- 
lege course and work done acceptably 
by correspondence is credited to the 
student. It is hoped a great many 
clubs will include in their program for 
next year, work to be done in this man- 
ner. 

There is no more vital question to 
the people of California today than 
the question of immigration. To meet 
the demand for information upon that 
question the department of economies 
offers a course including: (1) The his- 
(Continued on page 21) 



This Advertisement if pre- 
sented at my Studio within 30 
days, will entitle holder to one 
of my finest platinum portraits 
absolutely free, just to show 
you what a real portrait 
should be 



KRAUCH STUDIO 



444 SOUTH BROADWAY 



12 YEARS IN LOS ANGELES 
APPOINTMENTS F566I 



THE CLUBWOMAN 15 

WOMEN AT THE GREAT EXPOSITION 



There is to be no "Woman's Build- 
ing" at the Panama-Pacific Interna- 
tional Exposition, which opens in San 
Francisco February 20. 1915. There is, 
however, a Woman's Board — a corpor- 
ation — composed of thirty-six mem- 
bers, which is officially a sub-corrimit- 
tee of the Panama-Pacific Exposition 
Company. In addition to this director- 
ate, assoicate and auxiliary members 
composed of women from every one of 
the fifty-eight counties in California 
will be "at home" to the world's visit- 
ors in 1915 at the California Host 
Building. 

In every one of the departments of 
chief responsibility a woman, selected 
for her special fitness for the position, 
is active with the chief of that depart- 
ment in the direct management of af- 
fairs. Assisting George Hough Perry, 
chief of the division of exploitation, is 
Mrs. Ernest S. Simpson, one of the best 
known journalists on the Pacific Coast ; 
Mrs. Francis Carolan, whose acquaint- 
ance with art works is as extensive as 
her taste is excellent, is assistant to 
John E. D. Trask, Chief of the Depart- 
ment of Fine Arts. 

Mrs. Philip E. Bowles, daughter of 
a noted western manufacturer and wife 
of a prominent banker, is active in the 
department of manufactures and varied 
industries, where she is assistant to 
Charles H. Green, chief of the depart- 
ment ; Mrs. William Grant occupies the 
important position of assistant to 
Daniel O. Lively, chief of the depart- 
ment of live stock, and indeed, in all 
branches, executive, administrative, 
legislative and heraldry, women are 
working with direction, enthusiasm and 
splendid unanimity of purpose. 

The heaviest financial responsibility 
shouldered by the Woman's Board was 
undertaken when they acceded to Pres- 
ident Chas. C. Moore's request to op- 
erate, control, furnish and maintain the 
California Host Building; and the most 
splendid moral obligation was claimed 
by the Woman's Board when the pro- 



tection and guidance of young women 
and the direction of yuung men who 
come to the exposition, was promised. 

The Woman's Board is taking the 
initial step in the organization of a 
permanent non-sectarian traveler's aid 
society which will handle the tremen- 
dous responsibilities arising from the 
exposition, and later carry on the trav- 
eler's aid work o nthe plan which has 
been tried and approved bv New York. 

In organizing the women throughout 
the state in all of the counties, the 
Woman's Board is urging the mainten- 
ance of the auxiliaries after the exposi- 
tion closes, so that they may assist in 
the solution of the immigration prob- 
lems that must arise, the gravity of 
which has already caused the governor 
of California to appoint an immigration 
commission. With the women of Cali- 
fornia waiting to support the best 
movements n the direction of proper 
immigration regulations and to assist 
in the solution of the problems arising 
therefrom, a tremendous power will be 
exerted to make good citizens and valu- 
able state assets of the immigrant and 
home seeker who will find his way 
hither. 

In a sub-organization the Woman's 
Board is securing funds for a statue 
honoring Motherhood, to be dedicated 
to the pioneer mothers of California. 
This statue will have the place of honor 
in the Palace of Fine Arts, asd being 
of enduring material will be placed is 
Sas Francisco's civic center at the close 
of the exposition. 

Finally, the women of California 
through the Woman's Board, pledge 
themselves specifically to work for the 
success of the exposition and in the 
larger sense, to strive actively for the 
accomplishment of all the big human 
interests that must be furthered by 
such an undertaking as the Panama- 
Pacific International Exposition and 
which require for their completion the 
energy of tenderness, devotion ana 
courage. 



TO THE CLUBWOMEN OF CALIFORNIA: 



Your battle for the single standard of morality is 
being fought in California. 



D. W. Griffith's "THE BATTLE OF THE 
SEXES" a Griffith motion picture success — is car- 
rying the same slogan to the hearts and eyes of 
the entire world nightly, for the honor of American 
womanhood, and the single standard of morality. 
"THE ESCAPE" D. W. Griffith's great treatment 
of the world interesting question of eugenics, now 
playing in New York City, is telling the world the 
terrible dangers of mis-mating. 

The Clubwomen of California should see these great 
dramas which express more than printed page or 
word of mouth can tell, the great questions being 
fought for today all over the world. 



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18 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



General Federation 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President — Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker, 2606 Whitis avenue, Austin, Texas. 

First Vice-President — Mrs. L. L. Blankenburg, 214 West Logan Square, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Second Vice-President — Mrs. Samuel B. Sneath, 211 Monroe street, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Harry L. Keefe, Walthill, Nebraska. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Eugene Reilley, 508 Park avenue, Charlotte, North Carolina. 

Treasurer — Mrs. John Threadgill, 922 North Bobinson street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 

Auditor — Mrs. C. H. McMahon, 32 Caithness Apartments, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Directors — Mrs. William E. Andrews, 1225 Fairmont street, N. W., Washington, D. C; Mrs. 
A. L. Christie, 219 South Washington street, Butte, Montana; Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, 
Irvington, Indianapolis, Indiana; Mrs. Francis D. Everett, Highland Park, Illinois; Mrs. 
William P. Harper, 651 Kinnear place, Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Creighton Mathewes. 315 
Bermuda street, New Orleans, Louisiana; Mrs. Frank White, Valley City, North Dakota; 
Mrs. William B. Williams, Lapeer, Michigan. 

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS 

Art — Mrs. Melville F. Johnston, 103 North Tenth street, Richmond, Ind. 

Civics — Miss Zona Gale, Portage, la. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, The Gladstone, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conservation — Mrs. Emmons Crocker, 48 Mechanic street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Education — Mrs. O. Shepard Barnum, 312 South Fifth street, Alhambra, Cal. 

Household Economics — Miss Helen Louise Johnson, 234 Paddock street, Watertown, N. Y. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. A. E. Chantler, Tacoma Daily News, Tacoma, Wash. 

Legislation — Mrs. Horace T. Towner, Corning, la. 

Literature — Mrs. Frances Squire Potter, 4581 Oakenwald avenue, Kenwood, Chicago, 111. 

Music — Mrs. Lawrence Maxwell, Edgecliffe Road, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O. 

Public Health — Mrs. S. S. Crockett, 710 Belmont avenue, Nashville, Tenn. 

Press Committee — Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, Chairman, Indianapolis, Ind.. 



WHERE WE STAND IN GENERAL FEDERATION 



The following table of percentages 
of membership in the General Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs at once illumi- 
nates and points a moral. In each case 
the figure is the per cent of the total 
number of clubs in a state which have 
direct membership in the G. F. W. C. 
For example ninety-four California 
Clubs out of three hundred and forty- 
nine have direct membership in the 
National organization — twenty-seven 
per cent. This table was compiled by 
Mrs. Frank White, chairman of the 
General Federation membership com- 
mittee : 

West Virginia 50 

Missouri 43 

Colorado : 40 

Wyoming 33 

New Mexico 32 

Massachusetts 31 

California , 27 

Wisconsin 27 

Illinois 24 

Nebraska 24 

Texas : 23 

Rhode Island 22 



New Jersey 19 

Oregon 19 

Ohio 1 9 

Indiana 17 

Utah , 17 

New Hampshire 15 

Kentu cky : 14 

Louisiana 14 

Idaho 13 

Maryland '. 13 

Pennsylvania 12 

Montana 12 

District of Columbia 1 

Minnesota 1 

Nevada 1 

Nevada 1 

Iowa 1 

Arkansa s 1 

Kansas 10 

Vermont - 10 

Connecticut 8 

Florida 8 

North Dakota 8 

New York . 8 

Oklahoma 7 

South Dakota 7 

Geirgia 6 



THE- CLUBWOMAN 



19 



Michigan _ - 6 

Alississippi _ 6 

Virginia _ _ 6 

Washington 5 

Arizona .._ _ _ _ _ _ 4 

Tennessee 4 

Maine 3 

Xorth Carolina 3 

Alabama _ _ -... 2 

South Carolina 

Delaware _ _ 



GETTING TOGETHER 

A valuable suggestion comes from 
Sacramento in the way of an example. 
By common consent the merchants 
make Thursday, the meeting day of the 
Civic Club of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, a sort of general shopping day. 
Club women and others from the city 
and vicinity are invited to take the 
lunch incidental to their shopping with 
the club — a device by which all the ele- 
ments making for civic betterment are 
enabled to get together at short inter- 
vals for a valuable interchange of ideas 



A WORD OF WARNING 

It has come to the knowledge of the 
publishers of The Clubwoman that cer- 
tain other journals of a somewhat simi- 
lar character are, perhaps unknowing- 
ly, permitting their agents to approach 
prospective patrons with the claim 
that these periodicals represent the 
California Federation of Women's 
Clubs. For their own protection and 
for that of advertisers and subscribers 
entitled to the guarantee of the federa- 
tion endorsement, the publishers of 
this magazine desire to make plain that 
there is but one official organ of the 
C. F. W. C. and that is The Club- 



woman. 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

Harp Soloist of the Royal Academy 
of Music, London. 

Blanchard Hall. Ex. 82. Reridence 1972 Eitrdk 
Phone 24558Wm 4586. 



Marquis Ellis 

VOICE EXPERT 
Placer, Trainer and Coach 



Los Angeles Examiner: "Marquis 
Ellis' aggregation of singers, well 
known to music lovers, never dis- 
appoints." 

Los Angeles Times: "Mr. Ellis 
has brought a series of genuine dis- 
coveries to the public's notice." 

Los Angeles Herald: "Marquis 
Ellis is the tutor of many operatic 
and dramatic stars." 



STUDIO 
Majestic Theatre Building 

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MANUFACTURERS 



20 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




"Honorable J. Vincent Hannon of the Los 
Angeles bar, has announced himself as a can- 
didate for the position of Superior Court 
judge of this county. Mr. Hannon's friends, 
in a letter to the voters of Los Angeles 
signed by a number of Los Angeles attorneys, 
express their estimate of Mr. Hannon and 
his candidacy as follows: 

"Ladies and gentlemen: 

"We, the undersigned members of the bar 
of this county, take great pleasure in in- 



dorsing Mr. Hannon's candidacy, and we sin- 
cerely trust that the electors of the county 
-will see fit, in their wisdom, to select him 
for one of the ten judgeships. 

"Some of us have known Mr. Hannon since 
his boyhood days; others of us have known 
him since he first began his career as a mem- 
ber of this bar; others have known him in 
the active practice as an attorney, but all 
of us take great pleasure in certifying to 
the fact that in Mr. Hannon we have al- 
ways found not only a splendid gentleman, 
but an excellent, well equipped, competent 
lawyer, and one whom we not only believe 
but know from education, mental qualifica- 
tion and practice will make a splendid judge, 
and we indorse him as being fully qualified 
in every respect for that position. 

"Very truly yours, 
"Edwin A. Meserve, Oscar Lawler, Max 
Loewenthal, Isidore B. Dockweiler, John 

C. Mott, Frank P. Flint, George J. Denis, 
Walter F. Haas, J. Wiseman Macdonald, 
Albert M. Stephens, R. F. Del Valle, A. 

D. Laughlin, Luciene Earle, M. J. Mc- 
Garry, J. W. Swanwiek, John W. Carri- 
gan, Joseph Scott, William F. McLaugh- 
lin, Richard Dillon, H. W. O'Melveney, 
W. H. Anderson, W. S. Wright, Joseph 
H. Call, John H. Foley." Adv. 




ELMER R. McDOWELL 

Candidate for 

JUDGE 

of the 

SUPERIOR COURT 



Mr. McDowell was the first man in California 
to publicly advocate the Mother's Pension Bill. 

Mr. McDowell is the children's champion and 
has given years of devoted service to their 
interests while acting as President and Direct- 
or of the Los Angeles Humane Society for 
Children and Vice President of the State Hu- 
mane Society. 

Mr. McDowell believes in the equality of all 
races before the Law and the enforcement of 
equal Justice regardless of sex or race. He be- 
lieves the people will get Justice when they 
love Justice well enough to demand it and elect 
men conversant with conditions. 

Twenty years a resident of Los Angeles and a 
graduate of the University of Southern California 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 

Coninued from page 13 

tory of immigration and its causes; 

(2) the treatment of the immigrant; 

(3) the difference between the old and 
new immigrant : (4) the effect the im- 
migration from Southern and South- 
eastern Europe and Asia has had up- 
on labor conditions; (5) the problem 
confronting California with the open- 
ing of the Panama Canal ; (6) Japanese 
immigration to the Pacific Coast. 

The services of the bureau of Pub- 
lic Discussion and the Bureau of Mu- 
nicipal Reference are free to the peo- 
ple of the State. The purpose of Bu- 
reau of Public Discussion is to promote 
and direct interest in the consideration 
of public questions by establishing dis- 
cussion centers and providing lists of 
topics and biographies. This bureau 
is now making an effort to furnish bio- 
graphies on the vital questions in 
which people are interested especially 
on those on which they will be asked 
to vote at the next general election. 
The Bureau of Municipal Reference 
answers inquiries addressed to the 
University, devoting especial atten- 
tion to inquiries concerning Municipal 
affairs. 

The women's clubs are invited to 
make use of these bureaus. If it is a 
question for discussion or lists of a 
valuable material write to the Bureau 
of Public Discussion. It it is a mat- 
ter of street paving or lighting or a 
matter of play grounds or dance halls 
or any other municipal problem ad- 
dress the inquiry to the Bureau of Mu- 
nicipal Reference. When the Bureau 
of Municipal Reference is enabled to do 
the work it is designed to do, it will 
become the clearing house for infor- 
mation on all municipal problems. 

The clubs near Berkeley are asked 
to make use of the debating societies 
of the University. They are available 
with their knowledge and enthusiasm 
to open up discussion on questions up- 
on which they are informing them- 
selves and in which the women too are 
interested. The only charge for this 




DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

JOHN D. FREDERICKS 

OF LOS ANGELES 



The decision of District Attorney Freder- 
icks of Los Angeles to become a candidate 
for governor, made in answer to the request 
of the Young Republican Clubs of the State, 
has aroused widespread interest and evoked 
much favorable comment. 

Mention John D. Fredericks' name any- 
where in the United States and everyone 
within hearing will prick up his ears and 
listen. Why? Because he is nationally fa- 
mous as a prosecutor of great and small 
criminals; because he has been proven in- 
corruptible; because he is a man of remark- 
able courage, moral and physical; because 
he has been for years a conspicuous figure 
in the administration of justice of this State, 
and the results of his work have advertised 
California as a land of security under the 
law. 

In any walk of life a man of Fredericks' 
character would distinguish himself. He is 
a typical American, dauntless, serene, pa- 
tient and loyal. A good public speaker, a 
man of unblemished reputation, well educat- 
ed, just in his estimates of men and mea- 
sures, tolerant of the views and beliefs of 
his opponents, kindly of disposition, mel- 
lowed rather than embittered by his years 
of splendid service as prose'cuting attorney, 
affectionate in his family relations, a stu- 
dent at all times, he is of the best material 
for the office for which his friends have 
called him to make the race. 

That Mr. Fredericks is a fine type of ag- 
gressive Progressive in the Republican ranks 
is attested by the many endorsements that 
have been made of his candidacy in the short 
time since it was announced, including among 
others the instant approval and endorsement 
of the Women's Republican League of Los 
Angeles County, and of the Young Men's 
Republican Clubs. Adv. 



Your Mirror will tell you 
more about "Style" 




in a minute — 

'T'HAN you could learn from reading a 

whole book on the subject. 
There' ' s always something new to be learned 
about " Style" and there 's just one really satis- 
factory way of acquiring this knowledge — visit 
''''The Style Shop," try on some of the new 
gowns, and — 

Let the Mirror tell you! 

Jhe JlepTfovk 





You may change at will 

your entire appearance through 
your choice of really smart apparel 

It's all a matter of "Style" 

A ND never was there wider latitude for 
■^ the exercise af charming individuality 
than at the present time among our myriads 
of exclusive and artististic creations, from 
the trim little gown for morning shopping 
to the extremely elaborate evening costume. 

High Class Suits 

From $14.75 up 

Dresses and Gowns 

From $12.50 up 

Daintiest Blouses 

From $2.50 up 

Artistic Millinery 

At tempting reductions 

Gloves and Veils 

Latest styles and shades 
"The Style Shop" 





THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



service is the travelling expenses. 

During the summer session the Uni- 
versity has on its list of instructors 
and lecturers not only a large number 
of its own faculty, but a large number 
of able lecturers from other states and 
from abroad. It would be well for 
each club to designate some one who 
will be in attendance at the summer 
session to devote time to finding out 
the courses of lectures and the lectur- 
ers especially suited to the community 
interested. It will be a surprise to 
those carrying on the work of Univer- 
sity Extension if the next year does 
not show a large army of women ac- 
tively co-operating with the University 
in its undertaking to carry its inspira- 
tion and its instruction to all the peo- 
ple of the state. 



A BODY BLOW AT FREAK 
FASHIONS. 



By Mary L. Wood, Head of Informa- 
tion, G. F. W. C. 

Over and over again, especially dur- 
ing the past twelve months, the sub- 
ject of women's dress has been brought 
to my attention. Women have writ- 
ten to me, both personally and as Man- 
ager of the Bureau of Information of 
the General Federation of Women's 
Clubs, complaining that they were un- 
able any longer to buy skirts which 
did not hinder locomotion ; men have 
stopped me on the street to call to 
my attention some particularly notice- 
able costume (one of those which cov- 
ered everything and concealed noth- 
ing) and have asked if there was not 
something that could be done about it ; 
social workers have discussed in my 
presence the effect which dress has up- 
on morals ; advocates of the dance have 
urged that proper dressing would go 
far toward overcoming the evils of im- 
proper dancing; these and many others 
have brought the matter to my atten- 
tion and each and all with the request 
that the clubwomen take some action 
in the matter. 

Influenced by these things and mov- 




JOHN W. SHENK 

(Incumbent) 

CANDIDATE FOR JUDGE 

OF THE 

SUPERIOR COURT 
Los Angeles County 

Primaries Aug. 25. General Election Nov. 3 




E. J. BROWN ANNOUNCES 

HE WILL, BE CANDIDATE 
Aspires to One of Four Offices of Justice of 
Peace in Los Angeles Township 

His candidacy has the support of the fol- 
lowing leading attorneys, business men and 
others: W T illiam J. Hunsaker, Nathan New- 
by, J. B. McLaughlin. Reese Llewellyn. 
George Renwick, Frank C. Prescott, Dr. John 
M. Dunsmoor, George W. Dickinson, War- 
ren F. McGrath, Alfred W. Hare, John F. 
Poole, E. Earl Crandall, Robert C. Fairall, 
Gerald A. Doyle, Ulrich Knoch, F. P. Dunck- 
lee, Dr. Ernest Allin, Mrs. H. K. W. Bent, 
Mrs. H. C. Terrell, Miss Iva J. Angier, Dr. 
George F. Kenngott, Rev. Ralph B. Larkin, 
Raymond G. Tyron and W. C. Brain, T. R. 
Coles. J. F. Kanst. C. F. Ellis, B. O. John- 
son, George W. Tuttle, Fowler Brothers.yfrfz, 



24 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



ed by my own observation. I am led 
to ask myself 'and the clubwomen at 
large if the matter is not one in which 
we are vitally concerned. We are 
recognized as the vital thinking force 
among the American women; is it not 
time that we should cease to adopt and 
countenance styles set for us by Par- 
isian houses, regardless of the influ- 
ence of such styles upon our comfort, 
taste or sense of decency? 

The resolution is : 

Whereas : The General Federation 
of Women's Clubs, in convention as- 
sembled, view with disapproval the 
present extreme tendency among 
American women to follow designs in 
dress, regardless of beauty, comfort or 
modesty; and, 

Whereas: These objectionable de- 



signs in women's clothes emanate 
largely, if not entirely from foreign 
houses; and. 

Whereas : This constant patronage 
of foreign designs and foreign mater- 
ials hinders a normal development of 
American art and manufacture; Be it, 
therefore, 

Relosved : That this convention, in 
full recognition of the rights and priv- 
ileges of the individual, places itself 
on record as heartily in favor of the 
movement for simpler, more becoming, 
and more modest designs in women's 
clothes, and urges the co-operation of 
all clubs and clubwomen of the Fed- 
eration in a concrete effort to adopt 
styles in dress adapted to American 
needs, and to encourage American de- 
signers and manufacturers. 



A TRIBUTE TO MRS. PENNY- 
BACKER. 



Pearl Randall Wasson. 
I cannot tell you just the reason why 
That all who hear you silent tribute 

pay- 
It is not beauty rare, not power to 

sway 
With subtle charm alone, not manner 

high. 
Like the slow radiance from beneath 

a cloud 
Which, growing ever brighter, floods 

the ground 
So creeps abroad your influence pro- 
found, 
As sunshine, light and beauty, won- 
drous proud, 
A power for good, a sympathy which 

heals 
The hearts too roughly touched by 

thoughtless truth, 
The spirits roughened by the grief of 

youth ; 
A touch which brightens, a love which 

seals 
With bonds of growing friendship, 

deep and true. 
One million women-hearts in loyalty 

to you. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



25 



DISTRICT NEWS 
Los Angeles 

The following will comprise the Los 
Angeles District Board for the coming 
year, according to the still somewhat 
tentative arrangements of Mrs. Her- 
bert A. Cable, president: Education, 
Mrs. S. J. Keese, Ebell Club, Los An- 
geles ; art. Mrs. Theodore M. Walker, 
Ruskin Art Club, Los Angeles, reap- 
pointed ; music, Mrs. Carrie Stone Free- 
man, Harmonia Club, Los Angeles; 
peace, Mrs. Frank A. Stephens, presi- 
dent of the South Pasadena Woman's 
Improvement Association ; political sci- 
ence, Mrs. Mattison B. Jones, president 
Glendale Tuesday Afternoon Club ; 
forestry, Mrs. Charles Robinson of San 
Pedro Woman's Club ; country life, 
Mrs. Howard S. Trotter, Van Xuys 
Woman's Club, reappointed ; philan- 
thropy, Mrs. A. D. Clark, Whittier 
Woman's Club ; club extension, Mrs. 
D. M. Cate of Long Beach; necrology, 
Mrs. E. T. Foster, Ventura; press, Mrs. 
Ella H. Durley, Los Angeles Woman's 
Press Club ; public health, Dr. Maud 
Wilde, president Echo Park Mothers' 
Club, Los Angeles ; civil service and 
prison reform, Mrs. Elizabeth Baker 
Bohan, Badger Club, Los Angeles; 
home economics. Miss Emily Morrison, 
principal of the Anna S. G. Blake Man- 
ual Training School, Santa Barbara; 
bureau, library, information and reci- 
procity. Mrs. George A. Brewer, Averill 
Study Club. Los Angeles. 

The Friday Morning Club has unani- 
mously elected Mrs. Russell Judson 
Waters to serve a second term as presi- 
dent. Mrs. Seward A. Simons was 
elected vice-president ; Mrs. Edward 
Rankin Brainerd, second vice-presi- 
dent; Mrs. Andrew W. Francisco, cor- 
responding secretary, and Mrs. Frank 
Garrett, re-electe das treasurer. For 
the office of recording secretary there 
were two candidates, Mrs. W. C. 
Thurston who has held office one year, 
and Mrs. J. J. Ccnaty. Mrs. Thurston 
was re-elected. 

There were seven candidates for the 
board of directors, five to be chosen. 
Mrs. John J. Abramson and Mrs. E. 
Stanton Hoggin were re-elected. Xew 



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D.JOSEPH COYNE 

Candidate for 

Judge of Superior 
Court, Los Angeles 
County. 

Asks your support. 

Twelve years in 
practice of law. 



GAVIN W. CRAIG 

Candidate for 

Presiding Justice 

District Court of Appeal 

Second District 

Xow- Superior Court Judge of Los Angeles 
County 




26 



I' 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



members will be Mrs. Margaret Frick, 
Mrs. N. K. Potter and Mrs. George S. 
Wadleigh. 

The Los Angeles Ebell Club names 
as its new president, succeeding Mrs. 
W. L. Jones, Mrs. W. S. Bartlett, a 
charter remember and curator of the 
books and conversation department. 
The other officers are: Mrs. Chester 
Ashley, first vice-president; Mrs. G. P. 
Thresher, second vice-president; Mrs. 
H. P. Barton, third vice-president; 
Mrs. W. S. Browne, fourth vice-presi- 
dent ; Mrs. Charles F. Patterson, re- 
cording secretary ; Mrs. Augusta Lamb, 
corresponding secretary, and Mrs. C. S. 
Ward, general curator. Mrs. W. L. 
Jones and Mrs. George A. Brock, retir- 
ing president and second vice-presi- 
dent, were elected as directors The 
club now has a membership of 1450. 

The Averill Study Club, which gave 
up Mrs. Herbert A. Cable, its president, 
to become the head of the Los Angeles 
District, has chosen in her place Mrs. 
F. K. Adams. The other officers are : 
Mrs. S. T. Exley, first vice-president; 
Mrs. G. E. Averill, second vice-presi- 
dent; Mrs. Finlay, recording secretary; 
Mrs. Frank Porta, corresponding sec- 
retary, and Mrs. S. J. Paul, treasurer. 

For the Boyle Heights Civic League : 
President, Mrs. C. B. McClure; first 
vice-president, Mrs. Coldren ; second 
vice-president, Mrs. George Atkinson; 
recording secretary, Mrs. Ed. Conzis ; 
corresponding secretary, Mrs. Stand- 
ard ; treasurer, Mrs. Charles Murry. 

Mrs. Matthew S. Robertson, presi- 
dent, and Mrs. R. Robinson, corre- 
sponding secretary of the Galpin 
Shakespeake Club, were re-elected. The 
new officers are : Mrs. Alfred Allen, 
vice-president ; Miss Fannie Smith, sec- 
retary ; Mrs. A. K. Praether, treasurer, 
and Mrs. J. M. Hale, auditor. 

Mrs. J. E. Brown is again head of the 
Wednesday Morning Club. Other of- 
ficers are: Mrs. W. E. Bush, first vice- 
president; Mrs. E. B. Pinson, second 
vice-president; Miss Florence James, 
recording secretary; Miss Bessie Car- 
rick, financial secretary; Mrs. W. O. 
Bailey, treasurer. 

The new officers of the Ruskin Art 



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FRANK E. WRIGHT 



Prank E. Wright of Sacramento is an- 
nouncing his candidacy for the position of 
State Surveyor-General on the Republican 
ticket. He is well qualified to fill the re- 
sponsible position, having served eight years 
as Chief Deputy in that office under his late 
father, M. J. Wright, who was State Sur- 
veyor-General from 1S95 to 1903. Prior to 
that time, Mr. Wright was Chief Clerk in 
the United States Land office at Visalia for 
five years when his father was register of 
that office. Thirteen years of continuous 
service in the States Land offices is a record 
he may well be proud of, and alone stands 
as a recommendation for his integrity and 
ability. Mr. Wright is a native son, having 
been born in Vallejo in 1871. He is a young 
man of family and is well and favorably 
known throughout the State. He is asking 
the endorsement and support of the people 
at the coming election, relying upon his past 
record as to his efficiency, and promising 
to serve them to the best of his knowledge 
and ability if he has the honor of being 
elected Surveyor-General of the State of Cal- 
ifornia. Adv. 



15B5H5HSH5H5E5ES?15E5HSTiSH5H5E5H5ESTiSHSH5-| 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



27 



Club are: Mrs. George Sinsabaugh, 

president; Mrs. M. J. F. Stearns, hon- 
orary vice-president; Airs. W. S. Bul- 
lis; first vice-president ; Mrs. E. S. 
Hodgin, second vice-president ; Mrs. 
H. W. Clough. recording secretary; 
Mrs. W. H. Council, corresponding 
secretary ; Mrs. Hermon Smith, finan- 
cial secretary; Mrs. F. L. Kennedy, 
treasurer; Mrs. H. T. Fennell, librar- 
ian ; and Mrs. W. S. Urion, curator. 

The Southern California 'Woman's 
Press Club names the following: Pres- 
ident, Mrs. Lavinia Griffin Graham ; 
vice president, Mrs. Haines W. Reed; 
second vice-president. Mrs. M. E. John- 
son; corresponding secretary, Mrs. W. 
W. McCandless; recording secretary, 
Mrs. Eva Hamilton Young ; treasurer, 
Mrs. Hugh Harrison; auditor, Miss 
Marthine Dietrichson; historian, Mrs. 
Harriet W. Myers. 

The Los Angeles City Teachers' 
Club has chosen as its new president 
Miss Blanche Vance. Other officers 
elected are : First vice-president, Miss 
Mabel Jessen ; second vice-president, 
Miss Sarah Heineman; recording sec- 
retary. Miss Ila Glasscock ; correspond- 
ing secretary, Miss Louise Curtain ; 
membership secretary. Miss Maude 
McAfee ; financial secretary. Miss 
Adele Mosseman; treasurer. Miss Min- 
nie Hughes. 

Mrs. W. J. Lawless succeeds herself 
as head of the Sierra Madre Woman's 
Club. Other officers are Mrs. F. J. 
Hart, first vice-president; Mrs. G. Hal- 
let Johnson, second vice-president; 
Mrs. W. H. Ingraham, recording secre- 
tary: Miss Annie B. Coffey, Carre- 



s' lending secretary; Mrs. T. E. Klein- 
berger, auditor, and Mrs. Louis Deitz, 
treasurer. 

Officers elected for the coming year 
in the South Pasadena Woman's Im- 
provement Association include Mrs. E. 
M. Mumford, president; Mrs. Jonathan 
S. Dodge, vice-president; Mrs. John W. 
Shenk, Tr., second vice-president ; Mrs. 
Hartley T. Packard, recording secre- 
tarv ; Mrs. George Alfred Miller, cor- 
respondenng secretary; Mrs. Edward 
H. Rust, treasurer. 



Energy 



Efficienc 



Expediency 



The Three E Candidate 

DAVID G. HATHEWAY 

For 

Judge of the Police Court 

of 
The City of Los Angeles 

Primary Election Aug. 25, 1914 

General Election Nov. 3, 1914 

Home Phone 77560 



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28 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



A PROBLEM FOR CLUBWOMEN 
TO SOLVE 

By Mrs. Louis B. Hertz 

What shall the clubwomen do for the 
women who will be thrown out of 
employment when the Red Light and 
Abatement Act is enforced? Judging 
from the slavery that we know exists 
in the life of the outcast, it seems to me 
our first duty is to provide some place 
for recuperation and restoration to a 
moral life. If these girls are simply 
offered employment in department 
stores or other mercantile establish- 
ments, they will be followed and mo- 
lested by those who lived from their 
earnings. The clubwomen should pro- 
vide a place where these girls could be 
given medical treatment, and while 
they are being brought back to normal 
health, they should be given some vo- 
cational training. When they have 
been made efficient in any line of work, 
there is plenty of opportunity for em- 
ployment. 

The hardest part of the work will be 
to make them accept what may be of- 
fered. While they were in this nefari- 
ous traffic, they thought their lives 
were luxurious and even though it was 
slavery, many preferred it to the ordi- 
nary pursuits open to an unskilled 
worker. We say that wages in the in- 
dustrial establishments drive women 
to the immoral life. That is true to 
some extent. But why are the wages 
low? Because the workers are incom- 
petent. Girls take employment with- 
out the least preparation for the task. 
Let us raise the standard of the indus- 
trial worker. Let us encourage voca- 
tional training, so that every girl is 
prepared if she need earn a living. Let 
the clubwomen make the life of the 
domestic worker more like that of a 
human being. Do not expect your 
house worker to sleep in a two by four 
room where you would not put one of 
your own family. Have some regard 
for the time of recreation of those in 
employment and do not consider that 
twelve hours out of the twenty-four be- 
long to you. 




THOS. P. WHITE 

Present City Justice and Ex-Offleio Poliee 

Judge of Los Angeles, Who Announces 

His Candidacy for Re-election 

Thos. P. White, who was appointed City 
Justice of the Peace of Los Angeles and Ex- 
Officio Police Judge by the Board of Super- 
visors last August, has announced his candi- 
dacy to succeed himself at the coming prim- 
ary election. 

Judge White will be remembered by the 
club women of this city as the author of an 
ordinance now pending before the City 
Council, "which, if carried, will give Police 
Judges an opportunity to punish wife- 
beaters and habitual offenders without 
bringing privation or suffering on the de- 
rendant's family, by providing a fund out of 
which $1.50 per day may be paid for the 
support of the families of such offenders 
during the defendants' incarceration. 

Many other humanitarian practices and 
procedures in the Police Court owe their ex- 
istence to the efforts of Judge White. Adv. 




The announcement that W. A. Hammel has 
entered the race to succeed himself as Sheriff 
of this county has met with the general ap- 
probation of the majority of the voters 
throughout the county. Hammel should be 
retained in office if for no other reason than 
the following: efficiency f;airness; courage, 
and humane treatment of prisoners. 

Of all the public o ces, that of Sheriff 
is the most difficult to fill, it being an office 
in which every citizen is vitally interested; 
hence, it is frequently the case that adverse 
criticism are pronounced, yet but very few 
have ever been heard against Billy Hammel. 

His campaign will be presented to the 
people on the record which he has estab- 
lished during his incumbency for the last 
two terms, which is second to none. We 
feel that we need make no apology in rec- 
ommending to our readers William A. Ham- 
mel who has shown himself to be an official 
without reproach. Adv. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



29 



Just to show how the public needs 
to be educated in regard to the recre- 
ation of its employees, let me cite an 
experience of my own. I am living in a 
hotel where a social dance is frequently 
given for the guests. One evening just 
previous to the hour when the guests 
were to take possession of the dancing 
hall, I heard some music and upon in- 
vestigation found one of the waitresses 
playing the piano and one of the office 
men and a waitress dancing to their 
hearts' content. I concluded then and 
there that I would endeavor to get up 
a social dance for the employees. I 
asked some of the guests if they would 
contribute toward securing the neces- 
sary music. I then asked the manager if 
he would give the hall and he was will- 
ing, provided the guests would not ob- 
ject. After giving a regular disserta- 
tion on the subject of social conditions 
to a number of the guests, I secured the 
amount sufficient to engage the music, 
and the management — the woman end 
of it — offered to furnish fruit punch. 
The employees are most appreciative of 
the endeavor to give them a good time 
and they expect to get the same recrea- 
tion for their fellow workers in the 
other three hotels in the neighborhood. 

The whole social fabric needs to be 
educated. We should respect those 
who perform their duties even menial 
as they be. We should endeavor to 
make each one do the best in his or her 
line of employment and if we as club- 
women honor, respect and show them 
full consideration, we will do our part 



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in restraining those who might other- 
wise have fallen into evil ways and we 
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In his ten years of political life in South- 
ern California Mr. Williams has publicly 
from the stump advocated the building of 
the aqueduct, good roads, women's suffrage, 
the initiative, referendum and recall and di- 
rect election and refers for his ability and 
efficiency to 

Chief Justice W. H. Beatty 

Earl Rogers 

Mrs. W. C. Mushet 

Marco Hellman 

Stoddard Jess 

Mrs. Andrew W. Francisco 

Rabbi Isidore Myers 

Mrs. Clara Shortridge Foltz 

John Lopizich 

Chief of Police Sebastian 

Mrs. W. C. Tyler 

James H. Blanchard Adv. 



HOW TO WIN 

The greatest help to clear thinking and 
mastery in every department of life is the 
ability to express yourself forcefully in 
words well chosen to fit the purpose. 

Through my original method, which re- 
quires only a few minutes a day, you will 
immediately begin to feel a new sense of 
power and pleasure in social life, business, 
letters, speaking and literary work. 

It gives the brain a new zest. 

You will surprise yourself in a month. 

Special Terms. 

RUBY ARCHER DOUD. 
Granada Park, Los Angeles 



30 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



LIVING PICTURES. 

The Tuesday Afternoon Club of 
Glendale are winning fame from their 
lecture recital with living pictures of 
"Famous Women of the Bible," which 
was given at their reciprocity luncheon 
in April. They have repeated the en- 
tertainment at a number of clubs of 
the district with great success. The 
success was due to the combined work 
of the music and literary sections of 
the club. 

The idea of the pageant was origi- 
nated and staged by Mrs. Wayland 
Brown. The musical setting was ar- 
ranged and adapted by Mrs. E. V. 
Lawten. The lecture preceding the 
pictures was given by Mrs. E. H. Will- 
isford, curator of the Literary Section. 
Twelve members of the literary sec- 
tion appeared as the living pictures. 
The music section has among its mem- 
bers a number of professional women, 
who appeared as soloists during the 
pictures. 



Chief Deputy District Attorney 

W. J. FORD 



CALIFORNIA LITERATURE 

{Continued from page 12) 

it offers for their art, and so become 
naturalized Californians. 

Famous among those who came are 
Bayard Taylor, that master of descrip- 
tion, and Mark Twain, most extrava- 
gant of fun makers. Most renowned 
of those who came early enough to be 
rightly called Californians is Bret 
Harte; allied to him in fame (with a 
difference) are Joaquin Miller and Am- 
brose Bierce and Ina Coolbrith, while 
the novelists, Frank Norris, Jack Lon- 
don and Gertrude Atherton were born 
here. Among those who have come 
for their inspiration in our more recent 
and settled times, and remained to 
write, are the novelists Stewart Ed- 
ward White and Mary Austin. The 
younger native writers of the State are 
almost legion ; Lloyd Osbourne, Elinor 
Gates, Richard Tully, the Irwin broth- 
ers, Rufus Steele and the rest. 

The task is not easy to cover intel- 
ligently in a few hundred words the 




Candidate for District Attorney 
for Los Angeles County 



For the most important office within the 
gift of the people of Los Angeles County, 
the office of District Attorney, the Club- 
woman is pleased to announce the candi- 
dacy of Chief Deputy District Attorney ~W. J 
Ford. 

Mr. Ford has entered the field at the soli- 
citation of men and women of all classes 
throughout the county, and with the en- 
dorsement of practically all of the law pro- 
fession. That he is a man pre-eminently 
fitted for the place, by temperament, by a 
keen sense of Justice and right, and by a 
thorough knowledge of the law, he has 
shown during his eight years of service in 
the district attorney's office, where he has 
maintained the highest standard of exact 
justice to all, without fear or favor, com- 
bining with the aggressive and vigorous 
prosecution of crime, a most essential human 
sympathy for the unhappy criminal. His 
brilliant legal mind and his unquestioned in- 
tegrity have "won for him a high standing 
at the bar. He is the logical man for the 
place, and his wide acquaintance throughout 
the county, and the general familiarity with 
his faithful and conscientious service, give 
assurance of his election at the primaries on 
August 25th. 

Mr. Ford was born in Oakland in 1877, 
was educated in the public schools of L. A., 
graduated from the state university at Berk- 
eley, and admitted to the bar in 1899. He 
is married, has three children, and is a pop- 
ular member of the foremost fraternal and 
civic organizations. 

Mr, Ford's campaign committee has opened 
headquarters in the Herman W. Hellman 
Building, Fourth and Spring Streets, with 
Benjamin E. Page, attorney, as chairman, 
and with the active support of prominent 
and substantial men and women throughout 
the county. Adv. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



31 



progress of literature even in so young 
a State as ours. Omissions are una- 
voidable, and generalizations are '.in- 
safe. Besides, one finds one-self led 
to speak more fully of the fiction writ- 
ers than of those using the less popu- 
lar verse mediums, even while one re- 
alizes that noble work has been done 
by California poets not so often named 
as .Joaquin Miller, men like Charles 
Warren Stoddard, Edward Roland Sill 
and John Vance Cheney. Again and 
again the loveliness of California has 
moulded the poets' thoughts into puls- 
ing lyrics. 

Grace Ellery Channing sings the 
beauty of Southern California : 

Where mocking birds sing all night 

long 
And canons lift and lift the song 

And strike the echoes up 
To where the vestal yucca stands, 
Swinging aloft in slender hands 

Her snowy incense cup. 
Or where the morning hath unfurled 
A million poppy petals, curled 

Beneath the shadowing dark, 
And laughs to see the morning skies 
From every golden heart uprise 

A liberated lark. 

Edward Rowland Sill sings the 
beauty of one of the sentimentals of 
the "Golden Gate, the mountain whose 
profile is that of a fabled Indian prin- 
cess who lived out her romantic life 
long eons ago : 



I sat last night on yonder ridge of 

rocks 
To see the sun set over Tamalpais, 
Whose tented peak, suffused with rosy 

mist, 
Blended the colors of the sea and sky 
And made the mountain one great 

amethyst 
Hanging against the sunset. 

Far up in the Sierras lives a young 
man, who will one day be counted a 
California poet. Thus he writes of that 
dainty springtime flower that western 
children love and call the Fairies' 
lanterns. 
'Tis said these blossom-lanterns light 

The elves upon their midnight way; 

That fairy toil and elfin play 
Receive their beams of magic white. 
I marvel not if it be true ; 

I know this flower has lighted me 

Nearer to Beauty's mystery, 
And past the veils of secrets new. 

Perhaps I should pause to say that 
we must not be too proud of our fine 
roll of literary names, nor feel that 
they are entirely a new race, indepen- 
dent in their inspiration and owing no 
literary debt to the older world. For 
Bret Harte is a descendent of Dickens, 
just as Joaquin Miller is a descendent 
of Byron, and Frank Norris of Zola. 
And this literary kinship adds interest 
to names illustrious in themselves, 
showing how the influence of genius 
can cross oceans and continents to lead 
men of other nationality, environment 
and ambition to like achievement. The 



%'^fctfc 




224 SO. BROADWAY 
LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



It's the EXCELLENCE of the DAINTIES 
served combined with refined surroundings 
that makes the PIG and WHISTLE the favor- 
ite LUNCHEON place of PARTICULAR 
PEOPLE. 

And CANDIES "the taste you never forgot" 



32 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



humanity of Dickens, the passions of 
Byron, the vitality of Zola live on in 
these sons of the West. 

California is producing a noble lit- 
erature that will be nobler, just as the 
race itself grows worthier. Bliss Car- 
men prophecies of the Twentieth Cen- 
tury man : 

Here on this border of time 
Where mighty morrows are born 
Men shall grow wise and humane 
With a gladness virile and sane. 
Primal in beauty and pride, 
Christian in kindness and calm, 
Modern in knowledge and skill, 
Sons of the morning arise — 
Earth's awaited and best — 
From the Golden West. 



THE CALIFORNIA POPPY 
By Mrs. Jean de Chauvenet 

O, the California poppy, 

With its wealth of green and gold, 
Is a flower of glorious beauty 

Most wondrous to behold ; 
Its petals are like sunshine, 

An emblem of the West, 
Its pollen radiates pure eold. 

Which proclaims our Nation blest. 

Chorus : 

Beautious landscape! all excelling, 

Gorgeous as the sunlit sky, 
From thee, gather we the flowrets, 

Making glad each passerby ; 
Other states have brilliant flowers, 

All in perfumed beauty drest, 
But the California poppy 

Is the flower I love the best. 

The golden poppy of our state 

Has many virtues rare. 
Each rootlet from the sands of gold 

Sips wealth beyond compare ; 
Its glistening cups are seen afar 

O'er fields and valleys wide, 
True freedom does this symbolize 

Our California pride. (Chorus) 



O, blossoms of the summer land, 

We greet thee everywhere 
Thy richest hues of splendor true; 

No jewels can compare. 
Thy virtue beauty we adore, 

Thy brilliancy caress, 
For surely Heav'n bestows this flow'r 

Our glorious state to bless. (Chorus) 



FOR JUDGE OP THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 
LOS ANGELES COUNTY 

George A. Boden, for twenty years a resi- 
dent of Dos Angeles County, and having an 
irreproachable record as Attorney and Coun- 
sellor at Law, announces his candidacy for 
Judge of the Superior Court of Los Angeles 
County. 

Mr. Boden stands and has stood for the 
equality of rights for all. He has been an 
advocate of Woman's Suffrage even before 
the movement in favor of equal suffrage be- 
gan. He has always held that women, who 
are the determining factors in the develop- 
ment of the proper thoughts for the better- 
ment of man, should have an equal right with 
men in all respects, civic, political and other- 
wise. 

Mr. Boden is what may be termed a self- 
made man. He has worked for himself since 
he was ten years of age. He worked his 
way through the Los Angeles State Normal 
School, by carrying papers and doing such 
other work as was possible for him to do 
and carry on his studies. 

Since his graduation from the Los Angeles 
Normal, he has taught in the schools of the 
state for ten years, and has been principal 
of one of the large public schools in Pasa- 
dena for six years, where he has a host of 
friends among the pupils who attended the 
school when he "was principal. Mr. Boden 
contends that schools and other institutions 
should be run on a business basis "with equal 
rights to all who attend or who come under 
the supervision of the authorities, regardless 
of financial condition or social standing. 

Mr. Boden was born June 4th, 1S76, in Te- 
hachapi. Kern county, California, "where his 
father had a ranch, obtaining a public school 
education by riding seven miles to school 
each day. 

While Mr. Boden taught school, he studied 
law, and during his vacations and holidays 
and at night, attended the law school and 
graduated "with honors from the law school 
of the University of Southern California, and 
has been in the active practice of law for 
the past ten years in the City of Los An- 
geles. 

Mr. Boden was for two years a member of 
the Los Angeles County Board of Education. 

While in the practice of law, Mr. Boden 
has made a careful study of probate law and 
law pertaining to real property, besides tak- 
ing a deep interest at all times in juvenile 
■work an^ the welfare of juvenile offenders. 

Mr. Boden is a Native Son of the State of 
California, and belongs to th° Los Angeles 
Parlour. He is a member of tSe Los Angeles 
Bar Association, and belongs to the Masonic 
Order. 

Mr. Boden has offices at 527-2S Union Oil 
Building, Los Angeles, California. Adv. 




Uttttttial Nntwbfr 



Official OnfrvgP 

Federation of tykmenlr 
Club 



s. 



JULY. 1914 




3^ Compound interest paid on Term 
Deposits of $ 1 .00 or more 

LOS ANGELES TRUST & SAVINGS BANK 

SIXTH AND SPRING 



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OPTOMETRIST 



References by permission 
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Montgomery Bros. Jewelers 



408 TITLE GUARANTEE BLDG. 
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LOS ANGELES 



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our rates on some articles are a little higher than most 
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12 YEARS IN LOS ANGELES 
APPOINTMENTS F566I 



2 THE CLUBWOMAN 

WHAT THE "GRIFFITH" MOTION PICTURE IS 

DOING FOR THE CLUBWOMAN 

AND THEIR WORK 

By Russell E. Smith 



The great moral and civic principles 
inculcated and being fought for by 
the clubwomen of California and else- 
where are being daily and nightly en- 
hanced by the effects of the "Griffith" 
brand of motion picture ; notably by 
"The Escape" and "The Battle of the 
Sexes." 

These two great films have done 
and will do more to help the clubwom- 
en bring about the much needed reform 
measures than all the preachments, 
literary and vocal, in the world, can 
ever accomplish. 

What one hears or reads, one soon 
forgets, but what one sees right be- 
fore one, in real life or reel life, will 
never pass out from the portals of 
memory but will ever remain to warn 
against and prevent evil and ignorance. 

Holding as 'twere the mirror up to 
nature, these two photoplays stand 
out as a great influence for good, an 
influence that will be immeasurably 
felt wherever they are shown, and this 
moral effect should be assisted and 
brought to be by the Clubwomen of 
California and all over the country, 
demanding that they be shown, to the 
moral and civic betterment of their 
respective communities. 

"THE BATTLE OF THE SEXES" 
produced by D. W. Griffith for the Re- 
liance and Maffiestic Companies, is a 
strong argument for the single stan- 
dard of morality, the battle for which 
has been waged steadily for a long 
time by clubwomen, and it is believed 
that this film will give an added im- 
petus to the fight. 

It tells the story of a happy home 
left desolate by the temporary dere- 
liction of its male head, who is en- 
meshed in the silken toils of a siren, 
whose affection for him is entirely 



mercenary. The younger daughter of 
the family, learning the facts and see- 
ing her mother broken hearted over 
her husband's conduct, decides to bring 
her father back home again. 

She goes to the woman in the case, 
fully determined to kill her should she 
not accede to her pleadings that she 
send the father away from her and 
back to his deserted family. 

This the woman finally decides to 
do, but the father calls unexpectedly 
and finds his young daughter there in 
company with the paramour of the 
siren. 

His first thought is that his daugh- 
ter is following in his footsteps and he 
demands in a fury what she is doing 
in such a place. 

Her reply, bravely given, of "What 
are you doing here ?" gives him a reali- 
zation that he has no more moral right 
to be there than she has, and sends 
him back to his family, and the right 
of the single, standard of morality is 
never so firmly visalized as in this 
Griffith triumph of the screen. 

In "THE ESCAPE" which Mr. 
Griffith produced, based upon Paul 
Armstrong's play of the same name, 
the living question of eugenics is 
treated with a strength and virility 
that cannot fail to drive home to all 
who witness it. the terrible conse- 
quences of mis-ihating among the hu- 
man race. 

One New York newspaper hailed it 
recently as "a better moral lesson than 
Brieux's 'Damaged Goods'." It tells 
the story of a typical tenement house 
family and the consequences of the 
mismating, first, of the drink-sodden 
father ana sickly mother, and later the 
weakly sister and the brute gang 
leader. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



The vicious criminally insane 
brother of the family is shown, made 
more so by a blow on the head by his 
drunken father, and the consumptive 
younger sister, is seen in all her ter- 
rible situations. 

One sister, the elder, is apparently 
well and strong and foreseeing the con- 
sequences of a marriage with the brute 
McGee, she escapes from the atmos- 
phere of moral and physical torpitude, 
only to fail into a still more immoral 
life, though a pleasanter one. 

The younger sister marries the brute 
and her sickly baby is killed by his 
drunken conduct. The elder sister 
leaves her immoral life and goes to' 
work and later takes her younger sis- 
ter to live with her after her rescue 
from a dive by her brother and the 
police. There she dies and her brother 
kills her brute husband. 

An operation on the skull of her 
brother restores his reason and moral- 
ity and he becomes a good citizen, 
while the elder sister finds her happi- 
ness at last m the arms of a young 
doctor. 



The eugenics question is here treat- 
ed, frankly — even brutally, but who 
can question the terrible indictment 
ti'at is handed down to soc;ety in this 
^ieat film? 

The Clubwomen of California, fight- 
ing for these principles, can be assisted 
greatly in their fight if they will de- 
mand that these two pictures be shown 
in their city, for nothing will teach a 
greater moral lesson than these two 
masterpie' es <~t D. W. Griffith. 



Magnificent film productions 
from the master-mind of D. W. 
Griffith are shown at Clune's 
Broadway and also at the Audi- 
torium, Clune's Theatre Beau- 
tiful, where the ultimate 
achievement of the new art — 
''The Escape" — endorsed by 
doctors and club women, may 
now be seen. Here is > most 
forcjiul and yet gentle iximon 
for those interested in 'i-e bet- 
terment of man kind. 



TAGORE'S WORK TO BE 

READ AT CUMNOCK 



Clubwomen of Los Angeles who had 
the pleasure of seeing "Chitra' pro- 
duced at the Friday Morning Club re- 
cently, will be glad to know that an- 
other opportunity is to be presented 
them to learn further of the work of 
the author, the famous winner of the 
Nobel prize for literature, Rabindra- 
nath Tagore. On Wednesday morn- 
ing, August 5th. at 10:30, Miss Jane 
Farley of the faculty of Cumnock 
School, will read "The Crescent 
Moon."' and "The Postoffice" in the 



school auditorium at 1500 S. Figueroa 
St. These are two of the most in- 
teresting works of Tagore, aside from 
"Chitra." Miss Farley's reading will 
be the third of a series offered in con- 
nection with the Summer Session of 
Cumnock. On July 22nd, she reads 
"Dolly Reforming Herself." by Henry 
Arthur Jones ; July 29th Githa Sower- 
by's powerful "Rutherford and Son" 
will be given. 

This summer session of Cumnock, 
by the way, has proved to be a popular 
experiment, especially with clubwomen 
of the city, a number of whom have 
enrolled for the work in Story Telling, 
Dramatics, Voice Culture. Reading 
Aloud, and Interpretation of Poetry. 




ELMER R. McDOWELL 

Candidate for 

JUDGE 

of the 

SUPERIOR COURT 



Mr. McDowell was the first man in California 
to publicly advocate the Mother's Pension Bill. 

Mr. McDowell is the children's champion and 
has given years of devoted service to their 
interests while acting as President and Direct- 
or of the Los Angeles Humane Society for 
Children and Vice President of the State Hu- 
mane Society. 

Mr. McDowell believes in the equality of all 
races before the Law and the enforcement of 
equal Justice regardless of sex or race. He be- 
lieves the people will get Justice when they 
love Justice well enough to demand it and elect 
men conversant with conditions. 

Twenty years a resident of Los Angeles and a 
graduate of the University of Southern California 



Humanity's Gift to the People of Los Angeles 



THE IDEAL WA Y 



FOR ETERNITY 




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Make reservations now. When building is completed, it will be too late. 
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Appointments may be made by tele- 
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The Clubwoman 



Official organ of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 



Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 
Subscription Price, One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH, Editor and Publisher. 
MRS. HAINES REED, Federation Editor. 

196S Carmen Ave. Telephone Hollywood 2378 

Matter for Miss Smith must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 

Entered at the Los Angeles Postoffice as second-class matter 



CONTENTS 



Frontispiece Mrs. Haines Wa'dsworth Reed 

Editorial : 

Woman's Evolution 7 

California Federation 8 

Biennial Toast to Illinois 8 

President's Letter 9 

Women's Clubs and Public Policies ; Jane Addams 10 

Impressions of Delegates 12 

The New Federation Weapon ; Florence Pierce Reed . 13 

General Federation and Young Women ; Jessica Lee Briggs 14 

Biennialisms 15 

General Federation : 

Endowment Fund Pledged ; Mrs. W. K. James 16 

The Need of Endowment ; Clara B. Burdette 18 

Resolutions Adopted at Chicago 21 

Favors Town Meetings 23 

Biennial Entertainment 24 

District News : 

Los Angeles 26 

Northern 28 

Southern 30 




MRS. HAINES WADSWORTH REED 
State Federation Editor and Press Chairman 



Photo by Matzeue. 



TKe Clubwoman 



Vol. V 



July, 1914 



No. 8 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Commu- 
nications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P.O.Box 1066, by the 
twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 



In compliment to the splendid wom- 
en who made the Biennial at Chicago 
a monument of proud history for 
WOMANHOOD— this issue of The 
Clubwoman is dedicated as The Bien- 
nial Number.- 

Nothing can so remove the cobwebs 
from standpat minds ; nothing can so 
penetrate the way places of conserva- 
tism ; nothing can so surely quicken 
civic conscience; nothing has so truly 
shown the magnificent evolution of 
women themselves, as that Biennial. 

Only a few years ago, women were 
door mats and parlor ornaments. 
Woman's world was enclosed in an 
embroidery hoop and was as deep as 
a tea cup, sometimes a wash tub. This 
world was surrounded by a wall of 
convention, prejudice, superstition and 
masculine despotism, unventilated by 
any idea from the forbidden vastness 
outside "woman's sphere." 

Now the world is the home's front 
yard — to be cleared of stagnant legis- 
lation, political undergrowth, and 
fenced-in sociological injustices and 
prejudices. And the wall has crumbled 
to its base — eternally. 

Women used to work like beavers 
to compel a strawberry festival or ice 
cream social to net $6.67. Now they 
lay cornerstones in legislation; build 
temples of justice, and pyramids of so- 
cial reform. They are a standing army 
demanding everything that will con- 
tribute to race betterment. 

The Biennial proved that a great 
gathering of women can work in a 
compact body with business methods 
and parliamentary dignity. Personali- 
ties did not crop out on the convention 
floor. Those long ago moss covered 
male predictions, that part of club ses- 
sions would be dedicated to hair-pull- 



ing and gossip, are now interred with 
the bromidic dead who uttered them. 
No person without an icebag on his 
head and a temperature of 105 would 
dare to utter such inane scrapple at 
the front door of a Biennial. 

Sharp battles between brilliant wits 
were waged daily at the Biennial, with 
military precision and accuracy ; yet 
when sessions closed, women discard- 
ed their statesmanlike fighting ar- 
mours and became individuals — all 
done fracefully and in god taste. 
\Yhat clash of mentality there was at 
the Biennial was never rude or vulgar 
— it was businesslike. 

Nothing could be more businesslike 
than this convention — no laxity of 
rules, no slipshod methods of conduct- 
ing meetings, no wandering from the 
subject focused in the program. 

The General Federation solidifies 
and concentrates the strength of the 
individual clubs. It is the Solar Sys- 
tem of humanitarian endeavor — each 
State Federation a planet or satellite. 
It represents the Great Woman Voice 
calling for one standard of political 
equality, one standard of charity and 
justice, ONE STANDARD OF MOR- 
ALITY. 

Legislators are listening to the 
echoes of that Biennial. Men have bat- 
tled with conditions or they have let 
conditions battle them. Unless they 
were born reformers or humanitarians 
men have, until recent years, been con- 
tent to fight for their personal business 
and families. Women, whose minds 
are factories of detail, have awakened 
to the realization that the Home is the 
Citadel of government ; that social, in- 
dustrial, political and moral evils re- 
act on the home. 

So they are federated to protect the 
Citadel. 



8 THE CLUBWOMAN 

California Federation gf Women's Clubs 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 540 West Ivy street, San Diego. 

Vice-President — Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 2614 N>rth Griffin avenue, Los Angeles. 

Vice-President-at-Large — Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Henry DeNyse, P. O. Box 69S, Riverside. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. George W. Butler, San Diego. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Edward D. Knight, 238 San Jose avenue, San Francisco. 

Auditors — Mrs. Fisher R. Clark, 321 West Flora street, Stockton; Mrs. Andrew W. Fran- 
cisco, 143 South Figueroa street, Los Angeles. 

General Federation State Secretary — -Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 3454 Twenty-first street, 
San Francisco. 

District Presidents 

Northern — Mrs. A. F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery street, Oroville. 

San Francisco — Mrs. Percy S. King, Napa. 

Alameda — Mrs. William E. Colby, 2901 Channing Way, Berkeley. 

San Joaquin — Mrs. Harry Bates, Modesto. 

Los Angeles — Mrs. Herbert A. Cable, 1906 West Forty-second Place, Los Angeles. 

Southern — Mrs. A. J. Lawton, 1104 French street, Santa Ana. 

Chairmen of Departments 

Art — Not yet appointed. 

Bureau of Library Information and Reciprocity — Mrs. Susan T. Smith, State Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Civics — Not yet appointed. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. W. A. Galentine, Bedondo Beach. 

Club Extension — Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge, Boseville. 

Committee on Revision of By-Laws — Mrs. Calvin Hartwell, 411 Summit avenue, Pasadena, 
chairman. 

Conservation — 

Forestry — Mrs. Foster Elliott, 111 South Hidalgo avenue, Alhambra. 
Waterways — Mrs. E. G. Greene, 611 Waverly street, Palo Alto. 

Country Life — Miss Lillian D. Clark, 1534 Arch street, Berkeley. 

Education — Miss Gertrude Longenecker, San Diego State Normal School. 

Endowment Fund — Not yet appointed. 

Federation Emblem — Not yet appointed. 

Health— Mrs. L. P. Crane, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 

History and Landmarks — Not yet appointed. 

Home Economics — Miss Ednah Rich, Santa Barbara. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. C. F. Edson, 950 West Twenty-first street, Los Angeles. 

Legislation — Mrs. J. T. Harbaugh, 2706 N street, Sacramento. 

Literature — Mrs. George F. Beinhardt, 2434 Durant avenue, Berkeley. 

Music — Not yet appointed. 

Necrology — Not yet appointed. 

Parliamentary Practice — Mrs. J. A. Osgood, Sierra Madre. 

Peace — Mrs. A. H. Griswold, Box 53, El Centro. 

Philanthropy — Not yet appointed. 

Press and Federation Editor — Mrs. Haines W. Reed, 1966 Carmen avenue, Los Angeles. 

State University Club House Loan Fund — Mrs. S. L. Piatt, 1720 J street, Fresno. 



BIENNIAL TOAST TO ILLINOIS 



"Here's to Illinois, typified by her beau- 
tiful daughter, Chicago, may she ever be 
the spirit of beauty, but unhampered by 
traditions, may she not be so conservative 
as the East, not so impulsive as the South. 
May she be the ideal city, satisfying not 
the physical alone, but the moral and men- 
tal. May she grow to be in the western 
world great as Rome, greater than Rome — 
Rome with a heart, Rome with a con- 
science." — Mrs. Pennybacker. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER 



California attended the great Chi- 
cago Biennial one hundred strong. 
Every section of our Golden state was 
well represented. On every question 
that faced that mighty Congress of 
women. California voted her yea or 
nay as with one voice. 

It is a great satisfaction to know 
that even - question for progress and 
human betterment had our real sup- 
port ; that our strength has been felt 
and recognized. It was our soecial 
privilege to help to bring before the 
convention, a sane resolution endors- 
ing the principles of political equality 
which was carried enthusiastically by 
a large majority; and which it is safe 
to say was an action that helped to 
bring Illinois through her test (a ques- 
tion of constitutionality), and placed 
her as one of the States of Gold that 
recognize as a human right the politi- 
cal equality of men and women. 

To Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker, the 
wonderful little President, as she is 
often called, is due the honor and credit 
that belongs to a broad, fearless, and 
noble mind. Her trust and confidence 
in her convention at all times equalled 



her belief in the theory that majority 
should rule, with direct simplicity the 
question was always "put" and at no 
time was her trust betrayed. 

Order and courtesy prevailed, and 
difference of opinion never caused a 
delegate to forget she was a gentle- 
woman. 

To consider the Biennial broadly 
and generally, as perforce we must for 
lack of time or space for details, we 
are aware that we have witnessed a 
wonderful demonstration of the cumu- 
lative force in organization. We added 
our strength to its power and felt our 
particular responsibilities lifted up and 
carried on by the greater strength of 
"Strength United." 

At the same time we have been 
made to feel as never before that in 
this intense community of interests 
each unit must be as strong and true 
as every other unit if this great power 
is to serve us; and that upon this sin- 
cerity depends the whole Federation. 
In older and other words, as we give 
so shall we receive. 

Sincerely, 
LILLIAN PRAY PALMER. 



NEXT MONTH'S FEATURES 

The August Clubwoman will be the Civil Service Reform Number. 
Mrs. W. A. Galentine, State Chairman, and her assistants will contribute 
some earnest, entertaining and authoritative features from the club angle 
of the topic; and outside writers will bring down-to-date messages from 
the field of operations. Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, General Federation Chair- 
man, will present, "The Domestic Side of Civil Service Reform." We 
shall cover every side of the subject: the practical, theoretical, political, 
economic — the friendly side and arguments against the Civil Service Sys- 
tem. The issue will be educational, but not technically involved; enter- 
taining, yet with serious purpose. There will be other magazine material 
that every club woman should read. We have special plans for special 
issues. Watch for announcements. 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



WOMEN'S CLUBS AND PUBLIC POLICIES 



Twenty-five years ago 
women were only beginning to recog- 
nize the fundamental difference be- 
tween individual and social, between 
what a child inherits from its parents 
and what he derives from a social 
group ; what he shares with his blood 
relations and what he has in common 
with the men of his own generation. 

As housewives, women had taken 
little interest in the life of industry 
and business, because it was their sole 
and only aim to bring together the 
products in order to tarnsmute them 
into a home ; so when women first re- 
sponded to social claims, in the same 
spirit they merely selected from the 
methods of educationalists, from the 
foresight of statesmen, what they con- 
sidered needful for the social environ- 
ment of their children, and felt no re- 
sponsibility beyond that of a wise se- 
lection. 

The earliest clubs were chiefly valu- 
able because they revealed to women 
the use of that great agency, human 
intercourse, and the marvel that the 
solitary joy of individual effort may be 
supplemented by its due social se- 
quence of communication. 

Development Sought 

Newly-organized clubs attempted 
nothing less than to apprehend and to 
harmonize our common spiritual heri- 
tage as enshrined in poetry, in history, 
in science, in art, in drama, in music, 
that it might become a great apparatus 
for the evocation of cultural life. 

It is easy to treat lightly this period 
of club development, but certainly the 
constant co-ordination of these ever- 
multiplying specialized studies reacted 
on the life and character of each com- 
munity more deeply than anything 
less fructifying could. Women learn- 
ed to study and observe, to make use 
of the accumulated experience of man- 
kind, to follow life through all its be- 
wildering changes, to rejoice in its va- 



By Jane Addams 

Address at Chicago Biennial 

American riety and richness, to understand it as 
a vital process. Perhaps nothing less 
universal than those first programs 
could have made the women's clubs 
conscious of the tendencies which mark 
each age for what it is — that summary 
of its experiences, knowledge and af- 
fections found at the very root of so- 
cial existence, which is called ''the 
trend of the times." 

The early biennial meetings held by 
the federation were gigantic reviews 
of the forces engaged in the struggle 
to assert the strength and beauty of 
human nature in the teeth of a material 
civilization which inevitably tends to 
separate art from industry, intellectual 
from social life, business from morals. 

It is easy for a democracy which in- 
sists upon writing its own program to 
shut out imagination, to distrust senti- 
ment, to make short work of the past. 
It takes something like a united faith 
and a collective energy to insist upon 
their value and to make them operative 
upon public opinion. Was it the great 
function of the women's clubs through- 
out those earlier years to create com- 
munity of feeling and thought about 
the world and the way it works? Cer- 
tainly when the time for action came it 
was found that the soil had been pre- 
pared in which a sound public opinion 
might be nurtured, and that women's 
clubs were eagerly ready to discuss 
matters of public policy, one after an- 
other, as they came before the country. 

Their name is legion, but to select 
them with some reference to their his- 
toric order would be to instance the 
kindergarten and domestic science for 
the public schools, prohibition of child 
labor, civil service reform, immigra- 
tion, forestry, pure foods, protective 
legislation for women, conservation of 
water and mineral resources, vocation- 
al training, preservation of birds, trav- 
eling libraries and art galleries, the 
suppression of commercialized vice, 
and many another. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



11 



Many of these subjects remained 
mere themes for discussion for years, 
but society has a curious trick of sud- 
denly regarding as a living issue, vital 
and unappeasable, some old outworn 
theme which has been kicked about for 
years as mere conversational material. 
The newly moralized issue almost as 
if by accident suddenly takes fire and 
sets whole communities in a blaze, 
lighting up human relationships and 
public duty with new meaning, and 
transforms abstract social idealism into 
violent practical demands, although 
still entagled with the widest human 
aspiration. 

When that day of civic emotion 
surged into the focus of attention and 
is now high through the length and 
breadth of the nations, which had for 
its watchword the "city beautiful," it 
was important that there had been 
municipal are committees, that public 
schools had been supplied with good 
pictures, that trees had been planted in 
barren towns, that clubwomen had been 
instrumental in saving the palisades on 
the Hudson River and in establishing 
a national park ; it all gave realitv and 
background to the movement. When 
the new social imperative entitled 
"Know your duty" gathered moment- 
um and won acceptance far and wide, 
so that under its impulse and sanction 
there is inquiry into the facts and tend- 
encies of city life, it was again import- 
ant that women everywhere had been 
taught the value of inspecting milk and 
foods, the needlessness of tuberculosis, 
the necessity for good factory condi- 
tions, the possibilities of garden cities. 
Women's clubs were prepared for these 
social surveys, whether the maps ex- 
hibited sewers and water pipes, showed 
the need for organization of the rail- 
way terminals or demonstrated that 
because of a lack of recreational and 
cultural resources young people are 
led astray through sheer vacuity of 
mind. What a difference it made in 
the discussion and understanding of 
these public policies that a million 
women all over the nation were already 



conversant with them and constantl}' 
disseminating information! 

Women Seek Liberty 

Twenty-five years ago the prosper- 
ous American woman was peculiarly 
subjected to the temptations of falling 
into idleness and self-absorption, and 
to her credit be it said that she evolved 
and utilized the woman's club not only 
as a safeguard to herself but made it 
a tremendous force for democratic and 
beneficient action. 

The woman's club movement is but 
one manifestation of that larger effort 
for liberty and culture found in great 
women's souls all over the world. 

The clubs of this Federation early 
learned through their philanthropies 
that in loving kindness there is a great 
salvation ; through their study of poesy 
and -art. that in beauty there is truth; 
are they not now adding the third dic- 
tum, that in understanding of life lies 
the path to social progress? 

We are not without proofs that great 
results have been achieved. To illus- 
trate by examples of protective legisla- 
tion for working women — within thir- 
ty days during February and March of 
this current year the Supreme Court of 
Oregon, by a unanimous decision, sus- 
tained the minimum wage law ; the Su- 
preme Court of the United States, in 
an Ohio case, sustained the fifty-four- 
hour week, the ten-hour day and the 
six-day week, and by the vote of Con- 
gress eight hours for women workers 
was established in the District of Col- 
umbia. 

It would be interesting to know the 
number of letters to legislators written 
by clubwomen, the exact hundreds of 
papers read, and discussions held in 
women's club meetings, upon the 
themes involved in these three notable 
decisions. The Federation of Women's 
Clubs has been an important factor in 
creating and disseminating the new so- 
cial sympathy. Shall it hesitate to go 
on with the beneficient work because it 
is afraid to use political tools so long 
monopolized by self-seeking men? 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



IMPRESSIONS OF DELEGATES 



Prohibition Scores 
By Mrs. Russell Waters 

President Friday Morning Club 
Delegate to the Biennial 

One of the biggest things done by 
the club women at the Chicago Bien- 
nial was their adoption of the resolu- 
tion favoring the enactment of a mea- 
sure which shall effectually prevent 
the manufacture and sale of intoxicat- 
ing liquors in the United States. 

While I believe it meant quite as 
much for the Federation to take this 
stand as it did to endorse national 
woman's suffrage, it excited no com- 
ment beforehand and when the vote 
was taken there was little or no oppo- 
sition. Perhaps women believed that 
national suffrage would give so much 
power that they might, with the ballot, 
make quick work of getting national 
prohibition through. It is likely that 
many workers concentrated on getting 
the suffrage resolution through for that 
purpose. 

The resolution, presented by the 
Missouri delegation, was most drastic. 
Both Kentucky and Wisconsin sec- 
onded it and there were representa- 
tives of other delegations also in vari- 
ous parts of the house anxious to per- 
form this office. 

The women put themselves on rec- 
ord for big things and that Biennial 
shows what the concentrated women 
power can do. 

Unity Prevailed 
By Mrs. Percy S. King 

President San Francisco District 
Delegate to the Biennial 

The twelfth biennial convention of 
the General Federation of Women's 
Clubs just adjourned at Chicago was 
unquestionably the largest represen- 
tative gathering of organized women 
ever held. 

The most notable feature, consider- 
ing the convention as a whole, was the 
unity of purpose and action between 
the right thinking men and women of 
this republic. The programs present- 
ed brought to that convention the very 
brightest and most expert minds from 



the different parts of the United States. 

Because of this unity of thought and 
action between the right thinking men 
and women of this country, we may 
be assured they will bring to realiza- 
tion and fruition the social, political 
and moral reforms long sought by the 
women of our country. 

I believe this great convention was 
not only a great credit to the women 
of United States, but to the world over, 
because of the large territory repre- 
sented, and because of the splendid 
quality of the proceedings, and I be- 
lieve with such a force, and with such 
a working body, much will be accom- 
plished for humanity. 



FLAYS FASHIONS 
By Clara B. Burdette 

Delegate to the Biennial 

May I add a bit of information for 
the Biennial number that may explain 
why the address I gave and that has 
called out so much discussion in this 
country and Europe does not seem to 
have a place on the official program as 
printed. The address on "Dress and 
Morals" was delivered at the Confer- 
ence of Bureau of Information, Wed- 
nesday afternoon, June 10, presided 
over by Mrs. Mary I. Wood, who was 
there under trying circumstances, her 
son being at death's door in a Chicago 
hospital and her program appeared 
only on printed slips given out at the 
Convention and at hotels. 

However, a large audience greeted 
us for the other speakers were all lead- 
ing club women and the Resolution on 
Dress had been signed bv every mem- 
ber of the General Federation Board 
except two, and by over 400,000 club 
women before the Biennial had assem- 
bled. 

You will note in certain Los Angeles 
papers telegraphic reports oi inter- 
views from London on my address, 
which only shows how hard the de- 
signers of fashions were hit. New 
York papers gave columns to it, so the 
discussion made a dent all along the 
line. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



THE NEW FEDERATION WEAPON 

By Florence Pierce Reed 

State Federation Editor 



The greatest weapon the General 
Federation of Women's Clubs can raise 
is — equal suffrage. The Federation 
realized this, and, at the Biennial, gave 
a sort of national order that this weap- 
on be given them. In a polite yet 
specific way, the Federation adopted 
the resolution giving the cause of po- 
litical equality moral support regard- 
less of sex — in California phraseology, 
the endorsement of the cause for Na- 
tional Equal Suffrage. 

The resolution won in a fair, open 
presentation on the floor. In Califor- 
nia where women have had both the 
indirect and the KNOWN power of the 
ballot, the act of the General Federa- 
tion in going on record for woman's 
higher efficiency, is commended as a 
logical procedure. 

Significant is the fact that a Califor- 
nia woman, the President of the Cali- 
fornia Federation, helped to pave the 
good road over which the resolution 
traveled ; and it was another Califor- 
nia woman, the General Federation 
State Secretary, who introduced it. 
Long may we know both by name and 
deed. 

For years the Federation has heard 
arguments against endorsing woman 
suffrage ; arguments that the Federa- 
tion should not touch national politics, 
dip its fingers into suffrage, seize men's 
work, coerce a minority against suf- 
frage to a majority view ; but that the 
Federation was for the purpose of 
training women in citizenship. 

Issue Submerged 

So suffrage was laid jn the table 
(that wonderful vehicle of loss of mem- 
ory) or it was wantonly murdered in 
committee — until June 13, when there 
was no table strong enough to hold it 
and no instrument sharp enough to dis- 
patch it. 

Arguments against the resolution 
would have been futile. No sane argu- 



ment can be advanced against this 
enormous body of women supporting 
that which, when gained, is bound to 
give them more power to carry on the 
work they have federated to do. 

Suffrage is not politics. The Feder- 
ation did not endorse any political 
party when it recognized the validity 
of equal suffrage. Suffrage is a ques- 
tion of moral right. It will give wo- 
men that most formidable weapon with 
which they can demand what they 
want. We would not go to war with- 
out cannons; we would not go fishing 
without a pole. Why should we go 
reforming without the power to in- 
sist on reforms being carried out? 

We would not send a deaf mute to 
a convention to argue a vital question ; 
yet some women of the General Feder- 
ation have been willing to do their 
work in the sign language only, trust- 
ing that men, the ballot power hold- 
ers, might vote justly. 

California women realize the power 
they have in the ballot. It is their 
most priceless possession of citizenry. 
They would no more think of being 
without the ballot than they would 
try to work with their hands tied be- 
hind them. 

Interests Interlocked 

All that women do in the Federation 
is intimately related to home life. It 
is also intimately related to legislative 
action. The two are inseparable. If 
it were not that the legislature is a 
part of the home, women would not be 
so interested in the legislature — and 
suffrage endorsement. 

"Work for Women and Children" is 
the Federation slogan and its business 
is to train women for citizenship. Of 
what practical avail is knowledge of 
citizenship without being a citizen? 
Hands tied, brains tied. 

Seeking suffrage does not rob men 
(Continued on page SI) 



14 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



WHAT THE GENERAL FEDERATION CAN RENDER 
THE YOUNG WOMEN 

By Jessica Lee Briggs 

Address at the Chicago Biennial 

the style of dress should not be al- 
lowed to interfere with helping the 
young women to realize they possess 
bodies through which their souls may 
find expression and work. They can 
be brought to see that unselfish disin- 
terested work, — devotion to a cause, 
altruism, — all center around the home 
and they as responsible members of 
the family are also responsible mem- 
bers of society. In the world today as 
perhaps never before, it is true, that 
one must lose one's life to find it. Help 
the young women understand that club 
membership demonstrates loyalty to 
a movement and faith in its success. 

In the west there is a splendid type 
of young womanhood arising. She has 
the breadth of the prairies, the height 
of the mountain, and the gold of the 
sunshine in her make-up. She is fast 
creating an atmosphere of her own 
and she is ready to cast aside tradi- 
tions if need be to forge ahead for her- 
self. This type of young woman is 
eager, and competent, and reverent in 
a degree. She may be freer from es- 
tablished customs and conventionali- 
ties than her sister in the east and in 
the south, but she is only prescient of 
the "Mother of Tomorrow" in her dec- 
laration of freedom: 

You women of an older generation 
must help to restrain and yet sustain 
this new young woman. You must 
guard her that she does not become 
over indulgent with her own ideals 
and yet that her zeal for individual ex- 
pression may not lag. First and fore- 
most and above all else you must be- 
lieve in and love this young woman. 

If the General Federation of Wom- 
en's Clubs can in part render this ser- 
vice to the young women of America, 
the prophecy shall surely come to pass : 
"That the young womanhood of the 
future not neglectful of the least or 
oldest duty, and not loath to assume 
larger and more urgent service, links 
the past and present to coming ideals." 



I believe the greatest service the 
General Federation can render the 
young women of America is to help 
them see the real significance of life 
while they are yet young; to help 
them appreciate that the real values 
of life are not in the material of things, 
but in what those things mean to them. 
Life is its own excuse for being. Help 
the young women see this fact and ap- 
preciate the earnestness of it. Help 
them to understand that it is efficiency 
which counts. 

This is the age of the discovery of 
woman. You older women have been 
through this voyage of discovery, you 
have reached the land of promise — 
make this land of promise a reality to 
young women. You, as builders in 
this land, have the right to expect the 
young women to continue to build the 
great moral and cultural structures 
you have so firmly and ably begun. 
You have a right to the latent possi- 
bilities and power stored up in them, 
and I believe young women are anxious 
to become useful. I believe they are 
anxious and willing to be advised and 
directed. 

But speaking of young women gen- 
erally — they are not personally inter- 
ested in clubs. It is enough that 
mother is a club member. How are 
they to become interested? There 
must be somewhere a point of contact, 
and this contact must be sympathetic. 
Perhaps the older women become more 
fully aware that though the years have 
gone by, the same pot of gold which 
always hung hidden in the meadow of 
grain, or just over the hill among the 
tree tops, is still hanging at the end 
of the rainbow and feminine youth is 
ever reaching for it. 

It is said, "Woman's greatest critic 
is woman," this is true because "only 
a woman knows a woman's needs." 
But criticism of a particular debutante 
pose or a tango dance, or a tangent in 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



15 



BIENNIALISMS 



Mrs. Eugene Reilley of Charlotte, N. C, 
past president of her State Federation, and 
now its corresponding secretary, is keenly 
alive to the advantages of federation, which 
she summarizes as follows: "Ihe value of 
federation to the individual has never Deen 
fully appreciated even by ciub workers 
themselves. The opportunity which i. af- 
fords for personal service, experience and 
growth cannot be estimated. To the 
woman who enters federation ranks in a 
spirit of helpfulness and harmony a broad- 
er view of life is granced; she is brought 
in touch with the leaders of the move- 
ments in which she is most interested, and 
under their influence develops ability which 
she was not conscious of possessing. To 
the retiring woman it gives confidence and 
poise; to the lonely woman increased in- 
terest in life, recreation and companion- 
ship; to the ambitio.is woman a broad and 
fertile field of usefulness in which to 
achieve worthy ends. Federation is a Dor. d 
which unites kindred spirits, where women 
find sympathetic friends and oft;n hi. d 

themselves." 

* * * 

Frogram Was Perfect 

Mrs. Samuel B. Sneath, of Ohio second 
vice-president of the General Federation of 
Women's Clubs, in charge of the program 
for the Biennial Convention, worked dai.y 
for six months to have every feature per- 
fect. When asked i ' her work w T ere not 
trying, she replied: "I have found the 
preparation of the progra n a most deligh - 
ful task, made so by the willingness and 
unanimity of purpose with which all ha 1 , e 
endeavored to carry out plans proposed. 
My one regret has been the lack of funds, 
emphasising again the absolute necessity 
of the Endowment Fund." 

* * * 

Foreign Representation 

A feature of the Biennial which shows 
the remarkable growth of women's clubs all 
over the world was the program of re- 
sponses given by foreign representatives, 
including Mrs. D. J. Fleming, Lahore, In- 
dia; M _ s. C. P. Breckenridge, Isle of Pines, 
West Indies: Mrs. J. D. LecHe, Society of 
American Women, London. England; Mrs. 
Hugh Reid Griffin, Society of American 
Women, London, England; Mme. Helio- 
dore Fortier. president Montreal Women's 
Club, Montreal. Canada; Mrs. Sarah C. 
Thurston, president Woman's Club. Ha- 
vana, Cuba; Mrs. H. W. Roulett, president 
American Woman's Club. Calgary. Canada. 
Honorary members — Countess Okuma, To':- 
yo. Japan (represented by Mrs. Reitaro 
Tchmonio3 r a. Xew York; Mrs. Clark Mur- 
ray (Margaret Polsen), founder of Chi - 
dren of the Empire. 



Federation History 

"The History of the General Federation 
of Women's Clubs," is a new book just is- 
sued for the General Federation by the 
David C. Cook Publishing Company of El- 
gin, 111., price $2.00. The profits will go 
to swell the General Federation Endow- 
ment Fund. 

* * * 

The Club Husband 

Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker, president of 
the General Federation, said at a Biennial 
meeting: "Think what a splendid thing it 
is for us that we have the club husband. 
Think of the sympathy they have given 
us in our work. What a wonderful bless- 
ing to us is the American man." 

* * * 

Women Peaceful Army 

Julia Ward Howe called the Generul 
Federation a "peaceful army" and a peace- 
ful army it is as long as we consider the 
beauty^ and order, cleanliness and health, 
the intellectual and moral stimulus of the 
home; but we are a fighting army when 
any part of that home is menaced. 

Condemns Two Standards 

Mrs. Wil iam Heffernan was greeted wi.h 
prolonged applause when she declared that 
the time had come to put an end to the 
double standard of morals. Jane Addams 
of Hull House advised the women to ap- 
point committees in every ci y to crpe wi.h 
the social evil, and William L. Owens of 
the National Educational Association de- 
clared that organization probably will in- 
dorse the teaching of social hygiene. 

* * * 

Resolution Gives Power 

One of the important actions of the 
Biennial was the adoption of a resolution 
permitting delegates to initiate discussions 
from the floor. This came in the form 
of a resolution permitting such debate, a'-d 
when it was adopted it meant that the 
women members had the chance to start 
discussions of the question of the federa- 
tion's indorsing suffrage. Mrs. Lillian Pray 
Palmer of California was one of the 
women instrumental in getting this priv- 
ilege for the delegates on the floor. 

* * * 

No Men Needed 

Speaking of the first Chicago Biennial 
Convention in 1892, Mrs. Eass said that o- 
all the social movements none had been 
so definite in results as this great poteut 
organization. "Tonight for the first lime, 
she s^iid. "we need no men to speak tcr 
us but speak for ourselves and for t'-em. 
We b : d you welcome to the fruition of our 
hopes." 



16 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



General Federation 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President — Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker, 2606 Whitis avenue, Austin, Texas. 

First Vice-President — Mrs. Samuel B. Sneath, 211 Monroe street, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Second Vice-President — Miss Georgia A. Bacon, Worcestershire, Mass. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Harry L. Keefe, Walthill, Nebraska. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Eugene Reilly, 508 Park avenue, Charlotte, North Caro- 
lina. 

Treasurer — Mrs. William B. Williams, Lapeer, Mich. 

Auditor — Mrs. C. H. McMahon, 32 Caithness Apartments, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Directors — Mrs. William E. Andrews, 1225 Fairmont street, N. W., Washington, D. C; 
Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, Irvington, Indianapolis, Indiana; Mrs. Francis D. Everett, 
Highland Park, Illinois; Mrs. William P. Harper, 651 Kinnear place, Seattle, Wash- 
ington; Mrs. Frank White, Valley City, North Dakota; Mrs. William H. Crosby, 
Wisconsin; Mrs. W. B. Young, Jacksonville, Florida; Miss Mary Garrett Hay, New 
York City. 

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS 

Art — Mrs. Melville F. Johnston, 103 North Tenth street, Richmond, Ind. 

Civics — Miss Zona Gale, Portage. la. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, The Gladstone, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conservation — Mrs. Emmons Crocker, 48 Mechanic street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Education — Mrs. O. Shepard Barnum, 312 South Fifth street, Alhambra, Cal. 

Household Economics — Miss Helen Louise Johnson, 234 Paddock street, Watertown, 

N. Y. 
Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. A. E. Chantler, Tacoma Daily News, Tacoma, 

Wash. 
Legislation — Mrs. Horace T. Towner, Corning, la. 

Literature — Mrs. Frances Squire Potter, 4581 Oakenwald avenue, Kenwood, Chicago, 111. 
Music — Mrs. Lawrence Maxwell, Edgecliffe Road, Walnut Hills. Cincinnati, O. 
Public Health — Mrs. S. S. Crockett, 710 Belmont avenue, Nashville, Tenn. 
Press Committee — Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke. Chairman, Indianapolis, Ind. 



$100,000 ENDOWMENT FUND PLEDGED 



By Mrs. W. K. James 

Chairman of Endowment 



The $100,000 Endowment Fund is 
pledged. In fact, following the night 
of June 17, we had over that amount 
in form of cash, notes and pledges, i 
reported to the convention June 11 that 
there was $77,687.18 ca,sh ; $151 on 
notes; reported June 17, $78,369.78 
cash; $1,699.30, notes; pledges made 
June 17, $11,177 cash; $8,893.56 notes; 
total pledged $20,070.56; total paid and 
pledged $100,139.64. 

All the States but eight had paid 
their apportionment in full either in 
cash or partly by notes before the last 
meeting and at that time four more 
did so, leaving only four States that 
have given or promised less than 100 
per cent of the amount for which they 
were asked while many have given 
much more. 

Great excitement reigned as a veri- 
table treasury of money and promises 



of money poured in. It came in com- 
paratively small sums. 

The women evolved a plan whereby 
for $50 the giver may name some per- 
son or organization to be listed on the 
honor membership roll; $100 admits to 
the roll of honor, and $500 on the 
founders' list. New York State wo- 
men completed their share with $47,- 
000. Other states followed and the 
honor rolls began to fill up. Several 
women paid for the distinction for 
their husbands. 

Several clubs had been placed on 
the honor roll at $100 each when Mrs. 
Robert J. Burdette spoke for the press : 
"My husband is a newspaperman. My 
two sons are newspapermen, and I 
have ink on my thumbs," said the 
wife of the California humorist. "I 
will give $100 to place the press on 
the honor list." 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



17 



Then somebody started to make 
"founders" out of the news men and 
women, and Mrs. Pennybacker called 
for S10 contributions to make the 
amount which came so fast that it 
reached S536. 

The need of an endowment fund is 
urgent. The addition of every new 
line of work in the Federation means 
additional expense. Under Mrs. 
Moore's presidency the Federation be- 
came co-ordinated, with various other 
national bodies ; we are asked to ad- 
vise with these organizations and to 
send speakers to their conventions, 
which means expense. 

To meet this expense the work of 
raising an endowment fund was be- 
gun. If Idaho, taking up the subject 
of child labor laws, wishes to be in- 
formed of what is being done in Mass- 
achusetts, the General Federation en- 
dowment fund would allow some rep- 
resentative woman of Idaho to have 
her expenses paid to go to Massachu- 
setts to investigate conditions. If an- 
other state is taking up the question 
of a living wage and needs speakers 
to influence the state legislature, the 
endowment fund would provide the 
means whereby speakers might be sent 
to that state. The expense of the Bur- 
eau of Information, continually ex- 
tending its help to every State Feder- 
ation Club, and individual if asked, 
would have the funds to carry on the 
work. 

Members of my committee are : Airs. 
Percy V. Pennybacker, President of 
the General Federation ; Mrs. William 
B. Williams, Lapeer, Michigan; Airs. 
Catherine Carter Warren. Princeton, 
Xew Jersey; Airs. Robert J. Burdette, 
Pasadena, California, and Airs. Philip 
N. Aloore, St. Louis. 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

Harp Soloist of the Royal Academy 
of Music, London. 

Bluebird H «J I . Ex . 62 . Rai'docc 1972 EttreHa 
Phont 24558Wwt 4586. 



off Expirdssiioim 



Offers a thorough and effective three 
years' course in ail branches of Dra- 
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adequate preparation of teachers and 
readers, and for the development in 
the highest sense of true womanly cul- 
ture and character. Story Telling. 
Dramatic Interpretation, Principles of 
Art, Literature, and Physical Culture 
are especially emphasized. The school 
occupies^ its own spacious buildings 
and grounds in a charming, retired lo- 
cation, which offers unequalled advan- 
tages for healthy outdoor recreation of 
all sorts. 



Tkd C"MinniHa©dk 



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offers two four year courses — the col- 
lege preparatory and the general. All 
the usual academy subjects are given, 
with the additional advantage of work 
with the strong and able educators who 
conduct the CUMNOCK SCHOOL 
OF EXPRESSION. 

Write for Catalogue of Either School, 
and special souvenir Booklet of Views. 



1500 South Figueroa Street 
Los Angeles, California 



18 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



THE NEED OF ENDOWMENT 
By Clara B. Burdette 

Trustee of Endowment 

The time was when a propaganda of 
religious principles, educational in- 
struction, or philanthropic activities 
was carried forward, — after a fashion, 
— "without money and without price." 

But the old order chanfeth in this 
as in everything else and the voluntary, 
haphazard methods have been, or are 
being, replaced by efficient effort and 
those who serve should be worthy of 
their hire and be paid the price, and 
the necessary tools for efficiency 
should be supplied. This cannot be 
done for nothing. Expansion, in or- 
der to sow beside all waters costs 
somebody money. Lack of it retards 
and makes inefficient much of the 
splendid efforts that have been put 
forth through the years, and leaves un- 
fulfilled some of our most worthy 
promises. 

As I listened to the splendid reports 
of the various departments at the re- 
cent Biennial Convention in Chicago, I 
marveled that so much had been ac- 
complished with so little financial sup- 
port, but each report said in substance 
if not in so many words, "we sigh to 
think of all that was left undone be- 
cause there was not sufficient funds." 
To meet this very need the raising of 
an Endowment Fund was started at 
Cincinnati in 1912. 

The ultimate success of any organiz- 
ation is largely dependent upon the 
personal equation. Would you know 
of the General Federation, its aims and 
its powers there must be a visitation to 
your state or club from those who can 
bring knowledge and enthusiasm. In- 
terest on an Endowment Fund would 
contribute to the enrichment of club 
activities. When the state or club 
needs the inspiration of the personal 
presence of the General Federation of- 
ficers or department heads and are not 
able to accompany their invitation with 
an assurance of "expenses paid." the 
interest on the Endowment Fund 
would help make this possible. When 
the chairmen of the General Federation 
standing committees have a vision and 




JOHN W. SHENK 

(Incumbent) 

CANDIDATE FOR JUDGE 

OF THE 

SUPERIOR COURT 
Los Angeles County 

Primaries Aug. 25. General Election Nov. 3 

CURTIS D. WILBUR 

For Re-election as 

Judge of the Superior Court 

1914 
Juvenile Court 

The judge inaugurated Juvenile Court work 
in this city. He had to blaze a new trail, 
as there "were no plans laid out for such 
work. — The Graphic. 

Judge Wilbur's suggestions embodied in 
the final draft of the new juvenile court bill 
are admirable. This community is fortunate 
in possessing in Judge Wilbur one of the 
cleanest, fairest, most high principled and 
most thoroughly American of all public 
servants in the United States. — Herald, Los 
Angeles, Dec. 20, 1908. 

Civil Serviee 

Fortunately for the people, they have found 
in Judge Wilbur one able and strong enough 
to assert their rights. — Evening Express, Los 
Angeles, Feb. 17, 1914. 

Children's Relief and Mother's Pension 

Putting all its provisions together, we may 
say that Judge Wilbur has produced the bill 
of the year. It proposes that all young peo- 
ple shall be given a chance to get enough 
physical food and enough mental food to sat- 
isfy their needs and to fit them fully and 
competently for adult life. A simple idea. 
But millions more of children will perish 
physically and mentally before the world 
reaches it. — The Delineator (New York), 
May, 1913. 

1913 Judge Wilbur instructed the Grand 
Jury to investigate unlawful imprisonment 
of children. Adv. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



19 



have wrought out a method by which 
it may be visualized for others, they 
must either remain silent, — cease be- 
ing aggressive — or, they must con- 
tribute all, thus pauperizing those who 
"get something for nothing." This 
emphasizes the necessity for this fund 
which shall enable them to be "allowed 
to print" or transmit in some tangible 
form the vision given them. 

We have too long received from the 
leading workers in Federation their 
contribution not only of time, strength, 
tremendous physical effort and per- 
sonal influence, but we have accepted 
their money in large quantities in a 
manner that no self-respecting body 
of women have any right to continue. 
This willingness to accent all while we 
contribute little or nothing to the 
"common good" may have prevented 
us from being the great and good and 
glorious body of women we flattered 
ourselves we are. To maintain the 
dignity and influence of this great or- 
ganization, to use the wonderful power 
already generated, to be aggressive in 
our ideals, it cannot be too much to 
expect each woman in club life to con- 
tribute the price of an ordinary hand- 
kerchief to this fund that the serious 
direction of the work of departments 
of Education, of Civics, of Art, of Con- 
servation, of Home Economics, of 
Health, and Literature, may not only 
be enriched but will fall in line with 
the cry of the hour for expansion and 
efficiencv. 



LESLIE R. HEWITT 

(Incumbent) 
CANDIDATE FOR 

JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR 
COURT 

of Los Angeles County 



Primaries August 25 
General Election November 3 



Marquis Ellis 

VOICE EXPERT 
Placer, Trainer and Coach 



Los Angeles Examiner: "Marquis 
Ellis' aggregation of singers, well 
known to music lovers, never dis- 
appoints." 

Los Angeles Times: "Mr. Ellis 
has brought a series of genuine dis- 
coveries to the public's notice." 

Los Angeles Herald: "Marquis 
Ellis is the tutor of many operatic 
and dramatic stars." 



STUDIO 
Majestic Theatre Building 

JOHNSTONE JONES 




Candidate for 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

of Los Angeles County 

At Primary Election, Aug. 25 

General Jones is regarded by his friends 
as thoroughly qualified for this important 
position. He fully demonstrated his ability 
and fidelity in his services as District At- 
torney of San Diego; and later, as Assist- 
ant District Attorney of Los Angeles Coun- 
ty. He has practiced law in Los Angeles 
for a score of years, and his large experi- 
ence in criminal law, his unswerving in- 
tegrity and sense of justice to all have pecu- 
liarly fitted him for the duties of the office. 
His name will appear as a Non-Partisan 
Candidate upon every ticket in the August 
Primaries. 

Headquarters 307-308-309 Mason Opera House 



20 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




"Honorable J. Vincent Hannon of the Los 
Angeles bar, has announced himself as a can- 
didate for the position of Superior Court 
judge of this county. Mr. Hannon's friends, 
in a letter to the voters of Los Angeles 
signed by a number of Los Angeles attorneys, 
express their estimate of Mr. Hannon and 
his candidacy as follows: 

"Ladies and gentlemen: 

"We, the undersigned members of the bar 
of this county, take great pleasure in in- 



dorsing Mr. Hannon's candidacy, and we sin- 
cerely trust that the electors of the county 
will see fit, in their wisdom, to select him 
for one of the ten judgeships. 

"Some of us have known Mr. Hannon since 
his boyhood days; others of us have known 
him since he first began his career as a mem- 
ber of this bar; others have known him in 
the active practice as an attorney, but all 
of us take great pleasure in certifying to 
the . fact that in Mr. Hannon we have al- 
ways found not only a splendid gentleman, 
but an excellent, well equipped, competent 
lawyer, and one whom we not only believe 
but know from education, mental qualifica- 
tion and practice will make a splendid judge, 
and we indorse him as being fully qualified 
in every respect for that position. 

"Very truly yours, 
"Edwin A. Meserve, Oscar Lawler, Max 

Loewenthal, Isidore B. Doekweiler, John 

C. Mott, Frank P. Flint, George J. Denis, 
Walter F. Haas, J. Wiseman Macdonald, 
Albert M. Stephens, R. F. Del Valle, A. 

D. Laughlin, Luciene Earle, M. J. Mc- 
Garry, J. W. Swanwick, John W. Carri- 
gan, Joseph Scott, William F. McLaugh- 
lin, Richard Dillon, H. W. O'Melveney, 
W. H. Anderson, W. S. Wright, Joseph 
H. Call, John H. Foley." Adv. 



Camp Rincon 

Gem of the San Gabriel Canyon 
Good Health, Good Fare and Good Cheer 

For all who visit our Camp. New Management 

Spacious dining-rooms, pavilion for danc- 
ing, good music, plunge 40x80 feet, hot tub 
and shower bath, fine spring water, an 
ideal spot to spend a vacation. Stage fare 
to camp $1.50; Horses $2.00. 
Dr. M. H. Dailey, Mgr. R. C. Pollard, Pres. 

Azusa, Cal. Los Angeles Office 621 Central BIdg 

Telephone 213 Tel. A3475 Bdwy. 2673 

Camp Bonita 

Beautifully located at the junction of the 
main San Gabriel River and Cattle Canyon 
Creek. Completely furnished cobblestone 
huts and tents. Splendid dining room. Fine 
dance pavilion. Tennis court, croquet 
grounds. Al fishing. 

City Office 740 South Hill Street 
Henry Willard, Manager 

*For above camps take P. E. car 7:30 
Daily stage to each camp leavingat 9:30 



RELAXATION t 
RECREATION SPPk 
REJUVENATION ^^^ 



FREEDOM 
COMFORT 
NOVELTY 



at Follows Camp 

Beautiful trails and hospitable entertain- 
ment. Tents, bungalows, or rooms. De- 
i.--s food, fresh and nourishing. Horse- 
back riding, fishing. A complete and ideal 
modern camp. 

For your V acation 
Try the Camping ana Outing 

Cold Brook Camp 

First-class accommodations and amuse- 
ments. Every arangement for camping or 
boarding. 

Pacific Electric trains 6:30, 7:05, 8:00, 
8:55 A. M. Stage daily from Azusa. 

Social hall, tennis, croquet, boxball, 
horse-back riding. Large dining room; hot 
and cold tub and shower baths. 

or 8:30 A. M. from Los Angeles to Azusa. 
A. M. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED AT 
CHICAGO 

Nothing shows so much the deter- 
mination of club women to clean up 
social, moral and civic life as their ac- 
tion of resolutions submitted at the 
Biennial, dealing with vital phases of 
civilization. 

Resolutions adopted indorsed social 
organizations of women as outlined by 
the Agricultural Department; urged 
the opening of public schools and other 
public buildings to the people as social 
centers for popular debate; deplored 
any further impairment of Niagara 
Falls by power companies; indorsed 
efforts being made to prevent fire 
waste, and went on record in opposi- 
tion to the liquor traffic. 

A resolution, proposed by a delegate 
from Kentucky, placed the Federation 
on record as supporting prohibition 
and urging the abolition of the liquor 
business. Still another urged the 
greater teaching of sex hygiene in 
schools and homes, and praised the 
awakening conscience of both men and 
women to the demand for a single 
standard of morality and purity. 

Resolutions were adopted protesting 
against suggestive stories in magazines 
and pledging members of the federa- 
tion to subscribe for only those pub- 
lications whose columns are clean; 
pledging support to a national centen- 
nial celebration at Baltimore in com- 
memoration of the composition of 
"The Star Spangled Banner" ; censur- 
ing immodest forms of dancing. 

The resolution on suffrage read ; 

"Whereas, the question of political 
equality of men and women is today 
a vital problem under discussion 
throughout the civilized world ; there- 
fore be it 

"Resolved, that the General Federa- 
tion of Women's clubs give the cause 
of political equality its moral support 
by recording its earnest belief in the 
principle of political equality regard- 
less of sex." 

The resolutions recommend: 

Simple, becoming and modest de- 
signs in dress. 




DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

JOHN D. FREDERICKS 

OF LOS ANGELES 

Mr. Fredericks is a lawyer by pro- 
fession and has served as District At- 
torney of Los Angeles County for the 
past 12 years, during which time he 
has handled many notable cases and 
established a reputation for himself 
as a just, fair and able prosecutor as 
well as a sound lawyer. 

He is in the prime of life, honest, 
able and energetic and possesses those 
qualities of head and heart that endear 
him to all with whom he comes in con- 
tact. He is a man of strong mentality 
and his reasoning processes run in 
straight lines. He readily sees the 
right and possesses the force of char- 
acter necessary to follow it. 

He is a man of the Lincoln type, 
physically and mentally, and his pub- 
lic career has won him the friendship 
of Southern California irrespective of 
party affiliations. He possesses the 
qualifications for any office within the 
gift of the people. 

He has never been a standpatter in 
his party but belongs to the great bulk 
of the Republican party who believe 
that reforms in the party should -be in- 
augurated within the same. 

Captain Fredericks is a strong cam- 
paigner and, while not the most elo- 
quent of the candidates named for this 
high position, all his speeches show the 
sincerity of the man and carry convic- 
tion to his hearers. 

His strong personality and unques- 
tioned ability together with his un- 
doubted popularity south of Tehachepi 
make him at the present time the 
strongest candidate for the Republican 
nomination at the primaries. — Adv. 



Your Mirror will tell you 
more about "Style" 




in a minute — 

""THAN you could learn from reading a 

whole book on the subject. 
There's always something new to be learned 
about "Style" and there 's just one really satis- 
factory way of acquiring this knowledge — visit 
"The Style Shop" try on some of the new 
gowns, and — 

Let the Mirror tell you! 





at will 



You may change 

your entire appearance through 
your choice of really smart apparel 

It's all a matter of "Style" 

A ND never was there wider latitude for 
■^ the exercise af charming individuality 
than at the present time among our myriads 
of exclusive and artististic creations, from 
the trim little gown for morning shopping 
to the extremely elaborate evening costume. 

High Class Suits 

From $14.75 up 

Dresses and Gowns 

From $12.50 up 

Daintiest Blouses 

From $2.50 up 



Artistic Millinery 

At tempting reductions 

Gloves and Veils 

Latest styles and shades 
"The Style Shop" 





THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



Offered the services of the home 
economics division to further the 
Smith-Lever bill in Congress to estab- 
lish a bureau of home economics. 

Favored increased appropriations for 
state and city boards of health. 

Urged university exension work for 
the prevention of disease. 

Promised to co-operate with chil- 
dren's bureaus in employing nurses. 

Requested children's bureaus to pre- 
pare pamphlets for mothers on instruc- 
tion for the children. 

Approved state laws making man- 
datory the reporting of venereal dis- 
ease. 

Approved abatement and injunction 
law in suppression of immoral resorts. 

The vice traffic and tight skirts were 
attacked in the resolutions. 



Chief Deputy District Attorney 

W. J. FORD 



FAVORS TOWNMEETINGS 

Miss Margaret Wilson, daughter of 
President Wilson, made a plea at the 
Biennial for the restoration of the 
townmeeting of Colonial days where 
the people of a community may meet 
for civic discussions. Her text was 
"The social and civic functions of 
school centers," although her dis- 
course was on the topic, "What is the 
Greatest Service the General Federa- 
tion Can Render the Young Women of 
America?" 

In part she said: "The greatest 
thing the Federation of Women's 
Clubs can do for the young women 
of America is to show the way they 
can co-operate with all of the women 
and men of America in promoting the 
causes of freedom and justice. 

"The school house is the political 
capitol for us all, if we only knew it. 
We don't want school buildings to be 
social settlements, but community cen- 
ters. 

"Neighbors turn every district 
schoolhouse in this dear land oi ours 
into a council chamber. There let us 
get together, there let us talk, there 
let us learn our lessons in the highest 
citizenship, there let us fearlessly listen 
to every idea." 




Candidate for District Attorney 
for Los Angeles County 



Announcement in our last month's issue 
that Chief Deputy District Attorney W. J. 
Ford is a candidate for promotion to the im- 
portant position of district attorney, brought 
forth many reasons why he should secure 
the support and the votes of the women in 
Los Angeles county. Mr. Ford has done those 
things in the discharge of his duties as 
Chief Deputy District Attorney "which force- 
fully recommend him to the homes. 

Despite the fact that he is busily engaged 
now in his campaign, Mr. Ford has found 
time during the last week to effect a needed 
reform in the administration of the juvenile 
court law. According to the regulations 
"which have been in effect for a number of 
years, juveniles charged with minor offenses 
are taken into court on all occasions. Mr. 
Ford gave thoughtful consideration to this 
and finally decided that many cases should 
never be taken into court. 

By arrangement with the deputy in charge, 
Mr. Ford planned for regular daily confer- 
ences to consider such cases. Mr. Ford's 
plan, which will be put into effect at once, 
calls for a meeting of the juvenile court 
judge, the deputy in charge of the complaint, 
the arresting officer who brought the charge, 
and the young defendant. If deemed advis- 
able, after consideration, a severe lecure will 
be administered and the juvenile released 
after being properly cautioned. 

The stigma of an appearance in court is 
thereby removed, and the child is not dwarfed 
by a criminal record. In the future, Mr. Ford 
believes, a large percentage of the cases will 
be disposed of in this manner, without pub- 
licity and without public humiliation. 

Mr. Ford is the father of four children. 
Whenever an application is made by a man 
against his wife or by a wife against her 
husband, Mr. Ford's first consideration is 
about the children. Almost every day in his 
experience of eight years as a Deputy Dis- 
trict Attorney, he has re-united families. His 
record as a prosecutor is not a record of 
convictions, but it is a record of humanity — 
where the law has been upheld and where 
justice has been administered with human 
touch. 

Many of our readers also point out that 
Mr. Ford should be elected District Attorney 
as a matter of good business. They explain 
that he is the only candidate qualified by ex- 
perience to cope efficiently with the problems 
of the people in the criminal courts. Ad v 



24 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



BIENNIAL ENTERTAINMENT NATHANIEL P. CONREY 

Three thousand two hundred dele- 

gates and alternates from the 6000 
clubs of the General Federation and 
10,000 visiting club women stormed 
Chicago in attendance at the Biennial 
last month. The hotels in the vicin- 
ity of the Auditorium theater, where 
sessions were held, were full to over- 
flowing. The Auditorium, vast as it 
is, could not accommodate all the vis- 
itors at once, but there were plenty of 
attractions aside from the regular 
meetings. The figures are the more 
impressive because these women repre- 
sented one per cent of the total mem- 
bershio of the federation. 

Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker of Aus- 
tin, Texas, General Federation presi- 
dent, stayed at the Congress hotel, the 
headquarters of the federation board, 
all of whom were in attendance. 

A pretty courtesy extended to the 
president and each member of the 
board was a large basket of dark red 
roses from the hotel, and an equally 
large basket of light pink roses,' "with 
the compliments of the women of Illi- 
nois." A luncheon tendered the board 
by the Chicago Woman's Club Satur- 
day made a pleasant break in the day's 
duties. 

Perhaps the strongest impression 
the visitor received was the cordial 
hospitality which prevailed and the 
evidences of preparedness for the great 
event. The year and a half which had 
been given over to this part of the 
work is responsible for the facility and 
ease with which the various commit- 
tees came into line. The chairman of 
transportation, Mrs. H. S. Jaffray, had 
a detail from her committee of 200 on 
duty as early as Saturday to meet the 
blue-ribboned delegates on all incom- 



Is Presiding Justice District Court of Ap- 
peal. Thirty years of legal experience. 
Thirteen years a judge. Ability proven. 
Re-elect him! 

The following named women have en- 
dorsed him by consenting to the use of their 
names on the Conrey Campaign Committee: 

Mrs. E. K. Foster Mrs. T. T. Knight 

Mrs. H. K. W. Bent Alice H. Randall 
Mrs. Ada Moore Mrs. Michael Francis 

Miss Elizabeth Pack- Regan 

ard 
Miss Olive Pervical 
Mrs. Ida A. Talbert 
Mrs. J. E. Holcomb 
Mrs. Sarah Hopkins 
Virginia Johnston 
Mrs. J, S. Merrill 
Sarah E. Ramsey 
Mrs. C. Shaffer 
Mrs. R. H. F. Variel 
Mrs. Eliza Tupper 

Wilkes 
Miss Jessie Anthony 
Mrs. H. R. Boynton 
Mrs. Nettie E. Bryson 
Mrs. Charles Day 
Mrs. "W. S. Bullis 
Mrs. Anna J. Calkins 



Mrs. L. B. Torrey 
Mrs. J. S. Vallely 
Mrs. Harriette J. Wig- 
more 
Mrs. George V. 

Wright 
Emma Dockstader 
Mrs. F. M. Douglass 
Mrs. Emma L. Reed 
Mrs. Shelly Tolhurst 
Mrs. G. E. Averill 
Mrs. E. C. Bellows 
Mrs. R. L. Craig 
Mrs. E. C. Day 
Mrs. Emma De Garmo 
Mrs. R. L. Horton 
F. E. Fay 
E. A. Doran 
Miss Elizabeth L. Ken- 



Mrs. 
Mrs. Sidney J. Parsons Jfrf 
The Misses Dent 
Dr. Nannie Dunsmoore ney 
Mrs. J. W. Hendrick Mrs. Joseph P. Loeb 
Mrs. John Ellis Mrs. D. C. McCan 

Mrs. James A. FoshayAntoinette D. Metcalf 
Mrs. Chas. J. Fox, Jr. Elizabeth Day Palmer 
Mrs. W. S. Garrett Mrs. N. K. Potter 
Elizabeth J. Gibson Mrs. Harold Allen 
Mrs. "W. T. S. Ham-Mrs. Henry H. Mum- 

mond ford 

Mrs. W. S. James Mrs. Seward Simons 

Mrs. Viola H. Jeffries Mrs. Adelaide Tichenor 
Mrs. A. S. Lobingier Mrs. J. J. Penny 



Mrs. Mary A. Lewis 
Mrs. Wm. Mead 
Mrs. John Morton 
Mrs. Frank D. Owen 
Mrs. Adolph Ramish 
Mrs. Reuben Shettler 
Mrs. M. R. Sinsa- 

baugh 
Mrs. L. W. Stockwell 



Mrs. Charles Spence 
Mrs. John Edgar 
Mrs. Jotham Bixby 
Mrs. W. H. Anderson 
Mrs. D. G. Stephens 
Mrs. Anna Bartholo- 
mew 
Dr. Louise Harvey 
Clarke 



It may be because Illinois is the lat- 
est state to come into suffrage that the 
yellow badges of the transportation 
and other committees, and the yellow 
arm bands of the ushers and pages, 
with their black lettering, seem strik- 
ingly significant to those who are fa- 
miliar with the "Votes for Women" 
banners so much in the front of late. 



Mrs. Burton William-Mrs. Mary Darling 
son Mrs. Geo. H. Dole 

Miss Victoria Witmer Mrs. Priestly Hall 
Mrs. O. P. Clark Miss S. Alice LaRue 

Mrs. Geo. B. DobinsonMrs. Geo. C. Pope 
Mrs. C. F. Edson Mrs. Florence C. Bar- 

Mrs. Lyman Farwell ton 

Mrs. F. c. Howes Mrs. Eliza A. Curtis 

Mrs. S. C. Hubbell Mrs. Anna B. Garner 

Mrs. Randall Hutchin-Mrs. L. S. Howard 

son Mrs. Annie McFarlane 

Mrs. Fred Hooker Mrs. Mary Leicester 

Jones Wagner 

Mrs. H. H. Kerckhoff Mrs. W. S. Lewis 



Headquarters: 

236 Title Insurance Bldg. 

Los Angeles 



Adv. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



Id 



1916 BIENNIAL 

The next biennial will be held in 
New York City in 1916. New York 
boosters in a poll of 2833 delegates at- 
tending the convention found 2357 in 
favor of holding the thirteenth biennial 
in 1916 in New York City. For At- 
lantic City 410 voted, and for Kansas 
City 76. 

Chicago has announced that Mrs. 
George Bass, president of the local 
biennial board, will be a candidate for 
presidency of the Grand Federation 
Women's Clubs in 1916. 



BIENNIAL COUNCIL 

The Council meeting of the Biennial 
is a feature of the convention. The 
Council is a smaller body than the 
convention, and its sessions are more 
intimate than those of the greater body 
can be. The president of every club in 
the General Federation state secre- 
taries and, of course, the General Fed- 
eration's Board of Directors and chair- 
men of departments of work. 

The interests of the General Feder- 
ation are brought before the Council 
and full opportunity is given for that 
general discussion which we always 
crave and which has become impossi- 
ble in the great convention. The wo- 
men who are actively engaged in club 
work always derive great pleasure and 
benefit from these meetings. 



Remember — our 

WOMEN'S LOBBY 

IS ALWAYS 

AT YOUR = 

SERVICE 

This lobby has its own desks, 
writing materials, phones and big, 
restful chairs. Feel free to make 
it your headquarters whenever you 
are nearby. This bank is open 
from 8 a. m. till 10 p. m. every 
week day. 

For out-of-town club women we 
have a most satisfactory Banking 
by Mail service. Details gladly 
furnished. 
4% on Savings Accounts 

TRUST 

AND 

rs&viHQSL 

Owned by the Stockholders of the Citizens National Bank 

Savings — Commercial — Trust 

308-310 S. Broadway, Los Angeles 






D.JOSEPH COYNE 



Candidate for 

Judge of Superior 
Court, Los Angeles 
County. 

Asks your support. 

Twelve years in 
practice of law. 




Judge 

FredH.Taft 

Candidate for 
Re-election as 

Judge of the 
Superior Court 

Now 

Judge of the 
Juvenile Court 



GAVIN W. CRAIG 

Candidate for 

Presiding Justice 

District Court of Appeal 

Second District 

Now Superior Court Judge of Los Angeles 
County 



26 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



DISTRICT NEWS 



■ESHSa5Z5E5HSH5H5Z5ZSE5HSES'E5HSE5H5H5H5B5 



LOS ANGELES 
Ella Hamilton Durley, Press Chair- 
man 

Fifteen members of the new board 
of the Los Angeles District gathered 
at Christopher's, June 4, for the first 
meeting under the new District Pres- 
ident, Mrs. H. A. Cable. The board 
represented 17,000 club women of Los 
Angeles, Santa Barbara, Ventura, San 
Luis Obispo and Inyo counties. 

The ante-luncheon hours were con- 
sumed in laying plans for effective 
work during the coming club year. An 
outline for the guidance of clubs of 
the district will be prepared under the 
supervision of^a committee composed 
of Mrs. Cable,.Mrs, L. W. Harmon and 
Mrs. Ella H. -D'u'rley. Following the 
lead of the state organization, a new 
committee, that of Parliamentary Prac- 
tice, was formed. Mrs. E. R. Brainerd 
had accepted the chairmanship of the 
committee on Water-ways. 

The annual --di strict convention will 
be held at Long Beach March 1915, 
the exact date to be determined by the 
president, Mrs. H. A. Cable. 

Responding to roll-call were Mrs. L. 
W. Harmon, recording secretary; Mrs. 
R. C. Shipman, corresponding secre- 
tary; and the following committee 
chairmen : Public Library Service, 
Mrs. Adelaide B. Brewer; Music, Mrs. 
Carrie Stone Freeman; Public Health, 
Dr. Maud Wild ; Political Science, Mrs. 
Mattison B. Jones; Peace, Mrs. Frank 
A. Stephens; History and Land Marks, 
Mrs. Carleton Seaver; Philanthropy, 
Mrs. Artitisia D. Clark; Education, 
Mrs. Samuel J. Keese; Art, Mrs. T. M. 
Walker; Press, Mrs. Ella Hamilton 
Durley; Club Extension, Mrs. Dallas 
Mason Cate ; Civil Service Reform, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Baker Bohan. 

"Reciprocity day" with the South 
Pasadena Association doing the honors 
was one to be happily remembered. 
The spacious club-house and the 
charming hostesses were both in gala 
attire. Welcome and good cheer were 
in the air. The hour before luncheon 





FRANK E. WRIGHT 



Frank E. Wright of Sacramento is an- 
nouncing his candidacy for the position of 
State Surveyor-General on the Republican 
ticket. He is well qualified to fill the re- 
sponsible position, having served eight years 
as Chief Deputy in that office under his late 
father, M. J. Wright, who was State Sur- 
veyor-General from 1895 to 1903. Prior to 
that time, Mr. Wright was Chief Clerk in 
the United States Land office at Visalia for 
five years when his father was register of 
that office. Thirteen, years of continuous 
service in the States Land offices is a record 
he may well be proud of, and alone stands 
as a recommendation for his integrity and 
ability. Mr. Wright is a native son, having 
been born in Vallejo in 1871. He is a young 
man of family and is well and favorably 
known throughout the State. He is asking 
the endorsement and support of the people 
at the coming election, relying upon his past 
record as to his efficiency, and promising 
to serve them to the best of his knowledge 
and ability if he has the honor of being 
elected Surveyor-General of the State of Cal- 
ifornia. Adv. 



iSE5E5ESa5E5rl5H5H5E5ESE5H5H5HSaSH5?5ESE5"i 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



27 



was given up to enjoyment of the club- 
house and the numerous Arts and 
Crafts exhibits arranged for the enter- 
tainment of the guests. There was a 
wonderful table rilled with the hand 
work of Russian peasant women, laces, 
beadwork and chains; Mrs. G. A. 
Crandall had kindly loaned her inter- 
esting collection of rosaries; Mrs. 
Charles L. Powell, Mrs. George Baker 
Anderson, Miss Rose Conner and 
others had exhibits of artistic hand 
work in silver and jewelry. 

Mrs. Frank A. Stephens presided 
over the luncheon which was served to 
three hundred, members of the state 
and district board occupying seats of 
honor. Informal after dinner talks 
were led by Mrs. H. A. Cable, who 
spoke for effective co-operation among 
the clubs of the district, urged the ap- 
pointment of Federation secretaries by 
the clubs through whom closer rela- 
tionship with the district and state 
may be maintained; and dwelt upon 
the desirability of a purpose in every 
program, requesting that each chair- 
man send to district headquarters one 
purpose program. 

Brief talks were given by several 
district chairmen. Mrs. Carrie Stone 
Freeman, emphasizing her desire for a 
study of American composers and the 
crushing out of rag-time ; Mrs. Dallas 
Mason Cate, Club Extension, declared 
her willingness to assist in organizing 
clubs wherever there was a nucleus of 
ten women ; Mrs. H. S. Trotter, Coun- 
try Life, calling attention to the aim 
to make war on noxious weeds; Mrs. 
Ella H. Durley, Press, requesting that 



Twenty-five years in active 
practice of law 



A. ORFILA 

607-8 Chamber of Commerce BIdg. 
Candidate for 

Judge of the 
Superior Court 

County of Los Angeles 
Primary Election August 25 




Energy 



Efficiency 



Expediency 



The Three E Candidate 

DAVID G. HATHEWAY 

For 
Judge of the Police Court 

of 
The City of Los Angeles 

Primary Election Aug. 25, 1914 

General Election Nov. 3, 1914 

Home Phone 77560 



ws©ffy 

Commpsiimy 

Wholesale and Retail 
Ferns, Ornamental and Fruit Trees. All 

Kinds of Plants. Choice Roses 
1454-60 W. Jefferson St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



fJfflAxfame 






cSncloawtA/ie'H 






l£od 


SOtnaeled 



28 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



the clubs of the district send her re- 
ports of important doings. Mrs. Dur- 
ley's address is 616 South Burlington 
Avenue, Los Angeles. 



NORTHERN 
Mrs. A. F. Jones, District President 

The executive board meeting of the 
Northern District was held at Hotel 
Sacramento, in Sacramento, June 17. 
Beginning with September 5, the regu- 
lar Disrict board meetings will be held 
the first Saturday of the month during 
the club season of 1914-1915. 

The thirteenth annual District con- 
vention will be held March 23-26, 1915. 
I have presided at two very delightful 
Reciprocity Meetings recently', one at 
Nevada City, Nevada County, and one 
at Jackson, Amador County, both in 
the high Sierras. Both meetings were 
one day conventions. 

The Kahnungdatlageh Club of Nev- 
ada City, Miss Minnie Brand Presi- 
dent, was hostess. Representatives 
were present from four counties. 
Twelve club presidents reported at the 
morning session and seventy women 
were seated at a delightful noon lunch- 
eon. Department Chairmen addressed 
the afternoon session. The evening 
program was an exceptionally fine mu- 
sicale. This was followed by a recep- 
tion at the Brand studio. The success 
of the day was greatly due to the ef- 
forts of Mrs. G. E. Chappell of Grass 
Valley. 

The Woman's Improvement Club of 
Jackson, Mrs. C. B. Arditto, president, 
acted as hostess, entertaining the clubs 
of Sutter Creek, lone, Oroville, Stock- 
ton and Sacramento. Two fine papers 
were given on the local "history and 
landmarks" of Sutter Creek and Jack- 
son. Amador is called the "Mother 
Lode County." It is teeming with 
historic tales of the days of '4§. Near 
Jackson once lived the "bard of the 
Sierras," the immortal "Bret Harte." 

The Northern District executive 
board officers are : President, Mrs. A. 
F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery Street, 
Oroville; vice-president, Mrs. A. M. 



For Judge of tlie Superior Court 

FRANK R. WILLIS 



For thirty years Judge Willis has been a 
resident of the City of Los Angeles. His 
training" has been along lines fitting him for 
presiding in the criminal department of the 
Superior Court. 

For eight years he was in the District 
Attorney's office under the late Maj. J. A. 
Donnell and under James C. Rives, the pres- 
ent efficient Judge of the Probate Depart- 
ment of the Superior Court. For six years 
he has, except for his year as Presiding 
Judge, been actively engaged in handling 
criminal cases, disposing of between five and 
six hundred cases annually. 

As a student of criminology Judge "Willis 
has long since learned that punishment for 
revenge is a relic of barbarism which should 
be discarded, ' and that in determining the 
adequate correction for a given offense only 
two things are to be considered — the pro- 
tection of society and the good of the ac- 
cused, followed of course by the deterrent 
effect which the proper punishment of crime 
will have upon others. 

Long before our Juvenile law was enacted 
he was taking boys charged with minor of- 
fenses and placing them in charge of parents 
and "big brothers" instead of sending them 
to reform schools or jails. Since the proba- 
tion and parole laws were passed he has been 
their consistent advocate. In six years he 
has placed over 500 men and women on pro- 
bation, more than ninety per cent of which 
have made good. 

He has endeavored to elevate the moral 
tone of the criminal courts by excluding 
from the courtroom all morbid curiosity 
seekers, both male and female, holding cases 
where women and children are concerned be- 
hind doors closed to all except parents, rela- 
tives and officers of societies organized for 
the protection of delinque'nt children. There 
has been in one or two instances criticism 
upon the length of sentence imposed in cases 
where degenerate men -were preying on inno- 
cent and unprotected women, but investiga- 
tion of the details of these crimes, too vile 
to be printed in decent newspapers, show 
that the sentences were well merited in each 
case. And we all assert that Judge Willis 
will if re-elected continue to do all in his 
power to protect women and children from 
this class of criminals. 

Inquire of the officers of the Superior and 
Juvenile Courts, the jurors who have served 
in his department, as to his record, and voice 
your approval or disapproval by your vote at 
the primaries. — Adv. 



JOSEH F. CHAMBERS 

(Police Judge Los Ange'es City) 
Candidate for 

Judge of the Superior Court 

Subject to the Will of the Voters 
of Los Angeles County 

Primary Election August 25 
Election November 3 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



29 



Seymour, 1605 H Street, Sacramento ; 
recording secretary. Mrs. Orrin B. 
Whipple. 606 16th St., Sacramento; 
corresponding secretary, Mrs. C. O. 
Hamilton, Oroville ; treasurer, Mrs. 
Emily Hoppin, Yolo; auditor, Mrs. V. 
S. Woolley, Chico. 

Chairmen of departments are: Art, 
Mrs. J. B. Hughes, 413 Pine St., Oro- 
ville : Bureau of Library Information 
and Reciprocity, Miss Retta Parrott, 
City Library of Sacramento; Civics, 
Mrs. F. W. Ouast, Rocklin ; Civil 
Service Reform. Mrs. L. C. Hunter, 
2223 K. St., Sacramento ; Club Exten- 
sion. Mrs. George McCoy, 2410 K. St.. 
Sacramento ; Conservation, including 
Forestry. Mrs. C. L. • Donohoe, 13S 
South Plumas St., Willows and Water- 
ways. Mrs. W. S. Kendall, 2600 J St., 
Sacramento : Life, Mrs. Hattie Buffing- 
ton. Nevada City; Education, Miss Lil- 
lie Earll, 238 Hazel St., Chico; Feder- 
ation Emblem, Miss Etta Cornell, Fair 
Oaks, Sacramento Co. ; Health. Mrs. 
W. M. Strief, 615 8th St., Marysville; 
History Landmarks. Mrs. L. H. 
Walsh. Auburn; Home Economics, 
Airs. R. H. Jones. Marysville; Indus- 
trial and Social Conditions, Mrs. H. M. 
Albery. Colusa; Legislation, Mrs. H. 
J. Kilgariff, 2317 M St.. Sacramento; 
Literature. Mrs. George W. Hamilton, 
Auburn: Music, Mrs. Walter Long- 
To Workers : 

Prominent clubwomen are realizing 
the advantage of the best English in 
their public utterances. 

Articles that appear under their 
names in the papers and magazines 
should be beyond criticism, and should 
represent them worthily in all the per- 
fection of construction and finish. 

If you feel the desire to add to the 
cogency and force of your logic, the 
beauty and correctness of your style, 
drop me a line of inquiry concerning 
my individual coaching in public 
speaking and writing. 

Sincerely yours, 
RUBY ARCHER DOUD. 
Granada Park. Los Angeles, Cal. 



botham, 1915 Shasta Avenue, Sacra- 
mento; Peace, Mrs. C. B. Swain, 205 
3rd St., Chico ; Philanthropy, Mrs. G. 
E. Chappell, Grass Valley; Press, Mrs. 
B. F. Walton, 2209 2nd Avenue, Sac- 
ramento ; State University Club House 
Loan, Mrs. W. E. Craig, Portola. 

Miss Retta Parrott, Northern Dis- 
trict Chairman of the Department of 
Industrial and Social Conditions, has 
turned over to Miss Susan T. Smith, 



FRANK G. TYRRELL 



Frank G. Tyrrell, candidate for Superior 
Judge, was born in Ferndale, California, 
1865. of pioneer stock. Graduated from 
the San Jose State Normal School in 1883, 
and taught in the public schools of the 
State for three years. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1887, and has been practicing 
in Los Angeles for nearly ten years, head 
of the firm Tyrrell, Abrahams & Brown, in 
the Washington Building. 

Mr. Tyrrell is widely known for his 
effective platform work. His maiden 
speech at San Jose, in 1881. was in favor 
of woman suffrage, and he gave material 
assistance in the campaign which gave 
California women the ballot. 

But entirely apart from any claim for 
services rendered, his friends consider him 
admirably equipped for a judicial posi- 
tion, by wide experience, training and 
temperament. 

SIDNEY N. REEVE 



Candidate for 

JUDGE 

of the 

SUPERIOR 
COURT 



A Clean Record and 
a splendid reputa- 
tion on the Bench 




30 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



newly appointed state chairman of the 
Bureau of Library Information and 
Reciprocity, created at the Riverside 
Convention, a set of pamphlets on in- 
dustrial and social conditions similar 
to those placed in libraries in counties 
of the Northern district. There are 
enough of these pamphlets to supply 
one each to the remaining' counties of 
the state. 

Pamphlets cover subjects such as ed- 
ucation, art, music, literature, history, 
landmarks, peace, civics, conservation, 
civil service reform, home economics, 
legislation and parliamentary usage — 
all represented in Federation depart- 
ments. These pamphlets will be 
found useful for reference by club- 
women and a letter to the chairman, 
Miss Smith, State Library, Sacramen- 
to, will give information how to get 
them. 



Seven Years Active Law Practice in Los Angeles 



SOUTHERN 
Helene M. Deimling, Press Chairman 

An Executive Board meeting of 
the Orange County Federation of 
Women's Clubs was held at Anaheim, 
Wednesday, June 10th, Mrs. Ida F. 
Dutton, president, presiding. It was 
decided that the Southern District, 
C. F. W. C, will hold its convention 
in Santa Ana, November 10-13. 

Mrs. W. W. Wilson of East Newport 
Ebell gave her report as a member of 
the Woman's Auxiliary of the Fair 
Commission of the Southern Counties. 

After describing in a vivid way the 
work already accomplished by this 
Commission and giving their plans for 
the future, she urged all club women 
to talk "Fair" instead of "Hard Times." 

Officers elected by the La Mesa 
Woman's Club for the coming year: 
President, Mrs. M. B. Christopher; 
first vice-president, Mrs. C. E. Barney; 
second vice-president, Mrs. Merritt ; 
recording secretary, Miss Holland; 
corresponding secretary, Mrs. D. 
Keeney ; treasurer, Mrs. C. R. Fitz- 
gerald ; directors. Mrs. Mary Hodgson, 
Mrs. J. French, Mrs. O. W. Todd. 

The debate at the Woman's Club 




EDWARD JUDSON BROWN 

Candidate for Justice of the Peace 
of Los Angeles Township 

Women who are deeply interested in civic affairs will appreciate 
the importance of the Justices' Court. This Court comes into the 
closest contact with the people. Clean, able, experienced men are 
needed on the Justices' bench. Edward Judson Brown is en- 
dorsed for this office by William J. Hunsaker, Nathan Newby, Mrs. 
H K. W. Bent, Mrs. H. C. Terrell. Dr. John M. Dunsmoor, Dr. 
G eorge F. Kenn^ott. Rev. Ralph B. Larkin, Fowler Brothers, San- 
g~rn Vail and many others. 

FOUR JUSTICES TO BE ELECTED 




WALTER MALLARD 
For County Assessor 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



31 



last Thursday was of unusual interest 
in these stirring- times of war. The 
debate was on the question, "Resolved, 
that the greatest defense of our nation 
is through the conservation of public 
health and of our national and indus- 
trial resources, rather than through 
the increase of armaments." The ques- 
tion was ably debated by Mrs. Thome, 
Mrs. C. C. Garrett and Mrs. O. Todd, 
the latter supporting the negative for 
the sake of argument. 



THE NEW FEDERATION 
WEAPON 
{Continued from Page 13) 
of their work. Equal suffrage stimu- 
lates men and women. The "minor- 
ity" must always yield. In what more 
powerful manner could the Federation 
minority yield than to bow gracefully 
to the majority who were endorsing 
the most necessary reforms needed in 
the United States Constitution? 

The endorsement of equal suffrage 
by the General Federation will, if it 
has not already, exert a pressure on 
statesmen and lawmakers and just 
men throughout the nation. It will do 
much to bring equal suffrage into the 
form of a national Amendment. It will 
bring direct and presumably favorable 
action on such an Amendment. 

The new pledge of the General Fed- 
eration should be "Work for Women 
and Children and National Equal Suf- 
frage." 



"Baby" Gets Work 

Xew Mexico, "baby" of the General 
Federation, asked the Governor of her 
state for something to do for the Pan- 
ama-Pacific Exposition and was 
awarded the whole educational exhibit. 



Policewoman Speaks 
Miss Alice Stebbins Wells of Los 
Angeles spoke at the Biennial on ''The 
Need of Policewomen and Their 
Work." Federation members were 
anxious to hear Miss Wells because 
of the fact that she was the first police- 
woman in the countrv. She treated 
her subject interestingly. 




With a slogan of "A safe lawyer for all 
the people" he expects to make a vigorous 
campaign for the nomination at the primaries 
and the election in the fall. Lewis Cruick- 
shank has been a resident of Los Angeles 
County for IS years, first living at San Gab- 
riel, then Santa Monica and Los Angeles, 
with the exception of the time spent in 
China and the Philippines in active service 
during the Spanish-American and Chinese 
wars and while attending the Department of 
Law of the L'niversity of Michigan at Ann 
Arbor, 

After graduating from the University of 
Michigan and being admitted to practice in 
all of the courts of the State of Michigan 
and the State of Tennessee, he returned to 
his home in Los Angeles and was admitted 
to the bar here. He commenced the active 
practice of his profession in which he has 
been engaged with much success to the pres- 
ent time, having been employed as counsel 
in a number of important cases. 

He is a man of even temperament, very 
conservative in his judgment, weighing care- 
fully the merits and demerits of a proposi- 
tion before drawing his conclusions. He is a 
man of dignified bearing, strong personality 
and exceptional ability and would instantly 
commend himself to the favorable considera- 
tion of any audience before whom he might 
appear. We know of none 'who has a better 
reputation and a more enviable record for 
right thinking on the issues of the day or 
would perform the duties enjoined upon the 
District Attorney of Los Angeles County 
more conscientiously than he would. 

In making a statement of his policy and 
method of conducting the District Attorney's 
office he said, "If I am elected District At- 
torney of Los Angeles County, I will dis- 
charge the duties of the office fairly and 
impartially, treat the rich and powerful the 
same as the weak and oppressed. The office 
will not be used to pay back political debts 
or to even up political grudges, but will be 
conducted solely for the purpose of securing 
justice to the State against its internal en- 
emies and to thwart the designs of the foes 
of society. I shall always maintain to the 
best of my ability the wishes of the people 
as expressed in their laws and charters and 
shall not attempt to force upon them any 
untried theories or experiments whatever in 
connection with the business of the office. 
And every person having business with that 
office no matter what his standing in the 
community may be or his walk in life, shall 
receive fair and impartial consideration. The 
time honored slogan shall be maintained 
"Equal rights to all and special privileges to 
none." Adv. 



32 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



STRENGTH SHOWN 
By Jessica Lee Briggs 
San Francisco Delegate 

Strength and character were the two 
most impressive features of the Chi- 
cago Biennial of the General Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs. 

Its strength lay in the large delega- 
tion in attendance, in the executive 
ability displayed through its officers 
and chairmen, in its power to complete 
the endowment fund of one hundred 
thousand dollars, and in its main 
strength of purpose, which offers nei- 
ther fraternal nor social benefit to 
those who give their service, but is 
entirely disinterested and altruistic in 
its aims and intentions. 

Its character was expressed unmis- 
takably, in unselfish and impersonal 
motives and can be easily read through 
its long list of names of the splendid 
body of women who as officers and 
chairmen stand at the head of the 
Federation. 




In his ten years of political life in South- 
ern California Mr. Williams has publicly 
from the stump advocated the building of 
the aqueduct, good roads, women's suffrage, 
the initiative, referendum and recall and di- 
rect election and refers for his ability and 
efficiency to 

Chief Justice W. H. Beatty 
Earl Rogers 
Mrs. W. C. Mushet 
Marco Hellman 
Stoddard Jess 
Mrs. Andrew W. Francisco 
Rabbi Isidore Myers 
Mrs. Clara Shortridge Foltz 
John Lopizich 
Chief of Police Sebastian 
Mrs. W. C. Tyler 
James H. Blanchard Adv 




Frank Buren 

Register U. S. Land 
Office 1909-14 

Candidate for 

JUDGE 

of the 

SUPERIOR 
COURT 

Los Angeles County 



Primaries August 25. 



FOR JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT OF 
LOS ANGELES COUNTY 

George A. Boden, for twenty years a resi- 
dent of Los Angeles County, and having an 
irreproachable record as Attorney and Coun- 
sellor at Law, announces his candidacy for 
Judge of the Superior Court of Los Angeles 
County. 

Mr. Boden stands and has stood for the 
equality of rights for all. He has been an 
advocate of Woman's Suffrage even before 
the movement in favor of equal suffrage be- 
gan. He has always held that women, who 
are the determining factors in the develop- 
ment of the proper thoughts for the better- 
ment of man, should have an equal right with 
men in all respects, civic, political and other- 
wise. 

Mr. Boden is what may be termed a self- 
made man. He has worked for himself since 
he was ten years of age. He worked his 
way through the Los Angeles State Normal 
School, by carrying papers and doing such 
other work as was possible for him to do 
and carry on his studies. 

Since his graduation from the Los Angeles 
Normal, he has taught in the schools of the 
state for ten years, and has been principal 
of one of the large public schools in Pasa- 
dena for six years, where he has a host of 
friends among the pupils who attended the 
school when he "was principal. Mr. Boden 
contends that schools and other institutions 
should be run on a business basis -with equal 
rights to all who attend or who come under 
the supervision of the authorities, regardless 
of financial condition or social standing. 

Mr. Boden was born June 4th, 1S76, in Te- 
hachapi, Kern county, California, where his 
father had a ranch, obtaining a public school 
education by riding seven miles to school 
each day. 

While Mr. Boden taught school, he studied 
law, and during his vacations and holidays 
and at night, attended the law school and 
graduated with honors from the law school 
of the University of Southern California, and 
has been in the active practice of law for 
the past ten years in the City of Los An- 
geles. 

Mr. Boden was for two years a member of 
the Los Angeles County /Board of Education. 

While in the practice of law, Mr. Boden 
has made a careful study of probate law and 
law pertaining to real property, besides tak- 
ing a deep interest at all times in juvenile 
work and the welfare of juvenile offenders. 

Mr. Boden is a Native Son of the State of 
California, and belongs to the Lds Angeles 
Parlour. He is a member of tfie Los Angeles 
Bar Association, and belongs to the Masonic 
Order. 

Mr. Boden has offices at 527-2S Union Oil 
Building, Los Angeles, California. Adv. 



J. ALLAN HARVEY 

Late with "The French Gallery," London, England 

HIGH CLASS PAINTINGS 

Special Exhibition of American Artists 

EGAN SCHOOL BUILDING. 1324 S. FIGUEROA ST., NEAR PICO. LOS ANGELES 



Hemstitching, Pleating and Cloth-Covered Buttons 
ELITE BUTTON CO. 

604 Title Guarantee Building, S. E. Corner Fifth and Broadway 

Phone F-1255 



THE MOST COMPLETE CORSET 
SHOP IN THE WEST. FITTING 
BY TRAINED CORSETIERES 



• 531 

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HOME 20797 



SUNSET West 104 



T. F.M.WILLIAMSON 

Artistic Florist and Decorator 

540 W. WASHINGTON ST. Cor. FIGUEROA 

LOS ANGELES 

Flowers and Floral Arrangements 
We Deliver Promptly 



RAD8UM 

SulphurSprings 

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Bathe in LouiDSuHsniriE 

No»l Radx>Artiv<?e\in«ivertin«nD \Urt*r 
CURCS RHEUMATISM, SCIATICA, 
COLDS, CATARRH, STOMACH, 
LIVER. KIDNEY, BLOCD POISON 
AND NERVOUS DISEASES, POOR 
CIRCULATION, FEMALE TROUBLES. 
PHYSICIAN IN CHARGE. WATER 
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Back East 
Excursions 

1914 

ON SALE 

July 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 14, 15, 16. 17, 20, 
21, 25, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31. 

August 3, 4, 11, 12, 17, 18, 20, 21, 25, 
26, 27, 28, 29. 

September 4, 5, 9, 10, 11. 

ADDITIONAL DATES— 

August 25, 26, 27 Detroit 

GOING LIMIT 
Fifteen Days. 

RETURN LIMIT— 
Three Months from Date of Sale, but 
Not Later Than Oct. 31, 1914. 

FARES: 

Denver, Colorado Spgs., Pueblo.. $ 55.00 

Omaha, Kansas City 60.00 

San Antonio, Dallas, Houston . . 62.50 

Chicago 72.50 

St. Louis, Memphis, New Orleans 70.00 

St. Paul, Minneapolis 75.70 

New York, Philadelphia, Montreal 108.50 

Toronto 95.70 

Washington, Baltimore 107.50 

Boston 110.50 

Proportionately low fares to 

many other points. 

Liberal Stopover Privileges. 

SEE AGENTS 

Southern Pacific 

fCArETVF I '^ ie Exposition Line 1915 

l3Ar£i LOS ANGE LES OFFICES: 

212 West Seventh Street 
Phones: Home 10171 — Main 8322 
STATION, Fifth and Central Ave. 




The Clubwoman 



Official organ of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 



Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 
Subscription Price, One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH, Editor and Publisher. 
MRS. HAINES REED, Federation Editor. 

1966 Carmen Ave. Telephone Hollywood 2378 

Matter for Miss Smith must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 
Entered at the Los Angeles postoffice as second-class matter 



CONTENTS 



Frontispiece Mrs. W. A. Galentine 

Editorial : 

Peace Dove Wounded 

Civil Service Reform 

The Humane Prison 

The Nation Dry 7 

California Federation 8 

September Announcement 8 

President's Letter 9 

Merit Versus Bone Hunting; Mrs. W. A. Galentine 10 

Prison Reform Under Civil Service; Mrs. Emily S. Karns 12 

Civil Service a Boon to Women; Mrs. Martha Nelson McCan 13 

Woman's Part in the Merit System ; Dr. Francis B. Kellogg .' 14 

State Chairman's Call 15 

The Club Woman's Part IS 

General Federation 16 

Constructive Humane Reform; Elizabeth Baker Bohan 16 

Federation Board Opens Campaign Against Vice 17 

Need of Big Biennial ; Ada G. DeNyse 18 

California's Present 28 

District News : 

San Francisco 30 

San Joaquin 30 

Southern 31 




Photo by Matzene 



MRS. W. A. GALENTINE 
State Chairman of Civil Service Reform 



TKe Clubwoman 



Vol. V 



August, 1914 



No. 9 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Commu- 
nications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P.O.Box 1066, by the 
twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 



In time of War educate for Peace. 
While Europe has her cannon mount- 
ed and her military strength aimed at 
her own heart, the greatest humane 
impetus for the advancement of Uni- 
versal Peace is presented to civilized 
nations. The Peace Dove's wings are 
broken; but the slimsy pretexts of 
war should hasten the making of a 
powerful Armament of Peace. 

Two people, royal through accident 
of birth, and perhaps less useful to 
their country than any common la- 
borer killed unnoticed in industry, are 
assassinated. Austria, shivering with 
the fear that 8,000,000 Slavs are awak- 
ing from the sluggish sleep of despot- 
ism, decides to draw Servia's blood. 
Germany, likewise fearful for her own 
military imperialism, decides to have 
some of Servia's life fluid herself. Rus- 
sia, Servia's watch dog, bites at Ger- 
many's heels. France allies with the 
teeth of the watchdog. Germany starts 
to shave the French moustache, steps 
on Belgium's neutral toes, gets a mili- 
tary kick from her and a war cuff from 
England. Turkey, afraid that war 
may careen into her territory is in an 
armed state of excited neutrality. Italy 
is dizzy looking over the precipice. 
Belgium is getting what is handed to 
the innocent bystander. Holland has 
joined the majority. 

All of which is sufficient cause for 
war (?); cause to mobilize 17.000,000 
men to face all the hellishly scientific 
weapons of war and to pledge $2,875,- 
000,000 to conduct the slaughter. Ger- 
many asks God's aid to make her 
troops mangle the most men. 

Peace looks blood red in the face. 
But when public sentiment is nause- 
ated with stories of barbarous battles ; 



when the nerves of public decency are 
barbed with the horrible atrocities 
committed in the name of patriotism, 
that is the time to perch the Peace 
Dove in full view of public reason and 
to educate humanity lor Universal 
Peace. 



Civil Service Reform 

Civil Service Reform prevents knock- 
kneed mentality from usurping public 
desks and public money to the public 
detriment. It has stopped, in large 
measure, the upholstering of public of- 
fices for those seeking soft-cushioned, 
silk-tapestried jobs for private gain; 
expenses met by the public. It has 
strangled the illiterate and political of- 
fice monger with the tape of efficiency 
and intellect. The Merit System is 
still adolescent. What crusty Andrew 
Jackson started in his brain cells back 
in Eighteen Hundred Something, re- 
mains for specializing men and women 
to finish to a reality. A child learns the 
alphabet but that does not give him 
the complete guard of education. He 
needs constant training through years 
of applied scientific methods. So the 
Merit System needs the constant sur- 
veillance of civic specialists who will 
strengthen its prevalence from town to 
nation. 

We would not accept bottle and rag 
venders, garbage haulers or truck driv- 
ers for teachers in the schools. Re- 
gardless of sex, teachers must be EDU- 
CATED and COMPETENT to train 
childhood. Stenographers, telegraph 
and wireless operators TRAIN their 
BRAINS to go down into their fingers 
to make them COMPETENT Busi- 
(Continued on page 21) - 



8 THE CLUBWOMAN 

California Federation gf Women's Clubs 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President — Mrs. Lillian Pray Palmer, 540 West Ivy street, San Diego. 

Vice-President — Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 2614 N)rth Griffin avenue, Los Angeles. 

Vice-President-at-Large — Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Henry DeNyse, P. O. Box 695, Riverside. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. George Butler, 2980 C street, San Diego. 

Treasurer — Mrs. Edward D. Knight, 238 San Jose avenue, San Francisco. 

Auditors — Mrs. Fisher R. Clark, 321 West Flora street, Stockton; Mrs. Andrew W. Fran- 
cisco, 143 South Figueroa street, Los Angeles. 

General Federation State Secretary — Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 3454 Twenty-first street, 
San Francisco. 

District Presidents 

Northern — Mrs. A. F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery street, Oroville. 

San Francisco — Mrs. Percy S. King, Napa. 

Alameda — Mrs. William E. Colby, 2901 Channing Way, Berkeley. 

San Joaquin — Mrs. Harry Bates, Modesto. 

Los Angeles — Mrs. Herbert A. Cable, 1906 West Forty-second Place, Los Angeles. 

Southern — Mrs. A. J. Lawton, 1104 French street, Santa Ana. 

Chairmen of Departments 

Art — Not yet appointed. 

Bureau of Library Information and Reciprocity — Mrs. Susan T. Smith, State Library, Sac- 
ramento. 

Civics — Mrs. Lewis E. Aubury, Easton. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. W. A. Galentine, Redondo Beach. 

Club Extension — Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge, Roseville. 

Committee on Revision of By-Laws — Mrs. Calvin Hartwell, 411 Summit avenue, Pasadena, 
chairman. 

Conservation — 

Forestry — Mrs. Foster Elliott, 111 South Hidalgo avenue, Alhambra. 
Waterways — Mrs. E. G. Greene, 611 Waverly street, Palo Alto. 

Country Life — Miss Lillian D. Clark, 1534 Arch street, Berkeley. 

Bducation — Miss Gertrude Longenecker, San Diego State Normal School. 

Endowment Fund — Not yet appointed. 

Federation Emblem — Not yet appointed. 

Health — Mrs. L. P. Crane, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 

History and Landmarks — Not yet appointed. 

Home Economics — Miss Ednah Rich, Santa Barbara. 

Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. C. F. Edson, 950 West Twenty-first street, Los Angeles. 

Legislation — Mrs. J. T. Harbaugh, 2706 N street, Sacramento. 

Literature — Mrs. George F. Reinhardt, 2434 Durant avenue, Berkeley. 

Music — Not yet appointed. 

Necrology — Not yet appointed. 

Parliamentary Practice — Mrs. J. A. Osgood, Sierra Madre. 

Peaces — Mrs. A. H. Griswold, Box 53, El Centre 

Philanthropy — Not yet appointed. 

Press and Federation Editor — Mrs. Haines W. Reed, 1966 Carmen avenue, Los Angeles. 

State University Club House Loan Fund — Mrs. S. L. Piatt, 1720 J street, Fresno. 



CONSERVATION NUMBER 

No clubwoman can afford to miss "Moral Rejuvenation of Men," an 
article by Max Watson, City Forester of San Diego, in the September Club- 
woman, in which he outlines his method of reclaiming derelicts through 
tree planting. Mrs. Foster Elliott, State Chairman of Forestry, and Mrs. 
E. G. Greene, State Chairman of Waterways, will contribute news of their 
departments, and forest and waterways experts will write of authoritative 
phases of city, county and state work. The CONSERVATION Number 
will insure pleasant vacation reading with its word pictures of cool forests 
and restful streams. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER 



In these vacation days the many let- 
ters that come to our desk bring a 
breath of the sea, or the spicy tang of 
the mountain pine, or the peaceful at- 
mosphere of a country place. This is 
as it should be, for these are the days 
for relaxation and play, for meditation 
and renewal ; brief days, dear club- 
women of California. Make the most 
of them. Open your hearts and souls 
to the spirit of "God's great out of 
doors," and renew your strength, hope, 
courage, and faith in things simple, di- 
rect, and sincere; and when, rested in 
body, clear in mind, and with soul re- 
stored by your walk in green pasture; 
by waters still, the activities of home 
and club shall claim you, give to us the 
benefit of your fresh inspiration in a 
strong, vital, and focused enthusiasm. 
Pledge anew your best effort to all 
that our Federation stands for to make 
better the conditions of society. 

As we realize the opportunity for 
great service that each department 
opens to us; as we come to know our 
co-workers, and recognize by their 
sweet, earnest consecrated lives, that 
love of our fellowmen is the greatest 
thing in all the world, and that this 
alone is our motive for endeavor, we 
know that our best is only our reason- 
able service. 

While en route to the Chicago Bien- 
nial the kindly greetings and social 
courtesies extended to us by the club- 
women of Salt Lake, Canon City, Oma- 
ha, and Denver, were greatly appre- 
ciated. We hope in the days of club 
visit and convention before us, to 
carry to the clubwomen of the state 
their messages. 

We recall the beautiful ride through 
the Royal Gorge. Our special was fly- 
ing along by the turbulent waters of 
the Arkansas river, at the entrance of 
the Gorge, when our amiable special 
conductor, Mr. J. B. Gorden, called our 
attention to a restful mountain camp 
on the sloping bank across the river. 
We noted the attractive grouping of 
the white tents ; the neat khaki suits 



and high boots worn by the men who 
seemed the happy inhabitants. The 
men waved a cheery greeting which 
our California clubwomen returned in 
kind. 

"This is a convicts' camp," Mr. Gor- 
den explained. "The State Penitenti- 
ary is a few miles farther on. This is 
one of the new methods of prison re- 
form that the warden, Mr. Tynan, be- 
lieves in. The men build roads on 
honor and without particular guard. 
They are making that boulevard across 
the river, and that bridge is their work. 
Mr. Tynan does not believe in the reg- 
ulation prison stripes. They say none 
of them ever tries to escape ; they are 
allowed all the freedom possible, and 
given a chance to be useful. You will 
meet the warden at Canon City." 

We looked across at the gray walls 
of the Penitentiary with its silent 
"rock pile," and thought of the haven 
that mountain camp under the blue sky 
of Colorado must be. During the 
wonderful twenty minutes reception on 
the platform of the station at Canon 
City, Airs. Bucher, the charming sister 
of our own dear Past President, Mrs. 
Robert Potter Hill, introduced us to 
the warden and as we felt his kindly 
hand clasp, noted the strong face, clear 
friendly eyes with just a suggestion of 
twinkle showing sympathy and fellow 
feeling, we felt that in Civil Service Re- 
form we were co-workers, and that 
mountain camp with the smooth wide 
boulevard winding up and out of the ' 
rough and rocky gorge might be to us 
an earnest reminder of things such co- 
operation could accomplish. 
Yours sincerely, 
LILLIAN PRAY-PALMER. 



Civil service reform is, above all, a 
question not of politics, but of civic 
morality. Moreover, what is often for- 
gotten, teachers are a part of the civil 
service, and it is of equal importance 
that the teacher and the inspector shall 
be appointed for merit and not through 
"pull." 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



MERIT VERSUS BONE HUNTING 

By Mrs. W. A. Galentine 

State Chairman Civil Service Reform 



Civil Service Reformers feel, after a 
short struggle with the well estab- 
lished custom of "Bone-Hunting," 
much has been accomplished, but much 
is still undone ! Public money is no 
longer so flagrantly wasted and officials 
more frequently hold positions because 
they understand the duties than be- 
cause they pulled votes. Congressman 
Kent remarked : "Politics are not dirty, 
unless they are dirty hands that play 
the cards." The dirty hands predomi- 
nated in the bygone days of "bone- 
hunting politics," which in political 
parlance designated the hunting out 
and distributing of public offices to pay 
for the support of party workers. The 
system was well organized. 

The once famous Tammany leader, 
Plunkitt, put it thus, "A political or- 
ganization has to have money for its 
business as well as a church, and who 
has more right to put it up than the 
men who get the good things that are 
goin'? A great political concern like 
Tammany Hall does missionary work 
like a church. It's got big expenses 
and it's got to be supported by the 
faithful. If a corporation sends a check 
to help the good work of the Tammany 
Society, why shouldn't we take it like 
other missionary societies? No other 
politician in New York or elsewhere 
is exactly like the Tammany district 
leader, or works as he does. As a rule 
he has no occupation other than poli- 
tics. He plays politics every day and 
night of the year and his headquarters, 
bear the inscription 'never closed.' He 
is always obliging. He will go to the 
police court, put in a good word for 
the 'drunks and disorderlies' ; or pay 
their fine if a good word is not effec- 
tive. He will attend christenings, wed- 
dings, and funerals, feed the hungry 
and help bury the dead. A philan- 
thropist? Not at all. He is playing 
politics all the time." 

As a matter of personal taste and 
self respect, some persons have always 



preferred to take their charity straight, 
but others flourished under the spoils 
system. If a man could persuade, 
threaten or bribe many others to vote 
for the successful party, he was pretty 
sure of getting a good place for him- 
self and perhaps for friends and rela- 
tives. Quite likely he did the work 
neither very well nor very honestly, 
but that was not so important as his 
bone-hunting and vote catching power. 

"Spoils" Divided 

Under this old system, whether in 
national party politics, or local county 
or municipal affairs, the bulk of the 
activity of the Bone-Hunting Politi- 
cians was devoted to the function of 
keeping themselves prosperous, which 
they believed could not possibly be 
done except through "bones." Nat- 
urally, the people who profited by this 
system put up a hard struggle to cir- 
cumvent the Civil Service System. 
They had been getting jobs for which 
they would not be considered fit in the 
open market, or jobs carrying higher 
pay than their open market price could 
demand. The balance was credited to 
private political service over and above 
or instead of, real administrative value. 
Of course this meant that the public 
treasury paid the bills of the party or- 
ganization in power, quite as truly as if 
that party organization took the coin 
directly from the treasury. 

Patronage Eliminated 

Governor Hughes incurred bitter 
hatred because he persisted, both be- 
fore and after election, in what was 
termed a foolish and impracticable 
whim — that it was his duty to get a 
dollar's worth 'for a dollar's pay of pub- 
lic money, no matter what happened to 
himself. Mr. Roosevelt, although 
yielding somewhat and making slight 
concessions to the patronage theory, 
nevertheless got his public voting pow- 
er by his ideas and his action. Two 
prominent Democrats, Cleveland and 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



11 



Bryan, representing very different 
viewpoints, did not rest for political 
strength on the patronage theory. 

Let us resent the theory that the 
mass of people have no principles and 
can be swayed only by half-concealed 
forms of bribery. Will not the poorest 
and most ignorant of the people at last 
"get on"? If you can clearly show 
people of the tenements that tubercu- 
losis, the terrible foe of so many of 
them, has been fostered by violation of 
the laws concerning air space, win- 
dows, etc.. and that these illegalities 
exist because the tenement inspectors 
are active followers of the spoils sys- 
tem, will they not withdraw their al- 
legiance and transfer it to men who 
follow the Politics of Ideas, which also 
means Ideals? 

And what will they do, if you show 
them that the reason they have an in- 
sufficient supply of small parks and 
cannot get additional parks, is that the 
last one cost the price of two, because 
a city official bought up the land ahead 
of the city and sold it for twice its value 
to himself — acting in behalf of the city? 

More people are coming to believe 
that the law must provide a way in 
which government positions can be 
filled by decent, honest men and wom- 
en equipped for the work; and to pre- 
vent such persons from losing their 
positions for reasons connected with 
politics. Under Civil Service Law, all 
who wish such positions must pass ex- 
aminations, and those, who stand high- 
est on the list, must be chosen. 

Before the law was passed, each per- 
son who did any part of the public 



work was given his position by the 
persons at the head of his department; 
frequently without consideration as to 
his capability! Now, many of these 
positions are filled by men and women 
chosen from Civil Service lists of those 
who have passed examinations success- 
fully. 

The Civil Service System has many 
opponents among those who profited 
by the old system ; and, being often 
frustrated by the efforts of these dis- 
appointed grafters, the onlooker, igno- 
rant of the entire situation, looks with 
skepticism on the merit system, and 
says, "It can't be done !" 

It should seem easy to note that the 
merit system is an improvement on the 
old method of getting public work 
done. The public money is not so 
easily wasted, there is a better oppor- 
tunity of getting persons who under- 
stand the work, and those who are ap- 
pointed are reasonably sure of not be- 
ing turned out for political reasons, but 
only for non-performance of duty. The 
best proof of the success of the system 
is that few fail in probation and few 
lose their positions through intemper- 
ance, dishonesty or inefficiency. 

It is for the politicians to decide into 
which army they will go — the one 
fighting to preserve bone-hunting poli- 
tics, or the one struggling for the ad- 
vancement of the Politics of Ideas. 

The Politics of Ideas will be not only 
more satisfactory morally and im- 
mensely more effective in practice, but 
more fun. "Aggressive fighting for the 
right is the noblest sport the world 
knows." 



NOTICE 

The Clubwoman wishes to state that in accepting political advertise- 
ments, it does not endorse any candidate, nominee or political party. All 
advertising is plainly marked "Advertisement" and carries no endorsement 
whatever, either from The Clubwoman or The California Federation of 
Women's Clubs. 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



PRISON REFORM UNDER CIVIL SERVICE 

By Mrs. Emily S. Karns 

Past State Chairman Civil Service Reform 



Clubwomen have set themselves the 
task of championing the cause of the 
weak and helpless. In no way can it 
be done more effectively than knowing 
how well the new state-wide civil ser- 
vice law is being established and en- 
forced. One of the most beneficent re- 
forms has come to the penitentiaries in 
the strict enforcement of this law. 
Every position in the state prisons, ex- 
cept that of warden, comes under the 
merit system through competitive ex- 
aminations, and applicants receiving 
the highest percentage shall fill these 
positions. 

When a public institution of state or 
county is under investigation, the in- 
vestigators find themselves in the 
realm of politics. The ways of the poli- 
tician are devious and misleading. The 
investigator must be fearless, unselfish 
and persevering in order not to be 
sidestepped by these astute guardians 
of public property and supposed pro- 
tectors of precious human beings. 

In two years' experience in county 
jail investigations by county chairmen 
and by himself, we have found diffi- 
culty in securing the solid backing re- 
quired to right the wrongs found to 
exist. As illustration I cite the case of 
a county jail in which prisoners were 
compelled to sleep on thin mattresses 
thrown on the cement floor. There 
were no seats. A man had either to 
stand or sit on the floor. Ten cents per 
capita was allowed for two meals per 
day. The chairman of the board of 
supervisors sent me word that only six 
cents per capita was used by the sher- 
iff, therefore to meet my request for 
an advance to twenty cents per capita 
per day would be unnecessary or futile. 
The situation was laid before one of the 
woman's clubs of that county seat. 
They investigated and decided that the 
meals were good enough and would 
not recommend any change in the six 
cents per capita. Those conditions in 
this county jail exist today. 



To accomplish greatly needed re- 
forms for the helpless, the defective 
and the delinquent, the battle must be 
waged by men and women brave 
enough and wise enough to rise above 
persecution and the wiles of the politi- 
cal machine. This rather somber view 
of prison reform work is not presented 
with any idea that the splendid women 
of California shall abandon the work of 
prison reform as hopeless, but only to 
show some of the obstacles put in the 
way of the reformers. The surface in 
this reform has only been scratched; 
the deep furrows are yet to be turned ; 
ploughed by the women themselves, 
with the help of high-minded men who 
will elect good men and women to 
office. 

Mrs. Imogen Oakley, General Fed- 
eration Chairman of Civil Service, sent 
me full details of the alleged inroads 
the present administration at Washing- 
ton is making in the ranks of Federal 
civil service; clubwomen should know 
the facts. Three important bills passed 
by Congress and signed by the Presi- 
dent provide that many employes of 
the government shall be removed from 
the classified service, and become again 
merely political appointees. 

In the tariff bill, it is provided that 
deputies to be empowered in the col- 
lection of the income tax shall be ex- 
empt from civil service. The second 
was the urgent deficiency bill. It con- 
tained a rider providing that deputy 
collectors of internal revenue and 
deputy United States marshalls shall 
be exempt from civil service rules. The 
third act was the new currency law. 
The bill contained the provision that 
all employes of the Federal Reserve 
Board shall be appointed without re- 
gard to the civil service laws and rules. 
The Senate was divided over this pro- 
vision, and a dead-lock was broken by 
Vice-President Marshall, who voted in 
(Continued on Page 19) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



CIVIL SERVICE A BOON TO WOMEN 

By Mrs. Martha Nelson McCan 

Civil Service Commissioner 



Women who have asked for enfran- 
chisement have done so in the name of 
equality, justice and fair play. Inas- 
much as these same attributes are the 
fundamental principles of Civil Service 
the study of this form of municipal 
government should be part of woman's 
education, not only as members of 
clubs but as individuals. Not until I 
was made a member of the Civil Ser- 
vice Commission of Los Angeles did I 
realize the true import of the abolish- 
ment of the old spoils and patronage 
regime. The more I know of the work 
and its purport, the more I am con- 
vinced that women only need to under- 
stand the laws and modes of procedure 
of Civil Service to be at all times its 
most ardent supporters. 

Within the past decade conditions 
surrounding public or municipal em- 
ployment have undergone material 
changes which are principally due to 
the demands made on public officials 
and employees for a higher grade of 
service. Under the spoils system such 
improvement in the operation of mu- 
nicipal business would have been im- 
possible but the adoption of the merit 
system by numerous city and state 
governments has placed public employ- 
ment on a higher plane than could have 
been reached otherwise. 

The filling of positions in the public 
service through open competition and 
the tenure of office during good be- 
havior is the basis for all other re- 
forms in our government. The merit 
system recognizes no friends, has no 
axes to grind and eliminates favoritism 
in the selection of persons to fill posi- 
tions and through this method both 
men and women may compete on an 
equal basis for positions in the public 
service. 

Los Angeles recognized the need of 
improvement in its civil service many 
years ago and in 1903 an amendment to 
the city charter was passed by a very 
large majority which provided for the 



establishment of the merit system in 
the city service. At the time of the 
passage of the Civil Service law there 
were 1,820 persons in the employ of 
the city in all capacities and this num- 
ber has gradually grown until at the 
present time the payrolls of the mu- 
nicipality contain the names of over 
4,000 employees who have gained their 
positions oil the base of fitness alone 
and not through political influence. 

That the merit system encourages 
the employment of women wherever 
possible is borne out by the fact that at 
the present time 208 women are filling 
15 classes of positions in the service, in- 
cluding telephone operators, stenog- 
raphers, library attendants, clerks, as- 
sessors, nurses and policewomen, with 
a range in salaries of from $40.00 to 
$110.00 per month. It may be well to 
state that very important work is being 
carried on by these women city em- 
ployees. A woman at the head of the 
city pound has raised that department 
from one of continual turmoil and dis- 
satisfaction to a revenue producing de- 
partment on a humanitarian basis and 
has removed the odium from the busi- 
ness of "dog catching" entirely. 

By taking the stand that the preven- 
tion of crime is more important than its 
prosecution, Los Angeles has taken the 
initial step in dealing with unfortunate 
and delinquent minors through the in- 
troduction of women police officers. 
The results obtained by these women 
in the rigid inspection of places of 
amusement where the temptations to 
the young are strong and where a guid- 
ing hand will turn a young girl from 
the downward path, cannot be esti- 
mated. 

One of the strongest arguments in 
favor of the employment of women on 
the police force is that through their 
womanly sympathy they much more 
readily gain the confidence of the way- 
ward girl. It has come under my per- 
(Continued on Page 24) 



14 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



WOMAN'S PART IN THE MERIT SYSTEM 

By Dr. Francis B. Kellogg 

President of the Southern California Civil Service Reform League 



The Merit System may be defined as 
a method of filling vacancies in the 
public service on a basis of merit to the 
absolute exclusion of every other con- 
sideration, to be ascertained by com- 
petitive tests open to all qualified ap- 
plicants. President Eliot has charac- 
terized the Merit System as "the one 
fundamental reform which underlies all 
other reforms." The Merit System is 
absolutely essential to public owner- 
ship and operation of public utilities. 
Without it, each advance in this direc- 
tion would simply multiply the spoils 
army, strengthen the political machine 
and assure the failure of the enterprise 
from a business standpoint. Again, the 
Commission form of government, 
which holds so much of promise for the 
future municipality, must depend for 
lasting success upon a coordinated 
Civil Service. Without it, it would be 
difficult to conceive of a more effective 
device for the construction of a politi- 
cal machine of autocratic power. The 
short ballot means fewer electives, i. e., 
more appointments. In other words, 
more politics, unless the appointments 
are made under Civil Service rules. In 
the same manner, it could be shown 
that practically all other advances in 
democratic government are conditioned 
upon being coordinated with the Merit 
System. 

The Merit System is the apotheosis 
of the "square deal." It is the square 
deal to the public because it gives the 
public the best obtainable service in 
the conduct of its business ; because it 
guarantees equality of opportunity in 
demonstrating fitness for public serv- 
ice a fair chance for all and the best 
man (or woman) wins. 

It is a square deal to the public of- 
ficial, for it rescues him from the army 
of job hunters and enables him to de- 
vote his time exclusively to the duties 
of his office. It is a square deal to the 
employee, because he is secure in it as 
long as he behaves himself and renders 



efficient service. It makes possible a 
career in the public service for man or 
woman. 

It is of vital importance that all citi- 
zens — men and women — should assert 
themselves strongly in favor of the 
Merit System, otherwise it cannot 
achieve its best results. All the forces 
of political greed and cunning are 
against it, and it is not sufficient to vote 
it into being and then leave it to be 
beaten by the winds and waves of poli- 
tics. If it is not backed by organized 
support its enemies will see that it ac- 
complishes as little as possible. Their 
methods are no longer those of open 
warfare; they are those of the secret 
assassin. Very few, in these days 
openly oppose the Civil Service. They 
assert that they believe in it, but they 
attack its legality upon technical 
points, claiming that it is not properly 
administered. 

It is greatly to the credit of the wo- 
men's clubs that they have committees 
on civil service. It is a recognition of 
the importance of the Merit System 
and of women's responsibilities in its 
support. The State chairman of Civil 
Service Reform, Mrs. W. A. Galentine, 
was by virtue of her office, made a 
member of the executive committee of 
the Southern California Civil Service 
Reform League. The Friday Morning 
Club recently joined with the Civil Ser- 
vice Reform League in inviting the 
next National Assembly of Civil Ser- 
vice Commissions to meet in Los An- 
geles. Through the efforts of Mrs. D. 
C. McCann, who is a member of the 
Los Angeles Civil Service Commission, 
the invitation was accepted. This issue 
of "The Clubwoman" devoted to this 
reform is another evidence that the 
women are waking up to its import- 
ance. The New York Civil Service As- 
sociation has its Woman's Auxiliary 
Association which has done much to 
help forward the work in the empire 
{Continued on Page 26) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



15 



STATE CHAIRMAN'S CALL THE CLUB WOMAN'S PART 



Indifference rather than opposition 
has met Civil Service reformers, con- 
sequently a persistent campaign of edu- 
cation is still necessary. When wom- 
en are fully awake to the desirability of 
the Civil Service Reform system they 
will demand it. It has been said that 
the great distinctive feature of modern 
times is the mastery of the state over 
other forms of social organization. In 
early ages the family was the master in 
control; a little later the church domi- 
nated; now the state has supremacy. 
It has therefore become doubly import- 
ant that those through whom the state 
discharges its usual functions should 
be capable for that work. Civil service 
reform, as an aid in that direction, has 
an increasing value every year. But 
that the complete establishment of the 
civil service system might be hastened, 
this department of the California Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs has had for 
its slogan "Educate, educate!" 

It has endeavored to answer wom- 
en's questions — What is civil service 
reform? Why is it needed? What can 
it do ? What is our state law — its good 
points and weak points? Is it being 
enforced? How does the state manage 
her institutions for aged, poor, delin- 
quent and criminal? The coming club 
year the department hopes to arouse 
interest in the indifferent. The people 
must understand how shamefully the 
system of spoils has marred our past 
history, how essentially un-American it 
is, and how much of the national fu- 
ture must depend upon its utter eradi- 
cation. 

Let us concentrate during the year 
on INSTITUTIONAL WORK. May 
all the district chairmen and, inspired 
by them, may all the clubs of each dis- 
trict in California, unite in a mighty ef- 
fort for the improvement of all our 
state, county and city institutions; 
study prison farms, county farms, and 
municipal farms for tramps, inebriates, 
delinquents. Let us rid ourselves of 
the word and idea embodied in "jail." 
To do this means the gradual establish- 
ment of a new system. 



The first and foremost thing that any 
club woman can do for civil service re- 
form is to teach people that reform in 
the civil service is the fundamental re- 
form on which all other improvements 
in national, state and municipal admin- 
istration depend. It is useless to stop 
a dribbling leak here and there, when 
there is a big gash higher in your pipe. 
The civil service system, well estab- 
lished, is a strong permanent force, 
which WILL HOLD ALIKE 
THROUGH A GOOD OR BAD AD- 
MINISTRATION. 

Second. California women helped in 
the work of obtaining our State Civil 
Service Law, but even more must they 
work to maintain constant vigilance to 
hold the ground already gained and to 
defeat the persistent attempts at eva- 
sion that, in some cases, are systematic 
and almost nullifying. 

Third. Let us demand that the merit 
system be extended until the whole 
service of state, county, and city gov- 
ernment has been reclaimed. The goal 
is a public service, exclusively com- 
posed of men AND WOMEN who 
possess the knowledge and skill need- 
ed for their tasks, well disciplined, de- 
voted to their work and to the public 
authority which employs them. 

Fourth. To accomplish these things, 
let clubwomen inform themselves on 
the subject, then educate the public 
through newspapers, public schools, so- 
cial settlements. 

Fifth. Apply the merit system to in- 
stitutions, penal and charitable. Ask 
such questions as — How old is the 
county jail or other institution? Is it 
sanitary? Have the tanks and cells 
sunlight and proper ventilation? How 
often cleaned? Are vermin present? 
Are sick and well segregated? Are 
young and confirmed criminals segre- 
gated? Is reading matter furnished? 
Any efforts for reformation? Then 
work until satisfactory answers can be 
given. Also agitate for farms. State 
and district chairmen will be delighted 
to give suggestions and help. 

STATE CHAIRMAN. 



16 THE CLUBWOMAN 

General Federation 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

President — Airs. Percy V. Pennybacker, 2606 Whitis avenue, Austin, Texas. 

First Vice-President — Mrs. Samuel B. Sneath, 211 Monroe street, Tiffin, Ohio. 

Second Vice-President — Miss Georgia A. Bacon, Worcestershire, Mass. 

Recording Secretary — Mrs. Harry L. Keele, Walthill, Nebraska. 

Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. Eugene Reilly, 508 Park avenue, Charlotte, North Caro- 
lina. 

Treasurer — 'Mrs. William B. Williams, Lapeer, Mich. 

Auditor — Mrs. C. H. McMahon, 32 Caithness Apartments, Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Directors — Mrs. William E. Andrews, 1225 Fairmont street, N. W., Washington, D. C; 
Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke, Irvington, Indianapolis, Indiana; Mrs. Francis D. Everett, 
Highland Park, Illinois; Mrs. William P. Harper. 651 Kinnear place, Seattle, Wash- 
ington; Mrs. Frank White, Valley City, North Dakota; Mrs. William H. Crosby, 
Wisconsin; Mrs. W. B. Young, Jacksonville, Florida; Miss Mary Garrett Hay, New 
York City. 

CHAIRMEN OF DEPARTMENTS 

Art — Mrs.' Melville F. Johnston, 103 North Tenth street, Richmond, Ind. 

Civics — Miss Zona Gale, Portage, la. 

Civil Service Reform — Mrs. Imogen B. Oakley, The Gladstone, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conservation — Mrs. Emmons Crocker, 48 Mechanic street, Fitchburg, Mass. 

Education — Mrs. O. Shepard Barnum, 312 South Fifth street, Alhambra, Cal. 

Household Economics — Miss Helen Louise Johnson, 234 Paddock street, Watertown, 

N. Y. 
Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. A. E. Chantler, Tacoma Daily News, Tacoma, 

Wash. 
Legislation — Mrs. Horace T. Towner, Corninp, la. 

Literature — Mrs. Frances Squire Potter, 4581 Oakenwald avenue, Kenwood, Chicago, 111. 
Music — Mrs. Lawrence Maxwell, Edgecliffe Road, Walnut Hills, Cincinnati, O. 
Public Health — Mrs. S. S. Crockett, 710 Belmont avenue, Nashville, Tenn. 
Press Committee — Mrs. Grace Julian Clarke. Chairman, Indianapolis, Ind. 



CONSTRUCTIVE HUMANE REFORM 

By Elizabeth Baker Bohan 

Los Angeles District Chairman of Civil Service Reform 

To force men to be idle is a crime — Idleness is a condition of negation 
no, it is a sin; for the State has not and waste, and leads to physical and 
fulminated against it nor fixed a pen- mental deterioration. The State is 
alty for its commission. It is well to committing a heinous sin whenever it 
learn to distinguish between sins and seizes a human being and compels him 
crimes, and to see that many sins, of to exist without work. It is comtnit- 
which the State takes no heed, are ting a sin still short-sighted and repre- 
worse and more far reaching in evil hensible, when it compels a man to 
effect than many of the crimes for work in a jute mill continually through 
which men are incarcerated. Sin, be- his period of detention; for there is 
ing common to all, makes us all kin, no jute mill awaiting him upon his re- 
even as virtue, which, in varying de- lease, where he can make an honest 
grees is also common to all, makes us living. It is committing a sin when it 
also kin. When we realize this, the uses ALL of a man's time, leaving him 
dividing line between those inside a none for self improvement, or employ- 
jail and those outside breaks down ; ment profitable to himself. The State 
the great gulf fixed between those who Prison at Joliet, 111., has inaugurated a 
have suffered a penalty for their sins profit sharing system which has been 
and those who have not, vanishes ; and in operation three months. At the 
we are ready to work with heart and same time one hour from the working 
soul for those who are paying the time was set apart for recreation. "In 
State's price for their crimes. (Continued on Page 27) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



17 



FEDERATION BOARD OPENS 
CAMPAIGN AGAINT VICE 



Acting officially for the California 
Federation, the executive board, in 
third session, August 3, in San Diego, 
voted unanimously to begin at once a 
state-wide campaign for the Red Light 
Abatement Act. A pamphlet of edu- 
cation in regard to the act, which 
would have gone into effect last August 
had it not been for the referendum 
handled by vice and saloon interests, 
will be issued to the thousands of Fed- 
eration women who are requested to 
disseminate knowledge of its worth 
in cleansing the social life of Califor- 
nia. 

The pamphlet will be prepared by a 
special committee appointed by Presi- 
dent Lillian Pray-Palmer, members of 
which are Mrs. Charles Farwell Ed- 
son, State Chairman of Social and In- 
dustrial Conditions, Mrs. Haines W. 
Reed, State Federation editor, Mrs. 
James W. Orr, Past President, Mrs. 
W. E. Colby, Alameda District Presi- 
dent, and Mrs. James Swan; all advo- 
cates of the law. The campaign will 
be earnestly aggressive and every club 
in the state is asked to devote at least 
one program to Red Light Abatement 
before election time. 

Mrs. Palmer pledged her efforts to 
conduct the campaign for a State En- 
dowment Fund of $50,000. "If I can 
start my Federation on the road to 
having a fund which will enable the 
work of the Federation to become 
broader and more specific for human- 
ity, then I shall believe that my serv- 
ices have not been in vain." While the 
executive board is empowered only to 
outline plans for raising the fund; such 
{Continued on Page 25) 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

Harp Soloist of the Royal Academy 
of Music, London. 

Blunchard Hull. El. 82. Resident 1972 Eslrella 

Phont 24558West 4586. 



a 
©If 



nsmn 



<ITHE CUMNOCK SCHOOL 
OF EXPRESSION announces a 
new course in Journalism for 
Women, to open with the fall 
semester, October 6th. The scope 
of the work will be as broad as 
possible, including a consideration 
of the ethics and morals, the edu- 
cational and social responsibility 
of the press, as well as vigorous 
training in the writing of news and 
practice in all other branches of 
newspaper work. 

<I The course is open to every- 
one, and should prove a great aid 
to secretaries of clubs, press com- 
mittees and others who come in 
contact with the daily press. To 
many it will open up a profitable 
field for spare time endeavor. 
Magazine journalism and fiction 
writing will be included in the 
work considered. 

<I Mr. Bruce Ormsby Bliven, in- 
structor in Journalism at the Uni- 
versity of Southern California, has 
been secured to give this course. 

For further details address 

Tkd CMnaainiodk 
©IF E^pffd§in@sa 



iJCJf^®© 



1S©@ Smatlhi F£gM@ir©ai 
L®§ Amissles, Calif 



18 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



NEED OF BIG BIENNIAL 

By Ada G. DeNyse 

Recording Secretary California Federation 

I do not at all believe that "in mak- 
ing over the Biennial" that the repre- 
sentation should be reduced. The 
BIGNESS of the Biennial is the chief 
value of the meeting. Because of the 
great educational advantages it offers 
to the RANK AND FILE CLUB- 
WOMAN through splendid programs, 
able speakers of national and interna- 
tional fame, "local" atmosphere and 
opportunities for knowledge and com- 
parison of methods, contact with ef- 
ficient workers from all parts of the 
country, because the great numbers in 
attendance impress the whole nation 
and thus create and mold public opin- 
ion. It stands to reason that a meet- 
ing of 500 women delegates at Chi- 
cago would not have impressed Chi- 
cago, nor the country at large, as 2500 
to 3000 women delegates in the same 
cause would do. Nor would eminent 
speakers travel far and wide at their 
own expense to speak before a limited 
few. 

It is the vast numbers and their far 
reaching influence that makes the mes- 
sage worth while to these great women 
and men who speak from Biennial plat- 
forms. Would the suffrage resolution 
adopted by 500 delegates have meant 
as much as by 2500? There seems to 
me no object in reducing the represen- 
tation except for political reasons. In 
that case certain women would always 
represent the states and might manipu- 
late the offices. 

The "unwieldlyness" of the Biennial 
does not lie in the attendance, but in 
the immense amount of program and 
functions planned, which crowd the 
time until long past midnight. This 
is where a severe surgical operation is 
needed. It is not so much a problem 
but an existing condition to be met 
and overcome, and that is, either to ex- 
tend the time of the Biennial or cut 
the program and eliminate social func- 
tions. 




JOHN W. SHENK 

(Incumbent) 

CANDIDATE FOR JUDGE 

OF THE 

SUPERIOR COURT 
Los Angeles County 

Primaries Aug. 25. General Election Nov. 3 

Advertisement 



Marquis Ellis 



VOICE EXPERT 



STUDIO 

608-609 
Majestic Theatre Building 



Lessons Evenings, and on 
Sundays by appointment only 

Phone Bdwy. 3526 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



19 



PRISON REFORM UNDER CIVIL 
SERVICE 

(Continued from Page 12) 
favor of what we have considered the 
spoils system. 

It seems probable that an attempt 
will be made to remove assistant post- 
masters from the classified service, and 
there is a report that the Department 
of Commerce will be reorganized, and 
a plan formed to exempt from civil ser- 
vice rules the commercial attaches 
whose duties are to further the foreign 
trade of the United States. 

The General Federation, and each 
state federation is pledged to support 
the merit system as against the spoils 
system, and it becomes the duty of each 
federated club to protest in no uncer- 
tain terms against any substitution of 
political patronage for non-partisan 
efficiency. Our General Federation 
Chairman recommends that a joint 
committee from several clubs find out 
whether any deputy collectors of in- 
ternal revenue, or deputy marshalls 
have been dismissed since the passage 
of the urgency bill last November; the 
reason for dismissal ; and whether or 
not their successors were appointed for 
conspicuous ability and ascertained fit- 
ness, or because of political opinions, 
or support of the congressman from 
their district. 

In this way it will be known whether 
the President has been able to control 
appointments in 48 states, or whether 
he may or has had to yield to political 
pressure from congressmen. 



LESLIE R. HEWITT 

(Incumbent) 
CANDIDATE FOR 

JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR 
COURT 

of Los Angeles County 

Primaries August 25 
General Election November 3 

Advertisement 



For State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

HUGH J. BALDWIN 




Bring 
the 

Schools 
Nearer to 
the Needs 

of the 

People 



Educational leader of unquestioned ability. 

Active officer State Humane Society. 

Sixteen years Superintendent of San Diego County 
Schools- 
Past President State Teachers' Association. 

Member State Council of Education. 

Author of several statutes bearing on child welfare, 
polytechnic education, etc. 

Leading advocate of Free Texts and Teachers' Pen- 
sion Bill. 

Name on every ballot under "Schools." 

Advertisement 

JOHNSTONE JONES 




Candidate for 

DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

of Los Angeles County 

At Primary Election, Aug. 25 

General Jones is regarded by his friends 
as thoroughly qualified for this important 
position. He fully demonstrated his ability 
and fidelity in his services as District At- 
torney of San Diego; and later, as Assist- 
ant District Attorney of Los Angeles Coun- 
ty. He has practiced law in Los Angeles 
for a score of years, and his large experi- 
ence in criminal law, his unswerving in- 
tegrity and sense of justice to all have pecu- 
liarly fitted him for the duties of the office. 
His name will appear as a Non-Partisan 
Candidate upon every ticket in the August 
Primaries. 

Headquarters 307-308-309 Mason Opera House 

Advertisement 



20 



THE CLUBWOMAN 




"Honorable J. Vincent Hannon of the Los 
Angeles bar, has announced himself as a can- 
didate for the position of Superior Court 
judge of this county. Mr. Hannon's friends, 
in a letter to the voters of Los Angeles 
signed by a number of Los Angeles attorneys, 
express their estimate of Mr. Hannon and 
his candidacy as follows: 

"Ladies and gentlemen: 

"We, the undersigned members of the bar 
of this county, take great pleasure in in- 



dorsing Mr. Hannon's candidacy, and we sin- 
cerely trust that the electors of the county 
will see fit, in their wisdom, to select him 
for one of the ten judgeships. 

"Some of us have known Mr. Hannon since 
his boyhood days; others of us have known 
him since he first began his career as a mem- 
ber of this bar; others have known him in 
the active practice as an attorney, but all 
of us take great pleasure in certifying to 
the fact that in Mr. Hannon we have al- 
ways found not only a splendid gentleman, 
but an excellent, well equipped, competent 
lawyer, and one whom we not only believe 
but know from education, mental qualifica- 
tion and practice will make a splendid judge, 
and we indorse him as being fully qualified 
in every respect for that position. 
"Very truly yours, 

"Edwin A. Meserve, Oscar Lawler, Max 
Loewenthal, Isidore B. Dockweiler, John 

C. Mott, Frank P. Flint, George J. Denis, 
Walter F. Haas, J. Wiseman Macdonald, 
Albert M. Stephens, R. F. Del Valle, A. 

D. Laughlin, Luciene Earle, M. J. Mc- 
Garry, J. W. Swanwick, John W. Carri- 
gan, Joseph Scott, William F. McLaugh- 
lin, Richard Dillon, H. W. O'Melveney, 
W. H. Anderson, W. S. Wright, Joseph 
H. Call. John H. Foley." Advertisement 




Allison Ware 
A native of California. Gradu- 
ate University of California. 
Taught in the Public Schools. 
Supervisor, State Normal, San 
Francisco. State Board of Educa- 
tion 1910-12. Pres. State Normal 
School at Chico, since 1910. 



ALLISON WARE 

for 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

To the Women of California: 

The following important work should be under- 
taken by the State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction: 

The elimination of the book-ring from our free 
text book system. 

The use of business methods in the purchase of 
school supplies throughout the state. 

The establishment of standard elementary courses 
of study in the 58 different county school systems. 

The development of high school courses that pre- 
pare for life. 

The application of efficiency standards to every 
branch of the school service. 

The reorganization of the State Superintendency 
on a basis of public service and as a force for edu- 
cational progress. 

This work is your work, for it concerns the wel- 
fare of your schools and your children. 

I shall be glad to undertake it with your approval 
and support. 



Advertisement 



Very truly yours, 

ALLISON WARE. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



EDITORIALS 

{Continued from Page 7) 
ness demands SPECIALISTS, yet 
public offices are still open, in an 
alarming degree, to truck politicians, 
garbage grafters, rag and bottle "bone 
hunters" and humpbacked intellects 
who happen to have ' - pull" or "nerve" 
enough to get a bit out of the quotient 
of "spoils." 

Political parasites would like Civil 
Service to remain DEFORMED — 
FOR THEMSELVES. Some honest 
men are shut out of Civil Service be- 
cause they are mental incompetents ; 
but an honest man without a mind is 
as dangerous as a crook with a super- 
abundance of grey matter. Efficiency 
is the pass key to public office. WOM- 
EN, GUARD THE KEY! 

To be non-partisan, we solicited ar- 
ticles from men prominent in our city 
life who have expressed their disap- 
proval against the present Merit Sys- 
tem. NO ARTICLES WERE SENT. 
So this month's issue has no funny 



ADVERTISEMENT 



page. 

The Humane Prison 

Prison Reform is a vital part of Civil 
Service Reform. Civil Service has re- 
vealed the monstrous civic deformity 
in the gloomy abodes of abnormal men. 
It has begun the elimination of brutal- 
ity in officials who hold the keys of the 
prison gates. The LIGHT OF HU- 
MANITARIANISM IS SHINING 
INTO DUNGEONS through the high- 
er sympathy, tenderness and justice of 
social workers. 

Men will be deprived of honorable 
liberty for their misdemeanors but 
neither their bodies or souls will mold 
and rot to become a further menace to 
civilization. Through Civil Service, 
incorrigibles will be made into men; 
lawbreakers will be educated to honest 
occupation; out door prisons will 
change physical weaklings to husky 
workers ; and the "second" and "old 
timer" will be eliminated through hu- 
mane education. 

Offenders should be deprived of hon- 
orable freedom humanely, and senti- 
mentality should not topple true senti- 
ment and justice. The line between 




DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

JOHN D. FREDERICKS 

OF LOS ANGELES 

Mr. Fredericks is a lawyer by profession 
and has served as District Attorney of Los 
Angeles County for the past 12 years, during 
which time he has handled many notable 
cases and established a reputation for him- 
self as a just, fair and able prosecutor as 
w-ell as a sound lawyer. 

He is in the prime of life, honest, able and 
energetic and possesses those qualities of 
head and heart that endear him to all with 
whom he comes in contact. He is a man of 
strong mentality and his reasoning processes 
run in straight lines. He readily sees the 
right and possesses the force of character 
necessary to follow it. 

He is a man of the Lincoln type, physically 
and mentally, and his public career has won 
him the friendship of Southern California ir- 
respective of party affiliations. He possesses 
the qualifications for any office "within the 
gift of the people. 

He has never been a standpatter in his 
party but belongs to the great bulk of the 
Republican party who believe that reforms 
in the party should be inaugurated within 
the same. 

Captain Fredericks is a strong campaigner 
and, while not the most eloquent of the can- 
didates named for this high position, all his 
speeches show the sincerity of the man and 
carry conviction to his hearers. 

His strong personality and unquestioned 
ability together with his undoubted popular- 
ity south of Tehachepi make him at the 
present time the strongest candidate for the 
Republican nomination at the primaries. 



Your Mirror will tell you 
more about "Style" 




in a minute — 

'THAN you could learn from reading a 

whole book on the subject. 
There's always something ?icw to be learned 
about "Style" and there 's just one really satis- 
factory way of acquiring this knowledge — visit 
"The Style Shop" try on some of the new 
gowns, and — 




Let the Mirror tell you 



7he Jle&Xfoek 




You may change at will 

your entire appearance through 
your choice of really smart apparel 

It's all a matter of "Style" 

A ND never was there wider latitude for 
■^ the exercise af charming individuality 
than at the present time among our myriads 
of exclusive and artististic creations, from 
the trim little gown for morning shopping 
to the extremely elaborate evening costume. 

High Class Suits 

From $14.75 up 

Dresses and Gowns 

From $12.50 up 

Daintiest Blouses 

From $2.50 up 

Artistic Millinery 

At tempting reductions 

Gloves and Veils 

Latest styles and shades 
"The Style Shop" 





THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



the criminal and the honest man is a 
slender thread. A wild burst of tem- 
per has made a good man into a crim- 
inal in a trigger's pull. Liquor has in 
a moment put chains on a man's free- 
dom. The man who walks the quick 
step of freedom today may pace the 
"lock-step" tomorrow. 

Prison reform cannot be carried on 
alone behind prison bars. It must be 
carried on in the home. There must be 
parent reform, moral reform especially 
among men, liquor reform, and higher 
vocational ideals. 



ADVERTISEMENT 
Chief Deputy District Attorney 

W. J. FORD 



The Nation Dry 

Through their representatives at the 
Biennial, 1,700,000 club women unani- 
mously recorded a plea for national 
prohibition. They likewise voiced the 
sentiment of millions of women who 
never saw the inside of a club house 
but who have seen the misery in the 
dregs of a wine glass or have had life 
refracted through the glass of a whis- 
key bottle. 

The liquor evil, not only a curse in 
itself, BUT ACTING AS THE IM- 
PETUS FOR EVERY OTHER 
WORLD EVIL, will be abolished by 
women. They are feverishly conscious 
of the evil. They are waiting for power 
to fight it. That power will come 
when every woman in the United 
States has THE PRIVILEGE OF 
STAMPING CROSSES ON ELEC- 
TION BALLOTS. 

Wherever women have had the bal- 
lot and were in a majority high enough 
to turn an election, saloons have been 
closed. However the "dry" towns or 
county as AN ISLAND SUR- 
ROUNDED BY "WET" TERRI- 
TORY, is a success only as a matter of 
principle. All women should concen- 
trate for state and national prohibition 
of such drastic form that closing the 
saloon will not mean OPENING THE 
DRUG STORE. With the prohibition 
fight a battle should be waged against 
many patent medicines and "sleeping" 
drugs which stand in towers and pyra- 
mids on drugstore shelves — a substi- 
tute for alcohol often more deadly than 
drink itself. 




WORK OP THE DISTRICT ATTORNEY'S 
OFFICE 

By Mrs. P. P. Morrison. 
Treasurer of Woman's Republican League 

Efficiency in the public service demands 
the election of Chief Deputy District Attor- 
ney W. J. Ford. He has had eight years' 
practical training as a prosecutor for the 
people and during that time he has been 
given an unusual qualifying training by his 
work. He is the only candidate who has had 
that practical kind of experience here, and 
for that reason, it is the duty of all women 
voters to endorse and vote for him. 

Mr. Ford has been tried and has made 
good in every department of the District At- 
torney's office. In my judgment, the spirit of 
civil service vigorously argues for the pro- 
motion of Mr. Ford to the position of District 
Attorney. His record as Chief Deputy Dis- 
trict Attorney is the strongest possible rec- 
ommendation for him to the women of Los 
Angeles County. Mr. Ford in the discharge 
of his duties as a prosecutor for the people 
has never been anxious to prosecute any- 
one; he has never issued a complaint unless 
a thorough inquiry had previously been made 
into all the facts of the case. When he was 
convinced that the law had been violated, he 
did his duty fearlessly and effectively. 
Neither friendship, nor religion, nor politics 
have ever in any way swayed him from up- 
holding the law. 

Mr. Ford's Campaign Committee of women 
and men ask for his election on the ground 
that the county deserves it. They point out 
that it is absolutely necessary for a man to 
have experience as a prosecutor to be a com- 
petent District Attorney. Special training in 
all lines means efficiency. Ford has had this 
special training. Proper training has been 
officially recognized by the City of Dos An- 
geles. 

It is required by law that the city prosecu- 
tor shall have had five years' practice as a 
lawyer before he is qualified for appointment. 
In that office only misdemeanor cases are 
handled. The District Attorney handles the 
more important, — the felony cases. The 
Board of Free Holders, who framed the pres- 
ent City charter considered making ten years 
experience as a lawyer a necessary qualifica- 
tion for District Attorney. I am informed 
that this was inadvertently left out of the 
county charter. 

The voters and the homes of Dos Angeles 
need a competent, careftil, conservative, pub- 
lic servant in the position of District Attor- 
ney. We women "want that kind of a man 
there. We want a real District Attorney. 
Mr. Ford lias already proven that he is that 
sort of a man. There can be no argument 
against him; there is no argument against 
him; he should be elected August 25th. 



24 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



CIVIL SERVICE A BOON TO 
WOMEN 

Continued from Page 13) 

sonal observation that these girls will 
tell their story to a policewoman where 
the true inwardness could never have 
been reached by a policeman. The po- 
licewoman as a factor in municipal gov- 
ernment has passed the experimental 
stage and has become a necessity and 
acknowledged fact. With the excep- 
tion of the librarian and his assistant 
the employees of the public library are 
women who have been selected for 
their positions through competitive ex- 
amination. 

When the Civil Service examination 
was held in February for the position 
of Deputy Assessor many women com- 
peted on an equal basis with the male 
candidates and several successfully 
passed the severe test and were ap- 
pointed to positions in the assessment 
department. Women assessors as- 
igned to field duty performed the work 
satisfactorily and in many instances 
their efficiency greatly exceeded that 
displayed by men employed on similar 
work. 

The highest position in the city open 
to women is that of the newly created 
Director of Charities under the Mu- 
nicipal Charities Commission. The 
Civil Service department has adver- 
tised a competitive examination for the 
purpose of filling this position, which 
pays a salary of $3,600 per annum, and 
the person appointed will have direct 
charge of all work coming under the 
jurisdiction of the Municipal Charities 
Commission. This post offers oppor- 
tunity for constructive work in the 
handling of public and private charities 
in Los Angeles city and county and 
there is no reason why a capable wom- 
an experienced in this class of work 
should not be successful in passing the 
examination. The Los Angeles Civil 
Service Commission will take pleasure 
in supplying information which will aid 
readers of the Clubwoman to a more 
perfect understanding of Civil Service. 



Willis I. Morrison 




Now JUDGE OF 

THE SUPERIOR 

COURT 

(Department C) 



Is a Candidate 
for Re-election 



KEEP HIM ON THE BENCH 



Advertisement 



For State Treasurer 




C. D. SWAN 

OF MODESTO 

(President of Union Savings Bank) 

CANDIDATE FOR REPUBLICAN 
NOMINATION 

Subject to the Primaries, Aug. 25, 1914 

Advertisement 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



25 



FEDERATION BOARD OPENS 
CAMPAIGN AGAINST VICE 
{Continued from page 17) 
plans to be presented to the conven- 
tion body next May for approval or 
passage, Mrs. Palmer refuses to remain 
idle for a year. Instead she believes 
the Federation should raise money 
through using the Federation seal 
stamps on all stationery in the manner 
of the Red Cross. 

Mrs. Henry DeNyse presented plans 
to redistrict the Federation by divid- 
ing the state into congressional dis- 
tricts and establishing county federa- 
tion. In part they met the approval 
of the board, details to be developed 
later. The plan would give eleven dis- 
trict p/esidents and eleven directors ; 
making the personnel of the executive 
board larger, giving greater district 
representation and training more 
women in federation work. 

The "meat" of reports made : Mrs. 
Charles F. Edson, industrial and social 
conditions, "Train women leaders; cre- 
ate public opinion in rural communi- 
ties that they have industrial prob- 
lems; Mrs. Frank Gibson, (covering 
immigration in this department), take 
education to mothers in poor homes; 
Mrs. Elliott, forestry, will concentrate 
on legislative work; Mrs. A. H. Gris- 
wold, believes in educating school 
children in peace; Miss Gertrude 
Longenecker, education, is preparing 
a course to be used as club programs 
on her department work. Mrs. A. J. 
Lawton, Southern District President, 
will hold five county board meetings 
prior to her convention November 10- 
13 at Santa Ana. 



Judge 

FredH.Taft 

Candidate for 
Re-election as 

Judge of the 
Superior Court 

Now 

Judge of the 
Juvenile Court 

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D.JOSEPH COYNE 



Candidate for 

Judge of Superior 
Court, Los Angeles 
County. 

Asks your support. 

Twelve years in 
practice of law. 

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GAVIN W. CRAIG 

Candidate for 

Presiding Justice 

District Court of Appeal 

Second District 

Now Superior Court Judge of Los Angeles 

County 

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26 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



WOMAN'S PART IN SYSTEM 

(Continued from page 14) 
state, although in that state the women 
are still unfranchised. Surely the 
women of California who share in re- 
sponsibilities of government, must take 
hold of this problem and help in its so- 
lution. 

It should be clearly appreciated that 
the Merit System is the people's pro- 
tective bureau in their relations with 
their servants, the elected officials. 
Public officials are annoyed by this re- 
striction and inclined to evade it if pos- 
sible. It is therefore essential that a 
Civil Service commission, standing as 
it does between the people and elected 
officials, should have the hearty sup- 
port of the former. That support, in 
order to be effective, should be organ- 
ized. It is for this reason that the 
Southern California Civil Service Re- 
form League was organized. Although 
it has been in existence only two years 
it was largely instrumental in formu- 
lating and securing the passage of the 
law placing practically the entire state 
service under the Merit System. It 
co-operated with the County Board of 
Freeholders in placing in the Los An- 
geles County Charter, what have been 
characterized as the best Civil Service 
provisions in the country. It support- 
ed the county civil service commission 
in its contest over the exemption of the 
office of County Counsel from Civil 
Service classification. That fight won 
•a signal victory for the Merit System. 

"The stream cannot rise above its 
source." The principles of the Merit 
System find their origin and must find 
their support in the people outside of 
officialdom. Let us preach it that its 
principles may be clearly comprehend- 
ed by all. Let us all, men and women, 
stand together for the Merit System. 



•E5E5£5Z5aSHSH5a5H5H5H525E5E5H5H5E5E5H5H5 



STATE CIVIL SERVICE LAW 

The state-wide civil service law is 
one of twenty-three measures, listed in 
the "First Legislative Platform of the 
California Federation of Woman's 
Clubs." It was one of the bills in- 
which the Women's Legislative Com- 
mittee was interested. 




FRANK E. WRIGHT 



Frank E. Wright of Sacramento is an- 
nouncing his candidacy for the position of 
State Surveyor-General on the Republican 
ticket. He is well qualified to fill the re- 
sponsible position, having served eight years 
as Chief Deputy in that office under his late 
father, M. J. Wright, who was State Sur- 
veyor-General from 1S95 to 1903. Prior to 
that time, Mr. Wright was Chief Clerk in 
the United States Land office at Visalia for 
five years when his father was register of 
that office. Thirteen, years of continuous 
service in the States Land offices is a record 
he may well be proud of, and alone stands 
as a recommendation for his integrity and 
ability. Mr. Wright is a native son, having 
been born in Vallejo in 1871. He is a young 
man of family and is well and favorably 
known throughout the State. He is asking 
the endorsement and support of the people 
at the coming election, relying upon his past 
record as to his efficiency, and promising 
to serve them to the best of his knowledge 
and ability if he has the honor of being 
elected Surveyor-General of the State of Cal- 
ifornia. Adv. 

Advertisement 



15H5ES25Z5H5E525H5i5E5E5H5E5H5Z5E525£5aSi 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



27 



CONSTRUCTIVE HUMANE RE- 
FORM 

(Continued from Page lb) 

spite of this reduction in time," says 
the report, "the increase in production 
per man is marked. The quality of 
work done is better, the cleanliness 
and upkeep of the shop has improved. 
Harmony and inclination to help one 
another has resulted." 

San Quentin has not reached the 
"profit-sharing system" as yet, but it is 
introducing vocational training as rap- 
idly as possible. A furniture factory, a 
tin shop, a shoe shop and a clothing 
establishment are in successful opera- 
tion. James A. Johnston, the warden, 
is to be highly commended for his en- 
deavor to have each man given a trade 
by which he can earn a living when re- 
leased. To help men to become better 
and more useful is his object, and to 
this end he has also abolished all in- 
struments of torture, and the discip- 
line has greatly improved under his 
sensible reform methods. 

There is no place of detention that 
could not become constructive instead 
of destructive if citizens demanded it. 
A city jail should be a bee hive of in- 
dustry. No man or woman should be 
kept thirty,' forty, or sixty days with- 
out profitable occupation. We are 
running our jails in the costliest and 
most detrimental way, because the fun- 
damental idea, to which we still blind- 
ly cling, was punishment and not rem- 
edy. It is time for nobler impulses to 
be at work with a wider understanding 
to guide them. 



Twenty-five years in uctlve 
practice of law 



A. ORFILA 

607-8 Chamber of Commerce BIdg. 
Candidate for 

Judge of the 
Superior Court 

County of Los Angeles 

Primary Election August 25 

Advertisement 




Energy 



Efficiency 



Expediency 



The Three E Candidate 

DAVID G. HATHEWAY 

For 
Judge of the Police Court 

of 
The City of Los Angeles 

Primary Election Aug. 25, 1914 

General Election Nov. 3, 1914 
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28 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



CALIFORNIA'S PRESENT 



California contributed not only the 
sum she pledged to the Sarah Piatt 
Decker Memorial Endowment Fund, 
but gave $1000 more than her assess- 
ment share when the $100,000 was be- 
ing raised at the Biennial. While 
some states fell sadly in arrears when 
the final sum was being collected, Cali- 
fornia raised her promised amount, 
then added the extra sum. California 
women are being congratulated on 
their business efficiency and gener- 
osity. Mrs. Percy V. Pennybacker, 
commented on California's contribu- 
tion before the convention assembled. 



SAVING IN SALARIES 



Former Secretary of the Treasury 
Windom gave it as his experience that, 
under the old system, prior to a change 
of administration the work of the clerks 
in his department fell off nearly a half, 
and that it took the successors of those 
who were changed at least six months 
to learn their duties. Accepting the 
average salary of a government clerk 
as about $800 this would mean, in 
Presidential years at least, that nearly 
half this salary was wasted, no return 
being obtained by the people for the 
amount paid out. — Sixth Report of U. 
S. Civil Service Commission. 



$1400 SAVED 



One of Boston's aldermen had a 
brother who drew $2.50 a day as a pro- 
visional inspector of lumber, and who 
did not inspect any lumber. Even- 
tually, this brother was appointed pro- 
visional caretaker of horses, and his 
wages increased to $1400 a year. The 
civil service commission held an ex- 
amination, but the alderman's brother 
failed to obtain a place on the eligible 
list. It was thereupon found that the 
position of caretaker of horses at $1400 
was not necessary, and no one was ap- 
pointed, a saving to the city of $1400. 




HIS RECORD 'WILL RE-ELECT HIM 

Sheriff Wiliam A. Hammel may confidently 
rest his campaign on his record of public 
service, and it is acceded that he will be 
both re-nominated and re-elected at the Pri- 
maryies on August 25th. 

Since the office of Sheriff in this county 
has been filled by him, his second term just 
closing, the reputation of the county jail 
for humane treatment of prisoners has been 
of the highest order. Criminals are often' 
made confirmed and hardened characters for 
all of their future lives by the treatment 
they received in jails and prisons. We be- 
lieve that kindness and consideration with 
friendly advice given in a way which con- 
vinces the prisoner of sincere good wishes 
will help to solve the problem of the sub- 
merged part of humanity. 

Every prisoner that has entered the county 
jail under Hammers administration has come 
out a better man and always with praises of 
the humane treatment they received during 
their incarceration. Hammel's keen sense 
of justice and right to all without fear or 
favor, combined with a human sympathy for 
the unhappy criminal, makes him the logical 
man for the important office of Sheriff. 
Advertisement 



Frank A. Duggan 

Candidate for 

Justice of 
the Peace 

of 

Los Angeles 
County 

Advertisement 



JOSEPH F. CHAMBERS 

(Police Judge L09 Ange'es City) 
Candidate for 

Judge of the Superior Court 

Subject to the Will of the Voters 
of Los Angeles County 

Primary Election August 25 

Election November 3 

Advertisement 




THE CLUBWOMAN 



29 



FEDERATION WATCHES 
SYSTEM 



BONE HUNTER'S TACTICS 



The Federation of Women's Clubs 
has followed with sympathetic interest 
the work of the California Civil Service 
Commission in its efforts to establish 
the merit system, and will continue its 
campaign of education and inspection 
of public institutions for the aged poor, 
the defective and delinquent. Califor- 
nia club women point with pride and 
satisfaction to the fine work being 
done by Mrs. McCan, Los Angeles 
civil service commissioner. The won- 
derful work done on the civil service 
commission of Colorado by the late 
Mrs. Sarah Platt-Decker shows what 
a woman can do to serve the public 
as a civil service commissioner. 



REDUCED COST 



The city engineer of Kansas City, 
Mo., reports that in the first six 
months after the adoption of the merit 
system public improvements were con- 
structed, amounting in cost to $294,- 
000 more than for the preceding six 
months, but that the cost of inspection 
decreased from $25,000 to $15,000. The 
proportionate cost of inspection was 
thus decreased from 5 per cent before 
a civil service law was adopted to 1.9 
per cent after its adoption. 



Are You Quick ZFZ 

versation, equal to the emergency, 
— or do your best thoughts and sen- 
tences come next day? Try the prac- 
tical method, "Thought Awakining." 
It's a wonder to stimulate new ideas. 
By Ruby Archer Doud. Paper de luxe 
edition direct from the publisher, 25c. 

PARSIFAL PRESS 
Granada Park Los Angeles 



Efficiency — What'd you mean by 
efficiency? 

Honesty — Never heard of the word. 

Conscientious — Only in looting of- 
fice. 

Working capacity — "Working" the 
public 24 horsepower per day.. 

Loyalty — to "bosses" only. 



FRANK G. TYRRELL 



Frank G. Tyrrell, candidate for Superior 
Judge, was born in Ferndale, California, 
1865, of pioneer stock. Graduated from 
the San Jose State Normal School in 1883, 
and taught in the public schools of the 
State for three years. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1887, and has been practicing 
in Los Angeles for nearly ten years, head 
of the firm Tyrrell, Abrahams & Brown, in 
the Washington Building. 

Mr. Tyrrell is widely known for his 
effective platform work. His maiden 
speech at San Jose, in 1881, was in favor 
of woman suffrage, and he gave material 
assistance in the campaign which gave 
California women the ballot. 

But entirely apart from any claim for 
services rendered, his friends consider him 
admirably equipped for a judicial posi- 
tion, by wide experience, training and 
temperament. 

Advertisement 

SIDNEY N. REEVE 



Candidate for 

JUDGE 

of the 

SUPERIOR 




COURT 



A Clean Record and 
a splendid reputa- 
tion on the Bench 



Advertisement 



30 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



DISTRICT NEWS 



Seven Years Active Law Practice in Los Angeles 



SAN FRANCISCO 
By Mrs. F. W. Colburn 

Press Chairman 

The appointment of the chairmen of 
the various committees to serve with 
Mrs. Percy S. King, president of the 
San Francisco district, California Fed- 
eration of Women's Clubs, are as fol- 
lows : 

Art, Mrs. Edwin Stadtmuller, San 
Francisco ; history and landmarks, 
Mrs. B. F. Griffins, Vallejo; country 
life, Miss Nell Denman, Petaluma; lit- 
erature, Mrs. W. I. Clayes, San Fran- 
cisco ; club extension, Mrs. A. Z. Mur- 
ray, Eureka; music, Mrs. Hope H. 
Swinford, Santa Cruz; philanthropy, 
Mrs. Peter Hamilton, San Ansemlo ; 
education, Mrs. Ella M. Sexton, San 
Francisco ; forestry, Mrs. Harry E. 
Briggs, Alton ; waterways, Mrs. M. 
McBean, Los Altos; necrology, Mrs. F. 
E. Rea, Ukiah; legislation, Attorney 
Marguerite Ogden, San Francisco; 
peace, Mrs. C. E. Cumbersome, Red- 
wood City; civil service reform, Mrs. 
M. A. Buchan, Palo Alto; industrial 
and social conditions, Mrs. Raymond 
Hollingworth, San Francisco ; home 
economics, Miss Maude I. Murchie, 
San Jose Normal ; health, Dr. Millicent 
Cosgrove, San Francisco; clubhouse 
loan, Miss Ruth Robinson, San Fran- 
cisco ; press, Mrs. F. W. Colburn, San 
Francisco. 

The San Francisco District conven- 
tion will be held at Pacific Grove, Oct- 
ober 27, 28 and 29. A meeting of the 
executive board will be held Saturday, 
August, 10:30, at the Palace hotel, 
San Francisco. 



SAN JOAQUIN 
By Mrs. Leslie A. Ferris 

Press Chairman 

The San Joaquin District extends 
sincerest greetings to our new State 
President, Mrs. Palmer, and to her as- 
sistants, pledging, at the same time, 
our heartiest support. 

Never has the summer vacation 




EDWARD JUDSON BROWN 

Candidate for Justice of the Peace 
of Los Angeles Township 

Women who are deeply interested in civic affairs will appreciate 
the importance of the Justices' Court. This Court comes into the 
closest contact with the people. Clean, able, experienced men are 
needed on the Justices' bench. Edward Judson Brown is en- 
dorsed for this office by William J. Hunsaker, Nathan Newby, Mrs. 
H K. W. Bent, Mrs. H. C. Terrell. Dr. John M. Dunsmoor. Dr. 
George F. Kenngott. Rev. Ralph B. Larkin, Fowler Brothers. San- 
bom Vail and many others. 

FOUR JUSTICES TO BE ELECTED 

Advertisement 



Warren L. Williams 

(Police Judge) 
CANDIDATE FOR 

Superior Court 

Los Angeles County 

For 6 years Judge of the 

Police Court of Los 

Angeles City 



Subject to Primary Election Aug. 25, J 914 

Advertisement 



William I. Traeger 

Candidate for 

Justice of the 
Peace 

of 

Los Angeles 

Township 

Judiciary is Non-Partisan 
Name will be on all ballots 

Primary Election 
Aug. 25, 1914 

Advertisement 





THE CLUBWOMAN 



31 



found the clubs of San Joaquin district 
with their work for the ensuing year 
so definitely mapped out and so well 
prepared, as now. The president, Mrs. 
H. A. Bates, has received numerous in- 
teresting outlines of courses which 
clubs will begin in September. With- 
out exception preparations tend toward 
social and civic improvement. Many 
clubs have availed themselves of the 
courses in civics and domestic science 
offered by the Extension Bureau of 
the University of California, courses 
being used effectively in several rural 
clubs, and account for an increase of 
membership and interest prevalent dur- 



ing the last few months. 



"Optionals" and luncheons marked 
the closing sessions of valley clubs. 
The Modesto Woman's Improvement 
Club held a pleasant luncheon at the 
new Hotel Modesto. This club expects 
to give a pageant in the Fall in place 
of the annual Fiesta. Under the able 
leadership of the new president, Mrs. 
Walter Garrison, the club anticipates a 
profitable year. 

Mrs. W. P. Miller, of Fresno,, is en- 
joying a European trip, the gift of 
clubs of Fresno and surrounding com- 
munities where she conducts courses in 
Literature. Mrs. Miller is considered 
a fine literary interpreter and has many 
friends who are expecting interesting 
accounts of her trip. 

The Tulare Improvement Club gave 
a June Fiesta and the Hanford Club 
celebrated its annual Rose Festival. 
Miss Lillian D. Clarke, State Chair- 
man of Country Life, visited clubs re- 
cently, and brought many helpful sug- 
gestions to women in country districts. 



SOUTHERN 

Mrs. Helen M. Deimling, 

Press Chairman 

The Orange County Federation oi 
Women's Clubs will hold the annual 
meeting the first week in October in 
Fullerton. 

Mrs. A. J. Lawton, President of the 
Southern District, announces that the 
convention of the Southern District 
will be entertained by the Orange 




THE WAY TO THE EAST 



TO CLUBWOMEN 

Whose duties or pleasures 
take them on trips to the 
East, we wish to say that the 
service via the Salt Lake 
route makes the journey one 
of luxurious comfort. The 
well known Los Angeles 
Limited and the Pacific Lim- 
ited trains afford every ad- 
vantage in equipment and 
speed for a delightful trip of 
less than three days to Chi- 
cago. The dining car serv- 
ice is exceptionally good. 
Your patronage will be ap- 
preciated. 

Full particulars at all ticket offices. Los 
Angeles office, 601 So. Spring St. Phone 
Main 8908 or Home 10031. 

T. C. PECK, Gen'l. Passenger Agent. 

F. M. ANGELLOTT1 




ws 




CANDIDATE FOR 

CHIEF JUSTICE of the SUPREME COURT 

Has been Associate Justice of that Court 12 Years 

Advertisement 



32 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



County Federation at Santa Ana, No- 
vember 10-13. 



"BONELESS" SERVICE 

The relation between health and san- 
itation and civil service reform is close 
because any branch of work intrusted 
to public officers depends for its ef- 
ficiency upon this reform unless we 
can receive a guarantee that now and 
in all future years each officer in charge 
will rival George Washington in cour- 
age and public spirit. 



KNOWLEDGE SPREADING 

Knowledge of the fundamental im- 
portance of civil service reform is be- 
ing spread through traveling libraries, 
study outlines, and exchange papers. 
You cannot turn in any direction to try 
to better things without becoming 
linked with government ; and pure, ef- 
ficient government means a sound 
body politic, and that is an impossi- 
bility without civil service reform. 



GESNER WILLIAMS 

TO BE 

PRESIDING JUSTICE - COURT OF 
APPEAL 



In his ten years of 
political life in South- 
ern California Mr. Wil- 
liams has publicly ad- 
vocated building of the 
aqueduct, good roads, 
women's suffrage, the 
initiative, referendum, 
recall and direct elec- 
tion, and refers as to 
his ability and effic- 
iency to 

Chief Justice Beatty 

Earl Rogers 

Mrs. W. C. Mushet 

Marco Hellman 

Stoddard Jess 
Mrs. W. C. Tyler 
James H. Blanchard 




Mrs. Andrew W. Francisco 
Mrs. Clara Shortridge Foltz 
Chief of Police Sebastian. 



NON-PARTISAN 

The Second District Counties of Tulare, 
Kings, San Luis Obispo, Kern, Inyo, Santa 
Barbara, Ventura, Los Angeles, San Ber- 
nardino, Orange, Riverside, San Diego, 
Imperial. 

Advertisement 




Frank Buren 

Register U. S. Land 
Office 1909-14 

Candidate for 

JUDGE 

of the 

SUPERIOR 
COURT 

Los Angeles County 



Primaries August 25. 



FOR JUDGE OP THE SUPERIOR COURT OP 
LOS ANGELES COUNTY 

George A. Boden, for twenty years a resi- 
dent of Los Angeles County, and having an 
irreproachable record as Attorney and Coun- 
sellor at Law, announces his candidacy for 
Judge of the Superior Court of Los Angeles 
County. 

Mr. Boden stands and has stood for the 
equality of rights for all. He has been an 
advocate of Woman's Suffrage even before 
the movement in favor of equal suffrage be- 
gan. He has always held that women, who 
are the determining factors in the develop- 
ment of the proper thoughts for the better- 
ment of man, should have an equal right with 
men in all respects, civic, political and other- 
wise. 

Mr. Boden is what may be termed a self- 
made man. He has worked for himself since 
he was ten years of age. He worked his 
way through the Los Angeles State Normal 
School, by carrying papers and doing such 
other work as was possible for him to do 
and carry on his studies. 

Since his graduation from the Los Angeles 
Normal, he has taught in the schools of the 
state for ten years, and has been principal 
of one of the large public schools in Pasa- 
dena for six years, "where he has a host of 
friends among the pupils who attended the 
school when he was principal. Mr. Boden 
contends that schools and other institutions 
should be run on a business basis with equal 
rights to all who attend or who come under 
the supervision of the authorities, regardless 
of financial condition or social standing. 

Mr. Boden was born June 4th, 1876, in Te- 
hachapi, Kern county, California, where his 
father had a ranch, obtaining a public school 
education by riding seven miles to school 
each day. 

While Mr. Boden taught school, he studied 
law, and during his vacations and holidays 
and at night, attended the law school and 
graduated with honors from the law school 
of the University of Southern California, and 
has been in the active practice of law for 
the past ten years in the City of Los An- 
geles. 

Mr. Boden was for two years a member of 
the Los Angeles County Board of Education. 

While in the practice of law, Mr. Boden 
has made a careful study of probate law and 
law pertaining to real property, besides tak- 
ing a deep interest at all times in juvenile 
work and the welfare of juvenile offenders. 

Mr. Boden is a Native Son of the State of 
California, and belongs to the Lds Angeles 
Parlour. He is a member of tSe Los Angeles 
Bar Association, and belongs to the Masonic 
Order. 

Mr. Boden has offices at 527-2S Union Oil 
Building, Los Angeles, California. 
Advertisement 



The Clubwoman 

Los Angeles, California 
Enclosed is One Dollar for which send me the magazine for one 

year, beginning with the issue. 

Name 

Street No City 

Member Club. State 



Subscriptions to 


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Credit Krattch Studio 



MRS. FOSTER ELLIOTT, 
State Chairman of Forestry 




MRS. E. G. GREENE, 
State Chairman of Waterways 



Biorkman's 

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Institute 

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Phone Broadway 6097 

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Medical as well as Recreative. 

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Children's Corrective Exer- 
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References supplied on re- 
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Arch Flexions, Swedish System. Physical Effect: Ex- 
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For Advertising Rates 



IN 



The CLUBWOMAN 

ADDRESS 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 

227 BLACK BLDG. 
Phone F 1178 Los Angeles 



i fr i t i 1 ^ 1 i f i A i t i i j i i fr i fr i ^ i » £ * i fr i { i ^ i i ^ i i fr t fr ■ % ■ i ^ i ty t fr i ^ i t fr » { ** } • » } * » J i i y ' ^" S* * y V " S " * I * y * } ' ' } ' ' } ' ' S ' ^ t ' ' } ' ' I 1 * } ' j * ' 

The Clubwoman I 

Official organ of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 

Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 

Subscription Price, One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH, Editor and Publisher 

MRS. HAINES REED, Federation Editor 

1966 Carmen Ave. Tel. Hollywood 2378 

Matter for Miss Smith must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 

Entered at the Los Angeles postoffice as second-class matter 



Contents 



Frontispiece ; Mrs. Foster Elliott 2 

Mrs. E. G. Greene 3 

Intensive Study of Water Problems; Mrs. E. G. Greene 6 

Federation Aid in Forest Protection; Mrs. Foster Elliott 7 

Moral Rejuvenation of Men ; Max Watson 8 

The Water Commission Bill ; Dr. George C. Pardee 10 

Evils of Unjust Taxation ; George H. Rhodes 11 

Forests as Water Conservers ; T. P. Lukens 12 

How Women Can Aid State Forestry; George M. Homans 13 

Value of Birds to the Forests; Harriett Williams Myers 13 

How Woman Can Aid State Waterways ; William R. Wheeler 14 

Los Angeles Street Tree Planting; Laurie Davidson Cox 15 

Forestry Along the Highways; Stuart J. Flintham 15 

Navigation Versus Irrigation ; S. C. Graham 16 

President's Letter 18 

Conservation Greetings ; Mrs. John Dickinson Sherman 18 

Forestry Chairmen's Reports 9, 23, 32 

Waterways Chairmen's Reports 17, 24, 25, 26 

San Francisco District News 27 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



INTENSIVE STUDY OF WATER PROBLEMS 

By Mrs. E. G. Greene 

State Chairman of Waterways 



To those interested in water con- 
servation 1915 will be a year of oppor- 
tunity. History-making will not soon 
possess so rich and abundant an 
amount of printed matter or objective 
material, nor will it pulsate with the 
same vital current. With the Panama 
Canal completed, California will re- 
ceive its crest-wave expression in the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition, at which 
will be presented world-wide resources. 
California will be at the Golden Gate 
with every enterprise characterized by 
western spirit and genius. The Feder- 
ation of Women's Clubs will assemble 
in San Francisco in 1915. The Depart- 
ment of Waters looks to club members 
to help make the year's record truly 
representative of California's women. 

The activity of club women in water 
conservation dates from the Governors' 
Conference, called by President Roose- 
velt, to which representatives from the 
General Federation and other national 
organizations of women were invited. 
This Conference resulted in the forma- 
tion of a National Conservation Con- 
gress. The Woman's National Rivers 
and Harbors Congress was organized 
in 1908, with conservation of water as 
its special work. It now has a member- 
ship in 45 states and territories. 

Upon recommendation of the Gen- 
eral Federation the State Department 
of Waters was created in 1909, with 
Mrs, Robert Potter Hill, Past State 
President, as chairman. Mrs. Donald 
E. Green of Colusa filled the position 
from May 1910, to March 1911. The 
work was established on broad, prac- 
tical lines, therefore, as voters, taxpay- 
ers and club women, there is urgent 
need that we shall be careful students 
and thinkers on water conservation 
problems and projects. 

The Federation work is classified 
under the divisions: Municipal water 
supply, non-pollution of streams, irri- 



gation, water power, and navigation. 
The question of municipal water sup- 
ply, its source, purity, quantity and 
quality is engaging the attention of 
many localities. The Federal Health 
Bureau, under Dr. Blue, is seeking to 
establish a standard for pure water. 
The pollution of streams is a live issue, 
and there should be united effort to 
enforce legislation now on the statute 
books. 

Each district in the Federation may 
find interest, both from the standpoint 
of locality and the State : for example, 
the Oakdale Irrigation District, which 
the State Engineer calls "one of the 
best in California," or many other San 
Joaquin Valley projects; or the work 
under the State Reclamation Board, 
which is being carried on in the Sacra- 
mento Valley, known as the By-Pass 
plan. 

On the merits and demerits of the 
Water Commission law, club women 
should be well informed. They should 
have studied Bulletin No. 100 for in- 
formation on past legislation, water 
laws, water rights, present method of 
settlement, advantages of a commis- 
sion, and what other states have done. 
We should be informed about water 
power conditions, State water districts, 
irrigation, reclamation, and navigation. 
Women's intuitions and trained judg- 
ment have a value in the consideration 
of problems, which for so many years 
have been engaging the attention of 
men of experience and expert knowl- 
edge. 

In the question of values, it is neces- 
sary to recognize beauty as an impor- 
tant asset. Builders of the Roman 
Aqueduct never lost sight of the beau- 
tiful. Mrs. J.'B. Hume, in the leaflet, 
"European Waterways," says : "The 
one thing in which we are centuries 
behind European countries is the care 
and improvements of our waterfronts 

(Continued on page 21) 



The Clubwoman 



VOL. V 



SEPTEMBER, 1914 



No. 10 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Com- 
munications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P. O. Box 
1066, by the twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue 
of the magazine. 



EDITORIAL 

The October Clubwoman will be the Social and Industrial Condition 
Number, with articles by Mrs. Charles Farwell Edson, State Chairman, and 
other experts on Immigration, Child Labor, Red Light Abatement, Minimum 
Wage, Mothers' Pension and Marriage Laws. 



FEDERATION AID IN FOREST PROTECTION 

By Mrs. Foster Elliott 



State Chairma 

Conservation is "utilization with a 
maximum efficiency and a minimum 
waste." In planning the work for this 
department latitude was given, but 
committee members were asked to fol- 
low one or two definite lines of work 
to secure tangible results with little 
waste of energy. No serious danger 
has threatened the National Forests. 
It was feared that the movement to 
break them up would be renewed, 
therefore club women were warned to 
stand in readiness to defeat it. As we 
wished to secure an unbiased opinion 
from club women as to what they 
actually knew and thought of condi- 
tions prevailing in our National For- 
ests, a circular letter was sent to clubs 
containing questions regarding the 
practicability, the advantages, the 
courtesy of officers, and the value of 
the methods employed by the Forest 
Service. 

This inquiry made women investi- 
gate conditions. Answers have been 
unanimous in their approval of the For- 
est Service officers and their work. The 
only adverse criticism is that of insuffi- 
cient fire protection, owing, it is 
thought, to lack of funds to increase 



n of Forestry 

the force and occasional "red tape" in- 
terfering with proper administration of 
the work. Copies of this result were 
sent where we hope the expression of 
opinion from a state containing such a 
large number of National Forests, may 
be of value to those who criticise the 
methods and policy of the Forest 
Service. 

As we were asked to undertake an 
active campaign against the practice of 
"light burning" in our forests, a leaflet 
was prepared for club distribution. 
Too much can not be said against care- 
lessness with fire on the part of the 
public. In one district two excellent 
study outlines have been compiled by 
two succeeding chairmen — one for 
women's clubs, the other, "Forestry in 
Nature Study," arranged for use in the 
first five school grades. A Department 
of Forestry has been established in the 
College of Agriculture at the Univer- 
sity of California with Prof. Walter 
Mulford of Cornell, in charge. He lays 
emphasis on the importance of greater 
forestry knowledge for the average citi- 
zen. California boasts of having the 
only woman forest fire lookout em- 

(Continued on page 28) 



8 THE CLUBWOMAN 

MORAL REJUVENATION OF MEN 

By Max Watson 

Pueblo Forester of San Diego 

The unemployed problem is a serious menace to the welfare of the country, 
and although its extraordinary severity has been due largely to a temporary 
economic depression, it has served to awaken the people to search for some- 
thing to alleviate the condition. Much has been written in a statistical way, 
showing unemployment of thousands of men is a great problem. The social 
worker admits the problem. He is not seeking a solution because solutions 
rarely reach farther than the paper on which they are written, but a working 
plan to prevent the recurrence of the condition. He is seeking a common-sense 
plan that can be put into practice to lessen the serious phases of the unemployed 
problem. 

The real problem is not the man who is temporarily out of employment and 
then returns to steady work. The real menace is the result of continued unem- 
ployment — "the unemployable man," — the man who cannot be employed at a 
profit. He is the repeater in the police court, the vagrant, the inmate of the poor 
farm and other institutions, the man we say "wouldn't work if he could." It is 
impossible to do away entirely with the unemployed man, but the San Diego 
Municipal Farm is attempting to lessen the periods of unemployment. 

San Diego is fortunate in possessing nearly 8000 acres of farm land within 
its city limits. This tract, known as Pueblo Lands, was handed down to the 
present city by the Mexican Pueblo of San Diego. It is located along the coast, 
ten miles north of the city proper, and consists of dry brush covered hills and 
mesas, overlooking the Pacific. The only reason the land still remains in the 
possession of the city is because it was not considered worth having in the early 
days. 

In 1908 an amendment to the City Charter was adopted, imposing a spe- 
cial tax of two cents on each one hundred dollars assessed valuation of city 
property for the improvement of this land and exempting it from sale until 
1930. In the fall of 1910 the Common Council appointed a Pueblo Forester 
and assistant to plant a Municipal Forest. Ground was prepared, water piped, 
nurseries planted, headquarters and farm buildings were erected and imple- 
ments and stock purchased. During the spring 40,000 seedling eucalyptus 
trees were set out in forest form, new rDads built and land cleared. 

Portions of the land were consider ad too valuable for forest planting, as it 
will make future choice residence property; so its was cleared and planted to 
hay for stock on the far.m and in city departments. 

Economic Drifters 

Large numbers of men were hired to clear land and plant trees. Being 
situated on the road between San Diego and the northern cities, the numerous 
men applying for work often expressed their willingness to work for a small 
wage long enough to get a few dollars to carry them where work was plentiful. 

In 1911, when the unemployed problem in the City of San Diego became 
acute, it was apparent that the situation could be relieved by giving applicants 
work at fifty cents a day, with board and bunk furnished for ten days. A camp 
was established. Men came out from the city, some from the Associated Chari- 
ties, other from the Salvation Army. The Police Department and courts con- 
tributed to the number. Of" these men, some were first-class tradesmen tem- 
porarily out of work and in need of a little boost to set them on their feet ; 
others were unemployed men of the laboring class, who had spent their money 
and were unable to find a job ; others were young boys, who had left home to 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



find work and had failed. Then there 
were the unemployables, not able to 
earn a full wage and hardly able to 
earn fifty cents a day. 

Work Instead of Jail 

Those sent out by the Police Depart- 
ment were men and boys picked up on 
vagrancy charges, such as sleeping in 
empty buildings or in box cars, and 
were given this chance to work with- 
out the formality of a trial. Men sent 
out by the Police Court were usually 
arrested on charges of drunkenness or 
vagrancy, their sentences having been 
suspended on condition that they come 
to the Farm. Every trade and profes- 
sion was represented, well educated 
men, and men with no education, men 
who had been well-to-do, and men who 
never had anything. Of these, large 
numbers were put on their feet perma- 
nently, many were able to find work in 
their line through the lift given them, 
some went back to .the old life of 
drink and worthlessness. But NONE 
CAME to the farm without the DE- 
SIRE and DETERMINATION to 
HELP THEMSELVES and MAKE 
GOOD and none went away without 
that desire and NOT ONE was SENT 
any farther DOWN the social scale. 

Practically all had been subject to ar- 
rest and imprisonment on a charge of 
vagrancy while they remained in the 
city. Men who were not willing to work 
did not apply or did not remain long. 
Every man felt that he himself was 
doing something for his own better- 
ment and that he was not an object of 
charity. There was no restriction upon 
a man's action, and even if he had been 
sent out by the police it was with the 
understanding that he himself was 
doing it for his own good and not for 
punishment. No one was forcibly de- 
tained. In other words, he had a 
chance to work out his own rejuvena- 
tion. 

"Farm" Chain Needed 

The plan adopted the first winter 
was retained, and the place is always 
open to any worthy man wishing work. 
Hundred's of men have taken advan- 



tage of this. Last winter so many ap- 
plied that it was impossible to handle 
all. This farm is demonstrating what 
can be done with derelicts. A single 
farm of this character, however, is not 
complete in itself and, in order to ac- 
complish the greatest good, it should 
be a unit in a system of farms of similar 
character, located in each large center 
of population throughout the country. 
The farms should be in close touch 
with each other, and with the Munici- 
pal and State Employment bureaus, 
such bureaus to act as clearing houses 
for unemployed men. They would be 
in constant touch, not only with the 
jobs, but with men needing them. The 
system would tend to do away with the 
pernicious "pay for employment" agen- 
cies, the leaches hanging to desperate 
men out of jobs. 

Club women can do much for "down 
and out" humanity by creating public 
sentiment for chains of these work 
farms. The plan carried out logically 
offers a practical working basis for re- 
ducing the severity and frequency of 
periods of unemployment. 



FOREST LAWS NEEDED 
By Mrs. P. B. Westerman 

San Joaquin District Chairman of Forestry 

Forestry work in this district should 
be along the lines of information and 
agitation. The State Forest Depart- 
ment circulates literature in the schools 
giving information as to need of forest 
conservation. This literature could be 
used profitably in the clubs. The 
needs of the State are for suitable new 
forest laws, provisions for appropria- 
tions for forest protection and a co-op- 
erative plan to act with the Federal 
government. 

That is where agitation is needed. 
Women's clubs can aid in forest pro- 
tection through the press, lectures, pic- 
tures, the schools, and through indi- 
vidual work of club members. Among 
subjects presented for consideration by 
club women, forest conservation and 
protection ranks high in interest and 
importance. 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



THE WATER COMMISSION BILL 

By Dr. George C. Pardee 

Chairman State Conservation Commission 



Irrigation is absolutely necessary in 
California. Titles to our water rights, 
therefore, should be as good as titles 
to our lands. They are not, and can 
not be made so under our existing 
water laws. The following illustration 
shows the uncertain condition of our 
water titles : The Eastside Canal and 
Irrigation Company, of Merced, in- 
formed the Railroad Commission, 
which valued the company's property 
at $280,000, that it had spent $300,000 
in litigating its water rights, and is 
still litigating them. 

Water rights on the Santa Ana River 
have been four times "finally settled" 
by as many enormously expensive law- 
suits. A fifth suit has been begun to 
"finally settle" these same rights again. 
In six California counties, in which 
irrigation is essential, there are now 
more than 100 live water-right lawsuits 
before the courts — one small county 
has twenty. 

Oregon's Water Commission, in four 
years, finally settled 1000 water rights, 
at a cost of $10 to each claimant, or 
$10,000 for the 1000 water rights— with- 
out a single appeal from the decisions 
of the Commission to the courts. 
Many, many times $10,000 would be 
required to take 1000 California water 
rights through the Supreme Court. 
But, even when taken through the 
Supreme Court, our water titles are 
not settled, as the above-mentroned 
cases shows. 

Wyoming's Water Commission, in 
20 years, has finally settled over 15,000 
water rights, with only 10 appeals from 
the Commission to the courts. Several 
times 20 years would be required to 
litigate only once, without settling, 
15,000 California water rights. 

Under our present water laws, no 
matter how often a water user may be 
sued, he must defend each suit, at great 
expense. If he hasn't money to pay 
lawsuit costs, he loses his water right. 
If his right is "jumped" he loses it if 



he hasn't money with which to bring 
suit. The result is that only the water 
rights of those who are known to be 
rich are safe from lawsuits. 
_ The referendumed Water Commis- 
sion Law creates a Commission, whose 
duty it will be to settle California water 
rights as similar commissions settle 
them in other States. This law is mod- 
eled on the Oregon Law. It will do 
away with lawsuits over water rights 
in California, as similar laws have done 
away with such lawsuits in other 
States. 

When this law was before our Leg- 
islature it was vigorously fought by an 
expensive lobby financed by certain 
power and water companies. The same 
interests paid the heavy expense of 
securing, at 5 and 10 cents each, the 30- 
odd thousand signatures, forged and 
unforged, by which this law has been 
held up by referendum. The same in- 
terests are opposing its ratification by 
the people at the November election. 

Our Railroad Commission stands be- 
tween the people and the public serv- 
ice corporations. Our Water Commis- 
sion will stand, as similar commissions 
in other States stand, between the 
water users and the water-grabbers. 
It is said by opponents of this law that 
it will take water away from those who 
have a right to it. The law specifically 
recognizes and confirms "vested 
rights." The Commission will see that 
those entitled to them get good water 
titles and are protected in them. 

The Commission will be authorized 
to take water away from those who, 
speculating in water rights, neither 
use them nor permit others to use 
them. Much speculating is being done 
under our present water laws, so that 
much land which should be producing 
goes unirrigated. Neither can the 
Commission "unsettle California water 
rights," as is claimed. The California 
Water Commission will cheaply, quick- 

(Continued on page 32) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



11 



EVILS OF UNJUST TAXATION 

By George H. Rhodes 

Secretary California Forest Protective Association 



Statistics show that the annual per 
capita consumption of lumber in Cali- 
fornia is nearly 900 board feet. This 
means that even- ten persons use ap- 
proximately enough lumber every year 
to build a six-room house. In addition 
to this we use many other forest prod- 
ucts, such as shingles, posts, shakes, 
boxes, barrels, fruit trays, poles, ties, 
tan bark, rosin, turpentine, wood al- 
cohol and other things. 

To supply these necessaries is the 
function of those great industries which 
take the raw materials from the forests 
and turn them into usable products. 
These industries are necessary because 
the people need their products, just the 
same as they need the products of the 
agricultural industries. It is fortunate 
that the forests of California supply the 
raw material for nearly half the forest 
products needed by the State, as the 
competition from home products keeps 
within reason the prices paid for im- 
ported products, and the money paid 
for California forest products is kept 
at home. 

Lumber, the most important of for- 
est products, is manufactured by hun- 
dreds of sawmills, scattered throughout 
the timbered sections of the State, em- 
ploying thousands of men, paying fif- 
teen million dollars in wages alone, 
buying millions of dollars worth of 
farm products, and bringing the bene- 
fits of employment, industry and com- 
merce to many different communities. 
Next to agriculture lumbering is the 
most important industry in California, 
especially in the value and necessity 
of its products. 

Timberland produces only one crop 
in many years, while other land pro- 
duces a crop every year. This differ- 
ence makes it necessary to place forest 
economics in a separate class. A for- 
est, which is owned twenty years be- 
fore the timber can be cut, has to pay 
all the carrying costs, such as annual 
taxes and fire protection for the entire 



twenty years, out of the one crop. As 
this doubles the original cost at least 
every ten years it constantly tends to- 
ward the destruction of the forest by 
forced cutting. 

The government, in national forests, 
owns approximately one-third of the 
timber in California. This is sold to 
manufacturers as needed and in such a 
way as to prevent monopoly and regu- 
lates the stumpage value. Over one 
billion feet were sold during 1913 at an 
average price of $2.13 per thousand feet 
of standing timber. This also tends to 
prevent speculation. 

The lumber manufacturer must have 
a supply of raw material, just as the 
manufacturer of flour, woolens or any 
other commodity must have, but with 
this difference : the manufacturer of 
flour and woolens buys his raw mate- 
rial every year, while the manufacturer 
of lumber must buy enough raw mate- 
rial to last many years and pay for it 
in advance. This makes necessary the 
ownership of large tracts of timber in 
order to justify the immense original 
cost of sawmills, logging railroads, etc. 

Gifford Pinchot says : "Land bear- 
ing forests should be taxed annually 
on the land alone, and the timber crop 
should be taxed when cut, so that pri- 
vate forestry may be encouraged. Next 
to fire, there is nothing that so stub- 
bornly stands in the way of practical 
forestry in this country as bad methods 
of taxation." 

In California forests of merchantable 
timber are so well protected from fire 
by the Federal Forest Service and pri- 
vate owners that during 1913 less than 
one dollar's worth of timber in every 
$300,000 worth was destroyed. But 
brush and grass fires destroyed at least 
$300,000 worth of property, to say 
nothing of the loss to watersheds. 
What we need is a law providing that 
the State shall protect this "cover 
growth" and, at the same time, co-oper- 

(Continued on page 26) 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



FORESTS AS WATER CONSERVERS 

By T. P. Lukens 

Ex-Member United States Forest Service 



Neither war nor pestilence has ever 
wrought such destruction, or caused so 
much suffering and loss to humanity, 
as the irrational destruction of forests. 
The forestry movement in the United 
States is to avert the calamity that 
other nations have experienced, and by 
rational methods of harvesting to per- 
petuate the forests. 

History gives no instance of ruined 
cities being discovered in a wooded 
country. They are always on a deso- 
late, treeless plain or hill, as in parts of 
Asia Minor, Greece, and even in our 
own Arizona; but this was not so when 
the cities were builded. Hills and 
mountains were covered with trees 
and plains and valleys were rich in 
crops nourished by bountiful rains in- 
duced and conserved by the forests. 

The forest is the mother of the 
stream. Without forests there can be 
no irrigation, and without forestry 
there can be no forests. "How forests 
beneficially affect a clime, how they 
supply equible humidity ; afford exten- 
sive shelter, create springs and control 
the flow of rivers, is the teaching of 
science and the records of history. 
Now forests with their humid atmos- 
phere and their feathered singers ef- 
fectually obstruct the march of armies 
of locusts in the Orient, or hinder the 
progress of other insects ; how forests 
as slow conductors of heat lessen the 
temperature of warm climes ; how for- 
ests as ready conductors of electricity 
must influence and attract the current 
of the vapors, or impede the elastic 
flow of the air with its storms and its 
humidity, far above the actual height 
of the trees ; and how they condense 
the moisture of the clouds by lower- 
ing the temperature of the atmosphere, 
has over and over again been ascer- 
tained by many a thoughtful observer." 

The question of management of rap- 
idly disappearing forests is second to 
none in importance. Through lax laws 
and political influence the mass of our 



forests has passed into the hands of a 
few. The question which most con- 
cerns Southern California is the preser- 
vation of our forests for conservation 
of water as a depletion of forests causes 
the extremes of flood and drouth, and 
humid regions to become arid. 
Forests Give Water 

In the seven counties of Southern 
California, there are approximately 
10,000 square miles of arable land, with 
a population of 800,000 and property 
with an assessed valuation of $1,500,- 
000,000. An almost unbroken range of 
mountains from the coast in Santa 
Barbara County to San Diego forms a 
barrier from the Mojave and Colorado 
deserts on the north and east. This 
area of 4500 square miles has been 
wisely set aside as forest reserves, for 
on this rugged mountain range South- 
ern California depends for its supply of 
water for all purposes. 

The mountains of Southern Califor- 
nia were once heavily timbered. Fully 
eighty per cent of the area is now 
sparsely covered with brush, which 
when heated by a few weeks of con- 
stant sunshine, becomes as tinder. A 
fire once started is difficult to control, 
unless fire-breaks are made by remov- 
ing the brush along the ridges. The 
handful of men employed as rangers — 
one man to about 37,000 acres of steep, 
rugged mountains, — is entirely inade- 
quate, although they have accom- 
plished much in watching careless per- 
sons, and in putting out fires. 

To demonstrate the value of forest 
covering for conserving water : the San 
Gabriel river basin watershed, with an 
area of 223 square miles, delivered 90 
miner's inches during the dry months 
of 1900, while the San Antonio, about 
23 square miles, produced 190 miner's 
inches at the minimum. These basins 
are contiguous in the same range, there 
is the same precipitation in each, but 
the San Gabriel has been repeatedly 

(Continued on page 32) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



HOW WOMEN CAN AID 

STATE FORESTRY 

By George M. Homans 

State Forester 

There is need in California of an effi- 
cient and adequate State forest organ- 
ization and there is no substitute for 
the kind of support needed to bring 
such a working force into operation. 
The needs are evident and have found 
expression in the introduction of legis- 
lative measures. These measures were 
duly acted upon and a large amount of 
money and energy has been spent in 
their consideration ; and still the needs 
are as serious as before. The reason, 
perhaps, is the fact that some are eager 
to present substitutes for the real basic 
argument and support. 

Forestry work in California has been 
seriously embarrassed for several years 
by a series of limitations. The time has 
come when the conservation of our for- 
ests and watershed vegetation must be 
viewed from its true point. Those who 
are inclined to hold that forest fires do 
little damage in California because ma- 
ture and standing timber is not de- 
stroyed by every fire are overlooking 
the loss to homes, human lives, wild 
animal life and much of the forest 
brush, the value of which as a water- 
shed cover, is unquestionably great. 
The total money loss due to forest fires 
in California last year was about $511,- 
077. Much of this represents the loss 
to improved property. 

When I reflect on the various ways 
in which women of California can assist 
in the State forestry work, there is a 
convincing assurance that in no way 
can they exercise more genuine con- 
structive help than by retaining their 
support until the time when, after due 
study and consideration of circum- 
stances, they feel justified in directing 
that support in what seems then to be 
the right direction. The "sugar-coated 
legislative pill" sometimes has a bitter 
substance within and, quite frequently, 
a measure, well adorned with an exter- 
nal show of efficiency, lacks in sub- 

(Continued on page 19) 



VALUE OF BIRDS 

TO THE FORESTS 

By Harriet Williams Myers 

Secretary State Audubon Society 

The desire has been expressed by 
many club women to have the preser- 
vation of our bird life included in work 
done by the Forestry committee. 
These two necessary assets are inter- 
dependent. The forests of the State 
help to furnish the insect food for the 
birds ; and the birds, in ridding the for- 
ests of these very insect pests, are sav- 
ing the trees. 

It has been estimated that over 400 
species of insects feed on the oak, 80 
on the elm, 170 on the hickory, 41 on 
the locust, 100 on the maple, 105 on the 
birch, 168 on the willow, and 165 on the 
pine. "No period in the life history 
of the tree is free from attack, nor does 
any part, from roots to terminal buds, 
escape insect ravages. Living, dis- 
eased, dead, or decaying, a tree may be 
the home of thousands of insect 
pests." 

Birds are Nature's check on insect 
life. As there are insects which attack 
every part of a tree so there are birds 
which attack all kinds of insects, thus 
guarding root, bark, twigs, leaves, 
buds, flowers, fruit, and even the tree 
beneath the bark. 

More clubs should have Forestry 
and Bird Sections. The Ebell Club of 
Los Angeles has such a section. There 
is no more fascinating or helpful sub- 
ject to study. Club women can also 
help the bird protective movement by 
supporting Bills and urging legislators 
to vote favorably for bird legislation. 

Club women can help save our game 
birds at the election in November. An 
effort will be made to annul the Flint- 
Cary-no-sale-of game Bill, passed by 
the last legislature. Game dealers and 
market hunters of the north, who saw 
their profits slipping away, have in- 
voked the referendum, and the people 
must now decide whether or not they 
will have the State denuded of its wild 
bird life. Not content with annuling 

(Continued on page 29) 



14 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



HOW WOMEN CAN AID STATE WATERWAYS 

By William R. Wheeler 

President California Inland Waterways Association 



Women can aid in the development 
of State Waterways. That statement 
is a significant indication of the confi- 
dence entertained by women that they 
will be able to accomplish much for the 
good of California; and this conviction 
is entertained by all intelligent ob- 
servers. 

All the great uses of water in Cali- 
fornia are directly allied ; more than 
that, each use promotes all the others. 
Consider the inland waterways by 
themselves. These consist first of the 
bays on the coast of California, which 
supply harbors, the primary and imme- 
diate necessity when the usefulness of 
rivers, creeks, or other inland "water- 
ways, is to be developed. 

California has all the capacity for be- 
coming a great commercial State, be- 
cause of its position on the Pacific 
Coast, and its extent north and south, 
with the coast line approximately one 
thousand miles in length. The coast is 
indented by bays, and great communi- 
ties have been created, the reliance of 
which for future greatness is, unques- 
tionably, the use of the harbors in con- 
nection with ocean commerce. The 
people are awake to the advantages 
possessed in the matter of geographical 
position; from the north to the south 
they have taken steps to utilize these 
advantages, justly looking to the Fed- 
eral and State governments to give 
them efficient aid. 

The people of the north continually 
look to the betterment of Humboldt 
Bay; the people in the counties south 
of Tehachapi, see the activity of Los 
Angeles, as manifested in the harbor 
which it is preparing to utilize. 

The people of central California are 
looking to the improvement of the har- 
bors on the Bay of San Francisco, and 
to connecting waterways which pene- 
trate the interior, bordered by rich 
farming lands. These waterways in- 
clude the great rivers and waterways 
which give importance to the communi- 



ties they are competent to serve, but 
which are not fully developed. 

Fronted on one side by the ocean, 
California is bounded on the other side 
by a great mountain range. Between 
the two lie large fertile valleys, the 
richness of which has been demon- 
strated by their annual production of 
crops of high value. These valleys are 
fed by streams which have their origin 
in the mountains, and, thereby they 
have not only navigation but irrigation. 
But some counties at present have only 
irrigation and no navigation. The ad- 
vantage embraced in possession of the 
cheapest kind of transportation, and 
the possibility of producing the great- 
est amounts of freights, per acre, to be 
moved, is obvious. 

With this several problems are bound 
up — the control of streams, the re- 
clamation of lands, drainage, water 
storage and kindred activities. If Cali- 
fornia can be provided with cheap 
freight rates ; if it can develop full the 
water available for irrigation ; if it can 
control its streams and so insure the 
permanency of river improvements, 
and permit the reclamation of vast 
tracts, then it has a series of induce- 
ments to bring desirable population to 
the State. 

California women are interested in 
the future of the State. Possibly more 
than men, they earnestly desire that all 
wise steps may be taken, that shall lead 
to the making of a greater commercial, 
financial, industrial, horticultural, agri- 
cultural California. 

The Inland Waterways Association 
of California was organized last Jan- 
uary, and in its constitution it em- 
bodied the following: "The purpose 
of this organization shall be the fur- 
therance of navigation by means of 
inland waterways, and the investiga- 
tion, co-ordination and promotion of 
navigation, water storage, flood water 
control, irrigation, drainage, reclama- 

(Continued on page 30) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



15 



LOS ANGELES STREET 

TREE PLANTING 

By Laurie Davidson Cox 

Landscape Artist, Los Angeles Park 
Department 

Los Angeles is lacking in nearly 
every form of civic adornment, such as 
parks, parked boulevards, and park 
ways, and the design and decoration of 
her streets. Many things are responsi- 
ble for the lack of achievement in tree 
planting in Los Angeles, but the prin- 
cipal causes have been lack of public 
appreciation and absence of proper leg- 
islative machinery to carry out a tree 
planting program. However, one thing 
has been accomplished. The City 
Council has passed a tree planting or- 
dinance. 

According to the City Charter the 
control of the city streets is so abso- 
lutely vested in the Board of Public 
Works that it was impossible to trans- 
fer control of street parkings and their 
trees to the Park Department, where it 
naturally belongs. The Board of Pub- 
lic Works did not care to undertake a 
program of street tree planting, and 
the Park Department did not have the 
authority. Tree planting has been done 
by private owners of abutting property. 
This haphazard policy, and the exces- 
sive use of overhead wires on our 
streets, has given us the most ugly 
streets to be found in any sizeable 
American city. 

The new ordinance permits the 
Board of Public Works to plant and 
maintain trees on streets and avenue, 
and assess the cost against abutting 
property ; and to insure a systematic 
s -and scientific policy, the ordinance pro- 
vides that the work shall be done for 
the Board of Public Works by the Park 
Department and all matters of plant- 
ing, pruning, cultivation and care shall 
be according to the directions of the 
Park Department. Under the new or- 
dinance the Park Department may 
plant a street, or considerable section 
of it, at one time to a single variety of 
tree of uniform size and age and care 
for such trees over a period of years, so 
(Continued on page 31) 



FORESTRY ALONG 

THE HIGHWAYS 
By Stuart J. Flintham 

Forester of Los Angeles County 

The popular conception of Forestry 
in practical application is that it in- 
volves the management and protection 
of the forests and woodlands which 
cover the mountains. There is another 
phase of practical Forestry that is con- 
cerned with the planting or care of trees 
in parks and along streets and high- 
ways. Tree planting along the high- 
ways is no new idea, for street planting 
has always been practiced in towns and 
cities and constitutes a most attractive 
feature through California. Outside of 
the cities roadside planting has been 
casual and irregular, but in the last few 
years Los Angeles County has under- 
taken a work of roadside improvement 
which is probably the first organized 
effort to protect and to regulate tree 
growth along the country roads and 
highways. 

Roadside trees throughout the coun- 
ty have been placed under the jurisdic- 
tion of the County Forester, who is 
charged with their care and protection, 
and permit and approval are necessary 
for trimming, removal, or roadside 
planting. In addition to management 
of the present trees and regulation of 
new planting, improvement has been 
undertaken, as rapidly as funds have 
been available, by the planting of at- 
tractive trees along the notable system 
of macadamized boulevards throughout 
the county. Planting on various roads 
aggregates a total of 120 miles. 

In view of the extent of tree and 
orchard planting in Southern Califor- 
nia, it is surprising to discover how lit- 
tle tree planting has been done border- 
ing the roads and highways, and how 
exceedingly irregular, poorly selected 
and generally unsatisfactory most of 
the present planting is. It is our pur- 
pose to extend and improve uniform 
highway planting throughout the 
county. 

In planting operations we have been 
particularly impressed with the ad- 
(Continued on page 26) 



16 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



NAVIGATION VERSUS IRRIGATION 

By S. C. Graham 

President Los Angeles Men's City Club 



In a speech given at the Inland Wa- 
terway Congress in San Francisco, 
January 16, 1914, V. S. McClatchy, 
President of the California Reclama- 
tion Board, said : 

"That the first aim of California and 
of this Congress should be the restora- 
tion and permanent maintenance of 
navigability in the two great rivers of 
the State. There are districts of the 
State which believe at present that irri- 
gation is more important to them than 
navigation. But the experience and 
example of communities which have 
studied this problem, as clearly set be- 
fore this Congress in papers and dis- 
cussion, demonstrate that markets for 
the products of irrigation can not be 
maintained without the benefit of 
cheap water transportation. Therefore 
to defer restoration of navigability of 
the rivers would not be in the interest 
of lands which require irrigation." 

No one can read the Newlands Bill 
without being forced to the conclusion 
that where there is not enough water 
to maintain the navigability of streams 
and for irrigation use, it is the purpose 
of the author of the Bill to compel the 
use of the water to maintain naviga- 
tion without any regard to how much 
such a policy would stop or restrict the 
use of water for irrigation. 

All through the Newlands Bill it is 
made apparent that the use of water to 
maintain navigation is to be made par- 
amount. In Section 17 of the Bill, the 
following language appears : 

"And present to the Board compre- 
hensive plans providing for the best 
utilization of the water resources of 
the United States in connection with 
river regulation, flood prevention and 
protection, and the increase of the flow 
of rivers in low-water seasons and the 
maintenance at all times of a navigable 
stage of water in the waterways of the 
United States. * * * And to adjust 
all the plans contemplated for the pro- 
jects constructed under this Act to the 



ultimate purpose of regulating and 
standardizing the flow of the rivers 
and inland waterways of the United 
States. * * *" 

Any one at all familiar with condi- 
tions in California and in the arid west 
generally must know that the use of 
water for irrigation is absolutely es- 
sential to the profitable production of 
crops, and that water so used will pro- 
duce many times the wealth that it 
would be worth if used for transporta- 
tion purposes. 

The only justification there can be 
for the expenditure of public money, 
is to bring about an improvement in 
general conditions. If improving and 
maintaining navigation of the Sacra- 
mento and San Joaquin rivers would 
result in lowering the aggregate trans- 
portation cost in this State, there might 
be some justification in taxing the peo- 
ple of the whole State to make such 
improvements, even though only those 
owning land contiguous to the two riv- 
ers would be directly benefited. But, 
if the improvement of the Sacramento 
and San Joaquin rivers will not reduce 
the aggregate transportation cost in 
this State, there is no justification for 
the expenditure of the public money 
to make such improvement. If it can 
be shown that to spend a large sum of 
money to improve and maintain the 
navigability of the two rivers in ques- 
tion can not but result in an increase 
in the aggregate transportation cost in 
this State, it would be an economic 
crime to use the public money for the 
purpose of making such an improve- 
ment. 

These two rivers are already naviga- 
ble for a considerable portion of their 
course, and while they are not directly 
used for transportation purposes to any 
great extent, their existence has forced 
the railroad companies operating in 
territory contiguous to them, to make 
very much lower rates than the same 
roads have made, or could make in the 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



17 



rest of the State. The people along 
these rivers are entitled to the low 
rate which the natural advantages of 
the existence of water transportation 
gives them. 

This is just what has occurred where 
rivers have been improved in the 
United States. The Federal Govern- 
ment has spent hundreds of millions of 
dollars in the improvement of rivers 
and inland waterways, and there is less 
tonnage carried on them now than be- 
fore they were improved. Rates have 
been secured for those owning or 
occupying lands along or near to the 
improved waterways, but it has been 
necessary to permit the railroads to 
charge higher rates in other parts of 
the country. 

There is not more than enough water 
available in the water sheds of the Sac- 
ramento and San Joaquin rivers to irri- 
gate the land in the two great valleys. 
The irrigation of all this land is neces- 
sary to their full development. Only 
part of the land can be irrigated, if the 
avowed purpose of the Inland Water- 
ways Association is carried out. 

Mr. Shinn, a member of the State 
Reclamation Commission, who has 
been working to secure State and Fed- 
eral aid for a great many years, in a 
speech made at the Ford Control Con- 
vention for Los Angeles County, July 
1st, 1914, said there were more than 
one million acres of overflow and 
swamp lands that would be reclaimed 
by the work. That they are worth in 
their present condition from two to 
three dollars per acre, and would be 
worth, when reclaimed, from two hun- 
dred to three hundred dollars per acre. 
These lands are all privately owned 
and would be increased in value from 
$200,000,000 to $300,000,000. 

There would seem to be no good rea- 
son why the owners of these lands 
should not pay for the improvement. 
It will still leave a profit of at least 
$150,000,000. No one connected with 
the Internal Waterways Association or 
the State Reclamation Board has given 
any reason why the people of the rest 
of the State should be taxed for the 



purpose of increasing the enormous 
profits which the owners of swamp 
and overflow lands would realize if 
they paid for the reclamation work. 



IRRIGATION IMPORTANT 
By Mrs. Edwin Rankin Brainerd 

Los Angeles District Chairman of Waterways 

True conservation means the great- 
est possible production of wealth from 
any natural resource, and the widest 
possible distribution of that wealth. 
Conservation in California means more 
largely than all other things combined, 
the development and use of water for 
irrigation. For this reason it is neces- 
sary that we develop a method of dis- 
tribution and use of water that will 
insure its careful economic use in con- 
nection with intelligent cultivation. 

The present policy is based upon a 
method of distribution that has benefi- 
ted a comparatively small number of 
land owners, and this method of de- 
velopment has been allowed, and often 
assisted at public expense. In reality 
the public is not interested in increased 
profit for some land owners; it is in- 
terested in the production of more 
wealth to be distributed to all the peo- 
ple in the community. 

A satisfactory understanding of 
water laws, present and to come, means 
first : a study of the economic princi- 
ples involved, a study of the needs of a 
semi-arid country. This will be more 
or less difficult in California where the 
population is largely composed of peo- 
ple from the Eastern part of the United 
States where drainage and navigation 
are the great problems, and not irriga- 
tion. 

The Waterways Committee of the 
Los Angeles District California Fed- 
eration of Woman's Clubs, will attempt 
to encourage a historical study of the 
subject in order to lay a basis for in- 
telligent action when the time comes 
for further legislation. 



18 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

. From outlines sent for "Practical 
Suggestions for Department Work," a 
pamphlet to be issued with the Year 
Book, we assure the clubs that with 
their co-operation in ampliphying and 
adapting these plans to their needs, 
Federation work will proceed progres- 
sively and effectively. 

We recommend that a Federation 
Secretary be added to the corps of offi- 
cers in all federated clubs, and when 
practically possible, thi,s office shall 
be given to the past president of the 
club, because she will already be in 
close touch with Federation work. The 
General Federation recognizes the need 
and value of this office in a General 
Federation State Secretary, who serves 
as the link between the State and Gen- 
eral Federations. 

The lack of this link is a weak spot 
in our State organization system. 
Clubs are often out of touch with de- 
partment work and General Federation 
work, because there is no officer whose 
special duty it is to bring information 
of plans and progress to the clubs. 
This would be the Club Federation 
Secretary's duty. 

When we consider plans for more 
efficient methods of accomplishing 
Federation work, the financial problem 
presents itself. For this problem there 
is only one solution— A STATE EN- 
DOWMENT FUND. The first con- 
tribution to State Endowment was 
$100, made by Mrs. B. F. Walton of 
Yuba, new president of the Down and 
Outs, at the annual meeting in May. It 
is understood this club will devote most 
of its energy toward making State En- 
dowment a reality. It is the privilege 
of every club woman and club to act 
with characteristic generosity in this 
endeavor to increase the efficiency of 
our Federation. We have fulfilled our 
pledge to the General Federation. Let 
us avail ourselves of the privilege of 
meeting the needs of our own State. 
Yours sincerely, 
LILLIAN PRAY-PALMER. 



CONSERVATION GREETINGS 
By Mrs. John Dickinson Sherman 

Chairman Conservation, General Federation 

As newly appointed Chairman of the 
Conservation Department of the Gen- 
eral Federation, I have read with spe- 
cial interest the reports of State Con- 
servation Chairmen, and I am greatly 
interested in the splendid work done 
by the California women, and pleased 
with the evident earnestness of pur- 
pose in all their undertakings. Califor- 
nia is to be congratulated on the status 
of its conservation work. 

An outline of the work of the Con- 
servation Department of the General 
Federation will be arranged in Septem- 
ber when the full membership of the 
Department is completed by the Board 
of Directors. In the meantime, all 
State committees should continue to 
work along the lines prepared by the 
retiring Chairman of the Department, 
Mrs. Emmons Crocker, who has so 
ably directed the work for four years. 

In addition to work in progress for 
Birds, Forests, Waterways, Soils, Min- 
erals and the Tree Planting of the Lin- 
coln Highway, special attention will be 
given to the conservation of natural 
scenery. 

In connection with the care of Na- 
tional Parks a bill is pending in Con- 
gress known as the National Park 
Service Bill, H. R. 104. This bill has 
been indorsed by the General Federa- 
tion and should have the support of all 
club women. It provides for a central 
administration of National Parks and 
the machinery for their proper care and 
management. Its passage would be a 
great step forward, yet there is oppo- 
sition to the bill in spite of its distinct 
merit. Niagara Falls is again in 
danger owing to the expiration of the 
Burton Franchise and a bill is pending 
to protect the Niagara River from any 
further diversion of its waters. 

The Newlands Bill has had the ac- 
tive support of the General and State 
Federations. In speaking of the bill, 
Mr. George H. Maxwell, Executive 
Director of the National Reclamation 
Association, says : "An epitome of this 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



19 



bill creating the Commission and mak- 
ing a preliminary appropriation has 
been recommended by the Senate Com- 
merce Committee as an amendment to 
the River and Harbor Bill. If the Riv- 
er and Harbor Bill gets through at 
this session I believe this amendment 
will be passed. The necessity of vig- 
orously pushing our propaganda for 
the whole broad policy of the New- 
lands Bill will be increased by the 
adoption of this amendment." 

Of the greatest importance to the 
success of the work of the Conserva- 
tion Department of the General Feder- 
ation is the full co-operation of the 
Conservation Committees in all feder- 
ated organizations. Every Conserva- 
tion Committee, whether large or 
small, is a part of this great Conserva- 
tion machine, and weakness in a single 
committee means a lessening of power 
to the body as a whole. It is the hope 
of this Chairman that each committee 
will feel itself a vital part of the work- 
ing machinery of the General Federa- 
tion. 



USE OF THE LIBRARY 

The library plays an important part 
in the work of Women's Clubs. The 
former Bureau of Information and 
Reciprocity has been extended to in- 
clude the library for the purpose of 
bringing club members and books into 
closer relationship. The Bureau will 
suggest lists of references covering 
topics for programs or subjects for 
study which it is hoped may be on file 
in the libraries, and if not filed, that an 
effort be made to get them. 

The new bureau will continue to col- 
lect and distribute club papers and pro- 
grams. Club secretaries are urged to 
send typewritten copies of the best 
papers read during the year, also a 
club year book or program, to Mrs. 
Susan T. Smith, State Chairman of the 
Bureau, State Library, Sacramento. 

District Chairmen of the Bureau are 
ready to co-operate with clubs in plan- 
ning Reciprocity Days. Club members 
willing to appear before other clubs 
should notify the chairman. 



HOW WOMEN CAN AID 

STATE FORESTRY 

(Continued from page 13) 

stance what is actually desired. We 
must not apply this to forest legisla- 
tion alone, nor even suggest that it 
apply to any present forest measure in 
California. However, when giving our 
support to a measure which affects a 
great number of people, thorough an- 
alysis of its vital points is warranted 
and expedient. 

A forest bill for California must 
make unquestionable provision for the 
following: A protective organization, 
every member of which shall receive 
fair compensation for the public work 
he performs. (The present voluntary 
fire-warden system can never prove sat- 
isfactory since it requires a man to take 
charge, WITHOUT PAY, of men who 
are REQUIRED to fight fire WITH- 
OUT PAY.) 

A State forest protective fund, from 
which State expenses for fighting and 
preventing forest fires shall be paid. 
There should be no substitution for this 
fund, such as depending entirely upon 
counties and forest associations for 
payment of such incurred expenses. 
An amount to be paid every man for 
each class of work must be stipulated. 
The State Forester, with the approval 
of the State Board of Forestry, must 
be, and is logically, the man to super- 
vise such work. 

This fund should be under a sepa- 
rate appropriation since the present 
general fund is designed to meet ad- 
ministrative expenses, costs of special 
forest investigations, educational arti- 
cles and lectures and other divisions of 
forestry work. 

The club women of California can 
be active in every line of public work 
and there is an opportunity for them 
to help in Forestry. Their support, en- 
thusiastic recommendation and thor- 
ough appreciation of the above needed 
provisions, along with many other good 
provisions, will be powerful in creating 
and establishing a long needed effective 
forest policy in California. 



20 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



Advertisement 

COMMUNICATIONS 

We are sure the following letter from Mrs. Phoebe A. Hearst will be read 
with interest by the women of California. Mrs. Hearst's whole life has been 
lived in the spirit of broad and beautiful Christianity, and no one can ques- 
tion the sincerity of her views on the advisability of prohibition in California. 

POSTAL AND TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS: 

PLEASANTON, CALIFORNIA HACIENDA DEL POZO DE VERONA 

Mr. G. E. Lawrence, 

Room 501 — 12 Geary St., S. F. 

My dear Sir: 

I regret the delay in replying to your letter 
of July seventeenth. 

I am not and never have been in favor of pro- 
hibition. The W.C.T.U. people have asked me at dif- 
ferent times (not recently) to help them and I have 
always declined — not that I am not in favor of tem- 
perance but because I did not think their methods 
were always wise, or likely to achieve the end in view. 

I am opposed to intemperance, but not to a 
moderate use of wine, and I am convinced that the 
countries where wine is freely used are not those 
where the highest rate of intemperance prevails. 

In this wine producing state especially, I 
think it would be a mistake and do much more harm 
than good to establish prohibition. 

Yours very truly, 
July 27th, 1914. Phoebe A. Hearst. 



Zhe Cumnock School of Expression 

TWENTY-FIRST TEAR BEGINS OCT. 5TH. 

All branches of Literary Interpretation taught by specially trained and experienced 
instructors. Three years' course including Literary Interpretation, Dramatic Art, Story 
Telling, Public Speaking, Training the Speaking Voice, Physical Training and other 
subjects. 



Short Course 
in Story Telling 



Miss Jane Farley will offer this year a spe- 
cial short course in Story Telling, for moth- 
ers, teachers, and all others interested. 



Cumnock Academy 



College preparatory, or general course of 
four years. Instruction by the faculty of 
the EXPRESSION SCHOOL. Sub-prep- 
aratory courses are offered in the seventh 
and eighth grades. 

THE ACADEMY OPENS SEPT. 29TH. 



A Course in Play Production 

Miss Willamene Wilkes offers a course in 
the production of plays, including studies 
in stage-management, lighting and scenic 
effects, and the relation of action to 
dialogue. 

Journalism 

Mr. Bruce O. Bliven, a member of the 
faculty of the University of Southern 
California, will offer a course in Journal- 
ism, including training in newspaper and 
magazine writing, the organization of the 
newspaper, and a discussion of its place 
in the community. 

Special terms may be arranged by those 
wishing to take one or more of these 
courses. Address 

THE CUMNOCK SCHOOL 

1500 South Figueroa Street 
Los Angeles, California 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



INTENSIVE STUDY 

WATER PROBLEMS 

(Continued from page 6) 

and river banks. The beautiful bridges 
and the banks of the Tiber in Rome are 
recalled with as much pleasure as the 
cathedrals and galleries." 

There is need to consider the relation 
of waterways development to human- 
ity. What will it mean, both commer- 
cially and otherwise, to all users of 
water for irrigation, for power, light, 
heat, navigation, to the tenants on 
small holdings ; what to those pros- 
pective settlers for whom provision is 
being made ; how will water laws "in- 
sure to the State a citizenship safe and 
sane, happy and contented? 

There is need that all uses of a 
stream shall be considered as a whole 
in order that one use shall not inter- 
fere with another. Damming for power 
should not be allowed to interfere with 
navigation on 1 the lower reaches of 
the stream. Representative Rainey's 
report on the Keokuk Dam on the Mis- 
sissippi river, when it is presented to 
Congress, will furnish concrete illus- 
tration. 

Is it worth while to consider govern- 
ment control of water rights? W. V. 
N. Powelson says : "It is probably not 
of vital importance to the public wel- 
fare whether this control be exercised 
by federal or State government. The 
important thing is that it should be 
efficient and fair and in harmony with 
public welfare." 

It is essential to keep in touch with 
federal and State water legislation and 
policies. Study the Water Commis- 
sion bill and vote right for the New- 
lands Bill. Attention is called to Riv- 
ers and Harbors bill now pending in 
Congress. Hon. Joseph R. Knowland's 
speech regarding California appropria- 
tions is of much interest. For water 
power, see State laws. Continue Dis- 
trict Committee of 100 to read litera- 
ture sent to form public opinion con- 
cerning water conservation. Seek 
school co-operation through institutes, 
county superintendents and schools. 
Read Superintendent Hyatt's new 



Advertisement 




FOR GOVERNOR 

John D. Fredericks 

Republican 

OF LOS ANGELES 



Mr. Fredericks is a lawyer by profession 
and has served as District Attorney of Los 
Angeles County for the past 12 years, during 
which time he has handled many notable 
cases and established a reputation for him- 
self as a Just, fair and able prosecutor as 
well as a sound lawyer. 

He is in the prime of life, honest, able and 
energetic and possesses those qualities of 
head and heart that endear him to all with 
whom he comes in contact. He is a man of 
strong mentality and his reasoning processes 
run in straight lines. He readily sees the 
right and possesses the force of character 
necessary to follow it. 

He is a man of the Lincoln type, physically 
and mentally, and his public career has won 
him the friendship of Southern California ir- 
respective of party affiliations. He possesses 
the qualifications for any office "within the 
gift of the people. 

He has never been a standpatter in his 
party but belongs to the great bulk of the 
Republican party who believe that reforms 
in the party should be inaugurated "within 
the same. 

Captain Fredericks is a strong campaigner 
and, while not the most eloquent of the can- 
didates named for this high position, all his 
speeches show the sincerity of the man and 
carry conviction to his hearers. 

His strong personality and unquestioned 
ability together with his undoubted popular- 
ity south of Tehachepi make him the candi- 
date of all classes of the people. 



Disturbed Conditions Abroad 



Have definitely postponed the usual Paris Fashion openings. 

"The New York," however, has acquired a large number of the new models 
which were being held for the formal openings. 

Exact reproductions and clever adaptations of style creations planned for 
Autumn by famous designers abroad will be here, as usual, for your selection 





The Up-To-Date Woman 
Who Keeps in Touch With 

?ke JlepTfork 




Enjoys Many Advantages 

SUCH AS: 

— First choice of exclusive Style Novelties im- 
possible to procure elsewhere. 
— Special pricing of smart apparel for quick 
disposal. Stocks are carefully reviewed each 
day — broken sizes and odd styles repriced! 
— Our Standard of Quality never varies! "The 
best" is none too good for "The New York," 
or for you! 



Stunning Fall 
Styles 




Magnificent assortment of suits in every distinctive 
Autumn mode, $19.50 up. 

THE NEW BASQUE DRESSES 

Are here in a charming variety of fabrics, colors and 
effects. 

EXQUISITE BLOUSES 

Of Crepe de Chine, of Lace, of Satin, of Silk, of Chiffon — 
quaint novelties constantly arriving. 

Autumn Millinery! Original, chic, exclusive! 

COATS 

For motoring, street, sport wear, afternoon and evening. 



'THE STYLE SHOP OF LOS ANGELES" 




THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



manual on "Conservation of Our Natu- 
ral Resources." Stereopticon lecture by- 
State Chairman will be sent to schools 
with notes and slides upon applica- 
tion. 

Use library supplies for club pro- 
grams and reading. Advise with Fed- 
eration library chairman. See Bibliog- 
raphy of Department. Apply to dis- 
trict and State chairmen for literature. 
The local chairman will find it advan- 
tageous to confer with District Chair- 
man at the beginning of the year, that 
district reports may show the full 
strength of work accomplished. Col- 
lect data in your county and district 
concerning domestic water supply, non- 
pollution of streams, irrigation, water 
power, navigation. Valuable reports 
of State boards, commissions, and asso- 
ciations are usually found in libraries. 

No higher appreciation of the stu- 
pendous achievement of the Panama 
Canal, its immense value to the world, 
and to California especially, could be 
given by the California Federation 
than to bring to the Convention of 1915 
a real California record of work in the 
Waterways Department. 



WOMEN'S AID SOLICITED 
By Miss Gertrude V. Reid 

Southern District Chairman of Forestry 

It has been my privilege to make 
three tramping trips with the Sierra 
Club through the high Sierras. I now 
vividly realize the importance of forest 
resources and understand how forest 
protection not only insures timber sup- 
ply for all wood-using industries, but 
also maintains the flow of irrigation 
waters and prevents destructive floods. 

I implore women to visit the for- 
ests ; to work for State and National 
conservation policies ; inform them- 
selves in regard to forest laws, or 
rather lack of laws ; to begin an educa- 
tion campaign in clubs and schools ; 
write Forestry Chairman for literature 
and information ; study proposed new 
forest laws and determine their 
strength or weakness ; and work for 
adequate fire protection in the 1915 
legislature. 



SOUTHERN DISTRICT 

YEAR BOOK ISSUED 

Neat, correct and comprehensive in 
every detail is the new 1914 — 1915 
Year Book of the Southern District of 
The California Federation of Women's 
clubs, just off the press. Great credit 
is reflected on the capable District 
President, Mrs. A. J. Lawton, and the 
coterie of her printing committee, es- 
pecially in a piece of work where there 
is so much opportunity for errors to 
creep in. 

The Southern District is making big 
plans for its convention which will be 
held in Santa Ana, November 10 to 13 
and programs of the same will be forth- 
coming shortly. The Southern Dis- 
trict enrollment is 56 clubs with a 
membership of 4,004. 

The Southern District Executive 
Board is as follows : President, Mrs. 
A. J. Lawton, Santa Ana; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Mrs. Sarah M. Johnson, Red- 
lands ; Recording Secretary, Mrs. Anna 
Best, Brawley; Corresponding Secre- 
tary, Mrs. J. E. Gowen, Santa Ana; 
Treasurer, Mrs. F. J. Mueller, Corona; 
and Auditor, Mrs. Anna R. Owen, 
National City. 

Chairmen of Departments are : Art, 
Mrs. R. F. Garner, San Bernardino; 
Civics, Mrs. Ida Tipton, Anaheim ; 
Civil Service Reform, Mrs. J. M. Cole, 
Redlands; Club Extension, Mrs. F. C. 
Martin, Beaumont; Education, Mrs. 
Florence P. Willets, Colton ; Conserva- 
tion : Forestry, Miss Gertrude V. 
Reid, Alta Loma ; Waterways, Miss 
Emily K. Cuff, Fullerton; Philan- 
thropy, Mrs. R. L. Glasby, Calexico; 
Public Health, Mrs. J. H. Mallbery, La 
Mesa ; Country Life, Mrs. R. K. Smoot, 
Beaumont ; History and Landmarks, 
Mrs. Evelyn M. Lamb, San Diego; 
Home Economics, Mrs. R. B. Vaile, 
El Centro ; Industrial and Social Con- 
ditions, Mrs. George Cable, Upland; 
Legislation, Dr. Louise Harvey Clark, 
Riverside; -Music, Mrs. Alba J. Padg- 
ham, Santa Ana; Necrology, Mrs. 
Flora M. Pyle, Westminster; Press, 
Mrs. Helene M. Deimling, Santa Ana; 
Peace, Mrs. Jessie Hoyt Hatch, Imper- 



24 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



ial ; Bureau Library Information and 
Reciprocity, Mrs. T. C. Jameson, Coro- 
na ; Club House Loan Fund, Mrs. W. 
C. Crandall, La Jolla ; and Federation 
Emblem, Mrs. L. G. Ferrell, Calexico. 



WATER POWER IN USE 
By Mrs. W. S. Kendall 

Northern District Chairman of Waterways 

If we are to derive the greatest bene- 
fit from the Panama Canal, we must 
improve our inland waterways, build 
up coast trade and re-establish a mer- 
chant marine. It is difficult to sum- 
marize the possibilities of water power. 
Industrial United States uses about 
30,000,000 horse power gas, steam and 
water annually. Our water power pos- 
sibilities, if storage were employed, ex- 
ceeds mechanical power in use, would 
operate every mill, drive every spindle, 
propel every train, boat, light every 
city and town in the country. 

Think what water power would 
mean to project it into the agricultural 
districts. The farmer has plows, 
trucks, traction machinery, milking ap- 
paratus, pumps, all equipped with elec- 
tric motors. These could be hooked to 
a feed wire and could receive all nec- 
essary power. Tremendously big 
farming operations are carried on in 
this manner through the middle west. 



PLEA FOR PURE STREAMS 

Mrs. Robert Potter Hill was the first 
State Chairman of the Department of 
Waterways and made the first depart- 
ment report at Santa Barbara in 1910. 
Mrs. Hill believes there is no subject 
of more vital importance to California 
than the development of State water- 
ways. She has lived up to her belief 
in every phase of her work. 

She requested clubs to arrange for a 
Conservation Day in the schools, either 
in connection with, or independent of, 
Arbor Day. Mrs. Hill is author of an 
interesting leaflet , "Plea For Pure 
Streams," a gracefully worded appeal 
against water contamination. 



A NEW INDUSTRY 

An enormously valuable asset to South- 
ern California has been developed in the 
last six years in the canning of the Alba- 
core Tuna. This is a fish that in years gone 
by has been regarded as practically useless, 
either from a commercial or sportsman's 
standpoint. 

There is very little known of the habits 
of the Albacore Tuna; in fact, it is called 
"The Mysterious Fish of the Sea." Unlike 
the salmon, while being a deep water fish, 
it does not spawn in the rivers, and to date 
it has been absolutely impossible to ascer- 
tain where this species of fish hatches its 
eggs. 

In 1907 the SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
FISH COMPANY, who since 1892 had 
been canning Sardines at East San Pedro, 
as an experiment, canned two hundred and 
fifty cases of Albacore Tuna, using only the 
white meat, and the same was disposed of 
in Southern California. Since then eleven 
other canners have located all the way from 
San Diego to San Pedro, and have in- 
creased the pack to approximately 300,000 
cases this year. There are many different 
ways for preparing this delicate meat, and 
the canneries print these recipes and the 
same are in great demand throughout the 
country. 



No question coming before voters in 
November is of more importance than 
the Water Commission Bill. Clubs are 
requested by the Waterways Chairman 
to appoint chairmen who will give the 
bill special attention and will report on 
progress of work in Waterways during 
the year. 



A submerged oak forest covering 
several square miles, from which logs 
more than 100 feet in length have been 
taken, was discovered by Russian en- 
gineers while dredging a river. 



A fire in the Shasta Mountains pre- 
vented W. C. Hodge of the U. S. For- 
est Service from writing an article for 
the Conservation Number. 



The slogan of the Department of 
Waterways for 1915 is "A California 
Record for Panama Convention." 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



25 



WATER SUPPLY VALUABLE 
By Mrs. Alexander McBean 

San Francisco District Chairman of 
Waterways 

Before I investigated the subject of 
Waterways I knew its importance. I 
lived in the mountains of Arizona at 
one of the famous mines, sixty-five 
miles from a railroad. Every drop of 
water was hauled into town and cost 
50 cents a barrel. 

The Inland Waterways Association 
has selected September 24 to 26 for 
the first semi-annual convention at 
Stockton. Senator Newlands will be 
asked to speak on the Newlands-Brous- 
sard Bill. Mayor T. W. Drullard and 
the Chamber of Commerce of Santa 
Cruz have appointed a committee of 
seventeen to meet with the Rivers and 
Harbors Committee of the Federal 
Government about August 12 to study 
local harbor prospects. The Federal 
Committee will inspect the new muni- 
cipal pier. 

Pure water for domestic use is one 
phase of the Waterways question. 
Every citizen should be interested in 
the subject of pure water and every 
club in the State should help by agi- 
tation. 



Mrs. E. G. Greene, State Chairman 
of Waterways, expresses her apprecia- 
tion to District Presidents who have so 
cordially received the plan of work for 
the year, as briefly outlined for their 
board meetings. Each district is urged 
to bring to the State Convention con- 
crete reports of the work in that dis- 
trict. 



The Panama Exposition will be 
more instructive along Waterway lines 
than a year of travel because all lines 
of world work will be concretely pre- 
sented. 



Germany, 600,000 square miles 
smaller than Texas, by use of its fine 
waterways system, in 1912 made its 
foreign commerce exceed that of Unit- 
ed States by more than $500,000,000? 



Inexperience in 

Administering Estates 



Is 



Expensive! 



A private, untrained executor — no 
matter how sincere, may unwittingly 
cause untold waste, and lifelong dis- 
satisfaction for your heirs. Our Trust 
Department knows every step of ad- 
ministration. If named executor of 
your will, its long years of legal train- 
ing will always be at your heirs' ser- 
vice, but its charges will be no more 
than those of the individual. Con- 
sultation at any time — free. 

.TRUST ! 

AND 

_ FSAVINGSJL 

Owned by the Stockholders of the Citizens Naliotul Bank 
Savings — Commercial— Trust 

308-10 South Broadway, Los Angeles 





Marquis Ellis 

VOICE EXPERT 



Studio 

608-609 

MAJESTIC THEATRE BUILDING 



Lessons Evenings, and on Sundays 
by appointment only 

PHONE Broadway 3526 



26 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



EVILS OF UNJUST TAXATION 

(Continued from page 11) 

ate with the owners and Federal Forest 
Service in protecting the timber. Such 
a law was introduced in the legislature 
in 1913 by Assemblyman Johnstone. 
It was known as Assembly Bill No. 
643, an d passed both Houses. Al- 
though approved by Federal Forester 
Henry S. Graves, Gifford Pinchot and 
other authorities on forestry, it was 
opposed by the State forester and was 
not signed by the governor. 

Pennsylvania, New York and twelve 
other states have adopted the yield tax 
on timber, which is recognized by all 
authorities to be the only just and 
equitable method of taxing timber. 
This provides that timber shall be 
taxed only when cut and that refor- 
ested land shall be exempt from taxa- 
tion. These laws recognize that for- 
ests are necessary and that forest 
profits are community profits. 

The Fifth National Conservation 
Congress, which met in Washington, 
D. C, in November, 1913, came out 
strongly in favor of a yield tax on tim- 
ber. In its report on "Forest Taxa- 
tion" it said: 

"The general property tax on timber 
has an alarming tendency to become 
excessive and is additionally difficult 
to meet because it is imposed annually 
while revenue with which to meet it is 
deferred. From the individual stand- 
point it threatens injustice or even 
confiscation. From the standpoint of 
the public good it threatens rapid 
wasteful cutting of mature timber, pen- 
alizes the growing of a second crop, 
and for both these reasons hastens the 
cessation of all revenues from forest 
taxation and the consequent imposition 
of the entire burden on other forms of 
property. As stated in the report of 
the National Conservation Commis- 
sion, it is far better that forest land 
should pay a moderate tax permanent- 
ly than that it Should pay an excessive 
revenue temporarily and then cease to 
pay at all." 



FORESTRY ALONG HIGHWAYS 

(Continued from page 15) 

vantage of uniformity — the adherence 
to one species or combination of species 
on long stretches of roads, while en- 
deavor is made to secure pleasing va- 
riety by the adoption of different spe- 
cies for different roads. Choice of spe- 
cies for our planting is somewhat diffi- 
cult, and it is impossible to please 
everyone, but it has been the policy to 
select long-lived species uniformly, 
which will be not only well adapted to 
the locality, but also attractive in their 
development, in harmony with the con- 
ditions along the road and typical and 
characteristic of our section. With the 
many roads which are available for im- 
provement, it is the purpose to use all 
the attractive species which in later 
years will be a feature to make a tour 
over our highways memorable. 

The purpose of highway planting is 
not alone the ornamentation of the 
roads. Roadside tree growth effects 
an economic advantage, since it is a 
decided factor in the maintenance of 
Good Roads, whereby their upkeep ex- 
pense may be materially lessened, by 
virtue of the shading and protection se- 
cured. In the interest of such protec- 
tion and reduction in the cost of high- 
way maintenance the example of Los 
Angeles County might well be followed 
in other counties of the State, so that 
roadside trees may become an attrac- 
tive feature on all our country roads 
and highways. 



J. S. BERNARD 

The Ladies' Tailor and Importer 

430 S. BDWY., LOS ANGELES 

303 Bumiller Bldg. Phone F-3128 

I am just in receipt of a large ship- 
ment of Imported fabrics and desire 
to call your attention to the report 
from our Paris representative, to the 
effect that the latest edict of style in 
that center for the coming fall season 
will be mainly tailored suits. I am of- 
fering the greatest reduction in price 
of ladies' suits "tailored-to-the-min- 
ute" — ever placed before you. 






THE CLUBWOMAN 



27 



DISTRICT NEWS 

SAN FRANCISCO 
By Mrs. Frederick H. Colburn 

Press Chairman 

The Executive Board of the San 
Francisco District held a meeting Sat- 
urday, August 15 at the Palace Hotel, 
San Francisco, with Mrs. Percy L. 
King, District President in the chair. 
Miss Marguerite Ogden, Chairman of 
the Legislative Committee, acted as 
Secretary pro tern, Mrs. E. F. Crossett, 
Recording Secretary, having resigned 
because of ill health. 

The delegation from Pacific Grove, 
headed by Mrs. H. Dangerfield, an- 
nounced plans for entertaining the Dis- 
trict Convention at Pacific Grove, Oc- 
tober 26, 28 and 29. Chairmen present 
were Mrs. Edwin Stadtmuller, Mrs. 
B. F. Griffin, Mrs. W. I. Clayes, Mrs. 
Peter Hamilton, Mrs. Ella M. Sexton, 
Mrs. Alexander McBean, Mrs. C. E. 
Cumberson, Mrs. M. A. Buchan, Mrs. 
George A. Mullen, Mrs. R. Hallings- 
worth, Miss Ruth Robinson, and Mrs. 
Frederick H. Colburn. Mrs. J. H. An- 
derson, of the Salinas Civic Club, was 
appointed Chairman of Civics. 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

HARP SOLOIST OF THE ROYAL 
ACADEMY OF MUSIC, LONDON 

Blanchard Hall. Ex. 82. 
Residence, 1972 Estrella 
Phone 24558, West 4586. 



IF YOU BUY A CAN OF TUNA 
FISH WHY NOT BUY THE 

BLUE 



BRAND 

It Is The Original And Best And 
Costs The Same As Inferior Ones. 

PACKED BY 

Southern California 
Fish Company 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 
For Sale By All Grocers 



Home Phone 77S60 



Frank's Nursery 
Company 

Wholesale and Retail 

Ferns, Ornamental and Fruit Trees. 
All Kinds of Plants. Choice Roses. 

1454-60 W. Jefferson Street 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



fll>at3ene 






Photographer 








Los A 


ngeles 



28 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



FEDERATION AID 

IN FOREST PROTECTION 

(Continued from page 7) 
ployed by the Forest Service. All 
alone, 6444 feet above sea level, on top 
of Klamath Peak, in Siskiyou County, 
Miss Hallie Daggett, for weeks at a 
time did her part well, in aiding the 
government to preserve the forests 
from destructive forest fires. 

Much publicity was given to the 
Weeks-McLean Bill, which provides 
for the protection of migratory birds, 
also to that schedule in the tariff which 
makes it illegal to import the plumage 
of any wild bird, except that of the 
ostrich. This is the so-called "aigrette 
law." These two Federal Bills, among 
the most far-reaching laws ever en- 
acted, went into effect in October. In 
the State the non-sale-of-game law has 
been held up by a referendum petition 
which was circulated by exploiters of 
wild life. The effort to annul this law 
will come before voters next Novem- 
ber. Every bird lover should vote 
against this annulment and educate the 
public to do likewise. 

Women now realize their individual 



power to help fire wardens. In the fire 
last autumn, which did so much dam- 
age to the Muir Woods and Mt. 
Tamalpais, the Mill Valley Outdoor 
Art Club was transformed into an 
emergency hospital. Medical attention 
was given to the injured and exhausted 
fighters, and coffee and sandwiches 
were supplied. Now the Club has 
taken upon itself the duty of awakening 
the public conscience to the need of 
more adequate protection. 

We need most keenly an adequate 
forest fire prevention bill. We must 
see that this is made possible at the 
next session of the Legislature. The 
two greatest enemies of the forest are 
fires and unjust taxation. The former 
is the more acute, and we must further 
proper legislation. We are happy to 
announce that Mrs. Harriet Williams 
Myers, Secretary of the State Audubon 
society, will work with this committee 
next year. Everywhere women are 
vitally interested in conservation and 
are working valiantly for the Cause. 
We must stand ready to answer all 
calls from the General Federation and 
help when any need arises to further 
Federal legislation. 




You are cordially invited to 
inspect our very complete 
stock of Suits, Coats and 
Dresses for Women and 

Misses. 
Suits — 

$25, $29.50, $32.50, $35 and up 

to $75. 
Coats — 

$15, $19.50, $22.50, $25 and up 

to $50. 
Dresses 

$12.50, $14.75, $19.50, $25 and up 

to $55. 




437-443 South Spring St. 






THE CLUBWOMAN 



29 



VALUE OF BIRDS 

TO THE FORESTS 

(Continued from page 13) 

the Flint-Cary Bill, these same persons, 
posing- as the friends of the people 
under the name of the "People's Fish 
and Game Protective Association," are 
trying, through an Initiative Petition, 
to throw on the market all wild' life of 
the State. They would sell deer, doves, 
quail, grouse, ducks and geese during 
the Panama Exposition. If these pro- 
posed changes become laws, the State 
will be set back half a century in bird 
protective work and our game will be 
gone in half that time. 

The president of the "People's Asso- 
ciation" is Assemblyman J. W. Stuck- 
enbruck from Acampo, the man who 
has so persistently tried to take protec- 
tion from the meadowlark. Among 
the directors and instigators is John 
Coriea, game dealer of San Francisco, 
whose company has been arrested for 
game violations 21 times in the past 



few years; Cecil Raymond, game deal- 
er, whose company has been arrested 
31 times ; and L. A. Sischio, market 
hunter of the San Joaquin Valley, a 
man who, with two companions, killed 
191 geese at one shot. Surely the club 
women of the State will not allow such 
men to make our game laws. 



All but two cities in the United 
States having 200,000 population or 
more are situated on navigable water- 
ways? 



in repartee 
and con- 



ARE YOU QUICK 

versation, equal to the emergency, — 
or do your best thoughts and sentences 
come next day? Try the practical 
method, "Thought Awakening." It's a 
wonder to stimulate new ideas. By 
Ruby Archer Doud. Paper de luxe 
edition direct from the publisher, 25c. 

PARSIFAL PRESS 
Granada Park Los Angeles 





Unconditionally the best arid 
most artistic piano. One that 
meets every music requirement. 

Special terms to 
Teachers 



Smith Piano Company 



406 West Seventh Street 



705 South Hill Street 



30 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



The Dresden Apartments 




Ball Room — Dresden 

Prettiest apartment house in Los Angeles. In fashionable Westlake district. 
Ten minutes from Broadway. Absolutely modern. Wonderful ballroom. 

$30.00 AND UP. 

10994 — Wilshire 4394 SEVENTH AND WESTLAKE 



HOW WOMEN CAN AID 

STATE HIGHWAYS 

(Continued from page 14) 

tion and kindred subjects, all being re- 
lated or incidental to the primary pur- 
pose of inland waterways navigation." 

There is thus a central body, which 
now embraces in its membership coun- 
ties, cities, commercial organizations, 
banks, industrial enterprises, real es- 
tate owners and agents, and individuals 
representatives of all lines of activity, 
relating to internal waterways. 

To return to the text — "How women 
can aid in developing State Water- 
ways," co-operation is' the first word. 
It is much better to work together in 
any important project than it is for 
citizens to ally themselves in separate 
groups, without definite form of agree- 
ment or concert of action. The In- 
land Waterways Association includes 
women in its membership — not only as 
individuals, but at least one club of 
women is enrolled — this being the 
Bogue Wednesday Club of Yuba City. 



Mrs. E. G. Greene is the second vice- 
president of the association. 

To secure Congressional and State 
endorsement it is necessary to enroll 
thousands of women and men. 
Women's clubs in California would do 
well to act with the Inland Waterways 
Association of California as members ; 
also that the women of the State would 
lend efficiency by joining as indi- 
viduals. 

The important fact to be understood 
is that there is a central State organ- 
ization, which includes representatives 
from Shasta County on the north to 
Los Angeles . County on the south, 
formed primarily to improve water- 
ways, but which, incidental to its pur- 
poses, takes up the other lines that are 
correlated. 



The Clubwoman and the California 
Federation of Women's Clubs do not, 
either as a magazine or as an organi- 
zation, endorse any political candidate 
or party. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



31 



LOS ANGELES STREET 

TREE PLANTING 

(Continued from page 15) 

as to produce a luxurious and uniform 
growth. 

To secure a worth while effect it will 
be necessary to remove the present 
ragged, heterogeneous tree growth 
from each street. For example, the 
hodge podge of tree planting on West 
Adams and Figueroa streets. The ex- 
isting growth should be cut and a new 
growth of healthy, strong trees of a 
single kind should be started. 

To take advantage of the new tree 
planting ordinance, it is necessary for 
the majority of the frontage of a street, 
or section not less than three blocks 
long, to petition for the improvement. 
Whether Los Angeles remains a city 
of desolate and ugh* streets or becomes 
a city in which streets themselves are 
parks, depends upon the degree of 
aesthetic appreciation among her in- 
habitants. 

During the recent period of unem- 
ployed labor in this city, the City Coun- 
cil turned over $3000 'to the Park De- 
partment for street tree planting. Some 
20 miles of trees (those connecting 
with the County Highway system) 
were planted at this time and are being 
maintained by the Park Department. 
This is the only municipal street tree 
planting which has been done in Los 
Angeles for many years. On only one 
street, Alhambra avenue, opposite 
Eastlake Park, was it possible to se- 
cure the combination of wide parkings, 
uniform spacing and single variety of 
tree. In a few years this will be the 
finest section of street tree planting in 
the city. Could the poles and wires be 
removed from this street, and there is 
no reason why they could not, it would 
become a truely magnificent avenue. 



The largest cities, densest population 
and busiest and most prosperous peo- 
ple, throughout the civilized world, are 

found along navigable waterways. 




The Way to the East 



TO CLUBWOMEN 

Whose duties or pleasures 
take them on trips to the 
East, we wish io ^ay that the 
service via the Salt Lake 
route makes the journey one 

of luxurious comfort The 

well known Los Angeles 
Limited and the Pacific Lim- 
ited trains afford every ad- 
vantage in equipment and 
speed for a delightful trip of 
less than three days to Chi- 
cago. The dining car serv- 
ice is exceptionally good. 
Your patronage will be ap- 
preciated. 

Full particulars at all ticket offices. Los 
Angeles office, 601 So. Spring St. Phone 
Main 8908 or Home 10031. 

T. C. PECK, Gen'l. Passenger Agent. 



YOU'LL 
RECEIVE 




WITH 




Bread 

The Kind With the 

Sweet Wheaty 

Flavor 

Bradford's Bakery 



32 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



FORESTRY STUDY COURSE 
By Mrs. C. L. Donohoe 

Northern District Chairman of Forestry 

I Wave compiled a series of Forest 
Nature Study courses for grammar 
grades. The course is valuable ; not 
only for purposes of study but it is . 
made fascinating for children. It cov- 
ers almost .every topic pertaining to 
tree life: their habitat, species, habits, 
germination of bud, leaf, blossom, 
fruit; leaf, bark, trunk and branch 
forms ; and their usefulness to man, 
animals and insects. Lists for supple- 
mentary reading are provided and field 
work is outlined so that pupils may 
concretely study trees at intimate 
range. 

This outline is not intended to sug- 
gest that forestry should supplant any 
other subject but only to point out 
facts about forests which every public 
school pupil should know. The outline 
has been introduced into every school 
in the Northern District. 



WATER CONSERVERS 

(Continued from page 12) 

burned until nearly bare, and, conse- 
quently, the water conserving power is 
seriously impaired. The San Antonio 
basin has been burned only little, and 
the covering is practically intact. 

The provident pine tree, with man's 
aid, will, in time, cover our mountain 
slopes, store rainfall, and instead of a 
scanty supply of water for one-sixth 
of our arable land as now, we shall have 
an abundance of water for all the land. 
So long as fire is excluded from water- 
sheds the supply will increase with the 
demand ; while every fire lessens our 
water supply perceptibly. 

Along' the stage road to Mt. Wilson 
20,000 trees, planted under -my super- 
vision, are growing on every slope 
under all conditions. The species was 
determined after long study and close 
observation. 



CLUB FORESTRY PROGRAM 
By Mr*. Elon L. Warner 

Alameda District Chairman of Forestry 

Our district hopes to accomplish 
many things in forestry this year. For- 
estry primers One and Two sent out 
by the U. S. Forest Service are 
being used in many of the schools. 
"Photo slides" loaned by the depart- 
ment will be shown in the schools and 
before a number of clubs; also good 
speakers and programs will be pro- 
vided. 

The Civic section of Adelphian Club, 
the largest in Alameda, will study for- 
estry in connection with Arbor Day. 
The Thursday Reading Club of Oak- 
land will include a Forestry Day Pro- 
gram this year. We hope most of the 
thirty-seven clubs in this district will 
give some time to forestry study. 

Our task as clubwomen is to educate 
the public, especially in regard to in- 
jury and destruction through forest 
fires. 



WATER COMMISSION 

(Continued from page 10) 

ly and finally settle California water 
rights. 

Judge Bean, of the Oregon United 
States District Court, speaking, in a 
decision of the Oregon Water Com- 
mission Law, on which this referen- 
dumed California law is modelled, 
said : "I am impressed with the sound- 
ness of the view that a proceeding for 
the adjudication and determination of 
the rights to use water within the State 
of Oregon, initiated and conducted as 
provided in the legislative act of 1909 
the Water Commission Law, is in ef- 
fect a proceeding on behalf of the State 
through an administrative or executive 
board to have judicially settled in an 
economical and practical way, the 
rights of various claimants to the use of 
the waters of a stream or source of sup- 
ply, and thus avoid the uncertainties as 
to water titles and the long and vexa- 
tious controversies which have hereto- 1 
fore retarded the material development 
of the State." 



, 



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CLUB MEETINGS, LUNCH- 
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BANQUETS, BALLS AND 
SPECIAL FUNCTIONS 
receive unusual attention at Hotel 
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in appointments, an atmosphere of 
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The management is willing at all 
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THREE BIG SERIES. 
SIX STAR EVENTS EACH. 

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Maggie Teyte, Lhevinne, Gadski and others. 

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First Event — First Series 

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PRICES— $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50 



What Has ELMER R. McDO WELL Done to Merit the Votes of Women? 




|_| I g 

EDUCATION. 



H I S 
ASSOCIATES. 



H IS 
BUSINESS 
CAREER. 



elmer r. Mcdowell 

Nominee for 

JUDGE 

of the 

SUPERIOR COURT 



ELMER R. 

Mcdowell 
believes 



Self-supporting from childhood, 
he is self-educated in the 
schools of Illinois and Califor- 
nia. A graduate of the Col- 
lege of Law of the TJ. S. C, the 
president, Dr. George Bovard, 
says: "He is a man of EX- 
CELLENT CHARACTER." 
As page in the Illinois State 
Senate, he won the friendship 
of Gov. "Private Joe" Fifer, 
General Logan, and many other 
statesmen who impressed upon 
him a profound love of country 
and a recognition of the re- 
sponsibility of citizenship. 
He has a clean-cut, dignified 
business record — Chief Clerk in 
the Appraiser's Warehouse of 
Chicago, Chief Clerk and Audi- 
tor of the U. V. P. R. R., Pub- 
lic Accountant and Expert on 
city and county books for the 
Grand Jury of Los Angeles. 
In the State supporting the de- 
pendent mother he was the 
first man in California to pub- 
licly advocate the MOTHER'S 
PENSION BILL. 
In the "Red Light Abatement 
Law," a proven success in the 
District of Columbia and in 
nine States. 

In the enforcement of laws for- 
bidding the sale of liquors and 
tobacco to minors. In their 
segregation from adult prison- 
ers and in laws forbiding their 
commitment to jail. 
In the equality of sex, race and 
nationality before the law and 
in the eligibility of women for 
civic and state offices. 



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$30.00 AND UP. 
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.?. *> 

The Clubwoman 

■* •:• 

4» •:♦ 

Official organ of the California Federation of Women's Clubs 

Published Monthly in Los Angeles. Editorial Address P. O. Box 1066 

Business Office 226-227 Black Bldg. Tel. F1178 

Subscription Price, One Dollar the Year. Ten Cents the Copy 

E. M. SMITH, Editor and Publisher 

MRS. HAINES REED, Federation Editor 

1966 Carmen Ave. Tel. Hollywood 2378 

Matter for Miss Smith must be sent to P. O. Box 1066. 

Entered at the Los Angeles postoffice as second-class matter 



Contents 

Frontispiece — Mrs. Charles Farwell Edson and Children 6 

Editorial : A Criticism ; 

War Recruits ; 

Liquor and Drugs 7.8 

Duty of Club Women Toward Industrial and Social Conditions; Mrs. Kath- 

erine P. Edson 9 

The New Attack on the Social Evil ; Mary Roberts Coolidge 10 

Education of Mothers in the Home; Mrs. Mary S. Gibson 11 

Campaign for Children's Rights ; Mrs. E. K. Foster 12 

Commercial Vice Abolished In Iowa; Dr. Thomas D. Elliot 13 

Why AVomen Workers Should Organize ; Mrs. Frances N. Noel 14 

Attitude of the Club Woman Toward the Working Woman ; Miss Sarah 

K. Hagan 15 

Why More Women Do Not Enter Domestic Service ; Emma Anderson 16 

California Federation 18 

President's Letter 19 

Legislative Council Call 21 

Call for San Francisco District Convention 24 

Call for Southern District Convention 31 

Council of Presidents 31 





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Mrs. Charles Farwell Edson and Children 
State Chairman Social and Industrial Conditions 



Matzene 



The Clubwoman 



Vol. V. 



OCTOBER, 1914 



No. 11 



General and State Federation news published in the Clubwoman is official. Com- 
munications intended for either department must reach the Federation Editor, P. O. Box 
1066, by the twentieth day of each month in order to insure publication in the next issue 
of the magazine. 



Ebitorial 



In this issue we are pleased to pre- 
sent an article by Miss Sarah K. Hagan 
on the attitude of the club woman 
toward the working woman. The 
article is well written, fearlesss and 
frank in expression ; and robust with 
meaning. It should set club women to 
thinking. There are sharp criticisms on 
club women; also several unjust state- 
ments. In a most friendly and cordial 
spirit we beg to inform Miss Hagan 
that a few of the assertions may be 
true of a few club women; that all 
assertions may be true of SOME club 
women, but rarely true of THE MA- 
JORITY of them' 

'Quoting — "the club woman con- 
demns sweatshop and tenement house 
labor. But does the club woman put 
her views into practice in the store? 
Honest now? * * * In their love 
of "being at a bargain"' they are but 
following a natural bent, to which the 
best of us at times are inclined." In 
answer: 

Many club women have boycotted 
stores that do not pay a decent wage. 
Many club women will not buy store 
products so "cheap" they are known to 
be the product of sweatshop labor. Is 
Miss Hagan sure that .all "bargain 
hunters" are club women? From per- 
sonal observation, we can state she 
is mistaken. One rarely if ever sees a 
real club woman at "bargain counters." 
With few exceptions, club women buy 
clothes and accessories of a better 
grade than can be purchased at "coun- 
ters." 

Club women do not wear $1 waists, 
$1.69 shoes, and 95-cent corsets. They 
KNOW at what frightful cost such 



things are made. They know the tucks 
in a cheap waist may mean the eye- 
sight of a working woman ; the num- 
berless frills, the virtue of a wage- 
earning sister; the "high-speed" pres- 
sure with a dozen pearl buttons, the 
Hope of a young girl. 

Also — to a club woman, time is a 
factor which she dissects to the second 
in order to fill her post as a humani- 
tarian worker. Where is the club 
woman who has time to be juggled 
back and forth before a "bargain 
counter" ten to fifteen minutes to save 
49 cents when every minute is worth 
49 dollars to humanity elsewhere? 

Most women who buy from "cheap" 
counters do so because they cannot 
afford that which is more costly. 
There are exceptions, but eight out of 
ten women who do patronize them do 
so through economic stringency. In- 
stead o,f abetting and aiding 1 icheap 
goods made by cheap labor, club 
women are exerting pressure to create 
public opinion that will demand bet- 
terment of wage and working condi- 
tions for working women. Not only 
that, but they will create legislation 
to back public opinion. 

Quoting — "she professes much and 
practices little." In answer: 

Club women are engaged, in the 
most active way, in practicing what 
they profess. True, they do not join 
in the strike theory. It might be bet- 
ter if they did make more investiga- 
tions during progress of industrial 
disputes; but because they do not, they 
seemingly are indifferent. 

But does the working woman know 
that 37,000 Federated California club 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



women are working — SOME OVER 
EIGHT HOURS A DAY— to study 
economic evils; to plan and frame 
future laws to combat such evils ; to 
present such bills to their legislators ; 
later to demand that such legislators 
support such measures — ALL TO 
MAKE THE LOT OF THE WORK- 
ING WOMAN BETTER? 

Club women do not always come 
into direct contact with women work- 
ers, but they do come into contact with 
men who make the laws governing 
working women— AND THEY DIC- 
TATE SOME LAWS. The California 
Federation of Women's Clubs stands 
pledged in its very inception to work 
for the welfare of women and chil- 
dren. Remember — that it is not so 
very long that women have had the 
opportunity of direct suffrage coercion. 
Wait and watch. 

In the meantime let those club 
women who come under Miss Hagan's 
classification — think. Those who are 
right, keep moving; and we feel sure 
Miss Hagan and working women will 
give you justice. Her article will stim- 
ulate all of us. 

War Recruits 

In the Los Angeles Peace Parade of 
September 24 it was not the line of 
automobiles that presented the great- 
est argument for Peace ; it was not the 
blare of bands (implements used as 
courage sustainers in battle) ; it was 
not The Flag carried by anybody and 
nobody; nor police (sustainers of 
peace through Force) ; but — it was the 
line of towsled-headed kiddies who 
came down the thoroughfare in 
unmilitary precision— THE FUTURE 
PRODUCT OF WAR— unless the 
world throws the massive strength of 
public opinion against the Hell con- 
ducted in the name of Patriotism. 

Mothers, do you go down into the 
Valley of Moans to give birth to them ; 
are you protecting their tender bodies, 



savagely if necessity demands, from 
every evil force — in order that they 
may present more perfection of body 
to be riddled by bullets or mangled by 
shells — when they get old enough? 

Liquor — And Drugs ? 

Opponents of "California Dry" claim 
that in Kansas persons who cannot 
get liquor resort to drugs ; and present 
this as an argument against prohibi- 
tion. Whether or not we believe in 
prohibition, let us think. If this con- 
dition exists, it gives liquor one more 
evil for which to answer. No matter 
what we believe for this generation, 
how about removing that evil which 
would cause the next generation to- 
resort to drugs? Shall we give them 
the opportunity to acquire the taste for 
liquor — then if belated humanity takes 
it away (in case we do not) — force 
them to resort to drugs? 

Why not save the children from this, 
"personal liberty"? Do we believe in 
the personal liberty that makes inebri- 
ates, malformed physical and mental 
inefficients? Is it interfering with per- 
sonal liberty to make insane asylum 
and penitentiaries less necessary? If 
so, let us abhor personal liberty. Per- 
sonal liberty given on the principle of 
allowing people, not only to destroy 
themselves wilfully, but to stain the 
future Race, is certainly a malicious 
form of freedom. Let us put such per- 
sonal liberty in chains. It needs to be 
confined. 



STATE BOARD MEETING 

Mrs. Lillian Pray-Palmer presided 
over an interesting executive board 
meeting Thursday, September 24, at 
Hotel Lankershim. Unanimous en- 
dorsement of the request of the State 
University for a state appropriation for 
University Extension work was given ; 
the California Federation to request 
legislators to pledge themselves to act 
favorably for such appropriation. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



DUTY OF CLUB WOMEN TOWARD 

INDUSTRIAL AND SOCIAL CONDITIONS 

By Katherine Philips Edson 

State Chairman Industrial and Social Conditions Member California Industrial 

Welfare Commission 



The formation of a Social and In- 
dustrial Department in our General 
and State Federations of Women's 
Clubs is in answer to the widespread 
demand for some solution of the great 
questions pressing so hard upon civil- 
ized society. The different states are 
trying, through their respective Bu- 
reaus of Labor and Industrial Commis- 
sions, not only to investigate causes 
and conditions, but to enforce laws 
regulating hours of labor, factory con- 
ditions and sanitation. The newest 
note is the fixing of a minimum wage 
for women and children. It is thus 
hoped that the workers, and society 
itself, will be protected from that de- 
generacy that history proves to follow 
extreme hours of labor, bad factory 
and sanitary conditions, under feeding 
and poor housing, which are the neces- 
sary accompaniments of low wages. 

We in California have bravely faced 
our own problem and have tried, by 
the passage of such laws as the Eight 
Hour Law for Women, the Work- 
men's Compensation Act, which pro- 
vides, in case of accident, for com- 
pulsory compensation at the cost of the 
industry, and the Minimum Wage In- 
vestigation, to meet and to solve indus- 
trial problems. We hope to do this 
by constructive legislative action in 
place of that direct action of revolution 
and rebellion, which is the last resort 
of the discouraged and down-trodden 
worker. 

Certain interests object to such leg- 
islation as "interference in private 
business" and "freak legislation." How- 
ever, California is, by legislative 
action, protecting the business inter- 
ests of the State from revolution and 
destruction that would surely follow 
if commercial competition and unli- 



censed greed for money continued to 
exploit the workers. 

When low wages or exhausting 
hours and conditions of labor prevail, 
or where the lack of sanitary require- 
ments make it dangerous to health and 
life, when the machinery is unsafe, or 
the industry unreasonably hazardous, 
then we can expect that the workers, 
for life itself, must rebel, and such out- 
break as we have mentioned must 
necessarily occur. There are three 
ways by which the worker can be pro- 
tected from exploitation and degenera- 
tion : 

First, and best, through organiza- 
tions of the workers, so they can col- 
lectively bargain with their employers 
for the best conditions and wages pos- 
sible in the given industry. All the 
fine talk about the "industrial freedom 
of the worker" is a glittering gener- 
ality. Organized Labor has had many 
false leaders, so has Organized Capital, 
but the working class as a whole has 
been immeasurably benefitted through 
their organizations. 

Second, legislation and State action, 
such as the passage of laws for the 
benefit and protection of workers. 
Little action of this kind is ever taken 
until forced by the workers themselves 
through their Trades Union organi- 
zation. 

Third, direct action, in revolution, 
such as strikes, boycotts and the war- 
fare of industry. It means misery to 
the workers involved, great financial 
loss to the industry and the disorgani- 
zation of society in general. 

It is for us, as club women, to study 
these grave questions. It is for us to 
know the beneficial measures, to under- 
stand their object and administration, 
to press legislators to pass them, to 
stand by the men and the measures 
(Continued on Page 17) 



10 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



THE NEW ATTACK ON THE SOCIAL EVIL 

By Mary Roberts Coolidge 



There are three parties to the social 
evil — those who make the demand, 
those who form the supply and those 
who promote the business for the sake 
of profit. The consumer pays for the 
system in money and in physical and 
moral degeneration ; the women in the 
trade pay for it in slavery and in 
mental and moral degradation, and re- 
ceive less than half of the income from 
it; while the promoters — the panderers 
and the sensualists in pursuit of nov- 
elty, the liquor manufacturers and 
dealers who cater to them, and the 
proprietors and owners of the property 
— reap the largest share of the profits. 

We may and should have much 
mercy for the woman ; but there can be 
little, perhaps no excuse for those who 
reap the profits in rentals and in inor- 
dinate profits on drink sold on the 
premises. Until the present century 
the attack was upon the women alone, 
because of an almost universal h*1i<"f 
in the inevitableness of a double stand- 
ard. But with the newer dictum of 
the modern physician that continence 
is possible and wholesome for the vast 
majority; and with the growing sensi- 
tiveness of men themselves to the ter- 
rible price of the social evil in disease 
and demoralization, there is an attempt 
to imbue the penalties for disorder 
with a greater degree of justice. 

In our day the attack is being trans- 
ferred from the women in the trade to 
the promoters of it, principally the 
white slavers, the liquor dealers and 
the landlords who rent their buildings 
for such purposes. Houses which are 
all but unrentable for decent purposes 
bring an income beyond belief when 
used for vice. It is this fact which has 
brought about the proposal and the 
passage of the Red Light Abatement 
and Injunction Law in eleven States, 
including California. 

The purpose of the law is very sim- 
ple — simply to place the responsibility 



for the use of premises for vice where 
it belongs — on the owner. The method 
is equally simple and direct, for any 
citizen, as well as the District Attor- 
ney, may bring suit against the owner 
or proprietor to have the place declared 
a nuisance on a proper showing of dis- 
order on the premises, before a Judge 
of a Superior Court. The proceedings 
must be summary, that is, they take 
precedence of all except criminal and 
election cases, and under another 
statute, the person who brings the suit 
must give a bond of good faith. This 
is to prevent the possibility of cases 
being brought in spite. 

If the complainant wins his suit the 
owner of the premises is enjoined from 
continuing the business and must give 
a bond, in the discretion of the Court, 
if he wishes to open it for any legiti- 
mate purpose. He may thus lose the 
rentals until he can let the place for a 
decent business, and he must pay the 
costs of the suit ; but no other penalty 
falls upon him unless he should again 
attempt, in the guise of some legiti- 
mate undertaking, to carry on the Red 
Light business. In this case he may 
be fined from $100 to $1,000, or impris- 
oned from three to six months, or both. 
On the other hand, if the complainant 
loses his case, he must pay the costs. 

Without going into other legal de- 
tails which make the law still more 
effective and easy of enforcement, the 
best answer to the theoretical objec- 
tions which are sometimes brought 
against this law is the experience of 
the States where it has been sometime 
in operation and where it has proved 
its usefulness in closing houses of pros- 
titution. In Iowa, where it has been 
established for five years, fit is the 
unanimous testimony of the Mayor of 
Des Moines, the Chief of Police, the 
Attorney General of the State and of 
two investigations made by outside 
parties, that it has operated to close 
Continued on Page 25) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 

EDUCATION OF MOTHERS IN THE HOME 

By Mary S. Gibson 

Member California Commission of Immigration and Housing 



11 



The State Federation of Women's 
Clubs is the first great organization to 
effect co-operation with the Commis- 
sion of Immigration and Housing of 
California. It has done this by appoint- 
ing a Commissioner of Immigration of 
its own, choosing a member of the 
State Commission as its representative, 
and undertaking a certain definite part 
of the State work — that of devising and 
promoting a plan by which education 
may be taken to the immigrant woman 
in her home. 

This Commission was placed under 
the Social and Industrial Department 
because it is found that the immigrant 
home is even more complex in its re- 
quirements than the home of the 
American citizen — because home edu- 
cation involves the questions of hous- 
ing, of health, of employment, of wages, 
of laws and, above all, of paternal 
authority, and all these must be con- 
sidered and met by the immigrant 
handicapped by language. 

Much attention has been given to 
the education of children of the immi- 
grant, and the alien man has oppor- 
tunity to learn English and to prepare 
for citizenship— BUT THE ALIEN 
WOMAN HAS BEEN LEFT to 
ADTUST HERSELF to HER NEW 
CONDITIONS as _ BEST SHE 
COULD. Lately, social experts have 
found that the adjustment was not 
being made and that the quiet, usually 
well-intentioned, perplexed woman, 
struggling' to be a home-maker in a 
strange land, is a community problem. 

To quote Frances Kellor : 

"Her lack of assimilation reacts 
sharply upon her family. The home 
she keeps up for her husband and chil- 
dren does nothing to help them to fit 
themselves into an American scheme of 
life and work. It even hinders them. 
The children, rapidly grasping, if not 
thoroughly comprehending. American 
influences at school and in the street, 



come to look upon home as a place in 
which to eat and sleep, a place to get 
out of as quickly as the working age is 
reached and the possession of a job 
brings independence. The husband, 
when he begins to look for an Ameri- 
can setting and does not find it in his 
home, takes more and more frequently 
to finding it in the saloon. And so the 
"assimilation" of the mother takes 
place not at all; and the assimilation of 
her family takes place — outside the 
home." 

The problem that the new depart- 
ment of the Federation has undertaken 
is to devise ways by which the mother 
may be taught our language and such 
of our customs as are necessary; to 
help her maintain her natural place in 
her family by increasing her knowledge 
and giving her confidence in herself 
and pride in her nativity. 

In New York State a limited experi- 
ment is being carried on by the North 
American League for Immigrants, 
which sends out "friendly visitors," 
who visit two or three times a week 
about thirty families each. These 
"home educators" are required to have 
a good English education, nursing- 
training, to be practical housekeepers 
and to have social experience. 

The subjects taught are : Ventila- 
tion ; Sanitation — importance of keep- 
ing drain pipes, toilets and cellars clean, 
the disposal of garbage, danger of flies ; 
Care and feeding of babies, including 
instruction in prenatal care ; Hygiene — 
personal and sex; Household Eco- 
nomics — purchase and preparation of 
food, how to improve the appearance 
and comfort of home, sewing and dress- 
making; and advice in regard to educa- 
tional, recreational and social facilities, 
of the community. 

This work, always undertaken sim- 
ply and naturally, finally develops into 
model kitchens, model apartments or 
(Continued on Page 26) 



12 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



CAMPAIGN FOR CHILDREN'S RIGHTS 

By Mrs. E. K. Foster 

President Los Angeles Juvenile Protective Association 
Commissioner Child Welfare, C. F. W. C. 



The Women of California, since their 
enfranchisement, are feeling a keen 
sense of personal and civic responsi- 
bility. For years we have been educat- 
ing ourselves to think socially and to 
act collectively, and, as a result, our 
Women's Clubs now are alert and 
eager to serve the State. 

The care of children — the study of 
the psychology of childhood — is our 
special and undisputed province. All 
our ideals of motherhood are finding 
fuller expression in civics and the 
larger family of the State ; but there is 
still a great need of more enlightened 
motherliness in community life. Our 
paramount interest, now and always, 
should be the attainment of "Children's 
Rights." 

Muddled thinking and complacent 
superficiality are the barriers to all 
attainment ; but when women know 
what they want they will get it. We 
must continue to study sociology and 
economics in order to realize our inter- 
relationships and inter-dependencies ; 
but book knowledge is not enough. We 
must study the public health laws and 
their administration, and the agencies 
and forces that improve or impair our 
racial qualities. We must know local 
conditions and local needs thoroughly. 
It will make us genuinely helpful in 
dealing with such concrete human 
problems as household, institutional 
and public sanitation, neighborhood 
recreations and playgrounds. 

Even commercialized amusements, 
such as dance halls, skating rinks, and 
motion picture shows, must be studied 
in this modern spirit of motherliness — 
the spirit which recognizes that youth's 
craving for change, for amusement, for 
adventure is just as normal and just 
as imperative as the craving for food 
or for love. When this is clearly real- 
ized, each community will provide 
wholesome substitutes for unwhole- 



some commercialized amusements. 
The town of Santa Barbara is setting 
us a good example. 

If we are to be intelligently helpful 
we should have familiarized ourselves, 
before the next Legislature assembles, 
with the laws of this State relating to 
children. We should know the details 
of the child labor laws and the mis- 
called "Mother's Pension" law, and be 
prepared to try to make them better. 
This is distinctively an industral epoch, 
and sooner or later, some means must 
be devised to provide some form of 
insurance for all who are industrially 
disqualified, for all the immature, the 
aged, the disabled, and worthy mothers 
with young children. 

Our Juvenile Court law, for the 
enactment of which the women of the 
State are directly responsible, is a 
heterogeneous mass of legislation. The 
intention was to prevent juveniles from 
becoming criminal or vicious ; to enable 
delinquents to discontinue evil-doing; 
and to protect children from contact 
with hardened criminals. But there 
have been abuses of the special power 
of the Court created by this law. The 
feeling is growing that cases of neg- 
lected and dependent children should 
be dealt with elsewhere, possibly 
through our educational system or 
through a department of Domestic Re- 
lations. Normal children are never 
vicious. The "bad" child usually is 
sick or defective or abnormal. What 
he needs is not condemnation and re- 
straint, but understanding and oppor- 
tunity; communities need PSYCHO- 
LOGICAL LABORATORIES and 
PARENTAL SCHOOLS instead of 
"Reformatories." 

Women's clubs desiring to keep in 

touch with present day problems 

should subscribe for the "SURVEY" 

and send to Washington for publica- 

(Continued on Page 23) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



13 



COMMERCIALIZED VICE ABOLISHED 

IN IOWA— ABATEMENT SUCCESSFUL 

By Thomas D. Elliot, M. A., Ph. D. 

Field Secretary American Social Hygiene Association 



Every argument raised against the 
Red Light Abatement Law is crushed 
by the latest secret investigation of 
conditions in Iowa and Nebraska, made 
in May by the expert agents of the 
American Social Hygiene Association, 
and by a special investigator in Port- 
land, Oregon. The report, now on the 
press, declares as follows : "Conclu- 
sions from a field investigator on the 
workings of the Injunction and Abate- 
ment Law in Iowa and Nebraska made 
by the American Social Hygiene Asso- 
ciation, May, 1914: 

"The closing of segregated districts 
in Iowa and Nebraska has lessened the 
evil of prostitution, certainly in quality 
and probably in quantity. Compulsory 
prostitution, enslaving of the prosti- 
tutes by pimps, procurers, madams, 
bond sharks, and grafters ; the traffic in 
women and the exploitation of prosti- 
tution, for which a market place is 
necessary are no longer found in the 
cities of those two states. They flour- 
ished during the days in which segre- 
gated districts existed. * * * No 
«•" '/fence was offered or found to prove 
mat there are more prostitutes doing 
business outside the confines of the 
segregated districts now, than before 
they were closed. Abundant evidence 
was found to establish the contention 
that segregation did not segregate, and 
that many prostitutes, certainly most 
of those of the better class, never lived 
in the districts, but always operated in 
the residence neighborhoods. * * * 
The objection that the law opens the 
way for spite and blackmail work is 
absolutely without foundation. In a 
careful examination of the fifty-two 
cases brought in Des Moines, Omaha, 
and Lincoln ; consultation with attor- 
ney generals of both States, the county 
attorneys who brought the cases, at 
least one judge before whom they were 
brought, the police department who 
secured the evidence, and with many 



others familiar with the workings of 
this law, not a single case was found or 
had been heard of in which blackmail 
had been used or attempted. As re- 
gards the penalties provided in the law, 
the practical result of its enforcement 
has been that the owners have in 
almost every case abated the nuisances 
and cleared out the objectionable ten- 
ants immediately upon, and in some 
cases even before, the filing of the 
application for injunction. * * * It 
has been claimed that with the aboli- 
tion of the segregated district the 
predatory male has assaulted virtuous 
women, seduced the weak, and other- 
wise satisfied upon respectable women 
his animal passions which formerly 
found outlet within segregated districts 
upon professional prostitutes. There 
is not a shred of evidence in support 
of it. * * * The injunction law has 
proved immensely valuable as a legal 
instrument for wiping out segregated 
districts, as shown by the experience 
of Omaha which, we are informed by 
the district attorney, was duplicated by 
Portland, Oregon. * * * The injunc- 
tion law, by its public declaration of 
the responsibility of property owners 
for prostitution on their premises and 
its provision for their severe punish- 
ment for failure to accept that responsi- 
bility has changed a large number of 
them from obstructionists of law en- 
forcement into active allies for the law- 
enforcing officials." 

The last stand of commercialized vice 
is the contention that segregation 
segregates, and that repression in- 
creases the evil and scatters it. Pros- 
titution under toleration has become a 
business. It must advertise, and stimu- 
late trade. The most profitable ar- 
rangement is that of a well-defined 
"shopping district" where supply and 
demand can get together and sales will 
be increased. 

(Continued on Page 32) 



14 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



WHY WOMEN WORKERS SHOULD ORGANIZE 

By Frances N. Noel 

Chairman Los Angeles Committee of National Woman's Trades Union League 



Whatever woman's mission may be 
in life, her first vocation is motherhood, 
and motherhood of course means mar- 
riage. She may start at the bottom of 
the latter as a wage earner. At the top 
of the ladder will loom before her the 
home, the husband, the child. To be a 
genuine, successful wage earner, she 
must quit the home and the child. She 
may manage to continue the home life 
with the husband, provided his work 
time and her work time cover the same 
period. 

I do not say that a woman cannot be 
wife, mother and home maker, and yet 
pursue some vocation that suits her 
fancy, for it is at best a good thing for 
a woman to have some calling to take 
her out of the everyday routine of life ; 
but I am considering the woman wage 
earner. The woman who starts at the 
hour and quits at the hour, the woman 
who works under a boss and is sub- 
servient to that boss, either has to give 
up all home care, board out her chil- 
dren, or suffer both home and children 
to depend on chance care before and 
after her work time. 

Whether woman entered the Labor 
Market because she wanted economic 
independence, or because sheer neces- 
sity forced her, the fact is, woman is 
out in the world to earn her living. 
It is also safe to say that she will stay 
in the labor market. The European 
war will contribute another vast army 
to the millions of women toiling to 
earn their living. Woman is known to 
be the underbidding competitor of male 
workers in various trades. Marriage 
and home loom at the top of the ladder. 

It does not look far — she may marry 
tomorrow — so why worry about labor 
regulations; what is the use of fussing 
with a boss? Better just drift, until the 
man comes who offers to sustain the 
home. But the men who can marry 
and sustain a home securely are getting 
scarcer every day. A large percentage 



of marriages are based on the double 
bread winners' scale. The modern con- 
struction of the apartment house and 
hotel style of dwelling with all the 
conveniences and labor-saving devices 
makes many a childless wife idle by 8 
o'clock in the morning. What is the 
use of staying home idle when one can 
earn pin money for better clothes, a 
trip, or rainy day saving? 

The pin money worker is the worst 
competitor of any female worker in 
the labor market. She underbids from 
the minute she starts. Thus we have 
the three motives underlying the cause 
of the woman wage earner, viz : neces- 
sity, economic independence and desire 
for luxury. With these three types are 
filled the positions in drygoods stores, 
schools, offices and the stage. Can- 
neries, packing houses, shops and fac- 
tories are, with rare exception, filled by 
women who work because necessity 
forces. The woman wage earner, as an 
under-bidding competitor, has pulled 
down the scale of wages and standard 
of living for the family as a whole. It 
will now depend upon her to raise it, 
and by so doing save thousands of her 
sex from being deprived of the goal at 
the top of the ladder, which is wife- 
hood combined with motherhood. 

If woman is to be a wage earner, the 
only solution for bettering her condi- 
tion is to organize and bargain collec- 
tively. It is only as a collective bar- 
gainer that she can hold her own as a 
worker. It is through organizing with 
her co-workers that she learns to realize 
and understand the principles of social 
economy which underly the structure 
of the work-a-day world. She must 
organize to maintain the health and 
self-respect of her sex. She must 
organize to meet collectively the repre- 
sentatives of government on issues of 
labor, legislation. She must organize 
to unite with organized womanhood in 
(Continued on Page 23) 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



15 



ATTITUDE OF THE CLUB 
TOWARD 



WOMAN 

THE WORKING WOMAN 



By Sarah K. Hagan 

Assistant Secretary San Francisco Labor Council 

Among women in the trade unions 



there is a feeling of distrust toward the 
so-called club woman. This feeling 
does not imply any suspicion of the lat- 
ter's motives, but rather a doubt of the 
action likely to be taken in any given 
instance. We readily grant the club 
woman credit for the highest motives. 
We know that many of her kind devote 
their time and money to work which 
is in itself commendable and useful. It 
is this very fact that gives the woman 
trade-unionist cause for distrust, upon 
the principle that good intentions, when 
misdirected, are more dangerous than 
bad ones. 

The viewpoint of the club woman in 
dealing with the affairs of her sisters 
in the industrial world is different from 
that of the woman in the trade union — 
as widely different as theory and 
practice, as idealism and realism. The 
club woman has a natural sympathy 
for the lot of the working-woman ; she 
has also an equally natural lack of sym- 
pathy with the latters' method of im- 
proving her lot. The club woman dis- 
likes the strike and the boycott — in fact 
she simply hates them. For that mat- 
ter, so does the trade-union woman. 
But whereas the trade-union woman 
recognizes in the strike the only means 
in the last extremity by which she can 
compel recognition of her claims, and 
endeavors to make it succeed, the club 
woman in many instances recognizes 
the strike as an evil in itself, and en- 
deavors to make it fail. 

The club woman sympathizes with 
the telephone operator, let us say, but 
when the telephone operator ceases 
work as the only means left to her of 
making an effective protest against 
long hours and low pay, the sympathy 
of the club woman is likely to be trans- 
ferred to the girl who has taken the 
striker's place. And, what is more, the 
sympathy for the strike-breaker is like- 
ly to be much more active and prac- 



tical than was the sympathy shown to 
the telephone operator before she be- 
came a striker. 

The attitude of the club woman in 
her relation as a purchaser and con- 
sumer affords another unfavorable 
comparison between precept and prac- 
tice. The club woman condemns sweat- 
shop and tenement-house labor. But 
does the club woman put her views into 
practice in the store? Honest, now! 
Of course, our sisters and friends in 
the clubs are only human, after all. In 
their sympathy for the strike-breaker 
and in their love of "being at a bar- 
gain" they are but following a natural 
bent, to which even the best among us 
are at times inclined. 

Criticism and distrust are directed 
not so much against the practice as 
against the professions of the woman 
in clubland. She professes much and 
practices little. Moreover, her practice 
is too often at outs with her profes- 
sions. Criticism and distrust can by a 
very simple process be converted into 
confidence and co-operation. All that 
the club woman need do to put herself 
"in right" with the trade-union women 
is to grant the latter credit for knowing 
best the conditions under which she 
lives and the means by which these 
conditions may be improved. 



The State Convention, which will be 
held in San Francisco, May 17-21, will 
be a "non-strenuous" convention, as 
planned by Mrs. Lillian Pray-Palmer, 
President of the California Federation. 
This little woman intends to hold a 
convention from which women will not 
depart ready for the hospital nor be 
mentally and physically crippled for 
weeks after the arduous work of a 
state meeting has been done. Program 
material will be of such depth and 
breadth as can be assimilated without 
mental digestion and physical deterior- 
ation. 



16 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



WHY MORE WOMEN DO NOT 

ENTER DOMESTIC SERVICE 

By Emma Anderson 

President Progressive Household Club 

(An Employment Agency Run by Women in Domestic Service) 



The difficulties attending domestic 
service are as many and as varied as 
are the personalities of those dealing 
with the problem. The trouble is that 
the workers are considered as individ- 
uals instead of the work as an occupa- 
tion. 

We admit that the advantages of 
domestic service are many. Wages are 
better than in most occupations. 
Housework is always available and it 
is a field that is not overcrowded. What 
you make is clear gain. These factors 
weigh in the scales in favor of domestic 
service, but life outweighs them all, 
and that is what we lose in household 
service. 

Take for instance, the irregular 
hours. For a young woman seeking 
employment, the question of working 
hours is a lottery ; it may be ten hours 
or it may be fourteen, depending on 
how many whims or caprices there are 
in the family to satisfy. In the second 
place there is small opportunity for pro- 
motion. In almost every other occupa- 
tion, for an ambitious person, there is 
a chance for advancement. In house- 
work, you might have your wages 
raised, perhaps work in a more exclu- 
sive place, but if you are a cook, you 
are always a cook, or a waitress, al- 
ways a waitress. There is no chance 
for promotion. This is a serious draw- 
back to any ambitious woman. 

Few women go into domestic service 
with any intention of staying there, 
which is one cause for there not being 
more trained workers. What encour- 
agement is there for training? The 
more you know, the more you are 



called upon to do. , For example, an 
employer secures a cook, who loves her 
work and makes it a profession ; imme- 
diately this lady will have a siege of 
entertaining. Every person listed in 
her acquaintance must be entertained 
while she can be a successful hostess. 
And that means for the cook to be on 
her feet from fourteen to sixteen hours. 
Then there is that awful social chasm. 
A woman may do her own work and be 
praised as a wonderful housekeeper and 
brilliant woman, but let .'her hire a 
woman to do it, immediately that 
woman becomes a menial. Children 
and strangers address her as Tillie or 
Lena. It matters not how refined or 
intelligent or capable she may be. 

Then there is the isolation, particu- 
larly in general service. You may work 
in the beautiful rooms all day, but you 
are not a part of them. The only time 
you may take the front steps is when 
accompanied by a broom and a dust 
pan. The front door is a sacred portal. 
The back door and the back rooms for 
yours. If you have any friends to en- 
tertain, the kitchen is your parlor. But 
you have not even the privacy of the 
kitchen where you might chat for an 
hour uninterrupted. 

If the women who employ would 
consider that we are made of the same 
substance as they, have the same love 
of the beautiful, the same aspirations, 
and that we are just as timid and 
afraid to come around to the unlighted 
back door at night as they themselves 
would be ! Of course there are excep- 
tions, we admit, but these things are, 
as a rule, true. 



The Federation is officially support- 
ing the referendum Flint-Cary Non- 
Sale-of-Game law. Vote "Yes" to sus- 
tain this measure. 



The Federation is officially support- 
ing the Water Commission Bill. Vote 
"Yes" on this measure. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



17 



DUTY OF CLUB WOMEN TOWARD 
SOCIAL CONDITIONS 

(Continued from Page 9) 

when they are law, to defeat men who 
represent the special interests, who 
wish to take from workers their legal 
protections. 

Women are out in industry in a 
dangerous number. From my experi- 
ence as a member of the Bureau of 
Labor and the Industrial Welfare 
Commission, I can speak with author- 
ity. Many ask, "Why don't women 
stay at home?" There are many rea- 
sons, and possibly the first and greatest 
is because the man's wage is inade- 
quate to provide the proper standard 
of living at the present cost of living. 
The boy is taken out of school before 
maturity and frequently put into a 
blind alley occupation, and thus never 
learns a trade or occupation with a 
future. 

The daughter is pressed into the 
store, laundry or factory, half educated, 
immature in health and moral stand- 
ards. The mother works to help pay 
rent and feed the younger ones, who 
run the streets, unkempt and undisci- 
plined. The girl is likely to be 
tempted, by the lure of dance hall and 
movie, to forget the strain of the day's 
work. The mother and father have lost 
control of her, as she will tell them 
pertly that she can do as she pleases 
because she is helping to pay the bills. 
The younger children may sell papers 
and trinkets in the street, and thus 
swell the number in reformatories, 
whose inmates are recruited up to 60 
per cent from the street trades. 

Where is the day of the self-respect- 
ing American working man, whose 
wage was sufficient for him to main- 
tain a decent home with the mother 
of his children in command, his chil- 
dren having the benefit of our great 
school system and preparing them- 
selves to take a better position in the 
world than their father? This man is 
passing, for 60 per cent of the common 
labor east of the Mississippi is done by 
the immigrant where low standards of 



living have undermined our native 
worker. 

We protect our American industry 
by high tariffs in their products, but 
the high wages are not paid in the pro- 
tected industries, but in the industries 
that have highly organized trades 
unions. Thus, the causes of our social 
troubles, vice and crime, despondency 
and degeneracy are largely economic. 

Club women, we have the responsi- 
bility of voting women. We cannot 
say this is none of our business — for 
our chief business is conservation of 
life. If we bring nothing else to the 
body politic except this one duty well 
done, we shall have done over half 
there is to do. 




HIS RECORD WILL RE-ELECT HIM 

Sheriff William A. Hammel may confidently 
rest his campaign on his record of public 
service, and it is acceded that he will be 
re-elected 

Since the office of Sheriff in this county 
has been filled by him, his second term just 
closing:, the reputation of the county jail for 
humane treatment of prisoners has been of 
the higrhest order. Criminals are often made 
confirmed and hardened characters for all of 
their future lives by the treatment they re- 
ceived in jails and prisons. We believe that 
kindness and consideration with friendly ad- 
vice given in a way which convinces the pris- 
oner of sincere good wishes will help to solve 
the problem of the submerged part of hu- 
manity. 

Every prisoner that has entered the county 
jail under Hammers administration has come 
out a better man and always with praises of 
the humane treatment they received during 
their incarceration. Hammers keen sense of 
justice and right to all "without fear or favor, 
combined with a human sympathy for the 
unhappy criminal, makes him the logical man 
for the important office of Sheriff. 



18 THE CLUBWOMAN 

California jfeberation of Women's Clubs 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 
President — Mrs. Lillian Pray-Palmer, 540 West Ivy street, San Diego. 
Vice-President — Mrs. W. C. Mushet, 2614 North Griffin avenue, Los Angeles. 
Vice-President-at-Large — Mrs. Emily Hoppin, Yolo. 
Recording Secretary — Mrs. Henry DeNyse, P. O. Box 695, Riverside. 
Corresponding Secretary — Mrs. George Butler, 2980 C street, San Diego. 
Treasurer — Mrs. Edward D. Knight, 238 San Jose avenue, San Francisco. 
Auditors — Mrs. Fisher R. Clarke, 321 West Flora street, Stockton; Mrs. Andrew Francisco, 

The Hargrave Apts., Los Angeles. 
General Federation State Secretary — Mrs. E. G. Denniston, 3454 Twenty-First street, San 

Francisco. 

District Presidents 
Northern — Mrs. A. F. Jones, 1218 Montgomery street, Oroville. 
San Francisco — Mrs. Percy S. King, Napa. 

Alameda — Mrs. William E. Colby, 2901 Channing Way, Berkeley. 
San Joaquin — Mrs. Harry Bates, Modesto. 

Los Angeles — Mrs. Herbert A. Cable, 1906 West Forty-second Place, Los Angeles. 
Southern — Mrs. A. J. Lawton, 1104 French street, Santa Ana. 

Chairmen of Departments 
Education — Miss Gertrude E. Longenecker, State Normal, San Diego. 
Art — Miss Ethel M. Wickes, 519 Webster street, San Francisco. 
Music — Mrs. Walter Longbotham, 1935 Shasta avenue, Maple Park, Sacramento. 
Literature — Mrs. George F. Reinhardt, 1809 Euclid avenue, Berkeley. 
History and Landmarks — Mrs. C. C. Arnold, 1570 West Eighth street, Riverside. 
Peace — Mrs. A. H. Griswold, Box 53, El Centre 
Civics and Political Science — Mrs. Lewis E. Aubury, Easton. 
Forests — Mrs. Foster Elliot, 8 Alamansor street, Alhambra; Commissioner of Birds and 

Wild Life, Mrs. Harriet Williams Myers, 311 North Avenue Sixty-six, Los Angeles. 
Waters — Mrs. E. G. Greene, 17 Salvatierra street, Palo Alto; Commissioners: Mrs. W. S. 

Kendall, 2600 J street, Sacramento; Mrs. J. L. Craig, 211 East Vine street, Stockton; 

Mrs. E. R. Brainerd, Hotel Alexandria, Los Angeles. 
Philanthropy — Mrs. P. F. Powers, Napa. 

Public Health — Mrs. L. P. Crane, 826 Fifty-second street, Oakland. 
Country Life — Miss Lillian D. Clark, 2110 Hearst avenue, Berkeley. 
Civil Service Reform — Mrs. W. A. Galentine, 815 North Guadalupe avenue, Redondo 

Beach. 
Home Economics — Miss Ednah Rich, State Normal, Santa Barbara. 
Industrial and Social Conditions — Mrs. Katherine Philips Edson, 950 West Twentieth 

street, Los Angeles; Commissioner of Immigration, Mrs. Frank A. Gibson, 2301 

Scarff street, Los Angeles; Commissioner of Child Welfare, Mrs. E. K. Foster, 200 

East Avenue Forty-two, Los Angeles. 
Legislation — Mrs. J. L. Harbaugh, 2706 H street, Sacramento. 
Bureau of Library, Information and Reciprocity — Miss Susan T. Smith, State Library, 

Sacramento. 
Press and Federation Editor — Mrs. Haines W. Reed, 1966 Carmen avenue, Los Angeles. 
Club Extension — Mrs. Bradford Woodbridge, Roseville. 
Federation Emblem — Mrs. Lorraine P. Guiberson, Taft. 
State University Club House Loan — Mrs. S. L. Piatt, 1720 J street, Fresno. 
Necrology — Mrs. H. H. Borchers, Selma. 
Parliamentarian — Mrs. J. A. Osgood, Sierra Madre. 

Special Committee 
Revision of By-Laws — Mrs. Calvin Hartwell, 411 Summitt avenue, Pasadena; Mrs. B. 

F. Walton, 2209 Second avenue, Sacramento; Mrs. William L. Jones, 2096 Harvard 

boulevard, Los Angeles. 

Mrs. Lillian Pray-Palmer will repre- Every club in the state will be asked 

sent the California Federation in a to devote a least one program to Red 

monster peace demonstration to be Light Abatement before election to 

given in San Diego. She plans to have inform 37,000 club women as to the 

live doves on her float, to be liberated merits of the measure. Articles in this 

as Peace Doves, during the progress of issue tell why all women should vote 

the Parade. "ves." 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



19 



PRESIDENT'S LETTER 

We present in this issue the com- 
pleted list of Chairmen of Depart- 
ments. Every name represents a great 
gift to our Federation and the State of 
California,— a gift of SERVICE, that 
requires time, strength, knowledge, in- 
terest, devotion, loyalty, and the sacri- 
fice of many personal pleasures ; a 
beautiful gift made in true Federation 
spirit, which accepts the opportunity 
of service as an honor and a privilege. 

In the name of the California Feder- 
ation of Women's clubs, we desire to 
express our appreciation to each of 
these women ; to pledge them the sym- 
pathy and support of every loyal club 
woman in our Federation and the coun- 
sel, encouragement and co-operation of 
the Executive Board. 

As our Federation grows in size and 
usefulness, and is more universally 
recognized as one of the great humani- 
tarian forces of the Time, the work of 
departments broadens. 

To meet the present needs we have 
appointed under a number of depart- 
ments, commissioners to carry on 
branches of that department's work. 
Under "Waters" a commission of three 
has been named to do special work. 
"Forests"' has a commissioner for 
"Preservation of Birds and Wild Life." 
Under industrial and Social Conditions 
twi commissioners have been ap- 
pointed — Immigration and Child Wel- 
fare. Commissions will be formed in 
other departments as need is felt for 
specialized effort. 

The Year Book for 1914-1915 is now 
in your hands. We present it with 
some pride and no apology. It is our 
annual edition of Club History in Cali- 
fornia. It is our Book of Prophecy 
rich with promise ; our Library of Club 
information ; our Honor Roll wherein 
appear the names of great and good 
women who have been glad to serve 
humanity ; it is the Blue Book of 
Women's Clubs of California. We 
commend it to ever}- club woman. 

Yours sincerely, 
LILLIAN PRAY-PALMER. 




W. W. MIDDLECOFF 

Who Will Be the Next Presiding Justice 

of the District Court of Appeals 

for the Unexpired Term 

Mr. Middlecoff was educated in the 

University of Southern California and 

was admitted to the Supreme Court of 

California in 1892 and to the United 

States Supreme Court in 1893. 



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20 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



(Advertisement) 

SOME ASPECTS OF THE PROPOSED UNIVERSAL EIGHT HOUR LAW 

BY. J. T. MERRILL 



When it became generally known in Cali- 
fornia that an eight-hour law proposal 
would be placed before the voters of Cali- 
fornia at the November election, friends of 
the working man smiled benignantly and 
made a mental note that they would vote 
for Amendent No. 3, that being the eight- 
hour law's designation on the ballot. 

Hardly had the prospective voter's smile 
faded, however, before loud wails began to 
arise from totally unexpected quarters. The 
farmers and orchardists, almost as one man, 
began to decry the measure that had been 
supposed generally to favor them, and from 
a slogan of "Danger" they rushed to one of 
"Ruin!" and they are crying it in hundreds 
of mass meetings throughout the state and 
throughout the columns of the daily press 
in a manner and voice that shows them to 
be thoroughly aroused. 

Following the farmers came the grocers, 
then the street and suburban railway em- 
ployees, and then a host of tradesmen of 
all kinds until a veritable storm of protest 
is raised over what was generally consid- 
ered a purely "popular" constitutional 
amendment. 

The subject, upon close examination, is a 
large one, and only the most salient features 
can be touched upon in an article of closely 
restricted length. Briefly: The propon- 
ents of the "Universal Eight-Hour Law" 
want an eight-hour day for themselves, and 
for everybody else in whatever occupation 
they may be engaged. 

The opponents of the law do not want a 
compulsory eight-hour day, and their rea- 
sons are legion. 

To a better understanding, the text of the 
law is necessary. It is: 

"Any employer who shall require or 
permit, or who shall suffer or permit 
any overseer, superintendent or fore- 
man or other agent of such employer, 
to require or permit any person in his 
employ to work more than eight hours 
in one day, or more than 48 hours in 
one week, except in case of EXTRA- 
ORDINARY emergency caused by fire, 
flood, or danger to life or property, shall 
be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon 
conviction thereof shall be fined not less 
than $50 nor more than $500, or im- 
prisoned in the county jail not less than 
10 or more than 90 days, or both so 
fined and imprisoned." 
who shall require ar permit, or who shall 
suffer or permit any overseer, superintend- 
ent or foreman or other agent of such em- 
ployer, to require or permit any person in 
his employ to work more than eight hours in 
one day. or more than 48 hours in one week, 
except in case of EXTRAORDINARY 
emergency caused by fire, flood, or danger 
to life or property, shall be guilty of a mis- 
demeanor, and upon conviction thereof shall 



be fined not less than $50 nor more than 
$500, or imprisoned in the county jail not 
less than 10 or more t'an 90 days, or both 
so fined and imprisoned." 

As soon as this proposed law was sub- 
mitted to legal authorities for an opinion as 
to the operation of the "extraordinary 
emergency" clause, the following was elici- 
ted: "Extraordinary emergencies are those 
of such unusual occurrence as cannot be 
foreseen by men of ordinary experience and 
prudence, and differ from ordinary emerg- 
encies which may be reasonably anticipated 
from the general experience of men. 

"An orange grower who could reasonably 
have anticipated cold weather, and conse- 
quent damage to his fruit, could not bring 
himself within the extraordinary emergency 
law by reason alone of the fact that his crop 
needed protection. 

"This law will operate to prevent the con- 
tinuous employment of firemen. Possibly 
a fireman could be kept at work at one fire 
more than eight hours; but attendance at 
his post in anticipation of fires could not be 
insisted upon." 

The statisticians were then called into 
consultation, and it was found that the pas- 
sage of the law will increase the cost of the 
fire department in Los Angeles alone more 
than $1,000,000 yearly, raising the tax rate 
from $1.60 to $1.95. 

Grocers and all tradesmen making deliv- 
eries state that they must stop delivering at 
3 o'clock in the afternoon, or else add the 
cost of an extra shift of clerks, deliverymen, 
etc., to the cost of the goods, which must be 
borne by the householder. The same statis- 
ticians figure that the net increase in living- 
expense caused by operation of this law 
would be in excess of 20 per cent. 

Endless complications would inevitably 
arise in handling household servants. These 
would be compelled to leave the premises 
when not actually working, under a recent 
Supreme Court ruling; and Sunday service 
in homes would have to be discontinued. In 
common with all other domestic menage, 
hotels would have to increase their forces 
and their expense, with a resultant increase 
in rates extending all along the line. 

The citrus grower 1 ; contend that their in- 
dustry will be ruined, or that they must em- 
ploy Hindus or Japanese in their orchards 
if extra help must be added to the cost of 
oranges laid down in New York, for that 
they cannot compete under any additional 
expense with Spanish and Florida fruit. 

Lastly, in protest are the Union Labor 
forces, who decry the law as a measure of 
Socialists, and one that will remove the oc- 
cupation of many men in the trades. 

Those who are protesting are very much 
in earnest, and as they are numerically 
strongest the prospects for the only uni- 
versal eight-hour law in the world are not 
of the brightest. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



21 



LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL CALL 

Those who watched the measures 
presented to our last Legislature felt 
that there was duplication of work, 
with consequent inefficiency, even fail- 
ure. The Women's Legislative Coun- 
cil of California was organized to pre- 
vent a recurrence of such a condition. 
It is to serve as a Clearing House for 
all organizations interested in Legisla- 
tion. In no other way can such dif- 
fering organizations as the W. C. T. 
U., the C. F. W. C, the California Civic 
League, the Juvenile Protective As- 
sociation, the Women's State Demo- 
cratic Club, the State Board of Chari- 
ties and Corrections and Mothers' Con- 
gress, unite in working for measures in 
which all are mutually interested. 

Membership in the Council does not 
prevent an organization from working 
for measures not indorsed by the Coun- 
cil, but does pre-suppose support for 
the Council measures. Headquarters 
will be maintained in Sacramento dur- 
ing the Legislative session. A repre- 
sentative will be present to look after 
the bills, not more than five in number, 
endorsed by the Council. Membership 
in the Council is open to all clubs, fed- 
erations, leagues, or organizations in- 
terested in Legislation; the dues for a 
club being $3.00 a year, those of a fed- 
eration being proportioned on member- 
ship. Twenty leading women's or- 
ganizations are affiliated with the 
council. 

A discussion of tentative legislation 
for 1915 was heard August 31 in San 
Francisco. Final action will be taken 
at the annual meeting, October 26, 220 
Post street, San Francisco, at one 
o'clock. Any woman's organizations 
having bills should send them to Mrs. 
W. E. Colby, 2901 Channing Way, 
Berkeley, chairman of examination. 
MRS. J. L. HARBAUGH, 

President. 



Advertisement 



The November Clubwoman will be the 
San Francisco District Convention Number. 
Through no other source will club women be 
able to get the first hand news in all of its 
significance to Federation life. 




FOR GOVERNOR 



John D. Fredericks 

Republican 



OF LOS ANGELES 



Mr. Fredericks is a lawyer by profession 
and has served as District Attorney of Los 
Angeles County for the past 12 years, during 
which time he has handled many notable 
cases and established a reputation for him- 
self as a just, fair and able prosecutor as 
well as a sound lawyer. 

He is in the prime of life, honest, able and 
energetic and possesses those qualities of 
head and heart that endear him to all with 
whom he comes in contact. He is a man of 
strong mentality and his reasoning processes 
run in straight lines. He readily sees the 
right and possesses the force of character 
necessary to follow it. 

He is a man of the Lincoln type, physically 
and mentally, and his public career has won 
him the friendship of Southern California ir- 
respective of party affiliations. He possesses 
the qualifications for any office within the 
gift of the people. 

He has never been a standpatter in his 
party but belongs to the great bulk of the 
Republican party "who believe that reforms 
in the party should be inaugurated within 
the same. 

Captain Fredericks is a strong campaigner 
and, while not the most eloquent of the can- 
didates named for this high position, all his 
speeches show the sincerity of the man and 
carry conviction to his hearers. 

His strong personality and unquestioned 
ability together with his undoubted popular- 
ity south of Tehachepi make him the candi- 
date of all classes of the people. 



S-T-Y-L-E 

IS ONE WORD 

"The New York" 

Knows How 
To Spell 



We Can 

Spell It 

Correctly 

Without a moments hesitation 

For The 

SOCIETY FAVORITE 

Whose time is taken up by innum- 
erable social functions requiring 
costumes elaborate and exclusive. 

THE CLUB WOMAN 

Whose apparel must possess that 
quiet elegance suited to her various 
duties and pleasures. 

THE BUSINESS WOMAN 

Whose up-to-date smartness in the 
matter of dress is a distinct asset in 
her success in her chosen career. 

THE WOMAN AT HOME 

Who possibly has a flock of girls to 
provided with pretty and appro- 
priate garments and at modern ex- 
pense! 

FOR EVERY WOMAN 

At Every Time 
The Right Style! 



$he Jleptfork 




THE CLUBWOMAN 



23 



CAMPAIGN FOR CHILDREN 

(Continued from Page 12) 

tions of the Federal Children's Bureau, 
of which Miss Julia Lathrop is chief. 
Every community should try to co- 
operate with this Bureau in its won- 
derfuf welfare work. The Bureau is 
issuing an invaluable series of mono- 
graphs on the care of children. As a 
basis for future work, especial attention 
should be paid, in each community, to 
secure prompt and complete registra- 
tions of Births, for an adequate Birth 
registration law, properly enforced, will 
bring us into direct and immediate 
relation with our new-born citizens. It 
will enable us to find the causes of 
infant mortality, an urgent question ; 
to provide instruction for mothers as 
to child care and feeding; to cope with 
preventible social and economic condi- 
tions, such as over-work, under-nour- 
ishment, tuberculosis and various de- 
bilitating diseases. 

The greatest difficulties encountered 
in our efforts to safeguard children 
come from lack of community knowl- 
edge of local conditions. Improve- 
ments can be made, laws and ordi- 
nances can be secured, only by the 
pressure of public opinion. It rests 
with Women's Clubs to make the nec- 
essary investigations, secure specific 
data, and definitely inform each com- 
munity as to its most pressing needs. 



She must organize 



WOMEN WORKERS 

(Continued from Page 14) 
every walk of life, 
to protect childhood, to safeguard the 
family instinct of the race. She must 
organize to meet the organized employ- 
ers. She must organize to watch col- 
lectively the labor laws of State and 
Nation, for otherwise they become a 
mere figurehead on the statute books 
of the Nation. She must organize to 
raise labor from drudgery to efficiency 
and genius. 




JUDGE WILLIAM P. JAMES 

Of the District Court of Appeal at 

Los Angeles 

For 

ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE 

SUPREME COURT 

Only ONE of SEVEN Members of 

the Supreme Court is from Southern 

California. Are We Not Entitled to 

Another? 



ELECT 
D. Joseph Coyne 




JUDGE OF SUPERIOR COURT 

Nominated at the Primary 

TWELVE YEARS IN THE LAW 

Endorsed by Judges, Lawyers and 

Business Men 



24 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



CALL FOR SAN FRANCISCO 

DISTRICT CONVENTION 
By Mrs. Percy S. King, President 

The thirteenth annual convention of 
the San Francisco District will be held 
in Pacific Grove, October 27, 28, 29, 30, 
opening at nine Tuesday morning. The 
program committee has secured splen- 
did talent from Berkeley and Stanford 
Universities and the State Normals at 
San Jose and Santa Barbara. Several 
state chairmen will speak and district 
chairmen will give reports. 

Topics for discussion from the floor 
are : "How does County Federation 
affect District Federation?" and "Shall 
we change the time of our annual con- 
vention?" Mrs. F. W. Colburn will 
have charge of a study conference and 
Dr. Millicent Cosgrove a health confer- 
ence. A general report of the Chicago 
Biennial will be given followed by 
three-minute impressions of delegates. 
Reports of club presidents will be lim- 
ited to three minutes. 

The convention program follows : 

Tuesday — Formal greetings ; ad- 
dress, "War and Civilization ;" recep- 
tion parlors Civic club. 

Wednesday — Reports on civics and 
social service. 

Thursday — Reports on Art, Music, 
Philanthropy; evening, illustrated lec- 
ture on Panama-Pacific Exposition. 

Friday — Excursions. 

The Credentials committee will be in 
session at 8 o'clock opening morning. 
Resolutions must be presented through 
the Resolutions committee ; chairman. 
Miss Marguerite Ogden, Monadnock 
building, San Francisco. The annual 
dues of five cents per capita must be 
paid before the opening of the conven- 
tion. 

This has been a splendid year, eight- 
een new clubs having federated since 
the last convention. Perfect harmony 
has existed. Our chairmen are leaders 
and experts in their departments. The 
Federation spirit has been loyally fos- 
tered and our great District of 8500 
members more closely united in aim 
and effort. 









9 


RE-ELECT 


Thos. P. 
White 


X 


POLICE JUDGE 


Judge White is remembered for his 
establishment of the "Women's Court," 
which is such a bright spot in our po- 
lice court history. 

NOTE: — Police Judges appear on 
the ballot as "JUSTICE OF THE 
PEACE OF LOS ANGELES CITY." 




JOHN W. SHENK 

Incumbent 

CANDIDATE TO SUCCEED 
HIMSELF AS 

JUDGE OF THE 
SUPERIOR COURT 

LOS ANGELES COUNTY 
ELECTION NOVEMBER 3 






THE CLUBWOMAN 



25 



THE NEW ATTACK 

(Continued from Page 10) 
almost all the houses throughout the 
State and to make vice generally diffi- 
cult, expensive and hazardous. 

In Nebraska, where it has been ap- 
plied for four years, there are the same 
results ; and in Oregon, after one year 
of experience, the District Attorney of 
Portland, the State officials and the 
Citizens' Committee report most satis- 
factory conditions. Out of forty cases 
in Portland, brought under this law in 
one year, only three owners ever came 
into Court. Twenty of these places, 
under bonds of decency, are now being 
used for legitimate business ; four of 
the buildings are torn down and some 
will be replaced with business blocks ; 

The history of this Statute in Cali- 
fornia should arouse women citizens 
particularly to the tremendous issue 
which is at stake in the referendum 
which has been invoked against it. It 
was first presented to the Legislature 
in 1911 at the urgency of the W. C. 
T. U., but did not get out of committee. 
In 1913, after statewide agitation and 
a full debate in both houses, it was 
passed by two-thirds majority in the 
Senate ; and the Governor, after a pub- 
lic hearing at which the opponents of 
the bill declined to appear, signed it. 

Although they obtained 30,000 names 
to the petitions, it ultimately came out 
that several thousand of these signa- 
tures were not genuine, enough prob- 
ably, to have invalidated the petition, 
if it had not already been certified to 
by the Secretary of State. It is per- 
fectly understood that the operation of 
the law is thus being postponed in 
order that certain Red Light, liquor 
and pleasure resort interests may reap 
the full profits of an open vice district 
during the Exposition year. Women 
who understand the true motives of 
those allied against it cannot hesitate 
to vote to sustain the action of the 
Legislature. The law will appear on 
the BALLOT under the CAPTION: 
"ABATEMENT of NUISANCES," 
and those who wish to sustain it should 
VOTE YES. 



YOUR ESTATE 

Would Increase 

■ ■ ■ In Value » ■ ■ 



f^\ ^TEN an estate must be held to- H 

H V/ gether a time to realize fullest H 

benefits for the heirs. This for a pri- £ 

gj vate, untrained executor, is generally ■ 

H impossible. If named your executor, _ 
our Trust Department will place its 
long investment experience at your 

m heirs' service. Our fee is the same as P 

M the courts allow the individual. Con- B 

§| suit us any time. m 



TRUST 

AND 

, SAVINGS 

Owned by the Stockholders of the Citizens National Djna. 

Savings — Commercial — Trust 

m 

308-10 South Broadway, Los Angeles m 





M 



arquis 



Ell 



is 



VOICE EXPERT 



608 

MAJESTIC THEATRE BUILDING 

Los Angeles 

♦♦♦♦ 

"Thespic Coach Extraordinary." — 
Times. 

"Voice of Unusual Brilliancy." — 
Examiner. 

"Tutor of Many Stars." — Herald. 
PHONE Broadway 3526 



26 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



EDUCATION OF MOTHERS 

(Continued from Page 11) 
into classes at the public schools. Tlu 
women are taught how to buy to the 
best advantage. Gradually they are 
won from dependence upon that bane 
of infant life — the midwife. They are 
shown the menace of the lodger to the 
purity of their daughters, and taught 
to value privacy as a necessity to fam- 
ily life. The work has had excellent 
results, but the experiment has been 
limited and has not taken a permanent 
nor a positive position in the educa- 
tional world, because dependent on pri- 
vate funds. 

Los Angeles has neighborhood 
schools in the foreign quarter that are 
coming near to a solution of the prob- 
lem, but the home visiting is voluntary 
work. Some of the principals know 
every family in the district, their social 
and industrial history, joys and sor- 
rows. It is to the school that the men 
and boys go when out of a job, in 
family illness, when a friend is needed 
at police court or undertakers. In time 
of stress and employment, the Charities 
delegate powers and accept all recom- 
mendation of these social experts 
WHO KNOW THE CASE TEN 
MONTHS IN THE YEAR. But the 
home work is extra work, and a con- 
tribution to the city and to humanity 
from the devoted teachers, however 
willing the service, is not justice to 
the teachers nor to the city. 

With its splendid organization, the 
public school is the practical and log- 
ical instrument to use for the education 
of the mother in her home. It can do 
the work more economically ; its teach- 
ers are known in every family ; it has 
specialists who can meet the wants of 
the community, and it has it in its 
power to uphold and re-enforce 
parental discipline by the courtesy and 
friendliness of its dealings with the 
parent. Above all, the public school 
divorces education from charity, and 
makes it possible for the most self- 
respecting to accept its offices. 

Several volunteer experiments are 
being made in Los Angeles, 




Edward Judson Brown 

Nominee for 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE 

Los Angeles 

THIRD at the Primary, In list of fif- 
teen candidates. 

Endorsed by Wm. J. Hunsaker, Presi- 
dent State Bar Association; Nathan New- 
by, Mrs. H. K. W. Bent, Dr. George F. 
Kenngott, Rev. Ralph B. Larkin, Fowier 
Brothers, Sanborn & Vail and many oth- 
ers. 

FOUR TO BE ELECTED 



Leslie R. Hewitt 

(Incumbent) 
CANDIDATE FOR 

JUDGE 

OF THE 

SUPERIOR COURT 

OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY 
Primaries August 25 
General Election November 3. 



J. S. BERNARD 

THE LADIES' TAILOR and IMPORTER 

430 South Broadway 

303 Bumiller Building 

Phone F313S 

STRICTLY TAILORED SUITS 

That combine perfect fitting- with style 

that is approved by the most approved 

arbiters of late fashions are the kind 

of suits I make. 

My prices range from $35.00 and up 
Discriminating' women who once "wear 
a "Bernard" made suit — come back and 
bring others — WHY NOT GIVE ME A 
TRIAL? 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



27 



It is said that the money spent each" 
year in the liquor traffic would build 
five Panama Canals. What would hu- 
manitarian women do with the money 
if they could spend it? 

VOTERS ATTENTION! 



t 
t 




t 

t 
t 



This is a matter of VITAL IMPORTANCE 
to YOU. 

HON. NATHANIEL P. CONREY 

is now presiding Justice of the Second Dis- 
trict Court of Appeal. 

RE-ELECT 

him and retain the services of this most ex- 
perienced and honorable Judge. 
14 CONSECUTIVE YEARS ON THE BENCH 
in Los Angeles County. 



MRS. J. M. JONES 

HARP SOLOIST OF THE ROYAL 
ACADEMY OF MUSIC, LONDON 

Blanchard Hall. Ex. 82. 
Residence, 1972 Estrella 
Phone 24558, West 4586. 



IF YOU BUY A CAN OF TUNA 
FISH WHY NOT BUY THE 

BLUE 



BRAND 

It Is The Original And Best And 
Costs The Same As Inferior Ones. 

PACKED BY 

Southern California 
Fish Company 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 
For Sale By All Grocers 



Home Phone 77S60 



Frank's Nursery 
Company 

Wholesale and Retail 

Ferns, Ornamental and Fruit Trees. 
All Kinds of Plants. Choice Roses. 

1454-60 W. Jefferson Street 
Los Angeles, Cal. 



fll>at3ene 



Photographer 



Los Angeles 



28 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



Yes, this is the kind of Physique we all 
ought to have. What about yours? 

Well, this little "write up" is the outcome 
of the printer's devil who confused the 
gymnastic figures in the advertisement of 
Biorkman's Gymnastic Institute in the Sep- 
tember issue, and it cannot pass without 
correction. Many readers, we are sure, 
did not observe the mixing up of the two 
cuts, but technically it was very wrong in- 
deed. And inasmuch as the Swedish ex- 
perts, who are carrying on the Gymnastic 
Institute, have contracted for a long term 
of advertising in the magazine, it is just 
we should have publicity due to us. 

Our methods are scientific through and 
through. No experimentation on patients 
for so much per, but scientific work car- 
ried out according to the diagnosis of your 
physician. For more than a century has 
Swedish gymnastics stood the acid test of 
medical investigators and has never been 
found lacking of fulfilling its promises. All 
sorts of remedies spring up during the con- 
stant search for health and new ideas in 
application of our accumulated knowledge 
germinate, but the fundamentals of all 
health conservation — Fresh Air, Pure Water 
and Exercise, never change. 

In Biorkman's Gymnastic Institute, 416- 
17-18 Brockman Bldg., we have two experts 
on scientific exercise trained in the world's 
greatest gymnastic center — Stockholm. 
Whatsoever your problem may be, emacia- 
tion or adiposity, deformity or external 
damage to your body, we will be able to 
handle it for you scientifically. Not only 
medical gymnastics for the treatment of 
diseased conditions or Orthopedic exercises 
as corrective measures, but Recreative, 
Health preserving or Plastic Exercises are 
given as well. 

Reducing weight at a rate of a pound a 
day without stringent measures and build- 
ing up strength and endurance at the same 
time is one of our real drawing cards. 



HOTEL CLARK SHOWS PHE- 
NOMENAL GROWTH 

Notwithstanding the fact that it was 
opened to the public less than a year ago, 
Hotel Clark has already become the head- 
quarters for some of the leading women's 
clubs in California. From the formal open- 
ing last January, success has seemed to at- 
tend this hotel, and there is no apparent 
reason why it should not continue so. 

A part of this success must be credited to 
its able lessee and manager, Mr. F. M. Dim- 
mick, who has had a long and comprehens- 
ive experience in the administration of sev- 
eral of the leading hotels of the country. 
The management has made a special feature 
of the dining room and grill service, and 
has spared no pains or expense to secure for 
the heads of the various departments, the 
best talent and skill obtainable. Hotel Clark 
is said to be one of the most beautiful and 
artistically furnished hotels west of Chicago. 



RE-ELECT 




JEFF McELVAINE 

OF LOS ANGELES 

REPUBLICAN NOMINEE FOR 

MEMBER STATE BOARD OF 

EQUALIZATION 

Fourth District 

Why discharge a faithful employe 

who has made good? 

Why discharge a member of the 
State Board of Equalization who has 
made good? 



THE 
WEST COAST HOSPITAL 
ASSOCIATION 
is a co-operative institution, in which, by the 
payment of $1 per month, any person will be 
supplied by the association with complete office 
treatment, home treatment, hospital, ambulance 
service, medicine and surgical dressings free of 
charge; also emergency treatment or choice of 
any hospital in city, with complete private room 
care. 

Dental service, including FREE cleaning and 

extracting, is also supplied, and a chiropodist 

is maintained in connection with our modern 

and completelv equipped offices. 

GEO. T. RENAKER, Pres. and Gen. Mgr. 

WEST COAST HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION, 

1102-10 Black Bldg., 

Fourth and Hill Streets, 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Phones: Home 60753— Main 3341. 



Made in Los Angeles 

Women of Clubdom, we wish to call 
your attention to our new silks for fall, 
just off our looms. 

New Taffetas both plain and printed, 
Satins, Charmeuse, Crepes., etc., supe- 
rior to any others at the same price. 
Our stock of silk underwear and hos- 
iery is up to the minute. See our new 
two-color silk stockings — the very lat- 
est. Our prices are right. 

Patronize Home Industry 

LOS A1VGELES SILK CO. 

D. I. Ne-wton 

219 MERCANTILE PLACE 

LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



29 



rnrr guaranteed 

r K I" r American Silk 

MILL HOSIERY 

WE Want You to KNOW 
THESE HOSE 

They stood the test when all others 
failed. They give real foot comfort. 
They have no seams to rip. They 
never become loose and baggy as the 
shape is knit in, not pressed in. 
They are GUARANTEED for fine- 
ness, for style, for superiority of ma- 
terial and workmanship, absolutely 
stainless, and to wear six months 
without holes or replaced by new 
pairs free. 

OUR FREE OFFER 

To ever one sending us 50c to 
cover shipping charges, we will send, 
absolutely free: 

Three pairs of our famous men's 
AMERICAN SILK HOSE with 
written guarantee, any color, or 

Three pairs of our Ladies' Hose in 
Black, Tan or White colors, with 
written guarantee. 

DON'T DELAY — Offer expires 
when dealer in your locality is se- 
lected. Give color and size. 

The International Hosiery Co. 

85 Bittner Street 

Dayton, Ohio, U. S. A. 



Dr. George F. Bovard 

SAYS: 

"George S. Richardson, candidate for 
Police Judge, is a man of most excel- 
lent character and ability, and I believe 
he is thoroughly equipped for the posi- 
tion which he is a candidate for at this 
time." 

NOTE — On ballot this appears: "Jus- 
tice of the Peace, Los Angeles CITY." 



in repartee 
and con- 



ARE YOU QUICK 

versation, equal to the emergency, — 
or do your best thoughts and sentences 
come next day? Try the practical 
method, "Thought Awakening." It's a 
wonder to stimulate new ideas. By 
Ruby Archer Doud. Paper de luxe 
edition direct from the publisher, 25c. 

PARSIFAL PRESS 
Granada Park Los Angeles 





Unconditionally the best and 
most artistic piano. One that 
meets every music requirement. 

Special terms to 
Teachers 



Smith Piano Company 

406 West Seventh Street 705 South Hill Street 



30 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



BIORKMANS GYMNASTIC INSTITUTE 



416 BROCK MAN BLDG. 

We have every facility for Systematic Treatments. 
Medical as well as Recreative. 



Phone Broadway 6097 




Right Dorsal and Left Lumbar Lateral Curvature of the Spine, treated according 
to the new "Oldevig Method" 

Our Training Method for FLESH REDUCING Never Fails 

Children's Corrective Exercises successfully managed. 
References supplied on request. 




STARR SERVICE 
Means Piano Satisfaction 



Regardless of what your needs may be in connection with a Piano or Playerpiano we 
are in a position to serve you in the most advantageous manner. If you have no 

piano and wish to purchase a Grand, Upright or Player Piano — Have your piano 
tuned, Regulated, Repaired or Refinished by Factory Experts, we will take pleasure 
in furnishing estimates that will certainly interest you. 

Standard 65 and 88 note Playerpiano Music Rolls at 33 1-3 per cent discount. 

Buy your Piano or Playerpiano Direct from the Manufacturer 

The Starr Piano Company 

FACTORY DISTRIBUTING WAREROOMS, 

628-630-632 South Hill Street, 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

1333 Fifth Street, 160 G Street, 

San Diego San Bernardino 




THE CLUBWOMAN 



31 



CALL FOR SOUTHERN 

DISTRICT CONVENTION 

Mrs. A. J. Lawton, District President 

To all club women we extend cordial 
invitation to the Southern District con- 
vention which will be held in Santa 
Ana, November 10, 11, 12, 13. At one 
o'clock, Tuesday the 10th, we shall 
hold assembly and general conference. 
Discussion from the floor will be held 
on the following topics : 

"Redisricting the C. F. W. C.'\; 
■'How can the retiring department 
chairmen aid incoming chairmen?"; 
''How can department work and club 
work be brought into closer touch ?" : 
"What does your club most need and 
how can the District Federation help 
you?": "Why do we have reciprocity 
days?"; "State Endowment." 

Department work will be featured in 
the program wherever it is possible to 
have state and district chairmen han- 
dle the topics. Work of the Panama- 
Pacific Expositions will be featured 
Wednesday by Mrs. Florence Collins 
Porter, Secretary of the Woman's Aux- 
iliary of the two State Expositions, 
with stereopticon lecture. 

The Orange County Federation of 
Women's clubs of 800 members will be 
hostess to our 56 clubs, numbering 
4000 women. We expect 146 presidents 
and delegates and 30 state and depart- 
ment chairmen. Our rest room will be 
equipped with reciprocity booths in 
which will be shown club year books, 
programs and pictures of club houses. 
Completed programs will be ready the 
last of October. 



COUNCIL OF PRESIDENTS 

If the opening meeting of the Los 
Angeles District, held Oct. 1, in form 
of' a Council of Presidents, is a proph- 
ecy of the year's work, then the aims 
and accomplishments of this great dis- 
trict are fully assured. To Mrs. Herb- 
ert Arthur Cable's call as Los Angeles 
District President, some hundred wo- 
men responded for a beautiful luncheon 
and a helpful, inspiring meeting, held 
at the Friday Morning club. 




The Way to the East 



TO CLUBWOMEN 

Whose duties or pleasures 
take them on trips to the 
East, we wish to say that the 
service via the Salt Lake 
route makes the journey one 

of luxurious comfort The 

well known Los Angeles 
Limited and the Pacific Lim- 
ited trains afford every ad- 
vantage in equipment and 
speed for a delightful trip of 
less than three days to Chi- 
cago. The dining car serv- 
ice is exceptionally good. 
Your patronage will be ap- 
preciated. 

Full particulars at all ticket offices. Los 
Angeles office, 601 So. Spring St. Phone 
Main 8908 or Home 10031. 

T. C. PECK, Gen'l. Passenger Agent. 



YOU'LL 
RECEIVE 




WITH 




f u 



Bread 

The Kind With the 

Sweet Wheaty 

Flavor 

Bradford's Bakery 



32 



THE CLUBWOMAN 



COMMERCIAL VICE ABOLISHED 

(Continued from Page 13) 
The modern police chiefs, however, 
are increasingly and successfully op- 
posed to segregation. Chiefs Sebastian 
of Los Angeles, Griffiths of Seattle, 
Ross of Santa Barbara, Grant of Salt 
Lake City, and Commissioners Albee 
of Portland and McPheeters of St. 
Louis are examples. No large city has 
returned to the policy of segregation. 
San Francisco is one of only half a 
dozen cities in the Union of over 150,- 

000 population still clinging to the 
old system. 

The sleek proprietress of one of the 
most notorious houses in the so-called 
higher-class tenderloin admitted to the 
writer (incognito) that they would all 
have to move out were the Abatement 
Law passed. "Do you think it will 
pass?" I asked. She shrugged, "Well, 

1 don't know," she said. "You see, 
THE WOMEN VOTE in CALI- 
FORNIA." That that statement is 
double-edged was shown by her next 
words. "I've told all MY GIRLS to 
REGISTER." The women of the 
underworld are thus practically forced 
to vote for their own business. 

The old ideas and the ramifications 
of the vice interests are so intrenched 
and subtle that the fight for the Abate- 
ment Law is hanging in the balance. 
Every right vote cancels a wrong vote 
in some other part of the State. On 
NUMBER 4 VOTE YES. 



SILK MADE IN LOS ANGELES 

An industry whose relatively small but 
significant beginnings presage for it an 
important place in the business future of 
California is that which had its birth seven 
years ago at Graham Station, a tiny suburb 
of Los Angeles. Here, although compara- 
tively few know it, is a full-fledged silk 
plant, completely equipped for every stage 
of the journey of the silk-worm's produce 
from the cocoon to the finished bolt of 
shimmering dress-goods. It is to D. I. New- 
ton, chief owner of the Los Angeles Silk 
Works, that credit is due for this notable 
addition to Southern California's industrial 
resources. His California product was 
given the grand prize at the Alaska-Pacific- 
Yukon Exposition and has received three 
State Fair awards. From a small local mar- 
ket the demand for California silk has ex- 
panded until there is a call for it from all 
parts of the country. Much of the raw silk 
from the great Oriental producing centers 
passes through California on its way to silk 
mills in the East, and it has been frequently 
remarked upon that so little silk, compara- 
tively speaking, is produced in a state where 
conditions are so favorable for it. 



SPECIAL PEACE ARTICLE 

For November, The Clubwoman 
will publish the first installment of 
"Woman's Supreme Task: The Bring- 
ing In of Peace," an address given at 
the Biennial, by Dr. Jenkin Lloyd 
Jones, Head Resident Abraham Lin- 
coln Center, lecture and peace advo- 
cate. We offer this article as one of 
the greatest arraignments of war ever 
published. As war has modified or 
made obsolete parts of the paper, we 
requested a foreword from Dr. Jones. 



/\ Of Compound interest paid on Term 
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SIXTH AND SPRING Los Angeles 



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The Clubwoman 

Los Angeles, California 

Enclosed is One Dollar for which send me the magazine for one 
year, beginning with the issue. 

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Street No City 

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